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09-10

Mondavi Center

PROGRAM 7

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18

Arlo Guthrie

P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele

Vladimir Feltsman, piano

25

30

33

Lara Downes Family Concert

Ira Glass

Sonny Rollins

Issue 11 Apr-May 2010


a message from

UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi

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warehouse into a youth art studio, the warehouse was finally renovated with $342,000 in federal grants and the center opened its doors to the Woodland community in January of this year.   Located across the street from a large, subsidized housing neighborhood, the center is designed to appeal to teenagers and other youth who live there and throughout the Woodland area. Through silk-screen printing and mural painting, the center will help to cultivate the cultural and artistic life of the community, while encouraging participants to seek higher education and self-determination. In just a few short months, the impact of the arts is already working to better the lives of young people in the Woodland community.

t is a pleasure to greet the patrons of the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts as it concludes another very successful season. The evenings that Spyros and I have spent here during my first year on the UC Davis campus have been entertaining, enlightening, and a reminder of how important the arts are in our lives. As our campus grows in national recognition, the Mondavi Center shines a cultural beacon from Davis to the world! UC Davis is committed to bringing the arts to the forefront of campus life and to serving as a destination for artistic exploration for visitors from throughout the region and beyond. Indeed, I am very proud of the role the university plays in arts and culture in our region: •

Through the Mondavi Center’s offerings, which bring the best and brightest in performance to the region, including to our youth through a strong arts education program;

How eloquently UC Davis professor emeritus Malaquias Montoya, the major force behind the TANA Arts Center project, spoke about the arts at the center’s opening: “Art is like magic. It can lift people from the ashes. What this center is about is to bring art and culture—even for a moment—to lighten the load of the people we are trying to reach and, in that moment, they can see a better tomorrow.”

• Through our programs, which train the next generation of performing and visual artists; •

In the visual arts, through a long and vibrant tradition of great artists on our faculty and through our wonderful art collection, which our future campus museum right across the way from the Mondavi Center will reflect as well.

I could not say this any better than Malaquias Montoya’s beautiful words express it. I hope you will join me in the months ahead here at the Mondavi Center, and at other arts venues on campus, to see “a better tomorrow” through the arts.

UC Davis has long recognized and celebrated the inherent power of the arts to enhance the quality of life. At a recent meeting in the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre of Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson’s For Art’s Sake initiative, I was able to share an inspiring story that illustrates the power of the arts in building community. That story concerns the recently opened TANA Arts Center in Woodland.

Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi University of California, Davis

The TANA Arts Center was conceived of, and is operated by, the UC Davis Department of Chicana/o Studies. After a six-year effort to convert a Yolo County Housing

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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Before the show Before the Curtain Rises, Please Play Your Part

• As a courtesy to others, please turn off all cellular phones, beepers, and digital watches. • If you have any hard candy, please unwrap it before the lights dim.

Photo: Lynn Goldsmith

• Please remember that the taking of photographs or the use of any type of audio or video recording equipment is strictly prohibited.

a message from

Don Roth, Ph.D. Executive Director Mondavi Center

• As a courtesy to all our patrons and for your safety, anyone leaving his or her seat during the performance may not be re-admitted to his/her ticketed seat while the performance is in progress.

info

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elcome to the last playbill of the Mondavi Center’s eighth season. Thank you for taking the journey with us this season—I hope you enjoy this last group of very special events. In each new season, I like to encourage patrons to take a chance on something new, something unusual, something unfamiliar to them. To that end, I have developed my special Letterman-style “top 10” list of great events in our upcoming 10–11 season that may not yet be on your radar! Of course, you will want to come to the many events whose artists and speakers already are familiar to you and who fill the cultural landscape with beauty and wisdom. But do not pass up an opportunity to attend the following (you will note they are in chronological, not preferential order): 1.

Jonah Lehrer – October 27, 2010 This 20-something neuroscientist lives at the intersection of science and the arts. In his book Proust Was a Neuroscientist, he demonstrates how artists have anticipated scientific thinking in their work. A brilliant writer and dynamic speaker.

2.

Robert McDuffie and the Venice Baroque Orchestra “Seasons Project” – November 3, 2010 If you were lucky enough to hear McDuffie perform Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade when he appeared here in the 08–09 season with the Jerusalem Symphony, you know why he’s on the top 10 list. He’s as beautiful and sensitive a violinist as any performing today. And what a project—everybody’s favorite Vivaldi, paired with Philip Glass’s beautiful new take on the seasons, a piece written for McDuffie.

3.

4.

• Please look around and locate the exit nearest you. That exit may be behind you, to the side, or in front of you. In the unlikely event of a fire alarm or other emergency please leave the building through that exit.

Buika – November 6, 2010 You might not have heard of her (yet) but, like the Portuguese fado singer Mariza, this will be an evening not to miss. Buika comes out of the Flamenco tradition, and once you have heard her voice, its beauty and power will haunt you.

Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities 530.754.2787 • TDD: 530.754.5402 In the event of an emergency, patrons requiring physical assistance on the Orchestra Terrace, Grand Tier, and Upper Tier levels please proceed to the elevator alcove refuge where this sign appears. Please let us know ahead of time for any special seating requests or accommodations. See p. 44 for more information.

Membership 530.754.5436 Member contributions to the Mondavi Center presenting program help to offset the costs of the annual season of performances and lectures, and provide a variety of arts education and outreach programs to the community. Friends of Mondavi Center 530.754.5000 Contributors to the Mondavi Center are eligible to join the Friends of Mondavi Center, a volunteer support group that assists with educational programs and audience development. Volunteers 530.754.1000 Mondavi Center volunteers assist with numerous functions, including house ushering and the activities of the Friends of Mondavi Center and the Arts and Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee.

Tours 530.754.5399

Mark O’Connor and Julian Lage Trio – January 20, 2011 In a season stocked with great violinists, no one merges classical, jazz, and folk technique like Mark O’Connor. He took the lead in putting together this trio with rising star guitarist Julian Lage. We heard them at the Blue Note in New York and immediately urged them to tour. Like Frisell and Scofield, this is a genre-bending evening, exploring where the music takes them.

One-hour guided tours of the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall, Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, and Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby are given regularly by the Friends of Mondavi Center. Reservations are required.

Lost and Found Hotline 530.752.8580 Recycle We reuse our playbills! Thank you for returning your recycled playbill in the bin located by the main exit on your way out.

Cont. on page 5 Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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Mondavi Center 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1

BEST SEATS. LOWEST PRICES. SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW.

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers San Francisco Symphony and Chorus Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Madeleine Albright Mark Morris Dance Group Kronos Quartet Dianne Reeves Dan Zanes and Friends Cirque Éloize Tango Fire and many more!

Download the Season Brochure and order today:

MondaviArts.org Or Call:

530.754.2787 866.754.2787 (toll-free)

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a message from

Don Roth, Ph.D. Executive Director Mondavi Center

Cont. from page 3 5.

Mark Morris Dance Group – February 2, 2011 Is there a more “musical” choreographer working today? Morris is serious about his music, selecting truly great works, insisting on it being played live, and making dances that deepen how we hear and respond to the music. Ives, Beethoven, Lou Harrison? Great musical taste, great dance making.

6.

Bill Frisell and John Scofield – February 11, 2011 Plain and simple, a double dose of modern day guitar gods. Frisell and Scofield have never played a double bill like this—each with their own trios—before. We thought it would be a great idea and convinced them to put this tour together. Grounded in jazz, both players will move through styles and genres with ease and elegance.

7.

Yefim Bronfman – March 12, 2011 So here’s what novelist Philip Roth (no relation) said about Yefim Bronfman in The Human Stain—he says it better than I could: “When he’s finished, I thought, They’ll have to throw the thing out. He crushes it. He doesn’t let that piano conceal a thing. Whatever’s in there is going to come out, and come out with its hands in the air.”

8.

Max Raabe and the Palast Orchester – April 13, 2011 If you like P.D.Q. Bach and the Trockaderos you will love Max Raabe. This is one of those great evenings where the artistry is at the very highest level (in this case, cabaret music from the Weimar Republic) and at the same time there is a wit and sense of humor behind it all. Mostly in German, but no subtitles are required!

9.

Zakir Hussain, Béla Fleck, and Edgar Meyer – April 14, 2011 Crossing cultures and genres, this trio of super talented musicians was one of the main inspirations for our Crossings series. Moving through bluegrass, jazz, Indian classical music, and beyond, this will be an inspiring night of music, full of surprises.

10. Roby Lakatos Ensemble – May 5, 2011 There is more than one city on the Danube—but you can certainly hear the influence of Vienna on this gypsy violinist from Hungary, whose capital city Budapest straddles Johan Strauss’s favorite river. Lakatos brings an ensemble of virtuoso players, grounded in classical and gypsy styles, for an evening in old Budapest. You will never see a cimbalom played like this again!

Once again, thank you for being part of the 09-10 Mondavi Center season—I look forward to welcoming you back to the Center many times beginning this September!

Don Roth Executive Director Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Arlo Guthrie Guthrie Family Rides Again Featuring Arlo with Abe, Cathy, Annie, Sarah Lee Guthrie, Johnny Irion and the Kids An American Heritage Series Event Thursday, April 22, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission.

further listening see p. 10

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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A

nIGHT

REMEMBER TO

Make a night of it at the Hallmark Inn and Seasons Restaurant in Davis. Each of our 135 rooms and suites are spacious and well appointed. Our full-service hotel features: central downtown location, complimentary evening manager’s reception with full bar, complimentary deluxe breakfast, high-speed Internet access, room service, fitness room and outdoor pool. � Seasons Restaurant serves contemporary American cuisine and utilizes fresh, local products. The restaurant features a wood burning oven, open kitchen, a Chef’s table, and private dining facilities. Lunch and dinner are served daily and reservations are accepted for any number of guests.

First & F Streets, Downtown Davis, Hallmark Inn (530 ) 753 -3600, Seasons Restaurant (530 ) 750 -1801 www.hallmarkinn.com & www.seasonsdavis.com P R O U D G O L D L E V E L S P O N S O R S O F T H E M O N D AV I C E N T E R

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“The biggest treat was the encore, one of Woody’s last lyrics, written when he was in the hospital in the early ’60s, with the music added later by Arlo, a little-known but beautiful, spiritual song called ‘My Peace.’ And the audience left in peace, knowing that Guthrie music is alive and well, and that the legacy is in good hands.” Robert Price, New Jersey Herald

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n October 2009, folk music icon Arlo Guthrie began his trek across North America with three generations of Guthries for Guthrie Family Rides Again. Arlo Guthrie carries on the Guthrie family legacy as he travels to communities far and wide sharing timeless stories and unforgettable classic tunes. A celebrated artist in American music, his artistic ventures help bridge an oftendivided world through his powerful spirit of song. Guthrie Family Rides Again brings his singular voice as both a singer-songwriter and social commentator to the stage alongside his beloved children and grandkids. Guthrie Family Rides Again spotlights three generations of Guthries including Arlo’s son Abe, who has contributed keyboards and backing vocals to his father’s live shows since the 1980s. His daughters Cathy, Annie, and Sarah Lee Guthrie, all of whom have their own bustling music careers, will support by singing songs and accompanying on acoustic guitars. Sarah Lee’s musical partner and husband Johnny Irion will lead songs and lend his stalwart guitar playing. The youngest generation of Guthrie kids will join in the fun on select songs. The concerts feature Arlo’s standards as well as a selection of unpublished Woody Guthrie lyrics recently put to music by such distinguished artists as Billy Bragg, Wilco, Eliza Gilkyson, Janis Ian, Wenzel, the Klezmatics, and others. With many notable musicians from around the world contributing to keep the work of Woody Guthrie alive and well, the Guthrie Family will pay tribute to these artists as they perform some of the newly composed tunes.

Guthrie Family Biographies Arlo Guthrie Folk music icon Arlo Guthrie is a legendary artist who shares timeless stories and unforgettable classic songs as he carries on the Guthrie family legacy. With his singular voice as both a singersongwriter and social commentator, he has maintained a dedicated fan base that spans the globe. A celebrated figure in American music, Arlo connects with communities far and wide, leaving a lasting impression of hope and inspiration. His artistic ventures help bridge an often-divided world through his powerful spirit of song, and his inimitable musical ingenuity soars to new creative heights as he perseveres through the times.

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Arlo Guthrie

“The Guthries are the first family of American folk. They practice what Woody preached.” Vanity Fair

Arlo Guthrie left the major record label system in 1983 to fully embrace life as an independent artist, bringing his thriving career into the hands of a family-run business with the launch of his own label, Rising Son Records. Currently operated by his daughters Annie and Cathy Guthrie, Rising Son debuted with the release of Arlo’s Someday (1986). Since its inception, Rising Son has served as a family label housing Arlo’s complete catalog as well as albums by Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie, Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion, Abe Guthrie and his band Xavier, and Folk Uke (Cathy Guthrie and Amy Nelson, daughter of Willie Nelson), plus the soundtrack to Woody Guthrie Hard Travelin’ and a tribute CD to the influential banjo player Derroll Adams. In Times Like These (2007), one of Rising Son’s most recent releases, features Arlo alongside the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. The album marks the culmination of his work with 27 different symphony orchestras and more than 40 live concerts. His show at Boston Symphony Hall, conducted by Keith Lockhart, was recorded and aired on PBS’s Evening at the Pops. In 2001, the Fourth of July celebration with the Pops was broadcast live by A&E. A compelling collection of original songs and select American classics performed by Arlo and the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, In Times Like These was released on vinyl in 2009. In celebration of the 40th anniversary of Woodstock, Rising Son released Arlo Guthrie: Tales of ’69 (2009). Recorded just prior to Woodstock, the recently discovered lost tape highlights Arlo live in concert on Long Island and features nine tracks including an epic 28-minute talking blues tale as well as three previously unrecorded songs. When not at home in Washington, Massachusetts, hanging out with family and friends, Arlo tours the world. Guthrie Family Rides Again marks the second North American tour featuring Arlo on stage with his children and grandkids; in 2006, they traveled together in the Guthrie Family Legacy Tour. Arlo comments, “It’s really fun and an adventure to hit the road as a family. We get to travel together to all these wonderful cities. My parents always had a dream of doing this, but they never had the chance to pursue it. We’ve always been family oriented, and it’s a great excuse to get everybody out of the house.” In 2005, as part of a Guthrie Foundation-sponsored tour, the family rode the Amtrak City of New Orleans train from Chicago to New Orleans, stopping along the way to perform benefit concerts. Arlo Guthrie & Friends’ Ridin’ on the City of New Orleans has raised more than $140,000 and garnered hundreds of replacement instruments for musicians suffering in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Arlo’s ambitions have always included various community projects in addition to his artistic pursuits. In 1991, he purchased the old Trinity Church near Stockbridge, Massachusetts, which is now home to the Guthrie Center, named for his parents, and the Guthrie Foundation. The Guthrie Center is a not-for-profit interfaith church foundation dedicated to providing a wide range of local and international services. The Guthrie Foundation is a separate not-for-profit educational organization that addresses issues such as the environment, health care, cultural preservation, and educational exchange.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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Arlo Guthrie

Now On Display

in our

lobby

C.N. Gorman Museum The Mondavi Center display will preview pieces from: Niu Pasifik: Urban Art from the Pacific Rim Through June 13, 2010

artworks by more than 40 artists from Aotearoa (New Zealand), the Cook Islands, Samoa, Tonga, Niue, Hawaii, Papua New Guinea, and Australia. The exhibition features multi-media work including graph art, painting, drawing, animation, hip-hop music video, sculpture, photography, tattoo, installation, embroidery/textile, and street fashion.

At the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, we are deeply interested in the visual arts and the ways in which painting, photography, and other forms may enhance the experience of the performing artists we present. Located at the north end of the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby just behind the Ticket Office, the art display case is a collaboration among the Mondavi Center, the Design Museum, the C. N. Gorman Museum, and the Richard L. Nelson Gallery & Fine Arts Collection.

further listening

by jeff hudson In 2000, I witnessed musician/rabble-rouser Utah Phillips make a valiant effort to convert 120 academically achieving students from Advanced Placement history classes at Davis High School. Phillips knew he was facing a tough audience. He introduced the kids to old labor movement anthems, trying to get them to sing along. He pulled out his membership card from the International Workers of the World. He praised “the people (in the 1930s) who organized and bled and died for the eight-hour day, and child labor laws” and reminded the kids that “Adidas are being made in Thailand sweatshops…the reason is that Americans organized and got rid of the sweatshops here!” Alas, few of those Davis teens really grasped what Phillips said that day. Mostly, those kids were accustomed to kicking soccer balls in sunny Davis parks, surfing the Internet on a high-speed connection, and other material comforts. They frankly had difficulty getting into songs about dirt-poor miners and factory workers, risking life and limb (and unemployment) on the picket lines. So much for the old canard about “The People’s Republic of Davis.” I couldn’t help but recall Utah Phillips (who passed in 2008) when I recently introduced my own nerdy 20-year-old sons to “Alice’s Restaurant,” Arlo Guthrie’s famous 18-minute opus with massive socio-political implications. (Actually, the full title is “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree.”) The song weaves a delightfully meandering spoken narrative through the framework of an acoustic guitar part, closing with a jolly sing-along. “Alice’s Restaurant” soared to popularity in an era when there were roughly 500,000 American servicemen in Vietnam—many shipped out from Travis Air Force Base, down the road from where the Mondavi Center stands today. There was also this thing called the draft. As a high school student in 1970, I knew guys a bit older than myself who were called up. I knew others who became conscientious objectors, or got a “college deferment,” or moved to Canada. It was a big deal. (Ultimately, I never faced the draft myself—an all-volunteer military was announced in 1973, I turned 18 in 1974.) Currently, the American military is active in Iraq and Afghanistan—something like 200,000 troops as of January. But college guys nowadays lose no sleep worrying that the Selective Service might summon them into uniform. In fact, many students today are surprised to learn that 40 years ago, young men were inducted and sent to war (whether or not they wanted to go). Anyway...“Alice’s Restaurant” launched Arlo Guthrie’s career. The album came out in 1967 (in mono and stereo!), followed by director Arthur Penn’s movie starring Guthrie. Guthrie also sang “Coming into Los Angeles” (banned by some radio stations due to drug references) at Woodstock in 1969, which was featured in the Woodstock film the following year. The album Washington County (1970) included the lovely track “I Could Be Singing.” Arlo’s cover version of “City of New Orleans” (1972) is still heard on the radio. In the late 1970s, I saw Arlo Guthrie at the Santa Barbara County Bowl (a venerable outdoor venue built by the WPA in 1938—his dad Woody Guthrie’s era). Arlo was promoting his Amigo album, which featured some “fun” songs (“Guabi Guabi”)—but also a heartfelt memorial to Victor Jara, the Chilean singer/guitarist/activist who was tortured (Jara’s fingers were smashed) and executed by the military junta in 1973. (I still recall Guthrie singing the refrain: “His hands were gentle, his hands were strong.”) As the music industry “went disco,” Arlo Guthrie kept recording folk-oriented albums for major labels (which unfortunately became increasingly disinterested) up through Precious Friend (1982) with Pete Seeger. Then he launched his own label, Rising Son Records, obtained the rights to his old material, and kept on going. Recent albums include 32¢/ Postage Due (with the Dillards, 2008) and the retrospective Tales of ’69 (2009). I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention at least one Woody Guthrie disc, in recognition of family heritage. Try Struggle, a CD of songs about working people, recorded in the 1940s and released by Smithsonian/Folkways, including songs like “Buffalo Skinners” and “1913 Massacre.” Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

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Abe Guthrie If you’ve been to an Arlo Guthrie concert in the past 20 years, it’s likely you’ve seen Abe’s great smile and heard his tasteful keyboard accompaniment along with his powerful supporting vocals. In a recent interview Arlo said of his son, “Abe is a great musician and covers the bass for me, and whatever else I need.” It is rare to see an Arlo show without Abe by his side. A natural musical talent, Abe at age 3 traded another neighborhood boy his Big Wheel for a keyboard. At age 11, he was kicked out of a piano lesson for playing rock music. Abe’s first paying job at 15 was as David Bromberg’s guitar tech. Abe started performing professionally with his father in the early 1980s, playing transformative keyboard solos during his father’s concerts with Shenandoah. Displaying his sense of humor, Abe would occasionally show up on stage wearing spikes and chains. In the 1980s, he founded Xavier with fellow band mates Randy Cormier and Timothy Sears. Over the years, various forms of Xavier have backed up Arlo on the road. Its first full-length CD, Full Circle, was released on Rising Son in 2000, and Xavier is currently at work on a follow-up album. A multi-faceted artist, Abe Guthrie has demonstrated his versatility by having a hand in many music projects worldwide. His varied roles have ranged from performance and studio musician, engineer, producer, graphic artist, and of course, Arlo’s right-hand man on-stage and off. Abe has recently worked with such artists as David Bromberg, Rory Block, Bobby Sweet, Folk Uke (Cathy Guthrie and Amy Nelson’s band), Johnny Irion, Sarah Lee Guthrie, David Grover, and many others. Against his will and better judgment, Abe has also found himself performing with his sisters Cathy, Annie, and Sarah Lee as the G Babes. This unique family ensemble can be heard each year at the Woody Guthrie Folk Festival in Okemah, Oklahoma. Annie Guthrie Annie Guthrie runs the family record label Rising Son Records and is Arlo’s personal manager. Behind the scenes, she has been honing her own songwriting skills. As a single mother of two, she has been able to draw from real life experiences; as Woody says, “You can only write what you see,” and she has taken that to heart writing songs that tell it like it is. Another facet of the Guthrie Family keeping tradition alive and well in the vein of Johnny Cash and the Carter Family, Annie has her hands full but has still found the time to write a sackful of inspiring songs. Cathy Guthrie Cathy Guthrie always knew she’d be in the music business but never thought she’d be a musician. In some ways, she could be considered the Guthrie radical—right after high school, she moved to San Diego to attend college, and then spent several years pretending to be normal working at various normal jobs, although she just didn’t feel normal. In 1996, her dad called her and asked her to come home and help run the family business—and she

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Arlo Guthrie

To commemorate Arlo and his family’s imprint on American culture and ongoing social and musical influence, the Guthrie Family was featured in the November 2007 issue of Vanity Fair as part of the Music Portfolio Series on Folk Legends, a series featuring leaders in different musical genres.

accepted. Cathy came home and dove head first into the shallow end of the folk music business, learning as much as any Guthrie could in six months—maybe a little bit more. She then moved to Los Angeles where she set up a satellite office, while her sister Annie anchored the main office in Massachusetts. Together they run Rising Son Records as well as the affiliated companies that sustain the “family business.” In 2000, Cathy paired up with Amy Nelson (daughter of Willie) to form Folk Uke. With Amy on guitar and Cathy on ukulele, they began writing songs and playing for friends. In no time, they were getting offers for shows, and they couldn’t believe it. They weren’t very good, but they were funny and quite charming. In 2005, they released their self-titled debut CD, which has earned them a cult following. Their vocal harmonies and melodies are sweet and contagious, and their lyrics are explicit. Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion Sarah Lee Guthrie was two years old when she made her singing debut as part of a children’s chorus on Arlo’s 1981 album, Power of Love. Although she grew up within a celebrated music family, it wasn’t until after graduating high school that Sarah Lee discovered her love for making music. After tour managing for her father while he emceed the Further Festival in 1997, and subsequently moving to Los Angeles and meeting her life-long companion Johnny Irion, Sarah Lee’s path would forever change. Sarah Lee and her songwriter-guitarist husband Johnny Irion have worked together as musical partners for more than a decade. In 2005, the duo released an essential collection of unadorned American roots songs on their critically acclaimed debut release, Exploration. A follow-up to their simultaneously released 2001 solo records, Sarah Lee Guthrie and Irion’s Unity Lodge, Exploration has received accolades from both U.S. and international publications. Irion also recently put out a second solo recording effort, Ex Tempore. In 2009, Sarah Lee and Johnny released two new projects: Sarah Lee Guthrie & Family’s Go Waggalo and Folksong, a live HD DVD capturing their unforgettable Valentine’s Day 2008 show at Tales from the Tavern at the Maverick Saloon in Santa Ynez, California. Go Waggalo invites four generations of Guthries and Seegers to sing, play, and clap along to 13 newly recorded children’s songs. Go Waggalo features previously unreleased Woody Guthrie lyrics set to three new tunes, two traditional children’s songs, and nine original compositions written by Sarah Lee and Johnny. Arlo, Pete Seeger, Tao Rodriguez Seeger, and seven grandkids contribute guitar, ukulele, banjo, autoharp, and vocals alongside Sarah Lee’s beautiful voice. Folksong is a two-disc set featuring a DVD film of Sarah Lee and Johnny’s Valentine’s Day set at the Maverick Saloon and an accompanying audio-only CD of the 13 songs performed that special evening. Folksong includes four new compositions and highlights Sarah Lee and Johnny’s caressing harmonies, high-lonesome folk melodies, and heartfelt Americana songs.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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Lili Received the GIFT of LIFE Born two months early, Lili Jimenez had a difficult start in life. Weighing barely three pounds, Lili suffered a host of ailments, including a life-threatening intestinal disease unique to preemies. With little time to spare, Lili was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit at UC Davis Children’s Hospital—the region’s only comprehensive children’s hospital. After two complex surgeries, four months of round-the-clock care and lots of TLC, Lili was sent home to a future now in full bloom. At UC Davis Health System, our next medical breakthrough just may have your name on it.

Lili’s care team included neonatologist Mark Underwood, nurse Christa Mu and other specialists in the research and treatment of preterm birth complications.

A gift for advancing health.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour Professor Peter Schickele, enabler assisted by Michèle Eaton, off-coloratura soprano Brian Dougherty, tenor profundo William Walters, Manager of the Stage A With a Twist Series Event Friday, April 23, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele

P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour

from Little Notebook for “Piggy” Bach, S. 3 Little 1. Minuet in 3D Major 2. Chorale Prelude: “Scintilla, Scintilla” 3. Dance of the Various Body Parts Four Next-To-Last Songs, S.Ω ­- 1 1. Das kleines Birdie 2. Der Cowboykönig 3. Gretchen am Spincycle 4. Es war ein dark und shtormy Night Shepherd On The Rocks, With A Twist, S. 12 to 1

P.D.Q. Bach (1807-1742)

P.D.Q. Bach

P.D.Q. Bach

Intermission Three Canons Hedi McKinley The Brothers Joad D’Indy’s Turkey Three Songs Dear, If You Change (anonymous lyrics) Blue Window If You Will Try It Rounds The Mule P.D.Q. 3-Step Crab Dinner O Serpent Two for the Road Cyndi Songs From Shakespeare Macbeth’s Soliloquy Hamlet’s Soliloquy The Three Witches from Macbeth Juliet’s Soliloquy Funeral Oration from Julius Caesar

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Peter Schickele (b. 1935)

Peter Schickele

P.D.Q. Bach

Peter Schickele


One of the answers to the question is tied to the development of the long-playing record: the over-idolizing of historical figures is usually followed by a period of debunking, and during the last several decades, which have seen the recording of virtually (or maybe literally) everything written by J.S. Bach, there has naturally developed an interest in the soft underbelly of 18th-century music, the so-called Seamy Side of the Baroque. This is perfectly normal and nothing to be worried about. For another answer to the question we may adopt the reasoning of a United States senator from the Midwest, who, when one of thenPresident Nixon’s nominees to the Supreme Court was criticized as being “mediocre,” came to the nominee’s defense by pointing out that many people in this country are mediocre, and why shouldn’t they be represented on the Supreme Court? The author has actually found that P.D.Q. Bach’s music is capable of having a therapeutic effect on audiences; the works of J.S. Bach and Mozart are so serenely perfect that many people come away from hearing them with an aggravated inferiority complex caused by the knowledge that no matter how hard they try, they can never hope to achieve such beauty, whereas hearing the works of P.D.Q. Bach comforts the listener with the ego-building and not unrealistic feeling that, even if he has had no music lessons, he could easily do as well with one ear, as it were, tied behind his back. One thing that Peter Schickele and P.D.Q. Bach have in common is their love of writing party music. Schickele has composed rounds, songs, and piano miniatures which have served as presents, congratulatory messages, homages, bread and butter notes (notes, get it?), and simply as something new to bring to sight-reading parties. He has been writing such pieces since he began composing during his early teenage years, and he continues to do so with undiminished enthusiasm; sometimes the results turn out to be among his best works.

see p. 35

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P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele

Program Notes “Why?” That is the question most often asked, by musicians and lay persons alike, after the concerts of P.D.Q. Bach’s music presented by the author across the width and breadth of the North American continent. In the decades that have elapsed since he began regularly performing the works of this musical missing link, the author estimates that that question, “Why?” has been asked more than 2,000 times in his presence; the number of times it has been asked behind his back, were it ascertainable, would surely boggle the mind, and a boggled mind is of no use to anyone. For that reason alone, it would seem that providing some answers to this extraordinarily persistent question—probably the third most often-asked question in the Western hemisphere (after “What is the meaning of life?” and “Who was that lady I saw you with last night?”)—should be an incidental but nevertheless Number One concern for anybody purporting to write a definitive account of what is known about the strangest stop (if one may be permitted a metaphor) on the Bach family organ.

P.D.Q. Bach In 1954, Professor Peter Schickele, rummaging around a Bavarian castle in search of rare musical gems, happened instead upon the original manuscript of a Sanka Cantata by one P.D.Q. Bach, being employed as a strainer in the caretaker’s percolator. A cursory examination of the music immediately revealed the reason for the atrocious taste of the coffee, and when the work was finally performed at the University of Southern North Dakota at Hoople, the Professor realized too late that he had released a monster on the musical world. Unable to restrain himself, and with the misguided support of the U. of S.N.D. at H. and otherwise reputable recording and publishing companies, Prof. Schickele has since discovered more than four score of P.D.Q. Bach scores, each one more jaw-dropping than the last, each one another brick in the wall which will someday seal the doom of Musical Culture. The conspiracy of silence that has surrounded P.D.Q. Bach (18071742) for two centuries began with his own parents. He was the last and the least of the great Johann Sebastian Bach’s 20-odd children, and he was certainly the oddest. His father ignored him completely, setting an example for the rest of the family (and indeed for posterity), with the result that P.D.Q. was virtually unknown during his own lifetime; in fact, the more he wrote, the more unknown he became. He finally attained total obscurity at the time of his death, and his musical output would probably have followed him into oblivion had it not been for the zealous efforts of Prof. Schickele. These efforts have even extended themselves to mastering some of the rather unusual instruments for which P.D.Q. liked to compose, such as the left-handed sewer flute, the windbreaker, and the bicycle. Since 1965, the tireless Professor has kept audiences in stitches with his presentation of P.D.Q. Bach’s uniquely typical music. In addition to his annual concerts in New York City, he has appeared with more than 50 orchestras, ranging from the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra and Los Angeles Philharmonic to the New York Pick-Up Ensemble. Composer, musician, author, and satirist Peter Schickele is internationally recognized as one of the most versatile artists in the field of music. His works, now well in excess of 100 for symphony orchestras, choral groups, chamber ensembles, voice, movies, and television, have given him “a leading role in the ever-more-prominent school of American composers who unselfconsciously blend all levels of American music” (John Rockwell, The New York Times). His commissions are numerous and varied, ranging from works for leading symphonic and chamber music organizations to compositions for distinguished instrumentalists and singers. Recent premieres include A Year in the Catskills for woodwind quintet, with the Blair Quintet of Vanderbilt University; Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, with Danielle Farina and the Pasadena Symphony under Jorge Mester; Music for Orcas Island for the 2007 Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival; Symphony No. 2 “The Sweet Season,” premiered by the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra under Stefan Sanderling; Concerto for Cello and Orchestra “In Memoriam F.D.R.,” performed by Paul Tobias with the Pasadena Symphony under Jorge Mester; New Century Suite, a concerto for saxophone quartet and orchestra, commissioned by the New Century Saxophone Quartet and premiered by the quartet and the

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P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele

North Carolina Symphony; New Goldberg Variations for cello and piano, performed by Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax; Symphony No. 1 “Songlines,” premiered by the National Symphony under Leonard Slatkin and performed by such orchestras as the New York Philharmonic and Cleveland Orchestra; and Blue Set No. 1, a jazz string quartet commissioned by the Greene Quartet and recorded on the Virgin label, among others. Among recently released recordings are Schickele’s Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, featuring Robert Spring with the ProMusica Chamber Orchestra of Columbus; the Grammy Award-winning Hornsmoke, featuring the title piece as well as “Brass Calendar” and other works for brass quintet, performed by the Chestnut Brass Company; Schickele on a Lark, including the Quintet No. 2 for Piano and Strings, String Quartet No. 2 “In Memoriam,” and the Sextet for Strings, with the Lark Quartet; The Emperor’s New Clothes, for narrator and chamber ensemble, commissioned and performed by An die Musik; and another album of chamber music for strings, including String Quartet No. 1 “American Dreams,” the Quintet No. 1 for Piano and Strings, and String Quartet No. 5 “A Year in the Country” with the Audubon Quartet. Other compositions may be heard on RCA Red Seal, Vanguard, Crystal, CRI, D’Note, Carlton, Koch International, and MusicMasters. Peter Schickele arranged one of the musical segments for the Disney animated feature film Fantasia 2000. He also created the musical score for the film version of Maurice Sendak’s children’s classic Where the Wild Things Are, issued on VHS along with another Sendak classic, “In the Night Kitchen” (Weston Woods), which Schickele narrates. Among his varied projects was a weekly, syndicated radio program, Schickele Mix, which was heard nationwide over Public Radio International beginning in 1992 and which won ASCAP’s prestigious Deems Taylor Award. In 1993, Telarc released a recording of Prokofiev’s Sneaky Pete (a.k.a. Peter) and the Wolf and Saint-Saëns’s Carnival of the Animals with newly written texts narrated by Peter Schickele, accompanied by the Atlanta Symphony under Yoel Levi. Schickele gave the New York premiere of Sneaky Pete and the Wolf at Carnegie Hall as part of the 1993 Toyota Comedy Festival and has performed the SaintSaëns work with major American orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic. His orchestral programs P.D.Q. Bach: The Vegas Years and P.D.Q. Bach Strikes Back and his chamber program, P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour, have received wide acclaim. He also continues to tour with a program of original cabaret songs, which he sings from the piano with the harmonizing assistance of David Düsing. Condition of My Heart presents reflections on a long marriage in a continuous montage of original songs by Schickele and poems by his wife, poet Susan Sindall. In his role as “discoverer” of the now classic P.D.Q. Bach, Peter Schickele is acknowledged as one of the great satirists of the 20th century. In testimony, Vanguard has released 11 albums of the fabled genius’s works; Random House has published 11 editions of The Definitive Biography of P.D.Q. Bach (which has also been translated into German and is available as an audio book). That all of this adds up to “the greatest comedy-in-music act before the public today” (Chicago Sun-Times) is underscored by the four consecutive Grammy Awards earned by his Telarc discs P.D.Q. Bach: 1712 Overture and Other Musical Assaults; Oedipus Tex and Other Choral Calamities; WTWP-Classical Talkity-Talk Radio; and Music for an 16

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Awful Lot of Winds and Percussion, winners in the Best Comedy Album category from 1990-93. A CD of P.D.Q. Bach: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour on Telarc was released in 2007, and P.D.Q. Bach’s full-length opera, The Abduction of Figaro, is now available on DVD. In addition to touring, he continues to present both old and new discoveries of his music in New York City, recently with the New York Philharmonic. In 1998, Telarc released The Ill-Conceived P.D.Q. Bach Anthology. Vanguard has issued its own compilation on CD, The Dreaded P.D.Q. Bach Collection. Peter Schickele was born in Ames, Iowa, and brought up in Washington, D.C., and Fargo, North Dakota, where he studied composition with Sigvald Thompson. He graduated from Swarthmore in 1957, having had the distinction of being the only music major (having earlier been the only bassoonist in Fargo). By that time he had already composed and conducted four orchestral works, a great deal of chamber music, and a number of songs. He subsequently studied composition with Roy Harris and Darius Milhaud and with Vincent Persichetti and William Bergsma at the Juilliard School of Music. He composed music for high schools in Los Angeles before returning to teach at Juilliard in 1961. In 1965, he gave up teaching to become the freelance composer-performer he has been ever since. In the course of his career Schickele has also created music for four feature films, among them the prize-winning Silent Running, as well as for documentaries, television commercials, several Sesame Street segments, and an underground movie that he has never seen in its finished state. He was also one of the composer/ lyricists for Oh, Calcutta and has arranged for Joan Baez, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and other folk singers. Schickele and his wife, poet Susan Sindall, reside in New York City and at an upstate hideaway where he concentrates on composing. His son and daughter are involved in various alternative rock groups, both as composers and performers. Brian Dougherty, tenor, is active as a soloist and ensemble singer. Recognized for his beautiful and expressive singing, he enjoys a varied career on the concert, opera, and cabaret stage. Oratorio credits include solo engagements with the American Symphony, Clarion Music Society, Dessoff Choirs, Berkshire Bach Society, Melodious Accord, Music Before 1800, New York Concert Singers, Philomusica, and Westminster Choir. Brian has performed in theatrical and operatic productions with FringeNYC, West End Theatre, Fredericksburg Theatre Company, Berkshire Opera, and Spoleto Festival USA.   In recent seasons, Brian has appeared as A-Rab in West Side Story, Suites Nos. 1 and 2, with the New York Philharmonic; at BAM in Sir Jonathan Miller’s critically acclaimed staging of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion; with Sting and lutenist Edin Karamazov performing selections from Songs from the Labyrinth for XM satellite radio’s Artist Confidential series; and in the American premiere of Sir Paul McCartney’s oratorio Ecce Cor Meum, at Carnegie Hall. He was a member of the Cockney Quartet in a semi-staged production of My Fair Lady, starring Kelsey Grammer and Kelli O’Hara with the New York Philharmonic, and performed with Alice Parker in her chamber opera Songs for Eve as part of the Mohawk Trail Concert Series. He debuted with Professor Peter Schickele in 2009 in P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour.


Soprano Michèle Eaton has earned critical acclaim for her “sumptuous tone, keen dramatic sense, and striking agility” (The New York Times). Highly respected for her mastery of many styles, she is best known for her performances of Baroque and contemporary music. She recently sang the roles of Child Grendel and Shaper’s Apprentice in the New York premiere of the opera Grendel, directed by Julie Taymor and composed by Elliot Goldenthal. On the Sacred Music in a Sacred Space series at St. Ignatius Loyola Church in New York City, she has performed Handel’s Solomon and Saul, Bach’s Mass in B Minor, Tavener’s Lament of the Mother of God, and Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610. She has toured and recorded with the acclaimed Renaissance vocal group Pomerium, long recognized as one of the world’s premier ensembles for its beautiful phrasing and perfect intonation. With the Ensemble for Early Music she has appeared in staged productions of Sponsus, a medieval morality play. She also sings with the period instrument ensemble BaroQue Across the River and with the Carmel Bach Festival.

P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele

As an ensemble singer, Brian has appeared with many of the world’s premier symphony orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Moscow Virtuosi, London Symphonietta, and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. He performs regularly with Voices of Ascension, the New York Choral Artists, the Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola, Musica Sacra, Manhattan Voices, among others.   Brian’s discography includes recordings on the Naxos, Nonesuch, Gothic, Delos, Teldec, Wildflower, and Original Cast labels. Brian is a featured soloist on both My Love and I and Singers Glen, with the Musicians of Melodious Accord; performed on the Grammywinning recording of John Adams’s On the Transmigration of Souls with the New York Philharmonic; and on Judy Collins’s Portrait of an American Girl. His television credits include HBO’s acclaimed miniseries Angels in America, PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center, and NBC’s Today. Brian is an accomplished cabaret performer. For more information, see www.bridoc.com.

William Walters has been the stage manager, production manager, and company manager for P.D.Q. Bach ever since (almost) its inception. He joined up 40 years ago and has worked all over the world trying to bring a little sanity into the chaotic world of Prof. Schickele’s ever-increasing attempts to foist his “discoveries” off onto an ever-expanding and always-gullible public. Walters has, along the way, also worked for a bunch of other outfits: the New York Shakespeare Festival, NBC, the Acting Company, and HB Playwrights Foundation. As an actor, he has many movie and TV credits: Law and Order, Law and Order: SVU, Law and Order: CI, Gossip Girl, Life on Mars, The Wackness, Midnight Cowboy, Rent, Across the Universe, The Wrestler, August Rush, and the soon to be released Fame (a remake). He lives in New York with his wife and daughter and their eight birds and three cats, and sometimes he sits on top of a double-decker tour bus and confuses out-of-town visitors to New York by telling lies about the Big Apple. After 41 years, the Telarc and Vanguard recordings are still in print, as is The Definitive Biography of P.D.Q. Bach, published by Random House; nor has the Theodore Presser Company run out of P.D.Q. Bach’s printed music. For more information about recordings, books, printed music, Prof. Schickele’s touring activities, and lots of other stuff, check out the Prof’s website: www.schickele.com.

Eaton’s other solo oratorio performances have included Handel’s Israel in Egypt, Judas Macabaeus, and the Messiah, Mozart’s Vesperae Solennes de Confessore, Bach’s St. John and St. Matthew Passions and Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen, Faure’s Requiem, Haydn’s Missa Sancti Johanni, Vivaldi’s Magnificat, Purcell’s Come Ye Sons of Art, and Couperin’s Leçons de Tenebre. She tours annually with Peter Schickele and tenor David Düsing in both chamber and orchestral performances of the music of the legendary P.D.Q. Bach. She is equally at home in performances of contemporary music. She has sung John Adams’s Grand Pianola Music with the Jacksonville and Pasadena symphonies and the Lousiville Orchestra, and she has toured internationally with the Philip Glass Ensemble in performances of Einstein on the Beach; she has also performed and recorded Glass’s Hydrogen Jukebox. She was a Vocal Chamber Music Fellow at the Aspen Music Festival and premiered Henry Brant’s Rain Forest Requiem. She can be heard on the soundtrack for the film Dead Man Walking, and has recorded on the Deutsche Grammophon, Angel, Dorian, Sony Classics, Nonesuch, Arabesque, Glissando, and Delos labels. She lives in New Rochelle, New York.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Vladimir Feltsman, piano A Concert Series Event Saturday, April 24, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Pre-performance Lecture Chris Reynolds, Professor of Musicology, Chair, Department of Music, UC Davis AGR Room, Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center • 7PM

further listening see p. 20

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 18

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Vladimir feltsman, piano

Vladimir Feltsman, piano

Partita No. 1 in B-flat Major, BWV. 825 Prelude Allemande Courante Sarabande Minuet I Minuet II Gigue

J.S. Bach

Sonata No. 8 in C Minor, Op. 13 (“Pathétique”) Grave – molto allegro e con brio Adagio cantabile Rondo: Allegro

Beethoven

Intermission

The Four Ballades No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23 No. 2 in F Major, Op. 38 No. 3 in A-flat Major, Op. 47 No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52

Chopin

Steinway Piano Sony Classical, Musical Heritage Society, and Urtext Classical Exclusive Management: Arts Management Group, Inc., 37 West 26th St., New York, NY 10010

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the cold war and music

further listening

by jeff hudson Russia has a fabulous musical tradition, as does this country. But the Cold War made it difficult for Americans and Russians to experience each other’s music directly. Sometimes tension arose between Washington and Moscow. Other times the disruption was largely domestic. American bass-baritone Paul Robeson was an outspoken advocate for organized labor around the world. He toured the U.S.S.R. in 1934, sparking an interest in Marxism and Russian history. Robeson visited Moscow again in 1949, singing at Tchaikovsky Hall. That was apparently too much for the U.S. State Department, which denied Robeson a passport in 1950. Robeson was also effectively blacklisted by Hollywood and American television. Labor unions organized an outdoor concert on the U.S./Canadian border (near Vancouver, British Columbia). Robeson sang from the back of a flatbed truck (parked on the American side) to an audience of thousands. The State Department restored Robeson’s passport in 1958, but his career never recovered. In 1959, the superpower stand-off thawed a bit. Soviet composer Dmitri Shostakovich and cellist Mitsislav Rostropovich visited the U.S., recording the Shostakovich First Cello Concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy. Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic likewise toured the U.S.S.R.

took a seat in the pew directly in front of me—he seemed happy with what he heard. After the Soviet Union broke up, Pärt and Hillier became heroes in Estonia. D. Kern Holoman, now professor emeritus with the UC Davis Music Department, recalls visiting the Estonian capital Tallinn after independence. Holoman saw posters with portraits of Pärt and Hillier all over town. Pärt resettled in Estonia around 2000. But returning to the Cold War…in 1985, conductor Dennis Russell Davies (born in Ohio and music director of a West German opera house at the time) ambitiously programmed two weeks of 20th century American and Soviet music at the Cabrillo Music Festival, extending invitations to Soviet composers. Not one Soviet composer was able to attend. But the concerts promoted musical détente. Think of this when hearing pianist Vladimir Feltsman. Born in Moscow in 1952, he studied at major Soviet conservatories and won a major piano competition in Paris in 1971, launching his career.

But the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 plunged relations into a deep freeze, followed by a slow thaw. Rostropovich toured Europe again in the late 1960s—he was at the London Proms when Soviet troops crushed the “Prague Spring” in 1968. Rostropovich left the Soviet Union in 1974, settling in the U.S. He did not return to his homeland until 1990. (Writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, whom Rostropovich had supported, likewise left the Soviet Union in 1974, returning in 1994).

Feltsman’s website notes that in 1979, “because of his growing discontent with the restrictions on artistic freedom under the Soviet regime, Mr. Feltsman signaled his intention to emigrate by applying for an exit visa. In response, he was immediately banned from performing in public and his recordings were suppressed. After eight years of virtual artistic exile, he was finally granted permission to leave the Soviet Union. Upon his arrival in the United States in 1987, Mr. Feltsman was warmly greeted at the White House, where he performed his first recital in North America. That same year, his debut at Carnegie Hall established him as a major pianist on the American and international scene.”

Estonian composer Arvo Pärt left the Soviet Union in 1980 after challenging Soviet authorities. Pärt’s music was largely unknown in the West at that time. I vividly recall my first encounter with his music at the Cabrillo Music Festival (Santa Cruz County) in 1984—the west coast premiere of Cantus to the Memory of Benjamin Britten.

Things loosened up after the Soviet Union disintegrated in 1991, though some artists didn’t get to enjoy the new freedom for long. In 1992, I saw a Carmel performance by pianist Tatiana Nikolayeva (who had premiered the Twenty-Four Preludes and Fugues by Shostakovich 41 years earlier). She died in San Francisco in 1993, after collapsing on stage in mid-performance.

Pärt visited Davis several times. British conductor Paul Hillier, on the UC Davis music faculty from 1990-96, was (and is) a major advocate. Hillier conducted an all-Pärt concert at Davis Community Church in 1996 (music released on De Profundis on ECM). Pärt

Mondavi Center

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Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

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Partita No. 1 in B-flat Major, BWV. 825 J.S. Bach (Born March 31, 1685, in Eisenach, Germany; died July 28, 1750, in Leipzig, Germany) Bach’s Six Partitas, or “German Suites,” were published in 1731 as Part I of the Clavierübung, or “Keyboard Practice.” Part II of this monumental collection includes the “Overture in the French Manner,” sometimes considered the seventh Partita and the renowned “Italian Concerto”; Part III is given over to organ music, and Part IV to the “Goldberg Variations.” Bach’s title page to the Partitas read Preludes, Courantes, Sarabandes, Gigues, Minuets and other Galanteries. A galanterie in this context means those miscellaneous movements or “light pieces” such as gavottes, bourrées, airs, passapieds, etc., that come between the sarabande (the slowest movement of the Partita) and the gigue (the fastest). Piano Sonata in C Minor, Op. 13 (“Pathétique”) Ludwig Van Beethoven (Born December 16, 1770, in Bonn; died March 26, 1827, in Vienna) When this great work was first published shortly after its completion in 1799, it carried the unusual title Grande Sonate Pathétique, a forward-looking expressive idea of the kind that was to become popular in the 19th century. The title page also made a practical 18th-century point, adding that it could be performed on either harpsichord or piano. In our day, the Pathétique on the harpsichord is barely imaginable, but those who were interested in the music of Beethoven and had no piano were not expected to deny themselves any of his latest works. The Sonate Pathétique was a great expression of the Romantic sensibilities that were current and popular in German literature but had had little outlet in music earlier. Ignaz Moscheles (17941870), a splendid pianist and gifted composer who was an important musician of his time, wrote of his rapture on discovering this sonata during his student days, when his teacher had forbidden him the “crazy” music of Beethoven. Early critics recognized the sonata’s great emotional power and sought non-musical explanations for it. Many thought it a dialogue of some kind. One popular idea was that it represented an unhappy man’s struggle against fate. Even in the 20th century, a serious scholar of good reputation has claimed that it represents the old Greek tale of the sad death of the lovers Hero and Leander. The music requires no such fancies. Beethoven called it a Grande Sonate Pathétique—grande because it was a work large and important enough to be published as a separate piece rather than in a collection, and pathétique as an avowal that the music sought to express emotion rather than just to exist for its own sake. The French adjective means “moving” or “affecting,” and not the English “pathetic.” The tragic, slow opening Grave, is not simply a formal introduction but an organic part of the movement, whose return signals some of the important points in its structure. It starts the development section and is heard again a few measures before the end of the movement. The slow movement, Adagio cantabile, is a beautifully written, almost orchestral presentation of a simple, three-part structure. The Rondo finale, Allegro, is not one of those lightPrinted on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

Vladimir feltsman, piano

Program Notes

hearted closing movements that seek to give the impression of having been tossed off in a joyous, jolly moment, but an extended structure, serious in tone, mixing grace and passion. The Four Ballades Frederic Chopin (Born March 1, 1810, in Zelazowa Wola, Poland; died October 17, 1849, in Paris) Frederic Chopin’s greatness as a composer of smaller forms has rarely been questioned. Chopin’s contemporaries immediately recognized in him the emergence of a unique, musical voice of genius through his etudes, nocturnes, preludes, impromptus, and dance forms. Indeed, Chopin’s innovations in these forms are staggering: he extended the boundaries of pianism to untold heights through his etudes, translated the tradition of bel canto singing to the piano through his nocturnes, developed a whole new style of romantic contrapuntal writing (heavily influenced by Bach) in his preludes, forwarded the cause of nationalistic music through his harmonically progressive mazurkas and emotionally powerful polonaises, and transcended the genre of the salon piece with his impromptus and waltzes. Chopin’s mastery of larger forms has been slower in gaining universal recognition, but The Four Ballades demonstrate Chopin’s undeniable genius in handling larger structures. The Ballades can be examined against the backdrop of the archetypal formal design of the classical period—sonata form—but it is through his innovative departures from this model that Chopin demonstrates his genius. Through his tonal and formal deviations from the norm, Chopin creates a synthesis of traditional form and a new, romantic aesthetic (in form and content) that results in unified structures imbued with powerful, epic poetry. The title “ballade” has strong associations in both literature and music. It was a medieval poetic form that the early romantic poets revived as a narrative form to contrast lyric poetry. Settings of ballade texts constituted a major departure point for the relatively new genre of German Lied. In French opera, “ballade” denoted simple narrative songs inserted into operas. When Chopin wrote his Ballade in G minor, he essentially created a new keyboard genre, although the title carried with it these many associations. Later composers to write keyboard ballades include Liszt, Brahms, Grieg, Fauré, Debussy, Barber, and Perle. Like most vocal examples of the genre, Chopin’s ballades are written in compound duple meter (6/4 or 6/8). Chopin’s works are linked with the narrative tradition, each being associated with a specific poem of Chopin’s compatriot-in-exile, Adam Mickiewicz, although these ties are far from universally accepted. The Four Ballades are formally linked with sonata form in that they contain developmental areas, and two themes that are eventually recapitulated. In each ballade, however, Chopin undermines the classical aesthetic of departure and return, creating structures (especially Ballades 1, 3, and 4) that are end-weighted, and, consistent with the romantic aesthetic, that delay the attainment of an emotional climax for as long as possible. Program notes courtesy of AMG, Inc.

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In his 2009-10 season, Feltsman returned to Singapore in recital; performed Rachmaninoff’s Variations on a Theme of Paganini with the New York Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall; opened the Hollywood Bowl Festival performing Prokofiev’s 2nd Piano Concerto; played a recital at the Caramoor Music Festival in upstate New York; made his annual visit to the Aspen Music Festival; performed Mozart’s Concerto K.595 on his own fortepiano with the American Classical Orchestra at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall; and he recently returned to his native Moscow to conduct the Moscow Virtuosi Orchestra and to St. Petersburg performing Brahms’s 2nd Piano Concerto with Valery Gergiev and the Kirov Orchestra. He also appeared at Chicago’s Orchestra Hall in recital; in Beijing with the Macao Orchestra; and in recital at Carnegie Hall. Orchestral engagements include appearances in London with the London Symphony Orchestra performing the Paganini Variations of Rachmaninoff, and the Kansas City Symphony playing Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto.

the White House, where he performed his first recital in North America. That same year, his debut at Carnegie Hall established him as a major pianist on the American and international scene.  A dedicated educator of young musicians, Feltsman holds the Distinguished Chair of Professor of Piano at the State University of New York, New Paltz, and is a member of the piano faculty at the Mannes College of Music in New York City. He is the founder and artistic director of the International Festival-Institute PianoSummer at SUNY New Paltz, a three-week-long, intensive training program for advanced piano students that attracts major young talents from all over the world. Feltsman’s extensive discography has been released on the Sony Classical, Musical Heritage, Camerata Tokyo, and Melodiya labels. His discography includes eight albums of clavier works of J.S. Bach, recordings of Beethoven’s last five piano sonatas, solo piano works of Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, Messiaen, and Silvestrov, as well as concerti by Bach, Brahms, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Prokofiev. Feltsman is an American citizen who lives in upstate New York. www.feltsman.com

Feltsman expressed his lifelong devotion to the music of J.S. Bach in a cycle of concerts which presented the major clavier works of the composer and spanned four consecutive seasons (1992-96) at the 92nd Street Y in New York. His more recent project, Masterpieces of the Russian Underground, unfolded a panorama of Russian contemporary music through an unprecedented survey of piano and chamber works by 14 different composers from Shostakovich to the present day; it was presented by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in 2003 with great success. Feltsman served as artistic director for this project as well as performing in most of the pieces presented during the three-concert cycle. The programs included a number of world and North American premieres and were also presented in Portland, Oregon, and in Tucson at the University of Arizona. In 2006, Feltsman performed all of the Mozart Piano Sonatas in New York at the Mannes School of Music and NYU’s Tisch Center, presented by New York University on a specially built replica of the Walter fortepiano.

YOU GET MORE WITH AN ARC COMMUNITY MEMBERSHIP The Activities and Recreation Center at UC Davis, the region’s premiere full-service fitness facility, now offers community memberships. ARC community membership includes:

t Free access to Hickey Pool and Rec Pool t Access to Fit for Life (55+) program t Access to group exercise, dance, and martial arts classes t Access to personal training t Discounts on Campus Rec’s Youth Programs t Discounts on Craft Center, Outdoor Adventures, and Equestrians Center programs

Born in Moscow in 1952, Feltsman debuted with the Moscow Philharmonic at age 11. In 1969, he entered the Moscow Tchaikovsky State Conservatory of Music to study piano under the guidance of Jacob Flier. He also studied conducting at both the Moscow and Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) Conservatories. In 1971, Feltsman won the Grand Prix at the Marguerite Long International Piano Competition in Paris; extensive touring throughout the Soviet Union, Europe, and Japan followed. In 1979, because of his growing discontent with the restrictions on artistic freedom under the Soviet regime, Feltsman signaled his intention to emigrate by applying for an exit visa. In response, he was immediately banned from performing in public and his recordings were suppressed. After eight years of virtual artistic exile, he was finally granted permission to leave the Soviet Union. Upon his arrival in the U.S. in 1987, Feltsman was warmly greeted at

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Vladimir feltsman, piano

Vladimir Feltsman Pianist and conductor Vladimir Feltsman is one of the most versatile and interesting musicians of our time. His vast repertoire encompasses music from the Baroque era to 20th-century composers. A regular guest soloist with leading symphony orchestras in the U.S. and abroad, he appears on the most prestigious concert series and music festivals around the world.

Bring in this ad for a FREE one-week trial membership to the ARC. 530.754.5308 campusrecreation.ucdavis.edu

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 11: Apr-May 2010 |

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Lara Downes Family Concert “Mudpies and Lullabies” A Children’s Stage Series Event Sunday, April 25, 2010 • 1 & 3PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be no intermission.

further listening see p. 26

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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lara downes

further listening

by jeff hudson Pianist Lara Downes lives in Davis—in fact, I periodically run into her at a restaurant or at the bank. So it’s easy to take Lara for granted as “someone we all know,” and perhaps pay less attention to her growing discography than her work deserves. Her first disc, Invitation to the Dance, came out in 2000—and thereby hangs a tale. “I was so lucky, I had no idea how lucky,” she recalled. “I showed up in New York and did a recital at Weill Hall,” the 268-seat venue that is part of the Carnegie Hall complex. “And someone from a recording company showed up,” Downes continued. This led to an offer to do a CD, and she began preparing material. “I knew I wanted to do some sort of compilation disc (featuring several composers), and not an all-Beethoven disc, or something like that. ‘Invitation to the Dance’ was a Weber piece I’d started learning earlier, when I was in Europe. At one time, in the 1800s, it was a hugely popular piece, but it had kind of fallen out of the repertoire. I thought it would make a nice theme—basing all of the selections on the CD on the idea of dance.” Another disc, Reform, followed in 2003. “That was a collaboration with several composers at UC Davis,” Downes said. “The thread through that disc was that the music was based on very traditional classical forms that were being reinterpreted by the composers in a very different way. It was lovely to work with everybody, and it cemented a lot of friendships for me.” Dream of Me was released in 2006, and features music by several New American Romantics, including William Bolcom’s “Dream Shadows,” Aaron Kernis’s “Before Sleep and Dreams,” Adam Silverman’s “Nocturnes and Reveries,” and Dan Coleman’s “Burden of Dreams.” And 2007 saw the arrival of American Ballads, which (as you might imagine) features American works from the 20th century. “I’d put Samuel Barber’s ‘Souvenirs’ on my first CD, so for this disc, I went to Barber’s ‘Excursions,’ and built the CD around the idea of Americana,” Downes said. “As we were preparing the CD, I met Benny Golson”— the veteran jazz saxophonist and composer who’s been recording since the 1950s. “Benny wrote a piece that was on that disc. That was the beginning of my several-year-long journey through American music, which I featured in several concerts at the Mondavi Center.” What sort of preparations does a CD entail? “Lots of practice, obviously. I like to record after a season touring with the repertoire. Performance is totally different than what happens in the practice room…I like to get the music out in front of an audience and see how it takes shape that way.” Her next project? “I think the next recording is going to be called Diaspora,” she said. She’s currently doing a recital program with that title. “It will have pieces written by composers in exile, or writing about cultures or people in exile. It will feature Chopin, who we don’t think of as being in exile, but he was from Poland, and moved to France, and really missed Poland.” Chopin continued to honor the musical heritage of his homeland in his Mazurkas and other pieces. “I’ll probably also do Bartók”—who grew up in Eastern Europe, left to escape the devastation of World War II, and then settled in the United States. “And I’ll probably do a piece by Tan Dun about his childhood during China’s Cultural Revolution.”

Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

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lara downes family concert

Lara Downes Family Concert “Mudpies and Lullabies”

Perfect Happiness (from Scenes from Childhood, Op. 15, No. 5) Schumann Lara Downes, piano Happiness (from You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown)

Gesner

My Favorite Things (from The Sound of Music)

Rodgers/Hammerstein

The Rainbow Connection (from The Muppet Movie)

Williams/Ascher

Over the Rainbow (from The Wizard of Oz)

Arlen/Harburg

Mary Whitaker, 2010 Vocal Award Winner, Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition Members of the Willett Elementary School Chorus

Holiday Diary, Op. 5 Early Morning Bathe Sailing Funfair Lara Downes, piano

Britten

Mother Goose Suite I. Pavane of Sleeping Beauty II. Little Tom Thumb III. Empress of the Pagodas IV. Conversation of Beauty and the Beast V. The Fairy Garden Piano duet: Lara Downes and Alex Chien, 2009 Junior Grand Prize Winner, Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition

Ravel

Where the Wild Things Are Text by Maurice Sendak Original choreography by Mindy Cooper Music by Samuel Barber (Piano Sonata, Op. 26) Narration performed by Loren Taylor Music performed by Lara Downes Danced by first grade students from Korematsu Elementary School, Ms. Murphy’s and Ms. Ginn’s classes

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Lara’s chamber music appearances have included collaborations with the Alexander String Quartet, Miami String Quartet, cellist Zuill Bailey, violinist Lara St. John, and violinist Nicholas Kitchen. Commissions and premieres of new works for Lara include composers Aaron Jay Kernis, Benny Golson, Dan Coleman, Jonathan Russell, and Laurie San Martin. A new piano concerto by David Sanford is currently being commissioned for Lara for a world premiere performance at the Kennedy Center in 2011. Lara has been heard on NPR’s Performance Today, WNYC’s New Sounds, and WBGO’s Jazz Set, and she will be featured in an upcoming documentary produced by WQXR. Lara’s busy performance career is strongly impacted by her commitment to expanding and developing new audiences for the arts. She is the founder and president of the 88 KEYS Foundation, a non-profit organization that fosters opportunities for music experiences and learning in America’s public schools by providing pianos and music education programming in K-12 classrooms. Lara is also the founder and artistic director of the Rising Stars of California program, a statewide initiative that showcases California’s most gifted young musicians in concerts and community outreach performances. In addition to the excitement Lara brings to the concert stage, her commercial recordings have been met with tremendous critical and popular acclaim. Her debut CD, Invitation to the Dance, was called “a magical little recording” by NPR, and her CD American Ballads was ranked by Amazon.com among the four best recordings of American music ever made.

lara downes family concert

Lara Downes Steinway Concert Artist Lara Downes has attracted attention as one of the most exciting and communicative young pianists of today, cited by critics for her “breathtaking virtuosity” and called “a most delightful artist, with a unique blend of musicianship and showmanship” by National Public Radio. Lara has performed throughout Europe and the U.S., winning over audiences at some of the world’s most prestigious concert venues, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, and the Vienna Konzerthaus. Recent appearances have included concerts at the Kennedy Center, San Francisco Performances, University of Vermont Lane Series, American Academy in Rome, El Paso Pro Musica Festival, and the Festival International de Musica in Costa Rica. Upcoming performances include the Montreal Chamber Music Festival and the University of Washington World Series.

Guest Artists Alex Chien is the 2009 Junior Grand Prize Winner, Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition. A prizewinner in many competitions including the Young Artists Competitions of California Youth Symphony, the Marilyn Mindell Piano Competition, and the Sylvia M. Ghiglieri Piano Competition, Alex maintains a busy performance schedule, performing recitals and concertos throughout California, and making appearances as an artist member of Lara Downes’ Rising Stars of California program. In 2009, Alex made his European debut at Newcastle University in England. Alex is currently a sixth-grade student at Saint Andrew’s School in Saratoga. In addition to music, he loves writing and computers. Mindy Cooper is delighted to be a part of this family concert series. She has directed/choreographed and performed on Broadway, off-Broadway, national tours, regional theater, on television, and film. She believes the arts belong everywhere, including in the schools, and is pleased to have brought a bit of theater to her twins’ first-grade classes at Korematsu Elementary School. www.mindycooper.com  Loren Taylor worked for many years in New York theaters, appearing in numerous productions including A Man for All Seasons, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Antigone, and The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel. He began his theater work in Sacramento at Riverstage as Willy Loman in a production of Death of a Salesman and has appeared in numerous plays at Riverstage, Capitol Stage, and the B-Street Theater. Loren just completed work on the film Ojo, based on the comic book by Sam Keith. He has previously appeared at Mondavi Center as the narrator for The Carnival of the Animals and The Story of Babar the Little Elephant. Mary Whitaker is the 2010 Vocal Award winner of the Mondavi Center Young Artists Competition. She studies with Norma Mayer in Monterey, where she attends Monte Vista Christian School and is a recipient of its Performing Arts scholarship. She also studied with Dr. Victor Hurtado while attending the Interlochen School for the Arts summer vocal program. Last year, Mary was the first place winner of the Kristina Townsend Memorial Vocal Competition. She also received command performance awards at the Central Coast Regional California Music Teachers Association (CMEA) solo and ensemble festival, with a gold medal at the state CMEA solo and ensemble festival. When she graduates from high school, Mary hopes to attend a music conservatory as a voice performance major to prepare for a career in opera. Mary’s parents are both UC Davis graduates, and her big brother Alex is currently a junior with an Animal Science major at UC Davis. Willett Elementary School Chorus Jessica Block, David Chiu, Sophie Chertok, Anthony DiCarlo, Sam Goidell, Lauren Mills, and Sherry Zheng are members of the Willett Elementary School Chorus, directed by Claudia Krich. This volunteer chorus is open to Willett students in grades 3-6 and meets twice a week before school.

see p. 35

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Ira Glass Radio Producer and Host, This American Life Radio Stories & Other Stories: An Evening with Ira Glass A Distinguished Speakers Series Event Thursday, April 29, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Post-performance Q&A

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal. 30

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Ira Glass is the host and producer of the public radio program This American Life. The show had its premiere on Chicago public radio station WBEZ in late 1995 and is now heard on more than 500 public radio stations each week by more than 1.8 million listeners. Most weeks, the podcast of the program is the most popular podcast in America. Ira Glass began his career as an intern at National Public Radio network headquarters in Washington, D.C. in 1978, when he was 19 years old. Over the years, he worked on nearly every NPR network news program and held virtually every production job in NPR’s Washington headquarters. He has been a tape cutter, newscast writer, desk assistant, editor, and producer. He has filled in as host of Talk of the Nation and Weekend All Things Considered. Under Glass’s editorial direction, This American Life has won the highest honors for broadcasting and journalistic excellence,

ira glass

“Mr. Glass is a journalist, but also a storyteller who filters his interviews and impressions through a distinctive literary imagination, an eccentric intelligence, and a sympathetic heart.” The New York Times

including several Peabody and DuPont-Columbia awards. The American Journalism Review declared that the show is “at the vanguard of a journalistic revolution.” It has won critical acclaim and attracted continuous national media attention over the years. In 2001, Time named Glass “Best Radio Host in America.” In 2009, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting awarded Glass the Edward R. Murrow Award for outstanding contributions to public radio. In 2007, Riverhead Books published The New Kings of Non-Fiction, a collection of nonfiction essays chosen by Ira Glass. A feature film, Unaccompanied Minors, based on a story from the radio show was released by Warner Brothers in 2006. The show has put out its own comic book, three greatest hits compilations, DVDs of live shows and other events, a “radio decoder” toy, temporary tattoos, and a paint-by-numbers set. The television adaptation of This American Life premiered on Showtime in 2007 to great critical acclaim and in 2008, it won two Emmy awards (Outstanding Nonfiction Series and Outstanding Directing for Nonfiction Programming); in 2009, the show won another Emmy (Best Editing for Nonfiction Programming).

see p. 35

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instruments • accessories • sheet music • lessons • rentals • repairs

• Locally owned and operated since 1996 • • We stock over 20,000 print music titles • • We offer “guaranteed lowest price” on our huge and diverse inventory of instruments •

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Photo by John Abbott

Debut

Sonny Rollins A 90.9 KXJZ Jackson Hall Jazz Series Event Wednesday, May 19, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Pre-performance Lecture Jeremy Ganter, Associate Executive Director, Mondavi Center, UC Davis AGR Room, Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center • 7PM

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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He gravitated to the tenor saxophone in high school, inspired in particular by Coleman Hawkins. By the time he was out of school, Rollins was already working with big-name musicians such as Bud Powell, Fats Navarro, and Roy Haynes. In 1951, he debuted as a leader on Prestige; his affiliation with that label also produced classics such as Saxophone Colossus, Worktime, and Tenor Madness (with John Coltrane). From early 1956 until he went out on his own permanently as a leader in the summer of 1957, Rollins played in the Max Roach– Clifford Brown Quintet, one of the most definitive (and tragically short-lived) hard-bop ensembles of its day. Rollins then entered a tremendously fertile period, often with his piano-less trio, during which he recorded major works such as A Night at the Village Vanguard, Way Out West, and Freedom Suite. In 1959, Rollins took the first of his legendary sabbaticals. Living on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, he was often spotted on the nearby Williamsburg Bridge, deep in a rigorous practice regimen. “I wanted to work on my horn. I wanted to study more harmony,” he told Stanley Crouch in The New Yorker.

Road Shows was the inaugural release in a planned series of live Sonny Rollins recordings from the last 30-plus years. The seven tracks on the new CD, culled from the Carl Smith collection and Rollins’s own personal soundboard tapes, were recorded in the U.S., Canada, Poland, Japan, France, and Sweden. Featuring the saxophonist with a variety of sidemen—including, on one track, the Christian McBride-Roy Haynes trio that appeared with him at his 50th anniversary Carnegie Hall concert in 2007—Road Shows captures the Saxophone Colossus in full flight, dazzling audiences around the world. In Vienne was produced by French television and offers an up-close glimpse at Rollins onstage—in high-definition video—as he unfurls a superb hour-long set before a euphoric crowd at the 2006 Jazz à Vienne Festival. Sonny Rollins won his first Grammy for This Is What I Do (2000) and his second in 2004 for Without a Song (The 9/11 Concert), in the Best Jazz Instrumental Solo category (for “Why Was I Born”). Sonny, Please was nominated for a Best Jazz Album Grammy in 2006. Sonny received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences in 2004. In 2006, Rollins was inducted into the Academy of Achievement at the International Achievement Summit in Los Angeles, and in 2007, he was a recipient of the Polar Music Prize, presented in Stockholm. He was named best tenor saxophonist in the 2008 DownBeat Critics’ Poll and the JazzTimes Readers’ Poll, and by the Jazz Journalists Association in 2008.

When Rollins returned to performing in 1961, he recorded The Bridge with Jim Hall and Bob Cranshaw, led a quartet with trumpeter Don Cherry and drummer Billy Higgins, and recorded with his idol Coleman Hawkins. He also received a Grammy nomination for his score for the popular film Alfie. At decade’s end, he undertook one final hiatus, studying Zen Buddhism in Japan and yoga in India. While living in an ashram, he considered leaving music permanently in order to pursue spiritual studies, but a teacher persuaded him that music was his spiritual path, and an uplifting force for good.

If you can give a c an

In 1972, with the encouragement and support of his wife Lucille, who had become his business manager, Rollins returned to performing and recording, signing with Milestone and releasing Next Album. (Working at first with Orrin Keepnews, Sonny was by the early 1980s producing his own Milestone sessions with Lucille.) His lengthy association with the Berkeley-based label produced two dozen albums in various settings—from his working groups to all-star ensembles (Tommy Flanagan, Jack DeJohnette, Stanley Clarke, Tony Williams, George Duke); from a solo recital to tour recordings with the Milestone Jazzstars (Ron Carter, McCoy Tyner); in the studio and on the concert stage (Montreux, San Francisco, New York, Boston). Sonny was also the subject of a mid-1980s documentary by Robert Mugge, Saxophone Colossus; part of its soundtrack is available as G-Man.

In the spirit of giving back, we at the Mondavi Center encourage all audience members to contribute canned and non-perishable food items to help support the Sacramento Food Bank and Family Services, Solano/ Contra Costa County Food Bank, and Yolo County Food Bank. Collections will take place before every Mondavi Center performance in specially marked barrels situated in the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby. The proceeds will be split equally between the three regional food banks. For a complete list of suggested food items, visit MondaviArts.org.

His wife’s passing in late 2004 coincided with the expiration of his recording agreement with his longtime label, Milestone—and the establishment of Doxy Records. Doxy’s first CD release, the 2006 studio recording Sonny, Please, earned a Grammy nomination for Rollins. In 2009, Doxy released an extraordinary double dose of Rollins in concert with a live CD compilation, Road Shows, Vol. 1, and a DVD (In Vienne) of a 2006 European festival performance.

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sonny rollins

Walter Theodore Rollins was born in Harlem, New York, on September 7, 1930, of parents native to the Virgin Islands. His older brother Valdemar and sister Gloria were also musically inclined, but only Sonny veered away from classical music after his uncle, a professional saxophonist, introduced him to jazz and blues.

The art of giving back

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arts education

Mondavi Center Arts Education

school matinees

2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1

Mondavi Center Arts Education encourages all K-12 teachers to bring their students to Mondavi Center, UC Davis next season for at least one school matinee performance. Especially designed for students, the School Matinee program is curriculum based and focuses on the cultural authenticity and international exchange possible only through live performance.

Bayanihan  Friday, October 1, 2010

Don’t miss our annual Educator’s Preview Party

Gamelan Çudamani  Monday, October 25, 2010

May 5

Imago, ZooZoo Monday, November 8, 2010 Mariachi Los Camperos de nati cano Monday, December 6, 2010 MOMIX, Botanica Monday, January 31, 2011 Curtis On Tour Thursday, March 17, 2011 Dan Zanes and Friends

“Thank you for all that you do to keep the arts alive for our kids I don’t know what the Dixon High School Arts and Design Academy would be without the support of the Mondavi Center!”

Monday, March 21, 2011 Alvin Ailey american dance theater

Lisa Krebs Dixon High School

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 Cirque Éloize, ID Monday, April 11, 2011

All shows at 11AM

All teachers are invited to the annual Educator’s Preview Party on May 5, where we will showcase next season’s school matinees and other Mondavi Center educational and outreach programs. Call (530) 754-5431 for more information. Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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mondavi center

Individual Supporters -ONDAVI#ENTER )NNER#IRCLE Inner Circle donors are dedicated arts patrons whose leadership gifts to the Mondavi Center are a testament to the value of the performing arts in our lives. Mondavi Center is deeply grateful for the generous contributions of the dedicated patrons who give annual financial support to our organization. These donations are an important source of revenue for our program, as income from ticket sales covers less than half of the actual cost of our performance season. Their gifts to the Mondavi Center strengthen and sustain our efforts, enabling us not only to bring memorable performances by worldclass artists to audiences in the capital region each year, but also to introduce new generations to the experience of live performance through our Arts Education Program, which provides arts education and enrichment activities to more than 35,000 K-12 students annually. For more information on supporting the Mondavi Center, visit MondaviArts.org or call 530.754.5437.

Impresario Circle $25,000 and up

John and Lois Crowe†* Barbara K. Jackson†* Maestro Circle $10,000 - $24,999

Joyce and Ken Adamson Wayne and Jacque Bartholomew†* Dolly and David Fiddyment† Samia and Scott Foster† Friends of Mondavi Center Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Anne Gray†* Benjamin and Lynette Hart†* Mary B. Horton* Grant and Grace Noda* William and Nancy Roe†* Lawrence and Nancy Shepard† Joe and Betty Tupin†* Shipley and Dick Walters* Benefactors Circle $6,000 - $9,999 Michael Alexander Michael and Tootie Beeman California Statewide Certified Development Corporation Camille Chan† Patti Donlon† First Northern Bank† Bonnie and Ed Green†* Dee and Joe Hartzog† The One and Only Watson Margaret Hoyt* Sarah and Dan Hrdy William and Jane Koenig Garry Maisel† Stephen Meyer and Mary Lou Flint† Derry Ann Moritz and Charles R.S. Shepard M. A. Morris* Ben L. O’Brien Grace and John Rosenquist Hal and Carol Sconyers†* Raymond and Jeanette Seamans Tony and Joan Stone† Della Aichwalder Thompson Larry and Rosalie Vanderhoef†* And one donor who prefers to remain anonymous

† Mondavi Center Advisory Board Member * Friends of Mondavi Center

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Neil and Carla Andrews Apel Family Jeff and Karen Bertleson Cordelia S. Birrell Neil and Joanne Bodine Barry and Valerie Boone Brian Tarkington and Katrina Boratynski Michael and Betty Chapman Robert and Wendy Chason Chris and Sandy Chong* Oren and Eunice Adair-Christensen* Michele Clark and Paul Simmons Tony and Ellie Cobarrubia* Nancy DuBois* Catherine and Charles Farman Mr. and Mrs. Domenic Favero Donald and Sylvia Fillman Judith and Andrew Gabor Kay Gist Robert and Kathleen Grey Judy and Bill Hardardt* Tom and Mary Ann Herbert Lorena Herrig* Diana and Glenn Hofer Lesley and Ronald Hsu Debra Johnson, M.D. and Mario Gutierrez Gerald and Virginia Jostes Teresa and Jerry Kaneko* Dean and Karen Karnopp* Nancy Lawrence, Gordon Klein, and Linda Lawrence Greiner Heating and Air Dr. Richard E. Latchaw Jeffrey and Ginger Leacox John T. Lescroart and Lisa Sawyer Nelson Lewallyn and Marion Pace-Lewallyn Betty J. Lewis Dr. and Mrs. Ashley T. Lipshutz Paul and Diane Makley* Kathryn Marr Janet Mayhew* Helga and Robert Medearis Verne Mendel* Mary Ann and Richard Murray Jeff and Mary Nicholson Charles and Joan Partain Susan Strachan and Gavin Payne Lois and Dr. Barry Ramer Roger and Ann Romani* Melodie Rufer Ellen Sherman Tom and Meg Stallard* Tom and Judy Stevenson* Nathan and Johanna Trueblood Ken Verosub and Irina Delusina John Max Vogel M.D.and Jeanne Hanna Vogel* Claudette Von Rusten

Cantor & Company, A Law Corporation Susie Williams Elizabeth F. and Charles E. Wilts Bob and Joyce Wisner* And six donors who prefer to remain anonymous Directors Circle $1,100 - $2,999 Beulah and Ezra Amsterdam Russell and Elizabeth Austin Lydia and Ron Baskin* Virginia and Michael Biggs Kay and Joyce Blacker* Phyllis and Robert Bolt Jo Anne Boorkman* Clyde and Ruth Bowman Edwin Bradley Patricia Brown and Leslie Axelrod* Ralph and Clairelee Leiser Bulkley* Robert Burgerman and Linda Ramatowski Davis and Jan Campbell Lynne Cannady Seeley Chandler and James Kelly Jacqueline Clemens Rob and Liz Coman Eric and Michael Conn David J. Converse John and Gail Cooluris Jim and Kathy Coulter* John and Celeste Cron* Robert Crummey Chuck Cunningham and Deborah Dunham Terry and Jay Davison Jim and Carolyn DeHayes Cecilia M. Delury Cheryl Demas Bruce and Marilyn Dewey Martha Dickman* Rex and Joyce Donaldson* Richard and Joy Dorf* Thomas and Phyllis Farver* Nancy McRae Fisher Ron and Pam Fisher* Tom Forrester and Shelly Faura Dr. Andy and Wendy Huang Frank Joseph George Karl Gerdes and Pamela Rohrich Henry and Dorothy Gietzen Patty and John Goss* Donald Green Florence and Jack Grosskettler* Diane Gunsul Charles and Ann Halsted Donine Hedrick and David Studer Timothy Hefler Charles and Eva Hess Sharna and Mike Hoffman Suzanne Horsley* Claudia and Christoph Hulbe The International Wine & Spirit Competition Ruth W. Jackson Alessa Johns and Christopher Reynolds Clarence and Barbara Kado Barbara Katz* Robert Kingsley and Melissa Thorme

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Mondavi Center support

Producers Circle $3,000 - $5,999

Matthew and Cheryl Kurowski Brian and Dorothy Landsberg Mary Jane Large and Marc Levinson Edward and Sally Larkin* Allan and Claudia Leavitt Hyunok Lee and Daniel Sumner Yvonne LeMaitre* Lin and Peter Lindert Angelique Louie Natalie and Malcolm MacKenzie* Dennis H. Mangers and Michael Sestak Judith and Mark Mannis Marilyn Mansfield Richard and Anne Marder Yvonne L. Marsh Shirley Maus* In memory of Wm F. McCoy Kenneth McKinstry Gary and Susan McLaughlin Don and Lou McNary* Sonja and Steve Memering Joy Mench and Clive Watson Fred and Linda Meyers* Doc Miller John Meyer and Karen Moore Eldridge and Judith Moores Jim and Paula Munson Patricia and Surl Nielsen James Nordin and Linda Orrante Alice Oi in memory of Richard H. Oi Robert Ono and Betty Masuoka Philip and Miep Palmer Suzanne and Brad Poling Linda and Lawrence Raber* Kay Resler* Rick and Susie Rodgers Tom Roehr Don Roth† and Jolán Friedhoff Liisa A. Russell Beverly “Babs” Sandeen and Marty Swingle Ed and Karen Schelegle Marc and Heath Schenker Neil and Carrie Schore Jeff and Bonnie Smith Wilson and Kathryn Smith Ronald and Rosie Soohoo* Richard L. Sprague and Stephen C. Ott Maril Revette Stratton and Patrick Stratton Karmen Streng Jerome Suran and Helen Singer Suran* George and Rosemary Tchobanoglous Jennifer Thornton Claude and Barbara Van Marter Marie Lopez and John Walker Louise and Larry Walker Janda J. Waraas Mike and Ann Watembach Bruce and Patrice White Dale and Jane Wierman Fred and Mary Wood Richard and Judy Wydick Paul Wyman Elizabeth and Yin Yeh And eight donors who prefer to remain anonymous

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Mondavi Center support

mondavi center

members Encore Circle

$600 - $1,099 Gregg T. Atkins and Ardith Allread Robert and Joan Ball Doreen T. Chan Gale and Jack Chapman William and Susan Chen Dotty Dixon* John and Cathie Duniway Joan and Gregory Eddy Mark E. Ellis and Lynn Shapiro Carole Franti* Paul J. and Dolores L. Fry Charitable Fund David and Mae Gundlach Robin Hansen Roy and Miriam Hatamiya Katherine Hess Mary Jenkin Barbara and Robert Jones Irene Kennedy Kent and Judy Kjelstrom Paula Kubo Anesiades S. Leonard Susan Mann Maria Manoliu Michael Mantell John and Polly Marion Gary C. and Jane L. Matteson Barbara Moriel Robert and Janet Mukai Don and Sue Murchison Robert Murphy John Pascoe Ann and Jerry Powell* Harriet Prato Larry and Celia Rabinowitz Heather and Jeep Roemer Christian Sandrock and Dafna Gatmon Judith and Richard Stern Tony and Beth Tanke Lynn Taylor and Mont Hubbard Roseanna Torretto* Henry and Lynda Trowbridge* Robert and Helen Twiss Barbara D. Webster and Grady L. Webster Steven and Andrea Weiss* Frances and Nickols White Kandi Williams and Dr. Frank Jahnke Karl and Lynn Zender And five donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Orchestra Circle

$300 - $599 Steve Abramowitz and Dr. Alberta Nassi Jill and John Aguiar Mitzi S. Aguirre Paul and Nancy Aikin Steven Albrecht and Jessica Friedman Drs. Ralph and Teresa Aldredge Thomas and Patricia Allen David and Penny Anderson Alvan and Patricia Arthur Michael and Shirley Auman* Rex Avakian Murry and Laura Baria* Lupie and Richard Barton Drs. Noa and David Bell Carol L. Benedetti Tonya and Jack Berger Marvin Berman and Susan Flynn Robert and Diane Carlson Biggs Eduardo Blumwald and Angela Gelli Bobbie Bolden Elizabeth Bradford Paul Braun Joan Brenchley and Kevin Jackson Irving and Karen Broido* Frank Brown MD Greg Brucker

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John and Christine Bruhn Manuel Calderon de la Barca and Karen Zito Jackie Caplan Michael and Louise Caplan Michael and Susan Carl Richard Carlsen Anne Carlson Amy Chen and Raj Amirtharajah Charles and Mary Anne Cooper Michael Y. Corbett and Associates James and Patricia Cothern Paul Cox and Catherine Brennan Larry Dashiell and Peggy Siddons Thomas B. and Eina C. Dutton Vincent Elliot Brian Ely and Robert Hoffman Sheila and Steve Epler Micki and Les Faulkin Janet Feil Doris and Earl Flint Murray and Audrey Fowler Tom and Barbara Frankel Sevgi and Edwin Friedrich* Dr. Deborah and Brook Gale Craig Gladen Marvin and Joyce Goldman Paul N. and E. F. Goldstene Stephen and Deirdre Greenholz Marilyn and Alexander Groth Gwen and Darrow Haagensen Wanda J. Haas Sharon and Don Hallberg David and Donna Harris Jacqueline and Robert Harris Lauren L. Hastings Stephen and Joanne Hatchett Len and Marilyn Herrmann Paula Higashi David Hoffsten Robert Hollingsworth and Carol Beckham Frederick and B.J. Hoyt James and Patricia Hutchinson* Nancy Johnson Don and Diane Johnston Weldon and Colleen Jordan David Kalb and Nancy Gelbard Edith Kanoff Louise Kellogg and Douglas Neuhauser Ruth Ann Kinsella* Ken and Susan Kirby Joseph Kiskis and Diana Vodrey Peter Klavins and Susan Kauzlarich Paul and Pamela Kramer Charlene R. Kunitz Allan and Norma Lammers Richard Lawrence and Katie Thomas Ruth Lawrence Frances and Arthur Lawyer* Patrick D. Leathers and Kathrine Cole-Leathers Carol and Robert Ledbetter JH Edmund Lee Stanley Levin Barbara Levine Mary Ann and Ernest Lewis* Michael and Sheila Lewis* David and Ruth Lindgren Spencer Lockson and Thomas Lange Monica R. Lohr Bill and Harriet Lovitt Jim and Nancy Lyons Jeffrey and Helen Ma Jamie Madison Bunkie Mangum Patricia Martin* Robert Mazalewski and Yvonne Clinton Julie and Craig McNamara Nancy and Glen Michel Julianne and Dexter Morin Robert and Susan Munn* Beverly Myers William and Nancy Myers Forrest Odle Marilyn Olmstead Margaret Ong and Murray Levison* John and Carol Oster Sally Ozonoff and Thomas Richey Jack and Sue Palmer Dr. John and Barbara Parker

Suzanne and Robert Pearl Bonnie A. Plummer* Jerry L. Plummer John W. and Deborah Nichols Poulos Ms. Ann Preston J. and K. Redenbaugh John Reitan Judy, David, and Hannah Reuben* Guy and Eva Richards Tracy Rodgers and Richard Budenz Bob and Tamra Ruxin Tom and Joan Sallee Kathleen and David Sanders Mark and Ita Sanders* Howard and Eileen Sarasohn Jerry and Kay Schimke Mervyn Schnaidt Maralyn Molock Scott Jay and Jill Shepherd Kathryn Shigaki James and Rita Seiber* Elizabeth Smithwick Al and Sandy Sokolow Francis and Laurel Sousa Curtis and Judy Spencer Elizabeth St. Goar Sherman and Hannah Stein Tim and Julie Stephens Les and Mary Stephens Dewall Rob and Andrea Stone Pieter Stroeve, Jodie Stroeve, and Diane Barrett Eric and Patricia Stromberg* Kristia Suutala Julia Swain John and Donna Tewart Jeanne Shealor and George Thelen Butch and Virginia Thresh Dennis and Judy Tsuboi Ann-Catrin Van Robert Vassar and Nanci Manceau Donald Walk, M.D. Kathrine and Robert Ware Norma and Richard Watson Dr. Fred and Betsy Weiland Daniel Weiss and Elena Friedman-Weiss Jeanne Wheeler Charles White and Carrie Schucker, PhD Jim and Genia Willett* Denise and Alan Williams Sally Wood and William W. Vasey Charlotte C. Xanders Lisa Yamauchi and Michael O’Brien Iris Yang and G. Richard Brown Ronald M. Yoshiyama George and Hanni Zweifel And nine donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Mainstage Circle $100 - $299

Michelle Adams Tom and Betty Adams Mary Aften Jack and Karin Aguilar Susan Ahlquist Rudy Ahumada John and Tuesday Airola Suzanne and David Allen Brandy Anderson Elinor Anklin Alex Ardans Clemens Arrasmith Deborah Arrington Jerry and Barbara August Kevin Baker George and Irma Baldwin Beverly and Clay Ballard Charlotte Ballard Elizabeth Banks Michele Barefoot Paul and Linda Baumann Nicole Baumgarth Lynn Baysinger* Delee and Jerry Beavers Claire and Marion Becker Bee Happy Apiaries Marie Beeson Lorna Belden and Milton Blackman Merry Benard William and Marie Benisek

Robert C. and Jane D. Bennett Marta Beres Donald and Katheryn Bers* Boyd and Lucille Bevington Heather, Gary and Erica Bevowitz Ernst and Hannah Biberstein Elizabeth V. Biggert John and Katy Bill Andrea Bjorklund and Sean Duggan Caroline and Sam Bledsoe Deborah Born Steve and Cecelia Boswell Mary and Jill Bowers Robert and Maxine Braude Dan and Millie Braunstein* Richard Breedon Margaret and Jack Brockhouse Don and Liz Brodeur Karla Broussard-Boyd Edelgard Brunelle Don and Mary Ann Brush Janet Burau Mike and Marian Burnham Dr. Margaret Burns and Dr. Roy W. Bellhorn Victor and Meredith Burns William and Karolee Bush John and Marguerite Callahan Edward Callaway Lita Campbell* Jean and Bob Canary John and Nancy Capitanio James and Patty Carey Hoy and Patricia Carman* Jan Carmikle ‘90 Nancy Carr John Carroll Bruce and Mary Alice Carswell* Jan B. and Barbara J. Carter* Joan and Jack Chambers Dorothy Chikasawa* Frank Chisholm Annette Chow Michael and Paula Chulada Gail E. Clark Linda Clevenger and Seth Brunner Bill and Linda Cline Barbara Cody Stephan Cohen Christina Cole Sheri and Ron Cole Harold and Marj Collins Steve and Janet Collins Jan Conroy Roberta Cook Terry and Marybeth Cook Catherine Coupal* Victor Cozzalio and Lisa Heilman-Cozzalio Crandallicious Family Susan and Fitz-Roy Curry Elizabeth Dahlstrom-Bushnell* John and Joanne Daniels Sheila David and Peter Beal Dena Davidson Johanna Davies Mary Hanf Dawson Peter and Jennifer Demello Leigh Dibb The Dillon Family Joel and Linda Dobris Val Dolcini and Solveig Monson Val and Marge Dolcini* Keith Doram Katherine Douglas Sue Drake* Ray Dudonis Anne Duffey Leslie Dunsworth Edward and Norma Eason Julia Couzens and Jay-Allen Eisen Harold and Anne Eisenberg Eliane Eisner Allen Enders Merrilee Engel Adrian and Tamara Engel Sid England Richard Epstein and Gwendolyn Doebbert Gary and Barbara Erickson Carol Erickson and David Phillips M. Richard and Gloria M. Eriksson Jeff Ersig Christine Facciotti Nell Farr Andrew D. and Eleanor E. Farrand* Elizabeth Fassler David and Kerstin Feldman Elizabeth Fenton


Jong Sook Kim Louise Bettner and Larry Kimble Kris and Pat King Patricia M. Kivela* Dorothy Klishevich Paulette Knox Winston and Katy Ko Douglas Krause and Martha Ozonoff Dave and Nina Krebs Marcia and Kurt Kreith Sandra Kristensen C.R. and E. Kuehner Bill and Joan Kuhns Nate Kupperman Leslie Kurtz Cecilia Kwan Donald and Yoshie Kyhos Ray and Marianne Kyono Terri Labriola Corrine and Michael Laing Bonnie and Kit Lam* Marsha Lang Lawrence and Ingrid Lapin Bruce and Susan Larock Sharon Adlis and Harry Laswell Darnell Lawrence Leon E. Laymon C and J Learned Marceline Lee and Philip Smith Nancy and Steve Lege Robert and Barbara Leidigh Suzanne Leineke The Lenk-Sloane Family Evelyn A. Lewis Melvyn and Rita Libman Guille Levin Libresco Jim and Jami Long Kim Longworth Rubin and Carol Lopez Mary and Jack Lowry Henry Luckie Maryanne Lynch Ed and Sue MacDonald Leslie Macdonald and Gary Francis Julin Maloof and Stacey Harmer Frances Mara Joseph and Mary Alice Marino Pam Marrone and Mick Rogers Donald and Mary Martin Frank Martin Garth and Linda Martin Jeanne Martin Patti Martinez Mr. and Mrs. William R. Mason Evelyn Matteucci and Richard Vorpe Bob and Vel Matthews Leslie Maulhardt Katherine F. Mawdsley Barrett McBride Sean and Sebine McCarthy Karen McCluskey* Del and Doug McColm Babe McCormick John and Kathy McCoy Nora McGuinness* Donna and Dick McIlvaine Tim and Linda McKenna Richard and Virginia McRostie Kent and Laurie McVay Martin A. Medina and Laurie Perry Stanley Meizel Barry Melton and Barbara Langer Sharon Menke The Merchant Family Roland Meyer Leslie Michaels and Susan Katt Lisa Miller Sue and Rex Miller Melva Mills Douglas Minnis Steve and Kathy Miura* Kei and Barbara Miyano Sydney Moberg Vicki and Paul Moering Joanne K. Moldenhauer Amy Moore Marcie Mortensson Christopher Motley Tony and Linda Mras The Muller Family Terry and Judith Murphy M.A. Nelson Richard Nelson Margaret Neu†* Cathy Neuhauser and Jack Holmes Robert and Donna Nevraumont* Dana Newell and Keri Mistler Malvina Nisman Nobriga Family

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

Nancy Nolte and James Little Lisa Nowell and Stan Robinson John and Freddie Oakley Patricia O’Brien Ann O’Connell Drs. Joseph and Martha O’Donnell Kay Yae Ogasawara Mark Olander and Nancy Farwell Garrett Koslan and Phyliss Oliveira James and Sharon Oltjen Marvin O’Rear Lois and Henry Ortmann Bob and Beth Owens Jay Owens Jessie Ann Owens Carlene and Mike Ozonoff* Michael Pach and Mary Wind Joan S. Packard Frank Pajerski Thomas Pavlakovich and Kathryn Demakopoulos Kathryn Palmieri Ann Peterson and Marc Hoeschele Robert and Nancy Peterson Edward A. Phillips In memory of Walter Pilgrim Pat Piper Vicki and Bob Plutchok Ralph and Jane Pomeroy* Kevin Powers Jerry and Bernice Pressler Otto and Evelyn Raabe Edward and Jane Rabin Jan and Anne-Louise Radimsky Kathryn Radtkey-Gaither Mark and Cathryn Rakich J. David Ramsey Lawrence and Norma Rappaport Evelyn and Dewey Raski Olga Raveling Dorothy and Frederick Reardon Sandi Redenbach* Mrs. John Reese, Jr. Martha Rehrman* Michael A. Reinhart and Dorothy Yerxa Nancy Reitz Eugene and Elizabeth Renkin Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rice Fred and Bernadeen Richardson Ralph and Judy Riggs Kristyn Ringgold Caroline and Stephen Roberts David and Kathy Robertson Richard and Evelyne Rominger Sharon and Elliott Rose* Andrea G. Rosen George and Jean Rosenfeld Barbara and Alan Roth David and Catherine Rowen Jennifer Ryan Hugh Safford Bob and Joyce Sahara Terry Sandbek and Sharon Billings* Elia and Glenn Sanjume Fred and Polly Schack John and Joyce Schaeuble Leon Schimmel and Annette Cody Fred and Colene Schlaepfer Julie Schmidt* Bob Schmidt and Jennifer Kerr Janis J. Schroeder and Carrie L. Markel Jeanette and Peter Schulz Christopher Searcy Brian Sehnert and Janet McDonald Dan Shadoan and Ann Lincoln Nancy Sheehan and Rich Simpson Barbara Sheldon Valerie Brown and Edward Shields Ruth and Robert Shumway Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Siegler Sandra and Clay Sigg Andrew Sih Dr. and Mrs. James Silverman Mark Berman and Lynn Simon Michael and Elizabeth Singer Barbara Slemmons Marion E. Small Alexandra Smith Annabelle Smith Don R.C. Smith James and Suzette Smith Michael and Judith Smith Susan and Virgil Smith* Jean Snyder Roger and Freda Sornsen Greg and Pam Sparks Edward and Sharon Speegle

Joseph and Dolores Spencer DeAna Spiess Lenore and Henry Spoto Harriet Steiner and Miles Stern John and Johanna Stek Raymond Stewart Deb and Jeff Stromberg Becky and James Sullivan Jean E. Swearingen Stewart and Ann Teal* Pouneh Tehrani Francie Teitelbaum Julie A. Theriault, PA-C Janet Thome Marc Thompson, CRE, FRICS Cynthia Thorburn Henry and Kathy Thornhill Robert Thorpe Brian Toole Katharine Traci Michael and Heidi Trauner Rich and Fay Traynham Gary and Jan Truesdail Barbara and Jim Tutt Chris and Betsy Van Kessel Bart and Barbara Vaughn* Denise Verbeck Richard J Vielbig Merna and Don Villarejo Charles and Terry Vines Hyla Wagner M. Therese Wagnon Carol Walden and Sharon Jane Matthews Caroline and Royce Waters Marya Welch* Carolyn Wells Daniel and Eleanor Wendin Robert and Leslie Westergaard* William and Laura Wheeler Linda K. Whitney Barbara Weiman Mrs. Jane L. Williams Keith Williams Janet Winterer The Wolf Family Linda Yassinger Timothy and Vicki Yearnshaw Fan and Viola Yee Norman and Manda Yeung Phillip and Iva Yoshimura Heather M. Young and Peter B. Quinby Larry Young and Nancy Lee Phyllis Young Verena Leu Young* Melanie and Medardo Zavala Phyllis and Darrel Zerger* Scott and Linda Zimmerman Tim and Sonya Zindel Mark and Wendy Zlotlow

Mondavi Center support

Steven and Susan Ferronato Margery Findlay Kieran and Martha Fitzpatrick Manfred Fleischer David and Donna Fletcher Don and Eloise Foley Susan and Gary Ford Glenn E. Fortini Murray and Audrey Fowler Robert Fowles and Linda Parzych Marion Franck Barbara and Ed Frankel Anthony and Jorgina Freese Bill and Joyce Frey Joel I. Friedman Kerim and Josina Friedrich Joan M. Futscher Myra A. Gable Lillian Gabriel Charles and Joanne Gamble Claude and Nadja Garrod Ivan Gennis Peggy Gerick Gerald Gibbons and Sibilla Hershey Eleanor Glassburner Marnelle Gleason* Roberta R. Gleeson Burton Goldfine and Deborah Birnbaum Pat and Bob Gonzalez* Robert and Velma Goodlin Michael Goodman Victor Graf Phyllis Graham Lewis Gray Mrs. Marshall Greenberg Paul and Carol Grench June and Paul Gulyassy Wesley and Ida Hackett* Jim and Jane Hagedorn Frank and Rosalind Hamilton William and Sherry Hamre Marsha Hand Jim and Laurie Hanschu Marylee and John Hardie Michael and Carol Harris Richard and Vera Harris Cathy Brorby and Jim Harritt Gary Hart The Hartwig-Lee Family Mr. and Mrs. K. Hashagen Cynthia Hearden* Barbara Hegenbart Marjorie Heineke Martin Helmke and Joan Frye Williams Nancy and Larry Hendrick and Rich and Karol McCormac Rand and Mary Herbert Eric Herrgesell DVM DACVR Terry Hewett Roger and Rosanne Heym LuAnne Higgs and Jim Lane Alouise Hillier Calvin Hirsch and Deborah Francis Frederick Hodges Michael and Peggy Hoffman Jeannette Hogan Bryan Jeff Holcomb, M.D. Jan and Herb Hoover Steve and Nancy Hopkins Alice Howell Hull and Honeycutt Marketing and Design David and Gail Hulse Eva Peters Hunting Lorraine J. Hwang William Jackson Dr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Jensen Pamela R. Jessup Jane Johnson* Steve and Naomi Johnson Michelle Johnston and Scott Arranto Warren and Donna Johnston Mason Jones Martin and JoAnn Joye* Mary Ann and Victor Jung John and Nancy Jungerman Carole Kane Fred and Selma Kapatkin Shari and Timothy Karpin Jean and Stephen Karr Yasuo Kawamura Phyllis and Scott Keilholtz* Patricia Kelleher Dave and Gay Kent Michael Kent and Karl Jandrey Robert and Cathryn Kerr Pat and John Kessler

And 61 donors who prefer to remain anonymous

CORPORATE MATCHING GIFTS American Express Foundation Gift Matching Program Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Chevron/Texaco Matching Gift Fund ExxonMobil Foundation McGraw-Hill Company Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation Monsanto Company The Sacramento Bee Wachovia Foundation Matching Gifts Program Wells Fargo Foundation We appreciate the many Members who participate in their employers’ matching gift program. Please contact your Human Resources department to find out about your company’s matching gift program. Note: We are pleased to recognize the Members of Mondavi Center for their generous support of our program. We apologize if we inadvertently listed your name incorrectly; please contact the Development Office at 530.754.5436 to inform us of corrections.

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Mondavi Center

Corporate Support Corporate partners

Giving The Art of Giving

How does my gift make a difference? The Mondavi Center uses the support of its donors to ensure that season presentations are culturally diverse, affordably priced, and meet the highest standards of excellence.

Platinum

Ticket sales cover only 40% of our costs.

gold

Office of Campus Community Relations

40%

Your charitable donation makes it all possible: silver

• Brings world-class artists and distinguished speakers to your doorstep • Supports a nationally recognized Arts Education Program, serving more than 35,000 K-12 children and teachers • Showcases and supports talented, young artists

bronze

For more information, visit us at MondaviArts.org/supportus

Join Mondavi Center’s Corporate Partner Program and align your company with one of the nation’s most Mondavi Center Grantors and arts education sponsors

prestigious university performing arts presenters. Partnerships are available at a wide range of levels, from single-event sponsorships to affiliation with an entire season of performances. Our staff will work with you to create a customized benefits package that meets your company’s marketing objectives.

Benefits include: • Broad regional marketing exposure • Unique client entertainment opportunities • Priority ticketing services • On-site event presence

Friends of Mondavi Center

• Business-to-business networking opportunities • Access to UC Davis leadership and campus community

Event & Additional Support Partners Boeger Winery Ciocolat Davis Food Co-op 42

Seasons Restaurant Watermelon Music

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For more information about how you can support the Mondavi Center, please contact: James Warhover Associate Director of Development jtwarhover@ucdavis.edu | 530.754.5419


Mondavi Center staff DON ROTH, Ph.D. Executive Director Jeremy Ganter Associate Executive Director PROGRAMMING Jeremy Ganter Director of Programming Erin Palmer Programming Manager Lara Downes Curator: Young Artists Program ARTS EDUCATION Joyce Donaldson Associate to the Executive Director for Arts Educaton and Strategic Projects Jennifer Mast Arts Education Coordinator Ruth Rosenberg Professional Development Coordinator

AUDIENCE SERVICES Emily Taggart Audience Services Manager/ Artist Liaison Coordinator Yuri Rodriguez Events Manager Nancy Temple Assistant Public Events Manager BUSINESS SERVICES Debbie Armstrong Senior Director for Support Services Carolyn Warfield Human Resources Analyst Mandy Jarvis Financial Analyst Russ Postlethwaite Billing System Administrator Dena Gilday Payroll and Travel Assistant

DEVELOPMENT Robert Avalos Director of Development

MARKETING Rob Tocalino Director of Marketing

James Warhover Associate Director of Development

Rebecca Summers Marketing Manager Erin Kelley Senior Graphic Artist

Christine Vargas Donor Event Manager Elisha Findley Development Coordinator FACILITIES Steve McFerron Director of Facilities Greg Bailey Lead Building Maintenance Worker

Tim Kendall Programmer

Christi-Anne Sokolewicz Scene Technician TICKET OFFICE Sarah Herrera Ticket Office Manager

production Eric Richardson Director of Production

Erin McDowell Ticket Office Supervisor

Jessie Eting Stage Manager Christopher Oca Stage Manager

Zak Stelly-Riggs Master Carpenter

Mark J. Johnston Lead Application Developer

Jon Foster Scene Technician

Morissa Rubin Senior Graphic Artist

Jenna Bell Production Coordinator

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Darren Marks Programmer/Designer

Adrian Galindo Scene Technician

Daniel Goldin Master Electrician Michael Hayes Head Sound Technician

Steve David Ticket Agent Russell St. Clair Ticket Agent Head Ushers Huguette Albrecht Jennifer Carriere George Edwards Linda Gregory Donna Horgan James Nordin Joe Schwartz Linda Schwartz Mike Tracy Susie Valentin Terry Whittier Janellyn Whittier

Mondavi Center advisory Board The Mondavi Center Advisory Board is a university support group whose primary purpose is to provide assistance to the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis, and its resident users, the academic departments of Music and Theatre and Dance, and the presenting program of the Mondavi Center, through fundraising, public outreach, and other support for the mission of UC Davis and the Mondavi Center. 09-10 Season Board Officers John Crowe, Chair Lynette Hart, Vice-Chair Joe Tupin, Vice-Chair Dee Hartzog, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Lor Shepard, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Garry P. Maisel, Corporate Relations Co-Chair Camille Chan, Corporate Relations Co-Chair Garry P. Maisel, Immediate Past Chair

Members Wayne Bartholomew Camille Chan John and Lois Crowe Patti Donlon David and Dolly Fiddyment Mary Lou Flint Samia and Scott Foster Anne Gray

Bonnie and Ed Green Benjamin and Lynette Hart Dee and Joe Hartzog Barbara K. Jackson Garry P. Maisel Stephen Meyer John and Rita Onsum William and Nancy Roe Hal and Carol Sconyers

Lawrence and Nancy Shepard Tony and Joan Stone Chris Thompson Joe Tupin Rosalie Vanderhoef

Ex Officio

Linda Katehi, Chancellor, UC Davis Enrique Lavernia, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, UC Davis Jessie Ann Owens, Dean, Division of Humanities, Arts & Cultural Studies, College of Letters & Sciences, UC Davis Margaret Neu, President, Friends of Mondavi Center Veronica Passalacqua, Chair, Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center

Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee

friends of mondavi center

The Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee is made up of interested students, faculty, and staff who attend performances, review programming opportunities, and meet monthly with the director of the Mondavi Center. They provide advice and feedback for the Mondavi Center staff throughout the performance season.

09 -10 Executive Board Margaret Neu, President Laura Baria, Vice President/Membership Lois Crowe, Secretary Jo Anne Boorkman, Adult Education Sandra Chong, K-12 Education John Cron, Mondavi Center Tours Phyllis Zerger, Outreach Martha Rehrman, School Matinee Ticket Program Fundraising Eunice Adair Christensen, Gift Shop Manager, Ex Officio Joyce Donaldson, Associate to Executive Director, Ex Officio Member

09-10 Committee Members Veronica Passalacqua, Chair Jessica Cvetko Angie Dernersesian Jochen Ditterich Susan Franck

Stephen Hudson Erin Klein Oluwafunmilayo Ladeinde Jade McCutcheon Bella Merlin Claire O’Brien

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

Hearne Pardee Kayla Rouse Sally Ryen Mikal Saltveit Erin Schlemmer James Smith

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POlicies and information Ticket Exchange Policy • Once a season ticket request is processed, there are no refunds. • If you exchange for a higher priced ticket, you will be charged the difference. The difference between a higher and lower priced exchanged ticket is not refundable. • Tickets must be exchanged at least one business day prior to the performance. • Tickets may not be exchanged after your performance date. • Gift certificates will not be issued for returned tickets. Parking You may purchase parking passes for individual Mondavi Center events for $6 for each event at the parking lot or with your ticket order. Rates are subject to change. Parking passes that have been lost or stolen will not be replaced. Group Discounts Entertain friends, family, classmates, or business associates and save money. Groups of 20 or more qualify for a 10% discount. Payment must be made in a single check or credit card transaction. Please call 530.754.2787 or 866.754.2787. Student Tickets (50% off the full single ticket price*) Eligibility: Full-time students age 12 & over enrolled for the current academic year at an accredited institution and matriculating towards a diploma or a degree. (Continuing education enrollees are not eligible). Proof Requirements: School ID for the current academic year OR photocopy of your transcript/report card/tuition bill receipt for the current academic year. Children For events other than the family series it is recommended that children under the age of 5 not be brought into the performance for the enjoyment of all patrons. A ticket is required of all children regardless of age; any child attending a performance should be able to sit quietly throughout the performance. Privacy Policy Mondavi Center collects information from patrons solely for the purpose of gaining necessary information to conduct business and serve our patrons more efficiently. We also sometimes share names and addresses with other not-for-profit arts organizations. If you do not wish to be included in our e-mail communications or postal mailings, or if you do not want us to share your name, please notify us via e-mail, U.S. mail, or telephone. Full Privacy Policy at www.MondaviArts.org.

*Only one discount per ticket.

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Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities Mondavi Center is proud to be a state-of-the-art public facility that meets or exceeds all state and federal ADA requirements and is fully accessible to patrons with disabilities. Parking for patrons with DMV placards is available on the street level (mid-level) of the nearby parking structure, and on the surface lots near the covered walkway. There is also a short-term drop-off area directly in front of the entrance. Patrons with disabilities or special seating needs should notify the Mondavi Center Ticket Office of those needs at the time of ticket purchase. Requests for sign language interpreting, real-time captioning, Braille programs, and other reasonable accommodations should be made with at least two weeks notice. Mondavi Center may not be able to accommodate special needs brought to our attention at the performance. Seating spaces for wheelchair users and their companions are located at all levels and prices for all performances. Ushers are available at the doors to Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Please explain to the usher how best to assist you, if needed. Special Seating Mondavi Center offers special seating arrangements for our patrons with disabilities. Please call the Ticket Office at 530.754.2787 [TDD 530.754.5402]. Listening Enhancement Devices Listening Infrared Systems are installed in both Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Receivers that can be used with or without hearing aids are available for patrons who have difficulty understanding dialogue or song lyrics. They may be checked out at no charge from the Patron Services Desk near the lobby elevators. Elevators Mondavi Center has two passenger elevators serving all levels. They are located at the north end of the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby, near the restrooms and Patron Services Desk. Restrooms All public restrooms are equipped with accessible sinks, stalls, baby-changing stations, and amenities. There are six public restrooms in the building: two on the Orchestra level; two on the Orchestra Terrace level; and two on the Grand Tier level. Service Animals Mondavi Center welcomes working service animals that are necessary to assist patrons with disabilities. Service animals must remain on a leash or harness at all times. Please contact the Mondavi Center Ticket Office if you intend to bring a service animal to an event so that appropriate seating can be reserved for you.


Mondavi Center 09-10: Playbill 11