Page 1

mondo*arc magazine

T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M AG A Z I N E F O R D E S I G N E R S W I T H L I G H T

# 92 2 0 1 6

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL PREVIEW

2016 DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL 400 ENTRIES, 6000 VOTES WHO WILL COME OUT ON TOP?

issue 92 * August/September 2016


1 5 SEP TEM B ER 2 0 1 6 / L O N D O N

organised by

in collaboration with

with thanks to our manufacturer partners

supported by

awards manufactured by

technical partner


T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M AG A Z I N E F O R D E S I G N E R S W I T H L I G H T

# 92 2 0 1 6

A CLASS ACT

ACTLD GET IMMERSIVE IN MOSCOW

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL PREVIEW • KAI PIIPPO INTERVIEWED RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP PROFILE • TUA BY O/M REVIEWED


A r c h e Ty p e X A d v a n t a g e ®

Fewest Fixtures wins… With ArcheType® X, not only do you get cost savings from improved efficiency and uniformity, there are thousands of dollars in savings per pole eliminated because of the reduced cost of trenching, wiring, controls, sensors, installation and maintenance. 5 Traditional Fixtures

4 Type X Fixtures

For the same size parking lot Type X requires only 4 fixtures.

http://www.kimlighting.com/typex/

TypeXauto_Mondo_Ad_6-01-16.indd 1

6/3/16 3:30 PM


PROJECT: Futuroscope, Chasseneuil-du-Poitou, France PRODUCT: ArcPad 94


15 SEPT EMBE R 2016 / LOND ON

organised by

in collaboration with

supported by

partners

WWW.DARCAWARDS.COM


MAY 2017 / LOND ON

WWW.DARCAWARDS.COM


COMMERCIAL

A solution for Central Plaza One In collaboration with Haron Robson, Aurora has created a unique lighting scheme with 1305 tailor made LED panels in various sizes for Central Plaza One in Brisbane - a 44 floor, 571ft office tower block designed by Kurokawa Kisho. This restoration project resulted in 89% energy savings, providing static, adaptable and dynamic lighting effects that responded to daylight conditions whilst keeping the spirit of the original installation alive. Sizes up to 1500 x 1000mm Different lumen packages Recessed or suspended Interconnectable to form larger luminous surfaces

Dimmable options including DALI Suspended solutions offering up/down illumination ratio of 70-30%

projects@auroralighting.com 01727 83 66 11

Lighting Manufacturer of the Year, 2015

auroralighting.com


Always in control D700 Providing unparalleled control over the direction, style and lighting effect of its beam, the D700+ features an interchangeable fascia and filter system, along with an airtight universal gimbal. This exceptional adaptability allows you to update the look and orientation of the luminaire to suit interior changes over the years.

Enquire to become a Brightgreen distributor https://brightgreen.com/distribution

Designed in Australia. Distributed Worldwide.


PROLED PANEL 600 PREMIUM ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

slim LED PANEL for grid ceiling 600 x 600 mm and 625 x 625 mm with microprism diffusor (UGR < 19) for wall or ceiling mounting (with optional mounting bracket) for suspension (with optional suspension set)

4200–5000 Lumen neutral white 4000 K + warm white 3000 K CRI 80 UGR < 19 dimmable version (DALI or PUSH-DIM)

PROLED.COM

MBN GmbH Balthasar-Schaller-Str. 3 86316 Friedberg · Germany Phone +49.821.60099-0 Fax +49.821.60099-99 info@proled.com

proled.com


Photography James Newton


018

CONTENTS

[aug/sep] Front cover pic: ACTLD’s IMX-Immersive Experience, Moscow, Russia. Pic: Vitaly Rastopchin

044 Kai Piippo mondo*arc’s Femke Gow speaks with Piippo following a lighting tour of Stockholm, Sweden, whilst discussing his journey towards achieving the Nordic Light.

Pic: Ida Borg

DETAILS 022 Editorial Comment The darc awards /architectural voting period has ended. 024 Headlines The latest architectural lighting industry news. 026 Eye Opener Chapelle Corneille, Rouen, France 028 Drawing Board Our preview of proposed projects. 032 Spotlight A selection of darc awards / architectural shortlisted projects 040 Briefing Steensen Varmings’ Emrah Baki Ulas discusses its new London office. 042 Snapshot We feature DJCoalition. 044 Lighting Interview Kai Piippo - Head of Design, ÅF Lighting 052 Architect Profile Henrietta Lynch looks at Italian architect practice Renzo Piano Building Workshop. 062 Daylighting Henrietta Lynch discusses daylight design. 186 Inspirations Light IQ

ART & DESIGN 124 Art Low Budget Shortlist 126 Art High Budget Shortlist 128 New Dawn Mary Branson’s Palace of Westminster art. 130 IMX-Immersive Experience ACT Lighting Design’s 3D structure inside Moscow’s Zeleno Park. 134 Elisa Artesero Profile Manchester artist’s large-scale installations. 136 The Storm Ithaca’s audio reactive light installation at Brighton Town Hall. 138 Light Rain Chris Wood turns the water bottle into light art. 140 Event Shortlist 142 Kronach in Lights Eleventh instalment of Germany-based student lighting event at a glance. 144 San Francisco City Hall Arup illuminates the historic building for its 100th anniversary. 146 Colosseum Motoko Ishii and Akari-Lisa Ishii commemorate diplomatic relations between Italy and Japan. 166 Dark Source Stories The latest instalment in Kerem Asfuroglu’s dark vision of light.

TECHNOLOGY 148 Kit Shortlist darc awards / architectural shortlisted entries. 162 David Morgan David Morgan’s Bench Test focuses on O/M’s Tua LED bollard luminaire. 164 IALD Column Secrets of public speaking - John Martin, IALD. 168 Griven Case Study Bam Administrative Building of Tehran, Iran 170 Grupo MCI Case Study Gu restaurant, bar and nightclub, Spain 172 Insta Case Study National Socialism Documentation Center, Germany 174 Linea Light Case Study Walter Steiger showroom, France 176 Astro Case Study Astro HQ, UK 178 Tridonic Case Study St. Jean Granary, France 180 Zumtobel Case Study DVB Bank, Germany 182 Expo Diary Our calendar of worldwide tradeshows and events for the lighting industry.


art&image

Al Rafaa Wedding Hall Complex Doha _Qatar

GRIVEN provides for inspirational lighting equipment which instills a new sense of belonging and, via premium lighting efficacy and maximum control flexibility, reveals the true essence of architecture. www.griven.com

GRIVEN S.r.l. I Castel Goffredo I MN I Italy I Tel. +39.0376.779483 I Fax +39.0376.779682 I sales@griven.com


020

CONTENTS

[aug/sep] 098 Online EFLA Consulting Engineers has managed to create a natural and unique experience inside Iceland’s Langjökull Glacier through well planned light scenes and sophisticated use of colour. www.mondoarc.com

PROJECTS

PROJECTS

PROJECTS

064 Places Low Budget Shortlist

090 Spaces Low Budget Shortlist

108 Structures Low Bugdet Shortlist

066 Places High Budget Shortlist

091 Spaces High Budget Shortlist

110 Structures High Budget Shortlist

068 Nuo Hotel, Beijing

092 Crossrail Place, London

112 Koppelpoort, Amersfoort

076 Alphabeta, London

094 Belgrade Waterfront, Belgrade

114 Ports 1961, Shanghai

080 St Mary the Virgin

098 Into the Glacier, Langjökull

116 The Park, MGM Resorts

082 Mural Room, Santa Barbara

Glacier

International, Las Vegas

084 Guildford Recreation Centre,

100 Dalston Roof Park, London

118 Casa Triangulo, Sao Paulo

Surrey

102 Thomas More Square, London

120 Hyundai Understage Open

086 Selfridges Body Studio, London

104 Magic Garden, London

Performance Plaza, Seoul

088 Corrs Chambers, Melbourne

106 Four Season Hotel, Casablanca

122 Templo Expiatorio, Guanajuato

068

094

Pic: Filix Lighting

118


The Light.

SLOTLIGHT infinity slim 45â&#x20AC;&#x2020;mm extremely narrow LED light line

zumtobel.com/slotlightinfinity

Slotlight_236x333uk_MondoArc.indd 1

26.07.16 11:30


022

DETAILS

[editorial] Paul James, editor, writes: By the time you read this the darc awards / architectural voting period will have finished, the votes will have been counted and the winners will have been calculated ready to be announced at darc night, the awards ceremony in London on September 15th. As last year, we are oversubscribed by voters who have requested to attend darc night (there were over 6,000 votes!) so if you want to come, you’re a lighting designer or light artist and you didn’t vote, you’ll have to wait until our darc awards / decorative event that will take place in London next May (interior designers and architects will also be eligible to vote in the decorative awards). We’ll be launching the entry process for this very soon so keep your eyes peeled. This issue of mondo*arc is dedicated to the vast amount of high quality entries into the darc awards / architectural. Incredibly there were almost 400 entries this year and it was one hell of a job for our shortlist judges to whittle the architectural lighting and light art projects down to just over 160 for the lighting designers and light artists to vote on. We have tried to cover as many of these entries as possible in this issue to show you the diversity and quality of projects from around the world that have been completed in the last twelve months. Of course, we have covered many of the projects in previous editions of mondo*arc (for these projects we have included references to which editions they have appeared in) and we will continue to publish a selection of entry projects in the future. It has been a great by-product of the awards to get such inspirational international content that we can use! Each manufacturer partner is teaming up with a lighting design practice to create sixteen inspiration spaces at the specially selected darc night venue in London on September 15th. Big thanks to Speirs+Major, dpa lighting consultants, Michael Grubb Studio, Elektra, Nulty+, BDP, LDI, Licht Vision / Boom Collective, Arup, Electrolight, Lighting Design Collective, GNI Projects, Into, Light IQ, ACT Lighting Design and MBLD who have put in so much work into the darc night installations. For those of you that voted and received your free invite, you’re in for a treat!

#darcawards #darcnight

Editorial

Subscriptions

Publisher / Editor

Lauren Dyson

Paul James

l.dyson@mondiale.co.uk

p.james@mondiale.co.uk

Production

Deputy Editor Helen Fletcher h.fletcher@mondiale.co.uk Assistant Editor Laurence Favager l.favager@mondiale.co.uk

David Bell d.bell@mondiale.co.uk Mel Robinson m.robinson@mondiale.co.uk Zoe Willcox z.willcox@mondiale.co.uk

Advertising

Chairman

International Advertising Manager

Damian Walsh

Jason Pennington

d.walsh@mondiale.co.uk

j.pennington@mondiale.co.uk

Finance Director

International Advertising Sales

Amanda Giles

Andy White

a.giles@mondiale.co.uk

andy.w@mondiale.co.uk Steven Willcox s.willcox@mondiale.co.uk

Credit Control Lynette Levi l.levi@mondiale.co.uk

mondo*arc magazine ltd Waterloo Place Watson Square Stockport SK1 3AZ United Kingdom T: +44 (0)161 476 8350 F: +44 (0)161 429 7214 www.mondoarc.com mondo@mondiale.co.uk Printed by Buxton Press, Palace Road, Buxton, UK Annual Subscription rates: United Kingdom £30.00 Europe £50.00 ROW £65.00 To subscribe visit www.mondoarc.com or call +44 (0)161 476 5580

mondo*arc, ISSN 17535875, is published bi-monthly by Mondiale Publishing, Waterloo Place, Watson Square, Stockport, Cheshire, SK1 3AZ. Subscription records are maintained at Waterloo Place, Watson Square, Stockport, Cheshire, SK1 3AZ. Spatial Ltd is acting as our mailing agent.


DETAILS

news headlines

For the latest news stories, head online: www.mondoarc.com

Sylvania ToLEDo Retro achieves Which? Best Buy

darc awards voting comes to a close

(UK) – ToLEDo Retro A60 utilises Filament Chip Technology to provide end users with 300° omni-directional light distribution that is similar to incandescent.

(UK) – darc awards / architectural sees over 6,000 votes cast - a significant increase on last year’s inaugural event. www.darcawards.com/architectural

Read the full story online... 1

Helvar appoints new Lead Software Architect (Finland) – As part of continued investment in research of new technologies, Nadir Javed will focus on Internet of Things – a key component in Helvar’s future business. Read the full story online... 2

3

Fulham opens new European headquarters and design centre (Netherlands) – New Netherlands office to serve as focal point for European research and design, sales, and administration for new lighting products. Read the full story online... 5

4

Rosco launches Architectural Lighting division

PLDC 2017 confirms Call for Papers release date

(USA) – Rosco responds to industry growth by creating new specialty group with Amé Strong appointed Vice President.

(France) – Paper Reviewing Committee to select 70 papers ahead of 2017’s Paris convention.

Read the full story online...

Read the full story online...

Stéphane Rougeot appointed CFO of Philips Lighting (Netherlands) – Following stints at Technicolor and France Telecom – Orange, Stéphane Rougeot brings wealth of financial leadership experience to Philips Lighting. Read the full story online... In pictures

7

the latest news online

6

scan QR code to link to

024

1 darc awards / architectural peer-to-peer voting ends. 2 Nadir Javed, Lead Software Architect, Helvar. 3 ToLEDo Retro A60 lamp 4 Amé Strong, Vice President Architectural

Lighting division, Rosco. 5 Fulham’s new Netherlands HQ and design centre. 6 Call for Papers will be published on 1 September 2016. 7 Rougeot succeeds Rene van Schooten.


pll_mondo-arc_nov-2015.indd 1

29/09/2015 17:47


026

DETAILS

eye opener Chapelle Corneille, Rouen, France Opened to the public in February 2016, a seventeenth century chapel and historical monument, La Chapelle Corneille in Rouen was renovated and transformed to become the Normandy Region auditorium, a concert hall for chamber and choral music. Respecting the integrity of its historical volumes and features, the architectural lighting design from Wonderfulight follows three principles. Namely, all the lighting functions are provided in the chapel: ambient lighting, stage lighting and the beautification of the baroque decorative elements. At the transept crossing, a spherical chandelier of 6.5-metres in diameter catches the public attention when walking into the chapel. During the day or before concerts, the mirrored hemisphere of the chandelier is directed to the ground, reflecting the architecture in an anamorphosis effect. When concerts start, the spherical chandelier turns silently on its axis to show its other hemisphere, composed of 344 dimmable custom designed LED luminaires called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pampillesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, displayed in nine rings. The general ambient lighting and the beautification of the decorative features are provided by fifteen custom design chandeliers hanged to the keystones under the vaults. On every chandelier, a group of small LED projectors from 13W to 30W are displayed. Composed of a plastic cylinder lit from the base by an LED module, standing custom designed luminaires are displayed on the pillars at three-metres high. At the top of the luminaire, a half-sphere small mirror shines to create a fractal echo of the spherical chandelier of the chapel. www.wonderfulight.com Pic: Eric Peltier


027


028

DETAILS

[drawing board] The latest exciting works in progress from the world’s most imaginative designers.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS KAAN Architecten has won the commission to design the New Amsterdam Courthouse, Netherlands. The building will be located at the intersection of the Zuidas and Parnassusweg, where the current judicial complex will be demolished. With the new building set to be completed by 2020, in the meantime, the current law courts will be temporarily housed elsewhere in the neighbourhood. With a staff of 1,000, including 200 judges and 800 professionals, as well as many daily visitors and the processing of 150,000 cases a year, the Courthouse of Amsterdam is the largest in the Netherlands. The preliminary design is a stately, open structure that offers both employees and visitors views over the city, and passers-by the opportunity to engage with the building. The courthouse building will be exemplary in its efficiency, and be part of the daily life surrounding it. Natural design consequences of this are the big windows at the ground

floor, as well as the entrance courtyard intended for public use. The city’s streets merge with the layout of the building, with the forecourt, central hall and its foyers, and the waiting areas forming an extension of urban space. So that the building’s users will not be ‘on display’, visitors will find sheltered spots and judges, court clerks and ministerial representatives will have their own screened-off routes. Inside, just off the central hall, the building will have two independent structures with 50 courtrooms and council chambers, all provided with daylight. The large groundfloor courtroom, for cases that attract a large number of visitors, has been designed with a direct access route that is separate from the central entranceway, so as not to disturb ongoing proceedings. The building will also feature several gardens; namely, the central hall with escalator will border an enclosed garden, shielded by a glass wall and vertical gardens

will climb through the building among the offices. Additionally, in the western part, a sunken garden will supply daylight to the lower floor. A large terrace will also provide 50 workstations with connections. At this point of the design of the New Amsterdam Courthouse there is still no specific information about lighting but KAAN Architecten will be curating the lighting scheme themselves. KAAN is undertaking works for the New Amsterdam Courthouse as part of a consortium which includes Macquarie Capital, ABT, DVP, construction companies Heijmans and M.J. de Nijs & Zonen, and Facilicom. A 30-year DBFMO (Design Build Finance Maintain Operate) contract, established upon commission by the Rijksvastgoedbedrijf (Central Government Real Estate Agency), forms the basis of this public-private partnership (PPP). www.kaanarchitecten.com


Stormbell, by artec3 Studio. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A tribute to good designâ&#x20AC;? A tribute to good design, with a more decorative inspiration, in which the interaction between lighting typologies and accessories allow you to create different environments and convert this bell into a must for hospitality and retail.


030

DETAILS

[drawing board]

IN MEMORY IN LIGHT 2016 marks the 300th anniversary of celebrity landscape designer Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown – and his legacy is being brought to life at Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park, Warwickshire, UK this autumn, in a stunning and technologically ground-breaking interactive light art installation IN LIGHT, created by light artist Creatmosphere. A historic art gallery and former country house, Compton Verney is spearheading local and national celebrations devoted to Brown and his achievements. There are three elements to Compton Verney’s IN LIGHT: Illuminating Capability Brown’s landscape project, which is launched on 27 October, and then runs four days per week until 13 November. The first of these elements sees Compton Verney’s eighteenth century mansion, recently restored ‘Capability’ Brown Chapel, and the Robert Adam Bridge lit in dynamic ways for people to play and appreciate the magnificent architecture. As a truly interactive installation, members of the public will be able to take over the

controls for themselves and light up the various structures in whichever way they choose. Brown planted more than 2,000 trees in the 120-acres of Compton Verney parkland. Therefore part two of the IN LIGHT project is Light in Trees, in which some of the trees planted are imaginatively lit to demonstrate his choices of locations in the landscape. For example, a mammoth Cedar of Lebanon in front of the mansion will be interactive and change colours. The final element of IN LIGHT encourages participation and education. An illuminated field of 1,000 solar jars will be created as artworks - some during on-site workshops and others produced by local community groups. These will be displayed across the lawns of Compton Verney to map the history of the site and celebrate the diversity of green species. Artworks will be created on the themes of water and leaves, using paper, gels and luminescent paint to light up the autumn skies. There will also be interpretation inside the gallery to inform and document elements of

the project, including the technology used by artist Creatmosphere. When the IN LIGHT project takes place on a weekend, there will also be a wide range of fun activities for the entire family taking place throughout house and park. Creatmosphere was founded by artist Laurent Louyer, who said: “This project is about how you can look at the landscape differently, using light as the main medium. The Creatmosphere studio is using the latest lighting technology to allow the participating audience to enjoy an experience which is historical, environmental and engaging.” Director of Compton Verney, Dr Steven Parissien concluded: “Brown literally changed the landscape of eighteenthcentury England; designing stunning vistas for the gentry by moving hills, creating rivers and lakes in his quest to shape nature to his remarkable vision. IN LIGHT is very much in that revolutionary spirit, using light and innovative technology to illuminate his astounding legacy.” www.creatmosphere.com


www.reggiani.net

#theilluminationcollective

Mood

Combining style and substance, our invisible architectural recessed downlights are ideal for illuminating high-end interiors.


032

DETAILS

[spotlight] The latest projects with the wow factor from around the world.

EPHEMERAL HONOUR Hommage to Monet is an ephemeral intervention for the Lluèrnia Olot Festival 2015 in tribute to renowned French Impressionist painter of the nineteenth century Claude Monet. Lluèrnia is an annual festival of transitory works of fire and light that takes place from 6pm until midnight local time in the city of Olot, Catalonia, Spain. Hommage to Monet took place in a cloister within the ancient convent of El Carmen, built in the sixteenth century in Olot. The cloister is currently surrounded by the Escola d’Art I Superior de Disseny d’Olot, the main Design, Arts & Crafts School of Girona. With a €300 budget to work with, the light

sources used for the installation included 3,500 candles that transformed the 420sqmetre cloister into a magical water lily pond. Decorating the pond, the water lilies were made of red, silver, gold and white silk paper. In total, 3,500 were used, each of which with a candle inside, creating a warm atmosphere. The ground was covered in aluminium foil to create the water effect, reflecting the light from the water lilies; and the sidewalls of the cloister were covered with a mirror vinyl to create an infinity pond of water lilies. www.escolartolot.cat


033

Pics: Ralph Larmann

BERLIN BALLET Deep Web is a monumental immersive audiovisual installation created by light artist Christopher Bauder and composer/ musician Robert Henke. Sublimating the spectacular industrial architecture of Kraftwerk Berlin, Deep Web plunges the audience into a ballet of iridescent kinetic light and sound. The luminous architectural structure weaves 175 motorised spheres and twelve high power laser systems into a 25-metre wide and ten-metre high superstructure. Choreographed and synchronised to an original multi-channel musical score by Robert Henke, the spheres are illuminated by blasts of colourful laser beams, resulting in three-dimensional sculptural light drawings and arrangements in Kraftwerk Berlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cavernous darkness. The installation brings together decades of separate research and experimentation by two artists with unique visions and passions for sound and light, and by innovative companies working in these fields. Laser system manufacturer LaserAnimation Sollinger provided the technical expertise and development for this very specific spatial laser setup, while the motor winch systems and main control software are provided courtesy of Design Studio WHITEvoid and Kinetic Lights. The work was originally commissioned by the Festival of Lights Lyon 2015, and developed in cooperation with local producer Tetro. Due to the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cancellation after the tragic events in Paris, the project was presented in December 2016 in Lyon. www.christopherbauder.com


034

DETAILS

[spotlight]

HEART OF GLASS Cousins & Cousins’ multi-coloured jewellike pavilion Glaze was commissioned by Gx Glass – a UK manufacturer and supplier of glass to architects and interior designers. Situated on St John’s Square, London, Glaze formed part of the ‘Clerkenwell Design Week 2015 Presents’ programme, a specially commissioned project to create a focal hub for the festival. During the three day festival Glaze became a kaleidoscopic meeting point which played host to a variety of talks and workshops including daily live drawing sessions by London-based graphic illustrators Grace Easton and Aurelia Lange. The pavilion comes to life at night with a lighting scheme sponsored by Atrium. The lighting accentuates the differing qualities of opacity and transparency of the coloured glass, offering glimpses of the interior in between the diffusely glowing panels of colour. External lighting by Grupo MCI was applied to the two main flanks of glass at the entrance and exit using the Slim Line Grazer. A linear LED strip runs through the structure lighting it up like a beacon at night. The internal lighting was created using Flos In-finity fixtures, which are aligned with the structural steel to blend discretely with the form, illuminating the glass from within. Fully demountable and reusable, the installation was designed to highlight and celebrate the versatility of glass, its colour and the surface designs that make glass an important medium through which designers and architects can realise their ideas. Glaze has been exhibited at Clerkenwell Design Week 2015 and UK Construction Week 2015, Birmingham. The pavilion is in the final phases of organisation to secure its permanent location and use as a community hub. www.cousinsandcousins.com

Pic: Courtesy of COS


artemide.com ADV Algoritmo.indd 1

13/02/16 16:42


036

DETAILS

[spotlight]

LIGHT3 Installed atop the Lukoil headquarters, two kilometres from the Moscow Kremlin, LIGHT CUBE is a light installation unique to Russia. A dynamic sculpture, it is not only illuminated but able to change light forms as the result of using both static and dynamic themes to create threedimensional images. More than 90 projects from different countries, including several well-known international companies, were presented in a contest for the project. In the final, the concept by light designer Natalia Koptseva and lighting technician Vasiliy Tarasenko from Ekaterinburg was announced the winner. The project was implemented in May 2016 by MT Electro Company. Koptseva and Tarasenko were inspired by

the ideas of Kazimir Malevich’s suprematist compositions, especially by his Red Square painting, which was created one hundred years ago. Suprematist art represents the essence of art, its beginning as well as its ending, consisting of denuded feelings, nondescript art. Both life as a whole and object art, contain simple images of feelings, while art free of visual depiction of objects seeks to reveal pure artistic feelings. Constantly developing, today’s world is made up of numerous information flows and images that surround us. Inspired by this, the installation’s designers looked to produce a fast, appropriate and positive effect on the general public, utilising the simple imagery of the LIGHT CUBE as

an icon for the brand’s growing impact. Through clear perception and identification of the LIGHT CUBE with a socially oriented product will foster brand loyalty. Made up of individually controlled LED modules that evenly fill the installation’s volume of 5, 7х5, 7х12-metres spaced at intervals of 250mm, pixels are united mechanically and electrically into vertical light chains. Fastened with the help of cable ropes - two cables per line - every line is twelve-metres long, totalling 484 lines, 19,360 pixels and a total watt consumption for peak-load conditions of 25kW. The installation has become a powerful city landmark with dynamic constantly changing light content.


LiNi BLADE-S new

Scale 1:1

New slim surface mounted housing Designed for KKLN-01 narrow beam lens, LiNi BLADE-S is available with homogenous cover and premium finishes.

www.kkdc.lighting


038

DETAILS

[spotlight]

LIFTING THE VEIL The award winning Luminous Veil barrier structure, designed by Dereck Revington Studio was installed on the Prince Edward Viaduct in Toronto, Canada in 2003, inaugurating a new phase in the bridge’s history. A new public space was created on its deck, resulting in a safe passage between downtown and the east end of the city. Although anticipated in the original design, the lighting of the Veil was not realised until 4 July 2015 as the City of Toronto’s Legacy Art Project celebrating the opening of the Pan American/ Parapan American Games. The lighting concept and composition by Dereck Revington Studio was executed in collaboration with Lighting Designers and Engineers Mulvey and Banani International. The Luminous Veil is illuminated from dusk till dawn each night of the year: for sixteen hours on the winter solstice, 9.15 hours on the summer solstice and for twelve hours a night on average throughout the year. Rising as the sun descends, bridging twilight,

it follows a recurring cycle, changing in hue and intensity in continuous linear gradients and in response to wind direction, velocity and ambient temperature. Throughout this chromatic nightly cycle, diaphanous waves of contrasting colour play dynamically on the strings of the Veil. A lance of light hovers mysteriously above each of the lookouts crowning the piers. The lighting is subtle and evanescent, inviting participation in the invisible forces moving around the general public, as they pass from place to place, taking on the atmosphere of the surrounding world, expressing a whole that changes; second by second, day by day, and through the round of the seasons. A total of 2,863 linear feet made up of 600 RGB colour changing luminaires with custom LED binning to capture the correct hues, illuminate both sides of the 450-metre bridge. To reduce maintenance and improve system reliability, all LED drivers were remote mounted in two climate-controlled

cabinets in easily accessible locations off the bridge; each supplies a side of the bridge with power. All control components are stored in a climate controlled cabinet on the west side of the bridge. The system’s DMX control is carried over a fibre loop that keeps all quadrants of the bridge in communication with one another. In all, the lighting system required over 45,000 feet of power and control cabling carefully concealed within the structure. A weather sensor mounted to the top of the Veil outputs a digital weather signal received by a customised computer program that converts the received parameters into a real-time video, outputted to a video processor, which then maps the video signal across the luminaires. Tendered in January 2015, the installation was completed in just six months and illuminated on 4 July 2015 during opening ceremonies of the 2015 Pan American/ Parapan American Games. www.mbii.com


Linea Light Group MA&DE Collection Product 2Nights Design Davide Oppizzi

linealight.com


040

DETAILS

[briefing] With Steensen Varming opening a lighting design office in London we speak to Associate Emrah Baki Ulas who, together with fellow Associate Mirjam Roos, has moved from Sydney to the UK capital to develop the UK and European market for the engineering and design practice.

What is the story of Steensen Varming? Steensen Varming is a leading design practice with 83 years of history. Our founders have worked with some of the most influential people of their time, including Niels Bohr, Arne Jacobsen and Jørn Utzon. The company was established in Copenhagen in the 1930’s. The minimal and elegant Danish design approach has been engrained into our work since then. Some forty years ago, the construction of the Sydney Opera House brought the company to Sydney, Australia and we have been involved and associated with this world icon since then. Today we operate from Sydney, London, Hong Kong and Copenhagen, with a new office location underway for New York. We are well-known particularly in Australasia and hope to develop our portfolio further in Europe. Is Steensen Varming still involved in the Sydney Opera House? Yes, the Sydney Opera House is very important to us. It has a unique history also, both architecturally and in terms of how it transformed Sydney. The new lighting masterplan, developed in collaboration with Utzon Architects and Johnson Pilton Walker and endorsed by Utzon, is ensuring that the Opera House is perceived as intended. Why did you decide to set up Steensen Varming in London? Aspiring to work internationally with likeminded people and on some of the highest calibre projects and becoming a global firm; a geographical expansion was in the books for us for a while. Our founders established new offices in UK and Ireland already during the ‘40s and ‘50s, working on iconic projects such as St Catherine’s College with Arne Jacobsen, so the re-opening of our Copenhagen and London offices in the past few years has been a natural way for us to reengage with our heritage as well as setting in motion our strategy for international growth. We know that London is a key hub, especially in the world of lighting design. So Mirjam and I are here with the aim to establish our lighting design team, but also contribute to representing Steensen Varming as a whole, building on the great work our colleagues have been doing over the years. As I mentioned, a New York office is also in the pipeline, and beside being very important on its own, our London business is also important for future plans of growing towards the Americas. We hope to increase the lighting design activity for Steensen Varming in the UK straight away. Even though Steensen Varming has a great portfolio, we have to make the name and what it stands for known. We have challenges ahead but we also have the

experience of the firm behind us. How long have you been in London? We arrived here two days before Brexit! How long do you plan to stay in London? We plan on staying long enough to see the development of our London office, increasing our lighting design activities and undertaking new exciting projects in the UK. That being said, only time will tell. How did you get into lighting design? In my early years in lighting, when I lived in Istanbul, I was involved in stage and art lighting. I studied electrical engineering but then I discovered a way to combine art and science in lighting design. I went on to Wismar, Germany to take the postgraduate lighting design course. After a brief but very inspiring internship with Georgios Paisidis, I moved to Australia to join Steensen Varming. What projects are you working on? We have a wide range of very interesting lighting projects on at the moment in different parts of the world. What are the advantages of having a global team? Lighting design has always been a global business. It’s very advantageous to be able to call upon the expertise of the different individuals around the world. Our team has designers with specific strengths, and we are good at different aspects of what we do. They all add to one another. Also, when you have several different regions you can shift your attention to wherever its needed as times change. How do you see the role of the lighting designer changing in the future? Technology will inevitably change what we do and how we work. It is likely that a lot of the day-to-day work of a lighting professional will be undertaken by artificial intelligence in the not-so-distant future. The value of what we can offer will shift. This will affect the way we work, why and when someone needs our expertise and how we charge for our work altogether, I believe. www.steensenvarming.com


DYNO Technology: Perfect linear form

Drago

Drago Side

The lighting distribution of DYNO LED module is very smooth and in linear form without spot effect. Forward through distribution allows throwing the light 1x distance in horizontal position and 6x distances in vertical position.

1 unit 6 unit

Drago

Thanks to the optical technology using 5W (Drago Side) and 10W (Drago) itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible to have a clean, spotless lighting distribution up to 5 meter which optimises the distance between two bollards.

1 unit 6 unit

6 unit

Drago Side

www.heper.eu


042

DETAILS

[snapshot] DJCoalition is an international lighting design consultancy with offices in Bangkok and Sydney. Its tool of the trade is light and with it, the team creates stunningly lit environments.

HOTEL PULLMAN SYDNEY AIRPORT, AUSTRALIA Lit by lighting designers David Skelley and Pranmoonin Koomkum, to form a visual marker in the fast developing business area of Mascot, this hotel is illuminated for street presence to attract both guests and visitors to its food and beverage outlets. Combining projection and dynamic light effects to the entry and wine wall, the hotel is both artful and energetic.

COMO HOTEL PERTH, AUSTRALIA Pics Courtesy of Futamin

SUKHOTHAI RESIDENCES BANGKOK, THAILAND This Kerry Hill designed apartment tower is run as part of the beautiful and famous Sukhothai hotel in Bangkok. Thanks to lighting designers David Skelly and Pongkhun Yoosupab, the illumination of the lush tropical landscapes, the 100m long reflection pool and a glowing amenities block allow a sumptuous nighttime ambience to be created for the residents.

The Como is fashioned from the amalgamation of four beautiful, historic buildings. The traditional architectural planning of enclosed spaces was reinforced by a lighting strategy from David Skelley and Pranmoonin Koomkum in which rooms were illuminated as places of pause and rest; corridors were illuminated as spaces of movement. Dining rooms and lounges used custom designed light fittings which marry traditional form with modern material. Corridors facilitate orientation through opposing visual themes for north-south movement and east-west movement.


043

THE NEST SHANGHAI, CHINA The Nest is the first in a series of gourmet bars for the Grey Goose vodka brand. Shortlisted in this year’s darc awards’ ‘Places Low Budget’ category, this venue redefined the visual language for the brand by designing the theme around the nest. Thanks to the work of lighting designers David Skelley and Rinnin Kositanont, the textured warmth of glowing wall and ceiling panels encircle the lounges while the visually moving, dynamic vertebrae over the bar feeds energy to the space.

W HOTEL BANGKOK, THAILAND The W Bangkok was designed and built as an urban hotel playing with the themes of Film Noir. Light was used by lighting designers David Skelley and Rinnin Kositanont, to both reveal and mask detail via translucent backlit effects. At the same time techniques of projection and colour provided the energetic urban energy associated with the W brand.

DJCOALITION

Thailand Team

Sydney Team

· FOUNDER: David Skelly · THAILAND LEADER: Khun Ponkuhn Yoosupab · SENIOR LIGHTING DESIGNERS SYDNEY: Khun Nui Parnmoonin / Ben Baxter · SENIOR LIGHTING DESIGNERS THAILAND: Khun Perraanong Wongtanakornchai / Khun Pilasinee Rattarangsi · ESTABLISHED: 1991 · HEAD OFFICE: Bangkok, Thailand ··SATELLITE OFFICE: Sydney, Australia ·· EMPLOYEES: 15 · CURRENT PROJECTS: Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament Christchurch; Allen & Overy Thailand Law firm; The Cannery Shanghai. www.djcoalition.com


044

DETAILS

Pic: Ida Borg


045

AURORA BOREALIS From theatre lighting to city schemes, lighting designer Kai Piippo has made his mark with an international array of stimulating work as Head of Design at Scandinavian lighting practice ÅF Lighting. Piippo took mondo*arc’s Femke Gow on a lighting tour of Stockholm, Sweden, whilst discussing his journey towards achieving the Nordic Light.

As a largely self-taught designer, Kai Piippo’s journey to the critically acclaimed status he holds today has been colourful. He spent his childhood by the sea and every summer on an island 250km south of the Arctic Circle, where the magical summer nights instilled in him a sensibility and fascination with light. “To this day, the distinctive Nordic light is a great inspiration, with its slow movement and unique colour scheme,” Piippo says. With this exposure to natural light at such a young age, Piippo had an early start on his journey towards lighting design. Amidst a few stints of working as a dockhand carrying bananas for extra cash, Piippo began working with light at age fifteen when he offered to do the stage lighting for his friend’s band. “It made me realise how much light can add, how it can create magical moments, so I kept at it.” At eighteen, the budding designer moved on to lighting stage productions at a theatre,

and his career took off from there. Piippo set up his own lighting practice, Ljusarkitektur, in 1991 with his business partner Niklas Ödmann, who he met at The Royal Theater Drottningholm, Stockholm in 1986. Piippo reflects on the practice’s beginnings: “At the depths of the recession, nothing was being built and there was huge unemployment among architects. As it turned out, this was an ideal time to start a new business because when the tide turned, we were a name to be reckoned with. It took seven years before we stopped struggling though - until we felt the wind in our backs.” In August 2013, Piippo sold Ljusarkitektur; it was purchased by and fully merged with ÅF Lighting, which today is one of the world’s largest lighting design offices. “I wanted to be part of building the world’s leading competence centre in lighting,” explains Piippo. “In order to be a force in shaping and developing the world around you, you

need the combined power of many different competencies.” ÅF Lighting provides this diversity in competence in its multidisciplinary team comprised of lighting designers, architects, engineers, physicists and experts in economy, communication and culture. It forms part of the ÅF Group, with some 8,500 consultants globally, providing massive opportunities for cross-fertilisation between disciplines and access to new markets. Through the success of this joining of forces, the ÅF Lighting team works on both small and large scale architectural projects. Fourteen years ago, Piippo received his first large scale office project at the Stockholm OMX Stock Market 36 with Architects Sandell & Sandberg, a moment when the size and number of projects really started to take off. “These days we create masterplans for cities and strategies for brands,” says Piippo. “We are involved in


046

DETAILS

product development and we benchmark lighting fixtures within the Nordic market for governmental authorities. But we still take on projects of all sizes, and frequently design lighting for single shops, schools or art galleries.” Regardless of size, ÅF Lighting’s projects are based on a ten-point manifesto called New Nordic Lighting, which involves a holistic design approach that strives to achieve a balance between aesthetics, function and sustainability. In order to achieve this, Piippo sees it as vital to consider the perspectives of all experts involved in any single project. “Today, lighting is partly owned by many different parties throughout a project, not just the lighting designer,” says Piippo. “So above all else, I make sure to cooperate closely with all other partners and disciplines involved, including end users, if possible. This is the alpha and omega. You need a clear goal, a strong design concept and clear communication throughout the process. As a lighting designer, it is my job to ensure that the client gets a good output from their investment. Only through constant dialogue with them can I make sure that they realise the benefit of our solutions.” With this kind of clear process in place, the team can work together to create what they describe as 24-hour design, focussing on how daylight and electric light can come together to help improve social lives, health and well-being of people at home, at school and in the workplace. “I strongly believe that electric light should be changeable and dynamic, and inspired by the natural,” continues Piippo. “As organisms, we tend to feel better when we are outdoors, in a forest or on a beach. I want to bring those natural qualities to the built environment.” This can be seen in ÅF Lighting’s work on the recent King office project in Stockholm (featured in darc #17), where the practice worked with Swedish interior architects Adolfsson & Partners to create a 24-hour

Top to Bottom Participatory lighting event at Stockholm Royal Seaport, Djurgårdsstaden, Sweden, 2015. House of Sweden for National Property Board Sweden, 2006. Office for King with Adolfsson & Partners, Stockhom, Sweden, 2015. KFem department store for Svenska Bostäder AB, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008.

Pic: Lennart Johansson

Pic: Åke E:son Lindman

Pic: Joachim Belaieff / Adolfsson & Partners

Pic: Patrik Helin


LIGHT DEFINES THE EXPERIENCE Meubelplein Ekkersrijt, Netherlands Lighting Design: Industrielicht

Lumenbeam LBX Colour Changing luminaires have been used to light up the Meubelplein Ekkersrijt shopping venue, near to Eindhoven, Netherlands. The unique architectural façade has been accentua­ted using narrow optics and adjustable linear spread lenses guaranteeing a visually impressive shopping landmark for the region. Find out more at Lumenpulse.com


048

DETAILS

approach to lighting design that incorporates the qualities of both natural and electric lighting for the game creators of Candy Crush. “Light is the strongest link between humans and architecture,” Piippo states in the ten-point manifesto. “Daylight used to play a major part in architecture and built environments, and I want to bring this back. For me, it is the basis of every project, and we always start by carrying out a daylight analysis. The electric light is then designed and controlled according to the local daylight conditions.” The King project is one in particular to which this statement rings true; its integration of Pic Mikael Silkeberg - In the Tracks of Giants for Skistar, Åre, Sweden, 2011 and ongoing. 2013.

an atrium skylight lets natural light flood through to an interactive forest, where the lighting design reflects the changing seasons at the touch of a button. This is exactly the kind of marriage of technology and design that is central to ÅF Lighting’s work, and remains at the core of developments within the industry over the years. “I personally believe that design should influence technology – not the other way around. New technology itself has no value unless you find a useful application for it, one that creates value for human beings.” In general, Piippo finds the profession of lighting design to have matured along with

the market, with many municipalities giving increasing recognition to the importance and impact of lighting by organising themselves accordingly with groups and boards for lighting issues. “Some even have a lighting specialist on the payroll,” adds Piippo. The use of light as a branding tool is also becoming increasingly wide spread. “Look at stadiums, or areas in cities worldwide, who work specifically with lighting design to boost night time economy. In the future, this will spread even further. Whole cities will work with lighting, companies will work with office concepts and universities with campus areas.” In the academic field, great strides have


000 049


050

DETAILS

Pic: Olof Thiel

also been made in understanding how light affects human health. “There is a lot more to be found out, and this is something I would really like to be part of, both in terms of conducting more research and in applying the findings in the real world.” With such developments in recent years, Piippo holds a positive vision for how he sees his practice and the world of lighting design growing in the future. “Six years ago, ÅF Lighting had only a handful of employees. Now there are 80 of us. Our ambitions are high: we want to have an impact on society as a whole, by cooperating with all parties involved in the built environment, and by influencing politicians and the media. Personally, I would like to pave the way for the new generation of lighting designers by creating a great creative climate within ÅF Lighting.” Piippo sees lighting design as a self-growing business. The demand and the need for good lighting design has increased and will continue to do so. “The more we add, the more people come to realise the potential of good lighting design. I hope that through our work, we are paving the way for a new generation of professionals, to some extent.” Despite such developments across many

Pic: Mikael Silkeberg

areas, Piippo maintains that lighting designers are not yet fully recognised as a necessity, and certainly not as much as they will be in the future. “Having worked in this field for 30 years, I can safely say that good lighting design adds value, saves costs and creates a better, more sustainable world.” As recognition and understanding of the importance of lighting design grows, lighting designers will gradually be regarded as a necessity, and they will participate not just in a small percentage of all projects but in 100% of them. Architecture and light will blend together as professions, and the New Nordic Lighting may be given the opportunity to shine as the aurora borealis of architectural lighting. www.af-lighting.com

HIGHLIGHTS Projects that you’d like to change: I would like to redesign the lighting for the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, and the pyramids of the Teptihuacán in Mexico. Projects you admire: In general, projects with poetic, soft and simple light intervention. Projects you dislike: Newly installed LED projects producing unhuman and glary light, destroying the urban nightscape. Lighting hero: Alvar Aalto, for his ability to use light as a building material, and his iconic luminaires. Luis Barragan, for his ability to combine colours, materials and the gorgeous Mexican daylight. Jonathan Speirs, who was a decisive force in shaping the lighting profession. As for living lighting designers, there are simply too many to mention. Notable projects: House of Sweden in Washington, US; KFem shopping mall in Stockholm, Sweden; In the tracks of giants in Åre, Sweden; The Sölvesborgsbron bridge in Sölvesborg, Sweden

Above Left Powerpoles in Borensberg, Sweden for Svenska Kraftnät, 2015. Above Right Mall of Scandinavia for Unibail Rodamco in Solna, Sweden, 2015.

Most memorable project: Initiating the Lights in Alingsås festival. It is extremely energising to get to work with a hundred creative people for a week. It has been most enjoyable to see how this annual festival has affected the lighting culture in Sweden in a positive direction and put lighting design as a profession on the map.


NOW GO! AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE WITH 3D CONFIGURATOR

WWW.PROLICHT.AT


052

DETAILS

Renzo Piano © RPBW Pic: Stefano Goldberg - Publifoto


053

REACH FOR THE SKY Since its formation in 1981, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW) has successfully completed over 120 projects across Europe, America, Australia and Asia. Continuing to push the limits of building technology, artificial and natural light solutions are key to the firm’s design success. Henrietta Lynch delved into the world of Renzo to find out more.

The three offices of RPBW are located in Genoa, Paris and New York. They employ a total of about 140 staff with the majority of these being architects. The largest of these offices is in Paris but the founding office is in Genoa which is the Italian home town of Renzo Piano but also famous as being the birth place of Christopher Columbus and the eccentric, early nineteenth century violinist and composer Paganini. The Genoa office is situated near the Voltri harbour district on the western outskirts of the city and can be reached by walking along a coastal path which allows for views back into the town and out to sea. The office itself is famous for being a special timber framed, glass clad building that nestles high into the hillside. It

encloses a series of open terraced spaces reminiscent of Italian hillside terraced farms. The views from the office are spectacular and directly out onto the Gulf of Genoa and the Ligurian Sea. This inspirational space is reached via a glass elevator which smoothly and slowly climbs the hillside allowing employees and visitors time for reflection while observing the breath-taking scenery before entering the office. According to RPBW Partner Elisabetta Trezzani, it is “the creation of architecture that can blend and function within its specific environment that is seen as being integral to the design philosophy of the office”. She sees that a building’s ‘life’ extends beyond the building structure and


054

DETAILS

Pic: © Timothy Schenck / Whitney Museum of American Art


055

Left The Whitney Museum at Gansevoort, New York is an eight-storey building that is powerfully asymmetrical, with the bulk of the full-height museum to the west, Hudson-side. Tiers of lighter terraces and glazed walkways stepping down to the High Line diffuse and direct the natural light embracing it into the project (outlined above in sketch by Renzo Piano © RPBW). Below iGuzzini’s Le Perroquet Pendant, is a design icon, described by Renzo Piano as having “a joyful design that animates space”. Originally created by Piano to light the Pompidou Centre in Paris, this product has become an emblem of timeless design.

should form a relationship with the exterior world creating an emotional bond between the architecture and its environment. Key to this relationship is the dialogue between space, material and natural light. Trezzani also thinks that a link to the constant fluctuations of natural light and views beyond a building’s parameters allow occupants to have vital contact with their wider surroundings. This contact enables an understanding of the passage of time during the day and throughout the seasons. The light also provides definition for space and form and provides a context for activities taking place within a building, with different levels of opacity to light being appropriate for different building types, functions and contexts. Variations in light opacity can help to sculpt a building’s mood and create cultural and intellectual space. Trezzani, who has worked with RPBW for over eighteen years, thinks that the architectural design process is not just about building relationships between physically constructed space and the natural environment, but also about building relationships between people including design teams, building occupants and importantly the client. “It’s about the team and creating a good working environment,” she says. These relationships often last for many years and require trust and good communication. For this reason RPBW has chosen to work with Arup Lighting as external consultants to accompany them on their design journey for many of their prestigious projects. Both Trezzani and Mark Carroll, who is also a Partner at the RPBW office in Genoa, see the relationship with the building client as a

vital component to the success of a project. Carroll strongly believes that “you need a great client to create a great building”. RPBW has often employed specific techniques to build relationships with clients and design teams. These have sometimes included the hosting of design workshops at the start of a project, with some of these lasting for two to three days. These processes allow for bonds and understanding to be created at an early stage of a project’s development which can ease the flow of processes at later stages of design. Carroll, who has worked with RPBW since 1981, describes the RPBW design process as evolutionary, with every project taken individually and as an opportunity and a design adventure. “At the start of a project, we are never entirely sure where that adventure will lead us.” He describes RPBW as architects who are not happy delivering standardised solutions and who enjoy the design process and the steering of a project until its final conclusions. Carroll and Trezzani also think that a very important part of the RPBW design process over the years has been the construction of working models and 1:1 scale mock-ups of parts of buildings. These have been used to test almost every aspect of a building’s design, including the lighting design, glazing, façade and shading systems. They have been particularly important when testing lighting design solutions for sensitive museum buildings such as at the world famous Menil Collection in Houston, completed in 1987, the Harvard Art Museum at Harvard University in Cambridge MA,


056

DETAILS

All pics: © Piano & Fitzgerald © Fondazione Renzo Piano (Via P. P. Rubens 30A, 16158 Genova, Italy)


057

Pic: Hester, Paul - Paul Hester Photography

The guiding principles of the The Menil Collection project were the use of natural light and the conservation of works of art. The brief required that works should be viewed under daylight, with all its shifting moods through the day and season. To this end, a special ‘solar machine’ was built with Arup to evaluate the light’s behaviour at various angles, the mechanics of the multiple refractions, and options for the filtration of UV rays. In order to control and modulate both natural and artificial light, experiments were also conducted with various structural materials. This resulted in the creation of a curved structural element made of 25mm thick ferro-cement, which became known as a ‘leaf’. It has a cross section of 130 x 90cm and its thickness varies. Replicated 291 times, these leaves became the inner layer of the roof whose main function is to filter daylight. Each leaf is held in place on a steel grid. Because of the vast number of pieces in the collection, and for conservation reasons, a rotation system was put in place so that some 200 works of art are on display at any given time.


058

DETAILS

Pic: © Ed Lederman

Below Mark Carroll (pic © Gianni Berengo Gardin) and Elisabetta Trezzani (pic © RPBW Stefano Goldberg - Publifoto) were the RPBW partners in charge of the design team for The Whitney Museum of American Art (above). Bottom The model of the solar machine used for The Menil Collection project. Right Renzo Piano and Peter Rice on site at The Menil Collection, Houston, Texas.

which was completed in 2014 and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, completed in 2015. All these buildings utilise daylight as a fundamental lighting design solution to provide sensitive lighting for important contemporary art collections. In each case natural light has been directed and diffused into the gallery spaces using different layers of building structure, glazing, baffles and or louvres. In each case, the design solution has been specifically tailored to the individual building’s needs and identity. Carroll explained that creating each design solution has been a learning experience and given the office a better understanding of how to work with light. The design of the roof lighting for the Menil collection uses the now familiar double curved profile louvre roof construction to bounce light into internal spaces. This roof structure and the lighting solutions were developed using a series of large scale models and a full scale 1:1 mock-up of an entire structural bay of the gallery. These models were used to test natural and artificial lighting design together with other design solutions over long durations of time. They also helped to confirm the architect’s

assumptions about spatial proportions and provide the client with a valuable understanding of what they were actually procuring. In the case of the Harvard Art Museum, which was an extension project to an existing brick construction building, a fullscale mock-up of part of the new feature roof-light solution was built and tested by glazing system manufacturers Gartner in Gundelfingen, Germany, prior to final design ‘sign-off’ and construction on site in America. This helped the design team and client to understand the materials being used, the scale of components, the effect of the glazing and light transmission and to understand the cleaning and maintenance solutions for the glass roof. Carroll and Trezzani believe that the use of large scale physical models and mockups can help to tell design stories that can sometimes be difficult to explain with computer models alone. This is despite the increasing sophistication of much design software. Stories about how materials and light evolve over time, together with colour rendering and the combination of different surface materials and the tactile qualities of a space can be difficult to fully


059

Pic: Crossley, David © Piano & Fitzgerald© Fondazione Renzo Piano (Via P. P. Rubens 30A, 16158 Genova, Italy)


060

DETAILS

Pic: Christian Richters

communicate via computer renderings, as can be the entire physical and emotional experiences of a space and building elements. It is for this reason that RPBW try to work with a client and design team at the beginning of a project to allow for adequate budgets for the construction of appropriate models. These demonstration models can then be used to communicate design intentions, confirm performance assumptions, and despite costing a little bit extra at the start of a project, can save money at the end; since it is usually quite difficult and expensive to correct misunderstood design solutions or mistakes when the building is complete. RPBW retain many of their design development models and mock-ups at the offices in Genoa. Some of the smaller scale models form part of a permanent private exhibition which is housed in the Fondazione Renzo Piano building that is located below the Genoa office. This exhibition documents the work of Renzo Piano and RPBW from the earliest days and is open to viewing by specific invitation. Some of the larger models and mock-ups are kept outside within the office courtyard compound adjacent to the Fondazione (Foundation) building. These can be used as design reference for future projects by architects working for RPBW. These models

and the documented work displayed at the Foundation also represent the ‘Bottega’ or ‘on the job’ or ‘learning by doing’ approach to design that forms much of the basis of the RPBW design ethos. Currently the RPBW offices are working on approximately 30 projects around the world. Images and plans from all the current projects are displayed on the walls of the large meeting room in the Foundation building. This means that RPBW architects are able to observe the work that is progressing in all of the offices and learn from the other designs, even if they are not part of the actual project team. This work is also on view for specific visitors and clients. RPBW provide the facilities for employees to learn from past and current projects but the learning and education process is also extended to some selected university student interns. Each year RPBW offers intern fellowships for a small number of architectural students who work with the office for a few months at a time. The education processes offered also extend to invited school groups who on occasions attend architectural workshops at the Foundation, thus starting to build relationships with architectural design from a very early age. www.rpbw.com

Harvard Art Museums renovation and expansion Cambridge, Massachussetts (2006-2014) Above Third floor Gallery. Below Strauss conservation laboratory. Pics: Nic Lehoux


MINI CONTINUUM II CONTINUOUS LINES OF LIGHT

Mini Continuum II introduces a uniquely clean, simple LED lighting system offering continuous, highly uniform lines of light across walls and ceilings. This highly versatile lighting tool can be recessed, semi-recessed, surface-mounted or suspended, either vertically or horizontally. Available as direct/indirect or direct only distribution â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both of which can be interconnected. Every batten has a plug and socket arrangement for easy and rapid electrical installation. Mini Continuum II Direct is available in two versions: one with an outside trim detail for plasterboard ceilings; and a trimless version for when a seamless effect is required. Dimmable DALI versions and 3hr non-maintained integral emergency options are available as standard options.

www.concord-lighting.com

Tel: 0800 440 2478

4303_FS_Concord_Mini_Continuum_bi-directional_236x333_AD_01.indd 1

03/08/2016 12:17


062

DETAILS

CLOUDBUSTING With artificial lighting being a huge drain on energy in buildings, design with daylight has become increasingly important as part of the overall lighting schemes of commercial and residential projects. Henrietta Lynch takes us through the basic tenets of daylight design and urges lighting designers to add this skill to their repertoire.

Artificial lighting is responsible for the use of large amounts of energy in buildings. Despite increasing efficiencies in lamp and control technologies, we often continue to employ excessive lighting with badly designed and controlled architectural lighting schemes. These can waste energy and be financially expensive for building owners and occupants, at the same time as creating unwanted CO2 emissions and other negative environmental impacts. Badly designed lighting schemes can also have negative impacts on our health and well-being. As a species, humans have evolved to respond to light, specifically natural light from the sun. Our eyes and brains are mechanisms that have become finely tuned and adapted to react to natural light with all its complex qualities. Because we are adapted to respond to natural light, most people prefer to work within environments that are at least partly naturally lit. We usually enjoy the exposure to constantly changing natural light levels since these help to link us to time and the rhythms of the day. Naturally lit spaces and buildings are also usually considered more pleasant to occupy than purely artificially lit buildings. Predominantly naturally lit buildings can offer great opportunities for energy savings by reducing the need for artificial lighting. It is proven that they can be some of the most energy efficient buildings. The skilled use of natural light can also act as a further dimension of architectural design, helping to describe and modulate space. Taking all the above into consideration, it would make sense if we designed all our buildings for better use of natural light. If we are to do this to optimum effect, then natural lighting strategies need to be incorporated at the start of an architectural design. The consideration of natural lighting will affect a building’s orientation, the size and type of windows/openings and shading and façade strategies. Natural lighting

design also needs to be considered in terms of the ‘daylight’ or overall available light from the sky and the sunlight or direct light component of a design. ‘Daylight’ is predominantly used to provide interior lux levels whereas sunlight can provide ’passive solar gains’ or useful heat gain within a building. Both ‘daylight’ and ‘sunlight’ can be sources of heat gain and glare and thus need to be appropriately controlled. Before the wide-spread provision of grid power and the invention of electric lighting, building design throughout the world widely used natural light for internal illumination. It can be seen that many buildings which are over 100 years old from various climates, are restricted in plan dimensions by their need to maximise daylight.

Common floor plans prior to the twentieth century.

Indigenous architecture in different global locations evolved to respond to control the amount of light and heat entering a building from the sun. Buildings in hotter sunnier climates were often designed with more external shading and darker internal spaces, whereas buildings in more moderate climates often allowed more light and heat into interior spaces, particularly in winter. Many classical buildings display a good understanding of daylight use. Some of the earliest records of understanding of these principles are documented in the texts of

the Roman writer Vitruvius: “We must arrange so as to leave places for windows on all sides on which a clear view of the sky can be had, for this will make our buildings light. Not only in dining rooms and other rooms for general use are windows necessary, but also in passages… And on stairs; for people carrying burdens too often meet and run against each other in such spaces.” Prior to the industrial revolution, many window openings were often primarily used for ventilation. Louvres, shutters or perforated screens provided security and protection from direct sunlight whereas solid shutters protected against wind and rain. With the advent of glass and development of building construction technologies, buildings have become fully able to exploit daylight. However there are limits to how natural light can be employed to provide lighting in a building. These limits are defined by construction techniques and physics but also human comfort. The key parameters which define how successfully natural light can be used are window size and design, building fabric and form, colour and depth of plan and external obstructions. There are some basic limits to how deep a building’s plan can be if it is to be successfully day-lit. As a rule of thumb, for a single aspect building with vertical windows on just one side and a 3m high ceiling (or soffit), daylight will not be able to adequately penetrate beyond a depth of plan of about 6m. For a dual-aspect building with vertical windows on two sides and the same soffit height; daylight penetration will be about 12m. The installation of skylights or glazed roof areas will allow for greater depth of daylight penetration but also greater heat loss and gain and potentially glare. The use of skylights is also generally only applicable for building storeys that have direct roof access.


063

Uniformity of light levels is an important part of daylight design since non-uniform light provides us with contrast. While a little contrast is good and can enable us to understand form, extreme levels of contrast create difficulties with vision and can result in problems with glare. It can be noted that the amount of light that enters the human eye and eventually hits the receptors of the retina is moderated by the iris; this acts to prevent damage by only allowing a fraction of available light into the eye. The approach to the natural lighting design of a building can perhaps be seen in a similar way to the workings of an eye, in that it needs to be sensitive and respond to local light levels and climatic conditions. Since the levels and quality of natural light are constantly changing throughout the day and year, the measurement of daylight is based on a factor or percentage of the average amount of expected annual daylight. This method of measuring daylight was devised in the UK and Europe and assumes a specific ‘sky type’ as the basis of the measurement. In Europe and much of the rest of the northern hemisphere the sky type employed is the CIE (Commision de L’Elclairage) ‘overcast sky’ which allows for 100% cloud cover to moderate light levels throughout the year. Different locations around the world experience different typical standard sky types and average levels of illuminance. Daylight factor can be defined as the percentage ratio of interior illuminance on a given surface to the simultaneously available exterior illuminance from an unobstructed position; or to put succinctly: Daylight Factor = Daylight inside a building at a particular point x 100 / Unobstructed daylight simultaneously available outside The above calculation method can be employed to assess available percentage daylight in an existing space using calibrated light meters and taking simultaneous internal and external light level readings. We can also predict or model expected daylight factor for a building design with a basic manual calculation method. The calculation method below can be used to assess an average daylight factor or DF within a space or room. To model the average daylight factor (DF) in a space the following equation can be employed: DF = TAWθ / A(1-R2) Where: T = The diffuse light transmittance of the glazing (including effects of dirt etc.) Aw = The net glazed area of the window (m2)

θ = The angle subtended by the visible sky (°) (It is measured in a vertical plane normal to the glass, from the central window reference point) A = The total area of the interior surfaces: ceiling, walls, windows and walls (m2) R = The area-weighted average reflectance of the interior surfaces (in initial calculations for rooms with white ceilings and mid-reflectance walls, this may be taken as 0.5).

θ is the angle subtended in a vertical plane normal to the window, by sky visible from the centre of the window. N.B. • The result of this calculation is presented as a factor or percentage. • Glazing manufacturers can provide precise design data for glazing transmittance and fenestration. • CIBSE can provide some standardised glazing and window design data. The amount of daylight that can enter a space is moderated by a building’s architecture, with window design having a particularly important influence. Glazing specifically acts like a lens that will absorb, refract, and reflect available light into a building; and also potentially away from its façade. Extensive fenestration will block light penetration and less fenestration and layers of glass will allow for greater amounts of light into a space, but more solar gain and/or heat losses. Too much glazing may cause problems with internal thermal comfort, overheating or excessive heat loss and potentially increase energy use since cooling or additional heating strategies may need to be employed to mediate these effects. Thus daylight design needs be considered together with other ‘Passive Solar Design’ (PSD) strategies and the thermal design for a building. As for artificial lighting design, DF is influenced by the colour of internal surfaces with matt white surfaces able to evenly reflect the most light and matt black surfaces absorbing the most. The amount of

daylight entering a space is also affected by the colour of external materials surrounding a building which can absorb light or reflect it into a building. According to CIBSE (The Chartered Institute for Building Services Engineers) who represent the UK, an interior space can be considered to be adequately ‘day-lit’ if it achieves an average daylight factor of 5%. This means that it should not require artificial lighting for the majority of the year during daylight hours. CIBSE recommends average daylight factors for different building types and spaces within buildings but consideration should be given to a building’s specific use and its geographic location when employing these. Even if the average daylight factor for a room meets the minimum recommendations, a room may still be too deep to be successfully day-lit. A room will achieve a more even spread of daylight or level of uniformity if the following conditions are met: • Its depth is not much greater than its width. • Its depth is not too many times the height of the window head above the floor. • The surfaces at the back of the room are light. Achieving certain DF measurements in buildings is currently not a mandatory part of all building design in the UK. Instead certain DF measurements are recommended for some types of buildings such as schools and offices and different rooms in new domestic properties. Such recommendations are often reinforced by environmental or sustainability assessment methodologies for new designs and refurbishments; and working to achieve good daylight design can help with compliance with building regulations, save energy and provide a comfortable and desirable occupant environment. Today most lighting designers, engineers and architects employ computer software to aid them with the lighting design of buildings. However an understanding of the basic principles of natural lighting design prior to software modelling can help at the early stages of a building’s design to inform and provide intelligent decisions about environmental strategies. This early stage design can be integral to a building’s eventual ability to operate, to be sustainable and to control energy use.

More information about natural lighting design can be obtained from CIBSE lighting design guidance documents.


064

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

PLACES BEST INTERIOR LIGHTING SCHEME - LOW BUDGET Interior lighting projects (including commercial, retail, educational, leisure, hospitality, cultural, residential and heritage) where luminaires specified cost less than £30,000.

MURAL ROOM, USA ANN KALE ASSOCIATES, USA SEE PAGE 082

MAY FAIR BAR, UK LIGHTING DESIGN INTERNATIONAL, UK

BLOK, UK FABIO A P CRISTINI, UK

ST MARY THE VIRGIN, UK BRILLIANT LIGHTING, UK SEE PAGE 080

BOLON EYEWEAR, CHINA PFARRÉ LIGHTING DESIGN, GERMANY SEE MONDO*ARC 91

MALIN+GOETZ, MONMOUTH STREET, UK IDEA DESIGN, UK

GUILDFORD RECREATION CENTRE AQUATIC ADDITION, CANADA AES ENGINEERING, CANADA SEE PAGE 084

UBC STUDENT UNION BUILDING, CANADA AES ENGINEERING, CANADA

SEVEN STORIES, NATIONAL CENTRE FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS, UK MICHAEL GRUBB STUDIO, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 90

OVOLO WOOLLOOMOOLOO HOTEL, AUSTRALIA MEDLAND METROPOLIS, AUSTRALIA

PAPA'S HOSTEL, CHINA X STUDIO SCHOOL OF ARCHIECTURE (TSINGHUA UNIVERSITY), CHINA


065

ERESBY HOUSE, UK HUGO LIGHT DESIGN, UK

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT DYNAMIC LIGHTING, USA OCTAVIO LUIS PEREZ, USA

MARMARA UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF THEOLOGY MOSQUE, TURKEY KITOKO LIGHTING & ENGINEERING, TURKEY

ROTUNDA, GREECE L4A, GREECE

SPICE ROOM, AUSTRALIA POINTOFVIEW, AUSTRALIA

NEST BAR, CHINA DJCOALITION AUSTRALIA & THAILAND SEE PAGE 043

FORT SAM HOUSTON BRAC STUDENT ACTIVITY CENTER, USA RVK ARCHITECTS, USA

FLIGHT CLUB, UK INTO LIGHTING, UK

TIFFIN ROOM, UK TYSON LIGHTING DESIGN, UK


066

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

PLACES BEST INTERIOR LIGHTING SCHEME - HIGH BUDGET Interior lighting projects (including commercial, retail, educational, leisure, hospitality, cultural, residential and heritage) where luminaires specified cost more than £30,000.

TRAIN WORLD, BELGIUM LIGHTEMOTION, CANADA SEE MONDO*ARC 91

MUSEUM OF THE CATHEDRAL OF FLORENCE, ITALY MASSIMO LARUSS, ITALY

ACNE STUDIOS, USA ARUP LIGHTING, UK

CHAPELLE CORNEILLE, FRANCE WONDERFULIGHT, FRANCE SEE PAGE 026

HANNOVER CONGRESS CENTRE, GERMANY VOGTPARTNER, SWITZERLAND SEE MONDO*ARC 91

MALL OF SCANDINAVIA, SWEDEN JIM COLLIN AND ÅF LIGHTING, SWEDEN

BEIRUT HOUSE, LEBANON HILIGHTS LIGHTING DESIGN & SOLUTIONS, LEBANON

BRASENOSE CHAPEL, UK LAPD CONSULTANTS, UK

BOXING PLUS WELLNESS CENTER, TAIWAN CHUBIC LIGHTING CONSULTANT, TAIWAN

MCLAREN THOUGHT LEADERSHIP CENTRE, UK CINIMOD STUDIO, UK

COMO THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIA DJCOALITION, AUSTRALIA & THAILAND SEE PAGE 042

NUO HOTEL, CHINA ILLUMINATE LIGHTING DESIGN, SINGAPORE SEE PAGE 068


067

LE LAPIN, CHINA DOT DASH, USA

MEHR! THEATER AM GROÃ&#x;MARKT, GERMANY JACK BE NIMBLE, GERMANY SEE MONDO*ARC 89

PENINSULA PARIS, FRANCE FISHER MARANTZ STONE, USA

THE BEACH PROJECT, UAE LIGHT TOUCH, UAE

SUSSEX CELLAR, UK SUTTON VANE ASSOCIATES, UK

THE BROAD MUSEUM, USA ARUP, UK

ALPHABETA, TRITON COURT, UK HOARE LEA LIGHTING, UK SEE PAGE 076

CORRS CHAMBERS WESTGARTH, AUSTRALIA ELECTROLIGHT, AUSTRALIA SEE PAGE 088

VANDAL, USA FOCUS LIGHTING, USA

YVONNE'S, USA FOCUS LIGHTING, USA

GERMAN GYMNASIUM RESTAURANT, UK INTO LIGHTING, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89

SELFRIDGES BODY STUDIO, UK NULTY+, UK SEE PAGE 086


068

PROJECT

Right Skylux ceiling-recessed remote controlled adjustable 3,000K AR111 narrow beam LED downlights illuminate the hotel lobby, while Skylux ceiling-recessed twin MR16 wallwashers give light to statement art pieces in the lobby reception. Additionally, Skylux ceiling-recessed trimless 3,000K LED wallwashers illuminate the lobby's stone wall. Central to the lobby's lighting, Diamond Life RGB colour-changing LED nodes provide backlighting to stretched membrane panels in the skylight. This is complemented by Luci's 2,700K Power FLEX 20mm pitch LED striplights in the lobby's ceiling cove. Far Right Skylux ceiling-recessed remote controlled adjustable 3,000K AR111 narrow beam LED downlights illuminate the tables in the Yong Le ballroom, while Skylux square trimless AR111 adjustable narrow beam downlights light the wall panels. Also, Luci 2,700K Power FLEX 20mm pitch LED striplights are integrated into the ceiling cove and wall to provide an even illumination to the vast space. Finally, Diamond Life's decorative crystal chandelier uses a dual light source - GU10 3,000K LED and RGB LED, commissioned by HBA and lamp type specified by Illuminate.

FROM CHINA FOR CHINA Following an intensive and meticulous period of research into China's rich history, Illuminate, the lighting design division of Hirsch Bedner Associates, has created a lighting scheme that exudes luxury at NUO Hotel Beijing - the first of its kind.

Drawing inspiration from China’s 5,000 years of rich heritage, NUO Hotel Beijing takes its cues from the prosperous Ming dynasty. The 28-storey property offers a five-star modern luxury experience while paying homage to China’s celebrated era of scholarly pursuits. As the first ever NUO hotel owned by NUO - China’s first international luxury brand global hospitality interior design practice Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA) has created a signature look for its interior. HBA designers were tasked with creating a luxury international hotel brand that is a distinct reflection of Chinese heritage and culture, being modern yet rooted in tradition with a heavy focus on contemporary Chinese art. In pursuit of this, the HBA team spent six years immersing themselves in the Ming dynasty’s history and cultural significance. In addition, each facet of the design takes

NUO’s four pillars into account: uniquely Chinese, luxurious, contemporary and green. Designers were challenged to not get too caught up in the ornamentation of Ming China, to take a refined and selective look at the design, to embellish when appropriate and stand back and let the quiet confidence of the space run through the design. Guest rooms are based around the Chinese tea ceremony – a signature aspect of the NUO brand. Roots of the presentation and serving process inspire many aspects of the guest experience, as the Chinese tea ceremony is a fundamental part of the hotel design. “NUO is an important project for HBA, not only for its unique, high-profile design, but as the flagship hotel for the NUO brand,” said Lead Designer and HBA Co-CEO Ian Carr.


069


070

PROJECT

“Being involved in developing the hotel’s distinct look was a very exciting process and experience. It stretched the team’s creativity to another level and enlivened our imagination in the most rewarding way. This is 21st century luxury at its best, luxury from China for China.” The scope of HBA's design brief included the guest rooms and all public spaces except a Chinese and Japanese restaurant, which was conceptualised by another consultant but with its designs still developed and coordinated by HBA. ‘‘Lots of research was done to find the distinct look of NUO - being China’s first high-end hotel brand,’’ explained Carr. Following many rounds of presenting and discussing the proposal, the final product

remains functional while retaining authentic Chinese luxury in aesthetics and details. Bespoke and custom pieces of furnitures and decorative lighting were specially designed as one-off unique pieces to NUO. NUO Beijing marks one of HBA’s first designs to bring several divisions of the firm into one project – Canvas Art Consultants, Illuminate Lighting Design and HBA Graphics. The significance of Chinese art will serve as a cornerstone throughout each space of the hotel. The team at Canvas carefully selected art that reflects the dimension of Chinese culture, be it traditional or emerging, and used each piece as a greater expression of the culture. The most standout feature of the property is the grand entrance, which is

Left Skylux ceiling slats recessed adjustable gimbal MR16 snooted downlights for general lighting in one of the many lobby lounges. Luci 2,700K Power FLEX 20mm pitch LED striplights are integrated at the 'moon gate' entrances to the lobby lounge areas and Yuan tea lounge (top). Also, Diamond Life LED retrofit decorative bar pendants add a striking talking point in the lobby bar area - designed by HBA, with lamp type specified by Illuminate. Top Right 8x40° Skylux 2,700K ceiling mounted LED graze light profiles with antiglare circular louver graze the feature wall in the Yuan tea lounge, while wall-recessed mini 2,700K LED flat discs with narrow beam angle illuminate individual tea pot niches. Bottom Right Diamond Life LED retrofit decorative floor lamps create ambience in the lobby sitting area - designed by HBA, with lamp type specified by Illuminate. Right Page Diamond Life LED retrofit decorative pendants illuminate the lobby lift area - designed by HBA, with lamp type specified by Illuminate.


071


072

PROJECT

filled with seven-foot-tall blue and white Ming vases intricately hand painted, flanking a large sculpture centerpiece by famed contemporary artist Zheng Fanzhi. Illuminate achieved a feat of technology with the creation of a light installation that spans the ceiling in the common area and can project multiple images or nothing at all at the operator’s discretion. “Design creates the soul of this hotel; it makes it a special place to be,” said Carr. “That innate feeling of belonging is what we wanted to achieve to help guests feel at ease with the elements. Architectural elements are added and subtracted over the years, but the feeling of belonging is intrinsically what NUO is about. The design

elements and concepts are all there to deliver that one exceptional feeling.” HBA Graphics were commissioned to produce signage and graphics for the property’s food and beverage outlets, as well as a bespoke set of luxurious room amenities. The team was tasked with creating a graphic design that reflected the main pillars of NUO and interpret it into a contemporary fashion. Delicate details, such as the hand-painted ceramic plaques used to identify guest room number, embody this goal. Luxury is a statement synonymous to this project and in regards to lighting, this meant pushing the boundaries to maximise quality of light while keeping to minimal

Top Skylux integrated LED profiles, encased in edge-frosted resin, are nestled amongst the spa's swimming pool ceiling slats, while Skylux CMHMR16 adjustable downlights complement plant growth on the spa's green wall. In the adjacent space, Skylux trimless square triple head MR16 downlights, with a 36° beam angle, provide general lighting for the gym. Left Skylux surface-mounted box MR16 and AR111 gimbals with honeycomb louvers, are complemented by Fanzhi Studio's feature light art suspended above the spa entrance staircase. Top Right Integrated within the spa reception ceiling slats, Skylux recessed adjustable gimbal MR16 snooted downlights provide general lighting and highlight furniture pieces and art. Bottom Right The basement spa adopted a quiet approach where fixtures were intentionally positioned at a low level to slow down the pace of life and create a more intimate space. The lighting is predominantly concealed, revealing the space and highlights are used to create a play of light and shadow conducive to the spa ethos of relaxation and rejuvenation.


www.lightingsolutions.osram.com

Light â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Innovative. Individual. Efficient. OSRAM Lighting Solutions OSRAM Lighting Solutions sets new standards with innovative and customised lighting solutions, thereby creating global added value for customers.The passion, decades of experience and profound expertise with light enables breathtaking, innovative and state-of-the-art lighting solutions to be designed for a highly sustainable and energy-efficient future. Light is OSRAM

Our brands

AZ_Mondo_Boxpark_236x333.indd 1

19.07.16 10:38


074

PROJECT

obtrusions for Illuminate. Lighting is weaved into the fabric of the interior design, challenging forms of integration that aims to balance subtlety and visibility. Since the hotel design revolves around modern art displays, Illuminate implemented light fixtures that are art-specific, such as framing projectors, which have a focused, shaped beam of light. When introduced into a scene set environment, these deliver high contrast levels, creating a dramatic gallerylike experience for the guests. Illuminate also introduced signature RGB LED backlit barrisol panels located within the vertical sides of the deep pocketed skylights in the lobby, which help draw the eye up into the large volume and offer the possibilities of abstract motion. The animation changes in relation to time of day, event type or festivity, which help to compliment the artistic and creative essence of the hotel. Just like the depth of China's rich history, HBA's research conducted for this project was equally as deep. This is reflected in a luxurious and decadent design that runs throughout the hotel's interiors from its artwork to its lighting. ‘‘Being involved in developing the hotel's distinct look was a very exciting process and experience,’’ concluded Carr. ‘‘It stretched the team’s creativity to another level, which says so much about HBA’s principle motto from our founder Michel Bedner: ‘Do the best job we can and have fun with what you do’.” www.illuminateld.com www.hba.com

PROJECT DETAILS NUO Beijing Hotel, Beijing, China Client: YanXiang Development Project Architects: URBAN PROJECT Lighting Design: ILLUMINATE Lighting Design (HBA)

LIGHTING SPECIFIED Skylux Square trimless twin adjustable MR16 downlights Skylux Square surface-mounted adjustable MR16 downlights Skylux Square trimless AR111 adjustable downlight Skylux ceiling-mounted LED graze light profile Skylux recessed adjustable gimbal MR16 snooted downlights Skylux Ceiling recessed twin MR16 wall washer Skylux Ceiling recessed trimless 3,000K LED wallwasher Skylux Inground mini narrow beam 3,000K LED uplight Skylux surface-mounted gobo projectors Skylux Ceiling recessed remote controlled adjustable 3,000K AR111 LED downlight Skylux Ceiling slats recessed adjustable gimbal MR16 snooted downlights Skylux surface-mounted box MR16 & AR111 gimbal Skylux ceiling-recessed framing projectors Skylux trimless square triple head MR16 downlights Skylux CMH-MR16 adjustable downlight Skylux customised ceiling integrated LED profile Luci 2,400K Power FLEX 15mm pitch LED Striplight Luci 2,700K Power FLEX 20mm pitch LED striplight Luci 2,400K Flat FLEX 10mm pitch LED striplight Luci Wall recessed mini 2,700K LED flat disc Diamond Life LED retrofit decorative Wall Sconce and Study Table Lamp, design by HBA, lamp type specified by Illuminate. Diamond Life RGB colour changing LED Node Diamond Life Skylight Diamond Life LED retrofit decorative table lamps, floor lamps and bar pendants, design by HBA, lamp type specified by Illuminate. Diamond Life decorative ceiling crystal chandelier using dual light source –GU10 3000K LED and RGB LED, design by HBA, lamp type by Illuminate Fanzhi Studio Feature light art suspended at Spa staircase

Skylux Square Trimless Twin adjustable MR16 downlights in varying beams 10° (reading lights), 24°, 36° and Square surface-mounted adjustable MR16 downlights with elliptical lens illuminate the guest room corridors. Right Skylux ceiling-mounted 3,000K 8x40° LED graze light profiles with antiglare circular louvers highlight porcelain artwork found in the guest room corridors. Left Luci 2,400K Powerflex 15mm pitch LED striplights highlight the headboard artwork and wardrobe, while Luci 2,400K Flat FLEX 10mm pitch LED striplights are integrated under bathroom sinks, wardrobe hangers and bedside nightlights. Designed by HBA, with the lamp type specified by Illuminate, Diamond Life LED retrofit decorative wall sconces and study table lamp, provide accent lighting within the guest rooms.


Vivid Ă&#x2014; Oxy Luci Vivoxy Graze Indoor Realize maximum brightness using minimal space Sharp lighting to leave crisp impressions. It allows for uniform lighting that leaves a strong impression with a wall washer lighting design.

1

2

Installing upwards

3

Adjustable mounting fixture

4

Installing downwards

Glare cut louver

32.7

Louver

Fall prevention mounting fixture Mounting fixture

24.5

25.5

39

56.7

48

Adjustable mounting fixture 48

Visit our YouTube channel

27

Luci Vivoxy Graze Indoor

29

32


076

PROJECT

IDIOSYNCRATIC OFFICE SPACE As well as paying close attention to the building's historic façade and architectural identity, Hoare Lea Lighting's scheme is engaging and delights the occupants of London's Alphabeta workspace, highlighting a new way of thinking for large-scale office projects.

Located between Shoreditch and the City, the landmark Triton Court building on Finsbury Square, London has been transformed into a major new workspace – Alphabeta. The development, which is set over nine storeys and comprises 20,000 m2, features a dynamic atrium and a ride-in cycle ramp. Hoare Lea Lighting developed the lighting concept in conjunction with the project architecture team at Studio RHE. Led by Dickon Hayward, (winner of the RIBA London Project Architect of the Year Award for Alphabeta) the concept was designed from the ground-up, with Hoare Lea Lighting working closely with Studio RHE to

understand the space and its requirements from an architectural lighting perspective. Central to the lighting scheme was the careful consideration of the interior’s deliberate architectural idiosyncrasies. Using integrated and hidden sources wherever possible, the design complements the clean, seemingly effortless architectural approach. Ultimately for Hoare Lea Lighting, the design was about enhancing and working with the unusual and exciting character of the post-industrial space. The dramatic changes in level within the front-of-house areas focused attention on maintaining an even illuminance and providing lighting coherence. Warm white

light throughout the reception ensures the visual atmosphere is welcoming, while avoiding a typical commercial workplace feel. Clad in timber and steel, and with a series of cantilevered glazed meeting rooms, the dramatic atrium is the heart of the building, and benefits from daylight from a glazed roof light. Due to the height of the atrium, it was important to design ways to integrate luminaires into the architectural features at low level. These include the handrail, which runs around the reception desk, direct and indirect lighting in the low-height ‘waffle’ ceiling zone, and the integrated step lighting which leads to the basement level.


077

Pics: Redshift Photography

Left Hand Page Forming a visual statement, the lobby's 'Alphabeta' sign uses an integrated lighting approach, utilising the staggered linear form of the sign to keep the walls and ceiling free from luminaires. Top The Worship Street entrance features a cycle ramp that allows cyclists to enter without dismounting. Here, lighting is bold and direct, contrasting with the reception space. Middle and Left Different angles of the 'Alphabeta' sign highlight its visual impact and linear illumination.


078

PROJECT

The entrance on Worship Street features a dramatic cycle ramp positioned behind a glazed screen. This allows cyclists to enter the building without dismounting, leading them from street-level to bike storage and changing facilities at basement level. On view from the atrium and adding movement to the scene, the cycle ramp was a key statement, which reinforces the sustainability of the building. Here, lighting is bold and direct, contrasting enjoyably with the main reception space. The lobby entrance and ‘Alphabeta’ sign formed a primary visual statement, so Hoare Lea Lighting worked with Studio RHE to develop an integrated lighting approach, using the staggered linear form of the sign to keep walls and ceiling free from luminaires. The result is a spectacular interaction between the pendant sign and the lobby finishes, which creates dramatic impressions from all angles. The building’s historic façade has been restored and celebrated, and succeeds

in being simultaneously intricate and restrained. Illumination lent itself to traditional lighting techniques, which bring out the form and rhythm of this splendid façade. Alphabeta offers much, it engages and clearly delights its occupants; its vibrant articulation of spaces shows a new way of thinking for large-scale office space, providing an alternative to the sterile mainstream offer of more ‘shades of grey’. www.hoarelealighting.com

This Page Central to the lighting scheme, the interior's architectural idiosyncrasies have been highlighted by using integrated and hidden luminaires where possible, shown here in the building's glazed and timber-clad atrium, which benefits from daylight from a glazed rooflight.

PROJECT DETAILS Alphabeta, Triton Court, London, UK Client: Resolution Property Architects: Studio RHE, UK Lighting Design: Hoare Lea Lighting, UK

LIGHTING SPECIFIED acdc Plaza 35 with vertical louvre – Cycle ramp spots acdc Plaza 35 – Atrium gantry - downlights acdc Cold Cathode custom chevrons/light art Encapsulite T8 Lightstick – public/circulation threshold walls iGuzzini Le Perroquet LED – circulation / lift lobby spaces Optelma Quad 100 profile with custom centre joining piece – cycle ramp linears Optelma SAM 165 profile + Cita spotlights – bar zone task LEDLinear VarioLED Venus - reception desk handrail + reception desk task light + library task light LightGraphix LD22 POWER surface mounted linear washer ceiling ‘waffle’ raft uplight LightGraphix LD22 RGB surface mounted linear washer ceiling ‘waffle’ raft uplight LightGraphix LD12LT – stair treads, stair handrail, bar front wash, bar shelving LightGraphix LD32 joinery hidden shelflight washer Lumenpulse AlphaLED: 120 Series Nimble square – ceiling ‘waffle’ raft downlight


LUNEXO LED THE SMARTER LIGHT FOR MORE COMFORT www.trilux.com/lunexo

MondoArcFullPage_June16.indd 1

31/05/2016 21:00:13


080

PROJECT

Pics: Charlotte Gale

HAIL MARY Catered to the church's multiple uses, Brilliant Lighting's scheme balances functional lighting with unintrusive surface-mounted fittings and accent lighting that highlights the magnificent fourteenth century tombs found within.

St Mary the Virgin is a beautiful Grade II listed church in the Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales, UK. The brief was for a new, low maintenance, flexible lighting scheme for the multiple uses the church is put to: services, concerts, village meetings and events. The buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s listed status made cabling opportunities extremely limited with restricted fixing points and restrictions on drilling into the fabric of the building. The transition from a top heavy scheme dominated by halogen luminaires in the ceiling is dramatic. Now, functional lighting in the ceiling delivered by high output LED Xicato fittings is balanced with visually unintrusive surface-mounted fittings in the arches. Each surface-mounted fitting is custom RAL finished to hide in full view (as seen behind the Altar).

Accent lighting for the magnificent fourteenth century tombs is provided by miniature LED luminaires. The DALI based scheme minimises cable runs and the whole system is controlled by easy-to-use keypads for the Lutron HomeWorks QS system. The interior of the church has been transformed and received its official blessing from the Bishop in September of 2015. www.brilliantlighting.co.uk

PROJECT DETAILS St Mary the Virgin, Goldsborough, UK Client: St Mary the Virgin, Goldsborough Architect: Stephen Calvert, UK Lighting Design: Brilliant Lighting, UK Lighting Suppliers: Mike Stoane Lighting, Orluna, Lightgraphix, acdc, Lutron


modular system

EOS FAMILY

homogeneous light

transparent pannel

CIRCULAR, RECTANGULAR OR MODULAR SYSTEM EOS System and bigger sizes of EOS Circular are the latest addition to the family, which

• 3500 - 10000 lm

inspires with its transition from transparency to homogeneously lit surface. Elegant and

• 39 - 140 W

unobtrusive when turned OFF, the luminaires change their form when powered ON,

• 2700 - 5000 K

forming interesting lighting shapes enriching your ambience.

• CRI>80 / 90 (on request)

different dimensions: 470

560

www.ledluks.com

650

740

825

1000

1200

1500

1800

2000


082

PROJECT

THE CROWN JEWEL

Faced with glare issues, Ann Kale Associates has developed a lighting scheme that excites the visitors of Santa Barbara Courthouse Mural Room, elevating the artists' work to a newfound glory. If the Santa Barbara Courthouse is the crowned masterpiece of one of California’s most beautiful cities, the Mural Room is the jewel in that crown. Designed by William Mooser in the Andalusian Spanish Colonial style and completed in 1929, the 20-metre by eleven-metre Assembly Room is lined with five-metre tall murals depicting the Spanish and Mexican colonisation of Santa Barbara. Glare from the western facing windows made it difficult to see details on the west wall and the unfiltered setting sun created significant damage to the murals. To determine the best method for lighting the murals, three schemes were mocked up by Ann Kale Associates. Wall washers provided the best illumination when wall grazers and floodlights concealed within the chandelier (a request by the client Courthouse Legacy Foundation), proved glary or uneven. Fifty two 50W MR16 halogens line the room, two-metres from the walls. Chosen by the client, halogen was selected for its better colour rendering. However, LED compatible

transformers were specified should the client decide to switch to LED MR16s in the future. Since nothing could touch the delicate plaster ceiling, the fixtures were mounted to tracks along the tops of the north and south beams, while similar tracks span between the beams along the east and west walls. To highlight the never before illuminated Moorish-inspired ceiling, rows of 20W/m 3,000K 90CRI LED striplights were added along the tops of the beams. The murals were painted on canvas in Santa Barbara by Dan Sayre Groesbeck, a set designer for early films in Hollywood. His firsthand familiarity with Hollywood actors can be seen on the south wall where he used the likeness of Douglas Fairbanks for the man to left of door holding a wood beam and Error Flynn, seen sitting above the door conversing with a Chumash native boy. To ensure visual balance, the lighting for the west windowed wall was wired on a separate dimming zone. A photo sensor, concealed amongst the beams, dims the

three other walls throughout the afternoon when the western light is emitted into the room, now through UV treated windows. Wonderful parts of the mural, such as the mother and child and the whimsical Peter Pan-like character, were once hidden in the dark due to the window’s glare. The success of the restoration and new lighting has created excitement as a point of pride for the city. As a result, many of Santa Barbara’s locals are returning to the courthouse just to visit the Mural Room and truly experience Mooser’s and Groesbeck’s masterful work in a way they couldn’t before. www.annkale.com

PROJECT DETAILS Mural Room, Santa Barbara Courthouse, California, USA Client: Courthouse Legacy Foundation Architects: Bill Mahan, Ed Lenvik, Robert Ooley Lighting Design: Ann Kale Associates Lighting Suppliers: LSI Lighting Services, Visual Lighting Technologies


084

PROJECT

AQUATIC ADDITION Following the architect's pursuit for zen, AES Engineering's lighting scheme is pleasing to the visitors of the Guildford Recreation Centre, while meeting energy and budget targets. The Guildford Recreation Centre Aquatic Addition, located in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada, was designed as a destination aquatic facility for both recreation and therapeutic users, offering a 50-metre FINA certified lap pool, as well as a leisure pool containing a therapeutic area, waterslide, hot tub, and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area. The City of Surrey wanted the lap pool designed to Federation Internationale De Natation (FINA) swimming pool guidelines to host FINA competitions, allowing both the public and competitors to enjoy the facility. Surreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 'Wood First Policy' was achieved in the design of the structure which incorporated the lighting and HVAC for the natatorium. Initially destined to be open web steel joist, the final product consists of three dimensional timber trusses. These were pre-assembled offsite, which allowed for easier installation, reduced waste and cost, and saved construction time to help with the accelerated schedule. Becoming a defining feature of the Aquatic Centre, the timber space trusses spaced at four-metres conceal the mechanical ducts and electrical conduits. The lighting design was of key importance to meet the competition lighting levels, as well as the architectural intent of zen.

Working together with the project team members in an integrated environment, AES proposed the use of indirect high efficiency lighting, to create a soft diffused level of illuminance, which would provide the natatorium with a pleasant glare-free light, competition illumination levels, and remain within energy use requirements. AES Engineering utilised various software tools to maximise the light output from both the coves and the trusses including Revit and ElumTools. Through modelling of various luminaire types at multiple angles and positions, it was concluded that two rows of fluorescent vapour proof luminaires, using specular reflectors, would provide the best light quality and efficiency within the trusses. To further increase the illumination level, high reflectivity paint was selected and specified by the architect, and luminaires were mounted at optimal angles to maximise the amount of lumens leaving the truss and reflected onto the natatorium. The use of low voltage lighting controls was implemented to provide flexibility to the truss illumination system. Three levels of illumination have been implemented to provide selection options to suit its current use. Traditionally, luminaires are switched in rows or groups, but the lights

in the trusses are configured to switch in an interweaving pattern so that an even light output is achieved no matter what illumination level is selected. Highly functional and sustainable practices are the foundation of the addition. By providing even illumination using a minimal number of lights, overall energy consumption is reduced without sacrificing comfort or safety. The LV system is scheduled to sweep off lights when not required, and the use of LED underwater lights rather than traditional halogen lighting further reduce the carbon footprint. The main goal was to create a building that would provide the public with a welcoming swimming pool where they can compete, exercise, and play; an aesthetically pleasing and versatile space that complied with energy code requirements and met budget. www.aesengr.com

PROJECT DETAILS Guildford Recreation Center Aquatic Addition, Surrey, Canada Client: The City of Surrey Architect: Bing Thom Architects Lighting Design: AES Engineering Additional Design: Shape Architecture; Fast + Epp; AME Consulting Group; MC Squared System Design Group Lighting Supplier: Lithonia Lighting


Project: Private residence Designer: Sian Baxter Lighting Design Product: LD42A-500

C r e a t i v e

L i g h t i n g

S o l u t i o n s

LD42, LD42W, LD42A Miniature Low Glare LED Wall Light - Very minimal depth and bezel diameter - High power for its size - Recessed LED position for reduced glare - Optional glare shield (LD42W) - 20° tilt film available (LD42A) - IP68 for interior/exterior applications - Range of white LED colours - Excellent beam spread and shape Please see our website for more information

Tel: +44 (0) 1322 527629 Email: light@lightgraphix.co.uk www.lightgraphix.co.uk

Architectural, Marine and Display 30 years of design and manufacturing in the UK


086

PROJECT

BODY BEAUTIFUL Highlighting various retail pockets of Selfridges' Body Studio, Nulty's lighting design gives each space its own identity through considered luminaire choices, marrying with the store's variety of materials.

Nulty has recently completed work on the lighting scheme for the new 37,000sqft Body Studio in Selfridges. The new retail concept within the London flagship store is completely dedicated to women’s bodywear categories such as hosiery, loungewear, sleepwear and lingerie. Opened in what used to be the brand’s head office, the area is Selfridges’ largest retail department and also includes the first wellness café by health gurus Hemsley + Hemsley and hair salon by celebrity stylist Daniel Galvin. Working closely with the team at Selfridges and the interior architects Neri & Hu, Nulty created the store’s first all LED scheme, that complements the luxurious, feminine and uncluttered aesthetic of the interior design. Each individual retail pocket within the studio needed its own identity and by using highly considered lighting details alongside different materials, Nulty was able to provide a unique mood and character for each space. The lighting concept reinforced the design vision, creating an intimate,

calming and personal shopping experience for women, with a focus on making them feel beautiful. One of the aspects of the design is the different retail experiences customers have depending on the time of day. During daylight hours, natural light floods the space from the courtyard and two large skylights. At night, the studio is transformed to an intimate and visually stimulating retail space, where the light tells a story and showcase the contrast between the areas. Upon entering the department guests are greeted by large lanterns in the form of back illuminated barrisol panels, which were carefully positioned over the escalators to create an impressive approach to the Body Studio. Shoji screens on the floor wrap around the interior courtyard and are cleverly backlit using LED sheets, replicating the lucent light of a traditional Japanese tea house. The ceiling layout was purposely kept uniform throughout to provide a consistent vernacular to the overall retail space.

Surface mounted LED spotlights were used to achieve maximum flexibility, alongside joinery lighting that picks up on vertical surfaces illuminating the merchandise, all while creating a sense of depth and drama. The beautiful, bespoke fitting rooms utilise the best possible colour rendering and comfort of light levels to make the experience calming and enjoyable for the customer. Linear LED tape washes the ceiling of each individual booth, creating a diffused light in order to avoid unnecessary shadows on the human form. www.nultylighting.co.uk

PROJECT DETAILS Selfridges Body Studio, London, UK Client: Selfridges Architect: FD Architecture Interior Design: Neri & Hu Lighting Design: Nulty+ Lighting Suppliers: Flos, Lucent, Osram


Premium performance in the office Linea freestanding LED luminaire Linea is an elegant freestanding luminaire for office environments. It has a lean yet strong, rounded pole and stylish aluminium lamp head with a height of no more than 25 mm. The slim head is made possible by Lineaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of modern LED technology, which takes very little space while providing light of exceptional quality.

Please refer to our website

Please call our Sales team on 0208 953 0540

for information about our 5-year warranty.

www.glamoxluxo.co.uk


088

PROJECT

JUSTICE TO DESIGN With a focus on its reception void and casual entertaining areas, Electrolight's lighting scheme brings Corrs Chambers Westgarth' s vision of sophistication to life at the new Melbourne office.

Leading law firm Corrs Chambers Westgarth’s new Melbourne, Australia office is located over five floors from levels 22-26 in the innovative and unique centrepiece building at 567 Collins St. Corrs’ reception is situated on the 25th floor, with spectacular views over Melbourne’s skyline through floor to ceiling glazing. The feature staircase rises through the central void, linking reception with classic but contemporary mixed-use casual dining areas. Electrolight was appointed to provide a lighting scheme to realise Corrs’ vision of a sophisticated and timeless aesthetic, with a focus on the reception void and casual entertaining areas. Adding to this, the primary consultation spaces, including fifteen meeting and boardrooms, unite Corrs’ interface and consultation offering. During the daylight hours the south facing reception void and casual entertaining areas receive significant amounts of natural light. Artificial lighting was a key component in allowing the core lift lobbies, meeting rooms and corridors to connect with the

natural light flow throughout the tenancy. The team at Bates Smart meticulously pieced together elegant spaces and finishes with a multitude of refined detailing. Electrolight had to ensure that intrusions were to be minimised amongst the clean, sleek lines and subtle folded forms, so a deep level of planning and coordination between Bates Smart and Electrolight was necessary for light placement, concealment and performance. Electrolight worked with a blend of colour temperatures to distinguish each space to reflect its functionality. Cooler temperatures are utilised in the meeting rooms, combined with warmer colour temperatures throughout the casual entertaining and reception void areas adding to the relaxed mood and sophisticated ambience. The steel rods that span from ceiling to floor, framing the stair of the ten-metrehigh void are flanked with linear LEDs with acute optics to provide focussed lighting to the stair and primary circulation space

below. The feature lighting in the casual entertaining area is a bespoke solution that was designed to complement the architectural forms and finishes. The geometric angles offer a subtle reference to the undulating timber wall, as the finish and frame reflects the delicate structure of the shelving behind. This custom luminaire design carries through to the adjacent boardroom at a smaller scale to provide a more intimate setting for evening meetings with key clients. www.electrolight.com

PROJECT DETAILS Corrs Chambers Westgarth, Westgarth, Australia Client: Corrs Chambers Westgarth Architect/Interior Design: Bates Smart Lighting Design: Electrolight Lighting Suppliers: Artemide, Barrisol, Buckford Illumination, Erco, Darkon, Euroluce, iGuzzini, JSB Lighting, KKDC, Light Project, Litesource, Living Edge, Nocturnal Lighting, Zumtobel


Vici LED Ensuring our products meet the demands of their applications and surroundings, Hacel Lighting design and manufacture dynamic, architectural luminaires for inspirational installations. Creating a spectacular centrepiece, the Vici LED Pendant by Hacel suspended harmoniously in the space, provides visually impressive, yet practical illumination with outstanding performance.

S o p h i s t i c a t e d S t y l e , I n t e l l i g e n t I n n ov a t i o n

Introducing our New, Redesigned and Interactive Website at

www.hacel.co.uk

Steve Mayes Photography


090

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

SPACES BEST LANDSCAPE LIGHTING SCHEME - LOW BUDGET Urban or rural landscape projects (including masterplans, streetscapes, parks and plazas) where luminaires specified cost less than £30,000.

THE TERRACE @ ROSEWOOD, UK FOUNDRY LIGHT + DESIGN, UK

THE HARRODS BRITISH ECCENTRICS GARDEN, UK SIMON WHITE, UK

BOMONTIADA COURTYARD, TURKEY ZKLD STUDIO, TURKEY

KTH SQUARE, SWEDEN SWECO, SWEDEN

DALSTON ROOF PARK, UK MICHAEL GRUBB STUDIO, UK SEE PAGE 100

DUKE OF YORK STEPS, UK STUDIO-29, UK

PORTO MONTENEGRO YACHT CLUB (PMYC), MONTENEGRO VISUAL ENERGY, UK

INTO THE GLACIER, ICELAND EFLA CONSULTING ENGINEERS, ICELAND SEE PAGE 098

MEMORY OF SODIUM, BELGIUM RADIANCE35, BELGIUM

SAALFELD FAIRY GROTTOES, GERMANY AKTIVRAUM, GERMANY

FULL MOON, SPAIN UNPARELLD’ARQUITECTES, SPAIN

YELLOW PAVILION, UK LIGHT BUREAU, UK


091 1

SPACES BEST LANDSCAPE LIGHTING SCHEME - HIGH BUDGET Urban or rural landscape projects (including masterplans, streetscapes, parks and plazas) where luminaires specified cost more than £30,000.

SCOBEE EDUCATION CENTER, USA DURAND-HOLLIS RUPE ARCHITECTS, USA

CROSSRAIL PLACE, UK MAURICE BRILL LIGHTING DESIGN, UK SEE PAGE 092

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL, MOROCCO DPA LIGHTING CONSULTANTS, UK SEE PAGE 106

MAGIC GARDEN, HAMPTON COURT PALACE, UK SPEIRS + MAJOR, UK SEE PAGE 104

BANANA ISLAND RESORT, QATAR STUDIO LUMEN LIGHTING DESIGN & CONSULTANCY, UAE

COSMOPOLITAN TOWER, POLAND PULSAR LIGHT OF CAMBRIDGE, UK

THOMAS MORE SQUARE, UK BDP, UK SEE PAGE 102

VERDENSPARKEN, NORWAY ÅF LIGHTING, NORWAY

ČIKAT BAY, CROATIA SKIRA, CROATIA SEE MONDO*ARC 91

NØRREPORT STATION, DENMARK BARTENBACH, AUSTRIA; GOTTLIEB PALUDAN, DENMARK; COBE, DENMARK

HOTEL & SPA ABADIA RETUERTA LE DOMAINE, SPAIN LICHT KUNST LICHT, GERMANY

GASHOLDER NO 8, KING'S CROSS, UK SPEIRS + MAJOR, UK

BOX PARK PHASE 2, UAE DELTA LIGHTING SOLUTIONS, UAE SEE MONDO*ARC 91

BELGRADE WATERFRONT, SAVA PROMENADE, SERBIA BURO HAPPOLD, UK SEE PAGE 094

RENATO POBLETE PARK, CHILE DIAV, CHILE

PIER APPROACH & LOWER GARDENS, UK MICHAEL GRUBB STUDIO, UK


092

PROJECT

A WELCOMED CONTRAST Maintaining an overall harmony with the site's neighbourhood, Maurice Brill Lighting Design's scheme responds to the landscape of London's Crossrail Place and engages with people's spatial experience through characteristic lighting choices.

Located in London's Canary Wharf, Crossrail Place, designed by Foster + Partners, is a horizontal structure that resembles a sailboat floating on the dock waters that once sailed the West India Dock. With its natural wooden lattice beams and transparent ETFE cushions, it is a welcome counterbalance to the tall steel and glass buildings surrounding it. Beginning work in 2008, Maurice Brill Lighting Design (MBLD) was tasked with the interior lighting to main entrances, bridges, external lighting to the promenade walkways, Adams Place, flood storage reservoir and roof garden. MBLD's approach was to design lighting that engages with people’s spatial experience and gives each space a distinctive character, whilst maintaining an overall harmony with the site and neighbourhood. A big feature of the building is the rooftop public garden, including the landscape designed around the main walkway, which features a combination of exotic trees. MBLD responded to the landscape narrative by designing a special gimbal luminaire mounted in the roof nodes to illuminate the main pathway. For the secondary routes, higher and more even illumination has been achieved using bollards to comply with the client’s brief of higher illumination levels to deter any anti-social behaviour. A conscious decision was made not to have

any lighting for the roof skin, to allow the park lighting to come through the translucent ETFE panels for views from the ground and neighbouring buildings. Lines of light between the louvers tie in the architectural language for the main entrances. Each of the entrance luminaires are compliant with the LU 1-085 regulation of London Underground as a design requirement. The pedestrian bridge connecting the main entrance has a single line of light running the length, which allows for unimpeded views of the interiors. For external areas MBLD looked to combine light and architecture as a way of minimising external pole lights; this is demonstrated in lighting to Adams Place, which is achieved by hiding luminaires inside the structural ‘V’ columns of the bridge. Theatrical rhythms are positioned at selected public realm locations such as lighting to the flood storage reservoir. High power floods with straw coloured gels hidden under the walkway capture the movement of reeds in the wind. The play of light and movement is extended to the pedestrian bridge, which is punctuated with specially designed carbon fibre reeds up to nine-metres tall that gently sway in the wind. www.mbld.co.uk

PROJECT DETAILS Crossrail Place, London, UK Client: CWCL Canary Wharf Company Architects: Foster + Partners, UK Lighting Design: Maurice Brill Lighting Design, UK

LIGHTING SPECIFIED ACDC Blade linear LED wall grazers Crescent lighting fibre optics to concrete bricks - ground level Erco - tree uplighting - park level Ewo Indirect pole system 70W MH - column lighting - ground level Ewo reflector and 150W metal halide concealed uplighter within column - elevated walkway Lumino Vector 12 concealed linear lighting - park level Mike Stoane Lighting - tree uplighting - park level Mike Stoane Lighting custom gimbal - roof structure Mike Stoane Lighting - Surf M - park pavilion Mike Stoane Lighting custom 1W LED handrail mounted LED Mike Stoane Lighting custom stem reeds - boardwalk, flood storage reservoir Norka UK linear LED - under bench lighting Philip Payne emergency exit sign bollards - park level Schreder - primary pathways - park level Selux continuous T5 and T8 High output linear fluorescent and prismatic diffuser - ceilings Zumtobel emergency exit signs Zumtobel 4.5W LED floor washer - Adams Place planters


093

Top Left Resembling a floating sailboat, the structure's natural wooden lattice beams and transparent EFTE cushions contrasts with the steel and glass buildings surrounding it. Top Right Mike Stoane Lighting custom stem reeds illuminate the flood storage reservoir's boardwalk. Middle Left Selux continuous T5 and T8 linerar fluorescent provide a clean light from the ceilings. Middle Right and Right Erco and Mike Stoane Lighting uplighting fixtures provide illumination to the rooftop garden's many exotic trees.


094

PROJECT

Pics: Filix Lighting

PROMENADE FOR THE PEOPLE Previously an underused urban area of Belgrade, the river Sava's banks have become a vibrant and diverse new quarter for the city thanks to Buro Happold's people-focussed lighting scheme, forming part of a redevelopment masterplan strategy designed by architects RTKL and landscape architects SWA.

Buro Happold, together with architects RTKL and landscape architects SWA delivered the masterplan strategy for the Belgrade Waterfront development on the banks of the river Sava in Serbia. With 2.8km of river frontage, the waterfront will regenerate a previously underused urban area, becoming a vibrant and diverse new quarter for the city. Masterplanned to provide the best possible inner city environment, the development looks to become a hub for technology and smart design. The 100ha site has introduced a quality of facilities not seen before in the region, providing innovative and sustainable design to make this site a modern leader and exemplar in redevelopment. The first part of the masterplan to be constructed was Sava Promenada - a stretch

of the waterfront promenade to the north of the site, including the surrounding public realm. Buro Happold was tasked with the lighting strategy through to completion for this area. The project features custom designed columns and bollards by Technilum as well as a range of inground luminaires by Filix designed to cope with periodical flow from the river. The exterior lighting framework was developed to reflect the progressive and people-focused nature of this project. The lighting masterplan design document aimed to strengthen the Belgrade spatial plan for the waterfront development. At its core is a design intent that will deliver a public realm and streetscape that is both safe and secure for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists; as well as a general cityscape

that is intimate, inviting and romantic to encourage the citizens of Belgrade to make full use both by day and by night. The main focus points for this lighting framework are sustainability, light pollution and light quality, and a people focus. Firstly, sustainability in mind, energy efficiency has been perused through the exclusive use of energy efficient LED light sources. The use of LED sources together with a lighting control strategy that proposes, for all public realm and street lighting, to feature DALI dimmable control gear; linked to a site-wide lighting control system will enable the exterior lighting scheme to be modified and adapted to produce suitable lighting scenes in response to time of day and year, as well as crowd flows, special


095

Left Hand Page Filix Lighting linear luminaires have been integrated into the waterfront's many handrails. Above and Right Technilum custom bollards and columns punctuate the promenada's evening walkways.


096

PROJECT

The lighting scheme creates a pleasant and comfortable public realm. This was achieved by bringing some lighting elements down to a lower level, rather than uniform light throughout, allowing for pools of light and contrast shown here by Technilum's custom bollards and columns.

events and cases of emergency. Secondly, light pollution and light quality. Great attention has been given to the selection of luminaires and lighting effects to ensure that light pollution is kept to a minimum. Height of street lighting and side walk lighting has also been considered closely to ensure that light is only distributed and directed where it is needed. All luminaires feature optics to control the spread of light in accordance with European best practice guidelines. Finally, a people focus. The lighting scheme has been developed to create a pleasant and comfortable public realm. This was achieved by not simply lighting all areas uniformly to a set light level, but instead

bringing some lighting elements down to a lower level, allowing for pools of light and contrast in the public realm. Also by lighting all sidewalks along the road network from luminaires mounted at a lower height than the street lighting and by integrating lighting into urban furniture and landscaping elements wherever appropriate. The lighting scheme for the parks of Belgrade Waterfront also recognise the need to let some areas of the development remain without direct functional lighting, thus giving the visitors the contrast of bright and dark, which is typical of existing parks in Belgrade and the rest of Europe. www.burohappold.com

PROJECT DETAILS Belgrade Waterfront, Sava Promenada, Belgrade, Serbia Client: Eagle Hills Architects: RTKL, UK Landscape Architects: SWA, UK Lighting Design: Buro Happold, UK Lighting Suppliers: Filix, Technilum


Yo u r p a r t n e r i n u r b a n e n h a n c e m e n t French designer and manufacturer since 1971

Arbane

Shiraz K

Nano

Treille

Creation . Innovation . Design Technilum has a forty five year track record in designing and manufacturing urban lighting furniture. Technilum is considered as the specialist in responding to market needs with products definitely based on creation, innovation and design.

160729_Publicite_Technilum_MondoArc.indd 1

29/07/2016 15:23:48


098

PROJECT

Right Integrated lighting glows through the walls and ceiling of the tunnel, varying in intensity depending on the thickness and age of the ice. Below several themed spaces including an assembly hall and chapel proved a major lighting challenge due to difficulties faced when attempting to conceal all lighting equipment and cabling. Bottom Right LED projectors illuminate the 30-metre-deep crevasse.

TOUCHING THE VOID After conquering many challenges, EFLA Consulting Engineers has managed to create a natural and unique experience inside Iceland's Langjökull Glacier through well planned light scenes and sophisticated use of colour.

Inside Europe’s second-largest glacier, at a height of 1,200 metres, lies Iceland’s newest tourist attraction, a magnificent, manmade, 500-metre ice cave tunnel - the longest in the world. The aim of the project was to provide a natural and unique experience, well planned light scenes with natural light colours and limited use of other colours. Guests are to experience the lighting without any visible equipment or cables. As a consequence of this, the project presented many challenges, including the fact that the temperature is consistently around 0°C, so heat from LED lighting had to be minimal in order to prevent melting. This was done by raising lighting equipment from the ice so that it is never in direct contact, as well as having a tight network

of sensors and precisely programmed DMX controllers to limit the light-time of each light source to between five and seven minutes. All equipment had to be placed inside the walls and ceilings, with light sources of up to six-metres in length, without visible cables, control tables or light sources. Holes were drilled with a specially built steam drill for illumination, and slots were made in the tunnel corners for control and power cables. It proved difficult to reach the tunnel opening in winter, in a blinding snowstorm and at a height of 1,200 metres, so GPS was used to find the opening and tunnel in. The built-in lighting in the walls and ceiling of the tunnel provides pleasant illumination through the ice, which varies depending on the thickness and age of the ice, as

well as highlights layers of ash from times past, including ash from the infamous Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The visitor experience is divided into segments with darkened passages inbetween to provide contrast. When guests view the Eyjafjallajökull ash layer, for example, the passage ahead is darkened, with only a back-lit wall at a 50-metre distance, providing soft and billowing blue and white colours. When the guide has finished their account, the lights in the tunnel walls are turned on, slowly and gradually, until reaching the visitors by the Eyjafjallajökull ash layer 50-metres above. There are several themed spaces on the 500-metre trek through the glacier, including an assembly hall, chapel and pillar hall where lighting was installed


099

in locations such as an altar, benches, walls and the floor without any visible installations, proving to be one of the major challenges in this project. The most spectacular experience on this journey is the large crevasse that crosses the tunnel and provides guests with a spectacular and mystical connection to the natural forces from the bottom of its depths, 30-metres below the glacier surface. The lighting, provided by powerful LED projectors and Pharos controls, is a major factor in capturing the magnificence and drawing out the contrasts of this 200-metre-long, fivemetre-wide and 30-metre-deep crevasse. The crevasse is darkened when the guests reach it but is then illuminated in stages, enhancing the experience further. www.efla-engineers.com

PROJECT DETAILS Into The Glacier, Langjökull Glacier, Iceland Client: Isgöng Architects: Arni Pall Johannesson – Reynir Sævarsson Lighting Design: EFLA Consulting Engineers

LIGHTING SPECIFIED Anolis ArcSource 24MC exterior luminaires Griven Maxi WaterLED exterior luminaires Osram Value Flex Power Linear LED strip 860 Osram Value Flex Power RGB LED 865 Osram BackLED XL Plus G15 LED modules Pharos LPC, RIO LED lighting control Robe CitySkape RGBW exterior luminaires


100

PROJECT

Pic: Mike Massaro

SUMMER IN THE CITY

Located atop one of London's many rooftops, the Dalston Roof Park has been brought to life by Michael Grubb Studio's 'Sunset, all night long' flexible lighting concept, which can be reconfigured to suit the venue's wide range of events and activities throughout the year. Run by Bootstrap, a community charity, whose mission is to unlock local potential, Dalston Roof Park has become one of the most popular summertime destinations in London. Michael Grubb Studio (MGS) was tasked with developing the lighting design. The concept was â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sunset all night longâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, achieved through the use of white light and a limited range of yellow, amber and red filters. This approach allowed the studio to mimic sunset and create a unique atmosphere where visitors experience the subtlety of colour. Natural and artificial light was used in unison with the main event space, with the central point of the scheme focussed on specially manufactured triangles consisting

of a coloured filter and integral LEDs, which provided a stained glass window effect during the day, whilst being illuminated and sequenced to transform the space by night. Lighting within the bar was inspired by studio photography lighting techniques, using two different colours from adjacent angles. This simple approach allowed MGS to create the sensation of a late sunset, which in turn provides a warm glow that compliments skin tone. Finally, a unique lighting solution was developed where LED technology was incorporated within the irrigation system. This cost effective approach matched the ethos of the project and created a warm glowing effect to the planters and barrels that act as meeting points.

Through the enthusiasm, generosity and commitment of the many parties involved, the Roof Park is now a thriving space that houses a wide range of events and activities throughout the year. The lighting scheme is flexible and can be reconfigured in the future as needed. www.michaelgrubbstudio.com

PROJECT DETAILS Dalston Roof Park, London, UK Client: Bootstrap Lighting Design: Michael Grubb Studio, UK Additional Design: Lamps & Amps, UK Lighting Suppliers: Rosco, Architainment, Optelma, Holders Components


Project : Fenêtre sur cour – 30, avenue du 16 novembre, Rabat - Lighting designer : Florian Douet Design - Architect : Ramy Fischler

ATEA

R01 R02 R03 R04 R05 R06 R07 R08 R09 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 99 98 99 95 97 96 94 94 92 98 98 79 98 99 95 2200K - 2400K - 2700K - 3600K - 4100K - 6100K

ULTRACRI 97 www.atea.fr/4101

sales@atea.fr

Mondo.atea.2016.04.08valide.indd 1

11/04/2016 15:02:43


102

PROJECT

FROM SOULLESS TO SOULFUL In pursuit of a vibrant and well-loved public space, BDP has implemented a lighting scheme that has brought ambience and energy to a once lifeless Thomas More Square in London. Previously soulless and uninhabited, Thomas More Square is a commercial estate owned by Land Securities in London, UK. Neighbouring residents complained about the columns that lit the spaces uniformly but with uncomfortable glare. Through the conversion of ground floor office space to retail/restaurants and fundamental re-landscaping, Land Securities wished to create a vibrant and well-loved space, inhabited at night by residents and workers alike that would maximise the office rental values. Faced by BDP, the challenge was to provide safe light for the high pedestrian flows, but to do so in a sophisticated way that removed the need for columns. In the arrival square this was achieved with many layers of light. The entrances were refurbished to ensure that they created primary focus and their contribution to the ambience allowed BDP to minimise other interventions. Thereafter the raised planters lit the space

using a combination of bollards, recessed floor wash and integrated handrail lighting. Feature lighting was provided by uplighting planter walls and trees. Secondary entrances to the estates have been marked with corten portals uplit in warm light with soffits within, using a common linear recessed motif. This was to create a visual focus that aids estate legibility and provide a welcoming atmosphere. In the northern square, the ambient solution has been achieved via a discrete catenary system. Fully integrated with the existing structure and window cleaning cradle equipment, co-ordination with the landscape below (avoiding trees, illuminating paths) was challenging but ultimately successful. By avoiding overlighting, it allows the feature uplighting to planters and the surrounding retail/ restaurants to sing out. BDP found the detailing of the uplights challenging because of the plantersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; curving prows,

below grade co-ordination and construction sequencing; LightLab provided specialist installation and a five-year warranty. The arrival square provided seating alcoves, which were deliberately left darker to encourage people to sit and socialise away from the busier areas. The timber seating had lighting integrated within to create a glow and cast patterns on the paving. BDP has designed a lighting scheme that creates a pleasing level of ambience while ensuring adequate and safe light levels for the high number of pedestrians passing through Thomas More Square. www.bdp.com

PROJECT DETAILS Thomas More Square, London, UK Client: Land Securities Architect: BDP, UK Lighting Design: BDP, UK Lighting Suppliers: The Light Lab, Bega, Simes, DW Windsor, Reggiani, Insta, Ares, KKDC


THE ILLUMINATION OF STUDIO CITY MACAU Hollywood has come to Macau with the opening of the newest attraction, Studio City. The facade lighting of Studio City has been a single all-encompassing project for illumination Physics, from concept to completion. The lighting design and the purpose specific design of the fixtures manufactured and supplied by illumination Physics include over 12,000 luminaires for the podium and towers. illumination Physics is a project focused total service provider.

Specialists in customised lighting to suit your design

illuminationphysics.com IP2849_MSC-FINAL-SinglePage-FINAL DARC.indd 1

21/07/2016 10:51 AM


104

PROJECT

GARDEN OF ENCHANTMENT Creating the impression of a real life fairy tale, Speirs + Major has conjured up a mystifying after-dark experience at Magic Garden, London using light to take visitors on a journey of discovery.

The Magic Garden is a new interactive garden for families, designed by landscape architects Robert Myers Associates on the site of King Henry VIII’s former tiltyard at Hampton Court Palace, London, UK. The garden is layered with an array of enchanting and engaging character areas, where mythical beasts can be vanquished, battlements stormed, towers besieged and secret grottoes discovered. Speirs + Major were approached to create an after-dark experience for the garden. Based on the idea of a journey of magical discoveries, the design uses light to transform the character areas into a series of lit ‘jewels’. The surrounding landscape is left relatively darker, and path lighting is kept simple and restrained, creating a heightened sense of adventure for visitors. The journey begins at the entry gate where a spotlit perching griffin on the gatepost greets all visitors. The path ahead is lit indirectly from grazing linear uplights to the dense hedges, with distant views of the lit ‘Crown’ perched on top of the Spiral Mount enticing visitors in. Passing through the ‘Strange Topiary’ garden, where crazily shaped plants are either lit from within or sculpturally spotlit, visitors emerge onto the ‘Tournament Ground’, a large open space overlooked from the west by the majestic King and Queen Tiltyard Towers. These are resplendent in blue and red, their latticework cupolas revealed in silhouette, and light integrated into their balconies providing some spill onto the lawn. Behind them, three further towers are linked by a soaring aerial walkway, marked

out by linear runs of white light that graze up its textured mesh balustrades. Spotlights highlight the crossed supporting columns, casting shadows across the activity zones beneath. Each of the three towers is themed to represent a different aspect of Tudor history or fairytales, and is purposefully lit in contrasting shades of monochromatic light. Passing through the ‘Perspective Pergola’, which plays with illusions of scale and distance, visitors can enter the ‘Mythical Beasts Lair’, a secluded corner that contains dramatically spotlit creatures set amongst a dense forest landscape. Following the same path, visitors find the giant ‘Dragons Nest’ created by artist Tom Hare. Taking the form of an elliptical woven willow structure, it glows deep red from within, hinting at the fire-breathing creature that calls it home. The Café Terrace is where the dragon itself can be found – a huge 30-metre long sinuous steam-emitting red sculpture that snakes through the seating area. At night, the dragon comes alive with RGB LED lights set in the eyes and nostrils to terrifying effect, picking up the bursts of water and vapour that pour from the nose and mouth. Nearby, the ‘Encampment’, where medieval tournament and kitchen tents glow from within, is set against a backdrop of soft foliage lighting and uplighting to the historic tiltyard walls. The Magic Garden has real fairy tale quality, and the lighting design brings a new dimension to the garden, offering visitors a completely different – but equally as magical – experience after dark. www.speirsandmajor.com

PROJECT DETAILS Magic Garden - Hampton Court Palace, London, UK Client: Historic Royal Palaces Lighting Design: Speirs + Major, UK Additional Design: Robert Myers Associates, UK Lighting Suppliers: acdc, iGuzzini, Osram, BEGA, Mike Stoane Lighting, LED Linear, Architainment


Recessed Underwater Light 4.0012 POW-LED white 2 Watt · 140 Lumen Stainless Steel · IP68

AMANZOE, ARGOLIDA, GREECE; FOSS SA

LED UNDERWATER LIGHTING WIBRE Elektrogeräte GmbH & Co. KG info@wibre.de +49(0)7131 9053-0 Leingarten/Germany Anzeige_236x333.indd 1

Made in Germany. Since 1919. www.wibre.de

01.06.16 08:40


106

PROJECT

OCEAN VIEWS Integrated into the fabric of the architecture, dpa lighting consultants' scheme highlights the textural qualities of the Four Seasons Casablanca, discretely complimenting its modern Moroccan design.

Fronting the Atlantic Ocean, the new intimately scaled Four Seasons Casablanca offers a resort style hotel, blending textured sand-coloured contemporary architecture with a modern Moroccan interior. dpa lighting consultants worked closely with GA Design International, London to design the main public areas including the ‘Mint’ tea lounge and EDG Design, California for the design of the ‘Bleu’ speciality restaurant and ‘Latitude 33’ pool bar. Overlooking the oceanfront on the prestigious corniche, the hotel is part of the Anfa Place development, being the first masterplanned construction on the White City’s shore. Guests are greeted at the Porte Cochere, which consists of 1,225 Moroccan shaped pots, each individually lit with a LED retrofit candle lamp, with the exception of the pots above the entrance which contain LED PAR lamps. The understated doorway entrance gives way to a mix of interior spaces with a building geometry that is based around the linear courtyard and gardens. The brief called for the lighting design to be integrated within the fabric of the architecture, with the architectural light fixtures concealed where possible and where visible, to be small and discreet. It was important to strike a balance between the modern, clean and minimal lighting

equipment and more decorative fixtures, to appropriately compliment the modern Moroccan design. The lighting design was to support the charm and character of the hotel, helping to produce a quality and memorable end product. In addition, the lighting was to reveal the true textural qualities of the material palette across a wide mix of spaces, which necessitated a full understanding of the building design and how each material reacted to daylight, colour temperature, lighting optics and offset. For instance, the GRC exterior cladding panels had a textured surface, so by using a close offset lighting product with an elliptical distribution to graze upwards, this created appropriate shadows that modelled the cladding. A rhythm to the courtyard guest room balconies was achieved via the placement of linear fixtures at the threshold of the wall and soffit, providing definition and expressing the architectural perimeter. Select palm trees and low lying shrubs were picked out to the courtyard, whilst the pathway that connects the hotel interior to the pool bar and terrace on the main axis, was lit by regularly placed electric Moroccan lanterns, reinforcing the architectural geometry. Concealed underbench lighting creates further interest at guest level.

The lighting scheme uses LED light sources extensively within the external environment, offering a practical solution in terms of maintenance and energy efficiency, whilst being cool to touch, an important consideration particularly around the pool terrace. All front of house exterior lighting is connected to an architectural lighting control system, which provides automated control, linked to an astronomical time clock. The lighting design has been carefully considered so that each light fixture point serves a purpose and has an intended function, with each relating to an element such as cladding panels, water, trees, shrubs, wayfinding, structures, architectural features and so on. The lighting layouts are well organised and refined, which has been achieved through very close co-ordination with the project/design team, a process that took over four years to complete. www.dpalighting.com

PROJECT DETAILS Four Seasons Hotel, Casablanca, Morocco Client: Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts Architect: Confidential Lighting Design: dpa lighting consultants, UK Lighting Suppliers: Meyer, Bega, iGuzzini, KKDC, WE-EF, Wibre, acdc, iLight, Toshiba


108

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

STRUCTURES BEST EXTERIOR LIGHTING SCHEME - LOW BUDGET Exterior architectural lighting schemes (including building faรงades, monuments, sports stadia, bridges) where luminaires specified cost less than ยฃ30,000.

HISTORIC ANN STREET CHURCH, AUSTRALIA GILLARD GROUP, AUSTRALIA

LANDSHUT BRIDGE, UK MARK TRAINOR-HAYES, UK

GLAZE, UK COUSINS & COUSINS ARCHITECTS, UK SEE PAGE 034

STREETART UNDERPASS, FINLAND WHITENIGHT LIGHTING, FINLAND

BAM ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING, IRAN RGE LIGHTING DESIGN, UAE SEE PAGE 168

DOWLAT BUILDING, IRAN HOORSHAR DESIGN, IRAN

KOPPELPOORT, NETHERLANDS NEW URBAN VIEW, NETHERLANDS SEE PAGE 112

LIGHTING STATUES, FINLAND WSP, FINLAND

JETTE SUBWAY, BELGIUM RADIANCE 35, BELGIUM SEE MONDO*ARC 91

SPILLEPENGEN, SWEDEN JOHAN MORITZ, SWEDEN

CASA TRIANGULO GALLERY, BRAZIL FERNANDA CARVALHO DESIGN DA LUZ ESTUDIO, BRAZIL SEE PAGE 118

HYUNDAI UNDERSTAGE OPEN PERFORMANCE PLAZA, SOUTH KOREA KGM ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING, USA SEE PAGE 120


For over 30 years, our passion for developing and manufacturing energy efficient products has seen us deliver our portfolio of lighting and controls solutions to some of the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most innovative businesses.

WWW.LUXONIC.CO.UK

ACCREDITED Certificate No: 5020

ISO 9001 & 14001

SUPPLIER


110

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

STRUCTURES BEST EXTERIOR LIGHTING SCHEME - HIGH BUDGET Exterior architectural lighting schemes (including building faรงades, monuments, sports stadia, bridges) where luminaires specified cost more than ยฃ30,000.

PORTS 1961, CHINA INVERSE LIGHTING DESIGN, UK SEE PAGE 114

SYDNEY TOWN HALL, AUSTRALIA POINTOFVIEW, AUSTRALIA

CEPSA FLAGSHIP STATION, SPAIN AUREOLIGHTING, SPAIN SEE MONDO*ARC 90

LIT BROTHERS BUILDING, USA THE LIGHTING PRACTICE, USA SEE MONDO*ARC 90

IMAX WATERLOO, UK BRIGHT GREEN TECHNOLOGY, UK

HOTEL ROYAL RESORT EVIAN, FRANCE NAZZARENDO MUNDA, FRANCE

THE PARK, MGM RESORTS INTERNATIONAL, USA ARUP LIGHTING, USA SEE PAGE 116

CENTRAL BUS TERMINAL ZOB, GERMANY LDE BELZNER HOLMES, GERMANY

RUENTEX BOTANIC GARDEN VILLA, TAIWAN CMA LIGHTING DESIGN, TAIWAN

BRIDGE 13, CANADA MARCEL DION LIGHTING DESIGN, CANADA

BROOKE STREET PIER, AUSTRALIA POINTOFVIEW, AUSTRALIA

KIRIKKALE MERKEZ NUR MOSQUE, TURKEY ZEVE, TURKEY


111

STUDIO CITY, MACAU ILLUMINATION PHYSICS, AUSTRALIA SEE MONDO*ARC 91

FINNEVIK BRIDGE, FINLAND WSP, FINLAND

DALIA ENERGY POWER PLANT, ISRAEL STUDIO TWILIGHT, ISRAEL SEE MONDO*ARC 90

RITZ-CARLTON HOTEL, UAE VISUAL ENERGY, UAE

JAM TOWER, IRAN RGE LIGHTING DESIGN, IRAN

JAVADIEH BRIDGE, IRAN RGE LIGHTING DESIGN, UAE

CAILLE BRIDGES, FRANCE LES ECLAIRAGISTES ASSOCIÉS, FRANCE

HOTEL TORNI, FINLAND VALOA DESIGN, FINLAND SEE MONDO*ARC 88

SAINTE-AGNÈS CHURCH LACMÉGANTIC, CANADA OMBRAGES, CANADA

PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM, USA HORTON LEES BROGDEN LIGHTING DESIGN, USA

PRIME TOWER, UAE UMAYA LIGHTING DESIGN, UAE

RIVER THAMES PEDESTRIAN-CYCLE BRIDGE, UK URBIS SCHRÉDER, UK

TEMPLO EXPIATORIO, MEXICO LIGHTEAM, MEXICO SEE PAGE 122


112

PROJECT

LOVERS' KEEP Attracting admirers, photographers and lovers, New Urban View's fairytale-like lighting of Amersfoort's Koppelpoort highlights the medieval building's many characteristic details.

Built in 1425, the medieval Koppelpoort, situated in the Dutch city of Amersfoort, is a remarkable building. Serving as a land gate, water gate, land bridge and hosting guards to protect the city, it formed part of the second defence wall circumventing the city. The first was built 100 years prior, just after the city got its charter in 1259. Undertaken by Dutch lighting design consultancy New Urban View, the aim of the lighting scheme was to allow visitors to experience a total view in harmony, composed by highlighting details and the building's many characteristic forms; the result is almost fairytale like. During the day, the Koppelpoort is a increasingly popular wedding location and also draws the attention of couples, sitting hand in hand on the adjacent bridge. All light sources used are LED, with colour temeperatures of 2,700K and 3,000K.

The fixtures and inground spots were delivered by CLS, Netherlands and Osram, Germany. Much care was given to mount the fixtures out of sight. So the rows of inground spots accentuate the meaning of the building as a land bridge and land gate. It proved especially challenging for the New Urban View team to find the correct placement of fixtures on the outward side. The idea was to mount them on a few extra mooring poles at a three-metre distance. This turned out to be extremely dangerous, as there is still a lot of undetonated ammunition from World War II present at the chosen positions. Therefore, the team arrived at the solution to mount supports onto the building, with the fixtures mounted on them, clad with metal in the shape and colour of the existing mooring poles close by. The illumination project at Koppelpoort has

provided the city with a new sought after evening attraction, drawing many admirers, photographers and lovers. www.newurbanview.com

PROJECT DETAILS Koppelpoort, Amersfoort, Netherlands Client: City of Amersfoort Lighting Design: New Urban View, Netherlands

LIGHTING SPECIFIED CLS Revo Basic Inground luminaires CLS Revo Compact Inground luminaires CLS Revo Micro Inground luminaires CLS Revo Basic luminaires CLS Revo Compact luminaires (Colour temperatures used: 2,700K and 3,000k Angles used: 8, 12, 30, 61, 46/61, 61/46 degrees) Osram Linearlight Flex Protect Advanced LED modules, 3,000K, 120°


113


114

PROJECT

URBAN ICEBERG Creating a sense of depth at its entrance, Inverse Lighting Design's illumination of the Ports 1961 Shanghai glass block façade has become a sparkling urban statement.

Founded in 1961 in Toronto as a silk importing business, Ports 1961 has evolved into an international 327-store chain. In Shanghai, its high-fashion point-of-view was expressed in its initial store, which opened three years ago on The Bund - the city’s historic and fashionable thoroughfare. After outgrowing its original space, the store relocated to a new location as a free-standing, sculptural, sparkling urban statement. This adaptive reuse of a former office building takes full advantage of a high-visibility site with a dimensional façade of LED-illuminated glass blocks. The now 12,325sqft faceted glass structure has taken on a dramatic new life as a threelevel retail store, set like a jewel amidst steel and glass high-rise towers. The façade was designed was UUfie, Toronto, store interiors and merchandise fixtures created by Yabu Pushelberg, Toronto and New York,

and lighting by Inverse Lighting, London and Bangkok. Principal architect Eiri Ota of UUfie further compared the store to a free-floating iceberg: “During the day, the faceted glass façade reflects the sunlight. In the evening, it generates an overall glow by means of LEDs embedded in the joints of the masonry behind the glass block skin.” Two types of glass block with a satin finish were used: the standard twelve-inch square block and a custom-mitred block of the same dimensions used for the corners, creating the three-dimensional façade. The blocks rest on shot-blasted stainless steel plates of the same dimension which extend to a steel frame. The underside of the exposed steel plates has a soft matte finish. Strips of this metal divide the glass blocks into groups of 64. An elaborate ornamental stepping canopy fashioned of

glass blocks frames changing fashion images that extend outward from the planar glass block surface. According to Inverse Lighting director Filip Vermeiren, LED’s placed behind the exterior glass blocks are aimed towards the wall: “They light the façade indirectly to give a sense of depth and to smooth out any imperfections in the lighting to achieve a homogenous lighting effect,” he explained. www.inverselighting.co.uk

PROJECT DETAILS Ports 1961 Shanghai Flagship Store, Shanghai, China Client: Ports 1961 Architect: UUfie, Canada Additional Design: Yabu Pushelberg, Canada; Eightsixthree Architects, China Lighting Design: Inverse Lighting Design, UK Lighting Suppliers: Local suppliers


SAPPHIRE ZOOM EFFECTIVE ZOOM RANGE:

8º TO 50º

The Sapphire Zoom offers

Lightsource by

• Zoom range of the beam from 8° to 50°!

• White, black or grey housing

• Xicato Artist 2000 lm or Citizen 2500 lm LED module

• Locking mechanisms for pan/tilt & zoom

• 2700K - 3000K - 4000K, typical CRI of 85 or 98

• Analogue, mains, DMX or DALI dimming

European manufactured LED products

Arc-adv-jun-jul-2016.indd 1

www.cls-led.com

info@cls-led.com

P: +31 (0) 26 326 36 76

27-05-16 11:11


116

PROJECT

VIVA LAS VEGAS Challenged by the bright and bold Vegas Strip illuminations, Arup's lighting of MGM's The Park differentiates itself through dynamic colour options, creating a novel visual destination. Pic: Hanns Joosten

Arup’s lighting approach at The Park, MGM Resorts International, Las Vegas, included strategies to illuminate sixteen unique, monumental structures, each with singular compound curved surfaces. After lighting angles were calculated on paper, software and mock-ups, brightness proved to be a challenge, given the context of the Las Vegas Strip’s cacophony of lighted, animated signs. So, purposefully, the dynamic colour options were strictly defined to differentiate from the usual lights of the Vegas Strip. The client Marnell Companies desired a differentiated experience for visitors to The Park. Whereas the Strip is known for its brightness, sparkle and bold lighting, Arup was tasked to create a novel visual destination. Within the context of local materials – quarried stone – and plantings, the shade structure illumination layer provided an other-worldly, creative environment at night. The light-colour palette has been based on the desert horticultural selections of the landscape design. Just as each shade structure is unique, each tone is unique to that shade structure perforation. Meaning

two colour sequences are bright, while the other two are neutral. To build anticipation and extra reason to visit The Park, every fifteen minutes on the hour, the coloured light echoes a monumental cactus blossom – with warm magentas, deep oranges, and vibrant pink suffusing the space, creating a ‘visual chime’. Gold and white neutrals bookend the more active and colourful sequences; they are slower and more static, allowing viewers’ eyes to rest. The colours are visible through the leaves of the park’s trees all the way to the Strip, reinforcing the structures’ spatial relationships both with the forms, the light and with each other. www.arup.com

PROJECT DETAILS The Park, MGM Resorts International, Las Vegas, USA Client: Marnell Companies Architect: !melk Lighting Design: Arup Lighting Additional Design: Marnell Architecture Lighting Suppliers: Lumenpulse, City Theatrical, MA Lighting

Pic: francisandfrancis


C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

ZEKI multi-head gimbal luminaires Designer’s best friend for flexible lighting design

The MEGAMAN® ZEKI multi-head gimbal luminaires give designers flexibility and a wide variety of options, including the ability to mix a variety of beam angles and colour temperatures meaning you can achieve a number of different lighting goals from the same fitting.

ZEKI Ø111 3000K / 4000K 15º / 24º / 45º / 60º

ZEKI Ø50 2800K / 4000K 24º / 36º

www.megaman.cc

• Replaces 50W metal halide, 100W halogen AR111, 50W halogen MR16 and PAR16 • Available in 1,2, and 3 heads with a range of optics • Works with the serviceable TECOH® THx LED light engine and module • Allows for easy stock management with its flexibility and interchangeability • Perfect for use in retail, window display, galleries and museums


118

PROJECT

CASA DE LUZ

Creating a connection between the interior and exterior of Brazil's Casa Triangulo gallery, Fernanda Carvalho Design da Luz Estudio's lighting scheme turns the building into a luminaire, making the heavy concrete structure look as if it is floating above it. Created by Fernanda Carvalho Design da Luz Estudio, the lighting design concept for the Casa Triangulo gallery in Sao Paulo, Brazil was developed in close collaboration with the architects Metro Arquitetos. As the main idea was to create a connection between the interior and the exterior of the building, the architects proposed a translucent polycarbonate wall which, combined with light, is brought into life when the sunlight fades. Besides turning the building into a luminaire, this interior illumination emulates a soft and gentle diffuse light to the exterior area, bringing to the public space a new ambience for meetings. This light sensitive material seems to hold the heavy concrete structure above it; the poetic opposition of the weights in an upside down logic becomes more interesting

when it is dark, making the concrete structure look as if it is floating above a lighting mattress. Lighting is the primary means to reinforce the form of the building, which is particularly interesting where the polycarbonate folds and reveals the corner of the square shape. In order to achieve an even and equalised lighting effect, some lights are dimmed and others were specially placed to avoid a lower incidence of light. A portion of the light comes from the reflection of the main gallery, which is lit homogeneously. In some sections it was necessary to add linear lights following the walls to reach the desired light level. In addition, the trees are lit with uplights and help to compose a cosy ambience outside the gallery. In the side-corridor where people gather to

celebrate the vernissages, three fluorescent lamps enveloped by transparent tubes were placed vertically on the wall as a statement. This solution follows the main idea of the lighting for the interior of the gallery in which the materials are used as an expression of a constructive reality. Overall, by not trying to hide the lighting fixtures, they seem to merge into the other materials and installations of the gallery. www.fernandacarvalho.com.br

PROJECT DETAILS Casa Triangulo Gallery, Sao Paulo, Brazil Client: Casa Triangulo Gallery Architect: Metro Arquitetos Lighting Design: Fernanda Carvalho Design da Luz Estudio, Brazil Lighting Suppliers: Osvaldo Matos, Lumini


Your first choice global lighting partner For over 25 years Lucent has been driven by innovation, providing our partners with architectural grade lighting and seamless project integration. All our products are available worldwide through our specialist distributor network.

Featured Project: City Social, Jason Atherton | Lighting Designer: Russell Sage Studio | Featured Product: Focus 90 Accent

London | New York

CD3091_MONDO_Ad_August16.indd 1

04/08/2016 10:23


120

PROJECT

MUSIC FOR THE MASSES Designed to give back to its community, KGM's illumination of the Hyundai Card Music Library and Understage uses linear LED sources to create a perfect frame to view the Seoul skyline beyond.

On a steep hillside in the artsy Yongsan district of Seoul, South Korea, the Hyundai Card Music Library and Understage is home to one of the largest specialised music collections in the world. The design of the Open Performance Plaza structure appeals to the senses in an artistic fashion, creating a strong experience for the user. Designed to give back to the community, the plaza is intended for small-scale concerts and events. The project’s underlying goal was to create an approachable experience that would appeal to a broad cross-section of people. To enhance the form and the materials of the architectural environment, warm white linear LED sources have been successfully integrated into the uniquely painted corrugated wall and ceiling. Colour changing LED flood lights dialed in to a crisp 4,000K CCT enliven the concrete floor surface and create a visually appealing contrast to the warmth of the walls and ceiling. Starting at the plaza entrance, vertical

bands of light start roughly four-metres above the ground and descend at each bay until reaching the floor at the rear of the plaza. This unique approach to lighting creates a forced perspective, drawing the visitor into the space. To help support and enhance the identity of the project, the linear LED coves integrated into the structure mimic the graphics of the project logo. During normal operating hours, the plaza is flooded with 4,000K white light from energy-efficient programmable RGB LED lights. This helps the plaza stand out from the warmly lit music library and café beyond. To further support and enhance the function of the project, the amber colour LED cove lights are turned off during concerts. The space is then transformed into a surreal visual experience characterised by easily programmable RGB LED floodlights dialed in to the colour of the performer’s choice. Rigging used primarily as an elevated

performance stage doubles to support maintenance for the light sources. To allow for longer intervals between maintenance, robust LED sources were used. Aimable and programmable RGB LED floodlights are easily maintained from the roof of the music library. The striking shell of corrugated metal paneling, grazed with linear LED sources, creates a perfect frame to view the city skyline beyond, yet is carefully aimed to abide by codes that restrict any light from spilling onto adjacent properties. www.kgmlighting.com

PROJECT DETAILS Hyundai Understage Open Performance Plaza, Seoul, South Korea Client: Hyundai Card Architect: Gensler, USA Lighting Design: KGM Architectural Lighting, USA Lighting Suppliers: Pacific Technical Products


LONGER LIFE FILTERS FOR LED A new concept in LED filter design Regular lighting filter can often quickly fade when used with LED lights â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Zircon range is different. With a lifespan of up to 200 times longer than standard filters and at more than double the thickness (180 microns), Zircon filters are not only slower to fade, they are durable and easy to use, too. The four Warm Amber filters correct a range of different colour temperature white LEDs giving them a warmer feel. Three Diffusion filters offer different strengths of diffusion specifically designed for LEDs.

leefilters.com

6352 LF_Zircon_Ad_Mondo_Arch.indd 1

06/04/2016 09:29


122

PROJECT

LIGHT OF THE LORD Highlighting the beauty of the temple's Gothic Revival architecture, Lighteam's scheme diplays the Templo Expiatorio in its full divine glory.

In an effort to encourage the rediscovery of the tangible and intangible beauty that comes from the city of Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico has raised a lighting project to recover the presence of the temple. In doing so, it intends to integrate it into the nighttime urbanscape, conserve and protect the historical heritage, its social and cultural past, so that it lives in the present and is safeguarded in the future. Framed in an urban context, Lighteam was faced with lighting the expiatory church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, which is a vital organ because of its location, Gothic Revival architecture; stained glass windows; the square of urban scale; and recognition as a point of socio-cultural integration. It is also a potentiator for economic revival through tourism and social influx through extended hours. The project is based on equipment using advanced technology with optimum use of power consumption and minimal maintenance. The equipment used has optical properties that allow the use of light modelling accessories, as well as meeting the standards set in European countries, US and Mexican official rules.

It is considered important that the investment of public resources be channelled in works that benefit equally to all socio-economic strata and contribute to increased tourism, public safety and social coexistence. With this in mind, the exterior of the temple has been lit to exhibit itself as a domain of divine presence. The lighting concept shows a gradation of light in crescendo: starting silently from below, ending with great intensity at the top. This progression represents the proximity to God, who is symbolised as light himself. As an additional touch, the presence of the stained glass was recovered by lighting from the inside, displaying the stories that the windows have to tell expressed through light. www.lighteam.eu

PROJECT DETAILS Templo Expiatorio, León Guanajuato Lighting Project, Mexico Client: Guanajuato State Government Lighting Design: Lighteam Additional Design: Constructora Eléctrica del Bajío; Alcione Lighting Supplier: Italli Innovación


Track lighting is now wireless.

ONETRACK® is A.A.G. Stucchi track lighting system based on EUROSTANDARD PLUS® platform. This system combines the functionalities of all the current systems in the market and makes the upgrade to controllable lighting systems possible at any time. This state-of-the-art platform makes ONETRACK® the best solution for controllable lighting and perfect for the application of wireless control, making installation easy at any time. The ONETRACK® system, thanks to the EUROSTANDARD PLUS® platform, allows easy and fast integration of wireless control in track lighting applications. Simply insert the specific adapter into the track and it carries the signal to all the lighting fixtures on it, without any wiring. ONETRACK® can be integrated with different wireless control systems providing countless lighting scenarios and energy management solutions.

Define your track lighting projects the easy way with

IDE@pp

The new webtool that helps you understand what you need to realize your projects, easy and fast.

OneTrack® and EUROSTANDARD PLUS® are registered trademarks of A.A.G. Stucchi. For more info please go to www.aagstucchi.it

210X150_AAGSTUCCHI_Mondoarc_ideapp_ENG.indd 1

20/07/16 12:36

create the most stunning visual effects with ease.

stamp your name on it and shout about it. A simple and effective way to strengthen your brand.

enjoy greater flexibility with custom solder pads that make connectivity even easier than before.

Flexible LED-

Product enhancement for every application keeping you ahead of the competition Walk away with exactly what you need with a custom solution built to the highest quality, to your exact requirements.

Mondo Half Page Vertical Flexi.indd 1

www.forge-europa.co.uk +44 (0) 1229 580000

02/08/2016 09:30:04


124

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

ART

BEST LIGHT ART SCHEME - LOW BUDGET

Light art installations (permanent or temporary such as festivals of light installations) where luminaires specified cost less than £30,000.

OUTSIDERS: ENERGY IS INSIDE, CANADA NARGIZA, CANADA SEE MONDO*ARC 91

UNTITLED, BELGIUM 88888, BELGIUM SEE MONDO*ARC 88

LIGHT #20 (FALSE SUNSET), ITALY ROMANO BARATTA LIGHTING STUDIO, ITALY

THE RHYTHM OF FLAMES – “THE EVOLUTION OF LIGHT”, SWEDEN VIVI KATARINA HENNIG – WSP LJUSDESIGN, SWEDEN

“12”, CANADA NARGIZA, CANADA

FLOATING, TAIWAN WE DO GROUP, TAIWAN

HOMMAGE À MONET, CATALONIA ESDAP OLOT, CATALONIA SEE PAGE 032

LIVING ROOM UNDER THE HIGHWAY, SWEDEN REINHARD GERMER, GERMANY SEE MONDO*ARC 88

AN ADDITIVE MIX, UK LIZ WEST, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 86

COLOR WHEELS, GERMANY ALEKSANDRA STRATIMIROVIC, SWEDEN; ATHANASSIOS DANILOF, GREECE SEE MONDO*ARC 90

EQUILIBRIUM, UK ACRYLICIZE, UK

SENTIMENT COCOON, UK KONSTANTINOS MAVROMICHALIS, GERMANY


125

COLONIES, GERMANY [MUSSON+RETALLICK], UK; APPLELEC, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 91

DREAMERS, UK ELISA ARTESERO, UK SEE PAGE 132

LIGHT TRANSFORMS SPACE, MEXICO 1ER [DIA] – DISEÑO EN ILUMINACIÓN ARQUITECTÓNICA, MEXICO

DODECA, AUSTRALIA DIMITRIOS TSIOKARAS & KY SNYDER, AUSTRALIA

LITRE OF LIGHT, UK MICK STEPHENSON, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89

KINETIC FLUX, UK THE GLASS CYPHERS, UK

LIGHT ORIGAMI, USA KAZ SHIRANE, JAPAN SEE MONDO*ARC 86

LIGHT RAIN, UAE CHRIS WOOD LIGHT, UK SEE PAGE 138

LIGHT (ONDA) FLOW, NETHERLANDS LIGHT (ONDA) FLOW, SPAIN

LLUMVERSACIÓ, SPAIN MAURICI GINÉS, SPAIN SEE MONDO*ARC 91

MY LIGHT IS YOUR LIGHT, BELGIUM ALAA MINAWI, LEBANON

KIRKSTALL BRIDGE CLOCK TOWER, UK JPLD, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89

THE STORM, UK ITHACA VISUAL, UK SEE PAGE 136

THE PLAY OF BRILLIANTS, SINGAPORE NIPEK, SINGAPORE


126

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

ART

BEST LIGHT ART SCHEME - HIGH BUDGET

Light art installations (permanent or temporary such as festivals of light installations) where luminaires specified cost more than £30,000.

THE W, NEW YORK – TIMES SQUARE, USA BRIAN ORTER LIGHTING DESIGN, USA

SENATE HOUSE, UK SNOWY JOHNSON & SUSIE OLCZAK, UK

NORTHERN LIGHTS, NETHERLANDS & ISRAEL ALEKSANDRA STRATIMIROVIC, SWEDEN

NEW DAWN, UK MARY BRANSON, UK SEE PAGE 128

THE LUMINOUS VEIL, CANADA MULVEY & BANANI LIGHTING, CANADA SEE PAGE 038

SAYN IRON WORKS FOUNDRY, GERMANY LICHT KUNST LICHT, GERMANY

TIMELESS ELEGANCE, UK ACT LIGHTING DESIGN, BELGIUM SEE MONDO*ARC 89

THE BEACONS, UK STUDIO OF CINEMATIC ARCHITECTURE, UK

LIGHT CUBE, MOSCOW KOPTSEVA NATALYA & VASILY TARASENKO, RUSSIA SEE PAGE 036

THE MANSIONS AT ACQUALINA, USA GPI DESIGN, USA

IMPULSE, CANADA CS DESIGN, CANADA

MAKE-A-FLAKE, FINLAND WHITENIGHT LIGHTING, FINLAND

PIXEL FLOW, PERU CLAUDIA PAZ LIGHTING STUDIO, PERU SEE MONDO*ARC 89

DEEP WEB, GERMANY CHRISTOPHER BAUDER, GERMANY SEE PAGE 033

IMX-IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCE, RUSSIA ACT LIGHTING DESIGN, BELGIUM SEE PAGE 130

NOMA EARTH TUBES, UK CUNDALL LIGHT4, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89


ILLUMINATING NEW DAWN LED Light Sheet is now illuminating Mary Bransonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspiring New Dawn light sculpture for the Houses of Parliament. Characterised by a slim profile and created to bespoke requirements, LED Light Sheet is a versatile backlighting unit suitable for architectural, retail and commercial lighting applications.

Visit our central London showroom to discover our LED and OLED range www.ledlightsheet.co.uk ledlightsheet@applelec.co.uk +44 (0)1274 774 477

LED Light Sheet is manufactured in the UK by Applelec

MondoARC New Dawn advert.indd 1

09/08/2016 10:36:04


128

ART & DESIGN

IT'S A NEW DAY As the first piece of abstract art commissioned for permanent display in London's Westminster Hall, New Dawn is a light sculpture that celebrates women's suffrage through inspired imagery and symbolism.

Pics: ©UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor

One-hundred and fifty years to the day since the campaign for women’s votes began, New Dawn, a contemporary light sculpture by artist Mary Branson celebrating all the individuals involved, was revealed on 7 June 2016 in Westminster Hall, London, the oldest part of Parliament. New Dawn is located above the entrance to St Stephen’s Hall so that viewers of the artwork can literally stand in the footsteps of the hundreds of thousands of women and men who came to Parliament to fight for women’s right to the vote. New Dawn is a permanent addition to the Parliamentary Art Collection, as well as the first piece of abstract art commissioned for permanent display in the historic palace. Measuring over six-metres high, its massive scale is intended to reflect the size of the campaign, and the unique hand-blown glass scrolls that make up its dawning sun reflect the many individuals who were involved in the movement.  The glass scrolls are a direct reference to the Act Room at the Parliamentary Archives, where the legislation which brought women the vote is stored. These are mounted on a portcullis structure – the principal emblem of Parliament – symbolising women’s longawaited access to democracy. The circular scrolls combine with the metal portcullis to create 168 distinct ‘Venus’ symbols, representing the women who fought for their right to vote. 

The installation has also been influenced by the campaigners it celebrates. The rainbow of colours used in the artwork reflects the numerous organisations that were involved in the struggle, including the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, the Women’s Social and Political Union, the Women’s Freedom League and the Men’s League for Women’s Suffrage.  The title of the piece comes from the language of the campaigners themselves, many of whom conceived of the vote as offering a ‘new dawn’ for women.  The lighting of New Dawn’s sun shape rises and falls over a twelve and half hour cycle, linked to the tide of the Thames. The ebb and flow of the illumination reflects the ever-rising tide of change that campaigners were certain would bring women the vote in time. Each scroll is individually lit, allowing the appearance of the artwork to change moment to moment, encouraging onlookers to reflect on the value of the vote and women’s role in democracy. In addition to this, New Dawn was revealed on the 150th anniversary of John Stuart Mill MP presenting the first mass petition calling for women’s votes in the House of Commons. This date is generally seen as the beginning of more than 70 year’s campaigning for the vote, involving hundreds of thousands of people across the UK. Branson worked with a team of craftspeople

to develop the work – including Adam Aaronson (glass), Musson Engineering (metal work), Applelec (LED lighting), and WLX Productions (electrical programming). “Applelec’s LED Light Sheet has been vitally important in the creation of New Dawn,’’ commented Branson. “Being really bright but thin, the light source could be hidden in our structure and so gives the impression that the glass itself is glowing and floating in front of the structural portcullis metalwork. I needed a light source that was low power, and low maintenance, as my brief was to create an artwork that could be enjoyed by future generations. LED Light Sheet generates almost no heat and with our DMX controlled drivers, fades smoothly to give beautiful and subtle effects through the glass.’’ Ian Drinkwater, Applelec managing director, said: “We feel privileged to have worked with Mary Branson on the lighting for New Dawn, and to have contributed our expertise in LED lighting to this significant and beautiful artwork celebrating women’s right to vote.’’ Now a permanent addition to the Parliamentary Art Collection, New Dawn will educate, inform and inspire the one million visitors who pass though Parliament's doors each year. www.marybranson.co.uk www.applelec.co.uk


129

Top Scrolls of the Act Room at the Parliamentary Archives, where legislation which brought women the vote is stored, provided inspiration for Branson's art. Left Branson presents New Dawn above the entrance to St Stephen's Hall. Above The circular scrolls combine with the metal portcullis to create 168 distinct ‘Venus’ symbols, representing women who fought for the vote.


130

ART & DESIGN

VIRTUAL MEETS PHYSICAL Inspired by the forces of nature, ACT Lighting Design's multidisciplinary team combined creativity and technology to create IMX-Immersive Experience - a three-dimensional structure inside Moscow's Zeleno Park shopping and leisure centre, decorated with multimedia content, visual scenography and multiple lighting features.

Armed with its expertise in the retail industry, ACT Lighting Design took upon a new challenge at Moscow's Zeleno Park shopping and leisure centre - to design, develop and produce an immersive multimedia installation inside. Following the client DG19’s requirements for visitor experience, branding, differentiation and strong visual identity, ACTLD's multidisciplinary team elaborated a turnkey creative and technological solution: IMX, a fourteen-metre high and 19.3-metre wide multimedia sculpture created to become Zeleno Park’s distinctive signature.

The concept focuses on a multi-sensory approach that encourages the visitors to explore the structure’s interface and enhances the spatial experience through visual, interactive and dynamic elements. By merging the virtual with the physical, ACTLD wanted to explore all potential and seize the opportunity of IMX to stimulate the connection between the users and the commercial space by integrating storytelling, interactivity, original shows and branding in a playful way that awakes all senses. The team had to work within the existing

architecture and implement the IMX structure without interfering with the building, keeping a five-metre distance from surrounding shops and allowing the flow of visitors under it. The structure, in the form of a vortex, is composed of two-mirrored halves of a spiral that follow and embrace one another, fully occupying the space in depth, width and length to offer a visual experience from a 360° point of view. The three-dimensional structure, inspired by the whirlpool, embodies a powerful dynamic energy. The visual scenography,


131

Pics: Courtesy of ACT Lighting Design â&#x20AC;&#x201C; photos by Vitaly Rastopchin


132

ART & DESIGN

The visual scenography, multimedia content (video animations, projections and lights) and an original music score with sound effects, were inspired by the nature and form of the sculpture itself, which is equipped with multiple lighting features and madeto-measure lighting fixtures that ensure the visual coherence within Zeleno Park

multimedia content (video animations, projections and lights) and an original music score with sound effects, were also inspired by the nature and form of the sculpture itself. A multimedia show is played on the structure and its surroundings every hour. Various interactive games and brand boxes with digital commercial content are proposed to the customers in between the shows. With an unsurpassed breadth and depth of functionality, the sculpture and its surroundings were equipped with multiple lighting features and made-to-measure lighting fixtures that ensure the visual coherence within Zeleno Park. The inner side of the sculpture includes eight LED projectors and 160 lineair meter of pixel controlled led lines. Eight projectors cover the surface of 210m² on the exterior of the sculpture. In total 1540 linear meter of RGB led lines was integrated in the ceiling and surrounding wall coves, two Central audio systems inside the sculpture and four sound showers as well as eight touch screens were implemented to provide a complete system that offers an extensive range of future creative and technical possibilities. www.actlightingdesign.com


tools

for your lighting

design

graphics: Vilfredo Maria Ricci - © 08/2016 Studio Due

A broad range of products to deliver energy efficient solutions and creativity for any kind of lighting concept for all sizes including hotels, facades, airports, bridges, sport facilities, restaurants, clubs and monuments.

a wide spectrum of

STUDIO DUE light s.r.l. 01100 Viterbo (Italy) t. +39.0761.352520 f. +39.0761.352653 marketing@studiodue.com

www.studiodue.com

[ high power wall washer ]

[ ultra narrow beam ]

[ LED linear bars ]

[ ultraslim LED linear bars ]

[ Spots ]

[ inground ]


134

ART & DESIGN

ALL THAT IS SOLID IS STILL FRAGILE

Pic: Jo

Combining words and poetry with light, Manchester-based artist Elisa Artesero articulates themes of transience and the link between the conscious and unconscious mind through large-scale, perspective-disrupting installations.

UK-based artist, Elisa Artesero, creates immersive dreamlike spaces using light and text to address themes of transience, the nature of happiness and hope. Awarded Curator Choice by Tim Marlow (White Cube, Royal Academy) at NOISE Festival 2014 with her installation Sun Scroll (a Zen Poem revealed only by sunlight), Artesero has gone on to develop larger scale pieces and exhibit in France, Montenegro, the Faroe Islands, and across the UK. After completing a degree in English, Artesero went on to study Interactive arts at Manchester School of Arts. ‘‘Early on in my art degree I found that all of my experiments used light as an essential component to ‘activate’ the work I was making,’’ she explained. “Something about the transience of light fascinated me and I wanted to harness that to create an experience for the viewer. I use words and poetry in combination with light to articulate the running themes of my work - those of transience and the link between the conscious and unconscious mind. I find the written word only partially satisfactory as an articulation of my feelings, so I then use the sculptural elements to represent our earthly presence in the world and the light and shadow to reveal the more ephemeral part of our nature.’’ Her first solo exhibition, Light Holds Me Here supported by Arts Council England and lighting sponsorship from Pulsar, was a large-scale dream space at Castlefield Gallery, Manchester. Developed from a period of research on themes of ‘desire’ and ‘void’, visitors entered into a dream realm of light, reflections and shadows,

a space reflected and repeated infinitely through the mirrored windows of the cavernous space. Within this exhibition, walking down Shadow Path visitors read the words ‘nothing here but echoes of footsteps that follow the path of dreams’ cast as shadows along the floor, then House with the words ‘housed in dream, outlines trace edges of memory’ read through the black mirror floor. First exhibited at Manchester Enlighten Festival of Light Art in 2015, Artesero’s next work, A Solid Wish Scatters, was an installation of mirror and concrete blocks that reflected the words up onto the famous Tadao Ando concrete wall in Manchester Piccadilly Gardens. The earthly presence of the blocks scatter into an ephemeral light piece to show all that is solid is still fragile, and all that is perceived to be permanent never will be. More recently, is Artesero’s DREAMERS - her largest outdoor work to date. Commissioned by Artichoke for the UK’s largest light festival, Lumiere Durham 2015, giant steel and mirror letters are scattered across the grass and cast shadows onto a screen. Visitors are either participant or viewer. If participant, they become the ‘dreamers’ that weave their paths around the space, casting their own shadows onto the screen. 200,000 visitors to the festival became ‘dreamers’ and activated the work with thousands of shadow stories. There were hugs, kisses, umbrellas, bicycles, tugs of war and dance routines in this interactive installation. Artesero said of the work: “It’s about being in the moment; having fun and

just playing. Adult or child, it appeals to most people’s inner performer.” With light having a central theme in her works, Artesero both understands and appreciates its magical power. ‘‘I know this because when I was first developing my light art practice with artificial lighting in dark rooms I was becoming increasingly depressed,’’ she explained. “I eventually found out that I was suffering from severe vitamin D deficiency because I was not getting enough daylight. This seemed a cruel irony for someone so in love with the medium. However, the powerful effect on my health and wellbeing made me acutely aware of the power of light. It gave me a greater respect for it and the manner in which I use it. I now have a practice that uses artificial light in winter, and sunlight in summer.’’ Going forward, viewing light as a means of visual communication, Artestero sees light art manifesting into two strands. ‘‘The first is the continuation of immersive and largescale works of art exhibited at festivals and exhibitions, temporary spectacles that people enjoy for a short time and stay with them in their memories,’’ she said. ‘‘Then there’s the integration of light art into architecture, perhaps more subtle, but a continually shifting and responsive art form that enhances the day-to-day life of those who inhabit and pass through the space.’’ Artesero continues to create large-scale site-specific work to interact, enjoy and disrupt perspectives of space and context with light and text. www.elisaartesero.com

Pic: Jo

Pic: St


135

Pic: John Lynch

Pic: Elisa Artesero

Above Left The Stories Under Our Feet: A series of light and text poems trimmed the benches of Manchester Central Library for Enlighten Manchester Festival of Light and Sound Art 1012 December 2015, supported by Arts Council England. Above Right DREAMERS was commissioned by Artichoke for Lumiere Durham 2015, the UK’s largest festival of light art 12–15 November 2015. Left A Solid Wish Scatters was first exhibited as part of the Manchester Enlighten Festival of Light Art 11–14 December 2015 in Piccadilly Gardens, Manchester, UK, supported by Arts Council England.

Pic: John Lynch

Pic: Stephen Iles

Below Lights Hold Me Here was exhibited 24-28 September 2014 at Castlefield Gallery New Art Spaces, Federation House, Manchester, UK, supported by Arts Council England.


136

ART & DESIGN


137

THE STORM An audio reactive light installation that explores LED light diffusion and elemental shapes and soundscapes, The Storm is previewed in the eerie subterranean surroundings of Brighton Town Hall. In the surroundings of the old police cells underneath Brighton Town Hall, sixteen feet of cloud covers billows from ceiling to floor, concealing over 6,000 individually programmed LED lights. UK-based creative studio Ithaca has been working with LED lights in a variety of indoor and outdoor installations for some time and became increasingly interested in the effects produced when you diffuse them. The cells presented such a dark and atmospheric setting that it seemed an ideal place to experiment with the idea.

The Storm is made up of a circular wooden frame from which suspended strips of individually addressable LED lights are attached, made to Ithaca’s specification and divided up into sections. This ‘skeleton’ of light is draped with sheets of wadding fabric and then built up into billowing clouds with pillow stuffing. The lights are coded by Ithaca to synchronise with the audio, which is a custom soundscape produced by sister company Ithaca Audio. www.ithacavisual.com Pic: Chris Evans-Roberts, Ithaca


138

ART & DESIGN

COME RAIN OR SHINE Combining two contrasting weather systems, glass and light artist Chris Wood has turned the humble water bottle into a stunning visual art installation that uses light and sound to speak to shared environmental experiences. UK-based glass and light artist Chris Wood, has turned the ubiquitous water bottle magical through the simple intervention of focussed light onto desert sand. This installation was created as a gift from the land of rain for the land of sun - Sharjah, UAE. Light Rain evolved in response to Sharjah Art Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s invitation to make a work especially for the Islamic Arts Festival in 2015. Chris Wood set out to use everyday

materials that would speak to shared and different environmental experiences. The large blue water bottles were sourced from supermarkets in Sharjah and the green bottles came from the UK. Inserted into the tops of each bottle was an acrylic lens designed to intensify the focus of the LED lights onto sand, which was sourced directly from the desert on the outskirts of the urban city of Sharjah. An added element to the installation was the sound of an

English rain shower gently fading in and out, created for the project by sound designer Simon Keep, UK. As viewers entered and explored the space their movement caused the bottles to very gently sway creating slight ripples in the water contained within each bottle, which then shimmered in the projected pattern image on the sand. www.chriswoodglass.co.uk


MONDOARC ADVIRT - Svindersvik Bridge - 16-08-08.pdf 1 2016-08-08 10:51:47 AM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


140

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

EVENT BEST CREATIVE LIGHTING EVENT Any temporary event or collection of installations where the main medium of expression is light.

COLOSSEUM LIGHT MESSAGES, ITALY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR LIGHT SEE PAGE 144

RETHINK THE NIGHT!, GREECE HELLENIC ILLUMINATION COMMITTEE SEE MONDO*ARC 89

WINTER LIGHTS @ CANARY WHARF, UK KEITH WATSON

NIGHT OF HERITAGE LIGHT, UK SOCIETY OF LIGHT AND LIGHTING, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 88

SAN FRANCISCO CITY HALL CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, USA ARUP, USA SEE PAGE 144

URBAN LIGHT SCORE RACE, VARIOUS LARA ELBAZ & LUISA ALVAREZ, SPAIN

E-LUMINATE CAMBRIDGE FESTIVAL, UK E-LUMINATE CAMBRIDGE FESTIVAL, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 90

LUMIERE LONDON 2016, UK ARTICHOKE TRUST, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89

LUMIÈRE – THE PLAY OF BRILLIANTS, FRANCE ELEPHANT PANAME SEE MONDO*ARC 84

LEWESLIGHT 2015, UK LEWESLIGHT, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89

KRONACH IN LIGHTS, GERMANY KRONACH CREATIV E.V., GERMANY SEE PAGE 142

LIGHTS IN ALINGSÅS, SWEDEN THE CITY OF ALINGSÅS, SWEDEN SEE MONDO*ARC 88

LIGHTING UP THE ROYAL SEAPORT’S GAS HOLDERS, SWEDEN CITY OF STOCKHOLM AND ÅF LIGHTING SEE MONDO*ARC 89

SPECTRA ABERDEEN’S FESTIVAL OF LIGHT, UK CURATED PLACE, UK

ENLIGHTEN – MANCHESTER FESTIVAL OF LIGHT AND SOUND ART, UK CURATED PLACE, UK SEE MONDO*ARC 89


make life more vivid INTRODUCING THE CITIZEN VIVID RANGE

In addition to the high colour rendering LEDs aimed at making the colour of objects more faithful, the demands on high chromatic LEDs targeted for making objects more vivid are increasing. To meet this demand the CITILED COB Series is now available with high saturation and enhanced brilliance. These exciting new products are ideal for retail and commercial lighting applications. Visit the Marl website for samples and technical support.

www.leds.co.uk T +44 (0) 1229 582 430 | E sales@marl.co.uk

The UK distributor of Citizen Electronics


142

ART & DESIGN

Pic: Anja Barthen

STORIES IN THE STREETS Through the voluntary work of Kronach Creative and the citizens themselves, Kronach in Lights illuminated the historic town for the eleventh time this year, showcasing the work of 44 students from fourteen different nations.

From 29 April until 8 May, the annual light event Kronach in Lights took place for the eleventh time. Under the management of Professor Römhild from the University of Wismar, 44 students from fourteen different nations of the fields of architecture, design, interior design and lighting design were invited to the historical town centre of Kronach, Germany. The students, from the universities of Coburg, Leipzig, Bayreuth, Wismar, Polytechnico Turin and El Sheim University Kairo, told stories on the streets, squares and façades using light. For example, the Gate of Bamberg was illuminated under the management of Sabine de Schutter from Berlin. Her intention was to symbolise the differences between the dangerous area in front of the city gate and the security behind the city

wall in times of trouble. Making history come to life, the different ideas were realised through the use of various lamps and projectors. At the 2016 event, more than 800 lamps, mainly LEDs and discharging lamps, and approximately 4,000 metres of cable were used in the different workshops. The initiative was created by the Kronach Creative association, which was founded with the aim to encourage regional possibilities, support the development of the region and bring old and young together. Following the theme ‘feel good – discover – be amazed’, over 100,000 attended the event. For ten days they could discover high quality illumination concepts, listen to live music and taste regional specialities. During guided tours, visitors were told a story of light, the meaning of architecture

illumination, façade lighting and the danger of light pollution. Furthermore, the event included light art installations, art exhibitions and live music. Altogether, 63 light points were realised as a part of the exhibition physic of the light, four mappings, six areas with high quality façade illumination, eight art exhibitions and sixteen unique light art installations. Running alongside this, a light-academy mediated the visitors’ general knowledge about light atmosphere, light colour, light intensity and the basics about light planning. The event is supported by the local industry and the city of Kronach, but without the voluntary work of the members of Kronach Creative and the citizens themselves, this event wouldn't be possible. www.kronachleuchtet.com


E

Instrument ERCO has reconsidered art lighting. The Parscan range with LED offers the perfect lighting instruments to illuminate artworks and valuable objects. Different light distributions from narrow spot to oval flood and wallwash in the same design. Perfect light, minimalist design. www.erco.com/parscan

160627_en_erco_cluster_motiv_4_236x333_Mondo_arc.indd 1

27.06.16 16:15


144

ART & DESIGN

CITY HALL CITY HEART Brought to fruition in time for its 100th anniversary and the nation's Conference of the Mayors, Arup designed and engineered a cost effective and energy efficient lighting scheme for the façade of San Francisco's City Hall.

In November of 2014, the City of San Francisco approached Arup to work on the design and engineering of an upgrade to the SF City Hall exterior façade lighting, to be featured at the 100 year anniversary of the building in June of 2015. The City Hall building would simultaneously be hosting the nation’s Conference of the Mayors, meaning the opening date was fixed. Therefore research, design, installation, and commissioning for the upgrade needed to be completed at a rapid pace in just eight months. The fixture schedule with quantities was issued before the drawings with tie-in to the existing infrastructure were complete. The intent was to provide similar illumination of architectural features as the previous system, but with dynamic LEDs and significant energy savings. The previous façade lighting system used metal halide luminaires to highlight both the soaring dome, at the lantern on top, and the deep balconies with columns that wrap the prominent faces of the building. The metal halide fixtures used approximately 31,000W of energy and required nearly 40,000 hours of labour throughout the year when the coloured

theatrical gels covering fixtures were manually replaced for themed celebrations. Customised DMX LED fixtures provide RGB and two colour temperatures of white, so that the typical white light scene could be visually selected and agreed to by the city staff and Mayor’s office. A series of mockups determined the mounting details and beam angles of the various locations. Energy savings are estimated at 50-75% and regular labour costs to change colour scenes has been eliminated, saving the city roughly $8,000 each time the colour changed. Arup was commissioned to design a short lighting program for the new system that was played at the 19 June Centennial celebration for the public and visiting Mayors that highlighted the capabilities of the new system while artistically telling the building’s history in California. The Arup team handed over the system to the city with a series of dynamic façade lighting scenes that promise to activate the urban heart of City Hall for many years to come. www.arup.com


“LED expertise since 1977”

Courthouse in Montpellier (France) In use: 4040-Luminy 4, 5655-Lignon Lighting designer: Sylvie Sieg

www.lec-lyon.com

LED EXPERTISE SINCE 1977


146

ART & DESIGN

UNITED NATIONS Japanese lighting designers Motoko Ishii and Akari-Lisa Ishii commemorate the 150th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Italy and Japan through light messages of love. Commemorating the 150th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Italy and Japan, the Colosseum, a historical ruin representative of Italy, was illuminated 11-13 May 2016, delivering light messages with the theme “Love to Humanity, Love to Earth.” Imagined by Japanese lighting designers Motoko Ishii and Akari-Lisa Ishii, the theme was an appeal to the world, proclaiming the importance of love to humanity and the protection of earth and our irreplaceable natural environment. With respect to today’s fragile political and social conditions, the producers chose this theme to commemorate the occasion and communicate their message of friendship, love and peace to the Italian people the world. Scripted by the producers, the program began with a dynamic light performance spread across the façade and inside arches

of the Colosseum, followed by an original video art projection telling a story of love. Based on ink drawings created by the lighting designer especially for this production, the animation expressed the admiration for nature and love in general. This event marked the first time that suibokuga (Japanese traditional monochromatic brush and ink drawing technique) was transformed into a video art projection and applied to such an iconic World Heritage Site façade. The light message, made up of the word ‘Love’ in 150 various languages from around the world, was projected on the façade, sparkling like stars spreading across space and gathering as if to envelop the earth in light. Nature was also expressed on the Colosseum through projections of butterflies, flowers, forests and rivers streams. An original soundtrack was composed

especially for this show. Partially inspired by Japanese traditional music such as taiko (large Japanese drums) and gagaku (ancient Japanese court music), the music illustrates each scene of the spectacle as an accompaniment to the light and projections. State-of-the-art equipment was used to illuminate the Colosseum, reviving the huge ancient ruin with modern technology. 9 x 21 Klm video projectors were stuck on three screen-frames on the façade, and the colour changing scenic fixtures were used to cover the entire façade facing the Foro Romano, as well as inside the arches. Free and open to the public, the show saw visitors of all nationalities, fascinated by the success of light in commemorating such an important occasion for the two nations. www.motoko-ishii.co.jp


148

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

KIT BEST ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING PRODUCTS This category is split into three sub-categories: Exterior, Interior and Technology.

EXTERIOR

VarioLED Flex AMOR LED Linear

Siteco Streetlight 20 LED Osram

KALYPSO LED Linear

CFT500 WE-EF

www.led-linear.com

www.osram.com

www.led-linear.com

www.weef.de

Akro L&L Luce&Light

Blade acdc

Carella John Cullen Lighting

ColorBurst IntelliHue Powercore Philips Lighting

www.lucelight.it

www.acdclighting.co.uk

www.johncullenlighting.co.uk

www.lighting.philips.co.uk

Drago Heper

Invue Arbor LED Collection Eaton

Kona ERCO

ETER Filix

www.heper.eu

www.cooper-ls.com

www.erco.com

www.filixlighting.com


149

Euclid 60 IP65 Radiant Lighting

Exterior Wash 310 Martin Professional

Exterior Linear Graze Martin Professional

www.radiantlights.co.uk

www.martin.com

www.martin.com

www.gvalighting.com

FL100 GVA Lighting

G-Spot POI SGM Light

Cells Reggiani

IBUK Roger Pradier

MOTO-TERRALUCE Forma Lighting

www.sgmlight.com

www.reggiani.net

www.roger-pradier.com

www.formalighting.com

CRD60 Filix

Arpool Linear Surface Filix

Jade 16 W Griven

Disk Luminaire Gillard Group and Zenith Lighting

www.filixlighting.com

www.filixlighting.com

www.griven.com

www.zenithlighting.com

Seti Lamp Lighting

Light Up Earth iGuzzini

Stra L&L Luce&Light

Lumenfacade Lumenpulse

www.lamp.es

www.iguzzini.com

www.lucelight.it

www.lumenpulse.com


150

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

EXTERIOR

Lumenbeam Lumenpulse

Luxeos Pulsar

Ness Outdoor Design LED Products

Onyx NOWATT Lighting

www.lumenpulse.com

www.pulsarlight.com

www.designledproducts.com

www.nowatt-lighting.com

Punto Heper

Sardes Vestel

Tua O/M

Underscore InOut iGuzzini

www.heper.eu

www.vestel.co.uk

www.om-light.com

www.iguzzini.com

Zeta Heper

VarioLED OCEANOS LED Linear

Ghost Rectangular SIMES

Mini Look Wood Bollard SIMES

www.heper.eu

www.led-linear.com

www.simes.com

www.simes.com

MARS LED Linear

ZOOM Forma Lighting

www.led-linear.com

www.formalighting.com

Lif Selux www.selux.com

INTERIOR


152

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

INTERIOR

GUA BUCK

3D LED Flex 100 Z3 Radiant Lighting

3D LED Flex 40 Radiant Lighting

Siri Track L&L Luce&Light

www.buck.lighting

www.radiantlights.co.uk

www.radiantlights.co.uk

www.lucelight.it

Yori Linear Reggiani

Super-Oh! XS Pivot Delta Light

Splitbox Delta Light

Split-it On Delta Light

www.reggiani.net

www.deltalight.com

www.deltalight.com

www.deltalight.com

Beacon XL Muse Concord

Beacon Tune Concord

Mini Continuum LED Concord

Laser iGuzzini

www.concord-lighting.com

www.concord-lighting.com

www.concord-lighting.com

www.iguzzini.com

Alphabet Focus WILA

Malt ZKLD Studio

BENT HALLA

D700+ Brightgreen

www.wila.com

www.zkldstudio.com

www.halla.eu

www.brightgreen.com


Tel 44 ( 0 ) 208 348 9003 Web www.radiantlights.co.uk email david@radiantlights.co.uk

3D LED Flex 100 Z3 system with Xicato XTM LED modules Modular, 3D flexible LED linear lighting system Up to 7,000 Lumens per Mtr. Up to 98 CRI. Mondo Ad August 2016.indd 1

All products designed by

03/08/2016 18:15:43


154

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

INTERIOR

CAVO XAL

DROP LED Profile Antrox

Downito 70 Grupo MCI

Lucy ERCO

www.xal.com

www.antrox.net

www.grupo-mci.org

www.erco.com

OPPOSITE ES-System

Irideon FPZ ETC

Suspenders SONNEMAN

LP Grand Louis Poulsen

www.essystem.pl

www.etcconnect.com

sonnemanawayoflight.com

www.louispoulsen.com

Hidden Flex Mizar Lighting

LED Block One-Lighting

Billet Mike Stoane Lighting

Wink Modular Lighting Instruments

www.mizarlighting.com

www.one-lighting.com

www.mikestoanelighting.com

www.supermodular.com

Stormbell Lamp Lighting

Light Band System Luciferoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Linic NX WILA

liniLED Aeris Triolight

www.lamp.es

www.luciferos.it

www.wila.com

www.triolight.com


DAYLIGHT HARVESTING

PRESENCE DETECTION

Active+

self learning lighting solution Utilising 60-100 hours of automatic learning, Helvarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Active+ learns about the surrounding environment and detects changes in lighting conditions from other luminaires and light sources.

www.helvar.com


156

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

INTERIOR

Fraxion Lucifer Lighting

Lunis LED Osram

LYRA LED Linear

Minimo Precision Lighting

www.luciferlighting.com

www.osram.com

www.led-linear.com

www.precisionlighting.co.uk

Moda Mini Cove Moda Light

Mood Reggiani

NOD XAL

EOS LED Circular LED Luks

www.modalight.com

www.reggiani.net

www.xal.com

www.ledluks.com

Olympia Arkoslight

One O/M

Quad Curved Optelma

Slide Optelma

www.arkoslight.com

www.om-light.com

www.optelma.com

www.optelma.com

PABLO XAL

Pioggia Lighthole

TILE Premium Cooledge

RICO HR Megaman

www.xal.com

www.lighthole.it

www.cooledgelighting.com

www.megaman.cc


rcl_mondo-arc_aug-2016.indd 2

08/08/2016 11:31


158

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

INTERIOR

Puck Arkoslight

Margo Spotlight Factorylux

KKLN-01 Linear Lens KKDC

AVVENI Sattler Lighting

www.arkoslight.com

www.factorylux.com

www.kkdc.lighting

www.sattler-lighting.com

Sleek Dots Grupo MCI

Skyline Louis Poulsen

Tubular LED Enigma Lighting

View iGuzzini

www.grupo-mci.org

www.louispoulsen.com

www.enigmalighting.com

www.iguzzini.com

XOOTOO LED Linear

Dress Your Light Antrox

ZipTwo Vode Lighting

ZEKI Megaman

www.led-linear.com

www.antrox.net

www.vode.com

www.megaman.cc

OLED Light Panels LG Display

Active+ Helvar

araya5 Logic Module Lumenetix

www.lgdisplay.com

www.helvar.com

www.megaman.cc

TECHNOLOGY


The Vode DoubleBoxTM suspended LED provides both direct and indirect light for open office, conference room and classroom applications. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 6,000 lm/m at its most efficient. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to love?

A22843_3a_Vode_Mondo_3_Love 3.24.2016

Advertiser: Vode Pub: Mondo ARC

A22843x03A_DoubleBox.tif


160

DARC AWARDS / ARCHITECTURAL

TECHNOLOGY

Beauty Series Xicato

Color-Amp GVA Lighting

U-DIM Megaman

LuxiTune 3.0 LED Engin

www.xicato.com

www.gvalighting.com

www.megaman.cc

www.ledengin.com

EyeNut Harvard Technology

Media Wall Content Management illumination Physics

IoT Ecosystem Gooee

lightJuice CV4 Artisitic Licence

www.harvardtechnology.com

www.illuminationphysics.com

www.gooee.com

www.artisticlicence.com

Lumentalk Lumenpulse

LUXEON C Color Line Lumileds

LUXEON HR30 Lumileds

Micro Wall Washer MDB-W Bartenbach

www.lumenpulse.com

www.lumileds.com

www.lumileds.com

www.bartenbach.com

Casambi Control Technology Casambi

Flicker Free MR16 LED Lamp Soraa

e:cue SYMPL Osram

XIM BLE Xicato

www.casambi.com

www.soraa.com

www.osram.com

www.xicato.com


Cosmetics Ă La Carte, London Lighting design by Nulty. James French, photographer.

Putting the Spotlight on People Xicato Beauty Series makes people look and feel exceptional Developed in collaboration with lighting design practice Nulty and leading cosmetology professionals and backed by independent research, Xicato Beauty Series is a remarkable light source that makes people look and feel their best. Beauty Series brings out the natural, subtle beauty of skin tones. And its high color fidelity and gamut make it ideal for cosmetic selection. When people enjoy how they look and feel, they engage in their environment, socialize, and stay longer. That makes Xicato Beauty Series the perfect light source for any place where the subject is people.

How does your skin look under this light? % Negative Scores

% Positive Scores 4000K, 95+CRI

Learn more about Beauty Series. Contact Xicato now!

6500K, 85CRI 3000K, 95CRI 3000K, 95+CRI 2700K, 95+CRI Beauty Series 6% more positive scores than the next best 6x fewer negative scores than the next best!

@XicatoInc xicato.com

AD Beauty 160803.indd 1

8/3/16 12:00 PM


162

TECHNOLOGY

Following an impressive array of product designs at Light + Building earlier this year, David Morgan takes a look at O/M’s outstanding Tua LED bollard luminaire designed in collaboration with Eduardo Souto de Moura for the Tua dam project in northern Portugal.

FUNCTIONALITY FIRST

The Portuguese architectural lighting company O/M, previously known as Osvaldo Matos, made quite an impact with its debut at Light + Building this year. The stand was a visual treat with distinctive organic shaped enclosures designed around each of the luminaire types featuring bold graphics on the floors and walls. The stand design was the result of collaboration between Porvocação, an external creative team, and O/M’s Design team. The company presented a wide variety of architectural luminaire types incorporating innovative glare control optics. An extensive range of very low glare downlights is based on the Lightcore multi-facetted micro reflector designed with the leading Austrian optical design company Bartenbach. O/M was founded over 50 years ago and most of the standard luminaire range started life as custom designs for specific architectural projects. The company is now run by two cousins who are grandsons of the founder Osvaldo Matos. Major projects in Brazil have led to an assembly facility being established in the country.

The outstanding product on the O/M stand was the Tua LED bollard luminaire designed with architect Eduardo Souto de Moura for the Tua dam project in northern Portugal. The collaboration between this Pritzker prize winning architect and O/M spans a 20-year partnership and has produced some of the company’s most iconic products. Eduardo Souto de Moura is a leading figure in the Porto school of architecture having studied there in the 1970s and is now professor of architecture. Projects in the UK include the 2005 Serpentine Gallery pavilion in London designed with Alvaro Siza. Early sketches for the Tua show a ring based concept which has been developed by O / M into the final more rectilinear design The key requirement for the Tua bollard was excellent glare control. Tua produces a very wide and even distribution via a custom designed asymmetric reflector optic. The satin anodized high efficiency scoop shaped reflector profile was designed in house and apparently is defined by the combination of six different curved profiles. The modular LED light engine sits within the

reflector pointing upwards and incorporates 30 medium power LEDs providing over 110 lumens per watt. Three LED colour temperatures including 2,700 K 90 CRI are available. The Tua can be supplied without legs for mounting under benches and this version is known as Tua Optic. The self-supporting version is known as Tua and has support legs available in 300, 600 or 800mm heights to enable areas of different sizes to be lit. The optic creates almost no glare despite its wide area of illumination. At the Light + Building fair, visitors couldn’t understand where the light was coming from. They often looked around, unable to locate the source, completely unaware of the 600mmhigh luminaire in the middle of the space. Apparently Tua’s simplicity of design was driven by function; its starting point was the light effect: no aesthetics, no context, only the light. With the effect as the goal, the O / M design and development team experimented with various ideas to project light as far as was needed and with the final design the reflector profile achieved


163

Above Early sketches for the Tua from Eduardo Souto de Moura show a ring based concept which has been developed by O / M into the final more rectilinear design. Right The key requirement for the Tua bollard was excellent glare control. Tua produces a very wide and even distribution via a custom designed asymmetric reflector optic. The satin anodized high efficiency scoop shaped reflector profile was designed in house and apparently is defined by the combination of six different curved profiles.

the required level of control. The resulting optical system allows a six-metre luminaire spacing to be used while giving the desired light levels and uniformity. The Tua is constructed from a number of folded and welded aluminum elements with quite a complex structure to ensure that no screws or fixings are visible. This allows different widths to be created for specific projects and for the mounting to be adapted as required. The resulting appearance is very clean and minimal but it would be quite a time consuming process to open the luminaire for servicing on site. I also have some concerns about the strength and vandal resistance of the design which seems potentially vulnerable and would probably not allow it to be used in public realm projects in the UK where vandalism is a major problem. For private landscape and architectural lighting projects this would not be an issue The low level asymmetric optical design approach for the Tua reminds me of the Thorn Orus road lighting luminaire although the O/M design team have created a much

more attractive architectural luminaire design from this concept. The initial very positive reaction to the Tua range from lighting designers at Light + Building, including Daniel Blaker, creative director of Nulty+, has apparently resulted in a good level of enquiries following the show. Hopefully the interest will result in major orders following the completion of the Tua dam project. It is refreshing to see a novel design solution to one of the lighting industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hardy perennials and the range deserves to be commercially successful.

David Morgan runs David Morgan Associates, a London-based international design consultancy specializing in luminaire design and development and is also MD of Radiant Architectural Lighting. Email: david@dmadesign.co.uk Web: www.dmadesign.co.uk Tel: +44 ( 0) 20 8340 4009 Š David Morgan Associates 2016


164

IALD COLUMN

HOW TO TALK THE TALK John Martin, Public Policy Consultant IALD explains how knowing your audience, building a clear presentation and using slides to your advantage is the key to successful public speaking.

You’ve been called on to make a presentation at a conference; hundreds of peers and potential clients will be present. How can you assure success? Follow three phases: •Design the presentation with a core message to flow in a way that fits your audience and your topic. •Use slides as a support tool. •Hone your public-speaking skills through rehearsal. Underlying these steps is central to the idea that preparation and rehearsal are vital to successful presentations. Core Message If you had just fifteen seconds, what would you say? Your talk has a message and it’s your job to make it clear – repeatedly. Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. repeated the core message “I have a dream” nine times in seven minutes in his most famous speech on 28 August 1963. Make your message clear at the beginning of your talk, illustrate it, repeat it in the middle, illustrate more, and end with the core message a third time. If you are struggling to articulate your core message, use this trick: “The purpose of this presentation is…” and finish the sentence. This can help you narrow down all the ideas you’ll be presenting and bring focus to the presentation. Know Your Audience To whom will you be presenting? Consider your audience - who they are, how they learn, and what they respond to. Put yourself in the audience’s shoes: you’ve spent time and money to see and hear fellow professionals. Don’t speak down to

them, but don’t be unnecessarily in awe, either. What level works best to tie your core message to the people who have paid to learn about it? Know Your Topic The audience is there to hear and learn from you. Pick a topic you know about and don’t stray from what you know, at least not without informing your audience! At a conference, the audience wants to learn from you about the topic. The audience doesn’t want to see you show off esoteric knowledge - they want to hear your core message and why it makes sense. With that said, it is never a good idea to use acronyms or jargon without definition. The very best public speakers, even on advanced scientific topics, make their presentations accessible to all audience members. When introducing complex ideas, it can help to bring the audience along with you through interaction. Most people – especially in the design/build world – learn best by doing, rather than being lectured. Increase audience learning by engaging with the audience through humour, discussion, or taking an informal poll. When you know your audience and you know your topic, you can design your presentation to meet the audience at its level and make your core message memorable. ‘Presentation flow’ means that the presentation builds gracefully to an inescapable and clear conclusion. Design and Build Your Presentation To create a presentation efficiently, follow a design plan. One of the best includes these elements:

1. Opening: this is a humour opportunity, and the first / best time to connect to the audience on a human level 2. Core Message: the concise statement of the presentation. “LED lighting can be romantic” or “I have a dream” or “Art can sell food” 3. Presentation Structure: your agenda in brief 4. Key Point Number One: data, a story or visual image that illustrates your Core Message 5. Repeat your Core Message 6. Key Point Number Two 7. Summary 8. Core Message one final time 9. Closing: well-rehearsed, powerful; may be a call to action, a prediction, a summary, a quotation, a challenge, or humour. A strong close gives you a ‘smooth landing’ that will help people remember your presentation once they are out of the door. Maybe it’s a simple message, but put some humour or other engagement factors into it: “The lights of this park convey a sense of safety while revealing the romantic night sky to visitors, and birth rates have gone up 25% in this city since we completed the project.” (from PowerSpeaking: How Ordinary People Can Make Extraordinary Presentations, by Frederick Gilbert, PhD.) Stories are an important way to engage your audience emotionally - you want to connect with their experience, and narrative helps make a presentation memorable. You can repeat the cycle of Core Message-Key Point more than twice, but there is always a danger of getting bogged down. Additional stories or examples to illustrate your key points are usually more effective.


165

Slides Support, They Don’t Present Slides – even beautiful ones – can illustrate a presentation, but they are there for the audience, not as a crutch for the speaker. You are the presentation, not the slides— without you, the presentation is nothing. As a speaker, key the content and rate of progression of slides to your presentation plan; don’t get caught in the trap of describing the slides! Slide basics: •Fewer words are better - you are making and illustrating the points, telling the stories, and helping the audience draw conclusions, so… •NO SMALL PRINT. •Never read slides out loud to the audience. •Charts: If you are showing a chart, use the whole slide, not a corner, and make the chart obvious and clear •Images: Visual metaphors or images should be easily related to the point of the slide, or readily explained. A puzzle piece image would illustrate ‘Putting the pieces together’ for a presentation, for example. If you get too obscure with images, the audience loses the thread of the talk because they are trying to figure out the metaphor. This is especially true across borders – cultural touchstones and references can be lost on an international audience. •Pictures: If you are using a project image or other picture to illustrate a point, make sure that it does in fact illustrate the point you want to make, and always give appropriate credit. Try the following exercise: develop your slide deck, then copy it to a new file. Now, take out all the slides with any words other

than titles, or take the words off slides that are mainly pictures. Rehearse the presentation using the new slide deck. Don’t use ‘describe the slide’ language, but simply make your points as you go along. What happens? You may not need words at all on the slides. Rehearse Until You Drop A focus on rehearsal is substantiated by experts in the field. A June 2013 Harvard Business Review article by Chris Anderson, curator of TED, states: “Many of our best and most popular TED Talks have been memorised word for word… it’s the best way to go.” Note this means rehearse until you internalise the presentation, Not just until you more or less know it. This is a higher level of rehearsal than almost anyone does, but it makes the presentation something really special. Commit to the highest level of rehearsal you can possibly manage: rehearse with and without equipment, with and without slides, in front of colleagues, in front of your dog, in front of the mirror, and in the car. At the Podium Rehearsals are complete. You have built a great presentation with good flow, clear slides, and a level that matches your audience. That audience is now in the room in front of you, ready to hear and see you Ten tips for public speaking from Toastmasters International (www. toastmasters.org): 1. Know your material. Know more than is in your presentation, and use the key points in your flow to illustrate your core message. 2. Practice. Practice. Practice! You’ve

rehearsed early and often. 3. Know the audience. Confirm your ideas about the audience by greeting audience members as they arrive and asking friendly questions about what brought them to hear you. 4. Know the room. Show up early, practice with the microphone, and make sure you know how to use any technology onsite. 5. Relax. Before you start, face away from the audience and centre yourself.Transform nervous energy into enthusiasm. 6. Visualise yourself. As you rehearse, imagine the audience in front of you, applauding, and imagine your clear, confident voice and poised presence. 7. Realise that people want you to succeed. Always approach your audience as friends. They want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative and entertaining and you will be. 8. Don’t apologise. The audience doesn’t notice your nerves unless you tell them. 9. Concentrate on the message and the audience, not your anxieties. 10. Gain experience. Build confidence by gaining experience. Strong Close You know your audience, built a clear presentation that showcases your topic with a core message, you use slides to your advantage, and you’ve prepared yourself to speak in public. The bottom line is: the magic is in the preparation, so rehearse early and often. www.iald.org


166

ART & DESIGN / DARK SOURCE STORIES

CREATED BY

KEREM ASFUROGLU


darksourced.tumblr.com facebook.com/darksourced

167


168

TECHNOLOGY

SCULPTURAL SYMBOLISM Recalling ancient ascetic symbolism from 1,000-year-old Iranian culture, Griven's products use static light and vibrant colour to bask the BAM Administrative Building of Tehran in an eyecatching glow.

The BAM Administrative Building of Tehran in Iran stands out for its peculiar architectural structure. Shaped like a modern sculpture, the building recalls ancient archetypes and ascetic symbolism deeply rooted in the 1,000-year-old culture of the country. Rotating around its axis, the tower stretches towards the sky with an increasing rhythm, while creating a deep connection between the city and its surroundings. The RGE Lighting Design team wanted to emphasise both the modern architectural features of the building and their ancestral symbolic meaning through a clever usage of static light and vibrant colour. The main circulation of the project was

designed along the central courtyard to open the visual perspective to the city. Due to the complex architectural design used for the lighting of this tower, Griven tried to put forward a lighting idea to not only affect the final structure, but also manifest the symbolic forms. The first was the general background colour which redefined its totality. This was carried out through the use of light blue colour on white screen, which created a uniform body in the general background of the tower and did not affect the architectural form negatively. The second was the use of orange flames as a complementary colour on a blue screen, which manifested a sense of life in some

parts of the structure. In this project, special light sources were designed to simulate flame effect. Numerous tests were carried out to simulate these flames on the wall through these sources as much as possible. After a specific time, the desired result was achieved. The speed and colour of the flame effect (1,500K - 3,000K) produced by these sources can be controlled by the central controller. To hide these light sources from observers completely, aluminium shades with the same colour as the wall flashings were installed. www.griven.com


236x333.pdf 1 2016/5/11 15:28:41

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


170

TECHNOLOGY

Pics: Courtesy of Gu San Sebastián

RATIONALIST MONUMENT Out of respect to its architectural origins, Grupo MCI's Linear Flex RGB strips have been seamlessly integrated into the ceiling of the GU restaurant, cocktail bar and night club in the historic Real Club Náutico in San Sebastián, Spain.

GU is a brand-new restaurant, cocktail bar and nightclub located at the second floor of the historic Real Club Náutico in San Sebastián, Spain - an emblematic building in a rationalist architecture style, which replicates a morred ship. Built in 1929 by the architects José Manuel Aizpurua and Joaquín Labayen, it stands as one of the most important Spanish examples of modern architecture, and thus was declared 'Site of Cultural Interest' in the 'Monument' category. Recently, the building was renovated by the architectural studio Jose Angel Medina Murua. While respecting the building's origins, to illuminate and create different lighting scenes, Linear Flex RGB flexible

strips by Grupo MCI were installed in the ceiling in order to provide indirect light and high performance. The new range of Linear Flex; Basic, Plus, Ultra Plus, RGBW, Dynamic White and CRI> 90, are the ideal solution for applications with limited space, as they seamlessly integrate into any surface without changing the architecture of it. GU is a space where gastronomy, music, light and architecture coexist in a unique setting. Customers can enjoy the best views of the Bay of La Concha in San Sebastián through the spectacular windows that surround the building, which provide plenty of light. www.grupo-mci.com www.gusansebastian.com


ANOTHER PERSON’S DARK SPACE IS OUR BLANK CANVAS. AN IALD PROFESSIONAL LIGHTING DESIGNER SEES THE POSSIBILITIES IN EVERY ENVIRONMENT. LEARN HOW AN IALD LIGHTING DESIGNER CAN TURN YOUR VISION INTO REALITY. VISIT IALD.ORG AND CLICK ON "FIND A LIGHTING DESIGNER" TO REFINE YOUR SEARCH.

PUBLIC PASSAGE | MUNICH, GERMANY | LIGHTING DESIGN, PFARRÉ LIGHTING DESIGN | © ANDREAS J. FOCKE


172

TECHNOLOGY

UP IN FRAMES Built as place for remembrance, Munich's National Socialism Documentation Center has been filled with horizontal information panels illuminated by Insta's LEDLUX Plane system.

Since May 2015 Munich has had a central place for studies and remembrance - the National Socialism (NS) Documentation Center in Brienner Strasse on the premises of the former NSDAP party headquarters between Karolinenplatz and Königsplatz. The opening ceremony took place on 29 April 2015 - the day of the 70th anniversary of the relief of Munich. Only two and a half months after its inauguration, the NS Documentation Center welcomed its 100,000th visitor. During an architectural competition, Berlin-based architects Georg Scheel Wetzel convinced with regard to urban development and design on the grounds that its draft marked a historic place without referring to the ‘Brown House’. The cubic, seven-storey building of white

Pics: Christoph Mittermüller, München

exposed concrete forms a strong contrast to its surroundings of mostly neo-classical buildings, dating back to the NS time. Its large, partly two-storey windows link the interior with the historical environment and thematically integrate the architectural relics of the NS time. In the whole exhibition area vertical lighting frames and horizontal information panels are installed. The large-format lighting frames with photos and informative texts are highlighted by Insta's flat LEDLUX Plane, which is installed on the back walls. The horizontal backlit information panels in the illuminated frames provide clearly arranged, detailed information. LEDLUX Plane is a ready-for-connection LED surface lighting system for indoor use, for example as a wall or ceiling module or as in

this case, for surface backlighting. With this module surfaces of any size can be realised with very little overall height. Also, special effects can be realised with the LEDLUX Plane system, especially when the RGB or tunable-white versions are used. Any colour can be displayed and, by means of the Insta controls, static light scenes or dynamic colour sequences can be realised. In the exhibition panels of the NS Documentation Center, Plane was installed as economical variant LN in neutral white with 4,000K. With approximately 7,500 units installed, the Plane modules can be lined up optically, mechanically and electrically by means of the connector set. Moreover, the modules can be individually adapted to the desired brightness. www.insta.de


174

TECHNOLOGY

EN VOGUE Paying particular attention to fashion designer Walter Steiger's high-end products, Linea Light has provided a lighting solution that is both technologically advanced and aesthetically in line with the luxury showroom on Avenue Matignon, Paris.

Walter Steiger, Genevan fashion designer and collaborator of some of the most prestigious fashion brands, has had his highend shoes immortalised by the objective of Helmut Newton in a six-page feature story published in Vogue magazine. Discovered in London by Mary Quant, his shoes were chosen by Michelangelo Antonioni for the cult film Blow Up. His first store was opened in 1974 in the Parisian rue de Tournon, and currently he boasts a number of boutiques worldwide. One of his traits is the particular attention to the look of his products, as shown by the new lighting system at the showroom on Avenue Matignon in Paris - one of the most beautiful and important streets of the city, known for its art galleries, stylish cafes and

luxury boutiques. This project, completed in 2015, was conceptualised at Paris Fashion Week. The lighting solution had to meet the clear needs of the customer: a product with LED technology, with excellent performance that can be installed as a continuous line, characterised by a high visual comfort, which creates an elegant and soft atmosphere. A light system without any visual impact, which leaves the starring role to the product on display, highlighting the preciousness of materials, details and design. Many of these requirements were answered by Linea Light's Albatros, one of the i-Lèd solutions, characterised by the innovative Optilight Technology, which optimises the

luminous flux produced, guaranteeing top visual comfort. It is a suspension light with a central casing in white or grey coated extruded aluminium and pair of transparent polymethylmethacrylate diffusers on the sides of the fixture. It is evenly illuminated by a series of topLED circuits positioned in parallel on the central structure. The uniformity and high luminous performance of the diffuser are guaranteed by a laser engraved surface that evenly distributes the light emitted by the LEDs when the light is turned on, and is perfectly transparent when the light is turned off. Linea Light has provided a technologically advanced solution that is aesthetically in line with the luxury product. www.linealight.com


LpS 2016 6TH LED professional Symposium +Expo Smart Technologies for Lighting Innovations

International Conference on Lighting Trends & Technologies

International Exhibition for Lighting Technologies & Applications

▪ Latest insights from research and industry leaders

▪ State-of-the art showcases for R&D and design engineers

▪ Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Shuji Nakamura

▪ Cutting-edge products, equipment and services

▪ 80+ lectures in 4 conference tracks

▪ Highly-focused B2B sourcing and collaboration platform

▪ 1500+ professionals from more than 40 countries

▪ 100+ international exhibitors including the top leaders

Interactive Workshops & Forums

▪ EU Commission, LightingEurope, Zhaga, EPIC, IBM, NXP

▪ Tunable Lighting Workshop by HI-LED

▪ Infineon, Silvair, WadeLux, Bartenbach, GE, Zumtobel

▪ Design-meets-Technology Forum by APIL

▪ UniBright, Glamox, Nichia, Lumileds, Cree, Osram

▪ Horticultural Lighting Workshop by EPIC

▪ Fraunhofer, Yole, Holst Center, Joanneum, CSEM

▪ Int’l lighting and photonics cluster forums

Innovation Platforms

Social Networking Opportunities

▪ Technical innovations presented by start-up innovators

▪ Opening ceremony and expo reception

▪ Light-Art-Designs by lighting designers and students

▪ Get-Together boat cruise on Lake Constance

▪ Product launches presented by industry leaders

▪ Int’l press conference with more than 25 media partners

Sept 20th - 22nd 2016 | Bregenz | Austria www.lps2016.com

Organized by Luger Research e.U. - Institute for Innovation & Technology

Lectures from Renowned Organizations


176

TECHNOLOGY

HOMELY HEADQUARTERS With lighting at the heart of the building's interior design, Astro's all-new headquarters provides an inspiring work environment for its employees, whilst showcasing its broad range of versatile products in a design-led setting.

After achieving £20m in sales last year and continuing to achieve 20% year on year growth since it was founded in 1997, British lighting manufacturer Astro's all-new 86,000-sqft building looks to drive the business further still. Nichola McCann of Cann Creative worked closely with co-founders John Fearon and James Bassant as well as other members of the Astro team to ensure the building was not only lit effectively and efficiently, but reflected the core brand values. For McCann, it was clear from the start that “due to the broad range and versatility of Astro products, the manufacturer's light fittings would feature predominantly within the interior design of the office. “Despite the products being marketed at the high end residential and hotel sector it was important to create an interior that strengthened Astro’s brand and was a showcase for its products within its own working environment.” Lighting is at the heart of the building, with Astro products blended into the interior design to complement the working environment. From the staff canteen to meeting rooms to the open plan office; Astro lights feature for clients and the team to enjoy, whilst the overall look and feel of the building is contemporary, minimal and very much true to the brand’s ethos of elegant simplicity. As soon as you enter the double-height lobby, clusters of Osca pendants are used to create drama and subtle illumination on the

ground floor. Up the staircase, display units line the corridors, showcasing the Enna desk lamp, Oslo LED wall light and many others, which can be seen through the glass walls of the meeting rooms. The meeting room corridor itself enjoys soft lighting from the Astro Bevel 600 surface mounted shades, as well as natural illumination from the glass walls throughout this area. Even the WCs have been well considered through the use of Axios, Imola and Avlon wall lights which feature over vanity units, whilst the Parma wall light features within each cubicle. Through to the main open-plan office area, surface-mounted Osca fittings are installed as feature spots on galvanised trays and sprayed black to contrast with the minimal linear rafts and exposed industrial ceiling. An arrangement of Cortona pendants at varying heights add intimacy to more informal meeting areas within the large open plan space. Whilst the Osca fittings complement the exposed ceilings and feature brick wall, Atelier and Ginestra pendants are used to highlight spaces such as coffee areas and dining tables. “Our growing team at Astro now enjoys an interior that reflects and nurtures the company’s design-led approach and brand values. It is inspiring to be surrounded by our products, because it provides a tangible connection between our daily work and the lights we create,” concluded Fearon. www.astrolighting.com


Š all rights are reserved by Codega 2015 contestants and leblab.it

2016

Do you have a brilliant LED project or solution?

Make it shine! The Codega Prize is the international recognition of the excellences of LED Lighting Design and Products in Contract/Commercial applications for:

The Codega Prize ceremony will take place on Friday 7 October 2016 in Venice, following the conference dedicated to lighting design that will be held at

- originality and innovative aspects - smart lighting applications or solutions - results of energy saving & efficiency

ILLUMINOTRONICA

Information and subscription on

6-8 October 2016, Padua www.illuminotronica.it

www.codegaprize.com

Promoted by:

in partnership with:

under the patronage of:

INFORMATION: ph . +39 02 210111271 segreteria@premiocodega.it

adv_33,3x23,6_codega.indd 1

24/05/16 15:03


178

TECHNOLOGY

MODERN MEETS MEDIEVAL Displaying the interior in all of its medieval glory, Tridonic's lighting solution celebrates France's St. Jean granary through atmospheric lighting scenarios controlled from a touchscreen.

Built in the middle ages in Angers, France, the St. Jean granary is an impressive half-timbered building that is greatly appreciated as part of the town's cultural heritage. A new lighting concept has been recently installed to display the interior in all its glory, with different lighting scenarios available depending on the particular use of this historic building. The new lighting for the prestigious community hall blends discreetly with the original architecture with its beams, slate walls and round arches. Whether the hall is being used for a reception hosted by the mayor, a dance evening or a presentation, the historic setting provides an ideal environment with its LED solution and lighting control system from Tridonic. Three preprogrammed lighting scenarios for the 300-plus LED light points can be easily

selected on a colour touchscreen. Separate control of the lighting mood is also possible in the three naves created by the arches and pillars. The companies involved in the project recommended a modern lighting solution to the city authorities and the Angers Construction Office responsible for its cultural heritage, as this offers the flexibility to bring out the medieval charm of the former granary. The SLE LED modules from Tridonic selected for the spotlights and downlights offer high efficiency, homogeneous light and a life of 50,000 hours. Ideally suited to the historic look of the chandeliers, these modern light sources are controlled via LED Driver LCAI Eco with dimming and protection functions, supported by DALI and DSI protocols. DALI control modules are also used.

Thierry Bechtel, responsible for technical support at Tridonic France, described the challenges presented by the project: “Flexible use of the building was an important basis for the programming. With the touchscreen of our DALI x/e touchPANEL 02 control system I was able to offer the customer the ability to control each zone separately – simply by touching the screen.” Bechtel was also on hand during the commissioning phase for the system. “The customer was able to see precisely how the interior would look during each of the scenarios, such as a 'reception' or 'dance evening'. The atmosphere in the building can be changed to suit any event,” he added. www.tridonic.com


The Middle Eastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier Exhibition, Conference & Awards for Lighting Design and Technology

31 October â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 November 2016 Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Witness the ideas, products and intelligence that are shaping the future of the lighting industry at Light Middle East. Pre-register to visit now at www.lightME.net/register2 Platinum Sponsor

Silver Sponsors:

Gold Sponsors:


180

TECHNOLOGY

Pics:Jean-Luc Valentin

HOLISTIC HIGH-RISE In a union with the architect's flexible and sustainable design, Zumtobel's luminaires have been integrated into the interior of Frankfurt's DVB Bank to provide an open and welcoming appearance.

Located in the West End district of Frankfurt, Germany, the 142-metre-high City-Haus, designed by architects Johannes Krahn and Richard Heil, was one of the first skyscrapers to be built with a column-free faรงade structure. DZ Bank has owned this 1970s building on the Platz der Republik for more than 40 years, during which time the high-rise office block has gone through a number of renovation phases. After the illumination of the faรงade in 2006, the interior was to be gradually updated. The finishing touches to the design concept of the office and conference floor of DVB Bank were added at the end of 2014. The contract was awarded to Frankfurt-based architects Theiss Planungsgesellschaft. Architect and proprietor Alexander Theiss is an advocate of holistic concepts with high flexibility and sustainable design, in which light plays a significant role. Therefore, the lighting solution had to integrate seamlessly with the design of the conference rooms, offices and a coffee bar, providing an open and

welcoming visual appearance. The lighting design concept, which also had to comply with the building regulations, couldn't be realised using a standard solution. As a result, the project team from Zumtobel worked with the architects to develop a special luminaire based on the recessed version of MIREL evolution. The combination of low mounting height, excellent system efficiency and high lighting quality convinced both the architect and end users. The LED technology of MIREL evolution met the energy efficiency requirements, whilst also offering the optimum conditions for the future-oriented office and conference room architecture. The glass faรงade fulfils an important double function, providing fantastic views beyond the city limits and allowing plenty of daylight to enter the building. The fusion of white and grey tones with a range of high-quality materials creates a pleasant atmosphere in the conference and meeting rooms. The design of MIREL evolution and the neutral white light colour

further enhance the purist design of this area. Arranged in groups and integrated seamlessly into the office architecture, the luminaire defines the spaces, provides orientation and delivers taskspecific lighting for deskwork, meetings, presentations and lectures. The modular design of the luminaire guarantees flexibility for a variety of functions. Inspired by the versatility of the customised MIREL product, the architects and Zumtobel then set about devising a downlight that could be integrated in plasterboard and sheet-steel ceilings. This product palette is complemented by a compact surface-mounted luminaire, ideal for renovation projects where ceiling height constraints prohibit the installation of a false ceiling. With great design and functionality, this luminaire range lends itself to specification in a wide range of applications. This project-specific lighting solution shows what can be achieved with a flexible approach and close collaboration. www.zumtobel.com


ADVERTISERS INDEX A.A.G. Stucchi............................................... 123

GVA............................................................... 139

Marl............................................................... 141

Anolis.............................................................. 4-5

Hacel............................................................... 89

MBN................................................................ 13

Applelec........................................................ 127

Helvar............................................................ 155

Mizar.................................................................. 2

Architectural Area Lighting............................ 187

Heper............................................................... 41

Neonlite......................................................... 117

Artemide.......................................................... 35

IALD............................................................... 171

Nicolaudie....................................................... 11

ATEA Lighting............................................... 101

Illumination Physics....................................... 103

Nulty+............................................................ 182

Aurora................................................................ 8

Insta................................................................. 15

O/M Light........................................................ 23

Brightgreen....................................................... 9

ISTL................................................................ 181

Osram Lighting Solutions................................ 73

Chromateq.................................................... 159

Kim Lighting...................................................... 3

PLDC............................................................. 173

CLS................................................................ 115

KKDC............................................................... 37

Precision lighting............................................. 25

Codega Prize................................................. 177

Lamp Lighting................................................. 29

Prolicht............................................................. 51

Concord........................................................... 61

LEC Lyon........................................................ 145

Reggiani.......................................................... 31

darc night....................................................... 6-7

LED Linear..................................................... 188

Remote Controlled Lighting.......................... 157

David Morgan Associates.............................. 153

LED Luks.......................................................... 81

Rethink the Night............................................ 10

Design LED.................................................... 153

LEDYi............................................................. 145

Rising Dragon Technology.............................. 14

Dial................................................................ 151

Lee Filters ..................................................... 121

Self................................................................. 107

DPA................................................................ 182

Light Middle East.......................................... 179

Signcomplex.................................................. 147

Enigma.......................................................... 182

Light Source Europe (LSE)............................... 12

StrongLED....................................................... 16

Erco............................................................... 143

Lightgraphix.................................................... 85

Studio Due.................................................... 133

Euchips.......................................................... 155

LIGHTWORKS............................................... 183

Technilum........................................................ 97

Forge Europa................................................. 123

Linea Light....................................................... 39

Trilux................................................................ 79

Forma.............................................................. 83

LPS................................................................. 175

Unilamp........................................................... 17

GIA Equation................................................. 182

Lucent............................................................ 119

Vode.............................................................. 159

Glamox............................................................ 87

Luci Led........................................................... 75

Wibre............................................................. 105

Griven.............................................................. 19

Lumenpulse..................................................... 47

WSP............................................................... 183

Grupo MCI.................................................... 151

Lux Lumen..................................................... 133

Xicato............................................................ 161

Guangzhou International Lighting Exhibition........169

Luxonic.......................................................... 109

Zumtobel......................................................... 21

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES SHOULD BE MADE TO JASON PENNINGTON. TEL: +44 (0) 161 476 8350 EMAIL: J.PENNINGTON@MONDIALE.CO.UK The US annual subscription price is USD105. Airfreight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage pending at Jamaica NY 11431. US Postmaster: Send address changes to mondo*arc, C/O Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc., 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA.


“Right Light, Right Place, Right Time” TM dpa has created an international lighting consultancy Practice, which puts “design excellence” as its main focus. We are working on a wide range of exciting projects throughout the world. Our work includes lighting for all aspects of the built environment.

Junior Lighting Designer We are looking for a (Junior) Lighting Designer (dependant on experience) to join our friendly and busy Manchester office. Enigma Lighting specialises in the design and supply of lighting services, covering a full spectrum of projects in retail, commercial, residential and leisure industries. We operate from our newly opened showroom and design studio in Castlefield Manchester. Ideal candidates will have a strong design background and experience in the use of AutoCAD/Sketch-up/Adobe Photoshop – experience in the use of DIAlux/Relux would be an advantage, although not essential. The position will involve supporting our Head of Design, however we will support you with on the job training with eventually your progression onto leading your own design projects. If you are motivated and excited by the prospect of developing your career in lighting design then please apply by sending your CV to Faye Frankland. Email: fayef@enigmalighting.com

With studios in Dubai, London, Japan, Oxfordshire and a new studio opening in Edinburgh later this year, we currently have the following vacancies for suitably talented lighting design professionals: Edinburgh Studio, U.K • Designer Oxfordshire Studio, U.K • Associate • Experienced Senior Designer Dubai Studio, U.A.E • Experienced Senior Designer • Designer with relevant work experience These are important roles within the Practice and encompass all aspects of a lighting design studio. Remuneration for all vacancies will be commensurate with experience. Applicants applying for the position of Associate or Senior Designer must have previous relevant experience with an independent lighting consultancy. Excellent written and spoken English is also essential. Applicants need to demonstrate outstanding creative, technical and project management skills appropriate to the positions. For further details about dpa, please refer to our website: www.dpalighting.com Please e-mail your application letter and CV along with examples of completed projects where you have had a significant contribution to Elizabeth Grundy eg@dpalighting.com. Please clearly state which studio you are applying for.

Strictly no agencies.

Lighting Designer We are an award-winning independent lighting design consultancy, based in the vibrant design community of Bankside, London. We are currently seeking creative, enthusiastic and self-motivated lighting designers to join our talented and experienced team. Our current portfolio of work includes lighting masterplans, historic buildings, commercial developments, hospitality, retail and prime residential projects in the UK and overseas. You will have a passion for design and the ability to communicate your ideas through drawings, sketches and 3D visualization software. Experience in the use of AutoCAD, Revit, Photoshop and calculation software would be preferred. We offer a pleasant working environment, competitive salary and benefits. Candidates must be eligible to live and work in the UK. If you are motivated by challenge and excited by the prospect of developing your career in a leading lighting design practice, please apply by sending your current CV, samples of your work and a covering letter to Keith Miller. Email: keith.miller@giaequation.co.uk

Nulty is an award winning, independent architectural lighting design practice working in close collaboration with architects, designers, project managers and developers to provide creative and innovative lighting design consultancy. We work across a broad spectrum of sectors including: education, exterior/public realm, healthcare, hospitality, museums, residential, retail and commercial. DUBAI: JUNIOR, INTERMEDIATE & SENIOR DESIGNERS This is a truly unique opportunity to join our brand new office in Dubai and we’re looking for designers at all levels to help develop our portfolio of projects. You must be a team player, have lots of initiative and a passion for light. We expect senior positions to be filled by people with the appropriate level of experience. Salary commensurate with experience for both roles. To apply please send your CV along with your portfolio to:office@nultylighting.co.uk For more information visit: www.nultylighting.co.uk

17 Risborough Street | London SE1 0HG | Tel: + 44 (0)20 3772 2760 | www.giaequation.co.uk


LIGHTWORKS are innovative international providers of Architectural lighting solutions serving a wide variety of project applications. We illuminate retail spaces, museums, offices, airports, sports stadiums, hotels, chain stores and private dwellings. Founded in the late 1990s we have grown with pace having acquired purpose built premises in Kent in 2006 and in 2015 opened our own London showroom in the design district of Clerkenwell. Exciting opportunities have now arisen due to the company’s growth:

Project Specification Role – specification sales to London design sector £35,000 - £50,000 + (dependant on career experience) + high comm. earnings, Company car, ipad, mobile, pension, expenses We seek a dynamic and enthusiastic lighting professional to sell principally to architects and lighting designers within central London. Role would be based from our newly acquired Clerkenwell showroom. Suitable candidates should ideally be technically proficient and familiar with the specification sector. You should be confident, tenacious, professional and able to manage multiple projects through to completion. In return you can expect: the support of a stable, well established management team; an exceptional portfolio of products and a unique opportunity to really develop your career.

Retail Sales Role – sales to London based retail sector £35,000 - £50,000 + (dependant on career experience) + high comm. earnings, Company car, ipad, mobile, pension, expenses Expansion has created this exciting career opportunity to work at the high end of retail lighting solutions - working with designers and end users who seek more innovative and progressive solutions. Suitable candidates should possess natural enthusiasm, an affinity with designers combined with technical, commercial and sales acumen. Successful candidate will be able to make full use of our Clerkenwell showroom which enables designers, architects and end users to experience complete interaction with individual products and their variations. With our well established successful track record in retail lighting, numerous projects with blue-chip clients and a financially stable business, you will be able to focus fully on developing personal and house accounts within this sector. The ideal candidate will be a lighting sales professional experienced in providing retail solutions to architects and lighting designers within London/ South East.

Franchise Partner opportunities x 2 – take control of your future Scotland + Northern England A rare opportunity to take control of your destiny, effectively working for yourself under the umbrella of an established brand, selling quality lighting solutions into architectural, education and commercial sectors within Scotland or Northern England. Using an established and successful business model you will be given full technical and administrative support including designing, quotations, credit checks, trade + supply, invoicing and business mentoring. The ideal candidate will be an entrepreneurial lighting sales professional eager to progress from the constraints of an employed position to running your own business without the set up and ongoing risks. You should be confident in your sales ability, contact base and commercial nous. You will be in control of your own margins and overall profitability and should have the inspiration to work at the higher ends of the market. You will have sole access to our entire product range and project opportunities throughout Scotland or Northern England.

Please send all cvs or interest to our retained recruitment consultant Richard Allen at Hayden Nash Consultants: sales@hayden-nash.co.uk Tel: 0118 930 5555 www.hayden-nash.co.uk www.lightworks.co.uk

LOOKING FOR CREATIVE STAFF? WE’VE GOT IT COVERED. mondo*arc has the most targeted circulation of any international lighting magazine. Look at our International Lighting Design Survey to see what we mean. Reach our comprehensive circulation of 12,000 lighting designers, consultants, architects, manufacturers, distributors and end users in 107 countries. Adverts are also included in the digital issue and website. Call Andy White on +44 161 476 8350 or email andy.w@mondiale.co.uk

Lighting Designer Brisbane, Australia

WSP Vision Design is a specialist brand within WSP|PB providing creative and inspiring architectural lighting design. We have grown to become one of Australia & New Zealand’s largest specialist lighting consultancies, with a team drawn from a diverse range of backgrounds, including architecture, interior design, industrial & product design, electrical engineering, and theatre lighting design. With teams in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Canberra and Auckland (complementing WSP|PB’s global lighting team which boasts over 120 lighting designers) our projects span the built environment from hotels & hospitality, casinos, museums & galleries, theatres & convention centres, commercial, retail, education, health, residential, urban realm, and rail & air transport hubs. We are looking for an intermediate designer with 3-5 years’ experience to join our growing team in Brisbane, with consideration to senior lighting designers with a minimum of 5 years’ experience who may wish to apply, and are now calling on international candidates with experience working in similar markets such as the UK, Europe or North America. The successful applicant should have experience in the entire lighting design process from conceptual design and documentation through construction to commissioning and practical completion, demonstrating technical proficiency and strong presentation and communication skills with both clients, architects, interior & landscape designers and contractors. A strong collaborative design approach and team work is a must to join our diverse and expanding team, along with a keen interest & passion for light, enthusiasm and energy. Applicants should submit a Cover Letter, along with CV and Portfolio of design material and project photos demonstrating their experience, design methodology, skill-set in programmes (such as Photoshop / InDesign, AGi / Dialux, AutoCAD / Revit etc.) along with hand sketching and any other relevant skills – but most importantly your flair in design, creativity and a grounded approach. Remuneration will be based on experience, skills and potential, with WSP|PB to provide sponsorship for relevant visas to enable employment and residency in Australia.

www.mondoarc.com

Email: mark.truebridge@wspgroup.com


EVENT CALENDAR


Interlight Moscow 8-11 November Moscow, Russia www.interlight-moscow.ru.messefrankfurt.com

IALD Enlighten Europe 13-15 November Prague, Czech Republic www.iald.org

LuxLive / Strategies in Light Europe 23-24 November London, UK www.sileurope.com

INALIGHT 30 November - 2 December Surabaya, Indonesia www.inalight-exhibition.net

Japan Lighting Expo 14-16 December Tokyo, Japan www.lightingjapan.jp

Light Symposium 12-14 October Wismar, Germany www.lightsymposium.de

IALD Enlighten Americas 13-15 October Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, México www.iald.org

China (Guzhen) Int’l Lighting Fair 22-26 October Guzhen, China www.gzlightingfair.com/en/home

MATELEC 25-28 October Madrid, Spain www.ifema.es/matelec_06

Hong Kong International Lighting Fair 27-30 October Hong Kong, China www.hktdc.com

ALAN 2016 26-28 September Cluj-Napoca, Romania www.artificiallightatnight.org

LED + Light Asia 28-30 September Singapore www.ledlightasia.com

Light India 5-7 October New Delhi, India www.light-india.in.messefrankfurt.com

Illuminotronica 6-8 October Padua, Italy www.illuminotronica.it

Codega Prize 7 October Venice, Italy www.premiocodega.it

darc night 15 September London, UK www.darcawards.com

London Design Festival 17-25 September London, UK www.londondesignfestival.com

LED China 19-22 September Shanghai, China www.ledchina-sh.com

LpS 20-22 September Bregenz, Austria www.led-professional-symposium.com

Middle East Smart Lighting & Energy Summit

W WW. D A RC W A R DS. C O M

CELEBRATING THE BEST IN LIGHTING DESIGN

26-27 September Abu Dhabi, UAE www.lightingsummit.com

Light Middle East 31 October - 2 November Dubai, UAE www.lightme.net

Rethink the Night! 10-14 October Kea Island, Greece www.rethinkthenight.com

LightingTech Egypt 26-27 September Cairo, Egypt www.lightingtechegypt.com

Shanghai International Lighting Fair 31 August - 2 September Shanghai, China www.light-messefrankfurt.com.cn


186

INSPIRATIONS / #38 LIGHT IQ

CURATED BY

Sol, our source of life and light. The Sun, our closest star, bathes our world, enveloping our senses. It’s light releases the dormant beauty of all that it touches. An omnipresent source that inspires us as lighting designers to create and subtly reveal our environment with intrigue, surprise and wonder. The myriad of colours that encompass solar shine, provide humanity with the everlasting inspiration to artificially recreate it’s majestic rays. A deep-rooted connection that is felt in our gratification to design with light. Even the gaze of the moon, in sunlight’s absence, holds us in it’s sight.

Light Collective have invited UK based Light IQ to be the latest back page contributors and to share with us what inspires them about light. Light IQ are one of the sixteen design consultancies creating a light installation for this year’s darc awards. Light IQ www.lightiq.com


www.aal.net/products/kick_medium_scale/


mondo*arc Aug/Sep 2016 - Issue 92  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you