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montanan THE MAGAZINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA | Cover_ecfinal.indd 1

UM ART A peek inside a hidden collection

WINTER 2008

1/7/08 11:41:43 AM


Winter 2008 Volume 25 Number 1

PUBLISHER

Rita Munzenrider ’83

EDITOR-in-chief

Brianne Burrowes ’07

DESIGNER

PHOTO editor

contents

Eileen Chontos Todd Goodrich ’88

EDITORIAL TEAM Brenda Day ’95 Cary Shimek Patia Stephens ’00, M.F.A. ’07

CONTRIBUTING

EDITORS

ADVISORY BOARD

Betsy Holmquist ’67, M.A. ’83 Kathie Nygaard ’68, M.A. ’87

Meg Oliver Basinger ’93 Laura Brehm Denise Dowling ’82 Jim Foley Daryl Gadbow ’75 Bill Johnston ’79, M.P.A. ’91 Jed Liston ’82, M.Ed. ’00 Ginny Merriam ’86 Don Oliver ’58 Carol Williams ’65 Kurt Wilson ’83

Lowell Hanson

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

EDITORIAL OFFICES

University Relations 325 Brantly Hall The University of Montana Missoula, MT 59812-7642 406-243-2488 www.umt.edu/Montanan themontanan@umontana.edu Volun tary Sub scription:

$15

The Montanan is published three times a year by The University of Montana for its alumni and friends. Ch ang e of address: 877-UM-ALUMS or support@UMontanaAlumni.org

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Contents image cour tesy of UM’s Mont ana Museum of Ar t & Cul ture; Fra Dana, On the Wind ow Seat , oil on canv as, n.d., 16” x 19”, dona ted by Fra Dana

On the Window Seat, an oil painting on canvas by Fra Dana, is only one of 10,000 pieces in the Montana Museum of Art & Culture’s Permanent Collection at UM.

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ts

FEATURES T he State’s Hidden Treasure: UM Seeks Home for Permanent Collection 15

15

By Ginny Merriam More than 10,000 pieces of art valued at $17 million will soon find a permanent home at UM. 20

Young and Restless at UM

By Paddy MacDonald Alum Eric Braeden conquers the world of soap operas on CBS’ The Young and the Restless. 24

20

From Campus to Combat

By Alex Strickland A tale of three UM soldiers, including one man who has been to Iraq, one who is there now, and another who is about to leave for war

DEPARTMENTS 3 5 30 33

24

35 48

Letters Around the Oval Bookshelf UM Foundation About Alumni Artifacts

ON THE COVER: The Teepee Burner, located between Jeannette Rankin Hall and the University Center, frames Main Hall. Created by John Vichorek in 1970, the sculpture is made of welded steel and is part of UM’s Permanent Collection of art. Pho to by Erik Stenbakk en

www.umt.edu/montanan

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Mo n ta n a n w inter 2008 |



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1/7/08 11:53:37 AM


We have set a goal of marching at least 100 members in the Alumni Marching Band for Homecoming 2008. The Alumni Jazz Band, too, hopes to have the greatest ever turnout of former UM jazzers here in September!

A CHANGE OF PLACE

UM Alumni Band Organizing Committee

John Kafentzis ’75

Tom Cook, Chair,

Missoula

PHOTO BY TODD GOODRICH

YEARNING FOR UM

A fall 2007 view of the M from the University District; A previous photo taken from the same angle, only during summer, ran in the fall 2007 issue of the Montanan.

WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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MARCHING TO A GOAL

The University of Montana Alumni Band will celebrate its twentieth anniversary in fall 2008. Who was to know that, when a small group of us sat down together in 1987 to discuss the possibility of creating just such an organization, it would evolve into what it is today, let alone what it promises to become tomorrow? One of our greatest challenges is to be in contact with all those who have ever played in a UM band, whether a concert, jazz, marching, or even pep band! We’ve tried hard to create a mailing list that is as accurate and complete as possible. And yet, we know we’re missing reaching a number of important alums who would probably love to come together with the rest of us to renew old friendships and acquaintances, to reminisce about their days in the UM Bands, and to make music together again. We do have a wonderful time each and every Homecoming! So, if anyone reading this letter is one of those not on our list and wants to receive our newsletters and other organizational information, please contact me. We want everyone on our list, and no one should feel slighted. As far as we’re concerned, the more the merrier! What we need is the name, mailing address, e-mail address, and phone number of each interested party.

letters

I just received your fall issue and was tremendously impressed with both the content and the size of the publication. Your “Coming Home” feature was especially interesting to me and brought on a swell of homesickness and nostalgia. I was astonished at the tree-lined street shown on page sixteen. I’d love to see it. Unfortunately, at age eighty-three and enjoying certain limitations in my activities, I’ll never make it back there. Best wishes and congratulations on your great work. Wallace Danielson ’50

via e-mail DON’T FORGET ABOUT US

Each issue of the Montanan lifts my spirits as I read through the pages, look at the ads, and see the changes in both the University and surrounding community. It has been many, many issues (years) since the School of Social Work received any “Top Billing” in the magazine. My time there was very special, and the course work, my professors, the support staff, and my peers, all worked to provide me with the tools for my working life. I have been a state of Florida employee since 1992. I worked in foster care as a counselor and then as an investigator for four years. I have been a probation officer with the Department of Corrections since 1996, both in the institution setting and now in the community. I will continue to read the issues, looking longingly at all the photos of mountains, snow, and fall colors, and I hope to see my department highlighted.

I always enjoy your archive photos. However, there is an error in the cutline of the photo of the marching band practicing at Dornblaser. The field was where the Mansfield Library now sits. The scoreboard was in front of the discus-thrower at the men’s gym. via e-mail HOME SWEET HOME

The Montanan featured an article showing our old family home, which had been beautifully restored at 231 South Fifth East. My grandfather, Claude Otto Marcyes, and my grandmother, Estelle Miller Marcyes, purchased the home sometime in the 1920s. I grew up in that beautiful old house. Over the years, the family rented rooms to many University students. Fall was always a nostalgic time, with the beautiful leaf changes, the smell of burning leaves, and the town getting ready for UM’s Homecoming. Thanks for the memories. Stewart L. Maggee ’60

Atlanta, GA

WANTED: YOUR OPINIONS

The Montanan welcomes letters to the editor. Please sign and include your graduating year or years of attendance, home address, and phone number or e-mail address.

Send them to: Montanan Editor, 325 Brantly Hall, Missoula, MT 59812 or themontanan@umontana.edu.

Because of space limitations, we are not able to include all letters sent to us. Letters may be edited for length or clarity. While universities are places of discussion where good people do not always agree, letters deemed potentially libelous or that malign a person or group will not be published. Opinions expressed in the Montanan do not necessarily reflect those of The University of Montana.

Barbara A. LaMont ’92

Lehigh Acres, FL MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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Summer Semester at The University of Montana

Educate the Mind. Elevate the Spirit.

Reach higher.

Reach for Continuing Education at The University of Montana. A Higher Degree of Opportunity and Flexibility Put yourself in Missoula this summer, virtually or literally, with our great mix of online and 4-day-a-week on-campus classes. Earn those needed credits in the style that fits with your summer plans. To learn more, visit us at montanasummer.umt.edu or call 406-243-4470.

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Continuing Education offers educational opportunities for all seasons. UM offers courses to assist you as you begin your academic career or pursue a new profession, advance your existing career, meet degree requirements, or continue your lifelong learning. For more information about UM Continuing Education’s programs for all seasons, visit our website at www.umt.edu/ce or telephone 406-243-6419.

1/7/08 11:56:57 AM


NOTABLES | PRESIDENT‘S CORNER | BY THE NUMBERS | GRIZ NATION

around the oval

JAMES TAYLOR: SEPP JANNOTTA/MISSOULIAN; OTHER PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

Campus Hosts Prestigious Guests UM

is often referred to as the “Harvard of the West,” and judging by the prestigious visitors campus hosted fall semester, it’s easy to see why. September saw UM visits by Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.; the family of the late Joseph Stanley Kimmitt, former secretary of the U.S. Senate; and rock-and-roll superstar Elton John. In October UM hosted James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and James Taylor, legendary singer-songwriter. Edwards, former senator from North Carolina and John Kerry’s running mate on the Democratic ticket in the 2004 U.S. presidential election, made a brief campaign stop in Missoula September 4. Speaking to a crowd in the University Center Ballroom, he ran down his list of talking points—everything from the Iraq War (he wants to end it) to free college educations (he would make them available for students willing to work ten hours a week). Roberts was the fourth member of the U.S. Supreme Court to lecture in the School of Law’s Jones-Tamm Judicial Lecture Series WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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when he visited campus September 13 in the University Theatre. At the close of a long, hot Montana wildfire season, Roberts’ speech was inspired by the Norman MacLean book Young Men and Fire. He encouraged UM law students by comparing lawyers and firefighters, saying both were willing to fight difficult battles using their intelligence. Robert Kimmitt, U.S. deputy secretary of the treasury, and his brother Mark Kimmitt, U.S. deputy assistant secretary of defense, were joined at UM September 21 by three

September was a whirlwind month for campus when (clockwise from top left) iconic musician Elton John, Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards, U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., and legendary singer/songwriter James Taylor visited.

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around the oval

HOMECOMING

PHOTO OF BAND BY CARY SHIMEK; ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

The Montana Grizzlies received their fifteenth straight Homecoming win in a sold-out stadium September 29, when they beat the visiting Weber State Wildcats in an 18-10 victory.

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1/7/08 11:57:59 AM


PHOTO BY ERIK STENBAKKEN

The President’s Corner

A Walk Down Memory Lane

A

s the famous French novelist Alphonse Karr said, “The more things change, the more they are the same.” Just ask alumnus Don Oliver ’58, who created and produced a five-minute video segment on the University District as a companion to a sidebar he wrote for the fall 2007 issue of the Montanan. Oliver, who had a 30-year television news career with NBC, is recognizable as the narrator of the piece, which can be found on the video-sharing Web site YouTube. “Many university communities across the nation have deteriorated and are in disrepair,” Oliver says in the video. “But here in Missoula, strong leadership by caring owners has maintained the charm and integrity of the University District.” Since the video was posted in August, more than 2,000 viewers have logged on to watch it. The segment explores the past, present, and future of the University District with archived images and video of houses as they stand today. It can be viewed by going to http://www.youtube.com and searching “University of Montana district.”

PHOTO OF BAND BY CARY SHIMEK; ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

cont. from page 5

siblings—Mary Laxton, Jay Kimmitt, and Judy Rainey. Their father, Joseph Stanley Kimmitt, was a Lewistown native, UM alumnus, and Army colonel who served as secretary of the U.S. Senate during 1977-81—when Montana Sen. Mike Mansfield was majority leader. The family was on campus to announce the J. Stanley Kimmitt Public Service Lecture and Internship. Kimmitt, who died in 2004, is said to have considered himself “a gopher-shooting Montana boy at heart.” Elton John’s September 28 concert filled the Adams Center with 8,000 fans—many of them decked out in feathered boas, rhinestoneladen sunglasses, and similarly outrageous apparel. The pianist, singer, and songwriter put on a show befitting his legendary reputation, belting out No. 1 hits such as “Madman Across the Water,” “Yellow Brick Road,” “Bennie and the Jets,” and “Candle in the WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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Wind.” Sir Elton accepted an invitation from UM to return April 11, 2008, for an encore concert. James Hansen, called the “oracle of climate science,” spoke October 22 on “The Threat to the Planet: How Can We Avoid Dangerous Human-Made Climate Change?” As director of NASA’s Goddard Institute, Hansen has been a leader in the charge to acknowledge and fight global warming. Taking on the current administration, he said his goal was to uphold NASA’s mission “to understand and protect our home planet.” Folk rocker James Taylor had Montana on his mind when he played October 27 to a sold-out crowd in the Adams Center. A guitar on his lap, Taylor’s famously smooth voice filled the arena with old favorites such as “Sweet Baby James” and “Something in the Way She Moves.” How sweet it was, the Missoula crowd seemed to say.

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s I settle before the “infernal machine” to make a few comments for this issue of the Montanan, I think about a recent opportunity to peruse once again H.G. Merriam’s all too brief but highly readable book, The University of Montana: A History (1970). Among other events, Merriam recounts the experience of campus during the four major military conflicts involving the nation and the students and faculty of the University during its first three-quarters of a century. As he notes, the direct impact on campus differed, depending on the conflicts. But the commitment and dedication of the students and faculty to do all they could in their own ways in service to the University, state, and country persisted. Just so for the conflict in Iraq, as the interesting article by Alex Strickland indicates. Even considering the deeply held differences of opinion about the involvement and its likely outcome, the University community supports its members as they decide how to contribute. A University community by definition always supports its own, respecting individual choices. This issue focuses on a few alumni and their contributions to the University. Some have contributed by voluntarily placing themselves in harm’s way for the benefit of loved ones, friends, and community, as Strickland’s article demonstrates. Others have contributed through distinguished achievements in their chosen careers, as has Hans Gudegast, a.k.a. Eric Braeden, who attended The University of Montana in the late ’50s and early ’60s. Still others have done so through their support for various University projects and their willingness to donate time, energy, and valuable resources to assist the University. The Montana Museum of Art & Culture has amassed the largest collection of art between Minneapolis and Seattle because of these efforts, as Ginny Merriam notes in her fascinating story on our permanent art collection. As evidence of the critical importance of alumni contributions to any University, I will cite the institutional ranking developed recently by Washington Monthly. The approach relies on three critical categories: institutional contributions to social mobility, research, and service. The ranking for mobility takes account of the proportion of graduates who receive Pell grants because of financial need or are first-generation college students; for research, by the proportion of graduates who do advanced study and become scholars in their own right; and for service, by the number of those who graduate in ROTC or who enter the Peace Corps and other service-oriented agencies and institutions. Using this approach, UM currently ranks sixty-first among all colleges and universities in the country, up twenty points over last year’s ranking. In my view, the record will only improve with time.

George M. Dennison, ’62, ’63 President and Professor of History

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1/7/08 11:58:48 AM


around the oval A Tale Of Two Artists

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wo School of Fine Arts alumni— ceramicist/author/musician Beth Lo ’74 and composer/singer/actor David Simmons ’83—will be the featured guest artists this spring for UM’s School of Fine Arts eighth annual Odyssey of the Stars—A Celebration of Artistic Journeys. Scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 5, the event benefits the School of Fine Arts scholarship fund. Odyssey of the Stars showcases performing and visual arts alumni who have gone on to successful careers in the arts in concert with current UM students. Lo, a UM art professor, is a distinguished national and international contributor in the field of ceramics. Her pottery has been featured as the cover story in American Craft Magazine; at the Ceramics International Invitational in Beijing, China; and in a variety of exhibitions in Mexico, Taiwan, China, Germany, and major venues throughout the United States. Her art also has appeared in the Chinese Ceramic Newsletter, Contemporary Ceramics, Seattle’s International Examiner, and The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), and has been acquired by the Microsoft Corporation and Cheney Cowles Art Museum in Spokane, as well as by notable private collectors. Lo’s recently published children’s book, Mahjong All Day Long, earned her the 2006 National Marion Vannett Ridgeway Award and was designated a Montana Book Award “Honor Book.” In addition to Lo’s life as an artist, she leads another life as a musician. A member of the nationally recognized Big Sky Mudflaps, Lo will be joined on stage by this popular Montana band. An alumna of the UM

Beth Lo

Department of Art, she received a master of fine arts degree in ceramics. Simmons, an acclaimed singer with an electrifying baritone voice, is an artist who has worn many hats. A composer, playwright, and lyricist, he is an inspirational singer-songwriter whose recording credits include U*B*U, Yes I Can, and I Believe, all recorded with the U*B*U Band on the independent U*B*U Music/Joyful Records label. An internationally known musician and actor, his touring and performing experiences have included traveling to more than twenty countries on four continents. Simmons starred as Matthew in numerous regional productions and national tours of Harry Chapin’s bluegrass musical Cottonpatch Gospel. Simmons also has composed numerous soundtracks for the Minnesota Planetarium, short films, and children’s

David Simmons

musicals. For the past eight years, Simmons has served as coordinator of music and worship leader for the LivingWord Worship and services at Incarnation Lutheran Church in Shoreview, Minnesota. Simmons received a bachelor of music degree in vocal performance (cum laude) from UM. Odyssey 2008 spotlights students from the departments of Music and Drama/Dance, assisted by the Department of Media Arts and the Department of Art. For sponsorship and ticket information, call the School of Fine Arts Dean’s Office at 406-243-4971.

Meet Grizwald, The University of Montana’s cartoon bear. In each issue of the Montanan, we will provide a cartoon involving Grizwald in need of a caption. Then it’s up to you, our readers, to send in your most original and creative ideas. The winning contestant will receive a Griz stadium blanket. Send submissions to: themontanan@umontana.edu. Artwork by Neal Wiegert 8 | WINTER 2008 MONTANAN

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1/7/08 11:59:16 AM


PHOTO BY TODD GOODRICH

UM Professor Snares Share Of Nobel Peace Prize UM FORESTRY PROFESSOR STEVE RUNNING never dreamed his name and “Nobel Laureate” would be paired. But that changed October 12 when a Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Al Gore of An Inconvenient Truth fame and the authors of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. Since Running was lead author of a chapter about the ecological impacts of climate change on North America in the IPCC report, he snagged part of the prize for himself and UM. “This is such an unimaginable honor, and I’m just stunned,” Running says. “Nobody on the IPCC committee expected this award because a Nobel Peace Prize has never gone to a committee before.” The only other UM faculty member ever associated with the Nobel is Harold Urey (1893-1981), who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 for his discovery of heavy hydrogen, also called deuterium. Running was nominated by the U.S. government in May 2004 to help write the 2007 IPCC report. His U.S. working group author team then met with teams from the 180 IPCC member nations at meetings in Austria, Australia, Mexico, and South Africa over the next two and a half years. The final report, which presents strong evidence that humanity is artificially warming our world, was unveiled in Brussels in April 2007. The report is available online at http://www.ipcc.ch. Running directs the College of Forestry and Conservation’s Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, which has crafted software for NASA environmental satellites. He travels extensively nationwide to speak about climate change. In December he was promoted to Regents Professor. He contends combating climate change is the monumental task of our time. “We have no more time for arguing about petty details while huge climate changes occur before our eyes,” he says. “We need to get society to calmly acknowledge these climate facts and get to work.”

UM Ranks Among Best In Nation

WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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UM

“Nobody on the IPCC committee expected this award because a Nobel Peace Prize has never gone to a committee before.”

ranked sixty-first among all colleges and universities in the country, up twenty points from last year, in the 2007 Annual College Guide published by Washington Monthly magazine. It is the third annual college guide released by the magazine, which is based in Washington, D.C. The ranking system used for the guide includes several factors not given as much consideration in other universityranking systems, including national service, student social mobility, and research contributions. UM President George Dennison expressed support for the ranking approach, noting that it emphasizes social mobility for students through access to Pell grants; defines research not only in terms of dollar volume but also by the number and percentage of graduates who go on to advanced work in their disciplines; and includes service,

Nobel Laureate and UM Regents Professor of Forestry Steve Running delivers a lecture on campus in late November.

such as participation in the Peace Corps and ROTC and other forms of civic engagement. Paul Glastris, editor of the magazine, noted in a column that the magazine’s purpose in compiling the guide was to “focus on what colleges are doing for the country” rather than on what they do for individual students or faculty members. Rankings are based on how much a college or university “contributes to the higher good,” he wrote, adding that “nearly every challenge America now faces could be met in part by better harnessing the power of our colleges and universities.” Few other schools similar in size and mission ranked as high as UM. Oregon State University ranked seventy-fifth, the University of Wyoming ranked eighty-first, Washington State University ranked 127th, and Montana State University ranked 163rd. MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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Enrollment at UM

AN ARTIST’S ETCHINGS ON DISPLAY

13,858 $5,338

T

Total number of students attending UM in 2007

Cost of tuition and fees for an undergraduate resident in 2006-07

$16,031

Cost of tuition and fees for an undergraduate nonresident in 2006-07

135 2,840 3,774 45.8% vs. 54.2% Number of students enrolled in 1895

Total number of students enrolled in 1950

The total number of new students in 2007

Percentage of men versus the percentage of women who attend the University

90,262 7% 2,676

Number of living UM alumni in 2007

The percentage of all ethnic minorities attending UM in 2007

Total number of degrees awarded in the 2006-07 academic year

he Montana Museum of Art & Culture will exhibit thirty-five rare etchings created by the artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn. Sordid and Sacred: The Beggars in Rembrandt’s Etchings from the John Villarino Collection will be at the museum from March 11 to April 29, 2008. The etchings will be exhibited in the Meloy Gallery, located in UM’s Performing Arts and Radio/Television Center. The exhibition was organized by Landau Traveling Exhibitions to commemorate the 400th birthday of the seventeenth century Dutch painter, draftsman, and etcher who is considered one of the most skilled and beloved figures in the history of art. It includes etchings created by the master between 1629 and 1654. The museum also will feature Rembrandt’s etching The Persian (1632) from its Permanent Collection. Rembrandt is widely recognized as the greatest and most innovative practitioner of the etching technique of intaglio printmaking. He created 300 prints that constitute a body of work unparalleled in richness and beauty and was an inspiration for generations of printmakers. Rembrandt rendered the poor and underprivileged with the same empathy that he brought to his portraits and narrative subjects. In his etchings, the beggars are not disgraceful but rather individuals who demand a degree of respect. Beggars receiving alms at the door His profound sympathy for his subjects, of a house as well as the Christian notions common in seventeenth century Netherlands, motivated him to depict his beggars in Biblical scenes.

REMBRANDT, ETCHING, 1648. COURTESY OF THE MONTANA MUSEUM OF ART & CULTURE.

— — — — — — — — — — — — — -

PHOTO BY TODD GOODRICH

{ B Y

T H E

N U M B E R S }

around the oval

— Shiloh Akari

WHERE’S YOUR GRIZ BEEN?

M

ary Kay Kriley ’93 (left) and Casey Anne Kriley ’94 share their Griz pride in front of a statuette at the 2007 Primetime Emmys on September 16. “Casey was nominated for Project Runway as one of the producers. Her dad, UM media arts Professor Jim Kriley, took the photo. What a celebration!” Mary Kay Kriley writes. Congratulations, Kriley family. You’ve won a $50 gift card to The Bookstore at UM. Do you have a photo sporting your Griz gear in an amazing place? If so, send it along with a brief description to: themontanan@umontana.edu. Winners will receive a $50 gift card to The Bookstore at UM and see their winning photo published in the Montanan. To be considered, photos must be in focus with the UM or Griz logo clearly visible. 10 | WINTER 2008 MONTANAN

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1/7/08 12:00:26 PM


around the oval

GrizNation

GRIZ STARS SHINE DURING GREAT SEASON

PHOTO BY TODD GOODRICH

‘Up With Montana’ Now Available On Your Phone

PHOTO BY JAMES SNOOK

PHOTO BY TODD GOODRICH

REMBRANDT, ETCHING, 1648. COURTESY OF THE MONTANA MUSEUM OF ART & CULTURE.

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he scrappy Wofford College Terriers and a last-second field goal that went wide left—barely—ousted the Montana Grizzlies from the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs on November 24. But what a season they had. The 11-1 Griz went undefeated during the regular season for the first time since 1996. They beat the Bobcats in Bozeman 41-20. Coach Bobby Hauck was named Big Sky Coach of the Year. It was a season filled with stellar performances. Kroy Biermann, a senior defensive tackle from Hardin who wore scary Senior running back Lex red contact lenses, won UM’s first-ever Buck Buchanan Hilliard leaps over a award, given to the nation’s top FCS defensive player. teammate as an opponent During the season he tallied sixty-one tackles, fifteen tries to tackle him in sacks, five forced fumbles, two fumble recoveries, and the November 3 game one blocked field goal. He ranks second at UM for against Portland State. career sacks with thirty-two. Lex Hilliard, the senior running back from Kalispell who somehow rebounded from a devastating Achilles’ heel injury a year ago, ended his brilliant career with a school-record fifty-two total touchdowns and fifty rushing TDs. His 4,018 rushing yards were just fifty-two behind the school record set by Yohance Humphery during 1998-2001. Then there was Dan Carpenter, the senior kicker from Helena who definitely won’t be remembered for the last one that got away. He ended his career as the all-time kick-scorer in FCS history with 413 points. The previous record was held by another Griz kicker, Chris Snyder, who scored 394 points during 2000-03. Carpenter only missed four of the twenty-three field goals he attempted in 2007. His seventy-five career field goals are a national FCS record.

Working Overtime, Without A Game On The Line—Members of the

UM Grizzly men’s basketball team, along with head coach Wayne Tinkle, paint the M this fall. The basketball team last hiked up Mount Sentinel to lay down a fresh coat of paint in fall 2004. Assistant men’s basketball coach Andy Hill says the experience is a good team exercise that gives back to the community at the same time.

WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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Now your UM spirit can travel from the tummy of the Grizzly bear to your cell phone. “Up With Montana” is available as a ringtone through Verizon Wireless. To download, go to the “Get it Now” feature on your phone. Then select the free application, “Verizon Wireless Tones Deluxe.” Once connected, select “College Fight Songs” under the browse option. The cost is $2.99 for the download, which doesn’t expire as long as you have your phone.

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GrizNation

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well, as the Griz have three other freshman recruits, two with names familiar to Montana basketball. Derek Selvig, 6’ 10”, from Glendive, follows in the footsteps of his father, mother, aunt, and uncle, who all played for UM. And 6’ 5” Tyler Hurley from Anaconda follows his uncle to Grizzly basketball. Guard Zach Graves rounds out the freshman class. Tinkle and the Grizzlies never have to look far to see how success is achieved. Under the tutelage of twenty-nine-year veteran Lady Griz coach Robin Selvig, UM was named seventh on the list of all-time best women’s basketball programs by Street & Smith’s magazine, the bible of college hoops, in 2005. Selvig’s record is 672192 (.778) as a coach at Montana, and he ranks sixth in the nation

Senior guard Matt Martin (left) passes under pressure. Junior guard Mandy Morales (right) shoots a basket.

on the list of “Winningest Active Division I Coaches.” A native of Outlook, Montana, Selvig is well-known for finding success close to home by recruiting in the Treasure State. His current roster of fourteen features eleven players from Montana. Montana returns a seasoned squad with three seniors and a talented group of juniors. Topping the list is junior guard Mandy Morales, who was a Kodak/ WCBA honorable mention AllAmerican as a freshman and sophomore. She also is a Big Sky

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n his first year as Montana’s head coach, Wayne Tinkle led the Grizzly men’s basketball team to a 17-15 season, 10-6 in Big Sky Conference play. This year he’s looking to improve that record and move his team into some post-season play. This season Tinkle has an experienced team led by seniors Andrew Strait at center and Matt Martin at guard. Add in junior forwards Jordan Hasquet and Kyle Sharp, junior college transfers Ceylon Elgin-Taylor and Sean Watson, and the Grizzlies appear geared for a successful campaign. A talented group of sophomores led by guards Cameron Rundles and Ryan Staudacher add depth. True freshman Brian Qvale at 6’11” is already contributing as a big man inside for the Grizzlies. The future looks bright as

PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

MONTANA GRIZ, LADY GRIZ BASKETBALL GET ROLLING WITH TALENTED PLAYERS

Conference MVP, and one of eleven finalists for last year's Nancy Lieberman Award—which honors the nation’s top point guard. Start adding in all the other experienced talent on the team—forwards Britney Lohman, Johanna Closson, and Dana Conway; guards Laura Cote, Sonya Rogers, and Lauren Beck; and centers Tamara Guardipee and Shadra Robinson—and you have a team that could easily be playing in the NCAA tournament at season’s end.

If you’re someone who loves the Montanan, consider a $15 voluntary subscription. Those contributing $50 or more will receive a Montanan Wherever I Am cap. Maroon T-shirts also are available. Donations can be sent to Montanan Editor, 325 Brantly Hall, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812. You also may call 406-243-2523 and make a contribution via credit card. Thanks for your support.

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RemembeRed

Forever

Leave a lasting mark on the Oval by buying an engraved brick that helps support The University of Montana. Each $150 brick makes a great gift, memorial or tribute to UM alumni, students, classmates, family members and friends. For information, call 406-243-2523 or visit http://www. umt.edu/urelations/bricks.htm.

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T Sˇ° ˇ˙ ’˝

Hidden Treasure: UM Seeks Home for Permanent Collection

BY GINNY MERRIAM

I˜ ° ˛°˝˙ˆ˙˜ˇ ˘˜  ˇ  T U  M°˜° , Montana artist Fra Dana glows across the decades. Her auburn hair, drawn up on the back of her neck, reflects the leaves in the Montana landscape outside her window. Her blue cape flows around her as she absorbs the outside world from the newspaper in her hands.

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ana’s self-portrait oil painting On the Window Seat came to the University’s permanent art collection after she died in 1948. It’s one of the most famous works at UM, but few people see it because the collection has no home. Ten thousand works of art are spread among seven locations on and off campus, and some of them are on view on campus and around the state. But only one-half of 1 percent of them can be exhibited at any given time. The story astounds nearly all who hear it. Visionary collectors, artists, faculty members, and administrators began the collection 114 years ago, just a year after the University itself was founded. Today’s 10,000 pieces are valued at more than $17 million. They include Dana’s work and the work of her teachers—major painters such as Alfred Maurer—and much more. A Rembrandt etching from 1632 is stored alongside the contemporary works of pop artist Andy Warhol, Montana artist Henry Meloy’s modern forms, a Japanese print circa 1796, Rudy Autio’s bold ceramics, and Edgar Paxson’s 1904 oil painting Sacajawea. British painter John Brown, called the “Boot Black Raphael,” speaks to viewers from 1900 with his painting of a pinkcheeked boy, and a Spanish altar panel survives the fifteenth century with its circa1495 image of St. Gregory. “These are treasures,” says Barbara Koostra, director of the Montana Museum of Art & Culture, which houses and manages the collection and looks toward its future. “When I show examples of pieces in this collection, people’s jaws drop.” “People are stunned, universally stunned, when they see it,” says Jim Foley, University executive vice president. Museum curator and art historian Manuela Well-Off-Man knows the collection intimately, curating exhibits from it that are shown in the campus galleries and on tour. She loves to tell the stories. Take Dana’s self-portrait and her cascading blue cape. Then look at Alfred Maurer’s nearly life-size oil painting Gabrielle from 1900. Dana, though married to a Montana rancher, traveled and studied art in Europe and donated the works of her teachers along with her own paintings. The model Gabrielle, posing for Maurer around 1900, wears the same blue cape. “So Fra Dana not only purchased Alfred Maurer’s painting, she must have also talked him out of the cape,” Well-Off-Man says.

The Montana Museum of Art & Culture's Permanent Collection includes groups of treasures that have been donated throughout the years. These are just a few. • The Edgar Paxson Collection of Paintings and Memorabilia • The Fra Dana Collection of American Impressionism, including works by Alfred Maurer, William Merritt Chase, and Joseph Henry Sharp • The Henry Meloy Collection and Archive • The Bill and Polly Nordeen Collection, including works by Carl Bodmer, George Catlin, Eanger Irving Couse, Frederic Remington, and C.M. Russell • The Rudy Autio Contemporary Ceramic Collection • The Gilbert Millikan Collection, which spans 400 years of portrait art from around the world • The Helen Cappadocia Collection of Hmong Textiles

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Clockwise from top left:

Fra Dana, On the Window Seat, oil on canvas, n.d. 16" x 19", donated by Fra Dana; Russian Icon, fifteenth century, wood support and silver cover, 12" x 9.5"; Alfred Maurer, Gabrielle, oil on canvas, ca. 1900, 72" x 40", donated by Fra Dana; Henry Meloy, untitled, watercolor on paper, ca. 1948, on permanent loan to MMAC from the Henry Meloy Educational Trust; E.S. Paxson, Sacajawea, oil on canvas, 1904, 50" x 29".

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Well-Off-Man can go to a basement shelf and carefully unroll white preservation foam to show a 1930s child’s doll. Its perfect pretty face with porcelain complexion and red bow of lips are framed by a green hood. In the collection is also a 1936 Fra Dana painting, Portrait of Sally Chambliss. The girl Sally wears a green hood. Dana donated the painting. Years later, Sally Chambliss Turner, who grew up in Great Falls and now lives in Florida, came back to tell the story of visiting Dana in the Blackstone Apartments in Great Falls as a girl with her parents—and her doll—and having her portrait painted. She donated the doll. “That’s what makes a collection valuable,” Well-Off-Man says. “It’s not just how famous the painter was. It’s also the stories you have. And the value of the collection is in the relationships among them, too.” Well-Off-Man is one of hundreds of people in UM’s history who have nurtured the collection through its century. “Ever since 1894, it’s been such a legacy of giving,” Koostra says. “There were some very caring professionals and volunteers.”

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oday, under the umbrella of the UM President’s Office, the museum and the collection have stepped into a new phase. Koostra, the UM Foundation, and the museum’s board of advisors are raising $13.5 million for an endowment and a museum building, where the Permanent Collection will be the centerpiece. “The Permanent Collection belongs to all Montanans, in perpetuity,” Koostra says. “It’s my dearest hope that it’s the enduring quality of the collection that propels people to help.” Conceptual drawings and a program analysis developed by John Hilberry Museum Consulting of New York and A & E Architects of Missoula and Billings show a bright,

Opposite page: Well-Off-Man carefully adjusts Cow Wallpaper, a 1971 serigraph on wallpaper by Andy Warhol. The print was donated to the museum by UM President George Dennison and his wife, Jane.

“It’s not just how famous the painter was. It’s also the stories you have. And the value of the collection is in the relationships among them, too.”

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PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

Above: Manuela Well-Off-Man turns over a 1936 painting by Fra Dana titled Portrait of Sally Chambliss. Alongside is a doll donated to the museum by Sally Chambliss Turner, the subject of the painting.


state-of-the-art, 33,000-square-foot building set on the north edge of campus near the Van Buren Street footbridge and the Fitness and Recreation Center, where town meets gown. It will serve as a campus gateway and have space for exhibitions and educational programs and nearly 10,000 square feet of climate-controlled storage. The building will glow with light from the inside, Koostra says. “Anybody can move into a house,” she says. “This will be a home.” Montana, for its third state museum, simply deserves the best, says Helen Ingersoll Cappadocia, a native of the state and an art donor who supports the museum and the idea of a building. “I think the time has come for us to have one of the best museums in the country,” Cappadocia says. “Not because we have the population, not because we have the wealth, but because we have the vision.”

PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

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he Permanent Collection’s story has always been one of abundant vision and limited resources, Koostra says. It was founded and grown by alumni and business people who believed in the University as a center for art. Many graduated, traveled the world during their careers, collected art, and then donated it. In 1912, the effort took shape as the Northwest History Museum. It had its first exhibit in Main Hall and then later displayed art in the Journalism Building and Turner Hall. Among the first donors were the Gibsons—A.J. Gibson being the architect of Main Hall, the Daly Mansion, and the Missoula County Courthouse. In the 1930s, the first plan for a museum building showed a complex with a central gallery and four wings housing art, history, anthropology, and science. It went as far as architectural drawings, but funding never materialized. In 1937, the Women’s Club Art Building (known in modern times as International Studies) was built with a donation from the Woman’s Club and the help of the Works Progress Administration. From 1937 to 1955, it was touted as “housing the first art museum in the Inland Northwest.” Why its purpose changed is unclear. The collection went on, shepherded notably by faculty, especially of the Department of Art. Professor Jim Dew met Fra Dana and talked with her about her collection. Professors Rudy Autio and Don Bunse helped, along with Maxine Blackmer. In 1977, the collection was the victim of a robbery. The robbers took small objects. When the police worked to put a report together, the guardians of the collection realized they had to work from mental lists because the art was not fully catalogued. “In art as in life, sometimes something really bad has to happen before we realize a problem,” Koostra says. “It’s such a different place now. People on this campus really cared about this collection. But there just wasn’t the resource base.” Under the direction of Dean Kathryn Martin beginning in the late 1970s, curator Dennis Kern began a rigorous cataloging and evaluation of the works that moved their care into the professional realm. In 2001, the collection moved under the wing of the President’s Office. Under the direction of Maggie Mudd, the Montana Museum of Art & Culture was designated by the state of Montana as one of three state museums, joining the Montana Historical Society Museum in Helena and the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman. President George Dennison, a collector who has donated art to the museum, moved it onto the priority list.

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“I really think he believed in order to get it out of the basements, he had to talk about it more,” Foley says. “He saw it and recognized its importance.” Koostra, a musician who grew up in Missoula, performed around the country, and earned her master’s degree in business administration at UM, became the museum’s director in January 2005. When she interviewed for the job, she knew it was the perfect fit. The museum was ready to leap into a long-range plan, a marketing plan, a revised collections management policy, a reconstituted advisory board, new partnerships, and national traveling exhibitions, along with plans for a building. Today, the museum has eight changing exhibitions a year in its Paxson and Meloy galleries. Help from the Chutney Foundation and Grizzly Riders International has brought restoration funding. Four exhibitions are currently traveling, and Well-Off-Man is putting together a traveling show of Josephine Hale—a Montana painter who also was the first female Red Cross volunteer—set to tour in 2010. An exhibit of Rembrandt’s etchings, “Sordid and Sacred: The Beggars in Rembrandt’s Etchings,” will be on view on campus in March and April 2008. The goal for construction of the new museum building is a groundbreaking in 2010 or 2011 at the northeast corner of the campus.

“One of my favorite things about this job is building relationships,” Koostra says. “There are a lot of people who want to give back. They’re looking at art in a long-term way—a window into another time, a window into another culture, another experience in being alive, a window into the way an artist thinks. Because of how international our collection is, we have this to offer, in spades.”

To learn how you can help build a museum for UM’s Permanent Collection, contact: Barbara Koostra, director of the Montana Museum of Art & Culture, The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, 59812 406-243-2019; barbara.koostra@umontana.edu or Ric Thomas, vice president for development, UM Foundation, P.O. Box 7159, Missoula, Montana, 59807; 406-243-4965; ric.thomas@mso.umt.edu

Ginny Merriam ’86 is a freelance journalist who lives in Missoula. An award-winning reporter for the Missoulian for twenty years, she currently is the communications director for the City of Missoula. MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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Eric Bra eden: CBS photo, background: st efan kl ein, istockphoto.com

younga nd at UM restless

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alumni profile

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By Paddy MacDonald

Eric Bra eden: CBS photo, background: st efan kl ein, istockphoto.com

ollowers of daytime television’s popular soap opera, The Young and the Restless, both adore and despise the show’s linchpin character, Victor Newman—a brilliant, suave, womanizing, company-stealing captain of industry. Newman, also known as “The Black Knight” and “Mr. Mustache,” has been portrayed from the character’s inception by actor Eric Braeden. Many 1960s-era UM alumni may recognize Braeden as Hans Gudegast, a dashing student from Germany who threw discus on the track team, dated classmate Dorothy McBride, marched in daily ROTC drills—and pulled green chain at Bonner Mill in his spare time.

For twenty-seven years Braeden has portrayed Victor Newman from The Young and the Restless. “I know him better than anyone,” Braeden says of his character.

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as-leather survivor with a sensitive, vulnerI don’t know what to expect as I able core. As a child, Braeden escaped into approach Braeden’s dressing room at CBS the world of Karl May’s Wild West novels. Studios in Los Angeles. His alter ego, Victor “Every German boy read them,” Braeden Newman, has been shot, poisoned, spearsays. “So I was deeply steeped in that lore.” gunned, kidnapped, and presumed dead. Fascinated with the cowboys-and-Indians But—this is the scary part—you should stories, Braeden developed an early yen to see the other guys. Victor Newman presee America. vails. Always. He pursues his enemies with Captain Ahab-like monomania, never At age eighteen, Braeden left home for letting up until he’s exacted revenge. the United States, first spending a few So I’m hoping Mr. Eric Braeden wasn’t months in Galveston, where his cousin Eric Braeden taught at the University of Texas. Braeden’s typecast, if you get my drift. as pictured in cousin connected him with a fellow As I enter the room, Braeden sets aside The Sentinel in 1960. German—a man in his eighties who the script he’s editing, stands, and introduces ranched near Florence—and soon Braeden himself, his elegant voice mesmerizing with its slight Teutonic cadence. Tall, fit, and casually dressed boarded a Montana-bound Greyhound bus to become a in jeans, black jacket, and Rockport boots, Braeden radi- ranch hand. “August Hermberg picked me up in a brand-new ates a magnetic force, much like the character he plays. Chevy,” Braeden says. “I’ll never forget that new car—I But Braeden is younger-looking and more handsome was very impressed with that Chevy. All I wanted to do than his television doppelganger. The brown eyes are was drive cars . . . .” Braeden leans back and folds his larger, warmer—and they lack the sinister, heavy-lidded arms, lost for a moment in that inexplicable world of cast that can send a Victor Newman adversary screamin’ men and automobiles. “So,” Braeden continues, “August for his mama. Hermberg drove me out to the ranch where I met the Originally from Kiel, West Germany, Braeden was rest of the family and the foreman. The next morning born during World War II, the third of four boys. The trauma of growing up amid post-war destruction forever about five or five-thirty I got up, had breakfast, and was assigned a horse. We fixed fences . . . and we baled hay.” shaped Braeden’s character, ripening him into a toughMo n ta n a n w in t er 2008 |

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n accomplished athlete—Braeden’s prowess in javelin, discus, and shot put had helped his team capture the German Youth Championship in 1958—he won a scholarship to UM. But Braeden still had to earn a living, so he worked at Bonner Mill from six P.M. until two in the morning. With the job, academic studies, ROTC drills, and track team, “I slept for an average of—who knows—four or five hours a night.” Braeden rented a room near campus and later lived in the Sigma Phi Epsilon house. He remembers humanities Professor Leslie Fiedler as a dynamic lecturer and wishes he’d had more time to study. “I was enormously curious, intellectually,” Braeden says, “but I was exhausted and had no time to do anything . . . the luxury of having your living expenses paid for and just studying—my God, I used to dream of that.” Braeden’s only UM acting experience came when friends convinced him to try out for The Cherry Orchard. After winning a role, though, Braeden was forced to turn it down when he learned of the extensive rehearsal schedule. Life changed radically for Braeden when he met up with fellow student Bob McKinnon. “He was one of those Hemingway-esque characters, a tough guy, and very bright,” Braeden says. McKinnon had a plan: to take a fifteen-foot, forty-horsepower motorboat both up and down the Salmon River. McKinnon found a sponsor—Johnson Motors—and Life magazine was showing interest in the project. But McKinnon couldn’t convince anyone to accompany him on the journey. Until he proposed the idea to Braeden. “I said, ‘What’s the upshot?’ and McKinnon said, ‘We’ll make a documentary and take it to California,’ and I said ‘I'm in!’” Braeden laughs. “It meant adventure, and no one had ever done it before.” Braeden and McKinnon put in near Lewiston, Idaho, attended by the press and local officials. “The Chamber of Commerce people said, ‘Do you know what you’re getting into? Because people have died doing this stuff.’ And I said, ‘Let’s go!’ At that age you don’t register.” At first, Braeden felt like he was on

vacation. “I said, ‘This is nothing’—until I heard a certain noise, and it became more cacophonous as we came around the turn. I said, ‘What the hell is that?’ Well, it was the first rapid. It was a rather spectacular moment, and had I had a chance to get out of it then, I probably would have. But my pure male ego said, ‘No, I’m not going to give in. If he’s not going to turn around, I’m not either.’” A professional cameraman documented the trip, although he missed the most exciting segments, including the three times Braeden

La Scala, an upscale restaurant where he also bused tables. He joined a semi-pro soccer team and studied political science at Santa Monica State College, where he met his future wife, Dale Russell. “She went to a Catholic school,” Braeden says, and “was well-educated, very steeped in European literature . . . so there was an affinity.” As Braeden speaks, I’m hearing a timid but insistent knocking. Go away, I’m thinking, as I send waves of hate molecules toward the door. Then I worry that this is a planned inter-

photo by Heather Jackson

Having grown up in Germany’s farm country, Braeden was used to hard work. “I earned my living as soon as I was old enough to carry things,” he says.

“So I will always be grateful to this show for giving me the chance to show other sides to what makes up Eric Braeden—and Victor Newman, to some extent.” found himself close to death. “When you get past the rapid and you think you’re over the hump,” Braeden recalls, “that’s when it gets dangerous. Once you get through the washing machine, then you hit the rocks. I barely survived that thing.” By the time Braeden and McKinnon pulled to shore, they’d missed the Life magazine deadline, but they finished their documentary—The Riverbusters—and headed for L.A. “We showed that film on various talk shows, and we were taken around by a public relations man from J. Walter Thompson,” Braeden says. Eventually, McKinnon returned to Montana for family obligations and Braeden, with five hundred dollars from Johnson Motors in his pocket, stayed on. Braeden parked cars, moved furniture, and earned ten dollars a game playing soccer for

ruption. After all, Eric Braeden’s a busy guy. Perhaps I’m about to be sent on my way. But a puzzled look flickers across Braeden’s face. “Who is that?” he says. Tap, tap, tap. Braeden raises an eyebrow at the noise, which by now sounds to me like a definite . . . pummel. Then Braeden springs panther-like from the couch, and I’m suddenly witnessing a Victor Newman moment. “Who the hell is knocking on my door?” Braeden says, crossing the room in two strides and ripping open the door to reveal a hapless, paper-burdened assistant. “Put that in my mailbox!” he commands, then returns to the couch, sits back down and rubs his brow. “Okay,” Braeden says, smiling, and his eyes crinkle at the corners. “Where were we?” Oh, thank you. Thank you.

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photo by Sanja y Patel

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hile still in school, Braeden heard that Hollywood needed German actors—so he got an agent and was soon appearing in television shows and in films. In 1962 Braeden landed the part of Captain Dietrich in the television series The Rat Patrol, which ran for two seasons. When he got a starring role in the movie Colossus: The Forbin Project, Braeden was still using his given name, Hans Gudegast. But reluctantly, under studio pressure, he changed his name—later calling the decision

bad guys for so many years and wanted the chance to develop a more multifaceted character. The producer and head writer listened— and soon gave Victor Newman a tragic past and some emotional depth. When Braeden read the new scripts he realized, instinctively, that he’d stay on indefinitely. “So I will always be grateful to this show,” he says, “for giving me the chance to show other sides to what makes up Eric Braeden—and Victor Newman, to some extent.” The show’s writers have drawn liberally

one of the most difficult of his life. Opportunities increased exponentially, and Braeden worked with actors such as Marlon Brando, Janet Leigh, and Roddy McDowell, racking up more than 120 appearances in films, made-for-TV movies, and television series— playing such diverse characters as a “bad-ass” on Gunsmoke, an acerbic movie critic in The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and Colonel John Jacob Astor in the Oscar-winning epic, Titanic.

from events in Braeden’s life, including childhood traumas. “My father died when I was twelve,” Braeden says, and tears spring to his eyes, surprising him. “It was the greatest loss of my life, you know,” he says, swiping each wet cheekbone with a fist. The writers also incorporated Braeden’s talent and training as a boxer into the show, often featuring the character diffusing energy —or ramping it up—by working on the bag in the Newman ranch’s tack room. “I used to box in the ghettos,” Braeden says. “I have enormous respect for boxing. An old black boxing trainer told me, ‘It’s like walking through fire,’ and he’s so right. It tests you. To the core.” Braeden’s acting has garnered him enormous recognition, including a People’s Choice Award, an Emmy, a special honor at the thirty-eighth annual Monte Carlo Television Festival, and

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n 1980, Braeden signed a three-month contract to portray Victor Newman on The Young and the Restless. His character immediately resonated with audiences, and Braeden signed on—albeit reluctantly— for another hitch. And another. “I wanted to leave after the first year,” he says. “I didn’t like it at all.” Braeden felt “emptied out” playing

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most recently his own star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, which Braeden received in a ceremony last July. “That was a…very, very deeply moving moment,” Braeden says of the event, which drew hundreds of fans and friends.

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aking his first run at producing, Braeden made a film last summer, The Man Who Came Back. The movie, starring Braeden and featuring George Kennedy, Armand Assante, Sean Young, and boxer Ken Norton, is set for release this year. Opposite page: “I enjoyed it enormously,” Braeden kneels Braeden says of making the down to touch film. “It’s very challenging . . his star on . When you work as an actor, Hollywood's usually, you only do what you Walk of Fame, do. But when you produce, which he received last July. you are in charge of everything. I like to be in charge.” This page: Off-camera, Braeden Braeden, who plays tennis, does Olympic starred in five weight-lifting, and enjoys life different episodes at home in Pacific Palisades of the TV classic with Dale, his wife of fortyGunsmoke, is two years. They’re a close taking his love family—the Braedens spend of acting in as much time as they can westerns to the with their screenwriter son, silver screen in Christian, daughter-in-law, The Man Who Stacey, and granddaughter, Came Back. four-year-old Tatiana. “I adore her,” Braeden says of his granddaughter, laughing. “You find yourself doing things . . . crawling around the floor . . . I’ll do anything she says. Practically.” Asked how he’s managed so well in a profession with astronomical odds against success, Braeden smiles, his eyes crinkling again. “I grew up tough,” he says. “I’ll fight you to the last— I’ll never give up.” Never give up? Sounds just like something Victor Newman would say. And Eric Braeden would be the first to agree. [Editors Note: Eric Braeden will visit UM this spring to screen his upcoming film, The Man Who Came Back. Details, as they become available, will be posted on the UM Web site’s Newsroom at: www.umt.edu/news] Paddy MacDonald, a freelance writer, lives in Missoula. Her short stories have appeared in publications including Beacon Street Review, Writers’ Forum, and Seattle Review. Mo n ta n a n w in t er 2008 |

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From Campus to Combat By ALEX STRICKLAND

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U.S. soldiers walk the streets of Iraq at sunset www.umt.edu/montanan

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uniteD st ates DePaRtMent of Defense Photo

Photo couR tesy of heath beck

us

“I never didn’t believe in what I was doing,” he says. n the back of a little-used desk drawer, Heath “But personally, it doesn’t matter what war you fight. It’s Beck’s hearing aid is hidden behind a stack of not about love of country, it’s about you and your buddy files and papers. Inside the tiny device are the beside you and making sure you get out of there with all complicated machinations of a tool that can your fingers and toes.” compensate for the 60 percent hearing loss in Today, Beck is finishing his master’s degree in accountBeck’s left ear. It’s a tiny reminder of days spent ing from the UM School of Business Administration. He’s in the sandy wastes of Iraq’s desert and the the president of Beta Alpha Psi, a business honors society, booming concussion of a .50-caliber machine and fields job offers from major accounting firms around gun rattling off rounds from the top of a Humvee. It’s a the country. A far cry, he says, from the Iowa farm boy reminder of the ear plugs Beck didn’t wear because, as a sergeant, he needed to hear the men he led into battle. It’s who hated authority before he enlisted in the service seven years ago. a reminder of the man that was Sergeant Beck, soldier in “It’s night and day.” the United States Army. It’s not a reminder that Heath The transition from a military Humvee to the classroom Beck, now a successful graduate student at The University has been easier for Beck than some—a respite that he’s of Montana, needs. He remembers. made more grateful for thanks to his military experience. UM just might have saved Beck’s life. “It put my life in perspective. People got nervous about Beck returned to Missoula from his fourteen-month a big test when I got to college. I didn’t get nervous—the tour in Iraq in March 2004 and almost immediately put test wasn’t shooting at me. It humbled me and made me in papers to move his discharge date up from its original grateful for every moment I have here. September 7 slot. Since UM classes started at the end of “The Army honed my leadership capabilities,” Beck August, Beck was able to move the day to July 31 through says. “But it’s a part of my a “college drop” petition life I block out now. There’s that gives a soldier headed Sergeant Beck and there’s to college up to thirty days Heath.” before class to move and get For Beck, with a resume settled. of battle-tested leadership Beck’s unit received stopand academic achievement, loss orders that summer, a doors are opening. After he “loophole” in the contract, starts his accounting career, he says, which prevents any he’s thinking of attending soldiers from leaving or law school to pursue a transferring out of a unit degree in tax law. regardless of when they “If you tell a normal were originally scheduled to person to move a mountain, be discharged. The orders they’ll say, ‘You’re crazy,’” for Beck’s unit were effeche says. “If you tell a tive August 1, 2004. One Heath Beck holds an M-4 (a smaller version of an M-16) at combat arms soldier, they’ll day later, he left for UM. the National Training Center in California, days before his ask, ‘Where’s the shovel?’” It was two years after Army unit deployed to Iraq. He is pictured on his Observation September 11, 2001, when Post, with a Javelin Missile System strapped to his back. Beck went to Iraq, three The $16,000 missile can fire up to three miles away. The sands of Iraq exist since his mother wept as only in memory for Beck, but they grit the teeth and he told her he’d enlisted and offered consolation with, clog the lungs of Major Mike Brault, a 1996 graduate of “When was the last time we were in a war?” UM’s history program. Brault is serving his first tour of It was the waiting—the knowledge that heading to duty in Iraq in the eleventh year of a military career that battle was not an “if,” but a “when” that wore on Beck as the months passed by after America went to war with Iraq. already has sent him to Croatia, Bosnia, Kosovo, and “It was complete uncertainty,” Beck says. “I wish I could Afghanistan. Brault is the transportation officer for the Army’s 1st describe the words when you know your unit’s going and Armored Division, which means his duties include you just don’t know the day. It wasn’t being over there, it planning, coordinating, and tracking all modes of transwas the anticipation of going. It was telling your mother portation—aircraft, boats, and ground transport—in an goodbye when you don’t know if you’ll come back.” area the size of Georgia that is filled with 22,000 troops. Once there, Beck, an Army scout, spent his time Born and raised in Missoula, Brault figured out that running reconnaissance on the Iraq-Iran border and later went to Ramadi and Baghdad. He left the service with the scholarships were the only way he’d get to college. He says, “I wasn’t good enough at football or have perfect rank of sergeant and 40 percent hearing. cont. on page 26

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cont. from page 25 By Car y Shimek

ince UM was founded in 1893, hundreds of its alumni have faced the surreal experience of leaving the safe confines of campus for a “real world” that includes life-and-death combat on foreign soil. Others survived bloody war zones for a chance to attend college in Missoula and build better lives for themselves. Here are just three of their stories:

Vietnam —Rich Magera

enough grades to get one of those types of scholarships, so ROTC was the best answer. “As a kid, I always kind of thought I would end up in the military, but I thought it would be the Navy rather than the Army,” he wrote from Iraq. “I guess I saw Top Gun too many times and wanted to be a fighter pilot. Plus, had I gone into the Navy, I would have had to go to school outside of Montana.” Brault’s days in Iraq begin at 5:30 A.M. and don’t end until almost midnight. During those long, hot hours, he checks all outgoing convoys

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ich Magera remembers the day his hometown of St. Regis felt the farthest away. It was 1967 Vietnam, and the young Army sergeant was sent to Saigon for supplies. Driving his vehicle down a crowded street, he saw a little Vietnamese girl selling flowers twenty yards Rich Magera, who served away. She suddenly as the Operations Nonpulled a string and detonated the hidden exploCommissioned Officer for sives she wore, killing herself and five nearby GIs. the 58th Transportation “A combat zone is not a nice place,” says Battalion, handled all of Magera, now superintendent of Plains High the Army aircraft parts School. “There were a lot of heinous things that for South Vietnam—the secondary duty of serving went on.” as a helicopter doorThat wasn’t his only experience with suicide gunner. Here, Magera logs bombers. One night the Viet Cong struck the in classified materials at Tan Son Nhut Airbase where he worked. They the Tan Son Nhut Air Base destroyed several U.S. aircraft using mortars and in Vietnam in 1966. satchel-charge-carrying soldiers who blew themselves up. “Most military guys will tell you that being in a combat zone is hours of boredom interspersed with moments of terror,” Magera says. “You don’t have time to think, things suddenly just happen.” Magera served as a helicopter door gunner, guarding soldiers and supplies flown to and from the field. He often raked tree lines with bullets during landings and take-offs to ensure nobody was there. Sometimes the fire was returned. “Getting shot at is an odd experience,” he says. “You aren’t looking for the bullets coming at you, and they come in too fast to see anyway, but afterwards you feel drained coming down from that adrenaline high. I never got shot, but the choppers took some bullet holes.” After returning to the States, Magera found that “fireworks made me crazy.” He attended UM from 1969 to 1975. He said his time in Vietnam made him appreciate his country more, and he rolled his eyes

to ensure they’re packed with the right supplies and headed in the right direction. He has only five officers and soldiers to assist him. “I spend much of my day putting out proverbial ‘fires,’” he writes. “Everything is a priority and an emergency.” While he was in Afghanistan, Brault spent part of a day tracking down a herd of lambs and goats so some of the allied forces could get a meal. Though he’s only been on the ground in Iraq for about a month as of this writing, he says life there isn’t terribly different from that in

when hearing fellow students complain about registering for classes, professors or trying to get a paper done. They could be in the jungle. He earned his ROTC commission from UM in 1974 and stayed in the military until 1993. He commanded UM’s ROTC Grizzly Battalion during 1981-84. He then returned as a major and served as executive officer during his 1988-93 tour. Magera admits his opinions about ’Nam change daily, but he has a favorite memory: “Getting on the airplane and leaving.”

Korean War —George Gogas

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y the winter of 1951-52, Lynn Erb of Billings had a hard time focusing in her UM classes. That’s because her fiancé, a Missoula boy named George Gogas, had been sent to the Korean War. Gogas was a 1951 UM graduate George Gogas stands with an art degree and next to his tent in ROTC commission. April 1953, about six “It was sad and months after heading depressing,” she says. “It to South Korea. On wasn’t easy to concentrate days like this, when on what I was doing. But Gogas was held in George was good about reserve and not writing, and I would moving West with the write him back. It helped Third Infantry Division, get us through.” he participated in training exercises. That winter Gogas and his Army company found themselves guarding the 3,400-foot rim of a circular valley called the Punchbowl. It was Montana-cold atop the ridge, where they lived in trenches and bunkers. Strategic points such as the Punchbowl and the nearby Heartbreak and Bloody ridges had been purchased with many soldiers’ lives before Gogas arrived as a replacement. “The enemy were North Koreans,” he says. “They shelled us, and we shelled them. Then we’d duck into bunkers. It wasn’t much fun, I can tell you. We also sent out patrols every night. We only went out 100 to 150 yards—just to let Charlie know we had a presence there.”

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Photo Cou rtesy of Mike Braul t

Afghanistan as far as a soldier is concerned. “The climate is very similar,” he says. “Except that where I am in Iraq is very flat, whereas my location in Afghanistan was very mountainous. It is still very hot and dusty, dust seems to be everywhere.” A recent dust storm left him coated in desert—eyes, nose, everything. “I coughed up black stuff for days.” Brault says he became a career soldier without even really meaning to at first. One training session led to another, and before he knew it, his eight years were up and he was halfway

to retirement at twenty years. He didn’t come from a military family—though he says his grandfather, stepfather, and uncle were all in the service at various times—but he most certainly comes from a Griz family. His mother, Lanell Curry, is the assistant to the UM provost. His wife, Amy, graduated from Missoula with an education degree a year after he did, and his sister, Alicia Felix, and her husband, Jason Felix, are both UM ROTC graduates. Alicia is an Iraq veteran, and Jason is currently cont. on page 28 on his third deployment there.

He became executive officer for the company commander. His duties included running the command post at night and keeping in radio contact with the patrols. Despite the shelling, they only suffered three casualties in three months atop the ridge, and those came from friendly fire accidents. “One night we were sending out a patrol, and one of our guys was helping another guy put on an ‘overwhite’—a camouflage white parka that went over our (regular) parka. Anyway, one guy was holding his weapon between his knees as he helped the other guy. His automatic weapon slipped—we called it a grease gun or burp gun. It hit the frozen ground and recoiled. It fired big .45-caliber shells, and one went right in his body.” When Gogas made it home, he married his sweetheart and taught high school art in Missoula for 28 years. He also raised a son, trained and showed champion quarter horses, and became a prominent painter. UM has some of his works and did a retrospective on him in 2002. “I was really glad when he came home,” Lynn says.

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efore Sam Roberts helped put the finishing touches on World War II, he was a UM football hero. Reared in Helena, Roberts attended campus on an athletic scholarship from 1937 to 1941. The rugged player developed matinee idol looks, In this photo taken in the late '40s after World War II, Colonel Sam A. Roberts—at that time a major in the U.S. Air Force—sits at his desk at the Carswell Air Force Base in Fort Worth, Texas. Colonel Roberts served as provost marshal and acting deputy commander at the base.

World War II—Sam Roberts www.umt.edu/montanan

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Mike Brault stands near an anti-aircraft gun from the Saddam Hussein era. The base where he stands used to be Saddam’s Air Force Academy compound.

even though his nose was broken three times in the leather helmet days before facemasks. A business major who excelled in ROTC, he soon was named the cadet commander of the campus battalion. He fondly recalls marching on UM’s Oval or spending time with his Sigma Chi fraternity brothers—twenty-four of whom wouldn’t return from the conflict about to engulf the world. After war broke out, Roberts excelled at training bomber pilots and bombardiers in New Mexico. Many of those flew their twenty-five missions and returned from battle with medals and stories of survival. Roberts ached to practice what he preached, but his colonel wouldn’t release him for combat duty unless he graduated 400 certified bombing pilots without an accident. When Roberts accomplished that, his colonel sadly asked, “Can I talk you out of it?” No, sir. So in August 1945, the UM grad found himself commanding a B-29 superfortress in the night skies above Japan. Painted on the side was: “The Grym Gryphon—the Nipponese Night-mare.” She was among 250 planes flying in formation toward the last energy system in northern Japan. A few days earlier the world had entered the atomic age with the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the Japanese still hadn’t surrendered. The Gryphon was now part of what would be the last bombing run of the war. Flashes were soon seen in the darkness about them. They meant a rocket or kamikaze plane loaded with explosives had found a U.S. target. Roberts got on the microphone and told his nine-member crew, “Steady. Steady, everyone. No change.” Then he gritted his teeth and said a little prayer. They couldn’t take evasive action until after dropping their ten tons of bombs on the target. The B-29s did knock out the energy plant, but the Gryphon didn’t have enough fuel to return to its home base. If forced to ditch, all crew members had agreed they would fight to their last bullet—which like the Lone Ranger’s was painted silver—and that one they would use on themselves to avoid Japanese torture. But they were able to land on a new runway on Iwo Jima, and Roberts admits to hugging a marine who helped build it. Colonel Roberts served with distinction during a lengthy military career. By 1967 he was a top administrator in Vietnam, and he briefed presidents Kennedy and Johnson. He retired in 1970 with more than 7,000 flying hours. “We have many things to be thankful for,” says the 89-year-old with a bruising handshake. “Do you have a flag at home? Do you know what it stands for?” Mo n ta n a n w in t er 2008 |

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UM’s ROTC Program Among The Best

Dan DeCoite trains at Ft. Sill, Colorado, during his officer leaders course in November. DeCoite is a member of the Army’s Special Forces Unit. cont. from page 27

Dan DeCoite never could have guessed that his life’s path would take him through Missoula and then into the Army. First, the Truckee, California, native went to play football at Brigham Young University in Utah. After two years he decided he’d like to play with his brother, Dave, again and, as Dan tells it, “UM was the only place that would take both of us.” And so the DeCoite brothers came to UM in 2000 to terrorize offenses around the Big Sky Conference and cement their legacy as Grizzlies. But Dan’s senior year at UM was remarkable not just for the football, but for what another football player did that changed his life. September 11th happened while Dan was playing his senior season for the Griz, and not long after that, professional football player Pat Tillman enlisted in the Army, spurning a large contract and garnering widespread media attention. While at BYU, DeCoite had played against and briefly met Tillman. The NFL-bound player left an impression. After college DeCoite was playing football for the San Jose Sabre Cats when Tillman was killed in what later emerged as a friendly fire incident. “I was getting beat up in San Jose,” DeCoite says. “Tillman had just passed away, and that’s what pushed me over the edge to sign on the dotted line.” The dotted line brought DeCoite back to UM to pursue a master’s degree and enroll in the ROTC program. He excelled in field tests and exercises, distinguishing

Photo Cour tesy of Dan Decoite

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itting on the other side of campus from the gleaming Gallagher Business Building and the brand-new Anderson Hall, UM’s ROTC program has quietly built itself into one of the finest in the country, despite its less-than-modern home. Tucked away in the bottom of the Schreiber Gymnasium is the fifth-ranked ROTC program in America, responsible for producing more than 1,800 Army officers since its first cadet graduated in 1922. The success of UM’s program comes as no surprise to Helena native Major Dean Roberts, the battalion’s enrollment officer. Montana has the highest rate of military service per capita of any state in the nation —between 5 and 6 percent. “There are 100 cadets in the program,” he says. ‘We’re the second largest in the Pacific Northwest and very close to passing Washington State University.” Roberts also is quick to point out that the average cadet GPA is 3.55. “Our numbers are higher than they’ve historically been,” he says. “Kids today are raising their hands to volunteer knowing they’re going to be in a bad place. We’re at our largest levels since World War II. That’s unique in an era of complete volunteerism.” Up until 1974 ROTC courses were mandatory for every male student on campus. “We’ve got 23-year-old kids who have already been deployed for three years,” he says. “They come back and say, ‘Well, I’ve got to get serious about school now.’” Roberts and his boss, Whitehall-raised Lieutenant Colonel Michael Hedegaard, have long wondered how the quality of cadets in the program has remained consistently high, and the answer they’ve come up with is that 85 percent of them are from Montana. “They grow up in this state, and they understand hard work and leadership and motivation,” Roberts says. ”They knock on our door and say ‘It’s what I want to do.’” He sees that sort of understanding in the military science courses he teaches to regular students and his cadets, who have more knowledge of the world and maturity than previous generations. “They have more maturity than I did at that age, and I’m a West Point graduate,” he says. “I went because they paid for school and had a great wrestling team.” Roberts has a different take than those who have labeled today’s young people, in their world of iPods and MySpace, a “lost generation.” “I think this is the next greatest generation.”

himself as the best of his class. As a result, he was chosen to enter the Army’s Special Forces unit immediately upon commissioning—the only 2nd Lieutenant in the country to receive such an accolade. DeCoite knows he’ll be deployed eventually, but the reality of fighting overseas is still a long way off. The unit he’ll end up with, the 19th group out of Colorado, will have just gone to Iraq by the time DeCoite graduates from his first training and becomes a “deployable asset” on May 2. That leaves him with almost two years for the Army to train him. He will attend the Airborne and Ranger schools, military intelligence school, and “whatever other schools” they send him to, he says. When it’s all said and done, DeCoite will be a Green Beret, part of one of the most specialized and elite fighting forces on the planet. “Some people are happy with what they do,” he says. “If I was working for somebody, I’d want to be manager or owner. I don't like knowing there's something better I didn't try for. “To me the opportunity to do something like the military or Special Forces is the same thing as playing at UM. They're the best; you want to be part of the best, and be associated with the best.” Alex Strickland ’06 is the editor of the Bigfork Eagle. His articles have appeared in Empire Builder, Montana Magazine, and Bugle Magazine.

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Photo Cou rtesy of Dan Decoite

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bookshelf SCARLETT’S SISTERS: YOUNG WOMEN IN THE OLD SOUTH

By Anya Jabour, UM professor of history University of North Carolina Press, 2007, 384 pp., $39.95

STREAMS OF CONSCIOUSNESS: HIP-DEEP DISPATCHES FROM THE RIVER OF LIFE

By Jeff Hull, UM adjunct instructor of journalism

This true story of the celebrated fictional character’s flesh-and-blood counterparts explores the meaning of nineteenth-century Southern womanhood from the vantage point of a group poised to become its society’s feminine ideal: young, elite, white women. By tracing the lives of young southern women in a society in flux, this study reveals how the old social order was maintained and a new one created as these girls and women learned, questioned, and ultimately changed what it meant to be a Southern lady.

Lyons Press, 2007, 208 pp., $19.95

RADIANT DAYS

By Michael A. Fitzgerald, M.F.A. ’00

This collection is about fishing and everything but fishing. From the trout streams of Montana, shores of New England, spring creeks of Chile’s Patagonia, and clear waters of Belize, Hull regales readers with humility and hilarity. His dispatches, filled with compelling characters and spectacular fishing stories, offer searing insight into the human heart.

Shoemaker & Hoard, 2007, 256 pp., $15.00

Internet worker Anthony Sinclair, frustrated by ’90s dot-com mania, abandons his pampered life in San Francisco to follow the gorgeous but enigmatic Gisela on a search for her lost son in Hungary. In Budapest, they meet March, a brilliant British war correspondent. With swift plot and seamless style, Fitzgerald moves the novel’s readers from the tattered romanticism of Budapest to the sparkling Dalmatian coast and into the brutalized landscape of Croatia during the last days of the Balkan War. As the narrative unfolds, alliances shift, friendships loosen, and no one is to be entirely trusted.

MY MONTANA: A HISTORY AND MEMOIR, 1930-1950

By Jewel Beck Lansing ’52 Inkwater Press, 2007, 271 pp., $22.95

This memoir captures the pioneer spirit of Montana homesteaders and gives a warm and respectful look at a rural Western Montana girlhood in the 1930s and 1940s. Difficult days? Yes, but the challenges were met with ingenuity, cooperation, camaraderie, and humor. If you are a UM alum with a recent book release, don’t forget about your alma mater. To be considered for Bookshelf, you must send a copy of the book, along with any press materials and contact information, to: Montanan, University Relations, 325 Brantly Hall, Missoula, MT 59812. Submission of materials does not guarantee that your work will be featured.

CONTESTED WATERS: A SOCIAL HISTORY OF SWIMMING POOLS IN AMERICA

By Jeff Wiltse, UM assistant professor of history University of North Carolina Press, 2007, 288 pp., $29.95

From nineteenth-century public baths to today’s private backyard havens, swimming pools have been a provocative symbol of American life. In this social and cultural history of swimming pools, Wiltse relates the story of class and race conflicts, the growth of cities and suburbs, competing visions of social reform, the eroticization of public culture, the democratization of leisure, and Americans’ recent retreat from public life.

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CROMWELL DIXON: A BOY & HIS PLANE, 1892-1911

By Martin J. Kidston ’97 Farcountry Press, 2007, 168 pp.,

THE CHARCOAL FOREST: HOW FIRE HELPS ANIMALS AND PLANTS

By Beth A. Paluso, M.S. ’02 Mountain Press Publishing Company, 2007, 64 pp., $12.00

$14.95

Kidston tells the dramatic story of turn-ofthe-century child prodigy Cromwell Dixon, who became the youngest licensed pilot in the United States. In his plane, the Little Hummingbird, Dixon was the first to fly across the Continental Divide, only to meet with a fiery death two days later. Like the tale of Icarus, Dixon’s story is one of great daring, accomplishment, and tragedy. (Illustrated with 40 historical photographs)

Beautifully illustrated by the author, the book explores new habitat created by fire. Focusing on the Northern Rocky Mountains of the United States and Canada, Paluso describes twenty species of animals and plants that contribute to the reclamation and renewal of the charcoal forest. A delightful book for both kids and adults.

THE KIDS FROM NOWHERE: THE STORY BEHIND THE ARCTIC EDUCATIONAL MIRACLE

By George Guthridge, M.F.A. ’72 Alaska Northwest Books, 2006, 326 pp., $16.95

The true story of a group of Siberian Yupik Eskimo students from a school of forty-one kids who overcame seemingly insurmountable obstacles to achieve what others called “impossible.” On blizzard-swept St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea with Guthridge as their teacher and guide, children of whale and walrus hunters once labeled “uneducable” become the only team of Native Americans in U.S. history to win a national championship in academics—and they did so twice. [Editor’s Note: This book was written for charity. The author, along with Greg Mortenson, who penned Three Cups of Tea, are working to raise money to build a school in the Himalayas in the name of the “Kids from Nowhere,” as they proudly called themselves. For more information visit: http://www.thekidsfromnowhere.com.]

NORTHWEST TREES: IDENTIFYING AND UNDERSTANDING THE REGION’S NATIVE TREES, SECOND EDITION

By Stephen F. Arno, M.S. ’66, Ph.D. ’70 Mountaineers Books, 2007, 257 pp., $18.95

LOVE TRACKS: MYSTICAL ADVENTURES IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS

By D.J. Filson ’74 Humanics Publishing Group, 2006, 162 pp., $17.95

Through stories, quotes, and personal insights, Filson explores the roles animals play in peoples’ lives. She writes about dogs and mystics and the qualities they have in common, examining what it means to be touched by the profound gifts dogs offer.

WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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The updated and expanded version of the 1977 classic guide to identifying and appreciating Northwest trees covers Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, and north to Canada. The guide helps readers identify more than sixty species. Illustrated by Ramona P. Hammerly.

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Higher education creates capacity to change the world. Private support of UM has evolved to meet tomorrow’s challenges and create a University for the 21st century. We have you to thank for that. Your contributions during the Invest in Discovery campaign are truly something to be proud of. Such success begs the questions: What will UM look like in ten or twenty years? What will Montana look like? What will the world look like? At the UM Foundation, we’ll help the University answer these questions. But the ability of students and faculty to make a real impact depends in part on you. With your help, we can continue to nurture the University’s reach. And help today’s students make tomorrow’s discoveries.

Help secure the future of discovery at The University of Montana. Make your gift at:

DiscoveryNeverEnds.org

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UM foundation HATS OFF TO OUR VOLUNTEERS

V

olunteers have been at the heart of this campaign, and their success is UM’s success. Bravo for a job well done! Thank you to the UM Foundation Board of Trustees, the campus community, staff of the Foundation, and these campaign leaders: National Campaign Chair

Deborah Doyle McWhinney ’77 PHOTO BY TODD GOODRICH

Campaign Cabinet

We did it! UM’S CAMPAIGN, Invest in Discovery—Connecting People, Programs, and Place, is history—and historic. This record-breaking campaign has helped shape UM’s future as a university for the twenty-first century. As of this writing, the campaign is days from its December 31 conclusion, but it is clear the effort will exceed expectations. The final total will be celebrated throughout the spring, but already your gifts are making a tremendous impact on UM’s students and programs. Nearly 600 undergraduate scholarships and graduate

Broadcast journalism students using state-of-theart equipment in the new Don Anderson Hall.

fellowships have been established or enhanced to recruit and reward scholars and ease the financial burden of a UM education. The John J. Craighead Chair in Wildlife Biology and Poe Family Professorship in Entrepreneurship are in place, and more than twenty other funds have received support to benefit UM’s top-notch faculty. Collaborative research and science education are under way in the pharmacy and biomedical science addition to the Skaggs Building. Eleven other building projects received gift funds

AND THE WINNERS ARE…

IN THE FALL 2007 MONTANAN, Invest in Discovery national chair Debby McWhinney issued a challenge. Give to the campaign, she said, and she’d match five randomly drawn gifts dollar-for-dollar. Out of the challenge gift envelopes received, those selected to have their gifts doubled were Thomas H. Agamenoni ’60, Great Falls; Joe Fahn ’63, Harlowton; Pat Lamphere Jordan, a former UM professor of education now living in Guthrie, Oklahoma; Evelyn G. Rimel ’32, Missoula; and Edward T. ’48 and Phyllis T. Ruppel, Twin Bridges. WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

to move construction or renovation forward and create additional educational opportunities for students. More than 400 funds and 200 endowments are supporting academic programs all across the campus. More than 26,000 donors have partnered with the UM Foundation, campus leaders, students, faculty, staff, and the state of Montana through this campaign. That’s enough to populate the city of Helena or fill our own WashingtonGrizzly Stadium. Thank you.

The celebration of Invest in Discovery’s success will take place in May. Stay tuned for details.

Priscilla Pickard Gilkey ’62 Charles R. Oliver Mickey Cummings Sogard ’68, ’81 Campaign Steering Committee

Scott M. Brown ’67 John G. Connors ’84 Shaun Corette ’58 Earl E. Morgenroth ’61 John L. Olson ’62 William G. Papesh ’65 Terry W. Payne ’63 Susan Anderson Talbot ’80 A. Warren Wilcox ’65 Honorary Campaign Chairs

Ian B. Davidson ’53 Nancy Preston Davidson ’59 George M. Dennison ’62, ’63 Jane I. Dennison Dennis R. Washington Phyllis J. Peterson Washington ’64 Regional Chairs

John Connors ’84, Seattle Linda Phillips Knoblock ’65, Helena Wayne Linnell ’59, Great Falls James Mariska ’74, Billings Deborah Doyle McWhinney ’77, San Francisco Bay Area Ivan O’Neil ’50, Kalispell Pat Risken ’81, Spokane Sue Anderson Talbot ’80, Missoula

MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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Kick your heels up at the Mansion.

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Offices serving individual investors in: Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Montana, Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska 53 total locations in 16 states

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1/7/08 12:40:24 PM


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

aboutalumni

President

Marcia Ellen Holland ’76

Missoula

President-elect

Patrick M. Risken ’81 Spokane, WA

Vice President

Sharilyn McGuire Campbell ’87 Redmond, WA

Past President

Michael J. McDonough ’72

Dallas

Board of Directors

Eric D. Botterbusch ’87

Everett, WA

Craig W. Crawford ’79 Darien, CT

Thomas J. Dimmer ’85 Williamston, MI

Howard E. Hansen ’60

Flagstaff, AZ

Linda Phillips Knoblock ’64 Helena

Dawn Craven Lochridge ’85

Missoula

Jon I. Mathews ’84 Boise, Idaho

Keli Wenz McQuiston ’00 Missoula

James A. Messina ’93

Takoma Park, MD

Lori Salo Morin ’76, ’81, ’07

Enjoying the Homecoming sunshine are alums Cory ‘98 and Tara Hauke Rigler ‘98 and their twins, Owen Atticus and Payton Irene, from Westminster, Colorado. The Riglers flew to Missoula for Homecoming, loaded with baby gear, Griz wear, and lots of memories. Cory and Tara met on Daly Avenue while UM sophomores – Cory walking back to the Sigma Chi house, Tara on her way to campus from the Kappa Alpha Theta house. Their twins arrived on July 6, 2007, and continually bring smiles and comments from all who pass by. Tara has returned to work as director of finance for Avnet. Cory is a special rep in pharmaceutical sales for UCB Pharmacy. “We’re a pretty good team,“ Cory says of his and Tara‘s childcare, home, and work responsibilities. “We wonder what people with just one child do with their spare time!“

Missoula

Susan Pirrie-Munsinger ’90 Kalispell

Marnie McMeel Prigge ’73 Butte

Geannine T. Rapp ’92 Great Falls

Robert D. Ross ’71 Salt Lake City

Bernd A. Schulte ’65

Ocean Ridge, FL

Zane G. Smith ’55

Springfield, OR

Gregory K. Stahl ’82

Missoula

Marcia Holmes Yury ’62

Keep Us Posted. Send your news to Betsy Holmquist, The University of Montana Alumni Association, Brantly Hall, Missoula, MT 59812. E-mail your news to support@ UMontanaAlumni.org, FAX it to 406-243-4467, or call 1-877-UM-ALUMS (877-862-6867). Material in this issue reached our office by October 26, 2007. Note: the year immediately following an alum’s name indicates either an undergraduate degree year or attendance at UM. Graduate degrees from UM are indicated by initials. Snowbirds/Sunbirds: Whenever you change your mailing address, please contact the alumni office. Let us know where you are and when. Thank you.

Laguna Beach, CA

UM Alumni Association

Bill Johnston ’79, ’91 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (406) 243-5211 (877) UM-ALUMS www.UMontanaAlumni.org

’40s

The 60th reunion for the class of 1948 will be held on campus May 8-10, 2008. Contact the alumni office for further details. JOHN R. “JACK“ HALLOWELL

’42 writes from Lakewood, Colorado, “I jumped six feet in the air the first time I WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

Alumni_ecfinal.indd 35

saw ‘Big Sky Country’ on the new Montana quarter.” This phrase was adopted as the state’s nickname by the Montana Highway Commission in 1961 while Jack was its advertising director. He recalls meeting Pulitzer Prize-winning author A.B. “BUD“ GUTHRIE ’23, Ph.D. ’49, to ask permission to use the

title words from his novel, The Big Sky. “I thought I’d have to go through a lot of legalities to get permission,” Jack stated, “but Bud replied, ‘You just got my permission.’” Jack was off and running with the words that still remain among Montana’s most famous identifiers.

’50s

The 50th reunion for the class of 1958 will be held on campus May 8-10, 2008. Contact the alumni office for further details. GENE L. KUHNS ’55 writes, “I graduated in 1955 with Al Kelley and congratulate him on his award. Always knew he was smarter than the rest of us foresters. [Al received a Distinguished

Alumni Award at Homecoming 2007.] Won’t be able to come to the awards ceremony, but will be thinking about it while watching the sunset on Lake Winneconne in Wisconsin, where my wife, Ann, and I live, since retiring from the Forest Service.” DEAN G. BIESEMEYER ’57, M.Ed. ’60, Ph.D. ’74 has written Learning to Love: A Guide to Finding Peace and Love by Discovering How We Function Physically, Emotionally, Mentally, and Spiritually. Dean spent twenty-five years as a psychologist doing therapy, evaluation, consultation, teaching, and directing a clinical center, and seventeen years researching and writing this book. He presently lives in Switzerland MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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aboutalumni and plans to write his next book on emotional energy. JAMES C. MELIK ’58, Moxee, Washington, and FRED YALE ’57, Corinth, Texas, organized a reunion of the 1950s geology grads this past summer. Jim writes, “It was held on August 14 in Greenough Park in Missoula. Twenty-one people attended, including some wives, and Professor Emeritus Bob Weidman of Missoula. It was quite an experience to see classmates that you haven’t seen for about fifty years! We are thinking about having another reunion next year.”

’60s

The last name of Tom Riggert was misspelled in the fall issue of the Montanan. We regret the error.

West. The UM anthropology department helped me in obtaining materials for one of these books, and I am very grateful. I was on Japanese TV and discussed the ideas expressed in another book for almost fifty minutes with the anchor of the program.” SALLY CARROLL BULTMANN

’64, husband, CHUCK BULTMANN ’66, and their four children own and operate Good Things For All Seasons, a bursting-

’70s

HELEN GUTHRIE “GUS”

’60, Butte, was one of twelve nominees for the 2007 Women of Distinction Award, honoring women in Southwest Montana. Noted for her “passion for the arts,” Gus has served on the

PHOTO BY WALTER HINICK

MILLER

Montana Arts Council, the advisory board of UM’s School of Fine Arts, the Silver Bow Arts Foundation, and the Butte Center for the Performing Arts, where she currently fills the role of vice president. MICHIO KITAHARA ’61, writes from Partille, Sweden, “Since 2001, I have published five books in Japanese— all of which deal with the relationship between Japan and the WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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Virginia, “I’ve finally decided what I want to do when I grow up. Retiring from the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress as a public policy analyst after thirty-nine years of service, I took a masters of education degree at George Mason University and am teaching eighth-grade civics in the Fairfax County Virginia public school system. As a lifetime member of the Alumni Association, I send my thanks for keeping us up to date on the staff, students, alumni, and activities at the University.” WILLIAM C. SPRATT ’66, Hobson, retired as senior vice president after twenty years of service with First Bank of Montana.

at-the-seams gift shop in Grapevine, Texas. Sally previously worked for Department 56 at the Dallas Market Center. Her enthusiasm for the company’s Christmas villages led her to open her own retail store in 1997. “We’re known for our inventive displays,” Sally says, wishing she’d purchased more of the gigantic skeleton heads featured on a previous Halloween. “We are on a charming old Main Street in a historic downtown area,” daughter Tracey Bultmann Wendt explains. “There’s an old-fashioned steam locomotive that goes through town giving rides every day.” During Grapefest, an annual September wine festival that provided the town’s name, upwards of 250,000 people visit their shop. SHARON STIVER GRESSLE

’65 writes from Herndon,

The last names of Ken Dunham ’70 and his son John Dunham ’94 were misspelled in the fall issue of the Montanan. We regret the error.

CHARLIE BRIGGS ’70, M.A. ’78, Helena, joined Easter Seals-Goodwill Northern Rocky Mountain as vice president of Adult and Community Services. Charlie has worked nearly thirty years in community and state agencies in Montana, Oregon, Texas, and Washington, D.C. Previously Charlie had a consulting business focused on public policy and funding. ERIC BECKER ’71, Bellevue, Washington, is a senior manager at Boeing, where he

The 1975 class of Kappa Alpha Thetas

has held frequent reunions since its first in 1985 at the Alpha Nu Chapter house in Missoula. The women met in 1995 and 2000 on Flathead Lake, and in 2003 they celebrated their fiftieth birthdays in Scottsdale, Arizona. They’ve met in Cody, Wyoming, for river rafting and a rodeo, in the ”Up North” country of Wisconsin, and this past summer in Orange County, California, where they are pictured here, left to right: TAMARA ZAHN,

Indianapolis, Indiana; PAULA SINN-PENFOLD, Boulder, Colorado; JEANNIE BEARY STOLLE, Vancouver, Washington; JANE BUSH WIERZBA, Mequon, Wisconsin; KIM RANDAK HENRY, Bloomington, Minnesota; CHRISTINE MAHONEY, Seattle; CHRIS SWITZER BURNELL, North Tustin, California; JAN DOLAN, Scottsdale, Arizona; VIRGINIA MURPHY ELLISON, Chandler, Arizona; M.P. JEUB LOEWY, Redmond, Washington; KATHY REBICH MUNSON, Red Lodge; and SUSAN MCKENZIE CAMPBELL, Billings. Not Pictured is CHAROLETTE FJELD JONES, Cody, Wyoming. ”We made

new memories while trying to recall the old,” writes Chris Burnell, who sent the photo. The Theta sisters are planning a summer 2008 reunion in Idaho.

has worked for twenty-three years. Eric leads the organization responsible for the ordering, production, and distribution of all aircraft maintenance and repair documentation for Boeing and McDonnell Douglas aircraft. His wife, DORENA MARTIN BECKER ’72, has been a pre-

teen verses, the story was put to music and recorded by the Childrens’ Chorus of Santa Rosa. The book includes a CD of their performance, as well as their recording of “Song of the Meadowlark,” for which Charlene received the Outstanding Achievement in Songwriting from the Great American Song Contest in 2004. Charlene currently serves as interim executive director for the Westar Institute in Santa Rosa, California.

school teacher for twenty years. The Beckers have two grown children. CHARLENE P. MATEJOVSKY

’72, has written Stones & Bones, a children’s book on evolution. Written in sevenMONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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aboutalumni M.A. ’74, writes from Colorado Springs, “I had a short story (fiction) published in the Sport Literature Association’s academic publication, Aethlon, fall 2006/winter 2007 edition.”

MARSHALL L. GRIFFITH,

mulated more than 10,000 hours of flight time. Pete volunteers with Delta Pilots Mutual Aid, a voluntary

ROBIN FRAZIER OLIVEIRA

’76, Bellevue, Washington, received a $10,000 James Jones First Novel Fellowship award in November for The Last Beautiful Day. Robin’s novel follows the life of Mary Sutter, a midwife at the time of the Civil War, whose desire to become a physician is hindered by tradition, the war, and family entanglements. Robin graduated from UM with a degree in Russian and continued to study Russian at the Pushkin Language Institute in Moscow, USSR. She became a registered nurse and worked as a bone marrow transplant and cardiac care nurse in Seattle. In 2006 she earned an M.F.A. in writing from Vermont College. Robin is the current fiction editor for the literary magazine upstreet and an assistant editor at Narrative Magazine. She and her husband, Andrew Oliveira, have a daughter, Noelle, and a son, Miles. PETER K. WILKE ’79 recently became a Los Angeles-based captain with Delta Air Lines. A former Marine Corps officer, Pete was hired by Delta in 1991 and has served as a flight engineer and first officer on the Boeing 727200 and as a first officer and captain on the Boeing 757 and 767. Flying to both international and domestic destinations, he has accuWWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

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supplemental disability program, where he has served in a variety of officer positions, including three and a half years as chairman. He is a founding partner of Polaris Benefit Solutions LLC, a Florida corporation providing supplemental disability programs to a wide range of employee work groups. Pete, his wife, Anne, and children, Laura and Peter, reside in Laguna Niguel, California.

’80s

DUSTIN HARNER ’80 writes, “My wife, daughter, and I moved to Phoenix for a much-needed career boost. Things are going well, but we do miss Griz football. We have, however, found two local watering holes that have the satellite feed for every game. My son, Aaron, is deployed in Iraq right now. The first time he went to the mess hall, there were banners from a number of universities hanging all over the place. On one end, right in the middle, was a set of goal posts. On top of one upright was an old style Griz helmet and on the other a new one. Hanging in the middle was a banner proclaiming the Nat’l Championships in ’95 and 2001. Aaron said he actually got goose bumps seeing that.” LISA BRADLEY FLOWERS

’82, M.S. ’96, Ph.D. ’07, is director of conservation

LETTER FROM THE ALUMNI DIRECTOR

T

Enjoying the cruise are left to right: UM President GEORGE DENNISON; Alumni Director BILL JOHNSTON; SUSAN CRAWFORD ’79, Darien, Connecticut; JUSTIN HOKIN ’98, host and owner of the M.V. Oyster Catcher; and CRAIG CRAWFORD ’79, Darien, Connecticut.

he weather report suggested that our July 27 dinner cruise, hosted by UM alum JUSTIN HOKIN ’98, of Darien, Connecticut, might be canceled. The storm went north, luckily, allowing us a perfect evening to cruise the Long Island Sound in Justin’s boat, the M.V. Oyster Catcher. Set sail we did—thirty UM alumni and friends—for a three-hour cruise. The New York City skyline silhouetted the evening sky. At one point we paused to watch a fireworks display. Before docking, the skipper cut the engines, and we held a brief program. UM President George Dennison and UM Foundation Executive Director Laura Brehm thanked Justin and everyone who joined us for making the cruise, dinner, and wonderful evening with special friends possible. Find out more about the M.V. Oyster Catcher at www.oystercatchercharters.com.

BILL JOHNSTON

Alumni Association Director

for the Boone and Crockett Club at the Rasmuson

Wildlife Conservation Education Center on the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch west of Dupuyer. Lisa, her husband, THOMAS B. FLOWERS ’81, and daughter, Anne Marie, live in Choteau, where Tom is the regional investigator for Fish, Wildlife, and Parks. GARET HIL ’84, and his wife,

Jan, of West Islip, New York, have initiated the online National Kidney Registry to help with the problems related to incompatible and poorly matched donors and recipients. The Hils became involved as a result of their daughter’s kidney failure last February. Garet writes, “Every time we see our MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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aboutalumni lection of stories published by World Audience Inc. UM alum CLAIRE DAVIS, M.F.A. ’93, author of Winter Range, Season of the Snake, and Labors of the Heart, writes about Oliver's book, “It’s the rarest kind of treat—a collection you’ll want to read and re-read.” daughter running or riding her bike, we are reminded of the miracle of kidney transplants.” He encourages anyone considering becoming a living donor or facing kidney failure to visit the Web site www.kidneyregistry.org. SHARI A. MULLER-HO ’85, Seattle, is currently Principal Flute of the Orchestra Seattle, the Federal Way Symphony, the Northwest Mahler Orchestra, and the Rainier Symphony Orchestrtra—often featured as a repeat soloist with sev-

eral of these groups. Shari appears regularly as a recitalist in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest region and has recently performed concerts in China and Hong Kong. She also freelances, maintains a private flute studio, and adjudicates music competitions in Washington and Utah.

’90s

BLAIR E. OLIVER, M.F.A. ’91, has written Last Call, a colWWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

Alumni_ecfinal.indd 41

Blair is chair of the Arts and Letters Department at Front Range Community College in Fort Collins, Colorado, where he lives with his wife, Jennifer, and children, Fiona and Owen. Z. KENT SULLIVAN ’91, J.D. ’96 is a shareholder of Baxter Bruce & Sullivan, a local, nine-attorney firm in Juneau, Alaska. Kent, who has been with the firm since 2001, was previously a shareholder and associate with Sullivan, Tabaracci & Rhoades in Missoula. JOAN MARIE FOX, M.F.A. ’92, Tucson, Arizona, had her story “Hunting at Night” included in Listening to Cougar, a recently published anthology by University Press of Colorado. Joan’s stories and poems have appeared in various literary journals and a novel excerpt was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. EMILY HAZELTON WELLS

’92, her husband, Todd, and children, Evan, six, and Elizabeth, four, have moved from Colorado Springs, to Bend, Oregon. Todd is the director of corporate sales at Sunriver Resort, and Emily works from home for ShopTalk 2000. In July, to

celebrate their tenth anniversary, Emily and Todd vacationed in Mexico. RICH W. JANSSEN ’93 and his wife, JULIE ERPS JANSSEN ’93, live in Ronan with their children, Jake and Jenna. Rich writes, “I graduated in May from Gonzaga University graduate school of business with a master’s in business administration. I continue to work for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes as the division manager of Environmental Protection. Julie is employed by the Ronan School District. We continue to lobby state and national officials for more

funding for autism research on a disability that affects one in 150 births and is an increasing epidemic with no known cause or cure.” CLINT MORRISON ’93 is senior vice president and chief financial officer of American Federal Savings Bank in Helena. He has been a C.P.A. since 1997. Clint’s wife, KIM CURRIE MORRISON ’93, is a senior business analyst for the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. The Morrisons live in Helena with their children, Keely, seven, and Keenan, five. MAJEL RUSSELL, J.D. ’93, is the principal deputy assistant secretary of Indian Affairs with the U.S. Department of the Interior. Majel previously served as the lead prosecutor for handling criminal cases and enforcing tribal hunting and fishing regulations for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. She

next entered private practice in Great Falls and later the firm of Smith, Guenther and Monteau. In 1996 Majel established the Elk River Law Office in Billings, where she worked with the Crow Tribe on a major rewriting of its constitution. Majel also has represented several national organizations in the areas of Indian education, trust reform, and wildlife restoration. “My career has been about seeking to improve the quality of life in tribal communities and improving the quality of tribal governance through modernization and reform,” Majel said. JAMES E. BROWN ’94, works at Doney, Crowley, Bloomquist, Payne, UDA P.C. in Helena, practicing in the areas of energy, estate planning, environmental law, water law, administrative law, governmental relations, and land use. After graduating from UM, Jim worked six years as a congressional

aide in Washington, D.C., for U.S. Senators Conrad Burns and Chuck Hagel and for Representative

Judy Biggert. He received his law degree from Seattle University in 2004, graduating with top honors. Jim was one of the first students to use UMAA’s Ask-an-Alum program. He writes, “I’m quite proud that I was the student rep in the ASUM Senate that pushed the program through to its inception.” COLLEEN SCHWANKE

’94 and Justin Martin were married September 1, 2007, in Red Lodge. Colleen works in the

MARTIN

’98, Park Ridge, Illinois, started ThePenMarket.com, a Web-based business that sells fully restored, vintage fountain pens made between 1900 and 1960. His site also features a Trading Post for collectors to post pens they want to sell. ”I’m a faithful reader,” [of the Montanan], Nathaniel writes, ”always curious to see who I might know.”

NATHANIEL M. CERF

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technical writing in LSU’s Engineering Residential College and directs digital portfolio development for the Engineering Communications Studio. Her husband, JUSTIN FARRELL ’98, is a port spe-

Ava Grace Yates to AMY ALLISON YATES ’95 and RONALD J. YATES ’96, M.ACCT. ’98, March 27, 2007, Billings Taj Orion Gritzner to VALERIE JO BLOXOM ’99 and Justus Gallatin Gritzner, June 29, 2007, Missoula

GRITZNER

Emmett James Hauck and Tyler Anthony Hauck to JAMES T. HAUCK ’90 and Carol Nagle Hauck, July 7, 2007, Billings Fairclough (Fara) Temperance Hayes to THOMAS M. HAYES ’99 and Donde Hayes, August 2, 2007, Great Falls Olive Avignon to STACY LEE MAX ’02 and JASON PRINTZ ’98, August 24, 2007, Missoula Caelen Jarell Clemmensen to CHRISTIAN P. ’98 and Stella Clemmensen, August 29, 2007, Missoula CLEMMENSEN

Lillian Marie Johnson to AMY LUCK JOHNSON, M.B.A. ’01, and TODD A. JOHNSON ’97, August 29, 2007, Missoula Addison Rae McCollum to AMY NICOLE MCCOLLUM ’04, and Bill McCollum, August 29, 2007, Missoula Saphira Frances Kololo to AMY L. LA TRIELLE ’96 and TIMOTHY LOHOF ’97, August 30, 2007, Kampala, Uganda Alexis Angelina Mae to DANIEL JOHN NIELSEN ’06 and Violet Bradley, September 11, 2007, Ann Arbor, MI WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

Alumni_ecfinal.indd 43

ALUMNI EVENTS 2008 7

Hunter to EMILY GRACE HIGHTOWER ’05 and Louis Matteau, September 15, 2007, Milford, KS Briella Joy to WENDY WARWICK WILSON ’87 and JEFF W. WILSON ’85, September 15, 2007, Missoula Logan Walter Haynes to MORGAN NEWELL HAYNES ’03 and Kara Haynes, September 17, 2007, Missoula

12,19,26 FEBRUARY

Hunter Ot Moore to SHERI OTTO MOORE ’94 and Brad Moore, January 10, 2007, Richey

Jeremiah Daniel to JACQUELINE LYNN WARGA ’07 and Jeremiah Johnson, September 12, 2007, Missoula

Savanna Ruth to STEVEN T. SMALL ’04 and Chelsee Davie, September 22, 2007, Missoula Lillia Evangelene to MICHELLE COLLEEN KELLER ’04 and Michael Keller, September 25, 2007, Missoula Elizabeth Autumn Susott to RYAN P. SUSOTT ’94, and Angel Susott, September 25, 2007, Missoula Breanna Lea to ANDREA PROCHASKA ’07 and Zach Smith, September 26, 2007, Missoula Luca B. Khomenko to BERNARD V. KHOMENKO ’99, ’02, M.ACCT. ’04, and Danesa Khomenko, September 27, 2007, Missoula Moses Ernest Saileer to LORI A. DETIENNE ’00 and Jim Curtiss, September 28, 2007, Missoula Oden Tyghn Fiebelkorn to JED LAWRENCE FIEBELKORN, M.S. ’05, and Shannon Fiebelkorn, September 29, 2007, Florence Jaidyn Dawnal Imes to MELANY MARIE IMES ’04 and Justin Imes, October 2, 2007, Alberton Lazarus Jay Loonsfoot to LEIA RACHEL LOONSFOOT ’07 and Vincent Michael Loonsfoot, October 4, 2007, Browning Sam Daniel to LAURA ANN HICKEY ’94 and Jess McGee, October 9, 2007, Missoula

19 21 26 28 29 4,11,18

MARCH

Ander Harrison Eskew to ERIKA HARRISON ESKEW ’95 and Ethan Harrison, October 4, 2006, Sherwood, OR

6 5-16

APRIL

BIRTHS

attending UM. After graduation, they traveled in Patagonia and lived for six months in Puerto Varas, Chile. The couple writes that they “look forward to their honeymoon somewhere exotic and warm next spring.”

5 28-5/6

8-10 MAY

’98, earned her Ph.D. in English literature at Louisiana State University in August. She is teaching composition and

CHRISTOPHER G. STUMP

(pictured right) ’99 were married atop Snow King Mountain in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, September 15, 2007. Melissa serves on the Jackson Town Council and is the program director for the Equipoise Fund, a foundation that supports women and girls in Wyoming. Chris guides for Snake River Angler in Moose, Wyoming. They met as neighbors while

’00 and Jeremy Cox, Missoula, were married July 7, 2007. Kara is a guidance counselor in Alberton. Jeremy is a pharmacy student at UM. GABRIEL PINSKI ’00 writes from Washington, D.C., “I’m now the manager of foundation and corporate support at Catholic Charities USA, one of the largest social service providers in America, serving nearly eight million families each year.” KARA BERG COX

JUNE

JENNIFER KELSO FARRELL

cialist with Louisiana Sea Grant. The Farrells live in Baton Rouge. MELISSA E. TURLEY ’98 and

JULY

development office of St. Vincent Hospital in Billings.

aboutalumni ’00s

17-25

6/26-7/3

12-23

Bringing the U to You Lecture Series, Great Falls Community Lecture Series, Missoula Charter Day, Missoula Bringing the U to You Lecture Series, Great Falls Alumni Event, Palm Desert Bringing the U to You Lecture Series, Great Falls Alumni Event, Seattle Community Lecture Series, Missoula Bringing the U to You Lecture Series, Great Falls International Travel, Australia W. Pennsylvania Dinner International Travel, Danube River Cruise Class Reunions 1938, 1948, 1958 International Travel, Tuscany, Italy International Travel, Swiss Alps International Travel, France (Normandy, Brittany, Paris)

For more information, call the UM Alumni Association, (877) UM-ALUMS, or visit our Web site, www.UMontanaAlumni.org.

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aboutalumni

’01, Bolton, Massachusetts, received a 2007 Distinguished Alumni Award from Boston University’s School of Public Health. Circle of Health International, the organization Sera founded and continues to work with, is highly acclaimed for helping empower women to overcome obstacles in their lives. On July 29, 2007, Sera married Adam Rosenbloom, a medical student at Ben Gurion University in Be’er

SERA A. BONDS

Graduate School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, to Minneapolis. She has begun her postdoctoral research at the Department of Microbiology at the University of Minnesota. Kristi writes, “The education I received at UM was an excellent foundation for my graduate studies, and I often find myself missing my days in Missoula and studying (and napping!) on the couches in the lounge at the Davidson Honors College.” LISA L. WROBEL, PharmD ’03, received the 2007 Young Pharmacist of the Year Award from the Montana Pharmacy Association. Lisa is the clinical skills laboratory coordinator at UM and director of the pharmacy technician training program at the College of Technology. The award noted her imple-

Sheva, Israel. They are pictured here at the Great Wall in China. ADAM LEE MCQUISTON ’01 is market president of First National Bank in Missoula. A graduate of the Pacific Coast Banking School, Adam is also a member of the Grizzly Scholarship Association board of directors. KRISTI L. FRANK ’02 successfully defended her doctoral dissertation this past summer and moved from the Mayo

NEW LIFE MEMBERS

RACHEL ELIZABETH MANSFIELD

The following alumni and friends have made a commitment to the future of the UM Alumni Association by becoming life members. You can join them by calling 877862-5867 or by visiting our Web site: www.UMontanaAlumni.org. The Alumni Association thanks them for their support. This list includes all new life members through August 31, 2007.

’63, Billings KAY JUEDEMAN BOLLINGER ’67, Billings JANET S. BOYER ’67, Hinsdale, IL SCOTT D. BRIXEY ’95, East Wenatchee, WA LARA BUCHANAN ’06, Missoula NIKKI M. CARELLI ’99, Woodland Hills, CA DONNA JEAN-MARIE CASKEY ’88, Seattle EVAN E. CHAFFEY ’57, Providence, RI CLAY S. CRIPPEN ’92, Seattle KLINTON CURTIS ’04, Victor WHITNEY CURTIS ’00, Victor ANGIE LANETTE DAVIDSON ’07, Kalispell STEPHEN W. DILL ’71, Anthem, AZ LARRY D. EPSTEIN ’71, J.D. ’76, Cut Bank MATTHEW J. FAUTH ’98, Billings ROBERT A. FREDRICKSON ’65, M.A. ’67, Murrysville, PA SHELDON HODGES BELL

WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

Alumni_ecfinal.indd 45

’83, J.D. ’86,

MICHAEL J. GEORGE

Great Falls

MICKEY W. HANSON

Spokane, WA

THOMAS P. JONES

’90, M.Ed. ’95,

’82, Colorado

REBECCA J. HUTTON

Springs, CO

GENE JESSUP ’92, Wenatchee, WA

’86, Portland, OR ’86,

SCOTT M. JOURDONNAIS

Missoula

Each fall at Homecoming, the Alumni Association Board of Directors holds one of its three annual meetings. Members include, bottom row, left to right: Linda Knoblock, Marnie Prigge, Zane Smith, Keli McQuiston, Geannine Rapp, and Marcia Holland. Second row, left to right: Bernd Schulte, Craig Crawford, Sharilyn Campbell, Tom Dimmer, Dawn Lochridge, and Greg Stahl. Third row, left to right: Eric Botterbusch, Jon Mathews, Lori Morin, Marcia Yury, Susan Munsinger, and Bob Ross. Back row, left to right: Jim Messina, Pat Risken, and Mike McDonough. Not pictured: Howard Hansen.

’61, Butte Lacey, WA WAYNE F. KNIPPING ’67, Gilford, NH CONNIE CORETTE KENNEY STEPHEN R. KERN,

HELEN LAMBROS KOLOKOTRONES

’54, Missoula SUSIE BETHELL LARIMER

GA RICHARD L. MAGERA

Plains MICHELLE D. MANN

’81, Athens,

’74, M.S. ’85

’96, Missoula

Troy, MI FRAN M. MANSON

’07,

’00, Alberton ’96,

MAHLON PAUL MANSON

Alberton

’90, Spokane, WA JAMES A. MESSINA ’93, Takoma Park, MD MARTIN C. MEYER ’95, Albuquerque, NM ANNE S. NICKMAN MILLAR ’91, M.Ed. ’04, Huntingdon, PA BRYNN KATHLEEN MOLLOY ’05, Missoula LORI SALO MORIN ’76, M.B.A. ’81, Pharm.D. ’07, Missoula LORNA MIKELSON NELSON ’63, Bozeman WILLIAM R. NEWMAN ’76, Butte STACY MCKEE O’BRIEN ’93, Sammamish, WA CHAD OLSON ’99, Great Falls KATIE I. OLSON ’01, J.D. ’06, Missoula LINDA HEMSTAD OLSON ’69, Great Falls HARRY RICHARD PALIN ’65, M.Ed. ’71, Missoula RONDA A. MEECH

STEPHEN H. PALMBUSH

WA VINCENT J. PENOSO

Alexandria, VA

’72, Chelan,

’87, ’88,

CLAIR J. RASMUSSEN, M.ED

Dixon

’78,

’00, Dixon ’62, Granbury, TX DAN L. SEVERSON ’71, Stevensville MARJORIE A. SHORT SINNOTT ’51, Clancy DONALD E. SHURR ’75, Missoula TODD SIMMS ’86, Fallon, NV RUSSELL R. SMITH ’88, Seattle SHANNA STEVENSON SPARBOE ’01, M.ACCT. ’02, Billings CHARLES M. STONE ’64, M.B.A. ’75, Spokane, WA MATTHEW A. STROTH ’07, Rescue, CA KATHRYN M. SWEENEY ’95, ’97, Ph.D. ’01, Missoula JOSEPH M. TAYLOR ’00, Rockland, ME JESSICA VINCENT ’07, Missoula KATHERINE C. WALTER ’00, Saco, ME LESLIE J. WESTPHAL ’75, Tualatin, OR MARY C. WILCOX ’66, Missoula WILLIAM H. WYATT ’01, Lolo JANET R. RASMUSSEN DAVID B. ROLL

MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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aboutalumni menting changes in the COT pharmacy program, her developing online courses for place-bound

students, her work in UM’s clinical skills laboratory, and her help in receiving funding for a bio-defense project.

IN MEMORIAM To be included in “In Memoriam,” the UM Alumni Association requires a newspaper obituary or a letter of notification from the immediate family. We extend sympathy to the families of the following alumni, faculty, and friends. DONALD KENNETH STEVENS

’22, San Francisco

MARJORIE MUMM WISE

Idaho Falls, ID

’33,

MARTIN T. HINNALAND EMMELINE MCKITTRICK LEE

’35, Missoula

ORLINE COATS HAMES

’38, San Diego

DOROTHEA NELSON HEITZ

’38, Woodland Hills, CA

ANDREW LUDWIG HOFMEISTER ’38, Olympia,

WA

KATHERINE LOUISE PARKINS

’38, Sherman Oaks, CA

JOHN A. VANDERARK, M.ED.

’38, Grand Rapids, MI

DOROTHY CAMPBELL WALLACE ’38, Fullerton, CA JEAN SHEPPARD BAUCUS WALTER A. ELLIOTT

Missoula

ALDO J. FORTE

City, FL

’40, Palm

ROSEMARY DEEGAN STIVER

’40, Alexandria, VA

Bettendorf, IA

ARTHUR DEBOER

Forest, IL

’41, ’41,

’42, Lake

HELEN PETERSON SCHUETTE

’42, Cut Bank

WILLIAM COVINGTON BARNETT ’43, Absarokee KATHLEEN FLYNN MCKINNON ’44, Missoula MARY BROME BIELENBERG

’46, Bigfork

WWW.UMT.EDU/MONTANAN

Alumni_ecfinal.indd 47

’47, M.M. ’52, Cathlamet, WA

ALAN L. FRYBERGER

EDITH WARD MALCOM HARPER ’47, Big Timber SYBIL CRISTIANI MATYE ’47,

M.Ed. ’63, Portland, OR

Pullman, WA

HARLEY WILLIS CARTER, J.D.

Potomac

Glasgow

’53, Providence, RI

ALLEN LORIN HEARST

Missoula

’53,

RICHARD LAWRENCE MCGRAW ’55, Minneapolis GEORGE EDGAR STOCKING

’55, Whitefish

MARY H. PEMBERTON WEEKS ’56, Phoenix LUANNA PAGE AUSTIN

Olympia, WA

RONALD JAMES CARDENZANA ’57,

Falls

Orchard, WA

’57,

’59, Grand Forks, ND HERBERT C. MARTIN ’59, Glasgow

’48, Miles City

HELEN GILLESPIE DOTY EUGENE B. GISLEY

’49,

CLYDE M. HUGHES

’49,

HERBERT LESUEUR

’49,

Tucson, AZ

Tigard, OR

’48,

DONALE E. NORDSTROM

’49, Red Lodge

LOUISE CHRISTIANSON SALO

DORMANN D. RIEMANN

Coeur d’Alene, ID

Missoula

DEAN RAYMOND BYRNE EDWARD L. TISCH, M.S.

Port Angeles, WA

PHILIP C. MCCARVEL

Bismarck, ND

’59,

’61,

’61,

’62,

DONNA MCPHERSON BOWERS ’63, Lolo DARRELL L. CLARK ’63,

’49, Helena

Melbourne, FL

’49, Bellevue, WA

’63, J.D. ’73, Missoula

NORMAN G. WARSINSKE

EMILIE SMITH LORING, M.A.

JACK ELLIS COGGESHALL

LYNDA HARRISON SCHWERTFEGER ’63, Helena INGA BEAR CAMPBELL ’65,

’50, Sun Lakes, AZ JACK A. YOUNG ’50, Missoula

Spokane Valley, WA

HERBERT LOUIS ANDERSON

SUSAN FOSTER KORKALO

ROBERT ANTHONY CALLAGHAN ’51, Lake

ROD A. LINCOLN

’51, Missoula

’65, Livingston

’65, M.Ed. ’70, Ed.D. ’81, Cabin City

Monticello, VA

FRANK VALGENTI III, M.S.

’52, Bozeman

FRANK ALTMAN

JOHN J. ”BUD” GAFFNEY

’65, Bozeman Falls

Battle Ground, WA

’68,

ANABEL HORSMAN OSBORN, M.S. ’68, Lewiston, ID RALPH R. HANGAS ’69,

’69, Alberton

SHARON BECKER KEHLER

’70, Sidney

’70,

ROY G. LYMAN, M.ED.

MARY ”KAY” THOMPSON MATULKA ’60, Arlington, VA JOANN BROOKS WILLIS ’60,

Corvallis

ROBERT JUDSON BARNETT, M.ED. ’67, Missoula JOHN R. PALENSKY ’67,

CHARLES D. MACDONALD

K. ALICE TWETEN HAMMER

JEAN TRZCINCKI COFFMAN

’66,

Missoula

Great

BYRON E. ”GENE” BOTTOMLY ’48, La

CA

WILLIAM M. WELTZ

Noxon

WILLIAM P. PAUL, PH.D.

’66,

LUCY ALLEN CLEVENGER

’58, Clancy

Quinta,

M. F. ”RICH” SCHILLER

Missoula

’58, Port

CALVIN H. LUND

’66,

ROBERT F. MCNELLIS

WILLIAM H. STINCHFIELD

Carmichael, CA

is the assistant director of alumni relations at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington.

FRANCIS E. ”BUTCH” GALLAGHER, J.D. ’52,

KATHRYN SPACHT THROSSELL ’47, Billings JOHN R. WEDUM ’47,

’49, M.Ed. ’52, Swan Lake

Bernardino, CA

MARY MILNE HANNAH

Tucson, AZ

’46,

STEVE MATTHEW MATOSICH

JOHN HOLLAND DUNCAN

Fishtail

’46, Missoula

Klamath Falls, OR

HELENMARIE NIELSEN CARLSON ’41, San

JUNE HAMMOND GAY

JANICE RHEA KELLEY HALL

Polson

’40,

’41, Great Falls

Oakland, CA

’46,

LEONE HOWARD OSTER

’35, Billings

’39, Rochester, MN

JOHN B. ELLIOTT

The mother of two sons, Lisa also works part-time at Shopko in Missoula. JESSICA ANNE CARTER ’06

’66, Great

Missoula

JUDITH ANN SEIDENSTICKER STRONG ’70, Great Falls RICHARD EDWIN ROBERTS

’71, Superior

FRED IRVING ROOT

Vegas

’71, Las

STEPHEN JACK LOWE

’74,

JAMIE PATRICE GAUL

’75,

Brownwood, TX

Missoula

ELSIE ERICKSON BENNETT, M.ED. ’77, Missoula DOUGLAS W. CLEVELAND

’77, Helena

DAVID WILLIAM ROSSELL

’77, Pratts, VA

MICHAEL A. TOMLINSON

’80, Beaverton, OR

ROBERT ALAN WILSON

La Pine, OR

JERRY M. BUECHLER

Omaha, NE

’80,

’82,

JO JOYCE PHILIP DRATZ

Missoula

NATALIE KAY PHILLIPS

Anchorage, AK Billings

JEFFREY H. FIELDS

Angeles

JOSEPH MICHAEL WILSON, M.P.A. ’92, Helena DONALD M. WOOD, M.P.A.

’92, Spokane, WA

RANDOLPH BOYCE INGRAM

’96, Polson

GRANT MATTHEW KEMENY, M.P.A. ’99, Colstrip KENT RIISGAARD GILLETTE

’02, Forus, Norway

SCOTT JOHN WILLIAMS SR.

’03, Stevensville

CHRISTOPHER JOHN SCHAFER ’04, Havre CHRISTOPHER F. HAMRIN

’10, Wheaton, IL

SHARON ANN MCDONALD BRIGGS, Craig, AK JACK GALT, Martinsdale JAMES MCCREA HAUGHEY,

Billings

WILLIAM TRUMAN HEDGE,

Winnemucca, NV

CAROL MAUDE JONES,

Missoula

MARK LEO KLEFFNER, RUTH G. LANGE, Missoula IRENE TROWBRIDGE LIVINGSTON, Missoula VIVA ANN ”TY” MACLEOD,

Billings

RICHARD JOSEPH MANEY,

Arlee

JACK C. MARTIN, Laurel SUSAN LEA NOSE, Missoula ELIZABETH CLAIRBORNE ORTENBERG, New York BERTA JOSEPH PIANE,

Missoula

JOHN LEE RASBERRY, Polson EDWIN ROSENKRANZ,

Missoula ’82,

’82,

MORRIS J. BRADEN, J.D.

’87,

Missoula

CHARLES BARNEY WARD

’72, Centralia WA

Houlton, ME

’83,

’83, Los

KENNETH ”MAC” MCELMURRY ’85, Everett, WA

DALENE WILLIG SIMMELINK,

Valparaiso, IN

BENJAMIN B. STOUT,

OR

Albany,

WAYNE PAUL VAN METER,

Missoula

BARBARA BRINCK WALLER

Gillette, WY

RENEE RUSSELL WARD,

Missoula

LEOLA YATES,

Spokane, WA

MONTANAN WINTER 2008 |

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CAMPUS OVERHEAD PHOTO COURTESY OF UM’S K. ROSS TOOLE ARCHIVES, 94-1921.

Below: The original Ponderosa pines were provided by the forestry school nursery. They were marked with a white T-board bearing the name of the man or woman in whose honor the tree was planted. Lattice frames protected each tree from the wind and sun.

MEMORIAL ROW ”In their greenness will they keep ever

green the memory of these, our heroes.“ Elsie Tschudy, Kaimin November 25, 1919

T

hirty-two Ponderosa pines, the Montana state tree, stand in memory of UM men and women who died in service during World War I. The original trees, planted on Arbor Day, May 13, 1919, bordered what was then Van Buren Avenue from its campus entrance on Eddy Avenue to the northwest corner of the Oval. UM President E.O. Sisson presided over the dedication, and Law School Professor W.L. Pope delivered the memorial address. “My wish would be that somehow, in some way, those whom we honor here might be present and understand and find what we do here as they would wish,” Pope began. He then recited Joyce Kilmer's “Trees,” reflecting on the poet's own wartime death the previous year. “They will be remembered,” Pope Names of faculty, alumni, and undergraduates who died in service during WWI grace a memorial tablet unveiled on Class Day, June 13, 1925. The stone may be seen on the north corner of the Oval.

continued. “When we shall look upon the world and find it good, when we shall gaze upon the sky, the mountains, these trees, or any trees, let us resolve that like these trees their memory shall be ever green. So that when we shall be gone and shall have been forgotten, when the place where we stand shall know us no more, when countless generations of students shall walk upon this campus and look upon these trees, men shall remember and say that these men died to save the world.” UM student Elwood H. Best, a marine wounded at Belleau Woods and decorated with the Croix de Guerre, filled in the dirt about the roots of the tree planted in honor of Marcus Cook, the first UM student to lose his life in the war. Best also played “Taps.”

PHOTOS BY TODD GOODRICH

artifacts

BY BETSY HOLMQUIST

Today markers at the base of many of the trees indicate the dedicated WWI victims, and flags set off the southern boundary of the memorial. Buildings have crept into the original rows as they neared the Oval, and construction, bicycle and pedestrian traffic, weather, and disease daily stress the trees. Yet, thirty-two pines still stand, keeping alive the memory of our fallen alumni (top left). Above:

THE ROLL OF HONOR INCLUDED: Ian Guy Anderson George F. Bonzwitz Virgil W. Bostwick Lester Brennan Roy S. Butzerin Marcus B. Cook Gerard W. Cornelissen Paul L. Dornblaser Sidney W. Dunbar

Fredrick O. Eitflberg Norbert J. Gerondale James H. Haubensak Samuel L. Hiebert Harry H. Higman Ralph D. Johnson Niel H. Jonghin Raymond F. Loranger Calvin S. Marsh

Carlos Wayne Matheny James Muri George W. Nichols Chester F. Pogson Roy E. Reynolds William Emmet Ryan James Claude Simpkins John P. Skladany Enier E. Strandskov

Bruce McKay Thompson Henry Torrey David Whitmore Ward Woodward Mrs. Yoder Lillian Elizabeth Halse Mary Frances Garrigus Leila Requam Kathryn Byrne

48 | WINTER 2008 MONTANAN

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Campus overhead photo cour tesy of UM’s K. R oss T oole Ar chives, 94-1921.


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Montanan, Winter 2008  

The Montanan is a publication of University Relations at The University of Montana. It is published three times a year for UM alumni and fri...

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