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·GRAND LODGE Ancient, Free and Accepted

Masons of the State of Missouri

• Official Proceedings One Hundred Twenty-Sixth Annual Communication

• SAINT LOUIS Sept. 30, Oct. 1, 2, A. D. 1947, A. L. 5947


BIOGRAPHICAL

II

II SOLON CAMERON Grand Master, 1946-47

Dr. Solon Cameron, our one hundred and twenty-sixth Grand Master, was born in St. Louis, June 12, 1880, in the old Lewis Bissell Mansion on East Grand Avenue, now 4426 Randall Place. This house was built in 1823 by Captain Lewis Bissell, who was a son of Major Russell Bissell, the first Commandant of Bellefontaine cantonment, a brother of General Daniel Bissell, the third Commandant of the cantonment. The doctor's great-grandfather was Donald Cameron of Lochiel, Inverness, Scotland, a chief of the Cameron Clan. His father, Colin Cameron, born in Scotland, came to Montreal in the Province of Quebec, Canada, at the age of twenty-one years and to St. Louis about 1870. For fifty years he was an elder in the Cote Brilliante Presbyterian Church. The parents of his mother, Nancy Munro, came from Argyleshire, Scotland, and settled near St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, a few miles north of Lake Erie. There she met and was married to the doctor's father. Dr. Cameron graduated from Ashland Grade School and Central High School. In 1905 he graduated from Barnes Medical College. He was for eight years associated with Dr. William Porter, a leading throat and lung specialist in St. Louis, and was associate chief physician at Mount St. Rose Hospital under Dr. Porter. Dr. Cameron has specialized in diseases of the chest. At the beginning of World War I, he was medical member of the Twenty-Second Ward Draft Board. Entering active service as captain, October 1, 1917, he served with distinction at Fort Benjamin Harrison, at Camp Greenleaf, and at Camp Wheeler. He was then transferred to Camp Dix, New Jersey, in charge of heart and lung examination work where he was promoted to the rank of major. On being transferred from Camp Dix, Colonel H. R. Beary, Division Surgeon, posted a letter in which he said: "I especially appreciate the services rendered by Major Cameron, who has been a faithful, loyal and conscientious worker on the Camp Examining Board." Major Cameron was discharged from the service in July, 1919, at Camp Dix,


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BIOGRAPHICAL

New Jersey, with highest praise for efficiency, and patriotic devotion to duty. Major J. W. Bauman, M. C., said of him: "Major Cameron has shown patriotic devotion to duty both by precept and example.... With regret, I recommend that his application for discharge be approved." Dr. Cameron comes from a family of successful folks. One brother, the late Ossian Cameron, was a successful corporation lawyer in Chicago; John M., deceased, was instrumental in developing the oil industry in Oklahoma; Alexander E. is a Presbyterian minister in Linden, Michigan; two sisters, Misses Minnie M. and Annie B., taught for many years in the St. Louis Public Schools and they retain close and frequent contact with many prominent St. Louisans whom they have taught. The late Miss Christina K. served for many years as a missionary in China. David Livingstone Cameron died about the time he reached his maturity. Catherine Cameron Wallace, wife of Samuel Wallace, died in early life. The doctor, subject of this sketch, is the youngest of nine children. Dr. Cameron has been for many years a member of and a regular attendant at the Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis. On January 1, 1919, Dr. Cameron married Miss Margaret \Vease. They live at 43 \Vashington Terrace in St. Louis. They have two daughters, the well-known twins. Jean is married to Dr. Harold Eugene \Valters, who served with credit in the Pacific area and is now chief Resident in Surgery at St. Luke's Hospital. June is married to Dr. Robert Antoine Hall, who served with General Patton in the Sixth Armored Division. He won the Bronze Medal and the Purple Heart; was wounded in action but recovered. He is now resident in Medicine at the Missouri Baptist Hospital. Dr. Cameron was surgeon for the St. Louis Police Board from 1921 to 1925; and a member of the Board of Education of St. Louis from 1931 to 1938, being president of the board in 1935. In August, 1929, he was appointed physician for the Masonic Home of Missouri, in which capacity he is now serving. He is also a busy practicing physician in St. Louis. Brother Cameron was raised July 31, 1909, in Missouri Lodge No.1, of which he was 'N orshipful Master in 1916, the centennial year of Missouri Lodge. He presided at the one-hundredth anniversary banquet of the lodge held at Sunset Hill Country Club, which was well attended by representative Masons of St. Louis and the State. He was exalted in Missouri Royal Arch Chapter No.1, June 27, 1910; knighted in Asealon Commandery No. 16, K. T., April 18, 1914; made a Scottish Rite Mason, November 24, 1928; and created a Noble of the Mystic Shrine in Moolah Temple, April 16, 1941. He was Commander of Lloyd R. Boutwell Post No. 136, American Legion, in 1936. He is an enthusiastic member of the Missouri Lodge of Research and contributed liberally to the publication of the History of Missouri


BIOGRAPHICAL

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Lodge No.1, Volume II of the Transactions (1944) of said Lodge of Research. From September, 1928, to September, 1929, he served as District Deputy Grand Master, 33rd Masonic District of Missouri. Most Worshipful Brother Cameron was appointed Grand Pursuivant in September, 1938, and advanced up the line to the Grand East in September, 1946. There were four stations which he did not fill due to deaths and one resignation, but he served two years as Deputy Grand Master. His Grand Lodge Record follows: Grand Pursuivant, 1939; Grand Marshal, 1940; Grand Marshal, 1941; Grand Senior Steward, 1942; Grand Junior Steward, 1943; Senior Grand Warden, 1944; Deputy Grand Master, 1945; Deputy Grand Master, 1946; Grand Master, 1947. During his term as Grand Master, Most \Vorshipful Brother Solon Cameron attended approximately 75 meetings of lodges and conferences in the state, issued 40 dispensations and rendered 31 decisions on the Masonic law. With M. W. Brothers Bert S. Lee, Anthony F. Ittner, Harold L. Reader, Ray V. Denslow and R. W. Brother Morris E. Ewing, Deputy Grand Master, he attended, at Washington, D. C., the Masonic Service Association of the United States, the Grand Masters' Conference of the United States and Canada, George \Vashington Masonic National Memorial Association and the Grand Secretaries' Conference of the United States. The outstanding accomplishment of his administration was the complete revision of the By-Laws. He presided over one of the most difficult sessions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri in the revision of the said By-Laws, for which task he received letters of commendation from six Past Grand Masters and ninety-seven brethren who were present at the session. Any member of the Grand Lodge, so desiring, was given an opportunity to speak. \Vell done, thou good and faithful servant of the Fraternity. J. B. S.


GRAND LODGE Ancient, Free and Accepted

Masons of the State of Missouri

• Official Proceedings One Hundred Twenty-Sixth Annual Communication

• SAINT LOUIS Sept. 30, Oct 1, 2, A. D. 1947, A. L. 5947


ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION

FIRST DAY The One Hundred Twenty-Sixth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, at 9 :00 a. m., on Tuesday, September 30, 1947. PRESENT Solon Cameron, M. W. Grand Master. Morris E. Ewing, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. Harry F. Sunderland, R. W. Senior Grand Warden. James M. Bradford, R. W. Junior Grand Warden. Edmund E. Morris, R. W. Grand Treasurer. Harold L. Reader, R. W. Grand Secretary. Anthony It'. Ittner, R. W. Grand Lecturer. Emmett L. Robison, W. Grand Chaplain. Samuel Thurman, W. Grand Chaplain. H. F. Carl Haas, W. Grand Chaplain. Edward Potts, W. Grand Chaplain. Ray Bond, Grand Senior Deacon. Homer L. Ferguson, Grand Junior Deacon. Richard O. Rumer, Grand Senior Steward. J ames McBrayer Sellers, Grand Junior Steward. Orestes Mitchell, Jr., Grand Marshal. William J. Craig, Grand Marshal. Harold M. Jayne, Grand Sword Bearer. Ernest F. Carter, Grand Pursuivant. John A. Witthaus, Grand Orator. Herman Lark, Grand Tiler.

OPENING

At 9 :00 o'clock, a. m., Most Worshipful Grand Master Solon Cameron opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri in Ample Form assisted by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of representatives. The brethren united in singing "America," after which Grand Chaplain Thurman offered the invocation. INVOCATION

Almighty and Merciful God, Thou who art the Supreme Architect of the universe, by whose grace we again meet at this glorious season of the year in thanksgiving for the harvests that have been gathered

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in to feed the hearts and souls of men, for again we wonder how we may approach Thee and Thy throne. With humility indeed, and also with courage and with courage in the faith that we belong to Thee, and that Thou belongest to us. So we cultivate and nurture and cherish the spark of Thine within us, and 0 Lord, we thank Thee this morning, here in the sanctuary of the lodge dedicated to Thee and consecrated by Thy name, that we can feel deeply the songs of peace and drink deeply from the waters of brotherhood and salvation. Oh, never before, 0 Lord, has this world of ours needed both the peace and the brotherhood of man. Where else can we breathe and cultivate the spirit of peace, and breathe the breath of brotherhood better affirmed truer than here at Thine altar. We have much to be grateful for and we have yet more to ask of Thee; for the world is still ruled by the passion for power, by the lusts of passion, by the vanity of pride, by hunger and squalor and poverty which bar the doors of honor and sanity and peace. 0 Lord, inspire us in this great vocation that we may meditate in clear vision and with deep nicety into the truth of things, and bless him who guides the destinies of this assembly standing in the East as a symbol of Thine own authority and Thine own Supreme Mastership. Grant him the wisdom, the courage, yet also the humility and the kindliness wherewith he may attract to himself the hearts and the minds of his brethren. Finally, 0 Lord, perhaps first and always we ask Thee for the blessings upon this, our great and grand nation, Thine own foot stool, 0 Lord, America, the dream of the fathers that founded it, the vision of the sons that carried on to defend it, the hope and the promise of the whole world for leadership in democracy and in Divine blessing. Bestow Thy blessing upon the nation, its President, its executives, its judges, its law givers, its citizens, that out of this nation may the spirit call them and also the realization of peace on earth and good will to men everywhere. Amen. CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE-INTERIM REPORT To the Most WorshipfUl Grand Lodge, Lt. F. and Lt. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Credentials begs to report a constitutional num路 ber of subordinate lodges are represented. Respectfully submitted, HENRY G. DILLER, Chairman. TELEGRAMS

Telegrams of greeting were received from M. Wor. Bro. Henry C. Chiles, now in Europe, and M. Wor. Bro. Carl Claudy, Executive Secretary of the Masonic Service Association of the United States. APPROVAL OF 1946 PROCEEDINGS

On motion, duly made and carried, the published 1946 Proceedings were approved.


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DISTINGUISHED VISITORS

The following distinguished visitors were then introduced: M. Wor. Brother Edward Huwaldt, Grand Master of Nebraska. M. Wor. Brother J. V. Gray, Grand Master of Iowa. R. Wor. Brother Earl Delzell, Grand Secretary of Iowa R. Em. Sir Ray Bond, Grand Commander, Grand Commandery K. T. of Missouri. M. E. Compo Robert Whitaker, Grand High Priest, Grand R.A.C. of Missouri. M. Ill. Joseph D. Stewart, Grand Master of the Grand Council, R. and S. M. of Missouri. Ill. W. B. Massey, Sovereign G.I.G. of the Scottish Rite of Missouri. ADDRESS OF THE GRAND MASTER

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. <t A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: I deem it a great pleasure, as your Grand Master, to welcome you to this the one hundred twenty-sixth annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Many of you have been in attendance before but a goodly number are enjoying your first experience as representatives of your lodges at our annual communication. I know that your attendance will be both pleasant and profitable. You will have opportunities to meet men from every section of the State who are outstanding citizens in their several communities and who have labored diligently and loyally to help keep our great Fraternity in the forefront of the benevolent and fraternal organizations of the commonwealth. Freemasonry is preeminently a democratic organization and although the Worshipful Masters of its lodges and the Grand Master are nominally possessed of autocratic powers for the time being, both are accountable to the Grand Lodge where their actions may be reviewed and reversed if they have erred. I want each one of you who is an accredited representative of his lodge or an officer or committee member of the Grand Lodge or a past master to feel that he has a right to be recognized and heard in our deliberations. And none will be denied such recognition; but I trust that in this very busy session of our grand Lodge you will be reasonably brief and always endeavor to speak to the point at issue before the Grand Lodge. Though our Grand Masters who piloted the Fraternity through the difficult and trying years of the war each performed a splendid piece of work, it is nevertheless a source of great satisfaction to me that I am the first Grand Master for a number of years who has been permitted to serve his entire year in an era of so-called peace. The memory of the great struggle, however, cannot be blotted out, and especially the memory of the noble part played by so many


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of our gallant sons in the work of the armed forces. Many of these are no doubt here as lodge representatives, and I am especially anxious to have each of you hand the Grand Secretary a memorandum with your name, the name and number of your lodge and the details as to the branch of the armed forces in which you served. Please do not let considerations of modesty stand in the way of complying with this request, which is made with a view to preserving some of the most valuable Masonic history of Missouri. MEMORIAL MEETINGS It was my privilege on June 14, 1947, our national Flag Day, to preside over a great memorial meeting of Master Masons, and their families, in the Scottish Rite Temple in St. Louis, which I had called for the purpose of paying tribute to the memory of those Missouri Masons who lost their lives in the recent great world war, and to welcome and acknowledge our gratitude to our returned veterans, of whom there were about four hundred in attendance. Twenty-eight similar meetings were held at my request in other parts of the State. I trust that those Brethren who presided at these meetings, if they have not already done so, will as soon as possible send in to the Grand Secretary full reports of their programs. A full account of these meetings will be given elsewhere.

REDISTRICTING OF STATE An amendment passed last year provided for a redistricting of the State into not to exceed thirty Masonic administrative districts, each to be presided over by a Distrist Deputy Grand Master to be appointed and commissioned by the Grand Master. It was further provided that the four principal officers of the Grand Lodge should constitute a committee to fix the number and boundaries of these administrative districts. This committee was limited however by the further provision that each administrative district should consist of one or more ritual districts, the Committee on Ritual being charged with the duty of fixing the ritual districts. At my request, a meeting of the Committee on Ritual was called to meet in my Grand Lodge office on March 10, 1947, to fix the boundaries of the ritual districts. At this meeting the Committee on Ritual fixed the boundaries of the ritual districts exactly as they had been before, except that Rockbridge Lodge No. 435 was transferred from the fifty-third ritual district to the forty-sixth ritual district. At a meeting of the Committee on Administrative Districts, consisting of the four principal Grand Lodge officers, held at my office on March 11, 1947, using the action of the Committee on Ritual as a basis, the number of administrative districts was fixed at twentynine. The counties and lodges comprising those twenty-nine ad-


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ministrative districts are set out in tabular form on pages 200 to 229 inclusive of the Grand Lodge Proceedings of 1946, and are correct except that Rockbridge Lodge No. 435 was made a part of the Twenty-second Administrative District in accordance with the action of the Committee on Ritual. Beehive Lodge No. 393 at Lawson though correctly shown in the Sixth Administrative District should appear in the 11th Ritual District in accordance with the action of the Committee on Ritual. A Grand Lodge by-law enacted several years ago provides that in Districts having forty or more Lodges there shall be two District Deputy Grand Masters. This by-law was enacted to relieve the pressure on a single District Deputy in a district with forty-seven Lodges, and where a multiplicity of important questions constantly claimed his attention. It was emergency legislation and the emergency still exists to an even greater extent. It is important that District Deputies be appointed at the beginning of a Grand Master's term so before I had received copies of the amendments I appointed two District Deputies for the Fifteenth Administrative District, not knowing that the new law provides that "for each Administrative District there shall be appointed and commissioned by the Grand Master a District Deputy Grand Master." On learning of this provision I took the view that the Grand Lodge did not have in mind the situation existing in the old Thirty-third District, now the Fifteenth Administrative District, and certainly did not intend to punish or embarrass it by limiting it to one District Deputy. Accordingly, I so ruled, believing that I acted within my rights when I appointed two District Deputies for the Fifteenth Administrative District. I trust that the Grand Lodge will sustain my ruling or, if not, will adopt a new amendment at this revision session according to this district the right to two District Deputies. TAX ON SALARIES OF LODGE SECRETARIES Under date of February 7, 1947, our Grand Lodge received a communication from the Collector of Internal Revenue at St. Louis, bearing upon the tax liability of Secretaries of Lodges for the remuneration received by them as such. A copy of said letter was duly forwarded under date of February 17 to the Secretaries of all Lodges in the State for their information and guidance. The said letter is as follows: Copy

Treasury Department Internal Revenue Service St. Louis 1, Mo.

Copy

43-0160306 February 7, 1947. Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Mo., 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 8 Gentlemen: Please refer to office letter dated September 5, 1946, in which you were


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advised that services performed by secretaries of local Masonic Lodges in connection with the collection of dues are excepted from employment within the meaning of Section 1426 (b) (10) A (ii) of the Federal Insurance Contributions Act. Under date of January 30, 1947, this office was advised that after giving further consideration to the status of Secretaries of local Masonic lodges it is now the opinion of the Bureau that services performed by such individuals in connection with the collection of dues are not excepted under the above mentioned Section of the Federal Insurance Contributions Act. This opinion is based upon the fact that the secretaries do not collect dues and premiums for the Grand Lodge but rather collections are made on behalf of the local lodges and such local lodges, in turn, pay a certain sum in the nature of an assessment to the Grand Lodge. The exception accorded services performed by secretaries of local Masonic lodges in those cases where the remuneration does not exceed $45.00 for services performed during a calendar quarter is still in effect. Very truly yours, JAMES P. FINNEGAN, Collector.

DECISIONS During the course of the year many questions have been submitted to me for decision and all of such queries have been answered by me. A large number of them involved questions which were more or less routine, in that they involved matters which had previously been expressly passed upon by our Grand Lodge, either through By-law or decision. Such decisions have not been reported by me as they would unduly lengthen this message. However, the following decisions, in my opinion, involve points of sufficient importance to be submitted, for approval by this Grand Lodge.

1.

TEMPLE ASSOCIATIONS

In view of the long delay, incident to the revision of the Grand Lodge By-laws, and of the further fact that since the last revision many amendments have been adopted and many decisions covering the organization and conduct of Temple Associations and specifying the powers of the Building Supervisory Board have been rendered, we have been advised by the Building Supervisory Board that there has been a considerable difficulty in some instances which might be clarified by the rendition of an opinion to be approved by the Grand Lodge, covering the above mentioned matters. Many of these matters were involved in the following opinion rendered in the case of Samaritan Temple Association at Bonne Terre; and for the reasons above stated, we submit such opinion herewith, in full, for consideration and approval by the Grand Lodge. Said opinion is as follows: Facts. In 1925, certain members of Samaritan Lodge No. 424 formed a Temple Association which was incorporated by pro forma decree for the purpose of erecting, owning and operating a Masonic


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Temple for the use and benefit of Samaritan Lodge. Any member of Samaritan Lodge, in good standing, may, under the articles of agreement, become and be a member of the Temple Association by signing its constitution. Only members of Samaritan Lodge may be members of the Temple Association. Seven members of the association constitute the Board of Directors, two of whom are elected each year for three years. The current Senior Warden of the Lodge is automatically a member of the Temple Board. The Temple is complete and its mortgage debt has been paid. There seems to have been some difference of opinion between the officers and members of the Lodge and the officers of the Temple Association as to the manner in which the affairs of the association are being conducted. Many of the members of the Lodge feel that the title to the Temple property should be conveyed to trustees of the Lodge who should hold and operate it, under appropriate by-laws, for the benefit and under the control of the Lodge; and I have been asked to advise them how such action can be brought about. Law. In 1925, when the said Temple Association was formed, there was no Grand Lodge law prohibiting its formation. However, since that time the following by-laws have been adopted by our Grand Lodge: SECTION 721;2, TRUSTEES. "Each Lodge shall have authority to provide, by by-law, for the election or appointment of trustees of the Lodge. When a Lodge shall fail to make such provision, the Worshipful Master, Senior Warden and Junior Warden of such Lodge and their respective successors in office shall be and remain the trustees of the Lodge. "The title to all real and personal property of the Lodge shall be vested in the trustees, in trust, however, for the use and benefit of such Lodge, and in the event such Lodge shall cease to exist from any cause (except in case of consolidation), in trust for the use and benefit of the Grand Lodge under the terms of Sec. 73 of the Grand Lodge by-laws. Said trustees shall, subject to the by-laws of the Lodge, manage and attend to the maintenance of all such property and convey the property as the Lodge (and in the event of such cessation of existence of the Lodge, then as the Grand Lodge) shall direct and in accordance with the by-laws of the Grand Lodge." (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1929, page 202.) SECTION 99 (b). "It shall be the duty of the Master of every Lodge where a Building Association has been created by the members of the Lodge for the purpose of holding title to the building in which such Lodge meets, and the properties of the Lodge, iInmediately after installation, and before the budget as required in Section 99a, to request of the officers of said Building Association a detailed statement of its assets and properties, its receipts and expenditures for the previous year, and a budget for the ensuing


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year; and until such report is made by such Building Association to the Lodge, and has been furnished to such Lodge, no monies shall be voted out of the treasury of the Lodge to pay to such Building Association. "After such Report and Budget shall have been received by the Master of the Lodge and a budget has been made covering the expenses of the Lodge by the Budget Committee then and thereafter the Budget Committee is authorized and empowered to make such suitable contract for payment of monies to the Building Association as may be necessary and in accordance with the financial condition of the Lodge such contract so made to become effective when approved by the Lodge. "If the Budget Committee of the Lodge and the Building Association cannot agree upon a contract, then and in that event the entire matter shall be submitted to the Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge, which shall have full power and authority to adjust all matters and disputes between the Lodge and the Building Association, and the report of said Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge shall be final and conclusive between the Lodge and the Building Association. "This by-law shall not be held or construed to invalidate any existing contract or agreement heretofore entered into and at such time in good standing, or to require annual renewal of existing contracts by a Lodge or Lodges and a Building Association heretofore organized and composed of Lodges and other Masonic or kindred organizations for the maintenance of their Temple andlor the payment of any indebtedness thereon." (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1933, page 126.) SECTION 56, CONTRACTING OF DEBTS. "Except as hereinafter provided, a Lodge shall not be permitted to contract debts for any purpose until sufficient available assets are on hand to meet the payment thereof. There is hereby created a Board, to be known as the Building Supervisory Board. Said Board shall consist of three members of the Grand Lodge and shall be appointed by the Grand Master. Upon the adoption of this by-law, it shall be the duty of the Grand Master forthwith to appoint the first three members of said board, one of whom shall serve for three years. Thereafter, each succeeding Grand Master shall appoint one member each year for three years to fill the vacancy of the one whose term has expired. The Grand Master shall also have the power to fill all other vacancies caused by death or otherwise. "The members of such board shall serve without compensation, but shall receive their actual and necessary expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. "Said board shall have access to all records having to do with the


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matters submitted to said board hereunder, whether such records be the property of the local Lodge or of the Grand Lodge. "From and after the adoption of this by-law, no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or occupy a building or Temple until the plans for the purchase, construction and financing thereof shall first have been submitted to the Building Supervisory Board and its permission obtained. Nothing herein set forth shall apply to any Masonic Temple already erected or purchased or to any case in which a Lodge is making a bona fide lease of quarters privately owned by a person or corporation acting in the usual course of business and not directly or indirectly acting for or connected with the Lodges or its members. "Neither the Grand Lodge nor any officer or member thereof, as such, nor the Building Supervisory Board, shall be liable for any indebtedness hitherto now or hereafter incurred by any Lodge or Temple Association. "A Lodge may be permitted to contract a debt for the purpose of purchasing a cemetery, provided the written consent of the Grand Master shall be previously secured. Any Lodge obtaining permission to contract a debt for the purchase of a cemetery shall at once notify the Grand Secretary of the amount of the debt incurred, the security given, and the date of maturity of the debt. When any debt contracted for a building or cemetery shall have been paid, the Lodge shall notify the Grand Secretary of such payment. "A record of all such debts shall be furnished to the Grand Secretary by the respective Lodges and by the Building Supervisory Board, and such record, together with the record of payment thereof, shall be kept in the office of the Grand Secretary." (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1930, page 146.) In 1933, our Grand Lodge decided that: "Since the adoption of Section 56 in 1930, no Building Association proposed to be organized by the members of a particular Lodge and which is ostensibly organized for the purpose of owning a real estate and erecting buildings for the members of a particular Lodge, can be permitted so to organize and proceed with any building program until it shall have the permission of the Building Supervisory Board." (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1933, page 16.) In 1934, our Grand Lodge decided that: "SECTION 72V2' adopted in 1929, and Section 56, as amended in 1930, should be liberally construed to put power and authority in the Building Supervisory Board. Its decisions as to the methods of financing, holding title by a corporation or otherwise, joint efforts with other bodies and the nature of the other bodies, should be governed by the particular circumstances and limited only by the fact that adequate finances must be provided so that the reputation of the Fraternity will not be impaired by default and by the provisions


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of Section 50 of our by-laws in reference to joint occupancy." (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1934, page 32.) Decision Under the foregoing Sections and Decisions, it seems to be the plain intent of our Grand Lodge that where one Lodge is the sole owner of real or personal property, ownership thereof shall be vested in Trustees of the Lodge, duly elected 1l.ccording to its by-laws, which shall also contain appropriate provhdons for the management and maintenance of the property by the Trustees under the control of the Lodge. Any other position would seem to permit Lodges, by indirection, to violate the provisions of Section 49, which provides that "a Lodge in this jurisdiction shall not become incorporated under the laws of the State." From the foregoing it follows and I rule: 1. That Samaritan Temple Association was properly organized under Missouri and Masonic law in 1925. 2. That, in view of and since the foregoing amendments and decisions, no such Temple Association could be legally organized or permitted, but, in cases of such sole ownership, real and personal property of the Lodge must be held in the name of the Trustees of the Lodge, in the manner hereinbefor~ set out. 3. Under the decisions aforesaid, the laws adopted as aforesaid do not apply to the Samaritan Temple Association, and there is no express Masonic law by which the members of the Lodge, as such, may force the transfer of title to the Temple property from the Temple Association to Trustees of the Lodge; however, under the inherent powers of the Grand Lodge and Grand Master to guard the welfare of the Craft and the powers vested in the Building Supervisory Board by the by-laws and decisions aforesaid over the "holding of title by a corporation," I rule that where the Grand Master and Building Supervisory Board decide that the welfare of the Craft requires title to be placed in and held by Trustees of a Lodge, the Grand Master may order the officers of such a Temple Association to convey title to such Trustees of the Lodge. 4. If members of Samaritan Lodge wish the property transferred, they must do so, not as members of Samaritan Lodge, but as members of the Samaritan Temple Association. This can be done by proper resolution, duly adopted by majority vote at a properly called meeting of the Temple Association, authorizing and directing the officers of the Temple Association, to convey the property to the properly designated Trustees of the Lodge. After that has been done, and all outstanding debts, if any, of the Temple Association have been paid, the Temple Association can, under the provisions of Section 5461 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri 1939, by a three-fourths vote, dissolve in the manner provided in said Section.


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2.

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IN RE: GLENN DAVID YATES

Weare also submitting in full opinion rendered in connection with the above mentioned party for the reason that the opinion involves a question on which this Grand Lodge acted in 1929 and might be considered inconsistent with such 1929 ruling. We believe that the action taken in 1929 was erroneous and we feel that it should be overruled by this Grand Lodge. The instant opinion is as follows: Facts. Glenn David Yates petitioned for the Degrees in Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, A. F. & A. M., being elected on October 11,1945. In his petition for the Degrees he stated that he resided in the State of Missouri during the twelve months then last past and last six months in the jurisdiction of Ivanhoe Lodge. He was elected, initiated, passed and raised during the year 1945. On June 11, 1946, complaint was filed against him on the ground that his statement as to residence was false; that at the time of signing said petition and for several years prior thereto, he resided and then still resided in Kansas City, Kansas, outside the State of Missouri and outside the jurisdiction of Ivanhoe Lodge. Said complaint was referred to the Grievance Committee of Ivanhoe Lodge who, on June 15, 1946, found probable cause of guilt of the accused. Thereafter, charges, in usual form and based upon the above mentioned facts, were filed against said Yates, who was tried on said charges on August 10, 1946. Yates was represented by counsel at the said trial and by agreement of the Lodge and counsel for the accused, the following judgment order was agreed upon and entered in the minutes. of Ivanhoe Lodge at its next regular communication: "Ordered and decreed that the initiation of Glenn David Yates into the Degrees of Freemasonry was and is null and void, because he was not a resident of the State of Missouri at the time and that his name be stricken and removed from the records of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, A. F. & A. M. as a member thereof, and that Masonic recognition be withdrawn and his rights and privileges as a Freemason are hereby revoked and cancelled." Yates now desires to re-petition and the Lodge asks what kind of an application it should accept; namely, should his petition be for reinstatement, restoration, or for the Degrees'

Decision Section 121 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that a petition for the degrees shall not be entertained in any Lodge in this jurisdiction unless the petitioner shall have resided twelve months in the state, the last six of which shall have been within the jurisdiction of the Lodge. Section 187 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that if any Lodge shall invade the territory of another Lodge and make a Freemason of a person residing in the jurisdiction of such Lodge, without


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its lmanimous consent, the invading Lodge shall pay to the Lodge whose jurisdiction is invaded, double the fees received on account thereof and be subject to such discipline as may be just and proper. In 1873, our Grand Lodge held that after a Lodge finds that a candidate for the Mysteries does not reside within its jurisdiction all further proceedings must stop before the degree is conferred and such proceedings are null and void. (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1873, page 20.) In 1940, our Grand Lodge held that there is no provision in Missouri Grand Lodge Law for the acceptance of a petition for the degrees from anyone who is not a resident of Missouri. (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1940, page 28.) Inasmuch as we have no jurisdiction beyond the confines of the State of Missouri and have no right to confer any degrees upon anyone residing in another state, it must follow that the provisions of Section 187 apply only where there has been an invasion by one Missouri Lodge of the jurisdiction of another Missouri Lodge. In such cases, it would seem that an invasion is not such a jurisdictional defect as to make the conferring of degrees null and void. In view of the fact that no Missouri Lodge can confer a degree on a resident of another state without invading the jurisdiction of that state, it would appear that residence in this state is a jurisdictional prerequisite to the legal conferring of degrees on a petitioner; and that where such residence in Missouri is lacking, no Lodge has a right to receive a ,petition or confer a degree, and that, under such circumstances, the conferring of degrees is null and void. I therefore rule that the degrees conferred upon Glenn David Yates were illegally conferred and they are null and void; that said Yates stands in .the position of a profane; that if he wishes to join the fraternity he must sign the usual petition for the degrees, which petition shall take the usual course of petitions for degrees. Inasmuch as said Yates has already paid for the degrees, and his money has not been refunded to him, he may so petition for the degrees without further payment of the fees, unless, in the meantime, fees of the Lodge have been changed, in which event, suitable adjustment shall be made. If he is elected on a new petition, he shall have the several degrees conferred upon him in the usual manner. In connection with the foregoing, reference is made to Decision No.1 made by Most \Vorshipful Brother Ittner which came before our Jurisprudence Committee in 1928 and 1929. In that decision Brother Ittner ruled, under somewhat similar circumstances, that the degrees conferred upon a nonresident were null and void and that such petitioner stood in the same position as a profane who had never petitioned for the degrees. In 1928, five out of seven members of the Jurisprudence Committee were in favor of a motion that said decision should be approved,


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

15

while two members were opposed to its approval. Before the matter was decided, Most Worshipful Brother O. A. Lucas was suddenly stricken and passed away, after which all unfinished business was continued until the following year. In 1929, when the matter again came before the Grand Lodge, only three members of the Jurisprudence Committee were in attendance. Two of these members were in favor of overruling Most \Vorshipful Brother Ittner, while one member was in favor of approving his decision. The view of the two members prevailed and the decision was disapproved, and the Lodge ordered to confer the Third Degree (which had not been conferred previously) or prefer charges against the candidate. \Ve cite this case as a matter of information, but we are not inclined to follow it for two reasons, namely: 1. Because the facts in that case were different. There the question of nonresidence was not admitted, but determined by the then Grand Master, without trial. In the instant case, the residence in Kansas at time of reception of petition by the Lodge is admitted by Yates. 2. We feel that, independently of the reason stated in point 1, immediately preceding, the decision of our Grand Lodge in 1929 was wrong; that it countenances invasion of a jurisdiction of another state, and that it should be overruled by this Grand Lodge. 3.

INVASION OF JeRISDICTION AND MASONIC STATUS OF JOHN WAYLAND TODD

Facts. John \Vayland Todd, during the fall of 1945 or the spring of 1946, filed his petition for the degrees in Valley Lodge No. 413, A. F. & A. M. At the time, said Todd resided in the jurisdiction of \Vhitesville Lodge No. 162, A. F. & A. M. On March 21, 1946, Right \Vorshipful Brother John H. Scrivner, then D.D.G.M. of the Ninth Masonic District, visited Valley Lodge and learned that said Todd had been elected to receive the degrees in Valley Lodge without getting a \vaiver of jurisdiction from Whitesville Lodge. Brother Scrivner then advised Brother Glenn Neely, Secretary of Valley Lodge, that this was in violation of the Grand Lodge By-laws and that until they had received a waiver from Whitesville Lodge, they should not proceed further. A waiver was requested from Whitesville Lodge, but refused. Although no waiver was received, and in direct violation of the provisions of Section 194 of our by-laws, and contrary to the advice of Right \Vorshipful Brother Scrivner, Valley Lodge conferred E. A. and F. C. degrees upon said Todd and thereafter tendered to Whitesville Lodge a check in the sum of $42.00, being double the degree fees received by it from said Todd. The matter was considered by Most Worshipful Brother Willis J. Bray, who attempted to satisfy the Brethren of both Lodges, and who ruled (Decision No.9, Proceedings 1946, Page 29) that, "When a


16

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Lodge invades the jurisdiction of another Lodge, and, in consequence thereof, pays the penalty of double the fee received, as is provided by our law, the Lodge so paying such fee penalty is entitled to have the petitioner in question become a member of such Lodge paying such penalty, and the acceptance of such penalty on the part of the Lodge whose jurisdiction has been invaded amounts to a waiver of jurisdiction, even though such waiver had previously been refused." Although no waiver was received and Whitesville Lodge refused the tendered check, the Third Degree has also been conferred upon said Todd. We are satisfied that the decision was rendered in the belief that the $42.00 check, above mentioned, had been received and accepted by Whitesville Lodge. Such, however, is not the case as the check was refused and returned under date of September 9, 1946, and the decision in question therefore has no bearing upon the Masonic status of said Todd, which has been directly challenged by Whitesville Lodge, and which Most \Vorshipful Brother Bray, in a note to me under date of October 26, 1946, states "is an open question again." Section 121 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that a petition for the degrees shall not be entertained in any Lodge in this jurisdiction, unless the petitioner shall have resided twelve months in the state, the last six months of which shall have been within the jurisdiction of the Lodge. Section 187 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that if any Lodge shall invade the territory of another Lodge and make a Freemason of a person residing in the jurisdiction of such Lodge, without its unanimous consent, the invading Lodge shall pay to the Lodge whose jurisdiction is invaded, double the fees received on account thereof and be subject to such discipline as may be just and proper. Section 194 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that a Lodge shall not receive a petition from an applicant for the mysteries of Freemasonry who lives nearer another Lodge, without the unanimous consent of the latter Lodge. When a Lodge declines to waive jurisdiction over a petitioner, the Grand Master does not have power to interfere. (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1939, page 12.) There is no appeal from the refusal of a Lodge to issue a waiver on a candidate residing in its jurisdiction. (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1940, page 28.) In 1873, our Grand Lodge held that after a Lodge finds that a candidate for the mysteries does not reside within its jurisdiction, all further proceedings must stop before the degree is conferred and such proceedings are null and void. (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1873, page 20.) As Todd did not reside in the jurisdiction of Valley Lodge and Valley Lodge had no waiver from Whitesville Lodge, in whose juris-


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

17

diction said Todd resided, and Whitesville Lodge refused the tendered check, Valley Lodge had no jurisdiction over the said Todd and no right to receive his petition or confer any of the degrees of Freemasonry upon him. Decision. In the instant case, it appears plain that the officers of Valley Lodge deliberately ignored the advice of their District Deputy Grand Master and deliberately violated Section 194 of the Grand Lodge By-laws and deliberately invaded the territory of Whitesville Lodge No. 162. Surely, Section 187 of our Grand Lodge By-laws does not destroy Sections 121 and 194, but the three sections must be construed together. So construed, Section 187 surely is not intended to permit or cure a deliberate invasion of jurisdiction merely by the payment of a cash penalty and suffering possible discipline. On the contrary, . Section 187 must be construed to cover only innocent or careless, but not willful, invasions of jurisdiction. Any other construction would nullify Sections 121 and 194. It therefore follows and I rule: 1. That all degrees heretofore conferred upon said John Wayland Todd were illegally conferred and are null and void and said Todd has no standing as a Freemason, but is in the position of a profane. 2. That Valley Lodge and all officers of Valley Lodge No. 413 who deliberately, and with knowledge, violated our Grand Lodge By-laws, as aforesaid, are subject to discipline. 3. I hereby order the 1946 officers of both Valley and Whitesville Lodges to appear, with all pertinent Lodge records, before the Grand Lodge Jurisprudence Committee on Monday, September 29, 1947, at 11 o'clock a. m. at the Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, at which time said committee shall investigate and ascertain all facts in connection with the conferring of such degrees and recommend to the Grand Lodge, at its September, 1947, Annual Communication, what, if any, discipline shall be imposed upon the Lodge and/or officers involved. 4. This communication .shall be read at the next stated communications of Whitesville Lodge No. 162 and Valley Lodge No. 413, and made a matter of record in both such Lodges. 4.

AMENDED SECTION

22

OF OUR BY-LAWS

Still another decision rendered by me seems of sufficient importance to be set out in full. It bears upon the provisions of new Section 22 of the Grand Lodge By-laws adopted at the 1946 Annual Communication, by which a difference is made between ritual and administrative districts. We respectfully recommend that said amended Section 22 be carefully reconsidered by our revision committee as, in many instances, it appears defective. While it does not expressly overrule the old Section 22, I assume that it was so


18

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

intended. If so, there is no provision in the new section for the appointment of two deputies in the City of St. Louis. Moreover, the residential qualifications set out in the new Section 22 are so general that under it a Brother in one extreme part of the state might be appointed a deputy for a district in the opposite extreme part of the state. Again, the reduction in the number of administrative districts has so enlarged the districts that a number of very desirable deputies have refused to serve because of the great distances to be covered, and the great time necessary to the proper discharge of their duties in such large districts. Personally, I feel that this Grand Lodge made a serious mistake in the adoption of said section, and I earnestly recommend a reconsideration of the matter and a return to our former system. The decision in question is as follows: Facts. Prior to January 1, 1947, Marlborough Lodge was located in the old Fifty-ninth Masonic District. Prior to said date the old Twenty-second Masonic District consisted of the then area within the city limits of Kansas City, and Alpha Lodge No. 659 in North Kansas City. As of January 1, 1947, the city limits of Kansas City were so extended that since said last mentioned date, Marlborough Lodge is within the limits of the City of Kansas City. Query: What, if any, effect does the foregoing change in the corporate limits of the City of Kansas City, have upon Marlborough Lodge' Law. The query has four aspects, first of which has relation to the administrative and ritual districts in which Marlborough Lodge now is; second, the question of its jurisdiction over petitions since January 1, 1947; third, its obligations, if any, to the Kansas City Masonic Board of Relief; and fourth, its obligations to other Kansas City Lodges. The first aspect of the matter is determined by the provisions of the New Section 22 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, adopted at the 1946 Annual Communication of our Grand Lodge, by which a difference was made between ritual and administrative districts. Paragraph D of said Section 22 provides that the ritual committee shall, from time to time, determine the ritual districts. Paragraph C of said Section provides that each administrative district shall consist of one or more ritual districts, as may be determined, from time to time, by the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden and Junior Grand 'Varden. From the foregoing, it appears that the last mentioned Grand Lodge officers, in setting up administrative districts, cannot split up a ritual district, as administrative districts must be composed of one or more ritual districts.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

19

It also follows, from the foregoing, that the above mentioned Grand Lodge officers cannot, with any degree of accuracy or permanency, set up administrative districts until ritual districts are set up by the Committee on Ritual. Thus far, the Committee on Ritual has had no meetings and it has not as yet set up any new ritual districts under the authority granted by the above-mentioned By-law. Until changes are made, the old districts, in existence prior to the enactment of New Section 22, are, de facto, still in existence as present ritual districts. It being necessary, for the welfare of the Craft, to appoint District Deputy Grand Masters for the new administrative districts, the above mentioned Grand Lodge officers have set up new administrative Districts. Under that setup, Marlborough Lodge is in the Eighth Administrative District. Decision. 1. Under the foregoing facts and law, I rule that changing the corporate limits of the City of Kansas City had no effect upon the question of the administrative or ritual district in which Marlborough Lodge is located. The above mentioned Grand Lodge officers have no power to put a part of a ritual district into an administrative district; Marlborough Lodge will remain in Administrative District 8 and Ritual District Fifty-nine, until such time as changes may be made by the Ritual Committee and the above mentioned Grand Lodge officers in accordance with the powers conferred upon them by said amended Section 22 of our By-laws. 2. The question of jurisdiction of the Lodge presents an entirely different aspect. Section 192 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, as amended, expressly provides, among other things, that in cities or towns where .there are two or more Lodges, Lodges shall have concurrent jurisdiction over the territory they are in and also the territory lying equidistant between the corporate limits of such city or town and the nearest Lodge or Lodges in the various directions therefrom, except within ,the corporate limits of another city or town where there is a Lodge. I rule that, under Section 192, Marlborough Lodge, being within the limits of Kansas City since January 1, 1947, has since said date, concurrent jurisdiction with other Kansas City Lodges over the City of Kansas City and the adjoining territory described in said section. 3. A third matter has been called to my attention in connection with my investigation of the problem and that is whether or not, by being placed, independently of its own action, within the corporate limits of Kansas City, Marlborough Lodge automatically becomes liable as other Kansas City Lodges are for the support of the Masonic Board of Relief of Kansas City. It is clear, and I rule, that under the provisions of Section 65 of


20

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

the Grand Lodge By-Laws, as amended in 1944 (see Proceedings 1944, pages 140 and 141), Marlborough Lodge, since January 1, 1947, is liable for all obligations imposed upon Lodges in the City of Kansas City by the provisions of the last-mentioned Section of our By-Laws. 4. Under the provisions of Section 64 of the Grand Lodge Bylaws, Marlborough Lodge must furnish to all other Kansas City Lodges and all other Kansas City Lodges must furnish to Marlborough Lodge, all information required by said Section 64. DECISION

5.

A request for dispensation for new Lodge, signed by twenty members, was granted and issued on June 11, 1947, in the belief that all twenty were qualified, and the Lodge was regularly instituted U.D. Thereafter, and less than ninety days before the next annual communication, it was ascertained that three of the members who had signed the petition were officers of another Lodge and had not resigned their offices. When the matter was called to their attention, the officers resigned and their resignations were accepted. A number of petitions for the degrees and for affiliation were pending and the group was very enthusiastic and anxious to proceed. Believing it to be in the interest of Freemasonry that they be allowed to continue to function, I held the foregoing to be a substantial compliance with our by-laws. DECISION

6.

Several of our Lodges have received requests from Station KXLW, located at Clayton, Missouri, asking them to furnish notices and news items, to be edited by the parties in control of the Station and sent out over the air. Furnishing such notices involves what seems to me to be a change of policy which should first be considered and established by this Grand Lodge. I therefore submit the opinion in full with the request that the Grand Lodge consider the same and adopt such policy as it deems best for the guidance of our Lodges. Said opinion is as follows: Law. Section 200 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that a Lodge shall not publish the fact that it has or will confer any Masonic degrees upon anyone. Under said Section, it has been ruled that a Lodge may advise its members, only by first-class mail in a sealed envelope, of the names of persons whose petitions for the degrees are received or are to be balloted upon (Proceedings of the Grand Lodge 1923, page 26). The Grand Lodge further has a standing resolution (see Grand Lodge Bylaws, page 171) that no Masonic transactions shall be inserted in a newspaper by a Brother without permission of the Grand Lodge.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

21

It is a matter of common knowledge that Lodges in St. Louis and Kansas City regularly publish in the daily newspapers notices of their meetings, setting forth the time and place thereof and the degree or degrees to be conferred. Decision. It would seem that the proposed service to be rendered by Radio Station KXLW is quite similar to the above mentioned newspaper notices. Yet, Station KXLW proposes to enlarge upon and broaden the content of such notices and it might be difficult to keep the notices within proper limits or to check whether the written notices proposed to be furnished by the Lodges to the Radio Station will be properly announced over the air. Moreover, the proposed services involve an important question of policy, which I believe the Grand Lodge itself should pass upon after mature consideration of all the possibilities involved. I shall present the matter to the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge for determination; and I rule that, until such determination, the Lodges shall not furnish any information as to Lodge activities to said Station KXLW or any other radio station. 7. (A) Territorial jurisdiction of a Lodge is not limited by boundary lines of a county. Section 194 of the Grand Lodge By-laws means air line distances between the actual home or mansion house of the petitioner and the lodge hall (not the city limits). (B) Where the home of a petitioner is equidistant by air line from the lodge halls in several different towns, and no other Lodges are involved, the Lodges in all said towns have concurrent jurisdiction over the petitioner, and any of said Lodges has the right to receive the petition of such petitioner for the degrees, even though the mailing address of the petitioner is in one of the other said towns and he considers himself a member of that community. DECISION 8. Section 23 of the Grand Lodge By-laws orders the District Deputy to perform the following duties: (A) Visit officially the Lodges in his District, as far as practicable. (B) Examine its books and records and see that they are properly kept. In view of the great size of some districts, under new Section 22, it has been impossible for deputies thereof to visit all Lodges individually and in such cases some deputies have arranged for joint meetings of the several Lodges at convenient points. In such cases, as the deputy has the duty of examining the books of the Lodges, it is proper for him to ask that the books of the Lodges be taken by the appropriate officers to the point of meeting, for inspection by him. Books will always remain in the possession of the secretary of the particular Lodge. DECISION


22

PROCEEDINGS OF THE DECISION

1947

9.

(A) Under Section 152 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, a Brother raised since the adoption of said section who has not passed his examination in the proficiency lecture in the Third Degree, cannot object to an initiation of a candidate for the reason that said section provides that such an objection has the effect of a blackball and therefore amounts to voting on a petition for the degrees, for which right the Brother has not yet qualified. (B) Under Section 153 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, a Brother raised since the adoption of Section 152, who has not passed his examination in the proficiency lecture in the Third Degree, has the right to object to the passing or raising of another Brother for the reason that under said section such objection does not have the effect of a blackball, but merely stands as a bar against the candidate for sixty days, unless sooner withdrawn by the objector and the objection shall not be renewed by anyone, but charges may be preferred against the candidate. From this it seems plain that objecting to the advancement or raising of a Brother is not an exercise of the right to vote, but merely the filing of an objection against the Brother. Of this right, such a Brother is not deprived by the provisions of Section 152. DECISION 10. Where a Lodge desires to change the time of election from the first meeting in December to the first meeting in September, it may amend its by-laws, in the manner stated therein, so that the new by-laws shall provide that at the election to be held the first meeting in December, 1947, the officers then elected shall be elected for a term ending with the first meeting in September, 1948, and that, thereafter, officers shall be annually elected at the first meeting in September. DECISION 11. (A) Section 95 of the Grand Lodge By-laws does not require the holding of an election to fill a vacancy in an elective office at the first or any particular stated communication of the Lodge. Said section means that such election shall be held within a reasonable time after the vacancy occurs. (B) Under the authority granted by the provisions of Section 94 of the Grand Lodge By-laws and for the welfare of the Craft, the Worshipful Master of a Lodge has the authority to make certain temporary emergency appointments in elective offices when necessary that the business of the Lodge may be carried on in orderly fashion and the credit of the Lodge protected. In so doing, he must see that the interests and welfare of the Lodge are fully protected. (C) Where the Treasurer of a Lodge died between the second regular meeting in April and the first regular meeting in May, after


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

23

the May Trestleboard of the Lodge had peen prepared; and where the officers felt that the June Trestleboard would not reach the members five days before the first meeting in June, the calling of an election at the second meeting in June is a substantial compliance with the requirements of said Section 95. (D) Under the foregoing facts, the Master would not be justified in waiting until the next regular election in December of 1947 to fill such vacancy. Such an election would not be within a reasonable time. DECISION

12.

While the acting Worshipful Master of a Lodge must use the word "swear," a candidate who objects to the use of that word may substitute the word "affirm," and such an answer shall be acceptable to the Lodge, both at the time of receiving degrees and in proficiency lectures. DECISION 13. Section 272 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that, in voting on a petition for restoration after expulsion for un-Masonic conduct the Lodge shall "ballot" upon such petition. The section does not specify whether the ballot shall be a paper ballot or by ballot box. The meaning of the word "ballot" is broad enough to cover either method, and the Lodge may decide by majority vote whether it shall be by ballot box or by paper ballot. DECISION

14.

(A) A club organized by members of a Lodge for commercial purposes may not use the square and compasses for its bowling team or any other of the club's activities. (B) If the club and the bowling team are not organized for commercial purposes, it would seem that the square and compasses may be used on the uniforms of the members of the bowling team. However, it seems to be the policy of the Grand Lodge (see Proceedings 1922, page 203), that Masonic names and emblems should not be so used; and in view of such feeling, I strongly suggest that the square and compasses be not used. DECISION 15. Section 45 of the Grand Lodge By-laws expressly provides that "blank ballots shall not be counted" and that is the law today. The decision to the contrary, made in 1919, is no longer the law of our Grand Lodge. At that time Section 45 did not have in it the clause "blank ballots shall not be counted." DECISION

16.

(A) It is undoubtedly the law that Lodge by-laws do not have to be approved by the Grand Lodge.


24

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

(B) If revised by-laws were duly adopted and approved on a given date,and at that time there was no provision in the Lodge's old by-laws or the newly adopted by-laws or in the motion by which the new by-laws were adopted, specifying a date at which the new by-laws were to become effective, then and in such event, the new by-laws went into effect on the date of their adoption. (C) If, in the old by-laws, or in the new by-laws, or in the motion adopting the new by-laws, an effective date is specified, then and in that event the new by-laws take effect on the date so specified. Such date need not be a Lodge meeting date. (D) At the time of adopting by-laws, a provision to make them effective at a later date may be incorporated in the motion for adoption or in the new by-laws and in either such event the new by-laws would go into effect on the date specified. Such date need not be a Lodge meeting date. (E) If by-laws are adopted on a given date without a provision as to the date they should go into effect in the motion to adopt or in the old or new by-laws, the Lodge cannot, thereafter, by motion, specify a different date on which they are to be effective. That, in itself, would amount to a suspension of the by-laws, which is not permitted (see Section 34, Grand Lodge By-laws); and it would be tantamount to an amendment which could only be accomplish~d in the manner provided in the new by-laws for the adoption of amendments. DECISION

17.

(A) When a Brother requests "a demit in good standing from your Lodge," there is sufficient indication that he does not desire to sever his membership by demit, but really desires a certificate of good standing and the Lodge 3hould ascertain his wishes before issuing a demit. (B) Where a demit is issued upon such request, without such inquiry, and the Brother afterwards returns demit and requests certificate of good standing, the demit is null and void; should be cancelled, and an appropriate certificate of good standing issued. DECISION

18.

(A) Where a Brother is elected to membership in a Lodge on a certificate of good standing, before his petition for affiliation had lain over for four weeks, such election is null and void. (B) Where, in such case, a demit was requested by the receiving Lodge and issued in the mistaken belief that the Brother had been duly elected, such demit was improperly issued, is null and void, and should be returned to the issuing Lodge for cancellation, and the Brother continues to be a member of the Lodge issuing the demit. (C) When a certificate of good standing has been presented to a Lodge and the petitioner has been rejected, all rights under the cer-


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

25

tificate have been exhausted and a new petition for affiliation may not be accompanied by the same certificate of good standing, even though less than ninety days have elapsed since its issue. DECISION

19.

(A) Balloting on candidates must be at stated communications, which can only be held at the time. specified in a Lodge's by-laws. (B) Where a stated communication was continued past the hour of midnight, petitioners elected after midnight were elected on a day other than that provided by the by-laws for the holding of stated communications and all such ballots, either elections or rejections, are null and void, and all petitioners so balloted upon must be reballoted upon. (C) Special notice of such new balloting must be given to all members of the Lodge in a sealed envelope, first-class mail. Such notice shall set out the names of the candidates to be reballoted upon; the date of the stated communication at which the new ballot is to be taken, and the reason for the reballot, namely because the previous ballots were illegal and void. DECISION

20.

A candidate was elected to receive the degrees in Valley Park Lodge on November 19, 1946. After his election and before receiving any of the degrees, he left and established his residence in California, where he now resides. Through regular channels of our Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge of California, a Lodge in California was requested to confer the degrees upon the candidate for Valley Park Lodge. This request was denied because California refuses to confer courtesy degrees upon candidates who have personally moved to and reside in California. The California Lodge states that after a six months' residence they would be in a position, under their law, to accept the petition for the degrees there, but prior to such time they could receive the petition provided Valley Park Lodge issued a waiver on the petitioner. 'Vhen Valley Park Lodge ascertained the abovementioned facts, they returned to the petitioner the degree fees paid by him, and wanted to know what to do further in the matter. (1) Under a decision of our Grand Lodge, Valley Park Lodge had the right to return the initiation fee paid by the 路candidate. (2) Under our decisions, it had no right to issue a waiver of jurisdiction on said candidate after he had removed from the Lodge's jurisdiction. (3) While Valley Park Lodge has not perpetual jurisdiction over said candidate, it has jurisdiction over him for at least one year from the date of his election. (4) If, within such year, Valley Park Lodge takes no action, as provided in Section 114 as amended in 1946, its jurisdiction over


26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

said candidate will cease at the end of said year and he will thereafter be free to petition any Lodge in California that may then have jurisdiction over him. (5) If, within the period or periods specified in such section, Valley Park Lodge extends the time of initiation as provided in Section 114 as amended in 1946, then and in that event, it will retain jurisdiction over the candidate for the periods of any extension or extensions made as provided in said amended section. (6) Rising Light Lodge No. 397 of Huntington Park, California would, under our law, be invading the jurisdiction of Valley Park Lodge if it received a petition for the degrees from the candidate while he remained under the jurisdiction of Valley Park Lodge. DECISION 21. (A) When a Brother transfers his membership by a certificate of

good standing, the demitting Lodge must remit to the receiving Lodge the pro-rata part of unearned dues from the date of the demit. (B) When dues in the receiving Lodge are higher, the petitioner must pay the difference from the date of the demit to the end of the year. (C) When the dues in the receiving Lodge are lower the petitioner is entitled to credit for the excess so paid to the receiving Lodge. DECISION 22. When a charge of un-Masonic conduct is filed against a Brother and referred to the Grievance Committee of the Lodge, the only duty of that committee is to investigate the charge and ascertain whether, in the committee's opinion, there is probable cause to believe that an offense has been committed and of the probable guilt of the accused and to report their findings thereon. The Grievance Com~ mittee has no right to pass upon the gravity or lack of gravity of the offense charged. DECISION 23. It is not pernlissible for a Lodge to have Memorial or Flag Day Services as a Lodge on Sunday. DECISION 24. (A) Section 50 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that a Lodge shall not become a joint owner or occupant of a hall with any other than exclusively moral or benevolent associations. (B) 'Vhite Shrine of Jerusalem, which makes Masonic membership or relationship a prerequisite to admission, is such an association, and a Lodge may arrange for joint occupancy of its hall with White Shrine of Jerusalem. (C) A Rebecca Lodge, an affiliate of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is such an Assoeiation, and a Lodge may arrange for joint orrupanry of its hall with Reheeea Lodge.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI DECISION

27

25.

La Russell Lodge occupies the second floor of a building, the first floor of which has been, until recently, owned and occupied by a bank. The entire building has been sold and title conveyed to two individuals who propose either to occupy the ground floor themselves or rent it to others for use as a retail drug store, which drug store will sell package liquor, but will not operate a bar or sell intoxicating liquor for consumption by the drink upon the said premises. Query: May the Lodge continue to occupy the second floor of said building if the first floor is hereafter used as indicated' While it has been held under our present law that "it is not permissible for a Masonic Lodge to rent a portion of the lower floor of its Lodge building to a wholesale liquor house" (See Grand Lodge Proceedings 1943, page 37), I feel that such decision does not cover the case outlined under the above facts. Under our present law, the parties operating the proposed drug store under the conditions outlined, and in a manner not to bring disgrace upon the Fraternity, would be eligible to petition for and receive the degrees of Freemasonry; or if by Freemasons, such operation would not be un-Masonic. Under such circumstances, I rule that while our present laws remain in force, the Lodge may continue to rent from the new owners and occupy the second floor of said premises. However, the 1943 decision hereinbefore cited seems to indicate a policy in the Grand Lodge against such continued occupancy, and I therefore suggest that another meeting place be secured, if a suitable and approved one is available. DECISION

26.

A Lodge has no right to contribute Lodge funds to the building fund for an American Legion hall. DECISION

27.

(A) Section 135 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides that if one or more blackballs appear on a collective ballot, the ballot shall not be counted and the petitioners shall be balloted upon separately. (B) When a black cube appears in a collective ballot, that ballot is void and separate ballots must thereafter be taken. (C) Section 138 provides that when only one negative vote appears, the Master shall order a second ballot which shall, in all cases, be final. (D) Where one negative appears on such separate ballot, petitioner is entitled to a second separate ballot, as the collective ballot is void and is not counted. DECISION

28.

Section 189 of the Grand Lodge By-laws must be liberally con-


28

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

strued as indicating a policy that fees, in cases where Entered Apprentices or Fellow Crafts apply for' affiliation to another Lodge, should not be limited to $20.00, but should at least equal the minimum requirements of Section 46 of the Grand Lodge By-laws. Such minimum requirements in St. Louis are not $20.00 but $50.00; and the use, in Section 189, of the w.ords "at least" indicates that the Grand Lodge intended that the receiving Lodge shall be entitled to such amount as may be fixed by its by-laws for the degree or degrees to be conferred by it. DECISION

29.

Section 118 of the Grand Lodge By-laws authorizes the Grand Master to cause to be healed a Brother who, without his fault, has been irregularly or illegally initiated, passed or raised, not only by any Lodge in this jurisdiction but by any Lodge of any other recognized jurisdiction which has been regularly requested to confer a degree or degrees for a Missouri Lodge. DECISION

30.

Under the recent rulings of our Grand Lodge (p,roceedings 1943, page 33, and Proceedings 1944, pages 18, 139) the Lodge has no right to use funds of the Lodge for the payment of a cornerstone for a church. DECISION 31. When, pursuant to the provisions of Section 246 of the Grand Lodge By-laws, the Grand Master orders charges to be preferred against a Brother, notwithstanding the action of the Grievance Committee in finding no probable cause, the Grand Master has the authority not only to order the Junior Warden to choose counsel to assist him in the conduct of the trial but also to select the counsel to be chosen. REVISION OF GRAND LODGE BY-LAWS As the revision of our Grand Lodge By-laws has been laid over from year to year and has been pending so many years that the memory of man scarcely runneth to the contrary, I have urged the chairman and members of the Committee on Revision to make every possible effort to be ready for complete and final revision this year. They have promised me that they would endeavor to do so. As the gathering up and proper editing of the revised by-laws will be a job calling for the services of a Brother fully versed in the Grand Lodge By-laws, including the revisions, I recommend in this connection that the incoming Grand Master be empowered and directed to appoint a fully qualified Brother to perform the task. I also recommend that provision be made to reimburse him in a reasonable sum for his time and labor.


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WASHINGTON CONFERENCES The Masonic Service Association of the United States, The Grand Masters' Conference of the United States and Canada, George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, The Grand Secretaries' Conference of the United States. On February 18, 1947, in company with M. W. Brothers Bert S. Lee, Anthony F. Ittner, and Harold L. Reader, I journeyed to Washington to attend the annual meetings of the four great organizations named in the above headings. M. W. Bro. Ray V. Denslow and Rt. \V. Bro. Morris E. Ewing, Deputy Grand Master, journeyed to Washington by a different route and joined our party on the following morning, February 19. THE MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES On February 19, we attended the annual meeting of the Masonic Service Association of the United States, an organization which exemplifies Masonic charity in its finest phases and on a gigantic scale. Since the termination of the war, the work of this association at the great camps and forts which dotted the entire country has to a very large extent, if not entirely, been discontinued. However, the need of loving service and attention to our veterans has by no means ceased to exist, for all over the United States in the veterans' hospitals are thousands of more or less sorely afflicted veterans who require such service and which no other organization can give. We are intensely interested and deeply moved by a film which the Masonic Service Association exhibits showing the character of work done by our field agents in these hospitals. We have no reason to regret but every reason to be proud of our membership in this great organization. THE GRAND MASTERS' CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA On February 20 and 21, we attended the sessions of the Grand Masters' Conference of the United States and Canada. For her first year of membership in the conference Canada was represented by seven of her nine Grand Masters. The fellowship with them was delightful and inspiring. Puerto Rico also was represented for the first time this year. The papers read at this conference were all intensely interesting and replete with valuable information and ideas. The Grand Masters' dinner on the evening of February 20 was in very truth a feast of reason and a flow of soul. Senator Brewster was the principal speaker.


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1947

The Grand Masters' Conference is another important link in the great chain which goes to make up the "Universality of Freemasonry." GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION Our attendance on the annual convention of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, without wanting to make invidious comparisons, was perhaps the most inspiring of all our experiences in and about Washington. Our annual pilgrimage to Alexandria and Mt. Vernon has come to be regarded as a day of renewed devotion to a lofty ideal and a day for paying renewed tribute to the memory of our greatest American. The work done during the past year showed considerable progress. The large dining room and kitchen had been completed and were used for the dinner to the representatives and guests. I had the honor of presenting Missouri's check for $7,500.00. The aggregate of the contributions made that day was in the neighborhood of $200,000.00. The memorial is already completed for all necessary and practical purposes, though quite a bit remains to be done in the way of adornment. The contract for the heroic statue of George Washington in the great entrance hall remains to be let, but that will be taken care of in due time. Enough money is on hand or in sight to complete the memorial but some of the work which remains will probably be deferred in the hope of avoiding the present exorbitant costs of material and labor and also to insure greater economy by reason of continuous work until the task is finished. It is imperative that an adequate endowment fund be raised to insure the successful operation of the building and the necessary workings of the organization. A very creditable beginning has been made on the endowment fund, but a few years more will be needed to make it adequate and complete. In this connection, I recommend and earnestly urge adding the Senior Grand Warden to the delegation making the annual pilgrimage to Washigton. For many years prior to the great depression, he was a part of the delegation. I think it is high time now that he be added to the group and financial provision made therefor. THE GRAND SECRETARIES' CONFEREN~E OF THE UNITED STATES I attended the Grand Secretaries' Conference as the guest of M. W. Bro. Reader, our Grand Secretary. I found the Grand Secretaries to be a wonderfully fine group of men without exception. Their organization is doing a splendid work in affording its mem-


1947

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, 31

bers an opportunity for an interchange of ideas and enabling them to a considerable extent to unify and standardize their methods, though of course each grand jurisdiction fully retains its own individuality. Their work also enables them the more easily to solve and settle interstate problems and controversies. PROPOSED GRAND LODGE NEWSPAPER In his annual address at the Grand Lodge of 1946, Most Worshipful Brother Bray recommended the establishment of a Grand Lodge newspaper to be published monthly and sent to every member of the Craft. To underwrite the expense of the publication, he proposed that "fifty cents per annum from the Grand Lodge per capita dues should be set aside for this purpose," and that "the total dues to the Grand Lodge (per member) should be increased by that amount." Along with the rest of his address this suggestion was referred to the Committee on Grand Master's Address. The committee in turn recommended that the matter be referred to a committee of five of which the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary should be members, the other three members to be appointed by the incoming Grand Master. This recommendation was approved and adopted by the Grand Lodge. As the other three members of the committee, I appointed M. W. Bro. Karl M. Vetsburg, and R. W. Brothers Edmund E. Morris and Jolly P. Hurtt. When the proposal was advanced by M. W. Bro. Bray, I was very favorably impressed by it, but I realized that if I was elected Grand Master it would be my duty to keep an open mind and to conduct a thorough and impartial investigation. In addition to consulting many well-informed brethren in whom I had high confidence, I requested the executive secretary of the Masonic Service Association of the United States to give me all the data in his possession bearing on this subject. He complied with my request promptly and cheerfully though he maintained a strict neutrality in the matter and offered no advice. He merely submitted to me the facts pro and con which he had in his possession. It was evident from the data which I had received that the very high and still mounting costs of labor, material and equipment involved in getting out such a publication would make it a very costly venture, not taking into account the salaries of editor, business manager, clerical help and possible rent. I was also informed that from very carefully conducted investigations it appeared that on the average among the grand jurisdictions where Masonic newspapers were published, not more than 10 per cent of the membership took the slightest interest in such a newspaper. Possibly in our beloved state the interest might be somewhat higher, but we could not reasonably expect it to be many points above the average if the results of the investigation are correct.


32

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1947

The plan, too, of making further increases at this time in our per capita tax, which would have to be borne by many Lodges that could ill afford it unless they passed it on to the members, ought to be very carefully weighed before being adopted. I held a meeting of the committee at my Grand Lodge office on March 12, 1947, where the matter was very fully discussed. I asked each member to conduct a further full and impartial investigation of his own before arriving at a final conclusion. The report of the committee will be submitted before the close of this annual communication. In what I have said above, I have given my views as your Grand Master with no thought of binding the committee, which will decide the matter for itself. I consider it my duty to speak as Grand Master in a matter so vitally concerning the welfare of the Fraternity. In fulfillment of that duty, I advise the abandonment of the project, or recommend at least a waiting period of a year or two, or possibly more, before engaging in so expensive and possibly hazardous a commitment. CERTIFICATES IN RECOGNITION OF MASONIC VETERANS In grateful recognition of our Missouri Master Masons who served in the armed forces of America during the recent great 'Vorld War, I recommend that a committee of three be appointed to arrange for the preparation and fitting presentation to each such veteran of a Grand Lodge certificate commemorating his service and expressing the thanks and appreciation of the Fraternity. Let it not be said of Missouri Freemasonry that ,ve are forgetting our veterans which seems to be the tendency in so many departments of American life. Let this certificate be beautiful in form and still more beautiful in the warmth and sincerity of its expressions. I recommend that adequate financial provision be made for getting out these certificates. DISPENSATION FOR A LODGE U. D. On June 11, 1947, I issued a dispensation to a group of Master Masons to form a Lodge at Clarkton under the name of Clarkton Lodge, U. D. They were set to work under dispensation by R. W. Brother Robert D. Ellington, D. D. G. M. on June 17, 1947. If the Committee on Lodges U. D. finds that these brethren have done an amount and quality of work to entitle them to a charter, we shall accord them a hearty welcome into the fellowship of our Missouri chartered Lodges. PROPER RECOGNITION AND SUPPORT OF DISTRICT LECTURERS In his annual report to the Grand Lodge in 1946, M. 'V. Bro. Willis


1947

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33

J. Bray, under the heading of "Recommendations," as a part of Recommendation No.3, recommended as follows: "I further recommend that the actual expenses of the D. D. G. M. and the D. L. be paid by the Grand Lodge upon presentation of proper vouchers for official visitations." In the legislation adopted by the Grand Lodge, the expenses of the D. D. G. M.'s were adequately provided for, but unfortunately the rights of the District Lecturers were lost in the shuffie. I am sure that this was oversight, but I request that at this session of the Grand Lodge, adequate provision be made for the legitimate expenses of the District Lecturers whose work is as important and as essential to the welfare of the Fraternity as that of the D. D. G. M.'s. CHARGES ORDERED PREFERRED In matters involving alleged un-Masonic conduct arising in two of our Lodges, on what seemed an adequate prima facie showing of guilt in each case, I ordered charges preferred which was accordingly done in each of the Lodges. In view of the presumption of the innocence of an accused Brother until he is proved and found guilty, and in view of the further fact that if either or both of the accused brethren are found guilty, their cases will come before the Grand Lodge, I deem it wise, considerate, and expedient, not to mention either the names of the Lodges or of the accused brethren at this time. The ordering of charges by the Grand Master upon a proper showing is one of the most unpleasant duties he has to perform, but it cannot be side-stepped. DEATH OF MOST \VORSHIPFUL BROTHER GEORGE \V. WALKER On November 13, 1946, Most Worshipful Brother George W. Walker of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, one of our best-beloved Past Grand Masters, departed this life and entered into the Grand Lodge on High. M. W. Bro. Walker's services to the Grand Lodge and to Freemasonry are so well known to all our Brethren that it will not be necessary to recount them here. That will be the province of the Committee on Necrology and I know that committee will beautifully and ably discharge its duty. I feel a great personal loss in the death of M. W. Brother Walker. He was an efficient Grand Master and member of the Masonic Home Board and a true and loyal friend to all good Freemasons and all good men generally. I prepared and caused to be sent to all Grand Lodge officers and Past Grand Masters and to all the Lodges of the state a suitable memorial to M. \V. Brother Walker.


34

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

MISSOURI LODGE OF RESEARCH The Grand Lodge a few years ago enacted a by-law providing for the organization of Lodges of Research upon a proper showing of compliance with the by-law. Under the provisions of this by-law, Missouri Lodge of Research was organized and has done a wonderful work in ferreting out and preserving in book form many invaluable items of Missouri Masonic history which have remained through the years either wholly or partly buried in obscure and musty archives. The Lodge has attained a membership of approximately three hundred, which is entirely inadequate to underwrite the extensive and fasci~ating program it has outlined. It should have a membership of at least three thousand Master Masons and a majority of the Lodges of the state. The membership fee, which includes the dues for the first year, is five dollars; whether for a Lodge or a Master Mason. The annual dues thereafter are five dollars. I urge as many of the Lodges and Master Masons of the state as can afford it to become members. The first three Worshipful Masters of Missouri Lodge of Research were M. W. Brothers Henry C. Chiles, Ray V. Denslow, and Anthony F. Ittner. Its present Worshipful Master is Rt. W. Brother Eli S. Haynes of Columbia, Missouri. DUPLICATE CHARTERS During the year, I issued duplicate charters to Lodges as follows: Triplett Lodge No. 122, the original being no longer legible; duplicate Charter issued December 5, 1946. Senath Lodge No. 513, the original having been destroyed by fire on December 31, 1903, and the first duplicate being badly worn; second duplicate Charter issued March 27, 1947. Cleveland Lodge No. 651, original having been destroyed by fire July 26, 1947; duplicate Charter issued August 21, 1947.

DISPENSATIONS During my year as Grand Master, I have granted the following dispensations: On October 2, 1946, to St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 to hold special meetings in Scottish Rite Cathedral. On November 8, 1946, to R. W. Bro. Lacey Stapp to dedicate hall for Melville Lodge No. 458 in Dadeville, Missouri. On November 4, 1946, to Melville Lodge No. 458 to move to another location in Dadeville, Missouri. On November 22, 1946, to Winigan Lodge No. 540 to hold election of officers December 4, 1946. On December 18, 1946, to Freedom Lodge No. 636 to hold installation of officers for 1947 in Gardenville Temple on January 17, 1947. On December 18, 1946, to Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 to hold installation of officers in new Masonic Temple on December 28, 1946. On December 20, 1946, to Magnolia Lodge No. 626 to hold installation of officers at Alhambra Grotto on January 4, 1947.


1947

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35

On December 26, 1946, to Schell City Lodge No. 448 to hold public installation of officers with Eastern Star in High School building at Schell City, January 3, 1947. On December 26, 1946, to Equality Lodge No. 497 to hold election of officers on Friday, December 27, 1946. On December 26, 1946, to Phoenix Lodge No. 136 to hold election of officers on January 14, 1947. On December 27, 1946, to R. Wor. Clyde C. Evans, to dedicate the new hall of Galt Lodge No. 423, Galt, Missouri, on Tuesday, December 31, 1946. On January 8, 1947, to R. Wor. A. B. Cleaveland to dedicate new lodge hall of Berlin Lodge No. 378 at Fairport, Missouri, on Friday, January 10, 1947. On January 27, 1947, to Callao Lodge No. 38, to hold special election on February 6, 1947, to elect Worshipful Master and Senior Warden. On February 3, 1947, to Washington Lodge No. 87 to hold election of officers on February 4, 1947. On February 10, 1947, to Beacon Lodge No.3 to hold public installation of officers in Scottish Rite Cathedral on Wednesday, April 9, 1947. On March 18, 1947, to Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 to reballot on the petition for advancement of Harold D. Cook, E. A., on April 5, 1947. On March 19, 1947, to Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 to reballot on the petition of Nathan Schwartz at the first regular meeting of the lodge in April, 1947. On March 24, 1947, to Potosi Lodge No. 131 to reballot on petition of Rolin W. Jones at the next regular meeting of the lodge. On March 31, 1947, to Portageville Lodge No. 166 to hold regular meeting on April 2, 1947, instead of April 3, 1947. On April 7, 1947, to R. Wor. Arthur Lynch to dedicate new hall of Dockery Lodge No. 325 at Meadville, Missouri, on April 8, 1947. On April 10, 1947, to R. Wor. Ransom A. Breuer to dedicate Community Hall in Wentzville, Missouri. On April 10, 1947, to Wentzville Lodge No. 46 to hold meeting of the lodge in Community Hall of Wentzville on May 2,1947. On April 14, 1947, to Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 to reballot on the petition of Edward Meier at first regular meeting in May, 1947. On May 2, 1947, to R. Wor. R. D. Ellington, Jr., to dedicate High School gymnasium at Bernie, Missouri. On May 2, 1947, to Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 to hold special meeting in New Masonic Temple, St. Louis, May 20, 1947. On May 9, 1947, to Blackwell Lodge No. 535 to reballot on the petition of John P. Jeunger at first regular meeting in June, 1947. On May 12, 1947, to Bernie Lodge No. 573 to hold special meeting in High School gymnasium, Bernie, Missouri, on May 29, 1947. On May 15, 1947, to R. Wor. R. D. Ellington, Jr., to dedicate High School gymnasium in Chaffee, Missouri. On May 15, 1947, to Chaffee Lodge No. 615 to hold meeting of the Lodge in High School gymnasium on May 24, 1947. On May 16, 1947, to R. Wor. R. D. Ellington, Jr., to dedicate High School auditorium in Senath, Missouri. On May 16, 1947, to Senath Lodge No. 513 to hold meeting of the lodge in Senath High School auditorium on June 20, 1947. On May 19, 1947, to Evergreen Lodge No. 27 to reballot on the petition of A. Keith Hauser for the degrees, and on petition of Harold C. Riechers for affiliation on May 23, 1947.


36

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

On May 29, 1947, to R. Wor. R. D. Ellington, Jr., to dedicate High School gymnasium at Parma, Missouri. On June 3, 1947, to R. Wor. Ransom A. Breuer to dedicate hall into which Union Lodge No. 593 planned to move. On June 5, 1947, to Parma Lodge No. 650 to hold meeting of the lodge in High School gymnasium at Parma on June 7, 1947. On June 14, 1947, to Ferguson Lodge No. 542 to reballot on the petitions of David Loren Fear and Lawrence Frank Hamilton at first regular meeting in July, 1947. On June 27, 1947, to Heroine Lodge No. 104 to reballot on the petition of Floyd J. Snitz at first regular meeting in July, 1947. On August 4, 1947, to R. Wor. R. D. Ellington, Jr., to dedicate High School gymnasium at Braggadocio, Missouri. On August 7, 1947, to Cleveland Lodge No. 65 to hold regular meeting of August 12 in the hall of Belton Lodge No. 450, Belton, Missouri. On August 14, 1947, to Cleveland Lodge No. 65 to hold meetings in Hall of Belton Lodge No. 450, Belton, Missouri, as long as necessary on account of fire which destroyed Cleveland Lodge hall and equipment.

Among the foregoing dispensations, eight were granted to enable Lodges to reballot on petitions. Contrary to the views of some of my predecessors, I hold that if a Lodge is worthy of keeping a charter, and the Worshipful Master has done nothing to raise a presumption that he is acting in bad faith, a request to reballot on a petition ought to be granted as a matter of course if satisfactory reasons for reballot have been given. THE MASONIC WORLD Another most informative and invaluable phase of our Grand Lodge work is the report of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence, prepared and edited by Most "Worshipful Brother Ray V. Denslow, who constitutes the committee. The report appears each year in the back of our Grand Lodge proceedings under the title "Masonic World." As the report is too long to be read in the Grand Lodge, copies of it have been prepared in pamphlet form, and will be distributed among the members later in this morning's session. I urge each of you to read this entire report very carefully and ponder on its significance. It sets out many of the accomplishments of our sister Grand Lodges all over the world, and brings home to us more than anything else possibly could the idea of the universality of Freemasonry. Most Worshipful Bro. Denslow merits and I am sure has the thanks of our entire Fraternity for this great work. I recommend that the remuneration of M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow as chairman of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence be increased to an amount more fitting to his ability and performance. CONSTITUTION OF FREEDOM LODGE NO. 636 At the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of 1946, Freedom Lodge No. 636, which had been set to work as a Lodge U. D. in


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

37

the previous year under a dispensation granted by M. W. Brother Willis J. Bray, Grand Master, was granted a charter on the recommendations of both the Grand Master and the Committee on Lodges U. D. I issued a commission to Rt. W. Bro. LeRoy B. Hambley to set the Lodge at work and accordingly on October 1, 1946, Rt. W. Bro. Hambley dedicated the hall, constituted and consecrated the Lodge and installed its officers. There was a large gathering of friends and brethren present and Freedom Lodge was set to work under most pleasant and auspicious circumstances. The Lodge has done a creditable amount of work and has splendidly exemplified the tenets of Freemasonry in all its transactions. I deeply regret that I was unable to preside at the constitution of Freedom Lodge No. 636, as I had an engagement of long standing for that evening which could not be broken. VISITATIONS 'rhe Lodge of Instruction for the Thirty-third Ritual District held its opening meeting on Friday, October 4, 1946. The large attendance present was indicative of the keen interest shown by the brethren of this district in achieving ritualistic exactness. This initial large meeting was not a mere flash in the pan, as was proven by the fact that the attendance during the entire series of meetings was gratifying to the District Deputy Grand Masters and to the District Lecturer. On October 7 and 8, 1946, the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary enjoyed the hospitality of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, meeting in its annual communication at Chicago. A great number of Grand Masters and Grand Lodge officers from a majority of the Grand Jurisdictions in America were in attendance. Most Worshipful Brother Tinsley and his officers spared nothing in the effort to make our visit enjoyable. On October 10, 1946, the Grand Master was present at a great meeting of Scottish Rite Masons in the Scottish Rite Temple in St. Louis. On October 12, 1946, Mrs. Cameron and I were the guests of Polar Star Lodge No. 79, at a banquet in the Gold Room of the Jefferson Hotel, the occasion being the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the Lodge. The committee on arrangements, with Worshipful Brother J. Edward McIlvaine as chairman, did an outstanding job in making this meeting a great success and one of which Polar Star Lodge and the entire Fraternity could well be proud. On October 12 it was also my privilege to visit Cache Lodge and join them as they celebrated their seventy-fifth year of Masonic activity. A high percentage of the membership of Cache Lodge was in attendance and a true spirit of fraternity prevailed. On October 15, it was the privilege of the Grand Master to address the annual meeting of the Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. The attendance was limited only by the size of this auditorium and a keen interest in the work of the order was manifested by all present. October 18: At Independence, Missouri, we attended the one-hundredth annivarsary meeting of Independence Lodge No. 76. A large representation of the brethren from the western part of the state were present to assist in honoring this fine Lodge as it recognized its centennial. October 19: Pilgrim Lodge No. 652 observed its twenty-fifth year of Masonic activity.


38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

October 21: Euclid Lodge No. 505 had a large special meeting called for the purpose of recognizing the long and faithful service of its secre路 tary, Brother Merle E. Campbell. October 24: At St. Joseph, Missouri, the Grand Master assisted St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 in marking its one-hundredth year of Masonic activity. An interesting history was prepared, showing the great change between then and now. October 31: The Grand Master was the guest of the secretaries of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Masonic Administrative Districts. An excellent dinner was enjoyed and a helpful discussion by the secretaries was beneficial to all. October 31: An excellent play was presented by members of the Scottish Rite which brought closer to us the teachings and tenets of Freemasonry. November 9: To Cuba Lodge No. 312, where an impressive ceremony of burning the last evidence of debt upon their beautiful temple was held. A capacity attendance was evidence of the interest of the brethren in the district in Freemasonry. November 13: Perseverance Lodge No. 92 in Louisiana, Missouri, the occasion being the one-hundredth birthday of Brother John W. Rule. Accompanying me on this occasion were M. W. Brothers Ittner, Reader and Skelly, and Right Worshipful Brothers Bradford, Rumer, Witthaus, and Morrison. Brother Harvey Beffa, the Honorable Clarence Cannon, and many other distinguished brethren were present, all uniting in the effort to make the birthday of this grand old Freemason an outstanding event. November 14: At Naphtali Lodge No. 25, for the presentation of a fifty-year button to Worshipful Brother Werner Henke. Most Worshipful Brothers Ittner, Reader, Skelly and Vetsburg were present. Right Worshipful Brother Alex S. Dawson and many distinguished members of the Craft attended to pay honor to Brother Henke. November 16: The annual homecoming dinner of Tuscan Chapter No. 68 O. E. S. The attendance was large and the dinner excellent. November 16: At Triangle Lodge No. 638, where family night was presented in a highly creditable manner. November 21: Missouri Lodge No.1 observed Past Master's night in connection with fiftieth Masonic anniversary of Worshipful Brother George Spaulding. The Grand Orator was the speaker of the evening and he quickly demonstrated the reason for his selection to that important office. November 22: Was privileged to witness part of the work being conferred on a class of 374 candidates for the Scottish Rite degrees. November 25: At Centertown Lodge No. 611, Centertown, Mo., to a meeting honoring twenty-five years of devotion to our Fraternity by Right Worshipful Brother W. D. Rogers. M. W. Brothers Ittner and Vetsburg accompanied me on this trip. R. W. Brother Homer Ferguson and many other active and distinguished brethren were present. All paid tribute to R. W. Brother Rogers and to the ideals of our Fraternity. November 30: A dinner and entertainment at the Scottish Rite in St. Louis. Twenty-three hundred were present on this occasion and I was impressed by the fine spirit of fraternity that prevailed. December 3: At Mizpah Lodge No. 639, a meeting called to pay honor to our Grand Orator, R. W. Brother John A. Witthaus, a Past Master of that Lodge. R. W. Brothers Bradford and Rumer accompanied me. As is usual at that Lodge, a fine orchestra was present to add its part to the entertainment of the brethren. December 12: To Composite Lodge No. 369, at Doniphan, Mo., where a fine portrait of M. W. Brother William W. Martin was unveiled in the


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39

Lodge hall with appropriate ceremonies. M. W. Brothers Martin and Ittner accompanied me. December 14: The ball given by Moolah Temple of the Mystic Shrine was attended by the usual capacity gathering. December 16: At Euclid Lodge No. 505, where it was my privilege to install the officers for the coming year at an open meeting. December 17: At Tuscan Lodge No. 360. I was accompanied by M. W. Brothers Reader and Skelly. The fine attendance spoke volumes for the dignity and importance of this great Lodge. December 19: Missouri Lodge No.1, where it was my privilege to install the officers at an open meeting. December 21: At Triangle Lodge No. 638, for the purpose of presenting a fifty-year button to Worshipful Brother Joseph H. Beasley in conjunction with the installation ceremonies. Present with me were M. W. Brother Ittner and R. W. Brothers James M. Bradford, Alex S. Dawson and Fred H. Johnson. January 7: To Palestine Lodge No. 241, in St. Charles, Mo., for the purpose of installing the officers for the coming year. R. W. Brother Ernest R. Claus acted as Grand Marshal and R. W. Brother Edwin H. Barklage was master of ceremonies. This meeting aroused much interest in St. Charls and the surrounding community. January 8: Attended meeting of the board of directors of the Masonic Home. January 9: Held conference with the District Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers for the eastern part of the state. January 15: Held a conference in Kansas City for the District Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers of the western section of the state. The importance of these two meetings will be touched on elsewhere in my address. January 18: Lambskin Lodge No. 460, where eight candidates received the Entered Apprentice Degree. In this class were my son-in-law, Robert A. Hall, two of his brothers, and their brother-in-law. The late Dr. W. Antoine Hall was an honored member of this Lodge. It was my privilege to present him with his fifty-year membership button a few years ago. Present at this meeting were M. W. Brothers Anthony F. Ittner, and Harold L. Reader. Also R. W. Brothers Bradford, Rumer, Dawson, Rauch, Claus, Hamann, Aronson, Welkener, Witthaus, and many others. January 25: To Washington, Mo., where a district meeting was held by the" R. W. Brother Ransom A. Breuer Masonic Association." R. W. Brother Breuer has been for more than thirty years a District Deputy Grand Master and has been an honored occupant of our Circuit Bench for more than thirty-six years. It is my conviction that much good resulted to the Fraternity from such a meeting. January 28: At Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, where Worshipful Brother George A. Shepardson was honored for his forty years of faithful work as secretary of that Lodge. Worshipful Brothers Reader, Skelly, and R. W. Brothers Bradford, Witthaus and Claus accompanied me on this occasion. January 29: Attended the annual meeting and banquet of the Masonic Service Association, where 110 guests enjoyed an excellent dinner and listened to a well-conducted program. Brother Stewart D. Flannigan, president of the association, acted as chairman of the meeting. February 6: At Missouri Lodge No.1, for the purpose of presenting a fifty-year button to Worshipful Brother Charles McLean. Brother McLean's wife, who died in 1938, was a daughter of the late Reuben Oatrall, who was known to many of you.


40

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February 10: Paid an unannounced visit to the lodge of instruction in St. Louis. Found 354 brethren present, all showing a keen interest in improving their knowledge of the ritual. February 18 to 23: In attendance on the Grand Masters' Conference nnd other national meetings, in Washington, D. C. These meetings are dealt with more fully in another part of my message. March 7: Attended the centennial meeting of St. Louis Chapter No.8, Royal Arch Masons. The Grand High Priest and M. W. Brothers Gentry, Reader and Skelly were present. The large number present listened with great interest to an inspiring address by M. W. Brother William R. Gentry. March 10: Was privileged to attend a meeting of the Ritual Committee where many problems were carefully and seriously considered. In the evening of that day, with R. W. Brothers F. Ernest Carter and William J. Craig, visited the St. Louis Lodge of Instruction where we found the usual large and earnest gathering of brethren. Brothers Carter and Craig were greatly impressed by the interest taken in the lodge of instruction. March 11: Conference with my Grand Council in St. Louis, R. W. Brother Morris E. Ewing was prevented from attending. The redistricting of the state was discussed. Valuable assistance was given at this meeting by M. W. Brothers Reader and Ittner. 4 March 12: A meeting of the committee to consider the publication of a Masonic newspaper was held in the Grand Master's office. R. W. Brother Jolly P. Hurtt was unable to be present. The discussion covered every phase of the proposed publication and the report of the committee will be presented at this Grand Lodge meeting. March 17: At Harmony Lodge No. 499, where the Grand Master was assisted by the Scottish Rite degree team in conferring the Third Degree. All participants in the work wore suitable robes and the large gathering present showed a keen interest in the work or the team. March 18: To Mizpah Lodge No. 639, where a reception was tendered to the members of that Lodge who had returned from service in our armed forces. Present with me were M. W. Brothers Reader and Skelly. Also R. W. Brothers Bradford, Herman Lark, Paul Eckardt, Rauch, Aronson, Webb, Heuermann. Brother Kerth delivered an inspiring oration which held the interest of the large gathering. March 20: To DeSoto Lodge No. 119, where a District meeting was held. I was accompanied by R. W. Brothers Cecil A. Tolin, District Deputy Grand Master, and Robert Kleinschmidt, District Lecturer. March 27: To Hebron Lodge No. 354, at Mexico, Mo. This was a day on which a record-breaking heavy snow fell over the eastern part of Missouri, hence I traveled by train, but found that the weather did not keep the brethren at home. All of the officers of the Lodge were present with the exception of the tiler, who had been called out of the city. Eleven past masters of Hebron Lodge were present. Also present were the Grand Tiler, R. W. Brother Herman H. Lark, Paul A. Thomas, D. D. G. M., of the Thirteenth Administrative District, WilliaIl). R. Howell, District Deputy Grand Master of the Eleventh Administrative District, Julius R. Edwards of the 28th Administrative District, Charles S. Hicks, Past D. D. G. M. of the Seventeenth Masonic District, Cecil R. Shire. District Lecturer of the Twenty-seventh Ritual District, Worshipful Brother J. B. LaMar of Fulton No. 48, and twelve visiting past masters of various neighboring Lodges. The large attendance at the meeting, with travel conditions at their worst, was an impressive indication of the interest taken in our Fraternity. April 7: Visit to Cornerstone Lodge No. 323. Also present were M. W. Brothers Ittner and Vetsburg. With R. W. Brothers James M. Bradford,


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Alex S. Dawson and Max Wittmann. This is the mother Lodge of M. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg, and its fine condition speaks volumes for his leadership. April 9: Quarterly meeting of board of directors of the Masonic Home. April 9: Closing meeting of the lodge of instruction of the Fiftyseventh Ritual District. Also present were M. W. Brothers Ittner and Reader, and R. W. Brother Cecil A. Tolin, Richard O. Rumer, and Fred H. Johnson. The meeting was held in the hall of Maplewood Lodge. This Lodge has more holders of certificates of proficiency than any other Lodge in the State of Missouri. April 10: To Progress Lodge No. 657, for the purpose of conferring the degree on a long-time friend and patient. I was accompanied by R. W. Brother James M. Bradford. April 12: Attended the birthday party of Tuscan Chapter No. 68, O. E. S.. at the Congress Hotel. April 13: Held a conference with the committee selected to arrange a welcome for the Masonic veterans. April 19: Official visit to Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, with which I have been associated since its organization. April 21: Visit to Euclid Lodge No. 505, where I was greeted by the customary fine Masonic spirit and a large attendance. May 3: Attended dinner and party in the Scottish Rite Temple. May 7: Closing meeting of the lodge of instruction for the Thirty-third Ritual District. All resident Past Grand Masters with present and past District Deputy Grand Masters were in attendance. A fine report of the work accomplished was listened to with interest. May 10: At Lambskin Lodge No. 460 for the purpose of raising my son-in-law, Robert A. Hall, to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason. Present with me at this visit were M. W. Brothers Harold L. Reader and Anthony F. Ittner and R. W. Brothers Morris E. Ewing, Harry F. Sunderland, and James M. Bradford. All of these distinguished visitors took part in the ritualistic work. May 12: Visit to the Grand Commandery meeting in Columbia, Mo., where a delightful banquet was enjoyed in the evening. I was much impressed by the fine spirit of fraternalism so evident at this gathering. May 14: Fulton Lodge No. 48, for the purpose of awarding fiftyyear buttons to three veteran }'rcemasons. Brother Crockett Harrison, three-time mayor of Fulton, Mo.; Dr. William Henry Reno, who opened his office for the practice of dentistry on the second floor of the Masonic Temple in 1894 and is still following his profession; and Dr. Daniel Shaw Gage, ordained minister and professor of theology and Greek in Westminster College for more than forty-five years. A capacity attendance fined the hall. May 19: At Haska Lodge No. 420, where a large group of twentyfive-year members were honored. May 20: At a special meeting of Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, where a team composed of members of the metropolitan police department exemplified the work in a highly creditable manner. May 21: Keystone Lodge No. 243. This is the mother lodge of R. W. Brother James M. Bradford, Junior Grand Warden, and the large attendance was evidently a tribute to him. May 26: At Moberly Lodge No. 344, Moberly, Mo. where the large and interested assemblies gave evidence of their interest in their Fraternity. May 29: In Kansas City, Mo., where a joint meeting was held in the beautiful temple of Ivanhoe Lodge. May 31: At Pyramid Lodge No. 180, the principal attraction being


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the conferring of the 'l'hird Degree by the team of Eastgate Lodge from Kansas City. Over 300 Masons were present at this meeting, representing seven states and seventy-seven Lodges. June 3: Attended meeting of Pilgrim Chapter No. 473, O. E. S. at Harmony Lodge Temple, the purpose being to honor R. W. Brother Alex S. Dawson, a Past Patron of that Chapter. R. W. Brothers Arthur W. Rauch, and R. W. Brother John A. Welkener, District Lecturer, accompanied me on this visit. June 6: At Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia, Mo. At this meeting eight Walden brothers were present to assist in conferring the Third Degree upon the ninth brother. Nine states and twenty-four Lodges were represented at this meeting. Two hundred and forty-seven brethren signed the register. It was the privilege of the Grand Master to act as junior warden in the second section of the degree. Five Brothers of the Walden family are past masters of Twilight Lodge. June 13: Installed the officers of the Educational Craftsmen, an organization composed of the Masonic employes of the St. Louis Board of Education and having 285 members on its roster. June 14: Welcome to the Masonic veterans. This great meeting will be touched upon more fully in another part of the address. July 16: To Higbee Lodge No. 257, Higbee, Mo., for the purpose of presenting a fifty-year button to R. W. Brother Thomas Henry Walton, an honored resident of that community. R. W. Brother and Mrs. Richard O. Rumer accompanied us to Higbee. August 20: Conference with my Grand Council, the' Grand Secretary, the Grand Lecturer and M. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg. August 21: Fraternal welcome to the National Federated Craft, an organization composed of Federal employes in our Postal Service who are Freemasons at 9 a. m. August 22: At Westgate Lodge No. 445, where the delegation to the National Federated Craft were guests. August 23: Banquet in the Gold Room of the Jefferson Hotel and address to the National Federated Craft. August 25: At Euclid Lodge No. 505, for the purpose of raising the 505th member of this Lodge. The Grand Master was permitted to act as King Solomon as the Scottish Rite team conferred the Degree. My keen interest in Euclid Lodge No. 505 is due to the fact that I have been closely associated with it since it was set to work under dispensation. September 18: Missouri Lodge No. 1. This was my last official visit to my own lodge and I was most cordially received and spent a delightful time with my brethren.

WELCOME HOME TO MASONIC VETERANS Feeling that appropriate recognition should be accorded to the many members of our Fraternity who responded to the call of their country and joined the armed forces, the Grand Master decreed that Flag Day, June 14, 1947, would be a fitting time to pay honor to our patriotic and heroic brethren. Cooperation in this movement was requested and accorded, in every Masonic administrative district. For the meeting held in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Masonic Administrative Districts, the following committee was appointed: R. W. Brother Ernest R. Claus, chairman; Worshipful Brother J. Edward McIlvaine, secretary; M. W. Brother James W. Skelly, R. W. Brother John A. 'Vitthaus, R. 'V. Brother Alex S. Dawson, R. W. Brother


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Arthur W. Rauch, R. W. Brother Cecil A. Tolin, R. W. Brother Stanley Horn, W. Bro. Raleigh E. Sisson, Brother William L. Conrad and Brother Steven Kriwanek as marshal. Assistant marshals were chosen from a group composed of one representative of each Masonic Lodge in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth districts. Ushers were members of the路 Alhambra Grotto Patrol. Three thousand letters of invitation were sent to the veterans in this vicinity. In spite of an unexpected cessation of the public transportation system because of a strike, 4,000 visitors were in the auditorium when more than 400 Masonic veterans filed in to take the seats which had been reserved for them. After posting the colors the vast audience united in the pledge of allegiance and then joined in singing the "Star-Spangled Banner." Miss Pearl Walker' soprano soloist, was accompanied on the organ by Brother Oscar Jost. After an inspiring invocation by R. W. Brother Samuel Thurman, Grand Chaplain, the Grand Master was introduced and spoke as follows: Welcome to Missouri Masonic Veterans, June 14, 1947 To you, dear brethren, who served in the armed forces of the United States during the recent great World War the Masonic Fraternity of Missouri owes its heartfelt thanks and profoundest gratitude. It matters not what branch of the service you were in, whether as a humble private or as distinguished officer. The rank of Missouri's Masonic veterans range!J from private to general, from seaman to admiral of the Navy. You served under sea and in the air; on the land and on all the waters of the globe. Missouri's Masonic veterans are able proudly to wear and to exhibit every badge and award of merit that was bestowed by our Government. The medals were won for conduct and performance above and beyond the line of duty. Freemasons meet upon the level and part upon the square, and in our meetings we draw no class distinctions. Of course we are filled with sorrow at the thought that some of you may have been greviously wounded, or that your health may have been impaired by serious illness. All such will be the special objects of our solicitude in the days to come. We know that this war was won, and we hope that all our past wars have been won, through the justice of our cause as well as because of the courage, stamina and exalted patriotism of our people, especially of those who, like yourselves, have been called upon to defend the flag and the honor of our beloved country. As you well know, one of the cardinal principles of Freemasonry is loyalty to your government and the country in which you live. No man can be a good Freemason without being a loyal citizen. We thank God that you, and hundreds of thousands like you in our great Fraternity, have measured up to this necessary qualification so wonderfully that you have shed undying lustre and glory on the Masonic name and the Masonic emblems, a lustre that will raise our prestige, great as it may have been during a century of achievement, to newer and grander heights. The United States is a peace-loving country, slow to anger and slow in mobilizing when war threatens. But when thoroughly aroused it has been in the past, and ean again in the future, become the most deadly foe to brute force and aggressive and predatory power that the world has ever known.


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We devoutly pray that the United Nations may develop and fulfill the hopes and aspirations of its forward-looking founders, so that wars in the future will be impossible, and that a practical and sensible state of universal brotherhood may be established without destroying essential national sovereignties. But until that comparative approach to Utopia shall have been achieved, God forbid that we may ever again be caught napping, as w~ have been in all our past wars, while some ruthless power or combination of powers stealthily and deliberately plans to attack and overwhelm us. I am optimistic enough to believe that this will not happen, but vastly more than optimism is needed on the part of our people to ensure the perpetual safety of our flag and country. It is more vitally true today than ever before that "eternal vigilance is the price of liberty." In the present state of the world a failure to meet this exacting condition for its maintenance might well result in the destruction of our cherished institutions and the enslavement of our people. When you entered the armed forces the Grand Lodge of Missouri provided each of you with a small but beautiful certificate attesting the fact that you were a member in good standing of a Missouri lodge. I am sure that each of you prized that certificate and that it enabled you to make many happy and valuable contacts with your comrades. I now contemplate recommending to the next annual communication of the Grand Lodge that each of you, and the family of each one of those who made the supreme sacrifice, be given a larger and more beautiful certificate suitable for framing, attesting the fact of your service. The success of this plan of course would depend largely on the cooperation of the lodges in furnishing the Grand Lodge with the necessary information. And now, for myself and on behalf of the Grand Lodge and the Fraternity as a whole, permit me once more to thank you from the bottom of a grateful heart. Our gratitude is beyond the power of mere words to express. May God be with you through all the years to come and may you enjoy the full measure of happiness and success which you so richly deserve.

A letter was ~ad from M. W. Brother Harry S. Truman, President of the United States, expressing his keen regret that important affairs of State prevented his attendance at this meeing. The following message was read from General Douglas MacArthur: Tokyo, .Japan, .June 12, 1947. Dr. Solon Cameron, Grand Master of Masons in Missouri. It is a great privilege to join with the Grand Lodge of Missouri in paying homage to those whose names are inscribed on her membership rolls, both living and dead, whose service contributed to the invincible power which gained victory for American arms in the war just won. Please convey to all who attend your commemorative exercises on .June 14 my profound admiration for the service of Missouri's Masonic sons. It is my confident anticipation that from that noble Fraternity the comradeship-in-arms, welded to defend by battle those same American ideals which underlie Freemasonry's broad concept, may emerge the inspiration for such a sp'iritual force as firmly may sustain our search for a peace fully justifying the painful sacrifices of war. DOUGLAS MACARTHUR.

Brother Phil M. Donnelly, absent from the state on official business, was represented by M. \V. Brother William R. Gentry, who delivered an inspiring address.


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Hon. A. P. Kaufmann, Mayor of St. Louis, was present and addressed the gathering, welcoming the veterans as follows: Honorable Grand Master, Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen: Our emotions are mixed on such an occasion as this. Weare met to pay homage to the members of this great fraternity who defended their homeland during the war, and to express as best we can our appreciation for an that these gallant young men did for us. Although we rejoice over victory, and the return of so many of our sons and brothers, a pervasive sadness descends upon us at a time like this, when we are reminded so forcefully of those who went forth from here to the field of battle, never to return again. We pay solemn tribute tonight to those who made the supreme sacrifice to the end that the principles of Christianity and our way of life might not be trampled in the dust. We can fulfill our deep obligation to those who have passed on to their reward only by exerting our every effort to assure the kind of world for which they gave their lives. I have been asked to extend a word of welcome to those of you who have returned from the hell of war and taken your places once more in the peacetime life of our community. This I am pleased to do; and I am honored. I am happy to have this opportunity not only to bid you welcome home on behalf of the city but to tell you how grateful we are, for your magnificent services. We feel a keen sense of debt to you who left your loved ones, your homes, your schools and occupations, to don the nation's uniform and to fight for us, literally all over the globe, in the most catastrophic war ever to be visited upon mankind. You have truly given part of your lives to your country, in the founding of which your predecessors in Freemasonry played so prominent a role. In responding so valiantly to the call, you have demonstrated that you are worthy to carryon in place of your illustrious forebears in this Lodge. We are proud of you, happy to claim you as fellow citizens of this great city and state. Of your shining wartime record the entire community joins me, I am confident, in saying, "Well done t " Pride and gratitude are intermingled in the cordial welcome I voice tonight. We salute your patriotism and valor. And we pray that the future holds for you the rich rewards of happiness and satisfaction to which you are so completely entitled. We are glad to sec you home! (Prolonged applause.) ;

Brother James W. Clarke, minister of the Second Persbyterian Church, spoke on "The Men Who Did Not Return." Rev. Brother Clarke was eminently qualified to speak on this subject because his eldest son, James W. Clarke, Jr., was lost on an air mission over Germany. The official address of welcome and gratitude was delivered by R. W. Brother John A. Witthaus, Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, who spoke as follows: Into the flag of our country has been imprinted all of the ideals, all of the hopes, all of the progress, all of the moral and social and spiritual values, all of greatness of a free nation; as well as all of the tears that have been shed, the heartaches that have been endured and the sacrifices that have been made that it might continue to fly unstained and unsullied and undefeated as an emblem of strength and truth and justice for us and as a beacon of hope for the world. It is the symbol of America and all that America means in the hearts and minds of men. It is therefore a fitting choice that the day which marks the auni-


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versary of the birth of our :flag should have been selected to welcome home and give expressions of gratitude to those who 80 lately made their contributions of service and glory to it. Particularly is this true when Freemasons welcome home their Masonic brethren, remembering as we do the importance of symbols among us in directing our thoughts and moulding our lives. We are proud and thankful for your presence here today, proud of the service you have performed and of the records you have written, thankful for your safe return and the pleasure of again having you participate in our great t33k of building and developing better understanding and better relationships among men. Freemasonry, like all others who think and feel, realilzes what a tremendously destructive force war i~, and directs its efforts toward that perhaps distant but golden day of lasting peace. But Freemasons know too that unless freedom of thought and expression and opportunity are safeguarded and preserved, there can be no happiness and no basis upon which to build a lasting peace. Having made rich contributions to American thought and American leadership we are an integral and devotedly inseparable part of American life and respond to every national heartbeat and every patriotic duty and service. But not as a group apart do we contemplate our national position, but rather as individuals who by reason of group assocation in the work of building character and idealism have been able to make important contributions to the cause and progress of free government. Freemasonry cannot live in any but the air of freedom. History has been replete with examples that when dictatorship in any form lifts its ugly head, among its first acts is the effort to destroy Masonry and the free development and expression for which it stands. So that on this occasion when we welcome home our Masonic heroes, it cannot be amiss to give consideration to the thoughts and purposes and duties of our beloved nation. Throughout its more than a century and a half of national existence, America has loved peace and has but wanted the opportunity to cultivate the blessings of its national life. Pursuing its peaceful development under its constitutional guaranty of protection in its right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, it has through its widespread opportunity for education, its industry and desire to rise to righer levels of accomplishment, and its unswerving devotion to the principles of honor and fair play, advanced to a place of national strength and happiness that has commanded the respect and admiration of the world. But while we have loved peace, even more have we loved freedom and truth and justice, and we have never permitted ourselves to forget that upon these principles and these ideals rest our every opportunity and our every happiness. And so in every generation when the cause of freedom, truth and justice has been threatened, our young men have risen and gone forth in their defense. They did not ask what price was theirs to pay, but heeding the call to duty, offered their very all that the blessings of liberty might endure. We ask not now in which field nor in what station they served, for each in his place assigned served in the cause of right and decency. N or would our honored veterans of this day wish us to fail in our remembrance of those men who in times past responded to similar calls and made like sacrifices. While paying this tribute to the veterans of World War II they would not have us forget those who fought in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, the War between the States, the Spanish-American War, and the World War I. Into our :flag which so proudly flies in all parts of the world is written all their


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deeds of heroism and sacrifices of devotion. In its star-spangled field of blue we recognize their loyalty to principles and ideals, in its stripes of white their love of truth and purity, and certainly its stripes of red have been dyed a richer hue with the blood they gave for it. Indeed, they fought, they bled and they died that the things which are worthwhile in life might live and we stand in reverential and grateful acknowledgement of of their service and sacrifices. There were those who, when the call to arms came in December, 1941, doubted the ability of the youth of our day to stand the rigors and hardships of war. Pleasure loving, and reared in an atmosphere of comparative ease, without the toughening experiences of our earlier generations, some thought that our young folks might have grown soft and might not be equal to the rugged requirements of military service. But it didn't take long to get conclusive evidence of the error of that thinking, for soon came Bataan and Corregidor where men demonstrated endurance and loyalty and devotion and sacrifice as they had never been called upon to do before, and when history is written, although these battles must be recorded as battles that were lost, they will take their place in the hearts of men alongside the pages which record the devotion shown in the blood stained snow of Valley Forge. Then came Wake Island and Midway and the numerous Pacific Island engagements, and Tunisia and Italy and Normandy and France and Belgium, and our hearts swelled with pride and gratitude. Glorious indeed is the record you have written and we thank you for it. But let us not make the mistake of being lulled into a false sense of national security by the military successes which have always been ours. Rather let us turn back the pages of history and listen to the message of that idol of America, as in the field at Gettysburg, where he had gone to dedicate a battle ground as a last national resting place, our beloved Abraham Lincoln solemnly tells the assembled multitude: "It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to the cause for which they gave the,last full measure of devotion, that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth." These words spoken three quarters of a century ago ring in our ears even today with a compelling and vital admonition. It is not enough that we serve our country in time of war. We must serve her with equal fidelity and devotion in time of peace, for freedom can be lost from within as well as from without. We have successfully completed a war to stamp out oppression and yet totalitarianism and oppression are not dead. In an uncertain and unsettled world this rule by the power of a self-appointed select few is expanding its influence and exercising its power over weaker and less stable countries in its effort to become world dominant. Even in our own land there are those who through lack of understanding or lack of devotion or through selfish visions of personal gain are attempting to engraft these foreign ideologies upon us. Our task of defending American institutions is not finished and will not be finished as long as there remains in our land' one person to sow the destructive seed of any foreign governmental doctrine. Let us so increase our love and devotion to the blessings which are ours, that our 140 millions of people may arise as one, and in a voice that is clear and unmistakable, proclaim to the world that there is no room in America for any ism except Americanism. We may divide in our opinions on many things, but whatever those divisions of opinion might be, let us remain united in our purpose.


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Let us continue to devote ourselves in peace as in war to the blessings of liberty, and as deeply religious and God-loving people let us turn our eyes and hearts to the Great Architect of the Universe for guidance and help, and over and over let us repeat the prayer of the last verse of America: "Our father's God to thee, Author of liberty, To Thee we sing. Long may our land be bright With freedom's holy light; Protect us by Thy might, Great God our king."

This address held the audience in rapt attention and was the high point of the evening. After music by the Moolah Shrine Chorus and by Miss Walker, came the other principal address of the evening, the "Response for the War Veterans" by Brother 'Villiam H. McCorkle, minister of 'Vestminster Presbyterian Church. Because of his fine and gallant service, Brother McCorkle is recognized as one of the most decorated chaplains in American history. Brother McCorkle spoke as follows: Worshipful Grand Master, Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen: This is a distinct honor which you have accorded me in the privilege of responding to this welcome to veterans. It is all but capable of "puffing me up and turning my head" did I not call to mind what was said to have happened to one whose head was turned. Did you read in a recent issue of a popular magazine the story of the man who, when riding a motorcycle, turned his coat around so that the solid back and high collar of the garment would protect his chest against the wind as he traveled along' Coming to a road intersection, another vehicle sideswiped him, his machine was overturned, and he was temporarily knocked unconscious. While he was lying in a ditch, two policemen came along, one giving his attention to the motorcycle victim, the second having a general look around as to the cause of the accident. The second came back to his friend and the accident victim with this query: "How is the poor fellow who was riding the motorcycle 짜" "Too bad," said the first officer of the law, "it seems that the poor man got his head knocked completely around and before I could get it twisted back in place, he was dead." Well, if my head is turned at this honor you have given me, I don't want any of you trying to twist it back again. You men know it did not require any "flag-waving" welcome when we got our feet back on the soil of the U. S. A. to have us express our gladness at being at home. Whether we were articulate about it, I suppose the majority of us gave some kind of quiet prayer of thanksgiving that we had lived to see this country and home once again. On some occasions there were loud welcomes staged, bands played, crowds assembled. It was all very easy to accomplish in the spirit of victory in the early days after the cessation of hostilities. Personally, I missed that "hoop-la" and was rather glad of it. We slipped quietly in, having air transportation back from Guadalcanal for a new assignment, and we were just glad enough to say, as we had repeated to each other at the first shot we had heard fired in anger, we were just glad when we landed in San Francisco Bay, to say again, "This is it."


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As to a welcome, I think I can say for you tonight, "This is it." Not a fanfare of trumpets, not a brass band and a call to the colors, but a gathering of neighbors and friends holding something in common. They have said, they want to remember with us the ones who did not come back and they want to remind us that we are back where what we hold in common can be expressed in freedom and with mutual benefit. The ideals of Masonry, which you have embraced, are reminders with thnse friends that there is yet comradeship in service; there is yet fellowship in high purpose and united devotion to a cause. I put only one set of ideals higher than these and those are they in the Church of God. Many are similar in both organizations and they are certainly not in opposition, one to the others, but mutually support each other. On this common ground of fidelity to something better than we are, a genuine welcome can be based. I believe this kind of welcome is extended tonight in sincerity and truth. Therefore, it is well put and well placed. I would add my thanks and deep appreciation to yours for it, as it is generously offered. The gratitude we express, however, in return for this welcome extended us is of more concern to me than the welcome itself, for this gratitude is to be measured by our reaction and our adjustment to life about us. But, gentlemen, somehow I am afraid of that reaction in us and in other groups like us. I am afraid that the adjustment is so slow in coming, as our better selves would like it to come. I am afraid tonight, I am afraid in a different sense than I was when I was digging a hole for dear life on Bougainville with a pattern of Mortar fire surely to find us with every lobbing projectile. One shell sprayed us with water, the next getting closer, covered us with sand. I was digging and trembling and my buddy next to me was trembling and shaking. I, trying to be brave, slapped him on the back and said, "Burrow, it's not as bad as all that, is iU" He replied, "Chaplain, I am just shaking a hole." And he truly was. Well, many times we were afraid over there and justly so, but too many times of late I've had the same kind of feeling in the pit of my stomach. " Afraid of What ~" you ask. Afraid that you and I will not have our eyes open to the dangers of our so-called peace, that we will merely drift back into circulation, going the way of the crowd, drifting with the majority, or afraid that we will fight for our places with only the private possessions, we have been for awhile denied, as our goal. In reality, what is the use of winning a war if selfishness and greed are the aftermath' If the law of every man for himself and hatred is the pattern of existence, that can't lead to abundant life. These ideals of Masonry and the church cannot be supported with any such philosophy, as that, do you think' At Tuscan, I told the men one night one of the most moving stories I have heard out of either this war or the World War I. An ex-chaplain of the World War I told it in this country during the early days of World War II. Said he, "On one occasion I held in my lap the form of a man who had been seriously wounded and was dying. He talked in whispers, but faster as his life ebbed away. He told me of his wife in England and of their expecting a child. Said the wounded man, 'Tell her I went out right. Tell her anything you can, Chaplain, to comfort her. And our child! If he is a boy, he'll never have to go through anything like this, will he, Chaplain' This is a war to end wars.' " And said the ex-chaplain in repeating the story, "because I knew in my heart that this was a war to end wars, that we were fighting against the forces of evil to save democracy, I said, 'No, if your child is a son, he'll never


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1947

have to go through anything like this. He has been spared this by your sacrifice.' " ct But today," continued the chaplain in recalling the story, "Twenty years have gone by. Tonight that child, who was a SOil, is flying over the English Channel to drop bombs on Germany. He may even now be encountering anti-aircraft fire, he may even now be a casualty, as we speak." I do not know the aftermath of this story. I do not know whether that son of a veteran came through unscathed, but I do know the ideal of that father, blighted and blasted in the contribution of his son, can be blasted again, if we ourselves do not see to it that such is not repeated. I submit to you each one, what has happened once or many times can happen again if our pattern of life, if our challenge to live on a higher plane, is not met with all the high resolve that a good Christian, a good Mason, a good citizen can muster. We can, fathers and brethren, friends altogether, give and receive greetings to and from each other, but these will be more lasting and meaningful only if we give to life what we would like to have life give to us. Therefore, in the language of the "GI" with the challenge of a new life before us everyone, I would say, in conclusion, "THIS IS IT."

We have fine reports of the many other meetings to welcome the veterans on file and only lack of space prevents the inclusion of a record of those ceremonies in this report. Never have we seen a finer spirit of cooperation and enthusiasm than was evident in the preparation for this meeting. The fine work of the committee in charge and the loyal support of all the brethren resulted in making this an outstanding event in Masonic history. Had it not been for the unexpected streetcar strike, the capacity of this great building would have been taxed to the utmost. After the singing of "America" by the audience, a soul-touching benediction by M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader concluded the program. After the program, ample opportunity was given to all present to meet and greet the veterans. All Lodges in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Masonic Districts were represented by their Lodge banners and the American flag. Also present were: R. W. Brother William B. Massey, Sovereign Grand Inspector General in Missouri, who delivered an eloquent address of welcome; and the principal officers of the four Scottish Rite Bodies; M. W. Brother James W. Skelly, Secretary of the Scottish Rite Bodies; M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, Past Grand Master and Grand Lecturer; R. W. Brother James M. Bradford, Jr. Grand Warden; R. W. Brother Richard O. Rumer, Grand Sr. Steward and R. W. Brothers Alex S. Dawson and Arthur W. Rauch, District Deputy Grand Masters. Without the generous cooperation of our Scottish Rite Brethren, this great meeting would have been impossible. The sincere thanks of the Fraternity are due to the committee on arrangements and to the many other brethren who labored tirelessly to the end that we might be able to accord a fitting and suitable welcome to our Masonic veterans. GRAND MASTER'S PORTRAIT I have surveyed the portraits of Past Grand Masters which hang


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

51

in the Masonic Temple. Numbering about one hundred, these go back almost to the very founding of the Grand Lodge, and the collection constitutes a permanent value in sentiment and tradition. Of recent years, however, enlarged photographs have been substituted for the traditional oil paintings. I believe that this change in policy detracts materially from the dignity and the value in art and sentiment of these permanent records. . In this recommendation I would stress the essential difference, as recognized by artists, between the photograph and the work of a competent portrait painter. The former, however technically perfect, is a mechanical and merely factual likeness, lacking the interpretation of personality and the life-like qualities of color and feeling which are the soul of the work of a good painter. "Age cannot stale, nor custom wither" the portrait painting, while the photograph, as a record of inert fact, is little more than a reminder of the contemporaries of the subject, and will mean even less to future generations. To confirm this statement one has only to compare any collection of old photographs with the portrait paintings in a family or institutional collection which are treasured for the reason that they perpetuate personalities and sentiments in a manner impossible to a mechanical process. Hence, it is my opinion that it would be most unfortunate to discontinue the fine tradition of having oil paintings made of the Grand Masters. I recommend, therefore, that the portrait of each be painted while he is in office; further, that so far as may be practicable, such portraits be also made of those Past Grand Masters still living who are thus far recorded only in photographs. In either case I scarcely need say that the work should be entrusted to an artist of high standing in portraiture. This return to the former policy and tradition I feel we owe both to the men themselves and to posterity. Concerning the condition of the present collection of portrait paintings, many are in need of cleaning and varnishing (or revarnishing), a number doubtless require re-backing, and a few should be repaired or restored. I suggest that an annual appropriation be made for such maintenance operations, beginning with those canvases most in need of attention. The deterioration of oil paintings can generally be avoided if proper care be used in time. Long neglect, however, renders remedial operations not only more difficult but much more expensive. Considerable initial expenditures might be necessary, but once the collection is put in good condition the annual expense need not be large. GRAND MASTER'S CONFERENCES WITH DISTRICT DEPUTIES AND DISTRICT LECTURERS For the past ten years it has been the custom of our Grand Masters


52

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

each year in conjunction with the Grand Lecturer to hold two conferences and two schools of instruction, one at St. Louis and one at Kansas City. The state for the purpose of these meetings has been divided into two practically equal zones, one denominated the eastern and the other the western zone. The meeting at St. Louis was held on Thursday, January 9, in the Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Boulevard. It was a most timely meeting for me and my deputies, as the redistricting of the state into twenty-nine administrative districts had placed new responsibilities on the District Deputies and had given them considerable added work in the discharge of their duties. These problems were fully discussed and all were at liberty to express their views. Some favored the redistricting and some did not but all were willing to reserve judgment and give the new setup a fair trial. M. 'V. Brother Reader, our Grand Secretary, was present and offered some valuable suggestions. He also kept a record of the attendance and acted as paymaster to the deputies and lecturers. We were also favored with visits by M. W. Brothers Gentry, Skelly and Vetsburg and Rt. 'V. Brothers Bradford and Rumer. The remainder of the time not occupied by my conference was employed by the Grand Lecturer in conducting a school of instruction. The eager interest of both lecturers and deputies in acquiring a correct knowledge of the work and lectures proved conclusively to my mind the great value of these annual joint meetings. There seemed to be a feeling of absolute confidence and esteem almost bordering on affection between the Grand Lecturer and his efficient corps of district lecturers. The meeting at Kansas City was held in the Masonic Temple at Ninth and Harrison streets on Wednesday, January 15. There was a somewhat better attendance than at St. Louis but the difference was no doubt explainable by different weather conditions. My address to my deputies was along the same lines as that at St. Louis and the same general routine was followed. I learned much from the opinions of the deputies and I trust that I was helpful to them in preparing them to meet the altered conditions of their year's work. Most Worshipful Brother Reader was again with us at Kansas City and again ably and affably discharged his appointed and necessary role. We were favored by visits from M. W. Bro. William F. Woodruff and Rt. W. Brothers Harry F. Sunderland, Edmund E. Morris, George 'V. Paddock, Martin Dickinson and George C. Marquis. COURTESY DEGREES During the year I received requests from a number of sister Grand Lodges to confer degrees on their' candidates temporarily


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

53

residing near certain of our Missouri Lodges. These requests were uniformly granted and their purpose cheerfully carried out by the designated Lodges. In turn, it became my pleasant duty to request the conferring of degrees on a number of our own candidates by 2t Lodges in sister Grand Jurisdictions. Despite the existence of separate and exclusive Grand Jurisdictions there seems to be no limit to the exchange of mutual courtesies and helpfulnss. MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI This address would indeed be incomplete without at least a brief reference to our wonderful and beloved Masonic Home. I cannot, however, speak of this great institution from a strictly objective point of view, for through the years it has grown to be an important part of my life, ingrained into the very fibre of my being. For nineteen years I have served the Home as its physician and have come to know every member of its family, both children and old folks. I believe too that I have enjoyed the confidence and esteem of most if not all of them. You know, a doctor cannot perform miracles, and when he fails to do so he naturally sinks in the esteem of the person expecting the impossible. I know that I have made mistakes as has every member of the Home staff from the highest to the lowest, but these mistakes have no doubt all been mistakes of the head and not of the heart. It is my earnest desire to do all in my power to lighten the pathway of our aged members in their declining years, and to that end to help them keep up their morale and self-esteem. I am sure too that every member of the staff shares this feeling. 'Vith the young people it is the fixed purpose of the Home Board and staff to give them a good education, to keep them sound in body, mind and heart, and to promote their spiritual welfare free from sectarian bias. And it is also the aim of the management to equip these children as far as possible for the battle of life. If Saint Peter keeps books on the Freemasonry of Missouri, I feel sure that when the final reckoning is made and the balance struck we will win or lose largely through the record of the Masonic Home. On that score when we are weighed in the balance I believe that our great Fraternity will be found not wanting. Before leaving the subject of the Masonic Home, I am sure it will be of great interest to you to know that through the years I have assembled a staff of eminent specialists in every branch of medicine and surgery, whose services are free to members of the Home family and as carefully rendered as though they were dealing with millionaire patients. I mention this fact not to take credit to myself, but to render proper acknowledgment and thanks to these unselfish men who have done so much for our beloved Home.


54

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

VISITS FROM OFFICERS AND BRETHREN During the year I have received visits from officers and members of Lodges in every part of the state. Some came to have me help them with their problems, and others just to pay a friendly visit. They ~re all welcome and I believe that I learned something of value from each of them. I gave them as much time as I could spare and regret that I could not see more of them. But the days of a Grand Master are filled to overflowing and some of his most cherished hopes must go by the board for lack of time. BLACKBALLING During the year my attention was called to a distressing situation which existed in one of our Lodges. For a considerable period some misguided member seems to have felt that it was his duty to blackball every candidate who petitioned the Lodge, with the possible exception of a single one at long intervals. I set my District Deputy to work on the case arid through his tact and good counsel, accompanied by a solemn warning if the evil continued, he was able, at least for the time being, to effect a cessation of the practice and, I hope, permanently. If certain refractory members of a Lodge persist in a policy of wholesale blackballing and persistently ignore well-meant and timely warnings from the Grand Master or his District Deputy, there seems to be but one logical course to pursue and that is to arrest the charter. That drastic remedy has been applied a number of times in the history of our Grand Lodge and can be resorted to again if necessary. THE GRAND LODGE OFFICE This Most Worshipful Grand Lodge is fortunate in having its office in our great Masonic Temple, where it occupies the eastern half of the first floor. It has ample space and all of that space is needed for the efficient operation of its business. The beautiful office provided for the Grand Master has been used many times during this year, as it has been in the past, for important discussions, meetings of committees, conferences, and for many other purposes. There has been a great increase in the rental asked for office space during the past few years and it is my pleasure to inform you that most excellent business judgment was used when the Grand Lodge made its agreement for the use of the space occupied at the upkeep they now pay. Comparable space in any first-class office building in St. Louis would cost three times the amount that our Grand Lodge is paying today. I trust that the representatives to this Grand Lodge will take an opportunity to inspect the business office of your Fraterniy. I am certain that our capable Grand Secretary, Most Worshipful Brother Harold L. Reader, is able to do more efficient work because of the beautiful and spacious office room provided for him.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

55

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Before closing my address I feel prompted to express my sincere thanks and deep gratitude to some of the brethren who have ably assisted me in discharging the heavy duties of my office. The office of Grand Master is by no means a sinecure. In fact, it is impossible for any Grand Master to find time and summon the strength to accompJish all the good works which his heart prompts him to do for the advancement of the cause of Freemasonry. Without the ready and competent assistance of my officers and friends, I should have been . hopelessly defeated in accomplishing what the good Lord has permitted me to do. To M. W. Bro. Harold L. Reader, our Grand Secretary, I am indebted for his valued participation in several conferences, for giving me reminders of important matters that were coming up, for his able counsel in a number of matters, and for the faithful and efficient discharge of the general duties of his office. I am indebted to Rt. W. Bro. Morris E. Ewing, Deputy Grand Master, for his willingness to cooperate with me in every way, and for his actual cooperation in several important matters. To Rt. W. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland, Senior Grand Warden, I express my thanks for ably representing me at the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, attending important committee meetings and for numerous other manifestations of helpfulness and good will. . Rt. W. Brother James M. Bradford represented me in an able manner at the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, and has given me very valuable counsel on numerous occasions throughout the year. I thank him sincerely. Rt. W. Bro. Edmund E. Morris has also been very helpful to me and has given me some opinions which I deem of great value. I thank him for his help. Rt. W. Bro. Richard O. Rumer, Grand Senior Steward, has rendered me some highly appreciated assistance in several important matters and is assured of my thanks. M. W. Bro. William R. Gentry ably represented me in a very important matter and also at my request delivered an eloquent address at our Flag Day memorial meeting. I thank him and feel deeply indebted to him. , M. W. Bro. James W. Skelly, one of the best-informed Masons in the state, has assisted me on several matters for which he has my profound thanks. I also thank him and the Scottish Rite bodies of St. Louis for according us the use of their beautiful auditorium for the memorial meeting on Flag Day, June 14, 1947, and for inviting us to use this same auditorium for the annual communication of the Grand Lodge. I am indebted to M. W. Bro. Byrne E. Bigger, chairman of the


56

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Committee on Jurisprudence, for several valuable opinions which he has rendered me. lowe a great debt of gratitude to my entire body of District Deputy Grand Masters for keeping me posted on conditions around the state and for valuable work done in the respective districts. I cannot mention them all by name here but I want them all to know that my thanks and appreciation are just as sincere as if I mentioned them individually. Right Worshipful Brother C. Lew Gallant has responded cheerfully and willingly to the many calls that I made upon him for advice and assistance. His keen, analytical mind and his fine knowledge of masonic law and procedure have been of great assistance to me during the past year. He has my sincere thanks. Most Worshipful Brother Karl M. Vetsburg has responded to my many calls cheerfully and willingly. He has sat in on many important discussions and conferences and his calm, impartial judgment has been of incalculable value to my administration. I am under heavy obligations to Most \Vorshipful Brother Vetsburg. Most \Vorshipful Brother Anthony F. Ittner, my loyal friend since路 the day I knocked upon the door of Missouri Lodge No. 1 as a seeker after Masonic light, has been during the past year as he was for many years before, a wise and impartial counselor, ever a true friend, a real Freemason and a gentleman of the highest ideals. In his work as Grand Lecturer, I have thought that for many years he adds to his appointed duties the task of being an ambassador of goodwill for our Fraternity. God grant that he may be spared for many years to continue his great work. My good wife has given me strict orders not to mention her in my address, but I feel that I would be recreant to my duty if I obeyed her injunction. Her kindly and loving interest at all times and the valuable aid she has given me in countless ways have encouraged and helped to sustain me through the most trying periods of the year. One of the most valuable phases of this modest and unassuming desire to help was her willingness in all kinds of weather to accompany me to and fro and help me drive on my pilgrimages to distant Lodges which enabled me to reach home in the small hours of the morning and be ready for the duties of the succeeding day. 'N ords fail me adequately to express my deep appreciation. CONCLUSION Swiftly the sands are running out on my year as Grand Master, and I shall soon be handing the gavel of authority over to my successor with my blessing and best wishes for a successful and happy year. No man can serve a term as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri without being materially chastened and without experiencing a deeper sense of humility than he has ever known before.


1947

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Neither can he render the full measure of his duty in that high office without being worn in body and mind when he leaves it. One would not for a prince's ransom part with the precious experiences it has brought him, nor would he, save in a great emergency, accept it a second time. The discharge of the duties of the office of Grand Master brings a certain moral and spiritual uplift to its occupant which he cannot get from the regular pursuit of his daily vocations. He meets so many men who live righteously, fear God and never tire in His service or the service of their country and their fellow man that he can never quite go back to the same pattern of living and thinking that he followed before acceding to this high office. But let there be an end of moralizing. I thank you for the high honor you bestowed upon me a year ago and trust that you are reasonably satisfied with my stewardship. And now, before entering upon the labors of the Grand Lodge, may the God of Love and Peace, whose blessing our Grand Chaplain so eloquently and reverently invoked this morning, be with us through all our deliberations, "even unto the end." Fraternally submitted,

Grand Master.

The addr('ss was referred to the Committee on Grand Master's Address. NOMINATIONS FOR

~SONIC

HOME BOARD

The following brethren were nominated for direetors of the Masonic Home of Missouri: For term ending .1950: T. W. Cotton, W. W. Martin, DuVal Smith, Robert C. Winkelmaier. For term ending 1949: R. Jasper Smith. REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY

M. 'Vor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, presented his report for the period September 15, 1946, to September 10, 1947, which was adopted and ordered printed in the Proceedings. The report is as follows: DUPJ.ICATE CHARTERS

Triplett Lodge No. ]22, original no longer legible; duplicate charter issued December 5, 1946. Senath Lodge No. 513, original destroyed by fire December 31, 1903, and first duplicate badly worn; duplicate charter issued March 27, 1947.


58

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Cleveland Lodge No. 651, original destroyed by fire July 26, 1941; duplicate charter issued August 21, 1941. FREEDOM LODGE NO. 636 Charter was issued to Freedom Lodge No. 636 on September 26, 1946. REPORTS OF D. D. G. N.

's

Blanks for these reports were mailed to all the Deputies, and their reports have been turned over to the Committee on the Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters. LODGES CONSOLIDATED

Weatherby Lodge No. 235 consolidated with Parrott Lodge No. 308, under name and number of Weatherby Lodge No. 235 on September 16, 1946. Purdy Lodge No. 148 consolidated with Monett Lodge No. 129, under name and number of Monett Lodge No. 129 on April 4, 1941. CLARKTON LODGE U. D.

Dispensation granted June 11, 1941, and lodge set to work U. D. June 11, 1941. COURTESIES

By direction of Grand Master Cameron, 280 requests have been made to Sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer Degrees for Missouri Lodges, and 149 requests have been made to Missouri Lodges by Sister Grand Jurisdictions. DISPENSATIONS

Dispensations were issued as per the list in the Grand Master's Address. COMMISSIONS ISSUED

M. Wor. Grand Master Cameron appointed the following Grand Representatives: Rhode Island Mississippi North Carolina Rio De Janeiro

Harry A. Reed, Providence James P. White, Bailey Lambert R. Morris, Beaufort 1. Bert Love, Miami, Fla. FIFTY-YEAR BUTTONS

The following brethren whose names have been certified by their respective lodges and confirmed by the records of the Grand Lodge as eligible, have received buttons in recognition of their long years of Masonic standing: No. 1 522 316 130 214 78

and Name of Lodge Missouri Gate City Rural. Hume Forest City St. Joseph

Name of Brother William Buder R. C. Shipley George Henry Robinson John Gassonway Frank Walker Frederick Arnhold

No. of Years 50 50 58 50 50 50


1947 No. 284 340 340 256 320 614 654 656 620 620 620 522 443 332 630 163 551 551 551 360 460 466 466 25 424 656 17 550 550 79 79 79 121 324 13 64 550 331 331 360 299 299 299 299 299 295 483 470 470 470 470 638 179 179 546 614

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

59

and Name of Lodge Name of Brother No. of Years Canopy John S. Lea 50 Westport Ernest H. Wright 50 Westport William F. Lacaff 50 Ephram Blackwell 50 Shekinah Versailles George A. Brown 50 Mt. Washington George H. Cook 50 Commonwealth Gus W. Phillips 50 Country Club Albert Edward Hughes 52 Willard R. S. Staley 69 Willard William L. Fortner 50 Willard D. E. Cloud 51 Calhoun M. E. Merritt 50 Wallace J. Fodrea 50 Anchor 50 Excello George H. Temple East Gate Walter C. Buchanan 50 William A. Rutledge 50 OccidentaL Pendleton F. J. Antoine 55 Pendleton H. J. Ratley 51 Pendleton ,F. Haynes 53 Tuscan Joseph S. Calfee 54 Lambskin Frank Kirk 50 Francis M. Lauderdale 50 Southwest Southwest ,Andrew Jackson Sanders 56 Napthali. ,Werner Hencke ,50 Samaritan Archibald Francis 50 Country Club Martin Harry DeVault 50 50 Clarksville T. B. Jamison Rose Hill Fred Lincoln Clark 50 William Richard N ast 50 Rose Hill Polar Star William Sloss 50 Polar Star Alvin J. Wilderman 50 Polar Star Gotfried M. Fausek 50 Erwin Edwin H. Bosse 50 McDonald William Reece Hall 50 Rising Sun A. W. Craig 50 Charles L. Elzea 51 Monroe City Robert B. Puckett 50 Rose Hill Charity Herbert N. Couser 50 Charity Joseph L. Rogers 50 Tuscan Bert B. Culver 50 Temple ,. Frederick G. Curts 50 James Ketner 52 Temple James H. Nelson 50 Temple Temple Harry J. Schilling 50 Temple Sherman W. Wilcox 50 Moniteau O. B. Pettigreu 51 Fairfax Ferimin S. Strickler 50 Nodaway J. F. Cook ............â&#x20AC;˘........... 52 Nodaway U. S. Wright 55 Nodaway Marshall E. Ford 52 Nodaway Thomas W. Miller 58 Triangle J oseph H. Beasley 50 Pride of the West. James V. Aitken 50 Pride of the West J. Gartenbach 50 Orient Eugene D. Spickerman 50 Mt. Washington George E. Kingen 50


60

]947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

No. and Name of Lodge

Name of Brother

271 476 216 323 323 189 92 236 43 337 1 1 416 110 352 243 323 110 262 87 535 313 599 243 110 9 111 20 90 48 48 602 461 7 40 310 263 271 1 534 230 625 71 111 111 111 443 196 365 492 48 286 527 463 102 392

James H. 0 'Bryant Robert D. Crank ,William Baker Louis F. Muller Walter E. Seewoster Edward Lawhon W. Wirt Parks John T. Stinson Harry V. Latham William J. Selvey Frank X. Bouche Charles McLean William A. Graeper G. M. London Elisha M. Bishop Fred C. Freiberg Othello L. Bryan H. E. Honan J aIm E. Snyder Adam V. Coppedge Press G. Higginbotham Tillman Rock George W. Tidwell Thomas A. Woodling B. C. Francis ,Joseph W. Henry John W. Buchanan Leo S. Rassieur J oseph Clyde Gibson Daniel Shaw Gage William H. Renoe W. R. Wright. J saac T. McCue George T. Leeper Frederick H. Wolf Charles C. Pinnell, Sr ,0. C. Browning Howard Clinton Jeffers Daniel A. Gillespie Chris. C. Birkicht Frank C. Hunter Newall J. Ozias C. C. Clark George N. Liston ,Elgin Mallett ,Artie W. Race Henry W. Meyer J oseph C. Carden W. T. Wiles Robert M. Farbee Crockett Harrison S. W. W oltzen Thomas A. Walton W. Jasper Highfill Alfred B. Hughes R. B. Watts

Solomon Mt. Hope Hale City Cornerstone Cornerstone Zeredatha Perseverance Sedalia Jefferson Blue Springs Missouri. Missouri. Cache Marcus Friend Keystone Cornerstone Marcus Holden Washington Blackwell Meramec Elvins Keystone Marcus Geo. Washington Trenton St. Louis Russellville Fulton Fulton Acacia Caruthersville 0 'Sullivan Mt. Moriah Sikeston Summit Solomon Missouri Columbia St. James Sheffield Savannah Trenton Trenton Trenton Anchor Quitman Bayou Daggett. Fulton Urich Higbee Clifton Bloomington Christian

No. of Years

".

50 50 50 53 50 51 50 52 51 59 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 51 51 52 50 53 55 50 51 50 50 50 52 52 50 54 51 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 51 56 51 51 50 51 50 50 50 50 50 52 50 50 50 51


1947 No. 220 190 563 518 547 547 547 547 547 547 547 547 1 317 525 43 352 170 469 124 124 392

61

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

and Name of Lodge Kansas City Putnam york OrientaL South Gate South Gate South Gate South Gate South Gate South Gate South Gate South Gate Missouri Osborn Cunningham Jefferson Friend Benevolence Plato Union Star Union Star Christian ,

Name of Brother Ernest Zimmer Wada Hampton Haley Harry L. White John F. Martin Fred H. Turner Matthew W. Pickard Orville R. Mason Frank M. Perry Joseph F. Grogger Henry R. Albright Christopher R. Rosier Thomas M. Pratt, Sr Cornwell B. Binnington James A. Lawson Moses F. Hardy Wylie Rhoades J ohn S. Taylor William T. Stone Fred D. Willard S. B. Kirtley E. B. Griggs F. M. Burton

STATISTICAL, YEAR.

No. of Years 51 50 50 50 55 51 51 51 50 50 54 50 50 50 50 50 50 51 50 51 50 57

1946-1947

602 Number of Chartered Lodges, September 14, 1946 . 1 Lodge U. D . 601 Number of Chartered Lodges, September 10, 1947 . 1 Lodge U. D . September 10, 1947, Total Membership . 104,850 September 14, 1946, Total Membership in 603 Lodges. . .. 98,963 Plus: Adjustments by audit of Individual Lodges 107 99,070 Total Number Raised Affiliated Reinstated

. . .

7,095 987 1,137 9,219

Less: Total Number Dimitted Deaths Susp. N. P. D. Susp. U. M. C. Expelled

1,013 1,865 554 1 6

3,439 Net Gain, September 10, 1947 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5,780 104,850

1947

PER CAPITA TAX

1947 Per Capita Tax due on 595 Reporting Lodges Total Amount Paid to September 10, 1947, $218,275.35 (Less over-payments of $316.95)

$217,997.60

Balance Due on 595 Reporting Lodges, September 10, 1947 September 10, 1947, 7 Lodges unreported.

$

217,958.40 39.20


62

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

Welfare Committee: Paid to Masonic Home, Checks 40, 99, 120, 171 and 234 for $500.00 each $ 2,500.00 Per Capita Tax: Paid to Masonic Home: Check No. 59 $ 9,025.10 Check No. 220 :................... 22,000.00 Check No. 228 30,000.00 Check No. 236 45,000.00 Check No. 276 54,000.00 160,025.10 Balance due Masonic Home, on September 10, 1947: On 1947 Per Capita On 194'6 Back Per Capita On 1945 Back Per Capita On 1944 Jrack Per Capita On 1943 Back Per Capita On 1942 Back Per Capita

. $ 4,684.57 . 1,037.35 . 128.93 67.50 . 67.50 . 34.50 .

$ 6,020.35

SPECIAL INITIATION FUND

Paid to Masonic Home, alc this Fund, September 14, 1946, to September 10, 1947 $ 77,454.13 Balance due Masonic Home to September 10, 1947 3,092.86 GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Paid to Frederick J. Schondau, Secretary, (Check No. 37) .. $ ralance due to September 10, 1947 .

7,500.00 7,300.59

DR. WILLIAM F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

September 10, 1947-$500.00 Bond and $522.49 in Bank

$

1,022.49

$

928.26

JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBRARY FUND

September 10, 1947, Bank Balance GRAND LODGE FINANCES

Cash in Grand Lodge Depositories, September 14, 1946 .... $128,196.56 Cash Bal., Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. (Restricted) $ 1,672.60 Cas~ Bal:, Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, MIssourI 2,500.00 Cash. Bal.,. Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, MIssourI 10,000.00 Cash Bal., Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 114,023.96 $128,196.56

Receipts: Per Capita Tax, 1947 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $218,275.35 Back Per Capita Tax, 1942 $ 48.30 Back Per Capita Tax, 1943 94.50 Back Per Capita Tax, 1944 94.50 Back Per Capita Tax, 1945 180.50 Back Per Capita Tax, 1946 1,452.30 1,870.10 $220,145.45 War Service Fund

.

268.20


194'7

63

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Refund Bal. 1946 War Service Fund-Repurchase of Bonds Sale of Masonic Manuals . Sale of 1925 Constitution and By-Laws . Sale of 1921 Constitution and By-Laws . Sale of Dues Receipts . Sale of Masonic Veterans' Buttons . . Received from defunct Lodges and members thereof Refunds and Miscellaneous . Received to replace invalid Money Order (See Contra) .. Refund on Mileage and Per Diem Account $6,555.40 Interest on Permanent Fund Securities 3,267.50

9,822.90

Received for Philippine and European Masonic Relief Funds

288.60

Total Income

18.10 3,034.85 3.00 5.60 1,131.30 220.50 142.50 72.90 5.00

$235,158.90

September 14, 1946, Cash in Grand Lodge Depositories Total Receipts September 10, 1947

128,196.56 $363,355.46

ANALYSIS OF DISBURSEMENTS

Total Disbursements to September 10, 1947

$243,081.78

Pay Roll Proceedings $ Salaries and Allowances: Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Lecturer, Grand Lodge Office Account $ 16,821.12 (Less: Fed. W. H. Tax withheld and paid ... $1,695.80 Less: Fed. Employees O. A. B. withheld and paid 113.32 Less: City of St. Louis W. H. Tax withheld and paid 13.25 $1,822.37) Less: City of St. Louis w. H. Tax withheld but not paid .

25,000.00 1,886.57

11.15

$16,809.97

Grand Correspondent . Maintenance, Grand Lodge Office . Masonic Relief Association of U. S. and Canada Past Grand Master's Jewel . Expenses: 1946 Grand Lodge Session . Reporter: 1946 Grand Lodge Session . Telephone: JE 4877 . Bonds: Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer .. nontingent: Grand Lodge Expense Fund . C. K. Benson Audit Co . Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers (Order Grand Master) ..â&#x20AC;˘.............................. Printing, Postage and Stationery . District Lecturers' and District Deputies' Conferences . Grand Lodge Officers' Conference .

500.00 1,800.00 329.88 904.08 100.00 217.62 300.00 702.14 225.00 208.30 2,645.45 872.13 74.30


64

f947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Expenses: George Washington Memorial and Grand Master's Conferences . Membership Masonic Service Association . Committee of By-Laws Revision . Ritual Committee Expense . Welfare Committee, Masonic Home Board . Expenses: 1946-1947 D. D. G. M.'s (Approved Aug., 1947) . Total Budget Appropriation for 1946-1947 (Exclusive of Pay Roll) . Actual Disbursements $ 33,883.71 Plus: City of St. Louis W. H. Tax withheld, but not paid 11.15

450.00 1,989.63 185.68 92.42 2,500.00 1,090.54

$33,883.71

37,085.05 33,894.86

Amount Unexpended $ 3,190.19 Total paid Masonic Home account back Per Capita Tax collected to September 10, 1947 $ 9,025.10 Total paid Masonic Home account 1947 Per Capita Tax . 151,000.00 $160,025.10 1,324.51 20.25

Dues Receipt Cards . Proficiency Certificates . Social Security, Federal Old Age Pension (Grand Lodge Portion) . Purchase of Masonic Manuals . Purchase of U. S. Government Bonds (See refund of $18.10) Philippine Relief Fund (Masonic Relief Association of the United States) . Purchase of Masonic Veterans' Buttons . Expense Publication Committee . Invalid Money Order unpaid (See Contra) . Total Disbursements to September 10, 1947

112.42 1,996.89 18,718.10 470.47 1,491.53 33.80 5.00 $243,081.78

RECAPITULATION

Total Receipts to September 10, 1947 Total Disbursements to September 10, 1947

$363,355.46 243,081.78

$120,273.68 Cash Balance, September 10, 1947, in General Fund Cash Balance, September 10, 1947, Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. (Restricted) $ 1,672.60 Cash Balance, September 10, 1947, Bank of Kirksville, Mo. 2,500.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1947, Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 10,000.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1947, Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 106,101.08 $120,273.68 Less: Balance due Masonic Home aj Per Capita Tax to Sept. 10, 1947 . Less: $1,672.60 "Restricted" Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. . . Less: General Library Fund . Less: Unexpended Balance of War Service Fund

6,020.35 1,672.60 255.00 286.30 $

8,234.25


GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

65

September 10, 1947, Total Amount Available Cash in General Fund

$112,039.43

1947

Fraternally submitted,

Grand Secretary. REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: i submit herewith an abbreviated report of the Grand Treasurer from September 14, 1946, to September 10, 1947. A detailed report, showing all items in full, is filed with the Grand Secretary for the inspection of officers and members at any time they may desire additional information. Showing only a skeleton report is for the purpose of saving a substantial sum in printing of Annual Proceedings. 1946 Sept. 14

Sept. 14

Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Co. (Restricted) $ 1,672.60 Balance in Bank of Kirksville. . . . . . 2,500.00 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall 10,000.00

14,172.60

Balance in Union National Bank . Received from Grand Secretary during the year ..

114,073.96 235,167.90 $363,414.46

1947 Sept. 10 Disbursed during the year . Balance in Union National Bank . Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall . Balance in Bank of Kirksville . Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Co. (Restricted) .

243,003.12 106,238.74 10,000.00 2,500.00 1,672.60 $363,414.46

As Grand Treasurer, I charge myself with the custody of the following securities contained in Safe Deposit Box No. 6511 in the Union Safe Deposit Company of Kansas City, Missouri, which said Box is subject to the joint control of myself and the Grand Master, or his delegated representative: U. S. War Savings Bonds, Series "D," dated March, 1940, Maturity Value $10,000.00, Cost . $ 7,500.00 33,700.00 U. S. Savings Bonds, Series "G," 2%%, Cost . 29,000.00 U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2%%, Series 1964-69, Par Value 10,000.00 U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2%%, Series 1965-70, Par Value ..


66

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2%%, Series 1966-71, Par Value U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2%%, Series 1967-72, Par Value U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2%%, Series 1967-72, Par Value

6,000.00 40,000.00 15,000.00 $141,200.00

I also hold for William F. Kuhn Library Association, U. S. Treasury Bond, 2%%, Series 1952-54, Par Value

$500.00

Fraternally submitted,

E. MORRIS, Grand Treasurer.

EDMUND

REPORT OF AUDITOR

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Gentlemen: Pursuant to engagement, we have examined and checked the book records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer of the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri for the period from September 15, 1946, to September 10, 1947, also the Masonic Home Initiation Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund, the William F. Kuhn Library Fund and the Joseph S. McIntyre Library Fund for the same period, and respectfully present the following report : General Fund-Per Grand Secretary's Books Balance, September 15, 1946 $128,196.56 Receipts, Forwarded to Grand Treasurer Per Capita Tax 1947 $218,275.35 Back Per Capita Tax, 1946 $ 1,452.30 Back Per Capita Tax, 1945 180.50 Back Per Capita Tax, 1944 .. 94.50 Back Per Capita Tax, 1943 94.50 Back Per Capita Tax, 1942 48.30 1,870.10 War Service Fund . Received from Defunct Lodges . Sale of Manuals $ 3,034.85 Sale of Constitution and By-Laws 8.60 Sale of Dues Receipt Cards. . . . . . 1,131.30 Sale of Masonic Veteran Buttons. . 220.50 Refund on Mileage and Per Diem Account . Miscellaneous Funds: Philippine Relief $ European Relief Fund Interest on Permanent Fund Securities . Refunds: Overpayment on Ritual Committee Expense $ Overpayment on Mileage and Per Diem Account

268.20 142.50

4,395.25 6,555.40

217.60 71.00

288.60 3,267.50

1.00 7.90

8.90


1947

67

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Miscellaneous: 1945 Proceedings sold 1946 Proceedings sold Charter Fee Dispensation Fee Board of Relief-grave of D. K. Kimball

. .

1.00 3.00 20.00 30.00

.

10.00

$

Total Income

64.00 $235,135.80

Balance on check issued for purchase of bonds: Check issued $18,718.10 Bonds purchased 18,700.00

18.10

Received to replace invalid money order ....

5.00

235,158.90 $363,355.46

Disbursements: Per checks issued for expenses . $224,358.68 Per checks issued for purchase of United States Treasury Bonds . 18,718.10 Per check issued for invalid money order .. 5.00

243,081.78

Balance, September 10, 1947, Per Grand Secretary's Books $120,273.68 Balance, September 10, 1947, Per Grand Treasurer's Books $120,411.34 RECONCILIATION

Balance, September 10, 1947, Per Grand Treasurer's Books $120,411.34 Less Outstanding Check No. 277, August 28, 1947 137.66 Balance, September 10, 1947, Per Grand Secretary's Books $120,273.68 Consisting of Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri, in liquidation not subject to withdrawal $ 1,672.60 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106,101.08 Balance in Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri 10,000.00 Balance in Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Missouri 2,500.00 $120,273.68 BONDS

On September 16, 1947, in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, we examined the securities listed hereinafter, in the Grand Lodge safe deposit box at the Union National Bank of Kansas City, Missouri. All interest from these securities was accounted for. In our examination, we noted interest coupons due March 15, 1947, amounting to $75.00, still attached to the bonds.


68

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE PERMANENT FUND

Bond Number 211585E 211586F 23572B 2371A 4615E 21845E 21846F 8564D 77195E

Maturity

Interest Dates

S.'l'reasury S. Treasury S. Treasury S. Treasury S. Treasury S. Treasury S. Treasury

1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69

6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15

2%% 2%% 2'-%% 2%% 2%% 2%% 2%%

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 10,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 $ 29,000.00

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

1965/70 1965/70

3/15 & 9/15 3/15 & 9/15

2%% 2%%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00

10,000.00

Kind U. U. U. U. U. U. U.

Par Value

Interest Rate

Tot"l

56530 5932B

U. S. Treasury U. S.;Treasury

1966/71 1966/71

3/15 & 9/15 3/15 & 9/15

2 112%

9lh%

$ 1,000.00 5,000.00

6,000.00

8964D 49654D 41669K 41670L 41671A 281030 26122B

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72

6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15 6/15 & 12/15

2%% 2-%% 2%% 2%% 2%% 3%% 2%%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

55,000.00

V29384G V253352G C4377033G C4377034G D2320085G M864090G M4864091G M4864092G V702346G X582056G

M1528995D M1528996D M1528997D M1528998D M1528999D M1529000D M1529001D M1529002D M1529003D M1529004D

Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series

Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series

G G G G G G G G G G

D D D D D D D D D D

Maturity Value

Redemption Value 9/10/47

October, '53 $ 5,000.00 June, 1955 10,000.00 100.00 September, '58 100.00 September, '58 500.00 September, '58 1,000.00 September, '58 September, '58 1,000.00 September, '58 1,000.00 September, '58 5,000.00 September, '58 10,000.00

$ 4:760.00 9,470.00 98.80 98.80 494.00 988.00 988.00 988.00 4,940.00 9,880.00

$ 5,000.00 10,000.00 100.00 100.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

$33,700.00

$32,705.60

$33,700.00

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00

$

Savings Savings Savings Savings Savings Savings Savings Savings Savings Savings

3/'50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50 3/ '50

$10,000.00 $

900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 900.00 9000.00 $

Cost

$

33,700.00

750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 750.00 7,500.00

7,500.00 $141,200.00


1947

69

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI WM. F. KUHN LIBB.ARY FUND

Maturity

Interest

Interest

Date 3/15 & 9/15

Rate

2552B U. S. Treasury 1952/54 2.%% $500.00 In September, 1946, $18,700.00 of the balance remaining in the War Service Fund was invested in U. S. Series G, 2%% bonds purchased at par. MASONIC HOME INITIATION FUND

Balance in Bank, September 15, 1946 $ 7,704.13 Received from Masonic Lodges during period September 15, 1946, to September 10, 1947 72,850.00 $80,554.13 Transferred to Masonic Home during period September 15, 1946, to September 10, 1947.. Bank Charges .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$77,454.13 7.14

Balance in First National Bank in St. Louis, Missouri, September 10, 1947

77,461.27 $

3,092.86

GEORGE W ASIIINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Balance in Bank, September 15, 1946 Received from Masonic Lodges during period September 15, 1946, to September 10, 1947

$ 7,507.11 7,299.00 $14,806.11

Transferred to George Washington Memorial Association February 21, 1947 $ Bank Charges

7,500.00 5.52

Balance in First National Bank in Saint Louis, Missouri, September 10, 1947

7,505.52 $ 7,300.59

WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 15, 1946 Receipts Interest on Bond Interest on Savings Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 1,004.90

$

12.50 5.09

$ 1,022.49

Balance, September 10, 1947 Consisting of Cash in Savings Account, First National Bank in Saint Louis, Missouri U. S. Treasury Bond No. 2552B .

17.59

$

522.49 500.00

$ 1,022.49

JOSEPH S. MO INTYRE LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 15, 1946 $ No. Receipts or Disbursements During Period September 15, . 1946, to September 10, 1947 Balance in Mississippi Valley Trust Company in Saint Louis, Missouri, September 10, 1947

928.26

----$

928.26


70

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE MILEAGE AND PER DIEM COMMITTEE

Deposit from General Fund Disbursements Mileage and Per Diem Checks Issued and Paid Transferred to General Fund

$25,000.00 $18,444.60 6,555.40

Balance, September 10, 1947

25,000.00

$

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F. & A. M., from September 15, 1946, to September 10, 1947. The Lodge returns were checked to the Secretary's records and the recorded cash receipts of the Masonic Home Initiation Fund and the George Washington Memorial Fund were compared with the stubs of receipts to Lodges therefor. Cancelled checks were inspected in support of the disbursements and the bank balances shown in this report were confirmed directly to us by the depositaries. Fraternally submitted, C. K. BENSON, Certified Public Accountant.

REPORT OF THE MASONIC HOME W. W. Martin presented the Report of The Masonic Home. The report was adopted, and is as follows: FROM SEPTEMBER

1, 1946,

TO SEPTEMBER

1,1947

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI, LOCATED AT ST. LOUIS OFFICERS W. W. Martin, President. T. W. Cotton, Vice President Harry Theis, Treasurer Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary E. J. Reynolds, Superintendent Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Emma Bettis, Matron of Old Folks

St. Louis, Mo. Van Buren, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS T. W. Cotton W. W. Martin DuVal Smith Robert C. Winkelmaier

Van Buren, St. Louis, St. Joseph, St. Louis,

MO.} Mo. Mo. Mo.

Term expires 1947


1947

71

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Henry C. Chiles Martin B. Dickinson James W. Skelly F. Ernest Carter

Lexington, MO.} Kansas City, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Kansas City, Mo.

Harry Theis Harris C. Johnston Byrne E. Bigger Ray V. Denslow -George \V. \Val~er

St. Louis, Boonville, Hannibal, Trenton, Cape Girardeau,

MO.) Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

Term expires 1948

Term expires 1949

* Deceased.

R. Jasper Smith, elected to fill vacancy until next communication of Grand Lodge. EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Solon Cameron, Grand Master Morris E. Ewing, Deputy Grand Master Harry F. Sunderland, Senior Grand Warden James M. Bradford, Junior Grand Warden

St. Louis, Morrisville, Kansas City, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

ADVISORY BOARD Mrs. Ella Jean Flanders Mrs. Alta Tate Mrs. Edith Ambruster

Excelsior Springs, Mo. Kirkwood, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.

PRESIDENT'S LETTER

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Brethren: Pursuant to the Constitution and By-Laws of the Masonic Home of Missouri, we submit the Annual Report and request your careful consideration. At the Annual Session of the Most \Vorshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri held on September 24, 1946, in St. Louis, Missouri, the following brethren were elected directors for a term of three years: Ray V. Denslow, Trenton, Missouri. George W. Walker, Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Byrne E. Bigger, Hannibal, Missouri. Harry Theis, St. Louis, Missouri. Harris C. Johnston, Boonville, Missouri.

At the Board meeting held in St. Louis, January 8, 1947, the following officers were elected: W. W. Martin, President, St. Louis, Mo. T. W. Cotton, Vice-President, Van Buren, Mo. Harry Theis, Treasurer, St. Louis, Mo. C. L. Alexander, Secretary, St. Louis, Mo. E. J. Reynolds, Superintendent, St. Louis, Mo.


72

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

The following were appointed: Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician, St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children, St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Emma Bettis, Matron of Old Folks, St. Louis, Mo.

The Standing Committees for the year have been as follows: Trustees of Endowment Fund-W. W. Martin, Harry Theis, Harris C. Johnston. Exeootive Committee--T. W. Cotton, Chairman, Byrne E. Bigger, F. Ernest Carter, Henry C. Chiles, Ray V. Denslow, Martin B. Dickinson, Harris C. Johnston, W. W. Martin, James W. Skelly, DuVal Smith, Harry Theis, Robert C. Winkelmaier, R. Jasper Smith. FinatTWC Committee-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman, Byrne E. Bigger, T. W. Cotton. Admission and Discipline Committee-James W. Skelly, Chairman, Robert C. Winkelmaier, Harry Theis. Legal Committee--Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman, DuVal Smith, Henry C. Chiles, Martin B. Dickinson, R. Jasper Smith. Administration Committee-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman, Martin B. Dickinson, Harris C. J ohnston, DuVal Smith, Harry Theis. Hospital Committee-To W. Cotton, Chairman, F. Ernest Carter, Robert C. Winkelmaier. MEDIOAL STAFF

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Solon Cameron Leland B. Alford William R. Bohne Erich Brockelman James Barrett Brown C. E. Burford A. H. Conrad Ralph Cook CarlT. Eber James Forsen Joseph Glenn J. F. Hardesty D. L. Harris R. K. Kimmel Roland M. Klemme Charles L. Klenk Otto W. Koch Phillip S. Luedde William Nelson Bert O. Owens R. J. Payne Hugo Reim Robert E. Schlueter Charles W. Thierry Henry P. Thym R. S. Weiss Frederick A. Baldwin Hermon S. Major

St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Kansas City,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.


1947

73

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

SUPERINTENDENT

Brother E. J. Reynolds, who was elected Superintendent of the Home on January 9, 1946, resigned on August 26, 1947, to accept a very attractive offer as professor in \Vashington University. Brother Reynolds had fitted himself for University teaching and felt the offer from \Vashington University was so attractive that he could not fail to accept it. His services in the Home ceased on September 15. This leaves the Home without a Superintendent. The Board will make every effort to fill the vacancy at the earliest possible moment. DEATH

Again death has invaded our ranks and has taken one of our faithful and highly esteemed directors. Brother George W. Walker was a member of this Board from June 4, 1938, to November 13, 1946. He was very faithful in his attendance at the Board meetings until his health prevented regular attendance. He was highly respected in his profession and his advice and counsel, especially in the management of our Hospital, was always most helpful and constructive. NEW BOARD MEMBER

At the Board meeting held on January 8, 1947, Brother R. Jasper Smith, a Past Master and District Deputy of Springfield, was elected to the Board to serve until the next annual communication of the Grand Lodge. APPLICATIONS

During the past year 167 applications for admission to the Home were considered, and the following disposition was made of them: Admitted to the Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Died while application was being investigated Referred to the Welfare Committee of the Grand Lodge. . . . . . . . Referred to the Welfare Committee of the Grand Chapter, O.E.S. . . Rejected because of ineligibility Continued for further investigation .......................

39 4 2 0 4 118 167

MEMBER STATISTICS Members in the Home September 1, 1946 .. Admitted during the past year . Discharged during the year Deaths during the year

Men Women 72 167 14 23 86 0 16

190 1

17

Boys 17 6

23 5

o

Members in the Home September 1, 1947 .. 70 172 18 Total membership September 1, 1947 Admitted during the year but who have not yet arrived Average number in the Home during the year. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .

Girls 14 7 21 4

o

17 277 4 275


74

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

MASONIC INFmMARY

The following gives an account of the work done during the year: Total number of patients in the hospital at beginning of year .. 54 Total number of patients admitted during the year 241 Total number of patients discharged during the year 206 Total number of deaths during the year 33 Total number of patients treated during the year 6,127 Total number of patients in the hospital at end of the year. . . . . . 56 Average number of patients per day during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Total patients' days in the hospital 22,322 Total number of out-patient treatments during the year 13,646

PER CAPITA COST

The Home has very definitely felt the increased costs of both provisions and labor. \Vages have increased $19,000.00 from 1944 to 1947 and the increased cost of food during the same period amounts to over $23,000.00. I am sure these figures do not come as a surprise to anyone. The Department of Labor shows that the wholesale prices of commodities have increased from 1941 to 1947 about 76 per cent, and we are affected by economic conditions the same as every individual who belongs to the Fraternity. The per capita cost for the year was $941.68. CONDITIONS IN THE HOME

The increased cost of all supplies has compelled us to make only the repairs that were absolutely necessary and to curtail vital services wherever it was possible, without materially reducing the care of the people in the Home. Our people are still well cared for and we have a grateful and appreciative family. There is still a long waiting list of old people and the demands for the admission of old people seem to be increasing. \Ve have tried to take everyone who applied for admission who was really in need but at the close of the year we had a waiting list of 118. Many of those on the waiting list have either money or property, or children who should take care of them. CHILDREN IN THE HOME

During the year thirteen children were admitted to the Home and nine were discharged. Our children's population is definitely growing. Many inquiries are being received and there are very definite evidences that our children's population will increase from year to year. We now have several children in the Home under school age and the average age of our children has decreased during the year. We have two boys and one girl in Washington University; two girls and one boy in Harris Teachers College; one boy in the St. Louis College of Pharmacy and the rest in high school and grade school. KNIGHTS TEMPLAR EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION

One boy and one girl are in \Vashington University because of scholarships given by the Knights Templar. For many years this or-


1947

75

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

ganization has given us two scholarships every year. Their help is very highly appreciated. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR SCHOLARSHIP

The Order of the Eastern Star Scholarship Board has given one very substantial scholarship to one of the Masonic Home boys who is attending Washington University and this help is very highly appreciated by both the Home and the young man who is being helped. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR

The Advisory Board of the Order of the Eastern Star is now spending some of their money which has been accumulating through the war years. The old people's dining room is enjoying all new silver which was delivered during the year, and there has been delivered to the Home furniture to refurnish the men's building. All of it will not be placed at the time of the meeting of Grand Lodge but by the middle of October all of the old men of the Home will have new and very lovely furniture. We are grateful for this help and we believe that buying conditions have now improved enough that the Horne can enjoy the things that the Eastern Stars have been planning for us through the war years. The Advisory Board of Grand Chapter have been most helpful through the years, not only with new furniture and supplies that they have bought, but by their counsel and their help. ENTERTAINMENT FUND

The letter that the Grand Master sent out in the early fall asking for donations to the Entertainment Fund of the Home brought a most generous response from the Lodges. We not only received gifts from 355 Lodges but other organizations and individuals were also most generous. Following is a list of the donors to this fund and a list of the expenses from the fund. On September 1, there was a balance of $3,079.04, but this will be used during the fall months of the year and for the usual Christmas gifts made to the members of the Home family. Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis Howard Lodge No.4, New Franklin United Lodge No.5, Springfield O'Sullivan Lodge No.7 ,Walnut Grove.. George Washington Lodge No.9, St. Louis Pauldingville Lodge No. 11, Wright City Rising Sun Lodge No. 13, Barry Western Star Lodge No. 15, Winston Memphis Lodge No. 16, Memphis Clarksville Lodge No. 17, Clarksville Palmyra Lodge No. 18, Palmyra St. Louis Lodge No. 20, St. Louis Wellington Lodge No. 22, DeKalb Wyaconda Lodge No. 24, LaGrange

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 50.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 61.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 60.00 5.00 5.00


76

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Naphtali Lodge No. 25, St. Louis Ava Lodge No. 26, Ava , Evergreen Lodge No. 27, New Haven St. John's Lodge No. 28, Hannibal Windsor Lodge No. 29, Windsor Huntsville Lodge No. 30, Huntsville Liberty Lodge No. 31, Liberty Troy Lodge No. 34, Troy Mercer Lodge No. 35, Princeton Callao Lodge No. 38, Callao DeWitt Lodge No. 39, DeWitt Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City Bonhomme Lodge No. 45, Ballwin Wentzville Lodge No. 46, Wentzville Fayette Lodge No. 47, Fayette Fulton Lodge No. 48, Fulton Xenia Lodge No. 50, Hopkins J.Jivingston Lodge No. 51, Glasgow Wakanda Lodge No. 52, Carrollton Weston Lodge No. 53, Weston , Richmond Lodge No. 57, Richmond Monticello Lodge No. 58, Monticello Centralia Lodge No. 59, Centralia Waverly Lodge No. 61, Waverly Vincel Lodge No. 62, Cameron Cambridge Lodge No. 63, Slater Monroe Lodge No. 64, Monroe City Savannah Lodge No. 71, Savannah .. " Gorin Lodge No. 72, Gorin Eureka Lodge No. 73, Brunswick Silex Lodge No. 15, Silex Independence Lodge No. 76, Independence Lebanon Lodge No. 77, Steelville St. Joseph Lodge No. 18, St. Joseph Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, St. John's Station Jackson Lodge No. 82, Linneus Madison Lodge No. 91, Madison St. Mark's Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, St. Louis Bethany Lodge No. 97, Bethany West View Lodge No. 103, Millersville Heroine Lodge No. 104, Kansas City Kirksville Lodge No. 105, Kirkskville Gallatin Lodge No. 106, Gallatin Marcus Lodge No. 110, Fredericktown Maitland Lodge No. 112, Maitland , Plattsburg Lodge No. 113, Plattsburg Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia Laddonia Lodge No. 115, Laddonia Barnes Lodge No. 116, Cabool Helena Lodge No. 117, Rochester DeSoto Lodge No. 119, DeSoto Compass Lodge No. 120, Parkville Erwin Longe No. 121, St. Louis Gentryville Lodge No. 125, Gentryville Athens Lodge No. 127, Albany " .,

, ,

,

'"

'"

,

'"

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " . . . . . . . . . . '"

25.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 50.00 20.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 2.00 29.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 20.00 5.00 25.00 20.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 41.00 10.00 10.00 60.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 100.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 5.00


â&#x20AC;˘ 1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Lorraine Lodge No. 128, Ridgeway Hume Lodge No. 130, Hume.............................. Potosi Lodge No. 131, Potosi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmington Lodge No. 132, Farmington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Star of the West Lodge No. 133, Ironton Irondale Lodge No. 143, Irondale Latimer Lodge No. 145, Licking Cass Lodge No. 147, Harrisonville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bloomfield Lodge No. 153, Bloomfield Ionic Lodge No. 154, Desloge .. Ashland Lodge No. 156, Ashland ........................ North Star Lodge No. 157, Rockport.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Mountain Grove. . . . . . . . . . . . Green City Lodge No. 159, Green City Whites'ville Lodge No. 162, Whitesville Occidental Lodge No. 163, St. Louis Portageville Lodge No. 166, Portageville Hartford Lodge No. 171, Hartford ,.... .. Censer Lodge No. 172, Macon Gray Summit Lodge No. 173, Gray Summit Point Pleasant Lodge No. 176, Conran Texas Lodge No. 177, Houston .. Griswold Lodge No. 178, Bellflower .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pride of the West Lodge No. 179, St. Louis... . .. .. . Pyramid Lodge No. 180, St. Louis .. California Lodge No. 183, California Morley Lodge No. 184, Morley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chamois Lodge No. 185, Chamois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannibal Lodge No. 188, Hannibal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, St. Joseph Frankford Lodge No. 192, Frankford .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolivar Lodge No. 195, Bolivar. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carthage Lodge No. 197, Carthage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allensville Lodge No. 198, Allendale New Hope Lodge No. 199, Elsberry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ravenwood Lodge No. 201, Ravenwood... . .... .... .... . . .. Westville Lodge No. 202, Westville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, Popular Bluff Four Mile Lodge No. 212, Campbell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rolla Lodge No. 213, Rolla Forest City Lodge No. 214, Forest City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hale City Lodge No. 216, Hale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbee Lodge No. 217, Sweet Springs '" .. . Good Hope Lodge No. 218, St. Louis Albert Pike Lodge No. 219, Kansas City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas City Lodge No. 220, Kansas City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mystic Tie Lodge No. 221, Oak Ridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LaBelle Lodge No. 222, LaBelle Salem Lodge No. 225, Salem. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saline Lodge No. 226, St. Mary's '" '" .. . .. Shelbina Lodge No. 228, Shelbina St. James Lodge No. 230, St. James Cardwell Lodge No. 231, Cardwell St. Francois Lodge No. 234, Libertyville Sedalia Lodge No. 236, Sedalia. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LaPlata Lodge No. 237, LaPlata Rushville Lodge No. 238, Rushville .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 20.00 48.00 5.00 13.45 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 20.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 20.00 31.00 10.00 2.00 5.00 25.00 6.00 50.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 16.00


• 78

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Palestine Lodge No. 241, St. Charles Keystone Lodge No. 243, St. Louis Knobnoster Lodge No. 245, Knobnoster Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City Neosho Lodge No. 247, Neosho Carroll Lodge No. 249, Norborne Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington Butler Lodge No. 254, Butler Shekinah Lodge No. 256, Festus Mechanicsville Lodge No. 260, Defiance Holden Lodge No. 262, Holden Corinthian Lodge No. 265, Warrensburg Aurora Lodge No. 267, St. Louis Brotherhood Lodge No. 269, St. Joseph New Salem Lodge No. 270, Winfield Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia St. Clair Lodge No. 273, Osceola ., Grand River Lodge No. 276, Freeman Wm. D. Muir Lodge No. 277, Pilot Grove Essex Lodge No. 278, Essex Hogles Creek No. 279, Wheatland Fenton Lodge No. 281, Fenton Cosmos Lodge No. 282, St. Louis Hermitage Lodge No. 288, Hermitage Fairmont Lodge No. 290, Wyaconda Moniteau Lodge No. 295, Jamestown Temple Lodge No. 299, Kansas City Lick Creek Lodge No. 302, Perry Osage Lodge No. 303, Nevada Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305, Kansas City Ashlar Lodge No. 306, Commerce Parrott Lodge No. 308, Maysville Sikeston Lodge No. 310, Sikeston Kearney Lodge No. 311, Kearney Cuba Lodge No. 312, Cuba Meramec Lodge No. 313, Eureka Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas City Eldorado Lodge No. 318, Luray Versailles Lodge No. 320, Versailles Hardin Lodge No. 322, Hardin Cornerstone Lodge No. 323, St. Louis McDonald Lodge No. 324, Independence Linn Lodge No. 326, Linn Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327, West Plains Cainsville Lodge No. 328, Cainsville Charity Lodge No. 331, St.•Joseph Excello Lodge No. 332, Excello Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin Hallsville Lodge No. 336, Hallsville Blue Spring Lodge No. 337, Blue Spring Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, Herculaneum Westport Lodge No. 340, Kansas City Rockville Lodge No. 341, Rockville Circle Lodge No. 342, Roscoe Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Joplin America Lodge No. 347, St. Louis Pollock Lodge No. 349, Pollock

. . . . . . . . . . . . ,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

60.00 25.00 5.00 15.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 50.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 2.50 5.00 5.00 10.00 50.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 50.00 5.00 25.00 33.32 10.00 25.00 25.00 3.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 50.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 20.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 5.00


1947

79

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Hebron Lodge No. 354, Mexico Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356, Harrisburg Northwest Lodge No. 358, Tarkio Garrett Lodge No. 359, Arcola Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis Hiram Lodge No. 362, Kahoka Fraternal Lodge No. 363, Robertsville Higginsville Lodge No. 364, Higginsville Adair Lodge No. 366, Kirksville Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368, Adrian Composite Lodge No. 369, Doniphan Williamstown Lodge No. 370, Williamstown Sneldon Lodge No. 371, Sheldon Waynesville Lodge No. 375, Waynesville King Hill Lodge No. 376, St. Joseph Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377, King City Billings Lodge No. 379, Billings Queen City Lodge No. 380, Queen City Pythagoras Lodge No. 383, Cassville East Prairie Lodge No. 384, East Prairie Richland Lodge No. 385, Richland Arcana Lodge No. 389, Harris Raytown Lodge No. 391, Raytown '" Christian Lodge No. 392, Oak Grove Beehive Lodge No. 393, Lawson Decatur Lodge No. 400, Pierce City Malta Lodge No. 402, Malta Bend Lowry City Lodge No. 403, Lowry City Everton Lodge No. 405, Everton Malden Lodge No. 406, Malden Charleston Lodge No. 407, Charleston Louisville Lodge No. 409, Louisville Iberia Lodge No. 410, Iberia Appleton City Lodge No. 412, Appleton City Valley Lodge No. 413, Bolckow Hunnewell Lodge No. 415, Hunnewell Caehe Lodge No. 416, St. Louis Whitewater Lodge No. 417, Whitewater Itaska Lodge No. 420, St. Louis Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Bonne Terre Rothville Lodge No. 426, Rothville Glenwood Lodge No. 427, Glenwood New Madrid Lodge No. 429, New Madrid Winona Lodge No. 430, Winona Temperance Lodge No. 438, Smithville Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Jackson Anchor Lodge No. 443, St. Louis Ada Lodge No. 444, Orrick West Gate Lodge No. 445, St. Louis Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City Jacoby Lodge No. 447, Darlington Schell City Lodge No. 448, Schell City Continental Lodge No. 454, Stewartsville Wallace Lodge No. 456, Bunceton Lambskin Lodge No. 460, St. Louis Caruthersville Lodge No. 461, Caruthersville

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 50.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 13.81 25.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 50.00 10.00 20.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 3.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 100.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 2.00 5.00 27.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 10.00


80

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Clifton Lodge No. 463, Thayer Southwest Lodge No. 466, Southwest City Mineral Lodge No.4 71, Oronogo Nineveh Lodge No.4 73, Olney Mt. Hope Lodge No. 476, Odessa Henderston Lodge No. 477, Rogersville Rich Hill Lodge No. 479, Rich Hill Marceline Lodge No. 481, Marceline Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, Kirkwood Cairo Lodge No. 486, Cairo Chilhowee Lodge No. 487, Chilhowee Lock Spring Lodge No. 488, Lock Spring Lakeville Lodge No. 489, Bell City Daggett Lodge No. 492, McKittrick Lewistown Lodge No. 494, Lewistown Unity Lodge No. 495, Richards Equality Lodge No. 497, Newburg Harmony Lodge No. 499, St. Louis Buckner Lodge No. 501, Buckner Philadelphia Lodge No. 502, Philadelphia Prairie Home Lodge No. 503, Prairie Home Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis Saxton Lodge No. 508, Saxton Van Buren Lodge No. 509, Van Buren Skidmore Lodge No. 511, Skidmore Webb City Lodge No. 512, Webb City Granby Lodge No. 514, Granby Galena Lodge No. 515, Galena Milford Lodge No. 516, Milford Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520, St. Louis Lockwood Lodge No. 521, Lockwood Gate City Lodge No. 522, Kansas City Cunningham Lodge No. 525, Sumner Wayne Lodge No. 526, Piedmont Higbee Lodge No. 527, Higbee Conway Lodge No. 528, Conway Apollo Lodge No. 529, St. Louis Dexter Lodge No. 532, Dexter Columbia Lodge No. 534, Pacific Blackwell Lodge No. 535, Blackwell Winigan Lodge No. 540, Winigan Ferguson Lodge No. 542, Ferguson Mansfield Lodge No. 543, Mansfield Algabil Lodge No. 544, St. Louis Zalma Lodge No. 545, Zalma Orient Lodge No. 546, Kansas City : South Gate Lodge No. 547, Kansas City Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton Carl Junction Lodge No. 549, Carl Junction Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, St. Louis Pendleton Lodge 1'0. 551, Doe Run Clarksburg Lodge 1'0.553, Clarksburg Foster Lodge No. 554, Foster Moscow Lodge No. 558~ Moscow )lills Clarksdale Lodge No. 559, Clarksdale York Lodge No. 563, Kansas City Jamesport Lodge No. 564, Jamesport

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00 5.00 15.00 5.50 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 13.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 6.00 12.50 10.00 5.00 5.00 2.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 14.00 5.00 8.60 25.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 12.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 2.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 75.00 15.00


1947

81

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Maplewood Lodge No. 566, Maplewood Miller Lodge No. 567, Miller Naylor Lodge No. 568, Naylor Marlborough Lodge No. 569, Kansas City Republic Lodge No. 570, Republic Hayti Lodge No. 571, Hayti Rutledge Lodge No. 572, Rutledge Bernie Lodge No. 573, Bernie Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, St. Louis Illmo Lodge No. 581, Illmo Koshkonong Lodge No. 582, Koshkonong Novinger Lodge No. 583, Novinger Criterion Lodge No. 586, Alba Advance Lodge No. 590, Advance Union Lodge No. 593, Union Bosworth Lodge No. 597, Bosworth Leadwood Lodge No. 598, Leadwood Elvins Lodge No. 599, Flat River Cosby Lodge No. 600, Cosby Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton Acacia Lodge No. 602, Columbia Eminence Lodge No. 607, Eminence Strafford Lodge No. 608, Strafford Warrenton Lodge No. 609, Warrenton Mokane Lodge No. 612, Mokane Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, Mt. Washington Chaffee Lodge No. 615, Chaffee Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Kansas City Grandview Lodge No. 618, Grandview Anderson Lodge No. 621, Anderson Owensville Lodge No. 624, Owensville Sheffield Lodge No. 625, Kansas City Magnolia Lodge No. 626, St. Louis Mendon Lodge No. 628, Mendon Valley Park Lodge No. 629, Valley Park East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City Tower Grove Lodge No. 631, St. Louis Archie Lodge No. 633, Archie Steele Lodge No. 634, Steele Freedom Lodge No. 636, Lemay Mountain View Lodge No. 637, Mountain View Jennings Lodge No. 640, Jennings Trinity Lodge No. 641, St. Louis Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642, St. Louis Grain Valley Lodge No. 644, Grain Valley Shaveh Lodge No. 646, St. Louis Elmer Lodge No. 648, Elmer University Lodge No. 649, University City Parma Lodge No. 650, Parma Cleveland Lodge No. 651, Cleveland Gardenville Lodge No. 655, Gardenville Country Club Lodge No. 656, Kansas City Alpha Lodge No. 659, Kansas City Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661, St. Louis Clarence Lodge No. 662, Clarence Rockhill Lodge No. 663, Kansas City

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 30.00 25.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 22.00 5.00 10.00 50.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 12.50 25.00 25.00 27.00 20.00 15.00 100.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 50.00 8.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 27.80 6.00 10.00 20.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00


82

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS

Moolah Temple, St. Louis Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite, St. Louis Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite, Kansas City Alhambra Grotto, St. Louis Malden Commandery No. 61, K. T., Malden Neosho Commandery No. 57, K. T., Neosho Oriental Commandery No. 35, K. T., Kansas City Palestine Commandery No. 17, K. T., Independence Poplar Bluff Commandery No. 67, K. T., Poplar Bluff St. Elmo Commandery No. 43, K. T., Bolivar St. Graal Commandery No. 12, K. T., Columbia St. John's Commandery No. 20, K. T., Springfield Bolivar Chapter No.5, R. A. M., Bolivar Independence Chapter No. 12, R. A. M., Independence Orient Chapter No. 102, R. A. M., Kansas City Oriental Chapter No. 78, R. A. M., St. Louis Poplar Bluff Chapter No. 114, R. A. M., Poplar Bluff Tyrians Chapter No. 52, R. A. M., Neosho Neosho Council No. 46, R. & S. M., Neosho Ransome Breuer Masonic Ass 'n. of the 32nd District Lebanon Lodge No. 77, A. F. & A. M. and Mary and Martha Chapter No. 36, O. E. S.,· Steelville Herman Koopman, Wright City, Mo Ed. Morris, Kansas City, Mo

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 866.98 100.00 50.00 200.00 10.00 25.00 100.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 50.00 20.00 15.00 25.00 10.00 5.00

. . .

40.00 5.00 5.00

DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE ENTERTAINMENT FUND Boat Excursion $ 34.25 Shows at downtown theatres . 8.15 Birthday Gifts . 165.98 Thanksgiving Treats . 215.23 Christmas Gifts to Children . 97.29 Cash to Old People (The old people were given cash instead of gifts at their request) . 723.00 Christmas Treats and Gifts . 928.84 103.10 Greeting Cards and Currency Envelopes . . Boxes for Treats 16.57 Christmas Trees, Wreaths and Decorations . 61.58 Picture Shows-one each Satnrday (Films free, operator only) 115.00 Birthday Gifts . 74.25 . Cash to Old People on Washington's Birthday 488.00 27.24 Valentine Favors . St. Patrick's Day Favors . 41.61 Children to Ice Capades . 49.90 Easter Candy . 228.00 Easter Trea ts . 148.98 Tennis Supplies . 62.49 Tickets to ball game at Sportsman's Park . 18.00 Expense for Band Concert provided by Scott Field . 10.00 . Cash to Old People on July 4th 474.00 Equipment for the Children of the Home . 13.96 Treats for the Entire Family . 52.60 Watermelons . 51.00 Bus to Shriners Circus . 11.35 . Cash to Old People 470.00 Birthday gifts .............•............................ 125.00


1947

83

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Watermelons Cash to Old People for Labor Day

. .

42.00 470.00 $5,325.37

All of the old people of the Home are given birthday gifts on their birthdays. ST. LOUIS AND ST. LOUIS COUNTY

The Home is very grateful for the help of the Masonic and Eastern Star organizations of St. Louis and St. Louis County. During the year they have made many donations and have brought many entertairunents to the Home. The Shrine and Temple Clubs parties, the Masters and Wardens Clubs picnic and many other entertainments have been brought by both the Eastern Stars and the Masons. BUILDING PROGRAM

The Home will be compelled to let a contract for a new heating plant in the very near future. One of three boilers in our present plant has been condemned and the other two are more than thirty years of age and cannot be used much longer. The Board has postponed building a heating plant, hoping that building costs would come down. Bids were taken in the fall of 1946 and they were more than $100,000.00 higher than was expected. But our need is so great that we will probably be compelled to build, regardless of cost. BUILDING FUND CAMPAIGN

At the close of the year we had $95,604.24 in the Building Fund of the Home. This money came as the result of solicitation made by the Grand Master five years ago and the voluntary contributions have been coming in ever since the first campaign was conducted. During the past year there has been added to the fund $6,506.90. This money has not only come from Lodges but from other organizations and individuals. The donors for the year 1946-1947 are listed below. Beacon Lodge No.3, St. Louis George Washington Lodge No.9, St. Louis Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, St. John's Station Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, St. Louis Occidental Lodge No. 163, St. Louis Good Hope Lodge No. 218, St. Louis Aurora Lodge No. 267, St. Louis Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia Cosmos Lodge No. 282, St. Louis Temple Lodge No. 299, Kansas City America Lodge No. 347. St. Louis Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis Composite Lodge No. 369, Doniphan Riehland Lodge No. 385, Richland Anchor Lodge No. 443, St. Louis

. $ 541.00 . 2.60 . 485.70 . 100.00 15.00 . 20.00 . 50.00 . . 49.00 . 50.00 . 2.00 25.00 . . 50.00 . 30.00 . 1,472.00 . 25.00 . 200.00 . 1.00


84

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

West Gate Lodge No. 445, St. I.Jouis . Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City . Rich Hill Lodge No. 479, Rich Hill . Harmony Lodge No. 499, St. Louis . Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis . Apollo Lodge No. 529, St. Louis . Algabil Lodge No. 544, St. Louis . York Lodge No. 563, Kansas City . Elvins Lodge No. 599, Flat River . Clayton Lodge No. 602, Clayton . Chaffee Lodge No. 615, Chaffee . . Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Kansas City Shaveh Lodge No. 646, St. Louis . University Lodge No. 649, University City . Pilgrim Lodge No. 652, St. Louis . J. H. Brimer, House Springs, Mo . Will Docter, St. Louis, Missouri . W. A. Walker, Webster Groves, Mo . Fred A. Rick, St. Louis, Mo. . . ; . Chippewa Drug Co., St. Louis, Mo William L. Tamme, Fenton, Mo. . . . Oscar R. Witte, St. Louis, Mo. . Daniel Kerckhoff Foundation, St. Louis, Mo. . . Estate of Isaac N. Brown, deceased; Leonora Althen Memorial Anonymous Donor .

1947 115.00 26.50 1.00 19.40 155.00 10.00 30.00 19.50 5.00 5.00 12.50 1.00 21.00 25.00 17.70 70.00 200.00 100.00 150.00 100.00 25.00 25.00 250.00 2,000.00 5.00

ENDOWMENT FUND

During the past year gifts amounting to $18,194.62 have been added to the Endowment Fund. The list of donors with the amounts are listed under a separate heading. MRS. MARY HUTHMAKER MEMORIAL

This consists of an eighty-acre tract of land located in Kirkwood, Missouri, and St. Louis County, to be used eventually as a Children's Home. MRS. GUSSIE GRENNER ESTATE

This estate has a market value of approximately $200,000.00. It is not handled by the Masonic Home of Missouri but the will provides that the income from the estate shall go to the Masonic Home each year. During the past year, the income amounted to $6,757.74. CONCLUSION

We acknowledge our debt of gratitude to the Almighty for His continued help and blessing and rejoice that in spite of many difficulties created by the conditions following the war, our people have enjoyed health and the comforts of a good home. Fraternally submitted, MASONIC HOME BOARD, By W. W. MARTIN, President.


1947

85

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

ADDITIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1946-1947

ESTATE OF LOUIS A. GESERICH

. $ 200.00

WILLIAM J. WHIPRECHT ESTATE

.

5.00 917.87

HATTIE FULLER ESTATE

.

FULTON ESTATE

. 15,000.00

WILLIAM DOWNS

.

500.00

ESTATE OF G. 1. LANGENBBRG

.

250.00

ESTATE OF VIRGIL L. MUSKOPF

.

400.00

FRANKLIN V. KEMP ESTATE, STOCK, BONDS AND CASH

.

866.95

FANNIE McCARTY ESTATE

.

41.67

FRITZ WILLIAM SELLECK

.

13.13


86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIO HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1946

Knights Templar Fund James L. Kirkendall W. S. Smith Fund T. W. Higgins Fund James W. Harris Fund Masonic Home Certificate Fund Ferdinand Herold Fund John B. Croshaw Fund Jaeob F. Gunlieh Fund Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund Grand Chapter Royal and Select Masters Fund T. W. Cotton Fund Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund A. M. Hough Fund Jacob Lampert Fund Mrs. E. Wurz Adolph Gluck Fund Parralle Massengale Mrs. Lillie F. Fletcher Fund FredericK A. Logan Fund Robert Elliott Black Fund Nathan Schloss Fund A. P. Christianson Fund Rice Estate Hugh Hartshorn Fund William Pamprin Fund Morgena Peterson Fund Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund General Fund Julius C. Garrell Fund War Relief Loyal Service Fund James W. Boyd Fund Ararat Temple, Kansas City Fund Mrs. Willie A. Woods Fund Grotto and Shrine Fund Morris and Ella Leftwich Fund Mrs. Mary Lynch Fund A. P. Fletcher Fund Frank Beecher Fund A. M. Dockery Fund Edward H. Meier Fund William H. Potter Estate Fund J. C. Jaequith Estate Fund Initiation Fund Nicholas R. Wall Fund Abraham Palan Fund Bonds from a friend of the Home sold for Maggie Nicholson Fund Louisa Yott Fund

. $35,114.00 . 13,150.00 . 11,730.00 5,000.00 . 1,665.74 . 1,117.60 . 500.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 3,000.00 . 2,500.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 5,000.00 . . 30,000.00 500.00 . 500.00 . 806.60 . 1,000.00 . 500.00 . . 1,000.00 932.83 . . 2,067.91 . 51,096.35 2,327.75 . 1,000.00 . 500.00 . 1,000.00 . . 128,740.03 1,000.00 . 7,107.50 . . 500.00 . 500.00 . 3,000.00 . 17,056.95 . 1,800.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,442.48 . 1,000.00 . 500.00 . 13,305.50 . 19,122.61 . 246,700.00 . 500.00 . 584.70 . 52,218.75 . 550.36 . 500.00


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

87

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1946 500.00 Gustav Bischoff Fund . 550.00 W. L. Tamme Fund . 7,665.32 Erdhaus Estate secured and unsecured . 2,000.00 Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund . 500.00 William A. Hall Fund . 1,000.00 Henry Siegfried . 500.00 Edward Meyer . 9,548.75 Charles V. B. Slade . Robert F. Stevenson . 14,992.13 1,105.14 Glen Marquis . 1,000.00 Frank L. Schofield . 528.00 D. M. Wilson . 3,405.09 Mary C. Clapp " , 7,548.50 Samuel Rife Estate " . 100.00 Charles Reilly . 2,500.00 E. C. Robinson . 692.83 B. S. Schwartz . 1,000.00 Brockett A. Dickson . 500.00 George F. Bergfeld . 465.89 Sarah B. Coffman . 200.00 Samuel A. Gluck . 100.00 Wellston Lodge No. 613 . 200.00 Richard Sinclair . 100.00 Kar I Backrow . 286.00 Robert Lungstrass . 250.00 June Lee Cotton . 450.00 St. Joseph Chapter No. 198, O. E. S. . . 70.00 Marcus A. Loevy . 100.00 Sam Plan . 46.00 W. J. Scherek . 310.95 Myrtle Lodge No. 338 . 200.00 Ludwig Kotany . 300.00 Charles E. Kokcn . 137.40 Philip Stremmel, Jr . 400.00 Boor Fletcher . 100.00 Alphonzo Whipple . 400.00 A. Bolin FuiJ.d . 25.00 M. A. Covey Fund . William F. Kier Fund . 10,000.00 200.00 John T. Short Fund . 2,000.00 Paul Keiser Fund . 371.36 John Oliver Fund . 5,000.00 J. M. Darrow Fund . 1,000.00 . T. W. Pritchett Fund . 259.98 Annie Martin Fund . Comstock Estate . 115.760.97 2,500.00 Comstock Estate (doubtful value) . 1,000.00 Julia C. Norton Fund . 5,000.00 J. M. Darrow Estate â&#x20AC;˘.............................


88

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1946

William Latham, Jr. Estate . John M. Woodson Estate . . Sol E. Waggoner Estate Jacob C. C. Waldeck Estate . Adam Herold Estate . James Vinyard Estate . . George B. Mills Estate, Stock and Bonds John Rehrs Estate . William Russell Estate, Cash . William Russell Estate, Bonds and Other Securities .. Joseph Kronacher Estate . William A. Raming Estate . Fred Herket Estate . . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, Cash . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, Stock and Bonds Edward F. W. Kaiser . Henry W. Hunning Estate . Dr. Louis F. Bode Estate . Fred Segelke Estate . . Charles Geitner Estate William B. Archer Estate . James Ward Nixon Memorial . Henry C. Grenner Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Cash . Berthold Linder Estate . . Charles H. Schureman Estate . Charles A. Brown Estate Ernest Bruneman . . A. S. Hudson Estate Myrtle Kipp Estate . John Cunningham Estate . . Mrs. Pearl Kaiser Annuity Estate of William Modra . George W. Leeak Gift , , .. Louis J. Brohammer Gift . Fred D. Gardner Estate . . George H. Woltjen Estate Mrs. Virginia Allen Church Estate (in memory of Ethelbert Forrester Allen) . Irin Levosier Page Estate . Gift in memory of William T. Coombs . Barbara Seaman Bequest . Isador Mendle Legacy . Estate of Joseph S. McIntyre . Estate of James R. Anderson . R. F. Stevenson Estate . . George William .Tames Estate Gerard B. Lambert . Mary Huthmaker Estate, Bond and Cash . Estate of William Rothmeyer .

1,000.00 5,467.91 1,000.00 500.00 211.08 933.24 11,600.00 250.00 1,901.39 4,392.00 431.05 1,000.00 2,000.00 405.86 2,780.00 25,000.00 100.00 300.00 214.47 1,000.00 5,085.00 1,000.00 261,502.94 200.00 365.67 1,000.00 100.00 942.84 707.16 16,875.25 5,500.00 6,362.19 500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 2,053.03 10.00 1,000.00 7.40 5,553.59 50.00


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1946

Louis Schmidt Estate . 500.00 William W. Alexander . 1,000.00 . 625.00 Mrs. Kate Fellers Estate Fred Mueller Estate . 100.00 Frank Gottlieb Estate . 100.00 Clara Siegel Estate . 17,768.30 Emma Winkler Estate . 538.05 Clara Ethel Downs Memorial Fund . 1,000.00 William F. Kuhn Memorial Fund . 1,000.00 Arthur Emil Koethe Estate . 2,000.00 . Thos. H. Reynolds Gift 5,000.00 Edward Kuhn Estate .............................â&#x20AC;˘. 1,000.00 Alva Moog Estate . 100.00 . Nicola Zimmer Memorial Fund 50.00 Emma H. Doellner Estate . 500.00 Abraham Romansky . 250.00 Abraham Romansky Estate . 500.00 Albert Rabenneck Estate . 500.00 . Agnes McAdoo Estate, Bond and Cash 1,578.00 F. W. Struchen Estate . 400.00 Harry P. Brown Estate . 10,834.90 . Mrs. Anna Kern Estate 3,366.71 . Mrs. Elizabeth Clark Estate 5,000.00 Gift in Memory of Alexander Friedberg . 50.00 Emma Schumacher Estate . 17.75 Gift in Memory of Charles Hermann . 50.00 Charles Spraul Estate . 300.00 . Theodore Mueller Estate 5,000.00 Frank Ferguson Estate . 1,815.87 Kathryn Lehman Estate . 2,647.02 E. H. Lehnbetter Estate . 1,000.00 Logan Busby Estate " . 6,928.80 Etta Mueller Estate . 6,266.89 Franklin V. Kemp Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Cash . '45,935.08 . 20,000.00 Louis Duestrow Estate . 25,000.00 Rosa Ruhland Estate Fannie A. McCarty Estate . 2,765.91 . Sol Samuel Estate 100.00 Anna Kern Estate . 1,472.53 Fritz William Selleck Estate . 1,026.92 Eugene D. Ashbrook Estate . 1,000.00 Hugh S. Jamison Estate, Stocks . 32,025.00

89


90

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY September 1, 1946 to August 31, 1947. GENERAL FUND Receipts Grand Lodge Per Capita Tax $160,025.10 Grand Chapter Per Capita Tax. . . . . 16,640.50 $176,665.60 Interest on General Fund Securities

10.10 $176,675.70

Disbursements Provisions Dry Goods and Clothing Laundry Ice, Light and Water Fuel Salaries Wages Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory Board, attending Board Meetings Hospital Supplies Carfare for Members of the Home Family Telephone Auditing Insurance Repairs and Maintenance Supplies Printing, Stationery and Postage Miscellaneous Expenses

. . . . . . .

$77,790.18 4,281.03 18,614.77 7,548.30 15,833.42 22,650.00 75,755.18

. . . . . . . . . .

1,317.76 5,569.40 195.00 686.90 250.00 3,412.73 10,837.57 8,618.90 682.54 4,917.45 258,961.13

$ 82,285.43

Excess of disbursements over receipts ADD Transfers from Income Fund

$128,589.95 . $ 46,304.52 . 113,688.30

Net increase in General Fund Balance on hand September 1, 1946 Balance on hand August 31, 1947

$159,992.82

BUILDING FUND

Receipts Contributions Interest on Building Fund Securities Balance on hand September 1, 1946 Balance on hand August 31, 1947

$

.

6,513.10 1,807.50 $ .

8,320.60 87,283.64

$ 95,604.24


1947

91

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI INCOME FUND

Receipts Interest on Endowment Fund Bonds . $ 18,855.06 43,060.07 Intorest on Endowment Fund Real Estate Loans 10,126.43 Received from members of Home Family . 2,330.41 Pensions . 55.00 Rent-Kirkwood Property . 100.00 Sale of Cemetery Lots . 1,721.97 Interest on Income Fund Securities . 1,368.13 Sale of grease, garbage, old furniture, etc . 1.00 Miscellaneous Income . 531.25 Pront on Sale of Securities . $ 78,149.32

Di8bursements Annuities $ Taxes and other expenses on estates and members of Home Family Bank Charges .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,513.28 2,398.12 3.38 3,914.78

Excess of receipts over disbursements

.

74,234.54

DEDUCT 128,589.95

Transfers to General Fund

54;355.41

Net Decrease in Income Fund ADD Balance on hand September 1, 1946

.

Balance on hand August 31, 1947

95,213.92 $ 40,858.51

INITIATION FUND

Receipts Initiation Fees Interest on Initiation Fund Securities

. $ 32,454.13 . 3,452.79 $ 35,906.92

Disbursements Improvements on property for Children's Home Excess of receipts over disbursements

1,722.58 34,184.34

ADD Balance on hand September 1, 1946 Balance on hand August 31, 1947

169,577.67 $203,762.01


92

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Receipts Contributions

$

6,877.96

Disbursements 5,335.37

Entertainment and gifts Excess of receipts over disbursements

.

1,542.59

.

1,536,45

ADD Balance on hand September 1, 1946 Balance on hand August 31, 1947

$

3,079.04

REPORT OF AUDITOR

C. K.

BENSON,

C. P. A.

711 St. Charles Street St. Louis, .Missouri September 15, 1947 To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. Gentlemen: Pursuant to engagement, we have prepared this report preliminary to our formal report of the Masonic Home of Missouri, to be submitted to the Board of Directors at a later date. We examined the books and records of J'our secretary, Mr. Clarence L. Alexander, for the fiscal year ended August 31, 1947. Our examination covered the General Fund, Income Fund, Initiation Fund, Building Fund, Christmas and Entertainment Fund and Endowment Fund. We have prepared the following summaries of assets comprising these funds as at August 31, 1947: GENERAL FUND Cash in United Bank and Trust Company Cash in Boatmen's N a tiona] Bank Cash in Mercantile-Commerce BalJk and Trust Company Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National BankPay Roll Account Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National BankSavings Account Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company Cash in Manchester Bank ., Cash in Manufacturers Bank and Trust Company Investments-United States Treasury Bonds-At Cost Accrued Interest on Above at Time of Purchase

. $ 10.fi24.28 . 60,338.79 . 863.00 .

6,000.00

. . . . . .

1,017.82 250.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 70,813.00 130.50


1947

93

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

200.00

Cash in Matron's Petty Cash Fund

160,137.39 Less Reserve for Employees' Withholding Tax-City of St. Louis

144.57 $159,992.82

Total-General Fund INCOME FUND Cash in First National Bank Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company Securities-at cost Accrued interest on securities at time of purchase

$

. . . .

400.00 9,865.61 30,443.00 149.90

$ 40,858.51

Total Income Fund INITIATION FUND Cash in Mercantile-Commerce Bank and Trust Company Securities-at cost

$ 20,624.51 183,137.50

Total Initiation Fund

$203,762.01 BUILDING FUND

Cash in Boatmen's National Bank Securities-at cost

$

3,753.99 91,850.25

Total Building Fund

$ 95,604.24

CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAINMENT FUND Cash in Boatmen's National Bank

$

3,079.04

Total Christmas and Entertainment Fund

$

3,079.04

ENDOWMENT FUND Real Estate Loans $1,166,051.92 United States Treasury Bonds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211,774.00 Other Bonds and Stocks 36,626.00 Rife Estate Securities 75.00 Rife Estate Securities in Default 3.00 Comstock Estate Securities 10,336.01 Comstock Estate Securities in Default 120.00 George B. Mills Estate Securities 10,000.00 Henry C. Grenner Estate Securities 24,433.50 Cash in First National Bank 14,778.88 Total Endowment Fund

$1,474,198.31

The bank balances appearing in these funds were confirmed by reconciling certificates received directly from the depositaries with the stated book balances. The investments as shown in these funds were verified by examination of the securities. We have shown the securities listed in the General Fund, Income Fund, Initiation Fund and Building Fund at recorded cost. The investments in the Endowment Fund, which are not in default, are


94

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

stated at the values placed thereon by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund at the date of acquisition of the securities by the Home. Bonds in default are carried at market value or at an appraised value believed by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund to be market value. We also checked and reconciled the monthly reports of the secretary and the treasurer as at August 31, 1947, and found them to be in agreement after giving effect to outstanding checks, etc. H you desire any additional information relative to this report, we shall be pleased to have you call upon us. Respectfully submitted,

C. K. BENSON, Certified Public Accountant. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

M. Wor. Bro. Denslow presented the report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence which was adopted. The report is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of MissO'Uri: Brethren: The report of your Committee on Foreign Correspondence has been completed and printed, and will be distributed at this communication of the Grand Lodge. Since writing our annual review we have received further information concerning the South American situation which we feel should be given publicity: (1) The Inter-American Congress. This meeting was held in Montivideo, Uruguay, April 14-20, 1947. No American Grand Lodge was represented. Forty-four Grand Lodges were represented by ninety-four representatives as follows: No. of Grand Lodges No. of Representatives *Argentina 2 15 Bolivia 1 5 路Brazil 12 17 Colombia.. .. 1 1 Chile 1 6 Ecuador........ 1 3 *Mexico 15 15 Panama and Central America .. 6 1 Paraguay 1 1 路Peru 1 6 Puerto Rico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1 3 Venezuela 1 1 Uruguay 1 20

44

94

* The Gran Oriente Federal Argentino was represented; it is not generally recognized. The Grand Orient of Brazil was represented; it is not generally recognized. Mexico's York Grand Lodge was not represented. Peru's representatives were from the revolutionary group which broke away from the established Grand Lodge; in this connection it will be noted that Decree No. 147 of the Supreme Council A.A.S.R. of Peru expels all the officers of the regular Grand Lodge of Peru.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

95

The Inter-American Congress will meet every three years. In 1950, the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico will be the host Grand Lodge. It is now divided into three sections, Northern, Central and Southern. Valle de Mexico supervises the Northern; Panama the Central; and Peru the Southern. Fraternally submitted, RAY V. DENSLOW.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RECOGNITION

M. Wor. Brother Ray V. Denslow presented the report of the Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: We, your Committee on Foreign Recognition, after due investigation, make the following recommendations: Italy: Since the advent of Mussolini into Italy there has been ~o organized Freemasonry in Italy. Today, Freemasonry has emerged from a quarter of a century of inactivity and is again assuming its rightful place in the social and cultural life of the Italian people. Where there were once two grand bodies claiming jurisdiction over symbolic Freemasonry, there is now one which is outstanding. It is the Grande Oriente D'ltalia (address, Palazzo Giustiniani), a body which has legitimate parentage, observes the generally accepted Landmarks, and headed by men who stand high in the civic life of the Italian people. One member of our committee has visited with the Grand Officers of this group and :finds little to criticise and much to commend for the way in which these leaders have brought forth, like the fabled phoenix, the dying embers of Freemasonry and transformed them into a live and active society. We recommend the recognition of the Grand Oriente D'Italia and the exchange of representatives. Brazil: We have examined the petition of our brethren of the Grande Loja do Estado de Sao Paulo and believe this group is entitled to favorable consideration. We, therefore, recommend recognition and the exchange of representatives. Colombia: We have some correspondence with certain Grand Lodges in Colombia, South America. We believe that further information as to these groups should be secured before extending recognition, and we, therefore, recommend that the recognition be postponed without prejudice. Our relations with the various grand lodges throughout the world continue to be harmonious. Persecution may hinder the growth of our society, but only tends to increase the ardor and devotion of those who are faithful to the cause of universal brotherhood. Fraternally submitted, RAY V. DENSLOW, Chairman, HAROLD L. READER, WILLIAM R. GENTRY. HOUR APPOINTED FOR CONSIDERATION OF REPORT ON REVISION OF BY-LAWS

On motion unanimously carried, the hour for the consideration of the Report of the Committee on Revision of By-Laws was set at 9 :00 p. m. this date. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WELFARE

M. Wor. Brother T. W. Cotton, Chairman, presented the report of the Welfare Committee, which was adopted and is as follows:


96

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Your Welfare Committee has held regular meetings during the Masonic year now closing and has given due consideration to each and every request presented for assistance. Twelve years ago the demands for help amounted to more than $10,000, but there has been an annual decline since that time, down to the close of 1946; however there has been an increase for the present year over last year and perhaps the pendulum is beginning to swing in opposite direction now. As reported last session, some gracious contributor sent us $50 with the request" that it be used for Masonic charity." The letter was mailed in Massachusetts. The donor appeared to be of that modest class that does not want his left hand to know what his right hand does, and we were unable to express our gratitude for the gift. This money was earmarked for a special use, and the need has not yet arrived, so this money is still on deposit. Assistance has been given to twenty-six lodges, representing 15 men, 20 women and 4 children, a total of 39 persons. Total amount paid for relief $2,598.00. SUMMARY OF FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED DURIXG TIlE YEAR

Balance on hand October 1, 1946 . $ 433.23 Received from Grand Lodge . 2,500.00 Received from Trenton Lodge No. 111, refund on relief 10.00 paid for Mrs. Inez Hannan . Received from the estate of Mrs. Clay, Pendleton Lodge No. 351 50.00 for relief advanced during her lifetime . Received from Philadelphia Lodge No. 502, refund on relief 39.00 paid for Mrs. Simmons . Paid for relief Balance on hand at close of year

.

$3,032.23 2,598.00 $ 434.23

The following is a list of lodges assisted, with the names of the person or persons for whom appropriations were made, and the amount of the appropriations: Acacia Lodge No. 602, for Mrs. Cora Long $ 60.00 120.00 Barnesville Lodge No. 353, for P. B. Smith . Beacon Lodge No.3, for Mrs. Christine Couvion . 37.50 10.00 Cardwell Lodge No. 231, for Mrs. Edgar Harper . 60.00 Censer Lodge No. 172, for James P. Thompson . East Gate Lodge No. 630, for Mrs. Eugene DeHart . 180.00 75.00 East Gate Lodge No. 630, for William h Gordon . Eldorado Lodge No. 318, for Mrs. Luella Buckley and children 60.00 Fellowship Lodge No. 345, for J. Spencer Roberts and wife .. 60.00 50.00 Forest Park Lodge No. 578, for Arthur Lee Eastin . ]5.00 Friend Lodge No. 352, for C. F. Kraus and wife . Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for George Ransdale, wife and children . 60.00 180.00 Haska Lodge No. 420, for :Mrs. William Ward . 120.00 Haska Lodge No. 420, for August Roettger and wife . 120.00 Haska Lodge No. 420, for :Mrs. Margaret Fath . ]2.50 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, for Charles i\lcAlister . 150.00 Magnolia Lodge No. 626, for Mrs. Ella Mae Hollmann . Parrott Lodge No. 308, for Mrs. Mary Smith . 90.00


1947

97

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Philadelphia Lodge No. 502, for Mrs. Simmons Pyramid Lodge No. 180, for Frederick W. Rueblinger Pyramid Lodge No. 180, for John G. Faudree Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, for Philip William Price Salisbury Lodge No. 208, C. W. Cutler St. Louis Lodge No. 20, for Mrs. Josephine Baptiste Strafford Lodge No. 608, for Mrs. Emma Haines Summersville Lodge No. 555, for Marion W. Pittmann Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, for Mrs. Gussie Harding West Gate Lodge No. 445, Mrs. Louise Morris West Gate Lodge No. 445, for Mrs. Anna Cochran Weston Lodge No. 53, for George B. McAdow Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. William B. Polk, Sr Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. Joseph Daniels

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 25.00 200.00 60.00 60.00 45.00 60.00 48.00 165.00 60.00 120.00 $2,598.00

The Welfare Committee is a creation of this Grand Lodge to be a means of rendering assistance within its jurisdiction to those lodges that are not financially able, on their own, to care for their needy and dependent brother Master Masons, their widows and orphans. It has been a rather well-established custom with this committee to extend aid to these needy lodges on a fifty-fifty basis, when this is at all possible and this plan appears to be working fairly satisfactory. Inasmuch as it is the obligated duty of every lodge to care for its own dependents, from its own resources as far as possible, before requesting help from the funds of this Grand Lodge; we take it that it is not the intention or the policy of the Grand Lodge to furnish aid to those lodges that are not financially distressed. In other words, it is a relief measure and not contribution for the mere asking. There are many small lodges in Missouri the membership of which is made up very largely of those of small income, and the treasury of such lodges is not too affluent; however, these same lodges pay to the Grand Lodge their stipulated dues, which helps to supply the funds used by your committee on welfare. There are many other lodges, with large memberships, who are financially well-to-do, have an opulent treasury and are abundantly able to care for their own needy; yet strange as it may seem, we sometimes have requests from these wealthy lodges; one instance of this class, we understood after making an allowance, that the lodge had a sizable amount of bonds on interest as well as other resources that could be made available. On final analysis it would appear that this well-to-do lodge is asking the small rural lodges to help bear its burdens. We feel satisfied that these lodge requests are sometimes made without due consideration of its significance and just what it means to all concerned. This Grand Lodge stands ready and willing to come to the relief of any lodge which by no fault of its own comes to financial straits, but may we fraternally suggest that before asking outside aid for your lodge that you carefully consider according to Masonic standards whether relief should be furnished by yourselves or come in part at least from others. Fraternally submitted, T. W. C()TTON, Chairman, F. ERNEST CARTER, DUVAL SMITH, JAMES W. SKELLY, BYRNE E. BIGGER.


98

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

RESOLUTIONS

The following resolutions were presented by M. Wor. Brother Cotton and adopted: The following resolutions have been passed by this Grand Lodge, annually for several years and in the opinion of your Welfare Committee, they are still needful and in order: Be It Resolved, that the directors of the Masonic Home be instructed, if deemed to be advisable, to use 3 per cent of the dues payable to the Masonic Home in accordance to Section 74 of the By-Laws, for the relief of indigent Master Masons, their widows and orphans, either at the Masonic Home or elsewhere, and regardless of whether the beneficiary would be entitled to admission to the Masonic Home or not, and to transfer such amounts as the Board may deem advisable for the relief of those not entitled to admission to the Home, to the Welfare Committee. T. W. CoTTON, Chairman, BYRNE E. BIGGER, JAMES \V. SKELLY, DUVAL SMITH, F. E. CARTER.

(Approved) Be it Resolved, That the Ways and Means Committee, by and with the consent of the Grand Master, be authorized, the funds of the Grand Lodge being available, to transfer to the Welfare Committee, from time to time, moneys from the General Fund for the operations and maintenance of the Welfare Committee not exceeding however, the Bum of $5,000. T. W. COTTON, Chairman, BYRNE E. BIGGER, JAMES W. SKELLY, DuVAL SMITH, F. E. CARTER.

(Approved) CALLED FROM LABOR

At 12 :00 noon the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 1 :30 p. m. AFTERNOON SESSION-l:30 p. m.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 1 :30 p. m., Grand Chaplain Emmett L. Robison offering prayer. REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATION OF A MASONIC NEWSPAPER

The Grand Secretary read the report of the Special Committee to consider Publication of a Masonic Newspaper. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, L1.. F. and L1.. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your special committee appointed to consider the publication of a Masonic newspaper, reports herewi~h:


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

99

The entire committee feels that great good would result to the Fraternity from the publication of a Masonic journal, the purpose of which would be to keep our entire membership informed as to the activities of the Grand Lodge and the various subordinate lodges. The committee believes that fundamental instruction and education of the entire Craft are as important as instruction and exactitude in the Ritual; in other words, through the medium of an instructive Masonic journal the Craft would be able to learn many necessary basic facts regarding our Fraternity. Exhaustive study in the field of Masonic and other fraternal publications leads to the conclusion that a fraternal publication is not read by more than 15 per cent of the membership. In this study we were helpfully aided by Brother Carl H. Claudy, executive secretary of the Masonic Service Association. Brother Claudy canvassed the entire field of Masonic publications and the result of that study is now on file with the committee. In view of the shortage of newsprint at this time, in view of the rising costs of all material, and in consideration of the fact that a publication worthy of being the official journal of this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge would entail an additional per capita expense approaching one dollar per member, we recommend that this project be postponed until a more opportune time. In this recommendation we are influenced by the information that a request will be made that this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge increase the per capita allotted to our most worthy and beneficent activity, namely, the Masonic Home of Missouri. Fully aware of the great good that would result to our Fraternity from a properly edited and efficiently managed publication, your committee earnestly requests that this proposal be not laid aside and forgotten but that it again be brought up at a more opportune time. Fraternally submitted, JOLLY P. HURTT. EDMUND E. MORRIS, KARL M. VETSBURG, HAROLD L. READER, SOLON CAMERON, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

M. Wor. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful (}rand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association beg to make the following report: The thirty-seventh annual convention of the Association was held in the auditorium of the Memorial at Alexandria, Virginia, on Saturday, February 22, 1947. Fifty-three of the Grand Lodges of the United States, Canada and Porto Rico were represented by forty-nine Grand Masters, twenty-six Deputy Grand Masters and m;lny distinguished brethren. Missouri was represented by our Grand Master, M. W. Brother Solon Cameron, our Deputy Grand Master, Right Worshipful Brother Morris E. Ewing, our Grand Secretary, Most Worshipful Brother Harold L. Reader and the following Past Grand Masters, Anthony F. Ittner, Ray V. Denslow and Bert S. Lee. The meeting was very successful in every way. Work on the Memorial has been started again and there was turned in at the meeting by the


100

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Grand Lodges and affiliated bodies a total of $154,891.14, of which $34,722.00 was for the Endowment Fund. The problem now is to proceed with the completion of the interior finishing work as fast as workmen can be secured. Not being able to secure any satisfactory contracts the executive committee of the board of directors have decided to go ahead with the work by hiring a competent superintendent and workmen to work under his supervision. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, Chairman, ANTHONY F. ITTNER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BOARDS OF RELIEF

The report of the conunittee on Boards of Relief was presented by M. W. Brother James W. Skelly, chairman. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Mast Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.. F. and.A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Boards of Relief has received reports of the Boards of Relief in Kansas City, St. Joseph, Springfield and St. Louis, and the St. Louis Masonic Employment Bureau. After a careful reading of these reports we desire to submit the following: Kansas City. The board has continued to render assistance to transients, and during the year arranged funerals for fourteen members of Lodges outside of Kansas City. Many visitors were made to transient patients in hospitals. A large number of requests for assistance or relief were received, most of which the board was able to care for. A fine spirit of cooperation from constituent lodges prevailed. Other services rendered to lodges were: assisting to fill out applications to the Masonic Home; investigating applicants for reinstatement; caring for aged members on state pensions who are not eligible for admission to the Home-the board was able to place them in suitable homes and retain the pension. Numerous telephone calls for information were received, generally requesting information concerning the Masonic Home, and to locate persons supposed to be }"'reemasons. The financial statement, is in substance as follows: Balance, July 1, 1946 $6,732.61 Receipts: From one Lodge $ 130.00 From fraternal assistance and refunds 328.05 458.05 $7,190.66 Disbursements: Fraternal assistance outside Missouri Miscellaneous, including salaries Balance, June 30, 1947

. $ 320.00 . 1,435.06

1,755.06

. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

$5,435.60

One lodge, previously delinquent, has paid on initiates for 1945. No assessment was made for 1947. During 1947 the board held meetings on the third Saturday of each month. W. Brother Edwin W. Ernst is secretary. St. Joseph. The board serves the five lodges in St. Joseph. A bank balance of $432.71, with expenditures of $37.60 is shown; a financial statement is not shown. No assessment was made during the year. One Masonic funeral for a transient member was conducted. The board has answered a large number of requests for information as to the location of lodges, and has extended many courtesies. No calls


1947

101

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

for relief from transient members were received. An important feature is the publication of loss of lodge credential cards. R. W. Brother Orestes Mitchell, Jr., is secretary. Springfield. The board serves the three lodges in Springfield. Eight funerals of transient members were conducted by the lodges, an increase of five over the preceding year. The financial statement is as follows: Balance, July 1, 1946 . $873.36 10.00 Receipts-interest . Disbursements-miscellaneous item

.

Balance, June 30, 1947

$883.36 2.29 $881.07

No assessment was made during the year. M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee continues as president of the board, a position he has held for many years. Brother M. F. Smith is secretary. St. Louis. The board has had an exceedingly busy year, with 408 new cases and continued attention to 17 carried over, making a total of 425, all of which is set forth in a well-written report. The better to illustrate the scope of the report, we quote in full one paragraph: "1 clandestine lodge; 1 defunct lodge; 4 expelled members; 11 frauds and impostors; 48 hospital cases; 76 investigations for St. Louis lodges; 34 receipts lost; 2 receipts found and returned to owners; 3 persons reported missing; 20 applicants having no claim; 10 persons residing outside jurisdiction of the Board; 11 suspended members; 5 where the claimant was unknown; 8 unworthy persons; 3 applications withdrawn; and 170 were worthy. Thirty-nine funerals of transient members were conducted by the lodges of St. Louis, and three by St. Louis County lodges. Two graves were opened in Board of Relief lots. Applications for relief from frauds, impostors and former members expelled, and our work is hampered by the added attention we must give this type of applicant, as we must be doubly careful that they do not find our board a fertile field in which to ply their wiles. Lodges should be doubly careful in readmitting suspended members whose identity has been lost for many years. Some of our investigations have brought out very undesirable qualities of former members who sought restoration. The interest manifested by all members of the board is most gratifying to the officers. Every committee appointed to do any manner of the tasks has performed promptly and thoroughly. The secretaries of all the lodges have been prompt in making their remittances, and the spirit of cooperatiori prevails. The board maintains a list of volunteer donors for blood transfusions, a service which is deeply appreciated. . The financial statement is in substance as follows: Balance, July 1, 1946 Cash on deposit $ 3,150.13 Cash invested in War Bonds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,310.00 $ 9,460.13 Receipts Interest, etc Initiation fees Refunds

. . .

38.50 3,821.00 1,253.48

Disbursements Administration, office rent, salaries

.

2,037.62

5,112.98 $14,573.11


102

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Funerals and relief War Bonds

. .

2,167.67 2,220.00

6,425.29

Balance, June 30, 1947 $ 8,147.82 A limited assessment was made during the year. The board meets evefY Saturday night throughout the year. Brother Harry Schulz is president, and Brother Morris E. Markman is secretary. THE MASONIC EMPLOYMENT BUREAU OF ST. LOUIS

The Masonic Employment Bureau has submitted the annual report of its labors for the period ending June 30, 1947. Three hundred and fifty-two Master Masons and their dependents have been placed during the past year, and since the first of this year a substantial gain in placements has been made over the corresponding period of last year. In recent months a goodly number of workers have been dismissed. While this is a natural sequence during postwar periods, a strong contributing factor is lack of production, due to frequent and continued walkouts, strikes and other labor difficulties, chief among which has been the coal miners' strike, which caused a great shortage in steel. In the face of these layoffs, the bureau is receiving numerous requests for workers of all classifications, some of which offer very fine opportunities. These requests are coming in daily. Were it not for lack of qualified applicants, the bureau could greatly swell its list of placements. The work of the bureau is steadily increasing, and in keeping with the times, the cost of operation has naturally gone up, materially adding to our prob1ems. As the office has been continually operating on the allotted 1916 per capita tax, the need for financial assistance can be readily understood. The last two financial reports of the bureau have clearly indicated its financial condition, and it was only by the practice of strict economy that the office has been able to carryon its good work. Under these circumstances the bureau sincerely hopes that the Grand Lodge will take cognizance of this critical condition, and give favorable consideration to the amendment providing revenue for the work of the bureau. FINANCIAL REPORT

Balance, July 1, 1946 Receipts: Per Capita Tax $5,754.75 Interest on bonds 12.50 Sale of old office equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32.50 Disbursements: Salaries and withholding tax Rent and telephone Miscellaneous

$ 330.03

$5,799.75 $6,129.78

$4,200.00 972.72 641.61

$5,814.33

Balance, June 30, 1947 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 315.45 A copy of tne estimated 1946-47 budget is submitted, a.nd compared with actual fiscal year expenditures since 1942-43, showing the straitened financial condition of the bureau. Brother Charles I. McClellan is president. Fraternally submitted, JAMES W. SKELLY, Chairman, JOHN W. ADAMS, HARRY SCHULZ, ALFRED H. GOULT, J. V. GADDY.


MASONIC EMPLOYMENT BUREAU OF ST. LOUIS COMPARATIVE SCHEDULE OF OPERATING EXPENSES FISCAL YEARS ENDING 1943 THROUGH 1947 Estimated Percentage qj Increase Using 1942-1943 FisBudget

I

I

Fiscal Year Fiscal Yea,. Fiscal Year 1942-1943 1943-1944 1944-1945

Income: Per Capita Tax Interest Bonds, etc Total Income

forYea,. I Fiscal Year I Fiscal 1945-1946 1946-1947 $5.555.25 37.50 5,592.75

. . .

$5,306.25 20.00 5.326.25

$5,316.75 48.59 5.365.34

$5,419.00 37.50 5,456.50

Cost of Operations: Salaries (Includes All Texas) ..... Postage .....•..................... Rentals . Auto Mileage Allowance . Telephone Service . Printing. Stationery. Supplles. etc. Miscellaneous Petty Cash .

3,830.00 50.63 600.00 300.00 337.89 85.03 186.32

3,809.64 171.68 600.00 300.00 344.64 46.88 170.74

3,805.00 119.37 600.00 300.00 355.08 125.44 190.49

4.256.25 64.83 600.00 300.00 356.14 103.54 444.05·

.

5.389.87

5,403.58

5,495.38

6,124.81

.

63.62

38.24

38.88

Total Operating Expenses OPerating Loss

531.37·

$5.600.00 37.50 5.637.50

cat Year as a Basis of Normal Conditions

1943-1944 %

I

1944-1945 %

I

1945-1946 11946-1947 % % Estimated

.73

2.45

5.00

5.84

5,175.00 125.00 690.00 420.00 360.00 175.00 225.00

.53 239.09

.65 135.77

11.12 28.05

2.00 44.87 8.36

5.08 47.52 2.24

5.78 21.77 51.33··

35.12 146.89 15.00 40.00 6.54 105.81 20.76

7,170.00

.25

1.96

7.75··

33.03

1,532.58

27.2% 8.7% 1.2% .7% .7% Per Cent Operating Loss . • Includes 50th Anniversary celebration at a cost of $317.00 at which time two hundred persons were present which included some of the bureau's employer clientele and various Masonic body representatives. •• Percentage of increase in this case does not include anniversary expenses. Cash on handAssuming Per Capita Increase of 5c on present membership equals . $1,111.05 Fiscal year ending 1942-1943: Assuming Per Capita Increase of 30c on 57th district membership equals . 1,138.80 Bank Balance $ 979.21 $2,249.85 Defense Bonds................ 1.500.00 Less Loss at latest fiscal year-estimated .................•.................... 1,532.50 $2,479.21 Increases in working capital allowances for depression years $ 717.35 Cash on handFiscal year ending 1945-1946: Assuming the 57th DistrIct not contributing. It would be necessary to have an inBank Balance $ 330.03 crease of 10c per capita for the 33rd District or 22221 members at 10c each equals $2,222.10 Defense Bonds ....•.......... 1,500.00 Less Loss at latest fiscal year estimated 1.532.50 $1,830.03 Increase in working capital allowance for depression years $ 689.60 Decrease in working capital .... $ 649.18

----


104

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1947

REPORT OF THE BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

Rt. Wor. Brother C. A. Tolin, chairman, presented the report of the Building Supervisory Board, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The Building Supervisory Board submits the following report for the years 1946-1947, viz: On October 11, 1946, Caruthersville Lodge, No. 461, A. F. & A. M., was granted permission to erect a new building in accordance with plans submitted as soon as they have on hand either cash or collectible subscriptions in the amount of $40,000.00. 1'his lodge was meeting in a Temple which apparently is wholly unfit for a meeting place, and the Brethren are to be commended for the enthusiastic manner in which they are proceeding toward the erection of a new Temple. On April 15, 1947, granted Excelsior Lodge No. 441, A. F. & A. M., Jackson, Missouri, permission to borrow $2,000.00 to erect a one-story building on twelve feet of ground adjoining the Temple in order to utilize this valuable space, to be rented at $40.00 per month for commercial purposes. A member of the lodge is to furnish the amount borrowed and be repaid out of rent collected from the store. This was an unusual request and was granted reluctantly by a majority of the committee. On May 19, 1947, granted Equality Lodge No. 497, A. F. & A. M., Newburg, Missouri, permission to purchase the property in which they have been meeting for the sum of $5,500.00. These Brethren advised the board that they have on hand cash or collectible subscriptions for the full amount of the purchase price, but as the subscriptions were payable over a term of one year they were granted permission to borrow the amount necessary, which when added to the cash on hand would raise the purchase price; the amount so borrov路;ed to be repaid as the subscriptions are collected. On June 9, 1947, granted Lane's Prairie Lodge No. 531, A. F. & A. M., at Vichy, Missouri, permission to borrow $1,000.00 to enable the lodge to erect a building on lot donated to the lodge, to be used as a lodge hall. At present they meet in a rented room over the post office which is very unsatisfactory. The amount borrowed to be repaid out of collections 011 subscriptions payable in installments. On July 2, 1947, granted Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, A. F. & A. M., permission to erect a storage building on the property where the rremple is located, through the Temple Association, which holds title to the property, they having funds on hand to pay for the total cost of this building. From the above report it appears that the Building Supervisory Board had very little work during the year, but as a matter of fact there were twenty-five (25) communications making inquiry and asking for suggestions, none of which had developed to a stage where the committee took any definite action. One of the most complicated matters the committee has to deal with is to convince lodges that the Grand Lodge has jurisdiction over their Temple Associations if the lodge contributes anything whatsoever for the erection or the maintenance of the property, and it is regrettable that such a large number of our lodges have this impression, where they would reaqily be convinced to the contrary if the officers resorted to the reading of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. Respectfully submitted, C. A. TOLIN, Chairman.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

105

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

Rt. 'Vor. Brother Ernest Claus, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Necrology. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Gmnd Lodge A. F. and A. M. of MissO'Uri: Brethren: Your Committee on Necrology begs leave to submit the following report: "They gave much of their time in Devotion to our Cause." In His infinite Wisdom, the Supreme Grand Master has, in the year just ended, summoned no less than 1865 of our members into the Grand Lodge on high. With sincere Masonic faith and an abiding hope of a glorious resurrection, we humbly and reverently record their passing, and commit them to the keeping of the All-Father. Freemasons, brethren and children all, of one loving, omnipotent Father, they had labored diligently and ofttimes long in the vineyards of our beloved Fraternity; and by virtue of our peculiar mysteries we were privileged to know, to appreciate, to love them; and finally to mourn their passing. A great brotherhood, though weakened by the breaking of these links of gold, has yet been strengthened for their having gone our way. "May the Lord bless them and keep them and give them everlasting peace and rest." This Grand Lodge has been significantly blessed in that all of its official family save one, have been spared to us. The passing, on Novemher 13, 1946, of Most Worshipful Brother George W. Walker, Grand Master of Masons in Missouri for the year 1936-37, came as a severe shock to his many Masonic brethren. An amiable, courteous, christian gentleman and a devout Freemason, Dr. Walker was loved and respected by young and old alike. His constant and faithful service in behalf of our great fraternity was second only to his unswerving devotion to his chosen profession as a Physician and Surgeon. The welfare of his patients, was ever his first care; and this sacrifice, after repeated warnings, was doubtless the principal contributing factor in bringing about his dQath, which came all too soon. His calm, deliberate and untiring service in the cause of Freemasonry earned him the enviable reputation as one of the greatest among a long list of outstanding Grand Masters. Brother Walker was initiated in Jonesboro Lodge No. 111 at Jonesboro, Ill., on August 23, 1904. He later affiliated with St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 on March 5, 1906, where he served as Worshipful Master in 1909-1910. He served as presiding officer in each of the three York Rite bodies, i.e. Wilson Chapter No. 75, R.A.M., Cape Council, No. 20, R. & S. M. and Cape Girardeau Commandery No. 55, K. T., and as Grand Master of the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters of Missouri in the year 1923. He was admitted to St. Louis Conclave No. 42, Red Cross of Constantine in October, 1923, and served as M. P. Sovereign in 1936-37, was a 32째 Scottish Rite Mason, receiving the investiture of Knight Commander of the Court of Honor in October, 1943. He was a member of Moolah Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. and a Past Patron of St. Mark's Chapter No. 16-7, Order of the Eastern Star of Missouri.


106

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Brother Walker served the 49th District as D.D.G.M. and D.L. for six years prior to his first appointment in the Grand Lodge in 1925. He gave much of his time in devotion to our cause. His half century of continuous service to our Fraternity is an example of constant loyalty, self-sacrifice, and devotion without comparison. May the memory of this kindly, God-loving brother, be to each of us as a guiding star to a better and a brighter life. Religious services were held on Saturday, November 16, 1946, at the Presbyterian Church in Cape Girardeau, where he had been an active member. Masonic services were held at Memorial Park Cemetery with members of the Grand Lodge participating. Right Worshipful Brother Robert Clark Duffin, Past Master of George Washington Lodge No.9, died suddenly 'On Monday, November 11, 1946. Brother Duffin, one of tne most celebrated Freemasons in Eastern Missouri served as District Lecturer and District Deputy Grand Master during the years 1936 and 1937, respectively. "Bob," as his many friends affectionately knew him, had devoted a lifetime to his beloved Freemasonry, having been twice Master of his lodge. After his stewardship as Deputy Grand Master of the 33rd District he served his Lodge for a number of years as secretary. He was an active member of the Scottish Rite Bodies in St. Louis, was a Past Wise Master of St. Louis Chapter No.1, Rose Croix, receiving the investiture of Knight Commander of the Court of Honor of 1931 and being coroneted a 33 0 Inspector General Honorary of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in 1939. Brother Duffin's quiet manner, upright life, fine ability as a ritualist, and sincere loyalty won him the esteem and admiration of all who knew him. A great and true Mason has been taken from our band. Religious and Masonic services were held in the Scottish Rite Auditorium on Thursday, November 14, 1946. Right Worshipful Brother Charles T. Kornbrodt, one of Missouri MasonrY'8 most illustrious individuals, died at his home in Kansas City on the eve of this Grand Lodge session. Born in Germany 86 years ago, Brother Kornbrodt came to this country at the age of nineteen. He came to Kansas City from Detroit in 1885 where he founded a cornice company under his name. He was a world traveler, naving made ten trips abroad, twice circling the globe. A devoted churchman, one of the founders of the Boulevard Methodist Church, Brother Kornbrodt twice visited the Holy Land and in 1933 was a guest of the Ethiopian Emperor Haille Selassie. A Past Presiding officer of most Masonic Bodies of the American Rite, Past Venerable Master and 33 0 Honorary of the Scottish Rite, he also served this Grand Lodge as District Lecturer and District Deputy Grand Master, and was active in numerous civic and business organizations. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, grand and great-grand children and a host of admiring friends and brethren. Another actively prominent brother, R. Burns Strader, was called to his eternal rest on September 24, 1947. Born in Odessa, Missouri 67 years ago, he had been a resident of Independence for the past thirty years. Originally a school teacher and later a practicing lawyer, he was recognized as a profound student of the law, being regularly consulted by members of his profession in matters of advice. He was an active member of the 1st Presbyterian Church and rose high in the ranks of Masonic Bodies, having served as presiding officer of all York Rite bodies, the Eastern Star, and as Grand Commander,


GEORGE WILLIAM WALKEH GRAND MAS'l'ER

1936-1937


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

107

Knights Templar of the State of Missouri and Past Sovereign, Mary Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine. Brother Strader, too, was active in many business and civic groups, and was in great demand as a speaker. A great traveler, a student of horticulture, his accomplishments were many; and combined with his cultured, friendly disposition and a love for his fellow creatures he parted this world mourned by associates, friends and admirers from near and far. He was laid to rest with Masonic Honors by the brethren of Independence Lodge No. 76. Julius O. Christensen, a well-loved brother in our Fraternity passed away on October 1, 1947, at the age of 73. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, he came to this country at an early age. A graduate of Beloit College, Beloit, Michigan, he came to Kansas City in 1902. He was Secretary and Manager of the Ivanhoe Masonic Temple since 1932 and Se'cretary of the Board of Directors of the Temple since 1917. He was a member of every known Masonic Body of both Rites, a Past High Priest, Past Illustrious Master, Past Commander, founder and recorder of the Kansas City Council, Royal and Select Masters, Grand Treasurer of the Grand Council of Missouri and Grand Representative of the Grand Council, Chapter and Commandery, and held many other positions and appointments of honor. His was a magnificent life of service and devotion to our beloved Fraternity and his absence from our counsels is deeply felt. A list of honored dead from the Grand Jurisdictions is attached hereto. Respectfully submitted, ERNEST R. CLAUS JULIUS R. EDWARDS ROBERT P. T A.IT

Alabama: Rt. Wor. Bro. Guy T. Smith, Grand Secretary, died July 29, 1947. Arizona: M. Wor. Bro. John Joseph Sweeney, Past Grand Master, died January 23, 1947. Colorado: M. Wor. Bro. John Andrew, Past Grand Master, died January 4, 1947; Rt. Wor. Bro. Edward Charles Hanley, Grand Treasurer Emeritus, died May 15, 1947; M. War. Bro. Reuben M. Hershey, Past Grand Master, died August 5, 1947. Delaware: M. Wor. Bro. George Duffy, Past Grand Master, died November 9, 1946; M. Wor. Bro. Clarence A. Short, Past Grand Master, died March 23, 1947. De1lIm(J.rk: King Christian X, Grand Master, died April 20, 1947. England: The Rt. Han. The Earl of Harewood, K. G., Grand Master, died May 24, 1947. Idaho: M. War. Bro. Byron S. Defenbach, Past Grand Master, died February 25, 1947. Indiana: M. Wor. Bro. Douglas Burns Douglass, Past Grand Master, died June 20, 1947. Iowa: M. Wor. Bro. Frank B. Whitaker, Past Grand Master, died September 8, 1946; M. War. Bro. Fordyce Laflin Van Hbesen, Past Grand Master, died October 24, 1946. Kentucky: M. Wor. Bro. Henry Pendleton Barret, Past Grand Master, died July 9, 1947. Louisiana: M. Wor. Bro. Wynne Grey Rogers, Past Grand Master, died September 15, 1946; M. Wor. Bro. Emil Sundbery, Past Grand Master,


108

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

died September 24, 1946; M. Wor. Bro. John Carlton Ayers, Past Grand Master, died October 5, 1946; M. Wor. Bro. Leon Samuel Haas, Past Grand Master, died February 28, 1947. Michigan: M. Wor. Bro. Ira A. Beck, Past Grand Master, died August 19, 1947. Mississippi: M. Wor. Bro. Robert Alexander Carson, Past Grand Master, died September 21, 1946; M. Wor. Bro. John Foggo Dixon, Honorary Past Grand Master, died June 16, 1947. Montana: M. Wor. Bro. John Kain, Past Grand Master, died July 27, 1947. Nevada: M. Wor. Bro. Thomas Lindsay, Past Grand Master, died March 21, 1947. New H(J/fT/,pshire: R. Wor. Bro. William Porter Niles, Grand Chaplain, died September 19, 1946. Oregon: M. Wor. Bro. William Jasper Kerr, Past Grand Master, died April 15, 1947; M. W or. Bro. William Coleman Bristol, Past Grand Master, died July 24, 1947. South Dakota: Rt. Wor. Bro. Samuel Ellsworth George, Past Deputy Grand Master, died March 11, 1947. Tennessee: M. Wor. Bro. Howell E. Jackson, Past Grand Master, died January 12; 1947. Texas: M. Wor. Bro. Frank Hartgraves, Past Grand Master, died January 25, 1947; M. Wor. Bro. Joseph J. Mansfield, Past Grand Master, died July 12, 1947. Virginia: M. Wor. Bro. Braxton Davenport Gibson, Past Grand Master, died August 14, 1946. Wyoming: Rt. Wor. Bro. William W. Daley, Grand Treasurer, died September 30, 1946.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION

The Grand Secretary read the report of the Committee on the Masonic Temple Association, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your members appointed by the Grand Master to represent the Grand Lodge in the Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis, Missouri, submit the following report: In our report in 1946 the bonded indebtedness was $52,000.00 Money deposited by member bodies on which the Association pays 3 per cent interest was 40,500.87 Total indebtedness

$92,500.87

On December 1, 1946, in addition to the interest due at that time, the Association paid off bonds amounting to $ 9,000.00 On June 1, 1947, in addition to the interest due at that time, the Association paid off bonds amounting to 6,000.00 Total bond payments

$15,000.00

As of September 1, 1947, the indebtedness of the Association stands as follows: Bonds secured by a first mortgage

$37,000.00


1947

109

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Funds deposited by member bodies Total indebtedness

40,500.87 $77,500.87

Since September 1, 1946, there have been no payments on deposits made by member bodies. On April 1, 1947, the secretary's desk in Commandery Hall was memorialized in the name of Samuel Stevenson by the payment of the sum of $300.00. On June 19, 1947, the social room on the third floor was memorialized by Mrs. Anna and Annie Knittel for Ferdinand 1. G. and William Knittel by the payment of $2,000.00. This makes the total donations for the year $2,300.00. We congratulate the officers and members of the Association upon the progress they are making. â&#x20AC;˘ Fraternally submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGER, Cha.irman, JOHN WOIIRADSKY, JR., CHARLES A. JOBSON.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES (Condensed)

Rt. Wor. Brother Robert Aronson, chainnan, presented the report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.. F. and A.. M. of Missouri: Your committee has had referred to it four requests for reinstatement by applicants who were suspended for nonpayment of dues by lodges which are now defunct. We recommend that all four applications be granted and the following named brothers be reinstated as members of the Masonic fraternity: W. C. Potter, formerly of Ozark Lodge No. 297, recommended by Doric Lodge No. 300 of Elkland; Guy F. Stingley, formerly of Gaynor City Lodge No. 465, recommended by Defiance Lodge No. 88 of Sheridan; Samuel F. Smith, formerly of Lucerne Lodge No. 384, recommended by Hebron Lodge No. 374 of Oelwein, Iowa, and O. A. Reynolds, formerly of Civil Bend Lodge No. 409, recommended by Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65. In the matter of Magnolia Lodge No. 626 vs. Edward M. Dawsey. This appeal had been presented last year but consideration of it had been deferred until this Annual Communication. (Proceedings of 1946, pages 111-112.) Proper notice of the setting of this matter was given the accused and communications have been received from him. He is now in the Army and expected to be in England at this date. The evidence in the case was not as fully presented as might have been desirable. The most serious charge against the accused was an offense against his wife, but she was not a witness in the trial in Magnolia Lodge, nor was her absence explained. The evidence consisted of a police report, a report by a committee of two Past Masters appointed to interview the accused and his wife, a transcript of the testimony of the accused before the Grievance Committee of the lodge and his testimony at the trial. The verdict of the lodge jury was that the brother, an Entered Apprentice, was guilty of all five charges made against him, and that his punishment should be a reprimand in open lodge. The principal question before us is


110

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

the sufficiency of this punishment. The Grand Master at the time, M. Wor. Willis J. Bray, ordered the appeal. Of the five specifications in the charge, we find insufficient evidence to support the conviction on three. The record of the trial does not justify a finding of guUty as to specification two relating to profane language, section four relating to the circumstances of the arrest of the accused, and section five relating to newspaper publications. There was sufficient evidence to support conviction under specification one, relating to drinking intoxicating liquor in a public place to excess, although the accused made no disturbance at the tavern and did not conduct himself improperly there. Only after he returned to his home did he do anything which would indicate that he drank "to excess." This offense standing alone would not merit serious punishment, since it arose from a chance meeting of two men in uniform (The accused was at the time an ensign in the Merchant-Marine.) The most serious charge is specification three, alleging that the accused several times struck his wife and threatened her life and that of his young daughter with a pistol at their home on January 21, 1944. The accused remembered nothing of the incident but apparently accepted his wife's version of it. She had told him (and the police officers) that when he returned in an intoxicated condition he struck her with his fist and threatened to shoot her and the daughter. His pistol was not loaded, so the threat was more apparent than real. In self-defense she struck the accused on the head with an electric iron and ran from the house to call a policeman. Her injury was very slight; the accused was injured to a much greater extent. No prosecution resulted from the incident. On the evidence the jury properly found the accused guilty under specification three, but the punishment, merely a reprimand, was clearly insufficient. The incompleteness of the record of the lodge trial makes it difficult to determine proper punishment. The accused was an officer in the Merchant Marine and now is in the Army. He had never before been arrested nor charged with any breach of the peace. Apparently he made a good impression on the jury in his statement of penitence and contrition. He asserted that he had learned a lesson and had not taken a drink in the . time from January 21, 1944, until the trial on November 13, 1945. He expressed his desire to advance in Freemasonry and to live a life of a good Mason, and has repeated these assertions in his later letters. Nothing in the record indicates that his conduct was habitual; he is entitled to the benefit of all doubts and to the presumption of innocence. The incident of January 21, 1944, appears to have been an isolated instance arising from a meeting of two men in uniform. Under all the circumstances proper punishment would have been suspension of membership for a period of five years. We recommend that such punishment be assessed by this Grand Lodge as of date of the trial, November 13, 1945. In lieu of the original sentence finding the accused guilty on all five specifications of the charge, and setting the punishment at a reprimand, there should be ordered a new verdict finding the accused guilty under specifications one and three of the charge and assessing punishment at suspension for a period of five years, commencing November 13, 1945, and finding him not guilty under specifications two, four and five. Respectfully submitted, ROBERT L. ARONSON, Chairman, A. B. OLEAVELAND, P A.UL E. ECKARDT, HARRY GERSHENSON, EUGENE MCGEE, O. H. SWEARINGEN, WILLIA.M H. UTZ, JR.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

111

CALLED FROM LABOR

At 3 :00 p. m., the Grand Lodge was called from labor for the purpose of visiting the Masonic Home, buses having been provided for that occasion. TUESDAY EVENING-8:30 p. m.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 8 :30 p. m., following the rendition of an enjoyable musical program under the direction of Brother Oscar J ost, organist of the Scottish Rite. The Grand Chaplain offered prayer. ADDRESS OF GRAND ORATOR

Rt. Wor. Brother John A. Witthaus, Circuit Judge of St. Louis County, Grand Orator, delivered an inspiring address on "The Conception of Freemasonry." This address was received with great interest and was accorded prolonged applause. CONCEPTIONS OF FREEMASONRY No one can be insensible of the honor it is, by appointment of the Grand Master for that very purpose, to be accorded the privilege of addressing the Freemasons of all parts of Missouri assembled in Grand Lodge session. \Vhile I am deeply grateful for the honor, even more am I impressed with a consciousness of the many brethren who could fill this position with far greater interest and profit to the session. But perhaps my selection was prompted by the thought that it is wise occasionally to get the viewpoint of the average Mason, for it is only as such average Mason that I can talk to you. The subject "Conceptions of Freemasonry" was selected not because of any idea that my conceptions have any unusual importance, but because it seemed to permit of a wide field of discussion, and gave me the assurance that if I chanced to wander, as I probably shall, I would still be \vithin my subjeet. But primarily my selection of this type of talk was due to the conviction I have that there is a great need among our lodges and among our brethren for more frequent discussion of the ideas and purposes and possibilities of Freemasonry, of Freemasonry itself. We become so occupied and absorbed in the necessary formal work of the lodge that we fail to avail ourselves of the strengthening experience of analyzing together the very things we are trying to do. Even though no new thought or idea may be expressed, the effect is wholesome. Just as we do not tire of the repetition of the ritual because it constantly serves to remind us of lessons we have already learned, so a frequent presentation of the broad objectives of our


112

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fraternal work serves to renew our faith and increase our interest in the great work that is being done. And may I assure you from my own experience that the brethren are eager and hungry for this sort of discussion and information. It is even possible that the opportunity for more of it within our lodges might well lead to a more general participation and more faithful attendance among our members. Freemasonry cannot be readily defined. In fact, it is so broad in its scope and many-sided in its application as to beggar our power of description. There are those who would say that the Grand Lodge is Freemasonry, or at least that it is the fountainhead of all Masonic thought and action. And yet Freemasonry has come down to us unchanged through the centuries. 'Ve are told that it is not in the power of any man or body of men to change the principles of Freemasonry. Rules of government and even ritual may be changed, but the lessons, purposes, ideals and objectives remain the same always, and to the extent that any Lodge or Grand Lodge attempted any alteration in the basic concepts of the Fraternity it would not be a change in, but rather a departure from Freemasonry. Nowhere in our Grand Lodge laws do we attempt to determine what shall constitute Masonic conduct, and from the very nature of our idealism it is impossible to do so. \Ve do by by-law say that there are certain things Freemasons shall not do, or that lodges shall not be permitted to do, and sometimes I think we go too far in this. Some of these prohibitions are probably necessary and determine for the craft at large some questions which might otherwise be quite vexing to them. But some of these la\vs suggest a lack of confidence in our lodge leadership, and some of them are so out of tune with the accepted thinking of our day that we would certainly be better off without them. There must be rules for the government of the lodge organization and for determination of infractions of Masonic behavior, and it is the duty of the lodges, within their scope, and of the Grand Lodge to formulate and enforce such necessary rules. But there should be the greatest possible freedom of action among our members. Members who are conscientiously engaged in the practice of our art and whose devotion to the Fraternity is a greater asset and more definite protection to the good name of Freemasonry than any general rule or by-law can possibly be. Freemasons are not made in Grand Lodge sessions. Throughout our deliberations here, let us approach the important problems which may be presented with the knowledge and well founded confidence that those who guide the action of all of our Lodges are in truth and fact true Freemasons at heart, zealous in their desire that their Lodge may reflect honor upon the institution of which it is a part and added glory to its good name. Just as the Grand Lodge is not Freemasonry, so neither is the Lodge Freemasonry, although it is a necessary and vital part in the


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process of making Freemasons and building Freemasonry. Indeed, the Lodge as a body practices Freemasonry in many ways. Its solicitude for the unfortunate, its visitation of the sick, its care of the needy, its comforting and helping hand to the widow and orphan are expressions of Masonry in practice. But analysis indicates these beneficent Lodge activities are the result of the combined action of the members in an effort to give unified expression to the dictates of their hearts. Commendable as is the performance of these Lodge duties, more important are the lessons inculcated in the Lodge, which create among the members the desire to perform these acts of charity and helpfulness. Foremost among these incentives are the lessons contained in the ritual and our Fraternity is justly proud of the many men who have devoted themselves so faithfully and untiringly to our ritualistic work. \Vell deserved is the position of honor and respect which these men invariably hold within their Lodges and in the Fraternity at large, for their contribution to the welfare of men is beyond estimate. The importance of ritual must be obvious to all. It is important that the ritual should be carefully studied, and given with as near letter perfection and with as much meaning as possible. This is true not only because of its impressive beauty, but also because in it is contained the groundwork, the fundamental lessons upon which all Masonic effort and conduct are built. But the ritual is not Freemasonry. No mere repetition of words can be an active force in the affairs of men or in the life of a man, unless the repetition of those words incite him to action and effort. But somehow the igniting spark is kindled, the words become animate, and Freemasonry becomes an active, vital something which grips the minds and hearts and souls of men, and inspires each of them to find within himself the possibility of a finer and nobler life. Individual in its inception, it is individual in its character, and the individual upon and with whom it seeks to build is you. Nor is it an effort in which we can expect to see our objectives completely and perfectly accomplished. For just as ours is a progressive science, so is its work a cumulative and constantly expanding experience. Dr. Percy B. Eversden, a Past Master of my Lodge, now gone to his reward, whose keen mind and broad understanding and willingness to impart Masonic information were a delight to encounter, once told me that a man is in the process of being made a Freemason from the time he first knocks on the inner door of the Lodge until the time when in his funeral service he is given the last grand honors. A quarter of a century of Masonic association and activity has convinced me of the truth of that idea. Perhaps it has made me somewhat more tolerant of the seeming shortcomings of others. Certainly it has spurred me on to continued effort to over-


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come my own Masonic weaknesses. It is the process of the ill-fitting, jagged surface of the rough ashlar, by the constant application of the proper working tools, being hewn and molded into the perfect ashlar which may take its place in the building of an improved society and better relationships among men. Since we are within the precincts of a tiled lodge there are things which may be said here which could not be put in any manuscript. I should like to emphasize by such discussion the individual character of Masonic development as well as the unquestionable truth that growth and happiness and satisfaction are to be found in self discipline and in contributions of self, rather than in efforts to obtain the service and bounty of others. In this adventure in strengthening and building we have the advantage of contact and association with men who are engaged in a like effort. Men who meet together on a high plane. Men who have been tested in the same manner we have been tested, who have received the same lessons, and who have the same pride in their privilege of membership. Without any deceit and perhaps without any conscious effort, while we were at Lodge, we try to do the things we know our brethren expect us to do, and to be the kind of men we know they expect us to be. Weare anxious to merit their continued approval. Although we give no heed to the process it becomes a force which serves to nurture and activate the finer qualities we possess. Weare enriched by the effort and in some measure the experience which we have found so gratifying becomes a part of our life. It is Freemasonry at work. To an even greater extent do we find our own development being contributed to by traits of character which we admire and have observed in others. It is not at all difficult to heed the admonition that we endeavor to emulate the good qualities we find in others. It is rather a natural effortless reaction and inevitably adds something to what we were before. This influencing power of association is no mere sentimentalism, but is a psychological factor recognized by every thinking person who has had any experience with the problems of people. And contemplate, if you will, in what a rich field of human activity we have the privilege of association. Men of varying strengths and weaknesses, but all selected not because of what they have but rather because of what they are. Men with imperfections, to which, unfortunately, all humankind is subject, but all engaged in the ennobling work of trying to bring into practical application ideals of moral conduct and thereby striving to establish the basis for a peaceful and harmonious society. I wish it wer~ possible to relate the stories of the many Masonic friends who have been an influence on my life, and of the many hundreds who have been inspiring factors in my efforts to carry on.


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That pat on the back, that expression of confidence, that word of encouragement and approval frequently means more than anyone can possibly know. I know you have all had a like experience, and fully realize its value. Not often have these contributions come by way of admonition or advice. More frequently have they been by inspiration and example. I am sure my friends here will pardon my repetition of an illustration I love to use, not only because it has meant so much to me, but also because it graphically demonstrates the thing I am trying ~~~

.

The Temple in which my Lodge meets serves also as the meeting place of several other Blue Lodges. Also using this Lodge Room is a Royal Arch Chapter, a Commandery of Knights Templar, one or more Chapters of the Eastern Star, a Bethel of Job's Daughters, and a DeMolay Chapter. The Lodge Hall is on the second floor of the building. Some years ago we had a tiler who also served as the outer guardian for all the bodies which met there. He was an elderly man, with a kindly cheerful smile. We called him "Dad" and, although I was then about forty years old he called me "Son." He sat at the head of the stairs and I can remember how, when you neared the top of the stairs, he would reach down his hand in greeting and help you up the last two or three steps. He was a man who never said anything unkind about anyone. When differences or disagreements arose, as they sometimes do, he would deplore those differences, but would utter no word of blame. No words of scorn or contempt ever passed his lips, and his tongue was one which if it could not praise, indeed was chained. I knew I liked him, everyone liked him, but I didn't think much about it. One night he was being taken home from Lodge, was struck by an automobile and as路 a result of the accident died. He was then a man eighty years old, an age when most men find their friends have gone on before them. He was not a man of position or of financial wealth. A humble man, he had none of the things which would ordinarily attract crowds, yet as his body lay in state in the Temple, for hour after hour literally thousands, men, women, boys and girls, in a solid and continuous line filed past that casket and dropped their silent tear of regret. I felt his going keenly, and after his funeral I went into my study alone to try to think; and as I tried to analyze my feeling of loss, I realized that this old man, who had never tried to teach me a lesson in his life, had taught me more of the value of character than any other man I had ever known. There is now a bronze plaque bearing his likeness and the name Alfred S. Kirby on the wall over the chair where he customarily sat, but for those of us who knew him no bronze plaque is needed. The things which made us love him are engraved upon our hearts. I have again told this story of Dad Kirby, not only because I love to tell it, but also that by this means, the contribution of this simple,


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kindly, lovable old man, who meant so much to so many Masons, might take its place in our Grand Lodge records. No, Freemasonry is not the Grand Lodge, it is not the Lodge, it is not the ritual. It is a vital, dynamic, impelling force which finds expression in the lives of men, working constant change through the living application of truths and virtues which in themselves are ageless and changeless. What a treasure of memories we build up over the years. What a wealth of friends become ours, each in some measure becoming a part of us. In this auditorium tonight arc not only brethren here as Grand Lodge members, but many members of my own Lodge and of other Lodges, members of the Square Club and of several Craft Clubs which have welcomed me in their midst. Men with whom I have sorrowed, men with whom I have worked, men with whom I have laughed and sung and played; present not so much to hear me speak, but because they are my friends-friends Freemasonry gave to me. "While we build and grow upon these principles of truth and justice and brotherhood, principles upon which rest the hope of the world, what rich re,vards come to us now from participating in this great work. Because I know your experience has been the same as mine, and because I am sure the lines would express your feeling as I know they express mine, I should like to close with the poem by Brother Edgar A. Guest, which he calls "Wealth": I'm a rich man and I boast it! Rich in friendship tried and true. And a King'8 lot would be happier if such friends as mine he knew. I'm a rich man and I know it; rich in laughter and in mirth, And I wouldn't trade that treasure for the greatest bank on earth. I'm a rich man and I shout it! Who in all this world can sec More of sky and hill and valley than the Lord permits to mef When the summer birds are pouring out their music to the sky, Can the man whose purse is fatter hear more melody than n Can a hundred million dollars buy more perfume from a rose Or get more of rain or sunshine than my little garden knows' Let who will count wealth in figures, pages wide and columns long I'll count mine in lasting friendships and in hours of mirth and song.

At the conclusion of the address, Rt. \Vor. Bro. Emil Rake, on behalf of the members of the Square Club, presented Rt. \Vor. Brother


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Witthaus a beautiful and acceptable gift as a token of their love and appreciation. MOTION TO DEFER

At 9 :00 p. m., M. Wor. Brother B. E. Bigger, chairman, arose to present the report of the Committee on Revision, but a motion was unanimously adopted to defer consideration of the report until \Vednesday morning. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 9 :10 p. m., after prayer by the Grand Chaplain, the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 'tVednesday morning, October 1, at 9 :00 a. m.

SECOND DAY WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 1, 1947

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 9 :00 a. m., and Grand Chaplain Edward Potts offered prayer. The Grand Master, M. \Vor. Brother Solon Cameron, announced the passing of Wor. Brother Julius O. Christensen, for many years the faithful and efficient secretary of Ivanhoe Lodge and for years an active Freemason, at 2 :00 a. m., this morning, and called the Grand Lodge to stand in silence for several moments. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

M. Wor. Brother Willis J. Bray, chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful (}rand Lodge, A.. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on the Grand Master's Address submits the following report: We congratulate our Grand Master on the zeal and fidelity he has manifested in the discharge of the duties of his office. He has given generously of his time and energy to the Craft, and we commend him for the record he has made. He has taken much time from a busy medical practice to discharge the heavy duties of his office with credit to himself and profit to the Fraternity. We respectfully make the following recommendations: 1. That all matters pertaining to finances be referred to the Ways and Means Committee. 2. That the action of the Grand Master in granting a dispensation to Clarkton Lodge U. D. be referred to the Committee on Lodges U. D. 3. That all decisions, dispensations, and other matters pertaining to Masonic law be referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. 4. That the recommendation of the Grand Master providing for two District Deputy Grand Masters in Administrative District No. 15 be approved.

'


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5. That the recommendation of the Grand Master adding the Senior Grand Warden to list of delegates to the several conferences held each year at the time 0.ÂŁ the Conference of Grand Masters in Washington, D. C., in February be approved, and the Ways and Means Committee authorized to make the necessary appropriation. 6. That the recommendation of the Grand Master relative to providing an oil portrait for each Grand Master be referred to the Ways and Means Committee. 7. That the recommendation of the Grand Master be approved relative to the awarding by the Grand Lodge of a suitable certificate to each member of a Missouri Lodge who served in, and was honorably discharged from, or is still serving in, any branch of the armed services of the United States during World War II. We further recommend that a similar recognition be given each member of a Missouri Lodge who served in, and was honorably discharged from any branch of the armed services during World War I, insofar as the same can be done. 8. That the recommendation of the Grand Master relative to the appointment by the incoming Grand Master of a brother to edit the revised By-Laws be not approved, inasmuch as the report of the Revision Committee makes such an appointment unnecessary. 9. That the matter of the advisability of having a newspaper published by the Grand Lodge, and distributed to the membership in Missouri be referred to a special committee to be appointed by the incoming Grand Master with instructions to make full and complete investigation of all phases of the matter and report to the next Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge. 10. That the recommendations of the Grand Master relative to expenses of -District Lecturers be referred to the Ways and Means Committee. 11. We heartily concur with the views of the Grand Master relative to the misuse of the blackball in a few of our lodges. It cannot be too often stressed that the use of the blackball for selfish reasons or personal prejudice is un-Masonic, and unworthy of any real Mason. The use of the blackball for such purposes has done distinct harm to some of our lodges. Fraternally submitted, WILLIS J. BRAY, Chairman, T. W. COTTON, W. W. MARTIN, BYRNE E. BIGGER, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, HAROLD L. READER, RAY V. DENSLOW, BERT S. LEE, DUVAL SMITH.

REPORT OF THE MISSOURI LODGE OF RESEAROH

The Grand Secretary presented the report of the Lodge of Research, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most WorshipfUl Grand Lodge, A.. F. and A.. M. of Missouri: Brethren: In conformity with the laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, under which the Missouri Lodge of Research is chartered, I submit the following report of the activities of the Lodge of Research for the year 1946-47.


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During the year the Lodge of Research has continued to increase its membership, the total now standing at 267, an increase of 38 since the report made a year ago. The increase in membership is substantial and the present total is gratifying to those who have labored so long and diligently in behalf of the research project. It seems to me, however, that there must be many more Master Masons in Missouri who might be interested in the program of the Lodge of Research to the extent of supporting it by the payment of membership dues if we only knew how to make the appropriate appeal to them. During the year the third volume of the Transaction was distributed. This is the volume for the year 1945. Its contents were discussed by Brother Anthony F. Ittner in his report to the Grand Lodge made last year. The fourth volume of the Transactions is now in the hands of the printer and will soon be ready for distribution. These four volumes of Transactions constitute a fine contribution to the history of Masonry in Missouri. If the Lodge of Research had performed no other service to the craft than the production of these four volumes, its existence would be fully justified. The brethren who have contributed to the Transacticms and Brother Ray V. Denslow, under whose direction the volumes have been prepared, deserve the hearty commendation of every Master Mason in Missouri. During the year, also, the Lodge of Research distributed to its memo bers copies of that splendid monograph, the Masonic College of Missouri, by Brother Henry C. Chiles. The Lodge of Research has continued the policy of acquiring and distributing to its members certain important Masonic publications, some of which are not readily available to the craft. These include Minutes of the Conference of Grand Masters of Masons in North America (1946) ; Minutes of the Thirty-Sixth Annual Convention of the George Washing路 ton Masonic National Memorial Association; Address of the Grand Master to the Grand Lodge of Missouri (1946); the report of the Grand Lodge Committee on Correspondence, which appears in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge under the title, the Masonic World; and the commemorative pamphlet prepared by Brother Ray V. Denslow for the Grand Chapter, R. A. 'M. of Missouri and entitled" One Hundred Years of Royal Arch Masonry in Missouri." Several numbers of the Missouri Grand Lodge Bulletin, issued in the interval 1924-29, were distributed to the members of the Lodge of Research. These bulletins contain many articles of great interest to the craft and furnish information relating to the interval covered which any Master Mason might be happy to have at its command. Finally, six special articles were distributed. The titles are: From Small Beginnings; Hands Across the Sea; The Royal Arch in Scotland; The Royal Arch, Its Beginning, Its Development, and Its Influence on Symbolic Masonry; Zedekiah, the Last King of Judah; and Zerubbabel, The Royal Prince. . For Bome of the items distributed the Lodge of Research is indebted to the Grand Lodge, for some to the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, for some to the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters, and for some to the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of Missouri. Whichever the source, the Missouri Lodge of Research is deeply grateful for these favors. These activities of the Missouri Lodge of Research have been financed by a very modest income, consisting almost entirely of dues in the amount of twelve hundred and eighty dollars ($1280). On account of the great increase in the cost of printing and binding, the present program of the Lodge of Research will have to be curtailed unless additional income


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can be provided. The needed amount could be provided by a further increase in membership comparable to that which occurred during the year 1946-47. This docs not seem an impossible goal for the officers and members of 1947-48. In closing this report, may I extend to all Master Masons in Missouri a cordial invitation to become members of the Missouri Lodge of Research, share its opportunities, and participate in its benefits. Respectfully submitted, ELI S. HA.YNES, Worshipful Master, Missouri Lodge of Research.

REPORT OF THE GRAND LECTURER

M. Wor. Brother Ittner presented his report as Grand Lecturer. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, .A. F. and .A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: I desire to submit my thirteenth annual report as your Grand Lecturer. I do not have the official records of the number of raisings and affiliations reported by the lodges throughout the State. However, I have been able to gather from the reports submitted to me by my District Lecturers that in most of their lodges there has been a sufficient amount of work to keep the officers interested in the ritual and to inspire in them a desire to improve or even perfect themselves in the conferring of the degrees, and in their knowledge of the several lectures. Without doubt there is an intimate connection between the economic condition of the country and the average state of ritualistic proficiency in the lodges. When times are good, with employment at a high level, eligible young men who may long have contemplated petitioning for the degrees are prompted to carry their cherished hopes into effect. As a result, the lodges become busy with degree work and the officers, whether as a result of an inward urge or from sheer force of circumstances are moved to improve themselves in the conferring of the degrees and the delivering of the lectures. On the contrary, when times are bad and employment is at a low level, with wages down, the lodges receive far fewer petitions with the result that the officers on the average lose their keen desire to perfect themselves in the work and the average of ritualistic proficiency in the State sinks to a lower level. As Grand Lecturer I have had abundant opportunities to observe the effects on the material welfare of Freemasonry of both sets of conditions outlined above. Fortunately, for the last five or six years favorable conditions have prevailed and my work and the work of the District Lecturers has been made far easier and more pleasant. The reports of the DiRtrict Lecturers on their work in the lodges of their districtR in the main indicate an encouraging improvement in_the work of the officers. The number of requests for instruction, both individually and in schools has also greatly increased. The District Lecturers have uniformly complied with these requests, and not infrequently at considerable sacrifice to themselves. I feel that I would be recreant to my duty if I failed to acknowledge the great debt which the Grand Lodge and the Grand Lecturer owe to this splendid group of unselfish and untiring workers. All the reports submitted by the District Lecturers are good reports and give evidence of a determination to do their fun duty. It would be


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impossible in this report to review them all but I beg leave to make mention briefly of a few of the most outstanding ones. Rt. W. Bro. Freelon K. Hadley, D.L. of the Ninth Ritual District, reports that he has held one hundred fourteen schools of instruction through the year. When we take into consideration that Brother Hadley is one of the very best District Lecturers in the State and rates one hundred per cent in his knowledge of the work, it goes without saying that during the year just ending he has rendered a most valuable service to the Grand Lodge and the Craft of Missouri. Rt. W. Brother Robert L. Fowlkes, who has for a number of years been District Lecturer of the Fiftieth Masonic Ritual District, was drafted last spring to meet an emergency situation which existed in the Fiftyfirst Ritual District. A group of Master Masons at Clarkton was desirous of organizing a new lodge under dispensation. They had requested the services of the then District Lecturer to instruct them sufficiently to merit their dispensation. The District Lecturer was incapacitated and could not serve, and in the emergency I requested Rt. W. Brother Fowlkes to go to the assistance, of the Clarkton brethren. He cheerfully and promptly complied with my request, and and held a number of schools at Clarkton. I then appointed him District Lecturer of the Fifty-first Ritual District as well as of the Fftieth, which enabled him to certify to the Grand Master the ritualistic proficiency of the Clarkton brethren as required by law. The dispensation was granted and the lodge was set to work by Rt. W. Brother Robert D. ElHngton, D.D.G.M. It promises to be a most creditable addition to the family of lodges in the Fifty-first Ritual District. I am sure its record of service will entitle it to a place among the chartered lodges of the State. Though Rt. W. Brother Fowlkes is a very busy man outside of his Masonic work, he is never too busy to lend Freemasonry a 'helping hand when his services are needed. In the Thirty-third Ritual District, which includes the lodges of St. Louis and University City, in St. Louis County, forty-seven in number, Rt. W. Bro. John A. Welkener has served as District Lecturer during the past year. The St. Louis Lodge of Instruction holds weekly meetings, except at the Christmas season, for a period of sc\-en months. Its attendance, except in very inclemt'nt weather, ranges from 150 to 300 brethren, a majority of whom are officers of their lodges. Brother 'Welkener has ably headed its activiti<.'s and has submitted a fine report of his work. In the Forty-fifth Ritual District Rt. W. Brother William J. Craig, notwithstanding he is in the Grand Lodge line and feels he ought to turn over the duties of the District Lecturer to some other qualified Brother, has yielded to the unanimous insistence of the brethren of his District that he continue in the office for the time being. It would be difficult to find a Brother who could match his qualifications in every respect, notwithstanding he has trained many fine ritualists in the two counties of his District. His report is a fine one. Rt. W. Brotber F. Ernest Carter, District Lecturer of the Twentysecond Ritual District, which includes Kansas City and North Kansas City, has been doing a work for ten years fully comparable to that of the Dictrict Lecturers of the Thirty-third District, where they change District Lecturers every year. There are nineteen lodges in his District, and he conducts schools of instruction each Wednesday evening during January and February. Except on very bad nights the attendance at his meetings seldom falls below two hundred and often reaches two hundred and fifty or more. In addition to his work in the Lodge of Instruction, Brother Carter


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has general supervision over four so-called Study Clubs, which are "sponsored by Kansas City lodges and hold their meetings in the halls of these lodges. Their work is conducted by brethren who are almost if not quite as proficient as Rt. W. Brother Carter. All doubtful and disputed points of ritual are referred to Brother Carter for final decision, so that these study clubs can in no sense be looked upon as wild-cat organizations. Though they have no Grand Lodge recognition and are not seeking any at the present time, it is possible that after they have gone through a proving period of a few years it might be to the advantage of the Grand Lodge to accord them legal recognition. During the past year I had the privilege of visiting three of these Study Clubs. Brother Carter enjoys a place in what I might call the top bracket of ritualistic proficiency. The Fifty-ninth Ritual District is presided over by Rt. W. Brother Francis S. Turner, as District Lecturer. It includes the ten lodges in Jackson County outside of Kansas City, and Marlborough Lodge, No. 569, in the outskirts of Kansas City, which prior to January 1, 1947, was outside the limits of that city. Brother Turner holds a school of instruction each Wednesday in March" of each year and his meetings are largely attended by officers and brethren from all parts of the district, anxious to improve themselves in Freemasonry. It was my privilege and pleasure to attend the la!lt meeting this year at which the second section of the Third Degree was beautifully and impressively exemplified. In the Thirty-third, Fifty-seventh, Twenty-second and Fifty-ninth Districts their schools of instruction are held within the tiled precincts of official Lodges of Instruction, opened and closed and presided over in the transaction of their business by the several District Deputy Grand Masters. The Lodge of Instruction for the Fifty-seventh Ritual District, which includes fourteen lodges of St. Louis County, meets weekly for six months during the fall and winter season and maintains high standards of excellence. Rt. W. Brother Kermit D. Shelley has presided over its activities during the past year and has left no stone unturned to make its work a success. He has submitted an excellent report. Rt. W. Brother Robert E. Kleinschmidt, of Hillsboro, was appointed District Lecturer of the Fortieth Ritual District on February 1, 1947, to take the place of Rt. W. Brother Stanley Morse, who had moved out of the State and, to the great regret of your Grand Lecturer, was unable to continue his most capable administration of the office of District Lecturer. Brother Kleinschmidt, in a seven-page typewritten report, has given an unprecedented picture of ritualistic conditions as they exist in his District and of his work as District Lecturer. No detail of importance seems to have been omitted. Although Brother Kleinschmidt declares himself unqualified for his new position, by the excellence and thoroughness of his report he has conclusively proved himself to be mistaken. Without wanting to flatter Brother Kleinschmidt unduly, or to hurt the feelings of any loyal District Lecturers, I feel constrained to say that this year Brother Kleinschmidt's report was the best. Among the reports not already mentioned nearly all of them are very good. Two or three are briefer than they should be and dismiss the reports of activities and of conditions a little too summarily. To my great regret, three or four of the Districts have not reported. I grant them a special dispensation to send in belated reports and trust that another year they will be more mindful of this important duty imposed upon them by the Grand Lodge by-laws. On Thursday, January 9, and Wednesday, January 15, 1947, two


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joint meetings of D.D.G.M. 's and D.L. 's: were held under the auspices of the Grand Master and the Grand Lecturer, to give the Grand Master an opportunity to confer with his District Deputies concerning problems connected with their year's work, and to enable the Grand Lecturer to hold schools of instruction for the District Lecturers and such of the D.D.G.M. 's as might care to participate. The meeting in St. Louis was held at the Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Blvd., and the one in Kansas City at the Masonic Temple at Ninth and Harrison St. The first meeting was for the Deputies and Lecturers of the eastern half of the State and the second for those of the western half. The attendance of Deputies and Lecturers at each meeting was approxImately forty. At each meeting also the Grand Master made a preliminary talk ably outlining to his Deputies the problems which confronted them, and especially those bearing on the difficulties incident to the enlargement of their Districts. He urged them to put forth every effort to make the new administrative District set-up work out successfully. A general discussion followed his address, after which the hall was turned over to the Grand Lecturer for exemplification of the work and rehearsal of the lectures. At each meeting all of the floor work was exemplified and all of the lectures were gone over. It was my desire to have as many of the lecturers and deputies as possible participate in the work and practically all of them did have an opportunity to participate. I believe that the District Lecturers are unanimous in the opinion that these annual meetings which enable them to get together, and compare notes and participate in the work, afford them a wonderful refresher course and enable them to return to their districts better equipped to discharge their duties for the coming year. A slight increase in the sum appropriated for these joint meetings would enable the Grand Master and the Grand Lecturer to hold over for a second day. This would give the Grand Master more time to confer with his Deputies and would enable the Grand Lecturer to go over certain important parts of the work a second time with different sets of participants. It would also allow more time for questions and answers. The question-and-answer feature of a school of instruction furnishes one of the most effective methods of clearing up doubtful points in connection with the work, and of fixing the correct way indelibly in the mind of the questioner and the others who listen in. '1'0 be frank, a part of a day is hardly sufficient time in which to exemplify all of the work as it should be exemplified, and to allow those who are new in the office of District Lecturer to assimilate it thoroughly. I recommend and sincerely hope that the Committee on Ways and Means will suggest the necessary increase to carry out the two-day plan for these meetings. During the year I have attended a number of large and interesting meetings some of which have been of considerable historical interest, but as this is revision year and the time of the Grand Lodge will probably be occupied right up to the end of the last day, I deem it advisable not to review them in this report though I would gladly do so if time permitted. Last year, at the request of M. W. Brother Willis J. Bray, Grand Master, the Committee on Ritual, of which I was chairman, undertook to revise the funeral service by eliminating certain objectionable words and phrases and in other respects that would make it more acceptable to the Craft and more pleasing to the mourners and their friends who will be called upon to listen to it in the years to come. The Committee made thirteen recommendations to the Grand Lodge, eleven of which were adopted, and as a result I believe that the service has been materially


124

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

improved. The Grand Secretary's supply of Grand Lodge Manuals having become exhausted, a new edition was ordered and it became my duty to prepare the copy for the revised service, incorporating the changes ordered by the Grand Lodge. This revised edition is now on sale by the Grand Secretary and I would suggest that each lodge in the State order at least one copy, if not more, to provide the brethren who conduct the funeral service each with a copy of the revised service. Since the system of districting the State was first put into effect it has been the goal of Missouri Grand Lecturers to visit each District in the State each year. With one or two exceptions I have succeeded in doing this each year during my thirteen years of service as Grand Lecturer, but this year I have fallen considerably short of reaching the goal. Several causes conspired to keep me from so doing. In the early part of the winter an attack of the flu so weakened me that it was several months before I was able to work at anything approaching full capacity. Again, the mandate of the Grand Lodge, necessarily implied in the by-laws, to implement further the certificate plan already working so successfully with the proficiency or candidate's lectures has claimed a great deal of my time and thought. The Committee on Ritual, of which I am chairman, will be in a position to launch further extension plans when the Grand Lodge appropriates the funds necessarily incidental to the work. In the case of the certificate plan already in successful operation with the proficiency or candidate's lectures, the work has been seriously handicapped by lack of funds to conduct a large and growing correspondence. This has resulted in keeping many brethren out of their certificates for longer or shorter periods through no fault of the chairman of the committee, though he is blamed for it just the same. Lastly, I have received a goodly number of important commissions from the Grand Master, which have required considerable time and thought, and which I have tried to execute faithfully and successfully to the best of my ability. In closing, I desire once more to thank my able corps of District Lecturers for the loyal support they have rendered me, the Grand Lodge and the Fraternity. The Grand Secretary, M. \V. Brother Harold L. Reader, has co-operated with mo in every way and I thank him sincerely for this co-operation. Lastly, the Grand Master, W. Brother Solon Cameron, has given a year of devoted service to the Grand Lodge and to Freemasonry in Missouri. No Grana Master has ever worked harder for the success and glory of our great Fraternity and I believe that his work will bear rich fruit in the years to come. He has been very appreciative of my service and has made many flattering references to my work which perhaps I do not deserve. I thank him sincerely for his kindly interest and good will. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER.,

Grand Lecturer. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON RITUAL

M. 'Vor. Brother Ittner presented the report of the Committee on Ritual. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Lt. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Ritual begs leave to submit its annual report for the Grand Lodge year 1946-1947. At the annual communication of 1946 the Grand Lodge adopted a new by-law which fixed the maximum number of Ritual Districts at sixty and assigned to the Committee on Ritual the duty of determining how


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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many such Ritual Districts within the prescribed maximum number there should be, and what lodges should be included within each such district. On March 10, 1947, your Committee on Ritual, pursuant to due notice, convened in the Grand Master's office in the St. Louis Masonic Temple and as its first order of business took up the matter of fixing the number of Ritual Districts and their component lodges. After careful deliberation it was unanimously decided that, for the time being at least, there should be no material changes in the ritualistic framework of the State. It was further unanimously decided that the fifty-nine Ritual Districts and the several lodges composing them as set out in the annual Proceedings of 1946 be adopted as the ritualistic framework for the Grand Lodge of Missouri, with the exception of two lodges, namely, Beehive Lodge, No. 393, at Lawson, in Ray County, and Rockbridge Lodge No. 435, at Rockbridge, in Ozark County. For reasons of greater convenience to their officers and members, Beehive Lodge, No. 393, was transferred from the Twenty-third to the Eleventh Ritual District, and Rockbridge Lodge No. 435, was transferred from the l<'ifty-third to the Forty-sixth Ritual District. The foregoing actions of the Committee on Ritual were duly certified to the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary. The next order of business taken up by the Committee at its meeting on March 10, 1947, was the extension of the certificate plan. After much discussion and careful deliberation it was tentatively decided by the committee that the next extension should include the three lectures often referred to as the" curtain lectures" and the Worshipful Master's part in the second section of the second degree together with the charge in each of the degrees. On the question of whether or not a separate certificate should be issued for proficiency in each of these lectures or whether proficie!lcy in all of them should be required and that one certificate be issued therefor, the committee after full discussion was unanimous in the view that the latter course would be preferable, to avoid a multiplicity of certificates and endless detail work. The work of putting into effect the above outlined extension was deferred, however, for the reason that no adequate appropriation had been made to defray the expense thereof. 'rhe expense of putting into effect this and other proposed extensions will be suhstantial, but not more than the Grand Lodge can afford if it really wants a completely rounded out certificate plan. Each of the five members of your Committee on Ritual has been busy during the year in the furtherance of the certificate plan covering the three proficiency or candidates' lectures. It is unnecessary to go into lengthy detail as to the character of their work, hut it involves the writing of many letters, the sending out of application blanks, the appointment of examining commissions, and the careful checking of returned application blanks with the reports of the examining commissions. The names of all successful applicants together with the essential facts pertaining to their examinations must be entered on cards and placed in alphabetical card indexes. In addition to the general indexes there must be records of districts as well as of individual lodges, for ready reference in the appointment of examining commissions. Two lists of applicants who have received commissions as authorized instructors or who have become entitled to them since the last annual communication of the Grand Lodge are incorporated at the end of this report for the information of the Craft. The first list is of successful applicants for their first certificate, and the second of all successful applicants for their second or renewal certificates. We desire to thank Most Worshipful Brother Reader, our Grand Sec-


126

PROCEEDINGS OF

TH~

1947

retary, for his prompt and efficient help in having the certificates engrossed and in attesting, sealing and mailing them out. No requests have come to the committee during the year for rulings on disputed points of Ritual and therefore we have nothing of that nature to report. CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY

No. 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747

Name Lodge Arthur Loy Jones Shelbina Lodge No. 228 Edwin M. l!'isher St. John's Lodge No. 28 John B. Dugmore Hannibal Lodge No. 188 Gilbert P. Ellis Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Wayne H. Pickett East Gate Lodge No. 630 Harry E. Vick Gate City Lodge No. 522 George R. Duncanson Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Wal1lcr O. Engel. " Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Edward E. A. Johnson Westport Lodge No. 340 Harry W. Shapiro Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Robert A. Williams Swope Park Lodge No. 617 Ernest L. Klingler Alpha Lodge No. 659 Wayne A. Sharp Craig Lodge No. 606 John A. Huston '" Northeast Lodge No. 643 Levi C. Grumbine ~ Jamesport Lodge No. 564 Darrell O. Briggs Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Robert B. Meier Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Henry'R Turner Hebron Lodge No. 354 Wayne R. Hullett Westport Lodge No. 340 Raymond L. Craig Liberty Lodge No. 31 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 A. Lincoln Greene Taylor H. Nicholas Savannah Lodge No. 71 Virgil Atchley McDonald Lodge No. 324 Nelson K. Simmons Independence Lodge No. 76 James H. Cowan Kansas City Lodge No. 220 .Jewell O. Thompson Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 William P. Mathews Alpha Lodge No. 659 Max E. Bretschneider Temple Lodge No. 299 Fred L. Main Independence Lodge No. 76 John W. Scott. Albert Pike Lodge No. 219 Lewis R. Eastman Sheffield Lodge No. 625 .James A. Campbell. Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Harold L. Bassman Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Idris L. Garvey Gate City Lodge No. 522 James E. Manning Gate City Lodge No. 522 James A. Howery Triangle Lodge No. 638 Herman B. Tribue Swope Park Lodge No. 617 Tony M. rrhomas Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Charles S. Smarr Wayne Lodge No. 526 William O. Duncan Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Ralph B. Brogen Occidental Lodge No. 163 Grant A. Murry Westport Lodge No. 340 James W. Dunford 'rower Grove Lodge No. 631 James A. Riley Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 .John A. Welkener Algabil Lodge No. 544 Frank B. Markillie Orient Lodge No. 546 Loren E. Deaver ................â&#x20AC;˘ Orient Lodge No. 546


1947 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790. 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804

crRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

127

Ivan W. Dum Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Edwin H. Young Good Hope Lodge No. 218 Charles P. Crotty Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Ralph T. Jewell Valley Park Lodge No. 629 Virgil D. Allison Jefferson Lodge No. 43 William R. Salyer Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Avery W. Griffey Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Richard J. Eckert Westport Lodge No. 340 Fred A. Ueligger Lincoln Lodge No. 138 Elmer F. Peper Mount Moriah Lodge No. 40 Percy M. Best Liberty Lodge No. 31 Arthur H. Fredrick Northeast Lodge No. 643 Henry J. Hassfurther Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 Horace R. Acuff Westport Lodge No. 340 Hillard A. Striegel. East Gate Lodge No. 630 Joseph F. Janes East Gate Lodge No. 630 Charles T. Watts East Gate Lodge No. 630 Henry R. Cox Alpha Lodge No. 659 Ralph O. Shaw East Gate Lodge No. 630 Truett V. DeGeare Herculaneum Lodge No. 338 Hugh J. Todd Herculaneum Lodge No. 338 Clinton M. Laughlin Shckinah Lodge No. 256 Edward W. Ambo Bonhommc Lodge No. 45 Sidney C. Johnson Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 James T. Shillito Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 George G. Basnett Hannibal Lodge No. 188 Francis A. Ely Monroe Lodge No. 64 George H. Edwards Rural Lodge No. 316 Maurice E. Flentie Westport Lodge No. 340 Stanley C. Kuntz Wakanda Lodge No. 52 George I. Downing Wakanda Lodge No. 52 John L. Combs Jennings Lodge No. 640 Clyde Williams ..................•Joachim Lodge No. 164 Sam Ray Rowley Lodge No. 204 Ben F. Duncan Rowley Lodge No. 204 Forest L. Dean Rowley Lodge No. 204 Vincent A. Zoff Pilgrim Lodge No. 652 Arthur B. Vanlandingham Howard Lodge No.4 Willie R. Koelling Howard Lodge No.4 Ransome R. Scott Cooper Lodge No. 36 Walter Sayers Jackson Lodge No. 82 Max A. Canon Kansas City Lodge No. 220 Andrew T. Young Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Robert E. Michael, Jr " .. Joachim Lodge No. 164 Everett F. Feaker Kansas City Lodge No. 220 Lawrence Bene, Sr Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 Quinn G. Eubanks Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Herman M. Curtis Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Reuben C. Heim Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Al F. Hermeling Algabil Lodge No. 544 Rolla A. Hemphill Algabil Lodge No. 544 John E. Molly " .. Algabil IJodge No. 544 Oliver G. Hoffmeister Algabil Lodge No. 544 Ralph B. Trussell Bogard Lodge No. 101 Justus M. Bingham Bogard Lodge No. 101 D. Warren Minnis Bogard Lodge No. 101 Harry B. Craven ..............•.• Bogard Lodge No. 101


128 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858

PROCEEDINGS OF THE John H. Doernhoefer John R. Morris Harvey G. Sevits Otto C. Schroeder Alvin J. Cole, Jr Frank M. Brunscher Kenneth M. Kerby Norman R. Mahoney Virgil C. Lane Charles M. Sattell Benjamin E. Lollar Walter E. M. Rietman Sylvan A. Barton Davis N. DuBois Lloyd E. Marsden Earl Jones Lowell G. Stevens Edward H. Roorbach Robert H. Gaunt Frank J. Keck Arthur C. Mothershead Edward L. Thompson George W. Koenig Robert B. Snyder.' Joy L. Ortloff Dwight L. Woosley William R. Probst. George R. Crockett F. Earl Harding Willard M. Covey Fred W. Kocher Joe Edwards Robert L. Oliver Cecil F. Montgomery Leonard T. Gillham Samuel H. Crowe, Jr., Harry J. Miller Joseph A. Campbell Maurice E. Woodburn Rex L. Brooks Emanuel B. Schofield George F. Carr William L. Green J. Henry Bub George W. Evans Guy Patterson Horace C. Willoughby Orville D. Knight Edward B. Conwell, Jr Marion McC. Wolfe Earl G. Griffith Charlie B. Buckley Gazamell H. Cline L. Marshall Hollenbeck

1947

Algabil Lodge No. 544 Kirksville Lodge No. 105 Kirksville Lodge No. 105 Beacon Lodge No.3 DeWitt Lodge No. 39 Bogard Lodge No. 101 Bogard Lodge No. 101 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Rolla Lodge No. 213 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Cachea Lodge No. 416 Liberty Lodge No. 31 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Compass Lodge No. 120 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Westwort Lodge No. 340 Everton Lodge No. 405 Liberty Lodge No. 31 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Temperance Lodge No. 438 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Puxico Lodge No. 596 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Herculaneum Lodge No. 338 Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Westport Lodge No. 340 Rockhill Lodge No. 663 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Potosi Lodge No. 131 Sullivan Lodge No. 69 Potosi Lodge No. 131 Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Theodore Roosevelt Lodge 661 Carroll Lodge No. 249 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Temple Lodge No. 299 Northeast Lodge No. 643 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Four Mile I.Jodge No. 212 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310


1947

129

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI CERTIFICATES OF PROFICIENCY Series A-Renewals

No. A 1 A2 A 3 A4 A5 A 6 A 7 A 8 A9 A 10

All A A A A A A A A A A

A A A A

A A

A A

A A A A A A

A A A A A A

A A

A A A A A A A A A

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

Na~

Anthony F. Ittner William D. Rogers William J. Craig F. Ernest Carter Fred H. Johnson Fred O. Wade Wilbur P. Schnider James R. Irons Curtis F. Smith Paul L. Ward Freelon K. Hadley James A. Elgaard Carey A. Brock Erwin A. Hamann Jack C. Stewart John L. O'Brien William A. Slaughter Archie L. Fox J. Reay Jones George H. Davis Irvin J. Freiberger Charles W. Werdein Eugene T. McCullough George W. Reeves Howard F. Baker Charles E. Taylor, Sr George M. McAninch Charles W. Chaney Louis F. Dahn '" Ralph H. Davis Perry O. Sansberry Sidney E. Barr Gervis H. Thurman Stanley Horn Charles D. Sifford Claude R. White Floyd A. Morgan Cecil R. Shire Charles W. Whitchurch Ernest B. Kitchell Harry F. Heron Fred young Arthur W. Rauch Joseph M. Cross Brace E. Kitchell Joseph A. Halley William H. Cox Vernon V. Goslee Warren F. Drescher, Jr Clarence W. Crow John J. Drennon Arthur C. Klick

Lodge Missouri Lodge No.1 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Temple Lodge No. 299 Triangle Lodge No. 638 Friend Lodge No. 352 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Westport Lodge No. 340 Jacoby Lodge No. 447 Nodaway Lodge No. 470 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Nodaway Lodge No. 470 Lorraine Lodge No. 128 America Lodge No. 347 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Rural Lodge No. 316 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Lambskin Lodge No. 460 Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Canopy Lodge No. 284 Canopy Lodge No. 284 Lebanon Lodge No. 77 Novinger Lodge No. 583 Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Temple Lodge No. 299 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Fairmont Lodge No. 290 Wayne Lodge No. 526 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Jewell Lodge No. 480 Rural Lodge No. 316 Hebron Lodge No. 354 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 University Lodge No. 649 Cache Lodge No. 416 Cache Lodge No. 416 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Skidmore Lodge No. 511 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Solomon Lodge No. 271 Maplewood Lodge o. 566

II!


130 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Louis H. Helsher Paul E. Anway Joseph H. Anway Frederick E. Kiefer Oscar H. Jekel. Arno C. Cooper, Sr Ralph M. Mitchell Thomas H. Heape Thomas R. Summitt Morris A. N abe Julius R. Edwards Leroy Hambley Floyd B. Dennis Odell Colley Edward Merritt Charles J. Kreienheder Joseph H. Metz Collie Campbell Charles O. Smith August J. Hentz Gust F. Tuerkisch James E. Winterton, Jr Milas B. Hinton Bruce H. Hunt Harold L. Schmidt Edward H. August Homer Rearick Frank J. Metz John N. Orms George M. Morrison Jesse J. Brooks Laurance W. Jones Leland R. Hoffman Roy A. Hendrickson Frank M. Blair Ceeil W. Kirby Robert L. Fowlkes Rufus E. Noisworthy John B. Prosser Andrew Lechner James R. Stewart James W. Kennemer William E. Harris Russell C. McGhee Walter M. Rayburn Alonzo A. Harrison Hiram Stephens

1947

Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Triangle Lodge No. 638 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Westgate Lodge No. 445 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 Rural Lodge No. 316 Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Centralia Lodge No. 59 Gardenville Lodge No. 655 , .. Rural Lodge No. 316 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Gate of the Temple Lodge 427 Trinity Lodge No. 641 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Gardenville Lodge No. 655 Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Adair Lodge No. 366 Country Club Lodge No. 656 McDonald Lodge No. 324 Sheffield Lodge No. 625 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Wellston Lodge No. 613 , .. Swope Park Lodge No. 617 Swope Park Lodge No. 617 Fellowship Lodge No. 345 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Northeast Lodge No. 643 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Charleston Lodge No. 407 Gardenville Lodge No. 655 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Belton Lodge No. 450 Grandin Lodge No. 579 '" Wayne Lodge No. 526 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Four Mile Lodge No. 212 Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, Chairman. WILLIAM J. CRAIG, F. ERNEST CARTER, F. H. JOHNSON.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON HOTELS AND TRANSPORTATION

Brother William F. Miller presented the report of the Committee


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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on Hotels and Transportation, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: I hereby submit my report as Chairman of the Committee on Hotels and Transportation. I have made arrangements with various hotels here in St. Louis to accommodate members attending this meeting. The attached hotel circular has been prepared and copies sent to the Grand Lodge office, which copies in turn have been distributed throughout the entire State of Missouri. To date I have received various requests for hotel accommodations which have been made and confirmed with the secretary of the lodge reo questing the reservation. Fraternally yours, W. F. MILLER, ChairmlUl,. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES U. D.

Rt. Wor. Brother Charles W. Werdein presented the report of the Committee on Lodges U. D. The report was adopted and is ali follows: In June the Grand Master issued a dispensation for the organization of a Lodge in Clarkton, Missouri. The Committee has examined the books and records of Clarkton Lodge U. D. and highly commend the officers on the work done and records kept thus far. However, due to the late issuance of the dispensation and the limited number of meetings held since then, the Committee deems it advisable to continue the dispensation until the next session of the Grand Lodge. Respectfully submitted, CHARLES W. WERDEIN, ChOlirman, J. RENICK JONES.

ELECTION OF OFFICERS

The tellers appointed by M. Wor. Brother Cameron were announced, and the following officers were elected for 1947~1948: MORRIS E. EWING HARRY F. SUNDERLAND JAMES M. BRADFORD RAY BOND EDMUND E. MORRIS HAROLD L. READER

,

M. W. Grand Master R. W. Deputy Grand Master R. W. Senior Grand Warden R. W. Junior Grand Warden R. W. Grand Treasurer R. W. Grand Secretary

ELECTION OF DIRECTORS FOR THE MASONIC HOME

The following brethren were elected Directors of the Masonic Home: For term ending 1950: T. W. Cotton, W. W. Martin, DuVal Smith, Robert C. Winkelmaier. For term ending 1949: R. Jasper Smith. SPEOIAL REPORT OF THE WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE ON THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE GRAND MASTER WITH REFERENCE TO THE METHOD OF MEMORIALIZING GRAND MASTERS THROUGH A MEDIUM OF OIL PORTRAITS OR OTHERWISE, AND THE PROBLEM OF MAINTENANCE OF THE COLLECTION.

Rt. Wor. Brother Robert Mann presented a special report of the


132

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Ways and Means Committee. The report was adopted and is as follows: In view of the importance of this subject to many members of the Grand Lodge, and also in view of the aggregate expenditure involved, the Ways and Means Committee has attempted to give careful consideration to the various methods of acquiring and maintaining a complete gallery of pictures of our Grand Masters. The committee has found considerable variety in the manner of memorializing our Grand Masters during the several decades of our history, and the committee feels that there is a need of adopting a permanent policy on this question. The committee has therefore taken into account the question of cost, the question of the most desirable type of likeness, the permanency of such likenesses, and last but not least the convenience of those who are most interested in seeing these portraits, mainly the members of the Grand Lodge. The committee could not escape the conviction that although anum路 ber of the oil paintings in our collection are very creditable works of art, that unfortunately there are also a number which in our opinion are wholly inadequate depictions of our Grand Masters. We therefore investigated the cost of oil portraits which could truly be classified as artistry of the highest caliber. In this investigation it was apparent that we could obtain oil portraits in any price bracket imaginable and we therefore adhered to the requirement that the work must be of the highest caliber. The cost of such an oil painting would be close to $1,000.00 and certainly not less than $500.00. In the field of oil paintings it is our judgment we will be facing an expenditure of many thousands of dollars to complete the entire gallery up to this date. It is also our judgment that a great many of th.e oil paintings in our present collection do not adequately or accurately depict the character of the subject as he was known to his fellow members of the Grand Lodge, but rather represents the individual impression of the artist who did the work. We are advised by experienced art men that this will always be the case. In view of these findings, the committee also investigated the possi路 bility of using photographic portraits of the finest workmanship and we studied the relative merits of this type of gallery. We are advised that photographic portraits, if properly mounted, are not subject to deterioration with age. It is our judgment that they offer a more accurate likeness of the subject as we have known him. We also feel that such a gallery possesses a desirable quality of uniform treatment and at the same time offers the advantage of convenience to our members who desire to refer to the portraits of Past Grand Masters they have known or who desire to review or verify the succession of the various Grand Masters in office. It is physically impossible to organize our present collection in a convenient manner in one location. The collection is at present divided between different locations in our Temple, and does not lend itself to convenient inspection by those interested. We have investigated the facilities for housing a collection of photographic portraits in a setting to be built in the office of the Grand Lodge, and to be in keeping with the classical architecture of the Temple. Briefly, it would be an .enclosure constructed of the finest polished walnut, adequately lighted, and with the individual portraits mounted on materials of finest quality and arranged in order of succession. Our inquiry disclosed the fact that this type of installation has been used in certain government buildings of the monumental type, and also in some of the larger Masonic Temples of the country, notably in Detroit and Cincinnati. We estimate the cost of this installation, including the entire gallery of


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

133

portraits, at approximately $3,000.00. This installation is one that will suitably house the portraits of all Past Grand Masters, with provision to add additional portraits for many years to come. It can readily be increased by an additional unit whenever the size of the gallery warrants. The collection would thus display portraits of uniform size and quality. In view of our findings that this method is within our means and that it has the aforementioned advantages of more satisfactory likenesses and convenience to our members, we offer the following resolution: RESOLUTION

Be It Resolved, That the Grand Lodge adopt the use of photographic portraits of high quality and of uniform pattern for the development of a complete gallery of Grand Masters covering the entire life of the Grand Lodge and with provision for future additions, such gallery to be housed in a suitable enclosure, located in the offices of the Grand Lodge, and possessing excellence of design which shall be in keeping with the classical architecture of the Temple. Be It Further Resolved, That the sum of $3,000.00 be appropriated to cover the cost of the entire project. Respectfully submitted, H. C. JOHNSTON, GEORGE C. MARQUIS, E. E. MORRIS, ROBERT H. MA.NN, J A.MES M. DEWI'I"l'.

REPORT OF VISITING COMMITTEE OF MASONIC HOME

Rt. Wor. Brother Theo. Teel presented the report of the Masonic Home Visiting Committee. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, .A.. F. and .A.. M. of Missouri: Your Visiting Committee of the Masonic Home, appointed by Most Worshipful Brother Solon Cameron, begs leave to report as follows: Your Committee visited the Masonic Home several times throughout the year, and is pleased to report that it is recommendations made to Most Worshipful Brother Martin, President of the Masonic Home, have been carried out in their entirety, with the following exceptions: 1. It is your Committee's opinion and its recommendation that the equipment in the hospital building be replaced in its entirety with new up-to-date equipment. 2. The necessary funds approved, and bids let at the earliest possible date to replace present boiler room with boilers of the proper size to adequately heat the entire Masonic Home. 3. That an incinerator be purchased immediately for burning the paper which now lies in an open ashpit and is very much a fire hazard. 4. That the furniture and equipment, such as toilet fixtures, should be replaced at the earliest possible date, in boys' dormitory. We find general conditions at the Masonic Home of Missouri in good order and under good management and properly kept. THEO. C. TEEL, Chad.rman, HARRY A. HAGERTY. REPORT OF OOMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

Rt. Wor. Brother Lee Barger presented the report of the Com-


134

1947

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

mittee on Chartered Lodges. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: After careful examination and consideration of the annual returns of lodges, your Committee submits the following report: STATISTICAL

Number of Chartered Lodges, September 14, 1946 .......... 602 Lodge U. D. 1 Number of Chartered Lodges, September 10, 1947 601 Lodge U. D. 1 Total Membership, September 10, 1947 104,850 Total Membership in 103 lodges, September 14, 1946 98,963 Plus: Adjustments by audit of individual lodges 107 99,070 Total number Raised Affiliated Reinstated Less: Total number Dimitted Deaths Susp. N. P. D Susp. U. M. C. . Expelled

. 7,095 987 . . 1,137

9,219

. 1,013 . 1,865 554 . 1 . . 6

3,439

Net gain, September 10, 1947

5,780

104,850

COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Section 75 of our Constitution and By-Laws require that returns be in the Grand Secretary's Office on or before August 1 of each year. On that date this year 65 lodges had not filed their returns and of this number 58 did file a belated return by September 16 and seven lodges failed to file a return. Although our By-Laws provide penalties for delinquencies, we find that some of the offending lodges are the same ones, year after year. There can be extenuating circumstancs that would probably justify leniency in assessing the penalties, but it could hardly be an accident when the same lodges are continual offenders. There cannot be an excuse for so many offenders. An examination of previous reports by this Committee reveal that for many years this condition has existed, with very little improvement. The great number of secretaries attend to their duties with skill, fidelity and promptness and there is no good reason why a small minority should violate their installation vows and mar a splendid record made by an overwhelming majority of faithful officers. Needless to say that this careless attitude on the part of several lodges each year hinders and delays the work of the Grand Secretary in the preparation of his records and reports for the use of the Grand Lodge session. Therefore, we recommend that penalties for noncompliance be strengthened and adhered to. Recommendation number 3 of the Grand Master's 1945 address referred to an audit of the books and records of each lodge and that a copy be submitted with the annual returns, has been referred to this committee.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

135

It is only good business practice that the books and records of any or-

ganization be audited at regular intervals and a Masonic lodge is no exception. Your committee suggest that this requirement be made mandatory. In conclusion, we feel that the over-all record of last year's work in the various lodges of the state is commendable; that most lodges were busy, but not too busy admitting new members to prevent due attention to other activities that form a necessary part of Masonic duties. Respectfully submitted, R. L. BARGER, Chairmam. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON REVISION OF BY-LAWS

M. Wor. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Revision of By-Laws. This report was given very careful consideration, section by section, the brethren following the reading of the report from printed copies which had been distributed at the credentials desk. CALLED FROM LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called from labor at 12 :00 noon, until 1 :30 p. m.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON CALLED TO LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 1 :30 p. m., and the Grand Chaplain offered prayer. CONTINUATION OF REVISION REPORT

M. Wor. Brother Bigger continued the presentation of the report of the Committee on Revision of the By-Laws, which consumed most of the afternoon session. CALLED FROM LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called from labor at 4 :00 p. m., until 7 :30 p. m. CALLED TO LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 7 :30 p. m., and the Grand Chaplain offered prayer. CONTINUATION OF REVISION REPORT

M. Wor. Brother Bigger continued the presentation of the report of the Committee on Revision of the By-Laws, which consumed most of the evening session until 10 :50 p. m. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 10 :50 p. m., the Grand Lodge was called from labor until Thursday morning, October 2, 1947, at 9 :00 a. m.


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1947

THIRD DAY-OCTOBER 2, 1947 'THURSDAY MORNING, 9:00 a. m.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 9 :00 a, m" Grand Chaplain Haas offering prayer. ADOPTION OF REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON REVISION OF BY-LAWS

M. Wor. Brother Bigger resumed the presentation of the Report of the Committee on Revision of By-Laws, and moved that old Article XXI (Trial Code), now to be known as Article XXII, be considered a part of the report. The motion was adopted. Then on motion duly made and seconded, the report of the Committee on Revision of By-Laws was unanimously adopted, to become effective January 1, 1948. On motion duly made and carried it was then ordered by the Grand Lodge that the Constitution, By-Laws, Forms and Resolutions be printed in one volume, and the Trial Code be printed in a separate volume. (The report of the Committee on Revision of By-Laws will appear as the 1947 edition of the Constitution and By-Laws.) M. Wor. Brother Bigger then moved that the same Committee on Revision be continued another year. Seconded and carried. AMENDMENT PROPOSED

M. Wor. Brother Byrne E. Bigger proposed an amendment to Article XXII (Trial Code) so that when amended said Article XXII (Trial Code) will read as follows: (This Amendment is printed as a separate document and will be distributed to all the lodges.) REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

Rt. Wor. Brother George C. Marquis, chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Ways and Means. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A.. F. and A.. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee again reports the financial status of the Grand Lodge to be sound. Reports of the Grand Treasurer and Auditor, as of September 10, 1947, show bank balances of $120,411.34, and United States Bonds in the sum of $141,200.00. Continued conservative administration will insure our future. Savings were made during the past year in each item of the budget except those for fixed sums that do not vary. We commend those officers who were responsible. We recommend that United States Government Bonds be purchased in such an amount as the Grand Master, Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary and Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee may determine. We recommend the following appropriations:


1947

137

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURl

Printed Proceedings $ 2,500.00 Salary, Grand Master . 1,000.00 Expenses, Grand Master . 1,500.00 Maintenance, Grand Lodge Office . 1,800.00 300.00 Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers, on order of Grand Master .. Salary, Grand Secretary . 5,000.00 Salary, Grand Lecturer . 4,200.00 Expenses, Grand Lecturer . 1,500.00 500.00 Ritual Committee Expense . Office Help, Grand Lodge Office . 4,200.00 Printing, Postage and Stationery . 2,850.00 District Lecturers and D. D. G. M. Conference . 1,000.00 500.00 Salary, Grand Treasurer . 750.00 Committee on Masonic Review . 349.50 Masonic Relief Association, United States and Canada . 250.00 Telephone and Telegrams, Grand Lodge Office . 300.00 Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer . 600.00 Committee on Revision of By-Laws . 100.00 Reporter, Grand Lodge Session . Expenses, Grand Lodge Session . 1,900.00 Contingent: Grand Lodge Expense l"und . 1,000.00 227.81 C. K. Benson Audit Co. . . Expenses: To George Washington Memorial and Grand Masters' 600.00 Conferences . (Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master and Grand Secretary) Membership: Masonic Service Association . 2,048.50 300.00 Grand Lodge Officers' Conferences . Welfare Committee, Masonic Home Board . 2,500.00 500.00 Expenses: D.D.G.M. 's (at the order of Grand Master) . 265.00 Solon Cameron, reimbursement . Missouri Lodge of Research, for historical publication . 1,500.00 Mileage and Per Diem . 19,446.10 For care of portraits of Past Grand Masters as provided by resolution adopted . 3,000.00 $62,486.91 Because of inability to purchase, no appropriations have been made during the past few years for the customary Grand Master's jewel. An appropriation is not recommended at this time because of the exceedingly high cost. No appropriation was made last year to defray the expenses of the District Deputy Grand :Masters in the performance of their duties under the resolution adopted last year creating the new administrative districts. In August, 1947, the Ways and Means Committee authorized the Grand Secretary to pay these accounts, amounting to $1,090.54. Fraternally submitted, GEORGE C. MARQUIS, Chairman, EDMUND E. MORRIS, HARRIS C. JOHNSTON, JAMES M. DEWITT, ROBERT H. MANN.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS' REPORT

Rt. Wor. Brother Nat Jackson presented the report of the Com-


138

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

mittee on D.D.G..M.'s Reports. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters beg leave to submit the following report: There are now thirty (30) Administrative Districts) each in charge of a District Deputy Grand Master, in place of sixty (60) as formerly. There are reports from twenty-six (26) of these Districts, four failing to make a report. There were eight District Deputy Grand Masters who visited and reported on all the lodges in their Districts, they are the 7th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 15a, 15b, 16 and 24. The four failing to make a report are the 9th, 14th, 23rd and 27th. There are 603 lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction and reports have been received on 390, leaving 213 on which no report has been received. }'rom the 390 reports received your Committee has tried, from the limited information and the various viewpoints of those reporting, to divide the lodges according to their condition. It is realiwd that these figures are only a feeble attempt to arrive at some idea of conditions as a whole in this Grand Jurisdiction. Our results are classified as follows: 329 lodges reported as good; 42 lodges reported as fair; 19 lodges reported as poor. The report also indicates that a large percentage of the smaller lodges need instructions and that some way should be worked out to improve this situation. As a whole the reports received indicate most of the District Deputy Grand Masters are a sincere and hard-working group of Masons and have the welfare of the Fraternity at heart. Respectfully submitted, N. D. JA.CKSON, Chairman, CORNELIUS D. STRUBLE, JOHN H. HICKS, WALTER WEBB.

REPORT OF OOMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENOE

Rt. 'Nor. Brother Lew Gallant presented the report of the J urisprudence Committee which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Jurisprudence submits the following reports: I DISPENSATIONS

The several dispensations issued by the Grand Master have been referred to this Committee and we find them to be within the discretion of the Grand Master and are hereby approved. . II DECISIONS

The decisions of the Grand Master have been carefully considered by the Committee, and we make the following report thereon:


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

139

Decisions 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 are approved. Decision number 1 is hereby approved with this understanding: that the Building Supervisory Board does not have any inherent powers as set out in the third paragraph of the Grand Master's decision, but derives its authority from the Grand Lodge By-Laws alone. Decision number 2 is approved but we do not overrule action of the Grand Lodge in approving the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence in 1929. The facts in the two cases are entirely dissimilar and are easily distinguished from each other. We have a happy report to make to you on decision number 3. Pursuant to the orders of the Grand Master, representatives from Valley Lodge No. 413 and Whitesville Lodge No. 162 appeared before your Committee in person with their lodge records, and the brethren have succeeded in settling this matter entirely among themselves and peace and harmony prevails between the two lodges and their members. From all the facts ascertained from the records and the oral statements of the members we, therefore, recommend that the first paragraph of the decision of the Grand Master, found on page 15, be reversed, and John Wayland Todd be, and he is hereby declared to be, a member in good standing of Valley Lodge No. 413. That the officers and members of said Valley Lodge No. 413, having been heretofore reprimanded at the direction of Past Grand Master Bray, that no further penalty be inflicted. As peace and harmony now prevails between the lodges and their members, it is recommended that no further consideration be given to this unfortunate case. As to decision number 11, the same is hereby approved with this limitation: that the Worshipful Master does not have the power to "appoint" any elective officer, but he may request the assistance of any member of the lodge to act temporarily in a vacant office in the conduct of the business of the lodge. Decision number 13 is approved with this proviso: that if the ballot is taken by the usc of the ballot box, then before the voting takes place the ballot box must contain an equal number of white balls and black balls, and must contain enough of each kind so that every member voting shall have his free choice as to the kind of a ballot he shall cast. Decision number 31 presents a situation we desire to call to your attention. Section 251 provides that the Junior Warden shall conduct a trial on behalf of the lodge, and that he shall have authority to choose counsel to assist him. But we further hold that the Grand Master, as was done in this case, has authority to appoint counsel to act with the said Junior Warden, or his counsel, in the prosecution of the charges. Decision No.6. We recommend that decision number 6, of the Grand Master, be approved. In connection with this decision the Grand Master requested the Grand Lodge to establish a policy with respect to the right of lodges to use the services of radio stations to disseminate lodge news. In the case before the Grand Master, it will be noted that the radio stations reserved the right to edit news items furnished by the lodge. It follows, that under su~h an arrangement the lodge would have no control of the actual announcement transmitted over the air. Such an arrangement unquestionably would be bad. Independently of the foregoing facts, however, there Muld be no assurance that notices would be transmitted over the air, as furnished


140

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

by the lodge. It is well known that many radio announcers often depart from the text of the script. It follows that announcements could be transmitted over the air which might seem unobjectionable to the announcer and yet be annoying, objectionable or even hurtful to Freemasonry. We, therefore, recommend that it be the sense of this Grand Lodge that no radio announcement be used by any of our lodges. Respectfully submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGER, Chairman, KARL M. VETSBURG, C. LEW GALLA~T, RALPH V. WILSON, SA~I 'VII,COX.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS

W. Brother Henry Diller presented the report of the Credentials Committee. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grana Lodge, A. F. and A. F. of Missouri: Your Committee on Credentials is pleased to submit the following report: Subordinate Lodges represented .. '" There are in attendance: Grand Lodge Officers Past Grand Masters Grand Representatives District Deputy Grand Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Lecturers Past Masters Worshipful Masters Senior Wardens Junior Wardens Cl\airmen of Committees Distinguished Visitors

450 21 16 12 28 33 434 419 126 76 12 6

ACTUAL ATTENDANCE

Past Masters Worshipful Masters Senior Wardens Junior Wardens

434 419 126 76

Total

1,055 Respectfully submitted, HENRY G. DILLER, Chairman, JACOB ABAECHERLI, DR. JOHN F. BABER, FRED C. HEUERMANN, FRED H. KNIGHT, GEORGE A. McKEAN,

W. E.

TOWNSE~D.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM

W. Brother Walter Shrodes presented the report of the Committee


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

141

on Mileage and Per Diem. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Mileage and Per Diem at this session of the Grand Lodge begs to report allowances paid for mileage and per diem as follows: Grand Officers Past Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Masters District Lecturers Chairmen of Committees Committee on Jurisprudence Committee on Appeals and Grievances Committee on Credentials Chartered Lodges Assistant Grand Tilers Grand Total

. $ 644.20 363.40 . 898.20 . . 1,085.30 149.60 . 142.80 . 241.50 . 248.80 . . 15,612.30 60.00 . $19,446.10

Respectfully submitted, WALTER SHRODES, Chairman, HENRY A. STEINER, ERWIN A. HAMMAN, RUSSELL E. MURRAY, GEORGE W. PADDOCK.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS

W. Brother John Calhoun presented the report of the Committee on Unfinished Business. The report was adopted and is as follows: To the Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee begs leave to report that there is no unfinished business. (Signed ) JOliN CALHOUN.

THE GRAND MASTER: The next order of business, Brother Grand Secretary~

THE GRAND SECRETARY: Installation. THE GRAND MASTER: During the past year I have been true to my trust. Everywhere I went I ruined my clothing with this jewel. The hour has arrived for me to turn it over to one who is physically, mentally and morally much better qualified to wear it than I am. BRO. MURRAY: M. W. Grand Master: In behalf of the members of Missouri Lodge, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate you on having, what I think is an excellent year. I don't think any Grand Master has visited more Lodges than you have. I think no Grand Master has mingled with the brethren more than you have. I also would like to congratulate you on having conducted what I also think is a very excellent meeting here, with the exception of one thing. I remember in 1941 you told me when you were late to a scheduled


142

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

meeting, "My watch was wrong anyhow." 'Ve will accept that as an excuse, and some or all of the officers and some of the Past Masters and a number of the brethren have assumed to take care of that situation for you so you won't have that trouble any more, being late. I am pleased to present you in their behalf this twenty-one jewel Elgin watch which I am sure you will wear with a great deal of pleasure. (Applause.) THE GRAND MASTER: Brother Murray, the very fine box indicates that it is a very important watch. Brethren, it is a large box, and I take Bro. Murray's word that it is twenty-one jewel. That is a few more jewels than I have been able to assemble on my own account. It may be that the brethren selected this gift because they thought after my term as a Grand Master, I should have time on my hands. I have given my life, during this past year, to the Grand Lodge, but my first love has been and always will be Masonically with Missouri No.1, chartered, October 8, 1816. W. Bro. Murray, I thank you for all the brethren, because last year you gave me this hat. Thank you. Brethren, we will proceed with the installation. APPOINTMENTS ANTHONY F. ITTNER . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . R. W. Grand Lecturer EMMETT L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain SAMUEL THURMAN . . . . . . . . . . • • . . . • . . . . . . . . • . • .W. Grand Chaplain EDW ARD POTTS W. Grand Chaplain ALVIN J. LEE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W. Grand Chaplain HOMER L. FERGUSON Grand Senior Deacon RICHARD O. RUMER . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Grand Junior Deacon JAMES MCBRAYER SELLERS Grand Senior Steward ORESTES MITCHELL, JR• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Junior Steward WILLIAM J. CRAIG Grand Marshal HAROLD M. JAyNE Grand Marshal F. ERNEST CARTER . . . . • • . . , '" Grand Sword Bearer FRANK P. BRIGGS Grand Pursuivant PHILIP M. DONNELLY Grand Ora.tor ROBERT R. WRIGHT Grand Tiler

INSTALLATION

The hour for installation having arrived, M. Wor. Brother Ray V. Denslow, with M. Wor. Brother Bert S. Lee acting as Grand Marshal, installed the following officers, with the exception of Grand Orator and Grand Pursuivant : MORRIS E. EWING M. W. Grand Master HARRY F. SUNDERLAND R. W. Deputy Grand Master JAMES M. BRADFORD R. W. Senior Grand Warden RAY BOND :R. W. Junior Grand Warden EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. Grand Treasurer HAROLD L. READER R. W. Grand Secretary ANTHONY F. ITTNER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .R. W. Grand Lecturer EMMETT L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

SAMUEL THURMAN EDWARD POTTS ALVIN J. LEE HOMER L. FERGUSON RICHARD O. RUMER JAMES McBRAYER. SELLERS ORESTES MITCHELL, JR. WILLIAM CRAIG HAROLD M. JAyNE F. ERNEST CARTER PRANK P. BRIGGS PHILIP M. DONNELLY ROBERT R. WRIGHT

,

,

143

W. Grand Chaplain W. Grand Chaplain tW. Grand Chaplain Grand Senior Deacon Grand Junior Deacon Grand Senior Steward Grand Junior Steward Grand Marshal Grand Marshal . . . . . . . . . â&#x20AC;˘ Grand Sword Bearer Grand Pursuivant Grand Orator Grand Tiler

Following the installation, M. \Vor. Brother Cameron presented Grand Master Ewing with the Grand Master's jewel, and M. Wor. Brother Reader, Grand Secretary, presented the Grand Master's apron to Grand Master Ewing. On behalf of the Past Masters of the three lodges in Springfield, Rt. Wor. Bro. "William J. Craig presented Grand Master Ewing with a beautiful silk hat. BENEDICTION

.

The Grand Chaplain, after invoking the Divine Blessing, pronounced the Benediction. CLOSING

The M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri, rested from its labors and was closed in AMPLE FORM at 1 :00 p. m., this day, the 2nd day of October, 1947, no further business appearing, to meet again at St. Louis, Missouri, the last Tuesday, viz., the 28th day of September, 1948. HAROLD L. READER, Grand Secretary.


144

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

STANDING COMMITTEES 1947-1948 Jurisprudence-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; C. Lew Gallant, Samuel Wilcox, Henry W. Fox, R. Jasper Smith. .Appeals and Grievances-John F. Reinhardt, Chairman; Marvin E. Boisseau, William R. Gentry, John M. Gallatin, Robert W. Hedrick. Ways and MeaM-George C. Marquis, Chairman, one year; E. E. Morris, one year; Harris C. Johnston, two years; Robert H. Mann, three years; James M. DeWitt, three years. Credentia.ls--Elvin K. Luff, Chairman; John B. Vrooman, Robert D. Ellington, Jr., Jere Deal, Carl P. Westerhaus. Mileage and Per Diem-Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman; George W. Paddock, Charles A. Jobson, Edward E. Wilson, Edwin Knudsen. Chartered Lodg",s-Uobert Lee Barger, Chairman; Robert E. Armstrong, Charles C. Czechin. Lodges U. D.-Irvin J. Freiberger, Chairman; Andrew W. Herrington, Charles L. Gasper. Welfare-Tolman W. Cotton, Chairman; DuVal Smith, Byrne E. Bigger, Harry Theis, James W. Skelly. Masonic Boards of Relief-Paul A. King, Chairman; James W. Skelly, William H. Utz, Jr. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, Chairman; William J. Craig, F. Ernest Carter, Freelon K. Hadley, Bruce H. Hunt. Correspondenoe-Ray V. Denslow. N ecrology-EdlVard W. Potts, Chairman; Samuel Thurman, Alvin J. Lee, Emmett L. Robison. .A uditing-C. K. Benson & Co. Grand Master's .Address-Solon Cameron and all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business and Entertainment of Distinguished Guests-Frank P. Briggs. TraMportation and H otel-s-Sam A. Gilliland. SPECIAL COMMITTEES 1947-1948 Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Guy Million, Marvin Boisseau. George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association-Bert S. Lee, Chairman; Anthony 1<'. Ittner, Harry S. Truman. Building Supervisory Board-Cecil A. Tolin, Chairman; Harold Jayne, George J. Grossius. Revision of By-Laws-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; DuVal Smith, Ray V. Denslow, James W. Skelly, Harold L. Reader. Forms and Ceremonies-James M. Bradford, Chairman; Ray V. Denslow, Anthony F. Ittner. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman; Forrest C. Donnell, Willis .r. Bray. Library-Lawton E. Meyer, Chairman; John B. Vrooman, Robert Wright. LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION Name and Location Year of Service Arch A. Johnson, Landers Building, Springfield 1911-12 Tolman W. Cotton, Van Buren 1914-15 Bert S. Lee, 1224 Washington, Springfield 1922-23 William W. Martin, 5351 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis 1925-26 Anthony F. Ittner, 2353 South Compton Avenue, St. Louis 1927-28


1947

145

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Byrne E. Bigger, Courthouse, Hannibal William R. Gentry, 717 Louderman Building, St. Louis Ray V. Denslow, Trenton F. C. Barnhill, Marshall DuVal Smith, Court House, St. Joseph James W. Skelly. 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis Henry C. Chiles, Lexington Karl M. Vetsburg, 818 Olive Street, St. Louis (Suite 322) Harry S. Truman, White House, Washington, D. C Harris C. Johnston, Boonville Forrest C. Donnell, 463 Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C W. F. Woodruff, 825 Lathrop Building, Kansas City Willis J. Bray, 702 E. Normal, Kirksville Solon Cameron, Metropolitan Building, St. Louis

1928-29 1930-31 1931-32 1933-34 1934-35 1935-36 1937-38 1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-46 1946-47

DISTRICT DEPUTY G. M.'s

DISTRICT LECTURERS

1947-1948

1947-1948

1. James M. DeWitt, KirksvilJe 2. Russell A. Hauck, 320 So. 16th St., Unionville 3. H. H. Manring, McFall 4. Paul L. Ward, Maryville 5. Barent Springsted, St. Joseph 6. John J. Bowman, Liberty 7. Cornelius D. Struble, 1009 W. Gregory Blvd., Kansas City 5 8. Nat D. Jackson, 210 W. Maple Ave., Independence 9. Don Chapman, Chillicothe 10. Earl Cheesman, Carrollton 11. W. R. Howell, Monroe City 12. Vaden T. Wood, Canton 13. John R. Baker, Fulton 14. Ransom Breuer, Hermann 15a. Harry Gershenson, 506 Olive, St. Louis I5b. Elmer W. Schoenlau, 3933a Fillmore, St. Louis 16. Kermit D. Shelley, 6413 Page Ave., St. Louis 17. W. Frank Houk, St. James 18. Henry C. Thompson, Bonne Terre 19. Robert L. Fowlkes, Charleston 20. J. Fred Park, West Plains 21. L. B. Parrish, Bolivar 22. John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove

19. 20. 21. 22.

23. R. Jasper Smith, 821 Woodruff Bldg., Springfield 24. George F. Prater, Carthage 25. Finis E. Wrenn, Stockton 26. Ernest Browning, Appleton City

24. John W. Adams, Marshall 25. Ransome S. Scott, Boonville 26. Roscoe A. Miller, c/o Christian College, Colnmbia

1. Perry O. Sansberry, Wyaconda 2. Ernest T. Scofield, Kirksville 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Joseph W. Moore, Newtown Marvin W. Ewing, Trenton Carey A. Brock, Ridgeway Curtis F. Smith, Darlington James A. Elgaard, Maryville

8. Wayne A. Sharp, Craig 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Freelon K. Hadley, St. Joseph Chas. B. Whitchurch, Winston Emerson O. Boggess, Liberty John R. Blackman, Chillicothe Warren W. Dray, Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon David A. Leslie, Williamstown

16. Russell J. Rowe, Louisiana 17. W. Roht. Howell, Monroe City 18. H. Scott Welch, Higbee Arthur G. Lynch, Brunswick Charles Rutt, Carrollton Henry C. Noland, Parkville F. Ernest Carter, 5711 Locust, Kansas City 23. Camillus B. Waddell, Lexington


146

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

27. Charles C. Czeschin, Warrensburg 28. Roscoe A. Miller, Columbia 29. Virgil B. Saville, Jefferson City

1947

27. Cecil R. Shire, Mexico 28. Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City 29. Herbert J. Crosby, Winfield 30. Edwin H. Barklage, St. Charles 31. Wilbur P. Schnider, .Tefferson City 32. Ransom A. Breuer, Hermann 33. Thomas H. Heape, 5647 Neosho St., St. Louis 34. Claude R. White, 1701 Appleton, Independence 35. Thomas F. Herndon, Butler 36. Herbert W. Stark, Sedalia 37. Philip D. Trainer, Clinton 38. Oren Simpson, Richland 39. W. Frank Hauk, St. James 40. Robert E. Kleinschmidt, Hillsboro 41. L. B. Parrish, Bolivar 42. Clyde H. Tinsley, Eldorado Springs 43. Rayford B. Thomas, Harwood 44. Leland Roy Hoffman, Joplin 45. William J. Craig, 1035 So. Pickwick, Springfield 46. John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove 47. Wm. Z. Gossett, Van Buren 48. Francis E. Howard, Ironton 49. William T. Ruff, Jackson 50. Robert L. Fowlkes, Charleston 51. Robert L. Fowlkes, Charleston 52. Russell C. McGhee, Piedmont 53. C. Earl Armstrong, West Plains 54. Fred O. Wade, Ozark 55. Charles W. Werdein, Aurora 56. James E. Conell, Jr., Neosho 57. Cecil R. Bruce, 601 Landor Ct., Lemay 23. 58. William H. Brockman, Eldon 59. Francis S. Turner, 8309 Highland, K. C.

LIST OF GRAND SECRETARIES AND THEm ADDRESSES Alabama, W. E. Glazer, Box 98, Montgomery. Arizona, Harry A. Drachman, P. G. M., P. O. Box 229, Tucson. Arkansas, Woodlief A. Thomas P. G. M., Little Rock. California, Lloyd E. Wilson. P. G. M., San Francisco.

Colorado, Harry W. Bundy, 319 Masonic Temple, Denver. Connecticut, Hartford. Delaware, Chester R. Jones, 818 Market Street, Wilmington. District of Columbia, Aubrey H. Clayton, Masonic Temple, Washington, D. C.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Florida, George W. Huff, JacksonnIle. Georgia, Daniel W. Locklin, 801 Mulberry, Macon. Idaho, Clyde I. Rush, P. G. M., Box 1677, Boise. Illinois, Richard C. Davenport, P. G. M., Harrisburg. Indiana, William H. Swintz, P. G. M., Indianapolis. Iowa, Earl B. Delzell, Cedar Rapids. Kansas, Elmer F. Strain, P. G. M., Topeka. Kentucky, Alpheus E. Orton, 200 Shubert Building, Louisville 2. Louisiana, D. Peter Laguens, Jr., New Orleans 12. Maine, Convers E. Leach, Portland. Maryland, Claud Shaffer, Baltimore 1. Massachusetts, Frank H. Hilton, 51 Boylston, Boston 16. Michigan, F. Homer Newton, P. G. M., Grand Rapids. Minnesota, John H. Anderson, St. Paul. Mississippi, Sid F. Curtis, Meridian. Missouri, Harold L. Reader, P. G. M., 3681 Lindell, St. Louis 8. Montana, Luther T. Hauberg, Box 896, Helena. Nebraska, Carl Greisen, Omaha. Nevada, E. C. Peterson, P. G. M., Carson City. New Hampshire, J. Melvin Dresser, P. G. M., Concord. New Jersey, Isaac Cherry, Trenton.

147

New Mexieo, La Moine Langston, Albuquerque. New York, George R. Irving, New York 10. North Carolina, Wilbur L. McIver, Raleigh. North Dakota, Walter L. Stoekwell, P. G. M., Fargo. Ohio, Harry S. Johnson, P. G. M., Cincinnati. Oklahoma, C. A. Sturgeon, P. G. M., Guthrie. Oregon, Harry D. Proudfoot, P. G. M., 1119 S. W. Park Avenue, Portland 5. Pennsylvania, Matthew Galt, Jr., Philadelphia. Rhode Island, N. Arthur Hyland, 127 Dorranee St., Providenee 3. South Carolina, O. Frank Hart, P. G. M., Columbia. South Dakota, Elvin F. Strain, Box 468, Sioux Falls. Tennessee, T. E. Doss, Box 216, Nashville 2. Texas, George H. Belew, Box 446, Waco. Utah, E. Roy Gibson, P. G. M., Salt Lake City. Vermont, Aaron H. Grout, P. G. M., Burlington. Virginia, Dr. James N. Hillman, Richmond 20. Washington, John I. Preissner, P. G. M., Tacoma 3. West Virginia, I. Wade Coffman, P. G. M., P. O. Box 2346, Charleston 28. Wisconsin, William F. Weiler, P. G. M., 705 E. Wells Street, Milwaukee 2. Wyoming, Irving E. Clark, Casper.

Grand Lodge

Grand Secretary

Address

Alberta British Columbia

George Moore, P.G.M. W. R. Simpson, P.G.M.

Austria

Dr. Vladimir Misar

Canada

Ewart G. Dixon

Chile

Dr. Juan E. Pastene

Costa Rica

Enrique Chaves B.

Calgary Masonie Temple 692 Seymour Street Vaneouver, B. C. 149 Loekwood Sear Huddersfield, England P. O. Drawer 217 Hamilton, Ontario Casillo 2867 Santiago San Jose, Costa Rica


148 Cuba National Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia National Grand Lodge of Denmark England Finland National Grand Lodge of France

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Dr. Constantino P. Gutierrez Dr. P. Korbel Alex Troedsson Sydney A. White M.V.O. Eino Kyllonen (Acting) M. Vivrel

Guatemala

Oscar Paz Pinto

Ireland

Henry C. Shellard

Italy (Grand Orient) Grand Lodge of Jugoslavia Manitoba

Dr. Guido路Francocci

Mexico-York Grand Lodge Tamaulipas

Dr. Peter T. Pilkey, P.G. M. Carl E. Devries Severo Paredes

El Potosi

Ing. Jesus B. Hernandez

Occidental Mexicana

Joaquin Yanez Albarran

Valle de Mexico

Hector Bourges Patino

Cosmos of Chihuahua

Rigoberto Trevine

Campeche

Carlos M. Escobedo

Netherlands

Dr. A. A. Galestin,

New Brunswick New South Wales New Zealand

R. D. Magee

Nicaragua

Gregoria A. Tapia

Norway

Panama

O. BrinchmannHansen Reginald V. Harris, K. C., P. G. M. Jose Oller, P.G.M.

Philippine Islands

Antonio Gonzalez

Nova Scotia

James S. Miller H. A. Lamb, P.G.M.

1947 Apartado 72 Le Habana V-ll Bubenska, Prague, Czechoslovakia Blegdamavej 23, Copenhagen Freemasons' Hall London, W. C. 2 Vyokatu 9--B--14 Helsinki, Finland 8 Square Du Roule Neuilly, SUI'Seine France Apartado Postal 312 Guatemala Freemasons' Hall Dublin Rome Masonic Temple Winnipeg Apartado 1986 Mexico, D. F. Apartado 419 Tampico, Tamaulipas Apartado 104 San Luis Potosi San Luis, Potosi Apartado No.9 Guadalajara J aI. Mexico Apartado Postal 10 Artes Num. 53 Mexico, D.F., Mexico Apartado 171 Chihuahua, Chili. Mexico Apartado 17 DeCampeche, Camp, Mex. 22 Fluweelen Burgwal The Hague Saint John Sydney P. O. Box 2001 Wellington Box 14, Granada Nicaragua Frimurerlogen N. Vollgate 19, Oslo Freemasons' Hall Halifax Panama, Rep. of Panama 138 Guano St., Manila, P. 1.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Puerto Rico

Angel M. Torres

Rio' De Janeiro (Brazil)

Hely Franco Belmino

Sao Paulo (Brazil) Prince Edward Island Quebec

O. M. de Fleury

Queensland

L. A. McDougall W. W. Williamson, P.G.M. E. G. Radford

Rumania San Salvador

Humberto Acosta

Saskatchewan

Robert A. Tate

Scotland South Australia

W. King Gillies, M.A., LL.D. R. Owen Fox

Sweden

Eric Hallin

Swiss Alpina

Charles Serex

Tasmania Victoria

W. H. Strutt W. Stewart

Western Australia

A. E. Jensen

149

P. O. Box 747 San Juan, P. R. Caixa Postal 2215 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Caixa Postal 2611 Sao Paulo, Brazil Charlottetown Masonic Temple Montreal Box 675, K.G.P.O. Brisbane Segunda Calle Arienta 27 San Salvador P. O. Box 246 Regina 96 George Street Edinburgh Freemasons' Hall North Terrace, Adelaide Frimurareorden Stockholm Bogenschutzenstrasse 8 Berne, Switzerland Hobart 25 Collins Street Melbourne Freemasons' Hall Perth

NUMERICAL LIST OF LODGES-1947

I-Missouri 2-Meridian 3-Beacon 4-Howard 5-United 6. 7-0 'Sullivan 8-. 9-Geo. Washington 10-Agency 11-Pauldingville 12-Tyro 13-Rising Sun 14-Eolia 15-Western Star 16-Memphis 17-Clarksville 18--Palmyra 19-Paris Union

20-St. Louis 21-Havana 22-Wellington 23-Florida 24-Wyaconda 25-Naphtali 26-Ava 27-Evergreen 28-St. John's 29-Windsor 30-Huntsville 31-Liberty 32-Humphreys 33-Ralls 34-Troy 35-Mercer 36-Cooper 37-Hemple 38--Callao

39-DeWitt 40-Mt. Moriah 41-Bismarck 42. 43-JefIerson 44-Fair Play 45-Bonhomme 46-Wentzville 47-Fayette 48-Fulton 49-Holt 50-Xenia 51-Livingston 52-Wakanda 53-Weston 54-Index 55-Arrow Rock 56-Tipton 57-Richmond

â&#x20AC;˘


150 58-Monticello 59-Centralia 60-New Bloomfield 6I-Waverly 62-Vincil 63-Cambridge 64-Monroe 65-Pattonsburg 66-Grant City 67. 68-Kennett 69-Sullivan 70-Armstrong 7l-Savannah 72-Gorin 73-Eureka 74-Warren 75-Silex 76-Independence 77-Lebanon 78-St. Joseph 79-Polar Star 80-Bridgeton 81-Central 82--Jackson 83-Laclede 84-Webster Groves 85-Miami 86-Brookfield 87-Washington 88-Defiance 89-Friendship 90-Russelville 91-Madison 92-Perseverance 93-St. Mark '8 94-Vienna 95-Pomegranate 96-St. Andrew '8 97-Bethany 9B-Webster 99-Mt. Vernon 100-Ash Grove IOI-Bogard 102-Bloomington 103-West View 104-Heroine 105-Kirksville 106-Gallatin 107-Greenville 108-Altamont

â&#x20AC;˘

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 109-Stanberry 110-Marcus 11I-Trenton 112-Maitland 113-Plattsburg 114-Twilight lI5-Laddonia 116-Barnes lI7-Helena U8-Kingston 119-DeSoto 120-Compass 121-Erwin 122-Triplett 123-Hermann 124-lJnion Star 125-Gentryville 126-Seaman 127-Athens 128-Lorraine 129-Monett 130-Hume 131-Potosi 132-Farmington 133-Star of the West 134-Olean 135-Braymer 136-Phoenix 137-Delphian 138-Lincoln 139-0regon 140. 141-Amsterdam 142-Pleasant Grove 143-Irondale 144-Modern 145-Latimer 146. 147-Cass 148. 149-Lexington 150-Birming 151-Milton 152-Linn Creek 153-Bloomfield 154-Ionic 155-Spring Hill 156-Ashland 157-North Star 158-Mountain Grove 159-Green City

1947

160-Pleasant 161-Clifton Hill 162-Whitesville 163-occidental 164-Joachim 165. 166-Portageville 167. 168-Colony 169-Camden Point 170-Benevolence 171-Hartford 172-Censer 173-Gray Summit 174-Sturgeon 175. 176-Point Pleasant I 77-Texas 178-Griswold 179-Pride of the West 180-Pyramid 181. 182-Pilot Knob 183-California 184-Morley 185-Chamois 186. 187-Hermon 188-Hannibal 189-Zeredatha 190-Putnam 191. 192-Frankford 193-Angerona 194-Wellsville 195-Bolivar 196-Quitman 197-Carthage 19B-Allensville 199-New Hope 200-Sonora 20 I-Ravenwood 202-Westville 203-Brumley 204-Rowley 205-Trilumina 206-Somerset 207-Clay 208-Salisbury 209-Poplar Bluff 210-lJnionville


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

211-Hickory Hill 212-Four Mile 213-Rolla 214-Forest City 215-Hornersville 216-Hale City 217-Barbee 218-Good Hope 219-Albert Pike 220-Jransas City 221-Mystic Tie 222-La Belle 223-Ray 224-Hamilton 225-Salem 226-Saline 227-Cypress 228-Shelbina 229. 230-St. James 231-Cardwell 232-Polo 233-Bucklin 234-St. Francois 235. 236-Sedalia 237-La Plata 238-Rushville 239-Hopewell 240. 241-Palestine 242-Portland 243-Jreystone 244-Middle Fabius 245-Jrnobnoster 246-Montgomery 247-Neosho 248. 249-Carroll 250 . 251-Hope 252. !53-Laredo 254-Butler 255-Alton 256-Shekinah 257-Lodge of Light 258. 259-Lodge of Love 260-Mechanicsville 261: .

262-Holden 263-Summit 264. 265-Corinthian 266-Social 267-Aurora 268-Lodge of Truth 269-Brotherhood 270-New Salem 271-Solomon 272-Granite 273-St. Clair 274-Cold Spring 275. 276-Grand River 277-Wm. D. Muir 278-Essex 279-Hogle's Creek 280. 281-Fenton 282-Cosmos 283-Stockton 284-Canopy 285-Earl 286-Urich 287-Craft 288-Hermitage 289-Graham 290-Fairmont 291-Edina 292-Lamar 293-Sarcoxie 294-Mound City 295-Moniteau 296-Sparta 297. 298-Sampson 299-Temple 300-Doric 301-White Hall 302-Lick Creek 303-0sage 304. 305-Cecile Daylight 306-Ashlar 307-New London 308-Parrott 309. 310-Sikeston 31l-Jrearney 312-Cuba

313-Meramec 314-Pine 3l5-Jerusalem 316-Rural 317-0sborn 3l8-Eldorado 319-Paulville 320-Versailles 32l-Jonathan 322-Hardin 323-Cornerstone 324-McDonald 325-Dockery 326-Linn 327-Mt. Zion 328-Cainsville 329-. '" . 330-Paul Revere 33 I-Charity 332-Excello 333. 334-Breckenridge 335-Joplin 336-Hallsville 337-Blue Springs 338-Herculaneum 339-Fidelity 340-Westport 341-Rockville 342-Circle 343. 344-Moberly 345-Fellowship 346-Arlington 347-America 348-Wadesburg 349-Pollock 350-Tyrian 35l-Mosaic 352-Friend 353-Barnesville 354-Hebron 355-Adelphi 356-Ancient Landmark 357. 358-Northwest 359-Garrett 360-Tuscan 36l-Riddick 362-Hiram

151


152 363-Fraternal 364-Higginsville 365--Bayou 366-Adair 367-Barry 368-Crescent Hill 369-Composite 370-Williamstown 37l-Sheldon 372-Nonpareil 373-Belle 374-. . . . . . . . . . . . 375-Waynesville 376--King HilI 377-Ancient Craft 378-Berlin 379-BilIings 380-Queen City 38l-Ionia 382-............ 383-Pythagoras 384-East Prairie 385-Richland 386387-Woodside 388-Chula 389-Arcana 390-........ .... 39l-Raytown 392-Christian 393-Beehive 394-.. ... . . . . . .. 395-. . . . . . .. . ... 396--Western Light 397-Gower 398-Jasper 399-Pike 400-Decatur 40l-CartersviIIe 402-Malta 403-Lowry City 404-Rosendale 405-Everton 406-Malden 407-Charleston 40B-Montrose 409-Louisville 4l0-Iberia 411-Joppa 4l2-Appleton City 4l3-Valley

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 4l4-Greensburg 415-Hunnewell 4l6--Cache 4l7-Whitewater 418. 4l9-Star 420-Itaska 42l-Urbana 422-Gate of the Temple 423-Galt 424-Samaritan 425-Green Ridge' 426-RothviIIe 427-Glenwood 428. 429-New Madrid 430-Winona 431. 432-Competition 433-Mack's Creek 434-Wheeling 435-Rockbridge 436. 437. 438-Temperance 439-Mt. Olive 440-Trowel 44l-Excelsior 442-Burlington 443-Anchor 444-Ada 445-West Gate 446-Ivanhoe 447-Jacoby 448-Schell City 449. 450-Belton 451. 452. 453-Forsyth 454-Continental 455-Hinton 456-Wallace 457-Jonesburg 458-Melville 459-Hazelwood' 460-Lambskin 46l-Caruthersville 462-Santa Fe 463-CIifton

1947

464-Concordia 465-. 466--Southwest 467-Pleasant Hope 468-Red Oak 469-Plato 470-Nodaway 47l-Mineral 472-Pickering 473-Nineveh 474. 475-Golden 476--Mt. Hope 477-Henderson 478. 479-Rich Hill 480-Jewel 481-Marceline 482-Clintonville 483-Fairfax 484-Kirkwood 485-Coldwater 486--Cairo 487-Chilhowee 488-Lock Springs 489-Lakeville 490-Montevallo 491-Vandalia 492-Daggett 493. 494-Lewistown 495-Unity 496-Robert Burns 497-Equality 498. 499-Harmony 500-Jameson 50l-Buckner 502-Philadelphia 503-Prairie Home 504-Platte City 505-Euclid 506-Lathrop 507-Clearmont 508-Saxton 509-Van Buren 510-New Hampton 51l-Skidmore 512-Webb City 5I3-Senath 514-Granby


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

515-Galena 516-Milford 517. 518-0riental 519-Crane 520-Clifton Heights 521-Lockwood 522-Gate City 523-Stinson 524-Spickardsville 525-Cunningham 526-Wayne 527-Higbee 528-Conway 529-Apollo 530. 531-Lane's Prairie 532-Dexter 533-Comfort 534-Columbia 535-BlackwelJ 536-Ingomar 537-Bethel 538-Stella 539-Dawn 540-Winigan 541-Jacksonville 542-Ferguson 543-Mansfield 544-Algabil 545-Zalma 546-0rient 547-South Gate 548-Clinton 549-Carl Junction 550-Rose Hill 551-Pendleton 552-Calhoun 553-Clarksburg 554-Foster 555-Summersville 556-Prairie 557. 558-Moscow 559-Clarksdale 56o-Nelson 561-Cowgill 562. 563-York 564-Jamesport 565-Tebbetts

566-Maplewood 567-Miller 568-Naylor 569-Marlborough 570-Republic 571-Hayti 572-Rutledge 573-Bernie 574-La Monte 575-Easter 576-0live Branch 577-Ewing 578-Forest Park 579-Grandin 580. 581-Illmo 582-Koshkonong 583-Novinger 584. 585-Shamrock 586-Criterion 587-Branson 588-St. Francisville 589-Grovespring 590-;--Advance 591-Barnett 592-La Russell 593-Union 594. 595-Colc Camp 596-Puxico 597-Bosworth 598-Leadwood 599-Elvins 600-Cosby 601-Clayton 602-Acacia 603-Morehouse 604. 605-Walker 606-Craig 607~Eminence

608-Strafford 609-Warrenton 610-Clark 611-Centertown 612-Mokane 613-Wellston 614-Mt. Washington 615-Cbaffee 616.

153

617-Swope Park 618-Grandview 619. 620-Willard 621-Anderson 622-Norwood 623. 624-owensville 625-Sheffield 626-Magnolia 627. 628-Mendon 629-Valley Park 630-East Gate 631-Tower Grove 632-Belgrade 633-Archie 634-Steele 635-Greentop 636-Freedom 637-Mountain View 638-Triangle 639-Mizpah 640-Jennings 641-Trinity 642-Benj. Franklin 643-Northeast 644-Grain Valley 645. 646-Shaveh 647-Noel 648-Elmer 649-University 650-Parma 651-Cleveland 652-Pilgrim 653-Shawnee 654-Commonwealth 655-Gardenville 656-Country Club 657-Progress 658-Purity 659-Alpha 660-Holliday 661-Theodore Roosevelt 662-Clarence 663-Rockhill 664-Aldrich


154

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LODGES-LOCATIONS-DISTRICTS A No.

Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

District

602 Acacia Columbia ....••...Boone 28 444 Ada ,Orrick Ray . . . . . . . . .. 6 366 Adair Kirksville Adair 1 Platte . . . . . . . . .. 5 355 Adelphi ...........• Edgerton 590 Advance Advance Stoddard 19 Agency Buchanan 5 10 Agency 219 Albert Pike Kansas City Jackson 7 664 Aldrich Aldrich Polk 21 544 Algabil St. Louis 15-A 198 Allensville Allendale Worth 6 659 Alpha N. Kansas City Clay 7 108 Altamont Altamont Daviess 9 255 Alton Alton Oregon 20 St. Louis 15-A 347 America 141 Amsterdam Amsterdam Bates 26 443 Anchor University City ' 15-B 377 Ancient Craft King City Gentry 3 Harrisburg Boone 28 356 Ancient Landmark 621 Anderson Anderson McDonald 24 Missouri City ....• Clay 6 193 Angerona 529 Apollo St. Louis 15-B 412 Appleton City Appleton City St. Clair 26 389 Arcana Harris Sullivan 2 633 Archie Archie Cass 8 Dixon Pulaski 17 346 Arlington 70 Armstrong Armstrong Howard 28 Arrow Rock Saline 27 55 Arrow Rock Ash Grove Greene 23 100 Ash Grove 156 Ashland Ashland .Boone 28 Commerce Scott 19 306 Ashlar 127 Athens Albany Gentry 3 St. Louis 15-A 267 Aurora Ava Douglas 22 26 Ava B

217 591 116 353 367 365 3 393 632 373

Barbee Sweet Springs Barnett .....•...... Barnett Barnes Cabool Barnesville Ellington Barry .............•Washburn Bayou Bakersfield Beacon St. Louis Beehive Lawson Belgrade Belgrade Belle Belle

Saline Morgan Texas Reynolds Barry Ozark

27 29 22 ' 17 24 20 15-B Ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Washington 16 ,Maries 17


1947 No.

450 170 ~42

378 573 97 537 379 150 41 535 153 102 337 101 195 45 597 587 135 334 80 86 269 203 233 501 442 254

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

Belton Belton Cass Benevolence Utica Livingston Benjamin Franklin .. St. Louis Berlin ,Berlin Gentry Bernie Bernie Stoddard Bethany Bethany .Harrison Bethel .............â&#x20AC;˘Bethel Shelby Billings Billings Christian Birming Faucett Buchanan Bismarck Bismarck St. Francois Blackwell Blackwell St. Francois Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard Bloomington Bevier Macon Blue Springs Blue Springs J ackson Bogard Bogard ,Carroll Bolivar Bolivar Polk Bonhomme ,Ballwin St. Louis Bosworth Bosworth Carroll Branson Branson Taney Braymer ,Braymer Caldwell Breckenridge Breckenridge Caldwell Bridgeton ,St. John's Station. St. Louis Brookfield Brookfield Linn Brotherhood St. Joseph Buchanan Brumley Brumley ,Miller Bucklin ,Bucklin Linn Buckner Buckner J ackson Burlington Burlington Jet ,Nodaway Butler ,Bntler Bates

155 District

8 9 15-B 3 19 3 11 23 5 18 16 19 11 8 '" .10 21 16 10 23 9 9 16 10 5 21 10 8 4 26

C 416 Cache 328 Cainsville 486 Cairo 552 Calhoun 183 California 38 Callao 63 Cambridge 169 Camden Point 284 Canopy 231 Cardwell 549 Car I Junction 249 Carroll 401 Carterville 197 Carthage 461 Caruthersville 147 Cass 305 Cecile-Daylight 172 Censer

St. Louis Cainsville Cairo Calhoun California Callao. ; Slater Camden Point. Aurora ,Cardwell CarI Junction Norborne Carterville Carthage Caruthersville Harrisonville Kansas City Macon

15-A Harrison 3 Randolph 11 Henry . . .â&#x20AC;˘ . 26 Moniteau 29 ,Macon 11 Saline 27 Platte .. . . . . . . . . . . .. 5 Lawrence 24 Dunklin 19 Jasper 24 Carroll 10 J asper 24 Jasper 24 Pemiscot 19 Cass 8 Jackson 7 Macon 11


156 No.

Name of Lodge

611 81 59 615 185 331 407 487 392 388 342 662 610 553 559 17 U.D. 207 601 507 651 463 520 161 548 482 274 485 595 168 534 533 654 120 432 369 464 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519 368

Centertown Central Centralia Chaffee Chamois Charity Charleston Chilhowee Christian Chula Circle Clarence Clark Clarksburg Clarksdale Clarksville Clarkton Clay Clayton Clearmont. Cleveland Clifton Clifton Heights Clifton Hill Clinton Clintonville Cold Spring Cold-Water Cole Camp Colony Columbia Comfort Commonwealth Compass Competition Composite Concordia Continental Conway Cooper Corinthian Cornerstone Cosby Cosmos Country Club Cowgill Craft Craig Crane Crescent Hill

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Location of Lodge

District

Centertown Molino Centralia ,Chaffee Chamois St. Joseph Charleston Chilhowee Oak Grove Chula Roscoe Clarence Clark Clarksburg Clarksdale Clarksville

County

Cole Audrain Boone Scott Osage Buchanan Mississippi Johnson J ackson Livingston St. Clair ,shelby Rand01ph Moniteau De Kalb Pike

Excelsior Springs ..Clay ,Clayton St. Louis Clearmont Nodaway Cleveland Cass Thayer Oregon ,St. Louis Clifton Hill Randolph Clinton ,Henry EI Dorado Springs .Cedar Leeton Johnson Drexel. Cass Cole Camp Benton Colony Knox Pacific Franklin Wheaton Barry St. Louis ,Parkville 路Platte Competition Laclede Doniphan ,Ripley Concordia Lafayette Stewartsville De Kalb ,Conway Laclede Boonville Cooper Warrensburg J ohnson S~Lou~

Cosby St. Louis Kansas City Cowgill Canton Craig Crane Adrian

Andrew Jackson Caldwell Lewis Holt Stone Bates

29 13 28 19 29 5 19 27 8 9 26 11 11 29 9 13 19 6 16 4 8 20 15-A 11 26 25 27 8 27 1 14 24 15-A 5 21 20 6 9 21 28 27 15-B 5 15-B 7 9 12 4 23 26


1947 No.

586 312 525 227

157

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Criterion Cuba Cunningham Cypress

Location of Lodge

Alba Cuba Sumner Laclede

County

District

,Jasper Crawford Chariton Linn

24 17 10 10

Montgomery Livingston Lawrence Worth Shannon ,Jefferson Carron Stoddard Linn Webster

11 9 24 6 17 16 10 19 10 23

Daviess ,Jackson Mississippi Franklin Knox Clark Macon St. Francois Shannon Pipe Phelps

Chariton Franklin Dade Lewis Macon Oa pe Girardeau

9 7 19 14 1 1 11 18 17 11 17 15-B 19 15-A 10 14 25 12 11 18

Atchison Clark Polk . . . . . . . . . . . .. St. Francois Howard ,Jasper St. Louis St. Louis

4 1 21 18 28 24 16 16

D

492 539 400 88 137 119 39 532 325 300

Daggett Dawn Decatur Defiance Delphian De Soto De Witt Dexter Dockery Doric

McKittrick Ludlow Pierce City Sheridan Birch Tree De Soto De Witt Dexter Meadville Elkland

285 630 384 575 291 318 648 599 607 14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

Earl East Gate East Prairie Easter Edina Eldorado Elmer Elvins Eminence Eolia Equality Erwin Essex Euclid Eureka Evergreen Everton Ewing Excello Excelsior

Coffey Kansas City East Prairie St. Clair Edina Luray Elmer Flat River Eminence Eolia Newburg St. Louis Essex St. Louis Brunswick New-Haven Everton Ewing Excello ,Jackson

E

Stoddard

F 483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542

Fairfax Fairmont Fair Play Farmington Fayette Fellowship Fenton Ferguson

Fairfax Wyaconda Fair-Play Farmington Fayette ,Joplin Fenton Ferguson


158 No.

339 23 214 578 453 554 212 192 363 636 352 89 48

Name of Lodge

Fidelity Florida Forest City Forest Park Forsyth Foster Four Mile Frankford Fraternal Freedom Friend Friendship Fulton

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Location of Lodge

District

Farley Florida Forest City St. Louis Forsyth Foster Campbell Frankford Robertsville Mehlville Ozark Chillicothe Fulton

County

Platte Monroe Holt Taney Bates Dunklin Pike Franklin St. Louis Christian Livingston Callaway

5 11 4 15·B 23 26 19 11 14 16 23 9 11

G 515 106 423 655 359 522 422 125 9 427 475 218 72 397 289 644 514 579 276 618 272 66 173 159 425 414 635 107 178 589

Galena Galena Gallatin Gallatin Galt. Galt Gardenville Gardenville Garrett ,Arcola Gate City Kansas City Gate of the Temple Springfield Gentryville Gentryville George Washington .. St. Louis Glenwood Glenwood Golden Golden City Good Hope ,St. Louis Gorin Gorin Gower Gower Graham Graham Grain Valley. Grain Valley Granby Granby Grandin Grandin Grand River Freeman Grandview Grandview Granite Sedalia Grant City Gran t City Gray Summit Gray Summit Green City Green City Green Ridge ,Green Ridge Greensburg Greensburg Greentop Greentop Greenville Greenville Griswold Bellflower Grovespring ,Grovespring

Stone Daviess Grundy St. Louis Dade Jackson Greene Gentry ,Schuyler Barton Scotland Clinton Nodaway J ackson ·Newton ·Carter Cass ,Jackson ·Pettis ·Worth Franklin Sullivan Pettis Knox Schuyler Wayne Montgomery Wright

23 9 2 16 25 7 23 3 33-B 1 25 15-A 11 , 6 4 8 24 17 8 8 27 6 14 2 27 1 1 20 13 22

H

216 336

Hale City Hallsville

Hale Hallsville

Carroll Boone

10 28


1947 No.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

224 Hamilton 188 HannibaL 322 Hardin 499 Harmony 171 Hartford 21 Havana 571 Hayti 459 Hazelwood 354 Hebron 117 Helena 37 Hemple 477 Hendcrson 338 Herculaneum 123 Hermann 288 Hermitage 187 Hermon 104 Heroine 211 Hickory Hill 527 Higbee 364 Higginsville 455 Hinton 362 Hiram 279 Hogle '8 Creek 262 Holden 660 Holliday 49 Holt 251 Hope 239 HopewelL 215 Hornersville 4 Howard 130 Hume 32 Humphreys 415 Hunnewell 30 Huntsville

Hamilton Hannibal. Hardin St. Louis Hartford McFall Hayti Seymour Mcxico Rochester Hemplc Rogersville Herculaneum Hermann Hermitage Liberal Kansas City Eugene Higbee Higginsville Hinton Kahoka Wheatland Holden Holliday Holt Washington Lesterville Hornersville New Franklin Hume Humphreys II unncwell Huntsville

410 581 76 54 536 381 154 143 420 446

Iberia Illmo Independence Garden City Willow Springs Eldon Desloge Irondale St. Louis Kansas City

County

159 District

Caldwell Marion Ray

9 12 10 15-A Putnam 2 Gentry 3 Pemiscot 19 Webster 23 Audrain 13 Andrew 5 Clinton 6 Webster 23 Jefferson 16 Gasconade 14 Hickory 21 Barton 25 Jackson 7 Colc 29 Randolph 11 Lafayette 6 Boone 28 Clark 1 Hickory 21 J ohnson 27 Monroe 11 Clay 6 Franklin .......â&#x20AC;˘... 14 Reynolds 17 Dunklin 19 Howard 28 Bates 26 Sullivan 2 Shelby 11 Randolph 11

I

Iberia Illmo Independence Index Ingomar Ionia Ionic Irondale Itaska Ivanhoe

Miller Scott Jackson Cass Howell Miller St. Francois Washington Jackson

21 19 8 8 20 29 18 16 15-A . .. 7

J

82

Jackson

Linneus

Linn

10


160 No.

541 447 500 564 398 43 640 315 480 164 321 457 335 411

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Jacksonville Jacoby Jameson Jamesport Jasper Jefferson Jennings Jerusalem Jewel Joachim Jonathan Jonesburg Joplin Joppa

Location of Lodge

J acksonville Darlington J ameson Jamesport Jasper Jefferson City Jennings Jerico Springs Pleasant Hill Hillsboro Denver Jonesburg ,Joplin Hartville

County

1947 District

Randolph Gentry Daviess Daviess Jasper Cole St. Louis Cedar Cass J efferson Worth Montgomery Jasper Wright

11 3 9 9 24 29 16 25 8 16 6 11 24 22

Jackson Clay Dunklin

7 6 19 15-B 5 9 1 16 27 20

K

220 Kansas City 311 Kearney 68 Kennett 243 Keystone 376 King Hill 118 Kingston 105 Kirksville 484 Kirkwood 245 Knobnoster 582 Koshkonong

,Kansas City Kearney Kennett St. Louis St. Joseph Kingston Kirksville ,Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

222 83 115 489 292 460 574 531 237 253 592 506 145 598 77 494 149 31 302 138 326 152

La Belle Lebanon Laddonia Bell City Lamar St. Louis La Monte Vichy La Plata Laredo La Russell Lathrop Licking Leadwood Steelville Lewistown Lexington Liberty Perry Fillmore Linn Camdenton

Buchanan Caldwell Adair St. Louis J ohnson Oregon

L La Belle Laclede Laddonia Lakeville Lamar Lambskin La Monte Lane's Prairie La Plata Laredo La Russell Lathrop Latimer Leadwood Lebanon Lewistown Lexington Liberty Lick Creek Lincoln J~inn

Linn-Creek

Lewis Laclede ,Audrain Stoddard Barton Pettis Maries Macon Grundy Jasper Clinton Texas St. Francois Crawford Lewis Lafayette Clay Ralls Andrew Osage Camden

12 21 11 19 25 15-B 27 17 11 2 24 6 17 18 17 12 6 6 12 5 29 21


1947

161

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

No.

Name of Lodge

51 521 488 257 259 268. 128 409 403

Livingston Lockwood Lock Springs Lodge of Light Lodge of Love Lodge of Truth Lorraine Louisville Lowry City

Glasgow Lockwood Eagleville Lancaster Lock Springs Atlanta ,Ridgeway Louisville Lowry City

Location of Lodge

County

433 91 626 112 406 402 543 566 481 110 569 324 260 458 16 628 313 35 2 85 244 516 567 151 471 1 639 344 144 612 129 295 64 490 246 58 408 603

Mack's Creek Madison Magnolia Maitland Malden Malta Mansfield Maplewood Marceline Marcus Marlborough McDonald Mechanicsville Melville Memphis Mendon Meramec Mercer Meridian Miami. Middle Fabius Milford Miller Milton Mineral Missouri Mizpah Moberly Modern Mokane Monett Moniteau Monroe Montevallo Montgomery Monticello Montrose Morehouse

Mack's Creek Camden Madison Monroe St. Louis Maitland Holt Malden Dunklin Malta Bend Saline Mansfield Wright Maplewood St. Louis Marceline Linn Fredericktown Madison (Jackson Co.) J ackson lndependence Jackson ,Defiance 路St. Charles Dadeville Dade Memphis Scotland Mendon Chariton Eureka St. Louis Princeton Mercer St. Louis Miami. Saline Downing Schuyler Milford Barton Miller ,Lawrence Milton Randolph Oronogo J asper St. Louis St. Louis Moberly Randolph Humansville Polk Mokane Callaway Monett Barry J amestown Moniteau Monroe City Monroe Vernon ,Montevallo Montgomery City..Montgomery Monticello Lewis Montrose Henry Morehouse New Madrid

District

Howard Dade Davies Harrison Schuyler Macon Harrison Lincoln St. Clair

28 25 9 3 1 11 3 14 26

M

'

21 11 15-A 4 19 27 22 16 10 18 8 8 14 25 , 1 10 16 2 15-A . 27 1 25 24 11 24 15-A 15-B 11 21 11 24 29 11 25 13 12 26 19


162 No.

Name of Lodge

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

Location of Lodge

District

184 351 558 294 614 158 637 476 439 40 99 327 221

Morley Morley Mosaic Belleview Moscow Moscow Mills Mound City Mound City Mount Washington .. ,Mt. Washington Mountain Grove Mountain Grove Mountain View Mountain View Odessa Mt. Hope Mt. Olive Rogersville, R. 3 Mt. Moriah St. Louis Mt. Vernon Mt. Vernon Mt. Zion West Plains Mystic Tie Oak Ridge

25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 372 643 157 359 622 583

N aphtali Naylor Nelson Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton New Hope New London New Madrid New Salem Nineveh Nodaway Noel NonpareiL Northeast North Star Northwest Norwood Novinger

St. Louis Naylor Nelson Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton Elsberry New London New Madrid Winfield Olney Maryville Noel East Lynne Kansas City Rockport. Tarkio Norwood Novinger

163 134 576 139 546 518 303 317 7 624

Occidental Olean Olive Branch Oregon Orient OrientaL Osage Osborn O'Sullivan Owensville

St. Louis Olean St. Louis Oregon ,Kansas City Blackburn Nevada Osborn Walnut Grove Owensville

241

Palestine

St. Charles

County

Scott Iron Lincoln Holt Jackson Wright Howell Lafayette Webster Lawrence Howell Cape Girardeau

19 18 14 4 8 22 20 6 23 15-B 24 20 18

Ripley Saline N ewton Callaway Harrison Lincoln Ralls New Madrid ,Lincoln Lincoln Nodaway McDonald Cass Jackson Atchison Atchison Wright Adair

15-A 20 27 24 11 3 14 12 19 14 14 4 24 8 7 4 4 22 1

Miller " Holt Jackson Saline Vernon De Kalb Greene Gasconade

15-A 29 15-B 4 7 27 25 9 23 14

St. Charles

14

N

o

P


1947 No.

18 19 650 308 65 11 330 319 551 92 502 136 472 399 652 182 314 469 504 113 160 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 166 242 131 556 503 179 657 658 190 596 180 383

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Palmyra Paris Union Parma Parrott Pattonsburg Pauldingville Paul Revere Paulville Pendleton Perseverance Philadelphia Phoenix Pickering Pike Pilgrim Pilot Knob Pine Plato Platte City Plattsburg Pleasant Pleasant Grove Pleasant Hope Point Pleasant Polar Star Pollock Polo Pomegranate Poplar Bluff Portageville Portland Potosi. Prairie Prairie Home Pride of the West Progress Purity Putnam Puxico Pyramid Pythagoras

Location of Lodge

Palmyra Paris Parma Maysville Pattonsburg Wright City St. Louis Hurdland Doe Run Louisiana Philadelphia Bowling Green Pickering Curryville St. Louis Richville Bardley Plato Platte City Plattsburg Morrisville Otterville Pleasant Hope Conran St. Louis Pollock Polo St. Louis Poplar Bluff Portageville Portland Potosi. Gilman City Prairie Home St. Louis St. Louis St. Louis Newtown Puxico St. Louis Cassville

County

163 District

Marion Monroe New Madrid De Kalb Daviess Warren

12 11 19 9 9 14 15-B Adair 1 ,St. Francois 18 Pike 11 Marion 12 Pike 11 N odaway 4 Pike 11 15-A Douglas 22 Ripley 20 Texas 22 Platte 5 Clinton 6 Polk 21 Cooper 28 Polk 21 N ew Madrid 19 15-B Sullivan 2 Caldwell . . . . . . . . . . .. 9 15-A Butler 20 New Madrid 19 Callaway 11 Washington 16 Harrison 3 Cooper 28 15-B 15-B 15-A Sullivan 2 Stoddard 19 15-A Barry 24

Q 380 196

Queen City Quitman

Queen City Quitman

Ralls

Center

Schuyler ........... 1 4 Nodaway

R

33

Ralls

12


164 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of

Lod~e

Location of

Lod~e

201 223 391 468 570 479 385 57 361 13 496 435 663 341 213 550 404 426 204 316 238 90 572

Ravenwood Ray Raytown Red Oak Republic Rich Hill Richland Richmond Riddick Rising Sun Robert Burns Rockbridge Rockhill Rockville Rolla Rose Hill Rosendale Rothville Rowley Rural Rushville Russellville Rutledge

Ravenwood Camden Raytown Red Oak ,Republic Rich Hill Richland Richmond Buffalo Barry Gainesville Rockbridge Kansas City Rockville RolIa St. Louis Rosendale Rothville Dearborn Kansas City Rushville Russellville Rutledge

225 226 208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448 126 236 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 310 75 511 266

Salem Saline Salisbury Samaritan Sampson Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Seaman Sedalia Senath Shamrock Shaveh Shawnee Sheffield Shekinah Shelbina Sheldon Sikeston Silex Skidmore SociaL

Salem St. Mary's Salisbury Bonne Terre Lutie Santa-Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Milan Sedalia Senath Shamrock St. Louis ,Warsaw Kansas City Festus Shelbina Sheldon Sikeston Silex Skidmore Martinsburg

County

Nodaway Ray Jackson ,Lawrence Greene Bates Pulaski Ray Dallas Platte Ozark Ozark Jackson Bates Phelps Andrew Chariton Platte Jackson Buchanan Cole Scotland

1947 District

4 6 8 24 23 26 21 6 21 5 20 22 7 26 17 15-A 5 10 5 7 5 29 1

S Dent Ste. Genevieve Chariton St. Francois Ozark Monroe Jasper Andrew Buchanan Vernon Sullivan Pettis Dunklin Callaway Benton Jackson Jefferson Shelby Vernon Scott Lincoln Nodaway Audrain

17 18 10 18 20 11 24 5 5 25 2 27 19 11 15-B 21 7 16 11 25 19 14 4 11


1947 No.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

271 206 200 547 466 296 524 155 96 273 588 234 230 28 78 20 93 109 419 133 634 538 523 283 608 174 69 555 263 617

Solomon Somerset Sonora South Gate Southwest Sparta Spickardsville Spring Hill. St. Andrews St. Clair St. Francisville St. Francois St. James St. John's St. Joseph St. Louis St. Mark's Stanberry Star Star of the Wcst Steele Stella Stinson Stockton Strafford Sturgeon Sullivan Summersville Summit Swope Park

Springfield Powersville Watson Kansas City Southwest City Sparta Spickard Spring Hill. Shelbyville Osceola Wayland Libertyville St. James Hannibal St. Joseph St. Louis Cape Girardeau Stanberry Taberville Ironton Steele Stella " Stinson Stockton Strafford Sturgeon Sullivan Summersville Lee's Summit Kansas City

565 438 299 177 661 56 631 111 638 205 641 122 440 34 360 114 350 12

Tebbetts Temperance Temple Texas Theodore Roosevelt .. Tipton Tower Grove Trenton Triangle Trilumina Trinity Triplett TroweL Troy Tuscan Twilight Tyrian Tyro

T Tebbetts Smithville Kansas City Houston University City Tipton St. Louis Trenton St. Louis Marshall St. Louis Triplett Marble Hill Troy St. Louis Columbia Johnstown Caledonia

County

Greene Putnam Atchison Jackson McDonald Christian Grundy Livingston Shelby St. Clair Clark St. Francois Phelps Marion Buchanan Cape Girardeau Gentry St. Clair Iron Pemiscot Newton Lawrence Cedar Greene Boone Franklin Texas Jackson Jackson Callaway Clay Jackson Texas ,St. Louis Moniteau Grundy Saline Chariton Bollinger Lincoln Boone Bates Washington

165 Distriet

23 2 4 7 24 23 2 9 11 26 1 18 17 12 5 15-A 18 3 : .26 18 19 24 24 25 23 28 14 22 8 7 11 6 7 22 15-A 29 15-B 2 15-A 27 15-A 10 18 14 15-B 28 26 16


166

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1947

U No.

593 124 210 5 495 649 421 286

Narne of Lodge

Union Union Star Unionville United Unity University Urbana Urich

Location of Lodge

Union Union-Star Unionville Springfield Richards University City Urbana Urich

County

District

Franklin De Kalb Putnam Greene Vernon ,St. Louis Dallas Henry

14 9 2 23 25 15·A 21 26

Andrew ,St. Louis Carter Audrain Morgan Maries Clinton

5 16 17 11 29 17 6

V

413 629 509 491 320 94 62

Valley Valley Park Van Buren Vandalia Versailles Vienna Vincil

Bolckow ValJeyPark Van Buren Vandalia Versailles Vienna Cameron

348 52 605 456 74 609 87 61 526 375 512 98 84 22 613 194 46 445 103 396 15 53 340 202 434 301 417 162

Wadesburg Wakanda Walker Wallace Warren Warrenton Washington Waverly Wayne Waynesville Webb City Webster Webster Groves Wellington Wellston Wellsville Wentzville West Gate West View Western Light Western Star Weston Westport WestviUe Wheeling White HalL Whitewater Whitesville

Creighton Cass 8 Carrollton Carroll 10 Walker Vernon 25 Bunceton Cooper 28 Keytesville Chariton 10 Warrenton Warren 14 Greenfield Dade 25 Waverly Lafayette 6 Piedmont Wayne 20 Waynesville Pulaski 21 Webb City Jasper 24 Marshfield Webster 23 Webster Groves St. Louis 16 De Kalb Buchanan 5 St. Louis 16 Wellston Wellsville Montgomery 13 Wentzville St. Charles .....••.•1' St. Louis 15-B Millersville Cape Girardeau 18 Louisburg Dallas 21 Winston , .Daviess 9 Weston ..•........ Platte 5 Kansas City Jackson 7 Westville Chariton 10 Livingston ...•.•••• 9 Wheeling Barnard Nodaway 4 Whitewater Cape Girardeau 18 Whitesville Andrew ...........• 5

w


1947 No.

620 370 29 540 430 277 387 24

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

Willard Williamstown Windsor Winigan Winona Wm. D. Muir Woodside Wyaconda

Willard Williamstown Windsor Winigan Winona Pilot Grove Thomasville La Grange

50

Xenia

Hopkins

563

york

Kansas City

County

167 District

Greene Lewis Henry Sullivan Shannon Cooper Oregon Lewis

23 12 26 2 17 28 20 12

Nodaway

4

Jackson

7

x Y

Z

545 189

Zalma Zeredatha

Zalma St. Joseph

Bollinger Buchanan

18 5


;....l

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATDJ:B!rr

0)

00

FIRST ADMINSTRATIVE DISTRICT-JAMES M. DeWITT, D. D. G. M., Kirksville, Mo. Ritual District No.1

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

I] III

~

C

.... Fairmont, 290 ............ Eldorado, 318 ............ Hiram. 362 ............... St. Francisville, 688 .•••.. Memphis, 16 ............. Gorin, 72 ................ Rutledge, 572 ............. Middle-Fabius. 244 ........ Lodge of Love. 259 ........ Queen City. 380 .......... ' Glenwood, 427 ............ Greentop, 635 ............ TOTAL .............

7 4 12 4 6 2 6 3 5

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... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... 1 .... 2 .... ... 5~'''7'''4'''i 4 1 .... 4 6 ........ 1 .... 2 7 ........ 6 3 •.• ... 2 2 .... 1 4 1 .... ... 2 1 •.• 5 ... .( 4 1 ••• 1 . . . . . . . 2 .... ' ... 6 8 1 ..• 21 1 ... 4 1 1 •.• 1 .... \... 2 11 .. ·· ..• 21'" ....... ..• · ... 1... 431 421 41 ..• 1... 61 101 81 171

...

...;I... ~ 681

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168.001$ 168.00 140.70 140.701 50 241.50 241. 193.20 196.30 1 352.90 362.90 123.901 123.90 128.1. 128.10 70 142.80 142.80 127 258.301 258.30 62 130.20 130.20 59 128.10 128.10 591 ........• 1...•..... 1,0301$ 2,009.801$ 2,007.70 78 $ 67 U6 96 178 59

1lO

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$ ....... $ .... $

........ ....... . ..... 2.10 . ....... ...... · . . . . . .. ......

· ..... ··1 .. . . . . ..... "'1 ......

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63.36 $ 167.70 43.76 226.00 386.00 25.00

, ••01

~t§

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40.00 120.00 40.00 60.00 20.00

'•.•0

~

7.00 4.00 12.00 4.00 6.00 2.00

'.•0

40.00 4.00 50.00 6.00 I.. .. . .. .. 40.00 4.00 40.001 4.00 · . . . . . .. • ..... 1......... 1 ........ ····.·/··· .... ··1 •..... ···1·· ... ··· $ 2.101$ .... 1$ 948.801$ 570.001$ 67.00

·....."I"....

· . . . . . .. ......

81.00 12.00

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Ritual District No.2 Kirksville, 105............ 27 Adair. 366... 48 Novinger. Colony, 168583................

19 51 3

Edina, 291. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PaulvilIe, 319............. 8 Greensburg, 414... 6 TOTAL I 911

1 5 2 811

20 2 46 2 2....

10 9/ 6/ 41 9 13 7 71 8. "1' .. 1I..

"I"

1 . 1 .

'1'"

.. 3 ..•. 1 11 61' " .1 .. 3 2 .... 11 ... ·· .. I••• '" 1.... 1 2 1 21 . 751 61 241 361 191 131 1•••

330 $ 705.601$ 705.60 $ ....... 1$ $ ........ 1$ 270.00\$ 421 886.201 886.20. . . . . . .. 156.00 480.00 •.•... 120.00 •....... 61 128.10 128.10 20 89.90 39.90 27.00 10.00 114 231.00 233.10. . . . . . . . 2.10 95.00 20.00 76 157.50 157.50 . . . . . . .. •.•.•. 31.50 80.00 92 195.301 195.30. . . . . . .. 145.20 60.00 1,1141$ 2.348.601$ 2,345.70 $ 1$ 2.101$ 574.701$ 920.001$

'1'

27.00 48.00

.

1.00 2.00 8.00 6.00 92.00

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SECOND ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-CLYDE C. EVANS, D. D. G. M., Trenton, Mo. Ritual District No.3 Hartford, 171 ...•........ Somerset, 206 ............ Unionville, 210 ........... Humphreys, 32 ........... Seaman. 126 ............. Green City, 159 ..•...•.... Putnam, 190 ......•..•... Pollock, 349 ..•........... Arcana, 389 .............. Winigan, 540 ..•.......... TOTAL .............

3 6 10 1 7 3 5 5 1 401

3 4 16 10 2 1 2 2 1 411

31·· .. 1 , .... 1 15 2

1 ... 1.. ·1 .... 1... 1...

1 4

11 .• ·1

2

2

21·· .1 ..•

31 ... I...

............ "'-!-""I"".I... '1' ..

3 1 2 1 .. 13 .... 2 .... 1 2 1 2 1 ...... 1 .... 1 1 1 31 41 ...... 1· ... 1· .. ·1 .. · 2 .... 1. . . 1 . . . 21' ... /.... 1.. ·\ 11 .... · .. 1.. · 1 .... 1.... 1 11 ... 1 . . . . 1· .. 1.. · 431 21 121 81 121 111 ... 1... 1

661$ 134.401$ 134.30 92.40 42 90.301 348.60 164 1 348.601 81.90 81.901 39 388.50 183 388.501 190.80 91 190.801 273.00 128 1 273.001 102.10 102.901 501 92.40 92.401 441 132.30 132.301 651 8721$ 1,835.101$ 1,836.30

-l

3.00 30.001$ 5.00 50.001 10.00 100.001 1.00 10.001 7.00 70.00/ 30.001 3.00 •••••• " •••••• 1••••••••• , 50.00 6.00 .80/ ...... ( 3.50 ......... /........ ........ ...... 16.00\ 50.001 5.00 ........ 1 ...... 45.00 10.001 1.00 $ .901$ 2.10/$ 89.501$ 400.001$ 40.00 $

.101$

.. .. 1$

25.001$

::::::::I...2:~~1::::::::: I ::::::::1 ::::::1:::::::::1 ........ / ...... I· ........ I

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Ritual Distirct No.4 Trenton, 111. .•.......... Laredo, 253 ..•........... Galt, 423 ................. Spickardsville. 524 ........ Mercer, 35 ............... TOTAL .............

:::11 351

!I

291

1~1'1.... ·.'1.· ..11... 7 .... \ "'1;1 9 301

41 51

'1'"

11" 331 .......... 1 .... 1... 1... 2/ .. ·1 .. · 3 ... 31 .... 1 . . . 1... 81 21 121 31 ... 1.. •

2/

625.801$ 636.30 47 115.501 115.50 90 186.901 186.90 44 94.501 94.50 187 365.501 363.40 6751$ 1,388.201$ 1.396.60

'OT

$ ....... /$ 10.501$ ........ 1 ...... 1 ........ 1 ...... / ........ 1 • • • • • • 2.101 ...•.. \ $ 2.101$ 10.501$

270.001$ 130.001$ 13.00 32.00\ ......... I........ 80.20 140.001 14.00 120.001 ......... 1........ 28.751 80.001 8.00 530.951$ 350.001$ 35.00

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THIRD ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-C AREY A. BROCK, D. D. G. M., Ridgeway, Mo. Ritual District No.5 Bethany, 97 .............. Lorraine, 128 ............ Lodge of Light, 257 ....... Cainesville, 328 ........... New Hampton, 610 ....... Prairie, 656 .............. TOTAL .............

14 6 4 7 6 4 391

10 4 3 6 6

4 321

'1 1 ... 1....

7 5

5 5 3 261

21 1

4\.... 1•.• 1.•. 3 .... 1...... 41 • .... 1... 1. . . 1... 11 .... 1... 1... 2

21 1

2 1 .... 1 2 ... 1.... 1... 1... 11 .... 1... 1 11 .... 1... 1... 71 41 91 121 .... 1... 1...

125 $ 50 32 52 66 52 3771$

260.401$ 109. 20 1 65.10 109.10\ 138.601 107.101 789.601$

260.40 115.50 ~::::::: \$ '6'.301$ 60.90 4. 20 1 . . . . . . I 111.30 ........ 2.201 138.60 .. ...... 1 ...... 1 107.10 ........ I ...... 793.80$ 4.201$ 8.501$

366.001$ 67.20\ 66.00 40.001 70.00\ 48.00 635.201$

P:l H

130.001$ 50.001 30.001 70.00 60.001 40.001 370.001$

13.00 6.00 3.00 7.00 5.QO 4.00 37.00

~

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

-:]

o

Ritual District No.6

I NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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31 161 1 10 3 3 41 10\ 8 7 7\

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Havana, 21............... Stanberry. 109. Gentryville, 125........... Athens. 127. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ancient Craft, 377.. .. .. .. Berlin. 378... Jacoby, 447.. .. . .. .. .. .. . Grant City. 66............ Defiance. 88.. .. . .. . .. .. .. Allensville, 198.. .. .. .. . .. Jonathan. 321............ TOTAL.............

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3 61" .. \ \ \ 2\ \ \.. . 8 9 21 1 1 ' 21 11' "1'" 1 11.... 1 ... 1 11.......... 6 10j 31 2 31 31 21 1.. . 3 5 91 1 3 41" .. I 1.. . 3 3 41 1 1 81 1.· .J. . . 5 8 I. .. . 2 1 1... ... 16111 1 1/ 11 1.. 001 10 9/ 11 2( 21 1 21' .. 1. . . 7 7 11 1 I.... ... 4 5\ 1.... 11 \ \ \... 651 741 201 101 211 121 51 1. . . :

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441$ 86.10\$ 86.10 $ 1$ .. , ·1$ 16.00 $ 139 294.001 298.20 ·····1 4.201.·.· 36 69.30 67.20 2.10 1 8.00 149 312.901 312.90 \ ,. . . . . . . . . 116 243.60/ 243.60 1 •••••• ••••••••• 37 73.50 73.50 ········1 J......... 64 132.301 132.30. .. .. .. .. 00 98.00 114 241.601 241.50 \ \ 100.001 62 126.00\ 126.00. . . . . . .. . ·1 70.80 61 136.50 136.50 1 1 48.401 62 128.101 128.101 \ \ 8.00\ 8831$ 1,843.801$ 1.845.901$ 2.101$ 4.201$ 348.201$

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30.00\$ 150.001 10.001 100.001 60.001 30.001 40.001 110.001 80.00/ 70.00 70.00\ 750.001$

q)

3.00 15.00 1.00 10.00 5.00 3.00 4.00 11.00 8.00 7.00 7.00 74.00

41 5 2

31 7 3 1

131 19 4 3 7 571

8 19 7 2 7 671

4/ 8 31 1 '"

.j....

1.... 2 1....... 1 2 1

6 1 18 7 61· .. · 2 . 4 511 81

1 3 2 1

1 7

1 1 91 181

41 21 .. ·1 . 11 1 .. 1 1 2. . .. . .. 1 1 . 1 2 1 . 4 3 1 . 1···1··· 1 .. " '" .. , 11 .. 161 71 1 .

I

1. ..

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108 $ 220.501$ 220.50 $ 1$ 1$ 44 88.20 88.20 78 161.70 161.70 . . 38 81.90 81.90 . . 21 44.10 44.10 . . 46 96.601 96.60 331 676.10 676.10 00...... . r • . . . 36 77.70 79.80 2.10 52 111.30 109.20 2.10 . 197.40 ..... . . . 2.10 95 195.30 2.101$ 4.201$ 8491$ 1,753.401$ 1.756.50 $

'1'

.

135.00 $ 6.00 127.00 56.00 7.80 48.40 76.80 30.80 8.70 165.00 661.50\$

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FOURTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-PAUL L. WARD, D. D. G. M., Maryville, Mo. Ritual Dis trict No. 7 Xenia. 50................ Quitman. 196... .. Ravenwood.20l.......... Graham. 289. . . . . . . . . . . .. White Hall. 301. Burlington. 442.... . Nodaway, 470............ Pickering. 472............ Clearmont. 507. . . . . . . . . . . Skidmore. 511............ TOTAL.. .. .. .. .. .. .

'"0

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40.001$ 60.001 30.00

4.00 5.00 3.00

1

..

120.001 190.00 40.00 30.00 80.00 580.001$

. 12.00 19.00 4.00 8.00 8.00 58.00

~ ~

~

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Ritual DIstrict Xo~ S North Star. 157 •......... , Sonora. 200. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northwest. 358 Fairfax. 483... Maitland, 112............ Oregon. 139. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forest City. 214 Mound City. 294.......... Craig.606 TOTAL.. .. .. . .. .. ..

11 10 6 4 5 5 9 9 7 12 3 3 ·1···· 91 61 1 511 481

81 11 11· ··1 11· .. ·1· . -I· .• 3 4 .... \•.• \... 1 I 1_ •• 5 j 21 11 1 1 . 61 2 31 2 2 1 1· .. 11.... 21 ... I. 5 2 1 '" 11 I. _. _.. j 2111 1 I..• 1..• 51 3 .... ... 21 I. - ·1 ... 1 ..• 31 1..• 1•.• 431 121 121 31 121 1• . • 1. . .

1 21.

'-1'"

14a $ 296.101$ 29.6.1{) 5Z 109.20 10~UO 83 176.40 l'rL40 1200 %49..99 24'!t.!O 58 123.90 lK.OO 85· 180..68 180.60 68 144.90. lA.S!) 99" 206.80 Z'K.800 47 98.70 98.70 7561$: l.585•.601$ l,59UlO

$

1$ /

i$ 1016.(')1() $ 1.. . •. . . . . 5.40

lIo.OOIS

11.00 70.00 7.00 50.001 5.00 ••.•..... 90.00 9.00 "'1 2.1(} Z37.00 15.00 7G.00 7.00 10.00 3.00 ... 8.40 121.701" ....... I........ . . . . . . .. 75.00 100.00\ 10.00 85..40 10,00 1.00 $ 1$' 10.SO'I$: 594.501$ 530.001$ 53.00

......•.

FIFTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-cARL DIXON, D. D. G. M., C.oshy. Mo. Ritual District No. 9 Savannah.7l............ 7 9 9 1 . . . . 1. . . . 1 11 11 31 ... 1 . . . Helena. 117. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 21. . . . 4 ... , ... 1 I.. Lincoln, 138.............. 5 5 6 .... 1 '" 31 1 . Whitesville. 162... 3 2 2 1 1 11 11 11' .. I . Rosendale, 404. . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 2 .... 2 . .. 1.... .. Valley.413............... 4 4 4 2\ 1 ,. Cosby.600............... 5 4 4 21 1 1 . Agency. 10.. . 4 4 4 1 1... 4 .. "1" .\ . Wellington, 22........... 2 2.... 2 1••••..•••• St. Joseph. 78............ 61 64 65 6 7 2 61 11 ... 1... Binning. 160. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1 .... 1 1 1 ... , .... I.. Zeredatha. 189........... 58 62 73 3 10 2 15 41 .. Rushville. 238. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 2 ... . 2 1 21 I 1..• Brotherhood. 269.. .. . .. .. 27 26 25 3 2 2 71 , .. '1' .. Charity. 331. .. . . .. .. .. . .. 87 79 88 7 7 5 16 4 . King Hill. 376. . . . . . . . . . . . 47 41 46 2 4 3 5 1 . .. Saxton. 508. .. .. .. .. .. . .. 8 10 9 . ... .... 21 ... 1.. TOTAL... 3301 3201 8421 241 441 201 631 141. , .1 ...

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218 $ 42 61 61 67 50 77 95 59 674 70 930 91 356 1083 429 68 4,(06)$

438.90/$ 90.30 106.001 180. 20 1 115.50 105.00 161.701 189.001 128.101 1.419.60\ 142.801 1.971.901 195.301 80 751. 1 2,251.20 905.10 138.601 9.240.001$

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438.90 $ IS' '" 60.00)$ 70.00j$ 7.00 90.30 1 10.00 20.00 2.00 105.00 / 1 18.25 50.00 6.00 130.20 , ....•• 1 50.001 30.001 3.00 4.20 ....•• \ 102.35/ 20.001 2.00 111.30 105.00. . . . . . .. .....• 66.001 40.001 4.00 ! 125.001 60.001 6.00 161.70 1 189.00 ·1 110.00 40.001 4.00 128.10 1 28.00 I .. 1.419.60........ . 1 80.00 620.001 62.00 142.80 1 f 151.00 40.00 4.00 1,971.90 ··1 1 150.00 600.00 60.00 1 ••••• • 132.00 40.00 4.00 195.30 751.80 170.35 300.001 80.00 2.251.20. . . . . • .• 232.45 870.001 87.00 905.10 240.00 470.00 47.00 142.80. . . . . . . . 4.20 105.00 80.001 8.00 9,240.00$ 4.201$ 4.201$ 1.819.401$ 3.860.001S 835.00

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A d

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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.s Rising Sun, 13 ........... , Weston. 53 ............... Compass, 120 ............. Camden Point, 169 ........ Rowley, 204 .............. Fidelity, 339 ............. Adelphi, 355 ............. Platte City, 504 ........... TOTAL .............

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95 $ 197.(0)$ 197.40 117 249.90 249.90 106 223.70 223.70 70 151.20 151.20\ 216.3Q 102 216.30 73 155.40 155.40 65.10 65.10\ 31\ 79 157.50 157.50 6731$ 1,416.50\$ 1,416.50

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SIXTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-SAM 0'. SHERWOOD, D. D. G. M., Excelsior Springs, Mo. Ritual District No. 11

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Liberty, 31. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 20 16 161 5 2 1 61' ... \...... Holt, 49 ...........•..... , 1 1 1 .... •.• 1 2 •.•... Angerona, 193........... 3 3 3 3 1 11 . Clay, 207. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 6 6 .•.. 1 11. . .. . .. Kearney, 311.. . .. .. .. .. .. 2 2 2 2 ... ...1 1..... • Temperance, 438.. . .. . .. . 5 8 9 3 2 2 11 . Hemple, 37..... 5 3 3. 2 \ [ . Vinci!, 62................ 5 5 4 4 2 2 21 1 . Plattsburg, 113........... 4 41 4 1 1 1 Gower, 397. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 2 . . .. .... '" I••.. I. .• • •• Lathrop, 506............. .... .... .... .... 5 1/ ... 1 51 1 . TOTAL............. 561 501 501 131 191 81 131 ~l I ..

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204 $ 424.201$ 424.20 $ /$ ' " ./$ $ 140.001$ 14.00 34 71.401 71.40 10.00 1.00 90 26 6o. 60.9Q 40.00 30.00 3.00 155 315.00 315.00 150.00 60.00 6.00 61 123.90 123.90 ...•.... 120.00 20.00 2.00 122 245.701 245.70. 65.00 50.M 5.00 41 92.40 92.40 85.00 50.00 5.00 123 262.50 262.50 46.10 50.00 5.00 84 176.40 176.40 20.00 40.00 4.00 111.30.. . .. 60.001 20.00 2.00 54 111.30/ 1 •••••• ••••••••• • •••••••• I •••••••• 27 69.30 69.30 9311$ 1,953.001$ 1,953.00 1$ .....•. 1$ •... 1$ 586.101$ 470.001$ 47.00

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Bitua.l District No. 23 Waverly. 61. . Lexington. 149 . Higginsville, 364 .. , , Coneordia. 464 .. Mount Hope, 476 . Richmond, 57 , Ray. 223 . Bee Hive, 393 ' Ada. 444 . TOTAL .•...........

4

12 24 9 13 1 11 6 611

4

12 36 10 9 2 13 5 641

1"'1 21"'1'" 4/ 2 .. 1 1 2 . .. .., 10 1 .. 4 11 21 31 22 1 11. ... .. 6....3 ... ... 11 3 .... 2..... . 3 3\ 9 2 2 2 61 41 .... I. .. 1 11 1 .. 141 2/ . I... 61 . 2 2 .... I... 661 131 61 1~8~

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1

1$ 1

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5.00$ 240.00 160.00 10.00

1.........

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10.00 3.00 65.00 473.001$

40.001$ 120.001 20.001 40.001 90.00 130.001 10.00 140.001 50.001 640.001$

4.00 12.00 2.00 4.00 9.00 18.00 1.00 14.00 6.00 64.00

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SEVENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-ARTHUR D. N ORDBEBG, D. D. G. M., 114 W. 10th St., Kansas City 6, Mo. Ritual District No. 22

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441.00 $ 960.001$ 96.00 113.10 250.001 25.00 122.70 480.00 48.00 174.30 420.001 44.00 42.60 80.00 8.00 352.80 180.00 18.00 320.00 640.00 54.00 1,780.03 1,270.001 127.00 64.00 660.00 66.00 108.00 840.001 84.00 114.00 210.001 21.00 2.10 30.00 390.00 39.00 48.00 360.00 36.00 850.00 390.00 39.00 604.60 1,900.00 190.00 400.00 530.001 53.00 380.00 38.00 126.00 330.001 33.00 2.10 182.00 470.001 47.00 4.201$ 5,323.131$10,640.001$1,066.00

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EIGHTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-NAT D. JACKSON, D. D. G. Mo, 210 W. Maple Ave., Independence, M-O. Ritual Dis trict No. 34 U ~

Q NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Index, 54 ................ Cass, 147 ................ -Grand River, 276 ......... Wadesburg, 348 .......... Nonpareil, 372 ........... Belton, 450 ............... .J ewel, 480 ............... Coldwater. 485 ........... Archie, 633 ............... Cleveland, 651. ........... TOTAL .............

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12 15 4 2 1 631

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38 79.801$ 79. BO 1$ .... /, 5.001$ 110.001$ 11.00 294.0D .•...... I . . • • • • 30.00 90.00 9.00 140 1$ 294.001 63 182.30 ....... 60.00 6.00 33.60 •................••............. 1•....... 33.60 171 50.40 50.40 .....•.. . ..... /. . . . . . . . . 100.00 10.00 251 270.90 2.10 ...... ......... 130.00 13.00 129 273.00 344.40 20.00 14.00 344.40 140.00 162 147.00 ............... 139.40 69 40.00 4.00 147.00/ 102.90 ............... 24.00 49 102.90 20.00 2.00 46.20 ............... 22 1 5.00 46.201 10.00 1.00 7141$ 1,503.601$ 1,601.601$ 2.10/$ .... 1$ 223.401$ 690.001$ 69.00

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Ritual District No. 59 Independence, 76 ......... 1111 104 90 1 8 14 ,Summit, 263 ............. 16 16 14 1 11 .•.......• 4 .... McDonald, 324 ........... 35 48 46 5 4 111 21 2 ...... 9 Blue Springs, 337 ......... 10 1 10 10 4 2 6 ·1··· Raytown. 391. ........... 22 19 22 .... 1 2 41'" .Christian, 392 ............ 1 1 .. :1 .•. ' ( : : : : 4 2 5 5 Buckner. 501 ............. 9 2 2 ..• 8 11 Marlbarough, 569 ......... 26 28 29 4 1 '\ 1 2 .......... 2 .•.. :Mt~ Washington, 614 ...... 58 57 64 9 7 5 7 1 ...... 'Gramhriew. 618 •.......... 16 21 22 1 1 2 / ...... Grain Valley. 644 ........• 1 1 ............. 8 1 5 61 TOT,AL .••.......... 3151 3211 8191 501 271 261 801 101 ... 1•.•

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722 $ 1,486.801$ 1,486.80 , ...... ·1$ ... ··1$··.····· $ 1.01••0T 101.00 140.00 14.00 ,.. 336.001 34•• 2• ..... ···1 ,.20f 26.00 408 866.20 865.20 370.00 37.00 53.80 89 195.30 195.31' •.•..... ...... 40.00 110.00 11.00 208 434.70 436.80 ....•.•• 1 2.10 72.00 220.001 22.00 85 176.40 176.40 .•... ·.·1 ...... 1 40.00 4.00 10.00 90 191.10 191.10 ...001 9.00 '15.00 260.00 198 422.10 422.10 26.00 523 1.100.40 1,100.40 .. · .. · .. 1··· .. ·1· .. •· .... 580.00 68.00 213 449.40 445.20 220.00 22.00 4.201 •· .... 1 30.00 86 182.70 182.70 ........ .•.... 100.00 80.00 8.00 4.201$ &.301$ 346.801$ 3,120.001$ 312.00 2,7861$ 6,840.101$ 6,842.20 $

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NINTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-A. B. CLEAVELAND, D. D. G. M., Kingston, Mo. Ritual District No. 10 Union Star, 124 .......... Parrott. 308 .............. Osborn, 317 .............. Continental, 454 .......... Clarksdale, 559 ........... Western Star. 16 ......... Pattonsburg. 66 .......... Gallatin, 106 ............. Altamont. 108 ............ Earl. 286 ................ Lock Spring, 488 ......... Jameson. 500 ............. Jamesport. 664 ........... TOTAL .............

51

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51 71

il 31

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581

41 6 9 2 5 8 4 6

11 31 231 19l 11 31· ... 1 6 1.... 1 71 2 12 11 61 21 21· .. ·1·

21 31 .. ·1 ... 4 1.... 1 . . . 1 . . . 21 ......... , 11 ... 1... 11 11 11 11 ... 1 11 Ii .. ·1 .. · 11 ... 1 21 .... ! ••• 1 • • • 21 11 .... j ••• 1 • • • 21 21 .... 1· .. 1... .. ·1 11 11 11 ... 1... 11

11

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101 701

9 .... 1 11 1\ 1\ 21 ... 1... 1 .... 1 1 1 1 2 .... 1 . . . 1... 9 1i....... 41 11 ... I... 751 311 121 14'1 231 101 ... 1..•

831$ 176.401$ 176.40 143 300.30 300.301 86.10 38 84.001 40 84.00 84.001 47 100.80 98.701 66 138.60 138.601 89 184.80 182.701 111 231.00 233.101 29 60.90 60.901 43 90.30 90. 30 1 81 170.10 170.10 39 77.70 77.701 109 220.60 220.601 9171$ 1,917.301$ 1,921.60

5.001$ $ ....... 1$ .... 1$ ........ 1 .. · .. ·1 .. · ...... ........ 1 2.101········· ········1 ······1 95.001

::::::::I...2:~~1: : : : :49.501 : :: : ........ I 2.101

""601 ........I......·.1 2.00 ······1 ········1 ....

........ ...... ........ 1 ...... 1· ..

........ I ...... I $

2.001$

6.301$

40.00 10.00 5.00

· .... ·

70.001 426.101$

50.001$ 50.001 20.001 50.001 60.001 70.001 40.001 60.00 20.001 30.001 90.001 10.001 70.001 600.001$

5.00 5.00 2.00 6.00 6.00 7.00 4.00 6.00 2.00 3.00 9.00 1.00 7.00 60.00

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Ritual District No. 12 Kingston. 118... Braymer. 136...... Hamilton, 224. . . . . . . . . . . . Polo, 232. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breckenridge. 334........ Cowgill, 661. Friendship.89 Spring Hill. 155 Benevolence. 170. . . . . . . . . . Chula, 388 Wheeling. 434...... Dawn, 539. . . .. .. . . . . . . . . TOTAL... .. ... .. .. .

1 5 5 11 4 3 24

41 31 1 4 4 1 4 8 2 81111 .... 1 21 1 3\ 31 11 19 15 111

I....

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3 3 1 601

31 1 2 31

61

21 .. ·1 1· .. I· .. 31 41 41 ... I... 2 11 .... I ••• I••• 21 21 21 I .. 21 21 21 1 .. 1 11 I 1 .. 61 41 1 1 ..

\••• \••• 1•••• \••• 1••• '1".. I· •••"I'.' 1' ..

2 I.. I I\ , .1. '" ..•. 1. '" 1 11 31 3 ' 1... 3 1.. 1 1 2 1 ... 1 71 491 501 161 181 191 181 151

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371$ 121 119 96 82 38

2~~11 32 28 62 38 955

1

86.101$ 81.90 $ 231.001 231.00 249.901 249.90 201.601 ,201.60 176.401 176.40 79.80 79.80 609.001 609.00 18.90\ 18.90 66.10 65.10 28.40 28.40 126.001 126.00 69.30 69.30 $ 1,941.501$ 1,937.30 $

4.201$··· ·1$······· '1$ 1 • • • • ··1 77.00 1 1.70 I 168.00 / 116.001 . \ 32.001 1 . 212.60

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10.001$ 60.001 60.00 110.001 40.001 30.001 240.001

1.00 6.00 6.00 11.00 4.00 3.00 24.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'8 TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-ARTHUR G. LYNCH, D. D. G. M., Brunswick, Mo. Ritual District No. 13

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Jackson.82 Brookfield. 86. . . . . . . . . . . . Cypress, 227. . . . . . . . . . . . . Bucklin, 233... Dockery, 325.. .. .. .. .. .. . Marceline, 481. . .. . .. .. . .. TOTAL.............

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5 11 4 5 2 15 421

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831$ 177.451$ 177.45$ /$ /$ 10.00$ 200 1 405.301 405.30 80.00 68 144.901 144.90 '" 90.00 61 128.10 128.10....................... 46 94.60 105.00 / 10.60/ 32.00 200 422.101 422.10 I ...... I.. .. .. .. . 6571$ 1,372.351$ 1,382.85 $ 1$ 10.501$ 162.001$

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11 4 5 2 3 5 2 1 331

11 3 5 2 2 4 3 4 34)

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2 ... 1.... 1... 1... 41 21 31 ... 1... 2 ... 1 51 ......

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127 $ 266.70 $ 266.70 128.10 127.90 62 .20 ...... 60.00 142.80 149.10 67 142.80 142.80 : : : : : : :: .. ~:~~ .....5.5:~~ 74 310.80 312.90 150 73.50 73.50 37 126.00 61 123. 90 1 ..... 136.50 136.50 '. : : : : : : '.1 .. 64 6421$ 1,325.10/$ 1,835.40 $ .201$ 10.501$ 140.001$

::::::::1·· ~:~O :::::::::1 ~:~~II

1.0:~~

40.00 50.00 50.00 30.00 50.001 20.001 10.00 360.001$

11.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 36.00 l-i

~

~


.....

Ritual District No. 20

~

~

-l

DeWitt, 39 ............... Wakanda,52 ............. Bogard, 101. ............. Hale City, 216 ............ Carroll, 249 .............. Bosworth, 597 ...•......... Hardin. 822 .............. TOTAL .............

2~1 2~1

41··· .J •••• I 11·· .1 ... ·i ... 1...

16 9 8

20 10 4

il:1 'I 21

861

801

801

10 .... 9 6

1~1 1~1 1~1'"

il

91

'I"l'

11 .... 1 . . . . . . 3 1 31 1 ... 1. . . 1.... 1. . . . . . 1 1 11 .......... 21'''1 11'"l''' 3 2 11 11 ..........

111

71

71

21 ... 1...

119.701$ 119.70 $ ....... 1$ ·· .. 1$ 55.00 $ 4 701.40 345 126 266.70 266.70 70,. 136.50 136.50 65 88 174.80 174.30 165.90 165. 90 1 77\ 193.20 93 198.20 ::::::::/ ::::: :/ .... '5'5'.00 8471$ 1.757.701$ 1,757.70 $ ...... ·1$ ·· .. 1$ 188.001$

'T

°1

::::::::1 :::J::::~8:.;;

80.00 $ 270.00 160.00 100.00 80.00 50.00 110.001 850.001$

8.00 27.00 16.00 10.00 8.00 5.00 11.00 85.00

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ELEVENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-W. R. HOWELL, D. D. G. M., Monroe City, Mo. Ritual District No. 14 Callao, 38................ Bloomington, 102. . . . • . . . . Censer, 172.............. La Plata, 237.. .. .. . .. . .. Lodge of Truth, 268 Excello. 332. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elmer. 648............... St. Andrews, 96.. .. .. ... . Shelbina. 228............. Hunnewell,415........... Bethel, 537. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clarence, 662............. TOTAL.........

5/ 3 21 13

71 3 16 6

7/ 11 3 . . .. 17.... 12 2

2 4 3 3 6 2 521

2i 41

.

11 2 1

31 .... I· .. I...

'1' .. 1'1' .. 1... j. • • 4

21 I 1. .. 11 1.. ·1·.. 2 1 1. "j 3i .. 1. . . 31" .. I· .. · 1 ... I 6 1 1 1 11 I... 4 3 2 1 21 I... j 1 1 1 21 \...... 5 1 2 1\ 1 1. . . 61 11.... 2 11 ·1 ..• 1... 651 9i 161 10: 191 11 1... 1

2 5 5 2 1 8 2 671

3/

1

1

"I' ..'1'"

t:;

89 1$ 191.1 0 1$ 191.10'$ /$ .. "1$ 65.001$ 50.001$ 67 138.60 138.60 36.00 30.00 203 413.70 415.80 1 2.10/ 108.00 200.00 133 277.20 281.40 i 4.20 80.00 140.001 39 81.901 81.90 ········1······1.··.···.· •..•. · .. ·1 69 136.50 136.50 92.40 20.001 60 126.001 126.00.............. 65.00 30.00 59 126.00 128.10 ........ 2.10 77.90 50.00 122 256.201 256.20.............. 41.25 20.00 32 67.201 67.20 \ \ 37.60 10.001 42 92.40\ 92.40 120.00 51 107.10 107.10 I I 18.351 20.001 9661$ 2.013.901$ 2.022.30: $ 1$ 8.401$ 621.501$ 690.001$

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5.00 8.00 20.00 14.00 ··· 2.00 3.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 12.00 2.00 69.00

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Ritual District No. 17 ParisUnion,19.......... Florida, 23............... Monroe. 64............... Madison, 91. .. .. . .. . .. . . . Santa Fe. 462 Holliday, 660............. TOTAL...... .......

1( 1 2 21 \ 1 71

2( 1 1 4

1

11 91

2 1.... / 1/ 1 31 1... /... 11 1 \ I I... 11 11 1 1 1 1... 41 1. .. . 21 31 ·1... \ 1 1 \ 21 11 1... 1 1 1 1.... 1..• 1... 9-1-3-i-ll 21 81 11 ... 1...

59/$ 29 721 31 381 24 253i$

117.601$ 58.801 151.201 65.101 73.501 48.301 514.501$

117.60,$ 58.80 151.20 65.10 73.50 48.30 514.501$

1$

/

1$ 1

1 1 \ 1$

1

1 \ 1$

175.001$ 20.00 5.00 ..

. 75.45\ 275.451$

20.001$ 10.00 20.00 20.001 10.00 10.00 90.001$

2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 9.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued ~

-:J

00

Ritual District No. 18 Po

A 0

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Huntsville, 30 ............ Milton, 161. .............. Clifton Hill, 161. ......... Moberly, 344 ............. Cairo, 486 ..............• Higbee, 627 .............. Jacksonville, 641 ......... Clark, 610 ••............. TOTAL .............

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4 4 5 49 3 7

:1 801

11

11

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4 3 4 40 3 6 3 3 661

61 .... \.... 11 61 .... 1.. ·1 ... 1 ... 1... 1.... 1... 1 • . • 1 ..• 4 ....·1 11 11 ... 1... 36 4 8 3 121 31 ... 1 . . . 1 '1 ••.• 1.•• 1.•. 6.... 1 2 ... 1.... 1... 1 . . . l .. 3 2 I.... I ... I ... 31 2 ... 1. . . . 1. . . 1•.• 4 2 41 ... I... 641 81 161 81 191

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126 262.601$ 262.60 $ ...... ·1$ .... l$ 131.60 $ 26 1$ 46.20 46.201 24.00 43 90.aO 19.00 90. 30 1 481 1,008.00 1,008.00 . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 1 660.00 67 136.60 136.601 124.00 224.701 224.70 ::::::::1 ::::::\ 110 76.00 74 157.60 · .. · .... 1 ...... 1 167.60\ 180.00\ 119.70 66 119.70 ...... ·.1 ...... 1 66.00 981i$ 2,045.401$ 2,046.40 $· ...... 1$ . ... 1$ 1,268.601$

::::::::1 ::::::

gjeur:.

:;~~

Il.

40.001$ 40.00 60.00

4.0.001 30.00

70.00 30.00 40.00 790.001$

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4.00 4.00 6.00 49.00 3.00 7.00 3.00 4.00 79.00

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TWELFTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-DAVIDA. LESLIE, D. D. G. M., Williamstown, Mo. Ritual District No. 15 Wyaconda, 24 2 3 4 11 /2141 \ 1 . Monticello, 68............ 1 2 4 1 3 .,. 1 . La Belle, 222. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 5 1 •.. t• • ··1 41" .. / / . Craft, 287. .. • . . .. . .. . .. . 7 6 6 3 1 .. . 1 .... I 1 . Williamstown, 370........ .... .... 1 .... 11 ..•... 1 • • • ·1·· Lewistown, 494.......... 5 6 3 11 2 2 11 .. 001 ,. Ewing, 677. . . . • . . . . . . . .. . ... \... ·1 . Palmyra,18 6 3 2 31 3 2 1.. · St.John's, 28 121613 3 2 6 61 j . I Hannibal, 188............ 16 21 24 4 5 6 61 1 .. Philadelphia, 602 1 11 1 I.. • Ralls,aB •••.............. 2 .... 1 .... 1 1121 ··.1 ... Lick Creek, 302. .. .. . . .. .. 3 3 2 1 2 11 I. .. . .. New London, 807 1. . .. . I•... 1 I 1 1 1 1 . TOTAL....... 661 621 661 191 171211 271 1 1 ..

·1.... .... ·1··· ·1....

... .. 'j' .. 'j"

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/$

68 $ 140.701$ 140.70 $ 1$ .... 5.001$ 20.001$ 2.00 62 116.60 128.10 12.60 10.00 10.00 1.00 40.00 4.00 130 264.60 264.60 1 2.10 86.10 70.00 7.00 136 277.20 279.30 48 102.90 102.90 'j' ,.. .. .. .. I .. 63 128.101 128.10....................... 50.001 6.00 281 ..• ···•· ·1····· · ········1 ......•................. 1 . 112 231.001 231.00 1 334.66 60.001 5.00 \. . . . . . 24.00 120.00\ 12.00 482 890.40 890.40 440 907.20 907.20 " 364.00 160.00 16.00 33 67.60\ 67.60 1 66.00 ••••........••.•. 83 165.90 166.90 1 •••••• 76.00 20.001 2.00

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1~~1 ... ~~~:~~\ ....2.2.2:~~ :::::::: \ : : : : ::

1,7751$ 3,613.601$ 3,628.30 $

•...1.6.0:~~ .... ~~:~~ I.....3:~~ 1$ 14.701$ 1,106.261$ 670.001$ 67.00

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THIRTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-PAULA. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo. Ritual District No. 16 Eolia, 14..•...•.......... Clarksville, 17............ Perseverance, 92 ......... Phoenix, 186 ............. Frankford. 192 ........... Pike, 899 ................ ' TOTAL .............

6 1 12 17 1 2 891

2 8 8 9 1 2 261

12 1 . . . . 1... 1... 1. ·.,1· .. \... 8 .... .... .. ·1 11 ... ·1··· '" 7 2 10 8 1 3 ............. 1 .... 2 .... ....... '" .... I· .. · .. 861 11 71 81 .... 1... 1 1 61

...., 'I 21. '1" '1' ...... ·1 .. ·1 ..........

59 $ 128.90 $ 128.90 186.60 66 186.60 424.20 202 422.10 291.90 147 291.90 121.80 121.80 68 52.60 26 62.60 6681$ 1,148.701$ 1,160.80

-1

.,.2.1 ,.... ,.•• ·1···.····

$ ....... 1$ " .. 1$ ........ 1$

60.001$

6.00

282.70 120.001 66.00 160.00 65••••••••••. · . . . . . .. ...... ......... 20.001 $ ....... 1$ 2.101$ 420.901$ 360.001$

12.00 16.00

•••••••• 1 •••••• \ ·....... 2.10 · . . . . . .. ......

.......·1.·....

2.00 86.00

·1....

1.... .. .. I.... 2 ....

1

2

"

'1'" '1" .\ .

2 00 '" 1..... .. 61 11· .. I· ..

101 2. . . . 2 4.... 1 I ,••• 6 .... 1 2 10 I. .. . .. 2 .... ... 31 1 ••• '" 1 1 11 I ... 1 .. 1 1 2 1 11 00 .1 . 1 1.. ·1· .. 2.... 4 2 11 .. 001 1 . 281 31 111 81 261 11 1 ..

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Ritual District No. 27 Central, 81 1· Laddonia, 116............ 21 2 Social, 266 Hebron, 364. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 18 Vandalia, 491............ 6 4 Fulton, 48. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 9 New Bloomfield, 60....... 2\ 2 Portland, 242. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 Tebbetts, 666............. 2 2 Shamrock, 685 '" .1 Mokane, 612............. 4 3 TOTAL. .. .. .. . .. . .. 381 861

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26 $ 66.701$ 64.60 $ 84 67.20 67.20 31 68.00 63.00 801 609.00 609.00 84 174.30 174.80 196 409.60 409.60 81 168.80 163.80 28 66.70 66.70 41 88.20 88.20 14 29.40 29.40 76 163.80 168.80 9111$ 1,881.601$ 1,879.60 $

2.101$ 1 1

1$ ...... 00 $ ........ 1$ ....... 16.00 20.001 2.00 \ . . . . . . . .. . 1 . 1 •••••• 1 167.60 150.00/ 16.00 . 1 83.60 60.00 6.00 I 60.00 60.001 6.00 . . 1 72.00 20.00 2.00 1 26.00 10.00 1.00 80.00 20.001 2.00 12.001 1•••••••• . . . .. 70.00 40.001 4.00 2.101$ 1$ 626.101$ 370.001$ 37.00

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Ritual District No. 28 1 11 Griswold, 21 Wellsville,178 194............ 7 1. "'1' 6 "'1 4 1 .... 1 1 Montgomery, 246. . . . . . . . . 12 9 10 3 3 2 Jonesburg, 467. . . .. 3 3 3 1 D..... 492 •••••.••••.••.•.•••••..•.••••••••••• 1 TOTAL .,. 221 171 171 61 41 51

~

611 2 31 121

1 1

1 ..

2

. .. .

.I. . 41

I

.

46 124 161 1$ 63 62 4461$

60 96. 1$ 249.90 316.00 130.20 126.00 917.701$

96.60 $ 262.00 316.00 130.20 130.20 924.00 $

'1$

.. "1$ 2.10 . . I 4.20 1$ 6.801$

30.001$······· ·1$ .... ··· 168.40 70.001 7.00 24.00 120.00 12.00 26.00 30.001 3.00 70.00 1 . 308.401$ 220.001$ 22.00 I-l

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00

o GRAND SECRETARY IS TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FOURTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-RANSOM BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo. Ritual District No. 29

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7 2 5 2 3 4 2 251

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.= Troy, 34 •..••.••......... Silex. 76 ...•............. New Hope. 199 ........... New Salem. 270 .......... Louisville. 409 ............ Nineveh, 473 ............. Moscow, 658 ............. TOTAL ............•

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6 2 2 1 4 .... 6 1 5 .... 4 .... 2 .... 281 41

.... 1

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1 ... 1 2 21 41 91

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126 262.60 $ 262.60 44 92.40 92.40 96 201.60 201.60 102 207.90 207.90 38 81.90 97.65 44 92.40 92.40 178.60 85 176.40 5351$ 1.117.201$ 1,130.85

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::::::::1 :::::: .. ...... 1 16.75

.... 2:i0I::::::

2.101$ 15.751$

l:"CI

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$··· ....

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172.60 $ 100.00 20.00 106.00 20.00 70.00 487.601$

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20.00 60.00 20.00 50.00/ 40.001 20.00 260.001$

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ttl 271

T··IT·I···l"\""·

20 16.... 2 3 2 ...•.....• 3 7 ........ 1 ... 1.......... 2 .... 1 .......... \.... ,...... 1 .... 1... 1 . . . 6 3 2 ....... 36\ 31\ 6\ 2\ 6\ 31· ... \..• 1•••

51 6\

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Ritual Dis trict No. 30 Wentzville, 46 .....•...... Palestine, 241. ........... Mechanicsville, 260 ....... Pauldingville. 11 ......... Warrenton, 609 ..•....... ' TOTAL .............

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117.60 $ ..•. · •• 1$ •.•• 1$ ••••••.• 188 892.70 392.70 • . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . ' 50.35 86 178.50 178.60 61 102.90 102.90 : : : : : : : : \ : : : : : : I•••••6.9:~~ 121 262.00 252.00 · · · • • • • • 1 • . • • • • 1 45.00 5011$ 1,043.701$ 1,043.70 $ ...... ·1$ .. .. 1$ 164.701$

40.001$ 140.001 30.001 10.00 60.00 280.001$

4.00

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Ritual District No. 32 Evergreen, 27 ............ Sullivan, 69 .............. Gray Summit, 173 ........ Hope. 251 ................ Fraternal. 363 ............ Columbia, 534 ............ Easter. 575 .............. Union, 593 ............... Hermann, 123 ............ Owensville,624 ........... TOTAL .............

7 21 .... 1 . . ·1 21 .... 1··.1 ... 11 4 1 21 21 .... 1... \... 6 .... .... ... 21 .... 1...... 12 .... 2 3 1 4 .... 411 .........• 9 1 1 ... 61 .... '. 18 4 6 .... 5 1 1 .......... 13 1 1 1 1 .......... 911 131 61 111 201 .... 1. . . I . . .

~

4.00 8.00 9.00 9.00 4.00 9.00 18.00 5.00 4.00 12.00 82.00

-l

FIFTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT (A)-ARTHUR RAUCH, D. D. G. M., 4031 Oleatha Ave., St. Louis 16, Mo. Ritual District No. 33A

t1

51 8 11 9 4

9 18 5 4 12 851

7 10 8 12 4 9 18 8 5 13 941

"''1'''1''' "1'"

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78 $ 163.80 16308T 199 420.00 421.00 191.10 93 191.10 176 371.70 373.80 78 163.80 163.80 115 235.20 235. 20 1 128 266.70 266.70 124 258.301 262.50 268.80 268. 80 1 127\ 175 367.50 367.50 1.2931$ 2,706.901$ 2,714.20

$ ....... 1$ · ... 1$ 4.00$ ........ 1 1.001 ......... ........ 1 ...... ' ......... ........ \ 2.10\ 36.00 ........ ...... 44.00 ........ 1 ...... / .........

........ 1 ...... 125.00 ........ / 4.201 ........ ·

5.5:~~

'. : : : : : : : I : : : : : : \ •••••

$ ....... 1$

$

7.30j$

I...... 1$

264.001$

40.00/$ 80.00 90.001 90.001 40.001 90000 180.00 50.00 40.00 120.00 1 820.001$

Missouri. 1 '" 19 16 16 1 614 181 81· .. 1... 486 $ 1,018.501$ 1.018.50 1$ '1$ 190.001$ 19.00 Meridian. 2.............. 36 40 43 2 1 171 I I.. · 603 1.251.60 1,251.60 360.001 36.00 Naphtali. 26............. 16 18 15 1 3 5 121" .. 1 1 1 377 777.00 777.00....................... 160.00 16.00 Pomegranate, 95......... 45 53 47 2 2 3 6 1.. 627 1,308.30 1.310.40........ 2.10 ., 460.001 46.00 St. Louis. 20............. 34 34 29 6 3 1 121 \... 1 539 1.131.90 1.131.90....................... 340.001 34.00 Occidental, 163. . . . . . . . . . . 9 11 10 1 1/.. . 41 1.. . 195 396.90 396.90 \ 90.001 9.00 Pyramid, 180............ 35 38 301 21 3 41 61 31 1... 397 827.40 827.40....................... 310.00 31.00 Good Hope, 218 66 60 441 2/ 3 4 221 11" 1,110 2.324.70 2.331.00 1 6.30..... 660.001 66.00 Aurora. 267. .. . .. .. . .. 26 32 30 2 1 1 31 4 ..• 350 720.30 720.30 1 250.00 25.00 America, 347.. . .. . .. . 24 24 33.. .. 1 3 51......... . 331 682.50 682.50 .. I 67.20 240.001 24.00 Cache, 416 41 60 46 1 1 3 201 1 I.. · 743 1,564.00 1,554.00 1 1 22.60 410.001 41.00 ltaska. 420............... 17 17 20.... 3 1 8 835 688.80 688.90........ .10 300.00 170.00 17.00 Harmony, 499.. .. . .. .. .. . 21 17 21 3 1 3 71 I... ... 340 701.40 701.40.. .. .. .. ...... ......... 210.00 21.00 Clifton Heights, 520.. . .. . 32 41 46 1 2 . .. 121 1. •• ••• 613 1,257.90 1.257.90 1•••.•• 27.00 320.00 32.00 Algabil. 644. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 26 18 4 1 3 9\ 1\ ... 1.. . 361 763.90 766.00 1 2.101.. .. .. .. . 220.001 22.00 Rose Hill. 660............ 12 18 22 2 1 ... 21.......... 481 997.60 997.60 1 ...... 1 300.00 250.00 26.00 Magnolia. 626............ 63 61 64 6 2 4 221 1...... 901 1,871.10 1,871.10.............. 32.00 630.00 63.00 Trinity, 641. . .. .. .. . .. . .. 10 20 21. .. . 4 3 51 .... I... 325/ 672.00 674.10 / 2.101. . . . . . . . . 100.00 10.00 University, 649.. .. . .. . .. . 13 11 14 3 3 2 4\ ..•. ,. .• 2761 583.801 683.80.. .. . ..... 1 60.00 120.00 12.00 Pilgrim, 662............. 16 17 11 1.................... 233 483.001 483.00 36.00 170.001 17.00 Commonwealth, 654...... 14 14 17.... 11 3 31.......... 182 376.901 376.90.............. 84.00 140.00 14.00 Purity, 668.............. 16 12 17........ 2 61 I... ... 269 639.701 639.70.............. 72.00 160.001 16.00 Theo. Roosevelt, 661. . . . . . 23 25 43 4 2 2 2/ 1 1 1 227 476.701 478.80. . . . . . . . 2.10 49.00 230.00 23.00 TOTAL 6081 6451 6471 421 461 51/2221 181 \ 3 10,2911$21.394.801$21,409.60 $ 1$ 14.801$ 1,029.701$ 6,180.001$ 618.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

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FIFTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT (B)-ALEX S. DAWSON, D. D. G. M., 2626 Alhambra Court, St. Louis, Mo. Ritual District No. 33B I

A

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Beacon, 3 ................ 1281122 139 9 6 271 ···1··· ... 1,816/$ 3,780.001$ 3,780.00 694 1,228.601 1,228.60 2 6 191 ..... Goo. Washington, 9 ....... 12 13 12 1... 1 1,400 2,921.101 2,921.10 Mt. Moriah, 40 ........... 46 41 41 4 2 9 27 61'" 706 1,484.70 1,484.70 Polar Star, 79 ............ 17 23 27 1 7 3 171 6 ... 473 993.30 993.80 Erwin, 121. ...•.......... 23 31 28 .... .... 1 13 .... \... 804.80 886 804.80 2 .... Pride of the West, 179 .... 38 30 24 3 71 4 ... 677 1,188.60 1,192.80 Keystone, 243 ............ 32 33 29 .... 2 4 31·r· 410 863.10 863.10 1 2 3 81 Cosmos, 282 .............. 27 32 28 647 1,140.30 1,167.10 Cornerstone, 823 ......... 38 43 43 2 4 2 81 9 ....1 '... ......1 823 30 678.30 8 1 4 3 Paul Revere, 330 ......... 37 37 87 21 ...... 893 1,864.80 1,864.30 678. 2 4 Tuscan, 360 ..•.•......... 32 29 82 18 602 1,263.70 1,263.70 7 .... Anchor, 443 .............. 30 29 29 1 221 17 1 ... , ... 666 1,172.86 1,172.86 1 ...... West Gate, 446 ........... 22 24 26 .•.. 4 6 13 817 1,671.60 1,671.60 Lambskin, 460 ........... 61 61 60 6 6 6 141 499 1,060.001 1,060.00 44 41 2 2 Euclid, 505 ............... 38 3 91 2 ...... 625.00 262 626.00 Apollo, 629 ........•..... 11 12 10 ........ 1 2 1 ...... 601 1,026.90 1,026.90 Olive Branch, 676 ........ 33 29 30 2 .... 71 .... 1...... 474.60 227 474.601 1 1 1 Forest Park, 678 ......... 13 10 10 ·I ...... 364 760.20 760.20 1 Tower Grove, 681 .•....... 15 14 17 .... 669 1,407.00 1,407.00 Mizpah, 639 ..•.......... 39 50 46 1 2 3 424 888.30 892.60 1 4 Benj. Franklin, 642 ....... 50 69 83 600.60 600.60 288 Shaveh, 646 ..•........... 24 22 24 2 ...... 11 1 2 4 310 648.90 648.90 3 .... 1 4 Progress, 667 ............ 14 17 24 1 ...... 493.60 493.60 236 7 7.... 1 2 7 Triangle, 688 ............. 6 2 ...... TOTAL ............. 7661 8021 7871 641 501 7312671 441 ... , 2 13,8791$28,909.661$28,984.86

91

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304.001$ 1,280.001$ 128.00

262.00 9.00 46.00

130.001

460.00 170.00 230.00 330.00 320.001

13.00

46.00 17.00 · ..... ··1 ...... 1.. .. .. . . . 28.00 · ....... 1 ...... I.. .. .. .. . 33.00 32.00 ........ 1 '.201 72.00 27.00 121.20 · ....... 1 ...... 270.001 ........ 1 16.80 ......... 380.00 38.00 270.00 27.00 · .... · .. 1 ............... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1......... 320.00 82.00 .............. 1. 10.00 800.00 30.00 22.00 ........ 1 ...... / ......... 220.001 ........ / ...... 132.00 520.00 52.00 330.00 33.00 · .... · .. 1 ...... 1 ...... · .. ....................... 110.00 11.00 ....................... 310.00 31.00 180.00 18.00 ........ \ ...... 1 11.70 .............. , 150.00 15.00 ....................... 390.00 39.00 50.00 500.001 · ....... 1 '.20 1 168.00 ........ ...•.. 70.00 240.00 24.00 ......•. •....• 16.00 14.00 140.001 ........ ...... 12.00 90.00 9.00 $._.. -,_._._JL~5.201$ 1,222.901$ 7,580.001$ 768.00

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SIXTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-eECIL A. TOLIN, D. D. G. M., 7334 Chamberlain Ave., Univ. City 5, Mo. Ritual District No. 40 DeSoto, 119 ...•.......... Joachim, 164 ..•...•...... Shekinah, 256 ....•....... Herculaneum, 338 . Tyro, 12 .•.•............. Potosi, 131. ........••.... Irondale, 143 . Belgrade, 632 . Blackwell, 535 : . TOTAL .

14115/ 3 2 20 24 1 1

91 9 15 18 1 3

21 681

15 1 3 ••••41 .••.11 1 26 21 4 2 3 2 2 2 9 .... \ 2 .. , 20. . .. .... 1

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21 11 11 1 .... 1.. · ·1 .... 1... 1 11 731 781 81 91 71 151

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257 $ 527.101$ 527.10 $ $ ' " .\$ 150.00 $ 140.001$ 14.00 205.80. . . .. •........ 30.00 8.00 99 205.801 548.90. . . . . . .. 200.00 20.00 256 543.90 1 121.00 •................ 69 142.80 142.80 . 95 201.60 201.60 95.00 90.001 9.00 137 287.70 287.70 165.00 150.00 15.00 731 153.30 153.30 81.20\ 10.00 1.00 46 96.60 96.60 50.00 30.00 3.00 1 •••••• 1. . . . . . . . . 20.00\ 2.00 42 86.10 86.10 1,0741$ 2,244.901$ 2,244.90 $ 1$ '" .1$ 662.201$ 670.001$ 67.00

Ritual District No. 57

·t"I···

Bonhomme, 45 ........... 13 11 9 2 .... 1 2 .. 2 ...... Bridgeton, 80 ..•......... 36 36 35 5 1 ~I 71 7 Webster Groves, 84 ........ 43 40 37 8 7 81 41 .. · .. · 2 .... 3 3 .......... Fenfon, 281. ............. 10 13 18 5 7 7 3 1 1 ... 1.... 1... ... Meramec, 813 ............ Kirkwood, 484 ............ 31 31 36 11 2 '1·.· ... 3 1 4 61 Ferguson, 542 ............ 10 17 18 6 1 4 7 Maplewood, 566 .......... 32 36 25 2 '" 1 20 30 28 3 34 11 4 ..• Clayton, 601. .•.......... 2 7 Wellston, 618 ............. 74 72 83 4 ... 2 6 91 11 13 13 .... 2 Valley Park, 629 •........ 3 11 2 ... 9 9 9 3 .... Freedom, 636 •.•.......... 2 11 .... 1... 4 ... 2 6 2 1... Jennings, 640 ............ 29 31 32 1 2 11 Gardenville, 666 .......... 14 14 11 1 2 1 ... TOTAL ............. 3411 3561 3611 661 241 461 601 241· .. 1...

'''1' '1'''

161$ 429 656 185 81 419 244 520 363 811 167 47 269 213 4,6651$

1$· .... ···

338.101$ 338.10 $ ...... '1$ .... $ 110.00 $ 11.00 892.50 230.00 23.00 892.50/ 1,375.50 1,376.60 ::::::::1 ::::: :1···· 3'4:00 370.00 87.00 388.501 388.50 100.00 10.00 168.001 168.00 70.00 7.00 884.10 . ....... ··· ... 1......... 884.101 810.00 81.00 606.10 ........ 1 .. · ... 1 . . . . •• . . • 100.00 10.00 1,085.70 1,085.70 '" ·····1 ····.·1 820.00 82.00 396.00 768.10 768.10 .............. 1 80.00 210.00 21.00 1,686.30 1,686.30 .. ···· .. 1·· .... 1.. ·· ... ·· 740.00 74.00 364.90 ........ \ ...... I 130.00 13.00 854. 90 1 67.50 98.70 .............. \ ......... 98.70 90.00 9.00 548.10 ....................... 290.00 29.00 548. 10 1 446.20 445.20 ....................... 14.00 140.001 9,629.801$ 9,529.80 $ ....... 1$ .... 1$ 724.501$ 3,210.001$ 821.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

~

SEVENTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-W. FRANK HOUK, D. D. G. M., St. James, Mo. Ritual District No. 39

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Lebanon.77 Vienna, 94. .. .. . .. . .. Cuba, 312................ Salem, 225............... Belle, 373.. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . Lane's Prairie, 531. .. .. .. Rolla, 213................ St. James, 230............ Equality, 497. .. . . .. . . . . . . Arlington, 346 , .•. . . . Latimer, 146............. TOTAL.............

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10 3 15 10 6 6 171 61 6) 8 81 951

10 12 1 '-7 1 1 1 .... 1 2 21' .. 14 11........ 1 6 1 .. , 12 15 4 5 3 4 1 .. , .. , 10 7 2 2 I 4..... . 6 6 2 4 21 I , 14 18 8 1 7 41 4\...... 6 7 2 3 1 8 11... . 1 3 1 21 .. , .. , 8 6 . . .. 1 3j j.. , '" 8 6 1 1 3 21 I... ... 971 981 171 141241 331 131 ... 1...

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223\$ 464.101$ 464.10$ 1$ 1$ $ 68 144.901 144.90.. .. 138.00 175 367.501 367.50 / 25.00 2261 480.90\ 483.00........ 2.101 200.00 119 252.001 252.00 ··1 \. . . . . . . . . 56 115.60 116.60 431 882.00 882.00.............. 76.001 129 273.00 273.00 1 1 104 233.101 233.10 1 j 96 201.601 201.60 / \ 64.00 106 220.60 220.60 1 112.65 1,7321$ 3,635.101$ 3,637.20 $ 1$ 2.101$ 606.651$

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10.00 3.00 15.00 10.00 6.00 6.00 20.00 6.00 6.00 8.00 8.00 98.00

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Ritual District No. 47 Van Buren, 509 .......... Grandin, 679 ............. Hopewell, 239 ............ Barnesville, 363 .......... Delphian, 137 ............ Winona, 430 ............. Eminence, 607 ............ TOTAL .............

;1

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341

5 5 3 2 4 5 7/ 311

61 6 5/ 2

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7 361

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21 ... 1... I.... 1.. ·1 ... 1 2 ····1 11111 ... 1 1 ....... 1 31 .......... ... '/' .. ' " 1 1\ ... 1.......... 4"'1' .. 1 51"'/'" 1 5 1 21 1 ...•.. 71

121

31

I.···I··"!""·

61

61 ... 1•••

1231$ 264.101$ 264.10 79 161.701 161.70 132.30 64 132.301 163.80 82 155.401 30 111.30 66 111. 1 71.40 71.40 33 163.80 74 163.801 5101$ 1,050.001$ 1,058.40

$ ....... 1$ .... 1$ .... ·· .. $ ........ \ ...... \ 9.00 ....................... ........ 1 8.40\ ......... ........ / ...... 1 16.00 .............. / 12.00 ........ ...... 16.00 52.001$ $ ....... 1$ 8.401$

80.00 $ 50.00 30.00 80.00 50.00 70.00 70.00 330.001$

3.00 5.00 8.00 3.00 5.00 7.00 7.00 33.00

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EIGHTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-W. T. RUFF, D. Ritual Dis trict No. 48

j...

Star of the West, 133...... 6 4 61 11 1 1 11 I 6 6 6 1 1 .. I.. 001'" ... M08iac, 361.............. Marcus, 110.............. 26 20 26 4 6 1 21 3...... Bismarck, 41. . . . . .. . . 10 10 10 1 1 1 61. . .. Farmington, 132 10 10 10 2 51 /...... Ionic,154 12 10 6 ' 1 1 1: 21 1... St. Francois, 234......... 3 2 2 1 1 ... 1 , Samaritan, 424. . . .. . . . . . . 19 15/ 12 · .... 1 2 41 1 Pendleton, 551... .. .. .. .. 5 6 6 00 .. I.. .. 1 41 .... / 1. . . Leadwood, 598.. .. .. .. .. . 4 4 4 1 1 2 11 1 I.. . Elvina, 599 ......... 00 00 00 23 26 25 3 1 2 11 4...... Saline, 226............... 10 111 12 11 1 2 31 .. 001 ... TOTAL 1321 12-3"11241141 121 131 271 1l1~~

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G. M., Jackson, Mo.

6.00 971$ 201.601$ 201.60 $ 1$ ···.1$ 33.001$ 60.00/$ 6.00 611 128.101 128.10 1 ...... / ......... 1 60.00 22.00 235 499.801 606.10 00 1 6.30......... 220.001 113 233.101 233.10 1 / 65.00 100.001 10.00 180 1 10.00 361.201 878.00··.·.·.·1 16.801 24.75 100.001 12.00 154 317.101 317.10 1 60.00 120.00/ 1 2.00 381 75.601 76.60.......... 1 21.00 20.00 147 1 16.00 298.201 298.20. . . . . . .. .· 1 168.00 150.001 6.00 40 79.801 79.80 I I.. .. . .. .. 60.001 4.00 130 275.00 275.00 I 1 220.85 40.001 24.00 2661 541.801 541.80 00 001 240.001 10.00 1321 273.001 273.00 00.1 1 \ 100.001 1,5931$ 3,284.301$ 3,307.40 $ 1$ 23.10/$ 672.601$ 1,260.001$ 126.00

12 13 23 3 1 14 12 781

····1

121121- 1 1.... \ 3 21 8 8 1... 21 .. 21 27 4 41 4 91 2 1 1 ... 1 1 1 11 14/ 11/ 11 2/ 1 I.. 6 2 31 00' 21 631 611 91 91 91 171

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Ritual Dis trict No. 49 Trowel, 440. .... ..... .... Zalma, 645............... Mt. Marks, 93. . . .. . . .. . . . West View, 103.......... Mystic Tie, 221. .. .. .. .. .. Whitewater, 417. . . . . . . .. . Excelsior, 441 TOTAL.............

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1261$ 260.401$ 260.50 $ ...... '1$ .10\$ 8:00 $ 86 1 178.601 178.50....................... 393 806.40\ 806.40. . . . . . .. 61 106.00 106.00 00...... 173.70 113 239.401 241.60 1 2.101 60.00 107 228.90 228.90. . . . . 21.00 142/ 294.001 294.00 1......... 1,0181$ 2,112.601$ 2,114.80 $ 1$ 2.201$ 262.701$ 1

i20.001$ 130.001 220.001 30.00 10.001 140.00 120.00 770.001$

12.00 13.00 22.00 3.00 1.00 14.00 12.00 77.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued NINETEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-R. D. ELLINGTON, JR., D.D.G.M., 222 E. Main St., Portageville, Mo. Ritual District No. 50

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:5 East Prairie, 384 ......... Charleston, 407 ...... 0.... Morley, 184 .............. Ashlar, 306 .............. Sikeston, 310 ............ 0 Illmo, 681. .......... 0.... Chaffee, 615 ... 0......... 0 Bloomfield, 1530 ........ 00 Essex, 278 ............... Lakeville, 489 ........ 0... Dexter, 632 .............. Advance, 690 ............. Puxico, 696 .............. Morehouse, 603 ...... 0.... TOTAL .............

91

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89 186.901$ 186.90 $ ...... '1$ .... i$···· .... 1$ 100.00,$ 10.00 618.70 .......... ...... ......... 245 1$ 518.701 130.001 13.00 212.10 · ....... / ...... / 100 10.00 60.00 6.00 212.10\ 67.20 ........ ...... 36 67.20 6.00 ......... 1•••••••• 669.10 · ....... 1 ..... ·1 270 669.101 46.00 330.00 33.00 188 392.70 110.00 11.00 392. 70 1 134 277.20 277.20 ........ ...... ......... 80.00 8.00 289.10 · . . . . . . . 138 286.60 30.00 110.00 11.00 3.60 I 83 172.20 20 172. 1 40.00 90.00 '.00 109 233.10 · . . . . . .. ...... 233.10 105.00 100.00 10.00 162 325.60 · . . . . . .. ...... 326.60 128.00 160.00 15.00 180.60 · . . . . . .. . ..... \. . . . . . . . . 87 180.601 70.00 7.00 174.30 83 174.301 32.00 120.00 12.00 101 214.20 · . . . . . .. ...... 214.201 214.00 140.00 14.00 1,8241$ 3,809.401$ 3,812.901 $ ....... 1$ 3.501$ 610.001$ 1,680.001$ 168.00

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Ritual District No. 61 Kennett, 68.. . .. .. . . . . . . . 14 151131 61 5 21 21 51 1. . . Four Mile. 212............ 33 32 261 11....... 41 21 1... Hornersville. 215......... 1 2 3 1 2 21 11 .... I 1.. . Cardwell, 231..... 25 22 21.... 2 1 21 11 1... Malden. 406. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 13 101 31 6 161 11 21·' .. 1. . . Senath. 5.13.............. 6 81 8 .... 1 7 3 ... 1 4 1... PortageVllle.166 23 13 14 41 1: 1111 6\ 1... Point Pleasant. 176....... 3 6 7 .... I.... 1 11 1... New Madrid. 429......... 20 13 13 21.... 2 11 1 1... Parma, 650.. . .. . . . .. .. .. 11· 11 11 1 12 1 ... 1 I 1.. . Caruthersville. 461. . . . . . .. 25 23 18 3 6 31 5: 91 .. Hayti, 671........... .... 16 16 151 2 3 21 11 I... Steele. 684.. .. .. .. . .. . .. . 8 8 9 1 6 2 ... 1 1... Bernie. 673.............. 13 9 8 2 1 31 11.......... Clarkton. U.D.. .. .. . .. . .. . '" .... /....... 1... 1.... / TOTAL 2101 1901 1761 261 501 391 201 281 1...

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2131$ 453.301$ 453.30 $ 1$ '" .1$ 252.00 $ 140.001$ 14.00 1641 308.70\ 308.70 .··· ·1 · .... ·1 40.00 330.00 33.00 84 178.50 186.90 1 8.401......... 10.00 1.00 132 275.70 279.30 1 4.201 72.00 250.00 25.00 116 252.00 262.00 1 1. . . . . . . . . 130.00 13.00 111 243.60 243.60 ·.1 70.00 7.00 164 338.10 338.10 1...... 230.00 23.00 61 128.10 128.10 1 1 33.00 30.00 8.00 122) 264.10 254.10 I I......... 200.00 20.00 99 214.20 214.20 I 25.00 110.00 11.00 157 329.70 329.70 "1 146.00 260.00 25.00 1021 218.401 227.10........ 8.70 24.00 160.00 16.00 119 258.30 258.30 1 ...... 45.00 90.00 9.00 83 170.10 174.30 1 4.20......... 130.00 13.00 20 42.00 42.00 1 ...... 100.00 10.00 1,7371$ 3.664.201$ 3,689.70 $ 1$ 25.501$ 637.001$ 2,220.001$ 222.00

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TWENTIETH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-EUGENE L. McGEE, D. D. G. M., Poplar Bluff, Mo. Ritual District No. 52

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q PoplarBluff.209 Pine. 314. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Composite. 369. . . . . . . . . . . Naylor. 568 Greenville, 107 Wayne. 626.............. TOTAL.. . .. . .. .. . ..

10 3 2 8

10 8 6 10

4 271

5 331

13 1 3 .... 7 4 7 1

14\8: 1 ... 81 2 1 ... I 11 11 1 \ 6........ 31 1 351 61 41 91 131

1

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3281$ 46 116

686.701$ 76.001 247.801

/$ 686.70 $ 76.00 247.80. . . . . . .. .

/$

774.001$ 16.60 1. . . . . . . . .

180.001$ 30.001 20.001

18.00 3.00 2.00

300.001$

30.00

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1608JI ... ... 1371 281.401 281.40 7871$ 1,411.601$ 1.411.60 $

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

00 00

Ritual District No. 53

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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:§ Mt. Zion, 327 ............. Ingomar, 636 ............. Mountain View, 637 ....... Alton, 265 ............... Woodside, 387 ............ Clifton, 463 .............. Koshkonong, 682 ......... Sampson, 298 ............ Bayou, 366 ............... Rockbridge, 436 .......... Robert Burns, 496 ........ TOTAL .............

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$

49.24

:::::::/ :::H:>~~:i ........ \......I

71.40

: : : : : : :: :::::: I•••••4.0:~~

.... ···.1 .· .. ··1 $ ....... 1$ .... 1$

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2461$ 620.801$ 620.80 236.20 235. 20 1 114\ 61 132.30 132.30 107 224.701 224.70 29 63.001 63.00 143 304.501 304.60 43 90.30 159.60 87 169.60 50 105.00 105.00 44 88.20 88.20 83 165.401 166.40 1,0071$ 2,079.001$ 2,079.00

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1

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88.00 302.111$

90.00)$ 100.001 120.001 30.00\ 10.00 80.001 80.001 170.001 60.001 30.00i 30.001 790.001$

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9.00 10.00 12.00 3.00 1.00 8.00 8.00 17.00 6.00 3.00 3.00 79.00

TWENTY-FmST ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRI CT-L. B. PARRISH, D. D. G. M., Bolivar, Mo. Ritual District No. 38 Linn Creek, 162 \ I 6.... I ·1 2I 2 Mack's Creek, 433........ 6 5 Laclede, 83............... 14 18 15 1 4 1 Competition, 432. . . . . . . .. ..•. 5 ., .. •.. Conway, 628............. 6 6 6 2 6 8 Waynesville, 375. . . . . . . . . 3 4 5 1 .... 10 Richland, 385,........... 11 17 15.... 2... Brumley, 203............. .... .... .... .... 1 Iberia, 410............... 4 6 6 1 1 TOTAL............. 431 64\ 661 51 161 161

\

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1 1 ..•... 1 2, . 21 1 . 2\ 21 .. 1 ••..... 1 • • • 31 . 21 / . 1 . 131 61 1 .

881$ 1$ ..•..... $ 821 174.301 174.30 1811 380.101 380.10 651 105.00 106.00 65 136.50 138.60 167 1 344.40 344.40 147 312.90 812.90 34 65.101 67.20 100 205.801 206.80 9191$ 1,724.101$ 1,728.30 $

1$.··· .. ·· $ \$ .....•. 36.00 60.00 6.00 /......... 140.00 14.00 125.00 ••............... 2.101......... 60.00 6.00 76.76 30.00 3.00 " 186.50 120.00 12.00 1 2.10[ 105.001 . 8.001 40.001 4.00 1 .•.... 1 1$ 4.201$ 536.261$ 440.001$ 44.00

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Ritual District No. 41 Riddick, 861. .•........... Western Light, 896 ....... Urbana, 421. ............ Hogle's Creek. 279 ........ Hermitage, 288 ........... Fair Play, 44 ............. Modern, 144 .............. Pleasant. 160 ............. Bolivar. 193 .............. Pleasant Hope, 467 ....... Aldrich, 664 .............. TOTAL .............

7 7 9 8 1 8 4 4 8 6 1 .... 2 2 1 3 11 12 2 461

2 461

. .... .... ... .. ... .. ...,.

7 ... ., 2 2 11 .. · ... 10 .... 1 2 .• , .... ... .. , 8 1 1 .•• 4 1 2 .... ... . 1 .... 4 1 1 1 1 .... ... 1 .... . 6 .... 3 1 1 1 ... . 4 1 '0' •••• 11 4 3 3 .... 2 2 2 631 131 61 111 91 .... 1· .. 1...

...

.... ...

96/$ 206.80 $ 206.80 47 100.80 102.90 67 117.60 117.60 80 168.00 168.00 123.0Q 122.90 66 121.80 68 121.80 184.40 66 184.40 31 66.10 63.00 136 277.20 277.20 61 126.00 126.001 39 81.90 81.90 7351$ 1,521.601$ 1,521.50

$ ....... /$ ........

.... /$ 2.10

: .. :: .. : .... 1 :·... :·... 1•••• • .10 ...... 1 ........ ...... 1

'1:" 77.00

66.00 18.20

·····r······· 1.0.1:~~

•••••••••••••• 1

70.00 $ 7.00 90.00 9.00 20.00 2.00 40.00 4.00 80.00 8.00 10.00 1.00 20.00 2.00 10.00 1.00 110.00 11.00 •... 20:001' ••. 2:00

48.00 $ 80.00

........ ...... 108.00 2.10 : : : : : : : : \ : : : : :: .... $ 2.201$ 2.101$ 560.001$

470.001$

47.00

TWENTY-SECOND ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JOHN H. HICKS, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo. Ritual District No. 46 Ava. 26 ...........•...... Pilot Knob. 182 .......•... Barnes, 116 .............. Texas. 177 •.............. Plato, 469 ........••...... Summersville, 555 ........ Mountain Grove, 158 ...... Joppa. 411 ......•........ Mansfield, 548 ............ Grove8llring, 589 .......•• Norwood, 622 ............ TOTAL .............

21 4 6 9 2 8 18 2 6 4 8 781

16 2 6 5 8 8 10 8 7 4 8 671

14 1 2 1 2 .... ... ... 2 .... .... , 2 ... ... 2 ... ... 7 .... 4 2 9 7 4 .... ... ... 5 2 ... 1 .... ... 2 .... 1 ... 3 1 .... 2 .... 11 , 4 6 8 2 7 ..• 2 .... ... 3 .... 1 1 1 .... ... ... 7 .... .. , .... ... ... 4 .... 6 1 .... 2 1 .... . . . 1 . . . 651 181 161 91 231 111 ... 1...

... ..

... .... ... .... ...

... ... ... .. ...

140 $ 277.201$ 277.20 $ ...... ·1$ · .. ·1$·· ...... $ 52 106.40 ........ ...... 106.40 7.00 101 214.20 ........ 214.20 80.00 140 74.80 294.00 294.00 ........ ...... 93 197.40 197.40 ........ ...... 36.40 73 140.70 ........ . 140.70 875.90 ........ 172 875.90 ......... 43 88.20 . ....... ...... 35.00 88.20 65 141.30 15.00 143.40 2.10 ...... 27 56.10 56.10 . ....... ...... 20.00 64 1 132.3Q 182.30 ........ ..... ......... 2.101$ .... 1$ 218.201$ 9701$ 2,025.801$ 2,023.70 $

......

..... ......... ...... .

210.00 $ 40.00 40.00 100.00 20.00 30.00 130.00 20.00 70.00 40.00 80.00 780.001$

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21.00 4.00 4.00 10.00 2.00 8.00 18.00 2.00 7.00 4.00 8.00 78.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

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TWENTY-THIRD ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-R. JASPER SMITH, D.D.G.M., 821 Woodruff Bdg., Springfield, Mo. Ritual District No. 45 Po

A d

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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O'Sullivan, 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . 791 5 6 4 3 1 1 .. , ......• 91 1" Ash Grove, 100........... 3 4 4 ........ 11 .... 1... Solomon, 271. . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 681 9: • 2 91 71 .•. Gate of the Temple, 422.. . 741 82 88 51 71 6 181 .... I... Republic. 570............ 4 6 10 .... 1 2... II .... , ... S'raffo,d, 608 ............ 2 2 ........ ·1 .... I.. · Wlllard, 620.............. 5 7 7i 1 1 2 31 3, ... .. ·1 Webster, 98.............. 5 3 4 1 2 1 11 .... 1... Doric, 300. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 4 2. . .. .. I.... I· .. Mount Olive, 439......... 4 4 5 .... 1 .. , 1/ .... /... Hazelwood, 459 ............... \.... .... .... .... ... 41 .... I... Henderson, 477........... 13 14 16 1 1 11 ... 1 . . . . I... TOTAL ............. 2651 2791 2871 311 331 231 521 221·· .1 ...

711

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8411$ 671 133 6631 995/ 112 701 95 103 55 42 61 116 3,3431$

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1,774.501$ 138.601 249.90 1,388.101 2,068.501 237.301 140.70 195.301 30 98.40 1 216. 90.30 105.00 239.40 6,942.301$

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1,774.50 138.60 249.90 1,388.10 2,068.50 239.40 140.70 199.50 216.30 98.40 90.30 105.00 239.40 6,948.60

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$ ...... ·1$ .. , ·1$········ $ 790.00\$ 79.00 50.00 6.00 ........ / ...... / 72.00 ........ ...... 90.00 700.00 70.00 1 ::::::::/ ::::: :1 .... 3'5'.00 740.00 74.00 120.00 12.00 ........ 1 2.101 ......... · ... ··.·1 .... ·.1 68.00 ......... 1........ 50.001 5.00 .. · .. · .. 1 4.201········ . 60.001 6.00 ........ ...... 20.00 30.001 3.00 ....................... 60.001 6.00 .. ·· .. ···1 .... · .. · ::::::::1 ::::: :1···· '6'2:85 120.001 12.00 $ .... · .. 1$ 6.301$ 867.351$ 2,760.001$ 276.00

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Ritual District No. 54

Sparta, 296 .....•..•••... Friend, 852 ..............Billings, 379 ............. Forsyth, 468 ............. Branson, 587 ............. Galena, 515 .............. Crane, 519 ............... TOTAL .............

3 5 6 4 4 6 9 371

1 6 6 4 6 7 10 401

l·..

2 .... .... ... I... ... 7 2 .... 1 6 3 .... ... 4 .... 6 2 21 1 ... 4 ... 5 5 1 1 21 1 8 2 1 31 ....... 1 2 ....... 13 1 .... 461 121 91 61 151 61· .. 1.. •

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67 $ 119. 70 1$ 119.70 63.00 $ 118 241.50 241.50 $ 85.00 126.00 126.00 .............. 60 22.40 74 165.901 166.90 .............. 33.00 164 325.50 323.401 :: : : : : : : : 102 214.20 214.20 172 348.60 200.00 348.60 . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 1 7371$ 1,539.30 I $ 1,541.40 $ ....... 1$ 2.101$ 408.401$

·::::::f.. ::::

::::::::I...2:~~

30.00 $ 40.00 60.00 100.00 40.00 60.00 90.00 420.001$

8.00 5.00 6.00 10.00 4.00 6.00 9.00 43.00

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TWENTY-FOURTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-GEORGE F. PRATER, D. D. G. M., Carthage, Mo. Ritual District No. 44 Carthage. 197 22 201 201 91 4 21 81 31"'j'" Sarcoxie. 293............. 1 1 3 2 2................ Joplin. 335 : 45 48 50 4 4 1 14 1...... Fellowship. 345........... 54 43 46 2 7 61 161 6[ ... 1... Jasper. 398... ....•••.... 4 3 3· .. ·1 5 11 2\ 21" .\... Carterville, 401........... 7 7 101 1\.... 1 51 2 ... I... Mineral. 471. . . . . . . . . . • . . 3 8 81" .. I.. .. 1 21 .. I· .. Webb City. 512. ..••••. .. . 22 24 21. ···1 10. "1 81 5 I. .. Carl Junction. 549........ 2 2 2 2 11 I... Criterion. 586. .. . • . . . . . . . 3 4 81' •• ·1· 31 I· La Russell. 592.. .. .. . .. .. 4 4 4 .... . 1 1 11 11.... .. TOTAL... .. .. .. .... 1671 1641 1751 181 341 121 591 201 ... I.. .

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378 $ 791.70 $ 791.70 $ ·1$ \$ 25.001$ 220.001$ 22.00 73 157.50 157.50 1 60.00 10.001 1.00 656 1.371.30 1.871.30 1...... 450.001 45.00 655 1,375.50 1.375.50 \ \ 450.00 540.00 54.00 72 157.50 155.40 2.10. 10.00 40.001 4.00 152 287.70 287.70....................... 70.00 7.00 63 128.101 128.10 / ··1 60.00 30.001 3.00 237 508.20 508.20 I· ·1 10.00 220.001 22.00 95 195.30 195.30 1 25.00 20.00 2.00 63/ 111. 30 1 111.30 \ 1 39.00 30.00/ 3.00 28 58.80 58.80 .. I.. .. . .. .. 40.00 4.00 2,4721$ 5.142.901$ 5.140.80 $ 2.101$ 1$ 679.001$ 1.670.001$ 167.00

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Ritual District No. 55

"I'"'1'" .

Monett. 129.............. 261 20 181 341 11 51 81 51·· Barry. 367 .••.•......... , .... .... . ... ,. ... .... ... I... .. Pythagoras. 383.. .. .. .. .. 14 11 10 3 1 31 21 1 . 1 1 .. Comfort.588............. 71 6 91 .... 1 2 ... 1 11 Mount Vernon. 99. . . . . . . . 7 6 6 1 2 4 3[ I.. Canopy. 284. " . . . . . . . . . . . 28 29 25 2 7 8 9j 91 . Decatur, 400. .. . .. . . . .. .. 4 9 111 4.. .. 2 ... I I I . Red Oak. 468 •................ 1. . .. . ... I I.... \ ! ••• I I I . Stinson. 523.............. 31 21 11 1 1 1... 1 101.·.1 . Miller. 567............... 51 4: 31 11 .... 1 11 11 .... 1 1 .. TOTAL...... ....... 941 871 831 451 241231241 251 I· ..

'1' ..

3~~11~ .• :~~:~~II~ ...7.8.9:~~ ~::::::: 1$.. : : : : I~: ::::::: ~ .. ~~~:~~\~ .. :.5:~~

I

1911 401.101 401.10 ·1 ...... 168.00 110.001 172.20 48.40 70.00 85 172.20 I 135 283.501 283.50. . . . . . .. 200.00 70.00 3151 655.20 I 657.30. . . . . . . . 2.10 200.00 280.00 [ 239.40. . . . . . .. 56.00 40.00 114 239.401 241 50.401 50.40 . \ 20.00 •...•.... \ ..• 45\ 92.40 92.40 ········1 35.00 I 80.001 1......... 50.00 58 117.60 117.60 1 1.3761$ 2,801.401$ 2,803.50 $ 1$ 2.10\$ 727.401$ 900.001$

'1' .....

I

11.00 7.00 7.00 28.00 4.00 " . 3.00 5.00 90.00

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Ritual District No. 56 Southwest. 466 ........... Anderson. 621. ........... Noel. 647 ................ Neosho. 247 .............. Granby, 514 ...... , ....... Stella. 538 ............... TOTAL ........... ,.

4 111 11 3 12 16 12 19 1 17 771 591

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... 1... 1 11 ... / ... 21 31 41 .. · · .. 11.· ·1.·· .1 .. 13 41 .... 51 51 .... 1... · .. 1 ... I... 61 3 2 1 21 21 .... 1 . . . 1... 17 .... 1 1 ... 61 ... 1... 571 121 61 91 121

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70 $ 147.001$ 147.00 117 233.10 233.101 40 84.00 84.001 588.00 280 588.001 104 203.70 214.20 58 117.60 117.601 6691$ 1,373.401$ 1.383.90

$ ....... 1$ .... \$

8.001$

67.001

···.····1······ 1 .............. 55.00 ........ \ .. · .. ·1·· ...... · ........ \ 10.50\ 24.00 ........ ...... 34.10 188.101$ $ ....... 1$ 10.501$

".0'1'

110.00 40.00 230.00 160.001 190.001 770.001$

4.00 11.00 4.00 23.00 16.00 19.00 77.00

~

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

t-:)

TWENTY-FIFTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-DAVID V. MORRIS, D. D. G. M., Nevada, Mo. Ritual District No. 42

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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7 7 13 9 23 26 8 9 2 .... 4 4 5 4 8 4 651 681

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Stockton, 283 ............. Jerusalem, 315. " ........ Clintonville, 482 .......... Washington, 87 .......... Garrett, 859 .............. Everton, 405 ............. Melville. 458 ............. Lockwood, 521. .......•.. TOTAL ....•........

0

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7 16 26 12 4 4 7 761

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1

....I...1 .... 71 121

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2 .... 1 .......... 71 21 ... 1.. ·

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134.40 lOT 273.oT 315.00

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270.90 $ 2.10 $ .... $ 74.80 $ 136.50 ........ 2.10 ........ 315.00 ........ 25.00 243.10 ........ 235.20 7.90 60.00 88.20 ........ 88.201 27.00 180.60 60 ........ 104.26 180. 1 881 67 140.70 140.70 ........ ...... 87.00 130.20 130.20 ........ 62 ........ 7131$ 1,497.301$ 1,505.20,$ 2.101$ 10.001$ 828.061$

.

64 149 116 421

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70.001$ 180.00\ 280.00 80.00 20.001 40.00 50.00/ 80.00 650.001$

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~~;j 7.00 13.00 23.00 8.00 2.00 4.00 5.00 3.00 65.00

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Ritual District No. 43 Osage, 803 .....•......... 20 17 Sheldon, 371 ............. 5 6 Schell City, 448 ........... 15 16 Montevallo, 490 ....•...... 1 1 Unity, 495 ....•.......... 8 6 Walker, 605 .............. .... 1 Hermon, 187 ..•.•........ 13 12 Lamar, 292 ..............' 10 6 Golden, 475 .............. 5 6 Milford, 616 ..•........... .... .... TOTAL ............. 771 681

6 1 ....· 171 1 14 .•..31 ~ ... ~ ... ~

'11

l~7•••4 2 5 1

711

4

4 2

2 2

... ...

1 1 2 .,.

8

.... ... ...

2··l·l····

3 3 7 ...... 3 .... 2 2 .......... 4 .... 1 .......... 1... 181 101 151 121 141 ... 1...

tt:l

280 $ 679.60 $ 581.70 $ ....... $ 2.10 $ 156.20 $ 200.00 $ 191.10 ........ ...... 191.10 60.00 91 115.60 ........ 115.50 48.00 65 150.00 77.70 ........ ...... 31.20 20.00 77.70 37 168.80 163.80 ........ ...... 96.80 73 80.00 84.00 ....... 84.00 16.00 39 20.00 189.00 ........ 189.00 90.00 130.00 91 836.00 ........ ...... 836.00 80.00 100.00 160 149.10 149.10 ........ ...... . ........ j 73 60.00 69.80 69.30 36 28.00 ••••••.•• 9841$ 1,944.601$ 1,946.70 $ .... ··.1$ 2.101$ 544.201$ 800.001$

......

.

...... ......

.........

20.00 6.00 15.00 1.00 8.00 2.00 13.00 10.00 6.00 79.00

.....

~

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TWENTY-SIXTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTBIC T-THOMAS F. HERNDON, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo. Ritual District No. 35 Hume, 130 Amsterdam, 141 Butler, 264 Rockville, 341 Tyrian, 360 Crescent Hill. 368 Rich Hill, 479 Foster, 664 TOTAL

. . . . . . . . .

'1'" "I'"

6 14 18 2

4 11 10 8

8 2 10 2 10 6 3 ....

1 41.· ·1·.. 2 . .. 1 .. 18 3 6 4 ... '" 1 1.......... 6

7 4 671

7 7 6 471

6 .. .. 7 .... , 6 1 481 101

2 2 41' .. ·1... 2 2 1 .... I... 4 4 '" .1. .. 361 161 121 41 ... 1...

...6

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)$ .. "1$

931$ 191.20\$ 191.20 $ 391 86.10 I 86.10 140 329.70 329.70 661 126.001 126.00. . . . . . .. 14 1••••••••• 1021 212.10 212.10 . 106 210.00 210.00 80 180.60 180.60 " 6281$ 1,336.701$ 1,336.70 $ 1$

1

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\ 1$

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40.00 $ 40.00 16.00

60.00/$ 140.00 180.00 30.00

160.00 14.70 167.80 418.601$

60.001 70.001 40.001 670.001$

1

6.00 14.00 18.00 8.00 .

6.00 7.00 4.00 67.00

~

Ritual District No. 37

'1'" '"

Windsor, 29 '1 7 8 4 31' .. Urich, 286. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... 1 1 3 3 1 .. , ... Montrose, 408. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... .... •... 1 1 2 .... 1. .. . .. Clinton, 648.............. 16 12 12 4 7 13 81 71 ...... Calhoun, 662............. 1 1 1 .... .... 1 1 .........• St. Clair, 273. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 4 3 6 3. . . 2 .. , ..• Circle, 84.2............... 61 3 3 1 .. Lowry City, 403,.......... 2 3 3 1.... 1 21 Appleton City, 412. . . . . . . . 6 6 6 3 .. , . 1 31......... . Star, 419. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . .. 3 8 3 1 1 1 2 . TOTAL............. 421 891 861 121 141 241 241 101 I .

'j'" ..

127/$ 260.40 $ 260.40 $ -I$-----:-~ .. /$ 66.00 $ 70.00)$ 7.00 . 20 42.00 42.00 66.00 ....•.... . 64.60 1 2.10. . . . . . . .. • .•..•...... , . 36 62.60 1 890.00 160.00 16.00 286 609.00 609.00 86 76.60 76.60 . , 60.00 10.001 1.00 202.86 40.00 4.00 132 281.40 281.40 36 71.401 71.40 41.10 60.00 6.00 132.80.............. 76.00 •........ 1........ 68 132.301 106 220.60 220.60 160.00 60.00 6.00 8.00 41 86.10 88.20 2.10 36.00 30.00 880/$ 1,831.201$ 1,886.40 $ 1$ 4.201$ 1,064.461$ 400.001$ 40.00

'1' .....

TWENTY-SEVENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JOLLY P. HURTT, D.D.G.M., 1506 S. Vermont St., Sedalia, Mo. Ritual Dis trict No. 24 Arrow Rock, 66 ........... Cambridge, 63 ............ Miami, 86 ................ Trilumina, 206 ..•........ Barbee, 217 .............. Malta, 402 ..•............ Oriental, 618 ............. Nelson, 660 .............. TOTAL .............

...

...

.. , 4 .... 1 4 8 8 4 4 4 .... 8 2 .... ... .... 4 17 19 16 4 7 7 4 .... 9 7 7 .... 2 ... 21 .... . 2 21 .... . 2 .... 3 8 2 1 .... 1 .... . ,. .... :::1::: 2 .... .... 2 1 111 .... 491 441 831 111 161 81 161 .... I.. ·1· ..

...

....

l"" ..

.. ... ...

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26 $ 48.30 $ 60.40 $ .. · .... 1$ 2.10 $ ........ $ 2.10 . 160 343.40 ........ 436.86 341.30 78.60 . ....... . 36 73.60 20.00 249 620.80 622.90 ........ 2.10 90.00 262.60 ........ ...... 127 262.60 184.00 48 100.80 100.80 ........ ...... 10.60 116.60 116.60 ........ 67 36.00 40 84.00 • .. • .... 1 4.20 79.801 7421$ 1,642.601$ 1,663.00 S....... 1$ 10.601$ 776.36/$

.....

......

.........

40.001$ 90.00 40.00 170.00 90.00 30.00 20.00 20.00 6001001$

4.00 9.00 4.00 17.00 9.00 8.00 2.00 2.00 60.00

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

~

Ritual District No. 36

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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] Cole Camp, 595 ........... Shawnee, 653 ............. Knob NOElter, 245 ......... Holden, 262 .............. Corinthian, 265 ........... Cold Spring, 274 .......... Chilhowee, 487 ........... Sedalia, 236 .............. Granite, 272 .............. Green Ridge, 425 ......... La Monte, 574 ............ TOTAL .............

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1 2 2 2 3 1 1 .......... 2 .... 2 2 1 .... 1...... 2 ........... 15 9 1... 7 2 2 ... 1 41 ... 9 10 11 5 31 1 ... 1· •• 8 •. • . 4 4 4 1 1 ... 1 .... 1 . . . . . . 5 5 5 .... 1 1 1 1 ...... 1 27 27 26 3 4 9 5\ 5 ... 1... 26 26 23 31 .. 2 8 5 6 6 3 1 1 .... 2 ... 1.... /...... 1 .... .... .... 1 ...... 1....... I... 981 891 811 171 201 241 22) 101 ... 1•..

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37 $ 67.201$ 67.20 $ ....... 1$ . .. ·1$.·.····· $ 74 161.70 • • • • • • • • 1 • • • • • • \ 70 90.00 161. 24 50.40 1 50.40 138 291.90 291.90 195 409.50 . ••••... 1 •••.•• 78.50 409. 50 1 64 134.40 134.40 65 134.401 136.50 "2'.iO ::::::::: 451 945.00 120.00 392 827.40 827.40 240.00 48 100.80 100.80 .............. 35.00 67.20 54.60 67.20 .............. 311 1,6191$ 3,181.501$ 3,192.00 $ ....... 1$ 10.501$ 618.101$

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10.00/$ 20.00 20.001 150.00 90.001 40.00 50.00 260.001 260.00 60.00/ 10.00 970.001$

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TWENTY-EIGHTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JULIUS A. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Centralia, Mo. Ritual District No. 25 Cooper, 36 •.............. Pleasant Grove, 142 ....... Wm. D. Muir, 277 ........ ' Wallace, 466 ............. Prairie Home, 503 ........ Howard, 4 ............... Fayette, 47 ............... Livingston, 51. ........... Armstrong, 70 ........... TOTAL .............

12 6 5 1 3 7 4 7 1 461

10 11 1 1 31 ... ·1·· '1'" 11 .... 1...... 10 9 2 21 .... 1... 1... 4 .... 3 3 11 .... 1 . . ·[ . . . 5 1 11 ... 1... 5 1 ..... 5 5 2 3 1 2! .... 1... \... 6 7 i ... I .... I...... 5 8.... li ... I... I.... I.. 1 1 1 ....... 1... 1.... I...... 11 ... 1... 5 61 9! 491 491 81

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474.60 157.50 157.50 79.80 79.80 54.60 26 54.60 96.60 47 96.601 127 264.60 262.501 112 1 231.00 231.001 134.40 134.40\ 66\ 54 107.10 107.10 7741$ 1,698.101$ 1,600.20 75

39 22'1'

$ ....... 1$ .. "1$ ..•.•.•• 1 •••••.

60.001$ 60.00

·······/····r······ ........ ...... 30.00 10.00

........ I......

........ 1 2.10 ......... 71.60 ........ 1 ...... 1

........ [· .. ·.. 1· .. ·.. ·.. .......................

$ ....... 1$

2.101$

231.601$

120.001$ 60.00 50.001 10.001 50.001 70.001 50.00 70.00 10.001 490.001$

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Ritual District No. 26 Centralia, 59 ............. Twilight, 114 •........•... Ashland, 156 ............. Sturgeon, 174 ............ Hallsville, 886 ............ Ancient Landmark, 356 ... Hinton, 455 •.....•....... Acacia, 602 .......•...... , TOTAL .............

8 9 23 15 10 10 4 • 4 .... 8 3 1 1 28 26 811 681

8 16 10 5 3 30 721

11 1 4 2 11 .... / .. ·/··· 2 ... 1 3 1 2 .......... .... 2 1 ... .... 2 8 13 5 811 82 ...... 201 241 181 17\,. 121 ... 1... 8 8

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1891$ 285.60/$ 285.60 $ .. · ... ·1$ · ... 1$ 4.00 $ .40 ......... 2501 527.10 527.50 ........ 77 153.30 68.50 153.30 ........ 105 214.20 .5.00 214.20 ........ ...... 80 63.00 28.00 63.00 ........ ...... 66 188.60 19.50 138.60 ........ 19 37.80 2.10 12.00 89.90 ........ 350 760.20 760.20 ........ 1 ...... 1......... 1,0361$ 2,179.80/$ 2,182.30 $ ....... 1$ 2.501$ 177.001$

......

......

80.001$ 280.00 100.00 .0.00 40.00 30.00 10.00 280.00 810.00/$

8.00 28.00 10.00 4.00 4.00 8.00 1.00 28.00 81.00

TWENTY-NINTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-WILBUR P. SCHNIDER, D.D.G.M., 1120 E. McCarty, Jefferson City Ritual Dis trict No. 31 Jefferson, 43. .. . . . . .. .. .• 44 44 44 10 31 6 12 31 ...... Russellville, 90........... 5 7 7 2 4 3 1 .........• Hickon. Hill, 211. . . . . . . . . 3 2 2. • • . 3 3. . . 1 .. , ... Centertown, 611. . . . • . . . . . 5 6 6 1 3. .. •.•. . .•.•. Tipton, 56. . . . . . . • . . • . . . . 1 8 2 . . .. 1 .. , .... ... . .. California, 188. .. . .. .. • .. 8 11 11 1 ... 6......... • Moniteau, 295............ 4 4 1........ 1 6 .•....•..• Clarksburg, 553. .• . . •. . .. .... .... .... .... .... 1 .. , ......•... Chamois, 185. . . . • • • . . . . . . 2 4 4 1 2 1 1. . .. ..• . .. Linn, 326. • . . • . . . • . . . . . . . 6 6 9 .... .... 1 1. . .. .•• • •• TOTAL.. ... .. .. .. .. 781 861 851 161 121 191 271 41 ... 1...

5611$ 1,169.201$ 1,159.20 $ \$ .... \$ 131.25 $ 470.001$ 63 126.90 130.10 4.20 12.00 . 50.00 30 69.30 69.30 .....•... 30.00 58 113.40 113.40 \ \ 64.60 50.001 128.10. . . . . . .. 371.00 10.001 63 128.101 148 306.601 306.60. . . . . . •. 80.00 69 123.90 123.90 66.20 40.00 71.40 1 148.00 •••••..• 36 71.40 132 281.40 281.40 I •••••• 1. • • . . • . . . 20.00 179 369.601 869.60 / 1 168.00 70.00 1,3281$ 2,748.801$ 2,763.00 $ 1$ 4.201$ 960.061$ 820.001$

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262.6.1' 77.70 84.00 666.60 980.701$

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24.00 9•• 72.00 76.00 261.401$

70.00\$ 90.00 10.001 190.00 860.001$

7.00 9.00 1.00 19.00 86.00 ~

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIRST ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JAMES M. DEWITT, D. D. G. M., Kirksville, Mo. (Ritual Districts 1, 2) Ritual District No. 1 County Lodge Location NO.1 Clark ••••••••• Fairmont .....•.. 290lWyaconda ••••••• Eldorado ...•.••.. 3181Luray ••••••••••• " Hiram .....•..•.. 362lKahoka.......... " St. Francisville ... 688lWayland ..•••• " Scotla~ci::::: : Memphis •....•... 16IMemphis ••••••• Gorin ...•..•.•••. 72IGorin ............ " Rutledge ...••.• o. 6721Rutledgeo •••••••. " Sch~1Ier: ..•.. Middle Fabius •••. 2441 Downing ........ Lodge of Love .••. 259lLancaster ..•..••. Queen City •.•..•. 380lQueen City ••••••. " Glenwood ..•.••.. 427lGlenwood. Greentop .....•.. 6S6IGreentop ••.••. o.

......... ......... ......

....

...... ...... ......

......

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••••••

Master Fred Lawson ........ Virgil Kearns ....... Glen M. Crockett ..... Glen McMarlin ....... Wilbert Woodsmall ... Chester Hartman .... Troy Smith .......... John W. Fryrear ..... E. E. Shepherd, Jr.... Fred King ........... Chas. M. Bauhn, Jr... Harley Gingerich .... ,

Secretary J. C. Bowman ..... , Orville Worrell ..... Elmer C. Dinger ... ' Dale Hagerman .... W. C. Fender ...... R. E. Shacklett ..... James A. Bailey .... Harry R. West ..... H. C. Burkland .... G. L. Lauer ........ Nelson M. Hopper .. Arthur S. King ....•

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th MondayS ............. 1st and 3rd WednesdayS ...••••••. 1st and 3rd FridayS 1st and 3rd ThursdayS ..•.. 1st Friday •...•.•..•......•...••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......... : .. 1st and Srd Fridays •• 2nd and 4th ThursdayS ...••••.... 2nd and 4th Fridays .•... 2nd and 4th TuesdayS ....•••....•. 1st and 8rd Thursdays ...•...••... 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 0

•••••••••

0

0

......

0

0

0

••

••••••

0

.....

••••••••

Charter Date Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 17, 1870 Sept. 26, 1907 May 6,1862 Oct. IS, 1892 Sept. 28, 1906 May 26,1865 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 10, 1871 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 27, 1924

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Ritual District No. 2 Adair 1 Kirksville ..••.••. .. • Adair ' .. • •••••••. Novinger ..•..••• Knox Colony " Edina Paulville Greensburg

105IKirksville .....•.. 866IKirksville 683INovinger.••••••• 168jColony 291IEdina S19jHurdland 414IGreensburg •••••.

Albert R. Eschmann., Samuel W. Motter Alexander Nimmo Bruce S. McReynolds. Reed Sharp James Helton E. L. Priebe

Grover C. Chambers Ernest T. Scofield .. F. A. Steele C. E. McReynolds Ira D. Willows John R. Botts Goo. Wm. Farris

1st and 8rd Tuesdays .•••••.....•• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•.•.•••. Thursday on or before full moon 1st and 8rd ThursdayS 1st Tuesday. 2nd and 4th MondayS ......•...... 0

0

June 30,1864 Oct. 13,1881 Sept. 27, 1906 May 24,1864 Oct. 16,1866 Oct. 12,1869 Oct. 13.1871 ~

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SECOND ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-RUS SELL A. HAUCK, D. D. G. M., Unionville, Mo. (Ritual Districts 3, 4)

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Ritual District No.3 Putnam .. • •••••. .. • .••••. Sullivan ....... .. .. •••• ••••••.

Hartford Somerset ...•.•... Unionville....... Humphreys...... Seaman Green City .....•. Putnam Pollock ••.••••.•. Arcana Winigan ..•..••..

171IHartford 206IPowersville 210IUnionville .•.•••. 821 Humphreys ...... 126IMilan........... 1591Green City •.••••. 190INewtown 349IPollock .••••••••• 389IHarris 540IWinigan

Robt. W. McCollom.. Delbert Pauley...... L. W. McCalment.... William K. Johnson .. Russell C. Riggen M. W. Bennett George W. Barkley D. Crumpacker Geo. C. Foster Loss Jacobs

Homer L. Dickerson C. R. Ethington Ailey A. Williams .. Wm. E. Alexander. Chas. E. Smith Walter E. Singley .. Joseph W. Moore Otis Reinhard..... Cecil M. Clem J. W. Milhoan

1st Friday May 1st and 8rd Mondays............. May 2nd and 4th Mondays .•.•.•••••••. May 2nd and 4th Tuesdays............ Oct. 1st and Srd Mondays May 1st and Srd Thursdays Oct. 1st Thursday _ May 1st and Srd Tuesdays .•••••.•••••• Oct. 1st Wednesday Oct. 1st Wednesday ..•....•.....••.... Oct.

30,1867 29,1861 80,1861 18,1887 28,1868 16, 188~ 28,1869 16, 188~ 18,1871 14,1889

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Ritual District No. 4 Grun d7·······1 Trenton ·1 .. .. Laredo .. • Galt .. .. Spickardsvllle ..•. Mercer _ Mercer..........

111IT renton·········1 2581 Laredo 423IGalt 524ISpickard 85 IPrinceton ••.•..•.

E. C. Lawson········1 Wayne Freeman C. C. Barnett G. E. Shaw Ralph Orr

Stanley McKemy .. '1 E. J. Robertson R. E. McCracken R. B. Kennedy. . . .. C. S. King

1st and Srd Thursdays···· ....•... 1 May 9,1850 2nd and 4th Mondays Oct. 16,1868 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 16,1890 1st and 8rd Wednesdays... Oct. 16. 1886 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... June 9.1868

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LODGE nmECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THmD ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-H. H. MANRING, D. D. G. M., McFall, Mo. (Ritual Districts 5, 6) Ritual District No.5 County Lodge INo.1 Location Hat:,iB0n ..•• o. Bethany. . . . . . • . . 97 IBethany ..•..•••. Lorraine .•.. 128 IRidgeway •.••• Lodze of Lieht. •. 267 IEagleville Cainsville•.••... , 328ICainsville •.•.••.. New Hampton ... 610lNew Hampton ..• Prairie •.•.••.... 656 IGilman City ...•.. 0 •

••

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•••••••

Master Merton C. Duke Joe W. Campbell Ned McLain Alfred C. Taff Donald L. Cox Floyd DeWitt

. . . . . .

Secretary Chas. T. Bridges C. A. Brock Cleve Reece Rex A. Taylor Dr. R. L. Grun W. E. Richter

. . . . . .

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .....•....... 1st and Srd MondaYB ......•••.... 1st and 8rd MondaYB ....•.•.....• 1st and Srd Thursdays . 1st and Srd TuesdaYB . 2nd and 4th WednesdaYB .

Charter Date May 26,1864 Oct. 7,1878 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 28,1926 Oct. 19. 1892

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Ritual District No. 6 Gentl'J' ..•••••.j Havana ..••••.. o. Stanberry Gentryville 0" ••••• Athens ..•.•...... Ancient Craft ...•. Berlin .•.•••...... Jacoby. . . • • . . . . .. Worth ..... 1 Grant City........ .. Defiance. . • . . . . • .. Allensville •.•..... Jonathan ..

00 . . . . . . 00 • • 0 . 0 0

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21IMcFall. 109 IStanberry ....•.. 126IGentryville .. 1271 Albany ..•..••••. S771King City .•••••• 378IBerlin ..••.• o 4471 Darlington ..••.•. 661Grant City .. 881 Sheridan .. 198IAllendale•••.. 321IDenver ....•••••. 0 ••

0.0.

0 ••

I van Cleuenger. . . . ..

H. L. Edson. . . . . . . .. Goo. W. Crawford .... Elza L. Redman. . . .. H. G. Guest Lawrence Shipp Earl Martin. . . . . . . .. Jack Bell Herbert S. Bond Wade Dawson Lawrence Ruckman ..

H. Hovey Manring. S. A. Goodding. . . .. H. S. Jameson L. Frank Smith T. H. McElroy Ray Pittsenbarger. Marvin C. Miller. .. Geo. Hunt T. Roger McAlister. Zene Hammer Clyde Pryor.......

~

1st Friday .....•••...•••••••..••• 1st and Srd ThursdaYB •••••••••... 2nd and 4th Saturdays •... 2nd and 4th ThursdaYB ...••••.•.•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•.......••. 2nd and 4th Mondays ..........•. 1st and Srd FridaYB •• 1st and 3rd MondaYB .. 2nd and 4th MondaYB •••.•........ 2nd and 4th Thursdays .........•. 2nd and 4th WednesdaYB . 0

0

0 •

0

0

0

••• 0

0

.0 0

•••

0 ••

Oct. 6,1879 Oct. 17, 1879 Mar. 10, 1860 May 8,1861 Oct. 13, 1871 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 17, 1901 Oct. 10, 1894 Oct. 17, 1878 May 30,1860 Oct. 12, 1869

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FOURTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-PAUL L. WARD, D. D. G. M., Maryville, Mo. (Ritual Districts 7, 8) Ritual District No. 7 Nod~way •••••

Xenia •.•...••••. Quitman ...•.•... Ravenwood ..••.• ' Graham .••••.••.. WhiteHall ••••••. Burlington . Nodaway ••••..• , Pickering ..•••••. Clearmont .•..... Skidmore .•...••.

50jHopkina .••.••••. 196IQuitman •••..••.. 201 1Ravenwood .•..•. 289IGraham ..••..... 301lBarnard ..•..••.. 442 IBurlington J ct•.. 470lMaryville ..• , .•.. 4721 Pickering .•••.••. 6071 Clearmont .••..•. 611ISkidmore .

Galen B. Russell. . . .. Carl B. Grahl. . . . . . .. Clyde Adcock R. E. Geyer. . . . . . . . .. A. Floyd Strader Herman J. Miller. . .. Marshall W. Ward ... Eugene L. Crowson .. Alva Hazelton Joseph O. J ohnaon. ..

Glade Traster . Fred Wright . J. J. Smith . Frank E. McNeal .. P. D. Stalling . L. O. Staples . Walter E. Smith . Carl Homer Pyle . Elden Huls . Glenn J. Stevens .

1st and 3rd Thursdays ........••.. 1st and 3rd Mondays .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...•.••.... 1st and 3rd Thursdays , " •.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...••••.... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...•••• , . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•..••...••

June 2,1866 May 80.1860 Oct. 18, 1892 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 16, 1886 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 17, 1877 Oct. 11, 1878 Oct. 17,1874 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... Oct. 12, 1888

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Ritual District No. 8 Atchison

. North Star .•••••. Sonora ......•••. Northwest ••••.•• Fairfax ....••.... Holt ..••••.••• Maitland •••••••.. Oregon ..••..•••. Forest City •••••.. MoundCity ..•••• Craig .....•...•..

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..

Iii 71 Rockport •••..•.. 200IWatson •••••...•. 868lTarkio ..••. " .•. 483IFairfax .. 1121 Maitland .•.•...• 13DjOregon ..•••••••. 2141Forest City ..•... 2941Mound City .•.•.• 606ICraig .

Chas. E. Bell Vernon Herren G. W. R. Sheets J. W. Moore W. A. Richardson Willard 1. Kurtz Lavere North John R. Wilson E. L. Redmon. . . . . ..

Virgil E. Walter . Luther W. Hudson. Dale Dragoo . W. A. Groesbeck . J. E. Weller . Everett Planalp . L. R. Fawks . T. J. Bridgmon . C. M. Randall .

2nd and 4th Mondays .•....•...... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .••.•••••••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...••••.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••••••.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••••••••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ••••..•..•.• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

May 9,1866 Oct. 19, 1876 Oct. 17, 1884 Oct. 16, 1874 Oct. 19, 1867 May 31,1866 May 30,1861 Oct. 14, 1868 Sept. 29. 190t

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-BARENT SPRINGSTED, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph, Mo. (Ritual Districts 9, 21) Ritual District No. 9 County

Lodge INo.1 Location Savannah........ 7lISavannah •....... Helena ..•••••.•• 117IRochester •••••••. Lincoln ...•...... 138IFillmore..•..•... Whitesville ..••.•. 162IWhitesville ..•••.. Rosendale .•••.•.. 404IRosendale ..••..•. Valley 413IBolckow .. Cosby •••.•..•••• 6001 Coeby ..•..•..... Buchanan ..... Agency. • • • . • . • • . 10 IAgency .•..••••.. Wellington .••••. , 221 DeKalb ..••••••.. St. Joseph....... 781St. Joseph ....•.. Binning •••.•••.. 1501 Faucett•••..•.... Zeredatha .••••.. , 1891St. Joseph .••.... Rushville.. .•. ... 238IRushville ..•..••• Brotherhood ..•.. ' 2691St. Joseph ..••••. Charity .••••.••.. 3311St. Joseph .•••••. King Hill •••••••. 3761St. Joseph ••..... Saxton. . . . . • . 608 ISaxton .. An~rew•••.•..

Master Reuben R. Miller Rawliegh Ford Fred Ueligger Paulette Beattie O. D. Brandstetter A. W. Chamberlain Charles Klein Vannie D. Lynch Elmer W. Pearson Karl A. Larmer John Gavris J. E. Barfield Roy N. Tomlinson George C. Eblen Marvin C. Edson B. Harvey Watson Milo C. Tibbets

Secretary I Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd ThursdayS ......•...•. . W. W. Hall . H. E. Shanks. . . . .. 2nd Monday and 4th Saturdays . . J. T. Westcott..... 1st and 3rd TuesdayS . . Fisher Potts , 1st Saturday and 8rd Wednesday .. . C. J. Watts 2nd and 4th Thursdays •••••••••.. . Glenn Neely 1st and 8rd Thursdays •••......... . Willis B. Durant 1st and 8rd Saturdays .••••••.••.. . John T. Marteny 1st and 8rd Saturdays •.•..•••••.. . Hallie V. Rechmon. 1st Saturday .....•••.•..•...•.... . W. L. Mul~ania 1st and 8rd Tuesdays ..•••.....•.. . Chas. S. Mays 4th Saturday ..•..•..••••.•.••••. . M. W. Taylor 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ••..••....... , S. G. Hiner. . . . . . .. 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... ' Victor T. Cumming: 2nd and 4th Fridays ..•..•........ . Lewis O. WeigeL .. 2nd and 4th Mondays ..•.•••...... . Jesse Moore , 1st and 8rd ThursdayS •........... . J. S. DeVall. . . . . .. 1st and 8rd Saturdays .........•..

Charter Date Oct. 24. 1844 Nov. 8,1984 June 2.1866 May 28,1856 Oct. 2,1896 Oct. 17, 1878 Sept. 80, 1908 June 1,1888 May 6,1862 Oct. 14, 1848 May 22,1868 May 28,1869 May 26,1886 Oct. 19,1U1 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 12. 1882

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Ritual District No. 21 Platte .. .. .. .. ..

"1 Rising Sun.......

Platte........... Compass . . . . . . . . .1 Camden Point ..•• .. Rowley • •••••••. Fidelity ••.••••••. • ••.••••. Adelphi. •••••••.• • •••••••. Platte City ••••.•.

13IBarry ....••..... 53IWeston 120/Parkville 1691Camden Point •••• 204IDearborn 889IFarley •.•••••.•.. 855IEdgerton •.•.•••• 604 IPlatte City ...••..

Claude Williams James O. Offutt Paul Noland W. M. Wilson Sam Ray William I. Porter Ward Miller Robert Bills. . . . . . . ..

F. R. Williams Earl W. Foley , Richard R. Field W. K. Bywaters G. R. Manville Lawrence R. Porter Clyde M. Newman .. Herman Klein. . . ..

1st Saturday 1st and 8rd Thursdays 1st Monday 1st and 8rd Tuesdays •.••..•..•..• 2nd Wednesday 2nd Wednesday ••....••...•..•... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays. . . .. . . .•. . ..

May Oct. May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

8,1852 11,1842 10,1860 18,1887 19,1867 18,1870 18,1888 18. 1881

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SIXTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JOHN J. BOWMAN, D. D. G. M., Liberty, Mo. (Ritual Districts 11, 23) Ritual District No. 11 C~~y ....•••••.

Liberty ••.•.••••. Holt.·.•..••••..•. Angerona ..••••.. Clay •••.••••••••. Kearney ..•....•• .......... Temperance .••.•. Cli~~on.•..••• Hemple ..•••..••. Vincil. ••••••••.. Plattsburg ..••••. Gower ..•..••••.. Lathrop •••..••.• Ray .•........· Bee Hive ..•••....

31ILiberty ..•....•.. 49IHolt ..•........•. 1931Missouri City ...• 207jExcelsior Springs. 311 IKearney .•.. '" .. 4881 Smithville .....••. 37IHemple .•.•...... 621 Cameron ...•.••.. 113 j Plattsburg .••••.. 897IGower ......••..• 506ILathrop ..•...... 898ILawson ..•..••.•.

R. R. Richardson. . .. James Alton Bailey .. John W. Temple Albert Forsythe J. P. Craig F. H. Kindred. James R. Vaughn. . .. Louie L. Smart. . . . .. Robt. H. Frost Noel W. Chaney..... O. C. Hinderks .. : . .. Chas. Glen Shearer. ..

Edgar Archer. . . . .. Floyd Blum Robert E. Hicklin .. H. H. Woods C. W. HesseL Alfred O. Lowman. John M. Boyer. . . .. Fred E. Luce. . . . . .. R. W. Hayward J. C. Cummings J. L. Taylor. . . . . .. L. D. Estill, Act.. ..

2nd and 4th Mondays .....•••..... 2nd and 4th Mondays . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ••..••.•••••. 1st and 8rd Mondays .••...•••••••. 1st and Srd Thursda7ll •••••••••••• 1st and 8rd Wednesdays .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•...•..... 1st and Srd Mondays ....•.•••..•. , 1st Thursday . 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .. 3rd Monday . 1st and 3rd Mondays ........•.... ,

Oct. 9,1840 Sept. 1864 May 28,1869 May 30,1861 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 19, 1867 May 9,1850 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 13, 1871

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Ritual District No. 23 Laf~ette ..••.

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Waverly .•••••••. Lexington ..•••••. Hhrginsville ••••.. Concordia ..••••.. MountHope ••••.. Richmond •••..••. Ray .. Ada....•.••.•...

61IWaverly •••..•.•• 149 ILexington .....•. 364lHigginsville ..•..• 464 IConcordia ••••••. 4761 Odessa.•..•••••• 67lRichmond ..••••.. 22SICamden ..•••••.. 44410rrick ••......•..

Clifton L. White. . . .. Harry Baker Forrest A. Hoefer. . .. Dale Elling. . . . . . . . .. C. A. McDowell Harley L. Lee V. L. Huffman , E. W. Miller

L. M. James. . . . . .. R. J. Tarlton A. W. Fuhr. . . . . . .. Everett Pape. . . . .. W. F. Baker F. B. Thompson F. P. Kirkland J. A. Hughes

2nd Thursday •..•••......••.•••. 3rd Tuesday ..............•..••.. 2nd and 4th Mondays ...•.•.•..... 1st and 3rd Mondays •............ 2nd and 4th Fridays ...••..••••••. 3rd Monday . 1st Thursday .....•..••••••••..•. 2nd Thursday .........••...•..••.

June 2.1866 June 4,1886 Oct. 14, 1884 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 12, 1842 Sept. 19. 1921 Oct. 16. 1872

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SEVENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-CORNE LIUS D. STRUBLE, D. D. G. M., Kansas City, Mo. (Ritual District 22) County Lodge Jackson ....... Heroine ..•..•... Albert Pike ..•... Kansas City •••... Temple ..•.•••.•. Cecile-Daylight ... Rural ....•••••••. Westport ..••••.. Ivanhoe •.•••••••. Gate City ••..•..• Orient ...•••••••. South Gate ..•.... york •••••..••... Swope Park ...... Sheffield ......... East Gate ••••.••. Nortl\.east .....•.. Country Club •••.. Rockhill •.••••••• Cia,........... Alpha ...•••••..•

. ..... .

. .... .. .... .. ......

.......

...... ....... ....... ....... ......

....... .......

......

.......

Location No.1 1041Kansas City ...... 2191Kansas City ..•... 220lKansas City ..•••. 2991Kansas City ..•••. S051Kansas City •.•.. , 3161Kansas City ...... 840lKansas City .••••. 4461Kansas City .••••. 6221Kansas City ....•. 6461Kansas City ..•.•. 5471Kansas City ..••.. 6681Kansas City ..•••. 6171Kansas City •.•••. 6261Kansas City ..•••. 6S0lKansas City ..••.. 6431Kansas City ..•••. 6561Kansaa City ..•••. 6631Kansas City •...•. 6691N. Kansas City ...

Master Meyer Gilbert. ....... Perry Smith Perry ... C. C. Humphress ..... William H. Hover .... J. Harry Deeter ..... Floyd A. Morgan .... Ralph R. Craig ...... Wm. A. Slaughter'... Richard L. Waddell .. Will M. Torrence ..... Wm. Leftage Hale ... Carl Edward Barton . August L. Hunter .... W. J ames Menter .... Charles T. Watts ..... Cecil W. Kirby ....... Harold L. Schmidt ... Bertram Frank ...... R. S. Williamson .....

Secretary J os. S. Epstein ..... C. L. Soderstrom ... Carl Prentice Hall .. Henry M. Wethy ... Edgar D. Doane .... H. B. Blanchard ... Wm. F. Lacaff ..... F. A. Lewis ........ Fred H. Knight .... Vernie G. Fisher ... Th08. M. Pratt, Sr.. I. F. Strycker ...... J. E. Witt ......... Leonard F. Owens .. Leonard T. Gillham G. R. Hodge ....... R. T. Swearingen .. Joseph Weinsaft ... Chas. Norris .......

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .......... 1st and 3rd Mondays .....••..•.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd Saturdays .......•.... 2nd and 4th Fridays .............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ......•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ......•...... 1st and 8rd Thursdays ..........•. 1st and 3rd Mondays ....•••.•••.. , 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .......... 2nd and 4th MondayS .............

Charter Date May 10.1849 Oct. 17. 1896 May 30.1861 Oct. 16. 1888 Oct. 17.1923 Oct. 12. 1889 Oct. 11. 1894 Oct. 17.1901 Oct. 11. 1888 Sept. 22. 1920 Oct. 16.1890 Oct. 17. 1896 Sept. 28. 1911 Sept.25, 1912 Oct. 21. 191• Sept. 2, 1916 Sept.21, 1921 Oct. 28. 1925 Sept.21. 1921

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EIGHTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-NAT. D. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo. (Ritual Districts 34, 59) Ritual District No. 34

. .......... .......... ..... ..........

Casa •••.••..•. index ....•.••.••. Casa ..••.•••••••. Grand River ..•••. Wadesburg ••.••.. Nonpareil ..••••. " Belton .•..•••••.. JeweL .•..••••... Coldwater ..••••.. Archie .•.•••••••. Cleveland ........

.... ...

.

.......... .......... .......... .......... .......... ..........

641Garden City ..... 147lHarrisonville...• 276lFreeman .••••••. 3481 Creighton •••.•.• 872/East Lynne •..... 460IBelton ........... 480lPleasant Hill .••.. 4861DrexeI. .•••...•.• 633JArchie ••••••••••. 6611 Cleveland ...•....

G. C. Kimberlin ...... R. W. Kershaw ...... Geo. C. Nelson ....... C. W. Eggers ........ Lewis Hinote........ J. LeRoy Kennemer .. Arthur P. Burnett ... T. C. Bundy, Jr...... Frank Otis Barrett .. , J. A. Sears ..........

A. L. Burch ....... , C. A. Burke ....... , E. F. Draper ...... , Harold L. Brown ... 1. A. Stone ........ , J. W. Kennemer ... George W. Smith ... B. T. Webb ........ E. A. Cullison ...... C. R. Caldwell ..... '

lst and 3rd TuesdayS ....•..••.•.. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS ..••........ Third Thursday .................. Friday on or before full moon ....• 2nd Tuesday..................... 1st and 3rd TuesdayS ............. 2nd Friday ..........•.....•••... 1st and 8rd MondayS .....•........ 2nd and 4th WednesdayS .•..••.... 2nd and 4th Tuesday .............,

Oct. 15. 1884 Oct. 17.1867 Oct. 15. 1868 Oct. 2.1882 Oct. 17. 1873 Oct. 16, 1872 Dec. 20. 1878 Oct. 18, 1888 Oct. 1.1914 Sept. 20, 1920

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Ritual District No. 59

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"acbon •••... ' Independence ..•. Summit ..•.•••••. McDonald ..•••... Blue Springs ..•.. " Raytown ..•....• ' Christian ••...••. Buckner ..•..•. " It Marlborough ..... It Mt. Washington .. Grandview ....... " ...... Grain Valley .....

....... .......

....... ...... ...... .......

611 76IIndependence .••• 2631Lee's Summit ..•• 324lIndependence. " . 8871Blue Springs ..... 391IRaytown ..•..... 39210ak Grove ... '" . 501 IBuckner .••.••••• 66918009 Woodl'd,K.C. 6141Mt. Washina'ton .. 6181 Grandview ....••. 644/Grain Valley .....

J. Claude Wilson ..... Wm. A. Harvey ...... Paul M. August ...... J. G. Pryor .......... Carl E. Schulte ...... H. F. Middleton ..... Robt. V. Fitzgerald .. James G. Hatfield .... H. H. Haukenberry .. J. H. Perkins ........ Ferol Harrison ......

M. W. Sudbrock .... J. A. Randall ...... W. Lee Whitmire .. , G. L. Morrison ..... Virgil O. Dryer.... G. W. Robinson .... H. Bergschneider... Gustav W. Knecht .. Gregg B. Christy ... C. K. Pattengale ... Floyd A. Sharp ....

dand d 2nd and 4th Mondays ..•••........ 1st and 3rd TuesdayS ............. 1st and 8rd Mondays ..••••....... , 1st and 3rd Fridays ..........•.•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ...•.••..... 1st and 3rd Fridays ..•.........•. ' lst and 8rd TuesdayS ............. 1st and 3rd Mondays ...•••........ 2nd and 4th FridayS .............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••...•.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•••......•..

Oct. 14.1846 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 12. 1869 Oct. 13. 1887 Oct. 18, 1871 Oct. 18. 1871 Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 26, 1927 Oct. 17,1911 Sept. 28, 1911 Sept. 21, 1918

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued

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NINTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRIOT-DO N OHAPMAN, D. D. G. M., Ohillicothe, Mo. (Ritual Distri~s 10, 12) Ritual District No. 10 County Lodge DeKalb .•..•.• Union Star Parrott •..••••••• Osborn ..••••.••.. Continental...... Clarksdale ..•••... Daviess ..•••.• Western Star..... Pattonsburg. •.••. Gallatin Altamont ••••••.. EarL .•..•••••••. Lock Springs Jameson •••••.••. Jamesport

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NO.1 Location 1241Union Star ••••• 308IMaysville........ 81710sborn.......... 454IStewartsville..... 559IClarksdale....... 15IWinston......... 65IPattonsburg..... 106IGallatin......... 108IAltamont........ 2851Coffey .•••••••••. 4881Lock Springs.... 500IJameson .•••••••. 664IJamesport.......

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Master Aaron Morris Roscoe Davidson Lewis E. Doak Wm. R. Stewart Edwin J. Swails Clyde M. Reid Harry C. Mooney J. P. Galpin Ray Johnston H. E. Ellis Thomas E. Tye Sam Pugh Jim Edwards

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Secretary Ben U. Clark . L. L. Hofstatter . Raymond Brand . Clarence G. WaIler. Donald M. Barrow .. Alfred Dunlap . Harvey F. NaIle . Roy C. Cox . E. D. Prouty . W. S. Underwood .. M. A. Carpenter . John Smith . RoHan E. Fisher .

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••..•. 1st and 3rd Mondays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•..... 1st and 8rd Thursdays ..••..••.. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays ..••.••.•.. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays .•..••••... ' 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..........• 2nd and 4th Thursdays .•.••••... 1st and 3rd Wednesday .. 1st and 8rd Thursdays .••.•..... 1st and 8rd Thursdays ..•....•.. 1st and 8rd Mondays ......•.•...

Charter Date Oct. 16, 1885 Oct. 12. 1889 Oct. 12, 1864 Dec. 21, 1908 Oct. 3,1898 June 1,1866 May 29,1864 Oct. 18, 1879 Sept. 18, 1919 Oct. 15, 1888 Oct. 16, 1874 Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 19, 1898

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Ritual District No. 12

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Caldwell ..•••• Kingston ......... Braymer •••••••.. Hamilton •.....•. ,. Polo .••••..•..••. Breckenridge ..•.. Cowgill ..•••••••• Livingston .••. Friendship ..•.... Spring Hill ....... Benevolence ...... •••. Chula ..••••••..•. ••.. Wheeling ..••.••• .•.. Dawn ......••....

1181 Kingston ••••.••. 185IBrayrner.•••••••. 224lHamilton •••••••• 2821Polo .•••.•••• : ••. 3341 Breckenridge ..... 5611Cowail1. ••••••••• 891 Chillicothe .•••.•. 155!Spring HilL ••.•• 170IUtiea............ 888IChula••••••••.•• 434 IWheeling •••••••. 539ILudlow ..........

GUY Sloan ........... R. G. Geilker ....... John A. Cornett..... D. Irving Farrar ... Francis Hunt ........ Ira C. Wilson ...... Leamer Stone ....... Roscoe RU88eIl ..... T. W. Reed .......... J. L. Walker ....... Thomas M. Parker ... Sid F. Thomson .... Paul T. Sparks ...... F. W. Cornue...... William Black ....... Thomas E. Stith ... Wm. T. Stone ....... Harry B. Stone .... Joe Thorne.......... Ross D. Adkins ..•.. Louis Hoen .......... 1 P. B. Myers ..•...•. James Baxter ........ M. F. Pollard ......

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1st and 8rd Thursday ..•.•.••.•••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...••••.•.•.. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th WednesdaYl! ..•••.•••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•..•••••• 2nd and 4th Fridays ....•...•..•.. 2nd and 4th Fridays .............. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ............. 1st Saturday .....••...•••••••..•. 1st and 8rd Thursdays. . • • • . • • • • •. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .••••••••••. 2nd and 4th Fridays ..............

Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 17, 1889 July 16, 1867 Oct. 16, 1878 Oct. 80, 1870 Oct. 12, 1898 Oct. 12, 1847 June 2,1855 May 80,1867 Oct. 8, 1871 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 17,1889

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TENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-EARL CHEESMAN, D. D. G. M., Carrollton, Mo. (Ritual Districts 13, 19, 20) Ritual District No. 13 Linn. • • • . • • • •. Jackson . :: •• • • .. • • •. Brookfield . •••••••••. Cypress .•••...••. tt • • • • • • • • • • Bucklin •••••••••. •• •••• •••••. Dockery •••..•..• ' tt • • • • • • • • •• Marceline .••••.••

821 Linneus .•...••.• 861 Brookfield ..••••. 227ILaclede •..•..•... 2831 Bucklin .. 326 IMeadville ..•••••• 4811 Marceline .

Walter C. Hotaling . H. P. Backstrom . Eugene Lyle Savage.. Neil F. Connon . C. R. Keith . C. Richard Machen .

N. G. Couch John E. Kimber Thomas H. Wade D. R. Owen. . . . . . .. E. E. Sidebottom. .. Edward W. Tayler.

2nd and 4th Mondays .•.•..••..... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•••••.••••. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .••••••.••. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays . Each Tuesday evening .•••••••...• 1st and 3rd Thursdays ....•••••.••

Oct. 5,1846 June 2,1866 May 29,1862 May 26,1864 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 17, 1889

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Ritual District No. 19

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Chariton ..•••. Eureka.......... Warren.......... Triplett ••••••••.. Westville Salisbury •••••..• Rothville Cunningham Mendon

78IBrunswick •••..•• 74 IKeytesville ••••... 122ITriplett••••••••. 202IWestville 208 ISalisbury 426IRothville 00 625 1Sumner 628IMendon 001

Benjamin P. Hayes .. , E. C.,Drace K. L. Rosencrance , Ben Fox J. S. Herring W. L. Richeson Irvin Williams Carl Brassfield

Arthur G. Lynch ... Marvin G. Wilson .. J. P. Hampton W. L. Ray H. H. Brummall , Lee Clair Leslie O. Allen Carroll G. Shull

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1st and 3rd Tuesdays •••..•.•..... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•••••••••.. 1st and Srd Thursdays •••••••••••• 3rd Friday . 2nd Tuesday . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Mondays .

Uct. 16, 184& Oct. 20, 1846 Oct. 12, 1896 June 2,1866 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 28, 1924

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Ritual District No. 20 C~oll ........

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De Witt..•...•. ,. Wakanda ..•••••• Bogard ••.•..••.. Hale City .••••••. Carroll .. Bosworth •••••••• Hardin ..•..•..•.

391De Witt•...••••• 521 Carrollton .•••••• 101IBogard ••.••••••• 216IHale ...••••••••• 249INorborne •••••••. 597lBosworth ..•••••• 322IHardin ...•.•.•••

Glen R. Craig Claude Smith R. W. Matheney D. E. Parish John 1. Vale P. E. Kelley J ames Bryden

. . .. . .. . .

Carl H. Boelsen .... Harry E. Schanz. .. R. E. Dickerson .... Robert L. Bartlett .. R. Emmett Parrish. Henry Galbrecht S. L. Lockridge

1st and 8rd Thursdaya .••••••••••• 2nd and 4th Thursdaya. • . • • • • . . • •. 2nd and 4th Tuesdaya ••••••••••••. 1st and 3rd Mondaya. .••••••.•.•. 2nd and 4th Mondaya. • • • • •• • • • • •• 2nd and 4th Thursdaya •••••••••••. 2d Sat. and 4th Tuesday ,

Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 17, 1842 Oct. 14,1866 Oct. 12,1898 Oct. 19, 1867 Sept. SO, 1908 Oct. 12,1869 ~

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued ~

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ELEVENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTBIC'r-W. R. HOWELL, D. D. G. M., Monroe Oity, Mo. (Ritual Districts 14, 17, 18)

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Ritual District No. 14 County Lodge Macon •....... Callao ...••••••.. Bloomington ••••• Censer .•••••..•.. " La Plata ......... " Lodge of Truth ••• " Excello •••••••.•• " Elmer •..•......• " Sb*;!by: : : : : : : : St. Andrews .••... Shelbina ......... Hunnewell ••••... " BetheL .•.•...•.. " Clarence .....•... " 6

Location No.1 38ICallao ........... 102IBevier•••••••.•.. 172IMacon ....••••••. 2371La Plata......... 268lAtlanta ..••••..•. 832IExcello .•..•..•.. 648IElmer .•..••..•.. 96/Shelbyville .•••••. 228lShelbina ..••••••• 415IHunnewell ..••••. 537lBethel. •• . ••• •••. 662 IClarence ..•••••••

Master G. C. Long .......... Robert Lobmire ...... Vernon W. Whiles ... John Elsea .......... L. H. Newman ....... R. Clyde Foster ...... Clyde McCollum ...... J. E. Hilber ......... Harry Libby, Jr...... Harry Moore ........ Carson Earl Swisher. Roy E. Willey ....... ,

Secretary Bert B. Bledsoe ..... C. F. Larsen ....... Lester M. Smith .... E. H. Hawkins ..... C. G. Sagaser ...... Ross King ......... C. I. Murry ........ James J. Pflum .... Fred R. White ..... J. Albert Howe .... , Sam Ziegler ........ W. B. Brewington ..

Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••..•..•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•..•••...... 2nd and 4th Monday ....•.•••.•... 2nd and 4th ThursdaYS ....•.••.•.. 1st Monday •.•..•••..•••••••••••• 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ..••...•••. 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 2nd and 4th Fridays •••.•.•••••.•. 1st and 8rd Fridays ••..•.......... 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 1st and 3rd Mondays ..•••••.•••••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .............

Charter Date June 2,1866 May 10,1849 June 14, 1875 June 22,1866 Oct. 15,1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 20, 1920 May 10,1848 May 29,1862 Oct. 13, 1871 Feb. 22, 1888 Oct. 22, 1924

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Ritual District No. 17 Monroe ••...•. Paris Union ..•.•. 19JParis ...•••..•.•. Florida . 23IFlorida ..••.••••. " Monroe ..••••.... 641Monroe City ..•.• Madison ..•.•.... 91 IMadison •..•••.•• Santa Fe •..•..•.. 4621San18 Fe ..•..••. . Holliday . 660 IHolliday

W. R. Deaver Orville N. Francis... J. R. Henderson. . . ... J. W. Atterbury, Jr.. , Sidney McIllhaney. .. Vincil C. Woods

Randolph •••.. Huntsville •••.••. Milton ..•...••... " Clifton Hill ...... " Moberly •••.•.... " Cairo ............ " Higbee ..•••••••.. " Jacksonville ..••.. " Clark ..••.••••... "

Leonard P. Bradley .. Charles W. Marshall .. Maurice Million ...... Lyle B. Thomas ...... Hartley Huntsman ... Richard E. Atkins ... Davis Haley ......... W. E. Rice ..........

J. L. Gwyn . W. H. Hattersley . Geo. S. Tompkins .. Estell T. Broaddus .. Philander H. Stuart Thomas E. Sparks ..

o 2nd and 4th MondaYS .. 3rd Wednesday ....•............. 2nd and 4th Mondays ....••..•••.. 2nd and 4th Thursday . Friday before 3rd Sunday . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ...•.........

Mar. 1, 1886 May 6,1852 June 2,1866 Oct. 12, 1847 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 17,1928

1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•..•..•. 1st and 8rd Saturdays ............ 1st and 3rd Thursdays .••••••••••. 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•••..•.. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .•.•..•.••. 2nd and 4th WednesdaYS .......••. 1st and 8rd Tuesday ............•.

Oct. 8,1840 May 26, 1865 May 185D Oct. 5,1870 Oct. 14, 1874 Oct. 16, 1886 Sept. 24, 1902 Sept. 28, 1910

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Ritual District No. 18

..... .....

..... ..... ..... ..... .....

30IHuntsville ..••..• 151IMilton ..•••...•.. 1611Clifton Hill •..... 344 IMoberly •••...••. 486ICairo ............ 527lHigbee ...•..••.. 5411 Jacksonville ...... 610IClark ............

Warren A. Dennis .. Arthur Haak ...... J. W. Richeson ..... J. W. Tate ......... U. L. Dameron ..... Edwin B. Hawkins. Oresta C. Gross .... Frank L. Ornburn ..

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TWELFTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-VADEN T. WOOD, D. D. G. M., Canton, Mo. (Ritual District 15)

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Ritual District No. 15 Wyaconda .•••.•. Monticello ..••••. LaBelle ..•..•.••. Craft ......•..... Williamstown .... Lewistown .••... , Ewing .•••.•.••.. M~~ion ..•.••• Palmyra .•••..•.. St. John's ..•...•. H Hannibal. ....••. H Philadelphia ..••• R~,lls ...•.•.•. Ralls ........••.. Lick Creek ....... New London .....

Le:is ........

... . ...

..

......... ......... ......... ......... .........

........ ........ ........ ......... .........

24jLa Grange ••••.•. 58lMonticello ..••••• 2221 LaBelle .......... 287ICanton •••••••••• 370lWilliamstown ..•. 494lLewistown ..••.• 677IEwing••••••••••. 18lPalmyra..•..•••. 281Hannibal. •••••.. 1881 Hannibal. .•••.•. 602IPhiladelphia ....• 88ICenter ..•••••••• 302IPerry ........... 3071New London .....

Aura Lee Lowe ...... W. B. Smith ......... S. D. Skirvin ........ Harry M. Ward ...... E. L. Dorsey ......... Guy Tompkins .......

Leslie Edwards ..... R. Lance West ..... D. S. Bagby ........ Jere Bradshaw ..... John S. Smith ...... Archie E. Graves ...

John B. White ....... George F. Digel. ..... F. E. Herrin ......... R. S. Garnett ........ B. F. Coleman ....... Burney L. Fishback .. John P. Fisher .......

Rufus L. Haydon ... W. H. Blackshaw ... John T. Kretzer .... T. J. Bleigh ........ Grover C. Layne ... ' C. W. Deckerd ..... Geo. F. Watson .....

.................... ...................

1st and 3rd Thursdays .•••..••.... 2nd and 4th Thursdays •••.•••••.• 2nd and 4th Fridays .............. 1st and 8rd Mondays .............. 1st and 8rd ThursdayS ..••..•.•••. 1st and 8rd Thursdays .•.••••••••• 1st and 8r.l Thursdays ..•••.•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ............ 1st and 8rd Mondays ..••..•.••.••. 2nd and 4th MondayS ............. 1st Thursday ......•••..•..•••..• 2nd and 4th WednesdayS ••.••••••• 2nd Tuesday •..••..•..•.••...•••. 1st and Srd FridayS ...•..•••.•....

Oct. 11, 1887 Oct. 12, 1887 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 12, 1876 Sept. 7, 1906 Apr. 25, 1881 May 80,1861 May 80,1860 Oct. 11, 1877 May 27,1811 Oct. 16, 1888 Oct. 12,1869

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DI8TRICT8-Continued

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THIRTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JOHN R. BAKER, D. D. G. M., Fulton, Mo. (Ritual Districts 16, 27, 28) Ritual District No. 16 County Lodge INo.1 Location Pike •••••••••• Eolia. . . . • • • •• ••• 14IEolia•.....•••••. Clarksville. • • . . • • 171 Clarksville ••..... Perseverance. • • • . 921 Louisiana .....•.. Phoenix ....••... 136jBowling Green ... Frankford. •••• •• 192IFrankford..•..•. Pike. . . . . • . • • • . •. 3991 Curryville ..•.... ,

Master Russell P. Martin .... Eugene S. Townsell .. Dannie G. Billings . Gerald Harlinger , E. P. Hansen . J. D. McCune .

..

Secretary Wharton Schooler .. Harry C. Carroll . George M. Collier . Paul K. Meek . Robert J. Parham .. J. Henry Sisson ....

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Thursday . 1st and 3rd Thursdays ....•.••.••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..•........•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .. 2nd and 4th Mondays .•.........•• 1st Wednesday .

Charter Date Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 8,1880 Oct. 12, 1847 May 9,1857 May 26,1859 Jan. 24, 1871

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Ritual District No. 'l:7 Audrain ...••. Central••••.•.... Laddonia •••.••.• " Social .•••••••••• Hebron ..•..•.... Vandalia •••..••. , Call~waY ..•••. Fulton .••.....••. New Bloomfield ... Portland ..••••..• Tebbetts .••••••.. Shamrock .•••••.. Mokane .

81IMolino ..•..•..•. 115ILaddonia ••.••••• 2661 Martinsburg ..••• 854IMexico ..•••••••• 491IVandalia ..••••.. 48IFulton .....••••• , 60lNew Bloomfield ... 242lPortland ..•••••. ' 565 ITebbetts ..••.•••• 5851 Shamrock •••••••. 612IMokane .

Arthur Neil. Rober.t C. McKee Fred Klarenbaek A. A. Mitchell. . . . . . .. Edwin C. Waters ... " John B. LaMar. . . . .. Walter P. Holt , Royal T. Tate , Howard Holzhauser.. John Wells Raymond Swain.....

Clyde W. Ellis H. Christopher F. W. RiutceI. Benj. C. Denton. . .. Malcolm L. Motley .. C. R. Powell. . . . . .. Churchill M. Holt M. A. Gibson. . . . . .. R. J. Huffmaster. .. Wm. S. Armstrong. C. D. Winter

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2nd Saturday . 2nd Thursday ..••••.•••••••••..•. 2nd Friday . 1st and 2nd Tuesday ...•......... , 2nd Friday ......•...•••...•••.•• 1st and 3rd Fridays ............•• 1st and 3rd Mondays .. 2nd and 4th Fridays ......••••.... 2nd and 4th SaturdayS ..••••...••. ThursdaybeforefullmooD . 1st and 3rd ThursdayS ......•.....

Oct. 12, 1898 Oct. 28, 1882 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 18. 1870 Dee. 12, 1876 Oct. 17,1841 May 25,1854 May 26,1866 Oct. 22, 1902 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept.H, 1911

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Ritual District No. 28

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Montgomery .. 1 Griswold ...•.•. •• Wellsville ..•••••. Montgomery. . . .• Jonesburg. . .••.. Daggett.........

178 IBeUflower•.••• • •. 194IWellsville .....•.. 2461Montgomery City 4571J onesburg .••... , 492IMeKittriek .....• ,

1

········1

George Bowlby "1 Oland A. Jones "13rd Monday .....••...••. Wm. A. Boettcher , G. R. Barton 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...•••..•..•. B. C. Miller , Chester R. Badger .. 2nd and 4th Mondays. . . . . . .• . . . .. Lanham L. Woods. . .. Luther Watkins .... 3rd Monday Evening. . . •• .• • •••.• Adolph Grosse Donald T. Brashear, 1st and 8rd Saturdays............

May 28,1858 May 80,1860 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 12.1876

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FOURTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-RANSOM BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo. (Ritu~ Districts 29, 30, 32) Ritual District No. 29 Lin.~oln••.••••

Troy .•.••••..... Silex ...••••••••• New Hope ..••••• NewSalem .•••••. Louisville •.•..••. Nineveh ..•.•.••. M08COW ..••..••..

34ITroy ..•...••.... 76ISilex . 1991 Elsberry .....•... 270lWinfield .••..•... 409lLouisville ..••••.. 47810Iney . 668IM08COW Mills .

Joseph J. Marsh O. Z. Lovell Norman C. Evans William Watts Gus Bufford Byron Brown Delma Humphrey

. . . . . . .

Andy J. Blair. . . . .. Leon F. Gooch ..... James H. Powell. ., H. H. Arnhold. . . .. John Kleisner. . . . .. Raymond Lewallen. F. L. Dreyzehner ...

2nd and 4th Mondays ..••.•••••••• Friday on or before full moon ••..• 2nd Thursday . 1st and 3rd SaturdayS ..••••••••••. 8rd Thursday .•••••••••.•......•• 1st Saturday ....••.......•.••..•. 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..•.........

Oct. Oct. May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

7,1841 21, 1899 31,1860 15, 1868 17, 1901 15, 1874 13. 1892

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Ritual District No. 30 St. charles····1 .. • .. • ••. Warren ..

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······1 Melvin Elmer Brand········1 Fred Karrenbrock. '1 1st and 3rd FridayS ..•••••..•...•. June 22,1866 F. Lane E. R. Engholm 1st and 3rd Tuesdays May 26,1866

Wentzville ..•••. 46lWentzviUe. Palestine 2411St. Charles Mechanicsville 260IDefiance .••••••.• Pauldingville..... 11 IWright City Warrenton .•..••. 609IWarrenton

James Bair A. E. Katterjohn WiIliamHagman

King Pugh 2nd and 4th Saturdays ....•...•... Oct. 80,1868 G. C. Schmitt 1st and 3rd Saturdays............ May 8,1862 ArlieW.Tempel. .. 2ndand4thFridays ..••.......... Sept.19,1917

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Ritual District No. 32 ~in ...... Evergreen .••.••.

Sullivan .. Gray Summit . Hope ......•..••. Fraternal .•••.••. Columbia .•••••.. Easter •.•••.•••.. Union ..••••••••. Gasconade ..•. Hermann ..••.•.. Owensville .•.••..

..

271New Haven ...... 69ISullivan .•••••••• 173IGray Summit .•.. 251IWllBhington •••••. 363IRobertsville ..••.• 534IPac:ific ..•.•••••.. 67i'iISt. Clair.•••••••• 593IUnion . 123IHermann ..••.••• 62410wensville .•..•..

M. L. Grannemann . Edward J. Erni . Carson C. Scheer . Julius W. Lindauer .. Frank J. Ingram . Walter J. Pfeiffer . Carl Crow . Earl Sanford Eoff . Francis N. Sanders .. Virgil C. Cro~der ....

A. C. Goodrich ..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays , 1st and 8rd SaturdayS ••••....••.. ' A~g: j: 'H~it'h~~::: 1st and 3rd ThursdayS. • • • . • • • • • •. Walter A. Pfautsch. 1st and 3rd Fridays. . • . . . • • . . • • . .. Louis H. Bruns . 1st Saturday. . . . . • . • • • • • • • • . • • • •. E. A. Roemer . 2nd and 4th Thursdays. . • • • • • . • • •. R. C. Murphy . 2nd and 4th TuesdayS. • • . . . . . • . ... . 2nd and 4th FridayS .••••.••••..•• C. E. Triplett A. B. Suenkel . 2nd and 4th FridayS. . . . • . . . . . . . .. Edmund Knehans .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays

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May 26. 1m June 2, 1866 Sept. 23. 1903 Oct. 16. 1867 Oct. 12, 1870 Oct. 13, 1887 Sept. 28, 1906 June 18, 1907 May 30, 1850 Sept.25,1912

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o LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT (A)-HARRY GERSHENSON, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. (Ritual District 33a) Ritual District No. 33a County

Lodge

No. I Location liSt. Louis ..••• ; ... Meridian .. 21St. Louis ••.•••... St. Louis ..••.... , 20iSt. Louis .. Pomegranate .•••. 951St. Louis ••••.•.. Occidental ••.•••. 16SISt. Louis ..••..•. Pyramid ..•••••.. 1801St. Louis ..••..••. Good Hope . 2181St. Louis ..••..•• Aurora ..•••..••• 2671St. Louis ...•..•.. America •..•..... 3471St. Louis ......•.. Harmony ..••••.. 4991St. Louis ..•••••• ' Clifton Heights .. , 5201St. Louis .. Algabil ..•....... 5441St. Louis . . Rose Hill .••...••. 5501St. Louis Magnolia ..•.... 6261St. Louis ...••••• .. Trinity ..••••.... 6411St. Louis St. Louis Co••• University ..•.... 649IUniversity City ••. Pilgrim . 6521St. Louis .. St. Lo~is City .. Commonwealth .. , 6541St. Louis ..••••... st. Louis Co. :. Theo. Roosevelt .. , 661 1University City .. , . St. Lo~is City. Polar Star .. 791St. Louis . Erwin ..•.••.•••• 121 St. Louis . Olive Branch ..•.. 576 St. Louis . Ben Franklin ..•. , 642 St. Louis

St. Lo~is City. , Missouri. ..••.•..

Master R. E. Eickmeyer Lewis H. Schmidt Louis Linder Edward L. Ludwig A. W. Klein Victor J. Iborg Roy L. Tarter Wayne A. Meffert Oda L. Heenan Roland H. Winter Walter G. Punt Oliver R. Albrecht C. C. Stonebraker Roy L. M. Talbert Harry E. Treece Herbert C. Will Asa E. Turley. , , Andrew H. Tyrpak. Andrew J. Vivrett Robert A. Greifelt S. Nill Mohler, Jr John Mor06co Jack M. Gentle

. . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . ,. . . . , ..

Secretary John Wohradsky, Jr.. Harry C. Ploetze . Henry A. Steiner. , .. R. C. Winkelmaier . , C. L. Alexander R. S. Lorimier . Elmer M. Ruffin , Chas. V. Ehrmann . Geo. H. Holdsworth, . William E. Punt . J. E. Winterton. Jr . Louis C. Bermel. . Earl H. Pleitsch . James H. Leathers . Edward H. Bockhorst Henry G. Kislingbury Barney L. Arterbury. Duval O'Neal . Robt. W. Macdonald .. Val Krapp . A. A. Blankenmeister. Fred L. Oatman ..... Harold M. Goodman ..

Time of Meeting I Charter Date lst and Srd Thursdays .......••.. Oct. 8, 1816 2nd and 4th ThursdaYll ..•••.•.•• May 6, 1852 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•..... Oct. 24,1886 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..•••..•... Sept. 21, 1916 2nd and 4th TuesdaYll •.•••.....• May 29, 1856 2nd and 4th FridayS. . • . . • . . . • .. Sept. 21, 1916 lst and 3rd SaturdaYll •••.••..... May 30, 1861 lst and 3rd Tuesdays........... Oct. 19.1868 2nd and 4th TuE!2days •••••••.•.. Sept. 17, 1919 1st and Srd Mondays .....•...... Sept. 19, 1917 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ••••••..•.• Oct. 10,1894 2nd and 4th Fridays. .••• •• •. . •. Sept. 19. 1917 2nd and 4th TuesdaYll. • • • • • . • • .• Oct. 15, 1891 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ......• , Oct. 15, 1918 2'nd and 4th ThursdayS •••....... Sept.2l. 1916 1st and Srd Mondays ..•......... Sept. 22, 1920 1st and Srd Wednesdays ••.•.•••. Sept.21. 1921 1st and Srd Thursdays ••..••.... Sept. 21. 1921 2nd and 4th MondaYll .........•. Oct. 17,1928 lst and Srd Fridays .••..•....... Oct. 14. 1846 2nd and 4th FridayS ..•..•...•.. Apr. 26, 1850 2nd and 4th TuESdaYll ...••..•••• Sept.26, 1905 1st and 3rd Thursdays ' Sept. 26, 1916

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FIFTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT (B)-ELMER W. SCHOENLAU, D. D. G. M., St. Louis (Ritual District 33-B) Ritual District No. 33-B

.. ...... ... ..... ..

St. Louia City •. •. •. •• ., .. •. .. •. .. .. •. " •. ..

.... ..... .

..... .. ...

:. . •. •. •. • •• •. •. ••

Beacon .....••.• , Geo. Waahinirton . Mt. Moriah ..•..•. Pride of the West. KeyStone ..•••••.. Cosmos ..•..•.... Cornerstone ..•... Paul Revere ..••.. Tuscan •••.••.••• Anchor ..•..•.... West Gate .••...• Lambskin ..•..... Euclid •.••••••••• Apollo ........... Forest Park •••... Tower Grove ..... Mizpah .......... Shaveh ...••... ,. Progress ..••.•... Triangle ..••••... Naphtali. .•.••••. Cache .•••.....•. ltaska ..•.••.•••• Purity .........•.

3iSt. Louia .•..... 91St. Louis ....... 401St. Louia ..•.... 1791St. Louis ....... 2431St. Louis .••..•. 2821St. Louis ••••.•. 3231St. Louis ••••••. 3301St. Louis •••.••. 3601St. Louis ....... 4431University City. 4451St. Louis ••••••. 460JSt. Louis .••.••. 5061St. Louis .••••.. 6l!9ISt. Louis ••.•••. 6781S1. Louis ....... 631!St. Louis ..••••. 6391St. Louis ...•... 6461St. Louis ••••••. 6571St. Louis ..•.... 6381S1. Louis ....... 251S1. Louis .•••••• 4161St. Louis ....•.. 4201St. Louis ..•..•. 6681 St. Louis .......

Calvin F. Feutz ...... Ernest G. Ross ....... C. S. Lafferty ........ John T. Williams .... Garrett J. J aco ...... Edward D. Violetta.. John Louis Parker ... Paul r. Endsley ...... Alfred L. Biston ..... Wm. J. Holdoway .... Calvin T. Lauda ..... George H. Davis ..... Henry G. Engel. ..... Herman C. Lang ..... C. C. Melville ........ S. E. McFarland ..... Earl L. Overbeck ..... Morris H. Riggins .... Harry M. Sanders. . .. F. E. Kiefer ......... Emil W. Braun ...... Raymond A. Kuhn ... N. K. Scarlett....... L. L. Kirkpatrick~...

Harvey E. Waldt ...... Robt. C. Brinkman .... , Walter A. Webb ....... Norman H. Behrend... G. J. Tischler .......... Sam Broadbent ........ W. R. Schmitt ......... E. W. F. Brueggemann. Wm. C. Hilmer........ A. W. Reiter .......... E. B. Partenheimer .... Ben C. Burroughs ...... M. E. Campbell ........ George Ruths .......... Wm. C. Rese .......... A. H. Liebmann ....... Walter H. Voss ........ Thos. O'Rourke ........ Fred J. Mahner ........ Henry G. Diller ........ Rudy G. Brock ......... Gustav Heinichen ...... D. W. Eschenbrenner .. Harry J. Sims, Acting ..

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2nd and 4th Thursdays .•........ 2nd and 4th TuesdayS •••........ 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..••....... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•....• 1st and 3rd WednesdayS .....•... 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•.... 1st and 3rd Mondays ..•.••...... 2nd and 4th FridayS ............ 1st and 8rd TuesdayS ......•.... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••.... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .......••.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••...• 1st and 3rd MondayS .....••..•.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••.... 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•.... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•...•... 1st and 8rd 'ruesdayS .•..•..•.•.. 1st and Srd TuesdayS •••......••. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS .•......... 2nd and 4th Fridays. . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .......... 2nd and 4th SaturdayS. . • • . . • . .. 1st and Srd MondayS ••••••.••. " 1st and Srd Mondays. . . . . • . . • . ..

May 10,1849 May 10.1849 Oct. 14, 1841 May 28,1868 May 26,1866 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 26, 1928 Oct. IS, 1870 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 16,1872 Sept. 21, 1917 Sept. 12, 1918 Sept. 26, 1906 Oct. 2,1918 Sept. 29, 1916 Sept. 20, 1920 Sept. 21, 1921 ~ept. 29, 1916 Oct. 14.1H39 Oct. 14, 1871 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 12, 1921

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LODGE DffiECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SIXTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-KERMIT D. SHELLEY, D. D. G. M., Wellston, Mo. (Ritual Districts 40, 57) Ritual District No. 40 Lodge County Location NO.1 ,Jefferson •••••. De 8oto .......... 1191De 8oto •••...••.. Joachim •••••••.. 164lHillsboro..•..•.• " Shekinah ......... 266IFestus ........... " Herculaneum .••.. 3381 Herculaneum •••• " Waah!:,~~:: : Tyro ••••••••••••. 12lCaledonia••.••••. Potosi. ..•••••••• 1311Potosi. .••••••••• Irondale •.•••••.. 143lIrondale•.••••... " Belgrade ••••••... 632lBelgrade ..••.•••. " St. Francois: : '. Blackwell •••..••. 636lBlaekwell .....•..

......

Master Vincent O. Carter .... Julius T. Hausgen ... Mitchell Smith ....... Hugh J. Todd ........ WilliamHall ......... Joseph Henry Bub ... John A. Robinson .... Edward Webb ....... Roscoe B. Blackwell. .

Secretary Daniel L. Rouggly .. Edw. M. Williams .. Byrl Degeare ....... Geo. W. Hegel ..... Iva Queen ......... George Carr ....... GUY D. Maxwell .... Lewis Pierce ....... Howard E. Brown ..

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Thursdan ............ 1st Saturday ....••••••••••••••.•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdan ••••••••••••. 2nd and 4th Fridays ...••...•••••• Saturday on or before full moon •.. 1st Friday ....••................. 1st and 3rd Saturdan ••..••••••••. 8rd Saturday•••••••••••••••.•••. 1st Saturday ..•......••..•••.••..

Charter Date Nov. 16, 1867 May 31,1866 Oct. 17, 1868 Oct. 19, 1922 Apr. '1,1826 May 10.1861 May 26,1864 Oct. 1,1914 Oct. 13, 1887

...... .....

..,. ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... .. ...... ...... ...... .. ......

461 Ballwin ......•.. 801 St. John's Station. 84 IWebster Groves .. 2811 Fenton •••••.•••. 813lEureka ....••.••. 484IKirkwood .••.•... 6421 Ferguson ...••... 666IMaplewood ..••.. 601IClayton ••.••.•••. 613IWellston ..••.••.. 6291Valley Park ...... 640 IJenninp .•.••... 666IGardenville ...•.. 636IMehlville .•••••••

Edward N. Dechman. C. H. Armstrong..... Harold E. Walker .... Leslie H. Martin ..... Earl S. Voight....... Oscar H. J eke!. ...... Ernest W. Harris .... Brace E. Kitchell ..... Robert C. Gerhardt ... George E. Walka ..... Raymond T. Hiscox .. Leo E. Hogan ........ Andrew Lechmer .... Harry J ourden .......

Henry F. Woerther. Walter Reinemer ... G. A. Shepardson ... George F. Fuchs .... George E. Mottert .. Leonard L. Keevil .. F. G. Williamson ... William F. Harris .. I. F. R08enfelder ... Cecil A. Tolin ...... Elmer T. Hiscox ... Alfred C. Linck .... Florian Wolz ....... Harry A. Kolb .....

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Ritual District No. 57 St. Louis ...... Bonhomme •••.••• Bridgeton .•.•.••. " Webster Groves .. " Fenton ..•..••••• " Meramec ...••••. " Kirkwood ••.••.•. Ferguson ..••..•. Maplewood ....... Clayton ••••.•••.• Wellston ....••.•. Valley Park .••... Jennings ...••••. " Gardenville ..•... " Freedom •.•••••..

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1st and 3rd Saturdays .•..••••..•• 1st and 3rd Thursdays .....•••••.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdan ............. 2nd and 4th SaturdaYB .•....•••••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdan ••....•...•.• 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 1st and 8rd Fridan ............... 1st and 8rd Thursdan .•••••••••.• 2nd and 4th Thursdan .•••••••••• 1st and ard Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Tuesdan ....•..••••.. 1st and 8rd Saturdays ..•.••...... 1st and 3rd Tuesdan .............

Oct. 9,1841 Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 19, 1923 Oct. 16,1874Oct. 16, 1889 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 8, 1908 Sept. 28, 1911 Oct. 2,1913 Oct. 14, 1916 Sept. 21, 1921 Sept. 26, 1946

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SEVENTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-W. FRANK HOUK, D. D. G. M., St. James, Mo. (Ritual Districts 39, 47) Ritual District No. 39 Crawford .•••• .. • •••. Dent••.••••••. M~es ....•..• .. •• • • • • • • •. .......... Phelps ..•..••. .. • .•••••• .. • •.••••. Pulaski. . • • • •• Texas. . . . . . . ..

Lebanon ••••••..• Cuba .••••••..••• Salem •••••••••.. Belle; ••.••.. : .•••. L,;,ne 8 PraIrIe •.•. VIenna •.•••••••• Rolla •••.••••..•. St. James .•..•... Equality ..••••.•. Arlington .. Latimer ...•......

77ISteelville ••••••••. 312ICuba . 225ISalem ....••••••• 878IBelle . 531IVichy •..•••••••• 94IVienna .•..•••••. 213IRoIla .••••••••••• 230 ISt. James . 497INewbure ..•.•.••. 346IDixon . 145ILickine•...•••...

L. J. Perkins Roscoe Souders John C. Brice. . . . . . .. Evert Oliver Loyd E. Daniels. . . . .. Theodore T. Feeler Walter E. Casey. . . .. Arthur F. Mitchell Earl H. Carter C. A. Harrison. . . . . .. Don W. Walker

Coleman O. Garrett. C. F. Wilmesherr Louis L. McSpadden G. E. Slinkman.... O. E. Packheiser. .. James W. Shockley. Walter C. Campbell. W. W. Jackson John B. Vrooman .. A. W. Davis. . . . . .. W. D. Rodgers

1st Saturday .••••••.•...••••••••. 2nd Saturday ..•..••••••••••••••• 1st and 8rd Fridays ..••••••..••••. 2nd and 4th Fridays ....•.•••••••• 2nd Saturday •••..•••••••.•••••.• 1st Saturday . 1st and 8rd Wednesdays .•••••••.•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•.•••••••••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••..••..•• 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..........•.

Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 18, 1887 May 29,1862 Sept.27,1906 Oct. 15, 1885 Oct. 17, 1878 May 80,1861 May 27,1868 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 19, 1899

Van Buren .....•. Grandin ..•••••.. Hopewell •..•.••. Barnesville ..•..•. Delphian ••.•...•. Winona ..•••.••.. Eminence •.......

5091Van Buren .. 579IGrandin ..•.•.••. 239ILesterville ..•.... 353IEllington ...••.•. 1371Birch Tree ..•..•. 430IWinona ..•..••••. 607IEminence ••..•...

W. O. Price GUY A. Smith. . . . . . .. C. B. Hassler. . . . . . .. Paul Faulkenberry. .. G. O. Brown G. G. Rollins John A.Bolen. . . . . . ..

H. D. Condray. . . .. W. E. McKinney. .. Loren A. Hill. . . . .. R. L. Daniels. . . . C. O. Lemons J. T. Loyd Gilbert L. Rader.

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Ritual District No. 47 Carter.•...••. .. . ..••.•• Reynolds ..•••. .. • ••••• Shannon •.•••. .. • .••.. ......

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Saturday on or after full moon •••• 2nd Saturday .••••••••••••••••••• 4th Saturday .••..•..••••..••••.• 2nd Saturday •.......•.........•. 3rd Monday .••..•..••..••••••.••• Thursday on or b~fore full moon . 1st Saturday .

Aug. 12, 1882 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 13,1881 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 17, 1895 Oct. 10, 1894 July 1988

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued EIGHTEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-HENRY C. THOMPSON, D. D. G. M., Bonne Terre, Mo. (Ritual Districts 48, 49)

Ritual District No. 48 Lodge County Iron ........•. Star of the West. ' .......... Mosaic •••..•..•. ' Madison ...... Marcus •••••..... St. Francois •.. Bismarck .....••• Farmington ...... Ionic •••..•..••.. St. Francois ..•.. , Samaritan ..••.•. Pendleton •.•••••. Leadwood .••••... Elvins .••...•.... Ste. Genevieve. Saline ...........

..

.... .... .... ..

.. .... .. .. ..

Location NO.1 1331Ironton •.•..•.•.. 351 IBelleview ..••••.. 110 IFredericktown ... 41IBismarck ...•••.. 1321 Farmington ..... ' 154IDesloge ...••••... 234lLibertyville. " ..• 4241Bonne Terre ..•.. 5511Doe Run ..•...'... 598 ILeadwood ..••••. 5991Flat River••••••• 2261St. Mary's .......

Master Noel W. Rice ........ J. W. Boring ........ Harold Shrum ....... Clyde Ruble ......... H. A. Cobbee ........ Leo Ira ............. Fred Womack ....... Olin S. McDaniel ..... B. L. Haynes ........ Orner Ragan ......... J. L. Holloway ....... Dwight Smith .......

~ecretary

Frank H. Comfort. V. O. Sutton ....... Gus Winter ........ M. W. Baker ....... Hezzie Graham ..... R. E. Green ........ P. A. Cashion ...... A. J. Rosborough ... O. H. Kassabaum ... J. M. Link ......... J. E. LaBruyere .... Henry Schroeder ...

Time of Meeting 2nd an~ 4th Fridays .............. 1st Saturday ..•...•.•..•••••...•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......•..... 1st and 3rd Saturdays .••......... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... 1st and 3rd Mondays ......••.••.. , 1st Thursday ......•..•....•••... 1st .and 3rd Thursdays .•.•.....••. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ....•..... 2nd and 4th Saturdays ........... , 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•...•... Fourth Saturday .................

Charter Date May 5,1851 Oct. 13, 1870 May 24,1862 Dec. 15,1891 May 10,1851 Oct. 17,1901 May 26,1864 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 13, 1908 Sept. 30, 1908 Nov. 29, 1862

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Ritual District No. 49 Boli:~ger

Trowel ......•.•• Zalma ..•...••... St. Mark's . CapeGi~:lrdeau West View .•..•.. Mystic Tie ..•.•.. Whitewater ..•... Excelsior . .....

440lMarbie Hill .....• 546IZalma .. 931Cape Girardeau .. 103 IMillersville ••..••. 22110ak Ridge ..••.•. 4171 Whitewater •.•... 441lJackson ,

Lester F. Filer Lee Dalton Roy W. young J. R. Estes Fred H. Bruihl Fangie E.J ones J. W. Schreiner

. . . . . . .

J. V. Thompson H. D. Nichols L. Greene Stovall Goo. W. Howard W. A. Bowers. . . . .. Daniel F. Jones , D. G. Seibert

2nd and 4th ThursdaYB •.••.•.•••.. 1st and 3rd Saturdays .••......... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•..•..•••. 2nd Saturday .. 1st and 3rd SaturdaYB ........••.. 2nd and 4th Fridays ...•....•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays .

Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 14, 1847 June 8,1866 May 30,1861 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 16, 1872 I--'

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NINETEENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-R OBERT L. FOWLKES, D. D. G. M., Charleston, Mo. (Ritual Districts 50, 51)

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Ritual District No. 50 . East Prairie.. ... Charleston ..••.•• . . . .. Scott . Morley.. Ashlar .•••....... Sikeston .•••••••• Illmo... ••••.•.•• Chaffee Stoddard ..... , Bloomfield ...•... Essex. .....•.•.. " Lakeville •..•..•. , Dexter .....•.... , Advance..... " .. Puxico ......••... New Madrid ... Morehouse. • . . . .. Missi;:sippi

S841East Prairie ..••. 407ICharleston •••.••. 184 IMorley . S06ICommerce ••••••. S10ISikeaton ••••••••• 681IIllmo •••••••.••.• GI6IChaffee .. 16SIBloomfield..•.••. 278IEssex ..•••••••.. 4891BeIl City •.•.•... 632IDexter ...•.•..•• 590IAdvance •.•..•••. 596IPuxico . 603\ Morehouse .

R·. 'E: N~is'~~~th;::::

Noel J. Robinson . Dorman E. Buck . Alton P. Veasman . M. W.Sullenberger . C.E. Dudley . Alvin Corbin . J. P. Ross . Louis Keith . Thurston S. Hill . Robert Harris . J ames Wiley McGhee. F. T. Laminack .

Joseph A. Webb . . Dee Jennings F. J. Frobase . Albion H. Anderson Alonzo A. Harrison. Ben Hill . M. H. Stubblefield .. J. A. Poe . Albert Tarpley . . Melvin Henson Homer Smith . . Lloyd E. Revelle Claude Stone , C. B. Reynolds .

. 8 :00 p. m. each Thursday 1st and 3rd Thursdays ...•........ 2nd and 4th Mondays .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..••..•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•.•••...• 1st and Srd Thursdays ..•••.••.... 1st and Srd Wednesdays ..••••••.•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .......•••.. ' 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ...•••....••. 1st and Srd Thursdays ..••...•.... 1st and 3rd Mondays .••..•..••••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•.••..... ,.

July 1904 Oct. 13, 1893 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 14, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Sept. 27, 1905 Sept. 28, 1911 July 29,1869 Sept.29,1904 Oct. 12, 1874 Oct. 13, 1887 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 13, 1908 Sept. 29, 1909

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Ritual District No. 51

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Dunklin

.. Kennett......... Four Mile ...•.•.. HornersvilIe ..•.. ' CardweIl •••••.••• Malden Senath. New Madrid .. , Portageville. . . . .. Point Pleasant .•• " New Madrid ...... Parma ...•....•• ' Pemiscot . Caruthersville. . •. Hayti. ... " ..... ' Steele........... Stoddard ..•... Bernie .....•...•. Dunklin ..••.. , Clarkton ..•.•.•..

68IKennett ..••••••• 212ICampbell ......•. 215IHornersviIle ..••• 231ICardwell ..•..•.. 40GIMalden . 513ISenath ...•••.••. 166\ Portageville .•••• ' 176IConran ..••.•..•. 4291New Madrid ..•.. 650IParma ..•..••••• 4611 Caruthersville .... 571IHayti •••.••.•••• 634ISteele ..•..•..•.. 573IBernie ..•...•••• U.D.IClarkton ...•...

Silas Cuff........... Lloyd P. Oliver Truman E. Krapf. . .. Clark Da Vault A. R. Pierce. . . . . . . .. F. O. Sullivan....... S. C. Hook H. W. Clem , June C. Ransburgh J. Frank Edge L. E. Nickens Raymond Mercer H. A. Farris. . . . . . . .. Roy L. Pounds. . . . . .. J. B. Steinmetz

Clay P. Bixler . R. D. Whiteaker , D. P. Jackson . Chas. Ridings . D. L. Cochran , C. B. Houston . R. D. Ellington, Jr.. Harold A. SloM . C. M. Barnes . Tom. L. Streeter . Donald V. Magee . H. B. Bryant . M. H. Farris . I. L. Winer . C. B. James ,

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2nd and 4th Thursdays ..••.••..•• 1st and Srd Thursdays ..•••.••.... 1st and Srd Mondays ....•..••••... 1st and Srd Wednesdays .......•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•••••.... 1st and Srd Thursdays ..••..••.... 1st and 3rd Thu1'8days ......•.•••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..••••..... 2nd and 4th Mondays ........••... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .•••......••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .••••••.••••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•....•.... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•••••.. 2nd and 4th Thu1'8days ......•.•.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .

Oct. 17,1887 Oct. 19, 1867 May SO,1861 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 18, 1881 Oct. 27,1902 Oct. 16, 1890 May SO,1867 Oct. 17,1873 Sept.22, 1920 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 28, 1905 Oct. 1,1914 Sept. 8, 1905

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTIETH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-J. FRED PARK, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo. (Ritual Districts 52, 53) Ritual District No. 52 '"t1

County Lodge INo. I Location Butler.•.•.•.. Poplar Bluff ...... 2091 Poplar Bluff ..... Ril,l!ey .••..•.. Pine .....•••••••. 314IBardley ...•..•... Composite .•.•••. 369IDoniphan ..•.•.•. Naylor 568INaylor .. W~rne .. GreenvilIe.... .•• 107IGreenville..••••. Wayne ...•....•. 526IPiedmont .

Master T. W. Henson Fred Ollar Roy T. Venable Marvin Webb N. Strickland Austin M. Luna

. . . . . .

Secretary Time of Meeting Arthur W. Morse . 2nd and 4th Tuesdan ......•••••• Clyde Turner . 3rd Saturday ..•..•...••.•••..•.. Aubrey C. Jones .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdan .. Geo. W. Emmons . 1st and 8rd Thursdan ..•••.••.... C. L. Ellinghouse . 1st and Srd Thursdan ••..••.••••. Boyd O. Pyles . 2nd and 4th Saturdan ..•••.......

Charter Date May 31.1861 Oct. 11. 1888 Oct. 13.1871 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 14. 1886 Oct. 15. 1885

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Ritual District No. 53 Ho;~el1

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Mt. Zion Ingomar Mountain View Alton ..••••••••.. Woodside Clifton.......... Koshkonong Oz::rk. : : : : : : : Sampson........ Bayou .....•••••• Robert Burns. . ..

0n;¥on.......

327 IWest Plaina .••... 5361Willow Sprinp .. 6371Mountain View .. 255IAlton........... 387IThomasville 468IThayer

Otto F. Bess F. H. Pennington Frank N. LeBaron Ray Holmes Ray Huddleston H. F. Collier 582IK06hkonon~ Roy E. Staley Sr 298ILutie ..•.....•.•. E. P. Martin........ 365IBakersfield...... Earnest Grisham 496IGainesville.. • . . •. Vietor Eugene Luna.

W. A. Krumholz C. C. Brinsmaid Raymond L. Erbar. Roy S. Dunsmore Ceeil A. Elliott J. W. Mitehell R. T. Meek C. J. Hogan....... Virgil Wiles MearJe J. Luna. . ..

lst and 8rd Thursdan ...••••••••. 2nd Tuesday 2nd and 4th Tuesda)'B Saturday on or before fulI moon Fri. on or before fulI moon 2nd and 4th Tuesdan 2nd Wednesday Saturday before third Sunday ••... Saturday on or before full moon... 2nd and 4th Friday. . . . . . . . . • . . . ..

Oet. 18,1870 13.1887 Fept.29.1915 May 24.1868 Oet. 18.1871 Oet. 18.1881 Sept. 27, 1906 Oet. 18,1900 Oet. 11,1888 Oet. 11. 1877

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TWENTY-FIRST ADMINISTRATIVE DISTlUCT-L. B. PARRISH, D. D. G. M., Bolivar, Mo. (Ritual Districts 88, 41) Ritual District No. 38 C~den ••.•.••

Linn Creek .•.••.. Mack's Creek •.••. La~~ede..••.•• Laclede...•••••.• Competition •.••.. Conway •••••••.•. Pul:ski. ....•• Waynesville ••••.. Richland ..•...... Miller .. Brumley ••••..•.. Iberia ..•.•...... '

.

1521 Camdenton ..•..• 4881Mack's Creek ..... 831 Lebanon ..••••••. 4821 Competition •••.. 628 j Conway ..•••••.• 876lWaynesviHe •••••. 886lRichland •••••••• 208 1Brumley ..••.•... 4H>IIberia ..

Ted D. Willard Ted M. Whitworth Paul H. Watson Finis Dougan, Sr James S. Latimer. . .. Lester E. Hudson Fred H. Steward W. F. Clark Loran L. Adams. . . ..

C. R. Williams . Eldon Clemmons .. , Twyman Edwards .. Orr Van Stavern ... E. Herschel Harris. Roy C. Wilson .. Ross Dodd . A. M. Phillips . Charles L. Brown ..

2nd Thursday •••.•••••.••••••.••. 1st Saturday ..•••••••...••.•••.•. lst Wednesday ••.••••••.••••••••. Saturday on or after full moon ••.. 1st Saturday••••••••••••••••••••• 2nd Tuesday •••..•••••.•••..••••. 2nd Wednesday ..••.•....•••••••• 2nd Wednesday ...••••••••••••••• 1st Thursday ................•••.

Oct. Oct. May Feb. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

1l!, 1869 17, 1876 26,1864 21, 1908 16, 1886 11, 1888 17,1901 17, 1878 18, 1871

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Ritual District No. 41

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Dallas ......•. Riddick .......... Western Light ... Urbana ..•.•.. : •. Hickory ....... Hogle's Creek ..•• Hermitage •.•.••. Polk ..•••...•. FairPla,. ........ Modern ••••...... Pleasant ••••.•... Bolivar...••..••. Pleasant Hope .... Aldrich ..........

........

.......... ..........

..

.......... .......... ..........

861IBuffalo .......... 8961 Louisburg •••.... 421lUrbana..•••..... 2791 Wheatland •..•... 288IHermitage •.•.... 441Fair Play ..••.••. 144jHumansviHe••..• 160IMorrisonville .... 196IBolivar ••..•...•. 4671Plea.sant Hope... 664IAldrich ..........

L. D. Ward .......... Drury Lindsey ....... H. R. Klein .......... Gilbert Hataway ..... M. J. Losure ......... Howard West ........ Louis E. Riley ....... James Van Anderson. J. L. Maas ..........• Hubert Leach....... George Cooper .......

Clyde Morrow ...... Roscoe S. Lindsey .. James R. Fowler ... Jesse O. Gist ....... Alva L. Davis ...... F. W. Barker ...... Monroe A. Fields ... Morris E. Ewing ... S. B. Brown....... F. P. Slagle ........ J. S. Toalson .......

4th Friday. • . . • • . . . • . . . . . • • • • . • •. First Thursday ••••...•...•••...• 4th Saturday ..•..•...•.•••....••. First Thursday .••••••••••••••••• 8rd Saturday .................... 2nd Thursday ..•...•••..••..•.••. 2nd Monday night ..........•..... 2nd Tuesday ...•.••.•••..•....••. 2nd Wednesday ..••••.••..•••.... lst Thursday..................... lst Tuesday .....................

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

31, 1871 1893 14, 1886 16, 1868 16, 1868 18, 1900 19, 1867 27, 1867 19, 1867 1873 26, 1927

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-SECOND ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-JOHN H. HICKS, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo. (Ritual District 46)

NO.1 Location 26IAva ...•..•..•... 182 IRichville . .. 116 1Cabool. 177lHouston. '" . 469IPlato .. 6661 Summersville . 168 IMountain Grove .. 411IHartville .. 643lMansfield ....•.•. 689iGroveaprinsr ..... 622INorwood ....•... 436lRockbridge .

Mastel Secretary Ramey Smith . Lloyd E. Reynolds .. L. O. Dickison . C. M. Thompson. .. Lee L. Kirkman . George L. Arms. . .. W. T. Sheets .. L. R. Birkhead C. C. Parker . W. L. Tilley. . . . . .. L. W. Tune . Roy W. Wall Joe W. Nickle . Yale Myers. . . . . . .. Harold J. Coday . Edward B. Garner.. Alfred M. McQuay . Donald F. Hunter .. Earl Shaddy . A. J. Webb Floyd H. Sanders . R. L. Ferguson. . . .. Ocie Coonce . C. E. Hicks. . . . . . ..

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Ritual District No. 46 County I Lodge Dou~las. . . . . .. Ava .....•..•.... .. . ..•.•. Pilot Knob .•...•. Texas. . . • . • . .. Barnes ..•••••••.. .. . Texas ..•..•••••.. ......... Plato ..•.....•••. . . . • . . . .. Summersville ..••. Wri~ht....•.. Mountain Grove .. .. Joppa ..•.....•.. Mansfield ..•..... Grovespring ••.•.. Norwood ....••... Ozark I Rockbridge .

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Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd WednesdayS . Friday on or before full moon . 1st and 3rd TuesdayS ...•.......•. 2nd Wednesday . 1st Monday ..•..•••...........•.. 2nd Saturday . 2nd and 4th FridayS ........•...• 1st and 8rd Fridays . 2nd Wednesday .........•.••••... 1st and 3rd SaturdayS . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd Saturday ........•......••••.

Charter Date Oct. 1,1887 Oct. 17, 1896 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 15, 1891 Oct. 16, 1886 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 16, 1891 Oct. 2,1918 Sept. 16, 1912 Oct. 21, 1897

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TWENTY-THIRD ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-B. JASPER SMITH, D. D. G. M., Springfield, Mo. (Ritual Districts 45, 54) Ritual District No. 45 Greene ..

1 United .•...•.....

O'Sullivan •.... ,. Ash Grove . Solomon . Gate of Temple . Republic ...•..••. Stafl'ord ....•.... Willard . Webster ..•..• Webster .••••...• .. Doric .. Mount Olive . Hazelwood ..••... . • • . • •., Henderson ...•...

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6lSpringfield . 71 Walnut Grove . 100 lAsh Grove ..••••• 271ISpringfield .. 422 ISpringfield .. 570jRepublic •••.••... 608jStafl'ord ......•.. 6201 Willard .••..••••• 98 IMarshfield ..•.•.. 300lElkland ...•.•••.. 4391 Rogersville, R. R. 3 469ISeymour .. 477IRogersville .

Roscoe E. Hyder E. E. Claypool Robert Renshaw Milton W. Kinloch. .. Hayden E. Campbell. Howard Batson K. E. Bumgarner. . .. Jack W. Farmer Fred Edward Collier.. G. F. Price......•... L. F. Hutchison E. R. Mayfield Wayne Bailey ,

M. P. Smith J. G. Page E. E. Watson Zack M. Dunbar Frank W. Clark Samuel C. Hock Harry E. Grier " Joe W. Grant Paul V. Rathbun. " D. W. Haymes ..... Otto Brooks....... W. A. Williams A. H. Farmer "

3rd Monday ...•.••..•••..•....... 2nd Tuesday ......•..••••••••..•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .•...••.... 2nd Monday .....•.....•.••...•.. 3rd Thursday ....••..•.••••. , .••. 2nd and 4th ThursdayS ....•..••.. 1st Thursday .....••.•••••••••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays •••••••..••. 2nd Friday ..........•.....••..•. Saturday on or before full moon ... Friday before full moon ....••..... 2nd and 4th MondayS ....•.••••••. 3rd Thursday ..•••••••..•••••....

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May 30,1867 ~ Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 20, 1899 Z Oct. 16, 1868 t::J Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 28, 1905 .t"l Sept. 28, 1910 Sept. 26, 1912 t::J May 28,1868 Q Oct. 15, 1868 t;j Oct. 16, 1872 o Oct. 16, 1872 ~ May 8,1874

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Ritual District No. 54 C~tian..•••

Sparta .. Friend .••...•••.. Billings .. Forsyth .••....••. T~ey:::: :::: Branson ....•••.. Stone ..•••.• " Galena •.••.....• Crane .

..

296lSparta ..•.....•• 35210zark .. 379IBillings .•..•.••. 468/Forsyth ..••••••• 6871 Branson .•••••••. 616IGalena .••••••••• 619ICrane ..•...•....

Homer L. Howard .. Robert W. Rice Raymond Brown J. B. Hicks........ Robert W. Wade J. Merwin Hall. . . .. Wade Garoutt

Noel C. Johns G. T. Breazeale C. N. Thomas W. E. yates H. R. Melton, Acting. R. H. Patterson .... " David A. Holderman.,

Friday on or before full moon .•.•. Saturday on or before full moon . 2nd Thursday ••••••..•••..•••••.. 1st Saturday .•.•.•••••••••••••.•. 1st and 3rd FridayS .. 1st and 8rd Thursdaya ..•••••••••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdaya ..

Oct. 21. 1888 Oct.• 18. 1870 Oct. 18, 1881 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 26. 1907 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 26, 1896

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-FOURTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-GEORGE F. PRATER, D. D. G. M., Carthage, Mo. (Ritual Districts 44, 55, 56)

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Ritual District No. 44 Lodge County Jasper ••.••... Carthage ••••.•••. Sarcoxie••••••••• Joplin ••••••••••• Fellowship ••••••• Jasper •.•••••••.. Carterville •.••••. Mineral ..•••..•.. Webb City ...•... Carl Junction .•.. Criterion ..••.••. ' La Russell .......

.... . ..... ... ...

........ ........

Location NO.1 197ICarthage .•••.•.. 298lSarcoxie ••••••... S35IJoplin ........... 845IJoplin ••.••.••••. 398IJasper ....••••.. 4011 Carterville .•••.•• 4711 Oronogo .•••••••. 5121Webb City••..••. 5491 Carl Junction •••. 5861Alba ............ 5921La Russell ...••..

Master Ruel M. King ........ Ned C. Barkley ...... H. Everette Smart ... Julius H. Ebert ...... Arthur H. Rice ...... Loye L. Snyder ...... RoBon A. Lacey ...... Walter L. Klein ...... Earl Baker .......... B. M. Cooper.....•.. Robert N. Patton ....

Secretary H. S. Christman .... Nelson Brown ...... Sherman A. Smith. Mark E. Whitaker .. J 08eph L. Frerer ... C. E. Ault ......... Paul Ritter ........ R. L. Sullens ....... W. G. Appleman ... John William Hart. Lee L. Simmons ....

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th ThUl'Bdays ............ 1st and Srd Tuesdays ••........••. 1st and Srd Fridays ••.•••••••••••• 2nd and 4th Fridays ..••••.....••. 1st and 3rd TuesdayS ••••••••••••• 1st and Srd Fridays •.••••..•••..•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ••..•.•..•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..••••••••• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..••....•. 1st and 8rd Mondays ..••.••••••••. 1st and 3rd Fridays ...............

Charter Date Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct•• 18, 1871 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 12, 1898 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept.26, 1907 Sept. 21, 1921

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Ritual District No. 55

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Barry ••••••••. Monett •••..•..•. ' Barry ..•••..•... Pythagoras •••••. Comfort ..••••••. Lawre;;d~::::. Mount Vernon ..• Canopy •.•.•••••. Decatur••..•.... RedOak ......... Stinson ••••.•.••. Miller ...........

1291 Monett •••••.•••. 367lWashburn ..••.•. 3881 Cassville •..•.••.. 533IWheaton ...••••• 991Mount Vernon ..• 284lAurora ....••••.. 400lPierce City.••... 4681Red Oak ..••••••. 5231 Stinson ..•..••... 667IMiIler .......••••

W. S. Hutchens ...... Leon Weathers ...... Guy Douglas ......... Earl E. Lamberson ... George Pugh ........ Leonard Bisby ....... George H. Hawkins .. C. D. Easson ........ , Cecil Box ............ John W. Webb .......

4661Southwest City ... 621lAnderson ..•..•.. 647INoel. .. 2471Neosho ..•..• , ••. 514 IGranby •...••••.. 638JStella , ..

Willis F. Nichols . W. E. Adkins . Noah Y. East . George R. Chesney., Fred Schewmake . J. F. Lentz .

Frank E. Williams. N. E. Edens, Acting W. T. Priest ....... Chester B. Royer ... Leon Pugh ......... W. H. Lloyd ....... E. T. Ecroyd ....... M.H.Kemp ....... Arch Richesin ...... C. ~ieholson ....

1st and Srd Fridays ............•.. 1st and 2nd Saturdays .....•...... 2nd and 4th Fridays .............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays •••••.•••••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 1st and 8rd Thursdays ..•....•.... 1st and Srd Fridays ............... 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..••••••••.. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays ......•...

Oct. 16. 1890 Oct. 13, 1858 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 19. 1857 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 22, 1902 Sept. 29, 1904

1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....•.••••••. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•.•••.•. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays •••....... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .....•.•.... 1st and 8rd Fridays .. 1st and Srd TuesdayS ..

Jan. 22, 1892 Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 22. 1920 Oct. 21, 1876 Oct. 22, 1902 Oct. 17, 1889

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Ritual District No. 56

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MeDonald .•••. Southwest .....•. Anderson ••••••.. Noel .•..•.•••.•.. Newton ••••.•. Neosho •.•.. , ..•. ft Granby •••••.••.• Stella ..•..•..•...

Wm. F. Stevenson . Henry Eppard . Bert F. St. Clair . Wallace H. Swanson. Will W. Scholes . Noble C. Jessee _

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TWENTY-FIFTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRIC T-FINIS E. WRENN, D. D. G. M., Stockton, Mo. (Ritual Districts 42, 43) Ritual District No. 42 Cedar .•.••••..1Stockton ....•.... Jerusalem ....•.. , Clintonville ..••.. Dade ••.•..•.. I Washington ..••. , Garrett ...••..•.. Everton ••••..••• Melville ..•••••••. Lockwood .......

283IStockton ......... 3151Jerico Springs ... 482 1Eldorado Springs. 87lGreenfield ..•.... 3591 Arcola .....••••.. 4051 Everton ..•...••. 4581 Dadeville ....•...

Howard Wrenn ...... ' W. T. Neale ......... Elton P. Evans ...... Wm. Howe .......... Carl Glenn .......... Wm. Nelson Wright .. Geo. D. Casey ........

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J. C. Garrett ....... Lester Neal. ....... Earl F. Pentecost .. W. R. Allison ...... John F. Baker ..... D. W. Thomasson .. A. C. Blakemore ...'

1st and 3rd Thursdays. . . . . . . . . . .. 1st and 3rd Mondays ............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... 4th Tuesday ..................... 2nd Thursday ........••......•... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. Thursday on or before full moon and two weeks after .............. I 5211Lockwood ........ William A. Bickel. ... F. M. Steenrod ..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...........

Uct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

16, 23, 15, 12, 13, 15,

18611 1896 1874 1847 1870 1885

Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 11, 1883

3031 Nevada . 3711 Sheldon . 4481Schell City ••.•••. 490lMontevallo ....•.. 495 1Richards ••.•••.. 605IWalker ...•..•••. 1871Liberal. ••..•.... 292\Lamar ••.••••••• 4751Gol~n City ..•.•. 516lMilford ......•••.

Charles F. Witter M. L. Garrett ' Gentry Steincross Joe M. Wheeler. . . . .. Chester F. Mealman .. John A. Jones Archie Charlton..... Otis Smith.......... Fred O. Lollar Glenn Campbell

David V. Morris .... H. L. Burney. . . . .. C. P. Finks Oral Faith. . . . . . . .. C. H. Newland J. W. Marquis , E. H. Roselle ' W. A. Heydenberk .. H. F. Pugh J. C. Thomas

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Ritual District No. 43 Vernon ..•.... Osage ..•.....••. Sheldon .....•.... Schell City .••..•. Montevallo ..•••.. Unity ........•.. Walker .•..•..... Barton . Hermon ..•....•. Lamar .•••••..... Golden .•...•.... ' Milford ...••.•...

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Friday ................•..... 1st and 3rd ThursdayS .........•.. 2nd Wednesday .....•.•••••...... 1st and 3rd SaturdayS ...••..•.... 1st and 3rd WednesdayS .. Istand3rd Wednesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays .........•.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•..•.••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ••......••... 3rd Saturday ..••..•......••.....

Oct. 15, 1868 May 23,1895 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 17, 1895 Sept.29,1909 Oct. 1,1889 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 12, 1882

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-SIXTH

ADMINI~RATIVEDISTRICT-E RNEST

BROWNING, D. D. G. M., Appleton City, Mo. (Ritual Districts 35, 37) Ritual District No. 35

County Bates ..

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Hume Amsterdam Butler ..••.••.•.• Rockville .••..•... Tyrian .......•.•. Creseent Hill .... , Rieh Hill •....•••. Foster

No.1 Location 130IHume 141IAmsterdam 254IButler ..••.•..•.. 341 1Rockville. ••.•••• 350IJohnstown ••••... 3681 Adrian. . • • . .. ... 4791Rich Hill........ 5541 Foster.

Master J. P. Rhoads Ralph O. Fritts Lloyd W. Brooks D. M. Carroll. . . . . . .. W. P. Hoover W. I. N udson. . . . . . .. Charlie Vangorden Seth T. Arnold

Secretary C. F. Porter , E. A. Smiser S. L. Rook S. W. Schroff. . . . .. Walter McComb C. A. Six. . . . . . . . .. C. F. Krieger O. D. Jennings

Time of Meeting lst and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Fridays ...•..••••..... 1st Thursday. ... ..•••. ..•••• 3rd Saturday night 2nd and 4th Thursday. . . • . . . • • . .. 2nd and 4th Mondays ..•...••.•... Every Friday .................•..

Charter Date Oet. 14,1886 Sept. 27, 1906 Oet. 15,1868 Nov. 18, 1900 Oct. 12,1870 Oet. 18, 1871 Oct. 18,1881 Oct. 15,1891

.

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291 Windsor ...••••.. 286IUrieh •••••••..•. 408lMontrose ••••.•.. 548lClinton .••.•••••. 552 1Calhoun ••.••••.. 273 1Oseeola ••.••.••.. 342\Roseoe ....••..•. 40SILowry City •••••. 4121Appleton City .... 419lTaberville ....•..'

Russell E. Thomas... F. H. Hillebrand Chas. T. Campbell , Wilbur R. Pilant H. L. Redford Edgar A. Hinote M. G. Hawkins Paul Crawford John B. Browning. .. K. L. Ingalls

Otto F. Weiss . F. N. Erwin . Chas. P. Gardner . Joseph B. Holcomb. E. W. Masters . George W. Davies .. C. A. Weinlig . E. D. Hoover .. D. D. Seroggs . A. C. Davidson .

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Ritual District No. 37 Henry ..•..••. Windsor .. Urieh . Montrose •.•••.•• Clinton ••...•.... Calhoun •••...•.. St. Clair . St. Clair..•...... Cairo . Lowry City .•..... Appleton City .... Star ........•....

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8 1st and Srd Tuesdays •.••••••••.•• First Friday .....•..•.•.••••..••. 1st and Srd Mondays ..•..•••••••.. 2nd and 4th Fridays . 1st and Srd Thursdays .••.••..•••. 3rd Tuesday . Wednesday on or before full moon. 1st Friday ...••.•••••..•..••..••• 8rd Monday ..•.••..•••••••.••.•.. 4th Saturday ........•.......•.•. ,

June 2,1866 Oet. 19, 1889 Oet. 13, 1871 Oet. 15, 1890 Oct. 15,1891 Oet. 15, 1869 Oet. 18, 1870 Oet. 18, 1878 Oet. 18, 1871 Oct. 16, 1872

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~ TWENTY-SEVENTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTBIC'r-CHARLES C. CZESCHIN, D. D. G. M., Warrensburg, Mo. (Ritual Districts 24, 36) Ritual District No. 24

..

. Arrow Rock •••.•• C~mb!idge.•••••. Miami •••••••••.. Trilumina •.•.•••. Barbee••••.•..••. Malta ..•..••••.•. Oriental•••...•.. Nelson ........•. ,

55 IArrow Rock ..••. , 63ISlater . 85IMiami ••••••.•••• 206lMarshall .....•... 2171Sweet Springs ..• 402 IMalta Bend ..•••. 618lBlackburn ..•..•. 660 INelson . " .

Paul Burge Guy F. Hays Herrmann G. Malan. Dorsey Bail Chas. W. Scott , Thomas C. Hume L. W. yates Lee Bush

Benton ..•.••• Cole Camp ..••.•. Shawnee .•.•..... Johnson .••••• Knobn06ter .•.•.. Holden .••••••... Corinthian ..•..•. Cold Spring .••••. Chilhowee . Pettis .. Sedalia •••.•..•.. Granite ..•..••.•. Green Ridge ••••.. LaMonte '

5961Cole Camp ....•.. 653lWarsaw ....••.•. 246IKnobn06ter •••••• 262IHolden .......•.. 266 IWarrensburg .... 274 ILeeton ..••...••. 487 IChilhowee . 236lSedalia ..•...... , 272 ISedalia ••••..•..• 4261Green Ridge ...•• 574lLaMonte .

Raymond Smith ..... , J. H. Cooper........ Ray Kelly. . . . . . . . . .. George B. Collins. . .. Edgar D. Egelston. " Shelton J. Roop. . . H. K. Downing Leslie W. Long A. F. Scott Carl L. Ragar. . . . . .. Norman Hall

Saline

Robt. B. Thompson. Wm. W. Ames Geo. P. Wilson G. Howard Fuller .. Paul Wylie Robert Miller Walter C. Borchers. R. B. Finley

2nd Thursday .....••..•••••••.••. 1st Tuesday ••••••....•...••.•... 4th Tuesday ••••••....•••.•••••.. 1st Thursday •••••...•••••..•..•. Last Friday , 1st Tuesday..................... 3rd Tuesday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..•..••.••••.

Oct. 3.1845 June 6,1866 June 2.11166 Dec. 9.1867 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 17,1901 Oct. 11,1883 Oct. 12,1893

1st and 3rd Wednesdays.......... 2nd and 4th TuesdayS ..•..•••••••. 2nd and 4th ThursdayS. • • . • • • . • • •. 1st and 3rd Thursdays. . . . . . • • • • .. 1st and 3rd Mondays. . • • • . . • • • . . • 3rd Thursday. . • . . . • .. .. • • .. .. 1st and 8rd Fridays 1st Friday ..•••.•..•......••..••. 3rd Friday ..•..•..•••...•..•••••. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS. • . . . . . . • • •. 2nd Friday

Nov. 1925 Sept.21,1921 May 26, 1865 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 16, 1879 Sept. 27, 1906 May 29,1864 Oct. 15,1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 28, 1905

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Ritual District No. 36 E. H. Intelmann... James A. Logan .... H. A. Wimer. . . . . .. Clifton O. Landes.. Horace M. Cash. . .. Floyd E. FeweI. . L. W. young Ralph F. Boies J. R. Smetana Wilford G. Acker Glenn M. Wellman.,

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY

DISTRIOT~ont1nued

TWENTY-EIGHTH ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT-ROSCOE A. MILLER, D. D. G. M., Oolumbia, Mo. (Ritual Districts 25, 26) Ritual District No. 25

I

County Lodge NO.1 Location Cooper ..•.•-:: Cooper........... 36IBoonville . .. Pleasant Grove 14210tterviIle ..•••... Wm. D. Muir 2771Pilot Grove ••..•• Wallaee ......•... 456IBuneeton . Prairie Home ..... 503 IPrairie Home •... Howard ..•..•. Howard.......... 41New Franklin . Fayette. . .. . .. . . . 471 Fayette . Livingston. . .. . . . 51 IGlasgow ..•••.••. Armstrong. .• . . .. 70lArmstrong ,

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.-- .__Secretary----. ------_. .,============ - - . _ - - Time of Meetirli' Charter Date

'MMter"-J. Dale Skelton Vietor E. Hoehns Herman Ries C. E. Vilhauer T. Robert Howard... G. H. Chamberlain Raymond H. Sands Ralph E. Johnson G. W. Lenoir

Clarence L. Hurt J. H. Gunn Earl Hays J. W. Gerhardt Fred L. Schilb Garland E. Herrin .. Samuel P. Ayres, JI Robt. W. Raines John B. Thorpe

2nd and 4th Tuesdays ........•••.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .......•.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•....... 1st and 3rd Fridays.............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•••••••.•• 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays

Oct. May Feb. Oet. Oct. May Oet. Oct. May

9,1841 31,1855 5,1878 16,1872 13,1881 6,1852 12, 1842 12,1876 24,1854

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Ritual District No. 26 Boone .•••.... Centralia .....•.. ff Twilight ..•...•.. Ashland .....•... Sturgeon .•...•.. Hallsville . Aneient Landm'k. Hinton ...•..•••. Aeaeia ........•..

59lCentralia . 1141 Columbia ..•..... 156lAshland . 174ISturgeon . 336lHallsville.....•.. 3561 Harrisburg ..•.•. 455IHinton . 602IColumbia .

Hardin E. Markwell .. Loren L. Reynolds . Paul Q. Sapp . William Kemner . Shell B. Toalson . Everett Purcell . Stanley Botner . Walt W. Mason .

James C. Hunt '1 Walter A. Reed Ross N. Glascock ' A. E. Boothe William H. Roberts. T. Ray Long. . . . . .. Tilford Goslin , N. N. McGlasson

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1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Tuesday 1st and 3rd Friday 1st Friday " First Friday 1st and 3rd Saturdays First Saturday 1st and 3rd Tuesdays

. Oet. 19, 1867 . Oet. 19, 1867 . May 28, 1859 . Apr. 30, 1857 . Oct. 17, 1878 . Oct. 27. 1873 . June 8,1904 . Sept. 29. 1909

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TWENTY-NINTH ADMINISTRATIVE9 DISTRICT-VffiGIL B. SAVILLE, .D. D. G. M., Jefferson City, Mo. (Ritual Districts 31, 58)

Cole ••••..••.• Jefferson ..•..... Russellville •••.••. " Hickory Hill ..•.. ' .......... Centertown •••... Moniteau ...•. ' Tipton ••••••••••. California ..••.••. Moniteau ....•... ..... Clarksburg .•••... Os~lte ..••.•••. Chamois ••....••. !-inn ..•..•••....

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431Jefferson City .... 90lRussellville ..••.. , 211IEugene .....••... 6111 Centertown ..... , 56ITipton ..•...•... 1831 California ..••••. 295IJamestown .•.... 5531 Clarksburg , 185IChamois •..•..••. 326ILinn .

Charles W. Schafer, W. R. Howard ..... James A. Farmer. , Earl Powell,., , Roscoe L. Collier . R. W. Heck., , H. C. Harkins , ., H. D. Sappington .. H. O. Barbarick ... , R. D. Curley .... , ..

C. D. Sifford . Edgar L. Lindley . J. E. Dooley . James M. Swearingen Clifton W. Thomas . . A. E. Wilson G. G. Pennington . Hilton Douglas . E. H. Schowengerdt. , F. Edward Busch ....

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Ritual District No. 31

> 1st and 3rd Mondays ••...••.••..• , 2nd Friday . 1st Thursday . First Tuesday .. 2nd and 4th ThursdayS ...•..•.... ' 2nd and 4th Fridays •.••...••.•.•. 1st Saturday ..........•.•....•••. 1st and 3rd Mondays ......•..•••. 4th Friday •.•..•..•.••••.•••••••. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ........•••• '

Nov. 15, 1841 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 19, 1867 June 18,1910 June 2.1866 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1891 May 28.1857 Oct. 19, 1898

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Ritual District No. 58 Morpn·······1 .. .., •••. Miller........ ..

Versailles '1 Barnett Olean Ionia •••.........

320lVersames ......• 'I 591IBarnett......... 134jOlean 381IEldon...........

Archie L. Roark·····1 Jas. A. Gorham Nobel Berner Harod A. Reichel.

W. B. Todd '1 Robt. Edmondson .. C. E. Herfurth Ford Vaughan

2nd and 4th Mondays·············1 2nd Wednesday...... .••••.•••••• 3rd Saturday.................... 2nd and 4th Mondays

Oct. 28,1920 Sept. 6, 1917 JuneSO, 1860 Oct. 18,1871

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LIST OF ELEOTED OFFIOERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI

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FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election April, 1821. ••• Oct., 1821. ••• Oct., 1822 •••• Oct., 1823 •••. Oct., 1824 •••• Oct•• 1826 •••• Oct., 1826 •••• Oct.. 1827 •••. Oct., 1828 ••• , Oct•• 1829 •••. Oct., 1830 •••• Dec., 1881 •••. Oct., 1882 •••. Dec., 1838 ••.. Nov., 1884 •••• Oct.. 1836 .• tt Oct., 1836 ••.. Oct., 183T .••. Oct., 1838 •••• Oct., 1889 •••• Oct., 1840 •••• Oct., 1841. ••• Oct., 1842 •••. Oct., 1843 .... Oct., 1844 .••• Oct.. 1846 •••• Oct., 1846 •••• Oct., 1847 •••. May, 1848 •••. May, 1849 .••. May, 1850 •••• May, 1851 .••• May, 1852 .... June, 1853 •••• May, 1854 .••.

Grand Master I Thos. F. Riddick... N ath'l B. Tucker. .• N ath'l B. Tucker. .• N ath'l B. Tucker... Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Edward Bates •••.• Edward Bates •••.• Edward Bates •••.• Hardage Lane ••••• Hardage Lane ••••• Hardage Lane ••••• Edward Bates ....• H. R. Gamble • . . • •• Sinclair Kirtley. • .• A. B. Chambers .•. • A. B. Chambers ... • S. W. B. Carnegy.· S. W. B. Carnegy .• S. W. B. Carnegy .• P. H. McBride. . • .• P. H. McBride •.•. • P. H. McBride •••• • P. H. McBride. . . .• P. H. McBride ..•. • J. W. S. Mitchell ••• J. W. S. Mitchell ••• John Ralls ..•••••• Joseph Foster ..... Joseph Foster ••••• John F. Ryland John F. Ryland B. W. Grover...... B. W. Grover •••••• Wilson Brown ••••• L. S. Cornwell ....•

D. Grand Master . ...•••..••••••••••• Thompson Dougl888 • Thompson Dougl888 • Geo. H. C. Melody ••.• Geo. H. C. Melody •••• Geo. H. C. Melody •••• Hardage Lane ••.••• Hardage Lane •..••• Geo. H. C. Melody •••• Fred L. Billon ..•••• • Geo. H. C. Melody •.•• Geo. H. C. Melody •••• Geo. H. C. Melody •••• A. B. Chambers •.••• Sinclair Kirtley •.••• Sinclair Kirtley •.•.• John D. Daggett .... • John D. Daggett ....• John D. Daggett.... • A. B. Chambers ..•. • Joseph Foster •••••• Joab Bernard •••.••• J oab Bernard ••••••• Joseph Foster •••••• Fred L. Billon •••.••• John D. Taylor •••••• John D. Taylor ...•. • E. S. Ruggles ••••••• E. S. Ruggles ••.••• • E. S. Ruggles ••••••• B. W. Grover ....... • E. S. Ruggles ..••••• S. F. Currie • L. S. Cornwell ..•••• • D. P. Wallingford .. -

Senior G. Warden J ames Kennerly ••• Edward Bates •••• Edward Bates •••• Edward Bates •••• Wm. G. Pettus .... Wm. G. Pettus •••• Martin Ruggles •.• Martin Ruggles ••• H. R. Gamble ••.•• • H. R. Gamble ...•• • Sinclair Kirtley ..• Oliver Parker •...• M. J. Noyes ...•..• John Wilson •••.. Oliver Parker ..••• Oliver Parker ..•. Edward Searcey ..• A. B. Chambers A. B. Chambers Alex. T. Dougl888.Alex. T. Dougl888.Joseph Foster ••.. Joseph Foster .•.. J. W. S. Mitchell ••• E. S. Ruggles ••.•. • E. S. Ruggles .....• E. S. Ruggles .....• J. L. F. Jacoby ••.• Cyrus Osborn ••...• Joseph Megguire .. P. Draper ..•••...• S. F. Currie••.•••• J. H. Turner ••••• J. W. Chenoweth .. • James H. Britton .. •

Junior G. Warden William Bates ••••••• William Bates ••••••• Wm. G. Pettus ••••• • Wm. G. Pettus .•••• • Thornt. Grimsley •.••• Thornt. Grimsley •..•• John F. Ryland •••.•• H. R. Gamble ..••••.• Adam L. Mills ..•.••• Adam L. Mills .••••. • Adam L. Mills ..•.•• Augustus Jones ••••• • Auirustus Jones ••.•. • G. A. Tuttle ..•••.••• S. W. B. Carnegy .•• • S. W. B. Carnegy .•.• Granville Snell ..•..•• Thomas Andrews ...• Alex. T. Dougl888 ..•• Wm. C. Vance ...... • John Orrick ..•.••.• • C. H. Bowers ••..••.. C. H. Bowers .•...•.. E. S. Ruggles • J. L. F. Jacoby ....•• J. L. F. Jacoby • J. L. F. Jacoby Cyrus Osborn •...... • Joseph Megguire •••• • P. Draper ...•..••.. • S. F. Currie .•...... • J. H. Turner ..•.... • S. H. Saunders ..•.• • R.C.Hill ••.•••..... •

...................••

Grand Treasurer Archibald Gamble ••• • Archibald Gamble ••.• Archibald Gamble •.. • Archibald Gamble .•.• Archibald Gamble ••. • Archibald Gamble .•. • Rich. T. McKinney ..• Thornton Grimsley .. • Thornton Grimsley .• • Bernard Pratte ••••• * Thomas Andrews ... • Thomas Andrews •.. • Thomas Andrews ..• • Geo. H. C. Melody ••• * Geo. H. C. Melody .•• • Geo. H. C. Melody ..• * Geo. H. C. Melody ..•• Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Geo. H. C. Melody ..• • Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Geo. H. C. Melody ..• * Geo. H. C. Melody ...• John Simonds ..•..•. • Fred L. aillon ..•••. * John S. Watson ...•. John S. Watson ..••.• John S. Watson ..•.. • John S. Watson • John S. Watson • John M. Reed ....•. • J. T. Johnson ••.... • J. T. Johnson ••....• J. T. Johnson ••.... • Joseph Foster •••...• Joseph Foster ......•

Grand Secretary William Renshaw· William Renshaw* William Renshaw· T. Douglas* T. Douglas* John D. Daggett· John D. Daggett* John D. Daggett* John D. Daggett* John D. Daggett* Fred L. Billon * Fred L. Billon* Fred L. Billon * John Garnett* Thos. W. Conyers· Thos. W. Conyers. Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. DaIlam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam. Fred L. Billon * Fred L. Billon * J. W. S. Mitchell· J. W. S. Mitchell* C. D. W. Johnson* C. D. W. Johnson* C. D. W. Johnson * A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan·

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Kay, Kay, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct.,

1866 •••. 1866 •••• 1867 •••• 1868 1869 1860 .••. 1861. 1862 186S 1864 1866 1866 .••• 1867 1868 1869 .••. 1870 ..•. 1871. ••• 1872 .••• 1878.... 1874 .••• 1876 •••• 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881. 1882 1888 1884 1885 1886 1887 •••• 1888 •••• 1889 •••• 1890 .... 1891.... 1892 .••• 1898 •••• 1894 1895

~S.-COrnwell •••• - ....••..•...••..•. -, Benjamin Sharp •• ' W. A. Cunningham .. S. H. Saunders •••. - P. Draper ...•••••. • S. H. Saundel'8 Marcus Boyd Marcus Boyd M. H. McFarland M. H. McFarland.' W. R. Penick ••....• Wm. R. Penick John Decker • Geo. Whitcomb John H. Turner John H. Turner Wm. N. Loker • John F. Houston .. ' John D. Vincil. John F. Houston .. • John D. Vinci! • John D. Vinci] .•.. • W. E. Dunscomb •••. ' W. E. Dunscomb .• • C. A. Rowley • John D. Vinci! ....• R. E. Anderson • William D. Muir .. ' T. E. Garrett ...•... • Th08. E. Garrett .. • R. E. Anderson • Th06. E. Garrett .. • R. E. Anderson ' Samuel H. Owens.' J. E. Ryland .•••••. ' R. E. Anderson .... John W. Luke • John W. Luke ..••.• Xenophon Ryland ' James E. Cadle • Xenophon Ryland ' Xen. Ryland • Th06. C. Ready •••.•• T. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan Noah M. Givan ...• Joseph S. Browne .. ' J06. S. Browne .... - W. R. Stubblefield .. ' W. R. Stubblefield.' Alex. M. Dockery • Alex. M. Dockery •. ' Chas. C. Woods • Chas. C. Woods - Lee A. Hall Lee A. Hall - Robt. F. Stevenson Robt. F. Stevenson- James W. Boyd James W. Boyd ••• - George R. Hunt ' Geo. R. Hunt W. M. Williams • Wm. M. Williams .. • James P. Wood .•••• ' James P. Wood n Theodore Brace Theodore Brace ••• • Geo. E. Walker .••.. ' Geo. E. Walker •...• B. H. Ingram •••..•. ' B. H. Ingram ..••• ' John R. Parson ..•.. • John R. Parson ..• ' Harry Keene ..•.••• ' Harry Keene •••••• - J. B. Thomas ...••••• J. B. Thomas • A. M. Hough A. M. Hough D. A. Jamison

J. W. Chenoweth •• ' S. H. Saunders ••• • Marcus Boyd ..•.•• • John F. Houston .. ' W. R. Penick John Decker ..••••• Geo. Whitcomb Wm. N. Loker John D. Vinci! • A. L. McGregor Martin Collins R. E. Anderson •••. T. E. Garrett • Wm. D. Muir •...• • A. M. Dockery •••••• Sam H. Owens • Sam H. Owens ' John W. Luke ••.. ' Jas. E. Cadle •••.•• ' Jas. E. Cadle .•..•. • Th08. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • J08. S. Browne • W. R. Stubblefield • Jas. E. Carter U· Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall ' Robt. F. Stevenson· James W. Boyd .••• George R. Hunt .... Wm. M. Williams .. ' James P. Wood .•• • Theodore Brace ' Geo. E. Walker ' B. H. Ingram ...•. ' John R. Parson ••• ' Harry Keene ' J. B. Thomas ..••. • A. M. Hough •••••. • D. A. Jamison • F. J. Tygard •

H. E. Van Orsdell..' Marcus Boyd ....••• • John F. Houston • John Decker • John Decker Samuel M. Hayes • A. L. McGregor Samuel Russell A. L. McGregor • Martin Collins ' R. E. Anderson • A. L. McGregor .•..• • Wm. D. Muir ' Alex. M. Dockery ••. • Sam H. Owens ..•... • John E. Ryland .•••• ' John E. Ryland ..... ' Jas. E. Cadle .•..•.. ' Xenophon Ryland ..• • Th06. C. Ready .••.. • Noah M. Givan ••....• M. G. Hubble .•...•.. W. R. Stubblefield .. ' Jas. E. Carter • Alex. M. Dockery ' Lee A. Hall ' Robt. F. Stevenson •. ' James W. Boyd • Geo. R. Hunt • Wm. M. Williams • James P. Wood • -' Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram John R. Parson ' Harry Keene ..•..... ' J. B. Thomas ..•.•.. ' A. M. Hough .•..••. ' D. A. Jamison • F. J. Tygard • E. F. Allen •

John D. Daggett ..•. • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett ...• • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker ..•••. • Wm. N. Loker ...••• • Wm. N. Loker ..•••. • Wm. N. Loker ...••• • Wm. N. Loker ...•.. • Wm. N. Loker .....• • Wm. N. Loker ...... ' Wm. N. Loker ...••. • Wm. N. Loker ' Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker ....•• • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker ' John W. Luke • John W. Luke • John W. Luke 11 John W. Luke • Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.' Samuel M. Kennard.'

A. O'Sullivan' A. O'Sullivan' A. O'Sullivan' A. O'Sullivan' A. O'Sullivan' A. O'SullivanA. O'Sullivan' A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan. A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan. A.O'Sullivan.t G. Frank Gouley.t G. Frank Gouley' G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley' G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank Gouley' G. Frank Gouley. G. Frank GouleY··n John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!' John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!' John D. Vinci!' John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!' John D. Vinci!. John D. Vinci!-

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LIST OF ELECTED OFFIC'EBS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOlJ'BI

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FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23,1821 Date Election Oct., 1896 .•.. Oct., 1897 .... Oct., 1898 •... Oct., 1899 .... Oct., 1900 •••• Oct., 1901 •.•• Oct., 1902 . Oct., 1903 . Sept., 1904 .••. Sept., 1906 .••• Sept., 1906 .••• Sept., 1907 .... Sept., 1908 ..•. Sept., 1909 •.•• Sept., 1910 ..•• Sept., 1911 . Sept., 1912 . Oct., 1913 ..•. Sept., 1914 .••• Sept., 1916 . Sept., 1916 . Sept., 1917 ••.. Sept., 1918 . Sept., 1919 . Sept., 1920 .••• Sept., 1921. .•. Oct., 1922 . Oct., 1923 .. Oct., 1924 .••• Oct., 1926 . Oct., 1926 . Oct., 1927 . Sept., 1928 •••• Sept., 1929 ..•• Oct., 1930 ••..

Grand Master I D. Grand Master D. A. Jamison " F. J. Tygard " F. J. Tygard " E. F. Allen " E. F. Allen " C. H. Briggs " C. H. Briggs " Campbell Wells " Campbell Wells " Joseph C. Finagin .. " Joseph C. Finagin." John C. yocum " John C. yocum " Wm. F. Kuhn " Wm. F. Kuhn " Leroy B. Valliant .. * Leroy B. Valliant .. " A. S. Houston " A. S. Houston " D. M. Wilson " " John T. Short " D. M. Wilson John T. Short " R. R. Kreeger " R. R. Kreeger...... William A. Hall • Wm. A. Hall....... Clay C. Bigger " Clay C. Bigger " Arch A. Johnson . Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert " Jacob Lampert " Van Fremont Boor." Van Fremont Boor. Chesley A. Mosman.· Tolman W. Cotton .. Frank R. Jesse .... " Frank R. Jesse ....• Edward Higbee ....• Edward Higbee ..••• Wm. A. Clark ..... • Wm. A. Clark .....• John W. Bingham ..• John W. Bingham • Julius C. Garrell ... • Julius C. Garrell ..•• Wm. F. Johnson ...• Wm. F. Johnson ...• O. A. Lucas .......• O. A. Lucas........ Bert S. Lee . Bert S. Lee ........• Joseph S. Mcintyre .• Joseph S. McIntyre. Orestes Mitchell ....• Orestes Mitchell ...• W. W. Martin . W. W. Martin John Pickard • John Pickard ......• A. F. Ittner ........• Anthony F. Ittner .. B. E. Bigger . Byrne E. Bigger .... S. R. Freet ........• S. R. Freet......... Wm. R. Gentry . Wm. R. Gentry ....• Ray V. Denslow .

Senior G. Warden E. F. Allen .......•• C. H. Briggs • Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin.· John C. yocum ..•. • Wm. F. Kuhn .....• Leroy B. Valliant.· A. S. Houston ....• • D. M. Wilson " John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger • William A. Hall • • Clay C. Bigger Arch A. Johnson . Jacob Lampert • Van Fremont Boor.· Chesley A. Mosman • Tolman W. Cotton .. Edward Higbee • Wm. A. Clark " John W. Bingham· Julius C. Garrell • Wm. F. Johnson • O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee . Joseph S. McIntyre" Orestes Mitchell ....• W. W. Martin . John Pickard • A. F. Ittner . B. E. Bigger . S. R. Freet • Wm. R. Gentry, Sr . Ray V. Denslow . Thad B. Landon •

Junior G. Warden C. H. Briggs • Campbell Wells " Joseph C. Finagin .. • John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy B. Valliant ...• A. S. Houston • D. M. Wilson • Howard Watson • R. R. Kreeger • William A. Hall ....• Clay C. Bigger • Arch A. Johnson . Jacob Lampert " Van Fremont Boor." Chesley A. Mosman .• Tolman W. Cotton . Frank R. Jesse " Wm. A. Clark .....• John W. Bingham .• Julius C. Garrell. .• Wm. F. Johnson ..• • O. A. Lucas .......• Bert S. Lee ........• Joseph S. McIntyre.· Orestes Mitchell ....• W. W. Martin . John Pickard ......• A. F. Ittner . B. E. Bigger . S. R. Freet • Wm. R. Gentry, Sr . Ray V. Denslow . Thad B. Landon ...• Frank C. Barnhill ..

Grand Treasurer Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard •• Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard •• Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· John R. Parson ... • John R. Parson ..• • Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart. Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alph. C. Stewart "." Wm. A. Hall. .....• Wm. A. Hall • Wm. A~ HalL ',' • Wm. A. Hall ......• Wm. A. Hall ......• Wm. A. Hall ......• Wm. A. HalL ..... • Wm. A. Hall ......• Wm. A. Hall ·ttt E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris .

Grand Secretary John D. Vincil" John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil" John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil·ffll John R. ParsonU" John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson" John R. Parson· John R. Parson" John R. Parson" John R. Parson" John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson tt· Frank R. Jesse • Frank R. Jesse • Frank R. Jesse • Frank R. Jesse • Frank R. Jesse • Frank R. Jesse ."tt Arthur Mather ttt Arthur Mather· Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather.

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Sept., 1981. Sept., 1932 Sept., 1933 Sept., 1934 Sept., 1935 Sept., 1936 Sept., 1937 Sept., 1938 Sept., 1939 Sept., 1940. . •. Sept., 1941. •.. Sept., 1942 .... Sept., 1948.•.. Sept., 1944 •••• Sept., 1945 •••• Sept., 1946 Sept., 1947

Ray V. Denslow•••. Thad B. Landon ..•• F. C. Barnhill Du Val Smith James W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader ..••... Henry C. Chiles Karl M. VetBburg Harry S. Truman... Harris C. Johnston., Forrest C. Donnell .. W. F. Woodruff Willis J. Bray Willis J. Bray...••• Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing

Thad B. Landon • Frank C. Barnhill Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods Harry S. Truman Harris C. Johnston.. Forrest C. Donnell .. Grover C. Sparks.§§ Willis J. Bray, Solon Cameron Solon Cameron ....• Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland.

-Deceased. §Was not installed. tResigned. -tDied August 11, 1866, while in office. -~Appointed August 13, 1866, by John D. Vincil, Grand Master. --IIDied April 11, 1877, while in office. -IIDied October 12, 1904, while in office. ---Died April 22, 1916, while in office.

Frank C. Barnhill .. Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader H;enry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods ..• f Karl M. VetBburg Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell.. Grover C. Sparks §§ W. F. Woodruff Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford

Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods t Karl M. VetBburg Harry S. Truman Forrest C. Donnell .. Grover C. Sparks § § Wm. F. Woodruff James A. Kinder §§§ Morris E. Ewing .•.. Harry F. Sunderland Harry F. Sunderland James M. Bradford Ray Bond

-IiJohn W. Luke served, by appointment, as Grand Secretary, from April 11. 1877 to October 11. 1877, and died October, 1888. UDied within week after his installation. ttThere was no Communication in 1835, owing to the anti-Masonic excitement. "Withdrawn from Masonry. tt-Resigned May 20, 1921, account ill health. --·Appointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. Valliant, Grand Master.

E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E.

E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris........ E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris E. Morris

Arthur Mather-. Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur MatherArthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur MatherArthur Mather. Arthur Mather §§§§ Harold L. Reader-§ Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader

-tttDied November 7, 1924, while in office. ··ttDied August 29, 1927, while in office. tttAppointed September I, 1927, by John Pickard, Grand Master. §§Died December 28, 1942, while in office. §§§Died May 8, 1943, while in office. §§§§Died April 22, 1944, while in office. -§Appointed May I, 1944 by W. F. Woodruff, Grand Master.

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OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATION, FEBRUARY 22, 1821 EDWARD BATES, Worshipful Master JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer

J AMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden

WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden ABRAM BECK, Secretary

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GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI t\:) CIj

TO MISSOURI Grand Representative Post Office George W. Paddock . Kansas City Wm. C. Rese ....•....... _ . St. Louis , Byrne E. Bigger. . . . • . . .. . .. Hannibal. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . John W. Adams . Marshall Frank G. Ade ..............•. Joplin

GRAND LODGE

"'I

Alabama Alberta Arizona Arkansas British Columbia

. . . . .

John A. Witthaus ....•...... James DeWitt , Thomas B. Mather. . . . . .. .., Thornton Jennings . Harold M. Jayne . Jolly P. Hurtt ......•........ Wm. C. Gordon ,. J. M. Sellers " . Ray V. Denslow ~ .

St. Louis , Canada Kirksville Colorado Kansas City Connecticut Clinton ..............•............. Costa Rica Trenton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Cuba Sedalia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Delaware Marshall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Denmark Lexington. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . District of Columbia Trenton , England

Eli S. Haynes . W. W. Martin , Walter A. Higbee ........•... Walter J. Simon . DuVal Smith . Nat D. Jackson . Forrest C. Donnell. . . . . .. . .. Chas. L. Woods , F. C. Barnhill . Ovid Bell .

Columbia Florida St. Louis Georgia Lancaster '.' Guatemala St. Louis , Idaho St. Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . .. , Illinois Independence , Indiana Washington, D. C..............••.... Ireland Rolla. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Kansas Marshall Kentucky Fulton Louisiana

R~d~lph S~~: P. O. Box 186, San Jose Calixto Fajardo•..•••....... Havana Weldon C. Waples Newark Wm. Malling. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Copenhagen Geo. S.Foreman 5622 1st St. N. E. Hon. Wykeham Stanley Cornwallis " Kent . William W. Trice ' Tampa . Robert A. Collins , Unadilla . . CI~~~~~~'i>:P~;kh~~~:::"::. Caldwell 33 N. La Salle, Chicago . Carl W. Mulfinger Indianapolis . Herbert A. Graham .. Herbert Malcolm. . . . . . . . . . .. Ireland , D. A. Meredith ' Kansas City ' Sam K. Veach. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Carlisle New Orleans . Robert Waleter Smith

Frank P. Briggs , Harris C. Johnston '" James W. Skelly Harold L. Reader. . . . . . .. Orestes Mitchell, Jr Arch A. Johnson. . . . . . . . . . .. Ralph Wilson. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. Curtis J. Neal. , E. E. Morris Morris E. Ewing , GUY C. Million Henry C. Chiles E. L. Robison

Washington, D. Coo Boonville St. Louis St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. St. Joseph Springfield............. St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Cape Girardeau. . . . . . . .. Kansas City Morrisville Boonville Lexington St. Joseph

. ' .. . . . . . . . , . .

. . .. ,

Maine Manitoba Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota .....•... Mississippi. Montana Nebraska Nevada New Brunswick New Hampshire New Jersey

.

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative Post Office Blake W. Harper , Montgomery Archibald West . Edmonton Lee Garrett , Tucson M. W. Greeson . Prescott Lawrence Healey . 1138Nelson St., Vancouver Geo. D. Kleinhaus . Kitchener, Ontario Jos. M. Neal . Meeker

. . . .. . , .. .

:::::::::::::

Edward H. Britton Maris H. Garton. . . . . . . . . . .. G. A. Rasch Robt. D. Webster Neil W. Murray Harry E. Orr. . • . . . . . . . . . . .. James P. White , Knute L. Brujord Edward E. Carr Fred H. Callihan

Waterville Boissevain Baltimore Belmont Detroit St. Paul Bailey Culbertson North Platte Box 469, Las Vegas

O~~~~'E~~i~:je'~~li:::::::::: St. John H. E. Hutchinson

Princeton

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GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI-(Continued)

I

TO MISSOURI Grand Representative P~t Office Cecil A. Tolin St. Louis Richard O. Rumer St. Louis Anthony F. Ittner St. Louis J. Fred Park .......................... , F. Ernest Carter , Ray Bond William R. Gentry Fred O. Wood ..........•.... Sam Wilcox Martin Dickinson , Bert S. Lee Freelon K. Hadley. . . . . . . . . .. W. B. Massey. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. George C. Marquis , W. F. Woodruff T. W. Cotton , Don Chapman. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. James M. Bradford Harry S. Truman ........•... Theodore C. Teel David V. Morris Robert C. Winkelmaier , Robert Lee Barger Solon Cameron Leo H. Johnson Willis J. Bray. . . . . . . . . . . • . .. Karl M. Vetsburg , Homer L. Ferguson. . . . .. ..' Julius R. Edwards........... " O. H. Swearingen Ransom A. Breuer Harry F. Sunderland ,. C. Lew Gallant ..........•... John M. Gallatin

\

GRAND LODGE

,

New Mexico New South Wales New york

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West Plains . Kansas City Joplin St. Louis Kansas City St. Joseph Kansas City Springfield St. Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Bonne Terre , Independence........... . Kansas City Van Buren Chillicothe St. Louis Washington, D. C St. Louis Nevada St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Ironton St. Louis Neosho Kirksville St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Jefferson City. . . . . . . . . .. . Centralia Kansas City Hermann Kansas City St. Louis Chillicothe

Ne~ Zea~and . NIcaragua . North Carolina . North Dakota .. Nova Scotia . Ohio . Oklahoma . Oregon . Panama . Philippine Islands . Prince Edward Island . Quebec . Queensland . Rhode Island . Porto Rico . Saskatchewan . Scotland . South Australia . South Carolina . South Dakota . Swiss Alpina . Tasmania . Tennessee . Texas . Utah . Vermont . Victoria . Virginia . Washington ....•..... Western Australia . West Virginia . Wisconsin .

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative P~t Office Herbert S. Murdock Springer W. G. Lackersteen Sydney Andrew Ruppel. 80-27 Margaret Pl., Glendale, Brooklyn 27, N.Y. William Waring De Castro Wellington Raymond C. Jarnet Box 14, Granada Lambert R. Morris. . . . . . . . .. Beaufort Max M. Moore Valley City John Angus MacAskill Glace Bay James W. Morgan Jackson W. W. Groom McAlester Bryant A. Luzader. . . . . . . . .. Portland Julio Icaza " Panama City Melicio Fabr~............. Manila C. C. Carlton " Souris A. J. B. Milborne , Montreal Samuel James C~art Brisbane Harry A. Reed Providence Juan Olmo " Barceloneta J. Orville Clark " Govan John B. Peden Edinburgh William James Host Adelaide Gen. Chas. P. Summerall Charleston George W. Toft Mitchell Emil Glaser ' Switzerland Herbert Hays. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Hobart

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GRAND LODGE

MEXICO Edward P. Walsh , St. Louis / York Grand Lodge Claude A. Ferguson......... Kansas City ...•.•........•.•.. Occidental Mexicana R. M. Rankin

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THE MASONIC WORLD


GENERAL J. HVINDEN HAUG (k0lTlAi Master of Norway "Faithful to a trust under persecution."


THE MASONIC WORLD By RAY V. DENSLOW, P. G. M.

ETERNAL VIGILANCE IS THE PRICE OF LIBERTY

No organization suffered more during the last World War than Freemasonry. An examination of the record shows that both German and J apanese governments had adopted the same policy towards Freemasons. There seemed to be an opinion among the Axis nations that Freemasonry, being a great international fraternity, was a general peace movement; that it opposed war in all its hideous forms, and that as an organization it was being directed from Great Britain the home of early Freemasonry, and the mother of the fraternity. The next objection was that it was intimately connected with the Jews-that the Jews controlled the organir,ation. How foolish this seems to us who know that Jev,"s comprise only a very small per cent of the entire membership. Yet, as Hitler said, it is the big lies the people believe. And Hitler told them big. Why do we publish all of this news about the persecution of Ma, sons and Freemasonry' Because strife in the world has not ended. The United Nations cannot bring peace as long as a single nation refuses to abide by the will of the majority. So we can anticipate further wars. The millennium is a long way off. It therefore behooves us as a fraternity to examine our situation before, during, and since the war-to take stock as it were-and lay our plans for action, if, and when, another war should come. And so, in this year 1947, we shall take you for a tour over the entire Masonic world and give you a brief picture of what your brethren, and my brethren, suffered during the past six years. THE PHILIPPINES

Nowhere in the world has Freemasonry been persecuted more than in the Philippine Islands. In the beginning it was religious persecution; in later days, political aggression by military forces of an enemy. The roll call of Filipino martyrs has been large. To the names of Jose Rizal and other patriots must now be added: James R. McFie, Grand Master, killed. Jose Guido, Deputy Grand Master, beheaded. Jose Abad Santos, Past Grand Master, executed.


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Frederic H. Stevens, prominent American and resident of Manila has written a book dealing with the internment eamp, Santo Tomas (1946). Pages 340-345 deal ,,,ith some of his .Masonic experiences: My time for investigation came shortly after Thanksgiving. What a farce it was . . . I was head of the American Co-Ordinating Committee and as such had been outspoken in denouncing Japan and the Japanese -and I was a Freemason. Being such, according to Japanese thought, was to be an extremely dangerous character. On August 4, 1943, the Manila Tribune, under Jap auspices published an editorial, reading in part: The sinister background of the air raid on Rome was recently exposed by the Italian newspaper La Correspondentia, and the revelation is significant. According to the report, representatives from Freemason lodges of the United States, England, Scotland, and Canada attended the conference in London during the first week in June and unanimously adopted a resolution urging the bombing of Rome. In other words, the blasting of the Italian capital came as the result of a plan formulated by the }'reemasons, the organization based on the Jews and the Jewish ideology. Needless to add here is the fact that the British Foreign Secretary Eden, who sponsored the conference, is an influential ]<'reemason. He declared that it is the responsibility of the Italians to safeguard the Vatican. This disclosure clarifies the situation, enabling us to understand the real background of the bombing incident. To Roosevelt, who appears to be now the generalissimo of the Jews, and now the prisoner of the Hebrews, seems to have been delegated the task of executing the plans formulated by the Freemasons. However it cannot be said that he acted only in a passive capacity because Roosevelt himself is a Freemason of no mean influenee. It is rather nearer the truth to admit that the Freemason representatives had conferred at length with Roosevelt before their departure for London. Or it may be still more accurate to say that the proposal to bomb Rome originated in circles close to Roosevelt, and it was decided to discuss the question with the British Freemasons because of the very grave nature of the proposal.

Stevens tells of the nature of the Jap inquiries: The questions were first as to the International character of Freemasonry. Was it not true that Freemasonry was a world-wide organization linked with the Jews to rule the world' 'Vas it not true that President Roosevelt and General MacArthur were Freemasons, and that they had been chosen to lead this war~ Was it not true that there was an organization of army and navy officers (National Sojourners') that had pledged itself to bring on a war with Japan f Was it not true that ~e American Coordinating Committees were composed of Freemasons' Was it not true that T. J. Wolff and Judge Manuel Camus of the Red Cross were Freemasons f One investigator, whose inquiries were confined to Freemasons, had a pair of wooden pliers with which he would catch a piece of loose flesh on my face or arm and then give it a twist. Once, in answer to a question, I told him there had been Masonic lodges in Japan before he was born; he grew very angry. He considered this a stigma against Japan. A LAND OF PERSECUTION

In 1941, your reviewer issued the story of Freemasonry in the


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Philippine Islands. We called it "Through Fire and Sword" because of the persecution suffered by our brethren in the Islands in their attempt to establish Freemasonry there. But in writing the story we little realized that persecution of a different type was to follow and within so short a time. Within the last year we have seen and talked with several of our brethren who have returned to the United States. Their stories have been uniform in regard to the indignities, tortures, and punishment suffered at the hands of the Japanese. All were filled with enthusiasm at the patriotism of the Philippine people, and especially those who were members of the Masonic fraternity. Many of these brethren, at great danger to their own lives, secretly carried in, or otherwise caused to be delivered to American prisoners, food and supplies which saved many from actual starvation. The first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the Philippines, Dr. H. Eugene Stafford, returned to this country broken in health and spirit. All known to be Freemasons seemed to be singled out for some special kind of torture. Grand Secretary Antonio Gonzales tells the story in a graphic way: A few days after their entry in the City of Manila, the Japanese looked for us, first in our Plaridel Temple, and then in my home. At PlarideI Temple, the first thing they did was to seal our files, safes, taking note of all the contents of the building, including our library. Then, several Japanese officers came to my home and demanded access to the records and files in the office of the Grand Secretary.

Before the Japanese occupation the Grand Lodge had, by resolution, expressed its support of democracy against totalitarianism, and this resolution had been quite generally printed and distributed. Bro. Gonzales continued: They evidently knew the resolution we have mentioned, and they were thoroughly acquainted with all our articles and editorials published in the official organ, the Cabletow. In the course of our meeting, I took advantage of making certain inquiries from them, and learned that they regarded Philippine Freemasonry, particularly the Grand Lodge, as a secret organization, and an instrument of the American espionage system in this country. They were under the impression that our late President Roosevelt, being a Mason, and our then Grand Master McFie being an American, I, as Grand Secretary, a subordinate official of our organization, necessarily must have received orders and instructions from these two distinguished American Masons.

Such was the reasoning of the Japanese mind, which never seems to be able to ferret out the psychology of the American. Later, they informed me that our Grand Master was a prisoner in Santo Tomas Camp, and inquired whether or not Bro. Jose P. Guido was his successor. I replied that as our Grand Master was still living, and as he was temporarily absent, I had to shoulder the responsibilities of the Grand Lodge. In spite of this remark, they insisted that I knew


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all about F'reemasonry in the Islands, and asserted that Col. Guido was our acting Grand Master, and at the same time the Chief of the American espionage system in Manila. They claimed that Col. Guido was purposely left in Manila to accomplish this work, for which they insisted in having access to the files and records of Grand Lodge. Then they ordered me to accompany them to the Plaridel Temple. I explained that we had nothing to hide or conceal concerning our institution; that Masonry was not, and never has been a secret society; that our membership was known and open to the public as were our

TWO

PH~LIPPINE

Jose Abad Santos, P.G.M. (Exeooted by Japanese)

MARTYRS

James R. MaFie, P.G.M. (Killed by Japanese)

officers and activities. This simply amazed them, for they changed their attitude, and instead of requiring me to go to Plaridel Temple, they asked me to go the following morning. They ordered me to suspend all Masonic work and to refrain from making use of our money or properties. They admonished me to remain at home under pain of, being taken to Ft. Santiago together with other Freemasons. JAPS WOULD IMPRISON ALL MASONS

The plan followed by the Japanese was that employed by the German Gestapo, which would lead us to believe that there had been consultation between German and Japanese officers as to the handling of the Masonic problem. It was the ultimate intention of the Japanese


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to arrest and imprison all Masons in the country and intern them at Ft. Santiago. Several days after the authorities visited Plaridel Temple, one of their officers dropped in at the office of the secret service in Manila Police Department, and intimated that it was determined by the Japanese military to arrest all Masons and place them in military custody. Without hesitation, the Chief of the Department, a man of courage and conviction said: If you Japanese ar.e going to have to arrest all Masons, I must be the first one to be arrested, because I am myself a Freemason, and I am a Past Master at that.

The brother who so expressed himself was Eugenio Dizon of Batong-Buhay Lodge No. 27, aI).d his frank attitude under these circumstances proves that the Philippine Freemason, even at danger to his life, was willing to risk both life and fortune. Not being able to accomplish what they set out to do, the Japanese began to try out a different plan. This time they thought to induce Bro. Gonzales to call the Grand Lodge into session to nullify the resolution of loyalty to democracy. Gonzales told them that such a meeting would be contrary to the law of the Grand Lodge; that no one but members could attend, and that such a meeting if called would have to include not only Filipino, but Americans, most of whom were then in Santo Tomas camp. The Japs suggested that they (the Japs) could represent the American members. They were reminded that Freemasonry was not a Commercial entity in which each member had stock, but that it was necessary first for them to be a Freemason. Then they asked to be initiated. He explained the forms necessary to go through to become a Mason, the petition, the investigation, the election, and other matters. Finally, Gonzales was taken to Ft. Santiago to await a time when he would comply with their demand-to call a meeting of all the Filipino members of the Grand Lodge. Weare interested in the natnre of the Japanese inquiries, all of which are brought out in Bro. Gonzales' story: In their various inquiries regarding our resolution of adherence to the Allied Nations, and to the policies and ideologies which said nations relentlessly defended in war, and our editorials in the Cabletow, it was evident the Japanese military authorities had in mind to coerce us to do something in connection with the resolution. They made it very plain that they desired the Filipino Masons to meet and adopt a resolution setting aside the resolution.

Then the Japanese tried a different approach; they became less hostile. It was suggested that the monies in the National Bank were available for distribution among needy Filipinos. They were trying to bait the Filipino Masons. Gonzales told them plainly he could not do this without action of the Grand Lodge, for if monies had been permitted to be paid out, then it was plain that other acts could be carried out.


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GUIDO IS EXECUTED

Gonzales says: Grand Master (acting) McFie and myself agreed that whatever may happen to either of us, we would firmly and unqualifiedly maintain our stand not to open the 'Grand Lodge. Without our conformity and approval, no act of the Grand Lodge would be possible, and in the remote event that it was opened, it would be completely illegal and irregular, provided it was without our intervention. Bro. Guido and I were arrested, he on July 20, 1942, and I on September 2. Guido used to drop in at my house to exchange views on the status of Masonry ... he would stay to take an evening snack and often for lunch j we never guessed the J ap authorities were watching his visits j I only came to know of it when they arrested me. . . . Some of my listenel's have been in Santiago and have seen the cells j they are scarcely 8 x 8 and usually filled with 1-20 prisoners. In one of these cells I remained in vigil the whole night without being able to sleep. I passed the night in prayer, knowing that the fate of thousands of Masons and their families might hinge on me. . . . The next morning they took me from my cell and brought me to a room where I met Bro. Guido. In spite of maltreatment he remained steadfast. The J ap officer began to demand from Guido the names of our secret agents of the Intelligence Division, of which Guido was Chief, alleging the Japs had information that several of them had not been arrested. Guido insisted he had no secret agents. The officer, insolent and trembling with disgust approached Bro. Guido and grabbing his shirt with the left hand and with the forefinger of the right pointing at Guido, said: "You brown American. " Guido, with ease and dignity, calmly answered with a firm and steady voice: "With pride!" Whereupon the Jap slapped Guido so hard that he fell a few feet away. Another officer, apparently a superior, entered and took over; he said the Japanese military authorities were disgusted to learn that Filipino Masons refused to cooperate with the Japanese by not opening the Grand Lodge. He thought the Grand Lodge should be dissolved and in its place a fraternal organization of Filipinos only should be formed under auspices of the Japanese . . . the officer threatened me by saying they had more effective methods of convincing me if necessary. Guido was kept imprisoned ... I was virtually a prisoner at my home with a Japanese guard . . . Plaridel Temple was confiscated . . . Bro. Marquez and Bro. Garcia were driven out, first maltreating the latter by tying him for twenty-four hours and giving him blows which fractured his jaw.... On February 7, 1945, shortly before freed by the American troops, Col. Guido with his three sons were conducted in front of a fox hole where Col. Guido was beheaded, the Japs losing no time in shooting his three sons.

Today, the Japanese have gone. Freedom again reigns in the islands. The Grand Lodge has arisen like the phoenix from the ashes. Men who once held aloft the banners of the fraternity in the Philippines have gone to their eternal reward; others are recuperating from their ill treatment in other lands where they have found homes. But the fidelity of all these men who gave up their lives in a glorious cause


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shall ever be a benediction to those who shall continue to carryon the glorious ideals and traditions of the great fraternity. Brother Gonzales sums it all up as follows: And thus, my brethren, we have lost all our material possessions, but we have kept our honor unsullied, upheld our principles inviolate, and maintained our integrity intact. Now we can say to all the Masons throughout the world that Filipino Masons never cooperated with the vile invaders, never yielded an inch to their demands. At the risk of their own lives and liberty, they have undergone all kinds of sacrifices and vicissitudes, but never for a moment submitted to their desires. The legend of Hiram has become a reality ... in these hours of Triumph and indication let us not forget our brethren who have fallen during the ordeal. They paid dearly with their lives to building living monuments of our unyielding obstinacy. May the Almighty receive them in His Celestial Lodgel CHINA

In February, 1947, the press was full of dispatches announcing the death of the noted news editor and correspondent, James B. Powell, whose punishment and persecution by the Japanese resulted in his untimely death. We knew Powell when a student at the University of Missouri. He was a Freemason, made in Missouri, but later affiliated with one of the lodges in China. From our friend Philip Giovannini, of Shanghai, China, we learn that he was a friend of Powell, and that both were together in the infamous Bridge House. It appeared to be a political prisoner camp, located on Hyphone Road. Few lived after being sent to this camp. When the Japanese c;me in they invariably seized all Masonic Temples and proceeded to ransack them, destroying everything they did not care to keep for themselves. While the Japanese occupation is over in China, conditions there are still bad. We have a letter from a friend in China, who says: China is no place to buy anything. One of the great drawbacks is the lack of labor, at least qualified labor, to do the things they did before the war. There is labor, but it is lazy and unwilling to do any kind of a job. Prices are demanded far out of proportion to the work done. They want American labor prices and they are 80 per cent less efficient. We are spoiling China with our generosity; the Oriental mind cannot and will not conceive of getting something for nothing; to the Chinese, it is a sign of weakness. There are some wonderful Chinese, but most of that type are in the minority.

The American Lodge Hall is at 178 Route Dufour, Shanghai, in the event you travel that way. Freemasonry is moving forward, slowly, but surely. An oil heater keeps the lodge room from freezing. Three lodges are at work, one chapter of Royal Arch Masons, the Scottish Rite, and a chapter of the O. E. S. Degree work is not, and cannot, be up to former standards on account of the lack of paraphernalia. Bro. John Skinner, writing from Hong Kong tells of an attempt


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made by a brother to rescue the Charter of St. John Lodge No. 618 when Hong Kong was being bombarded: He went from his office near the hall to the hall trying to rescue the Charter and as much property as he could get out. He got some coolies and had all the regalia and charter when the Japs came in the front door; he dashed out back with his coolies, but in the hurry the coolies got the regalia, and Brother Harry got the Charter. Once placed in the concentration camp, the Japs sent for several of the better known brethren and questioned them as to the aims and objects of the Craft. During the period of internment we managed to meet on the quiet and give instructions to our younger brethren. After the Jap surrender, we began to think of the Craft and what we could do. The J aps had entirely demolished Zetland Hall, and it was a heap of ruins. In spite of this, one of the brethren, who had not been interned, had somehow or other climbed up the one remaining wall, and had drawn the sacred symbol in its old place on the wall above the Master's chair. The English brethten agreed to come in with us. As we were in no position to work the degrees, we opened the Hall as路 a Masonic Club on November 14. In February the first English lodge opened; they hrid a brother come from England, empowered to resume labor. Our charters we found in the vault of the French bank. Lodge St. John resumed work in April. Bro. Mow Fung was put in the Chair and there were just enough brethren to begin again. We had no regalia; we still are without. We had our usual installation in December and sat 100 to the supper afterward. Bro. Ferguson died two weeks after getting out of internment. Bros. Shrigley and Eccleshall also died, the first in the P. O. W. Camp, the other soon after release, so that all the senior members of G. L. passed on.

The name of David W. K. Au is well known in China and in the Philippines; he is the District Grand Master for the Philippines in China, and an officer in Keystone Chapter No.1, Royal Arch Masons. Au was in Chungking, December 8, 1941, when the war started. In March, 1942, he began the 3,000 mile trek back to Shanghai to get news of his family; his travel involved plane, train, boat, truck, sampan, foot, horseback and rickshaw. Landing in Shanghai he was arrested in November 1942, by the Japanese for (1) Masonic activities, (2) member British Committee on Information, and (3) suspected as a spy, having been in Chungking. He was confined in prison for five weeks, having as a cell mate, Bro. Philip Giovannini, both suffering from Japanese brutality. Bro. Au says: During the years 1942-45, several inqUll'leS concerning Masonic activities were conducted, first by the Japanese gendarmery, then by the Military, then the Navy, and finally, by a Special Commission from Tokio composed of two Russians. I was called in on every occasion, and although threats were used, they got little out of me they did not already know. A Japanese lady interpreter seemed to know a lot more about Masonry a-nd Masonic ritual than the average brethren. The two Russians, highly educated and refined, frankly admitted that after they had learned about Masonry from their inquiries, they would want to join the fraternity later.

Brother W. M. Awad says that


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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In March, 1943, he was interned with his two sons in a Civil Assembly Center, his first job being the digging of a four foot deep accumulation in a septic tank; he later rendered a variety of service including heavy duty laborer, infirmary orderly, canteen checker, kitchen helper, cook, chief work assignment, school teacher, song leader and entertainer. His wife was denied the right to be with him since she did not have allied citizenship. He saw his wife three times in 30 months; she was without funds but was assisted through the Swiss consulate. As a result of these experiences he developed a hernia from hard labor, lost 55 pounds and in December, 1944, was operated on in a room having no heat, although it was freezing cold and a local anaesthetic had to be used. His personal losses included a motor car, several cameras, a shotgun, personal possessions, and loss of income for five years.

Bro. L. C. Hylbert of the East Baptist Chinese Mission in Shanghai says he was permitted to live in his home until November 5, 1942. In April, 1942, the Japanese came to the home and took him to headquarters for questioning about his Masouic connections. He was severely threatened; the following day they came to his office and searched it thoroughly but could find no incriminating evidence. In November the gendarmes came, arrested him, and took him to Haiphong Road where he was kept until repatriated in September, 1943. He came to New York and lived until the war was over after which he returned to China. Brother W. W. Monk, an Engineer with offices at 370 Chun Chang Road, was questioned for two weeks in December, 1941, then taken to Haiphong Road Camp. He was questioned as to Masonic work, lodges, etc., but very little information was given. The examination took place seven hours daily at the Cathay Hotel. Philip W. Giovannini, secretary of the American Royal Arch Chapter in Shanghai, writes that on November 5, 1942, at 6 a. m. a gendarme, accompanied by a member of the French police force, came to his home at 6 :30 a. m., awakened him and his wife, and even came into his bedroom waiting for him to dress. He packed a suit case, walked a half mile to a waiting lorry and in company with others who had been arrested, was driven in a pouring rain to the military prison on Haiphong Road. On November 18, he was taken to the Bridge House, and he was deprived of all his personal belongings including shoes, belt, tie, and underwear. The buttons were taken from his overcoat. Then came the questioning; his answers were not satisfactory and he was slapped; he was then thrown into a cell containing two Chinese males, one Chinese female, a Russian male, and a Japanese male. This cell was 19 x 10 and opened on a courtyard; during the incarceration the atmosphere was 12째 below freezing. In one corner of the cell was a latrine bucket, and in another corner a small door 4 feet high and 28 inches wide, with a small door in it 9 inches square through which the food .was thrown. He was assigned one corner of the room, and when lying down his head was 12 inches from the latrine


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bucket. At 9 o'clock in the evening he was issued a thin cotton, vermin infested blanket which was as promptly taken away each morning. Prisoners were not permitted to talk and when not walking around in a circle were compelled to sit cross-legged on the floor. Food consisted of 4 ozs. of bread twice a day, and tea for all the inmates consisted of two bowls of weak tea. To vary the monotony, he was taken out at all hours of the day and night for questioning, some sessions lasting as much as 3 or 4 hours; during these periods he was beaten with bamboos, tied to a wall, kicked, punched, and slapped. He believes his treatment was worse than usual because he was one of the first prisoners at the Bridge House and rumors were afloat that Japanese prisoners in the U. S. were being mistreated. Then came the day when he was sentenced tq be shot and he was told to write a farewell letter to his wife-which he did. The charges were that he was a spy for the U. S. Navy; that he had invented a pilotless airplane; that he had drawn plans for automatically controlled airfire; that he was a Past Master of all the U. S. Masonic lodges in Shanghai, and Secretary of three; that he had led a plot against the Imperial Government; and that being Secretary of American Relief, he had disbursed money that properly belonged to Japan; this was strengthened by the fact that he wore Armband No.2. His name was on the list for evacuation of American Nationals in 1943, but the Japanese struck his name from the list; his wife was allowed to go; he lost 40 pounds as a result of ill treatment. Bro. Giovannini writes: Fear is a terrible thing, and I saw with my own eyes what Fear can do to a Human Being. DENMARK

We love Denmark and its people. They are an industrious, sober, intelligent nation of people who love liberty and who despise dictatorship. While the nation has had a king for many years, he has been a benevolent king, loved and admired by his people, and especially by his brother Freemasons whom he has served for years as Grand Master. Since this section of the report has been written, King Christian has aied. He will be succeeded by Prince Harald who is also highly thought of by the people and the Freemasons. During the early days of the war the Germans entered Denmark; they came in the early hours of the morning, proceding at once by arranged plan to all parts of the city. They wished to make Denmark an example of what a fine nation the Germans could make by occupation. The Danes were never satisfied with the remaking. The great Masonic Temple with its more than 500 rooms on the Avenue Blegdamsvej, was taken over by the Gestapo. We saw it before it had been restored; in fact the work of renovation ha~


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not been completed in June, 1947, when our friend Julius Christensen of Kansas City viewed it. .As for ourselves we should rather have seen it filled with live stock than with Nazi soldierdom; its treatment could have been no worse. Then one day, the old King Christian rode down the avenue to one of the principal squares where he saw the Danish flag had been taken down and a German flag run up. He ordered the Germans to restore the Danish flag; they reluctantly consented awed by the king's attitude. Then he started the return to his palace. His horse slipped, injuring one of his limbs, and from which injury he never recovered. We visited him in h~s summer home; he sat quietly in his library with a blanket thrown over the injured limb, yet happy that Denmark had been restored to its people. There was considerable feeling between the Germans and the Danes, resulting in guerrilla warfare on many occasions. The Danes uecorate regularly the spots in the street which mark the death of some Danish patriot. We stood on the balcony of the Palace Hotel in Copenhagen on a night the street lights were turned on for the first time since German occupation. Crowds thronged the streets and cheers arose when the lights flashed their message, announcing that Freedom, and Light, and Liberty, had once more returned to the country after an evil spell of six years. Light, Libel路ty, Fl路eedom. Truly great Masonic watchwords! NORWAY

Our readers of last year's Masonic World may recall some of the troubles experienced by our Norwegian brethren, worst of which was German occupation-than which there is nothing worse. The fine Masonic Temple in Oslo, office of the Grand Lodge of Norway was taken over by the traitor Quisling, and so utterly torn up that the question of remodeling was a great problem. The first act of the Germans was to take over Masonic Temples in all parts of Norway, and to round up the officials of Grand and subordinate lodges. They were not given the prison treatment as was done in some other countries although there was confinement and the usual interrogatories. Bombs rained on the coastal cities, destroying many of the beautiful Temples which were once the pride of Norwegian Freemasonry. In the interior the buildings were occupied by the Germans and made equally worthless by the occupation, for the Germans were poor tenants. In the City of Kristiansund the City was bombed although there were no military installations there. In Molde a similar condition prevailed; neither city was of any military importance. Quisling was an anti-Mason, even more so than the Germans who came in. We attended one session of his trial which took place in


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Masonic Temple, Oslo, Norway. (Wreoked intetrnally by Ger'mans)

KRISTIANSUND, NORWAY (The city was bO'TT/,bed by the Ger'TTWIM although of no military importance. Masonio Lodge marked by arrow)


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the former Masonic Temple which has now become a town hall in Oslo. The regular Masonic Temple was too torn up for meetings of any kind. In Bodo the walls of the Masonic building stand but all has been destroyed; in Alesund the interior has been wrecked; in Bergen the building was rebuilt but unfit for Masonic use. In Hamar the Temple became the jaiL In Oslo, Quisling helped himself to the silver candlesticks, the suits

Lodge hall at Molde, NorwOl!J, a city ruthlessly bombed by the Germans

of armor, the paintings, and anything else of value. The library of the Grand Lodge was boxed and packed for shipment to Germany, but fortunately a change in war conditions prevented its shipment. General J. Hvinden Haug, the new Grand Master, was the General in charge of the Oslo area when the Germans came in; naturally, he was questioned, but not because of Masonic activities, since he was not at that time the Grand Master. Grand Secretary BrinchmannHansen came in for inquiry. And the Grand Master's Room in the Great Temple was known as the "Fuehrer's Room" although only the lesser Fuehrer (Quisling) ever occupied it. HOLLAND (THE NETHERLANDS)

The }llonth of May, 1940, marked the entrance of the German hordes into Holland. Peaceful Holland, whose people had never suspicioned that their neighbors on the east would someday invade their country, seize their properties, and execute and torture their citizens. Yet one night the Germans did come, and with little warning. They came like the proverbial thief-in the night-and when the Hollanders waked from their sleep they discovered their cities filled with invaders. In the Hague, capital city, officers came at daylight, awakened the

â&#x20AC;˘


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proprietor of one of the oldest and leading hotels, and. informed him that his hotel was to be turned over immediately for the use of German officers. Not only that, but the officer in charge laid before the proprietor a map showing all of the floors and locations of every room in the hotel; assignments of German officers to rooms had been made even before the entry into the city. To show how thorough

Lodge Hall, Masonic Temple, Utrecht, Holland (After German Ocaupation).

was the preparation, we were told that the German officer referred to the fact that an invalid lady was located in a certain room in the hotel, and that in that case an additional day or so would be granted for her to remove elsewhere. One of the first of those to be seized was Grand Master Hermanus van Tongeren, a distinguished citizen, former military official, and honored in many ways by the Netherlands government. He was uncompromising and upstanding; he was therefore marked for extermination. He was taken to one of the German concentration camps where he was tortured and finally died, his captors generously offering to return his ashes to the family for the sum of $50.00. His name will


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be written in the annals of Freemasonry in the Netherlands as a Masonic martyr, as one who gave up his life rather than forfeit his integrity. ' There was the Rotterdam Chief of Police, Bro. J. H. Tas, who utilized his experience as a fingerprint expert forging passports for members of the Netherlands underground movement. After arranging

Deventer, Holland, Masonic Temple After Bombm'dment

hundreds of such passports, he was captured, taken to the concentration camp at Vught, and there executed. And again, there are thousands of patriotic Netherlands Freemasons who sheltered refugees fleeing from the Nazis, and assisted in the underground movement which eventually brought defeat to Germany. The Freemasonry of the Netherlands was true to its ideals during a most difficult period of its history. One of our Masonic friends recently visited Port Said, Singapore, and Batavia. He writes that it is painful to see Batavia still suffering from the aftermath of the war, with supplies of all sorts being scarce. He was then stopping at the Hotel del' Nederlanden, one of the better hotels in that City, where food was supposed to be the best, but as he says "even so, it is only moderate."


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Those who have kept up with the situation in the Far East will recall the recent signing of the Linggadjati agreement, wherein a form of political cooperation between Holland and Indonesia has been established. Whether it will work out as planned or not will depend on how the Indonesian government honestly executes the clauses in the agreement. The Indonesians are a conglomeration of races, which means a conglomeration of leaders, and it remains to be seen as to the character of such leadership. After all of the catastrophes which have happened in the Netherland East Indies, it would appear that they need Holland more than Holland needs the East Indies, and that the worst catastrophe which might befall them would be to lose Holland support and cooperation. Freemasons all over the world will learn with pleasure that notwithstanding the destruction of Masonic Temples throughout the East Indies, the brethren there are becoming active and that Masonic work is being carried on. The Temple in Batavia, through some oversight on the part of the Japanese, was undamaged, and many new candidates have recently received Masonic light in that city. The District Grand Master for that territory is Bro. Carpentier Alting. Dr. H. H. Bruinsma, a citizen of Holland, addressed the Grand Lodge of Manitoba in 1946. He had lived on a potato and water diet while in solitary confinement under the Nazi rule in Holland. Speaking before the Grand Lodge, he said: Five anxious years lie behind us. Laboring and fighting bravely you have come to the rescue of enslaved Europe. We have been waiting, not passively, but actively, struggling to save what could be saved. It was not material goods in the first place; of course they too had to be saved. Do not they form the basis of the possibility of our spiritual possessions ~ You, our brethren from overseas, can hardly understand what exertion, what courage, was needed to meet the future each day, undaunted, and with head erect. This is not the hour to look back on all the misery we have gone through, nor to commemorate our fallen heroes. This is the hour in which we wish to make each other's acquaintance, in order to know what we can be for in the future, for the possibilities of building together a better future, anchored in the better knowing and understanding of each other, and thlis building of the future is the great took of the Freemooon8. CZECHOSLOVAKIA

When Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia he found from 3,000 to 4,000 Freemasons. The Nazis had the complete list of Czechoslovakian Freemasons on March 15, 1939. As fast as possible, members were seized and sent to jail or concentration camp. Most of the prominent members of the fraternity were scheduled for rough treatment; among this number was the well-known, Grand Secretary for Foreign Relations, Dr. J. Sedmik, member of the Grand Council, and Dr. O. Hlavac, both of whom were murdered by the Germans after undergoing two years of torture and suffering. Of the 3,000-4,000 Freemasons


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who lived in Czechoslovakia, only a very small percentage managed to escape during the period of 1938-40. The number, it is thought could hardly have exceeded 5 per cent. And out of this small number, about one-half found hospitable refuge in England, at the very start of their exile. Among the number was the Grand Master, who went first to France, then to England after the collapse of the French government.

PERSECUTED GRAND MASTERS

Dr. Klecanda was Gmnd Master of the Grand Lodge Lessing in Czechoslovakia.

Dr. L. J. J. Caron is the present Grand Master of the' Grand Lodge of the Netherlands. His predeoessor died in a concentration camp.

When, as a consequence of the Munich dictate, the Germans seized a part of Czechoslovakia early in 1938, President Benes was compelled by ruthless German pressure to resign his office and to leave the country. A puppet government was then set up in what was socalled a Second Republic and included the part of Czechoslovakia which from October, 1938, to March 15, 1939, was under that rule. In March, 1939, the so-called Protectorate was established, and this government thought it its first duty to suspend Masonic work. Brother Korbel left Czechoslovakia in September, 1939; he was


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followed by Grand Master Klecanda in January, 1940. Both brethren knew, as did many of the exiled brethren, that regular meetings of lodges were being held in secret. It was generally known throughout the Masonic world that our Czech brethren had suffered, and were suffering as a result of the occupation, but the group was one of the most active in their persistent and bitter fight against the Germans during the occupation period. At the time of occupation, the Grand Master who had been in office only a few months, and the Grand Secretary and other Grand Officers, were su=oned to appear before the Gestapo and submitted to most searching and humiliating interrogations; the Temples were seized and converted into workshops; all property was seized, and Masons made the object of persecution in every manner possible, being dismissed from office and otherwise discriminated against in both public and private service. Of the whole number of active Masons in the Czech lands, over 40 per cent were engaged in the underground movement at home, or in President Benes' exile work abroad. Of this number, not less than 31 per cent were captured by the Germans, either executed or tortured to death, while 13 per cent were killed in those sinister gas chambers; 40 per cent were jailed in prison and concentration camps, and the remaining 16 per cent were lucky enough to escape with minor injuries, not to speak of the usual subjugation to inquiries and search. These figures refer to the National Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia. The Grand Lodge Lessing zu den drei Ringen suffered even worse; few details are available concerning the members of this Grand Lodge; the figures are from a few scattered lodges in Prague. It must be remembered that a large part, if not a majority of Grand Lodge Lessing was made up of Jewish brethren, but in spite of their being members of a German speaking Grand Lodge, they remained faithful unto death. The number of their murdered members runs to between 30 per cent to 60 per cent of the membership. It is said that of the more than 400 members of this Grand Lodge, in Prague alone, over 200 suffered death at the hands of the Nazi brutes, and since many suffered death from natural causes, it is hardly probable that more than 20 to 25 members of the former Grand Lodge of the Three Rings are left to tell the story. Here, in brief, is the tragic story of how a handful of Freemasons, in the midst of persecution, held together until succor should come from the outside world, and today are living in high hopes of seeing the fraternity re-established and to again become an influence in the promotion of those ideals which Freemasons preach and practice. We are using a picture of Dr. Klecanda, late Grand Master, who died in April, 1945, before he could see the object of his hopes completed. His death was undoubtedly hastened by reason of conditions above enumerated. His wife had died in a concentration camp at


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Osvecim, while his two daughters spent many years in these same camps. Fortunately, for our Czechoslovakian brethren, the United Grand Lodge of England gave support to their refugee brethren. In July, 1941, following the formation of Comenius Lodge in Exile, quarters were secured at 4 Wells Rise, but in 1942 the Temple was destroyed, necessitating new quarters; here again, the English Grand Lodge came to the rescue, donating one of their lodge halls for Masonic use by the lodge, and here they remained until the war's close. A letter from a prominent member of the fraternity in Pra.,crue says that our recent statement about the revival of the Grand Lodge Lessing den drei Ringen is correct. Its revival is quite out of question, both by reason of fact (its past) and in view of the present situation in Czechoslovakia. Its membership was largely Jewish, and its losses were much heavier than the National Grand Lodge. The former Grand Lodge used the German language, while the latter lodge uses the language of the country. Both Grand Lodges worked together in perfect harmony, in many instances using the same lodge halls. AUSTRIA

In previous reports we have told of the mistreatment of Grand Master Richard Schlesinger and other Freemasons under the Hitler regime. The Grand Lodge is struggling to survive, but the question of food arid clothing is uppermost in the minds of our Austrian brethren. One of the most interesting sidelights on Hitler and his attacks upon the fraternity is contained in recent letters being received from inside Austria. Notwithstanding what Herr Hitler had to say in condemnation of Freemasonry, it is quite generally known that he was much impressed with its method of organization and manner of instruction. He realized the impossibility of acquiring power over the fraternity, finding that while it was international in character, it was national in its organization, hence the seizing of control of one nation's Freemasonry, would not place him in control of the rest of the Masonic world. It was quite generally reported in Europe that Hitler, at one time, had had a strong desire to petition Freemasonry, but his background was not such as to impress the brethren in Austria or in Germany. He finally 路conceived the idea of establishing a Freemasonry of his own, and with this end in view he charged his associate, Heinrich Himmler, to make such Masonic contacts as he found possible, and to arrange if possible to set up a similar organization-not for the German soldier or citizen-but for the elite of the army, the storm or shock troops. One of those contacted proved to be Dr. Karl Doppler of Austria, now Grand Master. When asked as to the truthfulness of the report,


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Dr. Doppler admitted that he had been approached by a Gestapo Chief under Rimmler suggesting that I should draft a scheme for the Freemasonry intended exclusively for the elite how I evaded this demand made upon me and risk of losing my life at any moment is a story

foundation of a sort of of the SS Officers, and continually running the in itself.

Dr. Doppler celebrated his 60th birthday in April, 1947; he was

TWO PERSECUTED AUSTRIANS

Dr. Vladimir Misar, Grand Se<Y1"etary of the Grand Lodge of Austria, TWW residing in England.

Bro. A. Zohner, an official of the Grand Lodge of Austria (Vienna).

visited on this occa:sion by representations from three Vienna lodges. Dr. Doppler expresses the feelings of his brethren of Austria: We are glad that the U. S. A. are showing an interest in the Grand Lodge of Vienna. We feel it more than a consolation to think that somebody takes a friendly interest in our sorrows and the troubles and need caused by the hard times we are having, and which are in no way better than they were a year ago. The only redeeming feature for us is the slow but steady progress of Masonic life in Austria. The temples of our lodges have become the one and only refuge for many of our brethren-the one place they may flee to from all the misery around them; Freemasonry gives us the sorely needed backing and support we all must have in order to survive the struggle for existence. What Freemasonry means,


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and how necessary it is for mankind, is probably felt most deeply by those who have passed through the hell as we have done during these last years, and by those who are still suffering severely from the after-effects.

(Note: Cablegram just received announces death of Dr. Doppler.) FRANCE

The Germans did not discriminate between regular and irregular grand lodges in their vicious attacks. Everything which bore the label masonic came under their close scrutiny. They were aided in their attacks by the author, Bernard Fay, who, it may be recalled, was the author of at least two volumes dealing with Freemasonry, although not himself a Freemason. Fay, at one time spent several years in the United States hunting up material for his volumes. One, Freemasonry and Revolution, was very friendly to the Fraternity, and paid even more tribute than we deserve to the work of Freemasonry in setting up the present democracy. But when the Germans began their attacks upon the fraternity, they found in Fay a willing assistant. He had prepared for the use of the Gestapo, a card index system of 60,000 names of men known to be Freemasons; the list was released in an official publication of the Petain government, published, and distributed throughout France so that these brethren might be boycotted and hunted out. Of 989 members of the frateruity 'In France who were sent to Germany as prisoners, it is known that 549 were executed by German firing squads, or gave up their lives in concentration camps, the former method being preferred to the latter. When Fay was brought to trial in Paris, after the war, for engaging in Nazi practices, he had a very prompt, and what he thought, suitable reply: I was glad to have in my hands the instrument capable of renovating the country. My mission was to organize a service for the detection of the Freemasons and the Masonic archives. To be successful in the work, I was obliged to have relations with the Germans, especially as they had an organization parallel with ours.

The court inquired of Fay, why he had never protested against the role of an informer which had been imposed on him, to which Fay replied: I am not an informer, but a historian, doing this work for historical reason.

The jury was not impressed with Fay's "historical research." He was found guilty of conspiracy, and although the prosecution demanded the death penalty, he emerged with a sentence of imprisonment for life at hard labor, the confiscation of all his property, and national degradation. He will now have time to carryon his historical research under new surroundings.


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Fay was once a professor in the College of France, and a Director in the National Library. It is said that he was responsible for many of the Masonic exhibits set up by the Germans in an effort to ridicule the frateritity; he is also said to have prepared several anti-Masonic tracts for distribution in occupied countries. BELGIUM

Belgium was not slighted by the Nazi government. The fact that the Bible was not on the altars of Belgian lodges made no difference with the "Superior Race." Maurice Cock, an active Belgian Freemason, writing from Brnssels, Belgium, to friends in the United States, says: The Grand Master of the Grand Orient of Belgium was cruelly assassinated. The Deputy Grand Master died in prison in Germany. The Grand Commander and Deputy of the Scottish Rite were also murdered. One hundred and twelve Belgian Freemasons thus paid with their lives for their loyalty to Freemasonry. But the storm has blown over and the Belgian lodges have again beheld the light of liberty. Their wounds are healing and they are reborn to new vigor. Now they stretch forth their hands in a truly fraternal gesture to all regular Masons of the world. A newspaper account, recently published in this country, says that the lodges in Belgium have been opened; the author of the information states that he was present at the opening of the first Belgian lodge to be opened since the Germans came into Belgium in 194(1. Work is conducted in the French language and this particular lodge had been established in Belgium early in the 18th century. At the lodge meeting various stories of atrocities against Belgian Freemasons were reported. The lodge hall had been used during the German occupation as a place for an anti-Masonic exhibition, and following the usual German style the beautiful paintings which adorned the wall had been cut to shreds, and swastikas were painted in profusion throughout the building. FREEMASONRY IN HUNGARY

Brother 1. Hanft, Foreign Correspondent of the Grand Lodge Symbolic of Hungary has consented to write us a story of the origin of Freemasonry in Hungary and some of the problems which today confront our Hungarian brethren. After the defeat in the struggle for independence in 1848, the newly established Freemasonry was choked by the Hapsburg reign. Only after the treaty of 1867, was presented an opportunity for organizing Freemasonry, and at that time the Hungarian Lodges began their activity. This time the lodges were working in both Scottish and York rites, but finally merged in 1868 and founded the Symbolic Grand Lodge of Hungary. Of this prosperous time for Freemasonry in Hungary, the brethren overseas are well informed,


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DR. RICHARD SCHLESINGER Grand Master of Grand Lodge of Austria (Dead as result of Nazi torture)

because our connection with them at that time was very close. Even during the first World War, the lights were never extinguished in our lodges, and we are proud to say that Hungarian Freemasonry knew her duties. We were always guided by our constitution, although we


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had at the same time to respect the laws of our country. We never supported the war propaganda, and always prophesied, that after the war, the hostile nations must find a way of peaceful collaboration. After the first World War, in 1919, we were glad to see the constitution of a democratic government, and were willing to take part in building up a democratic Hungary. After a short period of time, a pro-fascist government under Horthy got control and the first victim of the new political tyrant was Hungarian Freemasonry.

Masonic Temple, Budapest, Hungary (Wrecked by Nazis)

In 1920, a few officers forcibly entered our Masonic T-emple, seized all our equipment, furniture, etc., and while it was an isolated, groundless, and voluntary action of some army officers, yet the government backed them up in it, and gave legal ground to their attacks, resulting in the dissolving of the Grand Lodge. After this, the sequestration and attacks went on, and all our paraphernalia, archives, library, and paintings were taken away and sold. The building was seized and handed over to Hungarian Army Officers Association, whose ill-famed activities were the pioneer work of the Nazis. After they had taken over they began holding lectures, in which they treated their listeners


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to the well-known lies about Freemasonry. Later on, they showed their audiences around the halls, prepar~d beforehand to prove how fearful and disgraceful Freemasonry was working in secret. We succeeded in repurchasing from pawnbrokers much of the equipment which had been taken away. It is worth while to mention that most of the audience were members of the police, gendarmery, and grade and high school students. Our Temple, the beauty of which our American brethren may recall, was rented out for a dancing school, fencing performances, and even business offices. Grand Lodge officers asked the government officials to make an investigation to prove the unworlhiness of these lies, but all effort was in vain. We were compelled to work illegally, if we worked at all. Our brethren paid little attention to the risk involved and planned to maintain our connection with foreign grand lodges. Many of our ¡American brethren paid us visits on the occasion of these illegal meetings, of which Ossian Lang of New York made report. We kept up correspondence with brethren in Holland, -Switzerland, Belgium, France, Yugoslavia, Austria, Czecho-Slovakia, and Roumania, our aim being to serve the cause of univer:"al peace. â&#x20AC;˘ Our last Grand Master, Dr. Joseph Balassa, took part in the Masonic Congress in Belgrade in 1926, and signed its peace manifest. The address of 1937, of the Masonic Grand Lodges, to President Roosevelt, in the matter of preservation of peace, was duly signed. We considered it our duty to maintain active relations with Masonic lodges of neighboring states, and to eliminate the artificial barriers which had been erected by a mutual understanding. Our.relationship with the Grand Lodge of Vienna was exceptionally close. The gradually increasing German influence made our position worse, and handicapped even our illegal meetings, which, finally, had to be stopped at the time of German occupation. The occupation was followed by a horrid Nazi terrorism, which caused heavy losses to us. Many of our brethren were deported and killed because of their Masonic connection. We shall not boast, but we are proud to mention that during the twenty-five years of persecution, not one of us became a traitor, and none took part in the fascist action. We took the hard role of opposition, fought against Nazism, and were true to our Masonic ideals. In March, 1946, a decree of the democratic Hungarian government annulled the decree of 1920, which ordered the Masonic societies existent in Hungary to dissolve, and confiscated their property; it stated that any rights under the annulled ministerial decree was invalid. The decree justified our opinion, maintained for a quarter of a century, that the Hungarian Freemasonry never ceased to exist, Out was only hindered by illegal acts from working. Now that all obstacles


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have been removed, our regular work, interrupted for twenty-six years, will be resumed. We face tremendous tasks, and feel justified in saying that Hungary never needed Freemasonry so badly as today. Not only our charity institutions will have to be reestablished, though one part of the work will be taken by the social program of the new democratic government, but it is the philosophic and progressive instruction which we have to consider our first duty. For twenty-five years we were subject to the forced influence of the Germans, an influence which tended to deprive us of the valuable lore, tradition, and ideals of western culture. We accept our responsibility with willingness and enthusiasm. We shall not neglect our most important and essential aim, and shall work with utmost effort for Peace, by dispelling all antagonism between nations, and preventing any activity which might lead to future war. Note: The present Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Hungary is Andor Gero, Budapest V, Szent Istvan korut 2. The Seizure of the gover:tunent by Russia may not be favorable to the carrying on of Masonic activities.-Ed. THE LAND OF GARIBALDI

OfficiaJly there had been no Freemasonry in Italy since 1923, when Benito Mussolini banned the organization by public decree. Actually, devoted members of the craft must have maintained some sort of an existence during the years 1923-1945 for when the American Masonic Relief mission went to Italy in September of the latter year, they found many lodges at work, and actually visited one lodge unannounced, finding an attendance of almost one hundred members. A Freemason in Italy during that period has the sympathy of all American brethren; it is bad enough to have the antagonism of Holy Church, which in Italy is no small antagonism, but to have regular government of the country opposing you at the same time complicates the situation. Grand Master Torrigiani, of the Grand Orient of Italy, never recanted his Masonry; he was placed in prison, finally moved to the Island of Lipari, off the Italian coast, and died there as a result of confinement and ill treatment on the part of his captors. Faithful unto the last to his brethren, and the fraternity, he becomes the great Masonic Italian martyr of the period, his name ranking with that of the Great Garibaldi, who was instrumental in its reorganization a century ago. There is another name in Italy, not so esteemed; it is Raoul V. Palerrni, once Grand Master of the National Grand Lodge of Italy, and head of the regular Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite. He proved to be a traitor to the fraternity, accepted favors at the hands


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of Mussolini, and today is putting forth every effort to again connect himself with an organization which he once repudiated. His name will not go down in the history of Italian Freemasonry alongside that of Garibaldi and Torrigiani! Some of our readers may not immediately recall the Italian Masonic situation of a quarter of a century ago. We have a clipping from the Mail and Empire, a Toronto, Canada, publication, dated January 2, 1926, from which we quote, but with which we cannot in every instance agree: Why Mussolini Hates the Masons. What is Fascism's capital quarrel with the Freemasons. What does Masonry represent in Italian life, and how far justified are the measures now being taken against it' The Masonic cult in Italy came from England in the 18th century, and at once figured prominently in the history of the Kingdom of Naples, incurring already at that early date the condemnation of the Vatican. But its great part in Italian public life was played under Napoleon, who discovered in the lodges a magnificent instrument for the consolidation of his sway in the peninsula. It became almost obligatory for the officials of the state, and for the officers of the army, to adhere to the brotherhood. Nor had the government any fear for the secret character of the lodges. A strict watch was kept on their activities and severe penalties attached to any deviation from the normal rites and ceremonies as approved by the government. With the collapse of Napoleon, Freemasonry quickly lost its power, but revived to a considerable extent towards 1860, when with the adherence of Garibaldi (later Grand Master) and other prominent leaders, it became a rallying point for the enthusiasts for a united Italy. Exactly how great a part was played by the brotherhood in the liberation of Italy is still hotly contested. The Masons themselves, and the ecclesiastical historians hostile to the Italian Kingdom, have always depicted it as decisive, and the minimization now in vogue in Fascist circles seems to be an interested after-thought on the part of anti-Masons who do not like to give credit for any laudable action to their foes. In the years following the union, Masonry firmly entrenched itself in the political life of the country in the dual capacity of an association for mutual succor and the exponent of certain principles which can be roughly summed up as (1) advocacy of a world republic and (2) relentless hostility to the Catholic church. On both these lines, the Italian Masons found themselves in close agreement with their French brethren. In the "unredeemed" province of Trent and Trieste, subservient to an Austrian Emperor who was a pillar of the papacy, Freema,sonry was a main support of the patriotic anti-German movement among the bourgeoisie; while the estrangement of France from the Vatican, and the progressive cordiality of the German Emperor toward the same institution rendered the "Freemasons heartily dissatisfied with the Triple Alliance and ready, as soon as the occasion arose, to be warm advocates of war at the side of France. All this simply explains one of the grounds for Fascism's hatred of Freemasonry-mere jealousy. Fascism likes to figure as the sole repository of militant patriotism in Italy today, and hates to have recalled the meritorious actions in more dangerous times of any still existing association of Italians. Moreover the patriotism of the Masons, while militant, was not fre=iedly expansive. They worked for the liberation of Italians from foreign yoke, but not for the acquisition of empires in Dalmatia and Turkey, such as the Fascists so bitterly revile their predecessors for


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having failed to acquire. A se~nd motive, allied, but distinct, to Mussolini's extreme impatience of any real claim upon the loyalty of his followers. Already in his socialist days he managed to compass the expulsion of Masons from the Sodalist party on the quite justified ground that Masonry formed a kind of a neutral zone between Liberalism and Socialism which blunted the edge of contrasts and abated the inclination to class war and bloody revolution. And in 1923, after he had profited hugely by the financial and personal help of the chief Masons in making Italy safe for the middle classes, and consolidating his own power, he expelled them with equally little ceremony from Fascism. His animosity towards Masonry has, according to credible reports, increased greatly since then because many of the "confessions" issued by frightened Fascists after the Matteotti murder (Rossi, Marinelli, etc.) were communicated by their writers, being Masons, to their Masonic superiors, who made political use of them. The third (often erroneously supposed the only) motive of Fascism's hostility against Freemasonry, is its increasingly evident desire to placate the Catholic Church. This important phenomenon can only be mentioned here. The destruction of the Masonic organization, though not, of course, in all details the way this is being effected, is an undoubted source of gratification to the Vatican. How far is Fascism's condemnation of Masonry as a source of political corruption and indiscipline, justified' There is little doubt that the power of Masonry hampered the efficiency of the military conduct of the Libyan War and of the Great War (I), in the latter of which the Masonic machine went heavily against the Catholic Generalissimo Cadorna. In the Parliament of 1921 there are said to have been over 120 Masonic Deputies, and the Premier, Bonomi, was obliged to refer to the Grand Master of the Grand Orient, questions which in a healthy state should have lain within his own exclusive jurisdiction. Many, however, who were strong critics of Masonry in its heydey have no liking for the savage campaign against it when it is already "down and out." Among the most pronounced of these critics was Benedetto Croce, who declared not many years ago that Masonry, imbued as it was with the petty bourgeois spirit and veneered with school board culture, was one of the greatest obstacles on the path of the Latin countries seeking for a healthier form of political existence. But when asked lately why in these circumstances he did not join the present hue and cry against the Masons, he quoted some words of a friend who had left Masonry to become a Fascist. I have been a Mason for twenty years, but now I have discovered that Fascism is the most perfect form of Masonry.

The words sound strangely like those of Palermi. We wonder whether he is still satisfied with this "perfect form of Freemasonry." The most perfect exponent of the Fascist order ended his existence at the end of a rope, and upside down, which if we care to use Masonic language, might be termed symbolic of most Fascist doctrines. SPAIN

Franco has about ceased to execute Freemasons in Spain. The reason 짜 There are none left. At one time Freemasons were punished in Spain in accordance with the number of degrees they possessed. Entered Apprentices were thus better off than the 33 0 boys.


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Spain, even in its balmy days, was no haven for the Freemasons. With the antagonism of the Church and sometimes the government, the Freemasons have always had hard sailing. The Revolution and the setting up of a Republic offered promise of better conditions, but the Republic couldn't take on as antagonists the Church, the Monarchy, and the Army. And governments like our own, which should have stood by a democracy, were missing at the finish. We reaped what

PHILOTAS PAPPAGEORGIOU Grand MOo8ter, Gram.d Lodge of Greece.

we had sown during the war when Franco sided with the Germans and Italians in their war against the Allies. We can see nothing in the future for Spanish Freemasonry. The odds are greatly against it. Brethren of the Grand Lodge and Grand Orient are striving to carryon in Mexico and in South America, but Freemasonry-in-Exile is a losing game. GREECE

Pitiful Greece! Robbed by the Germans, caught in the midst of Revolution among its own peoples, and suffering from economic disaster, either of which evil is bad enough. Greece is deserving of the support of all nations. She bore the brunt of early fighting in Albania when confronted by German and Italian. The Germans came in to ruin their economy; they set up printing presses which destroyed the currency of the country; they cut down


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the forests and left the people without fuel; they destroyed the shipping and prevented the sending in of food, and as a climax, the revolutionaries began to fight with the patriots in the very streets of the capital. Only two divisions of English troops prevented total anarchy. The Germans went in early and arrested all Masonic officials of all grades; they took over the beautiful and commodious temple and in

GROUP OF DISTINGUISHED GREEK MASONS (Left to right, seated): Grantd Master Papageorgiou, Hadjipanos, Pera7cis. (Standing): HOI"S, Ulissides, Pexopouws, Papademetrio~~, Meta7cis, Meletepoulos, Krimpas.

all ways followed their usual policy towards Freemasons. But in the northeast section of the country, in Salonika in particular, Freemasons came in for special treatment. One lodge which had a number of Jewish members was made extinct, its members having been killed or forced from the country. The Temple in Salonika was taken over, but being used for other purposes by the invaders, was saved. But today it has not been restored, and at recent meetings, members were asked to bring their own chairs, none being left in the building. Missouri Freemasons have taken an interest in the girl's orphanage


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Megos Alexandros, at Salonika, and already $3,500 has been sent over to assist this worthy charity. Recent word is that the Masonic Temple has been restored fit for occupancy, and that Grand Lodge has begun to carryon its activities. But the da~1age done by war will be years in being repaired, not taking into account the damage done to the morale of the country. And today the threat of Communism, bolshevik, and anarchy is staring our brethren of Greece. May they have strength to continue their unequal fight. FREEMASONRY IN HITLER'S BURGENBRAUKELLER

What is happening in Germany' Weare often asked this question. We know what Hitler wanted to do with Freemasonry, but Freemasonry is not something which can be driven from the souls of men who have lived for years under its banner. Weare not here interested in an American lodge which has been formed and is operating in Frankfurt, Germany, but we are speaking of men who are residents of Germany. Last December, in the City of Munich, known for its close connection with the activities of Hitler, an American Masonic Club was holding one of its regular meetings, when a knock on the door caused the group to start up in surprise. Inquiry developed the information that a German mail-carrier was attempting to deliver a special delivery letter signed by the "J\1unich Masonic Circle." Fritz Hopfner signed as Master. It was addressed to the Masonic Club of Munich, dated December 1, 1946, and read: I have heard that Freemasons of American Lodges meet here in Munich in a Masonic Club. Being the presiding Master of our German Masonic Circle in Munich, I take the liberty of submitting to you a list of our members. We wish you much success in your work in Munich, and should appreciate very much a connection with the Freemasons of the United States. We greet you i. d. u. h. z. Freimaurerische Vereinigung Munchen, (Masonic Circle) Signed: FRITZ HOPFNER, Master Munchen 5, Auenstrafse 90 III.

The club was meeting in the Burgenbraukeller, which was Hitler's first hang-out and the place where he started his march on Munich in 1923. The Haufbraukeller, his Munich Headquarters is next door. The club members were surprised at the information contained in the letter, believing that Freemasonry would most certainly have been suppressed in this city of Hitler the arch enemy of Freemasonry. Several members of the club, connected with the Military Government, took it upon themselves to investigate the membership. It was done,


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and strange to say, each and every member on the list was given a clean bill of health as to Nazi activities. Further investigation showed that, even in the midst of persecution, Freemasonry maintained an underground existence, and though membership was hazardous, they never lost faith that sometime, Freelilasonry would again be restored. All lodge property had been confiscated, members persecuted, placed in concentration camps, and otherwise mistreated, but German Freemasons had, in many instances, responded to the call of distress whenever possible. The Club invited Dr. Hopfner to visit the club; he did so, telling his American brethren of many things which occurred during the Hitler regime which had never been publicized. He assured his listeners that no member of the Munich Circle would be found to be connected with the Nazi party. He displayed the jewels of his old lodge which he had safely protected during the Hitler period; they were more elaborate than American lodge jewels. He referred to the fact that once there were 80,000 German Masons. During the meeting, the Military Governor of Munich, informed Dr: Hopfner that the Military Government was completely satisfied with the identity papers of each member of the Circle, and that a license would be issued in a few days permitting them to open their lodge in Munich. It was almost pathetic to watch the effect this announcement had upon the representative of the Munich lodge. Our informant in Germany does not believe that any German Freemasons were involved, or implicated in the doings of the Nazi Party, and that it is the duty of American Freemasons to see Freemasonry restored there just as soon as possible. Persecution is the poorest method of destruction. AS TO THE FUTURE

One of our Dutch brethren sums the war up in the following language: How bewildered, how unbalanced, the human mind may become, the past years of the war taught us. I need not go into details. You, brethren of the lodges of the Allied Nations, have seen enough yourselves j we, brethren of the Lodges of the subdued nations, experienced enough. We need not enter into a theoretical exposition of what happened; the question is, whether we can learn to understand what happened, or how it was possible that this war with all its atrocities broke loose. Can we discover anything of the cause, and can we make any alterations in iU

Freemasonry is an institution of PEACE. Nowhere in its ritual, in its traditions, or in its customs, is there mention of war, of force, of persecution, or punishment. True Freemasonry does not persecute. Its doors are open to men of every race, country, opinion, or creed, providing only that his opinion does not violently conflict with the opinions of his brethren, or his


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creed be such as to have no place for a Supreme Being. Freemasonry cannot have conflicting elements within the organization if it is to promote brotherhood. It may have men with differences of opinion, but not when those opinions advocate the overthrow of government, the abolition of religion, or the establishment of dictatorships. As an institution, Freemasonry has been persecuted by church and state; it has incited the enmity of men who cannot change or control its policies. It will continue to be persecuted; it will continue to have the antagonism of those whose membership it cannot, and will not, accept. This is entirely natural. The degree of persecution will depend upon who its enemies are, and under what circumstances they may act. It is easy to visualize, at the present time, the persecution we might undergo should certain nations dominate the world picture. The peace of the world will depend upon a union of hearts and minds of those nations in which Freemasonry plays a dominant part. You, as a member of the great world brotherhood, have a part in the great drama of world advancement. The future will depend on how well YOU play your part. Eternal Vigilance is the Price of Liberty! MASONS IN THE NEWS

Governor Guy B. Park, former governor of Missouri, died in Jefferson City, Mo., October 1, 1946. He was a Past Co=ander of his commandery of Knights Templar. Marvuel Roxas, president of the Philippine Republic is a member of the fraternity. General Omar Bradley is a member of a lodge at West Point, N. Y. King Ch?路istian X, Grand Master of Denmark, celebrated his 76th birthday September 26, 1946. He died in April, 1947. Royal Arch Gunnison, internationally known war correspondent, was killed in an air crash at Hong Kong, China, September 25, 1946. Although not a Freemason, his father was, and the name was given because the father had attended a Royal Arch meeting on the night of his birth. General Joe "Vinegar" Stilwell, hero of the China Campaign who was made a Mason at sight and became a Shriner all within twentyfour hours, died suddenly during the month of October, 1946. Governor R. F. MacWilliams of the Province of Manitoba received as guests members of the General Grand Chapter meeting in Winnipeg, Canada. During the meeting Lord Montgomery and His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury were guests of Gov. MacWilliams. James P. Kem, newly elected U. S. Senator from Missouri, is a member of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City, Mo. Governor Philip Donnelly of Missouri is a member of all the Masonic bodies in Lebanon, Mo. J. B. Powell, celebrated journalist, who was persecuted by the Japs


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and who was returned to this country during the war, died suddenly while addressing the Missouri Society in Washington in February. He was a graduate of Missouri University. He was initiated in Palmyra Lodge No. 18, Palmyra, Mo., September 3, 1908, affiliated with

TWO RULERS WHO ARE FREEMASONS

His Majesty, King Gustav V. Grand Master of Sweden.

His Excellency, Miguel Aleman, Preswl!'TI.t of the Republic of Mexico.

Acacia Lodge No. 602 in Columbia, June 2, 1914, dimitting from that lodge December 16, 1924, to affiliate with a Lodge in Shanghai, China. President Miguel Aleman is the first Protestant President of the Republic of Mexico. He is a member of a lodge in Mexico City. Governors Harold Stassen, John W. Bricker, Thomas E. Dewey and Earl Warren are much in the news these days as potential Presidential aspirants, not to mention President Harry S. Truman who is being suggested for re-election. Both of Missouri's Senators are Freemasons. Senator Forrest C. Donnell is a Past Grand Master of Missouri, and member of Tuscan Lodge No. 360 in St. Louis; Senator James Preston K em is a member of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 in Kansas City.


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William Wilson Corcoran's picture appears on the frorit page of the lodge notice of Potomac Lodge No.5, Washington, D. C., in which he held membership at the time of his death. The great Corcoran Art Gallery in Washington was his gift to the nation, 1869. He was made a Master Mason July 26, 1827, and died in 1888. Governor Pat Neff, Past Grand Master of Texas, was in the news recently when his school, Baylor University, conferred an honorary degree upon President Truman. At the Moscow Conference of United Nations are four Freemasons: General George C. Marshall, Senator Thomas Connolly, James F. Byrnes, A1路thur S. Vandenberg. No, Uncle Joe holds no membership; in fact he does not even permit the fraternity in his domain. The Four Freedoms do not extend to Russia. Conrado Benitez, well-known to American Freemasons as a Past Grand Master of the Philippine Islands, is one of seven men who wrote the new Philippine Constitution. Viscount Alexander, the new Governor General of Canada is a member of Athlumney Lodge No. 3245 in London and served as Master in 1938. Joseph Biena, Grand Master of Swiss Alpina Grand Lodge is a former Catholic Priest who became a Mason in 1932. Prince Gustav Adolf, killed in a plane crash at Copenhagen, Denmark, airport, was a member of the fraternity and in 1936 assisted King GUstav V in conferring degrees when the Grand Lodge of Sweden was visited by American Freemasons. King G~tstav V. recently sent a framed photograph of himself to the Masonic Service Association of the U. S. A. in appreciation of the work done by that association in Europe. Sir Bracewell Smith was recently elected Lord Mayor of London; in private life he is the owner of several hotels, the Ritz in Paris and the Park Lane in London. He is an active Freemason. King George of Greece, who died recently in Athens, was a member of a lodge in London and the Grand Lodge of England had conferred upon him the rank of Past Grand Senior Warden. Trygvie Lie, Secretary of the United Nations, is a member of a Norwegian Lodge. Jan Sibelius, famous composer, has been presented an annual pension of $1,680; the award was made by the Finnish government on his eightieth birthday. He lives in Suburban Helsinki, Finland. He once composed ceremonial music for all the Craft degrees. General Jonathan M. Wainwright, commanding general of the Fourth Army attended a Masonic Lodge meeting in Junction City, Kansas, in March, 1947. He is a member of the lodge there. Allen Laws Oliver: Brother Oliver has just completed a term as President General of the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution. He is a resident of Cape Girardeau, a graduate of the


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University of Missouri, and a member of the Masonic bodies at Cape Girardeau, having served a term as Commander of his Commandery. Henry Ford. The press reported, April 7, 1947, the death of the world's greatest industrialist, at the ripe age of 83 years. While never active as a member of the craft he proved to be a staunch member. He was made a Master Mason in Palestine (Mich.) Lodge No. 357, November 28, 1894, and had been a Mason almost 53 years. He very often visited lodges other than his own. When receiving additional degrees in 1940, he said: Freemasonry is the best balance wheel the United States has, for Masons know what to teach their children.

He was given life membership in Palestine Lodge, March 7, 1935; on the occasion of his seventy-fifth birthday anniversary he was given a plaque by his lodge. Earl of Harewoodj May 24, 1947, the Grand Master of English Freemasons died at his ancestral home near Leeds, England. He was a brother-in-law of the King of England; he was 64 years of age and one of the wealthiest men in England. Walter B. Weisenburger died June 23, 1947, at his home in New York City; he was a member of Ha=ibal Lodge No. 188, Hannibal, Mo., and previous to going to New York City as executive vice-president of the National Association of Manufacturers, he was a resident of St. Louis, Mo. He was 69 years of age and was born at Hannibal. He assisted in founding the St. Louis Municipal Opera and the development of the Union Station Plaza. St. Louis newspapers, as usual, overlook his Masonic connections. BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, MAGAZINES

Inside America: John Gunther has written another of his "Inside" books. This time it is Inside U. S. A. Our readers will be interested in the Masonic references, of which there are several. Gunther writes entertainingly and Missourians will read with interest what he says about Missouri. In discussing Utah, he refers to the Mormons and the Masonsa delicate subject in that state: To members of all other faiths-Jews, Catholics, what not-the Latter Day' Saints are friendly, but possibly because Mormonism borrowed so much from Masonry (Masonic symbols like the beehive may be seen all over Utah), there is a tendency to dislike Freemasons. The Mormons will, however, often accept a converted Mason, whereas Masons are more hesitant to take in an L.D.S. as a general rule.

When Gunther gets to Kansas he names twelve forces which he says "runs Kansas." Weare interested in one of these forces only, although he mentions the Methodist Church, the Lions, Kiwanis, and Rotary; little is said about the Freemasons which he lists as No.8:


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(To an indeterminate degree, the Masonic orders.)

Iowa gets more space: Another powerful element in Iowa is Masonry. Of 108 members of the lower house of the legislature, about seventy belong to the Masonic lodge, though nobody ever runs" as" a Mason, and only seldom is a man asked directly if he is one or not. Governor Blue is a Mason; so is the attorney general; so is every supreme court justice. Two things explain this: (1) Masonry is a kind of a badge of respectability, not only in Iowa but in almost all the Mississippi basin states; (2) a man comes up through the local Masonic lodge, and if he shows leadership, is pushed outward to the legislature almost as a matter of course.

Then Gunther tums to Michigan and Henry Ford; after telling how Henry Ford felt after his son, Henry, had married a Catholic girl, he says: At first people wondered what his grandfather would say. The old man, a masterfully oblique character, waited until several weeks after the marriage, and then, after many years of unsuccessful attempts to persuade him to do so, consented to enter the thirty-third degree of Masonry at an imposing ceremony at which all the thirty-third degree Masons in Michigan were present.

James J. Davis is referred to as one of the greatest joiners in American annals. Not only does he run the Moose, but he is a member of the Masons, Mystic Shrine, Grotto, Oddfellows, Knights of Pythias, Elks, Eagles, Foresters, Protected Home Circle, Knights of the GOlden Eagle, Woodmen of the World and Maccabees.

Almost everything except the Knights of Columbus and W. C. T. U.! Then he takes a whack at Senator McKellar, but there is little to interest us as Freemasons: He is a bachelor, a Prohibitionist, a Presbyterian, a 32d degree Mason, a Shriner, and an Oddfellow.

Just why he refers to McKellar's Masonic connections we cannot see, for there are four or five hundred other men named who are Freemasons, but who are not so listed. Incidentally, McKellar is given quite a panning. The last reference deals with Arkansas and Little Rock: The most impressive building (in Little Rock) today gives a hint about the community; it is the Albert Pike Memorial Temple, A.A.S.R. of Freemasonry.

Just what he means by "hint about the community" we shall leave to our Arkansas brethren to define. If Gunther had written 16 more pages, his readers would have had 1,000 pages for their $5.00. Freemasom-y Among Negroes in America: by Harry E. Davis and printed by the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite, Northem Jurisdiction is probably the first complete story of how, when, and where


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Negro Freemaso~ry received its start in America. It is an authoritative volume, well documented and destroys several traditions which have circulated in this country for many years. Credit for the establishment of a Colored Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite degrees is given to Albert Pike who "generously gave to the then Commander of the Prince Hall S. J. the ritual of the Scottish Rite as prepared by him, and his contribution, with slight modification became the basis for the work of the Prince Hall AASR" although Pike had been quoted "elsewhere as a virulent opponent of Negro Masonry." Davis has done much to place Prince Hall Masonry in a more favorable light. Most Famous Trial in History: issued by the Masonic Service Association; it is a 24-page mimeograph and discusses the trial of Jesus from a legal standpoint, the manuscript having been written several years ago by the late J p.dge Fead of Michigan. To this has been added "Notes on the Legal Phase of the Trial" by Wallace Stearns, Professor of History and Religious Education in Fargo (N.D.) College. The pamphlet will be of interest to those who are interested in the life of Christ. . Missouri Lodge of Research: The Transactions of 1945 were issued in September, 1946, and is the third volume issued by the Lodge. The book contains the story of Russell, Majors & Waddell, Golden Square Lodge, Davenport Frontier Chapter, Hamilton R. Gamble (Civil War Governor), and the usual minutes of the Lodge and membership list, 180 pages in all, and a most valuable edition. Sydney Lodge of Reseal'ch: the 1945 Transactions have been issued and is the XXXII year of issue. Interesting articles include "Jerusalem and the Temple Site," "Frederick the Great and his Masonic Life," "Influence of Shakespeare on our Ritual," "Cornerstones in U. S. A.," and the "Word Lodge." Our friend A. J. Kaglund acts as secretary and editor. CoUectanea: the annual volume of the College of Rites, Volume III, Part 3, is off the press. The issue contains the ritual of the Ancient Order of Zuzimites and the Queen of the South. Other sections of the Volume includes the Rite of Memphis with its 97째 and the Constitution of the Grand College of Rites. Centennial Address: The address delivered by Past Grand Master William R. Gentry (Missouri) at the centennial celebration of Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, Bridgeton, Missouri, has been printed in pamphlet form. We have an autographed copy which we have placed in our permanent files. It reads well but nothing can supply the place of the dynamic Gentry personality which delivered it. American Lodge of Researchj Volume IV, No.2, was issued during November, 1946, and covers the minutes of the Lodge to December 18, 1945. Among the articles of interest are "Masonry on the Santa Fe Trail," "Masonic Journalism," "Merchants as Masons,"


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"Beginnings of Masonry in Mississippi," and "Origins of the Grand Lodge of New York." Of most interest to Missourians is Bro. Strickland's article on the Santa Fe Trail which covers much Missouri history. Much of the material is taken from the reviewer's "Territorial Masonry" without credit to that volume. George Washington Bi1"thday Add1'ess: an address by Rev. Stanley B. Crosland, delivered before Wilmette Lodge No. 931, Wilmette, Illinois, February 22, 1945, and done into pamphlet form by Craft Fellows of Evanston, Illinois, in February, 1947. It contains much Masonic material about our first president. Manchester (England) Lodge of Researchj Volume XXXV covers the year 1945 but was printed in 1946. The current volume has articles on "East to West," the "Kabballah," "Influence of the Gilds," "Who was Tubalcain ~," and a Question and Answer section. 128 pages; paper cover. Secretary is Fred L. Pick, 23 College Road, Oldham. The Royal Arch, Its Hidden Meaningj George H. Steinmetz. Bro. Steinmetz is a former Missourian and member of Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, St. Joseph, Mo., although now a resident of California. His 150 page book has been printed by Macoy Publishing Co. of New York and is an addition to the literature of Capitular Masonry which has been neglected in times past. Bro. Steinmetz discusses the occult features of the degrees and many of the references will appeal to the reading Mason. A. Q. C., 1946-7 j Vol. LVII, Part 1 of the transactions of this great English Lodge of Research contains 136 pages printed on good paper but absolutely unfit for library or reading use until bound with other parts. At a subscription price of $5.00 per year it does appear that the volume might come to its readers bound-even if in a cheap binding. Part I contains a Dialogue between Simon and Philip, the Culdees, A Tale of Two Lodges, Furniture of Bath Lodge, and the usual routine business of the lodge. Part 2, 150 pages, contains interesting stories of Mirabeau and his efforts to use Freemasonry as a political weapon; there is a fine story of York Grand Chapter, of particular interest to Royal Arch Masons, and a few interesting short articles dealing with Masonic processions and King's College Chapel. The lodge is behind three years with its publication. Verses Grave and Gay j the veteran Vermont Mason, John Spargo, issued for Christmas distribution fifty-eight pages of verse under the above title; he has very kindly supplied us with a copy. The verses run the gamut from youth until the grave, all very nicely done and encompassed in a light blue cardboard cover. Memoriaj (Proceedings of the VII Congreso Nacional Masonico). This is the name applied by our Mexican brethren to their proceedings of their national Masonic congresses. No. VII records the proceedings of the 1944 Congress held at Guadalajara under the sponsorship of Grand Lodge Occidental Mexicana. The proceedings are a beautiful

â&#x20AC;˘


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specimen of printer's workmanship and its 230 pages give a complete story of the 1944 session. Those who doubt the sincerity and progressiveness of our brethren to the south will do well to read this volume-if they can read Spanish! CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION PROGRAMS

Bro. D. Tomitch, former delegate of Yugoslavia in the International Institute for'Intellectual Cooperation and representing the Grand Lodge of Yugoslavia at the meeting of the A.M.L in Geneva, has written a 64-page pamphlet on Responsibility of the Vatican in the Atrocities of the Catholic Clergy in Yugoslavia. The pamphlet is well documented with photographs and statements showing the Roman Church continuing its policy of engaging in world politics. He accuses the Vatican of publishing a volume in which Freemasonry was for the first time accused of the assassination of the AustrianHungarian Archduke which brought on World War 1. He gives names, places, and dates, of Catholic officials who gave orders for the slaughter of non-believers. M,S.A. Digest: April 4, 1947 the M.S.A. issued another of its mimeographed productions, this time being "Ten Minute Addresses" for the use of those Masonic speakers who often wonder what to talk about. At any rate our brethren will never become bored as long as they keep within the limit of these addresses. St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, St. Joseph, Mo., issued a 36-page souvenir program commemorating the establishment of the Lodge on October 14, 1946. John Ralls was Grand Master at the time, and the charter is attested by Fred L. Billon, Grand Secretary. Several photographs add interest to the program. Independence Lodge No. 76 observed its centennial during the week October 11-18, 1946, and issued a sixteen page pamphlet program, several pages of which were devoted to historical matters; the latter was written by Major N. D. Jackson, D.D.G.M. A photo of the original charter is worth examination; it too is signed by John Ralls and Billon. CONFERENCE OF GRAND SECRETARIES

The 19th annual conference was held in the Hotel Statler, Washington' D.C., February 21, 1947, Richard C. Davenport of Illinois presiding. Forty-five American Grand Lodges and six Canadian Provinces were represented. The program included the following: Foreign Relations, Charles H. Johnson (New York) Waiver of jurisdiction, Winthrop Buck (Connecticut) Dimits and Transfers, Harry W. Bundy (Colorado) Automatic Suspension, George H. Belew (Texas) Masonic Tolerance, James N. Hillman (Virginia) Address (Dinner), Paul Strawhecker (Michigan)


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Winthrop Buck, writing on "Waivers" said he had received "courteous answers from all Grand Secretaries but five." The great majority permit waivers. Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Tennessee do not permit waivers. Two Canadian jurisdictions require dispensation from the Grand Master at $10.00 per Disp. The speaker believed that at least one-fourth of the votes cast should be required to deny a waiver. Harry Bundy suggested that dimits should have stubs to be returned to issuing lodge; that the dimit should carry pertinent information as to petitioner such as age, height, complexion, dates of initiation, etc. A committee will study the question of uniform dimits. Texas has had "automatic suspension" since 1934 and George Belew calls it "the most constructive act of Masonic legislation." The law there, briefly, is that all dues to lodges shall be paid within twelve months from the date of accrual or the member stands automatically suspended. For the past four years there have been no outstanding dues in Texas. The law makes no exceptions, plays no favorites; a member may not feel aggrieved if he fails to comply with the law. Dues may still be remitted. The record for 10 years shows a paid decrease in suspensions, although a decrease in reinstatements. Yet over that period there have been an excess of 10,859 reinstatements over suspensions. Charles H. Johnson suggested a study of the European Grand Lodges before recognition. Grand Master Hillman spoke on the philosophy and meaning of Masonic brotherhood, while Grand Master Strawhecker of Michigan took a whack at New York, a Grand Lodge which recently went on record as "broadening" the requirements for recognition. He pleaded for unity without sacrifice of principle. The next conference is scheduled for Hotel Statler, Washington, D. C., 9 :30 a. m. February 25, 1948. CONFERENCE OF GRAND MASTERS

The Washington meetings have come and gone. The 1947 meetings were characterized by a change of location. For years the Hotel Willard was selected because of its location; this year found all official meetings at the New Statler. It is certainly a modernistic place and the hall in which we met more comfortable and accessible than the 13th floor Willard ball-room. All meetings were well attended. We refer to the Conference of Grand Masters, the Conference of Grand Secretaries, the Masonic Service Association, and the George Washington Masonic Memorial, although the meetings of the latter were held at the Memorial in Alexandria. Every Grand Lodge in the United States was represented as well as seven Canadian jurisdictions of British Columbia, Alberta, Sas-


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katchewan, Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, and even Puerto Rico. Grand Master Charles Froessel of New York called the conference to order in the South American Room of the Hotel. Grand Master James H. Stewart, jr., of Kansas was named as Chairman of the 1947 Conference. The agenda had been prepared by a committee of which Grand Master Samuel H. Wragg of Massachusetts was chairman. It included the following subjects and speakers: 1. Assimilating War Time Masons, Bruce Bannon, Texas. 2. Promoting Lodge Attendance, Gay Brown, New York. 3. Should the War change the Viewpoint on Physical Qualifications~, (Yes) John A. Stormon, North Dakota; (No) Harold Stephenson (Virginia.) . 4. Obligation to Negro Freemasonry~ William J. B;undy, North Carolina. 5. Effect of War on Future of Freemasonry, Richard Kern, Pennsylvania.

On the whole the papers were interesting and well prepared. There was little discussion, even on what appeared to be controversial subjects. We sometimes question as to whether most of the representatives return with any practical results from these meetings, other than the chance to meet with outstanding Freemasons from other jurisdictions, for those who are participating may, in a few short months, be out of die picture in their own grand lodges. We rather like the agenda of the Grand Secretaries' Conference which appears to be of a more practical nature, but since only Grand Secretaries and their Grand Masters are eligible to sit in, only a few can profit by the meeting. Again, there 'is a conflict in the two meetings, one overlapping the other. Four months have now elapsed and the proceedings of the conference have not been published, preventing us from giving our readers any of the details of the gathering. THE WASHINGTON MASONIC MEMORIAL

Work still proceeds on the George Washington Masonic National Memorial, but while work proceeded on the outside of the Memorial, fireworks took place on the inside. Dr. Elmer Am of Ohio presided as President of the Association; he has been a most worthy successor of the late Louis Watres. The thirtyseventh annual convention met at the Memorial building in Alexandria, Va., February 22, 1947. Missourians who registered were: Dr. Solon Cameron, Morris E. Ewing, Bert S. Lee, Anthony F. Ittner, Ray V. Denslow, Harold L. Reader, William R. Denslow, and Frank S. Land. The Association is in good shape financially, having total assets of $553,378, of which $146,439 is Endowment Fund. When the annual


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roll call was had, Grand Master Cameron of Missouri presented Missouri's check for $7,500. The total announced at this time was $154,891.41 which represents one of the largest collections in recent years. Then came the fireworks, which we have above referred to. It concerned the method of representation. As it now stands, each state has one vote in an official roll call, making forty-nine votes. An amendment was fostered by a certain group which would have given vote to every organization which has made a contribution towards the memorial. The proposal came from the Grand Master of Virginia (Coleman). To be quite frank, we cannot see why any associated or auxiliary group should want representation in a vote. The association has existed for thirty seven years and up to this time no such vote has ever been asked for. Weare quite familiar with two of the organizations affected by the amendment (the General Grand Council, R.S.M. and the General Grand Chapter, R.A.M.) and we have never heard any expressed or inferred desire on the part of these two organizations to have a vote. We have some little curiosity as to who wants the vote--and why~ Just who is back of the proposal, and what is it all about~ One speaker, referring to the change in the Constitution, said "it was as slick a scheme of planning as any political party ever indulged in," and that "this thing was hatched up and put over." Unfortunate statements in a Masonic meeting! The roll was called and the vote stood 21-9 against adopting the amendment. Our readers might want to know what states voted for, and what against: For-Arkansas, California, Kentucky, Nebraska, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Porto Rico. Against-Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Wyoming.

And then the group arose and sang one stanza (the record says verse) of "Blest Be the Tie That Binds." THE MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION

The annual meeting of the Association was held at the Statler Hotel in Washington during the February meetings usually held at that time. The report of the secretary and the executive commission is a record of service rendered Masons throughout the world, a service rendered by the following states: Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Phil-


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ippine Islands, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Wisconsin, Wyoming, District of Columbia, and now (1947) New York and Indiana. It will be noted that Illinois, Ohio, and Pennsylvania are missing from the Northern jurisdiction of the country, while Alabama, California, Florida, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, Waslllngton and West Virginia are missing from the rest of the country. Philippine Relief: at the time the books were closed the MSA had sent for relief in the Islands, $30,996.78. European Relief: At the close of the year 1946, $126,055.15 had been received for this relief work. In addition to cash sent European grand lodges, there were 825 packages of food shipped, weighing 24,750 pounds. Contributions came from many non-members of the Association. Hospital Service: The year marked the beginning of a hospital visitation service which is being favorably commented on. Missouri has been given four centers, Rolla (Ft. Leonard Wood), Neosho (Camp Crowder), Jefferson Barracks, and Springfield (O'Reilly Hospital). It is unfortunate for Freemasonry that it cannot get together on any plan for mutual service. Local, and some personal, prejudice have prevented this. We have heard all of the objections but we cannot believe any of the objections will outweigh the value of mutual cooperation. One or two objectors find their greatest complaint to be Carl Claudy's salary. We know what Carl Claudy does; we know the trials he has to undergo; how he is compelled to keep eternal watch in an attempt to avoid offending some thin-skinned Grand Master. We wouldn't have his job for all the money he gets-and some more added. The day is coming when some of the objectors will be missing from the Masonic picture, and those of us who have supported MSA will have reason to be proud of the work accomplished, and eager to raise a statue to commemorate the work done by it and its executive secretary. We are taught not to criticize a brother's motives, remaining silent, rather than speaking ill of him. Let's have less criticism from those who offer nothing better, and more cooperation from the rest of us. On May 6, 7, 1947, New York, the largest Grand Lodge in the United States threw its support behind the Masonic Service Association by joining the Association, their action being unanimous. The action was taken after an investigation by a committee composed of Past Grand Masters. New York, while not a member of the Association had given support to the War work of the Association. Hardly had New York taken action, until Indiana considered the question of joining, resulting on May 28, 1947, in that state taking similar action, and unanimously. Thus two of the larger Grand Lodges


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of the United States have approved the work of the Association and are adding their support. A CENTRAL AMERICAN CONFEDERATION

Whether it has been the organization of the United Nations, or whether it is a simple desire on the part of all Freemasons to become a United Fraternity, we do know that in recent years there have been several attempts to organize confederations of Grand Lodges. A few

Conference of Central American GrOllU1 Lodges held in Costa Rica, 1947.

years ago, Mexican .Grand Lodges organized their Supremo Consejo or Confederacion of Grand Lodges; then we note the attempts of Chile, Argentine and Uruguay to organize the Western Hemisphere. A meeting, little publicized in advance, was a meeting held in San Jose, Costa Rica, March 4-8, 1947, attended by representatives of all the Central American Grand Lodges, including, Honduras, Guatemala, Salvador, Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua. While much of the time was taken up with entertainment, banquets, and lodge meetings, the representatives managed to work in three hours a day for the discussion of current problems. During the period, Lodge La Luz No. 3 observed its semi-cente=ial. The proposed South American Conference was discussed and Grand Master Mojica of Panama will represent the Central American group at that conference which was last scheduled for April, 1947, in Montevideo, Uruguay. The next Congress of the Central American group will be held in San Salvador unless conditions change in the meantime.


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IN ENGLAND

Attendance at the March 5, 1947, Grand Lodge Communication was 1,601, which included 427 Grand Officers! There were 398 Masters, 776 Wardens. Statistics of the United Grand Lodge of England for the year ending 1946 show the largest number of lodges ever on the roll of the Grand Lodge. By years, they are: Year

London

Provincial

1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946

1,241 1,258 1,281 1,281 1,282 1,283 1,293 1,305 1,346 1,376

3,021 3,067 3,109 3,115 3,120 3,135 3,201 3,276 3,422 3,580

Abroad 735 735 739 739 739 738 737 739 751 753

Total 4,997 5,060 5,129 5,135 5,141 5,156 5,231 5,320 5,519 5,709

A lodge, Zuriel No. 2507, at Naraingunge, Bengal, has ceased to exist and has been stricken from the roll-a war casualty. The law has been so amended that but one meeting of a lodge may be held on one and the same day; this was done to prevent "massproduction Masons." During the discussion, the following instance was cited: A lodge in southern England with 435 members; it holds twelve meetings a year. Last year it held not only the twelve, but in each month except one it held two or three emergency meetings and initiated two or three candidates a month. . .. Another lodge has a membership of 81, and in 1946 had seven regular and 11 emergency meetings. In all thirty ceremonies were worked and there were twenty initiates, twenty-one passings and eighteen raisings.

The conclusion drawn by our English brethren is sound: It is quite apparent that in those lodges the candidates they are now initiating will not have an opportunity to take office in the lodge within a reasonable time; after passing through the degrees they are going to be assigned to the back bench, and there they will sit and watch others do all the work, and the resultant danger is that their interest will fade and they will drift away. There is no unemployment benefit in Freemasonry. Interest is maintained by active participation in the work ... we must aim to give every candidate a full Masonic life . . . we would suggest "smaller lodges, greater opportunity."

His idea of a successful year for any Master was Being satisfied that at the end of the year of office, he has so regulated the affairs of his lodge, that every man he has initiated, every Mason into whom he has infused the principles and tenets of our craft as a living force, may have an opportunity to undertake active participation in the lodge within a reasonable time, so that he may have his initial interest and enthusiasm maintained and enhanced.


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The Grand Lodge, by resolution, expressed its sympathy to His Majesty King Gustav of Sweden in the death of Prince Gustav Adolf. It said: The relationship with the Royal House of Great Britain and the long and close Masonic association which has existed between the two countries have made this tragic event one of real sorrow to members of the United Grand Lodge of England; and our brethren join in prayer that the Great Architect of the Universe may comfort and sustain the bereaved family in its grief.

And the brethren signified their assent by standing in silence.

Another act of courtesy was that extended the late Earl of Harewood, Grand Master. He was not present at the annual communication by reason of an illness from which he has suffered for several months, and which resulted in his recent death. The courtesy was the presentation of a gift of silver, $2,500 cost, to H. R. H. and the Princess Royal, upon the occasion of their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, celebrated February 28, 1947.

England is mourning the loss of its Grand Master of Masons, the late Earl of Harewood. The Constitution provides that in the death of a Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master becomes the Grand Master Acting; this makes it devolve on His Grace the Duke of Devonshire to assume the duties of Grand Master and to preside over the forthcoming annual communication of grand lodge. He does not assume the title of Grand Master until the Grand Lodge may have elected him. At the present time he cannot be known as "Most W orshipful" but as "Right Worshipful" until the September communication. The Acting Grand Master, General Darell, the Earl of Donoughmore (Grand Master of Ireland), Ernest Cooper (President Board of General Purposes), and Sydney A. White (Grand Secretary) represented English Freemasonry at memorial services attended by the King, Queen, and Princess Elizabeth. The Lord Mayor of London (Sir Bracewell Smith), also a Freemason, was present. The Grand Lodge of England had recently voted a silver wedding anniversary to The Earl and his Lady, and a letter was read in Grand Lodge from the Pri,ncess Royal which was incorporated in the minutes: I should like you to know that on the day he died, Lord Harewood asked me particularly to send through you to his brother Masons, his thanks for· the Silver Wedding Present. He feared he had not thanked sufficiently for such a very generous gift.

At Lord Harewood's own request the gift will be a portrait of himself, to be painted and hung in Harewood House, family seat near Leeds.


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The close connection between the Grand Lodge of England and the Grand Chapter is shown in the official notice, which went out to all Lodges and Chapters, from the office of the Grand Secretary announcing the death of Grand Master, the Earl of Harewood, who was at the same time, by reason of his office, the First Grand Principal of the Grand Chapter: United Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of England Right Worshipful Brother His Grace the Duke of Devonshire, K.G., etc., etc., Acting Grand Master. Dear Sir and Brother: It is with profound regret that I have to announce the deeply lamented death of our respected and beloved Grand Master, M. W. Bro. the Earl of Harewood, K. G. The Acting Grand Master has ordered that the Craft shall go into mourning for six months from this date. He directs that all Lodge Summonses shall be printed with a black edging or with a recognized emblem of mourning. Masonic mourning may be worn, if obtainable, but in view of existing conditions and the need for conserving materials and labor, it should be confined to one rosette on the collar of each Officer of the Lodge. Yours faithfully and fraternally, SYDNEY A. WHITE, Grand Secretary. Freemasons' Hall, London, W. C. 2 27th May, 1947.

THAT DECLARATION OF PRINCIPLES-AGAIN!

That Declaration of Principles adopted by the Conference of Grand Masters in 1939 will not down. Our readers may recall that many of the GM's who voted most vociferously for its adoption returned home, changed their minds after receiving some propaganda, and advised their grand lodges against adoption. The truth is-there was nothing wrong with the Declaration. While it declared nothing new, many jurisdictions held to the theory that with a war imminent, the world at large should be apprised of our tenets. Even the Mother Grand Lodge and those of the British Isles thought so--and adopted a similar declaration. Our readers by referring to the Masonic World for 1946 (page 16c) will note the action of the Grand Lodge of Sweden concerning some of the Latin-Supreme Council-Grand Lodges. A section of the report says. Freemasonry in Sweden has always refrained from taking part in or expressing opinions on matters relating to the internal or external policy of its own or any other country. In certain other countries societies exist which-though their members call themselves Masons--engage in political activities ... the Grand Lodge of Sweden refuses to recognize such societies as Masonic or to have anything to do with them.


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The whole matter was thrown into the lap of American jurisdictions at the dinner meeting of the Conference of Grand Secretaries by Grand Master Paul Strawhecker of Michigan, who read from the report of the Committees on Jurisprudence and Correspondence of the Grand Lodge of New York (1945 Proc. p. 115) dealing with the future policy of that Grand Lodge; he quoted the following: Anglo-Saxon Freemasonry charges Latin Freemasonry with concerning itself with political questions; and with the absence of the Bible from the altar. . .. The world can hardly take us seriously as a factor for world peace when we refuse to strive for understanding of peace within our own ranks. Your committee believe that this breach can be healed and must be healed; believe it can be healed in time and without the sacrifice of principle. We, Anglo-Saxons, and they, Latins, are of different race and temperament, different in habits of life and customs, in ways of thinking. God made us that way; made us, as we are, and seemingly that way, will always remain. And may it not be better that way' For thus may we not cover more ground, reach more people, spread wider our principles, do more good in the cause of brotherhood. It is worth trying out. . . . It is not logically conceivable that harm can come to us by our extension of recognition of Latin Grand Lodges, and joining hands with them, work each in his own way, to promote peace between the peoples of the world through better understandi:t;!g.

Grand Master Strawhecker believes that while the resolution adopted might never be exercised by a Grand Master-yet the power was there. He went on to say what he thought about the situation: Up until the Grand Lodge of New York adopted this report ... I had considered that ]'reemasonry in North America was united before the world so far as the V. S. L. and politics were concerned. Historically, I believe it to be true that this is the first conscious and intentional breach in that unity. While it is true that each of our jurisdictions is sovereign, and that our principles and acts of recognition are unilateral, yet up to this time we have been bound together by what we mutually considered to be our established principles and ancient landmarks concerning these two subjects. Because of this rift, it is now time for all of us to stand up and be counted. The report of the G. L. New York uses this language "It is not logically conceivable that harm can come to us by our extension of recognition, etc." . . . After the Grand Orient of France rejected the V.S.L. under the influence of the Free-Thinkers of the French Revolution, and subsequently engaged in political activity, every jurisdiction in the U. S. sooner or later withdrew recognition following the lead of the Mother Grand Lodge. (*)

(.) Fifteen American Grand Lodges recognize the Grand Lodge or Grand Orient of France according to statistics published by MSA a few years ago. What is to become of the brave declaration promulgated to the world in 1939' When we are attacked, do we make public statements with our tongue in our cheek and as soon as the emergency is over, change face' ... The report to the G. L. New York speaks of logic. My brothers, I fail to follow it. To me the arguments are specious and dangerous, and I for one repudiate them now.


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Then the speaker quoted from ye reviewer's address before the Grand Masters Conference in 1946, in which we asserted that unless something was done at this time to set up a legitimate Freemasonry in Europe there would emerge from the present world condition two brands of Freemasonry, one Angle Saxon-Scandinavian, and the other a Continental-Latin American.

The speaker said It has been said by Bro. Denslow that "unless opportunity is taken of the present situation to correct some irregularities, there will emerge from the present conditions two brands of Freemasonry." My brothers, there can be only one brand of Freemasonry in the world and that is the brand which does not change its underlying philosophies with the shifting winds. The world must know that regular Freemasonry is unchangeable, and the sooner the better. The world must know tllat we offer no compromise to our faith . . . the struggle between the two ideologies has just begun, and we cannot engage in this struggle to keep men free with our ranks divided.

We cannot tell from Bro. Strawhecker's address whether he was agreeing in our statement that two Freemasonries would emerge from present conditions or not. He has said there cannot be two in the world. And yet there are two and probably more brands! There is the Michigan brand-and there are 48 other types in this country; it is true they are similar, but they are different! Canadian Freemasonry is a different brand; in some ways it may be a better brand. And the Grand Lodges of the British Isles are different. It is the most conservative type, unless we may except the Scandinavian groups. And are they different ~ The United Grand Lodge of England tolerates no side degrees; it does not have the Shrine, the Grotto, nor a hundred more organizations which befuddle candidate and member in this country. Slot machines and gambling devices which creep out in the halls of many of these groups would find little sympathy in England-or even continental Europe. We have little sympathy for so-called Masonic groups which do not respect the well-known landmarks-what are theyOfbut if they practice the true principles of Freemasonry we can see nothing wrong with making an honest attempt to get them to restore the Bible to the altar and keep their hands out of political affairs. It might be well for some of our dignitaries to have to live in some of these foreign countries and to learn first hand as to what it means to try to be a Freemason under dictator or oppression. They might change their opinion-very suddenly. IN THE PUBLIC PRESS

President Attends Lodge: In the Kansas City Star, Saturday morning, November 2, 1946, appeared an article on President Truman's visit to Missouri; one paragraph read:


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-After leaving his mother's home last night, President Truman paid a visit to the Grandview Masonic Lodge No. 618. While Engle Wray, the Master of the fraternal organization, was supposed to be the only one apprised of the visit, somehow a rumor had spread around among the Masons of Washington township and a good crowd was on hand for the occasion. The meeting was called for the purpose of conferring the second degree in the Blue lodge on Harry A. Truman, son of his brother, Vivian, and a nephew of the President. In the ceremony the President took the role of worshipful master and his brother performed the duties of senior warden. The President remained at the lodge about forty-five minutes before starting the journey home to Independence. Following the lodge ceremony, a social period was held in which Mr. Truman visited with his friends and fellow Masons.

Some Father: Life magazine, in a recent article on members of Lincoln's Cabinet, referred to Edward Bates of Missouri, a former Grand Master; under his picture was the caption: "Edward Bates, Attorney General and father of 17 children, writes in a diary that Lincoln lacked 'nerve' to be drastic." It might have been added that Bates himself lacked some stamina when Masons had to stand up and be counted between 1830-40. Another Bequest: Dispatches of May 9, 1947, announce the bequest of $25,000 to the Masonic Home, Sullivan, Illinois, by the late Bernard J. Huenkemeir of Freeport. Burial Record: Brother 'Villiam Brockmeier, 81, died May 27, 1947; he ,vas a member of Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis, Mo., and the newspaper notice states that he had officiated as marshal at 5,586 Masonic funerals. Oregon Centennial. An observance in which Missouri Freemasons will be most interested is the Centennial celebration of the Grand Lodge of Oregon now set for June 17, 18, 19, 1948; the first two days will feature a Grand Lodge. session. The first lodge in that section was Multnomah Lodge No.1, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Mrs. America: Newspapers have been carrying publicity about the recently selected "Mrs. America." She is 24-year-old Mrs. Janice Pollock, mother of four children. She abdicated the honor and forfeited a $2,500 prize because she believed her duty was to remain home with her husband and children, the prize demanding her traveling for 20 weeks in modeling dresses. Mrs. "America" is a member of the OES and her husband a member of Humboldt Lodge, Columbus, Ohio. It is refreshing to find a mother who is so considerate of children -and husband! Hannibal, Mo., March 26, 1946.-The Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children and the Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, will receive more than $100,000 each from the estate of Mrs. A. M. Nipper, which was appraised at $227,983 today. Mr. Nipper was superintendent of the Hannibal Board of Public Works for many years.

Mr. Ainsworth Nipper was an Iowa Freemason; he died January


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28, 1932. He was Commander of Excalibar Commandery of Knights Templar at Hannibal in 1918. Neosho, Mo., Nov. 18, 1946.-Neosho's Masonic Lodge is looking forward to the biggest event in its history Thursday when the organization celebrates with a centennial dinner in the municipal building. The lodge was chartered October, 1846, and has an interesting history. Harold L. Reader, grand secretary, will be the principal speaker. Louisiana, Mo., Nov. 18, 1946.-John W. Rule, who celebrated his lOOth anniversary November 13, but did not allow the festivities accompanying the occasion to interfere with his duties as vice-president of the Bank of Louisiana, died last night at a hospital following a heart attack. He laid claim to being the oldest in Masonic service in the :Midwest, having been a Mason for 77 years.

John J. Ray, veteran Mason of Texas, holds the record for the oldest Freemason as well as the longest service. He conferred a Masonic degree on his 100th birthday. The St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Sunday, October 6, 1946, carried the story of the Centennial of Polar Star Lodge No. 79. The celebration took the form of a banquet at the Hotel Jefferson. Judge Bigger of Hannibal spoke. Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain) was an early day member of Polar Star Lodge; the Lodge numbers 700 members. The Globe even published the photograph of the Lodge officers. Craft Lodge No. 287, Canton, Mo., celebrated its centennial, N 0vember 13, 1946; the celebration consisted of an exemplification of the third degree by Wyaconda Lodge of vVyaconda, Mo., followed by a dinner, and later by a program in the Christian Church, featuring an address by Ray V. Denslow, P.G.M. Craft Lodge was the name of the consolidated Canton Lodge No. 100 and Craft Lodge No. 287, the date of Canton's dispensation being. October 6, 1846; it consolidated with Craft Lodge December 6, 1898. The most famous member of the Lodge was Stephen Wilson Barnes Carnegy, a Masonic pioneer. In the October, 1946, Saturday Evening Post is an article on Washington and the National Capitol Building. It is so unusual to see a national publication mention the Masonic Fraternity that we must quote a paragraph from the article: The building (capitol) was begun with a lodge meeting, a parade, a booster speech and a barbecue. On that bright day of September 18, 1793, George Washington, himself a Mason, met with a company of Masonic brothers and dignitaries at the future site of the White House. They then marched, with music of fife and drum, along the mile of dusty country road to Goose Creek and Jenkins Hill, where militiamen waited with cannon primed for salutes. Washington, wearing an apron made for him by Madame de Lafayette, laid the cornerstone. Thereupon, according to the contemporary account in the Columbian Mirror and Alexandria Gazette, "The whole congregation joined in awful prayer, succeeded by a volley from the Artillery." They then listened to "an animated and ingenious Oration" by the Right Worshipful Grand Master Pro Tem, Joseph Clarke.


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In an interesting article in the February, 1947, Readers Digest, is a reference to Freemasons. So rare is mention of Freemasonry in the press that we should like to print the entire article. That ~hich refers to Freemasonry reads: (" The U. S. Capitol, Magnet for Americans" by Scott Hart). The Capitol rose, stone by stone. When the foundations stood like a long low breastwork on the Hill, George Washington and his fellow Freemasons from Georgetown to the west, and Alexandria to the South, came in one morning and laid the cornerstone. Across Washington's waist was the white apron of the Masons, hand-embroidered by Mme. Lafayette.

Tax on Masonic Legacy: January 8, 1947, press dispatches from Mexico, Mo., told that the Burroughs estate of $120,647 which had been willed to the lodge at Mexico, would have to pay a $16,330 inheritance tax. His estate was left for the purpose of erecting and maintaining a Masonic Temple. Story of T. R. Henry J. Haskell edits a column in the Kansas City Star entitled "Random Notes." Incidentally, it is a very interesting column. In the June 15, 1947, edition of the Star he refers to an incident in which a Mason and a Masonic event is mentioned: Looking through the file of the Star for Sunday, June 9, 1907, a member of the staff happened on an account of the laying of the cornerstone of the Masonic Temple in Washington the previous day. Before the ceremony got under way the Grand Master tied a Masonic apron around the waist of President Theodore Roosevelt, who was to spread the cement for the stone. The Masonic official found an obstruction in his way and parted the tails of the President's coat. There in the right hip pocket was the butt of a large revolver exposed to the view of the multitude . . . these incidents didn't mean that the President was a ferocious man. His predecessor, William McKinley (also a Mason-Ed), had been shot and killed while shaking hands only six years earlier, and another predecessor, James A. Garfield (also a Mason-Ed), had been fatally shot in a railroad station twenty-six years before.

The same article has an interesting paragraph dealing with Russell, Majors, & Waddell and the pioneer wagon trains. All three of these partners were Missouri Masons. A bill is on foot in Congress to establish a memorial to the work of these pioneers. Missouri Compromise: The author is Tris Coffin, a Washington correspondent who devotes 314 pages to 'Vashington gossip; two Masonic, or semi-Masonic references may be noted. On page 15, we learn that the White House under President Truman: settled down to the pleasant atmosphere of a small town hotel. Many of the boys in the press room were won over to this friendly democratic man. (Truman). He treated the correspondents like fellow Masons.

On page 127, speaking of Senator Wherry of Nebraska, he said of him: He is an enthusiastic joiner, Shriner, and Legionnaire.


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Nuremberg Diary: G. M. Gilbert writes of the late Herman Goering; he tells of a conversation which Goering is said to have had in which he said: You can't fathom your fate. It depends on such little things. For in路 stance, the little thing that prevented me from becoming a Freemason. I had a date to meet some friends to join the Freemasons in 1919. While waiting for them, I saw a pretty blonde pass by and I p~ked her up. Well, I just never did get around to joining the Freemasons. If I hadn't picked that blonde up -that day, it would have been impossible for me to get into that party and I wouldn't be here today.

The'Masonic fraternity owes a debt of gratitude to that German blonde. FREEMASONRY IN CANADA

Ontario: Much to the dissatisfaction of several Canadian jurisdictions, Ontario carries the title "Grand Lodge of Canada" adding in smaller letters "in the province of Ontario." It is Canada's largest jurisdiction, having December 31, 1945, 99,509 members. The annual communication, July 17, 1946, was graced by the presence of the Mayor of Toronto, a Past Master, who extended his greetings. Eleven American jurisdictions were represented. Ontario has a meritorious service award, established in 1944, known as the William Mercer 'Vilson Medal; it cannot be given to Past Masters but is for the boys out in the field. The grand lodge was addressed by a Missourian, Bishop Ivan Lee Holt of Missouri. The jurisdiction is happy over the coming of II. E. Field Marshal, the Right Honourable Viscount Alexander of Tunis, etc., a Past Grand Warden of England, and now Governor General of Canada. The final statement of British War Relief showed the donation of $251,337.34 to their British brethren. The reviewer failed to receive Missouri proceedings. Manitoba: the Fort Garry Hotel, Winnipeg, was the scene of the 71st annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Alberta, Dr. Peter Pilkey presiding. Membership December 31, 1945 was 11,068. Speaker of the occasion was Rev. Canon G. H. Crane-vVilliams, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Alberta; he had been round the world forty times in his capacity as an Anglican minister. He is Past Master of Rising Sun Lodge No. 1401, and Past Z. of Rising Sun Chapter R.A.M. in Japan; he is a Past Maste! of Humility Lodge No. 229, Calcutta, India, and a Past Grand Officer of the District Grand Lodge of Japan. He spoke on the subject Qf the British Empire, during the course of which he said this significant thing: I recently read a statement: The British Empire can never be destroyed, because its component parts will never submit to separation. Whoever the pundit was, I think we can more applaud his patriotism than his prescience. The British Empire, in common with all other aggregations of peoples and mundane organizations, carries in itself its own


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seeds of dissolution, and those who see in the Empire the power for good which it undoubtedly is and which it increasingly may become will do well to intelligently inform themselves concerning it, that they may labor to delay, if not to prevent, its ever running to seed. . . . I am an old man and have seen many things and lived in many lands. I make a prophecy, which, of course, I would never be able to have you confront me with, but the day is coming when the Capital of the Empire will no longer be in Britain, too close to the hotbed of mutual misunderstanding, hatred, envy, malice, which we see on every hand in Europe.

Again, Missouri proceedings did not appear in the review. Prince Edward Island: The Grand Lodge is not large, but it recently observed its 71st anniversary. Its Grand Master in 1946 was Missouri's representative in that jurisdiction, Reginald Ernest Kemp, a wholesale stationer. Membership as of April 30, 1946, was 1,125, a gain of 3 per cent. The Grand Lecturer intimated a lack of uniformity in ritual; he also adds that most lodges might be able to improve their physical appearance. Quebec: This jurisdiction observed its '6th anniversary, October 9, 1946. It is located in a territory not favorable to Freemasonry and yet carries on in a fine way. Membership, June 30, 1946, was 14,920, a slight increase over the preceding year. A jurisdictional dispute seems to be pending in the City of Quebec, causing the Grand Master to observe The basic Masonic principle on which jurisdiction is founded is "Knowledge of one's neighbor." The members of a lodge are more likely to know, or can easily ascertain, whether an applicant is a fit and proper person, if he is of their own environs, than if he be a resident of another section.

St. George's Lodge had a Members Night and took up a hospital collection; it amounted to $100; curiously enough, it was a Hebrew Lodge; the money was turned over to the Treasurer who was an Irishman, and donated to a Presbyterian Hospital fund. See Ripley! Saskatchewan: Saskatchewan is one of the newer jurisdictions (40th communication). It had for its Grand Master, 'V alter L. Clink, who as a young man, journeyed as a Boy Scout, to attend the coronation of King George V. Membership February 28, 1946, was 14,066; there were 198 lodges. An Appendix to the Proceedings contains some interesting Masonic articles, showing that an educational work is going on there. Missouri receives some favorable mention from the reviewer. Fifth Annual Conference of Western Grand Lodges: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba engage in an annual conference similar to our Grand Masters' Conference although not taking in so large a territory geographically. The conference has been increasing in interest since it was founded. In 1944 there were 14 representatives present: in 1945, 21. Now invitations are being


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extended to Eastern Canadian Grand Lodges; two Illinois representatives showed up at the recent conference. The next Conference was fixed at Banff. The Conference at that point will be successful even if the representatives do nothing but sit on the porch of the Banff Hotel and watch the mountains and the stream. AUSTRALASIA

New South Wales: This jurisdiction has 619 lodges and the membership, June 30, 1946, was 86,352. An outstanding act was the donation of $15,000.00 for the Appeal for Food for Britain. It will be recalled that the Grand Lodge had a dispute with the government over the return of one of its Masonic schools by the military authorities. Temporary buildings which were erected by the government are being removed and the buildings are being restored to their former condition. Thir Masonic hospital reports 1,116 patients during the year, and 898 operations. It was reported that a memorial tablet had been unveiled, erected in.the lodge room to the memory of Corporal John H. Edmondson, who was killed at Tobruk and who was the first Australian soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in the last war. The Grand Lodge indulged in quite a discussion over the question of electioneering. The Board of Purposes had recommended a section making it a serious offense; their brethren did not see the necessity for the amendment. The words "totalitarism" and "dictatorship" were frequently used in the discussion. At any rate the amendment was carried. The Grand Master reported there was much complaint over lodges which had never had a visit from a Grand Master; he called attention to the fact that if the Grand Master attended six lodge meetings per week, at the end of twelve months he would have visited only half of the lodges in the jurisdiction. A special thanksgiving service of Grand Lodge was held at Sydney, May 17,1945, to commemorate the termination of the war in Europe. New Zealand: Sir Cyril Newall presided over the fifty-sixth annual communication of this Grand Lodge, meeting November 28, 1945, and resigned after a splendid war record, his successor being Ethelbert C. Smith. By official act, Grand Lodge placed on record its appreciation of the hospitality extended to brethren who were overseas with the 2nd New Zealand Expedition Forces. All brethren spoke most highly of the reception afforded them by lodges in Cairo and other parts of Egypt. These loJges work under English Constitution in a District Grand Lodge of Egypt and the Sudan; other lodges in Egypt work under Scottish and Greek Constitutions, all of which came in for thanks. There was formed a Second New Zealand Expenditionary Force Masonic Association. Membership in New Zealand, June 30, 1945, was 29,556. Queensland: On December 31, 1945, this Grand Lodge numbered 21,964 members. The Grand Master, Rt. Hon. Sir Leslie Orme Wilson,


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has been replaced by Eustace Alfred Jones, who was made a Mason thirty-four years ago in the Duke of Leinster Lodge, working under Irish Constitution but now of the Grand Lodge of Queensland. The Grand Lodge donated $1,000.00 toward the Food for Britain fund, with the proviso "that the food to be purchased shall be used only to supplement the rations of people in Great Britain." A special communication of the Grand Lodge was held in Brisbane, February 27, 1946, to pay tribute to Grand Master Wilson, who was leaving the country after having served as a representative of His Majesty, the King, for a period of fourteen years, twelve of which he had presided over the Grand Lodge. After a flood of speeches, the Grand Master responded, thanking his associates for having raised $5,000.00 for a charity fund kl}own as the Sir Leslie Orme Wilson Fund. He expected to be back in England in time to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of the lodge in which he was made a Freemason; His Majesty, the King, is a Past Master of this lodge. An interesting feature of one of the communications of the Grand Lodge was an aadress by Dr. B. L. Clarke, on Masonic Acvtivities in a P.O.W. Camp; he was a member of an Australian general hospital staff captured two days before the fall of Singapore. He said it took the Japanese ten days to put the group behind the wire and two months for the group to clean up and put the place in order. It seems there were 14,000 Australians and 25,000 British taken prisoner at Singapore. They were sent to Changi, eighteen miles distant; here a movement was started to hold Masonic lodge meetings. Among the prisoners was a Deputy Grand Master of the Eastern Archipelago, a Past Grand Senior Warden of England. The lodge had eight assistants armed with wood and stones, whose duty it was to throw the stones on the roof in case of- the approach of the Japanese. Then, if necessary, they would sing a well known hymn and carryon as if it were a church meeting. Two meetings a month were held and seating accommodations were limited to 200 per meeting, for the J aps would allow no more than 25 to congregate without guards except for church service. There were representatives of twelve Grand Lodges and six hundred daughter lodges in the group, including Americans, Dutch, Javanese, Chinese, and, after the Italian surrender, the J aps brought in 800 Italians. Finally the Japanese discovered an attendance book which belonged to one of the old Singapore lodges; the meeting had to be abandoned for they had located one man in the camp whose name was mentioned in the attendance book; he was treated very badly and subjected to many oriental methods of torture. In the end they threw him in jail, gave him a long period of solitary confinement, as a result of which his health broke. A medal was struck and the Grand Lodge has been asked for permission to wear it at regular functions. The Grand Lodge decided to form a Masonic Choir in Brisbane, the nucleus for which is already


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available. The brethren were very pleased with the forty voices which sang at the opening of Grand Lodge. A plan is on foot to provide for a levy of 40c per year per member for a fund to assist lodges in building, repairing, or discharging present liabilities on temples; the Grand Lodge itself has recently liquidated all liabilities on its present temple. The building was completed and dedicated in December, 1930, the total cost being little more than one-half million dollars. It is said to be the most beautiful Masonic building in the Southern Hemisphere and stands as a memorial to those gallant men who gave their lives in the first World War. South Australia: The last figures on the Grand Lodge of South Australia are for the period ending June 30, 1945-16,175 members; this marks the highest spot in membership. Tpe Grand Lodge was established April 17, 1884, and there are 158 lodges. The Grand Lodge expressed official congratulations to Justice Ligertwood, Past Deputy Grand Master, upon his appointment as Judge of the Supreme Court of South Australia. The Board of General Purposes was disturbed to learn that in some lodges it was the practice of the Master, prior to the ballot on a candidate, to invite the brethren to express their opinions for or against him. The Board believed it served no good purpose, but was a grave violation of the secrecy of the ballot. The Grand Lodge approved the recommendation of the Board of General Purposes that a loan be made to a lodge out of the general fund, not to exceed $2,500.00, to discharge the lodges bank overdraft, the amount to be free of interest, repayable on demand. The action arose over pressing necessity; an overdraft had been created in connection with the purchase of a temple and the interest burden was difficult to meet. At the installation of Justice Ligertwood as Grand Master there were representatives from New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and Queensland; the installation banquet was attended by 160 brethren. Tasmania: The Grand Lodge met in Fifty-fifth Annual Communication on February 23, 1946. From the proceedings we learn that an address of welcome from the Freemasons of Tasmania was presented to H.R.H., the Duke of Gloucester, who, as Governor-General of the Commonwealth, arrived on April 19, 1945. Formal meetings were arranged for His Excellency, Sir Ernest Clark, prior to his departure for Great Britain, after a sojourn of twelve years. Masonic thanksgiving services were held on the cessation of the war in Europe. It was reported that $40.00 had been received from the President Kamiri Masonic Club in Dutch New Guiana to be used for benevolent purposes. The Club was a branch of the Ming Club (Masons in New Guiana), composed of 278 brethren from various Constitutions. The Grand Lodge membership, June 30, 1945, was 4,899. Western Australia: Total membership reported for the year ending 1945 was 13,116; Grand Lodge has completed its forty-fifth year. On May 27, 1945, this Grand Lodge held a Masonic thanksgiving


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service in the theatre at Perth; present were visitors from the District Grand Lodge of Western Australia, held under the Grand Lodge of Scotland; in the list was W. W. Raad, Grand Master of the District Grand Lodge. The Grand Master disapproves of the custom which has grown up at installations of breaking into the ceremony with a solo; he finds that sometimes the solo is moderately appropriate, sometimes not at all appropriate. During the war another custom had grown up of initiating sons of Freemasons, who were under the legal age of twenty-one; he believes that now they should revert to the old practice, which he thinks is the sound practice in Freemasonry. He advocates the return to the evening dress worn in Australian lodges, but is willing to postpone action until brethren shall have had an opportunity to secure evening dress. One of the brethren inquired: "While you are on the matter of dress, I would like you to explain to the brethren the way to conform to proper dress." To which the Grand Master said: "Anybody who has a dinner jacket should wear a black tie; if he wears a white tie he is committing a solacism unforgiveable in ordinary society." A widows and orphans fund now amounts to $350,000.00. An intimation is given of a more cooperative feeling when District Grand Master Raad, of the Scottish Constitution, said: "I want to make a confession and admission. Since I have been here I have received a communication from the Grand Lodge of Scotland and it is their desire that they would prefer to be at friendship and relationship with the Grand Lodge of Western Australia, rather than retain their own lodges in thi8 State."

To which the Grand Master said: "I am pleased at what Brother Raad remarked and to know that the Grand Lodge which he represents in this State, and whose lodges we are always hoping will join with us, is now beginning to see the wisdom of one universal Craft in all the Dominions under the British Crown. It means solidarity, it means ability to work with a greater and strengthened Craft." . WHAT ABOUT EGYPT AND SYRIA?

Egypt and her Grand Lodges will always be a problem. And so will the grand lodges which are being formed under her wing, since they inherit the jealousies and private quarrels of the older grand lodge. The Grand Lodge and the Grand Orient of Egypt are putting forth every effort to extend their jurisdiction and are seeking to secure as much recognition as possible to bolster up their own claims to legitimacy. With them it is a question of desire for power and influence by certain discontented elements who are anxious to head the grand lodge; this causes secession, new coalitions, secession, coalition, etc. At the present time the dispute appears to be over the


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dissatisfaction of certain elements, discontented because in the District Grand Lodge they were not favored with coveted positions. Dr. Mustafa Fakhri Bey is an optician from the City of Damascus; he had disagreed with the Egyptian lodges and was expelled by them. He is not recognized as an outstanding personality in that section of the world. Mr. Nagea, actively mentioned, is an employe of the Customs Administration, and he too was expelled for similar reasons. THE SYRIAN LEBANESE GRAND LODGE

Nagea and a certain Hassan Louze, Depute Grand Master, differed with the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Egypt, Mohammed Rifaat Bey, because they were not given certain responsible positions in the District Grand Lodge Thereupon they seceded from the Egyptian group and formed the Syrian Lebanese Grand Lodge; at the meeting mentioned, not more than ten members were present. Now the situation has changed somewhat. Louze has become friendly with the Grand Secretary of Egypt and recently visited Egypt to adjust matters. The following lodges are known to exist under the Syrian Lebanese group: In, Beirut, Lebanon.. Lebanon, Istikal, AI-Wafa, AI-Riad, Armenian. In, Damascus. Omaya, Maaref, Name not known.

Egyptian Grand Lodges have lodges working in the same cities: In, Beirut. Rasheed, Beirut, Soliman, Hikmet. In, Damascus. Zahrat Dimcshk, Omaya, Ahrar, EI-Aziz.

Lodges working under Scotland and those holding from the Grand Lodge of New York are said to have no relationship with these lodges. Lebanon Lodge working in Beirut under the Mastership of Honein Kattini bears a good reputation; it is understood that he has seceded from Syrian Lebanese to form a Grand Lodge of Lebanon. RECENT NEWS FROM THE PHILIPPINES

Newly elected Grand Master of the Philippine Island Grand Lodge is Emilio P. Virata. He succeeds Michael Goldenberg. Bro. Virata was born in General Trias, Cavite, and studied in the Liceo de Manila, graduating in the Manila High School in 1909. He received the LL. B. degree from the University of the Philippines, passed the bar examination in 1915, and has since been engaged in the practice of law. He served as Representative in the Fifth Philippine legislature and later became Governor of Cavite Province. He visited the United States as a member of the Philippine Parliamentary Mission. Before the war he was a special investigator for President Quezon. In May, 1942, he organized the Noli Club, Masons being charter members, organized as a movement to resist the Japanese invasion.


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It later became the Cavite United Free Guerrilla force. He became Judge Advocate General with the rank of Lt. Colonel. He was initiated in Magdalo Lodge No. 371 under the Grand Orient of Spain, is a member of Manila Square and Compass Club, a Hero of Bataan, National Sojourner and Hero of '76. He is a Past Master of Ibarra Lodge No. 31. * * * * The Plaridel Templ~ in Manila at 520 Marcelino, was opened December 26, 1946, having been defiled by the Japanese in 1942, and finally destroyed in February, 1945. THAT PERU MESS

Appearing in the New Age magazine for February, 1947, was this: Under date of November 29, 1946, a letter from Carlos E. Espinosa, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Peru, stated that the best of relations exist now between the Grand Lodge and the Supreme Council of that country. The Grand Master of the Grand Lodge is Edgardo Portaro, and the Grand Commander of the Supreme Council is Manuel Y. Davila. The dissidents who left the regular organization and tried to establish a Rose Croix Chapter outside the Supreme Council, and two or three symbolic lodges, were unsuccessful in making any progress, and have about ceased their activities. The regular Grand Lodge and the Supreme Council have simply ignore.d them.

Your reviewer is not interested as a reviewer in the acts of the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite in Peru, but he is interested in the work of Symbolic Masonry. Espinosa is the secretary of the group which a few years ago broke into the temples of the legitimate Masonic group, tore off the locks and set up a new Grand Lodge; he represents the irregular group, and by use of the word "irregular" we mean just that-it is certainly irregular for any Masonic group to act as this group is said to have done in setting up a new Grand Lodge. And when Espinosa says "the best of relations exist now between the Grand Lodge and the Supreme Council" he conveys the impression that such a condition did not always exist, when as a matter of fact these two groups represent the same element. Espinosa's Supreme Council and his Grand Lodge are one and the same group. His statement is misleading. A. Solari Saco is Grand Master of the legitimate Grand Lodge and H. Polar Ramos is the Grand Secretary. Those who believe in Symbolic Masonry will not be deceived. DOWN IN RIO

Last year the Grand Lodge of Missouri extended recognition to the Grand Lodge of Rio Janeiro, first of the Brazilian Grand Lodges to be recognized in this jurisdiction. Mot of the regular Grand Lodges of Brazil are new and made up of 'parts of the old Grand Orient of Brazil which for many years dom-


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inated Freemasonry in that country. No one ever understood the structure of Freemasonry of that territory, made up of various rites, degrees, cabinets and supreme councils. Evidently the Masons themselves tired of this arrangement, so that in 1927 most of the states in Brazil set up their own Grand Lodge working under democratic policies. Outstanding among these groups in our estimation is the Grand Lodge of Rio de Janeiro, founded June 22, 1.927, under conditions above stated. This Grand Lodge is a separate and distinct entity for the Federal District of the City of Rio de Janeiro, much as vVashington, D. C., is to its Federal District. Its address is Rua do Carmo No. 64, 1ct floor, Rio de Janeiro; its mailing address is Caixa Postal 2215. Seven hundred and seventy-five members compose the ten lodges working under this Grand Lodge: Silence No.1 (The only English speaking Lodge in Brazil). Urias No.2 Luis de Cameos No.3 Estrela do Norte No. 7 Adonai No. Sete de Setembro No. Mario Behring No. 25 Philantropis e Ordem No. Maya No. 17 Humanitas No. 22

The Grand Lodge was organized in 1927 from the lodges: Silence No. 1 Urias No.2 Luiz de Cameos No.3 Imparcialidade e Caridade No.4 18 de Julho No.6 Estrela do Norte No. 7

Our informant makes the following statement about the formation of the Grand Lodge: As there was no other Grand Lodge which could issue a Dispensation or Charter, the Supreme Council of the 33째 of Brazil, A.A.S.R. recognized by the Supreme Councils of U.S.A. Northern and Southern jurisdictions, issued the necessary Charter, thus forming the new Grand Lodge of Rio de Janeiro, A. F. & A. M. for the Federal District of Rio de Janeiro; the newly chartered G. L. then proceeded and did elect its officers. . . . It then and there became a separate entity. The Supreme Council which issued the Charter immediately and everafter released the control, and to this day, the Supreme Council A.A.S.R. of Brazil, and the Grand Lodge of Rio de Janeiro are two separate and distinct entities.

Actually, the Grand Lodge could have been organized without an intermediary, since custom usually accords that right to three or more lodges. Cmmunications of the Grand Lodge are held June 22, September 22, and March 22, officers being elected at the meeting of June 22, The Grand Lodge has a printed constitution but it is in Portuguese,


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the government forbidding the printing of matter other than in Portuguese language. From our informant we learn more of the Grand Orient of Brazil which once controlled all Freemasonry: The Grand Orient of Brazil is a purely political machine. Further, when a man has become Master of a Lodge, he is immediately raised to the 18째 without taking any intermediate degrees ... they make Masons of men regardless of character ... for these reasons the Grand Lodges of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Bahia, Rio Grande do SuI, Paraiba, Ceara, Para, Minas Geraes, and Amazonas separated from the Grand Orient.

The Grand Lodge is in relationship with Arizona, California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Washington, and Missouri. It will be noticed that one of the lodges in the jurisdiction of Rio de Janeiro is Mario Behring. Behring was an outstanding Brazilian Masonic leader and largely responsible for the break from Grand Orient; he was anxious to place Brazilian Freemasonry on an equal standing with symbolic lodges throughout the world. As a first step he insisted that the election of a Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite and that of Grand Master of Symbolic Masonry should be conducted separately; it had been the practice to give both offices to one man. Opposition came from the political members and from Modern Rite lodges. The rank and file prevailed, and Behring was elected Grand Commander and Dr. Fonseca Hermes, Grand Master. Behring moved to have the Grand Master made independent of the overlordship of the Supreme Council; the opposition tried to have. Hermes retire. Without consulting Behring, the opposition elected and installed Dr. Octavio Kelly as Grand Master of the Grand Orient. Kelly's first act was to void the treaty, thereby making his election as Grand Master create him automatically the Grand Commander of the Supreme Council, whereupon Behring broke off all relations with the Grand Orient. Seven lodges followed Behring, moving out of the Grand Orient building and abandoning all vested interests therein. This movement was imitated by lodges in other states and it is easily possible that in due time grand lodges will be established in at least twenty other states. An American, Bro. L. B. Love, is Master of Silence No.1 which uses the York Rite ritual and works in English; he has recently returned to California after military service in Brazil. Brazilian Freemasonry comes largely from the French branch; what is not French is closely allied to Scottish Rite ritual. As a cohesive organization, Freemasonry there dates from January 18, 1883, when a -pacification of rites and degrees was perfected. Of course,


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Masonry of a kind, existed there long previous to that date, and there is a record of a so-called "unification" in 1860. The Grand Orient of France established a lodge in Brazil as early as November, 1815; it lasted a short time, was revived in 1821, but closed again in 1822 by order of Dom Pedro, Grand Master, and Emperor of Brazil. The Supreme Council of Belgium next took a hand, establishing a Supreme Council which split and died out. Since 1883, there have existed the following: (1) A Supreme Council, exercising ritualistic control over the Scottish Rite bodies. (2) The Grand Chapter of the Modern Rite, with ritualistic control over the degrees of the French Modern Rite of seven degrees, and said to be atheistic in character. (3) The Grand Chapter of the Noachites, a rite of thirteen degrees. (4) The Grand Chapter of the York Rite, with its three degrees.

Each of the above groups had thirty-three (active) members, which appeared to form a supreme board which governed the whole of Freemasonry. Fifty-six degrees controlled by 1:-32 members! England enters the situation by having a District Grand Lodge in Northern South Ameriea, reporting in 1939, 10 lodges, two of which are in the Rio de Janeiro District. It is generally understood that the Grand Lodge 0 f ~ngland has a treaty with the Grand Orient, and, while this treaty prevails, it is hardly possible they will see fit to recognize any of the State Grand Lodges. \Ve cannot reconcile the English policy in South Ameriea except through political expediency, which is never truly Masonic. \Vhile such conditions prevail, it would seem that England should offer little criticism to the recognition of other groups witl\ a much better background than the Grand Orient -of Brazil. MEXICO

Many American Freemasons took advantage of the Triennial meeting of the Grand Encampment, Knights Templar at Houston, Texas, to journey over into Mexico for a vacation. Among these was our own Frank C. Barnhill, P.G.M. who has written us an interesting account of his visit to Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico. \Ve prefer to quote Bro. Barnhill's words: In the lobby of our hotel one evening we were offered the choice of two trips, (1) to join a personally conducted tour of the night clubs of the city at a cost of $50.00 per person, or (2) a visit to the Gran Logia, Valle de Mexico. Thirty of us chose to visit the Grand Lodge. We took taxis to the lodge hall and were admitted by the tiler at the outer door, to the secretary's office; the grand secretary called in the Grand Master, Alfonso Rivera Perez, a fine looking man, about 50, who greeted us with a hearty handshake-and in Spanish. While we could not understand his words, we did feel that he was giving us a cordial welcome. He called in the Grand Junior Warden, Dr. Jose Rosenberg, a physician, who speke good English and acted as interpreter. They examined our


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lodge cards and looked up our jurisdictions, then conducted us into the main lodge room. A goodly attendance was present, and it being 8 p. m. the lodge was opened by the officers, all speaking Spanish. Gran Maestro Perez gave an enthusiastic address of welcome, the substance of which was that the Gran Logia was honored by the visit. He expressed his high regards for the Masons of U.S.A., for our country in general, and for our President. He mentioned the difficulties experienced by Freemasons in Mexico, but that Mexico was entering a new era of relationships in which Freemasons would play an important part, especially in securing greater education for the people. He said plans were on foot to erect a Grand Lodge Temple in Mexico City which would be in keeping with the dignity of the fraternity. Past Grand Master Gayle of Louisiana and myself, both P.G.M.'s were invited to seats in the East. Fifteen jurisdictions were represented and when lodge was closed we were personally greeted by each of the members. FRANCE NATIONAL GRAND LODGE

Vie have been wondering what happened to the National Grand Lodge of France. It must have gone underground during the German . occupation, because it had not emerged at the time the American Masonic Mission visited France in 1945. Since it is the only Masonic group recognized by England and most of the American States, its doings are of immediate interest. Now we hear that the Grande Loge N atwnale de France, for such is its title, has been revived and again at work. It has recently chartered another lodge, Esperance No. 35, and it was consecrated Saturday May 3, 1947, at a temporary meeting place, 7 Cite d'Antin, Paris, ge, under direction of the Provincial Grand Master of the Province of Neustrie. The new lodge is made up of 25 Frenchmen and one Englishman. Several visitors from England attended the consecration and a dinner was served at Cercle Republicain, Avenue de L'Opera, Paris. DANES OBSERVE BI-CENTENNIAL

The Bi-Centenary celebration of the National Grand Lodge of Denmark took place in the City of Copenhagen October 24-26, 1946, attended by delegations from several Grand Lodges. It was not an observance of a Grand Lodge bi-centenary, but an observance of the bi-centenary Lodge, St. John's and Zorobabel and Frederick of the Crowned Hope. The lodge was said to have been warranted by the Grand Lodge of England October 25,1745. Since the Lodge was constituted it had consolidated under the above name under which it has operated since 1788. The celebration was to have been held in 1945 but the war situation necessitated postponement. His Majesty, King Christian X, Grand Master, had intended to preside over the celebration but not having fully recovered from a fall which he suffered several months previous was compelled to forego the pleasure. However, the aged King did receive representatives of Grand Lodges at his castle. He has since died.


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On the 24th the Lodge was opened in the First Degree at the Freemason's Hall, now restored, and all visiting representatives were received by the Pro Grand Master, H.R.H. Prince Harald. The work was done in the Danish language and according to the Swedish Rite which differs much from the ceremonies we are accustomed to see in English and American bodies. The actual Bi-Centenary Celebration took place on the 25th and was presided over by Prince Harald, attended by 800 brethren, and in the great Ceremonial Hall. Hundreds of brethren were prevented from participating because of lack of seating space. 'Vhile the celebration was that of the bi-centenary of a lodge, yet it was also a commemoration of the return of Masonic properties which had been taken over by the Germans for several years. From the Freemason's Chronicle (London) we quote: There had been formed in 1743, at Copenhagen, its first Lodge by a member of the "Three Globes" of Berlin, without apparent authority, and after assuming two years later, the title of St. Martin, it applied to the Grand Lodge of England for a Warrant which was granted in 1749 as No. 204, and first appeared in the Engraved List the following year. Hardly had it been established than three members resigned and formed another under the name of Zerubbabel in 1744, applying forthwith for a Warrant to the Grand Lodge of England, but impatient at the delay shown in granting it, they approached the then English Provincial Grand Master for Lower Saxony at Hamburg, who also seemed to have been dilatory, causing them once more to apply to London. Soon afterwards a Dispensation was received from Hamburg, and on the 25th of October, 1745, Lord Cranstoun, then Grand Master of England, signed the Warrant, the Lodge being shown in the Engraved List for 1750, as the "New Lodge, Copenhagen No. 197." In 1749 Lord Byron, Grand Master of England, granted a patent for the formation of a Provincial Gran~ Lodge of Denmark and Norway, the Provincial Grand Master being Count Danneskiold Laurvig, a Dane, and his Deputy, curiously enough the Russian Ambassador, in Copenhagen, Baron Korff.

Then there was a strange turn of events, for about 1765, the Rite of "Strict Observance" came on the field. Shubart, a propagandist for the Rite showed up in Copenhagen that year in an attempt to saddle his Rite upon craft Masonry. A German Baron, von Hund, first established the Rite in 1754; it consisted of six degrees, the first three being those of craft Masonry. It was apparently an attempt to secure a restoration of Templar properties. It was an organization of Jesuit conception and no doubt controlled by them. The English Lodge disappeared from the English Roll in 1769; St. Martin Lodge had united with Zorobabbel of the Strict Observance to establish "Zorobabbel of the North Star" working both in German and in Danish, but in November, 1778, a purely Danish Lodge, "Frederick of the Crowned Hope" entered the scene, and ten years later all of these lodges united under the name "Zorobabbel of the Crown{3d Hope."


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When the National Grand Lodge of Denmark was founded in 1792, it came under the latter jurisdiction. King Christian VII recognized Freemasonry on condition that all of the lodges should recognize Prince Karl as Grand Master, since which time the Royal family has always had official connection with the Grand Lodge. Although the head of Danish Freemasonry at the time, the Prince of Wales in England, appointed Prince Karl, February 6, 1793, as "Provincial Grand Master of Denmark and Norway/' Grand Secretary Troedsson, writing from Denmark to Grand Secretary Stockwell of North Dakota, answering an inquiry about the Grand Lodge of Denmark, says: You ask about an institution styling itself Grand Lodge of Denmark, at 33 Smallegade, Copenhagen. My reply is that it is a spurious affair, which we do not recognize, and which is not recognized by the Grand Lodge of England, or by other regular European Grand Lodges. It was born under the auspices of some French lodge, which we do not recognize either, and unfortunately, when we had our name registered, it was omitted to register the name" Grand Lodge of Denmark." The Smallegade people discovered this defect and were not slow in adopting that registration. The omission has caused us a lot of trouble, and has made it necessary for us to adopt the name of "The National Grand Lodge of Denmark." The so-called Grand Lodge is only a very small lodge with a membership of about 200 people and was founded only a few years ago.

PRESENT SITUATION IN ITALY

The report to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts on Italian Freemasonry is so very full and complete that we are substituting it for material which we had prepared. Having visited the Grand Orient officials in 1945 we can verify all this committee has reported. The report is signed by some nationally known Freemasons, including Melvin M. Johnson, Roscoe Pound, Claude Allen and the Grand Secretary, Frank Hilton. ITALY

Your Committee on Foreign Relations has had a very voluminous correspondence with various organizations in Italy claiming to be legitimate Grand Lodges. All but three have been readily eliminated. These three are: (1st) The Grand Orient of Italy, known as the Palazzo Giustiniani group, and of which Dr. Guido Laj, Vice-Mayor of Rome is Grand Master, with its see at Rome. (2nd) Another group known as the via della Mercede group, with its see at Rome. (3rd) A group with its see at Bari.

Before the war, the first two groups were recognized by different Grand Lodges in this Country. The via della Mercede group descends from the group of which the dominant member was one Raoul V. Palermi, who was Sovereign


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Grand Commander of a Supreme Council which was recognized by the two Supreme Councils of the United States. 'When Mussolini obtained control of Italy, Palermi dissolved and deserted his Masonic affiliations and obtained an office under Mussolini. lie became officially a Fascist and remained such until the overthrow of Fascism in Italy. Meanwhile, he contrived to have a representative attend the International Conference of Supreme Councils at Brussels in 1935, at a time when no man could safely be known as a Mason in Italy. This representative was not admitted as a delegate, however. The Chairman of your Committee was present at the time, and even then viewed with great suspicion anyone who came out of Italy with papers authorizing him to go to another country to attend any Masonic meeting. Obviously, he was sent merely as a spy. The group headed by Palermi consisted not merely of the Supreme Council over which he presided but, also, of the Grand Lodge then known as of the Piazzi di Gesu. The Supreme Council dominated and controlled the Grand Lodge officially. The Grand Lodge was not then and is not now a sovereign body but subservient to the Supreme Council. It is well known that the Grand Lodges of this Country, however, will not recognize a Grand Lodge which is not sovereign but which is subject to a Supreme Council. It is true that in many countries, particularly in South America, the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite has been the missionary which carried to and preserved Freesonry in those countries. There it worked and controlled the Symbolic Degrees, as well as the so-called Higher Degrees. However, in every country where a legitimate Grand Lodge is organized and recognized, the Supreme Council should always utterly relinquish control or domination over such Grand Lodge and the symbolic degrees so long as it remains true to the landmarks as a genuine Grand Lodge of Masons. In view of the foregoing, the Supreme Council for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction withdrew its recognition of Palermi and his Supreme Council, which contained not only Fascists but some who were opposed to Fascism. Palermi and his fellow Fascists who survived the destruction of the Mussolini regime now seek to regain control of Freemasonry in Italy, and their influence is behind the present via della Mercede group. A very considerable investigation has been made of those who compose this group and, without specifications unless they are called for, your Committee advises that they are entitled to no consideration by this Grand Lodge. The principal former members of this group, who have maintained Masonic ideals, are now associated with the group located at Palazzo Giustiniani. The Bari, or third group named above, is a smaller group which does not appeal to your Committee either by reason of its descent or its standing.


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The Palazzo Giustiniani group, which takes its name from its place of meeting, is the one which your Committee recommends as the one which should have recognition. It is known as the Grand Orient of Italy. The words "Grand Orient" have two different significant Masonic interpretations. The one applicable to this group, however, is entirely synonomous with its alternate name, namely: the Grand Lodge of Italy. Its present Grand Master, elected last November, is M. W. Bro. Guido Laj, who also happens to be Vice-Mayor of Rome. Its other officers then elected are: Lieut. Grand Master Grand Secretary Senior Warden Junior Warden ~rand Orator Grand Treasurer

W. Bro. Prof. Ugo Della Seta, Deputy to the Constituent House Wro. Bro. Guido Francocci W roo Bro. Umberto Cipollone Wro. Bro. Giuseppe Angeleri Wor. Bro. Ottorino Petroni Wro. Bro. Publio Cortini

The members of this group show a legitimate Masonic heritage. This Grand Orient is a sovereign body and yields no power or authority to any Supreme Councilor other overlord than the law of the land. Its Constitutions have been submitted to and examined carefully by the Chairman of your Committee. We find from their Constitutions and by their assurances, that this Grand Orient complies fully with the requirements of Article 712 of our Grand Constitutions. Its officers and some of its leading members are personally known to Worshipful Bro. L. A. Jenny, of Dumont, New Jersey, who was a ~lonel in the U. S. Army and stationed in Italy for two years. While orks for Italy, and he there, he was Allied Minister of Public made careful investigation of the Masonic situation. He has furnished your Chairman in great detail with information concerning the various organizations in Italy, claiming to be Masonic; and his lengthy discussion may be summarized by the following quotation from a letter dated January 7, 1947:

'V

"My feeling is that the Grand Orient has acted correctly and that it and its members are regular Masons deserving recognition. ' ,

In the same letter, he also wrote: "It is hard to explain the great influence any recognition of American Grand Lodges will have upon the true Masonic body in Italy. Such a recognition will help to give them the standing needed for a unification of all good and true Masons into one great Grand Lodge and thus, jointly, united in the fight which they must wage against illegitimate upstarts. It is for that reason, and my own personal knowledge of the condition existing in Italy, that I strongly urge the early recognition of the Grand Orient of Italy, the only Grand Lodge there which, to my mind, deserves our recognition."

In the Spring of 1945, the Masonic Service Association sent a Commission to Europe to study Masonic conditions with a view particularly to help us determine what we could do by way of aid and re-


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habilitation. This Commission consisted of M. W. Ray V. Denslow, Past Grand Master of Missouri, Chairman; M. W. Charles H. J ohnson, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary of New York; M. W. Claude J. McAllister, Past Grand Master of Montana; and Worshipful George E. Bushnell, Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Grand Lodge of Michigan. They made a personal investigation in Italy, as a result of which they unanimously recommended the recognition of the Palazzo Giustiniani group. All other information which we have received leads to the same conclusion. A letter from W. Bro. Cortini, who conducts the foreign correspondence of the Grand Orient, contains some language so important that we quote it, as follows: "What we are actually looking for, over any material help, is esteem and the full certitude that our American brethren consider us as the proper fighters for liberty and democracy, the two ideals for which we fought since our childhood and especially during the Fascist period. During this long period we accustomed our souls to the sufferings and our body to the sacrifice, but now that we come back to liberty and democracy, our only wish is to feel ourselves free men in a free country. This is our real banner and our only aim. "It is quite necessary that the ritual American jurisdictions of North and South and the Grand Lodges of all the States give, as soon as possible, a juridical form to the Italian Masonry. If you esteem that there is another Italian Masonic family which deserves your confidence, and has more rights than we, give your recognition to it, but for God's sake do not waste time I Two years have been lost for this aim, and in Italy lVe need to find ourselves again, and be united if we want that the real ~fa足 sons collaborate and work, hand in hand, for the aims which are common to all Masonic families."

The Grand Lodge of South Carolina has already recognized this Grand Orient of Italy. . Your Committee believes it will be of great value to the cause of Freemasonry, to the restoration and preservation of liberty in Italy,indeed the restoration of freedom: civil, religious and intellectual, in that oppressed Country,-to grant recognition. We therefore recommend that this Grand Lodge recognize the Grand Orient of Italy, of which M. W. Bro. Guido Laj is Grand Mtlster, as the only Masonic Grand Lodge of that Country and authorize the opening of fraternal correspondence and the exchange of Representatives with said Grand Orient. THE BALKANS

Bulgaria. Freemasonry in the Balkans has always been a source of trouble. Often the subject of persecution, it appears that sueh persecution has been officially inspired by governmental authorities. George Dimitrov, a Bulgarian Communist leader, has recently written an article in which the statement is made "Freemasons' Lodges


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are agencies of alien espionage and treachery" which should give us an idea of the manner in which our fraternity is regarded in the satellite nations of the Soviet. Dimitrov adds this: Masonic Lodges are being revived in our country and are rallying old Freemasons and trying to recruit new ones from the ranks of the public workers and politicians. These lodges are the centers of alien espionage and treachery. They are a menace to the freedom and independence of our people and our country. Every effort should be put forth to liquidate these nests of antagonism, and everyone should realize clearly that it is impossible to be a Bulgarian politician, public worker, minister, deputy, leader of political party or of a social organization and at the same time be a Freemason.

Jugoslavia. June 9, 1919, shortly after the signing of the Treaty ending the first World War, there was established the "Grand Lodge of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, Yugoslavia." The name is a long one, and the races of people which made it up even more pretentious. It is doubtful whether it functions at the present time. The Grand Lodge thus formed was made up of at least six lodges which had been working under other jurisdictions; four of the lodges were daughters of the Symbolic Grand Lodge of Hungary, one under the Grand Orient of Italy, and one from the Grand Lodge of Hamburg (Germany). It is said that some of the lodges, before the Grand Lodge was formed, had placed themselves under the Supreme Council A.A.S.R. of Serbia, but all were released from their fidelity upon the formation of the grand lodge. The Constitution of the Grand Lodge Alpina of Switzerland was taken as a guide for the new Grand Lodge in setting up its constitution. A Supreme Council had been formed in Serbia in 1912 and generally recognized. Of this organization and its powers, Georges \Veifert, 33째, Sov. Grand Commander, writing April 17, 1918, says:

,

Masonry in Serbia being yet not very numerous, we deemed it best to form only a Supreme Masonic authority-the Supreme Council without forming a Grand Lodge. Taking for our model the Supreme Council of Belgium, which while governing the high degrees, has at the same time under its direct obedience also the symbolic lodges, we have constituted a Supreme Council A.A.S.R. which governs the philosophic degrees and also the symbolic degrees as has been the case during the past hundred years in many countries.

Within less than a year after this letter was written, Grand Master Weifert, Sovereign Grand Commander, writing as the Grand Master of the newly formed Grand Lodge invited the recognition of "All Masonic Powers of the World" stating that the new Grand Lodge had been formed, that its See was in Belgrade, and that they "work only to the third degree. By this time the Grand Lodge had grown to 11 lodges and 442 members. \Vriting March 1, 1921, Weifert says:


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The foundation of our seven lodges is of different dates: One lodge was founded in 1883 from the Grand Orient of Italy. Another was created by the Grand Lodge of Hungary in 1890. The third was created by the Grand Lodge of Hamburg in 1910. The fourth has been created by our Grand Lodge. The remaining three have also been founded by the Grand Lodge of Hungary in 1910. But all of them together after having received permission joined and come under the protection of this Grand Lodge. After this, two new lodges have been created in Belgrade and Zagreb under the protection of the same Grand Lodge. Consequently there are at present in all 9 lodges: Belgrade 4 Zagreb 3 Ossek 1 Skoplje 1 Before the war there had been in Belgrade a lodge working under the Grand Orient of France; it works no more and had no home.

There was a period in the life of Freemasonry in Serbia when the Masonic groups were forced to take refuge elsewhere. They selected the address "8 Rue de Puteaux" \vhich is the home of the Grand Lodge of France. We have a letter of January 30, 1947, from D. Tomitch, 119, Rue Cardinet, Paris XVII, referring to correspondence had in 1935, wherein he had drawn our attention to the propaganda then going on against Freemasonry. The former letter had called attention to the close relationship between a murder of a Freemason ordered by Mussolini and the assassination of the Austrian Chancellor Dollfus, ordered by Hitler. The former murder, he hinted, was a strange connivance of the Vatican in which Freemasonry was accused to focus attention elsewhere than upon the church. Since that time several Fascist and Nazi leaders have admitted the murders to have been carried out by the Italian government. Pavelitch, who organized the murder, was made head of the Croatian state under Italian occupation. Tomitch has issued a pamphlet on atrocities in Jugoslavia in which he presents evidence to show that the clergy took a direct part in the atrocities; he believes that almost a million Jews and Greek orthodox victims suffered at their hands. And neither the Vatican, nor clergy, did anything to stop the crimes or punish the priests responsible. SOME mREGULAR HAPPENINGS

Co-Masonry. Some of our readers may not have heard of "CoMasonry." It may be best they have not, for it is an irregular group which may be included as Masonic clandestine bodies, since it claims to confer Masonic degrees and descent from French Masonic bodies. We have a brochure from the society which refers to its title as "The International Co-Masonic Order." Its head in this country appears to be Mrs. Edith Armour, 33째. From the pamphlet we learn:


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When the first Grand Lodge of Modern Masonry, in London, adopted its first Constitution, in 1723, it decided that women would not be admitted to membership. This was probably a wise decision since it was in accord with the attitude towards women and a true reflection of the period. However, the ,position of women in the life of nations as well as general attitude of men towards them have been changing gradually during the last two centuries. . . . During the latter half of the nineteenth century several French Masons who were also interested in the feminist movement, urged the admission of women into Masonry ... in 1883 this agitation resulted in the application for membership in the Lodge Les Libres Penseurs (Lodge of Free Thought), at La Pecq, near Paris, of Marie Deraismes, a writer and lecturer in behalf of women's rights. The Lodge, working under the recently formed Symbolie Grand Lodge of France, asked for authorization to enter this woman and was refused. The Lodge then withdrew from the Grand Lodge it had helped to form and proceeded to carry out the innovation. Marie Deraismes was made a Mason in accordance with the rules of the lodge in the presence of a large number of notable visitors attracted by the new procedure. [We are not surprised at the crowd; such an event in this country, if permitted, would produce some excitement!] [French Masonry, however, was not yet ready for such a forward ('-Ed) step. The lodge lost its standing and soon became dormant.] In 1883, Dr. Georges Martin, a French Senator and ardent feminist, who had been present at the initiation of Marie Deraismes, persuaded this lady and Houbron, who was then Master of Les Libres Penseurs at the time of her initiation, as well as several other French Masons, to start a new organization to be open to men and women equally. Human Rights Lodge Co-Masonry, under the name La Respectable Loge Le Droit Humain, Maconnerie Mixte, was opened in Paris, and seventeen prominent French women were entered, passed and raised, among them the wife of Dr. Martin, a most capable woman who became the first head of the new order.... It became the mother Lodge of the Co-Masonic Order. . . . In 1896 new lodges were established in other parts of France, and one in Switzerland. In 1897, the Order secured a Temple of its own at 51 rue du Cardinal Lemoine, whieh it occupied until 1914, when the headquarters were removed to a fine new Temple at 5 rue Jules Breton. . . . Several lodges holding under the Grand Orient or the Grand Lodge of France meet in this building.

Will our readers note the last sentence, especially Grand Lodges in this country which reeognize either of these hvo Grand Lodges. In 1901, a second lodge was opened in Paris and the form of government was changed from that of a Grand Lodge to that of a Supreme Council. In 1902, a lodge was established at Havre, and another in London. This last, Human Duty No.6, for years attracted numerous visitors from among English Masons.

Grand Lodge of England please take notice. In all Latin countries the new movement had the support and cooperation of many Masons belonging to the older obediences. In 1914, a call was sent out for an International General Assembly to be held in Paris in September. The declaration of war postponed this meeting, but it was held in September, 1920, when delegates from Holland, France, Italy, Spain, Costa Rica, India, Switzerland, England, and the United States, assembled in Paris and adopted an International Consti-


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tution; The second General Assembly was held in Paris in September, 1927. . . . In September, 1934, the Federation was divided in two, the Western and Eastern Federations. At the present time (1936) the Supreme Council has 21 National Representatives, and there are over 700 Co-Masonic lodges of all degrees scattered throu~hout the world. The Portuguese movement was started by two loages of women holding charter from the Grand Orient of Portugal, the Grand Orient having participated in the formation in 1921 of the International Masonic Association which decided that none but strictly masculine bodies could belong, had to dispose of two bodies of women, and these with several men members of the Grand Orient applied to the Co-Masonic Order.

Weare further informed that the organization has lodges in: Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, District of Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Wyoming, Washington, and California.

The American Society publishes the "Co-Mason." Strangely, the address of Co-Masonry is the same as McBaine Thompson convicted for his Masonic (~) activities.

NEGRO We shall hear much in the years to come of the Negro Masonic problem, brought to the fore by a discussion at the recent Conference of Grand Masters in Washington. Some of our Southern brethren, thinking that it might deal with racial equality, did not sit in on the discussion, but it failed to elicit the fireworks that might have been anticipated. As for most of the representatives, they were willing to sit in and learn more about the situation. What those who listened in, learned, was that Prince Hall Grand Lodge was not so illegitimate as we have been told. The statement came from a jurisdiction most involved with the jurisdictional matter, and it came in the form of a report which was made to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts in November, 1946, and which was signed by all Past Grand Masters, including Joseph Earl Perry (Chairman), Melvin M. Johnson, Arthur D. Prince, Claude L. Allen, Albert A. Schaefer, and Arthur W. Coolidge. Here is what the report said: Your committee finds that accordirig to the then prevailing Masonic law and customs, the origin, early procedures, and subsequent development of the so-called Prince Hall (Negro) Grand Lodge in this Commonwealth have been, and are, regular and legitimate. Moreover, there is reliable and uncontradicted documentary evidence, dated June 30, 1784, that African Lodge, of which Prince Hall was Master, was, in 1776, granted a "Permet" by John Rowe of Boston (then Provincial Grand Master over North America where no other Provincial was appointed), , 'to walk on St. John's Day and bury our dead in form," etc. Rowe succeeded Henry Price in 1768. Thus for 170 years, African Lodge, and its successors have been functioning in Massachusetts in good faith and with justifiable belief


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that their orIgm and procedure were as regular and legitimate as we have thought ours to be. Obviously, we do not presume to pass upon conditions prevailing in any other jurisdiction. It is understood that there are other groups of Negroes who claim to be Masons, but we have found no evidence in support of such claims, and our conclusion thus far is that the so-called Prince Hall (Negro) Freemasonry is, alone, entitled to any claim of legitimacy among negroes in this Commonwealth. Members of this committee have inspected the original charter of African Lodge No. 459, granted by authority of H.R.H., the Duke of Cumberland, Grand Master of our own Mother Grand Lodge of England, dated 29th September, 1784, appointing Prince Hall (a negro resident of Boston) to be its Master. This is the source of all "duly constituted" Prince Hall Freemasonry, and is now in possession of the M. W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge F. & A. M. of Massachusetts. Our Grand Lodge traces its history as a "duly constituted" organization to 1733, and Prince Hall (Negro) F"reemasonry to 1787, when African Lodge began to function under its charter. Thus for more than a century and a half, these two branches of Freemasonry have existed side by side in this Commonwealth, each by its own preference. adhering strictly to its own racial sphere of activity and without intervisitation.

The committee then concluded: There is need for unifying and strengthening all influences for the improvement and uplifting of mankind. Freemasonry seeks to build character and promote brotherhood among men. These objectives have nothing to do with race or color, or social or economic status. In this country, the welfare and the future of the white and colored people arc interdependent and largely identical. Each has its own schools and college's and churches and societies, but both have the same ultimate hopes and aspirations; both make common sacrifices in defense of their single country, both read the same periodicals, hear the same radio programs, and enjoy or suffer together the triumphs or failures of our national well being; and each is affected by the material and spiritual welfare of the other. In conclusion, your committee believes that in view of the existing social conditions in our country, it is advisable for the official and organized activities of white and colored Freemasons to proceed in parallcllines, but organically separate and without mutually embarassing demands or commitments. Your committee believes that, within these limitations, informal cooperation and mutual helpfulness between the two groups upon appropriate occasions are desirable.

To this time, and so far as we know, there has never been a negro Masonic problem in Missouri. It is our understanding that the Missouri group claim descent from the Prince Hall organization. We do know some colored Freemasons, and be it said to their credit, that they represent the better element of their race. \Ve have an intimation that many are expert ritualists. The policy in Missouri has been helpfulness and understanding, but never a thought by either white or black as to intervisitation or consolidation. Only a few years ago, a certain Past Grand Master of Missouri, had occasion to represent one of these colored groups in a suit involving their Masonic Home, and he was much impressed with the sincerity and understanding of his clients.


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FEMALE MEXICAN MASONRY ('1)

Our sympathy goes out to our regular Mexican brethren, who in addition to other difficulties, have to deal with "Co-Masonry." A year ago we called the attention of some of our Mexican brethren to advertising appearing in a Mexican newspaper of a so-called female , group of "Freemasons." Armed with authority from their Grand Master, two of these Mexican brethren visited the headquarters of the group, and have reported: On that occasion they delivered to us copies of their Constitution and By-Laws, and were present at one of their meetings. Their Grand Master officially invited us for the following week when we were able to attend a special session. . . .

As a result of this visit, we can now inform you as follows: They do not place any Bible on their altars; do not even know their rituals; there are eight lodges with very few member~average twelve per lodge, with an average attendance of six (Ed. :-No quorum). Their hope is that the next President of Mexico will grant the vote to women, and in case this happens, to present a candidate for Congress. In reality, they know nothing of Freemasonry. They have been able to survive for about ten years, although weakly, and were it not for the help they have received from the Spanish immigrants, male and female, they would have already disappeared. They keep a close relationship with all the spurious and irregular bodies existing here in Mexico. On the occasion of our visit to this group, my companion was charged to explain to them what the Eastern Star Order was, in the hope they might organize as such a group; they answered sarcastically, thanking us very politely, some of them whistling, and finally told us they would continue their present policy, adding that men" were so egotistic, etc." These lodges were originally formed under the auspices of the spurious Mexican National Rite, and they are anxious to share in social struggle (political) .

Our correspondent adds the following: In Mexico City there actually exists three different Supreme Councils of the Scottish Rite; naturally, two of them must be spurious and irregular, nothwithstanding that all of them are divisions from the original Supreme Council. All of these groups continue to pick members from among the various blue lodges, and as a consequence, everybody has become scared, and is reluctant to join anything for the time being. FROM ONE OF OUR READERS

One reader of the Masonic World has the following to say concerning the conferring of degrees by Masonic groups: "There is one thing I would like to mention in regard to conferring degrees in lodges in our state. Perhaps I should not mention it, as I may be wrong in my thoughts concerning it, but for two or three years the Shrine has been exemplifying, or conferring degrees in various lodges in this jurisdiction. Since the Shrine is not generally recognized as a Masonic body it someliow seems wrong that they are allowed to do so.


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I know I would not be pleased if I had to look back when I took the third degree, and realize that I had received it from the hands of a nonMasonic body. I know, of course, that all Shriners are Freemasons, but to my mind that 'does not entitle the group to confer Masonic degrees. Changes are creeping into our degree work, and I suppose it cannot be helped, but at least all degree work in lodges should be conferred, I think, by strictly Masonic bodies."

PRINCE HALL TROUBLES

The Kansas City Star of August 30, 1946, contained the following reference to Negro Masonry: Woe in Negro Lodge Parley-Officers' 'unanimously re-elected Themselves, " delegates charge-Topeka, Aug. 30. (A.P.)-The annual state convention of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, currently meeting in Topeka, ended up in the Shawnee District court today when fifteen delegates filed a petition alleging the state officers for last year had unanimously elected themselves to office without benefit of a delegate election. The plaintiffs are asking the court to conduct an election of officers in accordance with law. No date has been set for court action. (The names of the defendants are listed).

THE LIBERAL FREEMASONS?

A friend has handed us some circular matter sent out by the "Association of Liberal Freemasons" with headquarters in Los Angeles, Calif. California is the home of a lot of "ham and egg" philosophy and "isms" but this is the first of its type with a Masonic handle. From their Handbook, 1940? it would appear that it started as a Masonic Library Association, but one of their reports having aroused considerable criticism on the part of conservative Masons who considered it too radical, an attempt wag made to suppress it. . . .

All of which resulted in the Library Board discharging the committee with the suggestion that they continue under a new name independent of the library. The object of the Association seems to be to substitute for the present system of private profit a scheme of economy entirely different from anything that has obtained before in the history of the human race.

The organization appears to be carrying on correspondence with two generally not recognized French Grand Lodges in the hopes of setting up the New Dispensation. Edward Bellamy of "Looking Backward" appears to be the Patron Saint and "Technocracy" a bedfellow. The circular announces that The principal trouble with Freemasonry in this country at the present time seems to be--that it has countenanced such acts, acts which have supplanted the Golden Rule with the rule of gold . . . that financial interests are prostituting Freemasonry, etc.


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The circular criticizes some Past Grand Master who wrote in condemning the report of the committee as "communistic bunk," to all of which we are inclined to agree. California has enough troubles on its hand with all its clandestine lodges. without this new association of "Liberals." A VEILED ATTACK ON FREEMASONRY

One of our choicest friends, who happens to be a minister, calls attention to a recent volume written by Randolph C. Miller, with a chapter on "The Church and Organized Fraternalism" written by Dwight C. Smith, B.A. and B.D. (Yale); PhD. (Edinburgh), and a minister of United Churches in Olympia, Washington; he is a member of the Congregational-Christian Church. lIe attempts to list all lodges "which seem to compete with the church in program and activity" under five headings: 1. Fraternal lodges: Masons, AASR, York Rite, Mystic Shrine, Demolay, (Junior Masons), B. P. O. E., Eagles, Moose, 1. O. o. F., K. of P., Pythian Boys, Knights of Columbus, Columbian Squires. 2. Service Clubs: Kiwanis, Lions, Rotary, Y. M. C. A. Club, B. and P. Women, Kiwanis Ladies, Soroptimists, etc. 3. Veterans Clubs: American Legion, Disabled American Veterans, V. F. W., G. A. R., Spanish War Veterans, Army Mothers, Navy Mothers, etc. 4. Women's Clubs: A. A. U. W., D. A. R., P. E. 0., etc. 5. Country and Yacht Club.

He says: Two Lodges, Elks and Eagles, having 41 per cent of the total membership reported in twenty lodges, maintain club houses as well as lodge halls. The major cost of the upkeep for these clubs is met by profits from liquor sales and the operation of slot machines, both forms of activity being forbidden under state law, but permitted in private clubs.

The writer goes on to speak of "the financial competition" the church has with lodges. Then, the competition "for time" wherein "a large proportion of church people are willing to put any other appointment ahead of the claims of the church . . . the fact is we no longer live in a time when the church is the one center of social life ... the country club type, with more or less Sunday schedules, are the outstanding exceptions, the real competition occurs during the week." His next objection is that "lodges are substitutes for religion," lodge ritual being full of Biblical and pseudo-biblical language, and often referring to God as "The Great Grand Master" or the "Grand Lodge on High.... Consider the titles assumed by the lodge member without even a self conscious blush. When a person of merely average capacity, spiritual or otherwise, is called "'Vorshipful Grand Master" or some equivalent title, one may well ask what happens to the meaning of language; by devaluating the language of religious


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devotion, fraternalism impairs the proper understanding of religious expression. All fraternities have their psychological roots in the initiation ceremonies of primitive tribes through which the youth enters the sacred brotherhood of the tribal elders. Such vestigial remnants have no useful meaning." He confesses that, while in theory, the ideal of brotherhood which the church professes is far more significant, yet in actual practice "the lodge, even with a lower aim may produce more real brotherhood among its members than does any church . . . there is much which is banal, not to say vulgar, in the adolescent habits of many service clubs." He thinks that organized fraternalism might be made the groundwork for religious training and that in building a world community, the leadership of fraternalism might be used. And then he adds this: Judged by the highest Christian ideals, the behavior taken for granted by fraternal groups may seem low, but it is only fair to remember that fraternalism does not claim to be ideal . . . we must however concede a positive contribution in the maintenance of a decent quality of group conduct by fraternalism.

In discussing the attitude to be taken by the church, he decides on this: Look at fraternalism as it really is, a limited and often inadequate social phenomenon which achieves success in its restricted sphere. Where a church can do so without compromising its own nature, the Church should welcome the aid of such an ally (but) it must have definite limitations.

Then he suggests for reading: American Legion Magazine, Elk's Magazine, Kiwanis and Rotary Publications.

What a choice for a man who wishes to study fraternalism 1 , No doubt we should do as Masons are taught to do, remain silent in the face of unfair criticism, but our fraternity is entitled to know what forces are at work in this country. Of all organizations in the country which fight fraternalism, the church should be the last to take up the cudgel. We are speaking only in behalf of the Freemasons, for our experience with most of the organizations mentioned has been nil. The writer takes up the axe against all fraternal organizations, using the bad features as argument, and yet he lets it be known that he is thinking of Freemasonry. He measures all fraternalism by its least worthy aspects. How would he feel if we measured his CongregationalChristian church by the acts and teachings of Jehovah's \Vitnesses, or polygamy, or similar teachings' He lets it be known by his statements that he knows nothing of


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Freemasonry. These are usually the people who write the most about it. We know of no organization which refers to "The Great Grand Master." \Ve do use the title of "Worshipful" in referring to the presiding officer of a lodge, but it does not mean that he is entitled to worship from his membership. The dictionary gives a definition, which meets with Masonic requirements, to be "worthy of honor, honorable, esteemed." It is an honor to be elected by your fellow men to preside over a lodge. He overlooks the fact that he himself is referred to as Reverend, which if taken literally might be regarded as blasphemy. The whole chapter sounds like jealousy. It would seem that he wishes to place the blame for non-attendance at church on the lodge, when the church should be using some of the lodge practices in securing interest and the consequent attendance. The Masonic fraternity is doing a work which is not being duplicated by the church. Actually, Freemasonry is organized charity. The church might advance further if it used the same recipe. An article in "Advance," a Congregational magazine, features a Webster Groves, Mo., church, in which the writer said the secret of the success of organized work for men, lay in the fact that many of them were young, or middle-~d, executives who were too intelligent to take lodges seriously. This is anti-Masonic propaganda of a new type, and it is potent in communities where men want to be included among "the best minds of the community" (?) This preacher friend tells me that he is regarded with tolerant amusement by some very fine men who consider his interest in Freemasonry as a sort of mental aberration. Many of these are Freemasons, but men who do not take their Masonry seriously. Some have a reputation for making Masonic speeches and appearing in the limelight but reserve their scorn for the fraternity when closeted with their ministerial brethren, where they pose as too sophisticated to be dazzled by a lodge! We know of some fine ministers who are active Freemasons. We have never questioned their seriousness, nor their interest. In our own day we have known three Past Grand Masters in Missouri who have been ministers. One of our most enthusiastic Grand Chaplains is a Jewish rabbi. \Ve know, that in their relationship with the fraternity, their lives have been broadened and some of that narrowness which is inclined to enter into single groups has disappeared with their broadened aspect of life. We have ample proof that Freemasonry is making many men better; it has made none any worse. The Church s}lOuld welcome such an ally as one of its greatest resources, and instead of standing aloof from it, and of criticizing its work, should support it, praise it, and enter into its work of social service. Weare speaking only for Freemasonry. We have no dispute nor brief for other groups, or social


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clubs. The fact that the writer includes the Demolays, which he lists as "Junior Masons," is evidence of his lack of Masonic knowledge or information. We have never heard a Mason speak of a lodge being his religion, although there may have been such foolish souls. It would be more in line with his thought to say that "lodge attendance is substituted for church attendance" but that only reflects the weakness of the church which may have so little to offer. It is a primitive urge for men to want to get together as menj this is the secret of the lodge, and in these days when the women have taken over the bars, the cocktail lounges, the barber shops, the pool rooms and most everything else, it is a genuine pleasure for men to find one spot where they can flee without molestation from the fair (') sex. Why should a Freemason blush at any title which might be eonferred upon him. We have plenty of the titles; we do not relish their overuse. But after all, what harm is done' No more than referring to the "Reverend Smith, Doctor of Divinity or Doctor of Philosophy." We are unfamiliar with the nomenclature of the CongregationalChristian Church, but we surmise there are plenty of "Right Reverends" and "Most Reverends" laying around loose. We have no objection to their use for it infers an element of respect and honor, but we ask for the same consideration on behalf of Freemasonry, which over the centuries has earned its tItle to the respect and kindly consideration of all American religious and patriotic groups. In fact, we, as a fraternity, were teaching the value of right living and the moral virtues long before Reverend Smith was born, and even before there was a Congregational Church. Half a century ago there lived in a small town in Missouri a very well-to-do family. They were communicants of a Protestant church and it was through their donations the little church was kept alive and grew until, in numbers, it was the leading church in the city. One day they erected a new church and called on all the members for donations. Again our family came to the rescue, donating to the building fund, and later giving a large and beautiful leaded glass window. The family later lost all of their money; donations became smaller as a result, and finally the elders of the family died, leaving as their only descendant, a widowed daughter who had to be sustained by pension from the old age fund until her death. Then came the question as to who was to look after the funeral bill. Church friends were appealed to-without result. The widow was finally buried by her CARD CLUB. Since which time our appreciation of the card club has gone up 500 per cent. As long as the church is found wanting by those in need, there will be card clubs and fraternal groups. OHARITY VS. RELIEF

We are not so much concerned with the attitude of reviewers upon


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material appearing in these columns as we are with the attitude of the average Freemason. vVe do not expect all of our remarks to carry the approval of the entire membership. Some comment received from individual Freemasons is reproduced herewith: "I quite agree with your objection to the use of the word' relief' in place of the well known Masonic one of 'charity.' Charity, Webster says, means Christian love, also act of loving all men as brothers because they are sons of God. Relief sounds too much like the New Deal and should not become a word to be used by Masons in place of Charity. Charity is a word of many meanings and Freemasons, I think, include all these meanings when using the word. ' ,

The word charity is derived from the Latin caritas, a word which means love. Charity, then, is the doing of something for a fellow man because of the love which exists between the two. The word relief smacks of WPA and the professional agencies of ministration to human needs in which Love does not enter into the picture. Shall we change the ritual to read: Faith, Hope, and Relief, but the greatest of these is Relief, for our faith may be lost in sight, hope ends with fruition, but Relief extends beyond the grave, etc.

When the Masonic Fraternity reaches the place where there exists no brother who wants to make change in ritual, in organization, in tradition, or in custom, then will there be no Freemasonry. ROUGHNESS IN MASONIO DEGREES

It is unfortunate that our Masonic ritual provides certain sections where some of our brethren, roughly inclined, are tempted to insert doings not intended by our founders or by our grand lodges. The English and our Pennsylvania brethren leave no place for such rough tactics. Even in Missouri we still have remnants of the "old" methods. Your reviewer recently conferred a third degree in a Missouri lodge (yes, we can still do it) and requested his brethren to remove certain features which smacked of the "old" way. But in Kentucky the Grand Master came out forcibly with an Edict which he has commanded to be read in every Kentucky lodge just before the conferring of a degree. In the edict he says: After receiving numerous complaints, and having discussed them with several Masonic leaders, and they being extremely apprehensive of the unhappy results which may develop through undue roughness . . . I therefore issue this appeal ... to the lodge that they exercise discretion and sound judgment in the conducting of the affairs of this section of the work. Be ever mindful, you are, this night, endeavoring to impress upon the candidate the seriousness of Freemasonry . . . it is not intended to be used for a show of strength or a display of brutality.... I solicit you to give proper consideration to the physical and temperamental qualifications of the candidate.


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There is an organization which uses the rough stuff, the electricity, and other uncivilized methods of "teaching" the candidate "great moral lessons," and personally, we believe they should be permitted to be the only "Masonic" organization so to do. Most of their candidates know what to expect-and they are never disappointed. Freemasonry is serious; brutality and roughness cannot be associated with great moral and religious teachings. CULLED :FROM THE PROCEEDINGS

Alaska: Lodges in Alaska work under jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of \Vashington. There are eleven lodges in the two Masonic Districts, stretching from Nome and Fairbanks to Ketchikan, numbering 1913 members and sho"..路 ing a gain of 81 for the year. Only one lodge showed a loss (Valdez with loss of one). Bequests: Many bequests have been made to Grand Lodges and to Masonic Homes during the year past. One of the most unusual was the gift of T/Sgt. T. R. Morrow of the 390th Bomb. Squadron (M) to the Grand Lodge of Nebraska's Charity Fund. The contributor was not a Mason; he was raised an orphan. The late Alpheus Keen, 64 Jrears Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico, left his estate to the Grand Lodge for the building of an Administration Building. His will reads: To the Glory of God, Our Heavenly Father and His Son Jesus Christ, to whom I am so grateful for their guidance and protection in my life and the faith and hope in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting.

In Utah, James Cash Penney of New York City (Penney Stores) and a member of Wasatch (Utah) Lodge No.1, gave $3,000 Temple Notes and $9,399 in cash for the use of Crippled Children. Biographical: Colonel Frank D. Rash died in Louisville in 1946; llC served with General Pershing in Mexico; he was president of the Federal Land Bank of Louisville, and headed Selective Service in Kentucky. His father, 93, is still living. . Fmncis E. White, born January 20, 1848, and for many years Grand Secretary of Nebraska bodies, died at the age of 97 in Los Angeles. He was initiated in 1869. Louis B. Hanna of North Dakota, no\v. 85 years of age, was presented to the Grand Lodge of North Dakota; he was made a Mason in 1885, attended Grand Lodge of Dakota Territory in 1889; he was the first Grand Tyler; was Governor 1913-16, served with the Red Cross in France with rank of Captain; and in 1939 was elected Hon. Past Grand Master. Buildings: The Grand Lodge of New York receives excellent advice from its Grand Master on the subject of financing buildings: Do not build Temples unless the money is reasonably in hand. Borrowing from the brethren on bonds, unless there is assurance of repay-


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ment is not good practice. When needy widows ask brethren for the just redemption of these bonds and you are unprepared to do so, the situation becomes tragic.

Conference of Grand Masters: Grand Master Perkins of Iowa, offers one of the few discordant notes concerning the Conference of Grand Masters; he said: Many interesting papers were presented on various topics. There was but little discussion on the subjects, and I wonder if a conference of grand masters would better serve its purpose if the Grand Masters would bring before the conference each year questions they may have in their jurisdictions for the discussion of Grand Masters attending the meeting. Would that be better than a "hew to the line" program 1 Or should there be set aside one day for mutual problems' Your grand master received more information to help him in his work from his personal contacts, visits, discussions, etc., outside the session.

Conscientious Objector: One wonders what should be the Masonic attitude towards the conscientious objector. California had the problem dumped directly into their lap. A lodge had refused to issue a past master certificate to a brother who had "conscientiously objected." \Vhile he did object, the record shows that he enlisted in the Forestry Service and served as a medical aide; he took care of tuberculosis patients at a salary of $10 per month on a voluntary basis. The certificate was finally issued. Crime Conviction: It is always embarrassing for a lodge to find some of its membership languishing in jails and penal institutions. Out of a three million membership it is unusual to find so few in that position. Yet what should be the lodge attitude~ Many grand Mdges are revising their laws so that a lodge may not be embarrassed by crime conviction. In Illinois the Grand Master asked for an amendment which would automatically drop out a brother convicted in federal or state court for offenses involving moral turpitude until a trial commission might find the charges to be unfounded in fact. The J p committee believed the brother should have his day in court and not be expelled without some chance of sustaining a defense, but that after a court had convicted a brother under safeguards which now surround our law, the G. M. should dired the entry of an order in the lodge expelling the brother until a trial commission might investigate the matter further. Decisions: A brother out in Idaho wanted the Grand Master to inform him "whether a man who dimitted from his lodge in 1940, may be considered a member in good standing, so that his grand daughter might qualify for membership in Job's Daughters. The answer was "No." This decision should come under the subject of "humor." It involved a case in New Mexico. The inquirer wanted to know whether a petitioner who had a certain surgical operation was a eunuch or not; the doctor had said "no." The Grand Master said the doctor was correct


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after consulting with "eminent medical authority," the constitution and the dictionary. The Grand Lodge of Louisiana is emerging from its financial worries. Several years ago it erected a very fine business and Masonic building in New Orleans at an outlay of two or three million dollars; hard times came along and it kept the bodies busy raising assessments and paying added dues. Then came the war-the building was rented to capacity-a new levy was made on each Louisiana Masonand today the worries are over. Clandestine Lodges: \Ve hear less and less of clandestine lodges; yet in prosperous times they seemingly flourish. \Ve often wonder just why a man should petition one of these lodges, until we stop and think; the probabilities are that the petitioner has no knowledge of what a clandestine lodge is and those who take his petition do not inform him. In California we find that a clandestine lodge is operating in the Hawaiian Islands and drawing into its fold Polynesians, Chinese, Japanese and mixed extractions. It is thought that the G. L. of California may soon be asked for a dispensation for this "International Lodge." The Grand Master expresses this very unusual opinion: It will be the subject for much controversy. G. L. may have to consider this question sooner than we think. In its solution, if it is shown that the applicants are good men and true, I hope that we may be as tolerant as the people of the Islands; if on the other hand, the application should originate from those who have selfish or mercenary motives, we should not hesitate to deny the application.

A committee in California says that clandcstinism in that state is confined to Mexi('ans, Filipinos, and Negroes, for "the termite has not yet invaded the Caucasian race." The activity is prompted by nationals desiring to associate together; Mexicans and Filipinos do not understand the English language and so cannot join California lodges. Few of these groups are found to exceed fifty, and usually thirty. Groups acting under the name "Chinese Masons" confer no degrees and have no paraphernalia similar to ours. They find a bit of news which is satisfying to many who want to see this irregularity cleaned up: For the first time the conditions seem to warrant a recommendation that may result in the healing of a substantial group of J..rexican clandestine and irregular Masons. This, we have been assured, will result practically in the elimination of this phase of the problem. These na路 tionals do not understand English. To confer upon them a Masonic degree in English is time wasted and would give them nothing. Neither can a degree be conferred through an interpreter. The work must be in conformity to the ritual of this grand lodge. In California there are far more Mexican nationals than French, German or Italian. There is far more reason to have Spanish speaking lodges than lodges in any other foreign tongue. The committee is informed that the failure to understand English is the primary, and some路


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times the only reason, for good men affiliating with this branch of clandestine Masonry. Our investigation of the personnel of some of these groups lead us to believe that many of their members are good Masonic material. One group in Los Angeles has indicated its willingness to surrender its present charter and take all necessary steps to be healed. The committee therefore recommends that the Grand Lodge approve as a policy the issuance of dispensations to confer degrees in the Spanish language.

\Ve must congratulate this California committee upon their handling of this troublesome problem. 'l'hey have taken the only practical step. If we refuse dispensations to men to form lodges using the only language the group can speak and understand, then we may expect to have irregularity, clandestinism and misunderstanding. It will, of course, require considerable attention in getting started, but once started and functioning, we may expect clandestinism to go out of business. There appears to be a Gran Oriente Filipino, Inc., operating in San Francisco; they even have a Supreme Council and issue a magazine, with the same name as that issued by the regular Grand Lodge in the Philippines; they claim twenty lodges and about a year ago held a Grand Lodge meeting in San Diego. New York has a clandestine problem. It appears that the Grand Lodge of Uruguay, recognized by many of our American jurisdictions, organized a lodge ((Dr. Julio Bastos" in New York City; the lodge applied to the Grand Lodge of Ne\v York for healing the lodge as a unit. New York law provides that an individual clandestine cannot be healed, therefore it would be illogical to try the "group" method of healing. New York does not recognize Uruguay. Another New York problem involved the case of a petitioner for affiliation who had been a member of a lodge organized years ago in Pennsylvania by the Grand Orient of Italy; the lodge exists no more. The committee discussed at some length the Latin and American viewpoints. It was finally determined that "the Grand Lodge of New York's recognition of the Grand Orient of Italy at the time the illegal act was done, can no more alter the indefensible nature and quality of its invasion than would an acknowledgment of friendship with a convicted civil offender alter or mitigate the consequences of his offense. The petitioner is still a profane. Demolay: Several references occur in the proceedings to the Order of Demolay for boys. Califorina is one of these; it has considerable experience with the Demolay problem, and here is their solution: We have determined that Demolay in California is more in need of advisors and direction rather than sponsorship. The Grand Council of Demolay has the means to charter chapters without direct sponsorship. The real need in California is for able and willing advisors, men who are capable of working and counseling with young people. If sponsorship was permitted we are afraid that enthusiastic lodges would sponS,or chapters and then after the novelty wore off would allow them to drift. We feel that the Demolay leaders can handle matters better if sponsor-


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ship were under their direct control; it entails financial support, and there is no reason why the Order cannot stand on its own feet. We do not feel that Masonry should in any way become obligated to the financial support of any institution that is non-Masonic in character.

Our experie'nce with the movement is that a Demolay chapter rises no higher than its advisory board. Distinguished Visitors: There has been developing in many grand lodges the fine custom of bringing in to the annual communication men who have exemplified in their daily lives the teachings of Freemasonry. Sometimes it is a governor, then a Supreme Court Justice, or some military chief; all add to the value of the program, many of which would be barren without the human interest features. The largest array may be credited to New Jersey; the Grand Marshal brought in for introduction Governor Walter E. Edge, member of Belcher Lodge No. 180, and his associates, all former governors of New Jersey; these included A. Harry Moore, Jersey City Lodge No. 74; Morgan F. Larson, Raritan Lodge No. 61; Harold G. Hoffman, St. Stephen's Lodge No. 63. This is by far the largest gubernatorial exhibit we have yet found. A visitor at the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of New York was Admiral Ernest Joseph King, member of George C. Whiting Lodge No. 22, vVashington, D. C., as well as other Masonic bodies. He came to receive the New York medal for Distinguished Achievement. The Admiral said: I did not become a Mason as carly in my life as I should have wished, due to a variety of circumstances. My father was a Mason. I have two brothers who are Masons; and I can say with all sincerity that since I became a Mason about ten years ago, I have never ceased to regret that I hadn't done it forty years ago.

Don Juan Antonio Bios, President of the Republic of Chile, was a visitor to a New York Lodge; the Grand Lodge tendered him a reception, October 16, 1945. Governor Thomas E. Dewey came down from Albany for the occasion and received at that time his commission as Representative from the State of Michigan, his birthplace. In South Carolina there was presented to Grand Lodge, Governor Ransome J. Williams, Damascus Lodge No. 161; among other things, the Governor said this: When I look at you I have a feeling of safety for this great nation of ours that we have made. In these times I am impressed with this leadership and I am glad; it gives me faith and courage, knowing that not only the State, but this Nation, is safe as long as we have the Masonic lodge. I am proud to be here; it is one of the greatest honors that has come to me since I have been governor.

Introduced, but remarks not printed, in the Grand Lodge of Tennessee were Governor Jim Nance McCord, Dillahunty Lodge No. 112; his private secretary, Fred Graves, and Secretary of State Joe Carr, the latter two members of Corinthian Lodge No. 414.


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But it remained for Vermont to receive Royalty. There came to them at their annual meeting, Lord Hltntingfield K. C. M. G.} Past Grand \Varden, and representative of the Grand Lodge of Vermont in England; he had a letter from the late Earl of Harewood, Grand Master. Called upon, he spoke entertainingly of his experiences in Victoria (Australia) and in England while in His Majesty's Service. Vermonters were "charmed by his personality and thrilled by his accomplishments." When Vermonters say that, they mean it's "tops." Electioneering: Under the section "Humor" we have mentioned a plain case of electioneering; this is a practice which crops out occasionally. In Kentucky the Jp committee presented a resolution permitting a subordinate lodge to send out a printed notice of the qualifications of one of its members for Grand Lodge station-but they can issue but one such, it shall contain no solicitation, nor shall they be distributed at grand lodge. Employment Bureau: The Grand Master of Louisiana looked around for a place to trim expenses. He settled on the Employment Bureau which he found had little place in the picture these days. Not wanting to lop it off all at once he proceeded to do it piece meal, cutting their allowance $100; then the committee said they would not '''ork; they would resign first. He declined to reinstate the amount; the committee did resign and they were not replaced and the space which they once occupied was taken over by a government agencyWPA Of Grand Lodge felt as did the Grand Master. Extraneous Societies: Florida takes the lead in keeping out what they regard as "extraneous societies," a policy which sometimes bars some very innocuous and helpful societies. However, in this instance, it concerns the "Knight Templar Priests." Whether the committee or grand lodge exempt the Templars or the Priests is not stated. The Jp committee were willing to let the KTPs in but not the grand lodge. \Vc have some KTPs in Missouri but so far as we can learn they do not run the grand lodge, nor in any other state so far as we can ascertain. The Shrine and Grotto are "approved" organizations in Florida. George Washington Memorial: It is hard to operate a Masonic or~anization in these United States without some objection. We should like to bring out in the open the forces back of these attempts to create dissatisfaction with established Masonic agencies which are filling a real need in our fraternity. Fortunately the objectors are few. We heard some of them at the meeting in \Vashington. The Grand Master of California objects to method of reporting: The various Grand Masters announced the contributions of their respective jurisdictions. Had I known that I was expected to appear on the platform with a special check as our contribution from this grand lodge, I would not have attended the meeting. (Where was Grand Secretary Wilson'). Personally, I felt humiliated and almost like the dull pupil who was in a corner of the school room with a dunce cap.


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Then from two or three sections of the country there comes a resolution, framed in almost identical words protesting against the use of any room in the Memorial for other than George Washington purposes. Grand Secretary Sturgeon offered the resolution in Oklahoma. It was adopted. We haven't yet figured out what it refers to; we shall ask the Association later. Election of Grand Officers: There is much dissatisfaction in and about the fraternity over methods of election of Grand Officers. The general method throughout the country, with few exceptions, is to permit the Grand Master to appoint a man at the foot of the line. If the man sits in his station, fails to oppose any thing on the floor of grand lodge, and keeps the good will of the various Grand Masters as they come along, he may finally reach the topmost round. Hardly a democratic process, yet producing a better grade of grand officer than "v-here nominations are made and the best back slapper gets in. The Grand Master of Arizona recommended a "more democratic method" and the Committee on General Policy offered an amendment which would permit the retiring Grand Master to propose four names for the position of G. J. Warden; no speeches could be made and the brethren could vote for others than those named if they so desired. In California there was "resentment against the method used in presenting the names of brethren for election to the office of Junior Grand \Varden." A committee could not approve the plan proposed and the grand lodge went along with the committee since "for 97 years the grand lodge had been able to function without the aid of a committee." Some Montana brethren thought out an idea which they thought workable; they would have the Grand Master come from regular districts to be set up; Judge Calloway spoke on the subject. He thought the Grand Master had enough trouble in selecting a prospective Grand Master as is. In Rhode Island the Grand Master said the method of selection was "neither democratic nor productive to the best that the fraternity affords . . . the condition is detrimental to the best interests and progress of the craft." Higher Degrees (') The Grand Master urged more stringent legislation to restrict rapid advancement "into the concordant organizations." The jurisdiction had a law a few years ago which prohibited advancement until one year had elapsed. Grand Master Huestis made the following statement: A brother cannot understand the higher degrees (so-called) until he is well grounded in the lessons of the first three. He should be taught that Ancient Craft Masonry is the basis and foundation of all Masonic teaching and that it is the Supreme Masonic authority in this jurisdiction. The third degree lecture is the most important of all the lectures, for without a knowledge of this he is not able to meet his Masonic brethren or attend a foreign lodge.


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Brethren were asked to take action to end "the injurious practice" which mayor may not stop it. In Florida the higher riters will have to teach the petitioner his lecture of the third degree or let him wait a period of six months. The Grand Master in New Mexico accused a certain Rite of soliciting a candidate who had just received his First degree! His indignation reached white heat. If these other branches of Masonry require their applicants to mature for a certain length of time as Master Masons, or attain a certain degree of skill as such, disregard these requirements, then our emotions should register compassion and pity rather than scorn or anger. Are they not building for inferior material and thus weakening their own structures' . . . Let every Master Mason know that regardless of his membership in other Masonic or non-Masonic bodies, he is subject to the penal jurisdiction of that lodge within whose boundary he resides and further, that Symbolic Masonry, Blue Lodge Masonry, Ancient Craft Masonry, all synonomous and being the root or foundation of Masonry, comprising the first three degrees, is the highest Masonic authority in the State of New Mexico.

The Grand Lodge overlooked his statement according to the proceedings. Up in 'Visconsin the boys are being solicited, so much so that the Grand Master refers to it as "obnoxious." One instance was reported of a Fellowcraft being solieited before he had been made a Master Mason. All committees apparently sidestepped the matter and there is still "open season for candidates." Honorary Membership: Several jurisdictions have been looking askance at the custom which seems to be creeping into Grand Lodges of making Honorary Past Grand Masters. There has always been a questionable value in the creation of such an officer, for the general Masonic doctrine has been that the holding of an office represents service in that office, at least for the time for which the brother may have been elected. The creation of the office of Honorary Past Grand Master tends to reduce the value of the office of Grand Master held by those who have regularly passed through the chairs of Grand Lodge and have rendered several years service in official capacity. In a recent law adopted by the Grand Lodge of Iowa, which has one Honorary Past Grand Master, "no Iowa Mason shall hereafter be made an Honorary Past Grand Master in this Grand Lodge." Historical: The committee on history of the Grand Lodge of Arizona reports it is in possession of a valuable collection of two thousand single spaced, letter size, typewritten sheets, with original documents and pictures that could never be replaced. The committee suggested that photostatic copies be made of some of these documents, even of the older charters and permitting the use of photostat copies of lodge charters. A committee in California has been busy securing interesting Masonic faets. One concerns Homer Lea, who played a leading part in the


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Chinese revolution, resulting in the overthrow of the Manchu Dynasty and the establishment of the Chinese Republic. 'He was a member of Pentalpha Lodge No.2, receiving the degrees in 1905. They have discovered that Charles Bennett, member of Salem Lodge No.4, was present at Coloma, January 24, 1848, when gold was discovered. Prior to that, Bennett was in the employ of General Fremont on one of his exploration trips. Bennett is buried at Salem, Oregon. A park is to be set aside at the mining town of Columbia, and in the proposed park is a lot on which was erected a Masonic Temple of Columbia Lodge No. 28; it is expected that Columbia Lodge will be the Williamsburg of the 'Vest. The Grand Lodge is interested in rebuilding the old temple and maintaining a lodge room. Byron De[enbach, of Idaho, continues his historical articles in the September, 1946, proceedings, covering the period from 1894 to 1911. Ralph J. Pollard, historian, has completed publication of the history of the Grand Lodge of Maine. He completed this assignment in the brief period of four months, and a committee which examined the manuscript made only a few minor changes. The Grand Lodge office building at Concord, N. H., was built in 1825, of red brick, fircd in kilns scarcely more than a stone throw from its site, set on massive foundation stones of native granite, and rebuilt during thc lattcr part of the 19th century, reflecting the spirit of the gay 90's. Stained glass windows and many large fireplaces give it a homey effect. It was once bequeathed to the State as a Gubernatorial mansion, but because of the probable cost of maintenance the bequest was refused. Dr. James J. Tyler, historian of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, in a section of the proceedings dealing with early Ohio Freemasonry, refers to the Union Master Degree, said to have been invented in England by the Lodge of Reconciliation. It consisted of a brief ceremonial and the investiture of certain modes of recognition. The degree was adopted by the Grand Lodge of New York in 1819, which authorized its lodges to confer it. Dr. William L. Cummings, of Syracuse, N. Y., has recently writtcn about this dcgree under the heading "A Forgotten Masonic Degree." In 1822, New York decided the degree was unnecessary, but several subordinate lodges continued to confer it as late as 1830. In the Grand Lodge of Washington there has been appointed a Tri-State Centennial Committee, composed of three members to work in cooperation with similar committees from Idaho and Oregon, to observe, in 1948, the centennial of the establishment of Freemasonry in the Great Northwest. Oregon appears to have appropriated sufficient monies, while the other two Grand Lodges furnish the cooperation, although Washington has offered $2,500.00 as their part of the expense.


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Life Membership: Doubtless we shall continue to read about life membership so long as life membership is pennitted in our various jurisdictions. The consensus of opinion is that life membership is a poor thing for any lodge. It turns out especially so when the funds paid for life membership are dissipated and only a few members are left to carryon the expense of operation. We know of one instance in which life membership was sold for lodge, chapter and commandery for the sum of $100.00; today the life members constitute the majority of the membership, their money has been used and the small group are forced to pay higher annual dues in order to carryon activities. Arizona reports: , 'The Craft would benefit materially if all life membership plans were abolished, but that if they are to be continued, they should be so circumscribed that the recipient may pay for what he gets. It appears that the present regulation favors the younger member who pays for a life membersllip the samc as the sixty year old member."

In Kansas a committee frowned upon life membership as a practice and favors only those requests which come as a result of extreme old age, coupled with years of faithful service and extreme indigence. Grand Secretary Grout, in Vermont, believes: "Life membership is a dangerous and unwise thing unless reduced to a conservative actuarial basis. . . . All in all, lodges would be happier and more prosperous to let life memberships strictly alone."

He disapproves the form of life membership which remits dues on members when they reach a certain age; he notes that two lodges in the State are now carrying 125 members without dues, but are paying the Grand Lodge per capita. The dues-free load is a drain on any lodge. Liquor: Connecticut has a regulation that appears to be overlooked in many instances. The Grand Master calls attention to the section which prohibits the introduction of spirituous or malt liquors on the premises of any lodge, and then asks: "When affiliated bodies, such as Grotto('s or Fellowcraft Clubs, or any other organization meet in a Masonic Temple, this regulation is effective. If it is violated, those who are party to the offense are subject to punitive action."

Otto Souders, of Kansas, in his report on correspondence, finds the greatest trouble confronting Grand Masters today comes from gambling, liquor and violation of Sunday rules, and"One organization, predicating its membership upon m:mbership in the Lodge, the Consistory and the Commandery, seems to be the cause of most of the trouble. A number of Grand Masters had to call in the heads of the organization in their State and either demand of them that


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they should comply with the ordinary Masonic laws or threaten them with some sort of punishm~nt. Violations ran from operating games of chance, or actual gambling, to operating circuses on Sunday and permitting their members to make the club rooms an almost open saloon. The matter is going to require more and more attention."

The Grand Master of Montana devotes a page of his address to Masons in the liquor business, reporting that information has reached him of laxity in the enforcement of certain resolutions of the Grand Lodge which state unequivoeally that Masons may not engage in the liquor business. He believes that any law that has become ineffective through lack of popular support should be repealed or modified, beeause disregard of one law breeds contempt for all law. He does not believe that Masonry can afford to lower its standards or eountenance its members engaging in the liquor business. The recommendation was referred to a special committee which discovered that the Shrine Club in Montana was operating a licensed bar. The committee deplored the conditions and urged that the liquor laws of Masonry be properly observed, and that its proper officers carry out that desire. In Nebraska, all complaints made to the Grand Master, with one exception, pertained to the sale of intoxicating liquor, causing him to remark: "It would appear that the lure of money to be made from the sale of a beverage which enslaves men and even women to a licentious habit has been too much for some of our brethren and some have chosen to suffer expulsion from their lodge rather than refrain from engaging in a business in violation of Masonic laws. It is no defense to say that the state licenses the sale of intoxicating liquors."

David Graham, Foreign Correspondent in South Dakota, says: "One Grand Master declared a stationary engineer ineligible to petition for the degrees because his employer is a brewery company, while another Grand Master gave his official sanction to reception of a petition from a man who dispenses liquor in a legally licensed refreshment parlor. "

Masonic Clubs: Traveling clubs and groups of Freemasons COIlferring degrees are causing no end of trouble throughout the country. The matter has reached such a stage in Ohio that a resolution has been introduced in Grand Lodge to disregard the conferring of degrees by groups who visit Masonic lodges under such names as FeIlowcraft Club, Square Club, etc., unless such a group shall have exhibited to the Master of the lodge in which the degree is to be conferred, a certificate from the District Deputy Grand Master certifying to the competency of such group to confer degrees in Masonry. Masonic Publications: It was reported to the Grand Lodge of California that there were numerous publications throughout the State which claimed to speak on behalf of the fraternity, but which had no interest therein except the fee derived from paid advertisements of candidates for public office or mercantile advertisers. The


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Better Business Bureau brought to the attention of the Grand Master one or two flagrant cases. Many of these journals were of infrequent and ullcertain issue, trading on the name of the fraternity and not hesitating to lend themselves to falsehood or political claims if they think it will increase their circulation. It seems to be a part of the strategy of these publications to continually make attack on some feature pending in Grand Lodge so if any drastic action is taken by the Grand Lodge, the cry would go up that it was retaliation or persecution. Masonic Service Association: Grand Master Perkins, of Iowa, in addition to expressing his disapproval of the Conference of Grand Masters, also recommended the withdrawal of membership from the Masonic Service Association, his reason being: t t l can sec no reason for contributing to outside interests without some return on the investment."

The jurisprudence committee, under the leadership of the veteran Charles C. Clark, did not approve the recommendation and the Grand Lodge rejected it. Iowa was the birthplace of the M. S. A., and of all jurisdictions they should be the last to withdraw membership! Medals: In recent years there has grown up a fine custom of rewarding brethren who have labored long and unceasingly in behalf of the fraternity. Almost a dozen jurisdictions now present medals or awards. Some jurisdictions are generous in the bestowal of these awards, while others restrict the conference to one or two in any one year. Connecticut confers the Pierpont Edwards Medal, this year on nine brethren, that being the limit to be conferred in anyone year. The only members outside the State to receive it this year were Frank H. Hilton, Grand Secretary of Massachusetts, and Allen M. 'Wilson, prominent in Masonic affairs in New Hampshire. In the District of Columbia the Distinguished Service Medal was awarded for the J'ear 1946 to Brother John C. Palmer, D.D., the eighth member to receive the award, whot t Throughout the years of a busy and successful life attending the ministerial duties of his calling, always found time and cheerfully grasped the opportunity to exercise his ability and devotion to Freemasonry, in exceptional service to this Grand Lodge, to the individual brethren of the fraternity, and to their lodges, exemplifying what Masonry is or should be in action, as well as in spirit."

He was initiated in Tin City Lodge No. 112, South Dakota, and has served as Master, High Priest and Commander. Maine presents the Josiah Hayden Drummond Medal, named after a Maine brother outstanding in national Masonic affairs, and with an unusual record in his own jurisdiction. Two awards were made in 1947, one to Ervin E. J. Lander, the other to Ray V. Denslow of Missouri.


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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The gold Jordan Medal, worn by the oldest Master Mason in the jurisdiction of Nebraska, has been surrendered to Brother Hiram A. Harter, a member of Aurora Lodge No. 68, who has been a Mason for more than sixty-seven years and is over ninety-three years of age. The former holder, Nicholas Schoenholz, who had worn the medal three years, died January 11, 1946. The Je1'emy L. Cross Medal, given by the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, was presented en masse upon all Past Grand Masters of that jurisdiction. The Grand Lodge Medal for Distinguished Achievement, annually awarded by the Grand Lodge of New York, went this year to General Omar Nelson IJttadley, now head of the Veterans Administration. Last year the award went to Admiral Ernest Joseph King. The Joseph Montfort Medal was presented to three Past Grand Masters of North Carolina in commemoration of their outstanding contribution to Masonry in that jurisdiction. The medal has been a\"Jarded since 1940 and appears to be restricted to three awards per year. Medals were awarded in Rhode Island to Franklin R. Cushman, Chaplain of Mt. Vernon Lodge No.4, Providence, who as a teacher and educator has helped instill in the minds of his pupils the need for orderly study in the pursuit of their education, and to H. Frank Anthony, holder of a Fifty Year medal in 1938, whose outstanding service to his lodge and to Masonry is a record of which he can be justly proud. South Dakota has proposed a distinguished service award for the Grand Lodge and want to hedge it about with restrictions so that it will not become commonplace. Awards shall be limited to thirty-five in anyone year, which in our estimation is not very restrictive. One award will go to each of the twenty-eight districts, the District Deputy Grand Master making the selection; the remaining seven are made by the Grand Master. Mexico: Many recognitions of foreign Grand Lodges are noted in the proceedings for 1946-47. Arizona recognized EI Potosi and Nuevo Leon. California recognized Cosmos of Chihuahua and Valle de Mexico. California, Florida, Nevada, New .Jersey, Pennsylvania and South Dakota have recognized Tamaulipas. Louisiana recognized Campache, Guadalupe Victoria, Hidalgo, Oaxaca, Queretaro. North Carolina recognized Baja, Calif. Oklahoma recognized Benito Juarez and EI Potosi. Pennsylvania recognized Unida Mexicana.

Miscellaneous: White \Vater Lodge, in Indiana, got mixed up in its meeting dates and conducted its annual election not in accordance with the phase of the moon, which governs the lodge's stated meetings.


98c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1947

It was an error; the Grand Master accepted the explanation and validated the election. It will be interesting to friends of the late Thomas H. Badge to know that his widow, Emma V. Bodge, who died recently, bequeathed to the Grand Lodge of Maine her real and personal property to establish the Thomas H. Bodge Memorial Fund. Massachusetts has Canal Zone and Chile Masonic Districts. The Canal Zone District shows 401 initiations, 94 rejections, and 3,031 members in the 7 lodges located in the Zone. In the Chile District, 3 lodges showed 5 initiations and 194 members. T,vo or three proceedings record the death of William Perry Freeman and assign him to Missouri. The truth is, Perry 'lW-S a Missourian originally, but his Masonic activities were all confined to Oklahoma, and, by the way, he was a great Mason. The Board of Managers of the Masonic Home in Mississippi have been studying the decline in membership. In the State of Tennessee the Homes have already been closed, and in Arkansas the number of guests has been reduced to ten. Grand Master Kern, of Pennsylvania, gives splendid advice to his Grand Lodge: "We must take our making of Masons more seriously. We must do our ritualistic work in a proper and dignified way, for first impressions are important and lasting. We must continue to show a personal interest in our new members after they have taken as well as while they arc taking their degrees. This interest must be planned, especially by the Worshipful Master and the Secretary of the lodge, and the recommenders of initiates must be impressed into service in such plans. More specifically, the recommenders should again and again invite those, whom they sponsored, to go with them to the lodge meetings and to visit in other lodges. "Lodge officers must plan their work so that the interest in stated meetings shall not be killed by the conferring of undue numbers of degrees. They should plan programs that arc instructive as well as entertaining. This advice I would recommend particularly to all Wardens, especially Junior Wardens. It is too late to begin planning after a man has become Master of the Lodge. "This problem of making Masons, rather than members, is particularly urgent in some of our largest and our must rapidly growing lodges. At least four lodges have each received over 170 new members this year, and one lodge initiated over 200. In addition to the inevitable lowering of the standard of the ritualistic work under such circumstances, several further causes for concern arise. , 'When 66 names of petitioners are listed on a single lodge notice, as occurred in one instance, a stated meeting is given over largely to balloting. If all members present were to vote, as required by the Ahiman Rezon (unless excused by the Master, on his own application), it would take all night to perform that function. Therefore what happens is an unwise decline in the exercise by members of their duty to guard against the admission of the unworthy."

Utah is struggling with a form of petition for the degrees. In view of the religious situation in that jurisdiction, we are interested in the religious inquiries appearing on the petition.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

99c

Vermont reports what they believe to be the oldest living Past Grand Master in the United States; he is W. S'cott Nay and served as Grand Master in 1899-1900; he is ninety-six years of age and the sixth oldest in point of service in the United States. Wisconsin's Grand Master believes there are several lodges in the metropolitan areas that have too large a membership, with the result that they are unwieldy in lodge activities and disregard the newer and younger members who desire to attain office. The suggestion has been made that lodges be limited to 500 members. Negro Freemasonry: Alpha Lodge No. 116, Newark, N. J., is the only lodge of colored Masf>ns in the United States working under what is regarded as a regular Masonic jurisdiction. It has been on the rolls of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey for three-quarters of a century, and was established January 19, 1871; it meets at 445 Broad St., in that city. Last year it raised 12 members. The most recent report shows a membership of 91. Open Air Degrees: The Grand Master of California, like many other Grand Masters has been besieged with requests for permission to confer degrees on highest hills or lowest vales, in moonlight ceremonials, and with midnight ceremonies. He refused permission in California for the reason there was an apparent resurgence of Ku Klux Klan activities which conducts its services by candle light and under fiery crosses, and it might be easy for the profane to confuse perfectly proper outdoor meetings of a Masonic lodge with the activities of the Klan. The Grand Master of New Mexico cannot explain the growing popularity of the outdoor meetings, but believes there is something intangible about a meeting which may be experienced only by actual attendance. He gave permission to three lodges for outdoor meetings. Philippine Islands: High Commissioner Paul McNutt made a full report to the Grand Lodge of Indiana on the activities in the Philippines, stating: "Every Masonic Temple has been destroyed and the Craft is faced with the task of providing relief to thousands of destitute widows and orphans of brethren who lost their lives in the defense of home and country. Many are shattered in health and are in desperate circumstances. The Grand Lodge committee on relief has expended most of the $55,000.00 sent them; relief was extended in amounts of $25.00 to $100.00. No relief was extended where the combined family income exceeded $75.00 monthly; it was based on the apparent need for food or medicine only, and extended a second time only in cases of dire distress. Many more are in need of help who have stoically refrained from asking for it, realizing that there was not enough for all. "Eighty-seven of the 110 lodges in existence before the war have resumed their meetings in small rooms in private homes, in shell-torn buildings or elsewhere. In Manila all the lodges which met in Plaridel Temple are now meeting in a dingy, hot warehouse. It is estimated it will cost $150,000.00 to re-erect Plaridel Temple. We may well be proud


lODe

THE MASONIC WORLD

1947

of our brethren in the Philippines. Four years of brutality meted out by a merciless conqueror failed to extinguish the light of Freemasonry."

Recognition: Belgium was denied recognition by Maine; Bolivia was recognized by California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Vermont, \Vyoming; Canal Zone recognition was postponed by New Jersey; Ecuador was recognized by Colorado; Grand Lodge of Hungary was recognized by Kentucky; Grand Lodge of Jugoslavia recognized by Kentucky; Grand Lodge of the Netherlands recognized by Kentucky; Grand Lodge of France, generally regarded as irregular, was recognized by Kentucky on the recommendation of John II. Cowles, ehairman of the committee on universality of Freemasonry; Grand Orient Espanol in Exile, there are no lodges under its jurisdiction and apparently there is nothing to recognize except its Apartado number, which is 231 Mexico City; Grand Orient of France was denied recognition by Maine; Honduras recognized by Connecticut; National Grand Lodge of Columbia recognized by Idaho, Louisiana, 'Visconsin, \Vyoming; Nicaragua recognized by California; Oriental Colombia recognized by Indiana; Palestine recogni7:ed by New York; Rio de Janeiro recognized by Colorado, Kentucky; Santander of Colombia recognized by Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky; Sao Paulo recognized by Colorado, Louisiana, Vermont; Swiss Alpina recognized by Connecticut; Venezuela recognized by California, Colorado, Indiana, Louisiana. Re,jected Applicants: The Grand Master of California offers a word of sympathy for those who have been rejected for the mysteries of Freemasonry. He says he knows two brethren at least who were rejected on their first application for degrees, who subsequently applied, were accepted and later became Grand Masters of the jurisdiction. 'Ve might add that we know of similar cases in Missouri. One of the finest Grand Masters Missouri ever had comes under this category. Relief: One of the finest works of Masonic relief is the Grand Lodge of Minnesota's work at Roehestcr, home of the celebrated Mayo Clinic. Hospital accommodations are being increased, more members of the Craft will be hospitalized and therefore more fraternal assistance needed; since the establishment of this service over 81,000 Masons or relatives have been contaded. Spanish Lodges: The matter of conferring the degrees in Spanish will be unfinished business at the 1947 communication of the Grand Lodge of California. The problem is undergoing a year of study and if all proper conditions are met it is thought the establishment of such lodges might reduce, and even eliminate, invasion of the jurisdiction by clandestine lodges. Unusual: Charles S ..Johnson, Grand Master of Kentucky, 1945-46,


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

IDle

is a product of the Masonic Home of that State. He, his two sisters and two brothers entered the Home in March, 1915. He served an apprenticeship in the printing department and at the present time is general manager of the Masonic Home Printing Plant. The first instance in which a Grand Master has been praised for certain activities appears in the Louisiana proceedings, where Grand Master Passman is commended for devoting his time to the lodges in "our State instead of visiting other jurisdictions. This shows his close attention to Masonic duties at home." Division of 0 ffices: From time immemorial the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter and Grand Commandery of New Mexico have occupied offices in the Masonic Temple in Albuquerque. With the death of Grand Secretary Keen, a change has been made and Grand Master Robbins notified the Grand Chapter and Grand Commandery they had to move for the quarters would not conveniently accommodate two sets of Grand Secretaries and assistants. Chaplain Appointments: There are seven colleges in the State of Rhode Island that grant degrees. One of them has as its President a woman, another a Dominican priest. The Presidents of the other five colleges are Masons and the Grand Master of Rhode Island appointed each President as a Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge. He supplemented these appointments by naming four other brethren who will apparently do the work. lVar: Five Iowa Masons addressed the Grand Lodge of Iowa on their experiences in 'Vorld 'Val' II; they were Colonel D. 1. Marken, Division Chaplain 34th Division; Colonel Ray C. Fountain Commanding 133rd Infantry; Lt. Col. Herbert H. Hauge, Intelligence Section 3rd Army; Herb Plambeck and Jack Shelley, well known war correspondents from Station WHO in Des Moines. Kristen A. Persen, member of Ancient Landmark Lodge in Shanghai and its Master in 1940, addressed the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts on December 27, 1945. He arrived in Manila seven hours before Pearl Harbor. He was the only authorized Norwegian war correspondent, but was detained by the Japanese for thirty-seven months. Through secret radio he kept civilian internees at Santa Tomas informed of the progress of the war. His story should be published in full and given to the Masonic press. The New York proceedings prove the disadvantages of Sca and Field Lodges. It may bc rccalled that during W orld War I many sea and field lodges were chartered; only one still survives and it is located in New York State. Its Master is Townsend Scudder, distinguished New York Mason. Its Secretary says: "As to why it still exists is as difficult to answer as any other question that would be a poser. The status of the lodge is unchanged; the report is a duplicate of last year's report. save as to date. We do not know anything about many of our members, whether they are alive or


102c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1947

dead. We can only assume that many have passed on, but faithfully we keep the record." A BIG NOISE

Three Grand Masters recently met during the annual communication of one of the western Grand Lodges; they were Howell (Howl), Bray, and Holleran (Hollerin). Noisy outfit we should say' William Loucks, past master of Beacon Lodge No.3, St. Louis, Mo., broke into the news in the St. Louis Globe recently, for while conducting an installation ceremony, he said to the new master, Calvin Feutz: , 'Cal, I know people are dying to meet you."

The audience laughed, knowing that "Cal" was an undertaker. A PEROIFENT FOR THE ZOO

Under a flaring headline "High State Mason Here" the Kansas City Star of May 26, 1947, tells of the visit of the Grand Master; in listing guests, we find: , 'F. Ernest Carter, grand percifent."

Thus are new and strange jobs created in the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Candidate: It may not be termed "humor" because of its seriousness, yet there is a certain element of humor in an announcement which we recently ran across. Weare purposely leaving out names and places: Dear Brother: Th!s is to announce that I expect to be a candidate for at the coming communication of the Grand Lodge. It is needless to say that I have held all the subordinate offices that candidates for have usually held. I could give the usual reasons why I should be given the office but they are rather trite. The real reason is of course that I want the ".job." If you are not already pledged to another candidate, I would appreciate receiving your vote. Fraternally

On the back of the card, which was distributed on the floor of the grand lodge, were the Masonic records of the "candidate," which included Star :-Patron four or five times Treasurer Fireman's Association State Rural Letter Carriers' Association.

Note: He was not selected.


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

103c

AVE, AVE, ET VALEI

From time to time we read in the Masonic and public press of men who stand high in the council chambers of their organizations as "highest ranking Mason in the United States," "highest degree Mason in the World," and various other appellations. These would be amusing, if they were not serious, for by such references we ofttimes belittle the fraternity. The ordinary master Mason should know there exists no such person as "the highest ranking Mason" and such statements should be put down with the stories of the hoop snake, and the cat of nine lives. It is true that in these United States we have forty-nine Grand Lodges, and in each Grand Lodge there is a Grand Master. Now a Grand Master presides over a Grand Lodge, and as such sometimes acts for the grand lodge in interim. We have many many instances in which a Jurisprudence Committee has told the Grand Master in no uncertain terms that he has exceeded his authority. A Grand Master 'is King only for the day. His rank departs when his Grand Lodge elects a successor. In other bodies, and in other rites, there are other presiding officers, state and national, but no Freemason worthy of the name would ever attribute to a General Grand Master, a General Grand High Priest, a Grand Master of Grand Encampment, or a Sovereign Grand Commander, the title of "highest ranking Mason" when there are 49 other of the species, throughout the United States, who easily rank for a time in the upper brackets. And to our own way of thinking there is nothing higher in Freemasonry than that brother who throughout a long and useful life has lived according to the teachings of the fraternity; who may not have held a position of responsibility, yet who has made it a part of his life to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and bind up the wounds of the afflicted. Upon his breast may hang no "jewel fit to grace the diadem of Eastern Potentate," around his form may hang the plain unspotted apron of the fraternity, yet the life he has lived, his treatment of a brother, the widow, and the orphan, may have been such as to write his name on the topmost round of the ladder, as did Abou Ben Adhem "who loved his fellow-man." Such a man has the true word of a Master Mason. It is unfortunate that in this year 1947 we cannot have a few more Abou Ben Adhems in our fraternity. If we cannot have United Nations, we are going to need United Masons. Fraternally, RAY V. DENSLOWâ&#x20AC;˘ . Trenton, Mo. July 15, 1947.


INDEX A.Q.C.: a review, 4lc Alaska: Masonic activity in, S5c Aleman, Miguel: mentioned, 36c; photo,36c Alexander, Viscount: arrives in Canada, 56c; mentioned, 37c Alpha Lodge No. 116 (N.J.): Masonic co'hditions in, 99c Arkansas: reference to in "Inside America, " 39c Au, Dr. D. W. K.: experiences with Japanese, lOc Australasia: Freemasonry in, 58c Austria: Freemasons persecuted, 2lc Awad, W. M. : experiences with Japanese,IOc Balassa, Dr. Joseph: Grand Master of Hungary, 27c Balkans: Freemasonry in, 72c Barnhill, F. C.: visits Mexico, 66c Batavia: Masonic conditions in, 17c Bates, Edward: news note, 53c Belgium: under occupation, 24c Benes, President: resigns office, 19c Bengal: lodge stricken from rolls, 48c Benitez, Conrado: P. G. M. Philippines, 37c Bennett, Charles: historical, 93c Bequests, 85c Biena, Joseph: Grand Master Swiss Alpina, 37c Blue, Gov.: a Freemason, 39c Bradley, Gen. Omar: given New York medal, 97c; mentioned, 35c Bricker, John W.: mentioned, 36c British Empire: the future of, 56c Brockmeier, Wm.: burial record, 53c Buildings: advice on financing, 85c Bulgaria: Masonic conditions in, 72c Byrnes, James F.: mentioned, 37c Camus, Judge Manuel: a Freemason,4c Canada: conference of western Grand Lodges, 57c; Preemasonry in, 56c Canal Zone: Masonic conditions in, 98c Caron, Dr. L. J. J.: photo, 1ge

Centennial Address: Bridgeton Lodge, 40c Centennial Celebrations: Craft Lodge No. 28, 54c; Independence Lodgo No. 76, 42c; Neosho, Mo., 54c; Oregon, 53c; Polar Star Lodge No. 79, 54c; St. Joseph Lodge No. 78,42c Central American Confederation: conference, 47c Charity: vs. relief, 83c Chile: Masonic conditions in, 98c China: address by member from, IOlc; American Freemasonry in, 9c; persecution of Masons, 9c Church: and Freemasonry, 80c Clandestine Lodges: in California, 87c Clandestine Masonry: see ' , CoMasonry; " sec ' , Mexico-female Masonry." Collectanea: a review, 40c Co-Masonry: story of, 74c Comenius Lodge in Exile: 2lc Conferences: Central American confederation, 47c; Grand Masters, 43c; Grand Secretaries, 42c; Masonic Service Association, 45c; Washington Masonic Memorial, 44c Connolly, Sen. Thomas: mentioned, 37c Corcoran, \Vm. 路Wilson: mentioned, 37c Cornerstone: national capitol building, 54c, 55c Craft Lodge No. 287: centennial observance, 54c Crime: status of one convicted, 86c Czechoslovakia: persecution of Masons, 18c, 20c; Lessing zu den drei Ringen not to be revived, 2lc Davis, James J.: a joiner, 39c Declaration of Principles: attitude of England toward, 52c; attitu'de of Sweden toward, 50c; Grand Master Strawhecker discusses, 5lc; New York report, 5lc Degrees: exemplification by groups, 78c, 95c; higher, 91c; open air, 99c; roughness in Masonic, 84c; solicitation, 92c DeMolay: the needs of, 8Se


106e

THE MASONIC WORLD

Denmark: bi-centennial of Grand Lodge, 67c; condition of Masonic Temple, 12c; death of King Christian X, 12c; during occupation, 12c; Grand Lodge of, irregular, 69c Dewey, Gov. Thomas E.: a Freemason, 89c; mentioned, 36c Distinguished Achievement Medal: New York award, 97c Distinguished Service Medal: District of Columbia award, 96c Dizon, Eugenio: experience with Japanese, 7c Donnell, Sen. Forrest C.: mentioned, 36c Donnelly, Gov. Philip: mentioned, 35c Doppler, Dr. Karl: contact with Gestapo, 21c; death of, 23c Earl of Harewood: death of, 49c, 3sc; gift from G. L. of England, 49c; Grand Lodge notice of death, 50c; portrait to be painted, 49c Edge, Gov. Walter E.: a Freemason, 89c Egypt: Masonic conditions in, 61c Electioneering: practice of, 90c; specimen of, 102c Employment Bureau: eliminated, 90c England: and the Declaration of Principles, 52c; attendance at Grand Lodge, 4Sc European Relief: M. S. A. report, 46c Extraneous Societies: in Florida, 90c Fascism: condemns Freemasonry, 30c Fay, Bernard: anti-Mason, 23c Ford, Henry: mentioned, 3Bc Ford, Henry II: marries Catholic, 39c France: conditions under occupation, 23c; headquarters for coMasonry, 74c; National Grand Lodge,67c Freemasonry: veiled attack on, 80c Gentry, Wm. R.: centennial address, 40c

1947

Geo. Washington National Masonic Memorial Association: California Grand Master objects to practices of, 90c; conference, 44c Germans: attitude toward Freemasonry,3c Germany: Masonic conditions in, 33c Giovannini, Philip W.: persecuted by Japanese, lIc Goering, Herman: why he did not join Freemasonry, 56c Gonzales, Antonio: story of persecution, 5c, 7c, 8c Grand Lodge of Denmark: irregular, 69c Grand Masters: conference, 43c; discordant note in conference, 86c Grand Officers: objections to methods of election, 91c Grand Secretaries: conference, 42c Grandview Lodge No. 618: President Truman visits, 52c Greece: Masonic conditions in, 31c; photo of Greek Masons, 32c; photo of Grand Master Pappageorgiou,3lc Guido, Jose: executed, 3c 8c; mentioned, 5c Gunnison, Royal Arch: mentioned, 35c Gun ther, John: review of "Inside America, " 38c Hanna, Louis B.: death, 85c Haug, Gen. J. Hvinden: in charge of Oslo area, 15c; photo, frontispiece. Higher Degrees: proposed restrictions, 9lc Himmler, Heinrich: fantastic Masonic plan, 21c Hlavac, Dr. 0.: murdered, l8c Hoffman, Gov. Harold G.: a Freemason,89c Holland: photo Masonic Temple Deventer, 17c ; photo Masonic Temple Utrecht, 16c; under oc路 cupation, 15c Holt, Bishop Ivan Lee: addresses Grand Lodge of Ontario, 56c Hongkong: Masonic conditions under occupation, 10c Honorary Membership: value of, 92c


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Hopfner, Fritz: letter to Masonic Club,33c Hospital Service: M. S. A. inaugurates, 46c Humor, 102c Hungary: Freemasonry in, 24c; photo Masonic Temple in Budapest,26c Huntingfield, Lord: a Freemason, 90c Hylbert, L. C.: experiences with Japanese, Hc Independence Lodge No. 76: centennial celebration, 42c Indiana: joins M. S. A., 46c , 'Inside America": a review, 38e Iowa: reference to in ' , Inside America, " 39c Italy: Massachusetts report on Freemasonry in, 69c; Masonic conditions since 1923, 28e Japanese: attitude toward Freemasons, 3c, 4c; inquiries as to Freemasonry, 4c Jeremy L. Cross Medal: New Hampshire award, 97c Jews: control of Freemasonry, 3c, 4c Jordan Medal : Nebraska award, 97c Joseph Montfort Medal: North Carolina award, 97c Josiah Hayden Drummond Medal: Maine award, 96c Jugoslavia: Catholic atrocities in, 42c; Masonic conditions in, 73c Kansas: reference to in "Inside America, " 38c Keen, Alpheus: Will of, 85c Kem, James P.: mentioned, 35c, 36c King Christian X: death, 12c; mentioned, 35c King, Adm. Ernest J.: a Freemason,89c King George of Greece: member of London lodge, 37c King Gustav: photo, 36c; receives sympathy of England, 49c Klecanda, Dr.: flees Czechoslovakia, 20c; persecuted, 20c; photo, 19c

107c

Korbel, Dr. P.: flees from Czechoslovakia, 19c Larson, Gov. Morgan F.: a Freemason, 89c Lea, Homer: historical, 92c Lessing zu den drei Ringen: members persecuted, 20c; not to be revived, 21c Lie, Trygvie: member of Norwegian lodge, 37c Liberal Freemasons: a new association, 79c Life Membership: discussion of, 94c Liquor: in Masonic buildings, 94c Lodges: advantage of small, 48c McCord, Gov. James N.: a Freemason, 89c McFie, James R.: killed by Japanese, 3c; photo, 6c McKellar, Senator: a joiner, 39c McNutt, High Com. Paul: report of, 99c MacArthur, Gen. Douglas: Japanese inquiry, 4c MacWilliams, Gov. R. F.: mentioned,35c Manchester Lodge of Research: a review, 41c Manitoba: Masonic conditions in, 56c Marshall, Gen. Geo. C.: mentioned, 37c Masonic Clubs: objections to, 95c Masonic Publications: objections to, 95c Masonic Service Association U. S. A.: conference, 45c; Iowa Grand Master ob.jects to, 96c; report on hospital service, 46c; report on relief, 46c Masonic Service Association Digest: ten minute addresses, 42c Masons, Persecution of, 3c Massachusetts: Canal Zone and Chile Masonic districts, 98c Medals: awarded by Grand Lodges, 96c Memoria: a review of Mexican proceedings, 41c Mexico: 7th national Masonic Congress proceedings, 41c; F. C. Barnhill visits, 66c; female Ma-


lOSe

THE MASONIC WORLD

sonry in, 78c; recent recognitions, 97c ." . Michigan: reference to ill InsIde America, " 39c Misar, Dr. Vladimir.: photo, 22~ Missouri CompromIse: a reVIeW, 55c Missouri Lodge of Research: a review, 40c Monk, W. W.: examination by Japanese, l1c Moore, Gov. A. Harry: a Frcemason,89c Mormons: attitude toward Freemasonry, 38c Most Famous Trial in History: a review, 40c "Mrs. America": of Masonic family, 53c Munich: Masonic Club in, 33c Music: unfortunate use of, 6lc Mussolini: antagonism to Freemasonry, 29c National Capitol Building: laying of cornerstone, 54c, 55c National Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia: persecution of members, 20c National Sojourners: accuscd of plotting, 4c Nay, W. Scott: oldest living P. G. M.,99c Neff, Gov. Pat: mentioned, 37c Negroes, Freemasonry Among: a review, 39c Negro Masonry: Alpha Lodge No. 116 (N.J.), 99c; Massa~hu足 setts investigates, 76c; Prmce Hall troubles, 79c Neosho, Mo.: centennial dinner, 54c New South Wales: Masonic conditions in, 58c New York: joins M.S.A., 46c New Zealand: Masonic conditions in, 58c Norway: see "Oslo"; bornbing of cities, l3c; photos of temples, l4c, l5c; Quisling, l3c; under occupation, l3c . Nuremberg, Germany: a rcVIcw, 56c Objector: conscientious, 86c Oliver Allen L.: mentioned, 37c Ontario: Masonic conditions in, 56c

1947

Open Air Degrees: objections to, 99c Oregon: centennial observance, 53e Oslo, Norway: condition of Temple, l3c, l5c; photo Masonic Temple, l4c Palermi, Raoul V.: traitor to the fraternity, 28c, 69c Pappageorgiou, Philotas: photo, 3lc Park, Guy B.: mentioned, .35c Penney, James C.: MasoDlc donation,85c Peru: disturbed Masonic conditions,63c . Philippine Islands: electIOn of Grand Master, 62c; M.S.A. report on relief, 46c; Paul McNutt report, 99c; persecution of Masons,3c Photographs: Miguel Aleman, 36c; Dr. L. J. J. Caron, 19c; Greek Masons 32c; Gustav V, 36c; J. HVinde~ Haug, frontispiece; Dr. Klecanda, 19c; James R. McFie, 6c; lodge hall, MoIde, Norway, l5c; Masonic Temple, Budapest, 26c' Masonic Temple, Deventer, l7c~ Masonic Temple, Kristiansund, l4c; Masonic Temple, Oslo 14c; Masonic Temple, Utr~cht, l6c; Dr. Vladimir Misar, 22c; Philotas Pappageorgiou 31c; Jose Abad Santos,6c; Dr. Richard Schlesinger, 25c; A. Zohner, 22c Pierpont Edwards Medal: Connecticut award, 96c Pike, Albert: gives ritual to negroes, 40c Plaridel Temple, Philippines: Japanese search, 5c Polar Star Lodge No. 79: centennial observance, 54c Powell, James B.: mentioned, 35e; persecuted by Japenese, 9c . Prince Edward Island: MasoDlc conditions in, 57c Prince Gustav Adolf: killed in plane crash, 37c Prince Hall Masonry: troubles, 79c Quebec: Masonic conditions in, 57c


1947

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Queensland: Masonic conditions in, 58c Quisling: an anti-Mason, 13c Rash, Frank D.: death, 85c Ray, John J.: veteran Mason, 54c Recognition: recent reports, lOOc Rejected Applicants: status of, IOOc Relief: European, 46e; Philippine Islands, 46c Rhode Island Medals, 97c Rio de Janeiro: historical, 63c Rios, Don Juan Antonio: a Freemason, 89c Rome: plot to bomb, 4c Roosevelt, Pres. Franklin D.: tool of the Jews, 4c Roosevelt, Pres. Theodore: interesting incident, 55c Roughness in Masonic Degrees, 84c Roxas, Manuel: mentioned, 35c Royal Arch, Its Hidden Meaning: a review, 4lc St. Joseph Lodge No. 78: centennial celebration, 42c Santo, Jose Abad: executed, 3c; photo,6c Santo Tomas: experiences in, 4c Saskatchewan: Masonic conditions in, 57c Schlesinger, Dr. Richard: persecuted, 2lc; photo, 25c Sea and Field Lodges: disadvantages, IOlc Sedmik, Dr. J.: murdered, 18c Shanghai: Freemasonry in, 9c Sibelius, Jan: pension a warded, 37c Smith, Sir Bracewell: Lord Mayor of London, 37c Solicitation: obnoxious, 92c South Australia: Masonic conditions in; 60c Spain: Masonic conditions in, 30c Spanish Lodges: in California, lOOc Spargo, John: review of volume by,4lc Stafford, Dr. H. Eugene: tortured, 5c

10ge

Stassen, Gov. Harold: mentioned, 36c Stevens, Frederic H.: book on internment camp, 4c Stilwell, Gen. Joe: mentioned 35c Strict Observance: rite of, 68c Sweden: and the declaration of principles, 50c Sydney Lodge of Research: a review, 40c Syria: Masonic conditions in, 61c; Syrian-Lebanese Grand Lodge, 62c Tas, J. H.: executed, 17c Tasmania: Masonic conditions in, 60c Tax: Masonic legacies, 55c Torrigiani: a Masonic martyr, 28c Truman, Pres. Harry S.: mentioned, 36c; mentioned in Missouri compromise, 55c; visits Grandview Lodge No. 618, 52c Union Master Degree: historical, 93c Utah: reference to in "Inside America, " 38c Vandenberg, Arthur S.: mentioned, 37c van Tongeren, H.: persecuted, 16c Verses Grave and Gay: a review, 41c Wainwright, Gen. Jonathan M.: mentioned, 37c Washington, Geo.: birthday address, 41c; lays cornerstone, 54c, 55c Western Australia: Masonic conditions in, 60c Wherry, Sen.: mentioned in Missouri compromise, 55c White, Francis E.: death, 85c Williams, Gov. Ransome J.: a Freemason, 89c Wisenburger, Walter B.: death noted, 38c Zohner, A.: photo, 22c


INDEX 1947 PROCEEDINGS A

PAGE

Address of Grand Master Cameron Acknowledgments Blackballing Certificates for Masonic Veterans .................... Charges ordered Preferred Clarkton Lodge U. D. Conclusion ...................................... Courtesy Degrees Death of M. Wor. Bro. Walker...... .. .. .. .. .. Decisions Dispensations Duplicate Charters '" Freedom Lodge No. 36 ........................... George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. . . . Grand Lodge Office .............. Grand Masters' Conference ......... Grand Master's Conference with Deputies and Lecturers Grand Master's Portrait Grand Secretaries' Conferenec Masonic Home Masonic Service Association Masonic World, The ,. .. . Memorial Meetings Missouri Lodge of Research Proper Recognition and Support of D. L. 's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proposed Grand Lodge Newspaper.... Redistricting of State Revision of By-Laws Tax on Salaries of Lodge Secretaries Visitations Visits from Officers and Brethren Washington Conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Welcome to Masonic Veterans Address of Grand Orator Witthaus .. Adoption of Report of Committee on Revision of By-Laws. . . . . .. Amendment Proposed . . . . . . . . .. Appeals and Grievances, Report of Committee Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Approval of 1946 Proceedings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auditor, Report of

5 55 54 32 33 32 56 52 33 8 34 34 36 30 54 29 51 50 30 53 29 36 6 34 32 31 6 28 7 37 54 29 42 111 136 136 109 142 4 66

B Benediction Biographical Sketch of Grand Master Cameron Bond, Ray, Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Building Supervisory Board, Report of Buttons, Veterans' By-Laws, Consideration of Report of Committee on Revision Postponed

143 i 5 104 58 117


2d

1947

INDEX

PAGE

By-Laws, Report of Committee on Revision o. By-Laws, Report of Committee on Revision Adopted By-Laws, Time set for Consideration of Report of Committee on Revision 0

00

•••••••••

00.

•••••

000

0

•••

•••

0

0

0

••••

••••

00.

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

00

••

••

0

0

0

•••••••

0

135 136 95

C Certificates of Proficiency Chartered Lodges, Report of Committee Chiles, Henry Co, Telegram ..... Claudy, Carl, Telegram Closing .. Committees, Special 1947-48 .. Committees, Standing 1947-48 Consideration of Revision Report, Hour appointed for Credentials, Report of Committee (Interim) .. Credentials, Report of Committee 0

0

••

0

••••

0

•••••••••••••••

0

0

••••••••

0

0

•••••••••••••

•••••••••

0

0

0

•••••••••••••••••

0

•••••••••••••••••••

0

•••••••••••••••••••

0

0

••

0

0

•••••

0

•••

•••••••

0

••

00

0

0

••••••••••

•••

••

0.0

0

0

0..................

0

0

0

•••

0

0

•••••••••

00......

0

•••••

0

0

•••

••

126 133 4 4 143 144 144 95 4 140

D

Delzell, Earl, Introduced Distinguished Visitors, Introduced District Deputy Grand Masters, 1947-48, List of District Deputy Grand Masters' Reports, Report of Committee District Lecturers, 1947-48, List of ..............•........... 0

•••

0

•••

00

•••••

00.

0

0

5 5 145 137 145

E Election of Masonic Home Directors Election of Officers Elected Officers of Grand Lodge, List of : 0

0.............. •

••

0

•••

0

0

•••••

0

••

131 131 226

F

Fifty-Year Veteran Buttons ... Foreign Recognition, Report of Committee 0

0...

58 95

G

George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Report of Committee .... 99 Grand Correspondent, Report of ... 94 and 3c Grana Lecturer, Report of 120 Grand J..Iodges Recognized by Missouri 147 Grand Master Address of 5 Biography i Photograph Frontispiece Grand Master's Address, RBport of Committee 117 Grand Orator, Address of 111 Grand Representatives To and }'rom Missouri .. 230 Grand Secretary, Report of 0.. 0...... 57 Grand Secretaries and Their Addresses 146 Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 168 Grand Treasurer, Report of 65 Gray, .T. V Introduced . 5 00....................

0

••••••••••••••••••••••

0.00...............................

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • '.

•••••

•••

0

0

0

••••

0

••••••

0

••••••••••

0

••

••

0

.00

•••••••••••••

0

•••••••••••••••

0

0

0'

0

•••

0

0

0

•••

•••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••

0

••••••

0

0

0

0..

••••••••••

00

0

0

H Hour A.ppointed For Consideration of Revision Report Huwaldt, Edward, Introduced 0

0

••••••

0

95 5


1947

3d

INDEX I

PAGE

Introduction of Distinguished Guests Invocation Installation

5 3 142

J

Jurisprudence, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

138

L

:.ist of District Deputy Grand Masters, 1947-48 List of District Lecturers, 1947-48 List of Elected Officers of The Grand Lodge List of Lodges, Alphabetical List of Lodges, Numerical List of Past Grand Masters, Living Lodge Directory, By Districts Lodges D.D., Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

145 145 226 154 149 144 196 131

M

Masonic Boards of Relief and Employment Bureau, Report of Committee Masonic Home, Report of Masonic Home Visiting Committee, Report of Masonic Temple Association, Report of Committee "Masonic World" Massey, William B., Introduced Mileage and Per Diem, Report of Committee Missouri Lodge of Research, Report of Motion to Defer Revision Committee Report

,

100 70 133 108 3c 5 140 118 117

N

Necrology, Report of Committee Newspaper, Report of Committee Nominations For Masonic Home Board

105 98 57

o Opening

3

P Past Grand Masters, Living Photo of Grand Master Cameron Proficiency Certificates

144 Frontispiece 126 R

Recognized Grand Lodges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Report of Auditor Report of Grand Lecturer Report of Masonic Home Report of Missouri Lodge of Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Report of Grand Secretary Report of Grand Treasurer Report of Committee on: Appeals and Grievances Building Supervisory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Chartered Lodges

147 66 120 70 118 57 65 109 104 133


4d

1947

INDEX

PAGE

Correspondence 94 and 3c Credentials (interim) 4 Credentials 140 0.•••.••• 0•• 0• . . . . • • . • • 137 D. Do Go M. 's Reports Foreign Recognition 0........................ 95 99 George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association .0 Grand Master's Address o. 0•••••• 0•••••• 0•••. 0.. 0• 0• • • • . . •• 117 Jurisprudence 0•••••••• 0.••••• 0••••• 0• 000• • • • • . . • . • . • . . . .• 138 Lodges U. Do . 0••••••••••••..••• 0.••• 0••••• 0• . • . • • • . . • . . .• 131 100 Masonic Boards of Relief and Employment Bureau 133 Masonic Home Visiting Committee ..... Masonic Temple Association .. 0•••.••••.•••.••.••. 0• 0••.• o. 108 00••• 0. • . • . •• 140 Mileage and Per Diem 0............................... 105 Necrology Publication of Masonic Newspaper 98 95 Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges Revision of By-Laws o. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 135 Ritual 124 Transportation and Hotels 130 141 Unfinished Business Ways and Means 136 Welfare 0•• 0. 0•• 00 •• 0..................................... 95 0............ 98 Resolutions Adopted (Welfare) 133 Resolution Adopted (Ways and Means) Revision of By-Laws, Report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 135 Revision of By-Laws, Adoption of Report of Committee. . . . . . . . .. 136 Ritual, Report of Committee . 0••• 0..•.••••• 0• • • • • . • • . . • . • • • • •• 124 0

0

0

••

0

0

••

0

••

S Special Committees, 1947-48 Special Report Ways and Means Committee Standing Committees, 1947-48 Steward, Joseph Do, Introduced

0

0

•••••••

0

144 131 144 5

T

Tabular Statement Telegrams Transportation and Hotels, Report of Committee 0

0

168 4

130

U Unfinished Business, Report of Committee

141

V

Veterans' Buttons

58

W Ways and Means, Report of Committee Ways and Means, Special report of Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Welfare, Report of Committee 0

••••

"

136 131 95


Masonic Manual of Missouri Containing all the Missouri Monitorial work and funeral service. Pocket edition sold at 75 cents per copy.

Book of Constitutions The Grand Lodge Book of Constitutions, 1921 revision, bound in cloth, price 50 cents per copy. Grand Lodge Book of Constitutions, 1947, price $1.00 per copy.

Any of the foregoing books may be obtained from the office of the Grand Lodge by application to the Grand Secretary. HAROLD L. READER, Grand Secretary, Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri.


OFFICERS

Grand Lodge of Missouri 1947-1948 MORRIS E. EWING

M. W. Grand Master Morrisville HARRY F. SUNDERLAND R. W. Deputy Grand Master 3519 Paseo, Kansas City JAMES M. BRADFORD R. W. Senior Grand Warden 4165 Shaw Avenue, St. Louis RAY BOND R. W. Junior Grand Warden Joplin Nat'l Bank Bldg., Joplin EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. Grand Treasurer Care Union National Bank, Kansas City HAROLD L. READER R. W, Grand Secretary 3681 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis ANTHONY F. ITTNER R. W. Grand Lecturer 2353 South Compton, St. Louis EMMETT L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain St. Joseph SAMUEL THURMAN W. Grand Chaplain St. Louis EDWARD POTTS W. GI'and Chaplain Kansas City ALVIN J. LEE W. Grand Chaplain Veterans' Hospital, Jefferson Barracks HOMER L. FERGUSON Grand Senior Deacon Jefferson City RICHARD O. RUMER Grand Junior Deacon St. Louis JAMES McBRAYER SELLERS Grand Senior Steward Lexington ORESTES MITCHELL, JR. Grand Junior Steward St. Joseph WILLIAM J. CRAIG Grand Marshal Springfield HAROLD M. JAYNE Grand Marshal Trenton F. ERNEST CARTER Grand Sword Bearer Kansas City FRANK P. BRIGGS GI路and Purs~tivant Macon PHILIP M. DONNELLY Grand Orator Jefferson City ROBERT R. WRIGHT Grand Tiler Rolla The 127th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held in St. Louis, beginning Tuesday, Septembel' 28, 1948.