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BIOGRAPHICAL J. EDWARD BLINN Grand Master. 1980-81 M.W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn, our 135th Grand Master, was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on Friday, December 13,1918. He was reared and educated in Kansas City, and received the Degree of Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) from the Kansas City College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1941. He interned at Ozark Osteopathic Hospital in Springfield. In 1942 he entered general practice in Fordland. In 1944 he entered the United States Naval Reserve and served about two years. Following this, he entered practice in Marshfield and has continued there to the present time. In 1943 he married DeEtta Climer of Springfield. They have two daughters and six grandchildren. Professional activities include: Member of Sigma Sigma Phi National Honorary Fraternity; member and Past President Of Ozark District Osteopathic Association; member of Missouri Association of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons and longtime member of House of Delegates; member of American Osteopathic Association; member, American Academy of Sclerotherapy, and American College of General Practitioners in Osteopathic Medicine; Active Staff of Springfield General Osteopathic Hospital (Chief-of-Staff 1965-68); Active StaffofWebco Manor, and Webster County Rest Home; Public Health Officer of Webster County. Civic affairs include: Mayor of Marshfield, 1956-62; member of Marshfield Board of Adjustment; member and Past President, Marshfield Lions Club; various other boards and committees. Dr. Blinn is an active member of Marshfield Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), having served on the Official Board for many years, first as Deacon and presently Elder, Past President of the Board, and not infrequently serves as a lay speaker. Masonic history is as follows: He was Initiated, Passed, and Raised in Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439 in 1944, and served as Master in 1953. In 1947 hejoined Vincel Chapter No.1 10, Zabud Council No. 25, St. John's Commandery No. 20, and Abou Ben Adhem Shrine Temple in Springfield. In 1957 he affiliated with Webster Lodge No. 98 in Marshfield and served as Master in 1966. In 1957 he joined A.A.S.R., Valley of Joplin. He is a member and Past Sovereign of St. Christopher Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine, and in 1979 received the rank and decoration of K.C.C.H. He holds the five Proficiency Cards offered by the Grand Lodge. He was appointed to the Grand Lodge line in 1972 by Most Worshipful Bro. W. Hugh McLaughlin. Prior to this he had served on the Appeals and Grievances Committee and as D.D.G.M. of the 45th Masonic District. He is a member of the Missouri Lodge of Research and the Sword of Bunker Hill. He has been very active in Webster Chapter No. 439, O.E.S. Hobbies include pencil sketching, photography, and travel.


GRAND LODGE Ancient, Free and Accepted

Masons of the State of Missouri •

Official Proceedings One Hundred Sixtieth Annual Communication •

September 28 and 29, 1981, A.L. 5981


OFFICERS

Grand Lodge of Missouri 1980-1981 DR. J. EDWARD BLINN •••.....•••..•..•••...•••.••..•••.. M.W. Grand Master P.O. Box 14, Marshfield 65706 WILLIAM

J.

HILL Deputy Grand Master 2330 Commerce Tower, 911 Main Street, Kansas City 64105 EARL K. DILLE Senior Grand Warden 10258 Butterworth Lane, St. Louis 63131 ROBERT J. CREDE Junior Grand Warden Route 2, Jefferson City 65101 W. MARION LUNA Grand Treasurer c/o Bank of Piedmont, P.O. Box 398, Piedmont 63957

FRANK A. ARNOLD ....•.••••••••.•••...........••••••....•.. Grand Secretary 800 Highway 63 North. Columbia 65201 STANTON T. BROWN

Grand Lecturer

Route 1, Box 225, Buckner 64016 VERN H. SCHNEIDER Senior Grand Deacon 100 North Broadway, Suite 700, St. Louis 63102 CHARLES H. SCHEURICH Junior Grand Deacon 124 Meadow Lane, Columbia 6520 I P. VINCENT KINKEAD Senior Grand Steward Route 2, Box 243, Farmington 63640 WILLIAM H. WISBROCK Junior Grand Steward 733 Landscape Avenue, Webster Groves 63119 THOMAS K. MCGUIRE, fR. Senior Grand Manhal 2522 South Glendale, Springfield 65804 ROBERT G. BIRD Junior Grand Manhal 2415 East Latoka, Springfield 65804 MORRIS J. FAULKNER , Grand Sword Bearer Route 1, Box 208A, Fordland 65652 CARL W. TERRY Grand PUTSuivant 609 East McVay, Marshfield 65706 THE REV. CARL L. RADFORD Grand Chaplain 2334 South Dollison, Springfield 65807 THE REV. CECIL H. HURT Grand Chaplain 400 Crestview Drive, Union 63084 DR. W. TRIBBEY NICKERSON Grand Chaplain 2309 Erie Street, North Kansas City 64116 RABBI BRUCE S. DIAMOND Grand Chaplain 7430 Tulane, St. Louis 63130 DR. MURRELL T. CUNNINGHAM Grand Chaplain 6354 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton 63105 DR. M. GRAHAM CLARK Grand Chaplain School of the Ozarks, Point Lookout 65726 THE REV. ERNEST H. WOTRING, JR Grand Chaplain Route l, Box 47, Conway 65632 LON G. ORR Grand Orator P.O. Box 73, Joplin 64801 ROBERT D. JENKINS Grand Orator 7741 Troost, Kansas City 64131 JAMES S. WEST Grand Tiler 1911 South Bruce Avenue, Springfield 65804


One Hundred Sixtieth Annual Communication ORGAN SELECTIONS Jack J. Stottlemyre. Organist

The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened in the 160th Annual Communication on Monday, September 28, 1981 in the auditorium of the Abou Ben Adhem Shrine Mosque, 601 St. Louis Street, Springfield, Missouri. M.W. Past Grand Master Walter L. Walker called the Grand Lodge to order at 9:45 a.m. for the presentation of Most Worshipful Grand Master J. Edward Blinn and other Grand Lodge Officers. M.W. Brother Walker presented the Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge of Missouri for the year 1980-81: Grand Tiler-RW. Bro. James S. West, Springfield Grand Orator-RW. Bro. Robert D. Jenkins, Kansas City Grand Orator-RW. Bro. Lon G. Orr, Carthage Grand Chaplain-R.W. Bro. Ernest H. Wotring, Jr., Conway Grand Chaplain-R.W. Bro. W. Tribbey Nickerson, North Kansas City Grand Chaplain-R.W. Bro. Cecil H. Hurt, Dexter Grand Chaplain-R.W. Bro. Carl L. Radford, Springfield Grand Pursuivant-R.W. Bro. Carl W. Terry, Marshfield Grand Sword Bearer-R.W. Bro. Morris J. Faulkner, Fordland Junior Grand Marshal-R.W. Bro. Robert G. Bird, Springfield Senior Grand Marshal-RW. Bro. Thomas K. McGuire, Jr., Springfield Junior Grand Steward-R.W. Bro. William H. Wisbrock, Webster Groves Senior Grand Steward-R.W. Bro. P. Vincent Kinkead, Farmington Junior Grand Deacon-R.W. Bro. Charles E. Scheurich, Columbia Senior Grand Deacon-R.W. Bro. Vern H. Schneider, Saint Louis Grand Lecturer-R.W. Bro. Stanton T. Brown, Buckner Grand Secretary-R.W. Bro. Frank A. Arnold, Boonville-Columbia Grand Treasurer-R.W. Bro. W. Marion Luna, Piedmont Junior Grand Warden-R.W. Bro. Robert J. Crede, Jefferson City Senior Grand Warden-R.W. Bro. Earl K. Dille, Saint Louis Deputy Grand Master-R.W. Bro. Wm. J. Hill, Kansas City

M.W. BROTHER WALKER: And now, Brethren, it is my privilege and great honor to present to you your Grand Master: Most Worshipful Brother and Doctor J. Edward Blinn of Marshfield. The Grand Lodge stood in applause of welcome. as M.W. Grand Master Blinn entered the auditorium and accorded him the Grand Honors. Not in attendance at the 160th Annual Communication: R.W. Grand Chaplain Bruce S. Diamond R.W. Grand Chaplain Murrell T. Cunningham RW. Grand Chaplain M. Graham Clark

5


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M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn with the Grand Lodge Officers opened the 160th Annual Communication on the Degree of Master Mason in accordance with Missouri Ritual. Bro. Jack J. Stottlemyre at the organ accompanied the singing of the opening ode. R.W. Bro. W. Tribbey Nickerson, Grand Chaplain, offered prayer. CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE-INTERIM REPORT

R.W. Bro Ray Hilton, Chairman of the Committee on Credentials, presented the interim report. To the Grand Lodge oj Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons oj the State oj Missouri: BRETIIREI\;: Your Committee on Credentials is pleased to report that a constitutional number of subordinate lodges is present. RAY HILTOI\;, Chairman. INTRODUCTION OF PAST GRAND MASTERS OF MISSOURI

R.W. Bro. Vern H. Schneider, Senior Grand Deacon, introduced the Past Grand Masters of Missouri who were present: Homer L. Ferguson (1951-52) Harold M. Jayne (1956-57) Frank P. Briggs (1957-58) Bruce H. Hunt (1960-61) George F. Morrison (1964-65) Elvis A. Mooney (1968-69) J. Morgan Donelson (1969-70)

William H Chapman (1970-71) Walter L. Walker (1973-74) Herman A. Orlick (1974-75) Lewis C. Wes Cook (1975-76) Fielding A. Poe (1976-77) Dr. James A. Noland, Jr. (1977-78) Dr. .J. C. Montgomery, Jr. (1978-79)

As each Past Grand Master was introduced, the Grand Lodge greeted him with applause. Grand Master Blinn called up the Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge accorded the Grand Honors to the Past Grand Masters. M.W. Bro. Frank P. Briggs responded to the welcome on behalf of all the Past Grand Masters. INTRODUCTION OF GRAND MASTERS OF OTHER GRAND LODGES

R.W. Bro. Charles E. Scheurich, Junior Grand Deacon, introduced the Grand Masters of other jurisdictions: M.W. M.W. M.W. M.W. M.W. M.W.

Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand

Master Master Master Master Master Master

Buford W. Vest of Arkansas Keith L. Muntz of Iowa Ben B. Boyles of Kansas Harold C. Wurdeman of Nebraska Wilson B. Haney of Oklahoma Danny W. Seaton of Tennessee

The Grand Lodged accorded the Grand Masters of other Grand J urisdictions the Grand Honors. M.W. Bro. Danny W. Seaton of Tennessee responded on behalf of the visiting Grand Masters.


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INTRODUCTION OF GRAND OFFICERS OF OTHER GRAND LODGES

R.W. Bro. P. Vincent Kinkead, Senior Grand Steward, introduced the Grand Officers of other grand jurisdictions: R.W. R.W. R.W. R.W. R.W. R.W. R.W. R.W. Service

Deputy Grand Master Monroe Robinson of Arkansas Senior Grand Warden E. Gene Ross of Illinois Senior Grand Warden Robert R. Stevens of Indiana Grand Secretary Tom Eggleston of Iowa Grand Secretary Albert O. Arnold, Jr. of Kansas Grand Secretary Melvin Mullins of Kentucky Junior Grand Warden Darrell Aderman of Wisconsin Bro. Stewart M. L. Pollard, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Masonic Association of the United States

R.W. Bro. E. Gene Ross of Illinois responded on behalf of the visiting Grand Lodge Officers. INTRODUCTION OF REPRESENTATIVES OF OTHER MISSOURI ORGANIZATIONS

R.W. Bro. William H. Wisbrock, Junior Grand Steward, introduced the leaders of the Appendant Bodies of Missouri: R.W. Bro. Walter C. Ploeser, Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Orient of Missouri. R.W. Bro. Gene M. Zinn, Most Excellent Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, State of Missouri. Bro. Robert N. Hunter, Most Illustrious Grand Master of the Grand Council of Cryptic Masons, State of Missouri. Wor. Bro. Henry R. Stoker, Right Eminent Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar, State of Missouri. R.W. Bro. Ronald M. Compton, Executive Officer of Missouri, International Order of DeMolay. Bro. Ronald Bardol, Associate Grand Guardian of the Grand Guardian Council of Missouri, International Order of Job's Daughters.

R.W. Bro Walter C. Ploeser, Sovereign Grand Inspector General, responded for the representatives of the bodies of the Masonic Family of Missouri. INTRODUCTION AND RECOGNITION OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS

R.W. Bro. Thomas K. McGuire, Jr., Senior Grand Marshal, presented the Right Worshipful Brothers who served as District Deputy Grand Master during the year 19RO-81. INTRODUCTION AND RECOGNITION OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND LECTURERS

R.W. Bro. Stanton T. Brown, Grand Lecturer, presented the Right Worshipful Brothers who served as District Deputy Grand Lecturer during the year I980-R 1. INTRODUCTION OF PAST GRAND TREASURER RW. Bro. Robert G. Bird, Junior Grand Marshal, introduced RW. Bro. William H. Utz,Jr., who served the Grand Lodge as Grand Treasurer during the years 1956-80. R.W. Grand Treasurer-Emeritus William H. Utz, Jr. responded to the introduction and welcome.


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1981

PRESENTATION OF 50-YEAR BUTTON OF GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI TO R.W. BRO. FREELON K. HADLEY. GRAND LECTURER-EMERITUS

M.W. Grand Master Blinn extended the honor and gave the recognition due RW. Bro. Freelon K. Hadley on his attainment of the distinguished status of 50-Year Master Mason. R.W. Bro. Stanton T. Brown conducted Brother Hadley to the altar and presented him. R.W. Grand Chaplain Cecil H. Hurt offered prayer. The Grand Secretary read the Masonic History of Brother Hadley. M.W. Grand Master Blinn invested Brother Hadley with the award of the Grand Lodge for 50 years of membership - The 50-Year Button. R.W. Brother Hadley addressed the Grand Lodge and expressed his appreciation for the ceremony of the presentation of the 50-Year Button in the 160th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. INTRODUCTION OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND STAFF MEMBERS OF THE MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

R.W. Bro. Wm. J. Hill, Deputy Grand Master and President of the Masonic Home Board, introduced the members of the Board and the officials of the Home: R.W. Bro. Carl I. Stein, Secretary to the Board of Directors R.W. Bro. Vern H. Schneider Wor. Bro. Joseph H. Collison R.W. Bro. Harry C. Ploetze R.W. Bro. K. Roger Pennel R.W. Bro. Earl K. Dille R.W. Bro. Robert J. Crede R.W. Bro. W. Marion Luna Wor. Bro. John E. Wetzel R.W. Bro. Robert D. Jenkins R.W. Bro. Robert G. Bird M.W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn, Honorary Chairman of the Board

Absent from the Session were: Bro.James E. Dearing, memberofthe Board; Bro. H. David Thomas, Administrator of the Home; R.W. Bro. Howard E. Ward, Coordinator of Fraternal Relations. MESSAGES AND GREETINGS

The Grand Secretary read the letter of the good wishes and fraternal greetings of the Grand Chapter of Missouri, Order of the Eastern Star. PARTIAL REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE

M.W. Bro. Walter L. Walker, Chairman of the Committee onJurisprudence, presented a partial report as follows: To the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Your Committee on Jurisprudence respectfully reports as follows: Two proposals to amend By-Laws were submitted at the 1980 Communication which require action at this time in order that the Mileage and Per Diem Committee may know how to figure your checks. The first resolution concerns increasing the Grand Lodge dues from $6.00 to $7.50. The second resolution is an increase in the mileage and per diem which increases per diem from $25.00 to $40.00 per day and the mileage from 12 cents to 15 cents. I have been


1981

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advised by the Grand Master and other Grand Lodge officers that if the increase in the Grand Lodge dues fails, then the resolution on mileage and per diem increase should also fail as we would not have funds to increase the mileage and per diem without the Grand Lodge dues increase. Be It Resolved, That Article X, Section 10.040, of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri, be amended to read as follows: Section 10.040. GRAND LODGE DUES. Each lodge pays seven dollars and fifty cents to the Grand Lodge for each Master Mason (except those whose dues have been remitted and those exempted under Section (a) of Section 18.050) reported in the annual return, which dues include a subscription to The Freemason magazine. The Grand Lodge, promptly as collected, pays two dollars and fifty cents for each Master Mason to the Masonic Home of Missouri.

Your Committee approves this resolution as to form and advises that it is proper to vote on this resolution as this time and makes no recommendation as to whether the resolution should pass or be defeated. In order to bring this matter to a vote, I move that this resolution be adopted. The motion was seconded. M.W. Grand Master Blinn called for discussion. R.W. BRO EARL K. DILLE: I would like to offer an amendment to the first resolution as stated by the Chairman of the Jurisprudence Committee - to change the figure $7.50 to $8.00, which would be an increase of $2.00 in per capita instead of $1.50. I would like to give the rationale for that. Brothers, several weeks ago I was invited to attend a meeting of the Ways and Means Committee, as Senior Grand Warden. I might add as a guest of that Committee, rather than as a member. This was a real eye-opener for me, following close on the near completion of my two years as Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Masonic Home. I have developed a considerable concern with these matters; and I found in the meeting with the Ways and Means Committee that we are faced with the absolute necessity, Brethren, of replenishing our General Fund. For the past several years we have been busily engaged in eating our seed corn. Let me give you just a few numbers. For the 1980-81 year, which we are presently completing, we budgeted $401,700. At the completion of this yearOctober 15 - we will have created an additional $58,000 deficit. If a $2.00 increase in the per capita is voted, for the 1981-82 year we will still not be in the black. Brethren, we will have a proposed budget of $426, 700; but with income including the increased per capita we will still be $42,700 in the red for the year's operation. The reason is that the per capita for the first year after it is voted affects the budget only to the tune of about 25 per cent, since the money won't arrive until next summer. However, if this amount is voted, then the succeeding year - 1982-83 - even assuming any normal inflationary increase in the budget, we will be in the black by $36,600. And in the following year 1983-84 - (and these are estimates, Brothers), we will have a budget of roughly $516,000; we will be in the black only $10,000. So in view of the fact that our General Fund has taken a terrible beating in the past few years - you all know that we had to hit it for some $230,000 to build our new office building in Columbia - I urge you all to support the amendment to make the increase in per capita $2.00, instead of$I.50. Thank you very much.


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M.W. PAST GRAI'D MASTER WILLIAM H CIIAPMAI': With mixed feelings, but without equivocation, I second the amendment made by R.W. Bro. Earl Dille. I'd like to give you a little bit of a different perspective. However, first, I say "with mixed feelings" because fortunately - I say fortunately, rather than unfortunately - our organization is not empowered with the right to print our own money. Therefore, we can't deficit finance as some organizations or groups that we know of do. I think that is fortunate. But that means then that we must ourselves be fiscally responsible. We cannot be any different from any other organization or any other business; we cannot afford to allow the output in the red and not do something to correct that type of a situation. Some years back you in Grand Lodge Session held in another city voted to build a Grand Lodge Building. It was estimated at that time the building would cost $200,000. And it was hoped that the funds to raise that building could be obtained from the membership. Brethren, it cost $300,000 to build that building; and the contributions from the membership was $70,000. That meant, as indicated by R.W. Brother Dille, we had to invade our General Fund to the tune of $230,000. The plan at that time was to replenish that fund over a period of nine years - a little over nine years - at $25,000 a year. Unfortunately, because of the situation we found ourselves in monetarily, we have not been able to make the first payment yet on that repayment. It was not long ago that our General Fund had approximately $500,000 as a balance. At the end of the previous fiscal year - not the one just ending, but the year previous to that-our General Fund balance was at $172,000. You will hear the report of the Grand Treasurer today that at the end of our last fiscal year that fund stands at $116,000. Brethren, we are going downhill fast. We had better put the brakes on; and the only way I know to do that is to take a responsible course and to commit ourselves to an increase of $2.00 per capita dues. Thank you. M.W. GRAND MASTER BLII'N: Are you ready for the question? We are voting on the amendment first. All in favor of the amendment to increase the per capita by $2.00, instead of $1.50 - all in favor of the motion as amended will vote by the voting sign of the order. Down. Contrary-minded by the same sign. The motion to amend the original motion by the change of the amount of increase of Grand Lodge dues from $1.50 to $2.00 was carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master called for the vote on the main motion as amended each lodge pays eight dollars to the Grand Lodge for each Master Mason.... All in favor of the main motion as amended will make it known by the voting sign of the order. Down. Contrary-minded by the same sign. The main motion as amended was carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The Resolution for the amendment of Section 10.040. Grand Lodge Dues. to read as follows: Each lodge pays eight dollars to the Grand Lodge for each Master Mason ... was ADOPTED. M.W. Brother Walker continued with the Report of the Committee on Jurisprudence. Be It Resolved, That Section 1.080. Mileage and Per Diem. be amended to read as

follows:


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Section 1.080. MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. Effective from the commencement of the 1981 Annual Communication the Officers of the Grand Lodge, the Past Grand Masters, the Past Grand Secretaries, the Past Grand Lecturers, the Past Grand Treasurer, the Members of the Committee on Credentials, Appeals and Grievances, Jurisprudence, Masonic Education, Ways and Means, Mileage and Per Diem, and of the Building Supervisory Board, the Chairman of all other Stand Committees, and one Representative of each Chartered Lodge and each Lodge U .D. are paid $40.00 for each day they are in actual attendance upon the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, and 15¢ per mile for each mile necessarily traveled in going to and returning therefrom. No one may receive more than one payment for the same attendance or travel.

The Jurisprudence Committee approves this resolution as to form and states that it is proper to vote on this resolution at this time and makes no recommendation as to whether this resolution should pass or be defeated. In order to bring this matter to a vote, I move this resolution be adopted. The motion was seconded. M.W. GRAND MASTER BUN]\;: It has been moved and seconded. Is there any discussion? Are you ready for the question? All in favor of the motion will make it known by the voting sign of the order. Down. Contrary-minded by the same sign. The motion is carried. The amendment of Section 1.080. Mileage and Per Diem. was ADOPTED. NOMINATIONS FOR MASONIC HOME BOARD

The following brothers were placed in nomination for the two four-year terms as members of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri: Wor. Bro. Walter E. Hays, nominated by R.W. Bro. Warren E. Carr R.W. Bro. Albert Elfrank, nominated by M.W. Bro. Elvis A. Mooney War. Bro. Eldon Turnbull, nominated by M.W. Bro. William H Chapman

The Grand Master announced that ballots for the election of members of the Masonic Home Board would be prepared and distributed to the voting members of the Grand Lodge at the time set for election: Monday afternoon - 2:30 p.m. The Grand Master announced that if there are any resolutions to be presented for action at this Grand Lodge Session they must be presented today. The Grand Master announced the group photograph to be taken at the front of Abou Ben Adhem Shrine Mosque, immediately after the Grand Lodge was called from labor. CAll FROM LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called from labor. R.W. Grand Chaplain Ernest H. Wotring, Jr. offered prayer.


Monday Afternoon 1:30 p.m. ORGAN SELECTIONS

Jack

J. Stottlemyre, Organist CALL TO LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called to labor. R. W. Grand Chaplain Carl L. Radford offered prayer. REMARKS OF OFFICERS OF MAGNOLIA LODGE NO. 626

Worshipful Master William]. Mathis and Senior Warden Eugene T. Davenport of Magnolia Lodge No. 626 at St. Louis made a presentation of M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn, which he accepted saying that he would add it to his Masonic memorabilia.

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Address of the Grand Master BRETHREN: Welcome to the 160th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri, and to Springfield, the Queen City of the Ozarks. Down here in Southwest Missouri we have lots of ways; and we feel sure that you are just bound to like some of them. A very hearty welcome also to our distinguished guests from other Grand Jurisdictions and to the leaders of our adoptive and appendant bodies in Missouri. A special welcome also to R.W. Bro. Stewart Pollard, Executive Secretary of the Masonic Service Association. I hope that we may hear from each of you some time during the sessions. A special thank-you is in order to the Potentate, Illustrious Sir Art Summer; the Administrator, Don Wardlaw; and to the Nobles of Abou Ben Adhem Shrine for the use of the Mosque during this session. We sincerely appreciate their willingness to share their facility and their help and cooperation. Although we have already introduced them, I would say a special word of welcome to our Past Grand Masters and express my thanks to you for the words of encouragement you have offered, and for your support, your presence at meetings this past year, and your leadership and counsel, both past and present. Your records are impressive; and it will be an honor to join your ranks at the close of this Communication. One note of concern - ourJewish brethren are unable to be with us this year due to the fact that the days of this session fall during the Jewish High Holidays, the holiest days of the Jewish religious calendar. Many of our Jewish brethren have expressed concern to me that they would not be able to attend. They were also concerned about what this would do to their eligibility for the Achievement Award. Because of my feeling that no brethren or their lodges should be penalized because of their faith, I have asked the Education Committee to take this into consideration when they review the applications of Masters and lodges affected by this situation; and I feel sure they will. STATE OF THE CRAFT It has been my pleasure this past year to observe many lodges at first hand, having visited and met with them. Here I saw a great deal of enthusiasm and activity on a continuing basis in most lodges, and evidence of revival in others. From these personal observations, I would be tempted to say of the State of the Craft, "All is well" - period. And with those and a large number of the lodges, all is well, and this is evidenced by many of the reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters. But there is all too large a segment of the lodges where all is not well, again evidenced by the reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters and from my own personal knowledge. The primary cause in most instances is poor quality of leadership. Other factors exist such as small number of members and smaller number of resident members, lack of interest, 'apathy, etc. Leadership is the key to survival of any lodge. All too often the lodge is willing to settle for far less than it should reasonably be able to expect. When a lodge elevates a brother to a position of prominence as an officer, it has a right 13


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to expect leadership and diligent service in return. Less than this is a dereliction of duty; and the lodge is bound to suffer. Apathy and lack of interest are usually symptoms of poor leadership. Leadership is not an "in name only" function. Successful leadership may require some Inspiration, but it requires more Perspiration! - work, if you please. Vntil our lodges begin to demand this type of performance in their officers, they are doomed to continue suffering setbacks, disappointment and decay; and the Fraternity will suffer proportionately. I believe our task at the Grand Lodge level is to find ways of strengthening all of our lodges, offering guidance and support by some type of leadership training for the officers of the constituent lodges. Leadership at the grassroots level is the key to survival of our Fraternity. An abortive attempt was made this year to start consideration of some type of officer training, but it "died a-borning." Hopefully, this will be a program of the future. I do not intend to sound pessimistic. Overall, the State of the Craft is good. But weakness tolerated is weakness propagated. It behooves us, then, to be about the business of strengthening our Fraternity where it counts most - at the constituent lodge level. And our efforts must be sustained. Persistence is the necessary factor. Calvin Coolidge had this to say about Persistence: "Nothing in the world can take the place of PERSISTENCE. Talent will not ... nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not ... un rewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education alone will not ... the world is full of educational failures. PERSISTENCE and DETERMINATION alone are omnipotent." But this persistence and determination must be properly directed. If we persist in following a course of apathy and inactivity, certainly nothing will be accomplished; our present course will be maintained; and our decline will continue. Our membership loss this year, I am informed, is around 1,850. In many areas of the state a true revival is occurring. We can, and we must, make revival our aim in every quarter. But it must be a concerted effort by all the Craft. The Grand Lodge Officers alone cannot accomplish the task. Every officer of every lodge must become involved, and then in turn involve the members. No question but there are still lodges in the state that need to consolidate. No question but it is a painful consideration for many of them; but if it must be faced, it must be faced. Other lodges can avert this dissolution; but they must work at the task. I positively believe we have made a good start this year; but it must be continued. The years immediately ahead are challenging years. The State ofthe Craft can become as good as we, collectively, wish to make it;


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and the future can be as bright as we wish it to be, provided only that we spell wish - W-O-R-K! LOGO I am sure that you all know by now that we have had a logo this year; at any rate, I have passed out a large number of cards trying to get the word around! The logo is the action word REACT, the letters standing for Ritual, Education, Administration, Charity, and the Tenets (especially Brotherly Love). It has been gratifying to see the way in which the logo has "caught on"; and I appreciate the many, many favorable comments you have made in regard to it. Certainly, these are five areas of fraternal life and concern that need to be bolstered and improved at both the lodge and individual levels if our Fraternity is to prosper. I think you have worked at it; and I think there is notable evidence of improvement. I urge you to continue to REACT! To do so will carryon the revival that was sought. CONFERENCE OF GRAND MASTERS OF MASONS IN NORTH AMERICA In February I attended this conference which was held in Orlando, Florida. It was the third such conference I have had the pleasure of attending. Also in attendance were Deputy Grand Master William J. Hill, and Senior Grand Warden Earl K. Dille. Our Grand Secretary Frank Arnold attended the Conference of Grand Secretaries. Others in the Missouri delegation were Imperial Potentate F. T. H'Doubler, Grand Master of the Grand Council George Johnson, and Sovereign Grand Inspector General Walter Ploeser. I served on the Finance Committee. I was also asked to deliver a paper on "Statewide Concurrent Jurisdiction." My thanks to R.W. Brother Arnold for his help in surveying the other Grand Jurisdictions in regard to their position on this matter, and to R.W. Bro. Vern Schneider for use of research he had done prior to our adoption of this process. Attendance at this Conference is a highlight of the year. The opportunity to hear discussion of problems and their possible solutions is of value; but the opportunity to meet and talk with the Masonic leaders of North America is of even greater value. It is a very worthwhile meeting. GRAND MASTER'S BREAKFAST One of the unique Masonic events of the year is the Grand Master's Breakfast sponsored by Perseverance Lodge No. 92 at Louisiana, held this year on October 18, 1981 for the 24th time. The 4:00 a.m. opening of the lodge is no deterrent to an enthusiastic crowd gathering, receiving the Grand Master, and then retiring to the dining room for a hearty breakfast. The contributions of the brethren, received via a washtub at the head of the serving table, totaled $1,246.75, and were sent to the Masonic Home - a great undertaking with a noble purpose. The Grand Master's Consecration Breakfast, held for the 29th time in StLouis on April 25, 1981, is truly an outstanding event. It certainly must be one of the largest, if not the largest, special Masonic events in the country. The sight of 1,500 to 1,600 men gathered together to break bread and hear an outstand-


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ing Masonic speaker is truly an inspiring experience. The Breakfast Committee, chaired by R.W. Bro. Harry Ploetze, is to be commended for their dedicated and untiring efforts in behalfofthis project. May it long continue to grow and prosper. AREA MEETINGS The Area Meetings, I believe, would have to be judged a huge success this year. The weather cooperated beautifully in all but one instance, that being the meeting at Maryville where blizzard conditions prevailed. Overall, the percentages of attendance were excellent, and the enthusiasm of the participants was evident by their attention and later comments, and by numerous later reports of various facets of the program presented being put into action in many lodges. These meetings are an excellent forum for disseminating and exchanging ideas and programs, and for meeting with the Masonic leadership of Missouri at the grass-roots level; for it is here that the ground swell of participation, renewal, and revival must occur. GRAND SECRETARY Unfortunately, most Grand Masters find it necessary to maintain their activities in their business, profession, or employment at least at maintenance level. I have endeavored to maintain my practice although at times it seemed at a rather abortive level, or so my nurse and receptionist have on occasion informed me. R.W. Bro. Frank Ames Arnold has been most helpful and effective in taking care of many routine matters that are continually necessary to handle, and in so many ways to help conserve my time so that I could invest it where I thought it to be most effective - at the constituent lodge level. I wish to publicly thank him for all ofthat help, aid, and assistance that he has so freely given. We have required a great amount of his time because of the large number of special ceremonies and other important matters that have continually arisen; but he has always been willing to assist. Thank you, Brother Arnold. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS I wish to thank the District Deputy Grand Masters for the excellent support they have given me this year, for their enthusiasm at the Deputy Conferences, and for their willingness to lend strength and support to the program for the year. I have had to call on all of them on at least one or two special matters, and many of them on numerous occasions. Their dedication is inspiring; and I thank each one for a job well done. RITUAL It has been my privilege to serve with R.W. Bro. Stanton Brown during all of my tenure in the Line, he having been appointed Grand Lecturer at the same time that I was appointed Senior Grand Marshal. I have been impressed with his dedication to the task of maintaining the Ritual at a high level of proficiency throughout the state, and with his willingness to serve the Craft. It was my pleasure this year to lend support to his efforts and that of his Deputies, by attending nearly all of the Area Schools, and also some District


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Schools. It was a special pleasure on one occasion to serve with him in the conferral of the Third Degree on a candidate of Trilumina Lodge No. 205 at Marshall. I also want to say a special word of thanks and appreciation to the District Deputy Grand Lecturers for their tireless and dedicated work with the lodges of their districts. If the officers or brethren desire help, it is readily available to them. I also must take special note of the Abou Ben Adhem Clowns Third Degree Team. It has been my privilege for several years to have been their instructor. R.W. Bro. John Lorenz has relieved me of that duty this year. I have made official visits to at least five lodges where this team has conferred the Third Degree. They are very devoted to the team effort and do an outstandingjob of conferring the Third Degree in an exemplary manner. I thank them for their efforts, and for the support they have given me this year. NECROLOGY At each Grand Lodge Communication we are saddened by the Report of the Committee on Necrology. Our Grand Secretary reports that more than 2,550 of our brethren have answered the summons to the Grand Lodge on High. We pause at this point in the Grand Master's Address to pay our fraternal respects to the memory of our departed brethren who have made the darkjourney, yet remembering that the ever-green and ever-living Sprig of Faith blooms at the head of the grave. We will not hear the reading of the biographies of those brethren who have served the Grand Lodge, as they are printed in the Report ofthe Committee. Instead, I have asked the Chairman ofthe Committee, M.W. Bro. George F. Morrison to conduct a brief memorial service. SPECIAL EVENTS FIRST MISSOURI LECTURE SERIES The First Missouri Lecture Series was a real highlight of the year. Wor. Bro. Harry Carr, a Past Junior Grand Deacon of the United Grand Lodge of England and for many years Secretary and Editor of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, who is recognized as one of the foremost Masonic scholars and lecturers living today, presented two lectures in four strategic locations around the state. One was on "600 Years of Craft Ritual"; and the other on "Freemasonry in the lJ .S.A." It was most interesting to hear him recount the development of our ritual, documenting each development with proof, and also to hear an English Mason's views of Masonry in this country. Wor. Bro. Tom Warden, Chairman, and his Education Committee are to be highly commended for obtaining and arranging for this outstanding program. It is regrettable that more brethren did not make the effort to attend. It was my privilege to issue an Edict making Worshipful Brother Carr an Honorary Member of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. It is as follows: EDICT To: All Masons in the State of Missouri, and to all Masons wheresoever dispersed. Re: Honorary Membership for Worshipful Brother Harry Carr in the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri. BRETHREN: The First Missouri Lecture Series, held in the month of May 1981, has


18

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

been completed, and is judged by all to have been an outstanding success and of great benefit to Missouri Masonry. Worshipful Brother Carr has rendered signal service to the Grand Lodge of Missouri in presenting two outstanding Lectures in four strategic sites in the State on, "600 Years of Craft Ritual," and "Freemasonry in the U.S.A.," and has given ofhimselfunstintingly in this labor of fraternal love and affection. Worshipful Brother Harry Carr is a Past Junior Grand Deacon of the United Grand Lodge of England; a Past Master, and for many years, Secretary of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge, and has been for many years acclaimed the Premier Masonic Lecturer of the world. I, therefore, do declare that Worshipful Brother Harry Carr be granted HONORARY MEMBERSHIP in the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and issue my Edict proclaiming that it be so ordered. I further order that a copy of this Edict be sent to each of the lodges in Missouri, and that it be read in its entirety at the next regular communication of the said lodges. Effective this 15th day of May, 19tH. Earl K. Dille, J. E. Blinn, D.O., Grand Master

Wm.J. Hill, Deput)' Grand Master

Senior Grand Warden

Robert J. Crede, Junior Grand Warden.

Attest: Frank A. Arnold. Grand Secretary.

GREEN TREE TAVERN Although at the time I am writing about it, this event has not yet occurred, I am sure it will be an outstanding event, and I wish to thank each one who helped to get it organized. R.W. Bro. P. Vincent Kinkead acted as my representative in the planning and preparation stages. The Green Tree Tavern is in Sainte Genevieve, and was the meeting place of the first Masonic lodge in Missouri Territory, and, in fact, the first Masonic lodge west of the Mississippi River. Louisiana Lodge No. 109 was chartered 17 July, 1807 by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania while meeting in a "Grand Extra Communication." A Specific Communication of the Grand Lodge is to be opened in Saline Lodge No. 226 at St. Mary's, then adjourn to Ste. Genevieve, form a procession and proceed to the Green Tree Tavern, where, after appropriate ceremonies in which I hope all of the adoptive and Appendant Masonic Bodies of Missouri will participate, a bronze plaque will be unveiled. MASONIC SERVICE HOSPITAL VISITATION PROGRAM This is a most outstanding volunteer program of the Masonic Service Association, rendering service of untold value to the patients in our Veterans' Hospitals. All that is necessary to get some idea of how those services are valued is to talk to some of the recipients. They speak in glowing terms of those volunteers who give of their time to help their fellowmen. At the request of Edward Gilmore, Field Agent at John Cochran V.A. Hospital, St. Louis; Andrew Dorsey, Field Agent at Truman V.A. Hospital, Columbia; and Don Robinson, Field Agent at Kansas City V.A. Hospital, Kansas City, I visited each of these brothers and met some of their staff of volunteers, toured the Hospitals, met the Administrators and some of their staff, and had opportunity to meet and visit with some of the Masonic brethren who were patients in these facilities.


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This is a most worthwhile program; and I thank these Field Agents and their staffs for a wonderful job well done. There are leaflets on a table in the foyer explaining this great program. I hope you will make yourselves informed on this program and if you can, volunteer your services. Help is always needed. DECISIONS R.W. Bro. Lloyd Finney, District Deputy Grand Master of District 24, presented a question on behalf of the Secretary of Trilumina Lodge No. 205, as follows: "Can a brother be restored to good standing on his membership record following favorable action on his Petition for Reinstatement by paying the dues for all of the period of his suspension, knowing, of course, that if he could, it would not in any case count toward eligibility for the 50路Year Jewel?" Section 19.020 provides for automatic reinstatement if delinquent dues are paid within one year. Section 19.030 provides the process for reinstatement after more than one year. Decision: Membership and good standing in the lodge is a current condition. Therefore, payment of delinquent dues other than as provided by Sections 19.020 and 19.030 does not restore a member to good standing on his membership record for his years of suspension. II

I am not certain that this qualifies as a decision, but I am reporting it because the question was asked twice by different lodges. The question was, "Section 30.230 of the Trial Code states that all documents and records connected with a Masonic Trial should be filed with the Secretary. Is this the lodge Secretary or the Grand Secretary?" Decision: In all instances in the Trial Code where the term Secretary is used it refers to the lodge Secretary. When the Grand Secretary is meant, it so states as in Section 29.200. Therefore, the records and documents should be filed with the lodge Secretary. III

The question submitted from Wakanda Lodge No. 52 was as follows: Can the Temple Board hold a proposed annual raffle to sell chances on various items to be given away? Annotation No.5 to Section 25.090 prohibits solicitation to win a contest; under Miscellaneous Decisions. Annotation No. 15 prohibits a lodge from raising funds by selling chances on a beef. Decision: In light of the foregoing previous decisions, I must rule that a lodge cannot sell chances on items to be given away (raffle). A temple board is bound by the same rules as the lodge. IV

The following question was put to the Grand Master: A decision made in 1974 recorded on page 96 of the PROCEEDINGS states as follows: Full proceedings of Grand Lodge, including discussions of resolutions, comments or remarks verbatim, without editing, shall be printed and distributed. 1974-96. Is this decision required at this time?


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1981

The Grand Master ruled as follows: That due to costs and time required in preparing all the comments or remarks verbatim, that the decision of 1974 recorded at page 96 is hereby reversed. TRIAL COMMISSIONS 1. Arnold Lodge No. 673 requested a Trial Commission to hear charges brought against a brother for electioneering. The defendant was found not guilty. 2. Nineveh Lodge No. 473 requested a Trial Commission to hear charges brought against one brother for striking another. The brother was found guilty and penalty was assessed at reprimand. In addition, the other brother, although not charged, was found to be not entirely innocent of provocation. 3. Solomon Lodge No. 271 requested a Trial Commission to hear charges brought against two members who had been convicted of felonies. They were found guilty and penalty was expulsion. 4. Twilight Lodge No. 114 recently requested a Trial Commission to hear charges that a member had been convicted of violating gambling laws.

HEALINGS It was necessary to issue five Healing Orders, and they are路 reported in the

Grand Secretary's report. CONSENTS AND PERMISSIONS Included in the Grand Secretary's report. DISPENSATIONS Included in the Grand Secretary's report. PRAYER 1 strongly suspect that I may be misunderstood by some in addressing this subject, but nonetheless, I feel that I must comment. Masonry teaches every initiate from his first entrance through the West Gate to rely on prayer and to call frequently on the G.A.O.T.V. for guidance and strength, yet leaving it to each one to name Him by whatever name he chooses. We of the Christian Faith so frequently seem to fail to recognize or remember that Freemasonry is a Universal Brotherhood that "unites men of every country, sect, and opinion and conciliates true friendship among those who might otherwise have remained at a perpetual distance." This is the beauty and strength of our Fraternity. It is able to span differences of political and religious persuasion, and proscribes those subjects as topics of discussion in the lodge. And yet, all too often, when we pray other than our ritual prayers (and sometimes even then); in particular, our table graces, and other special prayers, we so often Christianize them, forgetting that our Fraternity includes Jews, Moslems, Hindus, Buddhists and others. I am sure it is done with no malicious intent, and yet, if we follow our Tenet of Brotherly Love, we should consider, and be considerate of, our brethren of other Faiths. There is no intent to make this a theological discussion. Rather, I suppose that I am suggesting application of the Golden Rule, some version of which


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every faith endorses, and even in our prayers (or especially in our prayers), "Let Brotherly Love prevail and every moral and social virtue cement us, Amen." CORNERSTONES The Ceremony of Laying the Cornerstone was conducted as follows: 1980

October 4 Mansfield Lodge Hall, Mansfield 5 Washington Lodge Hall, Greenfield November 9 Butler Lodge Hall, Butler Crescent Hill Lodge Hall, Adrian 16 Jackson Lodge Hall, Linneus

23 Ivanhoe Lodge Hall, Kansas City 30 Fayette Elementary School, Fayette December 7 Twilight Lodge Hall, Columbia 14 Masonic York Rite Temple, Springfield

1981

March 22 Clinton Lodge Hall, Clinton 29 Miller Lodge Hall, Miller April 5 O'Sullivan LodKe Hall, Walnut Grove 25 Activities Building, Central Methodist College, Fayette

June 7 Craft Lodge Hall, Canton September 20 Junior High School, Kirksville 26 Sparta Lodge Hall, Sparta

The Grand Lodge has been called upon many times this year to conduct Cornerstone and Dedication Ceremonies. The large number of these ceremonies speaks well for the vitality of the Fraternity. The fact that three of the Cornerstone Ceremonies were for public buildings is of particular note. In the past the Grand Lodge was frequently called on for this service. It will be again if, in your local communities, you are alert to these opportunities, and offer this service through the constituent lodges. DEDICATIONS The following halls were dedicated for Masonic use: 1980

October 4 Mansfield Lodge Hall, Mansfield 5 Washington Lodge Hall, Greenfield November 2 Gallatin Lodge Hall, Gallatin 16 Jackson Lodge Hall, Linneus

December 14 Masonic York Rite Temple, Springfield 21 Archie Lodge Hall, Archie

1981

January April 4 Ivanhoe Temple, Kansas City 5 O'Sullivan LodKe Hall, Walnut Grove March September 2 Craft Lodge Hall, Canton 26 Sparta Lodge Hall, Sparta 8 Rising Sun Lodge Hall, Kansas City 22 Clinton Lodge Hall, Clinton 29 Miller LodKe Hall, Miller


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1981

APPRECIA1'101\ On November 1, 1980 the officers and members of Webster Lodge No. 98 sponsored a reception and roast for me at the Howard Johnson Convention Center in Springfield. It was an outstanding event; and although I may have been singed a bit, it was an occurrence I shall never forget. Also, at the time of my installation, Webster Lodge presented me with an Apron Case. My lodge has been most gracious, helpful and supportive in so many ways; and I sincerely thank them. My thanks also to Webster Chapter 1\0. 439, O.E.S., for their help and encouragement. To the many lodges and the Abou Ben Adhem Clowns that presented me with plaques and other mementos - thank you. To the lodges and districts that held special meetings and receptions thank you. To Illustrious Sir Ben Gaines and Abou Ben Adhem Temple for presenting me with a Grand Master's Fez, and to Illustrious Sir Art Summer for naming the June Ceremonial the Grand Master's Class - thank you. To the York Rite Bodies of Springfield for naming the May Festival Class the Grand Master's Class - thank you. To the Scottish Rite Valley of Joplin for naming the November Class the Grand Master's Class - thank you. To the Scottish Rite Valley of Kansas City for naming the May Class the Grand Master's Class - thank you. To the Abou Ben Adhem Legion of Honor for presenting me with a Life Membership - thank you. To Bro. Joseph E. Beydler for presenting me an Honorary Membership in High Twelve - thank you. To Charity Lodge No. 331 in St. Joseph for allowing me to receive on behalf of the Masonic Home a check for $30,000 - thank you. To the Grand Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; the Grand Council, Cryptic Masons; the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar; the Grand Chapter, O.E.S.; the State DeMolay Conclave; the Grand Assembly of the Rainbow for Girls; the Grand Guardian Council of Job's Daughters; the Missouri Association of High Twelve Clubs; and the Grand Order of the Sword of Bunker Hill for the invitations to be at their Grand Sessions, all of which I accepted - thank you. To the York Rite Bodies of St. Louis for naming the October 1981 Festival Class in my honor - thank you. To the Committee for the Entertainment of Distinguished Guests who have labored long and diligently to make this Grand Lodge Session a success thank you. To Imperial Sir F. T. H'Doubler for inviting me to be his guest at the Imperial Shrine Session in New Orleans, and for the opportunity to address the representatives - thank you. And for all of the myriad invitations, courtesies, well wishes and other kindnesses - I could never list them all - thank you, one and all. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. In 1977 M.W. Bro. Fielding A. Poe recommended that the Proceedings be distributed no later than 15 February following the Session. I am convinced


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that this procedure should be implemented. Therefore, I am also recommending that the Proceedings be distributed no later than 15 February followin~ the Session. 2. It is becoming increasingly commonplace to be requested to conduct Masonic Memorial Rites where the remains are to be cremated, or where the remains are not present. I recommend to the Forms and Ceremonies Committee that they consider preparing an adaptation of our Memorial Service to be used under such circumstances. 3. It is my recommendation that the Public Relations Committee be reduced to a workable size with, if available, brethren knowledgeable in this field as members. I believe an active committee in this field could do much to improve the image and visibility of our Fraternity: 4. I recommend that the Youth Committee do more liaison-type activity with the Masonically-related youth groups. I attended the Grand Sessions of these groups and was greatly impressed with their enthusiasm, vigor, and interest. However, I seemed to get the message that many of the young people feel that we do not communicate with them too well. 5. At the first of this year I appointed a Commission for Internal Affairs for the purpose of studying ways of improving our internal functions as a fraternity. They did some investigation and considered ways of improving member retention, ways of better absorbing new members into fraternal life, and in other ways to improve fraternal functions. Their work has not been implemented yet. It is my recommendation that further consideration be given to further developing the work and functions of this Commission. 6. I have one other recommendation that I didn't put in the printed report. I would like to talk about it for just a few moments. I want to kind of brief you on the recommendation I am making in regard to the ritual. Probably many of you think, as I did at one time, that there is a source whereby you can always know what is correct in the ritual. I found out several years ago that that is not available. There is not a source for keeping the ritual pure and unadulterated over periods of time - long periods of time.... The only way that there can be a sure and unchanged source is to have a written master ritual reference. I don't think that this would violate anything, because the Grand Lodge can do anything that it feels is necessary for its welfare and for its ongoing success. The writing ofthis ritual in detail will, when concluded, not be available except under circumstances such as it being necessary for three officers to be present - three Grand Lodge Officers. It would require three separate people, or more, to be there. This would certainly secure the longevity of our ritual unchanged. This may be a subject that many of you have not thought of before; I hope that you will give it some thought. I see the value of it. It would not necessarily be a violation of an obligation, because the Grand Lodge can do what it needs to do in this instance when what is needed is apparent. There will probably be a resolution presented some time today pertaining to this recommendation for your consideration. I hope that you will give it serious thought, knowing that it is something many feel to be vitally important those who are interested in the ritual.


24

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

ITINERARY FOR 1980-81 1980 September 30 S1. Christopher Conclave. Red Cross of Constantine. Springfield October 4 Cornerstone and Dedication of Hall. Mansfield Lodge No. 543, Mansfield 5 Cornerstone and Dedication of Hall, Washington Lodge No. 87, Greenfield 6 Webster County Scottish Rite Club, Seymour 7 Official Visit, 42nd District. Greenfield 10 Official Visit, Webster Lodge No. 98, Marshfield 11 Sword of Bunker Hill, Order No. 109, Springfield Installed Officers. Branson Lodge No. 587. Branson 13 Gave funeral oration for Bro. Paul Keeling, Conway Lodge No. 528 11th District Membership Committee, Valley of Joplin 16 Speaker, Past Masters' Night, Willard Lodge No. 620, Willard 17 Dutch Treat Dinner, Louisiana, before Grand Master's Breakfast 18 4:00 a.m., Grand Master's Breakfast. Perseverance Lodge No. 92, Louisiana Masonic Home Board Informal visit to Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, S1. Louis 19 Eastern District Deputies' Conference, S1. Charles Speaker. O.E.S., Grand Chapter Banquet before Grand Session 20 Introduced at Opening of O.E.S. Grand Chapter Session 22 Sat on Examining Committee for two Sub I Examinations 23 Official Visit, Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City, also Past Masters Night 24 Table Lodge at Lebanon, Laclede Lodge No. 83 25 Speaker. Family Night at S1. Joseph Lodge No. 78, S1. Joseph 26 Western Deputies' Conference at Kansas City 27 Visited Webster Chapter No. 439, O.E.S., Marshfield 29 Sword of Bunker Hill Degree Conferral, Strafford 30 High Twelve Club. Springfield - presented Honorary Membership by Joseph E. Beydler, State President November 1 Grand Lodge Officers' Conference, Springfield Reception and Roast for Grand Master, sponsored by Webster Lodge No. 98 2 Dedication of Hall, Gallatin Lodge No. 106. Gallatin 3 Webster County Scottish Rite Club, Rogersville 4 Luncheon with members of Society for Preservation of the Masonic Temple. S1. Louis Official Visit. Tuscan LodRe No. 360. S1. Louis 6 Visited Pleiades Chapter. Order of White Shrine of Jerusalem. Springfield 8 Visited York Rite Festival. Springfield Installed Officers of Galena Lodge No. 515. Galena 9 Cornerstone Ceremony, Butler Lodge No. 254, Butler Cornerstone Ceremony. Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368, Adrian 12 Speaker at Audrain-Callaway Masonic Association. 27th District 13 Speaker at Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Anniversary Dinner. Jefferson City 14-15 Scottish Rite Reunion, Valley of Joplin; Grand Master's Class Speaker at Banquet 16 Cornerstone Ceremony and Dedication of Hall. Jackson Lodge No. 82. Linneus 20 Installed Officers of Willard Lodge No. 620, Willard 21 Installed Officers of M1. Olive Lodge No. 439. Rogersville 22 Met with Education Committee, Columbia Installed Ofticers of Webster Lodge No. 98, Marshfield


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23 Cornerstone Ceremony, Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City 24 Installing Patron, Webster Chapter No. 439, O.E.S., Marshfield 29 Installed Officers of Strafford Lodge No. 608, Strafford 30 Cornerstone Ceremony, Elementary School, Fayette December 2 Met with Abou Ben Adhem Shrine Legion of Honor Unit; presented with Lifetime Membership 3 Installed Officers of Ash Grove Lodge No. 100, Ash Grove 5 Installed Officers of Henderson Lodge No. 477, Rogersville 6 Ritual Cast Member, Abou Ben Adhem Shrine Ceremonial; also introduced formally Installed Officers 路of Doric Lodge No. 300, Elkland 7 Cornerstone Ceremony, Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia 8 Official Visit to Charity Lodge No. 331, St. Joseph 12 Installed Officers of O'Sullivan Lodge No.7, Walnut Grove 13 Installed Officers of Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield 14 Cornerstone Ceremony and Dedication of Hall, Masonic York Rite Temple, Springfield 15 Spoke at Marshfield Optimist Club on Masonry, 6:00 a.m. 16 Installed Officers of Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin 17 Installed Officers of United Lodge No.5, Springfield 18 Speaker at Annual Banquet of St. Joseph Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine, St. Joseph 19 Installed Officers of Sparta Lodge No. 296, Sparta 20 Masonic Home Board, St. Louis Visited Bismarck Lodge No. 41 at their Installation; presented Wor. Bro. Jesse Shaner, retiring Master, with Achievement Award 21 Dedication of Hall, Archie Lodge No. 633, Archie 27 Installed Officers of Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall 29 Installed Officers of Hazelwood Lodge No. 459, Seymour 30 Installed Officers of Republic Lodge No. 570, Republic 1981 January 2 Installed Officers of Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Joplin 3 Frank Arnold's Annual Party, Boonville 4 Dedication of Hall of Ivanhoe Temple, Kansas City 5 Speaker at Webster County Scottish Rite Club, Marshfield 6 Official Visit, Freedom Lodge No. 636, St. Louis 8 Installed Officers of Solomon Lodge No. 271, Springfield 9 Installed as Master 3rd Veil, Vincil Chapter, R.A.M., Springfield 10 Installed Officers of Waverly Lodge No. 61, Waverly 15 Official Visit, Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, St. John 16 Past Master's Night, Osage Lodge No. 303, Nevada 17 Masonic Home Board Wardens' and Masters' Club, S1. Louis 20 Installed as Steward, Zabud Council No. 25, C.M., Springfield 21 Met with Clowns Unit, Abou Ben Adhem Shrine 22 Official Visit, St. Louis Lodge No. 20, Creve Coeur 23 Area Meeting, Rolla 24 Area Meeting, Flat River 25 Attended Grand Lecturer's Area School, Poplar Bluff Reception for Grand Master, 48th District 27 Met with Assembly No. 15, Rainbow Girls, Springfield 28 Boone County Masonic Association, Columbia


26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

30 Area Meeting, Carthage 31 Area Meeting, Maryville February 2 Metro Scottish Rite Club, Speaker, Springfield 3 Visited V.A. Hospital, Columbia, Andrew T. Dorsey, Field Agent Speaker, Annual Meeting, Cooper Lodge No. 36, Boonville 4-6 Grand Lodge of Arkansas 8 Grand Lecturer's Deputy School, Sedalia 12 Official Visit, Pleasant Hope Lodge No. 467, Pleasant Hope 13 Area Meeting, Clinton 14 Area Meeting, St. Louis 15-18 Conference of Grand Masters of North America, Orlando, Florida 20 Area Meeting, West Plains 21 Masonic Home of Missouri, Board Meeting Area Meeting, Palmyra 22 Grand Lodge Officers' Conference, Columbia 23 Official Visit, Plato Lodge No. 469, Plato, Clown's Degree Team 25 School of Instruction (Administrative), 45th District, Springfield 26 First Degree Conferral, Webster Lodge No. 98, Marshfield, initiated Tony Agostini 27 Area Meeting, St. Joseph 28 Area Meeting, Independence March I Grand Lecturer's Deputy School, Springfield 2 Third Degree, Webster Lodge No. 98, raised Bro. Joe Davis 4 School of Instruction (Ritual), 45th District, Springfield 5 Area Meeting, Springfield 6 Area Meeting, Boonville 7 Area Meeting, Chillicothe 8 Dedication of Rising Sun No. 13, Lodge Hall, Kansas City 9 Annual Past Masters' Night. Herman Lodge No. 187, Liberal 10 Official Visit, Republic Lodge No. 570, Republic, Clowns Degree Team 12-14 Grand Lodge of Kansas 15 Grand Lecturer's Deputy School, Washington 18 Scottish Rite Club of St. Louis, Grand Lodge Day, Speaker Official Visit, Shelbina Lodge No. 228, Shelbina 19 Visit, John Cochran V.A. Hospital, St. Louis, Ed Gilmore, Field Agent Official Visit, Berkeley Lodge No. 667, Berkeley 20 Area Meeting, Mexico 21 Area Meeting, Kirksville 22 Cornerstone and Dedication, Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton 24-26 Grand Lodge of Tennessee 27 Area Meeting, Carrollton 28 Area Meeting, Sikeston 29 Cornerstone and Dedication, Miller Lodge No. 567, Miller April I Masonic Banquet, Kansas City 3 Official Visit, Ferguson Lodge No. 542, Ferguson 4 Official Visit, Billings Lodge No. 379, Billings, Third Degrees Past Masters' Night, Neosho Lodge No. 247, Neosho 5 Cornerstone and Dedication, O'Sullivan Lodge No, 7, Walnut Grove Committee, Entertainment of Distinguished Guests, Springfield 10 Annual Coon Dinner, Jewel Lodge No. 480, Pleasant Hill II Annual Paul Revere Breakfast, Buckner Lodge No. 50 I, Buckner, Speaker Masters' and Wardens' Club, Kansas City, Speaker


1981 12 13 15 16 18 19 21 24 25

26 30 May 1 2 3 5

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27

Grand Lecturer's Deputy School, Breckenridge Official Visit, Easter Lodge No. 575, St. Clair; raised Dr. Geo. Peters Practice Session, Clowns Degree Team, Springfield Scottish Rite Maunday Thursday Service and Banquet, Marshfield Past Masters' Night, Buckner Lodge No. 501, Buckner Scottish Rite Easter Service, Marshfield Speaker, High Twelve Club, Branson Official Visit, Sarcoxie Lodge No. 293, Sarcoxie, Clowns Degree Team Grand Council, C.M., Annual Session, Columbia Red Cross of Constantine Breakfast Grand Chapter, R.A.M., Annual Session, Columbia Grand Lodge Officers' Conference Pre-breakfast Banquet Grand Master's Consecration Breakfast, St. Louis "A Night with the Grand Master," Cold Spring LodRe No. 274, Leeton

York Rite Festival, Springfield, Grand Master's Class Missouri Association of High Twelve Clubs, Kansas City Kansas City Valley, A.A.S.R., Grand Master's Class Official Visit, East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City; presented 50-year pin to Bro. William F. Kistler 8 Missouri Lecture Series, Harry Carr, St. Louis 9 Official Visit, Grandview Lodge No. 618, Grandview 11 Official Visit, Euclid Lodge No. 505, Crestwood 12 Official Visit, Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington 13 Missouri Lecture Series, Harry Carr, Jefferson City 15 Attended Grand Commandery, Jefferson City Missouri Lecture Series, Harry Carr, Springfield 16 Masonic Home Board Official Visit, Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, Clayton 17 Fair Play Lodge No. 44, Fairplay, Picnic; presented Bro. Coy Jones 50-year pin 18-20 Grand Lodge of Indiana 22 Mokane, joint meeting of lodge and chapter to dedicate carpet and furniture 23 Official Visit, Wayne Lodge No. 526, Piedmont 24 Sparta Lodge No. 296, Sparta, Ground-breaking Ceremony for New Hall 25 State DeMolay Conclave, Jefferson City 27 West View Lodge No. 103, Official Visit, Millersville; presented 70-year pin to Wor. Bro. Ray Miller 28 Official Visit, Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis; presented 50 year pin to Bro. George R. Reed 29 Official Visit, Pyramid Lodge No. 180, St. Louis 30 Burlington Lodge No. 442, Burlington Junction, Centennial 31 Grand Lecturer's Deputy School, Springfield June 2 District 23 Meeting - combined Meeting of Lodges and O.E.S. Chapters 4 Official Visit, Stockton Lodge No. 283, Stockton 5-6 Shrine Ceremonial- Grand Master's Class, Abou Ben Adhem Temple 7 Cornerstone Ceremony, Craft Lodge No. 287, Canton 8 Official Visit, Solomon Lodge No. 271, Springfield 9 Official Visit, Everton Lodge No. 405, Everton 10 Official Visit, Agency Lodge No. 10, Agency; presented two 50-year pins to Wor. Bros. John Cattron and Vernon Ernst 11-13 Nebraska Grand Lodge 14 Olin McDaniel Honor Night, Bonne Terre 16 Meeting in St. Louis with Imperial and State Shrine Officers, Membership


28

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

17 Meeting with Committee for Entertainment of Distinguished Guests, Springfield 19 Official Visit to Bolivar Lodge No. 195 and 41 st District, Bolivar 20 Masonic Home Board Mack's Creek Lodge No. 433 to present R. W. Bro. Wayne Osborn 50-year pin 25 Official Visit to Brentwood Lodge No. 616, Brentwood 26 Official Visit to Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Rededicate New Hall 27 Official Visit to Wentzville Lodge No. 46, 8:00 a.m. Breakfast Official Visit to Strafford Lodge No. 608, Outdoor Third Degree 28 Grand Lecturer's School for DDGL's at Rose Hill Temple, St. Louis Grand AssEmbly, International Order of Rainbow for Girls, St. Louis

July 2 Official Visit, Laclede Lodge No. 83, Lebanon; presented 50-year pin, Wor. Bro. Virgil Wood 4 Visit to Gate of the Temple's Rice Camp Annual Picnic 9 Official Visit, Linn Creek Lodge No. 152, Camdenton; presented 50-year pin, Bro. John F. Barjenbruch 10 Official Visit, Sparta Lodge No. 296 12-17 Imperial Council of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine Session, New Orleans, Louisiana 17 Grand Lodge Officers Conference, St. Louis 18 Masonic Home Board 23 Official Visit, Joppa Lodge No. 411, Hartville 24 Official Visit, Norwood Lodge No. 622; presented 50-year pin to Wor. Bro. Marion Huffman 25 Official Visit, Friendship Lodge No. 89, Chillicothe; Clowns Degree Team of Abou Ben Adhem Temple Conferred Third Degree 26 Grand Lecturer's Deputy Area School, Sikeston 28 Visit to Kansas City V.A. Hospital and Field Agent Don Robinson and his Volunteers 30 Attended Abou Ben Adhem's Corn Roast, Jones Farm, Strafford August

1 Official Visit, Southwest Lodge No. 466, Southwest City; annual outdoor Third Degree; Oklahoma Indian Degree Team 2 Visit and talk to picnic celebrating 120th Anniversary of Somerset Lodge No. 206 and Unionville Lodge No. 210, Unionville 3 Gave Funeral Service for Wor. Bro. Ben Johnson, Marshfield Official Visit, Jerusalem Lodge No. 315, Jerico Springs 6 Official Visit, Western Light Lodge No. 396, Louisburg 8 Official Visit, Brotherhood Lodge No. 269, St. Joseph; Abou Ben Adhem Clowns Degree Team Conferred Third Degree 9 Attended Grand Lecturer's Area School, Sedalia 10 Official Visit, Independence Lodge No. 76; presented 50-year pin to Bro. Elmer E. Hopkins 13 Official Visit, Trilumina Lodge No. 205; raised a candidate, Bro. Kenneth Williams 14 Education Program given at Webster Lodge No. 98 15 Masonic Home Board 20 Official Visit, Henderson Lodge No.477, Rogersville 21 Visit to Hermitage Lodge No. 288 Family Picnic; presented 25-year pins 22 Attended Honor Night at Wayne Lodge No. 526, Piedmont, for R.W. Bro. Raymond Carpenter 27 Attended Past Masters' Night at Border Lodge No. 672, Texarkana, Texas - four Grand Masters and two Deputy Grand Masters. Six Grand Jurisdictions represented.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

29

29 Attended Outdoor Scottish Rite Reunion and Shrine Ceremonial combined at Waynesville September 2 Met with Committee for Entertainment of Distinguished Guests, Springfield 3 Official Visit, Texas Lodge No. 177, Houston 4 Presented 50-year pins to W. O. Barrow and Walter Pursley, Rogersville 5 Official Visit, Owensville Lodge No. 624 6 Attended R. W. Bro. Lacey Stapp and Wife's 50th Anniversary, Greenfield 7 Attended 5:00 a.m. meeting, Liberty Lodge No. 31 8 Visit to Grand Lodge Office Regarding Grand Lodge Sessions 9 Official Visit, Magnolia Lodge No. 626; opened Lodge, with heads of Appendant Bodies as other officers 10 Official Visit, Latimer Lodge No. 145, Licking 11 Spoke at Springfield York Rite Club 12 Attended "Rededication Day" at Paul Revere Lodge No. 330, St. Louis Speaker, Centennial of Hopewell Lodge No. 239, Lesterville 13 Grand Lodge opened at Saline Lodge No. 226, St. Mary's; then to Ste. Genevieve to unveil plaque on Green Tree Tavern 14 Visited Yell Lodge No. 64, Green Forest, Arkansas Annual Meeting, Speaker 15 Official Visit, Arlington Lodge No. 346, Dixon 17-19 Grand Lodge of Iowa 19 Attended Grand Order of the Sword of Bunker Hill, St. Louis 20 Cornerstone Ceremony for Junior High School, Kirksville 21 Official Visit, Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439, Rogersville 24 Table Lodge at Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City 26 Cornerstone and Dedication, Sparta Lodge No. 296, Sparta 27-29 160th Grand Lodge Session

CONCLUSION As a period of nine years of progression through the Advancing Line of this Grand Lodge comes to a close, there are many mixed emotions: Thoughts revert to aspirations unfulfilled, dreams unrealized, actions undone, and words unspoken; a sense of inadequacy for the task, and yet a sense of satisfaction at having at least attempted; memories of the many acts of brotherly affection and fraternal concern that have been shown in words and actions; a sense of relief at coming to the close of a very active participation, and yet sadness at leaving the mainstream of Fraternal activity; and finally, the hope that the Fraternity is at least in no worse condition than I found it. Words cannot really express my deep appreciation to you, the brethren, for the opportunity you have afforded me to serve as your Grand Master. I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience and thank you most sincerely. I would also say a sincere thank you to the Grand Lodge Officers. They are an outstanding group of brethren; and the future of this Fraternity is bound to be bright under their leadership. To R.W. Bro. Bill Hill I extend every good wish for the coming year; we look forward to your leadership and a great year of progress for the Fraternity. Finally, Brethren, this Fraternity is worthy of our best efforts. May our efforts ever be worthy of the Fraternity. Respectfully submitted, J. EDWARD Bul'l', D.O., Grand Master.


30

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

The Grand Lodge acknowledged the address of Grand Master J. Edward Blinn and accepted his report with a voluminous standing applause. The report of the Grand Master was referred to the Committee on Grand Master's Address in accordance with Grand Lodge By-Laws. REPORT OF MASONIC HOME BOARD

R.W. Deputy Grand Master Wm. J. Hill, President of the Board of Directors ofthe Masonic Home of Missouri, presented the Report ofthe Masonic Home. RW. Brother Hill moved that the report as printed and distributed be accepted and printed in the official PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded; the Report ofthe Masonic Home was accepted by the vote ofthe Grand Lodge.


Report of the Masonic Home To the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: BRETH REI' : Pursuant to the Standing Resolution of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, not less than 500 copies of this report have been printed for distribution at the opening of this 160th Annual Communication, and the report is now submitted for the purpose of making the same a part of the official proceedings. Our Home Family: This report is about our residents and the thoughtful and excellent care which they are receiving. They consist of our brethren; in a few instances, their wives; most often, their widows, and a substantial number of members from the Order of Eastern Star. Each in his or her own right represents a source of inspiration and pride pointing to a long-standing dedication to the higher values and aspirations of life. The quality of their care and the maintenance of their happiness and dignity should always be at the forefront of our thoughts. Therefore, in reading and studying this report, it is hoped that each of you will not let the evident responsibilities of management and the details of operation overshadow our primary goal, that of serving others. Care ofOur Home Family: The high volume and high quality of care is a source of great pride and has continued to improve under the able supervision of our licensed and long-experienced Hospital Administrator and his dedicated staff, in combination with our highly professional and long-experienced Medical Director and his equally dedicated staff. A brief summary of the extended efforts of the Administrative Staff, the Medical Staff, and the Medical Consultants Team during the past year, and the results realized, are best reflected by the following report requested from our Medical Director: 1980-81 has continued to see an increasc in quantity as well as quality of mcdical care offered the Masonic Homc residents. A qualified physician (Dr. F. Abichandani) is in attendance eight hours daily. In addition the othcr doctors of our medical staff, including many specialists, spend time daily helping with our medical problems. We have increased our "In-Service" Trainin14 Program for the nursing staff. To that end, we now have a full-time R.;-.J. instructor. To date, :~5 nurses' aides have been certified according to state law. Twenty are ready for certification. The remaining nursing assistants are enrolled in our classrooms. We have added a full-time R.:".J. in our outpatient clinic. Several additional L.P.N.'s have been added to enlargc our :\'ursing Staff. A routine complete physical examination including X-ray and laboratory studics is now performed on each resident yearly. InJune of 1981 a new dietary program was started. It allows our rcsidents to pick from a choice of foods on our menu. Our relationship with S1. Luke's Hospitals through the past 20 years continues. Medical problems requiring hospitalization are handled in an excellent fashion by their staff. This past year, 60 student nurses from S1. Luke's and 42 student nurses from 51. Louis University were accompanied by their instructors and received geriatric training at the Masonic Home.

31


32

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

The total medical care received by the residents of the Masonic Home ranks at the top when compared with similar senior citizen facilities. /s/ HAROl.D E. WAl.TERS, M.D. Medical Director

The extent and significance of in-house hospital, outpatient, and outside hospital services, are only partially demonstrated by Exhibit "A" included in the Appendix of this report. It is significant to note here that the average number of i.l-house hospital patients per da)' was 219, while there were only 74 residents requiring outside hospitalization for the entire year. It is equally significant to note here that the total number of patients receiving treatment in the outpatient clinic was 6,236, and that there were a total of 14,101 treatments (including shots) given to residents. Medically speaking, the Home is almost self-sufficient. Census of Our Home Family: It is important that the Craft be kept informed as to the census and its significance. These figures are not mere statistics, but represent facts concerning our brethren, their loved ones, and members of the Order of Eastern Star. They provide a valuable insight into the kind of care furnished, to whom it is being furnished, and the direction in which the Home is moving. Exhibit "B" of the Appendix contains the member statistics for the year. As ofJune 30, 1981, the end of the Home's fiscal period, the total population was 312, consisting of 49 brethren and 263 ladies. Of the ladies, 11 entered as wives, 175 as widows, and 77 entered on their eligibility as members of the Order of Eastern Star. Thus, the brethren in residence represent slightly less than 16 percent of the total population and the ladies represent the remaining 84 percent. The ladies entering on their own eligibility as members of the Order of Eastern Star represent almost 25 percent of the total population and almost 30 percent of the total population of the ladies in the Home. Children of Our Home Family: As of June 30, 1981, there were no resident children in the Home. The children remaining in the Home at the beginning of the year reached their majority and voluntarily left the Home. Compatative Census ofthe Home and Trends: Exhibit "C" of the Appendix of this report shows that there was no net gain or loss in applications from the prior year. Exhibit "D" of the Appendix is a chart containing the census figures of the Home for the last ten years. It is included for comparison and reveals several significant and interesting facts. First, the admissions for 1980-81 were 66 as compared to a ten-year average of66.4 and supports the conclusion that admissions have been relatively stable and consistent during the last ten years. Second, the total population for 1980-81 was 312 as compared to an average of 323.9 for the last ten years. This difference is more apparent than real and does not represent a decrease when several factors are considered. The yearend totals used do not necessarily reflect the highest population during the reported years. For example, the monthly reports during the 1980-81 fiscal period averaged higher than 312, the high being 323 as late as December 1980. Also, it must be noted that the child population during the ten-year period has steadily declined from 19 to O. Notwithstanding, with a present adult population averaging approximately 320 during the year 1980-81, it can be concluded


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

33

that the loss of our child population has been almost offset by an increase in the average adult population during the same ten-year period. Third, the balance of population as between our brethren and the ladies has not significantly changed as of June 30, 1981 as compared to the average balance during this same ten-year period. Comparative Census as to O.E.S. Residents: The census of the O.E.S. residents should be of importance to the Craft. The statistics developed in Exhibit "E" of the Appendix of this report must be given careful consideration. They should not only be considered highly significant in future planning and cooperative participation in the fiscal operation of the present Home, but in the planning and cooperative participation in raising the substantial capital funds necessary to build and endow the operation of the needed Western Unit. This chart shows that during the last five years, admissions of O.E.S. members varied from a high of 21 in 1977 to a low of ten in 1979. Admissions in 1980-81 were 11 as compared to an average of 14.6 over the past five years. However, in the year 1979-80, the admissions were 15 as compared to the 14.6 five-year average, leading to the conclusion that the admissions on O.E.S. eligibility are also relatively stable and consistent in the long haul. This chart also shows that O.E.S. members, as an average over the last five years, have represented 27.6 percent of all ladies admitted. Also supporting the conclusion that the number of O.E.S. residents is likely to remain stable and consistent are the figures in Exhibit "D" of the Appendix. The O.E.S. residents represent almost 25 percent of the total population, and almost 30 percent of the total population of ladies. The latter figure is 1.4 percent higher than the average O.E.S. admissions for the last five years. Financial Condition of the Home: The Home has been operated on a balanced budget during the past year. Exhibit "F" attached as a part of the Appendix of this report, is the Independent Auditor's Report consisting of the Auditor's letter, Statement of Income, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances, the Balance Sheet, and the Notes to Financial Statements, all for the fiscal period endingJ une 30, 1981. This report reveals the Home to be operating on a sound financial basis. Masonic Home Cheer: Continuous efforts are made by the Administrative Staff to bring joy and happiness into the lives of our residents. Mrs. Susan Chandler, Director of Social Services and Recreation, assisted ably by two assistant directors, work in co-ordination with Mrs. Rose H. Curran, Director of Dietary Services, to bring ongoing programs and activities to our residents. These loyal and dedicated staff members have been known to sacrifice personal time from their families on major holidays, and to work long hours and on occasion even through the night. They have labored to carry to our residents the message that "we care." To them goes a resounding thanks on behalf of the residents, their families, the Board of Directors, the Advisory Board, the Freemasons of Missouri, and the members of the O.E.S. The effectiveness of these staff members is greatly enhanced by the unselfish and tireless efforts of the Masonic Home Cheer Committee. The number of hours contributed by this Committee, and the pleasure their efforts bring to our residents, cannot be measured in dollars. That the Craft may be fully informed of their efforts, and that an expression of appreciation can be made of record, a report has been made by that Committee at the request of the Board of Directors. This report is set forth as Exhibit "G" in the Appendix.


34

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Other Special Contributions: Exhibit "H" of the Appendix contains a list of gifts from the Order of Eastern Star during the current year, and Exhibit "I" contains a list of donors of Dinner Table and Hospital Tray Favors received during the year, for all of which the Board and residents are deeply grateful. Exhibit "J" is a list of the contributions for the period July 1, 1980 through June 30, 1981 for the Christmas and Entertainment Fund, additions to the Endowment Fund, additions to the Building Fund, and additions to the Reserve Fund. Names of those who generously contributed are too numerous to publish here. However, the Board of Directors make their appreciation to each a matter of record. The Western Unit: In writing this part of the report, one comes face-to-face with the realization that it will be read by only a very few. Therefore, and because of its importance to the future of the Western Unit, it has been written so that it can be read to you at this Annual Communication. This is being done for the express purpose of obtaining your approval and support for a very big step. The Board of Directors and your Grand Lodge Officers are making this proposal only after having given the matter considerable thought. The need to take this big step was fully explained in the timely August issue of The Freemason magazine. It was published so that the Craft as a whole, and all past contributors, would be fully informed, and so that you as members of the Grand Lodge would be prepared to make a responsible decision. By way of a brief summary here, it should be noted that the present proposal is based upon two professional studies made in 1974 and 1979 for different but related purposes and upon considerable but disappointing past efforts to launch a fund-raising campaign which began officially at the 1979 Annual Communication. From these reports and experiences have surfaced several conclusions. First, in spite of 92 years of successful operation of the present Home in St. Louis, an estimated 90 percent or more of the Craft and of the O.E.S. know little more of the present Home than the bare fact of its existence. The manner in which the present Home has been sustained over the years without the knowledge and loyal financial su pport of the bulk of the Craft and of the O.E.S. is fully explained in the August issue of The Freemason magazine. However, because of its startling revelations, and its relevance to the development of the Western Unit, it is set forth in outline form as follows: I. Earnings from invested principal, the major portion of which principal has been accumulated over 92 years of operation by way of gifts, bequests, and donations from a very small percentage of the Craft, O.E.S. members, and non-members; and by the use of gifts, bequests, and donations received during the year of operation which could not be invested because of current need.

I

2. Social Security and pension income of the residents and nonrecurring transfers of assets received from new admissions during the current year of operations.

}

3. Involuntary contribution by way of per capita tax received from the Grand Lodge of Missouri.

} }

4. Involuntary contributions by way of per capita tax received from the Grand Chapter of the Order of Eastern Star.

55%

35%

5% 2%


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

5. Voluntary contributions in response to the semi-annual Grand Master's} Letter.

35 3% 100%

Second among the inevitable conclusions is that there has never been a conscious goal, followed by an organized effort, to inform, educate, and gain the strong financial support of the rank and file members of the Craft or the O.£.S., or even their leadership ranks for that matter, and certainly not those selective nonmembers who might be potentially strong contributors. The lack of such a conscious goal is reflected in our past actions, as later illustrated in this Report. Third, under these circumstances, it would be extremely naive to conclude that we could now successfully re-institute a major fund-raising campaign or even a phased-in construction program. It is not reasonable to believe that we can now generate more interest and financial support for a proposed new facility, than we have been able to generate from the rank and file members of the Craft and the O.£.S. in support of a 92-year-old ongoing successful facility. Fourth, we have no realistic alternative but to develop and implement an ongoing informational/educational program to reach every contributor whose support is essential to the continued operation of our present Home, as well as the construction and operation of the proposed Western Unit. As indicated, our past actions accurately reflect the lack of a conscious goal or effort to inform and educate the rank-and-file members of the Craft and of the O.£.S. For example, the Standing Resolution mandating the printing of this report, simply requires that not less than 500 printed copies of the Annual Report are to be made available for distribution at each annual communication. By practice, 1,200 copies are printed for circulation, theoretically one for each brother in attendance. It is safe to say that not all who receive a copy will read it. Further, the report is, by routine vote, accepted and made a part of the necessarily lengthy official proceedings. It is later printed and bound, and even a lesser number of brethren receive a copy. It is safe to say that even fewer yet will search out and read this report at that late date. Likewise, it will not reach the rank-and-file members of the O.£.S. who should also have an active support interest. It is almost equally certain, that this report will not reach any deeper into the O.£.S. leadership ranks that it does in our own Fraternity. The rank and file of these two organizations receive no regular mailings concerning the Masonic Home or the proposed Western Unit. Immediately following the fund-raising "kickoff' at the 1979 Annual Communication, a color brochure was sent to the general membership of the Craft, advising many for the first time of the proposed Western Unit, and asking for a donation. Apparently, it was not meaningful to very many, as it did not generate substantial contributions as hoped. The only regular mailings to the Craft are the semi-annual letters from the Grand Master requesting contributions to the Home, and The Freemason magazine. As previously noted, the letters from the Grand Master have generated a response from only 7 percent of the general membership, and those precious ~ew brethren have generously contributed approximately 3 percent of our Income.


36

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

As for The Freemason magazine, it has been the practice each year to publish the biographical sketch of the new Home Board President, along with his picture, and a biographical sketch of each new member of the Board of Directors. Also, from time to time, quality articles have been written concerning the Masonic Home and the proposed Western Unit. However, such obviously has not generated needed interest and financial support. Our past efforts, whatever form they may have taken, obviously have not been a satisfactory substitute for an intense informational/educational program that is so badly needed to accomplish our goal. Neither the Grand Lodge nor the Masonic Home has the funds with which to develop and implement such a program. Our only realistic hope to accomplish our goal is to re-allocate a portion of the building funds for that purpose. The Home Board and your Grand Lodge Officers are of the opinion that "planning expense" is necessarily a part of the cost of building. Having isolated the fact that the Home is not well-known to the Craft and other prospective donors, it necessarily follows that an informational/educational program is an integral part of any building program, whether it be for the present Home or a Western Unit. Accordingly, the Home Board and Grand Lodge Officers have brought this situation to the attention of the Craft to gain a full understanding as to the need to defer a further fund-raising campaign and the commencement of even a preliminary phase of construction until an intense informational/educational program can be conducted. At the conclusion of this report, the Home Board and Grand Lodge Officers will ask this Grand Lodge to pass a resolution for the purpose of approving and supporting the re-allocation of a portion of the building funds to an informational/educational program. To determine the amount, preliminary proposals as to scope and estimated costs of such a program have been obtained from two professional firms at no cost to the Masonic Home or the Grand Lodge. Although these proposals are only preliminary in nature, they do furnish some basis for judgment in projecting the scope and costs of the proposed program. When the proposed resolution is presented at the conclusion of this report, it is sincerely hoped that the Grand Lodge will take this very big step forward toward the realization of the Western Home. In making this decision, perhaps you should take into consideration the fact that there could be a tremendous spinoff to our general Fraternity from such an informational/educational program. A concentrated effort to rally the Craft around such a worthwhile cause could well be the very thing that will put Freemasonry in ACTION, make us visible throughout our state, and give us that quality of success that will always attract successful men. Management of the Home: The organization of management of the Home is quite extensive. It illustrates the size of the task which Missouri Masons have undertaken. Board ofDirectors: The Board of Directors is composed of 13 members, eight of whom are elected by the Grand Lodge - two each for four-year terms, and five Grand Lodge Officers who serve by virtue of their Office. All are voting members. For the year 1980-1981 they are as follows:


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Dr. J. Edward Blinn, Grand Master, Marshfield Wm. J. Hill, Deputy Grand Master, Kansas City Earl K. Dille, Senior Grand Warden, St. Louis Robert J. Crede. Junior Grand Warden. Jefferson City Vern H. Schneider. Senior Grand Deacon, St. Louis

37

Robert G. Bird, Springfield Joseph H. Collison. Weston James E. Dearing, St. Louis Robert D. Jenkins, Kansas City W. Marion Luna. Piedmont K. Roger Pennel, Fairfax Harry C. Ploetze, St. Louis John Wetzel. Louisiana

Officers: The Grand Master is Honorary Chairman of the Board. The Deputy Grand Master, by virtue of his office, is the President of the Board. At the close of the 1979-80 Grand Lodge Annual Communication, as required by the By-Laws ofthe Masonic Home, the President called an organization meeting of the newly constituted Board, and the following officers were elected: Harry C. Ploetze. Vice President John Wetzel, Treasurer Carl I. Stein, Secretary

The committees appointed to assist in the study, review, investigation, and evaluation of the business of the Home, include the following: Executive Committee: Wm. J. Hill, and all members of the Board of Directors. Admissions and Discipline Commitee: Harry C. Ploetze, Chairman; all members of the Board

of Directors. Administration Committee: John Wetzel, Chairman; Harry C. Ploetze. James E. Dearing,

Vern H. Schneider, Robert]. Crede, Robert D. Jenkins. Finance Committee: Earl K. Dille, Chairman; W. Marion Luna. K. Roger Pennel. Robert G.

Bird, Joseph H. Collison. Gifts, Wills and Bequests Committee: James E. Dearing. Chairman; Vern H. Schneider,

Joseph H. Collison. Legal Committee: Vern H. Schneider, Chairman; James E. Dearing. Study and Development Committee: Robert D. Jenkins. Chairman; John Wetzel, Joseph H.

Collison. Relief and Charity Committee: (This is a Grand Lodge Committee appointed by the Grand

Master but limited to members of the Masonic Home Board) W. Marion Luna. Chairman; Robert G. Bird. Harry C. Ploetze. John Wetzel. Carl I. Stein, SecretaryTreasurer.

Advisory Board - Order ofEastern Star: The following are those elected by the Grand Chapter of the Order of Eastern Star. They meet quarterly with the members of the Masonic Home Board: Mrs. Velma Mischon, President, Lexington Mrs. Get;tldine Molander, Secretary, North Kansas City

Mrs. Lonnie Stalder, Treasurer. Sunrise Beach Mrs. Juanita Mauss, Emeritus. McDade. Texas

Attached as Exhibit "K" of the Appendix is a photograph of the members of the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, and the members of the Advisory Board, Order of Eastern Star. Administrative Staff: The Administrative Staff is composed of the following:


38

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

H. David Thomas, Administrator Mrs. Julia Courtney, Secretary Mrs. Bettye Newton, Accountant Mrs. Susan Kennedy, Bookkeeper Mrs. John LaGage, Personnel Records Clerk Miss Marion Gall, Payroll Clerk Mrs. Henrietta E. Bade, Receptionist-Typist Marshall Creech, Director of Maintenance and Engineering Service Emil E. Corte, Director of Procurement

Mrs. Dorina Abeln, Director of Housekeeping Service Mrs. Rose H. Curran, Director of Dietary Service Mrs. Sus'an Chandler, Director of Social Service and Recreation Miss Deborah Powers, Assistant Director of Recreational Service Curt Cardwell, Assistant Director of Recreational Service D. Jeff Lance, Legal Counsel Richard D. Jacobs, Sr., Financial Advisor

Medical StafF The Medical Staff and Medical Consultants are composed of the following: Staff

Harold E. Walters, M.D., Medical Director C. Rush McAdam, M.D., Director of Clinics Charles Kilo, M.D., Staff Physician Louis F. Howe, M.D., Staff Physician, Emeritus Florinda Abichandani, M.D., Staff Physician

Consultants

R. A. Chipongian, M.D., Ophthalmologist Robert Drews, M.D., Ophthalmologist Charles Nicoloi, M.D., Urology Shu S. Cheuk, M.D., General Surgery Earl Holt, M.D., Orthopedic Suq~ery L. Abichandani, M.D., Psychiatry William McGee, D.D.S., Dentistry Richard Bernstein, D.D.S., Dentistry

Legal Counsel: The Honorable David R. Hensley, former ProbateJudge of St. Louis County, who joined the Home as its Legal Counsel in 1973, retired as of January 17, 1981. D. Jeff Lance, a practicing lawyer in St. Louis, Missouri, and a former U.S. District Attorney, succeeded Brother Hensley. Co-ordinator of Fraternal Relations: This special position, created in 1979, has continued since the outset to be held by Howard E. Ward. Recommendations: As the retiring President, I make the following observations and recommendations: 1. That an item be established in the budget to develop and cover the cost of an ongoing professionally designed informational/educational campaign concerning the Masonic Home. 2. That a plan be implemented to assist the Advisory Board, O.E.S., in developing a similar, co-ordinated, self-sustaining, ongoing program for the rank and file members, as well as the leadership of the Order of Eastern Star. 3. That, until the monumental task of developing such an informational/ educational program is completed and is implemented, the Board of Directors increase the number of its meetings, or extend the time of its meetings, to assure sufficient time to adequately handle such matters, along with all other regular business of the Home. 4. That consideration be given to doing a computer analysis of vital statistics in the operation of the Home for the last five years, perhaps ten, to ascertain the average age of applicants on admission, the actual number admitted to residential units, actual number requiring nursing care on admission, actual number requiring immediate hospital care on admission, the average length of stay in the Home, the per capita cost of maintenance of each resident in the categories of residents, nursing and hospital care, the average amount of assets


1981

39

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

transferred by applicants at time of admission, and to pn~ject these figures to the future for operational planning needs. 5. That future Boards of Directors, in searching for ways and means of increasing income, move with great caution before becoming involved or participating in any program funded and controlled by any state or federal agency. Kudos: Words will not describe the contributions of time, energy and talent of the members of the Board of Directors. To each for his special efforts, his willingness to put in extra time for extended meetings resulting from the added major task of developing the Western Unit, and for the good fellowship, I can only add my personal thanks. To the Administrative Staff, which is confronted with seemingly endless new challenges, we say thanks on behalf of the Board, the Advisory Board, the residents, their families, all Freemasons of Missouri, and all members of the O.E.S. To Howard E. Ward, Co-ordinator of Fraternal Relations, who has done a signal job in the position for which he has been employed, we sayan extra special thanks for being willing to let the Board borrow him as a liaison in co-ordinating all of the efforts required in developing the plans for the Western Unit. To all who have been so generous in their thoughtful gifts, bequests and donations of time, energy, and money to the Home, we say thanks, and please keep up the good work of supporting our greatest Masonic charity. To Rose H. Curran, Director of Dietary Services, a personal thanks for her friendship and for the courtesies of repeatedly holding lunch for the Board and staff when we labored through and way past the normal lunch hour. Lastly, to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, I say, "Thank you for the great privilege and experience in serving on this Board and as its President." Respectfully submitted, WM.

J.

HILL

Presidl'1l I

APPENDIX EXHIBIT A MASOl';IC

HO~lE

HOSPITAL

Total number of patients in hospital, July I, 1980 Total number of patients admitted during year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total number of patients discharged during year Average number of patients in hospital per day during year Total number of deaths during year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total number of patients in other hospitals during year Total number of surgeries in other hospitals during year .............. Total number of patients in hospital, June 30,1981........

223 222 161 219 68 74 33 216

OUTPATIEl';T DEPARTMENT Total number of patients seen by Clinic physician 1,5:')4 Total number of patients treated in Clinic 6,236 Total number of treatments (including shots) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14.1 () I Average number of baths given per month. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25


40

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

EXHIBIT B ~fEMBER

STATISTICS

Members in Home, July I, 1980 Arrived during year Died during year Discharged during year Members in Home, June 30, 1981

. . . . .

Ladies

Brethren

276 48 55

49 12 13

4

I

265

47

Girls

EXHIBIT C APPLICATIO~S

Carried over from previous year Received during year

4 75 79 Admitted to the Home during the year 66 R~jected because of ineligibility 4 Died before application passed on by Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. I Died after application passed on by Board 0 Withdrawn by lodge/chapter before action by Board 6 Withdrawn by lodge/chapter after action by Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 0 Pending .J une 30, 1980 ~ 79

EXHIBIT D COMPARATIVE CENSUS OF TOTAL POPULATION FOR LAST TEN YEARS Year

'72 '73 '74 '75 '76 '77 '78 '79 '80 '81 Averages

Admissions

73 64 71 64 63 63 66 68 67 66 66.4

Total Population

Brethren

47 54 51 47 58 41 42 47 49 49 48.5

350 345 332 331 328 311 297 307 326

2.!L 323.9

Ladies

284 276 265 271 264 265 252 257 276 263 267.3

Children

19 15 16 11 6

5 3 3

I

o 8

EXHIBIT E COMPARATIVE ADMISSIONS OF O.E.S. MEMBERS IN LAST FIVE YEARS Year '77

'78 '79 '80 '81 Averages

Total Ladies

Wives

57 49 47 56 51 52

3 6 2 10 5 26

Widows

(J.E.S.

34 27 35 31 35 32.4

21 16 10 15 II 14.6

Percentage oIO.E.S.

36 32 21 27 22 27.6


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

41

EXHIBIT F REPORT OF AUDITOR To the Board of Directors Masonic Home of Missouri In our opinion, the accompanying balance sheet and the related statement of income, expenses and changes in fund balances present fairly the financial position of the Masonic Home of Missouri at June 30, 1981, and the results of its operations and the changes in fund balances for the year, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. Our examination of these statements was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and accordingly included such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. PRICE W ATERHOCSE & Co.


BALA:"JCESHEET .JL':"JE Current Unrestricted

General

Reserve

:~O,

1981

Restricted Christmas and Entertainment

Endowments (Sotf 3)

Buildinf(

Total

June 30, 1980 Total All Funds

Assets

Cash .......................... $ 15,889 $ 11,433 463,696 $11,116,646 Investments (Note 2) ........... Receivable from Trustees ....... 11,581 Inventory and supplies ......... 28,132 20,585 Receivable from C & A accounts Prepaids and other ............. 56,563 Due (to) from other funds ...... (390) 2,796 Total assets ................ $596,056 $11,130,875

53,318 23,146,702 50,303 28,132 20,585 56,563

$1,625

$

2,910 10,891,714 19,361

$ 21,461 674,646 19,361

$

--

(2,406) $10,911,579

$715,468

$23,355,603

$1,625

$

389,410 20,448,748 9,742 40,271 45,872 48,883

$20,982,926

Liabilities and fund balances

Liabilities: Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Accrued payroll taxes and withholding Accrued payroll .............. Total liabilities ............. Fund balances: Unrestricted ................. L' nrestricted Board designated .......... Restricted ................... Total fund balances ........ Total liabilities and fund balances ............

$ 53,120 29,561 44,725 $127,406 468,650 $11,130,875 $468,650

$11,130,875

$1,625 $1,625

$596,056

$11,130,875

$1,625

$

53,120

$

29,561 44,725 127,406

$

98,720

$

17,938 36,152 152,810

468,650

388,717

$10,911,579 $10,911,579

$715,468 $715,468

11,l30,875 11,628,672 $23,228,197

9,403,997 11,037,402 $20,830,116

$10,911,579

$715,468

$23,355,603

$20,982,926


STATEMENT OF INCOME, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1981 Currmt Unrestricted

General

Reserve

Income: Grand Lodge/Chapter . $ 256,547 $ 43,000 Interest and dividends from: Endowment Fund investments 838,639 . Reserve Fund investments 802,577 General Fund investments . 62,288 Other . 38,428 37,224 Gain (loss) on securit}' transactions 288,221 . Gifts and bequests 65,742 1,358,433 Home Famil}' income: Assets relinquished . 630,982 Pensions . 1,127,961 20,045 _ Miscellaneous . Total income . $3,843,209 $ 1,726,878 Expenses: . 1,938,754 Salaries and wages Payroll taxes . 144,056 Employee benefits . 123,602 Food supplies and services . 453,861 . Fuel and utilities 204,111 Repairs, maintenance and improvements . 144,144 EqUipment purchases . 23,656 Furniture and fixture purchases 55,864 Laundry and housekeeping . 43,572 Hospital supplies . 105,922 Outside medical service . 94,100

Restricted Christmas and Entertainment

Endowments (Note 3)

Total

Building $

$1l,l33

$11,133

$

254,287 159,900

414,187

$

299,771

120,127

838,639 802,577 62,288 144,173 542,508 1,715,335

817,077 703,300 35,427 74,271 620,566 1,179,979

$188,648

630,982 1,127,961 20,045 $ 6,184,055

578,0;t8 954,257 20,884 $ 5,283,580

1,938,754 144,056 123,602 453,861 204,111

1,768,957 133,127 122,712 442,883 186,069

154,026 23,656 55,864 43,572 105,922 94,100

164,165 57,612 21,969 40,497 99,504 73,969

$ 68,521 $

299,547

June 30, 1980 Total All Funds

9,882


Current Unrestricted

General

ResenH'

Other resident-related expenses 65,511 Insurance ..................... 67,454 Administrative expenses ........ 82,366 Burial expense ................. 43,011 Security ....................... 92,938 52,137 Agency management fees ....... Miscellaneous .................. 28,217 Total expenses ............. $3,763,276 Excess (deficit) of income 1,726,878 over expenses .............. . 79,933 Fund balances: Beginning of year ...................... 388,717 9,403,997 Fund balances: End of year ..... $ 468,650 $11,130,875

Restricted Christma.1 and Entertainment

Total

June 30, 1980 Total All FundI

$ 11,453

76,756 67,454 82,366 43,011 92,938 53,708 28,217 $ 3,785,974

42,057 66,529 98,867 39,380 85,753 48,906 13,023 $ 3,505,979

414,187

177,195

2,398,081

10,497,392 $10,911,579

538,273 $715,468

20,830,116 $23,228,197

Endowments (Sote 3)

Building

11,245

1,571

---

$11,245 (112)

-..LTIJ $ 1,625

See accompanying :'-Jotes to Financial Statements.

1,777,601 19,052,515 $20,830,116


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

45

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 1 -

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Description of funds: Current Funds - Unrestricted, General: General fund income includes all income from

members of the Home Family, dividends and interest from the Reserve and Endowment Funds, per capita taxes from the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter, O.E.S., and other general fund contributions. Such income is used to pay the operating expenses of the Home. Unr!!stricted, Reseroe: Unrestricted income of the reserve fund includes undesignated gifts and bequests and Grand Lodge initiation fees which according to Board policy may be transferred to the General Fund and expended for operations only upon approval of the Board of Directors. Dividend and interest income from Reserve Fund investments accrues directly to the General Fund. Realized gains and losses on security transactions are recorded in the reserve fund. Restricted, Christmas and Entertainment: Gifts designated for the purchase of Christmas gifts and entertainment are recorded as current restricted funds. Endowments: Certain gifts and bequests to the Home are in the form of endowments which contain legal restrictions as to the use of such funds. Generally, the restrictions provide that the income from the investment of the gifts and bequests accrues to the General Fund while the principal amounts are to remain invested and are not available to meet current expenditures. Accordingly, interest and dividend income from the investment of Endowment Funds is recorded in the General Fund. Realized gains and losses on the sale of securities are recorded in the Endowment Funds (Note 3). Building Fund: Contributions for the improvement of buildings and grounds and future construction, and the related expenses are recorded in the Building Fund. Investments in marketable securities: Marketable securities donated to the Home are recorded at their fair market value as of the date the gift is received; securities purchased by the Home are carried at cost. Interest and dividend income from these investments is recognized in income when received. Gains and losses from the sale of securities are recognized at the time of sale, and represent the difference between the proceeds received and the carrying value of the securities determined on an average cost basis. Fixed assets: Expenditures for furniture, equipment and building improvements are expensed as incurred. Home Family and pension income: Upon admission to the Home, residents are required to assign and transfer all properties and monies to the Home. Nonmonetary assets transferred to the Home are sold as soon as practicable and proceeds are recorded at the time of sale. Monetary assets, except paid-up insurance policies, are recorded at fair market value as of the date of receipt. It is the Ilome's policy to not record the cash surrender value of paid-up life insurance policies but to record the proceeds upon death. Pensions received by family members accrue to the Ilome. The Home gives each family member a monthly allowance of $25. The unexpended portion of these allowances, $111,981 atJune 30,1981, are held in custody by the Home in accounts segregated from Home assets. Remaining balances at the time of death revert to the General Fund. Penson income for 1981 is net of allowances of $95.200. Income taxes: The Home is exempt from federal income taxes under Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c)(3). Summarizedfinancial information for 1980: The financial information for the year ended June 30, 1980 presented for comparative purposes, is not intended to be complete financial statement presentation. NOTE 2 -

InvestmenL~:

Investments of the Home at June 30, 1981 were as follows:


46

General Fund Cost or Value When Acquired Market

Certificates of deposit and savings U.S. Government bonds and notes Corporate bonds Corporate stocks Investment in real estate and other

.

$462,490

. . . .

1,202

4 $463,696

$462,490

* * $462,490

Building Fund Cost or Value When Acquired Market

U.S. Government bonds and notes Corporate bonds . Corporate stocks . Real estate notes and pooled investments ....

* Not

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

ResenJe Fund Cost or Value When lHarket Acquired

$

500

$

500

633,500 4,4R2,660 5,728,736

575,123 4,104,389 6,690,016

271,250 $11,116,646

271,250 $11,641,278

Endowment Fund Cost or Value When Acquired AIarket

$457,500 3,643

$457,500 4,523

$ 1,220,376 4,485,042 5,095,036

$ 1,124,261 3,162,981 5,970,268

213,503 $674,646

213,503 $675,526

91,260 $10,891,714

92,667 $10,350,177

available.

NOTE 3 -

Endowment Funds:

The Endowment Funds consist of general endowments and two special endowments which in accordance with the bequests are required to be segregated. The balances of the William Knollman and Jacob and Sallie Simon endowments were $973,279 and $747,506, respectively, at June 30, 198 I.

REPORT ON ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

In our opinion, the accompanying information is stated fairly in all material respects in relation to the financial statements, taken as a whole, of the Masonic Home of Missouri for the year ended June 30,1981, which is covered by our opinion presented in the first section of this report. The accompanying information is presented as additional data and is not essential for a fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations and changes in fund balances. Our examination, which was made primarily for the purpose of forming an opinion on the financial statements taken as a whole, included such tests of the accounting records, from which the additional information was compiled, and such other auditing procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. PRICE W ATERIIOUSE & Co.


1981

47

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

SCIIEDL°l.E

I

GENERAL FUND INCOME COMPARED TO BUDGET FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1981

Grand Lodge per capita tax Grand Chapter per capita tax Investment income: Reserve Fund Endowment Fund Simon Memorial Fund William Knollman Fund General Fund Gussie Grenner Estate Home Family - Assets relinquished Home Family - Pensions General Fund contributions Miscellaneous 0

0

0

Actual over (under) budget

$ 222,342 34,205

$ 212,000 37,000

$ 10,342 (2,795)

802,577 714,398 60,225 64,016 62,288 38,428 . 630,982 1,127,961 65,742 20,045 $3,843,209

850,000 800,000 58,000 62,000 27,000 36,000 570,000 980,000 70,000 33,000 $3,735,000

(47,423) (85,602) 2,225 2,016 35,288 2,428 60,982 147,961 (4,258) (12,953) $108,209

••••••

0

°

.

0

0

0

•••••

••••••••••••

•••••••••••••

0

0

Budget

•••••••••••

0

0

0

Actual

0

0

••••

0

0

0

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0

0

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SClIF.DL°I.F.

II

GENERAL FUND OPERATING EXPENSES COMPARED TO BUDGET FOR THE YEAR ENDED jU;\lE 30, 1981 Actual

Salaries and wages $1,938,754 Social Security tax .. 123,961 20,095 Unemployment tax 76,410 Health and Welfare - Union 21,072 Health and Life - Nonunion . 24,920 Union pension 1,200 Retirement annuity .. 418,283 Food service supplies 35,578 Food service management ° Fuel 113,161 Electricity . 76,495 Water and sewer 6,996 Telephone 7,459 144,144 Repairs, maintenance and improvements .... 23,656 Equipment purchases 55,864 Furniture and fixture purchases ° Laundry 17,842 25,7:30 Housekeeping supplies .... ° Hospital suplies ..... 105,922 94,100 Outside medical services ... Clothing 20,920 29,219 Dry goods ° Dry cleaning ° 1,186 5,019 Personal supplies .... Barber and beauty shop .... 5.505 2,172 Education 1,490 Children's allowance and expenses ° 67,454 Insurance 3,255 Printing and postage ° 0

0

0

0

••••••

0

•••••••

••••••••••••

0

0

0

0

0

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0

0

0

0

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0

0

0

0

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•••••••••••••

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0

0

0

0

0

0

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0

0

0

0

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0

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0

0

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0

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0

0

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0

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0

0

0

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••••••

•••••••••••

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0

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0

0

0

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••••••••••

00

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0

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00

0

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0

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0

.0

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•••••••••••

0

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0

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0

Budget

$2.016,000 120,892 20,000 78,4000 17,800 25,500 1,200 448,500 37,206 104,170 71,500 6,500 6,800 90,300 17,400 30,000 16,700 25,000 98,000 78,000 13,000 15.000 1,500 5,000 4,000 2,500 1,700 73,300 4,500

Actual over (under) budget

($77,246) 3,069 (l,990) (l,990) 3,272 (580) (30,217) (1,628) 8,991 4,995 496 659 53,844 6,256 25,864 1, 142 730 7,922 16,100 7,920 14,219 (314) 19 1,505 (328) (210) (5,846) ( 1,245)


48

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Office supplies Newspapers Auditing and legal Director's travel Administrative travel Convention expense Promotional expenses Burial expense Security 5335-37 Delmar Apartments, net Agency management fees Miscellaneous

. . . . . . . . . . . .

9,021 2,627 18,715 11,714 2,924 954 33,156 43,011 92,938 3,520 52,137 24,697 $3,763,276

7,500 3,000 18,000 12,000 3,000 2,000 37,200 40,000 82,000 9,000 50,000 19,400 $3,713,468

1,521 (373) 715 (286) (76) (1,046) (4,044) 3,011 10,938 (5,480) 2,137 5,297 $49,808

EXHIBIT G

MASONIC HOME CHEER COMMITTEE August 1, 1981 Wm. J. Hill, President Masonic Home of Missouri 5351 Delmar Boulevard St. Louis, Missouri 63112 Dear R.W. Brother Hill: We are pleased to present our Fiscal Year Annual Report of the Masonic Home Cheer Committee as at July 31, 1981. The annual election of officers was held on Tuesday, September 30, 1980. The incumbent officers were reelected by acclamation; namely, Harlan B. Owens, President; Violet Whitworth, Vice President; R.W. Bro. George W. Whitworth, Secretary-Treasurer. The Grand Guardian Council of Missouri, International Order of Job's Daughters, held their annual Masonic Home Church Services on Sunday, October 26, 1980. As usual, there was a very large representation of these young ladies with a musical theme "I Believe." The sermon was given by Dr. Richard Brandon, St. John's United Church of Christ. Band concerts were provided by the Moolah Shrine Band and the Letter Carriers Band. Refreshments were provided by the Cheer Committee. A fun day for the "Home Folks" occurred on August 16 in the form of a Box-Lunch Picnic, held indoors in the Delmar Lounge, due to the heat. This event to take the place of the usual trip on the "Admiral." Not only were there games of skill with prizes for all, but also a famous gypsy fortune teller to mystify the guests. The committee was assisted by the young ladies from the Fenton Job's Daughters in the various activities. Everyone enjoyed the fine chicken dinner in the box lunch. The St. Louis Harp Ensemble's offer to return this year brought several hours of added e~joyment to all in attendance. The Committee approved a motion to increase the token monetary gifts being enclosed with the appropriate cards given on the many holiday visits by the Committee during the year. Our Christmas Party on Friday, December 19, 1980 was attended by an overflow crowd of ambulatory and wheelchair guests. The orchestra (which


1981

49

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

has performed for over 20 years) and the guest entertainers made it a truly enjoyable party, climaxed with homemade Christmas cookies and ice cream, served by the members of the Committee. The spring and summer activities also included the Alhambra Grotto Memorial Service on April 12, 1981, well attended by representatives of all the Masonic bodies. Music was provided by the Scottish Rite Choir. An inspiring message was given by M.W. Bro. William H Chapman. The fiscal year's activities was celebrated by the annual visit to Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 for the Barbecue and Fish Fry. The weatherman provided a nice day for the outing with 23 volunteer drivers furnishing the transportation to and from the barbecue. The Committee wishes to thank the many lodges and friends of the Committee in the other Masonic bodies and the Eastern Star for their participation in a monetary way in the work we do at the Home. Without their assistance we could not provide the many activities we plan each year. Finally, our sincerest thanks to Bro. H. David Thomas and the wonderful staff who make our appearances there a work of love. This is without a doubt the finest group of workers we have worked with over the years. The Secretary-Treasurer's Annual Report of Receipts and Disbursements with a list of contributors and expenses is made a part of this report. Fraternally, HAR.LAN B. OWE]\;S, President, Following is our Financial and Activities Report for the fiscal year, August I, 1980 through July 31, 1981. Balance in bank, July 31, 1980 Petty cash on hand Total cash on hand and on deposit Receipts, per list following Disbursements, per list following Balance on hand, July 31, 1981 Recepitulation: Balance in Mercantile Trust Co. . Cash on hand

. $3,087.80 97.75 . . $3,185.55 . 3,888.00 $7,073.55 . 3,657.48 . $3,416.07 . $3,364.95 51.12 . $3,416.07

ACTIVITIES AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE MASONIC HOME CHEER COMMITTEE August 1, 1980 Through July 31, 1981 1980

August 16 November 22 December 19

December 20

Box Lunch Picnic . $ 104.53 644.00 Thanksgiving cash distribution . Christmas Party, Vice President, Sister Violet Whitworth, Chairperson; entertainment, Santa Claus, refreshments, music - courtesy of Bro. Ben St. Ongc and his orchestra . 22.00 772.00 Christmas cash distribution .

1981

May 9

Mother's Day cash distribution

.

743.00


50 June 24 June 20 July 14 July 25

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

34.00 Moolah Shrine Band Concert . 728.00 Father's Day cash distribution . Letter Carriers Band Concert (Excess soft beverages left 78.00 at home for guests' enjoyment) . Outing to Bridgeton fish fry and barbecue (Transportation provided by representatives and other 275.00 members of the Masonic Family) . Printing, postage, cards for distribution days, noral tributes, etc. . 256.95 Total disbursements . $3,657.48

The above is in balance with the bank statements, checkbook and cash journal as of July 31, 1981. HARLAI\:

B.

OW1-:1\:5,

Presidmt

Attest: GEOR(;},: W. WHITWORTH,

Secretm)l.

RECEIPTS AND DEPOSITS Lodge.\, A.F. & A.At.: Meridian 1'0. 2 $ 100.00 100.00 George Washington 1'0. 9 . Mt. Moriah 1'0.40 . 50.00 Polar Star 1'0. 79 . 100.00 Bridgeton 1'0. 80 . 200.00 50.00 Pomegranate 1'0.95 ". 10.00 Occidental 1'0. 163 . 50.00 Pride of the West 1'0. 179 . 150.00 Good Hope 1'0. 218 . St. Francois 1'0. 234 LibertyVille . 10.00 Keystone 1'0. 243 ' , 50.00 Westgate No. 445 . 50.00 50.00 Lambskin 1'0.460 . Kirkwood 1'0. 484 . :~5.00 Clifton Heights 1'0. 520 . 100.00 50.00 Ferguson 1'0. 542 . Algabil 1'0. 544 , . 40.00 :)0.00 Maplewood 1'0. 566 . Forest Park 1'0. 578 , . 50.00 Brentwood 1'0. 616 . 25.00 Overland No. 623 . 25.00 25.00 Magnolia No. 626 . 50.00 Jennings No. 640 . 25.00 Benjamin Franklin No. 642 . Pill-\Tim No. 652 . 50.00 Gardenville No. 655 . 30.00 25.00 Progress 1',0. ~5? Berkeley 1'0. 667 . 40.00 15.00 Crestwood 1'0. 669 . Tuscan No. 360, Benevolent Fund 400.00 Members of Tuscan 1'0. 360: Wor. Bro. Hugo Davis . 20.00 Wor. Bro. Forest E. Head ,. 25.00 25.00 Wor. Bro. Otis L. Light Bro. Thomas L. Merrill 25.00 100,00 Bro. William F. I'olker . Bro, Harlan B. Owens . 25.00 10.00 Wor. Bro. Guy A. Turner, Jr. . 35.00 Members of Harmony 1'0. 499 . Members of Crestwood 1'0. 669: R.W. Bro. R. Edward Ceries . 45.00 Wor. Bro. Harold W. Smith . 10.00 Wor. Bro. Geo. C. Vincent 10.00 . 25.00 Bro. Melvin R. Docrnhoefer .

Appendant Bodies: Be11efontaine Chapter 25, R.A.M ... Wellston Cha/?ter 1'0. 138, R.A.M. Hiram CounCIl 1'0. I, c.~f. . Bonne Terre Council No. 43, C.M. Sl. Louis Commanderv 1'0. I, K.T. Ivanhoe Commanderv No.8, K.T. St. Aldemar Commandery No. 18, K.T . Moolah Shrine . The Square Club , . Scottish Rite Women's Club . Eastern Star Chap/en: Anchor 1'0. 51 , . Webster Groves 1'0. 64 . Crestwood 1'0. 82 , Mehlville 1'0. 187 . Martharae 1'0. 221 . Beacon 1'0. 256 . Maplewood ;\0. 264 . Bridgeton 1'0. 266 . Rob Morris 1\0. 328 . Rose Croix 1\0. 372 . Benjamin Franklin :\0. :~9:~ . Apollo 1'0. 424 . Trinity 1'0. 443 . Euclid 1\0. 425 ' , Jennings No. 497 . Iota 1\0, 506 .

.

IndilliduaL\: R.W. Bro. Earl K. Dille, Clayton 1\0. 601 ' . R.W. Bro. Henrv W. Busch,Jennings No. G40 . Wor. Bro. W. E. Krenning, Westgate 1\0. 415 . \Vor. Bro. Richard Teubner, l\.lagnolia 1'0. G2G . \Vor. Bro. Claude Sparks, Berkclq 1'0.667 , . Bro. .J. Kenneth Herman. Algabil, No. 544 . Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Saffell. nonaffiliated volunteers .

21

H.OO 10.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 30.00

25.00 500.00 50.00 35.00 22.50 15.00 10.00 5.00 50.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 10.00 55.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 lO.OO 25.00 10.00

50.00 10.00 50.00 15.00 25.00 25.00 50.00


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Memorials: R. W. Bro. Geo. W. and Violet Whitworth in memory of: Bro. G. Sidney Bryan, Berkeley 1\:0.667; Rose C. Locher. Rob Morris 1\:0. 328, O.E.S.; Elma Stein, mother of R.W. Bro. Carl I. Stein Other memorials to Rose C. Locher: Vir~inia Kleis . Bro. Harlan B. Owens .

30.00 3.00 10.00

51

Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Saffell 50.00 Past Matrons and Past Patrons of Clayton No. 328, O.E.S.. in memory'of: Melita Denny, WalLer Herr, and Bert McSpadden 22.50 Job's Daughters, Bethel 1\:0. 43. in 10.00 . memory of Robert Chaney ----2.llil Miscellaneous cash donations Total receipts $3.888.00

EXHIBIT H GIFTS FROM THE ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR July I, 1980 toJune 30,1981 Four cases jelly - America Chapter No. 484 Large amount men and women's clothing and accessories - Anchor Chapter No. 54 Two blankets (new) - Barry Chapter No. 369, P.M. and P.P. One case cookies - Benjamin Franklin No. 393 Large amount men and women's clothing and magazines - Betsy Ross Conclave No. 14 Handmade clothing and miscellaneous items - Blue Springs Chapter No. 428 Large amount clothing and shoes Crown Chapter No. 535 Eight lap robes and box polyester scraps - Florissant Chapter No. 161 Large amount men and women's clothing - Golden Link Chapter :'110. 512 48 jars jelly, large box cookies, 100 decorated cannisters filled with carmel corn - Grand Chapter Oranges and applies - Grand Chapter Large amount men and women's clothing, accessories and three rugs Hope Chapter No. 265 24 lap robes - Hope Chapter No. 265 Large amount clothing, coats, scarves, gloves - Maplewood Chapter No. 264 100 handmade Christmas cards Maplewood Chapter No. 264 Large box dresses, coats, hats, purses, scarves - Maplewood Chapter No. 264 Jewelry for bingo, coats, dresses, man's coat - Maplewood Chapter No. 264

Jewelry and other items for bingo prizes - Maplewood Chapter No. 264 One winter coat, two shirts, one dress Maplewood Chapter No. 264 Large amount clothing and accessories - Paul Revere Chapter No. 395 Large amount clothing - Paul Revere Chapter No. 395 Large amount men and women's clothing - Paul Revere Chapter No. 395 Large amount women's clothing - Paul Revere Chapter No. 395 Large amount men and women's clothing - Paul Revere Chapter No. 395 Large amount men and women's clothing - Paul Revere Chapter No. 395 Several boxes jewelry for bingo Pomegranate Chapter No. 397 Large amount of gifts for Christmas and bingo - Sedalia Chapter No. 57, Service Circle Seven quilts - Sedalia Chapter No. 57, Service Circle Three large boxes clothing and accessories, lap robes - Shell Knob Masonic Ladies One portable oxygen unit with extra tank, one portable emergency auto oxygen unit - Venue Chapter No. 153 Large amount jewelry for bingo Webster Groves Chapter Hi-Twelve Large amount women's clothing, accessories, lap robes and miscellaneous items - Weston Star Chapter No. 197

22


52

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

EXHIBIT I DINNER TABLE AND HOSPITAL TRAY FAVORS -

APPROXIMATELY 350

July I, 1980 through June 30, 1981 Independence Day - Webster Groves Washington's Birthday - Barbee Chapter No. 64 Chapter No. 31 Labor Day - Martharae Chapter No. St. Patrick's Day - Rob Morris Chapter 221 No. 328 Columbus Day - Crestwood Chapter Easter - Mehlville Chapter No. 187 Mother's Day - Gardenville Chapter No. 82 Halloween - Berkeley Chapter No. 503 No. 513 Thanksgiving - Paul Revere Chapter Memorial Day - Pomegranate Chapter No. 395 No. 397 Christmas - Pomegranate Chapter No. Flag Day - Hope Chapter No. 265 397 Father's Day - Mizpah Temple Chapter New Year's Day - Crestwood Chapter No. 515 No. 82 Additional favors were given by Job's Daughters Bethel No. 49 . Lincoln's Birthday - Martharae Chal?ter No. 221 Valentme's Day - Rose Hill Chapter No. 120

EXHIBIT J CONTRIBUTIONS - JULY I, 1980 THROUGH

.JU~E

30, 1981

RESERVE Ft::--;o

Donors

Amount

706 Regular Contributions $ 29,664.32 3,893 Response to Grand Master's Letters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75, I09.48 4,599 Total Contributions $104,773.80 E:--;I>OWME~T FC~D

74 Regular Contributions $ 11,671.39 ~ Response to Grand Master's Letters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,420.65 236 Total Contributions $ 16,092.04 Bt:lLDI~(; Fl:~D

10 Regular Contributions ~ Response to Grand Master's Letters 149 Total Contributions

$

398.45 3,780.65 4,179.10

$

15.00

$

.

CHILDRE:"'S BClLDI:"(; FL'~I>

Response to Grand Master's Letters WESTERI' Mlssot'RI Bl.'ILDI:"(; Fl':"!)

225 Regular Contributions 1,440 Response to Grand Master's Letters 1,665 Total Contributions

.

$ 43,007.51 37,133.69 $ 80,141.20

CHRISTMAS A:"I> E:"TERTAI:"ME:"T Ft':"D

201 Regular Contributions $ 9,362.29 -.R Response to Grand Master's Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,771.00 258 Total Contributions $ 11,l33.29 GE:"ERAI. FL'I'D

116 Regular Contributions $ 24,958.63 2,357 Response to Grand Master's Letters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42,286.80 2,473 Total Contributions $ 67,245.43


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

53

EXHIBIT K

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEMBERS OF THE ADVISORY BOARD -

Seated: Left to right Howard E.Ward, Coordinator of Fraternal Relations Dr. J. Edward Blinn, Grand Master Lonnie Stalder, Treasurer, O.E.S. Advisory Board Wm. J. Hill, President Geraldine Molander, Secretary, O.E.S. Advisory Board Harry C. Ploetze, Vice President Standing: Left to right W. Marion Luna Vern H. Schneider

MASO Ie HOME OF MISSOURI ORDER OF EASTER."1 STAR

John Wetzel, Treasurer David R. Hensley, Legal Counsel Earl K. Dille K. Roger Pennel Joseph H. Collison Robert J. Crede Robert G. Bird H. David Thomas, Administrator Richard D. Jacobs, Sr., Financial Advisor Robert D. Jenkins Carl I. Stein, Secretary

Not shown are James E. Dearing and Velma Mischon, President, O.E.S. Advisory Board. David R. Hensley retired as Legal Counsel as ofJanuary 17, 1981. D. Jeff Lance has taken his place.


54

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

REMARKS OF R.W. BRO. WM.

J. HILL

R.W. BROTHER HILL: Brethren, most of you who had the opportunity to read the interim report to you appearing in the August issue of The Freemason magazine, and those of you who have had the opportunity to receive and read the final report of the Board will know that the report - both reports - state that at this Grand Lodge Session the Board of Directors and the Grand Lodge Officers propose to submit to you for your consideration and vote a resolution to support the reallocation of a certain portion of the Building Fund for the purpose of an informational and educational program. Subsequent to the time when both of these reports were prepared, the Board of Directors has met, and, with the able advice of the legal committee of the Board headed by R.W. Bro. Vern H. Schneider, has concluded that that proposed resolution will not be necessary. In making that statement to you, let me give you the assurance of your Board of Directors of the Masonic Home that no part of those funds contributed up to this date for the purpose of the Western Unit will be in any way used for the purpose of implementing the informational and educational program. The funds for that purpose will come from other general operating funds. Thank you, Brethren. REMARKS OF M.W. GRAND MASTER BUFORD W. VEST OF ARKANSAS REPORT OF COMMITTEE OF GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

M.W. Bro.]. C. Montgomery,jr. presented the report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address and moved the adoption of the report. The motion was seconded; the Report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address was approved by the vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on the Grand Master's Address submits the following report: Although an old folk song speaks of "The Arkansas Traveler," it is evident from his itinerary that our Most Worshipful Grand Master certainly has been "The Missouri Traveler" this year. Having crossed the length and breadth of this great State many times in the fulfilment of his Masonic duties, the "Show Me State" has indeed been shown M.W. Brother Blinn's Masonic and civic concern. He may well have set a record for Masonic visitations and travels, and we give thanks to T.G.A.O.A.T.U. for protecting and enabling him through these many visits. Because our Grand Master has traveled so much, we pay particular attention to his remarks on the State of the Craft and agree with his experienced judgments that the lack of leadership and decline of the Fraternity can be cured only by persistence and determination expressed in W-O-R-K. Likewise we have been inspired by the use of his logo, R-E-A-C-T, and the thoughtful explanation accompanying it. We rejoice that this ingenious logo became known not only across the jurisdiction but also throughout the Fraternity nationally. We are also pleased that our Most Worshipful Grand Master filled positions of responsibility and leadership at the Conference of Grand Masters of North America.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

55

We note and heartily approve his praise of the Grand Lecturer and Grand Secretary in their several capacities. We take special note of the unique events, the breakfasts, the Carr Lecture series, the historic ceremony at the Green Tree Tavern, and all other occasions which have brought publicity to the Fraternity and edification to the general public as well as the brethren. M.W. Brother Blinn's decisions, the records of the trial commissions, healings, consents and permissions, and dispensations we refer to the Committee on Jurisprudence for that body's proper consideration and report. In the Grand Master's itineration we would call attention particularly to the 16 Cornerstone Laying Ceremonies and the 13 Dedications, probably something of a record for recent years. We are in accord with his several recommendations for the improvement and further work of the Craft and urge the committees to which those recommendations are referred to consider diligent action thereon. Finally, we, the Past Grand Masters, unite in applauding the outstanding leadership of M. W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn. The Fraternity has been well-led and well-served by him. Soon we shall welcome him to our ranks: and, together with him, we shall pledge our continued support of the Fraternity under his worthy successor. Fraternally submitted, HOMER L. FERGL'SO]\;, WALTER L. WALKER, LEWIS C. WES COOK, ELVIS A. MOO]\;EY, J. MORGAN DO]\;ELSO]\;, FRA]\;K P. BRIGGS, WILLIAM H CHAI'MA]\;, Fn:LDI]\;G A. POE, DR. JAMES A. NOLA]\;D, JR., HERMA]\; A. ORLICK, HAROLD M. JAYl\:E, J. C. MONTGOMERY, JR., BRUCE H. HUNT, Chairman Protem. GEORGE F. MORRISO]\;, REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

M.W. Bro. J. C. Montgomery, Jr., Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association and moved that it be received and printed. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHRE]\;: Towering above the City of Alexandria, Virginia this Memorial represents not only an inheritance of Freemasons but also a very important gift by Freemasons to the national consciousness, patriotic pride, and Masonic awareness of countless Americans. It also witnesses to our Masonic Fraternity for the many visitors who come from other lands as well as being a tribute to ~ great American and an outstanding Mason, Bro. George Washington. Since this is the only national project ever undertaken by the Grand Lodges of the United States, it deserves to be preserved and protected. As with all worthy memorials, maintenance becomes an increasing cost through the years: but our sense of Masonic responsibility should make us respond to this challenge. In addition to the regular contribution made by our Grand Lodge, $100 Life Memberships are of invaluable help to the Association.


56

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

By the action of our Grand Lodge at the last communication, you voted to increase the assessment for the Memorial to $5.00 from $1.00 for each Entered Apprentice initiated during the year, beginning July I, 1981. Thus this enlarged participation by the Grand Lodge will be reflected in the next annual report. We arejoined in this step forward by a number of other Grand Lodges in the United States. At the annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic I\;ational Memorial Association held in Orlando, Florida, last February, our Grand Lodge was ably represented by M.W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn, R.W. Bros. Wm. J. Hill, Earl K. Dille, Walter C. Ploeser, Frank A. Arnold, and George R.Johnson. Missouri presented a check for $2,153, representing our share for the Association. Fraternally submitted, FIELDIJ\;G A. POE, HOMER L. FER(~t;SON, JAMES A. NOLAJ\;D, JR. JAMES M. SELLERS, J. C. MOJ\;T<~OMERY, JR. LEWIS C. WES COOK, PRESENTATION OF RESOLUTIONS

M.W. BRO. WALTER L. WALKER: I have three resolutions that need to be read at this time. They do not alter or repeal any article of the By-Laws; they add to them. Therefore they will be voted on tomorrow. RESOLUTION FOR ADDITION OF SUBSECTION (r) TO SECTION 2.040. GRAND SECRETARY

To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri: The Jurisprudence Committee pursuant to authority granted in Section 5.070 proposes according to the recommendation of the Grand Master that a subsection (r) be added to Section 2.040. GRAND SECRETARY. Resolved, That Section 2.040 have added to it, subparagraph (r) to provide as follows:

(r) Has the proceedings printed and distributed no later than IS February following each Grand Lodge Communication. The Grand Secretary is authorized to obtain the services of a certified Court Reporter who must be a member of the Masonic Fraternity in good standing, to take and transcribe the minutes of the meeting.

Respectfully submitted, CHARLES E. BECRAFT, HERBERT C. HOFFMAJ\;, ELVIS A. MOOJ\;EY, WALTER L. WALKER. RESOLUTION FOR ADDITION OF SUBSECTION (e) TO SECTION 2.050. GRAND LECTURER Be It Resolved, That Subsection (e) be added to Section 2.050

to

read as follows:

(e) Shall be responsible for reducing one copy of Missouri Ritual to writing. The copy shall be securely deposited in the Grand Lodge Headquarters Building in Columbia, Missouri, in such a fashion that three people - the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master, and the Grand Lecturer - shall all be present to remove the copy.

J.

EDWARD BLINN, GEORGE F. MORRISOJ\;, WALTER L. WALKER.


1981

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

RESOLUTION IN RE SECTION 1.010. TIME AND PLACE To the Grand Lodge of Missouri, A.F. & A.M.: Resolved, That pursuant to Section 1.010 of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, the time of the 161 st Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is changed to commence at 10:00 o'clock a.m. on Monday, October 4, 1982. WM.

J.

HILL,

ROBERT

L.

CREDE,

ERNEST H. WOTRING,

P.

VIJ',;CENT KINKEAD,

VERJ',; H. SCII:--lEIDER,

CECIL H. HURT,

T.

WILLIAM H. WISBROCK,

STA:--lTON

EARL K. DILLE,

CHARLES E. SCHEURICH,

W. MARION LL'J',;A,

WALTER

Lo:-.: G.

L.

BROW:--l,

WALKER.

ORR,

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC EDUCATION

Wor. Bro. Thomas C. Warden, Chairman, presented the Report of the Committee on Masonic Education. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. oj Missouri: The Grand Lodge Achievement Award Program continued to be the benchmark of your Committee on Masonic Education during 1981; and it was the lecture tour of Wor. Bro. Harry Carr, of the Grand Lodge of England, that made this a singularly memorable year for Freemasonry in Missouri. Efforts were made to standardize and in some instances strengthen requirements for the Grand Lodge Achievement Award medallion. Via District Conferences and Area Meetings, we enlisted the support of District Deputy Grand Masters and Lecturers and Blue Lodge officers to encourage participation in the program. This cooperation has resulted in significant results: As of midAugust some 55 lodges had qualified for the award. Response to the program, at that point, was commensurate with the previous year when a recordbreaking 100 lodges qualified for this distinction. The highlight of our Masonic year was the lecture visit of Harry Carr, Past Junior Grand Deacon of the Grand Lodge of England. Brother Carr's 10-day, four-lecture series, which included appearances in St. Louis, Kansas City, Jefferson City, and Springfield, netted him a host of new friends and gave those who attended his lectures a unique experience and an understanding into the world of Masonic history and tradition. The 1,067 Missouri Freemasons who attended the lectures witnessed firsthand a man with the charm of the master, one who many consider to be the foremost Masonic lecturer and historian alive today. Though we had hoped for better attendance at these lectures, those who heard Brother Carr were so impressed - and made their feelings knownthat the Committee on Masonic Education proposes an annual lecture series in Missouri by outstanding individuals in the field of Masonic history and education. Members of the Committee, regular and ex officio, have suggested that efforts be made to enlist Brother Carr for a return engagement in 1982, and this is underway. Now, some uncomforting observations. Of some 90,000 Freemasons in Missouri, only 1,067 - around 1 percent - availed themselves of the time to see and hear this great man. Here are the sad statistics, based on a $1.00 per person donation at the door:


58

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

St. Louis - 370 attended; $559 receipts; $705.05 expenses; net loss $146.05. Kansas City - 374 attended; $374 receipts; $172.33 expenses; net gain $201.67. Jefferson City - 162 attended; $162 receipts; $81.66 expenses; net gain $80.34. Springfield - 161 attended; $161 receipts; $291.54 expenses; net loss $130.54.

Cost for each of the lectures to Brother Carr was $250 at each site, or $1 ,000. This leaves us a deficit of $994.58. From a financial standpoint, it was less than successful. But the reward must be measured in the beneficient experience of those 1,067 Freemasons who did attend the lectures ... and to them it was an undeniable success. As R.W. Bro. Earl K. Dille, Senior Grand Warden and a member of the Committee, noted: "Some belabor the contention that ritualists dominate Freemasonry. But I tell you that is not the case: Harry Carr is one of the premier ritualists in the world, and the ritualists did not show for the lectures." I might add my own observation. A lack of interest, an overwhelming display of apathy, pervades Freemasonry today. The Fraternity has far more members than it has Freemasons, and this was aptly demonstrated at the Carr Lecture Series. We shall give it another go in 1982, Brethren, but if that lecture series is accorded the same indifference as the 1981 event, it is unlikely that the "Annual Lecture Series" will survive more than two seasons. Time does not allow me to enumerate those brethren in St. Louis, Kansas City, Jefferson City, and Springfield who gave of their time and energies to bring this notable lecture series to Missouri. To them we are greatly indebted. For those who met and heard Brother Carr, therein is their reward. Your Freemason magazine continues under the competent editorship of Bro. Ray Hilton, and its content and quality have been excellent. It remains an integral part of the ongoing education of which all Missouri Freemasons should avail themselves. As new challenges confront the Fraternity - and they will in 1982 - The Freemason magazine will be a necessary liaison between the Grand Lodge of Missouri and the subordinate lodges. It is your window to the Grand Jurisdiction, Brethren. Open it and let in the light. The Committee continues to provide publications and visual aids to lodges, and a new booklet, "The Masonic Home - Our Greatest Heritage,"joined the list of publications this year. As in the past, your Committee on Masonic Education maintains a display table at the annual communication of Grand Lodge. Current publications are available there. In this regard, we urge members tojoin the Missouri Lodge of Research and the Masonic Service Association ... both organizations which contribute immensely to the literary light that glows beyond the confines of our Masonic altars. As brethren here assembled witness the presentation of Achievement Award medallions later on to Masters of lodges that have qualified for the honor, the Committee hopes each new master will make it his personal goal to qualify for the award next year. We feel strongly that the Achievement Award Program, if embraced by lodges throughout Missouri, can lift Freemasons to the realization that there is more to the Fraternity than wearing a pin in one's lapel or a ring on one's finger. The Committee would like to express its appreciation to all who have given their assistance in bringing Masonic education into the Blue Lodge temple. And to our Grand Secretary we express our profound gratitude for his guidance and assistance which has been invaluable to our endeavors.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Respectfully submitted, ROr-;ALD M. COMPTOr-;,

J. C.

BRUCE H. HUr-;T,

JOSEI'll

OLir-;

S.

McDA:"IEL,

59

MOr-;TGOMERY, JR.,

S. V ANDoLAH, C. WARDEN, Chairman.

THOMAS

ACHIEVEMENT AWARD LODGES, 1981

Rolla Lodge No. 213, Everett M. Ragan Rushville Lodge No. 238, Bill R. Dockery Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642, Edward S. Weinstein Pleasant Grove Lodge No. 142, L. Oliver Stahl Composite Lodge No. 369, Lloyd E. Dunigan Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Calvin Schroff Freedom Lodge No. 636, Theodore R. Brown Brentwood Lodge No. 616, Raleigh L. Sutton Euclid Lodge No. 505, Kenneth C. Dow Jr. Beacon Lodge No.3, George C. Kirby Wellston Lodge No. 612, Austin O. Gamble United Lodge No.5, Dr. James J. Gibbons Neosho Lodge No. 247, Howard Lee Dobbs Charity Lodge No. 331, Virgil D. Simpson Friendship Lodge No. 89, Leland O'Dell Gate City Lodge No. 522, August M. Ott, Jr. Trinity Lodge No. 641, Jack Baldridge Union Lodge No. 593, Raymond Vorderbruegge Mineral Lodge No.471, Charles Sweeney Latimer Lodge No. 145, Sam R. Pickering S1. Francois Lodge No. 234, Gregory L. Montgomery Lincoln Lodge No. 138, Dean Wilson Cuba Lodge No. 312, Clark S. Zucker Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, George O. Stewart Rising Sun Lodge No. 13, Norval W. Lee Vienna Lodge No. 94, James K. Roberson Palestine Lodge No. 241, Fred H. Courtney

Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305, Lonnie D. Wethered Sheffield Lodge No. 625, Paul A. Richardson Columbia Lodge No. 534, Garold Rulon Hayti Lodge No. 571, Glen R. Whitener Plato Lodge No. 469, Jack Butler Saline Lodge No. 226, Bobby Gene Thomure Jasper Lodge No. 398, John S. Gresham Noel Lodge No. 647, Jerry Green Carterville Lodge No. 40 I, Robert Dorsey York Lodge No. 563, Robert B. Armour Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Thomas H. Williams Webb City Lodge No. 512, Lynn R. Whitworth Neosho Lodge No. 247, Louis H. Partain Sedalia Lodge No. 236, Carroll L. Utley Granite Lodge No. 272, Bennie B. Hatfield Versailles Lodge No. 320, Carl Wood, Sr. Bonhomme Lodge No. 45, Marshall L. West Henderson Lodge No. 477, Michael D. Ballard Henderson Lodge No. 477, Richard F. Hays North Star Lodge No. 157, Steven R. Grossman South Gate Lodge No. 547, Donald L. Moorehead Alpha Lodge No. 659, James C. Stanley Hope Lodge No. 251, Roland Pepmueller Pilgrim Lodge No. 652, Linton W. Kneemiller Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Robert G. Pflug Meridian Lodge No.2, Earl T. Sowell Moberly Lodge No. 344, Joseph M. Rufkahr Saint Joseph Lodge No. 78, Dennis L. Henry


60

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Forest Park Lodge No. 578, Leo M. Kindel Agency Lodge No. 10, John Cattron Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Emmit G. Williams Lamar Lodge No. 292, Mike Davis Anchor Lodge No. 443, Thomas W. Stout Brotherhood Lodge No. 269, Conrad W. Klawuhn Greensburg Lodge No. 414, Richard Burrus Clay Lodge No. 207, Laverl C. Riley La Plata Lodge No. 237, Thomas O. Kelly Mount Olive Lodge No. 439, Randall Jay Jones Joplin Lodge No. 335, Benny L. Roach Owensville Lodge No. 624, Roger Grob Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Jacob C. Baird Whitesville Lodge No. 162, Leroy C. Bashor Lincoln Lodge No. 138, Phillip Prater Weston Lodge No. 53, Robert L. Kerns Grandview Lodge No. 618, James Ellis Spencer Circle Lodge No. 342, Marvin C. Prentice Sedalia Lodge No. 236, John Sterling Berry Acacia Lodge No. 602, John E. Wetzel Twilight Lodge No. 114, Wayne R. Twiehaus Hermitage Lodge No. 288, James C. Munden Harold O. Grauel Lodge No. 672, Charles S. Grantham Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520, L. Bruce Roberson Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, Donald J. Robbins King Hill Lodge No. 376, James M. Worley Blue Springs Lodge No. 337, Frederick A. Troxel Jr. Clay Lodge No. 207, C. Keith O'Dell Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Ralph E. Bess California Lodge No. 183, Frank V. Jones Sheffield Lodge No. 625, Lorna H. Frakes Higginsville Lodge No. 363, Raymond Horner

1981

Saxton Lodge No. 508, Franklin A. Flesher Fayette Lodge No. 47, J. Dwight Gerht Clinton Lodge No. 548, James V. Stone Liberty Lodge No. 31, Thomas S. Orwick Central Crossing Lodge No. 674, Samuel V. Penny Adair Lodge No. 366, Kenneth L. Motter Berming Lodge No. 150, Randy M. Gann Oregon Lodge No. 139, Ralph William Schaeffer Fairfax Lodge No. 483, James O. Davis Marceline Lodge No. 481, Brownlee Williams Maplewood Lodge No. 566, Clarence L. Jones Savannah Lodge No. 71, Dale K. Miller Linn Lodge No. 326, Lynn Hollandworth Meramec Lodge No. 313,John L. Whitelock Aurora Lodge No. 267, Bailey Dawson Richmond Lodge No. 57, Jimmie R. Mullikin Huntsville Lodge No. 30, James W. Pilkington Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Walter S. Huntley East Gate Lodge No. 630, Phillip D. Rendon Unionville Lodge No. 210, David Carter Wellington Lodge No. 22, Ronald Baublit Crestwood Lodge No. 669, George C. Vincent Richland Lodge No. 385, William R. Evans Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Thurman Ray Scott St. Mark's Lodge No. 93, Everette J. Estes Mystic Lodge No. 221, Vernon C. Daume Hamilton Lodge No. 224, Lawrence N. Allen Branson Lodge No. 587, Roy Rowland Raytown Lodge No. 391, George E. Marsden Belle Lodge No. 373, Bernard McIntyre Conway Lodge No. 528, Larry Atkinson Summit Lodge No. 263, Hugh Monroe Cambron


1981

61

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Buckner Lodge No. 501, John E. Baker Bismarck Lodge No. 41, Tom Reay Marcus Lodge No. 110, Howard C. BrewinKton St. Francois Lodge No. 234, Joseph Edward Stevens Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, Richard L. Smith Texas Lodge No. 177, Frank L. Miller Waynesville Lodge No. 375, Warren Webster Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Richard A. Wilson Macks Creek Lodge No. 433, James Tucker Heroine Lodge No. 104, Ronald Gill Hermon Lodge No. 187, Dennis Worsley

Saline Lodge No. 226, Ralph C. Primo Rockhill Lodge No. 663, Glenn D. Walters Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Daniel F. Cole Osage Lodge No. 303, Harold L. Cliffman Union Lodge No. 593, Gordian N. Parker Pauldingville Lodge No. II, Charles S. North Belton Lodge No. 450, Warren L. Conner Jr. Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Ralph L. Johnson Fulton Lodge No. 48, Sterling T. Campbell

Brother Warden moved that the Report of the Committee on Masonic Education be accepted, received, and printed in the PROCEEDI!':GS. The motion was seconded and carried by the vote of the Grand Lodge. ELECTION OF OmCERS AND MEMBERS OF MASONIC HOME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The Grand Secretary certified the account of the proceedings had by constituent lodges on the proposals to amend Section 2 of Article III ofthe Constitution and Section 4 of Article III of the Constitution. To the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: . BRETHREN, I hereby certify each of the following: REPORT ON ACCOUNT OF PROCEEDINGS HAD BY LODGES ON PROPOSED AMENDMENT OF ARTICLE

N umber Number Number Number Number

of of of of of

Ill,

SECTION

Lodges Lodges Lodges Lodges Lodges

2

OF TilE CONSTITUTION OF GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Reporting Not Reporting Voting "AYE" Voting "NO" With Tie Vote....

450 96 220 225 5

REPORT ON ACCOCNT OF PROCEEDINGS HAD BY LODGES ON PROPOSED AMENDMENT OF ARTICLE

Number Number Number Number Number

of of of of of

Ill,

SECTION

Lodges Lodges Lodges Lodges Lodges

4

OF TilE CO~STITCTIO!'O OF GRAND LODGE OF MISSOCRI

Reporting Not Reporting Voting "AYE" Voting "NO" With Tie Vote..... . . .

450 96 208 237 5

Fraternally submitted, FRANK A. ARM)LD, Grand Secretary. M.W. GRAND MASTER BUN!':: Brethren, as you can see the proposed amendments of the Constitution were defeated on referendum. Therefore they will not be considered on the Grand Lodge floor.


62

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

The Grand Master appointed R.W. Bro. Edwin B. Brzezinski to serve as Chairman of Election and the District Deputy Grand Masters of the oddnumbered districts to serve as Tellers. GRA!'jD MASTER BUN!": Are all ballots in now? (No response.) I now declare the ballot closed. REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER

To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHRE!": Herewith is submitted my ninth annual report as your Grand Lecturer, as required by the Constitution and By-Laws. One of the duties of the Grand Lecturer is to make a written report to the Grand Lodge regarding the general condition of the jurisdiction, work, and other matters of interest connected with his office. As a matter of record, this report is important, for by it, and those presented in years past by this and other Grand Lecturers, we are able to follow the progress of our ritual. Once again Divine Providence has smiled upon me in my travels and has blessed me with another accident-free year on the road. I have held schools of instructions in every district of the state at least once, and in many districts where I felt my services were needed, a second and third time. The attendance at these meetings, with few exceptions, has been greater than a year ago. The interest and enthusiasm in the ritual continues to grow in spite of the many other activities that are to be found in every community. Although there are still those lodges which require outside help to put on their degree work, the feeling is that these are fewer than in the past and most of the work in opening and closing is better than in the last visit. The condition of the ritual statewide is excellent and is due primarily to the efforts of the District Deputy Grand Lecturers. The reports submitted by these brethren indicate that we are holding our own with regard to attendance at the schools held by them over last year. In addition to conducting the more than 60 official visits, 20 sectional meetings were held with your District Deputy Grand Lecturers. Four meetings were held in each of five sections of the state. Those cities hosting the meetings this year were Cameron, Poplar Bluff, Sedalia, Springfield, Hannibal, Breckenridge, Washington, Sikeston, St. Louis (Rose Hill), North Kansas City (Rising Sun), and Mexico. We wish to express our appreciation to these lodges for letting us use their fine facilities for this important work, for through the efforts of the brethren who attend these schools we are able to perpetuate the work in the ritual the same all through this Grand Jurisdiction. The increased number of brethren in attendance at some of these schools was in evidence at three in particular: The Sunday meeting, held in Washington for the third straight year in March, had a record attendance of 194 brethren representing 56 lodges. For the first time in my experience as Grand Lecturer we held schools in the St. Louis and Kansas City areas with what I consider a great deal of success. At Rose Hill Temple in St. Louis we had an attendance of 120 Master Masons from 41 lodges. A fine lunch was served by R.W. Bro. Frank Lesinski, Sr. and family, to whom we are indebted for the personal attention to our dinner and advance notice to brethren in the area. At Rising Sun No. 13's new lodge hall in Kansas City we had 94 brethren from some 31 lodges. All in all it was a very good experience in the new areas.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

63

To that hard-working group of District Deputy Grand Lecturers to whom we owe so much for their unselfish giving of their time and talents along with travel to assist in the work in their own and adjoining districts, we salute you and only wish there were words in the English language with which to express adequately our heartfelt thanks. To this group of men and because of their efforts we can take pride in the work that is done, and that the work is performed in the same manner all over the state. Some of these brethren have asked to be relieved of their duties at the close of this year and have prepared new brethren to perform the duties of a District Deputy Grand Lecturer. Although we shall miss them in their respective duties, we know their interest is still in the ritual and that we can call on them for assistance as necessary. We appreciate so very much the work done by all the District Deputy Grand Lecturers and only wish there were more we could do for them. It is my sad duty to report the death of R.W. Bro. Glenn H. Oliver of Montgomery City, District Deputy Grand Lecturer of the 28th District. I had the pleasure to appoint R.W. Brother Oliver as a D.D.G.L. at the Grand Lodge session of 1978. He had worked hard and was very interested in the ritual from his first introduction into Freemasonry. His death is a reminder of the uncertainties of life and that no brother has the promise that he will have the opportunity to complete his unfinished work tomorrow. R.W. Brother Oliver was a consciemious, hard-working deputy, devoted to his work and well thought of by every Mason who knew him. He not only lived Freemasonry but took time out to teach it. He shall surely be missed. The work of the Grand Lodge cannot be carried on by Grand Lodge Officers alone. They must have the assistance and cooperation of at least 200 brethren from lodges throughout the state. These brethren must be selected from past and present Masters of our subordinate lodges. It is therefore very important that the incoming Worshipful Master of each lodge give careful consideration and study to the qualities of the brother he appoints to his progressive line of officers. The appointment of these men will be important to the Grand Lodge in the coming years. While the duties of the District Deputy Grand Master are different from those of the District Deputy Grand Lecturer, the men who hold these offices work together very closely. This is as it should be. On the many occasions when I have had to ask a District Deputy Grand Master for assistance, I am proud to say that not one has ever refused. The true spirit of Freemasonry is very prevalent throughout our great state of Missouri; and I am indebted to each of these brethren for his ready cooperation. Once again, I was given the opportunity to participate in the 17 area meetings throughout this last year with M.W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn, our Grand Master. The demonstration given by the District Deputy Grand Lecturers, District Deputy Grand Masters, and Grand Lodge Officers at each meeting was well received and was much needed as it exemplified the proper way to receive a Grand Master and we felt this was an important review. I have appreciated very much the many invitations received this past year to attend special meetings and Masonic functions and I deeply regret that I had to decline many of them. My first duty to the Grand Lodge and the Craft is teaching the ritual and this must take precedence. To have had the opportunity to be involved in all the area meetings and many other Masonic affairs with our Grand Master, M.W. Bro. J. Edward


64

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Blinn, and to have served under his appointment and his well thought-out and well-planned year was a very rewarding and delightful experience. We respectfully acknowledge that his attention to his Masonic duties, and his dedication to those duties, has strengthened Freemasonry in Missouri. To him and the other Grand Lodge Officers who have been a strong support to me, I thank each of you. May we give thanks to the Great Architect of the Universe for His watchful care over us and our Fraternity. God bless you all. Fraternally submitted, STANTON T. BROWN, Grand Lecturer. R.W. Brother Brown moved that the Report of the Grand Lecturer be received and printed in the PROCEEDIJ\:GS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RITUAL

RW. Bro. Stanton T. Brown, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Ritual and moved that the report as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Ritual met in Springfield on May 30,1981. A report was made with regard to the current numbers on Subdivision III proficiencies. There were, on May 30, 1981,236 qualified in Subdivision III of which 81 were present lodge officers. This compares to 183 and 61 respectively for last year. There was disappointment expressed by members ofthe Committee at the small amount of progress. However, the wheels of progress sometimes grind slow but sure. It was agreed that no immediate steps would be taken towards the requirement of a Subdivision III proficiency as a prerequisite to election as a Junior Warden. Several other areas of the ritual were discussed and reviewed by the Committee with concern as how to best achieve results in finding willing brethren to become more proficient, through the Achievement Award, four or five card clubs or some other competitive programs. No decision was made but we will continue to search for new ways. The Committee wishes to express thanks to R.W. Bro. Frank A. Arnold, our Grand Secretary, for his valuable assistance in handling the detailed work that goes through his hands from the office of the Grand Lecturer and Committee on Ritual. Receiving applications for certificates to the brethren is time-consuming and we do appreciate his fine work in assisting with the certificate plan. The list of names of the brethren who have received certificates this past year in Subdivisions I, II, and III will be listed in the PROCEEDINGS as a part of this report. Fraternally submitted, FREELOJ\: K. HADLEY, DALE A. LUDWIG, RONJ\:IE L. HOUSE, EUGEJ\:E E. "PAT" McFARLAND, CARROLL R. M< )ORMAJ\:, STANTON T. BROWN, Chairman.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI SUBDIVISION I -

5623 Timothy Keith Blum, Shekinah LodKe No. 256 5624 Alfred Elmo Blum, Herculaneum Lodge 1'\0.338 5625 Jerry Max Skelton, Hornersville LodKe No. 215 5626 Thomas Bernard Siebert, Arnold Lodge No. 673 5627 Thomas Richard Creager, East Gate Lodge 1\0. 630 5628 Robert N. Edwards, Branson Lodge No. 587 5629 Steven Lynn Bell, Sikeston Lodge No. 210 5630 Douglas W. Sutter, Puxico Lodge No. 596 5631 James Oliver Polly, Cooper Lodge 1'\0.36 5632 Gene Willhite, Joplin Lodge No. 335 5633 Robert Nevadomski Alvarez, Henderson Lodge No. 477 5634 Allen H. Eggen, East Gate Lodge No. 630 5635 David Andrew Landers, Savannah Lodge No. 71 5636 Richard D. Smith, Rolla Lodge 1'\0. 213 5637 Gerald D. Shelton, Saline Lodge No. 226 5638 Bailey Dawson, Aurora Lodge No. 267 5639 Gary L. Mason, Hazelwood Lodge 1\0. 459 5640 Lawrence I'\elson Allen, Hamilton Lodge No. 224 5641 Jack Robert Glaeser, Hamilton LodKe No. 224 5642 Norman William Zweifel, Gray Summit Lodge No. 173 5643 Jimmy Rex McGlathery, Independence Lodge No. 76 5644 Donald Lee Crites, Jr., Fellowship Lodge No. 345 5645 Robert Leland Stoops, Fellowship Lodge No. 345 5646 Edward Barry Spear, Webster Lodge No. 98 5647 Robert Lee Ayers, Valley Park Lodge No. 629 5648 Michael Wayne Gannaway, Carterville Lodge No. 401 5649 Elmo Edward Turner, Jr., Carterville LodKe No. 401 5650 Clarence Leroy Jones, Maplewood Lodge 1'\0.566 5651 John Melvin Korpi, Maplewood Lodge No. 566 5652 Richard Allen Holmes, Bonhomme Lodge No. 45 5653 Tom T. Perkins, Fayette LodKe No. 47 5654 Billy Joe Beatty, Joplin Lodge No. 335 5655 John Frank GoaJ, Samaritan Lodge 1\0. 424 5656 Larry D. Rader, Liberty Lodge 1'\0. 31 5657 William Wray Lain, Jr., Mizpah LodKe No. 639 5658 Keith Larry Meyer, Jonesburg Lodge 1\0. 457 5659 Gary Kit Garoutte, Sedalia Lodge 1'\0.236 5660 William Lewis Frazier, Strafford Lodge No. 608 5661 Elwood EUKene Crandall, Independence Lodge No. 76 5662 James Doyle Riddle, Hermon LodKe No. 187

65

ORIGINALS

5663 Richard J. Daume, Mystic Tie Lodge No. 221 5664 David Grayson Grover, Berkeley Lodge 1'\0.667 5665 Terry M. Young, Berkeley Lodge No. 667 5666 Clarence Leroy Brown, Belton Lodge No. 450 5667 Robert Eugene Ellington, Fellowship Lodge 1\0. 345 5668 Richard Gordon Tosland, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 5669 James EariJones,Jr., Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439 5670 Gary Don Rogers, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. '422 5671 Douglas Raymond Porter, Liberty Lodge No. 31 5672 Charles Franklin Mitchell, Tyro Lodge 1\0. 12 .5673 Robert William Schlichter, Sheffield Lodge No. 625 5674 Darrell R. Conder, Senath Lodge No. 513 5675 Dennis Lee Hammack, New Hope Lodge 1'\0.199 5676 Paul Franklin Ollar, Composite Lodge 1'\0.369 5677 G~e~ry L. Pyron, Branson Lodge No. 5678 Joseph Wilford Flood, Sr., Me Washington Lodge No. 614 5679 Thomas G. Willhite, Joplin Lodge No. 335 5680 John Charles Brandon, Plato Lodge No. 469 5681 Carlton Eugene Wyatt, Saline Lodge No. 226 5682 Harold William Brewer, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 5683 Daniel Eugene Lemasters, Sheffield Lodge No. 625 5684 DonaldJoe Crader, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 5685 John E Muench, Overland Lodge No. 623 5686 Rodney Don QuiKley, Charity Lodge 1'\0. 331 5687 Floyd Woodrow Cronley, Mt. Washington Lodge 1'\0. 614 5688 James Monroe Baker, Galena Lodge No. 515 5689 Albert Arthur Goddard, Galena Lodge No.515 5690 Robert R. Kiehl, Florissant Lodge No. 668 5691 Franklin Dyer, McDonald Lodge No. 324 5692 Donald Wayne Maddux, East Gate Lodge No. 630 5693 Thomas Robert Butts, East Gate Lodge No. 630 5694 Kenneth Wayne Derryberry, Rolla Lodge No. 213 5695 William Dean Montgomery, Leadwood Lodge No. 598 5696 JarnesEthil Bryant, East Gate Lodge No. 630 5697 James William McBath, Alpha Lodge 1\0. 659 5698 Joe D. Masterson, Excelsior Lodge 1\0. 441 5699 Cecil Larry Banner, Barnett Lodge No. 591


66

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

5700 James L. Parrott, Tyro Lodge No. 12 5701 'Terry .lay Rogers, Fellowship Lodge 1\:0. 345 5702 Ralph D. Bedwel1, Fraternal Lodge 1\:0. 363 5703 Lowell Ben VanDyke, Grandview Lodge 1\:0.618 5704 Dennis E. Fetter,. Fret;dom Lodge No. 636 5705 Kenneth Murvm Fltzgerel, McDonald Lodge 1\:0. 324 5706 Thomas M. Dooley, East Gate Lodge 1\:0. 630 5707 Bobbie Ray Michael, I\:eosho Lodge 1\:0. 247 5708 Larry Glen Warner, Cass Lodge 1\:0. 147 5709 James M. Sit7.e, Bismarck Lodge 1\:0. 41 5710 'Roy Preston Yager, Mont!{omery Lodge 1\:0.246

1981

5712 James Benard Wilson, Mt. Washington . Lodge 1\:0. 614 5713 Lloyd Edward Hickman, Henderson Lodge 1\:0. 477 5714 Ronnie Wayne Smith, Composite Lodge No. 369 5715 Larry Wayne Owens, Henderson Lodge 1\:0.477 5716 Marvin Walter Frost, Carthage Lodge No. 197 5717 Richard Bodine Crouch, Branson Lodge No. 587 5718 Leonard Duane Staley, Koshkonong Lodge 1\:0. 582 5719 Thomas P. Baker, Branson Lodge No. 587 5720 Harold Preston Harbin, Cecile Daylight Lodge 1\:0. 305

5711 .lames E. Hans, Montgomery Lodge No. 246 SUBDIVISIOI\: I A2604 Vernon Leroy Dunham, United Lodge No.5 A2605 David Edward Powell, Hornersville Lodge 1\:0. 215 A2606 Clifford Newton Tal1ey, Irondale Lodge 1\:0.143 A2607 Robert Clyde Foster, Excel10 Lodge 1\:0. 332 A2608 James Marion Shipton, Hayti Lodge No. 571 A2609 Benny Leroy Roach, Joplin Lodge 1\:0. 335 A2610 Wil1iam Link Lane, Ionic Lodge 1\:0.154 A2611 J. Bert Thacker, Mizpah Lodge No. 639 A2612 Walter S. Specie, Palestine Lodge ~o. 241 A2613 Clarence Walker Wieland, Rol1a Lodge No. 213 A2614 Melvin Brees, Mercer Lodge 1\:0. 35 A2615 Kenneth Loyd Goad, Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305 A2616 Wil1iam Adrian Webb, Aurora Lodge 1\:0.267

A2617 Frank Wal1is, Tyro Lodge 1\:0.12 A2618 Gary Lee Mul1ins, Swope Park Lodge No. 617 A2619 R. L. Tichenor, Rising Sun Lodge 1\:0. 13 A2620 Jules T. Brown, Saline Lodge 1\:0. 226 A2621 Harold David Hil1, Saline Lodge No. 226 A2622 Ronald Paul Stahlman, Friend Lodge No. 352 A2623 David L. Dixon, Jr., Liberty Lodge No. 31 A2624 Leon Dean Reed, Fairfax Lodge 1\:0. 483 A2625 Charles H. Moore, Fairfax Lodge 1\:0. 483 A2626 Robert Frank Mitchell, Rising Sun Lodge 1\:0. 13 A2627 Earl Gene Hays, Marceline Lodge 1\:0. 481 A2628 AltonJann Amos, Webb City Lod!{e 1\:0. 512 A2629 James Joseph Downey, Jr., Fraternal Lodge No. 363 A2630 Leo W. Chancy, Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305

FIRST RENEWALS A2631 Lonnie Darl Wethered, Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305 A2632 Jerry Francis Willis, Cecile DayliKht LodKe No. 305 A2633 Mike L. Hayes, Somerset Lodge 1\:0. 206 A2634 Warren Wal1ace Bergman, Florissant Lodge No. 668 A2635 James Eugene Green, Leadwood Lodge No. 598 A2636 Jerry I\:elson Greear, Mizpah LodKe No. 639 A2637 Robert Dee Scott, Richland Lodge No. 385 A2638 Charles D. Howel1, Henderson Lodge 1\:0.477

A2639 Eugene Walter Wade, Keystone Lodge 1\:0.243 A2640 Phil1ip M. Stanley, Mercer Lodge 1\:0. 35 A2641 Roger Lay Pritchett, Lathrop Lodge No. 506 A2642 Jerry J. Matthews, Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 A2643 Elmer Steven Moody, Norwood Lodge No. 622 A2644 Charles E. Woodson, Forest Park Lodge No. 578 A2645 Ralph Wayne Horton,Jonesburg Lodge No. 457 A2646 Robert A. Homan, Florissant Lodge No. 668 A2647 Harold Eugene Gregory, McDonald Lodge 1\:0. 324 A2648 William Donald Harvey, Gardenvil1e Lodge No. 655 A2649 Clarence Joseph Seaton, Warrenton Lodge No. 609 A2650 Claud F. Stephens, Warrenton Lodge No. 609 A2651 Larry C. Reynolds, Henderson Lodge 1\:0.477

A2652 Leo E. Endicott, Branson Lodge No. 587 A2653 Quantrell Chester Robbins, Weston Lodge 1\:0. 53 A2654 .lames William Duckett, Alpha Lodge No. 659 A2655 Roger Al1en Trent, Gate of the Temple Lod!{e 1\:0. 422


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

A2656 John Howard Cochran, Jr., Branson Lodge No. 587 A2657 Roben O. Smith, East Gate Lodge No. 630 A2658 Huben Eugene Bumgarner, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422 SUBDIVISION I B1423 Frank Blair Curry, McDonald Lodge No. 324 B 1424 Ezra Franklin Williams, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 B1425 James Richard Brooks, Branson Lodge No. 587 B 1426 Howard Clay Brewington, Marcus Lodge No. 110 B1427 Jimmie Trent Cox, Sheffield Lodge No. 625 BI428 Wallace E. Mainment, Richmond Lodge No. 57 B1429 Larry Dean Peugh, Cainsville Lodge No. 328 B1430 Bobby Lee Hackworth, Florissant Lodge No. 668 B 1431 John William McLoed, Clarksville Lodge No. 17 BI432 Ralph Claude Primo, Saline Lodge No.

226 B 1433 Sherman Glen Ferrell, Henderson Lodge No. 477 B1434 Bernard F. Radford, Crane Lodge No. 519 B 1435 Donald Eugene Campbell, Compass Lodge No. 120 B1436 Donald Lee Bobbett, Osage Lodge No. 303 BI437 Lawrence Milton Cripps, Osage Lodge No. 303 BI438 David Franklin Phillips, Osage Lodge No. 303 B 1439 Wendell G. Pennington, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 B 1440 Jerry Paul SlUrgeon, Kcnnett Lodge No.

68

B 1441 Charles Herman McClain, Arnold Lodge No. 673 B1442 Herald E. Schaper, Moscow Lodge No. 558 BI443 Douglas Allen Linville, Compass Lodge No. 120 BI444 Adis Branstietter, Bee Hive Lodge No. 393 B 1445 Norval Wilson Lee, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 B 1446 Gerald .I ames Kunold, Friend Lodge No. 352 B1447 James Ellis Spencer, Grandview Lodge No. 618 SUBDIVISIOI\: I C855 Charles Clinton Bybee, Solomon Lodge No. 271 C856 Stanton Thayer Brown, II, Buckner Lodge 1\:0. 501 C857 David R. Bunning, Nonheast Lodge 1\:0. 643 C858 Forrest Everett, Hayti Lodge No. 571 C859 Harry J. Eckert, Friendship Lodge No. 89 C860 Lee O. King, Columbia Lodge 1'\0. 534

67

A2659 Everett Joshua Hayes, Clifton Lodge No. 463 A2660 Eupene S. Frealy, Koshkonong Lodge 1'\0.582

SECOND RENEWALS B1448 Harold Dean Earp, Plato Lodge No. 469 B1449 Larry Clinton Hanna, Raytown Lodge No. 391 B 1450 George Ellery Marsden, Raytown Lodge No. 391 B 1451 Glen H. Oliver, Montgomcry Lodge No. 246 B1452 Calvin Schroff, Montgomcry Lodge No.

246 BI453 Wayne Henry Branson, Overland Lodge No. 623 B 1454 Daryl Linn Funk, Valley Park Lodge No. 629 B1455 Robert Anthony Wahlig, Fenton Lodge 1'\0.281 B 1456 Robert B. Elden, Sheffield Lodge No. 625 B1457 Billie Lee Bird, King Hill Lodgc No. 376 B1458 James R. Tinker, Sr., Florissant Lodge No. 668 B 1459 Roger W. Parker, Arnold Lodge No. 673 B1460 Everett Alben Hopper, Arnold Lodge 1'\0.673 B 1461 Arthur Eric Carlson, Shelbina Lodge No. 228 B 1462 Terry Dean Stanley, Carterville Lodge No. 401 B 1463 Howard Doyle Van Slykc, Carterville Lodge No. 401 B1464 Ernest J. Thacker, Algabil Lodge No. 544 B 1465 Wendell James Brunk, Grandview Lodge No. 618 B1466 Ben MacEdwards, Centralia Lodge No. 59 B1467 David R. Vogler, Magnolia Lodge No. 626 B146H Charles H. Schuler, Sullivan Lodge No. 69 B1469 Billie Pollard, Moberly Lodge No. 344 B 1470 RoLen S. Alexander, Branson Lodge 1'\0.587 BI471 Joseph Edward Stevens, St. Francois Lodge No. 234 B 1472 Lee Roy Nichols, St. Francois Lodge No. 234 B1473 Peter JohnJackson, Stockton Lodge No. 283 B1474 Cleo Freeman, Branson Lodge No. 587 THIRD RENEWALS C861 Lewis A. Smittle, Columbia Lodge 1'\0. 534 C862 Roy' C. Knierim, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 C863 WIlliam M. Clark, Jr., Gray Summit Lodge 1\:0. 173 C864 John C. Allen, Pleasant Grove Lodge No. 142 C865 John D. DeClue, Valley Park Lodge No. 629


68

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

C866 Dorrel Lee Plammons, Iberia Lodge No. 410 C867 Woodford Leroy Tilley, Jr., Plato Lodge No. 469 . C868 William Leonard Conley, Plato Lodge No. 469 C869 Elmer L. Stanley, Jr., Marceline LodKe No. 481 C870 Robert D. Terry, Bonhomme Lodge No. 45 C871 Wayne G. Tucker, Florissant Lodge No. 668 <:872 John H. Pate, Independence LodKe No. 76 SUBDIVISION I -

C873 Larrv Chiolerio, Marceline Lodge No. 481 C874 Larry Dean Mundorff, Alpha LodKe No. 659 C875 Philip Horn, Sr., Alpha Lodge No. 659 C876 Glenn J. Rohs, Craft LodKe 1\;0. 287 C877 Charlie B. Buckley, Four Mile Lodge 1\;0. 212 C878 Roy Irvin Sandefur, Columbia Lodge 1\;0. 534 C879 James Nelson Hamilton, Fellowship Lodge No. 345 C880 ROKer Ralph Adams, Criterion Lodge 1\;0.586 FOURTH REI\;EWALS

D555 John Lee Lorenz, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422 D556 Kenneth R. Clements, Aurora Lodge No. 267 D557 Bill J. Vaughan, Henderson Lodge No.

477

D558 Hubert R. Baumgarth, Columbia LodKe No. 534 D559 William Eugene Goggin, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 D560 Melvin Leslie Buck, Fraternal Lodge 1\;0. 363 D561 Jessie Carl Thompson, Forest Park Lodge No. 578 SUBDIVISION I E392 Earl F. Bowman, Gate City LodKe No. 522 E393 Jackson c. Spiking, Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377 E394 Hugh Monroe Peterson, Sullivan Lodge No. 69 E395 Dominik Louis Seeler, Meridian Lodge No.2 E396 Stanley Earl Massey, Competition Lodge No. 432 E397 William Wilmer Martin, Kirksville Lodge No. 105 E398 William Decherd Long, Rolla Lodge 1\;0. 213 E399 Charles R. Savage, Shaveh Lod~e No. 646 SUBDIVISIOI\; I F252 Thomas Lynn Dawson, Aurora LodKe No. 267 F253 William L. Bear, York Lodge 1\;0. 563 F254 Carroll R. Moorman, Easter LodKe No. 575 F255 Burette Barber Shannon, Elvins Lodge No. 599 F256 Harold Kenneth Campbell, Webster LodKe No. 98 F257 Jess H. Easley, Laclede Lodge No. 83 F258 Clarence Lee AlumbauKh, Buckner Lodge No. 501 SUBDIVISION I -

1981

D562 Laban Oliver Stahl, Pleasant Grove Lodge 1\;0. 142 D563 Irvin Frank TonKay, Florissant Lodge 1\;0.668 D564 Walter Stanfill, Amsterdam LodKe No. 141 D565 Thomas Arnel Meads, Trilumina Lodge No. 205 D566 James I\;athaniel Allison, Mt. WashinKton Lodge No. 614 D567 Harold Norman Napier, Willard Lodge No. 620 D568 Euell J. Sweeten, Wentzville Lodge 1\;0. 46 FIFTH RENEWALS HOO Billy K. Thomas, Cass Lodge No. 147 E401 Edward Wilson Whitehead, Algabil Lodge No. 544 E402 Otto J. Gumm, Alpha Lodge No. 659 E403 William Carter Bell, Dexter Lodge No. 532 E404 Robert H. Whan, Western Star Lodge 1\;0. 15 E405 James Calvin Allison, Trilumina Lodge No. 205 E406 James S. West, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422

SIXTH RENEWALS F259 GeorKe H. Strother, Vandalia Lodge No. 491 Lecil Ulry, Lick Creek Lodge No. 302 Frederick H. Neal, Morley Lodge No. 184 Willis Ralph Hunt, Alpha Lodge No. 659 Arthur S. Wehmeyer, Paul Revere Lodge No. 330 F264 Wilbur LaGelle Hains, Cambridge Lodge No. 63

F260 F261 F262 F263

SEVENTH RENEWALS

Gl64 Albert Hugh Miller, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 G165 Herbert Dale Deweese, Eureka Lodge No. 73

G166 Arnold John Millner, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Gl67 Joseph O. McKinstry, Twilight Lodge No. 114


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

GI68 Thomas C. Hurt, East Gate Lodge No. 630 GI69 John E. Bogue, New London Lodge No. 307 GI70 James Henry Bloom, King Hill Lodge No. 276 SUBDIVISION I -

SUBDIVISION I Duane Eiserman, Branson Lodge No. 587 Paul V. Raney, Potosi Lodge No. 131 Emmet L. Bunton, Hermon Lodge No. 187 AndrewT. Dorsey, Twilight Lodge No. 114 SUBDIVISION I .127 Virgil Wilbert Slaughter, Dockery Lodge No. 325 SUBDIVISION I -

GI71 Ronnie L. House, Mansfield Lodge No. 543 GI72 Charles R. Snidow, Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446

EIGHTH RENEWALS

H99 James Carl Jones, Union Lodge No. 593 HIOO Leo B. Kennedy, Edina Lodge No. 291 H 10 I Frederick Powell Rodecker, Savannah Lodge No. 71 H 102 Morns S. Sheets, ProRress Lodge No. 657 H 103 Alfred Whitfield Gnffith, Fulton Lodge No. 48 H 104 Frank Wall Hazelrigg, Jr., Fulton Lodge No. 48

152 153 154 ISS

69

H 105 Charles Elvin Divine, Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209 HI06 Chesley Emerson McAfee, Angerona Lodge No. 193 H 107 Benjamin Edward Lollar, Western Star Lodge No. 15 H 108 James Wilson Brewer, Alpha Lodge No. 659 NINTH RENEWALS 156 John S. Stillwell, Putnam Lodge No.;190 157 Farron Atkins, Laclede Lodge No. 83 158 John I. Williams, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13

TENTH RENEWALS .128 Glenn V. Bulla, Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377

ELEVENTH REI\'EWALS

KI3 Charles Goodman, Polar Star Lodge No. 79 SUBDIVISION II -

PART OI\'E -

408 Michael David Ballard, Henderson Lodge No. 477 409 Dennis Ray Speak, Northeast Lodge No.

643 410 Bailey Dawson, Aurora Lodge No. 267 411 John Wayne Greene, Meridian Lodge 1':0. 2

412 James L. Hackett, Rowley Lodge No. 204 413 Robert Lee Ayers, Valley Park Lodge No. 629 414 Preston B. Fleischmann, Aurora Lodge No. 267 415 Willard W. Boenzlc, Good Hope Lodge No. 218 416 Franklin Howard Rose, Algabil Lodge No. 544 417 William Link Lane, Ionic Lodge No. 154 41H William Wray Lain,Jr., Mizpah Lodge 1\'0. 639 SUBDIVISION II -

120

428 William John Mundy, Clifton Heights Lodl-{e 1\'0. 520 429 Gilbert LeeRoy Mattli, Berkeley Lodge No. 667

PART ONE -

A265 James C. Stanley, Alpha Lodge 1':0.659 A266 Clarence Walker Wieland, Rolla Lodge 1\'0.213 A267 Billy Ray Abbott, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 A268 George L. Hickman, Raytown Lodge No. 391 A269 Austin Oscar Gamble, Wellston Lodge No. 613 A270 Charles Bratton, Trinity Lodge No. 641

ORIGINALS

419 Charles Wesley Leach, Arnold Lodge No. 673 420 Doyle Eldo Mathes, Aurora Lodge No. 267 421 Thomas.1. Moser, Harmony Lodge 1\'0. 499 422 Claud F. Stephens, Warrenton Lodge No. 609 423 Jerry J. Matthews, Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 424 William Edward McGuire, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 425 Thomas B. Siebert, Arnold Lodge No. 673 426 Frank L. Lcnnaman, Joachim Lodge No. 161 427 Donald E. Campbell, Compass Lodge No.

FIRST REI\'EWALS

A271 Charles o. Shaffer, Jr., Mizpah Lodge 1\'0.639 A272 Clco Freeman, Branson Lodge 1\'0. 587 A27:~ Everett A. Hopper, Arnold Lodge No. 673 A274 Roger W. Parker, Arnold Lodge No. 673 A275 John D. DeClue, Valley Park Lodge No. 629 A276 Robert D. WcikaI. Sedalia Lodge No. 236


70

A277 Richard W. Goff, Clifton Heights Lodge 1\0. 520 A278 Chester Lee McDaniel, East Gate Lodge No. 630 A279 Howard Dovle Van Slyke, Carterville Lodge 1\0. 40 I SUBDIVISIOI\ II -

PART

B175 I\ed A. Donovan, Rising Sun Lodge 1\0. 13 B 176 John M. McLoed, Clarksville Lodge 1\0. 17 B 177 Lewis L. Krchmeyer, Meridian Lodge 1\0.2 B178 Peter John Jackson. Stockton Lodge 1\0. 283 B 179 James I\elson Hamilton, Fellowship Lodge 1\0. 345 B180 Verble Leo Johnson, Aurora Lodge 1\0. 267 SUBDIVISION II -

PART

C129 Lecil Ulry, Lick Creek Lodge No. C130 Jimmie Lee Moreland, Neosho No. 247 C131 Albert Hugh Miller, Wentzville No. 46 <:132 Hugh Edward Shubert, Sheffield 1\0.625 SUBDIVISION II -

302 Lodge Lodge Lodge

SUBDIVISION II -

SVBDIVISIOI\ II -

-

SECOI\D REI\EWALS ~tclvin

B 181 B 182 B 183 B184 B 185

O~E

-

John Sanders, Marlborough Lodge 1\0. 569 Wendell G. Pennington, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 Edward Wilson Whitehead, Algabil Lodge No. 544 I\orman S. Stites, Valley Park Lodge 1\0. 629 Theodore R. Brown, Freedom Lodge !':o. 636

THIRD REI\EWALS

C 13:{ Paul Turner, Solomon Lodge No. 271 C 134 William Eugene (;oggin, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 CI35 Victor 1.. Ford, Ravtown Lodge ~o. 391 C 136 Charles Edward Scheurich, Acacia Lodge 1\0.602 FOURTH REI\EWALS

DI02 Henry W. Busch, Jennings Lodge No. 640 FIFTH REI\EWALS

E76 Ronnie L. House, Mansfield Lodge No. 543 E77 R. Franklin Avery, Hope Lodge 1\0. 251 E78 Charles R. Savage, Shaveh Lodge 1\0. 646 E79 Eugene E. "Pat" McFarland, Hermon Lodge ]'1;0. 187

PART OI\E -

F40 Carroll R. Moorman, Easter Lodge 1\0. 575 F41 William V. McCollum, Solomon Lodge No. 271 F42 Olen Paul Erwin, Carthage Lodge 1\0. 197 F43 1'. Lynn Dawson, Aurora Lodge 1\0. 267

.J.

O~E

PART OI\E -

E71 George H. Strother, Vandalia Lodge No. 491 E72 Earl F. Bowman, Gate City Lodge 1\0. 522 E73 Dominik Louis Seeler, Meridian Lodge No. 2 E74 Dale A. Ludwig, Algabil Lodge 1\0. 544 E75 Dwight 1.. Pickinpaugh, Raytown Lodge No. 391

SUBDIVISION II -

A280 Frank Wallis, Tyro Lodge No. 12 A281 Riley Leslie Burrus, Blue Springs Lodge ~o. 337 A282 Thomas W. Porter, Heroine Lodge No. 104

PART OI\E -

DI0l Stanton 1'. Brown, Buckner Lodge No. 501

H 14

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

SIXTH RE]'I;EWALS

F44 Elmer W. Mueller, Magnolia Lodge 1\0. 626 F45 Orville M. Mash, Webster Groves Lodge 1\0.84 F46 Cheslev Emerson McAfee, Angerona Lodge 1\0. 193

PART OI\E -

EIGHTH REI\EWALS

Earl Landes, Shekinah Lodge 1\0. 256 SUBDIVISION II -

PART OI\E -

.12 Lloyd C. Kennon, Granite Lodge No. 272

SUBDIVISION II -

PART ONE -

K 1 Fredon K, Hadley, Sl.Joseph Lodge 1\0. 78

TEI\TH

RE~EWALS

.13 Averv Wi'lson (~rifley, Maplewood Lodge No'. 566 ELEVEl\;TH REI\EWALS


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI SUBDIVISIOI'\ II -

PART TWO -

381 David Richard Bunning, I'\ortheast Lodge No. 643 382 Clifton Newton Talley, Irondale Lodge No. 143 383 William Link Lane, Ionic Lodge 1'\0. 154 384 Preston B. Fleischmann, Aurora Lodge 1'\0. 267 385 Dennis R. Speak, I'\ortheast Lodge 1'\0. 643 386 Clarence Wallace Stone, Jr., Bonhomme Lodge 1'\0. 45 387 David Lee Swinney, Polar Star Lodge 1'\0. 79 388 Paul Edward McKean-Shields, Henderson Lodge 1'\0. 477 389 Gary Lynn Mason, Hazelwood Lodge No. 459 390 Doyle Eldo Mathes, Aurora Lodge No. 267 391 Joe L Willhite, Joplin Lodge No. 335 392 Bobby Ray O'Dell, Friendship Lodge 1'\0. 89 SUBDIVISIOI'\ II -

403

SECOI'\D REI'\EWALS

B 176 Edward Wilson Whitehead, AII-{abil Lodge 1'\0. 544 B 177 Doyle D. Sills, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 B 178 Jessie Carl Thompson, Forest Park Lodge 1'\0.578 B 179 R. Edward Ceries, Crestwood Lodge No. 669 BI80 Hugh E. Shubert, Sheffield Lodge No. 625

THIRD RE!'\EWAl.S

C 119 Charles Edward Scheurich. Acacia Lodge No. 602 C120 Donald V. Benson, Fulton Lodge No. 48 CI21 John D. DeClue, Valley Park Lodge !'\o. 629 CI22 Eugene E. "Pat" McFarland, Hermon Lodge No. 187

PART TWO -

D91 Ronnie 1.. House, Mansfield Lodge No. 543

FIRST RE!\EWALS

A247 Randall Jay Jones, Mt. Olive Lodge 1'\0. 439 A248 James Eugene Green, Leadwood Lodge !\o. 598 A249 Jerrold Kent Clemons, Bismarck Lodge ]\;0.41 A250 Amos William Arnold, Florissant Lodge ]\;0.668 A251 Jerry l'\e1son Greear, Mizpah Lodge 1'\0. 639 A252 Ralph Claude Primo, Saline Lodge No. 226 A253 George 1.. Hickman, Raytown Lodge No. 391 A254 Wendell G. Pennington, Rising Sun Lodge 1'\0. I:~

PART TWO -

CI15 Paul K. Kawakami, Heroine Lodge No. 104 <:116 Albert Hugh Miller, Wentzville Lodge 1'\0.46 C117 Kenneth R. Clements, Aurora Lodge No. 267 C118 .J. Edward Blinn, Webster Lodge No. 98 SUBDIVlSIOI'\ 11 -

402

PART TWO -

B170 JamesJ. Montgomery, Neosho Lodge No. 247 B171 John William McLoed, Clarksville Lodge No. 17 B 172 James Nelson Hamilton, Fellowship Lodge No. 345 B173 Peter John Jackson, Stockton Lodge 1'\0. 283 B174 Norman S. Stites, Valley Park Lodge 1'\0. 629 B 175 Victor Loren Ford, Raytown Lodge 1'\0. 391 SL'BDIVISIOl'\ II -

399 400 401

ORIGINALS

Erwin J. Roesel, Freedom Lodge No. 636 William John Mundy, Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 Elwood Eugene Crandall, Independence Lodge No. 76 Charles E. Becraft, St.Joseph Lodge No. 78 Ezra T. Lalik, Independence Lodge No. 76 Kenneth Loyd Goad, Cecile Daylight Lodge 1'\0. 305 William Wray Lain,Jr., Mizpah Lodge 1'\0. 639 Cleo Freeman, Branson Lodge No. 587 Cleo Everett Tapscott, East Gate Lodge 1'\0. 630 Dale Harmon Flanagan, Heroine Lodge No. 104 Billy Joe Beatty. Joplin Lodge 1'\0. 335

PART TWO -

A238 Clarence Walker Wieland, Rolla Lodge No. 213 A239 Tommy Curbow, Branson Lodge No. 587 A240 Donald Ray Jett, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 A241 Ezra Frankhn Williams, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 A242 Robert Joseph Wangelin, Anchor Lodge No. 443 A243 Larry James Chancellor, Buckner Lodge ]\;0.501 A244 Robert Edward Lee Shelton, Macks Creek Lodge No. 433 A245 Howard Lee Dobbs, I'\eosho Lodge No. 247 A246 Charles H. Daume, Jr., Mystic Tic Lodge No. 221 SUBDIVISIO]\; II -

395 396 397 398

71

FOURTH REI'\EWALS


72

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SUBDIVISIOI': II -

PART TWO -

E69 Earl F. Bowman, Gate City Lodge 1':0.522 E70 Thomas Lynn Dawson, Aurora Lodge 1':0. 267 E71 Charles R. Sava~e, Shaveh Lodge 1':0. 646 SUBDIVISION II -

PART TWO -

F43 Olen Paul Erwin, Carthage Lodge No. 197 F44 Carroll R. Moorman, Easter Lodge No. 575 F45 Richard George Keeling, Berkeley Lodge No. 667

SIXTH REi\EWALS

F46 Chesley Emerson McAfee, Angerona Lodge 1':0. 193

SUBDIVISION 11- PART TWO G26 William V McCollum, Solomon Lodge 1':0. 271 G27 Thomas Joseph Lehmann, Paul Revere Lodge 1':0. 330 SUBDIVISIOI': II -

FIFTH REI':EWALS

E72 Dwight L. Pickinpaugh, Raytown Lodge 1':0.391 E73 R. Franklin Avery, Hope Lodge 1':0. 251 E74 Dominik L. Seeler, Meridian Lodge 1':0. 2

SEVENTH REI':EWALS

G28 William Franklin Jackson, Shaveh Lodge No. 646

PART TWO -

EIGHTH REI':EWALS

H 14 Morris S. Sheeks, Progress Lodge No. 657 SUBDlVISIOI': II -

PART TWO -

TEi\TH REI':EWALS

.12 Avery Wilson Griffey, Maplewood Lodge 1':0.566

SUBDIVISION II -

PART TWO -

ELEVEl\'TH RENEWALS

KI Freelon K. Hadley, St.Joseph Lodge No. 78 SUBDIVISION II -

PART THREE -

379 Preston Blair Fleischmann, Aurora Lodge No. 267 380 Clifford Newton Talley, Irondale Lodge No. 143 381 Glen Otto Stottlemyre, Texas Lodge No. 177 382 Doyle Eldo Mathes, Aurora Lodge No. 267 383 Jerry Nelson Greear, Mizpah Lodge No. 639 384 Dennis Ray Speak, Northeast Lodge 1':0. 643 385 Garry Lynn Mason, Hazelwood Lodge 1':0. 459 386 Billy Joe Beatty, Joplin Lodge 1':0. 335 387 Gilbert Lee Roy Mattli, Berkeley Lodge No. 667

ORIGI:\ALS

388 Donald Earl Scott, Independence Lodge 1':0.76

389 Richard Allen Holmes, Bonhomme Lodge No. 45 390 William Wray Lain,Jr., Mizpah Lodge 1':0. 639 391 Frank L. Lennaman, Joachim Lodge 1':0. 164 392 Douglas Allen Linville, Compass Lodge 1':0.120 393 Robert Leon Wright, Columbia Lodge 1':0. 534 394 Dale Harmon Flanagan, Heroine Lodge 1':0. 104

SUBDIVISION 11- PART THREE A241 Billy Joe Crawford, Grain Valley Lodge No. 644 A242 Clarence Walker Wieland, Rolla Lodge No.213 A243 Frederick Allen Troxel,Jr., Blue Springs Lodge No. 337 A244 Howard Lee Dobbs, :\eosho Lodge 1':0. 247 A245 John Bailey Sloan, Branson Lodge No. 587 A246 James C. Stanley, Alpha Lodge No. 659 A247 Donald RayJett, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 A248 Larry James Chancellor, Buckner Lodge 1':0..:;01

FIRST RENEWALS

A249 Austin Oscar Gamble, Wellston Lodge 1':0.613 A250 Harley LeRoy Monroe, Sullivan Lodge No. 69 A251 Eugene Granvel Ritz, Pyramid Lodge No. 180 A252 Joseph Ronald Rivituso, Freedom Lodge 1':0.636 A253 Adis Allen Branstietter, Bee Hive Lodge 1':0.393 A254 Terry Dean Stanley, Carterville Lodge 1':0.401 A255 William Frederick Wieser, Ferguson Lodge 1':0. 542

61


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI SUBDIVISION II -

PART THREE -

B 160 Charles Keith Wilkinson, Sr., Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 B161 Woodford Leroy Tilley, Jr., Plato Lodge No. 469 B 162 Conley Eugene DePriest, Pauldingville Lodge No. 11 B163 Albert Hugh Miller, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 B164 Arvid E. Critchfield, Northeast Lodge No. 643 B165 Roger Ralph Adams, Criterion Lodge No. 586 B166 William Eugene Goggin, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 B167 Victor Loren Ford, Raytown Lodge No. 391 B 168 John M. McLoed, Clarksville Lodge No. 17 BI69 Peter John Jackson, Stockton Lodge No. 283 SUBDIVISION II -

SUBDIVISION II -

B170 Bobby Lee Hackworth, Florissant Lodge No. 668 B171 Rex Martin Williams, Henderson Lodge No. 477 B 172 Melvin John Sanders, Marlborough Lodge No. 569 B 173 Benjamin Edward Lollar, Western Star Lodge No. ' 1 5 ' . B174 Hugh E. Shubert, Sheffield Lodge No. 625 BI75 John D. DeClue, Valley Park Lodge No. 629 B 176 Edward Wilson Whitehead, Algabil Lodge No. 544 B 177 James Nelson Hamilton, Fellowship Lodge No. 345 B 178 Robert S. Alexander, Branson Lodge No. 587 BI79 Ned A. Donovan, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13

PART THREE -

C127 Lecil Ulry, Lick Creek Lodge No. 302 C 128 Paul K. Kawakami, Heroine Lodge No. 104 C 129 Charles Naaman Alcorn, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 C130 J. Edward Blinn, Webster Lodge No. 98 C131 Jimmie Lee Moreland, Neosho Lodge No. 247

SUBDIVISION II -

PART THREE -

FIFTH RENEWALS

E72 Arthur S. Wehmeyer, Paul Revere Lodge No. 330

PART THREE -

SIXTH RENEWALS

F45 Chesley Emerson McAfee, Angerona Lodge No. 193

F43 T. Lynn Dawson, Aurora Lodge No. 267 F44 Ronnie L. House, Mansfield Lodge No. 543 SUBDIVISION II -

FOURTH RENEWALS

D96 Laban Oliver Stahl, Pleasant Grove Lodge 1"0.142 D97 Charles Edward Scheurich, Acacia Lodge 1"0.602

E69 Earl F. Bowman, Gate City Lodge No. 522 E70 Olen Paul Erwin, Carthage Lodge No. 197 E71 Thomas C. Hurt, East Gate Lodge No. 630 SUBDIVISION II -

THIRD RENEWALS

C132 Lewis L. Krehmeyer, Meridian Lodge No.2 C133 Jo Maurice Fisher, Raytown Lodge No. 391 C134 Eugene E. "Pat" McFarland, Hermon Lodge No. 187

PART THREE -

D93 Ray Hilton, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422 D94 Marvin G. ShuIJ, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 D95 Henry W. Busch, Jennmgs Lodge No. 640

PART THREE -

SEVENTH RENEWALS

G25 Thomas Joseph Lehmann, Paul Revere Lodge No. 330 SUBDIVISION II -

PART THREE -

TENTH RENEWALS

.12 Avery Wilson Griffey, Maplewood Lodge No. 566 SUBDIVISION II -

73

SECOND RENEWALS

PART THREE -

KI Freelon K. Hadley, St.Joseph Lodge No. 78

62

ELEVENTH RENEWALS


74

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SUBDIVISION III -

191 Doyle Eldo Mathes, Aurora Lodge 1\'0. 267 192 Kenneth Loyd Goad, Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305 193 Albert Hugh Miller, Wentzville Lodge No. 46 194 James R. "Russ" Tinker, Sr., Florissant Lodge No. 668 195 William E. Goggin, Ferguson Lodge No. 542 196 Charles D. Howell, Henderson Lodge No. 477 197 Gary Lee Mullins, Swope Park Lodge I\' o. 617 198 Amos William Arnold, Florissant Lodge 1\'0.668 199 Ezra Thomas Lalik, Independence Lodge No. 76 200 Howard D. Van Slyke, Carterville Lodge No. 401 201 Billy Joe Cox, Friendship Lodge No. 89 202 Bobby Ray O'Dell, Friendship Lodge No. 89 203 Edwin Lee Smith, Marceline LodKe 1\'0. 481 204 Billy K. Thomas, Cass LodKe No. 147 205 Nolen H. Rinne, Linn Lodge No. 326 206 Gary Allen Inlow, Sedalia Lodge No. 236 207 Elmer E. Revelle, Montgomery Lodge 1\'0. 246 208 Ellick Edward Garren, Stella Lodge No. 538 209 Jack Robert Glaeser, Hamilton Lodge No. 224 210 William F. Nell, Charity Lodge No. 331 211 Virgil E. Bradley, Clinton Lodge 1\'0.548 212 Billy Joe Beatty, Joplin Lodge 1'\0. 335 213 Terry Dean Stanley, CarterVIlle Lodge 1\'0. 401 214 William Edward McGuire, Wentzville Lodge 1'\0. 46 215 Clarence R. Czeschin, Palestine Lodge No. 241 216 Preston B. Fleischmann, Aurora Lodge 1'\0. 267

1981

ORIGII\'ALS

217 Kenneth W. Hawkins, Clinton Lodge No. 548 218 Bobbie Ray Michael, Neosho Lodge No. 247 219 Oscar B. Rogers, Malden Lodge No. 406 220 Charles Elvin Divine, Poplar Bluff Lodge 1'\0.209 221 Richard Allen Grove, Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 222 Gerald Lee Lewis, Carterville Lodge 1'\0. 401 223 George Ellery Marsden, Raytown Lodge 1'\0.391 224 Frederick Allen Troxel, Jr., Blue Springs Lodge 1'\0. 337 225 Dennis Ray Speak, Northeast Lodge 1'\0. 643 226 I\'orman S. Stites, Valley Park Lodge 1'\0. 629 227 Paul Patton, Kennett Lodge No. 68 228 William Andrew Fry, Neosho Lodge No. 247 229 William I. Adams, Theodore Roosevelt Lodge 1'\0.661 230 William E. Brenneman, Laclede Lodge No. 83 231 Douglas Allen Linville, Compass Lodge 1\'0.120 232 James Roy Clarke, Compass Lodge 1'\0. 120 233 Arthur Lee Reece, Cass Lodge No. 147 234 Ernest H. Wotring, Conway Lodge 1'\0.528 235 Damon Eugene Bartles, Cass Lodge No. 147 236 William G. Barnett, Ancient Landmark Lodge 1'\0. 356 237 Billy R. Abbott, Ferguson Lodge 1\'0. 542 238 William Wray Lain,Jr., Mizpah Lodge 1\'0. 639 239 Peter John Jackson, Stockton Lodge 1\'0. 283 240 Dale Harmon Flanagan, Heroine Lodge 1\'0.104 241 Cleo E. Tapscott, East Gate Lodge No. 630

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAND LODGE OFFICE BUILDING

RW. Bro. Ernest C. Cottle, member, moved that the report of the Committee on Grand Lodge Office Building as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by the vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHRE!\': Your Committee on the Grand Lodge Office Building, charged with the upkeep and maintenance of the buildings and grounds, met on a monthly basis. Contracts were entered into for snow removal and lawn mowing, the lawn mowing being handled by the members of Columbia Chapter, Order of DeMolay. Various repairs and additions were authorized during the year. 1. Door chimes for the front and back doors. 2. Door stops for the interior office doors.


1981

75

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Sign for the Grand Secretary's office and Receptionist. Repairs to the front and back door thresholds. Removal of the dead trees on the property. Sign for the driveway designating it a private drive. Suitable picture frames were ordered for photographs of the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master and Junior Grand Master to be displayed in the foyer. 8. Commemorative plaque mounted on the brick wall at the front door. 9. Drapes for windows that are creating problems with sun glare. 10. Canopy over the back door because of rain and snow creating problems to interior of building.

It is the opinion of the Committee that some site repairs will be necessary this fall to correct drainage due to soil settlement. The Committee has been reluctant to have any landscaping authorized until it could be determined if the present budget was sufficient to carry out the assigned responsibilities. Respectfully submitted, ERl':EST C. COTTLE, jOHl': E. WETZEL, FRAr-.:K A. ARNOLD,

D()L'(~LAS

H.

GARRETT,

Chairman.

REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER

To the Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: This report covers the period from July 1, 1980 through June 30, 1981. . $627,837.65 56,549.91 . . $684,387.56 . 636,185.86 48,201.70 . . ( 5,852.58) . $ 42,349.12

Total Income Receipts Transfers from Agency Account Total Receipts Disbursements Excess of Receipts over Disbursements Balance July 1, 1980 (Net Overdraft) Balance June 30, 1981 Consisting of: First National Bank of Kansas City Exchange National Bank of Jefferson City

. $ 39,796.50 2,552.62 . $ 42,349.12

SECCRITIES--GE!'iERAL FC:"<D

United States Treasury Notes

Maturity

Interest Rate

9/30/82 11.87% 8/15/83 11.87% 2/15/84 7.25% Corporate Investments Federated Master Trust, Commerce Paper Fund Total Securities - General Fund Uninvested Cash Total

. . . . . .

Par Value

Carrying Value

$ 50,000.00 50,000.00 15,000.00

$ 50,052.09 49,562.50 14,971.50

1,748.00 $116,748.00

1,748.00 $116,334.09 .00 $116,334.09

Market Value June 030, 1981

$ 48,531.00 47,906.00 12,853.05 1,748.00 $111,038.05


76

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECVRITIF.S-PERMANE~TFCr.;O

Federal National Mortgage Association Debenture Interest Maturity Rate 3/10/82 7.15% U.S. Treasury Notes 9/30/81 6.75% 10/31/82 12.125% 2/15/83 8.00% 2/15/84 7.25% 2/15/87 9.00% Corporate Investments Federated Master Trust, Commerce Paper Fund Total Securities-Permant Fund Uninvested Cash Total

.

Par Value $ 20,000.00

. . . . .

20,000.00 10,000.00 65,000.00 45,000.00 50,000.00

. . .

4,145.00 $214,145.00

Market Value Carrying Value June 30, 1981 $ 20,010.15 $ 18,887.40

19,878.13 9,881.25 64,406.25 41,976.54 50,000.00

19,562.40 9,721.90 59,007.65 38,559.15 40,875.00

4,145.00 4,145.00 $210,297.32 $190,758.50 16,000.48 $226,297.80 Respectfully submitted, W. M. LUNA, Grand Treasurer.

R.W. Brother Luna moved that the report of the Grand Treasurer be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RELIEF AND CHARITY

R.W. Bro. W. Marion Luna, Chairman, moved that the report of the Committee on Relief and Charity as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: The Committee on Relief and Charity is composed of five members of the Masonic Home Board of Directors. It meets monthly at the Masonic Home and on call of the Chairman to consider requests properly submitted to it by subordinate lodges for financial assistance and relief to worthy eligible cases. The Grand Lodge, at the Annual Meeting last year, appropriated funds for use by the Committee and $10,000 of the amount appropriated was forwarded to the Committee during the year. This amount, together with the cash in the bank, constituted the total funds available for the work of the Committee from which we have disbursed assistance to four cases as follows: Granby Lodge No. 514 $ 1,100.00 Mendon Lodge No. 628 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300.00 Mountain View Lodge No. 637 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000.00 St. Francois Lodge No. 234 1,600.00 $ 5,000.00 Balance in bank July 1, 1980 . $ 2,761.90 Received from Grand Lodge . 10,000.00 276.83 Received from interest . $13,038.73 5,000.00

Checks issued for relief

.

Balance in bank June 30, 1981

. $ 8,038.73


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

77

The report of the Auditor verifies the facts of this financial statement. Since the term of the Committee runs from Grand Lodge to Grand Lodge and does not coincide with the fiscal year, we feel it only right that it be called to the attention of the Craft that a rather large balance is maintained at the end of the fiscal year to carry the Committee through the month of September when the new committee takes over. Respectfully submitted, W. MARION LUNA, Chairman, JOHN WETZEL, ROBERT G. BIRD, CARL I. STEIN. HARRY C. PLOETZE, REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CORRESPONDENCE

M.W. Bro. Bruce H. Hunt, Chairman, moved that the report of the Committee on Correspondence - "A Masonic Review" - be accepted and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded; "A Masonic Review" was accepted by vote of the Grand Lodge. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES

R. W. Bro. John Black Vrooman moved that the report of the Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be accepted, received, approved, and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by the vote of the Grand Lodge. M.W. GRAND MASTER BLINN: Brethren, by your approval of the Report of the Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges, the Grand Lodge of Missouri has granted recognition of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Alaska. To the Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on the Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges wishes to make the following report: GRAND I.ODGE OF AI.ASKA

In a letter dated February 23, 1981 from M.W. Bra.James A. Williams, Grand Master, it was stated that: "We are extremely happy to advise you of the recent formation of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Alaska-the first special communication of which was held on February 7, 1981." During the Conference of Grand Masters and Grand Secretaries at Orlando. Florida, the Grand Master and Grand Secretary of this jurisdiction met with the Commission on Information to answer questions and furnish information regarding the formation of this Grand Lodge. The said Committee reported to the Conference, which is of the opinion that the Grand Lodge of Alaska was organized in accordance with regular Masonic procedure and is, therefore, worthy and entitled to recognition. The Commission was advised that 12 of the 19 lodges chartered by the Grand Lodge of Washington in the State of Alaska have decided to remain as constituents of the Grand Lodge of Washington, which has no objection thereto. The first Grand Communication of the new Grand Lodge was held on February 7, 19H I. This is in accord with precedent in that, in IH77, when the Grand Lodge of New Mexico was formed, two lodges failed to affiliate with it at the time of the organization, but each one joined the Grand Lodge of New Mexico at a later date - Cimarron Lodge No. 348 (Missouri charter) in 1879, and Silver City Lodge No. 465 (also Missouri charter) affiliated with the Grand Lodge of New Mexico in 1882. We recommend that the Grand Lodge of Alaska be recognized by the Grand Lodge of


78

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Missouri, and that Representatives to and from that Grand Lodge be appointed by the incoming Grand Master. The matter of the recognition of the proposed Grand Lodge of Nigeria was brought to your Committee in 1979, but it was found that conditions in that country were unstable and uncertain. There is, at the present time, a movement on foot to organize a Grand Lodge in Nigeria, but until greater knowledge and information is available, your Committee recommends that no action shall be taken on the matter at this time. (;RA:-lD ORIEl'TE DE BRASIL

This is another situation that came to the notice of your Committee in 1979. There was and still is, a large amount of uncertainty about the status of lodges in Brazil; and the question ofjurisdiction and lines of demarcation still arise to trouble Masonic students. Your Committee does not yet have enough definite and pertinent information on Brazil by which to make a decision that will be adequate for the solution of the problems that are present. Your Committee, therefore, recommends that no action shall be taken at this time. ITALY

"A secret Masonic lodge" known as the P-2 (Propaganda 2) lodge, and the involvement of alleged illegal activities, has been a source of comment in the media recently, much of which has been in error and misleading. Your Committee has been in correspondence with M.W. Robert L. Dillard, P.G.M., Secretary of the Commission on Information ofthe Conference of Grand Masters of North America, and it is his opinion that this alleged lodge is an organization of men which was organized either by men \\路ho were never members of a regular Masonic lodge, or those who had been expelled from a regular Masonic lodge, and that this alleged lodge is neither regular or authorized. It is also considered that this lodge is not a danger to nor a menace to regular Freemasonry. The publicity given it has been erroneous and detrimental.

Fraternally submitted, FRAI\:K A. AR:\;oLD, JOIlI\: BLACK VROOM A:'\I , WIlJ.IAM R. DEI\:SLOW, Chairman. REMARKS OF M.W. GRAND MASTER KEITH L. MUNTZ OF IOWA REMARKS OF M.W. GRAND MASTER WILSON B. HANEY OF OKLAHOMA REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC BOARDS OF RELIEF

R.W. Bro. Albert H. VanGels, Chairman, moved that the report of the Committee on Masonic Boards of Relief as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be accepted and printed in the PROCEEDIl\:GS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHREI\:: Your Committee on Masonic Boards of Relief reviewed the reports submitted by the Boards of Relief in St. Joseph, St. Louis and St. Louis County, and Joplin for the fiscal year ended June 30, 19H 1. No requests for financial assistance were received during the year; however, the primary function during the year has been to arrange courtesy Masonic funerals with the full cooperation of the lodges. The financial status of the Boards appear to be in order, as expenditures are


1981

79

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

at a minimum and none of the Boards made any assessments of the lodges for funds during the year. The reports of the Boards of Relief are made a part of this report and explain in detail their receipts, disbursements, and devoted services rendered. Our sincere appreciation and thanks to all for their cooperation and dedicated service. Respectfully submitted, SHERMAN F. K!':ORR, LAMBERT A. SEILLER, EDGAR E. MARTI!':, ALBERT H. V A!': GELS, Chairman. CHRISTIA!': O. HUSING, St. Joseph To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri:

The St. Joseph Masonic Board of Relief is composed of six lodges located in St. Joseph. They are: St.Joseph Lodge No. 78; Zeredatha Lodge No. 189; Brotherhood Lodge No. 269; Charity Lodge No. 331; King Hill Lodge No. 376; and Saxton Lodge No. 508. The Annual Meeting was held on Tuesday, January 27,1981. The officers for 1981 are: A. J. Sevy, President; Glenn Swails, Vice President; and Kenneth McNaal, SecretaryTreasurer. There has not been a call for an assessment from member lodges for several years. The Board did not receive any requests for direct financial aid during the year. We continue to serve as the clearing house for all Masonic inquiries concerning membership verification, reports of deaths and illness, arranging Masonic funeral services, and serving as the liaison and coordinator for the Masonic organizations throughout the area. The Board wishes to acknowledge the generosity of the St. Joseph Scottish Rite in providing office space, postage, telephone and administrative expenses for the Board of Relief. The Board is cognizant of the fact that requests for financial aid and assistance are becoming almost nonexistent. The charity funds of the Blue lodges, the Scottish and York Rite and the Shrine appear to be fulfilling the need. The Board does feel that it does provide a service that would not be provided by any other organization in maintaining the liaison and coordinating service. They will continue with this endeavor. The following is the financial report for the period ofJ une 30. 1980 to June 30, 1981. Checking account Expenses: Funeral expense

Commerce Bank of St. Joseph

Bank balance - June 30, 1981

$261.86 15.00 $246.86

Respectfully submitted, KF.:"1\ETH L. McNF.AL, Secretary' Joplin To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri:

No requests for financial aid were received by the Joplin Masonic Board of Relief since our last report a year ago. Our funds consist of a checking account balance of $38.74 in The First National Bank and Trust Company of Joplin. Fraternally, JA~ES E. BROW:", Secretary.


80

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

St. Louis and St. Louis County To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: GREETI:-.IGS: The Board had four meetings this year and all were well attended. There has been a definite increase in interest shown by the lodge representatives. Many questions were asked with the desire to understand more about the Board's functions and obligations, for which we are grateful. We had seven requests for funerals which were handled in the usual numerical order, plus three lodges that had special requests, for which they will receive credit. No monetary assistance was given and none of our cemetery lots were used. Again, for the 17th consecutive year, being financially sound, there was no need to assess the lodges. The financial report is included. Fraternally, JACK ETIIERID(;E, President, WII.I.I H. WAHl'\V="G, Vice President, PHILIP WALD~fA=", Secretary, CHARI.ES COI.DfA1', Treasurer.

We have, as instructed, checked all the financial records of this Board for the fiscal year ended June 30, 198 I. A statement, showing the receipts and disbursements for this period, follows. For the Auditing Committee: LEO E. WHITROCK, Chairman. STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS

A:>;O

DISBCRSBfEl'\TS FROM ./L路LY I, 1980 TO ./L'="E 30, 1981

BalanceJuly 1, 1980 Receipts: Lodge assessments, 1980-81 Interest on V.S. Bonds Interest on Certificates of Deposit Donations (2)

$16,022.11 $ . .

.00 167.50 1,003.28 20.00

1,190.78 $17,212.89

Disbursements: Relief Cleaning of sickroom equipment Telephone

:~i~~~~~

$ . .

.::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Office supplies Safe Deposit Box rent Salaries

. . .

.00 5.00 218.96 75.36 36.34 2.61 8.50 .00

346.77 $16,866.12

Balance June 30, 1981 Recapitulation: Balance Checking Account 6-30-81 V.S. Bonds (5) Certificates of Deposit (5)

. . .

Total June 30, 1981

.

1,366.12 2,500.00 13,000.00 $16,866.12

REMARKS OF R.E. GRAND COMMANDER HENRY R. STOKER REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PUBUC SCHOOLS

R.W. Bro. Walter C. Ploeser, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Public Schools.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

81

To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri: During the past year, your Committee has stayed alert to any significant development that may occur within the state of Missouri which would affect adversely the welfare of the public schools. We don't know what to anticipate in the coming session of the State Legislature; but we do know there has been a lot of demagoguery upon the part of the nation's political" parties and the national candidates in the matter of some sort of support to parochial and private schools. The vicious Moynihan-Packwood Bill in the Congress is currently a great threat to the free public school system. We have a Missouri Cong-ressman who will introduce a similar bill. Your Committee thinks it is very important that every member ofthis Grand Lodge write their member of the House of Representatives and U.S. Senator in opposition to this Moynihan-Packwood Bill or any similar legislation. As a part of this report, we ask that adoption of this report express a resolution by this Grand Lodge against this legislation. Your Committee repeats its admonition of prior years and again puts great stress upon the request that every Mason take an active interest in their public school board and their public schools. We urge those who can to submit themselves for service on public school boards. Your Committee again recommends that you know your State Legislators and State Senators and your U.S. Congressmen and that you make immediately sure that they know your feelings on these subjects. Write your Congressman today! This report wishes to emphasize the traditional position ofthis Grand Lodge in behalf of the constitutional provision of the separation of church and state. Respectfully, NELSOl\: B. TIl\'l\:IN, ALBERT J. ELFRAN K, DR. JAMES A. NOLAN, JR. DR. CHARLES J. MCCLAIl\:, ELVIS A. MOOl\:EY, DR. M. GRAHAM CLARK, DR. G. HUGH WAMBLE, WALTER C. PU)ESER, Chairman. FIELDING A. POE,

R.W. Bro. Ploeser moved that the report be accepted. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JURISDICTION

R.W. Bro. Vern H. Schneider, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Jurisdiction and moved that the report as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be received and printed in the PROCEEDIl\:GS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. At the 159th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, which was held in 1980, Section 16.110 of the By-Laws was amended to permit multiple membership, subject to the recommendation of the Jurisprudence Committee that the effective date should be no earlier than the conclusion of the Grand Lodge Annual Communication to be held in 1982. As noted in the 1980 report of the Jurisprudence Committee, the suggested deferral was deemed to be appropriate to permit submission of related changes in the By-Laws in 1981 for possible action by the Grand Lodge in 1982. In the report of this Committee which was submitted to the Grand Lodge one year ago it was suggested that in the event of the approval of the proposed


82

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

amendment of Section 16.110 of the By-Laws, numerous other legislative changes would be required in order to facilitate the effective implementation of the concept of multiple membership. During the past year this Committee has made a careful study of the anticipated administrative problems associated with this new type of membership. In order to minimize administrative problems, we have tried to gain the benefit of the experience of other Grand Lodge Jurisdictions which permit such membership. The Committee has also considered the effect of such membership upon existing provisions of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. On the basis of its study the Committee recommends that Section 16.110, as amended in 1980, should be further amended. In addition, several other provisions should be added to Chapter 16 of the By-Laws. The amended section and the new sections would provide as follows: Section 16.110. MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. A Master Mason whose residence would otherwise satisfy the requirement under these By-Laws with respect to petitions for affiliation and who is a member in good standing of either a Missouri lodge or of a lodge in another Grand Jurisdiction which is in fraternal relationship with this Grand Lodge and does not prohibit multiple membership as herein contemplated may petition for and hold memberships in one or more additional Missouri lodges or in one or more additionallodges located in another Grand Jurisdiction. No multiple membership fee may be charged by any Missouri lodge as a condition to the filing of any such petition. However, if authorized by the Grand Lodge, a fee may be charged for the use and benefit of the Masonic Home of Missouri upon the filing of a petition for multiple membership by a petitioner who is not then a member of a Missouri lodge. A two-thirds favorable vote, by paper ballot, is required for election to multiple membership in a lodge of this Grand Jurisdiction. Section 16.120. DEFINITIONS AND CONDITIONS AS TO MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. (a) A multiple member's oldest membership shall be designated as his "original membership." The term "multiple membership" shall be deemed to include both dual and plural membership and shall be construed to include lawful affiliation with any additional lodges of Missouri or of any other Grand Jurisdiction which is in fraternal relationship with this Grand Lodge. (b) In addition to satisfying all other requirements set forth in these By-Laws a member in good standing of a Missouri lodge may petition for multiple membership in a lodge of another Grand Jurisdiction or a member of a lodge of another Grand J urisdiction may petition for multiple membership in a Missouri lodge only if all the following conditions are satisfied: (I) The election of the petitioner to such multiple membership would not violate the laws of such other Grand Jurisdiction; (2) The other Grand Lodge will furnish a certificate of good standing for multiple membership or its equivalent if a member of that Grand Jurisdiction petitions for multiple membership in a Missouri lodge and, if he is elected, such other Grand Lodge will promptly notify this Grand Lodge of any subsequent termination of his membership; (3) The other Grand Lodge will promptly notify this Grand Lodge when a member of a Missouri lodge is elected to multiple membership in a lodge in that Grand Jurisdiction or in the event his membership therein shall be terminated; (4) The other Grand Lodge will recognize the suspension or expulsion by a Missouri lodge of a Mason holding multiple membership in a lodge of that Grand Jurisdiction. Section 16.130. PETITION FOR MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. (a) A petition for affiliation with a Missouri 10dRe as a multiple member must be made


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

83

on such official form as shall be approved by the Grand Secretary and the petition shall be accompanied by a Certificate of Good Standing for multiple membership issued by the Missouri lodge(s) of which the petitioner shall then be a member or by valid evidence of Masonic status (by Certificate, Letter or Statement) issued by the lodge(s) of any other Grand Jurisdiction whose laws permit its members to hold multiple memberships. (b) A petition for multiple membership in a subordinate lodge of Missouri must include the full name, the age, the residence address and the period of residence thereat, the occupation, the name of his employer and period of employment, the business address, and such other lawful information about the petitioner as may be required from time to time, and the name, number and location (city and state) of the petitioner's lodge(s) of "original membership" and "multiple membership." The petition must be signed by the petitioner and must be recommended by two Master Masons of the lodge in which he seeks multiple membership. (c) A petitioner for multiple membership in a subordinate lodge of Missouri must execute an Application for Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership, using the official and approved form. The Application(s) for Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership will be forwarded by the Secretary of the lodge in which multiple membership is being sought to the Grand Secretary of Missouri for transmittal to the appropriate lodge(s) located in this state, or to the lodge(s) of any other Grand Jurisdiction(s) through the offices of the respective Grand Secretaries. If granted, the Certificate(s) of Good Standing for Multiple Membership must be sent to the office of the Grand Secretary for transmittal to the subordinate lodge to which the petition is to be submitted. (d) When a Master Mason whose dues are fully paid and who is not under charges nor indebted in an official capacity to his lodge applies in proper form for a Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership, his application shall be granted promptly and the fact entered in the records of the lodge and in the minutes of the communication. The Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership shall include: (I) All the facts of Masonic history of the brother as written into the books and records of the lodge; (2) Whether or not he has proved his Proficiency in the Master Mason Degree; (3) The date to which the dues are FULLY PAID. The lodge Secretary cannot issue the Certificate of Good Standing until it has been duly authorized by the action of the lodge. The certificate is to be sent to the Grand Secretary for certification and transmittal. (e) Upon the election of a multiple member the lodge Secretary shall promptly notify the Grand Secretary, who shall inform every other lodge in which a multiple member holds membership. Section 16.140. RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES. A multiple member shall pay all dues required by each lodge wherever membership is held and shall have all the rights and privileges of membership in each such lodge, except that (1) he may not hold office as Master or Warden in more than one Missouri lodge at the same time; (2) only the lodge of his "original membership" may exempt him from the payment of annual dues on the basis of his being a 50-year Master Mason and claim the exemption in the payment of Grand Lodge dues; (3) only the lodge of his "original membership" may remit the payment of annual dues on the basis of his inability to pay and claim the remittance in the payment of Grand Lodge dues; (4) only through the lodge of his "original membership" may he, his wife, his widow or child apply for admission to the Masonic Home of Missouri or request relief and assistance from the Grand Lodge Committee on Relief and Charity. Section 16.150. SUSPENSION OR EXPULSION OF MULTIPLE MEMBER. Suspension for nonpayment of dues or for failure to prove proficiency in the Master Mason Degree or suspension or expulsion of a multiple member for unmasonic conduct shall thereby terminate his membership in all lodges in the Grand Jurisdiction of Missouri. The Secretary of any Missouri lodge suspending or expelling such a multiple member shall immediately notify the Grand Secretary, who will inform every other Missouri


84

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

lodge in which the multiple member shall have held membership at the time of such suspension or expulsion; and the Grand Secretary shall also notify the Grand Secretary of every other Grand Jurisdiction in which such member shall then have held membership in a subordinate lodge. Like notice shall be given in case of reinstatement, which shall immediately and automatically restore him to membership in good standing in every other lodge in this Jurisdiction of which he was a member, subject, however, to any other provisions of these By-Laws pertaining to the payment of dues and application for reinstatement if the suspension shall have been of such duration as to necessitate the filing of a petition for reinstatement. The Grand Secretary is to provide the information of reinstatement to ALL lodges involved. Section 16.160. WITHDRAWAL OF MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. A multiple member of a Missouri Lodge may withdraw his affiliation as a multiple member by application in writing or in person at a stated communication for a certificate of withdrawal. If the member has fully paid the annual dues for the current year, and is not under charges nor indebted in an official capacity, the lodge shall issue the official and approved Certificate of Withdrawal of Multiple Membership. The brother shall not be entitled to a Certificate of Dimission, except from the lodge of "original membership." Upon the issuance of a Certificate of Withdrawal, the member shall not be entitled to any reimbursement on the unearned portion of the annual dues. The withdrawal of multiple membership from one or more lodges of Missouri shall have no bearing on the standing of the Master Mason in the lodge of his "original membership" or in other lodges in which he has established "multiple membership." The Certificate of Withdrawal of Multiple Membership shall not be evidence of Masonic standing for the purpose of applying for or obtaining membership by affiliation in another lodge. The lodge issuing the Certificate of Withdrawal shall promptly notify the Grand Secretary of such action. Section 16.170. DIMIT BY MULTIPLE MEMBER. A Master Mason who holds multiple membership and whose lodge of "original membership" is under the Grand Lodge of Missouri may terminate his affiliation with his lodge of "original membership" by dimission and still retain his membership in the other lodges. Said Master Mason shall apply in writing to the lodge of "original membership" for the Certificate of Dimission; the application shall contain the information of the name, number, location (city and state) of the lodge which he desires to be regarded henceforth as the lodge of his "original membership." The dimit, if granted, shall be mailed to the Grand Secretary of Missouri for certification and transmittal to the lodge in which the member will retain his "original" or "parent" membership. The dimit issued by the lodge of "original membership" shall not be given to the brother. (Refer to Sections 20.010 and 20.070, pages 73 and 75 of Constitution and By-Laws.) Section 16.180. MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP - DUTIES OF LODGE SECRETARIES AND OF GRAND SECRETARY. (a) The Secretary of each lodge of Missouri shall: (1) Forward to the Grand Secretary the personal application for Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership; (2) Forward to the Grand Secretary the Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership; (3) Notify the Grand Secretary upon the election of a multiple member or the formation of a new lodge containing one or more multiple members; (4) Notify the Grand Secretary of the suspension for nonpayment of dues or otherwise, or the expulsion of a multiple member; (5) Notify the Grand Secretary of the reinstatement to good standing of a multiple member; (6) Notify the Grand Secretary of the issuance of the Certificate of Withdrawal of Multiple Membership; (7) Forward the Certificate of Dimission from lodge of "original membership" to the Grand Secretary for certification and transmittal;


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

85

(8) Submit the Report of Multiple Members as of June 30 of each and every year with the ANNUAL RETURN. (b) The Grand Secretary of Missouri shall: (I) Forward the personal Application for Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership to the lodges of this Jurisdiction and/or of other jurisdictions for the attention and action of the members, respectively; (2) Receive and transmit the Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership which shall accompany the Petition for Multiple Membership; (3) Notify the other lodges involved of the election of a multiple member, or the formation of a new lodge containing one or more multiple members; (4) Notify the other lodges involved of the suspension for nonpayment of dues or otherwise, or the expulsion of a multiple member; (5) Notify the other lodges involved that a multiple member has regained good standing after suspension; (6) Forward the Certificate of Dimission from lodge of "original membership" to the lodge to be regarded by the member as the lodge of "original" or "parent" membership. Section 16.190. LODGE OF RESEARCH. Membership in a lodge of research or similar lodge is not considered multiple membership.

This Committee also recommends that Section 11.050 of the By-Laws should be amended to include the following additional sentence: Nothing herein shall prevent such a member from applying to his former lodge for multiple membership pursuant to the provisions of Section 16.110 of these By-Laws.

As our Grand Lodge gains experience in the use of multiple membership, unanticipated administrative problems may arise from time to time. Hopefully any such matters can be resolved by decision of the Grand Master, but if the problems are of such magnitude as to require legislative solution, it will be appropriate for the Grand Lodge to consider additional By-Law changes. This Committee is keenly aware of the increased responsibility which will be placed upon the Grand Secretary and the Secretaries of the constituent lodges to attend to the numerous administrative details associated with the use of multiple membership. Initially it will be essential for appropriate forms to be devised to facilitate smooth administration of the new law. Recognizing that the Grand Lodge might deem it necessary to make additional changes in the By-Laws pertaining to multiple membership at the 1982 Annual Communication, adequate time should be afforded the Grand Secretary to devise necessary forms pertaining to such membership. Therefore, this Committee recommends that all of the legislative changes as recommended herein should become effective January 1, 1983. Respectfully submitted, HAROLD M. JAYNE, ERWIN J. ROESEL, VERI': H. SCHI':EIDER, Chairman. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

RW. Bro. John E. Adams, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Chartered Lodges and moved that the report as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge.


86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Chartered Lodges met in the office of the Grand Secretary on August 21, examined the lodge returns and District Deputy Grand Master's reports, and made the following report: Late Returns-On August 1 there were 64 lodges whose returns had not been received by the Grand Secretary. Section 10.050 ofthe Grand Lodge Constitution and By-Laws reads as follows: "Each lodge makes an annual return to the Grand Lodge as of June 30. The return is sent to the Grand Secretary on or before August I." The Grand Secretary and this Committee cannot make a full report to the Grand Lodge when these returns are not in on time. At the time we met on August 21, the returns were still not in from the following lodges: 16,34,76, 129, 147,206,219,239,244,296,324,326,438,537,573,591 and 639. Some of these lodges have been too late to get in our report for five consecutive years. Membership - The returns from 347 lodges reflect a decrease of 2,273 members; 125 lodges reported an increase of 522 members, while 58 lodges reported the same as in 1980. Small Lodges - Of those lodges reporting, 92 lodges had a membership of 50 or less. The returns indicate that 54 of the 92 lodges had a decrease of 127 members; 21 of the 92 lodges had an increase of 41 members, while the other 17 lodges reported the same as 1980. Attendance - 475 lodges reported their attendance at 25 or less per meeting, and 314 of those lodges reported an average attendance of 15 or less per meeting. . Errors - Please, Brother Secretaries, follow the instructions given you by the Grand Secretary, and be more careful in making out your returns. This year 34.6 percent of the returns processed by the Grand Secretary had to be returned to the lodge Secretary due to errors. Raising Candidates - There were 154 lodges, of those reporting, which did not raise a candidate during the year. Rejections - Of those lodges reporting, 56 lodges reported r~jecting 72 candidates during the year. Dues and Fees - Following is a recapitulation of the fees charged for the degrees: No. of

Amount

Lodges

$31.00 41.00 42.00 45.00 51.00 61.00 71.00

2* 63* 2* to $ 50.00 69 to 60.00 119 to 70.00. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 70 to 80.00 73

No. of

A mount

$ 81.00 91.00 101.00 111.00 121.00 131.00 150.00

Lodges to $ 90.00 22 to 100.00................ 77 to 110.00 19 to 120.00 18 to 130.00................ 8

I 2

The dues reflected on the returns were: Amount

S 7.50 8.00

No. of Lodges

2 3

Amount

No. of Lodlies

$10.00 ........................... 48 11.00 4

* These 67 lodges are below the minimum of $45.00 as outlined in Section 10.010 of the Grand Lodge Constitution and By-Laws, which became effective .J uly I, 198 I.


1981

87

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Amount

No. of Lodges

$12.00 12.50 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 17.50 18.00 20.00 21.00

34 15 6 3 181 21 4 8 18 105 10

Amount

No. of Lodges

$22.00 7 22.50 2 24.00 6 25.00 45 27.00 2 30.00 5 35.00 3 ($9.00, $12.25, $13.25, $13.75, $16.25, $18.50, $19.50, $26.00, $27.75, $28.00 and $60.00 - I each)

Budget - The District Deputy Grand Masters' reports indicate that 277 lodges did not bother to prepare a budget for 1981. There were 147 lodges whose expenditures exceeded their income. Section 9.050 of the Grand Lodge Constitution and By-Laws states: "Not later than the second Stated Communication after the installation of the Master, the Budget Committee, consisting ofthe Master, Secretary, Treasurer, and two Master Masons, prepares and reports a budget of the revenues anticipated to be available for the operation of the lodge for the next year, and of the itemized expenditures required, appropriated, or recommended for the period including the per capita tax due the Grand Lodge." It is obvious from the above that some of the D.D.G.M.s are not performing that part of their duty which requires them to see that every lodge in their district has adopted a budget. Auditing - The District Deputy Grand Masters' reports reveal that 108 lodges have not been audited for entirely too long. They are: Date Last Audited

Jan. 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974

Lodges

26 15 6

9 2 I

Date Last A udited

1971 1959 Secretary didn't know when Never.. Not for years Approved by the lodge Total

Lodges 2 I

...

38 4 I _I

108

Every installed Worshipful Master should appoint an Auditing Committee to audit the books of the Secretary and Treasurer at any time during the year that is necessary, but particularly before the new officers take over the following year. District Deputy Grand Masters' Reports - Only two of the D.D.G.M.s failed to perform that part of their duty which requires them to visit each lodge in their District and submit a report to the Grand Secretary's office by August 1. At the time we met on August 21, The Grand Secretary had not received the D.D.G.M.'s reports for the following: Fifteenth District

(H. Fred Helbing) Williamstown Lodge No. 370 Thirty-fourth District

(H. Eugene Self) Cass Lodge No. 147* *His own lodge, he is Secretary.

Grand River Lodge No. 276 Belton Lodge No. 450 Jewel Lodge No. 480 Coldwater Lodge No. 485 Archie Lodge No. 633


88

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Condition of Lodges - The following are some comments from the District Deputy Grand Masters' reports: "This lodge needs better attendance of officers." "Lodge lacks young members, most officers are Past Masters, lodge needs more members" (42). "This lodge can barely function due to lack of members and attendance, requires help from other lodges to confer degrees. I have no recommendation to make." "This lodge is still suffering from personality conflicts, but this condition seems to have improved." "During the past year, outgoing Secretary did not keep up on membership changes and allowed records to become a mess. Records are organized except for membership count." "Declining membership, interest, age of members, friendly, many members out of state; should consider consolidation." "After a disruptive year in 1980, the lodge is making a strong comeback." "There are some dedicated Masons here, but the membership is small (22 members) and nothing is happening." "No leadership. Not too much interest in proficiency." "I set up an appointment with all the lodges in my District. They were all real cooperative except this lodge. The D.D.G.L. and myself both made appointments with them, but no one showed up. I have tried two more times to contact the Secretary and Master with no results. I will keep trying." "They had not met since their second meeting in November until tonight (2-25-81). Consolidation is in the future for them" (46 members). "Missed having several of the meetings because of no quorum, but are going to try to do better in the future" (48 members). "My frank appraisal of the Craft is fair to poor, because some members distract others from their work." "Past minutes were kept very poorly, new Secretary appointed for the remainder of the year. Lodge ritual very poor. New Master trying to get things straightened out. Recommend consolidation with another lodge." "Another small lodge run by a past D.D.G.M. who will not let younger members take hold and lead the lodge." "Lodge has had very few meetings during the past year. It is a small lodge, and they have a time getting enough to open lodge (24 members). "Lodge is barely hanging on. Some improvements have been made during the last two years. Some extremely elderly brethren help to keep the lodge open. I do not see how the lodge can keep on after their deaths." "This lodge is undergoing the pains of death. Lodge attendance and officers' attitude towards their duties is very poor. Ritual is extremely poor. Constant bickering among membership. If this were my lodge, I would either transfer or disassociate myself with Freemasonry. Cooperation with this lodge, between myself and the Grand Lodge for the past two years has been poor. In my report last year I stated that "The best that could happen to this lodge would be to forfeit their charter." I am still of that opinion. If the Grand Lodge still questions my statements, I welcome their attendance at the lodge meetings. Their ability to conduct a degree is zero. In closing, I have no axe to grind with this lodge. In my personal opinion, it is the farthest thing from Masonry I have seen to date."

Most Worshipful Grand Master, your Committee appreciates the opportunity of serving you and the Grand Lodge, and we would like to thank R.W. Frank A. Arnold, Grand Secretary, for his splendid cooperation and assistance.


1981

89

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Fraternally submitted, JOHN E. ADAMS, Chairman, WILBUR M. DAL'GHTREY, CHARLES C. BYBEE,

CLAUDE E. WELLS, JR., JIM WESTER.

REMARKS OF M.W. GRAND MASTER HAROLD C. WURDEMAN OF NEBRASKA REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION

Wor. Bro. Carl G. Brown, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation and moved that the report be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. oj Missouri: No new lodges were set to work under dispensation since our last Annual Communication and nothing has been referred to this Committee for action. Each member of this Committee wishes to express his gratitude for being named to this Committee and pledges his help and support in whatever way he may be of any further service. Respectfully submitted, BILL J. BEATTY, LESLIE M. (MAC) HOGUE, CARL G. BROWN, Chairman. DUANE EISERMAN, DR. HAROLD K. CAMPBELL, REPORT ON ELECTION OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

RW. Bro. Edwin B. Brzezinski, Chairman of Election, read the report on the 1,078 votes cast for the election of Grand Lodge Officers. For the Office of Grand Master William J. Hill .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1,067 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of William J. Hill to the office of Grand Master for the year 1981-82. RW. Brother Hill accepted the election. For the Office of Deputy Grand Master Earl K. Dille

1,068 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of Earl K. Dille to the office of Deputy Grand Master for the year 1981-82. R.W. Brother Dille accepted the election. For the Office of Senior Grand Warden Robert J. Crede

1,063 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of Robert J. Crede to the office of Senior Grand Warden for the year 1981-82. R.W. Brother Crede accepted the election. For the Office ofJunior Grand Warden Vern H. Schneider

1,017 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of Vern H. Schneider to the office ofJunior Grand Warden for the year 1981-82. R. W. Brother Schneider accepted the election.


90

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE For the Office of Grand Treasurer W. Marion Luna

1,037 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of W. Marion Luna to the office of Grand Treasurer for the year 1981-1982. R.W. Brother Luna accepted the election. For the Office of Grand Secretary Frank A. Arnold

1,021 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of Frank A. Arnold to the office of Grand Secretary for the year 1981-82. R.W. Brother Arnold accepted the election. REPORT ON ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF MASONIC HOME BOARD OF DIRECTONS

R.W. Bro. Edwin B. Brzezinski, Chairman of Election, read the report on the votes cast for the election of Members of the Masonic Home Board. Albert Elfrank Eldon Turnbull Walter Hays

794 votes 760 votes 497 votes

The Grand Master announced the election of Albert Elfrank and Eldon Turnbull as Members of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri for terms of four years. R.W. Brother Elfrank accepted the election. Brother Turnbull was not present to accept the election. CALL FROM LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called from labor. R. W. Grand Chaplain Cecil H. Hurt offered prayer. MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 28,1981

Grand Lodge Dinner for all Master Masons and Their Ladies Dining Room-ABOU BEN ADHEM SHRINE MOSQUE Recognition of Honor Lodges and Presentation of Medallions: GRAND LODGE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 7:30 TO 8:00 P.M.

ORGAN SELECTIONS IN AUDITORIUM Jack J. Stottlemyre, Organist 8:00 P.M.

OPEN MEETING Auditorium-ABOU BEN ADHEM SHRINE MOSQUE Dr. J. Edward Blinn, Most Worshipful Grand Master, presiding Introduction of Grand Lodge Officers and their Ladies Welcome - Grand Master J. Edward Blinn Remarks - Grand Master-Elect William J. Hill ENTERTAINMENT

GARY ELLISON Missouri's Official Ragtime Piano Player


Tuesday Morning September 29, 1981

ORGAN SELECTIONS Jack J. Stottlemyre, Organist

CALL TO LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 9:00 a.m. R.W. Grand Chaplain Carl L. Radford offered prayer. ANNOUNCEMENT OF M.W. GRAND MASTER BLINN

The Grand Master announced that Bro. Jim Marsh, Worshipful Master of Troy Lodge No. 34, had contacted Bro. Eldon Turnbull who accepted the election to the Masonic Home Board. PRESENTATION OF GRAND REPRESENTATIVE RECOMMENDATION

M.W. Grand Master Blinn presented to R.W. Bro. Thomas K. McGuire,Jr. the recommendation to the Most Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Alaska that he be constituted and appointed Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri near the Grand Lodge of Alaska. REMARKS OF M.W. GRAND MASTER BEN B. BOYLES OF KANSAS REPORT OF COMMISSION FOR INTERNAL AFFAIRS

M.W. Bro. Fielding A. Poe, Chairman, presented the report ofthe Commission for Internal Affairs and moved that the report be received as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M., oj Missouri: On Sunday, Dec. 7, 1980, the special Commission for Internal Affairs, appointed by Grand Master J. Edward Blinn for the study of membership trends, met in Columbia, in the new Grand Lodge office at 4:00 p.m. Present were M.W. Brother Blinn, Wor. Bro. Tom Warden, R.W. Bro. Ray Hilton, and M.W. Bro. Fielding A. Poe. Several articles, letters, and reports from Brother Grand Lodges and appendant bodies appertaining to reasons and methods of resolving declining membership were read and discussed by those present. The question, "Is growth necessary?," was then discussed. The conclusion was unanimous in the affirmative for several reasons: 1. Interest dies if growth is not present. 2. Assurance of future officers, leaders and workers in Masonic interest. 3. Continuation of lodges. 4. To provide ample support for Grand Lodge structure in monetary needs, as well as numerical needs in membership. 5. Assurance of Masonic heritage being preserved for future generations. The question was presented, "Is growth to be measured by increase in

91


92

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

members only?" The thought was presented that perhaps we have become overly obsessed with quantity of membership rather than quality of members. It was expressed that while quantity was important, if high quality was maintained the quantity necessarily would follow. The Committee would point out that while ritual is important and in no way to be slighted, however, by our strong emphasis in this area alone we have inadvertently neglected areas such as leadership, lodge programs, lodge activities, lodge administration, Masonic history, education and involvement, appearance and care of lodge buildings, and community involvement. Simply stated, the majority of our members are not in the Fraternity for the ritual alone and will not attend meetings just to hear the ritual recited. One solution presented was to permit lodges to open on the second and third degree when there is no business in the lower degree or degrees. In some jurisdictions, business is conducted in the first degree; hence members are made to feel immediately that they are an integral part of this society of friends and brothers. It is this Committee's consensus that we rush new members through the degrees too quickly. By taking the candidate through the degrees over an extended period oftime, he would have an opportunity to digest more fully the lessons and true meaning of Freemasonry. The Committee feels most emphatically that we are not selling the Fraternity, particularly in our own families. Is solicitation all wrong? Is it wrong for a man to solicit his own son for membership? Is it wrong to let non-members know what is necessary to become a Freemason? It was the Committee's consensus that here is an area which, properly modified, could produce positive results to our needs. The Committee concluded that Freemasonry is woefully weak in the area of public relations from the Grand Lodge level down through the subordinate lodges and appendant bodies, with the possible exception of the Shrine. If we are going to grow, there must be an accelerated program of public relations on the Grand Lodge level and most emphatically on the subordinate lodge level and this means public relations within the Fraternity as well as without. With today's changing society, strong emphasis must be placed on the following: 1. Appearance of Masonic buildings, inside and out. 2. Involvement in local community programs. 3. Application to the practice of Masonic programs of charity. 4. Exposure of not only Masonic activities and contributions to today's society, but exposure of Masonic principles and ideals as well. The question, "What can we do to get capable, interested, qualified men to serve in the junior stations and continue through the line?" has never been more critical. A four-point program is herein presented to the Grand Master and the advancing Grand Lodge line officers. Its development, presentation, implementation and enforcement must rest with that body. 1. Induction and Introduction. Reactivate the program of educating prospective members and their wives as to what Freemasonry is and is not, what is required of the candidate, the member.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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2. First Degree Emphasis. a. Make the first degree big, important, and an affair to remember. b. This is the one place ritual should really shine. c. No! No! Absolutely no other business the night of the first degree. d. Everyone remain in the lodge until the degree is completed. Close the lodge and then all go to refreshment together. The Master takes the new Entered Apprentice and escorts him to the front of the line. Make him feel important, that he belongs. Never, no never, send the new Entered Apprentice out of the lodge to fend for himself. When we get him, let's keep him. More important, let's develop him. 3. Instruction. a. This is the key to the lock. b. The instructor probably will be the most influential Mason to the new Mason long after he has completed his degrees. The instructor can have a great effect even to his continuation into appendant bodies. The instructor is the person who will first recognize potential officer material and/or a prospective lodge committee member. This person, if properly trained, qualified and genuinely interested, can have tremendous influence and his work will have far-reaching effects on the Fraternity. Which person in each lodge performs this task? What do we do to train them, notjust in ritual but in instructing Masonic tradition, custom and Masonic procedure, yes, even law? It all starts here; unfortunately, all too often this is where it also ends. The Grand Lodge needs to address itself to a great need for a program in this area. c. In most lodges, this is traditionally the responsibility assigned to the Senior Deacon. 4. Assignment. Immediately after receiving the third degree, each new brother should be assigned by the Master some duty or responsibility - a station on a degree team, a committee assignment, something to give him cause to feel that he has not only been accepted by that lodge, but that he also has a contribution to make to the betterment of that lodge. This assignment should not be delayed, but ready to give him the night he gets his third degree and the assignment should be made in open lodge for all to hear. Simply stated, with poetic license, the Four I Program is: 1. Introduction. 2. Imphasis.

3. Instruction. 4. Involvement.

In conclusion, Brethren, our problem of membership lies within the Fraternity. There is nothing wrong with Masonic Ritual, except perhaps a need for more proficiency. There is nothing wrong with Masonic ideals of charity and tradition. There is nothing wrong with Masonic virtues, but we must put them into practice. We must practice in the lodge and out of lodge those things we teach and to which we take obligation. We will be judged solely by our performance, not our words. Freemasonry must be responsive to all the needs of its community. This is what made it big and great in the past; but the needs of 1900 are not altogether the needs of 1982. We must face up to the fact that society has changed and if we are going to be a viable organization and an influence in our community,


94

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

then we must, without abandoning our landmarks, traditions or principles, move into the 20th century. Respectfully submitted, FIEI.DlI':G A. POE, Chairman, RAY HII.TOI':, THOMAS C. WARDEI':. REMARKS OF R.W. BRO. STEWART M. L. POLLARD, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF THE MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES REMARKS OF R.W. JUNIOR GRAND WARDEN DARRELL ADERMAN OF WISCONSIN REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

M.W. Bro. George F. Morrison, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Necrology and moved that the report be received and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren of this Grand Lodge, again it is an honor to have an Address of the Grand Master pause to include the Report of the Committee on Necrology. Since our last communication, our Grand Lodge has lost a total of 2,575 faithful brethren, among whom were 21 Right Worshipful Brethren. We shall not hear the names or biographies of those brethren who have served the Grand Lodge as Right Worshipful Sirs, for those facts will be printed in the Report of the Committee on Necrology in the PROCEEDII':GS of this communication. R.W.John R. Walker, Walker- Past D.DoG.M., District 43: 1956-65, diedJu1y 21,1980. RW. Herbert William Duem1er, St. Louis - Past D.D.G.M., District 33: 1962, died August 22, 1980. R.W. Wo Lee Brewster, Jonesburg - Past DoD.GoM., District 28: 1967-71, died August 22, 1980. RoWo Sidney D. Clark, St. Joseph - Past DoD.G.M., District 9: 1956, died August 24, 1980. R.W. Walter Charles Campbell, Rolla - Past Grand Tiler, 1971, died October 9, 1980. R.W.James Roswell Gray, Laddonia - Past D.DoG.L., District 27: 1964, died September IS, 1980. R.W. Allen C. Sodemann, St. Louis- Past D.D.G.M., District 33: 1963, died October 10, 19800 RW. James Ho Rudd, Hazelwood - Past D.D.G.M., District 30: 1956-60, died October 19, 1980. RoW. Lawrence Marshall Hollenbeck, Vienna - Past D.D.G.M., District 50: 1951; Past DoD.GoL., District 50: 1952-56, died December 2, 19800 RoW. Orland Ray McCoy, Farley - Past D.D.G.L., District 21: 1974-75, died January 8, 19810 RW. Herbert Ross Busch, Parkville - Past DoD.G.M., District 21: 1964-65, diedJanuary 12, 1981. R.W. Herbert R Kuhn, Prairie Home- Past D.D.G.M., District 25: 1958; Past D.D.G.L. District 25: 1963-66, died November 29, 1980. R.W. Arthur C. Yehlen, St. Louis - Past D.D.G.M., District 33:1941; Past DoD.G.L., District 33:1942, died February IS, 1981.


1981

95

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

RW. Floyd Sutton, Crystal City - Past D.D.G.M., District 48:1971-73, died April 5, 1981. R.W. Glenn Hart Oliver, Montgomery City- Past D.D.G.L., District 28: 1979-81, died in office, April 12, 1981. R.W. Manley C. Vanzant, Maplewood - Past D.D.C.M., District 57: 1963-64; Past D.D.G.L., District 57:1965, died May 8, 1981. RW. Elwood Joseph Chancellor, Buckner - Past D.D.G.L., District 59: 1976-78, died June 21, 1981. R.W. Cleon C. Thompson, Mountain Grove - Past D.D.G.L., District 46:1973-74, died June 25, 1981. RW. Vernon V. Goslee, Skidmore - Past D.D.G.L., District 7:1949-57, died June 30, 1981. RW. Morris Salwinsky, Kansas City - Past Grand Pursuivant, 1973, died July 19, 1981, Masonic Services. RW. James A. Riley, St. Louis - Past D.D.G.M., District 33: 1966, died July 31, 1981, M.W. Bro. George F. Morrison conducted Masonic Services.

Brethren, will you please stand for a moment of silence and tribute to our departed brethren and for prayer? Supreme Grand Master of the Universe, in Thy infinite wisdom these brethren have been called to the celestial grand lodge on high, for they have laid aside their earthly working tools and are now serving Thee, the Supreme Architect of the Universe. While we pay this tribute of brotherly love and respect to the memory of our departed brethren, let us also express our sincere fraternal greetings and sympathy to the bereaved loved ones. This we ask in the name of Him in whom we all profess to put out trust. Amen! Respectfully and fraternally submitted, Chairman, WILLIAM R. DENSLOW, DR. HAROLD O. GRAUEL, WALTER L. WALKER. FRANK P. BRIGGS,

GEORGE F. MORRISO!':,

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES

The Grand Secretary moved that the report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be received and made a part of the record of this Annual Communication. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge of Missouri A.F. & A.M. Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances has had under consideration and investigation the Application for Reinstatement of Bro. Elmer L. Crumley, who desires to be reinstated to good standing. Brother Crumley was suspended for nonpayment of dues onJune 1,1963 by Portageville Lodge No. 166 at Portageville, Missouri. Investigation made by our Committee through R.W. Bro. Frank A. Arnold, Grand Secretary, reveals that Brother Crumley is of good repute and worthy to be reinstated to membership in our Fraternity. The Committee therefore recommends that the Petition for Reinstatement to Good Standing be approved. LLOYD

L. SCHAIl\:KER, W. GARl\:!iOLZ,

EDWARD

ROBERT M. FEl\:LOl\:,

HAROLD

.los.

TO!':ER,

HARRY GERSHEl\:SO!':,

Chairman.


96

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

REPORT OF BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

Wor. Bro. Harold E. Thornton, Chairman, presented the report of the Building Supervisory Board and moved that the report as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be accepted and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Gram' Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: Your Buii.!ing Supervisory Board submits herewith its report of activities and decisions of the past Masonic year. We are indeed grateful to our Grand Master, M.W. Bro.]. Edward Blinn, for not only the appointment to serve on this committee, but for the many hours and days he and other Grand Lodge Officers spent in assisting the many subordinate lodges in their various cornerstone and dedication ceremonies. The vitality in the various lodges over the state of Missouri has been greatly enhanced by these great leaders. The Board has attempted to conscientiously attend to all matters brought before it; and a list of all cases and the action taken is herewith attached to this report. It is our fervent hope that our lodges will continue to grow and that our great institution will be forever preserved. Fraternally, Roy E. TALBOTT, NEI.sol': Row AI", HAROLD TIfORI"TOI",

Chairman.

Gallatin Lodge No. 106 and Gallatin Temple Corporation The Board approved amended Articles of Incorporation. Archie Lodge No. 633, Archie On recommendation of the District Deputy Grand Master that the lodge was receiving the fair market value, the Board approved sale of old temple. Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton The Board approved plans to exchange old building for new building to be built and paid for by local bank with no debt to the lodge so the bank could gain title to the old location for expansion of the bank. Palestine Lodge No. 241, St. Charles The Board answered inquiry regarding design for new temple. This was referred to the District Deputy Grand Master. Sarcoxie Lodge No. 293, Sarcoxie The Board granted permission to proceed with plans for their new temple with no debt to be incurred to the lodge. Sparta Lodge No. 296, Sparta Permission was granted to proceed with building new temple with no debt incurred. Lebanon Lodge No. 77, Steeleville The Board approved plans for new temple, and the sale of old building, without any debt to be incurred. Monroe Lodge No. 64, Monroe City Plans for new temple were approved with no debt to be incurred to the lodge. Sarcoxie Temple Association, Sarcoxie The Board approved Articles of Not-for-Profit Corporation. Lambskin Lodge No. 460, and Lambskin Temple Association, St. Louis The Board approved Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws for Temple Association. Trenton Lodge No. Ill, Trenton


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

97

Permission was granted to proceed with plans for new temple without any incurrence of debt to the lodge. Sheffield Lodge No. 625, and Sheffield Masonic Temple Association, Kansas City Approval was given for the lodge to make a loan (limited) to the Temple Association for necessary remodeling to the building. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BY路LAWS

M.W. Bro. J. Morgan Donelson, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on By-Laws and moved that the report as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" be accepted and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The Committee on By-Laws reports that after the 1980 Annual Communication it prepared and caused to be distributed the annual pocket part to the 1958 Annotated Constitution and By-Laws as reprinted in 1977. This supplement contains all amendments, standing resolutions, approved decisions and other actions ofthe Grand Lodge subsequent to those included in the bound volume. The 1980 actions of the Grand Lodge on matters of law are summarized, and proposed amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws are set out in full. A complete directory of the Grand Lodge and biographical sketches of the Grand Master and Deputy Grand Master are set forth for easy reference. Fraternally submitted, NEWTON R. BRADLEY, HARRY GERSHENSON, JR., WILLIAM H. Urz, JR., J. MORGAN DOl"ELSON. ROl"ALD M. BELT, REMARKS OF STATE MASTER COUNCILOR RANDAL L. WINGBERMUEHLE OF MISSOURI. INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF DEMOLAY REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ENTERTAINMENT OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

R.W. Bro. Thomas K. McGuire, Jr., Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Entertainment of Distinguished Guests and moved that the report be accepted and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The Committee and our wives have been privileged to assist our Grand Master J. Edward Blinn in extending the hospitality of the Grand Lodge to the distinguished visitors to our 160th Annual Communication from sister jurisdictions, to the leaders of affiliated bodies and other guests. Motel accommodations were provided at the Hilton Inn, Holiday Inn and Kentwood Arms. The annual reception and Grand Master's banquet were held on Sunday, September 27, at the Hilton Inn. The Grand Master's Appreciation Breakfast for the District Deputy Grand Masters and District Deputy Grand Lecturers was held on Monday morning, September 28, in the dining room of the Abou Ben Adhem Temple. A luncheon for those attending Grand Lodge was served Monday noon, September 28, in the dining room of Abou Ben Adhem Temple. The annual Grand Lodge banquet for all Freemasons, their families, friends and guests was held in the Abou Ben Adhem dining room on Monday evening, followed by entertainment in the auditorium by Missouri's Official Ragtime Piano Player, Gary Ellison.


98

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Visitors from outside of the State of Missouri and special guests included: M.W. Bro. Keith L. Muntz, Grand Master of Iowa, and wife Dorothy. M.W. Bro. Harold C. Wurdeman, Grand Master of Nebraska, and wife Irene. M.W. Bro. Wilson B. Haney, Grand Master of Oklahoma. M.W. Bro. Danny W. Seaton, Grand Master of Tennessee, and wife Carol. M.W. Bro. Ben B. Boyles, Grand Master of Kansas. M.W. Bro. Buford W. Vest, Grand Master of Arkansas. R.W. Bro. E. Gene Ross, Senior Grand Warden of Illinois, and wife Doris. R.W. Bro. Robert R. Stevens, Senior Grand Warden of Indiana, and wife Suzie. R.W. Bro. Darrell Aderman, Junior Grand Warden of Wisconsin, and wife Billie. RW. Bro. Tom Eggleston, Grand Secretary of Iowa, and wife Barbara. R.W. Bro. Albert O. Arnold, Jr., Grand Secretary of Kansas, and wife Marge. R.W. Bro. Melvin Mullins, Grand Secretary of Kentucky, and wife Helen. R.W. Bro. Stewart M. L. Pollard, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Masonic Service Association of the United States, and wife Peg. RW. Bro. Walter C. Ploeser, Sovereign Grand Inspector General of Missouri, and wife Dorothy. M.E. Compo Dr. Gene M. Zinn, Grand High Priest of Missouri, and wife Muriel. RE. Sir Knight Dr. Henry R. Stoker, Grand Commander of Missouri, and wife Shelda. M.1. Compo Robert N. Hunter, Grand Master, Grand Council of Missouri. Sister Betty Lee Egner, Worthy Grand Matron of Missouri. Bro. Gordon G. Saunders, Worthy Grand Patron of Missouri, and wife Darlene. Sister Adele C. Duerr, Grand Secretary of Grand Chapter, O.E.S. of Missouri. Miss Susan Sprague, Grand Worthy Advisor of Missouri, Order of the Rainbow for Girls. Miss Mary Nowack, Grand Bethel Honored Queen, Job's Daughters. Mrs. Marlene B. Frakes, Grand Guardian of Missouri,Job's Daughters, and husband Lorna H. Bro. Ronald Bardol, Associate Grand Guardian of Missouri, Job's Daughters. R.W. Bro. Ronald M. Compton, Executive Officer of Missouri, Order of DeMolay. Bro. H. David Thomas, Administrator, Masonic Home of Missouri, and wife Ruth Ann. Wor. Bro. Carl I. Stein, Secretary to the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, and wife June. Bro. Randal L. Wingbermuehle, State Master Councilor, Order of DeMolay. Bro. and Ill. Sir Arthur A. Summer, Potentate of Abou Ben Adhem Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S. of Springfield, and wife Nancy. R.W. Bro. M. Monroe Robinson, Deputy Grand Master of Arkansas, and wife Troyce.

The Chairman and the Members of the Committee express their thanks and appreciation of the assistance given by M.W. Brother Blinn and R.W. Bro. Frank A. Arnold and his wife Ruth and to the wives of the committee members in formulating the above activities for our Grand Lodge session. THOMAS K. MCGUIRE, JR., Chairman, L. DOYLE TREECE, ROBERT G. BIRD, JIMMIE LEE, EUGENE E. "PAr" McFARLAND, FRANK A. ARNOLD, CHARLES E. SCHEURICH,

JOHN LOREJ'I,;Z.

ROBERT J. CREDE,

REMARKS OF R.W. BRO. RONALD M. COMPTON, EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF MISSOURI, INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF DEMOLAY REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON YOUTH

R.W. Bro. Ronald M. Compton, Chairman, presented the report of the


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

99

Committee on Youth and moved that it be accepted as printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: The biggest single need of the Youth Program in today's time is adult leadership. The Order of DeMolay must have Master Masons working with them. Frank Land, who founded the Order of DeMolay, only allowed Master Masons to work with DeMolay in his time. Unfortunately, DeMolay will never properly grow until we have more Master Masons willing to learn about the Order of DeMolay and are willing to work actively as Chapter Dads in local chapters. It may not be line officers of the lodge; but it could be that Master Mason in your lodge who is looking for this kind of program to work in. Lodge officers should search out men at their lodge who have the inclination to work with the youth and encourage them to work with DeMolay. This is also true with Job's Daughters and Rainbow Girls. The Order of DeMolay, Job's Daughters, and Rainbow Girls are extremely thankful for the support it receives from Masons in Missouri. We encourage each Master Mason to visit a Chapter, Bethel, or Assembly and see the youth at work. Respectfully submitted, RONALD M. COMPTON, Chairman, O. WESLEY KONERING, LIONEL J. GOEDE, DAN C. PEAK. EUGENE E. WILSOl\', REMARKS OF BRO. RONALD BARDOL, ASSOCIATE GRAND GUARDIAN OF THE GRAND GUARDIAN COUNCIL OF MISSOURI, INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF JOB'S DAUGHTERS REPORT OF AUDITOR

The Grand Secretary stated that the report of the Auditor is printed in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" and moved that the report be accepted and printed in the PROCEEDINGS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: GENTLEMEN: Pursuant to engagement, I have examined the books and records of the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri for the period from July 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981, also the Masonic Home Initiation Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund, the Joseph S. McIntyre Library Fund, The Freemason Magazine, and The Revolving Fund for the same period and respectfully present the following report: (;ENERAL FL:ND--PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS STATEME;>;T OF CASH RECEIPTS A;>;O DISBL'RSDfEl\;TS JL:LY

l. 1980

TO JVNE

30, 1981 Amount

Cash Receipts Per Capita Tax Masonic Home Initiation Fees

. $533,619.72 43,000.00 .


100

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

George Washington Memorial Association Fees Dues Receipt Cards Revolving Fund-Sale of Sundries Interest on Investments: Permanent Fund (Less Agency Fee $913.05) General Fund (Less Agency Fee $1,115.78) Miscellaneous Visits-D.D.G.M. and D.D.G.L. Total Income Receipts Transfer from Agency Account - Net Total Receipts Disbursements Per Schedule Attached Excess of Receipts Over Disbursements Balance July 1, 1980 Net Overdraft Balance June 30, 1981 Consisting of First National Bank of Kansas City Exchange National Bank of Jefferson City, Missouri GRA:'\D LOD(a: A.F.

&

. . .

2,153.00 4,158.06 1,083.50

$16,088.58 21,173.77 37,262.35 1,101.02 . 5,460.00 . . $627,837.65 56,549.91 . . $684,387.56 . 636,185.86 . $ 48,201.70 (5,852.58) . . $42,349.12) . $ 39,796.50 2,552.62 . $42,349.12

A.M. OF MISSOCRI

GENERAL FUND STATEMENT OF CASH DISBCRSEM£:'IlTS .JULY

1, 1980

TO

W!':£ 30, 1981 Amount

By Appropriation of Grand Lodge Salary-Grand Secretary Salary-Grand Lecturer Salary-Grand Treasurer Retirement Expense Masonic Service Association-Per Capita Masonic Service-Hospital Visitation Grand Lodge Office Expense Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges Freemason Magazine By Requisition of Grand Master Expenses-Grand Master Expenses-Grand Lecturer Expenses-Grand Lodge Officers and Committees Expenses-Deputy Grand Master Conference of Grand Lodge Officers Conference of D.D.G.M.s and D.D.G.L.s Washington, D.C., Meeting Auditing Grand Masters Contingent Fund Expenses of Grand Lodge Sessions Regional Meetings-Lodge Officers

. $ 18,350.00 17,250.00 . . 600.00 . 13,450.00 . 2,457.39 5,000.00 . . 4,350.91 100.00 . 67,628.20 . $129,186.50 $ 10,000.00

. . . . . . . . . .

10,118.39 3,116.38 1,000.00 3,337.20 4,116.32 3,596.00 1,000.00 4,098.39 15,117.24 9,253.63 $ 64,753.55

By Requisition of Grand Secretary Salaries-Grand Lodge Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 27,845.80 4,054.59 Payroll Taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Insurance 9,228.54


1981

101

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Operation of Grand Lodge Office Printing, Postage, Stationery Telephone and Telegrams Office Equipment Office Supplies Incidental Office Expense Data Processing Office Improvements Incidental Travel and Expense of Grand Secretary Grand Master's Regalia Fifty-Year Veterans' Buttons Printing Proceedings By Requisition Committee on Committee on Committee on Committee on Committee on Committee on

. . . . . . . . . . .

Correspondence Masonic Education Ritual Relief and Charity By-Laws Mileage and Per Diem

12,665.98 2,931.64 7,677.57 2,493.13 1,248.81 3,793.61 962.62 3,089.36 2,294.23 4,938.50 12,133.05 $ 95,357.43 750.00 3,492.01 618.22 5,000.00 1,874.22 59,318.00 $ 71,052.45 $360,349.93 $222,341.55 43,000.00 2,153.00 $267,494.55 $627,844.48 5,460.00 2,913.88 (32.50) $636,185.86 $

. . . . .

Total Grand Lodge Operating Expenses Masonic Home-Per Capita Tax Masonic Home Initiation Fund George Washington Memorial Association

. . . .

Total Expenses Payments-D.D.G.M. and D.D.G.L. Visits Payroll Adjustment Discount-Missouri Withholding Total Disbursements

. . . . .

SECURITIES-PERMAl':ENT FlJl':D

I did not examine the securities which are held by the First National Bank of Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, as agent, charges and credits for the current year. Federal National Mortgage Association Debenture Interest Rate Maturity

Par Value

PERCENT

Carrying Value

Market Value June 30, 1981

3-10-82 7.15 U.S. Treasury Notes 9-30-81 6.75 10-31-82 12.125 2-15-83 8 2-15-84 7.25 2-15-87 9 Federated Master Trust Total Securities

$ 20,000.00

$ 20,010.15

$ 18,887.40

20,000.00 . 10,000.00 . 65,000.00 . 45,000.00 . 50,000.00 . 4,145.00 . . $214,145.00

19,878.13 9,881.25 64,406.25 41,976.54 50,000.00 4,145.00 210,297.32

19,562.40 9,721.90 59,007.65 38,559.15 40,875.00 4,145.00 $190,758.50

Cash Total

. .

16,000.48 $226,297.80


102

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECURITIES--GE:"ERAL FL::"D

U.S. Treasury Notes Interest Rate Maturity

Par Value

PERCENT

9-30-82 11.87 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 50,000.00 8-15-83 11.87 . 50,000.00 2-15-84 7.25 . 15,000.00 Federated Master Trust . 1,748.00 Total Securities . $116,748.00 Uninvested Cash Total

. .

Following is a summary of the changes Permanent Fund during the year. Uninvested Cash, July I, 1980 Receipts Matured U.S. Treasury Notes & Bills Income Account Transfers Amortization-Premium F.N.M.A. Deb G.M.A.C. Note

Market Value June 30, 1981 $ 48,531.00 $ 50,052.09 Carrying Value

49,562.50 14,971.50 1,748.00 116,334.09

47,906.00 12,853.05 1,748.00 $111,038.05

-0$116,334.09 In

the principal account of the $ . $ 35,562.00 1,249.14 . . 20.31 . 1,000.00

37,831.45

Disbursements U.S. Treasury Notes and Bills " $ 19,660.75 Federated Master Trust Commercial Paper. . . . . . . . . . . 3,033.00 Uninvested Cash, June 30, 1981

Balance July 1, 1980 Interest Received Transferred to Grand Lodge Collection Fees Transferred to Principal Balance June 30, 1980

. . . . . .

862.78

(22,693.75) $ 16,000.48

$

.00 18,271.08 ( 16,088.58) (913.05) 0,269.45) $ .00

Following is a summary of the changes in the principal account of the General Fund during the year. Balance July 1, 1980

.00

$

Receipts Matured U.S. Treasury Notes and Bills $302,988.19 Sale of Federated Master Trust Paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 322,000.00 From Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167,500.00 Income Cash ~2~6~.0~4

792,514.23

Disbursements U.S. Treasury Notes and Bills $244,716.32 Purchase Federated Master Trust Paper. . . . . . . . . . . .. 323,748.00 Transfer to Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 224,049.91

792,514.23

Balance June 30, 1981

.

$

.00


1981

103

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI A(;I::NCY INCOME ACCOUNT----GENERAL FeND

Balance July 1, 1980 Interest Received 0 0000000 0. 0000 0. 000 0000. Transferred to Grand Lodge .. 0. 000000. 00. 00000000. 000000000... 0 Collection Fees 0000 0. 0. 00000.. 0000000. 0.. 0000. 000. 00000 Transferred to Principal 00000000000 0000 0. 0. 0 . Balance, June 30, 1981 000 00000000000000000000000000000.

$ .00 $ 22,315059

(21,173.77) (1,115078) (26.04) $ 000

MASONIC HOME I:"ITIATIO:-': FUND

Balance July 1, 1980-Due to Masonic Home 000000000000000000000 Received From Lodges, July I, 1980 to June 30, 1981 00000. 00. 0000 Paid to Masonic Home . 0. 00000. 000..... 00000000000000000. 000000. Balance June 30, 1980-Due to Masonic Home 000000000000000000 0 GEORGE WASHI:"GTON

~fE~fORIAL

000 43,000000 43,000000 .00 $

$

FCND

Balance Due July I, 1979 000000000000000000000000.000.0000 .. 0000 Received From Lodges, July I, 1980 to June 30, 1981 0 . Paid to George Washington Memorial Association 00000000000000000 Balance Due June 30, 1981 00000000000000000000.. 0... 0.. 000.. 0. 00

000 2,153.00 (2,153.00) .00 $

$

JOSEPH S. MCI:-':TYRE LIBRARY FU:"D

Balance July 1, 1980 000 00000 0000000.. 0. 000 00. 0000 Interest on Savings Account 000. 000 0000. 0000000000000000000000 Balance in Mercantile Trust Company Savings Account June 30, 1981 000000000000.. 000000 000000 THE FREEMASON

$

1,972.15 106.02

$

2,078017

$

644.89 44.00 (45050)

$

643039

$

6,849053 8,079.94 (8.237070)

$

6,691077

~fA(;AZINE

Balance July 1, 1980 o. 0 00000000000.. 0. 000000000000000.... 0. 0 Receipts 0 00 00. 00. 0000000000000.. 00. 00 00.. 0 . Disbursements 0000.. 0. 0000000. 0.... 0000000000000000000000000000 Balance June 30, 1981-Exchange National Bank Jefferson City, Missouri 0.0 00000. 000.. 0000000000000000000000 000 THE REVOLVI:"(;

n:I'D

Balance July I, 1980 .. 0.. 0.0000000000.000000000000000000.00.0000 Receipts (Dues, Manuals, Etc.) .0000000 000000000000000000000000000 Disbursements 00000 0000000000 000000000000000000000000 Balance June 30, 1981-Exchange National Bank Jefferson City, Missouri . 0000000000000. 000000000000000000000000 MILEA(;E AND PER DInf

COM~ITTFF

Mileage and Per Diem Checks Paid 0000.. 000000000000000000000000 Balance June 30, 1981 000 00o. 0 000000000000000000000000

$ 59,318000 000

The 1980 Mileage and Per Diem Committee report and cancelled checks were examined during the course of the examination. The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri from July 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981.


104

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

All checks issued were examined in support of the disbursements. I found to be correct the per capita tax received and the amount paid to the Masonic Home. Approved invoices were examined for substantially all items. Payroll records and tax returns were also inspected. The bank balances shown in the report were confirmed directly by the depositaries. Respectfully submitted, ROBERT H. ASBURY, Certified Public Accountant REPORT OF THE GRAND SECRETARY

The Grand Secretary stated that his report was contained in the booklet "Reports of Officers and Committees" and that the sheet on statistics was included in the packet distributed to all voting members of the Grand Lodge. He moved that the report of the Grand Secretary be accepted for printing in the PROCEEDlJ',;GS. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: BRETHREN: Law and practice of the Grand Lodge of Missouri obligates the Grand Secretary to communicate - to give and receive information, instructions, orders, messages, reports, requests - with everyone who serves as a part ofthe whole ofthe Masonic Fraternity. Freemasonry of the present day is quite a complex arrangement of the persons and organizations whose lives and labors are meant to exemplify the essential characteristics of the Order: Those qualities of good men with knowledge and understanding of the principles symbolically represented by LEVEL, PLUMB, and SQUARE. The constituents of Masonry are: Brothers, Officers, Lodges, Clubs, Districts, Committees, Appendant and Adoptive Bodies, Grand Lodge Officers, Grand Master. The year 1980-81 has been very pleasant and especially full of activity for me as Grand Secretary, with all of the associations of official responsibility and of the close personal relationships with M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn, with the fraternal ties among the Grand Lodge Officers, the Past Grand Masters, the Past Grand Treasurer, the Past Grand Secretary, the Past Grand Lecturer, the District Deputy Grand Masters, the District Deputy Grand Lecturers, the Chairmen and Members of Grand Lodge Committees, the ladies of the late Past Grand Masters, and those who are the strength and support of our Masonic Brotherhood - the Officers and Members of the lodges under the Jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The following sections are the account ofCOMMUN ICATION with all who are the Grand Lodge of Missouri during the Year 1980-81.

IDEJ',;TIFICATIOJ',; CARDS Identification cards for the Year 1980-81, which certified the holders to be Officials of the Grand Lodge, were written for and sent to the Grand Lodge Officers, the District Deputy Grand Masters, and the District Deputy Grand Lecturers. Most Worshipful Past Grand Masters received identification cards for the year 1980-81, bearing the signature of M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn,


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

105

that certified service to the Grand Lodge of Missouri as Most Worshipful Grand Master with the dates of the respective years of their terms of office. COMMISSIONS TO DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS

Commissions were issued to 65 District Deputy Grand Masters appointed by Grand Master J. Edward Blinn to serve during the Grand Lodge year 1980-81 - one commission was issued because of the vacancy created by the resignation of the originally appointed District Deputy Grand Master. CERTIFICATES TO DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND LECTURERS

Certificates of the appointment of Grand Lecturer Stanton T. Brown were issued to 65 District Deputy Grand Lecturers - one certificate was issued because of the vacancy created by the untimely death of the originally appointed District Deputy Grand Lecturer. CONSOLIDATION AND MERGER OF LODGES

Havana Lodge No. 21 at McFall and Gentryville Lodge No. 125 at Gentryville consolidated and merged on October 1, 1980 under the name and number McFall-Gentryville No. 125. Havana Lodge voted on the proposition on April 4, 1980; Gentryville Lodge voted on April 26, 1980. The seal and the charter of Havana Lodge No. 21 were received at the Grand Lodge Office on October 1, 1980. Sonora Lodge No. 200 at Watson consolidated with and merged into North Star Lodge No. 157 at Rock Port on February 23, 1981. Sonora Lodge voted on the proposition on January 15, 1981; North Star Lodge voted on February 23, 1981. The seal and the charter of Sonora Lodge were received in the Grand Lodge Office on April 7, 1981. University Lodge No. 649 at Clayton consolidated with and merged into Clayton Lodge No. 601 at Clayton on July 3, 1981. University Lodge voted on the proposition on February 2, 1981; Clayton Lodge voted on June 4,1981. The seal and the charter of University Lodge were received in the Grand Lodge Office on July 13, 1981. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES

M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn accepted the recommendations of the respective Grand Masters and Grand Lodges and appointed Grand Representatives of the Grand Lodge of Missouri near other Grand Lodges. Certificates of Commission were issued to: Grand Grand Grand Grand

Lodge of Arizona - Samuel Anthony Scalzo Loge Reguliere De Belgique - Bernard Clarinval Lodge of Louisiana - Thomas T. Elkins Lodge of West Virginia - John E. Hall COURTESIES

Lodges of Missouri accommodated 74 lodges of other Grand Jurisdictions and performed fraternal services. The requests for fraternal courtesies were received through the offices of the Grand Secretaries, respectively, and transmitted to Missouri lodges. Constituent lodges of Missouri made 125 requests of lodges of other states


106

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

for fraternal courtesies: Conferrals of degrees, investigations to determine fitness for reinstatement to good standing after suspension for nonpayment of dues, investigations to determine fitness to receive the degrees of Masonry, assistance with the preparation of the application for admission to the Masonic Home of Missouri, presentation of the 50-Year Button of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to veteran brothers living outside the State of Missouri, inquiries for information as to whereabouts and conditions of "lost" members, the provision of gifts at Christmas for brothers, etc. In addition, many requests for information on Masonic history were exchanged and processed to provide official verification of Masonic affiliation to support membership in an appendant (adoptive) body and for genealogy research, to complete membership records in transactions of transfer of membership, to provide the latest mailing address for affiliates of other Masonic organizations. Authorizations for Masonic Funeral Services were given and received. HEALING ORDERS

Carl Junction Lodge No. 549 at Carl Junction M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn determined that the inaccuracies of facts as to place of residence entered in the petition of Michael Keith McKay for the degrees of Masonry were written by him with no deliberate intent to conceal or deceive or falsify; that Carl Junction Lodge No. 549, in good faith, received the petition of Michael Keith McKay for the degrees of Masonry and proceeded in regular order with the investigation and ballot and subsequent conferral of the degree of Entered Apprentice. The Grand Master caused the Entered Apprentice - Michael Keith McKay - to be healed in accordance with Section 13.140 of Law of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Kennett Lodge No. 68 at Kennett M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn determined that the irregularities relative to the proceedings of Kennett Lodge No. 68 that pertain to the membership of Bro. John Preston Churchwell - initiated an Entered Apprentice on October 17, 1968; passed to degree of Fellow Craft on June 26, 1969; raised to degree of Master Mason on March 4, 1971; suspended for failure to prove proficiency in the Master Mason Degree on August 24, 1972; petitioned for advancement on March 13, 1980; raised to degree of Master Mason (Second Conferral) on March 20, 1980 - occurred through no fault of the brother. The Grand Master caused the Master Mason - John Preston Churchwell - to be healed in accordance with Section 13.140 of Law of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Ionia Lodge No. 381 at E {don M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn determined that the irregularities relative to the proceedings of Ionia Lodge No. 381 that pertain to the transaction of the transfer of membership of Bro. Truman Gale Allee to Ionia Lodge from Rising Sun Lodge No.8 at Fort Scott, Kansas - the reception of the petition of Brother Allee for affiliation accompanied by invalid evidence of good standing as a Master Mason - occurred through no fault of the brother. The Grand Master caused the Master Mason - Truman Gale Allee - to be healed in accordance with Section 13.140 of Law of the Grand Lodge of Missouri.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

107

Jasper Lodge No. 398 at Jasper M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn determined that the irregularity relative to the proceedings ofJasper Lodge No. 398 that pertain to the conferral of the degree of Fellow Craft on Bro. Larry Eugene Harris - the advancement of Brother Harris to the degree of Fellow Craft in less than four weeks after his initiation as an Entered Apprentice - occurred through no fault of the brother. The Grand Master caused the Fellow Craft - Larry Eugene Harristo be healed in accordance with Section 13.140 of Law of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Acacia Lodge No. 602 at Columbia M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn determined that the irregularity relative to the proceedings of Acacia Lodge No. 602 that pertain to the conferral of the degree of Fellow Crafton Bro. William Lee Cook-the advance of Brother Cook to the degree of Fellow Craft in less than four weeks after his initiation as an Entered Apprentice - occurred through no fault of the brother. The Grand Master caused the Fellow Craft - William Lee Cook - to be healed in accordance with Section 13.140 of Law of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. DISPENSATIOJ\:S

By order of M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn, dispensations were issued for the dedication of halls for Masonic use and for the laying ofcornerstones, as follows: On October 3, 1980, to Thomas K. McGuire, Jr., R.W. Senior Grand Marshal, for Dedication for Masonic Use the outdoor site on the farm of Wor. Bro. James E. Jones, located one mile south and one quarter mile east of the Hall of Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439, where Mt. Olive Lodge plans to hold a special communication. November 6, 1980, to Roger L. Pritchett, R.W. District Deputy Grand Master, District II, for Dedication of Masonic Use the Rebecca Lodge Hall at Lathrop, where Lathrop Lodge No. 506 will meet in stated and special communications. November 14, 1980, to Jerrold K. Clemons, R.W. District Deputy Grand Lecturer, District 48, for Dedication of Bismarck High School for Masonic Use, where Bismarck Lodge No. 41 will meet in special communication for the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Saturday, December 20, 1980. December 8, 1980, to F. Kenneth Eads, R.W. Deputy Grand Master, District 10, for conducting the Grand Lodge Ceremony of Dedication of the new hall of Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65 for Masonic Use on Sunday afternoon, December 14, 1980. December 25, 1980, to Albert E. Gimple, Jr., R.W. District Deputy Grand Master, District 53, for Dedication of the Community Room of the Bank of Mountain View for Masonic Use, where Mountain View Lodge No. 637 will hold a special communication for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Saturday, January 9, 1981. February 25,1981 to H. Fred Helbing, R.W. District Deputy Grand Master, District 15, for conducting the Grand Lodge Ceremony of Dedication ofthe new hall of Craft Lodge No. 287 at Canton, for Masonic Use on Monday evening, March 2, 1981. March II, 1981, to Charles E. Scheurich, R. W. Junior Grand Deacon, for Opening a Specific Communication of the Grand Lodge in the hall of Fayette Lodge No.4 7 and to conduct the Grand Lodge Ceremony of Laying the Cornerstone (metal plaque) for Central Methodist College at Fayette on Saturday Morning, April 25, 1981. May 13, 1981, to Edward L. Tietsort, R.W. District Deputy Grand Master, District 3, for the Dedication for Masonic Use the outdoor site on the farm of Bro. James Cunningham where Pollock Lodge No. 349 will hold a special communication for the purpose of


108

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft on Saturday, May 23, 1981. September 10, 1981, to Walter K. Schneider, R. W. Past District Deputy Grand Master, District 59, for the Dedication for Masonic Use the outdoor site on the property of the Masonic Home of Missouri, Bannister Road and Westridge Road, Kansas City, where Grandview Lodge No. 618 will meet in special communication for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft on Saturday, September 19, 1981.

By order of M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn, dispensations were issued that authorized the transaction of specific matters oflodge business, as follows: On October 3, 1980, to Arlie H. Daugherty, Worshipful Master, of Leadwood Lodge No. 598 at Leadwood, for holding a special communication of Leadwood Lodge No. 598 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday Afternoon, October 12, 1980. October 9, 1980, to James Richard Pelletier, Worshipful Master of Wentzville Lodge No. 46, for holding a special communication of Wentzville Lodge No. 46 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday, November 2, J980. October 8, 1980, to Charles Norman Unversagt, Worshipful Master of Laclede Lodge No. 83 at Lebanon, for holding a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and one of Table Instruction on October 24,1980, in the Fellowship Room of the First United Methodist Church, which place was dedicated for Masonic use by R.W. Brother Ralph]. Shafer in 1976. October 13, 1980, to Leo E. Endicott, Worshipful Master of Branson Lodge No. 587, for the Conferral of the Degrees of Masonry on Orville James Hall, who was duly elected on October 6, 1980, in accordance with Section 13.110. The degrees to be conferred under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a brother Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample notice in advance of the dates when the degrees will be conferred. October 15, 1980, to Wendell H. Brunk, Worshipful Master of Grandview Lodge No. 618, for holding a special communication of Grandview Lodge No. 618 for the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday afternoon, December 7, 1980. October 17,1980, to Norman W. Thompson, Worshipful Master ofJefferson Lodge No. 43, for holding a special communication ofJefferson Lodge No. 43, for the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday, December 21, 1980. October 17, 1980, to L. E. Byrd, Jr., Worshipful Master of St. James Lodge No. 230, for holding a special communication of St. James Lodge No. 230 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday afternoon, December 7, 1980. October 27, 1980, to James F. Fitzpatrick, Worshipful Master of Buckner Lodge No. 50 I, for holding a special communication of Buckner Lodge No. 501 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday afternoon, November 30, 1980. October 29,1980, to Raymond E. Vorderbruegge, Worshipful Master of Union Lodge No. 593, for holding a special communication of Union Lodge No. 593 for holding a special communication of Union Lodge No. 593 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday evening, November 16, 1980. November 12, 1980, to Frank R. Charles, Worshipful Master of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, for holding a meeting of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 at Kansas City in the hall of Marlborough Lodge No. 569 at 8009 Paseo, Kansas City, on Sunday afternoon, November 23, 1980, prior to the opening of the specific communication of the Grand Lodge for the purpose of Laying the Cornerstone of the New Ivanhoe Masonic Temple. November 14, 1980, to Jesse A. Shaner, Worshipful Master of Bismarck Lodge No. 41, for holding a special communication of Bismarck Lodge No. 41 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Saturday, December 20, 1980 at


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

109

the Bismarck High School, after the place has been dedicated for Masonic Use by RW. Bro. Jerrold K. Clemons, District Deputy Grand Lecturer, District 48. November 17, 1980, to Claude E. Wells,Jr., Worshipful Master of Webster Lodge No. 98, for the Conferral of the Degrees of Masonry on Billy Paul Bowens, who was duly elected on November 14, 1980, in accordance with Section 13.110. The degrees to be conferred under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a brother Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample notice in advance of the dates when degrees are to be conferred. November 29, 1980, to Ralph M. Bailey, Worshipful MasterofUnity Lodge No. 495 at Richards, for holding stated and special communications of Unity Lodge No. 495 on the second Wednesday of each month in the hall of Osage Lodge No. 303 at Nevada, for such period of time as may be necessary until the officers and members make the decision regarding the future operation of Unity Lodge. This dispensation to be in effect and in force on December 10, 1980, the date when Unity Lodge No. 495 will hold the first stated communication in the hall of Osage Lodge No. 303. December 1, 1980, to Warren R Betts, Worshipful Master of Hickory Hill Lodge No. 211 at Eugene, for holding a special communication of Hickory Hill Lodge No. 211 on Sunday, December 7,1980, for the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers. December 1, 1980, to Everett M. Ragen, Worshipful Master of Rolla Lodge No. 213, for holding a special communication of Rolla Lodge No 213 on Sunday afternoon, December 14, 1980, for the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers. December 5, 1980, to James K. Roberson, Worshipful Master of Vienna Lodge No. 94, for holding a special communication of Vienna Lodge No. 94 for the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday afternoon, December 14, 1980. December 8,1980, to Frank R. Charles, Worshipful Master of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, for holding a meeting of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 at Kansas City, in the Hall of Marlborough Lodge No. 569 at 8009 Paseo, Kansas City, on Sunday afternoon, January 4, 1981, prior to the opening of the Grand Lodge for the purpose of the Dedication of the New Ivanhoe Masonic Temple for Masonic Use. December 25, 1980, to Robert L. Butler, Worshipful Master of Mountain View Lodge No. 637, for holding a special communication of Mountain View Lodge No. 637 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Saturday,January 9, 1981, in the Community Room of the Bank of Mountain View, after the place has been dedicated for Masonic Use by R.W. Bro. Albert E. Gimple, Jr., District Deputy Grand Master, District 53. December 31,1980, to Dr. Jack Kessinger, Worshipful Master of Viburnum Lodge No. 676, for holding a special communication of Viburnum Lodge No. 676 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday afternoon, January 11, 1981, in the Viburnum City Hall. January 14, 1981, to Edgar M. Burks, Worshipful Master of Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356, for holding a special communication of Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Sunday, January 18,1981. January 20, 1981, to William E. Burk, Worshipful Master of Kansas City Lodge No. 220, for Conferring the Degrees of Masonry on Floyd Mills Bair, who was duly elected on January 12, 1981, in accordance with Section 13.110; the degrees to be conferred only under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample notice in advance of the dates when degrees are to be conferred. February 19, 1981, to Harold J. Richardson, Worshipful Master of Allensville Lodge No. 198 at Allendale, for holding the annual election of officers of Allensville Lodge No. 198 at the stated communication of the fourth Monday of February - February 23, 1981 - after notice has been given to resident members. March 11, 1981, to Charles H. McClain, Worshipful Master of Arnold Lodge No. 673,


110

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

for Conferring the Degree of Master Mason on proficient Fellow Craft Orlan Dean Ferguson in such manner as may be appropriate in consideration of the physical condition of the candidate, in accordance with Section 13.110; the degree to be conferred under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample notice in advance of the date when the degree will be conferred. April 10, 1981, to George C. Vincent, Worshipful Master of Crestwood Lodge No. 669, for holding a special communication of Crestwood Lodge No. 669, for holding a special communication of Crestwood Lodge No. 669 on Saturday, April 25, 1981 at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 3633 Lindell Boulevard, Sl. Louis, for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on proficient Fellow Craft Paul E. Burns. April 13, 1981, to Robert D. Wright, Worshipful Master of Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, for taking a reballot on the petition of Gary R. Roubidoux for the degrees and on the petition of Steven W. Lalumandier for the degrees at the stated communication to be held on the First Thursday of May - May 7, 1981 - in accordance with Section 14.100, after notice to all resident members as set forth in Section 7.140 and Section 7.150. April 13, 1981, toJames L. Schraml, Worshipful Master of Belton Lodge No. 450, for Conferring the Degree of Master Mason on proficient Fellow Craft Dwight Merritt Graves in such manner as may be appropriate in consideration of the physical condition of the brother, in accordance with Section 13.110; the degree to be conferred under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample notice in advance of the date when the degree is to be conferred. April 29, 1981, to Keith G. Stever, Worshipful Master of Strafford Lodge No. 608, for holding a special communication of Strafford Lodge No. 608 for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft on SaturdaY,June 27, 1981, at the outdoor site on the farm of Bro. Tom Comstock, the place having been previously dedicated for Masonic use by R.W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn in 1972. May 13, 1981, to Edward L. Bandy, Worshipful Master ofJerusalem Lodge No. 315, for Jerusalem Lodge No. 315 atJerico Springs to Confer the Degree of Fellow Craft and the Degree of Master Mason on BrotherJoe Levi, in accordance with Section 13.110. The degrees to be conferred under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a brother Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample official notice in advance of the dates when the degrees will be conferred. May 13, 1981, to Cecil J. Michael, Worshipful Master of Pollock Lodge No. 349, for holding a special communication of Pollock Lodge No. 349 for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft on Saturday, May 23, 1981 at the outdoor site on the farm of Bro. .J ames Cunningham, after the place has been dedicated for Masonic use by R.W. District Deputy Grand Master Edward L. Tietsort, District 3. May 13, 1981, to James A. Turner, Worshipful Master of Rolla Lodge No. 213, for holding a special communication of Rolla Lodge No. 213 for the purpose of the observance of Sl. John's Day on Sunday, June 21, 1981 at the Ridgeview Christian Church, Ridgeview Road, Rolla. May 20, 1981, to L. Bruce Roberson, Worshipful Master of Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520, for holding a special communication of Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 for the purpose of the Masonic Occasion of Open Installation of Officers on Saturday evening, June 27, 1981, at Meridian Masonic Temple, 4500 Donovan Avenue, St. Louis. June 9, 1981, to George E. Marsden, Worshipful Master of Raytown Lodge No. 391, for officers and members of Raytown Lodge No. 391 to appear in aprons, jewels, and with rods on a float in the Round- U p Days Parade on September 26, 1981. The brothers participating are not to position themselves on the float as they would in a lodge meeting. July 5,1981, toJames E. Hawkins, Worshipful Master of Paul Revere Lodge No. 330, for holding a special communication of Paul Revere Lodge for the purpose of rededica-


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

III

tion and instruction at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 3633 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, on Saturday morning, September 12, 1981. June 24, 1981, to James A. Otto, Worshipful Master of Shaveh Lodge No. 646, for holding the annual election of the officers of Shaveh Lodge No. 646 at Creve Coeur, at the stated communication on the first Thursday of the month of September, 1981 September 3, 1981. June 27,1981, to Clarence B. Dawson, Worshipful Master of Paris Union Lodge No. 19, for officers and members of Paris Union Lodge No. 19 to appear on a float in the Sesquicentennial Parade of Monroe County on July 3-4, 1981, in aprons,jewels, and with rods. The brothers participating on the parade float are not to position themselves as they would in a lodge meeting. July I, 1981, to Floyd N. Doyel, Worshipful Master of Webster Lodge No. 98, for officers and members of Webster Lodge No. 98 to appear on a float in the July Fourth Parade at Marshfield in aprons,jewels, and with rods. The brothers participating on the parade float are not to position themselves as they would in a lodge meeting. July 8, 1981, to Michael D. Davis, Worshipful Master of Lamar Lodge No. 292, for Conferring the Degrees of Masonry on Wilton Beverly Veal, who was duly elected, in accordance with Section 13.110; the degrees to be conferred only under the personal direction of the Grand Lecturer, or of a Master Mason specially deputed by the Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lecturer, or the brother deputed by him, to have ample notice in advance of the dates when the degrees are to be conferred. July 10, 1981, to Glenn R. Weiss, Worshipful Master of Tyro Lodge No. 12, for holding a special communication of Tyro Lodge No. 12 on Saturday evening, August 8, 1981 at the outdoor site on the Lowell E. Bay farm on Highway 8, which place was dedicated for Masonic use by R.W. Bro. C. Nolen Miller in 1978. July 17, 1981, to Robert L. Kerns, Worshipful Master of Weston Lodge No. 53, for holding a special communication of Weston Lodge No. 53 for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft on Saturday evening, August 29, 1981 at the outdoor site on the farm of Wor. Bro. L. R. Vaughn, which place was dedicated for Masonic use by M.W. Past Grand Master Lewis C. Wes Cook. July 29, 1981, to James Hagar, Worshipful Master of Southwest Lodge No. 466, for holding a special communication of Southwest Lodge No. 466 at the outdoor site which has been previously inspected, approved, and dedicated for Masonic use, on Saturday evening, August I, 1981, when the Oklahoma Indian Degree Team of Tulsa, Oklahoma, will confer the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft of a Missouri Lodge, using Oklahoma Ritual. July 31, 1981, to William R. Probst, Worshipful Master of Everton Lodge No. 405, for holding a special communication of Everton Lodge No. 405 for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on Tuesday, August 11, 1981, in the Hall of Washington Lodge No. 87 at Greenfield. August 6, 1981, to Max W. Eggleston, Worshipful Master of Memphis Lodge No. 16, for holding a special communication of Memphis Lodge No. 16 with Greensburg Lodge No. 414 on Saturday morning, August 15, 1981 at the outdoor site in the Kaser Quarry, which place was previously dedicated for Masonic use in June 1976 by R.W. District Deputy Grand Master LeRoy E. Smith, District I. August 6, 1981, to John M. Frederick, Worshipful Master of Greensburg Lodge No. 414, for holding a special communication of Greensburg Lodge No. 414 with Memphis Lodge No. 16 on Saturday morning, August 15, 1981 at the outdoor site in the Kaser Quarry, which place was previously dedicated for Masonic use in June 1976 by R.W. District Deputy Grand Master LeRoy E. Smith, District I. September 9, 1981, to Steve R. Grossman, Worshipful Master of North Star Lodge No. 157, for holding stated and special communications of North Star Lodge No. 157 in the hall of Northwest Lodge No. 358 at Tarkio for such time as may be necessary until North Star Lodge can occupy its own permanent meeting place.


112

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

September 10,1981, tojames E. Spencer, Worshipful Master of Grandview Lodge No. 618, for holding a special communication of Grandview Lodge No. 618 for the purpose of the Conferral of the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Fellow Craft on Saturday, September 19, 1981 at the outdoor site on the Masonic Home property at Bannister Road and Westrdige Road, Kansas City, after the place has been adequately dedicated for Masonic use by R.W. Bro. Walter K. Schneider, Past District Deputy Grand Master, District 59. CONSENTS AND PERMISSIONS

M. W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn granted consent and expressed permission on various propositions and requests pertaining to the activities and the operation of constituent lodges of Missouri, in accordance with the requirements of Grand Lodge Law (Section 15.070, Section 21.100, Section 21.110, etc.) October 3, 1980 for Memphis Lodge No. 16 at Memphis, to make a fraternal visit to George Washington Lodge No. 618 at Donnellson, Iowa, when Memphis Lodge will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft in the hall of George Washington Lodge. using Missouri Ritual. October 8, 1980 to Milton R. Stewart for a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and one of Table Instruction to be convened on Thursday evening, October 30, 1980 at Clayton Masonic Temple - 222 North Brentwood Boulevard, Clayton - sponsored by Mount Moriah Lodge No. 40. October 13, 1980 to Maitland LodR.e No. 112 to consider a waiver ofjurisdiction over Darrell Harvey in favor of Emmanuel Lodge No. 405 at Blanchard, Iowa. December 3, 1980 to Kansas City Lodge No. 220 to receive the petition for the degrees of Floyd Mills Bair, a nonresident of the state of Missouri. December 10, 1980 to Hemple Lodge No. 37 to consider a waiver ofjurisdiction over Entered Apprentice Ronald Wuerfele in favor of Overland Park Lodge No. 436 at Overland Park, Kansas. December 19, 1980 to Swope Park Lodge No. 617 to consider a waiver ofjurisdiction over W. N. Hatten, Jr. in favor of Gardner Lodge No. 65 at Gardner, Kansas. December 29, 1980 to Milton R. Stewart for a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and one of Table Instruction to be convened on Thursday evening,january 29,1981 at Mizpah Masonic Temple - 12030 New Halls Ferry Road, St. Louis County - sponsored by Mizpah Lodge No. 639. january 21,1981 to Raytown Lodge No. 391 to consider a waiver ofjurisdietion over Leonard E. Davis in favor of Kaw Lodge No. 272 at Kansas City, Kansas. january 28, 1981 to Carterville Lodge No. 401 to host Baxter Lodge No. 71 at Baxter Springs, Kansas, for a fraternal visit on the occasion of the Annual George Washington Birthday Celebration on Saturday, February 21, 1981, when Baxter Lodge will confer the Degree of Entered Apprentice on their own duly elected candidate, using Kansas Ritual. january 28, 1981 to Carterville Lodge No. 401 to host Springdale Lodge No. 316 at Springdale, Arkansas, for a fraternal visit on the occasion of the Annual George Washington Birthday Celebration on Saturday, February 21, 1981, when Springdale Lodge will confer the Degree of Fellow Craft on their own proficient Entered Apprentice, using Arkansas Ritual. January 28, 1981 to Carterville Lodge No. 401 to host the Oklahoma Masonic Indian Team for a fraternal visit on the occasion of the Annual George Washington Birthday Celebration on Saturday, February 21, 1981, when the Oklahoma Masonic Indian Degree Team will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft, using Oklahoma Ritual. February 7. 1981 to Meridian Lodge No.2 to host Prospect Lodge No. 714 at Indianapolis. Indiana, for a fraternal visit on Saturday. March 28, 1981, when Prospect


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

113

Lodge will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft, using Indiana Ritual. February 25, 1981 to Ferguson Lodge No. 542 to make a fraternal visit to Franklin Lodge No. 25 at Alton, Illinois, on April 16, 1981, when Ferguson Lodge will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft, using Missouri Ritual. March 2, 1981 to Sheffield Lodge No. 625 to receive the petition for affiliation (re-affiliation) of Bro. Alfred W. Bird, a nonresident of the State of Missouri. March 11, 1981 to Independence Lodge No. 76 to consider the waiver ofjurisdiction over Dorrell Normanelbert Herzog in favor of Freeburg Lodge No. 418 at Freeburg, Illinois. To East Gate Lodge No. 630 to receive the petition for the degrees of Larry Dale Oliver, a nonresident of the state of Missouri. March 20, 1981 to Perseverance Lodge No. 92 to receive the petition for the degrees of Walter H. Cross, a nonresident of the state of Missouri. March 31, 1981 to Algabil Lodge No. 544 to receive the petition for the degrees of Orville Charles Ellis, a nonresident of the state of Missouri, March 31, 1981 to Lamar Lodge No. 292 to receive the petition for the degrees of Mark Harlin Mayo, a nonresident of the state of Missouri. April 8, 1981 to Perryville Lodge No. 670 to receive the petition for affiliation of Bro. Wade Ray, a nonresident of the state of Missouri. April 13, 1981 to Milton R. Stewart to convene a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and one of Table Instruction on Thursday evening, April 30, 1981 at Maplewood Masonic Temple -7468 Manchester, Maplewood - sponsored by Maplewood Lodge No. 566 and Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661. April 22, 1981 to Rushville Lodge No. 238 to consider the waiver ofjurisdiction over Dr. George R. Mesropian in favor of Washington Lodge No.5 at Atchison, Kansas. April 28, 1981 to Mizpah Lodge No. 639 to make a fraternal visit to Pike Lodge No. 121 at Petersburg, Indiana, on Saturday, May 2,1981, when Mizpah Lodge will confer the Degree of Fellow Craft on their own proficient Entered Apprentice, using Missouri Ritual. April 29, 1981 to Blue Springs Lodge No. 337 to consider a waiver ofjurisdiction over Ronald James Ayala in favor of Olathe Lodge No. 19 at Olathe, Kansas. May 13, 1981 to Meridian Lodge No.2 to host Hamilton Lodge No. 664 at Bettendorf, Iowa, for a fraternal visit on Saturday, September 5, 1981, when Hamilton Lodge will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft, using Iowa Ritual. May 20, 1981 to Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 to receive the petition for the degrees of Gordon Virgil Lieffring, a nonresident of the state of Missouri. May 27, 1981 to Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 to consider a waiver ofjurisdiction over Paul James Niedhardt, in favor of Roger E. Sherman Lodge No. 369 at Kansas City, Kansas. June 3, 1981 to America Lodge No. 347 to host Triple Lodge No. 835 at Granite City, Illinois, for a fraternal visit on June 23, 1981, when Triple Lodge will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft, using Illinois Ritual. June 9, 1981 to Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 to consider a waiver of jurisdiction over Rex Edward Tannahill in favor of Tyrian Lodge No. 333 at Springfield, Illinois. June 15, 1981 to George Washington Lodge No.9 to attend the Tri-State Reunion to be hosted by Grand View Lodge No. 1112 at Peoria Heights, Illinois, on Saturday, October 3, 1981. June 19, 1981 to Northeast Lodge No. 643 to consider a waiver ofjurisdiction over Dr. Veto A. Crabtree in favor of Chicago Lodge No. 437 at Skokie, Illinois. June 22, 1981 to Jefferson Lodge No. 43 to convene a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and one of Table Instruction on Thursday Evening, September 24, 1981 at theJefferson City Masonic Temple - 603 Ellis Boulevard, Jefferson City. July 10, 1981 to Raytown Lodge No. 391 to receive the petition for affiliation of Bro. Mitchell A. Sims, a nonresident of the state of Missouri.


114

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

July 10, 1981 to Milton R. Stewart to convene a Lodge of Entered Apprentices and one of Table Instruction on Thursday evening, July 30, 1981, at Bridgeton Masonic Temple - 8866 St. Charles Rock Road, St. John, St. Louis County - sponsored by Wellston Chapter No. 138, Royal Arch Masons. July 29, 1981 for Southwest Lodge No. 466 at Southwest City, Missouri, to host the Oklahoma Indian Degree Team for a fraternal visit on Saturday evening, August I, 1981, when the Oklahoma Indian Degree Team will confer the Degree of Master Mason on a proficient Missouri Fellow Craft, using Oklahoma Ritual. September I, 1981 to Hiram Lodge No. 362 at Kahoka, to consider a waiver of jurisdiction over Roger Wayne Gaston in favor of Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 27 at Farmington, Iowa. September 9, 1981 for Hermon Lodge No. 187 at Liberal, to consider a waiver of jurisdiction over William B. Thompson in favor of Pittsburg Lodge No. 187 at Pittsburg, Kansas. September 9, 1981, with the concurrence of R.W. Deputy Grand Master Wm.J. Hill, for America Lodge No. 347 at St. Louis, to make a fraternal visit to Triple Lodge No. 835 at Granite City, Illinois, on Wednesday, October 14, 1981, when America Lodge will confer the Degree of Master Mason on their own proficient Fellow Craft in the hall of Triple Lodge No. 835, using Missouri Ritual. FIFTY-YEAR BUTTON PRESENTATIONS

The Grand Lodge and the Constituent Lodges of Missouri gave honor and extended recognition to 491 Veteran Brothers with the award of the 50-Year Button during the Year 1980-1981. M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn approved the presentation of the Grand Lodge of Missouri 50-Year Button to each brother who attained the distinguished status of Fifty-Year Master Mason by faithful interest in the well-being of our Brotherhood as a member in good-standing for 50 years. FIFTY-YEAR BUTTONS PRESENTED JULY I, 1980 - JUNE 30, 1981 Acacia Lodge No. 602 - Frank D. Johnson Adair Lodge No. 366 - Everett R. Elsea, Loren A. Meiners, Aaron E. Miller Advance Lodge No. 590 - Lloyd E. Revelle, William Pixley Agency Lodge No. 10 - John F. Cattron, Vernon M. Ernst Algabil Lodge No. 544 - Russell Frederick DeGreeff, Edward John Belz, Walter C. Ploeser America Lodge No. 347 - Joseph A. Frimel, Jr., Charles F. Hufendick Anchor Lodge No. 443 - Herman Henry Luetzow, Gustave C. Schuler Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356 - Glen Murl Powell, Odus Powell, Harold O. Powell, Oscar Tisdel Apollo Lodge No. 529 - Clarence William Rosenberger Athens Lodge No. 127 - Raymond C. Lykins Aurora Lodge No. 267 - F. .1. McClendon Ava Lodge No. 26 - Ernie Gentry Barnes Lodge No. 116 - Orville.J. Lashbrook Beacon Lodge No.3 - Henry E. Gronemann, William H. Stuehmeyer, Ernest 1.. Wylie, George T. Koch Belgrade Lodge No. 632 - Hartie William Dickey Belton Lodge No. 450 - Frank Harrelson Scott Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642 - Edwin L. Stamm, Herman Charles Bamberger Bethel Lodge No. 537 - George W. Baltzer Billings Lodge No. 379 - Paul M. Bolley, Harry A. Cope Blue Springs Lodge No. 337 - Thomas G. Portwood Bogard Lodge No. 101 - Frank M. Brunscher


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

115

Bolivar Lodge No. 195 - James Oliver Lowery Bonhomme Lodge No. 45 - Fred William Broemmelsick Branson Lodge No. 587 - Charles E. Close Breckenridge Lodge No. 334 - A. B. Chapman, Cecil R. Moore Brentwood Lodge No. 616 - Floyd C. Larsen, John L. Smallwood Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 - H. Eugene Handkins, Thomas H. Roussin Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 - Homer J. Pellham, Leonard Wilcox, H. Marshall Jones Cache Lodge No. 416 - Henry Herman Kalverkamp, Fred Anton Nagel, Clarence Alford Geiger Cainsville Lodge No. 328 - Loren R. Thompson, David P. Max California Lodge No. 183 - Leonard L. Birdsong, Hartley Dedrick Sappington, Carl Davis Chambers Callao Lodge No. 38 - George William Pate Cambridge Lodge No. 63 - Harold B. Stephens Carl Junction Lodge No. 549 - Hays W. Shields Carteroille Lodge No. 401 - Harry Albert Simon Carthage Lodge No. 197 - Hugo H. Brakhage, Virgil T. Oldham, Alvin Osie Lindsey, Kenna Florien Baldridge Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 - William R. White, Harold S. Jones Charity Lodge No. 331 - Joseph A. Cohen, Orrin B. Boyer, Morton W. Ellershaw,James G. Ream Chilhowee Lodge No. 487 - Dale Albert Kellett Christian Lodge No. 392 - Millard Steinhauser Campbell, Charles Edward Morris Clarksdale Lodge No. 559 - George Murray Burns, Chester Isaacs Clayton Lodge No. 601 - Jacob J. Schacht, Jules Nickles Viner, Harry Lee Woodson, Jr. Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 - Paul Kram, Sam Kram, Charles Plax Clinton Lodge No. 548 - John C. Ham Cold Spring Lodge No. 274 - Lloyd C. Graham, John Russell Way Compass Lodge No. 120 - Ralph T. Hauetter, Jesse Leroy Borden Continental Lodge No. 454 - Freeman R. Schlup, Clarence G. Waller Cooper Lodge No. 36 - Herschel Hathaway Varney, Charles Frederick Hirlinger Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 - Samuel H. Bierman, Samuel David Soule, Loren Fay Bridges Country Club Lodge No. 656 - Harold H. Bell Craft Lodge No. 287 - Jesse Wilbur Denniston Craig Lodge No. 606 - Thomas Alfred Ward, Jr. Cunningham Lodge No. 525 - Clark Ernest McKee, Earnest E. Moffitt Decatur Lodge No. 400 - Lawrence E. Eicher, Harold Francis Morris, Meredith Garten DeSoto Lodge No. 119 - Oren E. Shaw, James Allen Bay Easter Lodge No. 575 - George Morgan East Gate Lodge No. 630 - Tas Manley Warren, Alba Melton Upp, Donald Kinablade Shaffer, Lester Laurance Troxel, William P. Kistler, William Henry Remy Eldorado Lodge No. 318 - Elvia Luther Dietrich Elvins Lodge No. 599 - Edward Thomas Houk, Orner Nash Equality Lodge No. 497 - Noah Clarence Hudgens Euclid Lodge No. 505 - Donald F. Gerken, John H. Fairbanks, Gus Luecke, Louis Rose Levy Evergreen Lodge No. 27 - Loren W. Olmstead Everton Lodge No. 405 - Clyde Wayne Wills Excelsior Lodge No. 441 - John I. Ellis, H. Harold Platt Fair Play Lodge No. 44 - Coy E. Jones Fellowship Lodge No. 345 - Alton Lemuel Jones, Glenn G. Brewer, Stanford Leffen, Robert Paul Eberlein, Quintus Edgar Boyd, Edward S. Larson, William Eugene Lynn Fenton Lodge No. 281 - Arthur F. Denkmann Ferguson Lodge No. 542 - Roy Arthur Held Fidelity Lodge No. 339 - Elbert Ray Noland


116

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Florida Lodge No. 23 - Glen Mathews Forest Park Lodge No. 578 - Frederick William Edward Best Forsythe Lodge No. 453 - John Chester Arnold, Clifford Wood Foster Lodge No. 554 - William R. Wolf Four Mile Lodge No. 212 - Henry A. Taylor Friend Lodge No. 352 - Robert S. Crenshaw Friendship Lodge No. 89 - Chauncey R. McCrary, Clyde O. Alexander Fulton Lodge No. 48 - George Loyd McPherson, Clarence E. Mirts Gallatin Lodge No. 106 - Sam T. Evans Gardenville Lodge No. 655 - George Philip Utter, Engelbert Knaus Gate City Lodge No. 522 - Harley E. Cambers Gate ofthe Temple Lodge No. 422 - Archie Harold Chastain,John Bennett Klinger,James Frederick Slentz, Hearl J. Kidd, Floyd Allen Yates Good Hope Lodge No. 218 - Robert William Milton Ziegler, Albert John Kreutzer, George Earl Younger, Elmer Henry Blase, AlvinJoseph Sackberger, Raymond Lotz Schmidt, Herman Frederick Troske, Walter Louis Kaltwasser, Clarence Walter Missler Gorin Lodge No. 72 - Joseph W. Newman Gower Lodge No. 397 - Raymond L. Moore Grain Valley Lodge No. 644 - Clyde Austin Fristoe Grandin Lodge No. 579 - Earl Cecil Kerby, Walter Ernest Mezger Greenville Lodge No. 107 - Paul H. Sturgeon, Calvin Lee Tune, James Everett Ives Hallsville Lodge No. 336 - Joseph Creed Edwards Hamilton Lodge No. 224 - Cecil A. Neal, John Paul Jones Harmony Lodge No. 499 - Chester George Senf Hebron Lodge No. 354 - Orval Glenn Hocker Henderson Lodge No. 477 - Charles W. Pursley Hermann Lodge No. 123 - Amos C. Schneider, Victor Louis Schindler Hermitage Lodge No. 288 - David Ray Owsley, Raymond F. Perry, H. Owen Schnitker, Marion B. Irland Hermon Lodge No. 187 - Thurlow L. Dugan Heroine Lodge No. 104 - Samuel Veta, Kenneth A. Davis, Joseph Bono, Irving Baum, Max Koppel Holden Lodge No. 262 - Ralph W. Cheatham, Clyde M. Jones Hunnewell Lodge No. 415 - Harry R. Moore, Oren B. Couch, Jesse W. Ewing Huntsville Lodge No. 30 - Claude L. Dale, Willard T. Jackson Iberia Lodge No. 410 - Earl Conner Independence Lodge No. 76 - Norman S. Walker, Elmer E. Hopkins, Ray Lowell Maul Irondale Lodge No. 143 - Leo Markotay, Martin R. McCleese Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 - Donald B. Eyer, Cecil Ross Brinton, Charles C. Fowler, Clinton Richard Krimminger, Carl Ernest Swanson, Cecil Marion Sexson, James A. Criswell, Ralph Evans McCammon Jamesport Lodge No. 564 - Walter K. Dinwiddie Jasper Lodge No. 398 - Glen A. Carter Jefferson Lodge No. 43 - Boyd W. Caplinger, Vaughn N. Enslow, Cleo Keane, Charles W. Moore, James Lee Harrison, Harold Warren Holliway, Lee Jordan, Jr., Edwin Burr Shoop, Presley Guy Parrish, Chester A. Finney, Melvin Garnett Gardner, James T. Elliott Jennings Lodge No. 640 - Arthur William Jacobsmeyer, Martin Van Buren Lafferty Joachim Lodge No. 164 - Douglas C. Fraser, Willis Ware Marsden Joplin Lodge No. 335 - Jack Solomon, Lee R. Dagley, Manasseh Harold Harutun Kansas City Lodge No. 220 - Carl I. Kraitchman, Abe W. Gray, Harry L. Schindel Kearney L.odge No. 311 - J. Homer Weakley, W. Reynolds Klepper King Hill Lodge No. 376 - Joseph Raymond Choun, Leo W. Fletcher, Jack Robert Barnett


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

117

Kirksville Lodge No. 105 - Archie D. Buress, Eddie Kirby, Bernie L. Stutler, Royal G. Payton Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 - George Maurice Abbott, Charles Monville Schwarz, Jack S. Eiseman, Claude Robert Chamberlain, Franklin George Riemeier, Nelson Christian Kapfer, Fred Wendell Baker Laclede Lodge No. 83 - Edwin H. Draper, Virgil Lee Wood Lamar Lodge No. 292 - Julius Ernest Jones Lambskin Lodge No. 460 - Arthur E. Bush, William Wallace Gill, Edward W. Cordes La Plata Lodge No. 237 - Raymond G. Whaley, Leon Edward Easley La Russell Lodge No. 592 - Don H. Boyd Lexington Lodge No. 149 - Roy B. Nix Lincoln Lodge No. 138 - Clark J. Lentz, Charles W. Lentz Lodge of Light No. 257 - Victor C. McCoy McDonald Lodge No. 324 - Arthur Allen Hartley, Tom Sheldon Tyson, Rochester Campbell Colgan, Laird Burton Jeffers, Sr. Macks Creek LodKe No. 433 - Wayne W. Osborn Magnolia Lodge No. 626 - Edward A. Zirkel, Rufus I. Valentine Maplewood Lodge No. 566 - William Vincent Rabenberg, Charles Franklin Attebery,Jr., John Henry Reitz Marceline Lodge No. 481 - Sylvan G. McDonald Marcus Lodge No. 110 - Henry Alexander Ballew, Louie Wilkerson Memphis Lodge No. 16- William Thomas Ware, Burton E. Mankopf, Roscoe Linn Terry, William Charles Fender, Kermit Rose Mendon Lodge No. 628 - Loyd Vernon Kennedy, Edwin J. Brown Meridian Lodge No.2 - Arthur A. Bindbeutel, John O. McDonald, George R. Reed Missouri-Commonwealth Lodge No.1 - Herman Willer, Edward Otto Proske Moberly Lodge No. 344-John P. McGinnis, William L. Davis, George E. Evans, Charles D. Embree, Sr. Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158 - Marcus H. Blackwell Mount Hope Lodge No. 476 - James Roger Gammon, Mordie A. Webb Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 - Edwin George Ruhl, Reinhold G. Buell, Edward H. Ruthsatz Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439 - Clyde C. Byrd Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 99 - Francis M. Gilkerson Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 - Cordes Joseph Schwenk, Claude Raymond Davis, Elmer Earl Carlton, Floyd Orville Sooy Naphtali Lodge No. 25 - Guy Wilcott Naylor Lodge No. 568 - Claude Moses Neosho Lodge No. 247 - Patrick D. Smith, Robert Hoffman North New Bloomfield Lodge No. 60 - Ralph Sylvester Ward New Madrid Lodge No. 429 - Andrew C. Hill Nodaway Lodge No. 470 - Harold Sawyers, Robert Godsey, Charles Kalstrup, Hugh K. Graham Northeast Lodge No. 643 - John 1. Getz North Star Lodge No. 157 - Frank L. Howell, Donald Emmett Douglas Northwest Lodge No. 358 - Loyd E. Hills Norwood Lodge No. 622 - Marion Jesse Huffman Orient Lodge No. 546 - John Paul Dallam, Ernest Walter Letzig, Martin Van Buren Stone, Charles Evans Arnold, George Franklin Bryant, John William Benton, Lee Francois Van Deusen, Sam G. Williams, Dudley Jahlett Roe, Richard Eugene Stevenson, Walter August Anderson, Herman Rudolph Scheerer, Harold Denmond Smalley Owensville Lodge No. 624 - John Eugene Fambrough, Homer H. Fuller, George H. Rehmert Palestine Lodge No. 241 - Geor~e 1. Schuster


118

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Parrott Lodge No. 308 - J. M. Isaacs, Cecil Trevalyn Pilcher, George W. Wyatt Paulville Lodge No. 319 - George V. Burnett Perseverance Lodge No. 92 - William Frederick West, Russell J. Rowe Phoenix Lodge No. 136 - Willie Marvin Griffith Pilgrim Lodge No. 652 -John F. Saul, William Matthew Scanlan, Charles William Pfeiffer Plato Lodge No. 469 - Paul Foster, Newton E. Hancock Point Pleasant Lodge No. 176 - Samuel Bentley Pikey Polar Star Lodge No. 79 - Lawrence Dean, Langdale Winfrey, Louis Morrison Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 - Arthur F. Osseck Prairie Home Lodge No. 503 - August C. Langendoerfer Pride of the West Lodge No. 179 - Max Weber Progress Lodge No. 657 - Winfred Ernest Blevins Purity Lodge No. 658 - Harry Julius Moeller, Carl Powitzky, Walter Eugene Wessler Pyramid Lodge No. 180 - Oliver Henry Wagschal Pythagoras Lodge No. 383 - Earle E. Stubblefield, Jack Gibbons, George M. Joslin Raytown Lodge No. 391 - Alva H. Ellison Rich Hill Lodge No. 479 - Marion Francis Hall Richmond Lodge No. 57 - Marvin Holsinger Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 - A. Bernhart Youngberg, Paul Gilbert Williams Rockhill Lodge No. 663 - Morris D. Poulin Rolla Lodge No. 213 - Floyd Stanley Macklin, Warren Heilig, Vernon A. C. Gevecker, Howard T. Gibbons, Raymond E. Colvin Rushville Lodge No. 238 - Earl N. Irwin Russellville Lodge No. 90 - Fred H. Garnett Rutledge Lodge No. 572 - Troy R. Smith St. Clair Lodge No. 273 - Roy Cecil Garrett St. James Lodge No. 230 - Clarence M. O'Sullivan, Thomas Theodore Bohon, John Russell Williams St.John's Lodge No. 28 - Herbert Franklin Stiver, George Roland Gregory, George Lee Johnson St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 - Randall A. Johnson, Harold C. Fisher, Freelon K. Hadley, George K. Heckel, Sr. St. Louis Lodge No. 20 - Morris Kahlmon, Paul Sylvester Wolf, Ben Kaplan, David Pasternak, Stanley D. Victor, Samuel M. Schneider Salem Lodge No. 225 - Victor Hugo Bircher, John Calvin Bressie, James R. O'Brien, Perry Denton Saline Lodge No. 226 - William H. Barber Samaritan Lodge No. 424 - Robert Julius Holecamp Sarcoxie Lodge No. 293 - Ned Calvin Barkley, James Allen Wild, Willard M. Scroggs Savannah Lodge No. 71 - Emmett Turner Sedalia Lodge No. 236 - John H. Marr, William Leslie Reed, Cecil Byron Gates, U. L. Howerton Senath Lodge No. 513 - Orville L. Hornbeck Shaveh Lodge No. 646 - Edward John Riekenberg, Eugene Robert Foskett Shekinah Lodge No. 256 - John V. DeGeare, Howard C. Litton Shelbina Lodge No. 228 - Howard E. Turney Sikeston Lodge No. 310 - Lewey C. Nealy Solomon Lodge No. 271 - Martin J. Whittleton Stella Lodge No. 538 - Silas Lee Weems Stockton Lodge No. 283 - Clinton N. Hall, Clifford Hill Gordon Swope Park Lodge No. 617 - Monroe Winn, Paul B. Brumley, Earl C. White, Julius Freelander, John Farrell Amos Texas Lodge No. 177 - Edward A. Kyser Tipton Lodge No. 56 - Roger E. Kirchner Trenton Lodge No. 111 - Ray A. Davis, T. O. Brassfield, Victor Eugene German


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

119

Triangle Lodge No. 638 - Philip C. Kopitsky, Hilbert G. Schoeninger, Arch R. King Trilumina Lodge No. 205 - William Catron Gordon, jr., Eugene T. Durrett, David G. Durrett, Donald Clayton Bates, Willard P. Heffron Trinity Lodge No. 641 - Homer A. Buckert, Ben Brant Soffer, Manual Louis Chozen, john A. Kaperonis, Gustav Adolph Vittert, Ben Goldring, Nathan Goldberg, Steve E. Manglis Troy Lodge No. 34 - William Penn Tuscan Lodge No. 360 - Carl F. Gast, Theodore Henry Becker, Oscar A. Zahner Tyro Lodge No. 12 - john Thomas Akers, john Davidson Rhodes Union Lodge No. 593 - Owen Adolph Frick United Lodge No.5 - Samuel Arthur Wood, john H. Fairman, Russell Lee Wilcox,jesse E. Smith, Claude S. Emery, Sherman R. Hammack, Arthur Leo Priester, Lorna Shelton Abbott, Harry Lee Suttle University Lodge No. 649 - William Eugene Walker Valley Lodge No. 413 - Willard Niles Hartman, William lIes Hartman Vincil Lodge No. 62 - Doak McKee Wallace Lodge No. 456 - Arthur G. Wolfe Warrenton Lodge No. 609 - Horace Kent Rowland, Arthur Clyce, Ralph M. Engel Waverly Lodge No. 61 - Theodore H. Tussey Wayne Lodge No. 526 - Earnest E. Evans, james Hughes Webster Lodge No. 98 - Howard R. Edmonds Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 - Ralph W. Mariott Wellington Lodge No. 22 - Oscar Crockett Wellston Lodge No. 613 - Sylvester.J. Niehaus, George E. Ward, Albert Henry Van Gels Western Star Lodge No. 15 - George Leonard Brown Weston Lodge No. 53 - john Irving Stelzer Westport Lodge No. 340 - Harry Carlson Dille, Fred H. Sorensen, Glenn Herbert Songer Windsor Lodge No. 29 - joseph S. Kidwell Zalma Lodge No. 545 - Luther jackson Zeredatha Lodge No. 189 - Alfred W. Brown, Ivor F. Brown,john A. Kirkpatrick, Wiley Earl Orr, Floyd F. Fisher CERTIFICATES AND CARDS FOR RITUAL PROFICIE!':CY

Certificates and cards were written for authorized instructors in the Proficiency or Candidates' Lectures (Subdivision I); cards were written for authorized instructors (Subdivision II); and cards were written for authorized instructors (Subdivision III). The certificates and cards were issued in accordance with the Certificate Plan of the Grand Lodge Committee on Ritual, as submitted with the Reports of the Examining Committees. Miss Lori J. Harris, with Mrs. Calvin M. Price, of the Grand Lodge Office Staff kept all the records of the Reports of Examining Committees, prepared quarterly reports of the certificates and cards issued for the Chairman and Members of the Ritual Committee, and prepared the cumulative report for the year 1980-81. The names of the Master Masons whose applications were approved during the year July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981 are included in the Report of the Committee on Ritual. SL'BDIVISIO['o.; I

Originals First Renewals (A) Second Renewals (B) Third Renewals (C) Fourth Renewals (D) Fifth Renewals (E) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

98 57 52 26 14 15

Sixth Renewals (F) 13 Seventh Renewals (G) . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 9 Eighth Renewals (1-1) to Ninth Renewals (I) 7 Tenth Renewals (j) 2 Eleventh Renewals (K) I


120

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SCBDIVISIOl\; II -

Originals ., " First Renewals (A) Second Renewals (B) Third Renewals (C) Fourth Renewals (D) Fifth Renewals (E) Sixth Renewals (F) Seventh Renewals (G) Eighth Renewals (H) Ninth Renewals (I) Tenth Renewals Eleventh Renewals (K)

m

SCBDIVISIO:-; II -

PART

I

" .. 22 " 18 , 11 ,'. 8 2 , , . .. 9 7 , , .. " 0 ,....... 1 ,........... 0 2 ,...... 1

,

PART

2

Originals 23 First Renewals (A) . , , " 17 Second Renewals (B) 11 Third Renewals (C) 8 Fourth Renewals (D) 1 Fifth Renewals (E) . , . , , , . , . . . . . . . .. 6 Sixth Renewals (F) 4

Seventh Renewals (G) Eighth Renewals (H) Ninth Renewals (1) Tenth Renewals Eleventh Renewals (K) ,

m

SlJBDIVlSIO]lo; 11 -

,

,

. .

,,

.

PART

3 1

.

o

.

1

I

3

16 Originals First Renewals (A) , , , . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 15 Second Renewals (B) ,' 20 Third Renewals (C) 8 Fourth Renewals (D) 5 Fifth Renewals (E) , . . . . . . . . . .. 4 Sixth Renewals (F) """...... 3 Seventh Renewals (G) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Eighth Renewals (H) 0 Ninth Renewals (1) 0 Tenth Renewals 1 Eleventh Renewals (K) ,'........... I

m

Sl'BDIVlSIO:-; III

Originals

, , , , , .. 51

The Grand Secretary wrote the 608 certificates and cards for Subdivision I, the 231 cards for Subdivision II, and the 51 "silver" cards for Subdivision III. AREA MEETINGS -

SPRING

1981

M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn conducted 17 AREA MEETINGS for lodge officers during the months ofJanuary, February, March. Invitations and informational notices about the meetings were sent to: Four officers of each constituent lodge, mailed in care of the lodge Secretaries (Worshipful Master, Senior Warden,Junior Warden, Secretary), Past Grand Masters, Grand Lodge Officers, Past Grand Treasurer, Past Grand Secretary, Past Grand Lecturer. District Deputy Grand Masters, District Deputy Grand Lecturers, Chairmen and Members of Grand Lodg-e committees. The Grand Lodge sincerely appreciates every kind attention shown by the officers and members of the lodges and temple associations, in whose halls the AREA MEETINGS were held, and by those who prepared and served the "Good Men's Meals" - an essential part of every successful Masonic gathering. As Grand Secretary, I am grateful to the District Deputy Grand Masters who collected the information on attendance from the lodges so that guarantees might be made for the meals and who registered the officers of the lodges of their respective districts so that the attendance facts might be calculated. Rolla - Friday Evening, January 23 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters ", District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 2 - Flat River - Saturday Evening, January 23 Officers Present Area 1 -

".,.......

77 4

--..1 84 II 77

(80%)


1981

121

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 3 - Carthage - Friday Evening, January 30 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 4 - Maryville - Saturday Evening, January 31 (Snowstorm) Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 5 - Clinton - Friday Evening, February 13 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 6 - St. Louis - Saturday Evening, February 14 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 7 - West Plains - Friday Evening, February 20 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 8 - Palmyra - Saturday Evening, February 21 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 9 - St. Joseph - Friday Evening, February 27 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 10 - Independence - Saturday Evening, February 28 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present

. 2 . _1 . 80 . II . 130 . 4 . --2 . 139 . 13

(83.3%)

(81.76%)

. 49* . 3* . ---2* . 55 (56.1%) . 5 . 92 . 4 . --1 . 100 . 6 . 191 . 6 . --2 . 202 . 14 . 81 . 3 . ~ . 86 . 8 . 59 . 3 . ---2 . 65 . II . 95 . 3 . ---2 . 101 . 19 . 144 . 4 . -.2 . 153 . 8

(75.8%)

(70.6%)

(70.5%)

(66.33%)

(80%)

(87.93%)


122

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Area 11 -

Springfield - Thursday Evening, March 5 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 12 - Boonville - Friday Evening, March 6 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 13 - Chillicothe - Saturday Evening, March 7 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 14 - Mexico - Friday Evening, March 20 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 15 - Kirksville - Saturday Evening, March 21 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 16 - Carrollton - Friday Evening, March 27 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present Area 17 - Sikeston - Saturday Evening, March 28 Officers Present District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Total Area Attendance Grand Lodge Officers and Others Present

* Including

. 94 3 . . 3 . 100 . 13 91 4

. . . . .

-.1

. . . . .

85 5 4 94 9

99 14

. 92 4 . . ~ . 98 . 10 . 95 4 . 3 . . 102 . 9 . . . . .

(77%)

(81.8%)

(71.76%)

(83%)

(66%)

73

3

--2 79 8

. 119 4 . . ~ . 128 . II

(78%)

(70.3%)

Makeups.

MISSOURI LODGES Al'D CANDIDATES YOUNGER THAN

21

YEARS OF AGE

The lodges of Missouri submitted a supplemental report with the 1981 Annual Return and provided information on the number of candidates between the ages of 18 and 21 elected; the number initiated; the number passed; the number raised; the number who proved proficiency in the Third Degree. The figures given in the supplemental report were accepted as valid; no effort was made to authenticate the data entered in the supplemental report by a


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

123

comparison with the facts of dates of birth written on page 2 of the Annual Return. Number of petitioners between the ages of 18 and Number of candidates between the ages of 18 and Number of candidates between the ages of 18 and Number of candidates between the ages of 18 and Number of candidates between the ages of 18 and Number of Master Masons between the ages of 18 proficiency in the Third Degree

21 21 "Elected" 21 "Initiated" 21 "Passed" 21 "Raised" and 21 who proved

151 147 143 88 69 55

GRAND LODGE MONEY

General Fund -

The Commerce Bank of St. Joseph and The First National Bank of Kansas City

An Automatic Transfer from Savings (ATS) account with its companion checking account was opened with The First National Bank of Kansas City on November 10, 1981. The General Fund account at The Commerce Bank of St. Joseph was closed on April 15, 1981, with the transfer of the balance to The First National Bank of Kansas City. Deposits: The payments of constituent lodges of the "Amount Due Grand Lodge" per the Annual Returns Interest income on investments Receipts from sales of publications of Committee on Masonic Education Miscellaneous receipts Withdrawals: The payments to the Masonic Home of Missouri and the George Washington National Masonic Memorial Association on the fees on initiations, to the Masonic Home of Missouri on per capita, and to the Masonic Service Association ofthe United States on the direct appropriations of the Grand Lodge The payments on the costs of printing and distributing The Freemason Magazine The deposits to the Imprest Account by transfer of funds as the reimbursement for authorized disbursements Other expenditures on budget and special authorizations Imprest Account -

The Exchange National Bank of Jefferson City

Deposits: Reimbursements by transfer of funds from the General Fund for authorized disbur~ements previously made Withdrawals: The payments of the costs relative to the operation of the Grand Lodge as provided by the approved budget Revolving Account -

The Exchange National Bank of Jefferson City

Deposits: Receipts for the sales of books, forms, publications, supplies of the Grand Lodge, the annual dues receipts cards, District Deputy Grand Master Aprons, District Deputy Grand Lecturer Aprons, Past District Deputy


124

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Grand Master and Past District Deputy Grand Lecturer Silver Lapel Pins Miscellaneous receipts The Freemason Account -

The Exchange National Bank of Jefferson City

Deposits: The remittances on the subscriptions of interested persons Withdrawals: Payments to' the General Fund of the Grand Lodge for each issue of the magazine at the rate of 25 cents per subscription Mileage and Per Diem Account - The Exchange National Bank ofJefferson City

Deposits: Transfer of funds from the General Fund as provided by the approved budget Withdrawals: Payments of mileage and per diem on attendance at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge as prescribed by Grand Lodge Law The records of receipts and disbursements have been submitted to the Auditor for examination. The Report of the Auditor verifies the accounts and records. Grand Lodge Officers and members of the Grand Lodge Committee on Ways and Means received monthly budget reports and regular reports on the Imprest Account, the Revolving Account, and The Freemason Account. DISTRIBUTION OF

1980

"CUMULATIVE AI':I':UAL POCKET PART"

The 1980 "Cumulative Annual Pocket Part" was mailed out as follows: 1. Four (4) copies of each chartered lodge for the use of the officers and members, addressed in care of the lodge Secretary. 2. Copies to each official of the Grand Lodge: Grand Lodge Officers, Past Grand Masters, Past Grand Treasurer, Past Grand Secretary, Past Grand Lecturer, District Deputy Grand Masters, District Deputy Grand Lecturers, Chairmen and Members of Grand Lodge committees. 3. Copies to individual brother Master Masons who own personal copies of the 1977 Edition of the Constitution and By-Laws - 1958, provided names and current addresses were on record in the "Pocket Part Card File." 4. Copies to other Grand Lodges and to organizations of The Masonic Family of Missouri. CONFERENCE OF GRAND SECRETARIES IN I':ORTH AMERICA

The Fifty-Third Conference of Grand Secretaries was held at Orlando, Florida, in February, in conjunction with the Conference of Grand Masters and the Annual Meetings of the Masonic Service Association of the United States and the George Washington National Masonic Memorial Association. The agenda of the Conference of Grand Secretaries included the following subjects, supplemented by discussion of each: Life Membership Concordant Bodies Grand Lodge Expenses, especially Grand Masters Masonic Charities and Masonic Homes


1981

125

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

M.W. Grand Master]. Edward Blinn and R.W. Deputy Grand Master Wm.]. Hill were my guests at the Annual Grand Secretaries' Dinner. Other Missourians present were: S.G.I.G. Walter C. Ploeser, M.1. Compo George R.Johnson, Imperial Potentate F. T. H'Doubler. DISTRIBUTIOl':S DURIl':G GRAl':D LODGE YEAR

1980-81

I. Mileage and per diem checks for attendance at the 159th Annual Communication to 22 Grand Lodge Officials and to 80 lodge representatives addressed to lodge Secretaries (Sunday, October 5, 1980). 2. Packets to all lodges and to all on the official mailing list. Contents: Propositions ADOPTED at 159th Annual Communication; propositions REJECTED at 159th Annual Communication; proposed Amendments of Constitution presented at 159th Annual Communication to lie over for action at 160th Annual Communication; proposed amendments of ByLaws presented at 159th Annual Communication to lie over for action at 160th Annual Communication; rosters with names, addresses, telephone numbers of Grand Lodge Officers, Past Grand Masters and Past Grand Officers, District Deputy Grand Masters, District Deputy Grand Lecturers, Committee Members, Masonic Home of Missouri, Missouri Lodge of Research; Schedule of AREA MEETINGS of lodge officers - Spring 1981; Masonic Home of Missouri; Educational and Entertainment Programs - Committee on Masonic Education; The Freemason Magazine; Grand Lodge Achievement Award - Standards and Application; STANDING RESOLUTION: "Charitable Contributions" and model of a lodge by-law; A Guide for Officers and Committee Members; Order Form - "List of Lodges (Masonic) 1981." 3. Written notice to Worshipful Master and Secretary of each lodge that lacked representation at the 159th Annual Communication (September 1980), as set forth in Section 7.230(b): November 10, 1980andAugust 15, 1981. 4. In re proposed Amendment of Constitution of Grand Lodge: Article III, Section 2, and Article III, Section 4, with instructions in compliance with Article V, Section 2, with prepared BLUE and PI N K sheets for the reports of proceedings had by lodges. The distribution was made onJanuary 15, 1981 in accordance with the Resolution presented at the 159th Annual Communication. The correspondence was written and mailed to Worshipful Masters of all Missouri lodges, with copies to lodge Secretaries and to all on the official mailing list. 5. In re lodge APPROVAL (or DISAPPROVAL) for Grand Lodge Office to authorize MASONIC FUNERAL SERVICES and lodge DECISION on "CHARITABLE MEMORIAL" or "FLORAL MEMORIAL." 6. Notification to lodges of the 30th Masonic District on the appointment of R.W. Bro. Leman Shepherd as the District Deputh Grand Master for the unexpired term 1980-81. 7. Notification to lodges of the 28th Masonic District on the appointment of R.W. Bro. Calvin D. Schroff as the District Deputy Grand Lecturer for the unexpired term 1980-81. 8. In re recognition of GRANDE LODGE REGULIERE DE BELGIQUE


126

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

15.

16. 17. 18.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

(Regular Grand Lodge of Belgium) and GRAND LODGE OF URUGUAY. EDICT of M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn in re Honorary Membership ofWor. Bro. Harry Carr in the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri. The notice and the invitation for AREA MEETINGS - spring 1981 to four officers of each lodge (Worshipful Master, Senior Warden, Junior Warden, Secretary) and to all on the official mailing list. Announcement of new educational and entertainment program - the film "Symbol of Pride." FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT about 160th Annual Communication to be held at Springfield in September 1981, with "Housing Request" sheets to all lodges and to all on official mailing list. COMPUTER PRINT OF MASTER MASONS - ADDRESSES, with cover letter and instructions: To all lodges addressed in care of lodge Secretaries. Worshipful Masters received cover letter and instructions. DUPLICATE BLANKS OF 1981 ANNUAL RETURN, with sheets of instructions: To all lodges onJune 15, 1981, addressed in care of lodge Secretaries. Worshipful Masters, District Deputy Grand Masters, District Deputy Grand Lecturers received appropriate cover letter and instruction sheets. In re FEES FOR DEGREES (Section 10.010) and GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL FEE (Section 1O.030(bÂťEffective July 1, 1981, per action of Grand Lodge at 159th Annual Communication. To WORSHIPFUL MASTER, SENIOR WARDEN,JUNIOR WARDEN of each chartered lodge on deputation of PROXY. SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT about 160th Annual Communication: To all lodges, addressed in care of lodge Secretaries, and to all on the official mailing list. MAILING ADDRESS INFORMATION for correspondence written to R.W. Deputy Grand Master Wm. J. Hill. MISCELLANIES

1. The form "Report of Installation of Officers" was sent to each lodge at the beginning of the month when election of officers is held, per the Lodge By-Laws. The report is the notification in compliance with Section 8.130. "Machine" copies of Installation Reports were sent to the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master, the Grand Lecturer, the District Deputy Grand Masters, the District Deputy Grand Lecturers. 2. The booklet "Planning for the East" was sent to the Senior Warden of each lodge per the information of name and address entered in the "Report of Installation of Officers." The booklet is the publication of the Grand Lodge Committee on Masonic Education. 3. The certificates of the Grand Lodge ACHIEVEMENT AWARD for the Worshipful Master and for the lodge were written by the Grand Secretary - 102 small certificates for Worshipful Masters and 102 large certificates for the lodges - in accordance with the applications approved by the respective District Deputy Grand Masters and the Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Education.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

127

4. The Grand Secretary attended and participated in the two Deputy Conferences held in October at St. Charles and Independence, the Specific Communications of the Grand Lodge for Ceremonies of Laying Cornerstones and of the Dedication of New Halls for Masonic Use, the meetings of the Grand Lodge Committees: Chartered Lodges, Masonic Education, Entertainment of Distinguished Guests, Ways and Means. 5. The Grand Secretary and Mrs. Arnold attended annual communications of other Grand Lodges: Grand Lodge of Kansas in March; and Grand Lodge of Tennessee in March; Grand Lodge of Nebraska inJune; Grand Lodge of Iowa in September. 6. In Process: The writing of the Official Proceedings of the 159th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri for distribution to each lodge, each official of the Grand Lodge, each Past Grand Master, and each Grand Lodge in fraternal relationship with the Grand Lodge, as prescribed by Section 2.040(h). 7. In Process: Members of the Grand Lodge Office Staff continued the project to make certain that all data on the Masonic histories of brother Master Masons in the Official Membership Files of the Grand Lodge Office and in the books and records of lodges are accurate and complete. Rosters of the members of lodges with membership of 100 up to 200 Master Masons, as of the net membership on June 30, 1980, with the complete Masonic history of each brother, as written into the Official Records of the Grand Lodge, were sent to the respective lodges for comparison with the facts entered in the books and records of the lodge. Time was not sufficient to com plete this part of the overall project of complete and accurate records of Masonic history for all Master Masons of Missouri lodges; the project will be continued through many future years. GRAND LODGE OFFICE STAFF

Work turned out by the Grand Lodge Office - the tremendous task of auditing Annual Returns; the gathering, stapling, stuffing, zip-coding of the many pieces for the numerous distributions; the issuing of 50-Year Buttons for presentation to veteran brothers; the filling of orders of lodges and brothers for supplies; the maintaining of the mailing-address information for the distribution of The Freemason magazine and other communications; the recording of the cards and certificates for the Proficient Instructors under the Certificate Plan of the Grand Lodge Committee on Ritual; the typing of many, many letters every day - official correspondence of the Grand Secretary; the doing of a myriad of assignments for a successful operation of the Grand Lodge Office - results from the accurate, obliging, courteous, and sincerely concerned attention to duties of the members of the Grand Lodge Office Staff. Even though the personnel have some specific areas of responsibility, all have demonstrated willingness and cooperation in the performance of any and all matters of Grand Lodge Office business, with no regard for any particular assignment. With pride and with sincere appreciation I acknowledge the Grand Lodge Office Staff - the ladies whose faithful service and friendly associations with each other and with me have meant so much as we all worked for our Grand Lodge of Missouri. The Grand Lodge Office Staff for the Year 1980-1981:


128 Mrs. Mrs. Miss Mrs. Miss

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Henry H. Smith (Darlene Smith) of Holts Summit Calvin M. Price (Gladys Price) of Jefferson City Lori J. Harris of Fulton Ernest Raub (Kathleen Raub) of Boonville Susan M. Herring of Centralia - resigned August 24, 1981 APPRECIATIO]\;

M.W. Gra:ld Master J. Edward Blinn, you have traveled many miles this year, uphill and duwn. You've traveled over mountains and through many a town, in sun and in storm, in sleet and in snow. But you have never been too tired or too busy to go. You traveled into districts and to lodges where our brothers had not enjoyed a visit of the Grand Master before. And it is so true that you became for them much more than the leader of Masonry in Missouri during the year 1980-81; you became a FRIEND. My warmest wishes are that your future holds nothing but the best, everything it takes to fill each day with happiness. For all of us who know will tell you a universal truth - all oflife's best and finest things should always come to you. We of the Grand Lodge of Missouri feel that you have drawn with such invention and particular character this year that even though the framework of your service as Grand Master was in great measure determined by what has been, it is in the arrangement of distinct and personal features that has produced the great year 1980-81 for the Grand Lodge of Missouri. STATISTICS (PER PRELlMI:"<ARY REVIEW OF

1981

AN:-IUAL RETVR1'<S OF

542

LODt;ES)

Adjusted net membership-July I, 1980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93,906 ADDITIONS: Affiliated 615 Initiated 2,037 Passed 1,622 Raised 1,619 Reinstated after suspension N.P.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898 Reinstated after suspension (Section 15,066) _ _2_1 Unadjusted total additions. .. 3,153 Unadjusted gross membership-June 30, 1981 97,059 SUBTRACTIONS: Suspended for nonpayment of dues 1,731 Suspended per section 15,066 50 Dimitted 583 Deaths 2,578 Suspended unmasonic conduct I Expelled _._ _ 7 Unadjusted total subtractions 4,950 Unadjusted net membership-June 30, 1981 92,109 Fifty-Year Members claimed as exemptions 5,693 816 Remissions

Fraternally submitted, FRA]\;K A. ARNOLD, Grand Secretary. REMARKS OF R.W. SENIOR GRAND WARDEN ROBERT R. STEVENS OF INDIANA


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

129

PRESENTATION OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT OF CONSTITUTION OF THE GRAND LODGE

M.W. Grand Master Blinn read the proposal to amend Section 2 of Article II of the Constitution as follows: PROPOSED CHAN(~E TO CONSTITUTIO:-.i ARTICLE II, SECTION 2 Add the following paragraph to Article II, Section 2, of the Constitution: In the event that the Worshipful Master, Senior Warden, and Junior Warden are unable to attend a communication of the Grand Lodge, any Past Master of that lodge in attendance will qualify that lodge for attendance credit only. If a subordinate lodge would have no other representation, one Master Mason from that lodge may be appointed by the lodge. This representative, so appointed, must present a legal proxy to the Committee on Credentials. DALE A. LCDWIG, P.M., Algabil Lodge No. 544, CHARLES W. MILLER, P.M., Steele Lodge No. 634, CECIL O. BLAYLOCK, P.M., Harold O. Grauel Lodge No. 672, JOH:-.i E. BRUH~GEMAr-;, P.M., Freedom Lodge No. 636, RAY HILTOr-;, P.M., Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422. CONTINUANCE OF REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE

M.W. Bro. Walter L. Walker, Chairman, continued with the presentation of the report of the Committee on jurisprudence. To the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Your Committee on jurisprudence respectfully reports as follows: DISPENSATIO;'l.;S We have examined the dispensations issued by order of the Grand Master as set forth in the Report of the Grand Secretary and we approve the same as within the discretion of the Grand Master. CONSENTS, PERMISSIOr-;S AND HEAU:"G ORDERS We have examined the consents, permissions and healing orders pertaining to the activities and operations of subordinate lodges granted by the Grand Master as set forth in the Report of the Grand Secretary and we approve the same as within the discretion of the Grand Master.

M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of this portion of the jurisprudence Committee Report. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The portion of the report was ADOPTED. DECISIO;'l.;S 1. A question was put to the Grand Master concerning Section 19.020 as follows: "Can a brother be restored to good standing on his membership record following favorable action on his Petition for Reinstatement by paying the dues for all of the period of his suspension, knowing, of course, that if he could it would not in any case count toward eligibility for the 50-Year Jewel?" The Grand Master ruled as follows: "Membership and good standing in the lodge is a current condition. Therefore, payment of delinquent dues other than as provided by Sections 19.020 and 19.030 does not restore a member to good standing on his membership record for his years of suspension. "


130

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

This decision is approved. 2. A question was put to the Grand Master concerning Section 30.230 of the Trial Code as follows: "Section 30.230 of the Trial Code states that all documents and records connected with a Masonic Trial should be filed with the Secretary. Is this the lodge Secretary or the Grand Secretary?" The Grand Master ruled as follows: "In all instances in the Trial Code where the term Secretrary used it refers to the lodge Secretary. When the Grand Secretary is meant, it so states as in Section 29.200. Therefore, the records and documents should be filed with the lodge Secretary." This decision is approved. 3. The following question was submitted to the Grand Master: "Can the Temple Board hold a proposed annual raffle to sell chances on various items to be given away?" The Grand Master ruled as follows: "Annotation No.5 to Section 25.090 prohibits solicitation to win a contest; under Miscellaneous Decisions, Annotation No. IS prohibits a lodge from raising funds by selling chances on a beef. "In light of the foregoing previous decisions, I must rule that a lodge cannot sell chances on items to be given away (raffle). A Temple Board is bound by the same rules as the lodge." This decision is approved. 4. The following question was put to the Grand Master: "A decision made in 1974 recorded at page 96 of the PROCU:OIN(;S states as follows: 'Full proceedings of Grand Lodge, including discussions of resolutions, comments or remarks verbatim, without editing, shall be printed and distributed. 1974-96.' Is this decision required at this time?" The Grand Master ruled as follows: "That due to costs and time required in preparing all the comments or remarks verbatim, that the decision of 1974 recorded at page 96 is hereby reversed." This decision is approved.

M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of this portion of the Jurisprudence Committee Report. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The decisions of the Grand Master were APPROVED. PROPOSED

A~ENDMEI'TS TO

THE CONSTITlJTIO:,\

Two proposals to amend the Constitution were submitted at the 1980 Communication which would effect Section 2, Article I II, of the Constitution which eliminate the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer as elective officers. Another proposed amendment would effect Section 4, Article IV, of the Constitution making the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary appointed Grand Lodge Officers. These questions were submitted to the local lodges as provided in the Constitution. The Grand Secretary has certified to the Jurisprudence Committee that both proposed amendments were defeated by the local lodges. Your Committee reports that due to the lodges defeating both proposals, no further action can be had on these two proposed amendments.

M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of this portion of the Jurispru-


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

131

dence Committee Report. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The portion of the report was ADOPTED. PROPOSED

AME~DMENTS TO

THE BY-LAWS

In connection with the proposed Constitutional amendments, proposals were introduced to amend Section 2.010, paragraph (e) to provide a method of termination of appointment of Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary or Grand Lecturer. Also proposed to be amended was Section 2.010, paragraph (I) concerning the appointive powers of the Grand Master which removed reference to the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary as elective officers. As the proposed amendments to the Constitution failed to receive an affirmative vote by the lodges, the Committee reports that it is improper to vote on these proposed amendments to amend the By-Laws.

M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of this portion of the Jurisprudence Committee Report. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The portion of the report was ADOPTED. An amendment was proposed to Section 2.040, paragraph (q) which would add the Grand Treasurer to those who review the budget of the Gra.nd Secretary's Office so that it reads as follows: Section 2.040. GRAND SECRETARY. The Grand Secretary (q) Devotes full time to the duties of his office; receives no compensation for any other activity, except jury duty and similar temporary public service; employs and supervises such clerical and secretarial assistants as may be required to discharge efficiently the duties of his office; and semi-annually reviews with the Grand Master, the other elective officers and the Grand Treasurer the operation and budget of his office, including the fixing of compensation for his clerical and secretarial assistants. Your Commitee approves this resolution as to form and advises that it is proper to vote on this resolution at this time and makes no recommendation as to whether the resolution should pass or be defeated.

In order to bring the matter to a vote, M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of the Amendment of Section 2.040(q). The motion was seconded and approved by vote of the Grand Lodge. The amendment of paragraph (q) of Section 2.040 of the By-Laws was ADOPTED. An amendment was proposed to repeal Section 9.160. COMMITTEE ON DELINQUENT DUES. The Jurisprudence Committee approves this proposed amendment as to form and states that it is proper to be voted on at this time. However, the Jurisprudence Committee feel that this repeal of the Committee on Delinquent Dues should be defeated as this program has been in effect only two years.

In order to bring the matter before the Grand Lodge, M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of the resolution for the repeal of Section 9.160. The motion was seconded and defeated by vote of the Grand Lodge. The Amendment for the repeal of Section 9.160. COMMITTEE ON DELINQUENT DUES. was NOT ADOPTED. An amendment was proposed to Section 4.030, paragraph (a) which would increase the expense allowance of the District Deputy Grand Master for his official visit from $5.00 to $10.00; thus, this section would read as follows: Section 4.030. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS - POWERS AND DUTIES. (a) Visits the lodges in his district as far as practicable. He receives an expense allowance of $1 0.00 for each lodge visited, to be reported and paid by the lodge in its


132

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

annual return, and remitted to him promptly after actual receipt by the Grand Secretary. The allowance is not for more than one official visit each year to each lodge. District or joint meetings do not qualify for the allowance. Your committee approves this resolution as to form and advises that it is proper to vote on this resolution at this time and makes no recommendation as to whether the resolution should pass or be defeated.

In order to bring the matter to a vote, M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of the Amendment of Section 4.030(a). The motion was seconded. R.W. Bro. Charles E. Scheurich: For many years our District Deputy Grand Lecturers and District Deputy Grand Masters have bet::n the backbone of this Grand Jurisdiction and are the workhorses. They not only make an Official Visit per year; but these brethren answer every call of every Master of a lodge. They help them in their degree work; they help them in their legal decisions. I feel that $5.00, or even $10.00, will in no way come close to what these brethren are worth to the lodges. I firmly think that our lodges can help pay some of the fellows' expenses. Over the year every lodge calls almost monthly for the District Deputy Grand Master and the District Deputy Grand Lecturer to come and help them or to do some work for them. I am in favor of this. The motion for the adoption of the Amendment of Section 4.030(a) was approved. The amendment of paragraph (a) of Section 4.030 of the By-Laws was ADOPTED. An amendment was proposed to Section 4.040, paragraph (b), which would increase the expense allowance of the District Deputy Grand Lecturer for the Lodges of Instruction from $5.00 to $10.00; thus, Section 4.040, paragraph (b) would read as follows: "Section 4.050. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND LECTURER - POWERS AND DUTIES. (b) Holds Lodges of Instruction, for which he receives an expense allowance of $10.00 for each lodge instructed, to be remitted and paid by the lodge in its annual return, and remitted to him promptly after actual receipt by the Grand Secretary. Not more than one such allowance is charged against each lodge each year. District or joint lodges of instruction do not qualify for the allowance." Your committee approves this resolution as to form and advises that it is proper to vote on this resolution at this time and makes no recommendation as to whether the resolution should pass or be defeated.

In order to bring the matter to a vote, M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of the Amendment of Section 4.050(b). The motion was seconded and approved by vote of the Grand Lodge. The amendment of paragraph (b) of Section 4.050 of the By-Laws was ADOPTED. The Jurisprudence Committee pursuant to authority granted in Section 5.070 proposes according to the recommendation of the Grand Master that a subsection (r) be added to Section 2.040. GRAND SECRETARY. Resolved, That Section 2.040 have added to it, SUbparagraph (r) to provide as follows:

(r) Has the PROCEEDINGS printed and distributed no later than 15 February following each Grand Lodge Communication. The Grand Secretary is authorized to obtain the services of a certified Court Reporter who must be a member of the Masonic Fraternity in good standing, to take and transcribe the minutes of the meeting.

This resolution is approved as to form. It is proper to be voted on at this time. The Jurisprudence Committee recommends that this resolution be passed.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

133

M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of the resolution. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. Paragraph (I') of Section 2.040 of the By-Laws was ADOPTED. The next Resolution says: Resolved, That pursuant to Section 1.010 of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, the time of the 161st Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is changed to commence at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, October 4, 1982.

This resolution is approved as to form. It is proper to be voted on at this time. The Jurisprudence Committee recommends that this resolution be adopted. It was moved and seconded that the resolution be adopted. Grand Master Blinn called for discussion. M.W. PAST GRAND MASTER LEWIS C. WES COOK: Most Worshipful Sir, Brethren, I am not aware - I am sure that those who are in attendance here are not aware - of the reason for the change in this proposed statement. We have met for many, many years, traditionally, at this time. Many of our brethren - Secretaries, officers, Past Masters - set aside this week specifically for Grand Lodge activities. To offer a change at this time for one year opens the door, I think, for a multitude of things: (1) For the date to be changed frequently in future years; (2) I think it destroys a tradition that we have enjoyed and cherished for a long time. And I think most importantly we need to determine whether there is a real emergency that would cause us to change or alter our meeting date. I would like to ask the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge Officers if they would explain to us why this proposal, the reason behind it, so that we might be able to consider before taking a vote, whether to accept or reject. R.W. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER WILLIAM J. HILL: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren, this proposal was introduced at my request and over my signature and over the signature of the other Grand Lodge Officers of the Advancing Line. The reason for this proposal is very significant. An unprecedented and historical event - Masonic event - is going to take place in the State of Missouri at the time when we would ordinarily hold our Annual Communication in 1982. About four years ago the Northern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite began to set its schedule, and our great Sister State of Illinois was asked to host that Supreme Council Session. As most you know, the State of Illinois is, of course, in the Northern Jurisdiction; the State of Missouri is in the Southern Jurisdiction. Our great Sister State of Illinois determined that they would not have the kind of Masonic facilities in the State of Illinois and in a location, or the city, where they would like to host the Session. They, therefore, came to their brothers in Missouri with the unprecedented move - and it's really historical - for the Northern Jurisdiction to hold the Supreme Council Session in the Southern Jurisdiction. Brethren, what an opportunity for Freemasonry to show its selflessness, its brotherly love, its unity - an opportunity to reach across the lines, if you please, which none of us observe, and bring together the great nations of the United States. What an opportunity we have to show hospitality. I would hate to be a party, Brethren, to a conflict of two important and significant and major Masonic events being conducted simultaneously in our great jurisdiction that is known for its hospitality.


134

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Therefore, Brethren, I would ask you to search your hearts prayerfully. And I would ask you to review very quickly the meaning of brotherly love. And I would ask you to accommodate the brethren of the Northern Jurisdiction who will be coming into this jurisdiction and the brethren of the State of Illinois who will be hosting those brethren, and make this a great and noble and charitable and understanding of brotherly love event. Thank you. R.W. SENIOR GRAND WARDEN EARL K. DII.u:: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren, I would like to endorse fully the remarks of R.W. Brother Hill, and simply add that this is simply a case of Masonic hospitality. And while we all treasure tradition, I would remind you that while the Constitution and By-Laws for years specified that our Annual Communication would be the last Monday in September and held in St. Louis, we broke the St. Louis tradition. Here we are today; I think that was a good idea. And I think in a case like this that certainly we can bend the time by one week. Thank you very much. M.W. BROTHER COOK: Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren, I sincerely appreciate the remarks of the Deputy Grand Master and the Senior Grand Warden. I recognize that a meeting of the Northern.J u risdiction of the Scottish Rite in the St. Louis area is unprecedented. At the same time I am aware of the fact that no organization anywhere that I am aware of is more conscious of the rights, the privileges, the traditions, the history of the Mother Grand Lodge of any jurisdiction than the Northern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite. They are without a doubt one of the strongest supporters of Blue Lodge activity. And I question if they had known would have initiated a conflict of date, such as it is. But even so, if there be a conflict, I again question whether or not there would be a number of brethren from Missouri, the Southern Jurisdiction, participating in those Northern Jurisdiction Council meetings. Our meetings, in all probability, would be on the opposite side of the state. I see no conflict; but I see a tribute to the great State of Missouri that two major Masonic groups would be meeting at the same time - one in Kansas City and one in St. Louis. We would avoid the appearance, if any, of having yielded in a sense to an appendant organization or because of a conflict of dates. And I am sure that no organization, such as the Northern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite, would be upset by the fact that we continued with our traditional meeting. Brethren, this is a personal preference, and I just wanted to say it. Thank you. M.W. GRAND MASTER BUN:": I'd like to report to you that for several years now the Advancing Line of Grand Lodge Officers has been solidly behind this resolution to change the date. They anticipated no difficulty in obtaining a favorable vote on it. R.W. BROTHER HILL: Brethren, I think it is essential that you be aware of additional facts. The first one is in 1977, when M.W. Brother Fielding A. Poe was Grand Master, this matter first came to the attention of the Advancing Line. This matter first came to our attention in 1977 - that is to the Advancing Line. At that time, as our Most Worshipful Grand Master has indicated, there was an endorsement by the Advancing Line that we should accommodate this historical event here in the State of Missouri. Brethren, we feel that even though it requires a vote of this Grand Lodge, that under those circumstances we felt that we could make a tentative commitment. Ofcourse, we did not know who the Grand Master would be, for certain, at this time. I would addjust one statement, Brethren, in closing on this. I would su~~est that you recall a very


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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basic lesson in life and in Masonry: That it is indeed better to give than to receive. WOR. BRO. ROBERTC.JARRETT, Past Master of Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 at St. Joseph: I am a Past Master of that lodge in 1969. Most Worshipful Sir, Most Worshipful Brethren, Brethren all, I am relatively new at this; I am not a speaker. But there is something that just touched my heart up there a few moments ago that I just can't hold any longer. First of all, the words of Brotherly Love were mentioned. That's very true; Brotherly Love with Blue Lodge Freemasonry. It was again pointed out that this was made known to our Advancing Line in the year of 1977. If that be so, I feel that it should have been publicized so that the brethren in the Blue Lodge would have known that. There is also no doubt in my mind that the Northern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite has known that this Grand Lodge has met at this particular time for a number of years. And if they did not desire a conflict of interest, it should have behooved them to have changed their date. After all, Blue Lodge Masonry is the foundation of Masonry; and we are obligated to meet and teach the Tenets of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth. And as a good brother over here remarked a while ago, we have set aside for years and years that this would be our vacation time so that we could attend our Grand Lodge Sessions. And I feel strongly that we should continue to maintain this date as our meetinK date of Grand Lodge. Thank you, Brethren. BRO. JOE K. NEAL, Senior Warden of Galena Lodge No. 515: Ijust want to say this one thing. Anything that is important to me as a Master Mason of a Blue Lodge, I would appreciate if this had been brought to a vote of our individual lodges, prior to this meeting. Thank you. M.W. GRAND MASTER BUN!':: Brethren, I am going to call forthe vote; and I hope you will be governed by the principle of Brotherly Love, rather than to be swayed by anything I have said. I think the important issue here is whether or not we show Brotherly Love to the Northern Jurisdiction. All in favor make it known by the voting sign of the Order. Down. Contrary minded by the same sign. Down. I think we had better take a standing vote. All in favor of this motion will let it be known by standing. You may sit down. Those opposed will stand. The motion is DEFEATED. The resolution for the change of the time of the 161 st Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to commence at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, October 4, 1982 was NOT APPROVED. RESOLL'TIOI' TO ADD SLiBSECTIO:--l

2.050(F.)

TO SECTIO:-';

2.050,

GRA:--ID I.Ecn:RER

Be It Resolved, That Subsection (e) be added to Section 2.050 to read as follows: (e) Shall be responsible for reducing one copy of Missouri Ritual to writing. The copy shall be securely deposited in the Grand Lodge Headquarters Building in Columbia, Missouri, in such a fashion that three people - the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master, and the Grand Lecturer - shall all be present to remove the copy.

The majority of the Jurisprudence Committee feels that this matter is of such a serious nature that it requires more consideration than it has received. We recommend that action on this matter be deferred until next year. M.W. Brother Walker moved the adoption of this portion of the Jurisprudence Committee Report. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the


136

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

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Grand Lodge. This portion of the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence was ADOPTED. EDICT

On May 15, 1981, the Grand Master issued an edict making Wor. Bro. Harry Carr an honorary member in the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri. A resolution was passed in 1924 which prohibits conferring of honorary rank by the Grand Lodge on any member of its subordinate lodges. Brother Carr is not a member of a subordinate lodge of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, but is a member of the United Grand Lodge of England. It has been the custom for honorary membership in the Grand Lodge to be granted by Grand Lodge Resolution. The Grand Master was joined in this Edict by our Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden and the Junior Grand Warden. The approval of this Edict by the Grand Lodge will complete the honorary membership for Wor. Bro. Harry Carr. The Jurisprudence Committee recommends that this Edict be approved by this Grand Lodge.

M.W. Brother Walker moved that the EDICT of May 15, 1981 constituting Wor. Bro. Harry Carr to Honorary Membership of the Grand Lodge of Missouri be approved. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The EDICT of M.W. Grand Master J. Edward Blinn making Wor. Bro. Harry Carr an Honorary Member of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri was APPROVED. M.W. Brother Walker moved that the Jurisprudence Committee Report be accepted and adopted as amended by the Grand Lodge. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The report of the Committee on Jurisprudence was ADOPTED. Respectfully submitted, ELVIS A. MOO1':EY, HERBERT C. HOFFMA1':, CHARLES E. BECRAFT, WALTER L. WALKER, Chairman. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS R.W. Bro. Walter H. Baird, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Ways and Means.

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHRF.1':: The Ways and Means Committee met on August 29,1981 and went over the expenditures in all funds as of that date. They were in order and charged to the correct appropriation or fund. We have reviewed the disbursements for the present budget year and the accounts as of today, that have been exceeded for: Acct. Nos. 10 The Freemason Magazine

21 22 30 45

Expenses - Grand Lecturer Expenses - Grand Lodge Officers and Committees Regional Meetings of Lodge Officers (Area Meetings) Grand Master's Regalia

Prior approval for the excess expenditures was obtained as provided by the By-Laws.


1981

137

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

A review of the last budget year expenditures show they were handled properly and as provided by the By-Laws. The income sources available for the operation of the Grand Lodge are the per capita tax and income from investments. Revenue from those sources available for budgeting is approximately $387,000. The following budget is presented to cover the budget year from October 15, 1981 to October 14, 1982. BY

DIRECT APPROPRIATlO:--; OF GRA:--;D LODGE

Acct. Nos.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Salary - Grand Secretary Salary - Grand Lecturer Salary - Grand Treasurer Retirement Expense Masonic Service Association Per Capita Masonic Service Association - Hospital Visitation Funds Operating Expenses - Grand Lodge Office Building Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges

10. The Freemason Magazine

11. Grand Lodge Office Building Fund BY

$ 20,500.00

. . . . . .

17,500.00 600.00 14,000.00 2,450.00 5,000.00 6,000.00

. . .

100.00 66,500.00 25,000.00

. . . . . . . . . .

10,000.00 9,000.00 4,000.00 1,500.00 4,000.00 4,500.00 4,500.00 1,000.00 4,000.00 18,000.00

.

10,000.00

. . .

28,800.00 4,250.00 5,000.00

. . . . . . . . .

15,500.00 4,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 2,000.00 5,000.00 2,000.00 3,500.00 3,500.00

. .

4,500.00 13,000.00

REQt:lSITIO:-.l OF GRAND MASTER

20. Expenses - Grand Master 21. Expenses - Grand Lecturer 22. Expenses - Grand Lodge Officers and Committees 22A. Expenses - Special - Deputy Grand Master 23. Conferences of Grand Lodge Officers 24. Conferences of D.D.G.M. and D.D.G.L. 25. Conferences of Grand Masters and Grand Secretaries 26. Auditing 27. Grand Master's Contingent Fund 28. Expenses of Grand Lodge Session 29. 30. Regional Meetings of Lodge Officers (Area Meetings) BY REQt:lSITIO:--; OF (;RA:-.ID SECRETARY 40. 41. 42. 43.

Salaries - Grand Lodge Office Staff Employees' Tax Expenses Insurance Operations of Grand Lodge Office a. Printing, Postage, Stationery b. Telephone and Telegraph c. Office Equipment d. Office Supplies e. Incidental Office Expenses f. Grand Lodge Office Improvement g. Electrical Data Processing 44. Incidental and Travel Expenses - Grand Secretary 45. Grand Master's Regalia 46. 47. 48. Fifty-Year Veteran Buttons 49. Printing PROCEEDI:-.IGS


138

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

BY REQCISITION OF COMMITTEES

50. Committee on Correspondence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 *8,000.00 51. Committee on Masonic Education 52. Committee on Ritual 500.00 53. Committee on Relief and Charity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,000.00 2,000.00 54. Committee on By-Laws 55. Committee on Mileage and Per Diem 75,000.00 Total Allocation by Budget for Year 1981-1982 $426,700.00 * The budget is supplemented for this year only by authority of Section 5.160 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws.

We recommend that for this year's budget any money expended over the income be appropriated from the General Fund. Fraternally submitted, HEI':RY R. STOKER, GEORGE F. MORRISOI':, OWEI': A. SLOAN, WALTER H. BAIRD, Chairman. W. MARIOI': LUI':A, R.W. Brother Baird moved the adoption of the report of the Committee on Ways and Means. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. The report of the Committee on Ways and Means - the budget for the year October 15, 1981 to October 14, 1982 was ADOPTED. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS

R.W. Bro. Ray Hilton, Chairman, presented the report ofthe Committee on Credentials and moved that the report be accepted subject to final audit. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report: At the present session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, there are represented 504 subordinate lodges and no lodges V.D., and there are present: Grand Lodge Officers Past Grand Masters and Past Grand Lodge Officers District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Past Masters Worshipful Masters Senior Wardens Junior Wardens Chairmen and Members of Grand Lodge Committees Distinguished Visitors Total Lodges without representation Non-voting Master Masons

Fraternally submitted, RAY HILTON, Chairman, CECIL O. BLAYLOCK, JOIlI': E. BRUEGGEMA:"N,

30 16 50 50 335 446 218 169 28

---1.! 1,363 41 90

DALE A. LUDWIG, THE REV. CHARLES MILLER.


1981

139

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

REMARKS AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF R.W. BRO. WILLIAM

J. HILL

R:W. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER WM.J. HILL: Brethren, let me say in response to your vote that I accept the will of this Grand Lodge. At this time I want to announce the place where the next Annual Communication will be held. As a preface, I would confess that I am in a little bit of a dilemma. If I do not announce a place other than St. Louis, we would not be able to avail ourselves of the place where we have found so much comfort, so much accommodation and hospitality over the years in St. Louis for the Scottish Rite Cathedral will be the facility in which the Northern Jurisdiction will hold its Supreme Council. Therefore, I announce to you that we will meet in Kansas City. I cannot assure you at this point whether or not we will be accommodated as you might wish, for we must block out convention facilities and space well in advance. I confess my error to you; it will not be my first during the coming year; but I presumed, which I had no right to do, upon the brothers. I ask your forgiveness. I also perceive that I may have acted in such manner as to clearly evidence a division in our Craft and perhaps its loyalty to Appendant Bodies. But we assure you that it is totally contrary to my philosophy and my desire. It is my desire that those brothers who voted with me to change the time to move in the direction of unity and to support fully the will of this Grand Lodge. Brethren, thank you. REMARKS OF M.W. BRO. WALTER L. WALKER

M. W. BRO. WALTER L. WALKER, Past Master of Stella Lodge No. 538: Brethren, there are times when we let things get out of hand. There are times when we think of things with regret. It takes at least two years, and in fact three, of advance preparation to hold a Grand Lodge and accommodate you all at the hotels, meals, and things of this nature. The Commitee went to the trouble (0 get this thing set up in Kansas City; they have the rooms blocked off for October 4. Now I can appreciate the sentiment that we all have; but I am wondering if we ought not to reconsider this from a practical standpoint. (Many voices of delegates: "NO!") If you do not want to reconsider, we won't. (Again voices of delegates: "NO!") RESOLUTIONS AND PROPOSED AMENDMENTS OF GRAND LODGE BY-LAWS FOR ACTION AT THE 161ST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION IN SEPTEMBER 1982

The Grand Secretary read the proposals presented to lie over for action at the 161st Annual Communication at Kansas City in September 1982, as follows: PROPOSAL FOR AMENDMEI\;T OF SECTION 16.110 AND SEeTIOI\; 11.050 AI\;D PROPOSAL FOR ADDITION OF SECTIONS 16.120 16.130, 16.140, 16.150, 16.160,16.170,16.180 AND 16.190 To the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of the State of Missouri: Resolved, That effective January 1, 1983. Section 16.110 and Section 11.050 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws shall be amended to provide as hereinafter set forth and additional By-Laws to be known as Sections 16.120, 16.130, 16.140, 16.150, 16.170, 16.180 and 16.190 as hereinafter set forth shall be adopted:


140

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

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Section 16.110. MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. A Master Mason whose residence would otherwise satisfy the requirement under these By-Laws with respect to petitions for affiliation and who is a member in good standing of either a Missouri lodge or of a lodge in another Grand Jurisdiction which is in fraternal relationship with this Grand Lodge and does not prohibit multiple membership as herein contemplated may petition for and hold memberships in one or more additional Missouri lodges or in one or more additional lodges located in another Grand Jurisdiction. No multiple membership fee may be charged by any Missouri lodge as a condition to the filing of any such petition. However, if authorized by the Grand Lodge, a fee may be charged for the use and benefit of the Masonic Home of Missouri upon the filing of a petition for multiple membership by a petitioner who is not then a member of a Missouri lodge. A two-thirds favorable vote, by paper ballot, is required for eiection to multiple membership in a lodge of this Grand Jurisdiction. Section 16.120. DEFINITIONS AND CONDITIONS AS TO MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. (a) A multiple member's oldest membership shall be designated as his "original membership." The term "multiple membership" shall be deemed to include both dual and plural membership and shall be construed to include lawful affiliation with any additional lodges of Missouri or of any other Grand.J urisdiction which is in fraternal relationship with this Grand Lodge. (b) In addition to satisfying all other requirements set forth in these By-Laws a member in good standing of a Missouri lodge may petition for multiple membership in a lodge of another Grand Jurisdiction or a member of a lodge of another Grand Jurisdiction may petition for multiple membership in a Missouri lodge only if all the following conditions are satisfied: (1) The election of the petitioner to such multiple membership would not violate the laws of such other Grand Jurisdiction; (2) The other Grand Lodge will furnish a certificate of good standing for multiple membership or its equivalent if a member of that Grand Jurisdiction petitions for multiple membership in a Missouri lodge and, ifhe is elected, such other Grand Lodge will promptly notify this Grand Lodge of any subsequent termination of his membership: (3) The other Grand Lodge will promptly notify this Grand Lodge when a member of a Missouri lodge is elected to multiple membership in a lodge in that Grand Jurisdiction or in the event his membership therein shall be terminated; (4) The other Grand Lodge will recognize the suspension or expulsion by a Missouri lodge of a Mason holding multiple membership in a lodge of that Grand Jurisdiction. Section 16.130. PETITION FOR MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. (a) A petition for affiliation with a Missouri Lodge as a multiple member must be made on such official form as shall be approved by the Grand Secretary and the petition shall be accompanied by a Certificate of Good Standing for multiple membership issued by the Missouri Lodge(s) of which the petitioner shall then be a member or by valid evidence of Masonic status (by Certificate, Letter or Statement) issued by the Lodge(s) of any other Grand Jurisdiction whose laws permit its members to hold multiple memberships. (b) A petition for multiple membership in a subordinate lodge of Missouri must include the full name, the age, the residence address and the period of residence thereat, the occupation, the name of his employer and period of employment, the business address, and such other lawful information about the petitioner as may be required from time to time, and the name, number and location (city and state) of the petitioner's lodge(s) of "original membership" and "multiple membership." The petition must be signed by the Petitioner and must be recommended by two Master Masons of the lodge in which he seeks multiple membership. (c) A Petitioner for multiple membership in a subordinate lodge of Missouri must


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

141

execute an Application for Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership, using the official and approved form. The Application(s) for Certificate of Good Standing for multiple membership will be forwarded by the Secretary of the lodge in which multiple membership is being sought to the Grand Secretary of Missouri for transmittal to the appropriate lodge(s) located in this State, or to the lodge(s) of any other Grand J urisdiction(s) through the offices of the respective Grand Secretaries. If granted, the Certificate(s) of Good Standing for Multiple Membership must be sent to the office of the Grand Secretary for transmittal to the subordinate lodge to which the petition is to be submitted. (d) When a Master Mason whose dues are fully paid and who is not under charges nor indebted in an official capacity to his lodge applies in proper form for a Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership, his application shall be granted promptly and the fact entered in the records of the lodge and in the minutes of the communication. The Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership shall include: (1) All the facts of Masonic History of the brother as written into the books and records of the lodge; (2) Whether or not he has proved his Proficiency in the Master Mason Degree; (3) The date to which the dues are FULLY PAID. The Lodge Secretary cannot issue the Certificate of Good Standing until it has been duly authorized by the action of the lodge. The certificate is to be sent to the Grand Secretary for certification and transmittal. (e) Upon the election of a multiple member the Lodge Secretary shall promptly notify the Grand Secretary, who shall inform every other lodge in which a multiple member holds membership. Section 16.140. RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES. A multiple member shall pay all dues required by each lodge wherever membership is held and shall have all the rights and privileges of membership in each such lodge, except that (1) he may not hold office as Master or Warden in more than one Missouri lodge at the same time; (2) only the lodge of his "original membership" may exempt him from the payment of annual dues on the basis of his being a 50-Year Master Mason and claim the exemption in the payment of Grand Lodge dues; (3) only the lodge of his "original membership" may remit the payment of annual dues on the basis of his inability to pay and claim the remittance in the payment of Grand Lodge dues; (4) only through the lodge of his "original membership" may he, his wife, his widow or child apply for admission to the Masonic Home of Missouri or request relief and assistance from the Grand Lodge Committee on Relief and Charity. Section 16.150. SUSPENSION OR EXPULSION OF MULTIPLE MEMBER. Suspension for nonpayment of dues or for failure to prove proficiency in the Master Mason Degree or suspension or expulsion of a multiple member for unmasonic conduct shall thereby terminate his membership in all lodges in the GrandJurisdiction of Missouri. The Secretary of any Missouri lodge suspending or expelling such a multiple member shall immediately notify the Grand Secretary, who will inform every other Missouri lodge in which the multiple member shall have held membership at the time of such suspension or expulsion; and the Grand Secretary shall also notify the Grand Secretary of every other Grand Jurisdiction in which such member shall then have held membership in a subordinate lodge. Like notice shall be given in case of reinstatement, which shall immediately and automatically restore him to membership in good standing in every other lodge in this Jurisdiction of which he was a member, su~ject, however, to any other provisions of these By-Laws pertaining to the payment of dues and application for reinstatement if the suspension shall have been of such duration as to necessitate the filing of a petition for reinstatement. The Grand Secretary is to provide the information of reinstatement to ALL lodges involved. Section 16.160. WITHDRAWAL OF MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP. A multiple member of a Missouri lodge may withdraw his affiliation as a multiple member by application in writing or in person at a Stated Communication for a Certificate of


142

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1981

Withdrawal. If the member has fully paid the annual dues for the current year, and is not under charges nor indebted in an official capacity, the lodge shall issue the official and approved Certificate of Withdrawal of Multiple Membership. The brother shall not be entitled to a Certificate of Dimission, except from the lodge of "original membership." Upon the issuance of a Certificate of Withdrawal, the member shall not be entitled to any reimbursement on the unearned portion of the annual dues. The withdrawal of multiple membership from one or more lodges of Missouri shall have no bearing on the standing of the Master Mason in the lodge of his "original membership" or in other lodges in which he has established "multiple membership." The Certificate of Withdrawal of Multiple Membership shall not be evidence of Masonic standing for the purpose of applying for or obtaining membership by affiliation in another lodge. The lodge issuing the Certificate of Withdrawal shall promptly notify the Grand Secretary of such action. Section 16.170. DIMIT BY MULTIPLE MEMBER. A Master Mason who holds multiple membership and whose lodge of "original membership" is under the Grand Lodge of Missouri may terminate his affiliation with his lodge of "original membership" by dimission and still retain his membership in the other lodges. Said Master Mason shall apply in writing to the lodge of "original membership" for the Certificate of Dimission; the application shall contain the information of the name, number, location (city and state) of the lodge which he desires to be regarded henceforth as the lodge of his "original membership." The dimit, if granted, shall be mailed to the Grand Secretary of Missouri for certification and transmittal to the lodge in which the Member will retain his "original" or "parent" membership. The dim it issued by the lodge of "original membership" shall not be given to the brother. (Refer to Sections 20.010 and 20.070, pages 73 and 75 of Constitution and By-Laws.) Section 16.180. MULTIPLE MEMBERSHIP- DUTIES OF LODGE SECRETARIES AND OF GRAND SECRETARY. (a) The Secretary of each lodge of Missouri shall: (1) Forward to the Grand Secretary the personal application for Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership; (2) Forward to the Grand Secretary the Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership; (3) Notify the Grand Secretary upon the election of a multiple member or the formation of a new lodge containing one or more multiple members; (4) Notify the Grand Secretary of the suspension for nonpayment of dues or otherwise, or the expulsion of a multiple member; (5) Notify the Grand Secretary of the reinstatement to good standing of a multiple member; (6) Notify the Grand Secretary of the issuance of the Certificate of Withdrawal of Multiple Membership; (7) Forward the Certificate of Dimission from lodge of "original membership" to the Grand Secretary for certification and transmittal; (8) Submit the Report of Multiple Members as ofJune 30 of each and every year with the ANNUAL RETURN. (b) The Grand Secretary of Missouri shall: (l ) Forward the personal application for Certificate of Good Standing for Multipie Membership to the lodges of this Jurisdiction and/or of other Jurisdictions for the attention and action of the members, respectively; (2) Receive and transmit the Certificate of Good Standing for Multiple Membership which shall accompany the Petition for Multiple Membership; (3) Notify the other lodges involved of the election of a multiple member, or the formation of a new lodge containing one or more multiple members; (4) Notify the other lodges involved of the suspension for nonpayment of dues or otherwise, or the expulsion of a multiple member; (5) Notify the other lodges involved that a multiple member has regained good standing after suspension;


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

143

(6) Forward the Certificate of Dimission from Lodge of "original membership" to the lodge to be regarded by the member as the lodge of "original" or "parent" membership. Section 16.190. LODGE OF RESEARCH. Membership in a lodge of research or similar lodge is not considered multiple membership. Section 11.050 shall be amended to include the following additional language: Nothing herein shall prevent such a member from applying to his former lodge for multiple membership pursuant to the provisions of Section 16.110 of these By-Laws. FRANK A. ARNOLD, P.M., Cooper Lodge No. 36, EDWARD BLI:-I:-I, P.M., Webster Lodge No. 98, ROBERT J. CREDE, P.M., Hickory Hill Lodge No. 211, P. VINCE:-IT KI:'I;KEAD, P.M., St. Francois Lodge No. 234, STANTON T. BROW:-I, P.M., Buckner Lodge No. 501, HAROLD M. JAYNE, P.M., Memphis Lodge No. 16, VERN H. SCHNEIDER, P.M., Tuscan Lodge No. 360, ERWIN J. ROESEL, P.M., Freedom Lodge No. 636, ROBERT G. BIRD, P.M., Solomon Lodge No. 271, WILLIAM H. WISBROCK, P.M., Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, GEORGE F. MORRISON, P.M., Tuscan Lodge No. 360.

J.

PROPOSAL FOR REPEAL OF SEeTIOl\:

25.140

AND TO SUBSTITUTE II\: LIEU

THEREOF THE FOLLOWING LAI\:GUAGE

To the Grand Lodge, A.F.

('1

A.M. of the State of Missouri:

Resolved, That Section 25.140 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws be repealed, and that the following language be adopted in lieu thereof and henceforth referred to as Section 25.140:

Section 2.140. PUBLIC PROCESSIONS AND EVENTS. A lodge may participate in public processions and other public events if such participation cannot be reasonably expected to tend to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, cause scandal, degrade it in public estimation or otherwise violate the principles, obligations or teachings of the fraternity. Any usage or display of aprons,jewels or rods during any such public appearance shall be limited to such an extent as not to reveal any ritualistic information which may not otherwise be lawfully known to the profane.

J.

EDWARD Bu:'l;:'I;, P.M., Webster Lodge No. 98, FRANK A. ARNOl.D, P.M., Cooper Lodge No. 36, STA:-ITO:'l; T. BROW:-I, P.M., Buckner Lodge No. 501, P. VI:-ICE:-IT KI:'I;KEAD, P.M., St Francois Lodge No. 234, VERN H. SCH:-IEIDER, P.M., Tuscan Lodge No. 360, ROBERT G. BIRD, P.M., Solomon Lodge No. 271, WILLlA~1 H. WISBROCK, P.M., Webster Groves Lodge No. 84. APPOINTMENTS

The Grand Secretary read the appointments made by Grand Master-Elect William J. Hill for the year 1981-82: Appointive Grand Lodge Officers District Deputy Grand Masters Chairmen and Members of Standing Committees Chairman and Members of Special Committees The Auditor

R.W. Bro. Stanton T. Brown, the Grand Lecturer, announced the appointments of District Deputy Grand Lecturers for the year 1981-82.


144

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM

The Grand Secretary presented the report of the Committee on Mileage and Per Diem and moved the acceptance of the report, subject to necessary corrections. The motion was seconded and carried by vote of the Grand Lodge. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Mileage and Per Diem reports amounts paid for attendance at this, the 160th Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge, held in the city of Springfield, September 28 and 29, 1981, as follows:

Grand Lodge Officers Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers District Deputy Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Lecturers Committees: Appeals and Grievances Building Supervisory Board Credentials Jurisprudence Masonic Education Mileage and Per Diem Ways and Means Chairmen other Standing Committees Subtotal for Grand Lodge Officers, including Committees Assistant Grant Tilers Representatives of Chartered Lodges Representatives of Lodges under Dispensation Total

. . . . . . . . . . . .

$862.50 248.80 876.00 364.80 547.10 552.80 392.10 424.80 . . .

$2,632.50 2,391.20 6,542.00 6,148.90

4,268.90 21,983.50 643.00 67,157.40 $89,783.90

Fraternally submitted, L. LIVINGSTOl', Chairman, EDWARD A. LAl'G, JACK R. CLARK, LEO G. WHITAKER. ORVILLE

GRAND LODGE DECLARED AT EASE

M.W. Grand Master Blinn declared the Grand Lodge at ease in preparation of the installation of officers for the ensuing year. He invited the ladies, families, and interested friends to enter the auditorium for the installation ceremony. INSTALLATION OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS Installing Officer Installing Marshal Installing Chaplain

M.W. Bro. Walter L. Walker M.W. Bro. J. Edward Blinn M.W. Bro. George F. Morrison

THE GRAND LODGE OFFICERS FOR 1981-82 Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Senior Grand Warden Junior Grand Warden Grand Treasurer

William J. Hill Earl K. Dille Robert J. Crede Vern H. Schneider W. Marion Luna


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Grand Secretary Frank A. Arnold Grand Lecturer Stanton T. Brown Senior Grand Deacon Charles E. Scheurich Junior Grand Deacon P. Vincent Kinkead Senior Grand Steward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. William H. Wisbrock Junior Grand Steward Thomas K. McGuire, Jr. Senior Grand Marshal Robert D. Jenkins Junior Grand Marshal Thomas C. Warden Grand Sword Bearer Emil O. Bayerl Grand Pursuivant Bert W. Casselman Grand Chaplain The Rev. Carl L. Radford Grand Chaplain The Rev. Cecil H. Hurt Grand Chaplain Dr. W. Tribbey Nickerson Grand Chaplain Rabbi Bruce S. Diamond Grand Chaplain Dr. J. c. Montgomery, Jr., P.G.M. Grand Chaplain The Rev. Robert B. Armour Grand Chaplain The Rev. Woodson O. Bennett, Sr. Grand Orator Dr. George E. Winslow Grand Orator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Herbert C. Hoffman Grand Tiler Emanuel D. Shockey DEMOLAY HONOR GUARD

Members of DeMolay Chapters of Springfield and Southwest Missouri served as an Honor Guard and formed the aisle through which the newly installed Grand Master William J. Hill was conducted to the East. State Master Councilor Randal Wingbermuehle and R.W. Bro. Ronald L. Compton, Executive Officer of Missouri, were in charge of the arrangements for the Honor Guard. M.W. Brother Hill has received extensive recognition as a Senior DeMolay, as an honorary member of the Supreme Council of the Order of DeMolay, as General Counsel and member of the Executive Committee. PRESENTATIONS TO M.W. GRAND MASTER WILLIAM J. HILL

M.W. Bro. Walter L. Walker presented the Grand Master's Apron. Wor. Bro. Walter S. Hundley, Worshipful Master of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 at Kansas City - the lodge in which M.W. Brother Hill holds membershippresented the apron case. Wor. Brother Hundley also presented M.W. Brother Hill with the 25 Year Pin of Ivanhoe Lodge. M.W. Bro. William H Chapman presented the Grand Master's Jewel. M.W. Bro. Herman A. Orlick presented the Grand Master's Lapel Pin. R.W. Frank A. Arnold presented the Grand Master's Gold Identification Card. M.W. BROTHER HILL responded to the presentations: Brethren, I accept these from the Grand Lodge of Missouri with the understanding that I do not receive them as tokens of honor to me personally. But I shall attempt to use them and wear them as honor to the Fraternity and to the office of Grand Master. I thank you from the bottom of my heart. Let me say to you, that in the event that I do not have any member of my family become interested or active in Freemasonry, who would be interested in receiving these as family heirlooms, it will be my intention to return them to the Grand Lodge of Missouri for whatever value they may have at that time. Thank you, my Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri.


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REMARKS OF M.W. BRO. WILLIAM J. HILL

M.W. BROTHER HILL: Ladies and Brethren, as I previously mentioned, it will be difficult to wear the hat of our Past Grand Master. And I can understand what it means to stand here, before you, as Grand Master and how heavy that might be. Let me assure you that I have observed several points over the years that lead me to believe that one must retain his perspective and never feel that he is more important than his brethren. I mentioned the other night that as a member of DeMolay I remember quite well a sentence from the Ceremony of Installation of Officers, which says: "From the ranks you may emerge, but to the ranks you shall soon return." If that were not enough to make one humble and cause him to retain his perspective, I can assure you that sitting here as an Advancing Line Officer and watching the tribute which our Grand Lodge extends to the outgoing Grand Master, then you can really become humble. Always in the past I've noticed that when the spotlight turns and shifts from the man you have applauded all year long and shines on the new man coming in, we really don't treat our outgoing Junior Past Grand Master with the same dignity. He has all of a sudden had the load of responsibility lifted from his shoulders and the attentions have been shifted upon the new officer. And so today I've asked that the Junior Past Grand Master be conducted to a seat of honor that we might truly continue to recognize in this meeting today the service that he has rendered to us with great honor, with great enthusiasm, and with great accomplishment. It is fitting, therefore, that I ask our Junior Past Grand Master to come to the East, if you will, Brother Blinn. I have a presentation I would like to make to you. As most of you know, I engaged the best possible photographer that I could during the last year; and I turned over every stone that I could, with absolutely no expense, to take photographs of our Grand Master. And I have one additional photograph of him, which was taken early in his career at one of the cornerstone layings. I am going to show it to you first, before I give it to him. This shows our Grand Master standing out in a field; and at the bottom it says: "A Grand Master Outstanding in his Field." Before I hand it to you, Grand Master, I want to call to your attention, and to the attention of the brethren and ladies assembled, that he is standing a little bit to the right in the picture. For those of us who belong to a conservative organization, where we think that we are just a little bit right of center, this photograph fits that description. And for those of you who may feel that they are on the left side of center, then it just depends on whether you are looking at the picture, or whether you are standing in the picture. Take your choice. Most Worship Sir, if you would like to "REACT," we would be happy to have you do so. M.W. BROTHER BLINN: I am thankful that Brother Bill chose this picture to present to me here, rather than some that might have been taken. He and his wife had a campaign going throughout the year to catch me in the act of eating. I have a whole album of those pictures with my mouth open in various stages with food on its way thereto. I do thank you for this "parting shot," shall we say. I do appreciate it. I have certainly appreciated the opportunity to serve with Brother Bill for eight years in the Advancing Line of the Grand Lodge. We have enjoyed a tremendous camaraderie through all those years. Thank you, very much.


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PRESENTATIONS TO M.W. BRO.

J. EDWARD BLINN

The Grand Secretary presented Past Grand Master Blinn a leather-bound book containing: The four issues of The Freemason magazine published during the Grand Lodge Year 1980-81; the Report of the President of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri (1980); the Address of the Grand Master (1981); the Program of the 160th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The Grand Secretary also presented to M.W. Brother Blinn the Patent that certifies service to the Grand Lodge of Missouri as Grand Master from September 30, 1980 to September 29, 1981. ADDRESS OF M.W. GRAND MASTER WILLIAM

J. HILL

M. W. BROTHER HILL: Brethren and Ladies, I am not unmindful ofthe hour; I shall attempt to be sensitive to that. When the brethren came into the auditorium quite early this morning, I hope that most of them received this flier, or at least saw a copy. It was for a purpose. It says, for the benefit of those who did not receive one, alive, on stage, and in living color: "FREEMASONRY IN ACTION." What that has reference to I would like to present while we still have the ladies here. The theme of this year will be "Freemasonry in Action." You will also see what I refer to as a business card, if you please; not the business card for the Grand Master, for this is not my year; this is your year; this is the year ofthe Grand Lodge of Missouri. (The representation of the "business card" was displayed on an easel in the East.) This business card as displayed is an enlargement of the business card of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. On the back of it, I do admit, is my name and address, etc. This is a folded card. As you can see it says: "FREEMASONRY IN ACTION ... Builds CHARACTER." The emphasis is on the word "ACTION." On the inside it says: "FREEMASONRY IN ACTION Grows with V.I.T.-C." Those of you who know anything about Masonry understand the relationship between light and vitamin C in growth. The "V.I.T.-C" has periods behind it and says and stands for "Visibility In The-Community." "Serving Others Builds Character." Without making a speech, let me say that it is my opinion that the lessons we learn in Freemasonry, the character we build within the four walls are vitally important. But the day when we put them in action outside those four walls and become visible to the outside community as we serve others, then we will be truly meaningful in the community. This is the solution, in my judgment, to what some may refer to as the decline in membership or lack of interest. Those are symptoms. We must get to the core to revitalize our Fraternity as we would like to have it. I do not propose to launch any theme about action without having an "action" program. Our greatest purpose as a Fraternity is to be charitable. I hope to launch and ask your support for a very positive program which I shall refer to as "I Can." The greatest Masonic Charity that we have is the Masonic Home of Missouri. The first part of this program is called "I Can T.O.P. M.A.G.I.C." Brethren, I am asking you to join the action program "I Can T.O.P. M.A.G.I.C." for the Masonic Home. "I Can T.O.P. M.A.G.I.C." means "I Can Tell Our Pennies Make Amazingly Good Investment Cents." As the brethren leave the session today, they will be able to pick up an envelope. In the envelope is an introduction sheet which tells how to imple-


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ment this program in the lodge. It is directed to the Worshipful Master and the Secretary of each lodge. Very quickly and simply, without reading it all, if each member sends in a penny a day by adding on to his dues payment a voluntary contribution of $3.65 or more. Brethren, we can build a substantial contribution for our Masonic Home. If $3.65 is sent in with the dues, the Secretary will affix on the Dues Receipt Card an "I can T.O.P. M.A.G.LC." Gold Seal. (The Gold Seal was displayed on the easel in the East.) Brethren, I would urge you to put Freemasonry in Action, and I would suggest to you that you can start immediately to raise as much as $150,000 to $300,000 per year to add to the much needed income of the Masonic Home by this simple "action" program. (Applause.) The other part of the Charity Program - it is part of the" I Can" program involves charity other than Masonic Charity. We proclaim ourselves to be charitable; and if we are to be charitable, it must be to others, even beyond our own established charities. What a marvelous thing it would be if we placed ourselves in a position to actively carry out our purpose, that we hold out to the world, by overt and clear action of charity, that are visible to the community. As the brethren pick up the envelope, they will receive also a can for each lodge in the state. (Blue one-pound coffee can covered with an "I Can" label was displayed in the East.) The label identifies the can with the "I CAN S.O.W. A. S.E.E.D." Program - I Can Serve Others With A Sensibly Entrusted Excess Dollar. Worshipful Masters and Secretaries, I am going to ask you to use this can all during this year, like you would an almoner's tray, and fill it up to the top, even more than once if you can. At this time I am going to ask my brothers to bring in something that I want you to see, which we will use at the Grand Lodge Communication in 1982. (A giant representation of the Blue I Can mounted on a trailer was brought into the auditorium.) Brethren, this will be at that communication. We will ask you to come and bring your lodge cans and dump the contents into this large can which is exactly ten times in all dimensions the size of a lodge can. Brethren, what a marvelous thing it would be if there was a disaster anywhere in the State of Missouri - such as happened close to Bolivar this last year: A tornado - if the Grand Lodge of Missouri could take a check for $50,000 or $100,000, or whatever, to that community-to a responsible agency-and made sure that it went to those in the community who had a great need. Let me say to you, that it is not only Freemasonry in ACTION, but it would impact that community to the extent that they would remember it as Freemasons for years to come. I ask you to support these two "I CAN" Charity Programs. Brethren, we can make ourselves Visible In The Community of the State of Missouri. It is my premise, in closing, that successful men want to belong to successful organizations and to be identified with them. Brethren, if we go beyond our four walls and take what we learn and put it into action, it will become Visible In The Community. We will grow with V.LT.-C. Those who are not members will want to become members. Enthusiasm is nothing more than an inverted pyramid that we cannot explain, but respect its existence. We have the power to put into operation - into action - those principles. Brethren, I ask you to support these programs. (Applause.) I apologize for taking so much time; but I wanted to hit the ground running this year. This is the greatest opportunity that I will have for a few weeks to reach as many people as possible to explain these programs. I thank you very


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much for allowing me the time to do so, because I know how precious time is to all of us. Thank you. I am not unmindful of some courtesies, certainly. I want to thank M. W. Bro. Walter L. (Bud) Walker, who is actually my Masonic Father who appointed me in this Grand Lodge Line. I want to thank M.W. Bro. George F. Morrison, who is my Masonic grandfather, and who appointed Bud in the Line. I want to thank M.W. Brother Blinn, with whom I have had the pleasure of serving in the Line and who served as Grand Marshal today. I also want to express my appreciation to the young men who came here to form the Honor Guard. Please believe me when I say that I did not solicit that attention. That came voluntarily; and it was very much appreciated because of that fact alone. I would like to introduce my wife, who is sitting over here. JoAnne, will you stand please. (Applause.) And sitting next to her is my mother Mrs. Hill. (Applause.) I believe this concludes the part of the program at which we could have the ladies and nonmembers present. I declare this part of the program concluded. If the ladies will step out and be patient with us, we will be out just as quickly as we can close the Grand Lodge. Thank you so much for coming and sharing this installation with us. CLOSING

After the ladies and nonmembers had left the auditorium, the Grand Master declared the Grand Lodge called from ease to labor. R.W. Bro. Earl K. Dille announced that the Masonic Home Board would hold a very brief meeting immediately after the close of the Grand Lodge. M.W. Grand Master Hill thanked Brother Jack]. Stottlemyre for the music which he provided for the Grand Lodge Session. He asked the brethren to join with him in an expression of appreciation. (Applause.) M.W. Brother Hill announced that Worshipful Masters, or representatives of lodges, should pick up the envelopes and Blue Cans for their respective lodges at the tables in the hall, which are designated according to lodge numbers. In the envelopes are several things to which the Grand Master called attention: (1) An Edict issued this date - September 29, 1981 - which has to do with the adoption of a Charitable Contributions By-Law by each Constituent Lodge. In order to carry out our inherent responsibility and obligation, each lodge must fulfill that adoption of a Charitable Contributions By-Law. If this is not done, the exemption status of our great Fraternity may be in jeopardy. And also there is violation of the spirit and purpose of our own obligations. (2) A Request For Compliance, which deals basically with the request for adherence to a nonsectarian prayer on all Masonic occasions and for every effort to conduct other matters of lodge business in such a manner as will be at all times nonoffensive to any brother, regardless of his religion. (3) A Calendar of Events - a schedule of major events during the Grand Lodge Year 1981-82, which are of interest to the Craft in general. The dates given in the last two entries are to be changed as the result of action taken by the Grand Lodge. The 161 st Annual Communication will be held at Kansas City on September 27 and 28, 1982. On Saturday, September 25, there will be a gala Blue Lodge-Grand Lodge of Missouri parade in Kansas City, for which all Masonic Bodies will be invited to participate. Freemasonry can be made Visible


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In The Community by joining in this kind of event. The 160th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri was closed until the next Annual Communication - the 161st - on Monday, September 27, 1982 at Kansas City, Missouri.

Grand Master.

Grand Secretary.


OFFICERS

Grand Lodge of Missouri 1981-82 WM. J. HILL M.W. Grand Master 2330 Commerce Tower. 911 Main Street. Kansas City 64105 EARL K. DILLE Deputy Grand Master 10258 Butterworth Lane, St. Louis 63131 ROBERT J. CREDE

Senior Grand Warden

Route 2, Jefferson City 65101 VERN H. SCHNEIDER Junior Grand Warden 100 North Broadway, Suite 700, St. Louis 63102 W. MARION LUNA Grand Treasurer do Bank of Piedmont, P.O. Box 398, Piedmont 63957-1398

FRANK A. ARNOLD Grand Secretary 800 Highway 63 North. Columbia 65201-6691 - Telephone: 314-414-8561 STANTON T. BROWN Grand Lecturer Route I, Box 225, Buckner 64016 CHARLES E. SCHEURICH Senior Grand Deacon 124 Meadow Lane, Columbia 6520 I P. VINCENT KINKEAD Junior Grand Deacon Route 2, Box 243, Farmington 63640 WILLIAM H. WISBROCK , Senior Grand Steward 733 Landscape Avenue, Webster Groves 63119 THOMAS K. McGUIRE, Jr. . Junior Grand Steward 2522 South Glendale Avenue, Springfield 65804 ROBERT D. JENKINS , Senior Grand Marshal 7741 Troost, Kansas City 64131 THOMAS C. WARDEN Junior Grand Marshal P.O. Box 540, Owensville 65066-0540 EMIL O. BAYERL Grand Sword Bearer Ellison Apartments, 300 West Armour Boulevard, Kansas City 64111 BERT W. CASSELMAN Grand Pursuivant 6001 N.W. Hilltop Road, Parkville 64151 The REV. CARL L. RADFORD Grand Chaplain 2334 South Dollison, Springfield 65807 THE REV. CECIL H. HURT Grand Chaplain 400 Crestview Drive, Union 63084 DR. W. TRIBBEY NICKERSON Grand Chaplain 2309 Erie Street, North Kansas City 64116 DR. J. C. MONTGOMERY, JR., P.G.M Grand Chaplain St. John'S United Methodist Church, 5000 Washington Avenue, St. Louis 63108 THE REV. ROBERT B. ARMOUR Grand Chaplain 19 West 66th Terrace, Kansas City 64113 THE REV. WOODSON O. BENNETT, SR. Grand Chaplain 4401 Norledge, Kansas City 64123 DR. GEORGE E. WINSLOW , Grand Orator P.O. Box 263, Wimberley, Texas 78676 HERBERT C. HOFFMAN Grand Orator 2414 Commerce Tower, 911 Main Street, Kansas City 64105 EMANUEL R. SHOCKEY Grand Tiler 7916James A. Reed Road, Kansas City 64138


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STANDING COMMITTEES FOR 1981-1982 Appeals and Grievances: Harry Gershenson, Sr., Chairman, Pierre Laclede Center, Suite 1144,7733 Forsyth Boulevard, Saint Louis 63105; Lloyd L. Schainker, 7 North Seventh Street, Saint Louis 63101; HaroldJos. Toner, 922 Walnut Street, Suite 1000, Kansas City 64105; Robert M. Fenlon, P.O. Box 26, Mexico 65265; James E. Brown, 305 Moffett Avenue, Joplin 64801 Building Superoisory Board: Harry E. Thornton (1), Chairman, 916 Walnut Street, Kansas City 64106; Nelson Rowan (2), 650 North Highway 60, Republic 65738; Clarence V. Buchholz (3), 48 West 53rd Terrace, Kansas City 64112 By-Laws: J. Morgan Donelson, P.G.M., Chairman, P.O. Box 211, Princeton, Missouri 64673; William H. Vtz,Jr., 1208 Corby Building, Saint Joseph, Missouri 64501; Ronald M. Belt, 108 Vine Street, Macon, Missouri 63552; Harry Gershenson,Jr., Pierre Laclede Center, Suite 1144,7733 Forsyth Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63105; Newton R. Bradley, 10 South Tenth Street, Lexington, Missouri 64067 Chartered Lodges: John E. Adams, Chairman, 219 South Clark Avenue, Ferguson, Missouri 63135; Wilbur M. Daughtrey, 9152 Pardee Spur, Saint Louis, Missouri 63126 Correspondence: Bruce H. Hunt, P.G.M., P.O. Box 188, Kirksville, Missouri 63501 Credentials: Ray Hilton, Chairman, P.O. Box 985, Commercial Station, Springfield, Missouri 65803; Dale A. Ludwig, 8226 Marvale, Saint Louis, Missouri 63123; John E. Brueggeman, 3121 Timm Drive, Saint Louis, Missouri 63125; Cecil O. Blaylock, 217 South Louisiana Avenue, Cape Girardeau, Missouri 6370 I; The Rev. Charles Miller, 13036 Geranium Court, Saint Louis, Missouri 63141 Entertainment of Distinguished Guests: D. Eugene Wisner, Chairman, 405 Palmer, Blue Springs, Missouri 640 IS; Owen A. Sloan, 1100 South 18th Street, Blue Springs, Missouri 64015; Robert D. Jenkins, 2609 West 70th Street, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66208; K. Roger Pennel, P.O. Box 157, Fairfax, Missouri 64446; Frank A. Arnold, 733 Main Street, Boonville, Missouri 65233 Forms and Ceremonies: Frank A. Arnold, Chairman, 800 Highway 63 North, Columbia, Missouri 65201-6697; ThomasJ. Davis, Jr., P.G.M., P.O. Box 217, Piedmont, Missouri 63957; Stanton T. Brown (Ex Officio), Route 1, Box 225, Buckner, Missouri 64016 Grand Lodge Office Building: Douglas H. Garrett, Chairman, 210 Bourn Avenue, Columbia, Missouri 65201; John Edwin Wetzel, 1117 South Glenwood Avenue, Columbia, Missouri 6520 I; Ernest C. Cottle, 1409 Stone Street, Columbia, Missouri 6520 I; Wm . .J. Hill, Grand Master, 2330 Commerce Tower, 911 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64105; Frank A. Arnold, Grand Secretary, 800 Highway 63 North, Columbia, Missouri 65201-6697 Grand Master's Address: Dr. J. Edward Blinn, P.G.M., Chairman, P.O. Box 14, Marshfield, Missouri 65706-0014; and all Past Grand Masters in attendance Jurisprudence: Herbert C. Hoffman, Chairman, 2414 Commerce Tower, 911 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64105; Walter L. Walker, P.G.M., P.O. Box 487, Neosho, Missouri 64850; Warren R. Maichel, 720 Olive Street, 24th Floor, Saint Louis, Missouri 63101; Charles E. Becraft, 1311 Village Drive, SaintJoseph, Missouri 64506; Emory L. Melton, 201 West Ninth Street, Cassville, Missouri 65625 Lodges Under Dispensation: Carl G. Brown, Chairman, P.O. Box 9902, Kansas City, Missouri 64134; Jack G. Padley, 2206 Walnut Street, Higginsville, Missouri 64037; I. Lee Ratcliff, 12001 Markham Road, Independence, Missouri 64052; Walter Stanfill, P.O. Box 171, Amsterdam, Missouri 64723;Joseph G. Wehner, 6007 East 86th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64138 Masonic Boards of Relief: Albert H. Van Gels, Chairman, 24 Spring Drive, Florissant, Missouri 63031; Jack A. Furlong, 1330 Linwood Boulevard, Kansas City, Missouri 64109; Jack C. Collister, 3727 Wyandott, Kansas City, Missouri 64111; Robert Lytle, 1502 Marsh, Kansas City, Missouri 64126 Masonic Education: Thomas C. Warden (3), Chairman 106 East Washington Street, P.O. Box 650, Owensville, Missouri 65066; Joseph S. Van Dolah (1), 10209 East 95th


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Terrace, Kansas City, Missouri 64134; Dr. J. c. Montgomery, Jr., P.G.M., (2), Saint John's United Methodist Church, 5000 Washington Avenue, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108; Olin S. McDaniel (2), P.O. Box 415, Bonne Terre, Missouri 63628-0415; Bruce H. Hunt, P.G.M., (3), P.O. Box 188, Kirksville, Missouri 63501; Ronald M. Compton (I), 3633 Lindell Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108; Wm. J. Hill (Ex Officio), 2330 Commerce Tower, 911 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64105; Earl K. Dille (Ex Officio), 10258 Butterworth Lane, Saint Louis, Missouri 63131; Robert J. Crede (Ex Officio), Route 2,Jefferson City, Missouri 65101; Vern H. Schneider (Ex Officio), 100 North Broadway, Suite 700, Saint Louis, Missouri 63102 Mileage and Per Diem: Orville L. Livingston, Chairman, Route I, Edgerton, Missouri 64444; Edward A. Lang, Route 2, Box 266, Cuba, Missouri 65453; Jack R. Clark, 9913 McGee, Kansas City, Missouri 64111 Necrology: Frank P. Briggs, P.G.M., 1132 North Jackson, Macon, Missouri 63552; Dr. Harold O. Grauel, P.G.M., P.O. Box 389, Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701; William H. Chapman, P.G.M., 20 West Lockwood, Webster Groves, Missouri 63119; Walter L. Walker, P.G.M., P.O. Box 487, Neosho, Missouri 64850 Relief and Charity: James E. Dearing, Chairman, 211 South Central, Saint Louis, Missouri 63105; Harry C. Ploetze, 5417 Donovan Avenue, Saint Louis, Missouri 63109; Robert G. Bird, 2415 East Latoka, Springfield, Missouri 65804; RobertJ. Crede, Route 2, Jefferson City, Missouri 65101; Carl I. Stein, Secretary, Masonic Home of Missouri, 5351 Delmar Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63112 Ritual: Stanton T. Brown, Chairman, Route I, Box 225, Buckner, Missouri 64016; Freelon K. Hadley, 1506 Wayne Drive, Saint Joseph, Missouri 64506; Carroll R. Moorman, Route I, Box 85-A, Saint Clair, Missouri 63077; Ronnie L. House, P.O. Box 335, Mansfield, Missouri 65704; Dale A. Ludwig, 8226 Marvale, Saint Louis, Missouri 63123; Eugene E. "Pat" McFarland, P.O. Box 146, Liberal, Missouri 64736 Ways and Means: Walter H. Baird (2), Chairman, 234 East Parkway Drive, Columbia, Missouri 65201; William H. Utz,Jr., (3),1208 Corby Building, Saint Joseph, Missouri 64501; Edwin B. Brzezinski (3), 9148 Pardee Spur, Saint Louis, Missouri 63126; Owen A. Sloan (2), 1100 South 18th Street, Blue Spings, Missouri 64015; W. Marion Luna, Grand Treasurer, C/O Bank of Piedmont, P.O. Box 398, Piedmont, Missouri 63957 SPECIAL COMMITTEES FOR 1981-1982

George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association: Dr. J. c. Montgomery, Jr., P.G.M., Chairman, Saint John's United Methodist Church, 5000 Washington Avenue, Saint Louis 63108; Homer L. Ferguson, P.G.M., 1927 North Circle Drive, Jefferson City 65101; Fielding A. Poe, P.G.M., 501 North Lafayette Street, Florissant 63031; Gus O. Nations, P.G.M., 2440 Copper Beech Drive, Saint Louis 63131; Dr. James A. Noland,Jr., P.G.M., Osage Beach 65065; Col. James M. Sellers, P.G.M., Sunset View, Lexington 64067 Jurisdiction: Vern H. Schneider, Chairman, 100 North Broadway, Suite 700, Saint Louis, Missouri 63102; David R. Hensley, 230 South Bemiston, Suite 410, Saint Louis, Missouri 63105; Frederick M. Woodruff, 705 Olive Street, Saint Louis, Missouri 63101; Gerald J. Zafft, One Mercantile Center, Saint Louis, Missouri 63101 Public Relations: Robert H. Bray, Chairman, 325 Corprew, Fayette, Missouri, 65248; Daniel F. Cole, 207 West Haven, Jefferson City, Missouri 65101; Herman A. Orlick P.G.M., 12 Cambridge Court, Glendale, Missouri 63122 Public Schools: Walter C. Ploeser, Chairman, 3633 Lindell Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108; Dr. G. Hugh Wamble, 4840 N.E. Chouteau Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64119; Dr. CharlesJ. McClain, Northeast Missouri State University, Kirksville, Missouri 63501; Bruce H. McCully, 2503 Stephenson, Sedalia, Missouri 65301; Walter H. Baird, 234 East Parkway Drive, Columbia, Missouri 6520 I; Dr. M. Graham Clark, School of the Ozarks, Point Lookout, Missouri 65726; Elvis A. Mooney, P.G.M., 117 North Prairie Street, Bloomfield, Missouri 63825; Ronald M. Compton, 3633 Lindell Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108; Albert J. Elfrank, Route 2, Advance, Missouri 63730


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Recognition ofForeign Grand Lodges: John Black Vrooman, Chairman, P.O. Box 402, St. Louis, Missouri 63166; William R. Denslow, P.G.M., P.O. Box 529, Trenton, Missouri 64683; Frank A. Arnold, 800 Highway 63 North, Columbia, Missouri 65201-6697 Youth: Ronald M. Compton, Chairman, 3633 Lindell Boulevard, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108; Lionel J. Goede, 715 Murray Hill Drive, Fenton, Missouri 63026; Eugene E. Wilson, III Loch Lane, Columbia, Missouri 65201; O. Wesley Konering, 611 Olive Street, Saint Louis, Missouri 63101; Dan C. Peak, 9702 Beacon, Kansas City, Missouri 64134

OTHER APPOINTMENT Auditor: Robert Asbury, 1750 S. Brentwood Blvd., St. Louis 63144 314-961-9030.

Telephone:

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI Officers 1980-1981 Honorary Chairman: Wm. J. Hill, 2330 Commerce Tower, gil Main St., Kansas City 64105. President: Earl K. Dille, 10258 Butterworth La., St. Louis 63131. Vice President: Harry C. Ploetze, 5417 Donovan Ave., St. Louis 63109. Treasurer: Joseph H. Collison, P.O. Box 126, Weston 64098. Secretary: Carl I. Stein, 5351 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis 63112.

Directors Robert G. Bird (1983), 2415 East Lotaka, Springfield 65804. Joseph H. Collison (1984), P.O. Box 126, Weston 64098. RobertJ. Crede, Rt. 2,Jefferson City 65101. James E. Dearing (1983), 6330 Waterman, St. Louis 63130. Earl K. Dille, 10258 Butterworth Lane, St. Louis 63131. Albert J. Elfrank (1985), Rt. 2, Advance 63730. Wm. J. Hill, 2330 Commerce Tower, 911 Main St., Kansas City 64105. Robert D. Jenkins (1984), 7741 Troost, Kansas City 64131. K. Roger Pennel (1982), P.O. Box 157, Fairfax 64446. Harry C. Ploetze (1982), 5417 Donovan Ave., St. Louis 63109. Charles E. Scheurich, 124 Meadow Lane, Columbia 65201. Vern H. Schneider, 100 N. Broadway, Ste. 700, St. Louis 63102. D. Eldon Turnbull (1985), Rt. 3, Box 257, Troy 63379. Administrator H. David Thomas, Masonic Home of Missouri, 5351 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis 63112. Secretary to the Board of Directors Carl I. Stein, Masonic Home of Missouri, 5351 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis 63112. Co-Ordinator of Fraternal Relations Howard E. Ward, Masonic Home of Missouri, 5351 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis 63112. MISSOURI LODGE OF RESEARCH Master: Stanton T. Brown, Rt. I, Box 225, Buckner 640 16; Secretary-Treasurer: A. W. "Whit" Griffith, P.O. Box 480, Fulton 65251-0480 UVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION Name and Address Homer L. Ferguson, 1927 N. Circle Dr., Jefferson City 65101 Col. James M. Sellers, Sunset View, Lexington 64067

Year of Seroice 1951-52 1953-54


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Harold M. Jayne, 129 S. Main St., Memphis 63555 Frank P. Briggs, 1132 N.Jackson St., Macon 63552 Dr. Harold O. Grauel, P.O. Box 389, Cape Girardeau 63701 Bruce H. Hunt, P.O. Box 188, Kirksville 63501 George F. Morrison, Clayton - P.O. Box 16674, St. Louis 63105 A. Basey Vanlandingham, Rt. 3, Columbia 6520 I William R. Denslow, P.O. Box 529, Trenton 64683 Elvis A. Mooney, 117 N. Prairie St., Bloomfield 63825 J. Morgan Donelson, P.O. Box 211, Princeton 64673 William H Chapman, 20 W. Lockwood, Webster Groves 63119 ThomasJ. Davis, Jr., P.O. Box 217, Piedmont 63957 Walter L. Walker, P.O. Box 487, Neosho 64850 Herman A. Orlick, 12 Cambridge Ct., Glendale 63122 Lewis C. Wes Cook, P.O. Box 12444, North Kansas City 64116 Fielding A. Poe, 50 IN. Lafayette St., Florissant 63031 Dr. James A. Noland, Jr., Osage Beach 65065 Dr. J. c. Montgomery, Jr., P.O. Box 574, Mexico 65265 Gus O. Nations, 2440 Copper Beach Dr., St. Louis 63131 Dr. J. Edward Blinn, P.O. Box 14, Marshfield 65706

155 1956-57 1957-58 1959-60 1960-61 1964-65 1965-66 1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 1970-71 1971-72 1973-74 1974-75 1975-76 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1979-80 1980-81

PAST GRAND TREASURER

William H. Utz, Jr., 1208 Corby Bldg., St. Joseph 64501. PAST GRAND SECRETARY

Elmer W. Wagner, 506 Redondo Dr., Ballwin 63011. PAST GRAND LECTURER

Freelon K. Hadley, 1506 Wayne Dr., St. Joseph 64506. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS 1981-1982

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND LECTURERS 1981-1982

I. Joe M. March (635), Rt. I, Box Ill, Greentop 63546 2. Gilvie Bertram (168), Rutledge 63563

I. Kenneth K. Sowers (588), Rt. I, Box 133, Alexandria 63430 2. Dale C. Motter (366), 909 Fairview, Kirksville 6350 I 3. Arthur R. Cullor (210), Rt. I, Lucerne 64655 4. James H. Hunter, Jr. (35), Rt. I, Box 179, Princeton 64673 5. Larry D. Peugh (328), Mt. Moriah 64665 6. Glenn V. Bulla (377), 112 Martin St., King City 64463 7. Richard Ray Cordell (50), Rt. I, Box 127, Parnell 64475 8. Darrell L. Jones (483), Rt. 2, Box 37, Fairfax 64446 9. Robert C. Jarrett (269), 2609 S. II th St., St. Joseph 64503 10. Benjamin E. Lollar (15), Winston 64689 11. Jim B. Rowland (31), 4904 N. Sycamore Dr., Kansas City 64119 12. Billy Joe Cox (89), 1616Jennings PI., Chillicothe 6460 I

3. Harold L. Stone (206), Rt. 1,- Box 62, Powersville 64672 4. Gerald D. Gentry (35), 1007 E. Main St., Princeton 64673 5. Robert A. Bartlett (97), 805 S. 20th St., Bethany 64424 6. G. Oren Steinman (377), P.O. Box 361, King City 64463 7. Michael K. Monk (511), Rt. I, Box 116, Skidmore 64487 8. William M. Kee (139), Rt. I, Box 4B, Oregon 64473 9. Stanford M. Burge (138), 905 S. 4th St. Terr., Savannah 64485 10. F. Kenneth Eads (488), P.O. Box 197, Jamesport 64648 II. Chesley E. McAfee (193), Rt. 2, Box 162, Orrick 64077 12. John D. Patton (232), Rt. 2, Box 77, Polo 64671


156

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

13. Edwin L. Smith (481), Rt. 2, Box 388, Marceline 64658 14. Earl Wayne Orr (228), #7 Sharon Dr., Box 602, Shelbina 63468 15. Clarence F. Houser (28), 2410 Palmyra Rd., Hannibal 63401 16. John E. Wetzel (92), 116 N. Fourth St., Louisiana 63353 17. Gillam Street (23), Rt. 3, Perry 63462 18. Billie Pollard (344),715 S. Morley St., Moberly 65270 19. C. Gail Brown (628), P.O. Box 98, Mendon 64660 20. James R. Paul (52), 40 I Santa Fe St., Carrollton 64633 21. Cecil W. Breid (13), 709 N.E. 81st Terr., Kansas City 64118 22A. D. Eugene Wisner (522), 405 Palmer, Blue Springs 64015 22B. Paul E. Kelly (563), 8800 Buckingham Ln, Apt. 18, Kansas City 64138 23. John M. Townsend (444), Rt. I, Box 163, Orrick 64077 24. Lloyd R. Finney (205), 604 Leadwood Dr., Marshall 65340 25. Dr. David L. Dimond (47), 305 Corprew, Fayette 65248 26. Dr. Wilbur R. Enns (602), 506 Bourn Ave., Columbia 65201 27. Roy Fowler (491), 713 N. Jefferson Vandalia 63382 28. John P. Simpson (246), 621 Cynthia Ln., Montgomery City 63361 29. James A. Vaughn (199), 212-214 Broadway, Elsberry 63343 30. Euell J. Sweeten (46), 3 Mark Twain Ct., O'Fallon 63366 31. Edward Ewing Shikles (90), Rt. I, Box 109, Russellville 65074 32. Kimber W. Key (593), P.O. Box 202, St. Clair 63077 33A. William B. Stephenson, Jr. (9), 10049 StoneJl Dr., St. Louis 63123 33B. FrankJ. Danko (416), 4337 Oleatha Ave., St. Louis 63116 34. Curtis G. Long (45), 512 Margarte Ln., Belton 64012 35. A. Freeman Stanfill (141), Rt. I, Box 40 I, Amoret 64722 36. Gary A. Inlow (236), 2795 Maplewood Cir., Sedalia 65301 37. Wayne U. Thomas (548), 307 E. Florence, Windsor 65360 38. William E. Brenneman (83), Linn Creek Star Rt., Lebanon 65536

1981

13. Virgil W. Slaughter (325), P.O. Box 224, Meadville 64659 14. R. Clyde Foster (332), 921 E. McKinsey St., Moberly 65270 15. Lee B. Turner (188), 4907 Prospect Ave., Hannibal 63401 16. Lester O. Henderson (92), 811 King St., Mexico 65265 17. Lecil Ulry (302), Rt. I, Perry, 63462 18. Delbert Dailey (344), 837 Myra St., Moberly 65270 19. H. Dale DeWeese (73), Rt. I, Box 143A, Brunswick 65236 20. A. Merlin Armstrong (52), 712 W. Sixth St., Carrollton 64633 21. Marvin G. Shull (13), 2304 N.E. Shady Ln., Kansas City 64118 22A. Kenneth L. Goad (305), 16116 E. 30th, Independence 64055 22B. Melvin J. Sanders (569), 9409 E. 80th St., Raytown 64138 23. Richard F. Martin (149), 606 S. 23rd St., Lexington 64067 24. Thomas A. Meads (205), 208 E. Rea St., Marshall 65340 25. Daniel C. Ray (4), 217 W. Broadway, New Franklin 65274 26. William G. Barnett (356), Rt. I, Box 258, Harrisburg 65256 27. William A. Gamblian (491), 615 E. Park St., Vandalia 63382 28. Charles N. Alcorn (46), Rt. I, Box 255, O'Fallon 63366 29. Herald E. Schaper (558), P.O. Box 9, Moscow Mills 63362 30. Ezra F. WilIams (46), 7 Knight Lane, O'Fallon 63366 31. Nolen H. Rinne (326), Rt. 2, Box 427, Holts Summit 65043 32. Lee O. King (534), 307 E. Sand St., Pacific 63069 33A. David E. Greco (641), 7307 Sharp Ave., St. Louis 631]6 33B. Ervin A. Drewing (626),4209 Humphrey, St. Louis 63116 34. Billy K. Thomas (147), 1203 Melinda, Harrisonville 64701 35. Arthur R. Zellmer (368), Rt. I, Amoret 64722 36. Robert D. Weikal (236),420 S. Grand Ave., Sedalia 65301 37. Edgar L. Kneip (548), 418 Peyton St., Clinton 64735 38. Virgil R. Bradsher (152), State Road "F", Sunrise Beach 65079


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

39. Elden Ommert (145), P.O. Box 54, Raymondville 65555 40. Carl P. Brown (673), 2537 Starling Airport Rd, Arnold 63010 41. Everett ,(Guy) Goodwin (44), Rt. 4, Stockton 65785 42. Lacey Stapp (87), P.O. Box 12, Greenfield 65661 43. Grover G. Phillips (605), Rt. I, Harwood 64750 44. Warren E. Carr (471), 502 E. Central St., Oronogo 64855 45. John S. McMullin (422), 717 W. Seminole, Springfield 65807 46. Jesse P. Matthews (469), Rural Rt., Nebo 65471 47. Angus C. Highley,Jr. (675), P.O. Box 63, Bunker 63629 48. Harold]. Richardson (424), 502 Norwood Dr., Bonne Terre 63628 49. Charles H. Daume,Jr. (221), Star Rt., Oak Ridge 63769 50. Harry H. Sutherland (407), 1300 E. Marshall St., Charleston 63834 51. Arblean McHugh (665), Rt. I, Box 260, Wardell 63879 52. John Alan Heneger (526), Rt. I, Box 34B, Piedmont 63957 53. John A. Foster (536), Rt. 2, Box 252, Willow Springs 65793 54. Duane A. Eiserman (587), 418 N. Sycamore St., Branson 65616 55. Charles A. Donica (129), 318 Broadway, Monett 65708 56. Clinton H. Shaddox, Jr. (647), P.O. Box 171,Jane 64846 57A. J. Bert Thacker (639), 14831 Larchburr Dr., Bridgeton 63044 57B. D. Robert Downey (652), 13006 Musket Ct., St. Louis 63141 57C. Charles C. Long (443), 7260 Pershing Ave., St. Louis 63130 58. W. Roger Bowness (381), Rt. 5, Box 22AC, Eldon 65026 59. Victor L. Ford (391), 7916 Arlington, Raytown 64138 60. Oscar B. Rogers (406), Rt 2, Box 218, Malden 63863

157

39. Maurice Mayberry (77), Rt. 2, Box 3, Cook Station 65449 40. Clifford N. Talley (143), 601 N. School St., Desloge 6360 I 41. Ronnie West (44), Rt. 2, Fair Play 65649 42. Dr. Peter]. Jackson (283), Rt. 3, Stockton 65785 43. Eugene E. "Pat" McFarland (187), P.O. Box 146, Liberal 64762 44. Robert E. Hammond (512), 328 E. Daugherty, Carterville 64835 45. Michael D. Ballard (477), 201 David Ln., Box 183, Rogersville 65742 46. Ronnie L. House (543), P.O. Box 335, Mansfield 65704 47. James E. Newton (509), P.O. Box 135, Van Buren 63965 48. Joseph E. Stevens (234), 515 Mill St., Rivermines 63601 49. Laymon A. Allgood (672), 1735 Ridgeway Dr., Cape Girardeau 63701 50. W. Carter Bell (532), 216 Carter St., Dexter 63841 51. Theodore T. Martin (571), 102 E. Washington St., Hayti 63851 52. Charles E. Divine (209), P.O. Box475, Poplar Bluff 6390 I 53. George A. Collins (182), 50 I Pennsylvania Ave., West Plains 65775 54. Carnell E. Cutbirth (515), Rt. I, Box 293B, Galena 65656 55. John Robert Mullins (284),1010 Sunset St., Aurora 65605 56. Jimmie L. Moreland (247), 1305 Wyandotte St., Seneca 64865 57A. Billy Ray Abbott (542), 430 Chanslor Ave., Ferguson 63135 57B. Theodore R. Brown (636), 6350 Mayville Dr., St. Louis 63129 57C. Carl E. Herbert (566), 2604 Circle Dr., Maplewood 63143 58. J. Dwight McDonald (591), Rt. 2, Barnett 65011 59. Donald Earl Scott (76), 14909 E. 39th St., Independence 64055 60. Dr. Guster R. Madle (68), 210 John R. St., Kennett 63857


158

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LODGES WITH DISTRICT NUMBERS No.

District

Name

A 602 444 366 355 590 10 219 544 198 659 255 347 141 443 377 356 621 193 529 412 389 633 346 673 55 100 156 127 267 26

217 116 353 591 367 365 3 393 632 373 450 170 642 667 378 573 See

Acacia Ada Adair Adelphi Advance Agency Albert Pike Algabil Allensville Alpha Alton America Amsterdam Anchor Ancient Craft Ancient Landmark Anderson Angerona Apollo Appleton City Arcana Archie Arlington Arnold Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland Athens Aurora Ava

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26 23 2 21 50 9 22-B 33-B 6

22-A 53 33-B 35 57-C 6

26 56 II 57-B 37 3

34 39 40 24 45 26 6 33-B 46

No.

Name

97 537 379 150 41 535 153 102 337 195 45 597 587 135 334 616 80 86 269 501 675 442 254

Bethany Bethel

:i~:::~Sg

District

. .

.:::::::::::::::::

Bismarck Blackwell Bloomfield Bloomington Blue Springs Bolivar Bonhomme Bosworth Branson Braymer Breckenridge Brentwood Bridgeton Brookfield Brotherhood Buckner Bunker Burlington Butler

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 14 54 9 48 40 50 14 59 41 57-C 20 54 12 12 57-B 57-A 13 9 59 47 7 35

C

416 Cache 33-B 328 Cainsville 5 486 Cairo.................... 18 552 Calhoun 37 183 California................ 31 38 Callao 14 63 Cambridge............... 24 169 Camden Point 21 B 284 Canopy.................. 55 Barbee 24 231 Cardwell................. 60 Barnes................... 46 549 Carl Junction . . . . . . . . . . . .. 44 Barnesville............... 47 249 Carroll 20 Barnett.................. 58 401 Carterville 44 Barry.................... 55 197 Carthage................. 44 Bayou 53 461 Caruthersville 51 Beacon 57-A 147 Cass..................... 34 Bee Hive 11 305 Cecile Daylight 22-A Belgrade................. 40 172 Censer................... 14 Belle 39 674 Central Crossing. . . . . . . . .. 55 Belton................... 34 59 Centralia................. 26 Benevolence 12 615 Chaffee.................. 49 Benjamin Franklin. . . . . . .. 57-B 185 Chamois................. 31 Berkeley................. 57-A 331 Charity 9 Berlin 10 407 Charleston............... 50 Bernie................... 60 487 Chilhowee 36 "Lodge Directory by Districts" pages 179-199 for location: Town and County.


No.

District

Name

392 342 662 610 559 17 645 207 601 651 463 520 548 482 274 485 595 168 534 533 120 432 369 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519 368 669 586 312 525

159

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

1981

Christian Circle Clarence ................. Clark .................... Clarksdale ............... Clarksville ............... Clarkton ................. Clay Clayton ' " ............... Cleveland ................ Clifton Clifton Heights ........... Clinton .................. Clintonville .............. Cold Spring Coldwater ................ Cole Camp ............... Colony .................. Columbia Comfort ................. Compass ................. Competition .............. Composite .0 ............. Continental Conway .................. Cooper Corinthian ............... Cornerstone .............. Cosby Cosmos Country Club Cowgill Craft Craig .................... Crane ................... Crescent Hill ............. Crestwood ............... Criterion ................. Cuba .................... Cunningham ............. ••

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59 37 14 18 10 16 60 II

57-B 34 53 33-B 37 43 36 34 36 2 32 55 21 38 52 10 38 25 36 57-B 9 33-A 22-B 12 15 8 54 35 57-C 44 39 19

D

492 Daggett.................. 539 Dawn.................... 400 Decatur.................. 88 Defiance................. 137 Delphian................. 119 De SOlO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 532 Dexter................... 325 Dockery 300 Doric....................

28 12 55 6 47 40 50 13 45

No.

285 575 630 384 291 318 599 607 14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

District

Name

E Earl . .................... Easter . .................. East Gate . ............... East Prairie . ............. Edina . ................... Eldorado . ............... Elvins ................. Eminence . ............... Eolia . ................... Equality . ................ Erwin . .................. "

Essex Euclid Eureka ..0 ............... Evergreen Everton Ewing . .................. Excello . ..• 0.· ..•.•..•..• Excelsior •

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10 32 22-B 50 2 1 48 47 16 39 33-A 50 57-C 19 32 42 15 14 49

F 483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542 339 23 668 578 453 554 212 363 636 352 89 48

Fairfax . ................. Fairmont . ............... Fair Play ................. Farmington Fayette . ................. Fellowship . .............. Fenton . ................. Ferguson . ............... Fidelity . ................. Florida . ................. Florissant . ............... Forest Park . ............. Forsyth . ................. Foster . .................. Four Mile . ............... Fraternal . ............... Freedom . ................ Friend . .................. Friendship ............... Fulton ...................

515 106 655 522 422 9 427 218

Galena................... Gallatin.................. Gardenville Gate City Gate of the Temple George Washington . .. Glenwood................ Good Hope

•••••••

0

......

8 1 41 48 25 44 57-C 57-A 21 17 57-A 57-C 54

35 60 32 57-C

54 12 27

G 54 10 57-C 22-A 45 33-A 1 33-B

See "Lodge Directory by Districts" pages 179-199 for location: Town and County.


160

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE District

No.

Name

72 397 289 644 514 579 276 618 272 66 173 414 635 107

Gorin ................... . Gower .................. . Graham ................ . Grain Valley ............ . Granby ................. . Grandin ................ . Grand P.iver .............

216 336 224 188 499 672 171 571 459 354 117 37 477 338 123 288 187 104 211 527 364 362 279 262 660 251 239 215 4 32 415 30

Hale City ............... . Hallsville ................ . Hamilton ............... . Hannibal ............... . Harmony ............... . Harold O. Grauel ........ . Hartford ................ . Hayti .................... Hazelwood ............... Hebron ................. . Helena ................. . Hemple ................. . Henderson .............. . Herculaneum ........... . Hermann ............... . Hermitage .............. . Hermon ................ . Heroine ................ . Hickory Hill ............. Higbee .................. Higginsville ............. . Hiram .................. . Hogles Creek ........... . Holden ................. . Holliday ................ . Hope ................... . Hopewell ............... . Hornersville ............. . Howard ................ . Humphreys ............. . Hunnewell .............. . Huntsville ............... .

Grand\·.~:\\'

...............

Granite ................. . Grant City .............. . Gray Summit ............ . Greensburg ............. . Greentop ............... . Greenville ............... .

1 11 7 59 56 47 34 59 36 6 32 2 1 52

H

20 26 12 15 33-B 49 3 51 45 27 9 11 45 40 32 41 43 22-B 31 18 23 1 41 36 17 32 47 60 25 3 14 18

District

No. Name

54 536 381 154 143 446

Index ................... Ingomar ................. Ionia .................... Ionic .................... Irondale ................. Ivanhoe ..................

34 53 58 48 40 22-B

82 541 447 500 564 398 43 640 315 480 164 321 457 335 411

Jackson .................. Jacksonville .............. Jacoby ................... Jameson ................. Jamesport ................ Jasper ................... Jefferson ................ Jennings ................. Jerusalem ................ Jewel .................... Joachim ................. Jonathan ................. Jonesburg ................ Joplin Joppa ...................

13 18 6 10 10 44 31 57-A 42 34 40 6 28 44 46

220 311 68 243 376 105 484 245 582

Kansas City .............. Kearney ................. Kennett .................. Keystone ................. King Hill ................ Kirksville ................ Kirkwood ................ Knob Noster ............. Koshkonong .............

•••••••••

••••

·0

••••

K

22-A 11 60 57-C 9 2 57-C 36 53

L

222 La Belle ................. 15 83 Laclede .................. 38 115 Laddonia ................ 27 489 Lakeville ................. 50 292 Lamar ................... 43 460 Lambskin ................ 33-A 574 La Monte ................ 36 531 Lanes Prairie ............. 39 237 La Plata ................. 14 4 253 Laredo .................. 592 La Russell ................ 44 506 Lathrop ................. 11 145 Latimer .................. 39 598 Leadwood ............... 48 410 Iberia .................. . 38 77 Lebanon ................. 39 581 Illmo .................... 49 149 Lexington . ............... 23 76 Independence ........... . 59 31 Liberty .................. 11 See "Lodge Directory by Districts" pages 179-199 for location: Town and County.


1981 No.

161

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Name

302 Lick Creek............... 666 Lilbourn 138 Lincoln.................. 326 Linn 152 Linn Creek 521 Lockwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 488 Lock Springs 257 Lodge of Light 259 Lodge of Love 268 Lodge of Truth 403 Lowry City

District

No.

17 51 9 31 38 42 10 5 1 14 37

99 614 327 158 637 221

M 125 McFall-Gentryville 6 433 Macks Creek 38 626 Magnolia 33-B 112 Maitland................. 8 406 Malden.................. 60 543 Mansfield................ 46 566 Maplewood 57-B 481 Marceline................ 13 110 Marcus 48 569 Marlborough............. 22-B 324 McDonald 59 260 Mechanicsville............ 30 16 Memphis 1 628 Mendon 19 313 Meramec 57-C 35 Mercer 4 2 Meridian................. 33-B 244 Middle Fabius I 567 Miller 55 151 Milton................... 18 471 Mineral.................. 44 1 Mi!l.:lOuri-Commonwealth.. 33-A 639 Mizpah 57-A 344 Moberly 18 144 Modern.................. 41 612 Mokane.................. 27 129 Monett 55 295 Moniteau 31 64 Monroe.................. 17 490 Montevallo............... 43 246 Montgomery 28 58 Monticello 15 603 Morehouse............... 50 184 Morley 50 351 Mosaic................... 48 558 Moscow.................. 29 294 Mound City 8 476 Mount Hope 23 40 Mount Moriah 57-B 439 Mt. Olive 45 See "Lodge Directory by Districts" pages

District

Name

Mt. Vernon Mount Washington Mt. Zion................. Mountain Grove Mountain View Mystic Tie

55 59 53 46 53 49

N 25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 643 157 358 622

Naphtali Naylor Nelson Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton New Hope New London New Madrid New Salem Nineveh Nodaway Noel Northeast North Star Northwest Norwood

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33-A 52 24 56 27 5 29 17 51 29 29 7 56 22-A

. . . . . . . . . .

33-A 51 33-A 8 22-A 24 43 45 57-A 32

8

8 46

o 163 Occidental 671 Odom 576 Olive Branch 139 Oregon 546 Orient 518 Oriental 303 Osage 227 O'Sullivan 623 Overland 624 Owensville p

241 Palestine................. 30 18 Palmyra 15 19 Paris Union 17 308 Parrott 10 65 Pattonsburg.............. 10 II Pauldingville............. 30 330 Paul Revere 33-B 319 Paulville 2 551 Pendleton..... . . . . . . . . . .. 48 670 Perryville 49 92 Perseverance............. 16 502 Philadelphia.............. 15 136 Phoenix 16 399 Pike..................... 16 179-199 for location: Town and County.


162 No.

Name

652 182 469 504 113 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 131 556 503 179 657 658 190 596 180 383

Pilgrim Pilot Knob Plato Platte City Plattsburg Pleasant Grove Pleasant Hope Point Pleasant Polar Star Pollock Polo Pomegranate Poplar Bluff Potosi Prairie Prairie Home Pride of the West Progress Purity Putnam Puxico Pyramid Pythagoras

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

390

Queen City

33 223 391 570 479 385 57 361 13 496 435 663 213 550 404 204 316 238 90 572

Ralls Ray Raytown Republic Rich Hill Richland Richmond Riddick Rising Sun Robert Burns Rockbridge Rockhill Rolla Rose Hill Rosendale Rowley Rural Rushville Russellville Rutledge

No.

Name

57-C 46 46 21 II 25 41 51 57-B 3 12 33-B 52 40 5 25 33-A 57-A 57-B

208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448 126 236 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 3 I0 75 511 271 206 547 466 296 273 588 234 230 28 78 20 93 109 419 133 634 538 283 608 174 69 555 263 617

Salisbury Samaritan Sampson Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Seaman Sedalia Senath Shamrock Shaveh Shawnee Sheffield Shekinah Shelbina Sheldon Sikeston Silex Skidmore Solomon Somerset South Gate Southwest Sparta St. Clair St. Francisville St. Francois St. James St. John'S St. Joseph St. Louis St. Mark's Stanberry Star Star of the West Steele Stella Stockton Strafford Sturgeon Sullivan Summersville Summit Swope Park

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19 48 53 17 44 9 9 43 3 36 60 27 57-B 36 22-A 40 14 43 50 29 7 45

565 438 299 177

Tebbetts................. Temperance Temple.................. Texas

27 II 22-A 46

3

50 33-B 55

R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .

17 23 59 45 35 38 23 41 21 53 53 22-B 39 57-B 9 21 22-A 9 31

39 48

3

22-A 56 54 37 I 48 39 15 9 57-B 49 6 37 48 51 56 42 45 26 32 46 59 22-B

1

1

S Salem ................... Saline

District

District

Q

225 226

1981

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

See "Lodge Directory by Districts" pages 179-199 for location: Town and County.


1981 No.

Name

661 56 638 205 641 122 440 34 360 114 12

Theodore Roosevelt Tipton Trenton ................. Triangle .. ...... ......... Trilumina ........... ..... Trinity . ..... ............ Triplett . ........ ...... ... Trowel ... ............... Troy .................... Tuscan .... .............. Twilight ...... ....... .... Tyro ....................

593 124 210 5 495 421

Union ....... ............ Union Star ......... ...... Unionville United ................... Unity .................... Urbana ............ ......

629 509 491 320 676 94 62

Valley Park ............... . Van Buren ........ ....... Vandalia ............ ..... Versailles ..... ........... Viburnum ............... Vienna .................. Vincil ....................

III

163

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

••

0

•••••••••••••••

District

No.

Name

57-B 31 4 33-A 24 33-B 19 49 29 33-A 26 40

74 609 87 61 526 375 512 98 84 22 613 46 445 103 396 15 53 340 162 417 620 370 29 540 430 387

Warren .................. Warrenton . .............. Washington . ............. Waverly Wayne ................... Waynesville .............. Webb City ............... Webster ................. Webster Groves . ......... Wellington ............... Wellston ................. Wentzville ··.0 ........... West Gate ................ West View ............... Western Light ............ Western Star Weston .................. Westport . ................ Whitesville . .............. Whitewater .............. Willard .......................... Williamstown ................ Windsor ................. Winigan .................. Winona .................. Woodside ................

50

Xenia . ...................

U

0

•••••••••••••

32 10 3 45 43 41

V 57-C 47 27 58 48 39 11

District

•••••••••••

.0

0

•••••

•••••••••

o

19 30 42 23 52 38 44 45 57-C 9 57-A 30 57-C 49 41 10 21 22-B 9 49 45 15 37 3 47 53

X 7

Y

W 52 605 456 665

Wakanda ................ Walker .................. Wallace ....... ........... Wardell ... ...............

563 20 43 25 51

York

....................

22-B

Z

545 189

Zalma ................... Zeredatha ................

49 9

See "Lodge Directory by Districts" pages 179-199 for location: Town and County.


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT

Name and Number and

D~~eL~~eharter

"C

] ~

I 2 3 4 5 7 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 40 41

Missouri-Commonwealth (10-8-1816) Meridian (5-6-1852) . Beacon (5-10-1849) . Howard (5-6-1852) . l;nited (5-30-1857) . O'Sullivan (10-19-1867) . George Washington (5-10-1849) . Agency (6-1-1866) . Pauldingville (5-8-1852) . Ty~o (4-7-1825) . RISIng Sun (5-6-1852) . Eolia (10-16-1884) . Western Star (6-1-1866) . Memphis (5-6-1852) . Clarksville (10-8-1830) . Palmyra (4-25-1831) . Paris Union (3-1-1835) . St. Louis (10-24-1836) . Havana (10-16-1879) . Wellington (5-6-1852) " . Florida (5-6-1852) . Naphtali (10-14-1839) . Ava (10-13-1887) . Evergreen (5-26-1864) . St. John's (10-14-1839) . Windsor (6-2-1866) . Huntsville (10-8-1840) . Liberty (10-9-1840) . Humphreys (10-13-1887) . Ralls (6-9-1853) . Troy (10-7-1841) . Mercer (6-9-1853) . Cooper (10-9-1841) . Hemple (10-18-1900) . Callao (6-2-1866) . Mt. Moriah (10-14-1841) . Bismarck (10-15-1891) .

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75 I~

9 55

II 3

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61

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1M %0 I

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26 2 12 17

28

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~olns~l~dlated .W;lh/ G~~trIYVH~ N/'O .. :2f as ~~~'all-~:entrYVillf

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1,440.00 3,945.00 3,570.00 576.00 4,032.00 582.00 837.00 456.00 618.00 954.00 2,805.00 328.00 426.00 737.00 168.00 600.00 504.00 1,974.00

80.00 180.00 100.00 40.00 140.00 220.00 20.00 80.00

4.00 9.00 5.00 2.00 7.00 11.00 1.00 4.00

120.00 300.00

6.00 15.00

20.00 40.00

1.00 2.00

40.00

2.00

370.00 138.00 870.00 744.00 210.00 1,452.00 720.00 641.00 2,070.00 108.00 348.00 848.00 582.00 990.00 384.00 348.00 2,172.00 666.00

100.00 20.00 80.00 20.00 20.00 100.00 40.00 80.00 220.00

5.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 4.00 11.00

140.00 60.00 40.00

7.00 3.00 2.00

20.00 80.00 60.00

1.00 4.00 3.00

00 ...


43 44 45 46 47 48 50 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 68 69 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 82

I~~fer~n (11-15-1841) . FaJr Play (10-18-1900) . Bonhomme (10-9-1841) . Wentzville (6-2-1866) . . Fayette (10-17-1842) . . Fulton (10-19-1842) . Xenia (6-2-1866) . Wakanda (10-17-1842) . Weston (10-11-1842) . . . . Index (10-16-1884) . Arrow Rock (10-11-1842) .. . .... Tipton (6-2-1866) . Richmond (10-11-1842) . Monticello (10-12-1842) . Centralia (10-19-1867) . . ~ew Bloomfield (5-25-1854) Waverly (6-2-1866) . . Vinci I (10-19-1867) . Cambridge (6-2-1866) . Monroe (6-2-1866) . Pattonsburg (5-29-1854) . Grant City (10-10-1894) . Kennett (10-16-1889) . Sullivan (6-2-1866) . . . . . . . . . Savannah (10-28-1844) . Gorin (10-13-1892) . Eureka (10-16-1845) . . Warren (10-20-1845) . Silex (10-21-1897) . . Independence (10-14-1846) . Lebanon (10-14-1846) . St.Joseph (10-14-1846) .. Polar Star (10-14-1846) . Bridgeton (10-14-1846) . Jackson (10-15-1846) .

12 3

7 1

1

13 3 10 7 2 12 I

II

2 3 I

1

4

3

6

1

I

9

I

3 2 4

5

5 3 3 7

5 2 5

7

I 2

I 4

2

12

2

I 4

I

5

3

I

2 2

I

I

2

I

4 3

2

2

2 20

2 5 3 4

10

11

I

2 13

I 2 I

3 8 2 2 2

4

5 3

5

26 3 12

8

5 4

24 2 11

2 22 2 7

4

6

5

4

I 6 4

6

15

23

I

I 22

10 2 5

4

1 2

13 1

4

40

6

I

17 3 14 8 34 8 2

2

1 6 6

5 7 3 II 7 7 10 9 4 4

3

3

5 4 5 2 2 3 2 42 3 17 10 14 3

12 1 9 7 2 27 17 49 48 23 5

I 4

11 5 4

7

575 55 303 194 141 149 129 346 134 101 30 48 307 75 103 60 66 126 77 70 73 93 212 242 232 37 81 45 52 1,735 208 607 184 481 59

3,192.00 330.00 1,680.00 1,157.00 789.00 852.00 732.00 1,836.00 813.00 594.00 190.00 270.00 1,962.00 432.00 552.00 357.00 387.00 702.00 402.00 364.00 408.00 558.00 1,323.00 1,398.00 1,401.00 210.00 426.00 240.00 342.00 10.250.00 1,131.00 3,363.00 774.00 2,706.00 330.00

260.00 60.00 200.00 140.00 40.00 240.00 20.00 80.00 120.00 20.00

13.00 3.00 10.00 7.00 2.00 12.00 1.00 4.00 6.00 1.00

40.00 60.00

2.00 3.00

20.00 40.00

1.00 2.00

180.00

9.00

30.00 20.00

2.00 1.00

20.00 20.00

1.00 1.00

520.00 60.00 240.00

26.00 3.00 12.00

140.00 60.00

7.00 3.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

:\ame and :\urnber and

".~

~~~:'~1~eharter

]

t:

< 83 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

100 101 1~

100

1M 1M 106

1M 100 110

III 112 113 114 115

116 117 119

IW 121 I~

Laclede (5-25-1854) Webster Groves (10-21-1897) Brookfield (6-2-1866) Washington (10-12-1847) Defiance (10-17-1878) .

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10

8

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205 488 187 186 45 305 106 162 376 40 320 133 166 106 126 87 28 61 858 487 106 107 73 227 335 38 91

6 3

5

488

1

4

2

6 3

5 19 29

1

2

4

12

37

2

5 8

2

8

3

9 11

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6 3 I 14

7

3 1 1 1

I I 1

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8 9 2 5

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34

22 7

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2 2 2 5

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38 70 34 231

18

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180

20

113 27

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Perserverance (10-12-1847) . St. Marks (10-14-1847) . Vienna (10-17-1878) . Pomegranate (9-21-1916) . Bethany (5-25-1854) . Webster (5-28-1858) . Mt. Vernon (10-19-1867) . Ash Grove (10-18-1899) . Bogard (10-14-1886) .. . . Bloomington (5-10-1849) . West View (6-2-1866) . . Heroine (5-10-1849) . . Kirksville (5-26-1864) . Gallatin (10-16-1879) . Greenville (10-4-1886) .. Stanberry (10-17-1878) . Marcus (5-10-1849) Trenton (5-9-1850) Maitland (10-19-1867) . Plattsburg (5-9-1850) . Twilight (10-19-1867) . Laddonia (10-12-1882) . Barnes (10-17-1878) . Helena (10-22-1924) . Desoto (10-19-1867) . Compass (5-10-1850) . Erwin (5-9-1851) . Triplett (10-12-1893) .

~~

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1,140.00 2,880.00 1,092.00 991.00 270.00 1,611.00 612.00 870.00 2,028.00 234.00 1,704.00 810.00 942.00 660.00 735.00 456.00 162.00 330.00 4,602.00 2,763.00 555.00 600.00 399.00 1,260.00 1,770.00 222.00 510.00 2,931.00 222.00 414.00 198.00 1,308.00 1,129.00 564.00 156.00

c :t

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80.00 120.00 40.00 50.00

4.00 6.00 2.00 3.00

340.00 40.00 120.00 80.00 40.00 40.00 200.00 160.00 20.00 60.00

17.00 2.00 6.00 4.00

20.00 240.00 460.00

2.00 2.00

10.00 8.00 1.00 3.00

1.00 12.00 23.00

40.00

2.00

140.00 60.00

7.00 3.00

320.00 40.00

16.00 2.00

80.00 20.00 40.00

4.00 1.00 2.00


123 124 125 126 127 128 129 131 132 133 135 136 137 138 139 141 142 143 144 145 147 149 150 151 152 153 154 156 157 158 162 163 164 168 169 170

HeTmann (5-10-1850) . . Union StaT (10-15-1885) McFaIl-GcntTyville (5-10-1850) . Seaman (5-28-1858) . Athens (5-8-1851) .. LOTTaine (10-17-1878) . Monett (10-15-1890) . Potosi (5-28-1851) ..... . . FaTmington (5-10-1851) . StaT of the West (5-5-1851) . BTaymcT (10-17-1889) . Phoenix (5-9-1859) . . Delphian (10-17-1895) . Lincoln (6-2-1866) .. . . OTegon (5-31-1855 . . AmsteTdam (9-27-1906) .. . . Pleasant Grove (5-31-1855) . ITOndale (5-26-1864) .... . . Modem (10-19-1867) . LatimeT (10-19-1899) .... . . Cass (10-17-1867) ... . . Lexington (6-4-1855) . BeTmmg (5-28-1858) . Milton (6-11-1855) .. . . Linn CTeek (10-12-1869) . Bloomfield (5-28-1859) . Ionic (10-17-1901) . Ashland (5-28-1859) . . NOTlh StaT (5-29-1856) . . Mountain GTove (10-15-1885) . Whitesville (5-28-1856). . . Occidental (5-29-1856) . .... Joachim (5-31-1856) . Colony (5-26-1864) . . Camden Point (10-19-1867) . Benevolence (5-30-1857) .

I 1

4

30

2

1

I

4 2

3 2

2 I 2 I

3

11

I

7 3 9

5 I I 2

I 2

2

2

1

2

2 I 5

2

I

2

1 2 3 3 2

1 3 11 3

5

I

3 I 2 6

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1 1 I

8

7

37 2

I 2 5 5 3

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9 3 9 3 8 2 2

3

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3 2

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18 2 2 2 2 2

13 2 5 9 8 2

6 5 5 2 2

I I 1 1

5 7

6 5

2 5 8

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1

I

::1: I

2 3 17 8 3 6 3 1

2

125 43 60 110 148 25 226 157 206 98 102 92 58 55 149 52 52 78 59 117 223 211 76 40 223 159 177 124 153 139 80 176 233 46 76 34

678.00 246.00 330.00 630.00 846.00 138.00 1,402.00 857.00 1,211.00 534.00 609.50 486.00 338.00 294.00 846.00 318.00 324.00 398.00 354.00 648.00 1,316.00 1,212.00 420.00 222.00 1,272.00 915.00 1,026.00 727.00 810.00 792.00 368.00 1,044.00 1,398.00 234.00 456.00 186.00

20.00 40.00

1.00 2.00

80.00

4.00

100.00 60.00 140.00 20.00

5.00 3.00 7.00 1.00

40.00

2.00

20.00 40.00 40.00 20.00 100.00 20.00 60.00 220.00 60.00 100.00 60.00 180.00 160.00 20.00 140.00 20.00 40.00 100.00 100.00 60.00

1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 11.00 3.00 5.00 3.00 9.00 8.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 5.00 3.00

20.00 20.00

1.00 1.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

:\ame and :\umber and

D~fteL~1teharter

]

]

t:

211

212 213 215 216 217

1""

~

'< 171 Hartford (5-30-1857) . 172 Censer (10-14-1875) . 173 Gray Summit (10-23-1903) 174 Sturgeon (5-30-1857) . 176 Point Pleasant (5-30-1857) . 177 Texas (10-19-1867) . 179 Pride of the West (5-28-1858) 180 !):ramid (9-21-1916) ..... 182 PJ!ot Knob (10-17-1895) .. 183 California (10-19-1898) 184 Morley (10-19-1899) .. 185 Chamois (5-28-1859) ... 187 Hermon (10-17-1889) .. 188 Hannibal (5-28-1859) 189 Zeredatha (5-28-1859) 190 Putnam (5-28-1859) .. 193 Angerona (5-28-1859) 195 Bohvar (10-19-1867) . 197 Carthage (10-19-1867) 198 AllensvJ!le (5-30-1860) 199 I"ew Hope (5-31-1860) .. 200 Sonora (10-19-1867) . 204 205 206 207 208 209 210

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Consolidated with :\orth Star :\0. 157 I 2 4 2 6

2

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2

2

2 8

10 :3

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15

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16 6 9 6 10 61 16

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3 8 3 I 2

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88 162 82 51 70 107 143 297 39 142 103 85 139 191

18 3 3

676 80 92 129 334 38 101

3

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5

133

48

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483.00 948.00 468.00 264.00 384.00 642.00 780.00 1,620.65 228.00 756.00 618.00 450.00 792.00 1,080.00 3,654.00 431.00 552.00 714.00 1,923.00 204.00 597.00 438.00 1,194.00 422.00 1.206.00 534.00 2.292.00 831.00 222.00 750.00 2.484.00 720.00 331.00 564.00

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20.00 80.00 20.00

1.00 4.00 1.00

40.00 100.00

2.00 5.00

200.00

10.00

100.00

5.00

60.00 300.00 40.00 60.00 40.00 160.00

3.00 15.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 8.00

60.00

3.00

60.00 60.00 20.00 60.00

3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00

200.00 120.00 100.00 60.00 220.00 20.00 40.00 40.00

10.00 6.00 5.00 3.00 11.00 1.00 2.00 2.00


218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 230 231 232 233 234 236 237 238 239 241 243 244 245 246 247 249 251 253 254 255 256 257 259 260 262 263

Good Hope (5-30-1861) . Alben Pike (10-17-1895) Kansas City (5-30-1861) . Mystic Tie (5-30-1861) . La Belle (10-11-1888) .. . . Ray (9-21-1921) . Hamilton (10-19-1867) . Salem (5-29-1862) . . Saline (5-29-1862) . Cypress (5-29-1862) . Shelbina (5-29-1862) .... . . St. James (5-29-1863) . Cardwell (10-19-1899) . Polo (10-17-1876) . Bucklin (5-26-1864) . St. Francois (5-26-1864) . Sedalia (5-24-1864) . . LaPlata (6-22-1866) . Rushville (5-26-1865) . Hopewell (10-13-1881) . Palestine (5-26-1865) . Keystone (5-26-1865) .. Middle Fabius (5-26-1865) . Knob Noster (5-26-1865) Montgomery (1-12-1920) . .... !\;eostio (5-28-1856) . Carroll (10-19-1867) . Hope (10-15-1868) . Laredo (10-15-1868) . . Butler (10-15-1868) . Alton (10-15-1868) .. Shekinah (10-15-1868) .... . . Lodge of Light (10-15-1868) .

~~~~~i~s~ilr: Sg--ltl~~~i

Holden (10-15-1868) Summit (10-15-1868)

.

. .

.

I .... ....

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2. . 10.. 17 .. 6 4 3.. 9 2 8. . I..

4. . 3.. 2. . .. 5. . II .. .. 35 4 4.. 6.. 4. . .. 6. . 3.... 3 25 6.. .. 15 3 7 .. 17 2 .... 2 .. 3 .... .... 7 26 2 10.. 14 I 4. . 3 .. 8 .. 12 I .... .. .... I I .. 3.. 2.... 5 5 7. . 22. . I. . .. 3 I 2. . .. 8. . 2.... 2.. 2.... 8.. 8.... 12 ..

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101 17 26 10

.. ....

431 227 283 74 107 48 105 268 169 38 163 159 65 83 31 90 464 146 86 181 517 210 32 99 256 322 46 187 58 123 109 259 46 82 81 137 285

2,148.00 1,186.00 1,527.00 384.00 576.00 270.00 576.00 1,277.70 978.00 216.00 920.00 906.00 396.00 480.00 174.00 522.00 2,557.00 852.00 486.00 950.00 2,982.00 1,152.00 198.00 573.00 1,374.00 1,836.00 231.00 1,068.00 343.00 722.00 594.00 1,458.00 258.00 440.00 541.00 774.00 1,644.00

40.00 180.00 100.00 .. . . .. 40.00 40.00 40.00 80.00 40.00 .. .. .. 80.00 20.00 ...... 80.00 20.00 ..... 300.00 40.00 20.00 200.00 220.00 . 140.00 140.00 100.00 . 40.00 20.00 80.00 100.00 60.00 20.00 40.00 ...... 100.00 120.00

2.00 9..00 5.00 . ... 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 .. .. 4.00 1.00 . ... 4.00 1.00 . ... 15.00 2.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 .. .. 7.00 7.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 5.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 6.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

!'IOame and !'IOumber and

D~;·~~eharter

~

"E

265 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 276 278 279 281 282 283 284 285 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 298 299 300 302 303 305 307 308 310

31I

Corinthian (10-15-1868) Aurora (10-15-1868)

.

:-;ew Salem (10-18-1868) ... . Solomon (10-15-1868) . . . . . Granite (10-15-1868) SI. Clair (10-15-1868) . Cold Spring (10-16-1879) Grand River (10-15-1868) Essex (9-29-1904) . Hogles Creek (10-15-1868) Fenton (10-15-1868) . Cosmos (10-15-1868) Stockton (10-15-1868)

. . . . . . . . .

~:rl°fI~_(l~.-l;6~~~9). :::::::::::::::

Craft (10-15-1868) Hermitage (10-15-1868) Graham (10-18-1900) . )'airmont (10-15-1868) Edina (10-15-1868) . Lamar (10-15-1868) . " . . . . . . . Sarcoxie (10-15-1868) . Mound City (10-15-1868) Moniteau (10-15-1868) Sparta (10-10-1888) Sampson (10-18-1900) . Temple (10-15-1868) Doric (10-15-1868) . . Lick Creek (10-15-1868) Osage (10-15-1868) . Cecile Daylight (10-17-1923) . New London (10-12-1869) Parrott (10-12-1869) . Sikeston (10-12-1869) . Kearney (10-12-1869) .

]

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225 172 46 598 78 964 438 79 101 55 91 90 382 225 129 254 21 126 128 43 47 108 173 72 108 36 69 71 374 57 III

189 133 87 84 363 57

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1,353.00 870.00 258.00 3,342.00 444.00 5,499.00 2,499.00 399.10 531.00 318.00 534.00 552.00 2,232.00 1,233.00 720.00 1,449.00 126.00 732.00 696.00 177.00 274.00 608.00 1,002.00 390.00 636.00 174.00 402.00 432.00 1,902.00 288.00 618.00 1,041.00 750.00 488.00 432.00 2,118.00 312.00

c o

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100.00 60.00

5.00 3.00

440.00 20.00 780.00 260.00 40.00 200.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 400.00 160.00 100.00 140.00

22.00 1.00 39.00 13.00 2.00 10.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 20.00 8.00 5.00 7.00

40.00 100.00 100.00

2.00 5.00 5.00

40.00 100.00 60.00 40.00

2.00 5.00 3.00 2.00

100.00 20.00 20.00

5.00 1.00 1.00

60.00 160.00 80.00 60.00

3.00 8.00 4.00 3.00

140.00 60.00

7.00 3.00


312 313 315 316 318 319 320 321 323 324 325 326 327 328 330 331 332 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 342 344 345 346 347 349 351 352 353 354 355 356 358

Cuba (10-13-1887) Meramec (10-19-1923) jerusalem (10-22-1896) . Rural (10-12-1869) ... . Eldorado (10-12-1869) Paulville (10-12-1869) . Versailles (10-18-1923) jonathan (10-12-1869) Cornerstone (10-12-1869) McDonald (10-12-1869) Dockery (10-12-1869) Linn (10-19-1898) .. . Mt. Zion (10-13-1870) . Cainsville (10-13-1870) . Paul Revere (10-26-1923) . . . Charity (10-13-1870) . Excello (9-29-1904) . Breckenridge (10-13-1870) joplin (10-13-1871) . Hallsville (10-17-1878)

(:

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13 30

26 22 3 15 17 7 15 12

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12 2 8 2 2 17 2 14 17

29 3 9 2

240 447 42 142 207 77 382 861 24 50 530 50 263 185 56

5 14

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15 3 3 12

161 149 42 128 50 83 164

I 15

I I

I

4

I

II

6 8

I I

12

3 2 5 I I I

17 5 3 6 22

6 6

9

Fidelity (10-13-1870) . . . . . .... Westport (10-11-1894) . Circle (10-13-1870) . . Moberly (10-13-1870) . Fellowship (10-13-1870) . Arlington (10-13-1870) . Amenca (9-17-1919) . Pollock (10-16-1884) . Mosaic (10-13-1870) Friend (10-13-1870) ... Barnesville (9-27-1906) Hebron (10-13-1870) . Adelphi (10-13-1870) . Ancient Landmark (10-17-1873) . :-';orthwest (10-15-1884) .

I

10

I 4 I

.

.

2 6

9

2 5

I

2

4

I

6

II

4 II 2

56 3 20 20 8 19 12

2 5 3 7

5 3 23

4 I 2

7 3

411

4 4

I

I 3

42 359 631 123 294 93 82 216 139 308 47 77 98

1.032.00 876.00 250.00 672.00 276.00 459.00 957.00 252.00 1,293.00 2,551.00 234.00 768.00 1,174.00 454.00 2.190.00 4,656.00 120.00 282.00 3.228.00 282.00 1,667.00 1.141.00 255.00 2.206.00 234.00 2.058.00 3.685.00 711.00 1,662.00 492.00 474.00 1,268.00 816.00 1,665.00 276.00 444.00 552.00

80.00 60.00 60.00

4.00 3.00 3.00

60.00 80.00

3.00 4.00

60.00 220.00

3.00 11.00

60.00 80.00

3.00 4.00

120.00 180.00

6.00 9.00

40.00 300.00 20.00 260.00 120.00 180.00 20.00 20.00 200.00 400.00 40.00 40.00

2.00 15.00 1.00 13.00 6.00 9.00 1.00 1.00 10.00 20.00 2.00 2.00

40.00 220.00 40.00 140.00

2.00 11.00 2.00 7.00

40.00 80.00

2.00 4.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

Name and r\umber and

D~~eL~~ehaTler

]

]

~

~~ .~ 7:

]

]

]

<: 360 Tuscan (10-13-1870) . 361 Riddick (10-13-1871) . 362 Hiram (10-13-1870) 363 Fraternal (10-13-1870) . 364 Higginsville (10-14-1880) . 365 Bayou (10-11-1888) 366 Adair (10-13-1881) . 367 Barry (10-13-1870) . 368 Crescent Hill (10-13-1871) . 369 Composite (10-13-1871) 370 Williamstown (10-13-1870) . 371 Sheldon (10-11-1883) . 373 Belle (9-27-1906) 375 Waynesville (10-10-1888) 376 King Hill (10-13-1870) 377 AnCient Craft (10-13-1871) 378 Berlin (3-19-1906) . 379 Billings (10-13-1881) . 380 381 383 Pythagoras (10-16-1872) . 384 East Prairie (9-29-1904) . 385 Richland (10-18-190 I) . 387 Woodside (10-13-1871) . 389 Arcana (10-13-1871) .. 391 Raytown (10-13-1871) . 392 Christian (10-13-1871) . 393 Bee Hive (10-13-1871) . 396 397 ~~~:(I~~~~~I(J~2:~-.I.~71) 398 Jasper (10-16-1873) 399 Pike (10-13-1871) . 400 Decatur (10-13-1871) . 401 Carterville (10-12-1893) . 403 Lowry City (10-16-1873) '" 404 Rosendale (10-22-1896) .,

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390 120 93 116 105 64 520 37 118 119 65 74 173 430 614 82 38 98 51 185 107

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217 39 26 802 106 118 67 76 72 26 64 100 45 49

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2,241.00 720.00 516.00 714.00 588.00 427.00 2,988.00 222,00 693,00 672.00 360.00 426.00 969.00 2,574.00 3,540.00 456.00 210.00 540.00 369.00 1,017.00 571.00 732.00 1.356.00 233.00 144.00 4,755.00 588.00 696.00 396.00 426.00 431.00 156.00 357.00 558,00 243.00 282,00

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20.00 80.00

1.00 4,00

60.00 20.00 90.00 240.00

3.00 1.00 5.00 12.00

40.00 20.00 40.00

2.00 1.00 2,00

80.00 280.00 80.00

4.00 14.00 4.00

160.00

8.00

100.00 20.00 40.00 140.00 20,00

5.00 1.00 2.00 7.00 1.00

300.00

15.00

140.00 40.00 60.00 100.00

7.00 2,00 3.00 5.00

40.00 60.00

2.00 3.00


405 405 407 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 419 421 422 424 427 429 430 432 433 435 438 439 440 441 442 443 444

445 446 447 448

450 453 454 456

Everton (10-15-1885) . Malden (10-13-1881) . Charleston (10-12-1893) . Iberia (10-13-1871) . Joppa (10-16-1872) . Appleton City (10-13-1871) . Vaney (10-16-1873) . Greensburg (10-13-1871) . Hunnewell (10-12-1871) . Cache (10-12-1871) . Whitewater (10-13-1881) . Star (10-16-1872) . Urbana (10-15-1886) . Gate of the Temple (10-16-1872) . Samaritan (10-16-1872) . Glenwood (10-16-1873) . :'>Jew Madrid (10-17-1873) . Winona (10-10-1894) . Competition (10-15-1891) . Macks Creek (11-1-1878) . Rockbridge (10-21-1897) . .. Temperance (10-16-1872) . Mt. Olive (10-16-1872) . . Trowel (10-16-1872) . Excelsior (10-16-1872) . Burlington (10-13-1881) . Anchor (10-16-1872) . Ada (10-16-1872) . West Gate (10-11-1888) . Ivanhoe (10-17-1901) . Jacoby (10-17-1901) . Schell City (10-17-1873) . Belton (10-16-1872) . Forsyth (10-16-1872) " . Continental (10-21-1903) . Wallace (10-16-1872) .

8

2

I

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2

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42 8

32 7

36 7

16 3

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12

43

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6 2 8 8 3 3 54 1 2 3 47 8

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3 I 8 14 2 22 25 190 3 3 3 8 4

3

2

43 160 175 170 35 90 55 93 35 352 135 45 46 1,521 169 54 162 31 57 125 39 108 98 131 240 69 318 101 254 1,024 33 47 255 170 73 52

261.00 954.00 994.00 984.00 263.80 496.00 282.00 546.00 192.00 1,772.00 852.00 246.00 249.00 8,859.00 960.00 280.00 930.00 168.00 336.00 738.00 234.00 634.00 576.00 732.00 1,368.00 402.00 1,736.00 618.00 1,337.60 5.064.00 180.00 264.00 1,488.00 975.00 420.00 300.00

20.00 60.00 20.00 20.00

1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00

60.00

3.00

20.00

1.00

20.00 840.00 160.00

1.00 42.00 8.00

40.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 40.00 40.00 80.00 20.00 100.00

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60.00

3.00

80.00 100.00

4.00 5.00

180.00 240.00 40.00

9.00 12.00 2.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

Name and Number and

';:~eL~1~~arter

-,;:

]

]

~

:5

';;: 457 lo.nesburg (10-12-1893) . 459 Hazelwood (10-16-1872) . 460 Lambskin (10-16-1872) " . 461 Caruthersville (10-16-1872) 462 Santa Fe (10-16-1873) . 463 Clifton (10-13-1881) . 466 Southwest (10-15-1890) .. . . 467 Pleasant Hope (10-16-1873) . 469 Plato (10-16-1873) . . 470 Nodaway (10-17-1873) . . 471 Mineral (10-17-1873) . 472 Pickering (10-17-1873) . 473 :'\ineveh (10-15-1874) . 476 Mt. Hope (10-15-1874) . . . . 477 Henderson (10-15-1874) . 479 Rich Hill (10-29-1881) " . 480 le~el (10-17-1878) . 481 \1arcehne (10-17-1889) " . 482 Clintonville (10-15-1874) . 483 Fairfax (10-15-1874) . 484 Kirkwood (10-15-1874) . 485 Coldwater (10-13-1881) . . 486 Cairo (10-15-1874) . 487 Chilhowee (9-27-1906) . 488 489 490 Montevallo (10-15-1874) . 491 Vandalia (10-12-1876) . .. " . 492 Dasgett (10-12-1876) . 495 Cmty (10-17-1895) . 496 Robert Burns (10-11-1877) . 497 Equality (9-27-1906) '" . 499 Harmony (9-19-1917) .. 500 lameson (10-11-1877) . 501 Buckner (10-11-1877) . 502 Philadelphia (10-11-1877) .

tak~v~O:i(I~J~~i~~4\8~~).::: .. ::

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414.00 504.00 2,994.00 608.00 120.00 564.00 396.00 567.00 1,440.00 1,698.00 384.00 189.00 234.00 613.00 1,350.00 378.00 1,601.00 1,090.00 795.00 710.00 3,084.00 365.00 312.00 264.00 288.00 618.00 258.00 636.00 234.00 360.00 462.00 714.00 1,290.00 96.00 870.00 96.00

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3.00 8.00 8.00

100.00 20.00 260.00 140.00 80.00 100.00

5.00 1.00 13.00 7.00 4.00 5.00

210.00 100.00

11.00 5.00

180.00 100.00 100.00 20.00 240.00 20.00 20.00

9.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 12.00 1.00 1.00

60.00 20.00

3.00 1.00

20.00 20.00 140.00

1.00 1.00 7.00

140.00 20.00

7.00 1.00


503 504 505 506 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 518 519 520 521 522 525 526 527 528 529 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544

Prairie Home (10-13-1881) . Platte City (10-12-1881) . Euclid (9-21-1917) . Lathrop (10-12-1882) . Saxton (10-12-1882) . Van Buren (10-12-1882) . New Hampton (10-28-1925) . Skidmore (10-12-1882) . Webb City (10-12-1882) . Senath (10-22-1902) . Granby (10-22-1902) . Galena (10-12-1882) . Oriental (10-11-1883) . Crane (10-22-1896) . Clifton Heights (10-10-1894) . Lockwood (10-11-1883) . Gate City (10-11-1883) . Cunningham (10-14-1884) . Wayne (10-15-1885) . Higbee (10-15-1885) . Conway (10-15-1885) . Apollo (9-18-1918) . Lanes Prairie (10-15-1885) . Dexter (10-13-1887) . Comfort (10-19-1898) . Columbia (10-13-1887) . Blackwell (10-13-1887) . Ingomar (10-13-1887) . Bethel (10-11-1888) . Stella (10-17-1889) . Dawn (10-17-1889) . Winigan (10-17-1889) . I~cksonville (9-29-1904) . Ferguson (10-16-1889) . Mansfield (10-15-1891) . Algabil (9-19-191 7) .

1 1

I

I 3

5

3

4

5 2 2 I

1

3

I 6 2 3 I

2 10 1

2 2 1

1

2 I 5 2 1

6 2

I 5

4 4

3

4 I 9 5 5 3 5

I

2 6 3

4

8 2 I

2 3 8

3

I

2 10

6

1

I

6 18 5 33 2 7 3 2

7 40 5 56 5 7 9

7

5

4

2 I 5

3

2

1 4 9

I

3 7

6

4

I

1

I 5

4

1

1 5 1

8

4

6

1 I 8

2

3 5 7 3 29

9 7 I I

7 I 9 I I I

14 5 4

5 6

2

2 1

I

4

3 5

1 4

5 2

3 10

8 2

1 I

8 4

3

2 3 I

I

8 5 5

12

55 149 281 57 184 97 66 115 131 103 78 151 61 90 417 67 400 59 180 65 47 115 109 184 74 163 68 112 57 70 44 44

2

5

45 529 75 260

300.00 864.00 1,668.00 318.00 1,110.00 564.00 390.00 636.00 732.00 552.00 444.00 876.00 366.00 780.00 2,214.00 372.00 2,056.00 317.00 1,026.20 336.00 270.90 684.00 676.00 1,092.00 438.00 942.00 456.00 627.00 326.00 372.00 263.00 219.00 222.00 3,108.00 423.00 1,386.00

20.00 20.00 100.00 100.00 40.00 40.00 20.00 40.00 200.00 20.00 40.00 40.00 20.00

1.00 1.00 5.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 10.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00

100.00 60.00 40.00

5.00 3.00 2.00

140.00 40.00 20.00 100.00 180.00 140.00 20.00 20.00 140.00 20.00

7.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 9.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00

180.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 280.00 100.00 80.00

9.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 14.00 5.00 4.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

Name and Number of Lodge and Date of Charter

] L::

'< 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 554 555 556 558 559 560 561 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 581 582 585 586

Zalma (10-15-1890) Orient (9-22-1920) South Gate (10-15-1890) Clinton (10-15-1890) Carl Junction (10-15-1891) Rose Hill (10-15-1891) Pendleton (10-14-1891) Calhoun (10-15-1891) Foster (10-15-1891) Summersville (10-15-1891) Prairie (10-13-1892) Moscow (10-11-1892) Clarksdale (10-12-1893) Nelson (10-12-1893) Cowgill (10-12-1893) York (10-15-1895) Jamesport (10-19-1898) iebbetts (10-22-1902) Maplewood (9-29-1904) Miller (9-29-1904) ~aylor (9-29-1904) Marlborough (10-26-1927) Republic (9-28-1905) Hayti (9-28-1905) .. '" Rutledge (9-28-1905) Bernie (9-28-1905) laMonte (9-27-1905) Easter (9-28-1905) Olive Branch (9-27-1906) Ewing (9-27-1906) Forest Park (9-27-1906) Grandin (9-27-1906) IlImo (9-27-1906) K~shkonong (9-27-1906) Shamrock (9-27-1906) Criterion (9-26-1907)

1l.

] E

1 c.

] ~

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ctvi

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

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~

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2 26 9 10 7 7

2 2 2 I

I I 2 I I

2 2

3 I

3 8 3 I 14 2

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3 I

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2

4 2

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2 4

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25 6 4

28 4

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4

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6

-6

10 19

2

7 7

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4

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80 36 24 6 26 2 6

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Continued

153 586 244 341 120 260 83 39 71 99 32 51 54 28 59 178 74 51 387 53 72 229 162 76 21 81 66 197 216 32 133 88 135 42 35 50

-~

~.5,"'2

-~~

oc;c. 00 .. "

~~~

864.00 2.988.00 1.146.00 1.890.00 702.00 1.461.00 507.00 192.00 396.00 606.00 190.00 316.00 312.00 156.00 342.00 900.00 314.00 282.00 2.094.00 217.00 384.00 1.308.00 918.00 459.00 120.00 478.00 384.00 1.116.00 1.122.00 180.00 732.00 447.00 762.00 258.00 201.00 256.00

..s

§ be·

:::-0 ·c·g·;

.E 6

~]~

0;~

51.:::! c.

-s;~?~:2~

;:::....:c.

100.00 100.00

5.00 5.00

220.00 40.00 100.00 140.00

11.00 2.00 5.00 7.00

20.00 20.00

1.00 1.00

20.00 60.00 20.00 40.00 40.00 80.00 20.00 100.00 60.00 20.00 120.00 40.00 60.00 140.00 20.00 160.00 20.00

1.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 5.00 3.00 1.00 6.00 2.00 3.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 1.00

80.00 40.00 80.00 40.00

4.00 2.00 4.00 2.00

140.00

7.00


587 Branson (9-26-1907) . 588 St. Francisville (9-26-1907) . 590 Advance (9-26-1907) . 591 Barnett (9-26-1907) . 592 LaRussell (9-21-1921) . 593 Union (9-26-1907) . 595 Cole Camp (10-28-1926) 596 Puxico (9-30-1908) . 597 Bosworth (9-30-1908) . 598 Leadwood (9-30-1908) . 599 Elvins (9-30-1908) . 600 Cosby (9-30-1908) . 601 Clayton (9-30-1908) . 602 Acacia (9-29-1909) . 603 Morehouse (9-29-1909) . 605 Walker (9-29-1909) . 606 Craig (9-29-1909) . 607 Eminence (9-29-1909) . 608 Strafford (9-28-1910) . 609 Warrenton (9-19-1917) . 610 Clark (9-28-1910) . 612 Mokane (9-28-1911) . 613 Wellston (9-28-1911) . 614 615 ~~~~e~7~~~~M9i~8: ~~ ~ .1 ~ . : : : : 616 Brentwood (9-28-1949) . 617 Swope Park (9-28-1911) . 618 Grandview (9-28-1911) . 620 Willard (9-25-1912) . 621 Anderson (9-25-1912) . 622 Norwood (9-25-1912) . 623 Overland (9-28-1949) . 624 Owensville (9-25-1912) . 625 Sheffield (9-25-1912) . 626 Magnolia (10-2-1913) . 628 Mendon (10-28-1925) . 629 Valley Park (10-2-1913) . 630 East Gate (10-2-1913) . 632 633 ~~~~:d(~d!? l9~~J~) 634 Steele (10-1-1914) . 635 Greentop (10-22-1924) . 636 Freedom (9-25-1946) . 637 Mountain View (9-29-1915) . 638 T~iangle (9-29-1915) . 639 MIzpah (9-29-1915) . 640 le~n!ngs (9-21-1916) . 641 Inmty (9-21-1916) . 642 Benjamin Franklin (9-21-1916) ..

_

.. :: ::: :: :::

II

14 3 5

3 2

5

I

8

6 I 2 I 5

3 2 I

3 4

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3 2 I

9 4

2 I 12 I 7 10 26 9

10 5 2 2

9

4

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I

4

5

4

3 6

I

I 3

3 I

4 2

4 I

I 5

I

I

3 3 10

5 3 I 4

8 21 II I I

38

6 39

7 37

I

I

3 2 I

3 2

I 4 I

II 2 I

8 2

10 2 6 2

8 3 6

I

I 2

I 8 10 3

5

4 5

3 I 2

2 21 21 3

2

5

2 5

6 15 6

10

10

22 5 5

2

7

I

2

I 2

3

17

I II

I

I

I

4

12 6 II

6

10

3 2 4 3

I 4 8

I 2

7 9 9 16 46

9

4

9

4

I

6 3

21

I

I

I I I 9

12

4

5

6 3

3 2

2 6

5 5

5 6 I I

III

266 122 192 327 96 39

3

44

I

3

116 110

II

III

3 5 46 35 4 7 15 9 2 3

I

I

5 9 25 64 8 2 72

II

72 122 32 39 199 72 121 114

4 3

9 3 20 15 2 68 3 I 2 3 6 I 5 24 9 8

304

I

I

I

3 2 19 2

13 6 2 3 5 I 4

I I

4 2

10 4 5 I I

2 2 4

7 3

5 8

2 I

I

2 2

4

6 8

4

6

I

I 4

2 7 3 2

6 3 II 2

22 I

3 I I

3 15 49 22 27 32

I 5 2 5

56 83 433 644 141 233 422 671 145 97 57 422 213 429 368 82 158 1,529 35 51 64 56 416 65 112 460 374 220 335

1,764.00 432.00 691.00 164.00 234.00 1,110.00 414.00 726.00 660.00 618.00 1,524.00 744.00 1,088.50 1,710.00 558.00 216.00 246.00 657.00 624.00 585.00 306.00 468.00 2,322.00 3,741.00 816.00 1,359.00 2,400.00 3,810.00 876.00 558.00 300.00 2,454.00 1,212.00 2,343.00 1,824.00 438.00 936.00 8,715.00 184.00 288.00 372.00 327.00 2,460.00 378.00 570.00 2,534.00 2,112.00 1,152.00 1,818.00

280.00 60.00 100.00 100.00

14.00 3.00 5.00 5.00

160.00

8.00

160.00 20.00 80.00 20.00 80.00 20.00 100.00 80.00 20.00

8.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 5.00 4.00 1.00

80.00 140.00 40.00

4.00 7.00 2.00

40.00 20.00 240.00 20.00 140.00 200.00 520.00 180.00

2.00 1.00 12.00 1.00 7.00 10.00 26.00 9.00

120.00 160.00 20.00 80.00 160.00

6.00 8.00 1.00 4.00 8.00

80.00 760.00 20.00 60.00 40.00 20.00 220.00 40.00 20.00 200.00 40.00 120.00 40.00

4.00 38.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 11.00 2.00 1.00 10.00 2.00 6.00 2.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT -

:-.lame and :-.lumber and

D~~eL~~eharler

~

~

.!l!

~

~ 643 ~ortheast (9-21-1916) 644 Grain Valley (9-21-1916) 645

646 647 649 651 652

Clarkton (12-15-1948) Shaveh (9-22-1920) Noel (9-22-1920)

660 661

662 663 665 666 667 668

669 670 671 672 673

674 675 676

:s

Pilgrim (9-21-1921)

~

Totals (per 1981 Annual Returns and adjustments from roster comparisons and correspondence)

c .

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1 6 3 4 4

18

I 3 3 2 3 18

I 4

3 2 5 17

17 3 3 10

I

I

5 16 10 3

4 15 14 3 5 6

4

9 5 10 9

I

9 4 2

~I

9 6 2

4

I

1 6 6 10 9 7

16 I

4

7

5 8 10

I

4

6

12

7 3 5

I 12 I

I

I

3 2 I

I I I

:3 rJl

6 2 18

9 8 20 9

go

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8 4 2 I 2

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ti-搂

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9 3 10 I

14 16 18 13 12 2 9

2 2

4

2

I

10 I

4

7

6

I

1

I 2

2 5

4

4 4 2

5

a>

2,544.00 594.00 477.00 1,212.00 342.00 540.00 618.00 882.00 1,014.00 1,822.00 1,526.00 1,098.00 1,146.00 4,026.00 90.00 528.00 402.00 1,110.00 282.00 325.00 1,215.00 2,034.00 1,311.00 528.00 576.00 1,013.00 742.00 296.00 373.00 258.00

117 74

65

2

43

957

21

I 1,717 I 46 I 624 I 2,615

5,568

I

838

I

92,509

Ill'"

-c.f-o

166

4

7 5

637 12,080 I 1,654 I 1,652

6J~

448 100 70 220 61 123 101 148 169 317 282 201 207 671 17 101 70 180 48 48 213 350 226 91 100

4

18 5 23 I

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~~

a:

19

~

-5 00 III

]

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I 4 2 I

c o

III

]

u

<D <D

3 2

. . . . . . . .

Gardenville (9-21-1921) Country Club (9-21-1921) Progress (9-21-1921) PUrity (9-21-1921) Alpha (9-21-1921) Holliday (10-17-1923) Theodore Roosevelt (10-17-1923) Clarence (10-22-1924) . Rockhill (10-28-1925) . Wardell (9-27-1951) . Lilbourn (9-30-1952) . Berkeley (9-29-1953) " . Florissant (9-30-1959) . Crestwood (9-27-1961) . Perryville (9-26-1962) . Odom (10-1-1968) . Harold O. Grauel (9-29-1969) .. Arnold (9-27-1971) . Central Crossing (11-21-1975) .. Bunker (9-30-1975) . Viburnum (9-25-1979) .

~q ",c.

~

1 ~

g~~v~~~d (~--ii--l~igl. :::::::::

653 Shawnee (9-21-1921) 655 656 657 658 659

. . . . .

1l.

]

o

Continued

I

520,902.95

5 o :t

bO'

路2路g~ ~.!l! c. ~.:::

u

~E~

.55

~~~

;: .... c.

0~J!

120.00

6.00

40.00 100.00

2.00 5.00

20.00

1.00

120.00 60.00 80.00 80.00 360.00

6.00 3.00 4.00 4.00 18.00

40.00 60.00

2.00 3.00

20.00 20.00 160.00 400.00 180.00 80.00 180.00 100.00 200.00 180.00 80.00 40.00

1.00 1.00 8.00 20.00 9.00 4.00 9.00 5.00 10.00 9.00 4.00 2.00

I 41,460.00 I

2,075.00


to

00

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIRST DISTRICT County

Lodge

~o.

Clark ......... Clark ......... Clark........ Clark ......... Scotland ...... Scotland ...... Scotland ...... Schuyler ...... Schuyler .... , . Schuyler ...... Schuyler ...... Schuyler ......

Fairmont ......... Eldorado. Hiram '" ..... St. Francisville ....

290 318 362 588 16 72 572 244 259 380 427 635

~~;rrf~i~ : : : . : : : : . Rutledge ......... Middle Fabius ..... Lodge of Love .... Queen City ....... Glenwood ........ Greentop .........

Joe M. March, D.D.G.M., Rt. 1, Box Ill, Greentop, Mo. 63546

Location

Secretary's

Master's Name

Wyaconda ...... leRoy E. Smith ......... Luray .......... James E. Frazier ........ Kahoka ......... Charles W. Shoup ....... Wayland ........ Leland R. Wayland ...... Memphis ....... Everett ~nior Keith ..... Gorin ........... Don D. ague .......... Rutledge ........ Emmett L. Shultz ....... Downing ........ Basil E. Anders ......... Lancaster ....... James D. Farley ......... gueen City ..... Audrey E. Drummond ... lenwood ....... Melvin Lancaster ........ Greentop ....... Mark A. March .........

~ame

Time of Meeting

and Address

Homer E. Ro~ers, P.O. Box 66, Gorin, Mo. 63543 ........... Robert L. St. lair, Route I Luray, Mo. 63453 ............... Donald C. Treece, Rt. 3. Box 3, Kahoka, Mo. 63445 .......... Norman S. Brammer, Sr., Rt. 1, Alexandria, Mo. 63430 ...... Gerald B. ~ohnston, Rt. I, Box 14, Me~his, Mo. 63555 ...... Archie S. altzell, P.O. Box 64, Gorin, o. 63543 ............ Hillis L. McCabe, P.O. Box 4, Rutledge, Mo. 63563 ..........

~;~~:~i~r~"~IRi.'::~ie~~~f~~63~!1~.~'.~~~~~. : : : : : : :

Ward L. Jones, Rt. 2, Queen Cit' Mo. 6356] ................ Max W. ranklin, P.O. Box 37. lenwood, Mo. 63541 ........ Charles R. McBee, P.O. Box 172, Greentop, Mo. 63546 .......

2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon.

C'l ~

> Z

o ro o ~

SECOND DISTRICT Adair Adair Knox Knox Knox Knox

. . . . . .

Kirksville Adair Colony . Edina Paulville . Greensburg.

. . .

105 366 168 291 319 414

Kirksville.. .. . .. Kirksville. . . . . .. Co~ony

Edma. . . . .. .. . .. Hurdland. . . . . .. Greensburg. . . ..

THIRD DISTRICT Putnam Putnam Putnam Sullivan Sullivan Sullivan Sullivan Sullivan Sullivan

. . . . . . . . .

Hartford Somerset Unionville Humphreys Seaman Putnam Pollock Arcana Winigan

. . . . . . . . .

171 206 210 32 126 190 349 389 540

Hartford Powersville Unionville Humphreys Milan Newtown Pollock Harris Winigan

[Tl

Gllvle Bertram, D.D.G.M" Rutledge, Mo. 63563

William E. Frazee. .. . ... Stanley H. Bohon. . . . . . . Ver~on D. Allen. . . . . . . . DaVid W. Sharp. .. . . . ... Duane K. Patterson. . . . .. John M. Frederick. . . . . ..

L. Dale Gardner, P.O. Box 323, Kirksville. Mo. 63501 .. '" ... Arthur H. Kumm, 1506 Cottage La., Rt. 4, Kirksville, Mo. 6350 I Mar~in O. Guinn, Rt. 1, Rutledge, M~. 63563 . L. Richard Parton, P.O. Box 142, Edma, Mo. 63537 '" . Glenn L. Scott, Rt. 1, Brashear, Mo. 63533 . John J. Pearce, 339 Green Street, Memphis, Mo. 63555.

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon.

Loris E. Minear Mike L. Hayes William C. Bruce, Jr Charles C. Bennett hn D. Shatto ack D. Tucker elbert G. Embree Phillip L. Wise " Wayne D. Smith

~

. Edward L. Tietsort, Rt. 5. Box 115, Unionville, Mo. 63565 , . Lonnie Dover. Putnam St., Unionville, Mo. 63565 . Emery H. Welsh, P.O. Box 36, Unionville, Mo. 63565 . John E. Boehner, P.O. Box 23. Humphreys, Mo. 64646 . Garold L. Scobee, Milan, Mo. 63556 . Wilburn L. Collins. Rt. 2, Box 7, Lucerne. Mo. 64655 . Melvin L. Hall, Rt. 3, Box 173,t:nionville, Mo. 63565 . Veldon T. Clem, Rt. 2, Box 9, Harris, Mo. 64645 . Clyde E. Ware, Rt. \, Box 60, New Boston, Mo. 63557

'Tj

Vi

(JJ

o c:: ~

Harold L. Stone, D.D.G.M" Rt. 1, Box 62, Powersville, Mo. 64672 . . . . . . . . .

o s:

. . . . . . . . .

1st Fri. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Tues. 2nd Wed. 1st Wed.

""-l

to


00

o

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FOURTH DISTRICT Grundy Grundy Mercer

, ,

, Trenton '1111 Laredo........... 253 Mercer. . . . . . . . . . . 35

Continued

Gerald D. Gentry, D.D.G.M.. 1001 E. Main St., Princeton, Mo. 64613

I Trenton

, . '1 Lrnnd' Free~an "1 Eldon B. Denn.ison, 1908 Bolser, Trenton. Mo. 64683 Laredo......... BIll ene Pnvttt. . . . .. .. Calvin Carl Rams. Box 218, Laredo. Mo. 64652 Princeton. . . . . .. Mervin Brees. . . . . . . . . .. James H. Hunter. Jr.• Route I. Princeton, Mo. 64673

. . .

1st Thurs. 1st Fri. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

FIn'H DISTRICT - Robert A. Bartlett, D.D.G.M.. 80s S. 20th St., Bethany, Mo. 64424 Harrison Harrison Harrison Harrison Harrison

. . . . .

Bethany "1 Lodge of Light. . .. Cainsville. . . . . . . .. New Hampton.. .. Prairie ., . . . . . . . ..

97 257 328 510 556

Bethany . lames W. Snead Eagleville . 'kobert C. Brenizer Cainsville . Craig Rhea New Hampton .. Harvey D. Christie Gilman City ..... Billy M. Ward

SIXTH DISTRICT Gentry Gentry Gentry Gentry Gentry Worth Wonh Wonh Worth

. Stanberry . . McFall-Gentryville . Athens . . Ancient Craft . . Jacoby . . Grant City . . Defiance . . Allensville . . Jonathan .

109 125 127 377 447 66 88 198 321

Nodaway !,;odaway Nodaway Nodaway Nodaway

. . . . .

Xenia Graham Burlington .. '" Nodaway Skidmore

. . . . .

50 289 442 470 51 I

. lack W. Hodge. 1801 Hubbard St.. Bethany. Mo. 64424 ..... '12nd & 4th Tues. . 13eryl D. Ark/e. P.O. Box 155. Eagleville. Mo. 64442 .... '" . .. 2nd & 4th Wed. . Claude Bain. P.O. Box 82. Cainsville. Mo. 64632. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1st & 3rd Thurs. . Steven D. Lundy. P.O. Box 250. ~ew Hampton. Mo. 64471... 1st & 3rd Tues. . Harold Carter. P.O. Box 34. Gilman City. Mo. 64642. . . . . . . .. 2nd Thurs.

. Robert Lee Fannon . Billie Crawford . Eddie G. Poff . lames R. Washburn . }'orrest A. Cooper. . Robert D. Hull . Richard L. Walker. Trustin C. Wilkinson Robert L. Craven

. Charles ]'1;. Osborn, Rt. 2. Box 45. Stanberry. Mo. 64489 . . Clair J. Clevenger. P.O. Box 176. McFall. Mo. 64657 . . L. Frank Smith. Rt. 2. Box 215. Albany. Mo. 64402 . . lackson c. Spiking. SOl S. 3rd Street. King City. Mo. 64463 . . 130bby L. Elhs. Rt. I. Box 73. Darlin~on. Mo. 64438 . . . ~~~GC.Sf::~~~~~i. t:~~2~.~5herida;~.~~.' ~~8~4~.~:::: . Wilbur T. Osborne. 801 S. Front St.. Grant City. Mo. 64456 .. . Robert E. Rineman, Rt. I. Denver, Mo. 64441 ....

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G. Oren Steinman, D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 361, King City, Mo. 64463

Stanberry McFall. Albany King City Darlingt?n Grant Cuy Sheridan Allendale . Denver .

SEVENTH DISTRICT -

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1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Wed.

o"'r1 ...,

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Michael K. Monk, D.D.G.M.. Rt. 1, Box 116, Skidmore, Mo. 64481

Hopkins . Graham . Burlington Jet. .. Maryville . Skidmore .

Michael F. McKee David L. Pierson Elmer Dawson Wm. C. Hollingsworth Turner W. Tyson

. . . . .

~~1I~ntB~:~~~~~: ~.t.B~xB67. ~a~·n~r~~n~.' ~~2~~~.1. : ::: :: Charles W. Bragg. P.O. Box 127. Burlington Jct.. Mo. 64428 .. Gordon T. Bennett. P.O. Box 252. Maryville. Mo. 64468-0252 Milo L. Monk. Rt. I, Box 116. Skidmore. Mo. 64487 .

1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon.

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EIGHTH DISTRICT - William M. Kee, D.D.G.M., Rt. 1, Box 4B. Oregon, Mo. 64473 County Atchison Atchison Atchison Holt Holt Holt Holt

Lodge . . . . . . .

North Star Northwest Fairfax Maitland Oregon Mound City Craig

. . . . . . .

No.

Location

157 358 483 112 139 294 606

Rock Port Tarkio Fairfax Maitland Forest City Mound City Craig

~aster's

. , .. , .. . . . .

l'ame

Christian O. Husing Lyle L. Brown Leon D. Reed Romaine Henry William S. Richards H. r. Nauman MiChael L. Whetsel

Secretary's Name and Address . Charles E. Eddy, 704 Underwood Dr., Rock Port, Mo. 64482 .. . Richard A. Halliday, P.O. Box 294, Tarkio, Mo. 64491 ., . . Charles H. Moore, P.O. Box 357, Fairfax, Mo. 64446 , . . lohn 1'. Christian, ~aitland, Mo 64466 . . Willard 1. Kurtz, P.O. Box 143, Oregon. Mo. 64473 , . . Silas P. Allen, 408 Nebraska Street, Mound City, Mo. 64470 . . William R. Miles, Rt. 2, Mound City, Mo. 64470 .

to 00

Time of Meeting 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues.

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NINTH DISTRICT - Stanford M. Burge, D.D.G.M., 905 S. Fourth Ter.. Savannah. Mo. 64485 Andrew ...... Andrew ...... Andrew ...... Andrew ...... Andrew ...... Andrew ...... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan .... Buchanan ....

Savannah ......... Helena ........... Lincoln ........... Whitesville ........ Rosendale ........ Cosby ............ ~ency ........... ellington........ St. Joseph ........

~:;~~~~. :::::::: Rushville ......... Brotherhood ... Charity ...........

King Hill ......... Saxton ...........

71 117 138 162 404 600 10 22 78 150 189 238 269 331 376 508

Savannah ....... Helena ......... Fillmore ........ Whitesville ...... Rosendale ....... Cosby ..........

~~~~~b:::::::::

St. Joseph ....... Faucett .........

~~lh~ilFe~:::::: : St. joseph ....... St. oseph .......

St. joseph ....... St. oseph .......

Garvin G. Porter ........ .g>hn D. Huffman ....... ouglas Kammerer ...... Davia E. Lancey ......... Harold D. Brunner ...... Eubert G. Schneider ..... Robert J. Steed.......... Ronald L. Baublet ....... Charles E. Becraft ....... Charles E. Saher ........ Frank Golden, Jr........ Robert L. Shier .........

.g~d~~D~~~h':1I~;';路:::: Harold L. Hamm ....... Earle C. Hadle, Jr. ......

Mac HOEue, 402 S. lIth Street, Savannah, Mo. 64485 ........ Marvin . Huffman, 6202 S. 24th St. Ter., St. Joseph, Mo. 64504 F. Dean Wilson, Rt. 3, Box 135 AA, Savannah, ~o. 64485 .... Ray E. Lancey, Rt. I, Savannah, ~o. 64485 .. , ............... Glenn W. kenkins, 306 E. Nelson Street, Savannah, Mo. 64485 Nelson -\. app, Rt. 1, Cosby, Mo. 64436 .................... Harold . Smith, P.O. Box 118, A~ency, Mo 64401 .......... Raymond E. Smith, Rt. 6, DeKalb d., St. Joseph, Mo. 64504 Leslie V. Stites, 2721 S. 20th Street, St. Joseph Mo. 64503 .... Terry D. Gann, 2313 Briarcliff Ave., St. Joseph, Mo. 64503 ... Robert D. Wrehe, 2406 Lafayette St., St. Joseph, Mo. 64507 ... Norman H. Ellis, Rt. 2, Box 65, Rushville, Mo. 64484 ........ Edfr E. Martin, 3110 N. 9th Street, St. Joseph, Mo. 64505 ... Ric ard G. Thornton, 2906 Coach Light Place, St. Joseph, Mo. 64503 ............................................. Edwin C. Carpenter, 2814 Charles St., St. Joseph, ~o. 64501. . Roger M. Heard, 1323 Cudmore Street, St. Joseph, Mo. 64503

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1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd ~on. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st Wed. 1st & 3rd Tues. 4th Sat. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Wed.

TENTH DISTRICT - F. Kenneth Eads, D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 197, Jamesport, Mo. 64648 DeKalb DeKalb DeKalb DeKalb DeKalb Daviess Daviess Daviess Daviess Daviess Daviess Daviess

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Union Star . Parrott . Berlin Continental Clarksdale Western Star Pattonsburg Gallatin Earl Lock Springs Jameson Jamesport

. . . . . . . . . .

124 C'nion Star 308 Maysville 378 Fairport 454 Stewartsville 559 Clarksdale 15 Winston 65 Pattonsburg 106 Gallatin 285 Coffey 488 Lock Springs 500 Jameson 564 Jamesport.

. . Marion L. Wilkerson . William H. Wheeler, Rt. 1, Union Star, Mo. 64494 . . Thomas V. Mix . Louis S. Goodwin, Rt. 2, Box 3B, Maysville, Mo. 64469 . Leroy E. Denny . . Thomas K. Courtney . g;~~~~ed\~~Wrr', ~~O~'~~X8~:SSt~~,;:;;'~~~:"~,~~.6::~搂0路:::: ohn E. Cobb, P.O. Box 134, Clarksdale, Mo. 64430 .... , . . lerry Lee Burris . ohn A. Dunlap, Rt. 2, Box 10, Stewartsville, Mo. 64490 . . 1>aul C'the . . Ermal D. Cameron . . C. Teel, 224 East First Street, Pattonsburg, Mo. 64670 . . Weldon J. Macy ohn 1'. McNeel, 212 S. Water Street, Gallatin, Mo. 64640 . . . Wayne Howard, P.O. Box 127, Coffey, Mo. 64636 . . Wally E. Sperry . . . Donald I. Worthington .. Ross J. Lee, 1114 Shanklin Avenue, Trenton, Mo. 64683 . lohn R. S"!ith, Jameson, Mo. 64647 '" . . Herald !Imore . . George S. Lockridge . boyle C. Klme, Rt. 2, Box 168, Jamesport, Mo. 64648

f

1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon.

~

Z

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~

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00

I\.:)

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS - Continued ELEVENTH DISTRICT - Chesley E. McAfee. D.D.G.M., Rt. 2. Box 162. Orrick. Mo. 64077 Clay Clay. .. . .. . Clay.... .. Clay Clay Clinton Clinton Clinton Clinton Clinton Ray

\ Liberty Angerona Clay . . . . . . . ..

.

. ..

Kearney Temperance

v~~te.

.

. . . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. lst & 3rd Mon. 1st Thurs. lst & 3rd Thurs. 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon.

. Rufus C. Eichler, P.O. Box 124, Braymer, Mo. 64624 . . Harry L. Goff, 511 !'I.'. Ardinger, Hamilton, Mo. 64644 . . Forrest R. Leamer, P.O. Box 42, Polo, Mo. 64671 . . Herbert F. Woolsey, P.O. Box 132, Breckenridge, Mo. 64625 .. . lesse C. Burton, Rt. I, Braymer. Mo. 64624 . . Billy Joe Cox, 1616 lennings Place, Chillicothe, Mo. 64601 . . C. Richard Sidden. 1604 Jennings PI., Chillicothe, Mo. 64601 . W. Dale Wood, P.O. Box 124, Dawn, Mo. 64638 .

2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon.

. George A. Morgan FreddIe I. Vanderpool. .. Francis fl. Overbey .

311

~~~~h:i1I~ :::::::

Lawrence B. MacPherson lames L. Osborn . Donald ,G. Wigger . Leroy 1 . Soperla . lames L. Hudson . l:rnie Lorenson . Sam L. Swindler . Garnett L. Clevenger .

438 37 62

. . .

113

.

2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues.

Liberty .... Missouri City .... Excelsior Springs

.

::::::::::

Plattsburg Gower Lathrop Bee Hive

.

31 193 207

397 506 393

Hemple Cameron Plattsburg Gower Lathrop Lawson

. . . . . .

Merritt G. Damrell. P.O. Box 182. Liberty. Mo. 64068-0182 .. Chesley E. McAfee. Rt. 2. Box 162. Orrick. Mo. 64077 Robert A. Corum. Rt. 3. Box 128, Excelsior Springs. Mo. 64024 . hn W. Ervin. P.O. Box 134, Kearney, Mo. 64060 ack S. laForce. P.O. Box 594, Smithville, Mo. 64089 â&#x20AC;˘ orman W. Conner, P.O. Box 28, Easton, Mo. 64443 G. Eugene Morgan, 623 N. Nettleton, Cameron, Mo. 64429 Rex V. Cook, 307 Broadway Plattsburg, Mo. 64477 osePh A. Willis, Rt. I, Trimble, Mo. 64492 ames D. Fox, Rt. 2, Box T24, Plattsburg, Mo. 64477 . Wayne Briant. Rt. 2. Box 380. Lawson, Mo. 64062

~

~

TWELFTH DISTRICT - John D. Patton. D.D.G.M., Rt. 2. Box 77. Polo. Mo. 64671

"':l ~

o (j M M

-ooz [fJ

Caldwell Caldwell Caldwell Caldwell Caldwell Livingston Livingston Livingston

. . . . . . . .

Braymer. Hamilton Polo Breckenridge Cowgill Friendship Benevolence Dawn ..

. . . . .. . .

135 224 232 334 561 89 170 539

Braymer Hamilton Polo Breckenridge

. Steve L. Tarr . Michael D. Trosper. . lames W. Carter . Wells Bothwell Bob L. Burns, Jr loseph C. Darr l:dgar Kohl Henry Applebury

~hilJfc~th~ :::::: Utica Dawn

. .

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THIRTEENTH DISTRICT - Edwin L. Smith. D.D.G.M., Rt. 2. Box 388. Marceline. Mo. 64658 County Linn Linn Linn Linn

No.

Lodge . lackson . Brookfield . Dockery . Marceline

. . . .

821 86 325 481

Master's Name

Location Linneus Brookfield Meadville Marceline

. . . .

Secretary's

~ame

Time of Meeting

and Address

, '1 James N. Rinehart, Rt. 3, Box 64. Purdin, Mo. 64674 Gail S. Turner Barney E. Adams. .. . . .. c. C. McGhee. 843 Brookfield Ave., Brookfield, Mo. 64628 Grayson Hancock . . . . . . . lack E. Friesner, 403 E. Hayward..Meadville, Mo. 64659 Raymond R. Oldham.... l:arl G. Hays. Rt. 1, Box 53. Buck1m, Mo. 64631

. . . .

2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

.....

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FOURTEENTH DISTRICT - Earl Wayne Orr. D.D.G.M.. #7 Sharon Drive. Box 602. Shelbina. Mo. 63468 Macon Macon Macon Macon Macon Macon Shelby Shelby Shelby Shelby

. . . . . . . . . .

Callao Bloomington Censer La Plata

. . . .

~~~io~~~~~~~: :

Shelbina Hunnewell Bethel Clarence

. . . .

38 102 172 237 268 332 228 415 537 662

Callao Bevier Macon La Plata Atlanta Excello Shelbina Hunnewell Bethel Clarence

. . . . . . . . . .

Lowell K. Albright Freddie Ricker, Jr. George R. Morgan Leland Collins

. . . .

~~~~te~~lf:;:d~~~::::: :

Robert D. Wharton Cecil L. Smith Clifford M. Marquette R. Kelly Smith

. . . .

Gerald E. Thomas, Rt. 2, Box 8, New Cambria, Mo. 63558 Delbert L. Kitchen, Rt. I, Bevier, Mo. 63532 Ralph M. Waller, 517 Sunset Dr., Macon, Mo. 63552 Thomas J. Mohan, 113 S. Gex ~t, La Plata, Mo. 63549 David R. Carnahan, Rt. I, Atlanta, Mo. 63530 Roy L. Leathers, College Mound, Excello, Mo. 65247 lames E. Sims, 526 Cooper Avenue, Paris, Mo. 65275 , Kenneth R. Shride, Emden, Mo. 63439 Donald Poor, Bethel, Mo. 63434 Dennis W. Williams, P.O. Box 325. Clarence, Mo. 63437

. . . . . . . . . .

cD 00

lsI & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 41h Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st Mon. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thur. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Wed.

Ci

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT - Clarence F. Houser. D.D.G.M.. 2410 Palmyra Rd.. Hannibal. Mo. 63401 Lewis Lewis Lewis Lewis Lewis Marion Marion Marion Marion

. . . . . . . . .

Monticello laBelle Craft Williamstown Ewing Palmyra St. John's Hannibal. Philadelphia

. . . . . . . . .

58 222 287 370 577 18 28 188 502

Monticello Labelle Canton Williamstown Ewing Palmyra Hannibal Hannibal Philadelphia

. William B. Smith, II . Kenneth R. Pinson . R. Marvin Zenge . Chester Welker , Theodore C. Palmer . Harold C. lacobs .. , . C. Dennis l-farrison . lohn B. Douglas . Russell N. Plunkett

. . . . . . . . .

:;l:l

Emery O. Geisendorfer, Rt. 2, Box 102, Lewiston, Mo. 63452 . Elmo L. Davis, P.O. Box 56, laBelle, Mo. 63447 '" .. , . Edwin E. Frye, 523 l\'. 7th St., Canton, Mo. 63435 , . C. Norman Tucker, Rt. I, Williamstown, Mo. 63473 " .. W. E. Shults, P.O. Box 368, Ewing, Mo. 63440 . Howard I. Gardhouse, 220 W. Ross St., Palmrra, Mo. 63461 . Frederic!': E. Norman, 508 Olive St., Hanniba , Mo. 63401 . . Lee B. Turner, 4907 Prospect Ave., Hannibal, Mo. 63401. . Earl Bauerrichter, Rt. I, Pbiladelphia, Mo. 63463

2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. lst & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. lst & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. lst Thurs.

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SIXTEENTH DISTRICT - John E. Wetzel. D.D.G.M.. 116 N. 4th St. Louisiana. Mo. 63353 Pike ........ Pike ........

Eolia ............ Clarksville .......

14 17

Eolia ........... Clarksville .....

Terry Shaw ............. Milton F. Duvall. Jr. .....

Pike ........ Pike ......

Perseverance .... Phoenix .........

92 136

Louisiana ....... Bowling Green

Wm. E. Griffith, Jr. ..... Jimmy C. Fryrear .......

Pike ......

Pike ............

399

Curryville .......

Richard A. Edmond .....

a:

Van Cleave H. Loewe, Rt. lA, Box 10, Eolia, Mo. 63344 .......... Richard W. Middleton, 203 S. Front St., Box 53, Clarksville, Mo. 63336 ...................................... Leonard C. Waite, 2808 Georgia St., Louisiana, Mo. 63353 ........ William K. Mallory, 310 N. Main Cross, Bowling Green, Mo. 63334 ..................................................... J. R. McCune, Rt. I, Frankford, Mo. 63441. .....................

2nd & 4th Thurs. lst & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 3rd Mon.

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SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT - GlIIam Street. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 3. Perry. Mo. 63462 Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe Ralls Ralls Ralls

. . . . . . . .

Paris Union Florida Monroe Santa Fe Holliday Ralls Lick Creek New London

. . . . . . . .

19 23 64 462 660 33 302 307

Paris Florida Monroe City Santa Fe Holliday Center Perry New London

. . . . . . . .

Riley E. Barton Dennis Hollingsworth Russell Hollowell H. D. Vanlandingham Robert B. Crain R. Joseph Bird Thomas M. Hodges Raymond U. Powell, Jr

'" . lohn T. Luu, Rt. I, Paris, Mo. 65275 . 1:.. Boyd Wilmarth, P.O. Box 232, Perry, Mo. 63462 . F. Adelbert Ely, Rt. 2, Monroe City, Mo. 63456 . lohn H. Rudasill, Rt. 5, Mexico, Mo. 65265 '" . Paul K. Callison, Rt. I, Holliday, Mo. 65258 . lohn C. Rodgers, P.O. Box 37, Center, Mo. 63436 . 1:.rnest c. Deckerd, P.O. Box 335, Perry, Mo. 63462 . Stanley Walkley Rt. I, New London, Mo. 63459

. . . . . . . .

2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. lst & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. lst & 3rd Wed.

00 <:JQ


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT Randolph Randolph Randolph Randolph Randolph Randolph Randolph

. Huntsville . Milton . Moberly . Cairo . Hil{bee . Jacksonville . Clark

. . . . . . .

30 Huntsville ..... 151 Milton . . 344 Moberly 486 Cairo 527 Higbee 541 JacKsonville 610 Clark

. . . .

Eureka

.

Chariton Chariton Chariton Chariton Chariton

Warren Triplett SalIsbury Cunningham Mendon

. . . . .

. . . . .

73 ! Brunswick 741 122 208 525 628

Keytesville Tnplett Salisbury Sumner Mendon

00 ~

BUlle Pollard. D.D.G.M.. 715 S. Morley St.. Moberly. Mo. 65270 . E. Allen Kohler, P.O. Box 170, Huntsville, Mo. 65259 loseph F. Stanturf. lloyd W. Frye . Thomas I. Marshall, 902 Gilman Rd., Moberly, Mo. 65270. Clarence K. Swan . Fred F. S"tuecken, 929 Bond St., Moberly, Mo. 65270 . Howard Lee Ridgway . loel C. RIdgway P.O. Box 3, Cairo, Mo. 65239. . .. Lowell C. Bankhead, Jr. .. l:dwin B. Hawkms, PO. Box 125, HIgbee, Mo. 65257 Hershall W. Wright . Leroy Taylor, Rt. I, Box 115, Jacksonville, Mo. 65260 James H. Patton, Rt. 2, Box 3, Clark, Mo. 65243 Frank Redding .. " .

NINETEENTH DISTRICT Chariton ....

-

Continued

. . .. , . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

C. Gail Brown. D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 98. Mendon. Mo. 64660

.

Raymond A. Scott

. . . . .

Harold Russell Howard L. Sanders Howard R. Elmore Ralph E. Allen Otto Earl Vaughn

on'" ::c

Jo~;r ~~~~~'.~~'.~: .~~~.24~: ~r~~~~i~~,.~~ . . . James c. O'Bryan, Rt. I, Box 3A, Keytesville, Mo. 65261 . . John M. Summers, Rt. I, Box 5, Triplett, Mo. 65286 . . Charles B. Winkelmeyer, III W. 2nd St., Salisbury, Mo. 65281 . . Marvin F. Lenu, P.O. Box 91, Sumner, Mo. 64681 . Cleo V. Kincaid, 310 Wood St., Box 103, Mendon, Mo. 64660-0103 .

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Mon.

tor: tor:

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TWENTIETH DISTRICT -James R. Paul. D.D.G.M.. 401 Santa Fe St.. Carrollton, Mo. 64633 County Carroll Carroll Carroll Carroll

No.

Lodge . . . .

Wakanda Hale City Carroll Bosworth

. . . .

52 216 249 597

'1 James 1". England Carl Wesley Walby

Carrollton Hale. . . . . . . . . . .. Norborne. . . . . .. Bosworth. . . . . ..

TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT Platte Platte Platte Platte Platte Platte Platte Platte

. . . . . . . .

Rising Sun Weston

. .

~~:;:a:~s p~i~i :: : Rowley Fidelity Adelphi Platte City

. . . .

13 53 120 169 204 339 355 504

Kansas City Weston Parkville Camden Point Dearborn Farley Edgerton Platte City

Thomas C. White Jerry B. Kemble

Time of Meeting

Secretary's fl;ame and Address

Master's fl;ame

Location

. . . .

Maurice H. Moeller, 803 fl;orth Leslie, Carrollton, Mo. 64633 .. Lee A. J'isher, Rr. 2, Box 180, Hale, Mo. 64643 '" . Harry H. Mattox, P.O. Box 74, l\orborne, Mo. 64668 ,. Reigge L. Crose, Rt. I, Box 80, Bosworth, Mo. 64623 .

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Fri.

...,

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Cecil W. Breid. D.D.G.M.. 709 N.E. 8lst Terrace. Kansas City. Mo. 64113 . . . . . . . .

Marshall W. Atkinson Ronnie D. Duncan Roy J. Clark Ernest Boydston Robert D. Wolfe Duane L. Meier Carol A. Rice Walter E. Tomb

, Eldon J. Cusic, 3001 N.E. 56 St., Kansas City, Mo. 64119 . ~mes A. Offutt, P.O. Box 155, Weston, Mo. 64098 . . . lack D. Hudson, P.O. Box 95, Dearborn, Mo. 64439 . l:dward A. Reavis, Rt. 27, Box 340B, Parkville, Mo. 64153 . Marion L. Shafer, Rt. I, Box 107, Edgerton, Mo. 64444 . Dr. Richard W. Calvert, P.O. Box 60(J, Platte City, Mo. 64079

. .

Mi~~~:i t.路l1:~~~~~', ~~~~,NBo~V;:~~de~a~~~t~~~.~~or:~ ~~::

. . . .

1st Sat. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Mon. 1st Tues. 2nd Wed. 1st Wed. 2nd Tues. 2nd Mon.

(..0

00


TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT

-

D. Eugene Wisner, D.D.G.M.. 405 Palmer, Blue Springs, Mo. 64015

(A) -

c.o

00

ackson .. '" ackson . ackson . ackson . ackson . ackson . ackson . ackson .. '" ackson . 'Clay .

Kansas City . Temple . Cecile Daylight .. Rural . Gate City . Orient . South Gate . Sheffield . Northeast . Alpha .

220 299 305 316 522 546 547 625 643 659

Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City :-.I. Kansas City

. .

Donald L Huggins Wallace J. Hickey Kenneth L. Goad . Chester H. Hazen . Orval D. Hicks . Richard W. Rudd . William S. Skinner . Frank M. Holcer . Harrold F. Anderson .. Virden L Daugherty

.

. . Eugene H. Peak, 2550 S. 45th Terr., Kansas City, Kan. 66106 . . Charlie E. McBride, 616 Lake Dr., Independence, Mo. 64053 . lohn K. Smith, 2705 Sterling, Independence, Mo. 64052 . . Howard B. Blanchard, 3339 Tracy Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 64109 .. . Earl F. Bowman, 903 Harrison St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106 . . Richard P. Flaigle, 903 Harrison St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106. '" .. . Kenneth B. Morris, 3030 Kendall Ave., Independence, Mo. 64055 . Harry M. Thompson, 6235 Peery Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 64126 . . . Arthur M. Latta, 407 N. Quincy, Kansas City, Mo. 64123 . Willis R. HUn!, 5817 N.E.Barnes Ave .• Kansas City, Mo. 64119 .

2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon.

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT (8) - Paul E. Kelly, D.D.G.M.. 8800 Buckingham La., Apt. 18, Kansas City, Mo. 64138

r~

ackson ackson ackson ackson ackson ackson ackson

..... ..... ..... .. '" ..... ..... .....

Jackson ..... ackson .....

Heroine ......... Albert Pike ...... york ............ MarlborouE h .... Swope Par ..... East Gate ........

104 219 340 446 563 569 617 630

Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas

~~~rfi.~I.~~: :::

656 663

Kansas City ..... Kansas City .....

~:~~~::::::::

City City City City City City City City

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

~mes

Paul K. Kawakami, 820 E. 31st St., Kansas City. Mo. 64109 .. " ... U. S. Smith, 8828 Rainbow La., Kansas Ci~, Mo. 64055 .... , ..... Clarence V. Buchholz, 48 W. 53rd Terr., ansas City, Mo. 64112.. Charles E. Wisdom, 13702 11th St., Grandview, Mo. 64030 ....... : : : : : : Timothy M. Duff. 520 E. 6Ist Terr., Kansas City, Mo. 64110 ...... Norman S. Meyers ...... Barry L. Bausenbach, 9809 Locust, A£t. 303, Kansas City, Mo. 64131 Gary L. Mullins .... , .... Glenn A. Kirk, 10323 C(?'stal Ave., ansas City. Mo. 64134 ....... Chester L. McDaniel ..... Henry L. McDaniel, 351 Blue Ridge Cut-Off, Kansas City, Mo. 64133 ................................................. P. Warrin~on, Sr...... William W. Corbin, 1601 E. 89th Terr., Kansas City, '-10. 64131 ... Mi ton Loef er ......... Jacob P. Kraft, 4607 S. Crysler. Independence, Mo. 64055 ........ M. Tate .......... illiam D. Norton ...... E. Palmer Cox ..........

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2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. Ist & 3rd Tues. Ist & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. Ist & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Wed.

. . . . . . .

LexinJ{ton Waverly Higginsville MOUn! Hope Richmond

. . . . .

~l'::::::::::::

149 61 364 476 57 223 444

Lexington Waverly Higginsville Odessa Richmond Camden Orrick.

. David W. Hall . Bertil C. Daleen . Donald G. Sturgess . Eugene Q. Jumet. . I ames W. Stigall . bonald P. Lauck John M. Hall

. . . . . . .

Herbert W. Wipperman. 722 Buford St., Wellington, Mo. 64097 Charles W. Zumalt. Rt. I, Waverly, Mo. 64096 Howard I. Tobin, Rt. 2, Box 236. Higginsville, Mo. 64037 Larry E. Goodwin, Rural Rt., Box 71, Wellington, Mo. 64097 Kenneth G. Stratton, 715 William St., Richmond, Mo. 64085 Robert E. Stonner, Rt. I, Box 113A, Camden, Mo. 64017 Maurice Hall, Rt. I. Orrick, Mo. 64077

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TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT - John M. Townsend, D.D.G.M.. Rt. 1, Box 163, Orrick, Mo. 64077 Lafayette Lafayette Lafayette Lafayette Ray Ray Ray

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TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT - Lloyd R. Finney, D.D.G.M.. 604 Leawood Drive, Marshall, Mo. 65340 Saline Saline Saline Saline Saline Saline

. . . . . .

Arrow Rock Cambridge Trilumina Barbee Oriental. ., . " Nelson

. . . . . .

55 63 205 217 518 560

Arrow Rock Slater Marshall Sweet Springs Blackburn Nelson

. . . . . .

William T. Burge Wilbur Hains B. Z. Leatherwood

. Herbert A. Templeton, General Delivery, Arrow Rock, Mo. 65320 . . I. I. Akeman, Rt. I, Slater, Mo. 65349 . . 'Thomas W. Lingle, 621 N. Franklin, Marshall, Mo. 65340 ., Emil O. Rippley, 404 Main, Sweet Springs, Mo. 65351 ..... , '" . Cecil O. Watkins. Rt. 2, Box 125, Sweet Springs, Mo. 65351 . . . Craig A. Scot!, Nelson, Mo. 65347

~~a~~: ~'. ~~f~~'.~~'.:::

Archie R. Bledsoe

2nd Thurs. 1st Tues. lst Thurs. 4th Fri. 3rd Tues. 4th Thurs.

00

c.n


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS -

TWENTY-FIFTH D1STmCT County

Lodge

No.

Cooper ......... Cooper ......... Cooper ......... Cooper ......... Howard ........ Howard ........

Cooper ........... Pleasant Grove .... Wallace .......... Prairie Home ..... Howard ...... Fayette ...........

36 142 456 503 4 47

. . . . . . .

Centralia . Twilight . Ashland . Sturgeon . Hallsville . Ancient Landmark Acacia .

59 114 156 174 336 356 602

Dr. David L. Dimond, D.D.G.M., 305 Corprew, Fayette, Mo. 65248 ~aster's

Location

Time of Meeting

Secretary's Name and Address

Name

Boonville ... .jtmes O. Polly, Rt. 1, Boonv.ille, ~o. 65.233 .................. :::::::: . Earl Routon, Rt. I. Box CIA, OtterVille, Mo. 65348 ........ Otterville ....... Bunceton ....... : Gil~n ~orris ........ Albert A. Eichhorn, Rt. 2, Box 102, Pilot Grove, Mo. 65276 ... Prairie Home. " . Gary . KIrschman ..... ~immb D. Sells, P.O. Box 52, Prairie Home, Mo. 65068 ....... 'om . ~arkland, 113 E. Broadway. New Franklin, Mo. 65274 James E. Gregory ...... I'ew Franklin '" Fayette ....... Carl H. Acton .......... Kenneth ~. Dougherty, 807 W. Spring St., Fayette, Mo. 65248

r~h~; ~e.z]Fe~ill:

TWENTY-SIXTH D1STmCT Boone Boone Boone Boone Boone Boone Boone

00 O'l

Continued

2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues.

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Dr. Wilbur R. Enns, D.D.G.M., 506 Bourn Ave., Columbia, Mo. 65201 Edward R. Torreyson. Melvin B. Goe, Sr., 450 S. Allen St., Centralia, Mo. 65240 ..... W. Bush Walden, 4811 St. Charles Rd., Columbia, Mo. 65201 James G. Wade . Robert E. Lee . !immy G. Pauley, P.O. Box 138, Ashland, Mo. 65010 . Buford C. Kanatzar . ~~~:lJ ~S~~ff~;/R~' 7~0:0~li21.tC~~~:bi~oM~5~~~oi: : : : Jerrv W. Cotton . Gary W. Maiden . Silas T. Hudnell, Rt. I, Box 256, Harrisburg, ~o. 65256 . Eugene E. Wilson .. Payne H. Percefull, 2222 Bluff Blvd. Columbia, Mo. 65201 .

Centralia . Columbia Ashland . Sturgeon . Hallsville . Harrisburg . Columbia ..

TWENTY-SEVENTH D1STmCT -

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1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd ~on. 1st Tues. 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues.

Roy Fowler, D.D.G.M., 713 North Jefferson Street, Vandalia, Mo. 63382

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Audrain .. Audrain Audrain Callaway Callaway Callaway Callaway Callaway

. . . . . . .

Laddonia . Hebron . Vandalia . Fulton . New Bloomfield .. Tebbetts . Shamrock . Mokane .

115 354 491 48 60 565 585 612

Laddonia . Mexico . Vandalia . Fulton . :-;ew Bloomfield Tebbetts . Auxvasse . ~okane .

TWENTY-EIGHTH D1STmCT Montgomery ....

~ontgomery

Montgomery. Montgomery.

Jonesburg baggett

. . .

Roger L. Stringer Randall D. Barnes. Ronald L. Heaton. Terry L. Keith Wm. D. Mosley Ralph M. Davis

~~h~/~k~.~et~: : : :

.

. .

~illr:~di\~(~t~,n~~'~2~r~路F~\~~,llM~~~~~I~~,.~.~ .. ~~~8~.::: W. Paul Holt, Rt. I. Box 33, Holts Summit, ~o. 65043 . David K. Smart. Rt. 1, Box 168, Tebbetts, Mo. 65080 . James L. Jones. P.O. Box 242, Auxvasse, Mo. 6523} . . Bryan R. Rogers, P.O. Box 141, ~okane, Mo. 650:>9 . . .

2nd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 3rd ~on. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st Thurs. 1st Fri.

John P. Simpson, D.D.G.M., 621 Cynthia Lane, Montgomery City, Mo. 63361

246

Montgomery City

David W. Barker ..

457 492

Jone~bu.rg

Douglas G. Engel. Leo J. Hauser

McKlttTlck

Alvin 1.. Kelly, Rt. 2, Box 12A, Laddonia, Mo. 63352 Harris L. Maupin, Jr., 1508 West St., Mexico, Mo. 65265

.

.

. .

Verle 1'. Naughton, Rt. 2, Box 164C, Montgomery City, Mo. 63361 G. Leroy Finke, Rt. I, High Hill, Mo. 63350 Sidney E. ~uehl, P.O. Box 413, Rhineland, ~o. 65069

. .

2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Mon. 2nd Tues.

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TWENTY-NINTH DISTmCT - James A. Vaughn. D.D.G.M.. 212-214 Brodway. Elsberry. Mo. 63343 Lincoln .. Lincoln .. Lincoln. Lincoln . Lincoln Lincoln

. .

Troy .. Silex ..... Jl,;ew Hope Jl,;ew Salem Nineveh Moscow

. . . .

Troy Silex

34 75 199 270 473 558

. .

James H. Foree Warren W. Wommack John H. Owens, Jr C. A. McDaniel, Jr. . Edward Jerome Cox . Leighton E. Lester

~~~;:i~ ::::::::

Olney Moscow Mills

. .. . . . .

Floyd E. Dodson, 653 Second St., Troy, Mo. 63379 .. Henry A. Hueffner, Rt. 1, Box 132, Cyrene, Mo. 63340 Edwin R. Whiteside, 615 N. 5th St., E~sberry, Mo. 63343 Martin A. Herring, Rt. I, Box 109, Wmfield, Mo. 63389 William W. Haines, P.O. Box 67, Olney, Mo. 63370 Edward W. Broyles, Rt. 2, Box 77, Moscow Mills, Mo. 63362

. . . . ..

2nd & 4th Mon. 4th Fri. 2nd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 1st Fri. 2nd Sat.

THIRTIETH DISTmCT - Euell J. Sweeten. D.D.G.M.. 3 Mark Twain Ct.. O路Fallon. Mo. 63366 St. Charles St. Charles St. Charles Warren . Warren

. . . .

Wentzville Palestine Mechanicsville Pauldingville Warrenton.

. . . .

461 241 260 II 609

Gerald W. Dowler, 739 Winston Place, O'Fallon, Mo. 63366 ... Harold L. Thomas, Sr., 2920 Yale Blvd., St. Charles, Mo. 63301 John Klinkerfuss. #26 Wilderness, Defiance, Mo. 63341 . Conley E. DePriest, Rt. 2, Box 557. Foristell, Mo. 63348 . George H. Gerdeman, 501 E. Banner, Warrenton, Mo. 63383

William E. McGuire ..

Wentzville ., St. Charles .. Defiance .... Wright City Warrenton

~il\::~SD~k~;:I~~::" . .

Paul Phiropoulos Herbert L. Smith

. .

1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

THIRTY路FIRST DISrmCT - Edward Ewing Shikles. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 1. Box 109. Russellville. Mo. 65074 Cole .. Cole ..... Cole. Moniteau Moniteau Moniteau Osage Osage

Jefferson Russellville. . . . .

.

Hickory Hill . . . . ..

[ 43 90 211

I Jefferson City. Eugene.

~~h~~~n'i~::::::::: I~~ ~'~h~~~~i~::::::. Moniteau . . . . . . . .. Chamois. . . . . . Linn.........

295 185 326

Jamestown Chamois Linn.

. .

THIRTY路SECOND DISrmCT County

Lodge

Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Franklin ........ Gasconade ...... Gasconade ......

Evergreen ........ Sullivan .......... Gray Summit ...... Hope ............. Fraternal ....... , . Columbia ......... Easter ............ Cnion ......... Hermann ......... Owensville ........

Pau! C. Rich, 1926 E. McCarty St.. Jefferso~ City, M~. 65101. . J. \\endell Heady. Rt. 1, Box 279, kussellville, Mo. 6:>074 ....

Lyle V. Mclaughlin John S. Heady ...

Russellville ....

Willard (Bill) Wood Floyd G. Turpin David R. Potter Larry W. Borts Douglas W. Kuebler Emerson F. Leinberger

. . . . .

Robertj' Crede, Rt. 2,Iefferson Ci!~.' Mo. 65101 RlChar D. Conn, Sr., P.O. Box T, lIpton, Mo. 65081 Billy R. Potter, Rt. I, California, Mo. 65018

. . .

~~~~eBSh~~er~~~~~b. ~~~ ~~2, ~~~~~rs~~o;~5~204 .6.~0~~::::

James J. Wolfe, Rt. 2, Linn, Mo. 65051.

.

1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd Fri. & 4th Fri. Jan., Feb., Mar. 4th Tues. 2nd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st Mon. 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri.

Kimber W. Key. D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 202. St.Clair. Mo. 63077

No.

Location

Master's Name

27 69 173 251 363 534 575 593 123 624

Jl,;ew Haven ..... Sullivan ......... Gray Summit .... Washington .... Robertsville ..... Pacific .......... St. Clair ....... Cnion .......... Hermann ....... Owensville ......

Elmer A. Allersmeyer... E. Ra~h Stroud ........ ~ohn . Cha拢man ...... 'homas A. uhlmann .. ~ames T. Clark ......... onald~. Huff. ........ Kennet L. Johnson .... Clay Barnhart. .........

~iftia~ g.. ~~~~~ ::::

Secretary's

~ame

and Address

John W. Sheible, 208 Main St., New Haven, Mo. 63068 ....... Charles H. Schuler, 684 E. Vine St., Sullivan, Mo. 63080 ...... Albert G. Cowan, Rt. 2, Box 480C, Gray Summit, Mo. 63039 .. R. Woodrow Caldwell. 1310 E. 6th, Washington, Mo. 63090 ... BillieJ. Hogue. Rt. 2, Box 551, Catawissa, Mo. 63015 ........ Roy L. Barnes, 913 Thornton St., Pacific, Mo. 63069 ......... Donald R. Hinson, Rt. 2, Box 387, Vnion, Mo. 63084 ........ Elvis L. Winchester. Rt. 2, Box 661, Union, Mo. 63084 . " .... Arthur C. Gaebler, Rt. 2, Box 151, Hermann, Mo. 65041 ..... Howard E. Brandt, Rt. 1, Rosebud, Mo. 63091. ..............

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Time of Meeting 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS - Continued THIRTY-THIRD City of St. Louis City of St. Louis

DISTRICT - William B. Stephenson. Jr.. D.D.G.M.. 10049 Stonell Dr.. St. Louis. Mo. 63123

(A)

MissouriCommonwealth George Washington

City of St. Louis City of St. Louis

Naphtali Erwin

City of St. Louis City of St. Louis

Occidental . Pride of the West. .

City City City City City

Cosmos Tuscan Lambskin Olive Branch Triangle

of St. of St. of St. of St. of St.

Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis

. .

. , . . .

9I

I StSt

25 121

······1 Clyde Milburn ~ortner P. O. DavIs . .....

Lou!s. LoUIs. . ....

St Louis.... St. Louis.

1631 St. Louis 179 SI. Louis 2821 360 460 576 638

SI. SI. St. SI. St.

.

Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis

..

. . . . . .

Henry S. Schulte JimmIe K. Tipton

. .

Thelbert J. Marlow Hugh H. Roy

. .

Ira M. Warden Thomas L. Merrill. Peter Cavic, Jr. Billy F. Hemphill Robert J. Mathews

" . . . . .

Clarence B. Doll, 8011 Crestway Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63123 ... William B. Stephenson, Jr., 10049 Stonell Dr., St. Louis, Mo. 63123 . Irvin M. Sprous, P.O. Box 2135, St. Louis, Mo. 63158 . Howard F. Dallman, 4125 Robert Koch Hospital Rd., St. Louis, Mo. 63129 . Charles E. Jordan, 1041 Rockman PI., Rock Hill, Mo. 63119 .. Harold F. Simmons, 242 Turf Ct., Webster Groves, Mo. 63119 . Gary W. Smith, 3701 McDonald, St. Louis Mo. 63116 . John W. Hillemeyer, 50 Magnolia Dr., St. Louis, Mo. 63124 . l:dwin C. Hawkins, 9487 Rosebay Dr., Crestwood, Mo. 63126 Melvin S. Acord, 1349 Graham, St. Louis, Mo. 63139 . Raymond C. ScOtt, 11940 Meadow Run Ct., Maryland Heights, Mo. 63043 .

3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd Thurs.

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THIRTY-THIRD (B) DISTRICT - Frank A. Danko. D.D.G.M.. 4337 Oleatha Ave.. St. Louis. Mo. 63116 City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St. City of St.

Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis Louis

Meridian Pomegranate Pyramid Good Hope Aurora America Cache Harmony Clifton Heights

~1!;~~li~'

. . . . . . . . .

::::::::: Trinity .....

2 95 180 218 267 347 416 499 520 544 626 641

St. St. St. St. St. SI. SI. SI. SI. St. SI. SI.

Louis ... Louis. Louis . Louis . Louis . Louis. Louis. Louis . Louis Louis Louis Louis

Robert F. DePung Gene R. Bell James Thompson Nestor G. Harkins Thomas A. Ban Thomas E. Kuhn Edgar D. Piles Harold L. Ratliff . . . .

. Harry C. Ploetze, 5417 Donovan Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 63109 . . Kenneth R. Hill, 1144 Magnet Drive, Olh'ette, Mo. 63132 . . . Jack c. Weaver, 2600 Lore, Arnold, Mo. 63010 . Willard W. Boenzle, 1650 Miller Road, Imperial, Mo. 63052 .. . William F. Flottmann, Jr., 3110 Elm St., St. Charles, Mo. 63301 . James R. Shadowens, 120 Brent, Oakland, Mo. 63122 . . . l"rank J. Danko, 4337 Oleatha Ave., SI. Louis, Mo. 63116 . William F. Schmidt, 9509 Yaffbury Lane. St. Louis, Mo. 63123 Mike I"ichlos, 3300 Halliday Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 63118 . Elmer L. Fowler, 5208 Alabama Ave.. St. Louis, Mo. 63111 . . . David R. Vogler, 5037 Fendler Place, St. Louis, Mo. 63116 . Ellis H. Havard, #2 St. Martha Court, Florissant, Mo. 63031 ..

~~~~~~r~oH~~~: ::::::

William J. Mathis Charles Bratton

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2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nn & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Sat. 1st Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Sat. 1st Mon. 2nd th Tues. 2nd . 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

Id

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THmTY-FOURTH DISTRICT Cass. Cass Cass Cass '" Cass

Index Cass . Grand River .. Belton . Jewe[ .

. . .

Cass '" Cass Cass '"

.

Coldwater. . Archie ..... Cleveland.

.

Curtis G. Long. D.D.G.M.. 512 Margaret La.. Belton. Mo. 64012

54 [47 276 450 480

~~~~~~n~路iiW~ : : : :

Bill J. Dickey Damon E. Bart[es Andy Hillman William C. Snead. Sr Howard L. Pippin .

485 633 651

Drexe[ Archie C[eveland

:\-1arvin D. Hocker Charles R. Sweet Ronnie D. Jones

Freeman Belton Pleasant Hill

. . .

. . .

. . Roger E. Orr. Rt. 2. Box 249. Garden City. :\-10. 64747 . H. Eugene Self. 1005 Edgevale Te~r.. Harrisonville. Mo. 64701 . John C. Waldron. P.O. Box 156. Freeman. Mo. 64746 . . . Patrick H. Bosley. 604 Prairie Circle. Belton. Mo. 64012 William L. Brown. 4[8!'. Rando[ph St.. Pleasant Hill. Mo. 64080 . . Eugene R. Powell.. Rt. 2. Box [7. Peculiar. Mo. 64078 . Darrell T. Mays. 606 W. Pine. Box 53A. Archie. Mo. 64725 . Edwin S. Craycraft. 1105 Edgevale Terr.. Harrisonville. Mo. 6470[ .

. .

1st & 3rd Tues. [st & 3rd Thurs. 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Tues. 3rd :\-1on. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd Tues.

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THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT County Bates Bates Bates Bates Bates

Lodge

. . . . .

Amsterdam Butler . Crescent Hill. Rich Hill Foster ...

No. .

141 254 :i6H .. , ,479 554

Location Amsterdam .. Butler . Adrian . Rich Hill. Foster ..

A. Freeman Stanfill. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 1. Box 401. Amoret. Mo. 64722 Master's Name A. Freeman Stanfill. R. V. Fahnestock. Sr. Tracy Rugg . I. c.. Robbins . l.ewls L. Watson ..

Secretary's :'I;ame and Address . .

~i!h~r~\F~~~~'hr/)81~0~6~)h1~s~~1:r~~~.06~~~g3.: :

. Scott Allen. Rt. [. Adrian. :\-10.64720 Harrison D. Philbrick. Rt. 3. Box [37. Rich Hill. Mo. 64779 ... W. Carl Trogdon. Rt. 3. Box 174. Butler. :\-10. 64730.

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o THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT Benton . Benton . Johnson . Johnson . Johnson . Johnson . Johnson .. Pettis . Pettis . Pettis .

Cole Camp . Shawnee Knob l'oster .. Holden .... Corinthian. Cold Spring . Chilhowee. Seda[ia. Granite . LaMonte .

.

595 653 245 262 265 274 487 236 272 574

Cole Camp . Warsaw . Knob Noster Holden ..... Warrensburg. Leeton . Chilhowee Seda[ia . Sedalia . LaMonte ..

c:

Gary A. Inlow. D.D.G.M.. 2795 Maplewood Circle. Sedalia. Mo. 65301 Dennis E. Brandt. Robert M. :'I;eely. Jr. Chester R. Best. Russell C. Lattimer. Charles D. Eldridge James E. Fitts . Fred Campbell . Thomas H. McCully. Howard R. Hillman Jerry R. Handley ....

. John D. Friedly. Jr.. P.O. Box [4. Ionia. Mo. 65335 . . fohn Owen. P.O. Box 275. Warsaw. Mo. 65355 . l.arry R. Reeder. 20[ E. March. Whiteman AFB. Mo. 65303 George W. Cast. 704 S. Olive. Ho[den. Mo. 64040 . Cecil D. Speas. 407 Benjamin Dr.. Warrensburg. Mo. 64093 . Edward K. Lenz. Rt. [. Greenridge. Mo. 65332 . .lames E. Hancock. Rt. 2. Box 103. Chilhowee. :\-10. 64733 Howard J. Gwinn. 667 E. 10th St.. Sedalia. :\-10. 6530[ . Ray F. Hendricks. [614 W. 20th St.. Sedalia. Mo. 6530[ .. Ray 1.. Stoll. 2407 W. I [th St.. Sedalia. :\-10.65301 .

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1st Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. [st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 3rd Thurs. [st & 3rd Fri. [st Fri. 3rd Fri. 1st Thurs.

00

(,D


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT Henry . Henry . Henry . St. Clair . St. Clair .. St. Clair .. St. Clair. St. Clair.

Windsor . Clinton . Calhoun . St. Clair . Circle . Lowry City .. Appleton City. Star .

29 548 552 273 342 403 412 419

-

Continued

( ,0

o

Wayne U. Thomas. D.D.G.M.. 201 E. Florence. Windsor. Mo. 65360 loseph S. Kidwell, 610 ~. ~in~sor ~t., Windsor, M~): 65360 . . :'1urrel V. Zollicker, P.O. Box 215, Calhoun, Mo. 65323. Eldon Lawson. Osceola. ~Io. 64776 . . . Rohert E. Bell. Sr.. P.O. Box 54, Roscoe. Mo. 647HI .. Perry L. Atchison. 200:". Mahan, Rt. I, Lowry City. Mo. 64763 lohn B. Browning, Rt. 3. Montrose, Mo. 64770 . Willard L. Dains, Rt. 2, Box 41, Rockville, Mo. 64780.

Harvev P. Acker ... Virgil E. Bradler .. Rohert O. Haas .. Rohert F. :'1cLcrry Robert T. Keeton'. Fred R. Bunch .. Charles ~1eredith... Kenwood I.. Harra

Windsor Clinton ..... Calhoun Osceola .. Roscoe .... Lowry City.

~~~~~YI7eCny

Harr~ L. Jerome, 316 !\. :>th St.. Chnton. :.io. 6473:>

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 3rd Tues. 2nd Wed. 1st Fri. 3rd Mon. 4th Fri. "tl

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THlRTY路E1GHTH DISTRICT Camden .... Camden. Laclede .. Laclede .. Laclede . Miller . Pulaski . Pulaski .

Linn Creek .. Macks Creek. Laclede . Competition. Conway . Iberia .

~~hla~dil~e : :

152 433 83 432 52H 410 375 385

William E. Brenneman. D.D.G.M.. Linn Creek Star Route. Lebanon. Mo. 65536 Darrell Crowell .. Mike Clopp . James R. Jones . I. R. Ozborn \1ichael :.i. Dameron William S. Gilliam .. Fred A. McMillan : : : : . Robert D. Scott .

Camdenton .... Macks Creek. Lebanon . Com petition . Conwav . Iberia .

~~h~~di.lI.e.

Virgil R. Bradsher, P.O. Box 143, Sunrise Beach. Mo. 65079 .. Edward P. Daniels. 147 :". High Rt. 3, Camdenton, Mo. 65020 Wilbur II. Bradley. P.O. Box 185. Lebanon, Mo. 6.'>536 . Owen H. Simpson. 1460 South Jefferson, Lebanon. Mo. 65536 Robert L. Jump. P.O. Box 38H. Marshfield. Mo. 65706 . ~orman D. DeVore. Rt. 2, Iberia, Mo. 65486 .. JohnJ. Ferrante, Rt. 2. Dixon, Mo. 65459 . Jackie B. :'liIler, Rt. 3, Box I H3. Richland, Mo. 65556 ..

. .

2nd Thurs. 1st Sat. 1st Thurs. 1st Sat. 1st Sat. 1st Thurs. 2nd Tues. 2nd Wed.

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THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT Crawford ..

Lebanon ...

Crawford. . . .. Dent . . . . . Maries . . . . Maries . Maries Phelps. . . . . . .. Phelps. . . . . . . . Phelps. . . . . . . . Pulaski , .. Texas. . . . .

Cuba . Salem . Vienna . Belle . Lane's Prairie .. Rolla . St. James . Equality . Arlington . Latimer .

77 I Steelville. . 312 225 94 373 531 213 230 497 346 145

Cuba ..... Salem. Vienna .. Belle. Vichy . Rolla . St. James .. :"ewburg Dixon .. Licking.

Elden Ommert. D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 54. Raymondville. Mo. 65555 :"arvel W. Frazier, Ir., Red Bone Ranch, Rt. 2, Box 3H8, Steelville,Mo. 65565 . I. Howard Murphy, 907 W. Main Ave., Cuba, Mo. 65453 . Wi/bern C. Sanders Rt. 3, Box 294, Salem, Mo. 65560 . Daniel E. Snodgrass, Star Rt. I, Box 2lB,Vienna, Mo 655H2 .. Bernard A. Mcintyre. Star Rt. 2, Belle, Mo. 65013 ' Garnett Walters, Rt. 5, Box 314, Rolla, Mo. 65401 . . . :"orman E. Ragan, Rt. 5, Box 378. Rolla, Mo. 65401 . lohn T. ~'oolsey 407 l'\. lefferson, .St. lames, Mo . .?5559 . Dewev W. Riden, Rt. 2, Box 232, l'\ew6urg, Mo. 6:>:>50 . . Rick Ray lohns, 1821 White Columns, Apt. I, Rolla, Mo. 65401 . . Gene Miller, P.O. Box 341. Licking. Mo. 65542

. .. I Raymond A. Stark. Jr....

.

Samuel C. Orr . Richard D. Jordon. Joe Blackwell ... James p. Lange .. David Glenn . Paul " Kittle Leland R. Duckworth Edward H. Schollian. Gregory 1': Campbell LOUIS E. Carmack,Jr

1st Sat. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st Sat. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd Sat. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

( ,0

00


(,Ci

00

FORTIETH DISTRICT County

Carl P. Brown. D.D.G.M.. 2537 Starling Airport Road. Arnold. Mo. 63010

:'\0.

Location

Jefferson. . . DeSoto. . . . . . . Jefferson. . . Joachim . . . . . . . . jefferson . . Shekinah , jefferson. . . . . Herculaneum..... Jefferson. . . Arnold. . . . St. Francois. . . Blackwell , Washington. Tyro. . . . . . . . . .. . .

I 19 164 256 338 673 535 12

DeSoto . Hillsboro . Crystal City . Herculaneum .. Arnold ..... Blackwell .. Caledonia ...

R. E. Jinkerson, jr. Robert F. Hamilton lohn R. Kassen Basil L Wright Howard /';. Brown Robert Exline .... Glen (R.) Weiss .

. .

Washington .. Washington .. Washington.

131 143 632

Potosi ... Irondale .. Belgrade ..

William H. Bust Stanley E. Reason John Wells .

.

Lodge

Potosi . Irondale . Belgrade ..

Master's /';ame

Secretary's /';ame and Address Charles H. Turley. Rt. 5. Box 238, DeSoto, . . .

~o.

Time of 63020

e;:: ~~ft~~i~:,. ~~2~3~~.9.

.

~e::~a~' ~~~:~;;/~41~;r~~~:~A

Henry A. Hartoebben. 4319 Sinnwell Dr.. St. Louis. ~o. 63123 john.J. Wilson. 2356 Lonedell Road. Arnold. ~o. 63010 . Howard R. Inman, Rt. 3. Valle Lake. DeSoto. Mo. 63020 . T. (Frank) Wright. P.O. Box 115. Caledonia. Mo. 63631 . Clarence E. Newcomer. 102 :-.:. ~issouri, Potosi. ~o. 63664 ... David L. Lynch. Rt. I, Box 6. Irondale, Mo. 63648 . l.ewis.J. Pierce. Rt. I, Caledonia, ~o. 6:~631 .

~eeting

2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st Sat. Sat. night on or before full moon & 2 wks. after 2nd ~on. 1st & 3rd Sat. 3rd Sat.

C') ~

>

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o V

FORTY-FIRST DISTRICT Dallas ..... Dallas .. Dallas. Hickory . Hickory . Polk . Polk . Polk . Polk .

Riddick ..... Western Light L:rbana . Hogle's Creek. Hermitage. Fair 1'101V . ~odern路 . Bolivar . Pleasant Hope ....

361 396 421 2i9 288 44 144 195 467

Buffalo .. Louisburg. L:rbana .. Wheatland Hermitage . Fair Plav . Humansville . Bolivar . Plcasant Hope .

Donald E. Gunn ...

g:~(~S::n~tr~~g: : . Carl Clvmore .... Frank \'. Ratliff Ronald L. Broksleck ... Ralph W. Flynn . James B. Marshall . bonald ~. Revels .

FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT Cedar. Cedar Dade Dade Dade

. . . .

Stockton lerusalem 路Washington. Everton Lockwood

. . . .

2831 315 87 405 521

CJ

Everett (Guy) Goodwin. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 4. Stockton. Mo. 65785 Harold B. Patterson, Rt. I. Box 289. Buffalo, ~o. 65622 Forrest ~. Dorman. P.O. Box II, Louisburg, ~o. 65685 .loci D. Monteith, Rt. I. Box 20. Preston. Mo. 65732 David ~. O路;'o.Ieal, P.O. Box 202. Wheatland. Mo. 65779

M

. . .

~;~i~);:,t~it~~~\\~/ri\~~\~~路l;~~~~h,r~(~~5~g;2~.::::: :

David L. Clare, P.O. Box 301. Humansville. Mo. 65674. james C. Faulkner. Rl. 2, Bolivar, Mo. 65613 . Robert E. Crowell, Rl. I. Pleasant Hope. Mo. 65725.

4th Fri. 1st Thurs. 4th Sat. 1st Thurs. 3rd Tues. 1st ~on. 2nd Mon. 2nd Tues. 2nd Thurs.

o'TJ 3::

(j) rFJ

o c::

~

Lacey Stapp. D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 12. Greenfield. Mo. 65661

John E. Wells ... Stockton . Jerico Springs . "reddv Lee Sell .. 'Greenfield . Robert L. Payne .. Everton . Rex ~iller . Lockwood . Carson J. Hanson ..

Fred C. Crutcher. Rt. I. Box 186, Stockton, ~o. 65785 Charles K. Gire. jerico Sprir;gs, Mo. 64756 Lacey Stapp, P.O. Box 12. (.reenfield. ~o. 65661 " William R. Probst, 1903 Arcadia. Springfield. ~o. 658~4 Henrv A. Habersaat, Rt. 2. Box 135, Lockwood. ~o. 6:>682

. . . . .

1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd ~on. 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

( ,,0


( .0

~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS -

FORTY-THffiD DISTRICT Barton Barton Cedar Vernon .. Vernon Vernon Vernon Vernon Vernon

. . .

Hermon . Lamar . Clintonville .

. . . . .

~~:~eo~ : : : : : : : ~~~:~;~Itfo' : : : : : : :

L'nit)' Walker

. .

187 292 482 303 371 448

490 495 605

Grover Phillips, D.D.G.M., Rt. 1, Harwood, Mo. 64750

~~~~~I.:::::... r~~~fcs\\~~i~~"::'

E.ldorado Spr. . . l"evada . . . . . . . .. Sheldon .... Schell Citv .. ...

~onteval(o.

"'1

RIChards. . .. ... Walker. . . . . ..

Continued

EURene E. "Pat" McFarland. P.O. Box 146, Liberal, Mo. 64762 . Ray M. Quackenbush, P.O. Box 281, Lamar. Mo. 64759 lames E. Welton, P.O. Box 33, Roscoe, Mo. 64781 . 'Ralph :\. White. 520 W. Walnut. l\:evada. ~fo. 64772 . Fims C. Morris, P.O. Box 141. Sheldon. Mo. 64784 . Billv D. Dickbreder. P.O. Box 47, Schell Citv, Mo. 64783 . I. Lewis Kennedy', Rt. I, Box 123, Milo, Mo'. 64767 . E;arl L. Roger.s.. Rural Rt.. Richards. Mo. 64778 . (,rover G. Phillips. Rt. I, Harwood, Mo. 647:>0 .

lames R..Leonard ... MIChael •. Buchanan Robert S. Pritchett. . Robert F. Flake . Leland R. Meyers .. Damel S. Cooper ... Richard R. McCrery

1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd Thurs. 2nd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd Wed. Is! Sat. 2nd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

'" ~

t"'\

'-I

n

~

tTl

S2 Z o 'JJ

o"rl ....l

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT -

i

Warren E. Carr, D.D.G.M., 502 E. Central Street, Oronogo, Mo. 64855

tTl

Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper. Jasper.

... <;:arthage . ... Sarcoxie . . . . . . .. Joplin .. : . . . . . . .. Fellowship . . . . . . .. Jasper . . . . . . .. Carterville . . . . . . .. Mineral . . . . . . . . Webb City . .... Carl Junction .. . . . . . . . Criterion .. . . . . . .. La Russell .

197 293 335 345 398 401 471 512 549 586 592

Carthage. Sarcoxie. . . . . . oplin......... oplm . . . . . .. asper . . Carterville.

J

Paul E. Barber Knute Gjeruldson . . Gene Willhite...... James H. Doran. . . . Gary Reynolds. . . . . Beauford Small

"

"

August C. Willm, Jr.. 1826 S. Garrison. Carthage. Mo. 64836.. Herbert F. White, Rt. I. Sarcoxie. \fo. 64862 . W. Larrance Roe, 1~15 ~ichigan. Joplin, Mo. 64801 . AI"m J. Lauener. 2609 West 32nd St.. Joplm, Mo. 64801 .. Lawson L. Sharp. 313 :-.0. 2nd St., Jasper. Mo. 64755 . Terry D. Stanley, 116 W. Daugherty, Carterville, \fo. 64835 ..

~~~b)~ft~::::: ~~~~~dlJ~I::;~~;ld·:::. t~~~a~DSi~iel~~~,~il~y~or6~~~b2~r~~ocft~~~~.·64870·:: Carl Junc·tion. I ~aymond \f. ,BiSChoff IieI'. bert D. Sand)', I'~O. Box 298, ~arlJunction', Mo. 64834 .. : Alba. . . . . . La Russell. . .

Charles Shupp

C. C. Conway. . . . . . . . . ..

\ LloY'd R. Abram. 162:> Cherry Blossom La., Carthage. Mo. 64836 Billy G. Campbell, P.O. Box 34, La Russell, Mo. 64848 .

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd \fon. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Tues. Is! & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues.

(.0

00


FORTY-FIFTH DISTmCT -

......

John S. McMullin, D.D.G.M., 717 West Seminole, Springfield, Mo. 65807

(.0

00

County

Lodge

Greene ....

Cnited ......

Greene Greene Greene

O'Sullivan . . Ash Grove. . Solomon. . . . .

. . .

. .. , 7 . . . 100 . .' 271

. . . . . . . .

Republic. , Strafford , Willard..... .., Webster. . . . . Doric............ ~ount Olive , Hazelwood , Henderson ,

570 608 620 98 300 439 459 477

I

Master's Name

Location

I Larry

Springfield

Gate of the Temple I 422

Greene .... Greene Greene Greene Webster Webster Webster Webster Webster

1\0.

D. Yount ..

Walnut Grove . Ash Grove . Springfield .

Bill H. Harp . D. R. Comer . Clifford L. Allen, Jr

.

Springfield.

Roger A. Trent

.

Ernest L. Fanning . Elmer A. Scott . H. :-<orman Napier . Warren E. !\ewton . William E. Young. . Randall L. Owens . . Joseph H. Hickey . . Charles D. Howell .

Republic ... Strafford .. Willard . Marshfield . Elkland ... Rogersville Seymour Rogersville

FORTY-SIXTH DISTmCT -

......

Time of Meeting

Secretary's :"ame and Address Almon A. Atkins. P.O. Box 1030] G.S.. Springfield. Mo. 65808-030 I . Harold E. Parkhurst. Rt. 2. Box 247. Walnut Grove. Mo. 65770 Edgar Jenkins. Rt. I. Box 65. Ash Grove, Mo. 65604 ..... Raymond R. Sanders. Jr.. 510 S. Scenic Ave., Springfield. Mo. 65802 . Ray Hilton. P.O. Box 985. Commercial Sta.â&#x20AC;˘ Springfield, Mo. 65803 . ~ruce L. Blanche. 215 E. Elm. Republic. Mo. 65738 . Gary W. Yarbrough. Rt. 3. Box 259, Strafford. ~o. 657:>7 . Donald B. Gordon. 406 S. Troy. Springfield. Mo. 65802 . Dr. J. Edward Blinn, 558 :"orth Pine. ~arshfield. ~o. 65706.. Wayne Haymes, Rt. I, Box 1747. Branson. Mo. 65616 . Randall J. Jones, Rt. 3. Box 65. Rogersville. Mo. 65742 . D. Dean Rowe, P.O. Box 115. Seymour, Mo. 65746 . Richard F. Hays. Rt. 4. Box 26. Rogersville. Mo. 65742 .

3rd Mon. 2nd Tues. 2nd Thurs. 2nd Mon. 3rd Thurs. 2nd Thurs. 1st Thurs. 1st Thurs. 2nd Fri. 2nd Sat. 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Thurs.

c; :::0

> Z o t""'

o oC')

Jesse P. Matthews, D.D.G.M., Hebo, Mo. 65471

M Douglas Douglas Texas Texas Texas Texas Wright Wright Wright .. Wright ..

. . . . . .

Ava . Pilot Knob. Barnes . Texas . Plato . Summersville . ~ountain Grove .' loppa . Mansfield . !'\orwood .

26 182 116 177 469 555 158 411 543 622

Ava ... Richville .. Cabool. . Houston . Plato . Summersville. ~ountain Grove Hartville .... ~ansfield .. :"orwood ..

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTmCT -

Perry R. Posey .... Edward F. Hozlock. Tom W. Carr . Leon W. William . Kenneth L. Shaffer

~

.

s~~~~et.RB~~Ji~. : : : : : : : : ohn W. Hamrick erry D: Williams alph Chadwell

. . .

Paul C. ~artin 1121 S. Jefferson, Ava, Mo. 65608 . George A. Collins, 501 Pennsylvania Ave, West Plains, Mo. 65775 Hugh D. Lower. P.O. Box 215. Cabool, Mo. 65689 . Elmer Murfin. 401 First St., Houston. Mo. 65483 . Harold D. Erp, P.O. Box 213, Roby. Mo. 65557 . Lynn A. Smith. Rt. 2. Box 42, Summersville. ~o. 65571 . loe W. :\ickle.,P.O. Box 387, Mountain Grove. ~o. 65711 . Raymond L. Wood. Rt. I. HartVille, Mo. 65667 . William E. Dennis. 210 W. ~aple St., Mansfield. Mo. 65704 . Jerry L. Richardson. Rt. 2. Box 17, I\orwood. ~o. 65717 .

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st Thurs. 1st Mon. 2nd Sat. 2nd Fri. 4th Thurs. 2nd Tues. 1st Thurs.

C 'T1

~

[JJ [JJ

o c

~

Angus Clifford Highley, Jr., D.D.G.M., P.O. Box 63, Bunker, Mo. 63629

Carter ........

Van Buren .......

509

Van Buren ......

E. Wayne Johnson ...

Bruce F. Elliott, P.O. Box 304. Van Buren. Mo. 63965

.

Carter. ... Reynolds .. Reynolds ...... Reynolds ...... Shannon ......

Grandin .......... Hopewell ..... Barnesville.... Bunker.......... , Delphian ..

579 239 353 675 137

Grandin ........ Lesterville ....... Ellington ........ Bunker ......... Birch Tree ......

Lloyd Collins Risby . Timothy Mathes .. Herbert T. Shell .... Billy E. Wisdom ..... Albert C. Bird ...

. . . .

Shannon ...... Shannon ......

Winona ... Eminence.........

430 607

Winona ......... Eminence .....

Dennis D. Johnston .. Charles A. Price .....

Warren Moore, Rt. 2, Box 160-8. Doniphan. ~o. 63935 James ~. Johnson. Rt. I, Box 28C. Black, Mo. 63625 Arthur L. Cook. Jr., P.O. Box 253. Ellington, Mo. 63638 Rodney B. Parker, Rt. 2. Box 56A. Bunker. Mo. 63629 Eugene G. Kragness. Rt. I. Box 322 E. Mountain View. Mo. 65548 . Ronald D. Brawley, Star Rt.. Box 218, Winona. ~o. 65588. 1'. F. Cox, P.O. Box 45. Eminence. Mo. 65466 .

Sat. on or after full moon 2nd Mon. 4th Sat. 2nd Sat. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd ~on. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Sat.

(.0 ~


(,CJ ~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FORTY路EIGHTH DISTRICT -

Harold

J.

Continued

Richardson, D.D.G.M.. 502 Norwood Dr.. Bonne Terre, Mo. 63628

Iron ......... Iron .......... Iron .......... Madison ....... St. Francois .... St. Francois .... St. Francois .... St. Francois .... St. Francois ....

Star of the West. ~osaic ...... Viburnum. ..... Marcus. Bismarck ... Farmington. Ionic ....... St. Francois. Samaritan ..

133 351 676 110 41 132 154 234 424

Ironton. ..... Belleview Viburnum. Fredericktown. Bismarck .. Farmington .. Desloge ...... Libertyville. Bonne Terre ..

Lyle ... Adams ......... Larry R. Crocker ........ Glen Wesley Lloyd ...... Benjamin W. Shelton .... ~ames T. Grider. ........ nnnyI_ Sparr ......... Richard D. Lindsey ..... ~erry P. Hibner ......... obert A. Groom ......

5t. Francois .... St. Francois .... 5t. Francois. Ste. Genevieve

Pendleton. Leadwood ........ Elvins ....... Saline ............

551 598 599 226

Doe Run. Leadwood Flat River ...... St. Mary路s.

Kirk Woodfin ...... james E. Green ..... erry P. ~cDermott ..... Gerald D. Shelton .......

Harold.J. Vandergriff, 330 S. Main St.. Ironton, ~o. 63650 .. Ralph A. Trask, Rt. I, Belleview, ~o. 63623 ................. jay R. Fallesen. P.O. Box 185, Viburnum, Mo. 65566 ......... ames O. Goldsberry, Rt. I, Box 145, Marquand. Mo. 63655 .. Garrv L. Dalton, Rt. 2, Box 161, Bismarck, Mo. 63624 ........ Ben B. Smith. 700 E. College. A~t. 6A, Farmington, Mo. 63640 Floyd H. Buckner. P.O. Box 15 6, Desloge, Mo. 63601-1546 .. Robert L. ~ohnston, Rt. 5 Box 21 O-A, Farmington, ~o. 63640 ~ilton D. erkins. 637 Rue Leona. TDL, Bonne Terre, ~o. 63628 ............................................. Gary E. Sutterfield, Rt. I, Box 135-F. Farmington, Mo. 63640 Marvin L Poston, 313 Station St., Leadwood, Mo. 63653 .. Clark Layne, Jr., Rt. I, Box 519, Elvins, Mo. 63639......... Dwight Smith. 439 :-.lorth West St.. Perryville, Mo. 63775 ...

2nd & 4th Fri. 1st Sat. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd ~on. 1st Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Sat. 1st & 3rd Tues. 4th Sat.

""c:l ~

on trl trl

s:: Z

~

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FORTY路N1NTH DISTRICT County Bollinger

Lodge .

No.

Trowel ...

440

Bollinger . Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau

Zalma . St. Mark's . West View .. Excelsior . Harold O. Grauel

545 93 103 221 417 441 672

Perry Scott Scott

Perryville . IIImo . Chaffee .

670 581 615

. .

~hi~~w~';~; :::

Location

o'Tl

..,

Charles H. Daume, D.D.G.M.. Star Route, Oak Ridge, Mo. 63769 ~aster's

l'Oame

!

Time of Meeting

Secretary's :-;ame and Address

::t tor:

Marble Hill ..... I Jimmy W. Lincoln ...

Thomas W. Anderson, Sr.. P.O. Box 83, Glen Allen, Mo. 63751 . Zalma. Grover Duniphan .. Lee Dalton, Rt. I, Box 6, Sturdivant, Mo. 63782 Willis D. Segraves .. James 1'. Childress, 617 Jackson Tr., Jackson, ~o. 63755 ~ill:r~\~r;deau.. l'Ooah H. Sharrock. 'William R. :-':e1son, P.O. Box 27, Millersville. ~o. 63766 Andrew P. Matz ... Oak Ridge .. Robert G. Eisenhauer, P.O. Box II. Daisy. Mo. 63743 Whitewater .. Leo H. Adams. '" Glenn E. Allmon, Rt. I, Box 161. Whitewater, ~o. 63785 . Joe D. ~asterson, Rt. 3, Box 236, Jackson. Mo. 63755 Jackson. .. . .... Larry P. Cunningham Cape Girardeau James K. Wills . Cecil O. Blavlock, 217 S. Louisiana Ave., Cape Girardeau. Mo. 63701 Perryville ... Meridith :'Il Bert . Kenneth E. Corse, Rt. 6. Box lA, Perryville. ~o. 63775 111010. Paul A. Davidson .. Homer R. Brazel. P.O. Box 275, IIImo, ~o. 63754 Chaffee . James S. Vickery .. William R. Alston, 205 Gray, Chaffee, ~o. 63740

. . . . . .

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

. . . .

1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. (,CJ

00


FIFTIETH DISTRICT -

-

Harry H. Sutherland. D.D.G.M.. 1300 E. Marshall St.. Charleston. Mo. 63834

c.o

00

Mississippi ...

~~~is~~a;i'd : Scott . Scott . Stoddard . Stoddard. Stoddard . Stoddard . Stoddard . Stoddard .

East Prairie. . . Charleston , Morehouse , Morley........... Sikeston , Bloomfield Essex , Lakeville Dexter......... Advance. . . Puxico.........

384 407 603 184 310 153 278 489 532 590 596

East Prairie Charleston Morehouse

. . .

~orley

Sikeston . Bloomfield . Essex . Bell City . Dexter . Advance. Puxico ...

FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT -

. Charles I. McCloskey. Rt. I. Charleston. Mo. 63834 . . Richard 1'. Reed.Jr.. 609 E. Commercial. Charleston. Mo. 63834 . Marlin 1.. Swinger. P.O. Box 224. Morehouse. ~o. 63868 . . Curtis 1.. Halford. P.O. Box 207. Oran. ~o. 63771 . . . Elbert F. Sloan. 708 E. Gladys St.. Sikeston. ~o. 63801 . Michael E. Bell. Rt. 2. Bloomfield. Mo. 63825 . . James W. Kelley. P.O. Box 37. Essex. Mo. 63846 . . Clifford Warren. Rt. I. Box 332. Bell City. Mo. 63735 . . Dallas G. Buchanan. Rt. 3. Box 484A. Dexter. ~o. 63841 . . George V. Green. Rt. I. Box 149. Advance. Mo. 63730 . . Leo H. Lowery. Rt. 2. Puxico. Mo. 63960 " , .

Gary W. ~orris Alfred 1.. Walker " lames c. Hewitt Kenneth R. Rodgers Joseph A. Munger. Jr. Jerry 1.. ~cClard lames M. Kelley William F. Henley Floyd ~. Staggs George W. Holder R. H. Pennington

.

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. COl

Arblean McHugh. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 1, Box 260. Wardell. Mo. 63879

::c

)-

]'I;ew Madrid. New Madrid .. New ~adrid .. :"ew Madrid .. Pemiscot. .. Pemiscol. .. Pemiscol. .. Pemiscol. ..

Point Pleasant . New ~adrid . Lilbourn . Odom . Caruthersville . Hayti . Steele . Wardell ..

176 429 666 671 461 571 634 665

Conran .. ]'I;ew Madrid .... Lilbourn .

r~~~lt~\:~~~lie路

Hayti .. Steele .. Wardell.

Doyne C. Gaddis Edward A. Clark Larry J. Townley John M. Hawkins : : : James E. Skiles Roy Don Carver William C. Johnson Ronald Ray Crafton

FIFTY路SECOND DISTRICT Butler Ripley Ripley Wayne Wayne

. . . .

Poplar Bluff Composite Naylor Greenville Wayne.

. .

209 369 568 107 526

. .

Popl.ar Bluff. Domphan. . ~aylor. . . . . Greenville. .. Piedmont

FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT Howell... .... Howell........ Howell. . . . . Oregon. .. . . . .. Oregon.. . . . . .. Oregon. . . . . . .. Oregon. . . . . . ..

Mt. Zion .. Ingomar. .... Mountain View Alton . Woodside Clifton Koshkonong

Ozark. . . . . . . ..

Robert Burns .....

g~Et ::::::::: i~i:i:g~:::::::

. . .

327 536 637 255 387 463 582 298 365 435 496

. . . . . . . .

Robert J. McAlister. P.O. Box 393. Portageville, Mo. 63873 . Harold A. Sloas. Sr.. P.O. Box 38. New Madrid. ~o. 63869 . lames E. ~anley. P.O. Box 25, Catron. Mo. 63833 . L c. Keith. 500 W. 9th SI., Portageville. Mo. 63873 . Ben W. Burns, P.O. Box 185. Caruthersville. Mo. 63830 . Theodore T. Martin, 102 E. Washington SI., Hayti. Mo. 63851

~hrliFo~~.~~~r~'a~e~OS~~~~~I~.dM~o;3~77St~el~:.~~.' .~3~7~. : :

2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd ~on. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 3rd Tues.

John A. Heneger. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 1, Box 34B. Piedmont. Mo. 63957

'1

. .. . .. ... . ..

Wendell. D. Cox . Roy 1.. ford . Walter I. Sieberg. Jr. .. Calvin~. Williams . Raymond 1.. Hodge .

Gene W. Friebe . R. E. Crudgington

.

~::=;: ~i.m&i:;~~~ : : : : : : Ronald 1.. Thompson Charles E. Steed Ray Dern Arlie J. Wallace Raymond R Smith. Flovd W. OGuinn .. Earl D. Holmes ...

. . . .

Samuel :'II. Hurst. 704 E. Hwy. 160. West Plains. Mo. 65775 ... Larry Meal. Rio 2. Box 365. Willow Springs. Mo. 65793 .. Robert 1.. Butler. Rio 3. Box 572, MI. View. Mo. 65548 . Hardin D. Franks. P.O. Box 37. Alton. Mo. 65606 . Arthur 1.. Franks. Birch Tree, Mo. 65438 . Haston F. Collier. 913 Vine SI., Thar.er. Mo. 65791 . Paul E. Huddle. Rio 2. Box 194-A. Ihayer. Mo. 65719 . Claudy D. Hunter. Rio 2. Box 242. Protem. Mo. 65733 . Mack G. Davis. Rt. A. Box 71 B. Caulfield. ~o. 65626 . I. G. Norris. 8 Hoffman Dr.. Rio 4. Jefferson City. Mo. 65101 Barney Douglas. Rio I. Box 30. Gainesville. Mo. 65655 .

~

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Charles E. Divine. P.O. Box 475. Poplar Bluff, ~o. 63901 ... '12nd & 4th Tues. Carroll E. Peck. 402 Green. Doniphan. ~o. 63935 . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd & 4th Tues. Roy R. Rideout. Rl. I. Box 112A. Harviell, Mo. 63945. . . . . . . . 1st & 3rd Thurs. M,~chael ~. Douglas, Star Rio. ~lu.bb. Missouri 63934 ... , . . . . . . 1st & 3rd Thurs. \\Ilham :-0;. Burch. 414 N. Milln SI.. Piedmont. Mo. 63957..... 2nd & 4th Sal.

John A. Foster. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 2. Box 252. Willow Springs. Mo. 65793

West Plains .... Willow Springs .. Mountain View .. Alton . Thomasville . Thayer . Koshkonong . Theodosia . Bakersfield . Almartha. Gainesville

z

1st Thurs. 2nd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 3rd Mon. 3rd Sal. 2nd Tues. 2nd Thurs. 3rd Tues. 4th Sat 2nd Sal. 4th Thur.

en rJj

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIFTY路FOURTH DISTRICT County

:-.10.

Lodge

Christian ..

Spana

Christian. Christian. Stone .... Stone Taney Taney

Friend . Billings Galena. Crane .. Forsyth. Branson

. .

.

.

Duane A. Eiserman. D.D.G.M.. 418 N. Sycamore. Branson. Mo. 65616

Location

. . . . " . . . . .

~onett . Barry . Pythagoras . Comfort . Central Crossing . ~ount Vernon . Canopy. Decatur. .. , , Miller ..

Southwest ..... Anderson :\oel ... l'Oeosho . Granby. Stella .

~aster's

:\ame

Sparta ....

Ivai W. Roller..

352 379 515 519 453 587

Ozark Billings. Galena .. Crane. Forsvth Branson ...

~ichael Scidner I.eo L. :-.Ietson.

129 367 383 533 674 99 284 400 567

Monett . Washburn . Cassville. Wheaton. Shell Knob. Mount Vernon. Aurora .. Pierce City . Miller ....

FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT McDonald. . .. McDonald. . .. McDonald . . .. ]'I;ewton l'Oewton Newton

I

296

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTmCT Barry Barry Barry Barry Barry Lawrence Lawrence Lawrence Lawrence

466 621 647 247 514 538

Southwest Citv Anderson. . :\oel.... l'eosho. Granby .. Stella.路 ...

Continued

Secretary's :-.lame and Address

.II Donald H. Roller. P.O. Box 47, Sparta. ~to. 65753.

Ronald P. Stahlman, Rt. 2. Box 106-36. Ozark. ~fo. 65721 . Richard G. Sullivan. Rt. I. Box 267. Clever. Mo. 65631. . Carnell E. Cutbirth, Rt. I, Box 293B. Galena. Mo. 65656 .. Charles II. Warren. P.O. Box (;. Crane, Mo. 65633 . Cletys R. Aderman. P.O. Box 191. Forsph. Mo. 65653 .. Alvin H. Jones. Star Rt. 2. Box 4/l9, Branson. ~o. 65616.

. ..

l~;n~~l~~IR~df~rd'::::

Clayton C. Cooper ..... John H. Cochran, Jr. ..

Time of Meeting Fri. on or before Full ~oon 1st Tues. 1st Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon.

. .

Ray' W. lohnson. 90/l 16th St.. P.O. Box 361, Monett. ~o. 6570R Ra\' D. Willard, P.O. Box 2272. Joplin. ~o. 64801 . Robert W. ~alarkey, P.O. Box 191, Cassville, Mo. 65625 . . Kellcy D. Garrison. Rt. I, Box 18. Fairview. Mo. 64842 Robert W. Main. Rt. I, Box 434, Shell Knob. Mo. 65747 . Vincen W. Baldwin. Rt. 3, Box 161, Mt. Vernon, Mo. 65712 .. Leslie R. Crouch. 304 W. Springfield St.. Aurora. Mo. 65605 .. Louis II. Garrison. 610 Elm St.. Piercc City, Mo. 65723 . Lawrence Mynatt. P.O. Box 100. Miller, Mo. 65707 .

n

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Charles A. Donica. D.D.G.M.. 318 Broadway. Monett. Mo. 65708 lohn Patton .: Raymond L Catron Ra}' Farwell . David Alan I.eitch .. Paul I. Camp . Charles Orr . (;ary R. Florer . Sanluel R. Goodman. Albert Bell .

"'0 ~

o

o [J) 1st Thurs. 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd Mon.

o "'r1 --l ::r:: trl

Clinton H. Shaddox. Jr.. D.D.G.M.. P.O. Box 171. Jane. Mo. 64846

~~l~;; rr~aek~~: : : . Loyd A. Browning . (;Ien B. ~tartin. lim Webb . Fay J. Granger .

Jamcs B. Cantrell, P.O. Box 245, Southwest City, Mo. 64863 .. Roy H. Eppard. Rt. 2, Box 4901). (;oodman, Mo. 64843 . Richard M. Easter, P.O. Box 263, Noel. Mo. 64/l54 . John W. Murphy, 317 Fain Avc., :-.Ieosho. ~o. 64R50 . Fred II. Shewmake. P.O. Box 216. Granbv. ~o. 64844. Edwin W. Parker. Rt. 4. Box 369. Ncosho', Mo. 64850 ..

1st & 3rd Tucs. 2nd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Thurs. 1st ~ton. 1st Tues.

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FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT (A) Count, St. Louis. .... St. Louis. . St. Louis. . . . .

~:: t::~::

St. l.ouis. Sc. Louis. St. Sc. Sc. St.

.....

Louis .. l.ouis .. Louis .... l.ouis.

Lodge

I :-.io.

Beacon .... BridKeton. Paul Revere.

:~:~O

I

:~

t~~;ff~~:~:'

542 613 62:~ 6:~9

Overland. \lizpah ... Jenning's.

.I ennings ...

640 657 667 66H

~~(;~~~:~. :. Florissarll "

\laster's l\;ame

Location Hazelwood. St. John. Ilazelwood. Ferguson ... Ilazelwood (h'erland. Florissant

HO

J. Bert Thacker. D.D.G.M.. 14831 Larchburr Dr.. Bridgeton. Mo. 63044

Florissant. Berkele, F10rissailt

Secretary's :"ame and Address

William D. ~etcalf .. Richard J. Krumrey. Jacob E. 1'\olde ..... 1I0race ~. Clevenger .. Andrew l.ee (;amble ...

~~~m~ t I~\~~~~::::.

Theodore R. Cassens Kenneth H. F. Tebbe. .lack D Gorman. Paul R. Knupp ...

Charles H. ~iller, 10216 Baltimore Ave., St. Ann, ~o. 6:~074 .. Richard L. Muenks, 9621 Lackland Rd., St. Louis, ~o. 63114 .. Roland E. TalmaR'e, 955 Switler J,,"e., St. Louis, \10. 6:H47 . ':incent I: Reagan, 130 Sack~tt, Florissant, ~o. 6:~~33 ',' . Edward? . ~ecly, Jr., .I? 19.1 C!overdale,Dr., St. LOUIS, ~o. 63136 Robert :". Cox, 4418 lustlll Coun, Bridgeton, ~o. 63044 ..... G. Glenn Wilson, 11161 Estrada Dr. Apc. 5, Sc. Louis, ~o. 63138 , ,. . . Alfred Schricker, 38 Flamingo Dr., lIazelwood, ~10. 6:~042 .. Paul C. :'-:euenkirk, 9252 Edna Ave., Sc. Louis, ~o. 63137 . Charles J. Couchman, 4H43 ~Iargaret, Berkeley, ~o. 63134 . CharlesJ. Coleman, 76:Ei Foresl\'Jew Dr., :'-:ormandy, \10. 6:~121

Time of

~eeting

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri.

o ;iI:l

;:.. Z

o ro oC') trl

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT (B) St. St. Sc. St. Sc. St. St. St. St.

Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis .. l.ouis. l.ouis. l.ouis. l.ouis. l.ouis ....

St. Louis. \11. ~oriah. Polar Star. Cornerstone Apollo .. Rose lIill. !\.Iaplewood. Clayton . Brentwood .

St. St. St. St.

Louis .. Louis .. Louis ... Louis.

Benjamin Franklin Shaveh . Purity路 . Theodore Roosevelt.

20 40 79

:~23

I

529 550 :,66 601 616

IC1a\'ton Cre\'e Cocur .. .. I

C1a\路ton ... Creve Coeur Cre\'e Coeur Creve Coeu. \laplewood .. Clayton.... . Brentwood ...

o 'Tl

R. Robert Downey. D.D.G.M.. 13006 Musket Ct.. St. Louis. Mo. 63141 L(~e

(;. Wall. Ral'lllond E. Becker ... Paul \1. lIall . . Emil.J. Sheldon (;ilbert ~1. Tavlor . W. ~f. Wimelllberg .. John M. Korpi .... .I ames E. Roberts. Robert Edwin Cox.

6421 Creve CO('lIr . 646 Creve Coeur. 658 C"eve Coeur ..

\lan'in II. Fine. Walter S. Schaulllan .. R. Terence ~ueller.

661 I \Iaplewood .,.

William W.

~cGuire

.....

Edward Solomon, 2452 Forestshadows Dr., St. Louis, ~o. 63136 Russell A. (;rosch, 651-C Rosetta Dr., Florissant, ~o. 630:~1 .. Fred O. lIahn, 7HO Jerome La., Cahokia, III. 62206 . Ronald E. Patterson, 1736 Battlefield Dr., FlOrISsant, \10. 63031 .J. ~.Jones, 10510 IIwy 366, Tr. Ct. 1'\0.14, St. Louis, ~o. 6:H27 Harn H. Hildebrand, Rt. I, Box 606, Glencoe, ~o. 63038 . William'" lIarris, 7572 WiS(' Ave" St. Louis, Mo. 6:H 17 . Earl E. Sampson IHOH Kenilwonh La., Brentwood, !\.10. 63144 Emmett Broombaugh, 1480S Woodford Way, Bridgeton, Mo. 6:~044 . Alben Krause, 6M2 Corhitt Ave., St. Louis, ~o. 63130 . Bobby L Fisher, 16 :"orine Ct., Florissant, \10. 63031 : . Ronald D. Winchell, 4140 Lockport Dr., BridKeton, \10. 63044 Lee D. Tufts, 7429 Warner, St. Louis,

~o.

63117 ..

3:: 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1s! & :~rd Sa! 1S! & 3rd Fri. 2nd !\.Ioll. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

\JJ \JJ

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2nd & 4th Thurs. Is! & 3rd Wed. Is! Thurs. 1st & 3rd ~Oll. 2nd Thurs.

* Deceased

to

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT (C) -

Charles C. Long. D.D.G.M.. 7260 Pershing Ave.. St. Louis. Mo. 63130

5t. Louis ....

Bonhomme...

451 Ballwin

[Clarence W. Stone, .I r. ..

路1

5t. Louis ..

Webster Groves.

84

I

.

Webstcr (;roves ..

Robert A. Kipp

Louis. Louis. Louis .. Louis .. Louis. Louis .... Louis. Louis .. Louis .. Louis .. Louis .. Louis .. Louis.

Kevstone .. Fenton . ~eramec . Anchor. West Gate. Kirkwood .. Euclid Forest Park .

~::~~do:;~~ :

Pilgrim .... Gardenville. Crestwood.

.

243 2HI 313 443 445 484 505 5i8 629 636 652 655 669

Webstcr (;rovcs.. Fenton .. .. Eureka . Crestwood Kirkwood. .. Kirkwood Crestwood.. . .. ~ehlvillc. . .. Vallcy Park .. '1 Mehlvillc. . . . .. . Webstcr Groves.. 5,1. LOuis....... Crestwood. . .

I 1

W~~~r 6~~'(J1'i'~~toll,. 90~. ~~ook.\.aI~ .Terr. ~1a.~dleste~~

.

i William H. Korhammer, 42H Inmsfail Dr., Webster Groves, ~fo. 6:~ 119

, 5t. 5t. 51. 5t. 51. 5t. 51. 51. 51. 51. 51. 51. 51.

Continued

(;ilbcrt R. Watson Charles E. Harris. Genc Bartrom .... James D. Clavton .. lIarrv E. Bell. Jr.. John T. Finlev . Frank ~. Lesinski, 5r. James C. Easton ..... "'.'alter E. :\ichols .. lIarn- O. ~acnner . Haro路ld.D?ll Wayman fohn W. Slsccl, III \1. R. Doernhoeler

. Floyd G. Ward. 464i Tower (;rovc PI., 5t. Louis, ~o. 63110. Robert L. '''''ilson. 4i35 Hedgemont Dr., 51. Louis, Mo. 63128. Robcrt J. Stanton. 305 Clara St .. Eurcka, ~o. 63025 . Robcrt J. \Vangelin, 45 ~fdntvre Dr., Fenton, ~o. 63026 . George R. (;acrtncr, 4653 5. 3ith 5t., 51. Louis, Mo. 63116 .

::~:~~i~\r~t:~d(~~~~,4\)H"c~r~i~I~~~~ ~di路.~~~I,Il~~, ~:~7路1~:H.2.2.

Olivcr Diers, H42i ~athilda, Avc., 51. I.ouis, ~o. 63123 . John D. DeCluc. RI. :~. Box 485. I.ewis Rd., Eureka, ~o. 63025 (;erald R. Burnworth. iOO Karlsruhe PI., 51. Louis, ~o. 63125 Glendle R. Boggess, 13 Stonevvicw La. Creve Coeur. ~o. 63141 Jeffrey c. Kitsmiller. 564 Bellsworth Dr., 5t. Louis, ~o. 63125 Charles Wcsdell. 204 Deane CI., Sunset Hills, ~o. 6312i .

1st &

:~rd

Tues.

2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Wcd. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th ~on. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & :~rd Thurs.. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

'"C'

::0

o:.J t't'l t't'l

:2 z

~

rJJ

o"'r1 .....J

i

t't'l

FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT County Miller. Morgan .. Morgan ..

Lodge Ionia . Versailles . Barnctt ..

:\0.

3HI 320 591

I.ocation Eldon ..... Versaillcs .. Barnell ....

W. Roger Bowness. D.D.G.M.. Rt. 5. Box 22AC. Eldon. Mo. 65026 ~faster's

:\ arne

Donald 5ullie . Kcnneth Dunnington .. Lawrencc I.. \fontan.

Secrctary's :\ame and Address

Time of

~feeting

F; D.ouglas P~rtridgc. 2!9 :\. Locust ~t., ~:Idon. ~o. ~5026 . '12nd & 4th ~1on. \ emon L. "hntlc, RI. ,~. Box 281, \ ersailles, ~o. 6:>084.. ... 2nd & 4th Mon. Cecil L Banner. RI. I, Barnett, ~o. 650 II . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3rd Mon.

~

00


.....

~

00

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT Jackson Jackson Jackson

.

Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson. Jackson. Jackson. Jackson.

. . .

. .

Independence Summill ..... McDonald. . . .

.. ., ..

Blue Sprin~s RaylOwn . . Chrislian . . . Buckner .. .... MI. Washin~lOn. . (;randview .. . . . . . Grain Valley. . .

! 26376 :{24

Victor L. Ford, D.D.G.M., 7916 Arlington, Raytown, Mo. 64138

Independence. l.ee's Summll. Independence.

Jack B. Kissee. " ..... Ralph S. Camrell, Jr. . Harold E. Osburn .

:n7 Blue SprinKs . . . . 391 Raytown. . . . . . 392 Oak (;rove . . 50 I Buckner. . . . . . 614 Independence. 61 H Grandview. . . . 644 Grain Valley. . .

Sherman D. Brady . Franklin B. HardinK . Champ T. Breeden . Emerson O. Brown . Charles E. Lull . F. Raymond Patten . Elliott Swiharl. .

Robert R. Crick, 329 Easl Kansas, Independence, Mo. 64050 . Harvey Wilson, 104 O'Brien Rd., Lee's Summil, ~10. 64063. Charles D. Lemaslers, RI. 2, Box 211, Blue Springs, Mo. 64015........... . . Jesse E. Ehlers, 4015 S. Foresl SI., Independence, Mo. 64052 .. Chriss 1.. Green,Jr., 3104 Claremom, Independence, Mo. 64052 Donald E. Denms, RI. 2, Box 82, Bales Cily, Mo. 64011 . Clarence 1.. Alumbaugh, RI. I, Box 59, Buckner, Mo. 64016 .. Keith Wilkinson, 215 S. Humer, Independence, Mo. 64050 .. Joseph G. Wehner, 6007 E. 861h 51., Kansas Cily, Mo. 64138 . .lames T. ~files, P.O. Box 233, Blue Springs, Mo. 64015 ..

.J.

2nd & 41h Mon. lsI & 3rd Tues. lsI & 3rd Mon. lsI & 3rd Thurs. lsI & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 41h Thurs. lsI & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 41h Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues.

~

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r"

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~

o'Tl 3::

SIXTIETH DISTRICT -

en'JJ

o

Oscar B. Rogers, D.D.G.M.. Rt. 2, Box 218, Malden, Mo. 63863

C

Dunklin. Dunklin Dunklin. . . . .. Dunklin Dunklin.. .,. Dunklin. . .. . I Dunklin. . '1 Stoddard. . . ..

Kennell. Four Mile. Hornersville .... Cardwell . Malden. Senath . C1arklOn . Berme .

68 212 215 231 406 513 645 573

Kennett. CarnpbelI. . Horners\'llle. Cardwell. . . . . . .. Malden. . . . . . . Senath. . . . Clarklon. Bernie. . . . ..

Paul Patton . Jessie R. Brid~es, Jr., P.O. Box 832, Kc'nnett, ~fo. 63857 .. Joe W. Cumins, P.O. Box 86, Campbell, Mo. 63933 .. John D. Bishop . Edward D. Powell . .J. D. YounK, P.O. Box 54, Hornersville. Mo. 63855 .. John R. Maxwell . g~~~a;. ioC~~:\~.1.2~'B~~b~~~: ~~id~~~~~1~路.'63863: ::: Julian ~1iller . Richard B. Rice . Billy T. Pon~er, P.O. Box 207, Senath, Mo. 63876 . . Lawrance Jordon. Jr . Dan A. Day. P.O. Box 222. Gideon, Mo. 63848 Roy'Ce L f:llsworth . Robert C. Crow, RI. I, Box 220, Dexter, Mo. 63841 .

2nd & 41h Thurs. 1st & :hd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st Thurs. 2nd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 41h Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

c:

..... ~ ~


-

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI TO MISSOl:RI Grand Representative

GRAND LODGE Post Office

Fielding A. Poe Thomas K. McGuire, Jr. Edward E. :-.Iixon Robert J. Crede William H Chapman John W. Adams Gus O. Nations

" "

Florissant.

.

. .

~lh~:n~~ ~~a~~; !~: :::::::::::

O. Wesley Konering W. Marion Luna Lloyd E. Poore Robert L. Harder

. . . .

l~s::p~. 'jj;Il~~c.~l~: : : : : : : : : : : : : : mes A. Noland, Jr ohn E. Wetzel. enry W. Fox Edward E. Wilson.

. . .

n

............

. . . . .

{d~inSe~~~a~k~~::::::::::::: : i>: ·V;~~~~;

Ki~k~~d::

Bruce H. Hunt Lester E. Schultz lohn H. Rich Harold O. Grauel Thos'J' Davis. Ir. Harol C. Smitn lames D. Sulton Harry C. Ploetze Roscoe Rooffener Walter C. Ploeser

::: .

.

. . . . . . . . .

~~~~~a~~~c~: : : : : : : : : : : : : : Parkville.... SI. Joseph..

....................

Thomas B. Mather Walter H. Baird George E. Winslow Walter L. Walker. Eric Sonnich

Springfield SI. Louis Advance '" Kansas City SI. Louis Piedmont. . Macon Kirkwood Mountain Grove Kirkwood

. . . . . .

. .

Kansas City Columbia Wimberley, Texas Neosho Trenton Lexington Neosho .

. . . . . . . .

~i~rs~71~~~~: ::::::::::::::

. 51. Louis . Jefferson City . Cape Girardeau . Piedmont. . Affton . Piedmont . SI. Louis . Macks Creek . SI. Louis

. . . . . . . . .

. J. B. Robinson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . John W. Patterson. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Gordon Robert Wilson. . . . . . . . . .. Ernesto ... J. Plaut. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Samuel Anthony Scalzo. . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . lack Stockburger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Austria . br. Leo Kandel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Clarinval . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. ·.B~~~lf-~i~i~ ::::::::::: Bernard loao Antonio de Souza J'ilmo. . . . . · Brazil-Rio de Janeiro . l:lysses U. Bittencourt .. . . . . .. . .. Brazil-Rio Granae do Sui . Valnyr GoulartJacques .... , .. . .. · .......... Brazil-Guanabara , .. Benito Gabriel e Jesus. . . . . . . . .. · Brazil-~inas Gerais . Arnaldo Pertence . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Brazil-Maranhao . · ~~a~~~~F~I:~:.~i.l~~. : : : : : : : : : : : :: Brazil-Para . · Brazil-Parana . Arnaldo Mazza, Jr. .. . .. . . . . .. . .. · Brazil-Pernambuco . Fernando Pinto de Araujo. . . . . .. · Brazil-Santa Catarina . · Djalma Ouri<I.ues ..... '. . . . . . . . . .. Brazil-Sao Paulo . AntOniO Camtlo de Fana. . . . . . . .. · · British Columbia . William Joseph McCoid. . . . . . . . .. ...............Canada . lo~n V. Lawer. .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. l.UIS SanchezoPuelma . . . . . . . . . . .. . Chile . China . . J. H. ~oore, III . .. Clyde Elton Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . · Colorado . · Columbia-Barranquilla. · Connecticut . . Wm. E. Piercey · Costa Rica . Cuba . . " .. . Delaware . Raymond ~. Savage Denmark . Knud V. Raude . . . Charles B. Gilley. Sr. . · District of Columbia . · Dominican Republic . Hector B. Penson .............. .Ecuador . EI Salvador . Francisco Javier Moreno . · The Earl of Eglinton and Winton ·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.Jr~I:~3:::::::::::: Risto Patiala . . Florida . . · France (Natl.) . W. H. Robinson . Sam B. Owens . Georgia . ............... .Greece . E. Tsitsones . . . '" .Guatemala . Tomas V. Contreras . Iceland . :: : : : : : : : : : . Idaho . . . Il1inois . Lester B. Ohlsen . Alabama ................Alaska . Alberta

::::::::::::::~~~~~~~ ::::::::::::

~~g::g~~~~do' :::::::::::::::::

:

~~~~n~~ekb~~~~~~~~

cD 00

MISSOURI

Grand Representative

~'il~t~~~l~. :::::::::::::::

. . lefferson City . Webster Groves . Marshall . SI. Louis Fairfax ~~I~o~~rJa~r.~~I.::::::::::::: : Jane

loe Gailey William F. Jackson

FRO~

Post Office Fairfield Southwest City, ~issouri Onoway Buenos Aires Tucson Winslow Wien, l. Dorotheergasse 12 Brussells Itapetininga Rio de Janeiro Rio Grande do Sui Rio de Janeiro Belo Horizonte

p~~~""'"

. Recife, Pernambuco 5~nta Catarina Sao Paulo Kamloops lslin~to':l' Ontario ValparaISo Taiwan Denver East Hampton P.O. Box 186, San Jose Havanna Copenhagen Aroda, VIrginia

o 1::1 :> Z o t"'" .

o o otTl

o'Tl s:: r;; VJ

o C ~

Santa Ana London Helsinki Dover Blackshear Athens Guatemala City Iceland Nezperce Chicago

I\:)

o


I\::J

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI-(Continued)

o

~

TO MISSOURI Grand Representative

Grand Representative

Post Office

Roy H. Sander . Howard F. Kizer . Elmer W. Wagner . Ronald P. Krueger . Anton J. Tomasek . Arthur O. Hodges . Lester Heckman . I. Morgan Donelson . William]. Hill . Frank A. Arnold . Vern H. Schneider . Frank P. Briggs . Robert H. Arnold . Thomas C. Warden . Robert R. Bradshaw. . . . .. . ... Hoyt young . Robert F. Burian . Ralph P. Bunnell . Bernard M. Meeker .

~~h~:dAw~ga~~~:::::::::: :

Carl I. Stein A. H. Van Gels

R. Terrence Mueller. Owen 5. Taylor Herman A. Orlick Robert D. Jenkins William R. Robbins Virgil R. Bradsher Robert Gene Embry Lewis C. Cook Roy H. Rude A. B. Vanlandingham Charles E. Scheurich Richard H. Bennett Elvis A. Mooney lack N. Matthews 'tldon D. Turnbull Blair C. Mayford Harold Thorne Herbert C. Hoffman Harry Gershenson

FROM MISSOURI

GRAND LODGE

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..

Webster Groves . Mexico Ballwin SI. Louis . 51. Louis .

~t:~~d~~c~.

. .

::::

Princeton . Kansas City Boonville St. Louis Macon Kansas City Owensville Boonville Macks Creek St. Louis Kansas City Weston Los Angeles . APO New York SI. Louis Florissant. " .

. . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

~~:!;~~.~ .~i.t:: : : : : : : : : : : : : .

. .

::::::: . · ·

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WM.J. HILL Grand Master

1981-82


A MASONIC REVIEW


A MASONIC REVIEW By BRUCE H. HUNT. P.G.M. FRATERNAL REVIEWS Each time we review a proceedings of another Grand Lodge we look for the . report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, or Fraternal Correspondence, as some choose to designate it. In all reviews we have not found a report on the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Several Reviewers state that they review only the current proceedings and list them. Others, most in fact, review jurisdictions by states or countries, and do not make topical reviews, like this one. One Reviewer stated that of the 48 domestic and 67 foreign jurisdictions with which his Grand Lodge was in fraternal relations, there were only 25 current proceedings in the office of the Grand Secretary. Each Reviewer attempts to bring something of interest to his particular jurisdiction. Most say they do not bother to review "old" proceedings, which are from one to five years old when received. In our own case, we do not necessarily cast aside those proceedings which some designate as "old," but we attempt to gather information throughout the year from any source. We find that newspapers, magazines and the reporting of other groups contribute to the interest of our readers.

WHAT AUDIENCE DO YOU PLAY TO SOUTH CAROLINA: Here is a sermon by Dr. John Wood Robison, Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. He gives the sermon this title, "What You Can Become." We would suggest the title, "What Audience Do You Plan To." He said: We give "God-like" power to those we select to be our "audience of significance." While I had never heard the matter put in just these terms, I sensed immediately the truth of this insight. Life is in fact a stage, and each one of us is an actor in relation to some kind of audience. John Donne was right, "No man is an island to himself." Interestingly enough, this is the very issue Jesus was dealing with in part of the Sermon on the Mount. When he says, "Beware of practicing your piety before men in order to be seen by them; for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in Heaven"; He was delving straight into this whole business of why we act as we do and whom it is we are trying to please. Jesus says that we should be careful as to who our audience is for surely that is what we shall become. First of all, He confronts us with the fact that we do have an audience in all our living. Jesus took the religious leaders of His day as examples of playing to men rather than God.Jesus with His x-ray eyes said, "for whom are the alms, tithes, fasting and prayers?" Their real audience was their peer group- the people who saw them and would acclaim them pious and applaud them accordingly. If you should analyze middle-class American life, and ask what is really important to most folk like us, the reality that stands out above all others is the opinion of ones' peers. Our real concern tends to be our peer-group - the people in our church or club or neighborhood or business and in making up our lives, the question that haunts us at every turn is: "What will 'they' say? What will 'they' think? How can I earn their approval and avoid their condemnation?"

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A MASONIC REVIEW

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Dr. Samuel ~iller once observed with great wisdom that the concepts of success and failure with ones' peers have taken the place in our day that the realities of salvation and damnation held in the Middle Ages. Back then, the thing a person feared the most was displeasing God and thus falling into the hands of an angry Deity. But today, all that is changed. Our hopes and fears are more immediate; namely, in terms of the opinions of our peers. The most hideous of all possibilities would be to fail in the eyes of our contemporaries. To have a good job and then lose it; or to own a fine house and be forced to sell it; or to have a child not conform to the standards that we set. Jesus tells us what we can become. He says that if we make any person or group other than God our audience, all we will get is that group and their limitations - what they are and what they make us to be. On the other hand, if we make Almighty God our audience, all the expanse of a loving Father will be ours. We will become truly free. To be approved one must be like others, and so my uniqueness is ground under, stifled, and crushed. Anything less than God is always bondage, a limitation, a shackling of our true potential. If God is our source - then He is our Father, our maker, the one who knows us better than anyone else, what is in us and what ought to be brought out. He loves our uniqueness, it is His creation. He is not interested in some kind of blind conformity. Masonry was built on these precepts and this is what makes good Masons. The principles of Masonry are grounded in these beliefs and if we are to rediscover what is essential we need to become good and honorable Masons. We should always be proud of our Order and praise God for its uniqueness. A good Mason knows God as his Father and he plays his whole life to the Supreme Being. He is not concerned about the outside pressures of the world. When God is your Supreme Maker then you are free at last.

ALASKA GRAND LODGE FORMED The Commission on Information for Recognition reported to the Grand Masters' Conference in Orlando, Florida, on February 17, 1981, that: The Commission has been advised by the Grand Secretary of the State of Washington that 12 of the 19 lodges chartered by the Grand Lodge of Washington in the State of Alaska have decided to organize a new Grand Lodge of Alaska. The other seven lodges have chosen to remain as constituent lodges of the Grand Lodge of Washington. The Commission understands that the Grand Lodge of Alaska has been formed with the consent of the Grand Lodge of Washington which had no objection thereto. The first Grand Communication of the new Grand Lodge was held on February 7, 1981.

The Commission further stated that it was of the opinion that the Grand Lodge of Alaska was organized in accordance with regular Masonic procedure and was therefore worthy and entitled to recognition. We received a request for recognition of the Grand Lodge of Alaska, F. & A.M. from its Grand Master, M.W. Bro.James A. Williams, which is now in the hands of the Committee on Recognition of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. In his letter M.W. Brother Williams gave these important statements, which certainly makes it eligible for recognItion, in our opinion: On Tuesday, February 17, 1981, the said Commission reported to the Conference, in session assembled, its findings relative to the various jurisdictions seeking recognition. Please find attached a partial report containing an excerpt regarding this Grand Body with the exact wording as used by the Commission, i.e., "The Commission is of the opinion that the Grand Lodge of Alaska was organized in accordance with regular Masonic procedure and is, therefore, entitled to and worthy of recognition." For your further information, please be advised that: First: The M.W. Grand Lodge of F. & A.M. of Alaska has been properly and legally formed by at least three (3) re~ularly constituted Lod~es.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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Second: This Grand Body is self-governing, responsible and independent, with undisputed authority over the Symbolic Lodges conferring the first three degrees of Freemasonry, and not subject to, or holding divided jurisdiction with, a Supreme Councilor any other claiming to have ritualistic or other control over the symbolic degrees. Third: The membership of the Symbolic Lodges under the jurisdiction of this Grand Body is composed of men only. Fourth: Each candidate for the degrees of Masonry shall express a belief in a Supreme Being. Fifth: This Grand Body requires of its Constituent Lodges a strict adherence to the Ancient Landmarks, Customs and Usages of the Craft as set forth in the Constitution adopted by the Grand Lodge of England in 1723, except insofar as they have been modified since that date by the United Grand Lodge of England, by our mother jurisdiction, the M.W. Grand Lodge ofF. & A.M. of Washington, or by this Grand Body. Sixth: This Grand Body has no Masonic relations of any kind with mixed lodges or bodies which admit women to their membership. Seventh: This Grand Body obligates its initiates on the Book of the Sacred Law. Eighth: This Grand Body prohibits the discussion within the lodge room of any and all religious or sectarian doctrines or of any political subjects. Ninth: This Grand Body requires that when at work in either Grand or Constituent Lodges, there shall be displayed the Three Great Lights of Freemasonry.

As of this time, we are informed that some 20 Grand Lodges have extended recognition to the Grand Lodge of Alaska. NEW MEXICO: The Grand Lodge of New Mexico heard this from its Committee on Foreign Correspondence, and followed its recommendation to recognize the newly formed Grand Lodge of Alaska: Alaska - In June of 1980 the Grand Lodge of the State of Washington passed a resolution to the effect that it would not object to the formation of a Grand Lodge in the State of Alaska. Until that time, all Alaskan Lodges had been chartered by the Grand Lodge of Washington. Last month, in February 1981, a convention of Masons met in Anchorage, Alaska, and 12 of Alaska's 19 lodges voted in favor of the organization of a Grand Lodge of Alaska. Most of the other seven lodges which voted in the negative are located in the southern panhandle of Alaska and preferred to continue their affiliation with the Grand Lodge of Washington. This was approved by the convention. On February 6 of this year these 12 Lodges met and formed the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Alaska. The next day the Grand Master of Nebraska issued an edict granting recognition to this new Grand Lodge.

ANNUAL PROCEEDINGS DELAWARE: The following was adopted by the Grand Lodge of Delaware: He shall record the proceedings of all other communications of the Grand Lodge, and unless otherwise ordered by the Grand Lodge, he shall cause the journal of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge to be printed within seven (7) months after the annual communication of the Grand Lodge, forward the requisite number of copies to the several lodges of this Jurisdiction and three copies of each of the Grand Lodges of the United States, and also the Grand Lodges of such foreign states as may be in fraternal communication with the Grand Lodge. See Ref. 472 also."

MONTANA: The Grand Lodge of Montana has a problem with its proceedings. This was said in the 1980 proceedings:


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A MASONIC REVIEW

1981

It would be very gratifying to me to state that the annual proceedings for 1978 and 1979 had been completed and distributed, but unfortunately I cannot. There are a number of reasons that I could give in detail that has prevented my completing this task, but they would probably only appear to be excuses. The two proceedings are in various states of completion and I must say that one item for the 1978 proceedings still has not been furnished to the Grand Secretary's office. Every effort will be made to complete the printing of all proceedings in the next few months.

APPENDANT BODIES OF MASONRY MAINE: We certainly agree with the Grand Master of Maine that there should be closer cooperation between lodges and the appendant bodies of Freemasonry. All appendant bodies should, in our opinion, ascertain whether or not a brother is in good standing not only in his lodge, but in all bodies which may be prerequisite to the one in which he is paying dues at the time. There are easy ways to accomplish this, and the result will be a happier Masonic family all around. The Grand Master of Maine made these comments: We are allowing candidates to take the easy route to Masonry and to membership in appendant bodies and the Shrine. I believe that the time has come, whether we want to or not, to stand up and be counted as to whether we desire quantity or quality and whether Blue Lodges are to be used merely as a "stepping-stone" to appendant bodies. I would ask those leaders of appendant bodies here today if they desire quality or quantity in their organizations. As Grand Master of all Masons in Maine I take liberty in suggesting that applications to your organizations include the question, "Has the petitioner complied with Standing Regulation No. 25 in the Book of Constitutions and Standing Regulations?" If he has not complied with the above, do you feel as though he should be allowed to progress? I to, realize that a serious communication gap exists between Blue Lodges and appendant bodies regarding the fact that there are Blue Lodge Masons who are under suspension for N .P.D. and other reasons still attending those appendant bodies. I would take the liberty of recommending that before attending any meeting of an appendant body or Shrine function, that a paid-up dues card be shown by each member.

APRON MICHIGAN: Michigan's noted Masonic scholar, W. Bro. James Fairbairn Smith, gives us this discourse on the Masonic Apron: THE MASONIC APRON

More Ancient than Golden Fleece or Roman Eagle More Honorable than Star and Garter By J. Fairbairn Smith, P.M., Grand Lodge Historian The "Masonic Apron" fulfills all the requirements upon which is the basis of all Masonic Landmarks and is therefore an active and universal fundamental, used from the immemorial; without the use of which it cannot be even considered. A new research of the use of "Masonic Clothing" informs us that in 1778 Lawrence Dermott in his 3rd edition of Ahiman Rezon - Ancient Constitution - of the Ancient Grand Lodge of England in 1751 heeded the demands of the oldest Masons that the Masonic Apron be renamed as the most important article of the Masonic wardrobe. Herbert A. Giles, well-known English Masonic authority, states the Masonic Apron is considered as dividing the body in two halves, the upper and nobler half contains the brain and the heart which are thus separated from the portion which contains the merely corporal or baser half below. Even earlier, Confucius in his discourses mentions an "apron" as a very necessary article of dress.


1981

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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Note also that Thomas Carlyle in his "Sartor Resartus" says "Aprons are defences against injury, of cleanliness, to safety, to modesty and even roguery." It is difficult to arrive at a chronology of the use of the Masonic Apron prior to its use and adaption by the Grand Lodge of England. We do, however, know that in a letter dated September 27, 1709, the writer states that he is admired for his membership in the Order of the Garter and Masonry, but he goes on to say that he, personally doesn't value a Blue Garter any more than a Blue Apron. This proves that prior to the Grand Lodge era the blue color was in use. A portrait of Anthony Sayor, the first Grand Master of the premier 1717 Grand Lodge of England shows him wearing a plain white apron which proves that the color of blue had not been adopted. Ten years later - June 24, 1727 - the original English (Moderns, so-called) designated white as the color for lodge collar ribbons, blue for Grand Lodge and red for the Grand Stewards. The next resolution concerning lodge clothing was adopted on March 17, 1731, which allowed private lodge members to wear leather aprons of a white color lined with white silk, while Grand Officers were to wear "white leather aprons lined with blue silk." No particular shade of blue for the aprons was prescribed in the resolution. However, in an order given to Thomas Bastion, Esq., three years later the color is specified as follows: Two Grand Master aprons lined with Garter blue silk and turned over two inches, with white string; Two Deputy Grand Masters aprons turned one inch 1/2 ditto." Just for the record we should here note that the Order of the Garter was instituted in 1348 and the color was "light blue." The Scottish Stewart Kings of Great Britain used the light blue but George II in 1743, to distinguish between the Scottish appointees, decreed that the color of the Star and Garter be changed to dark blue. By slow degrees the blue color became darker and darker and finally reached a condition where a majority of Grand Lodge appointees wore shades of light-blue violet and even purple and gave rise to the designation of those who gained Grand Rank as now being wearers of the Purple of the Fraternity after they had attained Grand Rank. A resolution passed in 1732 decreed that in 1734 orders for aprons as of that date be changed to Garter blue for the color of the lining and borders of Grand Lodge aprons. The red aprons are still worn in England and are the correct regalia for those who belong to the Grand Steward lodges or are perhaps still serving as Grand Stewards of the Grand Lodge of England. We find in Scotland and jurisdictions that are the direct offspring of Britain's Northern Kingdom that each private lodge under such jurisdictions are privileged to select colors for their aprons and other regalia as might be suited to the will and pleasure of a membership of each lodge. The colors of each lodge are properly registered with Grand Lodge and changes can only be made with the permission of Grand Lodge after a vote of the members of the lodge requesting the change. Every Freemason is familiar with the Apron Presentation Lecture which was recited during the ceremonies of the Entered Apprentice Degree, "It is an emblem of innocence, and the badge of a Mason; more ancient than the Golden Fleece and Roman Eagle; more honorable than the Star and Garter, or any other Order that can be conferred upon you at this time, or at any other period by King, Prince, Potentate or any other person except he be a Mason." There can be no question that the prose contained in the lecture is so ecstatic that it brings at one and the same time rapture, bliss and a sense of sublime emotion and excitement. The great industry of medieval England and Scotland was the tending of cattle and sheep and shearing wool and in consequence the great Merchant Woolen Guild brought the British people into close contact with the Association of Woolen Merchants of Flanders with the guidance of Philip of Burgundy. This then gives us the connection with the 1429 Order of Knighthood of the Golden Fleece whose badge and trademark have been most conspicuous in every marketplace of Western Europe. Moreover, the Hanseatic League, the headquarters of which was Lubeck, had constant contact with all of the larRe seaports of Britain, besides the merchants of the House had privile~ed settlements


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A MASONIC REVIEW

1981

in the British ports as was the prominence of the Knights of the Holy Roman Empire whose headquarters were centered at Lubeck. In fact, the arms of the Order of the Roman Eagle are also those of Lubeck. We should at this time make other comment to the effect that the British Star and Garter were indeed much better established and revered than either the Golden Fleece or Roman Eagle. Both of these Orders must have been considered as poor imitations to the Order of the Garter which was at least a century older. The great English Masonic author Lionel Vilbert in an article titled "Vistages of Early Days" states that because of the influence of operative days of the 18th century speculative Masons made their aprons of leather, lambskin, canvas, linen, silk and satin. Hawkins, another great English historian says, "In the process of time a custom grew up of ornamenting the plain white leather apron with all sorts of Masonic emblems and devices." During the 18th century the utmost diversity in aprons prevailed. Grand Lodge in 1815 curbed this trend. In an exposition of this sort some mention should be made concernin~ the 50 American Grand Lodges, but sadly enough, no effort was ever made to bring about a uniform pattern as far as regalia is concerned and so a chaotic situation prevails unless of course we agree that a multigathering is indeed colorful in the extreme and should perhaps even admit after scanning the regalia in use, it does present a variety which is, to say the least, most impressive. May I hope this little heterogenous collection of data on Masonic clothing has in some measure been of interest to you. I have tried to tell you the story as it actually exists today, and I doubt if the near future holds any hope of improvement unless of course, we consider the rash of gold chains now adornin~ the neck and shoulders of most Grand Lodge officers a partial sign of progress.

AUTOS FOR GRAND LODGE MISSISSIPPI: The following is a portion of the report of the Finance Committee, showing the "pecking order" of Grand Lodge automobiles: We recommend that Grand Master Ward be allowed to purchase the 1979 Pontiac that the Grand Lodge provided for his use at the appraised value established by Cliff Colbert Chevrolet-Olds, and that the incoming Grand Master purchase a new car of equal value and equipment in the class of a Chevrolet or Ford and that he be allowed to draw on the General Fund of the Grand Lodge for the cost of this purchase, including license tag and insurance. It is further recommended, effective Grand Lodge 1981, that the outgoing Grand Master turn his car over to the Grand Secretary for his use and the Grand Secretary turn his car over to the Grand Lecturer for his use, and that the Grand Lecturer turn his car over to the Finance Committee to be traded by the Finance Committee for a new car for the next Grand Master for his use. The Grand Lecturer may, at his option, keep his assigned car an additional year.

AWARDS MONTANA: Several Grand Lodges have special awards. The Grand Lodge of Montana proposes to adopt the following two awards: I. There shall be a standing committee on Honors (or Awards or Medals) consisting of the M.W. Grand Master, the R.W. Deputy Grand Master, the R.W. Senior and Junior Grand Wardens and the Junior Past Grand Master, which shall have the sole power to award the Distinguished Service Medal and the Meritorious Service Medal. 2. There shall be two grades of medals, distinguished by color and material, of the following design: The medals shall be one and a half inches in diameter, the face to bear the raised design of the Lion's Paw found on the Grand Master's ring, in the upper portion, with blank space below, the whole to be surrounded by the wording: "For Outstanding Service to Montana Masonry." The reverse of the medal shall bear the seal


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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of the Grand Lodge of Montana. With each medal awarded, there shall be a lapel pin one-half inch in diameter with the raised Lion's Paw in metal surrounded by enamel in the appropriate color. a. The first grade of medal shall be that of the "Distinguished Service Medal" and shall be of silver, suspended from a purple ribbon. The accompanying lapel pin shall be of silver with a border of purple enamel. The Distinguished Service Medal shall be awarded for eminent service to Montana Masonry, and only when circumstances indicate the desirability to extend the very highest Masonic honor for dedicated service. It is not intended that this should be an annual reward, but in no case shall there be more than one Distinguished Service Medal awarded in anyone year. Eligibility shall be limited to members of Montana Lodges who have never held any elective "line" office in the Grand Lodge of Montana. b. The second grade of medal shall be that of the "Meritorious Service Medal" and shall be of bronze suspended by a blue ribbon. The accompanying lapel pin shall be of bronze with a border of blue enamel. The Meritorious Service Medal shall be awarded for outstanding service to Montana Masonry and only when it is desired to recognize service above and beyond that which is constantly demonstrated by so many of our brethren. It is not intended that any given number of Meritorious Service Medals be awarded in any given period, but in no case shall more than four such medals be awarded in anyone year. Eligibility shall be limited to members of Montana lodges who have never held an elective "line" office in the Grand Lodge of Montana. 3. The awards shall be made only at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge and that presentation can be made at any appropriate time thereafter. Announcement of the recipients shall not be made in advance of the presentation.

BELGIUM NEW JERSEY: Most Grand Lodges have acted in a similar way to New Jersey in renewing fraternal relations with Belgium, after certain changes had been made. Due to information received and statements attributed from the Grand Master of Belgium that "a belief in God as a condition of membership is not required by the Grand Lodge of Belgium," I, as Grand Master of Masons of the State of New Jersey on May 28, 1979, withdrew all fraternal recognition with the Grand Lodge of Belgium. However, due to a change in the attitude and principles of the Grand Lodge of Belgium, I, therefore, recommend that the fraternal relations with this Grand Lodge be renewed.

BICENTENNIAL The Grand Lodge of New York was founded in 1781 and has an elaborate program of celebrations planned for its bicentennial. Various mementos are available, including silver and bronze medals at $81.00 and $10.00 each, commemorative plates at $17.50 and a lamp at $139.00. Numerous TV appearances are arranged for the Grand Master, and many other gala occasions have been arranged. A bicentennial history is being prepared at a prepublication price of $8.50. VERMONT: The Grand Lodge of Vermont has set plans in motion to observe in a proper manner the 200th anniversary of their Grand Lodge. The committee appointed for this purpose reported: To the Grand Lodge of Vermont, now in session:

Informal discussions on an individual basis have been had during the year and suggestions for the 1994 Celebration are being considered to include: Should a single celebration be held or should consideration be given to a celebration in each district and those followed by a statewide combined celebration?


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The Committee is looking for suggestions from our brothers as to their wishes for this momentous occasion and ask that these suggestions or recommendations be brought to the attention of your Committee during this coming year that we may begin to focus on specifics even though 1994 appears at this time to be far beyond the horizon.

BROTHER BANNED FROM ATTENDING LODGE LOU ISIAN A: The Grand Master of Louisiana made this report ofa disturbance in one of his lodges, and how it was handled: At this meeting, the officers of the lodge felt that peace and harmony would prevail in Perseverance Lodge No.4 if one particular member, Bro. Sid Sizeler, would not attend the lodge while this study was being made. I concurred with this feeling. I, together with R.W. Don Weiler, D.D.G.M. and R.W. Delwin Laguens, Grand Secretary, met with Brother Sizeler. Since he stated he was a member of ten (10) lodges in the New Orleans area, I did not feel that he would be deprived of any Masonic fellowship by not attending one particular lodge. I instructed him, until further notice, that he was not to attend Perseverance Lodge No.4; that he was to refrain from making unsubstantiated, derogatory remarks about Brother Masons before their faces or behind their backs, either in the lodge or outside of it. I further advised him if he had some factual evidence, not opinions or hearsay, concerning wrongdoing by any member of the lodge, that I would accept this information. The District Deputy informs me that there is an overall improvement in the conditions that had existed in Perseverance Lodge No.4, and the lodge is well on the road to recovery. I would recommend that this matter be closed and the return to the lodge of Brother Sizeler be left up to the discretion of the Master.

BROTHERHOOD WEEK OHIO: The Grand Lodge of Ohiojoined with the Knights of Columbus and B'nai B'rith in a Brotherhood Week program. The Public Relations Committee said: We joined with the Knights of Columbus and B'nai B'rith Columbus this year to work really hard on a Brotherhood Week and Brotherhood Night program. The state level public relations people of the three organizations got together and not only worked together as public relations people, but worked with the leaders of the three fraternities who got together. We wanted to see just how much publicity we could create with a Brotherhood Week event.

BUILDING A PERSONAL TEMPLE MISSISSIPPI: R.W. Bro. Van Aubrey Evans, Grand Orator, gave this brief but excellent discussion of building our personal lives: Several years ago, when I received light in Masonry, I was given certain working tools and instructed on how to use them to lay the foundation for building the temple of my personal character. With the Fellowcraft degree, I received more light, more working tools, and more instruction. When I was raised as a Master Mason, I was presented all the working tools in Masonry that I might complete this temple of my inner life. Now the erection of this invisible temple is made abundantly clear in the symbolic degrees. This is what Masonry is all about. By its construction we are enabled to live in peaceful accord with all mankind and have a closer understanding with God. Yet no other Mason knows for sure if we have built this temple for ourselves or not. No one else knows for sure if the foundation stone was ever laid. Indeed, you may have known someone in your Masonic life who was very active in the lodge, was proficient in the ritualistic work, and had advanced far in Masonry, to suddenly do something so


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outrageously at odds with our Masonic teachings that it was apparent our brother did not know the meaning of brotherly love, relief, and truth. The whole meaning of Masonry, which began with the Entered Apprentice degree, was never received. The foundation for the temple of his personal character was never laid. Situations such as this disturb us, and we are confused as to how it could have occurred. The confusion is a result of our not being able to distinguish between this temple and another temple which was being built at the same time. This second temple, even though visible with the eye, is built in a much more subtle manner than the first. Its construction is seldom mentioned in Masonry. This is the temple of our external being which is built by the honors and rewards bestowed upon us by our Masonic brethren. The foundation stone for this building was laid the night we were accepted into Masonry. Our acceptance indicated to all mankind that we had been examined by the Masons and found to be pure. With the com pletion of the Master Mason's degree, another im portant stone is laid . We are now entitled to wear upon our lapel, upon our external temple, the square and compasses, indicating to all mankind that we have received the mysterious teachings of our ancient brethren and are Master Masons. A most important stone is laid when we are elected to serve our lodge as Master; for we are then entitled to wear upon our lapel, upon our external temple, the compasses and sextant, indicating to all mankind that we are qualified to lead, guide, and direct the Masonic life of other Masons and see that they stay on course. As we add stone to stone in the erection of our external temple, our obligations to the Masonic Fraternity increase. A Master Mason is obligated to conduct his life in such manner as to bring honor to the Fraternity that he represents. A Past Master is obligated to guide other Masons in their search for Masonic truth and must conduct his life in such a manner as to be an example for other Masons. If we have built the temple of our personal character according to the Masonic teachings, then these obligations will become pleasant experiences. If not, they may be very difficult, if not impossible. Many problems arise when a brother seeks the honors and rewards of Masonry and starts to build on his external temple without first laying the groundwork for the temple of his internal character. My brothers, each one of you has started to build on your external temple. Most of you are Past Masters and have come a long way on its construction, but if you have not built the temple of your inner life according to the designs alluded to in the symbolic degrees, then Masonry will be hurt - but you are the loser.

CANCER DETECTION CENTER The Minnesota Masons actively support the Cancer Detection Center established in 1948 as a research unit of the University of Minnesota Medical School. It is said that it is the major center in the United States as a source of research information on the results of early cancer detection. The brethren of Minnesota contribute heavily to the support of this great institution. Several years ago we reported on a drive which raised one million dollars, and a gold check was struck for $1,000,000 to cover the cost of one additional wing of the hospital. It is said that cancer is a common disease, and that over 785,000 people will be found to have cancer this year alone. Various kinds of cancer are described in the "Masonic Cancer Center News." It was said that some 45,000 new cases of uterine cervix cases will come to light and over 400,000 cases of non-melanoma skin cancers will be found. Always early detection is stressed. Other types of cancer that are constantly being examined are breast cancer, intestinal cancer, prostate gland cancer and several other types.


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In the past 32 years over 20,000 volunteers have participated in the research program. Over 120,000 periodic examinations have been done, and countless lives have been saved through early detection and therapy. We have high praise to add to that of countless thousands who have benefited by the careful detection methods of this fine Masonic Cancer Detection Center. The Masons of Minnesota can bejustly proud of the more than 2.1 million dollars they have raised for this one charitable endeavor.

CANDIDATES MASSACHUSETTS: The Grand Master of Massachusetts referred to what he calls "particular procurement." He said: I urge you to continue to practice "particular procurement." Make it possible for that particular person, whom you know to be a good man, to find his way to your lodge room door. While you may open the door, he must cross the threshold of his own free will and accord. He must make up his own mind as to whether or not to follow the trail you blaze. I believe that many of our lodges are beginning to raise more candidates than they have for quite some time. Let us make sure that we are doing more than raising candidates. Make sure that we are making intelligent Masons of these men. Do not shortchange them. Remember, we teach a little by what we say, we teach much by what we do.

CATHOLIC MEMBERS OHIO: The Grand Master of Ohio said this: I note with pleasure an increasing flow of petitions for degrees from good men and true of the Roman Catholic faith. This trend should continue as more and more of our Roman Catholic friends come to realize they were never barred by our law and are no longer barred by the church from entering the fellowship of our order. Freemasonry is truly a universal brotherhood.

CENTURY-OLD MASONIC ESSAY From the Northern Light, official publication of the Supreme Council 33째, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, we find this interesting account of a century-old Masonic essay and other Masonic articles: When the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts met at Boston's Faneuil Hall last fall to open a 100-year-old metal box, many were intrigued by a Masonic emblem on the outside of the box. Even more interesting was the contents. The box contained maps of the city of Boston, messages from the mayor and governor, and a collection of essays written by well-known personalities of the times. Among the many subjects covered in the essays were reports on the religious conditions, manners and customs of the era, architecture, railroads, medicine and surgery, amusements, recollections of Boston, and much more. Of particular interest to Masons was a 28-page handwritten essay on "Secret Societies" by Ill. John Lindsay Stevenson, 33째, a Boston merchant of the 19th century. The late Brother Stevenson was Commander of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 1877-78; Commander of Boston Commandery, K.T., 1881, and Commander-in-chief of Massachusetts Consistory, 1877-81. He lists also 40 other organizations for which he was a member or officer. The century-old essay removed from the box begins with a brief mention of various "secret societies of the Old World." Moving on to America, Stevenson refers to Freemasonry as "the solidest and noblest of all the secret societies existing." Classifying Masonry today as a secret society would be considered misleading.


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Stevenson includes a lengthy list of so-called "secret societies" and indicates that the purpose of most of these groups was to pay death benefits to deceased members' beneficiaries. Referring to political secret societies, he points to the Know Nothing party of the 1850s as "probably the most successful." He says, however, "the party died of narrow ideas, and there were no mourners." Following a discussion of the Odd Fellows, Richardson devotes the remaining 13 pages to Freemasonry. "Freemasonry today is a moral progressive science, teaching charity and hospitality, broadening the mind, enabling the actions, and equalizing all rank and station among its members, 'and conciliating true friendship among those who might otherwise have remained at perpetual distance,''' writes Stevenson. "Such is Freemasonry today. How is it with ye, brethren, who listen with 'attentive ear' while the 'instructive tongue' reads you in 1980 that which I write in 1880. Are the mysteries of Freemasonry still safely lodged in the repository of faithful breasts?" Stevenson includes membership statistics as well as extensive discussions of the structure of the York and Scottish Rites, both of which remain basically the same today. The author tells why he listed all the associations to which he belonged. He wanted it understood that it was "not in a spirit of vanity, but inasmuch as the days in the year, nor the hours in (the) day will not be changed during the intervening time, that comparison may be fairly instituted between the capacity of an average man of today and one of 1980 in the duties of a secret society man, who all the time conducts his own business with success while attending to these calls on his time, and finds opportunity to wield the pen for the edification of future generations." He concludes with a series ofquestions to his future generations: "How many will there be who ever heard of me? Does anyone bear my name? Runs my blood in the veins of anyone present? Lives the old company? Waves the old Flag? Ah! Who shall answer these questions?" The box had been sealed during the 250th anniversary of the city of Boston in 1880, and was scheduled to be opened during the 350th anniversary last year. Members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company have been meeting at Faneuil Hall since 1746. Built in 1742, the building served as a meeting place for the colonists. Today the Company's museum, under the supervision of curator Sidney Abbott, 32째, is open to the public weekdays on the top floor of the historic building, where the 19th-century essays are on file. Started in 1638 as a militia for Massachusetts, the unit is considered today to be the third oldest continuous military organization in the world. Its function now, however, is ceremonial. Among its limited membership have been four U.S. Presidents: James Monroe, Chester Arthur, Calvin Coolidge, and John Kennedy. New material is being gathered for a box to be opened in another 100 years.

CHARITY KANSAS: The Grand Master of Kansas encouraged his lodges to be charitable: March 14, 1979 Dear Brethren: I feel that it is important for all lodges to be involved in community affairs, particularly in the field of charity. You are encouraged to make a $100 contribution to some charitable or worthy cause from within the community on a monthly basis. This is to include promotion of DeMolay, Jobs Daughters, Rainbow for Girls, or other youth activities including sports activities for both boys and girls. In view of the inflationary times, a recognized fact, the following fund-raising activities are suggested: Pancake suppers, chili suppers, potluck suppers, community dances, and bingo, if you are properly licensed. Be sure to have legal counsel advise the lodge before


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becoming involved with the latter, or any fund-raising activity, to be sure you are in compliance with all local and state laws. Fraternally, W. NOLAl" ARTZ Grand Master

MASSACHUSETTS: The following was reported in the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts: Several months ago our brethren in Mississippi suffered loss of their property due to a severe storm. The Masonic Service Association issued an urgent appeal to all Grand Lodge Jurisdictions to come to their aid with a financial gift. Our Grand Lodge responded by sending $1,000 from our Charity Funds.

WISCONSIN: The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin heard reports from two of its charity committees. The first is from the Board ofMasonic Welfare, and the other The Wisconsin Masonic Foundation, Inc.: WISCONSIN BOARD OF MASO:"IC WELFARE REPORT

To the Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons of Wisconsin:

The Wisconsin Board of Masonic Welfare had periodic meetings throughout the fiscal year, both formal and informal, for the purpose of considering requests for financial assistance from our brothers who requested relief. A seriously ill brother, residing in Oregon, whose only income was derived from Social Security benefits, requested monthly assistance. The Board granted the request and authorized a contribution of $100 per month until further notice. A report was received indicating that a brother Mason was severely burned in an electrical accident and unable to work for an extended period of time. The Board authorized payment of $200 immediately, plus the payment of two insurance premiums. It was also agreed that a payment of $300 a month be made throughout the 1979-1980 winter until our brother was able to again continue his employment. The Board agreed to continue the payment of$50.00 per month to a Masonic widow, with subsequent review later to determine further needs. At the request of Stewart M. L. Pollard, Executive Secretary of the Masonic Service Association, the Board decided to answer an appeal for disaster assistance resulting from the devastation caused by the hurricane and tropical storm in the Dominican Republic. One thousand dollars was allocated for this assistance. A Wisconsin brother in Texas, seriously ill with no funds, asked that the balance of his medical bills be paid. After due inquiry and verification the Board authorized payment of the balance of his medical obligations. A member of the District Grand Lodge of Bengal of Calcutta, India, requested financial assistance to help pay his tuition to the University of San Francisco. The Board felt that since more critical requests for relief are considered to be of higher priority than the payment of tuition, the request was denied. THE WISCOl"SIl" MASO!';IC FOUNDATIOl", I:'IIC.

To the Grand Lodge F. & A.M. of Wisconsin:

M.W. Grand Master, Grand Lodge Officers, Distinguished Guests and Brethren All. Again it is a privilege for me, on behalf of all ofthe Trustees of the Foundation, to report on the status and exciting activities of the Wisconsin Masonic Foundation and Wisconsin Masonic Home Endowment Fund. The fund balance of the Wisconsin Masonic Foundation is $1,530,967.38 of which $1,262,386.83 is that portion assigned to the Wisconsin Masonic Home Endowment Fund. We are pleased to announce that a contribution of$100,270.39 is being made to the Wisconsin Masonic Home representing the earnings of the Endowment Fund. This is


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the first time in the history of the Endowment Fund that it is possible to turn over an amount in excess of $100,000. This year the Wisconsin Masonic Foundation has had one of its most exciting times. The High School Scholarship programs, whereby constituent lodges would contribute an amount up to $250 which was matched by Wisconsin Masonic Foundation funds, was met with outstanding success. A total of 96 lodges, almost one-third of the total in Wisconsin, participated in the program. The Foundation's contributions amounted to $19,700 and, therefore, you brethren can be proud to know that Freemasonry in Wisconsin contributed in excess of $40,000 in High School Scholarship funding. You ought to be pleased. The demand for funds for the High School program was so great these past months that it was decided to discontinue the College and University Scholarship program this year and concentrate on the High School area because of the greater opportunity for lodge participation and the positive impact for Freemasonry in Wisconsin.

IOWA: The Trustees of the Iowa Grand Charity Fund began its report with this quote from the past: To the Grand Lodge of Iowa;

(Regarding Masonic Charity in the Grand Lodge of Iowa) "It was proved so eminently successful in relieving every case brought to the attention of the Trustees, that it is given the most hearty and generous support by the Grand and Subordinate Lodges of the jurisdiction. The hearts of the beneficiaries are made glad by the assistance that comes to them in the hour of need, not as a bounden duty faithfully performed, but rather as prompted by the spirit of brotherly love and relief, which are the principal tenets of our profession; for we are Masons not for what we may get, but for what we may attain, what we may do for others. This is our glory; this is what makes Masonry the synonym of charity throughout the civilized world; this is what will shine brighter luster upon her fair name, as the centuries one by one shall be added to the past, even down to 'the last syllable of time.'" William F. Cleveland, P.G.M. Editor, History of Grand Lodge of Iowa, Volume Two, p. 259, Grand Lodge of Iowa, 1913 This view of Masonic Charity is commended to the thoughtful consideration of the members and guests of this Grand Lodge, to all Masons wheresoever dispersed, and to all men of good will. It is in the spirit of this poetic description of what is "our glory" that the Board of Trustees of the Grand Charity Funds submits this report of its stewardship for the 1979-80 Grand Lodge year.

CIVIL RIGHTS KANSAS: The Masonic Home reported to the Grand Lodge of Kansas: We continue to be under the watchful eye of the Kansas City Regional Office for Civil Rights. As you know they have extended our probation period one more year. We are working hard to comply with their wishes. Mrs. Phyllis Gray, who became our admissions secretary many months ago, is doing a wonderful job and is keeping our compliance records in order.

CLERGY RELATIONS ARIZONA: A committee reported on its efforts to improve relations with the clergy throughout the jurisdiction of Arizona. We agree that this is important and the Committee reported to the Grand Lodge as follows: In 1979 our M.W. Grand Master asked Bro. Olin E. Lehman, P.M., and myself to form a committee, the purpose of which would be to suggest ways that this Grand Lodge could best distribute to the clergy copies of "An Open Letter Concerning Masonic Funerals"


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published by the Masonic Service Association. The Long-Range Planning Committee has suggested that this pamphlet, if disseminated to the clergy of Arizona, could be most helpful in improving our relationship with them. We concur wholeheartedly with the Long-Range Planning Committee. My Brothers, there may be some among you who are not generally aware that some hostility toward, and misunderstandings about, Freemasonry exist among the clergy, whether Protestant, Catholic, or Jewish. The purpose of this report is not to enumerate the causes: An excellent committee report was made at the last Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge on the .u~ject of improved relations between Masonry and Churches in Arizona. A number of methods were explored for ways to distribute the pamphlet to the clergy. All involved use of the Postal System for a one-time mailing to every church in the state. All of these ideas were discarded either because of the high costs involved or due to our questioning very much the effectiveness of sending an unsolicited pamphlet on so important a topic via bulk mailing methods. Clergy are inundated by unsolicited mail, so that many would ignore it and put it into the "circular file." Your Grand Master has a copy of a preliminary report we made that sets forth the costs for using different distribution systems. We do have several recommendations: We recommend that the Masonic Service Association pamphlet entitled "An Open Letter Concerning Masonic Funerals" be secured in sufficient quantities by this Grand Lodge, either by having it printed or by purchase from the M.S.A., so that each constituent lodge may have as many as needed: We recommended that this publication be distributed to each lodge Secretary and Worshipful Master through the Widow's Committee of this Grand Lodge; We recommend that the Worshipful Master be encouraged to give a copy of each minister with whom funeral arrangements are made, so that over a period of time many churches and clergy will receive a copy; We recommend that the sum of$IOO be appropriated to pay for the cost of having a quantity printed or purchased.

CLOSE LODGE FOR THREE MONTHS ANNUALLY MAINE: The Grand Lodge of Maine allows its lodges to close for a threemonth period during the year. It was said: Many lodges have taken advantage of the new ruling that a lodge may stay closed any three consecutive months once in a fiscal year. The cost of fuel oil (now over a dollar a gallon from a price of 16 cents a gallon when I first started using the stuff) is forcing lodges to close during the cold months and stay open in the warm season. This serves a double purpose, first, it conserves fuel, and second, the lodge is open during the summer when we have (hopefully) many summer visitors and gives them a place to visit. If your lodge goes back to using wood as a fuel, be sure the stove is properly installed. Many fires have occurred because of improper installation and poor chimneys. Unfortunately some of these fires have resulted in death. Be most careful. Some of our lodge halls still need sprucing up. If the cost of gasoline keeps our brethren from visiting other lodges, it may be the golden opportunity to work on our own halls. Do a little landscaping, painting and general cleaning up both inside and outside. Also be sure your hall is properly identified as a Masonic hall.

CONDITION OF THE CRAFT MARYLAND: The Grand Master of Maryland said the following: The year 1978 disclosed, once again, a statistical loss in membership. This continues a trend begun in 1962 and unbroken through the intervening years. From a high mark of 48,104 members, we have dropped to 41,626, a loss of 13 1/2 percent over a period of 17 years. This is cause for concern, no doubt about that. But your Grand Master seems to detect a ray of sunshine through the clouds, and I do


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not believe that he is looking at the matter through rose-colored glasses. Masonry, universally, has had its ups and downs through a turbulent history. Perhaps the pendulum is about to swing back the other way. We are encouraged as we go about the state to see the number of young men who are coming into the Fraternity, and the number of young men who are beginning to serve as officers in their lodge. This is not true in the large urban areas where the bulk of our losses is concentrated, but it is true in many of the statewide communities. It can be a good portent for the future, although it may take several years before we realize any concrete results.

The following year the Grand Master said: Once again the Grand Lodge of Maryland has suffered a loss in membership for the 12-month period ending June 30,1979. This continues a trend unbroken since 1961. At that time there were 48,547 Masons in Maryland. Today there are but 41,522, a loss of 14.5 percent over 18 years. But the loss this past year was 796, more than any other year in that period of time and representing 1.9 percent ofour membership on June 30, 1978. If there is any ray of hope it must lie in the fact that losses during the first six months of 1979 were less than in corresponding months of 1978. Lodges in rural areas and in smaller cities around the state are holding their own. Many of them are initiating young men in age, in their twenties and early thirties, and some of these men are accepting offices ami other duty assignments in their lodges. It is the lodges located within the inner city of large urban areas that are experiencing difficult times. The solution of their problems is not an easy one and should be of deep concern to us. Whether the cause of Masonry will advance in spite of a membership loss is something for history to determine. An excellent spirit prevails throughout the membership of our Fraternity. From personal observation, and from reports coming from representatives, the officers in our lodges are better acquainted with the ritual today than they have ever been before. Let us continue to build on any good that has been done. Let us cover any faults under the broad mantle of charity.

CORNERSTONES We have read many interesting and informative papers on the laying of Masonic cornerstones. One such dissertation comes from the Fraternal Correspondent of the Grand Lodge of Washington. WASHINGTON: The paper came from Arizona, and was said to be as follows: The laying of cornerstones with special ceremonies, making it an occasion for rejoicing or solemn consecration, appears to be as old as the art of building. The ritualistic placing of foundation stones, and of enclosing a deposit as a memorial, occurred in some of the most ancient civilizations which can be studied in the archeological records available to modern man. However, rejoicing and merriment were not always associated with cornerstones. The early builders, to protect their buildings from those who would injure it, offered human sacrifices in the beliefthat the angry ghost would haunt the structure. In like manner, to appease the gods and especially Mother Earth, who was to bear a new burden, human victims were walled up in the cornerstones or thrown bound into the hollow foundations, there to die of suffocation. In time the human victims were replaced with animals and these were supplanted with fruits of the earth. Freemasons lay cornerstones with corn, wine and oil and in the hollowed center put the book, the picture, the coin, the newspaper, etc. unknowing that these are the remains of the ancient superstitions that without a human sacrifice to provide a protective ghost to haunt the building it will fall. The involvemen~of Freemasonry in the laying of cornerstones dates back almost to the inception of the Fraternity. In 1722, only five years after the founding of the Grand Lodge of England, the first modern Masonic cornerstone laying was reported in a


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newspaper of the day. The article notes that "As the first stone of the foundation underground of the Church of St. Martins was laid by the Bishop of Salisbury; so the first stone of the foundation above ground was laid with a great deal of ceremony by the society of Freemasonry." Grand Lodges around the world have laid cornerstones on many important and noteworthy buildings, but probably nothing is dearer to the hearts of the Masons of the United States than the part played by the Grand Lodge of Maryland in laying the cornerstone of the United States Capitol. George Washington, President of the United States, was invited to preside at the ceremony. A procession, including bands and an artillery unit, marched in solemn dignity to the Capitol. After the ceremony the gavel used by Washington was presented to Potomac Lodge No.5. It is still preserved in a glass-fronted vault in Riggs National Bank. Likewise, the silver trowel utilized in this celebrated ritual, is in the possession of Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22. Masons have actively laid the cornerstones of many other governmental buildings, but to recite such a list would be meaningless and tiresome. However, it might not be amiss to indicate that the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Maryland in 1792, one year before the Capitol was started, laid the cornerstone for the White House, and in 1848 the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia was asked to preside at the cornerstone ceremony for the Washington Monument. Modern Freemasonry is the custodian of the symbolic use of the builders' tools, arts, ceremonies, and tradition. It applies these to the teaching of moral concepts and those standards of conduct which are approved by all virtuous men who believe in a Divine Creator. Operative craftsmen hewed, squared, and laid the stones which formed the noble structures of antiquity and the soaring cathedrals of the Middle Ages. Their creations were more than mere piles of bricks and of granite: They were symbols of man's persistent desire to establish order and harmony in the building of a civilization. Modern Freemasonry's purpose is that of the builders: to construct and never to destroy; to erect an intangible "building" of benevolent love and harmonious understanding. Speculative Freemasons, therefore, symbolically lay the cornerstones of public buildings to remind the nation's citizens of the purposes for which those edifices are erected. Because of its inherited forms and traditions it is the organization most suitably equipped to perform such ceremonies. Freemasonry has never assumed an exclusive right to "level the corner" but whenever invited to perform such labor, it has done it with matchless symbolism and beauty.

CUBA NEW JERSEY: For several years the Grand Lodge of New Jersey has maintained a committee on "Recognition of Cuba." This appears to be the final report of that committee: REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON

RECO(;~ITIO~

OF CUBA

Activities of the subject committee during the year 1979-80 were as follows: During April, a petition for a lodge under dispensation was prepared, the lodge to be named Jose Marti for the "George Washington" of Cuba. Since the issuance of the green cards, the brethren who were to compose this lodge had been meeting informally at the Elizabeth Masonic Temple, and at a meeting late in April, the signatures of the majority of the 105 brethren on the petition were obtained, and within about a week the remainder had signed. A further meeting for the purpose of examining additional Cuban brethren was also held during the month. On May 16 a meeting was held at the Grand Lodge Building, Burlington, chaired by the Grand Master, and numerous questions and problems posed by the dispensation and proposed lodge were discussed. OnJune 14 a further meeting for the examination of Cuban brethren was held at the Elizabeth Masonic Temple. On July 2 the petition was mailed to the Grand Master, and his favorable consideration of same was requested.


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On August 29, a further meeting, chaired by the Grand Master, was held at the Grand Lodge Building. The Chairman of this Committee gave a status report and answered all questions raised by those present. He then strenuously urged the Grand Master to issue his dispensation. The Grand Secretary made a motion, seconded by the Senior Grand Warden, that the petition be granted and the dispensation issued. The motion was unanimously passed. On December 28, at the Elizabeth Masonic Temple, the Grand Master presented his dispensation to W. Bro. Ernest Burns, first Worshipful Master ofJose Marti Lodge U.0. It is a pleasure to report that on March 28, 1980 Jose Marti Lodge U.0. conferred its first Entered Apprentice Degree upon five candidates, in the presence ofM.W. Morgan T. Morris, Jr., Grand Instructor. Despite the lack of prior experience the degree was conferred most creditably. There are still other candidates in waiting, and another Entered Apprentice Degree is scheduled for the month of April. This Committee, having served its purpose, is to be discontinued at the conclusion of this Grand Lodge year. It has been a most rewarding and interesting task, and I thank the Grand Master for this opportunity to take part in a masonically unique experience. To all those who contributed in this most worthy task, my sincere and fraternal thanks and affection. April 23, 1980

DAY'S PAY FOR DUES -

MONTH'S WAGES FOR FEES

IDAHO: All Worshipful Masters present were received, and one of their number, W. Bro.James A. Downs from Cassia Lodge No. 14, responded to the welcome. He said in part: As we voice our gratitude for this opportunity to serve our Craft, direct our decisions during this Annual Communication, and consider our future; we are all concerned about SURVIVAL. Constantly we hear that Freemasonry is declining, and we are all concerned about our status, but our greatest concern is - what to do about it. I am sure that I cannot provide the answers; however, I am certain that this trend must be corrected, or Masonry, one day, may become only a word in the history book. Unfortunately, many lodges today are so poor that we have little or nothing to offer beyond our rituals and brotherhood. Our financial status has eliminated our relief, our charities, and many of our former activities - what has happened to them? They appear to be gone, along with our declining memberships and our declining treasuries. I remember, as a child, my father pointing to some men who were unloading a carload of coal (during the Depression), and telling me "the Masons bought it, and are delivering it to several needy families." At that time Freemasonry was a force, and a respected organization in every community. How many of our lodges today could buy a carload of anything without going bankrupt? All of us have observed the varied activities of dedicated brethren in their efforts to keep their lodge solvent, and this is a wonderful project; but their numbers are few, and they face the severe problems of inflation. As I ask myself what needs to be done; we must admit that many things must be done, but the most urgent measures seem to be two: First, we must convince all our members (old and young alike) to forget, yes - forget yesterday's dollar. We must then match today's operational costs (dues and fees) with today's dollar. Our brethren in earlier days believed in the concept of a day's wage for annual dues, and a month's wage for the fees. We are certainly a long way from these basic guidelines now. They had finances for lodge equipment, furniture, banquets, tours, relief, and charitable programs; and when we look at our present status we find it most difficult to replace a few items which we inherited. Our obsolete (and cheap) dues and fees have done much to cheapen Freemasonry, and the old and proven adage needs our sincere attention"If it is cheap, it can't be quality, and it can't be very good."


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Second, Life Memberships: While it takes time to feel the effects of this fine program, everything and every program must begin somewhere, and sometime. Even though our senior members will not realize the financial benefits derived from a Prepaid Life Membership, and their personal benefits will be personal convenience only; there is great satisfaction to its other aspects. It is a wonderful way for many of us to leave a small legacy to our beloved lodges, and thereby assure a bright future for our lodge. It is a permanent investment in your lodge, and the earnings are dedicated so that the earnings continue to your lodge forevermore. As time passes, and more and more investments and legacies are added, our lodges will have the finances to get out of the poorhouse, they can be doing more and offering more, they can rebuild and retain the respected place a Masonic lodge should have in its community. It appears that sound financial planning, with current fees and dues, and an abundance of Prepaid Life Memberships, are necessary for our SURVIVAL.

Brother Downs concluded by saying that the solution to finances was only one ofthe problems facing Freemasonry. He believed it should be solved while attention was directed toward other challenges offered the Craft. We believe his thoughts as thus expressed are worthy of serious consideration by all of us.

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS There are two different points of view on the best method of appointing District Deputy Grand Masters. One is the annual rotation system, and the other allows the appointee to continue to serve as long as the incoming Grand Masters will reappoint him. The latter theory is that when you find a good man - keep him on the job as long as possible. In favor of the rotation system is the thought that the knowledge of the workings of the Grand Lodge is brought closer to more brethren and more lodges. LOUISIANA: The Grand Master of Louisiana seems to favor keeping a good man on the job. He said: As a general rule, the 19 District Deputy Grand Masters are devoted Masons and fulfill their duties and responsibilities with excellence. However, I cannot truthfully say that our selection of the District Deputies by the "rotation" system produces the best results. I would suggest that the District lodges make their recommendations to the Grand Master, based on a brother's past services, his ability. the amount oftime he has to devote to his office, and his love of the Craft. Simply serving through the chairs of a District lodge does not necessarily qualify a brother for this most important position. To those who have faithfully performed their duties and who have served me and Grand Lodge so well, I offer my sincere congratulations and appreciation.

DUES INDIANA: The Grand Lodge of Indiana adopted the following legislation governing the collection of unpaid dues: Reg. 37.070. Collection ofDues. Every lodge shall include in its by-laws a by-law reading substantially as follows: (a) The dues of this lodge shall be $_ _ per year for each member, to which shall be added the per capita assessment as established by Grand Lodge each year for operation of the Indiana Masonic Home. Dues and Masonic Home assessments are payable in advance on or before the first day of January of each year. Such dues and assessment not paid on January I in advance are in arrears. (b) On the first day of February, or not later than the date of the first stated meeting in February, the Secretary shall give notice by mail to all brethren who are in arrears for


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dues and assessments stating that they must, at or before the first meeting in March, pay or satisfactorily explain to the lodge in writing, all arrearage in dues and assessments. (c) At the first stated meeting in March, the Worshipful Master shall appoint a Dues Committee of three or more members, including the Senior Warden, Junior Warden and Secretary, to investigate all arrearage in dues and assessments, with instruction to said Committee to ascertain the cause of such arrearage wherever possible, and to prepare charges to be filed for nonpayment of dues against all members whose dues and assessments are not paid, or in worthy cases to recommend that such indebtedness be remitted. (d) At the first stated meeting in April, the Worshipful Master shall appoint at least one additional member to the Dues Committee for each delinquent member of the lodge. The Worshipful Master shall appoint brothers concerned and able to relate to the delinquent members or member of this Committee. Each such Committee shall make a complete and full investigation by personal contacts wherever possible. Communications by personal letter or telephone calls shall be made when personal contacts are prohibitive due to great distances being involved. (e) At the first stated meeting of the lodge in May the Worshipful Master shall call for a report from the Dues Committee and shall first take up the matter of remission in worthy cases. The lodge may vote to remit either upon recommendation of the Committee or upon other motion properly made and seconded. The Worshipful Master shall next order that charges for nonpayment of dues and assessments shall then be filed by the Committee against all brethren whose dues and assessments are not paid or remitted.

Missouri's automatic suspension law has merit, but the number suspended under it is probably far more than would be reported if handled in another manner. In the final analysis the success or failure of any dues collection system depends largely upon the officers of the lodge, particularly the Secretary. MINNESOTA: An amendment was adopted that a dues card or other documentary evidence of good standing would be acceptable, because they discovered that some Grand Lodges do not issue dues cards, only certificates or patents. OKLAHOMA: The Grand Lodge of Oklahoma increased its per capita dues from $3.00 to $6.00.

EDUCATION ARIZONA: The Committee on Masonic Education included this in its report to the Grand Lodge of Arizona: The Committee has published a new pamphlet entitled "Greetings to a Mason's Lady." It contains, among other things, a short history of the Craft, an ex planation of the Apron, and instructions concerning Masonic funerals. We think the new initiate's wife is deserving of more than "I can't tell you what happened - it's a secret." These pamphlets are available to the lodges through the Office of the Grand Secretary and the Editor of Arizona Masonry at no cost. The standards set for the Master Builder Award are set high - we believe that this recognition should not be handed out indiscriminately. Nine lodges applied for the award and we congratulate them for their ambition and zeal in trying to improve themselves. Of these nine lodges we are issuing the Master Builder Award Certificate to Oriental Lodge No. 20, Silver Trowel Lodge No. 29, Adobe Lodge No. 41, and Wayfarers No. 50. I wish we had another award, and it has been suggested - a Builder Award - an "E" for Effort - a "Close - But No Cigar" - it certainly would go to Tucson Lodge No.4, Chalcedony Lodge No.6, Safford Lodge No. 16, Scottsdale No. 43, and Builders Lodge No. 60. They all worked hard but did not meet all the high standards. We commend them


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for what they accomplished and feel that with a little more effort and strict attention to the standards, they all will receive this award next year. We recommend that those lodges not participating in the Award Program investigate the opportunities they are missing to advance Masonry and activate their lodges. The committee is willing and anxious to aid and support any lodge in any manner within its power. Because of anticipated travel to workshops, hoped-for new material to be published and the miscellaneous needs such as postage, stationery, etc., we recommend that $1,000 be budgeted for the coming year.

ARKANSAS: The Grand Lodge of Arkansas has a very fine Education Program. Here are excerpts from the Education Committee report: Last year we reported to you that the Masonic Education Program had taken on a "new look" utilizing visual-aid equipment. Those of you who were present at the Zone Meetings this year know that there was even a vast improvement over the visual-aid programs presented the two previous years. This year with the more modern, dual projectors with automatic dissolve type audio-visual equipment the presentation of the program was much more interesting and effective. With the aid of the new audio-visual equipment, this year the first half of the program included an impressive recording of the Grand Master's message, a very colorful and informative explanation of the Masonic colors and aprons. Also, the correct procedure for receiving a Grand Lodge officer in the lodge was shown in much detail. The second half of the program was a color slide presentation entitled "This Is Freemasonry." This part of the program dated Masonry back even to the beginning of Operative Masonry, detailing the progress of Masonry on into this part of the wor/d. Also, it pointed out that the principles of Freemasonry were the very "bedrock" of our Great Democracy, and still sustain our society with its moral teachings and aid to the poor and afflicted. In the development of the audio-visual program for this year, we are indeed grateful to the Grand Lodge of Texas and their Chairman of the Masonic Education and Service Committee, Bro. Jack Kelley of San Antonio, for their most able assistance. The program appeared to be well received by the brethren as evident by the many favorable comments and even a great number of requests for a repeat of the same program. We are proud to report that there were a total of approximately 2,300 Master Masons in attendance at the 19 Zone Meetings. The part of the program entitled "This Is Freemasonry" was made available to be shown at family nights. There were many written requests for the program, in fact some were turned down because there was just not enough time and dates to accommodate all. The program was shown to 22 groups where the families and invited non-Mason friends of Master Masons were present, a total attendance of approximately 2,200 including 186 non-Masons. For next year your Committee on Masonic Education is preparing another interesting and informative color slide audio-visual type program and we are looking forward to even greater attendance.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: The Grand Master ofthe District of Columbia reports satisfactory results from Workshops. In part, he said: For the benefit of the leaders of our lodges and other interested brethren, three Workshops were held on April 28, June 9, and September 8. The programs included instruction and discussions on the Masonic Code, the Landmarks of Masonry, and conducting Masonic Funerals. The September session was devoted to the duties of the lodge Secretaries with special invitations extended to them and the Masters and Wardens. The Committee on Masonic Education chaired by W. Bro. Harold Grainger, performed in their usual proficient manner and I am sure, presented much that was gratefully received and of great value to the officers and brethren of this Jurisdiction.


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Each of the sessions was well attended and those present showed by their active participation their thirst for knowledge. I trust that from the wide acceptance of these Workshops, future Grand Masters will be persuaded to continue these programs.

TENNESSEE: The Grand Lodge of Tennessee has an active Committee on Masonic Education. The following taken from the report of that Committee explains what was done the past year. Last year the Committee approved the printing of a new pamphlet entitled "What I Would Like My Friends to Know About Freemasonry." Eleven thousand of these booklets were distributed in five months, making it the most sought-after booklet yet to be printed by our Committee. Although the demand could not be met last year, we now have reprinted 9,000 more of these pamphlets for distribution. Thirty officers' workshops were held by the Director with an average attendance of 52 for each meeting. One hundred and thirty-one lodges applied for the Dr. Joseph C. Mobley Award. These applications were carefully screened by the Chairman of the Masonic Education Committee and the Director of Masonic Education. Three lodges from each section of the state were selected and presented to the Grand Master who made the final decision. This year the recipient is Red Bank Lodge No. 717 of Chattanooga. We urge all lodges throughout our state to participate in this prestigious award. Several years ago this Grand Lodge approved the appointment of a Lodge Educational Officer. We believe that each lodge should have such an officer appointed by the Master to carry out a progressive educational program. His name and address should be furnished the Grand Secretary. The Director of Masonic Education held 12 joint meetings with the three Grand Lecturers last fall. These meetings were well attended and much interest was shown. We believe these meetings are worthwhile and should be continued. The Committee is in the process of developing a new program for the lodges. We will continue to explore new ideas and keep our progress current to meet the needs of our lodges. Two pocket Planning Calendars were mailed to each lodge for the new Master and the Secretary along with lodge officers' ID cards. These materials contain valuable information beneficial to every lodge and we urge that each lodge take advantage of it.

WYOMING: At least a portion of the Educational Program of the Grand Lodge of Wyoming seems to be working satisfactorily: Your Educational Council strived to show how to put all officers to work, to teach them to take responsibility for some part of their lodge, to relate ideas for programming, and to encourage a Fair Booth in each county. One of the two highlights for me this year was the Fair Booth in Casper. We had 219 sign our guest book, 45 sojourners living in Casper asked about Dual Membership or transferring their membership to a Casper lodge, and 16 men asking how they could go about joining the Fraternity. This coming year should have a good start.

FAMILY COMMITTEE INDIANA: The Grand Lodge of Indiana adopted the following resolution: WHEREAS, An Entered Apprentice is taught that "To relieve the distressed is a duty incumbent on all men, but particularly on Masons"; WHEREAS, Regulation 38.010 reads in part: "... It is the duty of a lodge to help its destitute members or the destitute widows and orphans of deceased members wherever they reside ..."; WHEREAS, Masons publicly state in the Memorial Service: "... May the same tie which united us to our brother continue to bind us to his afflicted and bereaved family ... n;


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Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved, That a new Regulation be adopted to read: The Worshipful Master of each lodge shall appoint one or more brothers to a committee to be known as the Committee of the Family whose duty it shall be: 1. To maintain a location file on each member's widow and orphans. 2. To maintain contact with each member's widow and orphans and to inform the lodge as occasion should require, but no less than once annually, concerning the wellbeing of a deceased brother's family. 3. To encourage, whenever possible, a brother's widow and orphans being included in lodge social activities. For purposes of interpretation of this Regulation, a widow shall be defined as the unremarried widow of a deceased Mason and an orphan shall be defined as a child, under 21 years of age, of a deceased Mason.

FLORIDA - HOOSIER MASONS MEET IN FLORIDA INDIANA: Four meetings of Hoosier Masons in Florida were reported to the Grand Lodge of Indiana. This is a new concept in fraternal relations which appeals to us. Under the sponsorship of the Indiana Masonic Home Foundation, four 'Reunion Meetings were held on January 15-18, 1980 in Florida. These meetings were for Hoosier Masons located in Florida with the purpose of updating our brethren on the benefits of being a member of an Indiana lodge. The program was presented in Orlando, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, and Tampa by the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Home Board Chairman and the Executive Secretary of the Foundation. Through the cooperation of our lodge Secretaries we found that approximately 7,500 of our brethren are residing in Florida. This program allowed us the opportunity to update some 1, 100 of our Masonic family on the forward-moving prqjects underway in Indiana. We discussed our efforts relating to charity, education, and membership. They were told about our remodeling and construction at the Indiana Masonic Home. The plans being made by the Foundation for the future financing of the Home were explained. These meetings would not have been possible without the outstanding cooperation of the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge of Florida. Our Hoosier Masons and their wives expressed much appreciation for the update on our projects and the fellowship which was generated. These brethren felt this was a major step in the improvement of our Masonic communications.

NEW JERSEY: The second annual meeting of New Jersey Masons in Florida reported to Grand Lodge. ]'I;EW .JERSEY MASONIC REl:]'I;IO]'l;S 1;\1 FLORIDA

The Second Annual Reunions with our New Jersey brethren living in Florida were held on February 1,2, and 3, 1980. I was accompanied at these reunions by R. W. Carl O. Brodin, D.G.M.; R.W. Kenneth H. Sternkopof, P.G.C., President, Masonic Charity Foundation; R.W. Francis R. Mitchell, P.D.D.G.M., Vice-President, Masonic Charity Foundation; and M.W. Malcolm B. Wernik, P.G.M., Director of Development and Outreach Services of the Foundation. We had reunions in Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Lake Worth, and Tampa and spoke to over 900 people, Masons and their families and friends. I had the pleasure of presenting over 25 50-year tokens and 60-year wreaths. Our brethren were extremely appreciative of our second visit and look forward to further visits in the future. It was an extra pleasure for me as Grand Master to present a 60-year wreath to Bro. Walbridge Fullington, a member of Mount Moriah Lodge who was my History Professor at Bordentown Military Institute 28 years ago. We feel this is a very worthwhile venture as almost 6,800 New Jersey brethren are living permanently in Florida. The Grand Lodge of Indiana has followed our lead and the Grand Lodge of New York is considering it.


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FLORIDA The Grand Lodge of Florida celebrated its sesquicentennial by starting with a reinactment of the first meeting of three lodges to form the Grand Lodge of Florida in Tallahassee on July 5, 1830. REEI'ACTME~T

OF TilE

ORGA~IZATION

OF THE ~.w. (;RAND LODGE F.

&

A.M. OF FLORIDA

IN TALLAHASEF., FLORIDA, jeLY

5, 1830:

M onolog of Skit Presentation By Arthur Adler

National-Florida State and Masonic History Thru and About 1830 The forests would be silent if only the best birds sang, let me repeat that, the forests would be silent if only the best birds sang. To me, my Brothers, that could only mean that Masonry survives only because it takes all of us to accomplish what we do in this greatest Fraternity of men in all the world. Masons make efforts of varying degrees, but large or small, collectively the impact is a constructive power to be reckoned with in these times as it was back in 1830 when our Grand Lodge was formed. Andrew Jackson was in office as President of the United States, from North Carolina and Grand Master of Tennessee in 1822-1823. His lodge is actually unknown to Masonic Historians, but he is said to have attended Clover Bottom Lodge under the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. Yes, Masonry had its dark days too, especially following the Morgan Affair which occurred in Western New York. Beginning at Batavia in 1826, a wave of anti-Masonry broke over the Fraternity. It is not certain that this stemmed entirely from the Morgan Affair. Prominent Masons renounced Freemasonry and devoted their lives to its villification. Conventions were conducted against our Fraternity. Churches were recommending that Masons be excommunicated. The frenzy increased after 1830 and covered more and more territory. Politicians ran on anti-Masonic tickets, but, through all the turmoil Andrew Jackson during this very period in our history was elected President in 1828 and again in 1832 and yet he never once waivered in his loyalty to the Fraternity both privately and publicly. Masonic temples closed down, and as an example of how widespread the anti-Masonic feelings were, the Grand Lodge of New York had 480 lodges in 1826 with about 20,000 members. But, between 1827 and 1839 only 50 to 90 lodges were reporting to Grand Lodge. In 1835 only 75 lodges were on the rolls. For a time in Vermont not a single lodge was working. Anti-Masonic movements were worldwide in scope while the lowest point in Freemasonry in the United States was about 1840 and it required an additional 20 years after that date for Freemasonry to have recovered everywhere. After that, it grew rapidly and soon exceeded its former self and in the midst of it all the Grand Lodge of the Territory of Florida was born and has has flourished ever since. Why? Because not only the best birds sang. All Masons who had strong and true feelings for the value of the philosophy of our Fraternity made efforts large and small to hold it together, and collectively they succeeded. On March 3, 1513, the 52-year-old Ponce de Leon left Puerto Rico with three small ships and spent 25 days sailing among the Bahamas looking for Bimini. On Nfarch 14 they passed San Salvador, where Columbus first landed. Although Florida was sighted on March 27, 1513, they proceeded on a course of west northwest and anchored near the land in about eight fathoms of water. Thinking the land was an island, they named it La Florida, because it had a very beautiful view of many cool woodlands, it was level and uniform, but moreover they discovered it in the time of their country's Feast of Flowers


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as Florido in Spanish means Flowers. They wished to conform in the name for these reasons. Many years passed after the purchase of Florida from the Spanish, but eventually a bill to admit Florida as a state passed the National House of Representatives in 1845 and the U.S. Senate on March I, 1845. The 11th President,James K. Polk, also a Brother Mason of Columbia Lodge No. 31, signed it two days later, making March 3, 1845 the date of Florida's entry into the Union. The news reached Tallahassee five days later, and Governor Branch finally received an official copy of the act 10 days later. In Tallahassee there was much r~joicing with the ringing of bells, firing of cannons, bonfires, and a gala reception at Live Oak, the Governor's residence. The people of the 27th state moved rapidly to establish their new status. The Legislative Council met on March 11, 1845 and set elections for May 26 of that year. Voters would at that time choose a governor, a member of the National House of Representatives, 17 state senators, and 41 house members. June 23, 1845 was set for the meeting of the First General Assembly. In 1830 the Federal Census indicated that the population of Florida was 34,730, all rural residents. The slave population was 15,50 I. Also in 1830 it is indicated that 24,837 immigrants entered the United States, consisting of mostly people with no occupation at all and a few laborers, farmers, professionals, commercial, and servants. In 1830 what is now known as Orange County was just a part of Mosquito County which in fact included all of the future Orlando metropolitan area. Mosquito County was established by Legislative Council on December 29, 1824. It embraced all the country southward from near St. Augustine to Monroe County, and westward to Alachua County. The County Seat was New Smyrna. The 1830 state records show Mosquito County had a population of733 persons. These hardy pioneers had forged their way into the new territory and settled north of Lake Monroe. One of the first acts of the State Legislature after statehood was to change the name of Mosquito County to Orange County in 1843. On September 19, 1857, the United States Post Office officially recognized the name of Orlando, Florida, most popularly believed to have been named after Orlando Reeves, a volunteer United States soldier killed by an Indian arrow as he warned his fellow soldiers of the Indian attack and saved their lives in September 1835. And so, my Brethren, look upon all that has happened up to the year 1830, certainly after 1830, but most especially July 5, 1830, 150 years ago when Freemasons met to form the Grand Lodge of the Territory of Florida. All these things could not have come to pass if only the best birds sang. START CL'RTAII';S TO OPEl'; During the following monolog by the Moderator, the five stagehands will mingle with additional brethren coming into the scene. In all, a total of (24) will be present during this first scene. They will arrive singly, in pairs, and triples onto the scene. They will speak no words but will go about shaking hands, visiting, etc., as would be typical in any lodge prior to a meeting. A casual atmosphere at this time should prevail.

MODERATOR: The symbolic scene before you is a representation of the oldJackson Lodge No. 23 at Tallahassee, in the Territory of Florida. The time is a few moments before 10:00 a.m., Monday, July 5, 1830. The morning is particularly humid following the thunderstorms of the day before, and consequently many of the brethren present are in shirt-sleeves. It was in this lodge hall, a scant two months prior to this scene, during its regular May meeting that a resolution had been presented before the lodge. The resolution was read and the lodge subsequently adopted it. That Resolution was: Be it resolved: That the officers and members of Jackson Lodge No. 23, in the City of Tallahassee, in the Territory of Florida, under the Grand Jurisdiction of the Grand


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Lodge of Alabama, do invite the members of Washington Lodge, in the Town of Quincy, Gadsden County, in the Territory of Florida, and Harmony Lodge, of Marianna, Jackson County, in the Territory of Florida, to send delegates to Jackson Lodge No. 23, to meet at 10:00 a.m., on the first Monday inJuly, 1830, for the purpose ofdiscussing and organizing a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Florida. As the hour of 10:00 a.m. approaches we notice that the Worshipful Master, Bro. Isham G. Searcy, of Jackson Lodge, approaches the head of the table, and ... WORSHIPFUL MASTER OF JACKSO~ LODGE No. 23 (ISHAM G. SEARCY) (Portrayed by Biff Hayes): (He raps his gavel to gain attention a couple oftimes and) Brethren, can we please find a seat and let us come to order (done). Brethren, on behalf of the officers and members ofJackson Lodge No. 23, I bid you welcome here this morning. 1 am pleased that so many of you have turned out for this gathering, but then, it's too hot to be in the fields anyway. It feels as though it may get quite warm in here today so I solicit your attention that we may move on with our purpose as rapidly as possible. We are gathered here for possibly one of the greatest works we as Masons may undertake in our lifetimes and, as we have always been taught, let us call upon the Supreme Architect for his Guidance. Bro. Francis Cash, would you lead us in prayer? (Worshipful Master raps 3 times . .. all brethren including Grand Lodge present to rise.) FRANCIS CASH (portrayed by John Fletcher): (Prayer) Almighty and most merciful Father, in whom we place all faith and trust, and in whom we give all thanks for the privilege of meeting together in thy holy name to accomplish worldly ends, we do beseech thee to be with us in the proceedings of this meeting, that the results will be as thou didst direct, and that any selfish motives shall be made significant and ground under by thy power and will, so that in generations to come, yea, even 150 years from now, man will realize that we gathered here as free men and Freemasons, working thy will, for any results forthcoming. Strengthen that great Masonic virtue of tolerance within us and fortify our love for our fellowman, refortify us with charity toward those less fortunate than ourselves and rekindle within us the forgiveness of those that would trespass against us. And now, 0 Lord and Master of the Universe, subdue our passions and prejudices, and allow brotherly love to prevail through this meeting and may the end be to thy favor and liking, for it is through thee only that all things of endurance must come. Amen. BRETHRE~ (respond):

So mote it be.

WORSHIPFUL MASTER (raps gavel to seat brethren): Brethren, we all know the purpose of this meeting, and in order for it to proceed in proper fashion, 1 feel the first order of business will be for us to select a chairman and secretary. I feel that this should be someone other than a Lodge Master in chair, so 1 rule myself ineligible. JOH~

LINES (portrayed by Deem Raimy):

(Arises and) Worshipful Master, I myself would be greatly pleased with your chair-

manship, but since you have chosen to decline this favor, I move that the oldest Past Master among us be unanimously elected to be chairman of this meeting, and that he in turn select a secretary of his choosing. HENRY GEE (portrayed by Sam Lewis): (Arises and) Worshipful Master, our elders have always taught that with age comes wisdom, so I would be pleased to so second the motion on the floor. WORSIHPfUL MASTER: Brethren, we have heard the motion made and seconded that we elect to the chair, the oldest Past Master among us, and that he in turn appoint a secretary. May I hear any discussion of the motion? ... There being none, all those in favor of the motion vote by the usual sign of a Mason at the sound of the gavel (done). Those opposed, same sign, same sound (done). Brethren, there can be no doubt as to your


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favorable vote, and by it there is no doubt that you have selected Bro. John P. Duval to chair this meeting. Brother Duval, will you accept this assignment? JOH:" P. DevAL (portrayed by Art Forrester). (Arises slowly) Brethren, I am both favored and hurt by this appointment. I am favored that you deemed me worthy for this important duty, but hurt, that you consider me the old man in the group. However I will allow my hurt to subside and do humbly accept this important duty. (Searcy and Duval then exchange places at the table.) JOHI' P. DUVAL: Brethren, again I would like to thank you for your confidence in me. It is with humility that I shall govern, but with a strong faith that we shall favorably accomplish what we are here to do. Brethren, since you have invested me the authority to appoint a secretary, I would like to appoint Bro. Thomas Munroe to serve as secretary of this meeting. His quick skill with the pen should make him a valuable asset in setting down the happenings of this meeting. Brother Munroe, would you accept this appointment and make yourself a place here at the head of the table. We would be pleased if you would make record of the happenings of this assembly up to this point and to continue as we proceed. THOMAS MUI'ROE (portrayed by Dick Carr): (Munroe rises and moves to a place at the had of the table and before seating him5elf) Thank you, Brother Duval, I am pleased to be of some useful purpose. JOHI' P. DevAL: Brethren, it is getting well along into the morning, and I note that our brethren from Harmony Lodge over in Marianna have not yet arrived, and it would be folly for us to proceed without their due representation. I am sure {hat the storm of yesterday has muddied up the roads and impeded their travel, but I feel sure that they shall arrive in short time. Therefore, I would entertain a motion that we adjourn until 1:00 p.m. this afternoon. FRA:"C!S CASH: Brother Chairman, I will so move (rises as he

~peaks).

JOII:-.l LI:"ES (rises): Brother Chairman, I will second the motion. JOHN P. DUVAL: Brethren, it has been moved and seconded that we p.m. this afternoon. Those in favor, vote. (All brethren vote favorably.)

a~journ

until 1:00

JOH:" P. DeVAL: Brethren, we stand dismissed until 1:00 p.m., I understand that the wives of the Jackson Lodge officers have prepared some chicken in the courtyard for our convenience. CLOSE CeRTAINS OPE:-.I CURTAI:"S HOUSE ueHTS DOW:-.l (All participant5 will be up and milling about again as the light5 dim and come up again in very short time. As the house light5 COME BACK l!P, enter three delegates from Harmony Lodge. This causes milling brethren to greet and shake hands with them. As this is transpiringJoH:" P. DUVAL approaches the head ofthe table, and raps the brethren to order. As the brethren are seated, DevAL remains standing and . . .) JOHN P. Dl;VAl.: We are pleased that our brethren from Harmony Lodge have arrived, and may I present them to the brethren who may not be acquainted with them. Bro. James W. Exum (he rises), Bro. William J. Watson (he rises), and Bro. Jacob Robinson, delegates sent from Harmony Lodge over in Marianna. Brethren, let's give them cheer for their long journey. (Brethren respond with applause.) (Three delegates take seats.) (Dc VAL raps gavel to again gather order.) Brother Munroe, will you read the roll of those present and, Brethren, would you respond as the Secretary calls your name.


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THOMAS MUNROE (He reads the roll seated for convenience.): From Jackson Lodge No. 23, Brothers: Isham Green Searcy John P. Duval David M. Sheffield Robert W. Williams John Laudaman Justian F. Davis William P. Duval James Hughes Robert Butler James Bryan, Jr. Richard K. Call Purr H. Duval Romeo Lewis Thomas Brown Lewis Willis William G. Purgess James G. Ringgold and myself, Thomas Munroe Richard C. Allen Washington Lodge of Quincy: John Lines Henry Gee Francis A. Cash Isaac Nathans James A. Dunlap Harmony Lodge of Marianna: William.J. Watson James W. Exum Jacob Robinson (The Secretary then rises and directs himself to the chairman.)

Brother Chairman, I find present, 27 brethren, and amongst them the necessary representation and delegates from the necessary three lodges, to form a proper convention, which enables us to properly discuss the formation of a Grand Lodge. This being so, Brother Chairman, I move that this convention now be formally opened. JOHN P. DUVAL: Brethren, you have heard the report of the Secretary. He has reported that there is present the necessary delegates from the three lodges in the Territory of Florida, to form a convention, to act upon the matter of the formation of a Grand Lodge. The Secretary has moved that a convention for this purpose be now formally formed. Is there a second to this motion? JOHN LINES: Brother Chairman, I would be honored the privilege of seconding this motion. JOHN P. DUVAL: We have a second to the motion that a formal convention to discuss the formation of a Grand Lodge now be opened. Is there to be any discussion? There being none, let us vote. All in favor of the motion to now open a formal Convention for the discussing of the formation of a Grand Lodge, will vote by the usual sign of a Mason at the sound of the gavel. (Done. ... all vote favorably.) Those opposed, same sign, same sound.... Brethren, your overwhelming favorable vote on this matter clearly shows that we are in complete harmony as to our mission here. With the aid of the almighty God, may we continue in this spirit of brotherhood and carry our purpose to a successful conclusion. (He raps the gavel three tmes, brethren rise.)

Brother Cash, will you give thanks to our maker? FRAr-;CIS CASH: Supreme Grand Architect of the Universe, in whom we live and prosper, we beseech thee to touch the consciousness of each of us here present, give unto us strength to support our beliefs, and endow us with wisdom from on high to carry our beliefs to a conclusion that will meet with thy favor. May harmony continue to prevail among us and may the beauty of thy holiness be allowed to adorn our labors, for it is in thee that we place our trust. Amen. ALL BRETHREr-;

RESPo~D:

So mote it be.

Jom, P. DUVAL (raps gavel to seat brethren.): Brethren, we being now in formal convention, for the purpose of discussing the formation of a Grand Lodge, for the territory of Florida, and all the necessary prerequisites to this discussion having been met, the first


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order of business is for the convention to select a President to preside over the convention. May I hear discussion on this subject? JOHN LI:--lES (rises): Brother Chairman, Has not yOUT father ever admonished you, to never change horse in midstream? I move, Brother Chairman, that you continue on as President of this Convention and that Brother Munroe continue as its secretary. ALL BRETHREN RESPOND (with hands clapping and with a "hear, hear, hear"). JOH:--l P. OLIVAL (raps gavel somewhat embarrassed): Brethren, you honor me greatly, but we must continue in an orderly fashion .... FRANCIS CASH (rises and): May I express the will of the brethren present, and to perserve proper orderliness, may I be permitted to second the motion by Brother Lines. JOliN P. OLIVAL: Brethren, you have heard the motion presented and duly seconded that I, John Duval, continue on as President of this convention, with Brother Munroe as Secretary. I invite further discussion of this motion and invite further nominations. (The Brethren remain silent and, after a brief delay) There being no further discussion on the motion, all brethren in favor of the motion vote by the usual sign at the sound of the gavel. (Strikes gavel.) (All brethren vote favorably.) Those in opposition, vote (strikes gavel). (He directs his attention toward Brother Munroe.) Brother Munroe, the convention has selected you to continue as the Convention Secretary, will you accept this responsibility? THOMAS MUNROE (rises): I will be happy to serve the brethren to the best of my ability and thank them for their confidence in me. (Sits.) JOliN P. OLIVAL: I too, thank you, my Brethren, for this vote of confidence. BRETHREN RESPOI'D (with applause). JOH:--l P. OLIVAL (raps gavel): Brother Secretary, as a matter for the records of this convention, will you give report on the credentials of the delegates here assembled. (Sits.) THOMAS MLINROE (rises): Brother President and members of the convention: There is represented here assembled three lodges of Ancient York Masons, delegates from which have presented proper credentials and I have found them to be all in proper order. The lodges represented are: Jackson Lodge of Tallahassee, Washington Lodge of Quincy, and Harmony Lodge of Marianna. This according to precedent and ancient usage constitutes the necessary quorum to proceed. JOH:-'; P. DcVAL (remains seated): Thank you, Brother Secretary. HENRY GEE (rises): Brother President, I have the following resolution, which I would like to present in the form of a motion for the consideration of the convention, and to become a matter of record for the proceedings of this convention ... Resolved, That it is expedient for the convention, interest, and prosperity, of the Craft in the Territory of Florida, that a Grand Lodge be constituted; and be it further Resolved, That three regularly warranted lodges of Ancient York Masons are fully represented in this convention, and according to precedent and authority, they have the right to establish a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Florida. JOHN LINES (rises): Brother President, It is with pride that I be allowed to second this motion and resolution. JOHI' P. OLIVAL: Brethren, you have heard the resolution, presented in form of motion, and duly seconded. May I hear discussion? ... There being no discussion, the resolution just heard will be voted upon. All brethren in favor of the adoption of the resolution, will vote by the usual sign of a Mason at the next sound of the gavel (strikes) (done). Those opposed, same sign, same sound (strikes). Brother Secretary, you will so record that the adoption of the Resolution (strikes gavel). (Rises and makes following statement) The Florida Grand Lodge is now in existence.


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(ALL participants rise and applause and as the curtains close 2 feet, freeze into position, as the moderator commences. ...)

MODERATOR: By the adoption of this Resolution, 150 years ago, by the delegates to the first Convention of Masons of Florida, they did establish the Grand Lodge of Florida. The following day the convention adopted suitable By-Laws and Rules for the government of the Grand Lodge in the form of a Constitution. The first Grand Lodge officers were elected and appointed, and installed according to Ancient Usage. The first Grand Lodge was opened in ample form. The first Grand Master, John P. Duval, did order Warrants issued to three represented lodges, Jackson Lodge of Tallahassee, No. I; Washington Lodge of Quincy, No.2; Harmony Lodge of Marianna, No.3. The original Warrants of these three lodges were returned to the issuing Grand Lodge along with letters requesting recognition and correspondence with them. The first Grand Lodge was closed in ample form to meet the following January in its first Annual Convention. (Close curtains completely, slowly as narrator continues.)

MODERATOR: And thus it was so ... and as the ages have captured our ancient brethren ... none have captured their motives, and the Grand Lodge of the Territory of Florida did flourish and it has prospered down thru the ensuing 150 years to bring to us, the traditional privilege of meeting together as brothers. May we realize that we are ever under the watchful eye of that Supreme Architect and that we should always call upon Him to continue to favor us with His guiding hand.... To Him, may we always be grateful ... ever humble, and forever thankful for the great favor He has bestowed upon us as Free Masons, may He find us worthy in this 150th Grand Lodge Communication, so that we too, may be remembered through the next centuries, not so much as for who we are, but for the motives that bring us together ... to Him ... we do owe all things. END

FRANKLIN MEDAL CREATED PENNSYLVANIA: The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania created a Pennsylvania Franklin Medal to honor its Past Grand Master Benjamin Franklin who served the Grand Lodge as Grand Master in 1734 and again in 1749. The following was adopted: 1. That a Pennsylvania Franklin Medal be created for presentation to distinguished Masons; 2. That the recipients of such medal shall be chosen by the Right Worshipful Grand Master, Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Senior Grand Warden and Right Worshipful Junior Grand Warden, then serving in such capacities; the recipients, if not a member of this Grand Lodge, to be elected to honorary membership in accordance with the Ahiman Rezon; 3. That seventeen (17) such medals be struck initially and the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer shall make available from current operating funds the sum of Seven Thousand Dollars ($7,000.00) to meet the costs of same.

FRATERNAL RELATIONS RESTORED NEW JERSEY: The Grand Master reported this to the Grand Lodge: MISSISSIPPI

On February 12, 1980, while attending the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Virginia, I received word that the Grand Lodge of Mississippi had restored Fraternal Recognition to the Grand Lodge of New Jersey and also to the Grand Lodge of New York. This was indeed very welcome news and I immediately left for the Grand Lodge of Mississippi at their request to attend the final day of their Annual Communication. The warmth and great hospitality of their welcome convinced me of their great sincerity and their feeling of accomplishment in restoring this Fraternal Relationship. I


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was received in their Grand Lodge to a standing ovation and it was a real heart-warming experience. The friends I have made in the Grand Lodge of Mississippi have certainly been one of the highlights of this year and much credit for this wonderful accomplishment goes to M.W. James M. Ward, the immediate Past Grand Master of that Grand Lodge. That day was one which I will remember the rest of my life and I especially appreciate the Honorary Membership in the Grand Lodge of Mississippi to which I was elected at that Grand Lodge Session. This is something which has been accomplished over several years and is indeed for the good of Freemasonry.

FREEDOM IS NOT FREE The following is an address by the Grand Orator of Florida, W. Bro. William Gunter. W. WILLIAM GCI'TER, JR.: Most Worshipful Grand Master, Grand Lodge Officers, Distinguished East, my brethren and our ladies. My mind wanders back to a great day in my life, just a year ago, when I was highly honored by M.W. Grand Master Franklin C. Smith to be named Grand Orator of the Free and Accepted Masons of Florida. As that year draws to a close I express my sincere thanks to the Grand Master for the opportunity to have served him and this Grand Lodge. It has been a thrilling experience indeed to travel throughout the state among the Fraternity and witness the good works of the brethren. New friendships made, as well as the old friendships strengthened, have made it a year which I will never, never forget. I do appreciate so much the warm introduction of M.W. Brother Smith. I have to admit it was a far better introduction than one I received some weeks ago down in Broward County when I traveled to that great county to address group of condominium dwellers concerning some changes which the Legislature had made in the condominium insurance laws. I remember on that occasion when my time on the program came the MC introduced me something like this: "He said, 'And now ladies and gentlemen, for the latest insurance dope from Tallahasse, I give you Bill Gunter.'" [Laughter.] Every generation of Americans has gained strength through trial and through adversity. It did not matter if the challenge was physical, spiritual or social, the American character held firm. It persevered, and the nation moved forward. Every generation of Americans has worked hard to build upon the quality oflife attained by the last to make this country a little stronger in the process and to leave behind to its sons and its daughters something worth remembering. We will thrill with pride that Masons in the main, Masonic minds directing Masonic hands, incorporated Masonic ideals into our immortal Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. They impress their Masonic concepts of freedom firmly upon the fabric of this nation. Hence, we reached for liberty and forged the world's greatest democracy. We reached for justice and abolished slavery forever. We reached for the moon just a few miles from this very location and we left our footprints there. We succeeded because we were always willing to pay the price, to make the necessary sacrifices so that we would never have to settle for second best. Todays perils are posed by unparalleled inflation, energy dependency, a weakened military posture, the threat of unchecked aggression and a moral deterioration in this our beloved land. These perils are grave and real, but no more so than the other challenges this nation has met and overcome throughout our history. That is why I was recently distressed to read that a majority of Americans believe that this decade will be worse than the last that events are beyond the control of our leaders and ourselves. While I understand this frustration, I do not share this pessimistic view of our future and I trust that Florida Masons do not either. So it is, I want to talk to you for a few moments about a mythical character who could be responsible for much of what is wrong with our American democracy today. Let's call

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him Uncle Sam's nephew. And if I say something about him that reminds you of yourself, Brother Masons, don't think I'm picking on you in particular. There is no single Mason or Amencan with all of the characteristics of this mythical citizen, but it's a poor sermon, isn't it, that d~esn't hit everybody somewhere. Uncle Sam's nephew is a cynic. When you tell him we've got to do something about the waste and the corruption in Government, he says you can't do anything about that, forget it. When you tell him there's a great need for men and women of moral character in public office, he says politics is a dirty business. It's no place for a Christian, for a Mason, or for a gentleman. Uncle Sam's nephew is a buck passer. He says you can't blame me for the mess this country's in, I ain't voted in 15 years. And when you tell him that somebody's got to do something about the national debt or skyrocketing inflation, he says not me, I don't know anything about public affairs; and then he picks up his newspaper and thumbs past the editorial pages to the sports section or the comic strip. Uncle Sam's nephew is an expert excuse maker. When it's time to go to a political rally, he's too busy. When it's time to contribute to the candidate of his choice, he says what's the use of wasting the money. When it's time to write his congressman or his legislature about an important issue, he says my letter wouldn't even get past his secretary, and besides he doesn't pay any attention to a mere taxpayer anyway. Not only is Uncle Sam's nephew lax in his responsibilities as a citizen, he won't even take advantages of his privileges. All he wants is a good living. He sits down at the table of freedom with democracy spread out before him like a ten-course dinner and all he wants is the gravy. He picks up the menu which we might call the Bill of Rights, and turns over forthwith to the dessert page. He doesn't know the price of a single item. He's willing to leave it up to the cooks in the Washington and the Tallahassee kitchens to interpret that menu, to dish up whatever they think it means and he signs the check. Just so long, my friends, as he thinks he's getting his fair share of that gravy, Uncle Sam's nephew is the one who votes to abolish the lodge by his non-attendance and his non-participation. He votes to tear down the home by not spending enough time with his wife and children. He votes to do away with the moral and educational standards of this land by parking his children in the schools the way you plant a seed in the ground and wait for it to sprout. He's willing to leave it up to the teachers to fight the weeds and to grow young Americans with brains and moral character like these two fine young people who have just spoken to us. It's Uncle Sam's nephew who votes to do away with the vital institutions of our democracy and he does it just by not participating in them. He likes to turn over all of his responsibilities to his friend George. When it's time to vote or when it's time to serve on the jury, he says let George do it. After all, says he, it was George who got us into the Iranian mess. It was George who ran up the public debt. It was George who brought us the energy crisis. George is the one who is responsible for putting people into public office to place party above country and votes above both. But the truth is, my fellow Masons, you can't leave it up to George any more because it is your brains and your abilities that are needed in our representative form of government and only you can put them there; and please don't say that you don't know anything about that kind of situation in our society. You don't have to be an Englishman to speak the English language. You don't have to be a horse tojudge a horse show and you don't have to be a public official to be interested and concerned about this democracy. You know, I believe there are hundreds of people who would gladly do something about this democracy of ours if they just knew where to take hold. I submit to you today that you can begin where democracy itself begins, in the local government. You see, local government is the most important government of all. It is the cradle or the grave of our freedoms depending upon how you and I treat the institutions that make it up - how much attention we pay to those institutions such as the City Council, the County Commission, the School Board. I hope you'll think about going to the next meeting of one or all of these local governmental bodies. I hope you'll consider when you're called upon to participate in the jury system of your county; accept that responsibility without making the usual excuses.


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I hope you'll go out and vote in every election without having to be prodded by the Jaycees or some civic organization. Be willing to serve in public office as our own beloved Grand Master has done in the past by election or appointment, when you're called upon. Offer your advice and help to the person in office and support the candidate after the election with that advice as well as before. Read the editorial section of your newspaper. Read the congressional record. Read the Florida legislative journals. Attend the current session ofthe legislature and become acquainted with the people who pass the laws under which we live and who levy the taxes we pay. We have a Masonic breakfast up there in Tallahassee once a week during the legislative sessions. Our Grand Master always comes and I hope that all of you brother Masons at one time or another can visit your state capital. Visit the headquarters of the Florida Highway Patrol in your area or one of your other local law enforcement agencies and meet there the men who make your lives safer by risking their own. Go out in the country if you will, and talk to the farmer about his problems. There are some fine farmers who are here at this grand session. Go to the nearby school and visit with the principal about overcrowded classrooms, inadequate facilities and the shortage of competent teachers. Then make it your business to go and visit with your minister. Ask him whether he thinks this nation will continue to prosper, or yes even survive, if we go onjust tipping our hats to the churches on Sunday morning on our way fishing or to the golf courses. Ask your minister just how much difference it makes whether you are in your place of worship each and every Sunday. You see we've got to stop acting like Uncle Sam's irresponsible nephew in this country. In contrast we must remember we are Uncle Sam, we are the people who used to govern ourselves in a more responsible fashion, and, my friends, we can do it again if we make up our minds and muster what it takes, and that is a lot of religion, resolution, reason and responsibility. And I stand before you this afternoon and say Freemasonry in Florida is a wellspring of these traits. You see, democracy is not an accomplished fact. It is an unceasing crusade and every generation of Americans has the solemn obligation to build and strengthen the freedoms that were passed on to us. The man who really wants to do something will find a way and the other will find an excuse. It may be all right for us to go on offering excuses for poor citizenship, but when the chips are down and there is communism at the back door, socialism in the kitchen, corruption in the attic, inflation in the living room and depression down the hall, I say to you this afternoon you can't eat excuses, you can't vote with them, and you can't drive with them. So, Brother Masons, if we are ever going to stop bluffing and start acting, let's do it now. Thank you.

GAVELS NEW YORK: The Grand Master of New York used two gavels. He explained: One was presented to me last year by the M.W. H. Lloyd Jones Deputies, and is a very treasured possession. This other one, in the shape of a lion's paw, extremely heavy, is a loan from Howard and Prince of Orange Lodge No. 16 and is the work of Gutzon Borglum, who lived from 1871 to 1941. He was raised in Howard Lodge No. 35, June 10, 1904, and served as Master in 1910 and 1911. Later he was a Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Denmark. He was an internationally known sculptor, most famous for his gigantic Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The gavel is cast in bronze, with a bone handle, and the lion's paw holds in its pad a stone, said to be from the foundation of King Solomon's Temple; the toes curl up around the stone and the knuckles form the striking portion of the gavel. Brother Borglum also carved in stone a head and shoulders of the then Grand Secretary, M.W. Edward M. L. Ehlers, which is one of the exhibits in our Grand Lodge Library and Museum.


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(We believe it altogether appropriate to add that Bro. Gutzon Borglum was a cousin of Edwin Knudsen, who was a past master of Trenton Lodge No. Ill, as well as a Past Grand Master of the Grand Council of Cryptic Masons of Missouri.)

GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL We are informed that 21 Grand Lodges, including our own Grand Lodge of Missouri, has increased the contribution from $1.00 to $5.00 on each candidate who receives the Entered Apprentice Degree. This is a one-time contribution made by the candidate and will help to endow this great Masonic Memorial CALIFORNIA: The Grand Lodge of California adopted the increase of $1.00 to $5.00 for the Washington Memorial on a 5/6 vote. CONNECTICUT: The Grand Master of Connecticut said that Connecticut should be proud to help the Memorial by increasing its assesment from $1.00 to $5.00. We agree with him. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: The District of Columbia also increased its annual contribution of each new member to $5.00 for the Memorial. ILLINOIS: The Grand Lodge of Illinois passed an increase of from $1.00 to $5.00 for the Washington Memorial on each candidate receiving the Master Mason Degree. NEBRASKA: The Grand Lodge of Nebraska gave a beautiful memorial to its Past Grand Master Charles F. Adams, who had served many years as a Director of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial, and who at the time of his death was serving as President of the Memorial Association. The report of the committee ended with a recommendation that the assessment on every candidate be increased from $1.00 to $5.00 as a tribute to M.W. Brother Adams. However, the Grand Lodge rejected the proposal, and the assessment remains at $1.00. MAINE: The Grand Lodge of Maine increased the fee for the Memorial to $5.00 without any difficulty. MICHIGAN: It is interesting that the Grand Lodge of Michigan, with M.W. Bro. C. Fuller Dorr as a Director of the Memorial, defeated the amendment which would have increased the assessment from $1.00 to $5.00. After the defeat, Brother Dorr said: It didn't cost any of you a penny, but that motion you just defeated cost the George Washington Memorial several thousand dollars from Michigan Master Masons who are to be raised in the coming year. This past year, 1979, we raised 1,391 Masons. If we raise 1,391 next year, it will be S1,391 to the Memorial. Otherwise at $5.00 each for each Master Mason, that was raised, it would have been a total of $6,955. The Memorial is in sad condition. I have been a member of the Directors of that Memorial for 15 years and a member of the Executive Committee for the past six years. At the present time, we are putting a new roof on the lower part at a cost of about $150,000, and that money has to be realized from these dollars. We have been fortunate in the past few years that we have been able to put away $15,000 a year for maintenance of the building. That will be used up and more of it this year. We are walking a tightrope on that Memorial. It is a beautiful edifice, but the windows are going to pieces on the outside and it takes a steeple jack to fix them. We'd like to change and put storm windows on the inside so that it can be easily taken care of by the maintenance people of the building. Probably I should have risen and spoken on this beforehand, but I thought that most of the Master Masons of the State of Michi~an knew about this building and what it was


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and what it stands for. It is the first combined effort back in about 1922 of all the Masons of North America to erect this Memorial. In 1930 or thereabouts the Grand Lodge of Michigan became a member of that Memorial in that we adopted the Pennsylvania plan whereby each Master Mason raised would pay $1.00. We depend on those dollars to operate that Memorial. Michigan has always taken and will take for 1979 that $1,391 and ask that it be put in the Endowment Fund of the Memorial. Some of the Grand Lodges ask their money be put into the maintenance of the building and others ask that the money go for the operating expenses of the building. My Brothers, I am very disheartened at your actions. Thank you.

NEVADA: The Grand Lodge of Nevada increased the assessment to $5.00 on each petition for the degrees in that jurisdiction for the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. OHIO: The Grand Lodge of Ohio placed a $5.00 assessment on each newly made Master Mason for the Memorial.

GRAND LODGE OFFICER CONNECTICUT: The Grand Master of Connecticut had this to say about the responsibility of Grand Lodge officers: The Grand Lodge Line Officer who is advancing towards the Grand East over the several years that it takes is the representative of Freemasonry and Freemasons wheresoever dispersed in his District. He is concerned with the condition of Masonry and the welfare of his entire District. Their counsel this year has been greatly appreciated by this Grand Master. The conferences between the Line Officer and the District Deputy within their own District is an important factor in regards to the general Masonic welfare and concerns in each of the nine districts. I appreciate the smoothness and the closeness with which the Grand Lodge Line Officer and the District Deputies have cooperated in order to coordinate the Grand Master's Program on the district level.

HAWAII Hawaii is the only state in the Union that does not have a Grand Lodge. California has carefully guided the 10 lodges in the islands to their present level of proficiency and competence. We have visited there and, if what we have witnessed can be used as any barometer of their worthiness to become self-governing, we can only say that these lodges are most proficient and capable. It seems only logical that the last of the 50 states should have a Grand Lodge, independent of its territorial mentor. CALIFORNIA: We find the following in the address of the Grand Master: The memorable visitation to the lodges of the Hawaiian Islands was most enjoyable, and it can be truly said that the accomplishments of that group, in the field of entertainment and hospitality, is unsurpassed in the Masonic world and elsewhere. I need not mention here all that was done for my enjoyment. It is sufficient to say that the glowing terms used by my predecessors to pay tribute to the brethren of the Islands were none too lavish, and they deserve all the compliments that have heretofore been bestowed upon them. I am convinced that the leadership in this beautiful outpost of California Freemasonry will continue to work for the preservation of the highest level of fraternal participation. Your Grand Master, this year, permitted the Committee for the Study of the Feasibility of an Hawaiian Grand Lodge to continue their painstaking work. It is hoped that the incoming Grand Master will extend their authority through 1981 under the existing guidelines.


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In the Grand Master's visitations we read with a great deal of interest his stay in Hawaii from April 4-17 and the various visitations he made while there. We are familiar with the deep Masonic interest of the brethren there at the present time. We are somewhat familiar with the history ofthe Craft in the Islands, and what it has meant to the people there. This is truly a Masonic stronghold.

HISTORICAL ARCHITECTURE MINNESOTA: The following is from a presentation to the Grand Lodge of Minnesota relative to recording historical architecture: If I may, I would like to beg a moment of your time to consider my request for assistance in a matter which I consider to be of importance and interest. In December I was asked to participate in a panel at the Northern Great Plains History Conference in Duluth. The panel is to concern itself with a discussion of the architectural history of this region and will focus on the recognition and preservation of architectural resources. For my topic I have chosen a much-overlooked contribution to architectural history: buildings erected for Masonic organizations. In my observations of these buildings, I have realized that they are not only noteworthy for architectural and structural reasons, but for the integration of Masonic symbolism into the overall design. This symbolism, prominently visible to the passerby, is deeply seated in Masonic ritual but is often considered as mere ornament or curiosity by the novice. One example of visible symbolism known to most Minnesotans is the set of terrestrial and celestial globes which flank the entrance portal of the former Masonic Temple building on Hennepin Avenue in Minneapolis. For my part in the panel, I would propose to record and trace the development of symbols used in the architectural design of Masonic edifices in Minnesota. In doing so, I can assure all Masons that I will use extreme caution not to violate the purposes of the Order by inadvertently exposing matters considered secret and privileged to only those who have subscribed to membership. I feel, however, that the history of Masonic architecture can, and must be recognized for its contribution to our heritage. In my paper, I would propose to invite others, particularly Masons, to explore alongoverlooked and taken-for-granted bit of history.

INDEPENDENCE ROCK WYOMING: Once again the Masons of Wyoming met atop Independence Rock on July 4, 1980, to commemorate the 204th Independence Day of our country, and the 118th anniversary of the first Masonic meeting held in Wyoming. This was the seventh commemorative meeting, which, under Wyoming Grand Lodge Law, is required to be held every ten years afterJuly 4, 1920. The Governor of Wyoming, W. Bro. Ed Herschler, Past Master of Kemmerer Lodge No. 33, was the announced speaker. However, because of illness in his family, Governor Herschler was unable to be present, but his prepared address was read by R.W. Bro. William A. Riner, Senior Grand Warden. A portion of that address is as follows: These communications have been held every 10 years since 1920, and they present a fine opportunity for Masons and their families to gather together on an occasion of significance both to Wyoming Masonic History and to our nation's heritage. Today we mark several important events. It is our country's 204th Independence Day - 204 years since the bells tolled in Philadelphia to announce that American colonies were asserting their independence from Britain. George Washington was already commanding revolutionary forces which fought for freedom and self-rule. Today is also the 118th anniversary of the first Masonic meeting in Wyoming, held here on the top of the Rock in 1862. Wyoming was a territory, then, not a state, and the


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little band of 20 valiant men who climbed the Rock and placed the Holy Bible on an improvised altar were not residents. They were part of the great wagon trains that passed here on their way even farther west. These Masons were the trailblazers, facing unknown wilderness, desert, and mountains, plus the hazards of hostility and hunger, and some fell along the way. But their devotion to the Masonic Order bore fruit in Wyoming. Only a few years later lodges were being chartered in early mining camps and frontier railroad towns. The present Wyoming Grand Lodge was the logical result, and December 16 of this year will mark the 106th anniversary of its organization. We have excellent records of Masonic proceedings, meetings, and memberships ever since those days - the late 1860s - when groups of Master Masons in Cheyenne, South Pass, Laramie City, and Evanston sought their first charters. Three were grant~d by the Grand Lodge of Colorado and one by the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. In 1975 Walter Ruesser, Grand Historian, completed a masterful and factual history of the Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Wyoming, covering the years 1874-1974. These accounts, valuable as they are to Masonic history, have not attempted to discover or document the political and social influence of Masonry in Wyoming. Nor should they have. For one thing, that kind of interpretation is difficult and perhaps best left to outside scholars rather than to those within the Order. Secondly, Masonry itself does not advocate political and sectarian action as a body. It refuses to be involved in politics, other than as individual citizens, and as you know, even political and religious discussions are forbidden within the recesses of the tyled lodge. This too is as it should be. But the important thing is that Masonry DOES attempt to give its members a set of moral values, values which will incline them toward leadership. And it is this leadership that had tremendous influence on our newly developing state. Today is my opportunity to add some footnotes to the official records of Masonic lodges as they existed in Wyoming's territorial days, footnotes which demonstrate the strong leadership exerted by the early Masons of our state. With the information I have at hand, it is fair to say that their influence as individuals on the economic growth, on the government, on education, and on religious institutions of Wyoming was enormous. My facts are drawn from research on Masonic influence during the territorial years, completed in 1964 by J. J. Humphrey, who was then a candidate for his master's degree in history at V.W. His unpublished thesis is full of information about our Masonic brothers who took leading roles in civic and political life of the territory. I For example, he gives us a look at the occupations of the 28 men who signed the petition for the Laramie Lodge Dispensation in 1869. Laramie City then boasted a population of 493. Two of the three doctors in the area at the time were among the 29. Thirteen railroad employees of various positions signed. There were miners, hotel owners, printers, newspaper editors, lawyers, druggists, and professional lawmen. The first minister to live in the community was among the petitioners. One of these individ uals became the first Sheriff, another the first ProbateJudge in the area. During the first years of the Laramie Lodge almost all of the County Commissioners were Masons, as were the great majority of Laramie's Representatives in the Legislature. Wyoming's first delegate to the V.S. Congress was a Mason. John A. Campbell, the first Territorial Governor was, as have been all but three Governors, a Mason. His Secretary, Edward M. Lee, was a Mason. The Associate Collector of Internal Revenue, Edgar P. Snow, was a Mason who later served as the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Wyoming.

1. "The Political and Social Influences of Freemasonry in Territorial Wyoming, 1870-1885," unpublished thesis, J. J. Humphrey, Department of History, V niversity of Wyoming, 1964.


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The first Territorial Auditor and the first U.S. Attorney for the territory were both Masons. Masons served in every session of the territorial legislature in large proportion to the total body. So it is fair to say that the acknowledged government leaders of the day were for the most part members of the Masonic Order. However, the social influences of Masonry were probably more far-reaching than were the political. The territorial Masons possessed a wide range of talents and interests. M. C. Brown of Laramie, for example, practiced law but was also involved in everything from baseball teams and insurance companies to mining ventures. These men also worked to establish churches. Masons were on the first board of trustees of every Protestant church in Laramie. A distinguished minister of the Episcopal Church, H. L. Myrick, served as Speaker of the Wyoming House of Representatives. Also in Laramie, Masons helped organize the first city band and many played in it. The organized the Fire Department and Otto Gramm, a druggist and a poultry fancier, was Fire Chief for many years. The Laramie Literary Society would have failed several times during this period had it not been for Masons, who gave liberally of their time and money to keep it going. This Society was responsible for the development of the first public library in Laramie, and its stimulating programs added much to the cultural development of the city. Over the state there were Masons on school boards throughout the period, many spearheading bond issues for the construction of school buildings. They were active in founding the University of Wyoming and writing the first State Constitution. Certainly, Masonry had a good influence upon the members of the Order, and this influence was disseminated through their vocations and their activities - to the general benefit of our state. Many of you here today are better versed in Masonic history than I, but I'm sure you will agree that this record of civic leadership has continued to the present day. It is thoroughly evident in this particular audience. Masonic wives, sons, and daughters, too, have contributed in large measure to the ideals we shall always cherish.... The Fourth ofJuly awakens in Americans a sense of history and patriotism which may not always be apparent in our daily lives. It should also bring us an increased appreciation of those courageous individuals - whether at Independence Rock or Valley Forgewho hammered out the heritage of freedom which we enjoy today. It is appropriate then, as we are gathered at this magnificent milestone that marked a nation's westward course, to look even farther back, back to an era personified by a great Mason, a Mason who has come to exemplify the meaning of leadership for all Americans - George Washington. The American Revolution occurred more than two centuries ago. The surge for independence brought bitter warfare, six long years of acute danger and suffering endured by soldiers and civilians alike - citizens of separate, non-united colonies, citizens of diverse and conflicting loyalties. In the light of today's world, it is important to remember that Washington's great campaigns and the great struggle with the professional British armies were concurrent with the unending struggle between American patriot and American Loyalist, a civil war just as real and complex as the one which broke out in 1861. And, although the principal battles were decided along the eastern seaboard, the fighting on the frontiers, along the rim of American civilization was, if anything, even more violent. And it continued in many areas long after the peace treaty with England was signed. Moreover, although the Revolution was a civil war it was also, after 1778, something very much like a world war as well. The fighting extended from the West Indies to India, and at times England itself was in as much danger of invasion as in the year of the Spanish Armada. For some, it is hard to see how we could have won if the Revolution had not turned into a world war - that is, if France had not intervened in the wake of the surrender of Burgoyne's army. But there was an unconquerable toughness at the core of the American effort. The farmers and shopkeepers turned soldiers were hard men to beat, and


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they went quite a way on their own, with their own indomitable leadership. Despite opposing allegiances enough Americans, in the end, were willing to fight and die for what they believed, for the dream of freedom and independence. We who look back at them owe them a debt whose size is almost beyond our comprehension. The Minuteman at Concord, the Virginia rifleman, the statesman pondering how best to word the awesome Declaration, George Washington crossing the Delaware - these are not legends. They are real; they were people very much like ourselves, living, aspiring, and struggling. Somehow they brought a nation to its birth. Then, as now, and through the centuries in between, there have been upheavals and deep uncertainties in American life. Our early settlers of both East and West had uprooted themselves to come here in the first place, and they established us as a restless and mobile people, ready to move on, ready to try something new. This way of life has built individual and national self-esteem, has whetted our appetite for choices and options, and has lent courage and self-confidence which must not desert us today. True, we live in a difficult age. We see disunity, confusion, abuse of authority, unemployment, and grave economic problems on our home front. We see inequities in a nation dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. We see crises, cruelty, and chaos in foreign lands, and wars that threaten our own uneasy peace. Dillon Ripley recently commented that summers should be joyous in this land of ours, especially inJuly when we celebrate our independence. But oddly, we, who started out 200 years ago, weighed down by colonial rule and heavy taxation, longing for a change, now feel a sense of weariness with the new ways. "We have become gun-shy about the rest of the world, feeling that our motives are misunderstood, that all the international good works we have tried to do have stood us in poor stead," he wrote. 2 At home, we show little enthusiasm for those who wish to lead us; we are weary of politics, polls, and other new ways oftaking the public pulse. We see hostility and criminal and emotional terrorism. History can be for us only a source of further confusion unless we take from it a sense of perspective, and draw from it the best of times and the highest of achievements. It is within our power to restore our faltering will, for we have been d<;>wn this path before. As Ripley says, our natural resources of mind and kind are plain for all to see. We are a nation dedicated to peace and a new view of civilization. We can renew our determination to achieve the national goals inspired 200 years ago and never abandoned by the American people as a whole. We can reaffirm our goals in the full light of our own history. During World War II, Walter Lippman, speaking of what matters most to a country at war, said, "In the supreme moments of history, terms like duty, truth,justice and mercy - which in our torpid hours are tired words - become the measure of decision. We, unhappily, are acting as if we had forgotten them. We seem to be ashamed to utter them, in part because we tremble at the gibes of the Philistines, but in the main because they are remote from our habitual feeling.... We are trying to be too shrewd, too clever, too calculating, when what the anxious and suffering people cry out to us for is that we practice the elemental virtues and adhere to the eternal verities." These alone - duty, truth, justice and mercy, words which every Mason knows by heart - can guide us through the complexities of our days. "The straight and righteous path is the shortest and surest." That is the only path, the only way of greatness, again, for our country.

INFLATION Masonic Service Association: From Emessay Notes, we find the following interesting information. 2. S. Dillon Ripley, "The View From The Castle," Smithsonian, June, 19S0.


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Here's some food for thought in jurisdictions which have problems getting through even minimal increases in per capita tax. It's an extract from the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Michigan's Proceedings: "Due to the continuous rising rate and whereas this Grand Lodge is operating at a deficit and the per capita tax has been one dollar ($1.00) per month per member for several years, I strongly recommend an increase of fifty cents (50¢) per member per month or a total of one dollar fifty cents ($1.50) per member per month for Grand Lodge Tax." It passed easily.

Do they collect Grand Lodge per capita dues monthly?

INFORMATION AND RESPONSIBILITY CALIFORNIA: The Grand Lodge of California has a Committee on Information and Responsibility. The Committee seems to be subservient to the whims of the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge. It does not appear to act on its own behalf in the interest of the brethren at large. However, it does seem to arouse interest and stir enthusiasm among the brethren. Here are some of the items reported by the Committee: Our Liaison Officer, the Deputy Grand Master, was assigned to carry our program to the brethren at the Grand Master's Seminars in each of the six divisions. In a meeting with our Liaison Officer in November your Chairman was asked to prepare a job description for the Committee and the following was prepared: "The duties of the Masonic Information and Responsibility Committee are twofold: "1. To gather information pertinent to the policies and programs of the Grand Lodge as promulgated by the Grand Master and distribute the same to the lodges and brethren upon the approval of the Grand Master. "2. To encourage and assist the lodges, officers and brethren in the perfection of their skills in the area of education and leadership that they may effectually promote the policies and programs of the Grand Lodge." With our duties outlined by the Grand Master, the Committee set to work for the year. A meeting was held for those members in the North in November and one for those in the South in January, at which time our duties were outlined and each member was assigned several Masonic duties were outlined and each member was assigned several Masonic Districts in which he was to meet with the several lodges assigned to them. Each of the Committeemen performed yeoman service, meeting with the lodge officers at the District Officers' Schools of Instruction called by the Inspectors and with the individual lodges when invited to do so. Their program followed the Lodge System of Masonic Information for Candidates Education as well as pointing out the importance of the Monitor and the Handbook for Candidate Coaches.

The Committee was active throughout the year and in all the state: The effect of committee support in the greater San Francisco area has been weakened somewhat by health problems, but the committeemen are now whole again, and our next report should show an increased momentum there. All reports from committeemen indicate that when the program has been successfully practiced for even a short while by one or two lodges in an area, other lodges note the values, and follow by starting their own programs. Overall, in the short time that this program has been applied by the lodges of this Grand Jurisdiction, our progress has shown its value and the obvious need to continue the ever more rapid acceptance and implementation of the Candidates' Information Program by our constituent lodges becomes apparent.

INFLUENCE ON MASONRY UTAH: The Grand Orator of Utah, R.W. Bro. Curtis N. Lancaster, gave this address to the Grand Lodge of his jurisdiction:


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I want to direct your thoughts for a few moments this afternoon to a self-examination of your influence on Masonry. Perhaps you haven't given it much thought, but every Mason in this auditorium has an influence on Masonry; and the question I want you to ask yourself is, "What kind of influence do I have on Masonry?" Is it a positive influence that promotes Masonry, or is it a negative influence that detracts from our great order? The term "influence" is generally accepted to mean a power indirectly or intangibly affecting a person or a course of events. We humans respond to many influences. One of the most common examples of this is the commercials we see on television and hear on the radio. After you see or hear them a number of times, you either become interested enough to try the product or it begins to irritate you to the point that you are turned off to the product completely. Each one of us is a kind of broadcasting station and someone whom we are probably not even conscious of is undoubtedly responding to the kind of things that we broadcast with our lives. You should also remember that we influence people not only by our words and actions, but also by what we don't say and what we do not do. I read of a recent survey that analyzed the scope of an individual's influence on others during the course of a typical day. It found that the average person had a direct influence on the thoughts, opinions, and actions of22 other people, and, of course, those 22 people in turn influence others, so one statement or act can ultimately influence a great many people. Just imagine the number of people who are directly influenced by the members of our Fraternity in Utah alone, and how much we can achieve if we use our positive influence to its maximum advantage. Perhaps it is time for us to pause for station identification so to speak, and reappraise the Masonic message we are broadcasting. Maybe we need to listen to the voice of Freemasonry and determine if we are really tuned in to the ideals that should set us apart. I don't believe a practicing Mason can have a neutral influence on Masonry; if it is not a positive influence, then by default it is negative. A Mason is a different man. If he is not, then he has completedly failed to understand what Masonry teaches. Now that we have reviewed what makes us Masons, we must logically ask ourselves one final question: What are our responsibilities and how do we discharge those responsibilities? The answer is really quite obvious. First of all, as an organization we must use special care to maintain the quality of our membership. Although there is said to be strength in numbers, it is the essence of Freemasonry to seek quality rather than quantity. We must all times be sure our Grand Lodge and our subordinate lodges fulfil every obligation, whether financial or ethical. We must seek every opportunity to cooperate with the rest of the Masonic world. The real contribution of Freemasonry, however, is the quality of the individual lives of its members. Too many men accept the privileges of Masonry, but not the responsibilities, which are individual and personal. They cannot be delegated, or avoided, or ignored. Freemasonry has never had a single person authorized to speak for the entire Fraternity, yet the voice of Freemasonry continually speaks through the words and actions of its members. It is not necessary for our good deeds to be spread across the front page of the daily newspaper. The genuine life of a true Mason is all the advertisement Freemasonry really needs. Let our example be our public relations department. Lighthouses occupy but a few tiny spots in the vast expanse of the ocean, but they guide the way to safe harbors. So it can be with a single, upright character, which can be a beacon for a whole community. As a Mason you are casting a shadow daily upon everyone who comes in contact with you. It is your responsibility to assure that the influence you exert is an example for Masonry. In closing, I want to take the liberty of using a very personal example. I am a Mason because of my Father. I know many of you here today can make the same statement. I was privileged to grow up in the home of a truly dedicated Mason. We were of modest means and lived a very simple lifestyle. When I was very young, I remember my Dad didn't do much of anything except work. He had a few interests, he didn't go to church, and he didn't participate in any organizations or activities. But as I became a teenager, I realized a change was taking place in my Dad's life. He became active in our church. He began to take an active part in community affairs, and served as President of the School Board for two terms. I mentioned this to my Mother one day, and she said the change all started


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after he had joined the Masonic lodge in our neighboring town. He rarely missed a lodge meeting, and I can remember him spending many Sunday afternoons driving the country roads coaching someone. I later learned that he had then belonged to both Rites and served as a DeMolay adviser. I can remember how proud he was to serve as Worshipful Master of his lodge, and then later as a District Deputy Grand Master shortly before he was called to the Supreme Grand Lodge above. Even as a teenager boy, I realized the influence that Masonry had on my Dad's life, and I knew I wanted to be like him. I wanted to associate with the kind of men he chose as associates, have the kind of home he had, and most of all, earn the respect that he had. I realize now, that my Dad truly lived Masonry. His example led me to the door of our great Fraternity. I sincerely pray that I am living my life in such a way that it will be a similar example for my two sons. Let each of us resolve to be a true Mason, one who so lives that many others will be glad that he has lived. What good does it do if you learn all of the lessons of Masonry and keep them within yourself, except on the nights you happen to go to Lodge. To do this is to fail to keep your vow. I truly believe that if we Masons in Utah would live our lives so that our neighbors, friends, and working associates would know we are truly Master Masons by our actions, by our speech, by our thoughts, by our ambitions, by our sacrifices, and if we were genuine Masons at heart and not just in name only, we could exert an influence for Masonry that would be noteworthy nationwide in these times of decreasing membership. Masons practicing what they teach will do more to spread the principles and ideals of our beloved Order than all the articles, speeches, and explanations that can ever be written. What then is the Masonic message, or even more basic, what is Masonry? The classic definition is that it is a system of morality, veiled in allegory, and illustrated by symbols. There are dozens of other definitions, and each are equally correct because Masonry means different things to different Masons. Our ritual, constitutions, lodges, and Grand Lodges, as great and as revered as they are, are not Freemasonry. They are but the machinery through which Masonry functions. When all the definitions and explanations are given though, one basic fact comes through. Masonry is a state of being or a way of life that inspires a man: • • • • • • • • • •

To love his lodge and support his officers at both business and degree meetings. To visit a sick or needy brother and to look after his welfare. To visit and help our widows and children of our deceased brethren. To give of his time for Jobies and DeMolay in either working with them or just visiting their meetings. To take the time to learn a lecture or serve on a committee instead of watching TV. To take a day of vacation or time off without pay to attend Grand Lodge, as I'm sure most of you did today. To give of his services to his community and his church. To be honest in his dealings with his fellowman. To go out of his way to help a neighbor in distress. To live a moral and upright life and set an example for his peers.

Masonry has always been a quiet, ever-acting lump ofleaven in the dough of mankind, working within the lives of good men. Their example, the very nature of their lives and characters, the things they have stood up for day by day, and have drawn other good men into the ranks of our Order. The world has looked to Masonry and its members for a contribution no other organization of men has been able to give. In a world of greed and force, Freemasonry teaches self-restraint and reason. In a world of intolerance and bigotry, it teaches tolerance and kindness. In a world full of selfish rivalry, it teaches brotherhood. In a world of cynical disbelief, it teaches reverence for Deity. In a world floundering in the depths of a great moral and spiritual depression, it teaches industry and self-reliance and temperance and integrity. In a changing and superficial world, it points to the eternal and fundamental principles that have evolved unchanged from every era. That is what Masonry is and stands for. If we can agree on that concept as a definition of Masonry, the next question we must answer is, "What makes me a Mason?" Technically, we became Masons by virtue of


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having been initiated an Entered Apprentice, passed to the degree of Fellowcraft, and then raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason. In doing this, we have committed to memory certain lessons presented in the degrees. We wear rings on our fingers, pins on our lapels, and put emblems on our car, because we are proud to be identified as Masons. We have participated in the work of the degrees and have served in the offices of the lodge. But do any of these things, or all of them together really make us Masons? Most of them are necessary, and all of them are desirable, but if this is all that is required, then there would be few genuine Masons to carryon the great work of our Order. There is something much deeper, much more personal involved in the character of a Mason. It is a thing of the spirit, exhibited in ones' day-to-day conduct of his life. It begins in our homes and family relationship. This is clearly taught in our degrees. Unless we are better husbands, fathers, sons, or brothers, we aren't following the teachings or living the obligations of Freemasonry. From the home, life broadens into relationships of the community in which we live. We should expect to find Masons in the forefront of every worthwhile community activity, especially those which have to do with our youth and our public schools. Masons should be active in public affairs. A fundamental precept of Freemasonry envisions individual Masons carrying the principles of the Order into public life at all levels. This was clearly demonstrated in the founding of our nation. Masons should playa leading part in their churches. Masonry clearly teaches that the lodge cannot take the place of the church in the community, nor in the life of the individual Mason, but we should carry our Masonic light into the active life of our church. What makes a Mason? Is it what he is and does in the lodge room? Not at all. It is the manner in which he lives what he is taught in the lodge, or as we are charged, to practice out of the lodge those great moral duties that are inculcated in it.

INHERITANCE NEBRASKA: The Grand Lodge of Nebraska has been subjected to legal action as a result of an inheritance, which was contested by the Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children. The Grand Master reported: During the term of office of my predecessor, M. W. Jack H. Hendrix, the Grand Lodge received an inheritance to be used for the benefit of crippled children. This was contested by the Shriners' Hospital Corporation. M. W. Brother Hendrix had retained M.W. Hugh W. Eisenhart to represent the Grand Lodge and offered to settle the matter by sharing the inheritance with the Shriners on a 50-50 basis. The I22nd Session of this Grand Lodge voted not to settle for less than 50 percent. The matter was tried in County Court and we were successful. The Shrine Hospital appealed to District Court and their counteroffer was that we take 10 percent and they take 90 percent. Shortly before the hearing in District Court, I withdrew the 50 percent offer. The District Court held in favor of the Shrine Hospitals, and we filed a motion for new trial. This was sustained by the District Court, and on May 2, 1980, after another hearing, the District Court held in our favor, finding that the property vested in the Grand Lodge "for crippled children and for that sole and only use." The Court further ordered that we file an annual report to the Furnas County Court of the disposition of proceeds with a copy to William H. Sherwood, Personal Representative of the estate. As this report goes to press, it cannot be said whether or not the Hospitals will appeal to the Supreme Court since they have until June 2 to decide whether to do so. Even if they do, however, I have no doubt but that we will be successful. I therefore recommend that the handling of this inheritance and the proceeds thereof be turned over to our Grand Trustees. If an additional committee or subcommittee is needed to assist the trustees in receiving requests for grants, it is within the power of the Grand Master to appoint such as a special committee. The receipt of this inheritance is certainly a welcome opportunity for the broadening of the scope of Masonic charity in Nebraska.


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IRAN The Commission on Information for Recognition of the Conference of Grand Masters gives us this information on Iran: It appears that Freemasonry in Iran may have been completely destroyed. The information which comes to the Commission is that all of the lodges under the Grand Lodge of Iran have been closed, and the Masons who were not able to escape from the country have been persecuted and some of them executed. Until there is a change in the revolutionary government ruled by the Ayatollah Khomeini, there does not seem to be any possibility for the revival of Freemasonry in Iran. The Commission is advised that a number of lodges in the United States have been approached by Iranians to affiliate with such lodges or in some cases to receive the Fellowcraft and Master Mason Degree. The Commission is now in the process of trying to determine sources of information to verify the membership of such persons in constituent lodges of the Grand Lodge of Iran. NEW YORK: The following was reported in New York: We also took note of a report from the Saudi Gazette, dated November 28, 1979, which stated that the "Iranian newspaper Jomhorive lslami published a list of 1,800 alleged Iranian members of the Freemasons Society, which was banned in Iran after the February Revolution," as well as an article from the October 21-28 edition of the Moscow News Weekly, which is printed in Moscow, in English, and transported by air to the United States for distribution. The article presented a Soviet view of the Masons and is entitled, "Who Are the Masons?" Needless to say, it was not complimentary.

ITALIAN MASONRY We have read much in the press about the "P-2 Scandals," in Italy. We have been asked many questions about the situation there. We have made contacts with friends there, but nothing authentic has been forthcoming as of the date of writing this review. Until we do know what the actual condition is, we shall refrain from comment. DELAWARE: The Grand Lodge of Delaware reported the following on the Grand Orient of Italy: At the last annual communication, recognition of the Grand Orient of Italy was withdrawn by Grand Lodge on the recommendation of the Committee on Information for Recognition of the Grand Masters' Conference. For the past few years, the Commission had expressed alarm at conditions existing in the Grand Orient largely occasioned by the conduct of the Grand Master, Brother Lino Salvini, who allegedly was elected improperly, and who did not hesitate to expell from the Craft any who challenged him. Elections were held in the Grand Orient on November 19, 1978, and officers were elected who are completely independent of the influence of the previous Grand Master, and those who were arbitrarily expelled have been restored to membership by the new Grand Master. The Commission is satisfied that the Grand Orient of Italy is once again worthy of recognition. The Committee therefore recommends that the Grand Orient of Italy be recognized by this Grand Lodge with all the rights and privileges thereunto belonging.

JEWEL OF PAST GRAND MASTER MICHIGAN: The following was adopted by the Grand Lodge of Michigan: Amend Key 5-10 Section 1(b) by changing the third word "purchase" to the word "supply" and adding the following sentence. Beginning with the year 1987, and thereafter this jewel known as the Past Grand Master's Jewel shall remain the


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property of the Grand Lodge of Michigan and shall be returned to the Grand Lodge of Michigan upon the death of the recipient." The amended paragraph will read as follows: "G-4, Key 5-10, Section 1(b) He shall supply a Past Grand Master's Jewel and Apron, of similar design, respectively, to the jewel and apron presented to the retiring Grand Master at the annual communication in the year 1910, which design is hereby adopted. Beginning with the year 1987, and thereafter this jewel known as the Past Grand Master's Jewel shall remain the property of the Grand Lodge of Michigan upon the death of the recipient." Reason: The cost of gold, being what it is, makes the price of the Past Grand Master's Jewel prohibitive so that in order for the Grand Secretary to maintain a su pply of the Past Grand Master's Jewels called for in Key 12, Section N of the Michigan Masonic Law it is necessary that these Jewels remain the property of the Grand Lodge on loan to the Past Grand Masters, so to speak, being returned to the Grand Lodge of Michigan upon their deaths at no cost to the Grand Lodge.

JOHN GLENN - ASTRONAUT-SENATOR-FREEMASON OHIO: The Grand Lodge of Ohio received the following communication from their member, Senator John Glenn: Dear Friends: I am pleased to send my greetings and best wishes to all of you attending the 171 st Annual Meeting of the Masons of Ohio. Welcome to Cincinnati, one of the most beautiful cities in the great state of Ohio. I have been a Mason for just a short time; yet, I still remember with pride the Grand Master's Dinner in New York last May when I was able to address so many of my brothers. I spoke at that dinner about our hostages in Iran and about the tensions in the world. These situations have not changed much since then, I regret to say. But I have spoken about the faith we must have in the Great Architect of the Universe to be with us in these troubled times. If we just have enough sense to stop and let God lead us once in awhile as the Architect of the Universe, He becomes the Architect of our lives. May He guide you in the years ahead. Best wishes. Sincerely,John Glenn, United States Senator.

JURISPRUDENCE We came across this brief paper on Masonic Jurisprudence, and thought that others might also find it interesting: MASONIC JURISPRUDENCE

Many of us sit quietly and look straight ahead when a report is made by the J urisprudence Committee. Being not too sure ofour ground in legal matters, unless we happen to be lawyers, we pass it all off as something necessary but not very interesting, but it is all a part of the business of organizing and operating a lodge. The above title is chosen to include a few items that may be of interest to the brethren. Largely historical in nature, they furnish a background of understanding for us of this day. Many writers on Masonry consider that jurisprudence has to do with data and theories concerning laws and regulations ofthe Craft. To many very able Masons the whole field of Masonic jurisprudence bristles with additions to the Constitutions, rulings of Grand Masters, ancient landmarks and interpretations. This part is all very true as far as the purely legal aspect of the matter is concerned. But there are others who hold that Freemasonry is essentially a school of morality for the building of a temple of character. This being the case, the legal part sinks into the background. One historian tells us that, prior to 1717, when lodges met by immemorial usage, there does not appear to have been any question as to jurisdiction, and brethren would meet and practice the rites of Freemasonry without authority, other than their unquestioned time immemorial prerogative. The Grand Lodge of England, at its inaugural communication in 1717, adopted the following regulation: "That the privilege of assembling


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as Masons, which has been hitherto unlimited, shall be vested in certain lodges, meeting in certain places. All such lodges, in order to meet legally, should hereafter have a warrant from the Grand Lodge. Without such a warrant, no lodge will be considered regular or legal." This seems to be the first written law on jurisdiction. At least there is no previous law of which there is definite knowledge. Probably the Grand Lodge of England, as selfconstituted in 1717, originally intended to govern only the vicinity of London, but eventually it extended its scope until it claimed exclusive jurisdiction in England. The Grand Lodges of the United States were originally formed by lodges in the states declaring Masonic independence in emulation of the political Declaration of Independence. At that time there were several states in which there were two rival Grand Lodges, one "Ancient" and one "Modern," and it was not until after the rival Grand Lodges in England had united, that discord between the rival factions ceased in the United States. The lodges working under charters from the Grand Lodge of Scotland joined one of these Grand Lodges, and eventually there was developed the law relating to territorial jurisdiction, which is unanimously agreed upon by American Grand Lodges. The Master and officers of the lodge frequently refer to the Masonic Code of the Grand Lodge when matters of correct procedure arise. If the Master is not sure of his interpretation, he should refer the question to the Grand Master or Grand Secretary. In addition to all this, the officers and brethren will find many interesting things in the Code. A careful reading will repay the effort given. But, Brethren, let us not become so legal-minded that we forget the larger emphasis of Masonry, that of building a temple of character. The legal part is necessary and keeps us on the right path for correct procedure. But the possibilities are infinite when we begin to erect the temple. No man has yet climbed to the great heights where he can say, "The temple is finished." We all have enough to do to complete the edifice. R.W.T.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: A lodge in the District of Columbia desired to receive a petition for affiliation from a Fellow Craft who received his degrees in a lodge not recognized by the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia. The Grand Master made the following decision: Although I recognized in the letter of intent the petitioner's resolve to refrain from Masonic communication with the unrecognized brethren, it would seem not proper that he be elected to receive the degrees in thisjurisdiction while he was under obligation to a second and unrecognized Grand Lodge. I therefore directed that in order that the petition might be duly received, it must be accompanied by evidence that he had withdrawn his membership in the unrecognized Grand Lodge, this evidence to be in form of communication from his Grand Lodge (dimit or equivalent), or a letter from the petitioner to his Grand Lodge withdrawing his membership in said lodge and Grand Jurisdiction. This letter should accompany the petition and be presented to the Grand Secretary for review and to be forwarded by this office. Also: Be it understood that if elected, the petitioner must purge himself of his previous degrees and obligations by receiving each of the three degrees in this Grand Jurisdiction.

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS CALIFORNIA: The State Deputy for the Knights of Columbus was presented to the Grand Lodge of California. This account was listed in the proceedings: MANUEL SERPA, STATE DEPCTY, K:'I:IGHTS OF COLUMBCS

Prior to the start of the Tuesday afternoon session, Mr. Manuel Serpa, the State Deputy for the Knights of Columbus, was escorted into the Grand Lodge by the Grand


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Marshal and presented to the Grand Master, who, in turn, introduced this distinguished person to the assembled representatives. State Deputy Serpa was invited to address the representatives. He brought greetings from the members of his organization and stated that we are all interested in the same basic moral and ethical ideals. He further stated that our two Orders should and must work together, because we are the most qualified to solve many of the problems facing society today. He was accorded a standing ovation, after which the Grand Master escorted him to a position in front of the Altar while soloist Davis Leonard stmg, "Let There Be Peace," a most fitting climax to Deputy Serpa's remarks.

LADIES' PINS PENNSYLVANIA: The following resolution was adopted by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania: WHEREAS, The Grand Lodge has had a pin designed for the use of wives, widows of Master Masons, and other ladies of families with Masonic connections; and WHEREAS, The sum of $100,000 would be required for the initial purchase of said pins; and WHEREAS, As the pins are sold to the lodges and/or their members at actual cost of manufacture and distribution, the proceeds from sales will be needed as a rotating fund to replenish the inventory; and WHEREAS, The Committee on Finance has reviewed and approved the expenditure;

Now, therefore, be it resolved

1. That the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer make available from current operating funds the sum of $100,000 for the purchase of ladies' pins. 2. That the proceeds from the sales of said pins to lodges and/or their members may be used as a rotating fund to replenish the inventory of pins which have been sold; and 3. That the proceeds from the sale of the pins which may not be needed for a replenishing of the inventory shall be returned to current operating funds.

The Committee on Masonic Culture said: Since the release of the May issue of The Pennsylvania Freemason, announcing the issuance of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania "Masonic Ladies' Pin," the Committee on Masonic Culture has been deluged with orders. The interest shown by Pennsylvania Masons in purchasing the ladies' pin indicates that a "bestseller" has been created. Pins may be purchased from brethren manning tables in this building. Each pin is attractively boxed and has a presentation card; the cost per pin is $3.00.

LEGITIMATE FREEMASONRY NEW HAMPSHIRE: The Grand Lodge of New Hampshire defined legitimate Freemasonry as follows: For the purpose of preserving the integrity of our organization and making known to the members of the Fraternity its position in relation to the bodies which it regards as rightful and legitimate, the Grand Lodge hereby declares and recognizes as lawful, regular, and Masonic, the following designated bodies and their subordinates, established within its jurisdiction, namely: The General Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the United States. The Grand Royal Arch Chapters of the several states and territories of the United States. The Royal Arch chapters and other bodies under their jurisdiction. The General Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the United States. The Grand Councils of Royal and Select Masters of the several states and territories of the United States. The councils of Royal and Select Masters under their jurisdiction.


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The Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the United States. The Grand Commanderies of Knights Templar of the several states and territories of the United States. The commanderies of Knights Templar under their jurisdiction. The Supreme Council of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States of America. The Supreme Council of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite for the Southern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States of America. The various bodies under the jurisdiction of said Supreme Councils, with all the powers, privileges and prerogatives belonging to them, and incident to the enjoyment thereof by them respectively. Section 2. The use of the word "Masonic" is strictly prohibited, except in connection with those organizations decreed to be Masonic from time to time by the Grand Lodge.

LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS OREGON: The Grand Lodge of Oregon has a Committee on Legislative Affairs which attempts to keep abreast of action in the Legislature which might affect Freemasonry in that jurisdiction. The Committee reported this: LEGISLATIO:-l

The 1979 Legislative Assembly introduced 11 bills, each of which dealt with loss of exemption from property taxes. Each of these bills had been tabled in committee prior to last year's Grand Lodge Session, and we reported this to you at the last Annual Communication. Fortunately, no attempt was made to resurrect these proposals during the closing days of the legislative session. As a result, the Masonic Fraternity was not required to pay approximately $600,000 in property taxes during 1980. The Committee is encouraged by evidence of increasing interest in governmental affairs on the part of our members. Our visits to lodges indicate that many of our members are now well informed on such issues as sex discrimination and are in a better position to discuss legislative proposals with their legislators. COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES

During June of last year, the Committee concentrated its efforts on defeating the 11 bills which had been introduced. Our Committee then turned its attention to plans for the forthcoming legislative session, and to consider what additional steps which might be taken to strengthen our capabilities, and make our efforts more effective. We agreed that the financial data gathered last year will be adequate for use during the next session. However, names of lodge representatives will need to be updated. A circular is now in process of being mailed to each lodge in which the Master is asked to indicate the name, address, and telephone numbers of the lodge representative. The Committee will appreciate a prompt response so that a revised telephone network directory can be published and distributed. The Committee recommends that the importance oflegislative matters be emphasized in district meetings and seminars, and that members be urged to establish a working relationship with their legislators. We believe that many of our members are not fully aware of their potential impact on proposed legislation. Further, the Committee believes it to be of the utmost importance that lodge representatives report periodically to the members concerning legislation, and that a local telephone network be fully operational at all times. During the past year, the Committee has worked closely with Hunter and Kane, a governmental relations firm in Salem, which serves as the legislative representative for Private and Fraternal Organizations, Inc., formerly known as Oregon Non-Profit Clubs, Inc. This organization represents 94 private and fraternal organizations such as the


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Eagles, Moose, Elks, American Legion, Veterans Affairs, and Knights of Columbus. Also included are 16 private clubs such as the Multnomah Athletic Club, Arlington Club, Portland Golf Club, and Illahe Country Club. The total membership of the organizations represented by Private and Fraternal Organizations, Inc. now approaches 100,000. Hunter and Kane have demonstrated that they are highly competent and effective in obtaining important information as to proposed legislation, and probable voting action of legislators. It is important that this information be available to us sufficiently early that we can notify you in time for you to contact your legislators. Otherwise, any action is "too little and too late." To meet this need, the Committee recommended that the Grand Lodge enter into a cooperative agreement with Private and Fraternal Organizations, Inc., in which Hunter and Kane would provide us with this information during the forthcoming legislative session. We were delighted to learn that the Grand Lodge has approved this proposal, and a cooperative agreement is now being finalized, and will become effective July I, 1980. The Committee members will continue to represent the Masonic Fraternity in legislative hearings. This cooperative agreement will improve the capabilities of the Masonic Fraternity in achieving its legislative goals, and the Committee is delighted to have this additional assistance. While these new capabilities will enable the Committee to get the information to you early, our real success is dependent on the organization at a local level. We urge your continued interest and participation - not only as a Mason, but as a citizen and beneficiary of our democratic system of government.

WISCONSIN: The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin appears to have won a case involving taxation. The Committee reported: This report is going to be very brief. Last year before the Grand Lodge I submitted a rather lengthy and detailed report which appears in the proceedings of last year on page 161 through 164, in literally fine print, single spaced, and it was too lengthy, but I'll tell you when you don't yet have a victory to report you have to do a lot of talking sometimes. Last year we had to tell you fellows everything that had been done right down to the periods, commas and semicolons. I refer you especially to page 163 of that report and page 162 where we called attention to the fact that an extended hearing had been held in August of 1977 in Milwaukee that took over 400 pages of testimony. At the time that I submitted this report we did not yet have a determination by the department on that. When the determination came out, we thought it was wrong and it proved to be. On page 163, we referred to an incident beforeJudgeJackman when we made a proposal that the Department of Revenue, which was beating us over the back and over the back of the head, wait until the case was decided by the court and we turned to Judge Jackman. He said "I think that's a fair proposition." We turned to Mr. Conta and he said, "No way." Well, he paid through that. We told you at that time we were proceeding with a Writ of Certiorari and 1 honestly believe that a great many of you here wondered what in the world these lawyers were again tryng to do, were they just trying to confuse you with a lot of legal lingo that led nobody any place, but that wasn't the case. A Writ of Certiorari is a writ you ask for in which you say to the court, "Look, will you please go back and look at the record and see if this guy who is causing me a lot of trouble has the right to do it." When we finally got the court to look at that very sharply, the court said "I don't think they have any such right." But we weren't trying to confuse you, we were just going back more years than probably some might have, to find a proceeding which would challenge what the Department of Revenue was trying to do. The Department of Revenue, even after Judge Bardwell's decision (and I'll read you just the end of that decision), continued to harass us. This is a seven- or eight-page decision in which he says at the very end (and I'll get there pretty soon). These are the recommendations and findings of fact that a young lady hearing officer, who had the 400-page transcript before her, came out with, that we were under the gun and had our neck right on the chopping block and she was about to chop it.


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That's when we got in before Judge Bardwell and his order at the conclusion read as follows: He says, "Accordingly, we determine (now these judges always say 'we' because they know, of course, that they're working directly with God and in this case thank God he was) that the conclusion of the Department of Revenue that the actual practices of the petitioner lodges require discrimination in membership is not supported by substantial evidence in the record. The order of the Department that the petitioner lodges must pay corporate franchise taxes, commencing with the year 1977, and that any property they own must be assessed and taxed commencing with the 1978 valuation, is hereby vacated nunc pro tunc (now there's some more of that language, that means now or then and it meant that as the court was making the decision in 1979, he wanted it to be interpreted to go way back to when the Department of Revenue had made its original determination in 1977, so on that play they lost about 20 yards). Well, be it as it is, you know that every time that Masonry gets into a little bit of trouble, the media, and I speak principally of the newspapers, come out and they publish some statements that make us look bad and I think they are entitled to a little credit when they do something that makes us look good. AfterJudge Bardwell's decision there was even the MilwaukeeJournal of Sunday, September 16, 1979, his decision was dated on the 13th or 14th I think, and they said, "J udge reverses biased claim tax status of Masonic lodges and herewith Revenue Department overruled." This was a Madison paper - "no proof of Mason bias Judge Bardwell rules" and hereafter that the Department of Revenue and the Office of Attorney General got into a little fight between themselves. We sat by and enjoyed beingjust a spectator to that battle. We'd been in when the fighting was going on and we figured that neither of these agencies were going to hurt one another very badly, but this put up quite a fight. The Attorney General said "Look, if you people don't quit trying to take tax exemptions away from fraternal organizations, I will not represent you in these proceedings any more." Mr. LaFollette got on the right side of the street with onejump and I'm glad he did. Then came out a squib (I think it was in the Milwaukee Sentenel) , "No Appeal in Masonic Lodge Rulings"; here came out the Milwaukee Journal and said, "State Drops Cases of Four Masonic Mason Lodges." Well, the judgment was entered approximately a week after Judge Bardwell's decision, the publicity continued, and I hope that some of you read it. Now, we don't have to talk so long today because we do have a victory to report. We can say, look, do you like it and I think you fellows do, but I want you to know a little bit about the people who are responsible for this in your own Grand Lodge Office. I had the complete cooperation of the Grand Masters during the time that this proceedings was being carried on, even to the issuance of a special edict of which Judge Bardwell took note and which he indicated that in his mind showed no bias at all. This was done by the Grand Master. The hours and days, practically weeks, that our Grand Secretary, Doyn Inman, spent sorting mail, staying in contact with me and my office, writing all kinds of letters explaining the situation, just can't be measured, but these people get very little credit for what they have done because they are a part of the organization and they are su pposed to work that way. Well, I want you to know that a lot of clients don't work that way. I thank my lucky stars and my God and my Masonic brethren for the cooperation that Doyn Inman and Jim and the current Grand Master and everybody down the line gave us in saving Masonry from the Department of Revenue. Respectfully submitted, LEWIS A. STOCKING, P.G.M. Counsel for the Grand Lodge on Department of Revenue Matters

LIFE MEMBERSHIP Life membership, or as some prefer to call it, "Prepaid Membership," has long been an interesting subject to Freemasons. Many times it was only thought of as a means to raise additional funds so that some specific project could be funded. These include land acquisition, remodelin~ or rebuilding Masonic


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Temples, or the promotion of an outright new building. These reasons for life memberships have nearly always failed in the long haul. The present reason for life memberships being considered by several jurisdictions is merely to eliminate the bothersome duty - paying and collecting dues. Once a member is enrolled as a prepaid member he is always a member and, for him at least, the term S.N.P.D. will never arise. There are several very workable plans being considered. MICHIGAN: The Grand Lodge of Michigan has enacted legislation that clears the way for a member to purchase a prepaid life membership, based on his age. MARYLAND: The following edict was issued in the Grand Lodge of Maryland on the subject of life memberships. Apparently the life membership plan was not worked out previously. This is the edict: EDICT

Since September 21, 1970, the sale of life memberships has been banned in Maryland lodges. The Grand Master agrees with the basic premise that life memberships can be a financial drain upon a lodge unless the principal receipts from such sale were withheld in a special fund that could not be withdrawn from in principal nor expended by the lodge during the lifespan of the contributing member. If a minimum amount for the sale is specified, then the income from investment of principal can more than equal the member's annual dues. Thus, such a practice could become a financial asset, rather than a detriment to the lodge. Accordingly, on August 30,1979, I issued the following Edict: I have received several inquiries from subordinate lodges regarding life memberships. On September 21, 1970, M.W. Bro. William B. Stansbury, Jr., then the Grand Master of Masons in Maryland, issued an edict that "There shall be no sale of life memberships by subordinate lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction." It appears that a limited type oflife memberships would not be detrimental, and might be an asset, to the future financial stability of lodges. Therefore, it is my ruling: "That the granting of life memberships by subordinate lodges is permissible, upon adoption of a revision of the Lodge By-Laws, to be approved by the Grand Lodge Committee on By-Laws, incorporating the following provisions: "(a) That the fee for the granting of life membership(s) shall not be less than twenty (20) times the annual dues of the lodge, in the year granted (including Grand Lodge fees, assessments or tax). "(b) That the action granting life membership(s) may not be rescinded, nor is the fee refundable. "(c) That the fee collected for life membership(s) shall be deposited in an Escrow Account, in the name of the lodge, and shall be maintained so long as the lodge retains its charter. However, the fee may be withdrawn upon the demise of each life member and, upon approval of the lodge, deposited in the general funds of the lodge for operating expenses, or other purpose. "(d) Also, the income derived from the Escow Account, annually, upon approval of the lodge, may be withdrawn and deposited in the general funds of the lodge for operating expenses, or other purpose. "(e) A dues card shall be issued, annually, to each life member in good standing. "(f) That the granting of life memberships is optional with the several lodges, and of applicants in good standing, and no undue influence is to be exerted to secure applicants. Nor shall life memberships heretofore granted by the lodge be invalidated. "(g) That all dues, assessments and taxes payable to Grand Lodge, or for the operation or maintenance of the Masonic Homes, shall be returned to Grand Lodge for life members, as also regular dues-paying members.


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"All other provisions of the Edict of September 21, 1979, remain in full force and effect." (signed) WILLIAM M. KODliG Grand Master) The reading of this Edict at this Annual Communication gives it official status under Grand Lodge Constitution. Any lodge which avails itself of this practice must change the By-Laws accordingly, and should stipulate in its By-Laws the limitations on types of investment of the principal of the Escrow Account.

MINNESOTA: Minnesota has been a leader in the prepaid membership, or life membership program. Since it appears to have substantial backing, although not enough support for passage, we bring it to the attention of our readers: The sponsor of Resolution No.6 (1980), having to do with Prepaid Dues, W. Bro. Donald W. Sether, Grand Sword Bearer, explained that the resolution was printed in the Minnesota Mason and asked that the entire resolution not be read at this time. On a motion duly made and seconded, it was agreed not to read the resolution. Carried. A motion was made to adopt the resolution as printed, same was supported and discussion followed on the proposal. After discussion was had, the question was put to the Grand Lodge and the resolution was defeated by a vote of 105 for and 121 against, inasmuch as this required a vote of two-thirds in favor to pass, sufficient votes for were not received, and the proposal was therefore defeated. 6 - 1980 Prepaid Dues Fund

RESOLl:TIO:-': :-':0.

WHEREAS, In the belief that the Masons of Minnesota have a strong desire to participate in a plan whereby they may, if they so desire, obtain a prepaid dues certificate in their respective subordinate lodges; the Grand Master, 1977, 1978 and 1979, following the Annual Grand Lodge Communication, appointed a committee to develop a plan for prepaid dues for introduction to this Annual Grand Lodge Communication; and, WHEREAS, After extensive and exhaustive research and study the Committee propose to offer a plan, actuarially sound, equitable, practical and beneficial to the subordinate lodges, the individual member, to the Grand Lodge, and Masonry in general throughout this Grand Jurisdiction; and, WHEREAS, The following plan is designed to conserve membership by reduction in the number of members stricken from the rolls for nonpayment of dues; and, WHEREAS, The following plan would allow a member to prepay his dues when he can best afford to do so; and, WHEREAS, To accomplish all of the above without loss in dues to the respective subordinate lodges or loss of per capita to the Grand Lodge; Now, therefore be it resolved, That a new Chapter, Article XXI, be established entitled, "Prepaid Dues." The Code Review Committee to be responsible for proper arrangement in the Masonic Code of Minnesota.

Section A - General 1. The title or name of this plan shall be: "Prepaid Dues Fund" of the Grand Lodge of Minnesota. (Hereinafter referred to as the "Fund.") 2. The Fund to be operated and administered within a framework of such Regulations as may be adopted by this Grand Lodge. 3. A Prepaid Dues Committee to be established for the purpose of supervising the operation of the Fund, under the direction of the Board of Corporate Trustees of this Grand Lodge. 4. The Board of Corporate Trustees of this Grand Lodge to control all matters concerning investments made in the name of the Fund, accounting procedures and disbursements as such may effect this Fund subject to approval by the Grand Lodge and except as limited hereinafter.


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5. Any matter that might arise that is not specifically covered by Regulations, is to be disposed of in a manner directed by the Grand Master. Section B - Eligibility 1. Any Master Mason, who is in good standing in any lodge chartered by this Grand Lodge, may become a participant in this Fund. Section C - Cost of Prepaid Membership 1. The entire cost of purchase of a prepaid membership is to be established by application of a formula for determining the cost. 2. The formula to relate the amount of the member's annual dues in his home lodge, to that member's age at his last birthday at the time of application for prepaid membership. 3. The cost of prepaid membership shall be determined from the following formula: SCHF.DL路LE FOR

Age of Member

18-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50 51 52 53

DETF.R:\1I:"I~G COST

Factor (times dues)

18.0 17.5

OF PREPAID

Age of Member

69

70 71 72 73

~fF.:\1BERSIIIPS

Factor (times dues)

10.3 10.0 9.7 9.4 9.1 8.8 8.5 8.2 7.9 7.6 7.3

17.0 16.5 16.0 15.7 74 15.4 75 15.1 76 54 14.8 77 55 14.5 78 56 14.2 79 57 13.9 7.0 80 58 13.6 6.8 81 59 13.3 6.6 82 60 13.0 6.4 83 61 12.7 6.2 84 62 12.4 6.0 85 63 12.1 5.8 86 64 11.8 5.6 87 65 11.5 5.4 88 66 11.2 5.2 89 67 10.9 5.0 90 68 10.6 4. The Grand Lodge shall annually record average dues from all lodges, when such average dues increase, the formula factor shall increase one half of the percentage of the average dues increase percentage. Section D - Procedure of Application for Prepaid Membership I. The member desiring to participate in this fund shall submit an application on a form furnished by the Grand Lodge along with the required payment to the Secretary of his lodge, who shall issue a receipt therefor. 2. All checks shall be made payable to, "Prepaid Dues Fund - Grand Lodge of Minnesota." The Secretary of the lodge shall then immediately transmit the application and payment to the Grand Lodge Secretary. Section E - Effective Date of a Prepaid Membership I. Fund Membership is to be effective January 1 following the date that payment is received by the Secretary of the applicant's lodge. Section F - Effect of Prepaid Membership on an Individual Member 1. Upon the receipt of the application and payment by the Grand Lodge, a "Certifi-


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2.

3. 4.

5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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cate of Prepaid Dues" will be issued to the individual member, certifying that he is a prepaid member. On or before February 1 of each year after the year in which application was made to the member's lodge, the Fund shall pay the current dues of the prepaid member to that member's lodge. If a lodge increases its dues, payment from the Fund shall be limited to 5 percent increase of dues per year until the total increase ~s reached. The Grand Master and the Corporate Trustees may authorize a larger Increase. On or before January 1 of each year after the effective date of the application for prepaid membership, the Secretary of the lodge shall issue the regular and official dues card without any special designation. In the event of a member's affiliation with another lodge in this Grand Jurisdiction that member may then: a. Retain his prepaid membership in his former lodge and pay the regular dues to the affiliated lodge as a dual member; or b. May apply for prepaid membership in the affiliated lodge as a new prepaid dual member, while retaining his previous prepaid membership; or c. Request a dim it from his former lodge, and request that the Fund pay the affiliated lodge the dues amount to which he was entitled, and if the dues in the affiliated lodge are greater than the amount of payment made by the Fund, the member may pay the difference annually, or may pay an additional amount, according to the Prepaid Membership Fund, and receive a fully prepaid membership in the affiliated lodge. No dues shall be paid by the Fund for a prepaid member who is not an affiliated member in a lodge of this Grand Jurisdiction. No refund shall be made from the Fund to any person for any reason. In event of a lodge being consolidated with another lodge, the Fund shall pay those prepaid members' dues in the amount to which they were entitled, in the former lodge, to such consolidated lodge, on or before February 1 of each year. a. In the event the dues in the consolidated lodge are greater than the dues that were paid to the former lodge, the prepaid member may pay the difference annually; or b. The prepaid member may pay an additional amount, according to the current cost schedule to the Prepaid Dues Fund, and receive a fully prepaid membership in the consolidated lodge. In the event a prepaid member dim its from a lodge and affiliates with another lodge with lesser dues, the Fund shall pay the lesser amount of dues to the prepaid member's affiliated lodge. In the event a lodge decreases its annual dues, the Fund shall pay the lesser amount of dues to that lodge. In the event a lodge surrenders its Charter, the Fund shall not be liable to pay the dues of the prepaid members of such lodge until those prepaid members have affiliated with another lodge in the Grand Jurisdiction.

Section G - Effect of Prepaid Membership on the Lodge 1. The administration of the Fund being vested with the Grand Lodge, the subordinate lodges can exercise no control over the Fund. 2. The Fund shall annually remit the prepaid member's dues, and the lodge Secretary shall annually, issue the regular and official dues card, without special designation. 3. No prepaid member is exempt from a "punitive action" by his lodge. He is therefore, suqject to disciplinary action as is any other member. 4. The lodge is required to pay the "per capita" on all prepaid members. 5. A record is to be maintained by each lodge of their prepaid members. 6. Under no circumstances shall any lodge gratuitously pay into the Prepaid Dues Fund for, or on behalf of any person, or purchase a prepaid membership.


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Section H - Administration of the Fund by the Grand Lodge l. All elements of Section A are to apply. 2. All amounts received into the Fund must remain segregated from all other monies of the Grand Lodge. 3. Investments of all monies are to be made in the name of the Fund and for the benefit of the Fund. 4. A record is to be maintained on each individual member who becomes a prepaid member. 5. All monies shall be invested only in the following: a. Banks, b. Savings and Loan Associations, c. Federally guaranteed funds, d. And in such safe, first-class interest-bearing securities and common and preferred stocks as may be selected by the Board of Corporate Trustees. 6. Dues of all prepaid members are to be paid by the Fund to each lodge on or before February 1 of each year for those prepaid members of record on December 31 of the preceding calendar year. 7. No dues shall be paid by the Fund for any prepaid member during periods of non-affiliation, suspension or expulsion. 8. Upon the death of a prepaid member, the Fund shall pay no further dues on his behalf. But the Fund shall pay to a decreased member's lodge a percentage return on the amount paid in by such decreased member, less one time (first year's dues), the percentage paid not to exceed, one half of the current year's earnings or until the Fund administrators determine a change is necessary. 9. The Board of Corporate Trustees may deduct $5.00 from the initial remittance, and thereafter a sum not to exceed:> percent of the amount of the dues paid per year, for administration costs. Such costs shall be in addition to the dues paid, and shall be transferred from the Fund on or before the closing of the year. 10. Standard of accounting practices shall be followed in the maintenance of the records of the Fund with the following specific records to be kept: a. Total receipts from each lodge for: I. Each year. 2. Accumulative total since the inception of the Fund. The accumulative total to be all amounts paid by all prepaid members. b. Total receipts from sources other than lOa for each year. c. Total disbursements from the Fund to each lodge for e,ach year. d. Total disbursements for administration costs for each year. e. Net value of the Fund for each year. II. The Board of Corporate Trustees shall each year review the operation of the Fund and make any recommendation deemed necessary and desirable, to the Grand Lodge at its Annual Communication. 12. In addition to the required payment of dues each year and payment to lodges for deceased members as provided under Section H, Subsection 8, the Board of Corporate Trustees shall make recommendations to the Grand Lodge at its Annual Communication, regarding distribution of the surplus assets from the Fund. The Board of Corporate Trustees shall specifically make recommendations regarding distribution when the following condition exists: a. The Fund has an excess of assets and investment income necessary to meet its projected obligations. 13. Each lodge having prepaid members shall retain a vested interest in the net value of the Fund. Any reduction in the net value of the Fund, as may be established each year by the Board of Corporate Trustees, by the distribution of excess assets, shall be made to those lodges, based upon the amount of monies paid in by each lodge against the total monies paid in by all lodges since the inception of the Fund.


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Section I - Individual Lodge Prepaid Dues Fund 1. Notwithstanding the foregoing, any constituent lodge may establish its own prepaid dues fund, subject to the following conditions: a. The plan must conform to the same basic guidelines as set forth in this act, so far as practical. b. The cost of the participant may not be less than the cost set forth in this act, or such increased cost, as may be established by the amendment of this act. c. The plan of the constituent lodges must be approved by the Grand Master. d. Members of constituent lodges, having their own prepaid dues funds, may elect to join either the plan of such member's lodge, or the Prepaid Dues Fund of the Grand Lodge. -s- DO:-';ALD W. SETHER -s- GEORGE A. McDO:-';ALD -s- GEORGE A. LEE -s- ROI'ALD E. HOLT~1E1ER -s- R. GORDO:-'; N ESVIG -s- jOH:-'; P. PETERSOI' -s- HE:-';RY R. V A:-'; GEEST

IDAHO: Life membership was first presented to the Grand Lodge of Idaho in 1968 and finally adopted in 1972. In 1980 it was clarified by the adoption of several pages of amendments, but with no real change in the basic concept. Basically, any Master Mason who has been found proficient in the Master Mason Degree may purchase a prepaid life membership for an amount of money equal to 21 times the annual dues of his lodge. NEVADA: The Grand Lodge of Nevada permits life membership, but attaches a $10.00 administrative fee to each such one-time payment of dues. WASHINGTON: The Grand Lodge of Washington has the matter of life membership under consideration. The fees range from $200 for a brother over 66 years of age to $450 for those between the ages of21 and 35. The funds thus collected are to be forwarded immediately to the Grand Secretary, who will then place them in the hands of the investment board of control. He will also issue to the new life member an appropriate card under the seal of the Grand Lodge.

LIQUOR ARKANSAS: The Grand Master of Arkansas ruled that a "fine young Christian that was assistant manager of a supermarket" (where liquor is sold), did not come under their law, because he was not actually a salesman of intoxicants. He also noted that their law, in his opinion, did not apply to one employed solely as a manager, assistant manager, checker or cashier or stock clerk, nor to anyone who was not actually engaged as a salesman in the sale of intoxicants. There followed this discussion and action: Chairman of Committee's remark: "If the manager or assistant manager, or assistant manager, as the case may be, has the license or permit to sell the alcoholic beverage he would be in conflict with 287-b and based on the lack of classification as to the nature of his relationship to the Company and to the State or Federal Government in that field, the Committee has disapproved the Ruling and recommends that the Grand Lodge disapprove it for lack of clarification on the nature of the employment whether the man holds license or whether he doesn't." Vote taken on the Grand Master's actual Ruling was APPROVED. Bro. Frank A. Smith, P.G.M.: "M.W. Grand Master, yesterday we (the Masonic Law and Usage Committee) were of the opinion that if the Grand Master's Ruling were


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approved, which you just did, you have changed the Law to permit a liquor license to be held by a Master Mason." A Secret Ballot was requested. After discussion as to the clarification of the Ruling before the vote was taken not fully understanding what they were voting on, R.W. Bro. Hoyle W. Clanton, D.G.M. presiding, made the following statement, "Brethren, it has been brought to my attention that under Parliamentary Procedure that a delegate who voted with the majority may move that this action be reconsidered." Bro. Charles George: "Right Worshipful, I am Charles George, Westwood Lodge No. 353, I voted with the majority, I move that we expunge the vote, rescind the vote, and recast our BALLOT for this question." The motion received a second, which was APPROVED. M.W. Bro. M. C. Lewis, Jr., P.G.M., with permission of the Grand Master, made the following amendment to the Grand Master's Ruling: "The amendment would be to add after the word intoxicants a comma and say, 'unless the license is in his name.''' I move that amendment. A second was received and the amendment was APPROVED. A vote was then taken on the Ruling of the Grand Master as issued with the amendment was APPROVED.

WISCONSIN: The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin was urged to permit the Grand Master to grant individual dispensations to serve wine and beer at table lodges. At the 1979 Annual Communication, then Grand Master James Benz reminded us that the portion of the Junior Warden's responsibility "to call the brothers from labor to refreshment and to superintend them during the hour thereof and see that none convert the means of refreshment into intemperance or excess" should not be interpreted as meaning total abstinence. The Executive Committee believes that "Good Masonic fellowship" is one of the basic reasons why our Fraternity came into existence and why it has continued. The teaching of sound moral and Masonic values must continue to be the cornerstone of our existence. Masonic history and tradition inform us, however, that the festive Board and Table Lodge Ceremonies are important portions of the Fraternity, and contribute to "Good Masonic fellowship." Accordingly, the Executive Committee recommends that the Grand Lodge authorize the incoming Grand Master to grant individual dispensations to symbolic lodges (which may specifically request such dispensations) permitting the serving of wine and/or beer (in addition to nonalcoholic beverages) at table lodges, festival communications, holiday or other special occasions.

RHODE ISLAND: The Grand Lodge of Rhode Island heard this from its Committee on Status of the Craft on the subject of alcoholic beverages to be served in Masonic Temples: In the report of the retiring M.W. Grand Master last year, Bro. A. Sheffield Reynolds stated as follows: "It would seem to me that a new task for this committee (Status of the Craft) in the year ahead would be to explore once again the use of alcoholic beverages within our various facilities. I know full well that there is nothing within our rules and regulations to prohibit the use of such beverages in our buildings. I personally have no problem with the serving of such beverages after an annual meeting, or at ladies nights within the temples. In these days of inflation, etc., I also sympathize with owners of our buildings who want to rent facilities to outsiders with liquor privileges. However, it has come to my attention that alcoholic beverages may be being served after regular meetings in at least one instance, if not more. At the very least, I think an overall survey on this question is necessary from both within and without our state and this committee would be ideal to handle this task and to come up with their suggestions." This committee responds to the request of M.W. Bro. Paul A. Burkhardt to survey the situation as referred to by his predecessor as follows:


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The Committee feels that it is unnecessary and would serve no useful purpose to delineate in detail what our present deportment is regarding the use of alcoholic beverages in our subordinate lodge functions. The effort of the Committee therefore is to report the existing attitudes and position of (I) Our Masonic brethret:t both north and south of the United States borders; (2) Our Masonic brethren in 38 of our United States, excluding the six New England states, and (3) our six New England states. (I) In Canada, the Provinces of Ontario, New Brunswick, Quebec and Saskatchewan prohibit the use of alcoholic beverages written into their Regulations. Prince Edward Island follows an unwritten prohibition. In Mexico south of our border, so-called "hard liquor" is not permitted but beer and soft drink is permitted with some restrictions. (2) In the United States, 33 Grand Jurisdictions have prohibitions written into the Regulations; four Grand Jurisdictions follow an unwritten prohibition. It should be pointed out that 1I Grand Jurisdictions are so very strict on the subject that it is a matter of consideration in the investigation of Petitioners and Petitioners engaged in the liquor business are not acceptable as Candidates. Masonic buildings or any portion of them cannot be rented to anyone engaged in the distribution or sale of alcohol beverages. (3) In the six New England states the following conditions exist: Maine - has a prohibition written into the Regulations. New Ham pshire - permits liquor in the dining hall during social functions if no Masonic or Masonically-related body is meeting. When a social function is held on the same night as a Masonic or Masonically-related body is meeting, liquor cannot be served until after the close of the meeting. The State of New Hampshire laws and regulations must be observed. Vermont - same as New Hampshire plus the additional statement that the lodge cannot collect money for liquor refreshment. Massachusetts - nothing is written into the Regulations. Since 1975, alcoholic beverages have been permitted in Masonic temples, subject to the following restrictions: 1. Not permitted in the lodge room, Tyler's room or corridors. 2. No officer of the lodge may partake before opening the lodge. 3. No permanent serving facility is permitted in the Temple. 4. Social functions, banquet halls or dining rooms, however, cannot hold a license to sell liquor. 5. No reference to alcoholic beverages is permitted in the lodge notice. 6. The State of Massachusetts laws and regulations must be observed. Connecticut - Alcoholic beverages are permitted in the banquet hall and dining rooms when there is no Masonic or Masonically-related body meeting. Sale of liquor is prohibited and strict control is exercised. Rhode Island - We are well aware that our written law does not address the suqject of alcoholic beverage, however, there has been the unwritten prohibition in existence. With a couple exceptions, the lodges of this Grand Jurisdiction have followed this unwritten law until recent years. It is now quite apparent that, in the absence of written directive, lodges are gradually adopting liquor refreshment policy. This Committee believes that this problem is caused primarily by the absence of written guidance, and it is recommended: That every Mason in this Grand Jurisdiction be given the opportunity to provide input in whatever form is deemed most efficient on the subject of - "What should a Mason's attitude and position be on the presence and consumption of alcoholic beverages in Masonic facilities," thereby providing information that can be used as a basis for the establishment of written regulations for the future guidance of the Craft.

LODGE OPEN FIFTY-TWO YEARS Hiram Lodge No. 40 of Raleigh remained open for 52 years! Here are the facts surrounding this most unusual episode in the history of Hiram Lodge No. 40, as told to me by W. Bro. Dallas Holoman, Jr., a Past Master of the lodge. From the book Low Twelve by Edward S. Ellis, we find this account of the incidents leading up to the beginning of this story:


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Trying days were at hand for Hiram Lodge. General Sherman entered Raleigh on the morning of April 13, 1865, the advance under General Kilpatrick being the first to appear. The citizens hoped that the town would be spared, but were in dread lest an overt act by some rash person should draw down the wrath of the Federals, who were flushed with the decisive successes that had come to their arms. There was thankfulness, too, that the long, terrible war had come to an end. Brother Nichols relates that, after he had obtained protection for his family, as did many others, he set out with another Mason to secure, if possible, a guard of protection to the Masonic Hall. The Provost Marshal to whom they applied was not a Mason and was not disposed to show the Fraternity any consideration. While he was making curt inquiries as to the loyalty of the Order, a young Major came forward and asked the Provost Marshal to assign to him the duty of protecting the interests of Masons of Raleigh. This was done, and not the slightest molestation of Masonic property occurred. On Friday night, April 14, 1865, the saddest calamity that ever befell the American people occurred in the city of Washington. It was the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, the President of the United States. The following Monday evening, April 17, was the regular meeting of Hiram Lodge No. 40. There were present at this meeting quite a number of Federal Officers - Masons, of course - and among them was the young Major who interested himself in giving us a guard of protection of our property. The news of the assassination had reached Raleigh late in the afternoon of that day, and it caused a profound sensation among the Federal troops. About dark there was a restlessness and spirit of insubordination manifested among the soldiers, and a riot was feared by the officers in command. In order to prevent such a calamity the guards at every street crossing were doubled, and messengers were sent up and down the streets to every place where the people might have assembled to warn them to disperse at once and repair to their homes. Hiram Lodge had just opened for business. Suddenly we heard the hasty footsteps of someone ascending the stairs to the hall, and the low clanking of the sword of an officer. There was a rapid knock at the door, and I was requested to go to the anteroom. There I met a Federal Captain (a Mason, as I afterward learned, Captain W. C. Whitten, Ninth Maine Regiment), who hurriedly told me of the excitement among the soldiers in camp and suggested that the lodge be closed and that the members go to their homes at once. Orders were promptly obeyed. There are a few Masons still living, perhaps, who remember that terrible night. I say terrible night because the impending danger of riot, murder, and burning ofthe city was feared by everyone who understood the condition of affairs. The wise and prudent management and strict discipline of the Federal officers prevented what might have been a calamity of most serious consequences."

Brother Holoman calls attention to these facts: Author Edward S. Ellis is a Past Master of Trenton Lodge No.5 in New Jersey, and central figure in the story, Bro. John Nichols, was not only Master of Hiram Lodge No. 40, later becoming Grand Master of Masons in North Carolina, but was present to close the lodge on January 15, 1917. The minutes of Hiram Lodge No. 40, dated January 15, 1917, lists a large number of brethren being present, and then: The Master announced that this meeting had been anticipated for some months to give a distinguished member of our lodge an opportunity to prove that he could do that which he had not done. Past Grand Master and Past Master John Nichols was then presented. He gave us the history of Hiram Lodge for the last half century. He told us how the lodge came near to starving out in the 60s and what hardships they had to undergo and how he and the others had labored to keep the lodge intact. Owing to the fact that all young men were called to the front to fight in the Civil War, and he also told why and how William G. Hill Lodge was organized. Then, he told the circumstances under which the Lodge of April 17, 1865 was never closed. Turning to the Worshipful Master he said, "If you will give me that gavel, I will show you that I can close the lodge in due form." Labor was


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dispensed with and M.W. P.G.M.John Nichols then closed the Lodge of April 17,1865 in due form. Labor was resumed and Brother Lyon, Junior Warden, introduced Ex-Governor W. W. Kitchen (former Governor of North Carolina), a member of the lodge, who extended a welcome to all. (The Worshipful Master then introduced Governor T. W. Bickett (North Carolina) of Louisburg Lodge, who responded to the words of welcome and made a most interesting talk. (Other notables were present.)

MASON AT SIGHT OKLAHOMA: The Grand Master of Oklahoma reported this action: At 2:00 p.m. onJuly 26, 1980 I opened an occasional Lodge UD, with the assistance of the Grand Lodge Officers, in the lodge room of Norman Lodge No. 38 and conferred the Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft and Master Mason Degrees, including all lectures on Mickey Joe Gatewood, thereby making him a Mason at sight. This action was taken to correct what I considered to be a grave injustice to this young man and to the Masonic Fraternity. This young man had spent seven years actively working in DeMolay in the Norman Chapter, under the supervision of the Chapter Dad and an advisory board of21 members of Norman Lodge No. 38, who had found no fault with him during that time, and was serving as State Junior Councilor of DeMolay, under the supervision of the Executive Officer for DeMolay in Oklahoma, who had found no fault with him, when he reached the age of 21 and petitioned Norman Lodge No. 38 for the degrees of Masonry and was blackballed. Mickey continued to work in DeMolay and was actively working for the International Supreme Council of DeMolay when his 12-month waiting period was up and he repetitioned Norman Lodge No. 38 for the degrees of Masonry and was again blackballed. Certain factions of Norman Lodge No. 38 let it be known that, not because of any fault with Mickey but because of personal differences with his mother, he would never get into Masonry. After being apprised of the entire situation by several members of Norman Lodge No. 38 and Norman Chapter No. 41, O.E.S., I decided to correct this injustice by exercising the prerogative granted to the Grand Master by Landmark No.8 of the recognized Landmarks adopted by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of the State of Oklahoma.

MASONIC FLAG NEW YORK: The following is a description ofthe Masonic flag which was to be placed in the Bronx: Now I'll tell you about the Masonic flag. As far as we can find out this is the first to be flown at one of these facilities. The Veterans Administration came to us (we did not go to them - they came to us with the flag idea). At the main entrance to the Veterans Administration facility in the Bronx they have a flagpole, I guess 60 feet high, for the American flag; and around it some other flagpoles, perhaps 30 feet high, flying various other flags - the City, the State, the Red Cross, one or two others. They asked us if we would like to fly a Masonic flag from the pole immediately in front. And there it is, the blue flag. Your Masonic flag is now flying where no other fraternal flag, as far as I know in all the United States, has ever flow before. And this is because of what this great Committee on Service and Rehabilitation has done, for you and for this Grand Lodge. I think they deserve every plaudit that we can give them.

MASONIC HALL SIEGE It was reported in the press that a 33-year-old man was accused of seizing a Masonic Hall in Manchester, Massachusetts, on Christmas Day 1979 and


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holding it for about three hours after taking two Masons hostage. The two were released unharmed after about ten minutes. The man was reported to be Ernest J. Lassen, Jr., of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, an unemployed physiotherapist. Police said Lassen was carrying a .22 caliber rifle. He pleaded innocent of charges of assault with a dangerous weapon, breaking and entering in the nighttime, and assault with intent t,o murder. The case was continued.

MASONIC HOME TEXAS: The following is being considered by the Grand Lodge of Texas: Your Committee on Purposes and Policies has conferred with other committees and studied the substance of Resolution No.9 which recommends that a study be made to determine the feasibility of admitting qualified children to the Texas Masonic Home and School from the states of Arkansas, Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma on a per capita paying basis. Your Committee recommends that such matter be referred to the Committee on Special Assignments, as constituted by the incoming Grand Master, or such other committee as the Grand Master deems appropriate, and report their recommendations back to the Grand Master.

MASONIC PROGRAMS ARIZONA: These suggestions were made to the Grand Lodge of Arizona for ideas for Masonic programs: IDEAS FOR MASONIC PROGRAMS

Anniversaries Lodges' Charter - 10, 25, 50, 60, 75, 90, 100 Birthdays Oldest Member Mason of the Year Worshipful Master Birthday Month Charter Member Night Committeemen's Appreciation Night Concert Professional Home Talent Dedication Building Bible Degree Work Interpretation Night DeMolay Degree Exemplification Leaders Appreciation Membership Recognition Dinners Father and Son Father and Daughter Family Distinguished Person Doctor's Night Honor Service

Educational Programs Masonic Leadership Training Schools of Instruction Exchange Lodge Visitations Fellowship Night Invite Non-Mason Friend Grand Lodge Night Visitation of Grand Master Visitation of Grand Officers Report on Gr. Lodge Sessions Installation of Officers Public or Closed Job's Daughters and Guardian Night Ladies' Night Program Landmarks of Masonry Laws and Legislation on Masonry Masters of Neighboring Lodges Neighbors Night Degree Work Social Program New Members Night - Annual for All Raised this Year O.E.S. Night Old Timer's Night Past Masters' Night Degree by Past Masters Honor for Lodge Service


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Pastors' Night - Open Meeting for all Pastors and Wives Patriotic Events Picnic Pilgrimage to Another Lodge Plays - Masonic Public Schools Program Visit Schools Program Recognize Teachers Scholarship Awards Rainbow Night Rededication of Members Retreat - for member inspiration St. John's Day

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Sojourner's Night Sponsors' Night - Appreciation to brother who sponsored a candidate this year Study Clubs Ritual Masonic Education Sweethearts' Night Table Lodge Talks - Use of Masonic Services Association Short Talk Bulletins Bulletins which are sent to lodge Secretaries

MASONIC PROTOCOL Very little has been written about Masonic protocol. Here we find discussion of the subject, as it applies to the Grand Lodge of Delaware, as prepared by a distinguished Past Grand Master of that jurisdiction, who is currently serving as its Fraternal Correspondent, M.W. Bro. Paul E. Ellis. Certain allowances will necessarily be made to suit the protocol to a givenjurisdiction, but in the main it is quite good. DELAWARE: In Delaware we find this fine paper on protocol: This paper was given at a seminar sponsored by the Committee on Masonic Education, Culture and Information at Union Lodge No.7 on January 13, 1979. Since very little has been written in Grand Lodge on the subject, it is printed here for the benefit of the Craft. Protocol is defined in the College Edition ofWebster's New World Dictionary as follows: The ceremonial forms and courtesies that are established as proper and correct in official intercourse between heads of state and their ministers. Masonic protocol then is the ceremonial forms and courtesies practiced by the Craft, and it is nothing more than the practice of good manners and the use of common sense, but it is important. Following correct protocol is as necessary as observing the requirements of the ritual. For example, incorrectly addressing the Grand Master or failing to accord him the respect due his office is as serious as making a mistake in conferring a degree or opening and closing lodge. It reflects on our Masonic education and training, and at times, a breach of protocol can be embarrassing. Therefore, the rules of protocol should be learned and observed not only by lodge officers, but all brethren as well. Very little is written about Masonic protocol. I have encountered two books, Freemasonry and Its Etiquette, which applies to New York Masonry, and a second book, Our Station and Places, which is applicable to English Masonry. Some Grand Lodges have published pamphlets on the su~iect, but there is no uniformity among the Grand Lodges since practice and tradition varies in each Grand Lodge. There is little in our Constitution and Code in Delaware on protocol. Article II I of our Constitution sets forth the rank and title of the officers of Grand Lodge. In the ceremonies section of the Code, reference is made to the order of processions and you can ascertain the rank of our officers. In another section, there is a ceremony to be followed on the reception of the Grand Master during an official visit. In the 1975 proceedings, the Committee on Jurisprudence submitted a recommendation on reception and authority of the Grand Master in assemblies of Masons other than in Grand and subordinate symbolic lodges which you will find helpful. Since tradition and practice varies among the Grand Lodges with little uniformity, in this paper I will set forth protocol in Delaware as traditionally practiced in Delaware. The correct title of the Grand Master is Most Worshipful James H. Hutchins, Grand


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Master of Masons in Delaware. He is not Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Delaware, nor is he Grand Master of Masons of Delaware. He is Grand Master of Masons in Delaware for two reasons. First and historically, there were Grand Masters before there were Grand Lodges. Therefore, a Grand Master is never referred to as Grand Master of a Grand Lodge. Secondly and according to the rules of Masonic jurisprudence, a Grand Master is Grand Master of all Masons residing in hisjurisdiction, i.e., Grand Master of Masons, who are members of the symbolic lodges within his jurisdiction, Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of other jurisdictions, Grand Master of Free and Accepted Masons of otherjurisdictions, and Grand Master of York Masons of other jurisdictions. Thus, he is Grand Master of all Masons in his jurisdiction and his proper and historic title is Grand Master of Masons in Delaware. In any tiled Masonic assembly in this jurisdiction, the Grand Master is received last, given grand honors, and he speaks first before any business whatsoever is transacted. Of course, the Grand Master can speak whenever he wants, or he can be received whenever he wants. That is his prerogative; but by tradition, he is received last and speaks first. On official visits, it is custom for him to speak after the reading of the minutes. This is done because he has requested that the minutes be heard; but after the reading of the minutes, unless he directs otherwise, he should be called on to speak immediately. If the Grand Master is at a lodge on an unofficial visit, he should be received last, given grand honors, and if there be a main speaker of the evening, with his consent, he should be introduced before the main speaker. If the Grand Master is invited to attend a tiled meeting and designates a representative in his stead, then that representative is given all the courtesies due the Grand Master as though he were the Grand Master himself. It is custom in Delaware to afford grand honors only to the Grand Master, his designated representative, Grand Masters of other jurisdictions or their designated representatives, and Past Grand Masters of this and otherjurisdictions. At a communication of Grand Lodge, and at these communications only, the Grand Master has the prerogative to accord grand honors to dignitaries of other bodies. In Masonic processions, we generally follow the tradition of church and academic processions of reverse rank, i.e, the lowest first and the highest last. In Delaware, the rank in a procession is: first the Grand Tiler, Past Masters by the date of the chartering of their lodge with the youngest lodge first, Worshipful Masters in the same sequence, appointed Grand Lodge Officers, Past Grand Masters by date of election, elected Grand Officers, the Grand Master accompanied by the Grand Deacons, and last, the Grand Sword Bearer. Other than on an official visit, it's the custom to receive only the Grand Master or his designated representative, Past Grand Masters, Grand Masters of other jurisdictions or their designated representatives, and Past Grand Masters of other Grand Lodges. All are given grand honors. If the Grand Master is present at a meeting of a lodge and there are Grand Masters or Past Grand Masters from other jurisdictions, then the Grand Master himself receives them and accords them grand honors. Elected Grand Officers other than the Grand Master or his representative are not customarily received. However, I know of no objection in receiving elected Grand Lodge Officers and giving them a standing round of applause, not grand honors. This applies also to elected officers from other Grand Lodges. If elected Grand Officers of this and other Grand Lodges are not received, courtesy dictates that they be presented at the altar and given a standing round of applause. In a tiled lodge where there has been no reception, the practice in Delaware is to introduce first the Grand Master, then the Deputy, Past Grand Masters, Grand Lodge Officers, Worshipful Masters, and finally, Past Masters. I do not concur with the practice which is becoming more prevalent in Delaware of multi-introductions. For examples, on an official visit, Grand Master and his staff are received and introd uced. Then during the course of the evening Worshipful Masters will


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be recognized and they in turn introduce members of the Grand Staff who are members of their lodge, Past Masters who have been recognized, and so forth. This is unnecessary and only lengthens what is already a busy meeting. One introduction is enough. No member or officer of an appendant body, no matter how high his rank may be in that body, outranks the Grand Master, his symbolic lodges. Courtesy, however, dictates that they be recognized. With the myriad of appendant bodies which we have, to introduce them properly is a task worthy of the attention of the Chief Protocol Officer of the State Department. If you are ever confronted with the problem, to be correct, perhaps you should consult with the Grand Master because his decision is always right. You can appreciate the problem in Delaware when you observe that among the appendant bodies there is the chapter, council, commandery and Knight Masons of the York Rite, four bodies of the Scottish Rite plus its Supreme Council officers, the Shrine, etc. In the event that all or part of the officers of the appendant bodies appear at a lodge meeting, recognition by custom is granted to the presiding officers of the Grand Chapter, the Grand Council and St. John'S and St. Andrew's Commanderies, the Active and Deputy of Scottish Rite, the Potentate of the Shrine, and the presiding officers of Brandywine and Evergreen Forests of the Tall Cedars. From first to last, I would rank them as follows: Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, Illustrious Grand Master of the Grand Council, Deputy and Active of the Scottish Rite, commanders of the commanderies, Potentate of the Shrine, and Grand Tall Cedar of the Tall Cedars. I place the officers of the York Rite ahead of Scottish Rite because it has been in existence longer. Except at an Annual Communication presided over by the Grand Master, none of these are entitled to grand honors, but are given a round of applause. At such a meeting, the rank is as follows: First, the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Past Grand Masters (although in a procession the Past Grand Masters rank below the elected officers of Grand Lodge, in Delaware we usually recognize the Past Grand Masters after the Deputy Grand Master), elected and appointed officers of Grand Lodge by rank, Worshipful Masters by the date of the charter of their lodge with the oldest lodge first, Past Masters in the same sequence, presiding officers of the Grand Commandery, Grand Council, and Grand Chapter, Deputy and Active of the Scottish Rite, presiding officers of individual commanderies, councils, chapters and bodies of the Scottish Rite, Potentate of the Shrine, presiding officers of the Cedars, and others by the date of establishment of their body. At a lodge dinner with a head table, the Worshipful Master is the presiding officer, and brethren are seated by rank. The Grand Master sits on the right of the Worshipful Master and the Deputy Grand Master on his left. In Delaware, it is the custom on official visits to intermingle the lodge officers with the Grand Lodge officers. Consequently, after the seating of the Worshipful Master, the Grand Master and Deputy, the remaining seating is by rank, right, left, right, left, etc., mixing in the lodge officers with the Grand Lodge officers. The same practice should follow at a Ladies' Night. If there is a speaker at a dinner, he should be seated at the right of the Grand Master. Introductions should be made by rank with the Grand Master being introduced immediately prior to the speaker of the evening. At a lodge meeting and the Grand Master is a visitor and there is a speaker for the evening, introductions are by rank with the Grand Master being introduced and speaking immediately prior to the speaker. It is important to address a brother or officer properly. The title of Most Worshipful is accorded the Grand Master and Past Grand Masters; Right Worshipful for the Deputy Grand Master, present and Past Grand Wardens, Grand Secretaries and Grand Treasurers; Most Reverend for the Grand Chaplain and Past Grand Chaplains; and Worshipful for appointed Grand Lodge Officers, Masters and Past Masters. All other brethren are addressed as Brother. It is the practice in Delaware to omit "Brother" when another title is used, i.e., Most Worshipful James H. Hutchins, not Most Worshipful Brother James H. Hutchins, or Worshipful John Henry, not Worshipful Brother John Henry. After the correct title and name is given, the office is set forth, i.e., Most WorshipfulJames


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H. Hutchins, Grand Master, or Worshipful John Henry, Past Master. There are other acceptable forms of address, but avoid using "Brother" with a title. Do not use "Sir," i.e., Most Worshipful Sir or Worshipful Sir. "Sir" is an appellation of civil respect and should not be used in Masonic intercourse. In the introduction of officers of appendant bodies, ascertain beforehand their correct title. The presiding officer of lodges in the United States remains covered when presiding whether he be the Worshipful Master or the Grand Master. If the Grand Master is present at a lodge meeting and the Worshipful Master is presiding, then the Worshipful Master should be covered; but if the Grand Master is presiding, then the Grand Master should be covered. However, on the Grand Master's official visits to a lodge and on other visitations to a lodge when the Grand Master is called upon to close lodge in ample form, it is the practice for the Worshipful Master to remain at his station and to continue to be covered. What I have set forth are some guidelines for you to follow. I am sure that this is not sufficiently complete to cover all occasions. When in doubt, I suggest that you consult the Grand Master or a knowledgeable Mason for direction. Regardless of what is set forth in this paper, the wish of the Grand Master governs on all occasions and his wishes are to be observed. PAl:L E. ELLIS, P.G.M.

MEMBERSHIP ALABAMA: The Grand Lodge of Alabama reported a net loss of 927. Like many others, the suspensions exceeded the raisings. One thousand four hundred and thirty-five were raised, and 1,506 were suspended. ARIZONA: The Grand Lodge of Arizona had a net gain of94. While only 287 were raised, there was only 176 suspended for nonpayment to dues. CONNECTICUT: The Grand Lodge of Connecticut lost 749 members last year. DELAWARE: The Grand Lodge of Delaware lost 141 members. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: The Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia reported a loss of 493. . FLORIDA: Counting both dual and regular members, the Grand Lodge of Florida had a net gain in membership of 97 for the year. GEORGIA: The Grand Lodge of Georgia lost 474 members last year. MARYLAND: Maryland reported a loss of 815 members. NEW HAMPSHIRE: Lost 245 members last year.

MEMORIAL SERVICE SOUTH CAROLINA: The Grand Lodge of South Carolina adopted a Memorial Service which we like very much. We hope our readers will like it, too. lt was said that the service was recommended by the Grand Master in 1979, and that it had been prepared by M.W. Bro.]. B. McGuirt, Grand Master, and H. Dwight McAlister, Grand Secretary. The latter being a minister, also lends some importance to the following Memorial Service: MEMORIAL SERVICE

Instructions

The lodge to which the deceased brother belonged having been duly opened on the Third Degree, the brethren repair to the place of the Memorial Service. The place may be in a church or funeral chapel. A number of pews or seats should be provided for the members of the deceased brother's family and an appropriate number reserved for the brethren.


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If the lodge forms a procession to enter the place, the procession should be as shown on page 274 of the Ahiman Rezon (1978). The Master and the Chaplain should stand at the head of the casket and the Senior and Junior Wardens at the foot. The other officers should occupy the first row of seats reserved for the lodge. The Master can adapt the arrangement of officers to fit the locale if space will not accommodate the foregoing. The Chaplain should keep the lambskin apron and hand it to the Master at the appropriate time. The officers should have sprigs of acacia in their lapels or breast pockets. The Service MASTER: From time immemorial it has been the custom of Freemasons, at the request of a brother, or at the solicitation of his family, to hold a memorial service or accompany his body to the place of interment, and there deposit it with the formalities of our Fraternity. In conformity with this usage, we have here assembled in the character of Freemasons, to commemorate the life of our deceased brother and to offer up to his memory, before the world, the last tribute of our affection.

(One or more of the following Scripture selections may be used.) First Lession 121st Psalm

I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills: From whence cometh my help? My help cometh from the Lord, which made heaven and earth. He will not suffer thy foot to be moved; he that keepeth thee will not slumber. Behold, he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord is thy keeper: the Lord is thy shade upon they right hand. The sun shall not smite thee by day, nor the moon by night. The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil: he shall preserve thy soul. Second Lesson

(Selected verses from the 90th Psalm) Lord, thou has been our dwelling place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou are God. For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night. Thou carriest them away as with a flood; they are as a sleep: in the morning they are like grass which groweth up. In the morning it flourisheth, and groweth up; in the evening it is cut down, and withereth. The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and ifby reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we By away. So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom. o satisfy us early with thy mercy, that we may r~joice and be glad all our days. Let thy work appear unto thy servants, and thy glory unto their children. And let the beauty of the Lord our God be upon us; and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou it. Third Lesson

23rd Psalm The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul; he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake.


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Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever. Fourth Lession

(Selected verses) The Lord is my light and my salvation: whom shall I fear; the Lord is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? In the time of trouble he shall hide me in his tabernacle; yea, in the secret place of his dwelling shall he hide me. God is our refuge and strength; a very present help in time of trouble. Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be moved and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea. The Lord of hosts is with us. Trust therefore in the Lord for with Jehovah there is mercy and with Him is plenteous redemption. God shall wipe away all tears; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain; for the former things have passed away. Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord pitieth them that fear him. For the mercy of the Lord is from everlasting to everlasting. With everlasting kindness will I have mercy on thee saith the Lord. The mountains shall depart, and the hills be removed; by my kindness shall not depart from thee, neither shall my covenant of peace be removed saith the Lord whose mercy endureth forever. Prayer

Eternal God, the author of all good, the giver of all mercy! pour out Thy blessings upon us and strengthen us with the ties of true brotherly love and affection. In this hour of sorrow help us to put our trust in Thee and grant that we may be conscious of Thy presence, protection and care. As we contemplate the uncertainty of all things mortal, may we be reminded of that moment when we, as Masons, learned together the great lesson of immortality. While we commemorate the life of our departed brother, we commend his soul to Thee. Comfort and strengthen his loved ones and us, his brethren, as we look to Thee, the only refuge in time of trouble. Direct our lives that we may be led by Thy Spirit. And when at last we too, must lay down the working tools of life, grant us an entrance into that Celestial Lodge above where the Supreme Grand Master forever presides - Amen. Response by Brethren: So mote it be. Exhortation

My Brethren, as we are gathered here we are reminded of the uncertainty of life and the vanity of all human pursuits. What are the pomp and splendor of majesty, the pride of wealth, or the charms of beauty, when nature has paid her just debt. When we see life stripped of its ornaments, we will be convinced of the futility of those empty delusions. In death all fallacies are detected, all ranks leveled, all distinctions removed, and the king of the beggar are one. We are inclined to forget that we are mortal; we forget that we are born to die! We make plans for many years only to be alarmed at the sudden approach of death when we least expect it, and at an hour when we think ourselves to be in the meridian of our existence. Let us, therefore, while in this state of probation, support with dignity and reverence the character of our profession. Let us be true to the solemn ties of our Fraternity, and loyal to the teachings of the Holy Scripture, the Great Light of Masonry. Then, with becoming reverence, let us seek the divine grace and favor of the Eternal Being whose goodness, power, and mercy knows no bound; that when our own summons comes we


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may pursue our journey, without dread or apprehension, to that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler ever returns. The Great Creator having been pleased to remove our brother from this transitory life to a state of eternal duration, may we who survive him prepare for our own approaching fate. May we be more strongly cemented in the ties of friendship and brotherly love, so that we may mutually promote the welfare and happiness of each other to the honor and glory of God, and to the salvation of our own souls. (The Chaplain then presents a clean, white lambskin apron to the Master, who unfolds it and says:)

The lambskin or white leather apron is an emblem of innocence and the badge of a Mason; by it the Mason is reminded of that purity of life and rectitude of conduct so necessary to his gaining admission into the Celestial Lodge above. This symbol of purity presented to our brother on his first entrance into Masonry constantly reminds us of the need of a virtuous life. (The Master then places the apron on the casket. If casket is open, hang strings on the inside with apron draped over the side. Then, displaying the everygreen, he says:)

This evergreen is an emblem of our belief in the immortality of the soul. By it we are reminded that we have a high and glorious destiny beyond the world of shadows and that there dwells within man an imperishable, immortal spirit, over which the world has no dominion and death no power. (Here the Master and officers only, deposit the everygreen on the casket. Officers return immediately to their places and are seated, the Master than continues:)

"Now the laborer's task is o'er, Now the battle day is past, Now upon the farther shore Lands the voyager at last. Father, in Thy gracious keeping. Leave we now Thy servant sleeping." Benediction

May the blessing of Almighty God rest upon us and upon all our work and worship done in His name. May He give us Light to guide us, Courage to support us, and Love to unite us, The Lord bless thee and keep thee. The Lord make His face to shine upon thee and be gracious unto thee. The Lord lift up His countenance upon thee and give thee peace, both now and evermore. Amen. Response by Brethren: So mote it be. (The procession then returns to the place whence it set out and the lodge is duly closed.)

MOUNT ST. HELENS OREGON: The following mention was made of the eruption of Mount St. Helens, which affected the attendance at the annual communication: The number of representatives attending this Grand Lodge Communication was reduced the third morning due to the eruption during the night of Mount St. Helens. This volcano is located about 40 miles north of Portland and on this date erupted for the second time in about six weeks. Volcanic ash, being carried by winds out of the northeast, was deposited in large quantities over the Portland area. While this was falling some rain also fell causing hazardous driving conditions which caused some of the members to stay home rather than drive to the meeting. Some members called in to find if the meeting was to be cancelled or postponed. This date, Friday, the thirteenth ofJune, will long be remembered in the Grand Lodge of Oregon. Following the rain ceasing, the volcanic ash dried out and the dust then presented serious driving problems on the streets and highways in a large area of Oregon and Washington.


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A number oflives were lost in the first eruption by the mud flow from the volcano. This mud went down the various rivers leading from the mountain and eventually ended up clogging the Columbia River to the extent that shipping channels were closed for a time.

O.E.S. IOWA: The Grand Lodge of Iowa is considering leasing a portion of available space to the Grand Chapter, O.E.S., of Iowa. (This has been done.) At the request of representatives of the Grand Chapter of Iowa, O.E.S., a thorough investigation was made as to the effect on the tax status of the Grand Lodge, insurance, energy costs, etc., and the Trustees advised the Grand Chapter of Iowa, O.E.S., that the suite of offices formerly occupied by the Iowa Committee on Masonic Education would be available to be used as the Grand Chapter headquarters at a two-year rental rate agreed upon by both parties, with the right to renew the lease for an additional two years, subject to the renegotiation of the lease. The final decision on this matter rests on the outcome of proposed legislation which will allow the Grand Chapter headquarters to be moved from Des Moines to Cedar Rapids. This matter will come before the delegates at Grand Chapter, O.E.S., in October of 1980. (Move was approved.) This space has been unoccupied since the merger of the positions of the Lodge Service Chairman and Assistant Librarian. Its rental would put the space into service and, at the same time, provide some relief for the gradually diminishing Building Fund.

LOUISIANA: The Grand Master of Louisiana found it necessary to request the removal of an O.E.S. chapter from one of his lodges: The District Deputy Grand Master of the 14th Masonic District had tried unsuccessfully to restore peace and harmony in Sun Lodge No. 336. This unrest stemmed from conflicts between Eastern Star Chapter No. 186 and some of the members of the lodge. The Worthy Matron and the Worthy Patron have filed charges against each other. The peace and harmony of the lodge, being paramount, I instructed the District Deputy Grand Master to have the Sun Chapter of the Eastern Star remove their Charter and their furniture from Sun Lodge by January 12, 1980.

MONTANA: This recommendation of the Grand Master to meet at the same time and location as the O.E.S. was rejected by the Grand Lodge. That the Grand Lodge do whatever is necessary to change its By-Laws to provide for its annual communication to take place the same week and in the same location as the annual communication of the Montana Grand Chapter, Order of Eastern Star.

SOUTH DAKOTA: The Grand Lodge of South Dakota does not limit the waiting period of a Master Mason to petition the Order of the Eastern Star, neither does he have to pass his proficiency on the Master Mason degree to do so.

ORAL HISTORY TEXAS: The Grand Lodge of Texas has adopted an "oral history program." The following describes its functions. The Committee has established a project to pursue the development of an oral history program for the Grand Lodge. Technically, oral history can be simply defined as "the tape recording of reminiscences about which the narrator can speak from firsthand knowledge." Its importance as an added tool in developing the storehouse of knowledge of our past has been growing rapidly in recent years. A paper delivered before the Texas Lodge of Research by Bro. Lesley L. Walker, P.M., Anson Jones Lodge No. 1313, set the stage for this Committee's consideration of the


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development of such a program. And now, with the support of the Grand Lodge Trustees, the Committee has agreed to establish a modest beginning, with the goal, to quote Brother Walker: "... to preserve ... the reminiscences of those brethren who have led lives significantly beneficial to the Craft in this state, to the end that those reminiscences, when heard in future times, will lend greater understanding of Freemasonry and of its social significance in the Texas of our day." Heading the Oral History Subcommittee isJimJones, Wichita Falls, who has worked out a detailed plan for the development of this new Grand Lodge Program. Included in the immediate future will be experimental tapes with the Deputy Grand Master and, as soon as possible, with Texas's Senior Past Grand Masters. All products of the Oral History Program will be maintained in the Grand Lodge Library for the use of the Masons of Texas.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Several Grand Lodges are beginning to review the organizational structure of the Grand Lodge in light of modern business practices. We fear that many are viewing the operation of Freemasonry from a purely business standpoint and are completely forgetting the fraternal side of the Fraternity. Freemasonry has a business side, but it also has a side devoted to brotherly love. There is no way the cold business side of the Fraternity can be elevated to a position above that intended for the oldest and greatest of all fraternal organizations. It must contain the element of brotherly love, and be maintained on a democratic level. CALIFORN IA: The Committee to Examine the Organizational Structure of the Fraternity reported at length to the Grand Lodge of California. In its summary it said: SU~MARY

OF

RECO~~ENDATIOl"S

The Commission has made ten recommendations. In brief, they are as follows: No.1. Establish an Executive Committee composed of the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master and the Senior and Junior Grand Wardens. No.2. Designate the Grand Master as presiding officer of the Executive Committee, establish monthly meetings of the Executive Committee and define its duties. No.3. Establish that the Inspectors are directly responsible to the Grand Master on all matters except those pertaining to ritual. No.4. Make the Grand Treasurer rather than the Grand Secretary responsible for the financial operations and accounting of the Grand Lodge. No.5. Enlarge the duties and responsibilities of the Committee on Finance. No.6. Limit tenure for all committee members to nine years, and committee chairmen to five years. No.7. Authorize the Executive Committee to recommend persons for the offices of Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary and Grand Lecturer. No.8. Designate the Grand Master as chairman, without vote, of the special Committee for Selection of a Recommendee for the Office of Junior Grand Warden, and require that any decision by that committee be reached in a meeting at which a quorum is present. No.9. Revise the procedure for submission and processing of resolutions to be considered by the Grand Lodge. No. 10. Request the Grand Master, with the advice of the Executive Committee, to develop a comprehensive program to strengthen the Masonic education programs in the lodges. Whether or not to implement these recommendations will be for the Grand Lodge to determine. Legislative proposals for most, if not all, of the recommendations will be made in time for consideration at the Annual Communication in 1981. We urge all


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members of the Grand Lodge to give thoughtful consideration to the contents of this report, and to recognize that the recommendations here in contained are offered in the sincere belief that they will benefit and improve both the Grand Lodge and the quality and strength of Freemasonry within its jurisdiction.

PANAMA CANAL MASSACHUSETTS: The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and the Grand Lodge of Panama had a treaty. But, with the Panama Canal Treaty, this changed many things. The following was reported by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts: MASO:-':IC AGREEMENT OF MUTCAL Cl'I:DERSTANDlNG

On September 30, 1979, the effective date of the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, the Masonic Treaty between the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Panama will end, because the Canal Zone, as such, will cease to exist. For almost a year, at the request of the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Panama, a committee from the District Grand Lodge of the Canal Zone has been meeting with a committee representing the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Panama to draw up an agreement of Mutual Masonic Understanding to replace the treaty of 1917 as amended in 1921. I met with this combined committee during my sqjourn in Panama last January. At that time, I felt that excellent progress was being made. Upon returning to Massachusetts, I authorized R.W. Thomas C. Peterson, District Grand Master, to consummate the negotiations to the point of approval by this Grand Lodge. On August 27, 1979, R.W. Brother Peterson informed me that the negotiations had come to an impasse. The area of disagreement concerns the jurisdiction of candidates. The final proposal voted upon by the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Panama, and submitted by their committee, differs greatly from the original Treaty. This proposal is not acceptable to the District Grand Lodge Committee, and the Grand Master supports them in their decision. If no agreement is reached, the District Grand Lodge will continue to operate with no restrictions or recognition. This means that all candidates will stand in open jurisdiction.

PAST AND PRESENT The following paper was prepared by M.W. Bro. Charles E. White for presentation to the Annual Convocation of the Grand Chapter of Wisconsin. We feel that Brother White attempts to emphasize the position of the lodge in the superstructure of Freemasonry. FREEMASO:-':RY -

PAST A!'iD PRESEl'.'T

By Charles E. White, P.G.M. This gathering at the Annual Convocation of the Grand Chapter, R.A.M., of Wisconsin calls attention to the institution or brotherhood of Freemasons. Masonry is found nearly everywhere in human experience. It exists in most of our communities. It numbers men of all classes and conditions - the wise and men of moderate powers; the learned, the unlearned, the powerful, the humble; the rich, the poor; the men of moderate and of enlarged aspirations; men of all situations and ranks in life are gathered in this Fraternity. It has existed so long that just when it was first formed or in what particular ways it worked to accomplish its particular objectives is beyond all written history. The beginning of Masonry antedates history, it passes even beyond the realm of tradition until nothing is left in tracing its origin except its principle, shining grandly and proudly through the mists of ages and reaching to the time when man first was man and when brotherhood first existed. Much has been written and recorded as to the age of Masonry. The principles upon


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which it rests are from the world's foundation; for they comprise belief in God, faith in immortality of the soul, charity to all mankind in its largest and best sense, temperance, fortitude, prudence and justice and other principles founded by the creator of all, which were planted in man by Him as a part of the original creation. In its recorded history, traces of Masonry were distinctly made through many societies of different names, yet all alike in principal, from a very early age to the time of Solomon, King of Israel, who died early 1,000 years before the Christian era. Its marks and symbols can be seen in the foundation stones of the temple at Jerusalem, and from thence until today and in many places and in our lodge rooms the form and parts of that temple are represented and preserved. The earliest written Masonic Constitution now known to exist is what is called the Old York Constitutions of the year 926, a copy of which was discovered in the British Museum in the year 1838, and is now widely published in Masonic books. Sufficient evidence of the authenticity of this early Masonic Constitution is found in the single fact that in all of the essential particulars of its IS articles and IS points it corresponds exactly with the principles, rules and regulations of Masonry today. Among them are that the candidate must be without blemish; that brotherly love shall be cultivated and charity prevail; that a Grand Lodge shall be held each year; and that there shall be a Grand Master at its head; together with many other articles that might be enumerated. This fact alone establishes the historical existence of Freemasonry at the date of the earliest known written constitution. Another written constitution adopted prior to the year 1377 also exists; certain regulations of the year 1663; certain ancient charges adopted between 1685 and 1688 are still preserved in an original manuscript; the regulations of 1703 and 1717 and the charges approved by the Grand Lodge of England in 1722 are all in existence, having the force of written constitutions in the Fraternity and are printed and open for the world to read. All of them, like the York Constitution are in such entire accord with Freemasonry, as it is understood and practiced today, that there can remain no doubt that during all this time the institution has remained the same, and they furnish a connected record of its history. The year 1717 saw a general revival of Masonry in England and from that time the list of all the Grand Masters and Grand Secretaries of England are preserved and the written records of the Grand Lodge are complete. Most of the charges and regulations of 1722 are incorporated today in direct terms in the Constitution and Regulations of Wisconsin and all the other Grand Lodges of the United States. All of them are regarded and obeyed as fixed regulations as to which all Masons agree that it is not within the power of any man or body of men to change them, alter them or make innovations upon them. In America, Freemasonry was introduced early in the 18th Century. The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is now more than 200 years old; the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania has an equal age and Masonry there has a recorded history since the year 1730. One of the early lodges in New York named Independent Royal Lodge originally, in the English manner, conferred the Royal Arch Degree and received its Charter in 1760. In Wisconsin, the first lodge was organized at Green Bay in 1824 under dispensation from the Grand Lodge of New York. It was composed principally of officers of the United States Army stationed there. In that lodge, Bro. Henry S. Baird, afterwards Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin, received his degrees in Masonry and became its master. It was the first Masonic Lodge organized west of Detroit. Its existence terminated about 1830 and Washington Lodge No. 21 now occupies its place. In the year 1840, what is now Mineral Point Lodge No. l, Melody Lodge No.2 at Platteville, and Kilbourn Lodge No.3 at Milwaukee were organized. These three lodges in 1843 formed the present Grand Lodge of Wisconsin. The number of lodges then was three and their membership was about 60. Today, we have approximately 280 lodges and about 42,000 members. Forty-two thousand and upwards of men have adopted Masonic principles for their guidance. Were there nothing of Freemasonry except that which exists in Wisconsin it would appear there is enough in its history and progress here to vindicate its


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permanent lasting value. But in addition, every state of the Union has its lodges and Grand Lodge and there are about 3.5 million Masons in the United States. All the Provinces of Canada have their Grand Lodges and so of the nations of Europe. The same is true in Asia and Africa, in the Island of the Seas and in nearly all of the countries of South America. In all these countries and places and in every Masonic lodge each member of the lodge stands and has always stood and will continue to stand upon an absolute level with everyone of its brethren there. Although he cannot speak his tongue or converse with him, yet he can by never failing means signify to him his Masonic brotherhood and without fear of denial or refusal may demand and receive all his Masonic rights and privileges. A question may arise after considering the antiquity of Freemasonry, its progress and extent to which, as an organized fraternity, it prevails today; as to why this brotherhood, which has continued so long in substance and in essence the same, exists at all; why it is so widely diffused and what are the cords or secrets which so firmly and so closely cement it together. Its existence may be explained in the natural tendency of man to associate in organized forms of accomplishment fo.r any definite end. It is this tendency which lies at the bottom of all organized societies which makes the state, the county, the city, the village, the church, the school district and every organization embraced under the words of society or fraternity. Because in union and in united effort there is power; because all efforts when made by man singly fail and when made in joint work and labor succeed; because in the one case there is weakness and in the other there is strength; because in simple illustration a single strand is not used but the combination and interweaving of several is employed to make the full power of the cord; so Masons meet in the organized form of lodges to do and to perfect unitedly and in harmony what, acting singly, they could not accomplish. The answer to the questions why it has thus existed and has existed so long unchanged in its essentials, why it is so generally diffused and what it is that unites it together brings to consideration its objects, purposes and mission. Its best definition is that it is a beautiful symbol of mortality, veiled in allegory, and illustrated by symbols. Its parts are first that it is a system, which implies order and fidelity to preserve and keep it intact. The planets move in their orbit by system; the state in its political functions moves in like manner as does the church and all forms of organized effort. And so does Masonry, moving in aggregated form, in the special methods which it has adopted and in the ways that it has pursued from the earliest periods. It finds its accomplishment in the orderly methods that it has chosen for itself. Its members in each particular locality have the lodge, a central point in which they are united and dwell in harmony. It is ruled and governed by its Worshipful Master and Wardens. It has laws, rules and regulations which do not change. It has its subordinate officers of Secretary, Treasurer, Deacons and Tiler. All perform their alloted duties in an orderly harmonious way. The lodges together in any particular state or nation comprise through their lawful representatives the Grand Lodge of such state or nation as the supreme governing head of the Craft. The G.rand Lodge has its various officers. All are regulated by law and this law in the ages that have gone, has grown into and become as definite and fixed a body or code of laws as any ever yet produced as a result of human wisdom. Its known written constitutions have existed since time immemorial and still govern today. Its permanent landmarks, unwritten law, and traditions are safely preserved to a large extent in written forms and when not so, in the repository of faithful breasts. The degrees are three in number and are arranged to accomplish progress in each. In the first, the initiate comes freely as he does in all to learn what Masonry can give in lesson and in instruction. Here he finds how good and pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity and so gathers the lesson of friendship, commingled with charity. The Masonic use of the right hand as an emblem of friendship and as an emblem of good faith is here taught. The proper innocence that characterizes all decent life finds itself represented in the pure white apron that all Masons wear, as an emblem and symbol of


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purity of character, intentions and heart. The duties of brotherly love, relief, and truth and the cardinal virtues of temperance, fortitude, prudence, and justice are inculcated. The lesson and duty of charity is most particularly and strongly impressed. It is the charity which allows each member his particular religion and form of worship, without invading his particular tenets or imposing upon any special dogma of doctrine or worship; yet it always requires as a fundamental condition belief in one true and living God. The Fellowcraft Degree gives instruction in the useful and practical arts and liberal sciences, prefaced with a reference to the plumb line as an emblem of ever-continuing rectitude of conduct. The square and the level with their lessons of morality and equality are explained. Also in this degree the symbols of the attentive ear, the instructive tongue and the faithful breasts are illustrated. The candidate learns that his ear should be attentive and sensitive to every proper Masonic call, that his tongue should always be instructive to his less informed or less learned brother and that his breast should be continually faithful to all that concerns Masonry and the brethren. The Third Degree has one of the principal landmarks of the Craft, namely, the final resurrection to come. One of its perfections and beautie.s is that while its symbolic working tools are said to be all of the implements of Masonry indiscriminately, attention is directed to the trowel. In operative masonry, it spreads the cement that unites a building into one common mass; so all the brethren in and by the teachings of Masonry have become cemented together into one common band or society of brothers among whom no contention should ever exist, and that emulation of who best can work and best agree. The system of Masonry is beautiful. Every system which is complete and justly proportioned in all its parts and which moves and works in harmony is necessarily so. It is a system of morality. Belief in Deity, in the one great Maker, is first and always rigidly required. The profession of its belief must be full and ample, open, public and unequivocal. With it and in close and inseparable union follows the practice of all of the virtues which together constitute the sum of which is termed morality. Masonic teaching embraces all of these yet teaches them in a gentle way and a pleasant manner. The Holy Bible lays on every lodge altar; without it no lodge can be opened. It is an essential part of the furniture of every lodge and from this gift of God to man is derived the stories, the legends and the traditions which are the foundation principles of the Masonic Craft. If Masonry is shown to be a beautiful system of morality, veiled in allegory and illustrated by symbols, is it strange that it has existed at all, or so long, or has become so widely diffused? Is there any doubt of its lasting continuance? It is the needs of man that have brought about the inventions of man. There would have been no Masonry except that there was and judging especially from its great age and long continuance, there will continue to be a demand for the absolute goodness that is contained in it. And, among the best evidence of this is the absolute love of its true members for it, running to the last moment of struggling existence, when men ask in their almost and sometimes in their very last words that their remains shall be interred with the Masonic rites of burial. Bro. DeWitt Clinton of New York, who occupied many of the highest positions in the Craft, stated it this way: "Although the origin of our Fraternity is covered with darkness and its history is to a great extent obscure, yet we can confidently say that it is the most ancient society in the world and we are equally certain that its principles are based upon pure morality; that its ethics are the ethics of Christianity; its doctrines the doctrines of patriotism and brotherly love; its sentiments the sentiments of exalted benevolence. Upon these points there can be no doubt. All that is good and kind and charitable it encourages; all that is vicious and cruel and oppressive it detests and discourages.

* * * . "PI~asure is a shadow, wealth is a vanity, and power a pageant; but knowledge is ecstatic In enjoyment, perennial in fame, unlimited in space, and infinite in duration. In the


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performance of its sacred offices, it fears no danger, spares no expense, looks in the volcano, dives into the ocean, perforates the earth, wings its flight into the skies, explores sea and land, contemplates the distant, examines the minute, comprehends the great, ascends to the sublime - no place too remote for its grasp, no height too exalted for its reach."

PHYSICAL QUALIFICATIONS MISSISSIPPI: The Grand Lodge of Mississippi received the question: Question: We have had a Mr. A. B. petition the lodge for the three degrees.... The question that stands in his way is that he cannot hear or talk and has been this way since early childhood.... He can read lips; also sign language.... We would like a ruling as to his eligibility for the degrees and telling us how best to proceed. Answer: The answer to this question is given fully in the 1977 edition of the Digest, on page 73, Digest and Judicial Decisions following Section 8 of the Rules and Regulations: A lodge would not be entitled to accept the petition of and confer the degrees upon a candidate who, although able to read lips with some proficiency, still is unable to actually hear, and is not possessed of "mechanical art" of such degree as to enable him to hear. The key word is "hear," even if such hearing is through the medium of a mechanical device. But the law does not provide for the substitution of "sight comprehension" for actually "hearing." 1976-60.

The next question concerns an Entered Apprentice who suffered an accident: Statement of Facts: This concerns Brother W.H.L., who, in the fall of 1975, took his Entered Apprentice Degree in T. Lodge No. 318, but who has not since been advanced to the degree of Fellow Craft. Brother L. is now a patient at the Methodist Rehabilitation Center inJackson, paralyzed from the neck down, although now showing slight improvement. Question: He wants me to lecture him and see what can be done to get the rest of his work. Can I do this and can he receive the other two degrees? Please detail the laws applicable to such a case and suggest procedures that may be followed. Answer: Under Digest and Judicial Decisions following Section 8 of the Rules and Regulations it is stated, "Disqualifying maims do not apply to Entered Apprentices who are maimed after being initiated nor to Fellow Crafts after being passed, 1867-77. Disqualifying maims pertains to the Entered Apprentice degree alone, 1919-57."

PLANNING ARIZONA: These suggestions were made to the Grand Lodge of Arizona for long-range planning: The progressive line officers with Past Grand Masters composing the committee have brought before the combined committee for discussion and evaluation ideas expressed by the general membership for the betterment of the Fraternity as a whole. Among the topics brought before the committee for discussion (not all inclusive) were: 1. Rules of Order for Grand Lodge Communications. 2. Broader definitions of the duties of" all Grand Lodge Officers than those now covered in the Constitution. These and other items in our Constitution could be covered by Rules and Regulations; thus shortening, not lengthening our Constitution as it is now considered by many as being too long. 3. A considerable amount of discussion was held relative to our forthcoming Centennial Celebration in 1981; noting that certain phases of the planning would of necessity, have to be made and implemented during the year of 1980.


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4. It was proposed that Area Representatives be asked to work with lodges that missed Grand Lodge or were late with their year-end report. 5. Is there a need for a Committee on Publications to eliminate possible overlapping of expenditure of funds, or the possibility of a better price figure on all publications? 6. A need for better mechanics for clarification to general membership as to the functions and responsibility of the actions and powers of the General Policy, Jurisprudence and Finance Committees. 7. Objections to 1979 Grand Lodge voting method was reviewed and alternate plans or methods discussed. 8. The need and mode of degree proficiency requirements was evaluated relative to committee examinations in the First and Second Degrees. 9. The need for a synopsis, at least, of Grand Lodge Legislative actions enacted at our Grand Communication within two or three weeks after the close of the communication, for the proper function of our Grand Lodge Officers and members. 10. A publication for guidance concerning Masonic Funeral Services which led to the endorsement of a printed procedure published by the Masonic Services Association. 11. The feasibility and costs involved in mailing the Arizona Masonry publication to all members of Arizona lodges. 12. Upgrading of our Grand Lodge Library; making its contents better known and available to our total membership. 13. Costs and benefits of Grand Wardens and Deputy Grand Master visitations to constituent lodges.

PRINCE HALL MASONRY CONNECTICUT: The Grand Master of Connecticut reported this about Prince Hall Masonry in his jurisdiction: In response to a written request from The M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge, F. & A.M. of Connecticut, a meeting with their Grand Lodge Officers and our Grand Lodge Officers was arranged at the Masonic Home and Hospital. This meeting proved to be very informative and cordial. We were informed that the Prince Hall Masons did not want to integrate our lodges, thereby losing their own identity. They want separate, but equal status and acceptance. They do not wish for amalgamation but wish to retain their sovereignty together with the good relationship they now enjoy and want a closer working relationship with the A.F. & A.M. Connecticut Masons. From this meeting, committees from both Grand Lodges were appointed. I appointed four Grand Line Officers and four Past Grand Masters which have met on a scheduled basis to discuss things of a mutual interest to the benefit of both Grand Lodges. Several successful programs have been presented together which have not violated our Constitution, Masonic Law, Practice Rules and Regulations as they now stand. I am grateful to the five Scottish Rite Valleys who led the way in sponsoring these highly successful programs, also to Brainard Lodge No. 102 and Union Lodge No. 31 and their Worshipful Masters for planning, arranging and sponsoring the Common Table to be held in the Eighth Masonic District. I value the concerns of all those who have worked and lent support to this endeavor. The Brotherhood of Masonry has been working to dignify the internal and not the external qualifications of mankind regardless of color, race, or creed.

PRINCE HALL GRAND LODGE OF WISCONSIN WISCONSIN: The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin continues its negotiations with the Prince Hall Grand Lodge in itsjurisdiction. The Committee reported as follows:


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REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 0:-; FRATER!':AL RELATIO!':S WITH PRINCE HALL GRA:-;D LODGE OF WISCONSIN

To the Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons of Wisconsin: Meetings of the Committee on Fraternal Relations and representatives of the Wisconsin Prince Hall Grand Lodge have been held on a regular schedule. At the 1979 Annual Communication it was pointed out that the negotiations with the Wisconsin Prince Hall Lodge are being followed with interest by other Grand J urisdictions. As there have been some misunderstandings, all Grand Jurisdictions in the United States have been furnished with Committee Reports concerning Prince Hall. This is done by Grand Secretary Doyn Inman corresponding with other Grand Secretaries. Correspondence with other Grand Jurisdictions according to Masonic protocol is carried on through Grand Secretaries. During this past year, a Master of a lodge corresponded directly with several other Grand Jurisdictions, inquiring about their position in regard to Prince Hall. This was contrary to Masonic protocol and could have adverse effects on our relationship with these Grand Lodges. Fortunately, the Secretaries of these Grand Lodges were understanding enough to inform our Grand Secretary of the correspondence and not to take offense. It is of greatest importance that individual members do not attempt to take matters into their own hands. This type of action can only result in confusion and possible irreparable harm to Masonry. Should any lodge or member want information from another Grand Jurisdiction, the Grand Secretary, with the permission of the Grand Master, would carry out the correspondence. There have been several significant actions taken this past year with respect to Prince Hall Masonry in Wisconsin. 1. A series of articles were printed in the Masonic Journal to inform all Masons about history of Prince Hall Masonry. 2. On September 11, 1979, Grand Master George R. Hughey, at the suggestion of the Committee on Fraternal Relations with Prince Hall, sent a letter to the M.W. Grand Master of Prince Hall Masons in Wisconsin, offering to each constituent lodge in good standing in the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Wisconsin the opportunity to become a chartered lodge under the Grand Lodge, F. & A.M. of Wisconsin. 3. On September 19, 1979, Grand Master Arthur L. Myers, Jr. of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge responded as follows: "With the understanding that we are in agreement that an appropriately creative arrangement (not to be confused with something inane and simplistic like our complex organization being annexed by yours) is necessary for an indeterminate period of time, please be advised that I am prepared to recommend that the M. W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge accept your offer to merge itself with the Grand Lodge, F. & A.M. of Wisconsin. Discussions will be necessary pursuant to working out the details. "There are a number of issues that will need to be examined and attendant problems to be worked out. However, the obstacles are by no means insurmountable and my view is that if we are truly serious about ending the long night of racism that has divided Black and White Masons in America and in Wisconsin - it can be done in a manner that would be acceptable to Prince Hall Masons as well as the members of your Craft. Let us meet as soon as practicable and 'reason together' on these great issues." Several meetings have been held with representatives of Prince Hall Grand Lodge to discuss these letters. The representatives of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge have not given a clear answer to Grand Master George Hughey'S offer. They have advised us that it will have to be discussed at their Grand Lodge Annual Communication before any substantial answer can be given.


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A year ago this Annual Communication made the Committee on Fraternal Relations with Prince Hall Grand Lodge permanent. It currently appears that it will take an undetermined amount of time to resolve this matter. It is recommended that the offer made by Grand Master George Hughey be approved by this Grand Lodge and the Committee instructed to expedite acceptance of this offer.

PUBLIC IMAGE KENTUCKY: The Grand Master of Kentucky believes that Masonry needs to improve its public image. He made this recommendation: For a long time it has been the opinion of the Grand Master that Masonry has slipped in standing as far as public image is concerned. After a great deal of study about sister Grand Jurisdictions, allied and appendant bodies, it becomes more evident that the reason we have slipped from public esteem is due to the fact that we spend more time taking care of ourselves than helping our fellowman. I highly recommend to the incoming Grand Master and his corps of officers that they select a project that would enhance Freemasonry's public image to its highest potential. This recommendation is made with the best interest of the Craft in mind. I feel that one of the reasons we have not been accepted by the general public in the manner in which we should have, or that of days of old, is due to the fact that we have shown our primary interest to be within the Fraternity instead of without. I highly recommend a project for public image improvement to be adopted by this Grand Lodge.

PUBLIC RELATIONS ARIZONA: The Grand Lodge of Arizona published a "Guide to Improve Our Public Relations." It contained these ideas: SIMPLE GUIDE TO IMPROVE OUR PUBLIC REI.ATIO:-.IS

I. Desire and determination to improve Masonic image

A. Our Masonic image can and will be improved only when Masons possess and retain the desire and determination to do so. This can best be done by motivating every lodge member to become more concerned about the Masonic image and to have better communication with each other in our respective communities. By improving our communication with each other, it will become simple to improve our image in the community. This is the first important step toward a successful Public Relations Program. B. Develop your program by setting simple and easy goals. I. Newspaper publicity is only a small part of a Public Relations Program but it is a most important part. We realize that lodges in small, rural communities will find it easier to get articles into the paper than lodges in the metropolitan areas where there is more competition for newspaper space. But set your goal; it might be one article every month or two in the small papers or only twice a year in the large city papers. First, find out who the man or woman is that will make the decision as to whether or not to print, get to know them and ask the type of article they will print; their standards and requirements for copy. If they know you and like you, it will be easier to get them to cooperate. C. Support of the officers of the lodge. I. Elected and appointed officers must actively support and assist with the Public Relations program that has been established to improve community relations. By having good relations with the community, good and favorable publicity comes almost automatically. Without the support of the lodge and its members no program will be a success. D. Assignment of Chairman of Public Relations and Publicity. 1. The individual assigned to handle the public relations of the lodge must be


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one that will actively work at his function. He must have the desire and determination to improve the image of the Fraternity. It is the duty ofthe Master to get the best man from his membership to work with the non-Masonic community and strive for closer and friendly communication with good citizens. Always keep in mind, most good citizens make good Masons. II. Items and ideas that create interest and good relations in the community A. Masons must set a good example. 1. The most basic rule is simply be a good neighbor in your community. Every M;.soB can start his individual program by helping his neighbor - nothing big or lavish. Little courtesies sometimes do more to cement good relations than one huge party. There are far too many ways to be a good neighbor and friend to be listed here. B. Include non-Masons of the community in Masonic activities. 1. Some lodges have developed excellent programs that include the non-Mason in social activities of the lodge. Epes Randolph No. 32 of Tucson has one of the best that has proved to be a success. See the attached "Ideas for Masonic Programs" that was recently handed out in a training session. The standards set by the Grand Lodge of Arizona to win the Masters Builders Award furnishes an excellent opportunity to improve local public relations. A special meeting to honor a well-known and respected member of the nonMasonic community (attorney, teachers, doctors, etc.) is just one example. A lodge can develop its own program if it so desires but always remember to include the non-Mason in the program. C. Masonic-affiliated organizations 1. A good source for some excellent ideas to improve community relations are the Shriners; Order of the Eastern Star chapters; Rainbow Girls assemblies; Job's Daughters and DeMolay. Good community relations are made, and it need not be in the local paper, when a few Masons give tickets to the circus to the school principal to distribute. The ladies and wives of Masons are always sponsoring a spaghetti supper or bake sale for a worthy cause. It would be a simple thing to improve our Masonic image with so many excellent ideas and opportunities at our fingertips. III. A positive attitude must be cultivated and maintained A. Members of the Fraternity must realize that our numbers are decreasing. We must get the interest and attention of good citizens in the community and be ever alert to present our ideals to a good man that seeks the light of Masonry by asking questions. Rare indeed is the lodge that does not need members. All members of the Fraternity must become "recruiters" of good men. We must all strive to keep our Order flourishing and growing. We cannot let the Mason disappear from our communities.

o HI0: The following comments of the Grand Master of Ohio are very good. In addition to numerous appearances ofthe Grand Master and frequent references in the media, one hour per week on radio station WGUC was sponsored by the Freemasons of greater Cincinnati. "PM Magazine" taped and exhibited on WKRC-TVa seven-minute feature involving a visit by the camera to the Temple of Oakley Lodge No. 668 just previous to the opening of a lodge. Freemasonry was explained in an understanding manner. Over the months this feature will be viewed in many parts of the nation. The Cincinnati Enquirer recognized Freemasonry with a gracious editorial October 20, 1979, on the occasion of my installation as Grand Master, and carried one feature article by a widely read local columnist.

PUBLIC SOLICITATION OF FUNDS OHIO: The Grand Master of Ohio said, and followed with an edict:


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EDICT

WHEREAS, Ancient Masonic usage prohibits public solicitations for funds and gifts on behalf of Symbolic Masonry; and WHEREAS, In futherance of that injunction, Section 32.02 of the Code for Government of Lodges requires the approval of the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge for any solicitation for funds in the name of Masonry outside of the membership of the lodge or the membership of the lodges meeting in a particular Temple; and WHEREAS, The good of the order and the honor and respect it enjoys in civil society urge that Masonic custom and the Code be strictly enforced in regard to public solicitations; and WHEREAS, There has appeared some confusion in the public mind concerning sponsorship of public solicitations by organizations and groups whose membership is predicted on some Masonic affiliation or tie; Now, Therefore, I, Charles A. Brigham, Jr., Grand Master, do hereby issue this Edict

Declaring that it is prohibited, under penalty of suspension from membership in any lodge subordinate to the Grand Lodge ofF. & A.M. of Ohio, for any person to authorize, participate, or engage in any solicitation for gifts or donations outside of the ranks of the Fraternity by or on behalf of any such lodge. It is further prohibited, under such penalty, for any person to authorize, participate, or engage in any such solicitation outside of the ranks of the Fraternity using the name of Mason, Masonic, Masonic lodge, Freemasonry, Masonic Order, Free and Accepted Mason, or any other word or term tending to identify the Grand Lodge of Ohio or any lodge subordinate to it, or a committee thereof, with the person so soliciting or the organization on whose behalf he is so soliciting. This edict does not, in any manner, limit or intend to limit any organization whose membership is predicted on Masonic affiliation to conduct in its own name any public solicitation which is authorized or permitted by the regulations for its own ~overnment. I further direct that the Worshipful Master of each lodge shall read this Edict at the stated meeting next following its receipt, and that he shall forthwith notify each member of the lodge with a meaningful synopsis or summary of the essential contents hereof communicated by the same means customarily employed for communication of notices from the lodge to its general membership. Charles A. Brigham, Jr. Grand Master

HE-LAYING CAPITOL CORNERSTONE MICH IGAN: The Grand Lodge of Michigan re-Iayed the cornerstone of the State Capitol in Lansing. The ceremony was much the same, but readjusted to the end of the last and the beginning of the second century of its existence. The original cornerstone box was examined and opened on November 15, 1978. On October 2, 1979, the cornerstone of the State Capitol was re-Iayed with full Masonic ceremonies. It was quite an occasion and was attended by a large crowd of people. The full ceremony was published in the proceedings of Michigan.

RELIGION AND MASONRY OHIO: The Grand Master of Ohio gave this account of some of his answers to questions concerning religion and Masonry: There appears to be an unfortunate anti-Masonic undercurrent developing in some religious quarters. Bearing in mind the virtues of silence and circumspection, I have


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generally refrained from answering inquiries regarding the relationship of Masonry and religion. One, however, contained such thought-provoking content that I succumbed to the temptation to answer question by question, more for the organization of my own thought than for the edification of the propounder. My letter, with name deleted, follows, not that it is in any wayan official text, but that it may be a point of reference for the thinking of others on the issues stated. September 26, 1980 Dear Mr. Although the record of F. & A.M. of Ohio indicates that you have been indefinitely suspended for nonpayment of dues and therefore are not a Master Mason in good standing, I am inclined, nevertheless, to respond as best I can to the questions posed in your letter to me dated June 6, 1980. I answer your request for more light as follows: Your question No.1 According to Freemasonry, how does one obtain immortality or how does one get to Heaven? Answer: Freemasonry is a fraternity. It is not a religion and neither requires of nor imposes upon its members any theological concepts or religious dogmas, save two: 1) The oneness of the Creator or Supreme Being, identified in Masonry as the Grand Architect of the Universe, and 2) the immortality of the soul. Freemasonry does not presume to prescribe how an individual will achieve a state of perfect reconciliation with his Creator. As a Christian, I know that one does not go about obtaining immortality or entry into Heaven, for those are gifts of grace. Your question No. 2 Are there other books that would be considered equal with the Holy Bible in lodges in other countries? Answer: No lodge recognized as regular in Freemasonry may open and transact business unless the Volume of Sacred Law is open at the altar. Among Christians, that Volume is the Holy Bible. Although I have no specific knowledge, I find it difficult to assume that the Christian Bible would be that Volume of Sacred Law in a lodge composed of Mohammedan Master Masons located in Cairo, Egypt, or in a lodge of Jewish Master Masons located in Tel Aviv, Israel. Your question No.3 Who exactly is the Divine Architect referred to in Freemasonry? Answer: The one Creator or Supreme Being by whatever name He may be called. To Christians, of course, the name is God. Your question No.4. Is Freemasonry Christian? Answer: No - nor is it identified with any other religion. Freemasonry is a fraternity whose members are bound together in a body of moral and ethical principles within which they aspire to live. Most Masons in this country are Christians. Your question No. 5 What kind of position, if any, does Jesus Christ have in Freemasonry? Answer: None. I find, as a Christian, that the tenets of Freemasonry - brotherly love, relief and truth - tend only to strengthen and reinforce my own religious faith. Your question No. 6 If looked upon in a theological sense, would Freemasonry be considered unitarian in nature?


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Answer:

I don't know enough of what unitarianism is to give an adequate answer. Freemasonry is a fraternity; it should not be considered in a theological sense. Your question No.7 Does Freemasonry explain who the Supreme Being is that members are to believe in? Answer:

You will recall, I am sure, that early in your career in Masonry you were asked in whom you put your trust. I know that your answer was "In God," for you would have been advanced no further if the answer had been anything else. Your question No.8 Would it be acceptable to offer prayer in the name of Jesus Christ in lodge meetings? Answer:

Yes, and more often than not, it is, although at times that might be insensitive to the religious sentiments of others present. Y OUT question No. 9 Will all Masons unite in Heaven? If so, on what grounds? Answer:

The answer to that question is found in the religious tenets of each individual Mason, not in Freemasonry which is not a religion. You and I are both aware, I am sure, that the several Christian denominations are decidedly not in unanimity to the answer to these questions. Your question No. 10 Is there anything about Freemasonry that would offend my friends who may be Jewish, Moslem, Hindu, or Mohammedan? Answer:

No. Freemasonry will not offend your friends of any religious persuasion. To be a Mason, however, one must profess a belief in the oneness of God. Your question No.1 J Could a Master Mason present the gospel of Jesus Christ to others at a lodge meeting? Answer:

Present, yes; preach, no. Meetings of Masonic lodges are not forums for discussions of religious, political, or other matters of debate which are not the business of the lodge. The Master of the lodge would properly deny anyone opportunity during the course of a meeting to proselytize any religion or religious denomination. I hope that the foregoing has been helpful to you in clearing up your misunderstanding about our ancient and honorable Fraternity. It has been helpful to me in clarifying my thoughts on these very important questions. If you should wish to identify yourself with Freemasonry once more, I urge you to write your lodge Secretary for a petition to be reinstated to membership in the lodge. Sincerely, Charles A. Brigham, Jr.

RITUAL In the Grand Lodge Bulletin of Alberta, we find an article by W. Bro. P. W. Verrall, Master ofWaikato Lodge of Research No. 445. The editor, M.W. Bro. W. J. Collett, stated he had permission to use it. We trust that his permission covers this use of this very fine discussion of the presentation of the ritual of Freemasonry.


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THE DELIVERY OF RITUAL

By P. W. Verrall, P.M. Tonight I would like to talk about one aspect of the Ritual, its delivery. In my opinion, this aspect is the most important part of our ceremonies and yet there is very little, if any, tuition given in this regard and the only injunctions refer mainly to the adherence to the wording of the script. Our Ritual is a fine work of art and worthy of the Craft. It was certainly not written overnight but is based on developments that stretch over many hundreds of years. Because it has been committed to writing for a comparatively few years only, as previously it was passed by word of mouth, it is written to be spoken and not read. It is therefore the responsibility of those who speak it to be able to understand and interpret its meaning. It can be, and too often is, delivered a number of times by brethren without really being fully understood. A brother wrote that "one of the proofs of the stature of the Ritual is that it can still live even after a brother has done his best to murder it." There is a tremendous similarity, Brethren, between our Craft and the theatre. Just as our Speculative Freemasonry is based on operative masonry so the theatre presents on stage those occasions which could occur in real life. The theatre takes a small piece of this real life and draws attention to particular aspects very often with a moral in mind. In Freemasonry we use the artisan mason's work and derive a lesson on the fundamentals of life. Even our ceremonies are equivalent to stage productions for we too have rehearsals and a script, two most essential ingredients, plenty of actors, and our Director of Ceremonies as producer. We even have "stage hands" to alter the layout of our "sets" when necessary. In any production, whether it be Masonic or theatrical, it is essential that the message be got over to the audience. In our ceremonies the most important member of the audience is surely the candidate, he is hanging on every word that is spoken and it is disappointing if he is unable to get some understanding out of what is being directed specifically to him. There are two great dangers. First, there is a tendency .to regard the ritual as an irksome routine to be rattled through parrot fashion with only one thought in mind, to get it over. Second, and just as bad, there are those who regard the ritual as an opportunity for a full reign of histrionics and either turn it into a farce or a melodrama. We are certainly not all budding Richard Burtons or Laurence Oliviers, but the delivery of the charges is important. They must be given with sincerity for, as in a straight play, it becomes more effective. The title of my address is "Stand Up, Speak Up, Shut Up." In delivering most parts of the Ritual it is necessary first to "stand up" but, before doing so, try to place yourself as close as possible to the position from which you will be speaking. Before rising, take a few deep breaths to relax and move slowly to the candidate. Only salute once, either at your seat or at the W.M. if crossing the lodge. Stand relaxed and comfortable with your feet a few inches apart with one foot slightly forward. Don't rock backward and forward. This tendency can be avoided if your body weight is slightly forward, in other words if you were shot you would fall on your face rather than your back. A number of brethren have a tendency to be overconscious of their hands and if given the chance would gladly leave them on their seats. The easiest and most natural position is to let them hang at your sides. It is possible to close your fists if you prefer but remember that in acting hands can express feelings and to clench them means you are tense, a feeling soon transmitted to the candidate. Hands should certainly not be put in pockets or folded in front or behind you and jingling money, especially if the candidate has just been divested, or clicking fingers can be most distracting and easily spoil what would otherside be a good ritual delivery. Look the candidate straight in the eye and make him feel you are only talking to him. While gestures can be effective in the right place, they must appear natural and spontaneous. Paradoxically, to look unplanned they have to be carefully rehearsed. Make full gestures, startinK with your hand, followed by your body and head, finishing


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where you began. Don't flick a hand or head in the direction and do not hold a gesture after your point has been made. A gesture must have a reason, whether it is directing attention towards something or is explaining some article. If you are explaining an object you are holding, don't fiddle with it. Make distinct movements during your description and place it down as soon as you are finished. Finally, when you are standing, try and leave all your bad manners behind, forget the itching ear or nervous fingers. You cannot see them but they are in full view of the candidate and your audience who can find them extremely distracting. The second maxim "Speak Up" should really be described as "Speak Out" for greater volume is not necessarily more intelligible. Speak clearly and crisply with your voice cast upwards and outwards, not down into your figurative, or maybe, real beard. Try and get a good resonance and pronounce every word but don't overenunciate as in "Let(t) me add(er) to the remarks(s) of the Senior Warden(a)." Let your charges flow with a minimum of apparent effort with plenty of variety and contrast and not too fast or too slow. Changes in pace, volume, pitch, and inflection help to make that charge mean something. Pauses are most important and fall into two categories: a) natural breath and b) dramatic. A great example of the latter comes in the North East Corner when the charge builds up a climax "by calling upon you to exercise that virtue which mayjustly be denominated the distinguishing characteristic of a Freemason's heart (pause) I mean (longer pause) Charity." Pauses can accomplish four things if used properly: a) They give time for the candidate to absorb some of your ideas. b) It is a chance for you to concentrate on your next lines. c) It gives emphasis and meaning to special parts. d) It gives you a chance to catch your breath. For a suspensory pause you need not take a breath, but, for period pauses, which should average about 10 words, a breath is essential otherwise you find that you are running out of breath and lose control of your voice. Try and keep your lungs full, for with it you will: a) gain confidence; b) have plenty of reserve air; c) improve the quality and resonance of your voice; and d) hold your chest up and improve your appearance. Drop your jaw and tongue, open your lips and let that sound come out. Give variety to the volume of your voice. Early on, while the candidate is getting used to your voice, you may need a higher volume, not shouting but as your vocal power increases you can start to get a change, even in our larger lodge rooms, and still be heard. Vary your pitch and endeavour to get an inflection or modulation in your voice, something that we use when talking naturally and unconsciously in normal conversation but which suddenly disappears when we are called upon to do a charge. Don't PUT emphasis on the wrong words. Don't put EMPHASIS on the wrong words. Don't put emphasis on the WRONG words. Don't put emphasis on the wrong WORDS. By doing this you can not only change the meaning but also fail to put over your message. Try and accent what you consider are important words, not necessarily by making them louder. Bya rising modulation you transmit a feeling of cheerfulness, brightness and height. By a falling inflection you mean things are low, are sad and drab. Charges are addressed primarily to the candidate and must be intimate to him whilst at the same time they are fully audible to all brethren. Project your own personality, keep the candidate in a state of anticipation on what you are about to say and help him realize the solemnity of the occasion and the beauty of the words you are privileged to speak. Follow your own normal rate of speech, fast enough to be interesting but slow enough


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to be understood. Your slow rate will indicate thoughtfulness, deliberation and even sadness. When you speed up the message will be joy, excitement and vigor. And now, something common to most of us, nervousness - those little butterflies that will not stay still. First, in most cases only you are aware of them and, in fact, a little nervousness can help you give a far better and more meaningful delivery. Even the most experienced and hardened stage actors will confess to some level of nervousness on opening nights, especially. Remember that nobody present at a ceremony wishes to see you in a state of embarrassment or indignity. If you stumble for words, the prompter will help you audibly, but be assured all the brethren will be helping you mentally. If you have to take a prompt, and this should in no way affect the calibre of your charge, take it quietly as though pausing. The one or two-word prompt will immediately give you the clue. Don't turn round and ask for help and, when you get it, do not apologize or say thank you. This applies in rehearsals especially, for the habit gendered there can easily follow in the ceremony itself. Remember that memorizing the words is not all that is required. Learning is the first, not the last step. Treat every charge in is own context. Is it instructional like the Secrets and Charter or educational like the Lesser Lights and First T.B., Narrative like Traditional History and Second T.B. or just inspiration like the N.E. Corner, the Charges after Initiation or the Reasons for Preparation. Accept, with open arms, the opportunity to give a charge, treat it as a great privilege and enjoy it or at least sound as if you are enjoying it. It is essential to practice (ask any stage actor) and attend all the rehearsals. My third maxim is just as important as the other two. It is something that all Masons should, at the appropriate time, profess to admire and follow especially when other brethren are talking. It is just two words, "SHUT UP."

MICHIGAN: The Grand Lodge of Michigan turned down an amendment that would permit the Grand Lecturer to transport the "Master Key" to meetings with the District Deputy Lecturers. The Grand Lodge also said, "No," to an amendment that would have permitted proficiency examinations in a room adjacent to the lodge room by two qualified elected officers who could then report and vouch for the candidate's proficiency for advancement.

LENGTH OF RITUAL KANSAS: We were quite interested in the following from the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Kansas: LONG CATECHISMS A!':D LECTURES QUESTIO:-lED

And, in some jurisdictions, perhaps to the surprise of many of their members, with the approval of some, and to the consternation of others, a long look is being taken at rituals, especially the long lectures and lengthy catechism, as causing fewer petitions and as one reason so many candidates fail to advance. Perhaps we in Kansas might be pointed at as among the leading offenders in long lectures. In the second section of one degree, we laboriously recite to the candidate, step by step and in minute detail, what he has just been a part of, even to the extent of reciting again three exclamations which he had heard twice only minutes before. At least boring, at worst, a reflection on his intelligence, say some ofour critics. Perhaps the time might be better spent in telling him something about the functions and functioning of the lodge he has just joined. While our catechism isn't nearly as long as some, notably Arkansas and Texas, our Mother Grand Lodge of England thinks they are all much too lonp;. Says an Enp;lish


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Masonic writer about us: "The examination between degrees constitutes a complete resume of the ceremony in questions and answers, including memorization of the obligation. This would be a sufficiently difficult test even if it were supplied to the candidate in clear language. Generally we are content to pass a candidate to the second degree after answering 11 questions, and to the third after only nine." Perhaps we wouldn't be losing nearly 20 percent of our candidates at the end of the first degree if we patterned somewhat after our English brethren. CANDIDATE'S CIPHER SHORTENED

Massachusetts is reprinting its Candidate's Cipher with a new minimum or required questions and answers in boldface type. Use of only the minimum requirement is left to the discretion of the Master of each lodge. Says Grand Master Arthur Melanson, "Our lifestyles move at a faster pace than our previous ones. Most professional men do not have the time available to commit to memory the Candidate's Cipher. These are good men and true, who ought to be members of the Craft."

MASSACHUSETTS: The following was reported to the Grand Lodge: ~EW

CIPHERS

The reprinted Official Cipher and Candidates' Ciphers are available from the Grand Treasurer's Office. The change in ritual will become effective September 1, 1979.

MARYLAND: Of ritual, the Grand Master of Maryland said: But, more than anything, we need more people to learn the ritual. Every lodge should be able to confer the degrees with a capability which approaches excellence. To do proper degree work requires rehearsals, rehearsals, and more rehearsals. When you find a ritualist who is proficient in his work, you can safely say that here is a man who has spent hour after hour in memorizing and rehearsing the ritual, one who has been attendant upon the Schools of Instruction. It may be true that some persons memorize more easily than do others. But it has always been my contention that anyone who really wants to, can learn and confer any degree. The willingness to do so must be there first. A few years ago more of our members were interested in learning the ritual. We have to find some way to generate more interest in it. Good ritualistic work is a beauty to behold. But it can only be good if it is rehearsed many times. A play, or movie, or television, has been rehearsed many, many times. Hence, many of our brethren stay home to watch television.

NEW JERSEY: The Grand Lodge of New Jersey will have a Music Manual: The final prepublication phase of this Committee's work has been completed as projected. A prototype of the "Music Manual for Lodge Organists" was presented to the assembled District Deputy Grand Masters, by the Committee Chairman and the R. W. Grand Instructor on May 30, 1979. The manual received the approval of all in attendance. The prototype has been presented to M.W. Edward Rainey, Grand Secretary, for retyping and printing. In the next Grand Lodge year, the manual is scheduled to be distributed to lodges, and orientation sessions on the use of the man ual will be cond ucted by members of the committee. April 23, 1980

OREGON: The Grand Lodge of Oregon also hopes to have musIC for the several degrees: I have been able to continue the research of music for use in the presentations of the degrees in Masonry, initiated by our Past Grand Master, M.W. Bra. Joseph W.Jarvis, and gently urged onward by our previous Grand Master M.W. Bro. Lyman F. Coburn. Itis encouraRinR to note a Rreat increase of music beinR used both in lodRe activity and


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in degree conferral over the past two years. Apparently the harmonious and peaceful attitude music engenders has awakened lodge members to an awareness of musical talent among its members and the joy of giving when presenting a piano or an organ to their lodge. As to the results of our research for suitable music, we are now ready to go to press, so to speak. We shall make available on cassette tape music for opening and closing lodge and music for the three degrees. We wish to express our appreciation to the many officers and members of the Grand Lodge of Oregon who have supplied materials and assistance to accomplish this project.

MONTANA: The Grand Master of Montana said this of ritual in some lodges in his jurisdiction: I have also found that some lodges are using optional work in the degrees that is not Montana work. May I refer those lodges to Sec. 130 of the Code of Statutes. "Work and Lectures. No lodge shall be permitted to do any work not authorized by this Grand Lodge. The delivery or teaching oflectures not authorized, or which has not received the sanction of the Grand Lodge, or its lawful authority, is forbidden. If it shall be made to appear satisfactorily to the Grand Master that any lodge is permitting the doing of any work, or the teaching of any lectures, not prescribed by the Grand Lodge, he shall in his discretion either suspend the offending officers of such lodge or suspend the charter of the lodge until the next regular meeting of this Grand Lodge." I decided to do neither of these. If the members giving this lecture feel that it is worthy and adds to the degree, they should present it to the Committee on Work. If the Committee on Work approves of this addition, then it can be brought before this Grand Lodge for approval or rejection.

WYOMING: The following quotations were found in the report of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence to the Grand Lodge of Wyoming: PE:-lALTIES CLAUSES

"At my initiation, and indeed in the other two ceremonies, but most particularly at my intiation, I remember feeling a very definite sensation of repugnance when I came to repeat the penalties clause in its old form ... this appears to me to (be) calling upon God to witness an oath which is scarcely practical and certainly barbarous, while still maintaining a reference to what we are told, with perhaps an absence of positive proof, was the practice of our early brethren." M.W. Bro. H.R.H. the Duke of Kent, G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., A.D.C., and M.W. the Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of England, Address at Annual Investiture, April 25, 1979. We have inquired into changes in the Penalties which have been made in other Grand Lodges, and find that all in Canada, with the exception of Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia, have altered the form and application of the Penalties. This situation also applies to the Grand Lodges of England, Scotland, Ireland, the Netherlands and Switzerland, plus the American states of New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. It is our considered opinion that while the Penalties may be archaic, it is essential that reference to them remain in our Ritual, in order to demonstrate the reason for the signs used in each of the degrees. With the foregoing in mind we find it proper to suggest to this Grand Lodge a minor change in wording of the several Obligations, in order to answer the increasing objections being made to the moraly repugnant and legally indefensible Penalties, we recommend that this change be made by deleting the words "no less a" and substituting "the symbolic" in the Obligations of the various degrees. Report of the Special Committee on Penalties, Grand Lodge of British Columbia, A.F. & A.M. Proceedings of the One Hundred and Eighth Annual Communication, 1979.

The Grand Lodge also discussed at length the wisdom of the present long proficiency lectures. Here is a portion of that discussion:


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It has been brought to the attention of this Committee that many members still question the wisdom or necessity of our present proficiency system in being of such great length. In addition, they also question the rote or mechanical memorization technique presently required. These same members, however, do not question the need of candidates receiving a sound education in our basic Masonic teachings. This Committee finds itself in sympathy with a general need for change in the proficiency system; however, we do question the timing, of this immediate return to the floor, of such an important but controversial issue from last year's Grand Session. While a possible need for change can be demonstrated by our ever-increasing lists of E.A.'s and F.C.'s, who go no further, or by our inadvertently hearing of young people who refuse to petition because of the great amount of memory work required; or by our knowledge of highly intelligent people who simply cannot cope with the rote memorization technique; or by our knowledge of transient, but highly-skilled technicians, who simply do not have the time to accomplish such an undertaking.

SECRETARIES Good secretaries of lodges are truly deserving of our highest esteem and profound gratitude. They are, in many instances, the "backbone" of the Fraternity in their area. By contrast, a Secretary that fails in his duty to care for the records, look after the monies, issue the dues cards, and a multitude of other responsibilities, is actually guilty of un-Masonic actions. MAINE: The Grand Master of Maine had this to say: 1, therefore, RECOMMEND that lodges failing to respond within a reasonable time on any matter, after due notice, assume cost of postage and phone calls now paid for by Grand Lodge. As in the past many lodge secretaries have proven themselves as the "workhorses" of the lodge. In many instances the lodge secretaries are the angle that binds the building and without that keystone the building would most certainly collapse. There have been some unnecessary letters written to me from brethren who have paid their dues but after several months do not receive their dues card without which they cannot attend lodge. One threatened to dimit from Masonry. Is this type of treatment by apathetic secretaries necessary especially at a time in our existence when we are striving to prevent dimits?

SENATOR JOHN GLENN HONORED NEW YORK: The Grand Lodge of New York presented the Grand Lodge Award (for Distinguished Achievement) to Senator John Glenn. It was said: As to the Distinguished Achievement Committee, we are very happy to announce to you that the recipient of our Grand Lodge Award this year will be United States Senator John H. Glenn, better known as America's most famous astronaut, the first to orbit the earth. He will be with us tonight, and so will his wife, Annie. He has a wonderful background. I am going to call him in a few minutes to see whether he is coming in his own plane or not. Of course, having orbited the earth three times he certainly ought to know how to operate a plane, but he says that whether he flies or not depends on the weather. But if he does not fly himself, he will come by commercial plane. So you have this doubleheader waiting for you tonight, the tribute to our Grand Master, and the presentation of the Distinguished Achievement Medal to Senator Glenn. And third, and this not the least important, you have the fellowship of your brethren in the most amicable way that you could choose. 1 hope to see all this evening.

SHRINER STILL A FREEMASON MISISSIPPI: The Grand Master of Mississippi heard this from hisJurisprudence Committee:


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Membership in the Shrine is predicated upon Masonic membership. Members of Shrine Clubs are Shriners and by the same token are Masons. The fact that a Mason has "advanced" to Shrinedom relieves him in no manner from his obligations as a Blue Lodge Mason, nor does it place him outside of the pale of necessary adherence to the laws of the Grand Lodge under which his lodge is chartered. If engaging, either "directly or indirectly" in any form of "lottery, raffle, or game of chance" places a Blue Lodge Mason in violation of the law, then a member of the Shrine, whether acting on his own behalf or on behalf of the Shrine or an organization appendant thereto, is likewise in violation of Masonic law.

All Masons regardless of where or under what banner they operate are still subject to the laws of Masonry.

SHOULD PAST MASTERS VOTE IN GRAND LODGE? SOUTH CAROLIN A: The following dissertation on the subject of whether or not Past Masters should be entitled to vote in Grand Lodge may prove interesting to many. It was delivered by Past Grand Master Joel W. Frampton, Jr., of South Carolina: In March the Masonic Light carried an article by R. W. Dr. Sam Willis entitled "We Have Been There Before" with reference to the proposed amendment being brought by Granard Lodge No. 186. From 1817 to 1860 Past Masters were allowed to be voting members of our Grand Lodge because when the two Grand Lodges which were extant before 1817 merged, they had to compromise and include in the Constitution some things on which they didn't see eye to eye. Among these was an Ancient York Grand Lodge regulation - "Past Masters wishing to become members of the Grand Lodge shall apply by letter, and may be balloted for at the same communication, when, should they receive the votes of twothirds of the members present, they shall be declared duly elected, and shall sign the rules." They were then required to pay annually to the Grand Lodge $3.00 as long as they desired to remain a member. For the next 40 years the Grand Lodge lived with this provision, which became more abused year after year. There were 10 lodges in Charleston, known as the City Lodges, and about 50 to 70 lodges at various times over the state, which were known as the Country Lodges. The Grand Lodge met four times a year in Charleston as provided by the Constitution. Since it was impossible for many of the remote lodges to send their representatives to four meetings a year, the Constitution provided that they could appoint proxies among the Past Masters in Grand Lodge to represent them - of course, most of these proxies were Past Masters of the City Lodges. "As far back as 1822 Palmetto Lodge No. 19 at Laurensville sent a protest to Grand Lodge - declaring that from several years experience they had found it worse than useless to appoint a proxy in Charleston." The proxy, having a vote of his own, could negate the lodge's vote whom he represented when its wishes were contrary to his. Also there were occasions recorded when Grand Lodge would be called from labor to refreshment for a few minutes until the City Lodges could round up enough Past Masters to defeat a motion they opposed. There were, however, some City Masons who greatly opposed the Constitution which allowed such abuses - among these Albert G. Mackey, the Grand Secretary; Henry Buist, who later became Grand Master; Henry W. Schroeder, and others. In 1857 several amendments to the Constitution which were proposed at the last communication by Brother Mackey were to come up for final action. The business of Grand Lodge continued through the day until 12:00 midnight, when the Grand Master, Alfred Price, declared the communication closed without consideration of the amendments, which was contrary to Grand Lodge Rules. The reformers were not to be put off - a meeting was called to be held in the City of


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Columbia, presided ~ver by Henry Buist, S.G.W., and a new list of amendments were drawn up. The Grand Master issued a proclamation forbidding this meeting, denouncing it as illegal, and proposed to bring Masonic charges against those attending. This, however, did not come to pass. In 1858 the Grand Lodge met in Charleston and some of the recommendations of the Columbia meeting were passed - the more important being the abolishment of the proxy system; paying the expenses of one representative of each lodge (10 cents per mile for travel on stages, 5 cents per mile on railroads and $2.00 per diem); and establishing an Annual Communication at which all matters affecting the Craft at large would be considered. The Quarterly Communications were shorn of all power. The hard work was yet to be done - the entire Constitution needed revision to include the amendments already passed and also the disfranchisement of Past Masters. Knowing that this would never stand a chance in Charleston, in 1859 an independent amendment was offered and adopted, by which it was provided that hereafter the Annual Communication should be held in such place as the Grand Lodge might from time to time determine. By Resolution the next meeting of Grand Lodge would be held in Greenville. On November 20,1860, M.W. Bro. Henry Buist, Grand Master, opened Grand Lodge at noon in the Hall of Recovery Lodge No. 31, in the City of Greenville. This was the first time the Annual Communication was held away from Charleston. Seventy lodges were represented by their officers, or their regularly appointed delegates, which was a greater number than had ever before collected on the floor of the Grand Lodge since its organization. Very few Past Masters were present. On the second day the new Constitution was taken up. In Mackey's words - the only severe contest was on the second and third sections which disfranchised Past Masters of membership in Grand Lodge, although attempts were made to modify, if not to repeal these sections, but without success - more than two-thirds of the delegates had come there resolved that Past Masters should no longer be permitted to oppose by their votes those of the representatives of the lodges! Bro. Albert G. Mackey was perhaps the greatest interpreter of Masonic Jurisprudence the Order has ever produced, not only in South Carolina, but universally (that means the whole world); and he is recognized as such even to this day. Henry Buist was, in my opinion, the greatest of our Grand Masters, for his love of justice and his obstinacy in insisting on fair play, did more to bring unity between the upper part of our state and the lower in Masonic matters than any other before or since. Their opinions on the appropriateness of permitting Past Masters to be voting members of Grand Lodge are the basis of my opposition. Article 2 of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge says: "The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free Masons of South Carolina is a strictly representative body""... consists of ... and the Masters and Wardens of all legally constituted lodges ..." the representatives of their lodge, Brethren. Who would Past Masters represent? They were not elected by the brethren to represent them for life. Past Masters would be the representatives of no one but themselves, and are not, like the Masters and Wardens bound to obey instructions. A lodge has three legitimate votes in Grand Lodge. I know a small lodge, less than 200 members, which has 33 Past Masters. I don't know what an average would be over the state, but 1would expect it to be about ten to one in favor of Past Masters. You Masters here today ought to think about this. You are the Grand Lodge. You only enjoy this privilege three years - as Junior Wardens, Senior Warden, and as Worshipful Master. You should not deny this privilege to your successors. As Worshipful Masters of your lodges, you, when you were installed, admitted that it is not in the power of any man, or body of men, to make innovations in the Body of Masonry. Mackey - "Since the organization of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, none was perhaps more evidently opposed to the Ancient Landmarks and productive any time or more unjust or at least unequal representation than that regulation by which Past Masters were admitted to membership."


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The system was evidently in violation of the Landmarks and Ancient Usages. There was abundant historical evidence to show that it had never been recognized in the legitimate Grand Lodge of England, the Mother of the Provincial Grand Lodge of South Carolina, and that it was not introduced into the legal Masonic organization of South Carolina until 1808. It was, therefore, an innovation. The claim made by Past Masters that they were members by inherent right, and not by courtesy was beyond all reasonable proof. The Ancient Constitutions and Usages not only did not confer such privileges, but did not recognize them as members of the Grand Lodge at all. Our brethren of 1860 did not hesitate to oppose this system on the ground that every innovation is abhorrent to Masonry and should be removed at once. How does our present law compare with those of other Grand Lodges in this respect? The Masonic Service Association, of which our Grand Lodge is a member, reports that in the 49 Grand Lodges in the United States, five are represented only by Masters, two by Masters and Wardens and Special Representatives, IS by Masters, Wardens, and one Past Master, and 26 by Masters and Wardens like our Grand Lodge. In those Grand Lodges who allow Past Masters, some dilute the Past Masters' vote down to 1/4 vote up to a full vote. Our present law agrees with those of most of the other Grand Lodges. To change our law just because some other Grand Lodge does differently than we do makes no sense. My opposition to the proposed amendment to our Constitution is based on the opinion of Albert Gallatin Mackey, our Grand Lodge's most eminent scholar and authority on Masonic Law; M.W. Brother Henry Buist, our champion of the cause of those who were discriminated against by the powerful few, and those valiant lodge representatives in the Grand Lodge of 1860 who returned the Grand Lodge A.F.M. in South Carolina to those who are legitimately its leaders. Brethren, hold on to your prerogatives and don't deny them to those who come after you!

STATE FAIR DISPLAY MINNESOTA: The Grand Lodge of Minnesota sponsored a display at the State Fair. The Grand Master reported these results: Brethren, I'm happy to report that I have received many, many favorable compliments from all over the State of Minnesota, and other parts of the country from Masons and non-Masons alike, which praised our new State Fair Display. In the past, we have used a booth in the State Fair Grandstand building, but with little effect. This year our new display featured an attractive, well-designed, and informative walk-through photo-gallery of 68 famous Freemasons that covered seven categories: U.S. Presidents; Founding Fathers; Minnesotians; Entertainers; Free Enterprise; Explorers; Law, Science and Arts. A caption with each photograph emphasized the Blue Lodge activities of the famous Freemasons. In addition to the photo-gallery, there was a synchronized tape-recorded narration and slides of 80 famous Freemasons from all walks of life and from all periods of our nation's history. Also, there was a detailed Masonic Map showing the location of each lodge in Minnesota, giving the town, lodge name and number, with the 30 separate Masonic Districts and the 10 Custodial Regions outlined on the map.

TILER'S SWORD WISCONSIN: The following account of a beautiful Tiler's sword was reported to the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin: Bro. James R. Emery, President of the Madison Masonic Union, explained that while going through paraphernalia in the Temple of Freemasonry they came across a beautiful Tiler's sword that had been used for over 20 years in the mid-1800s by Grand Tiler Ebenezer Clewett. Brother Emery, on behalf of Madison Lodge No.5 and the Madison Masonic Union, took great pride in presenting this Grand Tiler's Sword to Grand Master


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George R. Hughey. Grand Master Hughey responded with appropriate words of thanks and asked Grand Tiler Karl Crane to take the sword to the Tiler's station and begin to use it promptly.

TOURS OHIO: The Grand Master of Ohio had this to say about tours: TOURS

It is my firm conviction that commercial tours are not proper functions of this Grand

Lodge. It is inconsistent with the best interests of Freemasonry in Ohio for the lodges and their members to become a "market" for an unrelated commercial enterprise. Our brief exposure in past years to tours wholly planned and conducted outside the Grand Lodge organization has not been good. I recommend that legislation be proposed to delete those portions of Sec. 34.01(d) of the By-Laws which relate to tours.

We certainly agree with the Grand Master of Ohio that some, not all, Masonic-sponsored tours do not seem to be in keeping with Masonic propriety.

TRIBUTE TO WILLIAM PRESTON WASHINGTON: Bro. Louis C. Hansen, Grand Historian of the Grand Lodge of Washington, past this tribute to the man responsible for the lectures used in the first three degrees of Masonry today. About him, he said: WILLIAM PRESTON

(1742-1818)

We have four systems of Masonic philosophy. Two are intellectual systems: First, that of Preston, whose key word is Knowledge; second, that of Krause, whose key word is Morals. Two are spiritual systems: First, that of Oliver whose key word is Tradition; and second, that of Pike, whose key word is Symbolism. Preston's philosophy is the philosophy of our American lectures and hence is the only one with which the average American Mason acquires any familiarity. Brother Preston was born at Edinburgh, Scotland, August 7, 1742. He had his schooling in Edinburgh where he made some progress in Latin and Greek. He later apprenticed to a printer until 1762. He became the King's Printer in London, which shows the mark of his abilities. Preston was made a Mason in a lodge of Scotsmen in London at the age of 21. At the age of 25 he became Master of his lodge. And, as such, he conceived it his duty to make a thorough study of the Masonic institution. It was a bold but most timely step when this youthful Master ofa new lodge determined to write the Lectures of Craft Masonry. The Old Charges had been read to the initiate originally, and from this there had grown a practice of orally expounding their contents upon the important points. To turn this into a system of fixed lectures and give them a definite place in the Ritual was a much needed step in the development of the work. When Preston began the composition of his lectures, he organized a sort of club, composed of his friends, for the purpose of listening to him and criticizing him. This Club met twice a week in order to pass on, criticize and learn the lecture as Preston conceived it. Finally, in 1772, after seven years, he interested the Grand Officers in his work and delivered an oration, which appears in the first edition of his Illustrations of Masonry, before a meeting of eminent Masons, including the principal Grand Officers. After delivery of his oration, his hearers approved the lectures. The result was to give a standing which insured their ultimate success. His disciples began now to go about from lodge to lodge delivering his lectures and to come back to the weekly meetings with criticisms and suggestions. Thus, by 1774, his system was complete. He then instituted a regular school of instruction, which obtained the sanction of the Grand Lodge and thus diffused his lectures throughout England. This made him the most prominent Mason of


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the time, so that he was elected to the famous Lodge of Antiquity, one of the four old lodges of 1717. Among other things, he organized a society of Masonic scholars, the first of its kind. It was known as the Order of the Harodim and included the most distinguished Masons of the time. Preston taught his lectures in this Society, and through it they came to America, where they are the foundation of our Craft Lectures. In addition to our indebtedness to Brother Preston for the degree lectures, we owe much to him in making our lodges more meaningful. The history of the Masonic symbolism of the Bible is interesting. Although referred to in the manuscripts before the revival of the Book upon which the covenant was taken, it was never referred to as a Great Light. In the oldest ritual that we have, that of 1724, there is no mention of the Bible as one of the Lights. Preston made it a part of the furniture of the lodge; but, in rituals of about 1760, it is described as one of the Three Great Lights. The questions asked the candidate prior to the Preparatory Lecture are of very old form. They are to be found in precisely the same words in the earliest edition of Preston. The office of Grand Chaplain is of very modern date. No allusion to such an officer is to be found in any of the old Constitutions, and Preston informs us that it was instituted on the 1st of May, 1775, on the occasion of the laying of the cornerstone of the Freemason's Hall in London. Although many Masonic scholars have recorded much history, American Craft Masonry in many respects had its origin in the work of Brother Preston. In concluding this report, which is now the 1978/1979 History of our Fraternity, I do so with the reminder that the Builder builds for a century, the Freemason builds for an eternity, and History records this progress.

UNUSUAL VISITATION WASHINGTON: The Grand Master of Washington recounts his return toa lodge he visited as an Entered Apprentice: On June 8, 1948, I received the Entered Apprentice Degree in Spokane Lodge No. 34. On the 9th of June, 1948, I had to fly a B-29 to Wright-Patterson Air Base for some modification. Having the evening free, I went into Dayton to visit a Masonic lodge. During the examination it was obvious that I did not have any proper credentials or even a dues card. The Worshipful Master said that if a young man would travel over 1,500 miles in less than 24 hours and wanted to visit his lodge, he would let him. He seated me in the East on his left, and I observed a First Degree, Ohio style. When it became apparent that I might become Grand Master, I contacted the Grand Secretary of Ohio, who researched the files, and found that 1 had visited Horace A. Irvin Lodge No. 647, in Dayton. With further correspondence and communications with the Worshipful Master, David A. Day, and the Grand Master of Ohio, M.W. Daniel F. Iceman, it was concluded that 1 should visit Horace A. Irvin Lodge No. 647, ... this time with proper credentials. I was accompanied by W. Edwin R. Shaffer, Grand Standard Bearer, and W. Ralph W. Hose, Chairman of the Representative Expenses Committee. The Worshipful Master took us on a tour of the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, and then to a fine dinner at the Main Masonic Temple in Dayton. M.W. Daniellceman, Grand Master, received me into the lodge and seated me in the East on the left of the Worshipful Master, where 1, once again, observed a First Degree, Ohio style. This degree was put on in my honor on the 16th of May, 1979, nearly 31 years after my first visit as a Sojourning Mason. The Grand Master consented to heal any errors that may have been committed by the Worshipful Master in 1948.

UPPERDOG President Upton was not addressing himself to Freemasonry, but his state-


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ments about achievement, dedication, and devotion to duty certainly parallel the philosophy of the Fraternity. He said: I have just about reached the end of my tolerance for the way our society now seems to have sympathetic concern only for the misfit, the pervert, the drug addict, the drifter, the chronic criminal, the under-achiever. It seems to me we have lost touch with reality and become warped in our attachments. I feel it is time for someone like me to stand up and say, in short, "I'm for the upperdog." I'm for the achiever - the one who sets out to do something and does it; the one who recognizes the problems and opportunities at hand, and endeavors to deal with them; the one who is successful at his immediate task because he is not worrying about someone else's failing; the one who doesn't consider it "square" to be constantly looking for more to do, who isn't always rationalizing why he shouldn't be doing what he is doing; the one, in short, who carries the work of his part of the world squarely on his shoulders. It is important to recognize that the quality of any society is directly related to the quality of the individuals who make it up. Therefore, let us stop referring naively to creating a "great" society. And to do so, our first task is to help each individual be decent unto himself and in his relationship with other individuals. We will never create a good society, much less a great one, until individual excellence and achievement are not only respected but encouraged. That is why I am for the upperdog - the achiever, the succeeder. Miller Upton President, Beloit College

WAITING PERIOD RHODE ISLAND: The Grand Master had this to say about a resolution that would require a waiting period of six months before a brother could petition any other organization that predicates its membership on the lodge: Today, you will cast your vote to determine whether newly-made Master Masons will or will not have to wait six months before applying to a concordant body for membership. I have expressed my views on this matter in a recent message in the Rhode Island Freemason. I will only reiterate this much - pass this resolution only if you are willing to make use of that six months by working with the newly-made Master Masons. If you pass this resolution and waste that six-month period, not only will the concordant bodies lose prospective members but in all likelihood, so will our Blue Lodges.

After careful consideration and considerable discussion the resolution was defeated.

WAIVERS Waivers ofjurisdiction between Grand Lodges that share a common border are frequent, sometimes unnecessary. For many years Missouri and Kansas had a problem along the border between the two states. More recently waivers have been regarded in a slightly different light than they were in former years. KANSAS: The Grand Master of Kansas granted a waiver to one request from Missouri, but denied another. We think this is altogether fitting and proper.

WAIVER OF PROFICIENCY AND TIME BETWEEN DEGREES KANSAS: The Grand Master of Kansas, by edict, tried out a waiver of proficiency requirements and the legislative time between degrees. At almost the close of this year, we understand, this waiver was rescinded. The following is a copy of the waiver:


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March 14, 1979 Dear Brethren: Effective immediately as Grand master of the M.W. Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Kansas, I issue the following blanket waiver: Time between conferral of degrees waived. Further, I waive all proficiency requirements for advancement on all candidates, including Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts now carried on your records and new Petitioners. These waivers to remain in effect through my tenure of office. In permitting this action please be advised that this does not mean that any of the work is to be omitted. All work must be conferred in a very proficient, solemn and impressive manner. It is my desire to have 5,000 new petitions this year. As this will mean added work for all lodges, the following will be permitted: A group conferral of degrees can be accomplished using one candidate with the others witnessing the ceremony. But all degrees and lectures must be presented in a proficient manner. If you have a petition and your lodge is unable to act on that petition because of lack of time or whatever the reason, you may send it direct to the Grand Master. In turn it will be thoroughly examined and if approved, all degrees will be scheduled and conferred. In cases such as this, the raising fee will be $80.00. Of that amount $5.00 will go to the Masonic Home. Fifty dollars will be returned to the lodge who eventually will receive the petitioner as a new member. Twenty-five dollars will be retained by Grand Lodge for handling costs. It will be the lodge officers' obligation to continue to diligently promote and encourage the proficiency program within the lodge. You are to actively encourage lodge officers and members to obtain "B's," "A's," "Master's," and "Unlimited" Certificates. I ask for your wholehearted cooperation. Fraternaly, W. NOLAN ARTZ Grand Master

WHAT IS FREEMASONRY? GEORGIA: The Educational and Historical Commission of the Grand Lodge of Georgia came up with a pamphlet, "What Is Freemasonry?," to be given to any non-Mason who expressed an interest in the Fraternity. It is stated that this is not intended to be used for solicitation. This is an outline of the pamphlet: WHAT IS FREEMASONRY?

This question has been asked for centuries. It is a system of morality which is designed to take good men, and, through its moral lessons, make them better than they were. IS IT A SECRET ORGANIZATION?

Freemasons have never attempted to conceal their identity. Lodge buildings are clearly identified and many members proudly wear jewelry attesting to their association with the Fraternity. Masonry does have a few hidden mysteries which are revealed to the initiate in the three degrees, but these hardly warrant the label secret being applied to the Fraternity. IS ~ASO:-lRY A RELIGIO:-l?

Freemasonry is not a religion. In fact religion and politics are two subjects which are strictly prohibited from being discussed in a lodge meeting. The reason is that these subjects are so divisive by nature. A man, however, must profess a belief in the Deity and in the immortality of the soul. In other words, a Mason must be religious; whether he be Jewish, Christian, Mohammedan, or whatever is strictly up to him.


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ORGANIZATION The Fraternity today operates through Grand and subordinate lodges. The first Grand Lodge was formed in London, England in 1717. Freemasonry in the United States and elsewhere can be traced to this Grand Lodge. Grand Lodges charter subordinate lodges which consist of members ranging in numbers from at least three to more than a thousand. There are 49 Grand Lodges in the United States. There are more than 3,000,000 Freemasons in these jurisdictions alone. Georgia currently has a membership of more than 94,000 spread among 470 lodges. These lodges are known by several names, such as: Blue, Symbolic or Craft. Individually they initiate the candidate into three degrees: Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and Master Mason. Freemasonry arrived in Georgia at least as early as 1734. Solomon's Lodge No.1, established in that year, has operated continuously. It is the oldest continuously operating Lodge in the Western Hemisphere. The M.W. Grand Lodge of Georgia began its existence in 1786. APPENDANT BODIES There are several allied Masonic groups which we call appendant bodies. Membership in a symbolic lodge is a prerequisite for membership. These appendant bodies bear such names as: Royal Arch, Knights Templar, and Council. They are often referred to as the York Rite Bodies. Also we have the various lodges such as the Lodge of Perfection, Rose Croix, etc., contained in the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. Some have thought, through error, that these are higher bodies, but there is no higher degree than that of Master Mason. MEMBERSHIP Membership is restricted to adult males. In all lodges working under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Georgia, F. & A.M., an applicant must be 21 years of age before he petitions for membership. No one is asked to join; a man petitions because he has formed a favorable opinion of the Fraternity on his own. The petitioner must be of good physical, mental and, especially, moral character.

WIDOWS' EMBLEM OREGON: After some consideration and armed with the knowledge that some jurisdictions had designed a widow's pin, the following resolution was offered in the Grand Lodge of Oregon: WHEREAS, Many inquiries have been made as to why this program had not been adopted in Oregon; and, WHEREAS, It is felt this is an appropriate way to make it possible for one Masonic Widow to recognize another Masonic Widow as well as making this identification recognizable to the members of the Masonic Fraternity; now Therefore Be It Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Oregon recognize this program for use by the constituent lodges and provide a supply of these emblems for purchase by those lodges choosing to participate; and, Be It Further Resolved, That the emblem or pin as is presently being used in the Grand Jurisdiction of Washington be adopted as this particular pin is already being used by several Grand Jurisdictions and will be more uniform and recognizable.

YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE THE BALL TO SCORE CALIFORNIA: The Grand Orator of California, Glenn D. Woody, had these things to say about the Fraternity: We must get off the defensive and get on the offensive in meeting these challenges in the area of activities. "You've got to have the ball to score!"


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A MASONIC REVIEW

1981

"You've got to have the ball to score" with regard to finances. My Brethren, the one place we have been the most defensive and passive, the one place we remain the most archaic in our thinking, in my opinion, is the area of the finances of our lodge. We have been so preoccupied with the thought of avoiding increases in dues and fees that we are drastically underselling our Masonry. I visited with the recipient of the Golden Veterans Award one evening recently and asked him what he paid to join the lodge in 1929. "One hundred dollars," he said, I turned to the Master and learned the present fees are 150 dollars. The 100 dollars compounded at just three precent, the 100 year average rate of inflation, would have the fees at 430 dollars in 1979. We refuse to raise the dues in the face of inflation and wonder why our lodges are going bankrupt. We believe if we hold a Stated Meeting dinner and don't lose money on it, we have charged our members too much and have thereby driven them away. We refuse to believe our members will pay 10, 12 or 15 dollars per person for a once-a-yearbanquet and dance at a beautiful hotel, when some lodges are packing the room at such events. Moreover, our own members are paying those prices to attend such events with other organizations. Why wouldn't they for us? We have built beautiful buildings, paid off the mortgages and then dusted off our hands and promptly dismissed any further thought of fiscal responsibility, setting up no reserves for maintenance and replacement. We then wonder, years later when the building is costing more to maintain than the lodge can afford, why the Temple Association has an impossible financial task. We have refused to address the conservative savings and investments policies for lodge monies which are very much a part of the Grand Lodge investments and of our members' personal financial activities. We have ducked the idea of life memberships in our lodges and the several benefits which result in providing future financial resources. Solutions? Get off the defensive and get on the offensive! Attack the challenge rather than ducking and dodging it. Approach this area in your lodge's administration in a businesslike way and run it responsibly, but aggressively. Put businessmen in spots of financial responsibility just as you would call on the plumber in your lodge to advise you about changing the fixtures in the kitchen or restrooms. The business of financing our activities and buildings is like rowing a boat upstream; you have no choice, you must go ahead or you will go back. You've got to have the ball to move forward! "You've got to have the ball to score" regarding our Masonic youth groups. There are three reasons why we must take an offensive, aggressive stance in support of our youth: 1) What it will do for them, 2) What it will do for our lodges, and 3) What it will do for our country. First, what it will do for them. Each of you knows the facts and could state the case as well as I. They are totally dependent upon us, in the long run, and we are letting them down. Problems of whatever size or nature in our youth groups are never traceable to the youth. They always stem from the adult area. They always come from having to few of the right kind of adults and/or not enough of the right kind of Masonic support. But I did not come here to try to convince each of you to become youth group advisors. That sort of commitment comes from the heart and not the head. I would, however, suggest each of you select one young person, other than your own son or daughter, with whom to get personally acquainted, to whom to pay special attention. Give them jobs in your business, invite them into your homes; listen to their thoughts, their problems, their ambitions. They want, most of all, an adult who will just listen to them with genuine interest. You see, they don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care. You will be amazed at what suc'" an association will do for you both. Second, what supporting the youth groups will do for the lodge. Many lodges find a significant number of their officers, in some cases more than half, are the direct result of the youth groups. They are either senior DeMolays or fathers or


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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advisors of the groups