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V16 Montana State University College of Arts & Architecture

School of Architecture


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Designers: Tad Bradley Alena Heger Jeremy Wussow Jimmy Swanson Kalina Vander Poel Nichole Casebeer Scott Freimuth Robert (Zyg) Wotzak Editor in Chief / Faculty: Tad Bradley Consultants: Steve Juroszek Rachael Ortego Photography: Corrine Rose (Frank Barkow photo) Publication: Advanced Litho Printing Great Falls, MT MSU School of Architecture Montana State University P.O. Box 173760 Bozeman, MT 59717-3760 Website: http://www.arch.montana.edu/ E-mail: architect@montana.edu Tele: 406.994.4256 Fax: 406.994.4257


NAAB STATEMENT

MISSION

The mission of the School of Architecture is to prepare students for the lifelong critical engagement in the arts and science of architecture. We teach and practice a moral, ethical and aesthetic responsibility to society and the natural world in the design of the built environment. To that end, we empower students to assume a leadership role in the synthesis of human activity, place, materials, systems, theories and methods from a critical, responsible and mature perspective. Concurrently, we strive to support the faculty in the active engagement of creative and research activities that advance the mission of the school and the university.

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. Master’s degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. Montana State University School of Architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program: Master of Architecture (preprofessional + 42 graduate credits) Next accreditation visit for this program will take place in 2014


Scott Freimuth

Kalina Vander Poel

Nichole Casebeer

Jeremy Wussow


Heath “Tadpole” Bradley

D. Jimmy Swanson

Alena Berger

Zyg Wotzak

V16 Design Team


When the School asked me to contribute to this new publication of student work I thought that this was a perfect opportunity to reflect on the current identity of the school. Having studied with Steve at MSU graduating in the early 80’s our education was balanced between a strong technical underpinning while sorting out a design sensibility between the fading influences of mid-century modernism (think Eames, Saarinen, Paul Rudolph) and the rising seductions of post-modernism (Venturi and Moore Inc.) as well as what regionalism might mean. The first lectures I attended were (incredibly in hindsight) from Buckminster Fuller, Bruce Goff, and Ant Farm to give you a sense of the extremes of those fading and rising influences. A strong art department next door provided a welcome refuge for me in those years from time to time.

seen recent student work I will try to characterize what the differences strike me now as most significant. This has been to a certain degree established by a number of MSU interns who have worked in our Berlinbased practice over the years, but in this way, I hope to write this introduction in the form of a report.

is a design consistency that resists both a global digitalized academic sameness as well as a sentimental nostalgia for regional contextualism. The majority of work here is sober, elegantly executed, mater-offact (versus utopian) materially engaged, and strongly located in “place” recognizing both the sublime landscapes of the West as well as the “dirty realism” of the towns, communities, infrastructure, campuses, dwellings, and history it is located in. This is work that is resistant to trends and is concerned and sensitive to its own tectonic physicality and location in contexts, which are often beautiful but also often problematic and difficult where sprawl, land use, and fragmentation effect these places.

One can be optimistic. If artist Donald Judd said that “the best visible things made in this century” (20th) were more likely made by engineers than architects (think Hoover Dam or steel suspension bridges) students at MSU seem to be well equipped to react to this criticism (that architects are irrelevant) and through a discourse of material, programmatic, and structural legibility. There is a clarity and honesty in this work that is very If there is an understanding of these places “as found” appealing. it is also to say this is work What is clear today is a school that is interested in its own and output that has reached a architectural vitality, that is, it Looking at the school now some thirty years on and having point of maturity where there


is directed toward buildability/ Hand and digital drawing, analogue model building, 1:1 realization whether through representation or directly, as construction, photography, and (even) painting offer a is often the case, by way of design-build, installation work, wide spectrum of choices. You use what you need to explain furniture, or the Community Design Center. This focus on what you think. This supports 1:1 construction is a particularly a philosophy which is adaptive and one that can evolve rather appealing aspect of the program where the interest in than one fixed approach. These architecture is physical and forms of representation and experiential. This also speaks of construction proliferate through an education that is at least as this journal and establish a interested in its effect beyond consistency to the school while the theoretical and how it is illustrating profound differences itself effected by the realities from student to student enforcing the idea of individual of construction, material, sustainability, economics, and thinking ultimately leading in viability rather than retreating the final year to considered and careful thesis work. into the academy as a selforiented and inclusive but ultimately ineffectual domain. The improvement and This is a training that prepares encouragement for students to venture forth into the world students perhaps more convincingly for the clients and through travel study forges societies they ultimately serve. new possibilities, broader knowledge, and experience with The tools these students use the chance of binding local and to represent their work speak universal sensibilities. of their resourcefulness and interest in making and ideation Previously the overwhelming influence of large centers like as a simultaneous activity.

New York and Los Angeles on the American architectural scene has given way to the emergence of strong critical practices and schools across the county in places previously having little impact. This certainly is a testimony to the independence, autonomy, and growing influence of schools like MSU in determining new and fresh approaches to the practice of architecture based on confidence and authority. As the school evolves into this next century it should continue to “play to its strengths�, that is, recognize what makes it unique and what are its potentials and cultivate this with conviction. Here is the possibility to confront relevant issues with imagination arriving at new ideas and possibilities for how we live and work and build.

Frank Barkow Frank Barkow studied architecture at Montana State University and the Harvard G.S.D. He is in practice with Regine Leibinger in Berlin, Germany.


Montana State University School of Architecture V16

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Montana State University School of Architecture V16

Located in the Gallatin Valley and surrounded by the Rocky Mountains in all directions, the School of Architecture at Montana State University enjoys a unique position within this landscape and within our academic community. The MSU School of Architecture is a part of the College of Arts and Architecture, which also includes the School of Art, the School of Film and Photography and the School of Music. Within this cultural and creative context, the School of Architecture seeks to prepare students for a lifelong critical engagement in the art and science of architecture. Located in ‘the last best place” of the Northern Rockies, we are in an extraordinary position to engage questions regarding the relationship between the natural and built environments. To that end, we teach and practice a moral, ethical and aesthetic responsibility to society and the natural world in the design of the built environment. We believe that architecture can and should be an essential tool for enhancing the human condition throughout our region and throughout the world. To implement the vision and mission of the School of Architecture and the University, we have adopted

a curriculum that focuses on a balance of conceptual investigation, building tectonics, professional responsibility and the development of a critical position in regard to the environment and the profession of architecture. Throughout our eleven-semester program, students undertake a rigorous sequence of design studios and architectural graphic studios along with required courses in history/ theory, building construction/systems and professional practice. Students explore these and other advanced topics through a wide-range of graduate electives and option studios. Our students engage in outreach activities not only within our own region but also throughout the world—including Asia, Europe, Africa and South America. Some of our outreach activities have been taking place for close to four decades while other activities have emerged only recently to address emerging needs. Similarly, our program promotes the act of building by our students—in particular we promote the use of design-build as a valued and important educational method. Our students and faculty have undertaken design-build projects in Nepal, Kenya, Morocco, and England in the past decade as well as in our own backyard of Montana. We believe that combining opportunities for travel and community engagement with the rigor of our design studio education and a strong work ethic,

prepares our students to address the pressing needs of our built and natural environment. The MSU School of Architecture has outstanding faculty and staff that support, challenge and engage our students in their academic and professional lives. The work on the following pages is a glimpse into the accomplishments, growth and commitment of our students, faculty and staff.

V16

Montana State Univers College of Arts & Architectu - Steven P. Juroszek, AIA, NCARB Professor and Interim Director

School of Architecture


undergraduate


Year


At its core architecture is a process of exploration, and the first steps are taken by re-examining relationships in the world around us. This initial course challenges us to critically engage with our surroundings, opening the door to discovering new ways of perceiving ourselves, our environment, and in turn the vast potential to influence and mold a particular experience. We can then begin to recognize that different relationships, (spatial, psychological, emotional, etc. ) are all part of greater sets of interdependencies, and with this understanding begin to reveal pieces of the world in ways which bring depth and richness to our lives. First year then focuses on equipping us with tools and processes for translating these personal discoveries into visually and thoughtfully harmonious compositions. Utilizing drawing, model making, photography, painting and other mediums, we explore factors which shape experience and in turn how we can shape their translation through these mediums. These analytical and descriptive techniques become tools which enable our unique voices to emerge, but more importantly they becomes tools with which we can careful listen and record, enabling us to creatively engage with, challenge, and synthesize personal expression in careful consideration of existent circumstance.

One


Design Fundamentals I

ARCH 151


Design Fundamentals II

ARCH 152


Year


Two

Learning to clearly communicate ideas is central to architectural studies and half of second year is dedicated to graphic studies. As students gain confidence in their vision, they are also honing their ability to visually translate, transform, and enrich their growing ideas and understandings. Graphics emphasizes both hand and computer applications, and students explore the unique poetics which various drawing crafts embody, learning to find value and appreciation for both traditional and contemporary methods of illustration. After gaining exposure to a range of introductory courses in structures and building systems students are equipped to take their first stab at design studio, and the awesome and overwhelming task of design their first building. In a small to moderate-sized project students are exposed to (and often awed at) the scale and extent of building program and site analysis. Students begin to address and understand key elements such as entry, circulation, and materiality in relationship to building systems and overall building function. In addition student learn basic analysis of natural conditions, and lightly explore natural lighting and ventilation potentials along with other sustainable site responses and building systems methods. Through a series of primarily site-wwfocused explorations supplemented with research and creative explorations, students learn to take conceptual stances on design problems, opening the door to challenging, questioning, and advance our ideas beyond our preconceptions.


Architectural structures incorporates the essence of design into structural elements such as wood, steel, masonry, and concrete. Students begin to learn about lateral considerations and calculations including environmental and seismic loads, while also building their understanding of building systems, diaphragms, connections, and structural engineer-architect communications.

Architectural Structures

ARCH 243


Architectural Structures

ARCH 244


Architectural Design I

ARCH 253


Graphics I

ARCH 261

Arch 261 is the first in a sequence of graphics courses. The purpose of this class is two-fold; first, enable students to understand drawing as a tool for critical observation, analysis, communication and design... second, teach students to discuss and utilize drawing as a verb. The goal is to ultimately understand drawing as a dynamic and thoughtful act.


Graphics II

ARCH 262

Why students of architecture should draw: The character of this course is predicated on the belief that students of architecture must experience visual language in two fundamental and related ways. Through design drawing, they encounter the problem of tangible speculation in design and the communication and generation of architectural ideas through convention and architectural graphic techniques. This integration is necessarily a shared experience with the architectural design studio. In a more visceral, internal sense, however, one must also assimilate the innate learning that enables insightful design through the uniqueness of observation drawing. Observation drawing awakens and internalizes visual reasoning, giving us a heightened and holistic sense of being ‘in the world’. We believe this ability is within the core of the creativity architects must bring to their art.


Year Th


Thr ee

With advanced knowledge of design students begin to apply their knowledge more comprehensively, exploring solutions which a express a deeper understanding of theoretical, technical and socio-cultural aspects of design. Further knowledge garnered in structures, history, building construction and environmental controls, while increasing both the complexity and scope of issues addressed in design, also deepen and sharpen students insights, furthering their ability to carefully and creatively approach design problems. Students begin to grasp an appreciation for the vast and vital responsibilities of architects as they explore the needs a building serves at expanded scales, and the environmental, social, and political repercussions design decisions can create both locally and abroad. Along with conceptual clarity in addressing social and environmental considerations, students begin to integrate issues such as accessibility, site conditions, structural/ enclosure systems, building code compliance, and assembly technologies and methods as well.


Building Construction II

ARCH 340


Beginning with a rough conceptual outline, students expand on their knowledge of building systems to systematically research and detail connections, assemblies and custom components required to make their vision a reality. Through a set of evolving construction documents, specifications, and graphic diagrams, these students designed a diner with a rotating glass shading system, constructed as an outgrowth of an existing structure on campus. Through these explorations students are encouraged to discover potentials to engage complex building issues with innovative and playful resolve.


Architectural Design II

ARCH 354

Divided into four distinct, blocks, this center for the arts recalls the carving, and segmentation which shaped this ethnically diverse mining community. Where absence brings the whole together, the unique constituent pieces are expressed while conveying the ability for a strong sense of community to endure despite the divisions therein.


Architectural Design III e str eet

birch

rous

under construction perspective

stree

t

128'

-9 1/4"

sawmill

north

181'-0"

wall section C

27'-0"

virtual office space

172'-4"

wall section D

boze

man

cree

k

lumber storage

section B

section A

ground floor plan

3 / 64 ”=1’ 302'-0"

stree

5 10

50

lumber storage

t

sawmill

15'-0"

8'-0"

north

rous

e str ee

t

birch under construction perspective

2'-0"

0

wall section C

mechanical room

mechanical room

wall section D mec room hanical

section A boze

man

cree

k

open park space

section B

section A

3 / 64 ”=1’

birch under construction perspective

stree

0

5 10

0

5 10

50

t

section A

wall section C

5'-0"

north

rous

e str eet

first floor plan

virtual offices

mechanical chase

mechanical chase

interior perspective

lobby

virtu

al offic

es

mec

hani cal chas e

boze

man

cree

k

wall section D

section A

section B

typical upper floor plan 3 / 64 ”=1’ 50

3 / 64 ”=1’

ARCH 355


Architectural Graphics III

ARCH 363

Digital Portion


Here students used digital modeling and rendering programs to explore potentials of graphic illustration, Focusing on shifting light and material properties within a static space, these projects reveal the varying emotional and aesthetic qualities which a single space can encompass .


Year F


Four

In the final year, student work culminates in further advanced research and problem solving, striving to synthesize and reconcile contemporary issues facing designers while taking stances which question and address architectural advancement. Seeking to translate conceptual ideas into realistic and meaningful solutions to world problems, students are asked to tackle concerns of urbanism, population growth, sprawl and other growing issues. With increased awareness of scales of impact, social considerations, and theoretical applications, students grow in their ability to responsibly consider growing and changing issues in the way people live and how we may create a more sustainable future. More personally directed projects cultivate innovative and unique solutions while group work helps tests these idea’s contribution and meaning within collaborative efforts. It is embraced that while these projects are not intended to be built, more importantly they are a manifestation of dreams, possibilities, and the means by which we may sculpt and influence the future. Through design students must show and express what they believe in, and by this are given both a choice and opportunity to envision and cultivate beliefs in a more conscious and compassionate way of living.


Architectural Design IV

ARCH 456


Architectural Design IV

ARCH 456


Graduate School


ARCH 5 5 1 Advanced Architectural Studio This graduate design studio undertakes projects which explore specific critical positions with regard to contemporary architectural issues. The studio provides an open-ended format that embraces experimentation, discovery, and innovation. With a focus on conceptual development, research and analysis of theoretical positions are emphasized along with the development of contemporary methods, models and techniques for analysis.


Advanced Architectural Studio

ARCH 551


Buildings, the way they are built today, are a foreign introduction to the larger natural ecosystem. Sustainable or green buildings are not enough to replace the missing link; a higher level of integration is required.

This project is a model or test of how architecture can be deeply integrated into the environment to work with existing ecosystems at all scales, from the whole picture to the pixel.


Advanced Architectural Studio

ARCH 551


This structure produces a protein that acts as a nucleating agent to ice crystals and therefore allows ice to form easier at a slightly warmer water temperature, reversing the affects of the global climate shift caused by human pollution and creating an integrated sub-system to the primary natural arctic ecosystem.


Building Construction II

ARCH 340

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Advanced Architectural Studio


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SITE PLAN 1” = 50’

A

4

3

2

1

CEPTION PLAN = 15’

CTION ‘A’

5

B

DINING/LIVING ROOM PLAN 1” = 15’

Advanced Architectural Studio

ARCH 551


Dungeness Spit Hospice_Sequim, WA Evidence of air and water had made its presence known through a series of bodily experiences. The dull roar of incoming waves, followed by their whisphering departure focused the mind on rhythms of breath, movement, and life. This project aims to simplify ‘being’ and ‘living’ in order to appreciate these phenomenological experiences.

The investigation led to a series of comparisons between the vestige of waves and humans. The waves contribute energy to the spit, carrying thousands of tons of sediment annually. People contribute energy and time to the ones that surround them during a lifetime. These instances are arguably only moments, unlike the evidence which continues to perpetuate through time.


ARCH 5 5 7 Architectural Design Studio This graduate design studio challenges students to undertake projects that are the realization of a synthesized cultural and technological concept. Students participate in a week-long field to an urban center to explore and understand the unique culture and context of their project site. Design projects integrate site analysis, programming, building systems, and contemporary design theory. An emphasis is placed on the synthesis of conceptual processes, analysis, preliminary design investigation, and design development.


Architectural Design Studio

ARCH 557


558 Bozeman Brewery Brent Huntley Jack Smith Fall 2011


Architectural Design Studio

Bozeman Brewing Company_Bozeman, MT Bozeman has a rich history of brewing beer dating back to the late 1800s when The Bozeman Brewery was comparable to large domestic beer companies today. The goal of this project is to expand the current brewing establishment in Bozeman and bring back the spirit of the brewing process to the community.

ARCH 557

The project is organized on two axes with the primary axis providing a great hall which contains the fermentation tanks for brewing the beer and a tasting room for patrons. This “fermentation hall� displays the brewing process to patrons while also materializing the spirituality of brewing. The second axis contains the program for the linear brewing process.


Architectural Design Studio

ARCH 557


Architectural Design Studio

ARCH 557


ARCH 5 5 8 Comprehensive Design Studio This graduate design studio requires students to synthesize all of their prior knowledge and design experiences into the comprehensive design of a programmatically complex architectural project. This studio integrates design thinking, investigative skills and theoretical explorations with site design, universal design, sustainability and building systems/tectonics. This studio is the culmination and celebration of a student’s academic experience in the School of Architecture.


Advanced Building Studio

ARCH 558


Advanced Building Studio

ARCH 558


“ Too often architecture is perceived as only a building and its site. To utilize the power of architecture, one must harness and develop the true nature of place in its totality. Place must be developed into an understanding of how it came to be; what it is now and how it will be shaped and strengthened as a union with architecture.

Development must be rooted in the human need to connect to a particular place, allowing one to fully understand their own identity. The aim is to create an Architecture that allows one to be awakened to the world around them, through a process of understanding and raising awareness to an environment and its specifics.�


Advanced Building Studio

ARCH 558


Advanced Building Studio Train Station + Pedestrian Path_Belgrade, MT Occupants are left with a broken city, no relation to its occupants or visitors. Over time the train began to diminish and retreat from being a part of Belgrade: and with it the acceptance of its industrial nature. Instead of hiding the industry, residents are encouraged to move through it and embrace its special characteristics. A pathway with moments of reflection into this place’s specifics inspires a connection to Belgrade as a destination.

ARCH 558


Advanced Photography

ARCH 525


Physics has shown us that the perception of space and time is relative. As humans, we have the incredible ability to absorb information about our environment and automatically process it into thoughts and emotions, often below the threshold of consciousness.

Photography can be used in a meditative effort to step back and question our seemingly autonomous understanding of space. When we open ourselves to the complexities and chaos of the physical world and how we observe it, we can free our minds from unnecessary constraints and begin to progress toward uninhibited creativity.


Advanced Photography

ARCH 525


An exploration of differing levels of abandonment that examines associated scales of dilapidation, quietness and forgetfulness. Maudlow, MT.


Fused Glass

ARCH 525

This course focuses on the craft involved with working with fused glass. It is all about the exploration of making. One gains an in depth understanding of the material and processes of manipulation which influence and enhance overall design aesthetic. Projects examine balance between real world issues of the translation from an initail idea to crafting the desired final outcome, as well as a philosophical approach of moving from thought (idea) into composition.


Materials

ARCH 543


Material: tactility and its connection to the human.


Furniture Design

ARCH 543


An exploration of material, tool, and construction. Materials: Baltic Birch plywood, wood glue, and poly-acryllic finish Tools: CNC mill, router, sander, and jigsaw.


Furniture Design

ARCH 543

Green Ash, mild steel.


Baltic Birch plywood, acrylic paint.

Baltic Birch plywood, mild steel, colored acrylic sheeting.


Advanced Architectural Graphics

ARCH 564


The single defining quality of art is that the composition, the form, the object, the shade and the shadow as well as the color all point to something beyond the limits of the canvas. Art is born in the mind not in the eye and if truly created well art points to the spirit and the process. Not to render or create an artifice rather, we are exploring the nature of art and the creative process.

The course focuses on observation and design drawing techniques designed to prepare students for drawing in the field as well as constructing design perspectives. Often, students will be instructed to consider particular course goals in composition, subject matter, and media in preparing their drawings. This course includes overnight remote field trips accessing significant historic regional sites.


Advanced Graphics

ARCH 564


Advanced Graphics

ARCH 564

Montana’s rich history and dynamic landscape provide abundant opportunities for developing a solid architectural graphics skill set.


Outreach


For more information on the following projects, please see the Appendix.


Since 1976, the Community Design Center (CDC) has provided architecture students with opportunities to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to assist public and non-profit groups in the state of Montana. The CDC mission is to develop communityuniversity partnerships to foster an interdisciplinary experience for students while providing research, planning, and conceptual design to the citizens of the region. CDC assists community groups and non-profit organizations representing under-served areas or under-funded projects. The center works

with state agencies, city departments, and other regional and national governmental entities. Offered as a 4th year undergraduate option studio in the School of Architecture, CDC students assist in the planning, programming, and designing of projects including facility and infrastructure assessments, schematic building design, feasibility studies, planning studies for controlled growth, community visioning documents, historic preservation reports and documentation, and exploring economic development opportunities. Students gain practical


Community Design Center

experience by sharing knowledge locally and regionally through community service, preparing for professional leadership and lifelong learning in architecture and related fields. Students develop knowledge for the profession through research and practice. CDC is committed to environmental stewardship and seeks opportunities to allow students a wide range of experiences to participate directly with communities on projects that are supportive of sustainable design and construction principles. Students learn about the complete

design process first-hand and the range o fsocial, environmental, and physical issues it cuts across. Students bring fresh ideas, creativity, and enthusiasm to the process while respecting their client’s’ insights and the unique character of the place in which they are working. This results in architectural solutions that respond to both the physical and cultural landscape through the production of in-depth research and design work that is uniquely responsive to the client’s needs and aspirations.


Traffic calming circle

Land use analysis Community gateway sign

In 2009 the city of Choteau faced a number of challenges. The population of the community had been stagnant for a number of years and major retailers left the downtown core for larger communities miles away. Several buildings in the downtown core were demolished, leaving holes in the street front. The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) was planning a major renovation of US highway 89, which was the main street of the downtown core. The city obtained a

grant from the Sonoran Institute and asked CDC to work with them to develop a visioning document to look at planning and development in the town core. The student team researched, documented, and evaluated the town core focusing on historic character, existing planning and zoning, growth patterns, vehicle and pedestrian circulation, and town infrastructure. Strategies and proposals for infrastructure and development projects were developed based on the goals identified in the


Community Design Center

Choteau Growth Document and data collected from the students’ research and documentation. Students conducted a series of town meetings to introduce their research, propose development strategies, discuss scale and proportion issues concerning development in the historic town core, present walkable community and traffic control concepts relating to the MDOT renovation proposal, and discuss community entry designs. The Visioning Document is a compilation of the

The Choteau Visioning Project

Choteau, Montana

students’ research and findings. It included the proposed solutions for defining the entrance gateways, speed reduction strategies, Highway 89 infrastructure design for establishing edges in the town core, pedestrian accessibility and pathways, lighting for safety, landscaping, directional signage, preservation of existing historic street frontage, and proposals for short-term and long- term infill development in the town core.


The Help Center is a non-profit organization that provides 24-hour crisis counseling, rape and suicide outreach, and crisis intervention services to the southern half of the state of Montana. After receiving a grant to expand their telephone counseling coverage, they realized that the small building housing their operations would be inadequate for the proposed increase in services. The Help Center approached CDC to develop a new facility to meet their needs. The existing building and site

in Bozeman are owned by the Help Center. Their goal was to construct a new facility on the existing site alongside the present structure. Students immediately discovered that the site was constrained by the proximity of Bozeman Creek which limited the area for parking and the location of the building. After some initial design work involving four proposals that explored a variety of site strategies and building massing proposals, the students settled on a design that incorporated the existing structure while still


Community Design Center

The Help Center

Bozeman, Montana

B A

C

B C A D

D

E

F

1

2

3

4 5

6

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satisfying the regulated number of parking spaces. The building is desig arranges program spaces in a U-shape around the existing building, using the site area available and applying sustainable practices in the reuse of the existing structure, passive day-lighting, and zoning the building for thermal isolation. Safety of counselors and clients was met by zoning the use of the building by separation of public, work, and private spaces physically and visually with controlled entry into each of the space

uses. The intimacy of the interior spaces, through use of color and material, provide a comfortable and non-threatening environment for counseling. The call center and sleeping quarters are located on the upper floor for sound isolation and night security, but remain visually connected to the counseling area and entry points. The scale and proportion of the building relate to the residential character of the neighborhood as do the structural and finish materials of the design.


MASTER SITE PLAN

SWAN VALLEY INNOVATIONS COMMUNITY DESIGN CENTER

Fueling

Experimental Forest

Scale

Wash Station

Maintenance Shop

Future Expansion Chop & Split Mill

Post & Pole

Biomass

Wood Shop

Educational Facility

Suites Employee Housing

Student Dormitory

Community garden Community Center Future Roads

Camground

Retail

Visitor Center

ty un

The Montana Legacy project is a complex and innovative initiative undertaken by the Nature Conservancy and the Trust for Public Land (TPL) in western Montana. To conserve a critical ecosystem, a contiguous land ownership was created which can be managed in a collaborative way by public and private conservation owners. A key underlying concept in the project is recognizing the “land’s intrinsic, natural value and its role in the economic sustenance for rural communities.”

N N

Rd

76

Co

With this concept in mind, TPL asked CDC to look at a 70 acre site near the community of Condon, Montana in the Swan Valley and to develop a master plan for the development of a sustainable community based on balancing Environmental, Equity, and Economic issues (Triple Bottom Line thinking). TPL conceived Swan Valley Innovations (SVI), a non-profit group made up of local conservation, community, and forest-based business interests to develop, implement, and perpetuate the sustainable

SCALE: 1”=100’-0” SCALE: 1” = 60’0”

0’

0’

100’ 150’ 200’ 225’250’ 50’ 100’ 150’ 200’ 225’250’ 50’


Community Design Center

business campus concept. CDC worked with SVI for two academic semesters engaging 14 architecture students and eight mechanical engineering students. The first semester team developed the initial research on triple bottom line, energy, and material strategies and also developed the site master plan which established the major goals of the project. The following semester’s team focused on developing deeper research on specific planning issues with the Missoula County Design Review Team, applying the

Swan Valley Innovations

Condon, Montana

strategies identified in the first semester, applying the new information to the campus master plan, and providing a conceptual design of the 20 plus buildings on the campus. Engineering students collaborated with the CDC students to flesh out the energy consumption profile of the buildings and to provide mechanical cost information to support the conceptual cost estimates for the buildings and site developed by CDC.


Bechler Soldier Station is a historic site located in a remote area in the southwest corner of Yellowstone National Park. In the summer, it provides access to the most popular horse packing trail heads in the park and is also the starting point for many day and overnight hikers in the park. Increasing public use of the area has created the need for more full time on-site park employees; however the existing living accommodations are inadequate. The National Park Service (NPS), through the

Yellowstone Park Foundation, retained CDC to study this problem. The goal of the project is to design an off-grid net-zero residential structure, with separate accommodations for two park employees. The site is particularly sensitive due to the national historic district designation for the two historic structures which requires that historic views from the district are maintained and that new structures should not deviate significantly in scale, color, and material use. Since the NPS had little ground data for the site,


Community Design Center

CDC arranged for the City College of Billings drafting department to provide a 3D digital scan and data cloud of the area from which CDC students later developed topographic information and 3D models of the site conditions. CDC students employed an iterative approach to the work that included frequent meetings and reviews with NPS staff. Strategies for off grid design included evaluation of energy efficient building envelope configurations, passive

Bechler Soldier Station

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

solar and lighting design, biomass and alternative fuel heating systems, heat recovery, and on-site energy production. Students developed concepts for modular, panelized, and site built construction approaches. Students also provided material and heavy snow design studies. Students prepared renderings to support the NPS environmental impact study for the Historic Preservation Office review process.


DCA Juried Design Communication Exhibition

2012


DCA Juried Design Communication Exhibition

2012


DCA Juried Design Communication Exhibition

2012


DCA Juried Design Communication Exhibition

2012


Dryland Competition

Grand Canyon National Park

The Challenge: Water scarcity is both the history and the future of the American west. Re-thinking water use, particularly in the face of climate change, will be central to the region’s survival. The work exceeds the grasp of a single discipline, and touches all dimensions of the way people live and work.

Sustaining the US West in the face of water scarcity and hydrologic variability brought on by climate change will require strategic architectures, infrastructures, and urbanisms that promote adaptation and resilience. Drylands Design seeks innovation in architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, regional planning, and infrastructure


design that addresses water supply, water quality, water access, water treatment, and the water/energy nexus. Drylands Design seeks integrative proposals from multidisciplinary design teams that anticipate science and policy perspectives as necessary dimensions of intelligent design response, and exploit beauty as an instrument of resilience and adaptation. Challenge Brief from drylandscompetition.org


Dryland Competition

Grand Canyon National Park


While in Asia in 2009, students visited Kyoto, Japan to learn about traditional Japanese architecture and its influence on contemporary architecture.


Foreign Study


Foreign Study

Australia


Foreign Study

Europe


Students visited Europe in the Fall of 2011 and travelled to the Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy, and Turkey.


Foreign Study

Europe

Sketches


Students who studied in Europe sketched the architecture they experienced. Their accordian sketchbooks were put on exhibit in the School of Architecture’s lower gallery the following semester.


Foreign Study

South America In the spring of 2012, fourth year architecture students travelled to South America and visited Maccu Picchu, Cusco, Lima, Brazilia, Rio De Janiero, and Santiago.


HATCH Festival Lounge

In the summer of 2011, Professor Bruce Wrightsman and John Montoya of CTA Architects designed and built the Innovators Lounge for the HATCH Festival, which was a creative mentorship and networking summit that was held in October of 2011. The design transformed the ballroom at the Emerson Cultural Center that hosted the event.

Bozeman, Montana


Highlands Glass Workshop

‘Highland Inspiration - Location and Self’, was a nineday International Student Symposium held at North Lands Creative Glass located in the village of Lybster in Caithness, Scotland. The Symposium held in the summer of 2012, was the coming together of students from various schools to work with Natali Rodrigues from The Alberta College of Art + Design, Michael Rogers from the Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, and Heath (Tad) Bradley from Montana State University’s School of Architecture.

Lybster, Scotland

While at the symposium, MSU architecture students joined other students and instructors from diverse backgrounds to learn glass blowing techniques, while having the opportunity to explore the community of Lybster, Scotland. The symposium was a perfect way for students to view the world in a fresh light, gain new experiences and advance conceptual and practical skills with the experienced guidance of internationally-respected educators.


Highlands Glass Workshop

Lybster, Scotland


Hyalite Pavilion

Hyalite Reservoir, Montana

From fall 2007 through spring 2009, a group of 24 architecture graduate students designed and built a public pavilion on the Hyalite Reservoir in the Gallatin National Forest. When access to the dam was reconstructed several years ago, Jane Ruchman, the Gallatin National Forest Developed Recreation Program Manager and Forest Landscape Architect, decided there was a need for a sheltered picnic area for visitors. The pavilion, 20 feet wide by

50 feet long, was designed to accommodate 25 people. Over the course of a year’s work, students worked to construct the pavilion with the help of local engineers. construction firms, and contractors. The structure consisted of masonry stone walls and a fireplace, custom picnic benches and barbeque grills. Every detail, including material connections, were specifically designed for the project.


Photo By Kelly Gorham

The students were thankful for help from Nishkian Monks Engineering, Dick Anderson Construction, Anderson Masonry, Great West Engineering, Allied Engineering Services, John Mills of Select Stone, Kerry Hughes of Northwest Concrete Services and Mike Combs, a steel fabricator from Sore Elbow Forge.


Hyalite Pavilion

Hyalite Reservoir, Montana

The second phase of the project included landscaping and hardscaping, and involved MSU’s Western Transportation Institute and the Department of Environmental Quality.


Working on a structure that would be built made me understand that there are a lot of aspects of a real project, as opposed to a model for school, that you don’t have to consider on a project that isn’t real. I think it will make me a better architect. -Chelsie Lough, student


Ice Climbing Tower

Bozeman, MT

A The International Mountaineering and Climbing Federation (UIAA) sanctioned competition climbing structure will make Bozeman, already recognized for its premiere ice climbing, the first community in the United States to host an ice climbing world cup event. More than a competition venue, the structure will serve the community as a recreational area, rope work training facility, and event center for concerts and performances.


The design of the project was initiated by a student competition during the winter of 2011. Winners were selected in March 2011. The first place winning team has joined an organized group of climbers, architects, contractors, local business people, Gallatin County, the City of Bozeman, Nishkian Monks Engineering and the MSU School of Architecture to develop and construct their idea.


Kenya Straw-Bale Housing

Since 2009, Assistant Professor David Fortin and MSU architecture students have researched housing issues in Kenya with Nairobi architect Ronald Omyonga, who also was the original Kenyan contact for MSU’s award-winning Engineers Without Borders project in Khwisero, Kenya. In 2011, David Fortin and MSU graduate Michael Spencer travelled to Kisima

Kenya

in rural Kenya to study straw bale construction as a viable low-cost construction option and helped build a potato storage facility out of straw bale. They also spent time with Red Feather Development Group, which has built straw bale houses on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in Montana, in order to learn more about the construction technique. During the


summer semester of 2012, David Fortin conducted the Straw Bale Studies course with Michael Spencer coordinating and assisting the program. MSU architecture students Melissa von Borstel,Taylor Klinkel, Victoria Bull and Erik Walton joined Fortin and Spencer in rural Kenya to work on a straw bale residential building for a local health clinic.


Kenya Straw-Bale Housing

Kenya


Khumbu Climbing School

Through collaboration between the School of Architecture and the Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation, SoA students designed the Khumbu Climbing School in Phortse, Nepal, under Associate Professor Michael Everts’ direction and in consultation with Bob Mechels, a LEED accredited professional with Dowling and Sandholm Architects. The collaboration was challenged to design a building which was culturally sensitive,

Phortse, Nepal

environmentally sustainable, and nurturing the opportunity for Sherpas to learn safe climbing skills and foster a passion for Alpinism. By creating a physical place for the gathering of climbers and community, the project strives to share the impossible immensity of the Himalayan Mountains. The project has been helping Montana State University’s School of Architecture to spearhead the education outreach and design research efforts underway in the school.


The Nepalese community of Phortse is at 13,000 ft. elevation and on the way to Mt. Everest (18,000 ft. elevation for its base camp), which can be seen on the horizon on nice days.


Khumbu Climbing School

Phortse, Nepal


Playful Ping Pong Pavilion

Oxford, England

In response to the London Festival of Architecture’s theme for 2012 – ‘The Playful City’ – students from Montana State University and Oxford Brookes University co-designed and constructed the ‘playful’ pavilion on the grounds of Oxford Brookes’ University in Oxford, England during the summer of 2012. Constructed as part of Oxford Brookes’ end of year show and the Live Project Pedagogy International Symposium, the pavilion was designed to engage the

public in examining the spaces for sport and be a catalyst for public interaction and spatial choreography. After participating in the RIBA’s Love Architecture Festival in Oxford, the pavilion was moved to the Industri[us] Festival of Upcycling site in Canning Town, East London to participate in the London Festival of Architecture and the 2012 London Olympics.


Playful Ping Pong Pavilion

Working with the Oxford-Brookes students was great. Their course curriculum was, in my opinion, very different than ours, so they had completely different ways of looking at the design and were able to bring new ideas and problem solving skills that we, the MSU team, weren’t necessarily thinking about, and vice versa: We brought new ideas and a new mindset to their design. -Zyg Wotzak

Oxford, England


Rome Studio

ARCH 414

Montana State University School of Architecture’s Rome Studio is an annual summer semester of study in Italy. Professor Emeritus Peter Kommers, a former Rome Prize laureate of the American Academy in Rome, established and led the School of Architecture Rome Studio from 2005–2012. The studio studies in Tuscany and Umbrian cities with a stay in the ancient center of Rome. The students’ time in Rome is centered around the studio space in the Palazzo

Pio. Following their residence in Rome, the students complete another two to three weeks of independent assigned travel in Europe before returning to the United States.


“The fact that students live in Rome for six to seven weeks means that they transform from being tourists to residents and as such they tap into the rhythms of the city. While in Rome, they study the renaissance architects of St. Peter’s Basilica and their precursors as well as complete a theoretical design project of a part of the city near the Coliseum. Living in Rome expands their senses, not only the history of architecture but in the study of a place in evolution.”

Peter Kommers, Emeritus Professor


Rome Studio

ARCH 414

“What I do find myself thinking back on was the process we used while we were participating in the Rome Studio. I think about the way we structured our group, the methods we used to study the site and share data and ideas. I reflect on our design process and our focus to work intelligently, fast, yet thoughtfully and with the goal of designing a project that was relevant and respectful to the people and the place.�

Robert Remark, 2011 Rome Studio Student


Sustainable Community Development

Zawiya Ahansal, Morocco


The Morocco Sustainable Community Development program is an international service learning program that offers university students in the fields of architecture, education, and health the opportunity to participate in ongoing community development projects in the rural communities of the Zawiya Ahansal region in the Central High Atlas Mountains of Morocco. The MSU program is partnered with the Atlas Cultural Foundation (ACF). a non-profit organization with the mission of helping

underserved Moroccans, especially women and children, improve their quality of life through locally determined development projects in the fields of cultural preservation, community education, and rural health. The program offers a five-week international experience for undergraduate and graduate students to travel to rural Morocco accompanied by Montana State University faculty and live and work in a small community.


Sustainable Community Development

Zawiya Ahansal, Morocco


Vegetable Washing Station

Bozeman, Montana


In the spring of 2012, professor Chris Livingston and famed architect Coleman Coker led a group of graduate architecture students to design and build a vegetable washing station for Montana State University’s Towne’s Harvest Garden, part of MSU’s 10-acre horticulture farm. This effort was a collaboration with Montana State University’s College of Agriculture and the College of Education, Health and Human Development’s sustainable food and

bioenergy systems program. The structure, made almost entirely of recycled materials, was to provide a place for workers in the garden to clean harvested vegetables without loss of soil or water from the garden. The flooring was made from old tables from MSU’s Plant Growth Center, and the polycarbonate siding came from the MSU greenhouse’s siding that was damaged during hail storms.


Vegetable Washing Station

I think (the wash house) is really beautiful, but for me what was really beautiful was what happened when two worlds came together. -Erin Chamberlin, student

Bozeman, Montana


Yellowstone National Park Charrette

The work on these pages represents work undertaken over the last five years coordinated through the School of Architecture at Montana State University. Over fifty individuals have participated directly, while scores more have contributed both directly and indirectly. Paul Bertelli and Christa Gertiser from JLF & Associates of Bozeman, Montana; Eleanor Clark, Zehra Osman, Alicia Murphy, and Bob Fuhrmann from Yellowstone National Park; and John

ARCH 551

C. Brittingham from the School of Architecture have spent countless hours working together as a team representing the private sector, the National Park Service, and the Academy. The aspiration of this unusual partnership of people and their perspectives is to generate a new model/ paradigm for looking at one of the country’s greatest resources—Yellowstone National Park. As the


Photo By Audrey Hall

strategy unfolded, fourteen regional, national, and international design firms, that are friends of the School of Architecture at Montana State University were invited to participate in three five-day design charrettes at Yelowstone Lake Lodge (Summer 2007), Old Faithful (Fall 2009), and Mammoth Hot Springs (Fall 2010).

Photo By Audrey Hall


Yellowstone National Park Charrette

Professor Brittingham offered six graduate electives and three graduate option studios in the School of Architecture that were essential to the outcome of the Lake, Old Faithful, and Mammoth Charrettes. In the spring of 2006 and the winter of 2010, MSU graduate students spent five days at Mammoth and Gardiner working directly with park staff in the development of an information resource package for the charrettes. In the summer of 2007, the fall of 2009, and the

ARCH 551

fall of 2010, MSU graduates worked directly with participating firms during the Lake, Old Faithful, and Mammoth Charrettes. The over-arching goal of the charrettes is to re-think how Yellowstone National Park might approach the design, preservation, and fund-raising challenges it faces, with the intent of preserving and protecting its assets.


a


a

appendix


Foreign Study

School of Architecture

This studio is a uniquely structured study under the direction of architecture faculty members. This studio is a 12-week study focused on examining architecture through the holistic study of urban environments, combining design, urban design, architectural history and theory, drawing and pre-travel research outside the traditional studio environment. Assignments may include field observation sketching, in-situ design exercises and urban design proposals. Specific destinations in a region are selected by faculty members based on their own research, interests and areas of expertise. Students can expect to visit multiple cities within a particular country. Spring 2013 Henry Sorenson John Brittingham India (North and South India) Thailand (Bangkok) Cambodia (Phnom Pehn, Angkor Wat) Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Bali, Indonesia Singapore Australia (Melbourne, Canberra, Sydney) Fall 2012 Program not offered Summer 2012 Peter Kommers Rome Studio Italy (Rome, Siena, Florence, Riomaggiore, Lucca, Perugia, Pisa) Spring 2012 Michael Everts Chile (Santiago, Valparaiso) Argentina (Buenos Aires) Brazil (Sao Paulo, Curitiba, Rio de Janerio) David Fortin Brazil (Rio de Janerio, Brasilia) Peru (Lima, Cuzco, Machu Picchu) Bolivia (La Paz) Fall 2011 Chris Livingston Netherlands (Amsterdam, Groningen, Utrecht, Delft,

Rotterdam) France (Paris) Sean Anderson Italy (Venice, Vicenza, Bologna, Florence, Sienna, Rome, Naples) Turkey (Istanbul, Izmir, Cappadocia, Goreme) Spring 2011 Program not offered Fall 2011 Ferd Johns England (London) Sweden (Stockholm) Finland (Helsinki) Portugal (Oporto, Lisbon) Spain (Madrid, Cordova, Seville, Rhonda, Granada, Barcelona) Spring 2010 Michael Everts Chile (Santiago, Valparaiso) Argentina (Buenos Aires) Brazil (Rio de Janeiro) Henry Sorenson Bolivia (La Paz, Copacabana, Isla del Sol) Peru (Lima, Cusco, Machu Picchu, Ollantaytambo) Sweden (Stockholm) Finland (Helsinki) Portugal (Oporto, Lisbon) Spain (Madrid, Cordova, Seville, Rhonda, Granada, Barcelona)

Fall 2009 Chris Livingston Netherlands (Amsterdam, Groningen, Utrecht, Delft, Rotterdam) Belgium (Antwerp) Germany (Berlin) Bill Rea Greece (Athens, Santorini, Thessaloniki, Kalambaka) Turkey (Kusadasi, Izmir, Istanbul) Spring 2009 Henry Sorenson Australia (Sydney, Katoomba, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Cairns) Jack Smith Japan (Kyoto) Fall 2008 Chris Livingston Netherlands (Amsterdam, Groningen, Utrecht) Belgium (Antwerp) France (Paris, Mont St Michel, Nantes, Bordeaux, Carcassonne, Nimes, Lyon, La Tourette) Switzerland (Basel) Ralph Johnson Spain (Bilbao, Madrid, Seville, Barcelona) Portugal (Lisbon) Morocco (Fez, Merezouga, Marrakesh)


Internship Locations

School of Architecture

In the early 1970’s, the School of Architecture developed the Internship Program which is open to qualified students during their fourth year of undergraduate studies. The intent of the Internship Program, offered to academically qualified students wanting a combination of a professional and academic experience to complement the design education they receive in the studios. The design core is strengthened by course work in architectural drawing, working drawings, environmental controls, structures, history, preservation and art. The School of Architecture is selective, choosing students on the basis of their academic achievement, interest and potential in the field of architecture. Through the program, we expect our students to be exposed to the entire spectrum of the architectural profession: observing how projects are obtained, designed, and developed; production drawings made, specifications written, and on-site inspections are carried out. We trust that the internship experience will expose our students to the firm’s organization, its checks and balances, operating costs, design control, production, and completion of the project. Further and when feasible, that the student-intern may be permitted to “sit-in” on conferences between architects and clients as well as contractors and subcontractors to gain a broader understanding of the total scope of the architectural profession. It is anticipated that the student-intern will be assigned to various projects that vary in size, type, and responsibility. Where practicable, the student-intern should be involved in programming, schematics, preliminary design, design development, and cost breakdown, the bidding procedure and construction administration. The student-intern is expected to be a productive member of the firm during the period of employment and thus benefit from the opportunity of working in an environment different from the academic experience, and gain professional experience. Fall 2007 Bozeman, MT (1) Spring 2008 Big Sky, MT (1) Bozeman, MT (1) San Francisco, CA (1) Philadelphia, PA (1) Mike SOmmerfeld Bethesda, MD (1) Fall 2008 No students out on internships Spring 2009 Bozeman, MT (1) Great Falls, MT (1) Seattle, WA (1) Denver, CO (1) Fall 2009 Anchorage , AK (2) Mongolia (1) Spring 2010 New York City, New York (1) Bozeman, MT (1) Hartford, CT (1)

Fall 2010 Billings, MT (2) London, England (2) Regina, Canada (1) Spring 2011 Bozeman, MT (1) Solana Beach, CA (1) Fall 2011 Billings, MT (1) Bozeman, MT (1) Casper, WY (1) Breckenridge, CO (1) Rio De Janerio, Brazil (1) Spring 2012 New York City, New York (1) Washington D.C. (1) Boulder, CO (1) Fairbanks, AK Chengdu, China (1) Berlin, Germany (1) Summer 2012 Portland, OR (1) Minneapolis, MN (1) Salt Lake City, UT (1)

Cuzco, Peru (1) Rome, Italy (1) Fall 2012 San Jose, CA (1) Berlin, Germany (1)


Student Scholarships

School of Architecture

Students are required to submit a general application form that qualifies them for all applicable scholarships (some scholarships require financial need or are limited to a specific studio year). In some instances, such as the AIA Montana and the Wood Prize, recommendations are made by individuals outside of the School of Architecture. The Scholarship Committee reviews all applicants and makes a recommendation to the faculty and director. Since the last accreditation visit a total of 214 Scholarships or Design Competition awards have been made totaling $161,250. One hundred forty-five different students have received these awards (a number of students have received more than one scholarship during their five years in the program). Of this total, 125 scholarship/awards have been awarded to male students (56%) and 89 have been awarded to women students (44%). Of the total dollar amount $89,725 has been awarded to male students (58%) and $71,525 has been awarded to women students (42%). Similarly the School awards the AIA Henry Adams Medal and Certificate, the AIA Henry Adams Certificate and the Alpha Rho Chi Medal to the top students in the graduating fifth year class. Since the last accreditation visit 8 of these 21 awards have been awarded to women students (38%). The breakdown between each award is as follows: AIA Henry Adams Medal and Certificate, 5 have been awarded to women students, 71% of the Medals awarded; AIA Henry Adams Certificate, 2 have been awarded to women students, 25% of the Certificates awarded; Alpha Rho Chi Meda one was awarded 15% of ARC medals awarded . The complete list of students that have received scholarships and awards is included in Appendix 5.14.


ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS

Dean Harold C. RosĂŠ Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 Shauntel Nelson $750 2009-10 Steve Berkes $750 2010-11 Kate Tillman Sam Irons $400 Terra Morgan $300 2011-12 Taylor Klinkel $750 2012-13 Zoya Utengova $750 Hugo Eck Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 Ian McNairy $1000 2009-10 Sten Witmer $600 2010-11 Phil White $900 2011-12 -2012-13 Evan Burnett Shirlie White Scholarship 2008-09 Clayton Cross $750 2009-10 Dustin Cantwill $500 2010-11 -2011-12 Casey Butler $1000 2012-13 -Mary Elizabeth McClure Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 Dean Soderberg $1000 2009-10 -2010-11 David Carron $1100 2011-12 -2012-13 Jake deNeui $600 Lowell W. and Mary Springer Scholarship 2008-09 Jarrod Greenwood Chris Hancock 2009-10 Daniel Carr 2010-11 Tanner Skelton $1300 2011-12 Scott Miller $900 2012-13 Bucko Slabaugh Bergum Architectural Design Award 2008-09 Yuki Fujii $2000 2009-10 Chris Hodgson $1500 Janay Schneider 2010-11 Danielle Farebrother $1500 2011-12 An Lan Taylor Sollbert 2012-13 Saya Utegenova

Hurlbert C. & Myrtle H. Cheever Scholarship 2008-09 Justina Hohmann $1200 2009-10 Joe Broders $500 2010-11 Danielle Cloutier $1000 Kevin Heaniy $1000 Jaron Mickilio $1000 2011-12 Parker Handyside $750 2012-13 Phil White $500 Robert Rea Esgar Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 Shane Wallace $1500 2009-10 Jordan Leppert $750 2010-11 Erin Chamberlin $1300 2011-12 William Zanoni $900 2012-13 Britni Jeziorski $850 Roscoe Hope Ackerly Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 Jimmie Blair $1000 Jackie Little $1000 Josh Nelson $1000 2009-10 Maryanne Hanson $1200 Brent Huntley $1200 Charlie Langford $1200 Tyler Tabbish $1200 2010-11 Courtney Reynolds $1000 2011-12 Kelsey Ward $1500 2012-13 Kate Tillman $1100 Dowling Scholarship 2008-09 Sean Neill 2009-10 Brian Sullivan $500 2010-11 Joe Procunier $800 2011-12 -2012-13 Andrea Tonc $500 Integrus Architecture Scholarship 2008-09 Chris Sjoberg 2009-10 Darian Rauschendorfer $1500 2010-11 Jake deNeui $1500 2011-12 Matthew Muir $1500 2012-13 Nichole Casebeer $1800 Jon R. Jurgens Scholarship 2008-09 Jason Stamp 2009-10 Mike Williams 2010-11 Mike Williams $1500 2011-12 Phil White $1500 2012-13 Britni Jeziorski $1400


Locati Scholarship 2008-09 Nick Diggins $3000 2009-10 Matt Sedor $3000 2010-11 Kara Johnson $3000 2011-12 Brent Huntley $4000 2012-13 Tyler Swingle $3000 Pamela J. Hill Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 Christine Anderson Megan Evans 2009-10 Shelby Hinchliff $1500 2010-11 Maryanne Hanson $1400 2011-12 Kara Johnson $1200 2012-13 Kelsey Ward $2000 Woods Prize 2008-09 Brian Johnson $4500 2009-10 Erin Chamberlin $3000 2010-11 Holly Mumford $3500 2011-12 Benjamin Larson $3500 2012-13 Theresa Lindenau $3500 Robert C. Utzinger Scholarship 2008-09 Jonathan Kitchens $1000 Todd Lampinen $1000 Raluca Vandergrift $1000 2009-10 Chris Hancock $500 Holly Mumford $500 Jason Stamp $500 2010-11 -2011-12 -2012-13 Patrick Edwards $700 Ivan L. Leigland Memorial Scholarship 2008-09 -2009-10 Kathryn Cheetham $1000 2010-11 Sarah Mackie $600 2011-12 -2012-13 Derek Stevens $400 Gutterson Foreign Study Scholarship 2008-09 Heather Archer $1000 2009-10 Kyla Salisbury $1500 Chris Sjoberg $1500 2010-11 Kathryn Cheetham $1500 Parker Handyside $1500 2011-12 David Carron $1000

Sarah Mackie $1000 Heidi Rodgers $1000 2012-13 Victoria Bull $500 Sam Irons $500 Agnes Pohl $500 Jamie Smith $500 Doerstling Excellence Scholarship 2008-09 -2009-10 -2010-11 William Zanoni $1000 2011-12 Milenka Jirasko $1800 2012-13 --

ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIPS

Leadership for the Profession 2008-09 Emily VanCourt $1200 2009-10 Dean Soderberg $1500 2010-11 Darian Rauschendorfer $1500 2011-12 Kathryn Cheetham $1500 2012-13 Elizabeth Schmiesing $1500 Architectural Society of Helena Scholarship 2008-09 Anthony Overbeeke $1000 2009-10 Kyla Salisbury $1000 2010-11 Kelsey Joronen $1000 2011-12 Jake deNeui $1000 2012-13 Seth Young $1000 Billings Architectural Association Scholarship 2008-09 John Atkinson 2009-10 Lindsay Robb 2010-11 Katie Forster 2011-12 Britni Jeziorski 2012-13 Hannah Stroebe Kasey Welles Columbia Paint Company Scholarship 2008-09 Luncinda Williams ($750) Thompson Limanek


Crossman-Whitney-Griffin 2008-09 Joe Broders Shelby Hinchliff 2009-10 Ian McNairy 2010-11 Sten Witmer 2011-12 Kluane Weibel $1000 2012-13 Phil White $1500 AIA Montana Chapter Scholarships (includes National AIA contributions) 2008-09 Nick Diggins $2000 Jeff Evans $1000 Justina Hohmann $1000 Dan Hudson $1000 Jordan Leippert $1000 Jaron Mickolio $1000 Heber Slabbert $1000 2009-10 Nick Diggins $1000 Katie Forster $1000 Yuki Fujii $1000 Shelby Hinchliff $1000 2010-11 Kathryn Cheetham $500 Matthew Muir $1000 Darian Rauschendorfer $1000 2011-12 Morgan Andenas $1000 Loius Brookie $1000 Kathryn Seifert $500 2012-13 Nichole Casebeer $1500 Andrea Duroux $750 Tyler Swingle $750 Montana State University AIAS Scholarship 2008-09 Daniel Cloutier Jarrod Greenwood Chris Herlihy Shelby Hinchliff Kari Kraske Todd Lampinen Chelsie Lough Ian McNairy Courtney Schuler Lauren Sherman-Boemaker Michael Williams Derek Wintermonte 2009-10 James Blair Joe Borders Daniel Carr

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

Clayton Cross Danielle Farebrother Yuki Fujii Chris Gorder Jarrod Greenwood Edward Hammer Logan Kato Todd Lampinen Tracy Longsdorf Heber Slabbert Adelina Tahiri Michael Willaims Paul Britvar $500 Steve Clark $500 Michael Guilano $500 Andrea Pierce $500 Lindsay Robb $500 Tanner Sketlon $500 Brandon Watts $500 Phil White $500 Derek Wintermote $500 Jeremy Wussow $500 Brandon Watts $500 Phil White $500 Derek Wintermote $500 Jeremy Wussow $500 Nichole Casebeer $500 Steve Clark $500 Ethan Davis $500 Andrea Duroux $500 Kirby Hancock $500 Charlie Langford $500 Cydney Means $500 Joshua Mollenkamp $500 Maarika Rang $500 Jeremy Wussow $500 Seth Young $500 Victoria Bull $500 Casey Butler $500 Miranda Clark $500 Scott Lawhead $500 Agnes Pohl $500 Elizabeth Schmiesing $500 Jamie Smith $500 Kalina Vander Poel $500 Jeremy Wussow $500


Timberweld Scholarships 2008-09 Justina Hohmann 2009-10 Todd Lampinen 2010-11 Joe Broders CTA Architects & Engineers Scholarship 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 President’s Fine Arts Series Scholarship (Awarded through the Dean’s office not SoA) 2008-09 Jake Ostind Mosaic Scholarship (Formerly DT Architecture Scholarship) 2008-09 Mike Engel 2009-10 Jarrod Greenwood 2010-11 Jonathan Weber 2011-12 Wesley Ballantyne 2012-13 Milenka Jirosko

DESIGN COMPETITION SCHOLARSHIPS

Pella Windows & Doors Competition 2008-09 Mike Levison $400 Kyla Salisbury $400 Chris Sjoberg $400 2009-10 Parker Handyside $500 Matthew Muir $400 Scott Freimuth $300 2010-11 Heidi Rogers $500 Steve Clark $400 Jack Oldham $300 2011-12 Lee Allen $500 Sam Irons $400 Nichole Casebeer $300 2012-13 Montana State Bricklayers Conference Scholarship 2008-09 Jason Stamp $500 2009-10 Michael Willaims $500

2010-11 -2011-12 James Harris $500 2012-13 -AIA Henry Adams Medal and Certificate 2007-08 Heather Schroeder 2008-09 Meaghan Evans 2009-10 Christopher Hancock 2010-11 Joe Broders 2011-12 Erin Chamberlin Ian McNairy 2012-13 AIA Henry Adams Certificate 2007-08 Alexander Lewton 2008-09 Tyler Fulton 2009-10 Nathan Shaw 2010-11 Philip Ballard 2011-12 Edward Hammer Jennifer Kleckner 2012-13 Alpha Rho Chi Medal 2007-08 Jobe Bernier 2008-09 Sarah Berwald 2009-10 Nick Diggins 2010-11 Robert Remark 2011-12 Darian Rauschendorfer 2012-13 Dan Man 2007-08 Travis Spahr 2008-09 Matthew Breest 2009-10 Nick Diggins 2010-11 Tymer Tilton 2011-12 Ryan Walters 2012-13 Tau Sigma Delta Bronze Award 2007-08 Kate Boland 2008-09 Matthew Breest 2009-10 Christopher Hancock 2010-11 Jason Stamp 2011-12 Cameron Walker 2012-13


ARCC King Medal 2007-08 n/a 2008-09 n/a 2009-10 Chris Sjoberg (UG) 2010-11 Joe Procunier 2011-12 Erin Chamberlin 2012-13 Best 590 (plan A) 2007-08 1st Jobe Bernier 2nd Kate Boland 3rd Alexander Lewton 2008-09 1st Matthew Breest 2nd Dylan McQuinn 3rd Meaghan Evans 2009-10 1st Jordan Leppert 2nd Nick Diggins 3rd Adelina Tahiri 2010-11 1st Joe Broders 2nd Jason Stamp 3rd Robert Remark 2011-12 n/a 2012-13 n/a Best 558 (plan B) 2007-08 1st Evan Jacobsen 2nd Chad Willis 3rd Allison Vaserella 2008-09 1st Dawn Carlton 2nd Aaron Overstreet 3rd Ian Burgess 2009-10 1st Elissa Jones 2nd Patrick Fava 3rd Jeffry Evans 2010-11 1st Tymer Tilton 2nd Jaron Mickolio 3rd Kyla Salisbury 2011-12 1st Agatha Frisbee 2nd Sten Witmer 3rd Kathryn Cheetham 2012-13 Christie (Endowment to the University-used to be awarded by Dean’s office) 2008-09 Jarrod Greenwood $1000 Andrea Orr $1000

2009-10 -2010-11 Milenka Jirasko $1000 Tanner Skelton $1000 Brandon Watts $1000 Kluane Weibel $1000 2011-12 Paul Britvar $2000 Daniel Torres $1000 Nathan Ziegler $1000 2012-13 Metal Association 2008-09 Jordan Leppert KKE 2008-09 Marit Leuth 2009-10 Jolene Dale 2010-11 Janay Schneider 2011-12 Shauntel Nelson 2012-13 Heidi Rogers Unico 2008-09 Becky Patton Cloninger 2009-10 Suzanna Peters Crennan 2008-09 Adam Zetterquist 2009-10 Nick Diggins 2010-11 Darian Rauschendorfer 2011-12 Kathryn Seifert $600 2012-13 Anderson Masonry 2009-10 Matt Aune $2500 Danny Hudson $1300 Chelsie Lough $1100 Courtney Schuler $1,050 Jordan Burbach $1050 2010-11 -- 2011-12 Victoria Bull $2500 2012-13 Derek Stevens $1000 Kalina Vander Poel $750 Robert Wotzak $750


Great Falls Association of Architects 2009-10 Charlie Langford George Wheeler 2010-11 Tyson Kraft Charlie Langford Andrew Stucker 2011-12 Eric Haffeman Andrew Stucker Chris Taleff 2012-13 Eric Haffeman Tyler Mortenson Derek Tice Davidson 2009-10 Michael Spencer 2010-11 Charlie Langford 2011-12 Rhys Anderson $2000 2012-13 Sam Harris $2000 Sweet Onion 2009-10 Nick Diggins Acker 2011-12 Tyler MacNeal 2012-13 Morgan Hoof CAA Parent (Awarded through Dean’s office not SoA) 2011-12 Holly Mumford Griffin 2011-12 Jonathan Weber Second year 2012-13 Alexander Dalzell $125 Adytia Dasgrupta $25 Scott Lawhead $50 Mitch Robinson $75 Dustin Talbert $100

Faculty Heath (Tad) Bradley Assistant Teaching Professor Montana State University M.ARCH; Montana State University B.A. Environmental Design Pravin Bhiwapurkar Assistant Professor Illinois Institute of Technology Ph.D; School of Planning & Architecture M.BEM; School of Planning & Architecture B.ARCH John Brittingham Professor Harvard University M.ARCH; Bowdin College B.A. of Art History Bill Clinton Instructor Michael Everts Associate Professor Columbia University M.S Architecture & Urban Design; UT Austin B.ARCH David Fortin Assistant Professor University of Calgary M.ARCH; University of Saskatchewan B.A. Architecture Jessica Jellison Instructor Montana State University M.ARCH; Montana State University B.A. Environmental Design Ralph Johnson Professor Columbia University M.S. Architecture and Urban Design; University of Kansas B.ARCH Ferdinand Johns Professor Emeritus Columbia University Master of Science, Architecture and Urban Design University of Virginia Bachelor of Architecture;Hampden-Sydney College Bachelor of Arts


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School of Architecture Steve Juroszek Interim Director/ Professor University of Washington M. ARCH; Montana State University B.ARCH Zuzanna Karczewska Assistant Professor Cornell University M.ARCH; New Jersey Institute of Technology B.ARCH Peter Kommers Professor Emeritus University of Oregon M.ARCH; Montana State University B.ARCH Chere LeClair Associate Teaching Professor University of Pennsylvania M.ARCH; Montana State University B.ARCH Christopher Livingston Associate Professor University of Texas at Austin M.ARCH; Montana State University B.ARCH Tom McNab Associate Teaching Professor University of Oregon B.ARCH Barry Newton Teaching Professor Thames Polytechnic Dipl. of Architecture Maire O’Neill Associate Professor Montana State University, D.ED; University of California, Berkeley M.ARCH; University of California, Berkeley B.A.. Environmental Design Mike Patterson Instructor Montana State University M.ARCH; Montana State University; B.A. Environmental Design

Bill Rea Teaching Professor Montana State University M.ARCH; Montana State University B.ARCH Fatih Rifki Professor University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Ph.D.; University of Oregon M.ARCH; American University of Beirut B.ARCH Lindsay Schack Instructor Montana State University B.ARCH Jack Smith Teaching Professor University of Hawaii D.ARCH FAIA, Fellow, College of Fellows, American Institute of Architects Henry Sorenson Professor University of Florida M.ARCH; University of Florida B.ARCH Bradford Watson Professor Cranbrook Academy of Art M.Arch; Pennsylvania State University B.A. Architecture Dan Wise Adjunct Assistant Professor Montana State University B.S. Tom Wood Professor University of Colorado M.ARCH; University of Michigan B.ARCH Bruce Wrightsman Assistant Professor University of Texas at Austin M.ARCH; Kansas State University B.ARCH


Residential Codes Illustrated: A Guide to Understanding the 2009 International Residential Code, by Steven R Winkel, David S. Collins and Steven P. Juroszek with Francis K.K. Ching Series Advisor, 2010. Barry Newton 2012 AIA Northwest Pacific Region Student Honor Award Dungeness Spit Hospice Michael Guiliano, student 2012 William Turnbull Drylands Competition Juried Exhibition Máire O’Neill Grand Canyon: Enchantment and Poetics, Rim to Berkeley Undergraduate prize for Architectural River Design Excellence Agatha Frisby, student Recipient of Berkeley Prize Traveling Fellowship Kali Jirasko, student 2012 William Turnbull Drylands Competition Juried Exhibition Berkeley Undergraduate prize for Architectural Desert View Village Design Excellence Tyson Kraft, student Semi-finalist Britni Jeziorski 2012 William Turnbull Drylands Competition Juried Exhibition 2012 Charles E. Peterson Prize (HABS/HAER/HALS) “Main Rendering for the Competition Board” Honorable Mention - HABS documentation of the Best of Category - Graduate Design Image Patterson Homestead in Bozeman Jake Weldon, student Agatha Frisby Mike Everts 2012 Charles E. Peterson Prize (HABS/HAER/HALS) 2011 NCARB Honorable Mention - HABS documentation of the Honorable Mention - “The Next Generation of Patterson Homestead in Bozeman Mountain Architecture” Samuel Marinez 2008 AIA Seattle “What is Green: Design Award for the MSU Master Christopher Livingston 2010 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Plan.” Best of Category - Faculty Observation Image Co-recipient Professor Emeritus Ferdinand Johns “Sketchbook - France 2008” David Fortin Architecture and Science-Fiction Film: Phillip K. Dick Henry Sorenson 2008 AIA AAF Photography Competition and the Spectacle of Home Special Commendation published by Ashgate Publishing Company, 2011 “Stained Light” Steven Juroszek 2011 AIA AAF Photography Competition Design Drawing (second edition), by Francis D.K. Second Place Ching with Steven P. Juroszek, “Celestial Stairway” published by John Wiley & Sons, 2010. John Brittingham 2012 William Turnbull Drylands Competition Juried Exhibition Graudate Studio Group Project Students: Agatha Frisby, HOlly Mumford, Darian Rauschendorfer, Scott Freimuth, Tyson Kraft, Amy Swinger, Charlie Langford, Jake Weldon, Sten Witmer, Thompson Limanek, William Zanoni, Stephani Johnson,


Awards 2011 AIA AAF Photography Competition Judges Special Commendation “Classic Wagon Wheel Rance House” 2010 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Dennis Allain Juror’s Award “Tait Hotel” 2010 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Thomas Schaller Juror’s Award “Cusco Casita” 2010 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Faculty Design Image “Yellowstone Chimney” Architecture in Perspective 25 Award of Excellence “Studio Retreat” Dawn Carlton, student Architecture in Perspective 25 Student Award of Merit “General Plan for a Contemporary Catholic Temple” Daliya Safiulliana, student 2010 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Best of Category - Graduate Observation Image “Story Mansion Stair” Daliya Safiullina 2010 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Best of Category - Graduate Design Image “Architectural Exploration” Brock Spain 2012 DCA Juried Design Communication Association Best of Category - Undergraduate Observation Image “Observation Drawing Final” Eleanor Reinhard Bruce Wrightsman 2010 AIA Montana Honor Award for Design Hyalite Pavilion 2012 Montana Excellence in Masonry Honor Award as the architect Hyalite Pavilion

School of Architecture

2012 Montana Excellence in Masonry Honor Award as the Masonry Contractor Hyalite Pavilion co-recipient with Anderson Masonry 2010 AIA South Carolina Honor Award in Green Design House at Buffalo View Ranch, Missouri co-recipient with Alan Purvis 2010 AIA South Carolina Robert Mills Residential Design Honor Award House at Buffalo View Ranch, Missouri co-recipient with Alan Purvis


References

School of Architecture

Abstract Eadweard Muybridge – woman jumping: http://sealmaiden.tumblr.com/post/279932931/eadweard-j-muybridge-woman-jumping-running Abstract Eadweard Muybridge – bird flying: http://www.mutualart.com/Artwork/Bird-in-flight--and-Cat-leaping/2C24FC37CC715AA4 Clay, Robert. Beautiful Thing: An Introduction to Design. Oxford: Berg, 2009. Print. DCA Juried Design Communication Exhibition: http://www.arch.montana.edu/pages/outreach/outreach_local.php HATCH Festival Lounge (Bozeman, MT): http://www.montana.edu/cpa/news/nwview.php?article=10369 Hyalite Pavilion (Hyalite Reservoir, MT): http://www.montana.edu/cpa/news/nwview.php?article=8673 Ice Climbing Tower (Bozeman, MT): http://bozemanicetower.wordpress.com Straw Bale Housing (Kenya): http://www.montana.edu/cpa/news/nwview.php?article=10652 Khumbu Climbing School (Phortse, Nepal): http://www.arch.montana.edu/khumbu Ping Pong Pavilion (Oxford, England): playfulpavilion2012.blogspot.com Sustainable Community Development (Morocco): http://www.montana.edu/international/studyabroad/summer_programs/ morocco.htm Vegetable Washing Station (Bozeman, MT): http://www.montana.edu/cpa/news/nwview.php?article=11364


Quick Facts

School of Architecture

GENDER STUDY - FEMALES WITHIN CLASS TO CLASS SIZE COMPARISON 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Program Entrance Class Size 66 90 89 89 91 51 64 Amount of Females Within Class 25 21 25 30 32 17 22 Graduation Class Size 54 68 64 53 * * * Amount of Females Within Class 21 14 15 18 * * * STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO Undergrad Studio 13 to 1 STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO Graduate Studio 12 to 1 OPTION STUDIO CHOICE COMPARISON SESSION ROME INTERNSHIP CDC REMOTE STUDIO 13 4 summer 2011 fall 2011 5 16 spring 2012 4 18 On average 40-50% of Montana State University’s School of Architecture students will go abroad before completetion of the program. * Have not graduated yet.


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Montana State University College of Arts & Architecture Visit http://art.montana.edu/ for more information.

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