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THE

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR: BY

THOMAS SMITH WEBB, PAST GRAND M.A.S!l'ER, ETO •• ETO.

'1'0 WIIICn IS

A~~}i~Y~TI~~:~T~=G~~::.E1 :J1.'ii~::G -;~~S:OOll:PTED GENE.S.AJ..LY KNOWN' .AS TllE.

INEFFABLE DEGREES, BY B. T. CARSON, So,·. •. G.'. Oom.•. Ohio G.·. Oons!stoxy of P:. R. •• S.'. 32".

NEW AND ILLUSTRATED EDIT.::ON.

OINCINN ATI: APPLEGATE & COMPANY. 43 l!AIN STREET,

1858.

RI'rll,


GRAND ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER OF THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND. Providence, July 7, .A. L. 5802. T!IE subscribers, having been appointed a committ.ee to examine a publication by Companion T!IOMA!I S. WEBB, entitled, "TIIE FREEMASON'S MONITOR," beg leave to report, that having attended to the subject of their appointment, they are of opinion, that the said publication is replete with useful Masonic information, and is fully entitled to the sanction of this Grand Chapter. JOHN CARLILE, R . .A. K. WM. WILKINSON, R . .A. S. JEREMIAH F. JENKINS, R . .A. T. NATHAN FISHER, R. A. C. JOSEPH TILLINGHAST, R • .A. C. Whereupon, resolved unanimously, That this Grand Chapter recommend the aforesaid Work to the attention and study of all the members of the fraternity to whom the same may come. Extract from the Records . .AMOS T. JENCKES, Grand Secretary.

Entered according to act of Oo11gress, !11 the year 1858, b;

.APPLEGATE & CO. In the Clerk's Oflice for the District Oourt for the Southern District ofOhto.


INDEX. CHAPTER I. Origin of Masonry and its General Advantages............

17

CHAPTER II. The. Government of the Fraternity Explained..............

19

CHAPTER III. The Importance of the Secrets of Masonry Demonstrated 21 CHAPTER IV. General Remarks......... .... •• ... ••• ...... .... ........... .... .. ...

28

CHAPTER V. The Ceremony of Opening and Closing a Lodge............

25

CHAPTER VI. Charges and Regulations for the Conduct and 'Behavior of Masons......... .... ..... ........... ...... ... .... .•••• .... . .... .•• 28 CHAPTER VII. Pre-requisites for a Candidate..................................

88

CHAPTER VIII. Entered Apprentice Degree.......................................

86

CHAPTER IX. Fellow Craft...... ......... .. .... . .. .... ...... .. .... ...... ...... ••••••

58

CHAPTER X. Master Mason...... ...... .. .• .. .. •• .• .. .•• ... .. .... ...... ... ... •. ••.•

76 ·


iv

INDEX.

CHAPTER XI. 1\I!Irk Master............... ... ...... ...... .. .... .. .... ...... .... .....

91

CH~\.PTER XII. Present or Past 1\Iuster...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ......

101

CHAPTER XIII. 1lost Excellent lHuster ......................................... .,

141

CHAPTER XIV. Royal Arch JI.Iason......... ......... ...... ...... .•..•. •••... ......

155

CHAPTER XV. On the Order of High Priest...... .. ... ...... ...... ... ......... 179 CHAPTER XVI. Royal Ma.ster's Degree............................... ...... •.•...

211

CHAPTER XVII. Select i\Ia.stcr's Degree..........................................

214

CHAP1'ER XVIII. Order of Knights of the Red Cross...........................

229

CHAPTER XIX. Knights Templars and Knights of 1\IaHa...... ..... ...... 246 CHAPTER XX. Knights of Malta.................. ......... ...... ....... ..........

270

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PREFACE TO THE ORIGINAL EDITION,1797. THE following work, although chiefly intended for the use of the .A.ncient and honorable society of Free and .A.coepted Masons, is also calculated to explain the nature and design of the Masonic Institution, to those who may be desirous of becoming acquainted with its 路principles, whether for the purpose of initiation into the society, or merely for the gratification of their curiosity. The observations upon the first three degrees, are many of them taken from Preston's "IllustratiQns Q.f ltftuQM'JJ." with some necessary alterations. Mr. Preston's distribution of the first lecture into six, the second into four, and the third into twelve sections, not being agreeable to the mode of working in .A.merioa, they are differently arranged in this work. It is presumed, that all regular Lodges, and Royal Arch Chapters, will :find it a useful assistant and ltfonitor; inasmuch as it contains most of the Charges, Prayers, and Scripture Passages, made use of at out" meetings, and which are not otherwise to be found, without recourse to several volumes; this often oocal!ions much delay in the recitals, produces many irregularities in their distribution, and sometimes causes important omissions. The whole are here digested and arranged in such order, through the several degrees, from the Entsred Apprentice to the TtoyaZ ..drch Nason, that they may be easily understood; a.nd, by a due attention to their several divisions, the mode of working, as well in arrangement as matter, will become universally the same. Tllis desirable object will add much to t.he happiness and satlsfact.ion of all good Masons, and redound to the honor of the whole fraternity. September 26th, 1797.


THIS EDITION

or WEBB'S MoNITOR has been repeatedly called for by prominent members of the Masonic Fraternity and the work is now issued to meet this pressing demand. For nearly sixty years WEBB's MoNITOR has been a standard work in the. Lodge Room: it has furnished materials for all other books of rituals; and whatever excellence they contain are but reflections from this great fountain of Masonic light. No man in America understood the arrangement and philosophy .of our rituals so well as THOMAS SMITH WEBB. The materials of the lessons and lectures pertaining to the :first three degrees he gathered from Preston, confessedly the ablest "workman" among our English brethren for the last hundred years; but the arrangement of the " Monitor'路' is less comple:x:, and better adapted to the work in this country, than is "Preston's Illustrations." Webb was the ablest Masonic ritualistic of his day-the very prince of 1\Iasonio workmen; and his Monitor has had many imitations, but no equals, since. For some thil-ty years subsequent to 1797, t.he Monitor was almost the only book of rituals known to the American Craft. All the old Masons were trained in the Art through the aid of this book, and to them its re-appearance will be like that.. of an old and long cherished friend. The work has been carefully and appropriately Tilustrated, by way of aid to the Masonic student. In ad<lition, a full and complete ritual of Ineffable Masonry, or the Ancient and Accepted Rite, ha.s been added, prepared by E. T. CARsoN, Esq. confessedly one of the ablest workmen in that Rite in this country. Taken as a whole, the work is now the most complete as a book of rituals that has ever been published, and the publishers confidently commend it as such to the Craft throughout the country.


FREEMASONS' MONITOR.

CHAPTER I. ORIGIN OF MASONRY AND ITS GENERAL ADVANTAGES.

FRoM the commencement of t1le world, we may trace the foundation of Masonry.* Ever since symmetry began, and harmony displayed her charms, our â&#x20AC;˘Masonry and Geometry are

so::~e-~u~~-:-sy~~nymous

I

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ter:: _ _ _


路--

18

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

order has had a being. During many ages, and in many different countries, it has flourished. , In the dark periods of antiquity, when literature was in a low state, and the rude manners of our forefathers withheld from them that knowledge we now so amply share, masonry diffused its influence. This science unveiled, arts arose, civilization took place, and the progress of knowledge and philosophy gradually dispelled the gloom of ignorance and barbarism. Government being settled, authority was given to laws, and the assemblies of the fraternity acquired the patronage of the great and the good, while the tenets of the profession were attended with unbolmded utility. Masonry is a. science confined to no particular country, but diffused over the whole terrestrial globe. Wherever arts flourish, tl1ere it flourishes too. Add to this, that by secret. and inviolable ~;igus, carefully preserved among the fraternity throughout the worl<l, masonry becomes an universal language. Hence many advantages are gained: the distant Chinese, the wild Arab, and the American savage, will embrace a brother Briton, Franc or German; and will know, that beside the common ties of humanity, there is still a stronger obligation to induce him to kind and friendly offices. The spirit of the fulminating priest will be tamed and a moral brother, though of a different persuasion engage his esteem. Thus, through the influence of masonry, which is reconcilable to the best policy, all those disputes, which embitter life, and sour the tem-


INTRODUCTION.

19

pers of men, are avoided : while the common good, 路 the general design of the craft is zealously pursued. From this view of the system, its utility must be sufficiently obvious. The universal principles of the art unite men of the most opposite tenets, of the most distant countries, and of the most contradictory opinions, in one i~dissoluble bond of affection, so that in every nation a Mason finds a friend, and in every climate a home. CHAPTER II. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE FR.ATERNITY EXPL.AINED.

I

l.

THE mode of government observed by the fraternity will best explain the importance, and give the truest idea of the naturf and design, of the masonic system. There are several classes of Masons, under different appellations. The privileges of these classes are distinct, and particular means are adopted to preserve those privileges to the just and meritorious of each class. Honor and probity are recommendations to the first class ; in which the practice of virtue is enforced, and the duties of morality inculcated, while the mincl is prepared for regular and social converse in the principles of knowledge and philosphy. Diligence, assiduity and application are qualifications for the second class ; in which an accurate elucidation of science, both in theory and practice, is given. Here human reason is cultivated by a due


20

F&EEM.ASON'S 路MONITOR.

exertion of the rational and intellectual powers and faculties ; nice and difficult theories are explained ; new discoveries produced, and those already known beautifully embellished. The third class is composed of those whom truth and fidelity have distinguished; who, when assaulted by threats and violence, after solicitation and per" suasion have failed, have evinced their firmness and . integrity in preserving inviolate the mysteries of the Order. The fourth class consists of those who have perseveringly studied the scientific branches of the art, and exhibited proofs of their skill and acquirements, and who have consequently obtained the honor of this degree, as a reward of merit. The fifth class consists of those who, having acquired a proficiency of knowledge to become teachers, have been elected to preside over regularly constituted bodies of Masons. The sixth class consists of those who, having discharged the duties of the chair with honor and reputation, are acknowledged and recorded as Excel路 lent Masters. The seventh class consists of a select few whom years and experience have improved, and whom merit and abilities have entitled to preferment. With this class the ancient landmarks of the Order are preserved ; and from them we learn and practise tho necessary and instructive lessons, which at once digI_

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INTRODUCTION.

21

nify the art, and qualify its professors to illustrate its excellence and utility. This is the established mode of the masonic government, when the rules of the system are observed. By this judicious arrangement, true friendship is cultivated among different ranks and degrees of men, hospitality promoted, industry rewarded, and ingenuity encouraged.

CHAPTER III. THE IMPORTANCm OF THE SECRETS OF MASONRY DEMONSTRATED.

IF the secrets vi Masonry are 1路eplet.e with such advantages to mankind, it may be asked, V'{hy are they not divulged for the general good of society ? To which it. may be answered; 'vera the privileges of Masonry to bt~ indiscriminately bestowed, the design of the institution would be subverteu ; and, being familiar, like many other important matters, would soon lose their value, and sink into disregard. It is a weakness in human nature, that men are genemlly more charmed with novelty, than the real worth or intrinsic value of things. Novelty influences all our actions and determinations. vVhat is new, or difficult in the acquisition, however trifling or insignifica.nt, readily captivates the imagination, and ensures a temporary admiration; while what is familiar, or easily obtained, however noble and eminent


22

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

~ddy II

for its utility, is sure to be disregarded by the and unthinking. Did thfl particular secret~ or peculiar forms prevalent among Masons constitute the essence of the art, it might be alleged that our amusements were triflin6', and our ceremonies superficial. But this is not the case. Having their use, they are preserved; and ft·om the recollection of the lessons they inculcate, the wellinformed Mason derives instruction. Drawing them to a near illSpection, he views them through a proper ·medium; adverts to the circumstances which gave them rise; dwells upon the tenets they convey; and, finding them replete with useful information, adopts tl1em as keys to the privileges of his art, and prizes them as sacred. Thus convinced of their propriety, he estimates the value from their utility. Many persons arc deluded by theil· vague supposition that our mysteries at·c merely nominal ; that the practices c:>tabliRhed among us are frivolm1s ; and that our ceremonies might be allopted, or waived, at pleasure. On this false foundation, we have found them hurrying through nil the deg1·ces, '"ithont advert· ing to the propriety of one step they fnmme, or possessing a single tlualification requisite for advancement. Passing through the usual formalities, they have accepted offices, and assumed the government of Lodges, equally unacquainted with the rules of the institution they prctcntlcd to support, or the nntnre of the trust reposed in them. 'l'lw conscqucuec is

II

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Lo~v:::~~-=' •~h ~=ot;:::~:~·~·::J


INTRODUCTION.

23

anarchy and confusion have ensued, and the substance has been lost }n the shadow. Were the brethren who preside over Lodges properly instructed previous to their appointment, and regularly apprised of the importance of their respective oftlees, i a general reformation would speedily take place. 'l'his would evinee tb,, propriety of our mode of government, and lead men to acknowletlge, that our honors were deservedly conferred. The ancient consequence of the Order w0uld be restored, and the reputation of the society preserved. Such conduct alone can support our character. Unless prudent actions shall distinguish our title to the honors of Masonry, and regular deportment display the influence and ut.lity of our rules, the world in general will not ear:;ily be led to reconcile our proceed路 ings with the tenets of our profession.

li

II

CHAPTER IV. GENEIIAL REMARKS.

MASONRY is an nrt equally useful :mel extensive. In every art there is a mystery, which requires a. gradual progression of knowledge to arrive at any degree of perfection in it. Without much instruction, and more exercise, no man can be skillful in any art: in like manner, without an assiduous application to

~~-~~l~~a:~~~ ~:bject~ trea~~d :

in

~h~-di~~~~~~t lectures


24

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

of Masonry, no person can be sufficiently acquainted with its true value. It must not, however, be inferred from this 1¡emark, that persons who labor under the disadvantages of a confined education, or whose sphere of life requires a more intense application to business or study, are to be discouraged in their endeavo1¡s to gain a knowledge of Masonry. To qualify an individual to enjoy the benefits of the society at large, or to partake of its privileges, it is not absolutely neucssary that he should be acquainted with all the intricate parts of the science. These are only intended for the diligent and assiduous Mason, who may have leisure and opportunity to indulge such pursuits. Though some are more able than others, some more eminent. some more useful, yet all, in their difl'erent spheres, may prove advantageous to the community. As the nature of every man's profession will not admit of that leisure which is necessary to qualify him to become an expert Mason, it is highly proper that the official duties of a Lodge should be execttted by persons whose education and situation in life enable them to become adepts ; as it must be allowed, that all who accept offices, and exercise authority, should be properly qualified to discharge the task assigned them, with. honor to themselves, and credit to their sundry stations.

â&#x20AC;˘


INTRODUCTION.

25

CHAPTER V. '1'HE CEREMONY OF OPENING AND CLOSING A LODGE.

IN all regular assemblies of men, who are convened for wise and useful purposes, the commencement and conclusion of business are accompanied with some form. In every country of the world the practice prevails, and is deemed es;;ential. From the most remote periods of antiquity it may be traced, and the refined improvements of modern times have not totally abolished it. Ceremonies, when simply considered, it is true, are little more than visionary delusions ; but their effects are sometimes important. When tl1ey impress awe and reverence on the mind, and engage the attention by external attraction, to solemn rites, they are interesting objects. These purpose;; are effected by judicious ceremonies, when regularly conducted and properly arranged. On this ground they have received the sanction of the 'visest men in all ages, and consequently could not escape the notice of Masons. To begin well, is the most likely means to end well ; and it is judiciously remarked, that when order and method are neglected at the beginning, they will be seldom found to take place at the end. The ceremony of opening and closing a Lodge with solemnity and decorum, is, therefore, universally admitted among Masons ; and though the mode 路in some Lodges may vary, and. in every degree must vary, still an uniformity in the general practice prevails in every Lodge ; and the variation (if any) is solely occasioned


26

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

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I

by a want of method, which a little application might easily remove. To conduct this ceremony with propriety ought to ,. be the peculiar study of every Mason ; especially of those who have the honor to rule in our assemblies. I To persons who are thus dignified, every eye is naturally directed for propriety of conduct and behavior ; and from them, other brethren, who are less informed, will naturally expect to derive an example worthy of imitation. From a share in this ceremony no Mason can be exempted. It is a general concern, in which all must assist. This is the first request of the Master, and the prelude to all business. No sooner has it been signified, than every officer repairs to his station, and the brethren rank according to their degrees. The intent of the meeting becomes the sole object of attention, and the mind is insensibly drawn from those indiscriminate subjects of conversation which are apt to intrude on our less serious moments. This effect accomplished, our care is directed to the external avenues of the Lodge, and the proper officers, whose province it is to discharge that duty, execute their trust with fidelity ; and by certain mystic forms, of no recent date, intimate that we may safely proceed. To detect impostors among ourselves, an adherence to order in the character of Masons ensues, and the Lodge is either opened or closed in solemn form. j ÂŁ At opening the Lodge, two purposes are wisely efLected : the Master is reminded of the dignity of his ...J

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INTRODUC'riON.

27

character, and the brethren of the homage and veneration clue from them in their sundry stations. 'l'hese are not the only ad vantages resulting from a due observance of this ceremony ; a reverential awe for the Deity is inculcated, and the eye fixed on that object, from whose radiant beams light only can be derived. Here we are taught to adore the God of heaven, and to supplicate his protection on our well-meant endeavors. The Master assumes his government in due form, and under him his \Vardens; who accept their trust, after the customary salutations. The brethren then, with one accord, unite in duty aud respect, and the ceremony concludes. At closing the Lodge, a similo.r form takes place. Here the less important duties of Masonry are not pa.ssed over unobserved. The necessary degree of subordination in the go\'ernment of a Lodge is peculin.rly marked, while the proper tribute of gratitude is oficred llp to the beneficent Author of Life, and his blessing invoked and extended to the whole fraternity. Each brother faithfully locks up the treasure he has acquired, in his own secret repository ; and, pleased with his reward, retires to enjoy and disseminate, among the private circle of his brethren, the fruits of his labor and industry in the Lodge. These are faint outlines of a ceremony which l.miversally prevails among Masons in every count1y, and distinguishes all their meetings. It is arranged as a general section in every degree, and takes the lead in all our illustrations. 2


28

FREEMASON's MONITOR.

Oflarge used at Opening a Lodge.

"Bel10ld ! l10w gootl and how plcnsant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity ! "It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, that went down to the skirts of hiH garment ; "As the dew of Hermon, that lle;;cendetl upon the mountains of Zion ; for there the Lord commanded a Llessing, even life for evermore." A Prayer used at Olosing the Lodge.

May tl1e blessing of Heaven rest upon us, and all regular l\lasons ! may brotherly love prevail, and every moral anu social virtue cement us ! .Amen.

CHAYrER VI. OHARGES AND REGULATIONS FOR 'l'RE CONDUCT AND BEHAVIOR OF MASONS.

A REHEARSAL of the ancient charges properly succeeds the opening, and precedes the eloHing, of a Lollgc. This was the constant practice of our ancient brethren, and ought never to be neglected 'in our regular assemblies. A recapitulation of our duty can not be di~足 agreeable to those who are acquainted with it; and to those who know it not, should any such be, it must be highly proper to recommend it.


INTRODUCTION. ANCIENT

29

CHARGES.

On the Management of the Craft in Working.

Masons employ themselves diligently in their sundry vocations, live creditably, and conform with cheerful~ ness to the government of the country in which they reside. [The most expert Craftsman is chosen or appointed Master of the work, and is duly honored by those over whom he presides. [The Master, knowing himself qualified, undertakes tl1e government of the Lodge, and truly dispenses his rewards, giving to every brother the approbation which he meritE~. [A Craftsman who is appointed Warden of the work under the Master, is true to Master and fellows, carefully oversees the work, and his brethren obey him. The Master, Wardens and brethren receive their rewards justly, are faithful, and carefully finish the work they begin, whether it be in the first or second degree; but never put that work to the first, which has been accustomed to the second degree, nor that to the second or first, which has been accustomed to the third. Neither envy nor censure is discovered among true Masons. No brother is supplanted, or put out of his work, if he be capable to :finish it ; as no man who is not perfectly skilled in the original design, can, with equal advantage to the Master, :finish the work begun by another.


30

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

All employed in Masonry meekly receive their rewards, anJ use no disobliging name. Brother or fellow are the terms or appellations they bestow on each other. They behave courteously within and without the Lodge, and neve1· desert the ::\laster till the work is finished. LawiJ for the Government of tha Lodge.

You are to salute one another in a courteot1S manner, agreeably to the forms established among Masons ;* you are freely to give such mutual instructions as shall be thought necessary or expedient, not being overseen or overheard, without encroaching upon each other, or' derogating from that respect which is due to any gentleman wenl he not a Mason; fo1· though, as Masons, we rank as brethren on a le,,el, yet Masonry cle1wivcs no roan of t.he honor due to his rank or character, Lut rather adds to his honor, especially if he has deserved well of the fraternity, who always render honor to whom it is due, and avoid ill manners. No priYate committees are to be allowed, or separate conve1·sations encouraged ; the Master or Wardens are not to be interrupted, or any brother speaking to the Master; but due clecorum is to be observed, and a pro· per respect paid to the l\Iaster and presiding officers. These laws are to be strictly enforced, that harmony may be preserved, and the business of the Lodge be carried on with order and regularity• .Amen. So mote it be.

* In a Lodge, Masons meet ns members of one family; all prejudices, therefore, on a.ccoun~ of religion, country, or pr!vu.te OI>inlon, are removed.


INTRODUCTION.

31

Charge on the. Behavior of MasonB out of tlte Loage.

l

When the Lodge is closed, you may enjoy yourselves with innocent mirth; but you are carefully to avoid excess. You are hot to compel any brother to act contrary to his inclination, or give oftimse by word or deed, but enjoy a free and easy conversation. You are to use no immoral or obscene discourse, but at all times support with propriety the dignity of your character. You al'e to be cautious in your words and carriage, that the most penetrating stranger may not discover, or find out, what is not proper to be intimated; and, if necessary, you are to waive a discourse, and manage it prudently, for the honor of the fraternity. At home, and in your sevc,al neighborhoods, yotl are to behave as wise and moral men. You are never to communicate to your families, friends, or acquaintance, the private transactions of our different assemblies ; but upon every occasion to consult your own honor, and the reputation of the fraternity at large. You are to study the preservation of health, by avoiding irregularity and intemperance, that your families may not be .negle~ted and injured, or yourselves disabled from attending to your necessary employments in life. If a stranger apply in the character of a Mason, you are cautiously to examine him in such a method as prudence may direct, and agreeably to the forms established among Masons ; that you may not b.e imposed upon by an ignorant, false J?retender, whom ;y-ou are to


32

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

reject with contempt, and beware of giving him any secret hints of knowledge. But if you discover him to be a true and genuine brother, you are to respect him ; if he he in want, you are to relieve him, or direct him how he may be relicveu; yon are to employ him, or recommend him to employment ; however, you are never charged to do beyond your ability, only to prefer a poor brotlwr, who is a good man and true, before any other person in the same circumstances. Finally ; t11ese rules you are always to observe nnd enforce, and also the duties which have been communicated in the lectures; cultivating brotherly loYe, the foundation and cape-stone, the cement and glory, of this andent fraternity; avoiding, upon every oeeasion, wrangling ancl quarreling, slallllering and haekbiting ; not permitting others to slander honest brethren, but defending their characters, and doing them good offices, as far as may lJe consistent with your honor and :-:nftJty, 1JUt no farther. Hence all may seo the benign influence of Ma1;onry, as all true !vlaRons luwe do!lC from the beginning of the world, and will do to the end of time . .Amen. So mote it be.

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INTRODUCTION.

33

CHAPTER VII. PRE-REQUISITES FOR A CANDIDATE.

BY a late regulation, adopted by most of the Grand Lodges in America, no candidate for the mysteries of Masonry can be initiated without having been proposed at a previous meeting of the Lodge; in order that no one may be introduced without due inquiry relative to his character and qualific~tions. All applications for initiation should be made by petition in writing, signed by the applicant, giving an account of his age, quality, occupation, and place of residence, and that he is desirous of being admitted a member of the fraternity; which petition should be kept on file by the Secretary. Form of a Petition to be preBentea by a Candidate for initiation.

"To the worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of - - JJodge, of Free and Accepted Masons: "The petition of the subscriber respectfully showeth, that having long entertained a favorable opinion of your ancient institution, he is desirous of being admitted a member thereof, if found worthy. " His place of residence is his age years ; his occupation - - - . [Signed] "A. B." After this petition is read, the candidate must be proposed in form, by a member of the Lodge, and tl1e proposition seconded by another member; a committee is then appointed to make inquiry relative to his character and qualifications,


34

FREEMASON'S l\IONITOR.

Declaration to be a.•sented to by a canrb'date, in a.n adJoining apm·tmcnt, p1'evious to Initiation.

" Do you seriously declare, npon your honor, before these gentlemen,* that, unbiased by friends, and uninfluenced by mercenary motives, you freely and voluntarily offer yourself a candi<.late for the mysteries of JHasonry ?" I do. " Do you seriously declare, upon ypur honor, before these gentlemen, that you are prompted to solicit the privileges of Masonry by a favorable opinion conceived of the institution, a desire of knovdeclge, and a sincere wish of being serviceable to your fellow-creatures?'' I do. "Do you seriously declare, upon your honor, before these gentlemen, that you will cheerfully conform to all the aneieut established usages and customs of the fraternity ?" I do. After the ahove declarations are made, and reported to the Master, he makes it known to the Lodge, in manner following, viz : "BngTURE~,-At the request .of l\Ir. A. n., he has been proposed and accepted in regular form; I therefore recomrncntl him as a proper candidate for the mysteries of Masonry, and worthy to partake of the privileges of the fratcmity ; and, in conseq ncnce of a declaration of his intentions, voluntarily made, I 1)elieve he will cheerfully eonform to the rules of the Order." If then' are then no objections made, the candidate is introduced in clue form. • The

Steward~

of the Lodge are usuo.lly present.


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OHAPTER VIII.

II

WE shall now enter on a disquisition of the different sedions of the lectnres appropriated to the several degTees of J)fasonry, giving a brief Rtlllltnary of the whole, and anne:-::ing to eYery remark the particulars to which the section alludes. By these means the industrious Mason will be instrnetccl in the rcgnlar arrangement of the se~tions in e::wh lectm路e, anrl be enablecl with more ease to acquire a knowledge of the art. rrhe first lecture o.f Masonry is divided into three Rections, and each section into different clause~. Vit-t.ne j,; painted in the most beautiful colors, and the tluties of morality are enforced. In it we arc bught Rnch nHefnl lessons as prepare the mind fo1路 a regular aclvan~ement in the principles of knowledge aud philosophy. These are imprinted on the memory by lively and sensiLlc images, to influence our conduct in

REM.<\.RKS ON THE FIRST LECTURE.

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36

FREEMASON'S :MONITOR.

REMARKS ON 'l'HE FIRST, OR ENTEflED APPRENTICE DEGREE.

'l'HE FIRST SBC'riON.

'THE first section in thi~ lecture is suited to all cnpacitie:;;, and may and ought to be known Ly every llei·son who ranks as a :Mason. It con~ sists of general heads, whh;h, though short and simple, carry weigllt with them. They not only serve as marks of distinction, but communicate useful and interesting knowledge, wl1en they are duly investi- ~ gated. They qualify us to try aml ex- ~~ amine tl1e rights of others to our privileges, while they prove our;;eh·es; and. as they induce us to enquire more minutely into othnr pn.rticnlars of greater importance, they sen·e as an introduction to subjects more amply cxpl:1incd in the following sections.

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A Prayer used at the Initiation nf a Candidate. Youch~afethineaid, Almighty Fatheroftlw UniYerse, to tl1h~. our pre:;;cnt conv<'ntion. 111111 gnmt that this rand irlnte for l\1nsomv mny dc1licttte and tle\·ote his life to th~r service, anti he~ome ·a true :md faithful brother among 11s! Enune him with a competency of thy divine wisdom, that hy the secrets of our art, he may be l1etter enabled to dh;play tl1e beauties of virtuousness, to the l1ono1· of thy l1oly name. .Amen. It is a duty incumbent on every MaAter of a Lodge, l1efore the ceremony of initiation takes place, to infom1 tl1e candidate of the pnrpose and design of the institution; to explain the nature of his solemn engagements ; and, in a manner peculiar to Masons


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EN'rERED .APPRENTICE.

II.,

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alone, to requit:e his cheerful acquiescence in the duties of morality and virtue, and all the sacred tenets of the Order. Towards the close of the section is explained that peculiar ensign of :Masonry, the lamb-skin, or white leather apron, which is an eu1 Llcm of innocence, aml the badge of a Mason; more ancient than the golden fleece or Roman eagle ; more honorable than the star and garter, or any ~ther order that could be conferred. upon the candidate at the time of his initiation, or at any time thereafter, by king, rn:ince, potentate, or any other person, except he be a 1\la~on; and which every one ought to wear with equal pleasure to himself, and honor to the fraternity. This section closes with an explanation of the worki11g tools and implements of an entered apprentice, which are, the twenty-four inch gauge, and the common gavel. The twenty-four inch t·· 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1' 1'1 1 1 1 1 1 l'l'l· gauge is an instrument made use of by orJerative masons, to measure and lay out their work ; but we, as free and accepted 1\lusons, are taught to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of dividing our time. It being divided into twenty-four equal parts, is emblematical of the t'Yenty-four hours of the day, which we are taught to divide into t!tree equal parts, whereby we find

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

eight hours for the service of God and a distre~:~sed worthy b1·other; eight hours for our usual avocations; and eight for 1·efreshment and sleep.* (] The common gavel is an instru!. ment made use of by operative masons, to break off the corners of rough stones, the better to fit them for the builder's use ; but we, as free and accepted Masons, are taught to make use of it fot· the more noble and glorious purpose of divesting our minds and consciences of all the vices and superfluities of life, thereby fitting our bodies, as living stones, for that spiritual building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. THE SECOND SECTION.

The second section rationally accounts for the origin of onr hieroglyphical instruction, and convinces us of the advantages which will eve1· accompany a faithful observance of our duty : it maintains, beyond the power of contradiction, the propriety of our rites, 'vhile it demonstrates to the most sceptical and hesitating mind, their excellency o.nd utility; it illustrates, o.t the same time, certain particulars, of which our ignorance might lead us into error, and which, as Masons, we are indispensably bound to know.

* " The most ~ffectunl expedient emplnyerl !Jy Alfl•ecl the <lrcnt. fnt• the encouragement (lf leat•ning~ wus his own cxnrnple, "nd the con::~.tant lli'Shluity with which he emplnycd himself in the pur•uit or knuwle<lgr•. He u•ltnlly divided his thne into tht•ee cqno•l portions ; one wa~ ent})loycd in sle~p nnd the refection of l1is bud,v ; nnothm· in the dispatch or business; nnd a tb.trd in stuuy and tlevutlcon."-lluzu:'ll Ht$TOilY OF ENGLAND.


ENTERED APPRENTICE.

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To make a daily progress in the art, is om· constant dnty, and expressly required by our general laws. \Vhat end can be more noble, than the pursuit of virtue? what motive more alluring, than the practice of justice ? or what instruction more beneficial, than an accurate elucidation of symhol).cal mysteries which tend to embellish ancl adorn the mind? Every thing that strikes the eye, more immediately engages the attention, and imprints· on the memory serious and solemn truths : hence Masons, uni ;·ersally adopting this method of inculcating the tenets of their order by typical figures and allegorical emblems, prevent their mysteries from descending into the familiar reach of inattentive and unprepared novices, from whom they might not receive due veneration. Onr records inform us, that the usages and customs of Masons have ever corresponded with those of the Egyptian philosophet·s, to which they bear a ncar affinity. Unwilling to expose their mysteries to vulgar eyes, they concealed their particular tenets, an<l principles of polity, under hieroglyphical figures ; and expressed their notions of government by signs and symbols, which they communicated to their Magi alone, who were bound by oath not to reYeal them. The Pythagorean system seems to have been established on a similar plan, and many orders of a. more recent date. 1\fa.sonry, however, is not only tl1e most ancient, bnt •the most moral institution that ever subsisted; every character, figure and emblem, depicted in a

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

Lodge, has a moral tendency, and inculcates the prac· tice of virtue. THE BADGE OF A

~!ASON.

Every candidate, at his initiation, is presented with a lamb-skin or white leather apron. The lamb has in all ages been dP.emed an emblem of innocence/ l1e, therefore, who wears the lamb-:.ldn .iiiJifitfllllll~ as a badge of Masonry, is thereby continually reminded of that purity of life and conduct, 'vhich is essentially necessary to his gaining aumission into the Celestial Lodge above, whct·e the Supreme .Ar~hitect of tl1e Universe presides. THE TIIIRD

Sl~CTION.

The third section explains the nature and prinl'i.plcs of our constitution, and teaches ns to disduugc with propriety the duties of our rc:,;pective stations. Here, too, we receive instruction relative to the forrn, ~'Up• ports, covering, fttrniture, omamcntll, lights und jewels of a Lodge, how it should be situated, and to whom dedicated.

A propct· attention is also paid to our ancient and venerable patrons.

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ENTERED APPRENTICE.

41

From east to west, Freemasonry extends, at1d between the north and south. in every clime and nation, are Masons to be found.

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Our institution Is said to be snpporti:tl l•y Jr;'.,. dom, Strengtfl, and Beaut!!; heeause it is ne:'"·''~'~'Y that there khonlrl lH! 11.•i.~ci:um to enntrive, slrCIIf!lh t<~ support, and. bw.?tfJ! to ai.lorn, all gn~at nwl im· portaut unokrtakings. li,; dinwnsinns arP unlimited, ond its co11erin!1 no lesR than t!H• enunpy of heaven. To this objec:t the :\lasoa's mind ill con·


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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

tinually directed, and thither he hopes at last to arrive, hy the aid of the theological ladder, which Jacob in his vision saw ascending fro1u earth to heaven; the three principal rounds of which are denominated Faitk, Hope and Oha.1路ity_: and which admonish us to have faith in God, hope in immortality, and charity to all mankind. Every well governed Lodge is furnished with the Hvly Bible, the Square, and the Compass; the BiUe points out the path that leads to happiness, and is dedicated to God; the Square teaches us to regulate our conduct by the principles of morality and virtue, and is dedicated to the Kaster; the Compass teache-s us to limit our desires in every station, and is dedicated to the Craft. The Bible is dedicated to the service of God, becauBe it is the inestimable gift of God to man ; the Square t.o the Master, because, being the proper Masonic emblem of his office, it is constantly to remind him of the lluty he owes to the Lodge over which he

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is appointed to preside ; and the Compass to the Craft, because, by a due attention to its use, they are tanght to regulate their desires, and keep their passions within due bounds.

The ornamental parts of a Lodge, di~;played in this section, are, the .llfosaic pa?Jemcnt, the inclented tessel, and the blazing star. The ~~fosaic pavement is a representation of the ground floor of king Solomon's temple ; the indented tcuel, tl1at bea.utifnl tessclat~d border, or skirting, which surrounded it ; and the blazing star, in the centre, is commemorative of the star which appeared, to gnid.e the wise men of the east to the place of our Savior's nativity. The .MI)saic pavement is emblematic of lmman life. checkcreil with good and evil ; the beautiful bord11r whit~h surrounds it, those blessings and comfort!'! whit:h surround us, and which we hope to obtain by a faithful reliance on the Divine Providence, which is ~-----........-....

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FREE:11ASON'S MONITOR.

hieroglyphically represented by the blazin,q star in the centre.

The moveable and immoveable jewels also claim our attention in this section.

Tl1e rough, ashla1路 is a stone as tal,en from the qnarry in its rutle and natural state. The perfect a:J!dar i'l a stone made ready by the hands of the workman to be adjnsted by the

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ENTERED APPRENTICE.

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The trestle-board is for the master workman to draw his designs upon. By the 1'01,{-(Jh ashlar, we are r~inded of our rude and imperfect state by nature; by the perfect as!tlltr, that state of perfection at which we hope to arrive, by a virtuous education, our own endeavors, and the blessing of God ; and by the trestle-bodrd, we are reminded, that as the operative workman erects his temporal building agreeably to the rules and designs laid down by the master on his trestle-board, so should we, both operative and speculative, endeavor to erect our spiritual bnilding agreeably to the rules and designs laid down by the Supreme Architect of the Universe, in the book of life, which is our spiritual trestle-board.

By a recurrence to the chapter upon tl1e dedication. of Lodges, it will be pel'ceived, that although our


46

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

ancient brethren dedicated their Lodges to king Solomon, yet Masons professing christianity dedicate theirs to St. J olm the Baptist, and St. John the Evangelist, who were eminent patrons of Masonry; and since their time there is represented in every regular and well governed Lodge, a certain point wit/tin a circle; the point representing an individual brother, the circle 1路epresenting the boundary line of his duty to God and man, beyond which he is never to suffer his passions, prejudices or interests to betray him on any occasion. This circle is embordered by two perpendicl1lar parallel lines, representing St. John the Baptist and St. J obn the Evangelist ; who were perfect parallels, in christianity as well as masonry ; and upon the vertex rests the book of Holy Scriptnres, which point out the whole duty of man. ln going round this circle, we necessarily touch upon these two lines, as well as upon the Holy Scriptures ; and whilst a Mason keeps himself thus circumscribed, it is impossible that he should materially err. This section, though the last in rank, is not the least considerable in importance. It strengthens those which precede, and enforces, in -the most engaging manner, a due regard to character and behavior, in public as well as in private life; in the Lodge, as well as in the general commerce of society. It forcibly inculcates the most instructive lessons. lJrotlterly love, relief, and trutk, are themes on which we here expatiate.

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ENTERED APPRENTICE.

47

OF BROTHERLY LOVE,

By the exercise of brotherly love, we are tanght to regard the whole human , J species as one family, the high and low, .'::-:" the rich and poor; who, as created by one Almighty Parent, and inhabitants of the same planet, are to aid, support and protect each other. On this principle, Masonry unites men of every country, sect, and opinion, and conciliates true friend· sl1ip among thosewhv might otherwise have remained at a perpetual distance. OF RELIEF.

To relieve the distressed, is a duty incumbent on all men; but partienlai·ly on Masons, who are linked together by an indissoluble chain of sincere afii~ction. To soothe the unhappy, to sympathize with their misfortunes, to compassionate their mise· 1·ies, and to restore peace to their troubled minds, is the grand aim we have in view. On this basis we form our friendships, and establish our connections.

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OF TRUTH.

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Truth is a divine attribute, and the foundation of every virtue. To be good and true, is the first le~;son we are taught in Masonry. On this theme we

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deaver to 1·egnlate our conduct; hence, wl1ilst influenced by this principle, hypocrisy and deceit are unknown amongst us, sincerity and plain dealing distinguish us, and the heart and tongue join in promoting each other's welfare, and rejoicing in eat.:h other's prosperity. _ '.ro this illustration succeeds an explanation of the four cardinal virtues-temperance, fortitude, prudence and justice.

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

OF TEMPERANCE.

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Temperance is that · dne restraint upon our affeetions and passions, whieh renders the body tame and governalili>, and frees the mind from the allurements of vice. rrhis virtue should be the constant praeticc of every Mason, as he is thereby taught to avoid cx:cco;s, or eontrading any licentious or vi(·i- ous habit, the inclnlgcnce of -::.::> which might lead him to disclose Home of those valuable secrctR, which he has promisCld to concClal ancl never reveal, and which would consequently >;ul)ject him to the contempt aml detestation of all good 1\lasons.

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ENTERED .APPRENTICE.

49

OF FORTITUDE.

Fortitude is that noble and steady purpose of the mind, whereby we· are enabled to undergo any pain, peril or danger, when prudentially .deemed expedient. This virtue is equa1Iy distant from rashness and cowardice ; and, like the former, should be deeply impres&ed upon the mind of every Mason, as a safeguard or security against any illegal attack that may be made, by force or otherwise, to extort from him any of those secrets with which he has been so solemnly entrusted ; and which was emblematically represented upon his first admission into the Lodge. OF PRUDENCE.

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Prudence teaches us to regulate our lives and actions agreeably to the dictates of reason, and is that habit by which we wisely judge, and prudentially detet·mine, on all things relative to our present, as well as to our future happiness. This virtue should be the peculiar chai·acteristic of every Mason, not only for the govemment of his conduct while in the Lodge, but also when -·-··-·--------.

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1 FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

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abroad in the world ; it should be particularly attended to in all strange and mixed companies, never to Jet fall the least sign, token or word, whereby the secrets of Masonry might be unlawfully obtained.

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OF JUSTICE.

Justice is that stanuarcl, or boundary, of right, which enables us to render to every man l1i~ just due, without distinction. This virtue is not only consistent with divine and human laws, but is the very cement and support of civil society; and, as justice in a great measure constitutes the real good man, so should it he the inYariable practice of every M:tson never to deviate from the minutest principles thereof. The illUf;tration of these virtues is accompanied with some general observations peenliar to Mn.~ons. Such is the arrangement of the different ~ections in the first lcctnre, which, with the forms adoptctl at the opening an(l clo:,;ing of a Lodge, <:omprehendH the whole of the first degree of Masonry. This plan has the advantage of regularity to ret路ommend it, the support of precedent aml authority, and tlw Ranction and re::;pect which flow from antiquity. 'l'he whole is a regular system of morality, conceivml in a strain of interesting allegory, \vhich must unfold its beauties to the can(lid and. industrious inquirer.


ENTERED APPRENTICE.

51

Charge at Initiation int' tiLe First Degree. BROTHER,- As

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you are now introduced into the :first principles of Masonry, I congratulate you on being acceptell into this ancient and honorable Order ; an~ cient, as having subsisted from time immemorial; and honorable, as tending, in every particular, so to render all men who will be conformable to its precepts. No institution was ever raised on a better principle, or more solid foundation ; nor were ever more excellent rules and useful maxims laid down, than are inculcated in the several Masonic lectures. The greatest and best of men in all ages have been encouragers and promoters of the art, and have never deemed it. derogatory from their dignity, to level themselves with the fraternity, extend their privileges, and patronize their assemblies. There aTe three great dutiP'<, which, as a Mason, you are charged to inculcate-to God, your neighuor, and yourself. rro God, in never mentioning his uame, but with that reverential awe whieh is due frt>m a creature to his Creator; to implore his aid in all your laudable undertakings, and to esteem him as the chief good : to your neighbor, in acting upon the square, and doing unto him as yon wish he should do unto you: and to yourself, in avoiding all irregularity and intemperance .â&#x20AC;˘ whieh may impair your faculties, or debase the dignity of your profession. A zealous attac.hment to these duties will ensure public and private esteem. In the state, you are to be a quiet and peaceful 4


52

FREEMASON'S MO:NITOR.

subject, true to your government, and just to your country ; you are not to countenance disloyalty or rebellion, but patiently submit to legal authority, and conform with cheerfulness to the government of the country in which you live. In your outward demeanor be particularly careful to avoid censure or reproach. Let not interest, favor, or prejudice, bias your integrity, or influence you to be guilty of a dishonorable action. Although your frequent appearance at our regular meetings is earnestly solicited, yet it is not meant that Masonry should :interfere with your necessary vocations ; for these are on no account to be neglected : neither are you to suffer your zeal for the institution to lead you into argument with those who, through ignorance, may ridicule it. At your leisure hours, that you may improve in Masonic knowledge, you are to converBe with well informed brethren, who will be always as ready to give, as you will be ready to receive instruction.· Finaliy; keep sacred and inviolable the mysteries of the Order, as the~e are to distinguish you from the rest of the community, and mark your consequence among Masons. If, in tl1e circle of your acquaintance, you :find a person desirous of being initiated into Masonry, be particularly attentive not to recommend him, unless you a1•e convinced he will conform to our rules ; that the honor, glory and reputation of tho :institution may be :firmly established, and the world at large convinced of its good effects.

,


CHAPTER IX. REMARKS ON TRE SECOND DEGREE. MAsoNRY is a progrsssive science, and is divided into different classes or degrees, for the more regular advancement in the knowledge of its myRterieR. According to the progress we make, wo limit or extend our inquiries ; and in proportion to our capacity, we attain to a less or greater degree of perfection. Masonry includes within its circle almost evf!ry branch of polite learning. Under the veil of its mysteries is comprehemlcd a regular system of seimlCe. Many of its illustrations, to the confined genius, may appear unimportant ; but the man of more enlarged . faculties will perceive them to be, in the highest deg;ee, I useful and interesting. To please the accompJi,..Jwdj:' scholar, ancl in5enions artist, Masonry is wiRely plan: ned ; and, in the investigation of its latent doctrines, (53) -~---

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

the philosopher and mathematician may experience equal delight ancl satisfaction~ To exhaust the various subjects of which it treats, would transcend the powers of the brightest genius ; still, however, nearer approaches to perfection may be made, and the man of wisdom will not check the progress of his abilities, though the task he attempts may at first seem insurmountable. Perseverance and application remove each difficulty as it occu1·s ; every step he advances, new pleasures open to his view, and instruction of the noblest kind attends his researches. In the diligent pursuit of knowlerlge, the intellectual faculties are employed in promoting the glory of God, and the good of man. The firfit degree is well calculated to enforce the duties of morality, and imprint on the memory the noblest pl"in<Jiples which can adorn the human mind. It is, therefore, the best introduction to tho second degree, which not only extends the Hame plan, lmt comprehends a more difl'm:ive Hy~tcm of knowlmlge. Here prnctif.'e and theory join, in qualifying tl1e industrious Mason to share the plrmmrcs whieh an advancement in the art must necessarily afford. Li:;tening with attention to the wise opinion of expcrif.'nccd Craftsmen on imp01·tant subjects, he gradually familiarizes his mind to useful instruction, and is soon enabled to in>•estigate truths of the utmost concern in the geneml transactions of life. From tllis system proceeds a rational amusement; while the mental powers arc fully mnployed, tho

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judgment is properly exercised. A spirit of emnlation prevails; and all are induced to vic who shall most excel in promoting the valuable rule;; of tho institution. THE .FrRST SECTION.

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The first section of the second degree accurately elucidates the mode of introduction into that particular class ; antl instructs the diligent Craftsman how to proceed in the proper arrangement of the ceremonies used on the occasion. It qualifies him to judge of their importaneB, an(l com·izwc~ him of the necessity of strictly a(lhering to en~ry estill;] ishe•l ns!lg(~ of the Order. Here he is entnlHtcd with l'lnti,~ulut· te;;tH, to enable him to prove his title to the pri,·ih•ges of thi~ degree, while Ratisf!wtory reason:> are given for their origin. l\Iany (lntie11, whieh <~mnent in tho firmest union we1l informed brethren, arc illustrated in this section ; and an opportunity is given to mako such atlvunces in Masonry, as will always distingni:-;h the aLilities of those who lmse arrived at prefemwut. The knowl(ltlge of thit:: sedion i:; aL~olutely Iwt•e:;~at·y for all Cmft>.mcn; and as it re('!lpitnlatPs the t'eretwmy of initiation, antl eontainH numy other impox·tunt particularH, no oftieer or member of a Lodgo t>houltl he unacquainted with it.

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The PLUMB, SQUARE, and LEVEL, those noble and useful implements of a Fellow Craft, are here introduced and moralized, and serve as a constant admonition to the practice of virtue and morality. The plumb is an instntment made use of by operative masons, to 1·aise perpendiculars, the sguat•e, to sqUtue their wod\:, and the level, to lay horizontals ; but we, as free and accepted Masons, are taught to make use of them for more noble and glorious pmposes ; the plumb admonishes us to walk uprightly in our several stations before God and man, squaring our actions by the square of virtue, and remembel'ing that we are traveling t1pon tlw level of time, to "that undiscovered country, from whose bourne no traveler returns." THE SECOND SECTION,

The second section of this degree has recourse to the origin of the institution, and views Masonry under two denominations, operative and speculative. These are separately considered, and the principles on which


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57

both are founded, particularly explained. Their affinity is pointed out by allegorieal figures, and typical representations. The period stipulated for rewarding merit is fixed, and the inimitable moral to which that circumstance alludes is explained; the creation of the world is described, and many particulars recited, aU of which have been carefully preserved among Masons, and transmitted from one age to another, by oral tradition. Circumstances of great importance to the fraternity nro here particularized, and many traditional tenets and customs Mnfirmed by sacred and profane record. The celestial and terrestrial globes are considered ; and here the accomplished gentleman may display his talents to advantage in the eluuidation of the Orders of A1路cltitecture, the Senses of human nature, and the liberal A1路ts and Sciences, which are severally classed in a regular arrangement. In short, this section contains a store of valuable knowledge, founded on reason and sacred record, both entertaining and instructive. Masonry is路 considered under two denominations : operative and speculative. OPERATIVE llfASONRY.

By operative masonry we allude to a proper application of the useful rules of architecture, whence a structure will derive :figure, strength, and beauty, and whence will result a due proportion, and a just correspondence in all its parts. It furnishes us with

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::nlHng., and th• and inclemencies of seasons ; and while it displays the effects of human wisdom, as well in the choice, as in the arrangement, of the sundry materials of which an edifice is composed, it demonstrates that a fund of science and industry is implanted in man for the best, most salutary and beneficent purposes. SPECULATIVE :MASONRY.

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By speculative masonry, we learn to subdue tl1e passions, act upon the square, keep a tongue of good report, maintain secresy, and practice charity. It is so far interwoven with religion, as to Jay us under obligations to pay that rational homage to the Deity, which at once constitutes our duty and onr lHlppinesR. It leadli the contemplative to view with reverence and admiration the glorious works of the creation, and inspires him with the most exalted ideas of the perfections of his divine Ch·eator. In six days God created the heavens and the earth, and rested upon the se\•enth day ; the seventh, therefore, our ancient brethren, consecrated as a day of ,.J'Ci:!t f1·om their labors, thereby enjoying frequent opportunities to contemplate the glorious works of the cl·ea.tion, a.nd to adore their great Creator. 'l'he doctrine of the spheres is included in the science of astronomy, and particularly considered in this section.


FELLOW CRAFT.

59

QF THE GLOBES.

The globes are two artificial spherical bodies on the convex surfcce of which are represented the countries, seas, and various parts of the earth, the face of the heavens, the p;;lnetary revolutions, and other particulars.

The sphere, with the parts of the earth delineated on its surface, is called the terrestrial globe; and that, with the constellations, and other heavenly bodies, the celestial globe. 5


60

FREEMASON'S MONITOR. THE USE OF THE GLOBES.

Their principal use, beside serving as maps to distinguish the outward parts of the earth, and the situation of the fixed stars, is to illustrate and explain the phenomena arising from the annual revolution, and the diurnal rotation, of the earth round its own axis. They are the noblest instruments for improving the mind, and giving it the most distinct idea· of any problem or proposition, as well as enabling it to solve the same. Contemplating tlle~c bodies, we arc inspired with a clue reverence for the Deity and his works, and are induced to encourage the studies of astronomy, geogl'll.· phy, navigation, a.ntl the arts dependent on them, hy whieh society ha~ been so much benefitted.

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The orrlers of architecture come unde1· consideration in this setJt.ion ; a brief description of them may therefore not be improper.

OF ORDER IN ARCmTECTURE,

By order in architecture, is meant a system of all the members, proportions and ornaments of columns and pilasters ; or, it is a regular arrangement of the projecting parts of a. building, which, united with those of a column, form a beautiful, perfect and complete whole.

OF ITS ANTIQUITY.

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From the firRt formation of society, order in architecture may be traced. vVhen the 1·igor of seasons obliged men to contrive shelter from the inclemency of the weather, we learn that they first planted trees on end, and then hlid others across, to support a covering. The bands whid1 connected those trees at top and bottom, are said to have given riFle to the idea of the baiSe and capital of pillars ; and from this simple hint. origina.lly proceeded the more improved art of ar(~hitccture.

The five orders are thus classed: the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite.

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62

! FREEMAsoN's MONITOR. THE TUSCAN

Is the most simple and solid of the five orders. It was invented in Tuscany, whence it derived its路 name. Its column is sc\路cn diameters l1igh; and its capital, base and entablature have but few mouldings. The simplicHy of the construction of this column renders it eligible where ornament would be superfluous. THE DORIC,

Which is plain and natural, is the most anl'icnt, and was invented by the Greeks. Its column is eight diameters high, and has seldom any ornamontf; on base or capital, except mouldings ; thongh tho frieze is di~颅 tingt~i~hod l)y trig1yphs and metopos, and triglyphs comllO~e the ornaments of the frieze. The solicl composition of this order gives it 11 preference in structures where strength and a noble simplicity are chiefly re-quired. The Doric is tl1e best proportioned of a11 the orderA. The several parts of which it is compose1l are founded on the natural position of solid bodies. In its first im路ention it wa8 more simple than in its pre~ent ~tate. In after times, when it began to be adontetl, it gailled the name of Doric; for when it was construetetl in its primitive and simple form, tho name of rruscan

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63

was conferred on it. Hence the Tuscan precedes the Doric in rank, on account of its resemblance to that pillar in its original state. TilE IONIO

Bears a kind of mean proportion between the more solid and delicate orders. Its column is nine diameters high; its capital is adorned with volutes, and its cornice has dentals. There is both delicacy and ingenuity displayed in this pillar; the invention of which is attrilmted to the Ionians, as ____ the famous temple of Diana at Ephesus was of this order. It is ~ai<l to have been formed after the motlel of au agreeable young woman, of an elegnnt shape, dressed in her hair ; as a contrast to the Doric onler, 路which was formed after that of a strong, robust man. THE OORINTlHAN,

The ric11est of the five orders, is deemed a mM;terpiece of art. ltll column is t<m diameters high, and its eapital is adonwd with two row,; of leave,;, and eight volutes, whid1 sustain the abacus. 'l'he frieze is ornanwnte<l with cnrionR device;;. The eol'nice with dentalR and nwllil!itlns. 'l'his order is used iu stately and superb structnres,


1-64

FREEMASON'S MONITOR,

OF THE INVENTION OF THIS ORDER.

It was invented at Corinth, by Oallimachus, who is said to have taken the hint of the capital of this pillar from the following remarkable circumstance. Accidentally passing by the tomb of a young lady, he perceived a basket of toys, covered with a tile, placed over an acanthus root, having been left there by her nurse. As the branches grew up, they encompasRed the basl;:et, till, arriving at the tile, they met with an obstruction, and bent downwards. Oallimachus, struck with the object, set about imitating the figure; the vase of the capital he made to represent the basket ; the abacus the tile; and the volutes the bending leaves.

THE COMPOSITE

Is compounded of the other orders, and was contrived by the Romans. Its capital has the two rows of leaYes of the Corinthian, and the volutes of the Ionic. Its column has the quarter-round as the rruscan and Doric order, is ten diameters l1igh, and its comiee bas dentals, or ~imple modilliom. 'rhis pillar is generally found in buildings 路where ~trength, elegance and Leauty are di~played.

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OF THE INVENTION' OF-t>RDER IN AROIDTEO'l'URE.

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The ancient and original orders of architecture, revered by masons, are no more than three, the Dome, IoNIC, and CoRINTHIAN, whieh were invented by the Greeks. To these the Romn.ns have added two ; the Tuscan, which they made plainer than the Doric ; and the Composite, which was more ornamental, if not more beautiful, tl1an the Corinthian. The first three orders alone, however, shew invention and particular character, and essentially differ from each other: the two others have nothing but what is borrowed, and differ only accidentally : the Tuscan is the Doric in its earliest stn.te; and the Composite is the Corinthian enriched with the Ionic. To the Greeks, therefore, and not to the Romans, we are indebtetl for what is gre~t, judicious and distinct in architecture. OF THE FIVE SENSES OF HUMAN NATURE.

An analysis of tl1e human faculties is next given in this section, in which the five external senses particularly claim attention: these are, hearing, seeing, feeling, smelling and ta,sting. HEARIN'G

Is tl1at sense by which we distinguish sounds, and are capahle of enjoying all the agreeable charms of music. By it we are enabled to enjoy the pleasures of society, and reciprocally to communicate to each other our thoughts and intentions, our purposes a.nd


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FREEMASON'S MONI'£0R.

desires ; while thus our reason is capable of exerting its utmost power and energy, ·The wi8c and beneficent Author of Nature intended, by the formation of this sense, that we should be social creatures, and receive the greatest and· most important part of our knowledge by the information of others. For these purposes we are endowed with hearing, that, by a proper exertion of our natural powers, our happiness may be complete. SEEING

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Is that sense by which we distinguish objects, and in an instant of time, without change of place or situation, view armies in battle array, fignres of the most stately structures, and all the agreeable variety displayed in the landscape of nature. By this sense we find our way in the pathless ocean, traverse the globe of earth, determine its figure and dimensions, and delineate any region or quarter of it. By it we measure the planetary orbs, and make new discoveries in the sphere of the fixed stars. Nay, more: by it we perceive the tempers and dispositions, the passions and affections, of our fellow creatures, when they wish most to conceal them ; so that though tl1o tongue may be taught to lie and dissemble, the countenance would diHplay the hypocrisy to the discerning eye. In fine, tho rays of light which administer to this sense, are the most astoni~;hing parts of the animated creation, and ronJer the eye a peculiar object of admiration.

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Of all the faculties, sight is the noblest. The structure of the eye, and its appurtenances, evinces the admirable contrivance of nature for performing all its various external and internal motions ; while the vaTiety displayed in the eyes of different animals, suited to their several ways路 of life, clearly demonstrates this organ to be the masterpiece of nature'~ work. FEELING

Is tl1at sense by which we distinguish the different qualities of bodies ; such as heat and cold, hardness and softness, roughness and smoothness, figure, solidity, motion, and extension. These three senses, REARING, SEEING, and FEELING, are deemed peculiarly essential among Masons. SMELLING

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Is tl1at sense by which we distinguish odors, the various kinds of wl1ich convey different impressions to the mind. Animal and vegetable bodies, and indeed molit other bodies, while exposed to the air, continually send forth effluvia of vast subtilty, as well in the state of life and growth, as in the state of fermentation and putrefaction. These effluvia, being drawn into the nostrils along with the air, are the means by which all bodies are smelled. Hence it is evident, that there i~ a manifest appearance of design in the great Orento1路's having planted the organ of smell in the inside of that rana1, through which the air continy passes in respiration. --

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68

FREEMASON'S MONITOR. TASTING

Enables us to make a proper distinction in the choice of onr food. The organ of this sense guards the entrance of the alimentary canal, as that of smell- i ing guards the entrance of the canal for re;;piration. From the situation of both these organs, it is plain that they were intended by nature to distinguish wholesome food from that which is nauseous. Every thing that enters into the stomach must undergo the scrutiny of taRting; and by it we are capable of discerning the changes which the same body undergoes in the different cornpositions of art, cookery, chemistry, pharmacy, &c. Smelling and tasting are inseparably connected, and ' : it is by the unnatural kind of life men commonly lead in society, that these senRes are rendered less fit to perform thr.ir natural offices. On the mind all our knowledge must depend ; what, therefore, can be a more proper subject for the investigation of Masons ? By anatomical dissection and ob- I servation, we become acquainted with the body; but it is by the anatomy of the mind alone we discover its powers ancl principles. To sum 11p the whole of this tram;cendent measure of God's bounty to man, we shall ada, that memory, imagination, taste, reaRoning, moral perception, and all the active powers of the soul, prcRent a vast and : boundless field for philosophical clisqui~ition, which far exceed human inquiry, and are peculiar mysteries, 1

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FELLOW CRAFT.

known only to nature, and to nature's God, to whom we and n.U are indebted for creation, preservation, and every blessing we enjoy. OF THE SEVEN LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES.

The se\·en liberal AnTs and ScmNor;:s are next illus· trated in this section : it may not, therefore, be im· proper to insert here a short explanation of them. GRAl\IMAR.

Grammar teaches the proper arrangement of words, according to the idium or dialect of any particular people ; and. that excellfmcy of pronunciation, which enables us to speak or write a langnage with accuracy, agreeably to reason and correct usage. RHETORIC.

Rhetoric teaches us to Rpeak copiously and fluently on any subject, not merely with propriety alone, but with all the atlvantages of force ancl elegance; wisely contriving to captivate the l1ea1·er by strength of argument and beauty of expression, whether it be to entreat and exhort, to admonish or applaud. LOGIC.

Logic teaches us to guide our reason discretionaUy in the general knowledge of things, and directs our inquiries after truth. It consists of a regnln.t• train of at·gumcnt, whence 've infer, deduce, and conclude, ac· cording to certain premises laid down, admitted, or

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

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granted; and in it are employed the faculties of concei~ng, judging, reasoning, 'and disposing; all of which are naturally led on from one gradation to another, till the point in question is finally determined . .ARITHMElTIO.

Arithmetic teaches the powers and properties of numbers, which is variously effected, by letters, tables, :figures and instruments. By this art, reasons and demonstrations are given, for finding out any certain number, whose relation or affinity to another is already lmown or discovered. GEOMETRY.

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Geometry treats of the powers and properties of magnitudes in general, where length, breadth, and thickness, are consi1lered, from a point to a line, from a line to a superficies, and from a superficies to a solid. A point is a dimensionless figure; or an indivisible part of space. A line is a point continued, and a figure of one capacity, namely, length. A superficies is a figure of two dimensions, namely, lengtlt and breadtlt. A solid is a figure of three dimensions, namely, length, bl"eadth and thickness. OF THE ADVANTAGES OF

By this science, the architect is enabled to construct his plans, and execute his designs ; the general to ar-

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range his soldiers ; the engineer to mark out ground forent~ampments; the geographer to give uR the dimensions of 'the world, and all thing:;; therein contained, to delineate the extent of seas, and t!peeify tho divisions of empires, kingdom~ and provinces ; by it, also, the astronomer is enabled to make his observations, and to fix the duration of times and seasons, years and cycle.c:;. In fine, geometry is the foundation of architecture, and the root of the mathl!matics. !IUS I C.

1Insic teacheR the art of forming concords, so as to compose delightful llarmony, by a mathematical and proportional anangemcnt of acute, gt路:n路e ann mixccl SQnnds. This art, by a sct路ics of experiments, is reduced t<> a demonstrative seiencc, with ro~-;pc(~t to t.onc11, and the intervals of sound. It inquires into tlrc nature of concords and discords, and enables ns to find out the proportion between tl1em by numbers. ASTRONO!I:Y.

Astronomy is that divine art, by which we are taught. to read the wiRdom, strength and beauty of the Almighty Creator, in those snercrl pages tl10 celcf>tial hemisphere. Assistt~d hy nstronnmy, we can obRcrve

the motions, measure the lliRtanecs, comprehend tile mngnitndcR, and (~n.lcnlat.c t.he pcriotls anti (lr!ipsc>s, of the heavenly bodies. it we lcnrn the me of the globes, the RyRtem of the wor路Id, anrl the pre1iminnry la.w of nature. While we arc employed in the study

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of this science, we must perceive unparnlleled Illstances of wisclom ancl goodneRfl, and, throngh the whole creation, trace the glorious Author by his works.

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FREEMASON'S :MO~ITOR.

OF THE MORAL ADVANTAGES OF GEOlffiTRY.

From this theme we proceed to illnRtrate the moral advantages of Geometry; a sulljeet on which the folowiug observations :may not be unacccpt!tblc :

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Geomeh)•, the first and noblest of !lcicncel'l, is the on which tho snpcrstmcturo of Masonry ia ereded. By geometry, we may cnrionsly traNl nature, through her various winding~, to her mo~;t l~On· cealed rceHsscH. By it, we diseover the power, the ;vi,.:1lom, and the goo(ln<·~s, of thP Grnwl Artilin•r nf the Univt~rRe, nn(l view with dnlight thc proportinns whidl comu~ct this vast mn('hiuc. l1y it we di~H.'O\'Cr ltow tho planet~; UW\'H iu their •lifli.~rent orbit:-;, nnd dt•m•mstrn.!t.' thtlir nniom; rcv,.lntimu;. Hy it we !l.l.l· count for the return of };Casons, aud the variety of ba.~is

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

scenes which each seaRon displays to the discerning eye. Numberless worlds are around us, all framed by the same Divine artist, which roll through the vast expanse, and are all conducted by the same unerring law of nature. A survey of nature, and the observation of her beautiful proportions, first determined man to imitate the divine plan, and study symmetry and order. This gave rise to societies, and birth to every useful art. The architect began to design, and the pla.ns whieh he laid clown, being improved by experience and time, have produced works which are the admiration of every age. The lapse of time, the ruthless hand of ignorance, and the devastations of war, have laid waste and de~ stroyed many valuable monuments of antiquity, on wl1ich the utmost exertions of human genius have been employed. Even the Temple of Solomon, so spacious and magnificent, and constructed by so many celebrated artists, escaped not the un~paring ravages of barbarous force. Freema~onry, notwithstanding, has still survived. The attenti?Je ear receives the sound from the instruc#路ve tongue, and the mysteries of Ivla~ somy are safely lodged in the repository of faithful brPasts. Tools and implements of architecture are selected by the fraternity, to imprint on the memory wise and serious truths ; and thus, through a sncces路 sian of ages, are transmitted unimpaired the excellent tenets of our institution.

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------1. --路路路

75 Thus end the two Rections of the second lecture, which, with the ecrcmony u~etl at opeuing and elosing the lodge, comprchenLl the whole of the second l]cgrce of )1a~onry. 'l'his leetme contains a regular ~;ystem of science, demonstrn.te1l on the elt'tlt'est principles, and e~t~Llislwd on the firmeHt foumlation. CHARGE AT INITIATION

I~TO

THE SECOND DEGREE.

llRoTHER:-Being advanced to the second degree of Masonry, we congratulate you on your preferment. The internal, and not the external qualifications of a man, nrc what Th1a~onry reg<trch. As yon increa;;e in lmowlot!ge, yon will improve in soeial intereourse. It is unnecessary to rccapitulnte the duties whil'h as a ::\[Mon yon are Lunwl to t!iselmrge ; or enlarge on the neccs;.;ity of a strid ndlwnmel; to them, as your , own expcrienee mn~>t have t>>;tahlished their value. Our laws and rPgnlations yon arn strenuously to support; allil Le nlway~ ready to a~Ah;t in ~o;eeing them duly cxccutcil. You arc not tn palliate, or aggravate, the ofTcnscs of your brethren ; hut, in the dceisiou of every trespass against our rules, yon are to judge with ('antlor, atlmoni~h with frielllltihip, and revrchewl with ju;;tice. The st111ty of the liberal arts, that ;-n1uah1e ln路arwh of eduention, which tends so eflectnally to poli;;h a1Hl adorn the mind, is earne~tly rccommPuded to your consideration; eRpeeinlly the scien~e of g<~omctry, whkh is estalJli~hed af> tl1e basis of our art. Geometry, or Masonry, originally synonymous terms, being of a 6

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

divine and moral nature, is enriched with the most useful knowledge; while it proves the wonderful properties of nature, it demonstrates the more impor· tant truths of morality. Your past behavior and regular deportment have merited the honor which we have now conferred ; and in your new character it is expected that you will con· form to the principles of the Order, by steadily perse· vering in the practice of every commendable virtue. Such is the nature of your engagements as a Fellow Craft, and to these duties you are bound by the most sa'cred ties.

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CHAPTER X. REMARKS ON THE TIDRD DEGREE. I

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FROM this class the rulers of regular bodies of Masons, in the first three degrees, are selected ; as it is only from thoxe who are capable of giving im;truction, that we can properly expect to receive it. 'l'he lecture of this degree, conHideretl separately from the duties and ceremonies appertaining to the degree of presiding or past master, is divided into three sections.

THB FIRSi' Sl!-:CTION.

The ceremony of initiation into the third degree is particularly specified in this branch of the lecture, and here many other useful instr1tctions are given. Such is the importance of this section, that we may safely declare, that the person who is unacquainted with it, is illy qualified to act as a ruler or governor of the work. The following passage of Scripture is introduced during the ceremonies : ( 77)


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FREEMASON'S MONITOR. ECCLESI~STES,

:xii. 1-7.

"Remember now thy Creator in the days of tl1y youth, while the evil days come not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say, I have no plea~ure in tht•m ; while the sun, or the light, or the moon, or the JStars, be not darkened, nor the clouds return after the rain: in the day when the keepez·s of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because .they nre few, and those that look out of the .windO\\'S be darkened ; and the doors shall be shut in the streets, when the sound of the grinding is low: and he shall rise up at the voice of the bird ; and all the tlanghters of mu;;ic ~>hall be brought low : also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the graRshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail ; because man goeth to his long home, and the mom·mlrs go abont the streets : or ever the :silvc1· coni be loosed, Ol' the golden bowl be broken, or the pitd11~r be broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistet·n : then shall the dust return to the earth as it was ; and th~ spirit shall return unto God who gave it."

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MASTER 路 M;ASON.

79

.j The working tools of a Master Mason, which are illustrated in this section, are all the implements of Masonry indiscriminately, but more especially the trowel.

r路'

The TROWEL is an instrument made use of by operative 1\Iasons, to spread the cement which unites a building into one common mass ; but we, as free and aceepte<l 1\lason~, are taught to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of spreading the cement of brotlterly love and affection; that cement whieh unites us into one Racred band, or society of frienrlH and brothers, among whom no contention should ever exist, but that noble contention, or rather emulation, of who best can work, or best agree. THE

SECO~D

SECTION.

rrhis section reeit<':S the hi~-;torical traditions of the Order, and pre;;ents to view a fini:-;hed picture, of the tltmost conseq1H.mce to the fratcruity. It exemplifies an instance of virtue, fortitude, and integrity, seldom equalled, and never excelled, in the history of man.

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

PRAYER AT RAISING A BROTHER TO THE SUBLIME DEGREE OF A MASTER MASON.

Thou, 0 God! knowest our down-sitting and our up-rising, and understandest our thoughts afar off. Shield and defend us from the evil intentions of our enemies, and support us under the trials and afflictions we are destined to endure, while traveling through this vale of tears. Man that is born of a woman, is of few days and full of trouble. He cometh forth as a flower, and is cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not. Seeing his days are determined, the number of his months are with thee, thou hast appointed his bounds that he cannot pass ; turn from him that he may rest, till he shall accomplish his day. For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease. But man dieth and wastetl1 away; yea, man giveth up the ghost, and whet·e is he? As the waters fail from the 11ea, and the flood decayeth and drieth up, so man lieth down, and riseth not up till the heavens shall be no more. Yet, 0 Lord! have compassion on the children of thy creation, administer them comfort in time of trouble, and save them with an everlasting salvation. Amen. So mote it be.

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THE THIRD SECTION.

The third section illustrates l'Crtnin hieroglyphica.l emblems, antl inculcates many useful lessons, to extend knowledge, and p1·omote virtue. In this branch of the lecture, many particulars rela.th·e to King Solomon's Temple are considered. The construction of this granll edifice was attended with two remarkable circnmHta.nces. From Josephus we learn, that although seven years were occupied in building it, yet during the whole term it rained not in the Jay-time, that the workmen might not be obstructed in their labor : and from sacred history it appears, that there wo.s neitl1er the sound of tl1e ham· mer, nor axe, nor any tool of iron, beard in the house, while it was in building.

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MONITOR.

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This famous fabric was supported by fomteen Jnmdred and fifty·tlll'ee columns, and two thousand nine hundred and six pilasters ; aU hewn from the finest Parian marble. 1'here were employed in itR buillling three Gi·and Masters; three thonsanrl and tluee hundred Masters, or overseers of the work ; eighty tlwusand Fellow Crafts; and seventy thousand Entered Apprentices, or bearers of lmrthcns. All these were classed and arranged in sucl1 a manner by tho wisdom of Solomon, that neither envy, discord nor confusion were suffered to interrupt that universai peace and tranquility, which pervaded the world at this important period.


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MASTER MASON.

3 •'.

THE l'OT OF INCENSE

Is an emblem of a pure heart, which is always an acceptable sacrifice to the Deity; and, as this glowR with fervent heat, so shm1lcl our hearts continually glow with gratitwlo to the great awl beneficent Author of our exiHtenco, for tlw manifold 1Jlessings and comfortH we enjoy. TII1i: BEE-HIVE

Is an emblem of industry, and recommends the praet.iec of that virtne to all t~rcatcd beings,

" ., ,

from the higlwHt seraph

in heaven, to the lowest rt'ptile of the dm;t. It tl)lLehes ns, that M we came into the worhl rational and intcl1igt•nt Lcing:::, so we should ever be in7


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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

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dustrious ones ; never sitting down contentecl wl1ile our fellow-creatures around us are in want, when it is in our power to relieve them, without inconvenience to ourselves. When we take a survey of nature, we view man, in his infancy, more helpless and indigent than the brutal creation; he lies languishing for days, months and years, totally incapable of providing sustenance for himself, of guarding against the attack of the wild beasts of the field, or sheltering himself from the inclemencies of the weather. It might have pleased the great Creator of heaven and earth to have made man independent of all other beings ; but, as dependence is one of tl1e strongest bonds of society, mankind were made dependent on each other for protection and security, as they t}Jcrcby enjoy better opportunities of fulfilling the duties of reciprocal love and friendAhip. Thus was man formed for social and active life, the noblest 11art of the work of God; and he that will so demean himl'lclf n.s not to be endeavoring to add to the common ~Stock of kuowledge and understanding, nuty be demMd a drone in the hi.ve of nature, a nseleHs member of society,. and unworthy of our protection as :Masons.

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TSE BOOK OF

CON~:~::.~::, BY TBB ~:--~~~~~ SWORD,

Reminds us that we should be ever watchful and gnarded, in our thoughts, words and actions, particularly wl1en before the enemies of Masonry; ever bearing in remembrance those truly l\Iasonic virtues, silence aud circumspection. TRE SWORD, POINTING TO A NAKED HEART,

Demom;tmtes that justice (M will sooner or later over~ tnke nd ; aml although our 路 thoughts, words, and actions, 1uay be hidtleu from the eyes of mnu, yet that

V

ALL路SEEING EYm,

Whom the Su!i, MooN aml

STARS

obey, and under


86

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

whose watchful care even comets perform tl1eir stupendous revolutions, pervades the inmost recc~~CH of the human heart, and will reward us according to our merits. THE ANCHOR AND ARK

Are emblems of a. well-groundedliope, and a well spent life. They are emblematical of that divine ark which safely wafts us over this tempestuous sea of troubles, and that ancho1· wl1ich s1Ja11 safely moor us in a peaceful harbor, where the wiekcd cease from troubling, and the weary shall find rest. THE FOUTY-SEVENTH PJ\OBJ,E~I OF EUG!,JD.

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This was an invention of onr anc·ient friend antl brother, the grt•nt Pytlmgoras, who, in l1is trnve!s thmugh ~hia, Africa, and Europe, waH initiatc1l iuto several orders of prieHthootl, a111l raise1l to the snl1lime degree of a J\Tnstcr ::Uason. This wise philosopher enriched his miJHl abundantly in 11 gen· eral knowledge of things, nntl more cspcl'ially in Geometry or Masomy; on this subject he drew out many problems and theorems, an!l amongst the mo~t .,. [TrmoRE:M-1-'fn any ri~ht-n.ng1etl trinng-k, the ~1pmrr~ whii'i1 is tle.., SCI'ilJell npon the ~ide auht<~JH1in~ tlJt! t·i~ht·aug-Je, i~ t•qu.~l to tla.• 1"11Uan~s upon the sides which contain the l"ight·:lll,l.d(•.

descl'ib~d

J:uclid, lib. i. Prop. 41


MASTER MASON.

87

distinguished, he erected this, which in the joy of his he called Eureka, in the Grecian language signifying, 1 lwve found itj and upon the discovery of which, he is said to have sacrificed a hecatomb. It tcaehcs Masons to be general lovers of the arts and sciences.

lu~art,

THE HOUR-GLASS

Is an emblem of human life. Behold ! how swiftly the sands run, and how· rapidly our lives are drawing to a close. "VYe can not without astonishment behold the little particles whicl1 arc contltincd in this machine, how t1wy pass away almm;t imperceptibly, antl yet, to our sm·prh;e, in the short ~>pace of an hour they &!'C all exhau~;tecl. T!mR wa~o~tos man l to-day, he puts forth the ten,Ier lcavm; of hope; to-mvrrow, lJloslioms, aml bears his hlnshing- lwnors thick upon him; the next day comes a frost, which nips the shoot, alld when he thinks llis grcatnc~>s is still a.11piring, he falls, like autumn leaves, to enrich our mother earth. THE SCY'l'HE

Is an emhlcm of time, wl1ir1l cntH the brittle thread of life, atnl I.

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lnnnehcs us into eternity. Boboltl I what luwoe the ~>t•ytlle of time makes among the bumo.n

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race; if by chance we should escape tl1e numerous evils incident to childhood and youth, and with health and vigor arrive to the years of manhood, yet withal we must soon be cut down by the all-devouring seythe of time, and be gathered into the land where our fathers have gone before us. THE THREE STEPS,

Usually de1ineatecl upon the Master's Carpet, are emblematical of the three principal stages of human life, viz : youth, ~iili:ll@ll manhood, and age. In youth, as Entered Apprentices, we ongl1t indnRtl'iously to occupy our minds in the attainment of 11Reful knowletlge; in manhood, as Fellow Cmfts, we shonld apply our knowle<lge to the discharge of om respeetive duties to God, om neighbors, and ourselves; that so in age, as :Ma>;ter 1\In.srms, we may enjoy the hn11PY refkctiom: eousc1pwut on a well-r;pent life, and die in the hope of a glorious immortality.

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MASTER MASON. CHARGE AT INITIATION INTO THE

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DEGREE.

BnoTHEU :-Your zeal for the institution of 1\:ra~ somy, the progress yon have made in the mystery, and your conformity to our regnlations, have pointed yon out as a proper oujcct of our favor and esteem. Yon arc now bound by duty, honor and gratitude, to be faithful to your trust; to support the dignity of your character on every occasion ; and to enforce, by precept and example, obedience to the tenets of the Order, In the character of a :Master Mason, you are authorized to correct the errors and irregularities of your uninformed brethren, and to guard them against a bt't!adt of fiuelity. To p1 eserve the reputation of the fmtnrnity unsnllied, mnst be your constant care; and fnr thh; purpose it is your province to l'Ccommeml to your infm·iors, ohedient~e and sulnnission; to your cqnnls, courte:-;y and nff!tbility; to your superiors, ldn1lncss and condm;cem;ion. Universal bcmn·olPnco you a.rc always to inculcate ; and, by tl1c regularity of yonr own behavior, afford the best example for the cowln,,t of othe1'R leRs informed. The ancient land~ mnrks of' the Onlcr, entrusted to yotn care, you are <~arcfnlly to preserve ; and ne\rcr Ruffer thctn to he infringed, or countenance a deviation from the established mmges and cuxtoms of the fra.temity. Your virtue, honor, and reputation, are .eoncorned in supporting with tlignity the character you now bear.

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MONITOR.

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duty, violate your vows, or betray your trust; but be tt路ue and faithful, and imitate the example of that celebrated artist whom you this evening represent. Thus you will render yourself deserving of the honor which we have conferred, and merit the confidence that we have reposed.

.FUNERA.L DIRGE. Solemn strikes the funeral chime, N ores of our deptuting time ; As w~ journey here below, Through a pilgrimage of wo I Mortals now indulge a tear, For mortality is near; See how wide her trophies wave O'er the slumbers of the grave I Here anotl1cr guest we brh1g, Seraphs of celestial wing, To our funeral alter come, Waft this Friend and Brother l1ome. Lord of aU! below-aboveFill our hearts with 'l1ruth and Love; When dissolves our earthly tie, Take us to thy Lodge on high.

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CHAPTER XI. REMARKS ON THE FOURTH, OR MARK MASTER :MASON'S DEGREE.

Tars degree of :Masonry was not less useful in its original institution, nor are its efft.lets less beneficial to mankind, than those which precc!le it. By the influence of this dPgTCC, caeh operative mal;on, at the ercetion of the 'l'emplll of Solomon, was known aml di~tinguishcd by the Senior Gran<l "\Varden. By its effect:; the tli~order an(l confusion that might otherwise ll!we attended so immemo an undertaking was completely prcvente<l ; an<l not on1y the crn.ftsmen themselves, 路who were eighty thouKand in nnmher, lmt eve1路y llart of their workmanship, was discriminated with the greatm;t nkety, and the utmost f1wility. If defeds were fonud, by the help of this degree the overseers were enal,Jml without difficulty to 1\Keerbtin who was the faulty workman: so that tlefidmwies might be remedied, without iujuriug the cre<lit, or diminiRh the reward, of the industrious and fnithful of the craft. ( 91 )

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CHARGE TO BE READ AT OPENING THE LODGE.

"vVherefore, Brethren, lny aside all malice, and guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speak~ ings. "If so be ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious, to whom coming as unto a living stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, and precious; ye also, as living stones, be ye built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up sacrifices acceptable to God. "Wherefore, also, it is contai~ed in tl1e scriptures, Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation ; he that believeth shall not make haRte to pass it OYer. Unto you, therefore, which believe, it is an honor; and even to them which be disobedient, the stone which tl1e builders disallowed, the same is made the he.ad of the corner. "Brethren, this is the will of God, tlu1.t with welldoing ye put to silence the ignorance of foolish men. As free, and not using your liberty for a cloak of maliciousness, but as the servants of God. Honor all men, love the brotherhood, fear God."

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REMARKS ON THE FOURTH LECTURE.

THE FIRST SECTION.

The first section explains the manner of convoca.ting and opening a Mark Master's Lodge. It teaches the stations and duties of the respective officers, and recapitulates the mystic ceremony of introducing a candidate. In this section is exemplified the regnlarity and good order that was observed by' the cmftsmen on

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Mount Libanus, and in the plains and quarries of Zcredatha, and it ends with a beautiful display of the manner in which one of the principal events originated, which characterises this degree.

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TilE SECOND SECTION.

In the second section the Mark Master is particularly instrnctcd in the origin and history of this d~J足 grce, and the indi~;pcnsa'ble obligation~:~ he is under to stretch forth his assisting hand to the relief of an indigent ancl worthy brother, to a certain and spccifietl extent. 'fhe progrcRs made in architecture, particulal'ly in the reign of Solomon, is remarked ; the number of artists employed in the building the Temple of J emsalem, and the privileges they enjoyml, are specified; the mode of rewarding merit, and of pnni,;hing the guilty, are pointed ont; and the marks of di~tinction which were conferred on our ancient brethren, as the rewards of excellence, are named.


rr=:::::::--.,-,:. =:--=====-=--=--==--:::::_:o:-_,_::::___: : :_: :.-.:-::. _:-__: :-::_::=___=--====- .:-:=• 94 FREEMASON'S MONITOR. I In the course of tl1e lecture, the following texts of scriptnre arc introduced and explained, viz : "To llim that overcomcth will I give to eat of tl10 hi<ldcn nuuuu1, and will give him a 'white stone, and in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving b,im that receiveth it."-Rev. of St. Joh.n, ii. 17. "And we will cut wood out of Lebanon, as much as thou shalt need ; and we will bring it to thee in floats by sea to ,Joppa, and thou shalt carry it up to Jerusalem."-2 Oltron, ii. 16. "The stone which the builders refused, is become the head stone of the corner."-Psalm cxviii. 22. "Did ye ueYer read in the scriptures, The stone which the bnilclers rt>jectetl, is become the head of the corner ?"-Jlattlt. xxi. 42. "And have ye not read this scripture, Tho stone which the huiJ,Jnrs r~jeeted, is become the head of the comer ?"-~Jfark xii. 10. "What is tl1is, then, that is written, The stone whid1 the hniltlcrs r~jected, is become the heatl of the cllruer ?"-.Lull:e xx. 17. ''This is the stone which was set at nougl1t of you lmiltlers, wldd1 i~ become the head of the corner.".t1ct.l' iv. 11. "He tlutt l1ath an ear to hear, let him hcar!'Re!l. iii. 13. "Then he llronght me back the way of the gate of the outward fianctnary, which looketh toward the east, an<l it \I'M. shut. Then said the r.. ord unto me, This gnte Rlutll lm ~>hut, it ~hall not be Ollencd, an<l no man shall \~llter in l1y it; bcc·an~;c the Lord, the God of Israel, lutth cntm·ecl in hy it, therefore it shall be shut. It is ful' the f>rilll:e j the p1·ince L.c sllaJl Hit in it to Oat bread

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before the Lord : be shall enter by the way of the porch of that gate, and shall go out by the way of the same. And the Lord said unto me, Son of man, mark well, and behold with thine eyes, and hear with thine etl.rs, all that I say unto thee concerning all the ordinances â&#x20AC;˘ of the house of the Lord, and all the laws thereof; and mark w"Il the entering in of the house, with every going forth of t~e sanctua1y."-Ezelciel xliv. 1-3 & 5. The working tools of a Mark Master are the ckisel and mallet. The Chisel momlly demonstrates the advantages of discipline and education. The mind, like the diamond in its original state, \ is rude and unpolished ; but, as the effect of the cl1i::;cl on the external cont soon presents to view the latent beauties of th<l diamond, so education discovers the latent vhtues of the mind, and draws them forth to range the large field of matter and space, to display the summit of human knowledge, our duty to God and to man.

P

The .Mallet morally teac'hes to correct irregularities, and to red nee man to a proper level ; so that, by quiet deportment, he may, in the school of dir;eipline, learn to be content. V\'hat the mallet is to the workman, enlightened reason is to the passions: it curbs ambition, it depresses envy, it moderates anger, and it encourages good dispositions; whence ari:-;cs, among good :Masons, that comely order, "Which nothing enrthly gives, or can destroy The suul's calm sunshlae, and t.he heart-felt joy."


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OH.ARGE TO llE DELIVERED WHEN A CANDlDATE IS AD· VANCED TO THE FOURTH DEGREE.

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BRoTHER :-I congratulate you on having been thought worthy of being promoted to this honorable degree of Masonry. Permit me to impress it on your. mind, that your assiduity should ever be commensm·ate with your duties, which become more and more extensive as yon advance in Masonry. The situation to which you are now promoted will draw upon you not only the scrutinizing eyes of the world a.t large, but those also of your brethren, on, whom this degree of Masonry has not been conferred ; all will be justified in expecting your conduct and behavior to be such as may with safety be imitated. In the honorable character of l\Iark l\Iaster Mason, it is more particularly yom· duty to endeavor to let your conduct in the world, as well as in the Lodge and among your brethren, be such as may stand the test of the Grand OverHcer's square, that yon may not, like the nntinished and imperfect work of the negligent and. unfaithful of former times, be rejected and thrown aside, as unfit for that spiritual building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. While such is '-"Our conduct, should misfortunes J assail yon, should fdends forsake you, should envy traduce your good name, and malice 11ersecnte you ; yet may you have confident•e, tl1at among Mark l\laster Masons, you will fiml friends who will administer rt~lief to your distrcsRcs, and conlfort yonr aftlictions; ever bearing in mind, as a consolation under all the

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frowns 路of fortune, and as an encouragement to hope for better pror;pects, that tiLe stone wJ.ic!L the builders rejected (pos~cssing merits to them unknown) ber;ame the cltiif stone of t!te corner.

Previous to closing the Lodge, the following Parable is recited : MATTII:S:W, :XX.

1-lu.

"For tl10 kingclom of heaven is like llnto a man that is an honHcholcler, which went out early in the morning to hire laborers into his vineyard. And when he 11ltd agt路ecrl with the lab01路ers for a penny a day, he sent them into his vineyard. And he went out about the third hour, antl saw othct路s standing idle in the market plaee, and said unto them, Go yc also into the vineyard, antl what~oever is rig-ht I will give yon. Awl they went tlwir way. A.!.\nin he went out about the sixth aud ninth hour and did likewise. And

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98

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

about the eleventh hour, he went out, and found ot11ers standing idle, and saith unto them, \Vhy stand ye 11ere all the day i•llc? They say 1mto him, Bnca.nse no man hath hired us. He B:Lith unto them, 0 o yc alHo into the vineyard, aml whatsoever is right, that shall ye receive. So when even waR come, the lnnl of the vineyard Ra.ith unto his stownr•l, Call the lalwrers, and give them. their hire, ])eginning from the last unto the Jirst. And when they came that were hired about the eleventh hour, they rccoived every man a penny. Bnt when the first came, they supposed that they shonl•l have received more, and they likewiRe received every man a penny. Anrl when they had l'eceived it, they murmnred againBt the good mau of the house, saying, These last have wrought but one hour, and thou hast made them eqnalunto us, which have borne the burthen and heat of the day. But ho answered one of them, and tJaid, Pricnd, I tlo thee no wrong: dith;t thou not agree with me for a penny? 'l'ake that thine is, and go thy way; 1 ·will giYo unto this lm:t even as unto thee. Is it not lawful for me to do what I will with mine own? Is thine eve evil because I mn gootl ? So the last shaH be fi1~~t, aml the first last : for. many be called, but few chosen." The ceremony of closing a Lodge in thi~ degree, when properly conducted, is peculiarly interesting. It asRists in strengthening tho social affections; it teaehes us tho duty we owe to our lm;thren in particular, and the whole family of ma11kind in general ; by ascribing praise to the mcritorions, and dispensing rewanls to the diligent and industrious.


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The following song is sung during the closing emony:

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1\[,\RK 1\!ASTERS, aU nppcar Before the Chief O'erseer; In con"crt move; . Let l1im ynur work inspect, For the Chief Architect, If there is no defect, lie wm approve.

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II. Those wl10 have pass'd the Square,. For your rewards prepare, Join heart. and hand; • Nach with his ·nutrk in view, Mtu-eh with the just and true; Wttgc~ 1<.1 you are due, At yom· command. III. IIirnm, the wiclow's son, Sent unto Solomon Our great key-stone; On it app<mrs the name Whieh r1tises hip:h the fnme Of all to whom. the same Is truly known.

IV. N{)w to the WeHt.wn.rd move, Whor~!, full of str(•ng!.h and love, II il·am doth stand:

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

But if imposters are Mix'd with the wol"thy there, Caution them to beware Of the right hana.

v. Now to the praise of those Who triumph'd o'er the foes Of :Mason's arti To the praisewol"thy three, Who founded this degree: May all their virtues be Deep in our hearts.

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CHAYrER XII. OBSERVATIONS ON THE DEGREE OF PRESENT OR PAST MASTER. THIS degree should 1o carefully studied, and well understood, by every Master of a Lodge. It treats of the government of our society; the disposition of our rulers ; and illustrates their requisite qua1ifications. It includes the ceremony of opening and closing Lodges in the several prer.e(ling degrees ; and also the forms of inBtallation anr'l. consecration, in the Grand Lodge, as well as private Lodges. It comprehends the ceremonies at laying the foundation stones of public builtlings, and also at dedications and at funerals, by a variety of particulars explanatory of those ceremonies. REMARKS ON THE FIFTH LECTURE.

THE FIRST SECTION. OF THE MAN::<ER 0]' CONSTITUTI::l'G A LODGE OF MASTER MASONS.

Any nmn ber of Master Masons, not under seven, desironR of forming a new Lodge, must apply, by petition, to the Grand Lodge of the State in which ( 101 )


102

FllEE:\fASON'S 1\f(l::.qiTOR.

re~i1lc, setting forth, "That they are Free and Aec1•pte<l l\Iastcr ::\ln~ons; that tlH•y arc nt pn•snnt, or l1:we been, memlwr~ of regular Lodgns; t1mt, having the prosp1•rity of tl!C fmteruity at hPart, thPy are willing to exert tlwir Lest cndensorR to promote and diffuse the genninc prineip]m; of ~Iasonry; thnt, for the eonveuienc:y of their respeetive dwelling:;, awl for other good reaRons, tlwy arc desirons of t'onning a new Lodge, in the town of •••.••.• , to be mtmc<l .....•.. ; that, in conHcqncncc of this desire, they pl'ay for letters of <1ispcmation, or warrant of constitution, to empower them to al'iReml>lc, as a legal Lotlw•, to tlisehnrge the duties of :\IasOill)', in a regular awl eon;;titntional manner, ac('onling to the original forms of tlll~ Ord(n·, and tho r<•gnltttions of the (J mud Lo,lge. rl'hnt they have nominate,! auil do rec:omlmln<l A B to he the first r.fn,;!er; C 1> to l1l' tho tirst

tl1ey

SPninr \\'1tt·•hm, aml E I•' to l1c tho i'in-.t .Junior \Yar,J,•n, nf tlw ~ai1l Lodge: th1tt, if tlw prnytll' oi the pH!it.ion slwn],J lw gmut1:1t, they pt·omil'ie !\ i-il!'iet t•onf<~nnity til :dl tlw eum;titut.iunal l!tWH 11.nd regulations Qf thP thaw! Lo.lg••.'' This 11etition, h:iug Higm~'l hy at Im~::;t f.iOV!'Il rt>g-nlnr 1\lasun~, niH! ret•ommt~mh•d hy n l,otlge or l,otlgt•R a•lj1wtmt to the ph>t·c wlwrtl tJw new I,c"lge i;; to be l~tllthm, is delivore•l to the Grand l::lecrctary, who lnys it lwfom the ( :raH•l I,otl~;,re. Jf the pPt.ition lllOC!b.; the approbation Of tlte (l !'ltn!l r,n,Jgt>, tht'.Y ~mH'mlly Ol'tll'f a DiH}H'IlHIItion t 0 he is~m·ll, whid1 is ~ignetl l<y the Chand or l>t·puty G mud :\las·

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tor, and nnthorizcs the petitioners to assemble as a. legal Lo<lge, for a certain l'lpecified term of time. In some juriHdidious, tho Grand and Deputy Gmml 1\Iust,m;, respectively, are invested with authority to grant tliR})em;ations, at pleasure, during the reec~:~s of the Grand LodgH ; in others, they are never issne1l without the special direction of the Grand Lodge. Lodges working nmlcr dispensations are conl'lit1cred merely as agents of tho Grand Lodge; their pre:;iding officers are not entitlctl to the rank of Past l\Iastcrs ; their officers are not privileged with a vote or voice in the Grand Lodge ; they can not change their officers without the special approbation and appointment of the Grand LOflg-c; and in C'ase of the ccl:ir>ati~m of slwh LodgeR, their fntuls, jewell-:, an<l other lli'Operty Mcumnlate<l by initiation:'! iuto tho ~;cveral dt>gr<ler>. bet~omo t1w propc1·ty of tho (·hantl I..~otlge, and mnst. be dolivered over to tlul Gmnd ~rrcasurcr. \Vhcn LodgeR that arc at first instituted by diRpcn8n.tinn, lmve pas110d a proper term of probation, they make application to the Grand I.otlgo for a Charter of conRtitution. If tlli11 be obtained, they are then <'Oilfil'l1Wtl in the JlOllllCSRion Of their property, &llU poS· SCHH all tho right.H ami p1·ivilcgcR of l'(!gnla.rly constitntll<l Lo<lg1111, as long as they co11form to the conl:ititu-

tions of llmwnry. Aftl.'r a clut.rtl~r ir> ~ranted lly the G rn.ml Lodge, tl1c Graml :Ma11tcr appointR n tlay aml hour for constituting and <lOilstwrating tho new Lotlgc, ancl for installing its :Master, and 'Wardens, and other officers.

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

If the Grand Master, in person, attends the cere~ mony, the Lodge is said to be constituted, in ample form; if the Deputy Grand Master only, it is said to be constituted in due form; but if the power of ·performing the ceremony is vested in a subordinate Lodge, it is said to be constituted inform. When charters of constitution are granted for places where the distance is Ro great as to render it inconvenient for the Grand officers to attend, the Grand 1\faster, or his Deputy, issues a written instrument under l1is hand and private seal, to some worthy Present or Past Master, with full power to conjugate, constitute and install the petitioners. CEREMONY OF CONSTITUTION AND CONSECRATION.

On the day and hour appointed, the Grand Master and his officers meet in a convenient room, near to that in which the Lodge is to be constituted is assembled, and open the Grand Lodge in the three degrees of Masonry. The officers of the new Lodge ai·e to be examined by the Deputy Grand Master, after which tl1cy return to their Lodge. The new Lodge then sends a messenger to ·the Grand Master with the following message, viz :

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"MosT vYonSHil'FUL :-The officers and brethren of ...... Lodge, who are now assembled at ...... , . have instructed me to inform you, that the ~iost VV orsllipful Grand Lodge [or Grand Master] was pleased to grant them a letter of Dispensation, bearing date

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the ••.. day of .•.... , in the year •••. , authorizing them to fqrm and open a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, in the town of ........ ; that since that period they have regularly assembled, and conducted the business of Masonry according to the best of their abilities ; that their proceedings having received the approbation of the M. W. Grand Lodge, they have obtained a Charter of constitution, and are desirous that their Lodge should l.e consecrated, and their officei·s installed, agreeably to the ancient usages and customs of the craft; for which purpose they are now met, and await the pleasure of the Most Worshipful Grand Master." He then returns to his Lodge, who prepare for the reception of the Grand Lodge. When notice is given that they are prepared, the Grand Lodge walk in procession to their hall. Vllhen tLe Grand Master enters, the grand honors are given by the new Lodge ; the officers of which resign their seats to the Grand officers, and take their several stations on the left. The n~cessary cautions are then given, and all, excepting Masters and Past Masters of Lodges, are requested to retire until the Master of the new Lodge is placed in the Ohair of Solomon. He is then bound to the faithful performance of his trust, and invested with the characteristics of the Ohair. Upon dne notice, the Grand Marshal reconducts the brethren into t.he hall, aud all take their places, except the members of the new Lodge, who form a procession on one side of the hall, to salute their Master. As they advance, the Grand Master addresses them, "Brctltren, behold your Kaster/" As they pass, they

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

· make the proper salutation; and when they have all passed, he joins then1, and takes his appropriate station. A grand procession is then formed, in the following order, viz: Tyler, with a drawn sword. Two Stewards, with White Rods. Entered Apprentices. Fellow Crafts. Master Masons. Stewards. Junior Deacons. Senior Deacons. Secretaries. 'l'reasurers. Past Wardens. Junior Wardens. Senior Wurdcns. Past Masters. Royal Arch Masons, Knights 'l'emplars. Masters of Lodges.

The New Lorlge. Tyler, with a Drawn Sword. Stewards, with White Rods. I~nteretl Apprentices. Jl'ellow Cmt'ts. 1\Iast.er Mnsons. Dcttcons. Secret ry aml '£rcasurcr. Two Brethren, cttrrying the J,odge.• Junior and Senior Wardens. The Holy Writings carrieu by the Oldest Membet·, not in Office. The Mttster. :Music. *Flooring.


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The Grand Lodge. G1•and Tyler, with a Drawn Sword. Grand Stewards, with White Rods. A Brot.her, carrying a Golden Vessel of Corn."' Two Brethren, carrying Silver Vessels, one of Wine, the other of Oil. Grand Secreto.ries. Grand Treasurer. .! Burning Taper, borne by a Past 1\Iast.er. A Past Master, bearing the Holy Writings. Square and Compass, supported by two Stewards with Rods. Two Burning Tapers, borne by two Past Masters. Clergy and Orator. The Tus('an and Composite Orders. The Doric, Ivnic and Corinthian Orders. Past. Grand Wardens. Past Deputy Grand Masters. Past Grand Masters. The Globes. Junior o.nd Senior Grand Wardens. Right Worshipful Deput.y Gro.nd Master. The Master ot' the Oldest Lodge, car1•ying the Book of Constitutions. The l\1. W. GRAND MASTER. The Grand Deacons, on a line seven feet apart, on the right and lef't of the Grand Master, with Black Rods. Grn.nd Sword Bearer, with a Drawn Sword. Two Stewards, with White Rods.

The whole procession moves on to the church or house where the services are to be petformed. vVhen the front of the procession arrives at the door, they halt, open to the right and left, and face inward, while \ the Grand Master, and others in succession, pass through a11d enter the house. A platfortn is erected in front of the pulpit, and

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provided with seats for the accommodation of the Grand officers. The bible, square and compass, and book of constitutions, are placed upon a table, in front of the Grand Master; the lodpe is placed in the center, upon the platform, covered with white satin or linen, and encompassed by the tluee tapers, and the vessels of corn, wine and oil. A piece of music is performed, and tl1e public services commence with prayer. An oration, or sermon, upon the design and principles of the institution, is then delivered by the Grand Chaplain, or some one appointed for that purpose, which is succeeded by a piece of music. The Grand Marshal then directs the officers and members of the new Lodge to form in front of the Grand Master. The Deputy Grand Master addresses the Grand Master, as follows :

"MosT "'l,i'ilonsmrFUL :-A number of brethren, duly instrueted in the my~tcricR of JHmwnry, ll!tving assembled together, at statetl periotls, for ~ome time past, by virtue of a di~pen~ation granted them for that purpose, do now de;;ire to be constituted into a regular Lodge, agreeably to the ancient usages and cuo;toms of the fraternity." Their Secretary then delivers the dispensation nncl records to the Master elect, who presents them to ihe Grand Master. The Grand Master examines the records, and if they are found correct, proclaims,


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"The records appear to be properly entered, and are approved. Upon due deliberation, the Grand Lodge have granted the brethren of this new Lodge a Charter, confirming them. in the rights and privileges of a regularly constituted Lodgej which the Grand Secretary will now read." After the Charter is read, the Grand Master then says, '' vV e shall now proceed, according to ancient 11sage, to constitute these brethren into a regular Lodge." · Whereupon the several officers of the new Lodge deliver up their jewels and badges to tl1eir Master, who presents them, with his own, to the' Deputy Grand Master, and he to the Grand Master. The Depnty Grand Master now presents the l\Iaster elect of th'l new Lodge to the Gmnd Master, saying, "MosT vVoRSHIPF!JL :-I present yon Brother ••.• whom the members of the Lodge now to be constituted have chot.en for their Master." The Grand Master asks them if they remain satisfied with their choice. ( Tltey bow in tolcen of assent.) The Master then presents, severally, his \Vardens, and other officers, naming them and their respective offices. 'l'he Grand Master asks the brethren if they remain satisfied with each and aU of them. (Tiley bow as before.)

The officers and members of the new Lodge then form in the broad aisle. in front of the Grand Ma~ter; and the business of consecration commences with solemn music.

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FREEMASON's MONITOR. CEREMONY OF CONSECRATION.

'l'hc Grand l\In.Rtcr, attcndetl by the Grand officers, and the Grand Chaplain, form themselves in order, ronntl the Loclge, whiuh is then uncovered. All devoutly kneeling, the Jir~t cbu:se of the consecmtion prayer i:> rehearsecl, as follows, viz : "Great Architect of the Uni\·erRo! Maker and Rnler of n.ll W orltl,! deign, from thy celestial Temple, from realms of light an<l glory, to bless us in all the pnrposes oP onr present a~scrnLly 1 "We humbly invoke thee to give us, at this and n.t all time:;;, ~l'isdom in all our doingN, strengtlt of mincl in all our cliflicnlties, and the beauty of harnwny in aH our communication~ ! " Permit us, 0 thon Author of Light and Life, great source of Love nntl Happiness, to erect this Lo•.lgc, and now solemnly to consecrate it to the ho11or of thy glory! "(:Hory be to God on 11igh."

[Response oy the brethren:]-" As it was in the begiuniug, is now, antl ever shall be! Amen."

Dnriug the response, the Dt'Imty Chaml 1\Ia~ter, a!lll Gmw1 \Yanlnns. take the vessel~ of corn, wine, an1l oil, and ;;prinkle the clements of consecration 11pon the Lodg1cl. [ Tfl.e Grand Cllaplain then continues:] "Gmnt, 0 Lord our G·o1l, that those who are now about to he invested with the government of this I,orlge, l!HIY be en.lnetl with wis1lom to i n~trnet their 1retlmm in a.ll their dntie~. 'Mtty orutlwrl!t love, -relief ant.l trutlt, a! wnys prevail among the members of this

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Lodge;. and may this bond of union continue to strengthen the Lodges throughout the world ! " Bless all our brethren, wherever dispersed : and grant speedy relief to all who are either oppressed or distressed. "We affectionately commend to thee all the members of thy whole family. May they increase in the knowledge of thee, and in the love of each other. "Finally: May we finish all our work here below with thine approbation; and then have our transition from this earthly 路abode to thy heavenly Temple above, there to enjoy light, glory and bliss, ineffable and eternal ! "Glory be to God on high !" [Response oy the brethren.]-".As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be ! .Amen l so mote it be l .Amen !" Then succeeds solemn music, while the Lodge is covered. The Grand Chaplain then DEDICATES the 路 Lodge, in the following terms : "To the memory of HOLY SAINT JOHN, we dedicate this Lodge. May every brother 1路evere his character and imitate his virtues. "Glory be to God on high!" [ Response.]-".As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen l so mote it be ! Amen !" A piece of music is then performed, whilst the brethren of the new Lodge advance in procession to salute the Grand Lodge, 'vith their hands crossed upon their breasts, and bowing as they pass. They then take their places, and stand as they were.


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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

The Grand Master then rises, and constitutes the new Lodge in the form following : "In the name of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, I no\v constitute and form you, my good brethren, into a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. From henceforth I empower you to act as a regnlu.r Lodge, constituted in conformity to the rites of our Order, an(l the charges of our ancient and honorable fraternity ; and may the Supreme Architect of the Universe p1·osper, direct and counsel you in all your doings." [Response by all the oretll.ren.]-" So mote it be!" The ceremony of installation then succeeds. THE SECOND SECTION. OEREMON'Y OF INSTALLATION.

The Grand Master* asks his Deputy, "Whether he has examined the Master nominated in the Warrant, and finds him well skilled in the noble science and the royal art." The Deputy, answering in the affirmative,t by the Grand Master's order, takes the candidate from among his fellows, and presents him at the pedestal, saying, "Most Worshipful Grand Master, I present my worthy brother, A B, to be installed Master of this new "' In this, and other sl.mllar h>etances, where the Grand !taster is •pcc!lled

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Lodge. I find him to be of good momls, and of great skill, true and trusty; and as he is a lover of the whole fraternity, wheresoever diRpersed over the face of the earth, I doubt not that he will discharge his duty with fidelity." The Grand Master then addresses him :. "BnoTHER :-Previous to your investiture, it is necessnry that you should signify your assent to those ancient charges and regulations which point out the duty of a Master of a Lodge." The Grand Master then reads, or orders to be read, a summary of the ancient charges to the Master elect, as follows, viz : 1. Yon agree to be a good man and true, and strictly to obey the moral law. 2. You agreP- to be a peaceable subject, and cheerfully to conform to the Jaws of the country in which you reside. ~- Yon promise not to be concerned in plots and conspiracies against govemment, but patiently to submit to the decisions of the supreme legislature. 4. You agree to pay a proper respect to the civil magistrate, to work diligently, live creditably, and act honorably by all men. 5. Yon agree to hold in veneration the original rulers and patrons of the Order of' Masonry, and their regular successors, supreme and subordinate, according to their stations ; and to submit to the awards and


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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

1·esolutions of your brethren when convened, in every case consistent with the constitlttions of the Order. 6. You agree to avoid private piques and quarrels, and to guard against intemperance and t>xcess. 7. Yott agree to be cautious in caninge and beha· ''ior, courteous to your brethren, and faithful to your Lodge. 8. Yon promise to respect genuine brethren, and to discountenance impostors, and all dissenters from the original plan of Masonry. 9. You agree to promote the general good of society, to cultivate the social virtues, and to propagate the knowledge of the art. 10. You promise to pay homage to the Grand Master fot· the time being, and to his officers when duly installed ; and strictly to conform to every edict of tl1e Grand Lodge, or general assembly of Masons, that is not subversive of the principles and gronnd-wodt of Masonry. 11. You admit that it is not in the power of any man, or body of men, to make innovo.tions in the body of 1\.iasonry. 12. You promise a rcgnlar at.tendance on the committees and communications of the Grand Lodge, on receiving proper notice; and to pny attention to all the dnties of Masonry, on convenient oc(•asions. 13. You admit that no new Lodge shall be formed without permisRion of the Grand Lodge; nud that no countenance be giveu to any irl'egular Lotlgc or to any

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person clandestinely initiated therein, being contrary to the ancient charges of the Order. 14. Yon admit that no person can be regularly made a Mason in, or admitted a member of, any regu路 lar Lodge, without previous notice, and due inquiry into his character. 15. Yon agree that no visitors shall be received into your Lodge without due examination, and proclueing proper vonchers of their having been initiated in a regular Lodge. These are the regulations oi Free and Accepted Masons. The Grand Master then addresses the Master elect in the following manner: "Do you submit to these charges, and promise to support these regulations, as Masters have done in all ages before yon?" The new Master having signified his cordial submission as before, the Grand Master thus addresses him : "Brother A. B, in consequence of your cheerful conformity to the charges and regulations of the Order, you are now to he installed Master of this new Lodge, in full confidehce of your care, sl;ill and capacity to govern the same." The new 1\Iaster is then regularly invested with the insignia of his office, ancl the furniture and im路 plements of his Lodge. The various implements of the profession are em-


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blematical of our conduct in life, and upon this occasion carefully enumera.t.ed. "Tho Holy Writings, that great light in Ma.sonry, will guide yon to aU truth ; it will direct your paths to the Temple of happiness, and point out to you the whole duty of man. "The Square teaches to regulate our actions by rule and line, and to harmonize our conduct by the principles of morality and virtue. "The Compass teaches to limit our desires in every station, that, rising to eminence by merit, we may live respected, and die regretted. "The Rule directs, that we should punctually observe onr duty; press forward in the path of virtue, and, neither inclining to the right nor to the left, in all our actions have eternity in view. "The Line teaches the criterion of moral rectitude, to avoid dissimulation in conversation and action, and to direct our steps to the path which leads to immortality. !' 'rhe Bnok of OonstUution.~ you are to search at all times. Cause it to be read in your Lodge, that none may pretend. ignorance of the excellent precepts it enjoins. "Lastly, you receive in charge tbe By-Ltws of your Lodge, which you a.re to sec carefully and punctually executerl." The jewels of the officers of the nP.W Lodge being then returned to tho Master, he delivers them, 1路espec-

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tively, to the several officers of the Grand Lodge, according to their rank. The subordinate officers of the new Lodge are then invested with their jewels, by the Grand officers of corresponding rank ; and are by them, severally in turn, conducted to the Grand Master, who delivers each of them a short charge, as follows, viz :

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"Brother C D, you are appointed Senior Warden of this new Lodge, and are now invested with the ensign of your office. "The Level demonstrates that we are descended from the same stock, partake of the same nature, and share the same hope ; and though distinctions among men are ncceRsary to preserve subortlination, yet no eminence of station should make us forget that we are brethren; for he who is placed on the lowest spoke of fortune's wheel, may be entitled to our regard ; because a time will come, and the wisest knows not how soon, when all distinctions, but that of goodness, shall cease; and death, the grand leveler of human greatness, reduce us to the same state. "Your regular attendance on our stated meetings is essentially necessary; in the absence of the Ma~ter you are to govern this Lodge; in his presence you are to assist him in the government of it. I firmly rely on your knowledge of Masonry, and attachment to the Lodge, for the faithful discharge of the duties of this important trust.-Look well to the We8t !" ·---·-- --

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR. TBE JUNIOR WARDEN.

"Brother E F, you are appointed Junior Warden of tl1is new Lodge; and are now invested with ti1e badgP. of your office. "The Plumb admonishes us to walk uprightly in om several stations, to hold the scale of justice in equal poise, to observe the just medium between intemperance and pleasure, ancl to make our passions and prejudices coincide with the line of our duty. "To you, with such assistance as may be necc~sary, is entrusted the examination of visitors, and the reception of candidates. To you is also committed the superintendence of the craft during the hours of refreshment; it is therefore indispensably necessary, that you sho\1ld not only be temperate and discreet, in the indulgence of your own inclinations, but carefully observe that none of the craft be suJferecl to convert the purposes of refreshment into intemperance and excess. "Your regular and punctual attendance is particularly requested; and I have no doubt that you will faithfully execute the duty which yott owe to your present appointment.-.Look well to tl~e Soutl~ !" TJIE TREASURER.

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., Brother G H, yon are appointecl Treasurer of this new Lodge. It is your duty to receive all moneys from the hands of the Sem·etary, keep just and regular accounts of the same, and pay them out at the vY on;hipful ~

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Master's will and pleasure, with the consent of the Lodge. I trust, your regard for the fratemity will prompt you to the faithful discharge of the duties of your office." THE SECRETARY.

''Brother I K, you are appointed Secreta.ty of this ne~ Lodge. It is your duty to observe the vYorshipful Master's will and pleasure, to record the proceedings of the Lodge, to 1路eceive all moneys, and pay them into the hands of the Treasurer. "Your good inclination to Masonry and this Lodge, I hope, will induce you to discharge your office with fidelity, and by so doing, you will merit the esteem and applause of your brethren.''

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"Brothers L M and N 0, 路 you are appointed Deacons '-: '-.路' ~ of this new Lodge. It is ' your province to attend on the Master and Wardens, and to act as their proxies in the active duties of the Jl Lodge ; such as the 1 eception of candidates into the J1 different degrees of Masonry; the intro<lnction and ~~ accommodation of visitors, and in the immediate pracI tice of our rites. Those columns, as badge's of:ourJ office, I entrust to your care, not doubting your vigilance and attention.'' 1

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"Brothers P Q and R S, yon are appointe<l Stewards of this new Lodge. 'The duties of your office are, to assist in the collection of dues and subscriptions, to keep au account of the Lodge expenses, to see that the tables are properly furni;;hed at refreshment, and that every brother is suitably provided for: and genera1ly to assi~t the Deacons and other. officers in performing tl1eir respective duties. Your regular and early attendance will afford the best proof of your zettl anll attachment to the Lodge."

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Is then app;inted, and receives the imtrument of hi;; oil.lce, with a shott charge on the occasion.

The Grand Master then atldreRses the officers and members of the new Lodge as follows : CHAUGB r.:I'ON Tim

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"\VonsHIPF'UL ::.\L~s-rrm :-The Grand Lodge having committed to your care the superiutr.udcnce and gnn~rnment of the bretlm.m who are to compose this new Lodge, you can not be insensible of the ol,Jigu.tions which devolve on you, a:;; their lwad; nor of your rel'pon~ibility for the faithful disdutrgc of the important d ntics !tnncxed to your appointment.


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"The honor, reputation and usefulness of your Lodge will materially depend on the skill and assiduity with which you manage its concerns; whilst the happiness of its members will be generally promoted, in proportion to the zeal and ability with which you propagate the genuine principles of our institution. "For a pattern of imitation, consider the great luminary of nature, which, rising in the East, regularly diffuses light and lustre to all within its circle. In like manner it is your province to spread and communicate light and instruction to the brethren of your Lodge. Forcibly impress upon them the dignity and high importance of Masonry; and seriously admonish them never to disgrace it. Charge them to practice out of the Lodge, those duties which they have been taught in it ; and by amiable, discreet and vhtuons conduct, to convince mankind of the goodness of the institution ; so that when any one is said to be a member of it, 1he world may know that he is one to whom tl1e bmthened heart may pour out its sorrows; to whom distress may prefer its suit; whose hand is gnicled by justice, and his heart expanded by benevolence. In short, by a diligent observance of the ByLaws of your Lodge, the Constitutions of Masonry, and above all, the Holy Scriptures, which are gi\â&#x20AC;˘en as a rule and guide t.o your faith, yon will be enabled to acquit yourself with honor and reputation, and lay up a crown of rejoicing, which shall continue when time shall be no more."

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"BROTHER SENIOR .AND JUNIOR VV .ARDENS : -Y Ott are too well acquainted with the principles of Masonry to warrant any distrust that you will be found wanting in the discharge of your respective duties. Suffice it to mention, that wltat you have seen praiseworthy in othet·s, you should carefully imitate; and wl1at in them may have appeared defective, yon should in yourselves amend. You should be examples of good order and regularity; for it is only by a due regat·d to the laws in your own conduct, that you can expect obedience to them from others. You are assiduously to assist the l\1aster in the discharge of his trust ; diffusing light and imparting knowledge to all whom he shall place under your care. In the absence of the Master yon will succeed to higher duties ; your acquirements mm;t, therefot·e, be such, as that the craft n1ay never suffer for want of proper instruction. Ft·om the spirit which you have hitherto evinced, I entertain no doubt that your future conduct will be such as to merit the applause of your bt·ethren, an.l the testimony of a goo(l conscience." BRETHREN OF •••••• LoDGE :-Such is the natnro of our constitution, that as some must of necesRity rule and teach, so others must of course learn to submit am\ obey. Humility in both is an essential duty. The officers who are appointed to govern your Lodge, are sufficiently conversant with the rnles of propriety, and the laws of the institution, to avoid exceeding the powers with which they are entrusted ; and you are


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of too generous disposition8 to envy their preferment. I therefore trust that you will have bnt one aim, to please each other, and unite in the grand tle:;;ign of being happy, and communicating happiness. "Finally, my brethren, as this association l1as been formed and perfecteJ in so mnch unanimity and concord, in which we greatly rejoice, so may it long continue. May you long enjoy eve1·y satisfaction and delight, which disinteresteJ friendship can afford. ·May kindness and brotherly affection distinguish yonr conduct as men and as l\I!J,sons. Within your peaceful wa1ls, may your children's children celebrate with joy and gratitude the transactions of this anspicions solemnity. And may the tenets of OlW profession he tran~mitterl through your Lodge, pure and unimpaired, from generation to generation.'' The Grand l\Iarshal then proclaims the new Lodge, in the following manner, viz : "ln the name of the :\1ost V\rorshipfnl Grand Lodge of the State of ..•.•••. , I proclaim this new Lodge, by the name of ........ Lodge, duly constituted." This proclamation is made thrice, and each time fol1owed with a flonrish of drums or trumpets. The Grand Chaplain then makes the concluding prayer, which ends the public ceremonies. The grand procession is then formed in the same order ll.A before, and returns to the hall. The Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, and Grand Wardens, being seated, all but Master Masons 10

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are caused to retire, and the p1路ocession: continues round the hall, which upon passing the sewral Grand officers, pays them due homage, by the usual congratulations and honors, in the dift\.~rcnt degrees. During the procession (whicl1 pa.s~es three times round the Lodge) tho following song is sung, which <:onchtdes the ceremony of installation : 路I. IIAII,, MASONRY divine I Glory of ages shine; Long mtty'st thou reign: Where'cr thy Lodges stand, May they lutve great command And ttlwuys grace the land, 'l'hou At路t divine I If. Great fabrics still arise, And grace the azure skies; Great are thy schemes: Thy noble Orders ll.l'O Mntcllless beyond compare; No art with thee can share, Thou Art divine I

III. Hiram, the arclliteet, Ditl a 11 the craft direct Irow they sll(mld build; Sol'mon, great Isr'el's king1 Did mighty blessings bring, Ohorut: And left us l'OOm to ~;ing, 'l'hred Pimaa. Hail, royal Art I


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The Lodge is then closed with the us11al solemnities in .the different degrees, by the Grand Master and his officers. This is the usual ceremony observed by regular Masons at the constitution of a new Lodge, which the Grand Master may abridge or extend at pleasure ; but the material points are on no account to be omitted. The same ceremony and charges attend every succeeding installation of new officers. THE THIRD SECTION. OEB.EMONY ODSERVED .AT LAYING TBE FOUNDATION STONE OF PUBLIC STRUCTURES.

This ceremony is conducted by the Grand Master and his officers, assisted by the members of the Grand Lodge, and such officers and members of private Lodges, as can conveniently attend. The chief magistrate, and other civil officers of the place where the building is to be erected, also generally attend on t.he occasion. At the time appointed, the Grand Lodge is convened in some suitable place, approved by the Grand Master. A band of ma1tial music is provided, and the brethren appear in the insignia of the Order, and with white gloves ancl Aprons. The Lodge is opened by the Grand Master, and the rules for regulatiugthe procession to and from the place where the ceremony is to be performed, are 1·ead by the Grand Secretary. The necessary cautions are then given from tl1e Chair, and the Lodge is adjourned : after which the proces· sion sets out in the following order : ·-·-

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

Two Tylers, with drawn swords. Tyle1· of' the oldest. Lodge, with do. Two Stewnrds of the oldest Lodge. Entered Apprentices. :Fellow Crufts. l\It1ster Masons. Stewards. "" J unio1· Deacons. [ Senior DeacoilS. ~ Secretaries. · f?.. 1'reasurers. Past Wardens. Junior Wltl'dcns. Senior Wardens. Past :\lasters. Royal Jhch 1\Insons. Knights Templars. Masters. l\lusic. Grn.nd Tyler, with a Drawn Sword. Grand Stewards, with White Hods. A Brother, with a Golden Vessel cont.nining Corn. Two Brethren, with Silver Vessels, one containing Wine, and the other Oil. Principal Architect., with Squttr<', Level and Plumb. . Grand Secretary u nd 'l'rcasurer. Bible, Square and Compass, carried by a :l.h1ster of a Lodge, supported by two :Stewards Grand Chnplain. The PiYe Orders. Past. Grttnd Wardens. Past Deputy Grand l\lttsters. I'ast. Grttnd l\lnstcrs. CMef Magistrate of' the place. Two Large Lights, borne by two Masters of Lodges. Gmnd Wttrdens. One Large Light, borne by a Master of a Lodge. Deputy Gl·nnd l\Inster. Master of the Oldest Lodge, bearing the Book of Constitutions, on a V cl vet Cushion. Grand Deacons, with Bl:tck Rods, on a line seven feet apart. GRAND MASTF;Il..

Grand Sword Be1trer, with a Drawn Sword. Two Stewards, with White Rods.

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A triumphal arch is usually erected at the place where the ceremony is 路to be performed. The proces-路 sion pasRes through the arch, and the brethren repairing to their stands, the Grand Master and his officers take their places on a temporary platform, covered with carpet. An ode on Masonry is sung. The Grand Master commands silence, and the necessary preparations are made for laying the stone, on which is engraved the year of Masonry, the na!!J.e and titles of the Grand Master, &c., &c. The stone is raised up, by means of an engine erected for that purpose, and the Grand Chaplain or orator repeats a. short prayer. The Grand 'l'reasurer then, by the Grand Master's command, places under ' . the stone various sorts of coin and medals of the present age. Solemn music is introduced, and the stone let down into its place. The principal Architect then presents the working tools to the Grand Master, who applies the plumb, 8quare and level, to the stone, in their proper positions, and pronounces it to be "WELL FORMED, TRUE A:ND TRUSTY.''

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路 'rhe golden and silver vessels are next brought to the table, and delivered, the former to the Deputy Grand Master, and the latter to the Grand Wardens, who successively present them to the Grand Master : and he, according to ancient ceremony, pours the corn, the wine and the oil which they contain, on the stone, ~aying,

"May the all-bounteous Author of Nature blesB t.be inhabitants of this place with all the necessaries, con-

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veuir.mccs ancl comfort of life ; assist in the erection and completion of thiR building; protect the workmen against every accident, and long preserve this structure from decay; and grant to ns all, in needed tmpply, the CORN of nourisltment, the WINE of refreshment, and the OIL of joy." ".Amen ! so mote it be I .Amen !" He then strikes the stone thrice with the mallet, and the public honors of Masonry are given. The Grand master then clelivers over to the Architect the various implements of architecture, entrusting him with the superintendence and direction of the work ; after which, he re-ascends the platform, and an oration suitable to the occasion is delivered. A voluntary collection is made for the workmen, and the snm collected is plaeed upon the stone by the Grand Tre1~snrer. .A song in honor of 1\:IaRonry concludes the ceremony, after whicl1 the procession returns to the place whence it set out, antl the Lodge is closed. TIIE FOUltTII SECTION. CEREMONY OllSEIWED AT TIIE DEDICATION OF MASONS' HALLS.

On tl1e day appointed for the celebration of the ceremony of dedication, the Grand Master and his officers, accompanied by tl1e members of the Grancl Lotlge, meet in a convenient room near to the place where the ceremony is to be performed, and the Grand

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Lodge is opened. in ample form in the first three degree~ of :Masonry. The Master of the Lodge to which the hall to be dedicated belongs, being present, rises, an<l addresses the GrandMaster, as follows: "MosT vVonsRIPFO"L :-The brethl·en of ...•••.• Lodge, being animated with a desire of promoting the honor and interest of the craft, have, at great pains and expense, erected a Masonic hall, fr1r their convenience and accommodation. They are now desirous that the Rame shonltl be examined by the Most Vil orshipful Grand Lodge; and if it should meet their approbation, that it should be solemnly dedicated to Masonic pnrpm;es, agreeably to ancient form." The Grand Master then <lirects the Granrl Secretary to read the order of procPs~ion, whieh is delivered over to the Grand Thhr~hal ; and a general charge reHpecting propriety of behavior, is given by the Deputy Grand Master. A grand procession is then formed in the order laid down in the first section (p.106-7). The wl10le moves forward to the hall whieh is to be dedicated, and upon the anival of the front of the procession at the door, they halt, open to the right and left, and face inward; wl1ilst the Grand :Ma~;ter, and others in succession, pass through ancl enter. The music eontinues while the procession marches tlll'ec times round the hall. The Lodge is then placeLl in the center; and the Grand :\Iaster having taken the Chair, under a canopy of state, tl1e Grand officers, and the Masters and Wardens of the Lodges, repair to the places previously

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prepared for tl1eir reception : the three lights, and tl1e gold anrl silver pitchers, with corn, wine ·fin'l oil, are placed round the Lodge, at the lientl of which stands the pedestal, with the Bible open, and the Square and Compass laid thereon, with the Constitntion-roll, on a crimson velvet cushion. Mattei s 1Jeing thus disposed, an anthem is sung, and an exordium on 1\Iasonry given ; after which the Architect addresses the Grand Master, as follows : "1\fosT vVoRSHil'FUL :-Having been entrusted with the snpe1·intendence and management of the workmen employecl in the construction of this edifice; 1md l•aving, according to the best of my ability, accomp]il,;hed the task assigned me ; I now return my thanks for the honor of this appointment, and beg leave to surrender up the itnplements which were committc<l to · my care when the foundation of thiR fnhric was laid ; humbly hoping, that the exertions whidt have been mad~ on this occnKion, will be erowned with yom npprobation, and that of the Most vVorshipful Grand Lo<lge." To wllich the Grand :Master makes the following 1·eply: "BRO'l'IIF.ll .A.ncHITECT :-The skill ana fidelity displayed in the cxt~cntion of the trno;t reposed in yon, at the commencement of this tmdcrtaking, have t;C(mred the entire approbation of the Graml Lo<lge; and they sincerely pray, that this edifice may continue a ln~:~ting monument of the taste, spirit and liberality of its founders." An ode in honor of Masonry is sung, accompanied with instrumental music. I I

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The Deputy Grand Master then rises, and says : "MosT \iVonBHIPFUL :-The hall in which we are now assembled, anll the pla·n upon which it has been constructed, having met with your app1·oba.tion, it is the desire of the fraternitv that it should be now dedicated, according to ancient form and usage." "\Vhereupon the Grand Master requests all to retire but such as are Master Masons. ·A procession is then formed in the following order~ viz : Grand Sword Bearer. . A Pe.st Master, with a Light. A Past Master, with Bible, Square and Compass, on e. Velvet Cushion. Two Past 1\Iasters, each with a Light. Grand Secretry and Treasurer, with Emblems. Grand Junior Warden, with Pitcher of Corn. Grand Seniot• Warden, wit.h l'it.cher of Wine. Deputy Grand Master, with Pitcher of Oil. Grand .Master. Two Stewards, with Rods.

All the other brethren keep their places, and assist in performing an ode, which continues during the procession, excepting only at the intervals of dedication. 'rhe Lodge is uncovered, and the first procession being made round it, the ,Junior Grand Warden presents the pitcher of corn to the Gra.ncl :Master, who ponrs it out upon the Lodge, at the same time pronmincing, "In the name of the great Jehovah, to whom be all l10nor and glory, I do solemnly dedicate this hall to MASONRY." Tlte grand honors are given. The second procession is then made round the Lodge, and the Grand Senior Warden presents tha 11 I·- -··---- ---· ..

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pitcher of wine to the Grand ]\faster who sprinkles it upon the Lodge, at the same time saying, "In the name of the holy Saint John, I do solemnly dedicate this hall to VIRTUE." Tlte grand !wnors are twice repeated. The third procession is then made round the Lodge, and the Deputy Grand Master presents the pitcher of oil to the Grand Master, who sprinkles it llpon the Lodge, saying, "In the name of the whole Fraternity, I do solemnly dedicate this hall to UNIVERSAL BENEVor.ENCE." The grand honor., are t!trice repeated.

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A solemn invocation is made to Heaven, by the Grand Chaplain, and an anthem sung ; after which the Lodge is covered, and the Grand :Master retires to l1is Ohair. An oration is then delh·ered, and the ceremonies conclude with music. 'rhe Grand Lodge is then closecl in ample fo1·m, in the several degrees. THE FIFTH SECTION. THE

CERE~fONY

OBSERVED A.T FUNERALS, .ACCORDING TO ANCIEN'!' CO'S'l'O~I j WITH THE SEIWICE USED ON THE OCCASION.

No Mason can be interre(t with the formalities of the Order, unless it be by his own special request, communicated to the Master of the Lodge of which he died a member, foreigners and sojourners excepted; nor unless he has been advanced to the third degree of Masonry ; and from this restriction there can be no exception. Follow Crafts, or Apprentices, are not j

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entitled to fnneral obsequies, nor to attend the Masonic proces~ion on such occasions. The Master of a Lodge, having received notice of a Master Mason's death, and of his request to be interred with the ceremonies of the Order, fixes the day and . hour for the funeral, and isHnes his command to summon the Lodge. He may invite as many Lodges as he thinks proper, and the members of those Lodges may accompany their officers in form; but the whole ceremony must be under the direction of the Master of the Lodge to which the deceased belonged, and he and his officers must be duly honored, and cheerfully obeyed, on the occasion.* But in case the deceased was not a member of either of the attending T_,odgcs, the procession and ceremony must be under the direction of the Master of the oldest Lodge. All the brethren who walk in procession, should observe, as much as possible, an uniformity in their dreRs. Decent mourning, with white stockings, gloves, and Aprons, is most suitable. THE FUNERAL SERVICE.

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The brethren being assembled at the Lodge room (or some other convenient place) the presiding :Master opens the L0dgc, in the third degree, with the tlsnal forms ; and having statetl the purpose of the meeting, the service begins : Master. "'What man is he that liveth, and shall * Except \vhen the Grand or Deputy Grand hluster is present and exercises his authority..

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not Ree dcatl1? shall he deliver his soul from tho lumd of the grnn~ ?" Rcsf!OIINI'. "1bn walketh in a vain shn<1ow ; he llf'<lpetlt up rielw~, arlll ('fill not tell who shn.ll gather thew." .Jla,\·ter. "vVhen llc aicth, he slutll Cfl.I'I"Y nothing 11\\'ny; "his glory kllllll not de~ceml after him." Response. "N'aketl he came into the world, and naked he must. retmn." .Jfaster. "The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lortl !" The g-rand honors are tlwn given, and certain forms usetl, whic:h can not be here explained. The :\hstE:>r then taking the SACHED ROLL lll his haw], ~ay~, "Let us die the {hath of the righteous, and let our last end be like his!" 'rho brethren answer, "Go1l is our Got\ for ever and ever; he will be our guide C\'en unto denth !" The ~laster then mcord::; the name nml age of the decmls('tl npon the roll, nnd ~uys, "Almighty li'atltt•r l into thy hnnd~ w~ commend thL' son! of onr l()ving ln·otlH~r." The bretlm'lt ::mswcr three time~ (giving the grand lwnors eae!J time), "The will of God i;; accomplislwtl! so be it."

'fhe ?\{aster then deposits the roll in the archives, anu rqwats the following pmycr: "}fost glorious Gotl! anlhor of nl1 good, and giver of all mcn'y ! ponr down thy bleHsil1gs 11pon u;;, and streugthe11 our solemn m1gngements with the ties of ~iucerc ntlcction! :l\Iay tlw present in~>tance of' mortality remind ns of onr npproa~!Jing fall', nnd draw our attention toward thee, tlw only refuge iu till!e of need!


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that when the awful moment shall arrive, that we are about to quit this transitory scene, the enlivening p1·ospect of thy mercy may diHpel the g1oom of death; and after our departnre hence in peace and in thy favor, we may be received into thine evedastin5 kingdom, to enjoy, in union with the souls of our departed friends, the just reward of a pious and virtuous life• .Amen." ..A. procession is then formed, which moves to the house of the deceased, and from thence to the place of interment. The different Lodges rank according to seniority, excepting that the Lodge, of which the deceased was a member, walks nearest the corpse. Each Lodge forms one division, and the following order is observed : Tyler, with a Drawn Sword. Stewards, with White Rods. Musicians (if they are Masons, otherwise they follow the Tyler.) Master Masons. Senior and Junior Dencons. Secretary and Treasurer. Senior and Junior Wardens. :Past 1\Insters. The Holy Writings, on a Cushion covered with Black Cloth, carried by t.he oldest Member of the Lodge. The Master. Clergy. The Body, with the insignia.

placed thereon,

and two

Swords crossed.

Pall Bearers.

Pall Bearers. ·--·- -----"- -~--- --~-----

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The brethren are not to desert their ranlts, or change places, but keep in their different departments. 'When the procession arrives at th_e church yard, the members of the Lodge form a circle x¡otmcl the grave, and the clergyman and officers of the acting Lodge taldng their station at the head of the grave, and the mourners at the foot, the service is resumed, and the following e:x:-. hortation given: "Here we view a striking instance of the ttncert:;.inty of life, and tl1e vanity of all lmman pursuits. The last offices paid to the dead are only useful as lectures to the living: from them we are to derive instruction, and consider every solemnity of this kind as a summons to prepare for our approa(~hing dissolution. "Notwithstanding the various mementos of mortality with which we daily meet, notwithstanding death has established his empire over all the works of nature, yet, through some unaccountable infatuation, we forget that we are born to die. \V e go on from one design to another, add hope to hope, and lay out plans for the employment of many years, till we are suddenly alarmed with the approach of death, when 've least e:x:pect him, and at an hour which we probably conclude to be the meridian of our existence. â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ What are all the externals of majesty, the pride of wealth, or charms of beauty, when nature has paid her just debt? Fix your eyes on the last scene, and view life stript of her ornaments, and expo~ed in her natural meanness ; you will then be convinced of the futility of those empty delusions. In the gl'ave,

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all fallacies are detected, all ranks are leveled, and all distinctions are done away. ""\Vhile we drop the sympathetic tear oYer the grave of our deceaseu friend, let charity incline us to throw a veil over his foibles, whatever they may have been, and not withhold from his memory the p1路aise .that his virtues may l1ave claimed. Suffer the apologies of human nature to plead in hL; behalf. Perfection on earth has never been attained ; the wisest, as well as the best of men, have erred. "Let the present example excite our most serious thoughts, and strengthen our resolutions of amendment. As life is uncertain, and all earthly pursnits are vain, let us no louger po!itpone the important con路 cern of preparing for eternity; but emlmtce the happy m<Jment, while time and opportunity offer, to provide against the great change, when all the pleasures of this world shall cease to delight, and the reflections of a. virtuous life yield the only comfort and consolation. Thus our expectations will not be frustrated, nor we hurried unpreparetl into the presence of an all-wise and powerful Judge, to whom the secrets of all hearts are known. "Let us, while in this state of e~istencc, support with propriety the chat路acter of our profession, advert to the nature of onr solemn ties, aud pmsue with assiduity the sacred tenets of our orde1路 : Then, with becoming reverence, let us supplicate the divine grace, to ensure the favor of that eternal Being, whose good~ ness and power know no bound; that when the awful


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moment arrives, be it soon or late, we may be enabled to prosecute our journey, without dread or apprehension, to that far distant country whence no traveler returns." 'I'he following invocations are then made by the master: Jfaster. "May we be true and faithful; and may we live and die in love !" .Answer. "So mote it be." Master. "l\Iay we profess wh!tt is good, and always act agreeably to our profession !" .Answer. "So mote it be." J1a.~ter. "l\lay the Lord bless us, and pro;; per us; and may nil our good intentions be crowned with success !" .Answer. "So mote it be." blaster. "Glory be to 'God on high! on earth peace! good will toward men!" .Answer. "So mote it be, now; from henceforth, and forevermore." The brethren then move in procession round the place of interment, and severally drop a sprig of evergreen into the grave, accom11anied with the m;ual honors. The l\Iaster then concludes the ceremony at the grave, in the following words : "From time immemorial it luts been a custom among the fraternity of Free and Acct\ptcd :M1\Sons, a!; the request of a brother, to accompany hiR corpse to the place of interment, ancl there to de!lOsit his remains with tbe usual formalities. . .. ...

_...,.. .., ___ â&#x20AC;˘. , .

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P .AST MASTER.

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路 "In conformity to this usage, and at the special request of our deceased brother, whose memory WE. revere, and whose loss we now deplore, we have assembled in the eharacter of Masons, to resign his body to the earth whence it came, and to offer up to his memory, before the world, the last tribute of our affection ; thereby demonstrating the sincerity of our past esteem, and our steady attachment to the principles of the Onler. "'The great Creator having been pleased, out of his mercy, to remove our brother from the cares and troubles of a transitory existence, to a state of eternal dm~ation, and thereby to weaken the chain by which we are united, man to man; may we, who Sl11'vive him, anticipate our approaching fate, and be more strongly cemented in the ties of union and friendship ; t.hat, duriug the short space allotted to. our present existence, >ve may wisely and usefnlly employ our time; and, in the reciprocal intercourse of kind and friendly acts, mutually promote the welfare and happiness of each other.. "Unto the grave we resign the body of our deceased friend, there to remain until the general resurrection ; in favorable expectation that his immortal soul may then partake of joys which have been prepared for the 1路ighteous from the beginning of the world. And may Almighty God, of llis infinite goodness, at the grand tribunal of unbiassed justice, extend his mercy toward him, and all of us, and crown our hope with everlasting bliss in the expanded 1-ealms of a boundless eter-


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nity ! This we beg, for the honor of his name; to ·whom be glory, now and for ever. Amen."

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Thus the service ends, a.nd the procession returns in form to the place whence it set out, where the necessary duties are complied with, and the business of Masonry is renewed. The insignia and ornaments of the deceased, if an officer of the Lodge, are returned to the Master, with the usual ceren10nies, after which the charges for regulating the conduct of the brethren are rehearsed, and the Lodge is closed in the third degree. NOTES.-Ifthe Past or Present Grand Master should join the procession of n p•·lvate Lodge, or Deputy Grand ll!aster, or a Grand W•u·den. a proper attention is to be paid to them. They take place after the Mnster of the Lodge. Two Deac••ns with black rods, are appointed by tlie Master to attend a Grand Warrl<n; and when tl•e Grand Master is present, ·or Deputy Grand blaster, tb<:' Book of Constitutions is borne before him, a Sword Bearer follows him, and the Deacons, with black rods, are placed on his right aud left, at ail llli.gular distance of seven feet. llfarshals are to walk, or ride, on the lert of the procession. On entering public buildings, the Bible, Square and Compass, Book of Constitutions, &.c., nre placed he fore the Grand ).hater. The Grand Marsha.! and Grand Veacons keep ncar him.

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CHAPTER XIII. REMARKS ON THE SIXTH, OR li!OI:lT EXCELLENT MASTER'S DEGREE.

NoNE but the meritorious and praiseworthy; none but those who through diligence and industry h1we progressed far toward perfection ; none but those who ha\'e been seated in the Oriental Chair, by the unanimous suffrages of their brethren, can be admitted to this degree of Mll.Sonry. In its original establishment, when the Temple of Jerusalem was fini8hcd, and the fraternity celebrated the cape-stone with great joy, it is demonstrable that none but those who had proved t~l~~s~lves to be

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complete masters of their profession were admitted to this honor; and indeed the duties incumbent on every l\Iason who is accepted and acknowletlgeJ. as a l\Iost Excellent .Master, are such as render it indiKpensable that he shouhl have a perfect knowledge of all the preceding degrees. One of the following passages of Scripture is rehearsed at opening, accompanied with solemn ceremonies:

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"The earth is tl1e Lord's, and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein. For he hath founded it upon the seas, and estahli~hed it upon the floods. vVho shall ascend into the hill of the Lord ? and who shall stand in his holy I> lace? He that hath clean handR, and a pure heart; who hath not lift up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully. He shall receive the blessing from the Lord, and righteousne~s from the God of his salvation. This is the generation of them that seek him, that seek thy face, 0 .Jaeob. Selah. Lift np, your heads, 0 ye gatos, and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of Glory sllll.Jl come in. Who is tlJis King of Glory? The Lord, strong anrl mighty, the I,onl, mighty in battle. Lift np your heads, 0 ye gates, even lift them up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of Glory shall come in. Who is this King of Glory? The Lord of Hosts, he is the King of Glory. Selah." PsALM cxxii.

"I was glad when they said ·unto me, Let 'us go into the house of the Lord. Onr feet shall sta~Hl within thy gates, 0 Jernsalen1. Jerusalem is builded as a city that iA compact together; whither the tribes

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go np, the tribes of the Lord, unto the testimony of IRrael, to give thanks unto the name of the Lord. For there are set thrones of judgment, the tlu路oncs of \he house of Drwitl. "Pray for the peace of ,Termmlem; t11ey shall prosper that love thee. Peace he within thy wall;.;, and prosperity within thy palaces. !?or my brethren an<l c.:ompanions' sake;;, I will now say, Peace be "lvithin thee. Beeause of the house of the Lord. onr God, 1 will seek thy good."

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The following song is sung with sole run ceremony:

MOST EXCELLENT JI!ASTER'S SONG.

Andante J,[oderato.

~~~~~E-

1-':--t'---.:L..:E~--~--·--tt+~.:rt.=i_E ........ +;t ~#

ALL hail to the morning, That bids us

re • joice ;

H~§;EB~3=#~~~E.~E

~~-it-~-~-t•···-•-=~=1=1-•--j·E+E ............ .:&: ALL hail to tho morning, That bids

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MOST EXCELLENT !lUSTER. Companions assemble On this joyful day; 'l'he occttsiou is glorious, 'l'he key-stone to lay: Fulfill'd is the promise, By the ANCiEN'!' 01" DAYS, To bring forth the C>tp-stone With shouting and praise.

[Ceremonies.] There is no more occasion for level or plumb-line, For trowel or gtt'l"el, for compass or square: Our works are completed, the ark safely seated, And we shall be greeted as workmen most rare.

Now those who are worthy, Onr toils who have shar'd, And -r.rpv'd th<•wselves ftdthful, Shrill rncet their reward; Their virtue and knowledge, Imlush•y aud Rkill, Have our npprobation, Have gain' !I our goo<! will. We accept antl re<:(~ive them, ~lost Excellent, Masters, Invested with honor$, and power to preside; Among worthy <'rilft~mcu, whercn~r assembled, 'l'he knowledge of MltSoHs to ~ln'cRd far and wide. AL~IIGliTY

JEHOV Ali I llesccnd now aml fill 'rhis Lodge with thy glory, Our hearts with good will! Preside at our meetings, Assist us to find True pleasure in tc:tehing Good will to numkind. Thy wisdom in~pire<l the great institution, 'fhy strength Hbnll suppot·t, it till nature expire; And when the Cl'l~lttiou shall full into ruin, Its beauty shall rise thl'mtgh the midst of the fire

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The following paRsagos of Script.nre are al::;o introduced, accompanied with sohmm eeremonio~: 2 CmtoN. vi.

"Then said Solomon, The Lord hath 8>lic1 that be would dwell in the thick darkness. But I have built an honse of habitation for thee, and a place for thy dwelling for ever. And the king turned his face, and b!ellsed the whole congregation of Israel (and all the congregation of Israel stood:) And he ~aid, Blessed he the Lord God of Israel, who hath with his hantl~ fulfilled that which he spake with his mouth to my father David, saying,


l!OST EXCELLENT MASTER.

Sinco> tl1e day that I brought forth my people 011t of land of Egypt, I choRe no city among all the tribM of Israel to 1mihl an l10nse in, that my name might be there ; neither chose I any man to be a ruler over my people IHrad ; but. I have chosen Jerm.alem, that my mune might be there ; and have chosen David to Le ovm· my people !AJ'ael. "Now, it was in the heart of Davirl, my father, to build an house for the name of the Lord God of Israel. But the Lord said to David my father, Forasmuch as it was in thine heart to build an hour;e for my name, tlwu didst well in tl1at it was in thine heart: notwithstanding thou shalt not build the house; but thy son, which...,hall come forth out of thy loins, he shall build the house for my name. The Lm·d, therefore, hath performed his worcl that he hath ~poken; for I am risen np in the room of David my fitther, and am set on tho throne of I.t.H'lllll, as tho Lord promi"'ed, and have !milt tl1e homm for tlw name of tho Lord God of Israel: and in it I have put the ark, wherein is the covenant of tho Lord, that he hath made with the children of Israel. "And l1e stood before the altar of tl1e Lord, in the presence of all the congregation of Ismel, and ~;prea.d forth l1is hantls: (for Solomon lmd matlc a b1·azen fH•nffo1d of five cubit~; long, and five cubits broad, and three cubits high, and had set it in the midst of the <:ourt ; and upon it l1e stood, and kneeled down npon his knees before all thr. COlJgrcgation of Israel, and spread forth his hands toward heaven) and Ha.id, "0 Lord God of !Rrnel, there is no God like thee in the l1eavcn no1· in the earth; which kcepcst <:oveuant lmd :;howest men•y lmto thy t>crvauts tha~ walk before thee with all.their hea.t·ts: thou which ha.th kept with thy servant David my father that which thou hast promised him ; a.nd speakest with thy mouth, and t}Je

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hast fulfi1Ied it with thine hand, as it is this day. Now, therefore, 0 Lord God of Israel, keep with thy Rervant Davitl my father, that which thou hast promised him, saying, There shall not fail thee a man in my sight to sit upon the throne of Israel ; yet so that thy children take heed to their way to walk in my law, as thou hast walked before me. Now then, 0 Lord God of Israel, let thy word be verified, which thou hast spoken unto thy servant David. (But will God in very deed dwell with men on the earth? Behold, heaven, and the heaven of heavens, can not contain thee; how much less this house which I have builcled!) Have respect, therefore, to the prayer of thy servant, and to his supplication, 0 Lord my God, to hearken unto the cry and the prayer which thy serYant prayeth before thee: that thine eyes may be open upon this house day and night, upon the place whereof thou hast said that thou wouldest put thy name there ; to hearkr.n unto the prayer which thy servant prayeth toward this place. "Hearken, therefore, unto the supplications of thy servant, and of thy people Israel, which they shall make toward this place: hear thou from thy dwelling place, even from heaven; and, when thou hearest, forgive.

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["If a man sin against his Reighbor, and an oath be laid upon him to make him swear, and the oath come before thine altar in this house : Then hear thou from heaven, and do and judge thy servants, by requiting the wicked, by recompensing his way upon his own head; and by justifying the righteous, by giving him according to his righteousness. "And if thy people Israel be put to the worse before the enemy, because they have sinned against thee, and shall return and confess thy name, and pray and.

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make supplication before thee in this honse: then hear thon from the heavens, and f01路give the sin of thy p<.>ople Israel, and bring them again unto the land whil:h thou gavest to them and to their fathers. "\Vhen the heaven is shut, up, and there is no rain, because they have sinned against thee; yet if they pray toward tl1iH place, and <:onfe~;s thy name, aml turn from their sin when thou dost afflict thetn: Then hear thou from heaven, and forgiYe the sin of thy servants, ant! of thy people Ismel, when thou hast taught them the good way wherein they should walk; and send rain upon thy land, which thou hast given unto thy people for an inheritance. "If there be dearth in the land, if there be pestilence, if there be blasting or mildew, locusts or caterpillars ; if their enemies besiege them in the cities of their lnnd ; whatsoever sore or whatsoever sickness there be: Then what prayer, or what supplication soever shall be made of any man, 01路 of all thy ptwillo I;;rael, when every one ~hall know hi;; own Rore, anti hi~ own g1路ief, and shall spread forth his hands in tllis house: rrhen heal" thou from heaven thy dwelling place, aud forgive, and render unto every man accoi路ding unto all his ways, whose heart thou knowest ; (for thou only .lcnowest the hearts of the children of men :) that they may fear thee, to walk in thy ways ~o long as they live, in the land which thou gavcst unto our fathers. "Moreover, concerning the stranger, which is not of thy people Ismel, but is come from a far country for thy great name's sake, and thy mighty hand and thy tstretched-out arm ; it' th~1y come and pray in this hon~e: Then hear thou from the llCaYens, even from thy dwelling place ami do according to all that the stranger calleth to thee for : that all people of the ea:rth may know thy name, and fear thee, as doth thy


FREEMASON'S MONITOR â&#x20AC;˘.

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people Israel; and may lmo\v that this house, which I have built, is c.alled by thy name. "If thy people go ont to -tvar against their ene.mit>s by the way that thou shalt send them, and .they pray unto thee toward this city which thou hast chosen, awl the house which I have built for thy name; Then heat¡ thon from the heavens their prayer and their supplication, and maintain their cause. "If they sin against thee (for there is no mnn which sinneth not) and thou be ang1-y with them, and deliver them over before their enemies, and they carry them away captives into a land far off or near; yet if they bethink themselves in the land whither they are carried captive, and turn and pray unto thee in the land of their captivity, saying, vVe have sinned, we have done amiss, and have dealt wickedly; if they return to thee with all their heart and with aU their soul, in the land of their captivity, whither they have carried them captivcH, and pray toward their land, which thou gavest unto their fathers, and toward the city which thou hast chosen, and toward the house which I have built for thy nam"l: 'fheu hear thou from the heavens, even from thy dwelling place their prayer and their ~uppli­ cations, and maintain their canse, and forgive thy people which have sinned against thee. "Now, my God, let, I beseech thee, thine eyes be open, and let thine ears be attent unto the prayer that is made in this place. "Now, tlJereforP., arise, 0 Lord God, into thy resting-place, thou and the ark of tl1y strength : let thy priests, 0 Lord God, be clothed with salvation, and let thy saints rejoice in goodness. " 0 Lord God, turn not away the face of thine anointed: remember the mercies of David thy servant."]

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:MOST EXCELLEX'r MASTER.

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2 CnRON. vii. 1-4.

"No\v, when Solomon had tiul.tlc· an end of pmying, ·the fire came down from heaven, and consume1l the burnt-offering and the sacrifices; and the glory of the Lord filler! the house. Ancl the prie~>ts conl1l not enter into the house of the Lord, because the glory of the Lord h1td filled the Lord's house. i. "And when all the children of Israel saw how the I fire came down, and the glory of the L01·d upon the house, they bowed. themselves with their faces to the 1 ; ground upon the pavement, and worshipped, and 1: praised the Lord, saying, For he is goou ; for his mercy endureth for ever." 1

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CHARGE TO BE DET,IVERED TO A BnOT!IER WIIO IS AC• CEPTED A:SJ) ACKNOWJ,rmGTm AS A MOST EXCELLE:S'l' MASTER.

••BnoTmm :-Your a.tlmittn.n<!e to this degree of 1\In.somy, is a proof of the good opinion the brethren of thitl Lodge entertain of your :\1a~onic abilities. Let thiR conRideration ·imlnce you to be careful of forfeit~ ing, by miseondut:t and inatt<>ntion to our l'ules, that esteem which l1as raisetl you to the rank you no\V pOf';RCSS.

"It is one of your great duties, as a 1\fost Exccllnnt Master, to dispense light anti truth to the uninformed l\Iason; aml I need not l'eminu yon of the impo!>sibilit.y of eomplying with this obligation without posses;;iug an accurate actltmintance with the lectures of each degree. "If you are not already completely con vorsant in all the degrees heretofore conferred on you, remember,


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that an indulgence, prompted by a belief that you will apply yourself with double diligence to make yourself so, has induced the brethren to accept you. Let it therefore be your unremitting study to acquire such a degree of knowledge and information as shall enable you to discharge with propriety the various duties incumbent on you, and to preserve unsullied the title now conferred upon you of a Most Excellent Master.

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CHAP'l'ER XIV. ODSERVA'l'IONS ON '.t'llE

s~:VEXTH.

on DEGREE OF ROYAL

AUCH l\!ABON.

Trns degree is irule:;;eriul\hly more nngnst, sublime, and important, than all whid1 pre1~ede it; and is the summit and pel"ieiJtion of Ancient Mas<mry. It im~ pre~ses on om路 mintls a belief of tho being and exist~ ence of a. Supreme Deit.y, without beginning of days o1路 entl of years : amlremind11 us of the reverence due to his holy unme. This degree brings to light many essentials of the craft, which were f'or the Rpace of four lnmdred a.nd seventy years lmried in darkness ; and without a. knowledge of which tlte Masonic character can not be complete. 13 ( 166)

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The following passage of Scripture is read at opening: 2

THESSALONIANS,

iii. u-17.

"Now we command yon, brethren, tl1at ye withdraw yourselveH from every brother that walketh disorderly, ancl uot after the tradition ·which ye reecivecl of us. For yourselves know how ye ought to follow us, for we behaved our8elves not disonlcrly among you. Neither did we eat any man's bread for nought, but wrought with labor and travel day and night, that we might not be chargeable to auy of you. N 0t becaucle we have not power, but to make ourseh·es an example unto yon to follow us. For oven when we >vere with you, this we commanded yon, that if any would not work, neither shoulc1 he oat : For we l10ar t.here are some who walk among yon disorderly, workins not at all, bnt are busy-bodies. Now them that are such, we command and exhort, that with quietness they work, and eat theil" own bn.'ad. But ye, brethren, be yo not weary in well 1loing. .And if any man obey not our word, note that man, and haHl no company with him, that be may lJe ashamed. Yet count him not as au enemy, but ndmoui><h him as a brother. Now the Lord of peac-e himc;elf give you peace always. The ~alntation of Paul, with mine own hand, which is the token: so I write." OBSERV.A'l'IONS ON THE SEVE:>fTH LECTURE.

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The lecture of this degree is divided into two Rections, and should be well tmder~tood by every Royal Arch Mason ; upon an accurate adqnaintanee with it, will depend his usefulness at our assemblies; and t it, he will be unqualified to perform the duties

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of the various stations in which his services may be rer1uired by the Chapter. TIIE FIRST SECTION.

The first section opens to our view a large field for contemplation and study. It furnishes us with many interesting particulars relative to the state of the fraternity, during and since the reign of King Solomon; and illustrates the causes and consequences of some very important events which occurred during his :reign. This section explains the mode of government in tl1is class of Masons : it designates the appellation, number, and situation, of the se'\"eral officers; and points out the purposes and dnties of their 1·espective stations. 'l'HE SECOND

Sl~CTION.

This section contains much valuable llistorical information, and proves, beyond the power of contradiction, anti in the most litrikiug colors, that pro~=;per· ity and happineKs are eve1· the ultimate consequences of virtue and justice, while 1li;;gracc and ruin invariarJly foll<HV the pra.(:tices of Vit1e and immorality. A p1·op(H' arrangement of the following charges, &c., is essentially nece~sary to be observed in every Chapter; a.n'l their application Hl10uld be familiar to every Roya.l Arllh Mason.

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known ; I will make the darkness light before thP.m, and crooked things straight : These things will I do nnto them, and will not' forsake them."-Isaiak, xlii. 16.

PRAYF.R REHEARSED DURING TB:E CEREMONY OF EXALTA~ TION TO TB:E DEGR!l1E OF ROYAL ARCH MAS()N.

"Supreme Architect of UniverRal Nature, who, by thine almighty word, didst speak into being the stn~ penclous Arch of Heaven, and for the instruction and pleasure of thy rational creatures, dith;t adorn us with greater and lesser lights ; thereby magnifyh1g thy


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power, and endearing thy goodneRs unto .the sons of men : we humbly adore anti worship thine nnHpeaka.~ ble perfection. We bless thee that. when man had fitllen from hiR innocence ant! hi::; happiness, thon clidst still lea1·e unto him the poweJ·s of reasoning, and ca~ prwity of imp1·ovcmcnt and of p1ea.snre. \Ve thank tlwe that amid~t the pains and calttmities of our pres~ ent ~:~tate, so many means of refreshment and satisfaction are reserved unto us, while trave1ing the rugged pat!~ of life. Especially would we at this time render thee our thanksgiving and pmisc for the institution, as members of which we are at this time assembled, anrl for all the pleasmes \Ve have derived from it. We thank thee that the few here assembled before thee, have been favored with new inducements, and Ju.id under new and stronger obligations, to virtue and holiness. May these oblig!ltions, Oh blessed Father, ltavc thcil· full effllet upon no;. 'l'each u~, we pray thee, the tme t·evcrcnce of thy great., mighty nnrl terrible name. Insi>ire nH with a firm aml unshaken reHolntion in our vil·tuous pmsnits. Give us grace diligently to Rea.rch thy woz·d in the Book of Natnre, wherein the dnt.ies of our high vocation are incnlcated with divine authority. May the solemnity of tho ceremonies of our institntion be duly impressed on our minds, and have a lasting and happy effect upon our lives. Oh thon who 1litlst a.forctime appear unto thy servant Moses i1t a .flame of fire out of the mid11t of a bush, enkin.lle, we beseech thee, in ead1 of otu· l1earts, a :flame of devotiQn to thee, of love to Ca.t!h other, and of charity to all mankind. :\Iny all thy miracles aua migktu worli:s fillu:; with the dread, aud t.hy goodnesR impt't1SR UH with the love, of thy lwly name. May lwlincss to tlte Lord he tmgmven on all our thoughtH, wonlll and Mtions. May the in<~ense of piety ascend continually unto thee f1·om the u.ltar'

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of our hearts, and burn, day and night, as a sacrifice of a sweet smelling savor, well-pleasing unto thee. And since sin has destroyed within us the first temple of purity and innocence, may thy heavenly grace guide and assist us in rebuilding a second Temple of reformation, and may the glory of this latter house be greater than the glory of .the former. A.men."

"Now Moses kept the flock of Jethro his father-inlaw, the priest of Midian; and he led the flock to the backside of the desert, and came to the mountain of God, even to Horeb. And the angel of the Lord ap路 peared unto him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush : and he looked, and, behold, the bush burned wit.h fire, and the bush was not consumed. And Moses said, I will now turn aside, and see this great

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sight, why the bush is not burned. And when the Lord snw that he turned aside to see, God called unto him ont of the midst of the bm;h, and said, Moses, Moses ! Aml be said, Here am I. And he said, Draw not nigh hither: put o.ff thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground. Moreover he said, I am the God of tl1y father, the God of Abraham, the God of tsaac, and the God of Jacob. Anrl Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look upon God."-Exorlus, iii. 1-6.

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"Zedekiah was one and t\venty years old when bP began to reign, and reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. And he did that tl·hich was cYil in the sight of the Lord his God, and hnmblctlnot himself before Jeremiah the propl1ct, speaking fl·om the month of the Lord. And he also rebelled against King Nebuchndnezznr, and stiffened his ueck, nnrl hnrdeneu his heart fx·om tuming unto the Lord God of lsrad. ":\Ioreover all the chief of the priests and the people transgressed very much, after all the abominations of the het~then, and polluted the house of the Lord,

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becnnse he hnd compassion on his people, and on l1is dwelling plu.ee. But they mocked the messengers of God, and despised his words, and misused his prophets, until the w1·ath of the L01·d arose againse his people, till the!'e was no remedy. Therefore he brought upon them the kinll' of the Chaldees, who

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slew their yonng men with the sword, in the house of their sanctuary, and had no compassion upon young man or maiden, old man, or him that stooped for age: he gave them all into his hand. .And aU tha veR· sels of the house of God, great a.nd small, and tl1e treasures of the house oi the Lord, and the treasures of the king, and of his princes ; all these he brought to Babylon. .And they burnt the honse of God, and bmke down the wall of Jerusalem, and burnt all the palaces thereof with fire, and destroyed all the goodly vessels thereof. .Anc.l them tl1nt had escaped from the sword, carried he away to Babylon: where they were servants to him and his sons, until the reign of the kingdom of Persia."-2 Ohron. xxxd. 11-20.

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"Now in the first year of Cyrus, king of Persia, the Lord Rtit-red up the r~pirit of Cyrur~, king of Persia, that l1e made a proclamation tluonghont all his kingdom, and put it also in writing, saying, Thus saith Cyrus, king of Persia, The Lord God. of Heaven l1ath given me all the kingdoms of tl1e eartl1, and he hath charged me to build him an houlle at Jel'Usa.Jem, which i:> in .Judah. vYho is therl.' among yon of all his people? hif; Go!l be witl1 him, and let him go np to Jerusalem wllich ill in ,Judah, and build the house of the Lord God of Israel, which is in Jernsalem."-.Ezra, i. 1--3. '* * * ".Anrl Moses 1mi•lnnto Gorl, Bel10ld, when I come unto tl1o children of Israel, and l'ihall ,;ay unto them,

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they shall say to me, "What is his name? what shall I say unto tl1em ? "And God said unto Moses, I Alii THAT I AM: Ancl thns shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM bath sent me unto you."-Exodus, iii. lH, 14.

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"Lord, I cry unto thee: make haste unto me : give ear unto my voice. Let my prayer be set forth before thee as incense, and the lifting up of my hands as the evening Racrifice. Set a watch, 0 Lord, before my month; keep the door of rny lips. Incline not my l1eart to any evil thing, to practice wicked works 1\路ith men tlutt work iniquity. Let the righteous smite me, it shall be a kindness ; and let him reprove me, it shall be an excellent oil. Mine eyes are un+.o thee, 0 God tho Lonl: in thee is my trust; leave not my soul de~颅 titute. Keep me from the snares which they have laid for me, and the gins of the workers of iniquity. Let the wicked fall into their own nets, whilst that I withal escape."-Psalm cxli.

"I cried unto the Lord with my voice ; with my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication. I poured out my complaint before him : I showed before him my trouble. \Vhen my spirit was overwhelmed within me, then thou knewest my path : in the way wherein I walked haYe they privily laid a snare for me. I looked on my .right hand, and heheld, bnt there was no man that would ]mow me : refllge failed me : no man cared fo1~ my soul. I cried unto thee, 0 Lord : I said, Thou art my refuge, and my portion in the land of the living. Attend unto my cry; for I am brought very low : deliver me from my persecutors ; for they are stronger than I. Bring


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my soul out of darkness, that I may praise thy name."-Psalm cxlii. "Hear my prayer, 0 Lord ; give ear to my snpplicat.ions : in thy faithfulness answer me, and in thy rlghteonsness. And enter not into judgment with thy sen路ant : for in thy sight shall no man li \'ing be justified. For the enemy hath persecuted. my soul ; he hath smitten my life down to the ground : he hath mad~ me to dwell in darkness. Therefore is my spirit overwhelmed within me: my heart within me is desolate. Hear me speedily, 0 Lord ; my spirit faileth: hitle not thy face from me, lest I be like unto them that go down into the pit. Caufle me to hear thy loving kindness in the morning; for in thee do. I trust: cause me to know the wav wherein I should walk ; for I lift up my soul unto thee. Teach me to do thy will ; for thon art my God : b1路ing my soul out of trouble, and of thy mercy cut off mine enemies, for I am thy servant."-Psalm cxliii.

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"And Moses answered and said, Bnt behold, they will not believe me, nor hearken unto my voiee : for tl1ey will say, The Lord hath not appeared unto thee. And the Lord said unto him, What is that in thine hand? And he said, A rod. .And he said, Cast it on the ground ; and he cast it on the ground, and it became a serpent; and :Moses fled from before it. And the Lord said nnto Moses, Pnt forth thine hancl. and take it by the ta.i1. And. he pnt forth his ham! aml eanght it, and it became a rod in his hand. 'l'hat they may believe that tho Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the Go1l of Isaac, and the God. of Jacob, hath appeared unto thee.

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"And the Lord said furthermore tmto him, Put no'v thine hand into thy bosom ; and he put his hand into his bosom : and when he took it out, behold, his hand was leprous as snow. And he said, Put thine hand into thy bosom again: and he put his hand into his bosom again, and plucked it out of his bosom, and, behold, it was turned again as his other flesh. And it shall come to pass, if they will not believe thee, neither hearken to the voice of the first sign, that they will believe the voice of the latter sign. "And it shall come to pass, if they will not believe also these two signs, neither hearken unto thy voice, that thou shalt take of the water of the river, and pour it upon the dry land : and the water which thou takest out of the river, shall become blood upon the dry land."-Ea:odus, iv. 1-10.

芦In the seventh month, in the one and twentieth day of the month, came the word. of the Lord by the prophet Haggai, saying, Speak now to Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, and to ,Joshua the son of Josedech, the high priest, and to the residue of the people, saying, Who is left among you that

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saw this house in her first glory? ancl l1ow do ye see it now ? is it not in your eyes in comparison of it as nothing? Yet now be strong, 0 Zoruubabcl, and be strong, 0 J o~lma, son of J o~edeeh the high prieHt, and be strong all ye people of the laud, and work; fvr I am with you, aeconling to the word whieh I covenanted with you when yo came out of Egypt, ~:;o my spirit remaineth among you : fear ye not. For thus saith the Lord of hosts, Yet once, it is a little while, and I will~;hake the heavens, and the earth, and the sea, and the dry land : and I will shake all nations, and the desire of all nations shall come, and I will fill this house with glory. rrhe HiJver is mine, and the gold is mine. The glory of this latter house Rhall he greater than of the former, and in tl1i;; llhec will I give peace. "In that day will I take theo, 0 Zerubbabei, my servant, the son of ShealtiHl, saith the Lord, nnd will make thee as a signet: for I have chosen thee."Haggai, ii. 1-9, 23.

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"This is the word of the Lor<l nnto Zernb1Ja1Je1, saying, Not by might nor power, but by my Hpirit. Who art thou, 0 great mountain? before Zerubbabel thou shalt become a plain, and he slw.ll bring forth

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the head stone thereof with shouting, crying Grace, grace, unto it. Moreover the word of the Lord came unto me, saying, The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation of this house, his hands shaH also finish it; and thou shalt know that the Lord of Hosts hath sent me unto you. For who hath despised the day of small things ? for they shall rejoice, and shall see the plummet in the hands of Zerubbabel with those seven."-Zechariah, iv. 6-10.

"In the beginning was the vV ord, and the Word ws.s with God, and theW ord was God. '!'he same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness, and the darkness com11l'ehendeth it not."-Jol~n, i. 1-5.

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"And it came to pass when MoRes had. mafic an end of writing the words in thio book, until they wet路e finished, that Mo&es commanded th'e Levites which bare the ark of the covenant of the r,ord, sayiug,

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the ny·k ROYAL AHCH. your 169 " of the C?venant of the Lord God, that. it may be there for a witness against thee."Deute.r. xxxi. 24-26. And thou slutlt put the mercy seat above, upon the ark ; and in the ark thou shalt pnt the testimony that I slw.ll give thee."-Exadus, xxY. 21. "And Moses said, This is the thing which the Lord commandetll, Fill an omer of the manna, to be kept for your genemtions: that they may see the bread where· with I have fed you in the wilderness, when I brought yon forth from the land of Egypt. And Moses said unto Am·on, Take a pot and put an omer full of manna. therein, and lay it up before the Lord, to be kept for yom generations. As the Lord commanded Moses, so Aaron laill it np before the testimony to be kept!'Exodus, xvi. 32-34. "And the Lonl saitl unto Moses, Bring Aa.t·on's rod again before the testimony, to be kept for a token.".;Yum'bers, xvii. 10. "E'or tlle1·e was a ta.bcrnadc made; tlte first, where· in was the candlestick, and the table, and the sh~w· bread; which is called 'fhe Sanctna1-y. And after the vails, the tabernacle, which is called The Holiest of all ; which hatl a golden censer, and the a1·k of the co\·enant ovedaicl ronntl about with gold, wherein Wllfl the golden pot that had manna, autl Aaron's rod tlm~ buddcd, antl the tables of the cO\'E.mant ; aml ovet• it the cherubims of glory, shadowing the mel'cy seat ; of which we can not now speak particularly."Hebrews, ix. 2-5.

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"In that day will I raise up the tabernacle of David that is fallen, and close up the breaches thereof, and I will raise up his ruins, and I will builcl it as in the days of old."-Amos, ix. 11.

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il "And God spake unto Moses, and said unto l1im, I am the Lord: And I appeared unto Abraham. unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them."-Exodus, vi. 2, 3. The following particulars, relative to King Solomon's Temble, may with propriety be here introrluced, and can not be uninteresting to a Royal Arch Mason: This famous fabric was sitnntecl on 1\Iount l\Ioriah, near the place where Ahrai1am was about to oft'c1路 up his son Isaac, and where David met and appeased the destroying angel. It was begun in the fourth year of the reign of Solomon; the third after the death of David; four hundred and eighty years after the passage of the Red sea, and on the second day of the month Zif, being the second month of the sacred year. which answer.s to the twenty-first of April, iu the year of the world 2992, and was canied on with such p1路o-


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digious speed, that it was finishell, in all its parts, in little more than se\'en years. By the MMonic art, and tl1e wise regulations of Solomon, every part of the building, whether of st{)ne, briek, timber or metal, was ·wrought and prepared before they were brought to J'erusalem ; so that the only tools made use of in erecting the fabric were wooden instmments prepared for that purpose. rrhe noise of the axe, the hammer, and every other tool of metal, was cour,ignetl to the forests of Lebanon, where the timber was procured, and to Mount Libanus, and the plains and quarries of Zeredatha., where the stones were raisetl, sqnared, marked nnd nnmbered; that nothing might be heanl nmong the :\Iasons at J erusa.Iem, but harmony antl peace. In the year of the worltl 3029, King Solomon diet!, and was sucl•eeded by his son Hchoboam, who, hnmediatcly after the (leath of his fnthm·, went down to Shechem, where tho chief); of the people were met tog~>thcr to proclaim him king. '\Vhen .Tcwr)()am, tlul son of Ncbat, who was in Egypt, whitl1er he had fled from the 1wesence of Solomon, and whose amhition had long aspired to the throne, heard of the death of the king, he hastened to return from Egypt, to put himl'elf at the hcnd of the discontented t1·ihes, an<l lead them on to rehcllion. He accordingly o.Rscmblcd them togethe1·, and came to King Rehoboam, and spakc to him afte1· this manner: "Thy father made our yoke grievous ; now, there~ fore, ease thou somewhat the grievous servitude of thy 14

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father, and l1is heavy yoke that he pnt tlpon us, and we will serve thee. And he said unto them, Come again unto me after three days. And the people dcpartocl. And King Rehoboam took counsel with the old men that had stood before Solomon his fnther while be yet lived, snying, What counsel give ye me, to return answer to this people ? And they spake unto him, saying, If thou be kind to this people, and please them, and speak good words to them, they will be thy servants for ever. But he forsook the counsel which the old men gave him, and took counsel with the young men that were brought np with him, that stood. before him. And he said tmto them, What advice give ye, that we may return answer to this people, whicl1 have spoken to me, saying, Ease somewhat the yoke that thy father did put npon us? And the young men that were brought 11p with him F:pake unto him, saying, Thus shalt thou answer the people that spake unto thee, saying, Thy fnther made our yoke heavy, but make thoa it somewhat ligllter for us ; thus shalt thou say tmto them, My little finger shall be thicker than my father's loins. For, whereas my father put a heavy yoke upon you, I will}mt more to your yoke: my father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions. So Jeroboam and all the people came to Rehoboam on the third day, aR the king bade, saying, come again' to me on the third day. And the king answered tl1em roughly; and King Rehoboam forsook tl1e counsel of the old men ; and answered them after the ad vice of the

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young men, saying, My father n~aae your yoke heavy, but I will add thereto ; my father chastised you with whips, but I will chai;tise yon with scorpions. And when all Israel saw that the king would not hearken unto them, the people an"werecl the king, saying, '\Vhn.t portion have we in David? and we have none inheritance in the son of .JeRse: every man to your tents, 0 Israel: and now, David, see to thine own house. So all Israel went to their tents."-2 Okron. x. But as for tl1e children of I!lrael that dwelt in the cities of Judah and Benjamin, Rehoboam x·eigned over them. In this manner were the tribes of Israel divided, and under two distinet. governments, for two hundred and fifty-four years, when the ten revoltecl tribes, having become weak 11.1\(l degenerated, by following the wickedness aml idolat1·y of tl1e kings who go"erned tlJCm, fell a pray to Salmanezer, king of Assyria, who in the reign of Ho!;hca, king of brae!, heRieged the city of Samaria, Iaitl their country waste, and utterly extirpated theit· government. Snch was the wretched fate of a people who disl'!a.ined subjection to the laws of tl1e llOuRe of David, and whose impiety an•l effeminacy ended in their dl1Rtruction. After a. series of changes and events, of which an account may be found in the history of the 'l'emplc, Ncbnchadnezzar, king of Babylon, with llis forces, took possession of .Jerusalem, and hnving made captive Jehoiachim tho king of Judah, elevated his uncle Zedekiah to the throne, after binding him by a solemn


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oath, neither to make innovations .in the govermnent, nor to take part with the Egyptians in their wars against Babylon. At the end of eight years Zecleldah violated his oath to Nebuchadnezzar, by forming a treaty offensive and defensive with the Egyptians ; thinking that jointly they could subdue the king of Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar immediately marched, and ravaged Zedekiah's country, seized his castle and fortress, and proceedetl to the siege of JernRalem. Pharaoh, learning how Zedekiah was p1路es~;;ed, advancetl to his relief, with a view of raising the siege. Nebuchadnezzar, having intimation thereof, would not wait his approach, but proceeded to give him battle, and in one contest drove him out of Syria. This circumstance suspended tho siege. In the ninth year of Z~dekiah's reign, the king of Babylon again besieged Jerusalem, with a large army, and for a year and a half exerteti all his strength to conquer it; but the city did not yield, though enfeebled by famine and pestilence. In the eleventh year the siege went on vigorously ; the Babylonians cofttpleted t.heit路 works, having raised towers all round the city, so as to dl'ive the invaded party from its walls. The place, though a prey to plague and famine, was obstinately defended during the space of a year and a half. But at length, want of provisions and forces compelled its surrender, and it was accordingly delivered, at midnight, to the officers of Nebuchadnezzar. Zedekiah, seeing the troops enter the Temple, ab-

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sconded by a narrow pn.ss to the desert. with his officers and friends: but advice of his escape being given to the Babylonians, they pursued them early in the rooming, and surrounded them nenr Jericho, where they were bonne!, and cnrried before the king, who ordered his wives and children to be put to death in his sight; and then ordered Zedekiah's eyes to be put out, and himself conducted in chains to Babylon. After this victory, Nebuchadnezzar dispatched his principal officer, Nebuzaradan, to Jerusalem, to ransack and burn both palace and Temple, to raze the city to the ground, and conduct the captive inhab· itanbJ to Babylon; this order he accordingly executed. Among the captives were the following persons of eminence : Seraiah, the High Priest ; Zephaniah, next in rank ; the secretary to the king ; three principal keepers of the r.remple ; seven of the king's <:hosen friends, and other persons of distinction. In the seventieth year of the captivity of the Jews, and the fil'st of the reign of Cyrus, king of Persia, he issued his famous edict, purporting that the God adored by the Israelites was the etemal Being through whose bounty he enjoyed the regal dignity, and that be had found himself honorably mentioned by the prophets of ancient elate, as the person who should cause Jerusalem to be rebuilt, and restore the Hebrews to their former state of grandeur and independency; he therefore gave oruers for the release of the captives, with his permission to return to their own native country, to rebuild the city, and the house of the Lord. - -•. ;......:;;;.=:~·;;_··;;:.·;;;.:···:::. ..·;;;.;-::;:;;"·=·;;:;·-=·=····c;;::·····;::·"-=:;;""::::;"·::;;;·;;:. ....;.;:---:;..: .. ...;;·-;:..;,--;;;;::--·:;.;;··;;;;;":;;;:-:;::;-·;,;:;"";;_":;;;;"":::;·:::;·=---;!Ji


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The principal people of the tribes of Judah ancl Benjamin, with the priests and Levites, immediately departed for .Ternsalern and commenced the undertaking; but many of the Jews determined to remain in Babylon rather than relinqui~h the possessions they had obtained in that city. CHARGE TO A NEWLY EXALTED COMPANION.

"WoRTHY CoMPANION :-By the consent and assistance of the members of this Chapter, you are now exalted to the sublime and honoi路able degree of a Royal Arch l\Iason. "Having attained this degree, you have arrived at the summit and perfection of ancient Masonry; and are consequently entitled to a full explanation of the mystel'ies of the Order. "The rites and mysteries developed in this degree have been handed down through a choRen few, unchanged by time, and uncontrolled by prejudice; aml we expect and trnst, they will be regarded 1Jy yon with the same veneration, and transmitt(Jd with the same scrupnlons pnl'ity to your snccessorR. "No one can reflect on th<3 ceremonies of gaining admission into this place, without being forcibly struck with the important .lessons which they teach. "Here we are necessarily led to contemplate with gratitude and admiration the sacred sonree from whence all earthly comforts flow ; here we find additional inducements to continue stcaLlfast and immoveable in the discharge of our respective duties; and


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here we are bouml, by the most solemn ties, to promote each others' welfare and correct each others' failings, by advice, admonition and reproof. "As it is our most earnest desire, and a duty we owe to our Companions of this Order, that the- admission of every candidate into this Chapter should be attended by the approbation of the mo~t scrutinizing eye, we hope always to possess the satisfaction Of finding none amongst us, but such as will promote to the utmost of their power the great end of our institution. By paying due attention to this determination, we expect you will never recommend any can路 cliclate to this Chapter, whoRe a'bilities, and knowledge of the foregoing degrees, you can not freely vouch for, and whom yon uo not firmly and confidently believe, will fully conform to tlw principles of our Order, and fulfill the obligations of a Royal Arch Mason. While such are our mcmberR, we may expect to be united in one object, witl10ut lukewarmness, inattention or neg路 lect; but zeal, fidelity, and affection, will be the dis路 tingniKhing characteri~;tics of our society, and that satisfaction, harmony and peace may be enjoyed a.t our meetings, which no other society can a.fford.' 1

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The chapter is closed with solemn ceremonies ; and t11e following prayer is rehearsed, by the )lost Excellent High Priest:

By the Wisdom of the Supreme High Priest may we be d.irectecl, by his &1·ength may we be enabled, and by the Beauty of virtue may we be incited, to perform the obligations here enjoined on us; to keep inviolably the rny~tel'ies here unfolded to us; ami. im·ariably to practise all those duties out of the Chapter, which are inculcated in it." Response: So mote it be. Amen.

After tnese observations, little more ean be wantecl to encourage the zealous Mason to persevere in his researches. vVhoever has traced the Art in regular progression from the commencement of the fir::;t to the conclusion of the seventh degree, aecording to the plnn here laid down, will have amassed an ample store of useful leaming : and must rcflllet with plea~ure on the goocl effects of his past diligence and attention : while, by applying the whole to the general advantage of society, he will observe method in the proper distrilmtion of what he has acquired, secure to himself the veneration of Ma~ons, and the approbation of ·all good men.

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THE ORDER

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HIGH PRIEST.

THIS Ordet appertains to tl1e office of High Priest of a Royal Arch ()hapter, and no one can be legally entitled to receive it until he has been elected to sustain that office in some regular Chapter of Royal Arch MMons. The following passages of Scripture are made use of dnring the ceremonies appertaining to this Order, viz:

"Aml they tor>k Lot, Abram's brother's son (w1l0 dwelt in Sotlom,) and llis goods, and departed. And there came one that had escaped, and told Abram the Hebrew ; for he dwelt in the plain of Mamre the Amorite, brother of E~heol, and ln·other of Ancr: and these were confc,leratc with Almtm. And when Abram lwartl that his brother WitS takt•n captive, he armed his trainetl servant~, bom in his own house. three hnn!lrctl and eigltteen, and pnrsnetl thl'm unto Dan. Antl he divitled himself against them, he and 15

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his servants, by night, and smote them, and pursued them unto Hobah,. which is on the left hand of Damascus. And he brought back all the goods, and also brought agnin his brother Lot, and hiH goot1s, and the women also, nnd the people. And the king of Sodom went out to meet him, (after his retu~n from the路 slaughter of Chedorlaomer, autl of the kings that were with him,) at the valley of Shevah, which is the king's dnle. And Melcbiseclek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine : and he was the priest of the most high God. And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be Ahram of the most high Gotl, possessor of heaven and earth: and blessed be the most high God, which hath deli\路erecl thine enemies into thy hand. And he gave him tithes of all. Antl the king of Soc1om said unto Abram, Give me the persons, and take tl1e goods. to thyself. Awl Abram Raid to the king of Sodom, I have lifted up mine hantl unto the Lord, the most l1igh God, the possessor of hc:n路en and earth, that I will not take from a threacl even to a shoe-latchet, ant'! that I will not tnke nny thing that is thine, lest than shonldcst say, I have lllade Abram :rich: Save only that which the yonng men have eaten, and the portion of the men which went with me, Aner, Eshcol, and Manue; let them take their portion."-Genesis, xiv. 12-24. "And the Lord spake unto l\foses, saying, Speak unto A:cron, and unto his sons, Haying, On thi;,; wise ye sl1all bless the children of Israel, saying unto them,

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his face shine upon thee, and be gracious 1mto thee; the Lord lift up his countenn.nce 1~pon thee, and give thee p~ace."-•.'i':umberll, vi. 22-2(). "For this ·:Melchisedck, king of Salem, priest of tl1e most high God, who met ·Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and ble~sed l1im; to whom abo Abraham gave a tenth part of all; (first being, by interpretation, King of Righteousness, and after that also King of Salem, which is, King of Peace; without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days nor end of life, but made like unto the Son of God;) abideth a priest continually. Now consider how gr•'at this man was, unto whom even the patriarch Abraham gave the tenth of the ~poils. Aml verily they that are of the sons of Levi, who receive the office of the priesthood, ltaYc a commandment to take tithes of the people according to the law, that ill, of their brethren, though they como out of the loins of Abraham. "For he tcRtificth, Thou art a priest. for ever, after the onlcr of l\Ielchised<:k. "Awl inasmuch as not without an oath he was made priest. "For those pri(:Hts (under tl1e Lmlitical law) were made without an oath ; but this '"ith an oath, by him tl111t !iaid unto him, 'l'!te LorJ swarc, and will not repent, Thou m't a .Pric~t for ever, after the order of M:dd1isedek."-lleorews, vii. 1-G.

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CEREMONIES .AND OH.ARGES UPON CONSTITUTING .AND DEDICATING A ROYAL .ARCH CHAPTER .AND INSTALLING ITS OFl~ICEUS.

I. The Grand officers will meet at a convenient place, and open. II. The st1bordinate Chapter will meet in the outer courts of their hall, and form an avenue for the reception of the Grand officers. III. When formed, they will dispatch a committee to the place where the Grauel officers are assembled, to inform the Grand Marshal that the Chapter is prepared to receive them ; the Grand l\Iarshal will announce the committee, and introduce them to the Grand officers. IV. The Grand officers will move in procession, conducted by the committee, to the hall of the Chapter in the following order: Gra.nd Tyler. Two Grand Stewards. Q Representatives of subordinate Chapters, according ~to seniority, by threes triangular. .... Tln路ee Great Lights. ~ Orator, Chapln.in and other Clergy. !:; Grand Secretary, Grnncl Treasurer, and Grand W Royal Arch Cnpt.a.in. :*Grand P. Sojourner, Gra.nd Captain of the IIost, and Deputy Grand High Priest.. Grand Scribe, Grand King, and Grand High Priest.

When the Grand High Priest enters, the grand honors are given. V. The Grand Secretary will then call over tl1e names of the officers e1eet ; and the Grand High Priest * The Grnnd l'rlncipnl Sojnurner, Grant! Captain or the llo,t, nnd Gn.nd

Royal.ue!l Capta.ln, are appolntod pro tempore.

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wiii ask whether they accept their respective offices. If they ans路wer in the affirmative, he then asks the members wl1ether they remain satisfied with their choice. If they answer in the affirmative, he directs their officers to approach the sacred volume, and become qualified for installation. VI. The Grand Marshal will then form the whole in a procession, and they will march through the veils into the inner apartment, where they will surround the altar, which is previously prepared in ampleform for the occasion. VII. All present will kneel, and the following prayer will be recited : "Almighty and Supreme High Priest of hea,ren and earth! Who is there in heaven but thee, and who l1pon earth can stand in competition with thee? Thy OMNISCIENT mind brings all thing;; in review, past, present and to como; thine OMNIPOTENT ann directs the moveme11tl'l of the vast. creation; thine OMNIPRESENT eye pervade>! the secret recess of eve1y heart ; thy bonndless beneficence supplieR us witlt every comfort and enjoyment; and thine unspeakable pcrfl'ctions and glory snrpaRs the understanding of the child1路cn of men I Our Father, who art in heaven, we invoke thy benediction upon the purpot>es of our present assembly. Let this Chapter be ClltabliRhed to thine :hono1路: let itA officers be endowed with wisdom to discern, and fidelity to pnrsue, its true interetlts ; let its members be ever mindful of the dnty they owe to their Goo; the obedien<>e they owe to thtlir ~;uperiors; the love they o've to their equals, and tl1e good will they owe to ali mankind. Let this Chapter be conl'iecrated to thy glo1路y, ax~.d ita members ever exemplify

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their Jove to GoD by their beneficence to man. Glory be to GoD on high." Response-" So mote it be. Amen." The officers are then qualified in due form. All the Companions, except High Priests and Past High Priests, are then desired to withdraw, while the new High Priest is solemnly bound to the performance of his duties ; and after the performance of other necessary ceremonies, not proper to be written, they are permitted to Tetum. VIII. The whole then return to their appropriate stations ; when the Grand Marshal will form a general procession, in the following order : Three RoynJ Arch Stewards, with Reels. Tyler of' a Blue Lodge. Entered Apprentices. Iâ&#x20AC;˘'ellow Ur!1fts. :Master :'.lnsons. Stewawls of Lodges, lmviug Jewels. Deacons, h:1ving ,) ewels. Secrct.aries, having ,Jewels. Tre[Lsurcrs, Jmving Jewels. Wo.rdcns, lmving Jewels. l\lark :Mn.ster ~Ia~10ns. l\:I. ll. ~bsters.

Royal Arch 1\hsous, by three. Royal al!1sters, by three. Select M11stcrs, by three. Orders of Knighthood. Gm1!'d of the new Chapter. Members of the new Chapter, by three. Three Masters of V cils. Secretary, Treasurct¡, R. A. Cn.pt.ain, and P. Sojourner, carrying the Ark. A Companion, carrying the l'ot of Incense. Two CompaniouR, carrying Lights. Scrib", High Pri~st and King:. Grand Chapter (as before prescribed.)

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On arnvmg at the church, or house where the services are to be performed, they halt, open to the right and left, and face inward, while the Grand officers and others in succession, pass through and enter the house. IX. The officers ancl members of the new Chapter, and also of the Grand Chapter, being seated, the Grand Mar~;hal proclaims silence, and the ceremonies commence. X. An Anthem or Ode is to be performed. XI. An Oration or Address is to be delivered. XII An Ode or piece of :.\Iw::ie. XIII. T'he Deputy Grand High Priest then rises and informs the Grand High Pric~t, that "a number of Companions, duly in~tructcd in the sublime mysteries, ueing desirous of promoting the honor, and propagating t.hc prim:ipleH of the Art, ha\'e applied to the Gmnd Chapter for n warrant to constitute a new Chapter of Hoyal Arch l\lasons, whid1, having been olJtainccl, they are now a~semuled for the purpose of being constitnted, mttl having their officers installed in dne and ancient form." XIV. The Grand :Marshall will then form the officers arulmembers of the new Chapter in front of the Grand oi11eers ; after which, the Grand High Priest directs the Gmml Sec:retary to read the wo.rrant. XY. The Gmnd High Priest then rises allll :;;ayR, "l}y vir路tne of the high powcm; in me vested, I (tO form yon, my respeded Colll}l:lnions, into o. regular Chapter of Hoyal .Arc:h :.\laxon~. l~l'Oru henceforth


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you are authorized and empowered t.o open and hold a Lodge of Mark Masters, Past Masters, and l\Iost Excellent Masters, and a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons; and to do and perform all such things as thereunto may appertain ; conforming, in all your doings, to the General Grand Royal .Arch Constitution, and the general regulations of the State Grand Chapter. .And may the God of your fathers be with you, guide and · direct you in all your doings." XVI. The furniture, clothing, jewels; implements, utensils, &c., belonging to the Chapter, (having been previously pl.aced in the center, in front of the Grand officers, covered,) are now uncovered, and the new Chapter is dedicated in due and ancient form. XVII. The dedication then follows : the Grand Chaplain saying, "To our Most Excellent Patron, ZmRUDBA.BEL, we solemnly dedicate this Chapter. 11ay the blessing of our Heavenly High Priest descend and I'est upon its members, and may their felicity be immortal. "Glory be to GoD on high." Response oy the Companions-" As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end I .Amen. So mote it be." XVIII. The Grand Marshal then says, "I am directed to proclaim, and I do hereby proclaim, this Chapter, by the name of .••.. ~ •• Chaptet·, duly consecrated, constituted and dedicated. This ••••.• day of .••••• , .A. D.18 .•. " XIX . .An Ode.

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I:N'STAT.LATION. XX. The Deputy Grand High Priest will then present the first officer of the new Chapter to the Grand High Priest, saying, "l\IoeT ExcELLENT GRAND HIGH Pnrn:sT :-I present you my worthy Companion •••••••. , nominated in the warrant, to be in~>talled High Priest of this new Chapter. I find him to be skillful in the royal Art, and attentive to the moral precepts of our forefat1lers, and have therefore no doubt but he will discharge the duties of his office with fidelity.'' The Grand High Priest then addresses him as follows: "MosT ExcELLENT CoMPANION - I feel much satisfaction in performing my duty on the present occasion, by installing yon into the office of High Priest of this new Chapter. It is an office highly honorable to all those who diligently perform the important duties annexed to it. Your reputed Masonic knowledge, however, precludes the necessity of a particular enumeration of those duties. I shall, therefore, only observe, that by a frequent reculTenee to the constitution, and general regulations, and constant practice of the several Sltblime lectures and charges, you will be best able to fulfill them; and I am confident that the Companions who are chosen to preside with you, will give strength to your endeavors, and support your exertions. I ehall now propose certain questions to you,

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relative to the duties of your office, and to which I must request your unequivocal answer:

1. Do you solemnly promise that you ;viii redouble your endeavors to correct the vices, purify the morals, and promote the happiness of those of your Companions, who have attained tl1is sublime degree? 2. That yon will never suffer your Chapter to be opened, unless there be present nine regular Royal · .Arch Masons ? 3. That you will never suffer either more or less than three brethren to be exalted in your Chapter at one and the same time ? 4. That you will not exalt auy one to this degree, who has not shown a charitable and humane disposition; or who has not made a considerable proficiency in the foregoing degrees? 5. That you will promote the general good of our Order, and, on all proper occasions, be ready to give and receive instructions, ancl particularly from the General and State Grand officers? 6. That, to tl10 utmost of your power, you will preserve the solemnities of our ceremonies, and behave, in open Chapter, with the most profound respect and reverence, as an example to your Companions? 7. That you will not acknowledge or l1avc intercourse with any Chapter that does not work under a constitutional warrant or dispensation ? 8. That yon will not admit any visitor into your Chu.pter, who has not been exalted in a Chapter

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legally constituted, without his being :first formally healed? 9. rrhat you will observe and support such by-laws as may be made by your Chapter, in conformity to the General Grand Royal Arch Constitution, and the general regulations of the Grand Chapter? 10. That you will pay due respect and obedience to the instructions of the General and State Grand officers, particularly relating to the several lectures and charges, and will resign the Ohair to them, severally, when they may visit your Chapter? ll. That you will support and observe the General Grand Royal Arch Constitution, and the general regulations of the Grand B.oynl Arch Chapter, under whose authority yon net? "Do you snbmit to all these things, and do you promise to observe and practice them fttithfully ?" These questions being answered in the affirmative, The Companions all kneel, and the Grand Chaplain repeats the following prayer: "Most Holy and glorious LonD GoD, the Great lligh Priest of heaven and e11rth ! we approach thee with reverence, and implore thy blessing on the Companion appointed to preside over this new assembly, and now prostrate before thc<l ; fill his heart with thy fear, that. his tongnH and actions may pronounce thy ~lory. Make him stMtlfnst in thy service; gruut him firmness of mind ; animMe his heart, and ~;tnmgtlwn hi;; endeavors; may he teach thy j<Hlgments and thy laws; aml mny the incense he ~hall put b<>fore thee, npou thine altar, prove an acceptable sacrifice unto


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thee. Bless him, 0 LoaD, and bless the work of his hands. Accept us, in mercy; hear thou from heaven, thy dwelling-place, and forgive our transgressions." Respo::se-" So mote it be." XXI. The Grand High Priest will then cause the High Priest elect to be invested with his clothing, badges, &c.; after which he will address him as follows: "MosT ExcELLENT :-In consequence of your cheerful acquiescence with the charges, which you have heard recited, you are qualified for installation as the High Priest of this Royal Arch Chapter; and .it is incumbent upon me, on this occasion, to point out some of the particulars appertaining to your office, duty and dignity. "The office of High Priest is a station highly honorable to all those who diligently perform the important duties annexed to it. By a frequent recurrence to the Constitution and general regulations, and a. constant practice of the several sublime lectures and charges, you will be best enabled to fulfill those duties; and I am confident that the Companions, who are chosen to preside with you, will give strength to your endeavors, and support to your exertions. "Let the mitre, with which you are invested, remind you of the dignity of the office you sustain, and its in~cription impress upon your mind a sense of your dependence t1pon GoD ; that perfection is not g'iven unto man upon earth, and that perfect holiness belongeth alone unto the LoRD.

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"The breast-plate with wl1ich you are decorated, in imitation of that upon which were engraven the names of the twelve tribes, and worn by the High Priest of Israel, is to teach you that you are always to bear in mind your responsibility to the laws and ordinances of the institution, and that the honor and interests of your Chapter and its members, should be always near yom路 heart. "The various colors of the robes you wear, are emblematical of every grace and virtue wl1ich can adorn and beautify the human mind; each of which will be briefly illustrated in the course of the charges to be delivered to your subordinate officers. "I now deliver into your l1ands the Oharter under which you are to work ; you will receive it as a sacred deposita, and never permit it to be used for any other purposes tl1an those expressed in it. "I present you with the Book of the Law, the great Light in every degree of Masonry. The doctrines contained in this sacred volume, create in us a belief in the dispensations of Divine Providence, which belief strengthens our FAITH, and enables us to ascend the first step of the Grand Masonic Ladder. This faith naturally produces in u1:1 a HoPE of becoming partakers of the promises expressed in this inestimable gift of GoD to ma.n; which hope enables ns to ascend the second step. But the tl1ird and lnst being CHARITY, comprel1ends the former, allll will continue to exert its influence, when Faith shall be lollt in sight, and Hope in complete eujoyxnent.


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"I present you with tl1e Constitution of the General Grand Royal Arch Chapter; the Rules and Regulations of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of this State ; and also, with the By-Laws of your Chapter. You will cause all these to be frequently read and punctually obeyed . ."And now, Most Excellent, permit me, in behalf of the Craft, here assembled, to offer you our most sincere congratulations on your accession to the honorable station you now :6.11. I doubt not you will govern with such order and regularity as to convince your Companions that their partiality has not been misplaced. "Companions of ••...... Chapter,-Behold your High Priest." [They rise and bow, or, if tlt.e installation be not public, salute him with tlte honors of Royal Arch .Masonry.] "Recollect that the prosperity of yonr Chapter will as much depend on your support, assistance and obedience, as on his assiduity, information and wisdom." XXII. The Marsl1al of the Ohapter will then pre·sent the second officer to the Depnty Grand High Prie~t. who will present him to the Grand High Priest. The Grand High Priest will then ask him whether he hns attended to the ancient charges and regulations before recited to his superior officer ; if he answers in the affirmative, he is asked whether he fully and freely assents to the same; if be answers in the affirmative, the Grand High Priest directs his Deputy to invest

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him with his clothing, &c., and then addresses him as follows, viz : CJIA.RGE TO THE KING. "ExcELLENT CoMPANION :-The important station to which you are elected in this Chapter, reqnires from you exemplary conduct; its duties demand your most assiduons attention; you are to second and support your chief in all the requirements of his office; and should casualties at any time prevent his attendance, you a1路e to succeed him in the performance of his duties. Your badge (the Level, surmounted by a. Crown) should remind you, that although you are the representative of n king, and exaltetl by office above your companions, yet that you remain upon a level with them, as respects your duty to GoD, yonr neighbor, and yourself; that you are equally bound with them to be obedient to the laws and ordinances of the inHtitution, to be charitable, humane and just, and to seek every occasion of doing good. "Your office teaches a striking lesson of humility. The in:;;titution& of political society teach us to consider the king as the chief of created beings, and that the first duty of his subjects is to obey his mandates ; but the institutions of our sublime degrees, by placing th<} King in a situation subordinate to the High Priest, teaches us that our duty to Gon is paramount to all other duties, and should ever claim the priority of our obedience to man; and that, however strongly we may


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be bound to obey the laws of civil society, yet that those laws, to be just, should never intermeddle with matters of conscience, nor dictate articles of faith. "The Scarlet Robe, an emblem of imperial dignity, should remind you of the paternal concern you should ever feel for the welfare of your Chapter, and the fer· vency and zeal with which you should endeavor to promote its prosperity. "In presenting to you the Crown, wl1ich is an emblem of royalty, I would remind you that, to reign sovereign in the hearts and affections of men, must be far more g1·ateful to a generous and benevolent mind, than to rule oyer their lh·es and fortunes ; and that to enable you to enjoy this pre-eminence with honor and satisfaction, you must subject your own passions and prejudices to the dominion of reason and charity. "You are entitled to the second seat in the council of your companions. Let the bright example of your illustrious predecessor in the Grancl Council at Jel'U· salem, stimulate you to the faithful discharge of your. dnties; and when the King of kings shall summon you into his immediate presence, from his hand may you receive a crown qf glory, which shall nevet· fade away." XXIII. The King will then retire to the line of offieers, and tl1e Scribe will be presented. in the .manner before mention~d. After his investiture, the Grand High Priest will address him as follows, viz :'


HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

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CHARGE TO THE SCRIBE. "ExcELLENT Oo]IPANION :-The office of Scribe, to which you are elected, is very important and respectable. In the absence of your superior officers, you are bonnd to succeed them and perform their duties. The purposes of the institution ought never to suffer for want of intelligence in its proper officers ; you will therefore perceive the necessity there is of your possessing such qualifications as will enable you to accomplish those duties which are incumbent upon you, in your appropriate station, as well as those which may occasionally devolve on you by the absence of your superiors. "The Purple .Robe, with which you are invested, is an emblem of union, and is cnlculated to remind you that the harmony and unanimity of the Cl1apter should be your constant aim. ; ancl to this end you arc studiously to avoid all occasions of giving offense, or countenancing any thing that may create divisions or dissensions. You are, by all means in your power, to endeavor to establif;ll a permanent union and good lmdcrstanding among all orders and degrees of 1\Iasonry; and, as the glorious sun, at its meridian hight, dispels the mists and clouds which obscme the horizon, so may your exertions tend to dissipate the gloom of jealousy and discord whenever they may appear. 路

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while you stand as a watchman 11pon the tower, to guard your companions against the approach of those enemies of human felicity, intemperance and e;tcess, lot this faithful monitor over rcmintl yon to walk uprightly in your station; admonishing and animating your companions to fidelity and industry while at labor, and to temperance and moderation while at refreshment. And when the great vV atchman of Israel, whose eye never ~:~lumbers n0r sleeps, shall relieve you from your post on earth, may he permit you, in l1ea von, to participate in that food and refre~hmeut which is 'Sneh as the saints in glory love, And such as angels cat.'

XXIV. The Scribe will then retire to the line of officers, and the next officer be presented as before. CHARGE '1'0 THE

OA~rAIN

OF THE HOST.

"Coii!PANION :--'I'he office with wl1ich yon arc entrusted iR of high importance, anrl tlcmumlH your most ZP!tlous eon:;itlera!ion. 'l'hc preservation of the most eH~cntiul traits of onr ancient customs, m:nges aml landmarks, arc within your province ; an<l. it i;_; indispen~ably neccs~ary that the part as~;ignccl to you, in the immediate practice of our rites and ceremonies,. should be perfct:tly understood an<l correctly administered. . â&#x20AC;˘' Your office corresponds with that of .Jlfarsltal, or

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Master of Ceremonies.* processions of your Chapter, when moving as a distinct body, either in public or private; and as the world can only judge of our private discipline by our public deportment, you will be careful that the utmost order and decorum be observed on all such occasions. You will ever be attentive to tl1e commands of yom· chief, and always near at hand to see them duly executed. I invest you with tl1e badge of your office, and presume that you will give to your duties all that study and attention which their importance demands."

XXV. He will then retire to the line of officers, and the next officer will be pmsentcd. CHARGE TO THE PRINCIP,\L SOJOURNER. "CoMPANION :-The office confided J,o yon, though subordinate in degree, is equal in importance to any in the Chapter, that of your chief alone excepted. Your office corresponds with that of Senior .Deacon, in the preparatory degrees.* Among the duties ro., 'l'he offi"er• of the Chnptcr nfficlntc In tl1c Lo<lges, hol<len for confcrrlng the prt•paratory <legrecs, nccordlng to rank, lUI follows, viz : The lllgh l'l"iest, ns 1\laster. Tlw Kin~~ as ::tmh1r \\'arden. 'rtw Srril.>e, AS ,Junior \\"'arden. The Cnptaln of the Rust, ns l\fltrshnl or llln•ter of Ceremonies. The l,l'int~lJHll Snjunrncr, as S~nim· Drmcon. ThtJ Rnynl Arch Cn:ptain, Ill! Junior lleacon. Tho llhu1t~r oftlm Third ''<•11, M Muster 0\'0t"Rr.er. The Mllllter uf t11~ S<•Coiul Yell, us St•nior Overseer. The )IW*ter of the l'lrat Veil, as Jllnior Ov•r•eer. The 'l'•·easul'!.•r, Secretary, Ollap!aln 1 Steward» and Guard (1'yler) u oftl• cers ot corresponding ra11k.

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quired of you, the preparation and introduction of candidates are not the least. As in our intercourse with the world, experience teaches that first impressions are often the most durable, and the most difficult to eradicate; so it is of great importance, in all cases, that those impressions should be correct and just ; hence it is essential that the officer, who brings the blind by a way that they knew not, and leads them in paths that they have not known, should always be well qualiiied to make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. «Your robe of office is an emblem of humility; and teaches that, in tho prosecution of a laudable undertaking, we should never decline taking any part that may be assigned us, although it may be the most difficult or dangerous. :' 'l'he rose-colored tesselated border, adorning the robe, is an emblem of ardor and perseverance, and signifies, that when we have engaged in a virtuous course, notwithstanding all the impediments, hardships and trials we may be destined to encounter, should endure t.l1em all with fortitude, and ardently persevere unto the end ; resting assured of receiviug, at the termination of our labors, a noble and glorious reward. Your past exertions will be considered as a pledge of your future assiduity in the faithful discharge of your duties." XXVI. He will then retire to the line of officers, and the next offioe1· is presented.

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CHARGE TO THE ROYAL AII.CH CAPTAIN.

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芦CoMPANION :-Tho well-known duties of your station require but little elucidation. Your office in the preparatory degrees corresponds with that of Junior Deacon. It is your province, conjointly with the Captain of the Host, to attend the examination of all visitors, ancl take care tl1at none are permitted to enter t1Je Chapter but such as have traveled tlte rugged path of trial, and evinced their title to our favor and friend路 ship. You will be attentive to obey the commands of the Captain of the Host during the introduction of strangers among the workmen ; and should they be permittetl to pass yonr post, may they, hy him, be introduced into the presence of the Grand Council. "The Wllite Banner, intrusted to your care, is em路 blematical of that purity of heart and rectitude of conduct, which ought to uctuate all those who pass tl1e wl1ite veil of the sanctuary. I give it to you strongly in charge, never to suffer any one to pass your post witlwnt the Signet of Truth. I present you the badge of your office, in expectation of yonr performing your dutic!; with intelligence, asHiduity and propriety."

XXVII. He then retires, and the three Grand Masters of the V oils are nresentcd together.


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A

CHARGE TO THE 1\IASTER OF THE THIRD VEIL,

"CoMPANION :-I present you with the Scarlet Banner, which is the ensign of your office, and with a sword to protect and defend the same. The rich and. beautifnl color of your banner is emblematical of fervency and zeal; it is the appropriate color of the Royal Arch degree. It admonishes us that we should be fervent in the exercise of our devotions to GoD, and zealous in our endeavors to promote the happiness of man."

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CHARGE TO THE MASTER OF THE SECOND VEIL.

"CoMPANION :-I invest you with the :purple banner, which is the ensign of yotu' office, and arm you with a sword, to enable you to maintain its honor. The color of your banner is produced by a due mixture of blue and scarlet; the former of which is the cl1aracteristic color of the symbolic or first tllree degrees of lrfasonry, and the latter that of the Royal .A1·cl~ degree. It is an emblem of union, and is tho characteristic color of tho intermediate degrees. It admonishes us to cultivate and improve that spirit of union and harmony, between the brethren of the symholic degrees, and the companions of the sublime degrees, · which should ever distinguish the members of a society founded upon the principles of everlasting truth and universal philanthropy." ~===========--·-·"··-

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CHARGE TO THE MASTER OF THE FIDST VEIL.

"CoMPANION :-I invest you with t1w blue banner, which is the ensign of your office, and a sword for its defense and protection. The color of your Launer i~; one of the most clura.Lle and beautiful in nature. It is the appropriate color adopted and "'lvorn by our ancient brethren of the three symbolic degrees, and is the peculiar clwracteristic of an institution which l1as stood the test of ages, and which is as much distin~ gnished hy the durability of its materials or principles, as by the beauty of its superstnwtnre. It is an em~ blem of universal friends/tip and benevolence ; and instructs us that in the mind of a Mason those virtues should be as expansive as the Llue arch of heaven itself." CHARGE TO THE THREE MASTERS OF THE VEILS, AS OVERSEERS. "CollrPANIONS :-Those wl10 arc placed as over~ soos of any work should be well qualified to judge of its 'beauties and deformities, its excellencies an(l dcfl!cts ; they should be capable of estimating tho formor and amending the latter. 'l'his consideration should induce you to cultivate and improve all those qualifications with wl1ich you are already endowc<l, as well as to persevere in your endeavors to acquire thoso in which you are defieient. Lot the various colo1路s of the banmrs committed to your charge. admonish you to the exercise of the several virtues


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of which they are emblematic; and you are to enjoin the practice of those virtues upon all who shall present themselves, or the work of their hands for your inspection. Let no work receive your approbation but such as is calculated to adorn and strengthen the masonic edifice. Be industrious and faithful in practicing and disseminating a knowledge of the t1-ue and perfect work, which alone can stand the test of the Grand Overseer's square, in the great day of trial and 1路etribution. Then, although every rod should become a serpent, and every serpent an enemy to this institution, yet shall their utmost exertions to destroy its reptltation, or sap its foundation, become as impotent as the leprous hand, or as water spilled upon the !!round, which can not be gathered up again." XXVIII. They then retire, and the Treasurer is presented.

" A

CHARGE TO THE TnEASURER

CoMPANION : -You are elected Treasurer of this Chapter, and I have the pleasure of investing you with the badge of your office. The qualities which should recommend a Treasurer, are accuracy and fidelity; accuracy in keeping a fair and minute account of all receipts and disbursements ; fidelity in carefully preserving all the property and funds of the Chapter, that may be placed in his hanas, and rendering a just account of the same, whenever he is called 路-路路


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upon for that purpose. I presume that your respect for the institution, your attachment to the interests of your Chapter, and your regard for a good name, which is better than precious ointment, will prompt you to the faithful discharge of the duties of your office."

XXIX. Be then retires, and the Secretary is presented.

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CHARGE TO THE SECRETARY.

"CoMPANION :-I with pleasure invest you with your badge as Secretary of this Chapter. The qualities which should recommend a Secretary are, promptitude in issuing the notifications and orders of his snperior officers ; punctuality in atton11ing the meetings of the Chapter; correctness in recording their }lroce•)!lings; judgment in diserimiuating between what ia proper and what is impro1Jer to be committed to writing; 1·egularity in making l1is annual returns to the Grand Chapter; integrity in accounting for all monies that may pass tluough his hands; and fidelity in paying the same over into the hands of the Treasurer. The pos~Pssion of these good qualities, I presume, has designated you. a suitable eandidato for this important office; and I can not entertain a doubt that yon will discharge its duties beneficially to the Chapter, and honorably to yourself. And when you sl11lll have completed the record of your transactions here below, and finished the term of your probation, may

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yon be admitted into the celestial Grand Chapter of saints and angels, and find your name recorded in the book of l[fe ete1路1wl."

XXX. He then retires, and the Chaplain is presented. CHARGE TO THE CHAPLAIN.

"E. AND REv. CoMPANION :-You are appointed Chaplain of this Chapter; and I now imrest you with this jewel, the badge of your office. It is emblematical of eLemity, and reminds UR that here is not our abiding place. Your inclination will undoubtedly conspire with your dnty when you perform, in the Chapter, those solen1'!'! services which created beings should constantly render to thei!路 infinite 0REA'.ron. ; and which, when offered by one who~:>e holy profesHion is, to ' point to heaven and lead the way,' may, by refining our morals, strengthening our virt1ws, and pul'ifying our minds, prepare us for admission i11to the society of those above, whose happiness will be as endless as it is perfect." XXXI. presented.

He then retires, and tl1e Stewards are CHARGE TO THE STEWARDS, "CoMPANIONs :-You being elected Stewards of this Chapter, I with pleasure invest yon with the badges of your offiee. It is your province to see thitt

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overy n'""''Y fo' the ence and accommodation of the Chapter, p1·evious to the time appointed for meeting. You are to see that the clothing, implements and furniture of each degi·ee, respl:'ctively, are properly disposed and in suitable array for use, whenever they may be required, and that they are secured, and proper care taken. of them, when the business of the Chapter is over. You are to see that necessary refreshments are provided, and that all your companions, and particularly visitors, are suitably accommodated and supplied. You are to be frugal and prudent in your disbursements, and to be careful that no extravagance or waste is committed in your department : .and when you have faithfully fulfilled your stewardship here below, may you rei!eive from heaven the happy greeting of' Well done, good and faithful servants.' "

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CHARGE TO THE GUARD.

« Co:MPA:NION : -You are appointed Guard of this Chapter, and I invest you ~ with the badge, an!l this implement of yonr office. As tl1e sword is })laced in the hands of the Guard, to enable him effectttally to guard against the approach of all cowan8 and eavesdroppers, a.nd suffer uoue to paro;s or l'cpass, but such as are duly qualified; so it shoulu morally serve a.s a.

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constant admonition to us to set a. guard at the entrance of om· thoughts, to place a watch at the door of our lips; to post a sentinel at the avenue of our actions; thereby excluding every unquali.fied and unworthy thought, word and deed ; and preserving consciences void of offense toward GoD and toward man. As the .first application from visitors for admission into the Chapter is generally made to the Guard at the door, your station will often present you to the observation of strangers ; 'it is therefore essentially necessary that he who sustains the office with which you are intrusted, should be a man of good morals, steady habits, strict discipline, temperate, affable and discreet. I trust that a just regard for the honor and reputation of the institution will ever induce you to perform, with fidelity, the trust reposed in you; and when tlw door of this eartly tabernacle shall be closed, may you find an abundant entrance through the gates into the temple and city of our GoD. XXXIII. He will then retire, and then follows an ADDRESS

TO TlDl HIGH PRIES'!'.

«M. E. CoMPANION :-Having been honored with the free suffrages of the membe\s of this Chapter, you are elected to the most important office which is within .their power to bestow. This expression of theil· esteem and respect should draw from you corresponding sensations ; and your demeanor should be such as to ----~~-----------

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repay the honor they have"'so conspicuously confened upon you, by an honorable and faithful discharge of the duties of your office. The station you are called to fill is important, not only as it respects the conect practice of our rites and. ceremonies, and the internal economy of the Chapter over which you preside; but the public reputation of the institution will be generally found to rise or fall according to the skill, fidelity and discretion with which its concerns are managed, and in proportion as the characters and conduct of its principal officers are estimable or censurable. You have accepted a trust, to which is attached a weight of responsibility, that will require all your efforts to discharge, honorably to yourself and satisfactorily to the Chapter. You are to see that your officers are capable and faithful in the exercise of their offices. Should they lack ability you are expected to supply tl1eir defects ; you are to watch carefully the progress of their perfotmanccs, and to see. that the long-established customs of the institution suffer no derangement in their hands. You are to have a careful eye over tllC general conduct of the Chapter; see that due order and subordination are observed,. on all occasions; that the members are properly instructed; that due solemnity be observed in the practice of our rites ; that no improper levity be permittefl at any time, but more especially at the introduction <if 8tranger8 among tlte workmen.

In fine, you are to be an example to your officers and members which they need not hesitate to follow;


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thus securing to yourself the favor of heaven and the applause of your brethren and companions." ADDRESS

'I'O 'I'HE OFFICERS GENERALLY.

" CoMPANIONS IN OFFICE :-Precept and example should e;er advance with equal pace. Those moral duties which you are required to teach unto others, you should never neglect to practice yourselves. Do you desire that the demeanor of your equals and inferiors toward you should be marked with deference and respect ; be sure that you omit no opportunity of furnishing them with examples in your own conduct towards your superiors. Do you desire to obtain instruction from those who are more wise or better informed than yomselves ? Be sure that you are always ready to impart of your knowledge to those within your sphere, who stand in need of and are entitled to receive it. Do you desire distinction among your companions ? Be sure that your clnims to preferment are founded upon superior attainments ; let no ambitious passion be sufl'ered to induce you to envy or supplant a companion who may be considered as better qualified for promotion than yourselves ; but rather let a laudable emulation induce you to strive to excel each other in improvement and discipline ; ever remembering, that he who faithfully performs his duty, even in a subordinate or private station, is as justly entitled to esteem and respect, as he who is invested with supreme attthority. ----------·--~ -·~--,-·--·-

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ADD'RESS

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TO THE CHAPTER AT LARGE.

"CoMPANIONS :-The exercise and management of the sublime degrees of Masonry in your Chapter hitherto, are so highly appreciated, and the good reputation of the Chapter so well established, that I must presume these considerations alone, were there no others of greater magnitude, would be sufficient to induce you to preserve and to perpetuate this valuable and honorable character. But when to this is added the pleasure which every philanthropic heart must feel in doing good, in promoting good order ; in dif:fnsing light and knowledge; in cultivating :Masonic and Ohristian charity, which are the great objects of this sublime institution, I can not doubt that your future conduct, and that of yotu路 snccessors, will be calculated still to increase the lustre of your justly esteemed reputation. " May your Chapter become beautiful as the TEMPLE, peaceful as the An.K, and sacred as its most ltoly place. May your oblations of piety and prai8e be grateful as the INcENSE ; your love warm as its jlame. and your charity diffusive as its fragrance. May your hearts be pure as the ALTAR. and your conduct acceptable as the OFFERING. :May the exercise of your CHARITY be as constnnt as the returning wants of tl1e distres::;ed widow and helpless orpltan. Ma.y the approbation of Heaven be your encouragement, and tl1e testimony of a. good conscience your supp01t; may you be endowed with every good a11d perfect gift,

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while traveling tlte rugged path of life, and finally be admitted wit/tin tke veil of heaven, to the full enjoyment of life eternal. Response. So mote it be. Amen.

XXXIV. The officers and members of the Chapter will then pass in review in front of the grand officers, with their hands crossed on their breasts, bowing as they pass. XXXV. The Grand Marshal will then proclaim the Chapter, by the name of - - - , Chapter, No. - - , to be regularly constituted, and its officers duly installed. XXXVI. The ceremonies conclude with an Ode. or appropriate piece of music.

XXXVII. The procession is tl1en formed, wl1en they return to the place from whence they set out. XXXVIII. vVhen the Grand officers retire, the Chapter will form an avenue for them to pass through, and salute them with the grand honors.

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CHAPTER XVI. :ROYAL MASTER'S DEGR.Elll.

Tms degree can not legally be conferred on any but Royal Arch Masons, who have taken all the preceding degrees; and it is preparatory to that of the Select Master. Although it is short, yet it contains some valuable information, and is intimately connected with the degree of Select master. It also enables us with ease and facility to examine the privileges of others to this degree; while, at the same time, it proves OUl'SOl VOS.

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Tl1e following passages of Scripture, &c., are con· sidered to be appropriate to this degree. "And Solomon made all the vessels that pertained unt.o the house of the Lord : the altar of gold, and the table of gold, whereupon the shew-bread was; and the candlesticks of pure gold ; :fi.ve on the right side, and five on the left, before the oracle ; with the flowers, and the lamps, and the tongs of gold ; and the bowls, and the snu:ffers, and the basons, and the spoons, and the censers, of pure gold ; and the hinges of gold, both for the doors of the inner house, the most holy place, and for the doors of the house, to wit, of the Temple. So Hiram made an end of doing all the work, that he had made King Solomon, for the house of the Lord.''-lllings, vii. 48-50, 40. •• And behold I come quickly; and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last. Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have a right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates of the city."-.Revelations, xxii. 12-14.

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"Anti he set the cherubims within the inner house ; and they stretched forth the wings of the cherubims, so that the wing of the one touched the one wall ; a_nd the wing of the other cherub touched the other wall ; and their wings touched one another in the midst of

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seated in the middle of the holy place, under the wings of the cherubim, was a small chest, or coffer, three feet nine inches long, .two feet three inches wide, and three feet three inches high. It was made of wood, excepting only the mercy seat, but overlaid with gold both inside and out. It had a ledge of gold surrounding it at the top, into which the cover, called the mercy seat, was let in. The mercy seat 'vas of solid gold, the thickness of a l1and's breadth : at the two ends of it were two cherubims, looking inward, toward each other, with their wings expanded; which embracing the whole circumference of the mercy seat, they met on each side, in the middle; all of which, the Rabhins say, was made out of the same mass, without any soldering of parts. Here the Shekinah, or Divine Presence, rested, and was visible in the appearance of a cloud over it. From hence the Ba.thkoll issued, and gave answers wl1en God was consulted. And hence it is, that God is said, in the Scripture, t.o dwell between the cherubim ; that is, between the cherubim on the mercy seat, ~ecause there was the seat or throne of the visible appearance or his glol'y among them.

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CHAPTER XVII. BELEOT li£.A.BTER'S DEGREE.

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Tms degree is the summit and perfection of ancient Masonry; and without which the history of the Royal Arch degree can not be complete. It rationally ac· counts for the concealment and preservation of those essentials of the craft, which were brought to light at the erection of the second Temple, and which lay con· cealed from the Masonic eye four hundred and seventy years. Many particulars relative to those few who, for their superior skill, were selected to complete an important part of King Solomon's Temple, are explained. And here, too, is exemplified an instance of justice and mercy, by our ancient patron, toward one of ~he craft, who was led to disobey his commands, by an O\'er zealous attachment for the institution. It ends with a description of a particular circumstance, which characterizes the degree.

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The following Psalm is read at opening: "His foundation is in the holy mountains. The Lordlovetl1 the gates of Zion more than all the dwell· ings of tT acoh. Glorious things arc spoken of thee, 0 city of God. Selah. I will make mention of Rahab and Babylon, to them that know me. Behold Philistia, and Tyre, with Ethiopia ; this man was born there. And of Zion it shall be said, This and that man was born in her: and the highest himself shall establish her. The Lord shall count, when he writeth up the people, that this man was born there. Selah. As well the singers, as the players on instruments, Rlmll be there: all my springs are in thce.''Psalm lxxxvii.

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The following pas:w.gcs of Seripture are introduced and explained : "So King Solomon was king over all IsraeL Azariah, the son of Nathan, was over the ofticcrs; and Zabnd, the son of Nathan, was principal ofl!cer, allll the king's friend ; and Ahi~;har was over the hom;ohol•l; ami Atloniram, the s<>n of Abda., was over the tribute.''-1 Kings, iv. 1, 5, 6.

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"Ami the king cornmandccl, and they 1n·ought great stones, costly stones, and hewed stones, to lay tl1e foundation of the h onse. And Solomon's builders and Hiram's builders did hew them, and tl1e stonesqnarers : so they prepared timber and stones to build the house.''-1 Kings, v. 17, 18.

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FR. .MASON'S MONITOR.

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"And King Solomon sent and fetched Hiram out of Tyre. He was a widow's son, of the tribe 路of Naphthali: and his father was a man of Tyre, a worker of brass ; and he was filled with wisdom and understanding, and cunning, to work all works in brass.-l.Kin9s, viii. 13, 14.

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"The ancients of Gebal, and the wise men thereof, were in thee thy calkers : all the. ships of the sea, with their mariners, were in thee, to occupy thy merchandise.-.Ezekiel, xxvii. 9. "And it came to pass, when Moses had made an end of writing the words of this law in a book, until they were finished, that Moses commanded the Levites, . i which bore the ark of the covenant of the Lord, say~ ing, Take this book of the law, and put it in the side of the ark of the covenant of the Lord your God, that it may be there for a witness against thee..De-uteronomy, xxxi. 24-26. "And Moses said unto Aaron, Take a pot, and put an omer full of manna therein, and lay it up before the Lord, to be kept for your generations. As the Lord commanded Moses, so Aaron laid it up before the testimony to be kept."-.Exodus, xvi. ~3, 34. "And the Lord said tmto Moses, Bring Aaron's.rod again before tho testimony, to be kept for a token."Numbers, XYii. 10.


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SELECT MASTER.

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"And when Moses was gone into thCJ tabernacle of the congregation, to speak with him, then he heard the \'Oite of one speaking unto him from off the mercy seat, that was upon the ark of the testimony, from between the two eherubims: and he s11ake unto him."J.Yurnoers, vii. 89. "And look that thou make tl1em after their pattern, wl1ieh was shewed thee in the mount.-.E.xod., x:x.v. 40.


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FREEMASON'S MONITOR. OHA~Gm

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TO.A SELECT MASTER.

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CoMPANION :-H~ving' attained to this degree, you lw.ve passed the circle of perfection in ancient Masonry. In the capacity of Select Master, you must he sensible that yottr obligations are increased in proportion to your privileges. .Let it be your constant care. to prove路 yourself worthy of the aon:fidence reposed in you, and of.the. high honor conferred on you, in admitting you to this Select degree. Let uprightness and integrity attend your steps ; let justice and mercy mark your conduct; let fervency and zeal stimulate you in the discharge of the various duties incumbent on you ; but suffer uot an idle or impertinent curiosity to lead you astray, or betray you into danger. Be deaf to every insinuation which would have a tendency to weaken your resolution, or tempt you to an act of d路isobedience. Be voluntarily dumb and blind, when the exercise of those faculties would endanger the pence of your mind or the probity of your conduct; and let silence and secrecy, those cardinal virtues of a Select Master, on all necessary occasions, be scrupulously observed. By a steady adherance to the important instructions containecl in this cl('gree, you will merit the approbation of the select number with whom you are associated, and will enjoy the high satisfaction of having acted well your part in the important enterprise in which you are engaged ; and nfter having 'wrought your regular hours, may you be admitted to participate in all the privileges of a Select .Master.

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ORDER ~F- CEREMONIES" IN CONSTITUTING AND DEDICA'l'ING COUNCILS OF ROYAL AND SELEC'L' MASTERS ; WITH 'l'HE FORM OF INSTALLATION.

I. The new .CoRncil will assemble in its Hall, and be in order. II. TheGrand Council ·w'ill meet and open in an adjoining .room. . . . III. A committee from -the new . Council will inform the Grand Marshal* that their Council is prepared to receive the Grand. Council; the Grand Marshal will announce the same to the Grand Puissant. IV. The committee will conduct the Grand Council to their Hall, in procession, when they will be received with the usual honors. V. 'fhe officers of the new Council will resign their seats to the Grand Officers, and cause their Jewels to be laid upon the altar, and covered. VI. The ceremonies will then commence with an Ode, followed by a Prayer and Oration. VII. The Grand Marshal will then rise and say : " TanrcE Ix.LUB'l'Rious GRAND PuissANT: A constitutional number of Companions, duly instructed in the "nblimc mystcrics,l!aving received from the Grand Council a WARRANT or CHARTER authorizing them to open and hold a regnlar Council of Royal and Select J,fusters, are now nsscmlllcd for the pnrpo~;c of being legally constituted, and having their officets installed in clne and ancient form." "' The Grand Marshal Ia a.n omcer of convenience appolntod for the occa.sion,

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

VIII. The Grand Puissant then says : "CoMPANIONs :-Do yon remain sati~fied with the choice you have made in the selection of your officers for the ensuing year ?" IX. The answer being in the affirmative, the offieen; elect are路 arranged in due form; when the following declaration is made by each : " I, A- 路B-, do solemnly promise, that I will faithfully, and to the best of my ability, discharge the duties of the office to which I have been elected in this Council; and that I will strictly conform to the requirements of the By-Laws of this Council; that I will support and maintain the Constitution, ByLaws and regulations of the Grand Council, under which the same is holden, so far as they may come to my knowledge." The Grancl Puissant will then direct the Grand. Recorder to read the vVarrant or Charter; after which, he will make the following

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DECLARATION OF CONSTITUTION.

"CoMPANIONs :-By virtue of the high powers in me vested, I do now form and constitute yon, my Worthy Companions, into a regular Council of Royal and Select Masters : and you are henceforth authorized

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and empowcrccl to open and hold such a Council; and'-路I to do and perform all such things as thereunto mn.y . appertain; conforming in all reHpeets to the Constitution, By-Laws and general regulations of the Grand Council under whose authority you act. .And may the ~

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221 God qf your fatlwrs be u•itlt, guide and direct you in all your doings." Response-" So mote it be." X. The Jewels will then be uncovered by the Deputy Grand Puissant, accompanied by solemn mu~ic. After which the Grand Chaplain will l'ise and pronounce the following DEDICATORY DECLARATION.

"To our Thrice Illustrious Grand Master, .King Solomon, we solemnly dedicate this CounciL May the blessing of Him who presides in the Grand Council above, rest upon its members, and may their felicity be immortal. Glory oe to God on lliglL" Response--" As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be. Arnen." XI. The Grand Marshal then says: "I am directed to proclaim, and I do herel•y proclaim this Council, '/ by the name o f - - Couneil, No.-, duly constituted and dedicated, this - - day of--, &c." I :XII. An appropriate Ode or Hymn may now be sung. XIII. The Deputy Grand Puissant will then pre./ sent the Thrice Illustrious for installation, in the :I following words : I "TumcE ILLUSTmous Gru.xn PuiSSANT : - I present I you my Illustriouo Companion, A. B., to be installed [ 'l'hrice Illnstriom; Grand Master of this OOlmci!j'l I find him to be well skilled in the Royal Mysteries;

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and in whose integrity and fidelity his Companions repose tht> highest confidmu:e." 'The Gran•! Puis>mnt then mldres~es him as follows: "Trmtct• !Lt.t:S'l'RIOt:S :-1 f'ut•l grt!nt ~atisfadinn in receiving you as the 'fluil·e Illu~;trious Grand :\Ia:;h•t· of this Council. It. is a station highly houorn.olc to him who diligently and faithfully perform,; the duties devolved upon him. But prcviom; to invt~stiug you ·with the appropriate insignia. of your ofih·c, I lllu8t require your uneqnivocnlas:;cnt to the following intt~r­ rogations: 1. Do you solemnly promise that you will use yom utmost endeavors to eoncd the vices an•l purify tl1e morals of your Companions; and to promote tho peace and prosperity of your Conneil? 2. That you will not suffer your Oount~il to lul opened when there are loss than nine 8t!lcct. :\la~>tors present? 3. That you will not Ruffer any person to pass tlte circle of }JeJ-fecfion in ynur ( :onndl, in who:'(l integrity, ferYency, and zeal, you luwo not t~uthe t•onfidenet•? 4. 'That you will not aekuowlt!,l;;o or holtl intl!t'~ cou!'se with any Vouncil thnt tlnl!S IH>t work under somo regular aml cou~;titutitmal authority? 5. That you will admit 110 vh;itor into your Coun<:il who has not been regularly antl lawfully in\'t!stt•d with the degree11 confened therein, without hit> ha,·ing previously been fo1·mally llea.led ?

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6. That you will faithfully oll~;tm·c am·l·. support ch By-laws as may be made by your Council, in .

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conformity with the Con::;titntion and general regulations of the G ratHl Council uutler whose authol'ity it workfi? 7. 'flmt ynn will }11\Y due respect and ohmlicnco to the G mud Oltit:t•rs, wht:n duly iu!-itallt~•l, uml sm>tain them in the tli,.,l'hargc of their lawful duties? " Do ynn sulmtit to all thc,.e requin•uwnts, and promi;;c to nh,.erru, 111111 prat'licc them fnithfully? •• Respolt.qe-" I tln." "An.I llllW, 'l'lu·ice Illustrious, with entire confidence in the rcditmhl your intentions, ami in the integrity of your dmmdcr a~ a Sel••ct :\In,.,tcr, I iuvc~t yon·wit h t l11! np}H'IIl•liute batlgu of yum· ollh·e. " !Iuving lw•~u lwuor.•1l l.y tlw fl't'l' su!1'1ag:•J of your GNlll•uui••ll,., nn•l dt"\uh·•l tu thu hig'I.Pht olli~:e within tlwir J.:'iit. it J,l'i'llllll'" yunr 1l11t~· In ~'>t'l tlwm nn m.::m1· ple nf t!ili~Piwt•, imlu~try aml litldity ; to :.~:1: tlu\t the otlit•t•rli a;.~twiat"ol with yr.m, fnithfully l"'!Tmtu tlwil' w~prd h·•• tllll i··~ ; :unl t hnt the iutPI c~tK nn•l n~ptltatiun

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of ytHII' t'wmeiltu•• nut cntlallh"'!rt!t.llJy imJmlllem:e or n··~h•t•t. Ttw iliiJtuttant trulit t•ummittt'tl to your t·lml).:'''• will mll furtlt y•mr lJcj;t <•xcrtiun~>, aml tho \'XI'n·isu uf ywu lll•~t fllt'llltic11. AK tltt• n•Jirt!-t•lltutivo cJf tlw wi-t! Kiu~ ~of J,uwl, it will l11: yrmr tlllly to n~•·il•• uur IM·n•t t1n•litiun,.., to illu"trutl' tlw lllurnl Jllitwii'h·~ uf till' Ur,!l•r, t11 dll'li,..h lim wullhy, uml huh! iu 1ln · \'1'111'1'111 iun t lw nlldt•nt hLwlnuu ks. •· Hy frt'•tllt'Ht h'•'llll'I'III'U tu tlw By·l.n\\'11 of your

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uh~•·n·auc:e of the great principltl8

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

inculcated in the lect?.wes and cha1â&#x20AC;˘ges, you will be enabled to fulfill the important obligations resting upon you, with honor to yourself, and with credit to the Craft. And may He, without whose approving smiles our labors are all in vain, give strength to your endeavors, and support to your exertions." OHARGE TO THE DEPUTY ILLUSTRIOUS GRAND MASTER.

"CoMPANION :-Having been elected to the second o:ffice in this Council, it is with pleasure that I invest yon with this Jewel, the badge of your office. "The duties of the important office to which your Companions have elevated you, will require your con~ stant and earnest attention. You are to occupy the second seat in the Council ; and it will be your duty to aid and support your chief in all the requirements of his office. In his absence, you will be called upon to preside in Oouncil, and to discharge his duties. "Although the representative of a King, and elevated in rank above your Companions, you should never forget that, in all the duties you owe to God, your neighbor, and yourself, you and they stand upon the same level of equality. Let the bright example of your illustrious predecessor in the Grand Council at Jerusalem, stimulate you to the faithful performance of every duty ; and when the King of kings shall summon you to His immediate presence, from His hand may you receive a crown of glory which shall never fade away."


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OHARGE TO THE PRINCIPAL OONDUOTOR OF THE WORK. "CoMPANION :-As the third officer of this Council, I invest you with this badge. It is your duty to sound the Silver Trumpet at early dawn, and eve of day, when the sun's first and last beams gild the mountain-tops; to announce high-noon, and proclaim the times of rest and labor. " In the absence of either of your superio1· officers, you will be required to perform his duties ; and, as the interests of your Council ought never to be permitted to suffer through want of intelligence in its officers, you will allow me to urge upon you the necessity of being always qualified and prepared to meet such emergency, should it ever arise. "Having been admitted to the fellowship of J{ings, you will be frequently 1·eminded that the office of mediator is both hon01able and praiseworthy. Let it therefore be your constant care to prese1·ve harmouy and unanimity of sentiment among the members of your Council. Discountenance whatever may tend to create division and dissension among the Companions in any of the departments of Masonry ; and as the glorious sun at its meridian dispels the mist and clouds that obscure the horizon, so may your exertions tend to dissipate the mists of jealousy and discor!l, should they eve1· unfortunately arise in your Council." CHARGE TO THE TREASURER, "CoMPANION :-You have been elected to a responsible office, and I with pleasure invest you with this

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Jewel. It is your duty to number and weigh ont the Shekels of the Sanctuary, and to provide for the helpless orphan. The qualities which should distinguish yon, are accnra~y and fidelity. Accuracy in keeping a fair and true account of the receipts and disbursements ; fidelity, in carefully preserving the property and funds of the Council, and in rendering a just account of the same, when required. Your interest in this Council, your attachment to the Craft, and your known integt路ity of character, are a sufficient guaranty that your duties will be faithfully performed." CHARGE TO THE RECORDER.

"CoMPANION :-It is with pleasure that I invest .. you with this badge of your office. The qualities which should recommend n Recorder, are, correctness in recording the proceedings of the Council; judgment in discriminating between what is proper and that wl1ich is improper to be written; regularity in making the returns to the Grand Council; integrity in accounting for all moneys that may pass through his 1w.nds ; and fidelity in paying the same over to the Treasurer. The possession of these qt1alities has designated you as a suitable Companion for this important office ; and I entertain no doubt you will dischnrge all the clnties incumbent on you with fidelity and horior. And when you sl1all have completed the record of your transactions here below, and finished the term of your probation, may you be admitted into the


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Grand Council above, and find your name recorded in the book of life eternal." CHARGE TO THE CAPTAIN OF THE GUARD.

"CoMPANION :-Having been elected Captain of the Guard, I present you with this implement of your office, Guard well your post, and suffer none to pass it but the select, the faithful, and the worthy. Be ever attentive to the commands of your chief, and always nea1路 at hand to see them duly executed.''

CHARGE TO THE SENTINEL.

"CoMPANION :-You are appointed Sentinel of this OOtmcil; and I take pleastu路e in investing you with this badge, and presenting you with this implement of your office. " As the sword is placed in the hands of the Sentinel, to enable him to guard the Sanctuary and entrance to the secret passa!Je, with sleepless vigilance, against intrude1路s, so should it morally serve as a constant admonition to us to set a guard at the entrance of our thoughts ; to place a watch at the door of our lips ; to p0st a sentinel at the avenue of our actions ; thereby excluding every unworthy thought, word, and deed ; and enab:iing us to preserve our consciences void of offense toward God and man." 19


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FREEM.A.SON'S. MONITOR. CHARGE TO THE MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL.

" CoMPANIONS :-From the nature of the constitution of e1路cry Society, some must rule, and others obey. And while justice and moderation are required of the officers, in the discharge of their official duties, subordination and respect for their rulers are equally demanded of the members. The relation is reciprocal. The interests of both are inseparable ; and, without mutual co-operation, the labor8 of neither can succeed. A house divided against itself can not stand. Let, therefore, Brotherly Love prevail among you; let each be emulous of the other, in all good works ; in promoting peace and unity; and in striving to see who best can rule and best obey. Let the avenues to your passions be strictly guarded ; let no curious intruder find his way into the secret recesses of your retirement, to disturb the harmony which should ever prevail among the select and chosen, and mar the respect of yonr Crnnpanions, and the commendation 路of your own cons~.;ience~."


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CHAPTER XVIII. OF THE ORDER OF KNIGHTS OF THE RED CROSS.

THE incidents upon which this Order is founded, occurred in the reign of Darius, king of Persia.. It is more immediately connected with symbolic Masonry, than any other Order of Knighthood. Their meetings are called Oouncil8; their sashes are decorated with a S'word and Trowel, and trimmed with 1路ed and green. PRAYER AT OPENING.

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"Our Fatl1er who art in heaven, ha11mved be tl1y name : thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

as it is in heaven. Give us thiA day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who treHpass against us. And leacl us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil : for thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen."

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The following passages of Scripture are considered by Knights of this Order, as applicable to their institution, and are occasionally rehearsed in their , Councils. LESSON FIRST.

"Now in the second year of their coming unto the house of God at Jerusalem, in the second month, began Zernbbabel, the sou of Shealtiel, and 'Jeshna, the son of ,J ozadak, and the remnant of their brethren the priests and Levites, and all they that were come out

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of the captivity unto Jerusalem: and appointed the Levites, from twenty years old and upward, to set forward the work of the house of the Lord. Then stood J eshua, with his sons and his brethren, Kadmiel and his sons, the sons of Judah, together, to set forward the workmen in the house of God ; the sons of Henadad, with their sons and their brethren the Levites. And when the builders laid the foundation of the Temple of the Lord, they set the priests in their apparel with trumpets, and th~ Levites, the sons of Asaph, with cymbals, to praise the Lord, after the ordinance of David king of Israel. And they sung together by course, in praising and giving thanks unto the Lord ; because he iP good, for his mercy endureth forever toward Israel. And all the people shonted with a great shout when they praised the Lord, because the foundation of the house of the Lord was laid."-Ezra, iii. 8-11. "Now when the adversaries of Judah and Benjamin heard that the children of the captivity builded the Temple unto the Lord God of Israel, then they came to Zerubbabel, and to the chief of the fathers, and said unto them, Let us build with you ; for we seek your God as ye do ; and we do sacrifice unto him, since the days of Esar-Haddon king of Assur, which brought us up hither. But Zerubbabel, and Jeshua, and the rest of the chief of the fathers of Israel, said unto them, Ye have nothing to do with us to build an house unto our God; but we ourselves together will ---·· ·------~'==~-~--=-~···=-~·====================~~~~~= -·

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build unto the Lord God of Israel, as King Cyrus, the king of Persia, hath commanded us. Then the people of the land weakened the hands of the people of Judah, and troubled them in building; and hired counsellors against them, to frustrate their purpose, all the days of Cyr11s king of Persia, even until the reign of Darius king of Persia. And in the reign of .Ahasuerus, in the beginning of his reign, wrote they unto him an accusation against the inhabitants of J udah and Jerusalem. And in the days of Artaxerxes wrote Bishlam, Mithredah, Tabeel, and the rest of their companions, unto Artaxerxes king of Persia ; and the writing of the letter was written in the Syrian tongue, and interpreted in the Syrian tongue ; Rehum the chancellor, and Shimshai the scribe, wrote a letter against Jerusalem to Artaxerxes the king, in this sort : This is the copy of the letter that they sent unto him, even unto Artaxerxes the king : Thy servants, the men on this side the river, and at such a time. Be it known unto the king, that the Jews, which came up from thee to us, are come unto Jerusalem, building the rebellious and the bad city, and have set up the walls thereof, and joined the foundations. Be it known now unto the king, that if this city be builded, and the walls set up again, then will they not pay toll, tribute, and custom, and so thou shalt endamage the revenue of .the kings. Now; because we have maintenance from the king's palace, and it was not meet for us to see the ldng's dishonor ; therefore have we sent and certified the king. That search


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may be made in the book of the records of thy fathers : so shalt thou find in the book of the records, and 路know, that this city is a rebellious city, and hurtful unto kings and provinces, and that they have moved sedition within the same of old time ; for which cause was this city destroyed. We certify the king, that if this city be builded again, aud the walls thereof set up, by this means thou shalt have no portion on this side the 1路iver. Then sent the king an answer unto Rehum the chancellor, and to Shimshai the scribe, and to the rest of their companions that dwell in Samaria, and unto the rest beyond the river, Peace, and at such a time. The letter which ye sent unto us hath been plainly read before me. And I commanded, and search hath been made, and it is found, that this city of old time hath made insurrection against kings, and that rebellion and sedition have been made therein. There have been mighty kings also over Jerusalem, which have ruled over all countries beyond the river; and toll, tribute, and custom, was paid unto them. Give ye now commandment to cause these men to cease, and that this city be not builded, until another commandment shall be given from me. Take heed now that ye fail not to do this : why should damage grow to the hurt of the kings? Now, when the copy of King Artaxerxes' letter was read before Rehum, and Shimshai the scribe, and their companions, they went up in haste to Jerusalem, unto the Jews, and made them cease by force and power. Then ceased the work of the house of God, which is at Jerusalem.


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So it ceased unto the second year of the reign of Darius, king of Persia."-Ezra, iv.

LESSON SECOND.

Josephus informs us that Darius, while he was yet a. private man, made a. vow to God, that if ever he came to the throne, he would send all the holy vessels that were at Babylon, back again to Jerusalem; and it happened about the time of his accession, that Zernbbabel, who was a captain or prince of the Jewish captives, came from Jert1salem, to Darius, as well


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to solicit his protection against their adversaries on the other side of the river, as to watch a suitable opportunity of endeavoring to persuade the king to fulfill his promise. He had long been known to Darius as a man of great judgment and understanding, and was therefore taken into the king's confidence, and put into a particular trust, with two other great officers, as his constant attendants.

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Darius, in the first year of his reign, gave a splendid and magnificent entertainment to the princes and r1 nobility, and after they had retired, finding himself~,.' ¡unable to sleep, he fell into a discourse with his three favorite officers, to whom he proposed certain questions, telling them, at the same time, that he who should give , him the mos~ reasonable a_nd s~tisfactory ans\ver should lj be clothed m purple, drmk m a golden cup. wear a ', sill{en tiara, and a golden chain about his neck. â&#x20AC;˘..He then proposed this q:r::tion : Which is g:at:~

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the strength of ~oine, of the king, of women, or of truth? To this the first answered, wine is the strongest ; the second, that the ki71f! was strongest; and tl1e third (who was Zerubbabel) that women were stronger, but above all things TRUTH beareth the v'ctory. LESSON THIRD.

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On the following day the king assembled together the princes and nobility, to hear the question debated; and having placed himself upon the royal seat of judgâ&#x20AC;˘ ment, he called upon them to make a public defence of their several opinions; whereupon the first began upon the strength of wine, as follows : " 0 ye princes and rulers, how exceeding strong is wine ! it causeth all men to err that drink it : it maketh the mind of the king and the beggar to be all one ; of the bondman and the freeman ; of the poor man and of the rich ; it tnrncth also every thought into jollity and mirth, so that a man remembereth neither sonow nor debt ; it changeth and elevateth the spirits, and enHveneth the heavy hearts of the miserable. It maketh a man forget his brethren, and draw his sword against his best friends. 0 ye princes and rulers, is not wine the strongest, that forceth lfS to do these things ?" Then began the second upon the power of kings, and spoke as follows : "It is beyond dispute, 0 princes and rulers, that God bas made man master of all tl1ings under the sun; to command them, to make use of them, and appl,y them to his service as he pleases:

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but whereas men have only dominion over other sublunary creatures, kings have an authority even over men themselves, and a right of ruling them by will and pleasure. Now, he that is master of those who are masters of all things else, hath no earthly thing above him." Then began Zerubbabel upon the power of women .and of truth, and spoke as follows : "0 princes and rulers, the force of wine is not to be denied ; neither is that of kings, that unites so many men in one common bond of allegiance ; but the super-eminency of women is yet above all this ; for kings are but the gifts of women, and they are also the mothers of those that cultivate our vineyards. Women have the power to make us abandon our very country and relations, and many times to forget the best friends we have in the world, and forsaking all other comforts to live and die with them. But when all is said, neither they, nor wine, nor kings, are comparable to the almighty force of truth. As for all other things, they are mol路tal and transient, but truth alone is unchangeable and everlasting; the benefits we receive from it are subject to no variations or vicissitudes of time and fortune. In her judgment' is no unrighteousness, and she is the strength, wisdom, power and majesty of all ages. Blessed be the God of truth." When Zerubbabel had finished speaking, the 'princes and rulers cried out, " Great is truth; and mighty above all things!'

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Then said the king to Zerubbabel, "Ask what thou wilt, and I will give it thee, because thou art found wisest among thy companions."

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Then said he to Darius, " 0 king; remember thy vow, which thou hast vowed, to build Jerusalem in the day when thou shoi1ldest come to thy kingdom, and to restore the holy vessels which were taken away out of Jerusalem. Thou ha~t ah;o vowed tv bnihl up the temple, which was burned when Judah was made desolate by the Ohaldees. And now, 0 King, this is


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that I desire of thee, that thou make good the vow, the performance whereof with thine own mouth thou hast vowed to the King of Heaven." Then Darius the king stood up and embraced him, and gave him passports and letters to his governors and officers, that they should safely convey both him and those who should go with him, to Jerusalem; and that they should not be delayed or hindered from building the city and the temple, until they should be finished. He also restored all the holy vessels remaining in his possession, that bad been taken from Jerusalem, when the children of Israel were can-ied away captive to Babylon, and reserved by Cyrus. " Then the prophets, Haggai the prophet and Zechariah the son of Iddo, prophesied unto the Jews that were in Judah and Jerusalem, in the name of the God of Israel, even unto them. Then rose up Zerubbabel, the son of Shealthiel, and Jeshua the son of' Josadak, and began to build the house of God which is at Jerusalem: and with them were the prophets of God helping them. At the same time came to them Tatnai, gpvernor on this side the river, and Shethar-boznai, and their companions, and said thus unto them : Who hath commanded you to build this house, and to make up this wall ? Then said we unto .them 路after this manner : What are the names of the men that make this building? But the eye of their God was upon the elders of the Jews, that they could not cause them to cease, till the matter. came to Darius; and then they returned answer by letter concerning

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this matter. The copy of the letter that Tatnai, governor on this side the river, and Shethar路 boznai, and his companions the Apharsachites, which were on this side the river, sent unto Darius the king : They sent a letter unto him, wherein was written: Unto Darius the king, all peace. Be it known unto tli.e king, that we went into the province of Judea, to the house of the great God, which is builded with great stones, and timber is laid in the walls, and this work goeth fast on, and prospereth in their hands. Then asked we those elders, and said unto them thus : Who commanded you to build this house, and to make up these walls ? We asked their names also, to certify thee, that we might write the names of the men that were the chief of them. And thus they returned us answer, saying, We are the servants of the God of heaven and earth, and build the house that was builded these many years ago, which a great king of Israel builded and set up. But after that om路 fathers had provoked the God of heaven unto wrath, he gave them into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, the Chal<lean, who destroyed this house, and carried the people away into Babylon. But in the first year of Cyrus the king of Babylon, the same king Cyrus made a decree to build this house of God. And the vessels also of gold and silver of the house of God, which Nebuchadnez.zar took out of the temple that was in Jerusalem, and brought them into the temple of Babylon, those did Cyrus the king take out of the temple at Babylon, and they

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were delivered unto one whose name was.Sheshbazzar, whom he made governor; and said unto him, Take these vessels, go, carry them into the temple that i$,jn Jerusalem, and let the house of God be builded in his place. Then came the same Sheshbazzar, and laid the foundation of the house of God which is in Jerusalem: and since that time even until now hath it been in building, and yet it is not finished. Now, therefore, if it seem good to the king, let there be search made in the king's treasure-house, which is there at Babylon, whether it be so, that a decree was made of Cyms the king to build this house of God at Jerusalem, and let the king send his pleasu1路e to us concerning this matter."-Ezra v. "Then Darius the king made a decree, and search was made in the house of the rolls, where the treasures were laid up in Babylon. And there was found at Achmetha, in the palace that is in the province of the Medes, a roll, and therein was a record thus written : In the first year of Cyrus the ldug, the same Cyms the king made a decree concerning the house of God at Jerusalem, Let the house be builded, the place where they offered sacrifice, and let the foundations thereof be strongly laid ; the height thereof threescore路 cubits ; and the breadth thereof threescore cubits ; with three rows of great stones, and a row of new timber: and let the expenses be given out of the king's house. ..A.nd also let the golden and silver vessels of the house of God, which Nebuchadnezza.r took forth out of the temple which is at Jerusalem and brought

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unto Babylon, be restored, and brought again unto the temple which is at Jerusalem, every one to his place, and place them in the houBe of God. Now, therefore, Tatnai, governor beyond the river, Shetharboznai, and your companions the Apharsachites, which are beyond the river, be ye far from thence; let the work of this house of God alone, let the governor of the Jews, ami the elders of the Jews, build this house of God in his place. Moreover, I make a decree what ye shall do to the eluers of these Jews, for the building of this house of God; that of the king's goods, even of the tribute beyond the river, forthwith expenses be given unto these men that they be not hindered. And that which they have need of, both young bullocks, and rams, and lambs, for the burntofferings of the God of Heaven; wheat, salt, wine, the appointment of the priests and oil, according which are at Jerusalem, let it be given them Jay by day without fail ; that they may offer sacrifices of sweet .~>avors unto the God of Heaven, and pray for the life of the king and of l1is sons. Also I have made a decree, that whosoever shall alter this word, let timber be pulled down from his house, and, being set up, let him be hanged theref!n; and let his house be made a dunghill for this. And the God that hath caused his name to dwell there, destroy. all kings and people that shall put to their hand to alter and to destroy this house of God which is at Jerusalem. I Darius have made a decree; let it be done with speed. Then Tatnai, governor on this side the river, Shetha.r~ 20 -.:=:;:.___....:.:::;=======~-=-.--=----=--=--路-=路路路--c;:;_;;-=;:::..:;:.:!.!

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boznai, and their companions, according to that which Darius the king had sent, so they did speedily. And the elders of the Jews builded, and they prospered through the prophesying of Haggai the prophet, and Zechariah the son of Iddo ; and they builded, and :finished it, according to the commandment of the God of Israel, and according to the commandment of Cyrus, and Darius, and Artaxerxes king of Persia. And this house was :finished on the third day of the month Adar, which was in the sixth year of the reign of Darius the king," and in the year of the world 3489.-Ezra, vi. "But it came to pass, that when Sanballat and Tobiah, and the Arabians, and the Ammonites, and the Ashdodites, heard that the walls of Jerusalem were made np, and that the breaches btlgan to be stopped, then they were very wroth, and conspired all of them together, to come and路 to fight against Jerusalem, and to hinder it. Nevertheless, we made our prayer unto our God, and set a watch against them day and night because of them. And Judah said, The strength of the bearer of burdens is decayed, and there is much rubbish, so that we are not able to build the wall. And our adversaries said, They shall not know, neither see, till we come in the midst among them and slay them, and cause the work to cease. And it came to pass, that wh~n the ,Jews which dwelt by them caine, they said unto us ten times, From all places whence ye shall return unto 路us, they will be upon you. Therefore set I in the lower plllces

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behind the waH, and on the higher places, I even set the people after their families, with their swords, their spears and their bows. And I looked and rose up, and said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, Be not ye afraid of them: remember the Lord which is great and terrible, and fight for your brethren, your sons and your daughters, your wives and your houses. And it came to pass, when our enemies hearcl that it was known unto us, and God had brought their counsel to nought, that we returned all of us to the wall, every one unto his work. And it came to pass, from that time forth, that the half of my servants wrought in the work, and the other half of them held both the spears, the shields and the bows, and the habergeons; and the rulers were behincl all the house of Judah. They which builded on the wall, and they that bear burdens, with those that. laded, every one with one of his bands wrought in the work, and with the other hand held a weapon. For the builders every one had his sword girded by his side, and so builded; and be that sounded the trumpet was by me. And I said unto the nobles, and to the rulers, and to the rest of the people, '!'be work is great and large, and we are separated upon the wall, one far from another: In what place, therefore, ye hear the sound of the trumpet, resort ye thither unto us: our God shall fight for us."-..iVekemiah, iv. 7-2L

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CHAPTER XIX. O:BSERV.ATIONB ON THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTS TEMPL.ARB, .AND KNIGHTS OF MALTA.

AccoRDING to the Abbe de Vertot, the Order of Knights of Malta, who were originally called Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem, took its rise about the year 1099; from which time to the year 1118, their whole employment was works of charity, and taking care of the sick. ' Some time after the establishment of this Order, nine gentlemen (of whose names two only remain on record, viz: Hugho de Paganis and Godfrey Adel------~---------

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~~~)-~~rmed a society to guard and protect the Christian pilgrims who traveled from abroad to visit the holy Sepulchre. These men were encouraged by the Abbot of Jerusalem, who assigned them and their companions a place of retreat in a Christian church, called the Church of the Holy Temple, from which they were called Templars, and not from the temple of Jerusalem, that having been destroyed by '.ritus Vespasian, nine hundred and eighty-two years before the society of Templars was instituted. The society increased rapidly, and was much respected ; but had neither habit, order, or mark of distinction, for the space of nine years, when Pope Honorius II. at the request of Stephen, Patriarch of Jerusalem, laid down a ntle and manner of life for them ; and ordained thttt they should be clothed in white; to which garment Pope Eugenius III. added a red cross, to be worn on the breast, which they promised by a solemn oath to observe forever. Incited by the example of the Knigkts Templars, about the year 1118, the Hospitallers also took up the profession of arms, in addition to their original charitable profession; occupying themselves at one time in attending upon the sick, and at others in acts of hostility against the Tnrks. and Saracens; At this time they took the name of Knights Hospitallers. Both Orders :B.omished and increased daily ; but that of the Templars, though the youngest of the two, having from its original establishm-ent been wholly

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employed in the profession of arms, was by many esteemed to be the most honorable ; and therefore many noblemen, princes, ancl persons of the highest distinction, who thought the service of tending the sick too servile an employment, entered themselves amongst the Knights Templars, in preference to the other Order. Both Orders, for years, generally took the :field together, and, as well by tl1emselves as in conjunction with the troops of the Crusades, won many battles, and performed prodigies of valor. The emulation, however, which subsisted between them often occasioned warm disputes, which rose to such a bight as produced frequent skirmishes between detached patiies of the two Orders. This occasioned the Pope and the respective Grand Masters to interfere; who in a great measure suppressed these quarrels ; but the Knights of the different Orders ever afterward continued to view each other with jealous eyes. Some time after these difficultiAs were thus partially 8uppressed, the Turks assembled a great fo1·ce and drove the whole of the Christians out of Palestine. The last fortress they had possession of was that of St. John d' Acre. This was long and bravely defended hy the Knights Templars against their besiegers. The Turks, however, ·at last forced three hundred Knights, being all that remained of the garrison, to take refuge in a strong tower, to which also the women fl.ed for safety. Tho Turks hereupon set

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effectually accomplished, that the Knights saw, in case they held out any longer, they must inevitably perish. They therefore capitulated, stipulating, among other things, that the honor of their women should not be violated. Upon this, the tower being opened, the Turks marched in ; but, in total breach of the terms of capitulation, they immediately began to offer violence to the women. The enraged Knights instantly drew their swords, hewed in pieces all the Turks who had entered, shut the gates against those who remained without, and resigned themselves to :inevitable death, which thf'y soon met with, by the tower being undermined and thrown down ·upon their heads. After this defeat, the two Orders found an asylum in the island of Cyprus; from whence, after some time, the Knights Templars, finding their number so diminished as to leave no hopes of effecting any thing toward the recovery of the holy land. without ne1v Crusades (which the Christian princes did not seem inclined to set on foot) retnrned to their different commanders in the various parts of christendom. From this time the two Orders separated ; the Knights Hospita1lers remained a while at Cyprus, from whence they afterward went to Rhodes, and thence to Malta ; which name they then assumed. ~' The Knights Templars dispersed themselves through,' ·ont all Europe, bnt still enjoyed princely revenues. i and were extremely wealthy. Vertot says, that Pope Boniface VIII. having engaged in a warm dispute with Philip, king of I

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France, the two orders, as had too frequently happened before, took opposite sides. The Knights of Malta declared in favor of King Phillip, whilst the Knights Templars espoused the cause of the Pope. This conduct, Phillip, partly from a revengeful di>:position, and partly from the hope of getting possession of the vast wealth of the Knights, never could forgive; but formed, thenceforward, the design of suppressing the Order, whenever a proper opportunity should offer. 路This, however, did not occur, until after the decease of Pope Boniface. Immediately on the death of that pontiff, the Cardinals assembled to elect his successor; but party disputes ran so high in the conclave, that there seemed no probability of again filling the papal chair very speedily. At length, through the intrigues and machinations of the friends of Phillip, the Cardinals were all brought to consent to the election of any priest that l1e should recommend to tlwm. This was the darling object the monarch had in view: this being accomplished, he immediately sent for the Archbishop of Bordeaux, whose ambition he knew had no bounds, and who would hesitate at nothing to gratify it ; and communicated to him the power he had received of nominating a person to the papal c11air, and promising he should be the person, on his engaging to perform six conditions. The Archbishop greedily snatched at the bait, and imme路 diately took an oath on the sacrament to the faithful performance of the conditions. Phillip then laid


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open to him five of the conditions, but reserved the sixth until after the Art:hbislwp's coronation as pope; which soon took place in consequence of the recommendation of the king to the conclave; and the new pope took npon himself the name of Clement V. Vertot goes on to ~11y, tlmt a Tcmplar and a citizen of Beziers, h11ving been 11pprehmule<l for some crime, and committed together to a dungeon, for want of a. priest confes~-;cd each other; that the citizen, having heard the Tel!lplnr's confc,.sion, in order to save his own life, accused the Order to King Phillip; charging them, on the authority of what his fellow prisoner had told him, with i<lolatry, nodomy, robbery and murder; adding that the KnightH Templars being secretly 1\1:ahometlans, each Knight, on his atlmission in the Order, was obliged to renounce J esns Christ, and to spit on the cross in token of his abhorrence of it. Phillip, on hearing these accus11tions, purdoned. the citizen, and disclosed to the Pope hiH sixth condition, whi<.:h was the suppression of the Order of Knights Templars. Not only every Knight Templar must know to a certainty the absolute falsehood of these charges, but every unprejn•liced reatler of Vertot's history must alHo perceive that the whole of their accusation was the proclnct of Phillip's own brain, in order to accomplish his long wished for object of suppressing the Order, an1l getting possession of their vast riehes in his dominions. It is, therefore, evident that the story of the rremplar's confession was all a fOl·gery, and that the citizen was no other than a tool of Phillip,

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who, to insure his own pardon, was prevailed on to make oath of such a confession having been made to him by the Templar. The historian proceeds to say, that in consequence of this accusation, the Knights Templars in France, and other parts of the Pope's dominions, were imprisoned by his order, and put to the most exquisite tortures, to make them confess themselves guilty. They, however, bore these tortures with the most heroic fortitude, persisting to the last in asserting their own innocence, and that of their Order. . In addition to these proceedings, Pope Clement, in tl1e year 1312, issued his bull for the annihilation of the Orclet· of Knights Temp1ars, which he caused to be published throughout every country in Christendom. He at the same time gave their possessions to the Knights of Malta, which appropriation of the Temp1ars' • estates WM assented to by most of the sovereigns in Europe; and there is now extant among the English statutes, an act of parliament, whereby, nfter setting forth that the Order of Templnrs hns been suppressed, their posses;;ions in England are confirmed to the Knights of St. John. Vertot., however, further says, tl1at in Germany, the histol"ians of that nation relate, that Pope Clement having sent his bull for abolishing the order, to the Archbishop of Metey, for him to enforce, that prelate summoned all his clergy together, that the publica~ tion might be made wit.h greater solemnity ; and that they were suddenly surprised by the entry of ·wall~


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gmffor Count Sauvage, one of the principles of the Order, attended by twenty other Templars, armed, and in their regular habits. 'l'he Count declared he was not come to do violence to anybody, but having heard of the bull against his Order, came to insist that the appeal which they made from that decree to the next council, and the successor of Clement, should be received, read and published. This he pressed so warmly, that the Archbishop, not thinking it proper to refuse men whom he saw armed, complied. He sent the appeal afterwards to the Pope, who ordered him to have it examined in a council o£ his province. Accoruingly, a synod was called; and after a lengthy trial, and various formalities which were then observed, the Templars of that province were declared innocent of the crimes charged upon them. Although the Templars were thus declared innocent, it does not appear that either their possessions or their government, as a distinct order was restored ; but that their estates in the German Empire were divided between the Knights of Malta and the Teu" tonic Knights ; to the first of which Orders, many Knights Templars aftenvards joined themselves. This appears altogether probable from the following circumstance, viz: It is unquestionable, that the habit of the Knights '£emplars was originally wltite~· but we now observe they distinguish themselves by the same color as the Knights of Malta, viz: hlack; which change can not be accounted for in any other wa.y than by an union with the Knights of that order.


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The assemblies of KnightH Templars and Knights of 1\Ialta, are called Encampment.~. Their uniform is black, excepting the stoek, which is white; to denote that it is not a mourning garb, but the habit of the Order. The apron and sasl~ are also black; the former is decorated with the cross-swords, skull, and crossbones; the latter with a large star, which falls npon the left breast, in the center of which is a cross and serpe,nt, upon a red field; the whole of these emblems are in silver or pearl, except the serpent, which is in gold.

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The following passages of Scriptures are路 occasionally rehearsed in encampments of Knights Templars.

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"James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, to the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad, greeting. My brethren, count it all joy when you fall into divers temptations; knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be porfect and entire, wanting nothing. If any of you lack wisdom let him ask of God, that giveth to a1l men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But


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let him ask in faith, nothing wavering; for he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea, driven with the wind, and tossed. For let not that man think that he shall receive anything of the Lord. A double minded man is unstable in all his ways~ Let the brother of low degree rejoice in that he is exalted. If any man among you seem to be religio11s, and bridleth not his tongue, but deceiveth his own heart, that man's religion is vain. Pure religion, and undefiled before God and the Fathet路, is this, To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world.

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EXHORTATION.

I greet thee. * * * Silver and gold have I none : but such as I have give I unto tltee.

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Hearken to a lesson to cheer thee on thy way, and assure thee of success. And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took bread and a bottle of 'UJater and gave it unto Hagar (putting it on her shoulder,) and the child, and sent her away, and she depa1 ted and wandered in the wilderness, and the water was spent in the bottle, and she cast the child under one of the shrubs; and the angel of God called to Hagar out of Heaven, saying arit:ie, lift up the lad and hold him in thine hand, for I will make him a great nation : and God opened lter eyes, and she saw a well of water. By faith Abraham sojourned in the land of promise as in a strange country, dwelling in tabernacles; for he looked for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God. Be ye therefore followers of God, as dear children, r~joicing in the Lord always; and again I say, rejoice. Farewell-Gael speed thee.

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EXHORTATION.

- - - - - - I greet thee. * * * If a broth~r or sister be naked and destitute of daily food, and one of you say depart in peace, be ye warmed and filltK1, and ye give them not of those things which are needful for the body, w1Htt ·doth it profit? To do good an(1 communicate, forget not, for with such sacrifices God is well pleast>d. Beware, lest any man Hpoil you tll!'ongh philosophy and vain · deceit, after the traditions of men; after the rudiments


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of the world, and not after Christ : For in him dwelleth all the fullness of the god-head bodily. Farewell-God speed thee.

EXHORTATION.

- - - - - - I greet thee. He that receiveth you receiveth me, and J1e that receiveth me recei,•eth him that sent me. Come unto me a11 ye that labor antl are heavy laden, and I will give yolt rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn of me, for I am meek and lowly in heart, and ye shall find rest unto your souls, for my yoke is ea~;y and my

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burden is light. Whosoever shall give to drink unto one of these little ones a cup of cold water only, in the name of a desciple, verily I say unto you he shall in no wise lose his reward. Farewell-God speed thee. Our Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth, As it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; But deliver us from evil : For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. .Amen. "Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you? And they covenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver. And from t.hat time he sougl!t opportunity to betray him. Now, the first day of the feast of unleavened bread, the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover? And he said, Go into the city to such a man, and say unto him, The master saitb, My time is at band ; I will keep the passover at thy house with my disciples. And the disciples did as Jesus had appointed them. .And they made ready the passover. Now when the even was conie, l1e sat down with the twelve. And as they did eat, he said, Verily I say unt.o you, that one of you shall betray me. And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began

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every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I ? And he answered and said, He tha.t dippeth his hand with me in the dish, the same shaH betray me. The son of man goeth, as it is written of him : but wo unto that man by whom the son of man is betrayed! It had been good for that man if he had not been born. Then Judas, which betrayed him, answered and said, Master, is it I ? He said unto, him, Thou hast said." .Matt. xxvi, 14-25.

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sorrowful and very heavy. Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful even unto death : tarry ye here, and watch with me. And he went a little farther, and fell on his face, and prayed, Eaying, 0 my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt. And he cometh unto the disciples, and :findeth them asleep, and saith unto. Peter, What ! could ye not watch with me one hour ? Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation : the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak. He went away again the second time, and prayed saying, 0 my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done. And he came and found them asleep again; for their eyes were heavy. And he left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words. Then cometh he to his disciples, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest : behold, the hour is at hand, and the son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners. Rise, let us be going : behold, he is at hand that doth betray me. And while he yet spake, lo, Judas, one of the twelve, came, and with him a great multitude, with swords and staves, from the chief priests and elders of the people. Now he that betrayed him gave them a sign, saying, WlJOmsocver I shall kiss, that same is he: hold him fast. And forthwith he came to Jesus, arid said, Hail Master; and kissed him." -.Matt. xxvi, 36-49. "When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water,

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and washed his hands before the multitude, saying. I am innocent of the blood of this just person; see ye to it. Then answered all the people and said, His blood be upon us, and our children. Then released he Barabbas unto them : and when he had scourged J esuH, he delivered him to be crucified. Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall, and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers. And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe. And when they had platted a crown of thorns they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand ; and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, king of the J e•vs ! And they spit upon him, and took the reed and smote him on the head. And after that they had mocked him, they took the robe off from him, and put his own raiment on him, and led him away to crucify him. And as they came out they found a man of Oyrene, Simon by name: him they compelled to bear his cross. And wl1en they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, A place of a scull, they gave him vinegar to drink, mingled with gall: and when he had tasted thereof he would not drink. And they crucified him, and parted his garments, casting lots : that it might be fnlfilled which was spoken by the prophet, They partetl my g:nments among them, and upon my vesture did they cast lots. Ani!, sitting down, they watched. him there; and set up o~·er his head his accusation written, THIS IS ,JESUS TH:E KING OF THE JEWS."-Matt. xx:vii, 24-38.

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LESSON.

Although it is appointed unto all men once to die, yet as the Scriptnres inform, the Savior of the world arose from the dead and ascended up into heaven, there forever seated on the throne of majesty on high, so they also assure us, that all who have receiveu Him for their righteousness, and put their trust in Him, shall rise to life everlasting. In the end of the Sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene, __j


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and the other Mary, to see the sepulchre. And behold, there was a great earthquake : for the angel of the Lord descended from ~eaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door and sat upon it. His countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow : And for fear of him, the keepers did shake and became as dead men. And the angel answered and said unto the women, Fear not ye : for I know that ye seek Jesus which was crucified. He is not here, for he is risen as he said. Come see the place where the Lord lay: and go quickly and tell his disciples that he is risen frotn. the dead ; and, behold, he goeth before you into Galilee: there shall ye see him: lo, I have told you. And they departed quickly from the sepulchre with fear and great joy, and did run to bring his disciples wo1路d. And as they went to tell his disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying, All hail. And they came and held him by the feet, and worshiped him. And he led them out as far as to Bethany; and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them. And it came to pass while he blessed them, he was parted from them and carried np into heaven. And they worshiped him. and returned to Jerusalem with great joy.


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HYMN.

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vails the skies,

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sud-den trcmb- ling shakes the ground.

Come, saints, and drop a tear or two For Him who groaned beneath your load; He shed a thousand drops for you, A thousand drops of richer blood, Here's love and grief beyond degree, The Lord of glory dies for man I But lo I what sudden joys we see: Jesus, the dead, revives again I The rising God forsakes the tomb; (In vain the tomb forbids his rise,) Cherubic legions guard him home, And shout him "Welcome to the skies !'' Break oft' your tears, ye saints, and tell How high your great Deliverer reigns : Sing how he. spoiled the hosts of hell, And led the monster death in chains! Say, "Live for ever, wondrous King! 路路 Born to redeem, and strong to save I" Then ask the monster, "Where 's thy sting?" And, "Where 's thy victory, boasting grave?" 22


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LESSON.

"And in those days Peter stood up in the midst of the disciples, and said, (the number of the names together were about an hundred an twenty,) men and brethren, this Scripture must needs have been fulfilled, which the Holy Ghost by the mouth of David, spake before concerning Judas, which was guide to them that took Jesus. For he was .numbered with us, and had obtained part of this ministry. Now this man purchased a field with the reward of iniquity; and falling headlong he burst asunder in the midst, and all his bowels gushed out. And it was known unto all the dwellers at Jerusalem; insomuch a.s that field is


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called in their proper tongue, Aceldama, that is to say, The :field of blood. Fo1¡ it is written in the book of Psalms, Let his habitation be desolate, and let no man dwell therein: and his bishopric let another take. Wherefore, of these men which have companied with us all the time, that the Lord Jesus went in and out among us, beginning from the baptism of John, unto that same day that he was taken up from us, must one be ordained to be a witness with us of his resur. rection. And they appointed two, Joseph, called Barsabas, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias. And they prayed, and said, Thou, Lord, which knowest the hearts of all men, shew whether of these two thou hast chosen, that he may take part of this ministry and apostleship, from which Judas by transgression fell, that he might go to his own place. And they gave forth their lots; and the lot fell upon l\Iat¡ thias; and he was numbered with the eleven apostles â&#x20AC;˘ .Acts i, 15-26.

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CHAPTER XX. KNIGHTS OF MALTA..

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THE following passages of scripture are occasionally rehearsed in encampments of knights of Malta. "And when they were escaped, then they knew that the island W&.!i called Melita.. And the barbarous people shewed us no little kindness ; for they kindled a :lire, and received us every one, because of the present rain, and because of the cold. And when Paul had gathered a bundle of sticks, and laid them the heat, and on the :lire, there came a viper out of C27o\ ......

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fastened on his hand. And when the barbarians saw the venomous beast hang on his hand, they said among themselves, No doubt this man is a murderer, whom, though he hath escaped the sea, yet vengeance su:ffereth not to live. And he shook off the beast into the fire, and felt no harm. Howbeit they )oolted when he should have swollen, or fallen down dead suddenly; but afte1路 they had looked a great while, and saw no harm come to llim, they changed their minds, and said that he was a god."-.Act8 :x::xviii,

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FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

"And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was, .TESUS OF NAZARETH, l'HE KING OF l'HE .TEvVS."-St. Joltn xix. 19.

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" But Thomas, one of the twelve, called Didymus, was not with them when Jesus came. The other disciples, therefore, said unto him, vVe have seen the Lord. But he said unto them, Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my :finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, I will not believe. And after eight days~ again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. Then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you. Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy :finger, and behold my hands ; and reach hither thy haud, and thrust it into my side ; and be not faithless, but believing. And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.''-St. Jokn :x::x:. 24-28. I

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AN' ADDRESS TO .A N'EWLY CREATED SIR KNIGHT TEMPLAR .AND KNIGHT OF MALTA.

Sm KNIGHT :-Having passed through the several degrees and honorary distinctions of our ancient and honorable institution-in your admission to the tesselated Masonic ground floor-your ascent into the middle chamber-your entrance to the unfinished sanctum sanctorum-your regularly passing the several gates of the temple-induction to the oriental chair, witnessing the completion and dedication of that superb model of excellence, the Temple, which has immortalized the names of our ancient Grand Masters, and the justly celebrated craftsmen :~Having wrought in the ruins of the first Temple, and from its sacred Royal .Arch brought to light incalorilable treasures and advantages to the craft-Having duly studied into the way and manner of theh· concealment; also having been engaged in the hazardous enterprise of traversing an enemy's dominions, and there convincing a foreign prince that truth is great and will prevail-therefore yon are now admitted to a participation of those labors which are to eftect the erection of a Temple more glorious than the first, even that beauteous Temple of Ht•liness and Inno!:ence, whose pillars are Charity, Mercy a.nd Justice, the foundation of which is in the bl'east of every one, who has tasted tha.t the Lord is gracious; to whom coming as unto a living stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God and precious, even that hope which is an anchor to the soul both sure and steadfast, that demonstrates the 23


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existence of the soul, and animates us with the certainty of a glorious immortality: And now, Sir Knight, we bid you welcome to all those rights and privileges, even to that disinterested friendship, and unbounded hospitality which ever has, and we hope and trust ever will continue to adorn, distinguish, and characterize this noble Order. It will henceforth become your duty as well as inclination, to assist, protect, and befriend, the weary way-worn traveler who :finds the heights of fortune inaccessible, and the thorny paths of life broken, adverse, and forlorn, to succor, defend, and protect innocence, the distressed, and ltelpless, ever standing forth as a champion to espouse the cause of the Christian Religion. You are to inculcate, enforce and practice 'Ui1路tue; and amidst all the temptations which surround you, never to be drawn aside from the path of duty, or forgetful of those due guards and pas!!-words which are necessary to be had in perpetual remembrance; and while one hand is wielding the snre defence for your Companion in danger, let the other grMp the mystic T1路owel, and widely diffuse the genuine cement of Brotherly Love and Friendsl1ip. Should calumny asRail the character of a Brother Sir Knigl1t, recollect that you are to step forth and vindicate his good name, ancl assist him on nll necessary occasions. Should as~ailnnts ever attempt your honor, interest, or happiness, remember, also, at the same time, you have the counsel and support of your


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brethren, whose mystic words, combining the virtues of Faith, Hope, and Charity, with Justice, Fortitude and lriercy, will leap from their scabbards in defence of your just rights, and ensure you a glorious triumph over all your enemies. On this occasion permit me, Sir Knight, to remind. you of our mutual engagements, our reciprocal ties; for whatever may be your situation or rank in life, on close examination, you will find those in similar stations, who have dignified themselves and been useful to mankind. Whether, therefore, you are placed. upon the highest pinnacle of worldly grandeur, and distinctly seen to glitter from afar; or glide more securely in the humble vale of obscurity, unnoticed save by a few ; it matters not, for a few rolling suns will close the scene, when nought bnt holiness will serve as a sure pa.ss-wonl to gain admission into that REsT prepared from the foundation of the world. You are therefore called upon to discharge all your duties with fidelity and patience, whether in the field, in the Senate, on the .Benck, at the ..Bar, or at the Holy .Altar. If you see a brother bending under the cross of adversity and disappoiutment, look not idly on, neither pass by on the other side, but fly to his relief. If he be deceived, tell him the Truth; if he be calumniated, vindicate his cause ; for, although in some instances, he may have erred, still recollect that indiscretion in him should never destroy humanity in you.

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Fint1.1ly, Sir Knigl1ts, as memento mori is deeply engraved on all sublunary enjoyments, let us ever be found in the habiliments of righteousness, traversing the straight path of rectitude, virtue, and true holiness; so that having discharged our duty here below, performed the pilgrimage of life, burst the bands of mortality, passed over the Jordan of death, and safely landed on the broad shore 路 of eternity-there, in the presence of myriads. of attending angels, we may be greeted as brethren, and received into the widely extended arms of the blessed EMANUEL, and forever made to participate in his Heavenly Kingdom. A:N EXHORTATION AT CLOSING AN ENO.AMPMElfT.

Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. Put on the whole路 armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickellness in high places. "Wherefore take unto you the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having dl)ne all, to stand. Stand, therefore, luwing your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness ; and your feet shod 路 with the preparation of the gospel of peace : abov.e all, taking t.he shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wic:_j


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And take tlle helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.-EpheBianB vi. 10-17.

CEREMONIES AND CHARGES UPON

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THE Sir Knights will assemble in some convenient room near the church, or hall, where the ceremonies are to be performed, and open an Encampment. The lines are then formed by the Grand Marshal, when they advance to the church, where tl1ey will halt and open to the right and left, and face inward, while tlle Grand (or installing) officers, and others in succession, pass in. After taking their several posts, they salute the audience by presenting arms. The Grand ~larshal will then order-" return arms-recover-be at case." The jewels are then collected and placed on the altar• .An Ode or .Anthem iB then peiformed, succeeded by Prayer, a Ser1Mn, and an Ode. The Grand Marshal will then rise and say, "Most Eminent Grand Commander-A constitutional num her of Knights Templar, duly instructed in the sublime mysteries of our Orders, and being desirous of promoting tlle honor of the same, by aiding the cause of humanity, Imowledge, and virtue, have applied to the proper authol'ity for a WARRANT or CHA!l.TER to L--·--·

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consti.tute tl1em a regnlar Encampment of Knights '.remplar, and the appendant Orders. The prayer for their petition having been granted, they are now assembled for the purpose of beiug legally constituted, and of having their officers installed in due and ancient form!' The Grand Master will then direct the Grand Recorder to read the Charter or Warrant, which being done, he will ask the members if they still approve. of the officers named in the Warrant ; if they assent, the Grand Master will then rise and declare, "By virtue of the high power and authority in me vested, I do now form you, my worthy brother Knights, into a just and regular ENCAMPMENT oF KNIGHTS 'IEMPLAR. Henceforth you are authorized and empowered to form and open a CouNCIL oF KNIGHTS OF THE, RED CRoss, an ENcAMPMENT OF KNIGHTS T:EmLAR, -and KNIGHTS OF MALTA of the ORDER oF ST. JOliN OF JERUSALEM, and to perform all such things as may appertain to the same ; conforming in all your doings to the laws and Constitution of the Grand Encampment under whose authority you act, and to the Constitution and edicts of the General Grand En路 campment of the United States. And may the God of your Fathers be with you, and guide and direct you in aU your undertakings." The jewels having been collected on tbe Knights :first entrance, and deposited on the altar or table in 路 front路 of the Grand Master, are now uncovered, to solemn music, when the Prelate rises and says-

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"From time immemorial, it ]fas been customary for the Masonic ft路aternity to dedicate the different departments of our insr.itution to different patrons. We dedicate our Lodges to Sts. John the Baptist and the Evangelist; our Chapters to Zerubbabel, and Encampments to St. John the Ahnoner. We do this not in that superstitious sense in which the heathen employ the term when they set apart their temples for the worship of their imaginary deities ; nor in that high and solemn i;iense in which Christians dedicate their churches to the great Jehovah ; but we do it simply to testify om路 respect and esteem for the character of those who have been so eminently beneficial to our institution, and that their examples may stimulate us to imitate their exalted virtues. "To our most eminent and worthy Patron ST. J OBN TI:IE ALMONER, I do now solemnly dedicate this Encampment, by the name and title of---liincampmcnt ; and may the God of all grace abundantly bless you in your laudable undertaking, and may each one of its members so redeem his time that he may finally receive the joyful invitation, 'Enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.' ' Glory to God in the highest, aud on earth peace, good will towards mcu.' (Response.) 'As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.' " The Grand Commander elect, is then presented to the Grand Master by the Marshal, who says "Most Worshipful, I have the honor to present you the Most Em;nont Sh - - - who has been appointed : :tho J oi 1

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office of first Grand Commander of this Encampment. I find him well skilled in our sublime mysteries, and observant of the noble precepts of our forefathers, and have, therefore, no doubt but he will discharge the important duties of his office with fidelity." The Grand Master then asks, "Most Eminent, are you ready to subscribe to the pledge of office ?" On his answering in the affirmative, the Grand Master will draw his sword, and holding it horizontally, the edge toward the Grand Commander elect, who will place his left hand on the same, and his right hand on his left breast, and repeat as follows:-" I do solemnly promise, upon the honor of a Knight Templar, that I will, to the best of my knowledge and ability, faithfu11y discharge the various duties incumbent upon the office to which I have been appointed; that I will support and maintain the By-laws of this Encampment, and the laws and Constitution of the. Grand Encampment under whose immediate authority I act; also the Constitution and edicts of the General Grand Encampment of the United States of America." The Grand M~ster then observes-" Most Eminent Sir - - - , I enter upon the discharge of my duty on this interesting occasion, with great pleasure. In insta1ling you as the first officer of an institution wllich is founded on the Holy Religion of Jesus Ol~rist, I am satisfied that I am promoting the interests of tl1e Order generally, but more particularly in this part of our country. Having accepte<l this honorable and responsible office, you will endeavor to discharge

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your duty in such a manner as to convince the world, that those calumnies which have been repeatedly cast upon our Institution by the enemies of our Order, a1·e false and unfounded. I shall now propose certain questions to you, relative to the duties of your office, to which I must request an unequivocal answer: 1. Do you solemnly promise, upon the honor of a. Knight Templar, that you will exert your best endeavors to correct the errors, purify th~ morals, and promote the true happiness of those of your brother Knights who have attained this magnanimous Order? 2. That you will not confer the Orders on any person who has not shown a charitable and humane disposition, nor upon any one who is an enemy to the Christian Religion : but only upon such as you have reason to believe will cheerfully conform to all our laws and precepts? 3. That you will endeavor to promote the general good of the Order on all proper occasions, be ever ready to give and receive instruction, ~.specially from the State and General Grand Officers? 4. That, to the utmost of your power, you will preserve the solemnities of our ceremonies, and conduct yourself in open Encampment with the most profound respect and reverence, as an example to your brother Knights? 5. That you will not acknowledge or have intercourse with any Encampment which does not work under a constitutional charter or warrant? .

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6. That you will not permit any person to visit your Encampment who has not been Knigbterl in an Encampment legally constituted, without his first being formally h~aled ? 7. That you wfill bind your successor in office to 1 the observance o these rues, to which you have now assented? Do you submit to all these things and promise to observe and practice them faithfully? Let us kneel and address the throne of grace. Prayer is then offered by the Prelate.

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INSTALLATION' CHARGE TO THE MOST EMINENT GRAND COMMANDER.

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MosT EMINENT :-I now invest you with the badge of your office, which is !!' cross surmounted by rays of light. It is to remind you that humility, love, and pure benevolence are refulgent Tays that emanate from the pure and undefiled religion of the blessed Emanuel, and which should ever characte1·ize the members of this Order; it is not only to remind you of the respect ' and obedience you have a right to expect from your brother Knights, but also those important duties which you owe to them and to the Order. I now declare you duly installed Grand Commander of - - Encampment, not doubting your determination to support, to the utmost of your · ability and influence, the honor and reputation of this magnanimous Order ; and I am persuaded, as it

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will be for your interest, that you will govern this Encampment with such wisdom and regularity as will convince the Sir Knights that their confidence and partiality has not been misplaced. I now present you with a Charter, under wl1ich yon will be authorized to work ; you will consider it 11 a sacred deposit, and never permit it to be used for If any other purposes than those which are expressed 1: in it. The Holy Bible, the great Luminary in every degree of Masonry, together with the Cross Swords, I now confide to your care. In the former part of this sacred volume we are taught to believe in the existence of the eternal Jehovah, the Creator of all things, the Governor of the UniversP., and the Judge of all; that man is a moral and accountable being; that he at first was created upright, but fell by transgression, and became justly exposed to eternal punishment. In the latter part we are taught, that when there was no eye to pity, nor created arm to save, Infinite Benevolence devised a plan whereby God could be just, and the justifier of, him that believeth on the Lord Jesus Christ; that the great Messiah came into this rebellious world, took upon himself the character of a servant, fulfilled the law, suffered an ignominious death upon the cross ; tl1at he rose from the dead, ascended into heaven, and is now seated on the right. hand of God the Father, making intercession for his people; that he has opened a door whereby all who will may enter into life eternal. :By the cross swords we are reminded of the &rmor 1-.~-

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we should put on when we are called upon to wrestle against principalities and powers, against spiritual wickedness in high places ; being assured that by the sword of the spirit, which is the word of God, we shall come off conquerors, and more than conquerors, through Him that loved us. The Constitution of the General Grand Encampment of the United States, and of the Grand Encampment under whose immediate authority yon act, together 'with the By-laws of-- Encampment, are committed to your care. It will be necessary frequently to consult them, and take special care that none of the latter militate against the former. And now, :Most Eminent, permit me to place you in the chair of your commandery, emblematic of that which was formerly filled by a succession of heroes of whom the world was not worthy; and may their bright example, whose matchless deec1s are recorded on the historic page, animate you to the faithful discharge of every duty. The Grand :Master then proclaims-" Sir Knights, behold your Grand Commander." The Knights rise, draw swords, and present arms: while in this position, the M. W. says" Recollect, Sir Knights, that the future welfare and prosperity of your Encampment will depend as much on your obedience, attention, and assistance, ns upon the wisdom, assiduity, and exertion of your Grand Commander." The Sir Knig1lts recover armR, return arms, and are seated. 'rhe M. vV. then continues:

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"Your duty henceforth, Most Eminent, will be to direct tl1e ceremonies of tl1e Encampment with wisdom aml impartiality, to confer the Orders on those who on application shall be found worthy; to preserve the Laws and Constitution of the Order from innovation and violation ; to dispense ju8tice, reward merit, encourage truth, suppress profanity at all times, and dispense the sublime principles of universal benevolence. Yon will distribute alms to poor and weary pilgrims traveling from afar; feed the ltungry, clothe tlte naked, and bind up the wounds of the ajftict'ea. In a word, you will inculcate the practice and duties of charity and hospitality, and govern your commandery with justice and moderation." The Grand Master will direct all the officers of the new Encampment, except the Grand Commander, to rise and prepare to take the pledge of office, similar to the one taken by the Grand Commander. The officers elect rise, and every third'" Knight from the rig路ht will draw and drop his sword to the rigl!t, on a horizontal position ; the Knights will lay their left hand on the swords before them, and the right, ( execpt of those who hold the swords,) upon their left breast. 'l'he M. W. then administers the obligation as follows : "You, and each of you, promise and agree, upon the honor of a Knight Tomplar," &c. &c., as before. The Grand Marshal then presents the Generalissimo.


288

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

CHARGE TO THE GENERALISSHIO.

Sm--You have been appointed to the offiee of Generalissimo of this Encampment; I now invest you with the badge of your office, which is a Square, surmounted by a Paschal Lamb. When beholding the Lamb, let it stimulate yon to have, at all times, a watchful eye over your own conduct, and an earnest solicitude for the prosperity of the kingdom of the blessed Emanuel, the spotless Lamb of God, who was slain from the foundation of the world. The Square is to remind you that the Institution of Freemasonry and the Orders of Knighthood were formerly governed by the same Grand Masters, and that the same principles of brotherly love and friendship Rhould forever govern the members of both Orders. Your station, Sir Knig1lt, is on the right of your Commander; yonr duty is to receive and communicate all orders, signs, and petitions, to assist your Commander in his various duties, and, in hi11 absence, to preside over the Encampment. 'rhe exercise of all your talents and zeal will be necessary in the discharge of your various dnties. I charge you, therefore, to be faithful to the Sir Knights with whom you are associated ; pnt them often in remembrance of those things which tend to their everlasting peace; finally, l)!¡each to them the Word; " be instant in season and out of season ; reprove,

] .

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CEREMONIES AND CHARGES.

289

rebuke, exhort, with all long-suffering and doctrine;" ever remembering the promise, "Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life." CHARGE TO THE CAPTAIN' GENERAL.

Sm-You are appointed to the imp or. tant office of Captain General of this Encampment. I now invest you with the badge of your office, which is a Level, surmounted by a Oock. As the undaunted courage and valor of the cock stimulates him to conquer his competitor, or yield himself a victim to the contest, so should you be stimulated to the discharge of every duty. Yon should have on "the breast-plate of righteousness," so that with patience and meekness yon may ever travel on the level of humility, and be so supplied with divine grace as to prevent you from selling your God or denying your Master. Your station is on the left of your Commander. Your duty among many other things, is to see that the proper officers make all due preparation fo1路 the various meetings of the Encampment, that the Council Chamber and Asylum are in suitable array for thil h1trodnction of candidates, and the dispatch of business. You are also to receive and communicate all orders from the Grand Commander through the officers of the line. Yon are to assist in Council, and in the absence of your Commander and Generalissimo, yon are to govern the Encampment. The distressea wiaow, the helpless orphan, and the innocent of the weaker se.:c,


290

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

~1

you are ever to assist and protect. But, above all, you are to stand forth, having your loins girt about with truth, in the defence of the Christian religion from all its enemies. And now I exhort yon, thnt with fidelity you perform every duty-" and whatsoever ye do, do it heartily as to the Lord, and not unto men; continue in prayer, and watch in the same with thanksgiving;" ever bearing in mind the promise, ~'Be not weary in well-doing, for in due season ye shall reap, if ye faint not.'' CHARGE TO THE MOST EXCELLENT PRELATE.

i

Sm-You are appointed Prelate ofthis Encampment. I now have the pleasure of investing you with this Triple Triangle, which is the badge of your office, and a beautiful emblem of tl1e Eternal Jehovah. Your station is on the right of the Genero.lissimo ; your duty is at the Altar, to offer up prayers and oblations to the Deity. The duties of your office are very interesting and highly important, and will require your early and punctual attendance at every meeting. Your jewel is to remind you of the importance of the trust reposed in you; and may " He who is able, abundantly futnish you for every good work, preserve you from falling into error-improve, . strengthen, establish, and perfect you," and finally~ greet you with " well done, good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord "

I I _ '- - - - - · - · · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - -

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CEREMONIES AND CHARGES.

291

OHARGE TO THE SENIOR WARDEN".

SIR-You are appointed SeniorWarden of this Encampment. I now invest you with the badge of your office, which is a Hollow Square anu Sword of Justice. It is to remind you, that as the children of Israel marched in a hollow square in their journey through the wilderness, in order to guard and protect the Ark of tl1e Covenant, so should you be vigilant in guarding every avenue from innovation and error. Let the sword of justice, therefore, be drawn to guard the Constitution ofthe Order. Your station is at the south-west angle of the triangle, and upon the right of the first division. You will attend on pilgrim waniors traveling from afar, comfort and support pilgrim penitents, and recommend them after due trial to the favor and 1notection of the Grand Commander. Yon will be assiduous in teaching your division their duties and exercises. You will, on all occasions, form the avenues for the approach and departure of your Commander; and prepare the lines for inspection and review. Let it be your constant care that the warrior be not deterred from duty, nor the penitent molested on l1is journey. Finally, "let your light so shine before men, that they, seeing your good works, may glorify your Father which is in Heaven."

24

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I

292

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

ij

I

CHARGE TO THE JUNIOR WARDEN.

I 1 [[ __

l

Sm-You are appointed Junior vV arden of this Encampment. I now invest you with the uadge of your office, whidt is an Eagle and Flaming Sword. It is to remind you to perform your dnties with justice and valor, having an eagle eye on the prosperity of tl1e Order. Your station is at the north-west angle of the triangle, and on tho left of the third division. Your duty is to attend on weary pilgrims traveling from afar, com1nct them on their jonrney, plead their canse, and, by permission of the Grand Commander, introduce them into the A;;ylnrn. You will be careful that, in addition to sawbls, staff, and scrip, their whole preparation aml deportment be such as shall cause them to be roc:ognized as ch:ildrcn of l~1<mitity. 'l'each them that "Magna est veritas et prevalebit," is the motto of one of om Orders, and although, in the course of their pilgrimage, they will oftâ&#x20AC;˘m find the heights of fortune inacc:essihle, and the thorny paths of life crooked, adverse and forlorn, yet, by faith and humility, courage, constancy and perseverance in the great dntics set before them in the G-oRpel, they may gain a(lmisRion into. the Asylum above, there to enjoy the honors and rewards that await the valiant soldiers of the I,ord Jesus Christ. Finally, be ye perfect, always aLounding in the work of the Lord; that you may be a shining light in the world. A city that is

seto~::~~l ~:not be ~1i~~ ----- ___ __ _ ___ _ ---- __


CEREMONIES AND CRARG ES.

293

CHARGE TO THE TREASURER.

Sm-Yon are appointed Treasurer of this Encampment, and I now invest you with the bat1go of yom office. Your station is on the right of the Grand Commander, in front. The qualities which should recommend a Treasurer, are accuracy and fidelity : accuracy in keeping a fair and minute account of all receipts and disbursements; fidelity in carefully preserving all the property and funds of the Encampment that may be placed in your hands, and rendering a j nst account of the same whenever called upon for that pmposc. I presume that your re~pect and attachment to the Encampment, and your earnest solicitude for a good name, which is better than preeious oint.ment, will prompt you to the faithful di:>charge of the duties of your office.

*

CHARGE TO THE RECORDER.

Sm-You are appointed Recorder of this Encampment, and I now invest you with the badge of your offiee. Your station is on the left of the Grand Commander, in front. The qualities whicl1 shoulti recommend a Recorder, are promptitude in issuing the notifications and orders of his superior officers ; punctuality in attending the meetings of the Encampment; correctness in recording their proceed.


r--路路-294

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

ings; judgment in discriminating between what is proper and what is improper to be commi.tted to writing; integrity in a.ccounting for all moneys that may pass through his hands ; and fidelity in paying the same over into the hands of the Treasurer. The possession of these good qualities, I presume, has designated you as a suitable candidate for this important office; and I can not entertain a doubt that you will discharge its duties beneficially to the Encampment, and honorably to yourself. And when you shall have completed the record of your transactions here below, and :finished the term of your probation, may you be admitted into the celestial Asylum of saints and angels, and find your name recorded in the Lamb's Book of Life.

0

CHARGE TO THE STANDARD BEARER.

Sm-You are appointed Standard Bearer of this Encampment. I now invest you with the badge of your office, which is a Plumb, surmonnted. by a Banner. Your station is in the west, and in the center of the second division. Your duty is to display, support, and protect the Standard of the Order, which I now with pleasure confide to your valor. Yon will remember that it is our rallying point in time of danger; and when unfurled in a JUSt and virtuous cause, you will never relinquish it to an enemy but with your life. Let, therefore, your conduct be such as

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CEREMONIES AND CHARGES.

295

the virtuous will delight to imitate ; let the 1路efnlgent rays which ever emanate from pure benevolence and humility diffuse their luster on all around, that it may encourage and animate aU true and courteous Knights, and, at the same time, confound and dismay all their enemies.

A

CHARGE OF THE SWORD BEARER.

Sm- You are appointed Sword Bearer of this Encampment. I now invest you with the badge of yotir office, which is a rr:ria~gle and C~路oss Swords. Yom statwn IS on the rtght of the Standard Bearer, and on the right of the second diviHion when formed into line. Your dnty is to watch all orders and signals from the Grand Commander, and see that they are promptly obeyed. You are, also, to assist in the protection of the banners of the Order, with a heart lively devoted to the principles of Faith, Hope, and Charity. With the mystic sword that is endowed with justice and fortitude, and tempered by mercy, in your hand, yon may cast your eyes upon the Standard, and remember tl1at "In Iloc Signo Vinces" is an expressive motto of our Order, and encouraging to the heart of every believer.

_:.....:,:__-.,;.:::::-------

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296

FREEMASON'S MONITOR. CHARGE TO THE WARDER.

I

Sm-You are appointed Warder of this I i Encampment. I now invest you with the II badge of your office, which is a square plate with a Trumpet and Cross Swords engraved thereon. Your station is upon the left of the Standard Bearer, and upon the left of the second division when formed into line. Your duty is to announce the approach and departure of the Grand Commander, to post the sentinels, and see that the Asylum is duly guarded. You will, also, report aU petitions from visitors and strangers, and communicate the orders of your superior officers ; and I charge you to be punctual in your attendance at. our meetings, and indefatigable in the discharge of your important duties ; for though yours is among the last offices in the Encampment, it is by no means the least important. CHARGE TO THE THREE GUARDS.

Sm KNIGHTs-You are appointed Captains of the Guards. I now invest you with the badge of your office, which is a square plate with a. Battle-Axe engraved thereon. Your post is that of honor as well as dnnger. You will therefore be vigilant, and challenge '\Vith spirit, examine with caution, admonish with candor, relieve cheerfully, protect with fidelity, and fight valiantly.


CEREMONIES .AND CHARGES.

297

CHARGE TO THE ENC.AMP:MENT.

1,; 1

[

SIR KNIGHTs-To manage and conduct the concerns of an Encam.pment of Knights Templar with that promptitude, integrity and skill which the Institute .demands, will require the exercise of all the talents and perseverance of it.s officers and members. Are any of you solicitous that your equals and inferiors should conduct toward you with deference and respect ? You will be sure to let no opportunity pass without furnishing them with an example in your own conduct toward your superiors. The officers will recollect that those moral and religious duties and precepts which they from time to time so forcibly impress upon the minds of others, should by no means be neglected by themselves; as the most effectual way to ensure success is to let precept and example go hand in hand. I would therefore exhort one and all of you to look well to the East, to the West, to the North, and to the South, and see that the entering avenues are strictly guarded, and that you suffer no one to pass the threshold of your Asylum but the worthy Children of Humility ; and, at the same time, that you suffer no one to walk among you disorderly, without admonition or reproof. Vllhile such is the conduct of its officers and members, you may rest assured that this valiant and magnanimous Order will forever flourish like the green bay tree. And now, my worthy Sir ---"~...:----·--·--·---·

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298

FREEMASON'S MONITOR.

Knights, I would address you, in the language of David to his beloved city, "Peace be within thy wails, and proRperity within thy palaces." For my Brethren and Companions' sakes, I will now say, "Peace be within thee." The Grand Marshal then proclaims the new ljlncampment, in the following manner, viz.: "In the name of the Most Eminent Grand Encampment of the State of--, I proclaim this Encampment by the name of---Encampment, No.-, to be legally constituted, consecrated, and the offi:cers duly installed." The lines 路are then formed, and return in the same order to the hall from whence they started, where the business of the Encampment is resumed. After the necessary business is finished, the Encampment is closed in due and ancient form.

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ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE; CONT.A.INING

AMPLE ILLUSTRATIONS OF .ALL THE GRADES, J'ROK SECRET :r.t.&.S'I'li:R TO SOVER.J:IGN GRJ..ND INSPEOTOR·GENim.J..L, INCLUJ)ING

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INTENDED FOR THE USII: OF Ol"FICERS A.ND MEMBERS OP LODGIIS OF PE!tl'ECTIOII, COUNOlLS OF PRINCES OF Jb:lt'CJSA..LEM1 C'HA.P"n':RB OF ROBII:"'CROIX,. GRA.ND CONSISTORIES, AND SUl'REM£. COUNOll.S.

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NORTHERN !I:ASONIC .TUR!$DICT!ON OF THE Ull"l'l'ED STATES,

BY E. T. CARSON, 0.". COW:.·. 01" 'l'HF! G.•. OOS:SJBTOilY OF P.·. B..".

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CINCINNATI: APPLEGATE & COMPANY.

1858.


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II


TRACING-BOARD OF SUBLIME PRINCE OF TBlll ROYAL SEO&ET, 32~.

(For a full description and explanation of it, see page lli.) ( iv)


EDITOR'S PREFACE.

THE following pages are intended to supply, to some extent, a want long felt of a more complete Monitor of the .A.ncient and .A.ccepted Rite. They have been prepared with an ~special view to relieving officers of the various bodies of the labor which has hitherto proved such nn obstacle to the spread of the Rite. It is 'vel! known that Bro. Webb did not possess the Grades; and upon examination, the writer found his work so meager and inaccnrnte, that it became necessary to re-write every part of it. In doing this, he has had the ad vantage of the Jnrgest Masonic library in .A.merica, of a great number of MSS. in the French, German, Spanish and English languages; some of them of remote antiquity; aud of an experimental acquaintance with all the degrees, except the :l3d, as an officer in the bodies of eo.ch. His chief aim has been accuracy of detail, and while the lessons are, of course, modern, and some of them new, he has spared no pains to 1uake the work, in all other respects, an exact transcript of the original ritunl. · Without cluiming to have attained complete success, the editor still hopes that he will be found to have improved \1pon the labors of his predeceesors. He desires to express a grateful sense of his obligations to Bro. K. H. Van Rensselaer, 33 o, Deputy fot· Ohio and Pennsylvania, and Bro. Geo. Hoadly, 32°, M .'. W. ·. of Cincinnati Chupter of Rose Croix, for the use of valuable MSS. and other services in the preparation of this work. He would also acknowledge his obligations to Dr . .A.. G Mackey, 33°, of whose Monitor of the Inelfuble degrees, published in the Southern and ( v)

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vi

EDITOR'S PREFACE.

-,

Western :Masonic Miscellany, he hlls mllrl" fl'M use. He has also derived much valuable historical information from the History of the Ancient and Accepted Rite, published in the London Freemason's :Magttzine of last year. He submits the result of his labotâ&#x20AC;˘ to the Craft, in the hope that it will meet the approval of those, who, like himself, value and are attached to this beautiful Rite. E. T. CARSON. P:. R.-. S.'. 32° CINCINNATI.

1858.

I I


INTRODUCTION.

I I

I '

II:I

IT is not within the province of this work to consider the .)rigin an~ early hi;;tm·y of the Ancient and Accepted (or, as it is often called, Scottish) Rite.• Suffice it to sav, that the Grades of this system first ttpp"ared in the form of a"Rite, about the middle of the htst century, in F1:ance and Germttny. It is now the most widely practiced of oJl the Masonic systems, SnJ?reme Councils of the 33d degree being in existence in the Umted States, England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Belgium, Portug:tl, Peru, Venezuela, and most other countries where Masonry~is known. In li62, the fir>t Grand Constitutions of the Rite (then consisting of twenty-five grades), were promulgated; and Fredm·ick the Great, king of Prussia, grnm011sly accepted the patronage of the Ordm·, ttnd became its chief, under t.he tit.Je of Sovereign Gt·and Inspector-General. In 1786, these Constitutions wt're revised, 1111d provision was made, that the Snpreme power, 'vhich had het·etofore been vested in Frederick alone, should be t.ransferred, in each country (except the United St:ttes whm·c two Councils nre nllowed), to one Sulwenw Council, cousisting of nine members, holding office fot• ife; and the series of twenty-five grades was enlarged t.u thirtv-three. . Previously, on the 27th of August, 1761, Bro. Stephmi Ilforin wns nuthorlzed, by letters patent issued by the Grand Consistory of Princes or' the R. S. nt Paris, to inst.itnte Lodges, Councils, Chnpt.ers, Colleges nnd Consistories of the sublime degrees, in the New Wot•ld. He appointed Bros. JI.Ioses Michael Hayes nnd Henr.v Andrew Fra.ncken, deputies for North Amet:ica nud the West Indies. In 176i, Bro. Francken constituted a Lodge of Perfection at Albn.ny, in the State of New York; this WM the first working Lodge of the Sublime degrees in this

* In the WTiter's opinion, the Rite originated in the Roy~l On:ler of H-RD-M- of Scotland, esta.hli•h~d hy King Rohert Bt·ucc, in 1314; the possessors of which were nearly an zealous 1\llvocates of the Honse of Stuart, and be·

on.me, in consequence, exiles f1-om their nu.tive la.nd, upon antla\ftCr·the acce$•

siou of the House of H11.nover to the throne of Grent 111-itnin. Those interested in the suh.Ject. are refP.t'l"•!d to '' history of the Rite, ptlhllshc<l in the Freem.a.·

son's Magazine, in London, in 1857, for further information.

II L::====·=-=··=-==--==-=-=-=--=--=·=-=-=-=-:.::-·-:::·

fvli)

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viii

INTRODUCTION.

Muntry. In 1783, Isaac Do. Costa, one of Hayes' successors, instituted a Lodge of Perfectiotl in the city of Chal'leston, S.C.; and in 1788, a Grand Council of P. of Jerusalem was established in the same place. These bodies still exist. In 1797, a Sov:. Chapter of Rose Croix: de H-R-D-M- was established in the city of New York. . On the 3Jst day of May, 1801, the Supreme Council of the 33d degree for the U.S. of A.. wns opened in Chnrleston, S. C.; Col. John Mitchell, a distinguished Revolutionary soldier, being the :first. Grand Commander, and Rev. Dr. Frederick Dalcho, Lieut. G.·. C.·. In 1806, a Grand Consistory S. P.R. S. 32•, was organized in the city of New York, of which Bro. J. J. J. Gourgas, who is still livtng, was the first Secretary. Bodies of the Rite were also e.~tablished enrl_y in this century, at Savannah, Philadelphia, Newport, and 1n other parts of the country. A.nd on the 5th of August, 1813, was instituted the Supreme Council of the 33d degree, for the northern jurisdiction of the United States; Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice President of the United States, being the :first Grand Commander, and Bro. Gourgas, Ill. Secretary of the H.·. E ••• Bodies of the Sublime degrees have been. established in many places in the United States ; but the expense attending theu· p1·oper :tl:tting up for work, and the labor required from those who undertake to :fill the offices, have prevented o. general diffusion of the Rite. On many accounts, this is not to be regretted; the degrees are not ealculated for every one ; they can only be appreciated by Masonic students, the real lovers of the arcana of Mnsonry; those who wish to understand the true cabala of the Order; to such, the degrees of the Ancient and Accepted Rite are a. cornu.copia, overflowing with treasures :-a dainty banquet, where they can feast themselves to satiety. In 1851, upon the resignation, after eighteen years' fn.ithful service, of Sov.'. G.·. Com.·. J. J. J. Gourgas, (the venerable Patriarch 6f tlle Rite in .A.merica), Bro. Giles F. Yntes declining the honor, on account of his residence in an inland city, Bro. E. A.. Raymond became Grand Commander of the N m·tl1ern Supreme Council, and the G1·and East was transfelTed to Boston, Mass., the city of his residence. Bro. R. P. Dunlap, of Maine, is Lieut.·. G.·. Com.·. and Bro. C. W. Moore, of Boston, Ill.·. Secretary of the H.·. E. ·• .A.mong the members nre the distinguished presidin~ officers of the General Grand Encampment and Chapter of t.ne U. S., Bros. Wm. B. Hubbnrd and Charles Gilman. Rev. John H. Honour, of Charleston, S.C., is Gr.·. Com.·. of

j

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INTRODUCTION.

I

i

Ij I

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I,_

i~l:

the Southern Council; Bro.'. C.'. M.'. Furman, Lieut.'. G.". C.'., and Dr. A.". G.'. Mackey, Ill.". Secretary of the H.'. E.'. AmonD" the members is the well-known name of that distinguished soldier, Gen. Quitman, of Miss. 'l'here have been, at various times, attempts to establish spu· 1·ions Supreme Councils in New York and New Orleans, but these have now all fallen into decay. The Ancient and Accepted Rite is arranged as follows: 1. Entered .Apprentice; 2. Fellow Craft; 3 .. Master Masou. (These are conferred in a symbolic Lodge, and the Ancient and Accepted Rite claims no control over them, wherever the York Rite is established. They do not differ very materially from the same degrees in that Rite.) 4. Secret Maste1·; 5. Perfect Master; 6. Intimate Secretary; 7. Provost and Judge; B. Intendant of the Building; 9, Master Elect of Niue; 10. Master Eh,ct of Fifteen; 11. Sublime Knight Elected ; 12. Grand Master Architect; 13. Knight of the Ninth Arch; 14. Grand Elect., Perfect and Sublime Mason, or Perfection. ('l'hese are termed the Ineffable degrees, and are conferred iu a body called a Lodge of Perfection.) 15. Knight of the East or Sword ; 16. Prince of Jerusalem. (These degrees arc conferred in a body called a Council of Princes of Jerusalem.) 17. Knight of the East and West; 18. Sovereign Prince of Rose Croix. (These degrees are conferred in a body called a Grand Chapter of Hose Croix.) 19. Grand Pont.iff; 20. Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges; 21. Noacltite, or Prussinn Knight.; 22. Knight, of the Royal. Axe, or P1·iuce of Libanus ; 2:3. Chief of the Tt\bernacle; 24. Prince of the Tabernacle; 25. Knight of the Brazen Serpent; 26. Prince of Mercy, or Scotch Trinitarian; 21. Sov<:rcign Commander of the Temple ; 28. Knight of the Sun; 29. Knight of St. Andrew, or Pnt.riarc.h of the Crusttdes; 30. Knight of Ka· dosh; 31. Grand InRpect.or Inquisitor Commander; 32. Sublime Pri nee of the Hoyal Secret. (These degrees are conferred in a body called a Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, 32° .) 33. Sovereign Gmnd lnRpector General. ('rhis degree is conferred in the Supreme Council. It is an official degree, and is only conferred ou those who nrc chosen members of that body.) ·


X ~nclnd• thio ,:'~O::::;ollnwing =•llont - - ~ W•

marks from the (London) ]'reemason's Quarterly Magazine, relative to this Rite : "If it be asked, for what good are the Superior degrees cultivn,~ed, we might answer, that as to personnl benefits, the opportunity to • do good and communicate,' to practice all the :Masonic virtues, as well as enjoy all the pleasures of fellowship and socialitv, so fm· as these are considered within the sphere of the Masotiic acquirements of any Brother, the original working de!,'!"ces of Ancient Craft Masonry will for him suffice. Only to one who wishes to attain a more extensive knowledge of, and become fully accomplished in, the religious, philosophic, and chi\•alric departments of our Order, as they were cultivated in the different ages of the world gone by, as well ns at the present day, would we recommend initintion into the high degrees. He only will be competent to appreciate tho honors and privileges attached to them, wl;o possesses, ~he disposition and ability to study the deeper and h1ghcr mysteries of our Cabala, nnd will not rest satisfied until he has disconred a satisftlCtorv solution to every :Masonic problem, and can, in every ca8e, explain 'de quo fab~tlum narratur;" who can thoroughly understand the moral mysteries, ns well as those of mt. nnd sclence, w]Jich our legends unfold, and who ha.s a htudablc ambit.ion to participttte in the most exalted sphere, with congenial associates, in 1Jmt subtle communion and fraternization which genuine 'Sublime Frcomasom:v' is pecu liurly calcnlateJ to l!fford "

!_____ _


r---------·,·-·-1

MONITOR OF

THE

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITR FIRST SERIJlS. INEFFABLE GRiDES.

SECRET MASTER. THE FO"C'RTI! GRADB m· THE ANC!llNT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND ~'HE I'li\S'l' OF Tllll !NJU•'FADLE SER!llS.

INTRODUO'riON. Tms Grade originn.t.ccl with Killg Solomon, ahont the time the temple \l':lR eompldt~rl. ot• Rlwrlly nftt:r. He selected scvPn of the most. worthy and expert Lretht·eu from the Ot·aft, ural appointred tlwm g-uanh of thc• S. ·. S. ·. nud the Sacred furwtnrc• of the Holy plaen. 'l'hey weru callvtl Scm·et }lasters, n.ucl in dne time WC'H' ndvanced to higher Gmdes, aud others se!Pdetl to fill their plnces. '!'he ILitual is replete with valuable and intere~ting details rehtivc to the mystic mc:tning of the Sacred furniture anti onmruents of the ·s. ·. S. ·. 'l'he ceremonies of initintion nre solellln an<l irnprcs,;ive, and it fot·m~ a beautiful introductory to the Ineffaulc Series.

DE CORATIO:YS OF THE LODGE.

I I

The Lod~e repre~cnts the Holr plnce or Sn.nctmtl'Y of Solomon's Temple. Separated from the S. ·. S. ·. by 11. stoue wall with one door, the pttsHnge to which is het.wcen hangings of four colors, blue, purple, crimson, ttnd white, suspeuded frorn fuur sm:tll columns. 'rhe Ark of the Oovena.nt iH placed iu the S. '. S. ·. and th<l goldeu cancll~sticks, altar of incense nud table of shew bread in the Holy place. In the E. ·. is 11 large

L[~::==

( 11)


12

ANCmNT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

circle, inclosin~ three luminous triangles interlaced, forming nine beams, w1th the blazing star in the center. The Lodge is huns- with black, sprinkled with white tears; the furniture coverea. with crape. There are eiglJty-one lights, distributed by nine times nine, (81 ); this number is generally reduced to three times three, (!I). At the door of entrance are two brazen columns, with curtains suspended from them. TITLES. There are but two officers in the Lodge. The Master, seated in the E.·. represents King S. ·. and is styled Thrice Potent; he is clothed m royal robes, with a scepter in his hand ; he also wears a large blue ribbon from the right shoulder to the. left hip, from the end of which is suspended n gold triangle; before him is a triangular table; on it a mallet (but this is not used, the work of the Temple being suspended, and the Craft in mourning). and a crown of laurel and olive leaves. The second officer seated in the W. ·. represents Adoniram, the son of Abda, who had the inspection of the work on Mount Lebanon. Masonic tradition says he was the :first Secret Master; he is styled Grand Inspector, 1s clothed in a black robe and cap, and weru·s the Order of the Grade. B.A.TTERY.

J J J J J d-J SYMBOLIC .A.GE. Th1·ee times twenty-seven-eighty-one years. HOURS OF WORK. From dawn until close of day. DRESS. Black robe and ca.p; white gloves; .Apron, white., with black strings, and blue :fiap ; on the :flap a golden eye; on the apron a key with the letter Z on it, surrounded with a. wreath of laurel a.ud olive leaves, open at the top. Order,-a white ribbon,• *The French say, blue.

d

I !'

!


SECRET

:MASTER.

13

bordered with black, with a black rosette on it; at the bottom of it is suspended the jewel of the grade,-an ivory key, with the letter Z ou it.

MORAL. The duty of Secrecy nnd Silence.

RECEPTION.

li 11

I 1

The Lord reigneth : let the people tremble : he sitteth between the cherubims : let the earth be moved. Praise ye the Lord. Praise, 0 ye servants of the Lord, praise ye the name of the Lord. Blessed be the name of the Lord from this time forth and forevermore. From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same, the Lord's name is to be praised. The Lord is high above all 11ations, and his glory above the heavens. Praise ye the Lord, praise ye the name of the Lord : praise him, 0 ye servants of the Lord. Ye that stand in the house of the Lord, in the courts of the house of our God, praise the Lord : for the Lord is good ; sing praises unto his name, for it is pleasant. For the Lord hath chosen Jacob unto himself, and Israel for his peculiar treasure. Let them praise the name of the Lord, for his name alone is excellent; his glory is abo.ve the earth and heaven. Thy name, 0 Lord, endureth forever; and thy memorial throughout all generations. Bless the Lord, 0 my soul, and all that is within me bless his holy name.

*

*

*


ANOIEN:T AND ACCEPTED RITE.

I

0 Lord, our Lord, how excellent is thy name in aU the earth ! who hast set tlly glory above the heavens. Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strengLh because of thine enemies, that thou mig路htest still the enemy, and the avenger. When I consider the heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and stars which thou hast ordained: -what is man that thou art mindful of him, and the son of man that thou visitest him? For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honor. Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands ; thou hast put all things under his feet : all sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field : the fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas. 0 Lord, our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! Whoso draweth nigh to the contemplation of the Ineffltble myr;leries, let him put oft' the shoes of his worldly conversation and corrupt affeetions, for the place whereon he standeth is holy ground. May we ever remember to keep a watchful eye upon the feet of our affections. Before we approach the house of the Lord, let us seriously consider whether we have taken straight steps in the paths of his commandments, and whether our feet are set in due order, and cleansed according to the purifications of the Sanctuary .. Let us wash, as it were, in the laver of repentance. \Vash and makH you clean. Put away the evil of your doings. Acknowledge your iniquities, and return unto

i

I '


;~-------

-路--------~--------

15

SECRET l'r!.ASTER.

the Lord, he will haYe mercy upon you, and to our Elohim, he will abundantly pardon. Let us incite each other to practice Yirtue and shun Yice. While our feet are prepared for walking in the ways of his commandments, our hands should, in like manner, be prepared for working in his serYice. Saith the father of our ancient Jl.fost Potent Grand Master, "I will wash mine hands in innocency, and so will I compass thine altar." May he who beareth the keys of DaYid open a door of entrance to this our brother. FIRST CHARGE. MY B~tOTI!ER

:-You haYe hitherto seen only the thick veil which hides from your view the S.". S.". of God's Holy Temple. Your fidelity, zeal and constancy have won for you the favor, you are now about to receive, of viewing some of our treasures, and gaining admission into the Secret or Holy Place.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

,.

Set a watch, 0 Jehovah, before my mouth : guard thou the door of my lips.

*


16

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

Freemasonry is a system of morals, and in the primitive ages was identical with pure religion. Inef路 fable Masonry is practiced with an eye to the improvement of morals, and a reference to those sublime truths which constituted the essence of religion in the earlier ages of the world. It rises high among human institutions, and forms a beautiful auxiliary to the practice of religion. In no place, except the Gospel, are the moral and social virtues enforced by such awful decrees and sanctions. The Grades upon which you are no路w entering, are called Inejj'able, because they treat of the Ineffable name of the Great Jehovah, and * * * *

Freemasonry is an art of great compass and extent. A knowledge of its mysteries is not attained at once, but by degrees only. Advances are made, only by much instruction and assiduous application. Each step-is progressive, and opens new light and information. According to the progress we make, we limit or


~ I' ,1,

l

17

SECRET >!ASTER.

extend our inquiries, and in proportJon to our capacities, attain a greater or less degree of perfection. Freemasonry is an allegorical system. Every doctrine and ceremony has its mystical reference, which is not always apparen(, at first blush. So that where the uninformed and weak find only child's play, the initiate and the thoughtful possess food for the employment of the noblest faculties. 'l'he true Mason will not rest content with mere cerenwnies, which, in themselves, are poor and wort11less, but will study to comprehend their mystic meaning. We retain and continue to practice them, because we believe that signs and sym~ bols work closer into our hearts than mere words.

*

""'

*

*

FIN .AL CHARGE. MY BROTHER :-I receive you as a Secret Master, and give you rank among the Levites. * * * The Laarel, an emblem of victory, denotes the conquest you ought to gain over your own passions. The Olive, a symbol of peace, refers to that peace, which should ever reign among us. 路with wisdom, strength and prudence, may you soon ues.erve the favor of an entrance into the Secret vault. It will be your own fault, if you are not found worthy, and do not, in due time arrive at the sacred place, where, rapt in divine joy, yon may contemplate the pillar of beauly. I deeorate you, my bro(,her, with a white and black ribbon, an emblem of innocence, :fideliLy and prudence. 2


18

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE;

On the key, you observe a symbol, which teaches you to keep a tongue of good report, and is an emblem of Silence, and refers to the Silence which should distinguish Secret Masters. The white apNn and gloves are emblems of pu1·ity, and marks of the candor of Secret Masters.

*

*

*

*

*

*

By the rank you now hold among the Levites, in the quality of Secret Master, you have become one of the guardians of the S. •• S. •• and' I place you in the number of Seven. The eye upon your apron, is to 1·emind you to keep a watchful eye upon the Sacred Treasures you are set to guard, and over the moral conduct of the Craft in general. Remember, too, that the eye of the Lord is on them that fear him.

1:::::::=:============.1.


PERFECT MASTER. THE FIFTH

GRADE OF THE ANC!ENT AND .ACCEPTED l!ITE, .AND l'HE SECOND OF THE INEFFABLE SERIES.

INTRODUCTION. "This grade was originally established as a grateful tribute of respect to the memory of a departed worthy brother." Its ritual and lectures furnish many interesting details of the mode of his interment, and the honors paid .to his memory. The ceremonies are gloomy and funereal, and well calculated to :fill the mind with solemn thoughts. In this grade are held the Lodge of Sorrow, and are performed the funeral ceremonies of any brother of the Sublime degrees. 'l'here is a lengthy esoteric history belonging to this grade.

DECORATIONS OF THE LODGE. The Lodge is hung with green tapestry, on eight white columns,- four on each siue, at equal dista.uces. His illuminated by sixteen lights, four in each cardinal point."' There must be two pyt'J).mids, one in the N. ·. and one in the S. ·.-on the latter, the blazing star; on the former, the jewel of the grade.

TITLES. The Master represents the noble Adoniram, Grand Inspector of King S. ·.; he is styled Right Worshipful and Respectable ; is clothed as a Prince of Jerusalem (16th grade), if he hns arrived at that distinction; otherwise as a G.·. E.·. P. •• & S. •• Mason (14th grade). There is only one Warden,- seated in theW.·.; he represents Stolkyn, and is st.yled Grand Inspector. He wears a black robe and cap, together with the order and jewel of the gt·ade. The third officer represents Zerbal, Captain of King Solomon's Guards; he is styled Master of Ceremonies. *The French say, sixty·four,-slxteen in e&eh comer of the Lodge. 119)


20

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

BATTERY.

I

SYMBOLIC AGE. One year at opening and seven at closing,-together, eight years. HOURS OF WORK. Open at four, close at close of day or

evening.<~~

DRESS. Black robe and cap: white gloves, and white apron with green flap ; on the npron is paintetl, or embroidered, three concentric circles, within which is a cubic stone, with the letter J. ·. npon it. 'l'he orJer of the gmtle is of a watered green eolor,ttt the end of which i~ suspended the Jewel,-a compass, open at the segment of a graduated circle, nt au ttngle of sixty degrees.

MORAL. That we should learn to pay due respect to the memory of a deceased worthy brother.

RECEPTION.

Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say, I have no pleasure in them : while the sun, or the light, or the moon, or the stars be not darkened, nor the clouds return after the rain : In the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the· *The French say, and more correctly, open nt one and close at seven.


21

PEHFEOT 1I.A.STER.

grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened, and the doors shall be shut in the streets, when the sound of the grinding is low, and he shall rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall be brought ]ow : also when they shall be afraid of that which is high and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail :-because man goeth to his long l10me, and the mourners go about the streets; or ever the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the pitcher be broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistern. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was, and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. Vanity of vanities, all is vanity.

*

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['·-

*

*

*

*

*

The following ode, originally written upon the occasion of the funeral of Bro. ·wm. St. Clair, of Roslyn, last hereditary Grand Master of Scotland, in the year 1778, is often used in this grade ; ,_

~----·---~·-·

·-----·-·- ..

"

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22

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

DIRGE. (Air, "Greenville.")

Come, ye sighing sons of sorrow, View with me your brother's tomb: Learn from it your fate : to-morrow, Death, perhaps, may seal your doom. Sad and solemn flow our numbers, While disconsolate we mourn The loss .of him who sweetly slumbers, Mouldering 'neath tl1e silent urn. May we all, his hope possessing, Triumphant leave the Lodge below, Crowned with every earthly blessing, Far removed from pain and woe. Once, when full of life, he never Proved unfaithful to our laws: May we, like him, be zealous ever, To promote the glorious cause. To the exalted power .Almighty, Softly breathe an ardent prayer, On his sacred mound tread lightly, While we wipe the falling tear.


INTIMATE SECRETARY.* '.I'EI:S: SIXTH

Gl!.AD:S: OF THE ANOI:S:NT AND AOCEl'Titl> l!.ITE, .AND THill TUln.D OF THE INEFFABLE SEltlES.

INTRODUCTION. This grade is purely historical, and is founded on an event which took place shortly at't.erthe completion of the Temple. It is not necessarily connected with either of the grades that prll-' cede or follow it. The ceremony of introduction is lively and exciting. The lecture contains out little s;rmbolic instruction; it is merely a recapitulation of the initia.t1on, and 8 history of the events upon which the grade is founded. DECORATIONS OF T:S:E LODGE. The Lodge re])resents the audience chamber of King Solomon's ])ala.ce, and is hung with black, strewed with tears. It is illumiuated by twenty-seven lights, divided into three clusters of nine each, E.路. w:. and S:. TITLES. There are three officers, S:. X::. I.'., :S:.'. X:. T:., and a Captsin of the Gusrds. In the reception, the first two officers only are present, seated in the E:., with 8 triangulAr table before them ; on it, a scroll and two cross swords. 'l'he brethren, 8S guards, are stationed in the adjoining apartment~ :BATTERY.

DRESS. S.'. and :S:.'. are clothed in long blue robes, with royal mantles of the same color, bordered with ermine, witl1 crowns on their heads. The brethren wear blnClk robes and oops, and the *This grade Ia also known as Master by Ollt'ioelq. (23)


24

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

order. Apron,-white, lined and borde1•ed with red, with a. scroll and golden triangle painted on it, and the letters A. P. P. in the c.oru<;•rs of the triangle. Order,-n red ribbon, with tl1e jewel of the g1~1de SUS}1ended from it. Jewe!,- a gold triaugle, with the letters .A. P. P. engraved on it. Gloves,-white, bordered with red. :MORAL. Tl1at we should be careful never to offend a brother by prying into his secrets, and the criminality of eavcsdropping. OH.ARGE. MY BROTHER : - I

receive you as an Intimate Secretary, on your promise to be as faithful to the Order into which you have now entered, as was that distinguished man whose place you are to supply. The Scarlet ribbon with which you are decorated, will bring to your remembrance the wounds which he received, and the blood which he shed, in the defense of his integrity. I trust that, like him, your fidelity will be proof against every trial, and that his Sword, with which I now invest you, will enable you to defend yourself against the illegal attacks of those who may endeavor to extort f1·om you any of those valuable secrets which I am now about to intrust to you.

*

*

*

*

HISTORY.

*

s:.

was under many obligations to H:., K.". T."., who lent him his best artists, and a large numl:>er of his Giblims, stone-cutters and sculptors, and of his setters, layers and builders. He also gave to K.". cedar and fir trees from Lebanon, and gold and stone from his quarries inTyre, to be used in the construe-

s:.

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25

II

INTIMATE SECRETARY.

i'

tion of the 'l'emple at Jerusalem; in return for which, agreed to give him 20,000 measures of wheat and ZO of pure oil, year by year, and also barley, wine and honey, and, upon the completion of the 'l'emple, twenty cities in the land of Galilee ; and there was peace between K:. I:. and H:. K:. and they made a league of friendship together. A year elapsed before the provisions of this league were complied with, on the part of S. •., and when H:. went to visit his newly-acquired territory, he found the lands poor, the people rude, and of bad morals; and that the keeping of it would be attended with more expense than profit. He, therefore, went in person to s: ., to complain of the deceit. ·when arrived, he made his entry through the guards, and went hastily to the king's apartment. His countenance was so expressive of anger, as he entered, that one of .'s favorites, named J: ., perceived it, and, apprehensive of the consequences, followed him to the door to listen. H.·. observed him, ran and seized him, and delivered him into .the custody of the guards. However, by the intercl;)ssion of s:. (who represented that J:. was, of all those about the Temple, most attached to him, and tl1at his int~ntions could not have been evil), H:. &greed to pardon him; and before they parted, they renewed their former friendship, and concluded a treaty of perpetual alliance, which was signed. by them, and to which J:. was Intimate Secretary.

s:.

s:.

'1': .,

s:

3

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,,=========== ====

PROVOST AND JUDGE.* THE SEVENTH GRADE OF TIIE ANCIENT .AND .ACOEP'rED RITE, .AND THE FOIJRTll Ob' 'XHE lKEl•'F .ABLI~ SERIES.

INTRODUCTION. Tms Grade was originnlly institut<?d by King S. ·. to aid in preserving peace and order, among the workmen er1gagcd in the erection of the Temple; it being the especial duty of a. Provost and Judge to settle difficulties and ditiputes that may arise among the brethren. DECORATIONS OF THE LODGE. The Lodge is hung with J"(•d. There are five lights,-{me in each of the four angles, and the fifth in the center.

TITLES. The Mustrr, RCat.ea in the E ... r<'prcRelltR Tito Zadoc, vrince of the Hnrodiud He is styled 'l'ln·icc lllu~tl'iouB. 'l'h~re nrc two Wardfm~,-they l'<'JH't''"•nt Atlonimm and Ahda his father. They arc seated in thu W. ·. and arc sl,ykd Illustrious Erothers. DRESS. All the brethren in black rohes and caps. Apron,-white, h·immed with red, with a pockd, in the center, with n r~d and white rosette; on the flttp, a key puiuto:cl or C'mbroidcrc•.l in gold. The Rocket iR intended to carry the plnns in, to he lttid out. on the l'restle-Boanl. Collnr,-red, frolll which is ~;us· pcnded tl1e Jcwd of the grade, 11 gold key. BATTERY.

J J J d_J *This Graac is nlsn knrJwn u.s Iri~h l'ftLster. t The :l,ti\10 c~icfs of the workmen (~laster Masons), were caiiC<l Harod!m.

( 26) ==··-::;··;;:;;·--;:;-=···:.:;"·:.;·-:;:-;:;·-::.:·;;;;·-:,:·;;;.·========·:.::~:::..:.:.:::...;....::.::.:..;:;.:::1


PROVOST AND JUDGE.

27

S Y M B 0 L I C .A. G E. Four times sixteen years.

HOURS OF WORK. Break of day, eight, two, and seven. MORAL OF THE GRADE. That we should render justice to all men. CHARGE.

Having fuU confidence, my Brother, in your zeal and devotion, I with pleasure receive you as a Provost and Judge, over the workmen of the Temple. It gives me joy, my Brother, thus to recompense your zeal and attachment to the institution of Masonry. Well assured of your prudence and discretion, we, without hesitation, intrust you with our most important secrets, and we doubt not that you will discharge all your duties in this Grade, as you have done in those you have already taken. You have now a twofold duty to perform,-as a Judge, to decide all matters of diftEâ&#x20AC;˘rence that may arise among your brethren, and as a ProYost, to rule over the worktnen of the Temple. Be impartial, just, and merciful.


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jl

I I I

INTENDANT OF THE BUILDING.* THE EIGHTH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, .AND THE FIFTH OF THE INEFFABLE SERIES.

!/ I

INTRODUCTION. As the former Grade was instituted to supply the loss of the Chief Builder, and the Grand Superintendant and administrator of justice in the Temple, so the object, of this was to proviue, in the plnce of the one principal Architect, n\·e others, to each of whom should be intrusted the care of coustructing enry thing that related to one departm<'nt of al"chitectuml labor. The Lecture contains much c:\balistical information on the subject of the Temple and its sacred contents.

DEC ORATIONS OF THE LODGE. The Lodge is hung with red, and lighted by twenty-seven lights (three times nine), distributed around the Lodge, nud five others iu the E. ·.t In the E.·. should be 11 brillitmt transparency, a luminous triangle, inclosing a circle, hnving ou its circumference the letters J. A. I. H., nnd in the center, the letters J. J. J.; also a blazing star with five bcams,-in the center, the letter J. TITLES. The Master represents KingS.·. and is styled Thrice Potent. The S. ·. W. ·. represents 'l'ito Zadoc, and is styled Thrice Illustrious Inspector. The J. ·. W. ·• represents Adoniram the son of Abda, and is styled Conductor. 'l'he candidate represents J. ·.

DRESS. The Thrice Potent is clothed in royo.l robes, with crown and scepter ; the brethren, in black robes and caps. The apron is white, lined with red, and bordered with green ; in the

I

* This Grade is also called Mnster in Israel. t The French rituals sn.y ,-Twenty-seven li~hts, in three grnups,-five llgl1ts in f!'ont of the J.". W.".; seven in fl'ont of the S.". w:.; and fifteen in front of the presiding officer in the E.·. This is probably correct. (28)

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INTENDANT OF THE BUILDING.

--~--1 29

center a ~tar of nine points, ancl below, a balance, and a sprig of acacia on the top of the fulcrum ; on the flap, a triangle with the letters B. A. J. plnccd in the three anglc•s. The Order, a broad red ribhon, from which is suspend<ld the Jewel of the Grade, oL o·old tri:tngle, wit,h the Hebrew words Ben-chorim, Achard, Jachintti, or their initinls, engravc•d on one side, and the letters J .•J. J. in the center. On the reverse, Juda, Jah and the lettel' G iu the center.*

) 1

i

BATTERY.

SYMBOLIC AGE. Three times nine years.

HOURS OF WORK. From break of day, till seven in the evening.

MORAL. Th!tt we should apply ourselvt;s with zeal and energy to whatever work mtty be llllotted us m the Temple, l'cmeruburing that the Lord UretLtor suwth.

RECEPTION. I will restore tl1y Judges, as at the iirst, and thy counsellors as at tlle beginning. 'l'he light of the righteous shall be establislJed, for the Lord giveth wisdom; out of his mouth cometh understanding and knowledge. '!'hen shalt thou understand righteousness and judgment and equity, yea every good path.

*

*

*

*

*Mackey sn.ys the wordH Juilen., Ki, .Te~, are engrn.ved on the reverse slcle; nwst of the ritua.1s in the ~nrtlwrn juris.dictiun hH.ve only the: lt~tter 0 on tho

'"verse, !Lntl only the luitinls ll. A••r. "" the !lrst side. But the French rituals, which arc generally correct, give as above, leaving uf! the letters J. J J.

I L-- ~ .... -·-· - ----------··

'.·\

- ~ - ·----·~---· _._J


lso

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

HISTORICAL CHARGE.

I

I 1

j

I

KingS."., d.,i<·nu• of ""ying to tho high"t '"'"' of perfection the work he had begun in Jerusalem, found it necessary, in consequence of being deprived of the services of our illustrious chief builder, under circumstances with which you are already acquainted, to employ five Chiefs or Superintendants of the architectural departments ; and he gave the command over them to Tito Zadoc, Adoniram, and Abda his father; being well assured that their zeal and abilities would be exerted to the utmost, in bringing to perfection so glorious a work.· In like manner, we expect you to do all in your power to promote the grand design of Masonry.


--1

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:MASTER ELECT OF NINE.* 1

TilE N!NTII

an,\ DE

OF

'riTE ANC!E:-I"C AN"Il

ACCEPTED lUTE, .AND

'l'llE S!X1'Il 01!' 'l'UJ; llilWFAllLE SEitrES.

INTRODUC'l'ION. Tms is an important and interesting Grade. In it. is detailed the mcHle in whieh eertaia craftsmen, who h:ul, juRt bd'ol"<' the completion of the 'l'emplt.•, been engaged in an (;xecmble d~ed of villainy, t'i!eei1·ed th<"il' punisllluent. The assmuoly of Masters Elect of Niue, is c:tlled a Chnpter.

DECORATIONS OF THE CH.A.PTER.t The Chapter represents the audience chamber of KingS.·., nnd is hung wit.h n•d ILIHl white lmngim;s,-the red with tlauws. t 'l'here ureuine lights,- eight iu one group, antl the other by it~clf.

TITLES. The Master repres<"nt.s S. ·., an<l is f\tyletl Most. Potent.. 9 Ther•• is ouly one \Varden, ''"at.tl<l in tlw W. ·.,who rcpreHtmts Stulkyn,ll with seven bn•tlmm nrounu hiru. l:lll is at.yled Inspector.

DRESS. TheM. P. in royal robes; the InRpcct,or and bret.hr<>n ttll in black robei! and caps, or with their hat.~ flapped. A.prou,*Mackey cnlle the

~ra<!P,

l:h,ctecl Kni(}lttR or :"ine. All the }'reuch •·itu:tls

whil'h I ha.ve cnwmlterl l-la~r, !\la~tel" }~led (Jf :\'iu~~. '£he rituals in the Nm·th· £!ru,iurh!!lit'tion say, u .Elect of Nine" ouly. l thiulc. Mastet• E.\ of Niue, is the (:orre~~t l!S.lne.

t 'rhe

}'renl."h rituals

sny, hlaclc

hnn~in~s,

\\1th flames, on coJunm.s at

equal dlstauct.ll!; the cQlttumH n.lteruatdy t·ed lLml white. t Mn.t~kt~y H:tys, it rll'pn:~eut:; the priVlLle apartments of Solomon. Thn Jlrcueh tillY~ it reprei:Wut.~ au npartmcut in ~olvnwn's l)~Llu.ce. I huve fullowcU the rltnal of the ~ol·thcrn,im·i~dietiou. \l :\Ia{'kl'y sn.;\r~, he iK Kt,ylt!tl, Thrice l'niR<:iant. The FreJI(~h stty, ".Mcmt Sovt~l·cigu." The ritua.lt~ iu the X m1.hern j uril'ltlidion s:Ly u.s nhtJVe.

the

II

~laek•y Hays, n ~t.okiu." ~·rene!<, say, "'Stolkyn."

1'bo ritUJJ,l• or tile NorUlem juri•ulctlon, ll.nd (31)

i


2

I

I

.ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

hite, sprinkled with blood, lined and bordered 'vith black; on the f!:tp, a bloody urm, ho!fling a d:tgger; on the apron, a bloody arm, holding a bloody !wall by lhc hnie. Ordc•r,-tL wide black ribbon, crossing Uw bt·c•ttst from the left shoulder to the right hip, with nine rosettes nr;ar the extremity,- four in frot1t and four behind, aud one 11t th" bottmu, where th<.> .Juwd o~· the grade is suspcudcd,-a guld-handleu dagger, with a s1lver blaue.

I

BATTERY.

J J J J J J J J-J SYMBOLIC .AGE. Eight and one years accomplished.

HOURS OF WORK. From break of day till evening. i

MORAL OF THE GRADE. That we should be careful how we suffer onrsc•Jvcs to be led awny by nn excess of 2:Ca!, even in n good enuRe, to l'Xeeute 011 an individual the vengeance uue for the vioh•tiou of divine or lnmmnlaws.

, '

RECEPTION.

:

*

*

*

*

HISTORY.

*

*

After the tragic occurrence * * * * had taken place, the perpetrators of that crime having made their eseape, a great assembly of Masters, with K. •. S. •• at their head, was convened, to consult as to the best means of discovering and apprehending them. Their deliberations were interrupted by the entrance of a stranger, who demanded to _speak to the king in private. Upon being admitted, he acquainted Solomon .......•.

-- ·-··

I

i !


I

;~II

MASTER ELECT OF NINE.

that he bad discovered an individual, concealed in a cave near the coast of Joppa, answering the description · u:iven of one of the traitors who had fled from the I' Temple, and he offered to conduct those whom the II king should select, to the place of his concealment. [j This being- communicated to the Masters, they one aud : all eagerly requested to be made partakers in the ven1 i geance due to the villain. Solomon checked their j] ardor, declaring that only nine should undertake the 1r task; and, to avoid giving any offense, ordered all their f: names to be put into an urn, and that the first nine that I: should be drawn, should be the pet•sons to accompany I. the stranger.* j, At break of day, J:., s:., and seven others, conI' ducted by the strang·er, traveled onward, through a f! dreary country, towm·d the coast of Joppa. t On the ': way, J:. found means to learn from the stranger, that the villain they were in quest of had hidden himself in ' : a cavern not fa.r from the place where they then were; he soon found the cavern, and entered it alone, whet·e, by the light of the lamp, he discovered the villain asleep, with a poniard at his feet. Inflamed at the sight, and actuated by an impatient zeal, he immediately seized the poniard, and stabbed him, first in the I' head, and then in ·the heart. · 'l'he villain l1ad ouly time 1: r

.!

J

1

~

1

1

'

I :I I

!!

1

1:.

I __ 1

*Hence, the grade is Cllllct!, ){!lster Elect online. t Joppn., now called .lu..tra, i::1 situated nn th~ !\Il~liiterrancan SetL, thirty-two mill!~ N. ·w·. <)f .Jcru~Ja.k~m. Anciently. It was a scapurt uf cunsidct'ILhle importance ; hut now the harhor iH so choked up with saud. Umt lt i~ tt.luwst unapproa.cha.ble hy n.ll exct_lpt smull coasting craft. J ~'PPM. is a name '~ fn.milin.r as household word~" to -every Mu.~W-u ; it figures, more or li.$8, in

:~:r:.:.:~_g,·au"s of the York lUte._____ -----· ------

'~

j !I!

-----~~---.J ---

j1


34:

.ANCIENT .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

to cry, "Vengeance is taken," and expired. When the other eight arrived, and had refreshed themselves at the spring, J:. severed the head fro~ the body, and taking it in one hand and his poniard in the other, he, with his brethren, returned to Jerusalem. Solomon was at first very much offended that J:. had put it out of his power to take vengeance himself, in presence of, and as a warning to, the rest of the workmen, to be faithful to their trust ; but, by proper intercession, was again reconciled. became highly ÂŁwored by Solomon, who conferred upon him and his eight companions the title of Masters Elect of Nine.

J:.

:1

I!


l

MASTER ELECT OF FIFTEEN.* TliE TENT!I GRADE 01<' TilE ANCII:NT AND ACCEPTED Till: SI>Vl>Nl'l! OF '£HE I:>"EIIF ABLE SEitlES.

lU:l'E, AND

i 1/

rl

INTRODUCTION.

il

Tms Grade very properly follows that of 1\fast'"r Elect of Nine, tts it giv1•s the continuation and conclusion of the history of the events commenced there, the arrest and punishment of the two other• criminotls for the atrocious crime they had committed, as relat<:d elsewhere. The assembly is styled a Chapter.

DECORATIONS OF 'l'HE CHAPTER. Thr Chapter r<'pr<'Scmts the Aw1ienee OhnmhC>r of King 8. ·., lmn~.(ing8.t It, iK lighted by fifwen lights,-fiv<~ in front of the 'L'hrit!c l!lus!rious .Mru,ter, and five in front of each of the Wurllcns.

and is hung with n•<l otnd whit•;

TITLES. The Ma.~t.er is ~tyled Thrice Illustrious; t.he Senior Warden, Inf!pcctor; ttnd the Junior Warden, Intrn<luctor. TlwN should not. he more than fiftt:('ll brethren present, :1t t!w rec••p· tim• of :l c:m •1idnt.e. If more attend, they ought to be stationed outside the Chapter.

DRESS. Apron,-wl1itx>, lined and hordPrcd with black; a suqnrc

city, rcpresentiug the city of J crusal~m painted on it, with

*

Mn.ck<•y ami tho ~·ronclo rituals sa;-, Il!u~tri<>u• F.toot of Firtoon ; tl>'-' ritun.lfi in the Northel·n juriHtlic•tiou sa:.-, ~In~tt•t· g1eet of l•'ifteen. 'rhe latter i~ j!'l':~U.c, whkh ~ny~, u 8olomun ch:cter;J

nwrl! in harmony with thtl hiHttiQ' uf the

fifteen l\la.sters, in wh"m he C(ntl<l place the

g'l't•at-e~t

confidence." &c.

tThe French rituals say, Black, sprinkled with re<l and white tea;rs

(35)


36

ANCIENT AND

~~CEP~~=-:~E~-- -~

three gates in pcr~pect.ive, over euch of which is represented a human head impaled on a spike.*' 1'he Order is tt black ribbon, worn from the left shoulder to the rig-ht hip; wht•re it crosse~ the breast, three heads impaled on Rpikes, ,u·e to be painted 01' embroidered. The Jewel is a golden poni:trd with a silve1• blade, worn suspended at the bottom of the Ot·dcr.

B.A.'l'TERY.

HOURS OF WORK. From five in the morning, till six in the evening.

MORAL OF THE GRADE. That the unerring eye of Justice will discover the guilty, and they suffer the punishment their crimes deserve.

HISTORY.

About six months after the execution of the traitor mentioned in the preceding Grade, Bengnbee, an intendant of Solomon, in the country of Oheth, which was tributary to him, caused diligent inquiry to be made, if any person had lately taken shelter in those parts, who might be supposed to have fled from Jerusalem. He publjshed, at the same time, a particular description of all those traitors who had made their escape; shortly after, he received information that *The rituals or the Northern jurisdiction, which I have consulted, say

'rcn1f)lt~ of Solonwn, with pinnacles or tow~rs, on the :fla.p, three spikes 'Mackey ::~nys, on the centm· are painted thl'ee heath;, impaled on spikes~ ftt'raug~ in a. tria.ngular fm·m. It must l1e ohvioul:l, to any ona who has carefully ~tudic~l the ritualH of this gnulc, that the apron dcsct•ibod above, I::1 tU.e mllst appropriate ; it con.·espoildS with the l.!'rcnch ritua.ls.

tl1e n.pl'on h(L:{ painted on it, tL repre:ientl\tion of the

t 1'he French say, ftve.

I

i

_____ ! ]


~=--MASTER 1

ELEctr OF

~EN.---------3-;-~

several persons answering his description had arrived

i there, and, believing themselves perfectly secure, had begun to work in the quarries of Bendaca. As soon as s:. was made acquainted with tllis circumstance, he .wrote to M:aacha, king of Oheth, to assist in apprehending them, and requested him to cause them to be delivered to persons to be appointed to secure them, and bring them to Jerusalem, to receive the punishment due to their crimes. then selected fifteen Masters, in whom he could place the highest confidence, among whom were those who had been in the cavern, and sent them in quest of the villains, and gave them an escort of troops. Five days were spf:nt in the search, when Zerbal, who bore Solomon's letter to King Maa.cha, and Eliham, discovered them cutting stone in the quarries; they immediately seized them, and bound them in chains. When they arrived at Jerusalem, they were imprisoned in the tower of Achizar, and the next morning, a punishment was inflicted on them adequate to their crimes.

I ~I

Ii

s:.

' I

'

I I

II I I

I


l I

SUBLIME KNIGHT ELECTED.*

II II

THE ELEVENTII GRAVE OF TIIE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED l!.lTE, AND THE EIGHTH OF Tf!E INEFFABLE SERIES,

il

INTRODUCTION. Tms Gmde wRS originally instituted by S. ' •• as a reward for the zeal and coust.nucy of the true and faithful craftsmen who were engaged in the construction of the T. 'l'he lecture explains tho duties of the S. K. E.; and the mystia 0-, which was composed ofF.', M.·. W. ·.and 0.'. The ceremonies, though brief, are highly intet·est.ing.

DECORATIONS.

!I ,I i II'I II

The Lodge is held in a place representing au antechamber in King S. ·. 's palace It is hung with red and white curtains, t and is illuminated by twelve lights.; The assembly is called a Chapter.

TITLES. The MaRter repreMnt.s S. '.; he is styled Thrice Potent. Instead of Wardens, there is a Grand Inspector and Master oi Ceremonies.

DRESS. Brethren clothed as in t.hc preceding grade, with the Or<Ier,a black ribbon, worn from the left shoulder to the right, hip ; on the Ord\'r are embroidered three inflamed hearts ; nud at the end is sus'l!ended the Jewel,- a. golden dugger, with a silver blade, wlueh the ritual symbolizes as tl1e Sword of Justice.

* Tl1is grade is also known by the name; " Chief of the Twel vc Tribes." t The l'rench suy, hung with black curtains, spri11kled with inflamed hearts. t The French say, twenty-five llt::ht.•; ~lackey says, twenty·fmu-. Twelve appearS to be mOI'C ia COil.eOIW.nCe With the S)'IDOOiiSIU Of the grude,

··----~-------

I

_________.]


SUBLIME KNIGHT ELECTED.

--,

39

I

The apron is white, lined and bordered with black; on it o.n inflamed heart.*

BATTERY. Twelve eoual knoeks.

HOURS OF WORK. From twelve o'clock till dawn.

MORAL. Thnt the true and faithful brother will sooner or later receive his just reward.

HISTORY.

1

King S.•• instituted this Grade to reward the Mas~ ters Elect of Fifteen, for their zeal and devotion, and for the very valuable services they had rendered him in the erection of the 'l'emple, and for theit· activity and energy in the apprehension of * * * * ; and also to make room for the promotion of other brethren whom he wished to rewax·d with the g1-ade of Elect of Fifteen. He selected twelve of the most worthy and talented from the Masters Elect of Fifteen. 'l'o them he gave command over the work of the 'l'welve Tribes. He expressed a particular regard for them, and for their sublime Order, and showed them many precious things in the Tabernacle. On them devolved the great and holy duty of completing to perfection the work their Grand Master had commenced. By partaking of the

II

m~:::F:~:ay~::e:c :::I::f t:::~:::::oo::t, ::::: a

1

I

1 ::

cross. ln Bllme

Lod~es,

lnstou.d of this, tbey ha.ve, on the I>oeket, a poniard

su!Toundc'<i by nl.ne t!amea

L----·-··---··-··-···-··-----···-··-·-···-··---··--·--_J


40

.A.NCmNT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

footsteps, and carry on the great work of perfection, or, like him, taste the bitter cup of death.* He called them by the Hebrew name, * * * * *, signifying a true man on all occasions, and referring to the qualities of :fidelity and truth, which they had ever pre-eminently displayed in their conduct. t

* This, with the two preceding grades, composes what a.re called the Elu Grades, which form a. part of nea.rly all the Rites, and allude to the arrest aud punishment of the guilty F C. In the York Rite the" Elu" is embodied in the Masters' grade. t The rituals give the names of the first S. •• X.·. E.·.; but the Hebrew has been so much corrupted by ignorant tl-anscribers, that we will not attempt to repeat them.

***

'


GRAND MASTER ARCHITECT. THE

TW~:LFTH

GltADE 0~' Till~ A:-iG!F:XT AND ACCEPTED lt!TE, AND THE NI.N'l'H Olt TUl~ l:Nh:Fll' AlH... I\. SEIUE8.

INTRODUC'l'ION. "'l'his is, skictly speaking, a Scientific degr•cc, and much resembles, in this respect, tlw Second, or• Fellow-Or·:1ft, degr•·e of the York Rite. In it. the principles of architecture•, am! t;he comwction of the liber·al arts nnJ sciences with Masonry, :we unfolded, and the lecture cmbr·aces a Sl'l'ics of instru<'t.ion~ well calculated to interest the neophyte."" 'l'hc cr1ndidate for admission is subjcclN! to a rigid exrnniB:ttion, as to hiR skill and !wofici~ncy in architecture (nmsoury), and is requit·ed t<) proc uee evi•l••uce that he h quulifiNI, intellectually nnrl momlly, to be admitted nmong the G.·. M. ·.A.·., and e11gage in building the great mot•al edifice. ·

DECORATIONS. asRcmhl~· is call('d a. Ohnptm'. It ig <lccorated with white lumgingH, ~prinklc••l with !'!'d tl:uues, emblt.•matic of the pnrit.y

The

of hc•art

whil'h shoulil h<' the ehnraetm·ist.ies of "v<·ry TJH, :five• ord<•rs of tLr<lhit<•dure should be delineated in tlw Ch:1pt.er, t.ogc•t.lwt• with a r<>pt•esentation of the

n. ·.

tllld Zl'tLl

M. ·. A.·.

North st.ar in the nort.h, aml seven wmll st.Lrs snrrouuding it. This signifies that, M the North star i~ a Rure guide to mariners, so should virtue be the guiding stflr of every G.·. M. •• A.·. 'l'ITLES. The Mast{•r, seated in the E.·., n•prt1H<mts King S. ·.;he is st.yled Most Potent. t 1'he S.'. W. · ., iu theW., i"' called Grand Inspector.

DRESS.

,I

The brethren are clothed, us in the preceding g-radP, with the Order, Jewel and apron of G.·. M. ·. A.·. The Order is, a ~

:MMkey's Monitm·.

t Mackey says, " Thdce Pu!slltl.nt Grand Master."

4

( 41)


~-42 I III 1

.ANCIENT .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

ston.a-colm·ed ribbon, worn from the left shoulder to the right hip, and the Jewel is susp<mued from the end of it. ,lewd,- a gold medal, with the five ord<•rs of architecture, a star nnJ a case of mathemat.ical instruments delim~1ted on both Hides. The npmn is of stone color, with a pocket iu tho center, and ou the flap a star.*

I

BATTERY.

il

II

HOURS OF WORK. Open on the day when Solomon commenced the lmilding of the Temple; close on the day the T<Jmple was oomplcted.

II

!II

MORAL. Thnt virtue is as necessnry as talents to every G.'. ~I:. A:.

I

RECEPTION.

*

*

*

*

*

CHARGE.

11£y DEAR BROTHER:- By practicing the many valuable lessons you have learned in the preceding- grades, and the study of Geometry, and by making virtue your guide through the journey of life, we hope and tmst that you will be fitted for * * * * * * * * * *, and gain admission to the secret place, where you may rest from your labors, and, with joy unspeakable, contemplate the pt:Uar of beauty. * 3!ackey says, the

compass,

squart..~

apron is white, lined and bordered with black, with a a.nd rule painted thereon. The Frew.•h have the 8atne color,

but do not mention the compass, square and rule. I have followed the rituoJ of the N ot1hcm jm·isdiction. t 'rhc French reverse t!Jiij, and have two and one. They nd<l seven otter:~ (3an<l3 and 1=71

il

__________________ II


I

43

GRaND MaSTER .ARCHITECT.

HISTORY.

s:.

1L'lsonic tradition informs us that King established this Grade with a view to forming a School of Architecture, for the instruction of the craftsmen employed in the building of the 'r.路 ., and to animate them with a desire of aniving at perfection in the royal art. He was a prince equally renowned fot路 his justice, wisdom, and foresight; he therefore desired to reward the faithful and meritorious craftsmen ; so that, by perfection in the art, they might be better prepared to approach the 'rhrone of God. He, accordingly, for this purpose, cast his eyes upon the Grand Masters of the workmen- the Sublime Knights Elected -as persons properly qualified to assist him in preparing for the fulfillment of the promise made to Enoch, to Moses, and to David, that, in the fullness of time, God would dwell in a fixed 'l'emple, and that his name should be there.

IL


KNIGHT OF THE NINTH ARCH.* THE i'HlRTEENTH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED AND THE TENTH OF THE INEFFABLE Sli:R!ES

RITE,

INTRODUCTION. Tars iB an important and interesting Grnde in the Ineft"ttble Series. Matters that have only been obscurely hinted at nud darkly shadowed fot"th in the preceding gmd<!s, in this rapidly culminate towa1•d the developnwnt of the gmnd mystm·y of Masonry, fully explained in the sublime grade of Per~ection. 'rhe dark clouds and mists that have hit.het•to veiled the sact•cd mystel'ics, now begin to be dispelled, the glot•ious dawn- illumines the E.·. with its bright effulgence, and its rays peuetrnte into dark and hidden places. ·· 'J'his grade is closely connected with that which follows it, and forms a beautiful, sol!>mn, and impressive introductory to it. 'l'he Lecture is very full and of gr~;Jat interest.

DECORA.TIONS. The assembly is styled a Ohapter.t The Lodge represents the auditmce· chamber of King S. ·• ; is hung with t•cd and white hangings, and ilhuuinat~d by nine lil('hts (three E.·. three W. ·. and three S. ·• ). 'I' hero is al$0 tL second apartment; it represents "' "' "' ~< "' "' "' and is lighted by "'

*

*

"'

"'

TITLES. The Master, seated in t.hc E.·. under a canol>Y• represents S. ·. ; he is styled Thrice Potent Grand Master; 1s clothed in n *This grade Is also sometimes cnlled Knights of the Ninth, or Ro~'!Ll Arch; it Is also known as the " Uoyal arch of Solomon," to di•tiuguish it, •nys 1\Jnckey, from the "Holy Uoy~tl Arch" of the York lUte. ·'J.'he Ft•ench rituals simply c~tll It "'.Vho Royal Arch," and l think this is Its proper title, liB it covet•s all the others mentioned. lt is the same grade often caiietl the Royal Arch of Enoch, to distinguish It ft•om the Royal Arch of.•Tosbth, practice< I in It•eltmd, anti of Zet·uhlmhel, in .England an<l this country. It has nothing, however, in common with eit.her of those gnt.d.es.

L

tThe Frepch say, a. College, or Roya.l Lodge

(44)

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i

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KNIGII'r OF 'rfiE NINTH .A.Rilli.

45

yellow robe, over which he wears a royal mantle of blue so.tin; a crown iR npon l1is head, and n sceptm· in his hand ; he also we:trs the Order and jewel of the gmde. The second officer or Senior \V~tnlen, seated at the left of the T.'. P. ·. M. ·. repre~ento H.·. K. ·.of '1'. ·.clothed in a pm·ple robe, over whieh he wears n. yellow mantle, together with thl• Order ltnd jewel of tht~ grade; a crown is upon his hcnd, and a swm·d in his hand. ~'he thil'd·officer or Sen.·. G.·. 'Wttrtlen, seated in theW.·., is ~tyled Gr,tud Iuspectot·; he repl'eseuts G.·. clothed in a blue robe, :111d wearing the Order and jewel of the gmde, with a swm·d in his hand. ~'he Jun.·. G.·. W:ndcn, sciLted in the S. ·., represents S. •• The G.·. 'l'rcasurer, seated in the N. ·.,clothed like the Grand Inspector, repr~seuts J. ·. * All the other bret.hrc•u are clotheJ in blnck robes and caps, with the apron, Order and je\tel of the grnde. Order,-a ht·otHl purple riubon, worn from, the right shoulder to the left. hip ; to th<l end of which is suspended the jewd of the gmde, n golden trinngle, on which is engr1Wt>d the deltn of Euoeh with rnyR.t Apron,-purple silk, bordered with white, ou it u triangle.;: BATTJ~RY.

J *

'rbe '1!"1·eneh fUtY 1 "'Lc ~ra.ml trcm~rler porte au con un cordon blam·, auqnel e8t t-~ut'lrwnt.lne u.nc clt~f en or; stlt' JU' eurdon, sont pcintcs ou hrodP.~S les lcltres, 1.'. V.". 1.". 0.'. L.". <jUC I' ou expli<tUe nino! • .lm;en£ 'IJQI'{JZ<1li. in ore leou.-MJ." t Mackey •ays the j ewe! is a mctlnl of gold. On one si<le is a rcpl'esenta·

tion nf two peuplc tettiu~ dnwn a. thi\·11 throu.~h a. square hole, u.ml ~Lround the t•t1ge, the:~e letter::~: 41 lt. ~- R.n ..J. }}. S. 1. P. A. rr. S .. It. l1., A.~[. QHHS." 'l'hf.~Y m·e tht! initial!:! of the following st.mtcncc 1 u lte(lt~cznte 4..1.;a,pieuti81llmo ;:Ja.1nm.one, 0-,T- et S- lnt•t!nn•u,nt '{)reaoxiJl~i·tnu?tt Artrjz'<~ll<'ln t/~;i!Rttu~ rum HU0ter 1'1t.i.IUZH .Hno<..•h,, A1uw Jfwull ~9llii " On the reverse of the me(lal, is a. triangle K\llTiHl.lll.lt~d hy rays Qf the sun, and having th.t! llcbt·mv

lett•" 11 (Ill') in tho c"nter. 'fhe French say, u. gold trhtnglc or methLl, on one side of whkh is

en~r:LVcd n. trap door to nn. ~l.rch, awl on the rcvc~e, ~\ trin.n~le. I h:tvo folJowod the rituals of the Northe1·n jnriscli1..~tJon; but eitlJ.cr of tlle other dc8CI'iptions \VO\lld he more apprnprin.tl~ to the J.,!"l.'ade.

t ~lackey says the apron Is white, line<! with yellow, haVing on the a trhtugle. ~

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The French say,-11ve, by two and three.

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ANCIEN'l' .AND .ACCEPTED RI'l'E.

HOURS OF WORK. From sunrise, to sunset: * MORAL.

That difficulties and dangers, however great,, should not deter the true and faithful brother, from prugressiug onward toward P. ••

OPENING. 1. The Lord is great in Zion ; let all the earth praise him; for his great and terrible name; for it is Holy. 2. Exalt the Lord our God; and worship on his Holy hill: for the Lord our God is Holy. 3. He spake from the cloudy pillar, and from the fire ; and from the deep cometh forth the riches of secret places. 1. Exalt the Lord our God, for he is Holy, and ·his name, for it is from everlasting to everlasting. 2. What is man that he should magnify him, or that he should set his heart upon him? 3. We are but of yesterday, and know nothing; our days are but a shadow, they tlee and we know not. 1. Canst thou, by searching, find out God; canst t}wu find the Almighty to perfection? He is high as Heaven, what canst thou do? he is deeper than Hell, wl1at canst thou know ? 2. His eyes are upon the ways of man, and he seeth all his doings. 1. 0 God, let thy work appear unto thy servants, and thy glory unto the children of men. *The French say,-from evening until morning.


:KNIGII'r OF THE NINTH ARCH.

47'

2. Let the beauty of the Lord be upon us, and establish the work of our hands; 0 Jehovah, establish thou it. 3. I will sing unto the Lord as long as I live, I will sing praises to my God, while I have my being. 2. My meditations of him shall be sweet, I will be glad in the Lord. 1. Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright; for the end of that man is peace. For thus saith the Lord, Mine eyes shall be upon the perfect man. The perfect of the land shall dwell with me. They sl1all walk in my name and serve me forever. * * * * Let us give thanks unto the Lord, who hath given us the treasures of darkness, and the hidden riches of secret places. PRAYER.

Ahnighty and Sovereign Grand Architect of t11e Universe, who by thy power dost continually search and penetrate the most secret recesses of our hearts, draw us ne:ner to thee, we beseech thee, by the sacred :fire of thy love; and guide us, by thine unerring hand, in the path of virtue, and drive, far from us, all impiety and perverseness. May the mysterious inscription settle in our minds a true notion of thine unspeakable essence and power, and as we preserve the memorials of the revelation of thy holy name, so may we preserve the fear of thee, which is the beginning of all wisdom, deeply graven upon our hearts. We beseech thee that our thoughts may be engaged in the grand work of our perfection, which, when attained, -#in be a.n ample


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ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

reward for all our labors. May peace and charity link us together, in a pleasing union, and grant that this assembly may exhibit a faint resemblance to that happiness the redeemed will enjoy in thy kingdom forever. Give us a spirit to refuse the evil and to choose the good. May we not be led astz路ay by those who unworthily assume the title of G.路. E.路. May all our doings tend to thy glory and our advancement toward perfection. May a sweet perfume ascend from the altar of our hearts, and be acceptable to thee, 0 Jehovah, our Adonai. Bless us, 0 God, and prosper the work of our hands ; keep us through life, and accept us in death. .Amen. RECEPTION.

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49

KNIGHT OF THE NINTH ARCH.

HISTORY.

:Mv BROTHER.:-It is my intention at tlns time to explain to you some circumstances of very remote antiquity. Enoch, the son of Jared, was the sixth in descent from .Adam, and lived in tl1e fear and love of his Maker.

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Enoch, being inspired by the Mo10t High, and in commemoration of this wonderful vision, built a temple under ground, and dedicated the same to God. Methuselah, the son of Enoch, constructed the building without being acquainted with his father's motives. 'rhis happened in that' pat路t of the world which was afterward called the land of Canaan, and since known by the name of the Holy Land. Enoch caused a triangular plate of gold to be made, each side of which wa10 a cubit long ; he enriched it with the most precious stones, and incrusted路 the plate upon a stone of agate, of the same form. He then engraved upon it the ineffable characters, and placed it on a triangular pedestal of white mat路ble, which he deposited in the deepest arch. When Enoch's temple was completed, lte made a door of stone, and put a ring of iron therein, by which it might be occasionally raised ; and placed it over the opening of the arch, that the matters inclosed therein might be preserved from the universal destruction impending. .And none but Enoch knew of the treasure which the arches contained. And, behold, the wickedness of mankind increased more, and became gl'ievous in the sight of the Lord, and 5


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.ANmENT .AND ACOEPl'ED ruTE.

God threatened to destroy the whole world. Enoch, perceiving that the knowledge of the arts was likely to be lost in the general destruction, and being desirous of preserving the principles of the sciences for the post.erity of those whom God should be pleased to spare, built two great pillars on the top of the highest mountain, the one of brass, to withstand water, and the other of marble, to withstand fire; and he engraved on the marble pillar, hieroglyphics, signifying that there was a most precious treasure concealed in the arches under ground, which he had dedicated to God. And he engraved on the pillar of brass the principles of the liberal arts, particularly of Geometry or Masonry.

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'rhe flood took place in the year of the world 1656, and destroyed most of the superb monuments of antiquity. The marble pillar of Enoch fell in the general destruction; but, by divine permission, the pill:w of brass withstood the water, by which means the ancient state of the liberal arts, and particularly Masonry, h:ts been handed down to us. * * * * * Solomon being the wisest of princes, had fully in remembrance the promise of God, that he would dwell in a fixed temple made with hands, and that his name should be there. Accordingly, Solomon began to build, in tl1e ~Oltrth yell.r of his reign, agreeably to a plan given to him by David, his father. He chose a spot for this pU1:pose, tl1e most beautiful and healthy in all Jerusalem. * * * *

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PERFECTION, OR,

GRAND ELECT PERFECT AND SUBLIME MASON. 'rUE FOURTTmNTfr GRADE 01•' Tl!E ANCIENT AND ACCEl'TED RITE, AND TliE ELll:VENTil, A;)(D L.\S'l', OF 'filE l:Sll:~'b'ABLE SERIES.*

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IN'l'RODUCTION.

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TI!Is Grade completes the Ineffable Series, and may, with great propriety be cnlled the lnst and higlwst, gr•ade of the Masonry of the first Temple. It is the per·feet poiut of ancient .Masonry; in it is fully devdop:·d the gmnd myst~ry. '!'his gmde em•r.:•~ponds with the last or highe;;t gmde of all the gr:tntl mystel'i<'S of antiquity, nnd its j'OSS\'S~ors are ~uppnsed to he perfect in their doct.l'im•s aud sym )l)lisru, aud qtmliticd to be teach<•rs aud r·ul•·r~ of 1ht~ir h•ss infurme<l bt·ethren. The cerenHH1ie8 are sublimely g'I':tud autl iruptlsing, and :u·e (llllcttlnkd to g-h·c us exa.It.{~d vft.~W~ of the grnw.hnn\ 1~owt•r, and nH\i{ :-it"V ,,f (Jo(.L 'J'Iw lt•(•,ture :tml histm-y (A' th<: gm<l<' i~ rich t;,>.]ll'ofn:,ion with vnluu.ble mtd inkrestiug· mnUt•r rdntiug- to th<J f\yruboli~m nnd instruction conl<tined iu all the prec~ding grade~ of ::lymlJolic and Indl:i.tblc llfasomy.

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DECORATIONS. The Lodge should r<'prcsent a subtl'rraneau vault, painted red, or hung with red h:utgingR. In theW.·., u JHII't. of};,·. pillar, consiRti ng of piect•s found among the ancient ruin~. In theE.·., t.ht· pillm· uf B.·., the 13.·. H.·., aud a tmnsparcut D.·., or triangl••, with the Hebrew lctta•s, "JOD-ln:-YAU-HE," in8er•ilwd thct'<'irt. '!'he Lo<lge is illnminate.l, wlwn not at work, by the B.". B."., :mtl wlwn nt work, by twentv-four lights, diott"iLHlted !18 follow$: thrc" in the K."., ih•,• in tfw S."., seven in theW."., atlll niue in t.he E.". The furniture e(ln~ists vf the Holy Bible, s<pwt'<', compussN\, and tl'iang-lu, t.he altnr of Incense, nl!Jw vf S,te.nfice, table ofSh~w Eread, lmtzen Ln.wr, Ark of the Oovemmt,

* Tha li"l•eneh Htyle thi!i grade. u Grt1.nll Et~OBSJ.Li~ de 1~ Youte Sa.crec do Jat•que:-~ VI, ott Orand Ecossais do- la Perfection, ou Ul'and Elu Ancien Mu.itre parfait et Sub!iUle Mut"On.'' (51


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ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

robles of tlu; Law, golden cnndl<?sticks, two bmzcn columns, golden urn of oil, goltlc·n vase, fillc•tl with water, golden goblet, filled with wine, gold ring aud trowel, n silver ho<l of oiHtment, and the cubic~tl stone. Before ench of the officers, is n white triaugultn· altar or stand. 'l'he asHemuly is called IL Gt•:tnd Lodl.(e of Ptorfcction.* It consists of twentv-sc•ven members only; if more join, enough must demit, or uecome honorary members, to reduce the number to that limit. TITLES.

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There are ten officers in n Grand Lodge of Perfection, viz: 1. 'l'he Thric.e Potent Grand :Mttster, representing King S.'., stationed in the E.·. ; he is the first officer of the Lodge, and presides over the work, and htts charge of the couf,m·iug of all the gr:tdes of the Ineffable SerieR. Official Jcwel,-o. crowned compass, with a bluziug sun· in the C<mter. 2. The Deputy Grand Master, who r~presents H.'., K.'. of '1'.". Station, on the right hand of_ K.'. S.'., in the E.'. He is the S<·eoud officer of the Lodge, and, in the absence of !he '1'.'. P:. G.'. M.'., presides overthework. Jewcl,-a crowned compass, with :t moon in the center. :3. The S:. G.'. Warden, who represents A.'., the son of A.'. Sttttiou, in theW.'. He is the third officer of the Lodge, ami, in the nl;s(•nee of the fir::;t two, he 11resides over tho work. Jewd,-a gold trowel. 4. The J:. G:. Wurdcn, who represents M.'. Station, in the S.'. He is the fourth officer of tlw Lodge, and, in the absence of the first thrl·e, he prt•Rides oven· the work. J<>wel,- a sword. 5. '!'he G.'. K.'. of the S(;:t]s, who rt']lresents G.'. Stttticm, on the left. of the s:. G:. W:., in theW:. Jewt•l, an ivory hy. His Jut.y is, to t.nk<O charge of the archives of the Lodge. 6. The Grand •rreas\ll'er, who represents G.·. SttLt.ion, in the N.'. Jt•wd,- a gold key. His duty is to take churge of the fun dB of the; Lodl-(e. 7. 1'he Grand Secretary, who represents J:. Sttttion, in the S.'. Jewel,-a gold pen. His duty is to keep a faithful rcconl of the proceedings of the Lodge. 8. '!'he Grand Ot~ttor, who reprc•sents A.'. St:ttion, in the S.'., between the J.'. W.'. and St!cretttry. Jewd,-a HCro\1. His duty is to make discourses in' illustmtion of the Order, tu inst.rnct new brethren, and explain to them the mysteries of Ineffable Masonry.

* The French call it a College. /1

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PERFECTION.

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9. The Grand Mast.er of Ceremonies, who represents S.'. Station, in theN.'., between the Trcasure1· and Oa.pt.Lin of the G.'. Jtnvel,-o. staff. His duty is to prepare and conduct cundit!at.es. 10. '!'he Grand Captain of the Guards, who represents Station, iu the N.'., between theM.'. of 0.'. and K.'. of the S.'. Jewel,-a spen1·. His duty is to see that the Guards are at their stations, and to provide for the accommodation of the members and visiting brethren. Beside these officers, who are elected annually, the T.'. P.'. G.'. M.'., in Lodges of Perfection, in theN.'. jurisdiction of the U. S., appoints at each election, two others, viz : 11. 'l'he Hospitable Brother. Station, in the N.'., between the M.'. of C.'. and '1'.'. Jewel,-a winged rod. His duty is to visit the sick brethren, and see that they reco:ive du~ attention, and to take charge of the charity funds of the Lodge. 12. The Grand Tyler. Station, at the door of· entrance, Jewel,- a flaming sword. His duty is to guard the S.'. V: .• etc. The election of officerB takes place evPry year, on the third day of the month Adar. Beside thi~, Lodges of l'nrfcction are req uircd to obst•r\'e the St. .T ohn's days, :Luil to cd(•bru.tt•, on the tifth t!ay of October, unmutlly, the building of the first 'l'emple; and to observe the fifth day of the month Ab, in commemoration of the dcdicntJon of that Temple.

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DRESS . .All the officers and brethren are dressed as in the prect'ding grndc, except. they wear 1hc apron, Order. nud JoW!!l uf this grade ; the offiC(!I'S W<•nring t.lwir official .TI!wds. 'l'llC (~ollar worn by the offict•rs is a bro11d, whitll, wttt<.•rt•d !'ihbon, with n. white and r<'d 1'1sctt,~ at. tho h<ltt<lm, frllm which is suspended the officinl Jewel. All the brethren w~tlr swords. Apron,• of 11. tl'inngular form, black, lined with whit.(!, nnd border<!d with gold ltl(le; in the ceut.er, a golden Delta, with the Hebre\V 1'.,tmgrnmmaton engraved thereon,-" JOD-HE-VAU-nE." The girdle of u. Perfect Mason .is rnade of \'tlrious colored silk,

* All the 3pronR of the v~trious grailes of the Inc!fahle Series, 1\S worn In the Northc'l'n juris<lictlon (•md, ll!clicve, the Sllme slmpe prevnil• tbruughout th•• worl<l,) ll.I'C tl'iiiiii!Ulsr in form. In the Southerujm•h<diction, the aprnn of this Jn'llde is wbile, lKordered with re<l, with the .lewl'l nf the gr•t<lo emhroideretl or painted on the llap. 'J.'he h'rench hnve the "'1me culor for the apron ; on it is tmintcd or emhroidere<l 11 large, flat, squu.re stone, In tile center of which Is represented an iron ring, fastened to It,


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.ANCIENT .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

aiTanged in the followin~ combinations,-tltree, five, seven, nine. Order,- a flame-colored ribbon (wm·n as a collar,) with a white and red rosette at the bottom, from which is suspE-nded the J cnvel of the grade,- a golden cornpa~s, crowned, the points exteuded on the segment of a gradu~ted cit·cle to ninety degrees. Bet.ween the arms .of the comp•~ss 1s n medal, ot• plate, on one side of wl1ich is engmved a sun, on the other, a blazing: star, with the Delt:1. in the center. The figures 3, 5, 7, 9, at·e en· gt·aved at equal distances on the segment of a circle.

B.A.TTERY.

S Y M B 0 L I 0 .A. G E. Nine times nine years. •

HOURS OF WORK. From midday until midnight.

OPENING LESSON.

1. The Lord is in his Holy Temple, his eyes behold, his eyelids try the children of men. 2. Lord, who shall stand in thy presence, and who shall abide in thy Tabernacle? 1. He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, and speaketh the truth in his heax·t ; he that backbiteth not with his· tongue, nor doeth evil to his neighbor, but honoreth them that fear the Lord. 3. Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord, or who shall stand in his Holy place? 1. He that hath clean hands,. and a pure heart, wl1o

* The French say, seven times

seven years.

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J.>ERFECTION.

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hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity nor sworn deceitfully. . 2. He shall receive blessings from the Most High, II and righteousness from the God of his salvation. ! 3. Lift up your heads, 0 ye gates, and be ye lifted i l;lP• ye everlasting doors, and the King of Glory shall I come in. 2. Who is the King of Glo1·y ? , 1. The Lord, strong and mighty, the Lord of Hosts, our Adonai : He is the King of Glory. I 3. I will wash my hands in innocency, and so shall I encompass thine altar, 0 Jehovah. 2. As for me, I will walk in mine integrity; my foot standeth in the even place, and het·e will I bless the I Lord forever. 1. Keep thy tongue ft·om evil, and thy lips from speaking guile ; depart from evil, and do good; speak pence, and insure it. Thus saith the Lord of Hosts: amend your ways, and your doings, and I will cause you to dwell in this place forever. 2. Who can say, I have made my bands clean, I am pure from sin ? for there is not a just man on the earth, that doeth good and sinneth not ; no, not one. 1. But whoso confesseth ·his sins, and forsaketh them, shall l11we mercy. 3. They shall fear the name of the Lord, from the west, and his glory from the rising of the sun. I 1. From the rising of the sun, even to the going down of the same, my mune shall be great among the Gentiles. In every place incense shall be offered I

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.ANCIEN'r .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

unto my name, and a pure offering for my name shaH be great among the heathen, saith the Lord of Hosts. 2. Sing unto the Lord, raing praises unto his name, extol him that rideth in the Heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him. :3. He discovereth deep things, in the darkness; an..! bringeth to light from the shadows of death. I. Gather together unto him them that have made a covenant with him by sacrifice, and offer up to him a holy libation with a perfect heart. How excellent is tl1y loving-kindness, 0 God, therefore the children of men put their trus't under the shadow of thy wings. 0, continue thy loving-kindness unto them that know thy na1:9e, and thy righteousness, to the upright in heart; for with thee is the fountain of life, and in thy light shall we see light, which shinetl1 more and more to the perfect day. OPENING PR.A YER.-(S!i:E PAGE 47.) ODE. AIR.-" Indian Philosopher."

No Solar beam nor lunar ray, Illum'd the dark, the narrow way, That led me to the door. I found myself a Knight, and then, The sacred vault ,I entered in, By mystic numbers four. 'Twas there, impressed with holy awe, A gold engraven plate I saw. With dazzling splendor shine. c====·:-·--·----·-·-·

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PERFECTION.

To us, the grand elect alone, Its secret characters are knownIneffable, divine. 'ÂŁhis precious treasure, long concealed, Was by three worthy knights revealed, Where erst a 'l'EMPLE stood. Its ancient ruins they explored, And found the granci mysterious word Made known before the flood. Fulfilled was then the promise made, And Beauty's pilhr soon displayed The THEASVRE they had found. Their ancient zeal and piety, Their dangerous toil and constancy, \Vere with due honor crowned. Honors like those, we all shall prove, Who, joined in pure and social love, Perfection's work pursue ! May the sublime GRAND ARCHITECT, By his unerring LAWS direct The honored, chosen few. May aU, who Friendship's feast partake,

'ÂŁhe good pmsue, the bad forsake; And may each rite and sign, A llappy, lasting influence shed; 'J'he QuADRANT crowned, the OrL, the bread, 'fhe GOLDEN RING, the wine.

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Long as I live, this RING I 'Jl wear. Symbol of an alliance dear, To every brother's heart ; And bless the sacred tie that binds In virtue's chain ! for virtue joins What death can never part.

III.N... ,tltletlem lllll.s·.. ,tltltltle.l IIIII!J.w· •••m m .. , JJJ- JJJ- JJJin E.'., the great L.". RECEPTION.

1. The Lord is in his Holy Temple. His eyes behold, his eyelids try the children of men. 2. Lord, who shall abide in thy Tabernacle? I. He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness and speaketh the t!'uth in his heart. He that backbiteth not with his tongue, nor doeth evil to his neighbor. In whose eyes a vile person is contemned. But he honoreth them that fear the Lord. 3. He that sweareth not to his own hurt, and olutngeth not his oath, who sweareth not by the name of God profanely. 2. What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good? 1. Keep thy tongue from evil and thy lips ft·om speaking guile,-depart from evil and do good. Seek peace 1 and ensure it. Thus saith tl1e Lo1·d of HOsts,

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Amend your ways, and your doings, and I will cause you to dwell in this piMe forever, 2. Who can say, I have made my heart clean, I am pure from sin? For there is not a just man on the earth, that doeth good and sinneth not; no, not one. 1. But whoso confesseth his sins and forsaketh them, he shall have mercy, saith the Lord of Hosts. 3. Thus saith tl1e Lord, Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool. Where . is the house ye have builded unto me? For aU these things hath mine hands made. But to this man will I look, even • to him that is poor and of a contrite spirit, and that trembleth at my word. 1. From the rising of the sun even to tl1e going' down of the same, my name shall be great among the Gentiles ; and in every place, incense shall be om~red unto my name, and a pure offering for my name shall be great among the heathen, saith the Lord of Hosts.

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And Moses called all Israel, and said unto them, Hear, 0 Israel, the statutes and judgments which I speak in your ears this day, that ye may leat"ll them, and keep, and do them. The Lord our God made a covenant with us in Horeb. The Lord made not this covenant with our fathet·s, but with us, even us, who are all of us here alive this day. The Lord talked with you face to face in the mount, out of the midst of the . the fire, (I stood between the Lord and ycm at that time, to shew you the word of the Lord : fot· ye were afraid by reason of the fire, and went not up into the

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mount), saying, I am the Lord thy God, which brought 1ee out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage. 'rhou shalt have none other gods before me. â&#x20AC;˘ Thou sl1alt not make tl1ee any graven 1mage, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the waters beneath the earth: Thou shalt not bow down thyself unto them, nor serve them: for I the Lord tl1y God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me, and shewing mercy unto thous~nds of them that love me, and keep my commandments. ~'hou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain: for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain. Keep the sabbath day to sanctify it, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee. Six days thou shalt labor, and do all thy work; but the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy so11, nor thy daughter, nor thy man servant, nor thy maid servant, nor thine ox, nor thine ass, nor any of thy cattle, nor the stranger that is within thy gates; that thy man servant and thy maid servant may rest as well as thou. And remember that thou wast a servant in the land of Egypt, and that the Lord thy God brought thee ou~ thence through a mighty hand and by a stretched out arm: therefore the Lord thy God -commanded thee to keep the sabbath-day. Honor thy father and thy mother, as the Lord thy God hath commanded thee; that thy days may be pro-


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PERFECTION.

longed, and that it may go \Vell with thee, in tl1e land which the Lord thy God giveth thee. Thou shalt not kill. Neither shalt thou commit adultery. Neither shalt thou steal. Neither shalt thou bear false witness against thy neigl1bor. Neither shalt thou desit·e thy neighbor's wife, neither shalt thou covet thy neighbor's house, his field, or his man ser\·a.nt, or his maid servant, hi's ox, or his ass, or any thing that is thy neighbor's. 'l'hese words the Lord spake unto all your. assembly in the mount, out of the midst of the fire, of the cloud, and of the thick darkness, with a great voice ; and he added no more : and he wrote them in two tables of stone, and delivered them unto me.

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Before this altar of a bt·oken and contrite spirit., with the fire of l10ly zeal, dt,tg, by confession, your sins, and mortify them by hatred thet·eof. Ofrer them up in a renewed consecration, as a sacrifice acceptable and well pleasing unto God. :Mtty \Ve all offer up to him, on the altar of our l1eat•ts, sacrifices of humility and praise, with the fire of fervent chnrity. Let us ofter a sacrifice of joy in the tabernacle of the Lord, and sacrifice the sacrifice of thanksgiving. Wherefore, to do good and communicnte, let us forget not, for with such sacrifices is the Lord well pleased. PRAYER. I

Almighty and Sovereign Grand A.". of the U:., thou who ridest in the heavens by thy nam'!l JAH, let all the earth keep silence before thee : there is no


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earth beneath ; thou who keepest covenant with, and showest mercy unto thy servants that walk before thee with all their hearts. When we draw nigh thy Majesty, may we ever preserve thy love, and the characters of thy ineftable essence engraven indelibly upon our hearts. 0 purify our hearts, we beseech thee, by the :fire of thy love, and guide our feet in the way of peace, the perfect path that shineth more and more unto the perfect day. May we all l1ave an interest in that coYenant which is well ordered in all things and sure. May we dwell together in unity, and be all of one mind, having compassion one toward anot.het·, and loYe as brethren. Mny nil Elect Masons, like the Elect of God, put on chat·ity, which is the bond of perfection. May our loins be girt with the girdle of truth ; and, fina1ly, luwing been faithful in all our course, may we be brought to behold the light Ineffable, and be admitted into thac sact·ed place where the sun shall no more giYe light by day, neiLher for brightness shall the moon give light: but the Lord, our Adonai, shall be unto us an everlasting light, and out· God, our glory. Amen. I shall now, my brother, proceed to* * * * * *, in the hope that you may ever live in his adombl~~ presence, with a head disposed to contrive, a heart to feel, and a. hand to execute only those things, toward him and toward your fellow-c1·eatures, which are wellpleasing in his sight. Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity. It is like the precious ointment upon the head, which

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r:tn down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, tlu1.t went down to the skirts of his garments. Ointment and perfume rejoice the heart ; so doth the sweetness of a man's friend by hearty counsel. If he reprove me, it shall be an excellent oil. If thy brother be waxen old, and P<?Ol', and fallen into decay, thou shalt relieve him. Give of thy bread to feed the hungry, and of thy wine to cheer the sorrowful, and forget not to pour the oil of consolation into the wounds which sickness o1路 affliction may have rent in the bosom of thy fellow-traveler. By kindness and commiset路ation fail not to pour the balm of wine and of oil into the bleeding heart. Our labors of duty and love will soon be over. As the lightning writes its fiery path upon the dark cloud, and disnppea1路s, so the ra<Je of men, walking amid the surrounding shades, glitter for a moment, through the gloom, and vanish from our sight forever.

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ANCIEN'r AND -•I..CCEPTED RITE.

Lo! Nature g-uards our vestal fire,

"Which never, never cnn expire. "With hearts tlHtt never change or falter, \Ve here surround one common altar.

Helig·ion builds it, and a beam From Heaven's own throne, no fitful gleam, Wraps it iu flames, while, hand in hand, We round this blazing altar stand. Let us, as Elect Masons true, Virtue's eternal league renew. While celebrating friendship's feast, May love be our ever welcome guest. And now in adoration bow, 'ro him who hears and seals each vow. Glory to Gou who reigns above, And to our fellow-creatures, love.

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CHARGE. MY DEAl~ BROTHER-I now salute you as a G:. E.". P:. nnd 8.". M.".; anJ. with great pleasure decorate you with the Aymbuls of the grade. This collar, of flame color, is emblematic of ardent zeal, afl~etion and charity. The crown on your jewel, is a symbol of the Royal origin of the gmde. 'l'he compass, extended to ninety degrees, denotes the extensive knowledge of the G.". E.". 'l'he sun, in the center, that our actions should be as open as the full blaze of the noon-day sun, and our eharit.y as dirl'usi\·e as its bea.ms. This jewel, suspnmled on your breast, should remind you to be attentive to your duti\:s, and admonishes you ever to walk so as to adorn your station. I also invest. you with the girdle of a G.". E.". P.". and S.". M.". 'l'he girdle was.used of old to slr"ngthen the body, and to enable man to continue and persi:;;t in his hbors. It is, therefore, an emblem of activiLy, promptness and perseverance. 'l'he girdle was used to bind on the garments, and prevent them f1·om flying open, and discovering our nakedness, and is an emblem of e1utrity; to the obscrmnce of which virtue, you lHwe been laid under new obligations. 'l'he girdle was also used fot· ornament and beauty. LeL it be your enueann· to be adorned with, and rich in, those vii·tues which its various colors represent. 'l'lwse are arranged by three, five, seven, and nine. '!'he three, are blue, red, and yellow; by a due mix~ 6


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ture of which, the primitive colors are all formed. The five, consist of these three, and of green, and purple. 'fhe seven, of these five, with white, and black. And the nine, of these seven, and stone, aud flame color. ~'he bltte is an emblem of friendship and fidelity; the 1·ed, of zeal; and the yellow, which resembles gold, of wisdom, which, said the wisest of kings, is better than fine gold. The green is a beautiful emblem of hope: the purple, of dignity and majesty of conduct. Purple is a 'l'yrian color, and reminds us of the alliance between S. •• and H.·. , and that other alliance into which you have now entered. 'fhe white is an em· blem of innocence: the black, of modesty and serious· ness of demeanor. The next color is that of stone. As stone is distinguished for firmness and durability, so this color teaches us constancy and deci::;ion of character. And the flame color reminds us to cultivate ardent affection and charity. 'fhe various colors united, in t.his g·irdle, are expressive of that unity; and the olive interwoven, of tlmt peace which should liuk us together. As these colors shine in yout· girdle, so Jet the virtues they represenL shine in your heart. and life. Yottl' apron * * * * * * * What these colors symbolize, has already been explained to yott. Its form is believed to be the true form of the apron which was wom by the Perfect Masters, at the building of the Temple, and alludes to t.he triangle of Enoch, whidt adorus its center. * * * * * 'l'hus, my brother, by yout· meritorious and blameless

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conduct, constancy and integrity, you have attained the title of G;. E:. P:. and M:., which is the summit of Ancient Craft Masonry; and upon your anival to which, I sincerely congratulate you. I most earnestly recommend to you the strictest care and cir.cumspection in your walk through life, that the sublime mystedes of this grade be not profaned.

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HISTORY.

When the Temple was finished, the Masons employed in constructing that stately edifice, acquired immortal honor. Their 01·der became more unif01·mly established and regulated than it had been before. Their care in admitting ne\v members, brought it to a high degt·ee of respect ; as the merit of the candidate was the only thing they then paid attention to. With these principles instilled "into their minds, many of Lhe Grand Elect, left the Temple after its dedication, and dispersed themselves among the neighboring kingdoms, instt·ucting all who applied and were found worthy, in the sublime grades of AncieJ:!.t Craft Masonry. The Temple was finished in the yeat• of the world 3000. ! Thus far the wise king of Israel behaved worthy of !i himself, and gained universal admiration; but, in process of time, when he l1ad advanced in years, his un· dersta.nding became impaired; he grew deaf to the voice of the Lord, and became strang·ely irregular in his conduct. Proud of having erected an edifice to his Maker, and much intoxicated with his great power,

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he plunged into all manner of licentiousness and debauchery, and profaned the 'l'emple, by offering that incense to the idol Moloch, which only should have been offered to the living God. The Grand Elect and .Perfect :Masons saw this, and were sorely grieved; being fearful that his apostasy would end in some dreadful consequences, and perhaps bring upon them their enemies, whom Solomon had vainly and wantonly defied. The people, copying the follies and vices of their king, became proud and idolatrous, neglecting the true worship of God for that of idols. As an adequate punishment for this defection, after a succession of wicl,ed kings, God inspired the heart of NebuchadnezztH, kiug of Babylon, to take Yengeance on the kingdom of Judah. '!'his prince sent an army with Nebuzaradan, Captain of the Guards, who entered Judah with fire and sword, took and sacked the c.it.y of Jerusalem, razed its walls, and dcst.royod that supex·b model of f;xcellence, the 'remple. 'Ihe people we1·e carried captiYe to Babylon, and the conquerors carri€d with them all the vessels of gold and silver, &c. 'rhis happened 470 years, 6 months, and 10 days afler its dedication.

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---1 SECOND SERIES.-HISTORICAL GRADES KNIGHT OF THE

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OR SWORD.

TH:Ji1 FIFTEE:<I'TH GRADE OF TfiE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED ll.ITE, AND THE FIRST CONFJmRED IN A GlUND COUNCIL OF PRlNCES OF JERUSALEM. I

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INTRODUCTION. Tms Grade and the next are called Historical, because they are founded on certain historical events which took place nt, nun shortly afteJ•, the Babylonish Captivity. The object of instituting them appears t<> have been, to animate and encourage the ti"Utl Ma8on to be Zl'nlous and active in his duties, by pres~nt.ing, in a vet•y eff•!ctive and drnnint.ic manner, some illustrious t•xitmples of true Humility, Pntieucc, Truth, Wisdom, Chivalric Cnurage, and Dln·otjon, ns displ:~yed by our ancient brethr<m, and also to pr~sm·ve the renwmbrance of the events upon which the grades are founded. '!'he inRtruction in t.he k-ctnre contnins much histnt•icnl matter relative to the Bnbvlonish Cnpt.ivity, the return of the captives, and the building' of the second Temple, mHlet• the direction of ZeruhbtthPl, which is the si'eond em m Freem11sonry. In these grndes, tlw initi:tte uppears in a double eap~~eit.y,ns crnftsman :md \Varrioi',IUJd mnst constantly be 011 the alert, ready eithet• for work or :for combat. DECOR.A.TIONS. The nssembly is styled a Conncil, and is held in two apartments. The :fi.t•st iA ttie apartment of theE.·.; it should repreSl'llt a pnlnce, magnificently fit,ted up, in the ol'iental style, with watet•-gr<•en hangings, witlt tht'OIH\ canopy; etc., in the E.·.; 0\'(!l' t.lu>. throne, a snn. The sccoucl is called the apartment of theW.·., and reprc;sents the G.·. L. ·. of P. ·.,at Jc!'llsalem, nmitl the ruins of the T. ·.,with red hangil1gs, and should he d•·corntcd ILS in P. •. (14th grnde); it is illuminated by seventy lighr.s, in gl'oups of seven each.• This number is usually

* The Fl'<lncl1 say "Cbaque npartn1ent est e<•laire par solxa.nte·<llx luml· eres, divl•ecs en dlx gro11pes de sept. •• This is evidently incorrect. 1'he

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number of lights l>t'e symbolical of the number of years of tbe Captivity, and

are !Lj>propr!ate to the seconll apartment, !Jut not ·ro the :first.

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to twenty-~':e, in. group~ as follows, vi_z: thrll7 N. • ., e S .. , seven W .• , nJUe E .. , aud the D •. , makmg the enty-fifth.

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TITLES. In the first apartment., the officers arc: Cyrus (styled Sovereign), who presid"s; Sen:. and Jun.'. Gun(lrals, Grand :Master of the Palnce, Grand Master of Ceremonies, Mnster of Dispatches, Captain of the Guards, with guard, soldiers, etc., all nrmed with javelins or pikes. Cyrus, the G:. M.'. of the Palnce, and G:. M:. of D:. are clothed in rich robes,- the first with crown, scepter, etc.; all the other brethren in roues of red or yellow, with caps or turbans, having- suns embroidered on the front of th~m. Oyrus, the G.". M:. of P."., and the G:. M:. of Dispatches, each we:u a red o1· green Order, as a collar, around the neck, from t.he end o( which is suspe1Hled a golden sun. In the second apartment, the·pt·esiding officer, in the first part of the reception, represents Ananias; he is seated in theE:., and is styled Sov. ·. G:. Master; he is clothed as the other br<•thren. but wears o. et·own, and holds a gavel in his hand; his Jewel is three triangles, interlaced, susj)endcd from the end of the Order. In the second part of t 1e cer(~mony of l'eception, he rep1•esents Zernbbabel. '!'he s:. W.'. is in theW:., clothed as the other brethren; his J.;wcl is a squar<J, within three tl"iangles. The J:. w:. is in the S:.; his Jewel is o. level within tlm<O triangles. '!'here is tllso a G:. C:. of the G:., clotlwtl as the othe1• brethren, wearing the Order and .Tewcl of the grade. All the brethren wctn• green nmnt1es or cloaks, trimmed with red, nnd the Order and Jewel, and are at•med with swords; two crossswords are embroider,•d on the front of tlw sword belt. Ot•der,a broad, wntet·-green colo1·ed J•ibbon or sash, with n green ro~ette at the bottom, worn from the .right shoulder to the left hip.* Jewel,-the same as tluit of Grnnd Master Al·chit<lCt., with the addition of. two steel cross-swords on it, or suspended from it.t Apron,-whit<l, lined nnd bordel'<>d with green, two crossswords painted or em b1•oidered on the flup ; on the apron, three links of n chain, the links of a triangular form, and L"'low them

* The Enp:lish rituals of this grade are much confused as· to the Order. apron, 11nd .Jewel. I have followed the ritu•>l of the N.·. jurisdiction, ns I found it. The ~·.-ench say, the Order is water·!\'l'een, with human bones, skeletons' ~cads, crowns, n.uU whole n.ud lu-okcn swords on it i where it Cl"OSSes the b•·enst, n !>ridge, ru1d on the center of it, the letters L.·. D.·. P.·. (in Eng· lish, L.·. 0.·. P.·.)

t The French l'ituals merely have a sabre·sbaped sword.

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an arched bridge,- on tile center arch, the letters, L.'. 0.'. P.'.* l~anner of the Order,- of green silk, bonlet•ed with red; on it, a lion aml a wolf, the <Jtublems of the tribes of Judah and l.lenjalllin. BATTERY.

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SYMBOLIC AGE. Ten weeks of years.

HOURS OF WORK. From the end of the captivity, until the instant of the building of the second Ten1ple.

RECEPTION. The reception is long, and full of stirring scenes and exciting iuci<.lcnts.

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During a pa1·t of the ceremony of reception, the following Lesson is read, ol', when practicable, chanted:

Thou, 0 Lord, wilt save the afflicted people; and wilt level the high towers of pride. By thine aid, have I run through a troop of enemies; and by my God, have I leaped in safety over a wall. As for God, his way is perfect ; the word of the Lord is tried : he is a buckler to all those that trust in him. For who is God, save the Lord ? or who is a rock,1 save our God ? He teacheth me in war, so that a bow of steel is broken by mine arms. Thou hast also given me the shield of thy salvation, and thy right hand hath holden me up, and thy strength hath given me power. I have pursued mine enemies, and overtaken them ; neither did I tum again until they were consumed. I have wounded them, and they were not able to rise; they are fallen under my feet. For thou bast· girded me with strength unto the battle, thou hast subdued undet· me those that rose up against me. Therefore will I pt•aise the Lord forevermore. Amen. A.ftel' which, the following Psalm (cxx:xvii.) is chanted:

By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, wl1en we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willuws in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us aw!ty t:aptive required of us a song; and they that wasted us rt>quired of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion. How shall we sing the Lord's song in a slt~tnge land? If I forget

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thee, 0 Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning. If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy. Remember, 0 Lord, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem ; who said, Raze it. raze it, even to the foundation thereof. 0 daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us. Happy shall he be that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. DECREE.

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Cyrus the king, to Sysina and Sarabasan, sendeth Greeting. Be it known unto you, that I have given leave to all the Jews that are in my dominions, to return into their own country, and there to rebuild their capital city, with the Holy Temple at Jemsalem, in the same place, where it stood before. I have likewise sent my treasurer Mithridates, and Zerubbabel, the novemor of Judea, to superintend the building, and to see it raised sixty cubits upward from the ground, and as many ove~:; the walls to be three rows of polished stone, and one of the wood of the <:ountry, together with an altar for sacrifices; and all this to be done at my charge. It is my further pleasure that. they receive, entire to themselves, all the profits ancl revenues that were formerly enjoyed by their predecessors, and that they have an allowance paid them, of 205,500 drachmas, in 7


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consideration of beasts for sacrifices, wine, and oil ; and 2,500 measures of wheat, in lieu of fine flour, and all this to be raised upon the tribute of Samaria; . and the priests may offer up sacrifices according to the laws and ceremonies of Moses, and pray daily for the king and. the royal family, and for the welfare and路 happiness of the Persian empire ; and let no man presume to do any thing contrary to the tenor of this my royal will and proclamation, upon pain 路of forfeiting life and estate. HISTORY.

After the destruction of the Holy city and the Temple, by Nebuzaradan, he took all the prisoners whom he bad captured, and carried them away into captivity, in Babylon (B. C. 606), making his triumphal entrance into Babylon with an immense number of these unfortunates in chains, not excepting even the unhappy king, Zedekiah himself, who died three years later. '.rhe links of their chains were of a triangular shape. The conqueror ordered them to be thus made, in order more fully to insult the captive Jews, who, be knew, had a profound religious veneration and respect for the triangle or Delta. Great was the sorrow of the Masons, when they witnessed the destruction of the Temple, the grandest work of human hands, which had been directed by the G;. A;. himself. Their te~rs never ceased to flow until the day of their liberation,


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when tl1ey were permitted to build it anew, after the model of the former one. 'fhis grace, after ten weeks of years of captivity, was accorded to them by Cyrus, king of the East, a prince famous alike for his brilliant victories, and great humanity. This great conqueror, master of the eastern world, had a singular and remarkable vision; he appeared to hear a voice from the Heavens, directing him to give liberty to the captives. 'l'he prophet Daniel, who had become one of the favorites of the monarch, and arrived at honor and rank in his court, explained to him the tt路ue interpretation of the vision. Zerubbabel, a prince of the house of Judah, having gained admission to the presence of King Cyrus, demanded of him the freedom of his nation, and permission to return to Jel'Usalem and rebuild the Temple. 'l'he king graciously granted the request, and made restitution to him, of all the treasures which had been carried nway from the Holy Temple, by his predecessors; and honored Zerubbabel with the title of Knight of his Order, and directed that every facility and assistance should be afforded him and his compatriots; and issued a royal edict to that effect. Zerubbabel received from the Grand Treasurer all the riches of the 'remple, and took his departure, accompanied by his people, on the day which corresponds with the twenty-second of March. Zerubbltbel and his people proceeded without opposition or molestation, until they came to a part of their journey

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where it became necessary to cross the river Euphrates.* He caused a bridge to be constructed, of sufficient capacity f<w all of his followers to pass over ; but the people beyond the river, actuated by jealousy, leagued themselves together to dispute his passage ; they attacked Zerubbabel and his followers at the passage of the bridge. After a long and sanguinary conflict, the prince succeeded in gaining free passage for his followers. In the conflict, however, he lost the marks of honor, with which his illustrious liberator and benefactor, Cyrus, had decorated him. Armed with his good sword, which could not be taken from him but with his life, and aided by the brave Masons who followed, he succeeded in routing the enemy, who, by their flight, left to the returning captives an unmolested journey to Jerusalem. Ever since the destruction of the city, a number of the Jews who had escaped from the fury of the war and the rigors of the captivity, had been wandering, despised and miserable, nea1· the ruins which had once been the scene of their grandeur. Among them were several G:. E:. P:. and Masons, who had received a knowledge of the mysteries from their ancestors, and m\')t together secretly to mourn over the

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line, is about six hundred miles ; but the circuitous route which Zerubbltl>el took, made it much grco.ter.

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misfortunes of their brethren, and to practice the ceremonies of their Order. These zealous Masons sought among the rubbish and ruins for the entrance to the S. ·• V. •• which had not been discovered by the enemy at the destruction of the temple. Having found the entrance, they * * * * * * Animated with the hope of some day seeing their labors renewed, they continued to elect a chief to preside over their assemblies. Ananias who was, at the time of the return from captivity, at their head, received Zerubbabel into the body of the fraternity, among tl1e ruins of the 'remple, and declared him chief of the nation. He also advised him as to the rebuilding of the Temple.

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l PRINCE OF JERUSALEM. THE !IIX'l"EEN'l'!I GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITF:, AND THE SECOND AND LAST OF •.rrn: GRADl;:S CONFERRED IN A GRAND COUNCIL OF l'R.INCES OF JERUSALEM.

INTRODUCTION. Tnrs ma.y be called the second J.>Oint of the preceding grad~, as it is a continuation and conchtsiOn of the history commenced there. The two !frades are so clo~ely conneoted, by coiucidenee of design and spa·it, t>s to be 11lmost inseparable ; and but for the length of time reqnired to confer bot.h in one evening, they might be tmited. 'I' his is done in the French ot• Modern Rite, under the title of "Chevnlier de l'Orient.'' Forrnel'ly, Princes of Jerusalem were entitled to many privileges and pre1·ogatives, by virtue of th<>ir mnk. 'l'hey had exclusive control of Sublime Freemnsonry, from S.". M.". (4th grnde}to K.". of the E.". orSwot•d (15th gt•ade) inclusive. Grnnd Councils of P.'. of J.". granted churt€l"S to Lorlg..s of Perfection, ttnd also goverll(•d aud cont!•olled the Symbolic gmdes of the Scotch Rite, in all couutrics where th<!I"e was no !'<!gular Grand Lodge established. Accordin.,. to the Coustitutions of 1786 (Artiele vi.), it w11s provided, "'fhat tlte power of the Supreme Cmmeil ~hall not intc·rfN·e with any gra<le under the lith or Knight of the E.". and w:. At prese!lt, this power is exercised by the Supreme Councils of the 33d grauu. DECORATIONS. 'l'wo npartmcnts are used in tlte ccrt•mony of reception ; the first, called the Hall of tlte West, representing the Httll of Knights of the E.·. or S. ·. at Jerusnlem, hung with ILIII'<H"acolored hangings. The E.·. represents the iukriot• of the S. ·• S. ·• In the first part of the reception, a large curtttin or veil is stretched aeross, in ft·ont of the <'ntrauce to it; in the third ):;art. of the reception, this veil or curtain is drawn aside. 'l'he Sacred furniture is in its proper plttce, in the S. ·. S. ·• In front of the cut•tnin in the E.·. is a canopied throne, elevllt~d on five steps, covered wit,h aurora-colored cloth ; near it, a pedestal or table, covered with the same. or with gold ; on which is a SC<'pter, ~word, trowel, and sc11les. A balance, in equipois<l, held by a hand, is puinted on the pedestal. All the ( 78)


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'79

officers occupy small thrones covered with auroro-colored cloth. 'I' he hall is illuminated, in the third and last part of the reception, by twenty-five lights, distributed in gl'oups of five each. The second apartment represents a magnincent oriental palace, with such decorations as good tn~te and a knowledge of o1·iental <mstoms may suggest. It would be entirely appropriate, to have it decorated as the first apartment in the preeeujng grade. TITLES. The officers of a G.·. C.·. of P. •. of J. •. are nine, viz: l. The Most Equitable Sovereign Grond Master, representin"'

jewel,-a hand of Justice, and mallet. 2. The Gra11 d Priest; jewel,-a Circle surrounding a Delta. 3. The Enlightened S. ·. G.·. W. ·., representing S. ·. P. ·. of Je':el,-the Pi~lar o_f Str~ngth, and a. Shield; 4 .. The Enlightened J .. G .. W .. , representmg M .. P .. of B.·.; jewel,-a Compass resting on the segment of a circle. 5. The Valorous Grand Keeper of the Seals, representing- E.·. P. ·. of the L. ·.; jewel,-a Balance, in equipoise. 6. The'Valorous Grand Treasm·er, representing A.·. P. ·. of the T. ·.; jewel,-an oblong Square, and a V:tse. 7. The Valorous Grand M11~ter of Ceremonies, rer,resenting S. ·. P. ·. of the W. ·.; jewel,-a Trowel, and a llumb. 8. The Valorous G.·. M. ·. of the Entrances, representing- N. ·. 'P. ·• of the G.·.; jewel,a Halberd or Spear. 9. The Valorous Grand Tyler; jewel,-o. Flaming Sword. All the jewels are of gold, on square medals. The meetings are called 'conventions: the brethren, Valorous Pl'inces. A Gr:tnd Council of P. ·. of J. ·. can not be composed of lesii than five members ; and that number is a quorum for the transaction of business, or for work. Officers are elected annually, on the 20th day ot' the month Tebet (bt>ing the day of the return of the embassy from Babylon), and installed on the 23d day of Adar, which is the Grand Feast of the Order (being the d:ty of thanksgiving to Almighty God for the re-construction of the Temple).' Princes of J~rusalem also observe the equinoctial days, in Mo.rch and September.

Z. ·.; High Most J. ·.; Most

DRESS. The officers and brethren are elothed in purple, white or aurora-colored robes, and caps, with red gloves and swords ; and each should be provided with a shield and cuirass. The officers wear their official jewels, suspended from aurora-colored

I

I


80

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

collars. The brethren all wear the Order, ·with the jewel suspended from the bottem of it. Ordcr,-a wide aurora-colored ribbon, edged with gold lace, worn from the right shoulller to the left hip ; embroidered ou it at·e a balnnce, a hand of justice, a poniard, five stars, and two crowns.

Jewel,-a golden mednl; engraved on one side of it, is n hand holding a balance in equipoise; on the other, a two-edged sword in a pe1•pendiculnr position, hilt down, with the letters D. and Z., one at each side of it; and five stars surrounding the point. Apron,-white* silk, edged wit.l1 gold lace, lined with aurora color; ptlinted or embroidered on it is a SCJ.uare, a Shield, a Delta, a hand of Justice, a pair of Balnnces m equipoise, and sometimes a representation of the Temple of Solomon.

BATTERY.

J J SYMBOLIC AGE. Ninety-two years.

HOURS OF WORK. From sunrise until tl1e middle of the day.

* The

French say, the apron. is red, lined and bordered with yellow 011

aurora colort

t The French say, five timea flve,-twcnty-flve.

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PRINCE OF JERUSALEM.

r I

TRIUMP:S:.A..L CHORUS. .A.IR.-" Suoni la. tromba."

I

Raise the glad voices of triumph, No longer shall tyrants enslave us, Lo ! he is coming to save us, Judah's lion to save. Crown him with garlands of laurel, Clothe him in raiment of honor, Welcome to Salem our brother, Zerubbabel the brave.

I

Huzza! Warmly we welcome our brother, Zerubbabel the brave.

:

II i 1

i!

Welcome the day of rebuilding, The chief whom we honor shall lead us. The prayers of the righteous shall aid us, Once more is Judah free. And on the mountain so holy, Our Temple shall rise to the Lord. In Zion his name be adored ; To him bend the knee.

Hosanna! In Zion our God be adored, 'l'o him beud the knee. Glory to God in the higl1est, He leads us from bondage and night, He brings us to freedom aud light, His name shall be adored.

81


82

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

I

And. on the bells of the horses, Shall be written in letters of gold, And again shall be sung as of old : Holiness to the Lord l

Hosanna!

Once more we will sing as of old. Holiness to the Lord l HISTORY.

Immediately after the return from captivity, Zei'Ubbabel, with his followers, set about the work of rebuilding the Temple, as related in the preceding grade. They were much disturbed and annoyed by the Samaritans, their neig1Jbors, who, actuated by a spirit of jealousy, would not permit them to proceed unmolested in their work; and the Masons being thus continually harassed, were finally forced, for a time, to abandon their underlaking. Through the influence of Zerubbabel, and a number of distinguished men, who were associated with him in an embassy to Darius, the successor of Cyrus, a decree was procured from that monarch, prohibiting all persons, under pain of death, from interfering with the Masons in rebuilding the city and 'l'emple. After this, they were no longer troubled, and the work went rapidly on to completion. With this grade, ends the second or historical series of grades, as they are arranged in this Monitor.

I I


THIRD SERIES.-PHILOSOPRICAL GRADES.*

II KNIGHT OF THE EAST AND WEST. Tli:E SEVENTEENTH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND THE FIRS'f CONFERRED IN A CHAPTER OF ROSE CROIX,

INTRODUCTION. "THIS is a degree of clliva!ry, unconnected, by its history, with Freemasonry. The Knights assert that, upon their return from the Holy land, in the age of the Crusaders, their aMestors organized this Order; aud that in t.he year 1118, the ftl'St Knights, to the number of eleven, took their vows of secrecy, frienushiJ> nnd disc1•etion, between the hands of Garin us, patriarch nnd Princ<l of Jcrnsnlem.''t 'fhis grade derives its name from the fact, that it originnted at the E11st., in Pttlestine, and was brought thence to the We~t. It is always conferrlld by communication.; DECORA.TIONS. Red hangings, sprinkled with gold stars. .A.t the E.·. a th1•one, upheld by four lions, upon seven steps ; between the lions, an animal of human form with wings. On one side of the throue, the sun, and on the other the moon, each in a transparency; beneath, a rainbow and a large basin of perfumed water, nnd a sknlland bones. A.t the N:. and S.'. are two small t.hrones, elevated on three steps. .At the W. '. are two m01·e, on five steps. ,. All the grades ahove the sixteenth are called " Philosophical," because they contain, respectively, more or less of the true philosophy of :M..sonry. t Mackey's Lexicon. 'l'he French and German rltllals, In my possession, etLll thl• Patri!U'Ch or Jeruslllem •• Garimont ;" a.nd those of the Northern juris· dlt'tlon, ".Arnulphus Guarimundus," which is probably the same name La.t· inized.. t Grades are confetTed by oommunloation, when they are not worked In tun; but the Instruction Is merely by word of mouth. This Is always permitted !n the Ancient and .A.oce!>ted lUte. (83)


84

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

TITLES. An assembly of Knights of the E.·. and W. •. is called a Council, and is composed of four and twenty Knights. 'l'he presitling officet· is styled "J\Iost Powerful;"* the two 'WardPHS, "Vencmble Ancients;" and the Knights, "Respectable Knights."

DRESS. Apron,-yellow, lined and bordered with red. t Two Ord;:rs are used in this grade,-one, white, worn from the right shoulder t<> the left hip. from which is suspended the jewd, !\ heptagon of sil1•er, at each angle a gold star, and the following letters, one in each of the nngles, respectively, B.·. D.·. W. ·. P. ·. H.·. G.·. S. ·.,and in the center a lamb on a book with seven sculs: on the re\•ersc, the same lettet·s, and a two-edged sword between the scales of n b11lance. 'l'he ot.her Order is black, hung round the ucck, with the cross suspended from it.

'I

BAT'l'ERY.

iJ

J J J J J

J-J

SYMBOLIC AGE. Very ancient.

*

So s:1ys iliackey, in hiR Lexkon. Some of the ll'rcnch and German ritn.a1s agree, a.ml some call him " V;~r.r· Powerful." The rituals of the Northern jurii:;Uiction style bim "AU l 1uis!:lant."

t Mnckey •:~ys,-whitc, lined with red, a.nd inscribed with a. two-edged sword. The rituals of the Northel'u jta·i::~didion say,-whitc. lined with rect, ho•·uered with yellow ; on the fiap a. twu·eu~:e<l swonl. I luwe followed the FreiJeh.

!I


SOVEREIGN PRINCE OF ROSE-CROIX DE H-R-D-M,"' ANI)

KNIGHT OF THE EAGLE AND PELIC.A.N.t THE EIGHTEEliTit ORAD'£ OF TIJE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED I!.ITE, ANJ) SECOND AND LAS'r CONFERRED IN A CHAPTER OF li.OSE·CROilC.

INTRODUCTION. is one of the most important and generally diffused oi the higher gmdt•s of Masonry. There have ~n many theories aa to its origin. Anti-ma~ons hnve sought to confound its possessors with the Rl)Sicl"Ucians of the middle ages ; but the only THIS

*There bas hcen much dispute with regard to the meaning of these letters. It Is surprising thiLt any possessor of the gt'llde ever dtlubted that they mean "Dorod!m," and reft>r \1) the fact that Chriatian Masomy is 1111 outgrowth of liebrew or Ancient Crnft llln.'l<lnry. :Jolvcry I'rince of Rose·Croix is neces· snrily of the number of Hnrodim or Chief• nmoug the Masters of the work of th<> fit·st Tem)>le. The I• len thnt they refer to a mountain in Scotland, called Jierodem or Heroden, where the fi1"8t Ch11ptcr was held, is sulliclcntJy refuted by the fact, that thers i8 110 xuclt mottntain. t Also sometimes CILih.'fl Knight of the White :Engle, also, ·of the BIMk Eu~rle, 1\0d Knight of St. Andrew of St'Otluml. This b'TI\de is the. . . lnst or the French Rite, and the forty·atxth of the lUte ·or Mil!raim or :Egyptiall

•=

Muonry.

( 85)

I !


86

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

alchemy that Rose-Croix Masons practice, is tlutt which transmutes the baser metals of the natural heart into the :fine gold of Christin.u life. This grade probably originated in the Royal or National Order of Scotland, established by King Robert Bruce, aftet• the battle of Bannockburn, in 1314. The possessor~ of the mys· tedes of this Order were, for the most part, attached to the political fortunes <?f the Stuart ftlmily; and becoming ~xiles in France and Pru~s1a, they there. practiced the ceremonies they had leamed at Kilwinning. "The Rose-Croix is an attempt to Chtist.ianize Freemasonry : ' to apply the Rite>~, and symbols and traditions of Ancient Cmft Masonry to the last and greatest dispensation ; to add to the :61•st Temple of Solomon and the second of Zerubbrtbel, a third, that to which Christ alluded. when he said, 'Destroy this Temple, and in three days will I raise it up.' The great discover'/ which was made in the Royal Arch ceases to be of \"alue in thiS degree; for it, another is substituted, of mm-e Christian application; the Wisdom, Strength and Beauty which supported the ancient Temple, are replaced by the Christiau pillars of Faith, Hope and Charity; the great li~hts, of course, remain, beco.use they are of the. very essence of Masonry ; but the three lesser give way to the thirty-three, which allude to the years of Messiah's sojourning on the earth. Every thing, in shot·t, about the degree is Christian." • 'l'he ceremonies of this grade l!.re in the highest degree solemn and imposing, and no one can pass through them without being deeply influenced for good. DECO RAT IONS. Three apartments are used. The first is n. hall of mourning, l111ng with black, sprinkled with tears. The third has red hangings. In the first and third, are thirty-three wax lights, arranged in t.hree groups of eleven each. In the E. ·. S. ·• and N. ·. are three columns, F.·. H.·. and C.·. Furt11er details can not properly be given. In the Rite of Misraim, six apartments are used in conferring this grade. *Mackey's Lexicon.


S. •. P.". OF ROSE-cROIX.

87

TITLES. The presiding officer i':l styled, "Most Wise and Perfect Master." There are two Wardens, S. ·. and J. · ., known as "Most Excellent and Perfect Knights." There are, beside, a Secretary, Treasurer, and Captain of the Guards, but no Tyler; the service being performed by the youngest brother present. The brethren are styled, "Most Respectable and perfP.ct ~nights." In the :first apa.rj;qlent, the designation, "Perfect," 1s not used. DRESS. The apron is of white satin, lined with black, and trimmed with red ; upon the black side, is a red cross ; upon the white side is a. representation of the jewel.* The Order is red on one sidt~, black on the other; and from it, is suspended the jewel of the grade. t The Kni~hts are clothed in black. Over their garments, they wear a wlnte linen or woolen chatsnble, bordered with black, having a. red Latin cross bcfot•e and bt>hind. The M. ·. W. ·. wears, suspended from his collar of office, a gold star, witl1 the lettrr J. ·. in the center, and around it the letters F.·. H.·. C.·. The S. ·. W. ·. wears a triangle with o. red cross in the center; and the J. ·. W. •. the square nnd compasses.

* Thill Is the apron wom In the French Rite, and that of Misraim, ancl described In the best l!'rench and Germs.n rituals of the Ancient and Aocepted Rite. Ma.ekey, however, In his Lexl.oon, su.ys, that two aprons are wom ; the !lrst,-a mourning apron, of white, bol"dered with hla.ek ; on the flap, a skull and cross·bones, between three red roses ; on the body of the apron, a globe 1111rrounded by a serpent, with the letter J:. above. The second apron, worn on festival oecasions, Is red, lined and bor<lered with the SIUQe; on it a triple triangle of gold, with three squares within three circles, and a. letter J.". In the center ; aoove these, the compa.sses,-one J>Oint resting on the trla.ngle, the other on the ciroles. In the Northern juri!Kiietlon, u. s.• tbe fll'llt apron Is similar to that described by MMkey, except tb&t the rosettes are biMk, ant! in a triangular position around the Iotter J.". on the body of the a11ron. The other apron, which may be on tbe reverse side of the first, is similar to that described in the text,-bla.ck, with a red cross. t I bave followed the FreMh and German rituals. Mackey sa.ys, "the collo\r Is red, with the eagle of the degree emhro!d01·cd on it." The rituals of the Northern jurisdiction say, red on one side, with black rosettes and cro•ses; and on tl•e other. black, with red rosettes and crossCII. On the breast ot tbe Order, a. sma.Jl cross or ribhon,and a l'OSette at the bottom ; Stlspended from the Order, a gol<l cross ; at the bnt.tom of the Order, over the cross, a small t·~'<l. rose, and over It & smaller, In black.

I


ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED BITE.

'

';'

.I 1\

II I

··--======-==-=-===-=-=====::::::-=········=-=-·········.

I


jew~!

s.·. P.".

OF ROSE-QROIX.

~

sixteentl~

The is a compass, extended on an arc to the part. of a c1rele, or twenty-two and a half d(•grees.• The head of the compass is snrmonntcd by ~~ crown. t Between the legs of the compass is a cross r<;sting on the arc of the circle· its eent.er is occupied by n full-blown rose, whose stem twines round the lower limb of the cro~s; at tha foot of the cross, ou tlw same side with the rose, is a pelican feeding her young with her own blood; and on the reverse, an eagle with exptluded wings. On the arc of the circle, the P. ·. W. ·. h~ cipher. 'l'he eagle, pelican, and rose, are of silver ; the rest of the jewel, of gold.

BATTERY.

FEASTS OF OBSERY ..A.NOE. The annual feast, at which the election of officers takes place, is the 'l'hursdtty before Easter, or Holy Thmsday, (the anniversary of the Last Supper of our Saviour). Thet·e arc four other feaHts, to-wit, Easter (gcncmlly celebrated on Easter :Mon<lay), Peutceo~t. All Suiuts', and Christnms days. The Knight.'! are also required to unite \vith their brethren in cele· brating the Sts. John's days. j:

S Y M B 0 L I 0 A G E. Thirty-three years.

RECEPTION. "The aspirant for this d<,grce, who mnst, of course, have received all the preptlrntory degrees, 11pplies at the door of the Chnptcr with a pt•tition for ailirnssion; and, if his praver is gi'llllted, the time and place of his reception are made linowu to him, when he retires, to retnl'll on the appointed day.

* Some rituals say, " 00 dCI\TCes."

t 1\t!l<lkey says, a triple crown, consisting of tmee series of points arrange<!

by 3, 5, and 7. t Mackey says, "The annual feast of the Order is on Shrove Tu<!llday, and must l>e celelll'ltted by every member. 'rhere are five other ol>ligatory days or meeting, vi•: Ascension day; St. John the Baptist's dAy, l!entocost; St.. John the Evangell»t's W..y; Tu<lSday after Easter; and All Saints' day." That the text is correct, a litUe reflection will make apparent, I think, to every ltose-Crobt Mason.

8

I


.ANCIENT .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

"On his second application, before admission he is called upon to make the following engagements : 1. That h<• will never reveal the place where he was received, nor the nan1<1s of those who Wtlre present at his reception. 2. That he will conform to all the ordinances of the Chapter, and keep himself uuifoJ·mly clothed as far as he is able. 3. That he will acknowledge his Mnste1• at all times and in all plnces, and uevei' conft•r this degree without permission from proper authority, as wdl as auswer for the probity and respectabihty of those whom he mny thereafter propose. 4. That he will be extremely cautious in granting the degree, so that it may not be unnecessarily multiplied."•

*

*

*

*

*

FIRS'l' .APARTMENT.

*

Solomon erected on Mt. Zion a Temple, in which to rendet· to the Divinity the homage due to him fwm mortals. Solomon received from God, in Gabaon, that which he was not able to conserve in Zion,-even Wisdom; and his errors and irregularities giving attaint to his glory, she constantly veiled from him her sacred tabernacles. This example, as striking as that of the conduct of the Children of Israel, during the fot·ty days that the Prophet went away into Sinai, demonstrates the instability and blindness of the man reputed wise, and warns us to be on our guard against ourselves and all others. Is it not wt·itten : "If any man among you seemeth to be wise, let him become a fool, that he may be wise. For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness. .And again : 'l'he Lord knoweth the thoughts of the wise, that they are in vain." ?

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~-~-sL_e_~_co-~.-=-=~ = ~-=-=-=-=-= ·= -=-=J~

_____________*MA __


S. •. P. •• OF ROSE-cROIX.

91

And yet it is also written : " Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding. For the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver, and the gain thereof than fine gold. She is more precious than rubies, and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. Length of days is in. her right hand, and in her lefL hand, 1·iches and honor. Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and aU her paths are peace. She is a tree of life to them that lay hold upon her, and happy is every * * * * * one that retaineth her. The Temple of Jehovah, sullied, profaned, and forsaken in Zion :-that of Moloch watered with the blood of human victims, burning upon its altars the incense due only to the true God, is not the only stain upon the glory of Israel. Ashtaroth, idol of the Sidonians, offensive charms, demons, abominations of the children of Ammon, seated on the thrones prepared for the Divinity, obscure every ray of glory, even the smallest. Bethel is sullied by the abominable preachings of Ephraim. 'l'he gods of Samaria and Damascus, and all the suite of false gods, whose idols subjected Egypt to their im~ pious worship, oppose themselves to any approoch to~ ward the point of Yision whence alone true wisdom can be beheld. Be not led astray by false lights. The Yapors that rise from the mire of the earth to the splen~ dor of the sun, may possess a certain luster, but as soon as the sun has retired, the passing brightness of the cloud is obscured, and disappears. Withdraw,. all of you, dark phantoms and black exhalations, monstrous

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92

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

cl1ildren of chimera and delusion, which deceive the uncertain traveler! Withdraw, all of you, lying oracles, augmers, magi, diviners, and false prophets, audacious and fantastic monsters ! The Most High, seated on his Throne, placed on the clouds, triumphs over your sacrilegious attempts. The Sun of Righteousness doth shine and scatters your mists. True Wisdom, which even Solomon, in all his glory, conceived not, :qevisits the earth. We find it in the Word of God : the Word manifest in the flesh, dwelling among men ; tempted in all points like as we are, yet without sin ; humbling himself that he might exalt the nations.

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98

S. •. P. •. OF ROSE-cROIX.

The Gospel according to Matthew, chap. xxvii, vs. 27 to 54, inclusive, may be here read, if d<lemed proper.

Let us lament no longer over the misfortunes of Eden, or on those of Zion : they will no longer obstmct the efforts of a free and absolute will. The malignant genius who contrived them, will remain a nullity in his abortive em:pire. Eden, that antique garden, that visible paradise, will be but a weak image of the splendors of the heavens, and of tbe beatitude which the Eternal has created for those that love him. For now we know the wisdom of God, "even the hidden wisdom, which God ordained before tbe world, unto our glory." Which none of the princes of this world knew; for, had they known it, they would not have crucitied the Lord of Glory. But, as it is writte.u, "Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered iuto the heart of man, the things which God hath prepured for them that love him."

*

*

*

-1

i 1

I

*

F.A.ITII is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. 1fhrough faitlt, we understand that the worlds were fo1·med by the w01·d of God. By faith, Enoch was translated, that he should not see death. By faith, Abraham, when he was tried, offered up Isaac ; and he that received the promises offered up his only-begotten son.

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94:

.ANCIENT .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

By faitlt, a steady course we steer, Through ruffiing storms and swelling seas; By fa£th, we pass the vale of tears, Safe and secure, though oft distressed; By faith, subdue the King of fears, And go rejoicing to our rest. HoPE is the evidence of things not seen, waiting for the redemption of our bodies from death. For we are saved by lwpe; but hope that is seen is not hope. For what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it. The lwpe of Heaven our spirit cheers, No more we grieve for sorrows past, Nor any future conflict fear, So we may safe arrive at last. Lord, on thee our lwpes we stay, To lead us on to thine abode, Assured thy love will far o'erpay The hardest labors of the road. Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. Charity sufferet.h long, and is kind. Charity envieth not ; charity vaunteth not itself; is not puffed up ; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth ; beareth all things ;

L .

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---- ·-=-==


~----~-~ ~~:-;·:::-cRor:------;~l ·

believeth all things ; hopeth all things ; endureth all things. Charity never faileth: and n.ow abideih Faitlt, Hope, and Charity, these three; but the greatest of these is Charity. For, Blest is the man whose ~oftening heart, Feels all another's pain; To whom the supplicating eye Is nevet· turned iu vain. "As my Father hath loved me," said the Lord, "eveu so have I loved you." And again: "A new commandment give I unto you, that ye love one another." SECOND APARTMENT.

II

Hear my prayer, 0 Lord, and consider my calling. Hold not thy peace at my tears. For I am a stranger and a sojourner, as all my brethren were. 0 spare me a litt.le, that I may recover my strength bef01·e I go hence and be no more forever. Before the earth and the world were made, thou art, even from everlasting to everlasting. Thou hast beset me behind and before, and laid thine hand upon me. ·Whither shall I go from thy Spi!'it? or whither shall I flee from thy presence? If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the

~

.. """"'"' P"'" of "" ,,.,_,::_:•"' shall thy hand

l

l'. ,

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96

l

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me. If I say, surely the darkness shall cover me ; even the night shall be light about me. Yea, the darkness hideth not from, thee; but the night shineth as the day; the darkness and the light are both alike to thee. Yet the Lord l1ath respect unto the lowly. He beholdeth afar off. Though I walk in the midst of death, yet shalt thou refresh me. Thou shalt stretch forth thine hand upon mine enemie~; and thy right hand shall save me. For there is mercy with thee ; therefore shalt thou be feared. Be thou not far from me ; 0 Lord, haste to deliver me, for I ~m brought very low. Bring my soul out of prison, that I may give thanks unto thy holy name. Man that is born of a woman, is of few days and full of trouble. He cometh forth in the morning, and is cut down: he fieeth, also, as a shadow, and continueth not. In the midst of life, we are in death; but to whom may we look for succor, but to thee, 0 Lord. I heat路d a voice from heaven, saying, Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord, from henceforth. Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them. 0 Death, where is thy sting? 0 Grave, where is thy victory? I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord. He that believeth in me, though

~:v:.!'~::~::~ ::;,.h:.::~:.路d :ho路oo:~b路_j


97

S.'. P .', OF ROSE-CROIX.

THIRD APARTMEN'l'.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Het·od the king, behold there came wise men ft·om the East to .Jerusalem, saying, Where is he that is born king of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the East, and are come to worship him. * * * * Philip findeth Nathaniel and saith unto l1im, We have found him of whom :Moses in the law and the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. And Nathaniel said unto him, Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth? Philip saith unto * * * * him, Come and see. And there appeared an angel from heaven unto him, strengthening- him. * * * * 'l'he scepter shall not depart fl·om Judah, nor a lawgi\·er fl·or:n between his feet, until Shiloh come; and ut1to him shall the gathering of the people be. ROSE-CROIX HYMN. Aut.- Old IIuudred.

Our Lord is risen from the dead, Our Jesus is gone up on high; The powers of hell are captive led, Dragg'd to the portals of the sky. There his triumphal chariot waits, And angels chant the solemn lay : "Lift up your heads, ye heavenly gates, ' Ye everlasting doors, give way." 9


98

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

Loose all your bars of massy light, And wide unfold the radiant scene; He claims those mansions as his right; Receive the King of Glory in. "Who is the King of Glory, who?" The Lord that aU his foes o'ercame, The world, sin, death, and hell o'erthrew, And Jesus is the conqueror's name. Lo! his triumphal chariot waits, And angels chant the solemn lay, "Lift up your heads, ye heavenly gates, Ye everlasting doors, give way," "Who is the King of Glory, who?" The Lord, of boundless power possess'd, The King of saints and angels too, 'l'he Son of God, forever bless'd. CHARGE.

Approach, my Brothel', and be fully instructed in our mysteries. I congt·atulate you on * * * * through which you have acquired the title of Perfect Prince Mason. You pe;·ceive, no doubt with Sl\tisfaction, that you were not deceived when you were promised an aim sublime, which should make you perfect in the mysteries of Masonry. To that point we shall now arrive. But I must remind you, that it is not enough to merit and acquil·e this sublime degt·ee. You must more and more render yourself perfect in it, and study to draw ft·om it, fo1· the future, all the ft·uits


s.路.

P,', OF ROSE-CROIX.

99

possible. That you may long enjoy it among us, is what we hope and most desire. Grant us that friendship, which is the bond of all associations, and be assured of ours which you have now acquired. PRA. YE R.

Deign, Sovereign Master of the Universe, to cast a propitious look on this assembly. Bless it: but let it perish, rather than contravene thy holy law. Banish from thy Sanctuary, we humbly beseech thee, all that is impious and profane, and grant that we may be solely occupied with the work of our perfection, and may ever be enabled clearly to distinguish that which is upright, from that which is ungodly; and finally, may the sacred bond of our union be eemented by peace, benevolence, and chaz路ity. Now, to the King Eternal, Immortal, Invisible, the only wise God, be honor, and glory, fot路evermore. .Amen. TABLE CEREMONIES. This solemn ceremony, Ol;iginallyest.abliRhed wben the grade was under the patronage of the ch~1rch, is now very properly dispem;ed with. Whenever Chapwrs of Rose-Croix shall, as th~y ought. admit only :rrofessing Christians, its observanee .may pl'ofitably be resume~.

FINIS.

Glory to God in the highest. good-will to men.

Peace on earth, and


FOURTH SERIES. CHIVALRIC, HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL GRADES. GRAND PON1'IFF. THE NINEl'EEN'fH GRADE OF Tf!E ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND ~'HE FIRST CO!'IFF.RRED IN A GRA:SD CONS!S'CORY.

INTRODUCTION. TarA grade is founded on cert:tin apocalyptic mysteries, relating to the New Jerusalem. The ceremonies and instruction are very brief. It is usually conferred by communication. DECORATIONS. The Chapter is hung with blue hangings, sprinkled with gold stars. In the E.路. is a tmnsparency, representing the Sun and the New Jerusalem. Through this comes all the light which illuminates the Chapter. The draft or tracing board, represents a square city,-the cclcstittl Jerusalem descending from Heaven to earth, with twelve gates, three on each side; and in the midst of the cit.y, a tree bearing twelve diff<!rent kinds of fruit. The city is elevtttcd or su~pended in the clouds; under it is the ancient city of Jerns1tlem, overthrown and in ruins; and the hytlra serpent with three he>ads, in chains, and as if crushed by the weight of the celestial city. On one side of the draft, is a high mountain. TITLES. The Master is styled Thrice Potent; he is seated on a throne in the E.路., under a canopy of blue and gold, clothed in white. There is but one Warden, seated in theW.路. with a golden sbtff in his hand. The assembly is styled a Chnpter. 'l'he brethren are styled "Faithful and true :Bretlmm." DRESS. The brethren are clothed in white linen robes, ench with a blue fillet of satin round his hc11d, with twelve gold Rtars on it. Order,-a broad crimson ribbon, with twelve gold stars in frrmt. Jewel,-n golden 111\\dnl or square plate; on one side of which is engraved the word Alpha, and on the other, Omega. BATTERY.

,,

i

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,!

JJ JJJJ JJ JJJJ

( 100)

l

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GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES.* 'rim TWENTIETH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE. AND THE SECOND CONFERRED lN A G.', OONSISTORY,

INTRODUCTION. When Masonry was :first introduced into Europe, the office of Master of a Lodge Wtts for life. This power iR confen-ed, in the Scotch Rite, upon the candidate, by initiation into this grade: hence the title, Alaster ad Vitam. The ceremonies carry us back to the time of the building of the Second Temple. The reception is brief; the instruction long, nnd relates to the building of the First and Second Temples. This grade is usually conferred by communication. DECORATIONS. The Lodge is hung with blue and. yellow hangings. In the E.·., is a throne, elevated on nine steps; over it, a canopy. In front of the throne, a table; on it, a sword, the Holy Bible, square, compasses, and mallet. In the S. ·.,is n caudlesticlt, w1th nine lights. TITLES. The Master is styled G.·. M. ·. He represent.s Cyrus Arta· xerxes; is seated on the throne in the E.·., clotlwd with royal robe, crown, etc., wearing t.wo Orders,- on(l of blue, the other of yellow, crossing c:tch other on the breast. There are t.wo Wardens; they t•epresent the two pt·ineipal offi1Jet'S of th:1t monarch's court. The candidate rt1presenb! Zcrubbabel. 'l'here must be at least nine Masters present to open a Lodge. DRESS. All clothed as in the seconil apat•tment in the grade of Prince of Jerusa.lero; with the Ordet·s, blue und yellow sashes, cross· ing each other on the breast; t.he Jewel suspended from the bottcm of the yellow sash. Jewel,- a golden triangular plnte, with the word "SECRET" engraved on it.t BATTERY.

d-J J * Also called ·• Sovereign Prince of Mn•onry," or "Muter ad Vitam."

t The .French say, tile letter R ongra.ved on it.

(101)


NOAOHITE, OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT; THE TWENTY·FIRST GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE AND TB.E THmJ> CONFERRED IN A G.'. CONSISTORY.

INTRODUCTION. THIS Grade is said to be of very ancient orlgin,-much ante· rior, as is asserted, to any of the Hiramite or Solomon ian grades. It is founded on events which occurred at the building' of the Tower of Babel, long previous to the erection of Solomon's Temple. It is claimed that the Noachites we1-e originally an Order unconnected with Masonry, but that, iu the time of the Cn1sades, the Masons conceived a great friendship and esteem for the Nottchites, and obtained admission among them; and from that time, according t.o the statutes of the Order then adopted, no candidate has been admitted unless he at least possessed the grade of G.·. E.·. P. ·. andoS. ·.Mason ;• and when the .Ancient and Accepted Rite was arranged in its present system, this Order was introduced into it, and made the twenty-first grade of the Rite. The ceremony of initiation is brief. The history embraces many curious traditions relativE\ to ancient Masonic chivalry, With an !J.Ccount of the adventures and fate of Peleg, the chief archit~ct of the Tower of Babel, and some curious details relative to a discovery made in Prussia, in the year 1553. The mo1·al of the grade is, that man's pride and arro~nce is offensive to God, nnd will inevitably meet its just pun1shment. It is usually conferred by communication. DECORATIONS. The Chapte1· is held in a retired place, in a hall disposed in such a manner, that the full moon may shine in at the windows (or, more properly, a single window). This is the only light allowed ; and for this reason the Chapter is held at the full moon. TITLES. The assembly is called n. Chapter. There are seven officers, as follows: 1st. The Knight Lieutenant Commander, representing Frederick the Great of Prussia, who gave the Order or gmde

* An a.ble writer on Masonry (Albert Pike), seeks to identify this Order with the Vehm·Gericht, or Secret Xrlbun.a.l of Juortice, in Geru>any, in the Middle .Age$. (102)


:KNIGHT OF THE ROYAL AXE.

103

its preRent form in 1755 : he wenrs n blnck collar, from which is suspended the Jewel. 2d.. 'l'he Gmnd Inspector. 3d. The Introductor. 4th. 'l'hc Grand Omtor (on, Chevalier d'Eloqucnee). 5th. 'I' he Guard. 6th. 'I' he Omnd Chancz>llor. 7th. The Grand Trensm·er. The members are culled Prussian Knights.

ARMORIAL BEARINGS. The first is nzure, with silver moon, surrounded by gold stars. The second sable, with the trinngle and the gold dart. DRESS. Apron and gloves, yellow. Order,-a blMk ribbon, worn from the right. shoulder to the left hip, from the end of which is susp£.>nded the Jewel,-a golden ('quilateral triangle, with a winge<l arrow crosRing it, the point down. 'fhe Knights may nlso wear, fur t.he ,Tew<>l of the Order, a silver moon, suspended from a button of the coat. BATTERY.

J-J-d KNIGHT OF THE ROYAL AXE, ott,

PRINCE OF LIBANUS. THE TWENTY·i'HlCOND GI!.ADE OF TilE ANCIF:Nl' AND AOCEl'TED RI'l'll:, AND Til£ ~'OIJI!.Til COlin:Rl!.B:D IX A a.·. CONSISTORY.

!i

Ii l,l.'

I' I' 1

INTRODUCTION. Grade is hi~toricnl, nnd conmwmorat.es four events in t.he hi~torj' of Mm,;onry; the eutting of thil cedars on Mount Lihtmus, or Lelinnnn.-.first, for th•~ building of Nonh's Ark; srrontlly. for the cunstrnl'tion of til<' Ark of the Cnvennnt; thirdly, for the ~n·<~tiou of Solomon·~ T,•mpl<•; nntllasll!f, for tho s,•,•owl 'l'emplz•, huilt, hy Zt.'l'llblmht'l. 'l'his wm·k WILS pz•rformed !.y the SidonitmR. It is ~uid iu the hi~l<>l)' of the gra•k•, thnt, at a very remoro nge, they founded, on Muunt Lebanon, colleges THill

1=.- =·-·---=..,·=···-

=···-····-·---- ....... ··-·-·-·--· --·-·- ··-····-----···--·-


104

ANCIEN'l.' AND ACCEPTED RITE.

for the instruction of the workmen, wl10, in their labors, always adored and worshiped the G.·. A.·. of the U. ·. This Justory contains much traditional matter relative to the Sidonians, and the service which they rendered KingS.·., and Zeruubabcl, in the building of the First and Second Temples. The cere· mony of r<,ception is brief, and the grade is usually conferred by communication. DECORATIONS. Two apartments are used in the reception,- the first is bung with blue, and represents the lodge or workshop on :Mount Lebanon ; it is illuminated by eleven lights : the second apartment is· hung with red, and styled the Council of the Round Table; it represents the office or lodge of the principal architects or overseers of the workmen on :Mount Lebanon. TITLES. In the first apartment, the assembly is styled a College, and the presiding officer called :Most Wise. In the second apartment, the assembly is styled a council, and the presiding officer called Grund Patriarch. Beside the presiding officers, there are two others. DRESS. White apron, witl1 a round table painted or embroidered on it, with architectural plans, mathematical instruments, tools, etc., lying on it. Order,- a wide sash or riubon, of the colors of the rainbow, worn from the rigl1t shoulder to the left hip, from the bottom of which is Ruspended the Jewel of the grade. Jewel,- a golden hatchet; on the top of it, a golden crown; on one side of the blade, the letters, L. ·. S. ·.; on the handle, on the same side, the letters, A.·. A.·. C.·. D.·. X.'. Z. ·.A.·.; on the other side of the blade, the letter, S. ·.; on the handle, on that side, the letters, N.·. s.·. H.·. J.·. :M.". B.·. 0. ·. These letters are the initials of the names of eertain prominent places and persons mentioned in t.he history of t.he grade. In the first apartment, the princes are all armed with hatchets or axes; in the second apartment, with swords. :BATTERY.

J J


=-=-=I

r==·=-======1,1

1

CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. THE TWENTY-THIRD GRAD:!! OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND THE b'!FTH CONFERRED IN A G.". CONSISTORY.

INTRODUCTION. THis grade commemorates the institution into the Order of Priesthood of Aaron and his sons, Eleazar nnd Itharnnr.* This was one of the grades introduced into the OJ'iginal system of twenty-five grades, in 1786, when it was extended to thirtythree, by Frederick the Great.. In the origiual arrangement of the grades, "The Knight of the Sun, Pt·ince Adept" (now the twenty-eighth grade), was the twcnty-thiJ.·d. It is conferred by communication.

DECORATIONS. ~'he Lodge is hung with white hangings, sustained by red and bluck columns, armnged in pairs, :tnd lit, HUCh distances,

as the t.ttste nf the Architect mtty suggest. 1.'he E.·. is sep· m·uted from the rest of the hall, by a balustrade nnd red cnr· tains, looped up on each side, nud is cnlle<1 the S:tncttmry. In the sanct;uary, ts a throrw, <'l<~Vttted on a plat.furm of seven st(•ps; before the throne, is an alt.1u· cuvere<l with red; on tlw altnr, the Bible and n poniard; above the tlmme, the At•k of Alliance, above whieh is :L glory, iu the ccmtcr of which appenrs the holy four-letter name (JOD·HE-VAU-Im), and on either side, :L re-presentation of the sun and moon. On the right siclc of tlw first altar, and :> little in ft·ont of it, is the altt1r of sacrifices, and on the !,;ft, that for incense. In t.he W. ·. :1rc two eandle~t,icks of five branches Puch, in the form of 11 pymmhi; in the E.·., one with two bt•anches. 'l'he presi,ling 'officer is scat.ed on the throne, ar.d th~ two 'V:wdeus are in ft•ont of the :tlt.w. In the reception, a durk cluunber is also used, in the middle of which is an ttlt.n.r; on it u. hnnp and three skulls; in front of lt, a human skdetou.

TITLES. The !lfaster is styleu SovN•eign Gt·:tnd Sttcrific~r. The two

·wardens, Grttnd Priest~; ani! the otht•r brethren, Lcvites. '!'he Lodge is designat<Jd tt Him·:<rehr.

--------

* Mackey's Lexicon.

(105)

'


106

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

DRESS. The Grand Sacrifieer wears a long robe, a.nd over it a yellow one, shorter than the ot,her, and without sleeves; he also wears 11 miter formed of golden tissue, in front of which is painted or embroidered a red Delta, with the ineffable name. Ov0r his dress, and passing from left to right, is a black scarf, trimmed with silver fringe, with a red ros.ette ttt the bottom, from which is suspended a poniard. The Wardens, or G.路. P. 路.,wear the same dress, \vith the exception of the Delta on the front of the miter. The Levites are clothed in white robes, over which passes the Order,-a scarlet. sash, trimmed with gold fringe, at the bottom of which is a black rosette, from which is suspended the jewel of the grade,-a pot of incense. Apron,-white, lined with deep scm路let, and bordered with red, blue, and purple ribbons: in the middle, it h:ts a goltl clmmlelier, of seven brunches ; and on the flap, a myrtle, of violet color.

11

I 1

BATTERY.

J J J J J J-J HOURS OF WORK. From the moment when the children of Hiram come to sacrifice, until the moment t.hat the sacrifice is consummated.

PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. THE TWENTY-FOURTH GRADE OF THE ANOJENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND THE SIXTH CONFERRED IN A G.". CONSISTORY.

INTRODUCTION. THIS grade is intended to illustrate the directions given for the building of the tabernacle, the particulars of which nrc recorded in the twenty-fifth chapter of Exodus.* Thi~; is one of the grudes introduced into the Rite, by Frederick the Great, in 1786. It is generally conferred by eommunicat.ion.

* M:tckey's Lexicon.

______.JI


E:NIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

107

DECORA.TIONS. There are two apartments. The :first, which adjoins the second, is termed the Vestibule; it is used as a vestry ; is decorated with various Masonic emblems and insignia. The second apartment. is of a circular form, illuminated by forty· nine lights. The decorations in this room are changed at each of t.he three points of the ceremony of initiation. In the center of the Lodge, is a seven-branched candlestick or chandelier. TITLES • . The assembly is styled a Hierarchy; the Master, Mostl,'otent. There are three Wardens, called Powe1oful, stationed 1n the S. ·., W. ·. andN.'. DRESS. A. blue silk robe; the collar embellished with rays, like a. glory; the body of the dress strewed with golden stars : on the head, a close crown, smTounded with stars, and surmounted by a Delta. O!'der,-erimson waoored silk, worn from the ri!!'ht si10ulder to the left hip. The apron is white, lined with cnmson; on the body is painted or embroidered with red, a representation of the Tabernacle; the finp is sky-blue. J ewel,-the letter A., in gold, suspended from the bottoiU of the Order. B,A.TTERY.

J J J J J J-d KNIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. THE TWENTY•FIFTH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND .ACCEl"TICD RITE, .AND THE SEVENTH CONFEBJ\ED IN A. G.'. CONSISTORY.

I , I 1

INTRODUCTION. THE circumstances upon which thi~ Grade is founded, are related in Numbers, chap. xxi, vs. f.-9: "And the Lord sent tlery serpents among the people, and they bit the people; and much penple M Israel died. Therefore, the people came to Moses, and said, We have sinned; ibr we have spoken against the Lord, and against

J

!_____________ --·---------·---------------------


.ANCIENT .AND .ACCEPTED BITE. thee; pray unto the Lord that he take away the serpents from us. And MoRes prayed for the people. And the Lord said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he Jooketh upon it, shall live. And Moses made a serpent of brass, and put it upon a pole; and it came to pass, that if a serpent had bitten any man, when he beheld the serpent of l>rass, he lived." This is one of the grades introduced into the Rite by Fl¡ederick the Great., in 1786. Previous to that time, the present thirty-second grade (S .. P .. R â&#x20AC;˘. s. .) was numbered as the twenty-fit\h and highest grade. The ceremony and instruction are brief, and always conferred by communication.

DECORATIONS. Hangings, red and blue; over the throne, in the E:., a transpa~ rency, on which is represented the B.'. B.'., with the Tetragrammaton in the center. A conical mount, elevated on five steps, is placed in the middle of the room. The Lodge is illuminated by a . single large torch or taper.

i'ITLES. The assembly is styled the Court of Sinai, and the presiding officer, Most Powerful Grand Master; he represents Moses. 'rhere are two Wardens, representing Aarou and Joshua, who are called Ministers. There is also an Orator, styled Poutitr; a Secretary1 ~;ailed Grand Graver; and an Examiuer. The candidate is callea. a traveler, and the brethren, Knights.

DRESS. Apron.-white, sprinkled with black' tears; on the flap, a triangle, in a glory; in the center, the Hebrew letter H (He). Order,a red ribbon or sash, worn from the right shoulder to the left hip, with the words VIRTUE and VALOR painted or embroidered on it where it crosses the breast. Jewel of gold,- a serpent, entwined around a Tau cross, $landing upon a triangle, with the Ineffable name engraved on it; worn suspended from a white ribbon.

BATTERY.

J d d d J-J J d-d HOURS OF WORK. Open at one, close at seven.


PRINCE OF

MERCY~

OR.

SCOTCH TRINITARIAN. THE 'l'WENTY·SIXTH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND THE EIG!lTH CONFERRED IN A G.". CONSISTORY,

INTRODUCTION. is a philosophical grade, founded on Christianity. The instruction speaks •• of the triple covenant, which the Eternal made; first, with Abraham, by circumcision; next, with the Israelites in the wilderness, by the intermediation of Moses; and lastly., with all manl•ind, by the death and sullilrings of Jesus Christ." j;'rom these three acts of mercy, the grade derive~ tbe names of Scotch Trinitarian, and Prince of Mercy. This grade was introduced into the Rite, by Frederick the Great, in 1786. The initiation is brief, and the instruction interesting. It is always conferred by communication. THIS

DECORATIONS. Hangings green, supported by nine columns, alternately white and red; upon each ot'whicb is an arrn of a chandelier, sustaining nine lights, forming, in all, eighty-one. The canopy is green, white, and red, under which, is a green-colored throne. Bctt>re the throne, a table covered with green clot11. Instead of a gavel, the M.". E.". uses an arrow, whose plume is on one side green, nne! on the other, rcd,-the spear being white, and the point gilded. On the altar (or by it), is a statue, which represeuts "Truth" veiled with the symbolic colors of the grade,-green, white, and red.

TITLES.

The assembly is styled the * * * * H.". * * * * The Master is called Most Excellent, and represents Moses; The s:. w:. represents Aaron; and the J.". w:. Eleaz-ar; beside tlwse, there is a Sacrificer, and a Guard ot'tlle Palladium. The candidate represents Joshua.

DRESS.

TheM.". E.". wears a large tri-colored tunic, of green, white, and r11d, and on his head a crown of lace, snrmounted by nine points. The other brethren wear each an apron, and the Order of the grnde. Apron,-red, bordered with white frin::e, having the jewel embroidered or painted on it. Order,-a broad tri-colored ribbon; from the t..ottom of which, is suspend11d the jewel,-a golden equi· lateral triangle; in the center of which, is a heart, aud upon the heart, tile hebrew letter H (He).

BATTERY.

JJJ--JJJJJ--JjJjJJJ S Y M B 0 L I 0 A. G E.-Eighty-one years. ( 100)

I I i,,·l


INTRODUCTION. THIS grade was introduced into the Rite, by Frederick the Great, in 1786. There is much ditlerence of opinion among authors, as to the interpretation of its cerernoniPs and symbols. Vassal, Ragon, Clave!, and other I•'rench writers, connect it with the Knight Templars, and explain the ceremonies, as allegorical of the tragic end of that illustrious Order. But the ritual says expressly, "It is improper to confound this Order of G1·and Commander of the Temple with that of * * * * Knights Templars." Mackey, in his Lexicon, expresses the same opinion. Vassal say8, "'The instruction of the grade is altogether Christian, and expresses the sincere piety of the Templars." There is no lecture attached to it, hence we have so much diversity of interpretation. It is usually conferred by communication.

DECORATIONS. Hangings,-red, on black columns; on each of which, there is an arm (or branch), holding a light. The canopy and throne are ret!, sprinkled with black tears. In the c<.'nter of the Lod~e, th•:re is a chandelier, with three rows of lights, arranged as tbllows: twelve on the lower tier of branches, nine on the second, and six on the tbird,-making twenty-seven. Twent~·-seven other lights are placed upon a round table, about wb1ch the Commanders are seated.

TITLES.

The assembly is styled a Court; the Master, MoRt Potent. In some Courts, he is styled "Most Illustrious and Most Valiant." The Wardens arc styled" Most Sovereign Commanders;" and the Knigllts, "Sovereign Commanders."

DRESS.

TheM.". P.". wears" white robe; over it, a red mantle, lint>d with ermine; on his head, a pointed crown. Apron,-tlesh-colored, lined and bnrdered with black; on the flap. a Teutonic cross (the cross ot' the Order), encircled by a crown ol' laurel; on the apron, a key. All these ornaments are painted or embroidered in black. White gloves are worn, lined and bordered with red. The Ordtlr is white, edged with red, worn around the neck, having upon its two sides embroidered in red, the !bur crosses of the Commanders; and from the bottom ot' it, is suspended the jewel,-a golden trianll:le, upon which is engraved, in Hebrew, the Tetragrammaton. The Commanders also wear a red sash, bordered with black, from the right shoulder to the left hip; from which is suspended, the cross of a Commander, of enameled gold.

JUTTERY.

.

I I iJJJjJJJJJ-JJJJJJJJJJJJ-Jj~ U R S 0 F W 0 R K .-Open at ten, close at four. ( 110)


KNIGHT OF THE SUN; OR PRINCE ADEPT. TIIE TWEN1'Y·l'IGIITII GltAD~; OF THE .ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, .AND '£liE '£BN1'H CO:WEJtlmD IN A G.". CONSISTORY.

INTRODUCTION. Grade. Its ceremonies and I~ctures are in giving a history of the precedin~ ~radt~s, and in explamiug- the emblems of 1\Ins<mry. Its ouject IS the immlcation of truth.* This was the twenty-third grade of the Rite, belore it was revised and enlarged by Frederick the Great, in 1780. The c<'remony of initiation ai1d the lecture are long. It is usually conlerred by communication. Tms is a

ernployt~d

philo~ophical

DECORATIONS. No particular hangings are prescribed. There may be painted on the walls of the Lodge, laadscapes of mountains and Jbrest.s, deRig-ned to represent nature, both in her rude and natural, and the refined and cultivated state. The Lodge is illuminated by a sun, placed above the head of the Master. This is in the center of a triangle, inscribed in a circle.. In each angle of the triangle is the letterS. In sorne Lodges, instead of the sun, they place, on an altar in the s:., a light behind a large glass globe, filled with water.

I I

/I

Ii

DRESS. A.'. wears an anrora-colored robe: his head is covered: in his rig-ht hand is a scepter, on the top of which is a golden globe: the haiH!Ie or extremity of the ~ceptcr is gilt: he wears a sun, sus· ponded by a chain of gold, amund his neck; on the rcvcr•e or the suu is a. globe. During the rcc:eption, no jewel or apron is \VOrna .Um. T:. holds a white scepter, with a goldeu ey<' on the eud of it, in his hand. The cc:. wear the Order,-a white watered rib· bon. woru across the body. at tlw bottom of which is painted or emiH·oidered an .-ye. Tbe'Jewel is suspended from the tJottom of the Order; it is a goldell triaug-le, with rays, aud, in the cent<!r, an eye. They wear no aprons. 'l'htl ss:. wear a short ha!Jit or tunic, a browu apron, and a. blue cap, tied with au aurora-colored ribbon.

TITLES. The Master is styled A.'. There is but one Warden; he nets as inti'Oduetor and prcparer, when there is a reeeptinn, and is called Bro.'. T.'. He is al~o the orator of the Council. Thtl other membt•r" oft. he Lod~e anl named cc:. There can only be seven cc:. iu a Council: if more than that uumber of members are prtlseut, the additional hrethrNJ, to the nnmtJer of ti,•e, are called SS.'. The fixed number of cc:. corre~ponds with the number of angels who governed the seven planet.• known to the ancients: their unnws are Michat>l, Gabriel, Uri<ll, Zaphl'it>l, Camiel, Raphael, Zaphael.t They were supposed to preside over and govern tli<l planets Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, l\Icrcury, and the Sun and Moon.

* Muckey's Lexi{~on.

t 'fhe C:th<Llist" tin not agree as to tl>e names and distribution of these heavenly SI>irits. I have given them as they are in the grade. (lll: ____

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112

.ANCIEN'r .AND .ACCEPTED RITE.

BATTERY.

J J

J J J J

KNIGHT OF ST. ANDREW, OR

PATRIARCH OF THE CRUSA],)ES. TBE TWENTY-NINTH GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND THE ELEVENTH CONFERRED IN A G.". CONSISTORY.

INTRODUCTION. THIS, according to Macl;ey, was the first Grade of Ramsay's Rite, which was introduced about tile year 1728, and wa• called Eccossais, or Scotch Mason. It is founded on Chivalric Masonry, or the Masonry of the Crusades. and gives a history of the events that Jed to the union of the Chivalric Orders with Fre<>masonry. The ceremony of reception is brief; the instruction full. It is usually conferred by communication. This grade is preparatory to the Ka· dosh. It was introduced into tile A.". and .A.". Rite by Jtrederick the Great in 1786.

DECORATIONS. Hangings, red, supported by white columns. The seats of the Master and Wardens are covered with red cloth, fringed with gold; those of the other Knights are blue. In each angle of the Lodge is a St. Andrew's Cross: be tore each of these, tour lights, arranged in a line, making sixteen lights in all. The total number of lights in the Lodge is eighty-one, arranged as follows,- two on the altar, seven groups of nine each, and the sixteen beti:lre enumerated.

TITLES. The assembly is styled a Grand Lodge; the Master, Patriarch; and the Knights, Respectable Masters.

DRESS. A red robe. Order,-scarlet, worn across the body, with a rosette, made of wide green ribbon, edged with black; at the end of it, and from it, is suspended the Jewel. When the Order is worn as a collar, it is green, edged with red. The Knights wear a white silk girdle, with gold fringe. Jewel,- a compass within three triangles, and these within a single large triangle. Under this is a square, reversed, with a poniard in theangleofthe square. When tbe Ordt>r is worn as a collar, the Jewel is a St. Andrew's Cr,)ss, surmounted by a crown: in the center of the cross is a pine-apple, or the letter J within a triangle, surrounded by a ring, to whi11h is attached a key. hanging hetween the branches of the cross; on the extremities of the arms of the cross, are the initials, B.". J.". M.". N:.


113

KNIGHT OF ST. ANDREW.

BATTERY.

J •I • A G E.

d--J J J-J SY MB0 LI C

II

The square of nine,- eighty-one years.

HOURS OF WORK. From Meridian until the first hour of the night.

KNIGHT OF KADOSH.* Tl!E THIRTmTII (UtADE OJI' TIIli: ANCIENT AND ACCEPTli:D RITE, AND TilE TWEL~"rl! CON~'E!lRRD IN A (l,'. CONS!STO!lY.

IN'l'ItODUC'riON. "This Gradt\ is intimately conn••ct.ed with t!le ancient Order of ](nights Tt•rnplars. n history of whose destructi<lll, by tile ur1ited eft<<rts of Philip the .1<'11ir·, Kin!' of l<'nmce, and Pope Clenwnt v·, ihrrus part of ttw inRt.ruct.inns given tu the ran<liclate."t This was the twenty-linrrth grade in the old Scotch Il.it.e, until 178H, when tht• system was revi"ed and ~•X tended. It. is ~lU important lnstorico.l and philosopllical pado. The cen•mony of initiation is very

* Kn.dosh or K()UCRh, A'-':a.nrtuo~ CO'Il8&'ratw~, rmrijleatUB.. The grade is also culled, "Kui~ht uf the 'White and Black Eagle." t Mackey'• Lexicon. 10


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114:

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

long, ann is intersperHed with a great variety of incidents. f'he

first part commemorates the ancient ceren1onies of initiation tnto Ord~r. (tS practiced when it was inRtitutecl during the Crusades, nnU is ~rand and· imposing. The second part is historical, and recounts, in a stirring' dramatic and military manner. the vicissitudes to which the Knights were subjected. Ttl is g•·ade is always worked

the

II

in full in the N:. J:. of the U.S. The :llst and ll:ld grad<•s are, wopcdy spealdng, portions of the K-H, and may be regarded as the second and third points ofthe gwdc.

DECORATIONS. FivP apartments are used during the reception. The first is bung with black, and illuminated by a single lamp, of a triangular form, suspended from the ceiling. Connected with this apartment, by a passage, is the second apartment, representing a cavern, with a mausoleum in the center, etc. "Quiconque poltrra vaincre les

frayew·s de la mort, sm·tira d·u sein de la terre, et aura droit

d'etre initie au:v grands myste1·es." The third apartment is huug with red, and illuminated by nine lights; it has a throne in the E:.: a black veil is stretched across the E.'., in front of the throne: in front of the veil is the altar, and on it, two cross swords, Holy Bible, square, compasses, and a dagger: near the A.ltar, is a*"'**, veiled with crape or black cloth,-

The fourth apartment, should, if practicable, represent a variety of uatural scenery,-mountains, valleys, deserts, coasts, military encampments, etc. Where this can not be done, a number of rooms, with long passage-ways, etc., may be substituted. The fifth apartment is hung with red, and illuminated by nine lights; in the E.'. is a throne; over it, a double-beaded eagle, crowtted, with extended wings, hold in!!; a two-edged sword in his talons: around his neck is a black ribbon, from which is suspended the cross of' the Order; on his breast is an equilateral triangle; on it, the name of God in the Hebrew (Adonai), and around it this


KNIGHT OF XADOSJI.

1~-;-l

inscription, "Nee proditor, nee 'J»'Orlitur, innocens jeret." The canopy is ti>rrned of black and wfiite velvet, ornamented with red Teutonic crosses. Behind the throne, are the three banners of the Order.-one white, having on it a green cross, with the inscription, "The will of God;" another is green, having on one side, the red Teutonic cross, and on the other, the double-headed black engle, surrounded by the motto," Victory or Death," embroidered in silver; the third is the ancient Beauseant, or war banner of the Templar~, half black, half white, reminding the spectator that the Order is" lilir and favorable to the friends and thllowers of Jesus Christ, but black and terrible to his enemies." This banner is used in the fourth apartment.

TITLEs. The first apartment is the Chamber of the Judges. In it, the G:. Chancellor (or s:. W.".) presides: he is assisted by two Judges; he wears on his breast an image emblematic ot'Truth, embroidered in gold. The second apartment is the Chamber of Reflection. In the third apartment, the assembly is called an Areopagus. The pre· siding officer is styled G.'. Commander, and is addressed as Thrice Potent: he rt>present.q Frederick the Ga·eat, of Prussia. The brethren are called Knights. In the fifth apartment, the assembly is called a Senate: here the Knigbts address eacb other by thee and thou. When there is no reception, the assem!Jly is held in the fifth apartment only. In addition to the presiding officer, there is a G.'. Chancellor on the right, and a G.'. Architect on the left of' the G.'. Com:. in the E.',; aM.'. of Cer:., Sec:., Treas.'., Cap:. of G.'. and Expert Brother.

DRESS. A white woolen cloak: on the left breast, a red cross: white cap, witJI white and black tllathers: sword, and an ebony and ivoryhandled dagger, worn on the !ell side of the sword-belt. In some Consistories, the Knights wear the ancient Chivalric dress.- a full stlit of armor, helmet, shield. battle-axe, spear, etc.• When not in full dress, the Knights are clothed in black, and wear a red girdle, a black scarf passing from the left shoulder to the right hip from tile bottom ofwllich is suspended a poniard: on the front of the sash are embroidered two Teutonic crosses, and a doubleheaded eagle, with U1e letters c:. K:. H.'. in silvE>r. The Jewel ill an enameled Teutonic cross, suspended from the collar, or attached to a button-hole of the coat, on the left side. Another Jewel, sometimes worn, is a red enameled cross, in the center of which is n. mother-ot~pearl medallion, having, on one side, the letters, J.'. M."., and on the other, a skull, pierced with a dagger. *Most of the French rituals sny, the dress is n white tunic, trimmed with blncl<, open at the sides, !Lilli confined lly n. lll<lck girdle, trimmed with sliver fringe. A dagger, with an ivory and et10ny handle, is wo•·n in the l~elt. The rim ot the hat is turned up In front. llJld ornamented with a. silver sun, surrounded hy golden raya, between the letters N ••• A.·. ; and III the center of the

caney:__

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116

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

BATTERY.

J d-J ol_J c'-J SYMBOLIC .A.GE.

The K-H. count not their years,- they exceed a century.

HOURS OF WORK.

From the beginning of the night, until the break of day.

GRAND INSPEOTOR-INQIDSITOR COMMANDER. THE THIRTY-FIRST GRADE OF THE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND TH!!: THIRTEENTH CONFERRED IN A G.'. CONSISTORY,

INTRODUCTION. THIS is merely an administrative Grade, it· being the dut:y of the Inquisitors to supervise and regulate the proceedi· gs of mt'erior bodies of the Rite, when properly brought betore them: and also, to examine all c•tndidates for advancement to the next grade. At the revision of the Rite by Frederick the Great, in 1786, this grade was formed by a division of the 25th grade of the Old Scotch Rite, which is now the 32d of the A.". and A.". Rite. The ceremony of initiation is very briet: It is always conferred in connection with the next grade, of which it was originally a part, and 1orms the first point in that grade, and the s.econd of K-H.

DECORATIONS.

White hangings, supported by eight gilded columns.

TITLES.

The assembly is styled a Sovereign Tribunal: The Master, Most Perfect PreRident; the Wardens, Inspectors; the Secretary, Chancellor; and all the members are called Most Enlightened.

DRESS.

No apron is worn in the Sovt. T.". In the inferior Lodges, posses$ors ofthis grade may wear a white apron, having on the llnp a Teutonic cross. The Order is white, worn as a collar, with a triangle, surrounded by rays. embroidered on the bottom ofit, and the number 31 in Arabic figures, in the center. In the Interior Lodges, instead of the Order, the Inquisitors wear a gold chain around the neck, from which is suspended the cross of the Order, the Jinks composed of the principal Masonic emblems. The Jewel is a silver Teutonic cross.

BATTERY.

I

I

J-J J J-J J J J-J

_

_[


SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 'filE 'fH!RTY-SECO)ID GRADE OF TilE ANC!ENT AND ACCEPTED RITE, AND 'l'IU! FOUR'fEENTH ,\ND LAST CONFERRED IN A G,', CONSISTORY.

INTRODUCTION. THIS was the twenty-fifth and highest grade of the Ancient Scotch Rite, until the year 178G, when Frederick the Great ex· tended the system. and "instituted tile 33d. Attached to the grade is a lonl( hist<>ry of the origin of Masonry, with eKplanatious of the Symbolic Masonry of the preceding grades. It can not be conferred without authority from the Supreme Council of the 33d, 01· from the Deputy of the di~trict where the ConsistorY. is located, The ceremony of initiation is of a chivalric and mtlitary char· acter, and there is much diversity of scene and incident in it, when the proper arrangement~ are made for conferring it.

DECORATIONS. The assembly should be held in an elevated place. The hangings are black, sprinkled with tears, with skeletons, skulls, and cross-bones, embroidered in silver. The throne of the presiding otliccr is elevated on a plattorrn of seven steps. The Wardens are placed under separate canopies. Betbre each Warden, is a table covered with crim"on cltltb, trimmed with blacl'; and on the front of the cover. nre, embroidered in black, the letters N:. 1{,'. M:. 1{.', A balustrade divides the hall into two parts, g;, and w:. In the w:. is the tracing-board, or plan of the J<;ncampment.

TRACING-llO.I.ltD, 011 PLAN OF THE ENOAID'MENT.* Its contour is a nonngon, in which is inscribed a heptagon: in the IH~ptagon is a pcnta~on; in the latter, an equilateral triangle; and t\nnlly, in the triangle, a circle: these forms retbr to the mystic numbers, :l, 5. 7, and 9. Iu tlw Rpnce between the heptagon and pent.al(on,.and parall(ll to the side• of the latter figure, are tive standards. designated by the letters U. G. N.J.:. T. The standard, T., is pur"p!e, and <HI it is embroidered the Ark of Alliance, with the nwtto ·•LmM Deo." Th~> standard 1<:, is azure; its device is a golden lion, with a collar about his twcl>, and holding a key in his mouth; motto, "Ad nwjurem Dei gloriam." The standard N. is Hilver; it displays a wing-ed heart, surmotlllted with Hames; above which, is a laurel wreath. The standard G. is ~;reen, having upon it, a crowned double-headed eagle, holding a sword in the ri:;llt claw, and a bl<wdiug heart in tlie Jeft. The standard U. is gold, nnd on it is a bull. On the sides of the nona!!;on, are nine tents nnd flags, and at the an~les, nine p~mno11s, of the same colors as the flags o!' the tents that precode them. The pennons are designated by lett<•rs dis· posed trom right to left in the !allowing order: I. :N. 0. N. X. I. L. A. S. These nine tents represent the tiivisions of the Masonic army, as foll"ws:

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" See engraving, page 4. ( 117) __ /j


118

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

Tent I., named E:.-fl.agand pennon blue: represents the three symbolic grades. Tent N., named J.".-flng and pennon green; the tent of the Perfect Masters. Tent 0 .. named A.".-flag and pennon red ancl g1路een; the tent of the Intendants of the building and Intimate Secretaries. Tent N., named J:.-tlag nnd pennon ch~ckered red and blacl! alternately; t.he tent of the Provosts and Judges. Tent X., named P.".-flag and pennon black; thE> tent of the Grand Master Architects and Masters Elect of Nine. Tent I., named J:.-tlag and pennon black and red; the tt'nt of the Sublime Knights Elected and Masters Elect of Fift.een. Tent L., named N:.-tlag and pennon red; the tent of the G:. E.". P:. and Masons. Tent A., named z:.-Jlag and pennon light green; the tent of the Knights of the E:. or Sword. Tent S., nalllt'd M.".-flag and pennon white, spotted with rE>d; the tent of the Princes of Rose-Croix, K.'. of the E:. and w:., and the p;. of Jerusalem.

s:.

TITLES.

The assE>mbly is styled a Sovereign G.". Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret. The Master is styled So~ere1gn of Sovereigns, Grand Prince, Illustrious Commander-in-Chief; in the work, he is styled Sovereign Grand Commander; he rE>presents Frederick the Great, king of Prussia. The Wardens are called First and Second Lieutenant Commanders; and the Orator, Minister of State. Beside these officers, there is a Grand Chancellor, Grand Architect, Grand Secretary, Grand T.easurer, Grand Master of Ceremonies, Expert Brother, Grand Captain of the Guards, Standard Bearer, Sentinel, and two Guards.

DRESS.

The presiding officer is clothed in the modern costume -of royalty; he is armed with a sword a11d shield. On a table betbre him, are his scepter and a balance. The L.". CommandE>rs have, nlso, swords and shields, and military hats. The officers, and at least six of the members, should be clothed in red, and stationed in the East. Neither the officers or members in costume wear any apron. They wear the Order, from which is suspended the jewel, a golden Teutonic cross. Order,-black, with silvE>r embroidery; at its extremity, is eml>roidered a red cross, in the center of which .is a doul>le路headed eagle, in silver; the Order is lii1ed with red, and on the lining is a Teutonic cross in black. The girdle, or sash, is black, fringed with silvf'r, with a red cross embroidered in front. The apron is white, linE>d and bordered with red; on the flap, is a red cross, embroidered with silver. In the center ot' the apron, is the plan of the Encampment.

BATTERY.

d-J J J J HOUR FOR THE DEPARTURE OF THE ARMY. The fifth hour after sunset.

l


SOVEREIGN GRAND

It~SPECTOR- GENERAL.

'rilE TliiR.TY-TiliRD AND LAST GR.A.DE OF TIIE ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

INTRODUC'l'ION. Tms is an official grade, and is only conferred on those who are elected members of the Sup1·eme Council, which is the chief and governing b<ldy of the Ancient and Accepted Rite. The ciJ·curnstances lmder which this body was created, by Fredericlr tlHJ Great, in 1780, have already been briefly narrated in the introduction to thi8 work. As there eRn only be one Supreme Council in any count1·y (except in the United States, where two are allowed), aud us the number of active members of which it is composed, can not exc,.ed nine, the number of Sov:. G.". 1:. c:. must. necessarily be very limited. Sometimes members of the s:. c:. resign their seats in that body, in order to make room li>r brethren on whom they wish to couter the powers of this grade, and in this way the number of s:. G.". I:. cr:. may, and very often does, excPecl the prescribed number nine. Sllprerne councils exercise control over all the grades above the sixteenth (Prio,ce of Jerusalem). In the Northern Masonic jurisdiction of the United States, they exercise control over aU the gmd<'S, from s:. M.". up.

DECORATIONS.

II

Hangings,- purple, with sl(eietons, skulls, cross-bones, &c., painted or embroidered thereon. In the 1~.". a magnitlcent thmnc, with a purple canopy, trimmed with gold, over it. Berwath the canopy, is a tranHparency, representing a Delta; in the (:c•rltcr of which is seen the inetlitblo name. Near the center of the mom, is a quadrangular pedestal. covered with scarlet cloth, on which n•sts nn OJWil Bible, with a mtked sword ac.rosH it. On the north of the pedt>stal stand~ * * * * * * * " holdiug the white banner of tlw Order in the left * * * "' and a poniud in the right, in the attitude or striking. Over the door of entrance, within the hall, is a blue st~art; bearing the de,·ice,5t'cue ntCltnHJUC Ju~. In the 1<::. a tlve-branched chandelier; in the \V.'., ouc wltll three branches; iu the s:., one wit.h two bt·:uu~hes; and m the N."., one with a siugle branch,-makiug, altogether, cleveu lights.

TITLES. The asgpmbly iH cnllcd a Supreme Council.

The Mt\Rtt>r is

stylptf l'vloHt Potent. Snv(.!l'C:ig-n Grand {Jnmmunder; he

n'p,·e~euts

Fre<lt>ricl' the t;rt•nt, king of Prussia. '!'her<~ is but oue \Vardt•n; ll<' Is styled Illustrious J.ieutmmut Grand Cornllland<•r. The other otlker~ nre,-au lllustrious Treasurer of th<.> H.". g:,: nn Illustrious SPer<•tury <ll' the !1.". E.".; !lll Illustrious G.". M:. of Ccr.".; awl an lllu>trious Captain of the Guards. The tnembers are styhH.1 Illustriou~ 811verPign:-;_ Grand In:-;pnctor-Gt.~IH~rals.

ln tlw N.". jurisdil'tion, U.S., two otlker!i !lave been r<•cent.ly added: a Gr.".<.: hauccllor, all(! an Assistau t Secretary orthe H.". E .•

DRESS.

The Most P:. s: G:. c:. is clothed in a crimson satin robe, trimmed with white; and wenrs a crown, with u naked sword in his right hand. The L.". G.". c:. wears a blue .-tin robe, and a ( 119 l

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120

ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED RITE.

qacal crown, and has a naked sword in his right hand. Th路e Captain of the G.'. wears an ancient military costume. All the members wear the Order and jewel, and in adclition, a red Teutonic cross attached to the left side of the coat. 路 . Order,-a broad white watered silk ribbon, trimmed with gold; at the bottom, a white, red and green rosette, trimmed with gold. Where the Order crosses the breast, is em broidered, in gold, a DPita surrounded. with rays, with the figures 33 in Arabic characters in tile ceutt~r, aud on two oftbe sides, a poniard directed toward the eenter. The Order is worn from the left shoulder to the right hip.

Jewel,-a large double-headed. black eagle, crowned; with wings extended; holding a sword in his talons; the beak, claws, and sword, are of gold. The jewel is worn suspended from the bottom ofthe Order, or from a. gold chain, bung around the neck.

HOURS OF WORK.

From the time when the word of the Otder is given, until the morning sun begins to illumine the Council.

B.A.TTERY.

J J J J J-J J d-d-J J ~=============================-

WEBBS FREEMASONS MONITOR  
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