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Mondavi Center

PROGRAM 3

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Elvis Costello, Solo

Lionel Loueke Trio

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

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Alexander String Quartet

Diavolo

Baaba Maal

Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra

Issue 10 Apr 2010


Before the show

Photo: Lynn Goldsmith

Before the Curtain Rises, Please Play Your Part

• As a courtesy to others, please turn off all cellular phones, beepers, and digital watches.

a message from Don Roth, Ph.D. Executive Director Mondavi Center

• If you have any hard candy, please unwrap it before the lights dim.

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or this, our next-to-last playbill of the For the Director’s Choice series, I’m pleased 09-10 Season, I’d like to glance a bit to present an eclectic mix of performers into the future, namely the Ninth Season of that range from the Weimar cabaret of Max the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for Raabe to the smart rock and roll of Stew and the Performing Arts, UC Davis. Both classic the rock-inspired work of Kronos Quartet. and contemporary, the 10-11 Season is filled Some of these performers may be unknown with well-established stars and artists just to you, but I believe they are among the coming on the horizon, bringing the best most interesting artists working today. from the U.S. and the entire globe. There is much more on the schedule than I can posThe Mondavi Center also continues its sibly capture here, but here are a few themes strong commitment to modern dance by that I think are keystones to the spirit of the bringing you three extraordinary programs forthcoming season. by three living legends I remain very careful about of choreography: Paul As many of you know, Taylor, Mark Morris, applying the term virtuoso, I remain very careful and Lucinda Childs. about applying the term but I encourage you to take Childs’ seminal 1979 virtuoso, but I encourwork, DANCE, includa quick look at some of the age you to take a quick ing music by Philip look at some of the tal- talent we’ve assembled for Glass, large-scale video ent we’ve assembled for projections by Sol this season... this season and reach Lewitt, and Childs’ dazyour own conclusions: zling choreography, beautifully (and at times literally) embodies the genre crossing and • An all-star genre-crossing super trio: virtuosic spirit of the 10-11 Mondavi Center Zakir Hussain, Béla Fleck, and Season. Edgar Meyer • Pianist Yefim Bronfman, who You can view the complete brochure at Esa-Pekka Salonen says “can play better MondaviArts.org/brochure. You can also than most other people on the planet” pick up a copy in the Rumsey Rancheria • Jazz guitar gods Bill Frisell and Grand Lobby during any one of our April John Scofield shows—we’ll have staff on hand to help you • Violinist Robert McDuffie, the with your order, should you need it. I do inspiration for Philip Glass’s new hope you will decide to take a journey of American Four Seasons discovery and enjoyment with us. As always, by purchasing a series subscription or Each musician above is a true master of his choose-your-own plan, you’ll secure the best instrument—and that’s only a short list of seats at the very best price. the many Mondavi Center artists that could easily make the cut. Of course, you can still enjoy a Mondavi Center experience in early April—and it’s a Our two Crossings series explore the fertile couple of weeks not to miss: Elvis Costello artistic intersection of genres and cultures. making his first appearance at the Mondavi On the cultural side, we have Yo-Yo Ma and Center; the Alexander String Quartet closthe Silk Road Ensemble, one of the finest ing out their performance year; the thrilling examples of cross-cultural artistry I know of. dance acrobatics of Diavolo; Baaba Maal’s We last hosted Ma in a solo recital two seaAfrican-inflected pop; and the Saint Louis sons ago, and we’re thrilled that he’s chosen Symphony playing John Adams’ Doctor to return to the Mondavi Center so quickly. Atomic Symphony. Be sure to join us, and get He’s joined in the series by the Hussain, your pencils sharp to make your schedule Fleck and Meyer super-group listed above, for next year! and Hungarian gypsy violinist Roby Lakatos. In our Studio Theatre, we mix genres, digging into the space between classical and rock music. Pianist Christopher O’Riley will play songs from Radiohead and Elliot Smith, while pianist Simone Dinnerstein and singer/songwriter Tift Merritt explore classic folk-rock, and our own Lara Downes will pay tribute to the great Duke Ellington.

• Please remember that the taking of photographs or the use of any type of audio or video recording equipment is strictly prohibited. • Please look around and locate the exit nearest you. That exit may be behind you, to the side, or in front of you. In the unlikely event of a fire alarm or other emergency please leave the building through that exit. • As a courtesy to all our patrons and for your safety, anyone leaving his or her seat during the performance may not be re-admitted to his/her ticketed seat while the performance is in progress.

info

Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities 530.754.2787 • TDD: 530.754.5402 In the event of an emergency, patrons requiring physical assistance on the Orchestra Terrace, Grand Tier, and Upper Tier levels please proceed to the elevator alcove refuge where this sign appears. Please let us know ahead of time for any special seating requests or accommodations. See p. 52 for more information.

Membership 530.754.5436 Member contributions to the Mondavi Center presenting program help to offset the costs of the annual season of performances and lectures, and provide a variety of arts education and outreach programs to the community. Friends of Mondavi Center 530.754.5000 Contributors to the Mondavi Center are eligible to join the Friends of Mondavi Center, a volunteer support group that assists with educational programs and audience development. Volunteers 530.754.1000 Mondavi Center volunteers assist with numerous functions, including house ushering and the activities of the Friends of Mondavi Center and the Arts and Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee.

Tours 530.754.5399 One-hour guided tours of the Mondavi Center’s Jackson Hall, Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, and Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby are given regularly by the Friends of Mondavi Center. Reservations are required.

Lost and Found Hotline 530.752.8580 Don Roth Executive Director Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

Recycle We reuse our playbills! Thank you for returning your recycled playbill in the bin located by the main exit on your way out.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Photo by James O’Mara

Debut

Elvis Costello, Solo A “Just Added” Event Wednesday, April 7, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

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lvis Costello has followed his musical curiosity in a career spanning more than 30 years. He is perhaps best known for his performances with the Attractions, the Imposters, and for concert appearances with pianist Steve Nieve. However, he has also entered into acclaimed collaborations with Burt Bacharach, the Brodsky Quartet, Paul McCartney, Swedish mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, guitarist Bill Frisell, composer Roy Nathanson, the Charles Mingus Orchestra, record producer and songwriter T Bone Burnett, and Allen Toussaint. Costello’s songs have been recorded by a great number of artists. The list of performers reflects his interest in a wide range of musical styles: George Jones, Chet Baker, Johnny Cash, Roy

further listening see p. 4

Orbison, Dusty Springfield, Robert Wyatt, Charles Brown, No Doubt, Solomon Burke, June Tabor, Howard Tate, the gospel vocal group the Fairfield Four, and the viol consort Fretwork with the countertenor Michael Chance. In 2003, he began a songwriting partnership with his wife, the jazz pianist and singer Diana Krall, resulting in six songs included in her highly successful album The Girl in the Other Room. During his career Costello has received several prestigious honors, including two Ivor Novello Awards for songwriting, a Dutch Edison Award with the Brodsky Quartet for The Juliet Letters, the Nordoff-Robbins Silver Clef Award, a BAFTA for the music written with Richard Harvey for Alan Bleasdale’s television drama series

The artist and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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elvis costello

Now On Display

in our

lobby

C.N. Gorman Museum The Mondavi Center display will preview pieces from: Niu Pasifik: Urban Art from the Pacific Rim Through June 13, 2010

artworks by more than 40 artists from Aotearoa (New Zealand), the Cook Islands, Samoa, Tonga, Niue, Hawaii, Papua New Guinea, and Australia. The exhibition features multi-media work including graph art, painting, drawing, animation, hip-hop music video, sculpture, photography, tattoo, installation, embroidery/textile, and street fashion.

At the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, we are deeply interested in the visual arts and the ways in which painting, photography, and other forms may enhance the experience of the performing artists we present. Located at the north end of the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby just behind the Ticket Office, the art display case is a collaboration among the Mondavi Center, the Design Museum, the C. N. Gorman Museum, and the Richard L. Nelson Gallery & Fine Arts Collection.

further listening

by jeff hudson Most people become nostalgic for the music that was popular when they were in their early 20s. But I have curiously little appetite for much of the music that was popular in the 1970s, when I transitioned through college into a career. So many albums from those years—ponderous prog rock opuses, thumping mechanical disco hits, and several Elton John chartbusters that I suspect even Sir Elton himself would now rather forget— have not held up very well. Several “new wave” singer/songwriters also made interesting albums around the same time, but most of them never really caught on. Punk bands made a splash in the late 1970s, and the angry, jarring music was initially invigorating...but most of those groups were “flashes in the pan.” The Sex Pistols came (and went) in about two years, and there aren’t a lot of people nowadays humming tunes by the likes the British band 999’s “Homicide.” When Elvis Costello came on the scene in 1977, people initially pegged him as somewhere between “angry, skinny punk” and “new wave”—probably closer to the latter. But even at the outset, it was apparent that the guy had brains and a pretty well educated background to go with his attitude. His early albums—My Aim Is True, This Year’s Model, Armed Forces, Get Happy—had a good run on the charts. By the time that critically acclaimed (if less commercially successful) albums like Imperial Bedroom (1982) and Blood and Chocolate (1986) came along, Costello was widely perceived as a major songwriter. He earned the respect of two exceedingly well established songwriters, sharing credits on several tracks with Paul McCartney on McCartney’s 1989 album Flowers In The Dirt, and teaming in 1998 on Painted From Memory with Burt Bacharach (who wrote the tune “Magic Moments” for Perry Como in the 1950s, and the tune “Do You Know The Way to San Jose?” for Dionne Warwick in the 1960s). Starting in the 1980s, Costello evidenced an interest in numerous musical styles. Almost Blue (1981) featured cover versions of old school country standards like “Why Don’t You Love Me (Like You Used To Do)” (written by Hank Williams in 1950). On The Juliet Letters (1993), Costello partnered with the Brodsky String Quartet on Romeo and Juliet material. More recently, Costello wrote a score for Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra under Michael Tilson Thomas (Il Sogno, 2005), and teamed up on a handsome pop album with classical mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter (For the Stars, 2001). And he sang on Welcome to the Voice, a 2007 Deutsche Grammophon recording of a modern opera by Steve Nieve (formerly a student at the Royal College of Music, Nieve joined Costello’s backup band the Attractions in 1977). Costello also did a post-Katrina album with veteran New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint (The River in Reverse, 2006), and released an album in 2005 with jazz pianist Marian McPartland (drawn from McPartland’s public radio series Piano Jazz, heard ocally on Capital Public Radio). And Costello continues to put out albums on his own—some of which, like When I Was Cruel (2007) and Momofuku (2008), harken back to the mercurial, intense sound that initially put him on the map back in the 1970s. His most recent disk—Secret, Profane and Sugarcane—features Costello with a string band in Nashville under producer T Bone Burnett. And you know what? Somehow, whatever the genre, Costello remains himself, yet manages to connect with the musicians that he’s working with in a meaningful way. When you see his name on an album, it’s a pretty good indication that you’ll hear something that’s thoughtful, honest, and interesting.

Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

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Elvis Costello and the Attractions were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003. During the same year he was awarded ASCAP’s prestigious Founder’s Award. There have also been a number of Grammy nominations for his recent albums When I Was Cruel and The Delivery Man. The late-2003 Deutsche Grammophon release North—an album of piano ballads composed, orchestrated, and conducted by Costello—retained the number one position on the Billboard Traditional Jazz Chart for five weeks. In 2004, Costello was nominated for an Oscar for Best Song—“The Scarlet Tide,” sung by Alison Krauss in the motion picture Cold Mountain. The song was co-written with T Bone Burnett. The summer of 2004 saw Costello presenting a series of concerts as part of the Lincoln Center Festival in New York City. Following concerts with the Metropole Orkest and the Imposters, the Brooklyn Philharmonic, conducted by Brad Lubman, gave the premiere concert performance of Il Sogno, Costello’s first full-length orchestral work. The music was commissioned in 2000 by the Italian dance company Aterballetto, for its adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Following performances in Bologna with the Orchestra del Teatro Communale, the ballet was staged throughout Italy, Germany, France, and Russia. Il Sogno was subsequently recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Michael Tilson-Thomas. The recording was released in 2004 by Deutsche Grammophon and stayed at the top of Billboard’s Contemporary Classical Charts for 14 weeks. Elvis Costello was commissioned by the Royal Danish Opera to compose an opera based on the life of Hans Christian Andersen. The Secret Songs, a “work-in-progress” cycle extracted from the opera, was given its first performance in Copenhagen in October 2005 to an appreciative audience and enthusiastic reviews. Costello sang both of the leading male roles, Andersen and that of the showman P.T. Barnum, while the leading female role of Jenny Lind was taken by Swedish soprano Gisela Stille. In 2006, Elvis Costello was a featured artist at the Sydney Festival in Australia, presenting a series of contrasting concerts. The first reunited Costello with the Brodsky Quartet for excerpts from The Juliet Letters, while in the second half, Steve Nieve, double-bassist Greg Cohen, and soprano Antoinette Halloran joined Costello and the Brodsky Quartet for several newly arranged excerpts from The Secret Songs. Costello and Nieve then gave a second concert, in which they drew on some of Costello’s rarely performed compositions. The festival appearances concluded with two concerts with the Sydney Symphony conducted by Alan Broadbent at the Opera House. The program consisted of a suite from Il Sogno, followed by a number of Costello’s songs arranged for orchestra by Costello, Sy Johnson, Bill Frisell, Vince Mendoza, and Steve Nieve. The program also included compositions by Charles Mingus and Billy Strayhorn with Costello’s lyrics, and songs written by Costello and Burt Bacharach for the album Painted from Memory.

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elvis costello, solo

G.B.H., and a Grammy for “I Still Have That Other Girl” from his 1998 collaboration with Burt Bacharach, Painted From Memory.

Many of these compositions are also featured on My Flame Burns Blue, the live recording of Costello’s performance with the Metropole Orkest at the 2004 North Sea Jazz Festival that was released in 2006 by Deutsche Grammophon coupled with the suite of Il Sogno highlights. Later that spring, Costello, Nieve, and conductor Alan Broadbent presented a program similar to their Australian tour throughout the U.S., including appearances with the San Francisco, Chicago, Houston, Austin, and Baltimore symphony orchestras. Costello toured extensively with the Imposters and also with Allen Toussaint throughout the U.S. and Europe in 2007. In autumn 2007, he undertook a highly successful tour, performing solo on The Bob Dylan Show. In late 2007, Costello completed his work on a commission from the Miami City Ballet when he collaborated with world famous choreographer Twyla Tharp. The work, entitled NIGHTSPOT, was premiered in Miami to great critical acclaim in 2008. A new album with the Imposters entitled Momofuku had already been recorded in secrecy in a period of just seven days and was released on April 22, 2008. In December 2008, Costello launched the inaugural season of his internationally acclaimed music television series Spectacle: Elvis Costello with…, a compelling blend of the best of talk and music television that offers a fly-on-the-wall perspective on the creative process with an extraordinary and eclectic array of guests joining host Elvis Costello to chat, perform, and share their passion for all kinds of music. The program’s eclecticism and depth reflect its uniquely qualified host, a songwriter and performer comfortable in almost every genre imaginable; a musicologist of formidable breadth and knowledge; a contributor to Vanity Fair; and a noted wit whose stint as guest host on The Late Show with David Letterman won rave reviews. The first season’s guests included Sir Elton John, Tony Bennett, Lou Reed, Julian Schnabel, Smokey Robinson, the Police (Sting, Stewart Copeland, and Andy Summers), James Taylor, Herbie Hancock, Rufus Wainwright, Rosanne Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Diana Krall, John Mellencamp, Jakob Dylan, She & Him (Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward), Norah Jones, Jenny Lewis, Renée Fleming, and President Bill Clinton. The second season of Spectacle began airing in late 2009 and features guests including Bono & The Edge, Neko Case, Sheryl Crow, Levon Helm, Ray Lamontagne, Lyle Lovett, Nick Lowe, John Prine, Ron Sexsmith, Bruce Springsteen, Richard Thompson, Allen Toussaint, and Jesse Winchester. In 2009, Hear Music released Costello’s Secret, Profane & Sugarcane. Produced by T Bone Burnett and recorded by Mike Piersante during a three-day session at Nashville’s Sound Emporium Studio, Secret, Profane & Sugarcane debuted at #13 on the Billboard 200, Costello’s highest album chart position since Get Happy in 1980. Following its release, Costello toured extensively with the featured musicians on the album, dubbed the Sugarcanes—Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Mike Compton, Jeff Taylor, and Dennis Crouch.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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If you can give a c an

In the spirit of giving back, we at the Mondavi Center encourage all audience members to contribute canned and non-perishable food items to help support the Sacramento Food Bank and Family Services, Solano/ Contra Costa County Food Bank, and Yolo County Food Bank. Collections will take place before every Mondavi Center performance in specially marked barrels situated in the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby. The proceeds will be split equally between the three regional food banks. For a complete list of suggested food items, visit MondaviArts.org.

The art of giving back

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Photo by Jimmy Katz

Debut

Lionel Loueke Trio A 90.9 KXJZ Studio Jazz Series Event Wednesday-Saturday, April 7-10, 2010 • 8PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be no intermission.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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Lionel Loueke Trio

Lionel Loueke Originally from the small West African nation of Benin, guitarist Lionel Loueke has enjoyed a meteoric rise over the past several years. In 2008 and 2009, he was picked as top Rising Star guitarist in DownBeat magazine’s annual Critics Poll, and was also awarded a 2009 USA Fellowship for the caliber and impact of his work. His sophomore release for Blue Note, Mwaliko, follows up the acclaimed Karibu (2007) with a series of searching, innovative, intimate duets with Angelique Kidjo, Esperanza Spalding, Richard Bona, and Marcus Gilmore. Loueke also includes three new tracks featuring his longtime trio with Massimo Biolcati on bass and Ferenc Nemeth on drums. Praised by his mentor Herbie Hancock as “a musical painter,” Loueke combines harmonic sophistication, soaring melody, a deep knowledge of African music, and conventional and extended guitar techniques to create a warm and evocative sound of his own. JazzTimes wrote “Loueke’s lines are smartly formed and deftly executed. His ear-friendly melodicism draws both from traditional African sources and a lifetime of closely studying the likes of Jim Hall and George Benson, and his rhythmic shifts come quickly and packed with surprises.” Karibu, featuring the trio with Hancock and Wayne Shorter as special guests, won widespread critical praise. Time called the album “a jamboree of sprung rhythms, splashed with African and Brazilian flavors, in which Loueke scat-sings, drums on his guitar, mouthclicks and plays some wicked jazz.” The New York Times declared Loueke “a startlingly original voice…a spellbinding presence…one of the most striking jazz artists to emerge in some time.” In addition to Loueke’s recordings as a leader and with his collaborative trio project Gilfema, Loueke has appeared on numerous standout recordings such as Terence Blanchard’s Grammynominated Flow (2005) and Hancock’s Grammy-winning River: The Joni Letters (2008). He has also toured the world as a member of Hancock’s band and appeared on recordings by such fellow rising stars as trumpeter Avishai Cohen, drummers Francisco Mela and Kendrick Scott, vocalist Gretchen Parlato, and more. These experiences all inform Loueke’s extraordinary work as a leader. Mwaliko (pronounced mwah-LEE-koh) is Swahili for “invitation,” and as Loueke explains, “you can see the title two ways. One is I’m inviting my friends and fellow musicians to make these duo recordings, and the other is an invitation to all listeners to enjoy the music. What I wanted to do was more of a duo recording with different people, but I also needed the sound of the trio, because those guys are really at the center of my music.” Mwaliko is also buoyed by Loueke’s inspired mix of acoustic and electric sound: vocals with layered harmonizer effects, nylon-string guitar with Whammy pedal to create an organ-like sound during solos, and a new custom-made Rolf Spuller guitar that enables him to access low bass tones, filling out the spectrum of sound even in sparse duo contexts. Having appeared on vocalist Angelique Kidjo’s album Djin Djin, Lionel wanted to reciprocate and feature his good friend and fellow Benin native on a pair of African songs dear to both their hearts. “We’re from the same place and we’ve known each other for so long,” Lionel says of Kidjo. “She’s got a great sense of rhythm and an incredible voice. It came out in the most natural way, no overdubs or anything like that. We both grew up listening to ‘Amio’; it’s a standard in Africa, from Cameroon. And ‘Vi Ma Yon’ is a traditional song from Benin, nobody knows who wrote it. It’s a song 8

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about how important it is to have kids, that basically if you have a lot of kids, you’re rich—which I don’t agree with today!” Much like Loueke, Richard Bona came from Africa (Cameroon) to take the jazz world by storm, turning heads with his virtuosity on electric bass and vocals. “I’ve known Richard for a while now,” says Loueke, “and he’s definitely one of the greatest musicians on the continent. The collaboration worked well because we had a few duo gigs before, and the gigs were great. I wanted to capture those moments.” Bona’s lilting, angelic voice is immediately identifiable on “Wishes,” which Loueke wrote with his friend very much in mind. “‘Wishes’ has a classical element,” Loueke adds. “Classical music is a big influence for me, and this really shows it, but, of course, I’m not a classical player, so I wanted to feature Richard’s voice on some of the parts. And I love the way he plays fretless bass.” About “Hide Life,” the second duet with Bona, which closes the album, Loueke muses: “It’s a song that says sometimes it’s better to fight with a smile. It’s a happy song. Sometimes you also have to hide yourself to be happy.” Another fine bassist/vocalist, Esperanza Spalding, joins Loueke for two tracks as well. “I also played a few gigs with her before, but never duo,” Loueke says. “I wanted to do this because she has such a strong personality and she’s one of the new voices of today.” Spalding puts her stamp on Loueke’s “Twins,” which appeared in a more orchestrated form on the album Gilfema + 2. Reworking the rich clarinet voicings of the earlier version, Loueke and Spalding create a vocal tapestry that’s sparse and yet somehow overflowing, full of color and spirit. “We’re both singing and playing at the same time, so with Esperanza too there are no overdubs. She’ll sing a line and play a different bass line, which is very hard to do. It came out exactly the way I was hearing. ‘Flying,’ too, is a new song that I definitely wanted to do with her, with those high notes and that groove.” With young drumming sensation Marcus Gilmore, Loueke turned his attention to Wayne Shorter’s “Nefertiti.” Gilmore, the grandson of the legendary Roy Haynes, is a member of bands led by Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Vijay Iyer, and is steadily making his way as a leader. “I’ve seen Marcus play and I just loved the sound and feel he got from the instrument. Suddenly he’s everywhere, for a reason— such a strong maturity at such a young age. The first time I played with him was in the studio, on this track, ‘Nefertiti,’ which was a first take. When we finished I said, ‘Ok, that’s it, go home.’ There’s nothing else to do when it’s right!” The three trio tracks on Mwaliko teem with “capricious harmonic movement and serpentine grooves,” as New York Times critic Nate Chinen described a recent trio performance, adding that theirs is “music of engrossing intimacy and ambition.” Loueke’s “Griot” highlights his richly harmonized vocals and slides easily between the rhythmic vernaculars of Afro-pop, Brazilian jazz, and driving swing. Loueke also makes a point of including original pieces by his band mates. Biolcati’s upbeat “Shazoo” builds on the promising compositional voice showcased by the bassist on his leader debut Persona (featuring Loueke, naturally). Nemeth’s “L.L.,” written specifically for Loueke, first appeared on the drummer’s leader debut Night Songs (also featuring Loueke). Here, Loueke recasts the introduction with a subtle octave-bass effect enabled—a sound heard in many spots on Mwaliko.


After graduating from Berklee, Loueke was accepted to the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz in Los Angeles—along with Biolcati and Nemeth—where he had the opportunity to study his greatest mentors: Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and Terence Blanchard. “I flipped,” says Hancock, recalling the moment he first heard Loueke’s audition tape. “I’d never heard any guitar player play anything close to what I was hearing from him. There was no territory that was forbidden, and he was fearless!” Soon after his time at the Monk Institute, Loueke began focusing exclusively on nylon-string acoustic guitar, an instrument on which he’s developed a signature voice. “I feel more connected to the warmth of the nylon-string sound, even if the sound is not completely acoustic,” he says. Indeed, as Loueke’s sound grows more uniquely involved, not purely acoustic, it still retains those qualities of immediacy, tenderness, and passion that have made Loueke an influential force on the world stage, in jazz and beyond. Massimo Biolcati, bass For several years bassist Massimo Biolcati has provided strong support for a variety of acclaimed jazz artists, including Terence Blanchard, Lizz Wright, Ravi Coltrane, Paquito D’Rivera, and Lionel Loueke. With the release of Persona on ObliqSound in 2008, his debut recording as a leader, Biolcati is finally taking a giant stride into the spotlight in his own right. “I’d been composing my own songs for years and always dreamed of having the chance to record with a dream band,” says Biolcati in explanation of his decision to finally pursue a solo career. “When (ObliqSound cofounder and album producer) Michele Locatelli first approached me to suggest that I record a project featuring my original material, I put a lot of pressure on myself to assemble just the right repertoire and players, which doesn’t always lead to an uninhibited flow of musical inspiration. I’m really pleased that it finally came together just as I’d envisioned it for so many years.” Born in 1972 in Stockholm, Sweden, Massimo Biolcati began his musical career at age 16, performing jazz on acoustic bass in Torino, Italy. When he was 21, he returned to Sweden to study at the Royal Music Academy of Stockholm and soon became a presence both on the local jazz scene and as part of several Scandinavian folk music groups. His early influences range from symphonic rock to Pat Metheny and Dave Holland, all of which have contributed to his strikingly original blend of extended compositions, unusual time signatures, and a lyrical, melodic style. “Growing up in both Italy and Sweden and speaking two languages probably most significantly influenced my own musical development, because I had such a vast, exciting playground to explore. It stoked my early curiosity about different music from different places,” says Biolcati. “In jazz and improvised music, I have found the

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Lionel Loueke Trio

After his initial to exposure to jazz in Benin, Loueke left to attend the National Institute of Art in nearby Ivory Coast. In 1994, he left Africa to pursue jazz studies at the American School of Modern Music in Paris, then came to the U.S. on a scholarship to Berklee College of Music. It was at Berklee that he first met Biolcati and Nemeth. Through jam sessions, the trio developed an immediate rapport, in part fueled by internationalism. Biolcati is of Italian descent, but grew up in Sweden, while Nemeth was born and raised in Hungary. Both had extensively studied African music and were drawn to Loueke who was just beginning to fuse a jazz technique with his African roots.

perfect medium to pour all the things I assimilate in my ongoing journey of discovery.” While still in his early 20s, Biolcati received a scholarship to study at Boston’s Berklee College of Music and was subsequently selected for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz at the University of Southern California, where he studied and performed with jazz greats such as Herbie Hancock, Dave Holland, Wayne Shorter, Kenny Barron, John Scofield, Christian McBride, and many others. Upon relocating to New York City, he quickly immersed himself in the music scene, playing with his peers and with more established artists. In 2003, he toured with trumpeter Terence Blanchard. “Playing with Terence taught me so much about musical interaction between performers on stage,” remembers Biolcati. “Performing his compositions also helped me improve my own compositional skills.” Throughout 2005 and 2006, Biolcati toured with Verve recording artist Lizz Wright. In the years leading up to the 2008 release of Persona, he also played frequently with saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and with the legendary Cuban musician and composer Paquito D’Rivera, who, says Biolcati, “is a great inspiration, not only challenging me to learn more about Latin music, but about classical music as it intersects with jazz.” Persona’s players include Loueke (on guitar and vocals), along with Peter Rende on piano, accordion, and vocals, and Jeff Ballard on drums. Singers Lizz Wright and Gretchen Parlato each contribute a vocal track. Biolcati is certain to make his own name more widely known with the release of his striking and complex debut. He has also recorded with Michael Buble and Gretchen Parlato, as well as with the trio Gilfema, which he formed with Lionel Loueke and drummer Ferenc Nemeth and which released its self-titled debut on ObliqSound in 2005. Biolcati has been collaborating with Loueke since the two attended the Berklee School of Music and the Thelonious Monk Institute; the acclaimed West African guitarist tapped Biolcati for his own recent ObliqSound recording, Virgin Forest. Biolcati is featured on “Kponnon Kpete,” the track that won a 2008 Independent Music Award for Best Song, World Traditional. Ferenc Nemeth, drums Ferenc Nemeth was born in Keszthely, Hungary. He started to play the drums when he was three years old. His father gave him his first drum lessons. At age 14, he moved out of the family house and went to the Richter János Conservatory in Gyõr, to study classical percussion. When he was 18, he moved to Budapest and started to play different styles of music. He attended the Franz Liszt Academy of Music. Soon Ferenc became one of the busiest jazz drummers in Hungary. After the Academy, he got a scholarship to Berklee College of Music and moved to Boston, where he lived for three years. He also attended the New England Conservatory for one year as a graduate student. In 2001, he was accepted in the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz program. He currently lives in New York. He has performed and/or recorded with a variety of artists such as Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Christian McBride, John Patitucci, Terence Blanchard, John Abercrombie, Phil Wilson, Billy Childs, Reggie Hamilton, John Clayton, Jimmy Heath, Dave Grusin, Bob Sheppard, Steve Turre, Eddie Daniels, Eddie Henderson, Ron McClure, Kenny Wheeler, Eli Degibri, and the Henry Mancini Orchestra.

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

MC

Debut

Photo by Lois Greenfield

A Dance Series Event Friday, April 9, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be two intermissions. Pre-performance Letcure: Jean-Philippe Malaty, Executive Director, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet Moderator: Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center • 7PM Post-performance Q&A Moderator: Ruth Rosenberg, Dance Consultant, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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Founder: Bebe Schweppe Artistic Director: Tom Mossbrucker Executive Director: Jean-Philippe Malaty Artists: Katherine Bolaños, William Cannon, Sam Chittenden, Katie Dehler, Seth DelGrasso, Samantha Klanac, Nolan DeMarco McGahan, Emily Proctor, Seia Rassenti, Joseph Watson Production Stage Manager: Steve Myers Lighting Supervisor: Jonathan Harper

Program Red Sweet ASFB Commissioned Work Choreography: Jorma Elo Music: Vivaldi, Biber Lighting Design: Jordan Tuinman Costume Design: Nete Joseph Katherine Bolaños, William Cannon, Sam Chittenden, Katie Dehler, Seth DelGrasso, Samantha Klanac, Nolan DeMarco McGahan, Emily Proctor Premiere: July 12, 2008, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Santa Fe, NM Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s production of Red Sweet is made possible through the generosity of Melinda and Norman Payson. Intermission

Sue’s Leg Choreography: Twyla Tharp Music: Songs by Thomas “Fats” Waller Lighting Design: Jennifer Tipton Costume Design: Santo Loquasto Staged By: Ron de Jesus Costume Construction: Nete Joseph Seth DelGrasso, Samantha Klanac, Nolan DeMarco McGahan, Emily Proctor Premiere: February 21, 1975, Twyla Tharp Dance Foundation

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s production of Sue’s Leg is made possible through the generosity of Sherry and Eddie Wachs and by the National Endowment for the Arts’ American Masterpieces: Dance initiative administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts. The performance of Sue’s Leg, a Tharp™ Ballet, is presented under license with W.A.T., Limited, and has been produced in accordance with Tharp™ Standard services. Sweet Fields, Choreography by Twyla Tharp, c19/20 [1992] Twyla Tharp.

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Slingerland Choreography: William Forsythe Music: Gavin Bryars* Lighting Design: William Forsythe Costume Design: William Forsythe Costume Construction: Nete Joseph Staged By: Jodie Gates Katherine Bolaños & Sam Chittenden Premiere: April 15, 2000, Ballet Frankfurt, Frankfurt *Gavin Bryars STRING QUARTET NO. 1 “Between the National and the Bristol” Used by arrangement with European American Music Distributors LLC, sole U.S. and Canadian agent for Schott Music Ltd., publisher and copyright owner. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s production of Slingerland is made possible through the generosity of Sherry and Eddie Wachs. Intermission

Noir Blanc ASFB commissioned work Conceived and Directed by: Moses Pendleton Assisted by: Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Nutmeg Ballet, and MOMIX Music: Musical Collage Lighting Design: Todd Elmer Costume Conception: Moses Pendleton Costume Design: Phoebe Katzin Katherine Bolaños, William Cannon, Sam Chittenden, Katie Dehler, Seth DelGrasso, Samantha Klanac, Nolan DeMarco McGahan, Emily Proctor, Seia Rassenti, Joseph Watson Premiere: May 4, 2002, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Park City, UT Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s production of Noir Blanc is made possible through the generosity of Nancy and Robert Magoon.

Representation: Margaret Selby Columbia Artists Management, Inc. 1790 Broadway, 16th Floor New York, NY 10019-1412 Ph: 212.841.9554 mselby@cami.com

Official Airline of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

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The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet company is founded on the idea of acquiring repertoire and inviting top choreographers in the field to create works for the company. With its sophisticated repertoire and broad appeal, combined with a successful blend of entertaining and engrossing contemporary dance, ASFB is one of the real success stories in American dance today. Audiences locally, nationally, and internationally have embraced this vibrant company on stellar stages from the Joyce Theatre in New York to the famed Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, from the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. to New York City Center’s Fall for Dance Festival and in foreign venues including Canada, France, and Italy. Over the years, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet has grown to become a multi-faceted entity, both as an internationally recognized dance company and as one of the largest dance presenters in the country. As the company travels to cities far and wide, at home in Aspen and Santa Fe, it presents top-level dance companies throughout the year. ASFB’s umbrella extends equally to its capacity as a center for learning, with a thriving dance school and a much-celebrated Mexican folkloric-dance outreach program for area children. ASFB appeals, with its adventurous repertoire and beautiful western landscapes, as a gathering place for the finest dancers and choreographers in the world. Never forgetting its deep roots in the creative and historic wealth of these majestic and awe-inspiring communities, the organization remains deeply committed to expanding and enriching the world of dance. With its fusion of classical good sense and western ingenuity, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet blends the best of both worlds to create a dance company that is truly unique. Bios Bebe Schweppe, Founder, grew up in Augusta, Georgia, and started dancing at the Georgia Dance Theatre, under Frankie Levy, at the age of seven. She was invited by Robert Joffrey to study at his school in New York on a full scholarship at age 11. Bebe moved to Aspen in 1975 and 15 years later, she founded the Aspen Ballet School. Her presence was a catalyst in the region. In 1996, she invited Jean-Philippe Malaty and Tom Mossbrucker to develop a small professional company in Aspen. Through their combined energies, the Aspen Ballet Company was born a year later. Shortly after, new performing opportunities beckoned in Santa Fe, upon which the company was renamed Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. Bebe speaks with pride when she considers the changes that have occurred over the last years to her “baby.” “The company has evolved to having earned a name of its own—ASFB. What a treat! It is recognized by other artists and respected by all. This is of course due in large part to Jean-Philippe and Tom.” She says that “their strength has been in their unique ability to perceive and design a repertoire that entertains all parts, whether it’s the audience or the dancer.” Tom and Jean-Philippe have “greatly succeeded” in realizing her dreams for the company, she says. “I am thankPrinted on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

aspen santa fe ballet

History Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s founder, Bebe Schweppe, was visionary when she made the decision in 1996 to create a company that residents in the Aspen Valley could call their own. Initially based solely in Aspen, Colorado, a second home for the company was created, in 2000, in another of the Southwest heartlands, Santa Fe, New Mexico. In both cities ASFB has helped strengthen the cultural fabric of the region, in synch with the world-class artistic activities in each of these beautiful communities.

ful that I had the dream and was lucky and persistent enough to convince JP and Tom to relocate from New York City. Never did I imagine that one day the company would be performing nationally and internationally, and never did I imagine that one day they would be performing works by internationally famous choreographers. Although I had the dream, I never imagined so much. I feel very lucky.” Jean-Philippe Malaty, Executive Director, has been instrumental in building Aspen Santa Fe Ballet from the ground up. He was born in the Basque region of France, and he recently became a United States citizen. After receiving his degree in dance, he accepted scholarships to train at Europe’s prestigious Mudra (Maurice Béjart’s school in Brussels) and John Cranko’s ballet school in Stuttgart. At the invitation of David Howard, JeanPhilippe traveled to America to study at the David Howard Dance Center in New York City. He then performed soloist roles as guest artist with various companies throughout the U.S., including Joffrey II, Los Angeles Classical Ballet, Ballet Hispanico of New York, and the Lyric Opera of Chicago. He is in great demand as a guest teacher and has taught at schools and universities throughout the country. Jean-Philippe is dedicated to asserting the prominence of the arts in the West, spearheading initiatives to bring dance into the community, and fostering programs that introduce children to the arts. He continues to provide invaluable creative assistance in all facets of the company’s operations. Jean-Philippe is equally proud to have forged a company based on an American ideal of energy, invention, popularity, eclecticism, and precision in what’s been called the “all star, no star” system. “Dance is a celebration of the human spirit, and not a celebration of steps. Here at Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, we foster the spirit and the love of dance.” —Jean-Philippe Malaty Tom Mossbrucker, Artistic Director, began his dance training at age four studying tap in his hometown of Tacoma, Washington. He studied ballet in New York City at the School of American Ballet and the Joffrey Ballet School. He began his career dancing with Joffrey II before joining the main company, the Joffrey Ballet, where he performed as principal dancer to great acclaim in more than 70 ballets. He danced ballets by some of the world’s greatest choreographers, including Twyla Tharp, William Forsythe, Jiří Kylián, John Cranko, Fredrick Ashton, Agnes de Mille, Jose Limon, Paul Taylor, and George Balanchine, and he was lauded for his work in Moor’s Pavane, in which he played Iago, and Billboards, a full-length rock ballet set to music by Prince. He also danced with the Atlanta Ballet and Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. Tom serves on the Board of Dance USA. Following in the tradition of Robert Joffrey, Tom is dedicated to presenting an eclectic repertoire and committed to acquiring new works that persistently challenge, enliven, and educate both audiences and the company dancers. Building relationships with choreographers has become a hallmark of the company. “We strive for continuity and enjoy bringing choreographers back to create second and third works…To us that is success,” Tom says. Dancer Bios Katherine Bolaños grew up in Oklahoma City and began studying dance at the school of Ballet Oklahoma under Bryan Pitts and Laura Flagg-Pitts. At the age of 15, she joined the professional company of Ballet Oklahoma. As a guest artist with the Los Angeles Ballet Ensemble, she also toured extensively through Taiwan and China. Katherine is in her seventh season with Aspen Santa Fe Ballet.

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William Cannon is in his second season with Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. At age 11, William entered BalletMet Dance Academy in Columbus, Ohio, and in 2001, he was a scholarship student at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago’s Lou Conte Dance Studio. In 2002, he was selected as a finalist in the National Foundation for the Advancement of Arts’ ARTS Week initiative. Upon graduation from BalletMet’s Professional Training Program in 2002, he became a BalletMet company member. He has also danced with Hubbard Street 2 and Complexions. In 2005, William won a spot in Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” roster.

Seia Rassenti, originally from Arizona, danced with Flamenco y Mas as a youngster and began her ballet training with Linda Walker at Tucson Regional Ballet. In 2002, she was accepted to the Kirov Academy of Ballet in Washington, D.C. While at the Kirov she spent summers on scholarship with Jilana, Debbie Allen, Alvin Ailey, and the Miami City Ballet. Seia graduated from the Kirov and joined North Carolina Dance Theater’s second company in Charlotte. During the two most recent summers Seia trained with Alonzo King’s Lines Ballet and Dwight Rhoden’s Complexions. This is her first season with Aspen Santa Fe Ballet.

Sam Chittenden is in his 12th year with Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. A B.F.A. graduate of the University of Utah Ballet Department and Colorado State University, he enjoys the physicality of dance and the pairing of that physicality with artistic intention. He has danced with the Utah Ballet and Canyon Concert Ballet in Fort Collins, Colorado, and has also studied at the Ballet West Conservatory and Ballet Arts Minnesota.

Joseph Watson started his formal dance training at an after-school program called T.W.I.G.S. His training at T.W.I.G.S. led to his acceptance into the Baltimore School for the Arts under the tutelage of Norma Pera. Upon graduating from high school he was accepted into the Juilliard School under the direction of Lawrence Rhodes and received a B.F.A. in dance. In 2007, Joseph joined North Carolina Dance Theater, where he performed both contemporary and classical roles by choreographers such as Dwight Rhoden and George Balanchine. This is his first season with Aspen Santa Fe Ballet.

Katie Dehler was born and raised in St. Joseph, Minnesota. Katie began her ballet training at the Stroia Dance Studio. She continued her studies on scholarship with the University of Utah’s Department of Ballet, where she received her B.F.A. with a performance emphasis. She is in her 10th season with ASFB. Seth DelGrasso is a founding member of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, now beginning his 13th season with the company. The Colorado native moved to New York to study dance with David Howard, Nanette Charise, Simon Dow, Gelsey Kirkland, and Talara Ruth. Although Seth has made numerous guest appearances with Complexions and other companies, he considers “ASFB the prime influence in my career.” Samantha Klanac is in her eighth year with Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. Growing up in Orchard Park, New York, Samantha trained at the American Academy of Ballet, the Chautauqua Institute, New York State Summer School of the Arts, and School of American Ballet. She also studied at SUNY Purchase, where she performed with American Ballet Theatre Studio Company. In addition to her work with ASFB, she was a guest artist with Configurations Dance Company and recently completed her B.A. in the arts at SUNY Empire State College, Center for Distance Learning.  Nolan Demarco McGahan, a native of Dallas, Texas, trained at Dallas Ballet Center, Ballet Academy of Texas, and with Fernando Bujones at the Orlando Ballet School. He also attended Booker T. High School of the Performing and Visual Arts before graduating from the Julliard School in New York, earning his B.F.A. in dance. This is Nolan’s third season with ASFB. Emily Proctor, a recent graduate from Juilliard, is starting her third season with the company. A native of North Carolina, Emily trained at the North Carolina School of the Arts and graduated in 2003 with a concentration in ballet. Emily has trained at the Houston Ballet, ABT New York, and Montreal’s Ballet Divertimento professional summer program. Prior to joining ASFB, she joined Hell’s Kitchen Dance on a national and international tour last summer of Aszure Barton’s Come In, starring Mikhail Baryshnikov.

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Choreographer Bios Jorma Elo, Choreographer Finnish-born Jorma Elo is one of the most sought-after choreographers in the United States and Europe. Named Resident Choreographer of Boston Ballet in 2005, Elo was singled out as a “talent to follow” by Anna Kisselgoff in her 2004 Year in Review for The New York Times. Elo has since created new works for New York City Ballet, Boston Ballet, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Royal Danish Ballet, State Theatre Nuremberg, and Norwegian National Ballet. Elo trained with the Finnish National Ballet School and the Kirov Ballet School in Leningrad. Prior to joining Netherlands Dance Theater in 1990, he danced with Finnish National Ballet from 1978-84 and with Cullberg Ballet from 1984-90. Elo has choreographed for Basel Ballet, Ballet Debrezen (Hungary), Alberta Ballet, Norwegian National Ballet, Finnish National Ballet, Stockholm 59° North, and Netherlands Dance Theatre 1. For Boston Ballet, Elo has created three world premieres: Sharp Side of Dark (2002), Plan to B (2004), and Carmen (2006). Elo was awarded the choreographic prize at the 2005 Helsinki International Ballet Competition. Dance Magazine recognized Elo as one of “25 to Watch,” and Pointe Magazine named him a VIP of Dance in 2006. William Forsythe, Choreographer William Forsythe is widely considered one of the most important dance artists of our time, on a par with such giants in the dance world as George Balanchine. A revolutionary thinker and artistic provocateur, Forsythe set new standards internationally for ballet and modern dance companies alike. His Frankfurt Ballet (known as Ballett Frankfurt abroad) has attracted the top dancers in the world, and the company’s rare concerts in the U.S. have been occasions for pilgrimages by a faithful following. Forsythe is a towering figure in his field, equally acclaimed for his daring and his virtuosity. He is an undisputed revolutionary who has altered the formal and conceptual terrain of dance, yet he has never lost touch with the pure physical joy of dancing.


aspen santa fe ballet

Twyla Tharp, Choreographer In 1965, Twyla Tharp formed Twyla Tharp Dance, for which she created 80 pieces, including Nine Sinatra Songs and In the Upper Room. When TTD merged with American Ballet Theatre, she created more than a dozen works. She also choreographed for Paris Opera Ballet, the Royal Ballet, NYC Ballet, Boston Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, and Martha Graham Company. Tharp has received 19 honorary doctorates, the Vietnam Veterans of America President’s Award, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and numerous grants including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her books include Push Comes to Shove and The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life. Her Broadway credits include When We Were Very Young, The Catherine Wheel with David Byrne, Singin’ in the Rain, and Movin’ Out, for which she won a Tony Award, Astaire Award, Drama League Award for Sustained Achievement in Musical Theatre, Drama Desk Award, and Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Choreography.

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Moses Pendleton, Choreographer For 30 years Moses Pendleton has been one of America’s most innovative and widely performed choreographers and directors. One of the founding members of Pilobolus Dance Theater in 1971, he formed his own company, Momix, in 1981 and has been its artistic director since 1984. Pendleton has also worked extensively in film, TV, and opera, and as a choreographer for ballet companies and special events. He received his BA in English literature from Dartmouth College in 1971 and immediately began touring with Pilobolus, which had grown out of dance classes at Dartmouth. The group shot to fame in the 1970s, performing on Broadway under the sponsorship of Pierre Cardin, touring internationally, and appearing in PBS’s Dance in America and Great Performances series. By the end of the decade, Pendleton had begun to work outside of Pilobolus, performing in and serving as principal choreographer for the Paris Opera’s Integrale Erik Satie in 1979 and choreographing the closing ceremonies of the Winter Olympics at Lake Placid in 1980. More recently he has choreographed works for Arizona Ballet and Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. Pendleton received the Positano Choreographic Award in 1999 and was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1977. He is a recipient of a 2002 American Choreography Award for his contributions to choreography for film and television.

Tchaikovsky DWKLVPRVWLQVSLUHG —The Washington Post

Photo: Conor and Kellee Brennan

VFKHGXOH Friday, May 7, 2010 at 8 pm Sunday, May 9, 2010 at 2 pm

ORFDWLRQ Sacramento Community Center Theater 1301 L Street, Sacramento

5LFNHWV 916.808-5181 | For more information: www.sacopera.org see p.6

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Photo by Patricia Ris

Presents

Alexander String Quartet Zakarias Grafilo & Frederick Lifsitz, violins Paul Yarbrough, viola • Sandy Wilson, cello An Alexander String Quartet Series Event Sunday, April 11, 2010 • 2 & 7PM Vanderhoef Studio Theatre, Mondavi Center, UC Davis Lecturer: Robert Greenberg (2PM performance only) There will be an intermission in the 2PM performance. Post-performance Q&A following the 7PM performance.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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Nikon Regained the GIFT of SIGHT Nikon Sandulyak was 34 years old when an industrial accident in his native Ukraine left him blind. Nearly four decades later, doctors at UC Davis restored his eyesight with one of California’s first artificial cornea transplants. Nikon calls it a miracle. “For the past 38 years I have lived in the dark. Now I’m surrounded by beauty and color. I’m the happiest man in the world!” At UC Davis Health System, our next medical breakthrough just may have your name on it.

Dr. Mark J. Mannis is an internationally recognized leader in the field of corneal transplantation and director of the UC Davis Health System Eye Center.

A gift for advancing health.

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Alexander String Quartet

Alexander String Quartet Zakarias Grafilo & Frederick Lifsitz, violins Paul Yarbrough, viola • Sandy Wilson, cello 2PM performance: Robert Greenberg, lecturer

String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, Op. 74 “Harp” Poco adagio—Allegro Adagio ma non troppo Presto Allegretto con Variazioni

Beethoven

Intermission (2PM performance only) String Quartet No. 11 in F Minor, Op. 95 “Serioso” Allegro con brio Allegretto ma non troppo Allegro assai vivace ma serioso Larghetto espressivo—Allegretto agitato

Beethoven

The Alexander String Quartet is represented by BesenArts LLC 508 First Street, Suite 4W Hoboken, NJ 07030-7823 www.BesenArts.com The Alexander String Quartet records for FoghornClassics www.asq4.com

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Program Notes By Eric Bromberger String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 74 Ludwig Van Beethoven (Born December 16, 1770, in Bonn; died March 26, 1827, in Vienna) Beethoven’s middle‑period quartets proved difficult for audiences from the very beginning. The exception is the lovely quartet in E‑flat major, Op. 74, long nicknamed the “Harp.” In contrast to the other middle quartets, this one is full of graceful music executed with consummate technical skill; no battles are fought and won here—instead one savors the calm pleasures of what is perhaps Beethoven’s most relaxed string quartet. Yet this music was composed during a difficult time for Beethoven, the year 1809. That year, French armies under Napoleon bombarded and occupied Vienna, forcing most of the city’s nobility and many of Beethoven’s friends to flee (the composer himself hid in his brother’s basement during the bombardment with a pillow held tightly around his head). And it was during the French occupation that Beethoven’s old teacher Haydn died. Anguished, Beethoven wrote to his publishers: “We are enjoying a little peace after violent destruction, after suffering every hardship that one could conceivably endure. I worked for a few weeks in success, but it seemed to me more for death than for immortality.” Beethoven’s music from 1809, however, shows little trace of his anxieties; from early in that year came the noble “Emperor” Concerto, and after completing the quartet Beethoven set to work on the incidental music to Goethe’s Egmont. The first movement of the quartet opens with a slow introduction whose chromaticism creates an uncertain tonality; from this tonal blur, the main theme leaps out brightly at the Allegro in unequivocal E‑flat major. Very quickly come the pizzicatos that have earned this quartet the (not particularly appropriate) nickname “Harp.” The development is quite active, and the recapitulation features a near‑virtuoso first violin part that goes swirling across all four strings before the movement’s vigorous close. The Adagio ma non troppo can be described simply—this is lovely music. It is built on one of Beethoven’s most attractive lyric ideas, which develops across three repetitions, each elaborated differently; throughout, Beethoven constantly reminds all four performers: cantabile and espressivo. By contrast, the Presto bristles with energy. Many have compared this with the scherzo movement of the Fifth Symphony, composed two years earlier: both are in C minor, both are built on the same characteristic rhythm, and both feature fugal writing in the trio section. Yet where the third movement of the symphony builds through a huge crescendo to a triumphant finale, Beethoven winds this movement in the quartet down very carefully, and the finale that follows seems consciously anti‑climactic. It is a variation movement consisting of an almost innocent theme, six variations, and a coda; the odd‑numbered variations tend to be vigorous and fast, the even‑numbered lyric and gentle. The sixth variation gives way to a coda that extends the theme and leads to a wonderful— and very appropriate—conclusion: a great rush of 16th notes powers the coda fortissimo to the very close where instead of hammering out a cadence, Beethoven concludes with two tiny and gentle chords. It is a conclusion brilliant in its understatement.

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String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 95 “Serioso” This quartet has a nickname, “Quartetto Serioso,” that—quite unusually for a musical nickname—came from the composer himself. Well aware of the music’s extraordinary character, Beethoven described the quartet as having been “written for a small circle of connoisseurs and…never to be performed in public.” Joseph Kerman has described it as “an involved, impassioned, highly idiosyncratic piece, problematic in every one of its movements, advanced in a hundred ways” and “unmatched in Beethoven’s output for compression, exaggerated articulation, and a corresponding sense of extreme tension.” Yet this quartet—virtually the shortest of Beethoven’s string quartets—comes from the same period as the easily accessible “Archduke” Trio, the Seventh and Eighth Symphonies, and the incidental music to Goethe’s Egmont. Beethoven was approaching his 40th birthday when he completed the quartet in the fall of 1810, and this music’s extraordinary focus and tension seem sharply at odds with those other, more popular scores. Beethoven was at this time nearing the end of his second period of composition, sometimes called his “Heroic Style,” but some critics hear in this quartet prefigurations of his late style and the great cycle of quartets written during his last years. The first movement is extraordinarily compressed (it lasts barely four minutes), and it catapults listeners through an unexpected series of key relationships. The unison opening figure is almost spit out, passing through and ending in a “wrong” key, and then followed by complete silence. Octave leaps and furious restatements of the opening figure lead to the swaying second theme, announced in flowing triplets by the viola. The development section of this (highly modified) sonata‑form movement is quite short, treating only the opening theme, before the movement exhausts itself on fragments of that theme. The marking of the second movement, Allegretto ma non troppo, might seem to suggest some relief, but this movement is even more closely argued than the first. The cello’s strange descending line introduces a lovely opening melody, but this quickly gives way to a long and complex fugue, its sinuous subject announced by the viola and then taken up and developed by the other voices. A quiet close (derived from the cello’s introduction) links this movement to the third, a violent fast movement. Note the marking: Beethoven once again stresses Allegro assai vivace ma serioso. The movement is in ABABA form, the explosive opening section alternating with a chorale‑like subject for the lower three voices which the first violin decorates. Once again, Beethoven takes each section into unexpected keys. The last movement has a slow introduction—Larghetto espressivo— full of the darkness that has marked the first three movements, and this leads to a blistering finale that does much to dispel the tension. In an oft‑quoted remark about the arrival of this theme, American composer Randall Thompson is reported to have said, “No bottle of champagne was ever uncorked at a better moment.” In contrast, for example, to the near‑contemporary Seventh Symphony, which ends in wild celebration, this quartet has an almost consciously anti‑heroic close, concluding with a very fast coda that Beethoven marks simply Allegro. Many commentators have felt that the Quartet in F minor is composed with the same technique as the late quartets but without their sense of spiritual elevation, and in this sense they see the present quartet as looking ahead toward the late style. But it is unfair to this music to regard it simply as a forerunner of another style. This quartet may be dark, explosive, and extremely concentrated—but it should be valued for just those qualities.


Greenberg has composed more than 45 works for a wide variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles. Recent performances of his works have taken place in New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Los Angeles, England, Ireland, Greece, Italy, and the Netherlands, where his Child’s Play for String Quartet was performed at the Concertgebouw of Amsterdam. Greenberg has received numerous honors, including three Nicola de Lorenzo Composition Prizes and three Meet-TheComposer Grants. Recent commissions have been received from the Koussevitzky Foundation in the Library of Congress, the Alexander String Quartet, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, the Strata Ensemble, San Francisco Performances, and the XTET ensemble. Greenberg is a board member and an artistic director of Composers, Inc., a composers’ collective/production organization based in San Francisco. Greenberg has performed, taught, and lectured extensively across North America and Europe. He is currently music historian-inresidence with San Francisco Performances, where he has lectured and performed since 1994, and a faculty member of the Advanced Management Program at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. He has served on the faculties of the University of California, Berkeley; California State University, East Bay; and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he chaired the Department of Music History and Literature from 1989-2001 and served as the Director of the Adult Extension Division from 1991-96. Greenberg has lectured for some of the most prestigious musical and arts organizations in the United States, including the San Francisco Symphony (where for 10 years he was host and lecturer for the Symphony’s nationally acclaimed “Discovery Series”), the Ravinia Festival, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the Van Cliburn Foundation, the Chautauqua Institute (where he was the Everett Scholar in Residence for the summer of 2006), the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra, and Music@Menlo. Greenberg has been profiled in The Wall Street Journal, the Times of London, Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor, and San Francisco Chronicle. For many years Greenberg was the resident composer and music historian to National Public Radio’s Weekend All Things Considered, and presently plays that role on Weekend Edition, Sunday. In 1993, Greenberg recorded a 48-lecture course, How to Listen to and Understand Great Music for the Teaching Company/SuperStar Teachers Program, the preeminent producer of college level courseson-media in the United States. Eleven further courses—Concert Masterworks, Bach and the High Baroque, The Symphonies of Beethoven, How to Listen to and Understand Opera, Great Masters, The Operas of Mozart, The Life and Operas of Verdi, The Symphony, The Chamber Music of Mozart, The Piano Sonatas of Beethoven, and The Concerto— have been recorded since, totaling more than 500 lectures. Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

Alexander string quartet

Robert Greenberg Robert Greenberg was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1954, and has lived in the San Francisco Bay area since 1978. Greenberg received a B.A. in music, magna cum laude, from Princeton University in 1976. In 1984, Greenberg received a Ph.D. in music composition, with distinction, from the University of California, Berkeley.

In 2003, the Bangor (Maine) Daily News referred to Greenberg as “the Elvis of music history and appreciation,” an appraisal that has given him more pleasure than any other. Dr. Greenberg is currently writing a book on opera and its impact on Western culture, to be published by Oxford University Press.

The Alexander String Quartet Zakarias Grafilo, violin Frederick Lifsitz, violin Paul Yarbrough, viola Sandy Wilson, cello Having celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2006, the Alexander String Quartet has performed in the major music capitals of four continents, securing its standing among the world’s premier ensembles. Widely admired for its interpretations of Beethoven, Mozart, and Shostakovich, the quartet has also established itself as an important ad­vocate of new music through more than 25 commissions and numerous premiere performances. In 1999, BMG Classics released the Quartet’s nine-CD set of the Beethoven cycle on its Arte Nova label to tremendous critical acclaim. The FoghornClassics label released a three-CD set (Homage) of the Mozart quartets dedicated to Haydn in 2004. Foghorn also released a six-CD set (Fragments) of the complete Shostakovich quartets, and a recording of the complete quartets of Pulitzer Prize-winning San Francisco composer Wayne Peterson was released in the spring of 2008. A new recording of the Beethoven cycle was released in June 2009. The Alexander String Quartet’s annual calendar of concerts includes engagements at major halls throughout North America and Europe. The quartet has appeared at Lincoln Center, the 92nd Street Y, and the Metropolitan Museum in New York City; Jordan Hall in Boston; the Library of Congress and Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D. C.; and chamber music societies and universities across North America. Recent overseas tours have included the U.K., the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Italy, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, France, Greece, the Republic of Georgia, and the Philippines. The many distin­guished artists to collaborate with the Alexander String Quartet include pianists Menahem Pressler, Gary Graffman, Roger Woodward, Jeremy Menuhin, and James Tocco; clarinetists Eli Eban, Charles Neidich, Joan Enric Lluna, and Richard Stoltzman; cellist Sadao Harada; soprano Elly Ameling; and saxophonists Branford Marsalis and David Sánchez. The Alexander String Quartet’s 25th anniversary was also the 20th anniversary of its association with New York City’s Baruch College as Ensemble-in-Residence. This landmark was celebrated through a performance by the ensemble of the Shostakovich string quartet cycle at Engelman Recital Hall in the Baruch Performing Art Center. Of these performances, The New York Times wrote, “The intimacy of the music came through with enhanced power and poignancy in the Alexander quartet’s vibrant, probing, assured and aptly volatile performances…Seldom have these anguished, playful, ironic and masterly works seemed so profoundly personal.” The Alexander String Quartet was also awarded Presidential Medals in honor of its longstanding commitment to the arts and education and in celebration of two decades of service to Baruch College.

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alexander string quartet

Highlights of the quartet’s 2009-10 season include a multiple concert series of music by Dvořák for San Francisco Performances, of Mendelssohn and Schumann at the Baruch Performing Arts Center in New York City, of Brahms at the Scottsdale Center for the Arts, and a continuing Beethoven cycle for the Mondavi Center. The quartet returns to the Library of Congress for a pair of performances, one an all-Beethoven program in collaboration with the lecturer Robert Greenberg and the other a program of 20th- and 21stcentury repertory performed in collaboration with the Afiara String Quartet. The quartet will premiere a new work commissioned for it from Jeeyoung Kim for San Francisco Performances in April 2010. They also continue their annual residencies at Allegheny College and St. Lawrence University.

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Among the quartet’s recent premieres are Rise Chanting by Augusta Read Thomas, commissioned for the Alexander by the Krannert Center and premiered there and simulcast by WFMT radio in Chicago. The quartet has also premiered String Quartets Nos. 2 and 3 by Pulitzer Prize win­ner Wayne Peterson and works by Ross Bauer (commissioned by Stanford University), Richard Festinger, David Sheinfeld, Hi Kyung Kim, and a Koussevitzky commission by Robert Greenberg. Bring in this ad for a FREE one-week trial membership to the ARC.

At home in San Francisco, the members of the Alexander String Quartet are a major artistic pres­ence, serving as directors of the Morrison Chamber Music Center at the School of Music and Dance in the College of Creative Arts at San Francisco State University and Ensemble in Residence of San Francisco Performances.

530.754.5308 campusrecreation.ucdavis.edu

The Alexander String Quartet was formed in New York City in 1981, and the following year became the first string quartet to win the Concert Artists Guild Competition. In 1985, the quartet captured international attention as the first American quartet to win the London International String Quartet Competition, receiving both the jury’s highest award and the Audience Prize. In 1995, Allegheny College awarded Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees to the members of the quartet in recognition of their unique contribution to the arts. Honorary degrees were conferred on the ensemble by St. Lawrence University in 2000. The Alexander String Quartet performs on the Ellen M. Egger Quartet of instruments, built in 1987 by the American maker Francis Kuttner.

Robert Besen, Director 508 First Street, Suite 4W Hoboken, NJ 07030-7823 T: 201.386.8565 F: 201.386.8564 Robert@BesenArts.com www.BesenArts.com

see p. 6 Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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A

nIGHT

REMEMBER TO

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

A Marvels Series Event Sunday, April 11, 2010 • 3PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Post-performance Q&A Moderator: Ruth Rosenberg, Dance Consultant, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

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diavolo

Artistic Director Jacques Heim Executive Director Jay Alan Quantrill Production Manager/ Technical Director Renee Larsen Rehearsal Director Briana Bowie Video Archivist Melinda Ritchie Education Coordinator Renee Larsen

The Company Briana Bowie Philip Flickinger Trevor Harrison Ali Hollowell Shauna Martinez Omar Olivas Melinda Ritchie Anibal Sandoval Garrett Wolf Chisa Yamaguchi

Lighting Designer/Director Stage Manager John ED Bass

Assistant Technical Director Anibal Sandoval

Costume Manager Philip Flickinger Office Manager Kristina Scott Set Engineering & Contruction Mike McCluskey & Tina Trefeten McCluskey LTD

Program All choreography by the Company, under the direction of Jacques Heim

“Tete En L’Air” (1994, recreated 2009) Literally translated, “Tete En L’Air” means “head in the sky.” Inspired by the surreal work of French filmmaker Jacques Tati, “Tete En L’Air” paints the journey of isolation faced by citizens in the modern world. Bewildered by endless commuting, relocating, fear of intimacy, and fear of the ultimate destination, citizens try to transcend disconnection and xenophobic tendencies that affect their lives. Original Collaborators: Rebecca Butala, Mark Branner, Nick Erickson, Meegan Godfrey, Lara Hudson, Curtis Hurt, Jeremy Jacobs, Stacy Liebsack, Robert Lou, Darren Press, Monique Sobolowsky Re-creation cast: Briana Bowie, Jonathan Curtis, Philip Flickinger, Becca Greenbaum, Trevor Harrison, Erica Juergens-Bow, Renee Larsen, Shauna Martinez, Omar Olivas, Melinda Ritchie, Ben Sales, Anibal Sandoval, Nilder Santos, Garrett Wolf, Chisa Yamaguchi Performers: The Company Set Design: Roger Webb Original Lighting Design: Evan Merryman Ritter Lighting Design: John ED Bass Original Costumes: Laura Brody Costumes: Briana Bowie Music: John Adams

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A love duet on and around a door, evoking images of the intimacy of couples behind closed doors and the distance and proximity of the two bodies. “Knockturne” is a six-year relationship in six minutes.

Original Collaborator: Meegan Godfrey Re-creation cast: Becca Greenbaum, David Zibalese Performers: Omar Olivas, Chisa Yamaguchi Performers: Briana Bowie and Philip Flickinger Set Design: Roger Webb Set Construction: Shawn Ellis, Cinnabar, Mike McCluskey Lighting Design: John ED Bass Costumer: Caesareo Ruiz Original Music: Paul James Music: Giacomo Puccini

“Bench” (2009) “Bench” is an exploration of human confrontations, the battle over where you belong and what belongs to you. It is within the structure and the reactionary movement of the dancers that themes of confinement, pressure, freedom, escape, and possession are explored. Original Collaborators: Briana Bowie, Trevor Harrison, Renee Larsen, Shauna Martinez, Melinda Ritchie, Anibal Sandoval, Nilder Santos Performers: The Company Music: Drum Invasion Lighting: John Bass

“Humachina” (1999, re-staged 2009) “Humachina” combines the word “human” with the Latin word for machine, “machina.” The principle of human motion and mechanical relations, a combination of the human form and the simplicity of the most important of machines, the wheel. What will survive: man or machine? Original Collaborators: Sita Acevedo, Monica Campbell, Nick Erickson, Laura Everling, Meegan Godfrey, Jeremy Jacobs, Robert Lou, Heather McCardle, Darren Press, Zoltan Re-creation: Briana Bowie, Philip Flickinger, Trevor Harrison, Shauna Martinez, Omar Olivas, Melinda Ritchie, Anibal Sandoval, Nilder Santos, Chisa Yamaguchi Performers: The Company Set Design: Jeremy Railton Set Construction: Mike McCluskey, Ltd. Lighting Design: Evan Merryman Ritter Music: Chemical Brothers Costumes: Meegan Godfrey

Intermission

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diavolo

“Knockturne 1 and Knockturne 2” (2006)

“Trajectoire” (Section 1: 1999, Section 2: 2001) Set on an abstract 21st-century Galleon, the group is set adrift— sink or swim—upon the ever-shifting landscape of human relations in modern society. A visceral and emotional journey, “Trajectoire” examines tremendous loss and abandonment, destiny and destination. At journey’s end, the piece shows the transcendence of the human soul against all odds. Original Collaborators: Sita Acevedo, Monica Campbell, Nick Erickson, Laura Everling, Meegan Godfrey, Jeremy Jacobs, Robert Lou, Heather McCardle, Darren Press, Zoltan Performers: The Company Set Design: Daniel Wheeler Engineering: Dan Williams Set Construction: Mike McCluskey, Ltd. and Daniel Wheeler Original Lighting Design: Daniel Ionazzi Costume Design: Meegan Godfrey Music Composition: Nathan Wang “Trajectoire” was commissioned by Benedicta Arts Center, College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, MN; El Camino College, Torrance, CA; Grand Performances at California Plaza, Los Angeles, CA; and funded in part by the Brody Arts Fund, the City of Los Angeles, Department of Cultural Affairs, and the Los Angeles County Arts Commission. “Trajectoire” premiered in 1999 at El Camino College in Torrance, CA.

About the Company Diavolo company members are dancers, gymnasts, actors, athletes, and above all, teammates. Under the guidance of Artistic Director Jacques Heim, they collaboratively develop work on oversized surrealistic sets and everyday structures. Heim’s childhood struggles and his journeys as a French-Jewish man have shaped his thematic choices within the urban landscapes. Themes of isolation, fear, destiny, survival, faith, modernization, destination, and danger help to illustrate the effect of our surroundings on our daily lives. The structural elements and surrealistic set pieces of Diavolo create a sense of daring and risk taking through dramatic movement that juxtaposes human fragility and survival. Only through working together with the elements of danger created by and on architectural environments does Diavolo accomplish its metaphors of the challenges of relationships, the absurdities of life, and the struggle to maintain our humanity in the shadow of an increasingly technological world. Jacques Heim founded Diavolo in Los Angeles in 1992. In 1993, the company was nominated for two Lester Horton Awards in Los Angeles, and in 1995, Diavolo made its European debut at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, where they were named Best of the Fest by the London Independent and Critic’s Choice by The Guardian. Also in 1995, the company received three Lester Horton Awards for the work Tete en L’Air. The company has since been nominated several times for numerous awards, including four 2001 Lester Horton Awards and two 2003 Lester Horton Awards, and they were honored to perform live at the 10th annual American Choreography Awards in 2004. In 1998, the company opened the performance series at the new Getty Center Museum in Los Angeles. In 1999, Diavolo created its first full-evening-length work, Catapult, which coincided with

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Diavolo’s first full North American tour. During the summer of 2001, Diavolo invited Jelon Viera, artistic director of DanceBrazil and the Capoeria Foundation, to Los Angeles to conduct an intensive capoeria workshop with the company. In 2002, Diavolo created a second smaller company to perform in a cabaret-style show, which ran for eight weeks at the New Shinagawa Prince Hotel in Tokyo. The commercial arm of the company, Diavolo Creative Productions, has created unique performance events for such corporate clients as Wells Fargo Bank, Honda, Sebastian Inc., and General Motors. Due to the unusual and innovative way that Diavolo works with architectural structures, the creative team at Cirque du Soleil hired Jacques Heim to choreograph a show in Las Vegas, Ka, which opened in 2005 and is still running. In 2007, Diavolo was commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic to create a performance to music director Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Foreign Bodies and is now working on a second commission for them to be based on John Adams’ Fearful Symmetries, to premiere at the Hollywood Bowl in September. The Los Angeles Times declared its premiere at the Hollywood Bowl “one of those rare events that define the art of this city when the levels of vision and support are equally exceptional.” The 2009-10 season marks Diavolo’s 11th U.S. tour. Diavolo has performed internationally in Scotland, Japan, Chile, Mexico, Canada, South Korea, Brazil, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. For more information about Diavolo, please visit www.diavolo.org. Company Biographies Jacques Heim, Artistic Director Jacques Heim, born in Paris, earned a B.F.A. in theater, dance, and film from Middlebury College. He was awarded a Certificate for Analysis and Criticism of Dance from the University of Surrey in England. Heim moved to Los Angeles in 1989 and attended California Institute for the Arts, receiving an M.F.A. in choreography. In 1992, Heim founded Diavolo Dance Theater. Heim received the 1992 Martha Hill Choreography Award from the American Dance Festival and the 1992 Special Prize of the Jury at the 6th Saitama International Dance Festival in Saitama, Japan. Heim was nominated for the CalArts/Alpert Awards in the Arts for Dance in 1996, 2000, 2009, and 2010. In 1998 and 1999, Heim was nominated for a Lester Horton Award for Best Choreography. In 1999, Heim received a James Irvine Foundation Fellowship in choreography and a Fellowship from the Brody Arts Fund. In 2001, Heim was one of three choreographers chosen to create a piece for the Ballet Pacifica Annual Choreographic Workshop. He has been named one of the “Faces to Watch in the Arts” by the Los Angeles Times and one of the “100 Coolest People in LA” by Buzz Magazine. From 1993-2001, he taught Intensive Movement for Actors at UCLA and Cal State LA. Heim was the artistic director for the 2005 Taurus Stunt Awards and returned in 2007 to stage a movement/stunt piece The Car. In 2002-04, Heim choreographed Ka, a permanent show for Cirque du Soleil, which premiered in 2004 at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. In 2006, Heim created choreography for The Stones, a theater piece produced by Center Theatre Group at the Douglas Theater. In 2007, he choreographed Foreign Bodies, based on a score by Esa-Pekka Salonen for the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. He has worked in television on BBC America’s Dancing with the Stars and Bravo’s Step Up and Dance. He is working on a second commission for the Los Angeles Philharmonic based on John Adams’ Fearful Symmetries. Jacques has taken Diavolo to Europe, South America, and Asia, as well as annual tours of North America.

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John ED Bass, Lighting Designer John has been lighting theater, music, and dance for more than 15 years. His last project with Jacques Heim was Territory while studying at UCLA’s School of Theater, Film, and Television. Previous national tour designs include The Great Tennessee Monkey Trial for L.A. Theater Works and both Peter Pan and Camelot for McCoy Rigby Entertainment. Past design highlights include The Soze Project at the Apollo NYC and Azure, an underwater fantasy show at the Silverton Las Vegas. John is the resident associate for Reprise Broadway’s Best and lights numerous musical acts in Los Angeles. Briana Bowie, Rehearsal Director/Performer Briana is from San Diego, and she began dancing at 8 years old. Her training includes modern, jazz, ballet, hip hop, improvisation, and tumbling. She graduated in 2006 from the University of California, Irvine with a B.A. in dance. She spent three years with the UCI Etude Ensemble under the direction of legendary choreographer Donald McKayle; she has performed many of McKayle’s dances, including Angelitos Negros, Games, Ash, Midnight Dancer, Masque of the Red Death, and Songs of the Disinherited. Briana joined Diavolo in 2006. Philip Flickinger, Performer Philip is from Minnesota, where he earned his B.A. in dance and sociology/anthropology from Gustavus Adolphus College. Philip continued his dance education with an M.F.A. in dance from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he danced with Nancy Smith and Frequent Flyers Productions, Katie Elliott and Third Law Dance/Theatre, and the Hannah Kahn Dance Company. Besides teaching and creating his own work, Philip has been dancing with Diavolo since 2006. Trevor Harrison, Performer Trevor started as a b-boy in St. Louis, breakin’ with his friends at talent shows and local events. He continued dancing at Lindenwood University and received his B.A. in 2007. He then joined the Modern American Dance Company and worked with choreographers from Rivernorth and Alvin Ailey. In 2009, he co-choreographed the dancing in R&B singer Ginuwine’s “Last Chance” video. This is Trevor’s first season with Diavolo.  Ali Hollowell, Performer Growing up in Falmouth, Maine, Ali began dancing at a young age but was also very involved in athletics and gymnastics. Having fallen in love with modern dance after studying with Lisa Race, David Dorfman, Heidi Henderson, and Adele Myers at Connecticut College, of which she is a graduate, Ali began her professional dance career in New York City. She worked with Propel-Her Dance Collective and BE Dance Collective and is a founding member of Lisa Race’s company, Race Dances. Ali is in her first season with Diavolo. Renée Larsen, Production Manager Renée Larsen is from the San Francisco Bay area. She joined Diavolo as a performer in 2005 and in 2009, she moved behind the scenes as production manager. Her training includes jazz, ballet, tap, modern, gymnastics, and Tae Kwon Do. She studied both dance and psychology, receiving her B.A. from the University of California, Irvine. She was a founding member of Eveoke Dance Theatre in San Diego. She spent four years performing with Eveoke and working as its rehearsal assistant. She currently teaches fitness classes and works as a stunt performer at Universal Studios Hollywood in the Terminator 2: 3D live-action show.


Anibal Sandoval, Performer/Assistant Technical Director Anibal Sandoval has been a dancer for 13 years. He has training in gymnastics, modern, ballet, breakdance, Chinese pole, and martial arts. He is one of the newest additions to Lux Aeterna Acrobatic Dance Company and the AVC Circus Troupe under the guidance of Master Zheng Yin Ping. Anibal made his debut as a chorographer at Dance Dimensions 2007 presenting “Disagreements Between You and I.” Centering on acrobatic technique he has pioneered breakdancing with exercise balls.

McCluskey, Ltd., Set Fabrication Mike McCluskey started restoring Shelby Cobras in 1969 while attending UCLA for mechanical engineering and never stopped. Best known for its diversity of fabricating services (design, construction, welding, mechanics, finish, and paint) McCluskey, Ltd. blends the art of hand-crafting with modern aerospace technology. Internationally known for restoration/repair of vintage Cobras, exotic concept and race cars, plus historical aircraft and jets, McCluskey also builds props and sets for stage, movie, and TV. Mike’s team of highly skilled craftsmen are based in Torrance, serving architectural, automotive, industrial, and entertainment clients including Getty, Disney, Shelby, Northrop, Honda, and Diavolo.

Tina Trefethen, Set Design/Engineer Tina Trefethen’s interests in art, extreme sports, design, and industry combine uniquely for Diavolo. An independent contractor, Tina keeps busy coordinating, designing, engineering, and fabricating on a great variety of architectural, aviation, automotive, sculptural, and graphics projects. She has been an actor on dozens of TV shows and commercials, a world hang-gliding champion, pro skateboarder, and aircraft manufacturer.

Omar Olivas, Performer Omar Olivas was born and raised in Santa Ana, California. He began his training at Saint Joseph Ballet under the supervision of Beth Burns. Omar graduated as a Haggerty and William Gillespie Scholar (B.F.A. in dance) from the University of California, Irvine, where he was a dancer with Donald McKayle’s student repertory dance company, Etudes. He was a member of BackhausDance for two years. He has attended the American Dance Festival, Jose Limon Summer Intensive, Idyllwild Summer School, and Impuls Tanz in Vienna. Omar has danced at the Conservatoire de Paris, and in Tammy L. Wong’s About Last Night for the Esplanade’s da:ns festival in 2006. Omar was a finalist in the Dance Under the Stars Choreography Festival and was invited to set a piece for Esplanade’s da:ns festival in 2008. Omar currently teaches ballet and modern throughout Orange County. Melinda Ritchie, Performer Melinda Ritchie was born in Seattle, where she still lives when not in Los Angeles or on the road with the company. She has been dancing and tumbling since the age of three and has extensive training in modern, ballet, jazz, and many other traditional and world dance forms as well as the aerial arts and some circus sports. Melinda earned a B.A. in dance with minors in both French and Asian/Pacific studies from Loyola Marymount University. Melinda is the webmaster and designer for diavolo.org as well as the video archivist and demo technician for the company. She is currently taking preparatory classes in order to return to school with plans to get a Doctor of Physical Therapy from the University of Washington. Melinda joined Diavolo in 2005.

Garrett Wolf, Performer Garrett Wolf is an elite-level gymnast who has been a part of Diavolo since 2000. Originally hailing from Alaska, Garrett was trained in gymnastics and has garnered further skills in partner stunts at the University of Anchorage. Along with training in ballet and jazz in both Los Angeles and New York, Garrett’s recent credits include stuntman work at Disney’s California Adventure Lights, Camera, Chaos; dancing in Disneyland’s Animazement; portraying Mr. Freeze at Magic Mountain’s Batman and Robin Action Stunt Spectacular; and acrobatics at Sea World’s Cirque de la Mer. Chisa Yamaguchi, Performer Chisa Yamaguchi was born and raised in Vallejo and earned a double degree from UCLA in world arts and cultures and Asian American studies. She began dancing during her third year and received training in modern, gymnastics, capoeria, tango, Rhaq Sharqi, and Balinese dance. She has studied with profoundly gifted teachers, most recently with Germaine Acony and her company Jant-Bi in Toubab Dialaow, Senegal. She has traveled around the world working as an international volunteer in New Zealand, Fiji, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Egypt, and is currently writing a children’s book based on her experiences. Diavolo Board of Directors Patrick Bolek, Chair; Jacques Heim; Peter Lesnik; Lindsey Nelson; Anna Thompson Diavolo Dance Theatre is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation organized in the State of California and is funded in part by the generous donations of many individuals, the Los Angeles County Arts Commission, Department of Cultural Affairs of the City of Los Angeles, the Pinchuk Artists Fund, the Dwight Stuart Youth Foundation, and the Skirball Foundation.

Evan Merryman Ritter, Lighting Designer   Evan began his career of professional lighting design in 1991, at age 17, with the Haight Street Puppet Theater in San Francisco. Since 1998, he has been with Diavolo, initially working with the company as lighting director, then assuming the lighting designer position in 1999, and the technical director position in 2004. In 1997, Evan was a Wally Russell Scholar and became the resident assistant lighting designer for the Los Angeles Opera Company. Evan’s lighting design for Diavolo’s DreamCatcher was nominated for a 2003 Lester Horton Award. He holds a B.F.A. in lighting design from the California Institute of the Arts and now lives in Seattle, where he is an M.F.A. candidate at the University of Washington.  Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

diavolo

Shauna Martinez, Performer Shauna, from Derby, Kansas, started dancing at the age of 3. She soon became a competitive all-around gymnast and later an AllAmerica collegiate cheerleader. She spent her summers as a collegiate instructor for the National Cheerleader’s Association earning awards as a top instructor. Shauna received her B.F.A. from Wichita State University in 2007. Martinez is accomplished in ballet, modern, jazz, mime, and hip hop. She has performed with dre.dance, Joe Torry, and Sinbad. Shauna is in her first season with Diavolo.

Exclusive Management David Lieberman Artists Representatives PO Box 10368 Newport Beach, CA 92658 714.979.4700 email: info@dlartists.com

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Presents

Baaba Maal A World Stage: Music Series Event Thursday, April 15, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be no intermission.

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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baaba maal

“I think the musician’s role is to give advice, to warn people, and to make them aware of what they might not have thought of themselves. We use melodies and harmonies to make songs enter your mind.” So declares the celebrated Senegalese master musician Baaba Maal of the songs on Television, his new multi-lingual album, released in June 2009. With its subtle blending of electronic dance elements with the timeless tradition of West African musical traditions, the album is a groundbreaking successor to Grammy-nominated Missing You (2001), released the year Baaba closed the South Africa Freedom Mandela Concert in London’s Trafalgar Square and headlined at the Hollywood Bowl. The title track refers to the relatively recent phenomenon in Africa of ubiquitous TV screens. “The television set is like a stranger you didn’t ask for coming into your living room,” explains Baaba. “You don’t care about who he is: he just seems to come from nowhere and gives you information.” Television was produced by Baaba Maal and Barry Reynolds, once the guitarist with the legendary Compass Point Studio Band, and mixed by Jerry Boys. In addition, the tune “Song for Women” was produced by John Leckie. “I use that song,” explains Baaba, “to talk about how women can be much more powerful in Africa, which can be really helpful for the entire continent. We should encourage that, and I sing about it to give them more power.” Television was recorded intermittently over three years, during which time Baaba kept up his rigorous global touring commitments, including his work on the large-scale Africa Express project, in collaboration with Damon Albarn (of the bands Blur and Gorillaz). In 2009, he headlined the African Soul Rebels tour of the United Kingdom and appeared as the guest on the esteemed Desert Island Discs on BBC Radio 4. In another field altogether, in 2008, Baaba Maal created the soundtrack for the Playstation and XBox game Far Cry 2. At the beginning of the decade he had fulfilled the same function, working with Hans Zimmer, for the Oscar-winning Ridley Scott movie Black Hawk Down. As he has made clear, Baaba Maal’s mission in West Africa extends beyond his music. He is committed to the concerns of families, young people, and the future of the continent, as is reflected in his role as Youth Emissary for the United Nations’ Development Program, about which he says, “It strengthens my determination to work harder to contribute more to improving the living conditions of disadvantaged people of the African continent, especially young people, whose future is seriously threatened by illiteracy, poverty, and HIV/AIDS. When I am talking about Africa, it is about how Africa will grow into the new millennium. This is why I really wanted to make music, so people can listen more to the music and the messages I am talking about.” His image of uplifting the African continent has long driven Baaba Maal. To this end, in 2003, he played the Nelson Mandela 46664 Concert in Cape Town, South Africa, and the next year he performed at the Nobel Peace Prize Concert in Oslo, Norway, for Dr. Wangari Maathai, the Kenyan environmental campaigner who won that year’s Peace Prize. In 2007, he played at the African Union heads of state summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and also performed at the Live Earth Concert in Johannesburg, South Africa.

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Back in the U.K., Baaba Maal has consistently topped the bill at prestigious events; in 2005, he not only headlined one of the BBC Proms Concerts at London’s Royal Albert Hall, but also the Glastonbury Festival and the Africa Remix Festival at London’s Royal Festival Hall. In July of that year Baaba led off the Make Poverty History March at the G8 protest in Edinburgh. Television was made in London and Dakar, the Senegalese capital. Baaba Maal worked on its eight songs with various musicians, but most extensively in a collaboration throughout the recording with singer Sabina Sciubba and keyboardist Didi Gutman, both members of New York’s Brazilian Girls, who blend electronic dance music with a diversity of eclectic styles. Searching for a diversified form for Maal’s music, it was Barry Reynolds who suggested he work with the pair. Immediately admiring their sound, Maal soon found further points of creative connection. Working on the song “Tindo,” for example, whose subject is the guidance meted out to Senegalese children as to their future responsibilities, Maal found that Sabina’s responses, sung in Italian, accurately mirrored his own lyrics: “I see language as an instrument. Sabina told me that she could just feel the meaning of the words that I was singing. This is the power of music—it can give you advice even if you do not understand the language. “Sabina is European but takes the name of Brazilian Girls; Didi is from Argentina, with its strong connection with Africa. I come from a tiny town in West Africa, but I’m connected to these people through my experiences, and to my English writing partner Barry Reynolds, who has worked with people like Marianne Faithfull and recently, Grace Jones, writing songs in different areas of life. I thought that this was a good combination, what I was looking for. I think really magical things came out of it.” Although the future of all of Africa is one of his priorities, Baaba never forgets his home nation of Senegal; in 2002, he sang the Senegalese national anthem at the opening match between France and Senegal of the FIFA World Cup Finals in Seoul—Senegal won the game. In Senegal, Baaba Maal came from humble beginnings. But he has learned and traveled and now speaks and sings of empowerment, enlightenment, and peace. He was born in Podor, a town with a population of 6,000, on the banks of the river Senegal that separates the country of the same name from Mauritania. (In 2006, returning to his home town, Baaba Maal established the annual Blues du Fleuve three-day festival in Podor.) Baaba’s family is Hal Pulaar, known in the English-speaking world as Fulani. He is not from a family of Griots–the hereditary caste of artists and communicators. His father worked in the fields but was also given the honor and responsibility of using songs to call the worshippers to the mosque. Baaba’s mother was a musician who sang and wrote her own songs, educating her son in the musical forms of the area and encouraging the young Baaba to value intelligent and thoughtful lyrics. At the same time Baaba was listening to black music coming out of America—people like James Brown, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, and Etta James. Later he caught up with Jamaican musicians such as Toots Hibbert, Bob Marley, and Jimmy Cliff.


baaba maal

Baaba went to school in St. Louis, the original French colonial capital, and, after winning an art scholarship, in Senegal’s modern capital, Dakar. There he joined Asly Fouta, a group of 70 musicians, and spent his time with the group learning as much as he could about the local musical instruments and how they work. On leaving college, he toured West Africa with longtime friend, guitarist and Griot Mansour Seck, soaking up more knowledge: “It’s traditional for young musicians to do that. When you arrive in every village you do a gig. This makes you friendly with all the young people who are in the village. The next day the young people take you to visit the oldest person who knows about the history of the village and the country and about the history of the music.” Baaba lived in Paris for several years, studying at the Conservatoire des Beaux Arts. On arriving back in Senegal, Baaba formed his band Daande Lenol (Voice of the People). As his work with the U.N. signifies, Baaba Maal’s vision extends beyond music. He often credits his much-loved mother with giving him a broader and more sympathetic view of the world than many of his contemporaries. Baaba is a citizen of the developing world who has carved out a place for himself in the first world. Baaba Maal can speak and sing to and for Africa with unprecedented authority. www.baabamaal.tv

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Robert and Margrit Mondavi

Center for the Performing Arts

| UC Davis

Photo by Scott Ferguson

Presents

Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra David Robertson, conductor Gil Shaham, violin A Western Health Advantage Orchestra Series Event Friday, April 16, 2010 • 8PM Jackson Hall, Mondavi Center, UC Davis There will be one intermission. Pre-performance Lecture • 7PM David Robertson, Music Director, Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra Moderator: Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

further listening see p. 42

The artists and your fellow audience members appreciate silence during the performance. Please be sure that you have switched off cellular phones, watch alarms, and pager signals. Videotaping, photographing, and audio recording are strictly forbidden. Violators are subject to removal.

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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saint louis symphony orchestra

Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra David Robertson, conductor Gil Shaham, violin

Rapture

Rouse

Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 63 Allegro moderato Andante assai Allegro, ben marcato

Prokofiev

Gil Shaham, violin

Intermission Symphony No. 7 in C Major (in One Movement), Op. 105 Adagio Un pochettino meno adagio; Vivacissimo; Adagio Allegro molto moderato Vivace; Presto; Adagio

Sibelius

Doctor Atomic Symphony The Laboratory Panic Trinity

Adams

Played without pause

Gil Shaham is brought to you through the generosity of the St. Louis-based Whitaker Foundation as part of the Whitaker Guest Artist Series. Christopher Rouse’s Rapture and John Adams’s Doctor Atomic Symphony are part of the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra’s Living Composers Series, which is supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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By Paul Schiavo Rapture Christopher Rouse (Born February 15, 1949, in Baltimore, Maryland) The close connection between music and elation has been noted by poets, philosophers, and musicians down through the ages. Still, it’s not often that a composer proclaims the blissful character of his music, as Christopher Rouse has done with his orchestral piece Rapture. But Rouse is a musician known and admired for his emotional openness and his ability to give feelings vivid expression in his compositions. Communication, rather than arcane compositional innovation, is the chief concern of this American composer, who admits that “I’ve always been a Romantic at heart.” Interestingly, the first of Rouse’s works to gain widespread attention gave expression to rather somber emotions. The composer’s Trombone Concerto, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1993, is darkly elegiac in tone. Other pieces convey a decidedly tragic character. But the emotional complexion of Rouse’s music has brightened over the last two decades, and with Rapture, written in 2000—well, the title says it all. The composer states that he intended this piece “to depict a progression to an ever more blinding ecstasy.” He adds, “It should be noted that the title of this score is not ‘The Rapture’; the piece is not connected to any specific religious source. Rather, I used the word ‘rapture’ to convey a sense of spiritual bliss, religious or otherwise.”

Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 63 Sergey Prokofiev (Born April 23, 1891, in Sontsovka, Ukraine; died March 28, 1953, in Moscow) In 1933, after some 15 years of composing and concertizing in the United States and Western Europe, Sergey Prokofiev returned home to live in the Soviet Union. This was a happy and productive period for the composer. In his homeland he found an enthusiasm for his music beyond any he had known abroad, and he had commissions in hand for concert works, film scores, and ballets. There remained, however, one obligation dating from his 10-year residence in Paris: a work promised to the French violinist Robert Soetens. Prokofiev fulfilled that promise with his Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor. Although written for a Western artist and audience, the Second Violin Concerto reveals the melodic warmth that emerged in Prokofiev’s music following his repatriation. The opening movement proceeds from a haunting melody—presented as a violin solo in the opening measures—through a series of energetic and colorful developments. The second movement offers music of entirely different character. Following two measures of introduction, the violin enters with a beautifully lyrical theme. From this subject the entire movement unfolds in a nearly unbroken stream of melody, its several subsidiary ideas being closely related to the main one. Dance rhythms mark the recurring principal subject of the finale. As in the first movement, the solo part requires no small degree of virtuosity.

Two points deserve notice here. First, an orchestral composition that conveys only bliss and light stands in distinct contrast to the great symphonic tradition, in which joy, triumph, and exultation are achieved only at the end of a musical drama marked by intimations of struggle or tragedy. Here those latter qualities are completely absent: Rapture conveys its titular emotion from start to finish. This brings us to the second point, which concerns the work’s harmonic coloration. Modern music, and even the more accessible post-modern music of recent years, draws freely on discords and harmonic ambiguity for its effect. But as Rouse himself observes, Rapture is rooted firmly in traditional harmonies and largely avoids sustained dissonances.

Symphony No. 7 in C Major, Op. 105 Jean Sibelius (Born December 8, 1865, in Hämeenlinna, Finland; died September 20, 1957, in Järvenpää, Finland)

Having deprived himself of discordant harmonies and the sense of sorrow, pain, or struggle they traditionally connote, Rouse faced considerable challenge in shaping this composition. He solved this challenge in part through skilled deployment of instrumental color. From the series of rhapsodic woodwind solos in the opening minutes through ecstatic outbursts by the brass, with flecks of percussion and garlands of swirling string sound near the close, Rapture presents a kaleidoscope of shifting orchestral hues. No less important is a carefully controlled process of rhythmic acceleration. Rapture, the composer notes, “is an exercise in gradually increasing tempi; it begins quite slowly but…proceeds to speed up incrementally until the breakneck tempo of the final moments is reached.”

This work went through a long creative gestation, during which time it changed form considerably. In a letter written in 1918, Sibelius described the symphony, which he must have already begun composing, as being in three movements, though he added, “the plans may be altered according to the development of the musical ideas. As usual, I am a slave to my themes and submit to their demands.” By the time it was completed, some six years later, the piece had been transformed into a composition in one movement. Sibelius seems initially to have been reluctant to call this work a symphony, and in March 1924, he conducted its premiere under the title Fantasia sinfonica. But when the score was published the following year, the composer had again changed his mind, admitting the work to the ranks of his symphonies.

Sibelius’s Seventh Symphony is the last, briefest, and most unusual of the works for which the composer’s admirers claim him as the greatest symphonist of the 20th century. It is perhaps the most beautiful as well. Avoiding the grand gestures of some of Sibelius’s earlier works in this form, the Seventh Symphony makes its effect through a compelling journey of thematic ideas, whose recurrences and evolution seem dictated by a dynamic inner life of their own.

Despite its compact single-movement form, the Seventh Symphony offers a satisfying variety of themes, moods, and textures. Its initial measures present a pair of important ideas: a scale rising quietly but firmly in the strings and, moments later, a brighter melodic figure in the woodwinds. These sounds give rise to a beautiful, prayer-like Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

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saint louis symphony orchestra

Program Notes


saint louis symphony orchestra

passage for the strings. As the music grows more confident and the winds rejoin the proceedings, a ringing call emerges from the first trombone, and soon we hear again the scale figure of the opening measures. His main thematic materials thus established, Sibelius follows them through wide-ranging developments that include a lively scherzando section, dramatic music that presses to an imposing climax, and a joyous passage that functions as the symphony’s finale. Doctor Atomic Symphony John Adams (Born February 15, 1947, in Worcester, Massachusetts) John Adams is widely recognized as the pre-eminent American composer of his generation. Since the 1970s, this longtime California resident has produced a substantial and varied body of work that has won over many listeners, even those normally wary of new music. Colorful, energetic, and accessible in the best sense of that term, Adams’s work draws on the virtues of different traditions: the expansive sonic architecture of the Romantic masters, the harmonic sophistication of 20th-century composers, the rhythmic drive and momentum of American popular music, the shimmering textures of the so-called “minimalist” school, and the delight in new discoveries that has always characterized the American avant-garde. Along with many orchestral compositions, choral works, chamber music, piano pieces, and a song cycle, Adams has produced four full-length operas. Three of the latter works—Nixon in China (1987), The Death of Klinghoffer (1991), and Doctor Atomic (2005)—examine pivotal events in 20th-century history, presenting them not in documentary fashion but in mythic and poetic terms. The most recent of these operas concerns the final days of the Manhattan Project, the American effort during World War II to create an atomic bomb, and concludes with the detonation of the world’s first nuclear device in July 1945, in the New Mexico desert. Doctor Atomic debuted in October 2005, in a production by the San Francisco Opera. Adams subsequently adapted portions of his score as an orchestral work. The resulting Doctor Atomic Symphony premiered during the summer of 2007, in London. Its first American performance was given early the following year in St. Louis by David Robertson and the Saint Louis Symphony. Adams dedicated the work to the SLSO Music Director. The piece unfolds in a single movement, beginning forcefully with music taken from the opera’s overture. The initial passage, Adams says, was suggested by Edgard Varèse’s pioneering composition Déserts and is meant to conjure a devastated post‑nuclear landscape. The frenzied music that follows evokes a fierce storm that lashed the desert the night before the bomb test. Of the ensuing episodes, two derive from recitations by J. Robert Oppenheimer, the poetry-loving physicist who directed the scientific part of the Manhattan Project. Verses by Charles Baudelaire, a writer especially dear to Oppenheimer, prompt declamatory phrases over complex, atmospheric accompaniment. Later, John Donne’s famous sonnet “Batter My Heart” brings music of gravity and poignancy, a trumpet replacing the opera’s baritone voice. © 2010 by Paul Schiavo

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David Robertson American conductor David Robertson is a compelling and passionate communicator whose stimulating ideas and exhilarating music making produce riveting performances, captivating and inspiring international audiences and musicians alike. Hailed by the press as a brilliant artist and master programmer, he is considered one of today’s most important conductors. His consummate musicianship, fresh stylistic instincts, and extensive mastery of orchestral as well as operatic repertoire have secured strong relationships for him with major orchestras worldwide. Robertson is currently in his fifth season as Music Director of the 130-year-old Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, while continuing as Principal Guest Conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, a post he has held since 2005. Highlights of Robertson’s 2009-10 season with the SLSO included a successful fall tour to Carnegie Hall. Guest engagements in the U.S. include performances with the San Francisco Symphony, Chicago Symphony, and New York Philharmonic, where Robertson is a regular guest conductor, as well as the Cleveland Orchestra. Internationally, he returns to conduct the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra at the Edinburgh Festival, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Staatskapelle Dresden, Berlin Philharmonic, Bayerischer Rundfunk Symphonieorchester, Israel Philharmonic, and Sydney Symphony, among others. Robertson has made numerous recordings, including, with the SLSO, the first recording of John Adams’s Doctor Atomic Symphony and Guide to Strange Places for Nonesuch. Robertson’s and the SLSO’s download-only “Live from Powell Hall” releases include works by Adams, Scriabin, and Szymanowski. Born in Santa Monica, California, Robertson was educated at London’s Royal Academy of Music, where he studied French horn and composition before turning to orchestral conducting. Robertson received Columbia University’s 2006 Ditson Conductor’s Award, and he and the SLSO are recipients of two major awards from ASCAP and the League of American Orchestras: the 2008-09 Award for Programming of Contemporary Music and the 200506 Morton Gould Award for Innovative Programming. Musical America named Robertson Conductor of the Year for 2000. In 1997, he received the Seaver/National Endowment for the Arts Conductors Award, the premier prize of its kind, given to exceptionally gifted American conductors. He is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Webster University and Maryville University. David Robertson and his wife, pianist Orli Shaham, are parents of twin boys. Robertson also has two teenage sons.


Shaham’s 2009-10 season will be marked by several exciting projects. His “Violin Concertos of the 1930s” project highlights masterpieces by influential composers in that decade and features 35 performances of works by Barber, Berg, Prokofiev, Stravinsky, and Walton. Highly anticipated performances include appearances with Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Michael Tilson Thomas and the London Symphony Orchestra, David Robertson and the New York Philharmonic, and Mariss Jansons and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. In addition to his many orchestral engagements Shaham regularly makes recital appearances. This season Shaham will give a series of all-Bach recitals beginning with an appearance at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, and then again during European tours that include performances in London, Istanbul, Milan, Prague, and Cologne. Shaham has the good fortune to enjoy musical collaboration with his family as well, including his wife, violinist Adele Anthony, his sister, pianist Orli Shaham, and his brother-in-law, conductor David Robertson. In 2007, his dream of bringing together friends and colleagues for chamber music came to fruition in a tour of Brahms programs, culminating in a series of three concerts at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall. An encore of this project took place during spring 2009. Shaham was born in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, in 1971. He moved with his parents to Israel, where at the age of 7, he began violin studies with Samuel Bernstein of the Rubin Academy of Music, and was granted annual scholarships by the America-Israel Cultural Foundation. In 1981, while studying with Haim Taub in Jerusalem, he made debuts with the Jerusalem Symphony and the Israel Philharmonic. That same year, he began his studies with Dorothy DeLay and Jens Ellerman at Aspen. In 1982, after taking first prize in Israel’s Claremont Competition, he became a scholarship student at Juilliard, where he has worked with DeLay and Hyo Kang. He has also studied at Columbia University. Gil Shaham was awarded an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 1990, and in 2008, he received the coveted Avery Fisher Award. He plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius. He lives in New York City with his wife, violinist Adele Anthony, and their two children.

saint louis symphony orchestra

Gil Shaham Violinist Gil Shaham is internationally recognized by audiences and critics alike as one of today’s most virtuosic and engaging classical artists. He is sought after throughout the world for concerto appearances with celebrated orchestras and conductors, as well as for recital and ensemble appearances on the great concert stages and at the most prestigious festivals.

Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra Founded in 1880, the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra (SLSO) is the second-oldest orchestra in the country and is widely considered one of the world’s finest. In 2005, internationally acclaimed conductor David Robertson became the 12th Music Director and second American-born conductor in the orchestra’s history. In its 130th season, the SLSO continues to strive for artistic excellence, fiscal responsibility, and community connection. In addition to its regular concert performances at Powell Hall, the SLSO is an integral part of the St. Louis community, presenting more than 250 free education and community partnership programs each year. The SLSO is one of only a handful of major American orchestras invited to perform annually at Carnegie Hall. Recordings by the SLSO have been honored with six Grammy Awards and 56 Grammy nominations over the years. The SLSO has embraced technological advances in music distribution by offering recordings over the Internet. The SLSO downloading initiative includes live recordings of John Adams’s Harmonielehre and Szymanowski’s Violin Concerto No. 1, with Christian Tetzlaff, available exclusively on iTunes and Amazon.com. In 2009, the SLSO’s Nonesuch recording of John Adams’s Doctor Atomic Symphony and Guide to Strange Places reached No. 2 on the Billboard chart for classical music and was named “Best CD of the Decade” by the Times of London. In 2008, the SLSO launched Building Our Business, which takes a proactive, two-pronged approach: build audiences and reinvigorate the SLSO brand, making the SLSO and Powell Hall the place to be; and build the donor base for enhanced institutional commitment and donations. This is all part of a larger strategic plan adopted in May 2009 that includes new core ideology and a 10-year strategic vision focusing on artistic and institutional excellence, doubling the existing audience, and revenue growth across all key operating areas.

SAINT LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 130th Season, 2009-10 Ned O. Lemkemeier Chairman of the Board of Trustees Fred Bronstein President and Executive Director David Robertson, Music Director Ward Stare Resident Conductor and Director of the Saint Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra Amy Kaiser Director of Saint Louis Symphony Chorus AT&T Foundation Chair Robert Ray Director of the IN UNISON Chorus

see p.6

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MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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The St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, John Adams, and Gil Shaham

Mondavi

further listening

by jeff hudson Since conductor David Robertson assumed musical leadership of the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra (SLSO) in 2005, he’s programmed several major works by composer John Adams, including Harmonielehre in 2007 (a recording is downloadable from the orchestra’s website), El Niño (a Nativity oratorio) in 2008, and the American premiere of the Doctor Atomic Symphony that same year. A Nonesuch CD of the Doctor Atomic Symphony by Robertson and the SLSO followed in 2009.

Center

There are many other recordings by the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, extending back seven decades, including eight CDs recorded under Hans Vonk, who led the orchestra from 1996–2002. Local audiences may remember Vonk and the SLSO at the Sacramento Community Center Theater in 1999, hosted by the old UC Davis Presents program. There’s also a six-CD retrospective covering highlights under conductor Leonard Slatkin (an advocate of American music who led the SLSO from 1979-1996).

The Silk Road Ensemble with Yo-Yo Ma Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers San Francisco Symphony and Chorus Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Madeleine Albright Mark Morris Dance Group

Composer John Adams, who lives in the Bay Area, has some two dozen albums on the Nonesuch label, extending back into the 1970s. In terms of his orchestral music, a good place to start is Harmonielehre. The piece originated when the composer dreamed he saw “a gigantic supertanker take off from the surface of San Francisco Bay and thrust itself into the sky like a Saturn rocket.” I’ve been listening to the San Francisco Symphony’s 1985 premiere recording (a Nonesuch release that I first bought on cassette!) for nearly 25 years, and my pulse still quickens every time I play it. Simon Rattle’s 1994 version with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI) is also good.

Kronos Quartet Dianne Reeves Dan Zanes and Friends Cirque Éloize Tango Fire and many more!

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Adams’ music is being done all over nowadays. The New York Philharmonic and baritone Thomas Hampson toured Europe in January/February with Adams’ “TheWoundDresser” (from 1988, incorporating Civil War-era poetry by Walt Whitman). The Los Angeles Philharmonic premiered a new Adams piece—City Noir—last October; Adams is serving under conductor Gustavo Dudamel as LA Phil’s “Creative Chair.” And the Metropolitan Opera will be staging a (long overdue) first Met production of Adams’ landmark opera Nixon in China (1985–87) in February 2011, with the composer conducting. Violinist Gil Shaham likewise has a big discography, with some 18 albums for Deutsche Grammophon, including big concertos (by the likes of Barber, Bartók, Brahms, Sarasate, Sibelius, and Saint-Saëns, et al.) as well as albums of chamber works. Shaham and composer/pianist Andre Previn picked up a Grammy for Best Chamber Music Performance in 1999 with their disc American Scenes (Works of Copland, Previn, Barber, Gershwin).

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MondaviArts.org Jeff Hudson contributes coverage of the performing arts to Capital Public Radio, the Davis Enterprise, and Sacramento News and Review.

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530.754.2787 866.754.2787 (toll-free)


saint louis symphony orchestra

Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra 130th Season, 2009-10 David Robertson, conductor First Violins David Halen Concertmaster Eloise and Oscar Johnson, Jr. Chair Heidi Harris Associate Concertmaster Louis D. Beaumont Chair Silvian Iticovici Second Associate Concertmaster Erin Schreiber Assistant Concertmaster Dana Edson Myers Justice Joseph H. and Maxine Goldenhersh Chair Manuel Ramos Darwyn Apple Jessica Cheng Margaret B. Grigg Chair Charlene Clark Emily Ho Jenny Lind Jones Joo Kim Angie Smart Mary and Oliver Langenberg Chair Takaoki Sugitani Haruka Watanabe Jane and Whitney Harris Chair Hiroko Yoshida Second Violins Alison Harney Principal Dr. Frederick Eno Woodruff Chair Kristin Ahlstrom Associate Principal Virginia V. Weldon, M.D. Chair Eva Kozma Assistant Principal Rebecca Boyer Hall Nicolae Bica Deborah Bloom Lisa Chong Elizabeth Dziekonski Lorraine Glass-Harris Ling Ling Guan Jooyeon Kong Asako Kuboki Wendy Plank Rosen Shawn Weil

Violas Jonathan Vinocour*** Principal Ben H. and Katherine G. Wells Chair Kathleen Mattis Acting Principal Christian Woehr Acting Associate Principal Weijing Wang Mike Chen Gerald Fleminger Susan Gordon Leonid Gotman Lynn Hague Morris Jacob Shannon Farrell Williams Chris Tantillo** Violoncellos Daniel Lee Principal Frank Y. and Katherine G. Gladney Chair Melissa Brooks Associate Principal Ruth and Bernard Fischlowitz Chair Catherine Lehr Assistant Principal Anne Fagerburg Richard Brewer James Czyzewski Sébastien Gingras David Kim Alvin McCall Bjorn Ranheim Double Basses Erik Harris Principal Henry Loew Chair Carolyn White Associate Principal Christopher Carson Assistant Principal David DeRiso Warren Goldberg Sarah Hogan Donald Martin Ronald Moberly Harp Frances Tietov Principal Elizabeth Eliot Mallinckrodt Chair Flutes Mark Sparks Principal Herbert C. and Estelle Claus Chair Andrea Kaplan Assistant Principal Jennifer Nitchman

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Piccolo Chair vacant Oboes Peter Bowman Principal Morton D. May Chair Barbara Orland Assistant Principal Philip Ross Carolyn Banham English Horn Carolyn Banham Clarinets Scott Andrews Principal Walter Susskind Chair Diana Haskell Assistant Principal Wilfred and Ann Lee Konneker Chair Tina Ward James Meyer E-flat Clarinet Diana Haskell Bass Clarinet James Meyer Bassoons George Berry Principal Molly Sverdrup Chair Andrew Gott Assistant Principal Felicia Foland Bradford Buckley Contrabassoon Bradford Buckley Horns Roger Kaza Principal W.L. Hadley and Phoebe P. Griffin Chair Tod Bowermaster Acting Assistant Principal James Wehrman Gregory Roosa Lawrence Strieby Julia Erdmann** Trumpets Susan Slaughter Principal Symphony Women’s Association Chair Thomas Drake Assistant Principal Joshua MacCluer Michael Walk David J. Hyslop Chair

Trombones Timothy Myers Principal Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein, Jr. Chair Stephen Lange Assistant Principal Jonathan Reycraft Gerard Pagano Bass Trombone Gerard Pagano Tuba Michael Sanders Principal Lesley A. Waldheim Chair Timpani Richard Holmes Principal Symphony Women’s Association Chair Thomas Stubbs Assistant Principal Paul A. and Ann S. Lux Chair Percussion William James Principal St. Louis Post-Dispatch Foundation Chair John Kasica Distinguished Percussion Chair Thomas Stubbs Keyboard Instruments Principal* Florence G. and Morton J. May Chair Music Library John Tafoya Librarian Elsbeth Brugger Associate Librarian Roberta Gardner Library Assistant Stage Staff Michael Lynch Stage Manager Joseph Clapper Assistant Stage Manager Joshua Riggs Stage Technician Bruce Mourning *Chair vacant **Replacement ***Leave of Absence

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arts education

Mondavi Center Arts Education

Artists on Tour Mondavi Center Arts education has a long-standing tradition of providing touring artists to schools for master classes and lecture demonstrations. In addition to augmenting ever-diminishing classroom instruction in performing arts—drama, music, dance—these classroom visits can help shape the personal connection of artist to audience. Artists on Tour is the heart of our outreach to aspiring young artists as well as children who never have seen a musical instrument in their classroom. The following comments were received by Mondavi Center following a visit by Curtis on Tour to Davis High School in March 2010: Thank you both for all your organization to get the Curtis students to our schools to perform. Your students did a wonderful job and were a real inspiration to the Jr. High Students. Their commitment and passion for their music was a real ear opener for these young musicians to observe. Would love to have you back every year! Thanks again to you and the Curtis players,

Angelo Moreno Orchestra Director Davis High School

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mondavi center

Individual Supporters -ONDAVI#ENTER )NNER#IRCLE Inner Circle donors are dedicated arts patrons whose leadership gifts to the Mondavi Center are a testament to the value of the performing arts in our lives. Mondavi Center is deeply grateful for the generous contributions of the dedicated patrons who give annual financial support to our organization. These donations are an important source of revenue for our program, as income from ticket sales covers less than half of the actual cost of our performance season. Their gifts to the Mondavi Center strengthen and sustain our efforts, enabling us not only to bring memorable performances by worldclass artists to audiences in the capital region each year, but also to introduce new generations to the experience of live performance through our Arts Education Program, which provides arts education and enrichment activities to more than 35,000 K-12 students annually. For more information on supporting the Mondavi Center, visit MondaviArts.org or call 530.754.5437.

Impresario Circle $25,000 and up

John and Lois Crowe†* Barbara K. Jackson†* Maestro Circle $10,000 - $24,999

Joyce and Ken Adamson Wayne and Jacque Bartholomew†* Dolly and David Fiddyment† Samia and Scott Foster† Friends of Mondavi Center Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Anne Gray†* Benjamin and Lynette Hart†* Mary B. Horton* Grant and Grace Noda* William and Nancy Roe†* Lawrence and Nancy Shepard† Joe and Betty Tupin†* Shipley and Dick Walters* Benefactors Circle $6,000 - $9,999 Michael Alexander Michael and Tootie Beeman California Statewide Certified Development Corporation Camille Chan† Patti Donlon† First Northern Bank† Bonnie and Ed Green†* Dee and Joe Hartzog† The One and Only Watson Margaret Hoyt* Sarah and Dan Hrdy William and Jane Koenig Garry Maisel† Stephen Meyer and Mary Lou Flint† Derry Ann Moritz and Charles R.S. Shepard M. A. Morris* Ben L. O’Brien Grace and John Rosenquist Hal and Carol Sconyers†* Raymond and Jeanette Seamans Tony and Joan Stone† Della Aichwalder Thompson Larry and Rosalie Vanderhoef†* And one donor who prefers to remain anonymous

† Mondavi Center Advisory Board Member * Friends of Mondavi Center

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Neil and Carla Andrews Apel Family Jeff and Karen Bertleson Cordelia S. Birrell Neil and Joanne Bodine Barry and Valerie Boone Brian Tarkington and Katrina Boratynski Michael and Betty Chapman Robert and Wendy Chason Chris and Sandy Chong* Oren and Eunice Adair-Christensen* Michele Clark and Paul Simmons Tony and Ellie Cobarrubia* Nancy DuBois* Catherine and Charles Farman Mr. and Mrs. Domenic Favero Donald and Sylvia Fillman Judith and Andrew Gabor Kay Gist Robert and Kathleen Grey Judy and Bill Hardardt* Tom and Mary Ann Herbert Lorena Herrig* Diana and Glenn Hofer Lesley and Ronald Hsu Debra Johnson, M.D. and Mario Gutierrez Gerald and Virginia Jostes Teresa and Jerry Kaneko* Dean and Karen Karnopp* Nancy Lawrence, Gordon Klein, and Linda Lawrence Greiner Heating and Air Dr. Richard E. Latchaw Jeffrey and Ginger Leacox John T. Lescroart and Lisa Sawyer Nelson Lewallyn and Marion Pace-Lewallyn Betty J. Lewis Dr. and Mrs. Ashley T. Lipshutz Paul and Diane Makley* Kathryn Marr Janet Mayhew* Helga and Robert Medearis Verne Mendel* Mary Ann and Richard Murray Jeff and Mary Nicholson Charles and Joan Partain Susan Strachan and Gavin Payne Lois and Dr. Barry Ramer Roger and Ann Romani* Melodie Rufer Ellen Sherman Tom and Meg Stallard* Tom and Judy Stevenson* Nathan and Johanna Trueblood Ken Verosub and Irina Delusina John Max Vogel M.D.and Jeanne Hanna Vogel* Claudette Von Rusten

Cantor & Company, A Law Corporation Susie Williams Elizabeth F. and Charles E. Wilts Bob and Joyce Wisner* And six donors who prefer to remain anonymous Directors Circle $1,100 - $2,999 Beulah and Ezra Amsterdam Russell and Elizabeth Austin Lydia and Ron Baskin* Virginia and Michael Biggs Kay and Joyce Blacker* Phyllis and Robert Bolt Jo Anne Boorkman* Clyde and Ruth Bowman Edwin Bradley Patricia Brown and Leslie Axelrod* Ralph and Clairelee Leiser Bulkley* Robert Burgerman and Linda Ramatowski Davis and Jan Campbell Lynne Cannady Seeley Chandler and James Kelly Jacqueline Clemens Rob and Liz Coman Eric and Michael Conn David J. Converse John and Gail Cooluris Jim and Kathy Coulter* John and Celeste Cron* Robert Crummey Chuck Cunningham and Deborah Dunham Terry and Jay Davison Jim and Carolyn DeHayes Cecilia M. Delury Cheryl Demas Bruce and Marilyn Dewey Martha Dickman* Rex and Joyce Donaldson* Richard and Joy Dorf* Thomas and Phyllis Farver* Nancy McRae Fisher Ron and Pam Fisher* Tom Forrester and Shelly Faura Dr. Andy and Wendy Huang Frank Joseph George Karl Gerdes and Pamela Rohrich Henry and Dorothy Gietzen Patty and John Goss* Donald Green Florence and Jack Grosskettler* Diane Gunsul Charles and Ann Halsted Donine Hedrick and David Studer Timothy Hefler Charles and Eva Hess Sharna and Mike Hoffman Suzanne Horsley* Claudia and Christoph Hulbe The International Wine & Spirit Competition Ruth W. Jackson Alessa Johns and Christopher Reynolds Clarence and Barbara Kado Barbara Katz* Robert Kingsley and Melissa Thorme

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Mondavi Center support

Producers Circle $3,000 - $5,999

Matthew and Cheryl Kurowski Brian and Dorothy Landsberg Mary Jane Large and Marc Levinson Edward and Sally Larkin* Allan and Claudia Leavitt Hyunok Lee and Daniel Sumner Yvonne LeMaitre* Lin and Peter Lindert Angelique Louie Natalie and Malcolm MacKenzie* Dennis H. Mangers and Michael Sestak Judith and Mark Mannis Marilyn Mansfield Richard and Anne Marder Yvonne L. Marsh Shirley Maus* In memory of Wm F. McCoy Kenneth McKinstry Gary and Susan McLaughlin Don and Lou McNary* Sonja and Steve Memering Joy Mench and Clive Watson Fred and Linda Meyers* Doc Miller John Meyer and Karen Moore Eldridge and Judith Moores Jim and Paula Munson Patricia and Surl Nielsen James Nordin and Linda Orrante Alice Oi in memory of Richard H. Oi Robert Ono and Betty Masuoka Philip and Miep Palmer Suzanne and Brad Poling Linda and Lawrence Raber* Kay Resler* Rick and Susie Rodgers Tom Roehr Don Roth† and Jolán Friedhoff Liisa A. Russell Beverly “Babs” Sandeen and Marty Swingle Ed and Karen Schelegle Marc and Heath Schenker Neil and Carrie Schore Jeff and Bonnie Smith Wilson and Kathryn Smith Ronald and Rosie Soohoo* Richard L. Sprague and Stephen C. Ott Maril Revette Stratton and Patrick Stratton Karmen Streng Jerome Suran and Helen Singer Suran* George and Rosemary Tchobanoglous Jennifer Thornton Claude and Barbara Van Marter Marie Lopez and John Walker Louise and Larry Walker Janda J. Waraas Mike and Ann Watembach Bruce and Patrice White Dale and Jane Wierman Fred and Mary Wood Richard and Judy Wydick Paul Wyman Elizabeth and Yin Yeh And eight donors who prefer to remain anonymous

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Mondavi Center support

mondavi center

members Encore Circle

$600 - $1,099 Gregg T. Atkins and Ardith Allread Robert and Joan Ball Doreen T. Chan Gale and Jack Chapman William and Susan Chen Dotty Dixon* John and Cathie Duniway Joan and Gregory Eddy Mark E. Ellis and Lynn Shapiro Carole Franti* Paul J. and Dolores L. Fry Charitable Fund David and Mae Gundlach Robin Hansen Roy and Miriam Hatamiya Katherine Hess Mary Jenkin Barbara and Robert Jones Irene Kennedy Kent and Judy Kjelstrom Paula Kubo Anesiades S. Leonard Susan Mann Maria Manoliu Michael Mantell John and Polly Marion Gary C. and Jane L. Matteson Barbara Moriel Robert and Janet Mukai Don and Sue Murchison Robert Murphy John Pascoe Ann and Jerry Powell* Harriet Prato Larry and Celia Rabinowitz Heather and Jeep Roemer Christian Sandrock and Dafna Gatmon Judith and Richard Stern Tony and Beth Tanke Lynn Taylor and Mont Hubbard Roseanna Torretto* Henry and Lynda Trowbridge* Robert and Helen Twiss Barbara D. Webster and Grady L. Webster Steven and Andrea Weiss* Frances and Nickols White Kandi Williams and Dr. Frank Jahnke Karl and Lynn Zender And five donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Orchestra Circle

$300 - $599 Steve Abramowitz and Dr. Alberta Nassi Jill and John Aguiar Mitzi S. Aguirre Paul and Nancy Aikin Steven Albrecht and Jessica Friedman Drs. Ralph and Teresa Aldredge Thomas and Patricia Allen David and Penny Anderson Alvan and Patricia Arthur Michael and Shirley Auman* Rex Avakian Murry and Laura Baria* Lupie and Richard Barton Drs. Noa and David Bell Carol L. Benedetti Tonya and Jack Berger Marvin Berman and Susan Flynn Robert and Diane Carlson Biggs Eduardo Blumwald and Angela Gelli Bobbie Bolden Elizabeth Bradford Paul Braun Joan Brenchley and Kevin Jackson Irving and Karen Broido* Frank Brown MD Greg Brucker

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John and Christine Bruhn Manuel Calderon de la Barca and Karen Zito Jackie Caplan Michael and Louise Caplan Michael and Susan Carl Richard Carlsen Anne Carlson Amy Chen and Raj Amirtharajah Charles and Mary Anne Cooper Michael Y. Corbett and Associates James and Patricia Cothern Paul Cox and Catherine Brennan Larry Dashiell and Peggy Siddons Thomas B. and Eina C. Dutton Vincent Elliot Brian Ely and Robert Hoffman Sheila and Steve Epler Micki and Les Faulkin Janet Feil Doris and Earl Flint Murray and Audrey Fowler Tom and Barbara Frankel Sevgi and Edwin Friedrich* Dr. Deborah and Brook Gale Craig Gladen Marvin and Joyce Goldman Paul N. and E. F. Goldstene Stephen and Deirdre Greenholz Marilyn and Alexander Groth Gwen and Darrow Haagensen Wanda J. Haas Sharon and Don Hallberg David and Donna Harris Jacqueline and Robert Harris Lauren L. Hastings Stephen and Joanne Hatchett Len and Marilyn Herrmann Paula Higashi David Hoffsten Robert Hollingsworth and Carol Beckham Frederick and B.J. Hoyt James and Patricia Hutchinson* Nancy Johnson Don and Diane Johnston Weldon and Colleen Jordan David Kalb and Nancy Gelbard Edith Kanoff Louise Kellogg and Douglas Neuhauser Ruth Ann Kinsella* Ken and Susan Kirby Joseph Kiskis and Diana Vodrey Peter Klavins and Susan Kauzlarich Paul and Pamela Kramer Charlene R. Kunitz Allan and Norma Lammers Richard Lawrence and Katie Thomas Ruth Lawrence Frances and Arthur Lawyer* Patrick D. Leathers and Kathrine Cole-Leathers Carol and Robert Ledbetter JH Edmund Lee Stanley Levin Barbara Levine Mary Ann and Ernest Lewis* Michael and Sheila Lewis* David and Ruth Lindgren Spencer Lockson Monica R. Lohr Bill and Harriet Lovitt Jim and Nancy Lyons Jeffrey and Helen Ma Jamie Madison Bunkie Mangum Patricia Martin* Robert Mazalewski and Yvonne Clinton Julie and Craig McNamara Nancy and Glen Michel Julianne and Dexter Morin Robert and Susan Munn* Beverly Myers William and Nancy Myers Forrest Odle Marilyn Olmstead Margaret Ong and Murray Levison* John and Carol Oster Sally Ozonoff and Thomas Richey Jack and Sue Palmer Dr. John and Barbara Parker

Suzanne and Robert Pearl Bonnie A. Plummer* Jerry L. Plummer John W. and Deborah Nichols Poulos Ms. Ann Preston J. and K. Redenbaugh John Reitan Judy, David, and Hannah Reuben* Guy and Eva Richards Tracy Rodgers and Richard Budenz Bob and Tamra Ruxin Tom and Joan Sallee Kathleen and David Sanders Mark and Ita Sanders* Howard and Eileen Sarasohn Jerry and Kay Schimke Mervyn Schnaidt Maralyn Molock Scott Jay and Jill Shepherd Kathryn Shigaki James and Rita Seiber* Elizabeth Smithwick Al and Sandy Sokolow Francis and Laurel Sousa Curtis and Judy Spencer Elizabeth St. Goar Sherman and Hannah Stein Tim and Julie Stephens Les and Mary Stephens Dewall Rob and Andrea Stone Pieter Stroeve, Jodie Stroeve, and Diane Barrett Eric and Patricia Stromberg* Kristia Suutala Julia Swain John and Donna Tewart Jeanne Shealor and George Thelen Butch and Virginia Thresh Dennis and Judy Tsuboi Ann-Catrin Van Robert Vassar and Nanci Manceau Donald Walk, M.D. Kathrine and Robert Ware Norma and Richard Watson Dr. Fred and Betsy Weiland Daniel Weiss and Elena Friedman-Weiss Jeanne Wheeler Charles White and Carrie Schucker, PhD Jim and Genia Willett* Denise and Alan Williams Sally Wood and William W. Vasey Charlotte C. Xanders Lisa Yamauchi and Michael O’Brien Iris Yang and G. Richard Brown Ronald M. Yoshiyama George and Hanni Zweifel And nine donors who prefer to remain anonymous

Mainstage Circle $100 - $299

Michelle Adams Tom and Betty Adams Mary Aften Jack and Karin Aguilar Susan Ahlquist Rudy Ahumada John and Tuesday Airola Suzanne and David Allen Brandy Anderson Elinor Anklin Alex Ardans Clemens Arrasmith Deborah Arrington Jerry and Barbara August Kevin Baker George and Irma Baldwin Beverly and Clay Ballard Charlotte Ballard Elizabeth Banks Michele Barefoot Paul and Linda Baumann Nicole Baumgarth Lynn Baysinger* Delee and Jerry Beavers Claire and Marion Becker Bee Happy Apiaries Marie Beeson Lorna Belden and Milton Blackman Merry Benard William and Marie Benisek

Robert C. and Jane D. Bennett Marta Beres Donald and Katheryn Bers* Boyd and Lucille Bevington Heather, Gary and Erica Bevowitz Ernst and Hannah Biberstein Elizabeth V. Biggert John and Katy Bill Andrea Bjorklund and Sean Duggan Caroline and Sam Bledsoe Deborah Born Steve and Cecelia Boswell Mary and Jill Bowers Robert and Maxine Braude Dan and Millie Braunstein* Richard Breedon Margaret and Jack Brockhouse Don and Liz Brodeur Karla Broussard-Boyd Edelgard Brunelle Don and Mary Ann Brush Janet Burau Mike and Marian Burnham Dr. Margaret Burns and Dr. Roy W. Bellhorn Victor and Meredith Burns William and Karolee Bush John and Marguerite Callahan Edward Callaway Lita Campbell* Jean and Bob Canary John and Nancy Capitanio James and Patty Carey Hoy and Patricia Carman* Jan Carmikle ‘90 Nancy Carr John Carroll Bruce and Mary Alice Carswell* Jan B. and Barbara J. Carter* Joan and Jack Chambers Dorothy Chikasawa* Frank Chisholm Annette Chow Michael and Paula Chulada Gail E. Clark Linda Clevenger and Seth Brunner Bill and Linda Cline Barbara Cody Stephan Cohen Christina Cole Sheri and Ron Cole Harold and Marj Collins Steve and Janet Collins Jan Conroy Roberta Cook Terry and Marybeth Cook Catherine Coupal* Victor Cozzalio and Lisa Heilman-Cozzalio Crandallicious Family Susan and Fitz-Roy Curry Elizabeth Dahlstrom-Bushnell* John and Joanne Daniels Sheila David and Peter Beal Dena Davidson Johanna Davies Mary Hanf Dawson Peter and Jennifer Demello Leigh Dibb The Dillon Family Joel and Linda Dobris Val Dolcini and Solveig Monson Val and Marge Dolcini* Keith Doram Katherine Douglas Sue Drake* Ray Dudonis Anne Duffey Leslie Dunsworth Edward and Norma Eason Julia Couzens and Jay-Allen Eisen Harold and Anne Eisenberg Eliane Eisner Allen Enders Merrilee Engel Adrian and Tamara Engel Sid England Richard Epstein and Gwendolyn Doebbert Gary and Barbara Erickson Carol Erickson and David Phillips M. Richard and Gloria M. Eriksson Jeff Ersig Christine Facciotti Nell Farr Andrew D. and Eleanor E. Farrand* Elizabeth Fassler David and Kerstin Feldman Elizabeth Fenton


Jong Sook Kim Louise Bettner and Larry Kimble Kris and Pat King Patricia M. Kivela* Dorothy Klishevich Paulette Knox Winston and Katy Ko Douglas Krause and Martha Ozonoff Dave and Nina Krebs Marcia and Kurt Kreith Sandra Kristensen C.R. and E. Kuehner Bill and Joan Kuhns Nate Kupperman Leslie Kurtz Cecilia Kwan Donald and Yoshie Kyhos Ray and Marianne Kyono Terri Labriola Corrine and Michael Laing Bonnie and Kit Lam* Marsha Lang Lawrence and Ingrid Lapin Bruce and Susan Larock Sharon Adlis and Harry Laswell Darnell Lawrence Leon E. Laymon C and J Learned Marceline Lee and Philip Smith Nancy and Steve Lege Robert and Barbara Leidigh Suzanne Leineke The Lenk-Sloane Family Evelyn A. Lewis Melvyn and Rita Libman Guille Levin Libresco Jim and Jami Long Kim Longworth Rubin and Carol Lopez Mary and Jack Lowry Henry Luckie Maryanne Lynch Ed and Sue MacDonald Leslie Macdonald and Gary Francis Julin Maloof and Stacey Harmer Frances Mara Joseph and Mary Alice Marino Pam Marrone and Mick Rogers Donald and Mary Martin Frank Martin Garth and Linda Martin Jeanne Martin Patti Martinez Mr. and Mrs. William R. Mason Evelyn Matteucci and Richard Vorpe Bob and Vel Matthews Leslie Maulhardt Katherine F. Mawdsley Barrett McBride Sean and Sebine McCarthy Karen McCluskey* Del and Doug McColm Babe McCormick John and Kathy McCoy Nora McGuinness* Donna and Dick McIlvaine Tim and Linda McKenna Richard and Virginia McRostie Kent and Laurie McVay Martin A. Medina and Laurie Perry Stanley Meizel Barry Melton and Barbara Langer Sharon Menke The Merchant Family Roland Meyer Leslie Michaels and Susan Katt Lisa Miller Sue and Rex Miller Melva Mills Douglas Minnis Steve and Kathy Miura* Kei and Barbara Miyano Sydney Moberg Vicki and Paul Moering Joanne K. Moldenhauer Amy Moore Marcie Mortensson Christopher Motley Tony and Linda Mras The Muller Family Terry and Judith Murphy M.A. Nelson Richard Nelson Margaret Neu†* Cathy Neuhauser and Jack Holmes Robert and Donna Nevraumont* Dana Newell and Keri Mistler Malvina Nisman Nobriga Family

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Nancy Nolte and James Little Lisa Nowell and Stan Robinson John and Freddie Oakley Patricia O’Brien Ann O’Connell Drs. Joseph and Martha O’Donnell Kay Yae Ogasawara Mark Olander and Nancy Farwell Garrett Koslan and Phyliss Oliveira James and Sharon Oltjen Marvin O’Rear Lois and Henry Ortmann Bob and Beth Owens Jay Owens Jessie Ann Owens Carlene and Mike Ozonoff* Michael Pach and Mary Wind Joan S. Packard Frank Pajerski Thomas Pavlakovich and Kathryn Demakopoulos Kathryn Palmieri Ann Peterson and Marc Hoeschele Robert and Nancy Peterson Edward A. Phillips In memory of Walter Pilgrim Pat Piper Vicki and Bob Plutchok Ralph and Jane Pomeroy* Kevin Powers Jerry and Bernice Pressler Otto and Evelyn Raabe Edward and Jane Rabin Jan and Anne-Louise Radimsky Kathryn Radtkey-Gaither Mark and Cathryn Rakich J. David Ramsey Lawrence and Norma Rappaport Evelyn and Dewey Raski Olga Raveling Dorothy and Frederick Reardon Sandi Redenbach* Mrs. John Reese, Jr. Martha Rehrman* Michael A. Reinhart and Dorothy Yerxa Nancy Reitz Eugene and Elizabeth Renkin Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rice Fred and Bernadeen Richardson Ralph and Judy Riggs Kristyn Ringgold Caroline and Stephen Roberts David and Kathy Robertson Richard and Evelyne Rominger Sharon and Elliott Rose* Andrea G. Rosen George and Jean Rosenfeld Barbara and Alan Roth David and Catherine Rowen Jennifer Ryan Hugh Safford Bob and Joyce Sahara Terry Sandbek and Sharon Billings* Elia and Glenn Sanjume Fred and Polly Schack John and Joyce Schaeuble Leon Schimmel and Annette Cody Fred and Colene Schlaepfer Julie Schmidt* Bob Schmidt and Jennifer Kerr Janis J. Schroeder and Carrie L. Markel Jeanette and Peter Schulz Christopher Searcy Brian Sehnert and Janet McDonald Dan Shadoan and Ann Lincoln Nancy Sheehan and Rich Simpson Barbara Sheldon Valerie Brown and Edward Shields Ruth and Robert Shumway Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Siegler Sandra and Clay Sigg Andrew Sih Dr. and Mrs. James Silverman Mark Berman and Lynn Simon Michael and Elizabeth Singer Barbara Slemmons Marion E. Small Alexandra Smith Annabelle Smith Don R.C. Smith James and Suzette Smith Michael and Judith Smith Susan and Virgil Smith* Jean Snyder Roger and Freda Sornsen Greg and Pam Sparks Edward and Sharon Speegle

Joseph and Dolores Spencer DeAna Spiess Lenore and Henry Spoto Harriet Steiner and Miles Stern John and Johanna Stek Raymond Stewart Deb and Jeff Stromberg Becky and James Sullivan Jean E. Swearingen Stewart and Ann Teal* Pouneh Tehrani Francie Teitelbaum Julie A. Theriault, PA-C Janet Thome Marc Thompson, CRE, FRICS Cynthia Thorburn Henry and Kathy Thornhill Robert Thorpe Brian Toole Katharine Traci Michael and Heidi Trauner Rich and Fay Traynham Gary and Jan Truesdail Barbara and Jim Tutt Chris and Betsy Van Kessel Bart and Barbara Vaughn* Denise Verbeck Richard J Vielbig Merna and Don Villarejo Charles and Terry Vines Hyla Wagner M. Therese Wagnon Carol Walden and Sharon Jane Matthews Caroline and Royce Waters Marya Welch* Carolyn Wells Daniel and Eleanor Wendin Robert and Leslie Westergaard* William and Laura Wheeler Linda K. Whitney Barbara Weiman Mrs. Jane L. Williams Keith Williams Janet Winterer The Wolf Family Linda Yassinger Timothy and Vicki Yearnshaw Fan and Viola Yee Norman and Manda Yeung Phillip and Iva Yoshimura Heather M. Young and Peter B. Quinby Larry Young and Nancy Lee Phyllis Young Verena Leu Young* Melanie and Medardo Zavala Phyllis and Darrel Zerger* Scott and Linda Zimmerman Tim and Sonya Zindel Mark and Wendy Zlotlow

Mondavi Center support

Steven and Susan Ferronato Margery Findlay Kieran and Martha Fitzpatrick Manfred Fleischer David and Donna Fletcher Don and Eloise Foley Susan and Gary Ford Glenn E. Fortini Murray and Audrey Fowler Robert Fowles and Linda Parzych Marion Franck Barbara and Ed Frankel Anthony and Jorgina Freese Bill and Joyce Frey Joel I. Friedman Kerim and Josina Friedrich Joan M. Futscher Myra A. Gable Lillian Gabriel Charles and Joanne Gamble Claude and Nadja Garrod Ivan Gennis Peggy Gerick Gerald Gibbons and Sibilla Hershey Eleanor Glassburner Marnelle Gleason* Roberta R. Gleeson Burton Goldfine and Deborah Birnbaum Pat and Bob Gonzalez* Robert and Velma Goodlin Michael Goodman Victor Graf Phyllis Graham Lewis Gray Mrs. Marshall Greenberg Paul and Carol Grench June and Paul Gulyassy Wesley and Ida Hackett* Jim and Jane Hagedorn Frank and Rosalind Hamilton William and Sherry Hamre Marsha Hand Jim and Laurie Hanschu Marylee and John Hardie Michael and Carol Harris Richard and Vera Harris Cathy Brorby and Jim Harritt Gary Hart The Hartwig-Lee Family Mr. and Mrs. K. Hashagen Cynthia Hearden* Barbara Hegenbart Marjorie Heineke Martin Helmke and Joan Frye Williams Nancy and Larry Hendrick and Rich and Karol McCormac Rand and Mary Herbert Eric Herrgesell DVM DACVR Terry Hewett Roger and Rosanne Heym LuAnne Higgs and Jim Lane Alouise Hillier Calvin Hirsch and Deborah Francis Frederick Hodges Michael and Peggy Hoffman Jeannette Hogan Bryan Jeff Holcomb, M.D. Jan and Herb Hoover Steve and Nancy Hopkins Alice Howell Hull and Honeycutt Marketing and Design David and Gail Hulse Eva Peters Hunting Lorraine J. Hwang William Jackson Dr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Jensen Pamela R. Jessup Jane Johnson* Steve and Naomi Johnson Michelle Johnston and Scott Arranto Warren and Donna Johnston Mason Jones Martin and JoAnn Joye* Mary Ann and Victor Jung John and Nancy Jungerman Carole Kane Fred and Selma Kapatkin Shari and Timothy Karpin Jean and Stephen Karr Yasuo Kawamura Phyllis and Scott Keilholtz* Patricia Kelleher Dave and Gay Kent Michael Kent and Karl Jandrey Robert and Cathryn Kerr Pat and John Kessler

And 61 donors who prefer to remain anonymous

CORPORATE MATCHING GIFTS American Express Foundation Gift Matching Program Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Chevron/Texaco Matching Gift Fund ExxonMobil Foundation McGraw-Hill Company Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation Monsanto Company The Sacramento Bee Wachovia Foundation Matching Gifts Program Wells Fargo Foundation We appreciate the many Members who participate in their employers’ matching gift program. Please contact your Human Resources department to find out about your company’s matching gift program. Note: We are pleased to recognize the Members of Mondavi Center for their generous support of our program. We apologize if we inadvertently listed your name incorrectly; please contact the Development Office at 530.754.5436 to inform us of corrections.

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Mondavi Center

Corporate Support Corporate partners

Giving The Art of Giving

How does my gift make a difference? The Mondavi Center uses the support of its donors to ensure that season presentations are culturally diverse, affordably priced, and meet the highest standards of excellence.

Platinum

Ticket sales cover only 40% of our costs.

gold

Office of Campus Community Relations

40%

Your charitable donation makes it all possible: silver

• Brings world-class artists and distinguished speakers to your doorstep • Supports a nationally recognized Arts Education Program, serving more than 35,000 K-12 children and teachers • Showcases and supports talented, young artists

bronze

For more information, visit us at MondaviArts.org/supportus

Join Mondavi Center’s Corporate Partner Program and align your company with one of the nation’s most Mondavi Center Grantors and arts education sponsors

prestigious university performing arts presenters. Partnerships are available at a wide range of levels, from single-event sponsorships to affiliation with an entire season of performances. Our staff will work with you to create a customized benefits package that meets your company’s marketing objectives.

Benefits include: • Broad regional marketing exposure • Unique client entertainment opportunities • Priority ticketing services • On-site event presence

Friends of Mondavi Center

• Business-to-business networking opportunities • Access to UC Davis leadership and campus community

Event & Additional Support Partners Boeger Winery Ciocolat Davis Food Co-op 50

Seasons Restaurant Watermelon Music

| mondaviarts.org

For more information about how you can support the Mondavi Center, please contact: James Warhover Associate Director of Development jtwarhover@ucdavis.edu | 530.754.5419


Mondavi Center staff DON ROTH, Ph.D. Executive Director Jeremy Ganter Associate Executive Director PROGRAMMING Jeremy Ganter Director of Programming Erin Palmer Programming Manager Lara Downes Curator: Young Artists Program ARTS EDUCATION Joyce Donaldson Associate to the Executive Director for Arts Educaton and Strategic Projects Jennifer Mast Arts Education Coordinator Ruth Rosenberg Professional Development Coordinator

AUDIENCE SERVICES Emily Taggart Audience Services Manager/ Artist Liaison Coordinator Yuri Rodriguez Events Manager Nancy Temple Assistant Public Events Manager BUSINESS SERVICES Debbie Armstrong Senior Director for Support Services Carolyn Warfield Human Resources Analyst Mandy Jarvis Financial Analyst Russ Postlethwaite Billing System Administrator Dena Gilday Payroll and Travel Assistant

DEVELOPMENT Robert Avalos Director of Development

MARKETING Rob Tocalino Director of Marketing

James Warhover Associate Director of Development

Rebecca Summers Marketing Manager Erin Kelley Senior Graphic Artist

Christine Vargas Donor Event Manager Elisha Findley Development Coordinator FACILITIES Steve McFerron Director of Facilities Greg Bailey Lead Building Maintenance Worker Robert J. Beauregard Lead Building Maintenance Worker

Christi-Anne Sokolewicz Scene Technician TICKET OFFICE Sarah Herrera Ticket Office Manager

production Eric Richardson Director of Production

Erin McDowell Ticket Office Supervisor

Jessie Eting Stage Manager Christopher Oca Stage Manager Jenna Bell Production Coordinator

Daniel Goldin Master Electrician

Mark J. Johnston Lead Application Developer

Jon Foster Scene Technician

Morissa Rubin Senior Graphic Artist

Zak Stelly-Riggs Master Carpenter

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Darren Marks Programmer/Designer

Adrian Galindo Scene Technician

Michael Hayes Head Sound Technician

Tim Kendall Programmer

Steve David Ticket Agent Russell St. Clair Ticket Agent Head Ushers Huguette Albrecht Jennifer Carriere George Edwards Linda Gregory Donna Horgan James Nordin Joe Schwartz Linda Schwartz Mike Tracy Susie Valentin Terry Whittier Janellyn Whittier

Mondavi Center advisory Board The Mondavi Center Advisory Board is a university support group whose primary purpose is to provide assistance to the Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis, and its resident users, the academic departments of Music and Theatre and Dance, and the presenting program of the Mondavi Center, through fundraising, public outreach, and other support for the mission of UC Davis and the Mondavi Center. 09-10 Season Board Officers John Crowe, Chair Lynette Hart, Vice-Chair Joe Tupin, Vice-Chair Dee Hartzog, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Lor Shepard, Patrons Relations Co-Chair Garry P. Maisel, Corporate Relations Co-Chair Camille Chan, Corporate Relations Co-Chair Garry P. Maisel, Immediate Past Chair

Members Wayne Bartholomew Camille Chan John and Lois Crowe Patti Donlon David and Dolly Fiddyment Mary Lou Flint Samia and Scott Foster Anne Gray

Bonnie and Ed Green Benjamin and Lynette Hart Dee and Joe Hartzog Barbara K. Jackson Garry P. Maisel Stephen Meyer John and Rita Onsum William and Nancy Roe Hal and Carol Sconyers

Lawrence and Nancy Shepard Tony and Joan Stone Chris Thompson Joe Tupin Rosalie Vanderhoef

Ex Officio

Linda Katehi, Chancellor, UC Davis Enrique Lavernia, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, UC Davis Jessie Ann Owens, Dean, Division of Humanities, Arts & Cultural Studies, College of Letters & Sciences, UC Davis Margaret Neu, President, Friends of Mondavi Center Veronica Passalacqua, Chair, Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee Don Roth, Executive Director, Mondavi Center

Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee

friends of mondavi center

The Arts & Lectures Administrative Advisory Committee is made up of interested students, faculty, and staff who attend performances, review programming opportunities, and meet monthly with the director of the Mondavi Center. They provide advice and feedback for the Mondavi Center staff throughout the performance season.

09 -10 Executive Board Margaret Neu, President Laura Baria, Vice President/Membership Lois Crowe, Secretary Jo Anne Boorkman, Adult Education Sandra Chong, K-12 Education John Cron, Mondavi Center Tours Phyllis Zerger, Outreach Martha Rehrman, School Matinee Ticket Program Fundraising Eunice Adair Christensen, Gift Shop Manager, Ex Officio Joyce Donaldson, Associate to Executive Director, Ex Officio Member

09-10 Committee Members Veronica Passalacqua, Chair Jessica Cvetko Angie Dernersesian Jochen Ditterich Susan Franck

Stephen Hudson Erin Klein Oluwafunmilayo Ladeinde Jade McCutcheon Bella Merlin Claire O’Brien

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this playbill for reuse.

Hearne Pardee Kayla Rouse Sally Ryen Mikal Saltveit Erin Schlemmer James Smith

MONDAVI CENTER PROGRAM Issue 10: Apr 2010 |

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POlicies and information Ticket Exchange Policy • Once a season ticket request is processed, there are no refunds. • If you exchange for a higher priced ticket, you will be charged the difference. The difference between a higher and lower priced exchanged ticket is not refundable. • Tickets must be exchanged at least one business day prior to the performance. • Tickets may not be exchanged after your performance date. • Gift certificates will not be issued for returned tickets. Parking You may purchase parking passes for individual Mondavi Center events for $6 for each event at the parking lot or with your ticket order. Rates are subject to change. Parking passes that have been lost or stolen will not be replaced. Group Discounts Entertain friends, family, classmates, or business associates and save money. Groups of 20 or more qualify for a 10% discount. Payment must be made in a single check or credit card transaction. Please call 530.754.2787 or 866.754.2787. Student Tickets (50% off the full single ticket price*) Eligibility: Full-time students age 12 & over enrolled for the current academic year at an accredited institution and matriculating towards a diploma or a degree. (Continuing education enrollees are not eligible). Proof Requirements: School ID for the current academic year OR photocopy of your transcript/report card/tuition bill receipt for the current academic year. Children For events other than the family series it is recommended that children under the age of 5 not be brought into the performance for the enjoyment of all patrons. A ticket is required of all children regardless of age; any child attending a performance should be able to sit quietly throughout the performance. Privacy Policy Mondavi Center collects information from patrons solely for the purpose of gaining necessary information to conduct business and serve our patrons more efficiently. We also sometimes share names and addresses with other not-for-profit arts organizations. If you do not wish to be included in our e-mail communications or postal mailings, or if you do not want us to share your name, please notify us via e-mail, U.S. mail, or telephone. Full Privacy Policy at www.MondaviArts.org.

*Only one discount per ticket.

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| mondaviarts.org

Accommodations for Patrons with Disabilities Mondavi Center is proud to be a state-of-the-art public facility that meets or exceeds all state and federal ADA requirements and is fully accessible to patrons with disabilities. Parking for patrons with DMV placards is available on the street level (mid-level) of the nearby parking structure, and on the surface lots near the covered walkway. There is also a short-term drop-off area directly in front of the entrance. Patrons with disabilities or special seating needs should notify the Mondavi Center Ticket Office of those needs at the time of ticket purchase. Requests for sign language interpreting, real-time captioning, Braille programs, and other reasonable accommodations should be made with at least two weeks notice. Mondavi Center may not be able to accommodate special needs brought to our attention at the performance. Seating spaces for wheelchair users and their companions are located at all levels and prices for all performances. Ushers are available at the doors to Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Please explain to the usher how best to assist you, if needed. Special Seating Mondavi Center offers special seating arrangements for our patrons with disabilities. Please call the Ticket Office at 530.754.2787 [TDD 530.754.5402]. Listening Enhancement Devices Listening Infrared Systems are installed in both Jackson Hall and the Vanderhoef Studio Theatre. Receivers that can be used with or without hearing aids are available for patrons who have difficulty understanding dialogue or song lyrics. They may be checked out at no charge from the Patron Services Desk near the lobby elevators. Elevators Mondavi Center has two passenger elevators serving all levels. They are located at the north end of the Rumsey Rancheria Grand Lobby, near the restrooms and Patron Services Desk. Restrooms All public restrooms are equipped with accessible sinks, stalls, baby-changing stations, and amenities. There are six public restrooms in the building: two on the Orchestra level; two on the Orchestra Terrace level; and two on the Grand Tier level. Service Animals Mondavi Center welcomes working service animals that are necessary to assist patrons with disabilities. Service animals must remain on a leash or harness at all times. Please contact the Mondavi Center Ticket Office if you intend to bring a service animal to an event so that appropriate seating can be reserved for you.


Mondavi Center 09-10: Playbill 10