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Summer  2009  ‹  Vol.  9,  No.  3

2 0 0 9Preview AUBURN  FOOTBALL

S O C C E R P R E V I E W VOLLEYBALL P R E V I E W 2009 FOOTBALL GAME DAY MAP


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F E A T U R E S

TIGER ROAR IS A JOINT PUBLICATION OF TIGERS UNLIMITED AND AUBURN ISP SPORTS NETWORK Jay Jacobs Tim Jackson Janie Boles Hillary Nowland Susan Canaan Bob Grant David Housel Jeremy Roberts Jack Smith Todd Van Emst AU Athletics Media Relations Design, Printing & Mailing Craftmaster Printers

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Director of Athletics Publisher Editor Associate Editor Editorial Staff

Published by Tigers Unlimited, P. O. Box 351, Auburn, AL 36831-0351

2 0 0 9Preview AUBURN  FOOTBALL

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Q&A with Football Coaches

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For additional copies of this issue or any back issues of Tiger Roar, call 1-800-AUB-1957 (ext. 2) or e-mail TUF@auburn.edu. TIGERS UNLIMITED STAFF Tim Jackson Executive Associate Athletics Director Vicki Meetze Director of Development Operations and Programs Kay Hargrave Senior Associate Athletics Director - Development Joe Whitt Assistant Athletics Director Rebecca Coan Associate Director of Athletics Development Chris Gary Associate Director of Athletics Development Kym Holland Assistant Director of Athletics Development Helen Yates Assistant Director of Athletics Development Janie Boles Director of Donor Services and Annual Giving Hillary Nowland Assistant Director of Donor Services and Annual Giving Kathy McCollough Executive Secretary for Donor Services TIGERS UNLIMITED MISSION To provide Auburn University student-athletes with a competitive advantage and prepare them for successful lives through annual scholarship support and private support for capital projects, endowments and other investment opportunities of the Auburn University Athletics Department. For information about advertising opportunities in Tiger Roar, or any other Auburn publication, Auburn ISP Sports Network radio or television broadcasts, or any type of promotional marketing associated with Auburn Athletics, contact Auburn ISP Sports Network at (334) 826-2929.

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VOLLEYBALL S O C C E R P R E V I E W P R E V I E W D E P A R T M E N T S from 5 AJayWord Jacobs Football 18 2009 Game Day Map 22 Student-Athlete Highlight Developement 30 Athletics 35 Above and Beyond

Through 42 Down the Years 49 Community Relations 53 Compliance Corner 53 Athletics Schedules 55 News and Notes Summer 2009

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A   W O R D   F R O M   J A Y   J A C O B S

Dear Tigers Unlimited Memb er, The top two goals for the Aub urn Athletics Department are to win and to graduate our student-athlete s. For the fifth straight academ ic year, Auburn finished 200 8-2009 in the top 10 percent of the NACD A Directors’ Cup, which com par es us against Division I institutions across 20 men’s and women’s sports. Tha t is a key strategic goal we strive to meet eve ry year. Auburn finished the 2008-2 009 academic year with thre e Southeastern Conference championships (women’s basketball, women’s golf and men’s swimming and diving) and one National Championship (me n’s swimming and diving). Since 2004-2005, Auburn has won 14 SEC championships, which is fourth most in the conference behind Florida, Georgia and Arkansas. While we are proud of these accomplishments, we are far from complacent. Under the Coach Gene Chizik, a new foo leadership of tball staff is working tirelessly to build a solid foundation for and return Auburn football to the future the top. They are working feve rishly to ensure that we add the depth necessary to once again tale nt and compete for an SEC Champion ship in our top revenue sport. Coach Nell Fortner’s women’s basketball team won 30 games, an SEC title and advanced to ond round of the NCAA tou the secrnament, returning the progra m to one of the nation’s elite. Our men’s basketball team showed improvement and fini shed strong in 2008-2009, whi sports including men’s track le other and field again finished in the top 15 in the country. Auburn the SEC Western Division title soc cer won under Head Coach Karen Hop pa. While Women’s Golf Head Coa ch Kim Evans again led her team to an SEC title this year, the team will seek to build on the men’s legacy of retired Coach Mike Griffin under the leadership Coach Nick Clinard, who brin of new Head gs eight years of head coachin g experience from the Univers Florida to our men’s program. ity of Cen tral UCF was ranked as the nation ’s 147th team in the country Clinard took over the progra whe n Coa ch m. Within three years, Coach Clinard signed the nation’s bes class, and this year led his team t recr uiti ng to an NCAA Regional title. Our baseball team narrowly missed postseason play und er first-year Coach John Paw season and will look to improv lowski last e next year with the help of new ly hired Director of Player Dev Link Jarrett, who comes to Aub elopment urn from East Carolina. Thanks to your support, we con tinue to invest in facilities tha t give our student-athletes the to compete at the highest leve chance l and that improve the game-d ay experience. Most notably, Auburn Arena is proceeding wor k on the on schedule and will result in an world-class facility that will men’s and women’s basketb help our all programs and our gymnas tics programs recruit top-no athletes and give our fans the tch stud entbest game-day atmosphere pos sible. On the academic side, 63 Aub urn student-athletes were reco gnized this summer for mak Southeastern Conference’s Spr ing the ing Academic Honor Roll. On e hundred seventy-one studentwere honored at our annual ath letes Tiger Torch Banquet this spri ng for posting or maintainin GPA for the past academic yea g at leas t a 3.0 r. The most recent federal gradua tion rate data shows Auburn student-athletes are graduating same rate as the general student at the population at Auburn. This is a significant accomplishment considers these outstanding stud whe n one ent-athletes juggle two full-tim e jobs while representing Aub first-class manner. urn in a Winning and graduating our student-athletes will continu e to be our primary goals at are grateful for your continu Auburn. We ed support, especially in thes e challenging economic times. neither goal could ever be acco Without it, mplished. I look forward to seeing you on the Plains in a matter of wee ks as another exciting year of Athletics unfolds. Auburn God bless and War Eagle,

Jay Jacobs Director of Athletics

Summer 2009

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POST 2009

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he practice fields behind the Athletic Complex are bursting with energy as the Tigers prepare for their home opener against Louisiana Tech on Sept. 5, and a stretch of 11 consecutive games without an off week. The Tigers get their first weekend off Nov. 21, after taking on the Georgia Bulldogs Nov. 14, and just before playing Alabama on Nov. 27. First-year head coach Gene Chizik has felt the excitement Tiger fans share for the upcoming season and believes the Tigers understand the expectations and pressure they will face in 2009. “I don’t think there’s any more pressure put on Auburn football than what I put on our kids and myself,” Chizik said. “We don’t really pay a whole lot of attention to all of the external issues out there. We put enough pressure on ourselves to be great. Every one of our coaches wants to be the best at their trade. I want to be the best at my trade. With that comes self-imposed pressure. So we set a foundation for what we want to do.” New coordinators (offense) Gus Malzahn and (defense) Ted Roof will play a large role in helping the Tigers handle that pressure, and with putting some pressure of their own on the opposition. The Tigers will unveil a new offensive and defensive scheme when the 2009 season gets underway, and Chizik knows the task he and his coaches face is putting the players in the best position to be successful. “There’s a fine line in there between putting in exactly what you would like to do on offense and defense, and trying to adapt and adjust to the talent and the skill level that you have,” Chizik noted. “We’ve kind of laid down the philosophy, the principles, the things that we know offensively and defensively that we want this team to be. So we’re going to be very, very structured in what we teach and how we teach it, yet we’ve also got to adapt and adjust to our personnel. So we’re not going to do something that we don’t think we’re physically fit to do. But that’s part

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of coaching. We’ve got to adapt and adjust, and we’ll do that.” One question on the minds of Auburn fans is who will earn the starting job at quarterback. Last season, the duo of Chris Todd and Kodi Burns combined to throw for 1,953 yards and seven touchdowns. Todd started five games last season, helping lead the Tigers to a 4-1 start to the season with only a last-minute loss to No. 6 LSU as the only blemish through five games. Burns started six games and finished second on the team in with 411 rushing yards. This season, junior Neil Caudle is in the mix along with freshman Tyrik Rollison. Todd missed spring practice recovering from shoulder surgery, and red shirt freshman Barrett Trotter missed the last half of spring practice after suffering a knee injury. Competition among the quarterbacks will be intense; something that Chizik believes will bring out the best in all of them. “Our quarterback situation is going be unique,” Chizik said. “There’s a unique dynamic there. There are some older guys with experience. Some of them went through the spring. One of them didn’t. Then all of a sudden, you have some young guys coming on campus. When you haven’t locked down a position and said, ‘This is my starter’, that means it’s up for grabs for everybody that walks through the doors. We would like to get that situation resolved. How long that will take, we don’t know. Obviously the guys that have more experience have probably a little bit of a leg up. But that doesn’t always tell the final tale.” Having an unsettled quarterback situation and a new offensive scheme to learn might be cause for concern for a team, but senior tight end Tommy Trott has seen all the QB’s work during the summer and has confidence in each of them. “They all have looked good this summer,” Trott said. “There’s a whole lot of competition out there, and hopefully, it will help us in the fall.”

Having an offensive coordinator that is as committed as Malzahn has been since arriving on the Plains will ease the transition for whoever is under center. Trott added that working with Malzahn has been a great experience and hopes the success of Malzahn’s previous offenses at Tulsa and Arkansas continues with the Tigers. “We’ve been with him (Malzahn) all through the spring and as much as possible since then because he can’t be out there in the summer and the first impression’s been great. He’s a football nut, football 24/7. He’s brought a successful offense here, and hopefully things will work well.” Trott is hopeful his senior season will be a big one in Malzahn’s offensive system. “The tight ends hopefully are going to play a big role for the offense,” Trott said. “It’s about not just being out there for passes but digging down and getting people off the line. There’s also times when the tight end moves in motion into the backfield, so there’s a lot to the role.” Senior defensive end Antonio Coleman has gone against Malzahn’s offense in spring practice and during individual workouts this summer and is optimistic heading into the fall. “You have one of the best in the business running the offense,” Coleman said. “It’s a different type of spread with running the ball first and getting the ball down the field. At the end of the spring, the offense started getting a hold of things. I think it’ll be real fun and interesting to see how things turn out.” Passing on the NFL for a year, Coleman remained at Auburn for his senior season with one goal: putting the program back on track. “Being an Auburn man and wanting to turn the program around, I didn’t want a 5-7 hanging over my head,” Coleman said. “Coach Chizik recruited me before he left, and that, along with getting a chance to play with my little nephew starting in a few weeks, it’ll be a blessing.” The Tigers are already hard at work preparing to make Coleman’s goal a reality. Playing in the rugged SEC, Chizik knows the Tigers will face a top-notch opponent every week. But he believes the foundation being built will take the Tigers back to championship form. “You know, our plan is to contend for a championship in everything that we do,” Chizik said. “We don’t think that’s out of the realm of possibility. We talk about it to our players, winning championships. That’s what matters. “We’re going to start the season out and that’s going to be the goal, to win the SEC West. I think that in this league anything can happen. It’s not like the SEC West championships are a stranger to Auburn. So we’ll work hard in that direction. I think our players feel very confident that we can be a very good football team. We’ll just have to let it all play out on the field. “


The Official Coffee & Tea of Auburn Athletics.


To help fans become familiar with the new staff, some of the coaches gave a few minutes of their time for a quick Q&A on football and some non-football related topics.

Jay Boulware Can you explain why you didn’t get to watch the 2007 Super Bowl? JB: “That was the year that I was interviewing for the job with Coach Chizik at Iowa State. Gene wanted to bring me in for an interview, and it was Super Bowl weekend. Well, I came in on a Friday night, expecting a Saturday interview and leaving on Sunday. But Gene was held up in Texas somewhere because he was recruiting. He came in late Saturday night, and I was going to go back, but I said `Coach, would you like me to stay another day?’ because we hadn’t talked any special teams at all. At first he said it was okay, but he called later and said `Yeah, stay another day, because I’d like to talk to you, then we can watch the Super Bowl together and you can fly home on Monday.’ And I thought that was great, but we started the next morning around 9 a.m. after breakfast, and I didn’t see any part of the Super Bowl. The only part I saw was Tony Dungy and Lovie Smith walking across the field with confetti coming down, and I had no idea who won the game. I was trying to see who was smiling or who had a frown on their face to figure out who actually won the game, because I missed the entire game because of the interview. We went all the way from 9 a.m. through the end of the Super Bowl, just talking about special teams. Gene has never coached special teams so he was asking me everything, and lucky for me, I had answers for him. It was the best interview I’ve ever been on.” Q: After your first Iron Bowl you will have been a part of two of college football’s biggest rivalries. What memory stands out to you when you think of playing for Texas against Oklahoma in the Red River Shootout? JB: “All of them. But my very first one especially, and actually I was redshirted that year. We never lost to OU when I was there, but that was a 12

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different time. But my very first one, I remember it was a defensive battle the whole game. I think they had actually scored seven points because our quarterback threw a pick six, and somehow we had mustered three points, so it was 7-3 down to the wire. It was in the fourth quarter, and their quarterback fumbled and one of my good friends, Bubba Jacques, scooped the ball up and took it to the house, and to hear the crowd erupt - it was split down the middle, but literally, you couldn’t hear anything. Our fans just knew there was no way OU was going to score on our defense, and that whole last quarter was the most exciting quarter, because everything they tried was stuffed. It was just a dominating effort by our defense. It was really exciting.” Q: Can you talk about your personal connection to the book and movie “Friday Night Lights”? JB: “I was a sophomore on the varsity when we went out to play Odessa Permian that year. We had a pretty good team that year, but to take a road trip of that extent - that was a five- or sixhour bus ride. We had the option of taking a bus ride or flying, and we elected to take the bus ride because we all wanted to stay overnight. That was a big deal when you’re in high school, because you don’t usually get to do that in high school. We went out there and just got our butts kicked from start to finish. They were a really good football team, but we didn’t show up that day. When you see the movie, we didn’t make much of an impact. Our game was so quick because they were on top of us from start to finish and it was a rout. But we did play that team that year - we’re the team that they played before they played Carter and some of those other big games.”

Jeff Grimes Q: What was life like growing up in Garland, Texas? JG: “Life was good. It was your typical middleclass background. My dad worked at Texas Instruments and was a hard-working guy who did whatever he had to to take care of us. He would work a second job around Christmas sometimes to make some extra money for Christmas. My mom worked. We were very involved in the church and were raised in a strong Christian home. Growing up in Texas is like growing up here in Alabama — very sports oriented and community. Football is big so we got involved in sports. I was probably your typical kid growing up in that part of the country.” Q: What do you remember about your Christmases growing up?

JG: “I remember some of the traditions that we had as a family. I think traditions are cool because it’s something that a family comes together around. I think it builds unity and I’ve carried on some of those with my family. It’s nothing big, just the little things of Christmas Eve and going to the church service with my family and my extended family of my grandma and aunt and uncle and cousins. We would have a big meal and share time together as a family that I remember. My dad was always the guy who would do something every year when I was little around Christmas to make it fun. I remember one year when he went stomping on the roof just as we were about to go to bed. My sister and I were having a tough time going to sleep and my parents couldn’t get us to go to bed and here’s my dad stomping on the roof and I was hearing `Ho ho ho’ coming down the chimney and my sister and I split off trying to find it. He said that he was going to come back in five minutes and if we weren’t asleep then he wasn’t leaving anything. It’s just some of those fun little things that make Christmas such a fun time for a family.” Q: After Idaho you then moved to other states out west: Arizona, Utah and Colorado. How does living in Alabama compare to those places? JG: “Well, it’s very different from being in the west, but honestly, it felt like coming back home for Sheri and I. I think that Alabama and Texas have a lot in common and it starts with the people. The people are very friendly down here and they care about one another and they look you in the eye when they say `hi.’ They’ll slow down on the road to let you in rather than speed up to cut you off. There’s just a real difference in the feel of people in different parts of the country. That’s not to say anything about people out west, but there just a difference and there’s more distance and I think that people aren’t as comfortable relating to one another in a short


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space of time. For us, it’s been a very easy move and something that we’ve looked forward to. We love a smaller town. Being in a small college town that has good schools and good people is a perfect fit for us.”

Phillip Lolley Q: What type of summer jobs did you have? PL: “I did a bunch of them. We always had plenty of vegetables in the “garden”. Daddy called it a garden but it was more than a garden, it was a three or four acre garden. But I always had that to do, that was just part of it. There was always work to be done. My daddy owned a construction company. He built, painted, sandblasted and welded water tanks. You were supposed to be 18 years old to work on them, but I can promise you I started working on them when I was 12 or 13. In the summer, especially when one of daddy’s workers didn’t show up, I was always to fill in. I didn’t have to do it all the time, but my summer job was against that hot steel 100 or 200 feet in the air, swinging around in the air, sandblasting and painting. I knew what work was, I can promise you. I was one of those kids that when football practice started, I was more than happy to come to football practice when the rest of the kids were griping. I was more than happy.” Q: You grew up in Alabama, you coached high school in a lot of different places in the state, is there a part of Alabama you haven’t been to? PL: “No. There’s really not. I’ve been all over this state and dearly love it. There’s a constant joke that goes around because I think the best high school coaches in the country are in the Deep South. I think they’re all the best coaches in the world in my opinion. You can get arguments everywhere, but it is Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia and Tennessee and I believe that with all my heart. And if you want to argue with all of them, I’ll battle every other state and say Alabama is number one because I coached here

and I love the high school game, and I’ve seen a good bit of football everywhere.” Q: Is there a particular talent or skill you have that might surprise fans? PL: “No, I’m an old Harley rider. I ride a Harley. That’s my spare time. I love that part of it. I reckon that’s the reason they call it the modern cowboy or whatever, the steel horse. It kind of gives me a little freedom as far as letting the wind hit me in the face and it kind of relaxes me.” Q: What’s the furthest you’ve ridden? PL: “Oh I don’t know. I’ve been some long distances. I’ve ridden as far before as Ft. Walton Beach in a day and back.” Q: Any week-long trips or anything? PL: “No, not yet. Me and my brother, who is dead now, he got killed three years ago in a car wreck. That’s what he and I were going to do that summer, is make that long ride. We were going to start somewhere on the East Coast and try to go up through the Dakotas. We’d talked about it, of course we never got to do that. But I ride by myself. A lot of groups have invited me to join them, but I can’t promise what my time frame will be. But the moment I feel like going, I say `I’m gone’ and I just get on it and go. It relaxes me, and more than anything it keeps me fresh.”

number one and two running backs in the state of Texas and we both chose Oklahoma State. Knowing what I know now, maybe I would’ve gone to A&M or Tennessee or Nebraska, but Thurman and I are great friends and we’ll always be great friends.” Q: What led you to leave OSU to go into the Army? CL: “Well, my stepfather was in the military so I was kind of enamored by it. We spent some time in Germany as a child and in California, so I was just enamored by the military. At Oklahoma State, playing behind Barry and Thurman, I decided I had to find something better to do so I joined the military. It was a great experience for me. I got to travel and grow up and I got my education paid for. I really began to appreciate our country and the preeminence of our country.” Q: You completed college at Stephen F. Austin as a 27-year-old running back. What did the other guys on the team think about that? CL: “That was a fun year. They thought of me as the old man. The story about me was one half, here’s this old man coming back from the military, and the other half was that I played in college behind Barry and Thurman. At that point in 1993, they were All-Pros in the NFL. Barry had already won the Heisman and Thurman had been in several Super Bowls. At that point, they were at the height of their popularity in the NFL. But it was a fun time and I learned a lot. That’s how I became a coach and when I write a book, that’s going to be a huge chapter - that 1993 year. My high school coach was the head coach there, too. The whole staff was my high school staff. Since I went to college twice, I have two sets of college friends and teammates and that’s also how I met my wife, through Stephen F. Austin. It was a blast.”

Curtis Luper Q: You played running back at OSU while Barry Sanders and Thurman Thomas were there. Did you think that you should have played more ahead of them? CL: “I thought then that I should have, definitely. Thurman and I were about the same. I was bigger and he was a little quicker, but I was faster. He was probably a little more mature. He was more of a city guy and I was a country guy. Other than that, there wasn’t much difference between us two. Barry was special. He was two years younger than us. Thurman and I were classmates and we went in the same year. We were the

Tommy Thigpen You lived in Spain while playing in the World League, what was that like?

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TT: It was the World League Football in Barcelona and that was probably the best time I’ve ever had playing football. I worked for a guy named Jack McNeil who was around during the time of `the pass,’ when Doug Flutie beat Miami. He was the head coach for Boston College and he had a different routine, as far as practicing went. He believed in keeping the guys fresh so we never practiced in full pads. Everything was so mental, so your body was fresh when you played. To him, it was to take as many mental reps as you can and you should, when you get to that level, already know how to tackle. That was the best time that I ever had while playing football. If you could swap one aspect of life in America and make it just like Europe, what would it be? TT: The siestas. From one o’clock to four o’clock every day, the shops closed and everything closed. You would go home and rest and at four o’clock, you would go back out and everything opened back up and stayed open until eight or ten at night. That was a big difference because people were energized to do better. That was the one difference because in the United States, you go from nine to five and you go as hard as you can. They were built on `work as hard as you can, rest, and come back and work again.’ That’s probably was contributed to the life expectancy, because over there, I want to say that it’s like 88 to 90-years old. It was a lot better than what it is in the United States. I don’t smoke or drink, but over there, people smoke and drink more than I’ve ever seen, but they live longer and live healthy lives for whatever reason. Who was your favorite superhero when you were a kid? TT: I would always go back and forth from Superman. But back in the day, we had the Super Friends and older people would know about that. The Super Friends were Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman, Aqua Man, the Green Lantern, and Flash. Those were the guys that I would always try to be like. Every day I would switch between them. One day I would be Superman and the next day I would be Batman. I went out every week being someone different.

My mom, dad, all my brothers and sisters all played sports all the way through high school, so most of our stuff was outdoor activities.” Q: How did you get the name Trooper? TT: “My uncle was in the military, and when he came to see me in the hospital, I had a little patch of hair and he said I looked just like one of his troopers. And, he called his paratroopers crybabies, and I was crying all the time in the little bassinet when he was looking through the window, so I became Trooper after that.” Q: What was the worst job you ever had growing up? TT: “The worst job was slopping hogs when I was about eight or nine years old. It’s not a nice-smelling job first of all. And the food that they eat — slop is an understatement, because of what it smells like when you’re digging it out with a bucket.”

Trooper Taylor Q: Being the 10th of 16 children, your family could have basically fielded two full baseball teams. What type of activities did you do as a family? TT: “Most of our activities were work to make ends meet. As far as play time, we played football and basketball a lot. It was more of a throw it and tackle who ever had it deal. We didn’t line up and kick off and all that. When we played baseball we never had to use a ghost runner. We always had someone that could run because we had plenty of people. My whole family was pretty athletic. 16

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Ted Roof Q: Did you have any summer jobs that were particularly unpleasant? TR: “Oh yeah. I started out working in a factory in seventh grade catching off the back of a band saw in a cardboard factory. With the hot temperatures in those plants and having the

cardboard dust coming back all day every day, it was a good lesson. As a young person, I don’t think that kids have a concept of how much a dollar really is. To start off working for less than minimum wage and being accountable for some of the things that I was buying, it was a great lesson of how hard you had to work to stay employed and how far a dollar really went after Uncle Sam took his cut. That was instilled on me early that when you are expected to do a good job, you get in a good day’s work. I also worked construction, which in the Georgia summers, is a job that certainly makes you realize the importance of a good education. I was also a CocaCola delivery man, which was probably one of the better jobs that I had. All of my jobs, early in life, made me appreciate people that work hard for a living and wake up early every day to go and bust their hump to make ends meet for their families.” Q: Do you remember the first record that you bought? TR: “Actually, I think that the first record that I ever had, I won in a radio contest. I was in the third grade and there was a call-in. It was a Hall and Oates album and it was something like the 33rd caller while my brother and I were sitting around. We probably spent about twice as much in gas just to go down and pick it up, but it was pretty cool because we won something on the radio.” Q: While in college at Georgia Tech, did you have any roommates with strange habits? TR: “Yeah, but probably like most college students, when you leave college, those stories get buried and stay there.” Q: What’s the most unusual thing you’ve ever eaten? TR: “I really don’t know what it was, but when I was coaching at Duke, we played Clemson in Tokyo, Japan. While we were over there, we went to some banquet and I don’t recall the name of it, but it was some kind of Japanese meal. I tried it, but it was definitely interesting.” Q: Is there a hidden talent or skill you have? TR: “I used to play the harmonica, but when I would practice my dog would start howling. The people who I lived around didn’t like me practicing too much because of the dogs howling, but I haven’t done that in a while. I had a book and I could play probably seven or eight (songs), some pretty good, but when I lived in an apartment and dogs were howling, I had to give it up.”


BRING YOUR DRIVER TO ENJOY THESE DOWNFIELD DRIVES. Pack those golf clubs in the trunk next time you’re headed to Auburn for a home game. Enjoy world class golf and unequalled luxury at The Auburn Marriott Opelika Hotel & Conference Center, just minutes from Auburn University. Located on 2000 wooded acres on Lake Saugahatchee and enveloped in 54 holes of world-class golf on The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Grand National, the hotel offers picturesque wooded settings and unequaled elegance. The 114 luxury guestrooms and 15 luxury suites all beckon at the end of the day with the cushiony comfort of the new Marriott bedding package. Located close to the stadium, it’s ideal for football games, college reunions or just visiting with the kids. Oh, and War Eagle!!! Going above and beyond. IT’S THE MARRIOTT WAY.

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A part of Alabama’s Resort Collection on The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail

Auburn Marriott Opelika Hotel & Conference Center at Grand National · Opelika, AL · For more information, call 866.343.5283 or visit www.marriottgrandnational.com © 2007 Marriott International, Inc.


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Proud to team up with the Auburn Tigers.

We understand. You need a winning game plan. At FedEx, every day is game day. Whether you want the speed and precision of FedEx Express or the dependability of FedEx Ground, you’ll get the performance you can count on when the game’s on the line.

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S T U D E N T - A T H L E T E   H I G H L I G H T was just leading me back to Auburn University.” Coleman’s faith brought him back for another year, but he mentioned that the Auburn family was another major factor in the decision making process. “I left my family in Mobile to come up to Auburn,” Coleman stated. “But it’s hard to leave this family I have here and go on to the NFL, which is just a business.” With his nephew, Terrance, joining the Auburn family and football team this fall, Coleman said that he is especially excited to get into football action. Away from all things football-related, the defen-

BY

JAMES ETTER

ANTONIO COLEMAN

L

ast season, Auburn football’s 5-7 outcome wasn’t what now-senior Antonio Coleman was hoping for, but the defensive standout took all the mistakes in stride and is carrying on toward a stronger final season on the Plains. “That’s not usual for an Auburn football team to lose seven games and I think all the guys have learned from that,” Coleman said. “We’ve worked hard to make sure it doesn’t happen again.” Though he led the defensive line in tackles last year, Coleman is striving to be a team leader this season, both on and off the field. “I want to be a leader and bring all of these young guys along with me,” said Coleman. “I’ll try to get out there and lead by example, but also by being a vocal leader so they’ll know what to do and they’ll know how to follow me.” Going into the season, the Mobile, Ala., native is hoping to build on where he stopped last year, with 46 tackles, six sacks and one forced fumble – numbers which led to his being named to this year’s All-SEC Preseason Team. Before Coleman was considered for SEC preseason honors, he faced a difficult decision: to stay at Auburn for one more season or to forgo his senior year to join the ranks of the National Football League. “I could’ve gone, but there’s just something about Auburn that brought me back,” Coleman noted. “I went in and I talked with Brother Chet (Williams) and we prayed about it every day. God

22

Tiger Roar

sive end admits to being a relaxed kind of guy. “Most of the guys know that when I’m not playing football, I’m probably at home, laying in the bed and watching TV,” Coleman said. “I love to lie down and watch Lifetime and The First48 and all those kinds of shows.” Majoring in criminology, Coleman’s television preferences are right in line with his education. He admitted, however, that he is slightly behind the times when it comes to video games. “I’m kind of old school. I have a Nintendo 64 and (GoldenEye) 007 is all I play,” Coleman noted. “Most of the guys try to get me into the Wii and all that stuff, but I just can’t get into it.” Although he has no interest in newer video game consoles, the six-foot-three inch defensive end does like his 16 tattoos, one of which is yet another ode to family. “My favorite one would probably be the one of my brother,” Coleman said. “He passed away, and I have a tattoo of hands praying for him.” Now on the cusp of his final season at Auburn, Coleman is looking to bring a better season to the Plains and is confident that everyone will know his ultimate goal. “They’ll know that I’m all about winning for Auburn University,” Coleman said enthusiastically. “We’re going to make that happen this year.”



When Jared Dobbins took off to Africa after graduating, he didn’t think much about insurance. Fortunately, his parents did.

When Jared came home from Africa, he brought

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama is perfect

two things back with him: A great sense of

for people who don’t have access to group

accomplishment for helping a small village build

coverage and are looking for a more affordable

a dam. And malaria. “When

alternative. “Five days in

you’re 24, sickness and disease

the hospital would have cost

aren’t even on your radar,”

me thousands of dollars,”

Jared says. “Fortunately,

Jared says. Today, Jared is

my parents told me to get

planning his next adventure,

Individual Blue before I

and Blue Cross is proud to

left.” Individual Blue from

be right there with him.

bcbsal.com/individual


Tigers Unlimited is honored to recognize those individuals who share our vision of becoming the preeminent athletics department in the nation. Yet The Talon Society represents more than a vision. For without the resources to build world-class facilities and the generosity of those who provide them, a vision is merely empty words on a page. This distinguished group of supporters has committed the resources to assure Auburn’s place in the increasingly competitive arena of intercollegiate athletics. The Talon Society honors those men and women who have contributed $500,000 or more to Auburn Athletics, outright, over and above their Tigers Unlimited ticket priority contributions. Their gifts will enable Auburn to compete at the highest level far into the future. Those recently inducted represent the very best of Auburn, what it has meant to them, and what they hope it will become.

They give because they believe in Auburn, and love it.

Charles Barkley *Sloan Y. Bashinsky Bennie & Stephanie Bray Tillis & Claudette Brett Skipper & Linda Brock Jim & Betty Carroll Jack & Lillian Clift Charlie & Gladys Dunkin Chris & Brandee Dupree Randall Ferguson Stan & Frances Harrell Coolidge Isbell Jack & Erwin Key Oliver & Sally Kingsley Jimmy & Jody Lee *Jonathan B. Lovelace *Catherine K. Lowder Jimmy & Margaret Lowder Bobby & Charlotte Lowder Joe & Dena Malugen Mike & Jane McCartney Milton & Pat McGregor Earlon & Betty McWhorter Johnny Montgomery Bill & Leila Morton Bill & Judy Nelson Tony Nelson Jimmy & Chris Pursell Clark & Cindy Sahlie The Charles Schilleci Family Todd & Allison Schuster Jimmy & Cathy Starr Steve & Laura Taylor Mary Lou Tolar John & Gail Watson Ernie & Kim Wright * posthumously inducted

Summer 2009

25


The All-American Society, established in 1999, consists of over 450 donors who have given or pledged over $90 million to benefit Auburn Athletics. Membership is granted to those who make contributions of $50,000 or more, over a 5-year period. These contributions are outside of ticket priority contributions or other annual support to Auburn Athletics. The members of the All-American Society embody the mission statement of Tigers Unlimited which is to provide Auburn University student-athletes with a truly competitive advantage and prepare them for successful lives through annual scholarship support and private support for capital projects, endowments and other investment opportunities of the Auburn University Athletics Department.

26

Tiger Roar

Ken & Mary Ann Adams In memory of John L. Adcock Bob Agee Billy & Sharon Ainsworth Don Allen All South Services Peter & Janet Amos Bill & Betty Anderson Michael & Babs Anderson Ed & Jeanne AndrĂŠ James & Janelle Andrews Alan & Celia Anthony Myers & Freida Armstrong Auburn ISP Sports Network Auburn Tip-Off Club David & Joanna Austin Roger Barker *Charles Barkley Gil & Alice Barrett Don & Jane Barringer Joann Bashinsky *Fred & Lisa Baxter The John M. Bayliss, III, Estate Jere & Sara Beasley, Sr. Tom & Kay Beaty Chris & Allison Bell John & Suzie Bell Richard Bendinger *Bob & Kim Berry Tom & Jenny Bethel Rennie & Catherine Bickerstaff Matt, Zach & Joel Bishop Jim & Kathy Black, Jr. Dorry Ann Blackburn Linda Ellis Bolton Linda & Ron Bowman JB Braswell Bennie & Stephanie Bray Louis & Patti Breland Kit & Gail Brendle Tillis & Claudette Brett Skipper & Linda Brock David & Judy Bronczek David & Terri Brooks Fleming & Lynn Brooks, Jr. Dan & Shelia Broughton Dwight & Mary Ellen Brown Martin & Gates Brown Randy & Anita Brown Brown & Jackie Bryars Steven & Kelly Buckner Buffalo Rock Company Lester & Nancy Burbic Mark & Annette Burkett John & Suetta Busenlener *Wayne & Lori Bylsma Bob & Pat Cameron *BC & Cindy Campbell Lucinda Cannon Charles & Carol Carlan

Jim & Betty Carroll Claude & Ruth Carter Lewis & Betty Carter Michael Carter Brian Casey Pete & Mary Cash Steve Cates Frank & Martha Chalfont James & Valerie Chandler Ed & Lee Chapman, Jr. Jay & Cynthia Chapman Steve & Deana Chapman Craig & Robyn Clement Jack & Lillian Clift Climate Control Systems, Inc. Carl Michael & Didi Cody The T.O. Collier Estate Al & Dudley Cook Brent & Elizabeth Cook *Curt & Margaret Cope Teal Corte, Jr. James & Carla Corte Bryan Cotney John & Laura Courtney Billy & Tammy Cox Bruce & Christy Cox Robert & Elizabeth Craft Jep & Cecilia Dalton Gerald & Virginia Davidson Nick Davis *Al & Lisa Del Greco *Dave & Jane Dennis Doyle Depreist Roger & Joann Dill *Ben & Pat Dolson Reggie Dubose, Jr. Charles & Gladys Dunkin Rebecca Dunn Chris & Brandee Dupree David Durden *Ed & Diane Dyas, IV Pat & Barbara Dye, Jr. EBSCO Industries Doug & Karen Eddleman Eric Ellis Mark & Regina Espy Jay & Kelley Evers Ferguson Properties Warren Fleming George & Laura Flowers *Bryon & Meriam Franklin, Sr. Ben & Michelle Freeman Mack & Jamie Freeman Richard & Leanne French Keith & Penny Fuller Roger & Kay Fuston Patrick & Marjorie Galloway Michael Garver Tom & Lisa Genetti Richard & Mary Gerakitis

In memory of Cleve Wester Charles & Joy Gleghorn Gene & Rachel Gordon James & Alison Gorrie Miller & Frances Gorrie Matt & Joni Gottlich Wayne Grant *Kevin & Tara Greene *Lee & Kathy Griffith Betty Grisham Glenn Guthrie Joe & Jennifer Guthrie Rosalie Hajek Steve & Lynn Hale Kit & Karen Hammond Reid Hanson Raymond Harbert Cliff & Grace Hare Jack & Pam Harrell Stan & Frances Harrell The Doodle Harris Family Thomas Harris Tom & Beth Hayley Newt & Betty Heath Patrick & Patti Henry David & Maribeth Herndon David & Darlene Herrick Elmer & Carolyn Hill Joe & Imogene Hill, Sr. The William Hitchcock Family Jeff Hodges Bret E. Holmes David & Rona Holmes John & Pat Hughes Suzanne Hughes William Hughes The Bill Ireland, Sr. Family Coolidge & Frances Isbell Kirk & April Jackson Charlie & Vikki Johnson John & Kim Johnson Don & Ferdie Johnston Warren & Kim Jolly Jake Jones Randy & Patricia Jones Rhon Jones Connie & Jo Ann Kanakis James D. Kay, Jr. Michael & Michele Kendrick Bill & Susan Kennedy Jack & Erwin Key Lester & Catherine Killebrew George & Sue King Keith & Julia King Thomas & Jeannie King, Jr. Oliver & Sally Kingsley, Jr. Charlie & Libby Kinnucan *Bill & Mary Knestrick Minga & Novan LaGrone, Jr. Andy & Bridgette Lamon


*Gaines Lanier The Carol Laster Family Charles Lawler Art Leadingham James & Jody Lee, III Less & Cindy Lee, Jr. Donald Leebern, Jr. Donald Leebern, III Gerald & Emily Leischuck Ed & Becky Lewis Walter & Judy Lindsay Phillip & Ashley Love Jon Lovelace Bobby & Charlotte Lowder The Catherine Lowder Family Jimmy & Margaret Lowder Thomas & Jarman Lowder Joe & Dena Malugen E.J. Marino The Martin Family Jim & Carolyn Mathews May, LLC Mike & Jane McCartney Buddy McClinton & Family George & Gigi McCluskey, III Tom & Margaret McCoy James McCrary Roy McCrary Milton & Pat McGregor Nancy McHugh Joe & Genia McKinney *Hank McLarty Phillip & Heather McWane Earlon & Betty McWhorter Jennifer Mengelt *John & Linda Mengelt Rick & Jennifer Merritt Bill & Kimberly Mershon Sam & Pam Miller Tom & Lee Mitchell John R. Montgomery Chip & Shannon Moore D.W. & Mary Moore Jerry & Tamara Moore *Pat & Karen Moore *Flynn & Julie Morris, Jr. Bill & Leila Morton *John & Betty Moulton Greg & Angelyn Mullins Tony Nelson William & Judy Nelson Newell Roadbuilders, Inc. *Lloyd & Sandy Nix Thomas & Lynn Norwood Pat & Carol O’Connor Tim & Mindy O’Neill, Jr. Jim & Lisalyn Parker

Tom Perry Louie M. & Betty M. Phillips Foundation *Stan & Kathy Pietkiewicz Lee & Sarah Provow James & Chris Pursell, Sr. Jamie & Anne Rainer Mark & Melinda Randol James & Angela Rane Michael & Kathleen Rane Buddy & Sue Redd Michelle Reed William & Betty Reed The Waymon C. Reese, Jr. Estate Fred & Mimi Renneker *Ken & Billie Ann Rice Jeff & Margaret Rickard Scott & Jennifer Ricks Jay Rish Graham & Carla Roberts Morris Roberts Robins & Morton Joe Romano Bobby & Cheryl Rushen Steven & Debbie Russell Wayne & Shan Russell Clark & Cindy Sahlie Vince & Mary Saia Stephen & Suanne Samelson Michael Samples Bill & Melanie Sanford Robert & Carolyn Sasser *Morris Savage The Charles Schilleci Family *Dick & Jane Schmalz Todd & Allison Schuster John P. & Mary H. Scott, Jr. Ashley & Gordon Sebring Robby & Denise Segars Bill & Anne Sewell C.N. & Johnnie Sfakianos Ned & Janet Sheffield Craig & Vonda Shoemaker *Brian Shulman Keith & Carol Sirockman Buddy & Jean Smith Doug Smith Smith Commercial Contracting Paul & Bena Spina Larry & Sherrie Stanyard Jimmy & Cathy Starr John & Jeanne Stein Everett & Lissie Stewart Lauren Stewart Taylor Stewart Robert & Dena Stowers Catherine Struble

John & Julie Stupp, Jr. Lee & Kelly Styslinger, III Michael & Jamye Swick Hilt & Scarlett Tatum, III Steve & Laura Taylor Vernon & Lisa Taylor David Thames, Sr. Robert & Terri Thompson Steve & Judy Thornton Mary Lou Tolar C.C. Bo Torbert Family Susan Turner Turner Insurance & Bonding Richard & Janet Ussery J.T. & Marilyn Waggoner Joe & Ann Waid Mac & Shirley Walker *Ernie & Sandra Warren Wick & Shirley Watkins John & Gail Watson Joe & Kathy Weatherford Sandra Weaver Sara West The Mack Whitaker Family Jim & Brenda Whitten Louise Wilborn Lorene Wilder Ken & Debbie Williams Mike & Patricia Williams Ronnie & Patricia Williams Barry Wilson John C. Wilson Walter Woltosz Biff & Ellen Woodruff Ernie & Kim Wright Des & Mary Yawn Michael & Kristi Zito, Jr.

Legacy Members –

Donors who have made contributions through planned/deferred gifts. Don Allen John & Janie Boles JB Braswell *Thomas Bryan Dan Bush Beau & Kathryn Byrd *BC & Cindy Campbell *Randy & Nancy Campbell Steve Cates Randall & Beth Chase Charles Conway *Yann & Susan Cowart Wayne & Louise Crews Eric Ellis Jack & Laura Fite

Warren Fleming Mack & Jamie Freeman Kevin & Laura French Charlie Frew Jim Ham Harry & Marguerite Handlin Roland S. Heard Dale & Nicole Henderson Patrick & Patti Henry Mike & Lisa Herron *Bobby & Becky Hess David & Susan Housel Thomas Hurst Coolidge & Frances Isbell Kirk & April Jackson *Jay & Angie Jacobs Ralph & Eve Jordan, Jr. James W. Knight, Jr. *Mike & Nancy Kolen James & Andy Lawson Art Leadingham Phillip & Ashley Love Dan & Lisa Lovell Nick & Bernadette Marino Charles & Susan Matsos Mike & Jane McCartney David & Kelah McNeill Bo & Laura Megginson John & Eleanor Montgomery John R. Montgomery *Pat & Karen Moore James Carl Mostellar Howard & Carolyn Nelson William & Connie Neville *The Jim O’Donnell Family Tim & Mindy O’Neill, Jr. James & Carole Parrish Mark Peeples Mark & Tiffany Pelham Caleb & Julia Pipes Scott & Jennifer Ricks B.T. & Gale Roberts Ruel & Margaret Russell Jody & Betty Saiia *Jerry Smith Paul & Bena Spina Michael & Jamye Swick Dale & Franke Taylor Troy & Celia Teel Gaines & Linda Thomas Rick & Tammy Towns Robert Jeff Veal Jon & Kammi Waggoner Joe and Ann Waid Ed & Diane Wampold Mike & Cindy Watson Paul & Alice Watts Rob & Christine Wellbaum *Stan & Tina White Billy Wood Carolyn Woodson Andrew & Elizabeth Wren

*Denotes Former Athletes

For more information regarding the All-American Society, please contact Kay Hargrave at 334-844-1152 or hargrrk@auburn.edu.

Summer 2009

27


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A T H L E T I C S   D E V E L O P M E N T

I

t’s hard to believe the summer is almost over and fall is just around the corner. We have so many exciting things going on and are grateful to those of you who support our Auburn University Athletics Department through Tigers Unlimited. The new basketball arena is rapidly taking shape. Please visit http://auburntigers.cstv.com/ arena/aub-arena.html for a view of the progress. Below is an article on our new program, WINGS, benefiting women’s athletics at Auburn. If you are interested in learning more about either of these or have questions about how to become a member of the All American Society or Talon Society, please don’t hesitate to contact us. War Eagle,

Kay Hargrave ’95, ‘97 Senior Associate Athletics Director, Development khargrave@auburn.edu

A

uburn recently launched a program benefiting women’s athletics, entitled WINGS: Women Inspiring and Nurturing Greatness in Student-Athletes. The vision of the group is to support and promote women’s athletics at Auburn University by actively engaging in programs designed to further enhance the overall experience for female student-athletes. On July 16, Auburn hosted its first career mentoring program, which paired 39 studentathletes with women in career fields they are interested in pursuing. “I thought the program was very beneficial, particularly with the field that I want to

30

Tiger Roar

get into, sports broadcasting,” said Jordan Greenleaf, a junior basketball student-athlete. “My mentor really helped me understand the steps to take to help get into the profession. It was great to make a contact in a field I am interested in pursuing.” Auburn plans to host two mentoring events this year with student-athletes and WINGS members. “The program is very exciting,” said Laura Grill, Executive Vice President of East Alabama Medical Center. “It is nice to see all the energy with the student-athletes. They all have really good questions, and it looks like it is going to be

a really good resource for all of them. “It is also beneficial for me because it helps me find young, energetic people who are looking to further their career opportunities. I look forward to doing it again.” WINGS currently has 59 members. In order to join, members must commit $1,000 over a three-year period. For more information on how to become a member of WINGS, please contact Meredith Jenkins, senior associate athletics director at (334) 844-9735, heinsml@auburn.edu or Kay Hargrave, senior associate athletics director, (334) 844-1151, khargrave@auburn.edu.


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JACOBS   ELECTED   TO   2009-2010   SEC   EXECUTIVE   COMMITTEE

A

uburn University Director of Athletics Jay Jacobs was elected to the Southeastern Conference Executive Committee at the SEC Spring Meetings in Destin, Fla., on May 29, 2009. Jacobs was the only Athletic Director from the conference elected to the 2009-2010 Executive Committee. SEC Executive Committee members for the 2009-2010 term in addition to Jacobs include: Dr. Lee T. Todd Jr., president of the University

32

Tiger Roar

of Kentucky, was elected president of the committee. Dr. Bernard Machen, president of the University of Florida, was elected vice president; and Howard Brill, Faculty Athletics Representative at the University of Arkansas, was elected secretary. Other Executive Committee members include Dr. Robert E. Witt, president of the University of Alabama; Dr. Bill Bearden, Faculty Athletics Representative at the University of South Carolina; and Carla Williams, Senior Woman

Administrator at the University of Georgia. The Executive Committee is charged with managing the conference’s financials, including approval of budgets, disbursements and supplements, in addition to hearing waiver appeals. The committee meets twice a year. Jacobs, who will mark five years of service as Auburn’s Director of Athletics in December, also currently serves on the NCAA Division I Administration Cabinet.


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BY

JANIE BOLES

A B O V E   A N D   B E Y O N D

W

e would like to introduce you to Amy Martin and Jennifer Wright. They were recently selected as our “Above and Beyond” Award winners. The Above and Beyond Award winners are nominated by the Auburn Athletics Department staff by doing something that is Above and Beyond the normal call of duty. began going to school she pursued a pre-vet degree. She has always loved animals and as a child she would constantly bring home injured animals. And even on certain occasions she would have a couple of frogs stuffed in her pockets! Due to her love for math she ended up with an accounting degree and graduated from Auburn University in 2004. Lori Arthurs, Director of Athletic Finance, shares with us, “Jennifer is one of the hardest working and dependable employees I have worked with. She takes her job seriously and has a deep sense of pride in her responsibilities and accomplishments.” We have had the pleasure of serving with Jennifer here since January of 2006. As most in athletics experience, there is never a typical day, which is what she enjoys most about her work. She likes working with the administrators and coaches, helping them with their accounting needs. She does an excellent job of organizing the budget information and presenting it in a way that is easily understood. Jennifer is very personable and is able to com-

“Jennifer is one of the hardest working and dependable employees I have worked with. She takes her job seriously and has a deep sense of pride in her responsibilities and accomplishments.”

J

ennifer Wright serves in the Auburn Athletics business office as an accountant. She considers herself not the typical accountant, she loves being outdoors, working with people and exercising. Initially when she

municate very well with the coaches and administrators. She is very sincere and hard working in serving others in the department. Jennifer shares that her most memorable experience while serving here was when her brother Jim, who had just finished his MOS in the Marines, came to visit the Athletics Department. Jim has been an Auburn fan his whole life and has never been to an Auburn football game. Jennifer reflects, “I will never forget how Virgil Starks (former Senior Associate Athletics Director for Academics) greeted him so warmly and took him to meet players, staff and others like he had known him all his life. Wonderful people within the department helped me arrange for Jim to see Jordan-Hare Stadium for the first time. To see the look of amazement on his face, much like that of our fans on football weekends, will forever be one of those Auburn moments I will never forget.” Jennifer strives to make a difference in others’ lives and likes working with people. Daily she makes a positive impact on all of those around her. She is also very selfless. One day she aspires to be a wife and mother. She also would like to get more involved in the community and possibly get her personal trainer’s license. Jennifer is originally from Florence, Ala. and grew up in a large family, four brothers and one sister! She is thankful she came from a large family and continues to be very close to them all.

AMY MARTIN

A

my Martin serves in the Auburn Athletics Ticket Office. According to those she works with she is irreplaceable. Stephen Naughton, Director of Ticket Sales states, “Amy comes to work every morning with a smile. Her attention to detail makes her a vital member of the ticket office team.” Amy is the kind of worker that everyone wants to have on their side. No matter

what is asked of her, she steps up to the plate and makes it happen. She is very reliable and exceeds expectations. She will even surprise you in that when you find yourself in a bind, she somehow is already there; ready to do what is necessary to get things back on track. She is also one that helps wanting nothing in return. She strives to do her best and does whatever it

Summer 2009

35


A B O V E   A N D   B E Y O N D Continued from page 35 takes to help others. The Auburn Athletics Department is blessed to have employees with this attitude. Amy is twenty-six years old and has one sister. She is originally from Alexander City, Ala. She attended Central Alabama Community College in Alexander City before transferring to Auburn University. Currently she is pursuing an accounting degree. Amy began working with Auburn Athletics in 2006. She started out in the business office before the ticket office. She stays very busy helping hundreds of fans answering calls, assisting those at the ticket window and handling ticket orders.

“Amy comes to work every morning with a smile. Her attention to detail makes her a vital member of the ticket office team.” The most memorable experience Amy shares with us is during this past year, the Auburn women’s basketball game against Tennessee. She recalls that it was so exciting to see the support of the fans. I don’t think any of the staff in the athletics department or the thousands of fans that attended the game will ever forget that game. She enjoys most working with the fans on game day. In the ticket office, game days are very busy and the unexpected normally happens, so it is a blessing to have someone solid like Amy on your staff to be available to take care of anything that does come up. In the future, Amy looks forward to completing her accounting degree. She would love to one day travel through Europe.

Honor the traditions of the past and help build the future of Auburn University. Become a member of The President’s Trust.

Through a pooled endowment of ten million dollars, The President’s Trust will establish discretionary funds, provided by the university’s most generous donors, to support programs and services deemed a priority by the president.

The President’s Trust Auburn University Foundation 317 South College Street Auburn, AL 36849 334-844-1191 www.develop.auburn.edu

Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer.

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W


SOCCER PREVIEW

W W

hen Karen Hoppa was hired in the spring of 1999, her team goal was to make the SEC Tournament that season and eventually climb the ladder into the top half of the extremely competitive SEC. “By being competitive in the conference, it would make us competitive nationally,” she said as a preview to her first squad. When you consider that in the past decade she has guided the program to a 11576-16 (.594) record, seven NCAA Tournament appearances and six SEC West titles, one would be forced to say that she has not only achieved those modest goals, but also turned the team into the marquee program in the SEC West and one of the nation’s most consistent squads in terms of yearly success. Coming off of another SEC West title and the school’s second NCAA Tournament host berth in 2008, the promise of another run into the national tournament and the school’s first Sweet 16 berth seem to be attainable goals as Auburn returns a high-octane offense to the pitch this season. “Our goals for the 2009 season are big once again. We want to achieve some things that we haven’t done before at Auburn, the first of which is qualifying for the Sweet 16. That’s our seasonlong goal and that’s going to be our focus,” Hoppa said. “We want to compete for a SEC Championship again, and we want to defend the SEC West Championship. Our goals year-inand-year-out always start right there.” The 2008 season was undoubtedly a successful one for Hoppa and the Tigers as the team recorded the most points (135) and goals (41) since the 2002 team won the league title while also going 7-3-1 in SEC play, the most league wins for Auburn since going 9-0-2 in 2004. Leading the way offensively last season and

BY

DAN FROEHLICH

back for her second year at Auburn is 2008 SEC Freshman of the Year Katy Frierson. A midfielder from Birmingham, Ala., she led the team in goals with nine during her inaugural season on the Plains, recording all but two of her team-leading 25 points in conference play en route to being named a Freshman All-American. Recognized nationally for her unique talents on the field, she spent the off-season fine-tuning her skills with the US Soccer U-20 team, an experience that will only enhance her play-making abilities for an offense that averaged 1.8 goals per game in 2008, but will be counted on for even more production in 2009. “This is going to be a year in which we will need to rely on our offense more than we have in the past,” Hoppa said. “We have the most experience up front and in the midfield, so we will

Coach Karen Hoppa

expect them to score two or three per game to give our younger defense and goalkeepers some breathing room.” Also returning to provide an offensive punch is senior forward Rebecca Howell, who’s teamleading 12 assists last year was just one shy of the school’s single-season record and gives her 48 career points (14 goals, 20 assists), which already ranks eighth in school history for career points. A starter in 22 matches last season, she has tallied six goals in each of the last two seasons despite never being the go-to scorer in the run of play, a title she could easily take over in 2009. Senior Caitlin King also will be counted on to ramp up the offensive output after being hamstrung by injuries a season ago that limited her to just 10 matches (570 minutes), only one of which came in conference play. During her first two seasons, King was one of the most dominant players on an attacking front line for Auburn, scoring five goals in each of her first two seasons while leading the team in assists in 2007 with a school-record 13. “We are really excited about our offensive power this year. First and foremost we have Caitlin King coming back healthy. She missed all of SEC play last year, and that was a big hit for our offense,” Hoppa said. “Having her back as a senior will provide a big spark. You add her to a very successful 2008 offense that ran through Becca and Katy and we should be able to challenge the numbers we put up last year.” Known for scheduling tough, the 2009 season is no different than any of the past years as Auburn will face eight NCAA Tournament teams throughout the course of the season, including 2008 National Champion North Carolina and NCAA Quarterfinalist Duke on the road and NCAA Second Round participant Missouri at home in the non-conference,” Hoppa said. “We didn’t back down on the schedule this year. We knew we would have a big senior class with six of them and we expect them to lead us through this very difficult schedule. It is always important to have a competitive schedule and a competitive RPI because our goals are to get into the NCAA Tournament and be successful once we get there. This schedule overall will prepare us for that.”

Summer 2009

39


VOLLEYBALL P R E V I E W

Head Coach Wade Benson

A BY

KENDRA LEE

A

uburn head coach Wade Benson enters his sophomore season at the helm of the Tiger volleyball team with year two of his three-year plan in place. Step two: bring in players that bring the program to another level in the right direction. The team enters the 2009 campaign with high hopes for its incoming class. Benson and his coaching staff brought in PrepVolleyball.com’s 26th-best class and the third-ranked class in the Southeastern Conference. With nine freshmen and a transfer joining the squad, youth is the name of the game for the 2009 Tigers. “We have 10 new players coming in, and we have to adjust them to the way we play and the way we go about our everyday business,” Benson said. “Our main focus of 2009 is to adapt the new players to life in college and get them prepared for a high level of competition.” The eight returning members, including four starters and libero, will play key roles to the progression of the young class. Returning at the middle position is a pair of juniors in Alyssa Davis and Lauren Mellor, each of whom saw action in all 31 matches last season. An incoming freshmen duo will make a push for starting positions and add depth for the Tigers. Courtney McDonald, from Palmetto, Fla., and Chloe Rowand, from Spokane, Wash., will be relied on to bring competition and be solid contributors at the middle spot. Benson is enthusiastic about the strong contingent of outside hitters joining the 2009 Auburn team. Katherine Culwell (Dallas, Texas) enters her freshman season as the No. 34 recruit according to PrepVolleyball.com and classmate

40

Tiger Roar

MacKenzy Harper (Lebanon, Ohio) comes in as No. 91. Joining them will be Sarah Bullock (Allen, Texas), Brittney Rhude (Spring, Texas) and Vesala Zapryanova (Sofia, Bulgaria). Adding experience to the group is sophomore Kelly Fidero. She was second on last year’s team with 202 total kills, seeing playing time in all 31 matches for the Tigers. Returning at right side is junior Jonelle Wallace (Denver, Colo.), who finished her sophomore campaign with the second-best attack

percentage on the team (.205) and averaged 1.72 kills per set. Joining Wallace is junior Morgan Johns, a transfer from Florida Atlantic that led the Owls in kills and service aces as a sophomore. Junior Sara Shanks returns as a two-year starting setter for the Tigers that led the team with 995 assists and 30 service aces. Sophomore Christina Solverson (Tucson, Ariz.) came off the bench and provided depth at the setting position. Adding competition for the starting position will be newcomer Kendall Burgess. Burgess, of Houston, Texas, is a three-time AllState selection and will be a solid contender for playing time. Returning to the libero position is two-year starter Liz Crouch (New Orleans, La.). The junior recorded a team-high 389 digs last season and her 3.70 digs per set average was fourth all-time on the Auburn single season list. Also returning is sophomore Chanelle Clark (Temecula, Calif.), who finished with a strong spring season. Freshman Sarah Wroblicky (Irvine, Calif.) has the ability to come in and provide added depth to the libero position. The 2009 schedule will prove to be a test for the young squad as it features eight teams that advanced to the 2008 NCAA Tournament. The Tigers open the season with the annual War Eagle Invitational in the Student-Activities Center Aug. 28-29. The team then travels to Minneapolis, Minn., for the Diet Coke Classic, a tournament that includes host Minnesota and Iowa State, both competitors in the 2008 NCAA Tournament. Following the Georgia Southern Tournament Sept. 11-12, Auburn opens up the SEC at Mississippi State Sept. 18 and concludes the season against Georgia Nov. 25. “It’s a good schedule with matches that are going to test us in different ways,” Benson said. “The Minnesota tournament is going to be very difficult and the SEC always is tough. It really isn’t going to be about the wins and losses for us, but more about improving. If we continue to improve in our numbers and as a team, then we are going to improve in our wins.”


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D O W N   T H R O U G H   T H E   Y E A R S

Years ending in nine have been pretty good to us.

BY

DAVID HOUSEL

–In 1939, Auburn Stadium, the edifice now known as Jordan-Hare Stadium was dedicated. Who could ever imagined on that day long ago that the stadium which then held 7,500 would one day hold more than 87,000 and be one of the premier football stadiums in the country? –1949 brought one of the epic upsets in Auburn history. After losing to Alabama 55-0 the year before in the first game of the modern series — the two schools didn’t play for 41 years, 1907-48 — Auburn upset Alabama 14-13 when Ed Salem missed an extra point near the end of the game. Auburn hero, quarterback Travis Tidwell, thought he might have had something to do with that miss. Salem and Tidwell knew each other from their high school playing days in Birmingham and, as Tidwell would tell it, “He knew I could fly...I told Coach Brown to put me in so I could rush from the outside...and Salem looked up to see where I was just before he kicked...and that could have caused him to miss...” Whatever the reason, Auburn had an epic victory, one of the few of that era, and that night “Stringbean” Jennings, influenced, shall we say, by the day’s celebration, placed a collect call to the Queen of England from a hall phone in the Thomas Jefferson hotel in Birmingham. When told that the Queen was sleeping and did not wish to be disturbed, Jennings said, “Well, when she wakes up, tell her Auburn just beat the hell out of Alabama...” –1959 was not an exceptional year (7-3) but there was a key 7-6 win over Georgia Tech in the 42

Tiger Roar

rain at despised Grant Field in Atlanta and a 6-0 win over Florida to extend a Homecoming winning streak to seven games. The streak would eventually reach 17 games, 1953-69, until the Tigers lost to LSU 17-9 in the rain on Homecoming in 1970. But can you imagine playing Florida and LSU on Homecoming? Times have changed, but it’s also fair to say that Auburn didn’t play but four home games in 1959 and only a few more in 1970. It’s also worthy of note that we now have another 17-game Homecoming winning streak, 1992-2008 and will be going for 18 this year against Furman. –1969, the beginning of the Pat Sullivan-Terry Beasley Era of Auburn Football. The 38-12 victory over the “Super Sophs,” John Reaves, Carlos Alvarez, and the haughty Florida Gators, the 16-3 win over Georgia in Athens, our first over the Bulldogs since 1965 and, of course, the Alabama game, 49-26. “Back to kick is Connie Frederick...we’ve been doing a little figuring here, remembering the Tennessee game was 41... hey, Frederick’s gonna run the ball...Frederick’s gonna run it...Need I say more? –1979, the best year of the Doug Barfield era, 8-3, behind the running and blocking of James Brooks, Joe Cribbs and William Andrews, with wins over Florida and an unexpected 33-13 blowout of Buck Belue and the Georgia Bulldogs in Athens, one of

big Frank Warren’s best days. Good stuff. –1989. December 2, 1989. Nothing more needs to be said, but there was a third straight SEC championship. The zenith of the Pat Dye Era. –1999. The beginning of the Tuberville Era, the surprising, and oh-so-pleasing blowout wins in Baton Rouge (41-7) and Athens (38-21), harbingers of the many good things to come in Tommy’s 10-years as head coach, highlighted, of course, by those six straight wins over Alabama. And now we come to 2009 and the beginning of the Gene Chizik Era. What kind of year will it be? Don’t ask me. I’m just an old retired guy, but I’ll venture a guess that Coach Dye would be right again. When asked how good his team was going to be, Coach Dye would always respond, “probably not as good as we want to be, but better than a lot of people want us to be...all we want to do is win the games we’re supposed to win and a few more...” And so it will be with the Gene Chizik Era. “We won’t be as good as we want to be, but we’ll be better than our opponents want us to be...” And probably better than the media thinks we will be. Perhaps a lot better. After all, this is a year that ends in nine, and years ending in nine have been pretty good to the Auburn Tigers.


Donor Services & Annual Giving Tim Jackson Executive Associate Athletics Director

Vicki Meetze

Director of Development Operations and Programs

Janie Boles

Director of Donor Services and Annual Giving

The mission of Tigers Unlimited is to provide Auburn University student-athletes with a truly competitive advantage through annual scholarship support and private support Hillary Nowland Kathryn McCollough for capital projects, endowments and investAssistant Director of Donor Executive Secretary for Donor ment opportunities of the Auburn University Services and Annual Giving Services and Annual Giving Athletics Department.

Development

Kay Hargrave

Senior Associate Athletics Director, Development

Joe Whitt

Assistant Athletics Director

Rebecca Coan

Associate Director of Athletics Development

Chris Gary

Associate Director of Athletics Development

Kymberly Holland Assistant Director of Athletics Development

Helen Baggett Assistant Director of Athletic Development

Auburn Arena Update

A

s the Auburn Arena draws closer to completion, excitement is building among the Auburn Family. There are many questions whirling around concerning Tigers Unlimited seating options as well as the how seats will be allocated in the new arena. Tigers Unlimited is working diligently to create a pricing plan that will be affordable for everyone who would like to join in the excitement of this new, state-of-the-art facility by joining the TUF-Basketball Ticket Priority Program while at the same time generating enough revenue to support such an amazing structure. There will be numerous seating opportunities within the Auburn Arena. From floor seats to TUF season ticket seats, there is something for

every Auburn fan. Seating options in the Auburn Arena include floor seating, Courtside Section seating, Loge Box seating, Scholarship Section seating and TUF-Basketball seating. Some of the amenities that will be included in the premium seat contributions are season tickets, access to the Courtside Lounge or Scholarship Lounge and reserved parking. Tigers Unlimited appreciates those who have been faithful in supporting Auburn basketball through the TUF-Basketball Ticket Priority Program and those who have made a major gift contribution to the Arena Campaign. Because this support has been instrumental to the Auburn basketball program, it is only fitting that seats in the Auburn Arena will be allocated based on

basketball ticket priority and major gifts to the Arena Campaign. As an added bonus, current 2009-10 Courtside Club members, Scholarship Donors and Arena Campaign contributors will have the opportunity to select their seats in the new arena through a series of exclusive selection events. Donors will be notified of the date, time and location of their selection event based on their TUF-Basketball priority level. The selection process will begin in spring/summer 2010. Tigers Unlimited will continue to post details concerning the Auburn Arena including a pricing plan and premium seat option updates at www.auburntigers.com/arena as they become available. For additional questions, please contact Hillary Nowland at nowland@auburn.edu.

Summer 2009

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BY JACK SMITH

B O O K   R E V I E W

“Rivalry Vault” chronicles greatest Iron Bowl victories B

o Over the Top. Reverse to Victory. Punt Bama, Punt. Most any Auburn fan of the modern era can remember those historic victories over Alabama — when they were, where they took place, and how they felt. But what about the year in which Auburn defeated Alabama not once but twice? (Answer: 1893). Or the year of the last Auburn-Alabama game played in Tuscaloosa for 99 years — when Auburn upset Alabama 17-0? (Answer: 1901). Those historic Auburn-Alabama games might not be as well known among Auburn faithful, but to Auburn historian David Housel, they are no less important than “The Sack Game” of 2005 or Auburn’s heart-stopping 18-17 win at JordanHare Stadium in 1997, when Auburn pulled off a near miracle after a late Alabama fumble. And who better than Housel to pick Auburn’s 20 greatest wins over Alabama, who recently put the finishing touches on a new book that is sure

to be a coffee table fixture in homes all over the state. “Alabama-Auburn Rivarly Vault,” written by Housel and Tommy Ford of Alabama, will be out this fall. It will retail for $49.95. The book is being published by Whitman Publishers, the same publisher that produced “Auburn Football Vault,” which has already become a favorite among Auburn fans. Researching and writing the book gave Housel the chance to reflect once more on the rivalry that was so much a part of his tenure as Sports Information Director and Director of Athletics at Auburn. Fans and sports writers can argue over what rivalry is the greatest in college football, but Housel offers a simple reason Alabama-Auburn is the only rivalry that matters here. “It’s ours,” he says. “The Auburn-Alabama rivalry is special because it’s ‘ours,’ and, for both sides, it defines who we are, how we feel about ourselves, not just for one day or for one week but for a whole year. Is it the biggest (best) rivalry in college football? It is for us — and for them. Not always the healthiest, but certainly one of the most torrid. It’s that way because we — both sides — let it

affect how we feel about ourselves.” The book features Auburn and Alabama’s 20 greatest Iron Bowl wins, which is fitting, perhaps, because the joy of winning in the rivalry may be exceeded only by the agony of defeat for fans on both sides. Auburn’s 20 greatest wins are captured in writing as only Housel can. “Alabama-Auburn Rivalry Vault” also features pictures from both schools’ archives, personal collections and newspapers. The publisher was careful, Housel said, not to just reuse pictures and artifacts from the Auburn and Alabama “Vault” books. Other Auburn victories profiled in the book include Auburn’s 14-13 upset of Alabama in 1949, Coach Shug Jordan’s first win in the rivalry in 1954, Auburn’s National Championship season win in 1957, Mailon Kent’s historic game in 1963, “Back to kick is Connie Frederick” in 1969 and Auburn’s furious comeback in 1970, when the Tigers won 33-28 after trailing 17-0 in the first quarter. “These are historic games, meaningful games, games with great, unexpected plays or performances, inspirational games — and just plain ‘it’s-good-to-beat-Alabama games,” Housel said.

Now you have SIX reasons to get an Auburn University tag: 1 Six characters are now available for optimum personalization (personalize your tag at no additional cost). 2 New, cool design featuring lots of orange and blue. 3 Your purchase supports scholarships. 4 Shows your Auburn pride and spirit to the world, or at least to other drivers in Alabama (or wherever the road may take you).

5 You’ll be a cool cat, just like Aubie. 6 Why not?

Buy your tag at the county tag office—make a difference and share the spirit by welcoming new students to the Auburn family.

AU BU R N www.auburn.edu/cartags

Summer 2009

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C O M M U N I T Y   R E L A T I O N S

Billy Hitchcock Miracle Field

Jake Ricks BY

T

HILLARY NOWLAND

here is a baseball field at Covington Park in Opelika, Ala. that stands out from all the others. At first glance, it looks like any other ball field with lush, green grass and tan clay. But, if you look closely you will see that the lush, green grass isn’t grass at all. A cushioned, rubberized surface colored green and tan in the right places covers the entire field. It isn’t until you take a closer look that you realize this particular baseball field at Covington Park was created for a special purpose, for special children who want to play ball like everyone else. On April 26, assistant head football coach Trooper Taylor and a band of Auburn football student-athletes and cheerleaders visited the Billy Hitchcock Miracle Field to participate in a game and see the impact a facility like this has on the community. The student-athletes and cheerleaders began by signing autographs and soon made it to the field to play ball. “I kind of went there a little nervous, not knowing what to expect,” said Taylor. “It gave me a new appreciation for these kids. If anyone thinks they have it tough, then go out there and see these kids play. We got there and probably had more fun than the kids did. We were only supposed to stay 45 minutes, but ended up staying about four hours.” The Billy Hitchcock Miracle Field gives children with disabilities the opportunity to play baseball with their peers. They dress in uniform, bat and play in the field. If a child is unable to

run the bases, someone runs for them. Everyone bats and everyone scores. “You really don’t think about the effect a handicap has on a child’s ability to participate in sports until you go out there,” said Taylor. “I think it is huge because it gives these children a chance to feel normal and participate in community activities.” The complex includes a custom-designed field with a manufactured surface to help prevent injuries, wheelchair accessible dugouts and a completely flat surface to eliminate any barriers to wheelchair-bound or visually impaired players. “When you first get there you are a little worried that you might hurt somebody,” said Taylor. “Then, you found out they were playing like regular kids. They don’t feel sorry for themselves. They are out there enjoying life, spending time with family and being normal kids. If those kids had half as much fun as we did, it was all worth it.” Among the Auburn football student-athletes to participate in the first visit to the Miracle Field were senior defensive end Antonio Coleman, junior defensive lineman Mike Blanc and senior defensive lineman Jake Ricks. The visit had such a positive effect on the student-athletes and Taylor that they immediately scheduled a second visit for May 31, the season’s closing day. “We decided to take a dif-

ferent set of players when we went back the second time,” said Taylor. “We talked about it in our team meeting, and so many players wanted to go that we didn’t have room for all of them in the van.” Making the trip on closing day was Director of Player Development Ben Thomas, red shirt freshman defensive back T’Sharvan Bell, freshman running back Onterio McCalebb, freshman wide receiver Deangelo Benton, sophomore wide receiver Harry Adams and sophomore defensive backs Darvin Adams and Neiko Thorpe. Taylor also brought along his wife, Evi, and their two children, Blaise (13) and Starr (11). “I was fortunate enough to take my family back with me the second time we went,” said Taylor. “I wanted my kids to witness it. It gives kids who are blessed with the ability to play a sport the chance to see kids play despite their disability. It will make you put some of your problems on the backburner. We definitely plan on going back again and again.” For additional information on the Miracle Field program, visit www.miraclefield.org.

Coach Taylor gets ready to pitch

Summer 2009

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W


Equestrian Student-Athlete

Lyndsey  Jordan

W W

ith the end of summer approaching, Auburn fans are looking forward to attending fall sporting events. The Auburn equestrian team will start its season Aug. 18 against Southern Methodist University. Lyndsey Jordan, a senior from Georgetown, Ky., majoring in Communications, has high expectations for next year and will play a dynamic role in the team’s success. Jordan started reining horses at the young age of 10, but was destined for riding even before she was born. “My mom and dad had a pony for me before I was born,” said Jordan. “Her name was Fancy Pants.” At the age of eleven, Jordan won her first world championship. Winning that title sparked

BY MONICA AFANADOR her passion for competitive horseback riding. “After I won my first world championship I wanted to do it more and more,” said Jordan. “I just fell in love with the sport. At the age of 16 I won my second world championship. I would wake up at 2 a.m. to practice by myself at horse shows. I worked hard and was really tough on myself to be better and better.” Because of her hard work and determination Jordan remains the second highest point earner in her sport’s history, and she has won two United States Equestrian Federation Gold medals. In high school, Jordan was unaware there were athletic opportunities for equestrian athletes in college. It wasn’t until head equestrian coach Greg Williams came knocking at her door.

“I didn’t even know girls could ride at college and especially for a scholarship until Greg Williams approached me and introduced himself,” said Jordan. “Then, after talking with Greg, I started getting offers from other schools.” It did not take long for Jordan to fall in love with Auburn University and the city itself. “After seeing Auburn and meeting the team for the first time, I fell in love with Auburn’s homey, country and small town atmosphere,” said Jordan. “I signed for a full scholarship and have loved it ever since.” Jordan has numerous memories from riding at Auburn, but her favorite part of being on the team is creating friendships that will last a lifetime. “There is a group of girls on the team that have become my sisters,” said Jordan. “They are amazing and a true blessing in my life. We have so much fun when we travel and even though we get worn out and tired, it’s all worth it. I don’t know what I would do without them.” Along with making memories with the girls on the team, Jordan has had success riding for Auburn. Jordan had her personal best record her freshman year winning a total of five Most Valuable Player awards. As a sophomore, Jordan received three MVP awards. Despite her outstanding performances during her freshman and sophomore years, Jordan overcame one of her toughest setbacks as a junior. Last summer, Jordan’s horse “Flip My Nic,” or as she called him, “Flipper,” was injured and had to be put down. Although Flipper was not at Auburn with Jordan, he had made a big impact on her life influencing her performances as a Tiger. “Flipper was the best horse I have ever had,” said Jordan. “Putting him down was the hardest thing I had ever had to go through. We won almost every event we rode. He always lifted my spirits and gave me confidence.” Dealing with her loss, Jordan feels that she did not ride well during the 2008-09 season. “I struggled inside, and it really hit me hard,” said Jordan. On June 27, Jordan won a gold medal in Oklahoma City and Collegiate Class, competing with the top 12 college riders in the nation and thought of Flipper when she showed. “It was the first time I really got my confidence back since Flipper died, and it showed me I’m back and prepared for next year’s season,” said Jordan. This summer Jordan has been working hard in and out of the classroom to prepare for next season. “Personally, I want to have another good season and win out again,” said Jordan. “Being a senior, I also want to be a strong leader on the team.” The Auburn Equestrian team looks to win all of their matches this fall to prepare them for the SEC and NCAA Tournament.

Summer 2009

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AUBURN BASEBALL ;PNLYZ<USPTP[LKPU]P[LZ`V\[VILHULZZLU[PHSWHY[PUZ\WWVY[PUNVULVM(\I\YUxZ SVUNH[OSL[PJ[YHKP[PVUZVM(\I\YUIHZLIHSS)`QVPUPUN[OL)PSS`/P[JOJVJR*S\I TLTILYZHYLHZZ\YLK[OLILZ[WVZZPISLZLH[PUNWYPVYP[`PU:HTMVYK:[HKP\T/P[JOJVJR -PLSKH[7SHPUZTHU7HYR;OYV\NO`V\YJVU[YPI\[PVUZ`V\LHYU[OLWYP]PSLNL[VW\YJOHZL ZLH[Z[OH[TH`ILYLUL^LKHUU\HSS`I`THPU[HPUPUN`V\YJVU[YPI\[PVUSL]LS)PSS`/P[JOJVJR *S\ITLTILYZ^PSSHSZVYLJLP]L[OLMVSSV^PUN;PNLYZ<USPTP[LKILULÄ[Z!   

     

     



‹7YPVYP[`ZLH[PUNPU:HTMVYK:[HKP\T/P[JOJVJR-PLSKH[7SHPUZTHU7HYR ‹7YPVYP[`VW[PVU[VVYKLYWVZ[ZLHZVU[PJRL[ZMVY:,* 5*(( 9LNPVUHS;V\YUHTLU[WSH` ‹(\I\YU)HZLIHSS4LKPH.\PKL ‹;PNLYZ<USPTP[LK4LTILYZOPW*HYK ‹;PNLYZ<USPTP[LK*HY+LJHS  ‹8\HY[LYS`0ZZ\LZVM[OLTiger Roar Magazine 

   

Contribute Now! By making a contribution of $100 per seat, you may join the Billy )`THRPUNHJVU[YPI\[PVUVM WLYZLH[`V\TH`QVPU Hitchcock Club for Auburn baseball. Make your contribution [OL)PSS`/P[JOJVJR*S\IMVY(\I\YUIHZLIHSS7SLHZLTHRL online using a Mastercard/Visa/AMEX credit card or an electronic JOLJRZWH`HISL[V;<-)HZLIHSSHUKTHPS[V[OL check at www.TigersUnlimited.com. HKKYLZZILSV^VYTHRL`V\YJVU[YPI\[PVUVUSPUL \ZPUNH4HZ[LYJHYK=PZHJYLKP[JHYKVYHULSLJ[YVUPJ JOLJRH[^^^[PNLYZ\USPTP[LKJVT  



;PNLYZ<USPTP[LK

 

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TICKET PRIORITY PROGRAM 2008-09 2009-10


A T H L E T I C S   S C H E D U L E S Equestrian Date 09/18/09

10/02/09 10/09/09 10/16/09 11/07/09 11/08/09 11/13/09

Soccer Date 08/23/09 08/28/09 08/30/09 09/04/09 09/11/09 09/13/09 09/18/09 09/20/09 09/25/09 09/27/09 10/02/09 10/04/09 10/09/09 10/11/09 10/16/09 10/18/09 10/22/09 10/25/09 10/30/09 11/04/09 11/06/09 11/08/09

Opponent SMU TCU South Carolina Tennessee-Martin Texas A&M Sacred Heart Delaware Georgia at

Location Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Martin, Tenn. Auburn, Ala. Fairfield, Conn. Newmark, Del. Athens, Ga.

Opponent Location Samford Birmingham, Ala. Dayton Auburn, Ala. South Alabama Auburn, Ala. Kennesaw State Auburn, Ala. Missouri Auburn, Ala. Texas Tech Auburn, Ala. Duke Durham, N.C. North Carolina Durham, N.C. Mississippi State Starkville, Miss. Mississippi Oxford, Miss. Arkansas Auburn, Ala. LSU Auburn, Ala. South Carolina Columbia, S.C. Florida Gainesville, Fla. Vanderbilt Auburn, Ala. Kentucky Auburn, Ala. Tennessee (W) Knoxville, Tenn. Georgia Auburn, Ala. Alabama Tuscaloosa, Ala. SEC Tournament (Day 1) Orange Beach, Ala. SEC Tournament (Semis) Orange Beach, Ala. SEC Tournament (Finals) Orange Beach, Ala.

Time TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA Time 6:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 2:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 2:30 p.m. CT 7:30 p.m. ET 12:00 p.m. ET 7:00 p.m. CT 2:00 p.m. CT 7:30 p.m. CT TBA 7:00 p.m. ET 2:00 p.m. ET 7:30 p.m. CT 1:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. ET 2:30 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT TBA TBA TBA

Volleyball Date 08/28/09

Opponent Alabama A&M Alabama-Birmingham

Location Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala.

BY SUSAN CANAAN

Time 12:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT

08/29/09 09/02/09 09/04/09 09/05/09 09/08/09 09/11/09 09/12/09 09/18/09 09/20/09 09/25/09 10/02/09 10/04/09 10/09/09 10/11/09 10/16/09 10/18/09 10/23/09 10/25/09 10/28/09 11/01/09 11/06/09 11/08/09 11/13/09 11/15/09 11/20/09 11/22/09 11/25/09

Alabama A&M Troy Minnesota Iowa State George Washington Jacksonville State Coastal Carolina Wake Forest Georgia Southern Mississippi State * Alabama * Louisiana State * Mississippi * Arkansas * Kentucky * Tennessee * Florida * South Carolina * Alabama * Mississippi State * Georgia * Louisiana State * South Carolina * Florida * Tennessee * Kentucky * Arkansas * Mississippi * Georgia *

Cross Country Date Sept. 5 Sept. 18 Oct. 3 Oct. 17 Oct. 31 Nov. 14 Nov. 23

Meet Troy Trojan Invitational Crimson Classic Wisconsin Badger Invite NCAA Pre-Nationals SEC Championships NCAA South Regional’s NCAA Championships

Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala Minneapolis, Minn. Minneapolis, Minn. Minneapolis, Minn. Auburn, Ala. Statesboro, Ga. Statesboro, Ga. Statesboro, Ga. Starkville, Miss. Tuscaloosa, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Lexington, Ky. Knoxville, Tenn. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Athens, Ga. Baton Rouge, La. Columbia, S.C. Gainesville, Fla. Auburn, Ala. Auburn, Ala. Fayetteville, Ark. Oxford, Miss. Auburn, Ala.

1:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 8:00 p.m. CT 1:00 p.m. CT 5:30 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 4:00 p.m. CT 9:00 a.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 1:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 1:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 12:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 2:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 1:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 1:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 12:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT 1:30 p.m. CT 7:00 p.m. CT 1:30 p.m. CT 6:00 p.m. CT

Location Troy, Ala. Tuscaloosa, Ala. Madison, Wisc. Terre Haute, Ind. Oxford, Miss. Tuscaloosa, Ala. Terre Haute, Ind.

Time TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

C O M P L I A N C E   C O R N E R

Recruiting Through Social Networking Site W

e live in a world with ever changing and evolving technology. Myspace, Facebook and Twitter have become popular websites among young people, and it is an easy way to communicate with others. This cyberspace communication can cause trouble for NCAA schools if fans and alumni do not understand the rules. The NCAA addressed the issues arising with the use of these web services in an article published in The NCAA News on June 4. In excerpt below, the NCAA addresses Twitter in particular as being a popular micro blogging service that has become a useful recruiting tool. “Coaches are aggressively using these micro blogging services to keep pace with a new generation of prospects. Twitter is one of the more popular web services. Twitter, which limits users to 140-character posts known as “tweets,” is designed to provide a quick glance into what a person — or entity — is

doing, thinking or feeling. College coaches began using it to communicate with the public — and recruits — months ago. In recent weeks, more conferences and college athletics departments have created Twitter accounts to promote their programs. “The immediacy and intimacy of Twitter has made it a popular recruiting tool, but some tweets have resulted in secondary violations, prompting the NCAA to lay out its current rules for using the medium. Divisions I rules allow for coaches to contact prospects through the direct-message function on Twitter, subject to the same rules applicable to email communication with recruits. However, publicly mentioning a recruit’s name or sending an ‘@reply’ message via Twitter are both considered NCAA rules violations. Coaches can ‘follow’ recruits on Twitter — and vice versa — so long as the @reply function is

not used. Any direct messages sent through Twitter must conform to the contact-period legislation for each NCAA sport. The issue of social networking is still under discussion with the NCAA. While the NCAA does not regulate the interaction between coaches and fans, communication between the two groups should comply with legislation prohibiting the discussion of recruits.” Please protect yourself and Auburn University by not communicating with prospective studentathletes on any social networking site. If you know of a prospect who is interested in playing sports at Auburn University, please contact the athletic department. We all need to do our part to make sure that Auburn University adheres to the rules and regulations of the NCAA. If you have any questions, you can contact the Athletics Compliance office at (334) 844-4750. Remember, ASK BEFORE YOU ACT!

Summer 2009

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N E W S   A N D   N O T E S JOIN the Tigers Unlimited Fund Baseball Program!!

Tigers Unlimited Calendar August Mid-Aug. TU Football season tickets mailed 21st-22nd Annual Football Scholarship Donors’ Weekend 22nd Annual Executive Suiteholders’ Night

September 1st TU Baseball Ticket Priority contribution deadline 15th TU Men’s Basketball season ticket order forms e-mailed

October 15th Deadline for submitting TU Basketball ticket order forms 30th Annual Basketball Scholarship Donors’ Dinner

November 1st TU Men’s Basketball season tickets mailed

December 1st TU Football Ticket Priority contributions accepted 15th TU Baseball ticket order forms e-mailed

We want to hear from you… You are important to Tigers Unlimited. Please mail or email any comments and/or suggestions you may have to: Tigers Unlimited P.O. Box 351 Auburn, AL 36831 TUF@auburn.edu

Don’t miss out! Join the Tigers Unlimited Baseball Ticket Priority Program. The deadline to join is September 1. Be part of the “Team Behind The Team!” Call/email 800-AUB-1957 ext. 2/TUF@auburn.edu for more information.

Guest Assist Guest Assist provides a simple text message code that will permit Auburn fans to send questions or concerns discreetly via their mobile phones to the command and control center at Jordan-Hare Stadium on game days. This service begins two hours prior to kickoff. For stadium assistance or to report an issue text the word Auburn, followed by your message and your location to 78247. Standard text messaging rates apply.

Tigers Unlimited CHAMPIONS FUND Make your contribution today! The Champions Fund is an offset of the popular ticket priority program. It invites new donors and young alumni to annually support Auburn Athletics. All contributions are 100% tax deductible. This program is perfect for people who want to support Auburn University student-athletes and the Auburn University Athletics Department outside of ticket priority. For more information about the different levels and how to contribute, please visit www.tigersunlimited.com and click on Fundraising Projects at the top of the web page.

New Faces in the Auburn Athletics Department Join us in welcoming new members to the Auburn Athletics family!

Nick Clinard

Evan Osteen

Ken Potosnak

Scott Carr

Eight-year head coaching veteran, Former UCF assistant is Auburn’s Former South Carolina assistant who led the University of Central new assistant men’s golf coach. is Auburn’s new assistant basketball Florida to a top 10 finish in the 2009 coach. NCAA Championship, is Auburn’s new head men’s golf coach.

Former administrator for the past eight years in the University of Southern Mississippi Athletics Department is our new Senior Associate Athletic Director for External Affairs.

2009 Football Schedule SEPT. 5 SEPT. 12 SEPT. 19 SEPT. 26

LOUISIANA TECH MISSISSIPPI STATE WEST VIRGINIA BALL STATE

Oct.  3   Oct.  10   OCT. 17 Oct.  24  

at  Tennessee at  Arkansas KENTUCKY at  LSU

OCT. 31 NOV. 7 Nov.  14   NOV. 27

OLE MISS FURMAN (HC) at  Georgia ALABAMA Summer 2009

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T I G E R S   U N L I M I T E D   P . O .   B O X   3 5 1   A U B U R N ,   A L   3 6 8 3 1  

PRESRT STD U.S. Postage

PAID Permit #335 Montgomery, AL

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or the highway.


Tiger Roar II