Page 1


GUIDE TO THE

ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER.


JEWISH HIGH-pnmS'r IN FULL

S.~CEBDO"X.AL

nOBEs.


G U IDE TO THE

A COl\IPLETE lVrONITOR FOR

l~:OYAL

.AltOR MASONRY.

\VITEr ]'ULL INSTRUCTIONS IN THE DEGREES OF

lVIARI{ J;IASTER, PAST ~IASTER, l\JI0ST EXCEI.JIJENT ~lASTER AND ROYAL AltCR, TI~XT

ACCORDING TO THE

OF

BY JOHN SHEVILLE, P. G. H. P.

OF

NEW ,JERSEY,

AND

JAl\:I:ES L. GOULD, G. H. P.

OF

CONNECTIOUT.

TOGETHER WITH

:\ HISTORICAl", INTRODUCTION, EXPLANATORY Nor!'ES AND EMENDATIONS.

CRI'J~ICAr.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED MONITORIAL XNSTRtTCTIONS IN TaE

IN

HOLY ORnER OF HIGH

ARCH

'WITH THE CEREMONIES OF THE ORDER.

1\1. A., 8B'\ G. H. P. OF THE GRAND CHAP'l'ER OF OONNECTIOUT, G. G. R. A. CAPTAtN O]i'

THE G:£N. GRAND CHAPTEl{ Oli' THE U. S. A.

NEW YORK: ~L\ S0 ~ ICPU BIJ ISIN G

AND

UF ACT

432 BROOl\fE STREET.

1868.

ING CO ••


'Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by the 1\rA~ONIC PUBLISHING

AND :MANUFAC'rURING CO.,

Cn the Clerk's Offiee of the District Court of the United states for the Southern

District of New York.


TO TBE

~I. -.

E.路. OFFICERS AND IVIEMBERS OF THE

GENERAL GRAND CHAPTER OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AJ\:IERICA

IS

. FRATERNALLY DEDICATED

BY

THE AU'IHOR.


PREF .ACE. unexpected favor with which the appearance of' the" J\Ianual THE of the Chapter" was greeted has induced the author to comply \vith the frequently expressed desire for the publication of that little work in a larger fprm, better suited to the use of the older Inembers of the Fraternity. The original ,vork was presented to the Ro:yal Craft, in the hope that it might call' attention to the ancient ritual of the Chapter Degrees, in what may be properly called the American Rite. The text of "that work has been carefll11y preserved, and such explanatory notes have been aclq.ed as seemed to be necessar:r to render the present volume not only a . con1plete Text Book of the several degrees according to the ancient ritual, but also a Guide for every Companion to a' proper understanding of the ceremonies and symbolism of the Capitular degrees. The author has consulted all the 'works of prc,rious \vriters on. the subjects investigated, that ,yere accessible, and especially the standard \vorks of JOSEPHUS, PRIDEAUX, OLIVER and ~:IACKEY. He ,vould also take this opportunit:y to ackllowlec1ge his indebtedness for vaJnable suggestions to a nun1ber of his l\1:asonic fi'iellds a.ncl ~ corl-espondents, among ,vhom he ,voulcl particularly nlention: Ill. '. J ORN SHEYILLE, his co-laborer ill the preparation of the original text of the" l楼Ianual of the Chapter," ,\路hose knowledge of J\Iasonic ritualism is unsurpassed by an:;r Companion ,vhose acquaintance he has ever macle; ~I.". E. ". LUXE .A.. LOCKWOOD, Esq., the accomplished Grand High-Priest of Connecticut; R. ". \v.. 路.. CHAUNCEY ~1:. IIAT~H, Granel Lectnrer of the Grand Lodge of COllnecticut; TIL .... ROBERT l\I.A.COY, of the city of New York; E. G. STORER, the venerable Past Grarid Secretar;y of the Gralld Chapter of Connecticut; and the la.te AN1'HONY O'SuLLnrAN, Grauel Secretary of J\:Iissouri, in "whose recent death, the author lost a valued friend and counselor, as ditl all vtho kne,,' him. The ,york 'was prepared for the press by the author, in the brief moments snatchecl here and there from the never-ending cares and In.bOl"S of his profession, at times but illy suited to successful lite. rttry eft'ort. He is not so presumptuous as to hope that it will be founel free froln imperfections; but, tl路t1sting it may cheer the way t~nd strengt,hen the resolution <?f some seeker aftel' Light, as.


6

PREFACE.

--"'-taught in the sublime ritual of Capitular l\Iasonry, he submits the present volume to the charitable judgment of the Royal Arch Craft of the Country. JA~:IES L. GOULD, MARCH, 1867. Bric1geport, Ct. e ••

PREFAOE TO THE MANUAL OE TIlE CHAPTER. Uemove not the anci.cnt landmark, which thy fathers have set.-PRov. xxii. 23 AT a time when the Masonic Fraternit~~ of the country is zealously seeking to discover the" .Ancient Land:marks," now almost obliterat.ed by the tide of innovation which has been sweeping over the " old paths" for half a centur;y, it is deemed unnecessary to offer any apolob'Y for presenting to the Craft a H Manual" designed to point out the old ,york. ' This little volume is intended to supply a constantly increasing demand for a Monitor of convenient size, devoted exclusively to the Chapter Degrees, and bearing to them the same relation that the several recent reprints of WEBB'S Monitor do to the Symbolic Degrees. Au acquaintance with zealous and intelligent COlupanions of the nl~'stic-tie, ,more or less extended into every jurisdidion, and a sonle\vhat general personal observation of the worJi as performed in the different sections of the <..~ountry, have made known the existing defects and cUscre!).1.ncies in the same, and the wants of the Fraternity in this respect. A thorongh knovdedge, derivc<l from unquestionable authority, of the old 'ritual, and the lJl'esent English system, as well as of the different rituals in. vogue in the United States for the past tbirt:y years, acquired by earnest study and by several years of constttnt and In-actical "wol'k in the quarries,." has enabled the authors to compare the ritual as 111'ac.. ticed in the last century with these later systenls, and by this means, to suppl~'I', as they believe, a Manual tha.t will "prove of essential service to the Craft" in retracing their steps to the old a.nd· tried paths. The published works of P.RESTON, 'VEB2l, TOWN. ROLLIN, DALCIiO, R<\.URIN, OLIVER, H.A.RRIS. BRADLEY, and Ilumerous others, together with many old and valuable unpublished manuscripts of these and othel' Masonic celebrities of the last century, have been diligently conlpared in the 11reparation of this work, and the authol'S have no hesitation in averring that the arrangement of its severa. parts is in accordance with the oldebt and best systeln of work in use before the hand of modern innovation and . sO~Cb.lled improvmnent had been laid upon the Lectures and Work of the Chapter Degrees. Tl'Usting that a. Fraternity, whose distinguishing characteristic is Charity, will overlook the faults and imperfections that may be discovered in the u n!anual, " it is submitted to the Companions of the Royal Art in the hope that it nUlY afford useful instruction to those who are seeking after light, and thus lead to a better understanding of the subliuIC and beautiful ritual of Royal Arch :Masoury

S£P'rE~BEn,

1864.

JOHN SHEVILLE, Jersey City, N. J. JAl\IES L. GOULD, J3ridgc!Jort, <.it..


CONTENTS. INTRODUCTION•..•..•..••.•••••••.• ~

',' • • • • • • .. • . •

History of the English Roval Arch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Dermott's Degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. DUllckerley's Degree. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. The Union...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Present Status of the English Royal Arch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. The Ro:yal Arch of Ireland and Scotlanc1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Intl'ocl11ction of' l\fasonry into the United Stt-ttes Earl~Y History of Royal Al"ch l.Iasollry in the U llited States.. The American Ritual '" Symbolism of the Chapter Degrees FOURTH DEGREE-'1'I.A.BX. l\:IAsTEn ••••••••••••• '

History Officers.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " Symbolic Color........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Opening Ritual Reception ' Jewel of a ~Iark l\Iaster... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Jewish Half ShekeL.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. 'Vorking Tools of a 1fark l\Iaster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charge to the Ca.ndic1n.te. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Pt1rable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. PAST 1t-iAsTER

,

History Officers. · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Symbolic Color : Opening Ritual and ReCel)tion The Gihlemites. " Charge to the, Candiclate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Closing.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ..,........................

9 11 11 17 24 28 32 34 37 41 43 47 48 50

51 52 53 61 G5 67 70 73 77 81 82 85 85 86 87 87 92 94


8

CONTEN'rs.

1foST EXCELLENT MASTER. . . . . • • • • . • • . • . • . • . • • . • . • • • • . . . • • •.

95

Histol'JT " .' .. ' '. .. 96 Officers ' ' '" 98 Symbolic Color. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 98 Opening•.............................................. 99 Ritual 101 Dedicntion of the Telnple 104, Historical Sumn1ary 119 Charge to the Candidate 125 Closing 126 History of I{ing Solomon's Temple 128 ROYAL ARCH .•••.•...••••••••••...•••.•..•..•..•.......••.. 131 Officers 132 Jewels and Clothing 136 Openil1g 138 Charge at Opening 139 Reception 141 The Ark of Safet:y 162 The Ark of Alliance 1G3 The" Ark of Imitation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 164 The Signet of Truth " .. , .164: The Ark of the Covenant 170 The Pot of ~ianna 173 : 17'"1 Aar()u's Rod The Book of the La"w 174 The Shekinah ancl the Bathkoll 182 Royal Arch Ode 183 Lecture 186 Charge to the Candidates 206 Closillg " 208 l

••••••••••••••••

ORDER OF I-IIGH-PRIESTHOOD•.••••••••.•••...••••......•..... 209

Officers 212 Reception 215 Closing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. 227 CEREMONIES OF THE ORDER ....••••••.•••••••........•••.•••• 232 CHAFTER JEWELS . . . . . • . . . . . . . • • . • • . . . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2G5 MA.SONIO DOCUME~TS••....•..... " . . . . . . • • . • • . . . . . . . . .

.

.. 2G7


INTRODUCTION. flij.~aIlHE antiquity of Freemasonry IS generttlly con-

ceded by all, 1v路hether :friend or foe; and while some have asserted that" from the commencement of the ,vorld. we may trace the foundation of l\Iasonry, "路;f others have deduced its rise at lMllllrI~~ a later date, from the societies of operative lV1asons and cathed.ral builders of the middle ages, t anc1 still others, preferring a mic1dle ground, derive its origin frOD1 the building of Solomon's Temple at Jel'usalem. Whatever be the date of its establishment almost all ,vriters are agreed in assigning to the Oreler an antiquity ,,"hose years Cll,nnot be c1efinitely measured. Nor is it neceSStlry that ,ve should be able to state its age 'With precision. The Order does not depend on its antiqnity for its value to the world. Were it but the creation of yesterday this fact would not inlpair the force of its solemn obligations, diminish its claims upon the go~c1-,vin of mt1:nkind, nor lessen in any degree the subllinity and importance of its teachings. The great popularity of Freemasonl'Y among the goocl and great, its aclolo,vledged age, its inllerent vitality, ancl its long existence against the combined attacks of religious fanaticism, bigoted intolerance, and blind prejudice, while other hunlan societies have faded away ancl are forgotten, may indeed serve to convince the ,vorld that it has within it the elenlents of Truth and Virtue; may indeed prove to the candid 11lind that the Order has been a special manner '"\vatche<1 over and protected by Divine Providence,; but to the intelligent 1\Iason. tllesethillgs in themselves are of little ,vorth. He regards the Order as the custocliall of great and sublime truths, and loves it for 路'what it is, and not simply for what i.t may have t Steinbrenner's Origin. * Webb's Monitor.

in

l~*


10

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

been in the past. He follows its teachings because they lead him upward and onv?ard to a higher and better condition. Freemasonry has been defined by an eminent American 'Yliter, * to be "the most perfect and sublime institution ever formed for promoting the happiness of individuals or for increasing the general good of. the community." It has also been said to be a "beautiful system of morality vailed in allegory and illustrated by symbols." This definition of the institution has been generally considered as more especially applicable to the first three degrees, which have been called par excellence "Symbolical Degrees;" but, when properly understood ancl conferred, the Chapter Degrees are equally entitled to the name. Indeed they have a higher claim to the title, because the symbolism of the first six degrees in regular and successive steps, bears the same relation to the Grand Onluific Symbol of TRUTH brought to light in the Royal Arch Degree, that the shad.ow does to the substance. The system or ritual of the first three degrees wmch are the foundation of all l\:fasonic science is essentially the same in all nations and climes, but differences have always existed in the higher degrees as practiced in different countries. It may be owing to this cause that few, comparatively speaking, Royal Arch 1\Iasons have understood the full import of the symbolism of the Chapter Degrees; and hence most of our l\fasonic "Titers and teachers have been contented with giving necessary instrnctions for the use of .the ritual and ceremonies of the Order. The only work published in this country professing to teach the symb.olism of these degrees is Dr. A. G. lV1A.CKEY'S excellent one. entitled" The Book of the Chapter." This distinguished author has accomplished much good by drawing the attention of the Royal Craft to some of that sublime symbolism which is the glory and beauty oithe institution. It may now be said that never before in the history of the Order was there so general a demand among intelligent craftsmen for light on these important subjects. To obtt1in, however, anything like a correct knowledge of the Royal Art it is necessary to understand somethingoÂŁ the con..

* Dr. Dalchc.

Orations, p. 7.


11

INTRODUCTION.

dition of the Order at the time of its introduction into this country. . To do this we must study the rise and l)rogress of Royal Arch l\fasonry in the British Isles and to SOllle ext:Ilt on the continent of Europe. It is therefore proposed to gl'\~(~ a concise history of the origin of the Royal Arch nnd append.., ant degrees in those countries, as contained in tIle valuable works of Dr. OLIVER and other historians.

HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH ROYAL .AHCH. DERl\!OTT'S DEGREE.

A.T what time Freemasonry was introduced into England, or by whom, it is now uttel'ly impossible to tell. It is trllt~, there exist many traces of it at an early period; hut" the first authentic account of it is the history of the asseIll h1S of ~rasons at York A. D. 926, at which Enwrn presided as (jr:llld ~raster. From this memorable cOllvention originated ~ tbe well-known title of Ancient York }\JIu,sons. At this as~~erl;lbl.V many old 'Writings were produced in the Greelt, I.JntiIl,. other languages, from which the Constitutions ()f th(~ ""', . . . . P't ... ju·~liI Lodges were derived. By virtue of the Qhartt~r .ATHELSTANE all the l\fasons of the kingdom 'Vt~r(;1 ;/,.i"'·I"l"t.~.U·'l,"·l,.t and a Grand Lodge was established for their The history of this Grand Lodge for mallJ" celltuxieH is hl'~t(·.l \"c._l in very great obscurity, on account of trhe destrtl(~tif)nl' iuthn year 1720, of many valuable papers and records, l'.j" ()\"(.Irpru.. dent brethren, * who, fearing the effect of their I)l'lUn(~ut'lr'3:J. took that means to prevent it. It is frequ(~I1tly nHnd(·tl tH however, and continued to exist until some YC;tfS nft.1 rlh.; revival, as it has very properly been called, which t()(Jk .A. D. 1717. At that time it bore .the title of "Tlle Gru:nd of all England, " though in fact it exercisec1110 juri8di(~tion in the south of England. Indeed it would ft!lpear that tht) (lrruul Lodge at York was little more than an annlu11 of Masons, whose main usefulness consisted in its b(~illg the (~()Xl'" servator of the primitive Gothic Constitutions nn<1 '\.,,:il..,4Itl "'~'.::';o,. ....

J1

* Dr. George Oliver.

Origin of the Ro.ral Art'll.


12

GUIDE TO THE· R. A.

CHAP~rER.

A. D. 1717 only four lodges existed in the south of England. On St. JOHN the Baptist's day, in that J¥ear, annual assem.. bly or feast was held for the first' time in many :yeai's, by.the , members of those lodges, a Granel Lodge formed ul;1cler the title of "The Grftud Lodge of Engln,nc1, ,,' aliel ,A.NTHONY SA1,"RE, Esq~, was elected Grand JYln,ster of l\fasons." Previous to this time there 'were no stated or chartered lodges; but a sufficient number of IVfasons, met together in a certain c.1istrict, having among :them a l\Iaster ~rason, hael ample pow'er. to make Masons, "ithout warrant or charter. It ,vas now cletermined, however, by the ne"\v Gr~nd' Lodge that this right should be restricted. to certai,n fixed "lodges, l'egnlarly constituted anc1 chartered by the warrtlnt of the Grand J\Iaster ~pprovec1 by the Grand Ludge. JJtl;t-"this right to make Masons must be understooclto apply only to Entered Apprentiees; for the Old Re~lations say that "Apprentices must be admitted Fello,yCrafts and l\fasters only here" (thn,t is in G~'allc1 Lodge) "lIDless by a dispensation from· the Grand :r,Iaster."* From this it is .evident that few of our anCIent brethren ever progressed farther than the first degree, ,vhich is corroboloated by the fact that Entered Apprentices ,vere then melubers of t~e Grauel Lodge. t In early times, indeed, 110·0ne ,va.s called a' l\faster Mas6n uutil .he had become lvfaster of his Lodge. t This ru~e Vlas moclified by a neVl Regulation adopted November 22, .A.. D. 1725,' ,vhich ordained that "The ~Iaster of a Lodge with his Wardens, aucl a competent nunlber of his Lodge, assembled in due form, can make l\ilasters and Fello,,"s ut discretion. " . About this time many other new Regulations ,vera proposed and adopted, '\vhich had, and still have, great influence on the Order. First in importance among these was the one alloviing the admission of members without regal-a to occupation or pursuit. Previous to this era the society ,vas composec1 mostly of operative J\Iasons, ,"vith an occasional exception in favor of men distinguished for rank,· scientific attainments, or !)osition in civil life, or those who had rendered some eminent service

an

*Old Regulations. Art. x. +Old Charges.

t Old Regulations. Art. xxxix. Note to Art, iv.


INTUODUCTION.

13

to the Craft. In qrder to incre,lse its membership and extend the infiueD;ce of the Ordel", the proposition was agreed ,to.~hat the l)l'ivileges of lVlasonl'Y should no longer be restricted to operative 1\:la80n8, butlllen of all trades and professions should be admitted to the rights and benefits of the institution being regulal'ly approved, From 'this point the Fraternity rapidly acquired popularity and influence. 1\fen of rank and position sought affiliation with the Order, and there came. knocking at its eloors men of talent and leal'ning. These men applied themselves to the study of its symbols and allegories, and by their labors the dust and rubbish of centuries ,vere removed :from the foundation of the old Temple of Gperative l\'IaSOlll'y, and the new Temple'of Speculative Masonry ,,"as reared in all its beauty and grancleu'i', -to bless the vl"orld. in which it ,vas erected. . But this did not satisfy the selflsh purposes and ambitious designs of some, 'whohn,cl sought and unfortunately qbtained admission to the Order. These luell, failing to secure at once the full measure of their ambition, soon became disturbers of the peace ancl harmony of the Fratel"nity, as many others have done since, for silnilar reasons. Hence arose the famous schisnl anlong the English lVIasons, which, continuing for seventy :rears, has filled the l\'Iasollic "w'orld till this dn:r, and probabl~y' for all tirne to COIne, ,vith those differences in rituals, the efforts to l'enlove which hnve exhausted the ingenuity of m~tn. This schism originated~\- ,vith some unruly spirits, '\vho, being exceedingly anxious to obtain the l\faster's degree, prevt:tiled on some inconsiderate l\iaster l\fasons to open an illegal Lodge, and to raise them to that sublime degree. This ,vas done 'Without the authority or sanction of a 'warrant, and in direct violation of the Regulation adopted by the Grand Lodge at the revival. At length the facts became kno,vll, and complaints were preferred against the offending. bretln'en at the Quarterly Communication of the Grand Lodge in June, A. D. 1739. The schismatic~, being joinecl hy othel'S of like eharacter, in defia,llce of the Grand Lodge opened Lodges in

on

* Dr. Oliver. tllOl'01.tghly

Some account of the schism, ~tc. The student who wishes to understand this sub :cct should read Dr. Oliver's 路work.


GUIDE TO TR"F R. A. CIIAPrrER.

various parts of London. Tht'} Granel ~6dge of England now oxpressly ordered the regnlar lodges not to admit the seceders as visitors or to countenance or acknowledge them in any way whatever, at the same time adopting as a means of prevention, the systems being the same, a slight change in the forIlls of recognition. 7'.. The seceders at once seized on this circumstance ,vith exultation, accused the Grand Lodge of having deviated from ancient usage and violated the Landmarks, and made it a pretext for stigmatizing the regular Grand Lodge and its adherents as lJfode1'"n l\Iasons. They at the same time appropl'iated to themselves the exclu:sive and honorable title of "Ancient York Masons. " Taking advantage of this popular cry they organized a Grand Lodget and by their zeal soon gained a wide popularity. Persons of rank were inc1uced to enrol themselves under their banner; and as a means to extend their popularity, they professed to confer benefits and reveal secrets to their initiates not understood by the "l\loderns," or adherents of the regular Grand Lodge.t They at the same time asserted that the latter did not possess the true "Master's part," or third clegree. In the year 1756 L.A.URENCE DER~roTT~ published his .A.himan Bezan, and therein boldly affirmed that "Ancient l\fasonry consists of four degrees, the three first of which are those of the Entered Apprentice, the Fello,v-Craft,

* NOOl'thouck. Const. p. 24:0. "To accomplish this purpose iJomc variations were Inade in the established forms."

11101'0 efl"ectually~

t The date of the organization of this body has been variously stated. Dr. Mackey, in his Lex.ic.."On, gives the date as 1739. Pierson, ill his Traditions, gives it as having occurred about 1753. Preston asserts that the sececlers continued to hold their meetings without acknowledging a superior until the year 1772, when they chose for-their Grand }faster the Duke of Athol, then Grand l\Iaster elect of Scotland. Sanc1~'s, in his "Short View," says they (the .Ancients) established their Grand Lodge in London in 1757. In certain testimony taken by cOlnlnission in England, for use in the New York difficulty some years since, Bro. 'Vhite, at that thnc the venerable Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of England, sa.ys, under oath, in answer to a qnestion, that the Athol or Ancient Grand Lodge was formed in 1752. This ought to settle the question. :t:A.himan Rezen, pp. 30.70. ยง Laurence Dermott was an Irish 1\r~son of ability, who aftlliated with the so.. called Ancients, and "as for many years their Grand Secretary. He was after.. ward the Deputy Grand :r"Taster of that body, and to his zeal and talents the 4.ncient.s owed very Dluch of their prospct'i!y and influence.


INTRODUCTION.

15

and the sublime degt'ee of l\faster; and a brother being well versed in these degrees, and otherwise qualified as hereafter will be expressed, is eligible to he admitted to the fourth degTee, the Holy Royal Arch. This degree is certainly more august, sublime, and important than those which precede it, and is the summit and perfection of Ancient l\fasonry."* The earliest reference to the Royal Arch as a separate or fourth degree that I have met is the following from Dr. FITFIELD D'.A.SSIGNEY, published in 1744. The brother says: "Some of the Fraternity have expressed an uneasiness at the Royal Arch being kept a secret from them, since they had already passed through the usual degrees of probation; but I cannot help being o~ the opinion that they have no right to any such benefit, until they make a proper application and are received ,vith due formality as having passed· the chair and given undeniable proofs of their skill. " It is well known by alll\{asomc students that originally the essential or grand feature of the present Royal Arch Degree was given as a concluding section or completion of the "l\faster's part. " The loss and recovery were so arranged as to follow each other in the same ceremonial. This ,,"as undoubtec11y the case at the time of the revival, A.. D. 1717. This is conclusively sho·wn by the consideration of the £01IO'\Ying facts. The first warrant for opening a Lodge in France ",vas granted in 1725 by the Grauel Lodge of Englil;nd to Lord DERWENTWATER and others; and Dr. OLIVER asserts that he has in his possession a French floor cloth of about that date in \vhich the true l\I. W. is to be found in its original place. Again, the early lectures in use at the time of the revival show conclusively that the Master's degree was then complete in ltsel£.i Soon after the revival,· in 1720, ANDERSON and DESAGULIEnB were authorized to revise the lectures. Their revision continued in 'use until about A. D. 1732, "rhen }\IARTIN CLARE was authorized to l)repare a new revision. Neithel' of these contained ~..ny evidence of a fourth degJ:ee.

* Prealnble to the original laws of R. A. Degree. t Lectu r~s of Sir Christopher Wren.


16

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

After a full and careful stud:yof the subject, Dr. OLIVEB asserts that the earliest mention of the Royn,I.A,.rch v{hich he can find is in the year 1740.'·x- DER~IoTTconfesses that the Royal Arch was first prt"tcticed' in England by the so-called . .\.ncien ts. t The separation of its concluding portion from the ancient l\:faster's degree, and its el'ection into another grade or degree, ,yas unquestionably the 'York of the schislllatics. This nlust have been done bet,veen the years 1740 and 1741:, and circumstantial evidence "vouid seem to fix the tUlle at or very near the fOl'mer year. The Ancients having been effectually excluded from the lodges adhering to the Grand Lodge of England, by the adoption of the slight change in the ritual before mentioned, resolved on retaliation. In order to render the schisn.l more complete, and also make amends for their o"!ltlawry by the constitutional Grand Lodge, they determined to mutilate the third degree, anc1 from its cOllcluding portion establish a fourth grade, ,vhioh they called the Holy Royal .A..r ch. They undoubtedly 0 btainecl the idea of this change, and also of the title ·which they gave the ne,Y degree, from Ohevalier RAl\ISAy,t ,vha ·visited Englaud ill 1740, and atternptecl to induce the Granel Lodge of England to adopt his ne'w inventions.?, His

* Dl" Oliver.

Origin of English Royal Arch, p. 19. p. 114. R~)'lllsay was born at Ayr, in Scotland, in 1686, and died in Fl'unce in 1743. lIe was a man of extensive learning, and a faithful follo,.. ~er of the fortuues of tho Pretender; and, it is said, attemptecl to nutke Freemasonry subscl'vieut to the interests of the house of Stuart. He advanced the theory that the institution arose in the Holy Land during the crusades, as an Order ofCbivalry, and originated several new degrees based upon that theory. Among these were tlu'ee degrees calleel Scotch Mason, N ovicc, and Knight of the Temple. III 1728 he also introduced another grade kno\,'n as Ramsa~T's Itoyal Arch. This degree is not the Royal Arch of England, Ireland, or the United States, and is mora prOlJerly termed the "Arch of Enoch." § The date of this attempt of Hanlsay is differently stated. Dr. 1\Iackey, in his Lexicon, gives the date as 1728. Dr. Oliver, in his "Rev~lations of a Square," states the origin of RaIllsay's Degrees to have been in 1725, and the same author, in his "Origin of the English Ro;yal Al'ch/' uses this l:mguage: "In 1740 he came over to England, and relnained in this country luore th~m a year," etc. In al10ther place Dr. Oliver says Rumsay's Degrees were originated ill 1728. A. T. C. Pierson, in his Traditions, gives the date of Ramsay's !loyal Arch H about 17,10" n.nd 'further says that "about A. D.1740 CheY~Llifn.· RanlsaJ~ appeared in I~ondon.u

t Ahinlan Rezon,

+


INTRODUCTION.

17

schenles being rejectecl by the constitutional Granel Lodge;* he \vithout doubt made overtures to the Ancients, which were more successful. By a cOlnparison of the ritual of RA~!SAY'S degree "rith the earliest ritual of the Royal Arch of DERMOTT, as practiced by the Ancients, it is apparent that DERMOTT and his colleagues must have hacl a knowledge of the former in constructing their O"Wll degree. The learned Dr. OLIVER indeed asserts his belief that in the earliest arrangement of the English degree the details of RAlVISAY'S clegree formecl one of the preliminary ceremonies. t Nothing is therefore more probable than that DER~:IOTT made use of RA!\.ISAY'S clegTee as the founclation on which to construct his OWll.t rrh.is belief is confirmed by many esoteric reasons, which cannot be written. Having thus briefly traced the origin of DERMOTT'S degree, or the Royal .AJ:路ch of the An.,cient lVIasons, used by them until the union bet,,"een the Grand Lodges in 1813, we ",'ill recur to the introduction of the clegree among the lJ[odm-ns. DUNCKERLEY'S DEGREE.

TEE Granel Loc1ge of England for many years after the origin of DER!\!OTT'S degree knew nothing of the Royal A.rch, and continued the practice of the first three degrees, including the brief completion of the third degree. In the year 1755 it was currently reported among the brethren that some of the members of Lodge No. 94 had been on the continent ancl there witnessed extraol'dinary manifestations in Ancient l\fasonry, which that Lodge had agreed to practice evel'y third lodge night. This Lodge being composed mostly of nlembers who had been affiliated ,vith the Ancients, though then acting under a charter from the Granel Lodge of England, was not in the best repute; vlhich gave currency to the l'eport. The Deputy Grand l\faster, Dr. l\f~"'"NINGHA!r, at once visited the Lodge, and thel'e learned th,at this pretencled Ancient l\fasonl'Y was

* Dr. Oliver.

Origin of English ROj~al Arch, p. 18. Oliver. Origin of English no~~nl Arch, 11. 19, allcl note. :j: That Dernlott 'was the lllaste-r spirit in its fabrication is fairl)" to be inferred from his well kJlO\Vn ~Lbility a:ncl position aluong the ,Ancients, allcl also fi'om the l~ct that he never denied its authorship when charged'witl.l it.

t Dr.


18

GUIDE TO THE R. A.' CHAPTER.

nothing more than a mixture of "'''hat is now knO\V1l as RAMSAY'S RO:Yltl Arch with DEB1\!OTT'S (legree, the principal feature of 1vhich was a transfer of the real Ltlndmark of it l\faster }\fason to a ne,v degree, \vhich 'was unknown and unrecognized hy the Grand Lodge of England. 7(At the ensuing Grand Lodge, l\farch 20, 1755, Dr. l\i.A.NNINGHAl\I communicated a statement of these il~regularities, \vhen it 'V3S unanimously resolved"That the meetings of brethren uncler any denomination of 1\fasons, other than as brethren of this our ancient and honorable society of Free and AcceptecllVlasons, is inconsistent 'with the honol.~ and interest of the Craft, and a high insult on our Grand l\laster, and the 1vhole body of ~lasons."t This appears to have been the first intilnation that tho Constitutional Grand Loc1ge had ever receivecl in regarcl to the innovations IDf).cle by the Ancients, u,11(1 the language of the resolution it ,vill be observed is exceedingly hll1a,rc1ec1-a good exanlple for more modern times. 'How"ever, the Loc1ge No. 94 persisted in holding the obnoxious meet.ings, and at the next qtutrterly communicatiou of the Gr~1:nd Lodge a vote was passed erasing that Lodge from the list, of reguh1r lodges. From these facts it is evident th:1t the ROJal Arch, ill the form of a separate clegrce, ,vas tlt thiLt time vtholl:)1' llnkno,vn to the .J.~foclerns. It soon became, fron1 this action of the Grana Lodge ftud the contumacy of Lodge No. 94:, a subject of discussion and controversy. Something of the feeling thus engenderecl may be seen in the following cirCUlnstance: In 1758 n.n Ancient 1\1ason applied to the J.lIoderns for pecuniary relief, and the Grauel Secretary of the Grnnd Lodge in reply stutec1: "Being an Ancient l\Iason, :Y-0u are not entitled to an:)"'路 of our charity. The .A.ncient l\Iasons haye a Lodge at the 'Five Bells' in the Strand and their Secretary's name is DERMOTT. Our society is neither .Arch,Rol/al.A'rch, nor .r1ncient, so that you have no right to partake of our charity. "~ From this it is apparent also tha.t

* Dr. Oliver.

Revelations of a Square, p. 296.

t l\Iinutes of Gruntl Lodge, 1755. t Ahiman Hezon. Introduction, p.

xi.


INTRODUCTION.

19

the l\foderns so late as 1758 had not adopted the ne,," degree. About this time, * ho,vever, the Rite of Perfection arose in France, and the Royal Arch of that rite, known as "Knight of the Ninth Arch," soon superseded the degree of Ohevalier R.A.l\ISAY, and may haye had some influence in molding sub.. sequent events. A.bout .this time a man named THOMAS DUNCKERLEY appearecl alnong the l\Iasonic celebrities of the eighteenth century. t He was a person of rare talents, and exerted during his career a great influence upon the Order, as will. be seen. He is clescribed by Dr. OLIVER as "the oracle of the Granel Loc1ge, and the accrec1ited interpreter of its Constitutions. "t DUNCKEnLEY ,vas authorized by the Granel Lodge some'"\vhere about A. D. 1770~ to construct a new code of lectures bJ 11 careful revision of the existing lituaI, which last 1,VftS based on the lectures of Dr.l\IAN~-rmGH.A.l\I.l1anc1l\IABTIN

* Dr. Oliver says in this ~"ear (1758) arose the Rite of Perfection, in which be is followecl by several other writers, among whom is Pierson; but Dr. l\Iackey (Lexicon, 1). 344,) makes the date to have been four :rears earlier. From manu.. scripts in rny possession I am inclined to think its origin must have been still earlier. Great llumbers of degrees were originated about the middle of the eighteenth century, which are now entirC'ly obsolete, and. whose names evon are nearly forgotten. t Thomas DUllckerley is said to have been an illegitimate son of George II. He is described as possessed of a most br5lliant intellect. The :first !)ublic luention of his name I have met, is in conne~tion with the (leliv~ry of an address or charge at Plynlouth, in 1757. He was appointed .Provincial Grand J\Iaster for H~lmpshire in 17G6; and for his zeal in the Royal Art, the Grand Lodge resolved that he should rank as a Past Senior Grand ""arden. He was :Master of a Lodge in 1770, and is said by Pierson (Traditions, p. 322,) to have been Grand l\Iaster. But this is probably a mistake as I can :find no record of the fact. He is said by Oliver to have been Grand Superintendent and Past Grand 1Jlaster of Royal Arch Masons for the county of Bristol and other counties, under the patronage of the Dnke of Clarence, and also l\Iost Em. and Sup. Grand l\Iaster of Knights of R. C.; Teml)lal's, K. H., etc., of England. Dr. Oliver states that he intl'ow duced a revised lecture into the Military Degrees which was in use runny year~ uncler the name of "Dunckerley's Sections." He died at :Porrsnlollth" Ellglau(l, in NOVe11'lber 1795, having been honored and esteemed by all who knew him. :j:Dr. Oliver.路 Revelations of a Square, p.90. 搂 Steinbrenner. Ol'igin of lVlasonry, p. 159. Dr. Oliver. Revelations of a Square, p. 9l. II It is impossible to give the date when the lectures of Dr. l\lanningham were promulgated. It lllust have been aOlnewhcl'e between 1745 and 1755. The~' never entireljr superseded the lectures of Clare.


20

GUIDE TO THE R .. A. CHAPTElt.

DUNCKERLEY ·was a person ·well fitted for that~task. " His views of l\Iasonry were liberal, and he despised sectarian controversy. He:frequently visited th~ .A ncient Masons' lodges for the purpose of ascertaining what ,vas the actual difference bet,veen the t,vo systems, as LAURENCE DERl\IOTT, in the .i\...himH..n Rezon, had confidently boasted of the superiority of their mode of 'work over that recommenc1ed by the legitimate Granel Lodge; and he carefully culled its flo,\vers, and transplanted them into Constitutional l\fasonry; for he actually found amongst the Ancients, to his undisguised astonishment, several material innovations in theil' system, including some alteration of the Old Landmarks, and a new application"t of an im.I)ol'tant itenl in the third clegree. He at once determined to introduce the essential features of this novelty into his ov:tn revision of the lectures. Divesting the DERlt.IOTT degree of many crudities, and ill fact substantially rearranging it, he rewrote its lecture, adapting it to his craft lectures, and presented the ""hole to the Grand Lodge. He hacl "executed his task so well that the Grand Lodge at once adopted his revision o:f the lectures, the Ro:ra1 .Arch included, ·without amendment or alteration, and enjoined its prn.ctice on all the lodges under its jurisc1iction.t But Dr. OLIVER regrets that DUNOKERLEY did not still further improve the ritual of the Royal Arch Degree, from the nu"tterials which he clerived from the Anclents, observing, ,v·ith much force::, tha,t he could not have failed to see their incongruity.~ It must .be remembered, however, that even the attempt to introduce the Royal Arch at all into the ritual of the Moderns

CLARE.·*

* 1\Iartiu Clare remodeled the then existing lectures about the year 1732. His systelU ,vas an amplification and expansion of the previous systems. His version. of the lectures is said to have been so judiciously drawn up that, in the language of Oliver, "its practice was enjoined on all the lodges under the COl1stitntion of EnglanLl, and all foruler lectures "were abrogated and pronounced obsolete. In his lectures w'e find the first allusion to the symbol of the point within a circle, though the point itself had been briefly nlentionecl in the lectures ot Anderson. t Dr. Oliver. Revelations of a Square, p. 90. t Dr. Olivcr: Revelations of a Square, p. 91. Steinbrenner's Origin, et.c., p~

160. § Dr. Olh"er.

Insignia of the

lto~;al

Arch, p. 11.


INTRODUCTION.

21

Waf., Lt bold step, find o.ne which "would have utterly ruinecl the l\:fasonic influence of a "weaker man. As it was, it required all DUNCKERLEY'S 0,\V11 influence, supported by the patronage of the Duke of Clarence, to carry the project through the Grand Lodge. For although it was adoptecl by that body by a large Inajority, yet it met vigorous opposition from the minority. DUNCKERLEY'S degree was given as an additional J.1拢aste'j"'s par"t, or, in other worcls, was',simply an amplification or expansion of the original cOlnpletion of the third degree. -x. It involvec1 however a further removal of the true lVe. W. than hacl been usual, ,vhich the older members conceived to be such an innovation that they bitterly opposed the adoption and use of the ritual. It was not until A. D. 1779 that the ne,v arrangement became generallJ acquiesced in, as '\ve shall see.. Other additions to the ritual were made by DUNCKERLE'Y in this system of lectures, a clescription of "which is foreign to Oul' present purpose; but we may say, in passing, that among these novelties were "the theological ladder with its three I'ounds of Faith, Hope, and Charity," anda1so "the lines parallel" as sj'Wbolic of the two Saints John, this l:1st, by the way, being an innovation which should have never gained currency in a universal institution. A. D. 1772 PRESTONt published in London the fil'st eilition of his'\york entitled "illustrations of l\1'asonry by WILLIA}!

*

Dr.. Oliver, in a. note on page 01 of his Revelations .of a Square, saJ's, "I hav't.\ in my possession a cOllY of the R. A. Lecture which was introduced into Grand Lodge on the above occasion. It is a curious and interesting docmnent, al::l constituting' a fair evidence of the nature of I{. A. l\Iasonry at its cOluroencenlent in 1740." t Willianl Preston was路 a Scotchman by birth, and a man of marked ability. To his labors as a ritualist and IIlstOI ian l\:Iasonry is nluch illdebtecl. He came to London in 1760, and soon after was initiated in a new Lodge working at the time under a dispensation from the Ancient Grand Lodge. Having Dlade the acquaintance of JUll1eS Heseltine, afterward Grand Secretary of the .Moderns,

he became doubtful of the legitimacy of the Ancients, and was induced to connect himself ,vith a regular Lodge under the Grand Lodge of England. Fr01u this time his advancement in the Order was rapid untU he cmue to exert an influence seconcl to no other person. [See Stephen Jones' Biography of Preston.]


22

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

PRESTON. "-X-

At this period a literal'y tt1ste was arising among all classes of society, and its influence. began to be felt upon the }\Iasonic Fl'aternity. A general clesire for a Ulore polished ritual ","as the natUl'a! consequence; and hence a l"e"vision of the lectures 'vas again demanded, if the Order would llleetthe exigencies of the times. PRESTON set hiulself earnestly at work to prepare for this labor, the necessity of 'which had made itself manifest to his active mind. He sought inforlllation from evel'y available SOU1"Ce, compared all the existing rituals, anc1 at length produced what is knO'Vl1 the ,vol'lel over as the "Prestonian Lectures." These lectures 'vtere used by the dependencies of the Grauel Lodge of England until the Union A. D. 1813. t About the same time another l\fasonic light was beginning to shine. I.refer to 'VILLI.A.M HUTCHINSON, who published in 1775 his first edition of "The Spilit of l\Iasonr~Y'," a work of much merit.~ The reader of that book will be struck, however, with the fact that the '\vork contains scarcely a vestige of an allusion to the Royal Arch.~ The same is true of PRESTON'S "illustrations;" for the slightest allusion to that degree does not appear in the edition of that vlork published in 1781.

*

Thil:l work went through nlany editions ane} was universally concedcl.l anlong the regular l\Iasons to be the standard book of the Order7 even so late as the Union in 1813. It was first reprinted in America in the ~路ear 1804:, and I have before me an edition printed in London so late as 1840. The Fr{~enlaSon's Monitor, published in 1797, b~~ Webb, was a reprint of Preston's ,york to a very large extent, so far as the first three degrees. "\Vebb's lectnres in those degrees were only a revision of the Prestonian system. Pi'estoll divided the first lecture into six sections, the second into four, and the third into twelve sections. \Vebb simplified. this construction, but undoubtecU:y' derived Illost of his ritual fronl the s;ystem of Preston. It has been said that ,,\Yebb ,'isited l~nglancl. to obtain information from Preston himself, but this is a mistake. 't Dr. Oliver asserts (Revelations of a Square, p. 127,) that Preston first presented his lectures to a meeting of Grand Officers and other elninent brethren held at the,Crown and .A.nchor Tavern in the Strand, on Thursc1a:r, l\Iay 21, 1772. :j: Willialu Hutchinson was an attorney of extensive practice, and was greatly respected for his literar:t" acquirements and his CUltivated mind. He was for nlany years J.\.Iaster of a Lodge; auclclied April 7, 1814, at the advanced age of eighty-t\yo years. SSteinbrenner (Origin, etc., p. 161,) sa:ys: "It is supposed th~l.t Hutchinson and Pl'eston at length ullitecl," and H that the lectures of the former were merg<?d into those of the latter." ' 7


INTHODUCTION.

28

though the next edition (1788) contains several Royal Arch odes by DUNCKERLEY and others. The Royal Arch Chapter as a separate body, but under the authority of the Grand Lodge, was established in London some time prior to 1780,?~ and yet it did not receive the slightest notice from PRESTON in his edition of the next year, a fact '\vhich ,vould seeln to ,varrant the conclusion that even then the Royal Arch was not in very high repute. among the J.lIoderns. At this tilne the title "Excellent" was applied to the degree anc1 its possessors. t A brother ,vho hac1 received the degTee was said, in the ritual and also in the certificates issued in those days, to have been " pn..s sed" to the" Sl~promeDegree of Excellent R. A. l\fason. "t The first Book of Oonstitutions of the Royal Arch was issued in 1786 by the (; (; Supreme Grallc1Chapter. " The regultttions contained in this Book of Constitutions were agreed to, however, l\fay 10, 1782, and it is Sttid were drawn up by DID{CKERLEY.~

It will be borne in mind by the reac1er that the Ancients had at this time a Grand Chapter and a systenl of laws :for the governnlcnt of the Royal Arch, and that the DER~roTT lectures were llsed by them without having unc1ergoue any essential ehunge.

* William Sandys, in his" Short View'," srotes that this occurred in 1777 or thereabouts. Dr. Oliver, in his" Origin of the English RoyaIA.rch," gives it as his opinion that the bodJ~ referred to was established in 1779. Clavel contends that the RO:fal Arch Degree originated in 1777; but he probably refers to the cstablishnlent of the Royal Arch Chapter. t Dr. Oliyer: Origin of the English Royal Arch, pp. 24:-27. :t: As these certificates show how the chapter was then held (at the tiIr1e oftha fOI'm.ation of the Grand Chapter), it Inay be interesting to transcribe one, "We the three Chiefs and Scribe, whose names are hereunto SUbscribed, do certify that in a Chapter of Holy Ito:yal Arch, convened and held under the sanction and authority of the worshipful Lodge No.-, our beloved brother A. B. having delivered to us the recomnlendation of the Lodge - - hereunto subjoined, and proved himself by due examination to be well qualified in the 8e'vera1 degrees of Apprentice, Fellow-Craft, and l\Iaster Mason, a'JUl havinf} passed the chat,路, wa~ by us adluittecl to the Supreme Degree of Excellent Royal Arch 1fIason." Fronl this it appears that "lxLssmg the chah'" was then n. prerequisite for the Itaya] Arch Degree. 搂 Dr. Oliver says these Regulations were agreed to by the constitutional G,'anrl Lodge. Origin, etc., p. 9.


24

I

GUIDE TO THE R. A. qIIAPTER.

Thus the Roya,ll\J.'ch Degree ,vas practiced uncleI' these two distinct ancl anta.gonistical jurisdictions until the union of the two Grand Loc1ges in 1813. It ,vas during this unsettled period that the Royal Arch WItS gcnel'ally introduced into America, and as might be expected the same c1ifficulties and disturbances were transplanted into this country as ahteady existed in路 Enghtnd. Before our investigation of the American system, ho,vever, it will be more in accordance ",ith our design to complete our can.. sideration of the English Royal Arch.. THE UNION. THE election of the Duke of Athol as the Grand l\Iaster of the Ancients at once gaye rise to the closest alliance between them and the Grand Lodges of Scotland and Ireland, inasmuch as that nobleman was then also the Grand ~Iaster of Scotland.. This cordiality between these several Granel Lodges induced the lJIoderns to make an effort in the year 1801 to bring about a union of their Grand Lodge 'with that of the Ancients, or Athol lVIasons, as they now began to be called. This effort, hO'wever, had no immediate effect, not being met ,vith a corresponding spirit by the Ancients. The next step to,vard a reunion of the CritIt originated in 1803, with the Earl of l\foirtt, the Deputy Grand l\fastel" of the Grauel Lodge of England. A.t the grancl festival of St. ~"DREW, holden at Edinblll*g, Nov. 13, in that year, Lord MomA, who was路 present as an in"vited guest, introduced the subject of the schisln in England, and explained the action of the Grand Lodge of -England in the premises. This led to mutual explanations between the Grand Lodges of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and a most :friencUy intercourse between these influential bodies.路X. This good feeling Vtl'as still flu'tller cQnfirmed by the election of the Prince of vVales as Grand l\:faster of Scotland, he already holding that honorable position in the Grand Lodge of England. This alliance bet,veen these several Grand Lodges, and their earnest ,vishes publicly expressed that the schism might be healed, seem to ha\'e

* Oliver's edition of Preston, p. 277.


INTRODUCTION.

25

made a strong impression on the Ancients, who, becoming alarmed lest this strong coalition should overthrow their authority and influence, now became exceedingly anxious to complete the reunion of the two bodies. This disposition ",'as unclonbteclly still further increased by the fact that all the differences between the two systems in the United States, where both had been early planted, were already settled or in process of settlenlent. The difficulties constantly arising among the Craft, from the existeJ3.ce of' the t,vo organizations, had heeolne so irksome that all l"ight-minded men were an.."rious to see the sellisnl brought to an end, and the most influentinl members of the Order upon either side interested themselves to promote a settlelnent of the trouble. But it was necessarily a 'York of tinle. Prejudices of long standing were to be removed, l)ersonal animosities of the most bitter character ,vere to be mollified, opinions of the most diverse natmoes "'rere to be harmonized, and hence it will not snrprise anyone familiar ,vith the lVlasonic history of the tilne, that the c1esired. object ,vas not consummated until 18130 It Vvill be renlelnbeloed also that each of the 0Pl)osing G-rand Lodges was a large .boc1y, composed of the first talent in Enghulc1, ane1 presided over by distinguished llobleluen.-* In addition to this it ll1USt illso be borne in n1.i'l1d that each Grand Loc1ge had. a large amount of property, and a charity flmcl 111allaged by its bOHlrd. All the intricate questions growing out of these CirCU111stances had to be fairly adjusted to nleet the vie,Ys and sanction of men ,vho had been but recently infl.anl~cl ,"ith hatrec1 to,vard each other. In such a state of things the object could only be attained by the exercise of charity, patience, and forbearance. In the year 1809 the constitutiOllill Grand Lodge met the overtures of the Ancients by passing a resolution, "That it is not necessary to continue in force any longer those meaSUl'es 'vhich ,vere resorted to in or ..

* " In 1717 there were only four lodges in the south of England; but in 1730 they had increased to 245 registered lodges; in 1707 there. were 416; in 1795 we And 542; in IH04, 600 011 the books of the Grand. Lodge of England, beside about 300 lodges of A.ncietl.t MasollS; SOUle of them being in foreign countries, a.nd others itinerant; in 1811 the llunlber of both amonnted to nearly l~OOO." Oliver. Historical Landmarks of Freemasonry, po' 215.

2


26

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHA.PTER.

about the yeal路 1739, respecting irregular l\fasons; and we, therefore, enjoin the Lodges to revert to the ancient la.ndmarks of the society. ,,芦. An occasional Lodge 'ViolS then appointed, called the Lodge of Promulgation, as a prep~lra颅 tory step to carrying out the union of the t","o Grand Lodges. This concession of the J.lloderns l'enl(Jved the greatest obstacle in the way of the return of the Ancients, n,ncl 'V,"lAS follo,ved, on their l)art, by the resignation of the Duke of .A.thoI, their then Grand l\'faster, and the appointment of the Duke of I{ent to that office. His brother, the Dul{e of Sussex, 'was at this time the Grand lViaster of the J.1Iode'rns, having been elected to that position on the accession of the Prince of Wales to the Regency, and his conseqnent resignation of the Grand J.\ilastership. Under the skillful direction of these tvv"o illustrious brothers the Union was acconlplished and finally consumnlated on St. JOHN'S day, Dec. 27, .A. D. 1813. The original articles for the Union ,vere Sif,rtled, r~"lAtified, and confirnlec1, and the seal of the respective Gra.ncl Lodges affixed Dec. 1, 1813. i路 The second of these articles ,,""as as follo'ws: "It is declared and pronounced that pur~Anciel1t l\Iasonry consists of three degrees, and no more~':;{i~~:~' those of the Entered Apprentiee, the Fello,v-Cr~1ft, and the l\faster l\Iasoll (including the Supreme Order of the Holy Royal Arch). But this article is not intended to prevent any Lodge or Ohapter from holding a meeting in any of the degrees of the Orders of Chivalry, according to the constitutions of the said Orders." The third article proyic1es that "there shall be the most perfect unity of obligation, of discipline, of ,vorking the lodges, .of making, passing and raising, instructing anc1 clothing brothers. "

* Grand Lodge Minutes, 1809. t These articleaare very interesting,

and can bo found entire with a. descrip.. tion of the rich and gorgeous ceremonies of the l'euniOll in the minutes of the United Grand Lodge, anel in Dr. Oliver's eclition of Preston's Illustrations. The whole of this interesting history of the formation of the United Grand L('dge should be understood b;Y' e.. . cry :l\Iason. The substa,nce of the seCOlld artidn:is; 81ill retained in the Constitution of tho ITnite>d. Gl':1Ild Lod,ge of Engla.lld.


27 To accomplish this uniformity the articles further provided for the appointment of nine "'\Yorthy ancl expert }\Iaster l\'Iasons vr Past l\{asters," from each of the t,vo Fraternities, who should meet and form a "Lodge of ReconciliaJtion," whose duty it should be to prepare the ,yay for the Grand Reunion. This Lodge 'was also charged \yith the duty of ascertaining from a COilll)arison of the t·wo systenls of work and lectures, and from other sources, what the ancient landmarks and ","ark of the Order was, and directed to communicate the same to the several lodges about to be united. Rev. S"tMUEL HEl\DIING, D.D., was the leading man ill this Lodge of Reconciliation, and hence the work and lectul~es prolnuIgated by the Lodge have been kno'w'll as the Union or H:&'UillNG Lectures. They were, of necessity from the constitution of the Lodge, a compromise between the systems of PRESTON and DEBl\IOTr, modified by the individual vievls of the authors of the new systenl. * Some of the most important synlbols ancl teachings of the Prestonian Ritual are entirely omitted in· the HEl\IlVlING system, which is llO"\V the stan<larcl ,york of the "United Grand Lodge of .Ancient Freemasons of England. "t The changes .thus made in the three degrees would not be considered by American l\:[asons as any inl!JrOyement on our established lllocles of "Tork.t Fronl,vhat has been said it is apparent that since the reyival in 1717 until the Union ill 1813, a !)el;'oc1 of less than one hundred years, the lectures and ritual of English Freemasonry have been authoritatively re'v"ised and changed at least seven or eight times, and 'while the Fraternity of that country have generally observed the binding force of the fundnmen£al landmarks,'

* See Dr. Oliver on this subject; also Steinbrenner.

Origin, p. 16I. Oliver sa;ys (Symbol of Glor~~, p. 100), U l\Ian:r of the above illustra.tions were expunged bj~ Dr. Hemn.ling and his associat(,:s in the Lodge of Reconciliation, from the revised Lectures ; .Moses aml Solom07~ were S1.Lbstitu.ted as Ote two j[asou'ic pa1*alleZs, etc." 4:The difference between the Ancient and Modern systems is stated by Dr. Oliver thus: "The ltfoderns, so·called by the innovators,l·ctained the original system, consisting of three degrees, in all its iutegrity; the Aru:ients, so·called by iheulselvcs, ll1utilated the third degree by dividing it into two parts, and pronounced in the· Book of Constitutions that Ut:ntl.lineAncient )Jla.sonry consisf.8 oflow· dcoree.". U Revelations ot a Square, p. 2~~9.

t Dr.


28

GUIDE TO THE R.. A. CH.-\.PTER.

yet ,,'"e are .forced to aclnlit that at least in two notable instances

such was not the case. * It further appears that in so far as the present system adopted by the Grand Lodge of England differs froln the Prestonian Lectures, our English brethren have a more modern l'itual than the American, as the American system is substantially that of PRESTON. Nor does it satisfactorily appear fiS has been alleged by a recent autholt that the English ritual is the more intellectual of the t,vo, but the contrary is undoubtedly the truth. The union of the t·wo Granel Lodges prepared the \'flay for the union of the two Grand Chapters, which OCCUlTed A. D. 1817. The united body was at first styled "The United Grand Chapter," but in 1822 the title of "Supreme GI'and Chapter" "was resumed. Thus ,vas bI'ought to an end the English Masonic schism, out of which grew the Royal Arch, and :from whose results the l\!fasonic Fraternity will probably ne",er reco",er. THE PRESENT STATUS OF THE ENGLISH ROYAL ARCH.

As before remarked, the Royal AJ.·ch system was practiced as an appendage to the third degree for many years after its introduction. At that eal"ly penoe1 any Loc1ge convened a Chapter and conferred the Royal A1'ch Degree under the sanction of its own charter. Gradual steps were taken in process of time, how'ever, which little by little separate a Capitular from Lodge Ma.~onry until distinct warrants ,vera declnrec1 to be necessary to authorize the holding of Ch£tpters; and the Order of the Royal Arch became after the lapse of many yeal'S an independent rite. The English Royal Arch at present is vlorl{e.d from the tracing boal'as of HARms, published under the sfl.n~tioll of the Supreme Grand Chaptel", and its ritual is some,v1l}),t different from that in use at the Union in 1817. Accorcling to the Constitutions it appears to be practit~cd as a fowrtl-t degree, although the AJ.,ticles of Union c1eclnre that Ancient 1\fasonry consists of tIl-'ree degrees only, ·includirtl..,l the Royal Arch. The Supreme Grand Chapter hDlds theorr~~it·fl.Uy

* For example, the a(.~t of 1739 and the separation. of tho RoJ·a! Ar~h. t Pierson. Traditions, p .. 327.


INTRODUCTION.

29

the position that "the Royal Arch is not essentially a degree, but rather the perfection of the thu-d." In practice, howe,Ter, the degrees differ in design, in clothing, in constitutions and in color, and the proceedings are regulated by different govern~ng bodies. Dr_ OLIVER confesses that this position of the degree is both anomnlous and at variance "with all the true principles of Masonry; * and while his own opinion seems to be that it should be macle a part of the third degree, t yet he candidly admits that there are eminent companions in his own country'\vho adopt the view that it is more properly the seventh degree. In a note in one of his latest wOTks, he uses in this connection the following language: "It is an established doctrine of the Order that while three form a Lodge, and five may hold it, seven only can make it perfect. In such a case there requires an intermediate degree to complete the series; for the JIa1-7c and Past lIfasters have been already adlnitted into the OJwaft Lodges. This degree, as used by our transatlantic brethren, who are zealous and intelligent J.\iIasons, is called the (l\fost) Excellent l\Iaster." In another place the same author observes: "If, however, Freemasonry, in its present form, lwequires the Royal Arch to be considered asa separate degree, inasmuch as it has acquired the designation of Red Masonry in contradistinction to the three first degrees, which are esteemed blue; and not only possesses detached fun€l.s, but is placed under the direction of a different governing bocly, with a separate code of laws, it Will be more consistent with the general principles of the Order, to consider it as the seventh than the fOluwth; for four is not a 1\'Iasonic number; and as it is now constituted, some intermediate ceremonies appear to be necessary to connect it with the previous degrees." This anomalous position of the Royal Arch is perhaps one of the very worst difficulties of English Masonry, and out of .it alise many of their troubles. To avoid these, some of the ablest craftsmen of that country are persistently urging the If: Historical

Landmarks, vol. 1, p. 469.

t" The Royal Arch is evid~ntly, therefore, to be consi(lered as a. completion of the third degree, which, in,leed, appears broken and imperfect without it; .and con!en·ed complete at one time in the Grand Lodge only_" Blst. Land., vol. 1, p. 470. Note.

ortginally was


30

GUIDE TO TEE R. A. CHAPTER.

adoption of the systenl nlade use of in the United States. It is to be hoped that,the efforts of these learned and zealous compn,niolls ",ill result in the general adoption of the .A.nlerican ritual, ,vhich, in its details and al'r;'1:ngement, is Inore ccnnplete and finishecl than any other now in use. By the present English Constitutions, the Suprenlo Grand Chapter of England does not require the pOdsession of anything more than the J.\;faster's degree as it pre-requisite for the Royal Arch. Any l\faster l\Iason of t"\velve months' stt1:ucling is eligible for the honors of the Royt11 .A.rch, nlthough on being proposed and balloted for t,YO negntives will prevent his exaltation. Neither the l\lark, Past, or l\:Iost Excellent degrees are deemecl pre-requisites, though all of them are being conferred to some extent. The Supreme Grand Ohapter allo\it"s the Principals of their Chapters to issue a ,varrant for the holding of Lodges to cOllier the intermec1iate degrees. This cnstonl is, pel-haps, better than not to have those degrees at aU, but our English com!Ji1nions woulc1 find it for the advantage of t,he Order, if their Grand Chapter "w'olud at once tnl{e those degrees uncler its government, ~Ul(l inCOll)Orate them into its capitular systeln. Indeecl the Past l\faster's degree has been now firmlJ est~1blishec1 as a separate grnde ,vith distinct privileges ancl badges. * The DERMOTT c1egree, as l)racticec1 by the .ilncients so early as 1744, required the possession of the Past l\Iaster's degree or cerenl0nyas a preliminary qualification, and such continued to be the case until the union of the t,YO Grauel Ohapters in 1817. t DUNClrnnLEY'S degree seelUS to have been conferred at first without the requireUlent of the Chair degree as a preliminary, but, ,,~hen nn indepenc1ent government "was established in 1779, and separate Chapters were helc1, the candidates, unless they were actual P~tst l\iasters, t ,,,,ere required to present a dis!)ensation from the Gl路aucl l\Iaster authorizing them to ' , privately pass the chair. "q, 1'

* Dr. Oliver.

Origin of the English Boyal Arch, p. 40.

t Alliman Rezen. L. Hj路nelTIlln'S reprint, p. 49. ~Dr.

Oliver.

Origin of English Royal Arch, p. 26.

搂 Pierson (Traditions, p. 291,) pertinently renutrks: "Where a Grand !\!aster del"ivcs his authority to grant such dispensMions, or how he beca.me possessed of jurisdietion over' l)as:ring tile ell ail',' is a nroblem worth sohing."


INTRODUCTION.

31

This dispensation ,vas in practice issued only upon the recommendation-K- of the Lodge to which the candidate belonged. The possession of the Chair degree was required by the .J>-"1foderns until the Union-and hence the present pl'actice of dispensing 'with that pre-requisite is a palpable violation of the ancient practice of both sections of the English Royal Arch Fraternity. This innovation has leel to much confusion, and should have never been tolerated. The fact that English Royal ...~ch J\Iasons had Iiot received the interluecUate degrees naturally led to their exclusion fronl the American Chapters. A case of this kind was brought to the notice of the General Grand Chapter of the U nitec1 States at its session in 1844, and leel to the adoption of a resolution conferring the right upon the several Chapters under its jurisdiction to confer the degTees of l\Iark l\Iaster, Past nfaster, anc1 l\Iost Excellent l\Iaster free of charge, on any worthy Companion Royal Arch l\Iason frOIU "rithout the jurisdiction of the United States,. who had not receivec1 those degrees. t The same thing was subsequently incorporated into, and is now a part of, the constitution of the General Grand Chapter.t ...~nother anomaly in the English Royal Arch is the making of EZRA and NEHEl\IIAH to be the cotemporal'ies of ZERUBBA.BEL and JOSHUA. The second temple was de<1icatec1 in the year .515 B. c.; but EZRA did not go up to J e1'u8n1en1 until 457 B. c., or seventy-eight years after the return of the Je,,"s under ZERUBBABEL; and NEHE~1IAR'Sgovernment did not begin until twelve :rears later than this. Another anomaly in the English ritual is to be fonnd in the names of the first three officers of a Chapter, vvhich al'~ termed

* The form of this recommendation was as follows: "lVl~e,¡eas. our trusty and well-beloved B'l'other - - , a geometricall\Iaster 1\fason, and member of our Lodge. has solicited us to recommend him as a l\Iaster l\lason, every way qualined for passing the Holy Ro:ya,l Arch; we do herebj"l' certifjT that so far as we are judges of the necessary qualifications the said brother has ohtained the unaninlOUS consent of our Lodge fot" this recoID1Uenc1l1tion. U This was signed by the Master an(l ""ardeus of the Lodge. t Compendium of Proceedings of ~ Article TIr., Sec. 5.

Gen. Gr. Chapter, pâ&#x20AC;˘. 135.


32

,GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Principals. The first 'with them is the King, the second is the Prophet or Scribe, and the third ~s the High-Priest. This is evidently incorrect. * There are nlany other inc~nsistencieswhich it is not our !)urpose to discuss. It has been asserted that the Anlerican system is inferior to the English, and it has been our design to direct inquiry to a conlparison 'of the t,vo systenls, rather than attempt ::t vindication of the American degrees fronl the charge. We will now turn to a brief consideration of the Royal .A..r ch of Ireland and Scotland, leaving the inquirer after truth. to pursue this investigation which, at every step, exhibits new phases of interest. THE ROYAL ARCH OF IRELAND AND SCOTLAND.

The capitular system of Ireland is essentially different from any other. It consists of three degrees, the Excellent, Super Excellent, and Royal Arch, as a preliminary step to which the Past :l\laster's degree is indispensable. The first t"TO of these degrees refer exclusively to the legation of l\IosES, and are confen"ed in lodges governed by a l\Iaster and Wardens. These c1egrees, of course, bear no resernblance to the l\'Iost Excellent and Super Excellent degrees known in this country. The Royal AI"cll is given in a Chapter governeel by three Principals without names, differing in this respect from the English Chapters. The ritual of the Irish Ro:ral Arch is based on the discovery of the book of the law as related in 2 Chronicles, chapter xLnv. verse 14, and hence its date is about 624 B. c. Of course the ceremonies are essentially different from those of other countries. From whence this degree was derived or when it was introduced into Ireland, I am unable to say. A recent wl"iter asserts that no trace can be found of it in :U"eland eal"lier than 1751. The COIDlnittee of Foreign Correspondence of one of our oldest Grand Lodges in a recent report make the statement that DERMOTT introduced the Ro:.yal Arch into Ireland by conferl"ing t路he degree on Irisll l\fasol1s in London.

* See further on this subject under the ROjral Arch Degree-title, Officers.


IN'fnODUCTION.

33

This is unc10ubtedly an error, because there is no l'esemblance between the Irish degree and that of DERMOTT. This consideration is sufficient to warrant the conclusion that the two systems had an entirely different origin. Dr. OLIVER expresses no decided opinion on t,he subject, but says it is doubtful whether the degree existed in Irehnd earlier than 1740. The Royal Arch sj"'stem of Scotland is still different in its degrees and organization. The l\fark and Past l"Itlster, which are called "Chair degrees," axe indispensable qualifications. Next after these the candidate receives two other degrees, entitled Excellent and Super Excellent, as preparatory to the Royal .A.reh. In addition to these five degrees, vlhich may be said to compose their Capitular rite, Scottish Chapters also confer on Royal Arch l\fasons the degrees of Royal Ark l\fariner and Babylonish Pass. *. As the reader vrill perceive, the ritual must be essentially different from either of the others that we have referred to, The 1\fark degree is not the same as the American l\Iark degree, and the Excellent is given as a preliminary to the departure of the Hebrew captives from Babylon, and is, of COU1'se, wholly unlike anything in the American lite. The Royal Ark ~fariner ancl Babylonish Pass are sometimes given in this country as side degrees. The el'a commemorated in the Scottish ROyt"tl AJ."ch is the same as in the English and American degree. Thel'o has been l)ublished but very little authentic iniol'mation concernillg the introduction of the RoynJ. AJ,'ch into either I1'eland or Scotland, ana it is to be hoped that some qualified companion of the Craft in those countries "ill give the world a history of the origin and early years of the Royal Arch in both countries. From a comparison of the ritual of the Ancient.s, and those of Ireland and Scotland, it would seenl that but little influence was exerted by them upon one another, although such a friendly feeling existed between them for many :years. The earliest mention of the existence of Royal Arch Chapters in Scotlancl is under the date of 1755 concerning Glasgo,v

* Gen. Reg. for the govenlment of tho Order of R. A. l\Iasona in Scotland, 1845.


34

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Royal .A.rcll, No. 77, and in 1759 concerning Stirling Royal Arch, No. 93, they unc10nbtecUy being chapters attached to the lodges bearing those numbers. The present Grand. Chfq3ter of Scotland ,vas not formed llutil A. D. 1818.

INTllODUCTION OF MASONUY INTO THE UNITED S1'.A.TES. THE earliest account of the introduction of l\fasonry into the United States is the history of a. Lodge organized in Rhode Island, A. D. IG58, 01' fi.fty-nine years before the revival in England, and seventy-five years before the establishment of the first Lodge in l\Iassachusetts. Rev. EDWARD PETERSON, in his "History of Rhode Island and Ne"1Jort in the Past," gives the follo\ving account of this early Lodge: "In the spring of 1658 l\IORDECAI CA]'!P~~ALL, MOSES P .A.CKECKOE, LEVI, ancl others, in all fifteen families, at路rived at Ne'''1JOrt from Holland. They bl'ought "ith them the three first degrees of l\fasonry, and ,,~orked them in the house of CAMP.A.NN.ALL, and continuecl to do so, they and their successors, to the year 1742. "路xThis is, ,vithout doubt, the first Lodge ever held in the limits of the present United Sttltes. The Order was introduced into Pennsylvania in the :yea-r 1732, but from what source I have been unable to ascertain. A \varrant dtlted April 30, 1733, ,vas granted by Lorc1 1\IONTACUTE, G,rand Master of tho Grand Lodge of England, to HENRY PRICE, Esq., of Boston, appointing him Provincial Grand l\faster for New England,with pov,~er to ftppoint bis Deputy Grand l\faster, and Grand Wardens. July 30, A.. D. 1733, the Provincial Grand l\Iaster organizBcl his Pl~ovincial Grand Lodge under the name of St. J ORN'S Grand Lodge. The first act of this body, after its organization, and on the same day, was the institution of "The First Lodge in Boston," which was again charterecl in 1792 by the name of St. JOHN'S Loclge. Early in 1734 the authority of Grand lVIaster PRICE was extell<.led by the Granc1 Lodge of England over all

* Page 101.


INTRODUCTION.

35

North America, and in pursuance thereof, J nne 24, in that year, a warrant "ras issued to BENJ.AlrlIN FR.A.NKLIN' for ,yhat was termed "The First Lodge in Pennsylvania." This was the first warranted Lodge established in that State under the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of England. At the time of the organization of the St. JOHN'S Granel Lodge in Boston, and for years after, its subordinates did not confer the l\faster's degTee, confining thell~ labol's to the first two degrees. ...;\ccorclingly, in the year 1738, a body called "The J\tIaster's Lodge" Vlas organized in Boston, to meet monthly, whose work was exclusively confinecl to conferring the l\faster's degree on brethren "who had received the t,yO preceding degrees in some one of the other Lodges then oxiRting in the colony."X. The ritual used in this "l\faster's La c1ge " Wt"LS the original "lVIaster's pal~t,)' pl'acticed by the Grand Lodge of England at that period, including the essen.. tial of the Royal Arch, and ,yas, unquestionably, the first use of that ritual in this country. In the year 1756 a numher oi brethren, who are saic1 to have been "Ancient" l\fasons, petitioned the Granel Lodge of Scotland, .and ~btainecl a "\val'rant for a ne,v Lodge in Boston, to be called St..A_"WBEW'S Lodge. St. JOHN'S Grand Lodge, concei\ing this act of the Granel Lodge of Scotland to be an infringement of their jurisdiction, "refused any conlIDunications or visits from such members of St. LL'IDREW'S Lodge as had not fornlerly sat in their Lodges. " In consequence of this refusal St..A.1\"'"DRE'V'S Loclge united vtith tVlO army Lodges then located in Anlerica, one being No. 58 on the registry of England, ancl the othel', No. 322 on the registry of Ire1'"tnd, in l)etitio'ning the Grand Lodge of Scotland for the appointment of a Provincial Grand l\iaster.. The Earl of Dalhousie, Grand l\Iaster of Scotland, accordingly issued his commission beal~ing d.ate JiIay 30, 1769, appointing JOSEPH WARREN, after路ward knO"'l as Genernl W.A..nREN, of I'evolutionary fame, Provincial Granel ]lIaster of ltlasons, " in Boston, Ne,v England, and ,vithin one hundred miles of the same. " This authority was subsequently extended over the ""hole continent. Gell.

* Moore's ?tIagazine, yol. lOI p. 135.


,36

GUIDE '1'0 TIlE H. A. CHApr.rER.

\vns insta.lled Grand l\Iaster, and the Grn,nd Lodge organized Dec. 27, 1769. This body was knO'Wll as "l\ia.ssachusetts Grand Lodg{~." It stenc1i1;y continued to prosper, <liscontinuing its nleetings only for fit short time during the ,yftl" 'which soon follov~tec1 its organization. 'l'his Gra.nd Loc1ge, ancl its subol"clillates which it chartered, evidently made use of the ritual of Scotland or that of the AncientB / 1110re 1)1"0bahly the latter, for the reason that the' founders of St. A..~Dlm路w's Lodge "were Ancient lVIa,sons, and undoubtedly exercised a controling influence in the Grand Boc1:y-; indeed, WEBB, ,,!~'iting only t\Yenty-five or thirty years niter, says as much. ~'hese facts httve gTeat weight in the consideration of the etlrly condition of the Order in this country. The present Gru,ud Lodge of the State of New York was first constituted by tl '\val'rant from the Duke of J.~thol, dated Sept. 5, 1781. The (jrallcl Lotlge of Pelll1sylvHillit"t ,,~as first constitutec1 by it grund 'W~1rrallt from the Ctrand Lodge of England, dtttec1 June 20, 17H4. The Cirnll(} Lodge of North Cktrolint1 ,vas first cOllstitutec1 by virt,llo of HI charter 拢1'0111 the Grautl Lotlgo of Scotland, A. D" 1771. TInls tlH~ t,YO SJ"'StCIl1S of ,,"'ork '\vhieh have been li:l1o"'11 as " .;.lfode:rn" ancl "...:1 ncient" ,vere plnntetl in different StH.tes, and fronl thenc(~ ,vel'O disselninated throughout the country... In Se)llle of the States, as iul\Inssachllsetts ancl South C11rolina, there existed t,v路o (fl"and Loclges, ,,,,hose s)'rstems,vere essentiull:r different. Of course the SftIlle causes led to the same results in connection \"ith the ritual and organization of the Capitular clef,l1.-ces. Soon nfter the close of the revolutionary ,vur nn earnest effort ,vas Inacle 011 the pn.rt of eminent brethl"Oll ill tlifllerent soct,iOIlS to unite the ]'raternity in eaoh State under one (fraud Loclgo, OJ result \",hieh '\\'118 finally ~tce()Iuplishe<1. 'rhe unioll of the tw'O Grand Loc1gcs in 1\fassachusetts '\"~lS cOIlslunlnatec1 J nne 19, 1792, aut! was follo\ved tlt illtervnls l)~llike ftetioll in other StfLt(.\S. '''1'AltREN


INTRODUCTION.

EAl1LY llISTOitY OF nOYAL ARCH l\fASONRY IN UNITED STATES.

37 ~rHE

AT ,v~at time or by ,v'hom Royal Arch l\lasonry as [L separate rite ,,~as introduced into the United States has never yet been settled. It has been frequently claimed that the first record of its existence in this country is to be found in St.. ANDREW'S Royal Arch Lodge connected with St. ANDREW'S Lodge before mentionec1, in the year 1769. * This, however, is a mistake. There was it Ohapter held so early as the year 1758, in Philadelphia, which \vas unquestionably the oldest distinct organization of l~o:Y'"ftl Arch l\Iasons eyer held on this continent, although this We-LS itself held under the sanction of [L l\faster's Lodge ",varrant. t '!'his "ras in accord "With the l)ractice at that d~lY of all Cha/pters, and even now Chapters fire attached to some Lodge ill Englancl, Ireland, and Scotland. It will also be observed that this ",vas pl'ior to the recognition and adoption of the Royal .A.:reh by the Granel Lodge of England, ~lnd hence the degree thus early '\vorked ill Pennsylvania must have heen the DER~IOTT degree, 01" at all events it could not have been DUNCKERLEY'S degree, as has heen stated by a late author. The next boc1y of Royal .A.reh 1\1;180ns of 'which we have an account is St. .A.NDREW'S Royal . J. \.rch Lodge, before mentioned,

* :\\'!OOl'O'S l\:Iagazino, yol. xii., p. 165.

Pierson's Traditions, p. 324. editor of the Masonic J1Iirrol' and KOj'stone, formerly published in Philadelphia, in the third volume, page 15, (~Tall11ary, 1854,) in speaking of this subject, uses the folloWing language: "Philadelphia has the honor of holding th~ first warrant for a Chapter in the United States; this Chapter i$ yet in exist.. ence, and has never ceased its Ineetings from the date of its organization, 1758/' This statement 'has never been to my knowledge questioned. The talented and intelligent a.uthor of the Report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, presented to the Grand Chapter of 1\!issouri in 1855, gives in that report n brief account of this Chapter. He says: "The ftrst Royal Arch Chapter of which your Committee possesses a particular account is that held in Pennsylvania anterior to the j~ear 1'1"58. This Chapter, working under the warrant of Lodge No.3, was recognized 'by a1ld had Masonic intercourse with a. !filitary Chapterworldng under a warrant of Lodge 351, granted by the Athol Grand Lodge, who subsequently approved of its proceedings. Upon like principles other Chapters were formed in Penns:dvania. U

t 'fhe


38

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CH.. U 'TEE.

organized in Boston, it is stLicl, in 1769.~· The ritual used in this l)ody 'was certainly that of DERl\IOTT; anc1 may have been obtained from the .A.ncients directly or by the ,yay of Scotlancl by the brethren of the three I.Joclges who about tha,t time petitioned for the Granel Lodge; or it nl~1Y h~y(j been brought to Boston by 011e or both of those A.1·lllY l> Lodges. At all events they assisted at the orgtlniza,tion of the "Royal Arch Loclge." And to this connection Inay be tracec1 the reason why an EngUs71~ Lodge under the J.1foderns shoulrl hu.yo united ,vith an Irish and Scotch Lodge in :fol'luing a new Grand Lodge uncleI' the authority of the Granel Lodge of Scotland, in territor:}'" in which there ,vas ah'eadyexisting a Grand Lodge legally constitutecl by its o,,'"n mother G·rand Lodge. But when we remember that the Grand Lodge of England had not yet recognized the Royal.A.reh degree, ·nor authorized its subordinates to confer it, ,ve ca.n Joeadily see why the .A.rmy Lodge under its jurisdiction should have united itsel£ so closely ''lith St. A..'!'ffiREW'S Lodge. It 'V~1sS evidently that its members might obtain the new degree. It "ill l)e observ'ec1, also, that the degrees then conferred in St. A...~DREW'S Ro:y-al Arch Lodge ,,"ere the saIne in l11.11nbe1' and title as those then conferred by sinlil~lr bodies in Scotland, and which aloe no,v recognizecl as the constitutional degrees by the Gloancl Chapter of Scotland. III the record of the first meeting the officers are· designated as in a Craft Lodge, but in a subsequent reco1'c1 t.he first ofilcer is styled "RoyuJ. .Arch l\Iaster. "t The meetings were held in

* In the Deceulber nUlnber, 1865, of l\Ioorc's Fremna.son's l\Ionthly :l\Iagazine, the editor says: "The records show the existence of the Chapter (then called a 'Ro~'al Areh Lodge') as early as 1768. In the record of the following year we find the following entrr: 'The petition of Bro. 'Villiam Davis coming before tho Lodge, begging to have and receive the parts belonging to a Ro:ra1 Arch Mason, which being read was receivec1, ane! he Unanill1<HlSlj" voted in, and was accord· ingly made by receiving the four steps, that of an Excellent, Super Excellent, Royal Arch and Knight Templar.' It "ill be. perceived thnt but one, if indeed either, of the intercalarj" degrees, as they are now given, was recogn.ized as belonging to the Chapter at the date of this recorcl. The Past l\raster's degree or ceremony was thon given in its proller place; and th.o ~rn.rk degrf10 was conferred in a l\Iark Lodge." , 1\Ioore's F. l\I. 1\!agazine, yo1. xii., p. 1G'i.


INTRODUCTION.

39

the loc1ge-room of St. ANDRE'W'S Lodge, "at the Green Dragon Tavern. " Its ,york ,vas clone under the sanction of the war.. I'ant of that Lodge, and it continued thus attitched to St. ~"DREW'S Lodge certainly until 1790, and prob~bly until the organization of the Grand Chapter in 1798. -x- It held its meetings at regular intervals unt.iI1773, when they were suspended in consequence or the clisturbecl condition of the country. In 1789 its meetings were resumed, and curiously enough the titles of the officel's appear in the first I'ecoI'd aitel' this resumption, as High-Priest, King, and Scribe. In' 1793 the c1egree of l\iark l\:Iaster Mason ,vas ac1decl to the other degrees conferred ill the Loc1ge, ancl in 1794 the boc1y seems to have assunled the status of an indepenclent Ohapter, inasmuch as it took t.he name of "St....t\.NDREW'S Royal Arch Clutpter." 111€Se changes were clue to the transformation then going on among the elements of American Royal Arch ~Iasonry, consequent on the union of the different systems before mentioned. Prior to the organization of any Grand Chal)ters there existed in the city of New York two Cht"Lpters, one kno"1Jl as the Old Chapter and the other called Washington Chapter, the oloigin or early histOl"y of ,vhich has .11ever been l)ublished.t The latter body, "rashington Chapter, issued charters to a nUlnber of subordinate Chapters, in which charters it stylec1 it,self "The l\iother Chapter." Fronl this boely ol'iginatecl the first Ohapters in Rhode Island and Connecticut. The history of that Chapter, if its eal'ly records coUld be found, ,vould throw much light upon the condition of Royal Arch t\!asonryof that date. As before remarked the first Chapter in Rhode Ishtnd \vas chartered in 1793 by this Washington Chapter of New York. The :fil'st Chapter in· Connecticut was called Hil~am Chapter !io. 1, ancl locnted at Newtown in Fairfield Connty. It was chartered by' \\1'ashington Chapter, New York, its charter *The following is recorded under date of Nov. 25, 1790; "Voted, That Bro. :Matthew Groves be a committee to return the thanks of this Lodge to st" Andrew's Lodge for. their politeness in granting us the use of their charter.." t Diligent inquiry has been made for some account of these bodies, but nothing has yet beeu f01.lncl. They never became suborclinatc to the Grand. Challter of New York, and must have died out some time subsequont to 1805, aF; ,\Yebb'p 1\IonitOl', edition of 1805, alluclc~, to thenl ~s then l)eing in existence.


40

GUInE rro rrHE It. A. CHAPTER.

bearing date .A.pril 29, HOFFlfIAN,

A. L.

5791, and is signed by J OSLffi O.

H. P. ,Y. C. R. A. l\:f.,

GEORGE ...- \.NTHON,

I{-g W. O.

R. A. lVI., ancll\f..f fiTIN HOFFl\L\.N, S-e, \\i'". O. R. A. 1\1:. Five other. Chapters were instituted in Connecticut under the authority of this \Vashington Chapter as follo'vs: Franklin Chapter at Ne,v Haven, its charter being dated l\fay 20, 5795; Solomon's Chapter at Derby, its charter bearing date l\Iarch 15, A. L. 5796, although its first 1 eco1"c1 is of the (late of December 29, 1795; Franklin Chapter at Normch, its charter being dated March 15, 5796, and signed by JOHN .ABRAHAM, M. E. H. P., JOHN LUDLOW, l\f. E. K., and WILLIAM RICH.-\.BDSON, l\I. E. S; Van-Den-Broeck Chapter at Colchester, its charter being dated April 9, 5796; and '\)'T"ashington Chapter at l\fidclleto,vll, its charter being dated l\ftltch 15, A. L. 5796, anel countersigned by EZRA HICKS, Secretary of \Vashingtoll Chapter. * These six Chapters nlftcle returns, ns appenrs ÂŁ1'on1 their records, to "lashing-toll Chclpter up to the org:1nizatioIl of the cOllvention of l::'oyal .A..r ch Chapters in the Stnte of Connecticut. The first cOllvention of the C1hapters in Connect,icut ,vas hellI on the first "reclnesc1ay of July, 179B, at Hartford, in ,,,,hich all the Chapters nbove nall1ec1 ,,"'ere representt.~d by delegn..t es, except Franklin Chapter, nt N e,Y Haven. A reg111n.l" orgl'1nization ,vas perfected and articles of agreement ,vere entered into for the government of the several Chapters in the State. Another convention ","as held October 20, 1796, at New Haven, of "'''hich DA"VID BA.LD'YIN ,,"as chairman. The Connecticut cOllventiollluet again inl\Iay, 1797, and agaiu in October, 1797, and at this dnte Bro. JUDD ,,~as the presiding officer, and such distin b'1lishecl men as EPHRAIl\I lUnBY and STEPImN TITUS Hos:MER were prominent men1bers. The organization 'V11S called "A Convention of Committees of the Chapters of R. J.\.. 1\ÂŁ. in Connecticut," and ,vas, so far as I can learn, the first governing body ill Royal Arch l\Itu?0nry organizec1 in the Unite<.1. 0

* These dates an,l nantes are given with the hOl')(~ that th()y ll'my le:ul to tha diRcovery of the (\a.rly recordR of '\Vasllington Chnpt~r.


INTRODUCTION.

41

States. The Grand Ohapter of Pennsylvania ,vas not estab... ilished until late in the year 1796, or eal'ly in the succeeding year, several months after the Connecticut convention.. The first meeting of delegates at Boston, out of which aI'ose the Gener1u Grand Chapter, occurred October 24, 1797, almost sixteen nl0nths after the organization of the Connecticut convention. In tTanuary, 1798, the convention adjourned from Boston, met ill Hartford, ancl organized the Grand Chapter of the Northel"U States.·x- The subsequent history of Royal Arch }\;Iasonry being accessible in the records of the several Grand Chapters, 'we do not propose to follow the subject flu·ther at this time. If ··what we have written from the few sources of in£orlllation ,vhich have been accessible shall lead to a fuller investigation, the cause of Royal Arch l\JIasonry ·will be promoted, and 'we .shall have accomplished our purpose. THE AMERICAN RI'l'UAL.

The ritual of the Capitular Degrees must have undergone many changes during the latter years of the last century. The union of the several Grnnd Lodges having been accomplished, the attention of the Craft \\"as turned to the ,,"ork, inasmuch as it "ras a necessity of that union, that there shoulcl be a uniform mod.e of confel·ring the degrees. An eminent lecturer in a recent ,york asserts that "after Dlature deliberation, it "ras determined that the princilJal Grand Officers of the Granel Lodges of the New England States should perforlu this duty, "t and then the distinguished brother ac1cls: "And, accorc1ingIJr , about the year 1797 they commenced their labors. " Again he says, in the same article: ".4t\..fter the organization of ChfLptel"S of Ro~yal Arch l\Iasolls and Lodges of Mark 1\fasters, Pn,st l\Iasters, and l\Iost Excellellt l\Iasters, it was c1eemed. absolutely necessary to systematize the work and the lectures pertaining to the same, and, accordingly, the

* As will be seen 1'1'on1 page 9 of the CompeucUum of Proceedings of the Gen. Grand Chal)ter, a strong eft'ort was DULdc to induce the Connecticut Companions to give up their prior organization and unite in the formation of the Grand Chapter of the 'Northcl'n States, au(l it will be observed tll~lt two of the Con.. necUcut COlnpanions ,yere chosen officers in thu,t body, viz: Ephraim Kirby Grand. High-Priest and Stephen 'I'itU8 Hosmer Grand Treasurer. t Jercluy L. Cross• .AtlverUSenlGllt to ~Il.l.ROnic Text-Book.


42

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

same comlllittee \vhich had been nppointecl for the D.l"st three degrees receiveel the Chapter Degrees in charge." It is saic\ that in private conversation l\fr. CROSS gave the nanles of 'rHOl\L-\.S Sl\IITH WEBB, HENRY FO\\"LE, Rev. GEORGE RICHARDS, Rev. JONATHAN NYE, JOHN HANl\IER, JOHN S NO"'''', STEPHE...~ BLA..~CHARD, anc1 others, as the prominent mell1bcrs of that committee. That SaIne such committee nULde ill1provements in the rituals about the time of the organization of the Grftud Ohapter of the Northern States is possible, hut the "work in the several degrees had been systenlatized anc1l11ftde uniform in l\fassachllsetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New York, before 1797. B~r whonl this 'was clone, it is perhaps now impossible to say, bu.t it does not apI)ear that '"'lEBR could haye done it. "TERB ,,"as not nlacle a,l\Iasolluut.il1792-3, and the first ,ve know of hill1 as it l\fasollic rit.ualist is not until his l'emoval to Albany in 1795 or 6. In 1797 he 'was the HighPriest of Tenlple Chapter, and, in that capaeitJ, represented that body in the convention at Boston, ,Yhich prepared the vtay for the organizn.tion of the Granel Chapter. III Se!)tembel', 1797, his J:i-'reclnason's l\fonitor "was copyrighted; ancl its pl'eparntion must h::1ye been the 'York of the tilne "whiell intervenec1 bet"ween his arri-ral ill All.Hl:1\Y' and the date of its publication. But, as ,\ve have seen, the Royal .A.roll ritual I:llllst have been substt1ntial1y the sanle as no,v, at tho tiIne \\7 nshington Chnpter of Ne"r York chartered the subordinates in Ithoc1e Island ancl COllnecticut, as evidenced by the titles of the officers ancI expressions used in the e~1rly xeeords of those Chapters. Agitin, \ye lULve other undoubted evidence that the l'itunl had lJecll revised, and a sJ"stem of \york adopted composec1 of the tw'O principal ones before in use, nnd that, too, at SOIue period bet,Yeen1790 and 1705. THO:\IAS Sl\rrrII ""EBB, though a young 1\1a50n, at once seizec1 upon this systenl, nlacle stlchftltert1tiol1s in it as he declued neeessary, ana then l)ub.. lishec1 its exoterie portions. lIenee it Cftlne to be kno,vn as the 'VEBB "work. '1'0 disselninutn untI give ehftrrl,(路ter to this ritual, ""Eun (~oneeiYed the idea, of organizing n Ctrand Chal)t,cr, nnel at, onec lent all his el1ergit~s to aeeolllplish his desif,tIl. 'l'hat aeeoll1plished. it furnished at vehie1e to dis-


INTRODuc'rION.

43

seminate his ,york, und he availecl himself 01 the advantage.. he lived, no oue questioned his authority, but at his death many of his pupils, ambitious to fill his place in the Fraternity, began to make alterations in his 'wol'k, until the old time jealousies and discrepancies became multipliec1 to an almost unlimited extent. For these evils a return to the early AInerican l~itual as pracf.:cec1 in the latter l)art of the last centul'y is the only remedy. Nor do we l'ecommencl a blind acceptance of a thing because it is venerable in years. The true standard by ,,"hich to test l\fasonic work is this: it should be consistent ,vith itself, in stl'ict agreement with sacred histOl~Y, and calculated to convey to the initiate great ancl solen1.ll truths by means of its symbols. If tried by this test, a "rork is deficient, then no matter what its age, it is not true l\fasonry; but if in addition to the essential principles above mentioned, it also possesses a venerable past and the sanction of the fathers, then, indeed, ","e may hold fast to it; and from it c1erive both instruction and delight.

"'nile

SYI\<IBOLISM OF THE CHAPTER DEGREES.

The late distinguished brother, Rev. SALEM: To'W'N, has left on record a brief summary of the symbolism inculcatecl in the several degrees which deserves to be read by every:r,fason. "The first degree in l\Iasonry," he says, "naturu.lly suggests that state of moral darkness which begloomed our world. On the apostacy of our first common parent, not a gleam 01 light ,vas left to cheer his desponding mind. Soon, however, the first kind promise was nlacle. Adam was, therefore, in a comparative sense, still in darkness. Such is the very nature of the first degree, that every observing candidate is led to vie"r ~is moral blindness and deplorable state by nature. lJnc1er these impressions he enters on the seconcl degree, ,vhich, in view of his mOl路al blindness, he is to consiclel' emblematical of it state of imprisonment and trial. Such was the second state of AD.AM.. Hence arises' the idea of probationary ground. A clue obsel路vance of all former requisitions, and a sincere c1esil'e to lnake advances in Imo\vlec1ge ancl virtue, open the ,yay for the reception of more light.. Halving diligently IJerSeverec1 in the use of appointecl nleans, the thil"c1


44

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTERâ&#x20AC;˘

.degree prefigures the life of the good man in his pilgrimage state. Although the true light has shined into his heart, and he has experienced much consolation, yet he sometimes wanders into devious and forbidden paths. In the midst of such trials he resolves to be faithful, and manfully to ,,'ithstand temptations. He determines to pursue that sacred trust committed to his care, and, therefore, endeavors to escape for his life to the GI'eat Ark of his salvation. In aclvancing to the fourth degree, the good man is greatly encouraged to persevere in the 'ways of well-doing even to the end. He has a name 'which no man knoweth save he that loeceiveth it. If, therefore, he be rejected, and cast forth amongst the rubbish of the world, he knows full well the Great l\rlaster Builder of the Universe, having chosen and pl"epared him as a lively . stone in that Spilitual building in the heavens, 'will bring him forth vlith triumph, while shouting grace, grace to his Divine Redeemer. Hence opens the fifth degree, where he discovers his election to, and his glorified station in, the kingdom of his Father. Here he is taught how much the chosen ones are honored and esteemed by those on earth, w'ho discover and apPl~eciate the image of their comnlon Lord. This image being engraven on his heart, he may look fOr'Val"d to those mansions above, where a higher and most exalted seat has been preparecl for the faithful, from the foundation of the world. With these views the sixth degree is conferred, where the riches of divine grace are o!)ened in boundless prospect. Every substantial good is clearly seen to be confelTecl thl'Ollgh the great atoning sacrifice. In the seventh degree the good man is truly filled with heal"tfelt gratitude to his heavenly benefactor, for all those wonderful deliverances wrought out for him 'while journeying through the rugged paths of hunlan life. Great has been his redemption from the Egypt and Babylon of .this wOl"ld. * * * Such is the moral an(l religions instrnction clerived from the orcler of the l\Iasonic c1egrees." The object and aim of all l\fftSonic science is the search after truth.. Divine Truth is symbolized by the LOGos, the WORD, the N.Al\m; not only ).lS 11 mere sYlubol, but as the sentient, actiYe, cl1eating and l)reServ'illg po,ver. It ,vas the NAME, or WORD, or LOGOS, that createcl th~ ,vorld and spake


INTRODUCTION.

45

its teeming life into being. It appeared to ADA.M: in the garden, and in the form of a glorious Shekinah, expellecl him from Paradise. It appeared to ABRAHAl\I on l\fonnt l\Ioriah; to JACOB in his vision; and to l\IosEs at the Burning Bush. The search for this Symbol, the study of this Truth, the pursuit of the W Ol路a is the object of our labor. To that sjtmbol all the lessons inculcated in the several degrees unerringly point. Through that symbol all the other symbols of l\fasonry guide us up,vard to the Creator. The great and sacred NAME which ineffable and ever glorious, is the grand central symbol of the Order, and the trne l\fason is he ,vho understands and appreciates this fact; and then makes its legitimate results practical in his life. In the Entered Apprentice degree the ct"Lndic1ate for I\fasonry is required to declal"e his belief in the existence of GOD, because no one can with propriety enter UIJon a search for tha路t which he does not confidently believe to exist. Hence no one can be allowed to take eyen the first step in l\f1l.S0nry, until he publicly professes his faith in that Great I Am of whonl the tetragrammaton is the symbol. The first prayer' of the l\fason is for the gift of divine 'wisdom that he may be better enabled to display the beauties of ";irtue to the honor of that holy name. By his circumambul.tttion he is taught the labors and trials that will beset him in his progress to,vard the discovery of TBUTR. By the vail of secrecy which is spread around the institution, the neophyte is instructed that the TRUTH he is to search for is enveloped in mystery. The .sublime ,vords of tIle Great Builder: "Let there be light, and there ,yas light, )) prefigures the mental and moral illumination, the spiritual light which he will receive, who obtains a knowledge of the symbol which ,ve are considering; and the three great lights, now, for the first time, masonically pre... senteel to the brother tench him those great lessons that Illust guide his steps in all the future. So the northeast corner and the memorial for the archives point to the s:,}"'lubol we are considering. In like manner the pillars of Wisc!oIn, Strength, and Beauty point the neoph:.",-te for,varc1 to tlutt triune \yord that planned, cre~Lted, aud adorned the universe, 'vhUe It''aith,

is


46

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTEU.

Hope, and Charity lead hiul up tho theological ladder to that divine Love ,vhich sustains 8ud recleenls the ·worlel The blazing stt1r and the point within a circle are also symbols leading forward the mind of the candidate to the symbol of s~Y'mbols-the central point around which revolves the ,vhole science of Ancient Freemasonry. In the Fello,v-Craft degree, as we enter the midcU-e chamber, ,ve observe the pro111inent emblem of that degree, the letter G, the English 8ubstitutefor the Hebre,v yael, and are taught to cIo reverence to the NAl\IE, before whom alllVIasonsfrom the youngest E ... A. · • to the 1\£. • • humbly,· reverently, and devoutly bow. Among the orientals the number fifteen was c1eenled sacred pecause the letters of the holy name, J AH, "'""61'e in their numerical value, equal to that number. Therefore, even the winding-stairs, vlith the fifteen steps, are sjrmbolic of the nalne of GOD. In the third c1egree, the l\fason is taught the gl"en,t truths of the restll'rection and life eternal. The ,vhole legend of the degree points to the power, beneficence, ana eternity of·· the deity, HUcl among the symbols ,ve may 1'efe1" to the all-soeing eye sJ"Dlbolical of the ollluipresent deity. In the lVIa1"k l\faste1* 1\'Iason's degree, the stone set at nanght of the builders, wllich became the chief stone of the corner, the s:rmbol of the white stone, Hnd the l{ewNcane,. in the l\'Iost Excellent lVIaste1"'s degree-the key-stone, and the ark of the covenant-all these and .many other symbols of the Order, in all the degrees, are but the shadows, the forerunners, the types of the great symbol upon which the ,vhole f~lbric of l\iasonry is constructed. . The l\fason ,vho does not look beyond the 111e1"e forlns and ceremonies of the institution :fails, .utterly fails· to realize the import· of its teachings. Its sublime truths are indeed IDJ Steries to him. But no brother, and especially no companion, can fail to become wiser and better, if he will l)ause on his way through the degrees, and deliberately study the allegories and symbols so profusely set before him ill Freemasonry. No matter in ·what direction he may turn,' the lessons of truth are set before· hinl on every side, and it only reUlftins for lrim to stucly their deep a.na hicl(,l~.,n me~Hling.

'V...

7


OI{,

fIS.~SJ~HIS degree of l\I~lso11ry ",Tas not less use.. .

ful in its original institution, nor nre its effects less beneficial to luaukind, than those ",vhich precede it. By its influence each operative Jiiason, at tIle erection of the Telnple of SOLOl\ION, ",vas kno,vn and distinguished by the Senior Grnnd ,\iTarden. By its effects the disorder and confusion that lllight othE~r\vise IlftVeattenc1ed


48

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

so immense an undertaking ,vas completely prfJvented; and not only the craftsmen the1l1Selves, who ,vei'e eighty thousand in nUlnber, but every part of their worklnanship was discriminated with the greatest ;nicety and utmost facility. If defects ,vere founel in the ,york, the Overseers, by the help of this degree, ,vere enabled, without difficulty, to ascertain ,,~ho ,vas the faulty workman; so that its deficiencies might, be remedied without injuring the credit or diluinishil1g the reward of the industrious and faithful among the Craft.

HISTORY. The origin of this degree has been the subject of much speculation, and is still involvec1 ill doubt. Dr. OLIVER says that anciently it was a degJ:ee leading to the l\Iuster l\Iason's chair. l\fany "'Titers have claimed it ,vas fornlerly a part of the second degree, as the Royal Arch ,vas of the third, and such may have been the case at some early period, but there has been no conclusive e'vidence of the ft1Ct produced as yet. It is perfectly certain that none of the ceremopies llO'V used. in this degree belonged to the Fello"\v-Craft degree, at the revival in 1717. There are two degrees callecll\Iark l\Ian and l\fark Master conferred in Europe, but they have but 'lery little resemblance to the American deg~路ee. The la/tter is no,v being confen"ed in England by the tolerance of the 1\fasonic authorities, rather than under their sanction. A.t the fil"st introduction of this degree into this country it ,vas considered a side degTee which any three brethren had the right to confer, and it ,vas not until several years had elapsed. thn.t the degTee began to be regularly conferred in Lodges. Subsequently, however, independent Lodges of l\Iark l\fastcr Masons ,,"ere held, aucl even after the organization of Grand Chapters, Lodges were held by S01Xtrate charters distinct fronl the 'Chapters. The loose 11lanner in ,,-hich the degree ,,-as at first


MAIU{ $IASTER.

49

conferred in this country necessarily prevented the keeping of records, and hence there is groat difficulty in tracing its early !listor:)'. The first record of the practice of the degree 011 this continent, that I have seen, is among the early records of 1\Iasonl'y in Halifax, Nova Scotia. This record bears elate Nov. 16, 1784, at which time the degree ,vas conferred by an:}'" brothe"r ·who possessec1 it, ill a Loclge held ullcler the sanction of the warrant of a lVIaBter's Lodge. ~~ From these records it further apl)ears that l\Iark Lodges ,vere regularly held under the sanction of, and annexed to, at least three Lodges in Halifax. Other 'Lodges were helcl in a sinlil::tr manner, in cliiicrent sections of .A..meriCt"t, from the peTiod above nlentionecl c1o'\vu to the adoption of the degree by the Chapters. As early as 1786 JOSEPH l\I1.~HS deposited in the archi ~"es of the Supreme Council of the ...'\.l1cient and i\..ccept·ecl rite at Charleston, S. C., the ritual of a degree called illtlster J.llarlc Jl[ason. Froll1 whence he obtained it, is UnkllO\Vl1. i' Th.is degree of l\fYEBS 'was a side or detached degree, and, fiS suell, \vas given by the Sovereign Grauel IllSpE~ctors of thn.t rite; au(l OJ chartier ,\yas issued 1>:17' tIle ell'and Council of Pl'inces of Jerusalem, for a regular Lodge of l\Iaster l\Iark nlasons, in Charleston, J'an. 21, 1802. :1: ..=\..bont that tillie, }l(},vcver, the nse of t.hat clegree seelns to have yirtllal1y eeuse(l in eonse.. quence of the Chapters aSS11111il1g jurisdietion of the l\Iark l\Ittster's degree. }t'roln [L cOlllparison of the ribulls of l\rYI~US' degree, and of our l)resent l\Iark degree, it is ovident tlutt the~y" e:1l110 froln ~1 similtll' source, though there al'e Inany :1'- This first recol'(l is as follows: Halifax, 1(3th NoV". 578·.t-lTpnll application to the 'Yol'shipfnl Bro. ~"ife, he was pleasc~d to open a. }\,Irlst(~l' :!.\Iark 1\Ias(Hl's Lodge. VI. Bro. li"ife, J.\Iastcr, fOl'nlerly of No.2 t3 L. Square; Bro. Hall, Senior 'Varden; Bro. Allen, J. '\Ya.rden, of Lodge No. 155; Bro. Lewis, 'rilm·, of ]~odge::\o. 210. '1'11e follOWing brethren receive,1 the degree of l\Iaster :l\Iark 1\,[ason, and ll1nda choice of their nUtrk, as follows. ~rhen follow the IHlrnes, Loclge lIlclnht:.·rship, and marks of six candidates. ':rhe 1'e001"<.1 then proceeds as follows: "These brethren haYing jnstJy paid the den.l3.nd for SUell llwl'ks, l'eeeived the same with proper instrllctions. ':r110 business of the night b":'ing finished, the Lodge ,'"rtts closed in due forru/' These l'e(~ordsare continued tllrongh the two sueceet..Ung

:rears. t Piersoll. Tl'aditions, p.

~:WO.

:,;

+Address of SuprclrlP (k.nlll.~H, D(·~~. 1802.


50

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAP'l'ER.

essential differences. In the D;?-oc1ification of the Chapter degrees, ,vhich took place about the year 1792, it is quite pl'obable that the present degree nlay have heen enriched by IJortions of the l\IYERS' degree.路:~ Oue of the traditions preser-v'ed among l\fasons relates that the degree of Mark l\:Iaster l\Iason was instituted seven dt1,Ys after the foundation stone of King SOLOMON'S Temple 'Wt1,S laid, 'when the three Grand l\fasters assembled the l\Iasters of all the Lodges of Fellow-Crafts, and conferred on them this degree. At the same time the Granel l\Iasters. established those admirable regulations for the inspection of the matel'ials as they came from the quarries, which so reac1il:y" enabled the Overseers to detect impel'fect ",'"ork. According to this tradi.. tion the degree, at its institution, "ras confelTec1 not only as an honorary reward for previ.ous inclustry, skill, and fidelity, and also as an encouragement to persevere in ,vell doing; but it 'was still further designed as a })ractical meallS for presel'Ying clue discipline and oyersight at the erection of the temple.

OFFICERS. regular Officers of a Lodge of JYlark Master l\iasolls are: 1. RIGHT 'VORSHIPFUL MASr.rER; 2. SENIOR GRAND ''''rARDEN; 3. JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN; 4. SENIOR DEACON; 5. J UNIon DEACON; THE

6.

lVIAsTER OVERSEER;

7. SENIOR OVERSEER; 8. J TINIOR OVERSEER. A distinguished .A.merican author, after glYlng a list of the officers as above, inaclYertentl:;, ,vithont c1 olIb t,

* Pierson (Traditions, p. 201), claims from that of MYERS.

that th.e .A.merican degree

W~\S

arranged


l\I.A.RK MA.STER.

51

makes use or the fol1owing~ language: (, The clegree cannot be conferred when less than six are present, ,vIlo, in that case, Inust be the first and last three officers aboye-named."* According to the ritual of the degree, at least eight besides the candidate are absolutely necessary to work; and in most, if not 'all, of the jUl·isdictions, this is the settled rule. It should be made the uniform and ilnperative l)ractice \vherever the American degree is conferred. The officer:;; of a Chapter take rank as follo\ys, viz: the High-Priest, as R. 'V. l\faster, in tIle E.; King, as S. G. \\7arden, in the W.; Scribe, as J. G. \'Tarden, in the S.; Captain of the Host, as ~It"Lrshal or l\Iastel" of Ceremonies, on the left, in front; Principal Sojourner, as Senior Deacon, on the right, in :f~'ont; ROYl11 .A.rell Captain, as Junior Deacon, on the rigllt of the S. G. Warc1en; ·l\1:aster of the Tllircl ,rail, as l\I~1ster Ovel'seer" at the E. a·ate; l\Iaster of .the Second Vail, as Senior Overseer, at the W. Gate; l\1aster of the First Vail, as Junior Overseer, at the S. Gate; the Treasurer, Secretary, anel Tiler (and Stewards ancl Chaplains, if any), as officers of tIle corresponding rank, :llld stationed as in a Lodge of l\:Iaster l\1:asons. The S;5rmbolic color of the ~[ark degree is l)urple. The apron is of 'w·hite lambskin, edged with !)urpie, and the collar of !)urple, ec1ged with gold.. A candidate recei,ring this degree is saicl to be "advanced to the 110norary degre0 of a ·l\Iark l\Iaster." Lodges of l\Iark J\faster l\Iasons are cledicatec1 to

H.·. A.·. B.". * Dr" l\IaekeJ·. Lexicon, p. 129.


52

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

,

OPENING. II

*

*

*

*

*

CHARGE TO BE READ .AT OPENING.

brethren, lay aside allinaliee, and all guile, allclllypocrisies, alld ellVies,. a11cl all evil speakings. If so be ~ye have tastecl that the LORD is gracious; to ,\vllo1n cOIning, as tll1tO a living stone, disallowed i11cleecl of lnell, but ellasell of GOD, allcl precious; ye also, as li'v"ely stones, l)e ye bllilt Ul) a Sl)iritllal house, an lloly priestllood. to offer UlJ sacrifices accel::>table to GOD. \i\Therefore, also, it is COlltaillecl in tIle Scripture, b,eholc1, I lay ill Zion for a fOllndation, a stolle, a tried stolle, H l)reciollS cor11e1" stolle, a sure fOU11datiol1: 116 tllat believetll sllall 110t I11uke haste. Brethren, this is tIle ,vIII of GOD, that., ,vith. ,veIl-doing, ye put to silellcc tIle ignorallce of foolisll Inen. .4.t\.s free, alld llot as llSilig YOllr liberty for a cloalc of l11aliciollsl1ess; but as the servallts of GOD. Honor all lUC11; love the brotherl1ood; fear GOD. WHEREFORE,


53

l\!ARK l\IAS'rER..

Or the following may be used: PRAYER.

Fatller of 1fercies, 'Yilt thOll, at tllis 11our, IJllt to sile11ce tIle ig110rance of foolisll Inell; al1cl grallt tllat all 111ulice an'cl all gllilc, al1d hYl)ocrisies, and en"vies, allc1 all evil speak:ings 111a}T 1)0 rell10veclfar frOlU llS~ that "\ve l11a}T, incleec1, taste tllat tIle LORD is gruciol1S. 11ale e lIS to be as living stones, tried all(l acceptecl of tl1ee, to be bllilt up ill tllat spiritllal l)llilding, tllat 11011se 110t Inac1e ,vitil l1a11c1s, eternal ill tIle hea'ie11s. So Inote it be.-.tl.1tIEN.

RITUAL. SECTION FIRST..

THIS section explains the preparatory CirC111TIstances attending tIle advancement of candic1ates, and oxelnpl~fies the regularity and gaocl orc1er that were obseryecl by the craftslnen at the building of the temple; illustrate,s the methoc1 by '\vhich the iclle ancl unwortlly ,\yere detectec1 and punishec1, and clisplays one of the principal eYents which characterizes this degree.

*

*

*

*

*

*


54

GUIDE TO THE Râ&#x20AC;˘.A. CilAPTETI.

Here the initiate is informed of the proper matel'ials necessary in the constrnction of the temple; the place whence they were obtained, and the Inanuer ill which thej'" were inspected, ttpprovec1 or rejected. The stoues of which the teulple was constructed. ,,"ere of ,vhite limestone or a species of marble. This materiitl is described as being soft and easily worked, but hardening by exposure. I~ecent discoveries in Jerusalem have left 110 rOOln for doubt as to the precise place fr0111 whence those hnulense stones used in the eclifice '\vere taken. A recent traveler thus describes a vast excavation which had been discovered about two hundred yards east of the Da.luascus gate of the city: "This ren1arkable place, ,vhich is evidently nothing else than a vast ullder-ground quarry, large enough, eyen as far as it bas been explored, to ha,ve furnished the matel'ials for the building of the teluple, and the walls of ,J eru:;:-alc'.ill, extends south-east of l\Iount l\Iorinh in the direction of the l\Iosql1c of OMAR. The roof of this enormous exca.vation, ,vhich took l1S about three hours ill perambulating, is s'llpportecl at intervals of about tVolel1ty, thirty, 01' forty :yards, by squfl.r(~, UH1Ssiyc, trr\n:1'like bastiolls or pillars of 'Various hights t\11<1 dhnellsiolls forn:lCc1


55

l\IARK l\:IASTEn.

out of the native rock, or rather left there standing by the sur... rounding parts being cnt fL\yay. The luarks of the chisel on the dry portions of the rock looked as ne,v and fresh itS if the workmen had only just retired. " Another traveler says: "I have l'oamecl abroad oyer the snrrounding hills, even to l\fizpeb, '''here SAnruEL testified, and into the long, deep, limestone qnarries beneath J erusalenl itself, ,,~hence SOLOMO~ obtained those splendid slabs, the origin of 'which has been so long unkno""11." It is quite evident from the cUscoveries of the last few路 years that the larger stones of the ten1ple ,vere taken from the immediate vicinity of the edifice. There is every reason, however, to believe, that stones of smallol' size and finer quality were obtained from the famous quarries of Zarthan..

*

*

*

*

*

*

Notlling bl1t gaoc1 work-true work-square wOl'k, is wanted for the building of the temple.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Holy Scripture informs us that "the house, Vthen it "".lS in builcling, was built of stone matte ready before it ,vas bronght thither; so that there was neither hamrner nor t1X,:tlOr any tool of


5(;

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

iron heard in the house 'while it'Vt1s in building."* The traditions of the Order assert that the stones "rel'e squared, marked, ancl numbered in the quarry, so that w'hen they 'were brought to J erusnlem each part ,,"as found to tally ,vith snch precision that when finished the temple appearecl to be composed of t't single stone. In order to fit with so 11luch exactness each stone must have been good 'work, that is, of good material, and. properly"wrought and polished; trne 'worl\:, that iR, of right di1l1enBions ancltrue t.o the pattern; square, that is the angles all being exact rightangles; and so ill the erection of our spiritual ten1ple, \ve must build 'with the squared stones vrhich are the perfect actions of a gooel man's life, of which each brother must contribute his full quota, emblematically wrought, markecl, and numbered, until the moral strncture is complete-a building not macle with hands, eternal in the heavens. In the language of an early vtriter: "He that is truly squnre, ,yell polished, and uprightly fixed, is qualifiecl to he a member of our most honorable society, He that trnsteth snch a pOl'son with any engagement is freed f1'on1 all trouble anc1 anxiety about the performance of it, for he is fn.ithful to his trust; his \'rorc1s are the breathings of his heart, and he is an lItter stranger to deceit." Such must w'e [tIl be if 'we 'would expect to pass the test of the G'rnnd Overseer's square.

.

~"II!il'I7

The TlL?"ee Gates. The ancient mythologists c1iviclec1 the future world into two realms, one being the infernal regions, and the other the elyshnn, or abo(10 of the goels. Each of these ,vas aecessible by three gates, through one of ,yhieh all mortals ","ere to pass after death. III like manner the ,Jews assigned to their G路ehennn, three opening'S or gt'ttes, whi(~h they supposed ,,"ere l'espoctlvcly situated in the 'wilderness, in the sea, find at ,Jer'l1Snle1l1. Allusions t,O these gates are frequent in the Scriptures. JACOB said 61' 13ethel: "This is llone other but the hOllse of GOD, and the gate of hefl,Vell."f *1 King, \1..7.

tGen. xxxviii. 17.


l\IARK J.\.IASTER.

57

The psalmist, in several places, speaks of the "gates of heaven" and the "gates of cleath." A representation of similar gates is still extant on the triumphal arch of S. lVIaria l\[aggiore, at Rome. A s:ymbolical gate-\vay arched over is placed at the bottom of a geometrical stair-case, another about midway up the ascent, and a a third at the top. These are the gates of heaven, which are expanded to admit all those who have faithfully performed their dut.:r to GOD, their neighbors, and themselves. At the building of the temple no \vork was suffered to pass the gates but such as the proper officers had orders to receive, and no cl'aftsman 'was entitled to ,vages until his wOl'k had been approved. These wise regulations 'were necessary in order to insure the reception of good, true, and square 'work only; and by them \ve are symbolioally taught to try all our actions by the square of virtue, that thus being able to exhibit suitable specimens of our labor on earth, "we may be suffered to enter the bUl'nished gates of the new Jerusalem, and prove our right to receive \-rages by the true token of Faith.

:,~ :",. :., ~ :,~

~" ,.

)\~-

.

:} I ~~;.

TIle sixtll Ilo11r of tIle sixtll c1ay of the week. The Jewish week began ,vith the Christian Sabbath or our Sunday, and closed 'with their Sabbath or our Saturclay. The sixth day of the J e'wish week 'was, thel'efore, our Friday. The J e,vs divided their day into t\velve hours, commencing at sunrise and ending at sunset.. The sixth hour "was noonday or "high t\velve. U The precise time, therefore, alluded to here ,vag Friday noon, when the Craft, in temple times, are said to have been called from labor to refreshment. The labors of the week being thus brought to a close, the faithful, whose \york had been approved, at a given signal formed in procession,' headed by the J. G. W., and moving to the notes of cheerful music, presented themselves at the pl'oper place to receive their weekly pay_ If an)'" one demanded wages when none were clue him, he 'was at once, by the wise precaution of King SOLOMON, deteoteq and made to sllffer tllO

3路*


58

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTEH.

penalty of ~l}: impostor. So \ve a:te here taught the important lesson that \ve shoulc1 be particularly careful never to take ","'ages not our clue, lest we should wrong a brother by taking that which in GOD'S chancery belongs to him.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The Seventh Day.

rI 1

II II

"

In six days GOD created the heaven and the eart11, and rested UpOll the seventll day; the seventIl, therefore, Otlr anciellt bret11ren C011secratecl as a day of rest frOIll tlleir labors, tl1ereby enjoying freqllellt 0PI)Ortllnities to COIlten11Jlate tIle gloriollS ,yorks of creatioll, allcl to

adore their great creator. HYMN-Old Hundred.

. . -~~ I .â&#x20AC;˘ ~#~lst.. '_If:~ ::-- = 3~-1.~... -~ ~._~~

~

--~-

~-~-;

-

-

r--

Another six days' ,vork is done; ..A.n-oth-er

L~i~j@~g[FJ~J!1~ ~--- -.~-G)-'

-

Another six days' '\vork is c1one; AIi-oth-er

DRS~.

~~~.~---r--,

- '#-2=,"----4-l---I--I-~~f--~

. .._-J--1-___'____+_


59

:rtf A.RK ThIASTER.

In holy duties let the cltt}?--~ In holy pleasures pass a\v~ty! Ho'\v sweet a Stlbbatll thus to speucl, III hope of one ,vhich ne'er slIall enclI

*

*

*

*

*


60

GUIDE TO THE; R. A.. CHAPTER.

The obligation resting upon }j"'reen1aso~s to remember the Bahbath day and keep it holy is alike recognizee1 and enforced in the great book of the law which lies open at all times upon their altars, and in the traditions and lectures of their Order. They all inform us that the Almighty Builder of the universe having finished the sixth day's ,vork l'estec1 on the seventh. "He blessed, hallowed, and sancti.fied it. He, thereh:y', taught man to work industriously six days, but strictly command.ecl him to rest on the seventh, the better to contemplate on the beautiful 'works of creation-to adore him, as their creator-to go into his sanctuaries, and offer up praises for life and every blessing he so amply enjoys at his bountiful hands."

The. first hour of the first clay of the vvee!r.

*

*

*

*

*

*

At the building of the temple, according to tradition, the craftsmen arose with the SUll ancl pl1rsuecl their labor with the same regularity that marks the course of that luminary. The tin1e designated by the "first hour of the first day of the \veek': ,vas the hour after sunrise on the day succeeding their Snbbath, equivalent to what is no\\r our Sunclay morning. This ,vas the hour when the craftsmen in the qnarries of Zarthan and in the forests of Lebanon l'esullled their weekly la,bor. SECTION II.

lllustrates the foundation and histOl"y of the def,'1.'"ce, and impresses upon the mind of the candidate, in a striking manner, the impoI'tance of a strict observance of his obligation to be ever ready to stretch forth his hand for the relief of indigent and \Yorthy brethren. A variety of interesting circumstances connected with the builc1ing of King SOL07v!ON'S Temple are detailed, and the marks of distinction which ","ere in use among our ancient brethren are explained.


61

l\lARK l\:IASTER.

RE~CEPTION.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

. *

*

*

*

*

The following Scriptlu'"e passages are appropriately introdllced:

The stolle which tIle builclers refused is beconle the lleacl stolle of tIle corller.

n Did y"'e lle'ver read ill tIle Scril)ttlres, The stone "7'hicll tl1e btlilclers rejected, tile saIne is becolue tIle lleacl of t.Ile corner ?

Alld have ye not reacl tllis Scripttlre, TIle stone 'vhicll tIle btlilders rejected is becoll1e tIle head of tl1e co1"11e1'?


62

GUIDE ':IX) 'rUE B. A. CHA.1>T'EH.

Ii

811

tI.\1

Wllat is t1:1is tllffil tl1at is written, The stone Wl1icll the bllilders rejected, the sanle is beC0111e the head of tIle corner?

*

*

*

*

*

*

* * He t11at 11atll an ear to Ileal', let llim hear.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

As the Fello,v-Craft degree refers to and describes the five senses of hUIDaunature, so in this degree two of them, Hearing and Feeling, are particularly alluded to.. In the language of the old lectures: "Hearing is that sense by which 'we distinguish soun!--ls, and are capable of enjo:ring all the agreeable charms of music. By it we are enabled to enjoy the pleasures of society, and reciprocally to communicate to each other our thoughts and intentions, our purposes alld desires; while thus our reason is capable of exciting its utmost power and energy. The wise and beneficent author of nat-uxe intended by the fOl'mation of this sense, that we shoulcl be" social creatures, and receive the路 greatest and most important part of our knowledge by the information of others. For these purposes ,ve are endowed with


63 Hearing that, by a proper exertion of OlU" natural po,\vers, onr happiness may be complete." "Feeling is that sense by \vhich we distinguish the different qualities of bodies; such as heat and cold, hal'c1ness and softness, l"onghness anc1 smoothness, figure, solidity, motion, and extension." To a 1I~1rk lIaster 1\Iasoll these t"I"O senses ever suggest that sacred tie \vhich binds hiro to his brethren, anc1 when he hea1 S a brother's call for assistance he is tftught that he should at once extend the hand of charity. In the eloquent l:"tnguage of BloO. A. T. C. PIERSON: "He that is deaf to the sufi'el'ings of a brother deserves no better fate than to be deprived of the great blessing of heCL'j'in'1; and he 'who is so callous to the \vants of his bl'other as to reftis~ to stretch forth his hand to alleviate his sufferings c1eserveR to have no hand to help himself." 4

Anc1 ,ve will cut wood out of Lebanon, as nluch as thou shalt need; and ,vill bring it to thee in floats by sea to Joppa, and thOll shalt carry it up to Jerusalem. The ancient city of Joppa, to \\"'hich allusion is here made, is one of the oldest towns of Asia,and. is situatecl on a rocky pronl0ntOl"y jntting out from the eastern coast of the :alediterrtln~u.nSea, about forty nliles in a north'W'cstel'ly direction from J erusn.lCIU. Its Greek name was Joppa, its Hebre\v name In.pho, "" and it is now calle'l Ji1'ftl1 or Yaffa.. It \vas, and still is, the principa.l seaport of the la.nd of Judea, nncl of course a place of gret1.t commercial importn.nce; but its harbor is bad, and shillS generally anchor a lui1e from the town. From this port sailea tihe ships of the IS1"aelitish kings,

* Joshua) xix. 46.


64

GUIDE TO 'l'HE It. A. CHAPTER.

and to it canle the treasures of Ethiopia, and the riches of Ophir. It has now a mixed population- of about fivethousanc1. It is desc:r.ibed by JOSEPHUS as a very dangerous haven o~ account of its bold precipitous shore, against which the north wi.nd dnshes immense waves. * Baron GERAl\IB, ,Yho visited the Holy Land, in 1842, has given a vivid description of the difficulty and danger attending a landing at this plr;tce, vthich has been partially quoted by Dr. JYL4..CKEY. t N otwithstaneling the difficulty and danger of the landing, and the subsequent ascent up the steep banks of the sea coast at that place, most of the materials for the temple ,yere la,nded here, 'when they ~ ere bl'ought down from JYlcunt Lebanon. \Vhen the immense size and weight of these materials are considered, it seems ~lmost incredible that they could have been conveyed to J erusalenl in that manner. But not only was this done at the building of the first temple, but \ve learn from Holy Scripture that the same was true of the second temple; for "TheJ gave money also unto the masons, and to the carpe:uters; and meat, and ell'ink, and oil, nnto them of Zidoll, and them of Tyre, to bring cedar trees from Lebanon to the sea of Joppa, according to the grant that the;y had of CYRUS, King of Persia."t ::j: * * * * Tilell 118 brought me bacl{ tIle ,vay of tIle gate of tIle out,vard sallctllary, '\vllicl1 loolretll toward tIle East; ,allc1 it ,vas Slll.lt.. AllCl tIle T LORD said lllltO l11e, SOIl of 111 an, ~Iarl{ -VV ell, and bellold \vith tIline eyes, alIcl Ileal' ,vitIl tllin.c ears all that I say UlltO tl1ee cOllcerlling all tIle ordillallces of tlle house of tIle LORD, Ulld all the la,\ys thereof; alld nlarl{ well tIle entering in of tIle llollse, witll ev"ery going fortll of the sanctllary..

* Josephus.

Jewish "Tars, B

t I.exicon, 11 2:32.

m. C.. ix. S. ,;.


J\IARK

65

~rAsrrER.

*

*

*

The ~Il1rk is the appropriate je'\vel of a ~Iark 1\Iaster :ThIason. The origin of the l\Ia,rk is unknow'u. Perhaps the lnost reasonable supposition is that it \vas adopted at t1 very early period as a species of signature used by those 'who were unable to ,,"rite. The trnc1itions of t.he Order are to the effect tha.t there ,vere three classes of Fellow-Crafts employed at the building of Iri.ng 801,,0MON'S Tenlple. One class "''1."ought in the clayey grouncls between Stlccoth and Zerftc1~1tha, the seconcl in the forests of Lebauon, while the tbirc1 or principr~l clnss ,vas 8Iuploy-ed in the qun.rries of Za.rthan. Those \vho ,vrought in the quarries ,yere eighty thoUSt1,11c1 in llUnlbel", divided into Lodges of eight:y' each. Over each of these Lodges presided a 1!t1rk ]'It1ster ancl t\\"o J\.Iark l\It~1l as '\Yardens. Each of these cr:1ftsmen ,vas obliged to select a c1evice "whieh Vlas recorded ill a scroll kept for tha.t purpose, anel, therenpon, beerune the "~rark" of thto brother, anc1 coulcl not be altered or changed. A cOPY' of this nlark, the craJtsman was required to Pltt on all his work, all (1 thus every person's w'orkcould be readily distinguished, ancl praise or censure be correctly besto'\",ecl ,\yithOllt mistakes. By this 'wise precaution, sueh a vast boc1:y of l110n ",'ere easily an<l correctly paid, and by its moans the '\vorkmeu Vlore enahled to pnt together 'with such r,wility nIlcl precision the nlaterials '\yhen COIl... "eyed frolu the qnarries to 1\IOllUt lrlorifLb. The nUl.rks used by our aneiellt brethren are snid to have beon invented by HruA1\r ABiFF, ~"nc1 consisted of cOlubillutions of the square, t'H~ leYcl, the


66

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHA.PTER.

plnmb, and the cross. At a subsequent time, modificatiolls of these marks were adoptecl by the Grand }\iasters as the Freemason's alphabet or cipher, which \yas used upon a menlorable occasion. The truth of these traditions is verified by the fact that such marks were in use by the operative 1\1:aso11s of the miclcUe ages. STEINBRENNER, in describing the guilds of stonemasons of Germany, says that if the candillate's. qualifications were deemed satisfactory, "he was at once taught the salute or 'gr-uss' and the token or 'handschenlc' by "which he could make himself known as a traveling Fellow-Craft. He also received a distinctive ?narlc, which he was thenceforth obliged to place on all his work."* Similar marks are to be found among all ancient ruins, ana..great numbers of them have been collected and despribed by JY!. DIDRON, . a French writer, and also by G, GOOD'\V"IN, Esq., a member of the English Society of" Antiquaries. Within a few :years similctr marks have been discovered in ]}Iexico and Central America. From the similarit:y' existing between them wherever found, it is conclusive.ly shown that they must have been in general use by an builders at a very early period. The primary nse of the mark was Ul1cloubt~dly that above mentioned, but they also very naturally came to be an equivalent in all transactions for the owner's name, and hence their use in the payment of wfLges. Hence, too, the "l\iark" became the je\vel of the lvlal'k 1Iaster ~rason, and was invested 'With the same properties aB were attftched to the Roman "Tesse1~a ]ÂŁospitalis," 01' hospitable token. \Vhen two 1)orsons in ancient tinles desired SOUle eroblenl of their friendship, they selected a piece of bone, metal, or stone, and engraved upon it their names, their initia.ls, or some device. This they divided in to two pieces, each taking one. This ,vas called a Tesse1~a Hospitalis, and became the pledge of a friendship and attachment which nothing l\"'as permitted to destroy. Though in itself considered of the smallest value, "yet as the memorial of a highly esteemed friend, it was retainecl and handed down from generation to generation, even to remote posterity; and whenever or wherever the two pieces v{ere produced mutual assistance and protection ,\,\:,e1'e assul'ed to the holders." The "l\1:ark" may be made of ~ny durable materia.l, and ill any fOl'm, to suit the taste or fane:y of the OVlner. On one side is generally engraved the o\yner's name, Chapter, and date of. his

* steinbrenner.

Origin of Masonry p. 72.


J\IARK

67

~I.A..STER.

advancement. On the other side must be el1gravec1 in a circular fornl these eight letters: H. T. ,Yo S. S. T. I{. S. 'Yithin this circle of letters is engraved the device selectecl by the brother, ancl 'when once chosen the ,,"hole should be drawn or recorclecl in a book kept for that purpose, and it is then said to be recorded in the , ,Lodge Book of l\Iarks." "Then this hn.8 been done the brother can neither alter 1101' chnnge it, but it reulaills as his mark to the clay of his death. l\Iany Chapters fix by their la,Ys the time within ,vhich each brother HUlst select his nlurk, and "\\ihere. this is not the caRe, the general regulations of the degree make it the iU1perative duty of a brother to do so, as soon as possible, and within a reasonable time after his ,advancement. The use of this jewel is thus beautifully explained by Dr. A. G. l\UCKEY: "This mark is nota mere ornanlental appendage of the degree, but is 'a sacred token of the l'ites of friendship and brotherly love, and its presentation at any time by the owner to another l\Iark ::U:Inster would claim fronl the latter certain acts of friendship ,vhich are of solemn obliga.tion nlnollg the Fratcl'uit:y. A mark thus presented for the purpose of 0 btailling a fhyor is said to be pledgecl; though remaining in the possession of the O""ller, it ceases for allY actua,l plu'poses of aclvnntage to be his propel'(r; Nor can it be again used by him until, either by the return of the , faYor, or the consent of the benefilctor, it hus been redeemed.; for it is a positive la,," of the Orc1er that no JlrIark l\Inster shall pledge his mark a second tilne until he hn.s rec1eemecl it frol11 its previous pledge." Should misfortunes assail the 1fal'k J.\:Inster 1Inson; should sickness fftll upon him; should grinl 'want come to his cloor, anc1 gaunt hunger gna\v at his vitn.ls; should the light of dftjr be shut out fro111 his sightless eJ"es, or his palsie(l tongne forget its office, his mark at once n.fforcls him immediate l'cHef, and 拢111路 surpasses in the 111ugical pathos ancl po,ver of itf:. silent appeal, all the eloquence of stt1cliec1 hl.nguflge.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The traditions of the clegree assert that the price of a mark is a "Belcah" or Jewish half shekel of silver, equal in vftl1.1e to the fourth part of a (loHnr. It has been clainlecl by some authors, that "the shekel was not a coin, but a definite 'weight of golcl or silv'cr


68

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

which, being vteighed out, pa.ssed as current money among the Hebrews." This is unc10uLtedly a mistftke. * . The sele.ction of the" BeJcah" or half shekel as the equivalent of a. "mark" is probably in ;allnsion to the "offering of the LORn" commanded to be made by the Israelites. " Every, one that passeth alllong them that are numbered, from twenty years old and above, shall give an offering unto the LORD. The rieh shall not give J1101'6, and the pOOl' shall not give less than half a shekel, when they give all offering unto the LOl-tD, to make an atonement for YOtl.l" souls. Exodus, xxx. 14, 15.

*

*

*

*

*

*

:t: Union Bible Dictionary. The learned Dean Prideaux sa:ys: "There are many old Je\yish shekels still in being, and others of the same sort are fre-


69

M.:\.RK MASTER..

:you builders, "\Vllich is becolue the head of the corller. * * * * * *

This passage and the similar ones* which are intl'oc1l1cecl nt an earlier period in the ceremonies, are quotations or paraphrases of the twenty-second verse of the 118th Psalm of DAVID, where the original language is used in reference to the promised l\Iessiah. The design of the passage at this point is to teach us the great truth that nothing has been made in vain. It matters not how \vorthless and insignificant a creature may appeo.r to Ollr finite ancl prejudiced eyes, we should never despise it, nor cast. it from us in derision, for we may rest assured that if Infinite '\Visdom has been employed in its creation, it has in the economy of Providence its appropriate place and use. From. it vvTe may also learn never to despond or grow weary in well doing. Although our motives lllay be misinterpreted, ancl the 'work of our hands be misjudged b~y our erring fellow-men, still ,ve may have faith that there is over all ,1 JUDGE, who sees not with the eyes of nian, and ,vho "rill a.t the last make the stone which the builders rejected" the head of the corner." The keystone is astrikil1g symbol of the close ullion that should ever exist between brethren of the same household. .A..s the operative l\fason constructs his materh1J arch so that. the stones employed, in its erection are made to <.1epenc1 for support all eaeh other, and most of all on the keystone "\vhieh binds thenl all together and completes the strnctnre, so b~y this s:ylllbol,Ya n.rc taught that in the great arch of FreeulO.sonry路w路hich Sp(1US the earth, we are dependant on each other for comfort and hal)piness, ftucl most of all must rely for our social plcaslu'es and blessings 011 tbat charity, which is the keystone to bind us together brother to brother, and which 'alone can render any society clesirable.

*

*

*

*

*

*

quently dug up in Judea, with this inscription on them in Sa,mnritanlcttcrs, Jerusal~m Kedosllah, that is, Jerusalem the Holy; ,,,'moh inscriptiou ahows that they could not be the coin either of the Israelites of' the ten tribes, 01' of the Salllaritans who after succeeded thenl intheir land; for neither of thern woulcl hONe put the name of Jerusalenl upon their coin, or eveIl have (~allc<l it the holy city. These pieces, therefore, lnust have beell the coin of those of tho two tribes before the captivitj路. Oonnectioll, yol. 1, p. 44.9. * Matt. xxi. 42. l\Iark, xii. 10. Luke, xx. 17. U


70

GUIDE TO rrHE R. A.

CHAP1~ER.

The ",\\7orking Tools of a ]'Iark l\faster l\.Iason are the Ohisel and l\fallet. THE CHISEL

Is all instrull1ent l11ade lIse of by operative 11asons to cut, carv"'e, Inark, "ancI illdent tlleir ,york. It 1110rally denl011strates tIle ad,ralltages of disciplille and educatioll. TIle 111iIld, lilte tIle diall1011d ill its origillal state, is rude alld unpolislled; bllt as the effect of tIle chisel 011 the exterllal coat S0011 IJreSellts to vie'\v tIle latellt beauties of the dial11oI1c1, so ec1ucatioll c1isco\7'ers tllq latent virtues of tIle l11illcl, alid c1ra,vs tllem fortIl to rallge tIle large fielcl of Inatter ancl space, to dislJlay the sUll11nit of 11ull1all kllowledge, Ollr duty'" to GOD and to luau. THE

:M.A.LLET

Is all instrum~llt l11ucle lIse of b.y operative 11asolls to knock off excrescences alld smooth Sllrfaces.. It 111oral1y teaches to correct irreglllarities, ancl reduce l11all to a pro!Jer level; so tllat by qlliet cleportll1ent, he l11ay, in. the sellool of clisciplille, learll to be COlltellt. "'\Vllat tIle nlallet IS to tIle work~111all GIlligll tellecl reaS011


71

1\fARK 1\lASTER.

is to tIle passions: it cllrbs all1bitioll; it depresses erlvjT; it 1110clerates anger, allcl it ellcourages good dispositions; '\vllence arises all10ng good ~{asons that cOlllely order, " Wh:Jh nothing earthly gives, or can destroy, The soul's calm sunshine, and the lleartielt joy."

*

*

*

*

*

*

:I:

*

*

*

These symbolical expla.nations of the Chisel ancl l\lallet 'were taken from the installation service of our English brethren in \yhich they are included among the implements presented to the new ~faster. . The chisel 'wasalso fonuerly one of the w'orking tools of an English Entered Apprentice, and as such "Tas thus symbolized. "From the chisel ,,"e learn that perseverance is necessary to establish perfection; that the nlde lllat~rial receives its fine polish but from repeated efihl'ts alone; that nothing short of indefn,tigable exertion CfLll induce the habit of virtue, enlighten the mind, ancl render the Eoul pure."

*

*

The following pttssage of Scriptnre is also al)prOpliately introduced and explained:

To 11ill1 tllat overC0111etll ,viII I give to eat oftlle hiddell Inanl1a, allcl I ,viII give 11inl a 1,vhite stone, and ill tIle stolle a ne,v na1116 ,vritteu, 'Vllicll no man kllo'\vetll saving lle tllat receivetll it.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The meaning of this and Idnclrec1 passages from the Apocalypse has been the snbject of 111uch speculation. Dr. A. G. 1IACKEY, in a commentary on the above, sa.ys it is lllost probable that by tho ",vhite stone" and the "ne'w lUl.llle," St. J ORN referred to the tessera~ hospitales of the ancients.


72

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHA.PTER.

Dr. OLIVER observes that" the 路white stone is an inestimable gift, promised t,o everyone 'who lives a nlol'al and virtuous life. '\Vhite is an emblem of purity, and the ne,v name conveys it. title to be admitted within the vail, and honorec1 with a seat near the living 'GOD, in that palace 'which is deseribed by St. JOliN as a perfect cube, vi"hose walls and foundations are garnished with all kinds of precious stones, all he,,~ed; squared, and polished by the masterly hand of T. G. A. O. T. U. ~'* Some commentators have supposecl the passage to allude to the l)l'actice among the ancients of passing judgment on an accused . person. Those in favor of acquitting him cast a "rhite ball into an nrn, and those \vho adjudged him guilty cast in a black ball; a custom which has been perpetuated in one of the most important transactions of a Lodge. If another opinion may be offereel among so many, it ",'ould seem to be more probably an allusion to an ancient custom at the Ol:ympian games, where white stones were given to the conquerors, \'vith their names ,vritten upon t.hem, and the value of the prize they had \yon. It is '\vell known that IDany of the figures usecl by the New Testament writel's were tn.kell from these nationnl. games of Greece. t The symbolical teaching then intended to he C011veyed to our minds is this: If we are 'victorious in our endeavors to reach the goal set bef01'e us, 'we shall receive fOl' our re,Yarc1, the '\vhite stone indicative of路 our purity 0f heart, and in it; the ne'\v name that shall be the passport for our admission into the Celestial Lodge above. rrhe new name may denote the adoption of the receiver into the family of GOD, + and hence the 'white stone may '\vith propriety symbolize the adoption of the lVIark 1\Iaster ~fn.son into a Fraternity 'whose only aim is to erect a spiritual temple to the GREAT I AM; and the new nam,e ,,~ill then become a symbol of that Great and Sacl'ed Name, that Eternal Truth 'which leads the trne l\Iason in search of light from his first step on the checkerecl pavcnle.llt until he has passed the vails of the Ta.bernacle.

* ~

*

*

Dr. Oliver's Dictionary of l\Iasonry. 1"Onion Bible Dictionary, de Race. :t Isaiah. 1xii. 2, Uuioll Bible DictiDnn.ry.

*

*

*


73

l"IARK 1\'fASTER.

CrIARGE TO TIlE CANDIDATE.. BROTHER: I congratulate you 011 11uving been thOllght vvorthy of being promoted to tl1is honorable degree of Masollry. Pernlit 111e to impress it on 3'"0111" l11incl tllat :your assiclllity should ever be COffilnenSllrate ,vitIl }TOlII' dLlties, wIliell becolne luore and ll10re extensive as :)7011 advallce ill l\1asollry. The situatioll to which you are 110'V pronloted will dra,v lIpan you not only tIle scrutillizing eyes of tIle world at large, b11t tllose also of your bretllre11, 011 wllom tl1is clegree of ~iaso11ry has not beell cOllferrec1; all will be j1lstified ill expecting your conduct allcl bellavior to be slle11 as may witll safety be ill1itatecl. In tIle 11onorable character of l\1arl~ 1faster Mason, it is more IJarticularly your Cltlty to endeavor to let y0111'" COllduct in tIle ,vol~lcl, as ,veIl as ill the Lodge, and anlong ~Y'Ollr 1)retl1ren, be such as may stalld tIle test of tIle Gralld Overseer's square, tllat }TOU nlay not, lik:e tIle unfinishecl al1d imperfect work: of tIle negligent and unfaitllful of fo1'n1e1" tinles, be 1"eiectecl and fJ tllro'V11 side, as llnfit for tllUt s!)iritlHtl lJllilding,

4

c


74

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

tllat 110l1Se 110t Inade ,vitl1 11ands, eternal ill the hea'vens. Wllile StIch is your conduct, sho111(1 l11isfor-. tlll1es ass~il you, should friellds forsake }TOlI, should ellvy tradllce }ToUr good l1allle, aIlcl Inalice IJersecute you; yet may you 11<1Ve confideIlce tIl at., anlong 1fark: ~{aster 1tlasons, yOll \viII filld friends who will adnlillister relief to YOlII' distresses, all~ cOlufort your afflictions; ever bearing ill mirlc1, as a C011solatio11 under all the frovvns of fortulle, alld as all encollragenlellt to 1101Je for better IJrosl)ects, that the sto?ze which tILe b'ztilclers re.jecteil (possessing l11crits to thell1 unkno,vn) becan2e t7~e chief stone of the corne')". The reader will observe that the anthors of this ,,~ork have restored the original charge as published by 'VEBD, and "which was mutilated by JEREl\lY L. CROSS, and most of those who have followecl hhn. It will also be observed that this charge, unlike those of other degrees, is more properly a congratulatory address, anel should al waj's be given in that form.

*

*

*

*

*

*

TIle sixth hour of the sixtll day of the week.

*

*

*

*

The last .shall be.first..

*


75

MARK MABTER.

The following song luay be sung:

----m-

1'IusIc-...4rnerica.

lLfi_--1---i-;;M-+ --1---:1--.-1- -:-1/1/IJ--I/P-lidI--~-.~~t-i~-~--J U_Q)l--fJli--=d!IIJ'- . --.-8'1- -14'--_t= 1= -

~

,,_4-p---·~ 1-.;.-·:=t1I!1\fark

~faster8

~.J'

'all

ap-pear,

Be .. fore

• -/llCE-'--Le=~t:::=F. • ~ t: E

_~~4:-. -~==!== t:

~

~ ___

the

~

--E ~E

l'~"--l----4~~~-.-4P-t!!I-r-

---III-

=....s:I!_£1tj_ _ _ Gij_ _!---I--!""_ iL._ . •-.-~- .... --.d- -l--~--1- -_-IcIP-~~-~ -.-IQ!!!==-~

=

=+-~ r=- I~ =t:: t::=c=~ Chief O'er-seer, In con" cert move; Let him your

~~-€=:E~~-~ § ::!'---=-

I~

iL-idP--

.~_-_Ill ..' ~===-~-~~--J-~

_S\I!':; _ _. _

- -

.

--t=-·_-S-~t=·_·_--~I= t=='=~===~ '\vork

in .. spect, For the Chief Arch . . i...

.

teet,

1~:F=l~ =1=g: ~:=:F=EiiiO:::::-~--=E ~~~~==diCt::==:t:====Et=:=:r -f=-E

~

t...--,_-~-~_ ~-;;m-.-~~-~-~-1-.-dJi-_- -111- tIII-';--;-c.-r--. --bm-'IJfI)-.--MIf};- -:::\---

.~ --w , ~';"'-l 1I1~ ...

~_~ ~-i=T-

If there be

110

t=

de · feet, He

!=~=

approve.

,,,,ill

~~---=:EB . ~~!if _==E2: I~.

,._ _E1-_ _-_ _ - __-_-_--~_

~-

=

~t:=E~ EHE

You who 11ave passed the square, For your re,vards !)repare, Join 11eal't ancl llu,nd ; Each with hi8 1nCt'j-1CJ 'l~n vie'll). l\farcll witll the just and trtle; 'V-ages to JOll are clue, At your ~ommandc


76

GUIDE TO 'l'RE R. A. CHAPTER.

HIR.Al\f, tlie wiclo,v's son, Sent 1.1UtO SOL01ION Our great key-stone; On it appears the name Which raises 11igll the fame Of all to 1vllom tIle saUle Is trluy kno,vl1.

Now to the west'\vard move, Where, full or strength and love, HIRA11 doth" stand; But if impostors are JYlix'd with the wortl1~Y tllere, Caution then~ to be1.oare Of the ?~ight hc(;nc'l.

*

*

*

*

*


MARK l\IASTER.

77

There are many traditions as to the amount of ,vages paiLl tho on the temple. One of these, which has been of late years somewhat extensively circulated in this country, is to the effect that those Fello'w-Crafts who were "advanced to the honorary degree of a l\'Iark Master Mason" Wel"e paid a Jewish shekel, or about fifty cents in the coin of the United States, for each day's labor. Another tradition, cun-ent among our English brethren, relates that the men were paid in their Lodges by shekels, and the number of shekels per day was regulated by the square of the number of the degree which each order of men had attained. According to this theory, an Entered Apprentice received one shekel, or fifty cents; a Fellow-Craft, four, or two dollars; a l\Iark l\Ian, nine, or four and one half dollars; a Mark J\iaster, sixteen, or eight dollars, and in like manner until they make the highest grade to have received about fort).. dollars per day. Both of these accounts are wholly fanciful, and were undoubtedly fabricated 'within the last fifty years, without the existence of any c1ocum0:cts or authorities on which to base them. According to the ancient traditions and the early rituals, the true amount of wages paid a faithful craftsman ,vho ,vrought in the quarries 'was a much smaller sum than those above named. The wages of a speculative craftsman is. the knowledge of Divine Truth which the Grand l\Iaster of the Universe will bestow 011 him who faithfully perfo~ms his allotted labor in the qnarries of earth. ~"orkmen

The follo,ving parable is read:

It is like 11nto a nlall tllat is an housel1older, which vvellt Ollt early in the lllor11illg to hire laborers illtO 11is vineyard. And "\vhen he had agreed vvith tIle laborers for a pel1n)~ a da~y', he sent themillto l1is vine:rard. AIld he "Tent Ollt about the tllird hour, and sa\v otllers standing .idle ill the l11ark:et-place, ancl said llnto tllelD, Go '~le also illto tIle villeyard; alld ,\,\rllatsoever


78

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTElt.

is right I will give you. And the~y ,vent tl1eir way. Agaill he 1vellt out about tIle sixtll alld nintll hour, antI did lik:ewise. Allcl about the eleventh hour, be went out alld found otllers stallding idle, and sa"itll unto theIn, W11Y stal1d. ye here all the day idle? They say unto him, becallse 110 mall 11ath 11irecl us. He saith Ullto them, Go ye also into tIle villeyard; alld ,vhat.. soever is right, tl1at shall ye receive. . So wIlen even was come, the 10rel of the villeyard saith unto his steward, Oall the laborers, alld giv'e them tlleir l1ire, begillYling froIll tIle last ll11tO the first. And when they caIne that ,vere l1ired about tIle eleventh hOllr, tlley received every man a pen11Y. But '\vhell the first caIne, tlley supposed that they should have received more; al1d tlley likevvise received every man a l)enny. Alld ,vhell they had receivecl it, they lllurmllred against tIle good mall of tIle 11ouse, saying, Tllese last have wrought but one hour, and thou hast l'.1ade them equal unto tlS, Wllicll have borne the burdell and l1eat of the day. But 11e allswered 011e of tIle lTI, and said, Friend, I do thee 110 wroIlg; didst not t110l1 agree ,vitIl 1118 for a penny? Tal\:e tllat tIline is, and go thy way; I will give unto tllis last cvâ&#x201A;Źn as tlnto


7拢1

:MARK lVI.A.STER.

tl1ee. Is it not lavvful for me to c10 '\vllat I ,:viII ,vitIl mine own? Is tllille eye evil becallse I anl goocl? So the last shall be first, and the first last; for nlany be called, but fe,v cllosen.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The penny alluded to here 'was undoubtedly the Roman penn~y, a silver coin equal to from twelve and a ha,lf to fourteen cents in U~ted States coin. A very erroneous impression prevails respecting the' value of money in olden times, on account of our associations with its present value. A penny, equivalent to twelve or fourteen cents, seems to us to be a mean compensation for ten or twelve hours toil in the vineyard, and the t'wo pence affOl路ds very equivocal evidence to our minds of generosity in the good Samaritan;* but, when it is considered how much of the c,omforts and necessaries of life these apparently trifling sums could obtain, the case appears differently. As lately as the year 1351 the price of labor was regulated in England by act of Parliament, and "hay-makers, corn-,,"eeders, without meat, drink, or other courtesy" (in modern phrase, finding themselv.es), were to have a penny a day. In many places these were the highest wages paid for any kincl of agricultural labor, some kinds being still less. The pay of a chaplain in England, in 1314, w'ns three half pence, or about three cents a day. At the same time wheat was sixteen cents a bushel, and a fat sheep only t'welve cents. A penny a day under such circumstances ,vould not be inconsiderable wages. In the fourth century before CHRIST a penny would have bought, it is estimated, at least ten times more than it would have done in England in the :rear 1780-and prices then were very much lower than at the present day.. lie The use of this parable, and also the quotations from the New Testament, are said to be 'c Americanisms "-although this may bo safely doubted. It is trne, the parable does not form a part of the ritual of the degree of cc Jfaster lJ.larlc llfason," as found among the detached degrees of the Ancient and Accepted rite; but this is not by any means conclusive that it was added by the early American ritualists. At all events these anachronisms have becolue of such

* Luke, x., 35.

t Union Bible Dictionary.


80

GUIDE TO ':RE R. A. CHAPTER.

long standing that they cannot no'Vv be discarded eyell were such a thing desirable. The great moral lessons taught 11S in this degree are concisely and eloquently enforced by the symbolism of this sublime parable. As a Fellow-Craft we are taught that" the internal and not the external qualifications of a man are ,vhat lVIasolll'y regards."* As 11 J\fark :Th:laster IVlason we learn the great truth that the Eternal Father is no respecter of persons, but will bestow the gifts of his beneficent hand alike to each one who sincerely labors to obey his righteous law. "The design of all ~Iasonry is the search after Truth, and everyone who seeks to discover it shall receive his reward in the attainment of it." So in the vi:q.eyard of Masonry it matters not ,yhether we commenced our labors with the rising sun, and have borne the burden and heat of the day, or whether we came in at the eleventh hour, just as the day was c1ra"ring to a close, if we but do our duty, if we are faithful and earnest, we shall receive our '\vages in a clear conscience, and in the commendation" well done good and faithful servant."

*

*

Now to the praise of those Who triumphed o'er the foes Of Mason's art; To the praiseworthy three, Who founde,d this路 degree; l\fay all their virtues be Deep in our hearts. The ceremonies previous to closing a Lodge in this degree are peculiarly interesting. They teach us the duty we owe to our brethren in pal"ticular, and the whole family of mankind in general, by ascribing praise to the meritorious, and dispensiri g rewards to the diligent and inc1ustl~ious. *,Charge in second degree.


PAST

~IASTER ..

THIS c1egree is more closely associatec1 with SYlllbolic than Chapter IVIasonry. It ,vas originally, and is to this day, an hono1"a1'y degree, ancl Sh01.1ld be conferred only on the 11e,vly-elected ~raster of a'Lodge. But as it has becolne [1 pel~manent COlll})Onent l)art of the Cft11itular sJTsteln, it is, therefore, useless to contend ,vith "'lHl,t is often terlnec1 the" inconsistency" of conferring an hOllor where no equivalent services ha"ve been, OrflJl'e eXIJecte<1 to be, rendered.. As the rulers of l\Iasonry are, ana should only be, selected for their superior skill and intelligence, the:r alone should be permitted to receive the vallutble light and information contained in the cel'elnonies of t11is degree..

4*


82

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTEn.

Those who receive the degree in the Chapter aTe termed" virtual" Past l\:Iasters, in contradistinction to those who have been elected and installed in a regularly .' constituted SYlnbolic Lodge, vvho are called "actnal" Past Masters; the former having no rights or plivileges, as such, out of the Chapter. In order to harmonize many of the controversies that were constantly arising in respect to the contending rights of Past l\:Iasters, the Genel"al Grand Chapter of the United States, in 1856, adopted a resolution recommending the Ohapters under its jurisdiction "to abridge the ceremonies now conferred in the Past 1\'Iaster's degree within the narrowest constitutional limits, only retaining the inducting of the candidate into the Oriental Chair, and communicating the means of recognition." The various sections of the lecture of this degree, which l'elate to the constitution and dedication of ne,v Lodges; the installation of officers; the laying of cornerstones; the dedication of l\Iasonic halls, and the funeral services, being only necessary to the actual Past l\iasters, are to be found in connection with the Symbolic degrees, under the title of "Ancient Ceremonies."

HISTORY. WEEN the Order of Past Master was first made a constituent part of the service used at the installation of a Master of a Lodge, or whence the ceremonies of that Order were derived, are problems that have never yet been solved, although the Past Master's degree has been more c1.isctJ,ssed than all the other ~rades at l.f:l."ee;m.asonry!


PAST

:M~ASTER.

83

The earliest allusions to the Ol~aer of Past 1faster are those which are found in DERMOTT'S Ahiman Rezoll, and PRESTON'S illustrations, 路where it is spoken of as a long-established thing, whose possession by a 1"Iaster could not be dispensecl with, and the confel~ring of ~"hich was the only esotel'ic portion of the ceremonies of installation. That it ,vas in use among both the Ancients and A!loderns is, therefore, certain, and, by both, was recognized as being of ancient and binding obligation. . The reader will bear in mind that at the organization of the Royal Arch degree as a separate and distinct grade, it could only be conferred Gn l\fasters of Lodges. This was one of the fundamental Landmarks of the original Royal Arch system. At first it was well enough; but in later years, when the Fraternity became more extended, this ancient regulation so limited the number of Royal Arch l\fasons that the excellent precepts of Capitular lVlasonry lost much of their effect by reason of the want of numbers sufficiently interested and duly qualified to teach them. It, therefore, became necessary to give up the genel"all)I'actice of the entire system or relax the above mentioned rule. So binding was the Landmark considered that, rather than violate it, the fathers of Ro~yal A.rch l\1:asonry contrived the ceremony of "plivately passing the chair." This "ras nothing more nor less than the creation of a Virtual in place of an .A.ctuall\faster, and was done by virtue of a dispensation from the Granel JiIaster. The candidate, after receiving this degree of Past l\{aster was considered as eligible to the l~oyal Al'ch as if he were an Actual Past 1\faster, and the Landmark was still preserved. In England, however, since the union in 1813, the ancient Landmark has been abrogated, aud the candidate for exaltation is required to possess neither the Order nor the degree of Past 1\faster. In Ireland, Scotland, and the United States, the ancien.t Landmark is still preserved, and in the latter country the rights, duties, nnd privileges of both Actual and \Tirtual Past T\iasters have been thoroughly discussed, and are now generally ""ell understood.


84

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

It is now settled that the Oi'der of Past:Thlaster is a paJrt of the necessary installation service to be conferred u po:q. a Master elect of a Lodge, and that a l\faster cannot be la"wIuny installed without receiving that Order; that Chapter Past Mastel'S cannot confer the Order of Past ]}Iaster lipan a Master elect, nor be present vlhen it is conferred; that an , Actual Past l\faster cannot sit in a Lodge of Virtual Past Masters; and that a Virtual Past Thfaster can claim no right, privilege, or immunity in a Lodge or among Actual Past Masters, by virtue of his having received the c1egree of Past 1YIaster. In short the degree of Past l\Iastel" is conferred in the Capitnlar system for Chapter PU11)oses only;" and entitles none who receive it to the honors accorded to one who has regularly passed the chair of a subordinate Lodge." The degree was not regnlarly introduced into the American system or rite until somewhere about the year 1792. Previous to that time it was the custom, generally, to COllvene the necessary number "who had l'Bceived it, and by c1ispensation of the Grand ~faster, confer the c1egTee 011 candidates in an occasionnl Lodge, 路which acted for the time being, b~y路 yirtue of the dispensation.-1'.The degree was also formerly conferred by the Loclges of Perfection under the Ancient and Accepted rite. The same regulation existed there, as in the Royal Arch, that none but Past J\fasters should be eligible for the degrees, and, therefore, whenever a c~1nc1idate, who was not an Actual Past Master, presented himself, the degree of Past l\Iaster ,VTLS in the first place conferred upon him.. I have now before me the records of it Loc1ge of Perfection, bearing date 1782, in which the above :facts appear. After the Chapters began to assume jurisdiction over the degree, the councils of the Ancient and Accepted rite relinquished their claim to it, and its status after much discussion is no,v ,vell understood, and the degree itself is much better appreciated than formerly.

* The

degree is now conferred in a similar manner in the jurisdiction of has never conle under the General Grand Chapter.

reI~sylvania, which


85 OF:E~ICERS. THE

regular officers of a Past JYlaster's Lodge aloe:

1. 2. 3.

RIGHT WORSHIPFUL l\I.ASTER; SENIOR GRAND WARDEN;

,";VARDEN. The officers of a Chapter take rank in a Past l\:Iaster's Lodge as follows, viz: the High-Priest as R. W. l\Iastel"; the King as Senior Granel \\iarden; the Scribe as Junior Grand 'Varden; the Treasurer and Secretary occupy the corresponding stations; the Principal Sojourner as Senior Deacon; the Royal Arch Captain as Junior Deacon, and the Tiler at l1is proper station. The symbolic color of the Past lVlaster's degree is purple. The apron is of ,vhite lambskin, square at the corners, edged ,vith purple, and the je,vel of the degree inscribed upon it. The collar is purple, ec1ged,vith gold. The jewel of a Past lVIaster is a pair of compasses, extended to sixty degrees, the' points resting on the segment of a circle. Bet","een the extended legs of the compasses is a flaming sun. The whole Inay be '~uspel1dec1 within a circle. Lodges of Past 1\fasters are" c1edicatecl to the Holy Saint JOHN." The candidate receiving this degree is said to he "inducted into the Oriental Cllair of King SOLO~ION." JUNIOR GRAND


86

GUII}E TO THE R. A. CHA.PTER.

OPENI路NG. i

til

*

*

*

*

*

*

THE following may be used as a charge at opening a Lodge in this degree:

Blessed is the man t11at walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, llor starldeth in the way of sinners, 1101" sitteth ill the seat of the scornful: But llis c1eligllt is in tIle law of tIle LORD; ancl in his law doth he meditate day and l1ight. And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth fortIl his fruit in his seasoll; his leaf also shalillot wither; al1d whatsoever he doeth shall prosper. TIle tlngodly are 110t~ so; but are lilre the cllaff ,vllich the wind driveth away. Therefore, the U11godly shall not stand in the judgment, or sillners in the congregatioll of tIle righteous. For the LORD kno,vetll the WHy of the righteous; but the way of the ungodly shall perish.

*

*

*

*

*

*


87

PAST l\iASTER.

RITUAL. SECTION FIRST.

THIS section treats of the government of our society; the disposition路 or our rulers; and their l~equisit~ qualifications. It also illustrates the ceremonies 01 conferring this distinguished honor upon such as are found worthy.

*

*

*

*

*

*

REQEPTION.

*

*

*

*

*

*

to the investiture of the candidate, he is reminded of the responsibilities he is about to assume, and his obligations to the Fraternity are enforced in the way peculiar to tIle Craft. PBEVIOUS

*

*

*

*

*

THE GIBLEl\IITES. IN a recent 'work by Past Grand lIaster A. T. C. PIERSON, there are collected many traditions which have been current at diffel'ent periods among the Fraternit~7". Many of them are fanciful and without any known "rarrant of authority, being generally of English origin. Among this last class is the following: "During the process of the erection of the temple, SOLOMON' ,vas in the .habit of visiting every part of the building, to inspect the work and examine the pl'ogress being made. Upon one occasion, as he was ascending a ladder of rope, one side gave 路路way,路 but just as he was falling, he ,vas canght by two of the workmen who happened to be passing, and he was thus saved from great injury if not from death. These workmen were Giblemites, and in gJ:atitude to them . for the service rendered him, and to perpetnate its remembranae, SOLOMON took this class under his especial protection, and ordered that in the future he should be cop.stantlv attended by two of the


88

GUIDE路 Tp" THE R. A. CHAPTEH.

Giblemitcs. Vilhen age, infirmity, and disease had renclered SOLOMON unable to walk alone, two of this favored class constnntly attended and assisted him even to seating him upon his throne."* Although much路 of this tradition is entirely,vithout authority to sustain it, yet there is in it some truth; and we may derive ii'om it . the in1portant lesson, one which we may see constantly verified around us, that even the wisest, best, and most exalted of men are at all times dependent on the charity of their fello,\,,...s, and the bounty of Divine Providence. The Giblemites were the people of Gebal, a cUy of Phcenicia, north of Beyl'oot, called Byblos .by the Greeks and Romans, now known by the name of J'iblah. At the present time it is but little more than a mass of ruins, which are sufficiently magnificent to indicate its former greatness and beauty. Indeed it was famous in former times for the skill of its masons and builders, who excelled all others ill the knowledge of architecture. We find them frequently mentioned in Scripture as "stone squarers," a term applied to them as being eminently distinguished in that kinclof w路ork.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The candidate is then regularly invested "\vith the insignia of office, and the furniture and implements of the Lodge are presented and explained. The }'Iastel"S je\yel is a square, and inculcates morality. It was a saying of .A.RISTOTLE that "he who bears the shocks of fortune valiantly, and demeans hiInself uprightly, is truly good, and of a square posture, without reproof." The ~In.ster should, therefore, never lose sight of the hnportant lesson 'which his jewel sJ'robolically teaches, but on every occasion, and bJl' all his acts, prove that he is in truth, a square stone in the temple of !\Iasonr;,Y'.

Tile Holy TT7;ritiIJ"gs, that great ligllt ill ~~fa颅 sonry, will guide you to all trlltll; it will clirect your patlls to tIle temple of l1apl)i11eSS, al1d point out to you tIle '\vl1ole dllty of ll1all. * TracUtiollS of Freelnasonr~t", p.

294:.


PAST MAS~~a. '

The Sq~lare teaclles us to reglllate oUI,,~~t,io.ns by rule and line, and to harlnollize our' COlldllCt by the princil)les of morality alld virtue. The Oo?npass teacl1es to limit our desires ill every station, tIlat, risi11g to emil1cnce by 111erit, we may live respected alld (lie regretted. The Rule directs tllat ,ve ShOllld Pllllctuall~y" obsei"ve our duty, press forward ill the !)atll of virfue, alld, lleither inclillillg to tIle rigl1t nor to the left, ill all our actiol1S l1ave eternity ill vie'v.

The Li?"te teaclles tIle criterioll of 1110ral rectitllc1e, to avoid dissimulation in c011versatioII and action, allcl to direct 0111" steps to tIle patll which leads to inlmortality. You no,\v receive in charge tIle Oltarter or Warran,t, by the authority of '\v11icll tllis Lodge is held. Y Oll are carefully to pre~erve it, nnd in 110 case should it ever be out of YOllr inlnle(liate COlltrol, alld duly traflS111it it to your successor ill office.

The Boolc of Oo?~stitutiortS )rOtt are to search at all tilues. CalIse it to be reacl ill YOllr Lodge, that none l1lay prete11d iglloral1ce of tho excellellt precelJts it enjoins.


.iJO

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CH..~TER.

You vtill also ,receive ill cl1arge the By-Laws of }iOUr Lodge, \Vllicll }70l1 are to see carefully and punctually executed. You will also receive ill charge the Records of tIle Lodge, Wllicll you are to see correctly lcept, that nothing in1proper is comn1itted to paper; a11dfor this reason yOll are to ha\rB a general super tision over the duties of the 1

Secretary.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

i1 i ""

(I

The following song may be introduced, accompanied with th~ hon07'"S:

PAST MASTER'S ODE.


91

PAST MASTER.

r楼-=;J~~' ~-l~~-~===l~d~~ -e==~= = -~-.. ..=====~= --e==~= -- - ._'~-------r

I

and

I

onr Gnide; May just - ice, truth, and pm - pose

-i==1--- ---4-~::P=:~--~---g--~

_=1~_ ::-~ ~ ~ ~= c::2 =1::: I:~ --de::;;;;;} - - - - l--t--==l== --GJ

---I-~-~~~---1-~~~-~-~--~_.':Z!I!l-_--- ,Ja!:_,,_~_ -- I , --~---l- - - =e- e-fIIt'..---.-I路 -- -

~

'~----1-~--l- -;--1~- - . -

high,

In

."".,.J--I----l-

-- -

(9--

-

a - bide.

thy power

a] 1

-

I~-~ ~ .~-@V:~ ~ help, in thy extended charge, To keep our temple fair; To rear it higher, lrigller still, The temple of thy care. GOD

Oh! lead us by tIle ligllt of truth, To "Talk in wisdonl's "\\1"aJ", Through all the trying paths of life, To realms of endless day.

, "

* * *

The duties appertaining to the Chair are many and "Various. They consist in opening, instructing, and closing Lodges; initiating, crafting, alld rai~ing Masons; presiding at funeral obsequies and u,11 other duties connectec1 there,vith.

*

*

*

*

*

The duties a,ppertainillg to the Chu,ir

*

fl.l-0 reCOtlll ted


92

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CRAPTER.

and explained, and the necessary assistants in their discharge are selected, according to the ancient Landmarks. These lessons .are illustrated by ceremonies, through which every Mastel" of a Lodge, from time immemorial, has been compelled to pass, to qualify him for the discharge of those iml)ortallt duties that devolve upon all who wield the gavel in the East. These ceremonies may be appropriately concluded by the delivery of the following

CHARGE TO THE CANDIDATE. ~1y BROTHER:

The Past ~Iaster's degree, unli1{e all t.he otller degrees of Freemasonry, sheds no light" ul)on itself. It was forn1erly conferred only on Masters of Lodges, to illstruct them in tIle duties tlley owed the Lodges over which they 'Vvere called to preside, alld likewise tIle cluties of the bretllren to the Ollair; but we, as Royal Arcli Masons, confer this degree, not only as a l)relilnillary step, but also for the more important purpose of guarding us against a breach of our 1\fasonic obligations. We are all, my brotllcr, too apt to come for,vard and l(neel at our sacred altar alld tak:e Ul)on ourselves tIle most solelnll obligatiollS to perfornl certaill


PAST MASTER.

93

cluties, alld then bellave as if ,ve llacl not done so . This, IllY brotller, is 110t as it ShOllld be. Let the Seetle wlliel1 }70U have tllis eve11ing ,vitllessed be a striking 1es8011 to yOll, alld 110t OIlly to you, bllt to us all as MaSOllS, never to lose si g llt of tIle solen111 obligatiollS wllicll ,ve have all take11 UpOll ollrselves of our O'Vll free will, and ill tIle Inost SOlelTIll Inanner IJI'Olllised tllat,ve "\vould never violate. It becomes YOtll~ cluty as a Past 11aster, by amiable, discreet, and virtuous COllClllct, to convince Inankind of the goodness of the institutioll; so tllat wIlen a persoll is saicl to be a Ineulber of it, tIle world Illay l(llOW tllat he is one to wholn tIle blll~(lelled 11cart may pour out its sorro\vs; to wholn clistress 111ay prefer its suit; wllose h~tncl is gtlic1ecl by justice, and "\vhose 11eart is expallcled by' bellevoleIlce. If j'l"OU 11ave any dOllbt of tIle extellt of your obligations, a daily recourse to the ScrilJtures of Diville Truth will set, you rigllt. It will nlake your duties plain, and tllediscllarge of tllem a pleasure rather tllall H, burden. 11ake tIlell tile Holy Bi1)le, tJ.1atGreat Light in l\fasonr~y, tIle man of YOtlI' counsels, ZLlld the l11edit~ttion of :your lleart.. 'Q


94

' GUIDE

TO THEE. A. CHAPTEH.

It will never mislead 110r deceive you, bllt a strict observance of its holy precepts will fit and prel)are you for llsefullless in tllis life, and for a glorious inberitallce ill tllat WIlicll is to come.

CLOSING.

*

*

*

*

..s.

...'

*

T:a:E following invocation is appropriate to be used in closing a Lodge of Past J}fasters:

Help us, 0, GOD of our sa]-\'"ation, for the glory of thy N an1e, and deliver US, and purge away our sins, for thy N al11e's sal{e.


~IOST

EXCELLENT MASTER.

THIS degree has special reference to that important period ""hen the temple erected by King SOL01ION for the worship of Jehovah was completed and consecrated in all its glory and beauty. None but those 'w"ho, through diligence ane1 industry, have progl"essed far toward perfection; none but those who have been seated in the ORIENTAL CHAIR by the unanimous suffrages of their brethren, can be adnlitted to this degree. In its ol"igina! establishment, when the Temple of Jerusalem was finished, and the Fraternity celebrated.


96

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

the cape-stone with great joy, it is demonstrable that none but those ,vho had proved themselves to be COID,plete masters of their profession were admitted to this honor; and, indeed, the duties incumbent 011 every Mason, '\vho is "received and acknowledged" as a ~Iost Excellent IvIaster, are such as render it indispensable that he should have a perfect kno'\vlec1ge of all the !)recec1ing degrees. It ,vas, therefore, a part of the wisdom and justice of SOLOMOlls.. plan to bestow upon many of his most skillful workmen some disting~ishing路 mark of his approval. No higher appreciation of valuable services could have been rendered to the worthy and meritorious . than conferring upon them an Order of l\'.ferit, "\vith the honorable title of "Thfost Excellent l\Iaster." And it is , still retainec1 by us as a memorial of the luethod adopted by the King of Israel to distinguish the nlost skillful portion of the Craft, and tlO reward them for their services in behalf of the Fraternity.

HISTORY. THERE are severa.! degrees beaTing the name of Excellent, "rhicll have been practiced in different countries; but none of those no,\,\r in use have al1:Y" resemblance to the l\fost Excellent l\Iaster's degree of the Alnerican rite. The Excellent of Irelancl has reference to the legation of I\IosEs; t.he Excellent of Scothtncl is ,~ery shnllar to Wh~lt is knO\Vll by passing the vails, alluding to a preparatory ceremony n.mong the Hebre"w路 captives at Babylon preyious to their c1epn,rture to rebuild the Tem!)le at ,Jerusnlem. The Super Excellent like\yise differs in everJ eountry froll1 the l\rfost Excellent degree.


97

MOST EXCELLENT MASTEn..

The latter has been considered by some recent writers as purely an .American invention. It has been asserted that it was manufactured ,at Providence, Rhode Island, at the very close of the last century, an opinion, however, which cannot be sustained. Others have supposed it to have been arranged by the .Rev. JONATHA..~ NYE and the Rev. GEORGE RICHARDS, two eminent l\fasons of the last century; but no substantial proof of this allegation has ever been adduced. A third origin has been assigned to the degree, "\yhich is that it was manufa~tured from fragmentary traditions by THO~IAS Sl\nTB: 'VEBB. The main reason for this belief seems to be the fact that WEBB first gave an account of it in his Freemason's ],拢onito7", published in 1797. It is quite probable that he may have rearranged the degree, or rather that he was one of the parties who arranged it in connection with the other degrees previous to his publication of the monitorial parts路 of it; but I have good reason to affirm that he could not ha;ve been the inventor of the degree. The late venerable Bro. W.A.DSWOBTH, of New York, has stated, ,vithout doubt correctly, the fact that WEBB did not acquire the Prestonian Lectures until 1795, an opinion corroborated by the investigations of Bro. RoB. MORRIS, and all those who have examined the origin of what is known as the WEBB Lectures. It is, however, a ,vell-known fact that the degree existed substantially as now ,vorked, at least two or three yea1 s prior to that time, and hence it is perfectly apparent that WEBB did not originate the degree, however he may llave improved its ritual. The truth about the matter is probably tIns, that the degree was one of those supplementary or detached degrees which arose during the eighteenth century, and, in the chaotic state of Masonry in this country about 1790, was incorporated into the regular Capitular system to supply a hiatus in the rituals which has been lamented by intelligent craftsmen of other countries, but which has never been satisfactorily supplied except in the American rite. The third degree left the temple unfinishec1, and the Ro:yul Arch noted it.s destruction. Its 4

5


98

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

completion and solemn consecration; its gorgeous ceremonial and worship; its use as the central glory of the Je,vish nation for four hundred years are passed over in perfect silence by the rituals of all other rites; to the American rite alone must the lViasonic student turn if he woulcl unc1erstand the full import of the complete allegory of Freenlasonry.

â&#x20AC;˘ OFFICERS. THE regular Officers of a l\Iost Excellent Master's Lodge are: 1. R~GHT 'VORSHIPFUL },IAsTER; 2. SENIOR GRAND WARDEN. Some writers add: 3. JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN, on the suppositioll thiLt AnoNIRAItI :filled that office at the dedication of the temple, a theory entirely at vttriance with the old rituals, which make that office to have been ¡v"acant for a reason well known to the Craft. The officers of a Chapter take rank as follo\vs, viz: The High-Priest as R. 'V. 1\:Iaster; the King as S. G. Warden,. and, for the purposes of reception, the Principal Sojourner acts as Senior Deacon; the RaJal Arch Captain as J uniol~ Deacon, the Captain of the Host as J.\!Iarshal, and the Treasurer, SecretarJ, and Tiler, fill their respe(rtive stations. The symbolic color of the Most Excellent ~IasterJs degree is purple. The apron is of white lambskin, edged with purple, and the collar of purple edged with gold. A candidate receiving this degree is saic1 to be "received and acknowledged as a J\:Iost Excellent l\tIaster." Lodges of l\fost Excellent l\Iasters are dedicated to K. SO'


99

MOST EXCELLENT l:IASTER.

OPENING.

* TH~

*

*

*

*

*

following passage of Scripture is read at OPENING.

The earth is the LORD'S, a11d tIle fullness thereof; tIle ,vorld, a11d tIley that dvvell therei11. For he hatll founded it UpOll tIle seas, alld established it llpon the floods. "TI10 shall ascend into tIle hill of the LORD? alld 'VI10 shall stand in 11is 110ly place? He that hath cleal1 11allds and a pure lleart; ,vho l1atl1 110t lifted up l1is soul llllto 'v"anity: 1101' S'YOrll deceitfully. He shall receive tIle blessing froln the LORD, alld rigllteouS11ess from tIle GOD of his salv路ation. This is tIle gelleratioll of theln that seek llim, tIlat seelc thy face, 0 J AeOB. Selah. Lift up YOlir heads, 0 37e gates, allcl be ye lift up, ye everlastillg dooi"s; and tlle King of Glory s11al1 come ill. . Wll0 is this King of Glory? The LORD strong alld 111igllt~y, tIle LORD llligl1ty in battle. Lift u!) 3rOllr lleads, 0 ye


路100

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

gates; even lift tIlell1 up,

~ye

everlasting doors;

and the -King of Glory s11all COlne in. WilO is tIle King of Glory? The LORD of 110StS, he is the King of Glory.

*

*

*

*

*

*

This Psalm is generally thought by commentators to have been composed by DA.VID upon the solemn occasion of bringing the Ark of GOD from the house of ODED-EnoM into the Tabernacle which had been built for it. The Ark of GOD is supposed to be moving in a grand and solemn procession of the whole Israelitisb nation, toward the place of its residence on Mount Zion. On ascending the mount, the Psalm is chanted in the rich and swelling notes of the Hebrew music. The celebrated COlumentntor J\-IATTHEw POOLE* says that this was probably the pnrpose for which this Psalm was written, but adds, " that DAVID had a further prospect, even to the temple which he ardently desired to build, and 'which he knew 'would be built by SOLOMON, and when that ,vas done, and the Ark was brought into it, then this Psalm ,vas to be sung." He adds, that DAVID'S Psalms were not only used by him npon the first occasion for which he made them, but they also had a reference prophetically to future eventR. What could be more appropriate to the opening ceremonies of this degree than this sublime Psalm chanted upon two occasions by the Jews, when removing the Ark of the Covenant into the places solemnly prepared for its reception.

*Annotations of the Holy Bible.

Folio edition, Glasgow, 1762.


MOS'ÂŁ EXCELLENT

101

JHAST}~R.

RITUAL.

nnn *

*

*

*

*

*

THE :i\Iost Excellent Master's degree is designed t:) commemorate the completion and dedication of tIle temple. Nothing cO"lIld be more appropriate, therefore, than setting up at the very entrance of ~lle degree that. keystone ,vhich, rejected of the builders, 'VttS destined to bind together the principal arc11, und COIlll)lete the temple. 'Vhen tIle labor \VaR brought to it successful close, and this degree ,vas established, a new tie was created bet","een the faithful craftsmen, and so in like manner we may learn the iInportant lesson that the tenets of our Institution should hind and celuen t lIS together in the bonds of speculative l\Iasonry, one common brotherhood. \

*

*

*

*

*

*


102

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER..

The following Psalm is rend during the ceremony of

,

RECEPTION:

II

I 路vv~'tS glad Wll~ll they said l1UtO me, Let go into the llouse of tIle LORD..

lIS

1\

1111

Our feet s11all stancl '\vitlliIl tllY gates, 0 J erusale111.. J erllsalem is builcled as a city that is compact together:

Whitller tIle tribes go IIp, tIle tril)es of tIle LORD, unto the testilno11y of ISR.A.EL, to give tl1allk:s Ullto tile nanle of tIle LORD..

For there are set thrones of juc1gl.l1eIlt, the thrones of the Ilouse of DAVID.

Pray for tIle peace of J erusuleln: tlley shall prosper that love tllee. Peace be 'YitlliIl tllY ,valls, aIld pros11erity 'Vitl1iIl tIl)'" !)alaces.


103

l\rOST EXCELLENT l'L\.STER.

.

i1

"

. For Iny brethrell a11d con1pa11io11S' sakes, I ,viII no,v say, Peace be \vitllill thee. Because of tIle house of tIle LORD our GOD I ,viII seek: thy good. This Psalm was written by DAVID for the use of the people, when they came np to Jerusalem, to the solemn feasts, unto the "testimony;" that is, up to the Ark of the Covenant ,vhich "ras.in Jerusalem. Three times in each year the devout Je,vs \vent up to Jerusalem, to acknowledge the mercies and give thanks unto the name of eTEHOVAH; and with great joy did they keep these returning festivals of their religion. How appropriate the words of thi8 glorious Psalm! How the heart thrills vti th emotion, as \ve go up to the dedication of our mystic temple, to the stirring strains of'DAvm's harp! And how touchingly ,ve are reminded that 'va are not only to dedicate our earthly temple to J ehovab, but also our spiritual building-and how all these solemn cerel110nies impress our hearts with the desire to e:x.claiul, "Let us go into tho House of the Loi~(l not made \"\rith hands: eternal in the heft\"'ens."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

.A lIfost .Excellerl,t lJIaster. The Holy Scriptures, as \yell as the tracUtioIls of ths Fraterllit:y", relate" that DAVID gave to SOLOMON the pntterl1 of an that he ha.c! by the spirit," for the construction of the teulple, allcl all its v~tl'icc1


104

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

furniture and fixtures. It is also related traditionally thn.t King SOLOMON, having completed every part of the 'Work according to this pattern, resolved to reward the best informed and most skillf111 of the Giblemites, by creating them l\fORt Excellent 1vI:'1.sters. 'rhe traditions of the Craft contain much information l'elative to the privileges and duties of those who ,vere admitted to this high rank. None were received but those who had proved themselves complete masters of their profe~sion., or, as vre woul~ no,v say, had served as }'Iasters of Lodges. The In.bor on the temple was finished, and many of the Craftsmen were soon to leave Judea in search of employment elsewhere. They had labored long, and with unexampled fidelity and zeal, encouraged and sustained by the hope that they' should become Master Masons at the completion of the temple. Provid'ence, in a sudden and mysterious manner, had prevented a full consummation of this hope, though they h,\d been permitted to receive the shadow in lieu of the substance; and now King SOLOMON resolved still further to re\varcl their fidelity. They were therefore set apart as teachers and masters of the art, and, as such, were charged to dispense Masonic light and kno,Yledge among the uninformed and ignorant. In this character they weloe to travel into foreign countries, and canoy iuto those lands that same sublime kn.owledge of Masonry which had, under the inspired wisd'om of SOLO)1:0N, wrought out from the quarry and the forest the wondrouR beauties of Jerusalem's pride and glory. This tradition is coufu·med by the derivation of the title conferred on them. The Je,vs had three titles of respect which they gave to their doetol's and teachers: Rab, Rabbi, and Rabball or Rabbolli. Our title, :rrIost Excellent Master, is equivalent to the designation Rabboni, which'Vwl'as the highest title of honor kno\vn to the Jews, and one tha.t implies the possession of the highest rank and learning.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Ii

••

* * * * * THE DEDIC.A.TION OF THE TE1\JIPLE. *

Dedica.tion is defined to be a religious ceremony by which any person, place or thing is set api;rt for the service of GOD or to


105

MOST EXCELLENT· MASTER.

some sacred use. The Alta,r, * the vessels of J ORAM, t the TabernacJe of l\1osES,4: and the Temple of SOL )l\10N, ,vel'e all dedicated to the service of GOD. The pra.ctice of consecration ,\Yfl.S very common among the J e,,"s, and ,vas suited to the peculiar dispensation under '\vhich they live<l. Cities, ,'n~lls, gates and even priyate d'wellings were cOllsecro.ted by peculiar cerenlonies. The custom was pI'eserved so long as the J e,vs had a country of their own, and is still retrdued, in modem times, in the consecration of churches and chapels. It is also practiced among Freemasons in the dedication of their halls and the consecl'n.tion of their Lodges. 'Vhen the temple 'was nearly completed, a circumstance occurred which threw a sudden gloom over the Craft~ and, for a time, dispelled the pleasures derived from the anticipation of a speedy and successful conclusion of their lahors, By that event the final completion and dedication of the magnificent edifice were delayed for several months. At length, howe,,;.er, King SOLOMON set apart a day for those solemn ceremonies, and caused proclamation to be made throughout all Israel, that all the Priests, Levites and peopJe should gather themselves together for the purpose of celebrating the com,[Jletion of the temple, and bringing.up the Ark of the Covenant. It is stated in the Scriptural account, § that the dedication ceremonies lasted seven days, ,vhich 'were followed by the Feast of Tabernacles, which also lasted seven days from the evelliug of the 15th of Tisri, to the evening of the 22d day of the same month. The day of holy convocation ""'as the 23d day of Tisri, on 'which the people were dismissed to their homes. The dedication cerenlonies must have eomrnenced on the evening of the 8th dfty of Tisri, the seventh month of the year 3001, and 011 the 9th the Ark ,vas brought up and placed in the temple.. The next day, or the 10th day of Tisri, was the DtlY of Atonement, the most sacred and solemllof the le"wish festivals, '\vhen the High-Priest, for the first time, weut into the Sanctum Sanctorum of the Temple, before the }Iercy Seat, to make atonement for the people of Israel. It is therefore quite evident that the temple could not have been dedi... cated on the 23d of Tisri, as has been stated by some authors. The scriptural account is very concise, and contains no allusion to any ceremony like that of placi.ng the copestone; but as the

* NUlubers, viii. 84. § COlnpare

t 2 Sam.uel, 'Viii. 11.

t Exodus.. xl.

1 Kings, 'Viii, with 2 Chronicles, vii. 8,

no¥.-


106

GUIDE "TO THE R. A. CHAP1.'EIt.

completion of public edifices is no\v, and always has beell, signalized by some oeremony, it is natural to snppose that such an important event as the cOlnpletion of the temple \YQuld not have been allowed to pass \vithout something being done to mark the event. Our JYIasonic traditions, in accorda!-1ce with this natural supposition, relate that the cope-stone or key-stone ,vas brought forth, and, amidst the plaudits of the workmen and assembled people, 'was placed in the principal arch by the Grand 1Iaster himself.

Placing the Key-stone in the P'rincipal Aroch. 1ti'odern l\Iasonic writers have indulged in much speculation as to what particular stone was used in the grand and imposing celebration of the completion of the temple. This difference of opinion as to the precise stone has led to a con-esponding disagreement among the rituals of the degree in use among the Fraternit;y. *

* Dr. Oliver, in W'l"iting of this subject, observes that the word key~stone was originally and correctly used, although, to quote his language, The Supreme Grand Chapter has substituted the words cape-stone, under an impression, we suppose, that arches and key-stones were unknown at the building of Solomon's Ternple.. But subsequent investigations have shown the inaccuracy of this opinion. It is now clear that the arch and key-stone were known to the Tyrians before the time of Solomon." Origin of tlle English Royal .Arch, p. 23. This, by the way, is another instance of the innovations made by our English conl.. t>anions in the ritual of FreeroasonrJ"'. It furnishes another striking proof of U


llIOST EXCELLENT l\IASTER.

107

The difficulty of attempting a satisftl.ctory explanation does not consist in there being any error or inconsistency in the correct ritual of the degree, but simply in the necessity of using only such terms as do not contravene the established rules of the Order. It ,vill be evident to anyone '\vho will examine the subject that the words ' , ca,pe-stone, " "cope-stone," "cap-stone," ,( chi~f-stone," and " key-stone," ,vere formerly used as sJ'rnonymous and convertible terms, and as such were applied to one and the same stone. * It is impossible to make extended quotations, but the follo,ving "'ill suffice to show the fact, '\vhich may be 'verified to any extent from,' the early writers: ANDEnsoN says "the cape-stone 'was celebrated ,~{ith great joy. "t 'VEBB says "The Fraternit:Y' celebrated the cape-stone '\vith great joy·"t In the J\Iost Excellent l\Jfaster's song, written by WEBB, the following expressions are used, all evic1ently allncling to the same stone:'·~" The cape-stone is finished;"§ "The key-stone to lay;"11 "To bring forth the cape-stone with shouting and praise. "II Dr. W onCESTER defines "cope" as "Anything spread over the heael, as the conca,'e of the sky, the a'i'ch tom'k 07}el' a door." WEBSTER'S Dictionary, edition of 1864, c1efines "colJer" as ".A.nything regarded as extended over the head, as the arch or concave of the sky, the roof or covering of fL house, the arch over a cloor', etc." · f).'he stone used in the older and correct .A..merican rituals is the '~key-stone,"that identical stone" \vhich the builders threw a\Vtl;Y.. "1f the supel'ior knowledge possessed b;y the early Anlcl'iCl1n l!asollS :relative to the temple and the Jewish nation. It also demonstrates that the inllo"aUon of' introducing the word" cape-stone," or "ColJe-slone" in tlte sense of the top-most stone of the builcling, is not chargeable to those" who constl'ucted the Amel'icall s:istelu, as has been a.lleged, but to the SU1)reme Grand Chapter of England. J1

* The worcl

cc cape-stone is not to be found ill any Lexicon within n)Ji~ reae}l, and was llsed bj,· the earls' authors either ignorantly for "c()pe-.~t()ne," or intentionally,' as SOIlle have supposed, to coin a word that should llave a technical Masonic nleaning. Dr. Mackey has the follOWing language: "The l!<.zpe-ston.e., 01', as it would more correctly be called, the cope-stone," evidelltl~· considering that the former word was originally used for the latter. t Constitutions. Edition 1783, p. 14. :I: Webb's l\!onitor. Int.roduction to the Most Excellent ~Iaster's degree. § Verse 1. 11 Yorse 2. ~ A recent writer, ,\"}10 is mueh attachccl to the English s~~stem, assert.s, how.. ever, that confounding this stone with the key-stone of the Mat"k degree is a prominE'nt Pl"l.'Ol'. '1'11e sa.me n1iscOllCE'1)f,ion as to the true stone nsc(l in thi:i'


108

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

For the v/allt of it; the Craft ,vere at a stand; upon it depended nothing less than the completion of the temple; it was found and applied to its intended use; "it bound together the principal arch and completed King SOLOMO'N'S Temple." This "principal arch has been understood by the ablest ritualists and scholars, to have been t.he arch over the partition between the "holy place" and the "most holy place,:' the principal entrance as it has been called. The Sanetu1n Sancto1~U1n was, as its name imports, the most sacred part of the temple; the oracle: the very essence, as it were, of the whole structure; the pl'incipal thing to which the rest of the building was only an au:xili~l.rJ路' Hence the arch over the entrance to this most sacred place is ,,\yery properly denominated the principal arch of the temple. The traditions relate that the stone was put in its place under the immediate supervision of the Grand l\Iaster himself in the presence of the priests and chief men ,vho hac1 entered the "holy pla.ce, " a.nd that thus the last act in the cOlnpletion of the magnificent edifice was performed on the dedication morning by the selfsame hands that .leveled the foundation-stone more than eight :);"ears before, To suppose, therefore, that the stone used in this degree is the same stone found:' at a subsequent period is at variance 'with the ritual and traditions of the Ordert and utterly inconsistent with the plainest dictates of common sense. The key-stone "'hich completed the principal arch \vas laid by King SOLOMON in the presence of the Most Excellent ~:rasters; 'while that stone ,vhich was discovered centuries ~fter must ha,"e been placed in its position ill secrecy, beca.use its very existence and location ,yas unknown to all the workmen at the temple, except a ,rery limited number. Besides, this latter stone was placed in its position, months before the dediration, inasmuch as that part of the temple -w:as completed, and certain articles deposited therein, before the Pillar of Beauty was broken. The last deposit V\"as also. made degree has led the same author to remark that" one of the errors in this degree is the combining of the two celebrations, the celebra.tion of the placing of the cope-stone, and the dedication of the temple in one and the same ceremony without explanation or intermission." On the other ha.nd Dr. Mackey favors the opinion that the key-stone was al>propri1:Ltely used in this degree, but wIth stra.nge inconsistency ad.<ls "that it was deposited on the day of the completion in the place for which it was intended, all of which relates to a. mystery not unfolded in this degree "-thus evidently alluding to a. still different key.ston~; one which could !lot have been pla.ced in its position in public amid the p1a.udita

pf the people,


MOST EXCELLENT MASTER.

109

before the dedication, and the sepulcher of the Omnific Symbol was then forever closed. Again the stone subsequently fotlnd* was among the foundations of the temple, while on the other hand the whole theory of the ritual is that the stone used in the commemoration of the final completion of the telnple was pla.ced in a. higher locality. As we have seen, that locn.lity 'w'as in'the "cope," or the arch over the entrance to the "1I01y of I:Iolies " or principal arch of the temple.

Bringing forth the A.rk of the Covenant with shouting and praise. The tabernacle of ].!OSES and the altar of burnt offering w,ere left in the high place of Gibeon; but DAVID prepared a tent or tabernacle for the Al'k of the Covenn,nt in the city of DA"VID, on 1'Iount Zion. Sacr~<1 history informs. us that D.A.'VID, and the elders, ana the captains of thousands, and all Israel, brought up from the house of Obed-Edom the Ark of the Covenant of the

*

This la.tter stone was undoubtedly wrought by the same celebrated artist that fashioned the one mentioned in the Mark degree and again in this degree, tor the reason that both of thenl bore the same mark.


110

GUIDE TO THE B. A. CHAPTEll.

LbBD, with shouting and with sound of the cornet, and 'with trumpets, and with cynlbals, making a noise 'with psalteries and harps, and set it in the midst of the tent that D.1..VID had pitched for it. There it remained until the dedication of the temple, when King SOLOMON assembled all the people of Israel, and all the elders, priests and Levites;-and the Levites took up the Ark, and in grand procession they bore it up to the temple, sacrificing before it sheep and oxen which could not be told nor numbered for multitude. The Levites then delivered it into the hands of the Priests, who seated it in its place in the Holy of Holies; but the rest of the multitude did not enter therein, and after that the glory of th.e LORD :filled the most holy place, nOlle ever entered it but the High-Priest, and he only once a year, on the great day of expiation. The Ark was seated on a pedestal prepared for it and placed in the center of the Holy of Holies. This pedestal * ""fiS a stone rising there three fingers breadth above the floor, and on either sic1e of it ,vere the cherubim, fifteen feet high, 'with their "'ings expanded so as to touch the side-"walls on each side, and also in the center ovor the Ark. The Ark ,vas placed with the ends toward the siele-walls, and its side fronting the entrance of the Sanctum SanctorulU, nnd the staves being dra.wll out reached downwards to'warel the holy place. t

The RecelJtion and Ackno7.vledgntent. the keystone had been placed in the principal arch, the temple finished, and the Ark safely seatecl in the Sanctwrn Sa'ncioru1n, King SOLOMON, having already conferred this honorable degree upon his most skillful workmen, in further token of his satisfaction at the successful conclusion of their labors, publicly received and ackno\vlec1ged them as Most Excellent l\Iasters, ill the presence and amid the applause of the assembled people.. 'VHEN

* Yoma, c. v. 搂 2. Dean Prideaux, Con. yolo i. p. 245. This was not the Masonic Stone of FOl.lndatioll J as has beon erroneously supposed bj'" sonl0 writers. t In respect to the Ark there is to be found a wide-spread error. l\Iost persons suppose the staves by which the Ark was borne on the shoulders of the Levitcs were placed on the sides of the Ark lengthwise; but such was not the tact. The staves were fixed a路cross the ends, making the distance between them three feet anel nine inches, ill stead of two feet and three inches, which would have been the distane:8 if they had been- placed the other way_ See Prideaux, Can., 1'01. i. p. 246, for a full confirnlation of this fact.


I\IOST EXCELLENrr

111

I\rAS~rER.

The follomng Ode is sung:

~-#I i~---1~-~~---~§---"dlIIII\lC---j~~----i-O . . tr~: .=-j:g;1=if-;: .. =1~-~_: .=-r~:~::::::j~:. -

·-·-r- '-1'9-.--

_~-+-_ilt

._~=---4-_ .~-

-1 - -tJ.-.:;;tP-i'All hail to

=1-

the morning, that bids us

:~:-

re - joice;

fiJl==.-

.:tri"t---~---==:j-~ ::t=::r~---~ ~~=iiI= -j--j= .,=,--j= . t===t=- -::::::j:: -~~-4-r=- .~ -.,-

~~~:i?~' --=1~~~f~3J~~ -=~~=~I.I-dJ:.=-- =~ -I'- - =-~=_iIt -.J,.p-i -»-P-#- --I ~ The tem-ple'8

COIn· plet

- ed,

ex - alt high clach voice,

The

r ~==1==:j=F~~ ~~=ar .=- ~- --~==EF=t===t:==i: - E:=E ~~-~~-~_.~~~~-f§.-~ -"I=~-· ~ "~-=".J=:jfIC: -: =~:=1=-"";-l:::::::j== ==l= --.- -r--:-=-- i!:_--L:-t--

I--r-- - - I

fin ishea, our

cap-stone is

~ •

--t=

t-

-t--

.

:fIC_~-

-'rJW!- I

111. - bor is

-r-·

---

.-

rrhe

o'er,

.-E=i 1-3=~~E=H-.=E

~ ..

l£:~~§3-_: =~E

--1---l-i~ --.,-_==1 -----i~_-l~~----~~~,¥~~ ~ AKI-'----1-=1-, ---I-S' ~..- -dIIlPi---,-~-+

_ _~--l-~! . - -

-,.- ---I

sound

of the

.

1-1'-lIIJi-"lJI

4IIP{

-

gn.v - el

_--J_

--1.

--1 --.---

orr

'" -,.... . .,.no rnore. To the

~-.-

t

shall hail us

.

~-~--1-~==1~--=-·-I~· :.::=:4-.=t=-.= diJ:.=4I:_~= :::j: .~~ -.

-,,-.

- -=====-- =!==I==t== -

- - ---


112

GUIDE· TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

- - - --==-=~ - ..-. ~=.':,- :--_.~ =J -r--t== +===t:== - -r- ! - : -~-

-I

tribes of

old

"'--W--

Is - rae], ex - alt

- ing

1---

their fanle;

m=~ _ ., ~. . =~===1fIJ-;i= ==

1=~~~ ==.,..r==_-~_E_-:;_SE_ ~_,

-3:=:::1

~

~-

- - - .- - -

--~~--'~~---~~~=~~::::I .. J:: .~ =1 ~- ~ ~jc-~ z::;I= -tIII-

I

-i---l,-.,.,..

-fIJI·

•.,-

I"

I-_~~ oH'

I-

._----. I -

-

-

rn- __=:-::=E===--==l:i==-r~::E. ~~~g=8E

Let's send forth our T'oi - ees

to

pra.ise his great name.

f:= .d:=1E

Companions, assemble On this joyful dt1Y; (TIle occasion is glorious,) The key-stone to lay; Fulfill'd is the promise, By the ANCIENT 9F DAYS, To bring forth the cap-stone With shouting aIlc1 praise.


!.:tOST EXCELLENT MASTER.

113

There is no more occasion for level or l)lumb-line, For tro,,"el or gavel, for compass or square; Our works are completed, tIle ARK safely seated, And we shall be路 gl'leetecl as workmen most rare.

No'v those tllat are ,vortll}", Our toils who have shared, And proved themselves faitllful, Shall meet tlleir re~"ard. Their virtue and kno,vledge, Industry and skill, Have our approbation, Have gained our good ,viII.

We accept ancl receive thenl, J\;Iost Excellent J}Iasters, Invested with 11onors, and l)o,ver to preside; Among ,vorthy craftsmen, wherever assembled, The knowledge of Masons to spread far ancl ,viele. A.lmigllty Jellovah,

Descend now and fill This Lodge ,vitIl tllY glor~r, Our llettrts 'vitIl good-,vill! Preside at onrmeetings, Assist us to find Trlle pleasure in teaclling Good-路will to mankind.


114

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Thy uJisdorn inspired the great institution, Thy strength shall support it till Nature expire; And when the creation shall fall into ruin, Its beauty .shall rise through the midst of the fire. The following路 passages of Scripture are introduced, accompaniecl with solemn ceremonies:

The LORD hath said that he would d,vell in the thiclt darklless. Bllt I have built all house of habitatioll for thee. a,nd a place for thy dvvelling forever. And the king turned his face, and blessed the whole congregation of Israel: (and all the congregation of Israel stood:) and he said,

Blessed be the LORD GOD of Israel, ,vho 11atll witll 11is 11al1ds fulfilled that 'vhiell 11e spal\:e witll l1is Inoutll to my fatller D.A.VID r saying, Since tIle day tllat I brollgllt fortIl IllY IJeople Ollt of the lallcl of EgYl)t, I cllose no city among all tIle tribes of Israel to build all 110use ill, tIlat Iny llanle 11ligllt be there; l1cither chose I allY l11all 路to be a rlller o'v"er In)'/" l)eople Israel; bllt I have ellosell J erusaleln~ tllat lny nallle migllt be tl1ere; a11cl llUV"e ellosell DAVID to be over my people Israel. N o,v it ,vas in tIle heart of DAVID, my father, to bllild all 110l1se for the nall1e of tIle LORD GOD of


115

MOST EXCELLENT }IASTER.

Israel.

But tIle LORD said to DAVID, my father, Forasll1l1Ch as it ,vas i.n tIline heart to build an house for nlY nalne, thou didst well ill tl1at it was in thine 11eart; not-\vithstalldillg, thou shalt 110t build tile house; but thy son, ,vhich sllall come forth Ollt of tlly loil1S, 118 shall bllild the house for my l1a11le. Tile LORD, therefore, hath performed his ,vard that he hath spokel1; for I anl risen up in the rOOlU of DAVID, my fatller, and am-. set on the tllrolle of Israel, as tIle LORD promised, and llave bllilt the llouse for tile nalne of tIle LORD GOD of Israel; ancl in it I 11ave Pllt the arlr, ,vherein is tIle covenallt of tIle LORD, that 11e made with tIle cllildrell of Israel.

*

*

*

*

*

*

And he stood before the altar of the LORD, in the presence of all the congregation of Israel, and spread forth his hands; for SOLOMON had made a brazen scaffold of five cubits long, and five cubits broad, and three cubits high, and had set it in the midst of the court; and upon it he stood, and kneeled down upon his knees, before all the congregation of Israel, and spread forth his hands toward heaven~ and said,

o LORD

GOD of Israel, there is no GOD lil{e thee in the heaven nor in the eartll, which keepest covenant, and sllewest mercy lInto tllY servants that '\valk: before thee wit.ll all tlleir


116

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

l1ea.rts; thOtl vvl1icll hast kel)t ,vitIl tlly servant DAVID, IllY father, tllat \vllicll thou Ilttst proll1iscd 11in1; and spakest "\vitll thy mOlltll, and llas fulfilled it ,vitIl thille harld, as it is tllis da)r. .N O\V, tIlerefore, 0 LORD GOD of Israel, keep ,vitIl tlly servallt DAVID, nlY fatller, tllat \vhich thou hast pronlise(llliln, saying, l'here 811all llot fail thee a rnall in InJ,T "sigllt to sit UIJOll t]le throne of Israel, yet so tllat tllY childreIl tul\:e heecl to their way to '\valk in my la,v, as thOll l1ast walked before me. N O'V, then, 0 L路ORD GOD of Israel, let thy word b~ verified, ,vhich tllJl servant D.A.VID. Rtlt ,viII GOD i11 very deed d'\vcll ,vi-th lllell 011 the eartll? Behold, heaven. nlld tIle Ilenven of 11eavens Call110t contaill, tllee: 110\V nll1cll less

thou 11USt spokell

UlltO

this 11011se,vllieh I have built! Have res!)ect. therefore, to tl1e prayer of thy ser,Tunt, arld to llis Sllpplication, 0 LORI) Iny GOD, to hearkell 11nto tIle cry and prayer 'Vllich thy servant prayetll before thee; tllat tIline e}'es 111ay be opell upon this hO"!J.se da.~y and night, 11!)On the pI"ace wllereof thou llast said that thOlllvouldst l)llt thy name tllere; to llearkenllnto tIle prayer \vIlich thy servnntprayeth toward this place. Ifcarkcn, tllerefore, lluto tIle Sllpplications of


117

1rIOST EXCELLENT MASTERâ&#x20AC;˘

..

thy servant, and of thy IJeople Israel, which they shall make toward this place; [lear thou from thy dwelling-place, even from heaven; and, '\vhell thou hearest, forgive. Now, my GOD, let, I beseech thee, thille eye~ be open; alld let thine ears be atte11t Ullto the . prayer that is made ill tllis l)lace. Now, tllerefore, arise, 0 LORD GOD, into tlly resting-place, tllOU, and tIle ark of tllY¡ strength: let thy priests, 0 LORD GOD, be clotlled with salvation, and let thy saints rejoice in goodness. 0 LORD GOD, turn not away tIle face of thine ttllointed; remember the mercies of D.A.VID, tlly servant.

*

*

*

~t.

"'l~

*


118

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER. if.

When SOLOl\fON had mac1e an end of praying, the fire came down from heaven, and consumed the burntoffering and the sacrifices; and the glory of the LORD filled the house. And the priests could not enter into the house of the LORD, because the glory of the LORD had :filled the LORD'S houso. And ,vhen all the children of Israel saw how the fire came dOW~l, and the glory.of the LORD upon the house, they bowed themselves with their faces to the ground upon the pavement, and worshiped, and praised the LORD, saying : FOR HE IS GOOD;

FOR

HIS MERCY ENDURETH

路FOREVER.

*

*

*

*

*

*

THE FIRE FROl\! HEAVEN. THE fire that consumed the burnt sacrifices of the Jewish nation w'as first kindled upon the altar" franl out fronl before the LORD," that is from Heaven, at the time when AARON olferecl his first sacrifice after his consecration to the High-Priesthood. lit ]'rom t,hn.t time this heaven-ligh~d:fir~ was ne"{,,'er suffered to go out, but 'ViLS kept continually burning on the altar by the direct command of GOD. t When the temple was completed, ana the ark seated benen.th the wings of the cherubim, the cloud of glory fillecl the Holy of Holies; and after SOLOMON had finished that fervent and most sublime prayer to JEHOVAH, the sacred fire again came dO\Yll from Heaven and consumed the offerings of SOLOMON. This sacred fire was jea,lously watched by the priests, anel kept constantly burning upon the Temple Altar as the fi;t'st hacl been on the Altar of the Tabernacle service. t

* Leviticus, ix. 24. t Leviticus, vi. 9, 13. :}: The reference to tlle Queen of Sheba which has been extensively used in this country within the last thirt:y' or forty years was 'llndoubtc(lly an innovation of the late Jeremy L. Cross. It is not to be fOlmd in any of the earlier rituals a.nd, indeed, no allusion to it can be found prior to about the j'l'enr 1817. I have the niost incUsputable evidence that it was not 'used in 1795, and for soveral years later. The visit of the Queen of Shl3ba to Jerusalem occurred about II

t


119

MOST EXCELLENT l\IASTER.

In the Lodge this vestal fire is symbolically kept burning on our altar, and in our hearts. "Religion rears the altar ancl a beam from the throne of GOD wraps it in flame. " Hanel in hand 'we gathel" arouncL that blazing altar and chant the hylnn of l\Iasonic charity.. "\Ve bo,v in solemn adoration. A scroll of woven light is unfolded by an unseen hand, and on it, written in letters of glowing radiance, we behold the grand aim of onr Institution, the end of all its teachings-Glory to GOD, and Love to ~fan.

*

*

*

HISTORIC-,-~.L

*

*

*

SUMl\IARY.

* * * * *

Alilldes to the vYOllder Ulld adrniratio'u eXIJressed by tllose of Ollr allciellt bretllrell "\vho were 1) erll1ittecl to' 'view tIle interior of tllat l11agnificellt eclifice '\vl1ich ICing SOL01fON 11acl erected, but 1110re especialI~y to the admiratioll aIld astonisI1nlent of tllose \yll0 behe1(1 the sub1ilne 111anifestations of tIle 811prelne Being at tIle clec1icatio11 of tIle ten11)le, \vhen tIle fire caIne davvll frolll 11eaveIl ancl conthirteen )'rears after the consecra.tion of路 the ternIllo, anel, therefore, it is an anachronism to connect that. visit with the cerexnonies of a degree conUllelllorative of the dedication. Not only SOl but it is utterly inconsi~tentwith the ,vhole genius of Masonry to ascribe the origin of any of our mystic rites to .one of a Gentile race, and that one too a female. The tradition is, therefol"C, chronologically incorrect, as applied to the ceremonies of this degree; it is inconsistent with the genius and spirit of the Institution which never goes out into pagan and fetish nations for its rites and ceremonies; it is not to be founel in the earlier rituals; and, finally, it is absurdly talne and weak in comparison with those sublime conceptions \vhich are awakened at the allusion to that U1Clnorable occasion when, to the astonished gaze of the awe-struck Israelites, the :flame descended froln the very throne of the Eternal, and consunleu the sacriilces. Well might the 1)e0111e evince their admiration and astonishment at such an evidence of Jehovah's presence 3.U1Qng them.


120

GUIDE TO TEE R. A. CHAPTER.

sumed the burnt-offering and tIle sacrifices, and the glory of tIle LORD filled the LORD'S house. TIle cerenlol1ies of tllis degree are intended to represent tllose of tIle completion alld dedication of King SOLO~ION'S Temple. You llave no'\v arrived at a period of Masonry whell the labor is over. The key-stone lIas been placed in tIle principal arcll, tIle tenlple finislled, an'd the ark, which lIas beel1 so long '\tvithout a resting-place, lias beell at length safely seated. We have imitated our anciellt brethren in assenlbling on that occasioll, repairing to the place designated, and participating in those solemil cereinonies. We llave iluitated them in gatllering around the altar, engaging ill prayer" and llavewitnessed a represelltatioll of the fire coming dOWll frorn Ileavel1, consuluing the bllrnt-offering al1d the sacrifices. We llave also in1itated their astonishment on bellolding it, by falling down llpon the grollud al1d exclainling: "He is good; for his nlercy enduretll forever!" A perusal of tIle books of Chronicles and Kings ,viII give you a minllte description of the tenlple and * * * * * * * * * Y Oll ,viII there find tllat the foundations of


"l\fOST EXCELLENT l\{ASTER.

121

tIle telnple "\vere laid by King SOLOMON in the ~year of the world 2992, and the building was finished ill the year 3000.

About seven, years and six months were consuuled in its erection. It ,vas dedicated ,ill tIle. year 3001, 1vith the most irllposing .and soiemll ceremonies, to the ,vorship of Jehovah, "vho condescended to nlake "it the I)lac~ for the special mal1ifestation of his glory. The cerenlonies lasted four"teen days. S'even days of this festival were devoted to tIle dedication exclusively, and sevell to the Feast of the Taberllacle. Tilis structure, for Inagllificence, beauty, and expense, exceeded any building tllat ,vas ever erected.. It ,vas built of large stones of white nlarble, curiously hewn, and. so artfully joined together that they appeared like one entire stone. Its roof ,vas of oliv路e wood, covered with gold; arid \Vhell the sun shone thereon, tIle re~ection frOIn it was of such 'refulgent splendor, that it dazzled the eyes of all who l)eheld it. Its various courts and other apartmentswere capable of holding three hundred tllousand persons It \vas adoflled ,vith 1,453 f)


122

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

COIUllll1S, of the finest Pariall 111arble, t\visted, sculptured, and voluted; a11d 2,906 pilasters, decorated \vith magnificellt capitals. rrhe oracle ancl sanctuary '\vere linecl witll nlassi've gold, adorned ,vitIl embellishl11ents ill SClllpture, and set ,vitil l1ulnerous, gorgeous, alld dazzling clecorations of diall1011ds and all l\:illds of preciolls .stones. In tIle empllatic language of JOSEPHUS, " the tel111)le 811011e alld~ dazzlecl tIle eyes of such as entered it by tIle splelldor of tIle gold that ,vas 011 e\Tery side of thenl."

r:rhe 111ultitllde 011 bcllolc1ing it \vere struck vvitll be'\vildering alllaze111e11t, alld raised their 11ands in adnliratioIl ancl astonishnleIlt at its ,volldrous magnificence, as. ,veIl as to IJl"otect tlleir eyes frOln the effect of its exceeding brilliancy. Nothing ever equaled tIle splendor of its consecration. Israel se11t fortIl 11er thollsarlds, a11d tIle assell1bled people belleld, ill solenln adoration, tIle 'vast sacrifice of SOL02tION accepted. TIle fialne descended llPOll the altar and consunled tIle offering; the shado'v alld glorJ'" of tIle li]terllal. proclaill1ec1 11is presellce bet,,,""ccll tl10 cl1crtlbin1, and tIle ,roice of his tlltlnders


MOST EXCELLENT MASTER.

123

told to the faitl1flll of the Craft that tile perfectlless of tlleir labor was appI~ov路ed. * * * * Bright ,vas the hour vVhen Israel's princes, in their pride and power, Knelt in the temple's court; the living flalne The accepted sacrifice to all proclaim. Brightly the splendor of the Goc1head shone, In awiuI glory, from his living throne; Then bowed was every brow-no human sight Could brave the splendor of tllat :flood of light That vailed his presence and his~l"'\vful form'Vhose path the ,Yhirl"'\vind is-\vhose breath the storm.

Our I11JTstic telnlJle is no\v COlll111eted aIld dedicated. YOIL have ,vrougllt 1110re tl1a.ll se,rell :y-ears ,vitil zeal and fidelitJr, and 路llave been received U11Cl ackllowledged as a 1fost Excellent }'fa.st~r. You are 110\~~ i11vested ,vitIl IJo,\ver to travel into foreigll COll11tries, ,vork: al1d receive l\iaster's '\vages, and dispense }.1asonic ligllt and Itl1o\vledge to all lll1inforll1e(1 bretllreIl. T11e telnple \vhicll "\ve ha"ve just COll11Jletecl re11reserlts the tC1111)1~ of tIle preScllt life. 'I'lle foreign COllntry illtO \Vllicl1, after its COll1pletiol1, a 1iasoll is expected to travel, is t11at "lllldiscovered COllntr3T fro111 \Vll0Se bourlle 110 traveler returns." Tile ,vages \vhich 118 is to receive are tlle re\vards of a \vell-spe11t life and the


124

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

kllO\vledge of diville trJlth, which the Grand Master of tIle lTniverse will besta,\'" UpOl1 all who have faithfully perforlned their task.

You have seell the fOUlldations 'of tIle telllple laid deep aIld strong. You have, as an Entered Apprentice, served your Master ,vitil free do III, fervency, and zeal; al1d, as a bearer of burdens, ha\re brougllt up frolll tIle qtlarries of Zarthan InH:ny a rough aslllar for the building. You have ,vrougllt your full time as a Fellow-Craft, and, under the skillful touch of your working tools, tllese rougl1 ashlars have become perfect ashlars-sto,nes, ,\ve doubt 11ot, fitted to adorn and beautify Otlr temple. As a 1'[aster-workman, :you have watched with unceasing care the ,volldrous beauties of tIle temple increase under the skillftll hands of tIle ""rido'v's Son; and 110'V :yo'u have at lengtll seen the object of our hopes cOlnpleted, and tIle last arch boun~ togetller by the rejected tllougll priceless key-stone.

We have

dedicated the temple to the service of the Suprellle Being; and by this vve are renlinded that we should also dedicate our spiritual building-that temple ,vhicll we have beell erecting '\vitllin otlrselves-to tllC service 110'V


125

MOST EXCELLENT MASTER.

of the saIne Suprenle Being. .Alld although \ve kno\v of a certaint.y tllat all earthly things are trallsient, and that in process of time, even at the best, the decay of ages will crllmble our magnificellt temple into dust, yet we are perslluded, that, if \ve 11ave erected tIle temple of our inllcr life by Square, Plulnb-Lille, and Rule, its fOlllldations shalJ never fail, and its fabric shall never crulnble nor decay. Then let. us, my brother, take care that ,ve so labor ill tIle erection of our temple here, that ,vhell we lea'te tllis,for that far-distant COtlntry from ,"vhence we s11all never return, we may there receive the ,vages of faithful craftslllell. CHARGE TO THE CANDIDATE.

BROTIIER: Y Ollr adlnission to this degree of Masonry is a proof of the good opinion -the brethren of this Lodge el1tertain of your ~fa足 sonic abilities. Let this consideration induce ~y"ou to be careftll of forfeiting, by misconduct aIld inattelltioIl to our rules, ttlat esteem ,vhich has raised you to the ranl{ Wllich yOll no,\v possess.

It is one of your great dllties, as a

~Iost

Ex-


126

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

cellent Master, to dispellse ligllt alld trut.ll to the Ul1i11formed ~fasoll; alld I Ileed 110t relnind :Y011 of the i1111)OssibiIity of COll11)lying ,vitIl this 0 bligatioll withollt IJossessing all accurate acqllaintance ,vitIl the lectl1res of each degree. If you are not already conlpletely COllversant in. all tIle degrees lleretofore conferred on you, re1l1elllber that an indulgellce, IJrOlnpted b:y" a l)elief tllut }TOU ,viII apply yourself "\vith double cliligence to n1ake ~yollrself so, has illduced tIle l)rethrell to accept ~you. Let it, therefore, be :your llllrelnitti11g study to acqllire SllCh a degree of k:no\vlec1ge al1c1 i11for111fLtion, as sllall enable you to c1iscllarge ,vi tIl propriety tIle y""arious duties inCU1TI bent 011 )''''Oll, U11c1 to 11reSCrV"e, unsullied, tIle title 110vV COllferred 111)011 ~YOll of a l\10st Excelle11t 1vlaster.

CLOSING.

*

THE

*

*

*

follo'\ving Psalm is read at

......,... ~

*

CLOSING:

The LORn is my sllepllerd; I shall not "\VH11t. He 111al(eth Ine to lie dOWll ill green pastl1res; he leadetll lIle beside the still ,vaters. _He reRtoretll IllY 80111; he leadetll 1110 ill tIle patlls


l\IOST EXCELLENT l\fASTER.

127

of righteollSlless for his I1ttlne's sake. Yen.: tll0Ugl1 I \valk: tl1l'Ougll tIle valley of tIle s}lado\v of deatll, I will fear 110 evil; for t110U art ''lith TIle; thy rod and tl1y stai~ tJle}T cornfort 111e. TIIOll preparest a table before lue, in tIle presence of TIline enemies; thatl allointest Iny llead ,vitI1 oil; nlY cup rUlllleth over. Surely goodness and Inerc~y 811ftll follovv Ine all tIle days of nlY life; alld I ,viII d "veIl ill the house of the LORD forever. Or the

follo~"ing may

be used: .

PRAYER.

o GOD,

our Creator, Preser,rer, and Benefactor, tlnto \Y}10111 all 11earts are 0l)C11: ancI all desires 1{110,\Vl1, and frOI11 ,:vhOl11 110 secrets are llid; ,1\r e heartily tl1all1c tllee for the fraternal C0111111Ullioll '\"ve l1ave 110'V beell per111itted to cnjoj". "\Vatch over Ollr Institlltioll and Inake it allinstrllrnent of great good ill tIle ,vorld. Go ,.vitIl lIS, '\ve beseecll tllee as ,ve sel)arate. Gllide lIS eVetlTIOre by thy good Providence; alld finally reUllite lIS all, irl tIle gloriotls teulple above, to l)raise tllee forever.

ReS1Jonse. So Incte it be.-AlIEN.


128

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

KING SOLOMON'S TEl\fPLE. Tms famous fal)ric was situated on l\!ount ~foriah, a lofty hill almost in the north-east corner of Jerusalem. At a littlo distance to the south-west was Mount Zion with the city of David and the king's palace on its summit. The top of Moriah was almost a square, occupying about five hundred cubits on each side, and was enclosed by a wall twelve and a half yards high. This was the place, it is said, where ABRAHAM ",'as about to offer np his son ISAAC, and also where DAVID met and appeased the destroying angel1\"ho was visible over the threshing floor of ORNA.J.~ the Jebusite. To prepare the place for the foundations of the building, it was first surrounded with an immense ,vall, and the space between the wall and the summit was filled in and made solid with large stones of almost incredible size. On this foundation were laid other stones 'nrnlly morliced into the rock, so as to furnish a secure basis for the building proper. King SOLOMON commenced the erection of the temple on the second day of the month Zif, in the year of the world 2992. It was the fourth year of his reign, being four hundred and eighty years. after the passage of the Red Sea, and the work was carried on "ith such prodigious speed that it was finished in all its parts in little more than seven years. The building does not appear to have been remarkable for its size, as many temples in Egypt and other heathen countries then existing, exceeded it in magnitude. Its surpassing excellence over all other structures consisted in its cost ancl the magnificence of its decorations. Built of enormous blocks of ,vhite marble, put together ,vith all the architectural symmetry and harmony which the most ingenious workmen could devise, it ,yas a monument of skill and mechanical ability. The roof, beams, doors, posts, and gates were overlaid with the gold of Ophir, and so, its effulgence dazzled all who beheld it. The temple 'was situated due East and \Vest, the Holy of Holies being in the West end, and the porch or entrance toward the路 East. The length ,,-as 70 ~ubits, or about 105 feet; the width was 20 cubits, or about 30 feet. But this does路 not include the chambers and courts路around the temple proper, for these, it路 must be remembered, ,vere capable of


1\10ST EXCELLENT

l\I~o\.STER.

129

holdiug' 300:000 persons. The temple proper was divided into three separate or distinct apartments: the porch, the holy place or sanctuary, and the Holy of Holies or Sunctum Sanctorum. The porch ,vas 10 cubits long, from East to West, a.nd 120 cubits* high. The sanctuary was 40 cubits long, and the Sanelwln Sancto1·u1n 20 cubits. In the latter apart.. ment or portion of the building . was. placed the Ark of the Covenant containing the tables of stone, AA"RON'S rod, and the pot of manna. In the sanctuary were placed the golden candlestick, the table of shew bread, and the altar of incense. The entrance from the porch into the sanctuary was through a wide door of olive posts and leaves of fir; but the door between 'the sanctuary and the Holy of Holies was composed entirely of o~ve wood. These doors were always open, and the aperture closed by a suspended curtain. The partition between the sanctuary and the Holy of Holies was partly composed of all open net-work, so that the incense daily offered in t4e former place might be diffused through this net-work into the latter. As before remarked, the temple proper was surrounded by valious courts and high 'walls, which occupied together the entire summit of l\fOUllt l\{oriah. Tfhe first or outer court ,vas the COlu"t of the GentiJes, beyond ,vhich no Gentile was allowed to pass. Wit.hin this, and separated fl'OIU it by a low ,vall, was the Court of the Children of Israel, and ,vithin that, and separated from it by another wall, ,vas the CO'lu·t of the Pli.ests, in "\vhich ,vas placed the altar of burnt offerings. From this court there ,vas an ascent of t\velve steps to the porch of the temple prol)er, before which stood the two brazen pillars Jachin and Boaz. The vessels consecrated to the perpetual use of the temple, were suited to the magnificence of the edifice in which they were deposited and used. JOSEPHUS states tllat thel-e were one hundred and.forty thousand of· those vessels ,vhich were

* The .A.mmalt or cubit was derived from the distance from the elbow to the extloemity of the middle finger. Little information is furnished by the Bible itself as to the absolute length of the cubit, although it is frequently mentioned. Scbolars b~we never yet settled· the question whether there were two or three dift°erent measures represented by the term, but it is generally agreed tha.t there were at least two. The length of the common cubit is generally conceded to ha.ve been about eighteen inches. 6~':


130

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CIiAPTEn.

ll1ade of gold; and one million three hundred and forty thousand of silver; ten thousand vestments for the priests, luade of silk, with purple girdles; and two u1illions of purple vestments 拢01' the singers. There were also tVfo hunch路ed thousand trumpets, and forty thousand musical instruments, made use of in the temple, and in ,vorshiping GOD. The dedication ceremonies "\vere indescribably grand and imposing. "l\{agnificent must have been the sight, to see the young king, clothed in royalty, officiating as priest before the immense altar, while the thousands of I.levites and priests 011 the east side, habited in surplices, "\vith harps, cymbals, and trumpets in their hands, led the eye to the beautiful pillars flanking the doors of the temple now thro,vn open and displaying the interior brilliantly lighted up; ,vhile the burnished gold of the fioor, the ceiling, and the walls, with the precious gems 'with which they 1vere enriched, reflecting the light on all sides, would completely overwhelm the imagination, ",'"ere it not excited by the view of the embroidered vail, to consider the :ret more a"~"ful glories of the l\fost Holy Place. And astounding must hiLve been the din of tIlA instrtuuents of the four thousand Levites, led on by the priests ,vith one hunc1J:ed and t\venty t.rumpets, directing the chorusses of the immense congregation, as the:y' chanted the sublime compositions of the rOJal psalmist, in the grand intonations of the Hebre1v language, like the roaring of many "raters. "or.. The Tenlple of SOLOMON has been symbolized in many different ,vays, and a lVlason ,vho has studied the sublime lessons inculcated in the several degrees until路 he has reached the distinguished rank of it l\Iost Excellent l\faster, cannot fail to discover much valuable truth in the history of the tenlple. In the superb glory of the building, uud the gorgeous ceremonies of itsdec1ication, the true craftsman sees the symbols of the spiritual temple '\vith its golden streets. Around and about him are the signs of dect:ty, and death, \vhiell cling "lith awful tenacity to his degenerate nature. But these are l\fasonic sllado,vs of supernal gladness; and the eye of faith looks through them to that light which "shineth more and n10re unto the perfect clay." It.

Bardwell's Temples, 1). 87.


ROYAL ARCH.

,HIS degree is illdescribably more august, sublillle, and important than . all which precede it; ancl is the summit ~tnd perfection of ancient ~ ~r,'tsonry. It i1l1preSSes on onr minds a belief of the being路 a.nd existence of a Suprelue Deity, ",vithol1t beginning of clays or end of years, and rell1inc1s us of the reverence due to llis holy name. It also brings to ligoht many essentials of the Craft, which "\vere, for tIle space of four I1tll1drod OJucl seventy years, buried in d.arkness, :lIld 'withol1t a kno'\vleclge or "\vhich the l\:Iasonic chtl.racter cannot be complete.


132

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER. '

O路FFICERS. A C~APTER of ,Royal, Arch Masons consists of any convenient number of members, and the following officers, viz:

1. The HIGH-PRIEST, ,vhose title is "Most Excellent," represents. JOSHUA, the first High-Priest of the Jews, after their return from the Babylonish captivity. He seated in the East, and is dressed in a robe 'of blue, purple~ scarlet~ and white, and is decorated with the ephod, breast-plate and miter-the garments and decorations of ,the ancient High-Pnest of the Jews. On the front of the miter, upon a golden plate, is inscl~ibed, in Hebrew charactel"S, Holiness to the Lord. His jewel is a miter.. The use of a Pontifical or Roman Catholic miter, instead of the Dliter of the Jewish High-Priest, is entirely incorrect.

is

2. The KING, whose title is "Excellent,," represents a Prince of Judah, who was the leader of the first colony of J e,vs that returned f1'0111 the Babylonish captivity to rebuild the tenlple. His station is in the East, on the right of the High-Priest, clothed in a scarlet robe, with a crown on his head and a scepter in his hand.. His je,,"'el is a level, surmounted by a crOWD. ZERUBB.ABEL,

8. The SCRIBE, whose title is "Ex.cellent," represents Haggai the prophet. His station is in the East, on the left of the. High-Priest, clothed in a purple robe, and weArip,g ~ tll:vban of the same color. His jewel is a plumb, surI.Q.oun~~d py ~ t"Q.rb~n:, 'fbe~~ tbree officers cons.~it-qt~ th~ G~~an'd OQlln~n~


ROYAL ARCH.

133

4. The CAPTAIN OF~'HE HOST represents the General of the troops who retnrned from Babylon. His station is in fJ.路ont, on the right of the Council. He wears a white l路obe and helmet; aIld is armed with a. sword. His jewel is a triangular plate, on which an armed soldier is engraved. 5. The PRINCIPAL SOJOURNER represents the leader of a party of Jews, who sojourned in Babylon for a time .aft~r the departure of ZERUBBABEL with the main body, and who subsequently came to Jerusalem to assi~t in rebuilding the temple: He wears a black robe, with a rose-colored border, and a slouched hat and pilgrim's staff. His station is on the left, in front of the Council. His jewel is a triangular plate, on which a pilgrim is engraved. . 6. The ROYAL ARCH CAPTAIN represents the Captain of the King's guards. He wears a ,vhite robe, and cap or helmet, and is armed with a sword. His station is in front of the Council, and at the entrance of the fourth vail. His je'w'e! is a sword.

up

7. The GRAND MASTER OF '.rHE THIRD VAIL sits at the entrance of the third vail, the color of which is scarlet. He ,years a scarlet robe and turban. His jewel is a s'\vord. 8. The GRAND MASTER OF THE SECOND VAIL sits at the entrance of the second vail, the color of which is purple. He wears a purple robe and turban. Hi's jewel is a sword. 9. The GRAND l\IASTER OF THE FIRST VAIL sits at the entrance of the first vail, the color of which is blue. He wears a blue rob~ and turban. His jewel is a sword.


134

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

These three officer8 represent the g'uards of the Tabernacle, anel especially those who were exalted to that rank to guara路a valuable treasure, a dlIty for which their industry, zeal, and fidelity had qualified them. The TREASURER, SECRETARY and TILER occupy their respective positions as in previous degrees, and wear their appropriate jewels. According to' the English l'itual, the first officer represents the second HAGGAI, and the third JOSHUA, an arrangement \vhich Dr. OLIVER admits is incorrect; but he suggests a change open to equally strong objections as exist against their present sj""stem. He and other English writers prefer that the order should be ZEBUBBA:BEL, JOSHUA, HA.GGAI, because they say that the IvfesHiah entered first upon the prophetical office; then on the sacerdotal itt Golgotha; and, lastly, on the regal at Olivet. But thiR argunlent proves too much, if anything; for, according to that, our English cou1pnllions should place HAGGAI first and ZERUBB"UlEL last. It has been said that the Americans ulnc1e an innovation at this point, during the latter part of the last century, on account of their hatred of the kingly office, an inlputn.tion which is \vholly undeseryecl b;y' the fathers of ~Iasonry in th~ United' States. A en.reful consideration of the Jewish polity, and the evidently typical design of the threefold offices in the Grand Council of the Chapter, \yill convince allY candid inquirer after truth that the American or \VEBB Ritua.l can be sustained on the plainest grounds of cOlui:non sense, historical correctness, and sound symbolisn'l, while the English can be defended on neither. It is ,veIl known to every reader that under the patriarchal fornl of governUlent by which the Hebre\vs \vere ruled, until after the exodus from Egypt, the Patriarch united in himself the threefold office of Priest, ICing, . an<l Prophet, anc1 in. t.hat l'espect \Y1lS a type of the 1Iessin.h. 'Vhen GOD, in his wise10m, determined to bring his people out from the ~ 'house of bondage," and destined them to become a great and powerful nation, he then gave thel"u a code of la\vs anc1 set over thenl a gorgeous hierarchy, endowed w'ith special privileges and inv-ested with a pomp and splendor l1efltting their high calling as Prie::;ts of 111e 1\fost High GOD. ZERUBBABEL,


IB5

ROYAL ARC:EI.

To this Priesthoocl was annexec1 not only the prophetica.l office, hut also the regal, inasllluch as the High-Priest, until the election of SAUL us King of Israel, was also the judge of the nation. And even aftel' the .t\..lmighty bad, in compliance with their iUlportunities, consented to give his people a king, still the High-Priest contiuued to be ill fact the head and front of ,the nation, an office.r of far greater influence and po'\ver th3.n the king. The HighPriest still remained the prime nlinister under GOD for their government, who, in all Inatters of moment, consulted GOD 'wl1at was to be done, and so l'ulecl the nation. * It is u14iversally conceded by all intelligent J e\"\~s that in the temple, and all its concerns, the High-Priest 路Wt1.S superior to the king, "A fact," says a Jewish :n.fason, "\vhich proves that the companions in the United Siates had a more correct knowledge of the Israelitish Institutions than Dr. OLIVER. "t Again the first three Officers of a Ohapter are universally con.. sidered, as ,veIl by Jew as Christian 1:Iasolls, to be symbolical of the threefold o:ffi.ces of the l\Iessiah. The Jew applies them, it is true, to a 1Iessiah :yet to come, but this does not militate against the symbolism. Although the 1Ylessiah unites the thl'ee offices of Priest, King, aucl Prophet, yet for the great purpose of man's redemption we look mainly to his sacerdotal office. That is the pronlinent central feature of his life, the great end of his death. Our love for the l\:Iessiah clusters around that great sacrifice; ancl the idea suggested to our minds by the n1elltion of his naUle is the offering made by hinl in the charo.. cter of the Great High-P.riest of our snlyn.tion. To set up in our Ch~),pters the kingly office, the symbol of earthly l'ulership, above the sanctity of the High-Priesthood, is to innovate on the plainest facoo in the Je,vish polity, destroy the finest sym.. balisul to be founel in the threefold. offices of the Chapter, and do violence to our ideas of natnral propriety. It has also been urged that the use of the "word Scribe, as applied to HAGGA.I, is incorrect. The ,Yord is of frequent use in the Scrip.. tares, and is applied by IIebre\v ,vl'iters to the ll:111l01' prophets. In this sense it is uSH'l in connection \vith I-IAGGAI.

* Patrick. Com,. vol. i., p. 2G6. t L. R~路nelll.allll Mirror and Ke~~stone, vol. i '0' p.

103.


136

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

JE'VELS AND CLOTHING. THE jewels of a Chapter are of gold or yellow metal, suspended within it triangle. The symbolic color of this degree is scarlet. The collar and sash of a Royal Arch Mason are scarlet, edged with gold. The apron is of white lambskin, lindd and bound with scarlet; on the flap of which should be .路placed a triple tau within a triangle, and all ,vithin a circle. Chapters of路 Royal Arch Masons 路are "dedicated to

ZERUBBABEL."

Oandidates receiving this degree are said to be "exalted to the most sublime degree of the Royal Arch." A Royal Arch Chapter represents the Tabernacle erected by our ancient brethren near the ruins of King SOLOl\!ON'S Temple.

The Triple Tau Is formed by the junction of three tau crosses, T, so called from their resemblance to the letter tau of the Greeks. This emblem \vas early appropriated to the Royal Arch, but its origin and meaning has never been satisfactorily explained. In England it is called the "grand emblem of Royal A.rch Masonry," and the English lectures thnsexplain it: "The triple tau forms two right angles on each side of the exterior lines, and another at the center, by their union; for the three angles of each triangle are equal tv two right angles. This being triplified illnstrat,es the


ROYAL ARCH.

137

jewel ,varn by the Companions of the Royal Arch; which, by its intersection, forms a given number of angles, that may be taken ill 'five several combinations; and reduced, their amount in right angles will be found equal to the :five Platonic bodies w hioh represent the four elements and the sphere of the universe." SOIDe havesupposed this emblem to be an allusion to the three Great Lights of ~Iasonry; others interpret it to be the letters H. T., the initials of Hiram of Tyre, or those of Templu~n Hierosolymae, the Temple of Jerus:.1lem; while others assert that it is only a ,modification of the Hebrew letter Schin, 'to. Perhaps its true signification may be the follo'wing: The device on the banner of the tribe of LEVI is supposed to have been a dagger. The triple tau, or three daggers, may be emblematic of the three offi.~es into which the children of LEVI were ia.stalled, and to which they were set apart by the command of GOD, viz., High-Priest, Priel?ts and Levites. However this may be, the t.rue symbolism of the triple tau undoubtedly is to represent the sacred name of the Great I Am, and as such was appropriately adopted by Royal Arch Masons as an emblem to <.1esignate those who have been taught the sublimo secrets of that august degree. 101

THE IJECTURE

OF this degree is divided into two sections, and should

be well understood by every Royal Ar ch Mason; upon an accurate acquaintance with it will depend his usefulness at our assemblies; and without it he ,viII be unqualified to perform the duties of the various stations in ,vhich his services luay be required by the Chapter. SECTION FIRST.

This section explains the mode of gO'T'ernment and organization of a Chapter; it designates the appellation, number and situation of the several officers, and


GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER~

138

points out the purposes a.nd duties of their respective statiollS.

OPE路NING . ~

I

II

*

*

*

* ~I

t!J II

*

*

iII

DEVOTIONS.

art in ]leaven, hallo'\ved be tI1Y 11ame. Thy kingdom come. TllY ,viII be dOlle 011 eartll as it is 111 lleavell. Gi'le tIS tllis daytlour daily bread. And forgive us our OUR FATHER, 'VI10


130

ROYAL ARCH.

treSl)usses, as ,vo forgive those ,vIlo t~"espass agai11st us.. Alld lea,cl 'us 110t illtO te1TI1')tatioll; but deliver lIS froln evil: For thille is tIle kingd9m, Ulldthe power, ~~lcl the glory, forever .-4\?tfEN.

*

.*

*

*

*

CHARGE AT' OPENING. _

11.\11

l~o,v' ,. ,ve cOlnmalld you, Bretllrell, that

ye withara,v }Tourselvesfroul e'v"ery brother that '\valketll disol'derly, alld 110t after the tradition ,vIlie11 ye receivecl of us. Jj"'or YOllrselves lrllo\v 110W ye OUgllt to follo'\v us; for ,ve beha,Tcd 110t ourselves disorderly alllo11g you.. Neither clid "\ve eat allY nlall's bread for nOllght; but vvrollgllt \vith labor and travaillligllt and da)r, tllat '\ve ll1igh.t llot be cl1argeable to any of YOll; 110t becallse ,ve l1a,re not p01vcr, bllt to l11ake ourselves an ensample 1111tO you to followlls.. ~lor evell ,vl1en ,ve ,vere ,vitIl you, tl1is we eOlnll1allde(1 you, tllat if allY ,vould not \vork, l1eitllcr should lle eat. For "ore hear tllat tl1ere are SODle ,vhicll walk all1011g you disorderly, working not at all, but are bllsy-bodies. N o'v tllem that are SlICh, we cOll1mal1d and


140

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHA.PTER.

exhort, that ,vith qlliet11ess tlley ,york, and eat their O'Vll bread. Bllt ye, Brethren, be not weary ill 路well-doing. Alld if any luan obey llot our ,vord by this epistle, note that man, and 11ave no company ,vith him, that he may be ashalned. Yet count 11im not as an enemy, but admonish hinl as a bratller. Now the LORD of peace himself giv"'e you peace always by all means. The LORD be with you all.II. TRESS., iii., 6-16.

*

*

*

*

m *

*

*

J1l

*

* SECTION SECOND.

This section is fully supplied ,vith illustrations of llistorical truth. It amplifies, in.beautiful and strikingcolors, that prosperity and happiness are the sure attendants of perseverance and justice; while dishonor and ruin invariably follow the practice of vice and inlmoralit;y_ It contains much that is beautifully illustrative of the preceding degrees; a perfect knowledge of "rhich is essential to the accoDlplished and wellinforrned l\Iason. THE FII~ST CLAUSE furnishes us with many interesting pal"ticulars ,reh1tive to the state of tIle Fraternity


141

ROYAL ARCH.

during and since the reign of King SOLOlVION; and illustr3tes the causes and consequences of some very important events which <?ccurred during his reign.

REOEPTION.

.... ... ii I 1 l i , '

'Q

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

follo'\ving passages of Scripture, with Prayer, are introduced during the ceremony of exaltation: THE

I will bring the blilld by a way tllat they knew not; I will lead them ill patlls that tiley 11ave ll0t kno,vn; I will lnake darkIless ligllt before tllem, alld crooked tllings straight. Tllese things will I do llIlto theIn, and not forsake them.

*

*

*

*

*

*

At every stage in Masonry grea.t moral truths are presented to the neophyte and enforced by impressi.ve lessons. So here, at the very threshold of this most sublime degree, we are taught to put our trust in the Narne of the LORD, and are assured that whatever may befall us, the Lion of the tribe of Judah will not forsake ns. By hiR power, when all human efforts failed, ","e ,,"ere raiRecl; and now, in our search for fUl'ther light, 'w'e are taught that if v,"c pnt


142

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

our 'whole trust in him, we shall not be cast down; for, although ,ve may he led through tho valley of the shadow of death, yet. 'we shall not perish.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

He that htlnlbletll 11ilnself shall be exalted.

*

*

*

*

*

Hunlility is a virtue absolutely essential to an earnest seeker after truth. The l\:Iason who would successfully prosecute his inquiries iuto the mysterious \vays of nature, or rna}re any progress to'ward the snblime truths which underlie the great fabric of Freemasonry, must, at the very outset of his illYestigationR, lay aside all pric1e of left,rning, and all worldly arrogance, and, clad in the sa,ble garb of humility, seek for the brightest manifestations of truth deep do\vn tnuong the lo,vly. The candidate, having been already taught to put his trust in GOD, is, therefore, reminded that a knowledge of truth is only attained after humble and pn.tient search, and he is conlmanded to stoop lo\y; for" he that humbleth himself shall be exaltecl. "

The Catenal'ian A?~ch made use of in this degree by sonle 'writers is evidently an innovation. A due consideration of the lecture win enable us to ayoid this moclern error. There can be but one form to the Royal Arch, and a due attention to this subject 'will insure not only strict propriety und solemnity in the cerenl0nies, but also a C01"l"ec.t kno\,'ledge of the beautiful s:ymbolism intended to be taught. We are conseqnently instructed to make a proper use of our sublime secrets, and to communicate thelll onl)T in the ancient mode; and more, we learn to begin eVel"y important undertaking by looldng to the Deit;y' for aid and SUPP01"t.

*

*

*

*

*

*


ROYAL ARCH..

14E

PRAYER.

o THOU eternal and onlnilJotent J ehovall, tIle glorious and everlasting I A~f, l)erlnit lIS: th~y.. frail, depende11t, and rleedy creatures, ill tIle l1a.rne of our lr:fost ExcelleTtt ct1~[l SU.1Vren2e Higl~足 Priest, to approacll tIly div'ine Nlajesty. Alld cl0 tliou, 'VI10 sittest between the Gherubin~, i11cline tIline ear to tIle voice of our praises ancl of our Sllpplicatio11: and. \iOUCllsafe to'.?COll1111une,vith lIS from off the rJ~ercy seat. 'V e 11l11nblyac1ore and worsllip tI1Y ll11speakabic perfections, ancl tllY unbollnc1ed gooc1nessand benevole11ce. We bless tllee, tllat \vhell mall l1acl si1111ed, al1d fal1e11 fronl his innocel1ce al1d happilless, tll0U didst still leave unto 11im tIle po\vers of reaSOIling allcl the capacity of itnprovell1ellt alld of pleasure. vVe adore thee, that alllidst tIle pains alld calarnities of our l)reSellt state, so lnany means of refresllnlellt and satisfaction are afforded lIS, \vllile traveling tIle r?lgged path oj life. Alld 0 tll0U ,vho clidst aforeti111e appear unto thy servant MOSES, i'n a jiaJTte offire, ou.t of tILe ??~idst of a bU81~, erlkilldlc, we beseech tllee, ill each of our hearts, a fianle of devotion to tl1ee, of love to each other, alld of l)enevolellce aIld charity to all ll1Ullkilld. May the va,ils of


144

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

ignorance and blindness be removed frolu tIle eyes of our understandings, that we Illay behold and adore thy migllty and wOIldrous ,vorl~s. May tIle rod and staff of tl1y grace and power contillllally support tIS and defelld us from the rage of all our enemies, and especially fronl tIle subtility and malice of that old serpe'tit, ,vho, witll cruel vigilance, seeketll 0111" r1lin. ~.fay the leprosy of sin be eradicated froln our bosoms, alld nluy Holi1~es8 to the Lord be engravell upon all Oll1' thoughts, words, alld actions. May t.he irlcense of piety ascend continually llnto thee, from off tile altar of our 11earts, al1(1 burn day a'na ')~ig7"t, as a sweet-snlellillg savor UlltO t.hee. May ,ve daily search tIle records of trutl~, tllat \ve may be lllore and Inore instructed ill our duty; and may we share tIle blessedness of those ,vho llear the sacred word a'TLd keep it. Alld, finally, o merciful Father, \v}lell we sIlall have passed througll the outward vails of these earthly courts r ,vllen the eartllly hOllse of this Tabernacle shall be dissolved, Inay ,ve be adlnitted into , the Holy of Holies above, into tIle presence of the Grana Oouncil of Hea'ven, where the Suprenle

I-h.gh-Priest fore,,'"er presides-forever reigns. A1tlEN .-So 1110te

it be.


145

ROYAL ARCH.

The posture of prayer among the Jews was mostly standing, but when the occasion was one of especial solemnity or humiliation, it was naturally expressed by kneeling. In the latter pos'turealone, the foregoing sublime prayer should alwa~Ts be reverently offered.

*

*

*

11 ""

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

.'

SILENCE AND SECRECY. MYSTERY has charms as well aspowel". "The entire fabric of the uuiverse is founded on secrecy; and the great Life-force 'which vivifies, moves, and beautifies the whole, is the profoundest of aU mysteries. We cannot,. indeed, fix: our eyes on a single point in creation which does not路 shade off into mystery and touch the realms of Eternal Silence." The first obligation of a }1:ason-hi<> supreme duty-his chief virtue-is that. of silence and secrecy. This primary duty is' particularly enforced in this degree; and along wit.h it are likewise inculcated, in the most solemn manner, the three-fold duties which Royal Arch Masons owe to GOD, to their fellow beings, and to themselves. No one that deserves the name can ever forget the ties of a Royal Arch Mason. And if the leSson is heeded the initiate must become a true friend, a pure patriot, and a better man.

*

*

7

*

*

*

*


146

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

N Q\V MOSES kept the flock of J ETIIRO, his father-in-law, tIle priest of l\fidian; and he led tile flock to the back side of the desert, and caUle to tIle Inountain of GOD. evell to Horeb. And the Angel of the LORD app~red U11tO hiln in a B.aIne of fire, out of the l11idst of a bush; and h~ looked, and behold the bllSh burned

with fire, and the bllSh ,vas not consunled. And MOSES said, I ,viII 110\V tllrn aside aIld see tl1is great sight, '\vhy the bush is not bllrnt. And when the LORD saw that 11e turned aside to see, GOD called tluto Ilill1 out of tIle lnidst of


147

ROYAL ARCH.

the busll, and said, ~fOSES! MOSES! Alld he said, .Here aln I. Alld he said Draw 110t nigll hither: put off tllY shoes frOln off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy grOtllld. Moreover, he_ said, I am the GOD of thy father, the GOD of A.BRAHAM, the GOD of ISAAC, alld tIle GOD of JACOB. And MOSES hid. his face, for he ,vas afraid to loolt upon GOD.-ExOD. iii., 1-6.

*

*

*

*

*

*

As the Royal Arch Mason IDnst make himself thoroughly acquainted '\vith the leading events in the exoc1us of the children of Israel, if he 'vould understand those instructions which distinguish him from the l-est of the Fraternity, it is peculiarly appropriate that his attention should be ch-awn to that passage of Scripture ,vhich l'elates the circumstances under which the Jewish law-giver was commissioned by the Almighty to conduct the children ot Israel out from the land of Egypt. It was in the seclusion and simplicity of his shepherd life that ~IosEs l"eceived his call as a prophet The traditional scene of this great event is in the valley of ShoH,yb, on the north side of Jebel 1vIusa, or It.1ount Horeb. Upon the mountain was the ,veIl-known acacia" or shittinl tree, the thorn tree of the desert, spreading out its t1tugled branches, thick set with white thorns, over the .1路ocky ground.. It was this tree which became the symbol of Divine Presence; it flame of :6.re in the midst of it, in which the dry branches would have naturally crackled and burnt in a moment, but which played around it \vithol1t consuming it. The rocky ground at once became holy, and that it might not be polluted, 1\{OSES ,vas commanded to put off his shepherd's saudals. Removing the shoes ,vas an ancient custom of general practice in performing religious rites. The Jewish priesthood sacrificed with bare feet. The Cretans made it pellal for any person to enter the Temple of Dia~ with covered feet; and even the RJlna:u ladies of the highest rank


148

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

'were not excused from this requirenleut when they entered the Temple of Vesta. This custom is still preserved among the nations of the East. A learned writer thus symbolizes the lesson of the Burning Bush: "As lYfosES 'was commanded to pull his shoes from off his feet, on Mount Horeb, because the ground whereon he trod was sanctified by the presence of the Divinity; so the Mason who \vould prepare hilnself for this a.ugu~t stage of ~Iasonry should advance ill the path of truth, be divested of every degree of arro.. gance, and come as a true Acacian, or blameless worshiper, \vith innocence, humility, and virtue, to challenge the ensigns of an Order, whose institutions are founded on the most sacred principles of religion."

* * * * * * ZEDEICIAH was Olle-and-t\Vellty years old ,vhen lle began to reign, and reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. And he did that ,vhich ,vas evil ill tIle sight of tIle LORD llis GOD, ancl 11l1mbled not hilnself before JEREl\IIAII the 'propllet speaking from the moutll of tIle LORD. Alld lle also rebelled against King NEBUCHADNEZZAR, and stiffelled his neck,' and hardened l1is 11eart, frOUl turnillg lll1tO tIle LORD GOD of Israel. Moreover, all tIle cllief of the pr~ests, alld the people, transgressed very nluch after all the abominations of the heathen, and pollllted the 110use of tIle LORD, \vllicll l1e had l1allo'\ved in Jerusalem. Alld the LORD GOD of their fatllers sent to them by his messengers, because he had cOlnpassion on llis people alld on his ~\\relling-place. But they mocked tIle lllessen..


ROYAL ARCH.

149

gers of GOD, and despised his '\vords and Inisused his propllets, llntil the wrath of the LORD arose agaillst his people, till there ,vas 110 rell1edy. Therefore 11e brollg11t upon tl1ell1 the King of tIle Ohaldees, who slew tlleir }70l1ng men with the sword in the llouse of their sanctuary, and had no cOll1passion upon young nlan or maiden, o~d Inen, or hilIl that stooped for age; 11e gave tllenl all into llis 11and. And all the vessels of the llouse of ~OD, g'reat ancl sInall, alld the treasures of the 11ol1se of tIle LORD, and tIle treasllres of the }{ing, and of 11is prillccs; all these 11e brougllt to Babylon. Alld tIle}"" bur~nt tIle 110use of GOD, and brake clovvn t]le ",vall of J ertlsalenl, ancl bllrnt all the palaces thereof ,vitIl fire; ancl destrO}7Cd all tIle goodly vessels tl1ereof. And tllenl t11at 11ac1 escaped froDl tIle s'tvord carriecl11e avvay to Babylo11; "\vllere they vvere servants to }1inl arld llis SOIlS, until tIle reigll of tIle Jringdolll of Persia. Ho\v solelnn and mournful in its sublimity is this description! We have follo\ved the history of GOD'S people step .by step, commencing with their exodus frOID Egypt. .....Ve have seen the miraculous interpoRition of the Altnighty in their behalf, 011 the banks of the Red Sea, in the \vilderness, and on Dlany a battlefield. "Va hava seen the Jewish people increase ill power, ricbe-C), and glor:y', until the splendor of their chief city and capital rivaled, if it did not surpass, all the 'world in its nlagnificence. 'Ve have


ROYAL ARCH.

151

seen the founda.tions of the temple laid by the wisest king that ever wore a crown, and have \vatched its rapid progress toward conlpletion, dazzled and amazed at its e-;x:uberant beauty and cost:. liness. 'Ve have seen the temple completed, the pride and glory of the Hebrew nation, the wonder of the past, the earthly symbol of the heavenly temple of the new Jerusalem. As ,"ve turn back to the days of SOLo~roN, and see the unexampled prosperity. of the nation, the wisdom by \vhich he was inspired, and remember the wondrous protection vouchsafed to his chosen people by GOD, 'we forget, for the moment, how desperately wicked that people became, how grievously they sinned, and dream that such a people must be happy. But, alas! how vain our fi1Dcy! How terrible \vas their punishment! What a crowd of sad emotions rush through our minds as \V{e are recalled to our senses and bâ&#x201A;Ź::hold the utter desolation of Jerusalem, and the sack and destruction of the house of the LORD. The miseries of the siege, the rivers of blood poured' out in vain to defend the city, the :final assault with its awful carnage, the butchery of the old and feeble, the unbridled license and lust of the Chaldean soldiery, the long and dreary march of the captive Hebrews in the triumphal train of NEBUCH.ADNEZZ.A.R, the hardships and terrible trials of the captivity; these, and much more, pass in review before our mental vision, and, like the sons of Israel in a strange land, we weep when 'we remember Zionâ&#x20AC;˘

..

THE SECOND CLAUSE

Introduces a new era,and is replete with the most valuable illfor1l1ation. It inculcates the great 'virtues of faith and !)erseverance, and denlonstrates that virtue 'v?ll sooner or later receive its reward. The ceremonies and lessons made use of are inexpressibly grand and imposing, and are well calculated to lead the mind to the praise and adoration of the GREAT I AM. In the first year of CYRUS, Iring of Persia, the LORD stirred IIp the spirit of CYRU.S, King of Persia, that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom, and put it also ill writing.


152

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

PROCLAMATION.

THUS salth OYRUS, King of Persia, the LORD . GOD of heaven hath giverl me all tl1e kingdonls of tIle earth, and he hatll charged nle to btlild him an 110use at J erusaleln, YVllich is iYi Judah. Who is there anl011g you of all his !Jeol)le? 11is GOD be ,vith hinl, and let him go up to J ertlSa1em, "\vhich is ill J lldah~ alld bllild tIle 110use of tIle LORn GOD of Israel, (he is tIle GOD) \vllich is ill J erllsalem.-EzR.A.. i., 2, 3. The seventy years, which the prophet J eremia.h had foretold should be the duration of Judah's captivity, were now just expired. King CYRUS, inspired by GOD, and prompted by the coullsels of DANIEL and the prophecies of ISAIAH, issued his l'oyal decree for the liberation of the lIebrew captives, in the first year of his reign, B. c. 536. \Vith "That joy must this proclamation haye been hearcl by the sons and daughtel"s of Israel, whose harps, hanging on the willows, had been for seventy :.yen.1"S untuned to ~he songs of Zion! \Vith \",hat alacrity the chilclren of the captivU,y, under the lead of the chief of the fathers, luust ha.ve gir(led themselves for their departure, to rebuild their city and temple! The principal people of the tribes of J uda.ll and Benjamin, with the Priests and Levites, to the number of 42,360, having been supplied by those \vho remainec1 behind, ,Yith many valuable treasures, and having in charge fiye thousand and four hundred holy vessels of gold and ..s ilver belonging to the ten1plc:', w'hich had been ca.rried a'\vay into Babylou, immediately departed for Jerusalem. Among their leaders there are three that deserve especial mention. JOSHUA, 'Yho was the High-Pl'iest by lineal descent from the Pontifical family, succeeded to that office on the death of his father, JOZADA.:K, who died ill Babylon during the captivity.. The


ROYAL ARCH.

153

lattor became High-PI'jest at the death of SERAIAR, who held that office at the time of the destruction of the temple, and. was slain by NEBUCHADNEZZAR at Riblah.路 ZERUBBABEL, or SHESHBA.ZZAR, as he was ct~l1ed in Ba.bylon, was the son of' SELATHIEL, the son of J ehoiachin, and the direct linenl . successor to the regal office of Judah. He was the acknowledged "Prince of Judah, or Prince of the Captivity." He was also appointed by CYRUS the governor of Judea, and in both of these capacities 'was the recognized c:ivii leader of the returning captives, as JOSHUA. was the ecclesiastical. HAGGAI, the Scribe, or Prophet, who was associated with the hyo just mentioned, was, according to tradition, born in Bab:ylon, and 'was but a young man '"(then he went up to Jerusalem. \Vith regard to his tribe and parentage, both history and tradition are alike silent. He was the first of those who prophesied after the captivity,. and on the accession of DAnlus to the throne, by the direction of GOD, incited the people to renew and complete the 'York on the temple, which h~1d been suspended. The journey from Babylon to Judea occupied about foul' months. The Jews left BabjTlon about the middle of the month Chislen, and arrived at Jerusalem. in the month Nisan. '" As soon as they came thit~er, they dispersed themselves according to their tribes and the families of theil- fathers, into their several cities, and betook thenlselves to rebuilding their houses and preparing the land for raising the necessary sustenance. On the first day of the month Tisri, the people assembled at Jernsalenl and celebrated the Feast of Trumpets. Having previously erected a tabernacle and set up the altt1.r, on the tenth of the same month, they kept, with all the ancient solemnities, the great day of Expiation, follo\ved on the fifteent.h and succee-cling days by the Feast of Tabernacles. The feasts and sacrifices of the Jewish religion having been thus restored, the people at once began to collect the offerings for the rebuilding of the temple. The founclations of the new' odifice ,vere not Iaid~ ho,vever, until the month Zif of the following year, the first year being COllslll11ed in necessary preparations. During this period the number of the people at J ertlsalem was occasionally augmented by the arrival of t-iluall parties of those who were left behind ill Bab:yloll by the mnin body under ZERUl3BABEL, and who afterward 011.1116 np to assist their brethren in rebuilding the house of the LonD.

* Dr. PrWeanx, 001:1., yo1.

i. I>. 2:12.


154

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

These small parties were composed mostly of those who were settled in the more remote l)rovinces of the empire, and on that arcouut did not hear the good news contained in the proclamation of CYRUS in time for them to go up with ZERUBBA.BEL, as the latter must have 16ft Babylon within a month after the c1ecree was issued. 'Vb.en the liberation of the Hebre'w captives ,vas made known to thenl, conpled with the tidings that the v~st body of their brethren had already departed with such brLste for Jerusalem, they j o~rftllly accepted the offer to return to their native Israel, although they were at first doubtful of ""Bat reception they would meet on their arrival.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Bellold, whell I COln.e unto the children of Israel, and shall say llnto theIn, r~rlle GOD of }l'our fathers 11atll sel1t l11e unto you: alld tlley shall say to Ine, Wllat is llis I1ftl11e ? \Vllat shall I say unto tlleln ? *

I

*

*

*

*

A~r:

TIlus s11alt thOll say unto the children of Israel, I AM hatll sent 111e unto you. A1f THAT

I

*

Being assured that the s.ame everIn.sting and eternal GOD, the 'W bo r~vealed hiIpself to ~IOSES n.t the Burning Bush, and "'who brought fort4 their fathers out of Egypt with a mighty hantl and an Qutst1."etch.ed ar~, would. also sustain and defend them in the Jop.g and perilolls joul:uey across the desert or over the IPount~ins, they 4esitatec1 ng longer. They at .once turned their backs upon all the fnscil1atio~s f),nd luxuries of Babylon, and left the domes and spires of that idolatrGus city, glistening in the sunlight behind them, as they resolutely started forth on their toilsome march. 'Vith a sublime faith anq an unselfish desire to honor the .GOD of their fathers by rebuilding the temple to his Great and Sacred Name, they sougllt not to ijub&erve their own e~se ana comfort; but, on the contrary, ~lthough thei)." journey mig4t be long, tedious and dreary, nne} their pathway rough, t1lgg~d ~ntJ. d~nfje;rous, ~l"et they were deteuij.ined to (j'.\Torcome

I AlrI,


155

ROYAL ARCH.

every obstacle, endure every hardHhip, and brave every danger to promote t.hat great ana glorious 'work. 'Vhat a lesson of faith, of unfeigned piety, of love to GOD, and of devotion and obedience to his service, does this little band of Hebrew captives, in a strange land, surrounded by all the allurements and temptations of an Eastern oapital, set before us! How strikingly was that faith.a~d devotion subseql1ently re\varded by the discovery of those inestimable treasures which gladdened their hearts, and which to.. da~r thrill ours with an unspeakable joy!

Retu/rn of the Oapti'ves from Babylon to Jerusalem. There "rere two routes from Babylon to Jerusalem; one across the northern part of the Desert of Arabii\, which was but little frequented; and the other up by the banks of the River Euphrates and around by the V-lay of Tadmor and Damascus, and so down into Palestine b:y the plains of Jordan, The latter was, unquestionably, the route taken by the Chaldeans when returning with their captives from t.he destruction of Jerusalem, and such would naturally be the route of those retttrning from the captivity, as in this way they would avoid crossing an extensive desert which could sllpply neither water nor provisions.

*

*

*

*

*

*

LORD, I Cl~Y ulltothee: make haste unto me: give ear unto my voice. Let my ptayer be set forth before tllee as路 incense, and the liftillg up of my llands as tIle evening sacrifice. Set a


156

GUIDE TO TIlE R. A. CHAPTER.

watch, 0 LORD, before IllY l110utll; keep the door of illy lil)S. Illcline 110t nlY heart to any evil tllil1g, to practice ,vicked \vorks ,vitIl Ineu tl~at \vork illiq1.1ity. Let tIle rigllteous sInite nle, it silall be a lrilldness; and let hilll rel)rove lue, it sIlall be all excellent oil. }lille eyes are unto thee, 0 GOD tIle LORD; ill thee is my trust; leave 110t Iny, soul destitute. Keep me froln tIle Sllare whicll tlley have laid for me, and tIle gillS of the vvarkers of illiquity. Let the ,vicked fall illtO their o,vn llets, ,"vhilst that I witl1al escape.

*

* I cried nlY voice

*

*

*

tIle LORD ,vitil Iny 路voice; ,vitIl ll11tO the LORD (lid I nlalre Iny Sllpplication. I l)Ollred Ollt my cOlnplaillt before 11inl: I srle,ved before ]lill1. IllY trollble.. "\VheJl illy spirit ,vas over\vllelmed \vitllin Ine, thell tllOll klle,vest IllY patll. III the ,vay wherein I wallred, have they l)rivily laid a Sllare for me. I lool\:ed 011 illy rigllt lland, alld beheld, but there ,vas 110 mall tllat 'VOllld ,kllO'V lne; refuge failed m~J no lllall cared for illy soul. I cried l~lltO thee, 0 LORD; I said, tIl-aU art'my refuge, allq lny portioll ill tIlE? l~n.q. Qf tIlE) livi11g. Ullto


157

ROYAL ARCH.

Attellclllllto IllY cry; for I aln brought v""ery lo\v: deliver I11e froln Iny 1)ers8cutors; for tlley are strollger tIl all I. Bring Iny soul Ollt of prison, tllat I 111ay praise thy llallle.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Hear my prayer, 0 LORD, gi\re ear to ill)' SllpplicatiollS;" in tIlY faitllfull1ess alls,ver tue, and in tI1Y righteouSlless. Alld ellter 110t into jlldgnlellt Wit]l thy ser,rallt; for in thy sight shall no man living be j~stifi.ed. For the enemy hath persecuted llly SOlll; 118 hath slnitteIl Iny life dO\Vll to the grouIld; 118 11atll l11ade 11le to d\vell ill darkness. Tllerefore is nlY slJirit over'\vllelnled ,vithill 1118; IllY heart "\yit11ill file is clesolate. Hear 1118 speedily, 0 LORD; my spirit faileth; l1ide 110t tIl}T face frOln 1118, lest I be lik:e lIllto theln that go dO\Vll into the pit. Oause me to hear tlly lovillg-killdness ill tIle mornillg; for ill thee do I trust; cause Ine to kl10\V the ,vay ,vhereill I ShOllId ,vaIk; for I lift IIp my soul llnto tllee. Teacll me to do thy will; for tllOll art my GOD; bring my SOlll out of trollble, and of thy mercy cut off . Iny ellelnies, for I Ul11 thy servant.


158

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CIIAI>TER.

THE UPPER ItOUTE. \vho took the upper or northern route usually nscended on the eastern banks of the Euphrates, crossing that river in the vicinity of Circesium. Their course then lay up the west bank of the riyer, occasionally diverging from it, and then approaching it again, and, perhaps, following the winding of the bank for a considerable distance, until nearly opposite Palmyra or Tadmor, when it led in a westerly direction to that city, distant about twenty miles through the ,vilderness. ' Palmyra, or "Tadmor, in the wilderness," \Yfl.S built by King SOLOMON, and was one of the most magnificent cities of the ,vorld. It was situated about one hundred miles east of Damascus, on a kind of oasis, separated from the habitable earth by a vast expanse of bn.rren sands. Situated in the midst of this vast and arid plain, it ","as immediately surrounded by the most luxuriant vineyards, and beautiful groves of fig and palm trees, from the latter of which both itt; Hebrew and Greek names ,vere derived. Its situation was such as to draw to it, in its earlier days, the entire inland commerce between the great Persian empire on the . East, and the countries l:ying on the ~:Ced.iterranean Sea. Here the immense and richly-laden caravans from the East stopped and unloaded t,heir trensures, which 'w'ere exchanged for the commodities of the West; and hence it became not only a source of great revenue to SOLOMON, but 'was itself, perhaps, the richest city in the world.. Its ruins are among the most famous monuments of past ages, and consist of almost countless remains of architectural splendor. In fact, it is now almost a forest of Corinthian pilla.rs, erect and fallen. "In路 the space covered by these ruins," says a celel)rated modern traveler, "we sometimes find a palace of which nothing remains but the court and the walls; sometimes a temple whose peristyle is half thro'wn down; and then a portico or gallery, or triumphal arch. Here stood groups of columns whose symmetry is destroyed by the fall of some of them; there we see them ranged in rows of such length that, like rows of trees, they deceive the sight, and assume the appearance oisolld walls.. And if we cast our eyes on the ground we behold nothing but subverted shafts, some above others, shattered to pieces or dislocated in their joints. And whichever way Vtl'e look, the earth is strewed with vast stones half buried with broken entablatu,res, mutilated friezes, disfigqre4 relics, effaced sculptures,violated tombs, and altars deft) ed with dust," TROSE


150

ROYAL ARCH.

From.. Palmyra, the returning captives pursued their devious and rugged way to Damascus, and thence in a southerly direction over the mountainous ranges of Ancient Syria, Iturea, and Upper Israel, until they reached the plains of the Jordan, passing the famous clay-ground between Succoth and Zarthan, 'where the holy vessels for King SOLOMON'S Temple 'were cast. Thus their weary and travelworn feet again pressed the sacred soil of the Holy Land, and as they approached Jerusalem we c'an imagine with wh'at mingled feelings of j OJ" and sadness they beheld its ruins in the distance. Mournful, indeed, must have been their thoughts as they remembered the sack and destruction of their beauteous city-sad, indeed, must have been their memories of the captivity; and yet ho'w their hearts must have swelled with pride and jOJr , as with the eye of faith they saw the city and temple of the LORD arise again, phcenix-like, from the ruin and desolation of Judah. '\Vith 'w'hat alacrity must theybave hastened:over the brief distance still separating them from the longed-for lIount MOliah. They must have forgotten, in the inspiration of t,he scene, that they were weary, ,vorn, and foot-sore; for now, although rough and rugged hacl been the road, long and toilsome their march, yet, sustained by a firm trust in the GREAT I AM, they had arlived at .. their journey's end.

*

*

*

*

A1"ri val at Jerusalenl.

*

*

'rhe children of IsrH.eI, after their arrival at Jerusalem, erected a Tabernacle, similar in form to that of MOSES'. * Traclition, ho\vever, informs us that the Tabernacle of ZERUBBAl3EL differed from that of MOSES' in many particulars. The most holy place of

* Bishop Patrio'l'.

COlnmentaries on 1 Chron., Ix. 11.


160

. GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

the original tabernacle contained the Ark of the Covenft.ut, and the ,,~hole structure was designed wholly for the 'worship of GOD. That of ZERUBBABEL 'was used as a temporary place of vv"orship, and the Sanctuary was also used for the meetings of the Grand Council, consisting of JOSHUA, ZERUBB;\.BEL and HAGGAI. This tabernacle, according to the 1fasonic tradition, ,vas divided into apartments by cross vails of blue: purple, scarlet, and white, at which guards 'were stationecl

nnpostot's aJnong the

lVo'rkn~en.

Sacred history relates that "\Vhell the adversaries of JUDAH and BENJAMIN heard that the children of the captivity builded Fhe temple unto the LORn GOD of Israel; then they came tOZERUBBADEL, and to the chief of the fn,thers, and said unto them, Let us build ,vith you; for ~'e seek your GOD, as ye do; and ,ve do sacri~ce unto him, since the clays of ESAR-HADDON, King of Assnr, which brought us up hither. But ZERUBBABEL and JOSHUA and the l'estol the chief of the fathers of Israel said unto them, Ye have nothing to do with us to build an house unto our GOD; but ,,"'e, ourselves together, will build unto the LORD GOD of Israel, as King CYRUS, the King of Persia hath commanded. us. ,,* Masonic tradition asserts the Su.nle fact ,vith more detail. From it ,ve learn that no impostors from among theBe "adversaries," were pernlitted to engage in any part of the work, and, for this reaSOll, the most scrupulous care 'was taken to ascertH.iu the lineage of all the 路workmen. NOlle \vere given employment unless they were able to trace their genealogy with certainty from those noble families of Giblimites who \vrought so harcl at the building of the first temple. These alone 'were permitted to engage in the great and glorious ,york of rebuilding the house of the LORD. It is to be furtber remarked that among those 'Vl ho returned to labor on the second temple 'were many old men who had seen the glory of the first, and ,,'ere present at its destruction by NEBUZA.RADAN, the lieutenant of the Chalde~ln monarch. This fact has been often doubted, but evidently without due consideration, for it is ph-dnly asserted in Scripture. * In this connection, it must be renlenlbered that the seventy j"etlrS of captivity began from the fourth year of JEHOIACHIM:, ancl that only fifty-hvo years intervened 'between the destruction of the temple and the return of ZERUB-

* Ezra, iv. 1-3.

l' Ezra, iii. 12, and Haggai, ii. 3.


ROYA.L ARCH..

161

If a Most Excellent Master had be.en twenty-three years of age \vhen King SOLOMON'S temple ,vas destroyecl, he would have been only seventy-five years old when the Hebrew captives reached Jerusalem. This view of the subject at once relieves the statement of all apparent inconsistency, and makes the matter plain to our DAJ3EL.

cOlnp~·ehension.

r; 11 I: ".

till

••

is embleluatic of universal frienclship and benevolence, and teaehes us that those virtues should be as expansive in the breast of every Mason as the blue v"'ault of heaven itself. BLUE

Alld ~fOSES: ans\vered alld said, Bllt, bellold, tIley vviII not believe me, nor 11earkenullto my voice: for they ,viII say·, TIle LORD hath 110t appeared llnto thee.. A.nd the LORD said unto llill1, "\Vllat is t11at in tIline ha11d ?A11d lle said, A rod.. And he said, Oast it on tIle grol111d. And he east it on tl1e grollIlc1, and it becan1e a serpellt; and 1{OSES fled fr0111 before it. j\.nd the LORn said ll11tO l\fOSES, Put fortI1 tIline halld, and tal{e it by tIle tail. A11d 11e Pl1t forth his 11UTlld, and caugllt it, and it becanle a rod ill [lis halld. That they may believe that

tIle LORD GOD of tlleir fatllers, the GOD of ABRAHAM, tIle GOD of ISAAO, and t.he GOD of JACOB hatll appeareclu11to tllee . The serpent is a symbol of frequent use in all the various rites, though of not so general use in the York rite as in the others.


162

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Much speculation has been indulged in as to the miracle of MOSES' ROd; and many strange and fabulous traditions are given by OLIVER and other vtriters. The roel of MOSES was undoubtedly the ordinary pastoral staff or crook of the shepherd, '\vhich he was using 'while tending the flocks of JETHRO, and all its efficacy and superiority was due alone to the divine po,,"er of GOD. The Sylllbol of the serpent may na,turally be employed to rerrlind us of the fa.ll of the l'ace in AD:A.M by the wiles of the teu1pter, and of fne promised restoration of· the race by the brnising of tho serpent':::; head by the seed of the ,yoman. It th~lS alludes to the loss

and ,·ecovery.

The Attic

of Safety.

The first ark, or, as it is commonly called, the ark of N O.A..H, was constructed by SHEM, HAM, anc1 J.APRET, under the direction of N OAlI, and in obedience to the command of GOD.

Ii •Ii 11'tI • tltI

till

PURPLE, being formed of a clue adnlixture of blue and scarlet, is intended to remind us of the intimate connection which exists bet,,"een symbolic IVfasonry aud the Royal Arcll degrees.

the LORD said furtherlIlorc llnto hirn, Put 110'V tI1Y lland iIltO tI1Y bOSOll1. And he put his 11Ulld iIlto his bOSOlll; anel ,vIlell 11e took it 011t, behold, 11is lland was lelJrous as S110'V. Al1d he said, Put thine 11UIld illtO thy bosom again. And he put llis haIld into llis bosonl again; alld plucked it out of 11is bosonl, and, bellold, it WfrS turned again as his other flesh. . And it shall come to pass, if tIley will not believe thee, . AIld


ROYAL ARCH.

163

neither hearkeIl to the voice of the first sign, that they ,viII believe the voice of the latter sigll. The leprous hand is another of those symbols emploJTed in the rituals of Masonry which refer to a loss and a recovery. Leprosy was a loathsome disease of the skin and tissues, and was regarded by the Jews and other ancient nations as 0. judgment from the hand of GOD; and was, therefore, believed to be entirely incurable except by miraculous power. The restoloation of the leprous hand to health was, therefore, a striking symbol of the Divine Presence with MOSES, and serves to assnre the neophyte in search after truth that the Deity will reward his earnest la.bors.

Tlte Ark

of

Alliance.

The second ark, or ark of alliance, v;"as constructed by MOSES, An:OLIAB, and BEZ.A.LEEL, in accordance with a pattern given by GOD. Itl was the first constnlcted, as it was the first in importance, of all the furniture of the original tabernacle. Its chief use seems to have been to contain, inviolate, the Divine autograph of the two tables, and to serve as the visible seat of the Divine Presence.. It was also a pledge to the people of Israel of the solemn covenant which GOD had made with his chosen servants.

11 ."

..ii ". " il .,

SCARLET is emblematic of that fel-veney and zeal which should actuate all Royal Arch l\Iasons, and is peculiarly characteristic of this degree.

And it shall come to pass, if tIley will not believe also tllese two signs, l1either hearken unto thy voice, tllat tll0U shalt tal\:e of the ,vater 'of the river, al1d pour it upon the dry land: and the water which thou takest out of "the. river shall become blood lIpan tIle dry lalld.


164

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

The symbol of the water turned to blood, like the others we have considered, has also a reference to a loss and. a recovery; a transition frOlll ignorance to knowledge, from darkness to light, from death to life. Its appropriateness in the lessons of a degree like the Royal Arch will be readily seen and understood by all those who have studied the teachings of OU1" sublime ritual.

The Ark

of

Irnitalion.

Here, too, we haye an allusion to the third ark, which fills so import.ant a place among the relics and s~71nbols of the higher degrees of Freemasonry; and concerning ,vhich the Fraternity possess so n1any interesting traditions. It ,,,,,as an exact copy of the Ark of the CoYenant, and, after its recovery, ~"as placed ill the sanctuary of the new tabernacle by JOSHUA, ZERUBBA.BEL, and fuGGAI.

The S拢gnet Qf Truth. It is impossible to ascertain the precise fornl of the signet of ZERUBB.A.BEL, or the inscription thereon; although some ingenious wl路iters have attempted to <10 so. Some ha.ve supposed it to have been a triangular plate; but the most reasonable conjecture is, thn,t it ,yu.s a ring on '\yhich was engl"~~ved an equilateral triangle ,vith the Hebrew letter yod in the center. The use of the signet ring was a~most universal anlong the Jews and other ancient nations, and frequent references to them are found in Scripture. ,\Vhell a king intrusted his signet to a person, it conferred on that person the authority and sanction of the monarch, and 'was the usual mode employed to anthenticate a delegated P?wer. rrhe synlbolical use of the signet of' ZERUBBABEL is to iuvest the aspirant af~er trnth ,vith 11. token which sha.ll enable him to prosecute his search, and also serve as H. pledge of his ultima,te victory, if he perseveres.


165

ROYAL ARCH.

Ii

1111

r:

,,-

~,

II.

II

WHITE is emblematic of that purity of life and rectitude of conduct, by which alone we can expect to gain admission into the Holy of Holies above.

Incense

bU1'7tS

upon our holy altar both day and night.

In tIle seventll n1011th, in the 011e and twentieth dajT of the mOlltll, caUle the 'Yard of the LORD by the prophet H..-\.GGA.,I, saying, Spealt no,\v to ZERUBBABEL, tIle son of SHEA.LTIEL, governor of J lldah, alld to JOSHUA, the son of J OSEDECH, the High-Priest, and to the residue of the people, saying, Who is left among yOll tllat sa"v this hOllse in her first glory? and 110'V do ye see it now? is it not ill your eyes, in cOlnparisoll of it, as 11otlling? Yet 110'V be strong, 0 ZERUBBABEL, and be strollg, 0 JOSHUA,


166

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

of J OSEDECH tIle High-Priest: and be strong, all ye people of the land, saith tIle LORD, and work: for I am with you, saith the LORD of hosts: according to the word tllat I covenanted ,vi tIl you wIlen )Te came out of Egypt, so my spirit remainetll a1110ng you: fear ye 110t. For thllS saitll the LORD of hosts, Yet once, it is a little while, alld I will shake the 11eavens, and the earth, and tIle sea, and tlle dry land; alld I will shake all l1ations, atld tIle desire of all nutiollS sllall COIne, ft11d I ,viII fill this hOllse vvith glory. The silver is l11ine, and tIle gold is Inille. The gl01"y oj this latter 7~o~l8e s7Lall be greater tha1~ oj the jor1ner, a11c1 in tllis place ,viII I give !)eace. III that clay ,viII I take tllee, 0 ZERUBB.ABEL, IllY servant, tIle son of SHEALTIEL, saith the LORD, alld ,viII rnake tllec as a Signet: for I 11ave cllosen thee.

SOIl

*

*

*

*

*

*

None but those faithful craftsmen who have received t.he signet of Truth can be admitted to participate in building the second temple of "Holiness to the LORD "-and for that reason it is absolutely necessar:y that every neophyte in Masonic science should give evidence of his proficiency in the sublime principles of the art, and of his ability to engage in the important 路work. Being satisfied on so vital a point, it is proper that his attention should be called to his symbolical working tools, and that he should be taught ho\v to l1S~ them in a,' proper mauner.


167

ROYAL ARCH.

The WORKING hel'e explaiiied.

TOOLS

of a Royal Arch Mason may be

':rhe Working Tools of a RO:Y'al Arch Mason are the Grow, Pickax, alld Spade. The Grow is llsed by operati,re l\1asons to raise tllings of great ,veight ancl bulk; tIle Picltax to loosen the soil, and IJrepare it for digging; and tIle Spacle to remo,re I'llbbish. But tIle I{oyal Arcll ~fasoll is ell1blelnaticall~y tallght to use tIlem for 1110re noble purposes. By them lle is rerl1inded . t~at it is llis sacred duty to lift frOlll 11is 111ind tIle heavy '\veight of passions alld prejlldices Wllich ellculllber his progress tovvard virtue, loosening - the hold whicll long habits of si~ and folly have had upon llis disl)Ositiol1, alld renloving tIle rubbisll of vice alld ignorallce, which prevellts him from beholding that eterllal fOU11datioll of truth alld wisdom upon ,vhich lle is to erect the s!1iritllal and moral temple of his second life.

*


168

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

The industrious student of our m:ysteries cannot fail to draw frop:l. these simple tools still further food for moral reflections. To such an one the crow will be a striking emblem of uprightness of life, integrity of character, and unyielding discharge of duty; the sound of the pickax 'will remind him of the sound of the las t trumpet, when the grave shall give up its dead; and the spade will depict to his mind the grave itself into which the mortal pal't of man is laid away from sight. The Royal Arch Mason cannot fail to learn further from the diligent use of these implements;, that he must search t.o the very foundations which underlie all human knowledge if he would find that great object of all his earthly pilgrimage-the end of his labors. Truth may be buried for a time under a cumbrous mass of error; the ruins of a better civilization may have been thrown down upon it; its very existence may be forgotten, but the diligent seeker after it will surely find it. " Truth crushed to earth shall rise again, Th' eternal ;years of GOD are hers."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

This is the word of tIle LORD untoZERUBBABEL, saying, Nat by might nor po,ver, but by In)'" spirit. Who art tl10U, 0 great InOulltaill? Before ZERUBBABEL tll0U shalt become a plain, alld 11e shall bring fortIl the Ilead-stolle thereof witll Sllouting, crying, Grace, grace unto it. Moreover, the word of the LORD came unto Ine, saying; The hallds of ZERUBBABEL have laid the fOUlldation of this hOllse; his hands shall also finisll it; alld tllOU shalt know that the LORD of hosts hath sellt ll1e Ullto you. For ,vho hath


169

ROYAL ARCH.

despised the day of snlall ~llillgS? for they shall rejoice, alld sllall see tIle plummet iIi tIle 11and of ZERUBBABEL ,vith those seven.-ZAcH. iv. 6-10. t

*

*

*

*

*

*

In our remarks on a preceding degree,we have sho\vn that arches and key-stones 'were kno'wn and emplo:y-ed in the construction of the temple; and it only l'emains to say that recent disco,,"eries have been made of archeel passages and vaults under the ancient foundations of the temple, 'which 'Wâ&#x201A;Źl'e undoubtedly c911strncted at the time when King SOLOMON laid those foundations. In BAnTLETT'S ""\Valks about the city of Jernsalem" (p. 170) is described one of these arched vaults uuder that part of the 1'Iosque of OMAR, \vhich occupies the site of the Sanctum Sanctol"nm of the ancient telnple.

* * * III tllat day will I raise 111) the taber11acle of . D.A.Vln that is fallen, alld close up tIle breaches thereof; and r"will raise up llis rllins, and I will build it as ill tIle da:ys of old.-"J\.!\IOS ix. 11. 8

*

*

*


170

GUIDE ".r0 THE R. A. CHAPTER.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The Ark if the Oovenant. What became of the Ark at the destructioll of the temple is a question much debated among the Rubbins; but it is agreed on all hands that it was not taken to Babylon ,vith the holy vessels. Some of the Jewish writers contend that it was taken and hidden ina rock by the prophet JEREMIAH, ,vho then sealed up this rock with his finger, writing thereon the name of GOD. lit "Others assert that King J OSlAl:!, being foretold by HULDAH, the prophetess, that the temple would speedily after his death be destro~l'ed, caused the ark to be put in a vault under ground, ,vhich SOLOMON, foreseeing t\lis destruction, had caused of purpose to be built for the preserving of it."t

* 2 )Iaccabces,

rio

l~'j'.

t Prideaux.

Con., vol. L) p. 241.


171

ROYAL ARCH.

The most learned commentators are of the opinion that it was destroyed with the temple. Such is the Masonic tradition, and there are manJ circumstances to confirm its truth. It is certain it was not in the second temple; and Dr. LIGHTFOOT, * Dea.n PRIDEAUX, t and others assert that an exact imitation or copy of the original ark was substituted for it in the ceremonials of the second temple. Of this imitation, and of its origin and construction, we unhesitatingly assert that the traditions of l\1asonry give the only authentic account. And here, too, we have another symbolical allusion to a loss and a recovery. This imitation or second ark possessed none of the prerogatives and honors \vith which the first ark was invested by Gon's own appointment. There w3;~ no cloud of glory over it, and no oracles were given from it. It 'was only a representative or tS'pe of the original, which was itself but a ~rpe of the Messiah.

*

*

*

*

In the begin11ing GOD created the heaven and the earth. And tIle earth was without form, and. void; alld darkness ,vas upon the face of the deep; and the Spirit of GOD moved upon tIle face of the waters. And GOD said, Let there be light; and there was light. * Lightfoot. t Prideaux

Pros. of the Temple, c. xv., ยง 4:. Con., yol. i., p. 24:3. .


172

GUIDE TOr.rHE R. A. CHAPTER.

i\.ncl it caine to l)ass, \Vllell ~IosEs llad l11ade an

elld of writing tIle ,vords of tllis la,v in a book:, until they \vere fillished, that MOSES cOlllnlallded , the Levites ,vllicll bare tile ark of tIle covenallt of the LORD, saying, Take tllisBool< of tile Law, alld put it ill tIle side of tIle arl{ of tl1e covenant of tIle LORD ~your GOD, tl1at it 111ay be tllere for a ,vitness agaillst thee. Ancl tllou shalt put tIle 111ercy-seat above, UpOll tIle ark: alld ill"tIle ark thou sllalt l)ut the testinl0ny that I sIlall give thee. And }v[OSES said, Tllis is tIle tIling \vllich tIle LORD cOlnmandeth, Fill all Oiller of tIle nlal1ua, to be Itept for your generatioIls; tllat tlley may see tIle breacl wllere'\vith I have fed yOll il:l the ,vilder11ess, wIlell I brought you fortil fronl tIle lallc1 of Egypt.. Alld 1foSES said tlllto AARON, 1\Lke a pot, al1d put an Olller full of nlanlla the.reill, and lay it up before tIle LORD, to 11e kCl)t for YOllr gelleratiol1s. -:As tIle LORD COll1TI1allded }'loSEs, so AARON laid it up before tIle testimony to be ltept. A.nd the LORD said tlllto ~fOSES, Bring AARON'S rod agaiIl before the testilnolly, to be ltept for a tokel}. '

*

*

*


173

ROYAL ARCH.

The Pot of J:lanna. The manna was a small, round thing" as smu,]1 as the honr-frost on the ground. It is described in Scripture as being like coriander seed, ",-hite, and t.he taste of it like wafers made with honey. "" The nalue is supposed by scholars to be derived from the t,YO words: ?nan'J'Lu, 'what ,is this? For forty years this article was miraculously supplied to the Israelites, while sojourning in the wilderness, it having ceased while they were encan1ped at Gilgal, immediately after they had celebrated the passover for the first time in the promised land. Three distinct miracles accompaniecl the gift 6f manna, all wrought in attestation of the sanctit.y of the Sabbath; and \vhich, in this connection, serve to remind the 1\10S011 of those early instructions which he receiv'ec1 as a Fello'w-Oraft t\1lc1 1'Iark 1\:I:aster. These miracles were as follo\ys: 1. A double quantity \vas supplied on the sixth day; 2. On the Sabbath, or seventh clay, none was furnished; 3. That 'which was kept fro1l1 the sixt.h to the seventh day'wa.s good and gweet, while that which \vas kept from any other day to the next day bred worms and became offen... sive. To commemorate this long-continued and 'wonderful miracle, ]rIOSES "ras instructed that a golden pott should be provided, and that an omer or one man's portion of the manna should be put therein, and be laid up in the side of the ark. There it was to remain for their genera.tions so long as the ark itself existed, as a 'menlorial of the miraculous manner in which the children of Israel were supplied 'with that article of food for forty)"'enrs in the wilderness. This pot is depicted on Samaritan roec1als in the fornl of an urn, with a lid or cover. The Rabbins considered the mallna to be a type of the Jewish lfessinh, who was to be the spiritual food of his people. It masonically teaches lIS that as the Isrnelites fed on nl~1nlla from heaven, so shoulc1 'we spirituall)' feed on that Truth, which is t,he great object of our investigations.

* Exodu~, xvi., 31.

t Hebrews, iX., 4:.


174

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Aaron'.~

Rod.

A signal attestation was granted by GOD to AARON'S offioial authority. Twelve rods or branches of the almond tree 'vere taken, one for the head of each house or tribe of Israel; and upon the rod of the tribe of LEVI was written the name of AARON. The rods were laid together in the tabernacle of the congregation before the testimony; and the next day when 1\'IosEs went into the tabernacle, the rod which had AARON'S name upon it "was budded, and brought forth buds, and bloomed blessoms, and :yielded almonds. U This wonderful miracle was made known to the people by an exhibition of the rod; but it 'was immediately taken back into the tabernacle, by divine command, to be kept there "for a token against the rebels," and also as a testimony of the appointment of the Levites to the priesthood.

The Book of the

La~/J.

"There 'was a tradition among t.he Jews," says Dr. J\tIACKEY, "that the Book of the Lil.1V ,vas lost during the captivity, and that it was among the treasures discovered during the building of the second teDlple." Dean PRIDEAUX, to the same effect, says that "l\Iauy of the ancient fathers hold that all the Scriptures were lost and destroS'ed in the Bab:rlonish captivity, and that EZRA restored them all again by divine revelation. Thus saith IRENAEus, and thus sny rrURTULLIAN, CLEMENS ALEXANDRINUS, BASIL, and others."* 110st commentators, ho\vever, reject the tradition, and assert that EZRA did no more than to coUect as man)'I' copies of the sacred . m-itings as he could, and out of them all set forth a correct edition; and this appears to be the opinion of Dr. PRIDEAUX himself.

* Prideaux, Con., vol. i., p. 432.


ROYAL ARCH.

175

The Scriptures were originally written in the old Hebrew or character, ancl copies of them were also made in that character until the captivity. * During the captivity the Hebrews, to a great extent, lost the use of that language, and hence EZRA. transcribed the law into the Chaldaic character, in order that it might be generally understood by the people. This was the origin of the Cha.ldaic paraphrases as they were called..t EZRA. also introduced synagogues among the J e\vs, and by himself and his scribes multiplied copies of the Scriptures and caused them to be read in the s:rnagogues that he established.+ It is, however, a generally conceded fact that twice in the Jewish histor;y there were no copies of the Scriptures known to be in existence. It is apparent that the Book of the Law was very rare in the reign of JEHOSHAPHAT, because 'we are told that when he sent teachers thro~gh a~l Judah to instruct the people in the law of GOD, they carried with them" The Book of the La"w of the LORD,"§ which, as PRIDEAUX remarks, they would not have done, had there been any copies of the la'w in the cities to which they went. In the succeeding years, dnring the wicked reign of 1IANAssEH and his successor,· it is evident that no copy of the Book of the Law was known to exist; for when HrLKIA.B: found the law in the temple,1I neither he nor King JOSIAH would have been so surprised at it, bad copies of it been common. Their conduct on that occasion sufficiently proves that neither of them had ever seen the book before. This opinion is now held by most commentators, as well as by the early fathers, err who assert that all the copies known to have been in existence ,yere destroyed by the injunctions of MANA.SBEH and A.M:NON, his son and successor. The only copies that escaped destruction were those which were preserved by the conservators of Jewish l\'Iasonry. It is probable that HILKIAB: and JOSIAH took care that this copy of the law, found by them, should be laid up in the ark from whence it had been taken, to preserve it from destruction at the hands of ],!ANASSEH; and there are som.e reasons for supposing that partial copies of it may have been made, which were preserved among the ~aptive8 in Babylon; but the Scriptures are si1~nt upon the subject. S~maritan

Prideau:x" Con., vol. ii., p. 58. Dr. Wm. Smith's Dictionary of the Bible. t Union Bible Dictionary. t Prideaux, Con., vol. 2, p. 13.§ 2 Chronicles, xvii., 9. 112 'Kings, xxii., and 2 Chronicles, xxxiv. ~Dr. Oliver, Rist. Landmarks. vol. jj,., p. 27.\ Dr. Prideaux, Con.• ,~ol. i., p.137. 11'


17G

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CIIAPTER.

A Jewish tradition, ho\vever, l'elates that the pl'ophetess HLTLDAH, foreseeing the clestrl1ction of the ten1ple, took this Book of the Law, and hid it in the tenlple. But 'wha,tever may ha,ve been its temporar:y disposition, it is generallyagreec1 by scholars that the book perished in the temple, ~tnd that thus the only knov-ln com... plcte copy of the law was again destroye<.1. In fa.ct, I{EN~ICOTT asserts that this was the original Pentn.teuch of ],rIOSES, in which opinion he is probably correct. The J ev,os have a tradition that at the rebuilding of t.he tenlple, by ZERUBBABEL, another complete copy of the "Book of the La\v " was fonnd hidden in H, part of the temple which hacl not been destroyed. * The 1\Iasonic tradition::; not only assert tbis to be the fact, but give such nlinute details of the circumstances attenc.ling the dE'J?osit and preservatIon of this book, as well as so circllnlstantial an f..ceount of the place, time, and mode of its discovery~ that they certainly seem to be true. If these traditions are rejecteJ, the student is left ellyirOllCc1 with such difficulties that, to escape theIn, some have supposed thn.t EZRA \vas inspired by GOD to re\vrite the Scriptures anew, the old copies being all destroyed. t But, on the other hand, if the trnth of the ~,fa.sonic traditions on this subject be adulitted, they at 011ce rationally account for the preservation ancl recovery of the Book of the Law, long lost, yet after'Nard found; and this, too~ in 0. way entirely consistent 'with the few historieal facts ",~hich appeal' in this connection in the sacred "writings, nncleql1nJly so "I,vith the genius of the Jewish religion and cnstonlS. The chLiln, therefore, that Freenul.sonry has preserved the only authentic account of the manner in ,vhich GOD'S blessec1 Book of the Lfi,\v ,vas preserved to mankind, is not so chin1el'ical as mal1Y persons have snpposed. Inclecd, any person who has given this subject the attention it demands cannot ft:t.il to ac1mitthe force "vhich all the cb'cumstances give to the :Th[asonic position 011 this 8t~bject. It remains only to ans,,"er a single objection which lul,S been urged against the b'uth of the tradition. It is said that the wlitillg ,vanIc1 have lost its legibility in so long a time as four hUllclred路 and seventy years, and hence the ,,,-hole claim 11lUSt be fabulous. It is sufficient to ans\ver, in the light of modern dIscoveries, that the ''\'"l~itings of the Egyptians have heen frequent.1y found in connection with mummies) '\vhic.h nrc cOl~('pdcd

* Pierson's TrM1itions~ p. 371.

t Pl'ideanx, Con.) vol.

i., p.

'1'~1-.


ROYAL ARCH.

177

to be at least three thousand years old, and yet remained perfectly iegible. lVlodern discoveries in science, history, anclthe antiquities of the eastern nations hn:ve in variably sustained and confirmed. the tra(litiollS of !vlasonry, and so, ill like manner, this objection 'we are consid.ering melts 3,\vay before the light of modern research and iuYestigation, as all other objections against the Order will, 'vhen brought to that test. To the wisdoDl and foresight of SOLO?fON ,ve may then reasonably ascribe the preRervation of the Book of the La"w"; and to the zealous descendants of the ancient Giblimites we may jus-tly a,scribc its recoverS"; and, finally, in the carefully guarded traditions of o'ur gTorious old Institntion may be found the only reasonable ana satisfactory acconnt of those events, fraught 'with such stupendous results to our race-which is the s11l'umit of the glory of the Ol'cler.

* * * * Al1c1 GOD spake llnto ~fOSES, allcl saicl llllto 11inl, I alll tIle LORD; an.c1 I apI)eared lln"to ABR.AJIA.~'(f, llnto ISAAC, and unto Ji\.COB, by tl10 nalne of GOD AL:I\fIGI-ITY; btlt by lUy nanlC JEHOVl\.H ,vas I not ]~l1o,vn to tllenl.

*

The Telragrantinaton.

rl1i1' The Ineffa.ble "Vord 01' rretragrammat.on* is, perhaps, the Inost . genel'a.l1y difftlsec1 syn1bcl to be founel in the ancient rites and mysteries, for there is probably no systenl of initiation in which it does not appear in son18 form. It is composed of the past, present, and future tense of the Hebrew verb ii""li to be; siguif;ying ,vas, is, and shall be. t It jg TT

* So

cn.Ued from the two Greek words tell"a, four, andgrarmna, letter; and hence the tel'In signifies thefour letle1'e(t路wol'd. It if) applied only to the Hebrew name of Deit;r, not being uscel ill conn.ection with other words, t It is a singular fact that the verl> "to be" in Illost, if not an, languages, is irregular in its construction and conjugation. This vC'rb is also used iIl. all languages as an auxiliary to be added to the other verbs to assistiu their conjngation. Putting these f:1cts together, we have tIlen em':>odied, ~md implied

8 7;'


178

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

also composed of three syllc.l.bles, a sacred number, symbolical of for:::o, stability and power. Three lines are necessary to form a :>;;nre, three columns at least are neces8ary for firm self-support~ and ires faciunt leges'" is an ancient legal maxim. The J e-wish Rabbins affirm that the letters composing it abound in mysteries, and some of them assert that "he \vho pronounces it shakes heaven and earth, and inspires the very angels with terror." ".A. soYereign authority resides in it; it governs the 'world; it is the fountain of all grace and blessings, the channel through Vi hich GOD'S mercies are conveyed to men." JOSEPHUS calls it "the shuddering nalne of GOD." It was also c~lled by the Jews the unutterable or inconlll'!-unicable name. It is usually marked .01' denoted in Jewish books by the initial letter alone, the Hebrew., yod, and was frequently written in Samaritan characters, in place of the Hebrew, lest strangers should discover and profane it. It was held in such 'Veneration and awe by the Israelites that they never pronounced it, always substituting for it, when reading, the word Adonai, LORD. This sacred word is supposed to have been known by the ante.. deluvian patriarchs down to and including ENOCH, when it was lost. It was specially communicated to l\IoBEs at the Burning Bush, by the LORn himself, as his most sacred appellation, to be reverenced by his chosen people. When MOSES asked to know in whose llama he \""as to demand the liberation of the Hebre,\ys from the thraldom of PHARAOH, the Almighty revealed to him this great Name in these ma.jestic and sublime ,Yords: "Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, JEHOVAH, the GOD of :your fnthers, the GOD of ABRAHAM, the GOD of ISAAO, and the GOD of JACOll hath sent me unto you; this is my llame forever, and this is my memorial unto all gene1 ations. ,'.... After\vard, when the efforts of l\:IOSES to obtain 1

in the Tc;tragrammaton, these three distinct ideas: First, the eternity of God, as embracing in hinlself the past, preseIlt, and future of existence; second, the mystery of that existence and attributes, and the unsearchable ways of his Pro\"idence, denoted by the irregularity of the verb from which his nanle is derived; and, lastly, the omnipotent power of the Deity, indicated in the auxiliary use of that saU1C verb. * "'rhree ma.ke laws." * Exodus, iii., 15. It will be observed that whenever the Hebrew Tetragram.. matoD, n1M" Jehovah, occurs, our version follows the Jewish custom, and almost always translates it LOU.D or GOD; but in all such cases the 'Word Bubstituted is printed in sma.ll capitals, to show that it in reaJ.ity stands for Jehovah. Our version, therefore, fails to convey the full import of the original text, unless this fu.et is bol'u(} in m.illcl.


ROYAL ARCHâ&#x20AC;˘

179

. their release, only increased the burdens and tasks of the Hebrews, and he repented that he had been sent on his mission to his coun.. trymen, the LORD again, and in still more emphatic language, declared' the TetragralllIDaton to be his peculiar name, when he said: "I am JEHO'TAH; and I appeared unto ABBA-HArtl, unto ISAAC, and unto JACOD by the name of GOD ALMIGHTY, but by my name, JEHOVAH, was I not known to them."* 'Ve are here explicitly t()ld tha.t GOD'S true name is h,n""l, but that he was known to the three patriarchs only by the name of El Shaddai. Thus solemnly promulgated to lIoSES by the Almighty, the Tetragrammaton at once became invested ,vith a peculiar awe among the children of Israel, which ,vas in after J;ears v~ry much increased by the general belief that the terms of the third commmandment forbade.~the use of this sacred Name, except by the High-Priest, on the day of expiation. Even to this day no pious Jew will speak the word, but wheneyer he meets ,vith it in Scripture he substitutes for it Adona¡i. The use of the word being thus abandoned, its true pronuncio.tion was lost, for the reason that the letters of the Hebrew langnage can give no possible indication of the correct pronunciation of any word to a persoll ,vho has never heard the word spoken. .The Hebrew 0.1 phabet consisted entirely of consonants, hence the vowels \vere sounded, but not written. Thus the Tetragrammaton ,vas written 'with four consonants, "'I yod, pronounced yoth; h he, hay; i t~au, vwauv; and n he, hay; making, when combined, "':1"'1, or, as nearly as 'w'e can represent it in English, yhvh or Jhvh. A person ,,"'ho had never heal,a those letters pronounced, of course, ',vould never be 1),ble to tell how they were to b~ sounded. Yet a Hebre"w' that had been taught orally the true pronunciation of the ,vords COlllposing his language had no more difficulty in speaking them oOl'rectly than we have in knowing that when we meet Dr. it should be pronounced Doctor, or that Geo. stands for George, t From this view of the Hebrew language it will be

* Exodus, vi.; 2, 3. t The Hebrew language continued to be written

in this manner without vowels until about the time of the Christian era, when the Ma.soretic or 'Vowel points were invented. The date of this invention is variously stated by scho14rs, some contending that they were introduced soon after the Babylonish captivity; others asserting that it was the work of the l\'Iasorites just before the birth of Christ; and still others, that the systenl was not perfeeted until after the COlllpletion of the TallDuds, fiye hundred years after Christ. For the several


180

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAP'rER.

apparent that the only way in 'which an Isra.elite could ullclerstand the true pronunciation of any Hebl'e,v 'Yard was by heal'iug it spoken; and hence, ,vhen the Tetragrammaton ceasec1 to be spoken, Adonai being always substituted for it, in a short time its trne pronunciation would necessarily have been forgott.en and entirely lost. The true pronunciation of the great and sacred Na,me ,vas preserved by the High-Pl:iests, each one of ,vhom received it from his prec1ecessor, and retained its correct sound by uttering it alouel three times, onoe a year 011 the day of atonement, 路when he enterecl the ,'Holy of Holies of the tabernacle or temple. The traclitions of 1'Iasonry relate that King SOLOMON was also in possession of the true prollunciatioll of the rretragrammaton, anc1 that he communicated it to his colleagues at the building of his ten1pIe. It \vas believed by the J e\vs that the power and wisdom of SOLO:\'[ON arose from his possession of the Ineffable NalIl6, and that by it he was enabled to erect the temple itself. \Ve ploonounce the r.retragramnlllton, Jeh01.xth,. but \vhat are the correct vowel sounds to be supplied is a vexed question, anlollg Hebrew scholars, which 'Yill never perhaps be c1efinitely settled. In the degTees of the . A.llcient and Accepted rite, many trn.c1itions aloe preserved, \vhich explain the luysteries cOllnected \yith the Ineffable'Vorcl, al1d the different pronunch'l,tiollS "'hich have been nt different periods applied to it n.1'8 explained. ..l\'xnollg these are the follo\vingJn.vh, Jno, Jaoth, Java" Juba, Ja.ft, Ja.h, rJehovah, J llha, J eva, J ova, J evo, J evab, J ahe. TbetL 1.1e pronunciation, however chin1ericf11 it llHl.Y appea.r, is sH,id to be preserved in the ritnn.l of Freemasonry, and, a.s ,va have before ren1arked, is the gl'D.nd syulbol of the Order. It was corrupted o.lnong all the heathen nations, in the ritos of' '\vhon1 it yet maintained a prominent place. Thus among the Syriac nations 'we find it contracted into a biliteral ,vorcl JAH. Among the Chaldeans \ye find it changed to BEL, or Belus, or Baal. Arl10ng the Egj'"Ptians 'we fincl it changed to ON, derived, perhaps, fl'Onl the Hindoo AUl\JI or OlVI. .A.mong the Latins ,ye find ,J'"llpite1" and Jove. From what has been said, it will be seen that the Tetragrn.mmaton ,vas the 'Vard of 'Yards among the Jews, or, ~1S it has been sometimes called, the ~INq. NAlVrE~ In Scripture, Truth or Light. is freque:q.tlyuseq. ~l1 its sYl~on:ym. It is the Logos of the ancient~.. 1

r

arguments in favor of these vie\ys, the reader is refel'retl tg :}?J.'id sv;I:Pf1 Vp~. i., p. {50, and t~e different Hebrew gramnlars.

Con:~


ROYAL ARCH.

路181

No single ,,"ord in our language can express its preglHtut meaning, embracing, as it does, not only the lVord, as a 'word, a written or vocil.l symbol of an idea, but also the sentient creative Po,ver, 'which conceives and expresses it. In this sense it is used in路 the Scriptures and translated" the ,",Vord. " " In the beginning \vas the 'N ord, and the Word was with GOD, and the "\Yord was GJD." Final1:r, the contemplation of the history and character of the great, mysterious and sacred name of Deity cannot but :fill us 'with fear and trembling, and lea.d us ,vith admiration to view the glorious ,vorks of creation, to adore their great Creator, to esteem him the chief'good, to inlplol'e his blessing upon all laudable undertakings, to trust in and lean upLln him in every hour of trial and danger, and to never mention his I1ftme but \'lith that reverential ft~"e 'which is so justly due fl~"?m a creature to its Creator.

The key hus been used as ft s:rmbol frolll very remote ages. The Egyptinns emplo:red it as the symbol of Anubis, the dog-star, because"they conceived that at the l"ising of that star the old year was closed and a new OU6 'ViLS commenced. From this, the use of the symbol was extenclec1 to the opening and closing the place of departed spirits. A t an early period it came to be used as a SYIUbol of po,ver, and in modern times ,ye note this use of the key in transferring the power and authorit~y over a city, or in giying possession of a building. It is also a syluhol of secrecy, and Dln.y appropriately impress upon the nlind of the initiate the ilnportance of safel:r locking \yithin his own breast those valuable truths "rhich, amicI the most bitter persecutions, have been transmittec1 from ge.neration to generation, for the benefit of the true Sons of Light. Its principal use, however, is to teach us that the Book of the Law furnishes the only key ,vith ,,"hich to unlock the deep hidden m~1"steries of our science, while a correct knowledge of our mys.. teries in turn solves mallY' cliffiuult things in the Book of the Lrnv itself, or in other 'worcls that Fl"eer:un.sonry is the halHl1uaitl of

Rpligion.


182

GUIDE TO THE

:a.

A. CHAPTER.

THE SHEKINAH AND THE Bâ&#x20AC;˘.\THKOLL. those things which were wanting in the second temple, and which constituted the main glory of the first, there are three which deserve especial attention, viz: the Ark of the Covenant with the mercy-seat; the Shekinah or Divine presence, and the Bathkoil. A substitute 'wns found for the original Ark, as ,ve have seen; but this po~sessed none of the glories of the first. The Sheldllah, which 'was a token of GOD'S presence among his people, "\vn,s a very shining flame or amazing splendor of light, ellveloped in a visible cloud,"* resting over the mercy-seat on the Ark. It first appeared when MOSES consecrated the Tabernacle, and was afterward transferred to the temple at the solemn dedication of that edifice by King SOLOMON. It continued to rest upon the Ark in the same visible manner until the destruction of the temple. t It never appeared again until it was temporarily renewed by GOD to punish the impious attempt of JULIAN, the Apostate, to frustrate the prophecy of CHRIST, by rebuilding the temple after its final destruction by TITUS. The Bathkoll, a compound Hebrew \vord, signifying the d~l.ughter voice, or the daughter of a voice, was a term applied to a voice from Heaven. It was used to denote particularly the oracular voice delivered from the mercy-seat, when GOD was consulted there by the High-Priest. The sacred Ark of the first temple being indeed lost, it ,vas very naturally supposed, by those who had seen that edifice in its splendor, that the Shekinah and the Bathkoll had <1epartecl from Judah forever. The "ancient men" wept with a loud voice, believing that the former glory would never be fully restored to Jerusalem until the Messiah should appear as the true Shekinah . and Bathkoll, the Divine presence and Oracle, tl.nlong manki~d. The Grand Council, without doubt, took measnres to preserve: with the most religious care, the sacred treasures so miraculously restored to them, and for that purpose, tradition states, suitable persons were exalted to the high honor of guarding them from lOAA or profanation. AMONG

* at: Bishop

* Patrick.

*

*

*

*

t Pridea.tl:'C, Con., vol. l., p. 2-17.


183

ROYAL ARCH.

An interesting annunciation is now made with grateful thanks to GOD for the discovery, when the following ode should be sung, the companions all standing:

ROYAL AROH ODE. l\Iusrc-Nurem.berg.

-PBIMO'~~-_-..-t--bl.,jIl~ ~ ~Q-I--_

_:L

SECONDO.

-

. .- .

--t;--

Joy, the

~

--.-.~==tz-

~

~

sa - ered law

is

found,

-!L---==~~~~ __.~ ~ ,~l! ,_, ~ ---, ', -' I - - r ,- 6 . - - - - , . . - - 1 s-~ - - J K -

--~..,-

.

Now

the

~-t;

I

teIn... pIe

stands

-r-

--

com . . plete,

~--5 ~jIl ~~E==tI,路 __ 2-~ ~-::t2==--~-

==lii==.= -_-.;-~-.~~ . ~ I:;

~ -

~,,-._~---

G:r;,d . . ly

---c;--~~

let

us' gath - or

round,

-~==r~ fW楼 Where the

pon - tiff

bolds

his

seat;

jj

~~::~~C~==g=ggo


184

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

,~~ Iill~ ~-=~ -l---i.--4 ~ . ~~~:=::j _ - _ . - -.01--.- _ _ - _ -~--';---l

-1--

_--flJ- -'--.--.--6-.- .--e-'-

Now

he. spreads

the

vol -

unH~

JOJ, the secret vault is fOllnc1 ; Full the sunbeanl falls ,vithin, Pointing darkly uncler grouncl To the treaSUTe '\ve '\votl1cl ,vine They llave brougllt it fortIl to ligllG) And again it cheel"s 路the earth; All its leaves are purely brigllt, , Shining in tlleir ne,vest '\voTth.

wide,


ROYAL ARCH.

Tllis sllaII be the sacl'ecl')'na'rk WIlicll sllall guide us to tIle skies; Bearing, like a holy ark, .All the Ilearts who love to rise; This shall be the corner-stone Wllicll the builders threw away, But was found tIle only one Fitted for the a1"ch's stay. Tllis shall be tIle gavel true At ,vhose SOLlnet tIle cro"\vd s11~"'Lll bend, Giving to the lata its due; This shall ~e the faitllfl1l friend; This the token which shall bring Kindness to tIle sicl( and poor, Hastelling on, on angel's wing, To the lone and cla?'"ksont8 (looy". This sllall cro\\"n th,e mighty arch,

WIlell the temple springs on lligh, Allc1 the bretl1ren bend tlleir nlarch, lVafting in,cense to the sky. Then tIle soleuln stl"ain shall 8\"\'"el1 FroIn tIle bosom ancl tIle tongue, And the ~faster's glory tell In the harmony of song. Here tIle exile, o'er tl1e waste, Truc1ging homeward, sllall repose; .All his toils and dangers past, Here his long sojournings close. Entering throng1l tIle sacrec1 'i)ctils, To the holy cell be bends; TIlen, as sinking nature fails, lIo)Je in glacl frlli tion ends.

185


186

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The High-Priest will then invest the candidates with important secrets of the degree, which should always be accompanied with an ex.planatory

LECTURE.

*

*

*

*

*

The Ilame is expressi,re of self-existence and eternity, and is applicable only to that great t,eing who was, is, and shall be; to him who created all things, to him whose 11ands are open to Sllpply Ollr every want, alld to him alo11e who is tIle source of every Mason's llope. It is considei~ed by Masons as the sYlnbol of Truth. It is tIle路 perfectiorl of Divine Truth, 'Vllich every good Mason is seeking to advance, \vhether it be by tIle aid of the theological ladder, or passing between tIle pillars of strength and establishment, or wandering in dar!{ness,

*

*

*

*

*

*

beset on every side ,vith dal1gers, or traveling over rOl1gh and rugged roads, weary alld \Yorn-,vl1atever be tIle direction of 0111" jour-


187

ROYAL ARCH.

ney, or how accomplished, light arld truth are the ultimate objects of our searclland our labor.

*

*

*

*

*

*

THE WORKING-TOOLS,

In additio'n to the Crow, Pickax, alld Spade, whose use you have already learned, are the Square and Oornpas8, which 'have been presented to your vie'\v in .everydegree of Masonry through which ~you ha'le passed. The Squatre teaclles us, as Royal Arch 1'fasons, tllat GOD has nlade all tllings sqtlare, upright, and perfect. 1'}le Oorrpas8 is an illstrllnlent used by operative ~fasons to describe circles, every part of the circumference of ,vhich is equally near and equally distant from the center. The circle is, tllerefore, a striking emblell1 of the relatioll in Wllich the creature stands to his Creator. As every part of the circumference of a circle is equally near alld equally distant from its center, so is every creaturew]lomGoD has Inade to hiln equally near and equally distant.


188

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CH...t\.PTER.

THE EQUILATERAL OR PERFECT TRI..A.NGLE,

*

*

*

*

Is enlblematical of the three esselltial attributes of Deity-. nall1ely, Onl11ipresence, 01nl1iscience, ancl Omnipotel1ce; and as the three equal sides or eClual angles forln but Oile TRL.i. NGLE, so tllese tl1ree eqlul1 attriblltes constitllte bilt one GOD,

*

*

*

*

*

*

T!lis el111)lelTI was adolJtecl by ~Ile al1cients as a SY111101 of tIle Deity-as embraci11g ill llimself tIle tllree stages of tinle-tl1e Past, tJ1C Prese11t, allcl tIle Futtlre.. An10ng tIle Hebre\'v路s a }7od, or l)oint ill tIle cellter of an equilateral trial1g1e, ,vas Olle of tIle 1110des of expressillg tIle in co 1111111111i cable name of JEIIOV~\.H. For this reaSOD, the number THREE 11US al,va~y路s l)een llcld in higll estill1ation l)y tIle Fraterllity. 1Ve .拢.11C1 it pervading tIle whole rittlal. Tllere are tllree degrees of Anciellt Oraft ~:faso11ry, three prillcipal officers of a Lodge, tllree stlpports, tllree orllame11ts, three greater and three lesser ligl1ts, tl1ree movable ancl tllree inlll10vable


189

ROYAL ARCH.

je,vels, three principal tenets, three rOllhds of J.ACOB'S ladder, three vvorking-tools of a Fello,v-Oraft, three principal orders of architecture, three important lluman senses, three ancient Gralld Masters, etc.

*

*

*

*

*

*

short, the allusion to tIle triallgle Inay be found wherever ,ve turll Ollr steps ill Freelnasollry. It is lleld in stillo higher estilnatiOll by all Royal Arc11 1ÂŁasolls. Tllere are tllree principal officers 'VI10 C01111)ose the Granel OOlll1cil, three Gralld Masters of the Vails, three-and only three-call be exalted at the same time. III

*

*

*

*

*

*

Our altar is triaIlgl11ar, our jewels are triallgular, and our

*

*

*

*

*

*

The Nlunber Tlu"ee.. rrhe fi'equellt recurrence of this number in the fl.llcient mythologies, in the Bible histories, and in the Ritual of J\ft"tsonry, is almost incredible to 0. person who has never examined the subject. Instances of its use can be multiplied l,1ntil the minel grows \venry. The following are given as examples rather than as any attempt to exhaust the subject. Among the ancient references to this number we find the following: Oracles "rere delivered from a tripod; libations wel'e threefold; there were supposed to be three worlds;


190

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

the magioalrod of the Hierophants had three heads of silver; if any revealed the mysteries they were told they would die in three days; and in the celebration of the mysteries the Hierophant smote the coffin three times with his tripartite rod. The Greeks divided their gods into three kinds; and DEMOCRITUS wrote a book called "Trilogenia," in which he endeavored to prove that all things sprang from the number three. Among the Druids the number three ,va.s held in the highest veneration, and was one of their most sacred symbols, and hence their use of the mistletoe and shamrock, because their leaves were tripartite. Of them a writer says: "They turn three times round their karns; round the persons they bless three times; three turns they make round St. BARR'S church, and three times round the well." The number three was a symbol of marriage, friendship, and peace, because it was said to unite contraries; it was also an emblem of wisdom and prudence, because men are said to order the present, foresee the future, and learn experience from the past. Its influence was said to extend to all nature, embracing the birth, life, and death of men and all living things, the commencement" miJdle, and end of an earthly matters, and the past, present, and futnre of universal space~ In the same way, the universe "ra~ divided into three zones, the earth, air, and rest. III the Bible history we find the following: The patriarchs held a threefold office; ADAM, N O.<\.H, and SAUL, each had three sons ABRA.HA.M, ISile, and JACOD were particularly blessed of GOD; JOB had three friends; EZEKIEL named three just men; three holy men were cast into the fiery furnace; and JONAH was three days and three nights in t.he whale s belly~ At the transfiguration three persons a.ppeared with the ltIessiah; and he remained three days in the tomb~ There were three orders of the priesthood) and three keepers of the door; the golden candlestick had three branches on each side, and there were three stones in each ro'w of the HighPriest's breast-plate; the oxen ,vhich supported the molten sea were arranged by threes; and the Jews were commanded to assemble to the temple three times in a year, at the three grand festivals. 3!r!OSES appointed by divine cOlnmand three cities of refuge, forbade the people to use the fruit of their newly-planted trees till nfter they,vere three years old, and made three ,vitnesses necessary to establish a fact by which the life or propertr of another was called in qnestion. In the renl1'l.rka.ble history of BA.LA.AM the ass 1


ROYA.L ARCH.

191

spake after being struck three times, and the prophet conferred on ISRAEL three separate blessings. SAMSON thrice deceived DELILAH; HANNAH offered a sacrifice of three bullocks; SA.'MUEL gave a sign to SAUL, consisting of a combination of triads; anel DAVID bowed thrice before JONATHAN. DAVID had three mighty men of valor; and when he had. numbered the people of Israel, he was offered three alternatives, viz: Three years路 famine, three months' at the mercy of his foes, or three days' pestilence. The principal religious festiv,tls of the Jews were t.hree; the camp of Israel w"as threefold, and the tribes \vere marshaled in divisions of three tribes each. There were three hallo wed articles in the sanctuary, the can dlestick, the table of shew bread, and the altar of incense. ELIJAH raised the widow's son by stretching himself upon the child three times; Samaria sustained a siege of three :rears; some of the kings of Israel and Judah reigned three years, some three months, and others only three days. REHOBO.A.l\I served GOD three years before he apostatized. The Jews fasted three days and three nights before they overcame HAMAN; their sacred writings had three divisions, the law, the prophets and the psalms; and they had three l'eadillgs of Scripture, the text, the lVlishna, and the Cabala. In the Masonic ritual we find the following among many others: There are three qualifications of a ca.ndidate; and his assent is required to t.hree interrogatories. The signs are threefold-t.he moral duties anel the theological virtnes are threefold. There are three qualifications for the servitude of an Entered Apprentice; three cardinal virtues; and three things which make a Lodge regular. The reports are threefold; three grand offerings are commemorated in Freemasonry; three places where the materials for the temple were prepared, the quarry, the forest, and the plain; three decorations to the pillars at the porch, emblematical of peace, unity, and plenty; three ways 'of preparing a brother; and three obligations in Ancient 1\Ias0nljr. There ,vere three plimitive Lodges; three ways to advance; three temples, the first built by SOLOMON and the two HmAMS; the second by JOSltUA, ZERUBBABEL, and HAGGAI; and the third by HEROD, H3::LLEL, and SHAMMAI; three sojourners; three working-tools of a Royal Arch l\:Iason; the temple ~ad three apartments; and the length was thrice its breadth. There were three curtains in the temple, each of three colors; and there were three courts. There are three lessons taught, secrecy, morality, and good fellowsbip.


192

GUIDE TO THE It. A. CHAPTER.

TilE BHE.A.. STPL.ATE,

W 01"11 by tIle Higl1-Priest, is ill inlitntioll of tllat ,vor11 by tIle Higll-Priest of Israel. Tile t,vel've stolles inserted tllerein allude to tIle t,velve ~[111e

breastplate ,vas called tIle "Oracle of UrilTI ancl Tlllllnl1lil11," 'Vllicll signifies ligllt ancl perfectiol1, or re'velatioll alld trlltll. By th.is oracle GOD \vas conSlllted by the Higll-Priest of Israel ll11011 all i111portant occasions. 011 the Sllo111ders of tIle e1)}10c1 ,vorll by tIle Higll-Priest ,vere t,vo ony'x stones: Wllicll served as bllttOl1S, by ,vhicll tIle breastplate ,vas fastened. 011 tllCSC stol1es ,vere engravell tIle nalllCS of tIle t,v-elve sons of JACOB, six on eacllthe nalnes of tIle elcler 011 tIle rigllt, tllose of tIle younger on tIle left. 1"'11ese stones sIlone tribes of Israel.


ROYAL ARCH.

193

wIth exceeding great brilliallCY wllenever tIle sacrifices of the childrell of Israel ,vore路 accepted of GOD; so that all the people were satisfied of his presence, assistance, and protection.. 'Whell the childreIl of Israel forsook tIle landmarks of their fathers, and "followed after strange gods, these sto11es ceased to shed forth their' brilliancy,

in consequence of GOD'S displeasure at their transgression of llis law. III like Inanner, if we, as Royal Arch Masolls, expect to secure the presence, assistallce, and protection of the Great I AM, ,ve must apply our hearts Ullto vvisdonl, a11d forsake 110t the landmarks wiliell our fathers set up. THE ROYAL ARCH BANNER,

Which ShOlll<i be displayed ill every regular Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, is composed

of the four standards used to distinguish the four princilJal tribes of the cllildren of Israel, \VI10 bore their banners throllgh the wilderness, viz: JUDAH, EPHRAL"\{, REUBEN, and DAN; 'and llnder eacll of these prillcipal stal1dards were assembled three tribes. There were, consequently, four divisions, ,vith tl1ree tribes in each, nUlnbel'ing 150,000, l11aki11g in all 600,000


194

GUIDE TO 'I'HE H. A. CHAPTER.

fig11ting 111en, or Inen of ,valr. rrhe~y rnarc118d in C1 11011o,v sqllare in traveling theollgll tIle ,vilclerness, iII oreler to gllard and protect 011 eyery side tIle sacred Arlr of the Covellarlt. TIle eSclltclleOll or sllield 011 tIle bal1ner is dividod into fOlIt" c01111Jartlnents by a greell cross, over 'Vllicll a l1arro,v oae of yello\v is l)lnced. Olleac}l cOl11partnlent formed by tIle lill1bs of tIle cross is clelineated tIle peculiar elnblelll of one of tl1ese tribes, to '\vit: ill the first Cluarter, agoldcll lion 011 a field of bIlle, representing tJUDA.I!; in the secolld, a black ox,


ROYAL ARCH.

195

a field of gold, represellting EPHRAIl\I; in the third, a InaIl all a field of gold, representing REUBEN; alld the fourth, a golclcll eagle all a field of blue, rel)resenting.D.. .\.N. Eaell of these is a comp011ent part of the l1ierogl~yphic of the Oherubim, vvhich路 represellts the chilc1rell of Israel; alld tIley teacl1 us tIl at, in tlle erectio11 of our second telnple of ~, Holiness to the I..JoRD," as ,veIl as ill tIle prosecutioll "of every great a11d ir111)Ortan't llndertaking, ,ve ShOllld" display, as did Ollr anciellt brethrell in the erectioll of tIle first temple, tIle stre11gtn alld bolclness of tIle lion, tIle patience of the ox, tIle swiftness of the eagle, allc1 the illtelligellce of an llprigllt and perfect 111an. As a crest, the bauller is sllrnl0l111ted by tIle .L:\..rk of the Covellant, guarded by t\VO Ollerllbill1, with tlleir 'VlllgS tOllclling in tIle center. 011

in

THE AUIe OF THE COVENANT

Was a sl11all chest or coffer, made by MOSES, AHOLIAB, and BEZi\.LEEL, allcl vvas tllree feet Ilille inches long, t,vo feet tIlree illcbes ,vide aIld dee}). It ,vas constrllcted of s11ittim woo~, covered ,vitIl fine gale1, arld over all 'vere the Cheru bim .,vitll eXl)allded ,vlngs. III tIle arJc


196

GUIDE TO THE Râ&#x20AC;˘ .A.. CHAPTER.

,vere placed tIle pot of Inanlla, A.ARON'S rod, and the tables of stolle, COlltaining the deca.. . logue, ,vritten by the fi11ger of GOD. It was at first placed ill the sanctuary of tile tabernacle, and afterward deposited b~y King SOLOMON in tIle Sanctu17"b Sanctoru111 of tIle tenlple, at the cOlllpletioll aIld dedicatioll of tllat edifice, as you have seen represented in the Most Excellent Master's degree. WIlell the temple was destroyed b:r tIle Ohaldeans, tllis ark was also destroyed, bilt Masollic traditioll illforms us tIl at, before tIle conlpletion of tIle temple, King SOLO~IoN--foreseeing tllat the childrell of Israel ,vould, ill. process of tilue,


197

ROYAL ARCH.

deviate froll1 tIle lavvs of GOD! arld prov'ol\:e 11is displeasure, ,an(l tllat in consequence tllereof, tlleir city ,vould be taken by their enemies and the temple be destroyed, and that so would foreyer perish the sacred treasures contained in the S:. S:. *

*

*

*

*

*

The ark "vas l)laced ~rl tIle }/I.A.SONIC STONE OF l?OUNDATION, Wlliqh Masonic tradition says, ,vas a perfect cube of ,vhite oriental IJorphyry, and. on which was inscribed, in preciolls stones, the characters COll1posing * * * * This MASONIC STONE OF Jj"OUNDATION our GrUlld Masters deposited ill tIle S:. V.路. underneath tIle s:. S:., as a pedestal, Up011 whicll to place the ilnitation of the Arl{ of tIle Covenant, and tllere it rOlnainec1 buried, llntil, at tIle rebuilding of the temple by ZERUBBABEL, it ,vas discovered . by tl1ree zealolls sojourners, and sllbseqtlently made the corner-stone of the second te"mple. It ,vas perfectly cubical in its form-all its sides being eqtlal-symbolizing divine truth, 'Vllich Inust alol1e clirect alldsustain us in our search after GOD fLl1d tIle true light. ThtlS, ,vithill the in1itatioll of the sacred A.rk 1')


198

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

of the Oovenallt, 'iVere del)osited and safely kept the saclj"ea treasures, for the space of 470 }TearS, 'v 11 iell SllOllld COllstalltly relnilld us tIlat Ollr O'Vll breasts sllould afford all equally safe repository for the Inysteries of tIle Order, that tIley 111ay be handed do\vn !)ure allcl ullimpaired to the latest IJosterit:y. r'J.'he Oherubim gtlarding tl~e Ark of the Covel1U11t are to relnind tIS tllat tIle sublinle principles of OllI' royal art have al\vays 11ac1 tIle ilnnlediate al)lJroval of heav"'en, allcl ellcourages lIS to redouble our assicluity ill tIle practice of all tllose virtues Wllicll 'vo are taugl1t ,vitllin the illner vail of tIle sanctllary. The motto of RO}Tal l\..rcll 1fasonr}r, enl bIaZOllecl 011 its ball11er, is t.Ile salll8 ,v}li911 you observe 011 tIle forefrollt of tIle Higll-Priest's 111iter: "Holi1~ess to th,e Lord." lTp to this titne YOllllave been addressed and 11a'le addressed eacll otller by tIle title of brother or brotllers. Y01I ,villll0'V be called COll1!)anions. Alld, COll1lJalliollS, I trust tllat it llas llot beell all idle or vaill Cllriosity, tllat nlerely grasps at novelty, vVllicll has indllced :YOll to be exalted to this nlost stlblilne degree of~fasonry, illfi-


ROYAL ARCH.

199

nitely luore 11111Jortallt thall all ,vllicll llave' preceded it. It is calculatecl to ilnpress "upon our lllinds a firlu belief in tIle existencealld attributes of a SUl)rel1le being1 and it teaclles us a due reverence for his great ~lld holy name. It also brirlgs to ligllt l11any valual)le treasures belollging to the Oraft, after tlley llacl ,lain buried ill darltness for tIle space of 470 years, alld \vithout a k:~:o\vledge,of Wllicll the NIasollic cllaracter is incoil11)lete. TIle great, 111ysteriolls, and sacred Ilnme of Deity: was COll1IDunicated to MOSES at tIle B..... B.". * * * * * TIlliS prolTIulgatecl to their law-gi,rer by the .A.1111ighty, as his special appellatioll, tllis l1all1e of GOD becalne i11vested alnong tIle cllildren of Israel witll tIle l)rofoundest velleration allcl awe; so muell so, that tIley never 1)reSllll1ed to pro110unce it, excel)t in a I>articlllar Inallner, alld then Ol11y with sole11111cereulo11ies and ,vitIl the greatest reverellce. Hence, in a long course of time, its true pronunciatioll "beeaUle lost, except by tIle Higll-Priest, ,vho Ollee a year, on the day of atonelnellt, pronOllllced tIle ,vord tl1ree times ill the sUlnctuar.y of tIle tabernacle.

'*


200

GUIDE TO THE R. A.. CHAPTER.

*

*

*

*

*

After a series of important evellts, of which you will find a particular account in the llistory of tIle Kings of Judah alld Israel, for the space of 416 years froln tIle consecration of tIle first telnple to its destructioll by N EBUCHADNEZZAR, we filld that in the eleventh year of the reign of ZEDEKIAH, Killg of Judah, NEBUZ.,:\.RAD.-\.N, Oaptain of the Guard of tIle King of Babylon, went IIp, besieged and took the city of J ertlsalem, seized all the 1101y vessels, tIle t,vo famolls brazerl pillars, alld all tIle treaSllres of the king's house, llis palaces, alld his princes. He tIlell set both tIle temple alld city on fire, overtllro\ving its ,valls, to,vers, an.d fortresses, and totally leveling alld razing it, llntil it becalue one tllorollgl1 desolation; and the renl11al1t of the people tllat escaped tIle s\vord carried he away captive to the King of Babyl~n, ,vllere tlley remained servants to him and his Sllccessors until tIle reigll of OYRUS, King of Persia, ,vho, ill the first year of llis reign, isslled 11is falnous proclamation, liberating the Hebrew captives, ,vith per'lnission to return to their llative COllntry, a11d rebuild the city alld the house of the LORD.


ROYAL ARCH..

Accordillg1J~

201

the principal people of the tribes of JUD . ~ . H alld BENJ.A.~IIN, togetller ,vith tile priests ancl Levites, ilnmediately departed for Jerusalem. They traveled over rougll and rugged roads-over river and mountaill-until, at lengtll, after a toilsome alld dreary match of more than four Inonths, tIley arri'ved at that city, \v}lere they erected a taberllacle near the rtlins of tIle old.otelnple. This tabernacle, like that built by MosEs, ,vas an oblong, situated due East alld West, inclosed, and divided into apartment~ by four cross vails, the colors of vvhich ,vere blue, l)urple, scarlet, and white; and alluded to the four IJrincipal tribes of the childrell of Israel, 'Vhf) bore their bal1ners tllrougll tIle ,vilderness. Guards \vere stationed at tIlose vails, to see tllat 110ne passed but such as were duly qualified-Ilone beillg admitted", into the IJresence of the Gralld Council but tIle true descerldants of the twelve tribes of Israel, who made themselves knowll by tIle same signs given by the LORD to MOSES ,vhen 11e commanded him to conduct the children of Israel out of the land -of Egypt, and from the hOllse of bondage. 9*


202

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

III tIle taberllacle tJley set IIp tile altar, and burllecl illcense thereon day alld lligllt. Ill' tIle sanctuary the Gralld COU11Cil, cOl1sistiIlg of JOSHUA, the High-Priest, ZERUBBABEL, tIle killg, and HAGGAI, the scribe, l1eld their sessiollS alld formed tlleir l)lans. All1011g those ,vIla retllrned \vere tllree of our allcient bretllrel1, 'VI10 ,\vere left behind in Babyloll by the ulain body under ZERUBBABEL, alld \VI10 after\vard \Vellt to J erusa1ell1, to help, aid, alld assist ill the great alld gloriolls ,~Yorl( of rebuilding tIle house of tlle LORD, "\vitllout tIle hope of fee or re\vard. Tllose three sojOtll'llerS discovered alld brougllt to ligllt, as yOll l1ave seell represeritec1, * alld, as a re\vard for their valuable labors, they \vere exalted to be Gral1tl Masters of tIle Vails. r~rl1ose three '\vortllies you have l1ad tIle llollor to represellt. Alld 110W, conlpaniolls, yOll l1a"V"e received all tIle illstrllction tllat pertail1S to our 110rJle Oraft.. You }la,re ascellded by reglllar gradations. to tIle Sll11l111it of OllI' sllblinle ancl royal art. *.

*

*

*

*

Y011 11ave beell eondllctecl arollncl tIle

oliter


ROYAL ARCH.

203

tIle teI11ple,vie\ved its b2autifll1 proportions, its massive pillars, its starry-decked canopy, its Mosaic 11a,reluellt, its ligl1ts, je\vels, allcl fllrlliture. YOll lla:v'e been introduced il1tO tIle l11iddle C}lalnber, ancl learlled, by the exaluple of 0111" allciellt bretllrell, to re\Terence tIle Sabbatll day, alld to keep it lloly. Y Oll ]la'le elltered the unfillislled S:. S:., alld there, ill the integrity alld illflexible ficlelitJ" of tIle illllStl~iotlS Tj7 riall, \Vitllessecl an example of ÂŁ'1'11111e88 allcl fortitllde lle"V'er SllI1)assed iIi tIle 1Iistory of lllall. YOlI have \Vrougllt in tIle qllurries, alld exhibited suitable sl)ecilneIls of your sk.ill, alld 11a've beell taugl1t ho'v to receive, in a proper C01lrts of

Inall11er, ~yollr ~rasonic \vages. You llave regularly l)as'sed tIle chair,alld

learned its in1portant duties-a lrno,vledge of Wllich can alolle qualify you to preside over the S011S of light. YOlI hav'e beell present, a11d assisted at the cOlupletioll a11ddedication of our 1l1ystic telnpIe; and, for )ToUr zeal a11dfidelity to the Or aft, have received tIle congratulatory title of Most Excellent lfaster.


204

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Y 011 l1ave 110\V \vitnessed the Inollrl1ful desolatioll of Zion, tIle sack and destructioll of tIle city alld telnple of our GOD, alld the utter loss, as the \vorld supposed, of all tllose articles COlltailled ill tIle Holy of Holies. You 11ave seen the choseIl people of GOD forcecl by a foreigll clespot froln the pleasant groves arid peaceful vineyards of tlleir l1ative Israel, and dragged into captivity on tlle.~ ba'nks of the far-off Ellphrates. But you llave seen those aftlicted sons of Zion visited, in tIle darl{est nigllt of their adversity, by a peaceful ligll.t franl 11eaven, \vhich guided thelll over rOll gIl alld rllgged roads to tIle scene of their f01"l11e1" glory". You 11ave seen them enabled, by the signet of eternal trutl1, to pass tIle vails that interposed between them alld their fondest llopes.. You have seell tllenl successfully ellgaged in the great a11d glorious work of l ...ebuilding the house of the LORD. Al1d, finally, you have seeIl the sacred treasures of the first temple brollgllt to light, and the blessed book restored to the longing eyes of the devout Israelites, to be 路the rllle alld


ROYAL ARCH.

205

guide-the comfort alld support-of the people of GOD tllroLlghout all fllture time. And, my cOll1pa11iollS, if, in all these things, you have seen only' a series of lll1meaning rites -if tIle ~pirit of truth has 110t applied to your hearts the morals of tllese ceremonies-the11, indeed, have we labored ill 'vaill, and you 11ave sl)ent your strengtll for 110Ught. l3ut I aUl persuaded to believe better things of YOll. I trust that you have.entered illto tIle spirit of these solerun ceremollies, alld tlll.derstand the full import of tllese illteresting SYll1bols; that all the forIns alld cereIllollies tllrough \;vhicll youha\rc passed, frOIn ,the InonleIlt YOlI first trod tIle outer COllrts of t]le telnple until your final reception within the vails, llave ilnpressecl deeply 011 your minds the great and fllndalne11tal principles -of Ollr tinlehOllored institution: for then, alld o]~ly the-n, call you justly claim the noble llame of Mason; the-n, and only then~, can you feel that friendshipr that "lIllian, that zeal, and that pllrity of heart, which ShOllld actuate every 011e vvho would appropriate to hinlself the proud title of a workman that needeth 110t to be ashamed.


206

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

CHAUGB TO THE CANDIDATES.

WORTIIY COMPANIONS: B~y路 the consent alld assistallce of tIle 111elubers of tllis Ohapter., you are 110\V exalted to tIle sul)lill1e alld 110norable degree of Royal Arcll Masoll. Tile rites alld m~ysteries develol)ed ill tllis degree l1ave been llanded dO\Vll, throllgll a ellosen fe\v, ullcllanged by tinle, alld 1111COlltrolled by prejudice; and \ve eXl)ectal1cl trllst they will be regarded by you "\vitIl tile same 'veneratioll, allcl transnlittecl with tIle sall1e scrUplllous purit.y to YOllr successors. No 011e call reflect 011 tIle cerell1011ies of gaining ac1111issioll illtO tllis place witll0U~ being forcibly strllck: ,vitIl tIle illJ.l)ortallt. lessons \Vllich tlley teaell. Here \ve are llecessaril~y led to cOlltell1plate, "\vitll gratitude al1d adn1iration, tlle sacred SOllrce frOln wllence all eartllly cOlnforts flo,\v. Here ,ve find additional iIldllceIllellts to contilllle steadfast and imll10vable ill tlle discllarge of Ollr respective duties; and 11ere ,ve are bOlll1Cl by the ill0st solelnll ties to prOlnote eacll otller's \velfare alld correct each otl1er's failings, by advice, adrnollition, alld rel)roof. As it is OllI' earnest desire, a11d a dllty we


ROYAL ARCH.

207

o,ve to our COlTIpaniollS o~路 this Order, that the admissioll of every calldidate illto this Ohapter s110uId beattendecl by the a!)probatioll of tIle most scrutinizing ey:e, we hope al,vays to possess the satistaction of finding 11011e al110ng lIS but such as ,viII promote, to tIle utmost of tl1eir l)o,ver, the great end of our i11Stitlltioll. By pa~yil1g due attelltion to tllis deternlination., we expect you ,viII never recoIIl111elld any call'" didate to this Chapter, \V110Se abilities alld k~llowledge of the preceding degrees yOll can110t freely vouell for, ancl 'Vh0111 :you do 110t firll11y alld conficlently l)elieve will fully cOllforll1 to tIle princil)les of Ollr Order, alld fulfill the obligations of a Royal Arcll Masoll. While . Ruch are Ollr nlelubers, we Inay expect to be llnited in 011e object, witllout ~uke,varmlless, inattelltiol1, or l1eglect; but zeal, fidelity, al1d affection, ,viII be the distillguishing characteristics of Ollr society; allcl that satisfaction, harmolly, alld peace, 'nlaybe enjoyed at Ollf meetings Wl1ich no other society can afford.


208

GUIrE TO '.rHE n. A. CHAPTER.

CLOSING.

*

*

*

.. ~

.,"

*

*

THE Chapter is closed with solemn ceremonies by the Most Excellent High-Priest, who rehearses the following

PRAYER:

By the 'LOi8do'n~ of the Supreme Higll-Priest, may ,ve be directed; by his stre12gth ulay ,ve be enabled, al1d by tIle· beauty of 'virtlle 11lay ,ve be incited to perform the obligations llere elljoilled on US; to keep illviolably tIle Illysteries 11ere Ullfolded to us; and illvari'ably to practice all those duties out of the Chapter 'Vllich are inculcated in it.-A:MEN.

Response.-So mote it be. *

*

m m

*

*

rT1•

,J •

*


ORDER OF HIGH-PRIESTHOOD.

, THE Order of High-Priesthood aJ)pert.ains to the office of High-Priest of a Royal Arch Chapter-; and no one can be legally entitled to receive it, until he has been du1y elected to preside as High-Priest in a regular Chapter of Royal Arch l\Iasol1s. The Order should not be conferred when a less number than three dulyqualified High-Priests are present. '路.'Vhenever the ceremony is perforzned in due and ample form, the assistance of at least nine High-Priests, who llave receiyed it, is l"equisite. _. Though the High-Priest of evel"Y regular Royal Arch Chapter, having himself been duly qualifie3., can confer


210

GUIDE '.rO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

the Order lInc1er the preceding liluitation as to number, yet it is desirable "\vhen circumstanees ,viII perluit (in States where no Grand Convent.ion has been organized), that it should be conferred by the q-rand Hi~h-Priest of the Grand Royal Arch Ohapter, or '~uch Present or Past High-Priest as he luay designate for that purpose. In such States, ho~;vever, it \vill generally be faunel that路 a convention, notified to meet at the time of any convocation of the Grand Chapter, will afford the best opportunity of conferring this important and exalted degree of l\:Iasonry with appropriate solemnity. A candidate clesirous of receiving the Order of HighPriesthood makes a written request to his l)redecessor ill office, or, \vhen it can he done, to .the Grand HighPriest, respectfully reque.sting" that a convention of Higll-Priests may be c~lled, for the purpose of C011ferring on him the Orcler.. "Then tIle convention meets, and is duly organizec1, a certificate of the due election of the candidate to the o~ce of High-Priest Illust be proclucec1. This certificate is signeclby his preclecessor ill office, attestec1 by the' Secretary and seal of the Chapter. On examination of this certificate, the qualifications of the canc1idate are ascertained. The solelun cereulonies of conferring the Order upon him then ensue. '\7ben ended, the presiding officer c1irects the Secretarjr of the conven tiOl1 to lnake a record of the proceedings, and return it to the Secretary of the Granel Chapter, to be by him laid before the Grand High-Priest, for the information of all whom it may concern. The cOIlvention of High-Priests is then closed in duo form.


HIGH-PRIEST.

211

These regulations should never be dispensed with in' the case of occasional or temporary ol~ganizations. In most of the States permanent Grand Conventions have been formed ,vith regular officers anel stated meetings. In this way only can the Order obtain the rank and dignity to which its in~rinsic merit 'entitles it, and it is to be hoped that measures will be speedily taken to place the Order in all the States on路 a solid and !)ermanent basis. If 'othe Order is cOnferl"ed by three High-Priests, under a temporary organization, the meeting is said to be a "Convention.': If a State body is established, its proper title is "The Grand Convention." It is the duty of every companion, as soon aitel" his election to the office of High-Priest as is consistent with his personal convenience, to apply for admission to the Order of High-Priesthood, that he maybe fully quali:fied properly to govern his Chapter. The -robes, collars, ancl j e,vels- are the same as those of th e Ro:ynJ Al"ch degree.

The jewel of a Past High-Priest consis'ts of a plate of _gold, in the fOl:ln of a triple triangle, a breastplate being placed over the points of union.. In front, the face of


212

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

each txiangle is inscribed with the tetragrammaton, on the other side, the upper triangle has the following mystical notation: fir::;, ti~~~= the two lower triangles have the Hebrew letters ~ and inserted upon them. Each side of each triangle should be one inch in ~ength, and may be ornamented at the fancy of the wearer. The breastplate may be plainly engraved or set ,vith stones. Candidates receiving this Order are said to be "anointed into the Holy Order of the High-Priesthood." A convention of High-Priests is "dedicated to MEL-

n,n';

p

CHIZEDEK:"

OFFICERS. THE Officers of a Grand Convention of anointed HighPriests should be as follows:

1. M . E.

2. 3. 4. 5.. 6. 7. 8. 9.

PRESIDENT;

E. VICE-PRESIDENT; E. CHAPLAIN; E. TREASURER; E. RECORDER; E. MASTER OF CEREMONIES; E . CONDUCTOR; E. HERALD; E. STEWA.RD;

To which it will be found convenient, in practice) to acld a

SENTINEL.


213

HIGH-PRIEST.

s.

7.

5.

~

~~) V

9.

~

110

/,

,

,;i:'

-/;:'

:a

'".'

8.

0.

4.

N.

OPENING. ~

• *

*

*

*

*

*

?t

ri ~ •• s.

*

*

*

*

*

*

7

~ ~

I1ii

~.:J

<1!]

9

lilli/I,

~

~

8

6

----_.. N"

*

;t:

*

*

.:,::


214

GUIDE TO THE U. A. CHAPTER.

DEVOTIONS.

OH, tholl SUprenle -Higll-Priest of heavell and eartll, enlightell lIS, ,ve beseecll tllee, witll the l(llO,vlec1ge of tlly trlltll, and grallt tllUt the 111~nlbers of tllis cOIlvelltioI1, Ulld all otllers ,vho are teachers in Israel, l11UY be eIlc1o\vecl ,vith vvisdom to ullderstand and to explain the nlYsteries of 0111" Order. Be ,vitIl us ill all our assel11blies, guide us ill tIle paths of rectitude, alld enable us to 1\:ee1) all thy statq.tesaIlcl COll1111andn?ents, \vhile life sIlalllast, Ulld finally bring lIS to the trlle kno\vledge of tllY 1101y and l11igllty nal11e.-..l\.1wfEN.

Respon.se..- So

1110te

it be.

Or the following may be appropriately rehearsed:

LESSON.

sl)irit of tIle LORD JEIIQV.c\.II is upon rne; beCftl.lSe tIle LORn hatll Ullointcd Inc to l)reacll good tidings Ullto tIle meel(j lle hatll sellt nle to billel 111) the brokerl-llcarted, to IJroc1ainl li1)erty to tIle captives, allcl tIle opel1ing of tIle THE

prison to tlle111 tllat are bOllncl; rro l)l'oclairn tIle aCceI)table ~year of tIle LORD,


·215

HIGH-PRIEST.

ancl the day of vengeullce of our GOD; to com.. . fort all tllat nlourl1 ; To aplJoint Ullto tIlelll tllat 1110111"11 ill ZiOIl, to give llnto tIlell1 beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for 111ourning, tIle garlnent of praise for the spirit of lleaviness; that they" 111ight be callecl Trees of Rigllteousness. The lJlallting of the LORD, that 11e l11ight be glorified.-IsAIAII, lxi., 1-3. *

*

*

*

*

*

11 tI "

I-=tE OEPTION. candidate n1ust present a certificate of his elec~ion to the office of High-Priest of a Ohapter of Royal Arch l\Iasons, which ShOl11d be in the following form: THE

TO ALL WHOM IT !\'IAY CONCERN.

This is to certify that Companion .......~. . ........ was, on the day of ,A. D. 18 .. , A. I. 23 .. , * duly and constitutionally elected to the office of High-Priest of ..... Chapter, No.... , ~voI'king tlnder charter from the M. E. Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the State of ..•..•• ,Given uncler IDy hand, and the· seal of the Chapter" this . . .. day of , A. D. 18 .. , A.. L. 23 .

[SEAL.]

*

--- ---,

Secr·etary.

The RO~'~Ll Arch Date (A. I., Year of Disco"er)",) is found by adding 530 to the l'car of our Lord.


216

GUIDE TO THE It. A. CHAPTER.

This certificate must be regularly authenticated 'by the signature of the Secretal"y, and the seal of the Chapter.. But should the candidate, for sufficient reason assigned, be unable to produce such a certificate, then a certificate from the Grand Secretary of the Grand Royal A.rch Chapter under which the candidate has served as High-Priest, certifying to the facts from the record, will be considered lawful information, and may be used accordingly. If the candidate is found worthy, the ceremonies follo\v in ample form. FIRST CLAUSE.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The following passage of Scripture is read by the Ex.cellent Chaplain during the ceremony:

Alld it came to pass in the days of AMRAPHEL, King of Sllinar; ARloeII, King of Ellasar; OHEDORLAOMER, King of EL.-\.~I, and TIDAL, King of Natio11S; tIlat these Inade ,val'" ,vitIl BERA, King of Sodoro; and \vitIl BIRSIl.A, King of GOlnorraIl, S:EIINAB, I{ing of . A.dnlall; al1d SHE}{EBER, King of Zeboiiln, aIld tIle Killg of' B~la, 'Vllicll

is

ZOAR.


217

~IGH-PRIEST.

*

*

1

*

*

All these were joined together in the. vale of Siddim, which is the Salt S~a. Twelve years they served; CHEDOR~AO~IER, and in the thirteenth year they rebelled. And ill the fourteellth year came CHEDOR~ LAOMER, and the kings that were vVlth hiln, and Slnote the Rephaims in Ashteroth, and tIle ZUZilllS ill ~am, and the Eluinls ill Shaveh Kiriatllailn, and the Horites in their !tIOllllt Seir, unto El-paran, which is by tIle vvilderness. *

*

2

*

*

And tlley returned, and came to Ellmishpat, . which,i$ Kadesll, and Slnote all the country of the All1alekites, a11d also the Amorites, that dwelt in Hazezon-tanlur. And tl1ere wellt out tIle King of Sodam, a~d the King of Gomorrab, and the King of Admall, and t~e King ofZeboiim, and the I{ing of Bela, and they joined battle with them in the vale of Siddi?1; with C,HEDORL.A.OMER, tile King of Elan1; and,vith~rIDAL, Kin'g of Nations; and AMR.A.Pl:IEL, King of Shillar; and ARIOCH, King of Ellasar; fOllr k:ings ,vitIl five. 10 .


GUIDE TO THE R. A. C~APTER.

218

*

*

3

*

*

Alld the vale of Siddilh was fllil of sliule pits; and the Kings of Sodom and Gomorrah fled and fell tl1ere; and they tllat relnail1ed fled to the Inoulltain. Alld they tool\: all tIle goods of SOdOl11 and GOlnorrah, and all tlleir victuals, alld ,vent their \vay. And they took LOT, ABR1\11'S brotller's son, \VI10 d'\velt In So cl 0 111 , alld llis goods, and departed.

*

*

4

*

*

And tllere caIne one that had escapecl: al1d

told .A..BRA.:M the Hebre'v; for lIe d,velt in the plaitl of llfa111/re the Anlorite, brotl1cl" of ESlfCOL, arld brotller of ANER; al1d these ,vere confederate with ABR.A.1\f. .i\.nd wlleIl ..ÂŁ1BR..;.\.:M IleaI'd tllat his brother was talcen captive, 11e arIned 11is trained servants, born in 11is O'Vll 110l1SC, tllree lluridred alld eigl1teen, H.lld pllrslled tllern llnto Dan. And 11e div"ided hinlself against thel11 , he and llis servants, by nigllt: alld snl0te them, and pursued tl1en1 llllto Roball, '\Vllicll is on the left 11and of Dalnascus.


219

HIGH-PRIEST.

*

*

5

*

*

.Al1d he brought back all the goods, and also brought again his brotller LOT, alld his goods, Ulld the women also, alld tIle peOl)le. Alld the King of Sodom ,vent out to meet him (after his return froln the ~laughter of Chedorlaomer, an~ of tl1e ItillgS tllat \yere \vith him), at the valley of Sha-y:eh, which is tIle lting's dale. .i\..lld .Jfelchizedek, King of SalelTI, brought forth bread al1d ,ville; and he was the Priest of the

jj{osi Hig71 Goel. *

*

6

*

*

And he blessed hiln, 311d said, Blessed be ABRAM of the Most High GOD, possessor of 11eaveIl and earth; and blessed be the 110st High GOD, ,vl1ich hath delivered thine enemies illto thy hand. Alld he gave 11im tithes of all. And the Killg of Sodam said unto ABRA1ÂŁ, Give me the persons, and take the goods to tllyself.

*

*

7

*

* Alld ABRA1\I said to the King of Sodam, I have lifted up mille hand unto the LORD, the }.fost High GOD, the possessor of lleavell and earth, that I will ll0t take from a thread even to


220 .

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

a shoe latchet, and tllat I,villllot take anything that is tllille, lesttlloushouldest say, I have made ABRA1! rich; save only that ,vhicll the YOllngmenhave eaten, alld the portiollof the mell" ,vhich went ,vi tIl lue, ANER,EsHCOL, alld "MAYRE; let theln take tllei: portioll-GEN. xiv.

*

*

*

*

8

This entire passage of Scripture should be read, accompanied by solemn ceremonies. The events which it describes should be carefully noted, as 11lany things in the ritual are made to depend upon its recital, and if abbreviated, the candidate ,viII fail to com!Jrehend the full symbolism intended to be displayed in the ceremonies.

*

*

*

*

*

In

••• 1

2

*

3

*

*

* 5

4

*

* 7

6

*

* B

9

*

*

*

*


221

mGR-PRIEST.

From cc'Thread to a Shoe Latchet.路 Sandals were worn by all classes of society in Palestine" even by the very l)oor, and both the sandal and the thong, or shoe latchet, were so cheap and common that they passed into a proverb for the most insignificant thing, in which sense it is used in Gen. xiv., 2, 3. The thread was路 a fillet used .by women. to tie up the~r. hair,and was also used proverbially to designate the cheapest or a valueless . thing. The force of this expression will be readily understood as employed in the ritual.

*

*

*

*

*

i:>ECOND CL.A.USE.

s. '*

*

~

*

~) ~~

*

1.路 ~1

. ~=

~

(=

(.= ,..{

("::: ex)

di

* * * *

~~

0-_

1:-_

(-

*

<:0

(=

(*-

(=

<=

*

*

*

*

*

J

*

Blessed be ABRAl\[ of the ~i(ost Rigll GOD, possessor of heavell U:lld eal~th. And blessed


222

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

be tIle Most Rig11 GOD, \vhicll llatll delivered tIline ellelnies into tilY hallds.

*

*

*

Such ,vas the blessing which the Ring of Salem, Priest of the l\:Iost High GOD, invoked on Abram the father of the faithful; and such will be the blessing 'Vouchsafed to every faithful High-Priest of a Chapter, who strives to ,va.lk in the fear of the Almighty, and who sets before his companions, in his own life, an example of uprightness and integrity. Such an one will, indeed. be blessed of the l\:Iost High GOD.

* ....

~

:.\:

:i:

s.

.,

to

') [> .~

*

*

*

~

Cf':)'

t--=

~ 1'4

~

0

~

Q o~

~

.......

*

*

cd

*

* '*

The Gomrnunion.,

of Breth'ren.

Bellold, 110W good anel 110\V pleasant it is for bretllrell to dwell together ill Ullity! It is like tIle preCi01..1S oilltment l11)on tIle l1ead, tllat raIl dO'Vll llPOll tIle beard, evell A,AllON'S beard; tllat ,vellt dO'Vll to tIle skirts of llis garlnent; as tIle dew of He rIll 011 , a11d as the clew tllat


223

HIGH-PRIEST.

descended lIpan the mountains of Zion; for tllere the LORD cOlumallded a blessing, even life for evermore.-PsALM cxxxiii.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Behold, bless ye the :LORD, all ye servants of the LORD, which by night stand in the house of the LORD. Lift up }TOUr hands in the Sallctuary, .~~ aUfl bless the LORD.. The LORD that l11ade lleaven and earth bless t]lee out of Zion.PSALlvI cxxxiv.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Among most of the ancient heathen nations it was a custom strictly observed, that those who sacrificed to the gods should eat of the sacrifice. It is an interesting question from whence this custom W1iS derived. },!any scholars are of the opinion that this universal custom of sacrificing to the gods was derived originally from the establishment ofa saclificial system by the divine command some period anterior to the foundation of the Leyitical System. It will be observed that the Mosaic account speaks of sa,orifices as sOlnething already existing, and apparently seeks to govern rather than invent them. Under the Jewish law, it was comm.anded that those who sacrificed sh(luld eat befol'e the LORD. It betokened the enjoyment of communion with GOD. So in thus partaking together of the Paschal Supper, those who ate together were at once to commune "rith GOD, and evince a mutual love and confidence toward each other. Hence a refusal to eat with one implied an entire and absolute separation. The Hebrews would not eat with the Egyptians'*' nor with the Samaritans. t. To eat a meal together is now regarded in the East as a pledge'of mutual confidence and friend-

at

* Genesis

J

xliii., 32.

t John, iv.â&#x20AC;˘ 9.


224路

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

ship. The communion of brethren is therefore a public attestation to the sincerity of purpose with which those who unite in it have thus far proceeded in the solemn services路 of .the Order, and a solemn pledge of that mutual love, assistance, and protection v:;hich is enjoined upon all who take upon themselves its covenant.

*

*

*

*

*

The anointlnent of a High-Priest is preceded by the following PRAYER:

Holy arld glorious LORD GOD, the great High-Priest of heaven and earth! we approach thee with reverence, and implore thy blessing on tllY servant, our companion, 110W prostrate before thee; fill his heart witl1 th~y fear, that 11is tongue and actiol1S l11ay prOnOlll1Ce thy .glory. Make hi 111 steadfast ill tIlY service; grant hinl firrnness of mind; anin1ate his heart, alld strengtllen 11is ellc1ea,rors; 111ay he teach thy judgments, .a11d thy laws; and may the incense lle sIlall put before tllee,Upol1 thiIle altar, prove an acceptable sacrifice llnto thee. Mal\:e him a trlle and faithful teacller of tIle comJ)allions over WhOJ11 he has beell chosell to preside, and enable l1inl to perforln the duties of his exalted office ,vith -fidelity. and. zeal. Bless him, 0 LORD, and l)less tIle work of his MOST


225

HIGH-PRIEST.

hands. Accept us in mercy. Hear thou from h'eaven, 'tI1Y dwellillg place, and forgive our transgressions.

Response-So mote it be.-A.MEN.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The President ,viII recite the following BENEDIOTION:

bless thee and keep thee; tIle LORn make his face to shine UpOll tllee, alld be gracious unto thee;' tlle LORD lift up his CQuntenarlce llPOll thee, and give thee peace. THE LORD

Response-So mote it be.-AMEN. *

*

*

*

*

*

Anointing the body or head with oil was a common practice with the Jews and other Oxiental nations. It was a rite of inaugul路ation into ea.ch of the thre,e typical offices of the Jewish commoll\vealth. Prophets were occasionally anointed to their office. Priests, at the first institution of the Levitical Priesthood, were all anointed to their offices, the sons of AUON as well as AA.RON himself; but after,vard anointing seems not to have been repeated at the consecration of ordinary priests, but to have been especially res8!'ved for the High-Priest. Anointing in like manner ,,"as the principal and divinely-appointed ceremony in the inauguration of the Jewish kings; indeed, so preeminently did it belong to the kingly office, that the "LORD'S anointed" was a common designation of the theocratic king. D,!:VID was thrice anointed to be king; privately by S.A.MUEL, again over Judah at Hebron, and lastly over the whole nation. It was customary at festivals and on other great occasions to anoint the head with fragrant oils, ancl hence it cnxpe to 'b.~ a

10*


226

GUIDE

TO

THER. A. CHAPTER.

mark of re'spectand a sign of joy. It was in all路 cases of .official anointing viewed as a symbol of sanctification and of dedication to the service of GOD, or to the holy and sacred use. .So reference is made to it here, as a symbolical consecrating or, setting apart of the ,neophyte to the honorable and responsible position of High Priesthood in Royal Arch Masom路y.

*

*

*

*

*

*

The following charge is delivered to the candidate by the President:

*

*

*

*

*

*

* * * Remember that tIle responsibilities of this Holy Ordel~, rest not alone upon the officers,bllt -equally UpOll the individual ll1embers of tIle Order; a derelictiol1 from duty being equally destl~uctive in the 011'e case as the otl1er. As yOLl value, then, ,your hOllor as a man alld Mason; as you prize tIle pllrity aIld permanency of tIle Order; as .you fear to displease GOD ALMIGHTY, whose l1alne you have so solemnly illvolred, keep inviolate every pledge you have made~ and perfor111 with "fidelity every 9.uty- to whicll yOll llave become bound.


227

HIGH-PRIEST.

B,e as swift as the, eagle to do every good "vork to a compallion anointed Higll-Priest;, ,be as patient as the ox ,vith the foibles alld errors of your companions; let the Lion of the tribe of Judah be the synlbol of YOltr strengtll and boldness 'ill tIle cause of trtlth and justice; but, above all, c011tinuall.y strive to set before ~your cOll1panions of the Royal Craft the, bright example of an uprigllt and perfect man. Let Holi7zess to the Lor路a be engraven upon all your thouglltS, words, and actions; and may GOD, who a,velleth .bet,veerl the cherubiln, finally, after this' painful life is ended, admit yOll into the Sanctuary, eternal ill the Heaven. *

*

.*

*

*

*

OLOSING.

*

* l\ ".

*

.

*

i

DEVOTIONS .

0

our GOD, andgatller us from amol1gst the nations:路 to, give thanks unto thy holy na,nle, to triuIllph in thy praise. Blessed .SAVE US,

LORD


228

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

be tIle LORD GOD of Israel franl eterllity to eternity; and let all the J)cople say, Anlell. Praise ye the ~ORD.-PSALM cvi., 47, 48. Or the following passages of Scripture may be read instead:

For this MELCHIZEDEK, King of Salem, Priest of the Most Rigll GOD, who l11et ABRAH.A.lr returning frOlll the slatlghter of tile kings, alld .blessed 11im; to ,vllom also ABRAH.A.M gave a tentll part of all, first being by il1terpretation King of rigllteous11ess, and after that also King . of Salem, 'Vllicll is King of peace; ,vithout fatller, vvithout nlot.ller, 'vvitholit desce11t, having 11either begi11ning of days, nor e11d of life; bllt nlade like unto tIle Son of GOD; abideth a priest continllally. Now consider ll0W great this luau was, Ullto whonl evell the patriarcll ABRAH..4.1t! gave tIle tenth of the spoils. And verily, tlley tllat are of the SOllS of LEVI, \Vll0 receive the office of the priesthood, llave a cODlma11dment to take tithes of the people according to the law, that is, of their brethren, though they come

out of the loins of ABRAHAM. For he testifieth, Thou art a priest forever after the order of


229

HIGH-PRIEST.

And ina.smuch as 110t "\vithout an oatIl he was made priest: For those priests (ullder the Levitical law) were made witllout all oath; but tllis ,vith an oath, by 11iln that said unto hinl, tIle LORD sware, and \viII not repent, T110u art a priest forever, after tIle . order of MELCHIZEDEK.-HEBREWS, vii. 1IELCHIZEDEK.

*

*

*

* ri

•• *

*

*

*


CEREMONIES ~OF THE ORDER. •• • CONSECRATION, DEDICATION, AND INSTAJJIJATION OF THE OFFICERS OF A NEW CHA.PTER.

1. The new Chapter will meet in its the Royal A.rch degree.

ha~" and

open on

2. The Grand Chapter will meet in' an adjoining~ room, and organize. 3. A. committee from the' new Cha,pter will inform the Grand Officers that their Chapter ~s prepared to receive them. 4. ,The Grand Officers will move in procession, conducted byihe committee, to the hall of the Chapter, in the following order: Grand Sentinel; Representatives of Subordinate Chapters, accor~g to seniority, by threes, triangular; ~Iasters of the Three Vails; Orator, Chaplain, and other Clergy; Grand Secret~ry, Grand Treasurer, and Grand Royal Arch Captain; Grand P. Sojourner, Grand Captain of the Host, and Deputy Grand High-Priest; One Companion carrying the Pot of Incense; Four Companions carry,ing .the Ark; Three Companions carrying Lights, triangularly; Grand Scribe,Gran<1 King, and GraIHl High-Priest.


232

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

5. When the Grand High-Priest enters, the grand. honors are given, and the officers of the ne\v Chapter resign their seats to the Grand Officers, and take their stations on the left. 6. An Ode may be sung. 7. All kneeling, the Grand Chaplain ,vill deliver the following PRAYER:

and Suprenle Higll-Priestofheaven and earth, ~,yho is there in heaven but thee, and "\vho upon earth call stalld ill competition vvith tllee? Thy On~frti8CieTlt Inilld brings all things in re'vie1v-I)ast, presel1t, alld to COIne; tllille On~rtipote1~t arUl directs the movell1ents of the ,rast creation; tllille On~,}2ip'resent eye perv.ades tIle secret recesses of every lleart; thy boun.dless belleficence supplies us ,vith e"very cOlnfort allel elljoYlnent; alld thine llllspeakable perfectiollS ancl glory sllrpass the ullderstallding of tIle childrell of nlell! Ollr Father, ,vho art ill 11eavell, '\ve illvoke tlly bel1edictioll upon the purposes of our presellt asseInbly. Let tl1is Chapter be establislled to thille honor; let its officers be endo'\ved "vith '\visdolll to discern, al1d fidelity to pursue, its true illterests; let its ll1Glnbers be e,?"er-mindflll of the drlty the~y owe ALMIGHTY


CEREMONIES.

233

to their GOD; the obedie11ce they o,ve to tlleir superiors; the love they owe totlleir equals, n,nd the good-'\vill they owe to all 'mankil1d. J-Jetthis Ohapter b~ consecrated to tllyglory, al1d its Inelnbers ever exemplify their love to GOD by their beneficence to man Glory be to GOD 011 high. Re8po')~se-So mote 'it be.-A1tI:EN. 8. Address by the Grand High-Priest. 9. The Grand:Captain of the Host will then form the officers of the new Chapter in front of the Grand High-Priest. 10. The' Deputy Grand High-Priest then rises, and informs the Grand High-Priest that

A number of COlnpal1iollS, duly illstrllcted In tIle sublinle mysteries, beillg clesirolls of pronlotillg the llonor, alld propagatil1g tIle prillciples of tIle Art, 11ave applied to the Grand Ollapter for a \varrant to COllstitute a new 路Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, whicll, having been obtained, they are no"vV'" assembled for the _ purpose of being constituted? and havi11g tlleir officers installed ill due andallciel1tl forln. 11. The Grand High-Priest directs the G1路and Secre... tary to read the warrant;wldch being done, 12. The Grand High-Priest rises, and says:


234

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

By virtue of tile lligll powers ill l11e vested, I do forrn yOll, nlY respected COlupallions, into a regular Ollapter of Royal Arch Masons. Froin hellcefortll you are authorized and elnpo,vered to open alld hold a I~odge of Mark Masters, Past NIasters, and J\ilost Excellent Masters, and a Cllapter of Royal Arch Masons; and t.o do and perform all Buell things as thereullto may appertain; conforming, in all :your doings, to the General Grand Royal .Arch. aonBtit~ttion and * the gel1eral regulations of the State Gralld Ohapter. And may tIle GOD of your fathers be with, guide,. a11d direct you ill all your doings. GRAND HONORS.

13. The furniture, clothing, jewels, implements, utensils, etc., belonging to the Chapter (having been . previollsly placed in the center, in :front of the Grand High-Priest,) are now uncovered, and the dedication proceeds: DEDICA.TION. THE Grand Chaplain, with the pot of incense in his hands, says:

To our Most Excellent Patron, ZERUBBABEL, \ve solenlnly dedicate tllisCllapter.. ÂťIay tIle * Those words marked in italics, and the

same words similarl:r" designated in

other parts of these services. ma.y be omitted in those States which are not under the jurisdiction of the General Grand ChaptC\r.


CEREMONIES.

235

blessing of our Heavell1y .Higll-Priest descend alld rest UpOll its 111elnbers, and may their felicity be imlnortal. Glory be to GOD on high. A.s it ,vas in the beginning, is now, and ever sl1all be, witlloUt end I-AlIEN: Re8pon~se-So nlote

it be.

INSTALLATION. THE Deputy Grand High-Priest will then present the first officer of tpe (new) Chapter to the Gran<1HighPriest, saying:

Most Excellent Grand Higll-Priest: I present yOll nlY worthy Companion, - - - - (nonli11ated in the warrant), to be installed RigllPriest of this (new) Ollapter. I ÂŁlIld IlilU to be sl{illful in tIle royal art, ancl attentive to the moral precepts of Ollr forefathers. alld llave therefore 110 doubt but he will discl1arge the duties of Ilis office ,vith fidelity. The Grand High-Priest then addresses him as follows:

".,. A

Most Excellellt Companion: I feelll1uch satisfaction ill performing nl}T dllty Qn the present occasion, by installing YOU. into the ~\ office of High-Priest of this (new) ~ Chapter. It is an office highly honorable to all tllose who diligel1tly perfornl the


236

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

important duties annexed to it. YOllr repllted Masonic knowledge, however, precludes tIle l1ecessity of a particular enumeration of tilose duties. I sllall, tllerefore, OIlly observe, that by a frequellt recurrellce to the Constitution, and general regulatiolls and COllstant practice of the several s.ublime lectures and charges, you will be best able to fulfill them; and I am confident tIlat the Oompanions \vho are chosell to preside with yOll ,viII give strength to yOllJ' endeavors, and support )TOur' exertions. I shall 110W propose certaill questions to you, relative to tIle duties of your office, and to ,vhicll I must request ~your unequivocal answer. . I. Do you solel11111y pronlise that you \viII redollble your e11deavors to correct the vices, purify the morals, ancI prOlnote the 11apIJilleSS of tll0se of ~your Conlpanions 'VI10 l1ave attailled tl1is sublime degree? II. Tllat yOll ,viII llever suffer Y0l.lr OhalJter to be opeI1ed unless there be presellt l1ine regll1ar Royal Arcl1 Masolls? III. That )lOll will never suffer eitller more or less thall tllree brethren to be exalted In yOlll'" Cllapter at one and tIle sallIe time?


CEREMONIES..

237

IV.. That you 'viII Ilot exal.tany one to tllis degree WI10 has 110tsho'Vll a charitable .and hUlllfLlle disposition; or who has not made a considerableproficiency ill the foregoing degrees?

V.' That youvvill promote tIle geI).eral good of our Orcler, aIld, OIl all proper occasions, .be ready to give alld receive instructio11S, and particularly from the. General and .State Grand Officers?

VI. That, to tIle utm~st of )'Ollr pOvver, you ,viII preserve, the solemnities of our ceremonies, and behave, ill 0lJenOhapter, ,vith the, Illost profound respect and reverence: as an exanlple to your 'Companions ? VII. That ~YOll will not acknowledge or have intercourse \vitil any, ChalJter that does not work under a constitutional \Varral1t or dispensa tiOll ? VIII. That you will not admit any visitor into your' Chapter vvhohas not been .exalted in a Chapter legally constituted, \vithollt llisbeing first formally healed?

IX. That

,viII observe and support such by-la'vs ,as nlay be nlade by your ChaI)ter, in y()ll


238

GUIDE TO THE R. At CHAPTER.

conformity to Ge路neral 'Grand Roya~l Arch Oonstitution, ana the general reglllations of the Grand Cllapter? X. That you ,viII pay due" respect and abe... dience to the instructions of tIle Ge1~eral ana State Gralld Officers, particularly relating to the several lectures and charges, alld vviII resign the chair to then1, severally, '\vhen tlley rnay visit }70l1I' Ohapter? XI. 'That yOll will sUl)port alld observe tIle Gene1"al Grand ROYCi6 Arc7~ OOttSt-it?ltion an.d the general reglllations of tIle Grand RO~'y"al Arch Ohapter, llnder ,vIl0se allthority you act?

XII. r.rhat you ,viII bind

~your

Sllccessor

111

office to tIle observaIlce of the saIne rules to Wl1icll yOll 11~lve 110\V assellted? Do you sllbnlit to all these tllings, alld do }TOU promise to observe and practice tl1eln faithfully? These questions being ans,,"'ered in the affirmative, the COlnpanions all kneel, and the Grand Ohaplain repeats the following PRAYER:

Mosrr Holy a11d gloriotlS LORD

GOD:

the Great

Higll.. Priest of 11eaven and eal~th! we approach


CEREM01HES.

239

tllee witll reverence, alld implore thy blessing on (tIle) Oomparlioll appointed to preside over this ne,v assembly, and now prostrate before tl1ec; fill his lleart with thy fear, that 11is tongue and actions Inay prOll0Ul1Ce ~hy glof)T. J\fake l1im steadfast ill thy service; grallt him firInness of 111ind; anilnate his lleart, and strengthen his endeavors; ma~y l1e teacll thy judgments and thy laws; alld Inay tIle illcense 11e sIlall Pllt before tllee,"111)011 thine altar, prov"e an accept.able sacrifice unto thee. Bless hilU, o LORD, arlcl bless tIle ,vork of llis 11ands. Accel)t lIS in Inerey. He~r tll011 frOln heaven, tI1Y d,velling place, alld forgive our transgressions. Respol1~8e-So 1110te

it be.

The Grand High-Priest ~rill then Cal.ISe the HighPriest elect to be invested with his clothing, badges, etc.; after which, he will address him as follows: ~fost

]Jxcellent: III conseqllence of :your cheerful acquiescence witll the charges, vvhich ~YOll 11ave heard recited, ~Y"ou are qualified for installation as tIle Higll-Priest of tllis RO}Tal Arcl1 Cllapter; and it is incumbent UpOll Ine, 011 this occa.sion, to point OlIt SOl1le of the


240

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

particu1ars appertaining to your office, dllty, and dig:nity. The Higll-Priestof every CllaI)ter bas it in special cllarge to see that the by-lavvs of his Chal)ter, r;t8 well as the Gene'rctl Gra'1~d Royal A;rc7~ C01~st'itulio1~, a路nd all tIle regulations of tIle Gralld Ollapter, are duly obser"ved; tllat all the officers of his Chapter l)erform the duties of their resl)ective offices faithflllIy, and are examples of diligence and'illdustry to their OOlnl)anions; tllat true and aCCllrate records of all the proceedings of the Cllapter are l{ept by the Secretary; that tIle TreaS}lrer l{eeps alld renders exact alld just aCCQUllts of all the nlolleys and other pro})erty belonging to the Chapter; tllat tIle }'"eglllar returns be Inade anllually to tIle Grullcl GllapteI'; and tllat t11e all1lual dues to tlle Gralld Cha.pter be regularly alld l)llnctually paid. He llas the right alld autllority of calling llis Ollapter togetller at pleasure, tlpOn any eUlergency or occurrellce Wllich, ill his jlldgment, In~ty l~equire tlleir Ineeting. It is llis privilege alld duty, togetller witll tIle lCillg and. Scribe, to attend tIle meetings of tIle Grand Ollapter,


CEREMONIES.

241

person or by proxy; and the wellbeing of the institutioll requires that this duty eitIleI"

ill

should on no occasion be omitted.

Tile office of High-Priest is a statioll highly honorable to all those 'VI10 diligently perform ,the ilnportant dllties annexed to ~ it. By a frequent recurrence to tIle Oonstitution and general regulations, and a constant practice of tIle several sublime lectures 311d charges, yOll will be best ellabled to fulfill those dllties; ancl I anl confident that tl1e COlnpal1ions WI10 are chosen to preside with YO'u ,viII give strengtl1 to your endeavors a11d support to yOllf exertions. Let the lIÂŁiter, \vith whicll you. are invested, rell1ind }TOU of the digllity of the office )TOU sustain, and its inscriptio11 impress upon. your mind a sense of your depen~ellce UIJon GOD; that perfection is not giv'en unto man upon earth, and that perfect 110Iiness belongethalone UlltO

tIle LORD.

TIle Breas~plate with which you are decorated, in iU1itatioll of that tlPOll which were ellgraven the l1Ulues of tIle t\velve tribes, alld worn by

the High-Priest of Israel, is to teach you that 11


242

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Y<?U are alwa)Ts to bear ill.111irld your responsibility to the la,vs alld ordillal1ces of tile institution, arId that the 1101101" and interests of your Ohapter and its members should be always near YOllI' lleart. ~rlle va,1'''io~/;8 colors

of the Robes you wear are emblelnatical of every grace and virtue whicll can aclorll and beautify tIle humall milld; each of whicll ,viII be briefly illllstrated ill the course of the charges to be clelivered to your 811bo1"dinate officer.

I now deliver into your llands the Oharter ul1der '\Vl1ich :you are to ,vorl\:. Y all will receive it as a sacred deposit, alld l1ever pernlit it to be tlsed for allY other purposes than tllose ex!)ressed in it.. I presellt you ,vitil the Book o..f the Lato, the Great Ligl1t ill every degree of 11asonry. The doctrines contained ill tl1is sacrecl volUlne create a belief i11 tIle dispensations of Di'vine ProvideIlce, vv11ich belief strengtllens 01.11' FAITI!, and enables us to ascclld tIle first stel) o~ the Gralld Masol1ic Laclder. Tllis faitll 11aturally produces in us a HOPE of beconling partal\:ers

ill tlS


CEREMONIES.

243

of the promises expressed in this inestirl1able gift of GOD to rnall; Wllicll hope enables 118 to asceIld the secolld stel)" But the third-alld last, being OHARITY, cOl11prehends the former, and ,viII continue to exert its influeIlce, whell Faith shall be lost 111 sight, allcl Hope ill complete enjoymellt. I prese11t you \vith tIle aO,}~8titution (of the Geileral Grand Royal Arch Chapter); tIle Rules and Regtllations of the Grand Royal Arc}l Ohaptel" of tllis State; alld, also, \Vit.rl tIle By-La~o8 of your Chapter. You· will cause all these to ·be fi~equently read and pllnctually obeyed. ~A.lld

1fost Excellent, permit Ine, In behalf of tile Craft l1ere assembled, to offer you our Inost Sill cere congratulations 011 )7our accession to the honorable statiol1 37011 110'V fill. I doubt not yOll ,viII goverll witll such order and regularity as to cOllvince··yollr con1pan.ions that tlleir partiality has not beell Inisplaced. 110'V,

. COlnpanio11s of Chapter, " : Behold Jiour Higll-Priest. [They rrise an~d bow, or, if theIn8tallatiio1~·be 'not j)'ublic,. salute hi'772 with .the hon"ors of Royal Arch Masonry.] Recollect


244

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

tllat tIle prosperity of YOllr Ohapter will as Inucll depend on Yo1J.r supl)ort, assistance and obediellce, as on his assiduity, iliformation and "ivisc1orn. The Grand Captain of the Host "rill then present the second officer to the Deputy Grand High-Priest, who ,yiII present him to the Grand High-Priest. The Grand High-Priest will then ask him whether he has attended to the ancient charges and regulations before recited to llis superior officer; if he answers in the affirmative, he is asked vlhether he fully and freely assents to the same; if he answers in the affirmative, the Grand High-Priest directs his Deputy to invest him with his clothing, etc., and then addresses him as follows: CHARGE TO THE KING.

Excellent COlnpallion: The ill11)ortant statioll to '\vhich yOll are elected in this Ollapter requires froln you exemlJlary COllduct; its duties demand }TOU1' Inost assiduous attelltiol1; yOll are to secolld and S"uPIJort YOllr chief in all the requirenlellts of his office; Ul1d sllould casualties at allY "till1C prevent llis attelldance, )"OU are to succeed him in tIle perforlnallce of llis dllties. Your badge (tIle Level, sllrmoullted by a arow1~,) sllould rel11ind you that, althollgll you are tIle


CEREl\-IONIES.

245

rel)resentative of .a Kirlg, a11d exaltecl by office

above your cOll1palliollS, yet that you路 remain upon a level ,vitil tllem,aSrespeGtsy路ou~-'duty to GOD, your neighbor, and YOllrself; that yOll are equally 1)OUl1d ,vit.h them to be obedient to tIle laws' and ordillances of tIle institution, to be cllaritable, hllmalle anel jllst. and to seek every occasioll of doing good. Your office teaclles a strik.ing lesson of humility. TIle institlltions of 'political society teacll us "to consider tIle Ki11g as tile cllief of created beings, al1d that the first dllty of his subjects is to obey 11is nlandates; btlt tIle institu.tions of Ollr Stl blime degrees, by placing the King ill a situatioll sllbordinate to tIle Higl1Priest, teaclles us tllat our duty to GOD is paramoullt to all other duties, and should ever clainl tIle priority of our obedience to lllan; aIld that, 110\VeVer strongly \ve may be bound to obey the laws of civil society, yet tl1at those la\vs: to be just, sllould l1ever intermeddle ,vith matters of conscience,

110r

clictate articles of

faith. The Scarlet Robe, an emblem of imperial


246

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

dignity, should renlincl yOll of tIle .paterllal COllcerIl jlOU SllOllld ever feel for the ,velfare of :rour Ohapter, and the fer've'J~cy and zeal "Tith '\vhicll you S}lOllld endeavor to pronl0te its prosl)erit~y.

presellting to you the Orow'n, vvhicll is an e111blenl of royalty, I would remind you that to reigll sovereigll ill the hearts alld affectioI1S of men 111USt be far ruore grateful to a generous alld benev'olent 111illd thaIl to rule over their liv'es ancl fortlllles; ancl tIlat, to ellable yOll to enjO}T this preetninellce ,vith 11011or and satisfaction, }TOU nlust sllbject YOllI' O'Vll passions alld prejtldices to tIle clonlinion of reaSOll alld III

cllarit}r.

YOll are elltitled to tIle second seat ill the COtlllCil of ~your COl11panions. Let tIle brigllt exall1ple of }TOllr illustrious predecessor in the Grand COlIIlCil at J erusaleln stimlllate }TQU to tIle faitllful discllarge of .yollr duties; anel ,vllen tIle King of l{ings sllall 811111111011 370U irlto 11is ilnlnediate l)resence, frOln 11is 11 all <.1 nlay you receiv'e a CROWN OF GLORY, 'Vllich shall never fade a,vay.


CERE1YCONIES.

247

CHARGE' TO THE SCRIBE.

Excellent Companioll: The office of Scribe~ to 'vvhich you are etected, is very ilnportarlt and respectable.. In tIle absellce of YOllr superior officers, }TOll are bOUIld to sllcceed them, ancl perforln their cluties. The purposes of the instittitioll OUgllt 11ever to suffer for want of intel___- __..__ ligence in its proper officers; yall will thei~efore perceive the necessity tllere is of your possessing such qualifications as will el1able you to accomplisll tl10se duties 'Vllich are incurnbellt lIpan you, in }Tour appropriate station, as well as tllose Wllich nlay occasiollally devol ve 011 yOll by tIle absence of your superiors. The Purple Robe, with which you are invested, is all enlblenl of UNION, and is calculated to ~emind you tllat the harmony and unanilnity of the Ohapter sl10uld be your consta~t aim; alld to tllis end JTou are studiollSly to avoid all occasions of giving offense, or coulltenancing anything that may create divisio11S or "dissenSIons. Y OU are, by all means ill your power, to endeavor to establish a permanellt


248

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

1111iol1 and good understallding a1110ng all orders alld de.grees of ~Iasonry; alld as the glorious sun, at its nleridiall hight, dispels the 111ists alld . CIOllds which obscllre the horizoll, so luay your exertions tend to dissil)ate the gloorrl of jealousy and discord \V11e11ever they may appear.

Your badge (a Plun~b-'rtlle, surrnounfed by a Turba?~,) is all emblenl of rectitude arlcl vigilance; alld ,vllile yOll sta11d as a ,vatcll111an ll110n tIle to,ver, to gllard your con1panions against the approacll of tllose enel11ies of hUlnall felicity, inte1Ylpe1"ance and excess, let this faithful 111onitor ever rell1illCl yOll to 'v alk: Ul)riglltly ill your statioll; adnlonislling alld anirnating Y'onI' coml)aniol1s to fidelity ancI industry ,vllile at labor, alld to tell11)cral1Ce al1d 111oderation. "\vllile at refresll111ent.

Arld ,vllen tIle great Watchll1all

of Israel, '\vhose e~ye never slulnbers 110r sleel)s, shall relieve you fronl :yollr post 011 earth, Inay he perlllit ~YOll ill heaven to participate in that food alld refresll111ellt '\Vllicll if "Such as the saints in glory love, And such as angels eat."


UEREn'I01\IES.

CHARGE TO rrl-IE C.A.PTAIN 路OF THE HOST.

COrIlpanion: The office '\vith 'Vllich you are intrusted i~ of higll importance, alid demands

your most zealous cOl1sideratioll. The preservation of the 1110st essential traits of Oltr allcient ~ CUStOl11S, llsages alld landmarks, are within )Tour province; alld it is illdispensably 11ecessaI'y that the part assi~lled to路 you, irl tIle ilnnlec1iate practice of our rites arid ceremonies, sl10uld be perfectly tlnderstood and correctly administerecl. J---

Y Ollr office corresponds ,:vitll that of A拢arshal, or Master of OerelTIOllies.

Y 011 are to superintend all processions of j""our Chapter, when moving -as a distillCt bod~y, either in public or private; and as tIle \vorld can only judge of our l)rivate discipline by our public deportlnelit, you will be careful tllat tIle utmost order and decorulu be observecl 011 all suell occasioIls. You ,viII ever be atteIlti,,-re to tIle cOlnnlands of YOllr cllief, al1d always l1ear at hand to see them duly executed. I invest you ,vith the badge of )iOtlr office, and preStllne that you ,viII give 11*


250

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CRAPTER.

to YOllI' duties all tllat stud)" allcl attention ,vhich their inlportance delllands. CHARGE TO TIlE PRINCIPAL SOJOU.RNER.

Oonlpallion: r.rIle office confided to }TOll, though stlbordinate ill degree, is equal in iU1portance to o an}T ill tIle Ohapter, tllat of your chief alone excepted. Your office corres!Jonds ,vitIl tllat ofSe1~ior Deaco1~,illthe l)reparatoryc1egrees. A.u1ong the duties required of }70U tIle prelJaratioll and introcll1ctioll of candiclates are not tIle least. As, ill our intercourse ,vitIl tile ,vorld~ experience teaclles tllat first ilnpressions are oftell tIle Illost dllrable, and the Ill0St clifficult to eradicate, so it is of great in1!Jorta11ce, ill all cases, tl1at tllose ilnpressions sl10uld be correct and just; hellce it is essential tllat tIle officer 'VI10 brings the blilld by a ,vay that tlley kne\v 110t, ancl leads them ill patlls that they l1ave not knO\Vll, should al\va~ys be ,veIl qualified to mal{e darkness ligllt IJefore them, ancl crooked tllings straight. .,;...-

---.JIO.

Your robe of office is an emblem of h1lmility ; and teaches that,路in the proseclltion of a latlda-


CEREl\iONIES.

251

hIe undertak:ing, ,\ve should never decline takillg '~tny part tllat may be assigned lIS, althollgh it may be 'tIle illost difficult or dangerolls. The rose-colored tesselated border, adorning the robe, is anembleln of ardor and perseverallce, a.rld signifies that whâ&#x201A;Źn we 11ave engaged in a virtuous course, 110t,vitllstancling all the impediInents, 11ard~11ips and trials we Inay be destined to ellcounter, ,\ve should endure thenl all "\vitll fortitude, alld ardelltly persevere unto the el1d; resting assllred of receivi11g, at tIle tern1inatioll of 0111" labors, a noble and glorious re,vard. Your past exertions \viII be considered as a pledge of your future assiduity in the faithful discharge of yOll duties. CHARGE TO THE ROY.A.L ARCH CAPTAIN.

Oompanio11: The well-known duties of your station require but little elucidation. Your office in the preparatory degr~es

A , '\ rn I,

c,',orrespondS with that of JUn,iOr Deacon. It is your province, con_ _ _'_ _ jOilltly\vith tIle Captain of the

Host, to attend the examinatiol1 of all visitors, al1d to take care that Ilone are permitted to


252

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

enter t.Ile Ollapter but SllC}l as llave traveled the r路ugged pat7&, of trial, a~1d evinced tlleir title to OllI' favor and fri~lldship. YOlI \viII be attentive to obey tIle cOll1ma11ds of the Cal)tain of tile Host during tIle introduction of strra1'tgers all10ng the 'VOrl{111ell; al1cl sllould tlley be. pernlitted to pass your post, nlay tIley, by l1illl, be iIltroduced into the presence of tIle Granel CounciL Tile lVhite Ba'i2ner, intrllstecl to :your care, is elllblematical of tllat l)urity of heart and rectittlde of COllc111ct \vhicll OUgllt t~ actuate all tllose 'VI10 pass tIle 'v [lite vail of tIle sal1ctuar)!. I gi,re it to )"011 strongl.y in cllarge, Ilever to suffer an~y one to !)H.SS Y'oll1' post ,vitll0l1t tIle Signet oj Truth.. I present }rotl tIle badge of J'"our office, ill expectation of J"Ollr l)crforlning YOll1' dtlties ,vitll intelligence, assidtlity ancl prol)riet~y. CII.ARGE TO TIlE l\I.ASTEH OF THE TIIIRD ,.,.AIL.

Conlpanion: I l)reSellt :YOU ,vith tIle Sca?--Zet n

Bartner, VVllicll is tIle ensigll of

ill

your office, and with a sword to protect and defend the same. The rich and bea1.1tiful color of }l'our

IA'\.

~

--..J

banner is elnblelnatical of fervency and zoal;


CERE!vIONIES.

253

it is tIle appropriate color of the Royal Arch clegree. It adlnonishes us that wo should be fervent in tlie exercise of our clevotioll to GOD, and zealous in our endeavors to prolnote the happiness of l11al1. CHARGE TO THE MASTER' OF THE SECOND VAIL â&#x20AC;˘.

001111)ani911: I in,,rest )TOU with tIle P'urple Barl/net', vvhicll is the ensigll of your office, and arnl J"ou with a s,vord, to enable you to IIlaintaill its 1101101". The color of your ballneris produced by a due nlixture of blue "alld scarlet:: the forll1er of "\v11icll is tIle characteristic color of tIle sYl1~bolic, or first three degrees of ]J.fasonry, and tIle latter tl1at of tIle Ro.yalArch degree. It is an emblenl of UNION. alld is tIle characteristic color of tIle illtermcdiate degrees. It adll101~ishes us to cultivate and improve tllat sl)iri t Oftll1ioll an cl 11 arll1 011 y bet\veen the brethrell of the s)rnlbolic degrees and the Oompallions of the sublilne degrees \Vllicll should ever distinguisll the lllelubers of a society founded llpon the principles of everlasting truth and- 'llniversalphilanthropy.. '---

-..t


254

GffiDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

CHAHGE TO THE 1IASTER OF THE FIRST VAIL.

I in,rest yOll '\vith the Blue BCtn'ner, ,vhicll is tIle ensign of your office, and a s,Yord for its defense ancl protection. The color of ~your banner is one of tIle illost dllrable [LIld beautiful in nature.. It is tIle appropriate color adoptecl and "vorll by our anciellt bretllren of the tllree S)Tl11bolic c1egl~ees, alld is the peculiar characteristic of an institutioll ,vhicll llas stood the test of ages, alld 'Vl1icll is as 111tlCll c1istinguislled b3r the dural)ilitjT of its nluterials, or principles, as by the beaut:y of its superstructtlre.. It. is all enlblell1 of llni'lersal fr'ien..clsn"iJ.J al1d benevolence; [LIld illstructs lIS tllat, ill tIle IniIld of a 11ason, tllose ,rirtues SllOllld be' as expa11sive as tIle blue arcll of lleavell itself. OOlllI)anioll:

TIIREE MA.STERS OF TIlE VAILS AS OVERSEERS.

OOml)Ullions: 1'hose 'VI10 are placed as over-

seers of any warl\: slloulcl be ,veIl qtlalified to judge of its beallties and clefornlities-its excel.. lencies alld defects; tlley SllOllld be capable of estill1ating the forl11er al1d anlellding tIle latter. r:rhis COllsideratioll SllOllld induce )rou to culti,rate and in11)ro've all tlloseq,ualifications ,vitil


CEREMONIES.

255

wllich Y'ou arc aleeadyendo,ved, as 'Vvell as to persevere in your elldeavors to acquire those ill \vhicll you are deficiellt. Let the various colo路rs of the ban,ners cOIDll1itted to your c11arge admonish yOll to the exercise of the several virtues of v{hiell tlley.areelnblematic; alld you are to enjoin tIle practice of those v'irtues upon all vvho s}lalJ present tllen1selves, or the work of tl1eir hands, for your inspectiorb. Let no ,vorl\:. receive :YOllr approbatioll but suell as is calClllated to adorll alld strengtllen the ~Iasonic edifice. Be inclustrious anel faithful in practicing and disseminating a kno\vle"dge of the tr~te a路ndpe?fect work, 1vhicl1 alone call stand the test of the Grand Overseer's Sq'uare, ill tile great da}T of trial and retribl1tioll. Then, although every rod sllould become a serpent, and every serpellt all cllemy to this institution, yet shall their utmost exertio11S to destroy its rep'utation, or sal) its foundation,become as ilnpotent as tl1e leprou,s ha'nd, or as 'i..fJater spillecl upon the g'round, vVllicllcannot be.gat11ered IIp agai11. CH...i llGE TO路 THE路 TREASURER.

Compallioll : You are eleJted l'reasurer of


256

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

this Cllapter, and I l1uve tIle pleasure of investing you witl1 the badge of jTOlll' office. Tile /r' qualities which should recommend ,/~~

a Treasurer are accuracy and fidel~~ ity j accuracy in keeping a fair and / - - - . nlillute aCCOullt of all receipts and disbursenlents; ficlelity ill carefully preserving all tIle property and fUllds of tIle Chapter, that l11ay be placecl ill llis hallds, and rendering a just aCCOllnt of the same \Vllellever 11e is called UpOll for that pllrpose. I 1)reSUll1e that }Tour respect for tIle institlltion, :yollr attachment to tIle illterests of ).70111' Cllapter, and )i0111" regard for a goocl nal11e, vvllicll is l)etter tllUll precious ointl1lent, ,viII 1)ron11)t }'OU to tIle faithful discllarge of tIle dllties of youe office. CIIARGE TO THE SECRET.A.RY.

COD1IJunioll: I ,vitIl IJleasure invest yOll ,vitIl your badge ,as Secretary of this Chapter. TIle qllali ties 'v llicll slloulcl recomlnen d // a Secretary are lJ'ro1nptit ude in II' isslling tIle Ilotificatio11S aI)cl orders ,I . _-~ of his superior officers; punct'lt-

~

l

!

ality in attending tIle nleetings of the Chap-


CERE~IONIES.

257

ter; correctness ill recording their proceedings; jttdg1nent ill cliscrill1iIlating bet,veeIl vvllat is proper a11d '\vllat is ill1proper to be conlll1itted to ,vriting; regularity ill nlaking his an11ual rettlrns to the Gralld Chapter; integrit)"l" ill accounting for all mOn~)7s that may pass through 'his hallds; and fidelity in paying the same over into thy hands of the Treasllrer. The possession of tb.esegood. qualities, I presun1e, has designated }70U a suitable candidate for this illl1)ortarlt office; and I canll0t elltertain a C10llbt tllat you ,viII elise'harge its duties bene-, ficiall}T to the Ohapter andllo110rably to }7ourself. And '\vhen :rOl1 sllall 11a"Ve cOlnpletecl tIle record of YOllr transactio11S Ilere belovv, al1d finished tIle ternl of your l)robatioll, 111ay you be ac11nitted into the celestial Grand Cllapter of saints and angels: alld find ~your nalne recorded in 路the book of life eternal. CI-I.A.HC+E TO TH:E CI-IAPLAIN.

E. and Rev. 00111paniol1 : You are appoillted Cha.plaill of this Ohapter; alld I 110W irlvest you ,vitIl tl1is je\vel, tIle l>adge of YOllr office. It is elnblelnatical of eternit)7, and relnillds us


258

GUIDE TO THE

Ii.

A. CHAPTER.

tl1at l1ere is. llot onr abiding-place. Your inclinatioll ,viII U11dollbtec1Iy conspire vvith YOllr dllty \vllen }70U I)erfornl:ill tIle Ohapter, t110se solerrlll services \Vllicll created beings should con_ _ _ _.. . . . stantly render to tlleir infinite Oreator, and Wllich, \Vhe11 offerecl by one \vhose lloly profes~ion is d to IJoillt to heaven, and lead the ,vay," may, by refining our nlorals, strel1gtllening our virtues, alld purifying 0111" millcls, prepare 118 for adn1issioll into tIle society of those above, '\vllose happiness ,viII be as elldless as it is l)erfect. CH.A.RGE TO TIlE SENTINEL.

COlnpanion: YOll are alJpointed Selltinel of tllis Chapter, nnel I ill,rest ~you ~Tith the badge al1d this inlplclnent of your office. /~

As the sword is placed in the ~ hands of the Sentinel, to enable / bim effectually to guard against tIle a!)proach of all co,\vans and eavesdroppers.. and suffer none to l)ass or rel)[Lss bllt SUCll as areduly q ualifiecl;> so it sllould nlorally serve as a constant adnl011itio11 to lIS to set a guard at


CEREMONIES.

259

the entrance of our thouglltS; to place a \Vatcl1 at tIle door of our lips; to post a sentinel at the avenue of Ollr actioll~: thereby exclllc1ing ever~y unqllalified alld unvvorthy tl10UgIlt, word and deed, and preserving consciellces void of offense towarcl GOD a11d tOvvard lnan. . As the first al)plicatioll from visitors for adlnission illtO tile Ohapter is generally made to the Sentillel at the door, YOllr statioll vyill often l)resent yOll to the observatio11 of strangers; it is the~"efore essentially necessary that 11e who sustains tIle office witll ,,,,,Ilicll yOll are illtrustec1 sllould be a mall of good 111orals, steady 11abits, strict discipline, te~lperate., affable alld discreet. 1 trust that a just regard for tIle hOllor and replltatioll of tIle institution ,viII e'ver induce yOll to perform ,vitIl fidelity the trust repos~d ill you; alld ,vllen the door of this earthly taber11acle shall be closed, may :Y路Oll find an abUlldant entrallce tllrougll tIle gates illtO tIle telnple and city of eur GOD. ADDRESS TO THE HIGH-PRIEST.

M. E. Compallioll: Havillg beell honored with the free suffrages of the melnbers of t;his Chapter,


260

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

you are elected to tIle illost ill11)ortant office

,vhich it is ,vithin tlleir !)o,\ver to besto,v.

rrllis

expressioll of their esteern alld respect S110l11d dra\v fronl you correspondillg sensatiol1S; and your derrleanor should be Buell as to repay the honor the~y have so C011SpiCtlOusly conferred ll!:>on

you, by all 110110rable alld faitllflll discl1urge of tIle dllties of YOlII' office. The station JOll are called to fill is important, not only as it respects tile correct l:>ractice of Ollr rites and cereillonies, alld tIle illternal eCOll0111Y of the Chapter over ~vhicl1 yOll preside, but the pllblic rel}lltation of tIle institution \vill be generall}'" fOtInd to rise or fall according to the sk:ill, fidelity allcl cliscretion \vitll,vllicll its concerns are 111allaged, and in peoportioll as the characters ancl conCltlct of its princil)al officers nre estinlalJle or censuralJle. You lla've acceptecl a trllst, to '\vllicll is attached a \veigllt of resl)onsibility, that ,viII reqllire all y'our efforts to discharge, llonorably to ~yollrself alld satisfactorilj'" to tIle Ollul)ter. You are to see that YOllr officers ttre cal)able aIld faitllful in the exercise of tlleir offices. Should tl1ey lack:abilit~y, :y-ou are expectecl to


CEnEM:ONIES.

261

supply their defects; ~you are to ,vatcll carefully the progress路 of their performal1ces, and to see that tile long-establislled custonls of the il1stitutionsuffe~' "110 derangelllent:in their hands. You are to路 have a careful eye over tIle general conduct of the Cllapter; see that due order alld sllbordination are observecl on all occasions; t4at the 111ell1bers are properly instructed; that due solemnity be observed in the practice of. alII" rites; .tllat no improper levity be perluitted at any tillle, but nlore especially- at tile introductioTL of

stra'nger 8 i

arJ~o1'fJg

the WOrk1Tl,en.

In fine, you are to be an example to your officers and nlembers 'Vllicll tIley need 110t hesitate to follo"\v; thus securing to yourself tI10 favor of Heaven and tIle applause of your brethrell and cOlnpanions. ADDRESS TO TIlE OFFICERS GENERALL:Y.

OOlnpanions ill Office: Precept alld example ShOlllc1 ever aclvance -"vitIl eqllal I)ace. Those moral, duties '\Y}licll yOll are required to 'teach Ullto otllers ~you s110uld l1ever 11eglcct to practice yOllrselves. Do you desire that the denlea110r of your equals allcl inferiors to,vard


262

GUIDE TO THE R. A.. CHAPTER.

you sllould be nlarked ,vitIl deference and respect? Be Sllre that you olnit 110 0l)portlll1it}i of furnishing theIrl \vitll exanlples in }rour O'Vll COllduct toward YOllr sUl)eriors. Do you desire to obtaill instruction from tllose vvho are luore \vise or better informed thall yourselves? Be sure tllat you are al'\vays ready to i1111)art of your knowledge to thosewithill :yollr spllere ,vho stalld in l1eed of and are e11titled to receive it. Do y'ou desire c1istillCtioll an10ng YOtII' conlpaniolls? Be sU.re tllat yOtII' clainls to l)refernlellt are fOll11decl tlP011 sUl)erior attaillrnellts; let no alllbitiollS passion. be suffered to induce ~you to ellvy or supplant a companioll 'VI10 111ay be considered as better qualifie'd for prOll10tioll tl1all yourselves; but ratller let n lallGlable enlulation indllce you to strive to excel eacll otl1er ill imlJrO\iement a11d discipline; ever relnelnbering that he ;'VI10 faithfully perforll1s llis dllt~y, even ill a sllbordinate or private station, is as justly entitled to esteem and respect as 11e 'VI10 is in路vested ~vith supreme all.thority. ADDRESS

rro

THE CHAPTER AT L.ARGE.

Companions: The exercise and nlanagenlent


CEREMONIES.

263

of tile sublime degrees of }'lasonry in YO'ur

Chapter l1ithcrto are so highly appreciated, and the good reputatioll of the .Ohapter so ,veIl established, that I n1ust presulne these considerations alone, \vere there no others of greater nlagnitude, \vonId be sufficiellt to induce you to preserve and to perpetuate this valuable and llonorable cllaracter. But ,vhell to tllis is added the pleasure vVllich every philallthropic heart must. feel in doing good; in pronloting good order; ill diffusillg lig11t and l~nowledge; in Cllltivating Masonic and Ohristian charity, which are the great objects of tllis subliule institutiol1, I call110t doubt that your future COllduct, and t11at of YOllr successors, will .be calculated still to "illcrease the lllster of your just1y-esteelued reputatioll. ~fay

your Chapte7"becolne bect~"tif'拢.tl as tIle TEl\lPLE, fJeacej'lll as tl1e ARI{, and saC'j~ecZ as its 'f)~ost

holYJ]lace. 11ay your oblatio11S of p~路ety alld praise be grateful as tIle INCENSE; }70l1r love war?7~ as its flan2,e / and your cllarity diffusi,~e as its fragra11ce. May Y0111' 11earts be pure as the ALT.AR, and your C011d uct acceptable as tIle


264

GUIDE TO THE R. A.. CHAPTER.

OFFERING.

1fay tile exercise of your

OfI.A.RITY

be as constallt as tile retllrning "\vallts of tIle distressed toido~() alld llelpless orl)l~an. ~lay the apprOl)c1tioll of Heavell be )~our ellcouragell1ellt and the testill10ny of a good COllscience YOltr sllpport. ~1ay yOll be endo\ved ,vi tIl eVer)i good Ulld l)erfect gift, wilile travelil~g the tr'ugged 1;,a,t7~ of life, and filIally be adn2ittecZ ~()itlti')~ the vail of !lea\re11, to tIle fllll enjo:ynlent of life eternal. So nlote it be.-A1IEN. The officers and menlbers of the Chapter 'Yill then pass in review in front of the grand officers, '\vith their hands crossed on their breasts, bo\ving as they ptLSS. The Grand COJptain of the Host then makes the fol1o\ving PROCL.AMATION :

III tIle l1alne oft11e :A1ost Excellellt Grand Chal)ter of tIle State of , I l1ereby peoclaill1 Oha})ter, No , to be legally constituted a11ddec1icated, a1](l tIle officers tllereof (luly installed. The grand honors are then given. Benediction, by the Grulud Chaplain. "\Vhen the Grauel Officers retire, tIle Chapter will form an ftc1vallce for theln to pass through, and salute them with the grand honors.


CHAPTER JEvVELS.

Captai'n of the Host.

King.

Scribe.

Princil'>al SoJourner-.

R . ..4.• Captain.

n

Treasu.~·f?t'"

~

/~ Secretary.

, ,---_.... Ohaplain.

12

Sentinel.


lVIASONIC DOCUlVIENTS. Petition

t"0J.-

Dispcllsa tion foJ.- N e"\v eha p'tcr.

To th( Jfost Etcellent. Grand

IIigh-P1~iest

of the Grand Ohaple1" of the : [Date.] 'VE, the unclersigned, being Royal Arch 11(1sons ill good standing, and having t.he prosperity of the Ro:yal Craft at heart, al'e anx.ious to exe~"F our best endeavors to promote and diffuse the genuine principles of Royal Arch l\iasonry, and for the convenience of our respectiV'e dwellings, and other good reasons, us thereunto moving, 'we are desirous of forming a new Ohapter at , in the . of , to be named . . . . .. Chapter. ,Ve, therefore, pray for a Dispensation empowering us to open and hold a reguh'tr Chapter at .".. aforesaid, and therein to discharge the duties and enjoy the lJl'ivileges of Royal.A.rch I\1asonr:r, according to the landmarks and usages of the Order, and the constitution and laws of the Grand Chapter. And we do hereby nominate and recommend Conlpa,llion A..... B. . . .. to be our first ]iIost Excellent High-Priest; Companion c..... D..... to be our first King, ~nc1 Companion E ..... F... to be our first Scribe. And shoulcl the prayer of this petition be grant,ec1, v,"e do hereby proll1ise a. strict conformity to the constitution, laws and eclicts of the Grand Chapter of the State of ... ", and to the constitution of the General Gretnd Chapter oj the United States, * so far as they mny come to our kno,vleclge. [This Dispensation must be signeel by not lesR than nine Ro:ra1 Arch l\;Insons.] It may be presented to either the Grand or Deputy Grand HighPriest, and must be accornpauied 'with the recommenda.tion of the nearest Chapter working under a warrant of constitntioll, 'which" recommendation shoulcl be in the follo,\,\7ing words:

State oj

* These wordfl in italics nlay be omitted in those states \'\'hose Grand Chapters are not in union \vitIl the General Grand Chapter.


268

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER. FO:ll"lll. of Reconllnelldatiou.

To the Jfost E:cceUent Grand High-Priest of the Urand Chaptel' oJ

:

At a . _.. convocation of Chapter No , holden at , on the .". dt1.y of . _..... , A. L. 586, A. 1. 239The petition of several Compn.nions, prH.ying for 11 Dispensation to open a new Chapter at , ill the of , 'was duly laic1 before the Chapter, ,vhen it \vas Resolved, That this Chapter, being fully satisfied that the petitioners are Royal Arch :h:Iasons, ill good standing, and being prepared to 'Vonch for their Dl0ral character and J\Ia.sol1ie abilities, does therefore recomnlend that the Dispensation prayed for be granted to them. A true copy of the rccor<ls.

. ....... , Secretary_ Upon the receipt of this petition, with the accolllpal1ying recorlllnendation, the Grand or Deputy Grand Iiigh-Priest is authorized to issue his Dispensation, under his private seal, for opening and holding the ne'w Chapt.er, vvhich Dispensation should be ill the follo\"rlng words: F01"ln of DispCll.Satiol1. for O!)c1l.il1.g antI Holtling a Nc,v Chapter.

it may concern: Know :y-e, that I, , l\Iost EX0ellent Grand High-Priest of the Grand Chapter of the Stnte , have received a petition from a constitutional number of Companions, \vho have been properly vouched for and recommended, ,,-hich petition sets forth that they are desirous of forming a ne\v Chapter at , in the .... of .... ; and 'whereas there appears to me to be good and sufficient cause for granting the prayer of the said petitionNow, therefore, by virtue of the powers in me vested by the constitutions of the Order, I do hereby grant this my Dispensation, authorizing and empo"'I'ering COll1panion A. B. to act as l\Iost Excellent High-Priest; Companion C. D. to act as King, and Companion E. F ..to act as Scribe, of a Chapter to be holden at , in the ... . . of ..... , to be named and designated as . . ... Chapter.. And I do hereby further authorize and â&#x201A;Ź,mpo'wer the said Companions, with the necessary assistance, to open and hold Lodges of Mark, Past and l\fost Excellent ~rasters, and a Chapter of Royal Arch 'Masons, and therein to advance, induct, r~ceive auclacknowlec1ge To all whorn


269

MASONIC DOCUMENTS,

candidates in the several preparatory degrees, and to exalt the same to the Royal Arch, according to the ancient lalldma,rks and usages of the Order, and the constitutions of the Grand Chapter of the State of , and oj the General Grand Chapter of the United States, * but not otherwise. And this Dispensation shall remain of force until the Grand Chapter aforesaid shall grant a 'Warrant of Constitution for the said Chapter, or until it shall be revoked by me, or by the authority of the Grand Chapter. Given uncler my hand and seal, at .' ... J this ... day of ... , .. , A.L. 586 .. , A.I. 239 .. .....• , Grand High-Priest. }...t the next convocation of the Grand Chapter this Dispensation is returned, and the Grand Chapter will, if there be no just reason to tb~ contrary, grant a Warrant of Constitution, which shall be in the following language ,: Fo~·m.

of a

l.Var~·allt

of Constitution..

To all whmn 'it ?nay concern: The l\fost Excellent Grand Ito:yal Arch Chapter of ... '... " assembled in Grand Convocation in the city of , and State afore· said, Send Greeting: Know ye, that we, the Granel Royal Al'ch Chapter of ..... , do hereby authorize and empo,,"ert?ur trust:y and'well-belovecl Companions A. B., High-Priest; C. D., King; and E. F., Scribe, to open and hold a Royal -\rch Chapter at , in th,e .. of , to be known and designated on our register as ..... Chapter, No. . ., and therein to exalt candiclates to the august degree of the Holy Royal Arch, according to the ancient lanclmal'ks and usages of Royal Arch ~:rasonry, allc1 not other\yise. And we do further authorize and empo\ver our said trusty and ,,""ell-beloved Companions, A. E., C. D., and E. F., to open and hold, under the jUl'isdiction of the saicl Chapter, Loclges, and confer the degrees 'of l\fark, Past, and l\Iost Excellent }Iaster, and therein to Rclvance, induct, l~e~eive, and acknowledge candidates, according to the aforesaid landmarks and usages of the Graft, and not othELrwise. 1'

•••

* These words in italics to bo ODlitted in States not under the jnrisdiction of the General Grupd C4apt~r.


270

GUIDE TO 'l'HE R. A. CHAP/rER.

And ,ve do further authorize and etnpo\ver our said trusty and ,"yell-beloved Companions, A. B., C. D., and E. F., to install their successors, duly elected and chosen, to invest them 'with aU the po\vers and dignities to the offices respectively belonging, and to deliver to them this Warrant of Constitution; and such successors shall, in like manner, from time to time, install their successors, and proceed in the pre~ises as above directed-such installation to be on or before the festival of St. J DRN the Evangelist. Provided always, that the above-named Companions and their successors do pay and cause to be paid due respect and obedience to the Most Excellent Grand Ro:yal Arch Chapter of aforesaid, and .to the edicts, rules, and regulations thereof;' otherwise, this Warrant of Constitution to be of no force nor virtue. Given in Grand Convocation, under the hands of our Grnlld " officers, and the seal of our Granel Chapter, at , this .. day of , in the ~"rear of light 585 .. , and of the discovery 238 .â&#x20AC;˘ L .... 11 , Granel King. G .... H .... , N. _.. 0 ) Gl'anc1 Scribe. Grand High~Priest. [SEAL.] J ..... R .... , Depnty G. H. Priest. R .... S .... , Granel Secretary. \Vhen a \Val'rant is grullted to a ne\y Ch~1pter which is at so gren.t a distance as to render it inconvenient for the Grana officers to personally attend the constitution of the Chapter and the installation of the officers, the Grand High-Priest lnay issue the following instrument, under his hand and private seal, c1irected to SOlne Past High-Priest : Certificate of Proxy, Autl1.orizing a Pn.st :lligJl-Pl.-iest to Constitute a Ne,v Chapter, and to Install its Ofiiccl"s.

To all whom it '{nay concent: But. more especially to COmpal110n A. B., l\Iost Excellent High.. Priest elect; O. D., King elect; E. F., Scribe elect, and the other Companions 'who 1.ave been empo\vered by a Warrant of Consti. tution issued under the authority of the l\:Iost Excellent Gr~tnd Chapter of , to assemble as it regular Chapter at In the of , and to be known and designated as _ Chapter, No ~ KIlQW' ye, that, re~)osing t111 tlttwt and confidence ill the skin,


271

l\IASONIC DOCUlVIENTS.

prudence and integrity of our l\fost Excellent Companion I have thought proper-being IDJ"self unable to attend-to nominate and appoint the 'said 1fost Excellent COlnpanion .•.. ". to constitute, in· form, the Conlpaniolls aforesaid into a regular Chapter, and to install the officers elect, according to the ancient usages of the Craft, and for so doing this shall be his sufficient warrant. Given under my hand and seal, at , this . .. clay of , in the :year of light 5SG .. , ancl of the cliscover:y' 239 ... [SEAL.] G. . . . .. H... .. , Grand Iligh-P'riest. Petition for tile Capitular Degrees.

[Date.]

To the J.1Iost Excellent High-P')"iest, King, Scribe and Companions of . .... " Ohaptel", No. . .. : The undersigned, a l\Iaster l\Iasoll, and nlember of Lodge, No. . .. , under the .Jurisdiction of the Gl'an<1 Lodge of , hn:ving the good of the Craft at heart, ana being desirous of obtaining further light in ~rasonr:y", fraternally offers himself as a candida/ta fo:r the degrees conferred iu your Chapter. Should his petition be grH,nted, be prolniscs a cheerful conlplianee with all the forms· anel usages of the Fra,ternit.y. IIis resiclence is in ......• and his occupation that of u. •••••• [Signed] B 0 . [To be recommended b:J" tv;":) Royal Arch ~ln,sons.] .

FOl'lU

of a

DClll.it

To. all Ray(d .A1~ch ...~Iasons to

?.vhon~

1J."om a CIln.pte:t·.

these l)resents shall come, greeting: This is to certify that Conlpanioll is, at the date of these presents, a Royal Arch ~If\.son, in good and regular standing, anc1 that, having paid all clues, and being free from all (~hnrges, he is, at his own request, by the vote of the Chapter, cUslllissecl frolH membership in Chapter, No , under the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of " ....... Given nuder IX1J" ha.ndand the seal of the Chapter, at .... , this .. clay of. ".. "., ill t.he yenr of light [SEAL.] 586 .. , and of the (1iscov~ry 2a9 .. . .. .. St~cl·el(n"'!I'


272

GUIDE TO THE R. A. CHAPTER.

Date of Royal Arc.h. DocuD1.ents.

Each of the systems of ~IasonrJT has a date peculiar to itself, and which, as referring to some important' event in its history, is affixed to its official documents. Thus, the epoch of the creation of light in the beginning of the \varld, according ta the ]M:osaic cosmogony, has been assumed, for a symbolical reason, as the era of Ancient Craft Masonry, and hence all documents connected with the first thloee degrees are dated from this period, which date is found by adding 4000 to the vulgar era, and is called in the Year of Light, or A'nno Lucis, usually abbreviated A.'. L.路 .-thus the present year, 1867, in a ~Iasonic document of the symbolic degrees, would be designated as A. '. L. '. 5867. Royal Arch Masons use this date also, but in addition to it they commence their peculiar era ,vith the year in 'which the building of the second Temple was begun, at '\vhich time their traditions inform them tbat a c1iscovery important to the Craft ,vas made. rrhey call their ern. the Year of the Discovery, 01" ....4.nno In.. ventionis, sometimes abbreviated A.'. I.'. or A.路. Inv.路. The 86C011(1 Tenlple 'was commenced 530 years before CHRIST, and hence the Royal Arcb date is found by adding that number of years to the Christian era. Thus, the present year, 1867, in a ROYt\l .A.roll document, would be designated as' Anno Inventionis 2397, and combining the t\VO l\{asonic eras, such a dOCUUlel1t would properly be designated thus: "Anno IJucis 5867, ;;\lld Anno Inventionis 2397," or "in the Year of Light 5867, and of the Discovery 2397."


r·_----------------------- .-------_ _..-POPULAR 'V~l~~~~~ ~EEMASONRY ...

I

I MASONIC PUBLISHING AND MANUFACTURING CO. 432

BROOl\iE STREET, N. Y.

.....

~

Any book in this list sent by mail to any address in the United

States, free of postage, on receipt of the price•

••• A

CYCLOPEDIA OF FltEEl\fASONRY;

containing Definitions of

the Technical Terms used by the Fl'aternity__ ,\Vith an acconnt of the rise and progress of Freemasonry and its Kindred Associations-ancient and nlooern: embracing OI.. IVER'S DICTIONARY OF SY:MBOI..ICAL 1t1ASONltY. Edited by ROBERT MACOY, Sad. Illustrated, willi. nUJ11ter(Jus Engraving8. Cloth, gilt side, $3 00. Half Morocco $4 00

GuiDE

TO THE ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER;

a complete 1\lonitor

for Royal Arch ~fasonry. ,\Vith full instMlctions in the degrees of l\fark iIaster, Past Mastoer, :blost Excellent :Master, ancl RoYiLl AI'ell, according to the text of the Manual of the Chapter. :By JOHN SIIEVILLE, P. G. H. P., of New Jer£ey, anel J.A8. L. GotTI.D, D. G. H. P., of Connecticnt. Together with a. Historical IntroductionJ Explanatory Notes, and Critical Emelldations. To which are adden l\fonitorialIllstructions in the Holy Order of High-Pricsthoocl in Royal Arch ~rasonry, ,,-ith the Ceremonies of the Ordor. By JA8. L. GOULD, 1\1. A.,33d. Cloth-gilt back and side...........•.................... 1 50

THE 1L~SO:NIC IIARMONIA; a Collection of ~rusic, Original and Selected, for the use of the Masonic Fraternj ty. By ItENny STErlIEN CUTr~ER, Doctor

etc.

in Music, Director of the Cecilian Choir,

Published under the auspices of St. Cecile Lodge, No. 5HS, City of New York. Half-boll11d-clotheidcs, $1 00 per doz.l0 00 Trm GENERA.L AHnIAN REZON AND FREE:\IASON'S GUIDE, containing Monitorial InstT11ctions in the Degrees of Entered Appren~

tice, Fellow-Craft, and Master :Mason, with Explanatory NotQs, Emendations" and Lectures: together with the Oerenl011icB of Consecration and Denication ofNc\Y Lodges, Installation of Granel and Subordinate Officers Laying Fonndation Stones, Dedication of :Masonic llana, Grand ,risitations, Burial Services') Regulatio{ls for Processions, :Masonic Calendar.. etc. 'ro which are added a ItITtTAL for a LODGl'J OF SORROW' a.nd the Ceremonies of CougeCratillg :Masonic Cemeteries; also an Appendix, with the Forms of l\!:'},snnw DoCtlmcnt8') Masonic Trials, etc. By DANIEL SICKELS, 3.'3d. Elllh~l1i~hcd with nearly 300 EOhrravillgs and Portrait of the Author. . . Bound in fine Cloth-extra-large 12mo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • • . . . . . . . . . . • •• 1 50 4~ " Morocco, full gilt~ for the 1V. :Master's table, 'with appro.. priate insignia of the East..... • _. . . .. .. . . . . •. .. . . • • 3 00

TIIE

HISTORICAL LAND:U"o\RXS

and other Evidences of Free..

masonry ~explained in a series of :Practical Lectures, with copions Notes. GEORGE OLIVER, D. D. 2 ,-ols. Large duodecimo-witll Portrait 0 the Author. Cloth, $5 00. Half Morocco. . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. ... .. DO

.t5r

\V ASrrrNGTON

AND IIIS l!.A.SONIC CO?trPEERS.

By

SIDNIiY

Past Master of Rural AnlUy Lo(1g'c, No. '70.. Pennsylvania. Illustrated with 0. copy of a :Ma,sonic t>ortrait of 'V~lshington, 1,aintefl /rmn life, never. before pnhlil'tlwd. and nnmerons other c-f1:.rra \'ingt'\. eloth.....:Unif~t'11l 8tj'lc, $250. Cloth-full g-ilt-gilt ~dgC8, ~:3 ;>0. 1\10HAYDEN,

rOl'(,~(,)-fllll

gilt

, .. .

. . .. . .

.

"

5 00


TUE LIGHTS A:ND SUAD(HVS UP FREE:MASONRY;

consisting of

11asonic 'l'ales, Songs and Scntiments~ never before published. By ROB. :MORRIS, K. 1\ Cloth, $1 "'5. Half Morocco $2 50 1rIANU.AL OF THE ORDER OF THE EAS~'ERN STAR,

containing

S:rmbols, Scriptural Illnstrations, Lectures, etc., adapted to the Amen· can system of Adoptive Masonry. By ROBT. :MACOY, National Grand Secretary. Beautifully Illustrated. Gilt Edges and lliuminated Cover 1 00

A~CIENrr CONSTITUTIONS OF FREEMASONS.

By

JA~rES

AN-

Verbatim copy of the original edition of 1723. Cloth, $100. 11al1' l\lorocco ' 2 00

DgR80N.

ILI.USTRATIONS OF

1\IASONRY.

By WM.

topious Notes and Ac1ditions. By REV.

With

PREs'roN.

GEORGE OLIVER,

$1 75. Half Morocco. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

D. D. Cloth,

, 00

YORK l\IASONIC CODE; containing the Olel Ohal'ges, compiled in 1720; Constitutions and General Hegulations of the Grand Lodge of New York, and the H.esolntions and'DeciRiollS now in foree ill that 1\1. \V. Grand Body. Collated by R. ,Y. \VILLI.A.:M T. '\VOODIWFF. Plain binding, 35 cents. Cloth, 50. Tuck .••...••..•••.•..••• 1 OU

Ng\y

.A. work of the

TUE USE AND AnUSE OF FUEEl\fASONRY.

greatest utility to the Brethren of the Society, to mankind in genernl~ and to the ladies in particular. By CAl)'!'. GEO. SWTU. Cloth, $1 25. Half Morocco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . • . . . . . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . • . .. • •. .. 2 50 'l'HE

IIrsrroRY OF

INITIATION,

in T,vclve I...Icctul'CS, comprising

a Detailed Acconnt of the RitC8 anc1 CerClnonies, Doctrines and DisCIpline of the Secret and :Mysteriotls I118titutions of tbt} Ancient World. ily GEORGE OLIVER, D. D. Cloth, $1.50. Half Moroccon .......•.... 2 50 TilE TIiEOORATIC PnILOSOPIIY OF FREEl\lASONRY, in

T"Te}ve

Lectures on its SpeculatiYe~ Operative, and Spurious Branches. By GEO. OLIVEH, D. D. Cloth, $1 50. Half :Morocco.... . . . . • . . . . .. •. . .. 2 50

FnEE1\IASON'S ~{O:h"'1TOn;

containing the Degrees of Free-

nlasonry, enlbraced in the Lodge, Chapter, Council, and Commandery,

embellished with nearly 300 Symbolic 111ustr:ttione. Together with 'l'actics and Drill of Masonic l(nighthood. Also, Forms of ltfasoulc Documents, Notes, Songs, 1:tfasonic Dates, Installations.; etc. By DANIEL SICKELS, 83d. Tuck 1 50

TRADITIONS OF FREEMASONRY and its Coincidence with the Ancient Mysteries. By A. T. C. PIERSON, 33d, Past Grand !\Iaster, Past Grand High-Priest, etc. Illustrated. Large 12mo. Cloth ......•••... 2 00

TIIE HISTORY

OF l\IASONIC PERSECUTIONS,

in different

quar-

ters of the Globe. By VARIOUS AUTHORS. \Vith an Introductory Es.say on the Usages and Customs of S)'mbolic :Masonry. By REV. GEO. OLIVER, D. D.

AIASONIC INsTrrUTES.

By

lTa1'io~ls .i!utlLo'rs.

With

an intro-

dnctory Essay and EXl)lallatory Notes. B~· Rev. GEO. OLIVER, D. D. ~ Two U8eJ'U& 'W01' '8 in one l.:olume. Cloth, $2 00. Ralf :Morocco, 3 00 TIIE TRUE 1\IASONIC CIIART; or, lIieroglyphic ~ronitor; containing· all tllC emblems explained in the c1e~ees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow·Craf't, and :Mastcr Mason. Designed and arranged agreeably to the Lectures. By JERE!lY L.. CnoBs, Grand Lecturer. '\lith a. :Memoir and Portrait of the Author. Edited by DANIEL SICKELS, S3d. 12mo. Cloth.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. . . •.. •• .. . •. 1 25 TIrE l\!YSTIC TIE; or, Facts find Opinions illustrative of tlle Character and Tendency of Freemasonry. By A. G. MACKEY, )1. D.. Cloth, $1 50. Half 1:tIorO'Cco.. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .. . . . . . .. • .. ... 2 50

TrrE

SYMnOT~ OF

masonl'.Y. B,)'

GLOUY, sho\"ing: the Objcet and End of Free-

GEORGE

Ol.rr.En.1 D. D. Cloth, $1 50. IIa.lf M:Ol'OCCO .....

~

no


SIGNS AND SY)IBOLS,

Illustrated and Explained in a Course

of Twelve Lectures on Frcema,sonry. Cloth,. $1 50. Half Morocco DIGEST OF 1VL.I\.SONIC LAW;

By

being a

GEORGE OLIVER,

c0111plete

Code of

D. D.

$:2 50 Regu-

lations, Decision8~ and Opinions upon questions of :Masonic Jurisprudence. By GEO. CRASE. 12mo.Cloth ........•..........•...•..• 1 50

'V.

A l\:fmnoR FOR

THE JOD:ANNITE

l\IAsoN. In a series of letters

to the Right IIonorable the EarlofAboyue. By Rev. GEO. OLIVER, D. D.

TJlE STAR IN TIIE EAST. ~

By Rev.

GEORGE OIJIVER,

D. D.

1?,wo inte'resting and valuable u'orks ol'ougll,t together in one Cloth, $1 50. Half :Morocco . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 50

volurM.

A

COMPAIUSON OF EGYPTIAN SYl\IBOLS WITII 'l'l10SE OF THE HEBREWS. By FREDERICK PORTAL. rrl'anslated from the French, by J01lN SIMONS. Illustrated with SODle fifty cuts, rcpresentin:~ the

'V.

Ancient Symbols, and accompanied with extended explanatIOns, which render it very entertaining and instrnctive. Contents: Principles of Symbology; Application to En'yptian Syml)ols, Sylubol of Colors, Symbol of the Bible, etc. Cloth, $1.00.· Half Morocco. •• . . . .. 2 00

THE SPIRIT OF l\IASONRY. '/

F. A. S.

By

WILLI..:\).!

IIuTCIIINSON,

With c012ioUS Notes, critical andexplallatory, by H.ev. D. D. Cloth, $150. Half l\Iorocco 2 50

GEORGE OLIVER,

BOOK OF

OO~nI.A.NDERY;

tl l\Ionitor for the Orders of

OF THE CHAPTER;

a l\Ionitol' for Royal Arch

TIrE

Masonic Knighthood; containing its 13uria1 Service; an improved System of Tactics and Drill; the Ceremonies of Installation for Grand and Subordinat-e COlnmandcries; a List of the Orders of Knighthood tl1roug:hout the 'Yorlel; and the Forms of Complaint. and Appeal. By JOHN "IV. SIl\1OKS, P. G. M:. lnexiblc CoYer-full gilt, 75 cents. Tuck -full gilt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . . . .. 1 00 ~IANUAL

Masonry, containing the Degrees of 1\.1al'k ~raster, Past 1\'laster, 1\Iost Excellcnt :Master, and Royal Arch; togf!.ther \vith the Order of HighPriesthood; the Ceremonies for Installing the Officers of a Chapter~ with Forms of 1\Iasonic Documents. By J OIIN SIIEYILLE, I>ast Grand High-Priest orNew ,Terscy,and JAl't!ES L. GOULD, Deputy Grand HighPnest of Connecticut. 32mo. Scarlet and gold.. . . . .. . . •. •. .. . . . . . . . .

75

SIGNET OF I{ING SOLO:\ION; or, the FreeUltlSOn'S Danghter. By AUG. C. L. A.,RNOLD, LL.D. Splendidly Illustrated ...•..••.•..••.. 1 25 FnEEl\L~SON'S 1\IONITOR; or,

Illustrations of linsonry. B.V :Ma.SOllic Lecturer. 'Vith Portrait\ ana EmbelClot11. ...•... ........•..... ..••... .... ... . . ... .......•• .•. ...•

rrnOMAS SMITH 'VERB)

lisllCd.

TIlE

RE'VELATIONS OF A SQ,UARE,

75

exhibitllo- a graphic dis-

pla.y of the Sayings and Doings of Eminent Free al1~ Accepted l\fasons, 1'rou1 the Revival in 1717, bY' Dr. Desaguliers, to tl~e Hcul1ion in 1813.

~r~c~~· ••?~~V.~~~ .~'..~: .. ~~~t~l•• ~~~~~~~~~: ••• ~~~~~~ • ~.1. ~~•••• ~~~ 2 50

FA:'\UIJLill TREATISE ON TITE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF

!{J..SONIO JURISPRUDENCE. By cJOIL.~ 'V. SIMONS, P. G.l\f. R_\.TIONALE .!.l\"'D ETHICS OF FREE!\fASONRY; or, the

Cloth... 1 50

Masonic

Institution considered as a means of Social and Individual ProgresfJ. By AUG. C. L. ARNOLD, LL.D. Cloth, $1 50. Half Morocco ••••••••.• 2 50

H.DREW

Cloth, 75.

HISTORY OF lfASONRY.

By G.. W..

FREEMASON'S HAND-nOOK. ':l'uck ORIGIN'

~"1)

EARLY

STF..I:N:Dnl~R.. •• •• ••••

By

Wlf.

1 00

•••••

STATUTES OF THE A.NCIENT AND ACCEPTED RlrrE. PIKll:l

By A.

1 00 8 00


'rITE BOOK OF THE .l.>\.NCIENT AND ACCEPTED SCOTTISII RITE

OF FBEE:MASON~Y: containing Instrnotions in an the Deb'TeeS from the 'Third to the Thirty-third and Last Degree of the :n.itet'together with Cerem.onies of Inauguration, Institution, InstallatIOn, Grand Visitations, Refections, Lodges of Sorrow, Adoption, Constitutions, General Regulations, Calcnaar, etc. By CHARLES T. MCCLEN-

33°. Jj}moellisll.eil with 'Upwards of 300 ;!inely-exeC1.lted. engravings, nearly all ()fwhich arefl'orn original de8'tgns. Cloth, gilt, $5 00

.AOHAN,

~IASONIC LA"\V AND PRACTICE, WITH LOCKWOOD,

Fon'rtrs. By

LUKE

A..

Past Grand High-Pfiest of Connecticut.. .... ....•....... 1 00

DE8 FREIMAURER"S, lIAND:Buclt

(Ge'·Jnan).......................... .....

MORAL DESIGN O:L~ FREEl\IA80NRY.

75

1 00 Booli: OF TIlE CI1A1lTER. By A. G.l\f.A.CKEY, ~f. D...................... 1 75 :M.A.aONIC VOCAL ~r.A..NU.A..L. By ROREP...T ~L-\coY •••••••••••••.••. per doz. 3 00 ~r.un1A.L DE LA },!ASONEIUA

By S.

LAWRENCE •.••••.••••••••••••

<.SjJanish). By A. CABBARD .•••••.••••••••••• 10 00 By ROBT. B. FOLGER. 6 00

HISTORY OF THE ANOIENT AND ACCErTED RITE.

By A. G. l\fACI\:EY.......... ••..•••••• •••• By A. G. :M.A.CKEY. • ••• • • • . • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • •• POCKET LliRARY .AND 'YORKING },!ONITOR. By CHASE................. :!\{ANU.AL OF THE LODGEl. By A. G. 1\f.ACKEY. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • FREEMASON'S It!ANUAL. By !{. J. STEWART........................ ..•. 1fIASONIC TRESTLE-BoARD. By C. \V. MOORE.. • • • . . • • •. . . • • • • • • . • • • • • • • I{EYSTONE OF THE 1tfASONIC Anoll. By CHARLES SCOTT................ 1\fASTER \VORltM.A..N. BY' JOIIN K. HALl•.•..•••.•....•.••.••..•••• TncI~, 1tI.ASONIO HA.RP. By GEORGE 'V. CUASE •••••••••.••.•••......•••. '...... JURYMAN 1IASON. By an E~GLISII RECTOR........ •••.••••.••.•••••••• LEXICON OF FREEMA.SONRY. j\IAaONIC JURISPRUDENCE.

3 2 1 1 1 1 1

00 00 50 75 50 75 25 75 1 00 -25

By TOWN•.••••• ,. •••••••• mUIGU PLACES. By an ENGLISH R:&CTOR......................

20 20

'OUTLINES OF SPECULATIVE FREE::\IABONRY. J\f.ASON

Printed Blank Books for Lodge, Chapter, or

Commandery.. I..IODGE on CU.ArTER REGISTER. . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . • . . • •. • ..••••.••• euch, nECEIPT BOOl\:S l'on LODG E OR CIIAI)'r}~l~..••••• , • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . "

PnoPosITION BOOKS DRAFT BOOKS FOR LODGE

. . •• •. • . . ••• . • • . . •• . . •. • ••

on CIIAP'rERs

•• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "

VISITORS' BOOI\.: •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 'BLAcK

B,ooIt. . . . . • •• •....•......... ......•..••...•..... ..•.•.....••..

OD:& CARns FOn. TllE LODG'I~ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• per dozen, ODE CARDS FOn. TnE CIIAPTER. • • • • . • • .. • • • • • • • • • • • • ... .. • • • • . " PETITIONS FOR 1l'1E:M:BERSIUP••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• per 100, LEDGERS .A.ND ::MI.NUT}~·BoOI{B. LARGE AND SMAl.!.. BIBLES.

2 3 4 3 3 3

50 50 00 50 50 50

1 50 1 50 1 25

:MABONIC LEDGERs-anew a1·ticlc .••• ••••••••......••••.•••.•• per ':,1.11re, 2 50 SECRETARY'S RECEIPTS •••••• •• •••••• ••• •••• •••..•••••• •••• •••• ••••• ••• 8 50 DoOlt OF MAnKS Fon CIIAPT}:ns. • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 4 00 QUESTION BOOKS FOR CO:U:M.A.NDERY. • • • • • • • • • •• ••••••••••••••••••••••••

GOODS OF ALL

LODGE, CIIAPTER,

I~:INDS

FOR.

COl\I~IANDEI{Y,

ON HAND A},"n MADE TO ORDER.

ErrC.,

4 00

GUIDE TO THE ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you