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eflAND LODGE Ancient, Free and Accepted

Masons of the State of Missouri

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Official· Proceedings One Hundred Twenty.-Nmth Annual Communicatioq

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SAINT LOUIS Sept. 26, 27, 28, A. D. 1950, A. L. 5950


BIOGRAPHICAL

JAMES M. BRADFORD Grand Master 1949-1950

James M. Bradford, Grand Master of Masons in Missouri for the years 1949 and 1950, was born iIi Keokuk, Iowa, June 26, 1880. His parents were Harry H. and Emma C. Bradford. He is a direct descendant of Governor William Bradford, who came to America on the Mayflower. and, as Governor of Plymouth Colony, proclaimed the first Thanksgiving Day observation in 1621. Anyone touring the Atlantic States will meet many reminders of the regard in which this great American is held. Most Worshipful Brother Bradford attended the public schools in Keokuk until he reached the age of thirteen years, when it became necessary for him to become a wage-earner. He came to St. Louis at about the age of fourteen and has been a resident of this city since that time, with the exception of the years路 1920 and 1921, when business obligations called him to Cleveland, Ohio, and New York City. After his first arrival in St. Louis the young man mastered short-hand and typewriting during his spare time and in his evening hours, becoming so proficient that he was able to hold several important secretarial positions. He studied law at home for thirteen months and with 44 others, all of whom were college graduates, took the examination for admission to the Bar. He was one of only eight in that group who passed the examination. One member of that Examining Committee remarked that he had never been privileged to read a more concise, clear-cut response than the answers submitted by James M. Bradford. He has never entered the private practice of Law, preferring business and Corporation activity. His connection with the Aeolian Company of Missouri began in 1913, when he assumed the position of Credit Manager. A few years thereafter he became Secretary and Member of the Board of Directors. For the past ten years he has been Secretary and Treasurer and Member of the Board of Directors of the Aeolian Company of Missouri. Brother Bradford married Miss Edna Lemen Sharpe of St. Louis. Mrs. Bradford was for' several years Deputy for the South-East District of the Daughters of the American Revolution. At the present time she is State Chairman of the Committee for the Advancement of American Music. She is President of St. Louis Pioneer Chapter of


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the United States Daughters of 1812 and an active member of the Uandi Literary Club of St. Louis. An accomplished vocalist, the lady was endowed by nature with beauty and a charming personality. She has sung in every state in our Union and in many countries abroad. Her activities have resulted in giving her a wide acquaintance throughout the entire country. Brother Bradford was raised in Keystone Lodge No. 243, September 22, 1917, and in December of the same year he was appointed to serve as Junior Steward by Worshipful Brother Taylor Young. After serving as Junior and Senior Steward he resigned because of business duties which compelled him to reside in Cleveland, Ohio. After a year in Cleveland he was called to New York City where he remained for another year. Returning to St. Louis in 1921 he was appointed to serve as Junior Deacon. He presided over Keystone Lodge as Worshipful Master in 1928. His term of office was a busy, prosperous and eventful one for his Mother Lodge. One of the outstanding meetings of that) year was the occasion of the visit of their member, Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh, after his return from a goodwill tour of the South American governments. Hundreds were unable to gain admittance to the Lodge. After the meeting Colonel Lindbergh was taken from the Temple by way of a special exit in order to avoid the crowd that thronged the hallways and the streets about the Masonic Temple. Colonel Lindbergh was presented with a gold life membership card bearing the name of James M. Bradford as 'Vorshipful Master. Brother Bradford is a member of Missouri Consistory No.1, Scottish Rite; Missouri Chapter No.1, Royal Arch Masons; Kilwinning Council No. 19, Allied Masonic Degrees; Charter Member of the Missouri Lodge of Research; The Square Club; Honorary Member, Wardens and Masters Clubs; Downtown and South Side Hi-12 Clubs; Longtime and supporting member of the Missouri Historical Society. Brother Bradford is a member and regular attendant at the First Unitarian Church in St. Louis. Brother Bradford was appointed to serve as District Deputy Grand Master for the 33rd Masonic District by Most Worshipful Brother Henry C. Chiles in 1938. His diligence in performing his duties in that important office had the effect of bringing his fine ability to the attention of the Grand Lodge officers in addition to earning for him the esteem and affection of the Brethren in the Jurisdiction entrusted to' his direction. He served as a member of the Appeals and Grievances Committee in 1939. In 1940 he was appointed to the office of Grand Pursuivant in the Grand Lodge line by Most Worshipful Brother Harry S. Truman. He advanced through the successive offices until he was elected to serve as Grand Master in September, 1949. The Brother who had appointed Brother Bradford to his first office


BIOGRAPHICAL

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in the Grand Lodge line, now the President of the United States, laid aside the cares and duties of his high office and flew to St. Louis to install Brother Bradford as; Grand Master. -Truly history was made at that time, because it is unlikely that ever in the future will a Grand Master be installed into office by the President of this great country. Most Worshipful Brother Truman earned and merited the affection and esteem of all Freemasons by this demonstration of his loyalty and devotion to our Fraternity. The performance in office of Most Worshipful Brother Bradford has amply justified th~ wisdom of his original appointment. Presiding over a Grand Lodge session that had before it the disposition of several important and controversial problems, Most W orshipful Brother Bradford acquitted himself in a most creditable manner. His fair and impartial conduct of the session was complimented by many experienced parliamentarians. Those who were present at the Grand Lodge Communication voiced the conviction that a true spirit of Fraternity prevailed when Most Worshipful Brother Bradford relinquished the gavel to his successor. As fine a tribute as was ever paid to a Grand Master was that tendered to James M. Bradford on May 8, 1950 when about four hundred of his Brethren from St. Louis and St. Louis County gathered in the dining hall of the Scottish Rite Cathedral to do honor to him. On another occasion, while visiting a Lodge in St. Charles, Most Worshipful Brother Bradford was surprised to find that a large delegation from his own Keystone Lodge was present to act as a special escort. Our Distinguished Brother would have needed many more days than were available in his year as Grand Master had he responded to all of the requests and invitations extended to him. He preferred to allot his time to the small and struggling Lodge where he felt that his visit and influence would be of lasting benefit. A knowledge of the ability of Brother Bradford was not confined to Missouri. At the meeting of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, in Chicago, early in October, 1949, where about eighty Masonic dignitaries comprised the list of Distinguished Visitors, Most vVorshipful Brother Bradford was selected by the Grand Master of Masons of Illinois to respond to the address of welcome. Again, at the meeting of the Grand Lodge of Canada, July 18-19, 1950, at the Grand Master's banquet, held in the convention hall of the Royal York Hotel in Toronto, attended by many distinguished guests and 1500 Brethren, Most Worshipful Brother Bradford was called upon to respond for the visitors. Strength of understanding, clearness of apprehension, and soundness of judgment are natural in him because of his fine liberal education and concise mode of thinking. His extensive acquaintance with


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classical and almost every other branch of literature places him in the first rank among men of learning. His thorough knowledge of civil and common law, which he has studied as a science founded in the principles of government and. the nature of man, combined to assure success in his chosen profession. His tender feelings, relative to his natural and civil ties, his exquisite sensitivity and generous effusion of soul for his friends, are proofs that his heart is as good as his head is sound, and all of these admirable attributes qualified him to preside over the destinies of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Masons of Missouri with high honor to himself and, like Chevalier Bayard, to live without fear and without reproach. In the administration of the duties of his high office, Most W orshipful Brother Bradford ruled fairly and impartially on every question. Where stern and prompt action was indicated he did not hesitate. Clear-headed and intensely practical, there was also about him a hint of the Idealist and the Dreamer ... hoping and planning to the end that our Fraternity might achieve its highest ideals and yield the greatest benefit to mankind in a troubled world, striving only to do his duty, with no thought of personal popularity, as Most Yvorshipful Brother Bradford surrendered his high office we find the almost unanimous verdict-Well done, "faithful Brother. Long may he live to serve, to guide and to advise us. S. C.


GRAND LODGE Ancien~

Free and Accepted

Masons of the State of Missouri

Official Proceedings One Hundred Twenty-Ninth Annual Communication

• SAINT LOl)IS Sept. 26, 27, 28, A. D. 1950, A. L. 5950


ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION

FIRST DAY The One Hundred Twenty-Ninth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, at 10 :00 a.m., on Tuesday, September 26, 1950.

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PRESENT James M. Bradford, M. W. Grand Master. Ray Bond, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. Homer L. Ferguson, R. W. Senior Grand Warden. Richard O. Rumer, R. W. Junior Grand Warden. Edmund E. Morris, R. W. Grand Treasurer. Harold L. Reader, R. W. Grand Secretary. Anthony F. Ittner, R. W. Grand Lecturer. Emmett L. Robison, W. Grand Chaplain. Samuel Thurman, W. Grand Chaplain. Earl Starke, W. Grand Chaplain. Edward Potts, W. Grand Chaplain. Herbert E. Duncan, W. Grand Chaplain. . . . . . . . . , Grand Senior Deacon. Orestes Mitchell, Jr., Grand Junior Deacon. William J. Craig, Grand Senior Steward. Harold M. Jayne, Grand Junior Steward. .., Grand Marshal. Frank P. Briggs, Grand Marshal. Robert L. Aronson, Grand Sword Bearer. Harold O. Grauel, Grand Pursuivant. Monk Bryan, Grand Orator;Herman A. Orlick, Grand Tiler.

OPENING

At 10 :00 a.m. Most Worshipful Grand Master James M. Bradford opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri in Ample Form assisted by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of representatives. The brethren united in singing one verse of America after which the Grand Chaplain offered the invocation.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE-INTERIM REPORT

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A.路M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Credentials begs to report a constitutional number of subordinate lodges are represented. FRED

H.

KNIGHT,

Chairman. MESSAGES

Messages of greeting were received from Past Grand Master Henry C. Chiles, in Germany, Past Grand Master Frank A. Barnhill, in Marshall, Grand Master Albert J. DeLange, of Texas, M. W. Bro. Carl H. Claudy, Executive Secretary, and Bro. John D. Cunningham, Director of Welfare, of the Masonic Service Association. APPROVAI.. OF 1949 PROCEEDINGS

On motion, duly made, seconded and carried, the published 1949 Proceedings were approved. AMENDMENT PROPOSED

The following amendment was proposed and referred to the Jurisprudence Committee: September 26, 1950 We, the undersigned, propos'e the following amendment: Change question eight on the petition for the degrees which reads "Have you ever been rejected by any Masonic Lodge' If so, when and where'," to read when amended as follows: "Have you ever petitioned, been initiated in, or rejected by, any Masonic Lodge' If so, when and where'" Signed, VERNIE G. FISHER, VERNIE G. FISHER, JR. RUDOLPH S. CHAPMAN, WILL M. TORRENCE.

BROTHERS CARTER, SELLERS, AND COTTON

Grand Master Bradford spoke of the death of Rt. Wor. Brother F. Ernest Carter, Senior Grand Marshal, in August, and of the illness of Rt. Wor. Brother James McBrayer Sellers, Grand Senior Deacon, and M. Wor. Brother T. W. Cotton, Past Grand Master. The Grand Master recognized Wor. Bro. James P. Hall, Wor. Master of Lexington Lodge No. 149, who read the following message from Rt. Wor. Bro. Sellers: To M. Wor. Gr(J//'/,d Master, Wa,rden.s and Brethretr~: I am with you in spirit on this the opening day of our Grand Lodge Session. To my hundreds of friends and brothers who may be interested, I send word that my recovery from the heart attack suffered August 25 has been all that can be hoped for. The expressions of good wishes from so many of you have meant more than I can say and I shall be up and about very soon. My best wishes for a fruitful and inspiring meeting. (Signed) COLONEL J. M. SELLERS.


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On motion of Rt. Wor. Ray Bond the Grand Secretary was directed to send message of greeting expressing the hope of speedy recovery to Brothers Sellers and Cotton. DISTINGUISHED VISITORS

The following Distinguished Visitors were introduced: Benjamin E. Patton, Grand Master of Illinois. Richard C. Davenport, P.G.M., Grand Secretary of Illinois. Glen G. Radcliffe, Grand Master of Iowa. Eliud Garcia Trevino, Past Grand Master of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Benjamin F. Eyre, Past Grand Master of Nebraska. S. Allan Daugherty, Grand Junior vVarden of Kansas. William B. Massey, S.G.I.G., Scottish Rite of Missouri. Roy A. Dickie, Grand Commander, Grand Commandery Knights Templar of Missouri. James P. Hull, Grand High Priest, Grand Chapter R.A.M. of Missouri. Ralph J. Brooks, Grand Master, Grand Council R. and S. M. of Missouri. Solon Cameron, W. Master Missouri Lodge of Research. ADDRESS OF GRAND MASTER

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri: BRETHREN: Again we assemble in Annual Communication, amidst global confusion that reaches out and touches the lives of the people of every nation. To millions of men abroad, living under the ever lengthening shadow of false and vicious philosophies, peace is a lingering hope, freedom a vanishing dream while over the entire world hovers the threat of internecine war. Unthinkable as it is, our own country, striving desperately in keeping with its ideals to forge, for the first time in history"a true world policy that will insure ppace, justice and liberty for all men, has not escaped the baneful and corroding effects of those same sinister ideologies so alien and hostile to our democratic processes. The two most precious possessions which can come to any man are American citizenship and Masonic membership. We, who enjoy those privileges, are gravely concerned with the constant menace to our American institutions and to our fraternity. And that menace, in the main, is but a larger aspect of the passions which Masonry seeks to subdue. More than ever before we are reminded that liberty is neither a birthright nor a vested interest. The truth of Washington's warning that "vigilance is the price of liberty" is impressed more deeply on our minds with the passing of time. Through the years the intent and mission of Masonry have been to


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further by precept and example the application of the principles of the fraternity to the problems which affect the welfare of mankind. While Masonry neither assumes nor aspires to political power it cannot be denied that the fraternity has been a tremendous force in shaping the political affairs not alone of this country but of the world as well. And it is equally true that every great political movement for the advancement of liberty and justice during the past two centuries has upon it the impress of Masonic influence. From the founding of our nation to the present time Masonry has been a dominant, steadying force in our national life, for Masonry provides, as does no other institution, a common meeting ground for men of every faith, race and shade of opinion. It is therefore entirely within the scope and purpose of Masonic thought and service to turn our attention as Masons to the immediate, serious and thoughtful consideration of the conditions which confront us as a nation, as a people and as a fraternity. Our Masonic forefathers, when their liberties were endangered, most certainly did not look upon Masonry as a passive fraternity of forms and ceremonies, rituals and degrees. On the contrary, the bonds of Masonic brotherhood bound them together into a unified band or society of Brothers imbued with the single purpose of safeguarding their rights and liberties as Americans and Freemasons. And history records that from the Colonial Lodges came the men who spearheaded the Revolutionary movement. Facing an even greater threat to our American institutions and to our fraternity we of today have no choice other than to emulate the example of our early American Brethren. To meet the present day challenge to our American institutions and to our fraternity 'we must regard Masonry not as a beautiful speculative philosophy but as a militant force for good. We must, as did our Masonic forefathers, take Masonry out of the four walls of the tiled Lodge and put it to work in the world in which we live. We must be practical but aggressive idealists. We must be constant and persistent in carrying out our ideals, ever bearing in mind that down through the years Masonry has been a potent factor in keeping bright in human hearts the ideal of peace on earth and good will toward men. To such a purpose let us as Americans and Freemasons, here and now, rededicate ourselves. INSTALLATION OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

The installation of the officers of this administration was an historic event. For the first and only time in history the President of these United States laid aside his official duties and responsibilities and as a Master Mason and Past Grand Master travelled hundreds of miles to install as Grand Master the Brother he appointed many


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years before as Grand Pursuivant. As the recipient of that most unusual honor I am deeply grateful and happy that my fellow officers, with one exception, could share that distinction. The occasion was made memorable also by the presentation to the Grand Lodge by the President of the historic Van Buren gavel. Our distinguished Brother endeared himself to his Missouri Brethren by his journey to St. Louis and his visit was another striking evidence of his devotion to the fraternity and his deep concern in the affairs of this Grand Jurisdiction. It was my further privilege on the first day of the last Annual Communication to unveil the portrait of President Truman which was presented to the Grand Lodge of Missouri at a breakfast in Washington during February of last year. That portrait will hang in the office of the Grand Master until such time as other arrangements are made for its placing. OUR PRESENT DUTY

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To review the accomplishments of the year which now. closes and to plan for the future is our present duty. Matters of vital importance claim our attention. Masonry is a democratic institution. Decisions reached must reflect the will of the majority, for majority rule is an inherent principle of democratic government. Each member of the Grand Lodge has the right to participate in the deliberations of this. body and to express his opinions. To do so is his duty as well, for only in such manner can the sentiment of this Grand Lodge be determined. But let, us approach the consideration of each item on the agenda with open minds, weigh each matter carefully and reach our decisions fairly and impartially. Let it be our single purpose so to act that when this Annual Communication shall have concluded its labors we may depart with the conviction that what we have done here represents not only the will of the majority but is for the very best interests of the fraternity in this Grand Jurisdiction. Thus will we exemplify Masonry in its truest and finest sense. VISITATIONS

The duties and responsibilities of the Grand Master are numerous and varied. Voluminous correspondence, decisions, appointments, dispensations, cornerstones, dedications and Lodge visitations are among the many and constant demands made upon the incumbent of the office. Of the many duties none, in my opinion, is more important than Lodge contact. Time and the requirements of my business made it impossible for me to accept many cordial invitations for Lodge visitations. I did succeed, however, in covering a good portion of the State and to meet with the Brethren in a number of Lodges.


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Everywhere and without exception I was the recipient of true Masonic hospitality and each visitation will be long remembered. I close my term of office with the single regret that I could visit only a comparatively few of the Lodges not recognized previously by a Grand Master. I am happy to report that with minor exceptions peace and harmony prevail throughout the State. Discord among the Brethren of a Lodge is not only unfortunate but is contrary to the basic principle on which Masonry is founded. Freemasons are men of intelligence and as such are not only entitled to but should have definite opinions and convictions relative to religion, polities and other matters which enter into our daily lives. But the true Freemason will not permit personal opinions and differences to influence his acts as a Freemason. Frankly, Lodge attendance is far from being what it should be. I am concerned with the failure of a large number of the Brethren to attend Lodge meetings and to support their Lodges. The records show an average attendance of 20 per cent or less. What about the 80 per cent? It is inconceivable that Masonry has lost its appeal or that Masonic membership has been extended to those unworthy of such privilege. But th~ ever present question is how to stimulate the interest of the Brethren and thus increase Lodge attendance. Unfortunately, this problem confronts almost every Lodge and the answer is not forthcoming. Increase in membership for the year is comparatively small. In my opinion this indicates a healthy condition, resulting from more care being given by the Lodges to the consideration of petitions. The door of Masonry stands open to all men who come of tJ:1eir own free will and accord and are found worthy. But our purpose is and should be Masons and not members. The Investigating Committee has been termed so aptly the first line of Masonic defense. Each Brother who is appointed as a member of such a committee should realize that he has been intrusted with the discharge of a very important duty. The standards of Masonry can be maintained only as each Investigating Committee performs its duty. VISITATIONS October 5. Keystone Lodge No. 243. (Home Lodge) I was cordially received by my Brethren and presented by the Lodge with very handsome luggage. October 6. Guest of the Scottish Rite bodies at the Feast of Tishri. Delivered Toast to the Grand Lodge. October 6. Missouri Lodge No. 1. Official visit. An interesting meeting and a splendid fraternal spirit prevailed. This Lodge enjoys the support and counsel of two Past Grand Masters-M. Wor. Bros. Anthony F. Ittner and Solon Cameron. October 9-10-11. Grand Lodge of Illinois at Chicago. The Grand Master


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and Grand Secretary were the recipients of the hospitality which is so graciously extended by our neighboring Grand Lodge. The honor of responding to the address of welcome by the Grand Master of Illinois was accorded your Grand Master. October, 12. It was my privilege to address 3,ODO members of the Order of the Eastern Star on the occasion of the Diamond Jubilee Communication. October 14. Guest of the Wardens' and Masters' Club of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts and made an Honorary member. October 15. Kirkwood Lodge No. 484. The meeting, called to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the chartering of the Lodge was well attended. The program included an interesting history of the Lodge and a splendid address by M. Wor. Bro. Karl M. Vetsburg. October 17. Cornerstone Lodge No. 323. The enviable position occupied by this Lodge is] evidence of the wise counsel of M. Wor. Bro. Karl M. Vetsburg. October 18. Conference with the District Deputies of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts to complete arrangements for the meeting to be held November 4 to commemorate the Masonic Birthday of George Washington. October 19. Lodge of Instruction of the 57th Ritual District. Presented for installation Rt. Wor. Bro. Warren F. Drescher, Jr., as District Deputy 16th Administrative District and Rt. Wor. Bro. Brace E. Kitchell as District Lecturer 57th Ritual District. October 20. Clayton Lodge No. 601. An interesting and well attended meeting. Delivered address, presented six 25 year buttons, a pen and pencil set to the Secretary of the Lodge, Rt. Wor. Bro. Irvin Rosenfelder and installed the Senior Deacon. October 24. Lodge of Instruction of the 33rd Ritual District. Attendance very satisfactory. The Brethren are keenly interested in the Ritual and a high standard of instruction is maintained. October 27. Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. Past Masters' Night. Attendance well over 700, including all resident Grand Lodge officers and many District Deputies and District Lecturers, past and present. It was privilege to install Rt. Wor. Bro. Richard O. Rumer as Junior Grand Warden. October 28. Brentwood Lodge No. 616. Ably assisted by M. Wor. Harold L. Reader and Rt. Wor. Bros. Robert L. Aronson, Warren l!'. Drescher, Jr., Irvin Rosenfelder and others I set the Lodge to work under Charter and installed the officers. , October 31. I was the guest of the Secretaries of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts at dinner and at the very interesting meeting which followed. November 1. Overland Lodge No. 623. Before an overflow gathering of the Brethren and assisted by M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader and Rt. Wor. Bros. Warren F. Drescher, Jr., Harry F.Herron, Brace E. Kitchell, Clarenc~ S. La,fferty and Ralph E. Davis, I set the Lodge to work under Charter and installed the officers. . November 4. Meeting arranged by the Scottish Rite bodies and the Grand Lodge to commemorate the Masonic Birthday of George Washington. The meeting, open to Master Masons, their families and friends, was held in the beautiful Scottish Rite Auditorium. The attendance was approximately 1,200. November 7. Guest at luncheon given by the Downtown High Twelve Club. Was made an Honorary Member of that organization and of the State High ')~welve Association. The various High Twelve Clubs are active and doing much to promote Masonic fellowship.


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November 8. Festus. Shekinah Lodge No. 256. Official visit following dinner given by the Past Masters of the Lodge. November 8. Monthly meeting of the Masonic Home Board. November 11. Springfield. United Lodge No.5. I was received officially and spoke briefly. Lodge was then closed and the Brethren adjourned to the banquet hall to enjoy a fine turkey dinner. Following the dinner I was presented by Rt. Wor. Bro. R. Jasper Smith and delivered the address of the evening. It was my further privilege on this occasion to present a 50 year button to W. Bro. Martin Vernon Ausherman. Attendance was splendid, over 300 names appearing on the register. Among the distinguished Brethren present were M. W or. Bros. Arch Johnson, Bert S. Lee and Morris Ewing. The meeting was an outstanding one. November 14. Jefferson City. Grand Master's Conference with the District Deputies. Twenty-five of the 30 District Deputies were present, a record for attendance. Present also were M. Wor. Bro. Reader and Rt. Wor. Bros. Gallant, Bond and Aronson. November 17. Jefferson City. Jefferson Lodge No. 43. Dinner and official visit. About 250 Brethren from Jefferson City and vicinity in attendance. Presented 50 year button to Bro. H. G. Mallett, a member of Lamar Lodge No. 292. November 19. St. Clair. Easter Lodge No. 575. In the presence of the Brethren of the Lodge, their families and friends, I dedicated the newly completed Temple erected by the Lodge. The hall was crowded to capacity, an evidence of the keen interest in Masonry in that community. November 19. Sullivan. Sullivan Lodge No. q9. Official visit. Received warm welcome and presented with a gavel. November 21. Desloge. Ionic Lodge No. 154. Official visit. I have a very definite interest in this little Lodge for the reason that I laid the cornerstone of the Temple and later dedicated the Temple. S.G.M. Massey and Rt. Wor. Bro. Harold O. Grauel were among the Brethren present. November 22. Cape Girardeau. St. Marks Lodge No. 93. Mrs. Bradford accompanied me on this trip and we were accorded every possible courtesy. A very fine turkey dinner for the Brethren and their families preceded my official visit. The Hall was filled to capacity and a keen interest in the fraternity was manifested. The Grand Pursuivant, Rt. Wor. Bro. Harold O. Grauel is a member and Historian of this Lodge. , November 23. Apollo Lodge No. 529. Official visit. A comparatively young but very active Lodge. November 30. Fraternal visit to the Lodge of Instruction of the 33rd Ritual District. December 7. Keystone Lodge No. 243. Presented eight Life Membership Certificates. December 9. Quarterly meeting of the Masonic Home Board. December 12. Luncheon and conference with M. Wor. Bro. Anthony F. Ittner, Grand Lecturer. December 14. Pride of the West Lodge No. 179. Guest at the Annual Homecoming dinner preceding election of officers. A very interesting address was delivered by M. Wor. Bro. Karl M. Vetsburg. December 19. St. Louis Commandery No.1. Public installation of officers. Addressed the meeting briefly. December 22. Mrs. Bradford and the Grand Master were guests at a dinner at the Masonic Home. Following the dinner a very interesting musical program was given by the Home children. It was my privilege to extend holiday greetings to the children and members of the Home family. December 25. The Christmas breakfast at the Masonic Home was


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much enjoyed by Mrs. Bradford and the Grand Masler. Nuts, candy and fruit were distrihuted and a genuine holiday spirit prevailed. For the 45th consecutive ~'ear Brother Falkenhainer and his orchestra added to the enjoyment of the Home Family. January 4. Installed the officers of Keystone Lodge No. 243. January 9. Guest at luncheon of the Downtown High Twelve Club. January 11. Installed officers of Anchor Lodge No. 443 following a dinner and an hour of Masonic fellowship. January 13. Annual Meeting of the Masonic Home Board. January 16. ltaska Lodge No. 420. Public installation of officers. Spoke briefly. January 18. Visited Lodge of Instruction of the 33rd Ritual District. January 20. Conference at the office of the Grand Master with the .Chairmen of several committees to work out plans for the dedication of the Hall in which Brentwood Lodge No. 616 has arranged t"'o meet. January 28. Montgomery City. Montgomery Lodge No. 246. Accompanied by a number of St. Louis Brethren on the occasion of my official visit. The meeting was an unusual and interesting one and a fine Masonic spirit was evideneed throughout the evening. Included in the membership of the Lodge are five brothers by the name of Worley. The first of the five brothers was raised by M. Wor. Bro. William R. Gentry while Grand Master. Subsequently four other brothers became Master Masons. On this occasion the sixtb brother was raised by Rt. Wor. Bro. Alex S. Dawson. January 30. Masonic Service Association. Annual dinner and election of officers. Delivered address of the evening. January 31.- Again I was the guest of the Secretaries of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts. After the dinner there was a general discussion in which the Grand Master, M. Wor. Bros. Reader and Skelly and Rt. Wor. Bros. E;umer and Aronson took part. February 4. Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40. Presented 50 Year Button to Brother August Wessels. February 5. Breakfast with the District Deputies of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts and the Chairmen of several committees for a discussion of matters of general interest. February 8. Boonville. Accompanied by M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader and Mrs. Bradford and Mrs. Reader attended the Annual dinner given by Cooper Lodge No. 36 and other Masonic bodies. A very happy and intimate affair and one which did much to promote real Masonic fellowship. M. Wor. Bro. Reader delivered a very fine address. February 10. Bridgeton Lodge No. 80. Special meeting to honor M. Wor. Bro. William R. Gentry. The hall was crowded to capacity, an evidence of the regard in which our distinguished Brother is held. Few men are more closely or definitely identified with Missouri Masonry or have given more of themselves than has Brother Gentry during the half century he has been a member of the Fraternity. One of my happiest privileges during the year was to present the 50 year button to this splendid Masonic veteran. February 11. Brentwood Lodge No. 616. In the presence of the Brethren of the Lodge, their families and friends, I publicly dedicated the Hall in which the Lodge will meet hereafter. Again I was most ably assisted by M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader and Rt. Wor. Bros. Drescher, Davis and Kitchell. . February 13. Guest of the Downtown High Twelve Club to honor the Honorary Members at luncheon arranged for that purpose. The Grand Master, Wor. Bro. John W. Calhoun and several other Honorary Members were present.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

February 20-21. Washington, D. C. Grand Masters' Conference. February 22. Guest at breakfast arranged by Frank Land in honor of President TrumaJ;l. Statler Hotel, Washington, D. C. February 22. Alexandria, Va. Annual Meeting of the George Washington Masonic Memorial Association and unveiling of the statue of George Washington by President Truman. The Missouri delegation, of which your Grand Master was Chairman, had the distinct honor of receiving our distinguished Brother on his arrival at the Memorial. February 23. Washington, D. C. Annual Meeting of the Masonic Service Association. March 1. Kansas City. Dinner arranged in honor of the Grand Master by the Wardens' and Masters' Club and Study group. More than 300 Brethren were in attendance, including M. Wor. Bro. A. F. Ittner, M. Wor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland, Rt. Wor. Bros. Mitchell, Nordberg, Hadley, Carter, Fox and W. Bro. Dickinson. It was a real privilege to have the opportunity to visit with my many Kansas City Brethren. March 6. Kirksville. Joint meeting of Kirksville Lodge No. 105 and Adair Lodge No. 366 to commemorate the coming of Masonry to' Kirksville a full century ago. Dinner preceded an interesting program, including a well prepared history of Kirksville and Masonry in Kirksville by Rt. Wor. Bro. Bruce Hunt. The ceremony of the burning of the Temple bonds was an impressive one. An enjoyable feature of the event was the opportunity afforded your Grand Master to visit again with M. Wor. Bro. Willis J. Bray, who is so much a part of Masonry in Kirksville. March 10. Quarterly meeting of the Home Board. March 11. Cache Lodge No. 416. Despite inclement weather the attendance was very satisfactory. March 16. Lemay High Twelve Club. Luncheon and address. March 17. Polar Star Lodge No. 179. Fraternal visit and installed the Treasurer. March 18. Linn. Linn Lodge No. 326. This Lodge, chartered 51 years ago had not been visited by a Grand Master. Small but active membership and a true spirit of Masonic brotherhood prevailed throughout the evening. March 22. Lodge of Instruction of the 57th Ritual District. March 25. Vienna. Vienna Lodge No. 94. Public dedication of newly completed Temple. March 30. South Side High Twelve Club. Luncheon and address. Made Honorary member. March 31. Square Club. Annual business meeting and election of officers. An organization of Past Masters of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts. Present membership approximately 900. April 1. Joint meeting of eight South St. Louis Lodges. Attendance about 400. A well worth-while meeting and it was a privilege to address such a representative gathering. April 2. Kansas City. All day conference with Jurisprudence Committee to work out recommendations to be made to the Grand Lodge by the Committee with reference to the Struble report concerning the Masonic Home. April 5. Lodge of Instruction 33rd Ritual District. April 7. Washington. Hope Lodge No. 251. Brethren from a number of adjacent Lodges were present. April 8. Caledonia. Tyro Lodge No. 12. One Hundred and .Twenty-fifth Anniversary Commemoration. Approximately 1,000 brethren from 100 Lodges representing eight grand jurisdictions gathered at Caledonia to honor the members of the oldest Lodge in Missouri under continuous charter. April 12. Wayland. St. Francisville Lodge No. 588. Public dedication of


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newly acquired 'remple. Small but active Lodge. The Hall was crowded to capacity with Brethren, their families and friends. April 18. Luncheon with the Officers of the several Scottish Rite bodies. Addressed the Class briefly. April 18. St. Charles. Palestine Lodge No. 241. Despite a heavy rain the attendance was more than satisfactory. I was honored on this occasion by the presence of 20 members of my Lodge, including sev.eral Past Masters. Following my address I presented a 50 Year Button to W. Bro. Percy William Gillette, raised in and Past Master of Daggett Lodge No. 492 and now an affiliate of Palestine Lodge No. 241. April 19. Dinner with the Officers of the several Scottish Rite bodies, after which I witnessed the conferring of the beautiful and impressive 18th Degree. . April 21. Wentzville. Wentzville Lodge No. 46. I was informed by the Brethren that the Lodge had not been visited before by a Grand Master. April 26. Unofficial visit to Magnolia Lodge No. 626. April 27. Meridian Lodge No.2. I was much impressed by the fine fraternal spirit prevailing in this Lodge. The officers are young but efficient and the affairs of the Lodge are well conducted. April 30. Breakfast with the District Deputies of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts and Chairmen of several committees for a general discussion of matters of interest. May 3. Lodge of Instruction of the 33rd Ritual District. As usual, attendance very gratifying and the Brethren keenly interested in the Ritual. May 8. Testimonial dinner by the Square Club. Over 300 members attended dinner at Scottish Rite Cathedral arranged by the President, Rt. Wor. Bro. Harry Gershenson, in my honor. I was presented by Rt. Wor. Bro. John A. Witthaus for the Club with a beautifully framed Certificate of Merit..This event will live in my memory as one of the happiest experiences of the year. May 12. Monthly meeting of the Masonic Home Board. May 12. Erwin Lodge No. 121. One Hundredth Anniversary commemoration. Over 700 Brethren, including Grand Lodge officers and Present and Past District Deputies, assembled in Commandery Hall to do honor to the Brethren of this fine old Lodge. From the time the Lodge was chartered until 1922 Erwin was truly a German Lodge and all work was done in the language of the Fatherland. As a result of the bitterness arising out of the first World War English supplanted the German language. Thus did the Brethren of Erwin Lodge demonstrate that Masonic ties are stronger than racial ties. The name Erwin was chosen to honor Erwin Von Steinbeck, a Grand Master of Germany and the principal architect of the cathedral at Strassburg. The program included an address by the Grand Master, who was followed by M. Wor. Bro. Ray Denslow, the principal speaker of the evening. Our distinguished Brother devoted his remarks to conditions abroad, a subject on which he is well qualified to speak. May 13. Bowling Green. Phoenix Lodge No. 136. Accompanied by 20 members of my Lodge I made an official visit to this Lodge, located in famous Pike County-in the heart of "Little Dixie." An old fashioned fish fry in the City park was enjoyed. Later in the evening the E. A. degree was conferred by the visiting Brethren. I was presented by the Lodge with a very beautiful card case. . May 14. All day conference with the Jurisprudence Committee to complete the Masonic Home report of that committee. May 16. Mizpah IJodge No. 639. Thirty-fifth Anniversary. A very active Lodge, as evidenced by an attendance of over 500. Features of the program were numbers by the Mizpah orchestra and an interesting and intimate his-


14

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

tory of the Lodge by Rt. Wor. Bro. John A. Witthaus. Preceding my address I was presented with a very handsome copy of the" Grand Master's March" composed some years ago by W. Bro. Percy B. Eversden, a Past Master of the Lodge. May 19. Marshall. Trilumnia Lodge No. 205. Following a dinner given by M. Wort Bro. Frank C. Barnhill, Lodge was opened and an informal evening of discussion of matters of general interest concluded the program. I enjoyed the privilege of renewing my acquaintance with M. Wort Bro. Barnhill and to visit with M. Wor. Bro. A. F. Ittner, who has just concluded his duties in the district. . May 22. Conference at the Grand Master's office with Committee appointed to prepare report covering the present system of districting the ~~

.

May 23. Festus. Shekinah Lodge No. 256. Accompanied by Rt. Wor. Bros. Warren F. Drescher, Jr., District Deputy and Ralph Davis, past District Deputy, I visited the Lodge. The purpose of the visit was to call the attention of the Brethren to the constant and persistent blackballing of candidates, to point out the duty of the Brethren and to warn them that arrest of the Charter was inevitable if the practice continued. Three petitions were balloted on and in each instance the ballot was dark. I promptly arrested the Charter. May 25. Lodge of Instruction 33rd Ritual District. Closing meeting. The attendance was disappointing, due, probably, to the hot weather then prevailing. The meeting was presided over by Rt. Wor. Bro. Clarence S. Lafferty. His colleague, Rt. Wort Bro. Ernest Dunford, was absent from the city. Among the Grand Lodge officers in attendance were M. Wor. Bros. Reader, Cameron, Skelly and Ittner and Rt. Wor. Bros. Aronson, Rumer and Gershenson. May 27. Desloge. Eighteenth Administrative District Meeting. Rt. Wor. Bro. J. L. Lutes was host to the Brethren at a very enjoyable dinner. Thirty-six officers from 16 of the 19 Lodges in the district were present. A two hour round table discussion rounded out a very splendid and well worth evening. May 29., Dinner and meeting of the Secretaries of the 15th and 16th Administrative Districts. M. Wort Bros. Reader and Skelly and the Grand Master participated in the discussion of matters of interest. May 31. St. Joseph. I was the guest at a dinner at the Shrine Club in ,my honor graciously arranged by Rt. Wor. Bro. William H. Utz, Jr. The Brethren then adjourned to the Temple of King Hill Lodge No. 376 where, under the direction of Rt. Wor. Bro. Jeff D. Austin, the 5th Administrative District meeting was held. I was much impressed by the manner in which Rt. Wor. Bro. Austin discharged his duties as District Deputy and the interest of the Brethren in all matters pertaining to the duties of their various offices. The attendance was most satisfactory, 21 of the 25 Lodges in the district being represented by officers of the several Lodges. Among the distinguished Brethren participating in the meeting were M. Wort Bro. DuVal Smith and Rt. Wort Bros. Austin, Hadley, Nordberg, Carter and Rev. Robison, Grand Chaplain. June 12-13. Grand Lodge of Iowa at Burlington. M. Wort Bro. Reader and the Grand Master were cordially received and enjoyed the courtesies always extended to visitors by the Brethren of the Hawkeye state. June 18. Meramec Cavern meeting. Through the courtesy of Bro. Lester Dill, a membe~ of Sullivan Lodge No. 69, the Meramec Cavern, located near Sullivan, was made available for an MM degree ceremonial. The program was under the auspices of Sullivan Lodge No. 69 and the many details were worked out splendidly by Rt. Wort Bro. William S. Juergens,


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15

also a member of Sullivan Lodge No. 69 and District Deputy of the 14th Administrative District. Some 1,000 Brethren from almost every district in Missouri and visiting Brethren from eight states and the Philippine Islands joined in making the meeting a notable one. Ample seating accommodations were provided and Bro. Dill arranged a unique lighting system. The Mizpah orchestra journeyed from St. Louis for the occasion and the music of that organization added much to the impressiveness of the degree work. One MM degree was conferred, the first section by the officers and Brethren of Sullivan Lodge No. 69 and the second section by a team chosen by M. War. Bro. Ittner, the Grand Lecturer. The curtain lecture was delivered most impressively by Rt. Wor. Bro. Freelon K. Hadley and the charge by Rt. Wor. Bro. Bruce H. Hunt. The day was made complete by the ladies of the Sullivan Chapter O.E.S., who provided amply for the inner man. Very graciously a table, beautifully decorated, was set aside by the ladies for the Grand Master and party. Among the distinguished Brethren present were M. Wor. Bros. Reader, Ittner, Skelly and Sunderland and Rt. War. Bros. Hunt, Hadley, Fox, Carter, Murray and Wagner. June 18. Sullivan Lodge No. 69. Following the Meramec Cavern meeting and accompanied by local and visiting Brethren, a fraternal visit to this Lodge was enjoyed. June 27. George Washington Lodge No.9. Fraternal visit. Presented 50 Year Button to Bro. J. Hugo Grimm. June 28. Boonville. Meeting of the 28th Administrative District at Cooper Lodge, presided over by Rt. War. Bro. Julius Edwards, District Deputy. About 100 Brethren from the various Lodges in the district were present. After dinner I discussed pending legislation and an interesting open forum followed. July 8. Brentwood Lodge No. 616. Public installation of officers. Spoke briefly. July 14. Quarterly meeting of the Home Board. July 18-19. Toronto. Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario. For the first time the Grand Lodge of Missouri was invited to attend the Annual Communication. This Grand Lodge was represented by the Grand Master and M. War. Bro. Reader. We were warmly welcomed on our arrival and quartered at the magnificent Royal York Hotel during our visit. On Tuesday evening, July 18, we were the guests at a small but intimate dinner given by the Grand Master to the visiting Brethren. The following day, after a cafeteria breakfast, we were driven to the Toronto High School for the opening of the Grand Lodge. After robing in a procession was formed by those in attendance. Each Brother attending the Grand Lodge wore collar, apron and cuffs. The procession, over a half mile in length, was headed by the flags of Canada and the United States, and the Royal Bag Pipers. After an inspiring march and counter march the Brethren, some 1,000 in number, entered the Masonic Hall for the Grand Lodge session. In the evening 1,500 Brethren assembled in the Convention Hall of the Royal York Hotel for the Grand Master's banquet. The dinner opened with toasts to the King and the President after which the two national anthems were sung. Your Grand Master was accorded the signal honor of responding for the visiting Grand Masters and Brethren to the address of welcome by the Grand Master of Ontario. August 3. Masonic Home. Birthday party for Mrs. Belle Dean, for 25 years a member of the Home family, who that day attained the remarkable age of 100 years. Those present to honor Mrs. Dean included the Grand Master, M. War. Bro. Skelly, and Rt. Wor. Bros. Murray, Dunford, Lafferty and Winkelmaier. Many presents and letters of congratulation were


16

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

received by Mrs. Dean from President Truman, Mayor Darst and others, and a. telegram from Gov. Smith. Mrs. Dean was particularly pleased by the presentation by Rt. Wor. Dunford of a big purple orchid. Happily she invited all present to be with her on the same day next year. August 4. Carrollton. A meeting arranged by the Lodges and Brethren of the 10th Administrative District to honor Brother Lynn Samuels, who attained his 98th birthday on August 1. Brother Samuels is a member and Past Master of Wakanda Lodge No. 52, a Royal Arch Mason and Knight Templar. Despite his age he is a regular attendant on the meetings of the several bodies and regularly participates in the degree work. His activities make good his claim that he is the oldest active Mason in Missouri. The program closed with an address by the Grand Master. August 8. The Grand Secretary and the Grand Master enjoyed a fraternal visit with Dr. Carlos Manuel Pineiro, Grand Master of Cuba, in his suite at the DeSoto Hotel. Dr. Pineiro, accompanied by the Grand Secretary, Dr. Constantino Pais Gutierrez and 60 Brother Masons from Cuba, are making a tour of the United States. Later in the day the entire delegation made a visit to the York Rite Temple. At this time, Dr. Pineiro stated, there are approximately 30,000 Masons in Cuba. August 17. Grandview. Grandview Lodge No. 618. I was cordially received by the Brethren of the Lodge of which President Truman is a member and enjoyed an evening of true- Masonic fellowship. I was happy to greet and visit with a number of the Kansas City Brethren including M. Wor. Bro. Sunderland, Ill. Frank S. Land, W. Bro. Dickinson and Rt. Wor. Bros. Nordberg, Carter, Raymond, Fox and Knecht. Purposely I delayed this visit until late in the year. While I have other engagements between now and the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge it is my desire that my visit to Grandview Lodge No. 618 be recorded as my last official visit. VISITS TO FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS

The time element made it possible for me to accept only three of the very cordial invitations from other jurisdictions. Oct. 9-10-11. Grand Lodge of Illinois at Chicago. Your Grand Master and Grand Secretary were the recipients of the hospitality so graciously extended by our neighboring Grand Lodge. The privilege of responding to the address of welcome by the Grand Master of Illinois was accorded your Grand Master. June 12-13. Grand Lodge of Iowa at Burlington. Your Grand Master and Grand Secretary enjoyed the courtesies always extended to visiting Brethren by the Brethren of Iowa. July 18-19. Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario at Toronto. For the first time the Grand Lodge of Missouri was invited to the Annual Communication and your Grand Master and Grand Secretary were happy to accept the invitation. Our welcome was a warm and hearty one and the genuine hospitality of our Canadian Brethren was evidence of the close fraternal relations that exist between our country and Canada. The meeting of the Brethren in Grand Lodge is one of form and ceremony. All Brethren in attendance wore collars, aprons and cuffs, and after donning their regalia, marched to the place of meeting headed by the flags of Canada and the United States and the


1950

GRAND LODGB OF MISSOURI

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Royal Bag Pipers. For the Grar.d Master's banquet approximately 1,500 Brethren assembled in the Convention Hall of the Royal York Hotel. Preceding the dinner toa~ts were drunk to His Majesty the King and to His Excellency The President of the United States, folowed by the singing of the two national anthems. The impression carried away from the entire proeeedings is one of dignity, sincerity and devotion to country and fraternity. Your Grand Master was given the signal privilege of responding for the visiting Grand Masters and others from the United States to the very cordial address of welcome by the Grand Master of Can ada. I indulge the hope that future Grand Masters will strengthen the bonds of fraternalism which I have reason to believe were established by the visit. I am indebted to M. Wor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland for representing me at the Grand Lodge of Kansas and to M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader who represented me at the Grand Lodge of Indiana. DEDICATIONS BY THE GRAND MASTER November 19. St. Clair. New Temple of Easter Lodge No. 575. February 11. Brentwood. Hall of Brentwood Lodge No. 616. March 25. Vienna. New Temple of Vienna Lodge No. 94. April 12. Wayland. New Temple of St. Francisville Lodge No. 588. OTHER DK)ICATIONS October 18. Wardell. Wardell Lodge UD. New Temple. By Rt. Wor. Bro. J. C. Montgomery. November 8. ~~hayer. Clifton Lodge No. 463. New Temple. By Rt. Wor. Bro. J. Fred Park. March 11. Humphrey. Humphrey Lodge No. 32. Hall. By Rt. Wor. Bro. Russell A. Hauck. June 5. Parkville. Compass Lodge No. 120. New Temple. By Rt. Wor. Bro. Jeff D. Austin. LODGES EET TO WORK UNDER CHARTER BY THE , GRAND MASTER October 28. Brentwood. Brentwood Lodge No. 616. November 1. Overland. Overland IJodge No. 623. INSTALLATIONS October 28. Brentwood. Brentwood Lodge No. 616. November 1. Overland. Overland IJodge No. 623. January 4. St. Louis. Keystone Lo.ige No. 243. January 11. St. Louis. Anchor Lod.ge No. 443. CORNERE:TONES

Requests to lay cornerstones were received too late for acceptance or conflicted with pre-arranged schedules. lt was therefore impossible for me to accept anyone of the four invitations to conduct such ceremony. I am indebted to the several Brethren who so willingly and graciously responded to my request to act in my stead.


18

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

October 4. Hamilton. J. C. Penney High School. By M. Wor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland. March 31. Columbia. Public School building. By M. Wor. Bro. James W. Skelly. June 10. Kirksville. New building being erected by Kirksville Osteopathic Hospital. By M. Wor. Bro. Willis J. Bray. March 22. Fulton. Library building of William Woods College. By Rt. Wor. Bro. John R. Baker. 50-YEAR BUTTONS PRESENTED BY THE GRAND MASTER November 11. Springfield. United Lodge No.5. To W. Bro. Martin Vernon Ausherman. November 17. Jefferson City. Jefferson Lodge No. 43. To Bro. H. G. Mallett, a member of Lamar Lodge No. 292. February 4. St. Louis. Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40. To Bro. August W. Wessels. February 10. Bridgeton. Bridgeton Lodge No. 80. To M. Wor. Bro. William R. Gentry. February 18. St. Charles. Palestine Lodge No. 241. To W. Bro. Percy William Gillette. June 27. St. Louis. George Washington Lodge No.9. To Bro. J. Hugo Grimm. September 12. St. Louis. George Washington Lodge No.9. To Bro. Oscar H. Bobel. DISPENSATIONS

Many dispensations were requested during the year. With few exceptions the dispensations 'were granted, as in each instance a sufficient reason was given for the request. . October 3. To M. Wor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland to lay cornerstone of J. C. Penney High School at Hamilton on October 4. October 12. To Rt. Wor. Bro..r. C. Montgomery, District Deputy, to dedicate Hall of Wardell Lodge UD on October 18. October 18. To Brentwood Lodge No. 616 to be instituted and set to work under Charter at Temple of Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 on October 28. October 18. To Overland Lodge No. 623 to be instituted and set to work under Charter at Temple of Bridgeton No. 80 on November 1. October 25. To Rt. Wor. Bro. J. Fred Park, District Deputy, to dedicate the new Temple of Clifton Lodge No. 463 at Thayer on November 8. October 29. To Ionic Lodge No. 154 to re-ballot on the petition of Willard R. Darnell on November 21. November 12. To Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 to re-ballot on the petition of Clyde William Kemper on December 13. November 16. To Lowry City Lodge No. 403 to re-ballot on the petition of James Wilson Moore. December 10. To Joppa Lodge No. 411 to hold meeting for the election of officers. No quorum was present at the regular meeting at which the officers should have been elected. December 10. To Graham Lodge No. 289 to meet in the Hall of Maitland Lodge No. 112 and to elect officers. Hall of Graham Lodge No. 289 burned the night of election of officers. December 12. To Portageville Lodge No. 166 to hold special meeting in the High School auditorium. This building was inspected on three different occasions and previously dedicated and used for such purpose.


1950

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December 17. fj'o Meridian Lodge No.2 to hold public installation of officers in auditorium of Alhambra Grotto. December 19. '}'o Cache-Lodge No. 416 to install officers in auditorium of Alhambra Grotto. December 28. 'ro Acacia Lodge No. 602 to install officers in Hall of Twilight Lodge No. 114. December 29. '}'o Freedom Lodge No. 636 to install officers in Hall of Gardenville Lodge No. 655. . December 30. fj~o Saline Lodge No. 226 to hold election of officers on January 7. January 9. To :Frankford Lodge No. 192 to hold election of officers on J anq.ary 23. . February 13. fj'o Beacon Lodge No. 3 for public installation of officers in Commandery Hall on March 30. . February 15. '}'o Aurora L路odge No. 267 to re-ballot on the petition of Frank Zucco fo:' affiliation. February 25. To Meridian Lodge No.2 to hold Special Communication at Alhambra Grotto to present Masonic play. February 25. To Tyro Lodge No. 12 to hold Special Communication in the High School auditorium at Caledonia. March 9. To Rt. Wor. Bro. Warren F. Drescher, Jr., District Deputy, to dedicate the High School auditorium at Caledonia. March 11. To Rt. Wor. Bro. Russell A. Hauck, District Deputy, to dedicate the Hall of Humphrey Lodge No. 32. March路20. To Versailles Lodge No. 320 to hold special meeting in auditorium of City Hall at Versailles. March 28. To M. Wor. Bro. J. W. Skelly to lay cornerstone of the new Public School building at Columbia on March 3l. April 10. To Anchor Lodge No. 443 to re-ballot on the petitions of Donald Henry Koch and Russell Thomas Schwarz. April 11. To Wentzville Lodge No. 46 to hold special meeting in the Community Hall. April 25. To Northeast Lodge No. 643 to re-ballot on the petition of John Bert Roberts. April 25. To Shekinah Lodge No. 256 to re-ballot on the petitions of Leon L. Woodland, George Wyman Gibson and James Oscar Vaughn. May 9. To M. Wor. Bro. Willis J. Bray to lay cornerstone of the new building being erected by the Kirksville Osteopathic Hospital. May 16. To Savannah Lodge No. 71 to re-ballot on the petition of Richard A. Newman. May 23. To Sullivan Lodge No. 69 to hold special meeting in Meramec . Caverns on June 17. May 22. To Rt. Wor. Bro. John R. Baker, District Deputy, to lay cornerstone of the Library of William Woods College at Fulton on May 27. June 3. To Rt. Wor. Bro. Jeff D. Austin to dedicate the Hall of Compass Lodge No. 120. June 8. To NOl:theast Lodge No. 643 to re-ballot on the petition of Charles Wesley Williams. June 30. To Oriental Lodge No. 518 to hold special meeting in the Community Gymnasium, Blackburn. July 11. To Rt. Wor. Bro. Charles C. Czeschin, District Deputy, to dedicate the Gymnasium at Blackburn. July 12. To Morehouse Lodge No. 603 to hold a special meeting in the local Gymnasium.


20

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

August 1. To Billings Lodge No. 379 to meet in_the Hall of Republic Lodge No. 570. August 3. To Temperance Lodge No. 438 to re-ballot on the petition of Willard A. JUstUB. DECISIONS

Numerous requests for decisions were received during the year. Reference to certain sections of the By-Laws in many instances supplied the answers. The decisions which follow, in my opinion, should be made a matter of record. 1. In order to validate a receipt for Lodge dues. it must be signed personally by the secretary of the Lodge. A typewritten signature of'the secretary of the Lodge is not sufficient. 2. Stated or regular communications of a Lodge can be held legally only on the day fixed by its By-laws. Neither the Lodge (except by duly adopted amendment by the Lodge) nor the Grand Master has any authority to change the date of a regular meeting. 3. From the record submitted it is held that Winn Fort Morrow, William F. Morrow and W.F. Morrow are one and the same person and at the time of his death was a Master Mason in good standing in Kansas City Lodge No. 220, A. F: & A. M.; and that his widow, Mrs. Jean B. Morrow, is eligible for admission to the Masonic Home of Missouri, subject to the Home rules governing admission. 4. (a) Section 110, By-laws 1947, provides that "each question (in a petition for the degrees or affiliation) shall be answered by the petitioner." The clear meaning of this section is that each question is of importance and has a bearing on the eligibility of the petitioner for Masonic membership. The petition, therefore, should be read in full when presented and before ballot is taken on the petition. (b) Section 181, By-laws 1947, provides that "when a p,erson residing within the jurisdiction of a Lodge petitions for the degrees and his petition is received and referred to a committee of Investigation the Lodge obtains lawful jurisdiction of the same, and the subsequent removal of the candidate into the jurisdiction of another Lodge does not deprive the first Lodge of its jurisdiction." This section must be construed in connection with section 114, By-laws 1947, which provides that "if a petitioner for the Mysteries of Freemasonry fails to present himself for initiation within twelve months after the date of his election, his election is void and all fees may be returned路 to him. The Lodge, on proper request may, prior to the expiration of the year, extend the time one additional year." It follows, therefore, that unless the Lodge extends the time as provided in Section 114, By-laws 1947, jurisdiction ceases twelve months from date of election. (c) The Grand Master refused permission for an Almoner to pass an Almoner's box among the Brethren at a Lodge meeting. He expressed the view that besides being contrary to Masonic practice it


1950

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was his experience that nothing will cause a drop in attendance more than a constant demand for money, but such a box placed on the Tiler's desk with appropriate cards and without solicitation would not be objectionable. (d) A Blue Lodge funeral should and must be conducted according to section 205, By-laws 1947. Nothing could be more inappropriate or contrary to the provisions of the section than for an acting Worshipful Master to conduct the services while wearing the regalia of another body and such practice should be discontinued. 5. (a) A petition for the degrees or affiliation must be presented at a stated meeting of the Lodge and cannot be withdrawn after the petition has been referred to it committee. (Section 109, By-laws 1947.) (b) The Grand Master has no power to suspend the operation of any law of the Grand Lodge nor to do anything contrary thereto. (Section 9, (k), By-laws 1947.) 6. A proposed By-law providing that any officer of the Lodge cannot be elected to a higher office unless he has attended two-thirds of the meetings the previous year in office is unconstitutional and is not proper as it wonld impose restrictions on an officer which the Grand Lodge does not recognize or sanction. . 7. The Worshipful Master has the power and authority to appoint a committee between meetings, if in his judgment such appointment is for the good of the Lodge, is made in good faith and for a specific purpose. Such committee shall have power only to report its findings at a regular meeting of the Lodge for consideration and action by the Lodge. The minutes of the regular meeting at which the report is read should show th8 appointment of the committee, the reason for the appointment, the nature of the report and the action of the Lodge in reference to the report. 8. Where there were irregularities in the reception of a petition for and the consequent conferring of the degrees, and where charges were preferred against a petitioner and he was acquitted of the charge of having been responsible for the irregularities, the Brother should be healed and the Grand Master so directed and ordered that his order be read in open Lodge at its next regular meeting and such action shall constitute the healing of the Brother. 9. Since the adoption.of a new Section 93 by the Grand Lodge in 1933 and which is now Section 97, By-laws of 1947, residence in the State is not a pre-requisite to holding office in a Lodge and therefore removal from the State of an officer of a Lodge does not vacate his office. The decision otherwise, made in 1938 (Proc. 1938, pp. 16 and 126) is expressly overruled. NECROLOGY

During the Grand Lodge year 2008 members have wended their way to that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler re-


22

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

turns. Death has invaded our Grand Lodge and carried away one of our bright junior officers and in other Grand Lodges there are aching voids this world can never fill. F. Ernest Carter, Senior Grand Marshal, died in Kansas City August 24, 1950. He was born in 1887 in Sedalia, Mo. He was superintendent of the Southwestern Bell Telephone Company and had been employed by that Company for forty-six years. He was Past Master of Temple Lodge No. 299, Past High Priest of Orient Chapter No. 102, Past Illustrious Master of Shekinah Council No. 24 and Past Eminent Commander of Oriental Commandery No. 35. In the Grand Lodge line he was appointed Grand Pursuivant in 1946 and was Senior Grand Marshal at the time of his death. He was District Lecturer for thirteen years. Albert M. Clark, Judge of the Supreme Court of Missouri, died June 9, 1950. He was a leading citizen of Missouri and a life-long Freemason. He prepared a valuable paper giving the history of the long line of judges of the Supreme Court who were Masons, which was read at Grand Lodge last September. Joseph Fort Newton, preeminent Masonic scholar and speaker, died January 24, 1950, He' was Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Iowa in 1911, 1912 and 1913, and the author of the "Men's House" and "The Builders." GRAND MASTER'S CONFERENCE WITH DISTRICT DEPUTIES

The Annual Conference was held in Jefferson City on November 14 and was a departure from the procedure followed for many years. Twenty-five of the 30 District Deputies were present, which established a record for attendance. For some time it has been my opinion that a one-day meeting does not give ample time to either the Grand Master or the Grand Lecturer to accomplish the purpose for which such meeting is held and that the results do not justify the expense incurred. Following out that thought I arranged for a' two-day meeting. The first day was devoted to the conference between the Grand Master and the District Deputies. After an outline of the various matters on the agenda of the Grand Master the meeting was thrown open. Then followed a general discussion pertaining to the office and duties of the District Deputies which lasted until late in the afternoon. Rt. Wor. Bro. C. Lew Gallant was present and rendered most helpful service in clearing up the legal aspects of many of the problems confronting the District Deputies. The following Grand Lodge officers participated in the general discussion: M. Wor. Bro. IIarold,l L. Reader, Grand Secretary, and Rt. Wor. Bros. Ray Bond, Homer L. Ferguson, Robert L. Aronson and C. Lew Gallant.


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23

The second da,y was in 'charge of W. Wor. Bro. Anthony F. Ittner, Grand Lecturer, and was given over entirely to ritualistic instruction. The District Deputies and District Lecturers agreed that the innovation was productive of good results and should be continued. DISTRICT DEPUTY CONFERENCES

One of the duties incumbent on each District Deputy is to call at least once a year a conference of the Worshipful Masters, Wardens and Secretaries of the Lodges in his District, for the purpose of discussing procedure and officer duties. To insure the carrying out of the requirements of the law I appointed Rt. Wor. Bro. Homer L. Ferguson as Chairman of the District Deputy Conferences. As a result of his good work meetings were arranged and hi~; constructive suggestions were most helpful to the District Deputies in setting up their programs. Much credit is due the District Deputies for their active cooperation. Reports submitted by the District Deputies indicate that the conferences were held in almost all of the districts. It was my privilege to be present at several of the conferences. Other District meetings were attended by or presided over by Rt. Wor. Bros. Ray Bond, Homer L. Ferguson, Richard O. Rumer, James McBrayer Sellers, Orestes Mitchell, Jr., Robert L. Aronson and Harold L. Grauel. I am indebted to these Brethren for their interest and cooperation. Attendance generally was fairly satisfactory, discussions covered a wide field and 'che meetings as a rule were worth while. As a result of the conferences the officers of the various Lodges are more familiar with their duties. CONFERENCE OF THE GRAND MASTERS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

On February 21-22 the Grand Master, M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, Rt. Wor. Bro. Ray Bond, Deputy Grand Master and M. Wor. Bros. Anthony F. Ittner, Ray V. Denslow, Bert S. Lee and Frank C. Barnhill, attended the sessions held in the Pan American Room of the Statler Hotel. All United States jurisdictions, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Chile, Cuba, Alberta, Quebec and Saskatchewan were represented by the Grand Masters of the named Grand Lodges. In the main, the problems which confront the Grand Masters of the various jurisdictions run parallel. The opportunity to meet and discuss those problems is most helpful. The papers read at the conference gave evidenee of thought and study, covered timely subjects and were of unusual interest. The general sentiment of the conference reflected the gravity of world affairs and the part Masonry must play to meet the problems arising out of the threat to world peace.


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1950

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES

On February 23 the delegates to the Association assembled for the Annual Meeting. With few exceptions the various Grand jurisdictions were represented. The day was devoted to a resume of the activities of the Association and to planning for the future. As is true with many organizations the financial problem was one of concern. Various suggestions were offered but no solution was arrived at. Again our nation is at war and the mounting casualties in Korea doubtless will make heavy demands on the resources of the Association in the immediate future. CONFERENCE OF THE GRAND SECRETARIES OF THE UNITED STATES

As the guest of M. Vvor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, I enjoyed the privilege of attending the Annual dinner. The Grand Secretaries form a group of splendid Masons, without whose services the work could not be carried on in the various jurisdictions. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

February 22 was an eventful day beginning with a breakfast at the Statler Hotel given by Frank Land in' honor of President Truman, and attended by the Grand Masters and Grand Secretaries. At the table with the honored guest were members of the cabinet, the Supreme Court, the Senate and House and other prominent national figures. The memorable occasion closed with a brief but intimate and cordial address by the President. Then followed the pilgrimage to Alexandria, Virginia, for the Annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association and the unveiling of the statue of George Washington. To the Missouri delegation was given the honor of receiving the President on his arrival at the Memorial and to occupy seats on the platform with our distinguished Brother, the Grand Master of Virginia and the titular heads of various Masonic bodies. The impressive ceremony of the unveiling of the statue of VIfashington by President Truman was followed by an historic address by the Chief Executive on the foreign policy of our country. The Memorial is nearing completion and is' a fitting monument to . our first President and to the Masonic fraternity. The statue represents Washington in full Masonic regalia, is cast in bronze and stands 17 feet and 3 inches in height. The heroic figure dominates the Memorial as the character of Washington dominated the thinking of his time.


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WASHINGTON'S MASONIC BIRTHDAY

1n-1922 the Grand Lodge adopted a Standing Resolution providing that on November 4 of each year the subordinate Lodges in this Jurisdiction observe the Masonic Birthday of George Washington. Despite the place our distinguished Brother occupies in the heart of every Missouri Freemason the resolution has been honored in the breach rather than in th(~ observance. On November 4 last, in St. Louis, a fitting program, attended by some 1,200 Master Masons, their families and friends, arranged by the Scottish Rite bodies and the Grand Lodge, carried out the purpose of the resolution. The Scottish Rite generously made available its beautiful auditorium and each Scottish Rite body had a part in the program. Without that splendid cooperation the program would not have been possible. An address on "George Washington, the Freemason" was delivered by the Grand Master and the program closed with an outstanding performance by the Scottish Rite Players of a Masonic play entitled "Prelude to Victory." The Lodges in Kansas City arranged and carried out an impressive program, which included a splendid address by Brother Chat A. Keyes. I am informed that a number of other Lodges through~ut the State also paid homage to the memory of our first President. Patriotism is a cardinal Masonic virtue and I urge the Lodges of this Jurisdiction to commemorate each year in appropriate manner the Masonic Birthday of George Washington. TAXES

During January of this year the Grand Secretary was served by the St. Louis Assessor with tax blank requiring return on or before April 1, 1950, covering such property of the Grand Lodge as comes within the provisions of the Personal Tax law. To have made such return would have been an admission that Grand Lodge property is subject to taxation. A precedent would have been established which in time might have become far reaching in effect. I considered it my duty as Grand Master to use every proper and legal means to preserve the tax free status of the Grand Lodge. I therefore appointed M. Wor. Bro. Karl M. Vetsburg and Rt. Wor. Bro. C. Lew Gallant as counsel, with instructions to take such legal action as might be necessary. As a result of their efforts a ruling was obtained from Joseph P. Sestric, Assessor, granting continued exemption from taxation of the personal property of the Grand Lodge. LODGE OF RESEARCH

Chartered only 9 years ago the Missouri Lodge of Research is now the largest institution of its kind in this country. The heartening growth


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1950

in membership is' evidence of the increasing interest of the Craft in Missouri in Masonic history and particularly in Missouri Masonic history. And few states have as interesting Masonic history as does Missouri, for in no other state has Freemasonry been so woven into the fabric of the civil, political and religious life of the state. Within the past several years the Lodge of Research has placed in the hands of its members numerous books and pamphlets of interest to members of the fraternity, including the biographies of prominent Missouri Masons. Membership will mean eventually an invaluable Masonic library. In some Jurisdictions each Lodge is requested to appoint a Lodge Historian. His duty is to compile a history of the Lodge and to record events of interest. A history of each Lodge in Missouri would furnish the Lodge of Research with interesting material for future publications. I recommend that each Lodge in this Jurisdiction make such appointment. Membership dues are only $5.00 per year and the Lodge of Research has no other source of income. The possibilities of the institution are unlimited but its future growth and usefulness will depend upon the support-the deserved support-of the Brethren. Certainly a large majority of the Missouri Lodges should be included in the membership and I urge the officers of the various Lodges to give the matter their serious consideration. As the result of the wise and. capable leadership of the present Worshipful Master, M. Wor. Bro. Solon Cameron, who has given unstintingly of his time and efforts, the membership has increased materially during his term of office. The services of Brother McKinney, as Secretary, have added materially to the,growth and progress of the institution. President Truman is now the Senior Warden of the Missouri Lodge of Research and, at the coming election, undoubtedly will be chosen Worshipful Master. In conversation with the President in Washington February last he assured the Missouri delegation that if elected he would accept. He further announced his intention to open the Library of Congress for the photostating of records dealing with Masonry and by so doing would render what he considered his outstanding service to the Craft. Thus the Missouri Lodge of Research would have recourse to a rich field of Masonic material not available elsewhere or at any other time. . Obviously the financial resources of the Missouri Lodge of Research are not sufficient to meet the cost involved and therefore additional funds will be needed. I recommend that the Ways and Means Committee appropriate a sufficient sum to carry out this objective.


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With such a wealth of Masonic matter to be presented to the Craft from time to time through the medium of the Missouri Lodge' of Research it seems to me that many Brethren would welcome the opportunity to have a part in carrying forward this project by adding their names to the roster of members. THE FREE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM

The attention of the Craft is directed to the following Standing Resolution adoptod by this Grand Lodge in 1920 : Resolved, The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted MasoIlB of the State of Missouri, in Annual Communication, declares: It regards the free public school as the chief bulwark of the State and Nation, to be kep'~ under the sole dominion and direction of the State, and so far as the efforts of Freemasonry in Missouri are concerned, its voice, vote and influence will at all times be exerted in keeping it so. It regards any individual or other influence that seeks to destroy or weaken the free public school system as now operated in this country, as an enemy of one of our most cherished American institutions. It urges that all teachers in our free pu1?lic schools shall be those who are in perfect sympathy with them. It demands that the highest type of manhood and womanhood may be secured as teachers in our free public schools, that they be paid generously and be required to realize that loyal, efficient service will be expected at their hands.

The free public school system is indeed, in the words of the Resolution, "the chief bulwark of the State and Nation." It is one of the foundation stoneB upon which rests our American democracy. As Freemasons we agree without. reservation that the State only shall exercise dominion over that system. The inevitable corollary of Federal aid to the States is go:vernment influence which too often leads to eventual control and Federal aid to church-related schools of any denomination is a constant menace to our American policy of separation of church and state. Let every member of our fraternity keep constantly in mind that freedom of education and Freemasonry go hand in hand. Consequently it is a Masonic "must" that the public school system be guarded jealously and it is incumbent on every Freemason to do his part to maintain that institution free ~rom Federal or sectarian influence. RESIGNATIONS AND ApPOINTMENTS

After many yeaTS of unselfish and valued service in the Grand Lodge and to the fraternity, M. Wor. Bro. Byrne E. Bigger resigned as Chairman and m{~mber of the Revision Committee. His resignation, it is needless to say, was received with extreme reluctance. M. Wor. Bro. DuVal Smith accepted my invitation to become Chairman of the Committee and M. Wor. Bro. Frank C. Barnhill was appointed as a member of the Committee.


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1950

Rev. J. C. Montgomery, because of ministerial duties, was impelled to resign as District Deputy of the Nineteenth Administrative District. W. Bro. C. F. Montgomery, a member of Puxico Lodge No. 596, was appointed to fill the vacancy. Rt. Wor. Bro. Irvin Rosenfelder, because of removal from Missouri, resigned as member of the Masonic Board of Relief and as his successor I appointed Rt. Wor. Bro. Elmer W. Wagner. W. Bro. John F. Reinhardt suddenly and unexpectedly left Kansas City to become a resident of California. His resignation as Chairman of the Appeals and Grievances Committee followed. He rendered a路 splendid service in that office during the past several years and his resignation was accepted with regret. As Chairman of the Committee to succeed W. Bro. Reinhardt I appointed Rt. Wor. Bro. R. Jasper Smith. PAST GRAND MASTERS

The Past Grand Masters of this Grand Jurisdiction without exception maintain a keen and lively interest in the affairs of the Grand Lodge and the fraternity and are alert to every opportunity to advance the interests of Masonry. Their continued willingness to serve on committees and to render any service requested speaks volumes for their devotion to Freemasonry. On a number of occasions I have found it expedient and most helpful to seek the advice of various Past Grand Masters. Always I found the Brother consulted as ready to give as I was to receive the advice needed. MASONIC TRIALS

While Masonic trials are to be regretted we must realize that Freemasons, like other men, are not immune to the frailties of the human family. Consequently it is not strange that occasionally a Brother transgresses the moral and Masonic law. During the year trials have been necessary on eight occasions. Without exception the Commissions or Lodge juries discharged their duties promptly, fairly and impartially; the weight of the evidence determined each verdict and the penalty inflicted was justified. In no instance has an appeal been taken nor has it been necessary for the Grand Master at any time to order trial. When we consider that there are approximately 115,000 Masons in Missouri a record of only eight trials during the entire year is striking evidence of the high morale of the Brethren and. their observance of the teachings and principles of the fraternity. HEALING

Irregularities in the handling of petitions and the conferring of degrees necessitated on several occasions the healing of Brethren guilty of no. infraction of our laws. In several instances such action


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resulted from the conferring of degrees by other Jurisdictions on Missouri candidates within less than the time mandatory in this Jurisdiction. May I remind the officers of the subordinate Lodges that it is their duty to acquaint themselves with the laws and regulations adopted by this Grand LOdge. Each Worshipful Master, Warden and Secretary should possess a copy of the 1947 By-laws and each such officer should familiarize himself with the laws and regulations therein contained. If doubtful questions arise or an interpretation is required, the District Deputy should be consulted. REQUEST FOR CONCURRENT JURISDICTION Independence Lodge No. 76, Independence. McDonald Lodge No. 324, Independence. Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, Jackson County.

About two years ago the city limits of Independence were extended westwardly, reducing the jurisdiction of Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 to a very limited strip of territory between the western limits of Independence and the eastern limits of Kansas City. The records sho路w that Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 receives many petitions from the territory known formerly as the "Intercity District." As a result of the extension of the city limits of Independence Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 was faced with the necessity of constantly requesting waivers from th路e two Independence Lodges. The utmost harmony prevailed between the three Lodges and all waivers were granted promptly and without question. Under the conditions above set forth the three Lodges quite properly petitioned for concurrent jurisdiction. Satisfactory evidence having been presented that each of the three Lodges had approved the petition for concurrent jurisdiction, as proyided for by the second paragraph of Section 188, By-laws 1947, I declared concurrent juriSdiction to be in full force and effect as of November 3, 1949, between the following named Lodges: Independence Lodge No. 76, Independence. McDonald Lodg(~ No. 324, Independence. Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, Jackson County. ARRESTS OF CHARTERS

The indiscriminate and persistent use of the blackball for petty or personal reason!, is reprehensible and no Freemason worthy of the name. will be guilty of such conduct. It is a pernicious evil in that it denies Masonic membership to worthy applicants and unfortunately is most difficult to combat. The right and duty of every qualified member of a Lodge to vote as his mature judgment dictates is not questioned but the use of the


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1950

blackball should be resorted to only when the petition of an applicant unworthy of Masonic membership is presented. To cast a-blackball for any other reason is a perversion of the right to votc~ is unworthy of a Freemason and constitutes a vicious practice which cannot be tolerated and a challenge to Masonry which cannot be ignored. For a number of years in Shekinah Lodge No. 256 at Festus, candidate after candidate has been blackballed. Little or no consideration has been given by a few perverse members to the qualifications of the petitioner, the standing of the petition endorsers or to the recommendations of the Investigating Committee. The Grand Lodge records show 68 rejections in the past 10 years and during the past four years the ballot has been dark on 38 occasions. Several Grand Masters and several District Deputies attempted to cope with the situation but their efforts failed to bring permanent results. Again and again the Lodge was warned that a continuance of this un-Masonic practice would result eventually in arrest of the Charter but the warnings were disregarded. Some months ago a Standing Committee of 12 Past Masters of the Lodge was appointed by the Lodge for the purpose of passing on petitions and submitting recommendations to the Lodge. The members of the Committee were Masons of standing in the community and in the Lodge and represented a cross section of the Lodge membership. It was hoped that the findings and recommendations of such a committee would carry sufficient weight with certain recalcitrant members to end the distressing condition which prompted the appointment of the committee. At a regular communication of the Lodge held March 28, 1950, five petitions were presented. The Standing Committee, after careful consideration, reported unfavorable on one petition and favorable on four. The ballot which followed resulted in the rejection of four of the five petitions. The Worshipful Master requested dispensation for re-ballot on three of the petitions. Convinced that the time had arrived for a final determination of the entire matter I granted the request for the dispensation. The three petitions were set for re-ballot on May 23. I purposely was present on that occasion. After calling the attention of the members present to the un-Masonic practice which had prevailed jn the Lodge for some years past, I admonished them as to their duty and warned that further blackballing would result in arrest of the Charter. The warning was ignored, the three petitions were rejected and I immediately arrested the Charter. It was with reluctance that I took this drastic action. The mem-


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bership of the Lodge includes many fine men and sincere Freemasons and there is a definite need for a Masonic Lodge in Festus. CHULA LODGE NO. 388

The Charter of Chula Lodge No. 388 was arrested by M. Wor. Bro. Sunderland on March 28, 1949 but the action of the Grand Master was not acted on by the Grand Lodge at the last Annual Communication. I ordered the arrest continued that this Grand Lodge might take proper action. The Lodge was and is the owner of the second floor of the building in which its meetings were held, the first floor _being occupied as a grocery store. Under the deed of sale the Lodge was obligated to keep the roof and second story in repair. After the arrest of the Charter it developed that the roof was and for some time had been in bad condition. Some months ago the owner of the ground and the first :floor, a Mrs. Phillips, called attention to the urgent need of repairing the roof and that unless such repairs were made there might be a claim for damage to the first floor as the result of the condition of the roof. Recently another and urgent demand by Mrs. Phillips that the repairs be made without further delay was referred by me to the Building Supervisory Board. Rt. Wor. Bro. Cecil A. Tolin, Chairman of the Board, in turn referred the matter to the District Deputy, Rt. Wor. Bro. Alfred Dunl~J,p. The District Deputy reported to Rt. Wor. Bro. Tolin that the roof could be repaired at a ~ost of $41.81, and, further, that the first floor tenant is willing to buy the second story for $150.00. Mrs. Phillips, the owner of the ground and first floor, has bid $100.00. The District Deputy further reported that there are now in the Lodge Hall 50 chairs, 3 pedestals, a flat top desk, an alter and a piano, also that Brother R. D. Adkins, the last Secretary of the Lodge, had assured him that there were ample funds in the treasury of the dormant Lodge to pay the repair bill of $41.81. That this troublesome matter might.be disposed of before increased costs were involved and to avoid any claim for damage to the first floor by reason of failure to repair the roof, I ordered Chula Lodge No. 388 to pay the sum of $41.81, with the understanding that a full release be obtained to protect the Grand Lodge against any further or future claim that might arise out of the arrest of the Charter and the taking over by the Grand Lodge of the physical assets of the Lodge in the event the arrest of the Charter is made permanent. I trust the Grand Lodge will approve my action. I now recommend that the second story be sold and that the arrest of the Charter of Chula Lodge No. 388 be made permanent. M. Wor. Bro. Sunderland made further Charter arrests as follows: March 28, 1949. Spring Hill Lodge No. 155. September 17, 1949. Wadesburg Lodge No. 348.


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1950

The action of the Grand Master concerning these two lodges was not passed on by the Grand Lodge at the last Communication. I ordered these two arrests continued that this Grand Lodge might take proper action. SOCIAL SECURITY

The trend of today's constructive thinking is to provide against impoverished old age and is in accord with Masonic philosophy. Many corporations are setting up pension plans and Old Age and Social Security are now incorporated pennancntly in State and Federal laws. While altruistic motives alone would encourage the consummation of such a desired objectivc emphasis is being placed more and more on the economic necessity as well as devising ways and means that will, in so far as is possible, insure individual financial secu~ity. The legislation recently enacted by the Congress and approved by the President, which widens the scope of Social Security and increases the benefits thereunder approximately 70 per cent, is a furthcr effort on the part of the Federal government to achieve that purpose. The St. Louis Social Security office recently conducted a campaign to make those covered by the Social Security law aware of the benefits provided by the law. Checks made by that office revealed that in many instances workers over 65 years of age and survivors or workers who died at any age have lost monthly insurance benefits through failure to file the required claims. Doubtless many members of the fraternity are included among those who now and under the law just enacted will come under the Social 'Security act. The early part of the year, using material furnished by the local Social Security office without expense to the Grand Lodge, I directed a letter to the Lodges of Missouri stressing the advisability of the Brcthren informing themselves of the benefits accruing under the Social Security act. I recommended that each Lodge appoint a committee charged with the duty of seeing that all Brethren and particularly the widows and children of deceased Brethren entitled to Social Security benefits are made aware of such benefits and to aid them in preparing and filing their claims. Reports from a number of Lodges indicate that the suggested committee has been appointed and that the infonnation furnished by the. local Social Security office has proven helpful in quite a few instances. AUTOMATIC SUSPENSION FOR NON-PAYMENT OF DUES

The report of the Grand Secretary will show a heavy incrcase in suspensions for non-payment of dues, as provided for by the Amendment to Section 158, By-laws 1947, adopted by this Grand Lodge in 1949 and effective for the first time this year. This condition is unfortunate but not unexpected. Other Jurisdictions where such a law is in force reported the same result the first


1950

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year and a substantial tapering off of suspensions each year thereafter. There is every reason to assume that the same results will follow in Missouri. DIVISION OF THE STAT'E INTO ADMINISTRATIVE AND RITUAL DISTRICTS

At the last Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge the Committee on Chartered Lodges recommended that the incoming Grand Master appoint a Hpecial committee to study the present division of the state into Administrative and Ritual Districts and to submit its recommendations at this Communication. I welcomed the opportunity to do so, as I do now and have since its adoption, considered the present system a grave mistake. Time and experience have vindicated that opinion, as only confusion and dissatisfaction have resulted. Few men eligible for the office or District Deputy care to assume the burden and responsibility of superintending large districts because of the time required, the expense involved and the necessity of travelling unreasonable distance to perform their duties. The Brethren who have served as District Deputies under the present system cannot be commended too highly for the willingness to make the sacrifices demanded of them. Under the present system District Deputies are not required to visit the Lodges in their districts unless ordered to do so by the Grand Master. Consequently, some District Deputies have not made the regular Lodge visitations which in the past were, in my judgment, productive of good results. Another unfortunate result is that to a large extent contact between the Grand Master and the Lodges has been lost. These statements are not made in a spirit of criticism but to emphasize the inadequacy' of the present system. As the Committee to make the survey and to report at this Communication I appointed M. Vvor. Bro. James W. Skelly Chairman and M. Wor. Bros. Ittner" Vetsburg, Cameron and Reader as Committee members. My recommendation to the Committee was that there should be a prompt return to the former system under which there were 59 Administrative and !:路9 Ritual Districts. The report of the Committee will so recommend. For the good of the Craft and to lighten the duties of future Grand Masters I urge the adoption of the Committee report. THE RITUAL

The Ritual is the basis of Masonic teaching and is a constant re-' minder of the obligations we have assumed and the duties we are to discharge. It follows that a knowledge of the Ritual is a very essential part of what may be termed the education of every Freemason.


34

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

It is also true that to impress indelibly upon the mind of the candidate the teachings of Freemasonry the degrees must be conferred properly and impressively. To accomplish this purpose the officers of each Lodge and the Brethren 'who participate in the degree work must attain a satisfactory degree of ritualistic proficiency. Much credit is due M. Wor. Bro. Anthony F. Ittner, who for 14 years has occupied the office of Grand Lecturer, and his corps of efficient District Lecturers, for their untiring efforts to impart ritualistic instruction. I cannot escape the conclusion, however, that there is a growing tendency to stress unduly the importance of the ritual, thus losing sight of the real purpose of Masonry. The Ritual is not Masonry and ritualistic proficiency alone does not make a man a Freemason. Furthermore, Masonry would not long survive as a dominant spiritual and moral force were its only purpose the conferring of degrees. Let us keep ever in mind that the degrees are but markers which point out the road down which the candidate must travel until through knowledge and understanding of the true and fundamental purposes of Masonry he attains the status of Master Mason. Masonry will fulfill its mission only as the teachings of the fraternity are put into practice. ORDER OF DEMOLAY

One of the finest of all youth organizations is the DeMolay. Organized some' 30 years ago the growth of the Order has been little short of phenomenal. Today the membership is over one million and is international in scope. In over a thousand Chapters Masonic teachings are inculcated through the medium of an impressive ritual. From the DeMolay Chapters come the citizens and in many instances the Freemasons of tomorrow. At a time when Masonry and Masonic influence are so essential to the welfare of our nation it is my opinion that this organization of trained young men deserves some recognition from Masonry. I do not recommend or even suggest sponsorship of DeMolay Chapters by Masonic Lodges but I do believe that moral support at least is in order. Certainly Masons as individuals should wecome the opportunity to encourage the boys of the DeMolay to attain a true understanding of the basic principles of our fraternity, thus preparing them for future Masonic membership. MASONIC HOME CHRISTMAS COMMITTEE

For many years a Committee known as the Masonic Home Christmas Committee rendered a fine service in bringing cheer and happiness to the members of the Home family, not only at Christmas but during


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the entire year. This Committee, composed of members of the various Lodges and Masonic bodies, was discontinued in 1946 by the then Grand Master. Being of the opinion that this truly Masonic work should be continued I ordered the Committee reinstated. ONE HUNDR:rm AND TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF TYRO LODGE NO. 12

On Saturday, April 8, 1950, Tyro Lodge No. 12 commemorated the 125th Anniversary of the chartering of the Lodge. Approximately 1,000 Brethren journeyed to the little village of Caledonia to join with the Brethren of Tyro Lodge in making the event a memorable one. One hundred and one Lodges were represented from eight states -Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Ohio, New Mexico, West Virginia, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Following the opening ceremonies a procession led by the Flat River Junior College band moved to the old cemetery where it was the privilege of your Grand Master to dedicate a monument of red granite stone from the quarries of Iron County erected by the Lodge to the memory of its first Worshipful Master, Marlin Ruggles. Later in the afternoon Sovereign Grand Inspector General William B. Massey dedicated a bronze plaque to the memory of the first three officers of the Lodge: Marlin Ruggles, W orshipful Master; William Abraham Eversole, Senior Warden and William H. Thomas, Junior Warden. Every possible courtesy was extended to the visiting Brethren and the officers and Brethren of Tyro Lodge No. 12 are to be commended for the efficient manner in which the entire program was conducted. The evening seBsion was devoted to the conferring of the Master Mason degree on two proficient Fellow Crafts. The first candidate was .obligated and raised by the officers and Brethren of Tyro Lodge. The degree was conferred on the second candidate by a team composed of visiting Brethren. Tyro Lodge, located in one of the historic and scenic sections of the Ozarks, wrote an impressive and colorful chapter in the history of Missouri Masonry. In re NEBRASKA LODGE NO. I, A. F. & A. M. OF NEBRASKA V8. BROTHER PAUL BLOTCKY

For some years past Brother Paul Blotcky has been a member in good standing in Heroine Lodge No. 104 of Kansas City. He resides in Omaha, Nebras:m, where he is and for some years has been engaged, in the wholesale liquor business. He does not engage in the sale of liquor for consumption on the premises and there has never been any complaint as to the manner and way he conducts his business.


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1950

Under the laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri such business is not a bar to Masonic membership or the basis for charges. Furthermore, the business in which Brother Blotcky is engaged is legal under the laws of the State of Nebraska. However, under tho laws of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Nebraska, regardless of the manner in which liquor is sold, the seller is guilty of a violation of the laws of that Grand Jurisdiction and subject to charges. Because of the nature of the business in which Brother Blotcky is engaged charges were brought against him in Omaha, Nebraska. The charge alleged that he was guilty of violating a certain section of the laws of the Nebraska Grand Lodge relating to the sale of intoxicating liquor. Accused was duly served with notice but before the trial date was set, M. Wor. Bro. Solon Cameron, the then Grand Master of Missouri, requested the Grand Lodge of Nebraska to transfer the case to Heroine Lodge No. 104, A. F. & A. M., of Missouri, in which Lodge the accused ~ held membership. The case was transferred by the Grand Master of Nebraska to Heroine Lodge No. 104. A commission was appointed and trial followed. The Trial Commission, finding that the accused was guilty of no violation of the laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, returned a verdict of acquittal. Appeal was taken to the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The Missouri Grand Lodge at its 1948 Communication, on the recommendation of the Appeals and Grievances Committee, vacated the proceedings held in Heroine Lodge No. 104 and referred the case to Nebraska Lodge No. 1 in Nebraska, for trial under the Nebraska law. (Pro. 1948, pp. 101-2.) Trial was held in Nebraska Lodge No.1, Brother Blotcky was found guilty and the penalty assessed was expulsion. Section 232, Trial Code-By-Iaws 1925 provides that "A Freemason of another Grand Jurisdiction while residing or sojourning in this State, shall not be entitled to Masonic comity, rights or privileges in this State, when his business, actions or conduct would, under the Masonic laws of this Jurisdiction, bar him from membership in a Missouri Lodge." It is conceded that Nebraska or any other Grand Jurisdiction may adopt and enforce similar laws and regulations within the confines of such Grand Jurisdictions. No question is raised as to the right of Nebraska Lodge No.. 1 to try Brother Blotcky for a violation of the Grand Lodge laws of the Nebraska Jurisdiction, and, having found him guilty, to refuse to recognize him as a Master Mason in good standing in that Grand Jurisdiction. But the question which is presented by the instant case concerns the force and validity of the findings, decisions and judgments of the Nebraska or any other Grand Jurisdiction affecting the status of Mis-


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

37

souri Masons residing or sojourning in such other Grand Jurisdiction. Here we encounter a divergence of opinions and decisions. In 1932 (Pro. 1932, p. 68) the then Grand Master, M. Wor. Bro. Ray V. Denslow, ruled that "under the present law (1925) in Missouri I do not believe a Lodge could transfer its authority for trial to another Jurisdiction and that expulsion (by such other jurisdiction), as matters now stand, is null and void." The decision was approved unanimously by the Jurisprudence Committee and the Grand Lodge. In his address to the Grand Lodge (Pro. 1932, p. 48) M. Wor. Bro. Denslow again alluded to the subject matter in these words: "It is my opinion that therEl is no legal obligation on the part of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to recognize the suspension by an Oklahoma Lodge of a Freemason whose membership is in a Missouri Lodge." In 1938 a Special Committee, appointed for the purpose of determining the then position of the Grand Lodge of Missouri with regard to the decision of M. VVor. Bro. Denslow, just quoted, and decisions rendered by other Grand Jurisdictions affecting the status of Missouri Masons residing or sojourning in such other Grand Jurisdictions, reached the conclusion that sueh decisions and judgments are valid and binding in this Grand Jurisdiction. The report, which was adopted by this Grand Lodge, overruled the Denslow decision above quoted. The decision rendered by the Appeals and Grievances Committee of this Grand Lodge in the Blotcky case was based on the aforementioned report of the Special Committee. Whatever may "be the decision arrived at by this Grand Lodge it must be admitted that the Blotcky case presents an incongruous situation. A Missouri Freemason, charged and tried for conduct which is not a violation of the laws of the Jurisdiction in which he holds membership, is expelled from Masonry by a Lodge of another Jurisdiction. And the offense of which he was found guilty under the laws of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, is not an offense against the laws of the State of Nebraska, not an offense in or of itself, but against a law or local regulation of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska only and not a law recognized by many Grand Jurisdictions other than Missouri. In other words, the offense is not one against Masonry per se. It should be particularly noted that the offense charged in the Blotcky case is entirely different from the offense charged in the Oklahoma case. In that case the offense was committed in the Lodge room and was an offense chargeable in any Grand Jurisdiction. Furthermore, if the verdict arrived at by Nebraska Lodge No.1 is affirmed by this Grand Lodge and the penalty of expulsion enforced, Missouri stands helpless to ever restore Brother Blotcky to Masonic membership. Only by the reversal of the decision of the Nebraska Grand Lodge by that Grand Lodge can Brother Blotcky again enjoy Masonic membership in a Missouri Lodge. Conflicting opinions and decisions justify a review of the Blotcky


38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

case, that the position of this Grand Lodge be clarified with regard to the force and validity of the findings and judgments of. other Grand Jurisdictions affecting the status of Missouri Masons residing or sojourning in such other Grand Jurisdictions. Therefore, I took no action on the request of Heroine Lodge No. 104 for a ruling as to the status of Brother Blotcky other than to order Heroine Lodge No. 104 to hold the entire matter in abeyance. I now present the case to this Grand Lodge for consideration and decision. RECOMMENDATIONS'

1. In 1943 an amendment to the By-laws was adopted by this Grand Lodge under which residence in this State is not a requirement for holding office in a Masonic Lodge in Missouri. It seems to me that each Lodge is entitled to the services when required of each officer in line. Certainly an officer who lives without the confines of the State would not be available at all times for the proper discharge of the duties of such office. I regard this as a bad law and recommend its repeal. 2. In a number of the Annual Reports submitted by the District Deputies to the incumbent Grand Master the need of a definite program for the District Deputies to follow at the District Meetings is stressed. The desire of the officers and Brethren to know more about Masonic history, Masonic symbology and Masonry in general, is emphasized by the District Deputies. Without question an informed Mason is an interested Mason and an interested Mason is an active Mason. A rounded out program arranged by a committee of well informed Brethren would do much to stimulate the interest of the officers and Brethren and at the same time increase Lodge attendance. I recommend that the incoming Grand Master give thought to the appointment of such a committee. 3. Section 76, By-laws 1947, provides that Grand Lodge Officers, Past Grand Masters, District Deputies, District Lecturers and one Representative from each chartered Lodge or Lodge U. D., the members of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances, the Committee on Credentials, the Committee on Jurisprudence, the Committee on Ways and Means and the Chairmen of all other standing committees, who do not draw mileage and per diem in any other capacity, shall be paid the sum of $5.00 for each day they may be in actual attendance upon the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge and 5 cents per mile for each mile necessarily travelled in going to and returning therefrom. Considering the increase in cost of travel by rail or automobile and hotel accommodations these allowances are inadequate. I recommend that the Ways and Means Committee give consideration to increasing the per diem and mileage to amounts commensurate with present conditions.


1950

-GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

39

GRAND LODGE PAMPHLET

Attendance on the Grand Lodge extending over a period of years has brought the conviction that too often we assemble in Annual Communication unprepared to pass on matters of importance presented for consideration and determination. To meet that condition I had printed as soon after the last Annual Communication as was possible a pamphlet which gave the names of the Grand Lodge officers, the District Deputies and District Lecturers, the various committees, the decisions of the Grand Master and certain amendments adopted and several amendments to be acted on at this Communieation. Eight copies of the pamphlet were sent to each Lodge, one for each Lodge officer and one copy to remain on the desk of the Secretary. Request was made that such parts of the matter contained in the pamphlet as might be of interest be read in open Lodge by the Worshipful Master or the Secretary., The major purpose in mind was to lay before the Craft all proposed amendments and resolutions to be considered at this Communication, that the Lodge representatives might have time to familiarize themselves with and be prepared to act on such proposed legislation. Unfortunately it was not possible to carry out in full the purpose which prompted the issuance of the pamphlet. There was considerable pending legislation which required committee consideration before such proposed legislation could be put in proper form for presentation to this Grand Lodge; consequently all such proposed amendments and resolutions did not appear in the pamphlet. The matter of most importance to be considered at this time and which could not be included in the pamphlet, has to do with the Masonic Home. However, that the Craft might have ample time in which to digest the report covering such proposed legislation, the J urisprudence Committee, to which committee the Struble report was referred for consideration and recommendations, held a number of early meetings. By doing so it was possible to have the report printed and distributed to the Lodges before summer vacation. Thus the representatives of eaeh Lodge should be informed as to the recommendations contained in the report of the Jurisprudence Committee and prepared to vote thereon. , THE MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

At the last Annual Communication a report was submitted by Rt. Wor. Brother Cornelius D. Struble recommending certain changes in the Relief and Welfare policy of this Grand Lodge. That report was most comprehensive and reflected a keen and thoughtful analysis of the methods of Relief and Welfa.re approved by certain other jurisdictions.


40

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

I am in agreement with two of the recommendations made by Rt. Wor. Bro. Struble, as follows: 1. That the management of the Home be brought more directly under the control of the Grand Lodge. 2. That outside relief be given in every instance which will permit of such care in keeping with the true spirit of Masonic concern for the welfare and happiness of those who need assistance.

The law recently enacted by the Congress and approved by the President widening the scope of Social Security and increasing the benefits thereunder may prove to be a factor in the Relief and Welfare policy of this Grand Lodge. The substantially larger amounts provided for by the law may in many instances permit of adequate outside relief rather than institutional care, thus lessening the demands upon the resources of the Home. I regard the Masonic Home as a splendid example of applied Masonry. Holding such an opinion I cannot agree with three other recommendations made by Rt. Wor. Bro. Struble, as follows: 1. That the Home property be sold and institutional care discontinued. 2. That outside relief only be the policy of this Grand Lodge. 3. That a sanitarium only be maintained.

In my judgment, the policy of outside relief only would in many instances be inadequate and for the further reason that such a policy would shift a substantial part of maintenance expenses to many Lodges not able financially to assume such obligations. Furthermore, the adoption of such a policy would, in my opinion, be regarded by the donors of the Endowment Fund as a breach of faith and, as a consequence, discourage further contributions to the Fund. Then, too, such changes would present many legal problems and might endanger the tax free status of the Home' and eventually the Grand Lodge. I am convinced, however, after mature deliberation, that definite changes in the administration of the Home are in order and the following recommendations are made for the consideration of this Grand Lodge: 1. That the Home affairs be administered by a Board of nine directors instead of thirteen as at present. 2. That the members of the Board shall be the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master, the two Grand Wardens and five Master Masons in good standing, to be elected by the Craft. 3. That the Grand Master, by virtue of office, shall be the President of the Board and the Deputy Grand Master Vice-President thereof. 4. That the first five directors not officers of the Grand Lodge路 be elected for staggered terms and their successors for terms of five years and no such directors shall be eligible for re-election. 5. That no member of the Board shall maintain residence at the Home.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

41

6. That the Home shall be in charge of a qualified Superintendent, who shall be appointed by and be subject to the Board. , 7. That an overall check be made of the employee personnel, all of whom receive wages or salary and full or part time maintenance. The number of employees appears to be out of proportion to the number of members of the Home family. 8. That the Endowment Fund be placed wit]t and handled by a Trust Company to be selected by the Board.

These recommEmdations are included with other recommendations necessary to implement the proposed changes in the administration of the Home, in the report which will be submitted to this Grand Lodge by the Jurisprudence Committee. r approve that report and recommend its adoption. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

No greater honor can come to any man than to serve as Grand Master of this Grand Jurisdiction but r say to the Brethren of this Grand Lodge in all sincerity that r value more your friendship and confidence than even the honor accompanying that high office. r accepted the office as a trust and it has been my constant aim and controlling purposes to discharge its duties as such. To adequately acknowledge my obligations to all who by their encouragement, cooperation and loyal support have made the year such a happy and eventful one is an utter impossibility. But r cannot permit this opportunity to pass without mention of a few of the Brethren to whom I am particularly indebted. No Grand Master has enjoyed more whole hearted and never failing support from the District Deputies than r have and to each of them I owe a debt of gratitude. I am heavily obligated to our Grand Secretary, M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, for his ever present and kindly cooperation which has done so much to lighten the duties and responsibilities incident to the office of Grand Master. Among the happy recollections of the year will be our several trips together to other jurisdictions. M. Wor. Bro. Karl M. Vetsburg and Rt. Vvor. Bro. C. Lew Gallant, of the Jurisprudence Committee, have willingly and gracjously responded to my many calls for counsel and advice and have throughout the year assisted me in reaching many decisions. To each of them I tender grateful thanks. lowe much to M:. Wor. Bro. Solon Cameron for encouragement and valued suggestions given freely out of his experience and for his collaboration in the handling of matters pertaining to the Lodge of Research and the Ways and Means Committee. I am indebted to M. Wor. Bro. James W. Skelly for making possible the George Washington Masonic Birthday Commemoration on November 4 last at the Scottish Rite Cathedral and for the time and


42

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

thought he has given to preparing the report embodying the proposed changes in the districting of the state. M. Wor. Bro. Anthony F. Ittner has been my good friend and confidant for many years and his interest in my efforts to serve the fraternity has been a constant inspiration. Sincere thanks are tendered to M. Wor. Bro. DuVal Smith for his acceptance of the Chairmanship of the Revision Committee following the resignation of M. Wor. Bro. Byrne E. Bigger and to Rt. Wor. Bro. R. Jasper Smith for his acceptance of the Chairmanship of the Appeals and Grievances Committee following the resignation of W. Bro. John W. Reinhardt. My deepest gratitude is to M. Vvor. Bro. Harry S. Truman, who appointed me as Grand Pursuivant and installed me as Grand Master. I shall be ever grateful to our distinguished Brother for his confidence as reflected by the appointment and for the many words of encouragement which, despite the demands of his office, I have received from him during the year. I trust that I have in some small measure at least justified his confidence. The months have run their course and the gavel of authority will _soon pass to my successor to whom I pledge my support. His experience, mature judgment and high regard for Masonry will insure an administration in keeping with the finest traditions of this Grand Lodge and our fraternity. And now, as I step aside, I indulge the hope that it may be my further privilege from time to time to serve the fraternity. Fraternally submitted, J. M. BRADFORD, Grand Master. The address was referred to the Committee on Grand Master's Address. REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY

M. Wor. Brother Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, presented his report for the period September 11, 1949, to September 10, 1950, which was adopted and ordered printed in the Proceedings. The report is as follows: SUMMARY OF LODGE WORK

Total Membership September 10, 1950 Net Gain Initiated Passed Raised BRENTWOOD LODGE NO.

. 113,801 1,477 . 5,314 . 5,123 . 5,120

.

'

616

Charter was issued to Brentwood Lodge No. 616 on September 28, 1949.


Caledonia, April 8, 1950

Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, Februa,ry 10, 1950


44

PROCEEDINGS OF THE OVERLAND LODGE NO.

1950

623

Charter was issued to Overland Lodge No. 623 on September 28, 1949. DUPLICATE CHARTERS

Duplicate charter was issued to Graham Lodge No. 289, original having been lost by fire. Duplicate charter was issued to Unity Lodge No. 495, original having become illegible. CHARTERS ARRESTED

Grand Master Sunderland arrested the Charter of Wadesburg Lodge No. 348 on September 17, 1949; Grand Master Bradford arrested the Charter of Shekinah Lodge No. 256 on May 23, 1950. LODGES CONSOLIDATED

Urich Lodge No. 286 consolidated with Clinton Lodge No. 548, under the name and number of Clinton Lodge No. 548, April 1, 1949. Grove Spring Lodge No. 589 consolidated with Joppa Lodge No. 411, under the name and number of Joppa Lodge No. 411, December 24,1949. COURTESIES

One hundred sixty-four requests have been made to Sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer degrees for Missouri Lodges; and seventyeight requests have been made to Missouri Lodges by Sister Grand Jurisdictions. COMMISSIONS TO DEPUTIES

Commissions were issued to all the District Deputy Grand Masters. COMMISSIONS ISSUED

The Grand Master appointed the following Grand Representatives: Chas. Alfred Derham, Adam Smith, Stephen C. Arnold, Oswald Eifler, Theo. Freedman, Dr. Ernest Vojda, William Webber, Dr. Theo. Vogel, Benito M. Flores, Albert M. Gessler, Hal W. Adams, Byard Stillwell,

Toorak, Victoria Dunedin, New Zealand Rapelje, Montana Pelotas, Do SuI, Brazil Little Rock, Arkansas Budapest, Hungary Mexico City, Mexico (York) Frankfurt on Main, United Grand Lodge Germany Monterrey, Mexico (Nuevo Leon) Orange, Connecticut Mayo, Florida St. John, New Brunswick

The Grand Master nominated brethren as Grand Representatives


D

1950

45

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

of the following Grand Lodges near the Grand Lodge of Missouri: John W: Blomquist, Kansas City Warren F. Drescher, Jr., Kirkwood Ernest Dunford, St. Louis John H. Gifford, St. Louis

Sweden do SuI (Brazil) United (Germany) Symbolic (Hungary)

FIFTY YEAR BUTTONS

The following brethren whose names have been certified by their respective lodges and confirmed by the records of the Grand Lodge as eligible, have received buttons in recognition of their long years of Masonic standing: No. and Name of Lodge

Name of Brother

190 Putnam John Brackett 190 Putnam Wm. Madison Tucker 315 Jerusalem James F. Farmer 550 Rose Hill Edwin Berger Sherzer 260 Mechanicsville Robert F. Tower 5 United M. V. Ausherman 472 Pickering C. G. McMillan 189 Zeredatha Alva D. Tilson 28 St. John's Fred A. Hurd 3 Beacon Theo. L. Pepperling 3 Beacon O. N. Chrismer 292 Lamar H. C. Mallett 113 Plattsburg Albert P. Fry 113 Plattsburg Robert L. Eberts 446 Ivanhoe Charles A. Thomas 188 Hannibal Wilson W. Johnston 443 Anchor Geo. A. Pennington 70 Armstrong Elmo P. Kirby 581 Illmo ...............• Ben Hill 422 Gate of the Temple }i'rank R. Schaeffer 28 St. John's Robert F. Ledford 393 Bee Hive John Clifton Crowly 548 Clinton Arthur N. Lindsey 484 Kirkwood George L. Elston 104 Heroine Arthur Fels 121 Erwin Louis G. Bender 483 Fairfax James Thomson 429 New Madrid Edward Floyd Sharp 1 Missouri Floyd Stewart 163 Occidental ..........• W. Frank Carter 163 Occidental Wm. A. Harvey 288 Hermitage Mont J. Losure 221 Mystic Tie John A. Rudisaile 271 Solomon ,J ohn W. Kastler 246 Montgomery City Jewett Pugh Ellis 52 Wakanda William B. Finley 210 Unionville M. Eppenstein 197 Carthage ...........• Everett Powers 345 Fellowship Geo. Washington Young 5 United ............•• 'Sidney M. Harrison

No. of Years

;

50 50 50 50 50 50 50 51 50 52 50 50 52 50 50 50 50 50 50 52 50 57 50 50 50 51 50 50 50 51 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50


46

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

No. and Name' of Lodge Name of Brother No. of Years 93 St. Mark's William H. Vedder 50 188 Hannibal William E. Griswold : 50 303 Osage James R. Davis 50 303 Osage James M. Clack 51 303 Osage JamesF.Barr 50 35 Mercer A. C. Kelly 50 35 Mercer Ira D. Mullinax 50 13 Rising Sun Claude F. Knighton 51 302 Lick Creell'" John E. Brown 51 40 Mount Moriah August William Wessels 50 548 Clinton Eugene W. Hall 50 294 Mound City William H. Weightman 50 393 Bee Hive Frank Clark 53 504 Platte City Arthur Ham 50 324 McDonald C. Edward Minnick 50 324 McDonald William Thomas Wilson 52 126 Seaman Edward T. Emery 50 60 New Bloomfield Lorenzo D. Thompson 50 213 Rolla John W. Scott 50 213 Rolla ...............• Edward Brucher 50 526 Wayne Robert L. Bone 50 210 Unionville Walter E. Gold 50 80 Bridgeton William R. Gentry 50 578 Forest Park John Harness 53 578 Forest Park L. M. Allen 52 420 Itaska Joseph J. Hauer 50 214 Forest City Charles O. Vancamp 50 9 George Washington Walter John Meyer 50 1 Missouri John H. Magnus 50 255 Alton Corwin S. Gohn 50 491 Vandalia Warren W. Bland 50 491 Vandalia Victor F. VanDuzer 57 243 Keystone David T. Williams 50 33 Ralls Russell Bobb 50 20 St. Louis Isidore Landau 50 162 Whitesville J. Cameron Vogt 50 217 Barbee Frank B. McGrew 50 127 Athens Emmett L. Wilson 51 201 Ravenwood Charles E. Bishop 50 201 Ravenwood William J. Wygal. 50 96 St. Andrews Leroy D. Quinley 50 501 Buckner Alonzo Patison 50 376 King Hill William C. Shannon 50 354 Hebron William G. Wilkins 51 352 Friend Geo. T. Breazeale 51 422 Gate of the Temple Alfred S. Abbott 54 375 Waynesville John L. Hicks 50 100 Ash Grove John F. Mason 54 561 Cowgill S. M. Thomson 50 89 Friendship Bascom P. Green 50 422 Gate of the Temple Ernest P. Buhrman 50 241 Palestine .......•.... Percy William Gillette 50 R. R. Wickuler ..................•. 50 476 Mt. Hope 476 Mt. Hope D. Claude Baggarly 50


1950

No. and Na;me of Lodge 352 511 404 65 43 445 413 88 422 29 97 578 360 147 147 147 3 576 460 1 316 483 40 360 197 55 209 294 283 614 259 269 287 278 639 15 15 188 225 300 9 9 288 360 28 630 438 166 188 90 353 353 353 490

47

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Name of Brother

No. of Years

Friend .. , Thomas C. Crain 50 Skidmore John H. Wheeler 53 Andrew Johns 50 Rosendale Pattonsburg ..........•Tunius B. McDonald 50 Jefferson Joseph S. Summers 50 West Gate Herman Charles Kralemann 50 Valley William E. West 50 Defiance James W. Evans 50 Gate of the Temple Toseph W. Vinson :~ 50 Windsor Joseph H. Walton 52 Bethany ..........•.. C. T. Bridges 50 Forest Park D. R. Curtis 50 Tuscan Thos. C. Hennings 50 Cass lIarlin F. CIark 50 Cass George W. Corrigan 50 Cass William C. Deacon 50 Beacon Herman L. Weiterer 50 Olive Branch Wm. H. Batiste 50 Lambskin Basil W. McCoubrie 50 Missouri George A. Higgs 50 Rural John Wm. Taylor 50 Fairfax E. R. McMahon 50 Mount Moriah Andrew MeNeiley 50 Tuscan Charles B. Sexton 50 Carthage Lee A. Sears 50 Arrow Rock J. H. Davidson 50 Poplar Bluff Edward L. Abington 50 Mound City Wm. Eben Smith 50 Stockton Wm. Ed. Williams 50 Mt. Washington John H. Twyman 51 Lodge of Love H. C. D. Towles 50 Brotherhood Hugh O. Ellingsworth 51 Craft William Downs 50 Essex R. W. Baskin 50 Mizpah Frederick W., Evers 50 Western Star Frank Whitman 50 Western Star Carl Steward 50 Hannibal Silas O. Osterbout 50 Salem William P. Elmer 50 Doric W. E. young 50 George Washington Hugo Grimm 50 Oscar H. Bobel. 50 George Washington Hermitage Otto K. Neihardt 50 Tuscan Charles M. Morris 50 St. John's W. E. Pledge 50 East Gate Adam Marchant 50 Temperance Alfred O. Lowman 50 Portageville Henry F. Hawkins 50 Hannibal Edward H. Seibel 50 Russellville G. W. Trem,ain 52 Barnesville C. M. Buford 51 Barnesville "..•r. H. Buford 50 Barnesville J. B. Russell " 54 Montevallo Charles M. Dodd ................•.. 50


48 No. 370 255 271 295 5 78 640 310 291 291 353 47 587 28 344 344 344 12 84 84 84 84 271 151 653 340 393 117 563

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

and Name of Lodge Williamstown Alton Solomon Moniteau United St. Joseph Jennings Sikeston Edina Edina Barnesville Fayette Branson St. John's Moberly Moberly Moberly Tyro Webster Groves Webster Groves Webster Groves Webster Groves Solomon Milton Shawnee Westport Bee Hive Helena York

Name of Brother John R. Morrow George Griffith Thea. C. Moore Snelling R. J. Johnson H. E. Bartlett Theo. T. Curtiss , James A. Mosley A. Ross Childress Frank Baldwin M. Bruce Hickman A. J. Lesh Thos. M. Crump H. R. Melton Arthur Conner Morton B. Levy Marvin Rowland Montrose E. Chrismer James F. Ransdell Carlton G. Haizlip Russell C. Harris James H. Howe Frank B. Miller R. C. Patterson I.Jewis A. Myers Ivan W. Phillips Orson H. Swearingen John D. Hightower Louis G. Deaton E. G. Treiber

STATISTICAL, YEAR

No. of Years 50 50 50 50 50 52 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 56 53 50 54 50 50 50 50 50 50 51

1949-1950

Number of Chartered Lodges, September Lodges U. D Number of Chartered Lodges, September Lodges U. D September 10, 1950, Total Membership September 10, 1949, Total Membership in Less: Adjustment by audit of individual

10, 1949

. 597 4 . 10, 1950 . 595 . 2 . 113,801 601 Lodges.. 112,563 Lodges. . . . . . 239 112,324

Total Number: Raised Affiliated Reinstated

5,120 848 950 6,918

Less: Total Number Dimitted Deaths Susp. N. P. D Susp. U. M. C Expelled

. 907 . 2,008 . 2,512 . 6 . 8 5,441


1950

49

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

NET GAIN, September 10, 1950

.

1,477 113,801

1950

PER CAPITA TAX

1950 Per Capita Tax due on 596 Reporting Lodges '.' $280,898.43 Total Amount paid to September 10, 1950. . . . .. $281,107.03 Lcss over-payments of 339.20 $280,767.83 Balance due on 596 Reporting Lodges, September 10, 1950.. $ September 10, 1950, 1 Lodge unreported.

130.60

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

Welfare Committee: Paid to Masonic Home, Checks 59, 105, 172, 232, 255 and 304 $ 2,800.00 Per Capita Tax: Paid to Masonic Home: Check No. 105 $ 2,709.34 Check No. 281. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,770.00 Chcck No. 300.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 100,000.00 70,000.00 Check No. 303........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 322.......................... 7,500.00 - - - - - $214,979.34 Balance Due Masonic Home, on September 10, 1950: On 1950 Per Capita Tax $ 1,113.55 On 1949 Back Per Capita Tax ........ 803.09 On 1948 Back Per Capita Tax 74.18 On 1947 Back Per Capita Tax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68.86 On 1946 Back Per Capita Tax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57.00 On 1945 Back Per Capita Tax 31.50 On 1944 Back Per Capita Tax 33.00 On 1943 Back Per Capita Tax .......... 25.50 On 1942 Back Per Capita Tax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.00 On 1941 Back Pcr Capita Tax .......... 21.00 On 1940 Back Pcr Capita Tax 15.00 On 1939 Back Per Capita Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.50 On 1938 Back Pcr Capita Tax .......... 3.00 On 1937 Back Pcr Capita Tax 1.50 On 1936 Back Per Capita Tax .......... 1.50 On 1914-19~8 Back Per Capita Tax 10.36 $

2,284.54

SPECIAL INITIATION FUND

Paid to Masonic Home, ale this Fund, September 11, 1949, to September 10, 1950 $ 53,297.47 Balance Due Masonic Home to September 10, 1950.. . . . . . . 2,057.87 GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Paid to F. Schondau, Secretaxy (Check No. 40) Balance Due September 10, 1950

$

4,900.00 4,425.10

September 10, 1950-$500.00 Bond and $576.30 in Bank ... $

1,076.30

DR. WM. P. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBRARY FUND

Septe!llber 10, 1950-Bank Balance

$

923.16


50

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE GRAND LODGE FINANCES

Cash in Grand Lodge Depositories, September 10, 1949. . .. $ 95,803.26 Cash Balance, September 10, 1949, Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Missouri (Restricted) $ 1,672.60 Cash Balance, September 10, 1949, Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Missouri 2,500.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1949, Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1949, Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri 81,630.66 - - - - $ 95,803.26 RECEIPTS

Per Capita Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per Back Per

Tax, 1950 Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax, Capita Tax,

$281,107.03 1949 $1,056.70 1948....... 97.60 1947....... 96.40 1946....... 79.80 1945....... 44.10 1944....... 46.20 1943....... 35.70 1942....... 25.20 1941....... 29.40 1940....... 21.00 1939....... 10.50 1938....... 4.20 1937....... 2.10 1936....... 2.10 1914-1918.. 14.50 - - - $ 1,565.50 . . . . . .

$282,672.53 14.00 11.50 280.50 1,713.37 366.75 2,525.25

Refunds and Miscellaneous: A. E. Spencer Agency-R-et. Premo $2.72 E. E. Morris-F. 1. C. A. Tax.................. 2.50

5.22

Received from Defunct Lodges and members thereof Sale of 1921 Constitutions and By-Laws Sale of 1947 Constitutions and By-Laws Sale of Dues R-eceipts Sale of Masonic Veterans' Buttons Sale of Masonic Manuals ,

Refund on Mileage and Per Diem Account Interest on Permanent Fund Securities

. .

4,878.50 4,375.09

General or Miscellaneous: Balance in Wadesburg Lodge No. 348 Checking Account . $111.52 Overland Lodge--Charter Fee . 20.00 20.00 Brentwood Lodge--Charter Fee . Unity Lodge--Duplicate Charter Fee . 5.00 Belton Lodge-Duplicate Charter Fee . 5.00 Sale of 1949 Proceedings : . 3.00 Tyro Lodge No. 12-Photostat . 1.60 166.12


1950

51

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Fines for Tardy Reports (3 Lodges)

40.00

TOTAL INCOME -' $297,048.83 September 10, 1949, Cash in Grand Lodge Depositories.. . . 95,803.26 TOTAL RECEIPTS, SEPTEMBER 10, 1950 $392,852.09 ANALYSIS OF DISBURSEMENTS

Total Disbursements to September 10, 1950.............. $296,658.06 Pay Roll $ 25,000.00 Printed Proceedings $ 2,644.44 Salaries and Allowances, Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Lecturer, Grand Treasurer, Grand Lodge Office Help and Temp. Helpcomplete Biog. File 20,229.98 Federal Withholding Tax: Paid $1,102.90 Withheld 1,102.90 Social Security-F. 1. C. A.: Paid $ 510.68 Withheld .........•........... 183.57 Grand Lodge portion St. Louis Earnings Tax: Paid Withheld

227.11

. $ 78.84 68.35

10.49 Grand Correspondent . Maintenance, Grand Lodge Office . Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers (O.G.M.) . Ritual Committee Expense . Printing, postage and stationery . District Lecturers and D.D.G.M. Conferences . . Masonic Relief Assn. U. S. and Canada Telephone and Telegrams-Grand Lodge Office Bonds: Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer .. Committee on Revision of By-Laws . Reporter: Grand Lodge Session . Expenses: Grand Lodge Session . Contingent: Grand Lodge Expense Fund . C. K. Benson Audit Company . Expenses: To George Washington Memorial and Grand Masters' Conference . Membership Masonic Service Association . Grand Lodge Officers' Conference . Welfare Committee: Masonic Home Board . Welfare Committee: Masonic Home Board (authorized by Ways and Means Committee, August, 1950) . Expenses: D.n.G.M.'s (Order Grand Master) .. Missouri Lodge of ResearchIndexing Committee . For care of Portraits of Past Grand Masters as per resolution adopted . Jewels for Grand Masters-1942-1950, inc.

750.00 1,800.00 319.40 452.00 3,363.04 1,316.78 406.40 247.39 300.00 149.18 100.00 2,350.89 432.16 231.88 600.00 2,125.63 2,500.00 300.00 46.15

161.23 1,665.30


52

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Delegate to Masonic Board of Relief-Canada .. Repairs to Furniture and Decorations in Grand Master's Office ..................•........ Additional Filing· Equipment . Lighting Equipment for Grand Lodge Office . Masonic Service Assn.-Hospital Visitation . Total Budget Appropriation for 1949-1950 (Exclusive of Payroll) Actual Disbursements

111.57 263.97 732.61 124.00 6,000.00 $ 49,724.00 $ 54,988.60

49,724.00

Amount Unexpended $ 5,264.60 Total paid Masonic Home alc Back Per Capital Tax collected to September 10, 1950........ $ 2,709.34 Total paid Masonic Home a/c1950 Per Capita Tax 212,270.00 $214,979.34 Purchase of Ma.nuals-Special Account Dues Receipt Cards Purchase of Veterans' Buttons Expense: Welfare Relief Survey Special Library Fund Truman Portrait Emergency Fund-Manitoba Relief European Masonic Relief

:

:.:

. . . . . . . .

2,921.57 1,552.00 900.00 87.14 23.91 32.50 1,150.00 50.00

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS TO SEPT. 10, 1950 .... $296,658.06 RECAPITULATION

Total Receipts to September 10, 1950 , $392,852.09 Total Disbursements to September 10, 1950.............. 296,658.06 Cash Balance, September 10, 1950, in General Fund ..... , $ 96,194.03 Cash Balance, September 10, 1950, Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. (Restricted) $ 1,672.60 Cash Balance, September 10,1950, Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Mo. 2,500.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1950, Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 10,000.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1950, Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo. 82,021.43 96,194.03 I.,css: Balance Due Masonic Home alc Per Capita Tax to September 10, 1950. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 2,284.54 Less: $1,672.60 "Restricted" Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, M9. 1,672.60 Less: General Library Fund .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164.53 $

4,121.G7

September 10, 1950, Total Amount Available in General Fund :\I 92,072.36

Fraternally submitted, l{,moLD L. READER, Grand Secretary. REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER

Rt. V\T or. Brother E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, presented his


1950

53

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI \.

report for the period September 10, 1949, to September 9, 1950, which was adopted and is as follows: 1949 Sept. 10 Balance in Fidelity Savings Tr. Co.-Restricted ... $ 1,672.60 Sept. 10 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall. . . . . . 10,000.00 Sept. 10 Balance in Bank of Kirksville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,500.00 Sept. 10 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City Sept. 9, 1950 Received from Grand Secretary

. .

$14,172.60 81,632.6G 297,050.13 $392,855.39

Sept. 9, 1950 Disbursed during the year by Warrants No.1 to No. 326 not consecutive .. $296,555.33 Sept. 9, 1950 Balance in Union Natl. Bank.... 82,127.46 Sept. 9, 1950 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank 10,000.00 Sept. 9, 1950 Balance in Bank of Kirksville.. 2,500.00 Sept. 9, 1950 Balance in Fidelity Sav. Tr. Co. 1,672.60 (Hestricted) : $392,855.39 As Grand Treasurer, I charge myself with the custody of the following securities contained in Safe Deposit Box No. 6111 in the Union Safe Deposit Company of Kansas City, which said box is subject to the joint control of myself a.nd the Grand Master, or his delegated representative: U. S. Savings Bonds-Series "G"-2 % % Due 10/1/53 Cost Due 6/1/55 Cost Due 9/1/58 Cost Due 12/1/59 Cost Due 4/1/60 Cost Due 4/1/6J Cost Due 9/1/62 Cost U. U. U. U. U. U.

S. S. S. S. S. S.

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

. $ 5,000.00 10,000.00 . 18,700.00 . 10,000.00 . 10,000.00 . 20,000.00 . 10,000.00 .

Bonds-2%%- 6/15/1964/69-Par Bonds-2%%-12/15/1964/69-Par Bonds-2%%- 3/15/1965/70-Par Bonds-2%%- 3/15/1966/71-Par Bonds-2%%- 6/15/1967j72-Par Bonds-2%%-12/15/1967/72-Par

Value Value Value Value Value Value

12,000.00 17,000.00 10,000.00 6,000.00 40,000.00 15,000.00

$183,700.00 I also hold for William F. Kuhn Library Association U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2%%, Series 1952-54, Par Value .... $ 500.00

Fraternally submitted, EDMUND E. MORRIS,

Grand Treasurer. REPORT OF AUDITOR

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Gentlemen: Pursuant to engagement, we have examined and checked the book records of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer of the Grand


54

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri for the period from September 11, 1949, to September 10, 1950, also the Masonic Home Initiation Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund, the Wm. F. Kuhn Library Fund and the Joseph S. McIntyre Library Fund for the same period, respectfully present the following report: GENERAL F'UND-PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS

Balance, September 11, 1949............................ $ 95,803.26 Receipts-Forwarded to Grand Treasurer Per Capita Tax 1950 $281,107.03 Back Per Capita Tax 1949 $1,056.70 Back Per Capita Tax 1948 .. 97.60 Back Per Capita Tax 1947 96.40 Back Per Capita Tax 1946 79.80 Back Per Capita Tax 1945 44.10 Back Per Capita Tax 1944 46.20 Back Per Capita Tax 1943 35.70 Back Per Capita Tax 1942 25.20 Back Per Capita Tax 1941. . . . . . . . 29.40 Back Per Capita Tax 1940 21.00 Back Per Capita Tax 1939 10.50 Back Per Capita Tax 1938 . . . . . . . . 4.20 Back Per Capita Tax 1937 2.10 Back Per Capita Tax 1936 ..... 2.10 Back Per Capita Tax 1909 to 1918 14.50 1,565.50 $282,672.53 Sale of Masonic Manuals $2,525.25 Sale of 1921 Constitution and By11.50 Laws . Sale of 1947 Constitution and ByLaws . 280.50 366.75 Sale of 50 Year Veteran Buttons .. Sale of Dues Receipt Cards . 1,713.37 Sale of Proceedings . 3.00 Charter Fees . Duplicate Charter Fees . Interest on Permanent Fund Securities . Photostat . Penalties for Late Returns . Back Dues-Members of Defunct Lodges . Balance in Defunct Lodge Checking Account Refunds: Mileage and Per Diem Account.. $4,878.50 Insurance Premium 2.72 2.50 Social Security Tax Payment. . . .

4,900.37 40.00 10.00 4,375.09 1.60 40.00 14.00 111.52

4,883.72

297,048.83 $392,852.09

Disbursements Per Checks Issued for Expenses

296,658.06

Balance, September 10, 1950 (Per Grand Secretary's Books) $ 96,194.03 Balance, September 10, 1950 (Per Grand Treasurer's Books) $ 96,300.06


1950

55

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI RECONCILIATION

Balance, September 10, 1950 (Per Grand Treasurer's Books) $ 96,300.06 Less Outstanding Check No. 324-August 29, 1950.......... 106.03 Balance, September 10, 1950 (Per Grand Secretary'8 Books) $ 96,194.03 Consisting of Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri-In Liquidation, Not Subject to Withdrawal $ 1,672.60 .Bala.nce i~ Union National Bank, Kansas City, MIssourI 82,021.43 Bala.nce i~ Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, MIssourI 10,000.00 Balance in Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Missouri 2,500.00 $ 96,194.03 BONDS

On September 18, 1950, in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer and a representative of the Grand Master, we examined the securities listed below in the Grand Lodge safe deposit box at the Union National Bank of Kansas City, Missouri. PERMANENT FUND

Bond Number 211585E 211586F 23572B 2371A 4615E 21845E 21846F

Maturity

Kind U. U. U. U. U. U. U.

S. S. S. S. S. S. S.

Treasury 1964/69 Treasury 1964/69 Treasury 1964/69 Treasury 1964/69 Treasury 1964/69 Treasury 1964/69 Treasury 1964/69

Interest Dates

Interest Rate

Par Value

Total

6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15

& 12/15 2%% $ 1,000.00 1,000.00 & 12/15 2%% & 12/15 2lh% 10,000.00 5,000.00 & 12/15 2%% & 12/15 2%% 10,000.00 1,000.00 & 12/15 2%% 1,000.00 $ & 12/15 2lh%

29,000.00

8564D 77195E

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

1965/70 1965/70

3/15 3/15

& &

9/15 9/15

2lh%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00

10,000.00

5653C 5932B

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

1966/71 1966/71

3/15 3/15

& &

9/15 9/15

2%% 2%%

$ 1,000.00 5,000.00

6,000.00

U. U. U. U. U. U. U.

1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72

6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15

& 12/15 2lh% & 12/15 2%% & 12/15 2lh% & 12/15 2lh% & 12/15 2%% & 12/15 2%% & 12/15 2%%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

55,000.00

8964D 49654D 41669K 41670L 41671A 28103C 26122B

S. S. S. S. S. S. S.

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

Maturity Value V29384G Series G

October, '53

$ 5,000.00

2%%

Redemption Value 9/10/50 $ 4,850.00

Cost $ 5,000.00


56 X253352G C4377033G C4377034G D2320085G M4864090G M4864091G M4864092G V702346G X582056G X806975G X807739G X909237G X909238G X1146710G

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series

G G G G G G G G G G G G G G

June, '55 September, '58 September, '58 September, '58 September, '58 September, '58 September, '58 September, '58 September, '58 December, '59 April, '60 April, '61 April, '61 September, '62

10,000.00 100.00 100.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 $83,700.00

9,610.00 94.70 94.70 473.50 947.00 947.00 947.00 4,735.00 9,470.00 9,560.00 9,620.00 9,780.00 9,780.00 9,880.00* $80,788.90

10,000.00 100.00 100.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 $83,700.00 83,700.00 $183,700.00

* Not Redeemable Until March 1, 1951. WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Bond Interest Number Kind Maturity Interest Date Rate Cost 2552B U. S. Treasury 1952/54 3/15 & 9/15 2%% $500.00 During the year under review, Series D Savings Bonds, purcha.sed in 1940 a.t a cost of $7,500.00, matured, having a maturity value of $10,000.00. These matured bonds were replaced by a Series G-2% % Bond for $10,000.00, thereby increa.sing the bond holdings by $2,500.00, representing the increment over 10 years on the Series D Savings Bonds. In checking the interest income on the other bonds held, we computed the interest at 2% % on the $173,700.00 principal which a.mounts to $4,342.50. The interest income, as shown by the cash receipts, was $4,375.09, a difference of $32.59. Mr. E. E. Morris, the Grand Treasurer, informed us that the $32.59 represents coupons on bonds belonging to the Anointed Order of High Priesthood, which he had inadvertently deposited in the Grand Lodge depositary. MASONIC HOME INITIA.TION FUND

Balance in Bank, September 11, 1949 $ 2,297.47 Received from Masonic Lodges during the period September 11, 1949 to September 10, 1950 .......... 53,060.00 $55,357.47 Transferred to Masonic Home During Period September 11, 1949 to September 10, 1950 .. Bank Charges .

$53,297.47 2.13

Balance in First National Bank in Saint Louis, September 10, 1950

53,299.60 $ 2,057.87

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Balance in Bank, September 11, 1949 Received from Masonic Lodges During Period

$ 4,020.98


1950

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

September 11, 1949 to September 10, 1950

5,309.00

.

$ 9,329.98 Transferred to George Washington Memorial Association, February 21, 1950 Bank Charges

$ 4,900.00 4.88

Balance in First National Bank in Saint Louis, September 10, 1950

4,904.88 $ 4,425.10

WM. F. KUHN LIBR.ARY FUND

Balance, September 11, 1949 Receipts: Interest on Bond Interest on Savings Account Balance, September 10, 1950 Consisting of Cash in Savings Account, First National Bank in Saint Louis United States Treasury Bond No. 2552B

$ 1,058.19 $

12.50 5.61

18.11

$ 1,076.30 $

576.30 500.00

$ 1,076.30

JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBR.ARY FUND

Balance, September 11, 1949 No transactions During Year Under Review

$ .

Balance in Mississippi Valley Trust Company, Saint Louis, September 10, 1950

923.16

---$

923.16

MILEAGE AND PER DIEM COMMITTEE

Deposit from General Fund Disbursements: Mileage and Per Diem Checks Issued and Paid Transferred to General Fund Balance, September 10, 1950

$25,000.00 $20,121.50 4,878.50

25,000.00 $

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer, and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri from September 11, 1949 to September 10, 1950. The Lodge returns were checked to the Grand Secretary's records and the recorded cash receipts of the Masonic Home initiation Fund and the George Washington Memorial Fund were compared with the stubs of receipts to the Lodges therefor. Cancelled checks were inspected in support of the disbursements and the bank balances shown in the report were confirmed directly to us by the depositaries. Respectfully submitted, C. K. BENSON & CO., Certified Public Accountants.


58

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

A Member of the Home Family REPORT OF MASONIC' HOME

M. Wor. Brother W. W. Martin presented the report of the Masonic Home which was adopted and is as follows:


REPORT OF THE MASONIC HOME 1950

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. cf; A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Weare pleased to submit the report of the Masonic Home and request your careful consideration. At the annual session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, held on September 27, 28 and 29, 1949, in St. Louis, Missouri, the following brethren were elected directors for a term of three years: James M. DeWitt, Kirksville, Mo. Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville, Mo. William R. Howell, Monroe City, Mo. William H. Utz, Jr., St. Joseph, Mo. Elmer W. Wagner, St. Louis, Mo.

In February, 1950, Elmer W. Wagner resigned and Russell E. Murray, St. Louis, Missouri, was elected by the Board of Directors to fill the vacancy until the next annual communication of the Grand Lodge. APPLICATIONS

During the year 192 applications for admission to the Home were considered and the following disposition was made of them: Admitted to the Home 56 Died while application was being investigated .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Referred to the Welfare Committee of Grand Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Referred to the Welfare Committee of Grand Chapter O. E. S. 0 3 Rejected because of ineligibility 129 Continued for further investigation

We have had the usual demand for the admission of old people and the census reports show that there will be an increasing demand with the years. But the demand for the admission of children has definitely increased. This has been especially noticeable in the last three months. The character of our children's department is rapidly changing. Next year, we will only have three children of older age in the Home and they will all be in college. We really have a Children's Home--one child only sixteen months. CONDITIONS IN THE HOME

We have often called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the fact


60

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

that we are overcrowded with women. We not only have a number living in the Men's Building, but we also have some living in the Hospital. The number of women applying for admission to the Home compared to the number of men is definitely on the increase. Weare getting three applications from women to everyone we get for a Master Mason. The average of our old people is eighty-one. We now have nineteen in the Home who are ninety years of age or older and one woman who is one hundred years old. As usual, we have a number of both men and women who have been admitted to the Home but who have not yet arrived. BOILER PLANT

Weare again calling your attention to the fact that our heating plant is in critical condition. We have one good boiler and one very old one. Rebuilding the plant can't be postponed much longer without real danger. MAINTENANCE

This past year we have been compelled to make extensive repairs; new fire escapes, expensive roof repairs, and many smaller repairs. But, this coming year the City of St. Louis may compel us to make, in the interest of safety, very extensive repairs. We have no idea now of the expense but it could be very costly. Many of our buildings are old and do not meet modern needs for maximum safety. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR

During tbe past year the Grand Matron and the Advisory Board have raised considerable money and they already had over $200,000.00 ready to be used for the development and enlargement of the Home, but this year on account of conditions, they were not in a position to buy many items of furniture and equipment badly needed at the Home. SCHOLARSHIPS

The Eastern Star Scholarship Board is paying the tuition of one Masonic Home girl in Washington University. We are grateful for their help. KNIGHTS TEMPLAR EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION

We are deeply grateful to this wonderful organization for their continued help. They are again furnishing a scholarship for one of our boys in Washington University Law School. MEMBER STATISTICS

Men Women Boys Members in the Home July 1, 1949 Arrivals during the year

Girls

, 60 17

171 30

23 4

15 3

77

201

27

18


1950

61

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Discharged during the year 1 Died during the year . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 18 Members in the Home July 1, 1950

58

7

o

1

23 176

20

17

2

o

MOlin Building of the Home Total members in the Home July 1, 1950 271 Average number in the Home during the past year 269 Admitted since July 1, 1949, but who have not yet arrived. . . . . . . . . . 5 MA$ONICINFIR~Y

The following gives an account of the work done during the past year: Total number of patients in the hospital July 1, 1949 70 Total number of patients admitted during the year 264 Total number of patients discharged during the year -. . . . . . . 227 Total number of deaths during the year 41 Total number of patients treated during the year 19,642 Total number of patients in the hospital July 1, 1950 66 Total patients' days in the hospital 24,817 Average number of patients per day during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Total number of out-patient treatments during the year 9,163 Total number of operations performed 20 BUILDING FUND

On July 1, 1949, we had $104,921.44 in the Building Fund of the


62

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Home. The following voluntary contributions have come to the Home during this past year: Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis Weston Lodge No. 53, Weston Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Webster Groves Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, St. Louis '" Greenville Lodge No. 107, Greenville Erwin Lodge No. 121, St. Louis ," Occidental Lodge No. 163, St. Louis Rolla Lodge No. 213, Rolla Good Hope Lodge No. 218, St. Louis Cuba Lodge No. 312, Cuba Richland Lodge No. 385, Richland , West Gate Lodge No. 445, St. Louis Henderson Lodge No. 477, Rogersville Chilhowee Lodge No. 487, Chilhowee Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, St. Louis Elvins Lodge No. 599, Flat River Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton " Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Kansas City F. B. Adams, St. Louis, Mo. . Peter Anderson, St. Louis, Mo. . J. H. Brimmer, House Springs, Mo C. R. Burroughs, Lesterville, Mo. . A. J. Clayton, Brunswick, Mo Will Docter, St. Louis, Mo Joe N. England, Clarksville, Mo Robert F. Feagan, Gasconade, Mo. . Walter Freund Bread Co., St. Louis, Mo.. , .. " , Mr. and Mrs. Horace Graf, in memory of John G. Goodin Wesley B. Henckler, St. Louis, Mo Daniel C. Kerckhoff Foundation, St. Louis, Mo. . John Mavrakos, St. Louis, Mo George F. Morrison, St. Louis, Mo Herman Murray, St. Louis, Mo. . August Ogle, St. Louis, Mo : Rick Electric Company, St. Louis, Mo Thomas Rutherford, Jr., St. Louis, Mo Roy D. Scott, Lesterville, Mo Herbert J. Smith, Chamois, Mo Mrs. Rose E. Stanford, St. Louis, Mo., in memory of C. L. Stanford Harry S. Truman, Washington, D. C W. R. Tweedie, Jefferson City, Mo U. S. Supply Company, Kansas City, Mo., in memory of May M. Lewis W. A. Walker, Webster Groves, Mo J. E. Weissenborn, St. Louis, Mo

$ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00 10.00 20.00 15.00 13.00 5.00 38.00 3.00 12.00 30.00 333.00 25.00 50.00 3.00 22.00 2.50 5.00 1.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 60.00 25.00 10.00 200.00 5.00 10.00 50.00 5.00 10.00 250.00 95.00 50.00 375.00 230.00 200.00 5.00 5.00 2.00

. . .

100.00 10.00 100.00

. . .

10.00 35.00 50.00

ENTERTAINMENT FUND

The Grand Master's letter brought a very generous response from the Lodges. Organizations and individuals have also made voluntary contributions.


1950

63

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Following the list of the donors is a list of the expenses. Any Lodge or Master Mason can get full information about how the money is used on inquiry. A Committee of the Board, and at the Grand Master's request, the three District Deputy Grand Masters of St. Louis and St. Louis County planned how the money was to be used. This money is used for picture shows, entertainments, birthday presents, boat excursions, watermelon feasts, and in many other ways. Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis United Lodge No.5, Springfield George Washington Lodge No.9, St. Louis Pauldingville Lodge No. 11, Wright City Tyro Lodge No. 12, Caledonia Rising Sun Lodge No. 12, Barry Eolia Lodge No. 14, Eolia Western Star Lodge No. 15, Winston Paris Union Lodge No. 19, Paris St. Louis Lodge No. 20, St. Louis Wellington Lodge No. 22, DeKalb Wyaconda Lodge No. 24, LaGrange Naphtali Lodge No. 25, St. Louis St. John's Lodge No. 28, Hannibal Windsor Lodge No. 29, Windsor Huntsville Lodge No. 30, Huntsville Liberty Lodge No. 31, Liberty Humphreys Lodge No. 32, Humphreys Ralls Lodge No. 33, Center Troy Lodge No. 34, Troy " Mercer Lodge No. 35, Princeton DeWitt Lodge No. 39, DeWitt Mount Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City Bonhomme Lodge No. 45, Ballwin Fayette Lodge No. 47, Fayette Xenia Lodge No. 50, Hopkins Livingston Lodge No. 51, Glasgow Wakanda Lodge No. 52, Carrollton Weston Lodge No. 53, Weston Index Lodge No. 54, Garden City Tipton Lodge No. 56, Tipton Richmond Lodge No. 57, Richmond Monticello Lodge No. 58, Monticello Centralia Lodge No. 59, Centralia Waverly Lodge No. 61, Waverly Vincil Lodge No. 62, Cameron Monroe Lodge No. 64, Monroe City Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65, Pattonsburg Sullivan Lodge No. 69, Sullivan Savannah Lodge No. 71, Savannah Gorin Lodge No. 72, Gorin Eureka Lodge No. 73, Brunswick Silex Lodge No. 75, Silex Independence Lodge No. 76, Independence Lebanon Lodge No. 77, Steelville

,

'" , ,

,

, ,

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50.00 25.00 60.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 21.50 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 50.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 43.00 45.00


64

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, St. Joseph..... .. . .... . .. . .. .. .. .. Polar Star Lodge No. 79, St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, St. John's Station. .. .. .. .. . .. . . . Central Lodge No. 81, Molino Jackson Lodge No. 82, Linneus Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Webster Groves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brookfield Lodge No. 86, Brookfield...... .... .. .... ... . . . .. Friendship Lodge No. 89, Chillicothe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. Madison Lodge No. 91, Madison. St. Marks Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau.. . .. ... Vienna Lodge路 No. 94, Vienna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, St. Louis St. Andrews Lodge No. 96, Shelbyville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Webster Lodge No. 98, Marshfield , . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . .. ... Ash Grove Lodge No. 100, Ash Grove.... Bogard Lodge No. 101, Bogard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bloomington Lodge No. 102, Bevier West View Lodge No. 103, Millersville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gallatin Lodge No. 106, Gallatin Marcus Lodge No. 110, Fredericktown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maitland Lodge No. 112, Maitland.... .... ..... . .. . .... ..... Plattsburg Lodge No. 113, Plattsburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laddonia Lodge No. 115, Laddonia. ... . . . .. . .. .. . Kingston Lodge No. 118, Kingston DeSoto Lodge No. 119, DeSoto.. Compass Lodge No. 120, Parkville........................ Erwin Lodge No. 121, St. Louis. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Triplett Lodge No. 122, Triplett Hermann Lodge No. 123, Hermann... . .. .. .. .. . .. Gentryville Lodge No. 125, Gentryville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seaman Lodge No. 126, Milan Lorraine Lodge No. 128, Ridgeway Monett Lodge No. 129, Monett.. .. .. . .. . .. .. . . Hume Lodge No. 130, Hume . . . .. .. .. .. .. Potosi Lodge No. 131, Potosi Farmington Lodge No. 132, Farmington.. . . .. .. .. . .. Star of The West Lodge No. 133, Ironton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delphian Lodge No. 137, Birch Tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lincoln Lodge No. 138, Fillmore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pleasant Grove Lodge No. 142, Otterville.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Irondale Lodge No. 143, Irondale '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cass Lodge No. 147, Harrisonville Linn Creek Lodge No. 152, Camdenton.. . .. .. Bloomfield Lodge No. 153, Bloomfield Ionic Lodge No. 154, Desloge. . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Ashland Lodge No. 156, Ashland.. .. . .. . .. North Star Lodge No. 157, Rockport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Mountain Grove... ... . ..... Green City Lodge No. 159, Green City... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clifton Hill Lodge No. 161, Clifton Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitesville Lodge No. 162, Whitesville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Occidental Lodge No. 163, St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portageville Lodge No. 166, Portageville Benevolence Lodge No. 170, Utica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Censer Lodge No. 172, Macon.. .... .... . ... .. . . . .. .. .. . .. . Gray Summit Lodge No. 173, Gray Summit.. . . .. . . . .. . .. .. ..

1950 10.00 15.00 60.00 3.25 10.00 25.00 10.00 2.50 10.00 25.00 5.00 33.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 50.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 5.00


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Point Pleasant Lodge No. 176, Conran . Pride of the West Lodge No. 179, St. Louis . Pyramid Lodge No. 180, St. Louis ...........•.............. California Lodge No. 183, California . . Morley Lodge No. 184, Morley Chamois Lodge No. 185, Chamois ..........••.•............ Hannibal Lodge No. 188, Hannibal . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, St. Joseph . Wellsville Lodge No. 194, Wellsville " ...•............... Carthage Lodge No. 197, Carthage . New Hope Lodge No. 199, Elsberry . Sonora Lodge No. 200, Watson . Ravenwood Lodge No. 201, Ravenwood . . Westville Lodge No. 202, Westville Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, Poplar Bluff . Unionville Lodge No. 210, Unionville . Four Mile Lodge No. 212, Campbell . Rolla Lodge No. 213, Rolla . Forest City Lodge No. 214, Forest City . Hornersville Lodge No. 215, Hornersville . Hale City Lodge No. 216, Hale . Barbee Lodge No. 217, Sweet Springs . Good Hope Lodge No. 218, St. Louis . Albert Pike Lodge No. 219, Kansas City . Kansas City Lodge No. 220, Kansas City . Mystic Tie Lodge No. 221, Oak Ridge . LaBelle Lodge No. 222, LaBelle .........•.................. Roy Lodge No. 223, Camden . Hamilton Lodge No. 224, Hamilton . Salem Lodge No. 225, Salem . Saline Lodge No. 226, St. Marys ...........................• Shelbina Lodge No. 228, Shelbina " •.... St. James Lodge No. 230, St. James . Polo Lodge No. 232, Polo . Bucklin Lodge No. 233, Bucklin . St. Francois Lodge No. 234, Libertyville . Sedalia Lodge No. 236, Sedalia . LaPlata Lodge No. 237, LaPlata . Rushville Lodge No. 238, Rushville . . Hopewell Lodge No. 239, Lesterville Palestine Lodge No. 241, St. Charles . Keystone Lodge No. 243, St. Louis . Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City . . Neosho Lodge No. 247, Neosho Carroll Lodge No. 249, Norborne . Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington . Butler Lodge No. 254, Butler . Alton Lodge No. 255, Alton . Shekinah Lodge No. 256, Festus . Mechanicsville Lodge No. 260, Defiance . Holden Lodge No. 262, Holden . Summit Lodge No. 263, Lee's Summit . Corinthian Lodge No. 265, Warrensburg ................•... Aurora Lodge No. 267, St. Louis . Lodge of Truth No. 268, Atlanta . New Salem Lodge No. 270, Winfield . Solomon Lodge No. 271, Springfield .......................•

65 32.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 22.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 3.00 5.00 25.00 15.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 13.00 10.00 100.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 25.00


66

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia . St. Clair Lodge No. 273, Osceola . Wm. D. Muir Lodge No. 277, Pilot Grove . Fenton Lodge No. 281, Fenton . Cosmos Lodge No. 282, St. Louis . Stockton Lodge No. 283, Stockton . . Canopy Lodge No. 284, Aurora Earl Lodge No. 285, Coffey , . Craft Lodge No. 287, Canton . Hermitage Lodge No. 288, Hermitage . Fairmount Lodge No. 290, Wyaconda . Edina Lodge No. 291, Edina . Lamar Lodge No. 292, Lamar . Moniteau Lodge No. 295, Jamestown . . Temple Lodge No. 299, Kansas City , . Osage Lodge No. 303, Nevada Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305, Kansas City . Parrott Lodge No. 308, Maysville . Sikeston Lodge No. 310, Sikeston . Cuba Lodge No. 312, Cuba " . " . Meramec Lodge No. 313, Eureka Pine Lodge No. 314, Bardley . Jerusalem Lodge No. 315, Jerico Springs . Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas City . Eldorado Lodge No. 318, Luray , . Paulville Lodge No. 319, Hurdland . . Versailles Lodge No. 320, Versailles Hardin Lodge No. 322, Hardin . Cornerstone Lodge No. 323, St. Louis . McDonald Lodge No. 324, Independence . Dockery Lodge No. 325, Meadville . Linn Lodge No. 326, Linn . '" . Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327. West Plains Paul Revere Lodge No. 330, St. Louis . Charity Lodge No. 331, St. Joseph . . Excello Lodge No. 332, Excello Breckenridge Lodge No. 334, Breckenridge . Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin , . Blue Springs Lodge No. 337, Blue Springs . Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, Herculaneum . Fidelity Lodge No. 339, Farley . Westport Lodge No. 340, Kansas City " .. " . Rockville Lodge No. 341, Rockville . Circle Lodge No. 342, Roscoe . Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Joplin . America Lodge No. 347, St. Louis , . Pollock Lodge No. 349, Pollock . Mosaic Lodge No. 351, Belleview . Friend Lodge No. 352, Ozark . Barnesville Lodge No. 353, Ellington . Hebron Lodge No. 354, Mexico . Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356, Harrisburg . Northwest Lodge No. 358, Tarkio . Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis . Hiram Lodge No. 362, Kahoka . Fraternal Lodge No. 363, Robertsville . Higginsville Lodge No. 364, Higginsville .........•..........

1950 10.00 15.00 5.00 25.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 2.50 25.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 25.00 5.00 50.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 20.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 50.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 20.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 20.00 20.00 5.00 135.40 10.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 12.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 50.00 10.00 5.00 10.00


1950

67

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Adair Lodge No. 366, Kirksville. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368, Adrian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,. . .. . . .. . .. . Composite Lodge No. 369, Doniphan

25.00 10.00 25.00

Home Youngsters and Christmas Tree Williamstown Lodge No. 370, Williamstown Waynesville Lodge No. 375, Waynesville King Hill Lodge No. 376, St. Joseph Queen City Lodge No. 380, Queen City Ionia Lodge No. 381, Eldon Pythagoras Lodge No. 383, Cassville Richland Lodge No. 385, Richland

" , , ,

. . . . . . .

10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 105.00 10.00 25.00


68

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Arcana Lodge No. 389, Harris . Raytown Lodge No. 391, Raytown . Christian Lodge No. 392, Oak Grove . Bee Hive Lodge No. 393, Lawson . . Gower Lodge No. 397, Gower Pike Lodge No. 399, Curryville . Decatur Lodge No. 400, Pierce City . Malta Lodge No. 402, Malta Bend . Everton Lodge No. 405, Everton . Malden Lodge No. 406, Malden . Charleston Lodge No. 407, Charleston . Louisville Lodge No. 409, Louisville . Iberia Lodge No. 410, Iberia . Appleton City Lodge No. 412, Appleton City . Greensburg Lodge No. 414, Greensburg . Hunnewell Lodge No. 415, Hunnewell . Cache Lodge No. 416, St. Louis . Whitewater Lodge No. 417, Whitewater . Star Lodge No. 419, Taberville . Itaska Lodge No. 420, St. Louis . Gate of The Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield . Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Bonne Terre , . . Green Ridge Lodge No. 425, Green Ridge Glenwood Lodge No. 427, Glenwood . Winona Lodge No. 430, Winona . Temperance Lodge No. 438, Smithville . Trowell Lodge No. 440, Marble Hill . Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Jackson . . Anchor Lodge No. 443, St. Louis West Gate Lodge No. 445, St. Louis . Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City . Jacoby Lodge No. 447, Darlington . Schell City Lodge No. 448, Schell City . Continental Lodge No. 454, Stewartsville . Jonesburg Lodge No. 457, Jonesburg . Melville Lodge No. 458, Dadesville . Hazelwood Lodge No. 459, Seymour ..........•............. Lambskin Lodge No. 460, St. Louis . Caruthersville Lodge No. 461, Caruthersville . Pickering Lodge No. 472, Pickering .......................• Nineveh Lodge No. 473, Olney . Golden Lodge No. 475, Golden City . . Mt. Hope Lodge No. 476, Odessa Rich Hill Lodge No. 479, Rich Hill . Jewel Lodge No. 480, Pleasant Hill . Marceline Lodge No. 481, Marceline . Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, Kirkwood . Cairo Lodge No. 486, Cairo . . Lakeville Lodge No. 489, Bell City Vandalia Lodge No. 491, Vandalia . Daggett Lodge No. 492, McKittrick . Lewistown Lodge No. 494, Lewistown , .. Unity Lodge No. 495, Richards . Equality Lodge No. 497, Newburg . Harmony Lodge No. 499, St. Louis . Buckner Lodge No. 501, Buckner . Philadelphia Lodge No. 502, Philadelphia .

1950 11.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 5.00 2.50 100.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 183.25 5.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 4.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 25.00 9.50 10.00 10.00 5.00 7.10 10.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 5.00


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Prairie Home Lodge No. 503, Prairie Home .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lathrop Lodge No. 506, Lathrop. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Saxton Lodge No. 508, Saxton Van Buren Lodge No. 509, Van Buren.... New Hampton Lodge No. 510, New Hampton................ Skidmore Lodge No. 511, Skidmore. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Webb City Lodge No. 512, Webb City........................ Senath Lodge No. 513, Senath Granby Lodge No. 514, Granby...................... Milford Lodge No. 516, Milford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gate City Lodge No. 522, Kansas City Cunningham Lodge No. 525, Sumner .............. Wayne Lodge No. 526, Piedmont........ Higbee Lodge No. 527, Higbee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Apollo Lodge No. 529, St. Louis. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dexter Lodge No. 532, Dexter Columbia Lodge No. 534, Pacific. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blackwell Lodge No. 535, Blackwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ingomar Lodge No. 536, Willow Springs. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bethel Lodge No. 537, Bethel '" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winigan Lodge No. 540, Winigan........ . Ferguson Lodge No. 542, Ferguson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Algabil Lodge No. 544, St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zalma Lodge No. 545, Zalma............................... Orient Lodge No. 546, Kansas City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . South Gate Lodge No. 547, Kansas City.. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carl Junction Lodge No. 549, Carl Junction Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... Foster Lodge No. 554, Foster Moscow Lodge No. 558, Moscow Mills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clarksdale Lodge No. 559, Clarksdale. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . Nelson Lodge No. 560, Nelson York Lodge No. 563, Kansas City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Jamesport Lodge No. 564, Jamesport . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Maplewood Lodge No. 566, Maplewood .. :......... . . . . . . . . . . Miller IJodge No. 567, Miller " ,. Naylor Lodge No. 568, Naylor. . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... .. Marlborough Lodge No. 569, Kansas City.. . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Bernie Lodge No. 573, Bernie. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, St. Louis Forest Park Lodge No. 578, St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Koshkonong Lodge No. 582, Koshkonong Criterion Lodge No. 586, Alba Branson Lodge No. 587, Branson. .. . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Advance Lodge No. 590, Advance Union Lodge No. 593, Union................ Puxico Lodge No. 596, Puxico Leadwood Lodge No. 598, Leadwood........................ Elvins Lodge No. 599, Flat River Cosby Lodge No. 600, Cosby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton.. .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Acacia Lodge No. 602, Columbia... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morehouse Lodge No. 603, Morehouse Strafford Lodge No. 608, Strafford :..... Warrenton Lodge No. 609, Warrenton......................

69 5.00 35.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 15.50 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 10~00

10.00 15.00 10.0-0 10.00 10.00 6.00 75.00 5.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 20.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 33.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00


70

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Mokane Lodge No. 612, Mokane Wellston Lodge No. 613, Wellston Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, Mt. Washington Chaffee Lodge No. 615, Chaffee Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Kansas City Grandview Lodge No. 618, Grandview AndeTson Lodge No. 621, Anderson Owensville Lodge No. 624, Owensville Sheffield Lodge No. 625, Kansas City Magnolia Lodge No. 626, St. Louis Mendon Lodge No. 628, Mendon Valley Park Lodge No. 629, Valley Park East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City Tower Grove Lodge No. 631, St. Louis Archie Lodge No. 633, Archie Freedom Lodge No. 636, Mehlville Mountain View Lodge No. 637, Mountain View .Tennings Lodge No 640, .Tennings Trinity Lodge No. 641, St. Louis Northeast Lodge No. 643, Kansas City Grain Valley Lodge No. 644, Grain Valley Shaveh Lodge No. 646, St. Louis Elmer Lodge No. 648, Elmer University Lodge No. 649, University City Pilgrim Lodge No. 652,. St. Louis Commonwealth Lodge No. 654, St. Louis Gardenville Lodge No. 655, Gardenville Country Club Lodge No. 656, Kansas City" Purity Lodge No. 658, St. Louis Alpha Lodge No. 659, Kansas City TheodoTe Roosevelt Lodge No. 661, St. Louis Clarence Lodge No. 662, Clarence Rockhill Lodge No. 663, Kansas City

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00 25.00 25.00 12.50 10.00 25.00 20.00 32.50 25.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 39.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 50.00 20.00 20.00 5.00 15.00 25.00 10.00 20.00 25.00 10.00 50.00 10.00 10.00 10.00

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS St. Graal Commandery No. 12,.K. T., Columbia $ Palestine Commandery No. 17, K. T., Independence . St. .Tohn's Commandery No. 20, K. T., Springfield . West Plains Commandery No. 48, K. T., West Plains . . Cape Girardeau Commandery No. 55, K. T., Cape Girardeau Neosho Commandery No. 57, K. T., Neosho . Albany Commandery No. 60, K. T., Albany . Poplar Bluff Commandery No. 67, K. T., Poplar Bluff . East Gate Commandery No. 70, K. T., Kansas City . Independence Chapter No. 12, R. A. M., Independence . Tyrian Chapter No. 52, R A. M., Neosho . Triune Chapter No. 93, R. A. M., Wellsville " •......... West Plains Chapter No. 108, R. A. M., West Plains . Poplar Bluff Chapter No. 114, R. A. M., Poplar Bluff . East Gate Chapter No. 136, R. A. M., Kansas City . Neosho Council No. 46, R. & S. M., Neosho . Moolah Temple, St. Louis . Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Kansas City . Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, St. Louis . Alhambra Grotto, St. Louis . Ransom A. Breuer Masonic Association of the 32nd District ..

20.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 20.00 15.00 10.00 500.00 100.00 150.00 100.00 10.00


1950

71

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

78.00 Goats Club, St. Louis and St. Louis County . 5.00 John W. Adams, Marshall, Mo . 5.00 F. C. Barnhill, Marshall, Mo . 20.00 William Burkemper, St. Louis, Mo . 1.00 H. H. Haukenberry, Independence, Mo . 25.00 Adelia Huffman, Camden, Mo., in memory of Vernon L. Huffman 10.00 Charles Jobson, Joplin, Mo . 5.00 W. S. Juergens, Sullivan, Mo . 100.000 Bertha Schaefer Agency Trust, St. Louis, Mo. . . 10.00 Mrs. J. C. 'Senate, Nevada, Mo . 3.00 Sam Silverman, St. Louis, Mo .

DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE CHRISTMAS AND

ENTERTAINMENT FUND Birthday gifts to the old folks Candy gifts for July 4, 1949 Rental of ponies and carts Prizes to the children Swimming suits Watermelon feasts on the lawn Boat trip for children and old folks Cash gifts for Labor Day Candy novelties, doughnuts and cider for Halloween Cash gifts for Thanksgiving Turkeys for Thanksgiving dinner Special busses; boat trip, Veiled Prophet parade, Firemen's Circus and Police Circus Shows at the Home-operator only Outside shows for children Civic Music League tickets Cash for Christmas gifts to old folks Christmas gifts to the children Turkeys for Christmas dinner Christmas trees, decorations, gift wrappings, etc. . Candy, nuts, fruit and pastry for Christmas Candy gifts for Valentine Day Cash gifts for Washington's Birthday Ca~dy g~fts for Easter PolIce CIrcus Cash gifts for Memorial Day Cash gifts for July 4, 1950 Special currency envelopes Treats for children's parties _ Municipal Opera tickets

. . . . . . . . . .

$ 229.00 273.75 30.00 35.00 4.78 67.43 112.80 230.00 85.33 530.00 239.58

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

152.00 125.00 25.65 21.60 693.00 115.14 270.60 169.84 720.00 365.85 546.00 243.00 47.60 530.00 528.00 62.73 62.50 4.80

$6,520.98

SALARIES AND WAGES

At the request of the Board of Directors, we are publishing a complete list of the salaries and wages paid at the Home. (Note. Unless otherwise designated, the persons named below receive maintenance as well as salary. The persons whose names are followed by asterisk [*] receive their noon meal in addition to their salaries. The persons whose names are followed by a dagger [t]


72

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

receive no maintenance. The superintendent, Brother Lewis C. Robertson, is furnished a residence but no maintenance.) Per Month

W. W. Martin, President ......•.......................... $ Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Emma Bettis, Matron of Old Folks Clara Rothe, Secretary Johanna Pistor, Secretary Velma Evans, Governess Jessie Fuson, Governess Alma Gangle, Governess Nina Held, Governess .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doris Saunders, Governess Wilma Saxe, Governess .-............. . . . . . . . . Laura Christy, Night Governess Helen McLaughlin, Housekeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessie Rouse, Music Teacher Inez Maffit, Head Nurse.. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ida Mae Myers, Assistant Head Nurse. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Dalia Fletcher, Nurse Betty Jean Forrest, Nurse Agnes Gilfoyle, Nurse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bertha Green, Nurse Edna Halbert, Nurse Margaret Houseman, Nurse. . . .......................... Clara Abernathy, Nurse Eva Elege, Nurse ,.............................. Estelle Hunter, Nurse Catherine Samson, Nurse. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blanche Splete, Nurse.................................... Evelyn Youch, Nurse Mae Bresnan, Diet Kitchen Worker. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stella Dugger, Diet Kitchen Worker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Josie Eatherton, Diet Kitchen Worker Anna Schwagerle, Diet Kitchen Worker. . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amanda Sorg, Diet Kitchen Worker........................ William Mehrer, Orderly...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James Pinkston, Orderly.. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . George Calkins, Clerk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mildred Brady, Dietitian .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mabel Burt, Kitchen Worker............................... Alta Moon,.Kitchen Worker.. Bertie Omohundro, Kitchen Worker Dora Lanham, Kitchen Worker.......... Margaret Buhs, Kitchen Worker ........................ Verna Vanover, Kitchen Worker Martha Gilliland, Kitchen Worker Mary Thompson, Kitchen Worker Clara Sabor, Kitchen Worker................ . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Emma Smith, Kitchen Worker.................... Martha Starkey, Kitchen Worker. . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Mae Thurmond, Kitchen Worker.......... Velta Skurbe, Kitchen Worker.... ... .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . Edward Van Dyke, Kitchen Worker... . . . . .. . .. . ... .. . . ..• . William Herbst, Kitchen Worker •.........................

562.50 200.00 150.00 140.00 115.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 125.00 50.00 75.00 50.00 150.00 135.00 85.00 75.00 75.00 85.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 85.00 85.00 85.00 95.00 85.00 55.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 65.00 75.00 70.00 70.00 125.00 80.00 . 70.00 75.00 70.00 60.00 90.00 70.00 70.00 65.00 60.00 70.00 80.00 60.00 70.00 60.00


1950

73

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

John Peters, Kitchen Worker ' Alfred Kaesser, Kitchen Worker Tony Kickel, Kitchen Worker Walter Dinkel, Kitchen Worker Robert Lepper, Serving Room Worker Arthur Weber, Serving Room Worker Louise Riehl, Serving Room Worker Mattie Clark, Serving Room Worker Louis Bailey, Maintenance Man Frank Fay, Fireman Jesse Maddox, Fireman Charles McCormack, Fireman Glen Summers, Fireman Martin Thornton, yardman Lewis C. Robertson, Superintendent Robert C. Winkelmaier, t Treasurer Dr. Solon Cameron, t Physician John Morris, t Night Watchman Laurence Everitt,* Bookkeeper Ethel Laux,* Nurse Lillian Wheeler,* N ursa H. F. Heitland,* Purchasing Agent Bernard Stuckenmeyer,* Engineer Henry Buelterman,* Maintenance Man. Zonis Freiberg,* Carpenter, per day Thomas Butler,* Painter, per day Charles Walker,* Laundry Manager, per week William Scherer,* Laundry Worker, per week Bertha Beck,* Laundry Workcr, per week Elsie Gilman,* Laundry Worker, per week Lena Edwards,* Laundry Worker, per week Victoria Melbeck,* Laundry Worker, per week Clara Reeves,* Laundry Worker, per week Catherine Tindall,* Laundry Worker, per week Louise Hicks,* Laundry Workcr, per week Ethel Rolf,* Laundry Worker, per week " Edna Cadwell,* Laundry Worker, per week Celia Davila,* Laundry Worker, per week Harry Dalton,* Laundry Worker, per day ;

~

'

. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

90.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 75.00 60.00 75.00 60.00 95.00 75.00 85.00 65.00 65.00 75.00 375.00 50.00 300.00 100.00 200.00 110.00 80.00 275.00 315.00 125.00 5.00 8.00 62.50 38.00 36.00 26.00 25.00 23.00 24.00 23.00 23.00 23.00 23.00 23.00 5.00

COLORED EMPLOYEES Dale Bougess, Porter William Gaines, Porter Austin Jackson, Porter Willie James, Portcr John Mullen, Porter Obern Ray, Porter Rufus Pillars, Porter Eddie Sykes, Porter James Burgette, Porter Charles Carutheri, Porter Paul Daniels, Porter Charles Gibson, Porter J obn Haywood, Porter Emma Jackson,* Maid Daisy Grant,* Maid

" :

. $ 60.00 50.00 . 70.00 . 50.00 . 70.00 . 60.00 . 70.00 . 60.00 . 45.00 . 45.00 . 50.00 . 45.00 . 45.00 . 50.00 . 50.00 .


74

1950

PROCE,EDINGS OF THE

Augustus Logan,* Maid Sarah Richardson, * Maid Fischer Simmon, * Maid Marie Young, * Maid .,

. . . '.' ..

50.00 • 50.00 50.00 50.00

ENDOWMENT FUND

During the past year additions to the Endowment Fund have amounted to $77,439.49. A list of the donors is given under a separate heading. The income from the Endowment Fund is over $76,000.00 and supports about eighty people in our Home. MRS. MARY HUTHMAKER MEMORIAL

This consists of an eighty-acre tract of land located in Kirkwood, Missouri, and St. Louis County, to be used eventually as a Children's Home. MRS. GUSSIE GRENNER ESTATE

This estate has a market value of approximately $200,000.00. It is not handled by the Masonic Home of Missouri but the will provides that the income from the estate shall go to the Masonic Home each year. During the past year, the income amounted to $7,532.35. CONCLUSION

Weare grateful to Almighty God for our many friends and for His keeping and sustaining power. Fraternally submitted, MASONIC HOME BOARD, W. W. MARTIN, President.


1950

75

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

ADDITIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND MASONic HOME' OF MISSOURI 1949-1950 ALBERT G. KELLER ESTATE, BONDS AND CASH $ 3,239.97 WILLIAM KAIRNS ESTATE.....................

100.00

H. O. HIRSCH ESTATE...........................

5,248.76

MRS. JULIA WEBER LEWIS ESTATE

5,000.00

F. W. WEINHEIMER ESTATE, BONDS, STOCKS AND CASH

56,618.75

MRS. MARY B. CHANDLER ESTATE. . .. . . . . . . . . . .

2,500.00

GIFT OF 1949 WARDENS AND MASTERS CLUBS OF ST. LOUIS AND ST. LOUIS COUNTY .... . . . .

100.00

GIFT OF WILLIAM R. DENSLOW AND WIFE ....

100.00

MRS. ROSE M. SIZEMORE ESTATE, BOND AND CASH

.

2,295.62

GIFT OF G. A. BUDER

.

393.99

MRS. MARY HUTHMAKER ESTATE "

.

VIRGINIA STROUD ESTATE.. . . ... . . .. .. . . . . . HUGH S. JAMISON ESTATE.....................

447.32 1,000.00 395.08


76

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1950

Knights Templar Fund . $35,114.00 James L. Kirkendall . 13,150.00 W. S. Smith Fund ~ . 11,730.00 5,000.00 . T. W. Higgins Fund 1,665.74 James W. Harris Fund . 1,117.60 Masonic Home Certificate Fund . 500.00 Ferdinand Herold Fund . 1,000.00 John B. Croshaw Fund . 1,000.00 Jacob F. Gunlich Fund . 3,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund , . 2,500.00 Grand Chapter Royal and Select Masters Fund . 1,000.00 . T. W. Cotton Fund 1,000.00 Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund ..........•..... 5,000.00 A. M. Hough Fund . Jacob Lampert Fund . 30,000.00 500.00 Mrs. E. Wurz ................•................... 500.00 Adolph Gluck Fund . 806.60 Parralle Massengale . 1,000.00 Mrs. Lillie F. Fletcher Fund . 500.00 Frederick A. Logan Fund ..•..................... 1,000.00 Robert Elliott Black Fund . 932.83 Nathan Schloss Fund . 2,067.91 . A. P. Christianson Fund Rice Estate . 51,096.35 Hugh Hartshorn Fund . 2,327.75 William Pamprin Fund . 1,000.00 Morgena Peterson Fund . 500.00 Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund . 1,000.00 General Fund . 128,740.03 . J uHus C. Garrell Fund 1,000.00 War Relief Loyal Service Fund . 7,107.50 James W. Boyd Fund . 500.00 500.00 Ararat Temple, Kansas City Fund . . Mrs. Willie A. Woods Fund 3,000.00 Grotto and Shrine Fund . 17,056.95 . Morris and Ella Leftwich Fund 1,800.00 Mrs. Mary Lynch Fund : . 1,000.00 1,000.00 A. P. Fletcher Fund . 1,442.48 Frank Beecher Fund . A, M. Dockery Fund . 1,000.00 Edward H. Meier Fund ...........................• 500.00 William H. Potter Estate Fund . 13,305.50 J. C. Jacquith Estate Fund . 19,122.61 Initiation Fund . 246,700.00 Nicholas R. Wall Fund . 500.00 Abraham Palan Fund . 584.70 Bonds from a friend of the Home sold for : . 52,218.75 Maggie Nicholson Fund . 550.36 Louisa Yott Fund . 500.00


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1950 Gustav Bischoff Fund . 500.00 W. L. Tamme Fund . 550.00 Erdhaus Estate secured and unsecured . 7,665.32 Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund . 2,000.00 500.00 William A. Hall Fund . 1,000.00 Henry Siegfried . 500.00 Edward Meyer ....................•.............. 9,548.75 Charles V. B. Slade . Robert F. Stevenson : _ . 14,992.13 1,105.14 Glen Marquis . Frank L. Schofield . 1,000.00 528.00 D. M. Wilson . 3,405.09 Mary C. Clapp ..................................• Samuel Rife Estate . 7,548.50 100.00 Charles Reilly . 2,500.00 E. C. Robinson . B. S. Schwartz : . 692.83 Brockett A. Dickson . 1,000.00 George F. Bergfeld . 500.00 Sarah B. Coffman ................................• 465.89 Samuel A. Gluck . 200.00 Wellston Lodge No. 613 . 100.00 Richard Sinclair . 200.00 Karl Backrow . 100.00 286.00 Robert Lungstrass . 250.00 June Lee Cotton . 450.00 St. Joseph Chapter No. 198, O. E. S . ]\farcus A. Loevy ...............................•. 70.00 100.00 Sam Plan .................•...•.•.••............ 46.00 W. J. Scherek . Myrtle Lodge No. 338 . 310.95 Ludwig Kotany .................................• 200.00 Charles E. Koken . 300.00 Philip Stremmel, Jr. . . 137.40 400.00 Boor Fletcher ...•................................ Alphonzo Whipple . 100.00 A. Bolin Fund , .......................• 400.00 M. A. Covey Fund . 25.00 William F. Kier Fund . 10,000.00 John T. Short Fund . 200.00 Paul Keiser Fund ..................•............. 2,000.00 John Oliver Fund . 371.36 J. M. Darrow Fund . 5,000.00 . T. W. Pritchett Fund 1,000.00 Annie Martin Fund : . 259.98 Comstock Estate . 115,760.97 Comstock Estate (doubtful value) . 2,500.00 Julia C. Norton Fund ....................•..•...... 1,000.00 J. M. Darrow Estate ......................•....... 5,000.00

77


78

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1950

William Latham, Jr. Estate . 1,000.00 John M. Woodson Estate . 5,467.91 Sol E. Waggoner Estate . 1,000.00 Jacob C. C. Waldeck Estate . 500.00 211.08 Adam Herold Estate . 933.24 J ames Vinyard Estate . George B. Mills Estate, Stock and Bonds . 11,600.00 John Rehrs Estate . 250.00 1,901.39 William Russell Estate, Cash : . 4,392.00 William Russell Estate, Bonds and Other Securities .. Joseph Kronacher Estate . 431.05 1,000.00 William A. Raming Estate . Fred Herket Estate . 2,000.00 Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, Cash . 405.86 Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, Stock and Bonds . 2,780.00 Edward F. W. Kaiser . 25,000.00 100.00 Henry W. Running Estate . . Dr. Louis F. Bode Estate 300.00 214.47 Fred Segelke Estate . . Charles Geitner Estate 1,000.00 . William B. Archer Estate 5,085.00 James Ward Nixon Memorial . 1,000.00 Henry C. Grenner Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Cash . 261,502.94 200.00 Berthold Linder Estate . Charles H. Schureman Estate . 365.67 . Charles A. Brown Estate 1,000.00 100.00 Ernest Bruneman . 942.84 A. S. Hudson Estate . Myrtle Kipp Estate . 707.16 John Cunningham Estate . 16,875.25 Mrs. Pearl Kaiser Annuity . 5,500.00 Estate of William Modra . 6,362.19 . George W. Leeak Gift 500.00 Louis J. Brohammer Gift . 1,500.00 Fred D. Gardner Estate . 1,000.00 George R. Woltjen Estate . 1,000.00 Mrs. Virginia Allen Church Estate (in memory of Ethelbert Forrester Allen) . 5,000.00 lrin Levosier Page Estate . 25.00 Gift in memory of William T. Coombs " . 50.00 Barbara Seaman Bequest . 100.00 Isador Mendle Legacy . 1,000.00 Estate of Joseph S. McIntyre . 1,000.00 Estate of James R. Anderson '.' . 2,103.03 R. F. Stevenson Estate . 10.00 . George William James Estate 1,000.00 Gerard B. Lambert . 7.40 Mary H uthmaker Estate, Bond and Cash . 6,670.31 Estate of William Rothmeyer . 50.00


1950

79

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1950

Louis Schmidt Estate William W. Alexander Mrs. Kate Fellers Estate Fred Mueller Estate Frank Gottlieb Estate Clara Siegel Estate Emma Winkler Estate Clara Ethel Downs Memorial Fund William F. Kuhn Memorial Fund Arthur Emil Koethe Estate Thos. H. Reynolds Gift Edward Kuhn Estate Alva Moog Estate Nicola Zimmer Memorial Fund Emma H. Doellner Estate Abraham Romansky Abraham Romansky Estate Albert Rabenneck Estate Agnes McAdoo Estate, Bond and Cash F. W. Struchen Estate Harry P. Brown Estate Mrs. Anna Kern Estate Mrs. Elizabeth Clark Estate Gift in Memory of Alexander Friedberg Emma Schumacher Estate Gift in Memory of Charles Hermann Charles Spraul Estate Theodore Mueller Estate Fra~kFerguson Estate Kathryn Lehman Estate E. H. Lehnbetter Estate Logan Busby Estate ~ " Etta Mueller Estate Franklin V. Kemp Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Cash Louis Duestrow Estate Rosa Ruhland Estate Fannie A. McCarty Estate Sol Samuel Estate Fritz William Selleck Estate Eugene D. Ashbrook Estate. " Hugh S. Jamison Estate, Stocks and Cash Estate of Louis A. Geserich William J. Whiprecht Estate Hattie Fuller Estate Elzie Fulton Estate William Downs Gift Estate of G. 1. Langenberg Estate of Virgil L. Muskopf Mrs. Earl C. Tuggle Gift

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

500.00 1,000.00 625.00 100.00 100.00 17,971.36 538.05 1,000.00 1,000.00 2,000.00 5,000.00 1,000.00 100.00 50.00 500.00 250.00 500.00 500.00 1,578.00 400.00 10,834.90 4,839.24 5,000.00 50.00 17.75 50.00 300.00 5,000.00 1,815.87 2,697.96 1,000.00 6,928.80 6,266.89 46,929.10 20,000.00 25,000.00 2,807.58 100.00 1,040.05 1,000.00 33,025.00 200.00 5.00 917.87 16,189.95 500.00 250.00 400.00 25.00


80

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIO HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1950

A. M. Freund Estate George C. Paulus Gift Bernard J. Kappel Estate Mary E. Knecht Estate Mrs. Anna Nipper Estate Fort Leonard Wood National Sojourners Gift F. W. Weinheimer Estate '.' Minnie K. Geller Estate Mary B. Chandler Estate Iva T. Burns and Lola B. Dickey, Memorial Fund

. . . . . . . . . .

500.00 2,000.00 500.00 250.00 83,679.73 100.00 1,000.00 250.00 2,500.00 200.00


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

81

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY

July 1, 1949 to June 30, 1950 Income

GENERAL FUND

Grand Lodge per capita tax $212,709.34 Grand Chapter O.E.S. per capita tax 19,292.50 $232,001.84 Interest on General Fund securities Miscellaneous Income

. .

1,366.58 1,317.19 $234,685.61

Expenses Wages $ 88,197.53 24,646.65 Salaries . 85,093.13 Provisions . 2,484.88 Dry Goods and Clothing . Dry Cleaning and Shoe Repair . 249.58 Laundry . 22,023.86 Fuel . 20,965.60 15,788.09 Repairs and Maintenance . 13,870.19 Supplies . Ice . 169.36 Light . 5,538.64 Water . 2,128.23 3,628.37 Insurance . 1,188.10 Barber •................................. Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory Board Attending Board Meetings . 2,015.54 Carfare . 294.33 698.90 Telephone . 325.00 Auditing . Printing, Stationery and Postage . 867.48 Steward's Car Allowance . 630.00 58.40 Inspection Fees and Taxes . 1,137.50 Hauling Ashes, etc . 217.94 Want Ads . 1,330.75 Petty Cash Expense . 1,082.40 Newspapers . 187.00 . Dues and Subscriptions 156.00 Safe Deposit Boxes . Piano Tuning . 112.25 327.50 Miscellaneous . 534.50 Grand Lodge Entertainment . 166.48 Masonic Home Convention Expense . 127.50 Publicity . 101.99 Superintendent's Travel Expense . 68.69 Education . 128.00 Children's Allowance . 518.75 297,059.11 Loss on Sale of Securities .

Excess of Expense Over Income ......................•.. $ 62,373.50 TrOlnSfers From Income Fund...................... 63,489.25 Net Incre(J;8B in General Fund...................... . 1,115.75 Balarwe on Ha;nd JUly 1, 1949 ....•......•.............. 30,329.56 Balance on Hand June 30, 1950 •.••......•.••....••.... $ 31,445.31


82

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE INCOME FUND

Receipts Interest on Endowment Fund Bonds and Stocks $ 24,584.80 Interest on Endowment Fund Real Estate Loans . 51,659.71 . Received From Members of Home Family 17,186.56 Pensions . 3,203.63 Sale of Cemetery Lots . 40.00 Interest on Income Fund Securities . 1,441.97 193.95 $ 98,310.62 . Miscellaneous Income

Disbursements Taxes and Expenses on Estates .... . . . . . . . .. $ Other Expenses on Members of Home Family Bank Charges , .

431.09 279.30 1.45

711.84

Excess of Receipts Over Disbursements $ 97,598.78 Deduct Transfers to General Fund .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63,489.25 Net Increase in Income Fund Add Balance on路Hand, July 1, 1949

$ 34,109.53 74,373.16

Balance on Hand, June 30, 1950

$108,482.69

INITI.A.TION FUND

Receipts Initiation Fees Interest on Initiation Fund Securities

. $ 53,297.47 . 7,691.82 $ 60,989.29

BalOince on HOInd, July 1, 1949

320,166.38

Balance on Hand, June 30, 1950

$381,155.67

BUILDING FUND

Receipts Contributions Interest on Building Fund Securities

$ .

3,148.84 2,257.50 $

Add Balance on Hand, July 1,1949 .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. Balance on Hand, June 30, 1950

5,406.34 104,921.44

$110,327.78

CHRISTMAS A.ND ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Receipts Disbursements Entertainment and gifts

Excess of Receipts Over Disbursements Add Balance on Hand, July 1 1949 Balance on Hand, June 30, 1950

. $

6,987.00

.

6,520.98

.

466.02 3,573.68

. $

4,039.70


1950

83

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

REPORT OF AUDITOR August 3, 1950 To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, Saint Louis, Missouri. Gentlemen: Pursuant to engagement, we have prepared this report preliminary to our formal report of the Masonic Home of Missouri to be submitted to the Board of Directors at a later date. We examined the books and records of the Secretary for the period July 1, 1949, to June 30, 1950. Our examination covered the General Fund, Income Fund, Initiation Fund, Building Fund, Christmas and Entertain-, ment Fund and Endowment Fund. We have prepared the following summaries of assets and liabilities of the various funds as at June 30, 1950: GENERAL FUND

Assets Cash in United Bank and Trust Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 436.02 Cash in Boatmen's National Bank . 2,105.55 Cash in Mercantile-Commerce Bank and Trust Company .. 2,772.31 Cash in. Mercantile-Commerce National BankPay Roll Account . 6,095.75 Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National BankSavings Account . 1,048.72 Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company . 250.00 . Cash in Manufacturer's Bank and Trust Company 500.00 Cash in Matron's Petty Cash Fund .•.................. 200.00 Inventories-Provisions and Supplies . 22,128.37 Unexpired Insurance . 6,539.30 $ 42,076.02

Liabilities Accounts Payable Accrued Withholding Taxes

. .

Balance, General Fund

9,336.26 1,294.45 $ 31,445.31

INCOME FUND

Cash in First National Bank Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company Securities-at cost Total Income Fund

$ . .

400.00 37,729.19 70,353.50

$108,482.69 INITIATION FUND

Cash in Mercantile-Commerce Bank and Trust Company .. $ 24,865.62 Securities-at cost . . . . . . . . . .. 356,290.05 Total Initiation Fund

$381,155.67 BUILDING FUND

Cash in Boatmen's National Bank Securities-at cost Total Building Fund

$

8,357.78 101,970.00

$110,327.78


84

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Cash in Boatmen's Natio'nal Bank Total Christmas and Entertainment Fund

$ . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

4,039.70 4,039.70

ENDOWMENT FUND

Real Estate Loans United States Treasury Bonds Other Bonds Corporation Stocks Cash in First National Bank

. $1,256,763.68 . 147,500.25 . 15,382.22 . 154,019.81 . 70,586.49

Total Endowment Fund

$1,644,252.45

The bank balances appearing in these funds were confirmed by reconciling certificates, received directly from the depositaries, with the stated book balances. The investments as shown in these funds were verified by examination of the securities. The inventories are stated as shown on the inventory sheets prepared by the management. We have shown the securities listed in the Income Fund, Initiation Fund and Building Fund at recorded cost. The stocks in the Endowment Fund are stated at an adjusted carrying value which was 15 per cent below market value on the stocks held at March 1, 1949, and market value on the date received on stocks acquired during the current fiscal year. The bonds are stated at the values placed thereon by the, Trustees of the Endowment Fund at the date of acquisition of the securities by the Home. The real estate loans are being carried at cost. If you desire any additional information relative to this report, we shall be pleased to have you call upon us. Respectfully submitted, C. K. BENSON & COMPANY

Certified Public Accountants.

OFFICERS W. W. Martin, President Morris E. Ewing, Vice-President Robert C. Winkelmaier, Treasurer William H. Utz, Jr., Secretary Lewis C. Robertson, Superintendent Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician ' Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Emma Lee Bettis, Matron of Old Folks

St. Louis, Morrisville, St. Louis, St. Joseph, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Term expires 1950 T. W. Cotton W. W. Martin

Van Buren, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.


1950

85

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

DuVal Smith Robert C. Winkelmaier Term expires 1951 Henry C. Chiles Martin B. Dickinson James W. Skelly Arthur D. Nordberg Term expires 1952 James M. DeWitt Morris E. Ewing W. Robert Howell William H. Vtz, Jr -Russell E. Murray

St. Joseph, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. '.' . Lexington, Kansas City, St. Louis, Kansas City,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

Kirksville, Mo. Morrisville, Mo. Monroe City, Mo. St. Joseph, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

James M. Bradford, Grand Master Ray Bond, Deputy Grand Master Homer L. Ferguson, Senior Grand "Varden Richard O. Rumer, Junior Grand Garden

St. Louis, Joplin, Jefferson City, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

ADVISORY BOARD

Mrs. Lorraine Hinn Mrs. Juanita Mauss Mrs. Alta L. Tate

Excelsior Springs, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. Kirkwood, Mo.

At the Board meeting held in St. Louis, January 13, 1950, the following officers were elected: W. W. Martin, President, St. Louis, Missouri. Morris E. Ewing, Vice-President, Morrisville, Mo. Robert C. Winkelmaier, Treasurer, St. Louis, Mo. tC. L. Alexander, Secretary, St. Louis" Mo. Lewis C. Robertson, Superintendent, St. Louis, Mo.

The following were appointed: Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician, St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children, St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Emma Lee Bettis, Matron of Old Folks, St. Louis, Mo. Harvey F. Reitland, Purchasing Agent, St. Louis, Mo. COMMITTEES

Trustees of Endowment Fund-W. W. Martin, James W. Skelly, Russell E. Murray. Executive Committee-Morris E. Ewing, Chairman;; T. W. Cotton,

* Elected until next communication of Grand Lodge to fill vacancy caused by the resignation of Elmer W. Wagner. t On March 10, 1950, C. L. Alexander was declared Secretary Emeritus and William H. Utz, Jr., was elected temporary Corporate Secretary.


86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

James M. DeWitt, Martin B. Dickinson, W. Robert Howell, Russell E. Murray, Arthur D. Nordberg, James W. Skelly, DuVal Smith, William H. Utz, Jr., Robert C. Winkelmaier. Fi1UJlTWe Committee-James M. DeWitt, Chairman; Arthur D. Nordberg, William H. Utz, Jr. Administration Comm.ittee-Robert C. Winkelmaier, Chairman; Martin B. Dickinson, W. Robert Howell, Arthur D. Nordberg, William H. Utz, Jr. Hospital Committee-To W. Cotton, Chairman; Morris E. Ewing, James M. DeWitt, W. Robert Howell. Admissions a.n,d Discipline Committee-James W. Skelly, Chairman; Russell E. Murray, Robert C. Winkelmaier. Legal Committee'-Martin B. Dickinson, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles, DuVal Smith, William H. Utz, Jr. MEDICAL STAFF

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Solon Cameron Leland B. Alford "\Villiam R. Bohne Erich Brockelman James Barrett Brown C. E. Burford A. H. Conrad Ralph Cook Carl T. Eber James Forsen J oscph Glenn J. F. Hardesty D. L. Harris R. K. Kimmel Roland M. Klemme. ',' Charles L. Klenk Otto W. Koch Philip S. Luedde "William Nelson Bert O. Owens R. J. Payne Hugo Reim Robert E., Schlueter Hcnry P. Thym R. S. '\Veiss Frederick A. Baldwin Hermon S. Major

,

'

St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. Kansas City, Mo.

PRAYER FOR OUR PRESIDENT AND OUR BOYS IN SERVICE

At this point in the proceedings Grand Master Bradford called up the Grand Lodge and requested Grand Chaplain Duncan to lead in a special prayer for our President and our boys in the Service.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

87

FLOWERS TO DR. COTTON

On motion of M. Wor. Brother Gentry, the Grand Secretary was directed to send flowers to Dr. T. \V. Cotton in Barnes Hospital. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

M. Wor. Bro. Ray V. Denslow presented the report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence which was adopted and is as follows: (See "The Masonic "T orId.") REPORT OF THE MISSOURI LODGE OF RESEARCH

M. \Vor. Brother Solon Cameron, 'VOl'. Master, presented the report of the Missouri Lodge of Research, which was adopted and is as follows: To the'Most Worshipful G1"and Lodge, Lt. F. 4" Lt. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: In conformity with the law of this Gra.nd Lodge, under whieh the Missouri Lodge of Resea.rch was ehartered September 30, 1941, that Charter bearing the signature of M. W. Brother Harry S. Truman, this report of the activity of the Missouri Lodge of Research for the year 1949-1950 is respectfully submitted. Next to being permitted to preside over this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, I consider the distinguished privilege of serving as Worshipful Master of the Missouri Lodge of Research to be one of the greatest honors that can come to any man. I have served to the best of my ability and rejoice that during my year there has been a fine growth in membership and much real good has been accomplished. We end the yea.r with a total membership of 603. Equally as important as our growing membership, however, is the fine, productive work that has been done whieh will continue to benefit Freemasonry and this Lodge of Research for many years to come. During the pa,st year the following books and publieations have been sent to our members: Transactions for 1948. Programs for Masonic Occasions: Washington the Mason. A Reading Course in Freemasonry. Missouri Commanderies. An Encyclopedia of Cryptic Masonry. The Royal Arch-Capstone of Freemasonry. The Masonic World for 1950. Copies of Grand Master's Address will be sent out immediately after Grand Lodge. M. W. Brother James M. Bradford, during his entire year in office and on every official visit has been a loyal supporter of the Lodge of Research. He always brought to the attention of his hearers the advantages of membership in oUr Organization. M. W. Brother Harry S. Truman, our Senior Warden, ha,s shown sincere interest and constant cooperation throughout the year. Carrying as heavy a burden of responsibility and authority as any man in the history of our Country, he still has found time to give much attention to the welfare and progress of the Missouri Lodge of Research. He has given fine assistance and support to the formation of the Masonic Section in the Jackson County Free Public I.. ibrary. He has made accessible to us the Archives of the Congressional Library in Washington, D. C., which, with


88

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

its wealth of historic material, will be of limitless benefit to the Lodge of Research. Our Junior Warden, M. W. Brother Forrest C. Donnell, has maintained a keen interest in this Organization and has responded to every call made upon him. M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow continues his fine work for the Missouri Lodge of Research despite the fact that demands are made upon him by many Grand Bodies. M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, in connection with his duties as Grand Lecturer, has also been a traveling Missionary and constant advocate of membership in the Missouri Lodge of Research. R. W. Brother Bruce H. Hunt delivered an excellent paper on "The History of Masonry in Adair County," at our Breakfast Meeting in Columbia. He has also served us diligently in the work incident to the formation of the Masonic Section in the Library in Independence, Missouri. It is my estimate that the Junior Past Master of the Missouri Lodge of Research has given almost one-half of his time during the year just ended to the services of this Organization. Our appreciation and sincere thanks are tendered to R. W. Brother George C. Marquis for his untiring work. To him goes much of the credit for the establishment of the Masonic Section in the Jackson County Free Public Library in Independence, Missouri. The books and pamphlets in our Section of the Library now fill twenty shelves. There are also many articles of historic and Masonic interest on display. By properly recorded legal action on the part of the Board of the Jackson County Library, all articles in this Masonic Section are declared and acknowledged to be the property of the Missouri Lodge of Research. We are confident that this store-house of Masonic lore will be of limitless and lasting benefit to the entire Fraternity. In time, this Library will receive my own collection, including some rare and historic volumes. Worshipful Masters of this Lodge of Research may come and go, but members and all those interested in the Lodge of Research and its work and purposes may rest assured that the Organization will continue to serve and to prosper as long as we have available to us our capable, efficient and untiring Secretary, Worshipful Brother Florian M. McKinney. May he long continue to serve us. This Organization had a fine Breakfast Meeting in Columbia, Missouri, on the morning of April 25th, 1950, in conjunction with the meetings of the Grand Chapter and the Grand Council. The attendance exceeded our best expectation and an historic paper by R. W. Brother Bruce H. Hunt was received with great interest. While there has been a fine increase in our membership in the past year, we feel that a membership of 603 is infinitesimal when we consider that this Grand Lodge represents almost 115,000 Master Masons. What a man gets out of Masonry depends to a very great extent on what that man has to put into Masonry. It is my :firm conviction that membership in the Missouri Lodge of Research and availing ones-self of all of its benefits will direct one, Masonically, on the surest path to the Way, the Truth and the Light,

Fraternally submitted, SOLON CAMERON,

Worshipful Master. CALLED FROM LABOR

I

The Grand Lodge was called from labor at noon, the Grand Chaplain offering prayer. .


TUESDAY'AFTERNOON 1:45 p. m.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 1 :45 p. m., Grand Chaplain Thurman offering prayer. . REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

M. Wor. Brother J. VI[. Skelly presented the report of the Committee on Necrology, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful (hand Lodg(}, A. F. go A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: During the Grand Lodge year, 2008 members have wended their way to that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns. Death has invaded our Grand Lodge and carried away one of our bright junior officers, and in other Grand Lodges there are aching voids this world can never :fill. R. W. BROTHER F. ERNEST CARTER Brother Carter, Senior Grand Marshal, died in Kansas City, August 24, 1950. He was born November 16, 1886, in Sedalia, Missouri. He was superintendent of the Southwestern Bell Telephone Company, and had been employed by the telephone company forty-six years. He was Past Master of Temple Lodge No. 299; Past High Priest of Orient Chapter No. 102; Past Illustrious Master of Shekinah Council No. 24; and Past Eminent Commander of Oriental Commandery No. 35. In the Grand Lodge line he was appointed Grand Pursuivant in 1946, and was senior Grand Marshal at the time of his death. He was District Lecturer thirteen years. BROTHER ALBERT Y. CLARK Brother Clark, judge of the Supreme Court of Missouri, died June 9, 1950. He wag a leading citizen of Missouri, and a lifelong Freemason. He prepared a va.Iuable paper which was read before the Grand Lodge last September, giving the history of the long line of judges of the Supreme Court who were Freemasons. BROTHER JOSEPH FORT NEWTON Brother Newton, preeminent Masonic scholar and speaker, died January 24, 1950. He was Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Iowa in 1911, 1912 and 1913, and was the author of "The Men's House" and" The Builders. ' , "Not silent are these hallowed dead, A richer eloquence survives, We have from those who've gone ahead The inspiration of their lives. They speak to us in memory Nor time nor change can dim their worth What though their forms we can not see; Pale death is but a gentler birth."


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Alabama: M. Wort Brother William Joseph Nash, Jr., Grand Master, died July 21, 1950. Alberta: M. Wor. Brother Edward Ainslie Braithwaite, Past Grand Master, died December 7, 1949. Arizona: M. Wort Brother James Christopher Moloney, Past Grand Master, died December 14, 1949. Georgia: M. Wort Brother John Livingston Travis, Past Grand Master, died May 11, 1950. Idaho: M. Wort Brother Roy N. Gilbert, Past Grand Master, Grand Treasurer, died August 21, 1950. IlliMis: M., Wor. Brother Ralph Hulbcr Wheeler, Past Grand Master, died March 10, 1950. Kentucky: M. Wor. Brother Emerson Elwore Nelson, Past Grand Master, died October 10, 1949. Manitoba;: M. Wor. Brother Henry Ernest Bletcher, Past Grand Master, died November 12, 1949. Michigan: M. Wor. Brother Harvey Andrew Sherman, Past Grand Master, died October 10, 1949. Montana: M. Wor. Brother Oscar Adolph Johnson, Past Grand Master, died October 8, 1949. M. Wort Brother W. Len Parmelee, Past Grand Master, died December 10, 1949. M. Wor. Brother Daniel J. Muri, Past Grand Master, died June 16, 1950. Nebraska: M. Wor. Brother Joseph B. Fradenburg, Past Grand Master, died June 14, 1950. M. Wor. Brother Archie M. Smith, Past Grand Master, died May 8, 1950. M. Wor. Brother James R. Cain, Jr., Past Grand Master, died September 3, 1950. Nevada: M. Wor Brother Henry W. Miles, Past Grand Master, died January 25, 1950. M. Wort Brother Andrew L. Haight, Past Grand Master, died May 7, 1950. North Carolina:: M. Wor. Brother Clyde Hamilton Jarrett, Past Grand Master, died November 1, 1949. M. Wor. Brother Wilkins Perryman Horton, Past Grand Master, died February 1, 1950. Oregon:: M. Wor. Brother Carl G. Patterson, Past Grand Master, died . May 1, 1950. Rhode Island: M. Wor. Brother James Cross Collins, Past Grand Master, died January 4, 1950. M. Wort Brother Albert Knight, Past Grand Master, died July 22, 1950. Saskatohewan: M. Wor. Brother Georg-e Moil' Weir, Past Grand Master, died December 4, 1949. M. Wor. Brother Robert Young, Past Grand Master, died November 20, 1949. Texas: M. Wor. Brother Alva Bryan, Past Grand Master, died March 14, 1950. M. Wor. Brother Ernest Malcolm Wood, M.D., Past Grand Master, died October 20, 1949. M. Wor. Brother Jewel P. Lightfoot, Past Grand Master, died .ruly 14, 1950. Washington: M. Wor. Brother Tom Wooster Holman, Past Grand Master, died Janua.ry 15, 1950. M. Wor. Brother Frank Newman McCandless, Past Grand Master, died November 30, 1949. West Virginia: M. Wor. Brother Ira Wade Coffman, Past Grand Master, died December 24, 1949. M. Wor. Brother Emmett M. Showalter, Past Grand Master, died November 5, 1949. Wisconsin: M. Wor. Brother Charles :K Shane, Past Grand Master, died April 7, 1950. M. Wor. Brother Robert O. Jasperson, Past Grand Master Foreign Correspondent, died August 19, 1950. Wyorning: M. Wor. Brother John Stansbury, Past Grand Master, died November 28,1949. M. Wor. Brother Dr. Edwin P. Rohrbaugh, Past Grand Master, died January 23, 1950. M. Wor. Brother Frank Severn Knittle,


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Past Grand Master, died January 31, 1950. M. Wor. Brother William J. Hogans, Past Grand Master, died June 22, 1950. Fraternally submitted, JAMES W. SKELLY, Chairman WILLIS J. BRAY, SAMUEL THURMAN, EMMET'I' L. ROBISON, EARL STARKE.

REPORT OF THE JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE ON MATTERS PERTAINING TO THE MASONIC' HOME

M. 'VOl'. Brother Karl Vetsburg, Chairman, presented the report of the Jurisprudence Committee on Matters Pertaining to The Masonic Home, which was adopted and is as follows: September 26, 1950. To the Most Wor8hipfu~ (kand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Three matters pertaining to the future of the Masonic Home' have been referred to your Jurisprudence Committee; namely, (a) Resolution proposing to levy a "contribution" of two (2) dollars for the Home, said resolution being set out in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, 1948, p. 103. (b) Proposed Amendment to our by-laws covering the same matter and appearing at length in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, 1948, p. 103. (c) Report of R. W. Bro. Struble, Committee to "Survey Methods of Relief and Welfare in Foreign Jurisdictions," and Resolutions路 and Amendments pertaining thereto, said matters appearing in Proceedings of the grand Lodge" 1949, pp. 68-84 and pp. 145-147. As all the above matters are set out in full in the Proceedings, as above indicated, we deem it unnecessary to set them out here, but expressly refer to them, as above set out and make them a part of this report. We approach the task of preparing for and suggesting to this Grand Lodge the proper solution of the above mentioned problems with deep humility. We feel that they are among the most important matters to come before this Grand Lodge in years. In suggesting their proper solution, the only consideration must be the future welfare of the Craft and of the Masonic Home. (a) and (b) With reference to the proposed Resolution and Amendment suggesting the "levy" of a two dollar "contribution" for the Home, we wish to say that we have received and attach hereto a request signed by all the proponents of such Resolution and Amendment, asking leave to have the same withdrawn. (Sec end of Report.) We understand that the request for this leave to withdraw comes from the belief that there is a considerable sentiment in the Grand Lodge against such" levies," and that whatever funds are needed for the Home should be raised through voluntary contributions, to be solicited in a well organized campaign which should be :financed by the Grand Lodge. Weare inclined to agree that a "levy" at this time would probably be ill advised and stir up considerable resentment. We, therefore, recommend this disposition of the Resolution and Amendment covering the two dollar" levy" for the Home, that proponents' request to withdraw both the Resolution and the Amendment be granted. We appreciate the fact that the foregoing action does not solve the


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financial needs of the Home, if it is continued, but merely postpones consideration of the amount required and the method of providing it. If our ideas, as expressed in the following Section (c), meet with the approval of the Grand Lodge, we believe that early consideration should be given to Buch financial needs. While other necessary improvements may wait, the need for the erection of a new boiler plant seems to be immediate and pressing. We are advised that such a plant will cost over Three Hundred Thousand ($300,000.) Dollars and that funds, properly applicable to that purpose, are available. In such event we believe authority should be given for the erection of Buch boiler plant, when such improvements become mandatory.

(c) In regard to'Rt. Wor. Bro. Struble's" Survey of Methods of Relief and Welfare in Foreign Jurisdictions," we wish to say that such Survey evidences a vast labor in the gathering of information from other Grand Jurisdictions, and while we believe that the Survey contains some valuable suggestions with which we agree, in principle, as hereinafter set out, we are of the opinion that some of the Survey recommendations are iconoclastic and ill advised. As we summarize the Survey, its major recommendations can be' briefly stated as follows:' MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS OF R. W. BRO. STRUBLE

(1) That after all present residents of the Home are cared for, the Grand Lodge should abolish institutional care except a sanitarium for chronic invalids, to be erected upon the Union Boulevard property of the Home. (2) That this Grand Lodge should adopt a plan of ultimately giving only outside relief to Freemasons, their wives, widows and orphans. (3) That ultimately all the present buildings and all the Home property between Delmar Boulevard and Enright Avenue should be sold. (4) That a closer relationship to and control of the Home by the Grand Lodge should be established and maintained. PROPO~ED ABOLITION

OF INSTITUTIONAL CARE

Addressing ourselves to the foregoing recommendations of R. W. Bro. Struble, the following considerations have brought your Committee to the conclusion that the submitted plan for the abolition of institutional care would be legally and Masonically inexpedient because: 1st: In our opinion, the Masonic Home of Missouri is one of the finest examples of applied Freemasonry, conducted for the greatest benefit of our charges and one which pleases and is appreciated by the Craft, and which is attractive to people of means who desire to make donations or bequests for worthy charitable purposes. 2d: The policy of institutional care for our charges has been too long established and fixed as a method of satisfying our obligations to these charges to be now abolished. 3d: There are cases, other than those of chronic invalids, for whom outside relief of the proper kind is not feasible, possible, or desirable. 4th: In our opinion a sanitarium for chronic invalids could very well be considered not as a "Home," or an institution to attract donations and bequests from charitably-minded individuals. In the past the Home has received from such individuals substantial bequests and gifts which have gone into an Endowment Fund now consisting of approximately One Million Six Hundred Thousand ($1,600,000.) Dollars.


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This fund includes bequests and donations of individuals in appreciation of the work which the Masonic Home of Missouri, as now operated, is doing, and we feel that the abolition of general institutional care by the Home would be an act of bad faith toward the donors of the past and a deterrent to future gifts and bequests. More than that, we feel that such abolition of institutional care would violate the express terms of many of our donations and bequests and seriously jeopardize them. 5th: In 1908, and pursuant to an agreement with the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star, not referred to in R. W. Bro. Struble's Report, the Charter of the Masonic Home was amended so as to give needy members of the Eastern Star and their needy orphans the right to care at the Home on payment by the Grand Chapter to the Home of twenty-five cents per capita on its membership. Since then, such per capita has been and now is being paid for the support and maintenance of the Home, and the O. E. S. has made large additional donations to the Home. In view of the foregoing, the abolition of institutional care would not only be in extremely bad faith, but might raise a serious legal question as to the propriety of such action. 6th: At the Home the children receive good, wholesome meals, so balanced as to provide them with the necessary calories and vitamins; and they also receive complete medical care, furnished by a staff of some of the most outstanding members of the medical profession. 7th: Many of the children at the Home come from small communities where Educational' facilities are limited. At the Home they attend the St. Louis grade and high schools; receive instructions in music; and, in the case of talented children, the advantages of a college education. 8th: The adoption of the plan of outside relief solely might jeopardize the rights of our charges to state or federal aid to which they may be entitled under our laws. OUTSIDE CARE

While we are thus opposed to the proposed plan for abolition of institutional care, we believe that there are cases in which outside care of children and old people would be desirable, better and cheaper. We agree with Rt. Wor. Bro. Struble that a child who has one parent, capable and proper for the child's care, and willing to care for the child, would be better off by being allowed to remain with said parent .and that such parent should ge given a reasonable allotment for the child's care. We further believe that there are instances in which men and women of middle age might find greater happiness by being given a suitable allocation and being permitted to live among friends. In both the above classes of cases, we feel that effort should be made to effectuate such outside care, and we, therefore, recommended that this Grand Lodge make larger allotments to the Committee on Relief and Charity (Welfare Committee) so as to enable it to properly care for cases of the above character outside of the" Home." However, we do not approve' the proposed plan of arbitrary assessment of the Lodges for a portion of the outside relief granted. CLOSER CONTROL OF HOME BY GRAND LODGE

We are in favor of R. W. Bro. Struble's concept that there should be a closer and more complete control of the Home and activities of the Committee on Relief and Charity (Welfare Committee) by the Grand Lodge; but we do not agree with the suggestions of R. W. Bro. Struble as to the manner in which such control should be exercised by a few Grand Lodge Line Officers and appointees of the Grand Master. We are, therefore, suggesting plans which, we feel, would better accomplish satisfactory results.


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CONCLUSION

For the foregoing reasons, we recommend that the "Report of the Committee to Survey Methods of Relief and Welfare in Foreign J urisdictions, " together with the proposed Amendments and Resolutions submitted therewith, all of which appear in the Grand Lodge Proceedings of 1949, pp. 68-84 and pp. 145-147, be not adopted; and in lieu thereof, we recommend the adoption by this Grand Lodge of the following substitute Resolutions and Amendments: RESOLUTIONS

AA. Be It Resolved, That, until the further action of this Grand Lodge, institutional care, as now furnished, be continued as at present, in cases in which outside care of children and adults is not feasible or desirable. BB. & CC. Be It Further Resolved, That the policy of outside care, as now conducted by the Committee on Relief and Charity (Welfare Committee) be enlarged and that sufficient funds for this purpose be arranged for out of the funds of the Masonic Home to enable said Committee to properly discharge these duties: that where a needy and indigent parent is found to be willing and to be a proper person for the care of his or her child, with a reasona.ble allotment, such child shall be left in the care of such parent, who shall be given such reasonable allotment; and where it is determined that. eligible adults might find greater happiness by being given a reasonable allotment and being permitted to live among friends under available suitable conditions, such reasonable allotments shall be made and such adults shall be permitted to live under such suitable conditions; and that all such allotments shall be for one .year only and shall be made and renewed from year to year, under such rules and regulations as shall be adopted, from time to time, by the Committee on Relief and Charity (Welfare Committee) with the approval of this Grand Lodge. DD. Be It Further Resolved, That the Membership and the Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri shall be, and they are hereby, directed to amend the Charter and By-Laws of the Masonic Home so as to provide that its Membership and Board of Directors shall consist of nine (9) members; namely, the following officers of the Grand Lodge: The Grand Master, who shall be the President;' the Deputy Grand Master, who shall be the Vice-President; the Senior Grand Warden; the Junior Grand Warden; together with five (5) Master Masons, members in good standing in Missouri Lodges, chosen in such manner and for such terms, respectively, as shall be provided from time to time by the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge. EE. Be It Further Resolved, That, while we recognize the inadequacy of our present hospital, and the probable need of a new and adequate hospital or infirmary, we believe that, while plans therefor may be prepared in the interim, contract for and construction of the hospital should be delayed until money therefor is available, and the contract is previously approved by this Grand Lodge. FF. Be It Further Resolved, as a STANDING RESOLUTION of this Grand Lodge, that, wherever the words" with the approval of this Grand Lodge" appear in any &solution or By-Laws of the Grand Lodge or Masonic Home, pertaining to the activities or functions of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home or the Committee on Relief and Charity, such words are intended and shall be construed to mean that, between


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Communications of the Grand Lodge, the Board of the Masonic Home or the Committee on Relief and Charity, as the case may be, may act in the premises, but must report their actions to the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge for approval, disapproval, or modification by the Grand Lodge.

00. Be It Further Resolved, That the Directors of the Masonic Home be, and they are hereby, directed to promptly contract with one of the leading banks or Trust Companies in Missouri, such contract to be previously approved by this Grand Lodge, to act as an advisory consultant as to the care and investment of any and all monies and investments of the Endowment Fund; and to amend Section 6 of Article VII, of its By-Laws so as to provide for such contract. HH. That pursuant to the authority granted by Section Second of the Agreement of Incorporation of the Masonic Home of Missouri, the terms of the members heretofore elected as Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri shall be, and are hereby, terminated, and they are hereby removed as members, such termination and removal to be effective when the Constitution of the Home is amended as herein proposed. II. Be It Further Resolved, That the Directors of the Masonic Home be, and they are hereby, directed to make an overall check of employee personnel who receive salaries or wages and/or full or part time maintenance, and report thereon to the Grand Lodge as soon as possible. PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE MASONIC HOME OHARTER AND BY-LAWS

JJ. Be It Further Resolved, That the Membership and the Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri be, and they are hereby, directed to amend Article I of its By-Laws by striking out Article I (Section 1, 2, 3 and 4 thereof) and substituting in lieu thereof the following: ARTICLE I MEMBERsmp

Section 1. The Masonic Home of Missouri shall be governed by a Board of Directors consisting of the Grand Master, who shall be President; the Deputy Grand Master, who shall be Vice-President; the Senior Grand Warden, the Junior Grand Warden, and five (5) Master Masons who shall be members in good standing of Missouri Lodges who shall be elected by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri in accordance with the Grand Lodge By-Laws. Section 2. The Board of Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy among such five (5) elected members temporarily, until the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, when such vacancy shall be filled by the Grand Lodge. Section 3. No member of the Board shall reside at the Home. KK. Be It Further Resolved, That the Membership and the Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri be, and they are hereby, directed to repeal Article III of its By-Laws and to substitute in lieu thereof the following: ARTICLE III OFFICERS

Section 1. The officers shall be a President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer. The Grand Master shall be President and the Deputy Grand Master shall be Vice-President. A Treasurer and a Secretary of the


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Board shall be elected by the Board of Directors and their terms of office shall be one year and until their successors are elected a.nd qualified. The Treasurer shall be a member of the Board. The Secretary may, but need not, be a member of the Board. The Secretary and Treasurer shall receive such compensation as may be provided by the Board of Directors, with the approval of the Grand Lodge. Section 2. The Board shall, with the approval of the Grand Lodge, employ a superintendent of the Home, a Home physician, Matrons of Children and Matrons of Old People, and such other agents and employees as may, in their judgment, be necessary. The duties, terms of office and salaries shall be fixed by the Board, with the approval of the Grand Lodge. LL. Be It Further Resolved, That the Membership and the Board of Directol"s of the Masonic Home be, and they are hereby, directed to amend Paragraph Second of the Agreement of Incorporation of the Masonic Home by striking out said paragraph and substituting in lieu thereof, the following: Second. MEMBERSHIP. That the Membership of said Corporation shall consist solely of nine (9) members; namely, the following officers of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the . State of Missouri: the Grand Master, who shall be President; the Deputy Grand Master, who shall be Vice-President; the Senior Grand Warden; the Junior Grand Warden; together with five (5) Master Masons, members in good standing in Missouri Lodges chosen by said Grand Lodge in such manner and for such terms as said Grand Lodge may from time to time determine; that no such elected member shall be eli~ble to succeed himself; that none of the Grand Lodge Officers, serving on the Board, as aforesaid, shall be eligible for election as a Director until the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge after their respective terms of office in the Grand Lodge shall have expired; that the Grand Master shall be President and the Deputy Grand Master shall be VicePresident; that vacancies among the five (5) elected members may be filled by the Board of Directors of the Home temporarily until the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge when such vacancy shall be filled by the Grand Lodge; and that the said five (5) members or any of them may be removed by resolution of said Grand Lodge. MM. Be It Further Resolved, That the Membership and the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home be and they are hereby directed to amend paragraph Third of the Agreement of Incorporation of the Masonic Home of Missouri by repealing said paragraph Third and substituting in lieu thereof the following: Third: Board of Directors. That the Board of Directors shall be constituted ex officio of the Members of the Corporation; that the Board of Directors may make, amend or repeal the By-Laws and Home Rule, subjee-t to control of the Gramd Lodge,. fill vacancies among the five (5) elected members until the following Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri; elect and for cause remove the officers, other than the President and VicePresident; fill vacancies in office, of Officers provided to be elected by the Board thereunder; and conduct the business affairs of the Corporation.

NN. Be It Further Resolved, That the Membership and the Directors of the Masonic Home be, and they are hereby, directed to carefully consider all their Agreement of Incorporation and their by-laws, rules and


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regulations, and to amend any thereof that are contrary to the changes, herein suggested and adopted by this Grand Lodge, and make them accord with such changes. AMENDMENTS RELATIVE TO MASONIC HOME

AAA. That Section 199 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws, 1947, be, and it is hereby, repealed and that, in lieu thereof, a new Section 199 be adopted as follows: Section 199. MASONIC HOME BOARD. Until the necessary amendments of the Constitution of the Masonic Home of Missouri are effected or until the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge in 1951, whichever occurs first, the present Board of Directors of the Masonic Home shall continue as such Board, with all the powers granted to the Board by this Grand Lodge and by the Charter and By-Laws of the Masonic Home. Effective with the amendment of the Constitution of the Masonic Home of Missouri to provide therefor, the Membership and the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri shaJl consist of the following Officers of the Grand Lodge: the Grand Master, who shall be President; the Deputy Grand Master who shall be Vice-President; the Senior Grand Warden; the Junior Grand Warden; together with five (5) Master Masons, members in good standing of Missouri Lodges, who shall be elected as hereinafter provided. The terms of the first fi ve (5) so elected, at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge in' 1950, shall begin when the Constitution of the Masonic Home is amended to provide therefor; and at said election in 1950, one of said five (5) Directors shall be elected for a term ending with the Annual Communication in 1951; one for a term ending with the Annual Communication in 1952; one for a term ending with the Annual Communication in 1952; one for a term ending with the Annual Communication in 1953; one for a term ending with the Annual Commuication in 1954; and one for a term ending with the Annual Communication in 1955. The terms of their respective successors shall be five (5) years each, and none of thel five (5) elected Board Members shall be eligible to successive terms, and none of the Grand Lodge Officers, serving on the Board, as aforesaid, shall be eligible for election as a Director until the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge after their respective terms of office in the Grand Lodge shall have expired. Nominations of Directors to be elected shall be made on the first day of the Grand Lodge Communication, as soon after the Grand Master's Address as can be conveniently done. If a greater number is nominated than the number to be elected, the Grand Secretary shall cause a ballot to be printed with the names of those nominated listed aJphabetically, which said ballots shaJl be used for the election when held as herein provided. In the event that no more are nominated than are to be elected, the Grand Master shaJl order the Grand Secretary to cast the baJlot for the members so nominated. Said Board shall have full power and authority to handle all matters pertaining to the conduct and management of the Masonic Home and its properties, and also all matters of relief in accordance with policies adopted or approved, from time to time, by this Grand Lodge. The election of Directors hereunder shall be held immediately following the election of the Grand Lodge Officers and shall be by plurality vote. This By-Law shall be effective immediately on its adoption.

BBB. That sub-paragraph (h) of section 30 of Article V of our Grand Lodge By-Laws, 1947., be, and it is hereby, repeaJed and a new Bubparagraph (h) of said section and article be adopted as follows: (h) Relief all/it Charity.


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A committee on Relief and Charity to be composed of not more than five (5) members of the Masonic Home Board. Said committee shall have full authority to provide for the care and relief, outside of the Home, of distressed worthy cases of Masonic charity, who, the Masonic Home Board finds, can be more advantageously cared for outside of the Home. Said committee shall meet on call of its chairman and shall make rules and regulations for the conduct and administration of its duties, such rules and regulations to be consistent with policies from time to time set by, or with the approval of, this Grand Lodge. This By-Law shall be effective immediately on its adoption.

To the Jurisprudence Comrmittee of the GrOlfU1 Lodge of Missouri .A. F. ~.A. M.: At the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge held at St. Louis on September 28, 29 and 30, 1948, the undersigned presented for the consideration of the Grand Lodge, a Resolution providing for an annual assessment of $2.00 for the benefit of the Masonic Home of Missouri, and also presented an Amendment to the Grand Lodge By-laws, to be known as Section 74A, which resolution and proposed amendment are found on page 103 of of the 1948 Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. Both the resolution and proposed amendment were referred to the Jurisprudence Committe-e of the Grand Lodge. We now request that the Resolution and By-law so presented be withdrawn. Respectfully submitted, JAMES W. SKELLY, HARRY THEIS, BYRNE E. BIGGER.

Fraternally submitted, KARL M. VETSBURG, Chairman, C. LEW GALLANT, SAMUEL WILCOX, CHET A. KEYES, HENRY W. Fox,

Jurispruderwe Committee. NOMINATIONS FOR MASONIC HOME BOARD

The following brethren were nominated for Directors of the Masonic Home: For term ending 1951 Arthur Nordberg For term ending 1952 T. 'V. Cotton For term ending 1953 Edgar C. 'Volcott William H. Utz, Jr. Emil Rake Morris Ewing Theodore P. Besch Robert C. Winkelmaier


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For term ending 1954 Elmer Wagner Rex Dewhirst Martin Dickinson P. E. Eckhardt For term ending 1955 Walter J. Simon W. W. Martin Cornelius D. Struble REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES

Rt. Wor. Bro. R. Jasper Smith, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. <J A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances submits the following report: I

In re: BERT

C.

TRIMBLE

Bert C. Trimble, at one time a member of Wallace Park Lodge No. 627, petitioned for restoration of membership. When the Charter of Wallace Park Lodge was surrendered on June 19, 1937, he had been suspended for non-payment of dues since April 22, 1934. Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 has investigated him, and recommends that the petition be granted, and that he be restored to membership so that he may become affiliated with Ivanhoe Lodge. After considering the 'Petition and supporting evidence, your Co=ittee reco=ends that the application for restoration be approved, and that Bert C. Trimble be restored to membership in the fraternity. II In re: SHEKINAH LODGE NO. 256

On May 23, 1950, the Grand Master arrested the Charter of Shekinah Lodge No. 256, at Festus, Missouri, for indiscriminate use of the Blackball to the extent that the condition was detrimental to the interests of Freemasonry. In due time certain members of the Lodge filed an appeal from the action of the Grand Master, which vested jurisdiction in this Committee. The Committee has considered this situation most carefully. W. Brother Earl Landes, Worshipful Master, Brother Clemence A. Temm, Senior Warden, Brother Fred W. Kocher, Junior Warden and Brother Byrl Degeare, Secretary, appeared on behalf of the Lodge. In addition Rt. W. Bro. Warren F. Drescher, Jr., District Deputy Grand Master, 16th Administrative District, and Rt. W. Bro. Clyde Williams, District Lecturer, 40th Ritual District, joined in the appearance of these officers. It appears that for a number of years, candidate after candidate has been blackballed, with a total of 68 rejections in the past ten years, and 38 rejections in the past four years. Of that number, 16 were rejected in 1947, 12 were rejected in 1948, six were rejected in 1949, and four were


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rejected in 1950. During the years several Grand Masters and several District Deputy Grand Masters attempted to cope with the situation with limited success. However, at the beginning of the year 1949, a standing Committee on investigation was appointed, consisting, in the beginning, of eight Past Masters and one Past Secretary, for the purpose of passing on petitions路 and making recommendations to the Lodge. During the year 1949, there were no rejections except in cases where the recommendation of the Committee was unfavorable. It is significant in this connection that over a long period of years prior to appointment of this standing Committee it was most rare that any investigating Committee returned an unfavorable recommendation on any petition. Of the four rejected candidates in 1950, one received an unfavorable recommendation by the investigating Committee. Another had been rejected the year previously following an unfavorable report at that time by the investigating Committee. The remaining two had been reported favorably. During the year 1950, a total of ten petitions had been received, six receiving favorable action by the Lodge. At the regular communication held March 28, 1950, five petitions were presented. The Investigating Committee reported favorably on four, and unfavorably on one. Upon ballot, four of the five were rejected. Dispensation for reballot was requested and granted .on three of the petitions, and the time set for reballot was May 23, 1950. The three petitions again were rejected, and the Charter was arrested. Shekinah Lodge No. 256 is, as its number indicates, an old, established Lodge, with high traditions of excellence in ritual and other Masonic activity. In fact, the District Deputy Grand Master and the District Lecturer, in urging reconsideration of the Grand Master's action, denominated the Lodge as "the best Lodge in the 40th Ritual District in all respects. " The Lodge owns its own building, clear of encumbrance, of a stated value of $50,000.00. It has personal property, bonds and cash of a value in excess of $4,500.00. It has a total membership at this time of 282. This Committee is definitely of the opinion tl'lat the Grand Master has the right and authority under Grand Lodge law to arrest the Charter of a Lodge when in his opinion there is an indiscriminate use of the blackball to the extent that the condition is detrimental to the interests of Freemasonry. (By-Laws, Sec. 65, 66.) The Committee is likewise of the opinion that the history of rejections of petitions over a period of years by Shekinah Lodge No. 256, furnishes ample warrant and justification for the action of the Grand Master in arresting the Charter in this instance. It must be borne in mind, however, that the record of rejections during the years 1949 and 1950 when the Lodge activities were not in abeyance shows a marked improvement in the condition, indicating that the Lodge may have been in the process of solving its own difficulties. This Committee is not prepared to say that a rejection of three out of nine petitions receiving favorable reports of the investigating Committee amounts to an indiscriminate use of the blackball. Your Committee feels that the action of the Grand Master in arresting the Charter of Shekinah Lodge No. 256 has had and will have a most wholesome effect upon this Lodge and others where similar conditions prevail. However, in view of the very high standing of this Lodge, its comparatively large membership, and the serious problems incident to its rather extensive property holdings, all of which would prevent great difficulties in reorganization under a new Charter, it is the opinion of the Committee that there should be no complete and final revocation of the existing Charter.


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The Committee therefore recommends that the arrest of the Charter not be made permanent by coniirmation thereof, and that the Charter be restored from its position of abeyance.

III In re:

FRANZ W. KLEIN

Franz W. Klein, formerly Worshipful Master of Erwin Lodge No. 121, who was expelled by action of the Grand Lodge on September 26, 1944, (Proc. 1944, pp. 111, et seg.) has petitioned for restoration to membership in the Grand Lodge. The petition is supported by certain other recommendations. M. W. Bro. William R. Gentry, a member of this Co=ittee, was Chairman of the Trial Commission which reco=ended expulsion of Mr. Klein; and consequently he did not sit during this portion of the Committee's deliberations. The Committee has considered the facts presented to it in connection with this petition, and finds nothing which would cause it to change the opinion expressed on September 26, 1944. The Committee therefore recommends that the petition for restoration of membership be rejected. Respectfully submitted, R. JASPER SMITH, ChlUirrna.n, WM.

R.

GENTRY, GADDY, MARVIN E. BOISSEAU.

J. V.

* M. W. Bro. Gentry not sitting in the matter of Franz W. Klein. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 4 :30 p. m., the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 9 :30 a. m. Wednesday, the Grand Chaplain offering prayer.


SECOND DAY WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 27, 1950

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 9 :30 a. m., Grand Chaplain Potts offering prayer. REPORT OF GEORGE WASmNGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION COMMITTEE

M. Wor. Bro. Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented the report of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most WorshipfUl GrOind Lodge A. F. tf A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association beg leave to make the following report: The Fortieth Annual Convention of the Association was held in the Auditorium of the Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia on February 22, 1950, beginning at 10 0 'clock a. m. All of the Grand Lodges were represented by their Grand Masters and Grand Secretaries. Ten Grand Lodges from Canada, the Grand Lodge of Chili, the Grand Lodge of Cuba and the Grand Lodge of Mexico were represented by their Grand Masters. It was the largest attendance which we have ever had. Missouri was represented by our Grand Master, M. W. Brother James M. Bradford, our Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Brother Ray Bond, our Grand Secretary and Past Grand Master, Dr. Harold L. Reader, and the following Past Grand Masters, Ray V. Denslow, Anthony F. Ittner, Harry S. Truman, Frank C. Barnhill and Bert S. Lee, Frank S. Land, Founder and Secretary General of the Grand Council of the Order of DeMolay and General Harry H. Vaughan. The most important event of this year's Convention was the Unveiling of the bronze statue of Worshipful Brother George Washington in Memorial Hall of the Memorial. This event occurred at two thirty in the afternoon. It was under the auspices of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Grand Lodge of Missouri had a most important part in the unveiling ceremonies. The day started with a breakfast given at the Statler Hotel to the President of the United States, his Cabinet, members of the Supreme Court and the Grand Masters and Grand Secretaries by Brother Frank S. Land, Founder and Secretary General of the Grand Council of the Order of DeMolay. Our Grand Master with an escort of six of our Past Grand Masters was selected by the co=ittee as a special escort to the President of the United States. Many photographs were taken of the unveiling ceremonies which were used in the official minutes of the Association. Your committee secured from the Secretary-Treasurer, Brother Frederick F. Schondau, the cuts of the photographs which he used and Most Worshipful Brother Reader will


Completed Statue in Plaoe


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use a part of them in this year's Grand Lodge proceedings so that each one of you may have an opportunity to see them. There have been thirteen Presidents of the United States who were Freemasons and the directors of the Memorial Association have placed placques for each one of them in the Auditorium of the Memorial which shows their photographs and records of the Masonic work. There has been paid out for the erection of the Memorial to February 11, 1950, a total of $5,272,830.95. There was turned in by the Grand Masters at this year's meeting a total of $193,163.24 for the Building Fund and $39,209.40 for the Endowment :F'und. There is now in the Building Fund a total of ~291,034.96 and a total of $597,282.88 in the Endowment Fund. All bills have been paid with the exception of one for the withholding for February of $78.30. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, Chairman, HARRY S. TRUMAN, ANTHONY F. ITTNER.

REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER

nL 'oN or. Bro. Anthony F. Ittner, presented his report as Grand Lecturer, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. g. A. M~. of Missouri: BRETHREN: At the close of each masonic year it becomes my duty to submit a report of my principal activities as Grand Lecturer and the condition of the Craft throughout the State in reference to its ritualistic proficiency. I herewith submit my sixteenth annual report. On Thursday, August 24, R. W. Brother F. Ernest Carter, District Lecturer of the Twenty-second Ritual District, Senior Grand Marshal of the Grand Lodge and a member of' the Committee on Ritual, was stricken with a fatal heart attack. His sudden passing was a great shock to the vast number of friends he had made allover the State and was a great loss to the Grand Lecturer, the Grand Lodge and the Craft as a whole. Brother Carter was appointed District Lecturer at the annual communication of the Grand Lodge in 1937 and served with distinction for thirteen years. His thorough proficiency in the ritual prompted M. W. Brother William F. Woodruff, the then Gl'and Master, to appoint him to fill a vacancy on the Committee on Ritual in 1945. His service on that Committee was of the highest order. Brother Carter was highly esteemed and beloved by his fifty-eight associates in the corps of District Lecturers, and speaking for myself and for all of them, we are profoundly grateful for his friendship and whole hearted cooperation. It is not my purpose to encroach on the functioIl8 of the Committee on Necrology which, at the proper time, will present a more detailed account of his various activities and pay a tribute to his great worth as a Freemason. I come now to the condition of the Craft in reference to its knowledge of the ritual and the activities of the District Lecturers in their respective Districts. Of the fifty-nine District Lecturers ten have not yet reported but I have the promise of a number of them that the reports will be submitted before the close of the Grand Lodge. I shall make no effort to single out the best reports because nearly all of them are excellent. A few however are briefer than they should be and do not recite conditions in their Districts as fully as they should be given. Nearly all of the Districts are shown by the reports to have achieved at least some improvement in


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knowledge and exemplification of the work. A few report marked progress in this respect. According to their reports, a few of the Districts, perhaps four or five, have made no substantial progress but at the same time have shown no retrograde movement. A majority of the District Lecturers have visited all of their lodges. One or two, because of illness, have not been particularly active. They expect to be able to do better in the coming year. Most of the District Lecturers report an encouraging number of petitions received in most of their lodges although the rush which took place a few years ago has largely abated. A preponderant number of lodges seem to have acquired greater accuracy in the wording of the ritual than they have in the movements of the floor work. 'l'his is entirely natural as there can be no doubt that the movements are harder to acquire and remember than the wording of the ritual. As a result an intensified effort will be made during the coming year, both by the Grand Lecturer and his Deputies, to impart to the officers of the lodges a more nearly perfect knowledge of and ability to exemplify these movements. At the end of the last Grand Lodge year R. W. Brother Herbert W. Stark, D. L. of the Thirty-sixth Ritual District, who resides at Sedalia, informed me that the condition of his health was such that it became necessary for him to resign, a step which he deeply regretted having to take. Under the circumstances I accepted his resignation and on his recommendation appointed W. Brother Henry E. Richardson, of Granite Lodge, No. 292. Brother Stark's service as District Lecturer was of a high order and his gentlemanly approach to his numerous brethren who looked to him for instruction endeared him to the hearts of aU. Brother Henry E. Richardson's service has fully borne out Brother Stark's estimate of him when he recommended him a year ago. Two years ago R. W. Brother William Robert Howell, the regular District Lecturer of the Seventeenth Ritual District, consented, in addition to his regular appointment, to accept a temporary ~ppointment as Disrict Lecturer of the Eighteenth Ritual District until a suitable Brother could be found to take the place of the former District Lecturer, Brother H. Scott Welch. At the end of the year he reported that he had found and helped to instruct a Brother who, he believed, would make a worthy successor to Brother Welch. It was Brother Edwin B. Hawkins, of Higbee, who accepted the appointment of District Lecturer of the Eighteenth Ritual District and has made an excellent record during the year for ritualistic progress in his District. Also at the end of the last Grand Lodge year R. W. Brother Cecil R. Shire, District Lecturer of the Twenty-seventh Ritual District, who resides at Mexico, for urgent business reasons tendered his resignation as District Lecturer. He had made an excellent record as District Lecturer for a number of years and it was with great regret that his resignation was accepted. On his recommenda,tion I appointed as his successor W. Brother Alfred A. Mitchell, of Mexico, who, during the year, has applied himself diligently to a study of the ritual and bids fair to become a worthy successor to R. W. Brother Shire. The Lodge of Instruction for the 33d Masonic District, which comprises all the lodges in the city of St. Louis and three in Univers~ty City in St. Louis County, forty-seven in all, held weekly meetings for seven months except for short periods before and after the holidays. It held its last meeting in May. The Grand Master and your Grand Lecturer both attended this meeting. The work accomplished by this series of meetings was fruitful indeed and covered every phase of our ritual. The Masonic Temple at 3681 Lindell Boulevard, where the meetings are held, has many fine lodge halls and smaller rooms so that it is possible for classes in every phase of the work to assemble and study each portion thereof. The attendance


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this year- was somewhat less than it was during the peak year of our socalled boom but was nevertheless very satisfactory and perhaps more fruitful in results than in some years when it was better attended. R. W. Brother Frederick E. Kiefer was District Lecturer for the 33d District and presided over the ritualistic work at each of these meetings except one when he was away attending an important meeting at Jefferson City. Though this Lodge of Instruction has had many :fine and competent District Lecturers through the years, I consider Brother Kiefer in no wise inferior to any that they have had. I thank him for his able and devoted service. The Lodge of Instruction for the Twenty-second Ritual District, which takes in all the lodges in Kansas City except Marlborough Lodge, No. 569, and includes Alpha Lodge, No. 659, at North Kansas City, met on each Wednesday night during January and February and on the :first Wednesday in March. The Grand Master was present at the last meeting and delivered a brief but able address. I also had the pleasure of being present. This Lodge of Instruction, during its two months' activities, exemplifies every phase of the :floor work, and from the many reports I have received, I know that the ritualistic work in most of the lodges of the District merits a high rating for proficiency, undoubtedly due to instruction received in these important and fruitful sessions. Following the close of the sessions of the official Lodge of Instruction the several study clubs of Kansas City carryon the work of instruction for the remainder of the year or until it is time for the official Lodge of Instruction to reconvene. As you know, these study clubs have no official Grand Lodge recognition and have not asked for any but they meet with the hearty approval of the Grand Lodge officers who know of their work. The Lodge of instruction for the 57th Ritual District, which comprises all the lodges in St. Louis County except the three in University City, holds meetings during five months of the year, closing its sessions some time in April. It has been my pleasure and good fortune to visit them in at least one of these sessions each year. R. W. Brother Brace E. Kitchell has served as District Lecturer in the Fifty-seventh District for two years and is acknowledged by all who have had an opportunity to observe his work to be a proficient ritualist and an excellent teacher. The high standard of the work in both the Fifty-seventh and Thirty-third Districts was eloquently attested on Saturday, June 17, at the meeting of Sullivan Lodge, No. 69, in Meramec Caverns, when a team composed of workers from these two Districts conferred the second section of the Third Degree on the candidate in an almost :flawless manner. The School of Instruction at St. Joseph is in the Ninth Ritual District and includes the lodges in Buchanan and Andrew Counties. Its sessions are presided over by R. W. Brother Freelon K. Hadley. Its regular scheduled sessions are held weekly during one month. However, I might add that owing to the untiring zeal of Brother Hadley there is a never ending series of schools of instruction in that District as Brother Hadley visits all the lodges time after time in response to requests from their officers. For a number of years R. W. Brother William J. Craig, Grand S. S., held the office of District Lecturer for the Forty-fifth Ritual District, which takes in Greene and Webster Counties. Two years ago, however, he decided that owing to the press of business and his position in the Grand Lodge line it would be better to relinquish the duties of the office. It was with regret that I acceded to his resolve but he recommended a brother who has proved a worthy successor and is almost if not quite as proficient as his predecessor. I refer to R. W. Brother J. Bennett Klingner, who presides over the schools of instruction in Springfield. The attendance at these meetings is drawn not only from 'the local lodges in Springfield but from many if not most of the lodges in both Counties. Brother Klingner is doing


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1950

a fine work and Springfield might be termed one of the banner Districts in point of ritualistic proficiency. The Fifty-ninth Ritual District is presided over by R. W. Brother Francis S. Turner, as District Lecturer. It holds a series of meetings for ritualistic instruction on each Wednesday in March each year. It was my pleasure to attend the last meeting of this lodge of instruction on March 29, 1950, in the hall of Mount Washington Lodge, No. 614, at Mount Washington. The second section of the Third Degree was exemplified and many questions were asked of me and answered after the conclusion of the exemplification. R. W. Brother Turner is an excellent ritualist and not only takes charge of the work during the annual sessions of their lodge of instruction but gives a great deal of instruction in the intervals between, as he deems best and ca.lls come in for instruction. In the other Districts of the State not mentioned in connection with these Lodges and Schools of Instruction there are many fine ritualists among the District Lecturers, a number of them being practically perfect in the work. I shall not undertake to enumerate them but want to assure them that I deeply appreciate the excellence of their work. On Monday, November 14th, 1949, the Grand Master held a conference with his District Deputy Grand Masters in the hall of Jefferson IJodge No. 43, at Jefferson City. I was invited to attend and did so at the afternoon session. Though I had no official connection with the agenda of this important meeting, I responded to the Grand Master's cordial invitation to say a few words in commendation of the good which had resulted from' these meetings during the last several years. On the following day, Tuesday, November 15, I held a School of Instruction for the District Lecturers of the State in the same llall. It was a well attended meeting although a few of the Lecturers were unable to be present. The lectures were all carefully reviewed and the opening and closing ceremonies and the Degree work were exemplified. Many questions were asked by the District Lecturers and answered by myself. I could note a marked improvement over their work since the corresponding meeting in the previous year. It would be a fine thing if this group could get together, say twice a year, or even oftener, but I shall not ask the Grand Lodge to incur the additional expense unless there is a strong general demand for more meetings of this kind. We were the guests of Jefferson Lodge, No. 43, in the use of the hall, and the ladies of the Eastern Star prepared and served our delicious meals at a very reasonable charge. I believe that I have previously thanked Jefferson Lodge for its fine courtesy in according us the use of its commodious hall but I take this occasion to thank them once more in this, my annual report. I feel sure that the incoming Grand Master will desire to hold another such conference with his District Deputies during the year and if the Grand Lodge makes the necessary appropriation I shall be happy to hold another School of Instruction for the District Lecturers. Once more, as has been my privilege for a number of years past, I attended the annual convention of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association on Tuesday, February 22, 1950. The Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master and the Grand Secretary, and M. W. Brothers Bert S. Lee and Ray V. Denslow, also ,joined in the pilgrimage to this great masonic shrine. This particular pilgrimage was of unusual interest and importance because it was the occasion of the unveiling of a bronze' statue of George Washington. The statue is 17 feet high and is mounted on a five-foot granite pedestal. It is placed in Memorial Hall in such a way that it meets the eye of every visitor as he enters the hall and causes him to ponder deeply the significance of this great man's contribution to the formation and early development of our Republic.


1950

109

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOUR;I:

The unveiling of the statue took place under the auspices of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Virginia, presided over by its Grand Master. The ceremony was participated in by our Past Grand Master, M. W. Brother Harry S. Truman, President of the United States, and he delivered the principal address of the occasion. It was the good fortune and pleasure of the Missouri delegation, whose names are given above, to form an escort to the President from the driveway outside the Temple into the hall and upon the platform. They also escorted him back to his limousine at the close of the meeting. Many more interesting details eould be given but M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, chairman of our George Washington Memorial Committee, will make an elaborate report and no doubt cover details more fully. Missouri's financial contribution to the George Washington Memorial, though not the highest in proportion to its membership, is well within and I might say high up in the top bracket in this regard. After the death of R. W. Brother Carter I had intended to hold open the appointment of his successor as District Lecturer until the annual communication of the Grand Lodge as a token of respect to his memory. However, it developed that he had received a goodly number of applications for Proficiency examinations which had not been acted upon and which called for the appointment of examining commissions. Accordingly, in order that the work might not lag, I decided to appoint a successor to Brother Carter as District Lecturer of the Twenty-second Ritual District. I therefore appointed Brother George M. McAninch, of Gate City Lodge, No. 522, District Lecturer of the Twenty-second Ritual District, with the understanding that he was to receive all applications for Proficiency examinations in Kansas City and forward them to a member of the Committee on Ritual with recommendations of suitable brethren to act as examiners. Brother McAninch is one of the best ritualists in his section of the State, and his appointment seems to meet with general approval. During the year it has been my great pleasure to attend a number of important meetings at which the Grand Master was received and honored. Among these meetings was his first official visit and the one at which his own lodge, Keystone Lodge, No. 243, received and honored him. I regret that I was unable to accompany him on a number of his important pilgrimages. My relations with both the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary have been pleagant and profitable and I thank them both for their cooperation with me in a number of important matters. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, {kOlnd Lecturer. REPORT OF MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION

The Grand Secretary read the report of the Masonic Temple Association Committee which was adopted and is as follows: Ta the Most Worshipful GrOlnd Lodge, .A. F. go .A. M..of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your members appointed by the Grand Magter to represent the Grand Lodge in the Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis, Missouri, submit the following report: In our report of 1949 the bonded indebtedness was Money deposited by member bodies on which the Association pays 3 per cent interest was

$11,000.00 40,500.87

Total indebtedness $51,500.81 On December 1, 1949, in addition to the interest due at that time, the Association paid off bonds amounting to $ 5,000.00


110

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

On June 1, 1950, In addition to the interest due at that time, the Association paid off bonds amounting to

1950 6,000.00

Total Bond payments $11,000.00 As of September 1, 1950, the indebtedness of the Association stands as follows: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 0.00 Bonds secured by first mortgage Funds deposited by member bodies 40,500.87 Total indebtedness

$40,500.87

It is apparent by this statement that the property of the association is no longer encumbered by the bonded indebtedness, but that the same has been paid in full, and the only outstanding indebtedness is cash advanced by the member bodies, drawing interest at three per cent. We congratulate the Association on this fine showing and we congratulate everybody connected with the Temple Association for having liquidated the bonded indebtedness so promptly and so far ahead of time that the bonds would ultimately have matured. St. Louis, Mo., March 29, 1950 Mr. Karl M. Yetsburg, President The Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis 3681 Lindell Boulevard St. Louis 8, Missouri Dear Mr. Vetsb,urg: In Re: The Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis First Mortgage Real Estate 3%% Notes dated 11-1-40 due 12-1-50. In connection with the redemption of $6,000.00 par value of Notes of the above issue Nos. 1 to 6 inclusive, which you have called for prepayment June 1, 1950, at their principal amount plus accrued interest to said date, wish to advise that in order to provide for the payment of said Notes, interest coupons then maturing together with our charges, funds in the amount of $6,112.76 should be deposited with us, explained as follows: Notes 1 to 6 inclusive, called for redemption 6/1/50 at par .. Interest Coupons due 6/1/50 ...........................â&#x20AC;˘ Paying Agent's charges 1/8% on notes $7.50; 1/4% on Coupons .26 .

$6,000.00 105.00 7.76 $6,112.76

Upon receipt of your remittance in the above amount, we will handle the payment of the Notes and interest coupons in the usual manner. It is our understanding that the mortgage securing these notes can be released of record by presenting same, together with all of the cancelled notes, to the Recorders' Office at the City Hall, and that no Trustees Deed of Release is necessary. Therefore, we will waive our usual closing fee. After the notes to be prepaid have been paid and cancelled, we will deliver same to you together with the original mortgage and such other papers we are holding in connection therewith, which will be of no further use to us. In reviewing our records, we find that your first mortgage loan has been with us since June 1926 at which time the amount was $1,000,000.00. Our records further indicate that never has there been any delay in the pay-


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ment of any of your maturing obligations, even through those trying years of the Depression, which is a record The Temple and its members should be very proud of. Wishing continued success to you, we are Yours very truly, J. W. SCHUTTE, Assistant Treasurer. Fraternally submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGER, Chairman, FRANK C. BARNHILL,

H. C.

DILLER,

RUSSELL E. MURRAY, JOHN A. WITTHAUS.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNITION OF FREIGN GRAND LODGES

M. Vvor. Bro. Ray V. Denslow, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on the Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. go A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: We, your committee on recognition of foreign Grand Lodges, submit the following report: The world seethes with war. Several countries in which organized Freemasonry existed a year or more ago are now 8uffering from persecution and militarism. This necessitates a revaluation of Freemasonry in the matter of Grand Lodge recognition. United Gra;nii Lodge in Berlin: On January 23, 1950, two Grand Lodges in the City of Berlin, Germany--Grand Lodge Royal York zur Freundschaft, and the Grand Lodge zur den Alten Pflichten-united ~n a Grand Lodge to be known as the United Grand Lodge in Berlin, having its seat in that City. This is a distinct forward step for the Freemasonry in Germany. A Grand Lodge now exists in the Western Zone, and this establishes one for the Eastern Zone. While its activities are: limited to the City of Berlin, yet it has lodges elsewhere, which we hope sooner or later will become active. The Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge in Berlin is Dr. Ernest Rudiger, who is an outstanding industrialist in Berlin and who has been the dynamo in the resurrection of Freemasonry in the Eastern Occupation Zone. Brother Fritz H. E. Weinmann, Berlin-..f<'riedenau, Hackerstrasse 2, Germany, is Liaison Secretary. Berlin Lodge, which exists in the City of Berlin under charter from the Grand Lodge of Connecticut, has maintained close connection with this newly organized Grand Lodge and its members are enthusiastic in support of this consolidation. We have examined the statement of principles and landmarks and find that they conform to generally accepted standards throughout the Masonic World. We, therefore, recommend recognition of the United Grand Lodge in Berlin, and express the hope that in years to come it may become a part of the larger organization known as the United Grand Lodge in Germany. Hungary: Recent news dispatches contain the information that Freemasonry has been prohibited in Hungary. This is very unfortunate for the symbolic Grand Lodge of Hungary had just begun to establish itself and had only recently refitted and refurnished its Masonic Temple. We recommend that the name of this Grand Lodge be removed from the


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

list of recognized Grand Lodges until such a time as conditions there justify a reestablishment of relationship. It is dangerous to list in the Proceedings of Grand Lodge in America the names of Grand Lodges, or officers of Grand Lodges, in countries where dictators are in control. China: One of the most interesting happenings in the Masonic world was the establishment in the Republic of China of a Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. The new Grand Lodge was proclaimed on January 15, 1949. Its Grand Master, is David W. K. Au, and the Grand Secretary is Henry H. Lin, Masonic Temple, 178 Tiwha Road, South, Shanghai, 18, China. The Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands was instrumental in the establishment of this Grand Lodge and it seems to bear the approval of all the existing Masonic groups which have jurisdiction in that Republic. Strange to relate, in spite of political upheaval the Grand Lodge seems to function normally; it has already received the recognition of several American Grand Lodges, and we recommend its recognition by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. IS1'ael: We have received request for recognition from a group known as the Grand Lodge of Israel. Its subordinate lodges appear to have been organized by elements of Grand Lodges which have existed in Egypt from time to time. Many Grand Lodges are not satisfied with the conduct of Egyptian Freemasonry. Another matter to be considered is whether the Grand Lodge of Israel has invaded the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, which maintains lodges in Palestine. We cannot recommend recognition at this time in view of the information supplied. Minas Gerais: The Grand Lodge of Missouri has recognized three of the better known Grand Lodges in Brazil. There is another Grand Lodge which we believe deserves recognition; it is the Grand Lodge Minas Gerais. It is one of the largest and most influential lodges of the Brazilian Group and has the same standard and principles as the other. groups. Its Secretary of Affairs is Sergio A. Ivanenko, Caixa Postal 5, Belo Hodzonte, ..Minas Gerais, Brazil. We recommend recognition of the Grand Lodge Minas Gerais. Colombia: Recent news dispatches convey the information that the Fr~emasonry of Colombia is being persecuted and that it is only a matter of time until all the lodges in that territory will cease operation. Colombia is not such a large territory, but it has five Grand Lodges, due largely to the character of the territory, which is very mountainous. In view of the present situation we hesitate to accord recognition and suggest postponement until conditions become more stable. (keece: A year or so ago we criticised the Grand Jlodge of Greece because of its domination by the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite of that jurisdiction. The criticism also came from other Grand Lodges resulting in only one or two Grand Lodges in this country extending recognition. However, at the beginning of the present year the Grand Lodge of Greece officially severed its connection with the Supreme Council and in a notice of July 31, 1950, stated" we confirm to you that our Grand Lodge of Greece works following the ancient and agreed rules of the Craft, and that our Grand Lodge is independent, having its own administration and has under its orders the whole of Greek Lodges which work in Greece and abroad." The records show that the Grand Lodge has 17 lodges in the City of Athens, 2 in Piraeus, 21 in other Greek Provinces, 2 in Egypt, 1 in Khartum-Sudam. . With this statement of the Grand Lodge of Greece, certified by its Grand Secretary, Dr. Anthonios Rammos, 19 Acharnon St., Athens (K), Greece, we recommend recognition of the Grand Lodge of Greece.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

113

Czechoslovakia: Communism is i~ complete cha~ge in Czechoslovakia. It is a fixed rule that where communism comes in, Freemasonry goes out. We, therefore, recommend that until conditions change for the better in that jurisdiction, we cease to list either of the two Grand Lodges once existing in Czechoslovakia. Itcly: Dr. Publio Cortini, Grand Treasurer of the Grand Orient of Italy, wishes us to express his greetings to his many friends in Missouri whom he met two years ago in his brief visit to our State. Our Italian brethren are confronted with many difficulties. They are compelled to maintain the fraternity. in a country which is antagonistic to Freemasonry. An unfortunate thing about the whole situation is that Freemasonry is divided; some of the divisionis due to elements outside of Italy, who have furnished funds with which to set up what is generally regarded as irregular groups. Fraternally submitted, H. C. JOHNSTON, JAMES W. SKELLY, HAR.OLD L. READER, RAY BOND, WILLIS J. BRAY.

. REPORT OF RITUAL COMMITTEE

M. 'Vor. Bro. Ittner, Chairman, presented the report of the Ritual Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Gro;nd Lodge, A. F. fj A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Ritual submits herewith its annual report for the Grand Lodge year 1949-50. With profound sorrow and a sense of irreparable loss, your Committee feels that its tribute to R. W. Brother F. Ernest Carter should take precedence over all other matters in this report. R. W. Brother Carter was stricken with a fatal heart attack and entered the GRAND LODGE ON HIGH on Thursday, August 24, 1950. Brother Carter was appointed a member of the Committee on Ritual in 1945 and served continuously up to the time of his death. His thorough knowledge of the Ritual and his unsurpassed ability to impart it, coupled with his great love for Freemasonry, had secured for him the profound admiration of all his brethren. These sterling qualities and his careful analysis of every question which came before the Committee for decision were 'a great inspiration and help to his fellow members. The vacancy on the Committee caused by his passing will no doubt be filled by the appointment of some worthy and thoroughly competent Brother, as he undoubtedly would wish, but the vacancy in our hearts caused by his untimely death' can never be filled. Your Committee has held two meetings during the Grand Lodge year. The first was at St. Louis on Friday, June 16. The first matter which came before the Committee was discussed at length and later decided by virtue of the power vested in the Committee by the Grand Lodge By-laws, namely, the power to determine the lodges which shall constitute each of the fifty-nine Masonic Ritual Districts. Under this power the Committee unanimously voted to transfer Brumley Lodge, No. 203, at Brumley, and Iberia Lodge, No. 410, at Iberia, from the 38th Ritual District, presided over by R. W. Brother Oren Simpson, to the (58th Ritual District presided over by R. W. Brother Harold A. Reiche1. The District Lecturers of the 38th and 58th Ritual Districts were duly notified of the change. The transfer of these lodges from one Ritual District to another at the same


114

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

time transferred them' from the 21st Administrative District, presided over by R. W. Brother L. B. Parrish, D.D.G.M., to the 29th Administrative District presided over by R. W. Brother Virgil B. Saville, D.D.G.M. Both Brother Parrish and Brother Saville were duly notified of the change. At the same time the M. W. Grand Master and the Grand Secretary were notified of the transfer. Both Brumley Lodge and Iberia Lodge were notified in letters addressed to their respective Secretaries. The other group of lodges involved in the action of the Committee consisted of the three lodges in Ralls County, which prior to the action taken by the Committee, had been in the 15th Ritual District presided over by R. W. Brother David A. Leslie. They were transferred to the 17th Ritual District presided over by R. W. Brother William Robert Howell. This transfer from one Ritual District to another automatically transferred these lodges from the 12th Administrative District to the 11th Administrative District, presided over respectively by R. W. Brothers Barkley D. Million and William Rober~ Howell as District Deputy Grand Masters. Both District Lecturers and both District Deputy Grand Masters were duly notified. The three lodges involved in the transfer from the 15th to the 17th Ritual District are Ralls Lodge, No. 33, at Center, Lick Creek Lodge, No. 302, at Perry, and New London Lodge, No. 307, at New London. All of these lodges were duly notified in letters maileq. to their Secretaries. The Grand Master and the Grand Secretary were also duly notified of the transfer. Prior to this transfer the 15th Ritual District had fourteen lodges, the transfer leaving it with eleven. The 17th Ritual District, prior to the transfer, had six lodges and the transfer gave it a total of nine lodges. Another matter pertaining to the ritual was brought to the attention of the Committee which called for a decision. A decision was made by the Committee that cannot be set out in writing as it has to do with a part of the esoteric work. It will be explained to the Grand Lodge orally at the conclusion of, this report" The Committee unanimously decided to hold its next meeting in St. Louis on Monday, September 25. , Prior to adjournment it was brought to the attention of. the Committee that a monster meeting of Sullivan Lodge, No. 69, A. F. and A. M., at Sullivan, would be held in Meramec Caverns the next day, namely, Saturday, June 17, under special dispensation granted by M. W. Brother James M. Bradford, Grand Master. It was hoped that all the members of the Committee would attend this meeting but unfortunately R. W. Brother William J. Craig was unable to attend by reason of press of business at his home office in Springfield. The other five members of the Committee went out to the Caverns the next day and witnessed a meeting attended by an estimated nine hundred to a thousand Master Masons. Sullivan Lodge, No. 69, in a most creditable manner, conferred the First Section of the Third Degree on one of its candidates, .and a cast of workers selected from the 57th and 33d Ritual Districts conferred the second Section. The work in both sections was a credit both to Sullivan Lodge and the workers from the 57th and 33d Ritual Districts who participated. The Lecture was delivered by R. W. Brother Freelon K. Hadley, of St. Joseph, and the charge by R. W. Brother Bruce H. Hunt, of Kirksville, both members of the Committee on Ritual. The work of the Committee on Ritual during the Grand Lodge year has by no means been confined to its discussions and decisions in called meetings. On the contrary, every member of the Committee throughout the entire year has been busy attending to a multiplicity of small though time-consuming duties calculated to further and promote the beneficial


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

115

effects of the Certificate Plan. Brothers Craig, Carter, Hadley, Hunt and Johnson have been kept very busy complying with requests for blank applications, appointing examining commissions, keeping a record of these appointments and forwarding completed application blanks to the chairman of the Committee. The chairman also has supplied brethren with a goodly number of application blanks and has received back from each member of the Committee completed blanks returned to them. Your chairman has been kept busy classifying and indexing the completed blanks of successful applicants, forwarding lists of them to the Grand Secretary, and finally signing the certificates awarded to the successful applicants. At least three of the members of the Committee, namely, Brothers Hadley, Hunt and Carter, on frequent occasions complied with requests from nearby Districts to visit them and supplement the instruction received from the Grand Lecturer, all of this with the consent and approval of the Grand Lecturer. Brother Craig has been a tower of strength to his own District Lecturer, Brother J. Bennet Klingner, who succeeded him in the office, and to a number of other District Lecturers in nearby Districts. Brother Johnson may not have made as many trips complying with requests from nearby Districts but he has nevertheless been kept exceedingly busy supplying applicants from the 47 lodges in the 33d District and the 16 lodges in the 57th District with blanks and appointing examining commissions for each applicant. The number of examinations condueted and completed blanks returned do not afford an accurate criterion for measuring the work done by the several members of the Committee. Numerous questions are asked of them and often the members of the Committee themselves serve on examining commissions. The secorrd meeting of the Committee on Ritual was held in the Masonic Temple in St. Louis on Monday, September 25,1950, pursuant to the action taken by the Committee at its meeting in St. Louis on Friday, June 16. The business transacted at that meeting consisted of a discussion of the contents of this report to the Grand Lodge and a discussion of tentative plans for the Grand Lodge year 1950-51. This discussion included the advisability of launching a third subdivision of the certificate plan. However, no final action was taken on an additional subdivision. This matter will be further discussed and possibly decided at the next meeting of the Committee. Since the close of the record last year the numbers of successful applicants for original certificates in the two Subdivisions and the first and second renewals under Subdivision 1 are as follows: Subdivision 1. . Original applications First Renewals Second Renewals Subdivision 2 Original applications

190 71 43 23

The names of all these successful applicants will be printed at the end of this report. Your Committee desires to thank the Grand Secretary, M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader, for his cheerful and efficient cooperation in the countersigning, sealing and mailing of the certificates and in keeping the Grand Lodge records thereof carefully posted to date. On the whole, your Committee on Ritual has had a very busy year and your chairman assumes the responsibility for recording the activities of


116

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

the other members so they may not be open to the charge of self-laudation. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, Chairmam" WILLIAM J. CRAIG, FREELON K. HADLEY, BRUCE H. HUNT, F. H. JOHNSON. CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY No. 1281 1282 1283 1284 1285 1286 1287 1288 1289 1290 1291 1292 1293 1294 1295 1296 1297 1298 1299 1300 1301 1302 1303 1304 1305 1306 1307 1308 1309 1310 1311 1312 1313 1314 1315 1316 1317 1318 1319 1320 1321 1322 1323 1324 1325 1326 1327

N0Im8

Earl R. Cook Drury A. Wake Roy H. Wagner, Jr Charles R. Skinner Joshua L. Rider Buford G. Lewallen Joseph M. Hampton Walter L. Shelton Montie L. Asher William D. Hughes George D. Borden, Sr John E. Wetzel. : Robert L. Kelly John A. Brooks Roy A. Stuart. " '" Paul D. Bragg James J. Manring Willard G. Terry Trueman D. Boone Roy C. Harvey Everett C. Jacobs Of{den L. Romine Frank H. Nitz William W. Martin Nathaniel P. Duffy James W. Lane Carl Pittman Elmer W. Pickles Gerald N. Grace Charles W. Loveland Lewis M. Brockman Frank W. Randolph Laurido M. Lauridsen Melvin Drummond Glenn E. Everman Rufus H. Lane William R. Allen Neville B. Frohwitter Harry L. Ruckstuhl. Richard N. Robinson William W. Gray William E. Meyer Stanford M. Burge Jack L. Taylor George M. McClelland George W. Gregory . Herbert W. Duemler

,

,

,

Lodge Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Lexington Lodge No. 149 Lexington Lodge No. 149 Dockery Lodge No. 325 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Friend Lodge No. 352 Bismarck Lodge No. 41 Westport Lodge No. 340 Compass Lodge No. 120 Perseverance Lodge No. 92 Perseverance Lodge No. 92 Lambskin Lodge No. 460 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Webb City Lodge No. 512 St. Marks Lodge No. 93 Winigan Lodge No. 540 Winigan Lodge No. 540 Winigan Lodge No. 540 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Triangle Lodge No. 638 Webb City Lodge No. 512 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Cache Lodge No. 416 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Huntsville Lodge No. 30 Joplin Lodge No. 335 American Lodge No. 347 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Webb City Lodge No. 512 Bogard Lodge No. 101 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Pyramid Lodge No. 180 South Gate Lodge No. 547 South Gate Lodge No. 547 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Lincoln Lodge No. 138 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Temple Loqge No. 299 Livingstone Lodge No. 51 Tower Grove Lodge No. 631


1950 1328 1329 1330 1331 1332 1333 1334 1335 1336 1337 1338 1339 1340 1341 1342 1343 1344 1345 1346 1347 1348 1349 1350 1351 1352 1353 1354 1355 1356 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 1370 1371 1372 1373 1374 1375 1376 1377 1378 1379 1380 1381 1382 1383 1384

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

117

Ralph E. Boyer Sikeston Lodge No, 310 Henry 1. Edinger Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Thomas H. Vinyard Po~egranate Lodge No. 95 Richard H. Heise Theo. Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 Paul Sibley Herculaneum Lodge No. 338 William K. Attebery, Sr Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Darrell G. Elam Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Rodney B. Leibengood Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Walter C. Harmack , Meridian Lodge No.2 Gail M. Jobe Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 A. Melvin Milam Westport Lodge No. 340 O. C. Winkler St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Warren L. Conner Moberly Lodge No. 344 John N. Warren Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Emmett Eo Gilbert Trinity Lodge No. 641 Clifford W. Andreasen Grandview Lodge No. 618 Eugene J. L. Breitenbach Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Eldie A. Clinton Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Freeman H. Cole Raytown Lodge No. 391 Donald L. Gregory Raytown Lodge No. 391 Charles C. Shoemaker Temple Lodge No. 299 Arthur M. Willian Marceline Lodge No. 481 Chester A. McAfee Marceline Lodge No. 481 Wallace R. Stonger Marceline Lodge No. 481 James T. Akers Marceline Lodge No. 481 Henry F. Emerson Morley Lodge No. 184 Morley Lodge No. 184 George K. Patterson Clifford W. Hodes Brentwood Lodge No. 616 John W. Kinman Maplewood IJodge No. 566 Julian M. Lattimore Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Eugene W. Eastin Brentwood Lodge No. 616 James A. Lawther Fulton Lodge No. 48 Chester S. King Mercer Lodge No. 35 Eugene E. Stacy Mercer Lodge No. 35 Virgil W. Slaughter Dockery Lodge No. 325 Roger A .. Seaton Grandview Lodge No. 618 Robert E. Feigenbaum Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 Livingston Lodge No. 51 Lewis R. Amick Russell A. Grosch '" .. Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 Levern li'. Wampler Wakanda Lodge No. 52 Paul W. Grimes Hardin Lodge No. 322 Eric L. Cowan Lambskin Lodge No. 460 Leonard J. Garrett Marlborough Lodge No. 569 Harry L. Rippetoe , Orient Lodge No. 546 James.r. Dumit Country Club Lodge No. 656 Robert R. Alley Westport Lodge No. 340 Kyle N. Page Parrott Lodge No. 308 William H. Luttrell. Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Vernon A. Evans De Soto Lodge No. 119 James D. Elliott De Soto Lodge No. 119 Emil A. Santschi. Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Wayne J. Duke " Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Keith R. Abernathy Lambskin Lodge No. 460 Donald A. Joslin , , Westport Lodge No. 340 Jesse S. Cass I vanhoe Lodge No. 446 John G. Henery Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Eugene F. Swope Rolla Lodge No. 213


118 • 1385 1386 1387 1388 1389 1390 1391 1392 1393 1394 1395 1396 1397 1398 1399 1400 1401 1402 1403 1404 1405 1406 1407 1408 1409 1410 1411 1412 1413 1414 1415 1416 1417 1418 1419 1420 1421 1422 1423 1424 1425 1426 1427 1428 1429 1430 1431 1432 '1433 1434 1435 1436 1437 1438 1439 1440 1441

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

Harry W. Warrings ...........•. We.st Gate Lodge No. 445 Alfred L. Gates California Lodge No. 183 Edward L. Piersol Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Paul L. Thompson Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Jewel W. Pike ....•.........•... King Hill Lodge No. 376 Robert W. Grimes Xenia Lodge No. 50 Charles T. Jones Rushville Lodge No. 238 Andrew A. McCory Brentwood Lodge No. 616 John H. Bender Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 Hobert E. Eaker Zalma Lodge No. 545 Samuel C. Bayless Cuba Lodge No. 312 Virgil L. Abbett St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Jewell H. Tiller St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Forrest L. Madden Dockery Lodge No. 325 Car I L. Miller Saline Lodge No. 226 Ruthford D. Smith Saline Lodge No. 226 William Dennert Overland Lodge No. 623 Carlyn N. McGuire Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Walter W. Repp, Sr Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 Jerry N. Kuhn Bosworth Lodge No. 597 Chesley E. McAfee Bosworth Lodge No. 597 Vernon M. Wohlgemuth Bosworth Lodge No. 597 George T. Cain Marlborough Lodge No. 569 Forrest G. Ward Marlborough Lodge No. 569 Lester C. Lucieer Marlborough Lodge No. 569 Emmett Stephenson Raytown Lodge No. 391 Albert L. Bohlen East Gate Lodge No. 630 Robert E. Kelley Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 William G. Spargo Algabil Lodge No. 544 Nathan L. Davis Benj. }'ranklin Lodge No. 642 James A. Dimitriades ~ Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 Julius T. Hausgen Joachim Lodge No. 164 Raymond Jeffords Wbeeling Lodge No. 434 Harley 1. Whaley Xenia Lodge No. 50 Charles F. Cook Erwin Lodge No. 121 Seymour Leventhal. St. Louis Lodge No. 20 Robert T. Wolken, Jr Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 John M. Cole, Sr., Ionic Lodge No. 154 George E. McEntire Bismarck Lodge No. 41 Virgil Foster Parrott Lodge No. 308 Kent N. Riffie Parrott Lodge No. 308 John W. Polley Zeredatha Lodge No. 189 Fred W. Greene Anchor Lodge No. 443 Robert M. Nail Tuscan Lodge No. 360 Allen C. Sodemann Tuscan Lodge No. 360 Eugene E. Darr Bismarck Lodge No. 41 Walter A. McFarland Tyro Lodge No. 12 Harold O. Grauel St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 Edison W. Ruhmann Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Kenneth M. Fields Canopy Lodge No. 284 Harry C. Dunham Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Frederick D. Michel Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Noel E. Walters Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Charles W. Powell ..............• Bismarck Lodge No. 41 Carl H. Pyle ..................• Pickering Lodge No. 472 William H. Barger .............• Dockery Lodge No. 325 Roland E. Vandall .............• York Lodge No. 563


1950 1442 1443 1444 1445 1446 1447 1448 1449 1450 1451 1452 1453 1454 1455 1456 1457 1458 1459 1460 1461 1462 1463 1464 1465 1466 1467 1468 1469 1470

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Lewis H. Large Merl E. Gladden Marion N. Duckworth Seymour L. Potter William E. Lewis Charles P. Woods Glenn G. Furber Robert J. Flair Joseph S. Cole Robert W. Lee Robert L. Burke Charles L. Dunn Aubrey W. French Glenn V~ Bulla Orrin L. Mark Walter A. Pfautsch George A. Moody Robert A. Jefferis Frank M. Shafer Hardie B. Whatley, Jr Merritt D. Boyle Ira A. McLean David W. Koogler John A. Danhakl. George W. Sheckells Jerry D. Richey Robert 1.1. Richey Paul E. Kelly Vernon R. Sigman

119

East Gate Lodge No. 630 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Independence Lodge No. 76 Independence Lodge No. 76 Northeast Lodge No. 643 Northeast Lodge No. 643 York Lodge No. 563 Kansas City Lodge No. 220 Northeast Lodge No. 643 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Charleston Lodge No. 407 ; .. Charleston Lodge No. 407 , Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377 Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Hope Lodge No. 251 Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Wayne Lodge No. 526 " . Carthage Lodge No. 197 Westport Lodge No. 340 South Gate Lodge No. 547 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Adair Lodge No. 366 Webb City Lodge No. 512 Webb City Lodge No. 512 Raytown Lodge No. 391 Raytown Lodge No. 391 York Lodge No. 563 Gate City Lodge No. 522.

SUBDIVISION I-SERIES A-RENEWALB

No. A 282 A 283 A 284 A 285 A 286 A 287 A 288 A 289 A 290 A 291 A 292 A 293 A 294 A 295 A 296 A 297 A 298 A 299 A 300 A 301 A 302 A 303 A 304 A 305

Name George R. Marts Camillus B. Waddell Jonah L. Lutes Benjamin F. Hembree Milton .T. Daily Grant A. Murry John R. Ward Virgil B. Atchley Charles J. Brockman Alfred A. Dunlap William R. Salyer ldds L. Garvey James R. Bryant Urcil DeW. Smith Arthur L. Jones John B. Dugmore James W. Skelly Garton J. Smith Wayne A. Sharp M. Fred Burrows Elasco D. Stricker Elmer F. Brown Earl Reynolds Fred A. Ueligger

Lodge Adair Lodge No. 366 Lexington Lodge No. 149 Ionic Lodge N.9. 154 Galena Lodge No. 515 Eureka Lodge No. 73 Westport Lodge No. 340 East Gate Lodge No. 630 McDonald Lodge No. 324 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Nodaway Lodge No. 470 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Shelbina Lodge No. 228 Hannibal Lodge No. 188 Tuscan Lodge No. 360 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Craig Lodge No. 606 Craft Lodge No. 287 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 Livingston Lodge No. 51 Lincoln Lodge No. 138


120 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Henry R. Turner Edwin H. Young Kenneth G. Chetwood William B. Vaught Robert B. Meier Avery W. Griffey Elmer E. Siefert Robert E. Michael, Jr George C. Lichty Andrew T. young Clyde Williams George 1. Downing Victor E. Mottert Israel R. Coen .. " George R. Duncanson A. Lincoln Greene Maurice E. Flentie Virgil D. Allison William R. Kyle Joseph L. Lewis George E. Mottert Rolla A. Hemphill David E. Weiss James W. Dunford Lloyd E. Marsden Frank E. Markillie Robert H. Gaunt William W. Forrester Lawson M. Branham Charles H. Perkins Walter E. M. Reitman Sylvan A. Barton Levi C. Grumbine Charles S. Smarr Louis G. Stovall Ernest rr. Niswonger William L. House Leonard W. Brown Milton C. Smith Vernie G. Fisher N. Kenneth Simmons William P. Mathews Arthur C. Mothershead Cecil F. Montgomery Delbert C. Johnson Alfred F. Hermeling Rayford B. Thomas

,

1950

Hebron Lodge No. 354 Good Hope Lodge No. 218 Grandview Lodge No. 618 Grandview Lodge No. 618 Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Joachim Lodge No. 164 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Joachim Lodge No. 164 Wakanda Lodge No. 52 Meramec Lodge No. 313 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Westport Lodge No. 340 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Meramec Lodge No. 313 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 Rolla Lodge No. 213 Orient Lodge No. 546 East Gate Lodge No. 630 East Gate Lodge No. 630 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Forest Park Lodge No. 578 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Jamesport Lodge No. 564 Wayne Lodge No. 526 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Friendship Lodge No. 89 Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Orient Lodge No. 546 Independence Lodge No. 76 Alpha Lodge No. 659 Compass Lodge No. 120 Puxico Lodge No. 596 Equality Lodge No. 497 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Schell City Lodge No. 448

SUBDIVISION I-SERIES B-:"-RENEWALS

No. B 1 B 2 B 3 B 4 B 5 B 6

Name Anthony F. Ittner William J. Craig Erwin A. Hammann Freelon K. Hadley F. Ernest Carter Archie L. Fox

Lodge Missouri Lodge No.1 Gate of the Temple No. 422 America Lodge No. 347 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Temple Lodge No. 299 Rural Lodge No. 316


1950 B 7

B 8

B 9 B 10 B11 B 12 B 13 B14 B 15 B 16 B 17 B 18 B 19 B 20 B 21 B 22 B 23 B 24 B 25 .B 26 B 27 B 28 B 29 B 30 B 31 B 32 B 33 B 34 B 35 B 36 B 37 B 38 B 39 B 40 B 41 B 42 B 43

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Wilbur P. Schnider Fred O. Wade Charles W. Werdein Eugene T. McCullough Frederick E. Kiefer Charles W. Chaney George W. Reeves Stanley Horn Louis F. Dahn Brace E. Kitchell Charles D. Sifford Vernon V. Goslee Ernest B. Kitchell Perry O. Sansberry Claude R. White Joseph H. Anway William H. Cox George M. McAninch Charles B. Whitchurch Joseph M. Cross Arthur W. Rauch Odell Colley Arno C. Cooper, Sr William D. Rogers John L. 0 'Brien Harry F. Heron Ralph M. Mitchell Bruce H. Hunt Louis H. Relsher Gel'vis H. Thurman Julius R. Edwards Sidney E. Barr George H. Davis Robert L. Fowlkes John B. Prosser Curtis F. Smith Francis S. Turner

Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Friend Lodge No. 352 Canopy Lodge No. 284 Canopy Lodge No. 284 Triangle Lodge No. 638 Temple Lodge No. 299 Lebanon Lodge No. 77 Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Skidmore r,odge No. 511 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Fa~rmont Lodge No. 290 Jewel Lodge No. 480 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Cache Lodge No. 416 Cache Lodge No. 416 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 West Gate Lodge No. 445 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 r vanhoe Lodge No. 446 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Adair Lodge No. 366 Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Centralia Lodge No. 59 Wayne Lodge No. 526 Lambskin Lodge No. 460 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Jacoby Lodge No. 447 Marlborough Lodge No. 569

SUBDIVISION

N o. 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95

Name Lowell R. Scott Edward R. Cox Charles W. Schafer Frank W. Randolph Samuel C. Bayless John McLeod J. Ovid Crook Millard N. Smythe Albert E. Loehr Jacob Bierman Rex L. Brooks Reuben C. Heim Weaver F. Conlin Jewell R. Tiller William D. Rogers Marion C. Harris

121

2

Lodge United Lodge No. 5 Carroll Lodge No. 249 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Joplin Lodge No. 335 Cuba Lodge No. 312 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Adair Lodge No. 366 Westport Lodge No. 340 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Cosmos Lodge No. 282 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Missouri Lodge No. 1 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Moberly Lodge No. 344


122

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Virgil L. Abbett St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Sidney E. Barr Wayne Lodge No. 526 William E. Harris ..•............. Grandin Lodge No. 579 99 Fred young University Lodge No. 649 100 Ray Neff St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 101 William K. Attebery, Sr Maplewood Lodge No. 566 102 John H. Yingling Gate City Lodge No. 522 96

97 98

RESOLUTIONS RELATIVE TO RELIEF AND CHARITY

Rt. 'Vor. Bro. Cornelius Struble presented the following resolutions, which were adopted: RESOLUTION

Be It Resolved; that the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home be, and they are, hereby authorized and directed to use such portion of the dues payable to the Masonic Home, in accordance with Section 74 of the By-Laws, as they may deem prudent and proper, for the relief of indigent Master Masons, their widows and orphans, either at the Masonic Home or elsewhere, and regardless of whether the beneficiary would be eligible for admission to the Masonic Home or not, and to transfer such amounts as the Board may deem advisable to the Committee on Relief and Charity for such purposes; HARRY F. SUNDERLAND, P. G. M. SOLON CAMERoN, P. G. M. CoRNELIUS D. STRUBLE,

M. E. EWING, P. G. M. V. DENSLOW, P. G. M.

RAY

RESOLUTION

Be It Resolved; that the Ways and Means Committee, by and with the consent of the Grand Master, be authorized, the funds of the Grand Lodge being available, to transfer to the Committee on Relief and Charity from time to time, moneys from the general fund for the operation and maintenance of the Committee on Relief and Charity, not exceeding the sum of $20,000.00. HARRY F. SUNDERLAND, P. G. M. M. E. EWING, P. G. M. ARTHUR D. NORDBERG, CORNELIUS D. STRUBLE, RAY V. DENSLOW, P. G.

M.

ELEOTION OF OFFIOERS

The tellers appointed by Grand Master Bradford were announced, and the following officers were elected for ·1950-1951 : RAY BOND ••••••••••••••••••••• • M.

Wor. Grand Master L. FERGUSON ••••• • R. Wor. Deputy Grand Master RICHARD O. RUMER .•.••• . R. Wor. Senior Grand Warden JAMES McBRAYER SELLERS . . R. Wor. Junior Grand Warden EDMUND E. MORRIS .•..••.••••• R. Wor. Grand Treasurer HAROLD L. READER .••••..••••.• • R. Wor. Grand Secretary HOMER


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

123

ELECTION OF DmECTORS OF THE MASONIC HOME

In addition to the first four Grand Officers, the following brethren were elected Directors of the Masonic Home: For For For For For

term term term term term

ending ending ending ending ending

1951 1952 1953 1954 1955

'.'

Arthur Nordberg T. W. Cotton ,Morris E. Ewing Elmer W. Wagner ,Cornelius D. Struble

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BOARDS OF RELIEF

M. Wor. Bro. Harris C. Johnston, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Boards of Relief which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most WorShipful GraniJ Lodge, A. F. 4' A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Boards of Relief has received reports from the Boards of Relief in St. Louis, Springfield, Kansas City, St. Joseph and 'the St. Louis Masonic Employment Bureau. We have read these reports carefully and note an increase in the number of funerals held for transients over last year. In St. Louis burials were held for thirty-eight brethren who were members of lodges in fifteen states and the Canal Zone. Springfield had six burials; Kansas City held burials for twenty-one from fifteen states; St. Joseph burials numbered five, coming from five different states. The total number of burials held this year was seventy compared with a total of forty-two last year. The work of the St. Louis Masonic Board of Relief has shown an increase during the past fiscal year. Four hundred and forty-four new cases have been handled by the Board and eleven cases carried over from previous years, making a total of four hundred and fifty-six, an increase of nineteen over last year. The cases are classified as follows: clandestine lodge-one; expelled members-four; frauds-eight; hospital cases-thirty-two; investigations made for St. Louis Lodges-one hundred and twenty; receipt reported lost-thirty-five; persons reported missing-four; applicants residing outside the jurisdiction of Board-one; applicants having no Masonic claims -twenty; suspended--eleven; applicants who did not know Masonic affiliations-nine; unworthy-six; applicants who withdrew requestsone; applicants found to be worthy-one hundred ninety-one. There are seven hundred and twenty calls registered by the office, an increase of one hundred and twenty-eight over the past year. The St. Louis Lodges were called upon to conduct services for the following thirty-eight transients: June 27, 1949-George J. Koch, Jr., Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City, Mo., by George Washington Lodge No.9. July 9, 1949-Jack Breman, Sibert Lodge, Gatun, C. Z., by Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. -July 27, 1949-Phil. J. Tennant, Perfect Square Lodge No. 526, Riteman, Ia., by West Gate Lodge No. 445. August 2, 1949-Fred R. Geiger, Kensington Lodge No. 804, Chicago, Ill., by Cornerstone Lodge No. 323.


124

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

August 4, 1949-Homer Rhodes, Trowel Lodge No. 440, Marble Hill, Mo., by Pomegranate Lodge No. 95. August 13, 1949-Adolph L. Kurtz, United Lodge No.5, Springfield, Mo., by America Lodge No. 347. (Services by Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40.) August 18, 1949-Harry G. Campbell, Moline Lodge No. 1014, Moline, Ill., by Naphtali Lodge No. 25. August 25, 1949-Hcrbert W. Williams, Halcyon Lodge No. 498, Cleveland, Ohio, by University Lodge No. 649. August 30, 1949-Charles W. Beeson, McAllen Lodge No. 1110, McAllen, Texas, by Occidental Lodge No. 163. September 10, 1949-Ivan Rouse, Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Bonne Terre, Mo., by Paul Revere Lodge No.. 330. September 19, 1949-Ernest Bradley, Central Lodge No. 673, Central City, Ky., by Pyramid Lodge No. 180. October 4, 1949-Wm. C. Beardon, Bigheart Lodge No. 486, Barnsdall, Okla., by Trinity Lodge No. 641. October 27, 1949-0wen E. Highland, Ft. Gratoit Lodge No. 374, Port Huron, Mich., by Shaveh Lodge No. 646. November 1, 1949-Fred Knickmeyer, Easter Lodge No. 575, St. Clair, Mo., by Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40. (Services by Progress Lodge No. 657 for America Ilodge No. 347.) November 4, 1949-Harrison E. Powell, Equity Lodge No. 878, Chicago, Ill., by Anchor Lodge No. 443. November 16, 1949-Curtis B. Newton, St. Johns Lodge No. 25, Omaha, Nebr., by Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642. December 2, 1949-H. H. Kreftmeyer, Humboldt, Lodge No. 42, Terre Haute, Ind., by Tuscan Lodge No. 360. December 13, 1949-Charles Reichman, Trinity Lodge No. 12, New York, N. Y., by Apollo Lodge No. 529. (Services by Pilgrim Lodge No. 652.) December 5, 1949-James M. Shy, St. Marks Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau, Mo., by Polar Star Lodge No. 79. (Services by Olive Branch Lodge No. 576.) December 16, 1949-Jules J. Wehrli, Rock Lodge No. 513, Tulsa, Okla., by Beacon Lodge No.3. (Services by Anchor Lodge No. 443.) January 1, 1950-Samuel C. Scott, Siloam Lodge No. 276, Oklahoma City, Okla., by Aurora Lodge No. 267. January 24, 1950-Herman J. Conrad, Hudson Lodge No. 71, Hoboken, N. J., by Lambskin Lodge No. 460. January 26, 1950-Wm. E. Palmer, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield, Mo., by Meridian Lodge No.2. February 1, 1950-Nelson Dale, St. Andrews Lodge No. 96, Shelbyville, Mo., by Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661. February 18, 1950-August Paul Broccard, Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia, Mo., by Itaska Lodge No. 420. February 8, 1950-Philip J. Somerlad, Piasa Lodge No. 27, Alton, Ill., by Olive Branch Lodge No. 576. February 28, 1950-Olin Pollock, Wisconsin Lodge No. 13, Milwaukee, Wis., by Forest Park Lodge No. 578. March 13, 1950-Chas. C. Ford, Malta Lodge No. 465, Grand Rapids, Mich., by Erwin Lodge No. 121. March 5, 1950-Henry Miller, Friendship Lodge No. 89, Chillicothe, Mo., by Missouri Lodge No. 1. April 2, 1950-Nelson E. Wilson, Plumbersville Lodge No. 253, Plumbersville, Ark., by Cosmos Lodge No. 282 (Services by Euclid Lodge No. 505.) April 17, 1950-Joseph W. Yerkes, Syracuse Lodge No. 309, Syracuse, Kan., by Clifton Heights Lodge No. 620.


1950

125

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

April 19, 1950-S01. Pugh, Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City, Mo., by Cache Lodge No: 416. May 6, 1950-Douglas E. Crowell, Integrity Lodge No. 997, Chicago, Ill., by Rose Hill Lodge No. 550. June 12, 1950-W. H. Howard, Owensville Lodge No. 624, Owensville, Mo., by Keystone Lodge No. 243. St. Louis County Lodges: August 2, 1949-Frank L. MeHaffey, Albert Pike Lodge No. 303, Wichita, Kans., by Kirkwood Lodge No. 484. December 23, 1949-Jessie E. Torres, Cherryvale Lodge No. 137, Cherryvale, Kans., by Bridgeton Lodge No. 80. Four graves were opened in the Board of Relief lot in Valhalla Cemetery for the following members: No. 1I3-Fred Back, Beacon Lodge No.3, St. Louis. No. 114-C. B. Newton, St. Johns Lodge No. 25, Omaha, Nebr. No. 115-Jos. Wm. Yerkes, Syracuse Lodge No. 309, Syracuse, Kan. No. 116-James L. Baehr, Star in the East Lodge No. 166, Rockford, Ill. Note-Funerals omitted. May 15, 1950-Fred Carl Birk, Craft Lodge No. 287, Canton, Mo., by Harmony Lodge No. 499. May 20, 1950-J. L. Baehr, Star in the East Lodge No. 166, Rockford, Ill., by Triangle Lodge No. 638. FINANCIAL STATEMENT

Cash on hand July 2, 1949

$

910.09

RECEIPTS

By dividend donation initiation interest sale of stock refunds

. . . . . .

$

2.50 50.00 4,367.00 37.50 177.00 1,348.71

5,982.71 $ 6,892.80

DISBURSEMENTS

To card index Flowers and funerals insurance-office equipment office rent postage, printing, stationery, etc President's expense refund relief repairs-office equipment safe deposit salaries telephone and telegrams withholding tax

. $ 10.00 . 288.35 . 52.64 . 360.00 . 215.45 . 150.00 . 5.00 . 1,646.60 . 29.50 6.00 . . 1,128.50 . 431.33 . 85.50

4,408.87

.

$ 2,483.93

Moneys invested in War Bonds Moneys on deposit, United Bank and Trust Company

. .

$ 8,088.50

Total moneys on hand July 1, 1950

.

$10,572.43

Working Capital of Board July 1, 1950 RECONCILIATION OF ACCOUNTS

2,483.93


126

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Moneys on hand property Grand Lodge Charity Fund-Posey Moneys on hand property Grand Lodge Charity Fund-Sigfred

$

7.50 187.50

180.00

Actual Worth of Board July 1, 1950

$10,384.93

Our sincere thanks go to our officers and members who have been helpful throughout the year and to all the St. Louis and St. Louis County Lodges. Respectfully submitted, Attest, HARRY SCHULZ, President. Harry Becker, Sem-etwry. ANNUAL REPORT OF SPRINGFIELD MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1950 RECEIPTS July 1, 1949, Cash in checking account at Union Nat'l Bank. . July 1, 1949, U. S. Government Bond No. 7598J . September 15, 1949, Interest on U. S. Gov't Bond No. 7598 March 15, 1950, Interest on U. S. Gov't Bond No. 7598 .. June 6, 1950, Received from Hurley Lodge No. 55, A. F. and A. M., Hurley, N. M . Total Receipts

$

389.99 500.00 5.00 5.00 25.00

$

924.99

$

899.99

$

899.99

DISBURSEMENTS May 31,1950 To Freeman V. Thompson, Member Hurley Lodge No. 55, A. F. & A. M., Hurley, New Mexico, relief . Total amount in U. S. Gov't Bond and Treasury

25.00

RECAPITULATION June 30, 1950 Invested in U. S. Gov't Bond No. 7598J $500.00 June 30, 1950 Cash in checking account Union Nat 'I. .. 399.99

Several cases of assistance have been rendered to transient Brothers, checking of facts relative to Brothers of other Lodges elsewhere and forwarding same to Lodges, and the following Masonic Funeral Services have been conducted for transient Brothers during the year: FUNERALS December 12, 1949-James Walker Erwin, Member Clifton Lodge No. 463, A. F. & A. M., Thayer, Mo. Masonic Funeral Service conducted by Solomon Lodge No. 271; burial in Hazelwood Cemetery. March 22, 1950-William Clayton Chamberlin, Member Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, A. F. & A. M., Independence, Mo.; Masonic Funeral Service conducted by United Lodge No.5; burial in Maple Park Cemetery. March 31, 1950-Richard Ray Robinson, Member Forsyth Lodge No. 453, A. F. & A. M., Forsyth, Mo.; Masonic Funeral Service conducted by Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422; burial in Eastlawn Cemetery. April 7, 1950-Columbus M. Plummer, Member Cold Springs Lodge No. 274, A. F. & A. M., Leeton, Mo.; Masonic Funeral Service conducted by Solomon Lodge No. 271; burial in Eastlawn Cemetery.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

127

May 18, 1950-John Almus 0 'Brien, Member Fraternity Lodge N 0.1111, A. F. & A. M., EI Paso, Texas; Masonic Funeral Service conducted by United Lodge No.5; burial in Greenlawn Cemetery. May 22, 1950-Samuel O. Ferguson, Member Chamois Lodge No. 185, A. F. & A. M., Chamois, Mo.; Masonic Funeral Service conducted by Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422; burial in Eastlawn Cemetery. BERT S. LEE, President, M. F. SMITH, Secretary. KANSAS CITY MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF REPORT YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1950 RECEIPTS Balance July 1 . . . . . . . . .. Fraternal Assistance $ 113.00 Flowers for sick and funerals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75.50 Telegrams ;.......... 8.80 Refund on President's Exp. 2.50

$ 6,979.31

199.80 $ 7,179.11

DISBURSEMENTS Fraternal Assistance Flowers for sick and funerals Burial Expense President's Exp. to Convention Secretary's Salary Stationery and Postage Miscellaneous Expense Telephone and Telegrams Balance in Bank June 30, 1950

. . . . . . . .

$

241.50 65.50 50.00 150.00 1,200.00 13.13 24.50 31.98

1,776.61 $ 5,402.50

The officers are the same as last year. No assessment was made for 1949路1950. We have' had the usual number of calls for relief and charity. Also the regular calls by telephone for information on various SUbjects: applications of Masonic Home, hospital cases, blood donors and. investigation of applicants for reinstatements. SOJOURNER FUNERALS Bro. Warren B. Franklin, late member of Lotus Lodge, No. 286, Lotus, Kansas. Bro. Walker T. Hatton, late member of Cass Lodge, No. 147. Masonic service by East Gate Lodge, No. 630. Bro. John E. Franklin, late member of Warren G. Harding Lodge, No. 39, Washington, D. C. Masonic service by Rural Lodge, No. 316. Bro. Clarence H. Williams, late member of Ravenwood Lodge, No. 20l. Masonic service by Kansas City Lodge, No. 220. Bro. Harley Nilson, late member of Luther Lodge, No. 370, Luther, Michigan. Masonic service by Albert Pike Lodge, No. 219. Bro. Oscar Short, late member of Sweet Home Lodge, No. 461. Masonic service by Kansas City Lodge, No. 220. Bro. Frank R. Dunham, late member of Morningside Lodge, No. 615, Sioux City, Iowa. Masonic service by East Gate Lodge, No. 630. Bro. Harry J. Reinhardt, late member of Xenia Lodge, No. 49, Xenia, Ohio. No Masonic service. Bro. Monte S. May, late member of Memphis Lodge, No. 118. Masonic service by Gate City Lodge, No. 522.


128

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Bro. Luther H. Marshall, late member of Shelbina Lodge, No. 228, Shelbina, Missouri. Masonic service by Swope Park Lodge, No. 617. Bro. Edgar M. Chaney, late member of Concord Lodge, No. 206, Watertown, South Dakota. Masonic service by Kansas City Lodge, No. 220. Bro. Virgil M. Draper, late member of Stephen Decatur Lodge, No. 979, Decatur, Illinois. Masonic service by Temple Lodge, No. 299. Bro. Lewis 1. Viall, late member of Fidelity Lodge, No. 51,' David City, Nebraska. Masonic service was authorized but the plans were changed. Bro. Virace S. Potter, late meniber of Pentagon Lodge, No. 1080, Fort Worth, Texas. Masonic service by Orient Lodge, No. 546. Bro. Maxmillian E. DeShaffon, late member of Pike Lodge, No. 399, Curryville, Missouri. Masonic service by Kansas City Lodge. No. 220. (This Brother missed the 100 year mark by one day.) Bro. Ernest L. Brundrett, late member of Potter Lodge, No. 441, Philadelphia, Pa. Masonic service by York Lodge, No. 563. Bro. Dr. Harold V. Cordry, late member of Cooper Lodge, No. 36, Boonville, Mo. Masonic service by Country Club Lodge, No. 656. Bro. Charles A. Robinson, Sr., late member of Joplin Lodge, No. 335, Joplin, Mo. Masonic service by Ivanhoe Lodge, No. 446. Bro. John R. Wear, late member of Pulaski Heights Lodge, No. 673, Little Rock, Ark. Masonic service by Ivanhoe Lodge, No. 446. Bro. Arthur D. Ticknor, late member of Golden Rule Lodge, No. 90, Topeka, Kansas. Masonic service by Northeast Lodge, No. 643. Bro. Fred C. Somers, late member of Valley Falls Lodge, No. 226, Merrill, Wisconsin. Masonic service by Country Club Lodge, No. 656. . In conclusion, I wish to say that the cooperation of the Lodges in Kansas City has made it possible to do this work. There are far too many members who are not aware of the great amount of good done for the Fraternity by the work of the Boards of Relief throughout the United States and Canada. Fraternally submitted, EDWIN W. ERNEST, See'y.-Treas. MA.SONIC BOARD OF .RELIEF, ST. JOSEPH

9,

MO.

To the Most Worshipful Grmnd Lodge, A. F. go A .. M. of Missouri: I herewith submit the Annual Report of the St. Joseph Masonic Board of Relief for the year ending August 31, 1950: . Since our last report, the Board has arranged for the following Masonic funerals, viz.: Emil Jonson, Friendship Lodge No. 239, Chapman, Nebraska, on October 22, 1949, Charity Lodge No. 331 officiating. Wm. A. Schroeder, Rochester Lodge No. 21, Rochester, Minnesota, on October 28, 1949, Zeredetha Lodge No. 189 officiating. R. W. Berndt, Pentagon Lodge No. 1080, Dallas, Texas, on November 19, 1949, St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 officiating. Sam Polsky, Seminole City Lodge No. 476, Seminole, O~lahoma, on January 24, 1950, St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 officiating. Oscar V. Lindley, Rainier Lodge No. 189, Seattle, Washington, on June 20, 1950, Charity Lodge No. 331 officiating. As in former years, the Board continues its membership in the Masonic Relief Association, United States and Canada. The Annual Meeting of the Board was held at the Masonic Temple on January 16, 1950, at which time the following officers were elected: Albert H. Jones (376) Barnet Springsted (189) Herbert H. Powell (351) Orestes Mitchell, Jr. (331)

President Vice-President Treasurer ' Secretary


1950

129

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

The Board has had a number of requests for information as to location of Lodges and requests for Masonic courtesies, all of which were complied with. There have been no calls for financial relief by any transient member of the Craft. The Board continues its efforts to publicize the loss of dues receipt cards. Our bank balance as of August 31, 1950, is $343.83. Receiptc-Interest $3.57. Disbursements-Miscellaneous operating expenses-$32.00. Respectfully submitted, ORESTES MITCHELL, JR., Secretary. MASONIC EMPLOYMENT BUREAU OF ST. LOUIS

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. go A. M. of Missouri: GREETINGS: The Officers of the Masonic Employment Bureau of St. Louis and St. Louis County are very happy to report at the closing of its 55th consecutive year June 30, 1950, the Service continues to increase and show more favor among the Employing Public. Our Placements again show an increase over the previous year--476 as against 402 for last year. These Placements consisted of 150 Master Masons; 24 Wives; 8 Widows; 79 Daughters; 86 Minor Sons; 10 Sisters and 3 Mothers of Master Masons, including 6 DeMolay Boys and 2 Job Daughters. The monthly earnings of those placed amounted to $834,110.00. These earnings very forcibly emphasize the importance of the Employment Service by reason of the fact that if the Brethren and their Dependents whom we placed had secured these same positions through the Fee Agencies, it would have cost them approximately $50,818.00 in fees. We feel this one feature alone fully justifies the Bureau's eristence, proving that it is not only fulfilling, but accomplishing the purpose for which it was organized. Our one problem still remains-lack of qualified Applicants to fill the many requests coming to us. All best wishes to the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge for success during the coming 129th Annual Communication. FINANCIAL STATEMENT

Balance in Bank June 30, 1949

$

965.90

RECEIPTS

Per Capita Tax Interest on Bonds Sale of Old Office Chairs

. . .

$ 8,986.55 12.50 15.00 $ 9,014.05

Total Cash

$ 9,014.05 $ 9,979.95

DISBURSEMENTS

Salaries Postage Rent Telephone Printing, Stationery & Supplies Auto Expense Organization Membership Dues Insurance Equipment-Replacement and Repairs Appropriated for Public Relations

. . . . . . . . . .

$ 5,709.51

142.32 660.00 360.49 183.20 420.00 40.00 70.22 139.68 700.00


130

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Miscellaneous-Petty Cash

.

207.18 $ 8,632.60

$ 8,632.60 $ 1,347.35

Cash in Bank Cash on hand-Petty Cash .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. S. Bonds

$ 1,317.35

30.00

$ 1,347.35 '................................

Total Cash and Bonds June 30, 1950

$ 1,347.35 1,500.00

$ 2,847.35 Fraternally submitted, JOHN F. SABIS, President.

Fraternally submitted,

H. C. JOHNSTON, Chatirman. JESSE MOORE, ELMER W. WAGNER, J. W. SKELLY, CHARLES McCLELLAN. PROPOSED AMENDMENT RELATIVE TO EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

The following amendment was proposed and referred to the J urisprudence Committee: September 26, 1950 Be It Resolv~d: That the Grand Lodge By-Laws be altered and amended as set out hereinafter, to-wit: That Section No. 197 (p. 52) Employment Bureau, be altered by striking out the words "three thousand dollars," in line twelve, and in lieu thereof, insert the words "six thousand dollars"; so that when altered and amended said Section No. 197 will read as follows: "Sec. 197. Employment Bureau. In cities where there are twenty or more Lodges, and in areas where thirty or more Lodges have concurrent jurisdiction, each Lodge shall appoint or elect one of its members, who shall constitute a General Employment Bureau, whose duty shall be to aid unemployed members to secure employment. Such Bureau shall adopt rules for its government; and each lodge in such city or area shall contribute the sum of thirty cents per capita per annum to the Employment Bureau, such contribution to be calculated on, and payable with, the annual Grand Lodge returns. Provided, that no contributions shall be called for when the amount on hand exceeds the sum of six thousand dollars. Such Bureau shall employ :1 Secretary and maintain a permanent office, where applicants may apply for employment." H. C. JOHNSTON, Chatirman, JESSE MOORE, ELMER W. WAGNER, J. W. SKELLY, CRAS. W. McCLELLAN.

REPORT OF WELFARE COMMITTEE

M. Wor. Brother J. W. Skelly presented the report of the Welfare Committee, which was adopted and is as follows:


1950

131

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

To the Most Worshipful Gra;nit Lodge, A. F. 4" A. M. of Missowi: BRETHR.EN: Assistance has been given to twenty-six Lodges, representing 4 couples, .14 men and 15 women, a total of 37 persons. Total amount paid for relief $3,045.00. SUMMARY

OF

FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED DURING

Balance on Hand October 1, 1949 . Received from Grand Lodge . Received from Pyramid Lodge No. 180, Refund allowance made for F. W. Rueblinger 9-1-50 ..

$

THE

YEAR

466.18 2,800.00 7.50

$ 3,273.68 Paid for Relief Balance on Hand at close of the year

$ 3,273.68 3,045.50 $

228.18

The following is a list of Lodges assisted, with the names of the person, or persons, for whom appropriations were made, and the amount of the appropriation. Canopy Lodge No. 284, for Clarence Hadley Carthage Lodge No. 197, for Clarence Kester Dockery Lodge No. 325, for August J. Brooks and wife Eldorado Lodge No. 318, for Mrs. Luella Buckley Euclid Lodge No. 505, for Louis Henry Schmidt Fellowship Lodge No. 345, for J. Spencer Roberts & wife Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for Mrs. George Ransdell Itaska Lodge No. 420, for Mrs. William Ward Itaska Lodge No. 420, for August Roettger and wife Itaska Lodge No. 420, for Mrs. Margaret Fath Jasper Lodge No. 398, for Homer C. Gulick Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, for Mrs. Ethel Harper Lakeville Lodge No. 489, for Mrs. Elsie Norman Lakeville Lodge No. 489, for Barnett J. Smith Magnolia Lodge No. 626, for Mrs. Ella Mae Hollmann Osage Lodge No. 303, for Murray C. Earhart Osage Lodge No. 303, for F. Lee Ewing Pyramid Lodge No. 180, for John G. Faudree Pyramid Lodge No. 180, for Mrs. Sadie Krone Pyramid Lodge No. 180, for F. W. Rueblinger Ralls Lodge No. 33, for Arah J. Rice Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, for PhilipWm. Price Salem Lodge No. 225, for William J. Jones St. Louis Lodge No. 20, for Mrs. Josephine Baptiste Strafford Lodge No. 608, for Mrs. Emma Haines Summersville Lodge No. 555, for M. W. Pittmann Twilight Lodge No. 114, for Mrs. George Long Vienna Lodge No. 94, for Walter C. Ragan Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, for Mrs. Sylvester Annan West Gate Lodge No. 445, for Mrs. Louise Morris Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. Joseph Daniels Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. William Polk To Leo Tout and wife, former member of Springhill Lodge No. Defunct

$

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, .

70.00 175.00 300.00 60.00 180.00 60.00 115.00 180.00 120.00 120.00 45.00 150.00 25.00 25.00 150.00 250.00 30.00 30.00 22.50 90.00 25.00 90.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 45.00 60.00 88.00 60.00 120.00 60.00 60.00

$3,045.50


132

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

Reviewing the records of your Welfare Committee for the eleven years last past, as stated last year, we find an annual decrease in demands of an average of a little more than five hundred dollars for thâ&#x201A;Ź first five years. Since that time requests for aid have gradually increased to the present year, in which demands are more numerous than formerly, which indicates that we are now on a continual ascending scale. All applications for assistance have had careful consideration, and in cooperation with the Lodge making the request, the Committee has furnished relief in such measure as was deemed needful and meritorious. The Committee has given consideration to an extension of outside relief as rcommcnded in the report of the.Jurisprudence Committee, when additional funds are provided by the Grand Lodge, under proper rules providing for fraternal care to worthy distressed persons, with safeguards to prevent a repetition of the experience of other welfare boards which have been overwhelmed with applications. TOLMAN W. COTTON, Chairman, JAMES W. SKELLY, DUVAL SMITH, MARTIN B. DICKINSON, ARTHUR D. NORDBERG.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MASONIC DISTRICTS

M. Vifor. Brother Skelly presented the report of the Committee on Masonic District,,; which was referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. The report is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. f A. M. of Mis.'1ouri: BRETHREN: Your special committee, appointed by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, February 15, 1950, to consider the present division of the Grand Jurisdiction of Missouri into administrative and ritual districts, which arrangement is currently reported to be unsatisfactory for various reasons, after careful consideration recommends a return to the former system of Districts, with administrative and ritual districts to be coincident, the single exception being the City of St. Louis, and with provision for future changes when deemed desirable. The Committee therefore recommends the following changes in the amendment to Section 27, Grand Lodge By-Laws, submitted at the 1949 Session of the Grand Lodge, and shown on page 130 of the Proceedings, to-wit: Strike out" such number of Masonic Districts as may, from time to time, be ordered by the Grand Lodge," and substitutâ&#x201A;Ź therefor the following: "fifty-nine Masonic Districts, bearing the same numbers and having the same boundaries as shown in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge for 1945, provided, that hereafter, from time to time, the Grand Master, with the concurrence of the Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, .Junior Grand Warden and Grand Lecturer or any three of them, may determine the number of Districts and the boundaries of Districts," 80 that the amendment as amended shall read, SEC. 27. Masonic Districts. The Grand- Jurisdiction of Missouri shall be divided into fifty-nine Masonic Districts, bearing the same numbers and having the same boundaries as shown in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge for 1945, provided,_ that hereafter, from time to time, the Grand Master, with the concurrence of the Deputy


1950

133

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, Junior Grand Warden and Grand Lecturer or any three of them, may determine the number of Districts and the boundaries of Districts, such determination to be in writing filed with the Grand Secretary and reported by the Grand Master to the Grand Lodge at its next Annual Communication. For each District there shall be appointed and commissioned by the Grand Master, a District Deputy Grand Master, who must be a Past or present Master of a Lodge in this Grand Jurisdiction, a member of a lodge in said District, and a resident of said District or of an adjoining District in this State. Districts which ha.ve, or may hereafter have, forty or more lodges shall have two District Deputy Grand Masters of equal rank over separate divisions of such District. The Grand Master may convene the District Deputy Grand Masters in regional conference at such time as he may deem best, the expense of such meeting to be defrayed by the Grand Lodge. No District Deputy Grand Master, so appointed shall serve for more than five consecutive years. M. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg, who is a member of the Committee, offered valuable suggestions, but being Chairman of the Jurisprudence Committee, to which this amendment Will be referred, he did not sit with the Committee and does not sign this report. Sincerely and fraternally submitted, JAMES W. SKELLY, Chairman, SOLON CAMERON, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, HAROLD L. READER. PRESENTATION OF M. WOR. BROTHER DONNELL'S JEWEL

M. Wor. Brother Skelly reported that in the President's office in

1ATashington, President Truman, assisted by M. Wor. Brother Skelly, presented to M. 'Vor. Brother Donnell his Past Grand Master's Jewel. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

Rt. Wor. Bro. Lee Barger presented the report of the Committee on Chartered Lodges, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M., of Missouri: BRETHREN: After a consideration of the returns of chartered lodges, your Committee desires to make the following report: STATISTIOAL Number of Chartered Lodges,September 10, 1950 Number of Lodges U. D. Total Number . R路aised Affiliated R~:dnstated

Total additions LESS: Total Number Dimitted Deaths

595 2 5120 848 950 6918 907 2008


134

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Suspended: N. P. D Suspended: U. M. C. Expelled

2512 6 8 5441

Net Gain Total Membership

1477 113,801 COMMENTS

It will be noted that the net gain this year is considerably less than for the last several years, which is no doubt due to the automatic suspension law which is now in effect. The suspensions for non-payment of dues this year are more than three times greater than last year. Possibly many of these already have or will soon re-instate by payment of delinquent dues. If the number of suspensions had been in the same proportion as last year we would have had a net gain of approximately the same as last year which was 3,330. However, this is not a criticism of the automatic suspension law, because we believe the brethren that have been somewhat negligent in paying their dues will soon learn the necessity for promptness and pay on time, relieving the Secretaries of additional needless work, which will tend to a more healthy condition. RECOMMENDATIONS

Inasmuch as nothing was submitted last year for the consideration of this Committee this year, we have nothing to report from that source. However, we feel it is our duty to call attention to the disregard of the officers of many lodges to Sections 48 and 49 of our By-Laws. Approximately 200 lodges have not met the requirements of these Sections. Section 48 requires the Masonic Home fee to be remitted to the Grand Secretary within 30 days of the time that the candidate is accepted and in no case wait until the annual returns are made. Likewise Section 49 which refers to the George Washington National Memorial requires the same procedure. We recommend that all Secretaries take due notice of these Sections and carefully follow the requirements thereof. IN CONCLUSION

Freemasonry in Missouri seems to be in a healthy and flourishing condition with most lodges working and active, despite the confused and unsettled world conditions. Should our worst fears become a realization and it is necessary for our country to enter a conflict, world wide, to prevent the hated philosophy of Communism from engulfing the world, the challenge to Freemasonry would possibly be greater than at any other period in its long history. Freemasonry, as always, will not be found lacking in its sacrifices to protect the ideals of democracy and freedom for all humanity. If the confused and tense conditions improve, and peace be established in the world, Freemasonry will still be a potent force in the advancement of a free people, holding fast to the ancient landmarks of the institution, as a bulwark of fraternal service and a builder for permanent peace. Fraternally submitted, R. L. BARGER, Chairman, ROBERT E. ARMSTRONG, C. F. MONTGOMERY, FRED W. HEUERMANN, VERN IE G. FISHER.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

135

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS

The Grand Secretary presented the report of. the Committee on Transportation and Hotels, which was approved and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M., of Missouri: BRETHREN: The duties assigned this Committee have been performed. W. F. MILLER, Chatirm(lll/,. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES U. D.

Wor. Bro. Albert Theis, Jr., Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Lodges U. D., which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Wor.~hipful Grand Lodge A. F. ~ .A. M., of MisSQfUri: BRETIIREN: During the past year there were no dispensations granted by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, and your Lodges Under Dispensation Committee submits the following report: LILBOURN LODGE, LILBOURN, MO. Dispensation was issued to Lilbourn Lodge U.D. of Lilbourn, Missouri, on June 24, 1949. This lodge was duly organized and set to work under dispensation on June 27, 1949, by Right Worshipful J. C. Montgomery, D.D.G.M. of the 19th Administrative District. As of the date of the inspection of the books and records, the lodge had 31 members, having raised 8 and suspended 2 during the past year for a net gain of 6. While the minutes indicate that one member was suspended and later reinstated, no mention of this was made in the annual return to the Grand Lodge. While the minutes seem to be in reasonably good order, some of them were made in pencil. The average attendance has not been impressive and there has been some turn-over in officer personnel. Since the lodge had a net gain of only 6 members and none of these were by affiliation, your committee recommends that the dispensation be extended until the Session of the next Grand Lodge. WARDELL LODGE, WARDELL,

MO.

Dispensation was granted to Wardell Lodge U.D. of Wardell, Missouri, on June 27, 1949. This lodge was organized and set to work by Right Worshipful J. -C. Montgomery, D.D.G.M. of the 19th Administrative District on June 28, 1949. At the date of this inspection of the records and books, this lodge had 28 members, having raised 2, affiliated 1, and suspended 2 during the year for a net gain of 1. The books and records appear to be in order and there is considerable interest in the lodge. Since the lodge had a net gain of only 1 and only 1 affiliation, your committee recommends that the dispensation be extended until the Session of the next Grand Lodge. Your committee feels that both of these lodges have made a very good start and if given further time will show more improvement in the mat路 tel' of affiliations. RespeetfuUy submitted, ALBERT TIlEIS, JR., Chairrruvn, GUSTAV W. KNECHT.


136

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

REPORT OF BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

Rt. Wor. Bro. C. A. Tolin, Chairman, presented the report of the Building Supervisory Board, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. rf A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: The Building Supervisory Board has had the most active year of its existence. There have been numerous lodges interested in building a temple of their own, where they have been renting in the past, and as a result, the Committee has had many inquiries and has rendered the following decisions for the year 1949-1950, viz.: VIENNA LODGE

NO.

94, VIENNA, MISSOURI

Under date of June 28, 1949, Vienna Lodge was granted permission to borrow $2,000 if they could raise $4,000 among the members to enable them to erect a temple to cost $6,000 on a lot they already owned. Under date of October 12, 1949, the lodge notified the Board that they had raised the $4,000 and was given authority to tear down the old building and sign a note for $2,000 to be repaid in 10 annual payments at the rate of $200 per year. BLOOMFIELD LODGE

NO.

153, BLOOMFIELD, MISSOURI

Having heretofore been notified that the lodge desired to purchase a lot and erect a new building thereon, permission was granted to purchase a lot and they undertook to secure pledges from the 170 members in the amount of $17,000, and succeeded in contacting 112 members and received $11,200. On October 28, 1949, the Board referred them to several lodges who had erected temples comparable with the one the desired to erect, but since that time, no information has been received by the Board. FORSYTH LODGE

NO.

453, FORSYTH, MISSOURI

The lodge reported on November 18; 1949, that the government, in the building of what is known as Bull Shoal Dam, had condemned the lodge property and offered them $3,750 cash. The lodge stated there had been donated, two lots on which to build a new hall, but they would not be able to erect a hall on the amount received from the government. The Board requested them to submit plans for the construction of their new building and to give full details, but as yet, this information has not been received. PHOENIX LODGE NO. 136, BOWLING GREEN, MISSOURI Under date of November 22, 1949, the Board refused to grant Phoenix Lodge authority to purchase a business building which is now occupied and could not be used for 2% years until the tenant vacated, the building to cost $16,000 and the lodge requested authority to borrow an additional $5,000. The principal reason for refusing this permission was the fact that they would have to borrow $5,000 now and raise an additional $8,000 in 2% years to convert the building into a suitable place for the lodge to meet. No objection would have been raised had they been able to raise the entire $16,000 in cash at this time. BEE HIVE LODGE

NO.

393, LAWSON, MISSOURI

On December 29, 1949, this lodge asked for permission to form a temple association to solicit funds with which to erect a new building, and as


1950

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the Grand Lodge by-laws provide that all the assets of the lodge shall vest in the trustees, the Board refused to grant permission to form a temple association. 588,

ST.. FRANCISVILLE LODGE NO.

WAYLAND, MISSOURI

Under date of January 25, 1950, the Board refused to authorize the lodge to borrow an additional $500 over and above the $1,500 authorized in 1947 and insisted that the lodge undertake to raise this additional $500 throug~ subscriptions or contributions from the members. CLAYTON LODGE NO.

601,

CLAYTON, MISSOURI

Under date of February 8, 1950, the Board granted Clayton Lodge authority to purchase a lot and to borrow, not to exceed, $10,000 for 3 years at 5% on which to erect a new temple, as their present temple is not adequate for their membership and it is in a highly localized business section, and they expect to sell the building having received offers in the neighborhood of $85,000, and with the proceeds, erect a new temple on the lot which they were authorized to purchase. BETHANY LODGE NO.

97,

BETHANY, MISSOURI

Under date of February 9, 1950, the Bethany Masonic Hall Association, Inc., which holds title to the temple, was authorized to borrow $20,000 at 4% interest to be repaid at the rate of $500 each 6 months over a period of 20 years, in order to enable the association to make necessary repairs to the building. This temple association was formed in 1929 and borrowed $20,000 and had already paid $18,000 leaving $2,000 unpaid at this time. The building had been neglected through lack of repairs, so it was unsafe to be used as a meeting place, but it appears that the location was desirable and the property had an approximate value of $58,000. The granting of this permission was done reluctantly but th~ lodge refused to sell the building and the only alternative was to make the repairs. Under the present setup, the revenue will be sufficient to maintain the building and pay the debt, but there will be nothing left for future repairs. EAST GATE LODGE NO.

630,

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

Under date of April 14, 1950, the lodge was authorized to solicit from its members, funds to erect a new temple to take care of their increased membership, as the present building is. wholly inadequate. The lodge had $18,000 on hand and felt that they could raise the other $42,000 without any difficulty. This is another case where apparently there is no reason for a temple association, as under the Grand Lodge by-laws, the title should have been in the name of the trustees. STANBERRY LODGE NO.

109,

STANBERRY, MISSOURI

Under date of June 13, 1950, the Board refused to grant Stanberry Lodge authority to borrow $6,000 to erect a new temple. This lodge had a membership of 136 and had $1400 cash on hand. They had planned to erect a two story building 36 feet by. 70 feet and even though they were chartered in 1879 and had never owned their own building, they were not willing to solicit donations in order to avoid borrowing such a large amount of money and on the other hand, the committee felt that such a building as they contemplated could not be erected for twice the amount of money they had available including the loan.


138

PROCEEDINGS OF THE FREEDOM LODGE NO.

636,

-1950

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, MISSOURI

This lodge was chartered on October 1, 1946, and through an Association known as Unity Building Association, which borrowed $6,000, a temple was erected and the lodge has been meeting in this building since. The association had a debt of $4,189 and the lodge had $3,000 cash on hand. Under date of May 16, 1950, the Board authorized the trustees of the lodge to accept a deed from the association to the property after which the lodge could apply the $3,000 on the debt, leaving $1200 unpaid. Twenty-nine of the members of this lodge formerly belonged to Lemay Lodge, which never received a charter, and said Lemay Lodge paid $877.34 to the Grand Lodge. Shortly thereafter, Freedom Lodge was formed and chartered and this Board recommends that the Grand Lodge pay $877.34 to Freedom Lodge No. 636 which will enable them to practically wipe out their debt. JEFFERSON LODGE NO.

43,

JEFFERSON CITY, MISSOURI

Under date of July 1, 1950, the Board granted Jefferson Lodge No. 43 authority to borrow $10,000 for a period of 10 years to be repaid at the rate of $500 each 6 months, interest at 4%, to enable the lodge to make the necessary needed repairs to the building. This lodge has a membership of 601. ADVANCE LODGE NO. 590, ADVANOE, MISSOURI Under date of July 18, 1950, the Board granted the lodge permission to crtlct a two-story brick building with the understanding that the lot and building would not cost more than $8,500, and authorized the lodge to borrow $1,000 to be repaid at the rate of $200 each 6 months, as the lodge had $7,500 cash on hand. CHAFFEE LODGE NO.

615,

CHAFFEE, MISSOURI

Under date of July 27, 1950, the Board granted Chaffee Lodge authority to erect a new temple at a cost of $16,000 and as they had on hand $9,000 cash and promised to raise an additional $3,000, the Board authorized the lodge to borrow, not to exceed, $5,000 and to be repaid at the rate of $500 per year. This lodge has a membership of 180. HERMANN LODGE NO.

123,

HERMANN, MISSOURI

Under date of August 9, 195"0, the Board granted Herman Lodge authority to borrow $7,000 to be repaid at the rate of $600 per year which, with their funds they had on hand, would enable them to erect a new building at a cost of $20,800. This lodge has a membership of 140. OWENSVILLE LODGE NO.

624,

OWENSVILLE, MISSOURI

Under date of August 18, 1950, the Board granted Owensville Lodge authority to enter into a contract to erect a temple at a cost of $25,000 and to borrow, not to exceed, $7,000 to be repaid at the rate of $350 each 6 months, as thcy had $18,000 cash on hand. They have a membership of approximately 200. INDEPENDENCE LODGE NO. 76, AND MODONALD LODGE, NO. 324, INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI Under date of August 22, 1950, the Board authorized these two lodges to join with the Chapter and the Commandery in the formation of a


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

139

Temple Association for the purpose of erecting a temple to be used as a meeting place for the various bodies. Independence Lodge was authorized to convey the lot and $14,000 to the association and McDonald Lodge was authorized to pay $7,500 to the association. The association was then to take subscriptions from the various members of the four bodies and endeavor to raise an additional $32,000, as the cost of the building apparently would aggregate this amount. Respectfully submitted, C. A. TOLIN, ChairmOtn.

RESOLUTION RELATIVE TO LEMAY LODGE U. D.

Rt. \Vor. Bro. Tolin presented the following resolution, which was referred to the vVays and Means Committee: To the Most Worshipful GrOtna. Lodge, ..4.. F. ~ ..4.. M. of Missouri: Whereas, Lemay Lodge U.D. during its existence had on hand $877.34 which was turned over to the Grand Lodge when the Grand Lodge refused to grant it a Charter; Whereas, out of the membership of some sixty members of Lemay Lodge 29 members, together with other brethren, formed what is now known as Freedom Lodge No. 636 and said Freedom Lodge members were the principal contributors of this $877.34; Whereas, Freedom Lodge has made an excellent record and has more than 100 members since it was chartered in October 1946, and owns its lot and building in which it meets, having paid some $5,000.00 and now owes $1,000.00; N ow, therefore, be it resolved that this Grand Lodge pay to Freedqm Lodge No. 636 the $877.34 which was paid into the Grand Lodge by the former Lemay Lodge U.D. Said amount if paid to said Freedom Lodge is to be applied by it on the debt on its Temple. C. A. TOLIN. CALLED FROM LABOR

At noon the Grand Lodge was called from labor.


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 1:30 p. m.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 1 :30 p. m., Grand Chaplain Starke offering prayer. PRESENTATION OF BROTHER LYNN SAMUELS

The Grand Master presented Bro. Lynn Samuels, whose ninetyeighth birthday had been celebrated by the Tenth Administrative District in August. Bro. Samuels was accorded hearty applause. RESOLUTIONS RELATIVE TO CHULA LODGE NO. 388 AND SPRING HILL LODGE NO. 155

M. Vvor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland presented the following resolution, which was adopted: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, ..4.. F. go ..4.. M. of Missouri: Whereas the Charter of Chula Lodge No. 388 and the Charter of Spring Hill Lodge No. 155 were duly arrested and such arrests duly approved by the Grand Lodge at the Annual Communication in 1950, and whereas the real estate among the assets of the lodges now belongs to the Grand Lodge, and whereas offers have been made to purchase of said real estate, now therefore be it resolved that the Grand Lodge sell any or all of said real estate under such terms as the Grand Master may deem proper and that the Grand Lodge execute a deed to all or any of said real estate so sold and the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary be, and they are hereby authorized and empowered, to sign, acknowledge and deliver proper deed for any of said real estate so sold. HARRY F. SUNDERLAND. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

M. Wor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland presented the report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. go ..4.. M.. of Missouri: Your committee on the Grand Master's Address submits the following report: Weare impressed with the rich philosophy as well as the keen sense of loyalty and patriotism brought forth in the opening paragraphs of this instructive, informative and interesting address. In the accounting of M. Wor. Bro. Bradford's activities he has pointed out that he has tJ;aveled much in most parts of this Jurisdiction. He has dispersed light and imparted knowledge to the many Brethren assembled in lodges and conferences, and in so doing we feel certain that he has endeared himself


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

141

with all who have been placed under his care. The Grand IJodge is deeply indebted to M. Wor. Bro. Bradford for the service he has so unselfishly rendered in its behalf. We are confident that its members wish for him many more years of happiness and usefulness, and we doubt not that he will derive many happy reflections consequent on a well spent year as Grand Master. We recommend: No. I-That all matters pertaining to finance and expenditures be referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. No.2-That all decisions and dispensations be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. No.3-That the arresting of Charters in 1949 of Chula I-iodge No. 388, Spring Hill Lodge No. 155, and Wadesburg Lodge No. 348 be approved. No.4-That the recommendation of the Grand Master relative to the Masonic Home be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. No. 5-Tl1at the portion of the Address dealing with Necrology be referred to the Committee on Necrology. No.6-That the portion of the Address relative to concurrent Jurisdiction be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. No.7-That other recommendations made by the Grand Master in the Address be approved, provided that no expenditure shall be made in pursuance to any recommendation until and unless the Committee on Ways and Means shall have first reported to the Grand Lodge its recommendation respecting such expenditure and the Grand Lodge shall have authorized such expenditure to be made. Respectfully and Fraternally submitted, HARRY F. SUNDERLAND, Chairman, W. W. MARTIN, BYRNE

E.

BIGGER,

M. E. EWING,

H. C. JOHNSTON, HAROLD L. READER.

ADDRESS OF GRAND ORATOR

The Grand Orator, The Rev. Monk Bryan, delivered an insplnng address which was accorded hearty applause. The subject was: "Freemasonry-A Bulwark of Freedom in a Free Society." REPORT RELATIVE TO PROPOSED NEW TRIAL CODE

M. Vl1or. Bro. DuVal Smith, Chairman of the Revision Committee, presented路 the proposed new Trial Code. The Grand Lodge, on motion duly made, seconded and carried, voted not to accept the proposed new Trial Code, but to continue under the present Code. The Grand Lodge, by vote, directed that the present Trial Code, with annotations, be printed in pamphlet form. INVITATION FROM SCOTTISH RITE

M. V\Tor. Bro. J. V\T. Skelly kindly invited the Grand Lodge to meet in the Scottish, Rite Cathedral in St. Louis next year, and the invitation was gratefully accepted.


142

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

REPORT OF JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE

M. 'Nor. Bro. Henry W. Fox presented the report of the Jurisprudence Committee, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the Mogt Worshipful

(k0lTliJ,

Lodgey A. F.

go

A.M. of Missouri:

Your Jurisprudence Committee submits the following supplementary report: DECISIONS

The several decisions of the Grand Master, being nine in number, were referred to this Committee, and we approve them subject to the following specific comments or two, to-wit: (1) Decision No. 4-(a)-We approve this decision; with the com路 ment that nothing herein in or of itself should be deemed to raise any question as to the validity of the outcome of the balloting on petitions not so read. (2) We approve Decision No.6; but W. Bro. Henry W. Fox was not voting hereon. DISPENSATIONS

The several dispensations reported by the Grand Master in his Address were referred to this Committee. In each instance, the Grand Master was taking such action in a matter within the discretion of the Grand Master. We recommend the approval of these actions. REQUEST FOR CONCURRENT JURISDICTION

Where lodges bring themselves within the provisions of Sec. 188 of our By-Laws, for concurrent jurisdiction, it is within the prerogative of the Grand Master to approve creation of such concurrent jurisdiction, which the Grand Master did in this instance, reported by him in his Address. We recommend the approval of this action. BY-LAWS, AMENDMENTS TO BE ACTED UPON

The several By-Laws Amendments heretofore proposed and referred to this Committee, and which were laid over for action at this Communication (appearing on pages 126, 127, 128, 129, 130 and 131 of the 1949 Proceedings) have been considereo by your Committee, and we report thereon as follows: (a) To amend Section 113. DISQUALIFICATIONS, PHYSICAL AND OTHERWISE. We approve the form of the proposed amendment and recommend its adoption in such form, to-wit: Sec. 113. Disqualifications, Physical arnd Otherwise.. No Lodge shall confer a degree of Ancient Craft Masonry on any person whose physical defects are such as to prevent his receiving and imparting the ceremonies of the several degrees; provided, that nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to render anyone ineligible to the privileges of Freemasonry who can by the aid of artificial appliances, possessed and used by him, conform to the necessary ceremonies. If from any cause, the Lodge finds the candidate totally disqualified, the fee shall be returned and no further action shall be taken. (b) To amend Section 115. FAILURE TO ADVANCE. We approve the form of the proposed Amendment and recommend its adoption in such form, to-wit:


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

143

Section 115. Failure to AdvOI1We. An Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft who fails to present himself for advancement within one year after having received the Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft Degree, shall regularly petition for the remaining degree or degrees, without repayment of the fee. His petition shall be referred to a committee and shall require a two-thirds vote of the members present at the time of action on his petition. The vote shall be by paper ballot. The Lodge on proper request, and by a majority vote, may, prior to the expiration of the year, extend the time one additional year. (c) To amend Section 142. Affiliation of Master Masons. This enlarges the present section, with provisions specifying that a Master Mason on a certificate of good standing may apply for affiliation to any Lodge, and is not confined to the jurisdiction nearest his place of residence j if he has removed from the jurisdiction of the Lodge to which he belongs; or if he has the consent of the Lodge to which he belongs. We approve in the main the form of the proposed Amendment and recommend its adoption in substantially such form, (making cross reference therein to Section 168 rather than to Section 166), to-wit: Sec. 142. Affilia,tion of Master M0!8on. A nonaffiliated Master Mason may apply for affiliation to any Lodge in this jurisdiction, and is not confined to the jurisdiction of the Lodge nearest his place of residence. A non-resident may not affiliate with any Lodge in this State, except as provided in Section 192. A Master Mason in good standing in a Lodge in this jurisdiction, whose Lodge consents, or who has removed from the jurisdiction of the Lodge to which he belongs, may apply for affiliation, in the manner provided in Section 126 and 168, to any Lodge in this jurisdiction, and is not confined to the jurisdiction of the Lodge nearest his place of residence. See Forms V and VI. (d) To Rewrite Section 117. ENTERED APPRENTICE OR FELLOW CRAFT FROM ANOTHER LODGE; and to substitute a new Section 176. CERTIFICATES TO ENTERED APPRENTICES AND FELLOW CRAFTS. This will accomplish a change, as to Entered Appretices and Fellowcrafts desiring to affiliate with another Lodge, with a Certificate of good standing j to conform in substance with the above-mentioned amendment on affiliation of a Master Mason. We approve the form of these two proposed amendments with a minor change in phraseology, and recommend their adoption; the form thereof thus being as follows: Section 117. Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft from another Lodge. An Entered Apprentice or Fellow Crait from another Lodge may petition for affiliation any Lodge in whose jurisdiction he resides, on proper certificate of good standing as an Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft, as the case may be, as herein provided in Section 176, and a clear ballot shall elect him to membership and entitle him to receive the remaining degree or degrees. If required by the Lodge with which he desires to affiliate, he shall transmit with his petition the remaining portion of the fees due for the degrees. Sec. 176. Certificates to' Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts. An Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft who wishes to affiliate with another Lodge as provided in Section 117, is entitled to a certificate of good standing as a路n Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft, as the case may be, (sometimes called a "certificate of dimission") granting a waiver of jurisdiction, after he has removed from the jurisdiction of the Lodge to which he belongs, but not while residing within


144

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

the jurisdiction of such Lodge, unless the Lodge consents. The Certificate shall have endorsed thereon whether the recipient has or has not been examined in the proficiency lecture and his examination approved by the Lodge. See Form VII. (e) To rewrite the first paragraph of Section 160. Dues One Year After Suspen.sion. The suggested addition to present Section 160 proposes to require that the vote be recorded. We approve the form of the proposed amendment and recommend that this amendment be adopted, thus: Sec. ] 60. Dues One Year After Suspension. A Brother who shall remain in arrears one year or more after his suspension, may be reinstated to membership only on his written petition, with payment of dues as provided in Section 164, and by a two-thirds vote of the members present at the time of action on his petition. The vote shall be by paper ballot, and shall be recorded. See Form XIII. (f) To amend Section 157. Exemption From Dues. The form of this amendment has been considered by your Committee, and in furtherance of clarification of its objectives and facilitation of its administration, we recommend for adoption the substance thereof, in somewhat rewritten form as follows: Sec. 157. Exemption from Dues. A Lodge, by its By-Laws, may provide that any member shall be exempted from payment of dues only under the following circumstances and conditions, and no other, to-wit: (a) Because such member has been a member in good standing in the Lodge continuously for fifty years or more; or (b) Because of outstanding meritorious service to the Lodge or the Fraternity, without length of membership, but by appropriate resolution in writing which shall be presented and read at a stated communication of the Lodge and which shall lie over until its next stated communication for action. 'l.'he vote thereon shall be by paper ballot, and a favorable two-thirds vote of the members present at the time of action thereon shall pass the same. Any member heretofore exempted from payment of dues for any cause or hereafter exempted under sub-paragraph (a) or (b) of this section shall not be exempt from payment of such amount as the Lodge or member is required to pay to the Grand Lodge for any purpose on account of his membership, which amount shall be collected and shall be paid to the Grand Lodge. (g) '1.'0 amend Section 126. Profimency of Master Masons. Conditioning the having of a Receipt-for-Dues card upon first passing the proficiency examination, seems to your Committee to be an irrelevant and inappropriate device for enforcing our By-Law calling for the proficiency examinations. Accordingly we recommend that this amendment be not adopted. (h) To add Section 126A. Petitioning Other Bodies. Making it UnMasonic conduct to solicit for membership in another organization, before the petitioner has passed a satisfactory proficiency examination as a Master Mason, seems to your Committee an undue extension of the basic meaning of the term" UnMasonic, " and to be irrelevant and inappropriate device for enforcing our By-Law calling for the proficiency examination. Accordingly we recommend that this amendment be not adopted. . (i) To add a Statement in the Form of Petition. The statement suggested in sub-paragraph 2 of this proposed amendment deals with the


1950

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above mentioned subject matter, this is, petitioning other bodies. In this instance, the suggested statement to accompany petition would be a statement by the candidate that he will not petition for membership in any other organization until he has passed a satisfactory proficiency examination. For the reasons last above mentioned, we recommend that this portion of the proposed amendment be not adopted. (j) To add Questions in the Form of Petition.. Four of the questions suggested in sub-paragraph 1 of this proposed amendment of the Form of petition seem to your Committee to unduly extend the Form with family matters primarily in the province of the Committee of Investigation; but the final question suggested concerning the candidate's connection, if any, with any subversive organization seems to be timely and proper. Accordingly, we recommend that the proposed changes in the Form of petition (Form II) as originally submitted be not adopted in the entirety; and that in lieu thereof the one change in the Form be adopted, which shall provide one question which may be in the Form of petition, which question shall read as follows: Do you upon your honor declare that you do not believe in, and are not a member of or do not support any organization that believes in or teaches, or has as its objective, the overthrow of the United States Government, by force or by any illegal or unconstitutional methods' (k) To add Section 219A. Statement to Acoompany Petition. The suggested statement to be required concerning the applicant's connection, if any, with subversive organizations seems to be timely and appropriate. Accordingly we recommend the proposed amendment, with minor changes, be adopted as follows: ,.. Sec. 219A. Statement to Accompany Petition. A Lodge shall not entertain a petition for the degrees or affiliation unless such petition is accompanied by, or embodies, a statement in writing on the part of the petitioner declaring upon his honor that he does not believe in, and is not a member of and does not support any organization that believes in or teaches, or has as its objective, the overthrow of the United States Government by force or by any illegal or unconstitutional methods. (1) To amend Sections 27, 28 and 29. Masonic Districts; Distriot Deputy (kand Masters; and District Lecturers. After these proposed amendments were submitted to your Jurisprudence Committee, the Grand Master appointed a special committee to consider the present division of the Grand Jurisdiction into administrative and ritual districts. Said special committee now has submitted its report, which recommends certain changes in the pending proposal for amendment of Section 27; the result of which would be to fix the suggested number districts in the first instance as 59, but with a method of subsequently changing the number from time to time by the Grand Master with the concurrence of the Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, Junior Grand Warden and Grand Lecturer, or any three of them; such determination to be in writing filed with the Grand Secretary and reported by the Grand Master to the Grand Lodge at its next Annual Communication. The substance of these proposed amendments of Section 27, 28 and 29, seems to your Jurisprudence Committee to be timely and appropriate, with the above mentioned changes in Section 27, (recommended by said special committee). We therefore recommend the adoption of the amendments as thus changed. The form recommended for adoption is as follows:


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ARTICLE IV DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS, DISTRICT LECTURERS AND MASONlC DISTRICTS

Sec. 27. Masonic Districts. The Grand Jurisdiction of Missouri shall be divided into fifty-nine Masonic Districts, bearing the same numbers and having the same boundaries as shown in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge for 1945, provided, that hereafter, from time to time, the Grand Master, with the concurrence of the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, Junior Grand Warden and Grand Lecturer or any three of them, may determine the number of Districts and the Boundaries of Districts, such determination to be in writing filed with the Grand Secretary and l'eported by the Grand Master to the Grand Lodge at its next Annual Communication. For each District there shall be appointed and commissioned by the Grand Master, a District Deputy Grand Master, who must be a Past or Present Master of a Lodge in this Grand Jurisdiction, a member of a Lodge in said District, and a resident of said District or of an adjoining District in this State. Districts which have, or may hereafter have, forty or more lodges shall have two District Deputy Grand Masters of equal rank over separate divisions of such District. The Grand Master may convene the District Deputy Grand Masters in regional conference at such time as he may deem best, the expense of such meeting to be defrayed by the Grand Lodge. No District Deputy Grand Master, so appointed, shall serve for more than five consecutive years. Sec. 28. Powers and Duties. Each District Deputy Grand Master shall perform the following duties: (a) He shall visit, officially, the Lodges in his District, as far as practicable, and his actual expenses shall be paid by each Lodge visited. (b) He may when directed by the Grand Master or when requested by the Master open any Lodge in his District; he may preside in each Lodge upon the occasion of his official visit, after it is opened; shall examine its books and records, and see if they are properly kept; inform himself of the number of members, and the punctuality and regularity of their attendance; ascertain the state and condition of the Lodges in all respects; point out any errors he may ascertain in their conduct and mode of working; instruct them in every particular wherein he shall find they may require or desire any information; particularly recommend attention to the moral and benevolent principles of Freemasonry, and the exercise of caution in the admission of candidates; and if he discover in his District any Masonic error or evil, endeavor to immediately arrest the same by Masonic means, and, if he judge it expedient, report the same to the Grand Master. (c) He shall, in the absence of the Grand Master, attend in person to the organization of Lodges U.D.; and when unable to attend authorize some Past or Present Master to perform such duties, who shall report to the District Deputy Grand Master his acts by virtue of such authority. (d) He shall discountenance all unauthorized Lecturers. (e) He shall call a LOdge of Instruction at least once a year, if deemed expedient, at such time and place as may be most convenient for the Craft, and notify the officers of the various Lodges in his District to appear at such Lodge of Instruction to receive the work and lectures from the District Lecturer. On such occasions the District Deputy Grand Master shall preside over the Craft, but the District Lecturer shall be the authority in the work, and have sole charge of teaching it. (f) He shall make annual report to the Grand Master, thirty days prior to the meeting of the Grand Lodge, setting forth an account of his official


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acts during the year; the state of Freemasonry within his Jurisdiction; the condition of the Lodges, and suggesting such measures as may to him appear conducive to the general good, which report shall be by the Grand Master laid before the Grand Lodge, but shall not be published with the Proceedings. Sec. 29. (a). District Leoturer. There shall be appointed and commissioned by the Grand Lecturer, for each Masonic District, a District Lecturer who must be a Past or Present Master of a Lodge in this Grand Jurisdiction, a member of a Lodge in said district, and a resident of said district or of an adjoining district in this State, and who shall be competent to teach the work of this jurisdiction. He shall hold his office until the next succeeding Session of the Grand Lodge, unless removed by the Grand Lecturer. He shall visit, officially, the Lodges in his district as far as practicable, and for holding Lodges of Instruction shall receive the necessary actual expense incurred by him in holding such Lodges of Instruction, to be paid by each Lodge so instructed; provided that where more than one Lodge is instructed by said District Lecturer at one time and place, each Lodge so instructed shall pay to said District Lecturer an equal part of his actual necessary expenses so incurred by him in holding said Lodge of Instruction. ' (b) Reports. The District Lecturer shall make a written report to the Grand Lecturer thirty days before the annual meeting of the Grand Lodge, giving a detailed account of the work done by him, and a statement of the condition of the Lodges in his District in reference to the work; but such report shall not be published with the Proceedings. (c) A District Deputy Grand Master may hold the office of District Lecturer. (d) Each District Lecturer shall be a holder of a current Certificate of Proficiency issued by the Grand Lodge. The foregoing supplementary report of your Jurisprudence Committee is Fraternally submitted, KARL M. VETSBURG, Chairman, C. LEW GALLANT, CBET A. KEYES, HENRY W. Fox.

ADDENDUM TO REPORT OF JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE RELATIVE TO MASONIC' HOME

M. 'Vor. Bro. Karl Vetsburg, Chairman of the Jurisprudence Committee, moved the adoption of the following resolutions as an addendum to the report of the Jurisprudence Committee relative to the Masonic Home, and the resolutions were adopted: RESOLUTIONS

In order to implement the directions contained in the amendment to the by-laws with reference to the employment of a bank or trust company to advise and aid the directors in the investment of funds of the Masonic Home (paragraph GG of the report of the Jurisprudence Committee on this subject) it is now resolved that the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home be, and they hereby are authorized) if they determine SUch action to be advisable, to make a contract with a bank or trust company in St. Louis to advise and counsel with the Board and aid it in the care and investment of any and all monies of the Endowment Fund, such contract to be on terms satisfactory to the Board of Directors and at a cost of not


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in excess of five (5) per cent of the income collected from the funds handled by such bank or trust company. Resolved, that in the administration of the affairs of the Masonic Home according to the requirements of the action of this Grand Lodge at this One Hundred Twenty-Ninth Communication the Directors of the Masonic Home shall not be personally liable except for acts of malfeasance.

CALLED FROM LABOR

At 4 :15 p. m., the Grand Lodge was called from labor, the Grand Chaplain offering prayer.


THIRD DAY THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1950

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 9 :00 a. m., Grand Chaplain Robison offering prayer. SOCIAL SECURITY

Bro. W. O. Gains, of the St. Louis Social Security Office, at the request of the Grand Master, spoke on Social Security. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM

'VOl'. Bro. Walter Shrodes, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Mileage and Per Diem, which was approved and is as follows: W01'shipfu~

Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Your committee on Mileage and Per Diem at this session of the Grand Lodge begs to report allowances paid for mileage and per diem as follows: To the Most

BRETHREN:

Grand Officers â&#x20AC;˘......................................... $ 633.10 377.40 Past Grand Masters . District Deputy Grand Masters . 688.40 District Lecturers . 1,451.30 108.30 . Ohairmen of Oommittees 99.00 Ways and Means Oommittee . 125.40 . Oommittee on Jurisprudence 134.70 . Committee on AppealB and Grievances 171.10 Oommittee on Credentials . Chartered Lodges . 15,173.90 69.90 Lodges U. D . 60.00 Assistant Grand Tilers . 192.50 Adjustments 1949 Communication . (due to failure to properly register) GRAND TOTAL $19,275.00 RESOLUTION RELATIVE TO DEMOLAY

Wor. Bro. Jackson Hagan presented the following resolution, which ,vas referred to the Jurisprudence Committee: The Grand Lodge of the State' of Missouri recognizes the need and importance to the National welfare and to the future of Freemasonry of the proper training of youths. There probably has never been a time in the history of this Nation or in the history of Missouri Freemasonry when there were so many ideological conflicts or when greater need for close attention to the training of our youth was more apparent. We recognize that one of the outstanding organizations for the proper inculcation of truthful thinking to our youths is the Order of DeMolay


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which has successfully carried on a youth program for more than thirty years. We further recognize that the Order of DeMolay, while it has from its inception enjoyed the sponsorship of Masonic groups, is not junior Masonic or Masonic affiliated j nor is there any pretense on the part of the Order or upon the part of Freemasonry in any of its branches to so define it. It is a self-governed youth movement for boys and young men from the ages of 15 to 21 inclusive which has taken for its ritual a Masonic story, and which has according to the ritual and sponsorship nurtured its initiates and trained its members in a Masonic atmosphere. Therefore, be it resolved by the Grand Lodge of the State of Missouri that all Master Masons under this Grand Lodge's jurisdiction be urged to interest themselves in the Order of the DeMolay and its fine work and that all member Lodges be urged to sponsor Chapters of the Order of DeMolay. HERBERT E. DUNCAN, Grand Chaplain, JACKSON J. HAGAN.

BROTHER WILLIAM R. GENTRY

The Grand Master referred to the fact that this day was the 81st birthday of our M. Wor. Bro. 'Villiam R. Gentry. The brethren sang "Happy Birthday," and Bro. Gentry cordially responded. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON C'REDENTIALS

Wor. Bro. Fred Knight, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Credentials, which was approved and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Gratnd Lodge, A. F. go A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report. At the present session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge there are represented 450 subordinate lodges and there are present: Grand Lodge Officers 21 Past Grand Masters ...................................... 16 Grand Representatives 11 District Deputy Grand Masters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 District Lecturers 42 Past Masters 520 Worshipful Masters ' 408 Senior Wardens 143 Junior Wardens 95 Chairmen of Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Distinguished Visitors 6 The Actual Attendance: Past Masters 520 Worshipful Masters 408 Senior Wardens 143 Junior Wardens :.................. 95 Total

1166 Fraternally submitted, FRED H. KNIGHT, Chairman, JULIUS R. EDWARDS, JOSEPH A. HALLEY, GEORGE F. PRATER, ARNO C. COOPER.


1950

151

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

M. Wor. Bro. Solon Cameron, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Ways and Means, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Mast Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F.

4- A. M. of Missouri:

LEMAY LODGE U.D.

In the matter of the funds of Lemay Lodge U.D., which are now in the possession of the Grand Lodge in the amount of $877.34, in view of the fact that practically aU contributors of said funds are now members of Freedom Lodge No. 636, which Lodge has purchased its own property and paid some $5,000.00 thereon and still owes a balance of $1,000.00 of the purchase price, your committee recommends that the Grand Lodge authorize its treasurer to pay over said funds to Freedom Lodge No. 636 with the proviso that they be applied to the unpaid balance on the lodge property. . In the matter of the Grand Master's recommendation that consideration be given to a reasonable increase in mileage and per diem allowance for members of the Grand Lodge, your committee believes that an increase of these allowances is not possible under the present Grand Lodge income of 60c per member. Your committet:l does not wish to be in the position of disapproving such an increase. We feel, however, that such an increase must be considered in conjunction with a corresponding increase in Grand Lodge per capita dues. In connection with the next to the last item of the recommended budget, namely, the contribution to the Visitation Program of the Masonic Service Association, your committee recommends that the incoming Grand Master appoint a special committee for the purpose of conducting a thorough inquiry into the National Visitation Program of the Masonic Service Association and making a fair and reasonable estimate of Missouri's appropriate share of the cost thereof, the committee to report its findings to the next Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge. 1950-51

BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS

Printed Proceedings ., Expenses, Grand Master Maintenance--Grand Lodge Office Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers (OGM) Salary, Grand Secretary Salary, Grand Lecturer Expenses, Grand Lecturer Ritual Committee Expense Office Help, Grand Lodge Office Temp. Help-complete Biog. file Additional filing equipment Printing, Postage and Stationery Lighting Equipment-Grand Lodge Office District Lecturer and D.D.G.M. Conferences Salary, Grand Treasurer Expenses, Committee on Masonic Review Mas. Relief Ass'n.-U. S. and Canada Telephone & Telegraph-G. L. Office Bonds: Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer

, .. $ 3,000.00 . 3,000.00 . 1,800.00 . 700.00 5,000.00 . . 4,200.00 . 1,500.00 . 900.00 . 4,800.00 1,800.00 . . 1,000.00 . 3,900.00 . 540.00 . 2,000.00 500.00 . 750.00 . . 409.50 . 300.00 . 300.00


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125.00 Reporter: Grand Lodge Session . 2,500.00 Expenses: Grand Lodge Session . 1,000.00 Contingent: Grand Lodge Expense Fund . 250.00 C. K. Benson Audit Company . 600.00 Expenses: To Geo. Wash. Mem. & Gr. Master's Conference . 2,138.07 Membership: Masonic Service Association . 300.00 Grand Lodge Officers' Conference . 2,500.00 Welfare Committee: Masonic Home Board _ . 300.00 Expenses:. D.D.G.M.'s (O.G.M.) . 100.00 Missouri Lodge of Research-Indexing Committee . 50.00 For care of Portraits of P.G.M. '8 as per resolution . 250.00 Jewel for Grand Master . 403.32 Aprons for Grand Lodge ' . 500.00 Aprons for Grand Lodge Officers . Lodge of Research Library of Congress Research and Binding of Proceedings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000.00 For illustrations Masonic Manuals .... 200.00 Legal expense Grand Lodge-Tax assessment case . . . . . . . . . . . 250.00 Repairs to Furniture and Decorations in G. M. Office. . . . . . . . 500.00 Masonic Service Ass 'no Hospital Visitation 3,000.00 Mileage and Per Diem ~ 19,275.00 $72,640.89 SOLON CAMERON, Chairman ROBERT H. MANN, GEORGE C. MARQUIS, JAMES M. DEWITT, EDMUND E. MORRIS. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS AND DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

The Grand Secretary presented the report of the Committee on Unfinished Business and Distinguished Guests, which was adopted and is as follo\'is: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. if A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN:

The duties assigned this Committee have been performed. JOHN W. CALHOUN, Chairman. VOTE OF THANKS TO SCOTTISH RITE

On motion of l\{' vVor. Bro. A. F. Ittner, the Grand Lodge extended a vote of thanks to the Scottish Rite bodies of St. Louis for the use of their beautiful temple. RESIGNATION OF RT. WOR. GEORGE C. MARQUIS

Rt. "VOl'. Bro. Ray Bond read the following letter of resignation from Rt. 'Vor. Bro. George C. Marquis: George Claude Marquis 114 East Ruby St., Independence, Missouri. September 28, 1950 Most Worshipful Ray Bond Grand Master of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Missouri. Dear Brother Bond: I hereby tender my resignation as a member of the Committee on Ways and Means, that younger and more capable hands may carry forward the


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responsibilities of this most'important Committee. I have enjoyed twentyeight years of service on the Committee, which I trust has been of some benefit to the Grand Lodge. With assurance of my continued devotion to the welfare of the G,rand Lodge, I am Fraternally yours, (Signed) GEORGE C. MARQUIS.

Following the reading of the letter, Bro. Bond spoke in appreciation of Bro. Marquis and asked the brethren to stand in recognition of Bro. Marquis' faithful and efficient service to the Craft through many years. VOTE OF THANKS TO BRO. JOST

A vote of thanks was extended to Bro. Oscar J ost, Organist of the Scottish Rite, for the beautiful music rendered throughout the Sessions. ' TRIBUTE TO M. WOR. BRO. BRADFORD

As Grand Master Bradford laid aside the gavel, the Grand Lodge arose with loud applause in tribute to his service as Grand Master. APPOINTMENTS

F. ITTNER .n. TV. Grand Lecturer' EMMETT L. ROBISON ••.••••••.••••••••••.•• TV. Grand Chaplain SAMUEL THURMAN lV. Grand Chaplain HERBERT E. DUNCAN ..•.•.•.•.•..••••.••.. W. Grand Chaplain BEN MORRIS RIDPATH . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W. Grand Chaplain FRANK J. PIPPIN .•.•.•.•...•...•.•.•.•... .W. Grand Chaplain C. E. LEMON . . . . . . . • . • . • . • . • • • . . . . . • . . . . . W. Grand Chaplain OHESTES MITCIIELL, JR. • . • . . . . . . . . • . • • • . • . . Grand Senior Deacon WILLIAM J. CHAIG . . . . . • . • . • . . • . . . . . . . . . . . .Grand Junior Deacon HAROLD M. JAYNE . • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Senior Steward FRANK P. BRIGGS Grand Junior Steward ROBERT L. AHONSON Grand Marshal HAROLD O. GHAUEL •••••••••••••••••••••••• Grand Marshal BRUCE I-I. HUNT . . . . • . • . • . . . • • . . . . . • • . . . . . Grand Sword Bearer ROBERT H. MANN . . . . . . • . • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . • . Grand Pursuivant ROBEHT "V. HEDRICK ..•.•...•••.•...•.•.•. .Grand Orator MAHK E. 'VHITAKER . . • • . • . . . . • . • . • . . . . . . . . Grand Tiler ANTHONY

INSTALLATION

The hour for installation having arrived, M. Wor. Brother Harris C. Johnston, assisted by M. Wor. Brother J. 'V. Skelly, as Grand Marshal, and Wor. Bro. Emmett L. Robison, Grand Chaplain, installed the following officers:


154

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

RAY BOND ..•••••••••••••••••••••• • M.

W. Grand Master .B. W. Deputy Grand Master RICHARD O. RUMER .••••••••••••••• • R. W. Senior Grand llTarden EDMUND E. MORRIS .••.•.•••••••••• • R. W. Grand Treasurer HAROLD L. READER ••••••••••••••••• .R. W. Grand Secretary ANTHONY F. ITTNER •••••.•.•• , " •• • R. W. Grand Lecturer EMMETT L. ROBISON ••••.••••••.••••. TV. Grand Chaplain SAMUELTIIURMAN •••••••••••.•.•.•. W. Grand Chaplain HERBERT E. DUNCAN ••••••••••.•••••• W. Grand Chaplain ORESTES MI'rCHELL, JR..•.•••••••••. Grand Senior Deacon WILLIAM J. CRAIG .•••.••••••••••... Grand Junior Deacon HAROLD M. JAYNE .••.•.•..••••••.•. Grand Senior Steward FRANK P. BRIGGS ••.••••••.•••••••• .Grand Junior Steward ROBERT L. ARONSON ••.•.•.•••••••.• .Grand Marshal HAROLD O. GRAUEL ••••••••••••••••• Grand Marshal BRUCE H. HUNT ...••..•.•••••••••• •Grand Sword Bearer ROBERT R. MANN .•.••••••••.•••••. Grand Pursuivant MARK E. W·HITAKER ....••••••.•••• . Grand Tiler HmiER

L.

FERGUSON •.•••••••••••••

Following the installation, M. Vvor. Bro. James M. Bradford presented Grand Master Bond with the Grand Master's Jewel, and M. 'Val'. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, presented Grand Master Bond with the Grand Master's apron. Rt. Vvor. Bro. Charles A. Jobson, accompanied by War. Bro. Frank Randolph, Worshipful Master, and Bro. John Bond, Junior Deacon, on behalf of Joplin Lodge No. 335, the Grand Master's own lodge, presented the Grand Master with a beautiful silk hat. M. 'Val'. Bro. Anthony F. Ittner presented to M. War. Bro. James M. Bradford his Past Grand Master's Jewel. Rt. 'Val'. Bro. Archie Fox, on behalf of the Masters and 'Vardens Club of Kansas City, presented M. Wor. Bro. Bradford with guest book containing many names of brethren, and with an autographed copy of President Truman's picture. BENEDICTION

The Grand Chaplain, after invoking the Divine Blessing, pronounced the Benediction. CLOSING

The M. 'VOl'. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of the State of Missouri rested from its labors and was closed in Ample Form at 12 :15 p. m., this day, the 28th day of September, 1950, no further business appearing, to meet again in St. Louis, Missouri, the last Tuesday, viz: the 25th day of September 1951. RAROL D

L.

READER,

Grand Secretm·y.


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STANDING COMMITTEES 1950-1951

Jurispru.aence-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman, Court House, Hannibal; C. Lew Gallant, 818 Olive St., St. Louis; Samuel Wilcox, Court House, St. Joseph; Karl M. Vetsburg, 818 Olive St., St. Louis; Chet A. Keyes, Dierks Bldg., Kansas City; Martin B. Dickinson, 1002 Walnut St., Kansas City (6). Appeals (JIlul Grievances-R. Jasper Smith, Chairman, 821 Woodruff Bldg., Springfield; William R. Gentry, Louderman Bldg., St. Louis; Marvin E. Boisseau, 705 Olive St., St. Louis; John B. Gallatin, Chillicothe; J. V. Gaddy, Corby Bldg., St. Joseph. Ways am,d Means-Cecil A. Tolin, Chairman (3), Mississippi Valley Trust Co., St. Louis; J. M. DeWitt (3), Kirksville; Solon Cameron (2), 508 No. Grand Ave., St. Louis; E. E. Morris (1), Union National Bank, Kansas City; Sherman A. Smith (1), Box 97, Joplin. Credentials-Fred Knight, Chairman, 9th and Harrison, Kansas City; George Prater, 321 East Macon, Carthage; George McKean, Lexington; Lowell E. Scott, Springfield; Arno Cooper, 5023 Claxton, St. Louis. Milea.ge aM Per Diemr-Walter Shrodes, Chairman, Union Station, Burlington, Iowa; J. L. Lutes, Flat River; John W. Adams, Marshall; Roscoe A. Miller, Columbia; Warren F. Drescher, Jr., 643 Pearl St., Kirkwood. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, Chairman, 2353 So. Compton Ave., St. Louis (4); Wm. J. Craig, 1035 So. Pickwick, Springfield; Freelon K. Ha.dley, 2005 Penn St., St. Joseph; Charles C. Raymond, 2406 Norton St., Kansas City; Frederick H. Johnson, 936 Rutger St., St. Louis; Bruce H. Hunt, Kirksville. Correspondence'--Ray V. Denslow, Trenton. Nem-ology-James W. Skelly, Chairman, 3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis (8) ; Emmett L. Robison, 2416 Doniphan St., St. Joseph; Samuel Thurman, 225 So. Skinker Blvd., St. Louis. Auditing-C. K. Benson Company. Gra;n.il Master's Address-James M. Bradford, 4165a Shaw Ave., St. Lous. AU Past Grand Masters in attendance. Unfinished Business- and Entertaiwment of Distinguished Guests-John W. Calhoun, 705 Olive St., St. Louis. Tra,nsportation am,d Hotels-Wm. F. Miller, 1600 Missouri Pacific Bldg., St. Louis. Chartered Lodges-Robert Lee Barger, Chairman, Ironton; Robert F. Armstrong, Neosho;t Vernie Fisher, 3201 Park Ave., Kansas City; C. F. Montgomery, Puxico; Ernest Dunford, 4586 Nadine Court, St. Louis. Lodges U. D.-Albert Theis, Jr., Chairman, 314 North Fourth St., St. Louis; J. C. Montgomery, Charleston; C. Rennick Jones, Independence; J. P. Hall, Lexington. . Welfare-Tolman W. Cotton, Chairman, Van Buren; Arthur D. Nordberg, 5717 Locust St., Kansas City; Cornelius D. Struble, 1009 W. Gregory Blvd., Kansas City. Ma.son~ Boards of Relief-Harris C. Johnston, Chairman (2), Boonville; James W. Skelly (3),3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis; Jesse Moore (1), Box 342, Sta. D., St. Joseph; Chas. W. McClellan (2),4215 Athlone Ave., St. Louis; Elmer W. Wagner (2), Mississippi Valley Trust Co., St. Louis. Building Supervisory Board--Walter Bublitz, Chairman (1), 14th and Howell, North Kansas City; Walter E. Gillham (l), Scarritt Arcade Bldg., Kansas City; Fred Heuerman (3), 4826 Penrose Ave., St. Louis.


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SPECIAL COMMITTEES 1950-1951

Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Charles G. Duggan, Chairman, 8376 Racquet Drive, St. Louis; John A. Witthaus, Court House, Clayton; Artemus H. Harwell, Poplar Bluff. George Washington Masonic National Memoria·l Association-BertS. Lee, Chairman, 401 W. Commercial St., Springfield; Antony F. Ittner, 2353 So. Compton Ave., St. Louis (4); Harry S. Truman, The White House, Washington, D. C. Recognition of Foreign GrOind Lodges-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman, Trenton; Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis (8) Willis J. Bray, Kirksville; Harris C. Johnston, Boonville; James W. Skelly, 3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis (8). MOinual Illustrations-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman, Trenton; Anthony F. Ittner, 2353 So. Compton, St. Louis (4); Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis (8). Masonia Publications-J. W. Skelly, Chairman, 3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis (8); Martin B. Dickinson, 1002 Walnut St., Kansas City; Willis J. Bray, Kirksville; Lawton E. Meyer, 3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis; Harry Gershenson, 506 Olive St., St. Louis. Program For District Meetings-Richard O. Rumer, Chairman, 6600 Oleatha Ave., St. Louis; J. M. Sellers, Lexington; Orestes Mitchell, Jr., Corby Bldg., St. Joseph; Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis (8) . Hospital Visitation Service-Arthur W. Rauch, Chairman, 4031 Oleatha, St. Louis; Vernie G. Fisher, 3201 Park Ave., Kansas City; William NaIl, 1068 S. Weaver, Springfield. LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION

Name and Location

Year of Service

Arch A. Johnson, Landers Building, Springfield 1911-12 Tolman W. Cotton, Van Buren 1914-15 Bert S. Lee, 1224 Washington, Springfield 1922-23 William W. Martin, 5351 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis 1925-26 Anthony F. Ittner, 2353 South Compton Avenue, St. Louis 1927-28 Byrne E. Bigger, Courthouse, Hannibal 1928-29 William R. Gentry, 717 Louderman Building, St. Louis 1930-31 Ray V. Denslow, Trenton 1931-32 F. C. Barnhill. Marshall 1933-34 DuVal Smith, ·Court House, St. Joseph 1934-35 James W. Skelly. 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis 1935-36 Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis 1937-38 Hel1l'Y C. Chiles, Lexington 1938-39 . Karl M. Vetsburg, 818 Olive Street, St. Louis (Suite 322) 1939-40 ---Harry S. Truman, White House, Washington, D. Coo ...•....... 1940-41 Harris C. Johnston, Boonville 1941-42 -"Forrest C. Donnell, 463 Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C 1942-43 W. F. Woodruff, 825 Lathrop Building, Kansas City 1943-44 Willis J. Bray, 702 E. Normal, Kirksville 1944-46 Solon Cameron, Metropolitan Building, St. Louis 1946-47 -Morris E. Ewing. Morrisville 1947-48 Harry F. Sunderland, 3519 The Paseo, Kansas City 1948-49 James M. Bradford, 4165A Shaw Ave., St. Louis 1949-50


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

157

DISTRICT DEPUTY G. M. 's 1950-1951

DISTRICT LECTURERS 1950-1951

1. Wallace H. Roberts, Memphis 2. James M. DeWitt, Kirksaville 3. Russell A. Hauck, 320 So. 16th St., Unionville 4. F. M. McKinney, Box 457, Trenton 5. Eugene Sutherland, Bethany 6. H. H. Manring, McFall 7. Martin Suess, Maryville 8. John Hatch, Mound City 9. Frank A. Miller, Corby Bldg., St. Joseph 10. Alfred Dunlap, Winston 11. John J. Bowman, Liberty 12. A. B. Cleaveland, Kingston

1. Perry O. Sansberry, Wyaconda 2. Ernest T. Scofield, Kirksville 3. Joseph W. Moore, Newtown

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Warren W. Dray, Linneus W. A. Bagley, Shelbina Barkley D. Million, Palmyra Richard N. Bloom, Bowling Green W. R. Howell, Monroe City Guy Patton, Moberly Arthur G. Lynch, Brunswick Chas. S. Rutt, 304 No. Main St., Carrollton Harvey B. Hufford, Gashland

22. Henry W. Fox, 1200 Land Bank Bldg., Kansas City 23. James P. Hall, Lexington 24. Robt. Hoy, Marshall 25. A. B. Vanlandingham, 3 North Garth, Columbia 26. Julius R. Edwards, Centralia 27. John R. Baker, Box 192, Fulton 28. George R. Barton, Wellsville 29. Fred L. Dreyzehney, Moscow Mills 30. Melge Golterman, Wentzville 31. Virgil B. Saville, Jefferson City 32. Wm. S. Juergens, Sullivan 33a. Oliver L. Luft, 5434 Goethe, St. Louis

4. Florian M. McKinney, Box 457, Trenton 5. Dean D. Johnson, Bethany 6. Curtis F. Smith, Darlington 7. Vernon V. Goslee, Skidmore 8. Wayne A. Sharp, Craig 9. Freelon K. Hadley, 2005 Penn St., St. Joseph 10. Chas. B. Whitchurch, Winston 11. Emerson O. Boggess, Liberty 12. Herbert F. Woolsey, Mooresville 13. Warren W. Dray, Linneus 14. Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon 15. David A. Leslie, Williamstown 16. Russell J. Rowe, Louisiana 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

William R. Howell, Monroe City Edwin B. Hawkins, Higbee Forest L. Kendell, Brunswick Charles S. Rutt, 304 No. Main, Carrollton Arthur C. Mothershead, Gashland George M. McAninch, 3806 Euclid (3), Kansas City. Camillus B. Waddell, Lexington John W. Adams, Marshall Lewis R. Amick, Glasgow

26. Roscoe A. Miller, c/o Christian College, Columbia 27. Alfred A. Mitchell, 802 E. Monroe, Mexico 28. Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City 29. Herbert J. Crosby, Box 53, Winfield 30. Edwin H. Barklage, 719 No. 5th St., St. Charles 31. Wilbur P. Schnider, 1120 E. McCarthy, Jefferson City 32. Ransom A. Breuer, Hermann 33. George H. Davis, 4513 McKinley Ave., St. Louis


158

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

33b. Robert C. Brinkman, 611 Olive, St. Louis 34. Clarence H. Bundy, Drexel 35. D. O. Bradley, Butler 36. Ohas. C. Czeschin, Box 362, Warrensburg 37. E. E. Browning, Appleton City 38. 39. 40. 41. 42.

Oren Simpson, Richland W. Frank Houk, St. James Robt. Bays, Caledonia L. B. Parrish, Bolivar Finis E. Wrenn, Stockton

43. Rayford B. Thomas, Harwood 44. Cha.9. A. Jobson, 106 Joplin St., Joplin 45. Paul A. King, 502 Holland Bldg., Springfield 46. John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove 47. George Dewoody, Eminence 48. Chas. B. Acuff, Bonne Terre 49. Norman Phelps, Marble Hill 50. L. M. Hollenbeck, Sikeston 51. Delbert C. Johnson, Caruthersville 52. Eugene L. McGee, Poplar Bluff 53. J. Fred Park, West Plains 54. Fred O. Wade, Ozark 55. Boone Royer, Wheaton 56. Bert St. Clair, Noel 57. Harry DePriest, 2622 S. Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis 58. J. F. Nichols, Versailles 59. Arthur O. Hodges, River and Jones, Independence

1950

34. Claude R. White, 1702 Appleton, Independence 35. Thomas F. Herndon, Butler 36. Henry E. Richardson, 317 W. 5th, Sedalia, Mo. 37. Philip D. Trainer, 106 E. Tebo St., Clinton 38. Oren Simpson, Richland 39. W. Frank Houk, St. James 40. Clyde Williams, Hillsboro 41. L. B. Parrish, Bolivar 42. Clyde H. Tinsley, Eldorado Springs 43. Rayford B. Tllomas, Harwood 44. George W. Prater, 321 E. Macon, Carthage 45. John B. Klingner, 424 E. Commercial St., Springfield 46. John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove 47. Wm. Z. Gossett, Van Buren 48. Francis E. Howard, Ironton 49. William T. Ruff, 1514 Whitener St., Cape Girardeau 50. Robert L. Fowlkes, Charleston 51. Delbert C. Johnson, Caruthersville 52. Russell C. McGhee, Piedmont 53. C. Earl Armstrong, West Plains 54. Fred O. Wade, Ozark 55. Charles W. Werdein, Aurora 56. James E. Conell, Jr., 708 W. Spring, Neosho 57. Paul D. Bragg, 638 Oakwood (19), Webster Groves 58. Harold A. Reichel, 407 No. Oak St., Eldon 59. Francis S. Turner, 8309 Highland, K. C.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

159

LIST OF GRAND SECRETARIES AND THEm ADDRESSES Alabama, Charles H. Stubinger, Box 98, Montgomery. Arizona, Joseph A. E. Ivey, P. G. M., P. O. Box 1488, Tucson. Arkansas, Woodlief A. Thomas; P. G. M., Little Rock. California, Lloyd E. Wilson, P. G. M., San Francisco. Colorado, Harry W. Bundy, 319 Masonic Temple, Denver. Connecticut, EarIe K. Haling, Masonic Temple, Hartford. Delaware, Chester R. Jones, 818 Market Street, Wilmington. District of Columbia, Aubrey H. Clayton, Masonic Temple, Washington, D. C. Florida, George W. Huff, Jackson'\Tille. Georgia, Daniel W. Locklin, 801 Mulberry, Macon. Idaho, Clyde 1. Rush, P. G. M., Box 1677, Boise. Illinois, Richard C. Davenport, P. G. M., Harrisburg. Indiana, Dwight L. Smith, Masonic Temple, P. G. M., Indianapolis. Iowa, Earl B. Delzell, Cedar Rapids. Kansas, Elmer F. Strain, P. G. M., Topeka. Kentucky, Alpheus E. Orton, 200 Shubert Building, Louisville 2. Louisiana, D. Peter Laguens, Jr., New Orleans 12. Maine, Convers E. Leach, Portland. Maryland, Claud Shaffer, Balti路 more 1. Massachusetts~ Frank H. Hilton, 51 Boylston, Boston 16. Michiga.n, F. Homer Newton, P. G. M., Grand Rapids. Minnesota, John H. Anderson, St. Paul. Mississippi, Sid F. Curtis, Meridian. Missouri, Harold L. Reader, P. G. M., 3681 Lindell, St. Louis 8. Grand Lodge Alberta

Montana, Luther T. Hauberg, Box 896, Helena. Nebraska, CarI Greisen, Omaha. Nevada, E. C. Peterson, P. G. M., Carson City. New Hampshire, J. Melvin Dresser, P. G. M., Concord. New Jersey, Isaac Cherry, Trenton. New Mexico, Chandler C. Thomas, Albuquerque. New York, George R. Irving, New York 10. North Carolina, Wilbur L. McIver, Raleigh. North Dakota, Walter L. Stockwell, P. G. M., Fargo. Ohio, Harry S. Johnson, P. G. M., Cincinnati. Oklahoma, C. A. Sturgeon, P. G. M., Guthrie. Oregon, Harry D. Proudfoot, P. G. M., 1119 S. W. Park Avenue, Portland 5. Pennsylvania, Matthew Galt, Jr., Philadelphia. Rhode Island, N. Arthur Hyland, 127 Dorrance St., Providence 3. South Carolina, O. Frank Hart, P. G. M., Columbia. South Dakota, Elvin F. Strain, Box 468, Sioux Falls. Tennessee, T. E. Doss, Box 216, Nashville 2. Texas, Leo Hart, Box 446, Waco. Utah, E. Roy Gibson, P. G. M., Salt Lake City. Vermont, Aaron H. Grout, P. G. M., Burlington. Virginia, Dr. James N. Hillman, Richmond 20. Washington, John 1. Preissner, P. G. M., Tacoma 3. West Virginia, 1. Wade Coffman, P. G. M., P. O. Box 2346, Charleston 28. Wisconsin, Paul W. Grossenbach, P. G. M., 705 E. Wells Street, Milwaukee 2. Wyoming, Irving E. Clark, Casper.

Grarnd Secretary George Moore, P.G.M.

Address Calgary


160

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Brazil (Rio De Janeiro) Brazil (Grande do SuI)

J acy Garnier de Baccellar J. M. Magalhaes

Brazil (Sao Paulo) British Columbia

O. M. de Fleury W. R. Simpson, P.G.M.

Austria Canada

Dr. Vladimar Misar Ewart G. Dixon

Chile

Dr. Juan E. Pastene

Costa Rica, C. A. Cuba

Enrique Chaves B. Dr. Constantino Pais

Denmark (National Grand Lodge) England

Karl J. Nilson

Finland

Sydney A. White, M. V.O. Eino Kyllonen

France (National Grand Lodge)

M. Vivrel

Guatemala

Oscar Paz Pinto

Ireland

Henry C. Shellard

Italy (Grand Orient) Manitoba

Dr. Publio Cortini Dr. Peter T. Pilkey, P.G.M. William Webber

Mexico (York Grand Lodge) Mexico-Campeche

Omar C. Olivera G

Mexico-Cosmos

Jose Vidol Rios

Mexieo-El Potosi

Mauricio Lopez Rivas

Mexico-Nueva Leon

Lie. Enrique A. Verastigui

Mexico-Occidental Mexicana

Joaquin Yanez Albarran

Mexico-Tamaulipas

Jose 1. Casarrubias

Mexico-Valle de Mexico

Jose Luis Salgodo

1950 Caixo Postal 2215 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Caixo Postal 683 Porto Alegra, Rio Grande do SuI, Brazil Caixo Postal 2611, Sao Paulo, Brazil 692 Seymour St., Vancouver, B. C. England P. O. Drawer 217, Hamilton, Ontario Casillo 2867 Santiago San Jose, Costa Rica Apartado 72, Le Habana Blegdamajev 23, Copenhagen Freemasons' Hall, London, W.C. 2 Vyokatu 9-B-14 Helsinki, Finland 8 Square Du Roule N euilly, SurSeine, France Apartado Postal 312 Guatemala Freemasons' Hall, Dublin Rome Masonic Temple, Winnipeg Apartado 1986 Mexico, D.F. Apartado 17, DcCampeche, Camp, Mexico Apartado 171, Chihuahua, Chili., Mexico Apartado 104 San Luis Potosi San Luis, Potosi Apartado 309 Monterrey, N.L. Mexico Apartado No.9, Guadalajara J aI. Mexico Apartado 419, Tampico, Tamaulipas Mexico Apartado Postal 10 Artes Nurn. 53 Mexico D. F., Mexico


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Netherlands

Dr. A. A. Galestin

New Brunswick New South Wales New Zealand

R. D. Magee James S. Miller H. A. Lamb, P.G.M.

Nicaragua

Agustin Vanegas P

Norway

Odd Lie-Davidson

Nova Scotia Panama

Reginald V. Harris, K.C., P.G.M. W. Julio Icaza

Philippine Islands

Antonio Gonzales

Prince Edwa.rd Island Puerto Rico

L. A. McDougall Angel M. Torres

Quebec Queensland .

W. W. Williamson, P.G.M. E. G. Radford

San Salvador

Humberto Acosta

Saskatchewan Scotland South Australia

Robert A. Tate W. King Gillies M.A., L.L.D. R. Owen Fox

Sweden

Eric Hallin

Swiss Alpina

F. Mueller-Ruegg

Tasmania United Grand Lodge of Germany

H. A. Wilkinson KarINuckell

Victoria

William Stewart

Western Australis

F. W. M. Sanders

161

22 Fluweelen Burgwal The Hague Saint John Sydney P. O. Box 2001 Wellington P. O. Box No. 102 Managua Frimurerlogen N. Vollgate 19. Oslo Freemasons' Hall Halifax P. O. Box 84, Panama, Panama 138 Guano St., Manila, P. 1. Charlottetown P. O. Box 747, San Juan, P.R. Masonic Temple, Montreal Box 675, K. G. P. O. Brisbane Segunda Calle Arienta 27 P. O. Box 246, Regina 96 George Street, Edinburgh Freemasons' Hall North Terrace, Adelaide Frimurareorden Stockholm Bogenschutzenstrasse 8 Berne, Switzerland Hobart Friedrick-Ebert Strasse 37, Frankfurt on Main, Germany 117 Macquare St., Melbourne Freemasons' ~aIl, Perth

(RECOGNIZED SEPTEMBER, 1950) United Grand Lodge in Berlin China

W. E. Weinmann

Minias Gerais-Brazil

Sergio A. Ivanenko

Greece

Dr. Anthonios Rammos

Henry H. Lin

Berlin-Friedenau, Hackenstrasse 2 Masonic Temple, 178 Trihua Rd., South, Shanghai, 18 Caixa Postal 5 Belo Horizonte . Mina.s Gerais 19 Acharnon St., Athens (K)


162

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

NUMERICAL LIST OF LODGES-1950 I-Missouri 2-Meridian 3-Beacon 4-Howard 5-United 6. 7-0 'Sullivan 8. 9-Geo. Washington lO-Agency ll-Pauldingville 12-Tyro 13-Rising Sun 14-Eolia 15-Western Star 16-Memphis 17-Clarksville 18-Palmyra 19-Paris Union 20-St. Louis 21-Havana 22-Wellington 23-Florida 24-Wyaconda 25-Naphtali 26-Ava 27-Evergreen 28-St. John's 29-Windsor 30-Huntsville 3I-Liberty 32-Humphreys 33-Ralls 34-Troy 35-Mercer 36-Cooper 37-Hemple 38-Callao 39-DeWitt 40-Mt. Moriah 41-Bismarck 42- ...........â&#x20AC;˘ 43-Je:fIerson 44-Fair Play 45-Bonhomme 46-Wentzville 47-Fayette 48-Fulton

49-Holt 50-Xenia 51-Livingston 52-Wakanda 53-Weston 54-Index 55-Arrow Rock 56-Tipton 57-Richmond 58-Monticello 59-Centralia 60-New Bloomfield 61-Waverly 62-Vincil 63-Cambridge 64-Monroe 65-Pattonsburg 66-Grant City 67. 68-Kennett 69-Sullivan 70-Armstrong 71-Savannah 72-Gorin 73-Eureka 74-Warren 75-Silex 76-Independence 77-Lebanon 78-St. Joseph 79-Polar Star 80-Bridgeton 81-Central 82-Jackson 83-Laclede 84-Webster Groves 85-Miami 86-Brookfield 87-Washington 88-Defiance 89-Friendship 90-Russelville 91-Madison 92-Pcrseverance 93-St. Mark's 94-Vienna 95-Pomegranate 96-St. Andrew's

97-Bethany 98-Webster 99-Mt. Vernon 100-Ash Grove 101-Bogard 102-Bloomington 103-West View 104--Heroine 105-Kirksville 106-Gallatin 107-Greenville 108. 109-8tanberry 1l0-Marcus Ill-Trenton Il2-Maitland Il3-Plattsburg Il4-Twilight Il5-Laddonia 116-Barnes 117-Helena U8-Kingston Il9-DeSoto 120-Compass 121-Erwin 122-Triplett 123-Hermann 124-Union Star 125-Gentryville 126-Seaman 127-Athens 128-Lorraine 129-Monett 130-Hume 131-Potosi 132-Farmington 133-Star of the West 134-Olean 135-Braymer 136-Phoenix 137-Delphian 138-Lincoln 139-0regon 140. 141-Amsterdam I42-Pleasant Grove 143-Irondale I44-Modern


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

145--Latilner 146-. . . . . . . . . . . . 147--Cass 148-~ ... 149--Lexington 150--Birming 151--Milton 152--Linn Creek 153--Bloomfield 154--Ionic 155--. . . . . . . . . . . . 156--Ashland 157--North Star 158--Mountain Grove 159--Green City 160--Pleasant 161--Clifton Hill 162-Whitesville 163--0ccidental 164--Joaehim 165--... . .•.... . . 166--Portageville 167-. . . . .. 168--Colony 169--Camden Point 170--Benevolence 171--Hartford 172--Censer 173--Gray Summit 174--Sturgeon 175--. . . . . . . . . . . . 176--Point Pleasant 177--Texas 178--Griswold 179--Pride of the West 180--Pyramid 181--.. . ..... . . . . 182--Pilot Knob 183--California 184--Morley 185--Chamois 186--. . . . . . • . • . . . 187-Hermon 188--Hannibal 189-Zeredatha 190--Putnam 191--. . . . . . . . . . . . 192--Frankford 193--Angerona 194--Wellsville

195--Bolivar 196--Quitman 197--Carthage 198-Allensville 199--New Hope 200--Sonora 201-Ravenwood 202--Westville 203--Brumley 204--Rowley 205--Trilumina 206--Somerset 207--Clay 208--Salisbury 209--Poplar Bluff 210--Unionville 211--Hickory Hill 212--Four Mile 213--Rolla 214--Forest City 215--Hornersville 216--Hale City 217--Barbee 218--Good Hope 219--Albert Pike 220--Kansas City 221--Mystic Tie 222--La Belle 223--Ray 224--Hamilton 225--Salem 226--Saline 227--Cypress 228--Shelbina 229-. 230--St. James 231--Cardwell 232--Polo 233--Bucklin 234--St. Francois 235-. 236--Sedalia 237--La Plata 238--Rushville 239--Hopewell 240-. 241--Palestine 242--Portland 243--Keystone 244--Middle Fabius

163

245--Knobnoster 246--Montgomery 247--Neosho 248. 249--Carroll 250 ..........•• 251--Hope 252-. 253--Laredo 254--Butler 255--Alton 256-Shekinah 257--Lodge of Light 258. 259--Lodge of Love 260-Mechanicsville 261-- ..........•. 262-Holden 263-Summit 264-. 265--Corinthian 266--Soeial 267-Aurora 268--Lodge of True. 269--Brotherhood 270--New Salem 271--Solomon 272--Granite 273--St. Clair 274--Cold Spring 275-. 276--Grand River 277--Wm. D. Muir 278--Essex 279--Hogle's Creek 280-. 281--Fenton 282-Cosmos 283--Stockton 284--Canopy 285--Earl 286-. 287-Craft 288-Hermitage 289--Graham 290--Fairmont 291--Edina 292--Lamar 293--Sarcoxie 294--Mound City


164 295-Moniteau 296-Sparta 297. 298-Sampson 299-Temple 300-Doric 301-White Hall 302-Lick Creek 303-0sage 304. 305-Cecile Daylight 306-Ashlar 307-New London 308-Parrott 309. 310-Sikeston 311-Kearney 312-Cuba 313-Meramec 314-Pine 315-Jerusalem 316-Rural 317-0sborn 318-Eldorado 319-Paulville 320-Versailles 321-Jonathan 322-Hardin 323-Cornerstone 324-McDonald 325-Dockery 326-Linn 327-Mt. Zion 328-Cainsville 329. 330-Paul Revere 33l-Charity 332-Excello 333. 334--Breckenridge 335-Joplin 336-Hallsville 337-Blue Springs 338-Herculaneum 339-Fidelity 340-Westport 34l-Rockville 342-Circle 343. 344--Moberly

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 345-Fellowship 346-Arlington 347-America 348-. . . . . . . . . . . . 349-Pollock 350-.. 351-Mosaic 352-Friend 353-Barnesville 354-Hebron 355-Adelphi 356-Ancient Landmark 357-.. 358-Northwest 359-Garrett 360-Tuscan 36l-Riddick 362-Hiram 363-Fraternal 364-Higginsville 365-Bayou 366-Adair 367-Barry 368-Crescent Hill 369-Composite 370-Williamstown 371-Sheldon 372-Nonparcil 373-Belle 374--. . . . . . . . . . . . 375-Waynesville 376-King Hill 377-Ancieut Craft 378-Bel'lin 379-Billings 380-Queen City 381-Ionia 382-............ 383-Pythagoras 384-East Prairie 385-Richland 386387-Woodside 388-............ 389-Arcana 390-. . . . . .. . . . . . 39I-Raytown 392-Christian 393-Beehive

1950

394. 395. 396-Western Light 397-Gower 398-Jasper 399-Pike 400-Decatur 40 I-Cartersville 402-Malta 403-Lowry City 404-Rosendale 405-Everton 406-Malden 407-Charlcston 408-Montrose 409-Louisville 410-Iberia 41l-Joppa 4l2-Applcton City 413-Valley 414-Grccnsburg 415-Hunnewell 416-Cache 417-Whitewater 418. 4l9-Star 420-Itaska 42 I-Urbana 422-Gate of the Temple 423-Galt 424--Samaritan 425-Green Ridge 426-Rothville 427-Glenwood 428. 429-New Madrid 430-Winona 431. 432-Compctition 433-Mack's Creek 434-Whecling 435-Rockbridge 436. 437. 438-Temperance 439-Mt. Olive 440-Trowel 441-Excelsior 442-Burlington


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

443-Anchor 444-Ada 445-West Gate 446-Ivanhoe 447-Jaeoby 448-Schell City 449. 450-Belton 451. 452. 453-Forsyth 454-Continental 455-Hinton 456-Wallace 457-Jonesburg 458-Melville 459-Hazelwood 460-Lambskin 461-Caruthersville 462-Santa Fe 463-Clifton 464-Concordia 465. 466-Southwest 467-Pleasant Hope 468. 469-Plato 470-Nodaway 471-Mineral 472-Pickering 473-Nineveh 474. 475-Golden 476-Mt. Hope 477-Henderson 478. 479-Rich Hill 480-Jewel 481-Marceline 482-Clintonville 483-Fairfax . 484-Kirkwood 485-Coldwater 486-Cairo 487-Chilhowee 488-Lock Springs 489-Lakeville 490-Montevallo 49I-Vandalia 492-Daggett

493. 494-Lewistown 495-Unity 496-Robert Burns 497-Equality 498- ..........â&#x20AC;˘. 499-Harmony 500-Jameson 50 I-Buckner 502-Philadelphia 503-Prairie Home 504-Platte City 505-Euclid 506-Lathrop 507-Clearmont 508-Saxton 509-Van Buren 510-New Hampton 511-Skidmore fiI2-Webb City 5I3-Senath 5I4-Granby 5I5-Galena 5I6-Milford 517. 5I8-0riental 5I9-Crane 520-Clifton Heights 52I-Lockwood 522-Gate City 523. 524-Spickardsville 525-Cunningham 526-Wayne 527-Higbee 528-Conway 529-Apollo 530. 531-Lane's Prairie 532-Dexter 533-Comfort 534-Columbia 535-Blackwell 536-Ingomar 537-Bethel 538-Stella 539-Dawn 540-Winigan 541-Jacksonville 542-Ferguson

165

543-Mansfield 544-AJgabil 545-Zalma 546-0rient 547-South Gate 548-Clinton 549-Carl Junction 550-Rose Hill 551-Pendleton 552-Calhoun 553-Clarksburg 554-Foster 555-Summersville 556-Prairie 557. 558-Moscow 559-Clarksdale 560-Nelson 561-Cowgill 562. 563-York 564-Jamesport 565-Tebbetts 566-Maplewood 567-Miller 568-Naylor 569-Marlborough 570-Republic 571-Hayti 572-Rutledge 573-Bernie 574-La Monte 575-Easter 576-0live Branch 577-Ewing 578-Forest Park 579-Grandin 580. 581-Illmo 582-Koshkonong 583-Novinger 584. 585-Shamrock 586-Criterion 587-Branson 588-St. Francisville 589- ..... 590-Advance 591-Barnett 592-La Russell


166 593-Union 594. 595-Cole Camp 596-Puxico 597-Bosworth 598-Leadwood 599-Elvins 600-Cosby i 60 I-Clayton ~ 602-Acacia i 603-Morehou'se 604. 605-Walker 606-Craig 607-Eminence 608-Strafford 609-Warrenton 610-Clark 61I-Centertown 612-Mokane 613-Wellston 614-Mt. Washington 6l5-Chaffee 6l6-Brentwood 617-Swope Park

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 618-Grandview 619. 620-Willard 621-Anderson 622-Norwood 623-0verland 624-0wensville 625-Sheffield 626-Magnolia 627-:..............•• 62S-Mendon 629-Valley Park 630-East Gate 631-Tower Grove 632-Belgrade 633-Archie 634-Steele 635-Greentop 636-Freedom 637-Mountain View 63S-Triangle 639-Mizpah 640-Jennings 641-Trinity 642-Benj. Franklin

1950

643-Northeast 644--Grain Valley 645-Clarkton 646-Shaveh 647-Noel 648-Elmer 649-University 650-Parma 651-Cleveland 652-Pilgrim 653-Shawnee 654--Commonwealtb 655-Gardenville 656-Country Club 657-Progress 658-Purity 659-Alpha 660-Holliday 661-Theodore Roosevelt 662-Clarence 663-Rockhill 664--Aldrich

ALPHABETIOAL LIST OF LODGES-LOOATIONS-DISTRIOTS

A 602 444 366 355 590 10 219 664 544 198 659 255 347 141 443 377 356

Acacia ...........•. Columbia ....••.. .Boone Ada Orrick Ray Adair Kirksville Adair Adelphi. ..........• Edgerton .......• .Platte Advance Stoddard Advance Agency Agency Buchanan ., Albert Pike Kansas City Jackson Aldrich ...........• .Aldrich Polk Algabil. St. Louis Allensville Allendale W orth Alpha N. Kansas City Clay Alton ............•. Alton Oregon America St. Louis Amsterdam ........• Amsterdam Bates University City Anchor Ancient Craft King City Gentry Ancient Landmark Harrisburg Boone 62~ Anderson Anderson .:McDonald Missouri City .•... Clay 193 Angerona St. Louis 529 Apollo Appleton City .st. Clair 412 Appleton City

26 23 2 21 50 , 9 22 41 33-A 6 22 20 33-A 35 33-B 6 26 56 11 33-B 37


1950

I

167

Sullivan .. \ Cass Pulaski Howard Saline Green Boone Scott ' .Gentry

3 34 39 25 24 45 26 50 6 33-A 46

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

389 633 346 70 55 100 156 306 127 267 26

Arcana Archie Arlington Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland Ashlar Athens Aurora Ava

Harris Archie Dixon Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland Commerce Albany St.Louis Ava

217 591 116 353 367 365 3 393 632 373 450 170 642 378 573 97 537 379 150 41 535 153 102 337 101 195 45 597 587 135 334 616 80 86 269 203

Barbee Sweet Springs Saline 24 Barnett Barnett Morgan 58 Barnes Cabool Texas 46 Ellington Reynolds 47 Barnesville Barry Washburn Barry 55 Bayou ,Bakersfield Ozark 53 Beacon St. Louis 33-B Beehive Lawson Ray " 23 Belgrade Belgrade Washington 40 Belle Belle Maries 39 Belton Belton Cass 34 Benevolence Utica Livingston 12 Benjamin Franklin .. St. Louis 33-B Berlin Fairport De Kalb 6 Bernie Bernie Stoddard 51 Bethany Bethany Harrison 5 Bethel ............•.Bethel Shelby 14 Billings ...........• Billings Christian 54 Birming Faucett Buchanan .. . . . . . . . .. 9 Bismarck Bismarck St. Francois .48 Blackwell Blackwell St. Francois 40 Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard 50 Bloomington Bevier Macon 14 Blue Springs Blue Springs .Jackson 59 Bogard Bogard Carroll 20 Bolivar Bolivar Polk 41 Bonhomme Ballwin St. Louis 57 Bosworth Bosworth Carroll 20 Branson Branson Taney 54 Braymer Braymer Caldwell 12 Breckenridge Breckenridge Caldwell 12 Brentwood Brentwood St. Louis 57 Bridgeton ,St. JOhn's Station. St. Louis 57 Brookfield Brookfield Linn 13 Brotherhood St. Joseph Buchanan '" . . . . . . .. 9 Brumley ••.•.•......Brumley Miller 38

Douglas

B


168 233 501 442 254

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Bucklin Buckner Burlington Butler

Bucklin Buckner Burlington Jct Butler

Linn .Jackson Nodaway Bates

1950 13 59 1 35

C 416 Cache 328 Cainsville 486 Cairo 552 Calhoun 183 California 38 Callao 63 Cambridge 169 Camden Point 284 Canopy 231 Cardwell 549 .Car I Junction 249 Carroll 401 Carterville 197 Carthage 461 Caruthersville 147 Cass 305 Cecile-Daylight 172 Censer 611 Centertown 81 Central 59 Centralia 615 Chaffee 185 Chamois 331 Charity 407 Charleston ~ 487 Chilhowee 392 Christian 342 Circle 662 Clarence 610 Clark 553 Clarksburg 559 Clarksdale 17 Clarksville 645 Clarkton 207 Clay 601 Clayton 507 Clearmont 651 Cleveland 463 Clifton 520 Clifton Heights 161 Clifton Hill 548 Clinton 482 Clintonville 274 Cold Spring

St. Louis Cainsville Harrison Cairo Randolph Calhoun Henry California Moniteau Callao Macon Slater Saline Camden Point Platte Aurora Lawrence Cardwell Dunklin Carl Junction Jasper Norborne Carroll Carterville J asper Carthage '.' .Jasper Caruthersville Pemiscot Harrisonville Cass Kansas City Jackson Macon Macon Centertown Cole Molino ..........•Audrain Centralia Boone Chaffee Scott Chamois Osage ,St. Joseph Buchanan Charleston Mississippi Chilhowee J ohn80n Oak Grove Jackson Roscoe St. Clair Clarence Shelby Clark Randolph Clarksburg Moniteau Clarksdale De Kalb Clarksville Pike Clarkton .......•. Dunklin Excelsior Springs ..Clay Clayton St. Louis Clearmont Nodaway Cleveland Cass Thayer Oregon St. Louis Clifton Hill Randolph Clinton Henry El Dorado Springs .Cedar Leeton ..•........Johnson

33-A 5 18 37 31 14 24 21 55 51 .44 20 .44 .44 51 34 22 14 31 27 26 50 31 9 50 36 59 37 14 18 31 10 16 51 11 57 7 34 53 33-A 18 37 42 36


1950 485 595 168 534 533 654 120 432 369 464 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519 368 586 312 525 227

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Cold-Water Cole Camp Colony Columbia Comfort Commonwealth Compass Competition Composite Concordia Continental Conway Cooper Corinthian Cornerstone Cosby Cosmos Country Club Cowgill Craft Craig Crane Crescent Hill. Criterion Cuba Cunningham Cypress

492 Daggett 539 Dawn 400 Decatur 88 Defiance 137 Delphian 119 De Soto 39 DeWitt 532 Dexter 325 Dockery 300 Doric

Drexel. Cole Camp Colony Pacific Wheaton St. Louis ,Parkville Competition Doniphan Concordia Stewartsville ,Conway Boonville Warrensburg St. Louis Cosby St. Louis Kansas City Cowgill Canton Craig Crane Adrian Alba Cuba Sumner Laclede D McKittrick Ludlow Pierce City Sheridan Birch Tree De Soto DeWitt Dexter Meadville Elkland

Cass Benton Knox Franklin Barry Platte Laclede Ripley '" Lafayette De Kalb Laclede Cooper -.. Johnson Andrew Jackson Caldwell ' Lewis Holt Stone .Bates .Jasper Crawford Chariton Linn

169 34 36 2 32 55 33-A 21 38 52 23 10 38 25 36 33-B 9 33-B 22 12 15 8 54 35 44 39 19 13

Montgomery 28 Livingston 12 Lawrence 55 Worth . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 ,Shannon .47 Jefferson .40 Carroll 20 Stoddard 50 Linn 13 Webster .45

E

285 630 384 575 291 318 648 599 607

EarL Coffey East Gate Kansas City East Prairie East Prairie Easter St. Clair Edina Edina Eldorado Luray Elmer Elmer Elvins ..•......•....Flat River Eminence ..••.......Eminence

Daviess Jackson Mississippi Franklin Knox ,Clark ,Macon St. Francois Shannon

10 22 50 32 2 1 14 .48 .47


170

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Eolia Newburg St. Louis Essex St.Louis Brunswick New-Haven Everton Ewing Excello Jackson

Pike Phelps

1950

14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

Eolia Equality Erwin Essex Euclid Eureka Evergreen Everton Ewing Excello Excelsior

483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542 339 23 214 578 453 554 212 192 363 636 352 89 48

Fairfax Fairfax Atchison 8 Fairmont ..........•Wyaconda Clark 1 Fair Play Fair-Play Polk .............• .41 Farmington Farmington St. Francois 48 Fayette Fayette .•........ Howard 25 Fellowship Joplin Jasper 44 Fenton Fenton St. Louis 57 Ferguson Ferguson St. Louis 57 Fidelity Farley Platte 21 Florida Florida Monroe 17 Forest City Forest City Holt 8 Forest Park St. Louis 33-B Forsyth Forsyth Taney 54 Foster Foster Bates 35 Four Mile Campbell Dunklin 51 Frankford Frankford Pike 16 Fraternal Robertsville Franklin 32 Freedom Mehlville St. Louis 57 Friend Ozark Christian 54 Friendship Chillicothe Livingston 12 Fulton Fulton Callaway 27

515 106 423 655 359 522 422 125 9 427 475 218 72

Galena Galena Gallatin Gallatin Galt Galt Gardenville Gardenville Garrett Arcola Gate City Kansas City Gate of the Temple Springfield Gentryville Gentryville George Washington .. St. Louis Glenwood Glenwood Golden Golden City Good Hope ,St. Louis Gorin Gorin

Stoddard Chariton Franklin Dade Lewis Macon Cape Girardeau

13 17 15-A 19 15-A 10 14 25 12 11 18

F

G

Stone 54 Daviess 10 Grundy ., . . . . . . . . . .. 4 St. Louis 57 Dade 42 Jackson 22 Greene ...........•. 45 Gentry 6 33-B Schuyler 1 .Barton 43 33-A Scotland 1


1950

171

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

397 289 644 514 579 276 618 272 66 173 159 425 414 635 107 178

Gower Gower Clinton 11 Graham ~ Graham Nodaway 7 Grain Valley 00Grain Valley 00. 0. oJackson 000000. 00. 0059 Granby. 00 0 Granby Newton 56 Grandin 0.. 0 Grandin Carter 47 Grand River ,Freeman Cass 34 Jackson 59 Grandview 0.Grandview Granite Sedalia Pettis 36 Grant City Grant City Worth 6 Gray Summit. Gray Summit Franklin 32 Green City Green City Sullivan 3 Pettis 36 Green Ridge Green Ridge Knox ............•. 2 Greensburg Greensburg Greentop Greentop Schuyler . . •• 1 Greenville Greenville Wayne 0 52 Montgomery 28 Griswold ..........• ,Bellflower

216 336 224 188 322 499 171 21 571 459 354 117 37 477 338 123 288 187 104 211 527 364 455 362 279 262 660 49 251 239 215 4

Hale City Hallsville Hamilton Hannibal Hardin Harmony Hartford Havana Hayti. Hazelwood Hebron Helena Hemple Henderson Herculaneum Hermann Hermitage Hermon Heroine Hickory Hill Higbee Higginsville Hinton Hiram Hogle '8 Creek Holden Holliday Holt Hope 0 Hopewell Hornersville Howard

H Hale Carroll Hallsville Boone Hamilton Caldwell Hannibal Marion Hardin Ray St. Louis Hartford Putnam McFall Gentry Hayti. Pemiscot Webster Seymour Mexico .Audrain Rochester Andrew Hemple Clinton Rogersville Webster Herculaneum Jefferson Hermann Gasconade Hermitage Hickory Liberal Barton Kansas City Jackson Eugene Cole 0 Higbee Randolph Lafayette Higginsville Hinton .Boone Kahoka Clark Wheatland Hickory Holden J ohnson Holliday Monroe Holt 0..Clay W ashington 00 0Franklin 0. 00. Lesterville Reynolds Hornersville 0.. Dunklin .. 0 New Franklin Howard

0

20 26 12 15 20 o33-A 3 6 51 45 27 9 11 .45 .40 32 .41 43 22 31 18 23 26 1 .41 36 17 11 32 .47 0.51 25


172 130 32 415 30

1950

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Hume Humphreys Hunnewell Huntsville

Hume Humphreys Hunnewell. Huntsville

,Bates Sullivan Shelby Randolph

35 3 14 18

I

410 Iberia 581 Illmo 76 Independence 54 Index 536 Ingomar 381 Ionia 154 Ionic 143 Irondale 420 Itaska 446 Ivanhoe

Iberia ....•...... ,Miller ,. '" ,Illmo Scott Independence Jackson Garden City Cass Willow Springs ,Howell Eldon Miller Desloge St. Francois Irondale ,Washington St. Louis Kansas City Jackson

82 541 447 500 564 398 43 640 315 480 164 321 457 335 411

Linneus J acksonville Darlington Jameson Jamesport Jasper Jefferson City Jennings Jerico Springs Pleasant Hill Hillsboro Denver Jonesburg ,Joplin Hartville

38 50 59 34 53 58 48 40 , .. 33-A 22

J Jackson Jacksonville Jacoby Jameson Jamesport Jasper Jefferson Jennings Jerusalem Jewel Joachim Jonathan Jonesburg Joplin Joppa

220 Kansas City 311 Kearney 68 Kennett 243 Keystone 376 King HilL 118 Kingston 105 Kirksville......... 484 Kirkwood 245 Knobnoster 582 Koshkonong

K ,Kansas City Kearney Kennett St. Louis St. Joseph Kingston . Kirksville Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

Linn Randolph ., Gentry Daviess Daviess Jasper .cole St. Louis Cedar Cass J efferson Worth Montgomery Jasper Wright Jackson Clay .Dunklin

,

13 18 6 10 10 44 31 57 .42 34 .40 6 28 44 .46

Buchanan Caldwell Adair St. Louis Johnson Oregon

22 11 51 33-B 9 12 2 57 36 53

Lewis Laclede Audrain

15 38 27

L

222 83 115

La Belle La Belle Laclede Lebanon Laddonia ...•.....•. Laddonia


1950 489 292 460 574 531 237 253 592 506 145 598 77 494 149 31 302 138 326 152 51 521 488 257 259 268 128 409 403

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Lakeville Lamar Lambskin La Monte Lane's Prairie La Plata Laredo La Russell Lathrop Latimer Leadwood Lebanon Lewistown Lexington Liberty Lick Creek Lincoln Linn Linn-Creek Livingston Lockwood Lock Springs Lodge of Light Lodge of Love Lodge of Truth Lorraine Louisville Lowry City

~

Bell City Lamar St. Louis La Monte Vichy La Plata Laredo La Russell Lathrop Licking IJeadwood Steelville Lewistown Lexington Liberty Perry ,Fillmore Linn Camdenton Glasgow Lockwood Lock Springs Eagleville Lancaster Atlanta Ridgeway Louisville Lowry City

M 433 Mack's Creek Mack's Creek 91 Madison Madison 626 Magnolia St. Louis 112 Maitland Maitland 406 Malden Malden 402 Malta Malta Bend 543 Mansfield Mansfield 566 Maplewood Maplewood 481 Marceline ;Marceline 110 Marcus Fredericktown 569 Marlborough (Jackson Co.) 324 McDonald Independence 260 Mechanicsville ,Defiance 458 Melville Dadeville 16 Memphis Memphis 628 Mendon Mendon 313 Meramec Eureka 35 Mercer ............â&#x20AC;˘ Princeton 2 Meridian .â&#x20AC;˘......... St. Louis 85 Miami. ,Miami.

Stoddard Barton Pettis Maries Macon Grundy Jasper Clinton Texas St. Francois Crawford Lewis Lafayette Clay Ralls Andrew Osage Camden Howard Dade Davies Harrison Schuyler Macon Harrison Lincoln St. Clair ., Camden Monroe , Holt .Dunklin Saline Wright St. Louis Linn Madison ,Jackson Jackson ,St. Charles .Dade Scotland Chariton St. Louis Mercer Saline

173 50 43 33-B 36 39 14 4 44 11 39 .48 39 15 23 11 15 9 31 38 25 _.. .42 10 5 1 14 5 29 37 38 17 33-A 8 51 24 46 57 13 .48 59 59 30 42 1 19 57 4 33-A 24


174

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1950

244 516 567 151 471 1 639 344 144 612 129 295 64 490 246 58 408 603 184 351 558 294 614 158 637 476 439 40 99 327 221

Middle Fabius ,Downing Schuyler 1 Milford Milford Barton 43 Miller Miller Lawrence 55 Milton Milton Randolph 18 .Jasper .44 MineraL ..........• Oronogo Missouri St. Louis , 33-A Mizpah St. Louis ', 33-B Moberly ...........•Moberly Randolph 18 Modern ,Humansville Polk 41 Mokane Mokane Callaway 27 Monett Monett .Barry 55 Moniteau Jamestown Moniteau 31 Monroe Monroe City Monroe 17 Montevallo Montevallo Vernon 43 Montgomery Montgomery City ..Montgomery 28 Monticello Monticello Lewis 15 Montrose Montrose Henry 37 Morehouse Morehouse New Madrid 50 Morley Morley ..•........Scott 50 Mosaic Belleview Iron 48 29 Moscow Moscow Mills Lincoln Mound City Mound City Holt 8 Mount Washington .. ,Mt. Washington J ackson 59 Mountain Grove Mountain Grove Wright 46 Mountain View Mountain View Howell 53 Mt. Hope ..•........ Odessa Lafayette 23 Mt. Olive .•......... Rogersville, R. 3 Webster 45 Mt. Moriah ........• St. Louis .••.......................... 33-B Mt. Vernon .......•. Mt. Vernon Lawrence 55 Mt. Zion West Plains Howell 53 Mystic Tie .•........Oak Ridge Cape Girardeau .49

25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 372 643 157 358

N Naphtali. .....•.... St. Louis 33-A Naylor Naylor Ripley 52 Nelson Nelson Saline 24 Neosho Neosho Newton 56 New Bloomfield New Bloomfield Callaway 27 New Hampton NewHampton Harrison 5 New Hope Elsberry .••...... Lincoln 29 New London New London Ralls 15 New Madrid New Madrid New Madrid 51 New Salem Winfield Lincoln 29 Nineveh Olney •...........Lincoln 29 Nodaway Maryville Nodaway 7 Noel Noel McDonald 56 Nonpareil East Lynne Cass 34 Northeast Kansas City Jackson 22 North Star Rockport A tchison . . . . . . .. 8 Northwest .........• Tarkio •..........!\tchison 8


1950 622 583

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Norwood Novinger

Norwood Novinger

Wright Adair

175 .46 2

o 163 Occidental 134 Olean 576 Olive Branch 139 Oregon 546 Orient 518 Oriental 303 Osage 317 Osborn 7 O'Sullivan 623 Overland 624 Owensville

St. Louis Olean Miller St. Louis Holt Oregon ,Kansas City Jackson ; .. Blackburn Saline Nevada ..•....... Vernon Osborn De Kalb Walnut Grove Greene Overland St. Louis Owensville Gasconade

33·A 58 33-B 8 22 24 43 10 .45 57 32

P 241 18 19 650 308 65 11 330 319 551 92 502 136 472 399 652 182 314 469 504 113 160 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 166 242 131

Palestine St. Charles St. Charles Palmyra Palmyra Marion Paris Union Paris Monroe Parma Parma New Madrid Parrott, Maysville De Kalb Pattonsburg Pattonsburg Daviess WrightCity Warren Pauldingville Paul Revere St. Louis Paulville Hurdland Adair Pendleton Doe Run St. Francois Louisiana Pike Perseverance Philadelphia Philadelphia Marion Phoenix .•.......... Bowling Green Pike Pickering Pickering Nodaway Pike Curryville Pike Pilgrim St. Louis Pilot Knob ,Richville Douglas Pine .•............. Bardley Ripley Plato Plato ...•........ Texas Platte City ......•...Platte City Platte Plattsburg Plattsburg Clinton Pleasant Morrisville Polk Pleasant Grove Otterville Cooper Pleasant Hope Pleasant Hope Polk Point Pleasant Conran .•.........New Madrid Polar Star St. Louis Pollock Pollock Sullivan Polo Polo Caldwell Pomegranate St. Louis Poplar Bluff Poplar Bluff Butler Portageville Portageville Now Madrid Portland Portland Callaway Potosi. Potosi. Washington

, .. 30 15 17 51 10 10 30 33-B 2 48 16 15 16 7 16 33-A 46 52 46 21 11 41 25 41 51 33-B 3 12 33-A 52 51 27 40


176

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

556 503 179 657 658 190 596 180 383

Prairie Prairie Home Pride of the West Progress Purity Putnam Puxico Pyramid Pythagoras

Gilman City Prairie Home St. Louis St. Louis St. Louis Newtown Puxico St. Louis Cassville

Harrison Oooper

380 196

Queen City Quitman

Queen City Quitman

33 201 223 391 570 479 385 57 361 13 496 435 663 341 213 550 404 426 204 316 238 90 572

Ralls Ravenwood Ray Raytown Republic Rich Hill Richland Richmond Riddick Rising Sun Robert Burns Rockbridge Rockhill Rockville Rolla Rose Hill Rosendale Rothville Rowley Rural Rushville Russellville Rutledge

Center Ravenwood Camden Raytown Republic Rich Hill Richland Richmond Buffalo Barry Gainesville Rockbridge Kap-sas City Rockville Rolla St. Louis Rosendale Rothville Dearborn Kansas City Rushville Russellville Rutledge

225 226 208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448

Salem Saline Salisbury Samaritan Sampson Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City

Salem Dent St. Mary '8 ..••.••. Ste. Genevieve Salisbury Chariton Bonne Terre St. Francois Lutie Ozark Santa-Fe Monroe Sarcoxie Jasper Savannah Andrew Saxton Buchanan Schell City Vernon

' Sullivan Stoddard Barry

1950 5 25 33-B 33-B 33-A 3 50 33-A 55

Q Schuyler ............ 1 Nodaway 7

R

Ralls Nodaway Ray Jackson Greene Bates Pulaski Ray Dallas " Platte Ozark Ozark Jackson Bates Phelps

15 7 23 59 45 35 38 23 .41 21 53 53 22 35 39 33-A Andrew 9 Chariton 19 Platte 21 Jackson 22 Buchanan 9 Cole " 31 Scotland . . . . . . . . . . .. 1

S 39 .48 19 48 53 17 44 9 " 9 .43


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

177

126 236 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 310 75 511 266 271 206 200 547 466 296 524 96 273 588 234 230 28 78 20 93 109 419 133 634 538 283 608 174 69 555 263 617

Seaman Sedalia Senath Shamrock Shaveh Shawnee Sheffield Shekinah Shelbina Sheldon Sikeston Silex Skidmore SociaL Solomon Somerset Sonora South Gate Southwest Sparta Spickardsville St. Andrews St. Clair St. Francisville St. Francois St. James St. John's St. Joseph St. Louis St. Mark's Stanberry Star Star of the West Steele Stella Stockton Strafford Sturgeon Sullivan Summersville Summit Swope Park

Milan Sullivan 3 Sedalia Pettis 36 Senath Dunklin 51 Shamrock Callaway 27 '.. St. Louis 33-B Warsaw Benton 36 Kansas City Jackson 22 Festus Jefferson 40 Shelbina Shelby 14 Sheldon Vernon .43 Sikeston Scott 50 Silex Lincoln , 29 Skidmore .Nodaway 7 Martinsburg Audrain 27 Springfield Greene .45 Powersville Putnam 3 Watson Atchison 8 Kansas City Jackson 22 Southwest City McDonald 56 Sparta Christian 54 Spickard Grundy . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 Shelbyville Shelby 14 Osceola St. Clair 37Wayland Clark 1 Libertyville St. Francois 48 St. James Phelps 39 Hannibal .Marion 15 St. Joseph " .. Buchanan 9 St. Louis 33-A Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau .49 Stanberry Gentry 6 Taberville St. Clair 37 Ironton Iron 48 Steele Pemiscot 51 Stella Newton 56 Stockton Cedar 42 Strafford Greene .45 Sturgeon Boone 26 Sullivan .....•... Franklin 32 Summersville Texas .46 Lee's Summit Jackson 59 Kansas City Jackson 22

565 438 299 177 661 56

T Tebbetts '. Tebbetts ...•..... Callaway 27 Temperance Smithville Clay 11 Temple Kansas City Jackson 22 Texas Houston ,Texas 46 Theodore Roosevelt .. University City St. Louis 33-A Tipton ........••.•. Tipton Moniteau ..........• 31


178 631 111 638 205 641 122 440 34 360 114 12

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Tower Grove Trenton Triangle Trilumina Trinity Triplett TroweL Troy Tuscan Twilight Tyro

St. Louis Trenton St. Louis : .. Marshall St. Louis Triplett Marble Hill Troy St. Louis Columbia Caledonia

1950

.Boone Washington

33-B 4 33-A 24 33-A 19 .49 29 33-B 26 40

Franklin De Kalb Putnam Greene Vernon St. Louis Dallas

32 10 3 45 43 33-A .41

Andrew St. Louis Carter Audrain Morgan .Maries Clinton

9 57 .47 27 58 39 11

Carroll ,Vernon Cooper Chariton Warren Dade Lafayette Wayne Pulaski .Jasper Webster St. Louis Buchanan St. Louis Montgomery St. Charles

20 43 25 19 30 .42 23 52 38 .44 45 57 9 57 28 30 33-B .49

Grundy Saline Chariton Bollinger Lincoln

U 593 Union 124 Union Star 210 Unionville 5 United 495 Unity 649 University 421 Urbana

Union Union-Star Unionville Springfield Richards University City Urbana V

413 629 509 491 320 94 62

Valley Valley Park Van Buren Vandalia Versailles Vienna Vincll

Bolckow Valley Park Van Buren Vandalia Versailles Vienna Cameron W

52 605 456 74 609 87 61 526 375 512 98 84 22 613 194 46 445 103

Wakanda Carrollton Walker Walker Wallace Bunceton Warren Keytesville Warrenton Warrenton Washington Greenfield Waverly Waverly Wayne Piedmont Waynesville Waynesville Webb City Webb City Webster Marshfield Webster Groves Webster Groves Wellington De Kalb Wellston ,Wellston Wellsvilleâ&#x20AC;˘..........Wellsville Wentzville Wentzville West Gate St. Louis West View Millersville

Cape Girardeau


1950 396 15 53 340 202 434 301 417 162 620 370 29 540 430 277 387 24

179

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Western Light Western Star Weston Westport Westville Wheeling White Hall Whitewater Whitesville Willard .Williamstown Windsor Winigan Winona Wm. D. Muir Woodside Wyaconda

,Louisburg Winston Weston Kansas City Westville Wheeling Barnard Whitewater Whitesville Willard Williamstown Windsor Winigan Winona Pilot Grove Thomasville LaGrange

Dallas Daviess Platte Jackson Chariton Livingston Nodaway Cape Girardeau Andrew Greene Lewis Henry Sullivan Shannon Cooper Oregon Lewis

41 10 21 22 19 12 7 49 9 45 15 37 3 .47 25 53 15

x 50

Xenia

Hopkins

Nodaway ..........â&#x20AC;˘ 7 Y

563

york

Kansas City

Jackson

22

Z

545 189

Zalma Zeredatha

Zalma St. Joseph

Bollinger Buchanan

49 . . . . . .. 9


I--' 00

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT A c5 NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

1 Missouri ........... 2 Meridian ........... 3 Beacon............. 4 Howard ............ 5 United ............. 7 O'Sullivan.......... 9 Geo. Washington .... 10 Agency ............. 11 Pauldingville........ 12 Tyro............... 13 Rising Sun ......... 14 Eolia .............. 15 Western Star ....... 16 Memphis........... 17 Clarksville.......... 18 Palmyra............ 19 Paris Union ......... 20 St. Louis ........... 21 Havana ............ 22 Wellington ......... 23 Florida............. 24 Wyaconda.......... 25 Naphtali ........... 26 Ava .......... : .... 27 Evergreen .......... 28 St. John's .......... 29 Windsor ............ 30 Huntsville.......... 31 Liberty ............ 32 Humphreys......... 33 Ralls ............... 34 Troy...............

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10 23 70 6 42 7 19 3 1 11 9 4 13 4 3 3 21

12 25 68 4 45 7 21 3 1 10 5 3 2 12 4 6 3 24

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480 $ 1,186.30 $ 1,186.30 $....... $ ....... $ ........... S 100.00 $ 10.00 647 1,597.50 1,597.50 ........ . ....... ............ 230.00 23.00 1,895 4,690.90 4,690.90 ........ ........ . ........... 700.00 70.00 137 330.00 330.00 . ....... ........ ............ 60.00 6.00 972 2,435.60 2,435.60 ........ ........ ............ 420.00 42.00 70 175.00 175.00 . ....... ........ ............ 70.00 7.00 596 1,469.20 1,469.20 ........ . ....... ............ 180.00 18.00 235.40 235.40 . ....... ........ ............ 98 30.00 3.00 49 115.00 115.00 . ....... ........ ............ 10.00 1.00 106 262.10 262.10 ........ ........ ............ 110.00 11.00 121 292.10 297.50 ....... 5.40 . ........... 90.00 9.00 156.25 156.25 . ....... ........ ............ 63 10.00 1.00 245.00 245.00 . ....... ........ ............ 98 60.00 6.00 191 460.00 462.50 ....... 2.50 90.00 130.00 13.00 79 197.50 197.50 . ....... ........ ............ 40.00 4.00 115 287.10 287.10 . ....... ........ ............ 40.00 4.00 62 152.50 152.50 ........ ........ . ........... 30.00 3.00 1,455.00 1,455.00 . ....... ........ ............ 587 210.00 21.00 43 107.50 107.50 . ....... ........ ............ ............ . ....... 61 150.00 152.50 . ....... 2.50 . ........... 50.00 5.00 30 75.00 75.00 . ....... ........ 10.00 . ........... ....... 170.40 170.40 . ....... ........ ............ ............ ........ 72 388 94250 942.50 . ....... ....... . ............ 60.00 6.00 164 395.00 395.00 ....... ........ ............ 160.00 16.00 202.50 . ....... 197.50 79 5.00 . ........... 30.00 3.00 1,129.80 1,129.80 . ....... ........ ............ 454 240.00 24.00 132 329.60 330.00 . ....... .40 . ........... 60.00 6.00 142 344.60 . ....... 344.00 .60 . ........... 70.00 โ€ข 7.00 219 530.00 530.00 . ....... ........ ............ 70.00 7.00 44 112.10 118.40 . ....... 6.30 . ........... 10.00 1.00 94 228.40 228.40 ........ ........ . ............ 50.00 5.00 327.50 136 327.50 . ....... ........ ............ 30.00 3.00

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Mercer. . . . . . . ... .. . . Cooper. . . . . . . . . . . .. HempJe.. Callao............. De Witt............ Mt. Moriah...... ... Bismarck........... Jefferson........... Fair Play. . . . . . . . . .. Bonhomme......... Wentzville Fayette............ Fulton............. Holt Xenia.............. Livingston.. . . . . . . . . Wakanda........... Weston............ Index.............. Arrow Rock. . . . . . . . Tipton............. Richmond.......... Monticello.......... Centralia........... New Bloomfield..... Waverly............ Vinci!.............. Cambridge......... Monroe............ Pattonsburg........ Grant City. . . . . . . .. Kennett............ Sullivan............ Armstrong.......... Savannah.......... Gorin.............. Eureka............. Warren............ Silex Independence....... Lebanon........... St. Joseph.......... Polar Star..........

2 13 3 2 .... 37 6 32 .... 9 7 16 10 8 16 7 4 2 3 14 6 8 5 6' 10 4 9 5 12 3 5 1 14 6 4 1 101 5 31 14

2 13 4 2 1 37 7 27 . ... 12 . 7 15 . 7 5 16 7 2 2 1 12 6 10 5 2 9 5 13 5 16 3 6 .... 10 6 .... 1 . 90 4 33 15

2 ........ 2 5 5 17 2.. .. 5 4 4 3 3 1 .... 2 6 22 118 1 1 34 2 3 6 34 7 9 1............ 2 25 9 3 3 8 7 ........ 5 . 16 4 1.. .. 3 3 1 1.... 2 9 2 1 1 3 10 2 2 2 2 6 .... 2.... 4 8 2 7 8 1 1 17 3 2 4 4 3 721142 8 2 1.. .. 1 2 1 ... '," .. 2 2 .... 2.... 3 9 10 2........ 3 10 6 .... .... .... ....

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10 1 1.. .. 2 2 5 .... .... 2 1 2 1.... 1 3 423511 8 3 1 .... 3 1 10 3 1.... 1 1 3 .... .... .... 3 12 1 1 1 1 1 3 .... 1 2 33 9 3343 .... 2........ 2 12 2 1 1 4 7 6 1 1 1 5 3 2 2 1............ 2

.. .. .. . .. .. . . . . .. . .. .. ..

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86 5. 3 .... 32 3 16 1

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. .. 2 18 2111 2 1 9 6 5 16

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. . . .

179 252 44 94 66 1,380 123 605 63 195 62 129 229 34 109 74 388 127 66 33 61 253 56 150 85 74 139 163 89 99 139 183 214 55 230 62 122 62 38 931 209 754 673

409.60 620.00 107.10 235.00 160.00 3,404.90 307.50 1,479.60 167.50 487.10 152.50 317.50 576.35 85.00 262.50 186.50 947.50 317.10 167.10 80.00 147.10 617.50 137.50 374.60 202.50 187.10 349.70 409.60 220.00 245.00 349.60 445.00 537.10 127.10 572.10 152.50 302.50 152.50 95.00 2,307.50 519.20 1,876.80 1,662.80

409.60 620.00 110.00 235.00 160.00 3,405.30 307.50 1,479.60 167.50 487.50 152.50 317.50 577 .50 85.00 262.50 186.50 947.50 317.50 167.10 80.00 147.50 617.50 137.50 374.60 202.50 190.00 349.60 409.60 220.00 245.00 354.60 445.00 537.10 127.10 575.00 152.50 302.50 152.50 95.00 2,307.50 519.20 1,876.80 1,675.70

::::::: :1" .. ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ .. .. .. .. ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ .10 ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ .... ~... ........

'2:90'1:::::::::::: .40............ 15.00 .40............ 5.00 1.15

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2.90............ 75.00 5.00

10.00 84.00

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10.00 140.00 20.00 20.00 50.00 370.00 90.00 270.00 30.00 90.00 70.00 190.00 10.00 90.00 80.00 170.00 60.00 30.00 20.00 30.00 140.00 60.00 80.00 50.00 60.00 100.00 40.00 90.00 50.00 120.00 30.00 10.00 150.00 50.00 40.00 10.00

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1,080.00 40.00 310.00 140.00

1.00 14.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 37.00 9.00 27.00 3.00 9.00 .. 7.00 19.00 1.00 9.00 8.00 17.00 6.00 3.00 2.00 3.00 14.00 6.00 8.00 5.00 6.00 10.00 4.00 9.00 5.00 12.00 . 3.00 1.00 15.00 5.00 4.00 1.00 . 108.00 4.00 . 31.00 14.00

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NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

1~1~1~1~ll J '13

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80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 109 110 111 112 113

Bridgeton .......... CentraL ........... Jackson ............ Laclede ............ Webster Groves ..... Miami ............. Brookfield .......... Washington ......... Defiance ........... Friendship.......... Russellville ......... Madison ........... Perseverance ........ St. Mark's .......... Vienna ............. Pomegranate ........ St. Andrew's ........ Bethany ............ Webster ............ Mt. Vernon ......... Ash Grove .......... Bogard............. Bloomington ........ West View .......... Heroine ............ Kirksville .......... Gallatin............ Greenville .......... Stanberry .......... Marcus ............ Trenton............ Maitland ........... Plattsbugr..........

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30.00 170.00 20.00 30.00 50.00 230.00 10.00 240.00 30.00 60.00 20.00 50.00 60.00

3.00 17.00 2.00 3.00 5.00 23.00 1.00 24.00 3.00 6.00 2.00 5.00 6.00

30.00 20.00 550.00 210.00

3.00 2.00 55.00 21.00

110.00 80.00 10.00 10.00

11.00 8.00 1.00 1.00

........ ............ ........ ............ . ....... 298.50 .60 . ........... ........ . ....... ........ ............ ........ . . . . . . . . ............ 15.00 ........ ...... 425.00 ........ .40 ........ ....... 18.00 ........ 5.00 120.40 ........ 3.00 . ........... ........ 1.65 . ........... ............ ........ ........ 5.00

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687.10 ........ . . . . . . . . ............ 736.70 ........ 2.10 . ........... 182.10 . . . . . . . . 1.20 ............ 205.00 ........ ........ 30.00

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114 115 116 117

Twilight ............ 22 20 19 Laddonia ........... 5 5 6 Barnes ............. 6 3 3 Helena ............. .... .... ....

120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 141 142 143 144 145 147 149 150 151 152 153 154 156 157 158 159 160

Compass ........... Erwin.............. Triplett . ., ......... Hermann........... Union Star ......... Gentryville ......... Seaman ............ Athens ............. Lorraine............ Monett ............ Hume .............. Potosi. ........... ., Farmington......... Star of the West .... Olean .......... ., .. Braymer ........... Phoenix ............ Delphian ........... Lincoln ............ Oregon......... ., .. Amsterdam......... Pleasant Grove ...... Irondale............ Modern . ., ......... Latimer ............ Cass ....... .,., .... Lexington .......... Binning ............ Milton ............. Linn Creek ......... Bloomfield .......... Ionic .... ., ......... Ashland ............ North Star ......... Mountain Grove .... Green City ......... Pleasant............

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.... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....

308 38 98 41 33 245 124 460 71 142 87 44 198 164 49 420 92 140 203 114 41 126 156 62 60 100 64 94 87 69 125 142 162 73 25 112 170 183 93 135 188 99 37

769.60 92.50 240.00 97.60 84.20 613.40 312.10 1,143.85 177.50 359.60 217.50 105.00 495.00 407.50 122.50 1,046.70 230.00 350.00 509.60 287.10 92.90 292.10 372.10 142.50 145.00 245.00 160.00 235.00 219.60 174.60 312.50 360.00 393.60 172.50 55.00 275.00 425.00 447.50 220.00 327.80 474.20 245.90 89.00

770.00 92.50 242.50 97.50 84.20 613.40 312.10 1,175.00 177.60 359.60 217.50 105.00 495.00 407.50 122.50 1,046.70 230.00 350.00 507.50 287.50 92.90 292.50 370.00 142.50 145.00 245.00 160.00 235.00 219.60 172.50 312.50 360.00 395.00 172.50 55.00 275.00 425.00 447.50 220.00 328.80 477.50 246.30 89.00

........ . ....... ........ . ....... ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ . ....... ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ 2.10 ........ ........ . ....... 2.10 ........ . ....... ........ . ....... ........ ........ 2.10 ........ ........ ........ ........ . ....... ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........

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............ ............ 50.00 11.00 70.00 ............ ............ ............ ............ . ........... 80.00 136.50 50.00 ............ 120.00 . ........... 30.00 35.00 80.00 . ........... 30.00 . ........... 50.00 . ........... 180.00 ............ ............ 70.00 . ........... . ........... 120.00 ............ 20.00 ............ 60.00 ............ 120.00 ............ 60.00 . ........... 60.00 . ........... 45.00

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A c3 NAME AND :NUMBER OF LODGE

161 162 163 164 166 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 176 177 178 179 180 182 183 184 185 187 188 189 190 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199

Clifton Hill ......... Whitesville ......... OccidentaL ......... Joachim............ Portageville ......... Colony .. " ......... Camden Point ...... Benevolence ........ Hartford ........... Censer ............. Gray Summit ....... Sturgeon ........... Point Pleasant ...... Texas .............. Griswold" ......... Pride of the West .. " Pyramid ........... Pilot Knob ......... California .......... Morley"" ......... Chamois ........... Hermon ............ Hannibal.. ......... Zeredatha .. ...... Putnam ............ Frankford .......... Angerona ........... Wellsville .......... '. Bolivar.... " ....... Quitman ........... Carthage .... " ..... Allensville .......... New Hope ..........

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1 2 9 7 17

1 1 10 6 13

7 1 5 11 1 2 5 5 4 17 26 1 6 9 4 10 16 37 10

4 2 1 13 2 2 4 3 4 19 24 3 8 12 5 13 13 38 3

5 3 1 7 2 2 3 3 4 22 20 3 6 11 4 12 13 31 6

3 2 4 2 9 2 1

3 3 7 5 6 2 3

3 2 6 4 7 2 3

.... .... . ...

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200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 230 231 232 233 234 236 237 238 239 241 242 243 244 245

Sonora ............. Ravenwood ......... Westville........... Brumley ........... Rowley ............ Trilumina .......... Somerset ........... Clay............... Salisbury ........... Poplar Bluff ........ Unionville .......... Hickory Hill ........ Four Mile .......... Rolla .............. Forest City ......... Hornersville ........ Hale City .......... Barbee ............. Good Hope ......... Albert Pike......... Kansas City ........ Mystic Tie ......... La Belle ............ Ray ............... Hamilton........... Salem .............. Saline .............. Cypress ............ Shelbina ........... St. James ........... Cardwell ........... Polo ............... Bucklin ............ St. Francois ........ Sedalia............. La Plata ........... Rushville ........... Hopewell........... Palestine ........... Portland ........... Keystone ........... Middle Fabius ...... Knobnoster .........

4 5 3

.... 6 20 7 10 4 7 11 1 13 15 3 6 2 14 16 17 28 5 3 2 13 5 9 6 8 6 5 7 2 5 25 3 14 7 14

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147.50 224.20 160.00 90.00 262.50 661.10 157.50 430.00 398.00 818.90 420.00 107.50 454.20 1,151.80 162.10 25000 177 .50 337.10 2,739.60 922.80 1,851. 90 287.50 359.60 75.00 300.00 545.00 380.00 186.70 332.50 354.60 332.50 225.40 16210 95.00 1,218.15 355.00 241.50 224.60 532.50 64.60 1,425.10 165.00 80.00

150.00 224.20 160.00 90.00 262.50 661.10 155.00 430.00 398.80 824.70 420.00 107.50 455.00 1,151.80 162.50 250.00 '177.50 337.50 2,739.60 922.80 1,851. 90 285.00 36000 75.00 30000 545.00 380.00 187.10 332.50 35500 332.50 225.40 162.50 95.00 1,218.15 355.00 246.50 225.00 532.50 64.60 1,430.00 165.00 80.00

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134.00 . ........... ........ 50.00 5.00 200.00 20.00 40.00 4.00 100.00 10.00 40.00 4.00 60.00 6.00 110.00 11.00 27.00 . ........... . ....... 20.00 130.00 13.00 ............ 140.00 14.00 88.70 30.00 3.00 ............ 70.00 7.00 ............ 50.00 5.00 ............ 160.00 16.00 ............ 110.00 11.00 . ........... 170.00 17.00 ............ 270.00 27.00 ............ 50.00 5.00 ........... J 40.00 4.00 ........... 2000 2.00 ............ 100.00 10.00 110.00 70.00 7.00 5.00 30.00 3.00 ............ 60.00 6.00 ............ 100 .00 10.00 . ........... 50.00 5.00 24.00 40.00 4.00 20.00 70.00 7.00 ........... 10.00 1.00 ............ 40.00 4.00 . ........... 280.00 28.00 ............ 60.00 6.00 52.00 120.00 12.00 ........... 60.00 6.00 20.00 140.00 14.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

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A d NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

246 247 249 251 253 254 255 256 257 259 260 262 263 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 276 277 278 279 281 282 283 284 285 287

Montgomery ........ Neosho ............. Carroll............. Hope .............. Laredo............. Butler ............. Alton .............. Shekinah ........... Lodge of Light ...... Lodge of Love ...... Mechanicsville ...... Holden ............. Summit ............ Corinthian.......... Social. ............. Aurora ............. Lodge of Truth ..... Brotherhood ........ New Salem ......... Solomon............ Granite ............ St. Clair............ Cold Spring .... ' .... Grand River ........ Wm. D. Muir .. '" .. Essex .............. Hogles Creek ....... Fenton............. Cosmos ............ Stockton ........... Canopy ............ Earl. .............. Craft ..............

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Hermitage.......... Graham ............ Fairmont........... Edina .............. Lamar ............. Sarcoxie............ Mound City ........ Moniteau ........... Sparta ............. Sampson ........... Temple ............ Doric .............. White Hall ......... Lick Creek ......... Osage.............. Cecile-Daylight .... Ashlar ............. New London ........ Parrott............. Sikeston............ Kearney............ Cuba .............. Meramec ........... Pine ............... Jerusalem .......... RuraL ............. Osborn............. Eldorado ........... Paulville ........... Versailles ........... Jonathan ........... Hardin ............. Cornerstone ........ McDonald .......... Dockery............ Linn ............... Mt. Zion ........... Cainsville .......... Paui Revere ........ Charity ............ Excello ............. Breckenridge ........ Joplin ..............

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216.50 120.00 202.50 299.60 454.20 226.30 295.00 150.00 167.10 214.60 3,014.05 132.50 50.00 289.00 753.40 440.00 90.00 116.70 374.60 757.10 157.10 475.00 237.50 112.50 155.00 1,026.80 92.50 155.00 215.00 330.00 184.60 202.10 1,424.60 1,231.30 157.50 484.60 657.50 120.00 997.50 2,893.80 180.00 219.20 1,783.70

216.50 120.00 202.50 299.60 455.00 227.50 295.00 150.00 167.10 214.60 3,014.05 132.50 50.00 290.00 753.40 435.00 90.00 112.50 374.60 757.50 157.50 475.00 237.50 102.50 152.50 1,030.00 92.50 155.00 215.00 330.00 182.50 202.50 1,424.60 1,23130 157.50 485.00 657.50 120.00 997.50 2,895.00 180.00 220.00 1,783.70

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A c5 NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

336 337 338 339 340 341 342 344 345 346 347 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371

Hallsville ........... Blue Springs. " ..... Herculaneum ....... Fidelity ............ Westport ........... Rockville ........... Circle .............. Moberly ............ Fellowship.......... Arlington ........... America ............ Pollock............. Tyrian ............. Mosaic ............. Friend ............. Barnesville ......... Hebron ............ Adelphi ............ Ancient Landmark... Northwest .......... Garrett ............ Tuscan ............. Riddick ............ Hiram ............. Fraternal.. ......... Higginsville ......... Bayou ............. Adair .............. Barry .............. Crescent Hill ....... Composite.......... Williamstown ....... Sheldon ............

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NonpareiL ......... Belle............... Waynesville ........ King Hill ........... Ancient Craft ....... Berlin.............. Billings ............ Queen City ......... Ionia .............. Pythagoras ......... East Prairie ........ Richland ........... Woodside........... Arcana ............. Raytown ........... Christian ........... Beehive ............ Western Light ...... Gower ............. Jasper ............. Pike. Decatur:::::::::::: Cartersville....... " Malta.............. Lowry City ......... Rosendale .......... Everton............ Malden ............ Charleston .......... Montrose ........... Louisville........... Iberia .............. Joppa.路 ............ Appleton City ...... Valley ............. Greensburg ......... Hunnewell.......... Cache .............. Whitewater ......... Star ............... !taska ............. Urbana ............ Gate of the Temple ..

.... 7 4 22

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75.00 344.60 357.10 1,256.30 285.00 95.00 170.00 158.80 709.60 482.10 240.00 350.00 85.00 109.60 645.00 227.50 265.00 120.00 135.00 162.50 77.50 280.00 367.50 130.00 172.50 142.50 212.50 319.60 670.00 99.60 110.00 272,00 180.00 263.30 135.00 230.00 95.00 1,902.10 345.00 127.50 772.10 155.50 2,625.60

75.00 344.60 357.50 1,256.30 285.00 95.00 170.00 158.80 709.60 482.50 242.50 350.00 85.00 109.60 645.00 227.50 265.00 120.00 135.00 165.00 77.50 280.00 367.50 130.00 172.50 142.50 212.50 322.50 670.00 99.60 110.00 272.00 180.00 263.30 135.00 230.00 92.50 1,902.10 345.00 127.50 727.50 155.90 2,640.10

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NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

423 424 425 426 427 429 430 432 433 434 435 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 450 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462

Galt ............... Samaritan .......... Green Ridge ........ Rothville ........... Glenwood .......... New Madrid ........ Winona ............ Competition ........ Mack's Creek ....... Wheeling ........... Rock Bridge ........ Temperance ........ Mt. Olive .......... Trowel.. ........... Excelsior ........... Burlington.......... Anchor ............. Ada ............... West Gate .......... Ivanhoe ............ Jacoby .. " .. " ..... Schell City ......... Belton ............. Forsyth ............ Continental. ........ Hinton ............. Wallace ............ Jonesburg .......... Melville............ Hazelwood ......... Lambskin .......... Caruthersville ....... Santa Fe ...........

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Clifton............. Concordia â&#x20AC;˘......... Southwest.......... Pleasant Hope ...... Plato .............. Nodaway ........... MineraL ........... Pickering ........... Nineveh ............ Golden ............. Mt. Hope .......... Henderson .......... Rich Hill........... JeweL ............. Marceline ... ..... Clintonville ......... Fairfax ............. Kirkwood .......... Coldwater.......... Cairo .. Chilhowee:::::::::: Lock Springs ........ Lakeville ........... Montevallo ......... Vandalia ........... Daggett............ Lewistown .......... Unity ............. Robert Burns ....... Equality ........... Harmony ........... Jameson ............ Buckner ............ Philadelphia ........ Prairie Home ....... Platte City ......... Euclid ............. Lathrop ............ Clearmont.......... Saxton ............. Van Buren ......... New Hampton ...... Skidmore ...........

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4 .... .... .... 1 3 1 .... 1 .... .... 4 .... .... 1 .... .... 1 .... .... 2 1 .... .... .... 1 .... 1 .... .... .... 1 .... .... .... 1 4 18 .... .... 1 3 8 .... .... .... .... .... 3 .... .... .... 1 .... .... .... .... .... .... 2 .... .... .... 1 2 .... .... .... 1 3 4 2 .... .... 2 1 1 10 .... .... :::: .... 1 .... .... .... 1 .... .... .... 4 .... .... 3 8 .... .... 2 .... .... 1 2 6 5 3 1 .... .... 4 .... 1 1 4 .... .... 2 .... 1 10 5 7 .... .... 7 3 .... 1 1 .... 2 .... .... .... .... .... 2 3 .... .... 1 2 .... 2 .... .... .... .... 1 .... 1 7 .... .... 1 2 .... .... 1 .... 1 1 .... .... .... .... .... 3 2 .... .... 6 .... .... 1 1 .... .... .... .... 2 .... .... .... .... 1 2 5 .... . ... .... 4 .... .... 4 2 .... .... 10 .... .... .... .... 10 . ... ... 1 2 .... 5 .... .... 1 20 1 .... 5 10 4 .... .... 2 .... 2 .... .... .... .... .... 2 .... .... 2 .... 2 .... 2 .... .... .... . ... 1 3 .... .... 2 2 .... .... .... 1 .... .... 5 .... .... 1 2 .... .... .... 1 4 .... .... .... 2 19 3 3 1 3 .... .... 2 .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 1 .... .... 1 .... .... 5 .... .... 1 10 .... .... 2 ''2' 2 .... .... 3 .... .... 2 .... 2 .... .... 2 2 4 .... . ... 1 .... 6 1 4 2 2 9 3 4 1 1 1 3 6 9 17 6 7 25 3 2 1 4 4 2 6 1

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156 45 73 78 99 352 53 48 46 79 140 109 116 173 206 193 131 485 77 76 74 81 117 38 103 65 66

83 96 116 363 47 97 27 51 96 535 42 50 82 127 69 102

382.10 109.60 179.60 192.10 245.00 868.10 132.50 114.20 115.00 192.10 347.10 26250 272.50 435.00 514.20 475.00 297.50 1,217.80 190.00 190.00 186.70 204.60 282.50 92.50 257.10 157.50 155.00 207.50 237.50 289.60 880.00 116.50 247.10 67.50 125.00 220.00 1,337.10 108.40 125.00 200.00 315.00 170.00 250.00

382.50 ........ .40 . ........... 107.50 2.10 ........ ............ 179.60 ........ ........ ............ 187.50 4.60 ........ ............ 245.00 ........ ........ 115.60 868.10 ........ ........ 151.60 132.50 ........ ........ 150.50 114.20 ........ ........ ............ 117.50 ........ 25.00 2.50 192.10 ........ ........ 15.00 347.50 ........ .40 ............ 262.50 ........ ........ ............ 272.50 ........ ........ ............ 435.00 ........ ........ ............ 515.00 ........ .80 ............ 475.00 ........ ........ ............ 295.00 20.00 2.50 ........ 1,218.40 ........ .60 ............ 19250 ........ 2.50 28.00 190.00 ........ ........ ............ 6.00 186.70 ........ ........ 204.60 ........ ........ ............ 282.50 ........ ........ 15.00 92.50 ........ ........ ............ 257.10 ........ ........ ............ 157.50 ........ ........ ............ 157.50 ........ 2.50 ............ 207.50 ........ ........ 30.00 237.50 ........ ........ ............ 287.50 2.10 ........ ............ 880.00 ........ ........ ............ 116.50 ........ ........ . ........... 247.10 ........ ........ . ........... 67.50 ........ ........ ............ 125.00 ........ ........ ............ 220.00 ........ ........ ............ 1,337.10 ........ ........ ............ 109.60 ........ 1.20 . ........... 40.00 125.00 ........ ........ 200.00 ........ ........ ............ 335.00 ........ 20.00 ............ 170.00 ........ ........ ............ 250.00 ........ ........ ............

40.00 20.00 40.00 10.00 20.00 140.00 30.00 30.00 10.00 40.00 50.00 20.00 60.00 80.00 130.00 90.00 180.00 240.00 50.00 30.00

4.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 14.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 4.00 5.00 2.00 6.00 8.00 13.00 9.00 18.00 24.00 5.00 3.00

40.00 50.00 20.00 70.00 20.00 10.00 20.00 150.00

4.00 5.00 2.00 7.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 15.00

22000 20.00 20.00 10.00

22.00 2.00 2.00 1.00

130.00 300.00 20.00 10.00 60.00

13.00 30.00 2.00 1.00 6.00

40.00 30.00

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512 513 514 515 516 518 519 520 521 522 524 525 526 527 528 529 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547

Webb City ......... Senath ............. Granby ............ Galena ............. Milford ............ Oriental.. .......... Crane..... ; ........ Clifton Heights ..... Lockwood .......... Gate City .......... Spickardsville ....... Cunningham ........ Wayne ............. Higbee ............. Conway ............ Apollo ............. Lane's Prairie ....... Dexter ............. Comfort ............ Columbia ........... Blackwell........... Ingomar ............ Bethel.. ........... Stella .............. Dawn .............. Winigan ............ Jacksonville ........ Ferguson ........... Mansneld .......... Algabil.. ........... Zalma .............. Orient ............. South Gate .........

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Clinton ............ Carl Junction ....... Rose Hill ........... Pendleton .......... Calhoun ............ Clarksburg ......... Foster ............. Su=ersville ....... Prairie ............. Moscow ............ Clarksdale.......... Nelson ............. Cowgill ............ york ............... Jamesport .......... Tebbetts ........... NIaplewood ......... Miller.............. Naylor ............. Marlborough ........ Republic ........... Hayti .............. Rutledge ........... Bernie ............. La Monte .......... Easter ............. Olive Branch ....... Ewing ........... Forest Park......... Grandin ............ Illmo .............. Koshkonong ........ Novinger ........... Shamrock .......... Criterion ........... Branson............ St. Francisville...... Advance ........... Barnett ............ La Russell .......... Union .............. Cole Camp ......... Puxico ............. 00

17 5 11 1 3

22 3 11 1 1

20 4 11 3 1

7 1 3 2 2

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350 118 484 53 41 35 75 74 56 81 59 48 53 468 102 51 602 109 59 245 139 114 59 83 45 160 514 27 231 99 216 43 62 14 55 154 97 99 42 43 150 37 97

827.10 294.20 1,197.10 132.10 87.50 85.00 187.50 169.00 130.00 202.50 147.50 11000 130.00 1,147.10 242.50 127.50 1,488.40 271.70 147.50 613.80 349.20 285.00 152.10 200.00 112.50 404.60 1,264.40 62.50 570.00 245.00 521.70 102.50 145.00 35.00 142.60 380.00 274.20 245.00 105.00 107.50 377.10 80.00 242.10

827.10 295.00 1,197.10 132.10 87.50 85.00 187.50 170.00 130.00 202.50 147.50 110.00 130.00 1,147.50 242.50 127.50 1,488.40 271.70 147.50 613.80 349.20 285.00 150.00 200.00 112.50 404.40 1,264.40 62.50 57000 245.00 532.50 102.50 145.00 35.00 142.60 380.00 274.20 245.00 105.00 105.00 377.10 80.00 242.10

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217.10 300.00 685.00 222.50 1,002.60 942.50 277 .50 112.50 107.50 249.30 175.00. 322.50 140.00 152.50 22000 2,230.00 1,685.00 334.60 202.50 1,369.60 582.50 270.40 297.50 147.50 167.50 472.50 1,517.50 2,232.10 162.50 402.10 4,956.00 946.70 110.00

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2 3 2 .... 1 5 27 26 21 1 5 4 5 3 3 .... 3 19 14 16 2 14 14 18 9 1 16 20 21 1 28 26 34 57 64 57 8 9 11 10 6 5 5 "i' 17 17 16 .... 1 6 6 6 1 1 5 .... 15 8 6 .... 4 5 5 .... 6 6 .... 5 13 12 17 .... 2 3 1 10 13 13 .... 13 10 13 .... 26 20 21 10 22 19 12 3 15 17 14 3 30 33 36 8 1 .... 1 .... 6 5 8 .... 2 3 3 2 37 30 28 .... 1 1 1 .... 10 8 8 .... 4 2 3 1 3 3

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30.00 6.00 3.00 8.00 21.00 22.00 28.00 71.00 6.00 6.00 17.00

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12.00 120.00 ........ ........ ............ ........ . . . . . . . . ............ ............ ........ 1.20 90.00 9.00 . ....... ............ 130.00 13.00 ........ ........ ............ 270.00 27.00 ........ ........ ............ 220.00 22.00 ........ ........ ............ 140.00 14.00 . ....... ........ ............ 400.00 40.00 4.20 254.00 . ....... 10.00 1.00 ........ ............ ........ 60.00 6.00 .80 ............ . . . ... . . 20.00 2.00 ........ ........ ............ 350.00 35.00 ........ ........ ............ 10.00 1.00 . ....... ........ ............ 100.00 10.00 . ....... ........ . .......... 4.00 40.00 . ....... ........ .... 20.00

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIRST DISTRIOT-WALLACE H. ROBERTS, D. D. G. M., Memphis, Mo. County Lodge NO.1 Location Clark ••••••••• Fairmont .••..••. 2901 Wyaconda ..••••. Eldorado .•••..•.. 318ILuray Hiram .....•..•.. 362jKahoka ..•.•••••. St. Francisville ... 588IWayland ..•••.•.. Scotland ..•••. Memphis......... 16lMemphis .•.•••.. Gorin............ 72IGorin ..•..•.•••.. Rutledge 5721 Rutledge Sch',l,yler ••••.. Middle Fabius •••. 244IDowning ..••••.. Lodge of Love 259ILancaster Queen City .•..... SBOIQueen City ..••••. Glenwood 427IGlenwood Greentop 63lBQ!eentop

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Master, Arthur R. Dorsey•... Earl Carter ••....•... B. E. Sherwood....• W. Earl Beer ....•... Thos. E. Walker ....• Raymond Austin ..•.. Charles L. Guthrie Forrest Harris ....•.. Willibie Andrews Thomas F. White. . .. Guy E. Kerby Leon Pearce

Secretary J. C. Bowman Arthur Mosier ...•• Elmer C. Dinger... Geo. W. Sowers.... E. F. Bertram ....• R. E. Shacklett James A. Bailey R. W. Farris H. C. Burkland G. L. Lauer......•. C. M. Baughn, Jr B. F. Arnold

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Mondays ..••••..••..• 1st and 3rd MondayS ••••• , •••.••• 1st and 3rd Fridays.............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ....••..••.. 1st Friday ............••..••..•.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......•.•... 1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...••••.... 2nd and 4th Fridays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•.• ~ . " •••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•......

Charter Date Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 12,1869 Oct. 17,1870 Sept. 26, 1907 May 6,1852 Oct. 13,1892 Sept.25,1905 May 26,1865 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 10, 1871 Oct. 17. 1873 OctJ7.1924

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SECOND DISTRIOT-JAMES M. DEWITT, D. D, G. M" Kirksville, Mo.

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Adair

. Kirksville .••••••. Adair ..•••••••••. Novinger ..••.••. Knox ..•...•.. Colony Edina ..•.••••••• Paulville Greensburg •.....

11l5IKirksvilJe ..•..•.. 366JKirksville •••••••. 583INovinger ...••••. 168lColony 291IEdina .••••.••••. 319jHurdland 414IGreensburg .•..•.

Harvey G. Sevits ..... Loren P. Wright ..•.. Ezra K. Noe ......•.. L. E. McReynolds Edward J. Phillips Wm. F. Johnson Chas. Rice

Grover C. Chambers Ernest T. Scofield .. Hoyt C. Davis C. E. McReynolds .. Wm. D. Scearce John R. Botts E. L. Priebe

1st and 3rd Tuesdays............. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ••..••..••.•. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•••••••. 2nd & 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays .••••••••••• 1st Tuesday 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•......

June 30,1864 Oct. 13,1881 Sept. 26, 1906 May 21.1864 Oct. 15.1866 Oct. 12,1869 Oct. 1871 jooool

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c.n o THIRD DISTRICT-RUSSELL A. HAUCK, D. D. G. M., 320 So. 16th St., Unionville, Mo. Put~~m ••••••. Hartford ....•....

Homer L. Dickerson C. R. Ethington .... L. W. McCalment.. W. E. Alexander . Chas. E. Smith . Wayne Bennett . Joseph W. Moore..• Otis Reinhard . Cecil M. Clem . George W. Munns ..

Somerset•.....• , Unionville ..•••.• SUlli~an••••••. HumphreyS ...•.. Seaman ....•••... Green City...•••. Putnam •••••.••. Pollock .••.•..... Arcana.••.•••... Winigan .

1st Friday. . . . . . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• 1st and 3rd MondayS. . . . • . • • • • • • .. 2nd and 4th Mondays •••.••••••••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...••.•.•.•.. 1st and 3rd Mondays. • • • • • • • • • • • •. 1st and 3rd Thursdays. . . . . • . . . . .. 1st Thursday ........•..••••.••• "1 1st and 3rd Tuesdays. . • • • • • • • • • •• 1st Wednesday. . . . . . • • •. .• •••• • •. 1st & 3rd Wednesdays .•.••.•••••.

May May May Oct. May Oct. May Oct. Oct. Oct.

30, 1867 29, 1861 30,1861 13,1887 28, 1858 16, 1894 28, 1869 16, 1884 13, 1871 17,1889

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FOURTH DISTRICT-F. M. McKINNEY, D. D. G. M., Box 457, Trenton, Mo. Grundy •••.••. j .. • •••••• :: ••••'••• Mercer

Trenton ·11l1ITrenton·········1 Laredo.......... 253ILaredo •.•••••••. Ga!t ....•. : •.•.•. ~23IGa!t Splckardsvllle ..•. o24ISplckard ..•••.... Mercer , 35IPrinceton ••••.••.

'1 1st Thursday each month ••••••••• , 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•.•.•.•.• , Oct.

Wm. R. DenslOw 1Stanley McKemy •. Taylor E. Grabast ..•. Wayne Freeman... J. O. Co.oper Byron Grisamore .•. R. B. Nichols ..•.•.•. G. E. Shaw........ Elba Kauffman W. Earl Kauffman ..

1849 15,1868 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 15,1890 1st and 3rd Wednesdays.......... Oct. 16,1886 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... June 9,1853

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FIFTH DISTRICT-EUGENE SUTHERLAND, D. D. G. M., Bethany, Mo.

...... ,... ...... .... ...... ......

Harrison •••••. Bethany ••....•.. Lorraine ..•.•.... Lod~e of Light •.• Cainsville ....•••• New Hampton ... , Prairie .••.••....

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971 Bethany ......... 128 IRidgeway .••••••. 257lEagleville •..•••.. 328 ICainsville ..••.••. 510lNew Hampton ... 5561Gilman City ......

R. E. Moulthrop ••... Chas. T. Bridges ..•

Paul Gillespie ...•.••. Leonard Todd ....•.• William Purdun ...•• Wayne Edson ..•••••. Kenneth DeWitt••..••

Harry C. Jones ..... J ames Kennedy ...• Alvin Wood ........ R. L. Grun ......... F. E. Eberhart .....

and 4th Tuesdays ••..•.••..... 1st and 3rd MondayS ..••••.•••.•• 2nd & 4th Wednesdays •••••••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•...•....•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....•...•••.• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .•........ ~nd

May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

26,1854 7,1878 15, 1868 13, 1870 1926 19. 1892 ~

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SIXTH DISTRICT-H. H. MANRING, D. D. G. M., McFall, Mo. County

No., Location Lodge Havana ..•••••.•. 21IMcFall ...•...•.. Stanberry .••.••.. 1091 Stanberry . Gentryville .••.•••. 1251 Gentryville .. Athens ...••.•••.. 1271 Albany ..•..••.•. . Ancient Craft ..... 3771King City Berlin ........•... 378IBerlin ..........• Jacoby .....•..•.. 447lDarlington ..•.••. W~~h........ Grant City ..••.•.. 661Grant City •.•..•. .. Defiance ..•..•.•.. 881 Sheridan Allensville ..•..•.. 1981Allendale ••••.••. Jonathan ..•...... 321IDenver ....•.•.•.

Ge~try .••••••.

Master Clair Clevenger . William Pickerel . Clarence A. Bacon . Vance Parman . George O. Vaughn . H. G. Pittsenbarger .. James Ellis . Fred Jacobs . A. G. Smith West ..•. Trustin Wilkinson . Wilmer D. Stevens .

Secretary I Time of Meeting H. Hovey Manring. 1st and 3rd Fridays . S. A. Goodding. . . .. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS .•••••.••••. Geo. W. Crawford .. 2nd and 4th Saturdays .••.••..•... L. Frank Smith .... 2nd and 4th ThursdayS .••.•.••••. N. B. Callahan. . . .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays . L. F. Shipp ......•. 2nd and 4th Mondays ....•.•...••• Hobart Ireland 1st and 3rd Fridays ..........••••. J. Harry Kibbee 1st and 3rd MondayS .. Roger McAlister. • •. 2nd and 4th Mondays .•..•.•••.••. Wade Dawson ...••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..••..••..• Clyde Pryor .....••. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .

Charter Date Oct. 6,1879 Oct. 17, 1879 May 10, 1850 May 8,1851 Oct. 13, 1871 Sept. 1906 Oct. 19. 1901 Oct. 10, 1894 Oct. 17, 1878 May 30,1860 Oct. 12. 1869

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SEVENTH DISTRICT-MARTIN SUESS, D. D. G. M., Maryville, Mo. Nodaway ..•.. •• .. ... •• • .... .. • .... .. .. ... •• • •... .. • .... •• • .... .. • .•.. •• . ....

Xenia........... Quitman ......... Ravenwood ....... Graham .......... White Hall ....... Burlington ...•.•. Nodaway ........ Pickering ........ Clearmont .•••... Skidmore ........

50jHopkins ......... 196IQuitman ......... 201\Ravenwood ...... 289IGraham ..••..... 301IBarnard ......... 4421Burlington Jet... 470 I Maryville ........ 472IPickering ........ 507iClearmont ..•.... 511ISkidmore ........

James Godsey ........ Byron D. young..... Merlin Warehime .... Jack Weston .......•. Edgar Jackson ....... Harold O. Staples.... Thos. R. Cox........ C. Homer Pyle ....... Wilbur Maier ........ John H. Jones .......

Lloyd E. Fine ..•••. Fred Wright ....... J. J. Smith ........ Raymond Geyer .... P. D. Stalling ...... Frank Larabee ..••. Walter E. Smith ... William E. Summy. Elden Huls........ Glenn J. Stevens ..•

1st and 3rd Thursdays ....••...•.. 1st and 3rd Mondays .............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .....•...... 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... 1st & 3rd Tuesdays ...••.•••.••... 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays............ 1st & 3rd Thursdays.............. 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•......

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June May 'Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

2.1866 30, 1860 13,1892 18.1900 18,1886 13, Ul81 17,1877 11,1873 1871 Oct. 12,1882

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o EIGHTH DISTRICT-JOHN HATC'H, D. D. G. M., Mound City, Mo. Atchison ..•••. North Star ..••••. Sonora.......... " Northwest .•..... Fairfax ....••.... Bolt ..•• :::::: Maitland ..•..•... Oregon ..•...••.. Forest City ..•... Mound City ..••.. Craig .........•..

..

157IRockport •••..... 200IWatson .••..•.... 358ITarkio ..•....... 483IFairfax ...•..••. , 112IMaitland .•.••... 13910regon .....•..•. 2141Forest City ...•.• 2941Mound City ••.•.. 606ICrai~

Delbert E. Stites ..... M. H. Morgan....... Frost Browning D. V. Bacon Ernest Rowlett...... Ralph C. Moore John S. Clanton..... Milton Crockett J. B. Offenbacker

Virgil E. Walter... Luther Hudson , Delbert Britton W. A. Groesbeck... Fred H. Davidson .. Everett Planalp Lavere North F. J. Bridgmon C. M. Randall

2nd and 4th Mondays .....••.•.... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•..••••••.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .....•..•••.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....••...••.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .•••••••.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••••••.•.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ......•...•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. May May

9,1856 14, 1867 1884 1874 19, 1867 31,1855 30,1861 1868 Sept. 29. 1909

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NINTH DISTRICT-FRANK A. MILLER, D. D. G. M., Corby Bldg., St. Joseph, Mo.

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. Andrew ••••... Savannah Helena ..••.•..•. Lincoln ...•...... Whitesville ••••.•. ,., Rosendale .•••.... Valley ....••••... Cosby •......•••• Buchanan .•... Agency •••••••••. Wellington .•..•.. St. Joseph .••.... Birming ......••. Zeredatha ••.••.. , Rushville ...•.••. Brotherhood .••... Charity .••.•.••.. KingHill ••.•..•. Saxton .

.

71ISavannah . 1171 Rochester . 138lFillmore . 162IWhitesville . 4041 Rosendale , 413IBolckow .....••.• 600ICosby ..•..•..... 10IAgency .....••... 22IDeKalb ...•...... 781St. Joseph . 150lFaucett..•....... 1891St. Joseph .•..... 2381Rushville . 2691St. Joseph ...•.•. 3311St. J05eph ..••••. 3761St. Joseph . 508lSaxton .

L. L. Schmitt . Frank Gunselman . Sheldon Weaver . Oren Lee Staley , Francis K. Hutson . Alfred E. Hagg . Willie Bowlin . Walter R. Cooke . Russell L. Wilson . Rex L. Brooks . Chas. F. Brown . Lloyd Seaman . Charles T. Jones . Orrin L. Mark . Price Shoemaker . Alfred W. Hartman .. Joseph Lang .

J. B. Rucker . H. E. Shanks . Bruce F. Wilkes . Fisher Potts . C. J. Watts . Glenn Neely . W. B. Durant . Robert H. Adams . Hallie V. Redmon .. W. L. Mulvania . Chas. S. Mays . Milton W. Taylor . Elmer Moore . Victor T. Cumming~ Lewis O. WeigeL . Elvis R. Poff . C. R. Brodrick .

1st and 3rd Thursdays •.....•••... 2nd & 4th Mondays .............•. 1st and 3rd Mondays , 1st & 3rd Wednesdays .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...•..•••.. 1st and 3rdThursdays . 1st and 3rd Saturdays .....•..•... 1st and 3rd Saturdays •.••.•••••.. 1st Saturday. " ., .......•..••..•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•••••...•.. 4th Saturday ..•..•...••••.•••.•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•.....•.. 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 2nd and 4th Fridays : .•.•... 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•.. , •..•. , . 1st & 3rd Wednesdays ..........•.

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Oct. 28, 1844 Oct. 22, 1924 June 2,1866 May 28,1856 Oct. 2,1896 1873 1908 June 1.1866 May 6,1252 Oct. 14, 1846 May 22,1858 May 28,1859 May 26,1866 Oct. 19, 1922 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 12, 1882

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o o LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TENTH DISTRICT-ALFRED DUNLAP, D. D. G. M., Winston, Mo. County

Lodge Union Star ...••.. Parrott •...•.••.. Osborn ....••.•... Continental ..••.. Clarksdale ..•.... ' ~a~ess....... Western Star •.... Pattonsburg . Gallatin .....•••.. Earl .......•••.•. Lock Springs •... Jameson ...••.••. Jamesport ..•.... De~alb••...•.

No. I Location 1241Union Star . 308lMaysville .••...•. 31710sborn . 454IStewartsville . 559lClarksdale . 15lWinston . 651 Pattonsburg ..•.. 106lGallatin ....•.... 285jCoffey . . 4881Lock Springs 500 IJameson .•••.•.•. 564lJamesport .

Master Irvin Richter . Jack Riffle . Forrest Doak ....•... Martin B. Winger.... O. R. Van de Linder .. Glenn E. Everman . Jesse E. Walker . Bruce M. Holbrock .•. Gerald Salmon ..•...• Charley O. Litton .... Herald Elmore ......• L. C. Grumbine .

Sec'retary B. U. Clark . . C. T. Pilcher Otis Mix . Clarence G. Waller. Donald M. Barrow .. Alfred Dunlap ....• Harvey F. NaIll' . Roy Cox . W. S. Underwood .. Joseph Hicks . Sam Pugh . Doyle C. Kime .

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ......•. 1st and 3rd Mondays ..•••••••.•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays •••••••... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ........•.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......••.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•....•... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ......••... 2nd & 4th TuesdayS .. 1st and 3rd Wednesday .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•.•..... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .......•.. 1st and 3rd Mondays .

Charter Date Oct. 15. 1885 Oct. 12. 1869 Oct. 12, 1864 1903 Oct. 3.1893 June 1.1866 May 20,1854 Oct. 16. 1879 Oct. 15. 1868 Oct. 15. 1874 Oct. 11. 1877 Oct. 19. 1898

.......... ..........

Liberty .......... Holt ........•..•. .......... Angerona ..••.... .......... Clay ....•••.•••.. .......... Kearney .....•.•. .......... Temperance ..•... Clinton ••.••.. Hemple .......•.. Vincil. .•..••••.. Plattsburg ..••... Gower ..••..•.•.. Lathrop •••......

..

31ILiberty .......... 49IHolt ..••......... 1931 Missouri City ...• 207 IExcelsior Springs. 3111 Kearney .•....... 4381 Smithville ..••.... 37IHemple ...•...... 62:Cameron ...•..•.. 1131 Plattsburg ..•••.. 397IGower ....•••.•.. 5061 Lathrop ..••.•...

Joe L. Moore ........ C. M. Thompson ..... Willie E. Shaw. Sr.... C. J. Martin ......... John W. Erwin ...... Joe Edwards ........ Gerald O. Boyer ...... C. ljarold Galpin ..... Darrel D. Lyon ...... Ira Bodenhausen ..... Ralph L. Rupe .......

John J. Bowman ... L. W. Bartee ...... Luke E. Donovan ... H. H. Woods ....... Don Thompson ..... Alfred O. Lowman. James R. Vaughn .. O. Rex Orr ........ Hugh O. Marshall .. E. G. Reid, Acting .. James L. Taylor ...

2nd and 4th Mondays ......••••••. 2nd and 4th Mondays ............ 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•..•.••. 1st and 3rd Mondays .•....••••.••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .••••••••••. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ........... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd MondayS ......•••..... 1st Thursday ... , ...••..•..•.. , .. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ...•...... 3rd Monday each month ..•.....•.

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ELEVENTH DISTRICT-JOHN J. BOWMAN, D. D. G. M., Liberty, Mo. ~

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8 Oct. 9.1840 Sept. 1854 May 28.1859 May 30.1861 1869 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 18. 1900 Oct. 19. 1867 May 9. 1850 Oct. 16. 1872 Oct. 12. 1882

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TWELFTH DISTRICT-A. B. CLEVELAND, D. D. G. M., Kingston, Mo. Caldwell •.•••• \ Kingston ..•.••.. ' .. Braymer ..•..••.• Hamilton •..••••. Polo ..........••. Breckenridge . . . . . . 1 Cowgill Livi~~ton:"'1 Friendship....... •.•. Benevolence ..•... .. • •.. Wheeling ..•••••• .. • ••• 1 Dawn ...•...•....

118IKingston ..•.••.. 135IBraymer 224/Hamilton •••.•••• 232IPolo ..•..•..••.•. 334IBreckenridge 561ICowgill.

Richard L. Adams , James V. Baker Robert D. Hines ....• Claud Cravens John M. Patrick T. M. Parker ; 89!Ch~llicothe R. E. Pettit 170,UtlCS Arthur young 434jWheeling •••••••. Stephen Biggerstaff .. 539ILudlow .....•.•.. James Baxter

R. G. Geilker D. Irving Farrar I. C. Wilson Lincoln Dana ,. Herbert Woolsey Homer Buster '. F. W. C?rnue H. D. RIce P. B. Myers ....•... M. F. Pollard

1st and 3rd Thursday ..••••••••••• \ 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..........•• , 1st and 3rd Tuesdays............. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ......••.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... 2nd and 4th Fridays 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st Saturday .....•......•..•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays , 2nd and 4th Fridays

Oct. 19,1897 Oct. 17,1889 1867 Oct. 16,1878 Oct. 30,1870 Oct. 12,1893 Oct. 12, 18~7 May SO, 1807 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 17,1889

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d2ILinneus 86IBrookfield... . .•. 227ILaelede ...•..•... 233IBucklin ....•..... 325IMeadville ..•••... 481fMarceline

Walter C. Anthony . N. G. Couch 'I 2nd and 4th Mondays . King Ridgway . J. E. Kimber , 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..........•. , Thomas H. Wade .. Russell Neeley. . . .. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ...•...... , F.!. Anderson . Don R. Owen...... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....•....•... B. G. Lewallen . E. E. Sidebottom. .. Each Tuesday evening ....•.•••... C. A. McAfee . W. R. StongeI', 11st and 8rd Thursdays .

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THmTEENTH DISTRICT-WARREN W. DRAY, D. D. G. M., Linneus, Mo. Linn •••••••... Jackson ......•.. Brookfield ....•.• Cypress ..••...••. Bucklin ...•.•••.. Dockery ...•••••• ' Marceline .•••....

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FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-W. A. BAGLEY, D. D. G. M., Shelbina, Mo.

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Macon ••.••... Callao ....•.•••.. Bloomington ..•.. Censer ...••.•.•. La Plata . Lodge of Truth . Excello ...••.•••• , Elmer ...•......• Sh~!bY . St. Andrews ••••.. Shelbina .. Hunnewell •••••.. Bethel ..•••..••.. Clarence ....••...

.

38ICallao .••..•..... 102IBevier.......... 172IMacon ....•...•. 2371La Plata.•••..•.. 268IAtlanta......... 332IExcello .....•.•.. 648IElmer ....••..••. 96IShelby.vilIe 228IShelbina ..••••••. 415IHunnewell 537IBethel 6621 Clarence. . . . . • . ..

Kenneth Keoppe Allen T. Jones Norman Gilbert H. W. Maitland , Joe H. Ayres LeRoy Andrews Geo. N. Meeks John W. Staggs B. M. Barkelew F. M. Browne , A. D. Wright Robert L. Shoush. . ..

Bert B. Bledsoe.... C. F. Larsen Romet Bradshaw Harry D. Carter Ernest R. Pierson .. Ross King 1. H. Grubbs ....•.. Ted A. Bollinger Fred R. White..... J. Albert Howe Sam Ziegler....... Claude Oylear '

1st & 3rd Fridays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•.....•..•. 2nd and 4th Monday .•....•.•••••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•....•. 1st & 3rd Mondays ....•••••••••.• 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ..••..•.•.. 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 2nd and 4th Fridays . 1st and 8rd Wednesdays ......•..• 2nd & 4th Fridays ....•.........•. 1st and 3rd Mondays . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

June 2,1866 May 10,1849 June 14, 1875 June 22, 1866 Oct. 15, 1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 22, 1920 May 10,1848 May 29,1862 Oct. 13. 1871 Feb. 22,1888 Oct. 22. 1924

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-BARKLEY D. MILLION, D. D. G. M., Palmyra, Mo. Lodge Wyaconda . Monticello .•••••. LaBelle ..•..•••.. Craft •••...•.•... Williamstown .... Lewistown ..•..•. Ewing .•••.•.•... M~~ion....... Palmyra•••..•... St. John's . HannibaL ....•.. Philadelphia .•••. ~1ls ••••••••• Ralls ........••.. Lick Creek .•••••. New London ..... County

Le,~is ••••••••

NO.1 Location 241La Grange .•••... 581 Monticello ...•••• 2221 LaBelle .••••••••. 287ICanton •••..•..•. 370 IWilliamstown ..•. 494ILewistown ..••.. 577IEwing ..••.•••••. 18lPalmyra.•..••••. 28lHannibal •..•••.. 188lHannibal•.•••••. 502lPhiladelphia•••.. 331 Center ..•..••••• 302jPerry •.•••..••.• 3071New London ..•..

Master Carroll D. Stewart Wm. B. Anderson Jared Woodworth Frank G. Watson H. E. Lemmon E. E. House Ira Wenneker A. S. Harrington K. T. Thomas Alvin A. Walker Lyman M. McPike B. E. Perkinson Jack M. English Charles W. Hayden

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Secretary Leslie Edwards . . R. Lance West Frank L. Young . Jere Bradshaw . John S. Smith . Archie E. Graves . John W. Terpening. R. L. Haydon . W. H. Blackshaw . Frederick E. Herrin Thomas J. Bleigh . Grover C. Layne . C. W. Deckerd ..•.. Geo. F. Watson ....

·Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd Thursdays " . 2nd and 4th Thursdays .•••••••••• 2nd and 4th Fridays .....•......•. 1st and 3rd Mondays ......•...... 1st and 3rd ThursdayS ..••.•.•.... 1st and 3rd ThursdayS •••••••••••• 1st and 3r.l Thursdays ..•••....... 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 1st and 3rd Mondays ...•..•....... 2nd and 4th Mondays ..........•.. 1st Thursday ...•.......••.•..••. 2nd and 4th WednesdayS ...••••.•. 2nd Tuesday ••••...•..•.••..••.••. 1st and 3rd Fridays ..••..•••.••••.

Charter Date Oct. 11, 1887 1842 Oct. 11, 18ls8 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 12, 1876 Sept. '/, 1906 Apr. 25, 1881 May 30,1861 May 30,1859 Oct. 11, 1877 May 27,1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 12, 1869

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SIXTEENTH DISTRICT-RICHARD N. BLOOM, D. D. G. M., Bowling Green, Mo. Pike

. Eelia........•.•• 14IEolia•.....•.••.. Clarksville ...•••• 17IClarksville.••.... Perseverance ..•.. 92ILouisiana Phoenix ..••••.•. 1361Bowling Green •.• Frankford •••••.• 1921Frankford ..•..•. Pike ...••••••••.. 399ICurryville.......

Joe N. England . R. B. Scholl, Jr . Ira Reed . Allen P. Crowley ,. Kennedy S. Bucks .. , . J. D. McCune .

Wharton Schooler .. Harry L. Martin . John L. Bray . Vernon E. Vogel. .. Robert J. Parham .. L. D. Harris .

2nd and 4th Thursday ••.•.••.•••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•.•.•••••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•........•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•.••••••••. 2nd and 4th Mondays .•..•......•. 3rd Friday each month ..•...•....

Oct. Dec. Oct. May May Jan.

16. 1886 1,1930 12, 1847 1851 26,1869 24,1871

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SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT-W. R. HOWELL, D. D. G. M., P. O. Box 382, Shelbina, Mo.

.

19IParis Monroe ••••••• Paris Union . Florida . 23IFlorida ..•...•.•. Monroe.. , •••.••. 641Monroe City .••.• Madison ......••. 91IMadison Santa Fe ...•••.. 4621 Santa Fe ..•••••• Holliday . 660IHolliday ..•..•.•.

Fred Brock Boyd Wilmarth Morris W. Betts Guy M. Threlkeld Stanley Poage Perry F. Lenhart

Henry Sladek Edward M. Adams. W. S. Dawson .....• Estell T. Broaddus. P. H. Stuart Thomas E. Sparks ..

0

2nd and 4th Mondays .. 4th Wednesdays ...••••.•.....•••. 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 2nd and 4th Thursday . Friday before 3rd Sunday . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..........•..

Mar. I, 1836 1852 June 2,1866 Oct. 12, 1847 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 17,1923

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EIGHTEENTH DISTRIOT-C'HARLES D, EMBRE, D, D. G. M., 1204 Fisk Ave., Moberly, Mo. .Ran~o)ph•••••

Huntsville ••••••. Milton ..•.•••••.. Clifton Hill .••... Moberly . Cairo . Higbee ..•••••••• ' Jacksonville ..•... Clark ....••••••••

30IHuntsville ..•••.• 151IMilton •.•••••••.. 1611Clifton Hill ••••.• 344IMoberly ••••.•••• 486ICairo •••••...••.. 527IHigbee •••..••••• 541IJacksonville •..•• 610IClark •••..•••.•.

o 0

David S. Eubank...•. J. M. Meals Robt. L. Leathers Arthur P. Hutts Harvey Reynolds Roy Muir.... '" ...• Frank Coulter ..•...• Vernon Settle

0

Warren A. Dennis .. Arthur Haak . Geo. K. Hill . John Wm. Tate . U. L. Dameron . Edwin B. Hawkins. O. C. Gross . Frank L. Ornburn. 0

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1st and 3rd Tuesdays. '" ....•..•. 1st Saturday each month .••••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays .. , .•••••••• 2nd and 4th Mondays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays ••..•••••••. 1st and 8rd Wednesdays •••.••••••. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ........•• 1st & 3rd Thursdays .

Oct.

8,1840 1865 May 1859 Oct. 6,1870 Oct. 14,1874 Oct. 15, 1885 Sept. 24, 1902 Sept. 28, 1910

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NINETEENTH DISTRICT-ARTHUR G. LYNCH, D. D. G. M., Brnnswick, Mo. Ch~ton •.•••.

Eureka.......... Warren.......... Triplett Westville ..• Salisbury.. Rothville ••..•••.• Cunningham Mendon ..•. 0

0

••• 0

0

0

•••••

73IBrunswick .•..... 74IKeytesville .•..... 122ITriplett 202IWestville ..•• 208ISalisbury 426IRothville ..••• o. 525ISumner 628IMendono 0

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Wm. D. Hibler, Jr W. Alburn Drace Claude E. Murray Marvin Graves H. R. Carter W. H. Richeson Chas. W. Myers Joe H. McGrew

0"

1Arthur G. Lynch ... Marvin G. Wilson .. A. L. wires , .. W. L. Ray H. H. Brummall ..•. \ Lee Clair ........•• Leslie O. Allen Carroll G. Shull

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1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•..•....... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....••..•.•.. 1st and Srd Thursdays ..•••.• 3rd Saturday ..•....•.... 2nd Friday each month . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .•....••.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Mondays ........•.•.. "0 0

0

••• 0

0

•••

Oct. 16,1845 Oct. 20, 1846 Oct. 12, 1896 1866 1867 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 16, 11184 Oct. 28, 1924'

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-ContInued

TWENTIETH DISTRICT-eHAS. S. RUTT, D. D. G. M:, 304 No. Main St., Carrollton, Mo. County Lodge Carroll .•••••. , De Witt..•••.••. ' to ....... Wakanda ..•••••. to ....... Bogard ••.•..•••. Hale City .••••••. CarrolL .•••••••• ' Bosworth•••••.•• Ray ... ::::::: Hardin ..•..•..••

.. ...

.......

Location 391De Witt ....•.••• 621 Carrollton ..••••• 101lBogard•..••••••. 216IHale ............ 249INorborne •••••••. 697IBosWGrth ..•••••• 322IHardin ..........

NO.1

Master John W. Tillman ...•. George 1. Downing ... Ray Allen ....••..••• Roy T. Gibson ......• Everett Wagner ..•.. Ernest Bittiker ....•• John M. Summers ..• ,

Secretary Truman W. Ward .. Harry E. Schanz ..• Frank Brunscher ... Robert L. Bartlett •. R. H. Robinson ..•. , Henry Galbrecht ... S. L. Lockridge ..•.

Time 'of Meeting 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••••••••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... ' 2nd and 4th Tuesdays •••••••••••• , 1st and 8rd Mondays ..•••.•••.... 2nd and 4th Mondays .•..•.•••..•• 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... , 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ......•••.••.,

Charter Date Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 17, 1842 Oct. 14, 1886 Oct. 12, 1893 1867 Sept. SO, 1908 Oct. 12, 1869

13IBarry 63IWeston •••.....•. 120 IParkville 169;Camden Point •••• 204IDearborn •••••••• 339IFarley 366IEdgerton •.•••••• 6041Platte City .•.•••.

Walter Roos Alfred L. Nower ..•.• Geo. D. Borden, Jr David Harlan ......•. Wm. R. Allen ....•... Jas. A. Patterson .••• Elliott Foster ....•.•. J. W. Sullard

Frank R. Williams. James A. Offutt .... Leon A. Robbins... A. J. Hillix ....•••. G. R. Manville H. E. Babcock Clyde M. Newman .. Herman Klein

1at Saturday . 1st and Srd Thursdays .••••••••••. 1st Monday . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ••••••••••.•• 2nd Wednesday •....••••..•...... 2nd Wednesday .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•.•••....... 2nd and 4th Mondays .

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TWENTY-FmST DISTRICT-HARVEY B. HUFFORD, D. D. G. M., Gashland, Mo. Rising Sun ....... Platte ,. •••••••• ' Weston •••••••••• Compass .•..••••• Camden Point ..•• Rowley ..•.••.••• Fidelity •.••••••.• Adelphi ..•••••... Platte City .•..••.

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1862 11, 1842 10,1860 19, 1867 19, 1867 13, 1870 18, 1888 13, 1881

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TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT-HENRY W. FOX, D. D. G. M., 1200 Land Bank Bldg., Kansas Oity, Mo. .Jackson ..

1 Heroine

Albert Pike Kansas City Temple Cecile-Daylight Rural Westport Ivanhoe Gate City Orient South Gate york Swope Park •..... Sheffield East Gate Northeast Country Club ••••. Rockhill. •••••••• Clay •.•..•..•. Alpha .....•.•.••

..... "I

1041Kansas City 2191Kansas City 220lKansas City 2991Kansas City 3061Kansas City •••• ;. 3161Kansas City 340lKansas City 4461Kansas City 6221Kansas City 5461Kansas City 5471Kansas City 6631Kansas City 6171Kansas City .••••. 626 IKansas City 630lKansas City 6431Kansas City 6661Kansas City ..•••. 6631Kansas City •..••. 6691N. Kansas City ...

Philip Goldberg L. K. Languein James H. Cowan ..•.. Charles W. Chaney Ralph A. Hughes Edward E. Wolf Richard J. Eckert John A. Weiss .....•. R. R. Radford Rudolph S. Chapman. Lester O. Hart Chas. C. Hetzler R. V. Nick Carter HomerRearick E. A. Landingham A. E. Critchfield W. D. Strosnider•.... Edward Ross. . . . . . •• Charles F. Dennis ....

Joseph S. Epstein .. C. L. Soderstrom ..• Edwin W. Ernst Clare M. Chitty ...• Edgar D. Doane H. B. Blanchard Wm. F. Lacaff.~ Frank A. Lewis Fred H. Knight ...• Vernie G. Fisher Thos. M. Pratt, Sr.. Irvin F. Strycker J. E. Witt........• LeonardF.Owens .. Leonard T. Gillham. E. N. Haynes .....• R. T. Swearingen.. Joseph Weinsaft. .. Walter Hansen .....

2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd and 4th MondayS 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th WednesdayS ..••••.... 1st and 3rd Mondays 2nd and 4th TuesdayS 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd SaturdayS............ 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•••..... 2ndand4thThursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd MondayS ...••••••••••. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays. .• . • . . . .. 2nd and 4th Mondays •.•....•.••..

May 10.1849 Oct. 17.1896 May 3,1861 Oct. 15.1868 Oct. 7,1923 Oct. 12.1869 Oct. 11,1894 Oct. 17.1901 Oct. 11.1888 Sept. 22. 1920 Oct. 16.1890 Oct. 17.1896 Sept. 28, 1911 Sept.:!5,1912 Oct. 21,1911 Apr. 19, 1916 Sept. 21. 1921 Oct. 28, 1926 Sept.21.1921

..

..... :::::

61 1Waverly ••...•... 149ILexington 364IHigginsville .•••.• 464IConcordia ••••••• 47610dessa 57/Richmond •••••.•. 2231 Camden 393ILawson .••...••• 44410rrick •..........

W. D. Weedin James P. Hall Herbert E. Mock ..••. Elmer Walkenhorst .. Mack E. Green Floyd H. Clark ...•.• , Harry L. Waller ....• J. R. Basham .....••• R. A. Stockton ....•..

W. C. Rowe ...•.••• R. J. Tarlton ...••. , John R. Bridges ..•. Everett Pape...... Rufus H. Kelly F. B. Thompson •••. Frank P. Kirkland. Laurence D. Estill.. J. A. Hughes ....•..

2nd Thursday •.•••••.....•..••••. 3rd Tuesday . 2nd and 4th Mondays ...•..•••.••. 1st and 3rd Monday~•.•.••••••••. 2nd and 4th Fridays . 3rd Monday each month ...•.•••••. 1st and 3rd MondayS .. 1st and 3rd Fridays ......•...••••. 2nd Thursday each month ......••.

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TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT-JAMES P. HALL, D. D. G. Mo, Lexington, Mo. Laf~rette ..•.. Waverly .•••••••. Lexington .••••••' Higginsville •••••. Concordia ..••••.. .......... Mount Hope ••••.. Richmond •••..••. Ray . ~ Bee Hive ..•...... Ada....•.......•

o

June 2.1866 June 4,1886 Oct. 14. 1884 Oct. 15,1874 Oct. 16. 1874 Oct. 12, 1842 Sept. I, 1921 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 16, 1872

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-ROBT. L. HOY, D. D. G. M., Marshall Bldg., Marshall, Mo. County Lodge INo.1 Location . Sa}Jne........ Arrow Rock. • • . • . 551 Arrow Rock C~mb:idge.... .• . 6~ISI~ter: .••••..... MIamI ... ,. .••... 8oIMlami •...••..••. Trilumina ..•.••.. 205 IMarshall. ....•... Barbee ••.•••..••. 2171Sweet Springs .•. Malta .....•..•... 4021Malta Bend ..•••. Oriental •.••.•••. 518IBlackburn .....•. Nelson 560INelson .

Master Wm. A. Dickson Joe H. Hume Ralph W. Malan Forest Duncan Claude Burnett Horace C. Taylor J. C. Egan G. H. Williams

Secretary ;. E. E. Hailey . . Frank G. Schmidt .. . Geo. W. Wilson . . Geo. H. Fuller . . Paul Wylie . . Robert G. Miller . . Walter C. Borchers. . Harry H. Coburn ...

Time of Meeting I Charter Date 2nd Thursday. . . . . . • • . . • • • • • • • • .. Oct. 8, 1845 1st Tuesday. . • . •• . • . .• • • •• . .• . .. June 6, 1866 4th Tuesday. . • . . • . . • . . • . • • . • • . .. June 2, 1866 1st Thursday. . . . • • . • • • • • • • • • . . . . Dec. 9, 1867 Last Friday. .• •• •••• •• • •• ••••• ••. Oct. 19, 1867 1st Tuesday Oct. 17,1901 3rd Tuesday Oct. It, 1883 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....••••••••. Oct. 11, 1893

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TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-A. B. VANLANDINGHAM, D. D. G. M., 3 No. Garth Ave., Columbia, Mo.

...... .. ..

Cooper ..••.•.. Cooper ........••. ........ Pleasant Grove ... Wm.D.Muir ..... Wallace ....••••.. Prairie Home .... , Ho:arci: ::: ::: Howard ..•..••.•. ....... Fayette •..•..••.. ....... Livingston ••••••. ....... Armstrong .......

36lBoonville ..•.••.. 14210tterville •.•••• " 2771 Pilot Grove •••••• 456lBunceton ..•.•••• 5031Prairie Home •••. 41New Franklin ..•. 471 Fayette ..•••••• ,. 51 IGlasgow ..••••••• 70IArmstrong .......

Robert F. Geiger ..... L. E. Wagenknecht... Charles Sandy ....... J. W. Gerhardt ...... A. C. Langendoerfer. W. R. Koelling ..•.... John A. Golson ...... Lewis R. Amick ...... Marion Walker ......

Clarence L. Hurt ... J. H. Gunn ........ P. E. Hays ......... Robert Case ........ Fred L. Schilb ..... Carl A. Edmonston. Samuel P. Ayres, Jr Robert W. Raines .. Aubra M. Green ....

2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ...•...•.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....••....... 1st & 3rd Tuesday .•..•........... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•••••..•.•• 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....••....... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .•••••••••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays •••...•.....

Oct. May Feb. Oct. Oct. May Oct.

9, 1841 1855 5,1878 16, 1872 13, 1881 6,1852 11, 1842 1876 May 1854

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TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-JULIUS R. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Oentralia, Mo.

..

Boone••••••..

Centralia .•...•.. Twilight ..•••.••. Ashland •••••••.. Sturgeon ••...•.. Hallsville ..•..... Ancient Landm'k. Hinton ..•..•.••. Acacia ..••....•..

69lCentralia ......•. 114IColumbia .•...... 156IAshland ..•.••••. 174ISturgeon ...••... 336lHallsville ..•..... 356 IHarrisburg ...•.• 455IHinton ....•..... 602IColumbia .

Franklin J. Struwe .. , Charles W. Roemer .. , L. R. Gilpin . Dewey O. Roberts . L. S. Neese .........• Earl O'Brian .......• W. E. Throckmorton. E. H. Haden .

Paul R. Pruett. . ..• Walter A. Reed.... Ross N. Glascock. .. Virgil E. Crowley.. Wm. H. Roberts , J. E. Richardson Tilford Goslin Walter H. Baird ,

1st and 3rd Thursdays ......•.•... 2nd and 4th Tuesday •••••••.•.... , 1st and 3rd Friday•.........••••. 1st Friday ........•..........•... 1st Tuesday each month .......••• 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..•.•.••.... , 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..•...•..... , 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 19, 1867 Sept. 1858 Apr. 80,1857 Oct. 17, 1878 1871 June 6,1904 Sept.29, 1909

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TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRIOT-JOHN R. BAKER, D. D. G. M., Box 192, Fulton, Mo.

.

Audrain •••••.

Call~wa,.

.. ......

Central. •.•.•.• ,. Laddonia ..•..•.. SociaL Hebron Vandalia . Fulton •••..••.•• , New Bloomfield... Portland .•••••.. '1 Tebbetts ........• Shamrock .••••••. Mokane..........

81lMolino. ... ..•... 115ILaddonia....•.•. 266IMartinsburg 354IMexico ..•••••.•• 491IVandalia........ 48IFulton .......••. , 60lNew Bloomfield .. , 2421 Portland..•••.•• ' 565ITebbetts ..•..••.. 585 IShamrock •••••••. 612IMokane

Harry E. Rowland C. M. Roady John B. Ross Joseph M. Bone, Jr Otis W. Ash E. L. Scott Homer E. young Frank J. Soukup Oscar Stuart John Wells Cecil B. Powell

. . . . . . , , . . ,

Clyde W. Ellis H. Christopher Fred Klarenbach B.C. Denton Malcolm L. Motley., Chas. R. Powell. . .. C. M. Holt. . . . . . . .. M. A. Gibson Henry Hazlett W. S. Armstrong Clifford D. Winter ..

2nd Saturday .. 2nd Thursday ....•.••••••••••••• '. 2nd Friday ..........••. , ..•••••• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ........••... 2nd. Friday ... , ......•••...•••••• 1st and 3rd Fridays ............•• 1st and 3rd Mondays .. 2nd and 4th Fridays . 2nd & 4th Wednesdays •.•.•••••••• Thursday before full moon •••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•..........

~

1893 Oct. 28, 1882 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 13, 1870 Dec. 12, 1876 1841 May 25,1854 May 26.1865 Oct. 22, 1902 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept.H, 1911

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TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRIOT-GEORGE R. BARTON, D. D. G. M., Wellsville, Mo.

'I W. A. Marlow 1Paul Rodgers Fred A. Zimmermann G. R. Barton

Montgomery •. 1 Griswold ·1178IBellflower ...•.•• .. •• Wellsville ..•••••. 194IWellsville ..•..•.. .. •• Montgomery .•..• 246 IMontgomery City .. •• Jonesburg ••••••. 457IJonesburg ..••••. .. " Daggett......... 492IMcKittrick

W. L. Schlanker Nicholas L. Key Walter J. Holt

3rd Thursday each month·········1 '1 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...••••.•..•. W. J. Niedergerke .. 2nd and 4th Mondays ....••••..•.. Luther Watkins 3rd Monday Evening .•••••••••••• William A. Bezold .. 1st and 3rd Saturdays............

May 28,1858 May 1860 Sept. 22. 1920 Oct. 12,1893 Oct. 12,1876 t..:>

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DI8TRICT8-Continued

00

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-FRED L. DREnEHNEY, D. D. G. M., Moscow Mills, Mo. County Lodge Lineoln ...•... Troy .....•...•.• Silex ...•..•.•••. New Hope ...•... New Salem .••.•. Louisville ..•..... Nineveh ..•.••.•. Moscow .

..

NO.1 Location 34ITroy .....••..... 76ISiIex . 199 IElsberry ...•.•... 270IWinfield: ....•... 4091 Louisville ..•••.. , 47310Iney . 558/Moscow Mills. , ..

Master Wm. L. Colbert .•.... Clifford J. Horton . Jack Vann . Nathan Ricks , Louis Beasley . Fred R. Worrell , Walter Ki!chner .

Secretary A. J. Blair . Ralph E. Williams. , J. K. R. Langford .. H. H. Arnhold . Ruben T. Michie . A. C. Kerns . A. C. Langford ,

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Mondays .... "...•••.•. Friday on or before full moon •.... 2nd Thursday .......••....•••..•. 1st and 3rd Fridays ..........•••• 3rd Thursday ...••...•.•.......•. 1st Friday ............••••••••... 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..•.........

Charter Date Oct. 7, 1841 Oct. 21, 1897 May 31,1860 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 17.1901 Oct. 16. 1874 1892

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THIRTIETH DISTRICT-MELGE GOLTERMAN, D. D. G. Mo, Foristell, Mo. St. charles····1 Wentzville .••••• " .. Warren ..

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46lWentzviIIe. •.•. Palestine •.•..•.. " 24118t. Charles , • ••. Mechanicsville 260IDefiance ..•••••.• Pauldingville..... lllWright City Warrenton ....•.. 609IWarrenton

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Tolman Cotton Waldo A. Kreder.... Waldo Tuepker John Drewer J. L. Ordelheide ,

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Dallas W. Finn 'lIst and 3rd Fridays ..•.•••..•.... June 22.1866 Ernest R. Engholm. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .•..•.•••••.. May 26,1865 King Pugh , 2nd and 4th Saturdays Oct. 30, 186/l G. C. Schmitt 1st Thursday.................... May 8.1852 A. Juergensmeyer. 2nd and 4th Fridays Sept.19,1917

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THmTY-FmST DISTRICT-VmGIL B. SAVILLE, D. D. G. M., 118 Lavinia, Jefferson City, Mo. ~!e

.

Jefferson . Russellville .••.•.. Hickory Hill ..... ' Centertown .....• Moni~~~·.·.·.·.·.: Tipton ...••.••... California ..••••. , Moniteau .•...... Clarksburg ..•.... Os~&'e •••••••• ' Chamois .•..•.•.. Linn ..•...... '"

.....

431Jefferson City 90IRussellville , 211IEugene 61lICentertowll 66ITipton 183ICalifornia, .•..•. 295IJamestown...... 553:Clarksburg 18oIChamois •.....•.. 326ILinn

William Q. Kehr . Paul V. Bond . James A. Farmer . Truman E. Wegener. D. W. Fenton . G. W. Heslar . Chas. E. Burrus . D. M. Maness . Hubert J. Smith . John Gelven .

Roy D. Jennison . Edgar L. Lindley . Joseph S. Ford . Norman A. Gouge .. William H. Helt . A. E. Wilson . Hugh C. Harkins . H. Sappington . E. H. Schowengerdt F. Edward Busch ...

1st and 3rd Mondays ..•.......... , 2nd Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . 1st Thursday ............•••••. " First Tuesday 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Fridays. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st Saturday each month. . . . . . . . .• 1st and 3rd Mondays. . . . . . . . . . . .. 4th Friday ...............•....... 1 1st and 3rd Saturdays............

Nov. 15, 1841 1888 Oct. 19, Ul67 June 18, 1910 June 2, 1866 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, lh!H May 28. 1857 Oct. 19,1898

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THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT-WM. S. JUERGENS, D. D. G. M., Sullivan, Mo.

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Franklin .••... Evergreen .•••.•. Sullivan •••..••••. Gray Summit •••. , Hope .•.••.•..••. Fraternal .••••••. Columbia .•••••.. Easter .....••••.. Union ...•••••••• . Gaac?,nacie':::: Hermann Owensville ..•..•.

271New Haven ..•..• 1 Edwin H. Baker ..... 69ISullivan ...•••••• Geo. Wm. Biehl •..... 1731Gray Summit ..•. Earl Durbin ........• 251 IWashington ••••.. James Rennick, Jr... 363 1Robertsville .••••• August A. Buck 534IPacific ...•.••••.• Howard H. Turley •.• 5751St. Clair .••••••.• Walter Hiatt. .. ..••• 593IUnion .....•.•••. William S. Toelke..•• 123IHermann ....•••. R. H. Adams ...•.... 62410wensville .•..... Luther Willhite ...•..

Alpheus C. Goodrich., Harry E. Vieten ...... Wm. E. Arnold ..•.•• Walter A. Pfautsch .. Louis H. Bruns .....• E. A. Roemer . Paul E. Lack . Philip H. Frueh , W. D. Stoener . Virgil C. Crowder .

2nd and 4th Thursdays ...•..... ' 1st and 3rd Saturdays .......••. 3rd Thursday each month •••••.• 1st and 3rd Fridays ......•..... ' 1st Saturday ......•...•••.•.... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..••....• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•..•.•..• 2nd and 4th Fridays ..••••.•..•. 2nd and 4th Fridays ....•....... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••.....

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May 26. 1864 June 2,1866 Sept.23. 1903 Oct. 16. 1867 Oct. 12, 1870 Oct. 13. 1887 Sept. 28. 1905 June 18, 1907 May 10,1850 Sept.:l.o.l!l12

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liSt. Louis , 21St. Louis .. 20iSt. Louis .. 2518t. Louis ..•..... 951St. Louis ••••.•.. 1631St. Louis ..••..•. 1801St. Louis ..••..•. , 2181St. Louis ..•••••• ' 2671St. Louis . 3471St. Louis ......•.. 4161St. Louis ••...... 420 St. Louis ..••••• , 4991St. Louis ..•••••• ' 520 ISt. Louis .••..•.. , 5441St. Louis .. 5501St. Louis .•.•..•• 6261St. Louis ......... 6381St. Louis .•..•••• 6411St. Louis .. 649IUniversity City •• , 6521St. Louis . 6541St. Louis .. 6581St. Louis .. 6611University City .. ,

Echard A. West .•.••. Elmer L. May . Sam A. Aronoff . Lee W. Weber . Robert B. Meier . David H. Underwood. Albert F. Neiger ..... Clarence A. Haus, Sr. Joseph J. Schmid . Chas. R. Goodhead . . J ooeph M. Cross Philip P. Baebler . Robert L. Hedden .•.. Walter Siefert . John E. Molly .•..... Paul I. Black . A. L. Struebig ...••.• James A. Howery .•.. Richard Burhman •... Luther E. J aco .....• F. L. Catiller.....••. Walter Gammeter . Raymond Runge . Herman S. Maas .•••.

John Wohradsky, Jr.. Harry C. Ploetze. . . .. Harry Schwartz. . . .. R. C. Brock R. C. Winkelmaier W. C. Smith. Acting. R. S. Lorimier. . . . . .• Elmer M. Ruffin. . . .. Charles V. Ehrmann. Geo. H. Holdsworth .. Gustav Heinichen .... Walter E. Haustein .. Wm. E. Punt J. E. Winterton. Jr Wm. R. Bridegroom .. Earl H. Pleitsch ..... Henry C. Mayer ....• Henry G. Diller. . . . •. Harry Treece .••.•.•. Alfred A. NaIl. . . . . .. B. L. Arterbury Duval O'Neal John Heines. . . . . . . .. S. K. Bradley. Jr.....

1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays .••••.•••. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••.•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .....••••• 1st and 3rd Saturdays ....•..•••. 2nd and. 4th Tuesdays ...••..•••• 2nd and 4th Fridays .........•.. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ....••.•.. , 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•••....•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•....•. 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..•....... 1st and 3rd Mondays ......•••••• 1st and 3rd Mondays .....•..•... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...••....•. 2nd and 4th Fridays ..•••••...•• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...••..•••• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th FridayS .••••..••••• 2nd and 4th ThursdayS •.•...... , 1st and 3rd MondayS ........•.•. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .•....•.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays •••.•••••. 1st and 3rd Mondays .........••. 2nd and 4th Mondays ..........•

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THIRTY-THmD DISTRICT (A)-OLIVER L. LUFT, D. D. G. M., 5434 Goethe Ave., St. Louis, Mo. St.Louis City. Missouri......... .. .' Meridian........ St. Louis........ Naphtali. . . . • . . . . Pomegranate..... •. Occidental....... Pyramid ..•.•.... •. Good Hope •••.... .' Aurora .' America •..••.... •. Cache........... .. Itaska ....•.•.••. • ' Harmony .....•.. •. Clifton Heights .. ' Algabil Rose Hill........ Magnolia •. Triangle • Trinity ..•....... 8t. Louis Co•.. University....... 8t. Louis City. Pilgrim .. . .. Commonwealth .. Purity 8t. Louis Co Theo. ROO8evelt ..

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Oct. 8,1816 May 6, 1852 Oct. 24, 1836 Oct. 1839 Sept. 21, 1916 May 29,1856 Sept. 21, 1916 May 30. 1861 Oct. 19, 1868 ~ept. 17.1919 Oct. 14,1871 Oct. 16, 1872 ~ePt. 19, 1917 Oct. 10. 1894 Sept. 19. 1917 Oct. 16, 1891 Oct. 16,1918 Sept.29, 1915 Sept.21, 1916 Sept. 22, 1920 ::>ept. 21, 1921 ~ept. 21. 1921 Sept. 21, 1921 Oct. 17, 1925

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o LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT (B)-ROBERT C. BRINKMAN, D. D. G. M., 611 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. County Lodge St. Lo~ia City .. Beacon .......... Geo. Washington. .. Mt. Moriah .....• .. Polar Star ....... .. Erwin ........... .. Pride of the West . .. Keystone ..•..... .. Cosmos .....••... .. Cornerstone ..... .. Paul Revere ..•.. •. Tuscan ••..•..•.. · Anchor ......•.. .. WestGate ....... .. Lambskin ..•.... ,. .' Euclid ....•.••... • Apollo .......... • Olive Branch ..... •. Forest Park ..... •. Tower Grove ..... •. Mizpah ..•....... •. Benj. Franklin ... .. Shaveh .......... · ProJ1,Tess .........

..... .... .. ,... ..,. .... . ..... ... ....

No.1 Location 31St. Louis .•.... 91St. Louis ..••••. 401St. Louis ...... 791St. Louis ....... 1211St. Louis ....... 1791St. Louis ...... 2431St. Louis .....•. 282iSt. Louis ...•... 3231St. Louis .•••••. 3301St. Louis .•.... 360ISt. Louis ..••... 4431University City. 4451St. Louis ••••••. 460!St. Louis .•...•. 5051St. LouiE. ...... 5::!9ISt. Louis •...••. 6761St. Louis ....... 5781St. Louis ••••••. 6311St. Louis ..•.•. 6391St. Louis ...•... 642jSt. Louis ...... 6461St. Louis ••••... 6i'i7ISt. Louis .......

I

Master Secretary Jesse L. Hill ......... Harvey E. Waldt ...... L. Raymond Pepper.. Robert C. Brinkman ... Percy A. Cool ........ WaIter A. Webb ....... Joseph Noskay ...... Val Krapp ............ J. B. Buffington ...... A. A. Blankenmeister .. A. H. Luechtefeld .... John T. Williams ...... Walter F. Meyer ..... George J. Tischler ..... George D. Ferris ..... Sam Broadbent ........ Ruben J. Tockman ... Alex S. Dawson ....... , John G. Keirn ........ E. W. F. Brueggemann. G. W. Marsalek ...... W. C. Hilmer .......... Edwin E. Rippstein .. Arthur W. Reiter ...... Joseph Ofstein ....... E. B. Partenheimer .... John R. Oliver ....... Ben C. Burroughs ...... Frank McLain ....... Merle E. Campbell ..... Edward A. Lang ..... George Ruths .......... Raymond D. Thurston Fred L. Oatman ....... Charles H. Perkins ... William C. Rese ....... James W. Dunford ... Adam L. Liebmann .... Wm. H. Heitert...... H. L. Stein ............ Max Weinberg ....... Harold M. Goodman .... Albert G. Seiving .... Thomas O'Rourke ..... Elmer C. Goewert .... 1 Robert F. Mohr ........

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Thursdays ......... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•........ 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..•••...... 1st and 3rd Fridays ......•.••••. 2nd and 4th Fridays ............ 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ........ 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ....•••.. 2nd and 4th Mondays ........... 1st and 3rd Mondays .....•..•... 2nd and 4th Fridays ............ 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•..•..... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ....•..• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .......••.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ........ 1st and 3rd Mondays .........•.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ........ 2nd and 4th Tuesdays, 1 :30 p.m.. 2nd and 4th Mondays ........... 2nd and 4th Thursdays .......... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....•..•••.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .......... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•••.•..•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .........•

Charter Date May 10,1849 May 10,1849 Oct. 14,1841 Oct. 14, 1846 Apr. 26, 1850 May 28,1868 May 26,1866 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 26, 1923 Oct. 13. 1870 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 16. 1872 Sept. 21, 1917 Sept. 18, 1918 Sept. 26, nOG Sept.27,1906 Oct. 2,1918 Sept. 29, 1916 Sept.21, 1916 Sept. 20, 1920 Sept.21,1921

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THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-eLARENCE H. BUNDY, D. D. G. M., Drexel, Mo. c~

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Index .••••••••••• Casso .••••••••••• Grand River ..•••. Nonpareil •.••••.. Belton •••••..•••. JeweL •••••••••.. Coldwater ..••••.. Archie .•.•••••••. Clevela.nd .....•..

541Garden City 147IHarrisonville ..•• 2761 Freeman. •.••••. 37~IEast Lynne •..... 450IBelton •.•.•..••.. 480lPIeasant Hill .••.. 4851Drexel. ..•••••..• 633IArchie 651ICleveland

R. H. Breed . Tom Parsons . David W. Mills . Fred H. Talbott . J. Maurice Robie . John Holley, Jr . WilliamH. May . Joseph H. Hess .....• Geo. E. Myers ......•

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o Harold P. Dyar.... Jesse L. VanMeter. Joe H. Adams ....•. Proctor Keyton. . .. Jas. W. Kennemer. Geo. W. Smith. .. .. C. H. Bundy E. W. Wesemann .•. Earl L. young ....•

1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....••••••••• , Oct. 15.1884 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••••.••.•• Oct. 17,1867 3rd Friday each month ....•.•.•••. Oct. 15,1868 2nd Tuesday. . . . . . • . • . • • • • • • • • • •• Oct. 17, 1873 1st and 3rd Tuesdays............. Oct. 6,1872 2nd Friday. .. . . .. .. .•.. . . ..•. .• . 1878 1st and 3rd Mondays ...•.•...•.... Oct. 31,1881 2nd & 4th Tuesdays ......•....•... Oct. 1.1914 2nd Tuesday ................•.••• Sept. 20, 1920

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THmTY-FD'TH DISTRICT-D. O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo.

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Bates .•••••••. Hume .....•..••.. Amsterdam .••••• Butler .....•••.•• Rockville ..•..•... Crescent Hill..... RichHiJI •..•••••. Foster .........•.

130IHume •....•.•..• 1411 Amsterdam •••••• 254IButler ..•.••..•.. 341IRockviIle.••..••. 368lAdrian. .•... 4791Rich Hill. ..••... 5541 Foster

G. A. Kennedy .. : James W. Kipper Austin K. McNay R. H. Hirni Chester Griffith Marvin M. Hurst Jay Bright

. . . . . . .

C. F. Porter ......• E. A. Smiser. . . . . •. S. L. Rook .......•. E. L. Midkiff.....•. C. A. Six ........•• C. F. Krieger O. D. Jennings ....•

1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••••.•••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .. 1st and 3rd Fridays ..•...••••..••. 1st Thursday ........••••..•.••. 2nd and 4th Thursday . 2nd and 4th Mondays . Every Friday night ........•...•.

Oct. 14, 1886 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 15, 1868 1900 Oet. 13, 1871 1881 Oct. 15, 18!!l

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THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-eHAS. C. CZESCHIN, D. D. G. M., Box 362 Warrensburg, Mo. Be~~on.......

Cole Camp Shawnee Joh~on...... Knobnoster ..•••. Holden ..•••••••• Corinthian Cold Spring..•••. Chilhowee ••...•.. Pe~is .. Sedalia Granite Green Ridge LaMonte .••••••..

6951Cole Camp 6531 Warsaw 2451 Knobnoster •••••• 262IHolden ..•....... 265IWarrensburg 274ILeeton ....•.•••. 487IChilhowee •.•••.. 236ISedalia 272 1Sedalia 4251Green Ridge 574ILaMonte

Perry Fryberger Ralph F. Wiest J. W. Greer Oren M. Henry Wm. G. Talley R. E. Mohler Raymond Carder Francis C. Rudd Lon V. Morris H. K. Johnson ....• Robert B. Burke

E. H. Intelmann ....• James A. Logan C. L. Saults ........• C. O. Landes Chas. H. Malone Donald E. Bailey ....• Marcus Wallace ....•. Ralph F. Boies ....•.. J. R. Smetana...••... Wilford G. Acker Arthur E. Perkins ..•

1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays .•.•.••••••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ...•...•••.. 1st and 3rd Mondays............. 3rd Thursday ......•...•••.•.••.. 1st and 3rd Fridays •••..•..••••••. 1st Friday....................... 3rd Friday 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd Friday....•.•.•••••.••••••••

Oct. 28,1926 Sept. 1821 May 26,1865 Oct. 16.1868 Oct. 16,1868 Oct. 16,1879 Sept. 27. 1906 May 20,1864 Oct. 15,1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 28, 1905

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS--Continued THmTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-E. E. BROWNING, D. D. G. M., Appleton City, Mo. Lodge Windsor •.•..•... Montrose •••••••• Clinton ••••••••.. Calhoun •••••••.. St. Clair•••.•. St. Clair ••••.•... Circle.•.••••.•.• Lowry City .•.... ' Appleton City •.•. Star ........•.... County

H~~ry ........

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Location I Master 29iWindsor ••.•••... Lester W. Taylor.... 408IMontrose •••••••• E. M. Fenimore ..•.•. 548IClinton E. J. Catley....••••• 552ICalhoun J. A. Housey ......•. 27310seoola ...••••••. Lewis D. Baldwin .... 342IRoscoe..••.•..•• W. R. Dunham, Jr•... 4031Lowry City J. E. Crowder . 4121Appleton City •••. Paul J. Vannatta . 419fTaberville ....•... Joseph C. Brinkman.

NO.1

Secretary Otto F. Weiss . Geo. F. Towler ...•• J. B. Holcomb ..•.• E. W. Masters ..... George W. Davies .. C. A. Weinlig.....• Jackson Bray . David Scroggs, Jr . Kenneth J. Ingalls ..

Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•••••••..•. 2nd and 4th Monday •••••••••••••• 2nd & 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd ThursdayS •••••••••••• 3rd Tuesday ••••••••••••••••••••• Wednesday on or before full moo}}. 1st Friday ..••••••.•••••••••••••. 3rd Monday .••.•••••••••••.•••••. 4th Friday ........•.....••••..•..

Charter Date June 2.1866 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 15, 1890 1890 Oct. 15. 1869 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1873 Oct. 18. 1871 Oct. 16, 1872

THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-OREN SIMPSON, D. D. G. M., Richland, Mo.

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Camden ••••••• Linn Creek •..•.. , Mack's Creek ..•.. " Laclede::::::: Laclede....•.•... Competition •..•.. Conway .•.•••.••. Pulaski. ••..•• Waynesville ..•... Richland ••••••... Miller .•••••.•. Brumley .••...•.. Iberia ...••...... ,

. . .

1521 Camdenton ...••. 433lMack's Creek ..... 83ILebanon ..••.•••. 4321 Competition .•••. 528 IConway ..•.••••• 375 IWaynesville •.•••. 3851 Richland •••••••• 2031 Brumley .••..•..• 4101 Iberia .•......•..

Claude F. Osborn •••. Wm. Floyd Bonner••. E. N. Painter . Aubrey F. Russell .••• Goo. Dean Boyd ..•... Kenneth E. Mitchell .. Everett L. Ogle .••.•. Donald Williams ..... Berry C. Livingston ..

Rollin E. Morse .... Roy Cunningham .. Stanley Brooks ..•.. D. E. Cook .......•. E. Herschel Harris. Roy C. Wilson . Frank A. Jones . A. M. Phillips .•..•. Leslie Jones .

2nd Thursday ....•..••••••.•..•.. 1st Saturday ..•••••••.••••••••••. 1st Wednesday..•••..•••.••••.••. 1st Sat. after full moon •••••...•.. 1st Saturday ••.•••••••.•••••••••• 2nd Tuesday ••••.•••••••••••••••. 2nd Wednesday . 2nd Wednesday .•.••••••••••••••. 1st Thursday......•..•..•.••••..

Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 17, 1876 1853 Oct. 15, 1891 Oct. 15. 1885 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 17. 1901 Oct. 17, 1887 Oct. 13. 1!l71

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THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT-W. FRANK HOUK, D. D. G. M., St. James, Mo.

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Crawford ..••• Lebanon •••.....• Cuba .•••.•••.••• Dent ..•••••••. Salem ..••••••••• ' Maries ..•••..• Belle .•..••••••••. Lane's Prairie ..•. .......... Vienna •.•••••••• Ph~lps . Rolla ..•..•.••.•• St. James ..•.•... Equality ..•..•••• Pulaski·::.·.·::.· Arlington .••••... Texas •........ Latimer .......•• '

77 ISteelville. .•••••. 312ICuba 225ISalem ...•••.•••. 373IBelle ..••••..••.• 531IVichy 94IVienna•••••••••• 213IRolla ••.•.••••.•• 2301St. James .••.••.. 497INewburg ....••.. 346IDixon ..•••••••.. 145ILicking.....• ';...:.'

Robert RandeL .•.... Melvin Askins ......• Robert W. VanPelt .. , Cecil Shockley Lester Daniels Columbus Crum..... Ralph J. Grimm Edward R. york James W. Finley P. A. Christeson Roland E. Baker

Coleman O. Garrett lIst Saturday each month ••••.••••• Chas. Wilmesherr .. 2nd Saturday . James L. Bangert .. 1st and 8rd Fridays ...•••••..••... N. B. Stockton 1 2nd and 4th Fridays . Wm. E. Ray 2nd Saturday . Carl A. Baldwin 1st Saturday ..•••...•..•••••••••• Walter C. Campbell. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .••••.••••• W. W. Jackson 1st and 3rd Thursdays •••••••••••• Howard R. Pinto 2nd and 4th Fridays ....••••...... A. W. Davis....... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ....•.••...• W. D. Ro~ge~ .• 2nd and 4th Thursdays ,

Oct. 15, 1846 Oct. 1887 May 29,1862 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 15, 1885 Oct. 17,1878 May 30,1861 May 27,1863 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 19, 1899

1191De Soto ..•..•.... 164 IHilisboro .•...•.. 338IHerculaneum.... 12ICaledonia 131IPotosi. .......•.. 143lIrondale ...•.•... 632IBelgrade ..•...... 535IBlackwell 256IShekinah .....•.•

Vernon Evans ......• Douglas C. Fraser ... , Harry Francis .....•. Robert Bays . William H. Bust, Jr.. Floyd Scott . M. E. Turner . C. E. Meadows . ~. Earl Landes ,

A. L. Schwaegerle .. Edw. M. Williams .. Geo. W. Hegel . Frank Wallis . George Carr ......• GUY D. Maxwell ...• Lewis Pierce . . Geo. V. Welch ByrI Degeare .

2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 1st Saturday ....•••.•...••••••.•. 2nd and 4th Fridays .., . Saturday on or before full moon . 1st Friday .... ~ .•.•.•.••••••••••. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ....••••..•• ' 3rd Tuesday ....••....•..••.••... 1st Saturday •.............•..••.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•••••••....

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FORTIETH DISTRICT-ROBT, BAYS, D. D. G. M., Caledonia, Mo. Jefferson ....• ,I De Soto ..•..••... .. . . . . . .1 Joachim .•....... .. . . . . .. Herculaneum ..•.. Washington •.. Tyro ...••....••. , .. Potosi ........•.. Irondale ...••••.• . "1 Belgrade ...•.. " . St. Francois. .. Black well ..•..••. Jefferson. . . .. Shekinah ,

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Nov. May Oct. Apr. May May Oct. Oct. Oct.

16, 1867 31,1856 19, 1922 7,1825 1851 26.1864 1,1914 13, 1887 17, 1868

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FORTY-FmST DISTRICT-L. B. PARRISH, D. D. G. M., Bolivar, Mo. County Dallas ..

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Lodge Riddick .....•..•. Western Light Urbana Hic~ory . Hogle's Creek Hermitage •....•. Polk ••••••.... Fair Play........ Modern .•....•... Pleasant .•....... Bolivar ...•....•. Pleasant Hope .... Aldrich ..•.•.....

.

No. I Location 361IBuffalo 3961 Louisburg ..•.... 421IUrbana 279IWheatland ...•... 288IHermitage 441Fair Play .....•.. 144IHumansville 160 I Morrisville 195IBolivar ........•. 4671 Pleasant Hope .•• 664IAldrich

Master ClydeMontgomery Frank Barker Carl Gatliff Perry Reno Homer A. Wilson Glenn Lyon Ray Martin, Jr Elmer E. Hinkle S. B. Brown, III Roy J. Cochran...... Keith N. Lowry

1

Secretary Time of Meeting ByronRea 4thFriday Roscoe S. Lindsey .. First Thursday •••....•••..•.•.•. James R. Fowler 4th Saturday Jesse O. Gist First Thursday •••••..••..••..••. Alva L. Davis 3rd Saturday.................... W. M.·Price....... 1st Monday ........•............. Gregg Miller 2nd Monday night Morris E. Ewing 3rd Monday each month.......... S. B. Brown....... 2nd Wednesday .....•..•..•...... Floyd P. Slagle.... 1st Thursday.................... J. S. Toalson 1st Tuesday

Charter Date Oct. 31,1871 Oct. 1893 Oct. 14,1886 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 1868 Oct. 18,1900 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 1867 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 26,1927

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FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT-FINIS E. WRENN, D. D. G. M., Stockton, Mo. Ced~ •••••••• 1 Stoekton .•••••••• 283IStockton ..•..... , Chas. E. Fox ........

.. • •••.••. , .. •. • • . . . .. Dade.. ••• .• •• ..

Jerusalem ..•••••. Clintonville ••••.. Washington •.•... Garrett •..••••••. Everton •.••.•••. Melville .••••.•••.

3151Jerico Springs ... 4821Eldorado Springs. 87lGreenfield.•.•..•. 3591 Areola ........... 405IEverton ......... 4581 Dadeville .•••••.•

I

Jimmie Leonard ..... Edw. A. Ramey ...... Tom Cotner ......... E. E. Crutcher....... Lewel E. Darst ...... H. Curtis Cassada....

Lockwood .....•.. 521ILoekwood ••..•..• H. A. Stout ..........

J. C. Garrett ....... Elwin Wilson ....•. Earl F. Pentecost ... James VanDam .... John F. Baker ..... Wm. R. Probst ..... A. C. Blakemore ....

1st and 3rd Thursdays ...••.•..••. 1st and 3rd MondayS. . • . . . • . • • • . . 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... 4th Tuesday. .................. .. 2nd Thursday. . • . . . . . • • . . . • • • • . .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays. . . . . . . . . . • .. Thursday on or before full moon and two weeks thereafter ......... Thos. M. Morris .... 2nd and 4th ThursdayS ..•........

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Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

16, 1869 22, 1896 15,1874 12, 1847 13, 1870 15, 1885

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c:.n o FORTY-THmD DISTRICT-RAYFORD B. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Harwood, Mo. Osage ..••••••••• Sheldon. • • • . . • Schell City ••••.•. Montevallo .•••••. Unity .....••••.. , Walker .••••..... Barton ..•..••. Hermon......... Lamar •••••••.... Golden Milford ..•••..... Ve~~on •••..•.

.

303INevada ....•..... 3711 Sheldon. .. • • • 4481Schell City ....••. 490IMontevallo .•..•.. 495IRichards........ 605IWalker., .••.•••• 187ILiberal ••••.••••. 292:Lamar ...••••••• 4751Golden City ..••.. 516IMilford ......••..

Richard E. Place ..... E. L. Wisely. . . . . . . .. Victor Thomas , Murray Haynes Clifford H. Newland .. Ralph Bloesser Frank G. Curless Robert Trimble Frank J. Ernst Wayne Maupin

David V. Morris ... , H. L. Burney. . . . .. C. P. Finks Oral Faith Robert J. Minor J. W. Marquis..... E. H. Roselle W. A. Heydenberk. Alva Ellis J. C. Thomas

~nu .1'·rlday ..........•••...•••.. '. 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd Wednesday ........•.••..•.•. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..••••••..•. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .. 1st and3rd Wednesdays .••...••.•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .••......•.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .••....••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .. 3rd Saturday ..•..•..•....•......

Oct. 16, 1868 May 23,1895 Oct. 17.1873 Oct. 15,1874 Oct. 17, 1896 Sept.29, 1909 Oct. 1,1889 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 12, 1842

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FORTY-FOURTH

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Jasper ....•... Carthage .••...•. Sarcoxie ..•.•••.. Joplin ....••••... Fellowship •••••.. Jasper ..•.••••... Carterville •.•••.. Mineral ...•...... Webb City ..•••.. ,. Carl Junction .•.. Criterion ......... ........ La Russell .......

.... .....

,...

....... ....... ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........

DISTRIC~HAS. A.

197ICarthage ..•..•.. 293lSarcoxie ...•••... 335IJoplin •••..•..•.. 345IJoplin ........... 3981J asper ......•... 401ICarterVUle ..••... 47110ronogo ..••••••. 5121Webb City ....... 5491Carl Junction •••. 5861Alba ............ 5921La Russell ....••.

o

JOBSON, D. D. G. M., 106 Joplin, Joplin, Mo.

Alfred T.York...... A. L. Cockrell ....... F. W. Randolph ..... ' Loren J. Simpson .... S. Howard Elliott .... Paul D. Terry ....... A. C. Badgett ........ John A. Danhakl. .... M. D. Berry ......... Walter U. Stephens .. J. D. Evants .........

F. M. Shafer ....... Nelson Brown ..... Sherman A. Smith. Mark E. Whitaker. , Joseph L. Frerer ... C. E. Ault ......... Paul Ritter ........ R. L. Sullens ....... Roy A. Gnadt ...... John Wm. Hart .... Leo L. Simmons ....

and 4th Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .•••••....••. 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 2nd and 4th Fridays ..•••••.•••.•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ••••••••••••• 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•..•..•.•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ••••••••••• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••...... 1st and 3rd Mondays .............. 1st and 3rd Fridays ..•.....••...•. ~nd

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1867 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 21, 1921

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FORTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-PAUL A KING, D. D. G. M., 502 Holland Bldg., Springfield, Mo. Lodge County Greene .••.•.•. United .....•..•.. O'Sullivan ....... Ash Grove ...••.. ff Solomon •........ Gate of Temple ... Republic ...•..... Strafford ..•..... to Willard .......... Webster ...•.. Webster .•••••..• Doric ......•..•.. to Mount Olive ....•. Hazelwood ..••... to Henderson .......

....

....

.. ..

No., Location 6ISpringfield ...•... 71Walnut Grove .... 100lAsh Grove ....... 271 ISpringfield ....... 4221 Springfield ....... 5701 Republic .•••.•... 6081 Strafford ........ 6201 Willard .......••• 98lMarshfield. .••••. 300IElkland ...•...•.. 439IRogersviIIe,R.R.3 459ISeymour .•....... 477IRogersville .......

Master Herbert F. Gilmore ... Ralph Hawkins ...... O. Paul King ........ John A. Harrison .... Osa F. Godfrey...... D. S. Maness ........ Josia~ D. McKerraIl .. Denms R. Grant ....• Sam H. Goza. .. .• .•. Frank Hyder .......• C. E. Hale ....•...... George R. Clift...... Clyde B. Tillman .....

Secretary M. F. Smith ....... R. M. Fagan ....... Lee K. Renshaw .... Milton W. Kinloch .. Frank Wm. Clark .. F. J. Comisky ...... Harry E. Grier ..... Charles W. Wadlow. Paul V. Rathbun •.. D. W. Haymes ..... Otto Brooks ...•••. Louis Tochen ...... David Northrip ....

Time of Meeting 3rd Monday ••••••••.••••••.•..... 2nd Tuesday .......•..•••••••.•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ••..••.•..• 2nd Monday ..................... 3rd Thursday .................... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....••..... 1st Thursday .................... lst and 3rd Thursdays •••••••••••• 2nd Friday. . . . . . . .. .•..•. .•.• .. . Sat. on or bef. full moon.......... Friday night bef. full moon....... 2nd and 4th Mondays ..•••.••••••• 3.!:,d Thursday ..•.•••.•..•••••••••

Charter Date May 30,1867 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 20,1899 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 16,1872 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1910 Sept. 25, 1912 May 28, 1858 Oct. 15.1868 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 16,1872

M~L31, 1~74

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FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOHN H. mCKS, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo. DOUglas .••••..1 Ava............. It ••••••• Pilot Knob ...•••. Texas Barnes .. • •....... Texas ..••.••••••. to Plato to • • • • • • • • • Summersville ..•.. Wright..•••.. Mountain Grove .. .. Joppa Mansfield Norwood

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26IAva ......•...... 182IRichviIle•..•••... 116iCabool 177IHouston ...•..... 469IPlato 6551 Summersville. 1681Mountain Grove .. 41l\HartviIIe 643IMansfield 622 Norwood.

Lawrence Durham Jim M. Murrell •..... Willard Knight Leon Moody ...•..... ElmerHelton Clell M. Allen ..•..... Wm. Ray Hall Cecil C. Carter Donald Hunter Noel.lY. Worsham...

Ramey Smith Clyde Bell......... S. F. Whittaker John Flowers .•.••. W.L.TiIley Chas. L. Hawkins •. Yale Myers ......•. Edward B. Garner .. Donald Livingston .. C. O. Peck

1st and 3rd Wednesdays ......••... Friday on or before full moon..... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd Wednesday ...•••••..••••••.•. 1stMonday : 2nd Saturday each month 2nd and 4th Fridays............. 1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd Wednesday 1st and 3rd Thur.l.d'lYs

Oct. 1,1887 Oct. 17,1895 Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 15,1891 Oct. 16,1885 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 16,1891 Sept. 16, 1912

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FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-GEORGE DEWOODY, D. D. G. M., Eminence, Mo.

Ca~;er::::::: : Re~olds::::: :

Van Buren . Grandin ......•.. Hopewell •..•.•.. Barnesville .....•. Sha~non •.••.. Delphian .•••..... Winona ..•••••••. Eminence .

50ll, Van Buren ...•... 579IGrandin ....•..•. 239ILesterville 353IEllington ....•... 137jBirch Tree .....•. 430IWinona 607!Eminence .......•

Robert W. Adams .... Leo. E. McDaniel ..•. J. R. Warren Charles R. Lages Robert C. Moger L. J. Baldwin Glen C. Williams

C. P. McClintock . GUY A. Smith . J. F. Faulkenberry. R. L. Daniels .•••.. Harold Walton .••.. J. W. Bockman . W. A. Despain .

Saturday on or before full moon... 2nd Saturday. . . . . . . .. .. . ... • . ... 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..••••....•. 2nd Tuesday each month 1st & 3rd Mondays ......•......... 2nd Tuesday each month ......•... 1st Saturday and 3rd Wednesday ...

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o Oct. 12,1882 Sept.27, 1900 Oct. 13, 1881 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 7,1895 Oct. 10, 18!l4 Sept. 29, 1909 Q

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FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-CHAS. B. ACUFF, D. D. G. M., Bonne Terre, Mo. Ir,~n •.•..••••. 1 Star c: f the West .. ..•..•.... MosaIc .. Madison. . . • •• Marcus ..••...... St. Francois •.. Bismarck ..•..••. .. Farmington ..••.. Ionic ..•..•..•... St. Francois ..•.. , Samaritan ..•••.. .. I Pendleton .••••••. .. .., Leadwood .••.•... .. .. Elvins ..•.....•.. Ste. Genevieve. Saline .

1331Ironton ..••...... 351IBelleview ...•.... 1101 Fredericktown 41IBismarck ...••... 132IFarmington ..... 154IDesloge ......•... 234 ILibertyville 4241Bonne Terre 5511Doe Run 698ILeadwood....... 5991Flat River 2261St. Mary's

Andy L. Keithly Jos. F. McCall E. W. Delezene Norman C. Marler E. J. McKinney, Jr E. L. Ward E. S. Harter John L. Keller ......• H. W. Kassabaum John E. Sago R. C. Calywell Ca!!]... Miller

Frank H. Comfort .. V. O. Sutton . Gus Winter . Clyde Ruble . Hezzie Graham . F. H. Buckner . P. A. Cashion . Oran J. Holdman .. John PauL . F. T. Westlund . J. E. LaBruyere . Dwight Smith ...:..;-:.

l!nd allG 4th Fridays ..••••..••.•.. 1st Saturday . 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•....•..... 1st and 3rd Saturdays .•.......... 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Saturdays .....•..••••. 1st Thursday ......••.•.••.••.•.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••..•..•. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ....•..... 2nd and 4th Saturdays ....•.•..... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays •••.•••...... Fourth Saturday .

May 5,1851 Oct. 13, 1870 1862 Dec. 15, 1891 May 10,1851 Oct. 17,1901 1864 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 13, 1908 SelJt.30, 1908 ~9,1862

CapeGi~~~d~~~

TroweL ••...•••• Zalma .....••.... St. Mark's ..••... West View ..•.•.. Mystic Tie ...•... Whitewater .••... Excelsior .

440lMarbie HilL 545IZalma ....••..••. 931Cape Girardeau .. 103IMillersville••..••. 22110ak Ridge ..••••. 417 IWhitewater •.•... 441IJackson ....•..••

Lester F. Filer M. E. Kerr Edgar F. Huhn Renzo James Herbert E. Riehn Linus A. Poston Walter O. Schroeder ..

J. Virgil Thompson H. D. Nichols ..•.•. Arthur C. Stein ..•. Geo. W. Howard ..• Fred H. BruihI. Daniel F. Jones Daniel G. Seibert

2nd and 4th Thursdays •.•••••••••. 1st and 3rd Saturdays............ 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .........•••. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS............ 1st and 8rd Saturdays .••••••••••. 2nd and 4th Fridays ...•....•..•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays.... ..•....

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FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT-NORMAN PHELPS, D. D. G. M., Marble Hill, Mo. Boll~pger ..•..

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Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 15,1890 Oct. 14,1847 June 2,1866 May 30,1861 Oct. 13,1881 Oct. 16,1872

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued

FIFTIETH DISTRICT-L. M. HOLLENBE.CK, D. D. G. M., Sikeston, Mo.

I East Prairie Lodge .....

Location 3841East Prairie ..••. 407ICharleston •••••• 184IMorley .••••••••• 306ICommerce ••••• o. 310ISikeston .•••• 581IIllmo o 615IChaffee ..•••••••. 153IBloomfield ..••••. 2781 Essex. . • • • • • • • •. 4891Bell City ..•••••• 532IDexter ..••...••• 590JAdvance 596JPuxico ....•••••• fi03 I Morehouse ....••.

NO.1

County Mississippi. . .. •, .. , Scott ....•... , .. .

Charleston ..••.•. Morley ...•...... Ashlar . Sikeston •..•..••• Illmo .....•..•.•. Chaffee ..•..•.... Stoddard ..... 1 Bloomfield ..•.•.. Essex .....••.•.. Lakeville .. Dexter ..•.••..... Advance •....... Puxico ...••••••. New Madrid .. I Morehouse 0

0

0

0

0 •• 0

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Master W. H. Wellborn . Edmund T. Burke . Joe K. Emerson . Robert McVay . Clarence L. Dowden .. O. C. Amick . Otis Snyder . John A. Wright . Raymond Mayberry .. Elmer Calliotte . Arthur B. Parker . Lloyd E. Revelle . Alva Wilfong . Joseph M. Barnett .

:Secretary B. K. Reasor . Dee Jennings . . G. K. Patterson Albion H. Anderson Alonzo A. Harrison. Roy R. Rodgers . L. L. Chronister . Ermer Garner . Elisha Y. Launius .. H. A. Parker . E. Asberry, Sr , J. O. Wills . S. L. Binford . M. D. Spence .

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Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th ThursdayS .••••...•... 1st and 3rd 'l'hursdays ..••........ 2nd and 4th Mondays ••••••••••••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...•....••.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••..••.... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•••••..•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••••••..•. 1st and 3rd WednesdayS ••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .....•••••.. , 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .••.•.•.••••. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays ..••••••...•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••..••.... 1st and 3rd Mondays .••••••••••••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•......... 0 •••••••

Charter Date July 1904 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 1911 July 29,1859 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 13. 1887 Sept.28. 1907 Sept. 30, 1908 SePt.29. 1909

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FIFTY-FmST DISTRICT-DELBERT O. JOHNSON, D. D. G. M., Caruthersville, Mo.

..

Dunklin

.

.

New Madrid ..

Pemiscot ....•. It

Stoddard ..••.. Dunklin .••.•.. Pemiscot . New Madrid .

Kennett......... Four Mile ;... Hornersville ~. Cardwell ...•..... Malden Senath.......... Portageville Point Pleasant. .. New Madrid ...... Parma. .. .. .. .•. Caruthersville. . •. Hayti. .•. .. .. . .. Steele...... ..•.. Bernie ..•..•...•. Clarkton •.•••••.. Wardell. . • . . . . .. Lilbourn

6~IKennett..•.•.... 212ICampbell .....•.. 216IHornersville ..... 231ICardwell ......•. 406IMalden . 513ISenath . 1661 Portageville •..... 176 1Conran .....•.... 4291New Madrid ..... 650IParma ..•..•...• 461 ICaruthersville ..•. 571IHayti ••••••••••. 634ISteele .••..••.••. 673IBernie ..•...••••. 646/Clarkton . UD Wardell . UDILilbourn .

Bobbie L. Cuff Alva R. Lynn James W. Jackson Tommy Glasscock Harry E. Taylor Truman Ponder Ralph McGee H. L. Ponder Kenneth E. Bird Russel Coffey M. J. yeager Nathan Carle Carl Barrett Fred Brown Woodrow New W. G.Phelps Albert L. Davis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Clay P. Bixler . R. D. Whiteaker, Sr Archie A. Young . Henry Burgess . . R. C. Patterson . C. C. McCluney R. D. Ellington, Jr.. Myron Latimer .... Charles M. Barnes .. Orville Coffey . Donald V. Magee . H. B. Bryant . W. D. Rider . 1. L. Winer . Elmer Walker . Ira M. Rubottom . R. J. W. Leonberj:teI

~nd

and 4th Thursdays ..••••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••.••.... 1st and 3rd Mondays ......•••••••. 1st and 3rd WednesdaYS .•.••••••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays •.••••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••••••••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......•••.•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ' 2nd and 4th Mondays ..•..••.•.... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•••••••.••• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .•••••••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••..•.•... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•••••••.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .•••••..... 2nd and 4th Mondays . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 1st and 3rd Mondays .

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Oct. 17,1887 Oct. 19, 1867 May 3,1861 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 18, 1881 Oct. 27, 1902 Oct. 16, 1890 May 30,1857 Oct. 17,1873 Rept.22, 1920 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 25, 1905 Oct. I, 1914 Sept. 8, 1905 Dec. 15, 1948

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o LODGE DIREC'rORY BY DISTRICT&-Continued

FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT-EUGENE L. McGEE, D. D. G. M., Poplar Bluff, Mo. Lodge County Butler ..•..••. Poplar Bluff ...... Ripley •••••••. Pine ......•••••.. OJ Composite .•.•••. Naylor ...••.•.•. Wayne •••••••. Greenville.••..•. OJ Wayne .......•..

.

........

........

........

Location NO.1 2091 Poplar Bluff ...•. 314 [Bardley .......... 369[Doniphan ..•...•. 668[Naylor ..•.•...•• 107 IGreenville ....... 626lPiedmont ........

Master

Secretary

Time of Meeting

Charter Date

R. H. Weber ......... Arthur W. Morse... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•...•.•••. May 31.1861

I. E. Newberry....•.

Henry A. Tanner .... Fred L. Moutrie ..•.. Chas. Kennedy ....... Victor W. Ward .....

Clyde Turner ...••• Aubrey C. Jones .... Ralph Chedister ..•. C. L. Ellinghouse ... John W. Daniel ....

3rd Saturday ........•••.•••..•.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ...•..•••... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..•.........

Oct. 11, Uct. 13. Sept. 29, Oct. 14, Oct. 16.

1888 1871 1904 1886 1886

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FIFTY-THmn DISTRICT-J. FRED PARK, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo. Howell ....••.

Mt. Zion OJ Ingomar ..•..•... Mountain View ... Or~~on....... Alton ..•••••.•••.. Woodside Clifton Koshkonong..... Ozark •••••••. Sampson........ Bayou ......•••.. Rockbridge...... Robert Burns

..

3271West Plains 6361WilIow Springs .. 6371Mountain View .. 256IAlton •••..••..•• 387IThomasville ....•. 463IThayer 582IKoshkonong ..••. 298ILutie .........•.. 365IBakersfield 435IRockbridge...... 4!l6IGainesviIle

Virgil yadon J. H. McMillin Herbert M. Henry J. Robert Barton John R. Walton E. P. Lee .....•...... O. W. Mitchell H. G. Hampton Joe A. Hager Woodroe Enloe...... Fred Owens ~.

Henry Breck Clyde R. Williams .. Frank N. LeBaron. R. S. Dunsmore ..•. Chas. Franks ....•. J. W. Mitchell R. T. Meek ..•..... C. J. Hogan....... Virgil Wiles C. E. Hicks Everett Herd

1st Thursday . 2nd Tuesday ........••..•••.••.•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•....... Saturday on or before full moon . Saturday on or before full moon . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 2nd Wednesday .•...•.•••.••••••• Saturday before third Sunday .•... Saturday on or before full moon ••. 2nd Saturday each month ••••••••• 2nd and 4th Friday .•.............

00

Oct. 13. 1870 Oct. 13. 1887 Sept. 29, 1916 Oct. 15. 1868 Oct. 13. 1871 Oct. 13, 1881 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 18. 1900 Oct. 11. 1888 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 11, 1877

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FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-FRED O. WADE, D. D. G. M., Ozark, Mo. Christian ..... Sparta ..•..•..•.. Friend.......... ..... Billings ..•....... Taney . Forsyth ..•....•.. , . Branson ......•.. Stone . Galena ......•.... Crane

.

~!l6ISparta........•. 35210zark .........•. 379IBiIlings......... 453IForsyth ..•...••. 587JBranson ...•.•... 515jGalena .•••..•..• 519ICrane

James Todd Clell McGinnis W. I. McGehee Lawrence A. Camp A. H. Stacey Hugh J. Warren Alfred C. Bennage...

I James Jenkins

H.T.Breazeale, act.. Clay Hodges, Jr Otto R. Wolf H. R. Melton R. H. Patterson D. A. Holderman

Friday on or before full moon . Saturday on or before full moon . 1st Thursday each month . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ....•..... 1st and 3rd Fridays .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......••.••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .

1888 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1881 1872 Sept.26, 1907 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 26, 1896

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FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-BOONE ROYER, D. D. G. M., Wheaton, Mo. Barry ..•.....

Monett . Barry .......•... Pythagoras . Comfort . Lawrence ..•.. Mount Vernon . Canopy .......•.. Decatur •...•.... Miller .

12!lIMonett 367IWashburn ...•... 3831 Cassville. ..•.... 533IWheaton 991Mount Vernon 284IAurora 400lPierce City. . . . .. 567IMiIler

George W. Gunter A. Bryan Cook Glen Linebarger Ralph E. Dickson W. Earl Burns Ted G. Wilson Harold F. Morris Glen R. Leiman

. . . . . . . .

Frank E. Williams. N. E. Edens. . . . . .. W. T. Priest Earl E. Lamberson. Leon I>ugh. . . . . . .. W. H. Lloyd. E. T. Ecroyd '1 E. B. Friar

1st and 3rd Fridays 1st and 2nd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Fridays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Werlnesdays

. . . . . . . .

Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 3,1858 Oct. i6, 1872 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 19, 1857 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 13, 1871 Sept. 29, 1904

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRIC'TS-Continued FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-BERT ST. CLAIR, D. D. G. M., Noel, Mo. County Lodge McDonald •••.. Southwest •...••. Anderson .•..•... NoeL •..•..••••.. Newton .. : : : : ~ Neosho .•...•.... Granby ••••••••.. Stella .....•.....

.. ..

Location I Master Secretary 4661Southwest City Levi Mitchell . W. F. Stevenson ..• 621IAnderson .....••. E. Lynn Clark . Henry Eppard . 647 INoel. .•.•.. ..••. Claude S. Eskridge . Noah Y. East . . W. H. Swanson •... 247INeosho .....•..•. R. E. Armstrong 514IGranby ...••••... Judson J. Bell . C. H. Bucklew . Vestal H. Weems . Mart E. Weems . 538IStella

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Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..••••••••••• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•.•••... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .•.....•.. 1st Friday of each month . 1st and 3rd Fridays .•••.•••.•••••• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..••..•.••...

Charter Date Jan. 22. 1892 Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 21, 1876 Oct. 22, 1902 Oct. 17, 1889

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FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-HARRY DE PRIEST, D. D. G. M., 2622 So. Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis, Mo.

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St. Louis ...... Bonhomme .••.... Bridgeton .•..... Webster Groves .. " Fenton .....•.... Meramee ..••.... Kirkwood .•...... Ferguson ..•..... Maplewood ..••.. , Clayton .•••.•.... Wellston ......... Valley Park ...•. Jennings ..•.•... Gardenville ..•... Freedom ..••••••. • •• .. Brentwood ....... •.... Overland ........

..,... .. ..... .... .... ..

......

.....

..... ......

......

...... ...... ...... ......

451 Ballwin ......... 801St. John's Station. 841Webster Groves .. 281IFenton .••••.•.•. 313IEureka .•........ 4841 Kirkwood ....•... 542 IFerguson ....•... 5661 Maplewood ...•.. 601IClayton ...•..••• 613IWellston ......... 6291Valley Park ...... 640IJennings ........ 655!Gardenville ...... 636IMehlville ...••..• 616\Brentwood ....... 623 Overland ........

I Lester L. Barner ..... Felix R. Meador ..... J. W~ Alverson ....... Fred T. Horn ........ George J. Wirtel ..... Charles E. Hartwein. Hugh H. Barden ..... Kenneth C. Dow, Sr.. Jesse W. Glasgow .... Charles A. Venator.. R. F. Hildebrandt .... Fred B. Gibbons ..... Harry A. Korn ...... Harry Stubblefield ... Carl Pittman ........ Wm. Dennert ........

Henry F. Woerther. Walter Reinemer ... Fay G. Fulkerson ... Henry E. Reynolds. John W. Thee ...... Leonard L. Keevil .. John N. Warren ... William F. Harris .. R. W. McElhinney .. Cecil A. Tolin ...... Elmer T. Hiscox ... John T. Cassens .... Florian W olz ...... Harry A. Kolb ..•.. Paul D. Bragg..... Wm. F. Hecht .....

1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•..•••.•.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 2nd & 4th Fridays ................ 1st and 3rd Fridays .............. 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 1st and 3rd Fridays .•..••••••••••. 1st and 3rd Fridays ............••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•..••..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..••.•••••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•.•• '••••... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....•...••... 2nd and 4th Thursdays .....•.•••.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•.•..•.. 2nd & 4th Thursdays ..•••.•.•.••• 2nd & 4th Thursdays ..........•..

Oct. 9, 1841 Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 19, 1923 Oct. 15,1874 Oct. 16, 1889 Sept. 9. 1904 Sept. SO, 1908 Sept. 11, 1911 Oct. 2, 1913 Oct. 14, 1916 Sept. 21, 1921 Sept. 25, 1946 Oct. 18, 1949 Sept. 28, 194~

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FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-J. F. NICHOLS, D. D. G. M., Versailles, Mo. Morgan·······1 " ..•••.. Miller ..•••••. ' " .•..•...

versailles········1 Barnett ...• ~ Olean ..•.••••••.. Ionia ..•.....•...

3201 Versailles ......• 'I 591IBarnett ...•.•... 13410Iean 381IEldon .......•...

Willard M. VanHorn'l W. B. TOdd········1 Gurnsey Tonpkins Robt. Edmondson .. W. E. Miller .......• 1 C. E. Herfurth Durward Butcher Ford Vaughan

::!nd and 4th Mondays·············1 Oct. 28,1920 2nd Wednesday Sept.~, 1917 3rd Thursday ......•.•.•......... May 30,1860 2nd and 4th Mondays Oct. 12,1871

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FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT-ARTHUR O. HODGES, D. D. G. M., North River & Jones, Independence, Mo.

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J lldependence .... Summit ...••..... McDonald . Blue Springs . Raytown ..•....•. Christian .....•.. Buckner . Marlborough . Mt. Washington .. Grandview ....•.. Grain Valley ....

7611ndependence 2631Lee's Summit. . .. 324IIndependence 3371Blue Springs 391IRaytown ..•..... 39210ak Grove 501IBuckner 56918009 Woodl'd,K.C. 614IMt. Washington .. 618IGrandview ....•.. fi441Gmin Valley

E. Otis Myers , M. W. Sudbrock . Forest Selvey Wm. A. Harvey . W. Burnays Boman. J. E. McCluhan . F. J. Lewis...... George M. Hale . A. C. Flemming Virgil O. Dryer . Marvin E. Harris Geo. W. Robinson .. Chester W. Auld. ' H.W.Bergschneider Walter E. Hoag ,. James P. Wise . Joseph L. Lewis Gregg B. Christy . William L. Crotty H. L. Bratton . George Barrett Maurice Barnard .

::!nd and 4th M.ondays .•..• , ••••.•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•..•.•••... 1st and 3rd Mondays ....•...•.... ' 1st and 3rd Fridays ...........•.. 1st and Srd Thursdays ..•...•..... 1st and 3rd FridayS .••.•.•.•...... 1st and 8rd Tuesdays •••.•..•••••• 1st and 3rd Mondays .....••...•.. , 2nd and 4th Fridays ..•••••..•••.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•...••.... 2nd lind 4th Tuesdays , .

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

14, 11:!41; 18, 1870 1::!, 1~6!1 13, 1887 13, 1871 1871 Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 26, 1927 Oct. 17,1911 Sept. 1911 Sept. 21, 1916

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LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI

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FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election I Grand Master April. 1821 .••. Thos. F. Riddick ..• Oct., 1821. Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Oct., 1822 Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Oct., 1823 Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Oct., 1824 ..•. Nath'l B. Tucker .. • Oct., 1825.... Edward Bates ..•.• Oct., 1826.... Edward Bates •...• Oct., 1827 .... Edward Bates •.•.• Oct., 1828... Hardage Lane •...• Oct., 1829.... Hardage Lane ....• Oct., 1830.... Hardage Lane .•..• Dec., 1831.... Edward Bates ....• Oct., 1832 .... H. R. Gamble ...•.• Dec., 1833.... Sinclair Kirtley ...• Nov., 1834 ... § A. B. Chambers • Oct., 1835 .. tt A. B. Chambers • Oct., 1836.... S. W. B. Carnegy.· Oct., 1837.... S. W. B. Carnegy.· Oct., 1838 .••. S. W. B. Carnegy .• Oct., 1839.... P. H. McBride ....• Oct., 1840 .••. P. H. McBride .... • Oct., 1841.... P. H. McBride ..•.• Oct., 1842.... P. H. McBride ....• Oct., 1843 P. H. McBride .... • Oct., 1844 J. W. S. Mitchell .. • Oct., 1845 .•.. J. W. S. Mitchell •.• Oct., 1846.. •. John Ralls ....•.•• Oct., 1847 .... Joseph Foster ••••• May, 1848 .•.. Joseph Foster ..•• • May, 1849 .... John F. Ryland ..•• May. 1850 ••.. John F. Ryland ..• May, 1851. ... B. W. Grover •••.• May. 1852 ..•. D. W. Grover •••.. June, 1853.••. Wilson Brown •••• May, 1854 .... L. S. Cornwell .•.. •

D. Grand Master

.................... Thompson Douglass Thompson Douglass Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Geo. H. C. Melody .•. Geo. H. C. Melody .•.• Hardage Lane •.... Hardage Lane ..•..• Geo. H. C. Melody ...• Fred L. BilIon ..•... • Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Geo. H. C. Melody ...• Geo. H. C. Melody ... • A. B. Chambers ....• Sinclair Kirtley •...• Sinclair Kirtley •...• John D. Daggett .... • John D. Daggett ....• John D. Daggett ....• A. B. Chambers ....• Joseph Foster ••.•.• J oab Bernard •..•.. J oab Bernard .•.••.• Joseph Foster .•••• Fred L. Billon ..••.. John D. Taylor ••••.• John D. Taylor ..•.. • E. S. Ruggles .••••.• E. S. Ruggles .•.... • E. S. Ruggles ••.... B. W. Grover ..•.... E. S. Ruggles ..•... S. F. Currie ..•..... L. S. Cornwell D. P. Wallingford .. •

Senior G. Warden J ames Kennerly ••• Edward Bates ..•.• Edward Bates •...• Edward Bates ...•• Wm. G. Pettus ....• Wm. G. Pettus .... • Martin Ruggles ..• Martin Ruggles ..• H. R. Gamble.••.• • H. R. Gamble ...•. • Sinclair Kirtley •.• Oliver Parker •...• M. J. Noyes ..••.. • John Wilson .....• Oliver Parker •...• Oliver Parker ....• Edward Searcey ..• A. B. Chambers • • A. B. Chambers Alex. T. Douglass.· Alex. T. Douglass.· Joseph Foster •...• Joseph Foster •... * J. W. S. Mitchell •. • E. S. Ruggles •.... • E. S. Ruggles • E. S. Ruggles • J. L. F. Jacoby •.. • Cyrus Osborn ••...• J oseph Megguire .. • P. Draper • S. F. Currie ..••... • J. H. Turner ..•.. • J. W. Chenoweth .. • James H. Britton .. •

Junior G. Warden William Bates ••....• William Bates ••.... • Wm. G. Pettus ....• • Wm. G. Pettus ....• • Thornt. Grimsley .••. • Thornt. Grimsley •..• • John F. Ryland ..... • H. R. Gamble ....•..• Adam L. Mills • Adam L. Mills • Adam L. Mills ....•.• Augustus Jones ..•.. • Augustus Jones ..... • G. A. Tuttle ......•. • S. W. B. Carnegy ... • S. W. B. Carnegy ..• • Granville Snell ......• Thomas Andrews ...• Alex. T. Douglass • Wm. C. Vance • John Orrick ..••.•.. • C. H. Bowers •..••... C. H. Bowers .•..•... E. S. Ruggles .......• J. L. F. Jacoby • J. L. F. Jacoby • J. L. F. Jacoby • Cyrus Osborn • Joseph Megguire ••.. • P. Draper ..•.......• S. F. Currie .•...... • J. H. Turner .....•. • • S. H. Saunders R. C.Hill •

...................••

Grand Treasurer Archibald Gamble ... * Archibald Gamble .•. • Archibald Gamble .•. • Archibald Gamble • Archibald Gamble • Archibald Gamble • Rich. T. McKinney .. * Thornton Grimsley .• • Thornton Grimsley .. • Bernard Pratte ....• • Thomas Andrews ...• Thomas Andrews ..•• Thomas Andrews ...• Geo. H. C. Melody .•• • Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Geo. H. C. Melody ..• • Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Geo. H. C. Melody ..• • Geo. H. C. Melody ..• • • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody John Simonds .......• Fred L. BilIon ..••.. • John S. Watson ..••. John S. Watson .•••. • John S. Watson ..•.. • John S. Watson ..... • John S. Watson ...•. • John M. Reed ...•.. • J. T. Johnson .•.... • J. T. Johnson ••.... • J. T. Johnson ••.... • Joseph Foster .•..•.• Joseph Foster .•••.. •

Grand Secretary William Renshaw· William Renshaw· William Renshaw· T. Douglas· T. Douglas· John D. Daggett. John D. DaggettJohn D. Daggett· John D. DaggettJohn D. Daggett· Fred L. Billon· Fred L. Billon. Fred L. Billon· John Garnett· Thos. W. Conyers. Thos. W. Conyers· Richard B. Dallam. Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam * Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam. Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Fred L. BilIon· Fred L. BilIon· J. W. S. Mitchell· J. W. S. Mitchell· C. D. W. Johnson· C. D. W. Johnson * C. D. W. Johnson· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan·

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May, 1866 ..•. L. S. Cornwell ....• May, 1866 .••. Benjamin Sharp ..• May, 1867 •.•. S. H. Saunders .•..• 1868 .••. S. H. Saunders ..•.• :~;: 1859 .•.. Marcus Boyd ..•.•• May, 1860 ..•. M. H. McFarland.· May, 1861. ••. Wm. R. Penick .••• May, 1862 ••.. Geo. Whitcomb ....• May, 1863 .••• John H. Turner ... • May, 1864 .•.. John F. Houston .. • May, 1865 .... John F. Houston .•• May, 1866 .••• John D. Vincil ••.. • Oct., 1867 .... W. E. Dunscomb .. • Oct., 1868 ..•. John D. Vinci! ....• Oct., 1869 ..•. William D. Muir .. • Oct., 1870 ..•. Thos. E. Garrett .. • Oct., 1871 .••. Thos. E. Garrett .. • Oct., 1872 •••. Samuel H. Owens.· Oct., 1873 .••• R. E. Anderson .•. • Oct., 1874 .••• John W. Luke • Oct., 1875 .••• James E. Cadle • Oct., 1876 ..•• Xen. Ryland •.....• Oct., 1877 •••. T. C. Ready ..•.•.. • Oct., 1878 •••• Noah M. Givan • Oct., 1879 .... J os. S. Browne • Oct., 1880 •••• W. R. Stubblefield.· Alex. M. Dockery ..• Oct., 1881. ••. Oct., 1882 •••. Chas. C. Woods ••• • Oct., 1883 .••• Lee A. Hall .....•.• Oct., 1884 •••• Robt. F. Stevenson· Oct., 1885 . James W. Boyd .•• • Oct., 1886 .. Geo. R. Hunt .•...• • Oct., 1887 •••• Wm. M. Williams •• • Oct., 1888 .. James P. Wood .... ff . Theodore Brace •••• Oct., 1889 Oct., 1890 . Geo. E. Walker •.•.• Oct., 1891. .. B. H. Ingram ..•.. • Oct., 1892 •••• John R. Parson ..• • Oct., 1893 •••• Harry Keene .••••.• Oct., 1894 .... J. B. Thomas ..••. • Oct., 1895 •••• A. M. Hough •

..................•• W. A. Cunningham .. P. Draper ...•••...• Marcus Boyd ......• M. H. McFarland ... • W. R. Penick .•.... • John Decker • John H. Turner • Wm. N. Loker • John D. Vincil. . • . . .• John D. Vinci!. .•.•• • W. E. Dunscomb .... • C. A. Rowley ..••..• * R. E. Anderson ..... * T. E. Garrett ......•• R. E. Anderson...... R. E. Anderson ..... • J. E. Ryland .•••...• John W. Luke * Xenophon Ryland • Xenophon Ryland • Thos. C. Ready ....•• Noah M. Givan .....• Joseph S. Browne .. * W. R. Stubblefield •.• Alex. M. Dockery • Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall •••......• Robt. F. Stevenson .. James W. Boyd.•.••• George R. Hunt..••. * W. M. Williams ..... * James P. Wood ..••. * Theodore Brace ..... Geo. E. Walker .•... B. H. Ingram •••...• • John R. Parson.... .• Harry Keene . . . • • • .• J. B. Thomas ....•..• A. M. Hough • D. A. Jamison -

J. W. Chenoweth •.• S. H. Saunders ..•• Marcus Boyd • John F. Houston .•• W. R. Penick ....• • John Decker • Geo. Whitcomb • Wm. N. Loker ..•. • John D. Vincil. •.. • A. L. McGregor ... • Martin Collins .••• • R. E. Anderson .•.. • T. E. Garrett ...•.. • Wm. D. Muir .•... • A. M. Dockery .•••.• Sam H. Owens .... • Sam H. Owens •... • John W. Luke •••• • Jas. E. Cadle ••..•. • Jas. E. Cadle .•..•• • Thos. C. Ready .... • Noah M. Givan ..•. • J08. S. Browne .... • W. R. Stubblefield • Jas. E. Carter ..•• ff· Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall • Robt. F. StevensonJames W. Boyd••• • George R. Hunt .•• Wm. M. Williams ..• James P. Wood ... • Theodore Brace ..• Geo. E. Walker .... * B. H. Ingram ..••.• John R. Parson ••. * Harry Keene •.••.. • J. B. Thomas .•••. * A. M. Hough .••••. D. A. Jamison ..... • F. J. Tygard ....•. •

H. E. Van OrsdelI..· Marcus Boyd • John F. Houston •... John Decker .....•.. • John Decker ....••.. * Samuel M. Hayes ... • A. L. McGregor .•.. ~* Samuel Russell ••... * A. L. McGregor •...• * Martin Collins .••••• • R. E. Anderson ..... • A. L. McGregor ••..• • Wm. D. Muir ...•... • Alex. M. Dockery ••• • Sam H. Owens ..•••. • John E. Ryland .•••• * John E. Ryland ..••• • Jas. E. Cadle ....•.. * Xenophon Ryland Thos. C. Ready .••.. • Noah M. Givan •••.. • M. G. Hubble W. R. Stubblefield .. • Jas. E. Carter•••... • Alex. M. Dockery * Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson .. • James W. Boyd .....• Geo. R. Hunt ....••. * Wm. M.Williams • James P. Wood ..••......•.•••••••• Geo. E. Walker ••••• • B. H. Ingram John R. Parson .••.. • Harry Keene ..••.... • J. B. Thomas ..•••.. A. M. Hough ••••••. • D. A. Jamison * F. J. Tygard * E. F. Allen .......•. •

John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett John D. Daggett * John D. Daggett ..•. * John D. Daggett ..•. • John D. Daggett * John D. Daggett * John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett * Wm. N. Loker ..•••. * Wm. N. Loker ..••.. • Wm. N. Loker ..•.•. Wm. N. Loker ..•••. * Wm. N. Loker ..•••. • Wm. N. Loker ..•••• • Wm. N. Loker .••••• • Wm. N. Loker ....•. * Wm. N. Loker ..•.•• • Wm. N. Loker * Wm. N. Loker.•.••. * Wm. N. Loker .....• * Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker ...•.. * John W. Luke .•••.. * John W. Luke * John W. Luke -II John W. Luke * Samuel M. Kennard .• Samuel M. Kennard .• Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard .• Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard .• Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard.-

A. O~Su1livan· A. O'Sullivan. A.O·SullivanA.O·SullivanA.O·SullivanA.O·SullivanA.O·SullivanA.O·SullivanA.O·SullivanA. O·Sullivan. A.O·Sullivan· A.O·Sullivan.t G. Frank Gouley*:!: G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank GouleY*·1I John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci}· John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!.

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LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & °A. M. MISSOURI

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FROM ITS ORGANIZATION. APRIL 23. 1821 Date Election Oct., 1896 . Oct., 1897 . Oct., 1898 .••. Oct., 1899 . Oct., 1900 . Oct., 1901. . Oct., 1902 . Oct., 1903 . Sept., 1904 . Sept., 1905 .•.. Sept., 1906 .... Sept., 1907 ..•• Sept., 1908 •••• Sept., 1909 •••• Sept., 1910..•. Sept., 1911 . Sept., 1912 . Oct., 1913 . Sept., 1914 . Sept., 1915 . Sept., 1916 . Sept., 1917 .. Sept., 1918 . Sept., 1919 . Sept., 1920 . Sept., 1921. . Oct., 1922 . Oct., 1923 . Oct., 1924 .•.. Oct., 1925 .... Oct., 1926 ••.. Oct., 1927 ..•. Sept., 1928 •••. Sept., 1929 .••. Oct., 1930 •••.

Grand Master D. A. Jamison * F. J. Tygard * E. F. Allen C. H. Briggs * Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin.. John C. yocum .... • Wm. F. Kuhn .....• Leroy B. Valliant ..• A. S. Houston .....• D. M. Wilson ......• John T. Short ...... R. R. Kreeger...... Wm. A. Hall....... Clay C. Bigger.....• Arch A. Johnson .... Jacob Lampert ....• Van Fremont Boor * Tolman W. Cotton .. Frank R. Jesse ....• Edward Higbee ..•• Wm. A. Clark ..... • John W. Bingham • Julius C. Garrell .••• Wm. F. Johnson ... * O. A. Lucas ....•..• Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre * Orestes Mitchell * W. W. Martin John Pickard ......• Anthony F. Ittner.. Byrne E. Bigger ..•. S. R. Freet..•.•.•• Wm. R. Gentry .••••

D. Grand Master F. J. Tygard * E. F. Allen * C. H. Briggs * Campbell Wells ....• Joseph C. Finagin .. • John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn * Leroy B. Valliant .. * A. S. Houston • D. M. Wilson * John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger * William A. Hall ....• Clay C. Bigger • Arch A. Johnson . Jacob Lampert ....• Van Fremont Boor .• Chesley A. Mosman .• Frank R. Jesse ....• Edward Higbee ....• Wm. A. Clark ..•.• • John W. Bingham ..• Julius C. Garrell ..• Wm. F. Johnson ...• O. A. Lucas .......• Bert S. Lee . Joseph S. McIntyre.* Orestes MitchelL ... * W. W. Martin ....•. John Pickard A. F. Ittner ...••.••• B. E. Bigger ......•. S. R. Freet ...••••• Wm. R. Gentry ....• Ray V. Denslow ....•

Senior G. Warden E. F. Allen ......•• * C. H. Briggs ,* Campbell Wells * Joseph C. Finagin.· John C. yocum .... * Wm. F. Kuhn .....• Leroy B. Valliant.· A. S. Houston • D. M. Wilson * John T. Short ....• • R. R. Kreeger • William A. Hall ,. Clay C. Bigger * Arch A. Johnson . Jacob Lampert * Van Fremont Boor.· Chesley A. MosmanTolman W. Cotton .. Edward Higbee • Wm. A. Clark • John W. Bingham· .Tulius C. Garrell • Wm. F . .Tohnson • O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee ........• Joseph S. McIntyre * Orestes Mitchell. ... W. W. Martin ..••.. John Pickard ....• • A. F. Ittner ..•...... B. E. Bigger ......•. S. R. Freet • Wm. R. Gentry, Sr.•. Ray V. Denslow ..... Thad B. Landon ..••

Junior G. Warden

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C. H. Briggs Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin .. • John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy B. Valliant *\ A. S. Houston • D. M. Wilson Howard Watson * R. R. Kreeger • William A. Hall • Clay C. Bigger * Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert • Van Fremont Boor.· Chesley A. Mosman. * Tolman W. Cotton. .• Frank R. Jesse * Wm. A. Clark John W. Bingham.· Julius C. Garrell .. Wm. F. Johnson * O. A. Lucas Bert S. Lee ........• Joseph S. McIntyre.Orestes Mitchell * W. W. Martin John Pickard • A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger....... S. R. Freet Wm. R. Gentry, Sr Ray V. Denslow ...•• Thad B. Landon * Frank C. Barnhill..

Grand Treasurer Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard. * Samuel M. Kennard .• Samuel M. Kennard.* Samuel M. Kennard.* Samuel M. Kennard.* Samuel M. Kennard. * John R. Parson * John R. Parson ...• Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart* Alphonso C. Stewart* Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart* Alphonso C. Stewart" Alphonso C. Stewart* Alphonso C. StewartAlphonso C. StewartAlph. C. Stewart . Wm. A. Hall Wm. A. Hall * Wm. A. Hall . Wm. A. Hall ......• Wm. A. HalL . Wm. A. Hall Wm. A. Hall ....•.• Wm. A. HalL .....• Wm. A. Hall ...•ttt E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris .••..... E. E. Morris ......•. E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris .

Grand Secretary John D. Vincil * John D. Vincil * John D. Vincil * John D. Vincil':: John D. Vincil * John D. Vincil * John D. Vinci! * John D. Vincil * John D. Vinci! *UU John R. ParsonU * John R. Parson * John R. ParsonJohn R. Parson * John R. Parson * John R. Parson * John R. Parson * John R. ParsonJohn R. ParsonJohn R. Parson * John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson * John R. Parson tt* Frank R. Jesse • Frank R. Jesse Frank R. Jesse Frank R. Jesse * Frank R. Jesse * Frank R. Jesse ·*tt Arthur Mather ttt Arthur Mather * Arthur Mather * Arthur Mather·

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Sept., 1931 •••• Sept., 1932 .••. Sept., 1933 ..•. Sept., 1934 ..•. Sept., 1935 ..•. Sept., 1936. • •. Sept., 1937 .••. Sept., 1938 .•.. Sept., 1939 .••. Sept., 1940 ..•• Sept., 1941. Sept., 1942 •••• Sept., 1943 .••. Sept., 1944. • •• Sept., 1946 •••• Sept., 1946 Sept., 1947 Sept.• 1948 ...• Sept., 1949 Sept., 1950

Ray V. Denslow .••. Thad B. Landon ..• F. C. Barnhill Du Val Smith James W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker..... H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Karl M. Vetsburg Harry S. Truman Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell.. W. F. Woodruff Willis J. Bray...... Willis J. Bray.••••• Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford .. , Ray Bond

Thad B. Landon ...• Frank C. Barnhill Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly ..•... Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader. . . . . . .. Henry C. Chiles ..•. Elwyn S. Woods Harry S. Truman Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell .. Grover C. Sparks.§§ Willis J. Bray Solon Cameron..... Solon Cameron ..•.. Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford Ray Bond Homer L. Ferguson ..

·Deceased. §Was not installed. tResigned. *tDied August 11, 1866, while in office. *~Appointed August 13, 1866, by John D. Vincil, Grand Master. "IIDied April 11, 1877, while in office. *UUDied October 12, 1904, while in office. ·"Died April 22, 1916, while in office.

Frank C. Barnhill .. Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker , H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles..... Elwyn S. Woods t Karl M. Vetsburg Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell .. Grover C. Sparks §§ W. F. Woodruff Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing... Morris E. Ewing ... Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford .. ; Ray Bond Homer L. Ferguson .. Richard O. Rumer ,

Du Val Smith ...•.. Jas. W. Skelly ..•... Geo. W. Walker ..•.• H. L. Reader ..•..•.. Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods t Karl M. Vetsburg Harry S. Truman Forrest C. Donnell .. Grover C. Sparks §§ Wm. F. Woodruff James A. Kinder §§§ Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland Harry F. Sunderland James M. Bradford Ray Bond Homer L. Ferguson.. Richard O. Rumer... James McB. Sellers .. ,

·IIJohn W. Luke served, by appointment, as Grand Secretary, from April 11. 1877 to October 11. 1877, and died October, 1888. fiDied within week after his installation. ttThere was no Communication in 1835, owing to the anti-Masonic excitement. ··Withdrawn from Masonry. tt·Resigned May 20, 1921, account ill health. ···Appointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. Valliant, Grand Master.

E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris. . . . . . .. E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris. . . . . . .. E. E. Morris ..•..... E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris

Arthur Mather * Arthur Mather * Arthur Mather * Arthur Mather '" Arthur Mather '" Arthur Mather '" Arthur Mather '" Arthur Mather '" Arthur Mather '" Arthur MatherArthur Mather '" Arthur Mather '" Arthur Mather §§§§ Harold L. Reader .§ Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader

*tttDied November 7, 1924, while in office. ··ttDied August 29, 1927, while in office. ttt Appointed September 1, 1927, by John Pickard, Grand Master. §§Died December 28, 1942, while in office. §§§Died May 8, 1943, while in office. §§§§Died April 22, 1944, while in office. *§Appointed May 1, 1944 by W. F. Woodruff, Grand Master.

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OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATION. FEBRUARY 22, 1821 EDWARD BATES, Worshipful Master JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer

JAMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden

WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden ABRAM BECK, Secretary

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GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI TO MISSOURI GRAND LODGE Grand Representative Post Office St. Louis .................•........ Alabama Robert L. Aronson . Wm. C. Rese •....•....•. _ . St. Louis ..•............ , Alberta. .•.....•••. Byrne E. Bigger ......•..••. Hannibal Arizona ..........•. Arkansas. . . . . . • • . .. John W. Adams . Marshall. ••.........•.. , Russell E. Murray ..•.•.••••• Warren Drescher, Jr . Frank G. Ade .......••..•..• John A. Witthaus .•••••••••• James DeWitt ....•••••••.•.. Thomas B. Mather. . • • • .• . .. Thornton Jennings .•••••..•. Harold M. Jayne . Jolly P. Hurtt ..........• " .. Wm. C. Gordon .. J. M. Sellers .............•••• Ray V. Denslow ....•...• _ .•. Eli S. Haynes .............•. W. W. Martin .. " ...•...•..• Walter A. Higbee ..••..•., '" Walter J. Simon . DuVal Smith .......•........ Elmer W. Wagner ......•.... Forrest C. Donnell , . Cornelius Struble . Chas. L. Woods ......•.•..... F. C. Barnhill .. Ovid Bell . R. Jasper Smith ......••..... Claude A. Ferguson . R. M. Rankin ' . William J. Craig . Archie L. Fox . Arthur Nordberg . Frank P. Briggs . Harris C. Johnston . James W. Skelly ' " Harold L. Reader. . . . • . •• . •. Orestes Mitchell, Jr . Arch A. Johnson ....•....... Ralph Wilson . Curtis J. Neal. ............•• E. E. Morris ,

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative Post Office Blake W. Harper . Montgomery Archibald West . Edmonton ' Lee Garrett , Tucson Theo. Friedman .........••• ' 2201 Battery St., Little Rock St. Louis ...••....•.•.....••. Brazil-Rio de Janeiro ..... 1. Bert Love " . Rio de Janeiro ....... Brazil-Sao-Paulo ...••.• Jules Glinternick ' Sao Paulo Kirkwood .......•...•••.......... Brazil-Do SuI. . Oswald Eifler . Joplin '.....••... British Columbia .......• Lawrence Healey . 1138 Nelson, Vancouver St. Louis ...••.....•................. Canada . Geo. D. Kleinhaus . Kitchener, Ontario Kirksville ............•.. ' ....•...... Colorado . Jos. M. Neal. , Meeker Kansas City , ...•...... Connecticut......•••• Albert M. Gesler ........•... Orange, Conn. Clinton ..............•.. , Costa Rica ......•.... Rudolph Sasso . P. O. Box 186, San Jose Trenton ....•.......•...........•.... Cuba ' Calixto Fajardo••••••••••••. Havana Sedalia , Delaware ..........• ' Weldon C. Waples ....•...... Newark Marshall ..••........•.. ' Denmark ••.......•. Alex Troedsson . Copenhagen Lexington ..•.•...•... " District of Columbia . Geo. S.Foreman ' 5622 1st St. N. E. Trenton ..•.•••...•..... ' ..•........ England ....•....... Hon. Wykeham Stanley Cornwallis .. Kent Columbia .........•................. Florida " ., .. Hal W. Adams . Mayo St. Louis ..........•.. " Georgia . Robert A. Collins , UnadiIIa Lancaster Guatemala . St. Louis " Idaho . Clarence D. Purkhiser. . . . . .. Caldwell St. Joseph , Illinois . Carl W. Mulfinger 33 N. La Salle, Chicago St. Louis Indiana •........... Herbert A. Graham Indianapolis Washington, D. Coo " •••.••.•.... Ireland •••.•. '" •.. Hector C. C. Deane Ireland Kansas City , Italy (Grand Orient) . Fabio Luzzatto............. Milan Rolla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Kansas ...•........ D. A. Meredith .......•..... , Kansas City Marshall .........................•. Kentucky .•......•.. Sam K. Veach. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Carlisle Fulton Louisiana . Robert Waleter Smith...... New Orleans Springfield. . . . . . . . . . . .. . ...•.... Mexico-York .. " ....• WiIIiam Webber ..........•. Mexico, D. F. Kansas City Mexico-Occidental Mexicana .. Jose Carlos Flores , Guadalajara Jal., Mexico Rolla Mexico-El Potosi. .....• Mauricio Lopez Rives....... San Luis Potosi, Mexico Springfield. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Mexico-Tamaulipas ....•. Amado Abrego V. . . . . . • . . .. Peynosa Tamaulipas . , Mexico-Valle de Mexico •... Lie. Valentino Rincon Apartado Postal 10 Artes Num. 53,Mexico,D.F. Kansas City , Mexico-Nueva Leon . Benito M. Flores Monterrey Kansas City , Mexico-Cosmos . Antonio Hernandez......... Chihuahua, Mexico Washington, D. C '" ' Maine . Edward H. Britton Waterville Boonville " Manitoba.....•••••• ' Maris H. Garton. . . . . . . . . . .. Boissevain St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Maryland ' G. A. Rasch................ Baltimore St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Massachusetts ........• Robt. D. Webster ' Belmont St. Joseph " Michigan ..•••.•..•• ' Neil W. Murray , Detroit Harry E. Orr. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. St. Paul James P. White Bailey Cape Girardeau ' Montana ' Stephen C. Arnold.......... Culbertson Kansas City Nebraska . Edward E. Carr North Platte

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GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI-(Continued) TO MISSOURI GRAND LODGE Grand Representative Post Office Morris E. Ewing ...•...•. ' ... Morrisville Nevada . Guy C. Million ...........•••. Boonville ......•.•...•....••.... New Brunswick .....•.. , Henry C. Chiles ......•...•.. , Lexington 1 New Hampshire . New Jersey . E. L. Robison ..........•.... St. Joseph , New Mexico . Cecil A. Tolin . St. Louis Richard O. Rumer . St. Louis ........•...... -, New South Wales . Anthony F. Ittner . St. Louis , .......•... New york .

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J. Fred Park West Plains ' New Zealand . ...............••.•.•.•.•••..................••..... ' ....•..... Nicaragua . .......................... , ; North Carolina . Ray Bond Joplin North Dakota . William R. Gentry St. Louis , Nova Scotia . Fred O. Wood .•••••••••••.•• Kansas City .................•........ Ohio ...........•.. Sam Wilcox St. Joseph ' Oklahoma . Martin Dickinson. . . . . . . .. . .. Kansas City Oregon ......•....•. Bert S. Lee Springfield ..........•.............. Panama .......•.... Freelon K. Hadley ..•........ St. Joseph .....•..••.••........ Philippine Islands . W. B. Massey Bonne Terre ' Prince Edward Island . George C. Marquis ; Independence ..................•...• Quebec ••••••••••••. W. F. Woodruff Kansas City ................•...... Queensland .•.•....... T. W. Cotton ,. Van Buren ...•......... , .••••••••• Rhode Island •••..••••. Don Chapman Chillicothe , Porto Rico .....••.... James M. Bradford St. Louis ..........•............. Saskatchewan . Harry S. Truman ........•... Washington, D. C ' ....•...... Scotland . John F. Reinhardt .....••.•. Menlo Park, Cal South Australia .. David V. Morris Nevada South Carolina . Robert C. Winkelmaier , St. Louis _ .......•. South Dakota.•.•...... John N. Blomquist Kansas City , Sweden . Robert Lee Barger , Ironton ' Swiss Alpina..•.•..••• Solon Cameron. . • • • • • • • • .. • •. St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .......•.• Tasmania ......•.••• Leo H. Johnson Neosho ....•....................... Tennessee•.....•.•.. Willis J. Bray ........•.••... Kirksville .........•.................. Texas ..•..•.•..... Roy B. Meriweather , Monroe City ...••.•... " The Netherlands . Ernest Dunford St. Louis ..........•..... United Grand Lodge of Germany Karl M. Vetsburg ,. St. Louis ........•..•... , ........••... Utah ......••••... , Homer L. Ferguson. . . . .• Jefferson City .......•.. , ....•....•. Vermont ......••.... Julius R. Edwards........... Centralia ........•.................. Victoria .....•...... O. H. Swearingen ..•••..•.. , Kansas City .....................•... Virginia ....••..•... Ransom A. Breuer Hermann Washington ....•..•.. Harry F. Sunderland. . • ••• •. Kansas City .......•............ Western Australia ......• C. Lew Gallant ....•.•.•.•.•. St. Louis _ West Virginia ..•.•.••• John M. Gallatin ..•••••••••.. Chillicothe ..•...•.................. Wisconsin •••••••••••

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative Post Office Fred H. Callihan ......•.•... Box 469, Las Vegas Byard Stilwell ........•..•.. St. John Oscar Earle Jewell ......•••. St. John H. E. Hutchinson ........••. Princeton Herbert S. Murdock .....•... Springer W. G. Lackersteen ......•... Sydney Milton W. Huebsch . 4140 Carpenter Ave., New York 66, N. Y. Adam Smith .....•.••••••••. Wellington Raymond C. J arnet ........• Box 14, Granada Lambert R. Morris ..•....... Beaufort Max M. Moore ....•.•....... Valley City J. Wm. McLellan . New Glasgow James W. Morgan .. Jackson W. W.Groom ........•...... McAlester Bryant A. Luzader . Portland Julio Icaza ..........••••••. Panama City Melicio Fabros ......•...... Manila P. Sidney Fielding . Charlottstown A. J. B. Milborne ' Montreal Samuel James Cossart . Brisbane Harry A. Reed .......••••••. Providence Juan Olmo . Barceloneta J. Orville Clark . Govan John B. Peden . Edinburgh William James Host . Adelaide .. Charleston Gen. Chas. P. Summerall George W. Toft . Mitchell T. C. Bergent ...••.•......•. Stockholm Emil Glaser .. Switzerland Herbert Hays . Hobart

G:W.'RB.: M~~i~~~~~Y::::::::::. T. Hoffman Theo Vogel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Edwin Charles Randall N. Dean Rowe Alfred Melbourne Derham ..• Vernon G. Harlin John I. Preissner F. A. Gregory. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Spenner, S. Bowman Claude J. Hendricks

Fort Worth Amsterdam Frankfurt on Main Ogden Johnson Newtown Harrisonburg Yakima Perth Parkersburg 2321 E. Belleview Place, Milwaukee

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THE MASONIC WORLD


THE MASONIC WORLD By

RAY

V.

DENSLOW,

P. G. M.

INTRODUCTION

On the opposite page you will see a photograph of a ruined, and almost destroyed building. It is a symbol of something that WAS, but is no more. It is a reminder of what was once a great nation, a nation which today is practically non-existent; a nation which has been divided into zones, and sectors, and occupied by forces which range from the friendly forces of a democratic government to the despotic forces of dictatorship. The building is the once proud Ge1'man Reichstag, the home of the German National Congress, and symbol of Constitutional Law and Order. Today, the building stands in ruins, along the great, and once beautiful, Unter den Linden. Today, it is not the symbol of Law and Order, but a monument to the forces of destruction, and teaching that when the people of a nation give up, or surrender, their liberties, they have taken a step which leads only to their dissolution as a great people. Germany was once a great nation. Thousands of German people are today just as patriotic, just as honorable, just as high-minded, as their neighbors in other parts of the world may be. Their failure was in permitting themselves to be led by one who was anxious for power. Now, power in itself is valuable; but it must be controlled. In the case of the German system under Hitler, it lacked all elements of control. Hitler took advantage of a condition which existed at the close of the first world war, when Germany lay torn and wounded with no Samaritan nearby. The German people were grasping for a leader -a leader which might lead them out of a grave economic crisis. In came Hitler, and by seizing power, here and there, soon became the Great Dictator. Many Germans could not follow the Hitler doctrine, yet what may one do when all the forces of government stand back of such a leader' Why did not some force arise in Germany to prevent the seizure of power' We do not know. But this we know: Freemasonry was not united. Some nine or more grand lodges attempted to function, but lacking that unity which makes for success, it was only a matter of time until they were forbidden to meet at all.


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Freemasons were thrown out of government position; they were not permitted to teach in public schools or colleges. Their leaders were thrown into concentration camp. Freemasons were never permitted to become members of the Storm Troopers, the Elite of the German Army; in fact they were not even made a part of the army under draft. Neighbors were expected to spy on each other and to report any meeting of those suspected to be Freemasons. The newspapers were required to print articles derogatory to the fraternity. The lodge rooms were taken over by the Gestapo; Masonic museums were established and admittance charged to view the terrible (') secrets of the Masonic Craft. The text books in the public schools were changed, charging the Jew and the Masonic fraternity with all the sins of the Decalogue; both were said to govern the world in a sort of International Freemasonry, all under the direction of the King of England who was said to be the head of this insidious sect. We shall not attempt in the few pages which we have a discussion of the German question, except to state that there are several systems of Freemasonry practiced in Germany. Our readers are referred to the M. S. A. Pamphlet "After Fifteen Years," which gives a complete story of conditions there as of August, 1949. One of these systems, which stands in the way of German Masonic union, is that known as the Rite of Strict Observance, a Rite still in use in the Scandinavian countries. Because the Rite represents all the Freemasonry there is in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, it has been quite generally recognized by American Grand Lodges. And we may add, we think deservedly, for our brethren there maintain a very high standard of membership. But the Rite is an aristocracy. It is governed from the top down, and not from the bottom up, as in this country. The Rite is two centuries old and is not a new star in the Masonic firmament. It shows traces of several ritualists, including Swedenborg, Zinnendorf, and others, with ideas taken from Rosicrucian, occult, and cabalistic writings. It is largely a Christian type of Freemasonry, and maintains the claim that Freemasonry was brought down to us through the early Templars. It does have some very beautiful features. The National Grand Lodge of Freemasons of Germany practices the Strict Observance or Swedenborgian Rite. It is an old Prussian group of Freemasons, substantial men, yet unwilling to give up any, of what they think, old traditions. Now the oldest tradition in Freemasonry is that a Grand Lodge of symbolic Freemasons is the highest authority, Masonically. (We know some people who don't think it.) This Grand Lodge claims control over all of its bodies from the top down. They regulate the action of all the symbolic lodges. And of course, such a grand lodge cannot claim sovereign rights. Be it said to the credit of the brethren in the Western Zone of Occupation, that in establishing the United Grand Lodge of Ger-


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many, all of the nine grand lodges surrendered their sovereign authority to the U. G. L. and to preserve the old tradition of name, became known as Provincial Grand Lodges, following the English system. Those so-called higher groups are carrying on, but are in nowise attempting to control the symbolic degrees. Just why these two grand lodges in Berlin could not do the same thing is unexplainable. To those of us who are acquainted with the American doctrine of exclusive jurisdiction, it will be hard to explain the doctrine of concurrent jurisdiction which has prevailed for centuries in Germany and other sections of the world. Previous to 1934 there were at least nine generally recognized Grand Lodges in Germany; they had a sort of concurrent jurisdiction, and, strange to say, never came in conflict with each other. The Grand Lodge of Germany in Berlin had a Provincial Grand Lodge in Hamburg, while the Grand Lodge of Hamburg had a Provincial Grand Lodge in Berlin. Since the Unification of German Grand Lodges in 1949 in the Western Zone, and the Unification of two Grand Lodges in the Berlin Zone, the situation is becoming quite different and an honest attempt is being made to assign lodges to the Grand Lodge which occupies the particular territory. Naturally, many lodges prefer to remain under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge under which they have always worked. As long as there are Inner Orients, Supreme Councils, and Committees of Administration dominating Symbolic Freemasonry, it will be hard to nationalize these groups. Autocracy dies slow; its adherents, having a touch of power, hate to surrender authority. The Grand Lodge of Germany, an old Prussian group, is still a power in German Freemasonry and will have to be reckoned with eventually. It has a Provincial Grand Lodge in Hamburg with over a thousand members. Many of the representatives of these lodges would prefer to work with, and under, the United Grand Lodge of Germany, but there are many factors to be considered, one of which is the fact that for two centuries they have worked the ritual of Strict Observance. Old ideas give way slowly. But there is the greater argument of Masonic Unity. Our brethren in Germany have had a practical experience in the lack of unity, when Hitler took them over lock, stock, and barrel. This, in itself, should be ample reply to those who seek to isolate themselves from the great body of the fraternity. In Berlin the situation is quite the same. Here, the Grand Lodge Alten Pfiichten, a newly organized group, has united with the Royal York of Friendship into a United Grand Lodge of Berlin, and it is not a far cry from the day when these two grand lodges

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may enter the confederation known as the United Grand Lodge of Germany. IN THE BERLIN AREA

The City of Berlin constitutes an island of democracy in a sea of communism. It is not only the first line of defense for democracy

Berlin German Masons Meet Here.

but the advance post for Freemasonry. How necessary therefore it is that all support possible be given these, our brethren, in Eastern Germany. It is very unfortunate that some of our Masonic brethren of German descent, even in Berlin, cannot see the ultimate results of any lack of unity on their part, because there have been, up to January, 1950, four so-called Grand Lodges attempting to function within the confines of one great city. Such a thing might have been, and was, possible before the days of Hitler, but, today, with enemies on all sides, it is most impractical. Fortunately, there are, or were, two groups in Berlin which could foresee what might happen, and who realized that Unity was the one thing essential at this time. In the midst of a cataclysm it is foolish to speak of details. And it seems that detail is all that prevents a union of the four grand lodges. Two of these groups did unite, January 23, 1950, into an organization to be known as the United Grand Lodge in Berlin. On January 27, 1950, we received an official notice to that effect; it reads: .


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Berlin-Wilmersdorf 27/1/50 Emserstrasse 12-13 Logenhaus Weare very happy to be able to inform you that the Grand Lodge Royal York "Zur Freundschaft" (To the Friendship). and the Grand Lodge of Free Masons "Zu den Alten pflichten" (To the Ancient Charges (Landmarks) ). have established the United Grlllnd Lodge in BeTlin

on Monday, the 23rd of January, 1950. We most humbly and fraternally beg you, kindly to note this fact. A minute report shall be forwarded to you without delay. We salute you with D. G. and S. of F. United Grand Lodge in Berlin Seal R. Y. of F. Seal Z. D. A. P. AUGUST HOR.NEFFER,

Grand Master THIEL,

Deputy Grand Master

ERICH RUDIGER,

Grand Master HOFFMAN,

Deputy Grand Master

We shall give a brief resume of the History of Freemasonry in Berlin since it has been occupied by the allied forces. With the fall of Berlin and the apparent death of Hitler and his mistress, German lodges began their process of revival. There were in Berlin the following: Grand National Mother Lodge "Zu den drei Weltkugeln" Grand Landes-Lodge of Freemasons of Germany Grand Lodge Royal York" Zur Freundschaft" Provincial Grand Lodge Berlin of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg. (The latter is today the Grand Lodge" Zu den Alten Pflichten")

The latter named Grand Lodge proposed, in the interest of Masonic unity, the establishment of a single grand lodge for Berlin. The suggestion was turned down at the time, but later on, both the Grand Lodge of the Three Globes, and Grand Lodge Royal York agree that there should be a closer cooperation, at least to discuss common problems and how best to meet them. And that is, briefly, how the "Vereinigte Landesloge Berlin" (United Provincial Lodge of Berlin) came into being, only the Grand Landes-Lodge of Germany remaining out. These three Grand Lodges then issued a statement, which because of its historical value we shall quote in full: Orient Berlin, July 12, 1948. The three Grand Masters who have signed their names hereunder are giving the following declaration in the name of their respective grand lodges . . . The路 reestablishment of German Masonic lodges has taken place after a Masonic darkness of twelve years' duration, in a period of the greatest German disintegration. Those grand lodges which have their seat in Berlin erected their organization separately, but in closest cooperation. But the fact that the activity of the individual grand lodges


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is restricted to Berlin for the time being, induced us to approach the idea of a closer union in order to utilize the fullest energy in reconstruction. We have been strengthened in our intentions by the information that the British Military government will restore to the Grand Lodge "Zu den Alten Ptlichten" the previously beautiful and spacious lodge building situated in Berlin-Wilmersdorf, Emserstrasse 12-13. (Badly bombed.) The three grand lodges intend to work together in this building. To give an external token of unity, we have decided to join the three grand lodges closely together into one Provincial Grand Lodge of Berlin. The

Dr. Rudiger and Brerthren of German Lodge in Berlin. Col. R. A. Egner (4th from left). union is not formed with the idea of breaking away from any existing forms or customs. On the contrary, due respect for the traditions of each individual grand lodge bids us not to touch or change the existing rituals and the hitherto exercised usages. But we are quite sure, that this union is the best guarantee for a powerful growth of Freemasonry in Berlin. (The statement is signed by Grand Masters Sasse [National Mother Grand Lodge of Three Globes], Dr. Horneffer of Royal York, and Dr. Rudiger of Alten Pfiichten.)

And thus the three grand lodges carried on for a time. The new arrangement was in reality a joint committee, formed with no thought of enforcing a common obedience. Alten Pflichten took the lead in attempting to form out of this group a United Grand Lodge in Berlin, but in every instance all such attempts proved failures. The Grand Lodge of Freemasons of Germany was brought into the discussions, but neither it nor the Three Globes showed any interest in a united grand lodge; they gave as their pretext that "their higher degrees were amalgamated and a part of the St. John's or symbolic degrees," and that they could not separate them without destroying their system. Royal York was far more sympathetic. It could be easily seen, that unless there was some unity among the

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Berlin lodges, no foreign jurisdiction would be inclined to extend recognition or aid. Then on January 22, 1950, at a communication of Freemasons, it was decided by a vote of 111 to 11, to agree to a proposal of the Grand Officers' Council. On the day following, a Constitution and By-Laws was prepared and discussed. But only the two grand lodges, Royal York and Alten Pflichten, took part in the formation. Officers of the Grand Council, which we think may be regarded as an executive committee, were: Grand Master-Dr. August Horneffer (RY.) Deputy Grand Master-Dr. Erich Rudiger (Z.D.A.P.) Senior Grand Warden-Willy Mayer (Z.D.A.P.) Junior Grand Warden-George Thiel (RY.) Grand Secretary-Alfred Richter (Z.D.A.P.) Grand Treasurer-Felix Hesse (RY.) Master Ceremonies-Arthur Hermann (RY.) Grand Senior Deacon-Walter Vorwerk (Z.D.A.P.)

Dr. Rudiger writes that it is the intention of this new group "to collaborate on its part, in forming connection with other grand lodges, to further the establishment of Masonic thought and unity in Germany (for the time being in Berlin), and in their new task hopes to receive especially the support of the Mother Grand Lodge, the American Grand Lodges, and all foreign jurisdictions which may form the regular Freemasonry of the world." MOST RECENT NEWS FROM GERMANY

In a report made to the Masonic Service Association of the United States, the Committee investigating conditions in Germany expressed the hope that Dr. Theodor Vogel would be re-elected to the position of Grand Master. At the recent meeting, held in Hanover, Germany, June 8-11, 1950, Dr. Vogel was re-elected, and the work which he so auspiciously begun will be continued. Dr. Vogel is the man of the hour so far as German Freemasonry is concerned; he has administrative ability; he has the proper conception of the fraternity; he is not interested in the upbuilding of the higher degrees but in the strengthening of symbolic Freemasonry, which is the task of today. Of the 175 constituent lodges forming the United Grand Lodge of Germany, some 168 were represented, proving that the brethren are interested in Masonic unity in Germany. Officers elected for the year 1950-51 are: Grand Master-Dr. Theodor Vogel of Schweinfurt First Deputy G. M.-Bro. Ehmke of Hanover Second Deputy G. M.-Bro. Myer of Rhens Grand Chancellor-Bro. Gebhardsbauer of Offenbach Grand Secretary-Bro. Buchwald of Lubeck Grand Treasurer-Bro. Kramer of Stuttgart Grand Orator-Bro. Bernhard of Stuttgart


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The Constitution of the new grand lodge provides for a Council of Administration, which presumably includes all of the regularly elected grand officers; to this group have been added brothers: Korfgen, Klingler, Schulze, Thun, Demeter, Kettler, Hintze, Christiani. The annual communication of the grand lodge was divided into two sections, one of which was open to the general public. During the first part, the assembly occupied itself with a discussion of the laws and regulations, approving of financial and other statements and reports, fixing a budget for the year, and providing for matters affecting recognition by other Masonic grand lodges. The second part, open to the public, discussed problems, spiritual and cultural. These discussions are said to have been on a very high plane. Germany has many problems and these discussions served to focalize interest in them and Dr. Th. Vogel (1949) set up standards for future conduct. This assembly closed with a widely projected demonstration attended by officials of state and city; the Prime Minister of Lower Saxony was in attendance, as well as brethren from many other countries. The Grand Master took occasion to thank those who took part in the assembly and who had made possible the rejuvenation of German Freemasonry. A collection of more than a thousand German Marks was taken up and turned over to the Lord Mayor of Hanover for charitable purposes. The German press were, as a rule, favorably impressed with the assembly and its work. Following the installation of grand officers, announcement was made of several awards and appointments that had been given by the United Grand Lodge. The living members of the old German Grand Lodges which are now Provincial Grand Lodges, were given the title of Past Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of Germany; among this list were Bro. Beyer at Bayreuth, Ganser at Frankfurt, and Guyot of Dermstadt.


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The United Grand Lodge Awards were presented to the following: Bro. Bro. Bro. Bro. Bro. Bro. Bro. Bro.

Horneffer, Berlin August Pauls, Frankfurt Hopker at Frabertsham Andres at Wesel Ray V. Denslow of Missouri Martin J. Dietz of New Jersey Carl Voigt of New York Carl Claudy of District of Columbia

Offices United Grand Lodge of Germany. M. S. A. ENTERS THE pICTURE

Some of those jurisdictions who are hesitant about entering the Masonic Service Association relief picture should enjoy a section of a report made to your reviewer by Lt. Col. Raymond A. Egner, who is Master of the American Berlin Lodge No. 46 (Rhode Island). We know Colonel Egner and the fine job he has done in Berlin in maintaining contact with German Freemasons. When the roll is finally called, Colonel Egner's name will be among those at the top because of the aid he has rendered these very deserving brethren of ours in Berlin. Writing, February 14, 1950, Colonel Egner says: It was good to learn of your pleasure in receiving the cable announcing the consolidation of the Grand Lodge Zu den Alten Pilichten and Royal York of Friendship into the United Grand Lodge in Berlin. The members of those two Grand Lodges are all elated over the consolidation, and deserve much credit for their untiring efforts in effecting the union -something that was furthest from their thoughts not too long ago. Royal York has since moved into the Emserstrasse Temple which you and Brother Dietz visited when here. Your congratulations have been extended to the German Brethren for the fine manner in which they brought about a consolidation. They appreciate that it was the visit


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to Berlin by you and Bro. Dietz, your advice, and the untiring efforts of Major Brown, that impressed upon them the importance of one grand lodge in Berlin. (Colonel Egner overlooks the part that he and his associates in Berlin played in this consolidation.) Recently twelve members of our lodge attended one of the German meetings, at which time a copy of the cable sent to you was read, the two reels of film sent by Brother Carl Claudy turned over to them and 'then announcement was made that the M. S. A. had turned over to them $4,000 for the relief of needy German Freemasons hereabouts. They

Officers amd M6'lnbers of Berlin Lodge. were overwhelmed, and no poor words of mine could describe their appreciative reactions! Brother Rudiger gave a beautiful acknowledgment, in which he said: "We have in the German language an expression meaning that when the heart is full, the tongue cannot talk." Incidentally, the $4,000 is to be used for the benefit of approximately 1,800 worthy distressed German Freemasons, their widows, and orphans.

This money was not the first sent into the Berlin zone by the Masonic Service Association. We trust that it shall not be the last, for our brethren there are still in great need-probably greater need than in any other section of Europe. No single American Grand Lodge can cope with the problem, and we were indeed fortunate in being able to combine our relief funds and to see that it is properly distributed by brethren in whom we have the utmost confidence. This is especially necessary when we happen to know of several thousand dollars squandered by Masonic groups when turned over to individuals who proved unfaithful to the task.


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Colonel Egner writes us again in regard to the charity problem in Berlin: . You have all done your utmost and we join with the German brethren in expressing gratitude. Our Lodge and the individual members generally try to take care of the immediate needs of the German lodges, insofar as we can determine what those needs are. Our charity committee in making a survey of the situation among the German Freemasons and their families, found many-too many-in real need. As you know Berlin is right in the middle of the Russian Zone, and many members of the German lodges live in the Russian Sector of Berlin. Many are returned prisoners of war and former inmates of concentration camps. We find that these people have a knack of making clothing of some kind out of any semblance of warp and woof, regardless of its tattered condition. Here might be a field for American lodges, sending such clothing as might be concerted for their use. To those of our American brethren and grand lodges that might be interested we append a list of four names to whom clothing might be sent: Dr. Erich Rudiger, 12-13 Emserstrasse, Berlin. George Thiel, NW, Bochumerstrasse 1, Ausgang 2, Berlin. Fritz Sasse, Steglitz, Ahornstrasse 15 A, Berlin. Paul Hoffman, Schoeneberg, Eisernacherstrasse 12-13, Berlin. What a field for Masonic charity! UNDER WHAT CONDITIONS 7

Another of our German friends in Berlin tells of the receipt of the M. S. A. films: All of the brethren are very glad and thankful to M. S. A. for sending these wonderful movie pictures. They will help us to strengthen the Craft here in Berlin. Now, our brethren can see how strong and active Freemasonry is in the U. S. A. and what remains in Berlin to be done to attain the same goal. The films will be shown to all Berlin Masons in the large meeting hall on the first floor of the lodge building in Emserstrasse. And then, touching on the conditions under which they work, he added: The last winter under the hard blockade, conditions proved difficult; in a half damaged building, partly without windows and electric light, the brethren had their rehearsals twice a week, and each week had one working in the 1째, 2째, or 3째. Transportation is bad and often the members had to walk through dark streets. I shall never forget those days because it has demonstrated that the power of the Masonic spirit is stronger than the brutal forces of atheism and materialism. What a lesson for our American brethren! WHAT IS HAPPENING IN AUSTRIA?

Vienna, in the Western Occupation Zone of Europe, is one of the outposts of Freemasonry. Thanks to American occupation forces the spirit of the fraternity is being encouraged and our Austrian brethren are carrying on their fraternal and charitable work in a way that challenges the admiration of the Masonic world.


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That the Grand Lodge is appreciative of all that is being done for them is shown by their sending a "plaque" to several of their friends in this country; we are happy to be one of those friends, but we doubt whether we deserve a plaque, for all that we have done for our brethren there was no more than should have been done by the average Freemason. These plaques read: Grand Lodge of VWMU], for Austria .

Dip,Zoma.

This is to certify that the Grand Lodge of Vienna for Austria has decided to dedicate the accompanying plaque to Brother - - - - - in grateful appreciation of the many proofs of fraternal love and readiness to help in times of direst need. SOHEIOKELBAUER m/p Grand Master K. KRAUS, m/p Grand Secretary or. Vienna, May 10, 1949.

Freemasonry in Austria and in Hungary has been largely of the hide-and-seek variety over the centuries. Forbidden in one country, it emerges in the 'other. For a brief time, following the last (we hope) World War, Freemasomy appeared in both countries. But not for long. Within the last few weeks the fraternity has been dissolved in Hungary and it is now left to our Austrian brethren to carryon the great work of Brotherhood and Fraternity. The road of Austrian Freemasomy has been rough and rugged. We well recall the appeal made on behalf of our Austrian Freemasons when Hitler's forces entered Austria during those sad days when it appeared that despotism was sweeping the country. The story has never been written as to how some of our Austrian brethren got out of Austria and into the lands of freedom. One of these brethren was Dr. Vladimir Misar, then Grand Secretary of Austria, who, with his wife, reached England just before the war broke. While waiting there for the quota allowed Austrians, he found himself in the very midst of war activities; he accepted industrial employment, and there he worked until the war's end, doing what he could as a man of advanced age for the government which had allowed him to enter. We have had rather extensive correspondence with Dr. Misar, even before he left Vienna, and have urged that he write us the story of his grand lodge. He has been very kind and supplied us with generous notes, from which we have been able to give you the following story. We feel that Dr. Misar has been entirely too modest in not giving us some of his own experiences. Freemasomy in Austria had its beginnings back in the early part of the eighteenth century with the founding of the Lodge. Zu den Drei Kanonen, in the City of Vienna, in 1742. While the lodge was located in Austrian territory, it was under the obedience of the


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Grosse Landesloge von Berlin, as were several other similar lodges later to be established. The fraternity entered a period of uncertainty. It was at first protected and promoted. Then it became persecuted and prohibited. Although Francis Stephan of Lothringen was a Freemason, his Queen-wife, Maria Theresa, silenced the fraternity by government order; later on she permitted her son, Joseph II, who was a Free-' mason, to revive the order and it experienced a period of great activity. Mozart, Haydn, Sonnenfels, and many other notables, became members of the fraternity during this period. Then came the foundation of the independent Grand Lodge known as Grosse Landesloge von Osterreich. GRAND LODGE IS DISSOLVED

But even while Francis Joseph ruled, the fraternity was dissolved, and not again until 1918, following the first World War, did Freemasonry have official standing in Austria. Yet those characteristics which marked the fraternity during those early days caused it to develop along lines quite different from that of their German neighbors. German Freemasonry was, and remained for years, strictly formal and nationalist; on the other hand, Austrian Freemasonry was liberal and super-nationalistic. This situation was no doubt the result of the geographical situation of the time, for in the territory of Austria there were no less than eight nations united under one government, and in the last third of the nineteenth century several Austrian Lodges had been formed on Hungarian soil. At that time, under Francis Joseph I of Hungary, Freemasonry was permitted in Hungary, but forbidden by the same Francis Joseph I as Emperor of Austria. The first of these lodges, Humanitas, was founded at Neudorfel in 1871, a small village near the Austro-Hungarian frontier. Other lodges followed, many of which were founded by Austrians living in Hungary, so that by 1918, there were as many as fourteen lodges working under the obedience of the "Symbolic Gra.nd Lodge of Hungary." These lodges were: Humanitas Eintracht Treue Pionier Zur Warheit

Zukunft Schiller Goethe Kosmos Fortschritt

Socrates Freundschaft Lessing Gleichheit

Ritualistic meetings were possible only on Hungarian territory, and this was carried on, almost exclusively, at Pressburg. This limited the number of meetings, and so these were only held on two or three occasions during the year, usually on Saturdays and Sundays. The custom was to have a meeting of the third degree on Saturday evening; the following morning, the lodge worked in the


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second degree, and at noon was held the meeting for initiation. This was followed by the "white-table" or dinner meeting, a meeting which united all brethren of all degrees into one common fellowship. Then began the return journey to Austria, a journey which provided fellowship not to be found in everyday life, and what promised to be a drawback became an essential feature for the upbuilding of the fraternity. These occasions became Masonic week ends. Preserved from outward distraction, the interest of the group was devoted solely to the meeting and to friendly intercourse. The rarity of these meetings also contributed to the solemnity of the ritualistic work, and an initiation, involving this journey across the border, became a never to be forgotten experience for each candidate. These meetings also resulted in the welding of friendships with the Hungarian Freemasons who frequently visited these Austrian lodges. Representatives from these Austrian frontier lodges were permitted to attend the Hungarian Grand Lodge and to vote in elections of the grand officers. Yet, the administrative work was carried on in Austria. LODGES OCCUPIED UNIQUE SITUATION

This situation presented a peculiar problem, for it became necessary, in order to maintain the semblance of legality, to have a parallel organization in Austria, which was referred to as a covering association. All of the Austrian membership were required to be members of this group. The Master became the president; other officers of the lodge were committee members. Under this arrangement the charities of the lodges was carried on; best known of these groups was the Humanitas, Zukunft and Freundschaft associations. They operated the following charities: Children's Home Humanitas, located at Kahlenbergerdorf. It cared for orphan children of earlier years, and provided for them until they left school. Even after that time, however, the group continued to give aid and advice. Many of these children, when grown up, returned as visitors to the homes which had cared for them during their youth. Zukunft took over the care of a home and industrial school for young people who had quit school; here they became apprentices and studied various trades, fitting them for life work. Freundsehaft maintained a home for the convalescent poor women at Hutteldorf. It is to be noted that Emperor Francis Joseph I, knowing from the press that the institution was operated by the Masonic Craft, visited the Home, and expressed his pleasure at all he saw there. Verein Ferienhorl was an association which provided holidays and vacation trips for the underprivileged. Verein fur Unentgeltliche Brotvertelung distributed free bread to the poor.

The committee, representing these covering societies, met weekly. Their aim was known to the police, for their dates and agenda were published monthly in the official paper "Zirkel." In this same magazine were given the titles of the addresses made before the


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groups. Even these weekly meetings, under such circumstances, proved helpful in uniting the groups into one solidified organization. We have said that the police knew these to be Masonic meetings, yet there was only one point which they insisted on-no Masonic clothing was to be worn. And after all, for the interested Freemason, that does not constitute a very heavy prohibition. With the outbreak of the First World War, the meetings were canceled, but the charitable work was necessarily increased because of the heavy demand made upon all charitable societies. END OF W.AR BRINGS DEMAND FOR GRAND LODGE

It was quite natural, that with the coming of peace, there should arise a demand for a central governing authority for all Masonic lodges. What was this new freedom if it did not supply a place for freedom loving institutions ~ The Symbolic Grand Lodge of Hungary were sympathetic with the idea, and within four weeks after the establishment of the Austrian Republic, there took place, December 8, 1919, the formation of the Grand Lodge of Vienna) at a communication of representatives from the fourteen lodges, the meeting being held in the building known as the Militarkasino. No election of a Grand Master was held at this time, and for the interim period, three well known brethren were named to exercise the powers of Grand Lodge; they were Dr. Carl Ornstein, Dr. Adolf Krapalik and Hans Neeser. In the following months, selection was made of one whose fame and integrity as a Freemason will ever stand as an inspiration to Freemasons everywhere, the late Dr. Richard Schlesinger. To give the effect of legality to the new Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge of Hungary issued it a Charter, January 25, 1920, but the ceremonies of consecration were not carried out until later by Bro. L. Pfeiffer, Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Hungary. The last elections held in the Grand Lodge were those of 1937 and included the names of such men as Dr. Robert Pelzer, Dr. Karl Doppler, Dr. Ludwig Altmann; other men who had served were: Dr. Ottokar Mascha and Dr. Karl Count Lonyay. The Masonic publication "Der Zirkel" (Compasses) which had been circulated only among Freemasons, was replaced by the Wiener Freimaurerzeitung which was sold publicly. The editorial work done by Bro. Heinrich Glucksmann was transferred to Bro. Eugen Lennhoff, and in 1934, to Dr. Vladimir Misar. Application was made to various grand lodges of the world for recognition; our Austrian brethren were unacquainted with the outside picture, and many of those recognitions offered were accepted, some of which are questionable. Among those which recognized the new Grand Lodge were:


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Grand Lodge of Hungary Grand Lodge of France Grand Orient of France Grand Orient of Italy Grand Lodge of Spain Grand Lodge of Yugoslavia Grand Lodge of New York (1922) United Grand Lodge of England (1930) Grand Lodge of Ireland Grand Lodge of Scotland Grand Lodge of Denmark Grand Lodges in Czechoslovakia (2) Grand Lodge of Greece Grand Lodge of Luxemburg Grand Lodge of the Netherlands Grand Lodge of Bulgaria Swiss Grand Lodge Alpina Grand Lodges of Poland, Portugal, and Roumania Grand Lodge of Canada U. S. A. Grand Lodges: Alabama, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Washington, Missouri. Miscellaneous Grand Lodges in Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Manitoba, Nicaragua, Panama, Para路 guay, Peru, Uruguay (2), Venezuela, San Domingo, Bahia, Para, Paraibi, Valle de Mexico, York, Cosmos, Nuevo Leon, Peninsular, Unida Mexicana, Porto Rico, New Zealand, Rio Grande do SuI, Sao Paulo.

But the work of the new Grand Lodge was not confined to securing recognition; welfare work had to be carried on. Economic conditions in Austria grew bad; undernourished children of both Masonic and non-Masonic families were sent to the Netherlands where Masonic brethren, working under Dr. Wychgel, placed them under foster parents; many of these children grew up in Holland securing positions there, while those who returned have ever since kept up their contacts with their Holland befrienders. But there was the mistrustful attitude of the Austrian population to combat; they had been dosed with the poison of "anti-Masonry" for so many years that it was hard to destroy the opposition. At Linz, the Masonic group were unable after several years to build into a regular lodge. Yet, three provincial lodges were founded in the towns of Wiener Neustadt (Pythagoras), Klagenfurt (Paracelsus), and Graz' (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart). Working under such circumstances, it was gratifying to learn of the establishment of the lodge, Lux Orientis, in Shanghai, China, whose members were Austrian citizens. Before establishing the lodge, inquiry was made of the jurisdictions affected, all of whom gave their permission, provided only that the members must be of Austrian extraction. That lodge was constituted for the Grand Lodge by Brother Henry J. Clark, the then S. D. G. M. of England. The Master of the lodge was a member of the Council of four Grand Lodges which met in Shanghai. And now the membership of lodges in the Grand Lodge of Austria numbered twenty-six. All have been named in this article


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with the exception of Pythagoras, Mozart, Prometheus, Heimat, Labor, Plato and Sarastro. Austria sought to cultivate internationalism by mingling with the brethren of such groups as the Association Maconnique International. In 1934 the annual meeting of the International Masonic League was held in Vienna, a meeting which turned out to be a never forgotten event in the life of Austrian Freemasonry. Friendly relations were entertained with the brethren in Hungary through speakers who addressed brethren in each country. Mutual visits were made between the lodges at Bratislavia. Relationship with German lodges was not so close due to the anti-semetic attitude of the old Prussian groups. On the tenth anniversary of the Grand Lodge of Austria, several brethren from other jurisdictions were present, including Bro. Groussier of France; Bro. Brandenberg of Swiss Alpina, Bro. Carpentier of Belgium, and Bro. Arna Juranek of Czechoslovakia. There were other groups in Vienna not regarded as Masonic and visitation with them was strictly forbidden. The permanence of Freemasonry in Austria depended largely upon the preservation of peace; it was therefore thought the duty of Grand Lodge to encourage all peace activities. At the regular meetings of lodges, instruction was given the membership, not only in ritual, but in the traditions of the fraternity. Each month, some subject was proposed for discussion in lodges; these discussions were reported to Grand Lodge and reviewed. Youth was not to be overlooked, and so an association of young men was created, known as Die Kette (The Chain), and to this movement Bro. A. Brill devoted his entire time. In some instances, daughters of members were permitted to attend, and prizes were awarded for the best articles on the subject of Peace. In one competition more than 20,000 school children participated. It is to the great credit of the Grand Lodge that Dr. Alfred Hermann Fried, who received the Nobel Prize was one of the oldest and most faithful members of Lodge Sokrates. DANGERS THREATEN THE FRATERNITY

Danger clouds lurked on the horizon. The disturbances of 1934, at which time Grand Lodge contributed large sums of money for the wounded and relatives of victims. This action marked the beginning of a period of uncertainty, caused by the demands being made by a national socialism which nourished antagonism on the part of the population. As a result of this, Paracelsus Lodge in Klagenfurt ceased its activities in 1934. Pythagoras Lodge at Wiener Neustadt closed up February 7, 1936; Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on March 21, 1936. Prometheus Lodge, an outgrowth of Zukunft, returned to its Mother lodge.


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Then came the plebiscite. The Schnuschnigg government had planned the plebiscite for March 13, 1938; it was to be a vote on Austria's independence. But two days before that date, a meeting of the Grand Lodge officers was called; the meeting took on a most serious look when Bro. John R. Schlesinger, son of the Grand Master, entered the room to inform those present that the plebiscite vote had been canceled. The Grand Master immediately closed the meeting and his officers set out for their homes with the gravest misgivings and forebodings. The following night the German Army crossed the borders and on March 12, 1938, the keys of the Grand Lodge building were turned over to the gestapo by their order. Not content with this overt act, a rude crowd, made up of SS and SA troops, composing nothing but a vulgar mob, broke into the lodge rooms, plundering them of all records, silverware, paintings, statuary and furniture. Irretrievable archives of the Grand Lodge were lost, never to be recovered. Then came the persecution and imprisonment of the Grand Master, Dr. Richard Schlesinger, a man endeared to the population of Vienna by his kindly acts, high character, and deeds of beneficence. Dr. Schlesinger rejected any thought of trying to save his own life; he was taken into custody despite a very severe illness. He was plied with the most absurd inquiries as to the Freemasons, their activities, structure, and objectives. He could not answer all of these, but he assumed entire responsibility for the activity of all the Austrian lodges, thereby saving the life of many friends. When it became evident that Dr. Schlesinger could serve no further useful purpose, the prisoner, already marked by death, was discharged; a few hours later he gave up his life. In the nineteen years of his administration he had embodied in the grand lodge much of his high character, and a real store of his Masonic experience. The memory of this man is, to the Austrian fraternity, a sacred heritage, another example of a brother who gave up his life rather than prove unfaithful to a cause. Then came the war and temporary extinction. With the coming of peace, the Grand Lodge again set up it banners, and though hindered by the zonal conditions prevailing in Vienna, the fraternity is carrying on, proving that the spark of Masonic Light is not easily extinguished in the human heart and will survive any reign of terror. Our sympathy goes out to these brethren of the Grand Lodge of Austria, striving to preserve a society of human brotherhood and understanding in a country torn by the rigor of wars. SOMETHING NEW IN ISRAEL?

Most of our American Grand Lodges have been receiving requests for recognition from the Grand Lodge of Israel, whose headquarters


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are in the City of Tel Aviv, and whose secretary is Eliezer Dubinsky. Some of our foreign relation committees, believing they are furthering the cause of democracy have rushed out and extended recognition without, in some cases we fear, investigating the claims and the authority of this new organization. In the first place, we may question their legality of descent; they state in their application: Our Grand Lodge was constituted in 1932, then under the name of the National Grand Lodge of Palestine, by seven regular lodges, which revived their Charters from the National Grand Lodge of Egypt, from which we received the Charter for the Constitution of our Grand Lodge. There has always been a question in the minds of lIlany familiar with conditions in Egypt as to the Masonic regularity of that group; at one time there were two grand lodges both claiming control. They were accused of accepting women into the brotherhood-or sisterhood in this case; they did many other things which are regarded by Freemasons as irregular. Yet, even with all of this, some U. S. A. grand lodges extended recognition to one or the other. One of these Egyptian grand lodges invaded Cuba by instituting the Lodge Martires Arabes No. 76 in Havana. One of our larger grand lodges said a few years ago: The National Grand Lodge of Palestine was constituted in 1933, being organized by seven lodges under the N. G. L. Egypt, an organization revived in an attempt to unite the two opposing grand lodges. The first Grand Master was Choukry Kouhry, whose previous experience was with the so-called Masonry of the French Grand Orient. . . . Moreover, there were lodges in Palestine organized by England and Scotland which did not fraternize with the Egyptian Grand Lodges . . . Palestine is mandated to the British Crown, consequently the British lodges claim· occupation of the territory . . . and the Egyptian lodges were invading their territory. Weare supplied with a list of foreign grand lodges which are stated to have recognized the Israelian group; they are thirty-eight in number and include the following: Belgium Grand Orient of Brazil Grand Lodge of Denmark (irregular) Grand Lodge of France Grand Orient of France Grand Orient of Haiti (Negro) Grand Lodge of Peru (schismatic) Grand Orient of Syria (¥) Grand Orient of Turkey (¥) Grand Orient of Uruguay (a no Bible Grand Lodge) There are twenty regular lodges in the Israel group, and one lodge of instruction. Seven of the lodges are located in Jerusalem; eight are in Tel Aviv; three are in Haifa (Joppa). The "Grand Master Mason" is Dr. P. H. Korngrun.


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Like all other grand lodges, regular and irregular, they state they follow the "Ancient Landmarks." THE ITALIAN SITUATION

In 1945, Grand Secretary Charles H. Johnson of the Grand Lodge of New York, Judge George E. Bushnell of the Grand Lodge of Michigan, Claude J. McAllister of the Grand Lodge of Montana, and your reviewer, visited Italy in an attempt to aid in the resuscitation of Italian Freemasonry. Before going there we had consulted all of the known authorities on the Italian situation, including Col. L. A. Jenney of New Jersey who had spent several months in Italy supervising the rebuilding of some three or four thousand bridges which had been destroyed in World War II. Colonel Jenney had made the acquaintance of several elements in Italy, but in his judgment he believed that the group under Grand Master Guido Laj and known as the Grand Orient of Italy, offered the greatest strength and possibilities. Having arrived in Rome, the committee proceeded to investigate the whole situation. When our investigation had been completed, it was the unanimous opinion that the Grand Orient of Italy represented legitimate Freemasonry in that country. On our return, the committee gave out such information as it possessed; in February, 1948, Dr. Publio Cortini, Grand Treasurer of the Grand Orient, came to America and appeared before the Conference of Grand Masters meeting in Washington. Dr. Cortini told his story in an honest straightforward way, and permitted his hearers to interrogate him. As a result of Brother Cortini's visit, some thirty-three or four American Grand Lodges extended recognition. Since 1945, Dr. Guido Laj, who was at one time named by the Allied Forces as Vice-Mayor of Rome, and who was on the Supreme Court of Italy when he died, has been succeeded by Dr. Ugo Lenzi, a prominent lawyer of Bologna, Italy. We had occasion to revisit Rome in August, 1949, and there renewed our acquaintances with the Grand Orient officials. We have no reason to change our minds or attitude toward the Grand Orient of Italy. Those who have recognized Grand Orient may well be proud of their Italian connection. What has happened since 1945 ~ Well, some human personalities enter the picture, an entrance which has not helped the stability of our Italian brethren. Briefly and plainly stated, certain groups in the United States have sent money to Italy enabling some rival groups to set up a paper organization, thereby continuing the rivalry which existed in Italian Freemasonry before the days of Mussolini. Weare informed that Prof. Carlo Martelli heads the higher bodies of the new group. Professor Martelli is a high class gentleman


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and teacher in the city of Naples. Martelli was inveigled into the new organization by one Franco Moroli who has become Secretary General, a position with a salary attached. In a certain printed proceedings we learn that Dr. Franco Moroli has shown himself to be a capable and efficient leader of the Italian Masons in the work of revitalizing Freemasonry in the Italian republic.

Now let us see just how capable Moroli is. We have a photostat copy of Moroli's "capable and efficient" leadership supplied us by authorities in Aquila, Abruzzi, Italy. And here it is: Franco Moroli; born at Bareta, in the Province of Aquila (Italy), April 29, 188l. Issued by the Tribunal of Aquila, Abruzzi. (1) June 20, 1918. Sentenced to five months imprisonment and a fine of 125 lire by the Court of Appeal, Rome, for misappropriation of funds. Sentence was postponed for five years. (2) March 27, 1924. His unpaid creditors demanded an Act of Bankruptcy. (3) February 13, 1933. Denounced for misappropriation of property, but amnestied before trial. (4) April 16, 1935. Denounced for forgery but amnestied before trial. (5) October 30, 1935. Declared bankrupt by the Tribunal at Rome. (6) November 16, 1936. Acquitted of crime of omitted delivery of pawned furniture for reason of insufficient proof. (7) April 21, 1937. Sentenced by the Court of Appeal, Rome, for term of two months and four days imprisonment for assault and battery. (8) January 10, 1941. Fined 50 lire for not having carried out the -instruction of a legal authority according to Article No. 650 of the Penal Code.

There is no evidence whatever that Moroli was even a member of the Rite when in November, 1948, he was charged ('?) to rebuild Freemasonry in Italy. At that date the Palazzo Giustianini group (Grand Orient) had between 15,000-20,000 members. Moroli claims to be a 33째 Mason, but records show he was expelled as a 32째 Mason, March 8, 1923. We wonder how he acquired his reinstatement. What a man to revive Freemasonry'? An act which we are informed took place April 30, 1949. Then, on July 3, 1949, the Supreme Council to which this group belongs was established. Perhaps those who sponsored Moroli do not kn.ow that his attempt to join a lodge under the Grand Orient was turned down'? And do they know that the so-called Serenissima Grand Lodge had already fused with the Grand Orient'? And that the new Serenissima has nothing to show for its regularity except what it has manufactured '? Is it any wonder that Moroli wrote his high-up friends in this country accusing the Grand Orient of being atheistic and communistic'?


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There are many things Moroli must explain, and which he unfortunately may have forgotten. First. Moroll did not know that the "Serenissima Gran Loggia N azionale Italiana Degll, etc." had, on December 15, 1923, united with the Grand Orient of Italy and that all of the lodges working in the former grand lodge were now subordinates of Grand Orient. Second. Moroli was never an officer of either grand lodge, and all of his titles are assumed. Third. We are interested in knowing whether the Grand Lodge was invented to serve as a basis for a Supreme Council' Fourth. Who is supplying the money for Moroll to carryon his paper organization' Fifth. Who double-crossed Scalera of Connecticut by turning over his private correspondence to Moroli' _.._ -

We think there are many things which ought to be explained for the benefit of those of us who have no political chestnuts in the Italian fire. And what is back of all this splurge of anti-Grand Orient propaganda going out to American grand lodges? There is an old Masonic maxim which runs like this: If you can not conscientiously speak well of them, you may at least keep silent.

SPAIN

Hard to extirpate. We have been under the impression that Freemasons were obsolete in Spain. We were probably in error, for one J. Alvarez del Vayo, writing in the Nation, attacks Congress for considering a loan of $55,000,000 to General Franco. del Vayo, former foreign minister in the Spanish Government in exile, says that Article II of the first section of the budget of the Spanish Government includes the sum of $90,909 for the suppression of Freemasonry. But Freemasonry is in the same bed as the Protestant sect; Protestants are forbidden to propagate their faith; they may not designate by any sign the location of their churches; they may not bury their dead publicly with the rites of their church, publish Protestant Bibles, books or hymnals. Might we suggest to Franco to make application for the loan through the Federal Council of Churches! IN ENGLAND

The Grand Master of England stated at the Quarterly Communication of the Grand Lodge, December 7, 1949, that six lodges located at Freetown, Sierro Leone, and Bathurst Lodge of St. John at Gambia, had united to form a new District Grand Lodge of Sierra Leone in Africa.

_


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Grand Secretary Sir Sydney A. White has reached the age of 65; under grand lodge regulations a grand secretary may not continue after that age, as such, except at the pleasure of the Grand Master. Of course the G. M. was pleased to continue Sir Sydney in the station to which he has added so much lustre. Military Lodges in England are a thing of the past. Two years ago, Military Lodge Social Friendship No. 497, was made a permanent lodge. And now Lodge of Unity, Peace and Concord No. 316, last of the Military Lodges, has decided to surrender its military warrant and receive in exchange a renewed warrant as a stationary lodge. Of this action, the grand lodge said: This brings to a close an important chapter in English Freemasonry, for there can be no doubt that the spread of the Craft overseas was largely due to the enthusiasm and pertinacity of the members of the Military Lodges who carried with them the seeds of Freemasonry to many distant garrison towns and cantonments, where stationary lodges were subsequently established and still flourish. The story of the Military Lodges, not only in England, but in other parts of the world, constitutes a brilliant chapter in the history of Freemasonry. Lady Ann Cavendish, daughter of the Duke of Devonshire, Grand Master, is about to be married. The Grand Lodge, desiring to pay tribute to their Grand Master, voted to expend the sum of 200 guineas ($1,000) for a suitable gift on the occasion of the wedding. New lodges have been established at Jos, Nigeria (Triad Nigeria 6909) ; Trincomalee, Ceylon (Trincomales No. 6923) ; and Port Blair, Andaman Islands, Bengal (Light in Andamans No. 6931). The last numbered lodge on the roll of the United Grand Lodge of England on January 1, 1950, was William Sennocke No. 6932, in the Province of Kent. mELAND

The Grand Master of Ireland reports prosperity throughout the island, and particularly in the south provinces. Anxiety is expressed over their lodges in Hong Kong and Shanghai. He attended the meeting held in Scotland, celebrating the 350th anniversary of Mary's Chapel Lodge; there he was made an honorary member. In September, 1949, he attended a meeting of the Grand Lodge of Norway meeting in Oslo; it was the bi-centenary of St. Olaus' Lodge, which we once attended. He tells of his meetings with representatives of England and Scotland, where apparently, an agreement was reached as to united action; he said of this: We found it extremely difficult at present to straighten out between us the question of why one of us may be in amity with a Grand Lodge


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with which the other two are not . . . but we definitely decided that in the future no one of us will recognize a new body without consulting the other two.

Ireland recognizes Argentina, the Negro republic of Hayti, and the very irregular Grand Orient of Brazil. It occurs to us that the Grand Lodges of the British Isles need a general overhauling of their foreign relationships before telling the rest of us what they are going to do. By inference we judge our brethren of the Isles believe us unfitted to know who we shall recognize. At any rate the Grand Lodges of the U. S. A. are sovereign Grand Lodges, and few of them like to be told just what they mayor may not do in extending recognition. HOW ABOUT KOREA?

Little information is being received out of Korea. Less will be received in the weeks to come. But there is some Freemasonry in that section although few natives are members. The City of Seoul, prominently mentioned in the recent news dispatches, is the home of Hang Yang Lodge No. 1048. This lodge was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1908 and its membership has been recruited largely from American missionaries, and the representatives of American and British business concerns. In 1939 the Japanese raided the lodge rooms and carried away all of the paraphernalia and furniture. When the war closed a few of the former members got together and revived the lodge. At last reports the lodge had more than one hundred members, but under present conditions, it has in all probability, closed its doors. DENMARK

Through the courtesy of former Grand Secretary Alex Troedsson of Denmark, we are able to supplement our chronology of Danish Freemasonry, as well as make a few minor corrections (See 1949 MASONIC WORLD.)

1749: Feb. 8 1753:

1763: 1782: 1792: July 3 Nov. 11

Lord Byron of England grants patents to Count Qhristian Conrad Danneskiold Laurvig, a Danish admiral, as Provincial Grand Master for Denmark and Norway. Three Ardent Hearts Lodge established in J ena, Germany, in 1749; removed to Copenhagen, 1749-50, with first initiation of Christianus Lewe, February 27, 1750. The patent was issued in Berlin by the Grand Lodge of the Three Globes, January 1, 1749. St. John's Lodge Phoenix established by Dansk Neergardske Lodge, Provincial Grand Lodge. Modified Strict Observance Rite introduced, following Wilhemsbad Convention, C. B. C. S. Death of Duke Ferdinand, Landgrave Karl heads Danish Lodges. King Christian officially recognizes Freemasonry, he to head the Craft.


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1848: Jan. 20 1853 : June 24

Death of Christian VIII; Frederick VII Grand Master. Lodge" Kosmos" adopts Swedish Rite in Elsinore. King Frederick VII initiated in 1852 by Swedish Crown Prince, Karl XV. 1855: March 18 St. Andrew's Lodge C. F. S. instituted in Elsinore; moved March 11, 1857, to Copenhagen. 1858: Nov. 21 A Chapter constituted at Frederiksborg Castle. National Grand Lodge of Denmark constituted in Copenhagen. 1870: Nov. 1 King Frederick VIII initiated in Lodge" Zorobabel & Fre.derick to the Crowned Hope." 1896: April 23 H. R. Ii. Prince Harald initiated in Lodge "Nordstjernen. " Death of King Frederick VIII. 1912: May 15 June 15 Christian X made Grand Master. 1947: Sept. 18 Prince Harald made Grand Master. Died March 30, 1949. 1949: Dr. Frode Rydgaard, Grand Master. MEXICO

Conditions in Mexico show gradual improvement. York Grand Lodge, the English speaking group, will never become a large institution but it will furnish satisfaction to those brethren who use the English language. A small net increase is shown in the last report, for we learn "young men of the best moral fibre are coming forward to take the places of those who from time to time must leave our earthly company." Missourians will sorrow at the death of Marcus A. Loevy, former Missourian, and P. G. M. of York Grand Lodge, and who was a familiar visitor at many of our annual communications. By order of the Grand Master a Mexican flag must be displayed at all lodge communications "as a demonstration of respect and gratitude for the liberal laws of Mexico which favor Masons and Masonry." Intervisitation with Mexican lodges seems to meet with general approval from Mexican and English brethren alike. Recognition was denied the irregular Italian "Serenissima" for good reason, "it being a one-man type of Grand Lodge." Grand Orator Ulfelder deplores attempts to revise the Constitution of Grand Lodge; he compares it with a revision of the "Ten Commandments" or the American Constitution. Dr. Ulfelder does not know, apparently, that we have many many amendments to the American Constitution. We do not have the proceedings of any of the Mexican Grand Lodges. It appears that they issue no proceedings. GOOD NEWS :FROM GREEOE

We do not have official notice from the Grand Lodge of Greece as to some recent changes in the structure of Greek Freemasonry, but from other sources we learn that there has been a complete separation of the Symbolic from the Higher degrees.


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Article III of the Treaty between the two powers gave control of all symbolic ritual matters to the Supreme Council. Article IV permitted active members of the Supreme Council to remain unaffiliated as Master Masons. Article XIII specified that in all disputes between Symbolic and Philosophic Freemasonry, the case was to be submitted to the Grand Commander of the Supreme Council of Belgium. Article V specified that Supreme Council members could not be tried by a symbolic body. We anxiously await further information as to whether all of these articles have been amended in accordance with Masonic tradition and custom. ALASKA

The territory of Alaska, which hopes to become a state at some forthcoming date, announces the formati'Jn of a new lodge, which was recently chartered by the Grand Lodge of Washington, under which Alaskan lodges work. It is located at Sitka, and is to be: known as Mt. Verstovia Lodge No. 291. FINLAND

We hear little of Finland during these days of the cold war, yet Grand Master Gunnar J aatinen, writing to friends in this country, said: "The first Masonic lodges were founded in Finland towards the end of the 18th century, but after the Russian occupation of 1809, they were all closed by imperial order. After Finland gained independence in 1818 some Finnish brethren, who had joined Masonry in the U. S. A., called a meeting in Helsinski and as a result of same they wrote to the Grand Lodge of New York asking for its support and protection for the new lodge they had decided to found here. The reply was favorable and the first lodge, Suomi Lodge No.1, was inaugurated in August, 1922. It was soon followed by two other lodges in Tampere and Turku. The Grand Lodge was again established in September, 1924, and two other Blue Lodges were founded during the following two years. All the lodges had nice temples and club rooms and everything promised well until World War II when German influence made it impossible to continue with our Masonic work. We lost our temples, our club rooms and our office rooms, but we hid our archives and stored our furniture in reliable places. In the beginning of 1945 we considered the time opportune for a new start and the Grand Lodge was re-established and instructed the local lodges to resume their work as soon as possible, but the fact that we have no permanent home for our Grand Lodge and no place for our Blue Lodges, hinders our work very seriously. The lodge meetings are held in halls rented for the occasion and the lodge furniture, etc., are transported to and from the meeting every time the lodge assembles . . . Our Grand Lodge has been planning to construct our own premises, but under prevailing conditions it is impossible because of shortages of building materials, and, if we should succeed in erecting a house it is probable that we would be compelled to let it to others. Besides we do not have the capital required for a new construction, and in case we should buy a house


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we would have no possibility of getting possession of it without showing the old occupauts a place to move to."

In another letter the Grand Master said their problems were being solved in a most interesting way. The Grand Lodge had contracted for an old restaurant building which was large enough to accommodate the restaurant, the Grand Lodge and afford a place for the Blue Lodges to meet. Lodge meetings could not be held until the restaurant business was finished for the day. When the restaurant business was over, the dishes washed and the pots and pans put away, the lodge furniture was brought in and the room set up as a Masonic Lodge. He reports a new lodge at Pori. Total membership of the six local lodges in Helsinki is 250. In Massachusetts proceedings we find additional history of the Grand Lodge of Finland, from which it appears that St. Augustin Lodge, dissolved in 1809, was revived under the Grand Lodge of Sweden on April 3, 1923, but that in the meantime (1919) some Finns living in Helsinki, members of lodges under the jurisdiction of New York, applied for a warrant for a lodge in Helsinki. Grand Master Tompkins of New York, accompanied by Grand Secretary Kenworthy and Ossian Lang, consecrated Suomi Lodge No. 1 in the old Parliament House at Helsinki. Its first Master was Axel Solitander, who had been Consul General of Finland in New York, and who at the time was a government officer in Helsinki. In August, 1923, these same brethren constituted Tammer Lodge No. 2 at Tampere, and Phoenix Lodge No.3 at Turku. The ritual was translated into Swedish for the benefit of the Finnish brethren. Representatives of these three Finnish lodges met August 9, 1924, and organized the Grand Lodge of Finland. On September 9, 1924, Past Grand Master Tompkins delivered the charter to the newly established Grand Lodge and by 1941 there were 220 members in the five lodges then existing. There exists in Finland one Mark Lodge and one Symbolic Lodge under authority of the Grand Lodge and Mark Grand Lodge of England. Activities were suspended early in 1941, due to war conditions, but were resumed in 1945 and there are now 250 members in the five lodges. Many of their temples have been taken over by the government; building materials are not available. We learn that 97 per cent of the population of the territory are .Protestant Christians, most of them being Lutherans. CZECHOSLOVAKIA NO PLACE FOR MASONS

All chance of a -at least for the Curtain. It was once the language, and the

revival of Freemasonry in Czechoslovakia is gone present. This nation is decidedly behind the Iron home of two grand lodges, one using the German other the Czechoslovakian tongue.


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One of its best known Freemasons, Dr. P. Korbel, has recently made his escape from the country and we had the pleasure of talking with him while attending the Grand Lodge of New York in May. From a newspaper article in the New York World Telegram of May 3, 1950, we feel privileged to extract the following news: CZECH MASON TELLS LODGE CONCLAVE HOW HE FLED THROUGH IRON OURTAIN. ELUDED PURSUERS BY THREE MILE RUN.

A Mason who escaped from behind the Iron Curtain is here attending the annual conclave of the New York State Grand Lodge. Wholly free for the first time in 12 years to join in the secret ritual of his ancient order, P. R. Korbel, former Czech government official, today was welcomed to the state observance of American Masonry's 169th communication. As secretary of Czechoslovakia's Grand Lodge, banned by the Nazis and little better off since the Red coup of 1948, Mr. Korbel is participating with New York grand officers, past and present, in the annual three-day sessions which began yesterday at 71 West 323rd Street. Mr. Korbel, 49, literally ran with his wife and son, 16, from pursuing security police to e-scape from his country into the American zone. of Austria. â&#x20AC;˘'One night," he said, "we packed what property we could carry and the next day I left my office with as innocent an air as I could manage." (He held a post about like that of a permanent undersecretary of state). "I joined my family and we just walked away." Outside Prague they headed for the border, beyond which they knew they could find American troops. Every time a car approached they dived into the underbrush. But the security police, from their car, spotted foot tracks in the deep mud of the highway and got out to look more closely through the wooded, often marshy countryside. "I told my wife and son to drop everything and run," Mr. Korbel said, "and I followed." It was a three mile run, but they crossed the border well in front of their pursuers. "The Americans were splendid; finally, the Korbels got to England." In England Mr. Korbel was knocked down by a cyclist and his hip was broken. Long hospitalized, he arrived here only ten days ago. Friends have taken him in, and the Masons are helping too. Czechoslovakian Masonry, Mr. Korbel declared, is about finished for now, although before the Nazi putsch in 1938 his own grand lodge had 1,500 members and a German speaking unit had 2,000. Both grand lodges had been organized after World War I gave Czechoslovakia freedom. Under Hapsburg rule, as far back as 1848, Masonry was banned in all Austria-Hungary and its few members, who included Mr. Korbel's uncle, had to go outside the country to join. "But it will come back again," said Mr. Korbel, "if we can free ourselves. Only a free citizen can be a Freemason."

Yes, Freemasonry will return to Czechoslovakia. When, we do not know, but the human heart can never be fettered by the chains of totalitarianism. PROGRESS IN THE PHILIPPINES.

One of the brightest spots in the Masonic firmament is the Grand Lodge of the Philippines. Troubles they have had plenty, but our


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Filipino brethren are endowed with enthusiasm and zeal which persecution and war have failed to kill. Esteban Munarriz, elected Grand Master in 1949, was born on the spot where Brother, and General Douglas MacArthur landed his forces when returning to the Islands. He is a graduate of the public school system and ample evidence of the work of the school system in the Islands.

Plaridel Masonic Temple.

Grand Master Brazee instituted a Lodge at Marikana in the Province of Rizal; it was the desire of the membership that the ceremonies be held in public. The Grand Master was skeptical for fear that some of the detractors might create a scene at the formation of the first Masonic Lodge in that section. The ceremonies were held in a school building with an attendance so large that all could not be accommodated. Other Lodges were instituted: Okinawa Lodge No. 118, Okinawa. Yokosuka Naval Lodge No. 120 at Yokosuka, Japan.

A lodge was constituted at Clark Field, the ceremonies being atgreeting was received from General MacArthur. Dispensation was tended by Brother and General Jarred Crabb of the Air Base; a given to the following Lodges:


1950

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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Saipan Memorial Lodge, Saipan (Numbered 121). Quezon City Lodge, Quezon City (Numbered 122). Armed Forces, Agana, Guam (Numbered 123). Far East Lodge, Yokohama, Japan (Numbered 124).

The readers of this Review will recall the shooting by the Japanese of a Past Grand Master of the Philippines-Jose Abad Santos. Twenty-one members of Maranaw Lodge made a special trip to Malabang, . Lanao, some eighty miles, to locate the grave of the martyred Mason. The ~ grave was found, cleared ~ of rubbish and properly ''1't': marked and decorated., -. Two martyrs will be commemorated by the is_ â&#x20AC;˘ , '" I _ suance of special medals , . ' _ _~J -,--~~ ..,.,~.,...

>-r----

-= - ,

F E_ _

'

c==:

or awards, one to be .il~~' named the "Jose Abad .'" Santos Medal for Masonic Service." It will be awarded only for exceptional Masonic service. In 1948 a committee was appointed to Eliminate Religious Instruction in Public Schools. Esteban Munarrw, Chairman Mauro Baradi G. M. Philippines. reported that all Freemasons be vigilant to fight against any attempt to circumvent the Constitution. Grand Lodge is proud of the part it has played in the organization of the new Grand Lodge in China. The feeling between natives and Americans is splendid and is reflected in the organization of a chapter of Royal Arch Masons made up largely of natives, and including in its membership many of the most active officials of the Grand Lodge of the Philippines. Three natives, past grand masters, have been accepted in the Red Cross of Constantine. But the Grand Lodge does have its problems. One problem is the existence of a Lodge not working under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of the Philippines, but under Scotland. It is Perla del Orient Lodge. This is always a problem where there exists divided jurisdiction. Several years ago the General Grand Chapter engaged in a heated controversy with Scotland over a Chapter which worked in

.J/J'


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the Islands under Scotland jurisdiction. Fortunately, by personal contact between the heads of the two bodies controlling Royal Arch Masonry, it was settled and has ceased to be a problem. Our friends in the Islands and Scotland should get together before an actual breach is created. It would be our opinion that if the Perla del Orient did not come under Philippine Grand Lodge, then by all means it should exert every means possible to work in harmony with that Grand Lodge. After all, foreigners are foreigners and should respect the rights of the native people. The big problem-and we do mean BIG-is the attitude of the Church toward Freemasonry. The situation has not been helped by the withdrawal of American forces from the Islands. In the midst of the controversy comes the use of Rizal's books in the public schools and libraries. Jose Rizal is the original Philippine martyr; during his lifetime he wrote several books and novels which, while true, were critical of Church policies-at least their political policies. These books were utilized by the government as text books and reference works. Now the Church comes forward maintaining that before Rizal was shot he had repented being a Freemason and died within the arms of the Church. This is bitterly contested by the brethren of the Masonic fraternity, for Rizal was a Freemason. Newspapers took up the fight and much publicity was given the matter. Even some of the Catholic people in public office sided with the Masonic attitude. As late as May 16, 1950, we are assured that the Rizal books remain as official reading matter in the public school system. SITUATION IN JAPAN

We cannot close our article on the Philippines without mention of the fine service their Grand Lodge is doing in pushing Freemasonry to the front in the Far East. Our brethren there are in a much better position to accomplish this than any other country for they are "Far Easterners" and what they do does not constitute a "Yankee invasion." We believe our readers would prefer to read what one of our highly thought of brothers of the Philippines has to say about this work; not being a native, his remarks could certainly not be prejudiced: The Grand Lodge officers who made the voyage to Japan, constituted two symbolic lodges during their stay in that country. Our Grand Lodge now has four lodges under charter and two under dispensation, making six lodges in all in Japan. Most of the members are American servicemen; however, several prominent Japanese have been raised Master Masons. Our officers were royally received by officials of the American Occupation forces, as well as by Japanese high officials of the civil government pf Japan. Several banquets were given our grand officers. At one of these banquets, given by a very high ranking Japanese who had been made a Freemason, our Grand Master was called upon for remarks, and he in turn, called on R. W. Bro. Maurio Baradi, our junior grand warden to respond, and from all reports, he made a wonderful speech. It was


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all extemporaneous, but he was really inspired, bringing tears to the eyes of those present, including our own brothers, Japanese, and the' 'high brass" of the occupation forces. H\'J spoke of the cruel treatment received by Filipinos here in the Philippines from the Japanese during the occupation of this country by those people. He told how his own brother was treated and killed before his very eyes; he told of many of the atrocities on the part of the Japanese soldiers in the Philippines, giving many examples of horrible incidents. He stated, that when he first learned that it was the intention! to receive Japanese as brothers in our fraternity, he, as well as most of our brethren, could not see how this, in all sincerity, could possibly be done. But he added that the tenets of Freemasonry taught us to be tolerant, and to forgive. He'said that he realized that Japanese civilians present were most likely innocent of all of this, yet it was their people who had committed the crime. He said he had convinced himself, that as a Freemason, it was his duty to forgive, and that as Freemasons, we have forgiven, but he stated that it would take a generation or two to enable us to forget. He expressed the hope and prayed that the Japanese who were being admitted as Freemasons, under the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands, would bear all of this in mind, and convince their Filipino brethren by deeds (and not words) that they have repented for the wrongs done his countrymen.

The speech did much to increase the admiration and respect of both the Americans in Japan and of the Japanese for the Grand Lodge of the Philippines. Our correspondent adds: I wish we had more brothers out here who could speak like Brother Baradi. God bless him.

We have a letter from Grand Secretary Antonio Gonzalez along the sa~e line; he says of the Japanese situation: Freemasonry has gone far from its pivot since last year. The Grand Master has constituted two new lodges: Tokyo Lodge No. 125 and Square and Compass No. 126 in Tokyo and Tachikawa respectively. We have also two petitions for dispensation, one at Fukuoka and the other at Kyoto. While we should be slow at conclusions, it is my firm belief that the Japanese are beginning to grasp, and rightly too, the Masonic teaching of Brotherly Love. They are not ashamed to tell in their talk of their past barbarous behavior and ask atonement for their sins.

Brother Naotake Sato, president of the House of Councillors, said in part: When the late war broke out in our countr! there were some intellectuals and pacifists. But these people were not mfluential enough to check the militarists. We cannot regret too much for having the United States and Great Britain our enemy, and fight in China, Philippines, Australia, Malaya Peninsula, and Indonesia, giving the people there untold suffering and loss of life and property. We, Japanese, are now in the deepest repentence for our sins, begging the pardon of all the nations of the world.

He went on to say:


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However, all the people of Japan have been determined to go the right way, looking forward to the time when we will be excused by their generosity. To achieve this objective we have just taken a step in the direction of liberty along the lines of democracy . . . I believe the Brotherly Love, advocated by Freemasonry, can never fail to help us.

Among other initiates in Japan are Tamotsu Murayama of the Nippon Tinnes, and Prince Lee of the Royal Family. I have noted that the Japanese intellectuals are very receptive to Masonic teaching. They realize that our tenets afford them a new way of life. Apparently, Brother, and General MacArthur is doing a fine job for the Japanese--and for Freemasonry. IRREGULAR GROUPS IN THE PHILIPPINES

Legitimate Freemasonry in the Philippines is having its troubles with irregular and clandestine groups which have grown up since the ending of the Japanese invasion. Some of these are made up of individuals who have been expelled from legitimate Freemasonry and have discovered a chance of adding a few extra dollars. Our attention to these groups was called by receipt of circulars asking for recognition. According to Grand Secretary Gonzalez these groups are: Gran Gran Gran Gran

Logia Nacional de Filipinas Oriente Espanol Logia del Archipelago de Filipinas Logia Soberana del Archipelago Filipino

They are all made in the same mold. Take your choice! Subordinates of some of these groups have from time to time showed up in California. FREEMASONRY ALIVE IN CHINA

Those of us who have been reading the metropolitan press can hardly realize that Freemasonry is on the march in China, notwithstanding the civil war going on there. A new Grand Lodge has been organized. This action was brought about by Amity Lodge No. 106, which on November 27, 1948, sent out a letter to all lodges in China inviting each lodge to send four delegates to a convention in Shanghai for the purpose of considering the organization of a Grand Lodge for China. Nanking Lodge No. 108, Pearl River Lodge No. 109, Scechwan Lodge No. 112, West Lake Lodge No. 113, and Sun Lodge No. 114 accepted the invitation and the convention was duly held. It convened on January 15, 1949, and continued until the following day, on which date the Grand Lodge was officially proclaimed, and the following officers elected: Grand Master-David W. K. Au Deputy Grand Master-Luther M. Jee


1950 Grand Grand Grand Grand

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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Senior Warden-To F. Wei Junior Warden-Ralph A. Ward Treasurer-T. T. Zee Secretary-Alfred S. Lee

All of the lodges forming the Grand Lodge were subordinates of the Grand Lodge of the Philippines, which graciously relinquished all rights and permitted the lodges to retain their assets and charters. Thus there can be no question as to the legitimacy of the lodges founding the Grand Lodge, and the Convention itself followed all of the established customs necessary to preserve regularity. The Grand Lodge of the Philippines was the first Grand Lodge to recognize this new star in the Masonic firmament. The new Grand Master, Brother Au, has served for ten years as District Grand Master in China. The membership of the six lodges is 602, a gain of 42 members since its formation. As evidence of the fine fellowship which prevails in that area we note the election of Brother Au as an honorary member in a lodge working under Ireland, and another working under Massachusetts. At the same time the China lodges made honorary members of Brother Streit, Grand Inspector for Ireland, and District Deputy Grand Master Kirichok of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge. The newly formed group has purchased an interest in the Masonic Temple in Shanghai. Brother Au says: There may be some who will, with the best of intentions, question the wisdom and the expediency of our organizing the Grand Lodge at a time when the political stability of our country is seriously at stake. Our answer is that it is precisely at a time like this when Masonry is most needed and it is at such times that Masonry can serve best under an indigenous organization. We have no illusions as regards the difficult task before us, but we cheerfully accept the challenge. We regard it as a test of what Masonry is and what Masons are made of. Members of our fraternity of all ages and climes have had to go through the same test at one time or another and each time they have emerged strengthened and purified. Such tests have produced the pillars and heroes of our Craft, the Jose Rizals, the M. H. del Pilars, and George Washingtons and the DeMolays. We shall be very much ashamed and disappointed if our brethren in China, having accepted the challenge, will not likewise emerge from their trials strengthened in faith and richer in experience.

In a letter written by David W. K. Au, Grand Master of the newly formed Grand Lodge of China, we are informed; We take pleasure in advising you that at an historical Masonic convention, held on January 15-16, 1949, in the Masonic Temple, 178 Tinwa Road, South, in the City of Shanghai, China, the Grand Lodge of F. & A. M. of China was inaugurated. . . . On March 18, 1949, a delegation from the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands journeyed to Shanghai and installed the grand officers. The establishment of the Grand Lodge of China was undertaken at a time when the country was threatened by forces which might endanger


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Masonry. Fully realizing the menace, many Masons, especially those of Chinese extraction, numbering several hundred, were of the firm conviction that an indigenous, independent jurisdiction in China territory, would possess the best chance of survival. With faith, determination, !ind courage of conviction, the Grand Lodge of China was founded early this year (1949) and has been, and is functioning in spite of political upheaval.

The newly adopted seal of the Grand Lodge contains these words: Within four seas all are Brethren. BEFORE THE DISSOLUTION

Conditions in Hungary were discussed in an issue of the Christian Science Monitor of February 14, 1950; through the courtesy of this magazine we may give our readers a picture of what has been happening there. In today's Hungary, Freemasonry and the Roman Catholic Church, which have been on opposite sides of the fence for some two hundred years now, by the force of circumstance, find themselves neighbors in an anti-Communist front. (The writer goes on to tell of the lead taken by the Church in its fight on Communism, which he says gives no signs of retreat. Then he tells of the Masonic conditions.) Freemasonry has been treated with comparative tolerance by the government up to now, although Communists have had to give up their lodge membership. Otherwise, the working of the lodges has not been interfered with. It may be that the government considers them a useful counterweight against the influence of the Roman Catholic clergy. It may also be because for a long time central European Masons have been known as debaters rather than agitators. Masonic lodges for many decades have refrained from any activity outside the field of charity. Another reason suggested for the surprising leniency of the government toward the Masons, is that among them are members of the dissolved Citizen's Party, as well as Radicals and right wing Social Democrats. Their attendance at lodge meetings may provide the government with valuable information about their doings. At present the activity of the association is confined largely to discussions on Masonic doctrine and on self-education. There are two divergent trends within the lodges. One favors immediate closing of the lodges, since neither freedom nor secrecy can be assured, and every member attempting to live up to the ethical ideals of Freemasonry would endanger himself. The other trend favors keeping the lodges open as long as the government does not step in. The group, which is the stronger of the two, also advocates that the Masons shou1d go on with their work in a modified form even if the government outlaws Freemasonry. The chief value of continued Masonic activity in Hungary lies, not in the political field but rather in upholding the ideas of liberty, equality and fraternity, and in the disseminating humanitarian progressive philosophy. In a sense, ÂĽasonic groups have assumed the functions of adult education centers where all those Hungarian elements that are tolerant, western-minded, progressive, and anti-Communist can take refresher courses in subjects that can neither be taught nor practiced in Hungary today.

But remember-this article was written in February, 1950!

â&#x20AC;˘


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AND NOW IT'S HUNGARY

Hungary has now received a death blow to its Freemasonry. The act has not been entirely unexpected, but had not been thought possible at this time. A representative from New York visited Hungary about a year ago and while there talked with the Premier and other officials of that country. He was told that the government would do nothing against the fraternity unless some cause was given, principal of which was the engaging in national politics. Knowing the character of Hungarian Freemasonry, we know that it was not from that cause. The action apparently stemmed from a belief that democratic tendencies were to be uprooted wherever found. The news dispatch telling of government action was contained in the press dispatches of June 12, 1950: HUNGARY DISSOLVES FREEMASON LODGES

Budapest, IIungary, June 12, 1950 (AP)-The Interior Ministry announced tonight that Hungary's Freemason lodges had been dissolved. The dissolution was carried out earlier today. The announcement called the lodges the "meeting places of the enemies of the people's Communist republic, of capitalistic elements, and of the adherents of Western imperialism." The Hungarian lodges celebrated their 200th anniversary this year. After their golden age, before World War I, when outstanding liberal elements in the country belonged to them, they were dissolved in 1919 during the Communist first council's republic headed by Bela Kuhn. The lodges were revived, but the counter-revolutionary regime which governed during the two world wars dissolved them again in 1920. The Masonic lodges were recognized in 1945, when there were 16 lodges in Budapest and three others in the country.

The Grand Lodge occupied beautiful offices in their own building in the city of Budapest; and while they had been damaged by bombing during World War II yet they were being refinished and it was thought conditions were for the better. Our sympathy goes out to our brethren of the Symbolic Grand Lodge of Hungary. POLYTECHNICS IN PERU

In previous reports we have mentioned the disturbance in Peru. The situation has not changed if we may judge from the following letter received by one of our Masonic friends; it is dated at Lima, June 26, 1950, and so may be considered as recent. The writer, a well known Peru Freemason, says: In July, 1945, this country had a change of government which resulted in the partial elevation to power of a political party of extremist tendencies, called Apra. During that time, and after the annual elections had been carried out, a group of brothers, members of the Apra party, attempted to hinder the installation of the newly elected grand officers,


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and threatened to attack the Grand Master and others who were invested ready for installation. A few days later, this same group of brothers, members of the Apra, entered the building of the Grand Lodge; at once the grand officers left; the Apra took over charge of the building, and with the employes of the Grand Lodge acting as their accomplices, they changed the locks. From then on, they did not allow entrance to the building of those members that did not change their political tendencies. The Grand Master, to avoid scandal, limited his action to informing the police of all that occurred, and asking for the return of the building. This could not be accomplished because the police were either Apristas or feared their reprisals. Under the circumstances, Grand Lodge decided to rent another location where they could carryon their activities. This situation continues to exist as the irregular group are occupying our old quarters. Those who occupy the old building on Washington Street are wholly irregular; they have no legal succession to the powers of Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge which they set up in 1945 was without any authority. He, who was elected as Grand Master, and who has carried on the traditions of the Grand Lodge of Peru, established in 1882, has been ignored and has moved to another location.

While our informant does not supply us with further information as to his Grand Lodge and the name of its Grand Master, we find that Jose Polar Ramos is the present Grand Secretary, and those desiring to address him will note that the address of the Grand Lodge of Peru is Apartado Postal No. 2190; the street address of their headquarters is Callao, No. 77. The city is Lima, Peru. The irregular group are vociferous, sending out propaganda to all countries, and many of our Grand Lodges are still listing the group as being in fraternal relationship. What a parody on the word "fraternal"? CANADA

British Columbia: This jurisdiction reports 16,410 Master Masons, being a net gain of 1,011. The unusual thing about this net gain is that it is exactly the number of Masons raised during the year. The Grand Master told of an unusual lodge existing in the jurisdiction, as told him by John Hepburn, charter member and twice Master of Kitselas Lodge, whose four score years or more did not prevent him from traveling two hundred miles to be present at an official visit of the Grand Master. He wanted to tell the Grand Master of a clandestine lodge, and here is the story: "I have a little cabin in the Gulch where I live quietly and alone. There are no near neighbors. My eyesight is bad and does not permit me to read. The fall and winter evenings are long and often dreary, and, when the shadows gather one feels in need of something to keep his mind busy and at ease. So, last fall I thought to myself why not form a Masonic Lodge. And, so I did, by my own Warrant. There was no need of regalia or furniture. In the center of my cabin I arranged an altar and the lights. In the West I placed a large length of stove-wood, and another in the South and at all other proper stations. I, of course, as


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Worshipful Master, presided in the East. At the regular hour I proceeded to open lodge. Going from station to station I asked the prescribed questions, made the usual replies, and performed the accustomed ceremonies, until the lodge was duly opened in the respective degrees. Then we proceeded with the usual order of business and when all was finished, closed the lodge in due form. There were, of course, candidates for membership-who were all of the same solid material as my junior officers-and had to be ballotted on. All were accepted and later initiated, passed, and raised. Each degree was conferred in full form, and in a manner which delighted and satisfied the critical eye and ear of the Worshipful Master. Our meetings continued monthly until last summer. The attendance was noteworthy-in fact, one hundred per centthroughout the entire season. Every officer knew his work and did it well; and the lodge year closed with peace, good will, and harmony prevailing. "

We are always interested in the Yukon Territory. One of the lodges, Peace Lodge No. 126, is located at Dawson Creek; lodge attendance there has not been good due to the long, hard winter and bad roads, but we note that on May 2, 1949, Fort St. John Lodge was instituted with 19 charter members; 10 petitions have been received recently and they have been assisted by members of Peace Lodge, fifty miles distant, showing the Masonic spirit which prevails in the Yukon. A history of the Grand Lodge has been prepared; it will be mimeographed and sent to all lodges in the jurisdiction. In the matter of recognition, several requests were received, largely from Grand Lodges in South America. The committee asked further time with reference to York Grand Lodge in Mexico and stated that the "Grand Lodge of the Netherlands did not conform to the standard of recognition adopted by this Grand Lodge." This is rather strange when the United Grand Lodge of England recognizes the Netherlands. Ontario: The membership of this Grand Lodge, December 31, 1948, was 112,781, a net increase of more than 3,000 in more than six hundred lodges. The Grand Master, in his address, reported that during the year over $120,000.00 had been received in donations, enabling their committee to continue to send to brethren in Britain each month 1,200 parcels of food, 20 pounds to a parcel. He stated that during recent years the brethren had subscribed voluntarily almost half a million dollars to assist brethren in the British Isles. The Grand Master reported the suspension of a secretary who had written an impertinent and discourteous letter. He reported that in a Niagara Falls lodge a young man signed an application and was initiated before it was discovered he was only nineteen years old; the Master and Secretary of the lodge were his sponsors, and they were reprimanded for carelessness on their part and on the part of the investigating committee. A committee on awards named seven brethren to receive the meritorious service medal. Hereafter names for the award must be submitted through the Grand Secretary, giving complete information concerning the proposed recipient and the spe-


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cial service he had rendered. After nomination is approved by the award committee, it must be supported by resolution of the lodge and adopted by a majority vote in open lodge. And here is what Reviewer Copus says路 about foreign recognition: "It is somewhat alarming to note the diversity of practice that still continues with regard to the recognition of foreign jurisdictions. This is especially noticeable in the Grand Lodges of the United States, many evidencing a catholicity of recognition that-we hope--will not be regretted in after years. Even here in Canada there is as yet no uniformity of practice in this important matter, only about one-half of our Grand Lodge being in agreement with the United Grand Lodge of England and with ourselves in the view that recognition must be deferred both in Europe and in Latin America until the present political and economic . situation has become much clearer."

Saskatchewan: This jurisdiction, on February 28, 1949, had a membership of 15,927, a net gain of 460 as shown by the 203 chartered lodges. The committee on foreign correspondence recommended recognition of the National Grand Lodge of Colombia at Barranquilla. Other Provinces: No proceedings have been received. AUSTRALASIA

New South Wales: Membership on June 30, 1949, was 107,177, which represented a net gain of 7,531. There are some seven hundred lodges working under this jurisdiction. An interested visitor at a communication of the Grand Lodge was His Excellency the Governor, Lt. Gen. John Northcott; also present was the Lord Mayor of Sydney. We note with sadness the death of A. J. Kaglund, chairman of the committee on foreign correspondence. For many years he was a valued correspondent in that Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge carries on an educational campaign and lists a large number of speakers, together with subjects on which they speak. One brother offers twentyfive subjects. The subject of Negro Freemasonry took seven pages of the review, being largely quotation from proceedings of the Grand Lodge of California. New Zealand: The membership reported is 34,415, a net gain of 1,510 by the approximately three hundred lodges reporting. The Grand Lodge is dangling with the idea of building a widows' and orphans' home and voted the sum of approximately $50,000.00 for the purpose. Then they found it would require five times that amount to build the home, and when finished there would not be enough brethren to fill it. One of the brethren said: "Was it to be expected that an aged Mason or his widow, with or without dependents, who had lived for the greater part of a lifetime in one district, would be happy if torn out of his environment and put into a Masonic home somewhere else in the Dominion f"

The Grand Lodge has adopted an order of service to Masonry and


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has adopted a design for a badge similar to that in use in the United Grand Lodge of England, being a pierced gold jewel showing in monogram the letters O. S. M. and pendant from a garter blue collarette. The matter of research lodges was discussed and it was found that the six research lodges were doing a fine work in the interest of Freemasonry and financial encouragement was given by a grant of $1,000.00. Approximately $30,000.00 was invested in food parcels shipped to brethren and Masonic institutions in London. An interesting story is told by the secretary of one of the New Zealand lodges: "One of the most interesting happenings in the annals of this young lodge has been the initiation of one of our Maori brethren, Inia te Wiata, late of Ngaruawahia, who voyaged to England as a fellow passenger of W. Bro. C. J. Wray on the Rimuta7ca in April of last year to pursue his musical studies at Trinity College. After an informal Masonic meeting held on the ship te Wiata got to hear of it through a cabin mate of his, who told him that he had been present at the meeting. Te Wiata at once expressed great interest and stated that he carried a letter from an elderly friend of his-who, by the way, was not a Freemason-strongly recommending him to 'get in touch with Freemasons in England' and join a lodge, because he (the writer) had always heard the fraternity 'very well spoken of.' The Scottish brother brought te Wiata to Mr. Wray's cabin and the letter in question was produced. Bro. Wray took the matter up with Viscount Bledisloe, P. G. M. (New Zealand), who was' also a passenger on the ship, and Lord Bledisloe, who had already formed a good opinion of the young Maori, gave a letter strongly recommending him as a suitable person to be admitted to Freemasonry. To make a long story short, he was duly initiated in New Zealand Lodge in January of this year, and was raised to the degree of a Master Mason on 24th September."

Queensland: The membership for the year ending December, 1948, was 26,444, a net gain of 1,334. There are no figures as to past years, but we presume this marks the high spot in membership. The President of the Board of General Purposes made a recent visit to England and spent considerable time in telling the brethren of the beautiful Grand Lodge building on Queens Street in London. We believe his description worthy of quotation: "Coming to the Memorial Temple itself, I paid a couple of visits there. Actually, one would need quite a long time there to see everything properly, particularly in the library and the museum. It is a veritable storehouse of knowledge and information. However, I had the opportunity, through the courtesy of the officials of the building, to see very many lodge rooms and the Grand Hall itself, and some notes that I made with respect to the Grand Hall and the lodge rooms may be interesting to you. "The entrance to the Grand Temple is by way of three porches leading to doors, and these represent the three degrees of Freemasonry. In the first of these porches is a roll of honor that contains the names of the members of 4,000 lodges contributing to the building. It is a memorial to those who fell in the first World War, and by turning the handle of a particular drum all the names inscribed can be seen.


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" A very attractive feature of the Grand Hall is the pair of doors. The designers did not make the mistake that we did in connection with this Grand Hall in having two very small doors that are quite inadequate for a team of officers to enter. There are two massive doors of bronze, which weigh as much as one and a quarter tons each, but so well poised on their hinges that even a touch with the little finger suffices to open them, and the massive lock has a key that moves equally easily. These doors are of a magnificent and beautiful design. On the outside there is a representation of the stages in the building of the temple, the ark and the covenant. On the inside of the doors is a symbolical memorial to the men of the services. It shows figures of ancient type representing soldiers. Angels are depicted on either side. There is a beautiful emblematical representation of the outstretched hands of God receiving the souls of men as they ascend to the Grand Lodge above. "In the construction of the Grand Hall, 500 tons of pure white marble were brought from Italy. It seats not many more than 2,000 Freemasons, and is beautifully upholstered in plush. The ceilings are of a glorious design. In the center there are emblematical representations associated with the phrase, 'He will build me an house ind I shall establish His throne forever.' , 'On the four sides of the ceiling are representations of prudence, temperance, fortitude and jlistice. At the four corners of the ceiling are the coats of arms of the Grand Lodge. In the center of the dome one sees stars and the crescent of the moon, whilst the sides of the ceiling are made of gold mosaic. This was the result of the artistry of Italian workmen imported especially for the purpose. It was stated that during the time they were working the doors were closed as they would not allow"anyone to see them doing this particular work. "Over the exit doors of the temple are Masonic coats of arms and a Latin inscription meaning, 'See, hear and be silent.' The chairs of the Grand Master and the Grand Wardens are upholstered with golden damask. There are beautiful curtains at the back of the hall, and there is also a fine organ with pipes at the top. "I was informed that there was only one blemish in the Grand Hall, but unless it was pointed out you would not notice it. In one place the square and compasses are in the reverse position. The whole room is floodlit for visitors, and the floodlighting shows up the magnificence of the interior decorations. Hundreds of visitors pour into the Grand Temple all day. "In the library there is the Duke of Connaught's chair, and there is also a Chippendale chair owned by one of the lodges. There are also silver centerpieces donated and dedicated to the Duke of Sussex, former Grand Master for 25 years. There is also a series of glass bookcases on which one finds inscribed 'How old is Freemasonry" and underneath one can read the minutes of some of the oldest records in the possession of the United Grand Lodge. One may also see the first printed attack on Freemasonry, published in the year 1698. On my visit to this museum I was shown the Entered Apprentice apron that was worn by the Duke of Windsor, then Prince of Wales, on his initiation ceremony. "There are some 30 odd lodge rooms in the Masonic Memorial Temple, and virtually all are different one from the other. Here again, I think, there is a lesson for us that we should not have designed our four lodge rooms so very much alike. Actually, I think groups of lodges were responsible for the decorations of lodge rooms in the Grand Masonic Temple. The lodge room which is their show lodge room was donated by the Freemasons of India anQ. it cost, I was informed, some ÂŁ 30,000 for the inside decorations. It is really a magnificent spectacle to enter this


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lodge room but, although it is so magnificent, the others-and I was privileged to attend lodge in two of them-are remarkably beautiful in their effects. The tessellated pavement covers the whole floor of the lodge and there is no prohibition against walking upon it as is the case here. " He gave us another picture of English lodges: "There is no altar in an English lodge, and the Worshipful Master on no occasion left his seat. The secrets were conveyed to the candidates who came right up to the Worshipful Master's pedestal. , 'I was very in1:!igued with the ballot box used in that lodge in connection with the election of candidates. It was a ballot box with only one entrance into which you put the whole of your hand, and there were two passages, one to the left and the other to the right. The passage to the left led to a little box on which the word' No' was inscribed, whilst that to the right led to another box marked 'Yes.' There were no black balls or white cubes, but there were shells or beans, and you merely directed your hand into either the 'Yes' or the 'No' chamber. The Master merely took out the 'No' chamber after the ballot and showed that it had received no shells."

South Australia: The most recent statistics from this jurisdiction show a membership of 19,430, the highest in the history of the Grand Lodge. A Grand Lodge edict requires the establishment in each lodge of a committee of inquiry to insure the most searing investigation into the character and qualification of candidates. This committee consists of the Master and three Past Masters in each lodge. It was discovered that the standard of work in some lodges was not what it should be because Masters allowed brethren, young in the craf~ to do work for which they were not sufficiently qualified. Tasmania: The sixty-three reporting lodges show a membership of 6,140, ~ net gain of 119. A new edition of the ritual is to be printed. One of the speakers said that for sixty years there has been a need for such a ritual, and eventually one had been worked out used in England, the Emulation Ritual, generally accepted in Englishspeaking countries. VictOl-ia: The last report on membership shows 76,355, an increase of more than 3,000 for the year and the largest membership in the history of the Grand Lodge. Six hundred thirty-nine lodges are reported, 37 being new lodges. The matter of irregular bodies was discussed, brought about by an appeal of one Brother Herbert Spong, who had appealed from the decision of the Board of General Purposes which had suspended him until such a time as he had resigned his membership in the Order of the Eastern Star. The remarks of the Master are quoted: "I desire to draw the attention of the brethren to the existence of certain irregular bodies copying and adopting, as far as possible, the phraseology used by regularly established and properly constituted Masonic institutions. Such irregular bodies, for example, are the orders known by the name of 'The Star of the East,' 'The Eastern Star' and 'Co-Masonry. '


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"The brethren are distinctly warned against having any connection or association in any way whatever with such irregular organizations, which have been formed without the sanction or approval of this Grand Lodge. The brethren should clearly recognize that the visitation to, or the recognition of such irregular bodies would be an absolute breach of their Masonic obligations, and any brother acting contrary to this pronouncement must expect Masonic punishment. "That is one of several similar pronouncements made by M. W. Grand Masters from time to time. I have one which was made in 1925 in almost similar terms when His Excellency, the Earl of Stradbroke, was Grand Master. Similar pronouncements have been made in other jurisdictions in the Commonwealth, and in no other such jurisdiction is the Order of the Eastern Star recognized. The Grand Lodge of England takes up a similar attitude, and in 1921 the Board of General Purposes of that Grand Lodge made a very exhaustive investigation into the activities of the Order of the Eastern Star. After due deliberation the Board recommended, and that recommendation was subsequently adopted, that no brother could at the same time be a member of the Grand Lodge of England or a subordinate lodge of the Grand Lodge of England and a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. Arising out of the issue of the last pronouncement in July, 1947, Brother Spong, the appellant in this case, asked for an interview with the Grand Master. That interview was granted, and at it Brother Spong freely acknowledged that he was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. The Grand Master then referred the matter to the Board of General Purposes, and in due course Brother Spong was called before the Board, when he again acknowledged that he was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. The Board gave due consideration to the matter and intimated to Brother Spong in writing that unless he gave satisfactory evidence within one month of his resignation from the Order of the Eastern Star, the Board would proceed to deal with him. That was in September, 1947. Some two and a half months elapsed, and Brother Spong did not communicate with the Grand Secretary or give any intimation that he had severed his connection with the Order of the Eastern Star. On the Brd December, 1947, the Grand Secretary mote him and reminded him of that fact aJd informed him that unless by the 18th December he announced his intention of resigning his membership of the Order of the Eastern Star, the Board of General Purposes would proceed to take appropriate action against him. Nothing further was heard, and the Board of General Purposes then dealt with the matter. The Board was put in this position. Brother Spong had acknowledged his membership of the Order of the Eastern Star both verbally and in writing. The Board had before it the recent pronouncement by the M. W. Grand Master, and there was only one thing 'for the Board to do, and that was to inflict appropriate punishment. The alternatives of such punishment were fine, admonition or suspension. A fine would, have been quite inappropriate. He would still have remained a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. An admonition would have had the same effect. The Board wall left with only one alternative, which was to suspend him from membership of our Order until such time as he gave satisfactory evidence that he had resigned his membership of the Order of the Eastern Star."

The Grand Lodge sustained the action of the Board of General Purposes in the suspension of Brother Spong. Western Australia: The membership of this jurisdiction was 16,552, being a net increase of 1,117 and the largest membership in the his-


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tory of the Grand Lodge. It is noted that there was an increase in membership each year during the war, beginning with 1921. The brethren are returning to evening dress, which was abolished during the war period; they are finding difficulty in securing clothes to conform to the standard. In the meantime the Grand Master expressed the hope that he may not see in the lodges in the near future "either white flannel trousers or open necked shirts with the blazer." Past Grand Master Raad offered a resolution providing that the ritual of the third degree work in three lodges working under Scotland be adopted by the Grand Lodge of Western Australia as an alternative ritual of the Grand Lodge. The situation comes about as a result of the Grand Lodge of Scotland and the Grand Lodge of Western Australia each having lodges in that jurisdiction. It was claimed that the third degree as worked in the Scottish lodges was not like anything in the third degree in other lodges, and while it was nicknamed a Scottish ritual, it never came from Scotland but from Queensland. The attempt to grant permission was defeated by a vote of 203 to 132. BROTHER CHADIRAT EXPLAINS

Grand Master Georges Chadirat of the Grand Lodge of France asks that he be set right in his statement about the use of the Bible in French lodges; we are happy to be able to give an extract from his letter; he says: In my letter I asked that you give me the definition of Tolerance and Liberty. My name was mentioned in several American publications, and if my information is correct, the publication mentioned that I said that the Holy Book on the altar might be the Treaty of Versailles, the Bible, or the Koran. If it is true that I was thus quoted in this manner, it is not exact. I stated that the Bible is not the only Holy Book, and there are other Holy Books, which, therefore, can be on the altar. Certainly, that is the opinion of the Grand Master of France, but if the convention differs, he must, as a disciplined member, concur with the resolution.

Two of the members of the committee which visited Brother Chadirat at the Hotel Athenee in Paris are dead-Brothers Johnson and MacAlester. Judge Bushnell and your reviewer were the two others. There is always difficulty in translating from one language into another but on consulting the notes made on that occasion, we have specifically noted that on inquiry, Brother Chadirat after mentioning how tolerant the French Grand Lodge was, replied that a book of "blank paper" or the "by-laws and regulations" were all that was necessary on the Masonic altar. His tolerance consisted in the statement that if we wanted the Bible that was our right. We have never given Brother Chadirat our definition of Tolerance or Liberty. The two terms mean different things to different people in different countries. What Liberty is to an American, is not the same as what Liberty may mean to a Japanese or a Russian. The


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Tolerance of the Roman Catholic is quite a bit distinct from the Tolerance of the Protestant. As a rule, tolerance means having proper respect for the opinions of others; it is a sort of Golden Rule for the government of our mental thinking. But we do not tolerate murder, or rattlesnakes. From time immemorial the Bible has been in use on the Masonic altar; it was so in France until 1870; its use is a Masonic tradition or landmark. To remove it, makes that organization irregular and quite generally unaccepted throughout the Masonic world. If France cares to set itself up without the Bible, they are free to do so; we are that tolerant. But we cannot permit ourselves to call their organization Masonic. All races have their Holy Writings and we are tolerant enough to permit any race to use their Vedas, Koran, New Testament, Old Testament, or the writings of Confucius, but as for a White Book -No. Our French brethren are out of step with the Masonic world. THE OLDEST MASONIC LODGE

Weare often asked what is the oldest Masonic Lodge in the world ~ It is the Lodge of Edinburgh No.1, sometimes known as Mary's Chapel, and in July last year, it observed the 350th anniversary of its establishment, at which time Masonic dignitaries from far and near journeyed to Edinburgh, Scotland, where the lodge continues to carryon. And it has records to prove its long time existence for its first five pages of minutes incorporate the Schaw Statutes which are dated December 28, 1598; six months later, July 31, 1599, are to be found the minutes which confirm the lodge's claim to the oldest existing Masonic minutes. The Schaw Statutes are named for William Schaw, who was Master of Work to His Majesty and General Warden of the Masonic craft; in these statutes he declared that these ordinances issued by him for the regulation of lodges considered the lodge at Edinburgh to be for all time the first and principal lodge in Scotland. It will be noted that the lodge has gone under two names; it was first called "The Lodge of Edinburgh" and retained this name until 1688, when the Grand Lodge of Scotland confirmed its charter, designating it as "The Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel) No. 1." Our readers may want to read this first minute of July, 1599: "The qlk day george patoun maissoun grenttit & confessit that he had offendit agane the dekin & mrs for placing of ane cowane to wirk at ane chymnay heid for tua dayis and ane half day for the qlk offenss he submittit him self in the dekin & mrs gud willis qt unlaw thay pleass to lay to his charge, and theyy having respect to the said georges humill ~ubmissioun & of his estait, thay remittit him the sai offenss, Providing alwayis that gif ather he ony vther brother comitt the Iyke offenss


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heireeftr that the law sall stryke vpoun thame Indisereta wtout exeeptioun of psonis this was done In pres of Paul Maissoun dekin, thoas Weit warden, thoas Watt Johne Broun Henrie Tailziefeir the said george patoun & adame Walkar. ITa est adamus gibsone norius (Mark) PAUL MAISSOUN DEKIN"

The minutes of 1600 show that the lodge was meeting in Holyrood House. Then on November 20, 1613, we read of the lodge "Maries Chapill in Nidries Wynd" showing that the meeting place had been changed. The Chapel was built in 1504 by the Countess of Ross, and in 1618 purchased by an Incorporation of Wrights and Masons. In 1787 the building was torn down to make way for a new bridge (South Bridge) and the last meeting on that site was a farewell meeting attended by all the lodges in Edinburgh. During the next 100 years the lodge met in many locations, but in August, 1893, acquired the home 19 Hill Street in Edinburgh where it still meets. As early as 1600 the lodge began to admit as members non-operative Freemasons, for in June, 1600, the Laird of Auehinleck was made a speculative member, the first authentic record of the making of such a member. The famous Dr. Desaguliers visited the lodge August 24, 1721; he had served as Grand Master of England and was referred to as "General Master Desaguliers." On the next day, while he was present, the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, the Treasurer, the Deacon Convener of the Trades and the Clerk to the Dean of the Guild Court were admitted members. This date is thought to mark the change over from operative to speculative Freemasonry in Scotland. When the Grand Lodge of Scotland _was established, Lodge of Edinburgh took an active part; this was on November 30, 1736, and thirty-three lodges were represented at the meeting held in the lodge room of Edinburgh Lodge. Because the oldest minute of a lodge was that of Edinburgh Lodge, it was placed first on the roll of the Grand Lodge. Lodge Kilwinning was second because of its records dating to December 20, 1642. Considerable friction developed in 1807 when Grand Lodge permitted Kilwinning to prefix the word "Mother" to its name. Naturally in a lodge of such prominence as Lodge of Edinburgh there were prominent names. First on the list was H. R. H. the Prince of Wales (afterward King Edward VII) and H. R. H. King Edward VIII. Both were affiliated with the lodge, taking the obligation on the "Breeches Bible," printed in 1587. The pen with which these two brethren signed the roll is still preserved in the lodge museum. The names of the Masters of the Lodge since 1599 are still preserved. Few of the names would be recognized in this country. In 1810 Alex Deuchar, Engraver, was Master; he was the first Grand Master of the Scottish Conclave of Knights Templar.


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MONUMENT TO MARTIN RUGGLES

One of those outstanding figures of early day Freemasonry in Missouri who failed to reach the station of Grand Master was Martin Ruggles, who served as Senior Grand Warden in 1826 and 1827. There was another Ruggles, Elijah, who was even more active than was Martin Ruggles. However, a century or more has not dulled the appreciation of our brethren of the lead-belt, and on April 8, 1950, more than one thousand people assembled at Caledonia, Missouri, to dedicate a monument to the memory of Martin Ruggles. The monument is of granite and stands on a stone base; the inscription on the face reads: (Square and Compasses) Erected by Tyro Lodge No. 12, A. F. & A. M. In Honor of MAJOR MARTIN RUGGLES First Worshipful Master Charter Granted 1825 Born 1775 Died 1840 LODEMA His Wife Born 1778 Died 1848 Dedicated April 8, 1950

Grand Master James M. Bradford attended the dedication and eulogized Ruggles as a Freemason. At the Masonic Hall, Bro. William B. Massey dedicated a memorial plaque. One hundred lodges were represented on these occasions. We hesitate to call the attention of our brethren of Caledonia Lodge to their statement that the lodge has been under continuous charter since its establishment, but the records fail to bear out the statement. In 1843 the charter was arrested, and in 1844 the Deputy for the District was ordered to take possession of the property, which he apparently did, for in that latter year, the Grand Lodge voted to restore the Charter and the property of the lodge. The lodge was originally at Caledonia; then it removed to Mine-aBreton, and later to Caledonia. PRESERVING HISTORY

Most of our older generations will remember, and some may have known, Richard P. (Silver Dick) Bland. He was a member of the Masonic bodies at Lebanon, Missouri, and this story has to do with his death and burial. Weare not at liberty to divulge the source of our information for some reasons readily understood. But here is the story as written us: "Silver Dick" Bland was in Congress for 25 years, representing Missouri. He was a Methodist; his wife was an ardent Romanist, and


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quite naturally wanted him buried next to the spot reserved for herself in the Catholic cemetery. Despite the fact that there were no automobiles in those days, and the Bland home was 180 miles from St. Louis, the railroad ran excursion trains, and there was an estimated crowd of 13,000 people in the little county seat town of Lebanon. Bland died June 15,1899, and the funeral was shortly after that. There was an unusually large committee from the House of Representatives headed by the then speaker, Henderson, from Iowa, a Republican. The Governor of Missouri and his staff were there. I thought we never would get him buried for there were so many of the" big wigs" who wanted to pay tribute; the last man to speak was the local Catholic priest, who said he was not acting "officially," but as a friend of the family; in a few words, I thought he said more to the point than had been said by all the others-Bryan included. Burial at the grave was, by the Freemasons. In 1896 Bland could have been nominated for the presidency instead of Bryan, had Bland been willing to make two promises. One was, if elected, to make Senator Walsh of Georgia, Secretary of Agriculture. Bland declined. Had Bland been nominated he would have been elected, for, according to Senator Lindsay of Kentucky, there would have been no bolt. At the opening of Congress that fall, Senator Berry of Arkansas accosted Senator Lindsay where I happened to hear the conversation, and said: "Lindsay, why in h - - did you nominate that wild Nebraskan whom nobody knowsf Had you named Bland, we would have trusted him and there would have been no bolt."

From the Globe-Democmt (St. Louis, Missouri) of June 1, 1950, we learn: IRREGULAR CLANDESTINE, AND MISCELLANEOUS

Suit for OustlW of Negro MasO'ns' Gmnd Master Opens-Dr. George B. Key has held the office of Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri since 1939, contrary to a three-year limitation set up in the organization's by-laws, it was testified yesterday in the court of Circuit Judge Waldo Mayfield. Eight members of the Grand Lodge are seeking to oust the physician, a Negro, from the Negro Masons' top post. Hearing of their charges opened yesterday with the testimony of Dr. Samuel E. Moore, former Grand Lodge treasurer. Dr. Moore said the organization's by-laws provide that no officer may serve more than three one-year terms consecutively, with an eight year interval necessary before he could be elected to the same post. Dr. Moore also testified that Dr. Key bought the Grand Lodge's present headquarters building, 4525 Olive Street, for $87,500-though it was worth only $35,000 in Dr. Moore's opinionand coerced member lodges into moving in. The former treasurer said each of the organization's 4,000 members was assessed $35 to pay for the new building. Headquarters had formerly been at 3619 Easton Avenue.

From a later dispatch we learn that an out-of-court settlement is to be effected, so that hearing was suspended until September when the court will hear the terms of settlement-if any. From the Kansas City Star of February 19, 1950, we learn of the establishment of a "New Negro Masonic Unit" whatever a "Unit" may be:


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St. Peter's Grand Lodge of Missouri, a Negro Masonic Group, with headquarters at 2434 Park Avenue, has been organized with a membership of about thirty. And by the way, this is the first occasion on record where St. Peter seems to have been recognized! SHADES OF TOLERANCE

We can imagine what some of our Grand Lodges will say when they read this clipping from the Detroit Masonic World: BUSHNELL ADDRESSES COLORED FREEMASONS

In the first Prince Hall Affiliation Masonic public recognition of a united attack on Communism, Supreme Court Justice George E. Bushnell and Governor G. Mennen Williams were guests of Michigan's Prince Hall Grand Lodge at their Americanism Day, January 22, 1950. Governor Williams, who is just entering the fraternity, stressed the importance of brotherhood in a world full of conflicting forces. Justice Bushnell, who is Lt. Grand Commander of the Supreme Council, 33 0 , N. M. J., and Deputy for Michigan, in a masterful address, reexamined the value of democracy. More than 1,000 Negro Masons were present at the meeting held in Bethel A. M. E. Church.

It would appear that our friend, Judge Bushnell, might be working "along parallel lines." EXTRANEOUS SOCIETIES

A reader of Masonic Historiology, writing to that publication from a small town in Missouri asks: I have recently been informed by men I have reason to believe knew what they were talking about that in some jurisdictions it is not permissible for a member of the Masonic fraternity to be a member of the O. E. S.; that in Ohio a visitor must state he is not a member; that a statement to that effect is included in the Tiler's oath . . . that Pennsylvania notified the membership that if they were members of the O. E. S. they must relinquish membership in either the Masonic fraternity or the O. E. S. . . . I am particularly interested due to the fact . . . that that there was entirely too much influence of/by the O. E. S. in Masonic Lodges in smaller towns, and more particularly to that part of our jurisdiction (Southwest Missouri) in which I am more familiar with existing conditions. The editor of the publication gives no reply but adds "If the readers have opinions to express they should write to the editor or the inquirer. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL

It is hard to believe that this association has been holding annual meetings for forty years, yet February 22, 1950, marked the Fortieth Annual Convention of the Association. It was marked by the completion and unveiling of the George Washington Statue.


Washington Statue Unveiled.


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For several years the great Memorial Hall has stood almost empty; it is much like having the Temple of Solomon without the Ark of the Covenant, for the whole idea of the erection of the monument was to honor George Washington and Memorial Hall was the "sanctum sanctorum" of the structure.

President EsclYrted by Missouri Past Grand Masters.

Needless to say, the unveiling was carried out with all of the spectacular accessories, music, oratory, and dignity which should characterize such a program. The statue was the work of Bryant Baker, a member of the craft; it was the gift of the Order of DeMolay who gave some $20,871 for the purpose. The statue cost $85,000. The DeMolay made the offer several years ago when prices were reasonable. The unveiling exercises took place in Memorial Hall which had been arranged for seating some 600 people. Grand Master Flowers


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of Virginia presided. Many distinguished visitors brought greetings; the statue was unveiled by Grand Master Flowers, Dr. Elmer Arn of the Association, William B. McKay of the DeMolay, and Godfrey Runaldue of Alexandria-Washington Lodge. Before it was concluded, even the President took a hand in pulling one of the ropes which released the covering. Music was supplied by the U. S. Air Forces Band. President Truman delivered an address ; Washington "the Freemason" was not mentioned as such; it was an address on democratic principles beamed especially to foreign nations. Certainly, even the enemies of Freemasonry could not take exception to anything said on that occasion. The meeting of the Association was routine. The sum of $232,372.64 was contributed by member bodies, $39,209.40 being for the Endowment Fund. California was the largest single contributor, although on the basis of membership Alabama took the prize with Minnesota a close contender. An interesting addition to the auditorium are the large plaques of Masonic Presidents; the work was done at cost by the Mint and at a cost of $2,890.03. There are twelve plaques in all but only eleven have been placed, that of President Truman (in accordance with his wish) not as yet being placed. Each plaque bears the profile of a President in bas-relief and a metal plate giving his name and Masonic record; they make a fine bit of decoration for a room which is void of decoration. Missouri came in for its share of the meeting. The President, a Past Grand Master of Missouri made the address; on the reception committee for the President were five Past Grand Masters: Ittner, Lee, Bradford, Denslow and Reader. As of February 22, 1950, $5,913,817.74 had been received for the building. There is $306,247.92 in the Endowment Fund. Grand Master Clift, representing Arkansas, said of the Memorial: "Last year, while representing the Grand Jurisdiction of Arkansas for Grand Master Stockburger, I kept my seat in the audience while the other Grand Masters filed by and left checks totaling $251,000.00. This year I again found the most inconspicuous spot and sat there while other Grand Jurisdictions donated $262,945.00."

In Louisiana a committee of five Past Grand Masters proposed the granting of authority to the Grand Master to restore active membership to five associated Masonic groups in the George Washington National Memorial Association. One Grand Master, J. Luther Jordan, disapproved and the proceedings state: "After considerable discussion, the report of the minority was approved and the resolution was not adopted."

Over in North Carolina a similar effort was made to get representation in the Memorial Association, this time sponsored by Thomas J.


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Harkins, Inspector General for the Scottish Rite in that jurisdiction. He said: "There are many Masonic leaders in the country who believe that membership in the Association should be restored to the original plan and that no Masonic Grand Body should be excluded. . . . Even with these other bodies admitted to membership the Grand Lodges would have a membership within themselves of 48 or 49, and that . . . justice and fair play require the plan of membership be changed to its original basis."

The Grand Lodge apparently took no action on the recommendation. CONFERENCE OF GRAND SECRETARIES

We bow our hats to Ted Doss, secretary of the Conference of Grand Secretaries which held its annual meeting in Washington, D. C., February 21, 1950; his proceedings reached us on March 11, 1950, just eighteen days after the meeting. Featured at the meeting were talks and discussions on Grand Lodge Publications, Subordinate Lodge Returns, Regional Conferences for Secretaries, Improvement of Office Systems, and the Open Forum. The Association has had but three presidents in its twenty-two years of existence: Orin Scott, Charles C. Hunt and Richard C. Davenport. It has had two vice-presidents: James M. Clift and Lloyd Wilson; likewise but two secretaries: D. Rufus Cheney and T. E. Doss. Dwight Smith of Indiana, leading the discussion on Grand Lodge Publications, discussed the usual proceedings issued by each Grand 'Lodge, calling attention to their good and bad qualities. In general we can agree with his conclusions. He said that in many instances it was impossible to discover from proceedings what the final action was on recommendations of a Grand Master. He thought sub-titles should be used in various reports. Some grand officers have never heard of a s'ub-head. Lists of Masters and Secretaries are believed to be necessary, especially their addresses. Lists of Grand and Past Grand Officers are frequently needed, as well as their addresses. And by all means there should be some place within the volume, preferably on the back cover, the time and place of the next annual communication. Incidentally, we have just searched high and low in the proceedings of one of our largest jurisdictions, for the time and place of their next annual. Lists of extinct lodges also prove of value. Biographical sketches are essential for they preserve the history of the Grand Masters. In some jurisdictions the picture and sketch is inserted in the account of the meeting following election; in other states, it is included in the year's report of his administration, where all of the essential facts concerning the Grand Master and his work are to be found in a single volume. Missouri has this plan. Most important of all was his suggestion as to an index. To us, an index is the most essential feature of a proceeding; we hesitate about combing through


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three hundred pages of a volume to find some little fact that an index might have furnished us in a few moments. The difficulty here is that one man in a thousand knows how to build an index. And as to a cross-index, well that is simply out of question. A most interesting fact was brought out by Grand Secretary Thomas of Arkansas: it was found that Communists were infiltrating into Arkansas lodges to such an extent that the Grand Master, after consulting with his officers, decided that the petition form should be changed, and all petitions cleared through Grand Lodge before ballot. Now birth certificates must accompany each petition; he is asked to state all of the organizations with which he is connected. Secretary Belew of Texas gave this instance: We had a man who came into Texas from another state; he visited four lodges in Dallas. We got information on him and traced him down through the FBI and he is an avowed communist; he came to Texas for the specific purpose of getting into our lodges, and through infiltration, dividing them. There is one lodge in Texas today that is completely divided; you cannot get a petition through . . . this man has meetings with groups, never more than ten in a group, meeting in their homes. We screened last year over 600 petitions, and you would be surprised, that of the 600, there were upwards of 100 who had communist affiliations. Your investigating committees are not investigating; you are not getting over 50 per cent efficiency in any investigation.

Grand Secretary Reader of Missouri discussed Regional Secretary Conferences, discussing such subjects as the Secretary, his office, his records, his brethren, relation to the Master, and to the Grand Lodge. Under improvement of Office Systems, Grand Secretary Haling discussed microfilming and card indexing. In a discussion which followed it developed that in many jurisdictions obsolete systems were still being used "because they were used one hundred years ago, and ever since." It is a fine thing to maintain our ancient customs, traditions and landmarks, but God help that jurisdiction which tries to maintain eighteenth century bookkeeping. In a list of Grand Secretaries found in the proceedings, we find that the ranking Grand Secretary in point of service is '\Talter L. Stockwell of North Dakota, elected April 1, 1910. THE

1951

MEETINGS

February 19, 1951-Masonic Service Association February 20, 1951-Conference of Grand Masters February 21, 1951-Conference of Grand Masters; Conference of Grand Secretaries February 22, 1951-George Washington National Masonic Memorial Association (Alexandria) MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION

The Grand Master of Kansas reported that he had formed a favorable opinion of the work of the Masonic Service Association as


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administered at Wadsworth General Hospital, Leavenworth, Kansas, but"Found very divided opinion, some quite favorable, while others are decidedly against this Association."

He thought the work was worthwhile and a hospital chaplain said the service was a great benefit, not only to Masons in the hospital, but in the community. He found officials in the hospital and the Veterans Administration, and the lodges at Leavenworth, high in their praise of the program, and that not one word of criticism had come from those who had viewed the work first hand. The committee on reports of Grand Officers stated that a committee had investigated the work of the field agent at Wadsworth and"We don't believe this work to be of sufficient importance to enough Masons to justify us going into it."

And their report was adopted. On the recommendation of the Grand Master of Mississippi the Grand Lodge voted to resume membership in the Masonic Service Association. Past Grand Master Harkins, representing the M. S. A. in North Carolina, sent out a questionnaire to lodge secretaries relative to the short talk bulletins. He reported that the bulletins were not regularly read in open lodge; in most instances never read. In Ohio, a committee, including three Past Grand Masters, recommended that no action be taken at present toward obtaining membership in the M. S. A. The Grand Master of Wisconsin didn't like some of the actions of the Executive Commission, but said: "There is no doubt that the Association has done, and is still doing, an excellent piece of work, and I believe we should continue our membership." FREEMASONRY IN THE PUBLIC PRESS

Under the heading of "Blames Woes on Masons," the Kansas City Star of December 12, 1949, states: Madrid, Spain (AP)-Arriba, organ of the Falance Party, declared today that Freemasonry is to blame for all of Spain's misfortunes since the nineteenth century. The article declared Freemasonry was brought into Spain by foreigners-the British and the French-to destroy "royal Jauthority, divide Spaniards and undermine and ruin Spanish strength. "

Freemasonry has failed to undermine the royal authority in Britain; and the U. S. A. has not been ruined by the Freemasons. The truth is that Spain had little to ruin and the small handful of Freemasons that once existed there had about as much influence as a pound of ice in the hot place.


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In a Saturday Evening Post article we are told: It is a matter of comment that Donnell makes no campaign promises and never mentions his opponent except in a complimentary manner. An illustration is made of an instance when Donnell, then running for Governor, was introduced by a politician who made a slighting remark about the Democratic opponent, Lawrence McDaniel.

The Post says: . . . that when Donnell rose to speak he made it clear that he did not like the reference to McDaniel; he said that McDaniel had been a member of his Sunday School class and that he knew him to be a fellow of sterling character. Then Donnell made a thirty minute speech in favor of his opponent.

Illustrating the Masonic teaching that "if you can't speak well of a man, you can at least keep silent."

• • • The Holiday number (1949) of Paradise, published in Honolulu, H. 1., devotes four pages to a story of "Freemasonry in Hawaii." The story was written by our friend Walter R. Coombs. While giving some interesting bits of history, the writer has devoted most of the article to the beginnings of the Scottish Rite in Hawaii. Truman Pins Jeweled Mas=ic Badge on Senator Donnell: Washington, ,D. C., October 21, 1949 AP.. President Truman today pinned on Senator Donnell a jeweled badge symbolic of Donnell's service as Grand Master of Missouri Masons in 1942-43. Donnell, a Republican, succeeded Mr. Truman as Grand Master. The badge is a traditional gift to past holders of the office, but wartime restrictions prevented Donnell from receiving his when his term ended. The badge was brought to Washington by Col. James W. Skelly of St. Louis, also a Past Grand Master in Missouri. Skelly participated in the informal ceremony in Mr. Truman's office. -Globe-Democrat, St. Louis, Mo., October 21, 1949. He's Trying too Hard; Masonic Lodge Meeting not a Bingo Game: Chicago, October 14, 1949 AP. Two police raids on big bingo games in the last week made newspaper headlines in Chicago and won official commendation for the police captain who made them. Edward Noonan, police sergeant, was thinking about it when his bingo-conscious eyes spied a row of lighted windows on the third floor of a northwest side building Wednesday night. A peep-hole shutter flipped open in his response to a knock. He caught sight of a crowd of men, some wearing aprons, that reminded him of those worn by bingo changemakers. But the doorkeeper wouldn't let Noonan in. He called for more cops, but they didn't get in either. The doorkeeper finally convinced them that the crowd inside was attending a Masonic lodge meeting and wearing fraternal regalia. -Kansas City, Mo., Star, October 14, 1949.

Note: Noonan got in the wrong church.

Distinguished Honor: Col. William Southern, writing in the Independence Examiner, says:


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It was appropriate and proper that the picture of President Truman, wearing his Masonic Grand Lodge regalia, be placed among the archives of the Masonic fraternity of Missouri. President Truman served Missouri as Grand Master of Masons, the highest and most distinguished honor which comes to anybody in any state . . . the picture in the Grand Master regalia shows the President bareheaded and holding the silk top hat, a part of that regalia, in his hand. It is in my mind that the picture should have shown the Grand Master with his hat on; all Masons will understand this reference.

Then the Colonel tells this appropriate story: At an open session of one of the Independence, Missouri, lodges, a distinguished Episcopalian bishop was the speaker. The Master, introducing him, remarked that he was all right even though he wore his collar reversed. Quickly the bishop replied: "I may wear my collar reversed, but I know enough to take my hat off in this distinguished company."

For the information of those who may wonder about Col. Southern's statement, we may say that a Grand MasHarry S. Truman (1949) ter wears the hat in Visits Grand Lodge of Missouri. presiding. But the reader should also know that there are occasions when the Grand Master removes his hat. The artist has intended to represent that time. Again, the portrait of the President with a hat on would fail to show the facial characteristics of the subject and that is what was desired. Donnell a Ca~m Fellow: The K. C. Star of October 10, 1949, contains a news story about Senator Donnell which contains one Masonic reference of interest: Reminded that the administration was out to get his place and that President Truman said he was going to campaign against him, the Missouri RepUblican added: "The President has a perfect right to do that, and I have no objection. I have always considered Mr. Truman a very good friend of mine. We both worked in Masonic affairs in Missouri." Mr. Truman and Senator Donnell are former Grand Masters of the Missouri Grand Lodge of the Masonic order.


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From the magazine Newsweek, November 7, 1949, we gather this rare specimen of prejudice: Mason from Missouri: Sir, President Truman, referring to the time when he became Grand Master of the Missouri Grand Lodge in 1940, says: "I consider it, and still consider it, the highest honor that ever came to me." (Time, October 10, 1949.) If Mr. Truman doesn't consider being President of the U. S. a far greater honor, the voters should return him to his Missouri Masons in 1952. Cleveland, Ohio.

Mrs. C. S. :Rothman.

We might tell Mrs. Rothman that we think President Truman was right. The position of Grand Master was never sought after by Mr. Truman; it came unsolicited. It is our belief that if Mr. Truman had never served the Grand Lodge of Missouri as Grand Master, he would never have been considered as a United States Senator, or President of the United States. Mr. Truman has a right to feel as he does. Politics did not enter into his Masonic election; his first position in the Grand Lodge of Missouri line was an appointment by a Republican, the appointment being concurred in by two other Republicans! From the Kansas City Star of January 8, 1950, we take the following: Ma<ionic Lodge in Japan.-Five Members of Diet Included in First Tokyo Members.-Tokyo, January 7. AP-Japan's first Masonic Lodge was established yesterday. Naotake Sato, president of Japan's House of Councillors, and foUl' other Diet members were among the initial group accepted in the Blue lodge. General MacArthur and other occupation leaders sent greetings.

The item is wrong in that it was the first Tokyo lodge to be established. There were lodges in Japan previous to World War II, but by agreement with the Japanese government, membership was confined to persons not citizens of Japan. General MacArthur had reasons to extend greetings-he is a member of the Philippine bodies. The Satu1'day Evening Post of May 27, 1950, carries the story of Criminal at Large by John Bartlow Martin. In detailing the thinking of a criminal who is out of prison he quotes the man as saying: Fundamentally, I like things that are not connected with this (crime) . . . I get tired of night clubs. And there's little things to do. Like my dad was a Mason, and of course that stuff is out for me.

Proving that even the rougher element of our people look upon the Masonic fraternity as connected with the better things of life.

It is always news when a President goes to lodge. The Kansas City Star of December 27, 1949, tells of one such incident:


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Truman in Lodge Role At Grandview Masonic Installation He Acts as Master President Truman joined his fellow Masons last night for an installation ceremony of the Grandview (Mo.) lodge. Lodge members filled the second story hall on the main street in Grandview when the President arrived shortly before 8 o'clock. Before going into the hall he rode from his home in Independence to the home of his sister, Mary Jane Truman, Grandview. Miss Truman accompanied him as far as the hall. The ceremony was limited to members. Mr. Truman who was Worshipful Master of the lodge in 1911, the year of its founding, and again in 1912 and 1917, acted as installing officer. (Here follows list of officers installed.) RECENT MASONIC BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS

Official Missouri Manual: This publication, known as the Blue Book, was issued in March, 1950. It is a compendium of Missouri information, but to us the biographical sketches are of most interest. Most of these sketches are turned in by the individuals themselves; some of them seem willing enough to admit their Masonic connections; others "forget" or don't care to give them. First comes President Truman, whose Masonic connections are quite well known-but not mentioned in the sketch. Next is General Omar Bradley, a sincere Freemason. Pictures of Pershing, Malin Craig, Admiral Coontz, Mark Twain, Walter Williams, William Beaumont, J. C. Penney, all Freemasons. Governor Forrest Smith is shown as an "active member of Richmond Lodge No. 57, A. F. & A. M." the Chapter, Commandery and Shrine. Lt. Governor James T. Blair is "a member of the Masonic order" including the Templars. State Auditor W. H. Holmes is credited with being "a Mason." State Treasurer M. E. Morris is a member "of the Masonic Orders and Shrine." Both United States Senators, Forrest C. Donnell and James P. Kem are listed; of the former it is said "he is a Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of the State of Missouri," and of the latter "he is a member of the Ivanhoe Masonic lodge." Masons in Congress, as listed, are: Clare Magee, Phil J. Welch, Leonard Irving, George H. Christopher, Dewey Short. We are reasonably positive that one or two others are members but overlook their membership. Among the state Senators, twenty-two of thirty-four give their Masonic connections: John D. Fels, P. G. Winans, David E. Horn, Hartwell G. Crain, Frank M. Frisby, John Hoshor, Harry J. Revercomb, William M. Quinn, Richard J. Chamier, Robert H. Linneman, Edward V. Long, M. C. Matthes, Emery W. Allison, Yewell D. Lawrence, William H. Robinett, Horace R. Williams, J. E. Curry, R. Jasper Smith, A. rves Reid, William H. Burden, C. R. Hawkins, and Doyle Barrow.


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Among the State Representatives are: George Baskett, Dwight Beals, John T. Buckley, O. L. Burnett, T. Fred Cline, Wallace Cooper, Russell Corn, Noel Cox, Frank Dickman, Milton F. Duvall, Roy D. Eddy, Howard Elliott, Clarence E. Felker, Melvin E. Fish, Ray H. Fordham, John W. Fowler, Max Garrison, Luther D. Greene, E. P. Hatcher, Elmer C. Henderson, Austin Hill, D. L. Houtchens, Charles E. Johnson, Virgil R. Johnson, Walter V. Lay, W. N. McDonald, Roy W. McGhee, Arch McRoberts, Charles D. Mahnkey, L. E. Merrill, John W. Milhoan, Joe H. Miller, Elvis A. Mooney, James M. Neal, Ben W. Oliver, Sam W. Padget, Wallace M. Pearson, T. M. Penman, Andrew Poe, E. B. Pope, Homer L. Pruett, William L. Rose, B. H. Rucker, J. L. Sando, William Siefert, Harry W. Smith, J. D. Swiers, J. M. Tanner, 1. E. Tulloch, C. P. Turley, O. F. Underwood James U. Watson, R. F. Whiteside, L. E. Wilhoit, James M. Woods.

One representative says "is not now active in fraternal organizaTruman, Vaughn, Wallace {1949} tions but holds dimit attend G. L. Missouri. from .the following: Knights of Rose Croix No.3, Joplin; Ancient Free and Accepted Masonry No. 247, Neosho." Some of the representatives are women and hold membership in the Star. Candidate Information Program: The Grand Lodge of Illinois has issued a series of educational pamphlets for the enlightenment of candidates and members. They are divided into "discussion groups" (five) and these groups are sub-divided into subjects. Discussion group 1 covers: Candidate Information, What Is Masonry (Freemasonry), Whence Came (Free~) Masonry~ How Has Freemasonry Come to Us~, Charity, Freemasonry's Attitude Toward Politics and Religion. Group 2: History and Meaning of the Term Entered Apprentice, Privileges and Rights of an Entered Apprentice, Obligations in Masonic Law and Practice, Some Teachings of the First Step in (Free)Masonry, Story of Freemasonry in Illinois. Group 3: Teachings of the Second Step in (Free) Masonry, Fellow-


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crafts Then and Now, The Literature of (Free)Masonry, History of a Particular Lodge, Senior Deacon's Lecture and the Middle Chamber Lecture. Group 4: Interpretation of the Master Mason Degree, Behavior in the Lodge, The Ballot, Forms and Ceremonies, Lodge Visitation, Lodge Organization. Group 5: Right of a (Free)Mason, Relief, Masonic Law, Grand Lodge and Its Constituents, the Work of (Free) Masonry. Collectanea: The latest volume issued by the College of Rites, U. S. A., is Volume 4, Part 2, and contains the entire ritual of the Free and Accepted Architects, an obsolete organization, but which once numbered several lodges. It was established March 1, 1862, at Charleston, Illinois, by the late Henry P. H. Bromwell, who served as Grand Master of Illinois Grand Lodge in 1865. When Bromwell removed to Denver, Colorado, he took the organization with him. With Bromwell's death in 1903, the order languished and died, leaving its records in the custody of the Grand Lodge of Colorado. The background for the ritual is. laid in Bromwell's massive volume on "Restorations of Masonic Geometry and Symbolry." 164 pp., cardboard cover. History of Freemasonry in Winchester, Virginia: Now comes William Moseley Brown, P. G. M. of Virginia with a story of a famous old Virginia Lodge which he has made into a 286 page volume, cloth bound and well illustrated. The lodge at Winchester is known as Winchester Hiram Lodge No. 21, and is of particular interest to Americans, being the mother lodge of William McKinley, one time President of the United States. The volume is dedicated to a distinguished Virginia Freemason, C. Vernon Eddy. Copies may be secured by addressing the Secretary of the Lodge, Winchester, Virginia. Congratulations to the lodge, chapter and commandery which issued it, and to Brother Brown who wrote it. District Deputy Grand Masters in Pennsylvania: That the office of D. D. G. M. in Pennsylvania is one of honor and importance is shown in the recent volume issued by the Grand Lodge of that state under the direction of its Library Committee. Preparation of material was the work of Past Grand Master Richard A. Kern, and George Hay Kain, a District Deputy Grand Master. From this volume of 58 pages, cloth bound, we learn that Massachusetts was first to adopt the District Deputy system (1801); Virginia followed in 1808. District Deputies are provided with special aprons and jewels. The most distinguished of the Deputies was Brother James Buchanan, 1824; he was President of the United States in 1857-61. After Fifteen Years: A story of Freemasonry in Germany, written by the Masonic Co=ission of the M. S. A. A factual story well illustrated and giving the "inside" of conditions in Germany at the present time.


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German Edition of "After Fifteen Years": The United Grand Lodge of Germany has reissued the M. S. A. Report on "After Fifteen Years" in a German translation, reproducing all of the photographs and other material and dedicating it to various individual brethren who have helped in the resurrection of German Freemasonry. It is a great tribute to the work of the M. S. A. Commission. Ohio Chapter of Research: Volume I of the Transactions of this new research group has just reached us; it is a nicely bound volume of 165 pages containing the business of the Chapter for the year 1948. Its greatest interest lies in the 70 pages of photographic reprint of the records of American Union Chapter No.1. We only wish that the volume had been thoroughly indexed for the benefit of the research worker. South American Diary: Melvin M. Johnson, senior Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts has issued a 66-page account of his recent trip to South America, which he has written in diary form. He visited Brazil, Uruguay and the Argentine. We shall comment in the proper section on some of the things which he found in Brazil and Uruguay. It is a very readable story as one would expect from Dr. Johnson. Nocalore: Volume No. 12-19, dated 1949, has just reached us; it is the transactions of the North Carolina Lodge of Research which has been dormant for seven years. The 102-page bound volume has some valuable stories: An Introduction to C. B. C. S., The Bradley Exposure, N. C. Premier Council, American Eagle Mark Lodge, The Rite of Memphis, The Traveling Mark, Red Cross of Constantine, French Mark Ritual, Ragon Mark Rituals, English Mark Rituals, and the usual proceedings of the Lodge. It is edited by J. Ray Shute, P. G. M. and noted M~sonic student. Domingo Faustino Sarmiento: A biography of Bro. Sarmiento has been published by the Grand Lodge of Argentina; it is a tribute to a great Freemason who served as Grand Master. Sarmiento was born in February, 1811. The pamphlet contains an address by Sarmiento in 1868, just before he accepted the presidency of the republic. He died September 11, 1888. The History of Freemasonry in Staunton, Virginia: The value of this book lies in the information it contains about a former Missourian, J. Worthington Smith, one time head of the ill-fated Masonic College of Missouri. Not that it does not contain many other matters of interest for William Moseley Brown, the author, has done a fine bit of writing local history which is about the hardest thing imaginable to make popular outside the local field. He has done this by bringing in many famous Virginians. J. Worthington Smith, we learn from this volume, was a teacher by profession and petitioned Staunton Lodge No. 13, May 27, 1831. He soon became Master of his lodge and one notation concerns good old


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Brother S. W. B. Carnegy, a Past Grand Master of Missouri whom ill luck seemed to follow all of the days of his life. The item is a letter quoted in the volume: The Most Worshipful Brother Carney (Carnegy) Past Grand Master of Masons of Missouri, being on his return from a long journay & finding himself nearly destitute of funds, has signified to me his wish that our Lodge would advance him thirty dollars to be returned as soon as he reaches home. You will please pay to him that amount thro' Brother Charles H. Lewis, out of any funds now in your hands or which you may collect for the occasion, & this shall be your voucher, to the Lodge. Staunton, Va. J. W. SMITH, Master of No. 13. June 14; 1843.

Bro. Carnegy was probably returning from the Baltimore Convention when he became "nearly destitute" as described. On March 28, 1844, a farewell reception was given by the Lodge, honoring Bro. Smith on the eve of his departure for the wilds of Missouri where he was to head the newly established Masonic College. An echo of the Carnegy matter was that Bro. Smith endeavored to collect the $30 loaned but without effect; the Grand Lodge of Virginia then tried to collect. Smith graduated at the University of Virginia and was highly regarded by the Staunton community; he was Master of Staunton Lodge 1834-36, 1838-41 and 1842-43; he was High Priest of his chapter (Union) 1836-44. He was made Grand High Priest 1840-41; he served as Grand Master 1842-44. Weare told that "he remained in Missouri for some years but did not like the rather rigid and primitive conditions under which he had to labor there. Hence, he returned to Virginia and settled in the lower valley where he died in 1857." In 1850 Smith presided over a Convention of High Priests. Templary in Pennsylvania: Weare indebted to our friend George Hay Kain for a copy of a most interesting history of the Templar Orders in the Keystone State. The 136-page book, bound in cloth, is issued by Past Grand Commander Paul Moore, with the authority of the Grand Commandery of Pennsylvania. The work is that of Frater Kain-and a good job he has done too. In addition to the story of Templary, it deals with certain other of the so-called "high degrees." Laying the Cornerstone of the White House: Potomac Lodge No.9 of Washington, D. C., has issued a pamphlet on the above subject. It was written by Ray Baker Harris, a Past Master of the Lodge, and adds much information concerning a historic event which had almost dropped into obscurity. Thanks are due Bro. Harris for a job well done. One page is devoted to a history and photograph of the Washington Gavel, used by nine of our Presidents, not all of whom were Freemasons. There was an interval between 1929-1948 when it was not used by any President.


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Retirement Plans of Grand Lodges: Another of the digests issued by the M. S. A. explaining what various Grand Lodges are doing in the matter of retiring aged employes. Thirty-four pages. The Royal Arch Degree, Fundamental Significance: A pamphlet issued by the S. R. I. S. Metropolitan College of Scotland and written by J. Mason Allan, head of that group. It was published in Edinburgh in 1949, and has much to interest those engaged in the study of the connection between lodge and chapter. American Freedom and Catholic Power: By Paul Blanchard, Beacon Press, Boston, eighth printing in 1949. The best documented volume on the subject we have ever read, and a ,must for all interested in preserving American ideals. It touches upon the Church, State, Education, Public Schools, Church and Medicine, Sex, Birth Control, Marriage, Divorce, Censorship, Boycott, Science and Superstition, Fascism, Communism, Labor, and kindred subjects. The Masonic Fraternity is referred to in several instances (pages 76, 237, 245, 292). A writer in the Boston Pilot is quoted as stating that George Washington "became a son of the Catholic Church before he died." Pride of the Malay Race: Little is heard in these United States of this volume although it was published in the United States by Prentice-Hall. It is the story of Jose Rizal, the Philippine martyr who was a Freemason. In recent years the Roman Catholic Church of the Islands has been making the claim that before Rizal was shot that he had renounced his Freemasonry and rejoined the Church. The author of the volume was Dr. Rafael Palma, writer, lawyer, statesman, and former President of the University of the Philippines. It was translated into English by Associate Justice Roman Ozaeta of the Supreme Court of the Philippines. The volume was awarded first prize in a nationwide contest sponsored by the Philippine government in 1936. The particular chapter under fire is Chapter 33, "Critical Examination of Rizal's Alleged Retraction." As we might suppose, there are many references to the Masonic Fraternity. The dispute over the volume occupies the headlines in Manila newspapers; while the volume is approved for public school reading, yet the Church has banned it "under pain of sin and canonical sanction." A committee of three appointed by the President to examine the complaint of Knights of Columbus, stated that two of the committee were Catholics; they found "no merit in the protest submitted against the book." Missouri Commanderies: The Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of Missouri have issued a 115-page volume on Missouri Commanderies, which contains a brief story of the 71 Templar organizations established in Missouri. The material has been taken from the files of the Grand Commandery, is authentic, and will constitute a source book for any commandery which desires to continue the work further. It has been distributed to all members of the Research Lodge.


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Goethe der Meister, 1949: This 164-page volume has been written by Dr. August Horneffer of Berlin, Germany; it is in German and a few copies have reached this country. It contains several portraits of Goethe at various periods of his life and is enriched with poetry written by this distinguished writer and Freemason. Red Cross of Constantine in Scotland: Our friend George S. Draffen of Scotland has issued a very valuable publication dealing with this interesting order and its history in Scotland. It is a pamphlet of 40 pages and sells for $1.00 to those interested. Draffen is the author of Scottish Masonic Records, and History of Great Priory of Scotland. In these publications he has rendered a valuable service to Freemasonry in Scotland. Apuntes Para La Historia de la Masoneria en Mexico: We are the recipient of an autographed copy of a de luxe edition of this History of Freemasonry in Mexico. It is a two volume edition, the two volumes running into more than 1,000 pages. It is the most complete and comprehensive story of Mexican Freemasonry that we have seen. Brother L. J. Zalce, the author, has seen fit to autograph our copy, for which he has our thanks. It has a personal interest in that it describes the Confederacion meeting in Guadalajara, which we had the good fortune to attend several years ago. We have forgotten to explain to our readers that the two volumes are in Spanish. Freemason's Guide and Compendium: This volume by Bernard E. Jones is ~ithout doubt the best single volume which has come out of England in many a day; it should be in the hand of every Masonic student. It is written from the English point of view and many of the things therein described may not appear too plain to the average American Mason, but students are always interested in the customs and traditions of the Mother Grand Lodge. To the Royal Arch Mason it will be a revelation, for the author places great stress on the value and connection of that branch with symbolic Masonry of the three degrees. Our copy, direct from England, cost about $4.80. C1'yptic Masonry Encyclopedia: The Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of Missouri have recently issued an Encyclopedia of the Cryptic Rite; while only a small booklet, yet it seems to supply definitions for all of the generally accepted terms of that rite. The series will include an Encyclopedia of the Capitular Rite, and one of the Chivalric Rite, the latter two being published by the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons and the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar, as a help to members of the American Rite in Missouri. MASONS IN THE NEWS

Many Freemasons gathered at the statue of Louis Kossuth, Hungarian patriot, Easter Sunday, 1950, to lay wreaths. There was a brief ceremony which was broadcast in Hungarian language to breth-


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ren across the sea. Present were Frank M. Totten, Grand Master of New York, and Morris CUk01' and Arthur H. Keil, two well known Hungarian-birth-Americans. Judge Charles W. Froessel, Supreme Court Justice, is being prominently mentioned as candidate for governor of New York. During the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of New York, Brother James Edgar Hoover, FBI head, was presented with the Award for Distinguished Service, he being characterized as "a national symbol of the safety, security, and protection of our American way of life. He has been a member of Federal Lodge No. 1 (District of Columbia) since 1920. Paul Hoffman, head of the ECA, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, according to a biographical sketch submitted by him. Admi1'al BY1'd and Bemt Balchen, two of the "pole" explorers are Freemasons. During their trip over the poles, North and South, Masonic flags were dropped. General Sam Houston of Texas fame was both a Freemason and a Catholic. The laws of Texas, at one time, required one to be a Catholic in order to hold title to land. And Houston wanted the land! The Lord Bishop of British Guiana is the English D. D. G. M. for that country. Much interest is being manifested in Freemasonry in that territory. Sir Malcolm Ba1'clay-Harvey, Grand Master Mason of Scotland, and head of Royal Arch Masonry there, is on a trip to the Masonic groups in South Africa. Governor J. St1'om Thltrmond of South Carolina was a recent visitor to the Grand Lodge of that state. The new Nawab of Rampur, India, was made a Freemason in Lodge Raisana No. 3819, E. Const. in 1931. He is an enthusiastic Freemason, giving of his time and money to worthy Masonic purposes. The following Freemasons signed the Declaration of Independence: John Adams, Samuel Adams, Josiah Bartlett, William Ellery, Benjamin Franklin, Elbridge Gerry, Lyman Hall, John Hancock, Joseph Hewes, William Hooper, Sam Huntington, Thomas Jefferson, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lewis, Philip Livingston, Thomas McKean, Robert Morris, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Robert Treat Paine, John Penn, George Read, Benjamin Rush, Roger Sherman, Richard Stockton, George Taylor, Matthew Thornton, George Walton, William Whipple, John Witherspoon, Oliver Wolcott, and George Wythe. We question one or two of the above names which total 32 of the 56 signers but we give it as taken from a Masonic publication. Our record is somewhat better among the signers of the Constitution. Of the 39 signers, the following (23) were Freemasons: Abraham Baldwin, Gunning Bedford, Jr., John Blair, William Blount, David Brearley, Jacob Broom, Daniel Carroll, Jonathan Dayton, John Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, Nicholas Gilman, Alexander Hamilton, Rufus King, John Langdon, James McHenry, James Madison, Robert Morris, William Patterson, Charles Pinckney, George Read, John Rutledge, Roger Sherman, George Washington.


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James E. Craig has been named as editor of the Protestant, a church magazine. Bro. Craig is a native Missourian and until the New York Sun closed up had been its editor. He also wrote the Correspondence report of the Grand Lodge of New York. Among the speakers at the Grand Lodge of Maryland was U. S. Senator J. Allen Frear, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Delaware. Representatives from the various jurisdictions were received in the Grand Lodge of Minnesota and the response to their reception was made by Past Grand Master Luther W. Youngdahl, who is Governor of the State. The title of Honorary Past Grand Master has been bestowed upon Brother Roscoe Pound by the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. He is a former member and Past Master of Lancaster (Nebraska) Lodge No. 54, and has rendered distinguished and unusual service to the Craft, and is probably the foremost living authority on Masonic jurisprudence. In a letter sent out by the Grand Lodge of New Jersey we learn of the activities of Benjamin Franklin. It is there stated that the earliest records of St. John's Lodge, in Philadelphia, are dated 1730 and shortly thereafter Franklin became a member. December 8, 1730, he had printed in his newspaper, The Gazette, an article pretending to reveal Masonic mysteries. February 1, 1731, he was initiated and he acknowledged that he had been in error in printing the article. He at once became active in the lodge and in June, 1732, he drafted the lodge by-laws. In the same month he became Warden of his lodge. In June, 1734, he was elected Master; Secretary 1735-38; June 10, 1739, he was elected Grand Master of the Province. Until his death, April 17, 1790, he was an active Mason and concerned with Masonic affairs. In 1732 he printed the Constitutions of the first Masonic book in America. Nicholas B. Eckerlin represents Arkansas near the Grand Lodge of New York. He claims to be the happiest man in the world in that he wouldn't change places with anyone. He owns and operates a grocery store and meat market in New Rochelle. He likes to help people, especially handicapped people; he has a remarkable gift of insight. He sees the beauty of this lovely world in its entirety. He sees the courage and heroism that animate lives about us. He sees everything and everybody in true perspective for he is blind. At a recent communication of the Grand Lodge of New York, Brother Eckerlin sat in the gallery. When the brethren applauded, his seeing-eye dog gave forth vociferous barks. In June, 1948, Earl Newbry, Secretary and acting Governor of the State of Oregon, welcomed the Grand Lodge on behalf of the Governor who was out of the State. The newly elected Bishop of Western Missouri of the Episcopal


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Church is Bishop Edwin Welles, member of Ancient Landmark Lodge in Buffalo, New York. Harvey T. Graceley, president of the Marion (Ohio) Steam Shovel Co., has a Bible bearing an inscription written in it by the late President Warren Harding. Lou Holland, a Past Master of Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 (Missouri), has been elected president of the American Automobile Association.

Grand Master Braiiford Presents 50-year Button to P. G. M. William R. Gentry (left).

Lt. General Robert L. Eichelberger, who commanded the 8th Army in the Pacific (World War II) has recently published a series of articles on "Our Bloody Jungle Road to Tokyo" which has been featured in The Saturday Evening Post. He is a member of Pike Lodge No. 36, Washington, D. C. Lord Mayor of London, Sir George Aylwen, has been named as Junior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons of England and Wales. The ceremony of installation was conducted September 6, 1949, General William H. Darrell, Grand Master, presiding. Judge Albert M. Clark, 71, of the Supreme Court of Missouri, died suddenly at his home in Jefferson City, January 9, 1950. His paper on "Judges of the Supreme Court 'Vho Had Been Master Masons" was read at the last communication of the Grand Lodge. He was a member of the bodies at Richmond, Missouri, his home town. J. Edgar Hoover delivered an address at a dinner given by the


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Grand Lodge of New York, May 2,1950. There were twelve hundred guests at the dinner given in the banquet room of the Hotel Astor. Mr. Hoover was presented with the Grand Lodge Achievement Award on this occasion. Gov. G. Mennen Williams of Michigan was made a Master Mason recently in Lotus Lodge No. 549, in the presence of 1,600 brethren. Sir A. Henry McMahon, 87, died recently in England. He held the position of Past Grand Senior Warden of the Grand Lodge and was at one time the Grand Master of Mark Masonry in the Mediterranean, as well as Grand Superintendent of the Royal Arch Masons at Malta. We once sat in lodge with him in London and found him a very democratic and friendly brother. Dr. Eli Stuart Haynes, professor of Astronomy at Missouri University, and a former officer of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, retired in June, 1950. The Eal'l of Malmesbury, 77, who once served as Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of England, died June 12, 1950; he had a world famous collection of paintings. Rufus Burrus is the new President of the Missouri Bar Association of Missouri. Col. Burrus is a member of McDonald Lodge No. 324, and serving as an officer of Independence Chapter, R. A. M. Robert B. Gaylord of California is the new Grand Master of the Grand Encampment, Knights Templar, elected at the triennial in San Francisco, September, 1949. Dr. Joseph Fort Newton, eminent divine, and for many years editor of national Masonic publications, died at his home in Philadelphia, January 24, 1950. For several years during World War I he occupied the pulpit of Temple Church in London. General H. H. Arnold, head of the air forces during World War II died at his home in California, January, 1950. George L. Fox, one of the four chaplains depicted on a recent stamp, and who lost his life in the sinking of a ship, was a member of Moose River Lodge No. 82, Concord, Vermont. Chaplain Poling, according to his father, had planned to petition after the war was over. Myron C. Taylor, representative (unofficial) to the Vatican, resigned in January, 1950. It is understood that he will not be replaced. He was first appointed under the Roosevelt administration, the appointment coming in for severe criticism on the part of non-Catholic faiths because of an impression that it was not in harmony with American ideals of separation of church and state. Taylor is a New York Freemason. Roger T. Sermon, mayor of Independence, Missouri, and close personal friend of President Truman, died at his home in that city, January 23, 1950. Marcus A. Loevy, Past Grand Master of York Grand Lodge of Mexico, and an internationally known Freemason, died after a short


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illness at his home in Mexico City, D. F., in December, 1949. He was the possessor of a very fine Masonic library. Frank M. Totton, Grand Master of New York, is a vice-president of the Chase National Bank of New York City, and an outstanding civic leader. James E. Webb, undersecretary of state in Washington, D. C., is a member of the fraternity. Harold Lloyd, movie actor and producer, and recently Imperial Potentate of the Mystic Shrine, is a member of all the Masonic bodies in California. John Hancock, illustrious signer (in large type) of the Declaration of Independence, although an American citizen, was made a Freemason in a Quebec, Ontario, Lodge, Merchant's Lodge No.1, in 1760. Later on he affiliated with St. Andrew's Lodge in Boston. L01'd Petre, Grand Master of England 1772-76, and Anthony Brown, Viscount Montague, Grand Master in 1732, were both Catholics. EXTRANEOUS SOCIETIES

Arizona Grand LQdge has attempted to assist in the organization work of the Order of DeMolay. In fact they have a committee on such work, but during the year they received no communication from a single DeMolay Chapter in the jurisdiction. The committee expressed the hope: "That DeMolay Chapters will endeavor to extend some cordiality to the members of this committee in the future, and invitations to meetings would be encouraging and might bring some unexpected rewards." In Florida we learn that the Grand Master ordered Florida Masons to withdraw from the National Sojourners, an organization composed of officers and former officers of the armed forces, because the Grand Lodge had declined to authorize a chapter in Florida. A new petition was filed, approved and now the Sojourners are in good standing in Florida. The Grand Master also stopped a bull fight which the Grotto proposed to stage in the City of Jacksonville. The Order of the Amaranth wished to establish chapters in Florida, but an edict was also issued against that organization. Out in Nevada the Grand Master recommended that no endorsement be given the Order of the A,maranth until it had been endorsed by the 01'der of the Eastern Star. New York announces a new organization-the Masonic War Veterans. They have been incorporated under a charter prepared and approved by Grand Master Totton, and any Mason in good standing, who was a veteran of any war in which the U. S. A. was engaged, is eligible for membership. At a recent communication of the Grand Lodge representatives from this group appeared in full uniform of the organization and were given official endorsement of Grand Lodge.


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The True Kindred applied for authority to operate in the State of North Carolina. It is composed of Masons and certain women relatives. The Grand Master informed the organization that he did not have the power to authorize the formation of chapters in that jurisdiction and that they would proceed with the organization at their own risk. Ohio has trouble with several extraneous societies and sent out a circular letter to all the membership with reference thereto. A resolution was introduced in the Ohio State Legislature calling for an investigation of fraternal organizations in respect to certain practices of gambling. At the same time information reached the Grand Master that in a club house of the Oasis Club, a feature of the Shrine Temple in Akron, slot machines were to be found on the first floor and gaming tables on the second floor. A notice to the Potentate of the Temple brought no reply; another inquiry brought a reply from the Potentate's secretary, and later from the Potentate himself. In the meantime the same group sent out a notice of a bingo party. The D. D. G. M. for that district reported that he had visited the bingo game and found prizes were given to persons with winning combinations, whereupon the Potentate and his officers were ordered to appear before the Grand Master to show cause why they should not be suspended. Then they announced that the slot machines had been removed and the reason for permitting the situation to continue was: "These were just a continuation of past activities and that some past officers, as well as some of the present officers and other high ranking Masons who were members of the Temple, had supported the proposition, that the practices could continue as nothing had been done by Grand Lodge in past years and it probably would not interfere now."

The Grand Master decided it was high time"These high ranking Masons got a truer picture of the noble calling of our fraternity and lend influence of their position to a stricter observance of our tenets."

All officers of the Shrine Temple were suspended, but later, believing that certain ones of those suspended had been sufficiently punished, the suspension was vacated with the exception of the three principal officers. A special committee which considered the matter found that the officers of the Shrine had full knowledge of the provisions of the by-laws and that their conduct was a wilful defiance of the laws of the Grand Lodge. Then along came the Grotto. A Grotto in Cleveland decided to give away an automobile by lottery. The Monarch, who happens to be the presiding officer, was contacted and made a promise that a full explanation would follow. His explanation, which came later, was to the effect: "Nothing was done this year in the conduct of this event that differed


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in any respect from what has been done in each of the three previous years.' ,

The committee, passing on the matter, found that the Grotto action was a violation of the laws of Grand Lodge. In view of the attitude of the representatives of the Grotto who appeared before the committee, and who made promises that it would not be repeated, they were released with a reprimand. In Tennessee, the High Twelve Inte1'national asked for permission to organize luncheon clubs, but Grand Lodge turned thumbs down on the proposition. ANTIMASONRY

There will always be anti-masonry. It is the perfectly natural thing for people to be "agin" anything worth while or any organization whose membership may be restricted. In some instances this attitude is brought about by some one individual who joins an organization and then finds to his dismay that he cannot run it. A century ago there were many religious organizations which opposed Freemasonry; time and education have changed many of these associations, so that today there are only two or three religious societies which assume this intolerant attitude. We naturally expect opposition from the Catholic and Lutheran societies j but today it is the Missouri Synod of the latter church which issues brochures and diatribes against us. Today we take from the daily press this particular item: Masowic Order Called Anti-ChristiaJn by Lutheran Council-Fisherville, Ontario (CP) The Council of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church will decide May 18 (1950) whether to order a congregational vote on the expulsion from the church of three members of the Masonic order. Rev. Walter D. Bauer, minister of the 600-member church for the last six years, said today he considers the Masonic order "anti-Christian," an accusation that is denied by the order's members. The minister, who held a charge at Desboro in the Owen Sound area for 17 years before coming here, has touched off a controversy which has split this village of 300 persons in a farming district 25 miles south of Hamilton.

The "Unchristian" order in Ontario has just completed the sending of $500,000 in food for the relief of their "Unchristian" members in Britain. A SPIRIT OF TOLERATION

Recent press dispatches are to the effect that the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran Church are again on the rampage. Not content with publishing books and pamphlets attacking Freemasonry, they are now engaged in a crusade which has brought the whole matter into the public press. Here are some paragraphs as taken from the Globe Democrat of St. Louis, Missouri, dated at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 23, 1950:


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The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod's Bureau of Information Regarding Secret Societies gravely warned the body's triennial convention here today against what it described as the" lodge evil. " At the same time it exhorted church members to avoid "undue toleration" of lodge members within the synod's 5,000 congregations in this country and Canada. Calling for a policy of "alertness" against the menace of lodgery, the bureau singled out for special censure youth organizations "sponsored by Freemasonry." . . . expressed the conviction that "the Acacia fraternity and other organizations more or less loosely affiliated with Masonry must be recognized as a growing menace to Lutheran students on university campuses," and added "there is need of thorough indoctrination of new members, especially of adult converts, to maintain our position on lodges, and it will remain the duty of our pastoral conferences not to permit the' lodge question' to become a dead issue in their areas."

A speaker from Concordia Seminary in St. Louis (Bretscher) said: Basically, the secret organizations embrace a universal type of religion making it possible for a person to conceive of God in whatever manner he wishes.

It was said that Missouri Lutherans may do business with fraternal bodies "that have become insurance companies without violating church doctrine." Communion is to be denied all members of societies which are "Unchristian in character." In a handbook issued in 1929, we learn It is the solemn duty of every pastor to properly instruct his people on the sinfulness of such lodges as deny the Holy Trinity, the Deity of Christ, the vicarious atonement and other scriptural doctrines and induce his congregation to take action against all members who after thorough instruction refuse to leave such a lodge.

The Information Bureau will hereafter be known as "Commission on Fraternal Organizations." As to the Boy Scout organization, the question of membership is to be left "to the discretion of the local congregation." The Synod, carrying on its tolerant (~) attitude, will "show a sympathetic attitude toward the Jews in their community and a yearning desire to lead them to the Saviour." But, apparently, the "sympathetic attitude" is not to be displayed towards the sinful and heretic members of the Masonic Fraternity! A CATHOLIC-FREEMASON UNION '!

That the Pope does not express the opinion of thousands of his members of the Roman Church is borne out by the following editorial written for the St. Joseph News-Press, and we understand by one who is a Catholic. The editorial is in line with the spirit of the day. As for ourselves, we could never see why any church should oppose any of the forces working for the betterment of the world-even though there might be a difference in method employed to accomplish such a condition.


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Stram,ge Bedfellows? There is a popular conception in certain Roman Catholic and in certain Masonic circles that the two great worldwide institutions, the Roman Catholic Church and Freemasonry, must be eternally at war. The more educated the Catholic the more he knows this need not be true. The further the Blue Lodge novice goes in Freemasonry the more he knows it does not have to be so. So with a world of friends in both places-as the wag said when he discussed his particular destination in the hereafter-we are happy to report that at last that ancient church and that ancient lodge are the proverbial strange bedfellows. As to why it should be strange, we shall let deeper or say more controversial minds, argue. But we note from, of all newspapers, The Christian Soienoe Monitor of last Wednesday, that Masons and priests are fighting on the same side of the fence. It is in benighted Hungary where for two centuries the Roman Catholic Church and Freemasonry have been at daggerpoints, that Mason and priest find themselves locked arm in arm resisting Communism. The Christiam Science Monitor, not given to too much praise of Catholicism or Freemasonry, reports that strange as it may seem, the strong resistance Freemasons and Catholic clergy are giving to the Red dominated government, the more popular have the Church and the Lodge ,become. The Monitor says the Church stand in resistance is unyielding I' and this resistance has increased its popularity. Never before were churches so crowded, priests so occupied, so many masses each day." The quotations are from the Vienna correspondent of the Monitor. The Lodge has been dissolved by the Communist government, but like others in history have found of Freemasonry, the Lodge refuses to dissolve. The activities of the Masonic order are increasing and, like their now friends the Catholics, numbers seeking admission to the Lodge are getting greater day by day. The Masons have defied the government and the veople are applauding. It would be a happy thing if some world calamity such as Communism, ,would be the unintentional instrument of bringing the oldest Christian church in the world and the oldest fraternal lodge in the world into icloser union and harmony. A sage once said, " 'Tis an ill wind that blows 'nobody good." ATTITUDE OF ROMAN CHURCH

At a time when all elements of the people should unite in fighting the inroads of communism, atheism, and fascism, comes a strong denunciation of Freemasonry from the Roman Catholic Church. We have to laugh when we read of Freemasonry's attitude to be "one of hostility to religion." But here is the news article as taken from the Kansas City Star of March 19, 1950: Firm in View on Masonry Vaticam, Paper Says Catholio Church Has Not Changed Stand Vatican City, March 18 (AP)-The Vatican's Osservatore Romano \reminded Catholics today that enrollment in Masonic order will expose them to excommunication. The newspaper said there has been no change in the church's attitude toward Masonry. It said that recent reports and propaganda aimed at "the ingenuity of the weak" try to persuade Catholics that" certain Masonic rites no


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longer contrast with the church," and that "there even is an accord between the church and Masonry." "The leaders of this propaganda," says Osservatore Romano, "certainly know that nothing has been changed in the church's legislation regarding Masonry." The history of Masonry, Osservatore said "is one of hostility to religion.' ,

And there you have the most recent pronouncement from the fountain source. We wonder whether the Pope found our Brother Myron Taylor, the Quaker, hostile to religion ~ Or is President Truman hostile to religion ~ Or Bishop Oxnam ~ or Bishop Holt or a host of other Bishops~ Or King George~ or King Gustav V~ The only way Freemasonry may be said to be hostile to religion is when it gets into politics. And we know of some religions that do just that! A friend sends us two pamphlets, on "Whose Country Is This~" being the supposed conversation of "two Masons, one of whom was a Shriner" both of whom had attacked the Catholic church, but who were immediately silenced by the vast knowledge of their Catholic companion. It is one of a number of pamphlets being put out by "The Queen's Work" of 3741 West Pine Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri. The second pamphlet bears the title "Quizzes on Secret Societies" with a glossy cover done in red and black. The central design is a red cross, in front of which is a groping blindfolded figure making its way between various emblems of secret societies, only one of which could be identified-and that Masonic emblems. It answers, from the Catholic standpoint, such inquiries as "Does the Catholic Church condemn secret societies ~", "Is Freemasonry condemned as a secret society~", "Is it a sin for a Catholic to employ a Mason ~", "Why do you hate the Masons~", "Can a Mason become a Catholic~" Our readers of course will know the answers. The latter publication is issued by Fathers Rumble and Carty of St. Paul. If further literature is needed, it will be supplied by the Knights of Columbus Religious Information Bureau, 4422 Lindell, St. Louis; one of these pamphlets covers Nuns, Birth Control, Mary, Masons, and Salvation of non-Catholics. Certainly these are great helps in carrying on a campaign for Tolerance! HERE AND THERE IN FREEMASONRY

Alaska: The Grand Lodge of Washington, under whose jurisdiction the lodges in Alaska work, shows the total membership of the eleven Alaska lodges to be 2,072, a net gain of 43 for the year. There are lodges in Nome, Fairbanks, Valdez, Cordova, Seward, Anchorage, Skagway, Douglas, Juneau, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Sitka, the latter being a newly established lodge.


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Automatic Suspension: Proposed amendments to law providing for automatic suspension have been rejected by the Grand Lodges of Indiana and Iowa. Bequests: On January 26,1892, W. P. Winkley, a charter member of Chicopee Lodge, in Massachusetts, died leaving the lodge $1,000.00 to be invested for fifty years. This fund has now reached an amount of $5,000.00. Buildings: The Grand Lodge temple in New Orleans, Louisiana, which threatened to become a white elephant, has been entirely refinanced by an assessment laid upon each member in the jurisdiction; at present the building is 100 per cent rented, and the bonded indebtedness on the five million dollar building is only $273,000.00. The Grand Lodge of New Jersey is the owner of an old Masonic building in Trenton reputed to. be the oldest Masonic building north of the Mason-Dixon Line. It was closed during World War II, but has now been refinished and is open to the public daily. Canal Zone: There is considerable activity among the seven lodges in the Canal Zone, working under Massachusetts jurisdiction. The membership is 3,559, a net gain of 211 for the year. Chile: Massachusetts has a District Grand Lodge in the Territory of Chile, the three lodges there reporting a membership of 202, a net gain of 15 for the year. China: Massachusetts has two District Grand Lodges in China. In the northern district there are three lodges, one of which is dormant at the present time and has made no report; the other two lodges show a membership of 261, a net gain of 26 for the year. In the southern district, with headquarters at Shanghai, there are three lodges with a total membership of 402, which is a net loss of 11 for the year. Communism: In the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas we find reference to Communism. In a recent visit to Texas, the Grand Master discovered "there exists an organized, active and shrewd campaign on the part of the Communist party to destroy the effectiveness of Masonry and the Church through infiltration and their boring from within tactics." The Grand Master of Oklahoma was similarly disturbed after a visit to Texas. He wondered what Communists might hope to accomplish by getting into the fraternity, and said: "They do not hope to out-vote anybody. That isn't their purpose. They do not intend to put a large group of men in anyone lodge; they are going to put only two or three in every lodge and after they get in, what are they going to do' They may be very quiet and ideal for a long time. Theirs is a long range program, not something to be accomplished in a month or a year, but once they get in they are going to start little troubles here and there, small at first, then larger and larger, and finally men are going to become so disgusted with such turmoil and strife that they are going to stay away from lodges and wash their hands of such an organization. "


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In Pennsylvania, the Grand Master issued an edict to a lodge not to confer any further degrees upon one who "since his initiation has expressed ideas which are subversive to the lodge as well as to the principles of Freemasonry." Cornerstones: The Grand Master of Maryland refused to lay a cornerstone of a church building on Sunday, believing that such an act was un-Masonic; the church decided to move up the cornerstone laying to a Saturday date. The same Grand Master laid a cornerstone of the new Salvation Army building in Annapolis, Maryland.

James C. Penney and Gramd Officers at Layilng of Cornerstone of Hamilton, Missouri, School Building.

In Mississippi, the Grand Master refused to lay two cornerstones, one because the stone was a marble slab and not a cube; the other because the walls were already built. In Montana, the Grand Lodge laid the cornerstone of a DeMolay memorial building in Great Falls, probably the first building of its kind to be erected in this country. Courtesy Degrees: A New Mexico lodge made request for courtesy of the United Grand Lodge of England, but was refused for the reason that the United Grand Lodge of England does not confer the Entered Apprentice degree by courtesy. Educational: In 1854, a Past Grand Master of Oregon sponsored an educational fund which, in ninety-four years, has grown to $434,393.00. Disbursements for educational assistance during the


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year totaled $9,817.00. Forty-one applications for relief for children were granted, the amounts ranging from $20.00 to $100.00 per month. Grand Secretary: For many years it has been the policy of Masonic bodies in most jurisdictions to employ the same Grand Secretary. In recent years there has been a movement, encouraged from certain quarters, looking toward the breaking up of this arrangement. Grand Master Crebbs, of Colorado, suggested that the Grand Secretary in that jurisdiction "devote his time to the Grand Lodge, the salary being commensurate with the time devoted." A committee, including the Past Grand Masters, passing on the matter "considered the same and recommended that the same be disapproved." So Harry Bundy will continue his work as Secretary of the Colorado groups. Life Membership: In Maryland, the Grand Master was requested to present ninety life membership certificates in one of the lodges. He learned that this lodge had approximately 330 life members out of a total membership of slightly less than 1,000. He believes this to be a problem which is attaining serious proportions and if continued would result in virtual bankruptcy for some fine lodges. Liqnor: In Kansas two resolutions were presented calling for repeal of their so-called liquor law. The principal argument for repeal was that the State had legalized the manufacture and sale of liquor, and had provided strict regulations for its manufacture and sale. The Grand Lodge expressed its opinion vigorously, the committee stating: , 'The Masonic institution has a number of standards for membership that are not required by State or Federal law."

It recommended that the proposed repeal be not adopted. Lodge Name: Georgia has adopted a regulation providing that no Georgia lodge shall be named for a living person, nor shall a lodge in that jurisdiction adopt a name already held by an active lodge in the jurisdiction. Masonic Home: In Arizona, a resolution to increase per capita tax from $1.00 to $3.32, being an increase of $1.82, for Masonic Home purposes, failed of adoption. A committee in Arkansas considered the question of establishment of a home for the aged. It found there was a definite trend away from home care and that no new homes had been constructed in any jurisdiction since 1934, due probably to the Federal welfare program of 1933. The committee recommended adversely to any action involving establishment of such a home, and the report was approved. An Iowa lodge, through a committee, circularized lodges in that State regarding the advisability of establishing a Masonic Home. The Grand Master expressed his belief that such a thing was not desirable, that he had visited several jurisdictions during the time of Grand Lodge sessions, and"In each of these where they have a Masonic Home there has been dis-

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cussion and trouble. The cost per patient in a home is exorbitant. We are doing more for our less fortunate brothers by our field work than that being done in those jurisdictions that have homes."

Military Lodge: Oregon Military Lodge, located at Frankfurt, Germany, had its dispensation continued as of June 16, 1949. Monuments: September 12, 1948, a special communication of the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire was held in the city of Manchester for the purpose of consecrating a monument to Gen. John Stark. Past Master Degree: A report shows that the degree of actual Past Master has been conferred upon 154 Masters and Past Masters of Florida lodges. Grand Master Keith, of Massachusetts, visited the Grand Lodge of Virginia, where he found the degree of actual Past Master being conferred and finds a variation in the customs and rituals of different Grand Lodges. Publications: The Masonic Messenger is the official publication of the Grand Lodge of Georgia. Annual receipts showed $19,416.00. However, disbursements were $29,082.00, leaving excess of disbursements over receipts of $9,666.00. New York Grand Lodge publishes two periodicals-one the Masonic Outlook, the other the Masonic Family Magazine. The Masonic Outlook, because of publishing costs, has been forced to increase its subscription price from $1.00 to $2.00 a year; it has been operating at a loss. As to the latter magazine, the Grand Lodge allocated $68,000.00 for the publication last year, and it actually cost $64,000.00. The Grand Lodge of Oklahoma, in order to assist the 0 klahoma Mason, has proposed that 50 cents of the per capita tax be assigned to the publication committee to defray expense of publication. In Texas, a magazine, The Masonic Star, asked approval of Grand Lodge. The Grand Master learned that the activities of its owners included selling advertising in the magazine and used Masonry to promote a business enterprise. He notified the magazine that unless their activities were stopped immediately he would recommend action on the part of the Grand Lodge to protect Masonic and civil rights. Later he was informed that the publishers were ignoring his warning, whereupon he filed charges against them for un-Masonic conduct. Public Relations: The Grand Master of Connecticut believed that the fraternity should not hide its light under a bushel and stated that in trying to maintain a strict policy of secrecy we have gone too far in one direction. He believed if we refused to give out information to the public they might jump at their own conclusions and form their own ideas as to what was happening in Masonic rooms. This might lead to the spreading of stories and rumors which are based largely on speculation and yet have a harmful effect on the institution. Relief: The Grand Lodge of Indiana has a contract with the Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis whereby special rights may be secured

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for a Mason or eligible member of his family. Members of the Home family avail themselves of this privilege. He sponsored the sending of CARE packages to brethren in Europe at a total expenditure of $6,091.00. A special committee investigating charitable activities of the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin believes that the most effective charity and relief is that extended on a local level and that Grand Lodge should be called upon only when the local lodge finds the burden too heavy. It believes that a return to the practice of placing responsibility on the Master of each lodge supplies the answer. With the present program of public assistance by Federal, State and County agencies, the duty of Masonic groups is to supplement rather than to replace this assistance. Ritual: Some of the enthusiastic brethren in Montana injected unauthorized work in the degrees, the most flagrant violation being theso-called soliloquy of the Master Mason degree. The Grand Master brought it to the attention of Grand Lodge, where permission to use the soliloquy carried by a large majority. In Washington, the Grand Lecturer finds the need for a master copy of the ritual very apparent. He feels that officers and members are entitled to have a standard, where the correct working may be obtained, and that interpretation of the ritual should be the same from day to day and year to year. The Grand Master recommended that the master copy prepared by the Grand Lecturer be approved. Taxation: It was brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge in Maryland by the State Tax Commission that a new interpretation of the law assessing taxes against real and personal properties of all fraternal organizations was in effect. Since it had been the policy of the State for sixty-five years to exempt fraternal organizations a committee was appointed to confer with members of the State Legislature and a bill was adopted which exempts Masonic halls and temples from all except that rented for commercial purposes. HISTORICAL

Freemasonry and the FU1' Trade is discussed by Grand Historian Ware in the Idaho proceedings. Included in the story is that of Andrew Henry, at one time a member of a Missouri Lodge and the discoverer of the south pass through the Rocky Mountains, Minnesota has a centennial commission which has under consideration a number of plans for the celebration of the Grand Lodge centennial and for the writing of a history of the Grand Lodge. The centennial will be held in 1953. In 1951, Montezuma Lodge in New Mexico, will celebrate its 100th anniversary and preparations are being made for that event. Missourians will recall that Montezuma Lodge was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1851.


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Grand Secretary Walter L. Stockwell delivered a historical address before the Grand Lodge of North Dakota in connection with its 60th anniversary. Dr. James J. Tyler continues his historical work for the Grand Lodge of Ohio. This year he discusses the beginnings of Freemasonry in Mahoning County. Multnomah Lodge No.1, in Oregon, a former Missouri lodge, held its centennial celebration June 17, 1948. Grand Historian Frank Knoll read an interesting historical article before the 1948 Grand Lodge session on 芦How Masom'y Came to 01路egon." From the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania we learn that Joel R. Poinsett, one time American Ambassador to Mexico, although not a Pennsylvania Freemason, held a Pennsylvania commission as D. D. G. M. for Mexico. It is also learned that the only Provincial Grand Lodge ever constituted by Pennsylvania was in San Domingo. A History of Freemasonry in California is to be printed; it will require four volumes and will sell in the neighborhood of $20 per set. Grand Lodge appropriated $4,000.00 for the purpose of aiding in the publication. It is thought 2,000 sets should be printed; it is our guess that 500 will supply the $20 demand. The Grand Master of California assisted in the dedication of a plaque ordered by Grand Lodge to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the formation of Western Star Lodge No. 98 (now No.2 California) May 10, 1949. The Grand Master of South Dakota called attention to the fact that three-fourths of a century ago, at Elk Point in South Dakota Territory, the Grand Lodge was formed by lodges working under charters from the Grand Lodge of Iowa, and fifteen years later, at Mitchell, South Dakota, the two Dakota Grand Lodges were born. Fredericksburg Lodge No.4, in Virginia, is making plans for the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the initiation of George Washington; the celebration will occur in 1952. The story of Alaska and its lodges is contained in the 1949 proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Washington. Volume II of Wyoming's Masonic history has been prepared, but at the request of the finance committee and vote of the Grand Lodge, publication has been delayed. MISCELLANEOUS

The Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia occupies quarters in a Masonic building operated by the Masonic Temple Association. In another section of the building is a motion picture theatre; it was reported that objectionable pictures were being shown in that section of the building. At a later communication it was reported that the


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operators of the theatre had assured them that these pictures were supplied by the producers, but that in the future effort would be made to supply less objectionable ones. Attention was called to the fact that all pictures shown in United States theatres must be passed by the National Board of Censorship. Could it be possible that the brethren of Grand Lodge were attending the theatre in preference to sessions of the Gmnd Lodge? It is gratifying to know that the Grand Lodge of Iowa is to erect a new building to be occupied as a library and administration building, and to replace buildings which are outmoded and not of fireproof construction. A lodge in Louisiana a..<;ked the Grand Master whether they could lend $100.00 to a local choir. The Grand Master ruled that the choir was a private institution and that money voted for such purpose would have to be by unanimous vote of the lodge. New York reported some instances of spite in rejection of candidates. It was reported that one lodge in New York had gone for a whole year unable to initiate a single candidate; not because they were not worthy candidates, but some brother had exercised his prerogative and had cast a blackball. Some thought.there was too much power placed in one member of a lodge. Past Grand Master Dutton thought it should require. two blackballs to reject a candidate, especially when a committee had reported favorably and unanimously. He referred to the fact that the Mother Grand Lodge of England requires two blackballs, and some Grand Lodges in Canada require three. Attempts to change the law were defeated. Oklahoma is having portraits of its Past Grand Masters painted. The price (7)-$106.00, which includes the frame. On the other hand, Tennessee has had these portraits painted for many years. Now they need retouching and to rejuvenate them would cost at least $10,000.00; most of them are stored, and many are without names and could not be identified. The pictures on hand are to be returned to the lodges of which the Grand Master was a member, or, where the lodge does not want the picture, to the family. President Harry S. Truman sent a word of greeting to the Grand Lodge of Texas at its annual communication, congratulating them upon the erection of a new temple. Present at the dedication of this building was the Hon. Tom Connally, senator from Texas, who reviewed the history of Freemasonry in Texas from the days of Stephen F. Austin in 1828. Grand Master Sprague, of Vermont, is not a believer in the utopian welfare state. He said: "We detest socialism, but, believe it or not, we are willingly becoming socialistic. The liberalistic medicine we are taking is slightly bitter and somewhat habit-forming, but we are taking it in such small doses it ian't


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too unpleasant. After all, it has a stimulating effect; sort of like a spring tonic. It gives us a sense of strength, security and well-being. We hardly notice the loss of our normal sense of independence if the doses are taken with sufficient frequency. It is a remarkable system. Money is collected from the many and paid to the few. It works beautifully until the few become many and the ratio becomes fifty-fifty, then the many pay and the many receive and each helps everyone but himself. Then it is that socialism blossoms out in full force and effect. "My brothers, we are all Vermonters. Less than 300 years ago our forefathers carved this State out of the wilderness. Less than thirty years ago we were completely independent. What is making us soft' Haven't we the stamina to stand up and battle out a living for ourselves and our families and work for the joy of working' Individual initiative, self-reliance, self-responsibility and freedom to establisli our own livelihood made this country what it is. "Communism lives and breeds on fear. We will never throw it off if we are afraid. Danger signals flash in the distance. If you and I disregard them and trouble 'ensues we will have no one to blame but ourselves." MISSOURIANS

One of the visitors to the Grand ~dge of Colorado in 1949 was Cornelius D. Struble, listed as Grand Master of R. & S. M. of Missouri. The Grand Master of Connecticut (1949) was Philip James Jones. His biographical sketch lists him as a member of Missouri Lodge of Research. A resolution introduced in the Grand Lodge of Florida made President Harry S. Truman an honorary Past Grand Master of that Grand Lodge; the resolution set forth that the President was "intimatelyand pleasantly associated with the State and the people of Florida." Visitors to the 1949 communication of the Grand Lodge of Iowa were Grand Master Harry F. Sunderland, Past Grand Masters Harold L. Reader and Morris E. Ewing, of Missouri. The speaker at the Grand Lodge of Indiana in 1949 was Frank S. Land of the DeMolay; his address occupies six pages of the Indiana proceedings. Past Grand Master Harry F. Sunderland was a visitor at the Grand Lodge of Kansas in 1950. From proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Minnesota, 1949, we learn, "Harold L. Reader, Past Grand Master and present Grand Secretary, delivered an eloquent and inspiring address." Nebraska proceedings for 1949 report the visitation of Grand Master Harry F. Sunderland. The 1948 proceedings of Oregon report the visitation of Grand Master Morris E. Ewing and Past Grand Master Ray V. Denslow. Grand Master Ewing visited Multnomah Lodge No.1, at Oregon City, on the occasion of its 100th anniversary. Carnelius D. Struble, Grand Master of R. & S. M. of Missouri, was an interested visitor at the 1950 communication of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee.


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NEGRO FREEMASONRY

While the cause of contention has disappeared, nevertheless there is some aftermath of the recent clouds which threatened the Masonic horizon and this comment is, of course, varied, depending upon the jurisdiction from which it comes. In Colorado, w~th reference to the rescinding of the Massachusetts resolution, it was said: "This will stand for a long time as an impressive example of unselfish renunciation on the part of a proud and venerable sovereign Grand Lodge. Whether right or wrong in its earlier action, the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts manifested commendable courage and strength of character in reversing itself in the interest of Masonic harmony, and for that deserves the appreciation of every member of the Craft."

The Colorado proceedings further state that a Colorado attorney was appointed to prosecute the suit instituted against the Secretary of State and so-called Ivanhoe Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M., demanding the surrender of a charter issued in violation of the statutes of the State of Colorado and the Masonic doctrine of exclusive jurisdiction. Florida was one of these jurisdictions which broke off membership with Massachusetts over the Negro situation, the Grand Master, Hal W. Adams, issuing an edict in which it was set forth that the action constituted a positive trespass upon the jurisdictional rights and prerogatives of the Florida Grand Lodge. Later in the session Past Grand Master Noble offered a resolution setting forth that when the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts had clarified its action "the edict be annulled and Masonic relations resumed." Another brother moved that the edict be overruled and that fraternal relations be resumed subject to the June action of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. Then came a substitute motion to the effect that when Massachusetts had acted "to the satisfaction of the Grand Lodge of Florida" the edict be repealed, and this was done. In Louisiana, the Negro situation was brought to the fore by Past Grand Master Gayle. After going into the affair to the extent of sixteen printed pages, a resolution was offered breaking off all relations with the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. Past Grand Master Nungesser offered a substitute motion providing that action be deferred until 1950. There was much discussion, and on a roll call tho vote was 355 for postponement and 167 against. Luther A. Smith, Past Grand Master and Sovereign Grand Inspector General in Mississippi, made a special report on the Massachusetts situation, and his recommendation was that all Masonic intercourse be forbidden with Massachusetts and its membership until Massachusetts had withdrawn its resolution. There was a minority report, apparently prepared by Past Grand Master Tom Q. Ellis, which cited many telegrams and communications between Roger Keith,


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Grand Master of Massachusetts, and himself, which resulted in the adoption of the supplemental report postponing action "until this unfortunate situation may be satisfactorily resolved." North Carolina had a special committee on the Massachusetts situation, appointed by Grand Master Hoffman, but apparently the original report of the committee was not adopted. A later report set forth that unless Massachusetts by its action had not rescinded or amended its resolution sufficiently by April, 1950, the Grand Lodge might find it necessary to take further steps. The North Carolina committee was made up of Past Grand Masters Hobbs, Thomas J. Harkins, and Deputy Grand Master Horton. Reviewer Ellingwood, writing on the Negro question in the Ohio proceedings, said: "We are glad to note the diminishing importance of the Prince Hall episode generally. It is unfortunate, we believe that a few Grand Lodges have taken drastic action on the matter. When these Grand Lodges look back on the proceedings which record these ill-tempered actions, they will be reminded that temperance is applicable to more things than the liquor - . traffic."

Henry F. Collins, of the committee on foreign relations in the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, said: "We do not feel that the action of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is sufficient to justify any change whatsoever in our relations. As we understand, the action simply recognizes the legitimacy of Prince Hall Grand Lodge without authorizing any intervisitation, . . . and no real establishment of fraternal relations exists between them."

Reviewer Titus, in Utah, finds that the agitation has died down, and adds: "Dissolving relations with other jurisdictions does nothing to solve the problem. One cannot but remember that no Grand Lodge has taken steps to withdraw fraternal relations with the Grand Lodge of England on account of her open mind about racial distinction which has been practiced by them for these many, many years."

Aaron Grout, reviewer for Vermont, finds the only rift in the Masonic World being "right here in the good old U. S. A." He says: t 'We refer to the Prince Hall Negro incident, which so thoroughly upset California, Texas and one or two other jurisdictions. These objectors . . . base their position on the purely American requirements of exclusive jurisdiction. We still suspect that color is the real reason for their position. . . . After all, we are supposed to be in the business of brotherly love. Why maintain an attitude that prevents some respectable and earnest individual from enjoying the uplift we have in Freemasonry merely because his skin is shaded or his language is not our own."

The Grand Master of Wisconsin notes the storm which had been raised and his opinion is : , 'It is obvious that the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts has a right


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to recognize as legitimate anybody that it believes is legitimate. However, the prejudices and emotions of our southern brethren were so aroused that they took the action mentioned, which on its face is a denial of the right of Massachusetts to determine its own law on the matter of recognition of other Masonic groups. . . . The continued fraternal relationships with the Masonic lodges of some of our southern states is of such value that regardless of the inconsistency in their stand, it is more important to retain friendly relations with them. Time will probably cure both of these difficulties."

The Wyoming reviewer, discussing the situation, said: "It is n,ot a problem in Wyoming, and all that is necessary for us to do is to think straight aJld go forward."

Grand Master Siems of California tells of his belated appearance at the Conference of Grand Masters: I felt obliged, recognizing full well that it would be received with mingled feelings, to issue a "declaration of intent" at the closing session of the -Grand Masters Conference. The statement was to the effect that our patience was rapidly running out. I further indicated that if the situation remained the same in October I would have no alternative but to recommend to this grand body that we join the Grand Lodges of Texas and Florida in severing relations with the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. The statement made at the conference, as was expected, was stricken from the record but" even though the Judge sustained the objection," I am confident the jury got the point.

Knowing, as he has stated, "it would be received with mingled feelings," our California brother had no business in bringing the Negro matter to the attention of an organization in which disputes must be kept out; it was a plain effort to evade the law as is shown in the expression "as was expected." "Too many conferences in smoke-filled hotel- rooms" for the good of Freemasonry. We are happy that Missouri did not engage in the Negro controversy. We have nothing to. regret and our feelings with all Grand Lodges is as it should be-harmonious. RECOGNITION

Arkansas recognized the Grand Lodge of Tamaulipas and Unida Mexicana of the Mexican group. At the 1948 communicatio'n of the Grand Lodge, the committee on recognition recommended the recognition of the Grand Orient of Italy, but their recommendation was deferred until 1949; the 1949 proceedings fail to list any action on the Grand Orient's request. Colorado recognized the National Grand Lodge of the Dominican Republic and the Brazilian group of Amazonas and Acre. Connecticut recognized the Grand Lodge of the Netherlands, and the South American Grand Lodges Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul. Action on recognition of the Grand Orient of Italy was postponed due to a report from "a reverend brother . . . who recently


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infonned us that he had withdrawn from the Grand Orient of Italy in 1947 because he considered it communistic and atheistic." The Reverend Brother is Rev. Dom-inico Scalera, one time pastor of the Congregational Italian Church at Hartford, ConneGticut, and whose Masonic record should be subjected to some very close scrutiny. The District of Columbia denied recognition to the Grand Lodge of Tamaulipas because it "lacks the basic element of sovereignty" in that it was a member of the Confederation of Grand Lodges of the Republic of Mexico. On this ground most any Grand Lodge could withdraw recognition from American Grand Lodges because we annually gather into a confederation of regular Grand Lodges in Washington' D. C. Florida recognized the Brazilian Grand Lodges Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais j the Grand 01'ient of Italy also came in for recognition. Idaho has extended recognition to the Mexican Grand Lodges Baja California and Del Pacifico. Illinois received a number of applications for recognition, but, in accordance with their standard policy, "these applications are still under consideration and investigation." Indiana has recognized Minas Gerais. Iowa has deferred recognition of the Grand Orient of Arabia and Syria, the Grand Lodge of Campeche in Mexico, and the National Grand Lodge of Syria and Lebanon, and Palestine. Claude F. Young, who is Sovereign Grand Inspector for the Scottish Rite in Kansas and chairman of the Kansas committee on foreign recognition, reported: ÂŤ' Several Grand Lodges, including our own, at its last communication recognized the Grand Orient of Italy. At that time your committee acted upon the best information we had. It has since been definitely proven to the committee that we were hasty in this action and that we should withdraw this recognition and extend recognition to the Grand Lodge of Italy, of which Brother Franco Moroli, whose address is 93 Piazza Caprobica, Rome, is Grand Secretary. It has come to our attention that the Grand Orient of Italy is notoriously irregular. The Grand Lodge of Italy is the revived and regular Grand Lodge that existed in Italy before Freemasonry was suppressed in that country by Mussolini. Your committee would earnestly recommend that we withdraw the recognition that we extended a year ago to the Grand Orient of Italy, and that we extend recognition and exchange representatives with the Grand Lodge of Italy as set forth above."

We would be interested in knowing as to what infonnation our friend Young possesses relative to this so-called Grand Lodge of Italy, of which Franco Moroli is Grand Secretary. We hope our readers will look elsewhere in this review concerning Italian Freemasonry, which includes the story of Moroli and his paper organization.


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Louisiana has recognized the Grand Lodge of Vienna for Austria, and also Grand Lodge Zur Sonne, but in the meantime Zur Sonne has become a Provincial Grand Lodge under the United Grand Lodge of Germany. Resumption of relations was had with the Grand Lodge of Hamburg which, until recently, has been in exile. The application of Zu den Alten Pfiichten was turned down because"We have recommended resumption of fraternal relations with Grand Lodge Zur Sonne and with the Hamburg Grand Lodge and cannot consistently recommend the recognition of the Grand Lodge Zu den Alten P:fiichten. The fact that this Grand Lodge is located in Berlin and sharing the jurisdiction of Berlin with three other Grand Lodges while claiming jurisdiction over all of Germany, and the fact that the fate of Berlin itself is in serious doubt."

Judging from the conclusion at which they have arrived, our Louisiana friends have failed to get a complete picture of the German situation. In Maryland the report of the committee on foreign recognition' is not given, although the discussion of the subject is. One of the speakers said: "This Grand Lodge could not recognize any Grand Lodge which merely based its lineage on some Scottish Rite Lodge of Freemasonry. . . . Our committee is divided, some in favor of recognizing any Grand Lodge which follows out the principles which were set forth two years ago; others feel we ought not recognize Grand Lodges that trace their lineage to Scottish Rite Masonry."

Another speaker said: , 'We found that when a jurisdiction separated its first three degrees from the Scottish Rite, that while they elected a Grand Master and other officers, yet the authority of the Scottish Rite frequently continued in control, and in some cases it was almost impossible to determine when that authority did cease, so we decided to recognize no Grand Lodges that emanated from Scottish Rite jurisdiction."

Minnesota extended recognition to Finland, Hungary, Grand Orient of Italy, and the Brazilian Grand Lodges of Ceara, Minas Gerais, Rio Grande do Sul. In Mississippi action on Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul was postponed; Sao Paulo was recognized; Zu den Alten Pfiichten application was held in abeyance. Montana recognized the Grand Lodge of Israel. No action was taken upon request from Amazonas and Acre, Grande Oriente Espanol, or the Grand Lodge National of Colombia. Nebraska recognized the Grand Orient of Italy, the Grand Lodge of Tamaulipas, and the Brazilian Grand Lodges of Rio Grande do Sul, Minas Gerais, Ceara, and Sao Paulo. Action on the Grand Lodge and the Grand 01'ient of France, and Zu den Alten Pfiichten was postponed without prejudice.


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Nevada granted recognition to the Grand Orient of Italy and the Brazilian Grand Lodges Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais. New Hampshire recognized Rio Grande do Sul and Ceara. New Mexico recognized Puerto Rico and the Grand Orient of Italy. Ohio did not believe that Freemasonry had reached a point of stability justifying recognition of the Grand Lodges of Ceara, Minas Gerais, Grand Orient of Italy, Nuevo Leon, or Hamburg. Pennsylvania held up recognition of Hungary and Zu den Alten Pfiichten, and declined to recognize the irregular National Grand Lodge of Italy. They turned down the request of certain Mexican and Brazilian groups because of its policy of non-recognition of Grand Lodges conferring the first three degrees of Freemasonry in accordance with the Scottish Rite ritual. Rhode Island postponed action on certain Brazilian and South American Grand Lodges, the Grand Orient of Italy, and Zu den Alten Pfiichten. South Dakota refrained from recognizing Rio Grande do Sul. Tennessee has recognized the Grand Lodge of Italy which it finds "to conform to the fundamental requirements of this Grand Lodge." Texas has recognized the Grand Lodge of Italy and the Grand Lodge Swiss Alpina. Utah recognized Minas Gerais, Uruguay, Rio Grande do Sul, Chile, Ceara, and the Netherlands. Their 1950 proceedings show that they entered into relations with the United Grand Lodge of Germany and the Grand Lodge Nuevo Leon. Virginia recognized the Grand Lodge of Chile and the Brazilian Grand Lodge Porte Alegre. As to Germany and Italy, it was said: "The situation in Germany and Italy is in such a confused state at present we think it unwise to extend recognition at this time."

Washington recognized Sao Paulo, Para, Amazonas and-Acre, Rio Grande do Bul, Ceara, Minas Gerais, Grand Oriental in Columbia, and Zu den Alten Pfiichten in Germany. They had applications from the Grand Orient of Italy and the National Grand Lodge of Italy, but made no recommendation. Wisconsin, looking over the "foreign situation, condemned the Mother Grand Lodge of England for its action in Newfoundland (Nova Scotia') where it said their action"Is clearly exceeding the bonds of good Masonic relationship, en路 deavoring to put pressures on other sovereign Grand Lodges as to whom they may and may not recognize. The Grand Lodge of Newfoundland clearly has the right to recognize whatever Grand Lodge it may desire and the action on the part of the United Grand Lodge of England is ill-advised.' ,

A Wisconsin lodge urged the recognition of Sweden and Norway, but the foreign relations committee recommended that such recogni-


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tion be not extended. As to the Grand Orient of Italy and the National Grand Lodge of Italy, lodges in Mexico, in Brazil, France and Spain, we learn: , 'In view of the unsettled and even chaotic conditions prevailing in many parts of the world we consider it would serve no useful Masonic purpose to extend recognition freely and might result in later embarrassment to do so."

But they did recognize the National Grand Lodge of Colombia where there is a surplus of Chaos. A supplemental report of the committee defended their action in not extending recognition to the Scandinavian Grand Lodges. Wyoming recognized Rio Grande do Sul, Amazonas and Acre in Brazil, and Nuevo Leon in Mexico. RESEARCH LODGES

Arkansas Research Lodge No. 739 continues with its historical productions printed annually in the proceedings of the Grand Lodge. The contents for 1949 include the story of St. John's College in Arkansas, a Masonic institution, an article on Albert Pike as a lawyer, and the story of a Tennessee lodge whose membership was made up of some distinguished Arkansas brethren. In Colorado, Grand Secretary Bundy requested permission to pre. pare data necessary to organize a lodge of research to work in cooperation with the Grand Lodge education committee; it is to be regularly chartered and will have permission to grant dual membership, but not to confer degrees. The Grand Master of Iowa expressed the opinion that the code should be amended so as to permit the formation of a lodge of research. It appears that an application for such a lodge had been made and the Grand Master 'had been willing to grant the dispensation, but there was no authority for so doing. The jurisprudence committee turned down the idea of a lodge of research, stating: "There is nothing within the law that prevents any group of Master Masons from organizing themselves into a research group."

However, the report did authorize the incoming Grand Master to appoint a special committee to make a study of the proposal. A report of the American Lodge of Research, of the Grand Lodge of New York, reveals that 42.8 per cent of the membership were from outside the jurisdiction and located in thirty-five other jurisdictions. The conclusion was that the percentage contrasts vividly with other research lodges where the membership and interest are almost wholly within the jurisdiction in which the lodge is located. The work of the lodge of research in Oregon is largely that of supplementing the work of the educational program of the Grand Lodge. The lodge started with the issuance of transactions, but that


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has been discontinued. They now have a list of 111 brethren available for public addresses. Grand Lodge pays much of the expense. In Texas, it was recommended that the Grand Lodge take necessary steps to set up lodges of research, believing that wherever established they had made definite contributions to the work of the Craft. UNUSUAL

The Grand Master of Arkansas introduced Brother Dale Kirkland, who had received his Masonic degrees during the year by special dispensation. In presenting him, the Grand Master said: "In this notable gathering tonight there sits a brother, William Dale Kirkland. I have been told by him that although he worried greatly before his affiiction which he knew was coming, he has not worried since that time, because he then prayerfully gave himself to the Great Architect of the Universe and determined, with the help of God, to talk by faith. He owns and operates some good farms near Plumerville and also travels over several states near Arkansas as a representative for a publishing concern. He acquired his present financial station in life since his a.ffiiction. He is generous in giving of his money and of himself. He likes to help people, handicapped people, because they need strength. He sees the beauty of this lovely world-not the sordidness in it. He sees the work of our Heavenly Father unfold on the stage of human destiny. He sees everything and everybody in true perspective for he is blind."

The Grand Lodge of Iowa has been presented with a flag which has flown over the U. S. Capitol in Washington. It was presented by U. S. Senator Hickenlooper on the first day of the Grand Lodge session. The Grand Master of Nevada was presented with a peculiar proposition. The secretary of a lodge asked for information as to the eligibility of a prospective candidate employed as personnel and floor manager of a gambling establishment in Reno. Although the prospect did not gamble, drink or smoke, his avocation was ruled as gambling and he was therefore ineligible. The committee on public relations in New York reports the reenactment of the first inauguration of Washington at the Sub-Treasury Building, site of the old Federal Hall. The re-enactment was covered by all metropolitan newspapers. St. Mark's Church in the Bouwerie, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary asked the Grand Lodge of New York to join it in a special celebration. In the churchyard are the graves of many Masonic leaders, including Daniel Tompkins, one time Governor of New York and Vice-President of the United States. At a special communication of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, March 2, 1949, Robert Livingston Johnson, President of Temple University in Philadelphia, was made a Freemason at sight by Grand Master George H. Deike. On June 1, 1949, the Grand Lodge listened to a program of ancient Masonic music arranged by a committee on


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library and museum; the program included numbers by Bros. Mozart and Sibelius. Brethren in South Carolina gathered on August 27, 1948, at an abandoned quarry near Travelers Rest, South Carolina, and by the dim light cast by flares and under a star-decked canopy of heaven, carried on the ritualistic work of the Order. Grand Secretary Henry Collins, of this jurisdiction, delivered seventy-five addresses on Masonic subjects; conducted twenty-seven Masonic religious services; and preached forty-eight sermons as guest minister during the past year. Grand Master Hugh M. Craig, of Texas, is a product of the Masonic Home and School, as a ward of Fort Worth Lodge No. 148. He now holds a very responsible position with a well known oil concern. At the Grand Lodge session, Brother Craig introduced Brother John J. Ray, who at that time was 104 years old. Utah reports the strange disappearance of I. J. Ketchum, a member of Kaibab Lodge No. 25, while on a business trip. His stalled automobile was found at a small settlement in Utah. A caravan of twentyseven automobiles, carrying 104 Masons and DeMolays, started out in search; the number was later increased to 175 brethren from nearby towns, but no trace was found of the missing brother. A lodge in Vermont recently conferred the third degree in full form on the six Rowse brothers; their ages range from twenty-one to thirty-one, and all were ex-service men. The father, a member of Quebec Lodge, was present, together with 200 Freemasons from lodges in Vermont and Quebec. An enthusiastic Junior Deacon of Alexandria Washington Lodge No. 22 sent out a letter soliciting funds for an Alexandria, Virginia, foundation. The letter was sent out without authority and the Grand Master of Virginia at once notified all Grand Lodges that the solicitation was inconsistent with Virginia law and was a case of overenthusiasm. AS TO THE FUTURE

We are growing weary of preaching-preaching-preaching the value of an International Freemasonry. Not a World Organization under some one power, but groups of organizations bound together by certain mutual ties, endowed with similar ideals, and all working for a common purpose-the Brotherhood of Man under a Fatherhood .of God. Certainly this is not too much to ask of the Masonic Fraternity, yet when an attempt is'being made to accomplish this desired purpose, we find objections here and there, some of which may be well founded, and others trumped up to prevent proper consideration. Again, we have the rivalry of certain competitive Masonic groups fearing that one or the other might gain undue advantage. And so Symbolic Freemasonry suffers. Here in these United States we have some forty-nine Grand Lodges,


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each with its Grand Master. We all must know that all Grand Masters are not leaders; some are the products of a vicious cycle in which some Grand Master appoints a personal friend to the foot of the line, and the brethren, year after year, continue to advance the appointee until finally he wears the purple of the fraternity. This good brother may have the best intentions in the world; he may know all of the details of the lodges of the 137th District, or the workings of the lodge in Podunkville, but he lacks, not through his own fault, that necessary training which should be required of each Grand Officer to make him realize that "Freemasonry is an organization which unites men of every race, country and creed" into a brotherhood of man. The world today stands at the cross-roads of civilization. The next decade will prove whether we are to have a peaceful world or a maelstrom of war. To our way of thinking, the section known as Western Europe holds the key to the picture. What are Freemasons doing about it' Are we to follow the lead of a Grand Lodge which insists that Freemasonry must not have any spoken ideas as to what the future of this world is to be 1 Are we, as an organization, to sit supinely by and permit the Hitlers and the Mussolinis to continue their nefarious processes of dividing the world 1 Adolf Hitler is dead; Benito Mussolini is dead. But the world is yet full of potential Hitlers and Mussolinis eager to take up where both laid down. That hideous ideology taught the children of Europe is not dead, nor will it expire until that whole generation born from 1922-40 shall have passed out of the international picture. Why does the Dictator select Freemasonry as its first object of attack in taking over the economy of a nation' He is not so concerned as to whether we number Jews or Christians among our membership, although this is always used as an excuse in stirring up religious hatreds of a people. What he is concerned in is that Freemasonry is a peace loving institution; it encourages friendship. Friendship is followed by Brotherhood. Freemasonry urges peaceful settlement of disputes. The Dictator prefers the sword. Why do we devote space to such a harangue' Because we must, as Freemasons, see what this situation is leading us into. How necessary it is, then, that we cultivate the friendship of those people who have been our allies during two wars, and those who were our friends, even though on the Axis side, in the last war. And this can be done without sacrificing any of our ideals. Problems there are; problems there will be, but all problems have an eventual solution. First, we might number the attitude of the Mother Grand Lodge of England for whom we all have the highest respect; but, unfortunately, that Grand Lodge, while preaching abstention from politics, always considers the politics of the situation when coming to a decision. At the present time they have entered into certain agreements with Ireland and Scotland, adopting a Standard of .Principles, which on the


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surface sounds dignified, simple, and unobjectionable. We had a similar "Declaration" presented to the Grand Lodges of the United States a few years ago, and we shall remember how many amendments were attached, and, even then, the Declaration failed to make the national grade. The Declaration of Principles is a self-satisfying document. It means that those Grand Lodges which adopt it are satisfied with themselves; it fails to take into account that all over the world are Grand Lodges which are endeavoring to carryon the spirit of Freemasonry against odds not to be found in countries where the Declaration is standard policy. What is a Declaration of Principles worth unless it is lived up to' Do we, or do we not, have obligations to Freemasons in other sections of the world who have no such Declaration ~ People do not like to be driven into action. Is it possible that our British friends believe they can force other Grand Lodges to follow the lines laid down by them~. It was tried once in America and failed miserably! For years we have urged that representatives be appointed from the British and American groups to discuss common problems, but whether our English brethren have fears of rubbing off some of our American irregularity upon their persons or not, we do not know; at any rate no such conferences have been held-conferences which might have prevented the present situation. If our friends in Britain are anxious to do away with irregularity, we llrge them to fully investigate the Grand Orient of Brazil which has as little Freemasonry about it as does the Knights of the Setting Sun. Some of our Southern States, which have waxed warm over a recent Massachusetts manifesto, might find plenty of ammunition in England's recognition of Liberia, the Negro Republic, or of Uruguay where no Bible is said to be used on the altar, or (until recently) Greece, where the Symbolic Masonry was under ritual control of the Supreme Council. And while politics may not be brought into the lodge, yet political expediency may easily become the policy of a Grand Lodge. THIS IS A CONCLUSION

And now we come to that section of our MASONIC WORLD known as the Conclusion. To those who do not agree with us, it will appear as the finest feature of the report-for a report it is. We have some among our acquaintances-we hesitate to call them friends-who have expressed the fear that your reviewer might become the spokesman for his jurisdiction in matters of Masonic policy. A careful examination of our own proceedings will prove that we have never criticized the action of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, for whom these reviews have been written for these eighteen years. We have never exceeded the power given us by the Grand Lodge, Section 30 (n) reading:


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A Committee on Masonic Review, which shall make a concise report on the general condition of Freemasonry. (Until 1948 the law provided the report should not exceed 150 pages.)

We have usually kept within 100 pages and have made the report as concise as we felt it should be. We have reported on conditions affecting Freemasonry, even at times when it required courage to do so. As to ever becoming a "spokesman" for Missouri, we disclaim all such charges; no officer of the Grand Lodge, no chairman of a committee, and not even the Grand Master may become a spokesman for the fraternity or Grand Lodge, until their reports or sayings have been approved by the Grand Lodge itself. 'Vhen we have seen danger threaten symbolic Freemasonry, we have been free with our criticism. We aspire to no Masonic honors. We have no chestnuts to remove from the fire. There are no colored men in our woodpiles. Consequently, we have been free to expressnot the opinion of our Grand Lodge-but of one individual brother, who for more than forty-four years has made a study of Masonic trends, and who tries, honestly, and fairly, to give his own brethren the results of these studies. Our own readers must admit that we have not pursued the easy way. We might have gone along without criticism, without suggestion, and with nothing but approval for everything we read and hear. But that does not bring about progress. Instead we have tried to open the eyes of those, our brethren, to the politics which sometimes color the attitude of Masonic groups. When our brethren know this, we have no fear of their ultimate judgment. After all, there is such a thing as PRINCIPLE. Too many people overlook this thing of Principle, when taken up into the Masonic heights to behold what appears to be the Promised Land! It was Milton who said: Honor, glory and popular praise; Rocks, whereon greatest men have oftest Wrecked.

To the writer, the friendship of his brethren, and continued residence in Missouri, constitute his Promised Land! The good will of his associates and not popular praise is his ultimate goal. Fraternally, YOUR (MISSOURI) REVIEWER.

Trenton, Missouri. July 15, 1950.


INDEX After Fifteen Years: review, 64c; German edition, 65c Alaska: l!'reemasonry in, 78c, 84c; new lodge in, 29c AIten Pflichten: Grand Lodge of, 5c, 7c ; takes lead in forming Grand Lodge, 8c Amaranth, Order of: mentioned, 73c American Freedom and Catholic Power: review, 67c Anti-Masonry: Catholic attack 77c; Lutheran attack, 75c Argentina: biography of Sarmiento,65c Arnold, Gen. H. H.: in the news, 72c Au, Dr. David W. K.: issues official notice, 37c; Grand Master of China, 36c Australasia: Freemasonry in, 42c Austria: establishes lodge in China, 19c; formation of Grand Lodge, 18c; Freemasonry in, 13c; overthrow of l!'reemasonry, 21c; photo of Masonic Temple, 15c Automatic Suspension, 79c Aylwen, Sir George: in the news,

7lc Balchcn, Bernt: in the news, 69c Barclay-Harvey, Sir Malcolm: in the news, 69c Bequests: Masonic, 79c Bengal: new lodge in, 26c Berlin: consolidation of Grand Lodges in, 9c; Grand Lodge Alten Pflichten, 5c, 7c; Grand Lodges in, 7c ; Masonic conditions in, 6c; photo of officers, Hc, 12c; Royal York Friendship, 5c, 7c-9c Bland, Richard P.: story of death, 50c Blind Brother: tribute, 94c Books: review, 62c Bradford, James M.: presents :fiftyyear button to PGM Gentry, 71c British Columbia: Freemasonry in, 40c British Guiana: The Lord Bishop is English DDGM, 69c Brown, Anthony : former Grand Master of England, 73c

Bryan, William J.: speaks at Bland's funeral, 51c Buchanan, James: mentioned, 64c Buildings: Masonic; 79c Burrus, Rufus: in the news, 72c Byrd, Adm.: in the news, 69c California: history of Freemasonry in, 84c Canada: Freemasonry in, 40c-42c Canal Zone: activity in, 79c Candidate Information Program: review, 63c Carnegy, Stephen W. B.: story of, 66c Catholic: see "American Freedom and Catholic Power"; attitude of church toward Freemasonry, 77c; death of R. P. Bland, 51c; pamphlet attacking Freemasonry, 78c Ceylon: new lodge in, 26c Chile: Masonic conditions in, 79c China: Austrian lodge in Shanghai, 19c; formation of Grand Lodge, 36c; Massachusetts lodges in, 79c Clandestine Freemasonry, 51c Clark, Judge Albert M.: in the news,7Ic Collectanea: review, 64c _ Communism: infiltration into Freemasonry, 57c; mentioned in Grand Lodges, 79c Connally, Thomas: speaks to Grand Lodge of Texas, 85c Cornerstones: mentioned, 80c; White House, 66c Cortini, Dr. Publio: visit to America, 23c Courtesy Degrees: in England, 80c Craig, James E.: in the news, 70c Cryptic Masonry Encyclopedia: review, 68c Cukor, Morris: in the.news, 69c Czechoslovakia: Masonic conditions in, 30c Declaration of Independence: signers who were Masons, 69c Declaration of Principles: discussion, 97c DeMolay: mentioned, 73c Denmark: Masonic chronology, 27c


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Desaguliers, Dr.: visits Scottish lodge,49c District of Columbia: Temple Association trouble, 84c Donnell, Forrest C.: news article, 59c, 60c; receives badge from President Truman, 59c Eastern Star, Order of: irregular in England, 45c; status of, 52c Eckerlin, Nicholas B.: in the news, 70c Edinburgh, Lodge of: now Mary's Chapel Lodge, 48c Educational: Oregon fund, 80c Edward VII: visits lodge, 49c Edward VIII: visits lodge, 49c Egner, Col. Raymond A.: letter, Hc; photo, 8c, 12c Eichelberger, Lt. Gen. Robert L.: in the news, 71c England: balloting in lodges, 45c; description London Masonic Temple, 43c; Freemasonry in, 25c; OES irregular in, 45c; Wisconsin criticises, 92c Extraneous Societies, 73c Finland: early history of Freemasonry in, 29c; rejuvenation of Grand Lodge, 30c Fox, George L.: in the news, 72c France: use of Bible in lodges, 47c Franklin, Benjamin: membership of, 70c Frear, Sen. J. Allen: in the news, 70c Fredericksburg Lodge No.4 (Va.) : two hundredth anniversary, 84c Free and Accepted Architects: ritual,64c Freemasonry in the Press, 58c l'''reemasons Guide and Compendium: review, 68c Froessel, Charles W.: in the news, 69c Fur Trade and Freemasonry: story, 83c Gambling: eligibility of petitioner, 94c; mistakes lodge for bingo game,59c Gaylord, Robert B.: in the news, 72c "Gentry, William R.: receives fifty year button, 71c G-eorge Washington Masonic Na-

1950

tional Memorial: 1950 convention, 52c; attempts to change constitution, 55c; Truman unveils statue in, 54c; Washington statue photo, 53c Germany: Berlin lodge, 12c; Freemasonry in, 3c; Grand Lodge of Hamburg, 5c; Berlin Masonry, 5c-9c; photo, Berlin Masonic Temple, 6c;路 photo, officers, Hc; 12c; photo, Reichstag, frontispiece; photo, Rudiger and brethren, 8c; photo, Dr. Vogel, 10c; MSA in, Hc; National Grand Lodge, 4c; recent news from, 9c; United Grand Lodge of, 4c Goethe del' Meister: review, 68c Graceley, Harvey T.: in the news, 71c Grand Lodge of Italy: Kansas recognizes, 90c; Tennessee and Texas recognize, 92c Grand Orient of Italy: Kansas withdraws recognition, 90c Grand Secretaries: conference, 56c Grandview Lodge No. 618: President Truman visits, 61c Gran Logia del Archipelago de Filipinas: irreglar, 36c Gran Logia N acional de Filipinas: irregular, 36c Grand Logia Soberana del Archipelago Filipino: irregular, 36c Gran Oriente Espanol: irregular, 36c Greece: Masonic conditions in, 28c Grotto: mentioned, 73c, 74c Guam: lodge at Agana, 33c Hamburg: Grand Lodge of, 5c Hancock, John: in the news, 73c Hawaii: news article, 59c Haynes, Dr. Eli Stuart: in the news, 72c Henry, Andrew: mentioned, 83c High Twelve International: mentioned, 75c Historical: review, 83c Hoffman, Paul: in the news, 69c Holland, Lou: in the news, 71c Hoover, James Edgar: addresses Grand Lodge of New York, 71c; in the news, 69c Houston, Gen. Sam: in the news, 69c Hungary: before dissolution of Grand Lodge, 38c; Freemasonry


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

in, 16c; Freemasonry dissolved, 39c India: Nawab of Rampur, a Freemason,69c Iowa: new Masonic library, 85c Ireland: Freemasonry in, 26c; Grand Master visits Scotland and Norway, 26c; recognition irregular bodies, 27c Irregular Freemasonry, 51c Israel: see "Palestine, National Grand Lodge of"; formation of Grand Lodge, 22c; Freemasonry in, 21c Italy: Masonic situation in, 23c Japan: attitude of people toward Freemasonry, 34c; dispensation for lodges at Fukuoka and Kyoto, 35c; lodge in Yokohama, 33c; lodge in Yokosuka, 32c; lodges established at Tokyo and Tachikawa, 35c; new lodge constituted in, 34c; news ~rticle, new lodge, 61c; remarks of Naotake Sato, 35c Johnson, Robert L.: Freemason at sight,94c Keil, Arthur H.: in the news, 69c Korbel, Dr. P.: escapes from Czechoslovakia,31c Korea: Freemasonry in, 27c Laj, Dr. Guido: Grand Master, Grand Orient of Italy, 23c Lenzi, Dr. Ugo: Grand Master, Grand Orient of Italy, 23c Life Membership: overdone, 81c Liquor: in Kansas, 81c Lloyd, Harold: in the news, 73c Lodge: oldest Masonic, 48c Lodge Name: restriction, 81c Loevy, Marcus A.: death noted, 72c Louisiana: loan to local choir, 85c Lutheran Church: attacks Freemasonry,75c McMahon, Sir A. Henry: in the news,72c Malmesbury, The Earl of: in the news,72c Mark Ritual, 65c Martelli, Prof. Carlo: heads irregular group in Italy, 23c

101c

Mary's Chapel: oldest Masonic lodge,48c Masonic Homes: mentioned, 81c Masonic Service Association: aid to German Masons, Hc; brickbats and bouquets, 57c; history of Freemasonry (review), 68c Masonic War Veterans: mentioned, 73c Masons in the News, 68c Mexico: Masonic conditions in, 28c Military Lodge: the end of, 26c; Oregon lodge in Germany, 82c Minnesota: centennial history, 83c Misar, Dr. Vladimir: story of, 14c, 18c Missouri Commanderies: review, 67c Missouri Manual: book review, 62c Missourians: mentioned, 86c Moroli, Franco: court record, 24c Munarriz, Esteban: Grand Master of Philippines, 32c; photo,33c National Grand Lodge of Germany; 4c National Sojourners: mentioned, 73c Negro Freemasonry: Bushnell addresses colored Freemasons, 52c; new Grand Lodge, 52c; ouster of Missouri Grand Master, 51c; review of situation in USA, 87c Newbry, Earl: in the news, 70c New Mexico: Montezuma Lodge centennial, 83c New South Wales: Freemasonry in: 42c Newton, Dr. Joseph Fort: death noted, 72c New York: use of blackball, 85c New Zealand: Freemasonry in, 42c Nigeria: new lodge in, 26c N ocalore: review, 65c North Dakota: historical address, 84c Ohio: Freemasonry in Mahoning County, 84c; Research Chapter transactions, 65c Okinawa: Philippine lodge in, 32c Oklahoma: paintings of Past Grand Masters, 85c Ontario: Freemasonry in, 41c Oregon: story of Multnomah Lodge, 84e


102c

THE MASONIC WORLD

Palestine, National Grand Lodge: sponsors Grand Lodge of Israel, 22c Past Master Degree: in Grand Lodges, 82c Penney, James C.: photo at cornerstone laying, 80c Pennsylvania, District Deputy Grand Masters in: review, 64c Pennsylvania, Templary in: review, 66c Peru: conditions in, 39c Petre, Lord: former Grand Master of England, 73c Philippines: fight over Rizal books, 34c; irregular groups in, 36c; Masonic conditions in, 31c; new lodges in, 32c; organizes Grand Lodge of China, 36c; organizes lodges in Japan, 34c; photo, Grand Master Munarriz, 33c; photo, Plaridel Masonic Temple, 32c; Santos medal, 33c; Scottish problem in, 33c Photographs: Berlin Masonic Temple, 6c; Gentry receives fiftyyear button, 7lc; German Reichstag, frontispiece; Hamilton high school cornerstone, 80c; Masonic Temple, Vienna, Aus., 15c; Missouri PGM's escorting Pres. Truman, 54c; Munarriz, 33c; officers Berlin Lodge, 12c; officers, UGL Germany, llc; Plaridel Temple, P.r., 32c; Rudiger and brethren, 8c; Truman en route to Grand Lodge meeting, 63c; Truman in garb of Grand Master, 60c; Dr. Vogel, lOci Washington statue, 53c Poinsett, Joel R.: mentioned, 84c Pound, Roscoe: in the news, 70c Pride of the Malay Race: review, 67c Publications: Masonic, 82c Public Relations: Masonic, 82c Queensland: Freemasonry in, 43c Recognition: by Grand Lodges, 89c Red Cross of Constantine in Scotland: a review, 68c Reichstag: photo, frontispiece Relief: CARE packages, 82c Research Chapter: Ohio transactions mentioned, 65c

1950

Research Lodges: in New Zealand, 43c; review, 93c Retirement Plans: review, 67c Ritual: violation, 83c Rizal, Jose: see "Pride of the Malay Race" ; controversy over books by, 34c Royal Arch Degree: review, 67c Royal York Friendship: Grand Lodge in Berlin, 5c, 7c-9c Rudiger, Dr. Erich: Grand Master UGL in Berlin, 7c; address, 15c; officer of Grand Council, 9c; photo,8c Ruggles, Martin: monument to, 50c Saipan: lodge at, 33c Santos, Jose Abad: medal for service, 33c Sarmiento, Domingo Faustino: biography review, 65c Sagkatchewan : Freemasonry in, 42c Schlesinger, Dr. Richard: persecuted, 2lc Scotland: controversy over Philippine lodge, 33c; formation Grand I .. odge, 49c Sermon, Roger T.: death noted, 72c Shrine: slot machines, 74c Sight Mason: Robert L. Johnson, 94c Sitka, Alaska: new lodge in, 29c Smith, J. Worthington: story of, 65c South American Diary: review, 65c South Australia: Freemasonry in, 45c Spain: Freemasonry in, 25c; news article, 58c Staunton, Va., Freemasonry in: review, 65c Strict Observance: Rite of, 4c Tasmania: Freemasonry in, 45c Taxation: new laws, 83c Taylor, Myron C.: in the news, 72c Tennessee: paintings of Past Grand Masters to be returned, 85c Texas: President Truman sends greetings to, 85c Thurmond, Gov. J. Strom: in the news, 69c Totten, Frank M.: in the news, 69c, 73c


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

True Kindred: mentioned, 74c Truman, Harry S.: criticism of, 60c, 61c; photo, in Grand Master's garb, 60c; photo, on way to Grand Lodge, 63c; photo, Past Grand Masters escorting, 54c; presents badge to Sen. Donnell, 59c; visits Grandview lodge, 61c Tyro Lodge No. 12: Ruggles monument,50c United Grand Lodge in Berlin: formation, 6c-9c; photo, officers of,

llc Vermont: Grand Master attacks socialism and communism, 85c Victoria: Freemasonry in, 45c Vogel, Dr. Theo: photo, 10c

103e

Washington Statue: unveiled, 53c; photo, 53c Webb, James E.: in the news, 73c Welles, Bishop Edwin: in the news,

7lc Western Australia: Freemasonry in, 46c White House: pamphlet on cornerstone laying, 66c White, Sydney A.:. mentioned, 26c Williams, G. Mennen: in the news, 72c Winchester, Va., Freemasonry in: review,64c Yokosuka, Japan: lodge in, 32c Youngdahl, Luther W.: in the news, 70c Yukon Territory: Freemasonry in,

4lc


INDEX 1950 PROCEEDINGS

A

PAGE

Address of Grand Master . Acknowledgments . Annual Meeting Masonic Service Association . Arrest of Charters . Automatic Suspension . Chula Lodge No. 388 . Conference of Grand Masters . Conference of Grand Secretaries . Conference With District Deputies . Cornerstones . Decisions . Dedications . Dispensations . District Deputy Conferences . Division of the State Into Administrative and Ritual Districts .. Fifty Year Buttons . Free Public School System, The . George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association . Grand Lodge Pamphlet . Healing . In Re Nebraska and Brother Paul Blotcky . Installations . Installation of Grand Officers . Introduction . Lodge of Research . Lodges Set to Work . Masonic Home Christmas Committee . Masonic Home of Missouri . Masonic Trials . Necrology . Order of De Molay . Other Dedications . Our Present Duty . Past Grand Masters . 'Recommendations . Request For Concurrent Jurisdiction . Resignations and Appointments . Ritual, The '.' . Social Security ~ . Taxes .

~I~~at~~~e. ::::::::::~ ~ :::.' :::::::

Visits to Foreign Jurisdictions Washington's Masonic Birthday Address of Grand Orator Amendments Adopted: Affiliation of E. A. and F. C Affiliation of Master Mason

:

~

'.' :

~~:

4 41 24

29 32 31 23 24 22

17 20 17 18 23 33 18 27 24

39 28 35 17' 6

5

25 17 34

39 28 21 34

17 7

28 38 29 27 33 32 25 35 7

. . .

16 25 141

. .

143 143


t.

2d

INDEX

1950 PAGE

Certificates For E. A. and F. C. Disqualifications D.D. G. M. 's and D. L. 's and Masonic Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dues One Year After Suspension ;...... Exemption From Dues , Failure to Advance Masonic Home..... Question Added to Petition '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Statement to Accompany Petition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amendments Proposed: Change in Petition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employment Bureau Appeals and Grievances, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appointments Approval of 1949 Proceedings Auditor, Report of

143 142 145 144 144 142 97 145 145 4 130 99 153 4 53

B Barnhill, F. C., Message Grom ........................... 4 Benediction 154 Biographical Sketch of Grand Master Bradford ............. i Brook~ Ralph, Introduced 5 Building Supervisory Board, Report of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 136 Buttons, Veterans, 45 C Cameron, Solon, Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter, F. Ernest, Mentioned. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Certificates of Proficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Chartered Lodges, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chiles, Henry C., Message From. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CIaudy, Carl H., Message From. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Closing Committees, Special 1950-1951. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Committees, Standing 1950-1951............................... Cotton, Dr. T. W.: Mentioned Flowers to. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credentials, Report of Committee (Interim)..................... Credentials, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cunningham, John D., Message From. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 87 3 150 4

D Daugherty, S. Allan, Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Davenport, Richard C., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DeLange, Albert J., Message From............................ Dickie, Roy, Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distinguished Visitors, Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Directors of Masonic Home, Election of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Deputy Grand Masters, List of (1950-1951). . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Lecturers, List of (1950-1951)......................... Donnell, Forrest, Presented With Jewel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 5 4 5 5 123 157 157 133

5 4 116 133 4 4 154 156 155


1950

INDEX

E

3d. PAGE

Election, Directors of Masonic Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Election of Officers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elected Officers of Grand Lodge, List of.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eyre, Benj. F., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

123 122 224 5

F Fifty Year Veterans' Buttons.. First Day, Afternoon... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First Day, Morning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45 89 3

G

Gentry, William R., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 150 George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Report of Committee , .. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 102 Grand Correspondent, Report of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Grand Lecturer, Report of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Grand Lodges Recognized by Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Grand Master Bradford Address of................................................ 4 Biography i Photograph Frontispiece Tribute to.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Grand Master '8 Address, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 140 Grand Representatives to and From Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 228 Grand Secretary, Report of ... ".. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Grand Secretaries and Their Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement.......................... 180 Grand Treasurer, Report of. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 H Hull, Jat:nes P., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. .

5

I

Installation Introduction of Distinguished Guests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Invitation From Scottish Rite... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Invocation

153 5 141 3

J J ost, Oscar, Vote of Thanks to. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jurisprudence, Report of Committee '-,' . . . . . . . . . Jurisprudence, Report of Committee Re Masonic Home. . . . . . . . . . . Jurisprudence, Addendum to Report of Committee...... ..

153 142 91 147

L

List List List List List List List List

of District Deputy Grand Masters 1950-1951 o'f District Lecturers 1950-1951. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . of Elected Officers of Grand Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . of Grand Representatives ~ ................ of Grand Secretaries and Their Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. of Lodges, Alphabetical..................... . . . . . . . . . . . .. of Lodges, Numerical.............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . of Past Grand Masters, Living. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

157 157 224 228 159 166 162 156

.-


.4<1

INDEX

1950 PAGE

Lodge Directory, by Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Lodges U.D., Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

196 135

M

Marquis, George C. Resignation of............................................. Tribute to.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Masonic Boards of R-elief, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Masonic Home, Report of.................................... Masonic Temple Association, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. "Masonic World"........................................... Massey, William B., Introduced, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Messages Mileage and Per Diem, Report of Committee " Missouri Lodge of R-esearch, Report of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

152 153 123 58 109 1c 5 4 149 87

N Necrology, Report of Committee......... Nominations for Masonic Home Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

89 98

o Opening.................................................... Officers, Election of..........................................

3 122

P Past Grand Masters, Living : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 156 Patton, Benj. E., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Photo of Grand Master Bradford , Frontispiece Prayer for Our President and Our Boys in Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Proficiency Certificates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 R Radcliffe, Glen G., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Report of Auditor........................................... Report of Committee on: Appeals and Grievances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boards of Relief........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Building Supervisory....................................... Chartered Lodges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Correspondence Credentials (Interim). . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Credentials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. . . .. . Grand Master's Address.................................... Jurisprudence Jurisprudence Re Masonic Home '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jurisprudence, Addendum Re Home " Lodges U.D :. Masonic Boards of Relief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Masonic Districts .. ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Masonic Temple Association. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mileage and Per Diem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Necrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ritual....................................................

5 53 99 123 136 133 87 3 150 102 140 142 91 147 135 123 132 109 149 89 111 113


1950

INDEX

5d PAGE

Transportation and Hotels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unfinished Business and Distinguished Guests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Ways and Means................. Welfare Report of Grand Lecturer Report of Grand Secretary ;......................... Report of Grand Treasurer ;....................... Report of Masonic Home..................................... Report of Missouri Lodge of Research........................ Resolutions, Adopted Chula Lodge and Spring Hill Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Relief and Clliarity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Resolutions, Referred De Molay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lemay Lodge U.D.......................................... S Samuels, Brother Lynn, Presented. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Second Day, Afternoon........................................ Second Day, Morning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sellers, James M. Mentioned Message From 路......... Social Security '.' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special Committees 1950-1951. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Standing Committees 1950-1951. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .

T Tabular Statement........................................... Third Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation and Hotels, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Trial Code, Consideration of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribute to George C. Marquis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. Tribute to Grand Master Bradford............................ Trevino, Dr. Eliud Garcia,Introduced. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

135 152 151 130 105 42 52 58 87 140 122 149 139 140 140 102 4 4 150 156 155 180 149 135 141 153 153 5

v Veterans' Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vote of Thanks: To Oscar J ost. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To Scottish Rite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

45 153 152

W Ways and Means, Report of Committee............. Welfare, Report of Committee.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

151 130


DECISION APPROVEP, 1948* Sec. 188, Decision (p. 49). Concurrent jurisdiction established December 18, 1941, between the Lodges in St. Louis and St. Louis County is not limited to petitions only. The By-laws on the Employment Bureau and the Board of Relief automatically take effect and make the Lodges responsible under these other provisions. (Proc. 1948, pp. 106-107.)

DECISIONS APPROVED-1949 Sec. 45. Decision (p. 21). Elective officers of a Lodge must be elected by paper ballot. Election by acclamation is void. (Proc. 1949, p. 13.)

Sec. 52. Decision (p. 24). Card playing in the dining room of a Lodge is not prohibited. (Jurisprudence Committee added-"We approve Decision No. 11, with the observation that, in this instance, the card games in the lodge dining hall were to be only social card games and not played for money or any other form of gambling.' ') (Proc. 1949, pp. 14, 124.)

Sec. 106. Decision (p. 36). Installation of officers of a Lodge by a brother who is not a Master or Past Master, is void. (Proc. 1949, p. 14.)

Sec. 113. Decision (p. 37). A petition for the degrees may be received from a man who must wear a metallic brace attached to a shoe, (Jurisprudence Committee added-' , We approve Decision No. 9 with the observation that your Committee, in considering this decision, understood that, in this instance, the so-called shoe worn by the candidate, to which a metallic brace was attached, was, in fact, a part of the artificial appliance.' ') (Proo. 1949, pp. 14, 124.)

Sec. 127. Decis~n (p. 40). When the Master clearly announced a ballot to be taken on a candidate, when the report of the committee was two favorable and one unfavorable, when the ballot was clear and the Master announced the result accordingly, the election is legal. A motion to take a second ballot is out of order. (Proe~ 1949, p. 15.)

Sec. 166. Decision (p. 46). A dimit issued without the application, knowledge, or consent of a member, is void. (Proc. 1949, p. 15.)

* In order to understand the circumstances surrounding each decision, the record in the Grand Lodge Proceedings, as indicated by the reference, should be read.


1950

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

9d

Sec. 206. Decisi<Yn (p. 55). A Lodge may send to its members by firstclass mail, sealed, a pamphlet containing names of petitioners, with information as to rejections, suspensions, etc. (ProD. 1949, p. 14.)

Sec. 219. Decision (p. 57). A member who has a permit to sell package liquor can not be suspended or expelled without a Masonic trial. (Proc. 1949, p. 13.)

Sec. 219. Decision (p. 57). According to law 3.2 beer is not an intoxicating liquor. (Proc. 1949, p. 14.)

Misc. Decision (p. 55). Members of a Lodge may as individuals, participate in a traffic safety program, or a patriotic enterprise, but not as a Lodge. (Proo. 1949, p. 13.)

Misc. Decision (p. 55). The Grand Lodge does not sanction a written ritual. (Proo. 1949, p. 13.)

AMENDMENTS ADOPTED-1949 Sec. 9 (m). Gro;ru], Master. (p. 9.) The Grand Master shall receive from the Grand Lodge for his traveling, office, stenographic, clerical and other expenses, the sum of $3,000.00 per year, and same shall be remitted to him in equal monthly installments. (Proc. 1949, p. 126.)

Sec. 30 (k). Ritual. (p. 19.) A Committee on Ritual, to which shall be referred all proposed changes in the ritual. The Committee shall constitute a Board of Custodians whose duty it shall be to conserve and preserve the work and lectures of the Three Degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry and to act _as final arbiter in the decision of all disputes arising in this jurisdiction concerning the Ritual. Said Committee shall consist of five members. The Grand Lecturer shall be ex-officio Chairman but shall not be counted as one of the five members. The Committee may provide for authorized instructors in the Ritual, dividing the ritualistic work into such sections as the Committee may deem best and shall make such rules and r.egulations as may be necessary. The Grand Secretary shall issue to such brethren as may be designated by said Committee, appropriate certificates as to their proficiency, such certmcates to be for a term of three years unless sooner revoked by the Committee on Ritual. A record of such certificates shall be kept in the office of the Grand Secretary. (Proo. 1949, p. 126.)

Sec. 77A. Lodges of Instruction (p. 31). In each Ritualistic District having a city with ten or more Lodges, the District Deputy Grand Master and District Lecturer, together with three other members to be selected


~.'

1950

GRAND LODGE OF'MISSOURI .

.

lId'

from three separate Lodges in such District by the District J;.ecturer, shall constitute a Committee on Masonic Instruction. This Committee may adopt rules for its government, and shall, for a period of at least four months' in each year, hold a Lodge of Instruction once a week and appoint such assistant instructors as may be necessary, subject to the approval of the District Lecturer, who shall be the authority in the work and have sole charge of teaching it, as provided in Sections 27 (b) and (g), and 29 (a).' The Grand Lecturer may, on the recommendation of the District LectureJ:, appoint one or more suitable brothers to be present and superintend the instruction on such occasions, when, for any reason, the District Lecturer is unable to be present. In support of such L.odge of Instruction, the Lodges voluntarily participating in such Masonic instruction, may contribute an路 nually to the support thereof, such sums as may be necessary to pay the actual expenses. (Proc. 1949, p. 131.) See. 142. Affiliation of Master Mason (p. 42). A non-affiliated Master Mason may apply for affiliation to any Lodge in this jurisdiction, and is not confined to the jurisdiction of the Lodge nearest his-place of residence. A nonresident cannot affiliate with any Lodge in this State except as provided in Section 192. (Proc. 1949, p. 125.) -

Sec. 158. Non Payment of Dues (p. 44). When a member shall fail to pay his dues on or before the 1st day of April of any year, it shall be the duty of the secretary within 10 days after said April 1 to notify said member in writing, of his delinquency, and if said member shall fail to pay his dues on or before June 1 thereafter, he shall automatically stand suspended for non payment of dues, without action of the lodge, and such suspension shall be recorded by the secretary in the minutes of the meeting on that date or at the first meeting of the lodge thereafter. It shall be the duty of the secretary to notify by written notice, all members automatically suspended for non payment of dues said notice to be given within 10 days after said suspension. Notification as above provided for shall be by mailing a written Notice to said member at his last known post office address by United States mail, in sealed envelope, with sufficient postage thereon. Failure of the secr.etary to give the above notices or to record the suspension shall not affect the automatic suspension of said member. (Proc. 1949, p. 124.) Sec. 159. Dues, Paid Before Suspension (p. 45). Payment of dues before June 1 of each year shall avoid automatic suspension, and payment of said dues within one year after suspension, shall reinstate the brother. The secretary shall report the same to the Lodge, and the fact of such payment shall be noted in the records of the Lodge. (ProD. 1949, p. 125.) See. 192. Waiver of Jurisdiction From Another Grand Lodge (p. 51). Any resident of another Jurisdiction, otherwise qualified, who desires to petition a Lodge in Missouri for initiation or affiliation may be permitted to do so, first having secured a waiver of Jurisdiction from the Lodge or Lodges within whose jurisdiction he may reside, and also securing路 the consent of the Grand Master of that Jurisdiction and the consent of the Grand Master of Missouri. (Proc. 1949, p. 125.)


Masonic Manual of Missouri Containing all the Missouri Monitorial work and funeral service. Pocket edition sold at 75 cents per copy.

Book of Constitutions The Grand Lodge Book of Constitutions, 1921 revision, bound' incloth, price 50 cents per copy. Grand Lodge Book of Constitutions, 1947, price $1.00 per copy.

Any of the foregoing books may be obtained from the office of the Grand Lodge by application to the Grand Secretary. HAROLD L. READER, Grand Secretary, Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri.


OFFICERS

Grand Lodge of Missouri 1950-1951 RAY BOND M. W. Grand Master 709 Joplin National Bank Building, Joplin HOMER L. FERGUSON R. W. Deputy Grand Master 1927 North Circle Dr., Jefferson City RICHARD O. RUMER R. W. Senior Grand Warden 6600 Oleatha, St. Louis JAMES McBRAYER SELLERS R. W. Junior Grand Warden Lexington EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. Grand Treasurer Care Union National Bank, Kansas City HAROLD.L. READER R. W. Grand Secretary 3681 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis ANTHONY F. ITTNER ...........•..... . R. W. Grand Lecturer 2353 South Compton, St. Louis , EMMETT L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain 2416 Doniphan Ave., St. Joseph SAMUEL THURMAN W. Grand Chaplain 225 S. Skinker, St. Louis HERBERT E. DUNCAN W. Grand Chaplain 5825 Central Ave., Kansas City BEN MORRIS RIDPATH W. Grand Chaplain Armour Blvd. & Kenwood, Kansas City FRANK J. PIPPIN W. Grand Chaplain 7200 Jefferson, Kansas City C. E. LEMON W. Grand Chaplain Columbia ORESTES MITCHELL, JR. Grand Senior Deacon , 717 Corby Bldg., St. Joseph ,',ILLIAM J. CRAIG .....•............... Grand Junior Deacon 1035 S. Pickwick, Springfield HAROLD M. JAyNE Grand Senior Steward Memphis FRANK P. BRIGGS .......• : Grand Junior Steward . • Macon ROBERT L. A}iONSON Grand Marshal 6242 Southwood, St: Louis HAROLD O. GRAUEL : Grand Marshal Cheney Hall, Cape Girardeau BRUCE H. HUNT Grand Sword Iiearer Kirksville ROBERT H. MANN , •.' Grana Pursuivant 800 Bryant Bldg., Kansas City.! ROBERT W. HEDRICK .....................•.... Grand Orator Jefferson City MARK E. WHITAKER Grand Tiler . Joplin The 130th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held in St. Louis, beginning Tuesday, September 25, 1951.

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