Page 1


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS of the

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION of the

GRAND LODGE ANCIENT FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS of the

STATE OF MISSOURI Held in

ST. LOUIS

SEPTEMBER 29 AND 30 A. D. 1936


BIOGRAPHICAL

II

II JAMES W. SKELLY Grand Master 1935-1936

Our ninety-second Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother James W. Skelly, is the son of John Skelly of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, who fought as a private in the Union Army. His mother was Clementina M. Weidler, of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. They came to Missouri in 1863. His father died before he was thirteen years old, leaving his mother to bring up a family of six children. For thirty-five years, Most Worshipful Brother Skelly has shown a sustained devotion to Freemasonry that has brought formal recognition by those branches of the Fraternity with which he has affiliated. He first received light in Laddonia Lodge No. 115, at Laddonia, Missouri, in 1900. Removing to St. Louis the following year, he affiliated with Tuscan Lodge No. 360. Five years later he was placed in the official line, becoming Worshipful Master in 1913. Worshipful Brother Skelly served as District Deputy Grand Master of the Thirty-third Masonic District in 1920-1922, and two years later was appointed to a place in the Grand Lodge line, being regularly advanced, and reached the Grand East at the One Hundredth and Fifteen Annual Communication held in St. Joseph, Missouri, September 24 and 25, 1935. Our Grand Master served as High Priest of St. Louis Chapter No.8, in 1923. He is a member of Hiram Council No.1, R. & S. M., and Ascalon Commandery No. 16, K. T. In the Scottish Rite he received the degrees fourth to thirty-second in 1911-1919; the investiture of Knight Commander of the Court of Honour in 1921, and was coronated 33rd Degree, Inspector General Honorary, in 1925. He has served the Scottish Rite Bodies of St. Louis for twelve years as Secretary, prior to which time he was a Civil Engineer, receiving the degree from Missouri University in 1896. From the University he went with the Engineer Department, United States Army, first as rodman with the Mississippi River Commission, and subsequently serving on surveys and improvement work on that river, except for about a year in the Engineering Department of the Missouri Pacific Railroad.


ii

BIOGRAPHICAL

From May, 1917, to May, 1919, he was a volunteer in the overseas war service of the United States Army, going abroad as Captain of the Twelfth Engineers (light railway) among the first thirty thousand troops from this country. For his war services he was awarded the Military Cross of Great Britain and Ireland. He is at the present time Colonel in the Engineer Officers Reserve Corps. He is a Past President of the St. Louis Chapter of National Sojourners. Our Grand Master resides at 7470 Kingsbury Boulevard, Univer'sity City. The family includes the wife, nee Pearl Smith, a daughter, Miss Gladys Gertrude, and son, Frank Howard.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS of the

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION of the

GRAND LODGE ANCIENT FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS of the

STATE OF MISSOURI Held in

ST. LOUIS

SEPTEMBER 29 AND 30 A. D. 1936


ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION-FIRST DAY

The One Hundred and Sixteenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened at the Scottish. Rite Cathedral, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, at ten o'clock A.M., on Tuesday, September 29,1936. PRELIMINARY Prior to the opening of the Grand Lodge, entertainment was rendered by the children of the Masonic Home.

PRESENT James W. Skelly, St. Louis, M. W. Grand Master. George W. Walker, Cape Girardeau, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. Harold L. Reader, Webster Groves, R. W. Senior Grand Warden. Henry C. Chiles, Lexington, R. W. Junior Grand Warden. Edmund E. Morris, Kansas City, R. W. Grand Treasurer. Arthur Mather, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Secretary. Anthony F. Ittner, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Lecturer. Thomas R. Mather, Kansas City, W. Grand Chaplain. Samuel Thurman, St. Louis, W. Grand Chaplain. Elwyn S. Woods, Springfield, Grand Senior Deacon. Karl M. Vetsbul'g,.St. Louis, Grand Junior Deacon. Harry S. Truman, Independence, Grand Senior Steward. Harris C. Johnston, Boonville, Grand Junior Steward. Forrest C. Donnell, St. Louis, Grand Marshal: Grover C. Sparks, Savannah, Grand Marshal. Leo H. Johnson, Neosho, Grand Sword Bearer. Eli S. Haynes, Columbia, Grand Pursuivant. Thomas Needham, St. Louis, Grand Tiler.

OPENING Promptly at ten o'clock A.M., the Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, James .1N. Skelly, opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri in AMPLE FORM: in its One Hundred and Sixteenth Annual Communication assisted by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of representatives. 'V. Brother Thomas B. Mather, Grand Chaplain, offered the following:


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PROCEEDINGS OF TIlE

1936

INVOCATION Oh God, in whom we live, move and have our being, without whose strength we would falter, without whose love we would be lost, we throw ourselves into Thy presence asking for guidance, illumination and peaee. We look about us at the restless and confused world. Sometimes we wonder what is going to become of it all. Our dreams are so vague and our aspirations so ineffective, and we come to Thee in all humility to give us that stability of mind and heart to go out to do Thy will and seek Thy Kingdom first. Grant us the ability to see what we must do, the courage to cooperate with Thy will, the faith to appreciate the power of the unseen. Keep us, oh God, from pettiness, let us be large in thought, in word, in deed. Make us to grow calm, serene and kind. Help us to put into action our better impulses. May the creative principles of this great fraternity help us to find the way to build a better world and make of our lives positive expressions of worthwhileness for Thee and for our fellow men. For Thy name's sake we ask it. Amen.

CREDENTIALS

R. W. BROTHER ARTHl}R MATHER: Most Worshipful Grand Master, I have the interim report of the Committee on Credentials which is to the effect that a eonstitutional number of Lodges is represented, and the Grand Lodge is now ready for the dispatch of business. TELEGRAMS

The Grand Secretary read the following telegrams: Regret exceedingly I am unable to attend Grand Lodge stop Absence of other Bank Officer and important business engagement prevents my leaving home convey my greetings to the brethren with best wishes for a successful and harmonious communication. (Signed) FRANK C. BARNHILL. Your kind letter inviting me to a "seat in the East" received for which I thank you stop I regret very much indeed I cannot be with you stop It would be a great pleasure and I am sorry I must forego it stop Hoping that you will have a pleasant and memorable communication, and with all good wishes and kindest personal regards, I remain as ever, Fraternally, (Signed) JULIUS C. GARRELL.

REGRETS

The Grand Secretary also announced the unavoidable absence of W. Brothers Loren M. Edwards and Emmet L. Robison, Grand Chaplains, both of whom were unable to be present at this Session, the one having been called West for a funeral, and the other being detained on account of the Meeting of his Annual Conference of which he is the Secretary. INTRODUCTION

R. WORSHIPFUL BROTHER REYNOLDS: Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, I want to thank you for the privilege of presenting Brother


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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Louis T. Tune. He is President of the Cathedral Association of St. Louis, and one of our distinguished members of our Thirty-third Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in the valley of St. Louis. Brother Tune. THE GRAND MASTER: Illustrious Brother Tunc, it is needless to say we are glad to greet you here in your own building, which, through the courtesy of the Scottish Rite Cathedral Association, has been placed at the disposal of the Grand Lodge for a number of years. We recall that years ago you were a member and warden of a lodge in Texas, the place where men are men and a woman has been Governor. Weare glad to meet you here this morning, and I will ask Illustrious Brother Reynolds to conduct you to the East where we will be pleased to hear from you. WORSHIPFUL BROTHER TUNE: It is a great pleasure to meet with you this morning. Adding to the pleasure of extending greetings to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, is the fact that my good friend Brother Skelly is in the Chair at this time. This is the second time that I have had an opportunity to visit a Grand Lodge. My first was in Texas nearly fifty years ago. I was made a Master Mason in Holland Lodge No.1 at Houston, and it was a great thing at that time for them to revere Sam Houston, and it might be of interest to you and I am quite sure many of you will doubt it, but I was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason by a Roman Catholic, Tom Cronin, who afterwards, however, was buried by the Masonic Order in Houston. That was nearly fifty years ago. I suppose you are all familiar with the organization of Holland Lodge and the class of people that organized it. Weare led to believe that that same condition prevails not only in Texas but in Missouri, and many other states, and for that reason I am glad to be with you. I am glad to welcome you to this building that we have all worked hard to create, and I hope that you may be able to use it for many years to come. It is always yours when you meet in St. Louis, probably some of our western friends may want this meeting from time to time, but we hope that you will eventually find your way here permanently. I thank you very much and I am very glad to welcome you each and everyone to our wonderful City of St. Louis and to this wonderful building. INTRODUOTION OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

The Committee on Credentials reported the presence of several distinguished visitors. The following were conducted to the altar, introduced to the Grand Lodge, rendered appropriate honors, and assigned to seats in the Grand East: Grand Lodge of Nebraska. M. W. Brother Chancellor A. Phillips, Grand Master. M. W. Brother Lewis E. Smith, P. G. M., Grand Secretary.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

Grand Lodge of Iowa. M. W. Brother T. B. Throckmorton, Grand Master. R. W. Brother C. C. Hunt, Grand Secretary. Grand Lodge of Texas. R. \V. Brother John T. Rice, Grand Senior Warden of the Grand Lodge of Texas, bearing the Commission of the Grand Master as his representative. Grand Lodge of Illinois. M. \V. Brother Hal C. McLoud, Grand Master. M. W. Brother R. C. Davenport, P. G. M., Grand Secretary. M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, P. G. M. of Missouri, and Past Illustrious General Grand Master of the General Grand Council of United St&tes of America, R. & S. M. Brother Robert W. Hedrick, Member of Jefferson Lodge No. 43, and Most Illustrious Grand Master of the Grand Council R. & S. M., of Missouri. M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, P. G. M., of Missouri, and General Grand Principal Sojourner of the General Grand Chapter, R. A. M., of the United States of America. W. Brother Frank P. Briggs, P. M. of Censer Lodge No. 172, and Most Excellent Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter R. A. M., of Missouri. W. Brother R. Burns Strader, P. M. of Independence Lodge No. 76, and present Secretary thereof, and R. E. Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery K. T., of Missouri. W. Brother Thomas H. Reynolds, P. M. of Temple Lodge No. 299, and Illustrious Deputy of the Supreme Council A. A. S. R., for Missouri. Milton L. Meyers, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Oregon. APPROVAL OF MINUTES

The Proceedings of the 1935 Annual Communieation, having been printed and distributed, were approved. ADDRESS OF GRAND MASTER

INTRoDvc'roRY We meet today in the One Hundred and Sixteenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, and the time has arrived for me to give an account of my stewardship, together with a brief statement of the condition of Freemasonry in the Grand Jurisdiction of Missouri. The results of the year just closing show gradual improvement, and although many Lodges continue to show net losses, a large and increasing number are showing gains. Collections are better and Lodges are more prompt in payments to the Grand Lodge. Greater progress would have been made, however, had many of our Lodges realized earlier that their affairs must be conducted in a businesslike way. The


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

7

amount of dues owing to Lodges last year reached the astonishng total of $143,146.91, or more than one dollar and a half for every member in the Grand Jurisdiction. The total outstanding for this year is $133,315.67, which is still just that much too high. In many cases Lodges have permitted members to become five years or more in arrears. This indicates either a form of mistaken kindness or indifference, for a member so far in arrears will rarely pay up, and years earlier, the Lodge should have made an active effort to collect, and, failing in this should have remitted the dues of worthy members and suspended others. There is still much work to be done along this line, as judging by reports, Lodges in some cases seem to have quit trying to collect dues and meet their obligations. The net results of reports of our 637 Lodges are shown in the Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement. For years it would seem the first question to be asked is, "How much did we gain, or lose." This has been carried to such an extent, particularly in the secular press, that due to the thoughtless publicity given to losses during past years, the idea is actually becoming prevalent that Freemasonry is dying out. It will not do to say that we are not interested in numbers, but we are more deeply interested in the condition of the spirit of Freemasonry, and I am glad to say that the heart of Freemasonry is sound. Many of our Lodges, however, and many of our brethren have had to contend with great discouragements. They are entitled to all the fraternal support and encouragement we can give them and on this occasion we hope that every delegate will return to his Lodge with renewed inspiration and with a firmer purpose to rededicate himself to those great principles for which Freemasonry stands. In the world at large we find unrest, and insidious forces are now at work trying to tear down our own Government. These influences have invaded our schools, our churches and even our homes. The experience in other countries shows that when these forces gain control, one of their first actions is to suppress Freemasonry. The influence of Freemasonry is needed right now, as much as it has ever been needed in our history, to maintain that form of government which was established so largely by Freemasons more than one hundred and fifty years ago. VISITATIONS

Immediately following my installation, on September 25, 1935, I set about to get in touch with the brethren and the Lodges throughout the State. It is impossible for the Grand Master to visit every Lodge during his year, but by arranging for several Lodges to hold a district or regional meeting, the Grand Master can make contact with a large number of Lodges. These contacts have been made throughout most of the State, and in several cases I have also visited Lodges where it was said a Grand Master had never been.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

My first visitation, on September 26, 1935, was made to Laddonia Lodge No. 115 and my last on September 25, 1936, to Santa Fe Lodge No. 462. These are small Lodges out in the State, located as it happens scarcely twenty-five miles apart. The first was the Lodge in which I first saw Masonic Light, while the second, which is one of the most energetic small Lodges, is also located in a section in which a visit was of great value to the Fraternity. During the year I have laid six cornerstones, issued dispensations for two others, and dedicated one Masonic hall. I visited six other Grand Jurisdictions, installed officers of three Lodges and presented seven veteran buttons. I have spoken in Lodges, churches, schools and out in the open. In all cases the finest spirit of Freemasonry prevailed. It is impossible to do justice to the courteous brethren who have assisted me, much as I should like to pay a personal tribute to each one, hence I shall be obliged to be content with the following simple list of visitations made, and the notable features in each instance: 1935 Sept. 26-Laddonia Lodge No. 115, Ladd.onia. This W38 the Lodge in which I first saw M380nic Light. Sept. aO-Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis. This is my own Lodge and the occasion W38 a reception tendered to me by the Lodge. Brothers Forrest C. Donnell, Grand Marshal, and Loren M. Edwards, Grand Chaplain, were installed at this meeting by M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, P. G. M. Oct. 5-Triangle Lodge No. 638, St. Louis. Oct. 17-Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City. Homecoming and gettogether meeting. Principal address delivered by R. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg, Grand Junior Deacon, whose late father was once Master of this Lodge. Oct. 18-Censer Lodge No. 172, Macon. District or Regional meeting with about 200 present. Presented veteran button to Brother Philip R. Smith. Oct. 22-Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, St. Louis. Oct. 29-Hebron Lodge No. 354, Mexico. Raised an old schoolmate. Oct. 30-Pride of the West Lodge No. 179, St. Louis, also meeting of Secretaries of the 33rd and 57th Districts. Nov. 2-Gardenville Lodge No. 655, St. Louis County. Nov. 4-Malden Lodge No. 406, Malden. Meeting of 51st Masonic District Association. Nov. 7-Columbia. Fourth Annual Royal Arch School of the Grand Chapter of Missouri, R. A. M. Nov. 8-Algabil Lodge No. 544, St. Louis. Sixteenth Annual Homecoming. Nov. 16-Grandview Lodge No. 618, Grandview. R. W. Brother Harry S. Truman, Grand Senior Steward, installed by M. W. Brother Thad B. Landon. Nov. 19-5t. John's Lodge No. 28, and Hannibal Lodge No. 188, Hannibal. Dedicated tablet on 100th Anniversary of Brother Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain).


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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

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Nov. 26-George Washington Lodge No.9, St. Louis. Nov. 27-St. Louis Lodge No. 20, St. Louis. Installed. W. Brother Samuel Thurman, Grand Chaplain. Nov. 27-Anchor Lodge No. 443, University City. First meeting in new Temple. NQv. 29-Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington. Raised. the candidate. Nov. 30-Leadwood Lodge No. 598, Leadwood. Forty-eighth Masonic District Association. Dec. 3-4-Waco, Texas. Annual and 100th Communication of the Grand Lodge of Texas. Dec. 9-Wellston Lodge No. 613, Wellston. Dec. lo-Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Webster Groves. Dec. 20-Palmyra Lodge No. 18, Palmyra. Fifteenth Masonic District Association. Presented veteran button to Brother J. M. Gash. Dec. 27-Tu8can Lodge No. 360, St. Louis. Installed the officers. Dec. 28-Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis. Installation.

1936 Jan. 8-Pride of the West Lodge No. 179, St. Louis. Installation. Jan. 10-Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, Herculaneum. Installed the officers. Jan. 14--Shekinah Lodge No. 256, Festus. Installed the officers. Jan. 21-Van Buren Lodge No. 509, Van Buren. Laid the cornerstone of Carter County Court House. Jan. 23-Wheeling Lodge No. 434, Wheeling. The 12th Masonic District Association, with exemplification of work by several teams. Jan. 28-0live Branch Lodge No. 576, St. Louis. Installation. of the 33rd and 57th Districts. Jan. 3O-St. Louis. Meetings of Secretaries, and Masters and Wardens. Jan. 31-Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City. Twenty-eighth Masonic District Association. Feb. I-Twilight Lodge No. 114, and Acacia Lodge No. 602, Columbia. Laid cornerstone of new Post Office Building. Feb. 11-Masonic Home, St. Louis. Presented veteran buttons to Brothers William H. Davidson and James N. Farris. Feb. 12-Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Jackson. Forty-ninth Masonic District Association. Feb. 14-Paul Revere Lodge No. 330, St. Louis. Feb. 18-King David's Lodge No. 68, Masonie Temple, Baltimore, Maryland. Third Degree conferred by Grand Lodge officers. Feb. 20-21-Washington, D. C., Grand Masters' Conference. Presented paper relating to training of Masters of Lodges. Feb. 22-George Washington Masonie NatiQnal Memorial Association, Alexandria, Virginia. Feb. 26-Westport Lodge No. 340, Kansas City. Twenty-second Masonic Distriet Association and close of Lodge of Instruction. Attendance 560. Feb. 27-Twilight Lodge No. 114, and Acacia Lodge No. 602, Columbia. Twenty-sixth Masonic District Association.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

Mar. 19-Urbana Lodge No. 421, Urbana. Laid cornerstone of Vocational Agriculture Building. Mar. 21-Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis. Mar. 23-Forest Park Lodge No. 578, St. Louis. Mar. 25-Pilgrim Lodge No. 652, St. Louis. Fifteenth Anniversary. April 3-Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327, West Plains. Conference with R. W. Brother C. E. Armstrong, D. D. G. M. 53d District. April 3-Delphian Lodge No. 137, Birch Tree. Laid cornerstone of Birch Tree Consolidated School District Building. April ll-Waynesville Lodge No. 375, Waynesville. Secured counsel for the Lodge in trial of a member. April 14-Moberly. Conference at Masonic Temple with representatives of Moberly Temple Association. April 14-Adair Lodge No. 366, Kirksville. Second Masonic District Association. Raised the son of our District Deputy Grand Master. April 15-Mound City Lodge No. 294, Mound City. Eighth District and organization of District Association. April 16--Laredo Lodge No. 253, Laredo. Fourth Masonic District Association. April 22-Maplewood Lodge No. 566, Maplewood. Lodge of Instruction. Fifty-seventh Masonic District Association. A large and enthusiastic meeting. R. W. Brother Stanley Horn, D. D. G. M., has done good work in this District. April 27-Jefferson City. Annual Assembly Grand Council, R. & S. M. April 27-Rolla Lodge No. 213, Rolla. Thirty-ninth District meeting. Steps were taken to organize a District Association. April 28-Jefferson City. Annual Convocation Grand Chapter, R. A. M. April 28--Union Lodge No. 593, Union. Thirty-second District meeting. A District Association was organized. April 29-Marshall Lodge No. 205, Marshall. Twenty-fourth Masonic District Association. One of the oldest in the State. May 2-Cypress Lodge No. 227, Laclede. Laid cornerstone of High School building. About 2000 present, largely in honor of General John J. Pershing, whose birthplace was Laclede. May 7-Missouri Lodge No.1, St. Louis. Presented veteran button to Brother Thomas J. Wallace, a life-long friend. May 7-Commonwealth Lodge No. 654, St. Louis. May 9-Liberty Lodge No. 31, Liberty. Eleventh Masonic District Association. May ll-Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, Kirkwood. Raised the son of an old friend, and District Deputy Grand Master. May 13-Magnolia Lodge No. 626, St. Louis, accompanied by R. W. Brother Edward P. Walsh, D. D. G. M., a member of that Lodge. May 15-Moberly. Moberly Temple Association. All members of Building Supervisory Board present. May 18-20-Columbia. Annual Conclave, Grand Commandery. May 23-Terre Haute, Indiana. Acoompanied George Washington Lodge No.9, of Missouri, to visit Terre Haute Lodge No. 19. May 25-Kansas City Lodge No. 220, Kansas City. Seventy-fifth Anniversary.


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May 26-Springfield. Regional and 45th Masonic District Association meeting. May 27-Anchor Lodge No. 443, University City. Raised the candidate. May 30-Good Hope Lodge No,. 218, St. Louis. Seventy-fifth Anniversary. June 5-Fulton Lodge No. 48, Fulton. June 6-Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis. Raised my son. June 8-9-Davenport, Iowa. Ninety-third Annual Communication of Grand Lodge of Iowa. June I5-Hermann Lodge No. 123, Hermann. June 16-Westgate Lodge No. 445, St. Louis. June 22-Bodley Lodge No.1, Quincy, -Illinois. Tri-State meeting of Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, called by M. W. Brother Hal C. McLoud, Grand Master of Illinois. June 27-Pyramid Lodge No. 180, St. Louis. July 20-Seaman Lodge No. 126, Milan. Third Masonic District Association. July 21-Lexington. Twenty-third Masonic District Association meet路 ing held in the Battlefield Memorial Park. July 22-Clay Lodge No. 207, Excelsior Springs. Dedicated new hall of Clay Lodge and attended a meeting in the evening at which the 3d Degree was conferred by a team from Mt. Hope Lodge No. 476, Odessa. July 29-Monett Lodge No. 129, Monett. Fifty-fifth Masonic District Association. Presented veteran button to Br.other James Johnson. July 30-Neosho. Laid cornerstone of Newton County Court House. July 30-Neosho Lodge No. 247, Neosho. Fifty-sixth Masonic District Association. Aug. 4-Palestine Lodge No. 241, St. Charles. Thirtieth District meeting. Aug. 5-Keystone Lodge No. 243, St. Louis. Presented veteran button to W. Brother Robert M. Hanna. Aug. 13-Lowry City Lodge No. 403, Lowry City. Thirty-seventh Masonic District Association. Aug. 14-0sage Lodge No. 303, Nevada. :E'orty-third Masonic District Association. Aug. 15-Butler Lodge No. 254, Butler. Thirty-fifth Masonic District Association. In spite of the hot weather the attendance was fair. Aug. 19-Fellowship Lodge No. 345 and Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin. Forty-fourth Masonic District Association. Aug. 2o-Clintonville Lodge No. 482, Eldorado Springs. Forty-second Masonic District Association. Aug. 21-Cass Lodge No. 147, HarriSQ'llville. Thirty-fourth Masonic District Association. Aug. 22-Eldon. Conference with R. W. Brother Andrew B. Stanley, D. D. G. M., 58th Masonic District and several brethren from Ionia Lodge No. 381, Eldon, and Olean Lodge No. 134, Olean. Aug. 25-Chaffee Lodge No. 615, Chaffee. Laid cornerstone of gymnasium of High School. Aug. 25-St. Marks Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau. Forty-ninth Masonic District Association.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

Aug. 26-Buckner. Fifty-ninth Masonic District. Basket picnic and out路 door meeting on grounds o-f public school. Sept. 10-St. Louis. Conference with R. W. Brother Warren H. May, D. D. G. M., 16th District, and representatives of Perseverance Lodge No. 92, and Temple Association, Louisiana. Sept. 12-Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington. Accompanied a team from St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A. M., and raised the candidate. Sept. 14--Troy Lodge No. 34, Troy. Twenty-ninth District meeting. Good attendance. Brother John E. Richards, 91 years old, has been a regular attendant for 69 years. Sept. 19-Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, St. Louis. Twentieth Anniversary. R. W. Brother Robert C. Winkelmaier, D. D. G. M., is a useful member here and has given good service in the 33rd District. Sept. 21-Cornerstone Lodge No. 323, and Masonic Temple Association, St. Louis. R. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg, Grand Junior Deacon, who has contributed so much to Freemasonry, is a Past Master of this Lodge, and President of the Temple Association. Sept. 22-America Lodge No. 347, St. Louis. A young but energetic Lodge. Sept. 24--Columbia Lodge No. 534, Pacific. The brethren of this Lodge never do things by halves. Sept. 25-Santa Fe Lodge No. 462, Santa Fe. Seventeenth District meet路 ing. True Masonic spirit is to be found here and this Lodge deserves the good report it has received from R. W. Brother Charles S. Hicks, D.D.G.M.

From the foregoing it will be noted that I have visited eighty-one Lodges or Masonic meetings in forty-three Districts. VISITS TO OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS

On December 3 and 4, 1935, accompanied by our Grand Secretary, R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, and at the invitation of M. W. Brother John H. Crooker, Grand Master, I visited the Grand Lodge of Texas, at Waco, on the occasion of its One Hundredth Communication. We were most cordially received, and had an excellent opportunity to view the workings of this Grand Lodge with its vast territory and its 120 Districts. On February 18, 1936, at the invitation of M. W. Brother Harry B. Wright, Grand Master, and accompanied by R. W. Brother Mather, and R. W. Brother George W. Walker, Deputy Grand Master, I visited the Grand Lodge of Maryland, at Baltimore. M. W. Brother Wright and 1\:1. W. Brother Harry C. Mueller, Grand Secretary of Maryland, who had accompanied R. W. Brother Mather and myself from St. Louis to \Vaco, on our visit to the Grand Lodge of Texas in December preceding, gave particular attention to our comfort. A special Communication of King David's Lodge No. 68 was held for our especial benefit and the 3rd Degree was conferred by officers of the Grand Lodge of Maryland. This was a meeting to which I had looked forward for a long time as I have been the Grand Representative of


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Maryland near the Grand Lodge of Missouri for fifteen years. The fraternal spirit of these brethren of Maryland and the opportunity to witness the workings of a Grand Lodge which has been in existence since 1787 will never be forgotten. On May 23 I accompanied George Washington Lodge No.9, of St. Louis, on a visit to Terre Haute Lodge No. 19, Terre Haute, Indiana, and ~ssisted in conferring the 3rd Degree on a member of George Washington Lodge No.9. Grand Master Rudolf H. Horst and other officers of the Grand Lodge of Indiana were present and our party. was treated with great hospitality. On June 8 and 9, accompanied by our Grand Secretary, R. W. Brother Mather, I visited the Ninety-third Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Iowa, in session at Davenport. The Lodges which formed the Grand Lodge of Iowa were chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1841 and 1843. Very shortly after its organization, the Grand Lodge of Iowa started a Masonic Library which has grown to such an extent that at the present time it is one of the greatest Masonic Libraries in the world. On June 22, accompanied by M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, Past Grand Master, I attended a Tri-State meeting at Quincy, Illinois, called by M. W. Brother Hal C. McLoud, Grand Master of Illinois. This meeting, which is an annual affair, includes the first Lodges established in Illinois, Missouri and Iowa, namely, Bodley No.1, Quincy; Missouri No.1, St. Louis, and Des Moines No.1, Burlington. I was unable to visit the Grand Lodge of Illinois which met at Chicago, October 8 and 9, 1935, but was ably represented by R. W. Brother Mather. An invitation from M. W. Brother Otto R. Souders, Grand Master, to visit the Grand Lodge of Kansas, in session at Topeka, on February 19 and 20, 1936, was declined with regret, as the dates conflicted with the Grand Master's Conference in Washington. I was represented at the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, which met at Omaha, on the same dates as the Grand Lodge of Iowa, by R. W. Brother Edmund E. Morris, Grand Treasurer. This was particularly agreeable to R. W. Brother Morris, as he is the Grand Representative of Nebraska near the Grand Lodge of Missouri. CORNERSTONES

During the year I have laid six cornerstones and issued dispensations for two others, one of which, for a high school building at Piedmont, was laid by M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, P. G. M., on October 15, 1935. The other dispensation was issued to R. W. Brother Elwyn S. Woods, Grand Senior Deacon, to lay the cornerstone of the Community Hall at Branson, on April 4, 1936.


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PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

On January 21, 1936, assisted by R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, M. \V. Brother Tolman W. Cotton, P. G. M., M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, P. G. M. and Grand Lecturer, R. W. Brother George W. Walker, Deputy Grand Master, R. 'V. Brothers James A. Kinder and John N. Sparks, D. D. G. M.'s, I laid the cornerstone of the Carter County Court House, at Van Buren. The ceremonies were well attended and were favorably received. On February 1, 1936, assisted by R. \V. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, M. W. Brother John Pickard, P. G. M., and R. W. Brother Julius R. Edwards, D. D. G. M., I laid the cornerstone of the new Post Office at Columbia. Following the ceremonies, a meeting was held in the Boone County Court House, at which several addresses were delivered. On March 10, 1936, assisted by R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, and R. W. Brother Morris E. Ewing, D. D. G. M., I laid the cornerstone of the Vocational Agriculture Building at Urbana. This building is a credit to the village in which it is located. On April 3, 1936, assisted by R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, M. W. Brother Tolman W. Cotton, P. G. M., and R. W. Brother John N. Sparks, D. D. G. M., I laid the rornerstone of the Birch Tree Consolidated School District building at Birch Tree. The extent to which educational facilities in small towns have been enlarged in recent years is little short of amazing. On May 2, 1936, I laid the cornerstone of the High School building at Laclede. There were present on this occasion General John J. Pershing, a native of Linn County; M. 'V. Brothers Byrne E. Bigger and Ray V. Denslow, P. G. M.'s, R. \Y. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, R. 'V. Brothers Edward P. Walsh, Robert C. Winkelmaier, Herman D. Taggart, and Hendrix Newman, D. D. G. M.'s. A crowd of not less than 2000 was present. This was a memorable occasion and great interest was shown by the people of Laclede in the return of General Pershing who participated in the ceremonies. He is a member of Lincoln Lodge No. 19, Lincoln, Nebraska. His father, John F. Pershing was a member of Cypress Lodge No. 227, at Laclede. On July 22, 1936, I dedicated the new hall of Clay Lodge No. 207, at Excelsior Springs. M. W. Brother DuVal Smith, P. G. M., R. W. Brother Emsley C. James, D. D. G. M., R. E. Sir Burns Sttlb.der, Grand Commander, and M. E. Compo Frank P. Briggs, Grand High Priest, were present. On July 30, 1936, I laid the cornerstone of the Newton County Court House at Neosho. The principal address was delivered by R. \V. Brother Harry S. Truman, Grand Senior Steward. A large crowd was present and the ceremonies attraeted widespread and favorable comment. R. 'V. Brother 'Valter A. Phipps, D. D. G. M., deserves great credit for his excellent work on this occasion. On August 25, 1936, assisted by R. \V. Brother George W. 'Yalker,


CORNERSTONE LAYING OF LACLEDE PUBLIC SCHOOL BY M. W. GRAND MASTER JAMES W. SKELLY MAY 2, 1936. GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING PARTICIPATING IN THE OEREMONY.


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15

Deputy Grand Master, and R. W. Brothers George A. Sample and James A. Kinder, D. D. G. M.'s, I laid the cornerstone of the gymnasium of the High School at Chaffee. Request for dispensations for laying three other cornerstones were received, but for good and sufficient reasons the Grand Lodge did not participate. COMMISSIONS, DISPENSATIONS, ETC.

The list of dispensations, commissions and duplicate charters issued, will be found in the report of the Grand Secretary. Reports continue to be received of destruction of halls and records by fire. By the exercise of a little forethought it is frequently possible for a Lodge even with limited resources, to buy a second-hand fireproof safe for a small amount, in which the charter and valuable records may be safely preserved. . CONSOLIDATIONS

As a result of the extension of improved roads, shifting of industries and population, adjustments have been made in Lodges as follows: Ravanna Lodge No. 258 consolidated with Mercer Lodge No. 35. 'Vilderness Lodge No. 374 consolidated with Pine Lodge No. 314. Red Bird Lodge No. 584 consolidated with Cuba Lodge No. 312. Bunker Lodge No. 275 consolidated with Salem Lodge No. 225. Revere Lodge No. 167 consolidated with Hiram Lodge No. 362. Lucerne Lodge No. 394 has surrendered its charter. These changes should ultimately strengthen the Fraternity by transferring members from inactive bodies to better surroundings. All possible encouragement is due a struggling Lodge and will be given as long as there is a reasonable prospect of fulfilling its normal functions, but a Lodge which is practically defunct should either consolidate with a stronger Lodge or surrender its charter. NECROLOGY

The silent messenger has been in our midst and the moving finger has written "finished" in the record ot many of our brethren. No less than 1611 have answered the summons, including many who have deserved well of the Grand Lodge. As we look about this morning we miss many familiar faces of other years, men we remember who once sat upon this p1atform. Those great and good men who once guided the destinies of this Grand Lodge are sorely missed, yet their influence abides with us as a sweet memory that flourishes "in immortal green." On May 5, 1936, R. W. Brother James W. Christian, District Deputy Grand Master and District Lecturer, died after a lingering ill-


16

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1936

ness. I conducted the Masonic Service at his funeral in Palmyra on May 8. A large concourse of friends followed the remains of this beloved brother to their last resting place. On June 17,1936, M. W. Brother Joseph S. McIntyre, Grand Master, 1924, passed away in sleep. Although he had been in failing health for several years his sudden departure was unexpected. "A prince and a great man has fallen in Israel"; and in the words of Pushmataha the Chahta Chief, "it is like the falling of a great oak in the forest. The fall will be heard afar off, and the sound will be reechoed from many and far-off lands." His funeral was held in the Scottish Rite Cathedral i,n St. Louis, on June 19. After a brief eulogy by the Grand Master, in accordance with the wishes of M. W. Brother McIntyre, three hymns which he had chosen were sung, and Rose Croix services of the Scottish Rite were rendered, after which his remains were interred in the family lot in Bellefontaine Cemetery. DISTRICT MASONIC ASSOCIATIONS

I have paid visits to the following Districts through visits to Lodges or other personal contact, with the District Deputy Grand Master: Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5,8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45,47,48, 49, 50, 51,53, 55,56,57, 58,59. Total 50. The District Deputy Grand Masters have almost without exception been ready and willing to give assistance. Some of the District Deputy Grand Masters have rendered long and faithful service. 1 should be glad to mention everyone of these brethren but can only point out a few who have had the longest service. The first honor goes to R. W. Brother Granville J. Vaughan, 54th District, with thirty-four years. Next appears to be R. W. Brother Walter A. Phipps, 56th District, with thirty-three years. Several others have served for ten or more years. The map of Districts shows great inequalities in size, and omitting St. Louis, St. Louis County, Kansas City and St. Joseph, the variation in IVlmber of Lodges is equally great, ranging from five to fourteen. As District boundaries were established years ago before the advent of improved roads, a survey and adjustment of Districts should be made at the present time with a view to providing a better distribution of Lodges. Through the cooperation of District Deputy Grand Masters, District Masonic Associations were organized in several Districts and are now to be found in most of the Districts. These Associations are beneficial and it is believed that there should be one in every District. TRIALS

I have appointed Commissions to conduct four trials. The work of these Commissions has been entirely satisfactory and their action


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17

has, in more than one case reached results which under the ordinary method of a trial by a Trial Committee composed of members of the Lodge, might have resulted in open rupture or lasting injury to the morale of the Lodge. . There are no cases before the Appeals and Grievances Committee. DECISIONS

To promote brevity and clearness, questions have been reduced to simplest form. Other questions which might have been obviated by a reference to the By-Laws and previous decisions, are not reported. Several decisions were made on liquor questions, sometimes repeating decisions of other Grand Masters, and always adhering strictly to the law. Questions concerning residence and physical qualifications were answered, in addition to the following: The Grand Master has no authority to shorten the time between degrees; it is not permissible to lay a cornerstone on Sunday; a petition for degrees can not be received from a person living outside the jurisdiction of Missouri; a suspended member can not be reinstated after he is dead. No.1. Question: Can a Lodge which has declined to give a member residing within its jurisdiction, and who is otherwise qualified, a certificate of good standing for the purpose of affiliating with a Lodge in another Jurisdiction in this State, be required to grant such certificate' Answer: No. No.2. Question: Is a Master Mason obligated or bound by any Masonic law to blackball a candidate for the degrees, for the reason that a brother Master Mason has asked him to do so, Answer: No. No.3. Question: Is it permissible to use the word "Masonic" in the name of a public park along with a noted general of the Revolutionary War who was a Freemason ~ Answer: No. No.4. Question: Can a Masonic Lodge give a picnic or outing under the name of the Lodge on Sunday, the Lord's Day ~ Answer: No, neither in the name of the Lodge nor through any auxiliary organization acting for the Lodge. No.5. Question: The fee of a Lodge as shown by the minutes and By-Laws is $30.00. Several members state that the fee was regularly reduced to $20.00, and that the minutes are incomplete. What is the legal fee' Answer: Thirty dollars. No.6. Question: Can Lodge A grant a waiver of jurisdiction to Lodge B to receive the petition of a man removing from the jurisdiction of Lodge A, who has lived in the jurisdiction of Lodge B less than six months' Answer: No, Lodge A has lost jurisdiction.


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. PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

No.7. Question: A Lodge has been requested to nominate or select a majority of the Directors to administer or operate a charitable nonsectarian trust; the Directors may not be restricted to members of the Lodge, and they do not control the finances of the Trust. Is this undertaking permissible or within the scope of authority of the Lodge' Answer: No. No.8. Question: Is it permissible for a Lodge to sponsor a Chapter of the Order of DeMolay for Boys or other similar organizations ~ Answer: A Lodge should not hereafter engage to sponsor any nonMasonic or extraneous organization, nor should its funds be used for the support or maintenance of such organizations. THE MASONIC HOME

The Home had its inception in the minds of our forward-thinking Masonic leaders, fifty years ago. This important event should have a suitable observance. For many years the membership of the Home was small, hence the capacity was adequate, and the income was sufficient. During the past five years, however, the waiting list of applicants has grown until at present it numbers almost seventy-five. During these years the income of the Home has been seriously decreased, due to losses in Lodge membership. Under present circumstances there is no prospect in the near future of building on any other site, either a new Home or an extension of the present Home. More room is needed immediately, however, to remedy the present badly crowded situation, provide better sanitary conditions and care for some of the more urgent cases waiting for admission. Funds will soon be available, suffieient in amount to erect a building for children and old ladies on Delmar Boulevard, by. razing a smaller building in the northeast corner, built in 1901, and now in bad condition. This larger building should relieve the congestion for some time, provide better dining room facilities for old people, and do away with the present intolerable dining room in the hospital. I recommend the approval of this project. The care of the members of the Home, both old people and children, imposes an obligation to provide facilities far beyond what ,,,ould be required simply for a boarding house. The limited acreage of the Home grounds makes provision for adequate recreational facilities almost impossible. The proposed building will, however, provide enlarged reading rooms, with study and play rooms for children. Consideration should be given as far as possible to contentment and peace of mind of the old people, and the children should be edueated and trained so that when the time comes for them to leave the Home to make their way in the world they will be self-reliant, their minds


1936

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19

will not be warped, and they will not imagine that the world owes them a living. On June 23 and 24, I attended a meeting of the Masonic Homes' Executives, held at the Indiana Masonic Home, Franklin, Indiana. The President of our Home, M. W. Brother Martin, and the Treasurer, W. Brother William S. Campbell, were present. The papers and discussions which were presented, were mutually beneficial to all the Homes represented, and should promote improvement and uniformity in management. Several Grand Lodges maintain Homes whose acreage, equipment and endowment are considerably in advance of our own. On November 30, 1935, at the suggestion of the President of the Home, I sent a letter to all Lodges in the State requesting a modest contribution for the purpose of supplying some of the comforts of life, particularly at Christmas time, and to bring gladness and contentment to the members of the Home family. I am glad to acknowledge the prompt responses and to return my thanks to the Lodges which made them. For more than twenty-five years the Lodges in St. Louis and St. Louis County have been making stich contributions to the Masonic Home Christmas Fund. COMMITTEE ON WELFARE

This Committee, which is composed of Directors selected from the Masonic Home Board, gives financial assistance to those applicants who can not be admitted to the Home, usually because of mental or physical ailments, and sometimes from lack of room, and who can be cared for by relatives or others outside the Home. This Committee meets every month to consider the applications before it, and to make its limited funds go as far as possible. It deserves our highest appreciation. GRAND MASTERS' CONFERENCE

In company with our Deputy Grand Master and our Grand Secretary, I attended the conference of Grand Masters which was held in Washington, D. C., February 20 and 21, 1936, and presented a paper, entitled, "How May Masters of Lodges Be Trained in Advance, So That, Upon Assuming Office, They Will Be Better Prepared to Administer the Affairs of the Lodge Efficiently'" R. W. Brother George W. Walker, Deputy Grand Master, attended the Conference at his own expense. The Grand Masters' Conference, in addition to its educational value, affords practically the only opportunity for meeting Grand Masters from all over the United States. The value of these contacts, in facilitating cordial relations, and in the transaction of business with other Grand J urisdictiol1s, can scarcely be estimated.


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1936

Problems of Grand Lodges, even though widely separated, are often similar and through the medium of these Conferences, solutions may be more readily found. "In the multitude of counsellors there is safety." THE GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

Accompanied by R. W. Brother George W. Walker, Deputy Grand Master; R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary; M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, P. G. M. and Director, and R. W. Brother Harry S. Truman, Grand Senior Steward, I attended the Twentysixth Annual Convention of the Association, held February 22, 1936, in the auditorium of the Memorial at Alexandria, Virginia. This Memorial, which stands on Shooters Hill, is a national Masonic shrine. ~rhe cornerstone was laid November 1, 1923, and the Memorial was dedicated May 12, 1932. The interior is incomplete, however. There have been expended approximately three and onehalf millions of dollars, and another half million will be required for its completion. The Association has the will to complete the Memorial, and with the cooperation of Grand Lodges the country over, the comparatively small balance required should be forthcoming. The Association has no debts, as it has wisely adhered strictly to the rule that no work shall be done until funds are available for payment. The Memorial in its present condition is not a credit to the Fraternity, but is rather a symbol of defeat. Completed, it enhances the standing of every Freemason in America, whether he resides on the Atlantic Seaboard or in the Mississippi Valley. To preserve the reputation of Freemasonry the Memorial must be completed with the least possible delay. MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION

There is need for this agency for educational services. A cry comes up from all over the State for petitions and degree work to create interest, and there is no doubt that in many Lodges, interest is sadly lacking. On the other hand it is a fair question whether candidates can be expected to petition a Lodge which is inactive and apparently has little to offer, either in fellowship or in the teachings of Freemasonry. It is a mighty dose question as to which comes first, candidates or interest, and while petitions are not solicited, the interest which will attract them, can be created. The pamphlet prepared for the Association several years ago for presentation to newly-raised members is good and its use should be continued. In other Grand Jurisdictions, notably in the work of the Board of General Activities in New York, provision is made not only for instruction of new members, but for programs and other helps to


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

21

enable Masters to make meetings interesting. Some Lodges present a Bible to the newly-raised brother and their motives are to be commended, but it should be remembered that the fil'st duty of a Lodge is to teach Freemasonry. W. Brother Thad R. Smith Chairman of this Committee, died August 29. The Grand Lodge, and the Grand Chapter, in which he had recently been started in the line, will keenly miss this faithful brother. It is good to know that quite a number of our brethren scattered throughout the State avail themselves of the privileges of our Grand Lodge Lending Library. Any Brother in good Masonic standing can obtain a book for home reading who will send his request to the Grand Secretary and agree to pay the return postage. FINANCIAL SNAGS

Go

AGAINST THE GRAIN OF THE BUILDING

SUPERVISORY BOARD

Masonic buildings in several localities, financed too largely with borrowed capital during the boom years, continue to give trouble to the Board, and no satisfactory solution is in sight. The Temple at Moberly is in imminent danger of court action and ultimate foreclosure, largely due to misunderstandings over nonessentials. Whatever leadership was responsible for this project, seems to have practically disappeared and in its place there has sprung up a new and strange proposal to repudiate Masonic obligations. At Clinton a temple which was not completed above the basement was foreclosed early in the year. There are rumors of impending troubles in other localities. The Supervisory Board has given much time and attention to these situations, as well as to the resulting havoc to the reputation of Freemasonry. In some cases the Lodge involved has been slow to give the Board due courtesy and .cooperation. It should be understood that the law give3 the Board broad powers which will be enforced whenever the best interests and the reputation of the Fraternity require decisive action. MASONIC DIRECTORIES AND PERIODICALS

The situation of the Masonic publications in this Jurisdiction continues to be unsatisfactory. There are two of these, one in St. Louis, the other in Kansas City. Both are owned and controlled by private interests. These papers may lead the uninformed to believe that they speak as the voice of the Grand Lodge, when in fact they have no such authority. Claims have been made during this year that the publication of a Masonic paper or periodical or of a directory of Masonic Lodges confers a vested right on the individual who may have enjoyed this


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1936

privilege. At least one thinly veiled threat has been made of action in court, in case the Grand Master should forbid Lodges to furnish information to such publisher. It should be clearly understood that the furnishing of membership lists for a Masonic directory or of Masonic transactions to a Masonic paper are matters entirely under control of the Grand Lodge, which may at any time forbid Lodges to furnish such information. (Proc. 1893, p. 58.) The Committee on Masonic Publications has made a careful and exhaustive investigation of the question of Masonic publications and Masonic directories and will report at this session with recommendations. This Committee and its Chairman, M. W. Brother Frank C. Barnhill, are to be commended for careful and thorough work. THE REVISION PROPENSITY

The By-Laws of the Grand Lodge were last revised in 1921, and were last published in 1925, with annotations of decisions which are extremely valuable. The last ten years have produced a considerable number of amendments, with the usual number of decisions. At the 1933 session of the Grand Lodge, a Revision Committee was authorized, but up to the present time it has been impossible to provide for the necessary expenses of the Committee. An extra day of a session would probably be required for consideration of the revision in addition to the cost of printing, amounting in the aggregate to several thousand dollars. During September of this year, the amendments adopted since 1925 have been assembled, printed and mailed to Lodges and interested members, prepared for convenient insertion in the By-Laws of 1925. This should relieve the immediate need for a revision. A similar reprint of decisions covering this period may be made when practicable. A careful revision of By-Laws and publication of a new edition is desirable when funds are available, and after it is ultimately completed future amendments should be scanned very carefully to avoid hasty and unnecessary laws: Above all, the Grand Lodge should make no experiments in legislation. RECOMMENDED FOR REFLECTION

In a letter to the Lodges relating to elections, dated November 16, 1935, I stated that public installations are not objectionable, provided that the Lodge is able to bear the expense and provided further, that the purposes of installation are not made subordinate to those of entertainment. Further observation, and the comments which have come to me indicate that the public installation should be held only where there is a good reason for public display. It is too frequently made an occasion of a light form of entertainment which tends to crowd out more serious members. The purpose of the installation is


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

23

to seriously impress upon the officers their duties to the Lodge and its members, and upon the brethren in turn, their duties to the Lodge and its officers. Fun is all right in its place but there is need for more serious thought in Freemasonry. The Grand Marshal in particular on these occasions too frequently imagines that he should furnish amusement by an attempt at being funny. A good time is a poor substitute for good fellowship. Other Grand Jurisdictions have forbidden public installations, and the wearing of robes of other Masonic bodies when conferring degrees. In our own Jurisdiction there is no law against either, and it remains for our Lodges to see that these privileges are not misused. A

FRATERNAL REMINDER

Freemasons have from time immemorial recognized the worth of religion, particularly as represented in its organized form in the churches, and large numbers of our brethren are either active members and workers in our churches, or if not members, are supporters thereof. It is not our purpose to speak of any church in particular. Will you suffer a word of exhortation on this matter' Civilization needs more than at any former period, the inspiration and help of every institution working for its development and progress, and the example of our Brotherhood in its attitude to the church today can be of untold value to the world at large in the upbuilding of its sadly damaged morality. May we, therefore, in all our activitieS', exalt and assist in every way possible, our greatest ally, in the onward march toward our ideal of "that world which is to be." On Sunday, August 30th, accompanied by R. W. Brother Mather, Grand Secretary, I attended the annual homecoming in the church in which I was brought up, the Littleby Methodist Church in Audrain County. Through the good work of R. W. Brother Louis J. Graue, D. D. G. M., of the 27th District, brethren were present from the Lodges at Mexico, Santa Fe, Molino, Hannibal, Laddonia, Mokane and perhaps other places. The result was a record attendance and the services which were conducted not only heartened the community which was sadly depressed by the drouth, but left a high opinion of the purposes and results of Freemasonry. RECOMMENDATIONS

In 1924, the present By-Law (Sec. 76) governing allowances for mileage and per diem was adopted. Since that time substantial reductions have been made in transportation and other expenses incurred by representatives attending our sessions. The Grand Lodge is entitled to share in these savings. I therefore recommend that the Committee on Ways and Means be requested to prepare an amendment to the By-Laws reducing the allowances for mileage and per diem, and to report the same at this session.


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1936

I recommend that authority be granted to the Masonic Home Board to erect a new building for children and old ladies on Delmar Boulevard, as set forth in the report of the Board, and if necessary to make an appeal to Lodges for voluntary contributions for this purpose in such manner as the Board and the Grand Master may determine. I recommend that the Standing Resolution of 1914 relating to the attendance of Representatives at the Grand Masters' Conference, (Proc. 1914, p. 173), as amended in 1931 (Proc. 1931, pp. 96,140-1), be enlarged so as to provide for the attendance of the Deputy Grand Master at these conferences. I recommend that the matter of revision of Masonic districts be referred to a special committee to make a survey and report its findings to the Grand Lodge. I have recommended the appointment of the following Grand Representatives of other Grand Lodges near the Grand Lodge of Missouri: Willis J. Bray Elwyn S. Woods Eli S. Haynes Forrest C. Donnell Harris C. Johnston Harold L. Reader Grover C. Sparks Louis J. Graue David W. May William F. Woodruff Harry S. Truman Karl M. Vetsburg John M. Gallatin Edward P. Walsh

Kirksville Springfield Columbia St. Louis Boonville Webster Groves Savannah : Mexico .Mexico Kansas City Independence St. Louis Chillicothe St. Louis

Connecticut Delaware Florida Ireland Manitoba Mississippi New Jersey New Zealand Porto Rico Queensland South Carolina Utah Wisconsin " York Grand Lodge of Mexico, F. & A. M.

THE VOICE OF THE GRAND LODGE SHOULD BE HEARD

It has been brought to my attention, that on several occasions, bodies whose membership is predicated on membership in the Lodge, have conducted enterprises to raise money, in which a form of lottery has been involved. The literature, tickets, punch boards, etc., were delivered by messengers, as they were forbidden to be sent through the U. S. mails. Action on this matter has been taken in some other Grand J urisdictions, particularly in that of Illinois, where charges were recently filed by the Grand Master, which resulted in the expulsion of twelve members. In our Jurisdiction, the laws relating to such matters are not clearly defined; and, believing this to be a matter of growing importance, upon which the Grand Lodge should speak, I have appointed a committee composed of M. W. Brothers Bert S. Lee, Byrne E. Bigger, Thad B. Landon, Ray V. Denslow and R. W. Brother George W. Walker, to give careful consideration to the attitude and policy of


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

this Grand Lodge and report at this session. meet with your approval.

25

I hope this action will

UNEVENTFUL BUT NEVER DULL

No emergencies have arisen during the year, and ordinary or routine matters have been disposed of as they occurred. When word was received of the floods in the East, information was immediately sought as to whether assistance was necessary to any of our brethren in the flooded areas. The replies which came were to the effect that contributions were not needed. While I have found no occasion to call a conference of the Grand Officers during the year, I have frequently consulted the Deputy Grand Master, the Grand Wardens and other officers, on matters of importance, not only to acquaint them with the affairs of the Grand Lodge, but more especially to have the benefit of their judgment, the value of which is gratefully acknowledged. At every opportunity I have discussed Masonic affairs with officers and members of Lodges, from whom I have received a number of useful suggestions, as well as acquainting myself with Lodges all over the State, under widely varying conditions. Such discrepancies as have been found are generally due to lack of acquaintance with the Grand Lodge By-Laws and Masonic customs. It is noted that two recent By-Laws are not being generally observed, namely, Sec. 106a, relating to report of installation of certain officers, and Sec. 99a, providing for a Budget-Committee. With the publication of the supplement containing all amendments to By-Laws since 1925, there is no good reason for further disregard of these important By-Laws. IN GRATEFUL RETURN

The labors of a Grand Master would be inefficient and perhaps futile without the ready and intelligent cooperation of many other officials of the Grand Lodge. Mention has been made of the assistance given by the District Deputy Grand Masters. No acknowledgment would be complete without a mention of our Grand Secretary, R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, whose acquaintance with the affairs of the Grand Lodge and of Freemasonry has been invaluable. Our Grand Treasurer, R. W. Brother Edmund E. Morris, and our Grand Lecturer, M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, have been pillars of strength, and the advice and support of M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman of the Jurisprudence Committee, and R. W. Brother James A. Kinder, Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, have helped me over many a rough spot. W. Brother Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman of Payrolls, whose inimitable signature is so familiar, has been with this Committee for not less than twenty-nine years, and we trust will be good for many more. Mention must also be made of the two District Deputy Grand Masters in the 33rd Dis-


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1936

trict, R. W. Brothers Edward P. Walsh, and Robert C. \Vinkelmaier, who have always been willing to accompany me on visits, some of them at considerable distances, and to cheerfully render other services. CONCLUSION

Every Lodge has lost members during the past decade. Some Lodges have lost hundreds. Now is the time to go over the rolls and make a real effort to return to the fold, worth-while members who have been lost either through unused dimits or by suspension. The tide is turning, and many of them can be reclaimed. But the work must be done at once for the interest of these brethren ebbs every day, and on the other hand after awhile the Lodge may hesitate to restore them. Respect for Freemasonry is too often sadly lacking from those to whom we should look for the best, and when conferring degrees, indifference, poor training, or lack of sincerity is plainly noticeable. The capable worker who is really in earnest, whether Master or Steward, will make a happy and lasting impression upon the candidate. Sometimes at funerals we behold an incompetent Master attempting to render that sublime ritual, and bringing discredit on the whole body of Freemasonry. But the most serious offender is the brother who, by misconduct, brings the fraternity into disrepute. A persistent clamor continues, to "Bring Freemasonry up to date," which in reality means bringing it down to the level of questionable practices in everyday life, and to "excuse" some Freemasons who may do certain things under the specious plea of necessity. The depression has broken down the moral fiber of many men, who, as a result, do things they would never think of doing under normal conditions. But Freemasonry demands that its followers live up to its standards, and the problem is to bring the world up to Freemasonry. Freemasonry is a venerable institution, whether it has existed for three thousand years, or three hundred; it has withstood adversity, and has always emerged stronger than ever. But it has never triumphed by compromising with baser elements; the charge given with the apron of the Entered Apprentice forbids that. And finally, the Freemasonry that survives through the ages must inspire men to lead honest, pure and upright lives, to be good citizens and true to their government, to respect the sanctity of the home, and finally to look forward to a blessed immortality "in that House not made with hands." Sincerely and fraternally,

Grand Master.


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

27

R. W. BRO'l'HER WALKER: Brethren, in accordance with the usages of this Grand Lodge, this splendid address of our Grand Master is now referred to the Committee of Past Grand Masters of which Most 'Vorshipful Brother DuVal Smith is Chairman. REPORT OF THE GRAND SECRETARY

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, presented his report covering official action in the office of the Grand Secretary for the period September 16, 1935, to September 15, 1936, which was received and ordered printed in the Proceedings. DUPLICATE CHARTERS A Duplicate Charter was issued to the following Lodge: Point Pleasant Lodge No. 176, charter "lost"; duplicate issued February 28, 1936.

PROCEEDINGS DISTRIBU'l'ED The 1935 Proceedings were printed and distributed as soon as possible after the Grand Lodge Session. COMMISSIONS TO D. D. G. M.'S By order of M. W. Brother James W. Skelly, Grand Master, commissions were issued to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters by him appointed in the fifty-nine Masonic Districts; the thirty-third district having two District Deputy Grand Masters. CHANGES IN D. D. G. M.'S

R.. 'V. Brother James 'V. Christian, of the Fifteenth District, having died, 'V. Brother David A. Leslie, was appointed to fill the vacancy. REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS Blanks for these reports were sent to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters, and their reports have been turned over to the Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters. COMMISSIONS

TO

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES

M. W. Grand Master Skelly appointed the following as Grand Representatives of Missouri near their respective Grand Lodges: New York, Robert B. Hunt, 2011 Newkirk Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. Prince Edward Island, Reginald E. Kemp. Ontario, George DeKleinhans, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

BLANKS FOR ANNUAL RETURNS Two copies were mailed June 15, 1936, with accompanying circular giving full directions to Secretaries.


28

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATISTICAL

Number of Chartered Lodges as of June 30, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 644 MinusLodges consolidated 5 Charter Arrested 1 Charter Surrendered 1 7 Number of Chartered Lodges as of September 15, 1936 637 Note: Three of the Lodges consolidated sent in a 1936 report. Number of Lodges reported as of September 15, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 622 Number of Nonreporting Lodges...................

18

MEMBERSHIP RETURNS

1935 Membership on 622 Reporting Lodges To which is added: Initiations

.

93,276

2,110 1,926

P~s~ngs

R8.lsmgs Affiliations Reinstatements

1,869 569 1,339

3,777

.

97,053

From which is deducted: Dimissions 739 Deaths 1,610 Suspended N. P. D... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3,576 Suspended U. M. C '. . . 3 Expelled.................................. ... 5

5,933

Net membership 622 reporting Lodges, September 15, 1936 1935 membership on 18 outstanding reports due .

91,120 906

Actual net membership as of September 15, 1936 Net membership as of September 15, 1935 Loss account memberships adjusted during the year

. . .

92,026 94,363 104

Actual net membership as of September 15, 1935 Actual net membership as of September 15, 1936

. .

94,259 92,026

Net loss . Per capita on 91,120 M. M.'s from 622 reporting Lodges as of September 15, 1936 . Arrears for preceding years .

2,233 $191,352.00 2,890.12

Overpaid 1935

.

$194,242.12 126.75

.

$194,115.37 10,296.07

Balance due 1936 per capita

.

$183,819.30 5,990.53

Credits

.

$177,828.77 93.85

.

$177,922.62

Gross Total as of September 15, 1936

Dues remitted

"

Total per capita received to September 15, 1936


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

29

LODGES CONSOLIDATED

Ravanna Lodge No. 258 consolidated with Mercer Lodge No. 35, on November 5, 1935. Wilderness Lodge No. 374 consolidated with Pine Lodge No. 314, on May 9, 1936. Revere Lodge No. 167, consolidated with Hiram Lodge No. 362, on September 4, 1936. Bunker Lodge No. 275 in process of consolidating with Salem Lodge No. 225. Red Bird Lodge No. 584 consolidated with Cuba Lodge No. 312, on July 1, 1936. CHARTER ARRESTED

The Charter of Marion Lodge No. 616 was arrested on July 15, 1935. CHARTER SURRENDERED

Lucerne Lodge No. 394 has voted to surrender its Charter. COURTESIES RECEIVED AND GRANTED

By direction of M. W. Grand Master Skelly, 29 requests have been made to Sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer Degrees for Missouri Lodges and 22 requests have been received to confer degrees for Sister Grand Jurisdictions. TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS

Circuiar letters were mailed out as usual to all Lodges with the information concerning the list of leading hotels and locations and rates. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS DEDICATIONS

D. V. Morris, New Hall, Golden Lodge No. 475, December 26, 1935. Thomas D. Williams, New Hall, Weatherby Lodge No. 235, March 30, 1936. Frank C. Barnhill, New Hall, Carroll Lodge No. 249, April 22, 1936. W. J. Bray, New Hall, Ark Lodge No.6, June 3, 1936. Harold M. Jayne, New Hall, Eld<lrado Lodge No. 318, August 24, 1936. ELECTION OF OFFICERS

Monett Lodge No. 129, November 4, 1935. Jacksonville Lodge No. 541, November 13, 1935. Pine Lodge No. 314, December 9, 1935. Clifwn Hill Lodge No. 161, December 10, 1935. Washington Lodge No. 87, December 26, 1935. Signal Lodge No. 304, December . 26, 1935.

Equality Lodge No. 497, December 30, 1935. Lewistown Lodge No. 494, January 3, 1936. Pendleton Lodge No. 551, January 6, 1936. Lincoln Lodge No. 138, January 17, 1936. Novelty Lodge No. 181, April 23, 1936. Middle Grove Lodge No. 42, July 3, 1936. Dawn Lodge No. 539, July 10, 1936.


30

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS

Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, December 10, 1935, Scottish Rite Cathedral for public installation. Magnolia Lodge No. 626, December 13, 1935, Alhambra Grotto, for public installation. Independence Lodge No. 76, January 6, 1936, Memorial Hall, for public installation. McDonald Lodge No. 324, January 6, 1936, for public installation. Beacon Lodge No.3, January 9, 1936, Commandery Hall, New Masonic Temple, for public installation. :MEET IN OTHER HALLS

Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, to meet in McKinney Hall, New Masonic Temple, N ovemher 11, 1935. University Lodge No. 649, to meet in Temple in University City as and from December 2, 1935. Good H{)pe Lodge No. 218, to hold Anniversary Communication in Royal Arch Hall, New Masonic Temple, May 1, 1936. LAYING CORNERSTONES

Anthony F. Ittner, High School Gymnasium, Piedmont, Mo., on October 10, 1935. Elwyn S. Woods, Community Hall, Branwn, Mo., on April 4, 1936. REBALLOTS ON PETITIONS

Ionic Lodge No. 154, Petition of L. A. Halbert, December 19, 1935. Rushville Lodge No. 238, Petition of Dalton F. Jones, March 23, 1936. Brookfield Lodge No. 86, Petition {)f Marvin L. Cox, April 4, 1936. Windsor Lodge No. 29, Petitions of RDland B. Brown, Floyd S. Sappington and Dewey Larson, April 24, 1936. Anchor Lodge No. 443, Petition of J. Herndon Kirkland, August 25, 1936. VISIT OTHER LODGES

George Washington Lodge No.9, to visit Terre Haute Lodge No. 19, of Terre Haute, Indiana, and confer third degree on one of their own candidates, May 16, 1936. Polar Star Lodge N{). 79, to visit Triple Lodge No. 835, Granite City, Illinois, and confer third degree on one of their own candidates, May 16, 1936. RECOGNITION OF VETERAN MASONS FH'TY-YEAR BUTTONS

The following Brethren, whose names have been certified by their respective Lodges and confirmed by the records of the Grand Lodge as eligible, have received buttons in recognition of their long years of Masonic standing, as follows: No. and Lodge 52 Wakanda 111 Trenton 207 Clay 135 Braymer

Name of Brother Number of Year.~ W. H. Hutchison................ 51 W. R. Painter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 O. T. Welch.................... 50 .James B. Wright. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 51 .John A. Eby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Henry Harr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Humphrey Mount. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 51


1936 No. and Lodge 5 United

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Name of Brother Number Samuel C. Haseltine............. James M. Greer................. G. W. Moore.................... 98 Webster L. L. McNeely.................. 191 Wilson David F. Morton................ Frank Shaw.................... 224 Hamilton 323 Cornerstone Wm. E. Jones................... James F. O'DelL.............. .. 526 Wayne Joseph C. 0 'Dell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nathan J. Gordon............... 61 Waverly 291 Edina ..•............. Charles Stauder................. Geo. Henry Chamberlin.......... 128 Lorraine Mr. Warnhoff................... 179 Pride of the West William Shouse. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 537 BetheL 86 Brookfield Oliver Cramer................... 316 Rural ...........•.....Wm. J. Carr.................... Harvey Nally................... 328 Cainsville Robert T. Scott................. 481 Marceline 327 Mt. Zion Thomas J. Whitmire............. George H. Carter........ . . . . . . . . J. M. Gash..................... 18 Palmyra Joel S. Linville................. 511 Skidmore J. W. Weddell.................. Thomas Wiley................... 460 Lambskin Robert F. Dowell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Agency Leander L. Hoaston. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Xenia Edward C. Wolfers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . John A. Akin... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Dana A. Sargent................ . 139 Oregon .....•......... Wm. M. Ellis................... J. L. Dillard.......... 422 Gate of the Temple Jeremiah H. Wilson. . . . . • . . . . . . .. 214 Forest City J. N. Farris.................... 356 Ancient Landmark C. D. Koch..................... 470 Nodaway .Perry Buchanan...... . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Gate of the Temple James W. Crank................. J. R. Hargis.................... Wm. H. Davidson............... 127 Athens W. C. Eagon.................... 287 Craft Robert G. Martin................ 52 Wakanda 613 Wellston Wm. M. Stewart................ John Newton................... 327 Mt. Zion 323 Cornerstone ...•....... Chas. M. Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James Taggart Geo. W. Barnes................. 422 Gate of the Temple 38 Callao W. N. Bunden.................. Arthur L. Freeland... . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Shelbina Edward B. Browne.............. 422 Gate of the Temple 443 Anchor Wm. T. Gould.................. W. S. Parsons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Pleasant Grove E. F. yancey................... 360 Tuscan Wm. T. Owens.................. Robert A. Morrison... . . . . . . . . . .. David A. Kelmel................ 232 Polo

31 of Years 50 59 50 56 54 51 50 52 60 54 52 52 50 50 52 50 54 52 53 62 61 66 51 50 50 58 59 50 54 50 54 57 52 54 65 52 59 50 51 50 50 53 50 50 50 50 58 58 50 56 52 53 55 52


32 No. and Lodge 52 Wakanda 282 Cosmos 79 534 273 59 380

Polar Star Columbia St. Clair Centralia Queen City

324 McDonald 272 Granite 233 Bucklin 119 DeSoto 1 Missouri. 427 Glenwood 4 Howard 236 174 5 35 547 333 547

Sedalia Sturgeon United Mercer South Gate Chillicothe South Gate

421 Urbana 129 Monett 87 Washington 613 53 174 279

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Wellston Weston Sturgeon Hogles Creek

243 Keystone 172 Censer 111 Trenton

Name of Brother

Number of Years

Wm. C. White................... 54 Chas. L. Stuart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 53 Jacob J. Wertheimer ,. 60 Geo. W. Milius.................. 52 Richard O. Bolt................. 50 Joseph W. Morrill...... . . . . . . . .. 50 Geo. P. Brown.................. 57 Robert Lee Hope " 50 ..John T . Jones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 J. G. Farmer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 53 Austin Buckallew...... . . . . . . . . .. 50 G. C. Stewart................... 54 Greene L. }'owler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Chas. E. Messerly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 C. M. Cole...................... 53 W. E. Gibson................... 50 Geo. C.Wagoner................ 50 Thomas Wallace.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Geo. W. Ford................... 55 Geo. C. Edwards.... .. 62 R. T. Kingsbury................ 63 John P. Gass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Geo. R. Summers................ 58 Chas. H. Van Pelt............... 58 Frank Ward.................... 50 S. B. Lightcap............ . . . . .. 66 John P. Tudor.................. 52 Edwin Dawson.................. 53 Roland Hughes.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Joel T. Clymore................. 53 James Johnston................. 55 S. A. Payne..................... 50 H. H. Finley... 50 Wm. H. Eoff '" 50 James W. Layton............... 50 L. P. Wharton.................. 54 N. F. Meador................... 52 J. R. Wilson.................... 67 Robert M. Hanna............... 50 Chas. G. Howe............... . . . 50 Joseph L. Nichols............... 58 Abram C. Dudley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 MASONIC ROME OF MISSOURI

WELFARE CoMMITTEE: (Delinquent 1932 and 1933 per capita tax.) RECEIPTS: From September 16, 1933, to September 14, 1935 $20,414.03 DISBURSEMENTS: From September 16, 1933, to September 14, 1935.......................................... BALANCE DUE Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee to September 14, 1935.. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. RECEIPTS: From September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936

20,350.00

$

64.03

$ 3,830.79 $ 3,894.82


1936

33

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

DISBURSEMENTS: From September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936: Check No. 61, January 6, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee............... Check No. 70, February 6, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee......... . . . . . . Check No. 87, February 29, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . . Check No. 94, April 7, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 111, May 6, 1936, Masonic Home, aceount Welfare Committee................. Check No. 121, June 1, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee............... Check No. 136, July 6, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee................. Check No. 157, August 6, 1936, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee............... TOTAL amount paid to Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee from September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936. . . . .

$ 600.00 300.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00

$6,900.00路

TOTAL amount collected from September 16, 1933, to September 14, 1935, on account delinquent per capita tax to be used by the Welfare Committee $20,414.03 RECEIPTS: From September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3,830.79

24,244.82

AMOUNT paid from General Fund (see note below)

3,005.18

TOTAL amount paid to Masonic Home from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1936, on account Welfare Committee .

$27,250.00

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1934 Per Capita: BALANCE DUE Masonic Home, this account, to September 14, 1935 $

643.40 1,810.80

RECEIPTS: From September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936 $ TOTAL amount paid Masonic Home, September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936 . Check No. 137, July 6, 1936 $1,240.80 888.10 Check No. 170, August 31, 1936...............

2,454.20 2,128.90

$2,128.90 BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1934 per capita, to September 15, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

325.30

路NOTE: $3,005.18 of the $6.900.00 paid to the Welfare Committee represents amount paid out of General Fund in accordance with Resolution. (See Grand Lodge Proceedings, 1935, pp. 95-97.)


34

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1935 Per Capita: BALANCE DUE Masonic Home, this account, to September 14, 1935 $

1,383.80

RECEIPTS: From September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936.......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $5,992.00 (Masonic Home Pro Rata thereof) .

4,280.00 $

TOTAL amount paid Masonic Home, September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936.................................. $4,501.75 Check No. 138, July 6, 1936 . .. 953.98 Check No. 171, August 31, 1936......

5,663.80 5,455.73

----

$5,455.73 BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1935 per capita, to September 15, 1936................................. $

208.07

1936 Per Capita: RECEIPTS: From July 1, 1936, to September 15, 1936 $177,922.62 (Masonic Home Pro Rata thereof) $127,087.58 TOTAL amount paid Masonic Home, July 1, 1936, to September 15, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000.00 Check No. 141, July 15, 1936 '" 10,000.00 Check No. 142, July 22, 1936 Check No. 143, July 29, 1936 , . 25,000.00 Check No. 159, August 10, 1936.............. 25,000.00 Check No. 172, August 31, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 51,385.15

126,385.15

$126,385.15 BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1936 per capita, to September 15, 1936................................. $

702.43

SPECIAL INITIATION FUNl}

Total amount received from October 15, 1920, to September 14, 1935 $506,590.00 *Total amount received from September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

120.00 $506,710.00

Total amount paid to Masonic Home on this account from October 15, 1920, to路 September 15, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

506,530.00 $

LESs-Bank Service Charge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BALANCE DUE Masonic Home, on this account, to September 15, 1936 $

180.00 1.00

179.00


1936

35

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Cash Balance-September 14, 1935...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ *Total amount received September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936 .

107.98 16.00

September 15, 1936....... . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 123.98 Total amount paid to J. Claude Keiper, Treasurer of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Inc•........................................... $157,017.01 THE DR. WILLIAM F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Inau.gu.rated by Donation of $500.00 by Brother Marcu.s A. Loevy, at Grand Lodge Session, October 17, 1922. This fund since exchange of bond was made July 18, 1928, consists of: One $500.00 United States Treasury 3% per cent bond held in Grand Lodge safe deposit box, Kansas City, Mo. $ CAS~, in s?,vings account, First National Bank, St. Louis, MIssourI $

Total Library Fund reported September 14, 1935.. $714.48 Interest on Bond...................... $16.88 Interest on Savings Account as follows: December, 1935 $1.75 June, 1936.................... 1.67 3.42 20.30 TOTAL

FUND,

September 15, 1936............... . . . . .. $

500.00 234.78 734.78

734.78 734.78

GRAND WDGE FINANCES

CASH in Grand Depository" September 14, 1935. . . . . . . . . . .. $ 59,031.82 Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri (restricted) $ 4,778.82 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri 52,482.13 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri 1,770.87 $ 59,031.82 Total 1932-1933 per capita tax received from September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936, from Lodges delinquent in payments (for Welfare Committee) 3,830.79 Total 1934 per capita tax received from September 15, 1935, to September 15, 1936 (for Ma1,810.80 sonic Home) Total 1935 per capita tax received from September 14, 1935, to September 15, 1936. . . . . . . . .. $ 5,992.00 Total 1936 per capita tax received to September 15, 1936 $177,922.62 $183,914.62 -For amounts paid by individual lodges, see Grand Secretary's Tabular State-

ment, 1936 proceedings.


36

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Sale of dues receipt cards Sale of Pocket Edition Manuals $ Sale of Library Edition Manuals....... . . . . . . Sale of 1925 Constitution and By-Laws Sale of 1921 Constitution and By-Laws

$ .

. 624.15 7.00 38.00 4.50

Sale of 50-year veteran buttons . Refund, Union National Bank, 1935 mileage and per diem account . Facsimile signature cut (for Trenton Lodge 111) . Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due September 15, 1935.............................. $ 100.61 Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due October 15, 1935................................. 606.25 Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due December 15, 1935.............................. 575.62 Interest on U. S. Go-vernment Bonds due March 15, 1936................................. 127.98 Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due April 15, 1936................................. 563.15 Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due June 15, 1936................................. 575.63

856.67 631.Ui

42.50 145.50 555.20 4.64

2,549.84

TOTAL RECEIPTS to September 15, 1936.. . . . . . . . . . .. $253,373.53 ANALYSIS OF DISBURSEMENTS

Total of vouchers Nos. 1 to 173, inclusive

$187,759.42

Pay roll, 1935......................................... $ 20,800.00 Proceedings, 1935........................... $ 1,575.00 Salaries and allowances, Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Lecturer, 15,023.75 . Lecturer, Grand Lodge Office Account 1,500.00 Grand Lecturer Emeritus . 500.00 Grand Correspondent . 1,800.00 Maintenance Grand Lodge Offices . Masonic Relief ..Association, United States and 235.91 Canada . 195.00 Past Grand Master's J ewe!. . 500.00 Expenses Grand Lodge Session, 1935 . 75.00 Reporter, Grand Lodge Session, 1935 . 164.83 . Telephone, Jefferson 4877 300.00 Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer 671.79 Contingent Fund, funerals, etc . 150.00 Perkins Audit Company . Expense, George Washington Memorial and 200.00 Grand Master's conferences . Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers, Order Grand 161.36 Master . 2,043.07 Printing, postage, stationery and incidentals . 25,155.7] 60.00 Memorial Tablet, Mark Twain .


1936

37

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Total budget appropriation for 193536 (exclusive of pay roll) . . . . . .. $ 26,955.00 Actual disbursements............. 25,155.71 UNEXPENDED BALANCE

1,799.29

Masonic Home: Paid on account 1934 per capita tax $ 2,128.90 Masonic Home: Paid on account 1935 per capita tax 5,455.73 Masonic Home: Paid on account 1936 per capita tax 126,385.15 Masonic Home: Paid on account Welfare Committee Dues Receipt Cards

. .

September 15, 1936-AcTUAL DISBURSEMENTS

133,969.78 6,900.00 933.93

$ 187,759.42

RECAPITULATION

Total receipts to September 15, 1936..................... $253,373.53 Total Disbursements to September 15, 1936............... 187,759.42 CASH BALANCE, September 15, 1936, General Fund. . . . .

65,614.11

Cash balance, September 15, 1936, Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. (restricted) $ 4,778.82 Cash balance, September 15, 1936, Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59,064.42 Cash balance, September 15, 1936, Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,770.87

65,614.11

Less: Balance due Masonic Home, account 1934 per capita $ Balance due Masonic Home, account 1935 per capita ,., , .. ". ,." "" Balance due Masonic Home, account 1936 per capita , , , ,.

325.30 208.07 702.43 $1,235.80

Less: $4,778.82 "restricted" Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri .

4,778.82

6,014.62

September 15, 1936, Total Amount Available Cash in General Fund ... ,.................................... $ 59,599.49 Fraternally submitted,

~. Grand Seln'etary.


38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

REPORT OF THE GRAND TREASURER

R. W. Brother E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, presented his report covering the period from September 14,1935, to September 15, 1936, which was received as follows, together with report of Auditor, and both ordered printed in the proceedings: 1935 Sept. 14 Balance cash on hand in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri (restricted) $ 4,778.82 " 14 Balance cash on hand in Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri...... 1,770.87 " 14 Balance cash on hand in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri...... 52,482.13 $ 59,031.82 Receipt No. Oct. 2 857 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, Bond Interest .................... $ 100.61 19.71 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 22 858 1,156.50 859 " " " " 16 860 " 137.75 " mather, " Grand " Sec'y, "Bond " 28 861 Arthur " 606.25 Interest ............... , .... 72.00 Nov. 1 862 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary 276.00 " 18 863 " " " " 131.50 Dec. 2 864 " " " " 17 865 541.78 " " " " " 24 866 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, Bond " Interest .................... 575.62 1936 614.51 Jan. 2 867 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary 516.28 868 " " " " " 16 Mather, Grand Secretary, " 20 869 Arthur trans. mileage and per diem balance to General Fund ......... 555.20 214.94 Feb. 3 870 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary 17 871 1,265.50 " " " " " Mar. 2 872 251.95 " " " " 329.50 17 873 " " " " 24 " 874 Arthur Mather, Grand See'y, Bond " Interest ............. , ...... 127.98 Apr. 1 875 Arthur Mather; Grand Secretary 75.84 15 876 446.75 " " " 21 " " 877 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, Bond " Interest I ' . • . . • • . . . . . . . . • • . • 563.75 May 1 878 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary 852.20 18 879 731.08 " " " " " June 1 880 139.70 " " " " 881 775.30 " " " 16 " " Mather, Grand Sec 'y, Bond " 20 882 Arthur Interest .................... 575.63


1936 July " " " "

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI 1 883 2 884 2

"

6

"

6

"

7

" " "

7 8 8

" "

9 9

" 10 " 10 " 11 " 11 " 13 " 13 " 14 " 14 " 15 " 15 " 16 " 16 " 17 " 17 " 20 " 20 " 20 " 20 " 21 " 21 " 22 " 22 " 23 " 23 " 24 " 24 " 25 " 25 " 27 " 27 " 28 " 28 " 29 " 29 " 30 " 30 " 31 " 31 Aug. 1 " 1

" "

885

3 886 3 887

3 3

888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937

138.80 3,363.30 14.21 41.66 5,988.44 42.19 9,741.30 12.63 2,774.10 9.09 3,038.80 26.25 6,168.60 5.08 1,482.00 18.74 4,166.40 12.97 4,445.27 17.29 3,881.00 34.95 7,617.35 24.10 4,540.20 9.33 2,143.75 20.72 4,942.35 19.21 4,754.40 23.29 4,991.70 27.87 6,160.80 23.57 5,539.60 19.98 4,594.70 20.09 4,673.40 5,451.19 25.87 29.14 6,762.80 54.48 12,102.40 38.02 9,149.30 34.27 8,321.20 73.53 14,675.55 32.78 6,394.95

Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary $

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40

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Aug. 5 " 5 " 5 " 5 " 6 " 6 7" " 7 " 8 " 8 " 11 " 11 " 14 " 14 " 17 " 17 " 24 " 24 " 26 " 26 " 29 " 29 Sept. 1 " 11 " 11 " 15 " 15

938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 947 948 949 950 951 952 953 954 955 956 957 958 959 960 961 962 963 964

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"

" " " " " " "

" " "

"

" " " " "

" " "

"

" " " " " " " " " " " "

" " " " "

" " " " " " "

" " " " " " "

" " "

"

"

" " " " " " "

"

" "

" " " " " "

"

" "

" " " "

"

" "

"

" " "

"

" "

" "

$

20.10 3,865,05 10.70 1,877.70 3.74 727.54 13.85 3,071.50 1,100.38 5.81 11.97 2,022.60 8.24 1,393.54 14.26 2,137.80 8.27 1,562.20 20.60 3,828.70 2.63 487.20 42.64 24.18 985.82 5.55 720.40 $194,341.71 $253,373.53

DISBURSEMENTS

1935 Sept. 16 "

16

"

30

"

30

"

30

" " "

30 30 30

" "

30 30

"

30

"

30

"

30

"

30

Check No. 1 Grand Lodge of Missouri, mileage and per diem, a/c. . . . . . . . . . .. $20,000.00 2 Arth ur Mather, Grand Secretary, printing, postage, stationery .. 100.00 3 Arthur Mather, expenses Grand 500.00 Lodge Convention . 4 Aug. F. Niederluecke, Reporter, Grand Lodge Convention . 75.00 5 Masonic Temple Assn., mainte150.00 }lanCe •••••••••••••••••••••• . 375.00 6 Arthur Mather, salary . 325.00 7 Anthony F. Ittner, salary 8 Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand 100.00 Lecturer . 125.00 9 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 10 P. G. Master's jewel, Herman Mauch . 195.00 11 Jas. W. Skelly, expense, Grand Master . 500.00 12 Perkins Audit Co., Audit Grand Lodge . 150.00 13 Van Dyke & Co., bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer . 300.00 150.00 . 14 F. Berger, salary


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Sept. 30 Oct. 1

15 16

"

11 11

17 18

"

11

19

" "

26 26

20 21

" "

26 26

22 23

"

26

24

"

26

25

"

26

26

"

26

27

"

31

28

" " " " " " Nov.

31 31 31 31 31 31 4

29 30 31 32 33 34 35

" "

4 9

36 37

" "

13 30

38 39

" " "

30 30 30

40 41 42

" " " Dec.

30 30 30 11

43 44 45 46

" "

11 11

47 48

" "

11 11

49 50

"

11

51

0"

75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary , $ Grand Lodge of Missouri, pay800.00 . roll a/c 26.65 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . Masonic Relief Assn., U. S. and 235.91 Canada, year 1935 . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, 18.90 expense alc Ill. Grand Lodge 126.05 Spalding Sta. Co., office supplies Whitehead & Hoag Co., Veteran 130.36 Emblems . Lilley-Ames Co., supplies . 25.27 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, printing, postage, stationery .. 100.00 Strauss-Peyton, portrait, DuVal 38.89 Smith . Menke Ptg. Co., printing, postage, 30.05 stationery . Karl Vetsburg, expense to Jeffer9.10 son City . Arthur Mather, expense alc Grand 17.80 Lodge, Kentucky . Masonic Temple Assn., mainte150.00 nance . 375.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 325.00 A. F. Ittner, salary . 100.00 A. F. Ittner, Exp. Gr. Lecturer .. 125.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Union Safe Deposit Co., rental 8.25 safety deposit box No. 6111 ... 15.88 Jas. A. Kinder, Exp. Ritual Com. Harris C. Johnston, expense to 7.05 Mendon, Mo . 1,575.00 Ovid Bell Press, Ptg., Proceedings Masonic Temple Assn., mainte150.00 nance . 375.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 325.00 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary, expense, 100.00 Grand Lecturer . 125.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Spalding Sta. Co., 1936 dues re933.93 ceipts . 73.36 Spalding Sta. Co., office supplies Bodine Pattern Co., Mark Twain 60.00 Bronze Plaques . 34.54 Bell Tel. Co., service . Ovid Bell Press, printing and of174.91 fice supplies . Ovid Bell Press, postage for Pro98.86 ceedings .

41


42 Dec. " " " " "

24 24 24 24 24 31

52 53 54 55 56 57

"

31

58

1936 Jan. 2 " 2

59 60

"

6

"

27

"

31

" " "

31 31 31

" " " Feb.

31 31 31 6

" " " "

14 14 14 14

"

14

"

14

"

24

" "

29 29

" " "

29 29 29

" " " " "

29 29 29 29 29

Mar. 31 "

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

31

Arthur Mather, salary $ J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . F. Berger, salary . R. L. Bohle, salary . Jas. W. Skelly, Exp. Grand Master Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . Arthur Mather, Ptg., postage and stationery .

Anthony F. Ittner, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 61 Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief Program . 62 Arthur Mather, Exp. 12th Dist. meeting . 63 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . 64 Arthur Mather, salary . . 65 Anthony F. Ittner, salary 66 Anthony F. Ittner, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 67 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 68 F. Berger, salary . 69 R. L. Bohle, salary . 70 Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare R.elief . 71 Arthur Mather, Exp. Publ. Com. . 72 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service 73 Becktold Co., office supplies . 74 Spalding Sta. Co., Ptg., postage and sundries . 75 Arthur Mather, Exp. Goo. Washington Mem. Conf . 76 Jas. W. Skelly, Exp. Geo. Washington Mem. Conf . 77 J. Claude Keiper, Exp. Grand Master's Conf . 78 Shaw-Walker Co., office supplies .. 79 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . 80 Arthur Mather, salary . 81 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . 82 Anthony F. Ittner, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 83 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 84 F. Berger, salary . . 85 R. L. Bohle, salary 86 J as. W. Skelly, Exp. Grand Master 87 Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare Relief . 88 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . 89 Arthur Mather, salary .

375.00 125.00 150.00 75.00 500.00 150.00 100.00 325.00 100.00 600.00 14.26 150.00 375.00 325.00 100.00 125.00 150.00 75.00 300.00 42.00 24.93 35.00 69.44 100.00 100.00 25.00 8.79 150.00 375.00 325.00 100.00 125.00 150.00 75.00 500.00 1,000.00 150.00 375.00


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Mar. " " " Apr.

31 31 31 31 7

90 91 92 93 94

" " " " " "

9 9

95 96

9

97

9

9 9

98 99 100

"

25

101

"

25

102

"

30

103

" " "

30 30 30

104 105 106

" " " "

30 30 30 30

107 108 109 110

6

111

"

16

112

"

16

113

"

29

114

" " "

29 29 29

115 116 117

" " " June

29 29 29 1

118 119 120 121

"

1

122

"

11

123

"

15

124

"

16

125

May

Anthony F. Ittner, salary $ 325.00 125.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare 1,000.00 Relief . 28.64 . S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service Whitehead & Hoag Co., veterans' 130.36 embleDlB . Mo. Ptg. & Sta. Co., office supplies, 90.40 etcâ&#x20AC;˘........................ 49.00 Korzendorfe Bick Co., repairs ... 32.16 Spalding Sta. Co., office supplies Arthur Mather, Gr. Secy, Ptg., 100.00 postage, etc . Case, Thomas & Marsh, fire in 94.75 surance . Strauss-Peyton, Grand Master's 33.83 portrait . Masonic Temple Assn., mainte150.00 nance . 375.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 325.00 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, Exp. Grand 100.00 Lecturer . 125.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . F. Berger, salary . 150.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . 75.00 F. C: Bar~hill, Exp. to Norborne, 4.50 Mlssourl . Masonic Home of Missouri, ale Welfare Relief . 1,000.00 Becktold Co., Ptg., postage and stationery . 155.75 Ovid Bell Press, Ptg., postage and stationery . 189.37 Masonic Temple Assn., mainte150.00 nance . Arthur Mather, salary . 375.00 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . 325.00 Anthony F. Ittner, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 100.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 125.00 F. Berger, salary . 150.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . 75.00 Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief . 1,000.00 Elwyn S. Woods, D. D. G. M. meet64.96 ing, Springfield . E. E. Morris, Exp. a/c. Grand Lodge, Nebraska . 16.40 E. E. Morris, salary Grand Treas450.00 urer . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, postage . 56.46

43


44

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

June 30

126

" " "

30 30 30

127 128 129

" " " " " "

30 30 30 30 30 30

130 131 132 133 134 135

July 6

136

"

6

137

"

6

138

"

15

139

"

22

140

"

29

141

"

29

142

"

31

143

"

31

144

"

31

145

"

31

146

"

31

147

"

31

148

" " "

31 31 31

149 150 151

" " " Aug.

31 31 31 6

152 153 154 155

"

6

"

6

156 157

"

6

158

"

10

159

Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance $ 150.00 375.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 325.00 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand 100.00 Lecturer . 125.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . 8.00 W. E. McIlroy, repair check writer 30.57 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . Mo. Ptg. and Sta. Co., return 169.94 blanks . Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare 1,000.00 :Relief Com . Masonic Home of Mo., back dues 1,240.80 clo welfare . Masonic Home of Mo., back dues 4,501.75 alc Welfare . Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax . 15,000.00 Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax . 10,000.00 Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax . 25,000.00 C. A. Tolin, Exp. Bldg. Com. 15.47 Clinton & Clark, Mo . A. Kron Livery and Undo Co. alc 12.00 J. S. McIntyre funeral . Melbourne Florists, Inc., floral 15.15 emblem, J. S. McIntyre funeral Journal Ptg. Co., McIntyre Me27.51 morial . Sanders & Melsheimer, printing, 16.01 postage and suppplies . Spalding Stationery Co., printing, 171.01 postage and supplies . Masonic Temple Assn., maintetenance . 150.00 375.00 Arthur Mather, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary . 325.00 Anthony F. Ittner, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 45 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 125.00 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Journal Ptg. Co., ale balance McIntyre Mem . 10.00 . S. W. Bell Tel Co., service 19.50 Masonic Home of Mo., alc Welfare :Relief . 1,000.00 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, printing, postage and stationery 100.00 Masonic Home of Mo., alc per capita tax . 25,000.00

1936


1936 Aug.28

45

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI 160

"

28

161

"

31

162

" " "

31 31 31

163 164 165

" " " "

31 31 31 31

166 167 168 169

"

31

170

"

31

171

"

31

172

Sept. 3

173

F. C. Barnhill, Tnal. Com., Exp. Concordia . $ 4.96 Aug. D. Niederluecke, Reporting Concordia Trnal. . 39.00 Masonic Temple Assn:, mainte150.00 nance . 375.00 Arthur Mather, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary . 325.00 Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand 28.75 Lecturer . 125.00 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Jas. W. Skelly, Grand Master's 1,000.00 salary . Masonic Home of Mo., per capita 888.10 tax . Masonic Home of Mo., per capita 953.98 tax . Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax . 51,385.15 Ray V. Denslow, Fraternal Cor500.00 $187,759.42 respondent . Cash on hand in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo. (restricted) $ 4,778.82 Cash on hand in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo $ 1,770.87 Cash on hand in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo........ 59,064.42 60,835.29 Total

65,614.11 $253,373.53

Addenda: The $4,778.82 referred to above as being in the Fidelity Savings Trust Company in Kansas City is 47%% of the balance which was in said bank at the time of the bank moratorium which affected all banks in the United States on March 3, 1933. Because of a large amount of frozen assets, believed good, the said Fidelity Savings Trust Company did not reopen at the close of the holiday but went into voluntary liquidation, under direction of three liquidating trustees acting for the depositors, and serving without pay. The recovery of the amount referred to above will be slow, but those most directly concerned with this liquidation believe at this time that there are ample assets with which to pay all or nearly all of the entire restricted balance referred to above. In the meantime the amount in question will receive 3% annual interest if depositors are paid in full. It is confidently believed that there will be no ultimate los8.

Respectfully submitted, EDMUND E. MORRIS,

Grand Treasurer.


46

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

REPORT OF THE GRAND AUDITOR

September 24, 1936. To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Gentlemen: Conforming with your instructions, we have examined and checked the book records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer of the Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri for the period from September 16, 1935, to September 15, 1936; also the Masonic Home Initiation Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund and the Wm. F. Kuhn Library Fund for the same period and respectfully present the following report: GENERAL FUND--PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS

Balance, September 16, 1935............................ $ 59,031.82 Receipts-forwarded to Grand Treasurer: Per capita tax, 1936 $177,922.62 Back dues, 1932................ $ 2,942.89 Back dues, 1933................ 887.90 3,830.79 Back dues, 1934................ $ 1,810.80 Back dues, 1935................ 5,992.00 Sale of Manuals . Sale of dues receipts . Sale of By-Laws . Sale of Masonic Veteran Emblems ,. Sale of facsimile signature cut . Interest on Permanent Fund securities . Unexpended Mileage and Per Diem Fund transferred to General Fund .

7,802.80 631.15 856.67 42.50 145.50 4.64 2,549.84 555.20

194,341.71 $253,373.53

Disbursements: Per cheques issued, numbers 1 to 173, inclusive. . . . . . . . . .

187,759.42

Balance in banks, September 15, 1936... . . . . . . . . . .. $ 65,614.11 Balance September 15, 1936, per Grand Treasurer's book ... $ 65,614.11 Consisting of: Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri-in liquidation not subject to withdrawaL.................. $ 4,778.82 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri $59,064.42 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri............. 1,770.87 60,835.29 $ 65,614.11 BONDS

On September 19, 1936, in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, and a representative designated by the Grand Master, we examined the following securities in the Grand Lodge safe deposit box at the Union National Bank of Kansas City, Missouri. All interest income from these securities was accounted for.


1936

47

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI PERMANENT FUND

Bond No.

Kind

Interest Date

Par Value

Interest Rate

17038J U. S. Treasury

3-15 & 9-15 315 & 9-15

2%,% 2%,

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 $ 2,000.00

60789K 60790L 4394D

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

3-15 & 9-15 3-15 & 9-15 3-15 & 9-15

2% 2% 2%

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00

7,000.00

150022B 1500230

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15

3 1,4 314

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00

2,000.00

JOO048489 KOO048490 000013673 DOOO13674 4911A

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

6-15 & 6-15 & 6-15 & 6-15 & 6-15 &

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 5,000.00

27,000.00

000002873 000000803

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

6-i5 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15

4 4

$ 1,000.00 5,000.00

6,000.00

GOO026327 HOO026328 JOO026329 KOO038060

U. S. U. S. U. S. U. S.

4-15 & 4-15 & 4-15 & 4-15 &

4 1,4 414 414 4%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

25,000.00

17037H

U. S. Treasury

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

12-15 12-15 12-15 12-15 12-15

10-15 10-15 10-15 10-15

$69,000.00 WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

7451A

U. S. Treasury

3%%

$

500.00

Since our previous examination of September 18, 1935, two 4% 0/0 Fourth Liberty Loan Bonds for $1,000.00 each were ,called and exchanged for 2%, % United States Treasury Bonds. MASONIC HOME INITIATION FUND

. Balance in Bank, September 16, 1935. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Received from Masonic Lodges during period September 16, 1935, to September 15, 1936... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

120.00

$

180.00

Deduct: Bank service charge.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Balance in First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo., September 15, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .• $

60.00

1.00 179.00

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Balance in bank, September 16, 1935. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Received from Masonic Lodges during period September 16, 1935, to September 15, 1936.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Balance in First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo., September 15, 1936.. . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

107.98 16.00 123.98


48

1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 16, 1935............................. $ Receipts: Interest on bond.............................. $ 16.88 Interest on savings account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.42

714.48

Balance, September 15, 1936......................... $ Consisting of: Cash in Savings Account, First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo................................... $234.78 United States Treasury Bond No. 745IA.......... 500.00 $

734.78

20.30

734.78

MILEAGE AND PER DIEM COMMITTEE

Deposits Payroll cheques issued and paid

. $20,800.00 . 20,244.80 $

Refund to General Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Balance, September 15, 1936

555.20 555.20

$

00

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri from September 16, 1935, to September 16, 1936, and the securities on hand in the above stated funds as at September 15, 1936. Respectfully submitted, PERKINS & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountants.


Report

Masonic Home of Missouri FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1935, to SEPTEMBER 1, 1936 MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI, LOCATED AT ST. LOUIS OFFICERS W. W. Martin, President Robert R. Kreeger, Vice-President W. S. Campbell, Treasurer Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old Folks

St. Louis, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. ,; .. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS T. W. Cotton Thad B. Landon Thomas H. Reynolds

Van Buren, Mo. } Term expires 1936 Kansas City, Mo. Kansas City, Mo.

W. S. Campbell Orestes Mitchell F. H. Wielandy Byrne E. Bigger Ray V. Denslow Arch A. Johnson R. R. Kreeger W. W. Martin James R. McLachlan

St. Louis, St. Joseph, St. Louis, Hannibal, Trenton,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

Springfield, Kansas City, St. Louis, Kahoka,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

I

Term expires 1937

}

Term expires 1938

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS James W. Skelly, Grand Master George W. Walker, Deputy Grand Master Harold L. Reader, Senior Grand Warden Henry C. Chiles, Junior Grand Warden

St. Louis, Mo. Cape Girardeau, Mo. Webster Groves, Mo. Lexington, Mo.

ADVISORY BOARD Mrs. Ella Jean Flanders Mrs. Alta L. Tate Mrs. Edith Ambruster

Excelsior Springs, Mo. Kirkwood, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.


50

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

PRESIDENT'S LETTER

To the Most lVorshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Brethren: Pursuant to the Constitution and By-Laws of the Masonic Home of Missouri, I herewith submit as President of its Board of Directors, the Annual Report and request your careful consideration. At the Annual Session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri held on September 24 and 25, 1935, in St. Joseph, Missouri, the following brethren were elected directors for a term of three years:

Arch A. Johnson R. R. Kreeger W. W. Martin James R. McLachlan

Springfield, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Kahoka, Mo.

At the Board Meeting held in St. Joseph, Missouri, September 25, 1935, the following officers were elected: W. W. Martin, President R. R. Kreeger, Vice-President : W. S. Campbell, Treasurer C. L. Alexander, Secretary Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old Folks

St. Louis, Mo. Kansas City, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo.

The standing committees for the past year have been as follows: Trustees of the Endowment Fund-W. W. Martin, R. R. Kreeger, W. S. Campbell. Executive Committee--R. R. Kreeger, Chairman, A. A. Johnson, T. 'V. Cotton, J. S. McIntyre, W. S. Campbell, T. H. Reynolds, F. H. Wielandy. Finance Committee--T. W. Cotton, Chairman, Orestes Mitchell, Ray V. Denslow. House Committee--"\V. S. Campbell, Chairman, J. S. McIntyre, F. H. Wielandy. Legal Committee--A. A. Johnson, Chairman, J. S. McIntyre, Orestes Mitchell, T. H. Reynolds, W. S. Campbell, Byrne E. Bigger, Thad B. Landon. Administration Committee--Orestes Mitchell, Chairman, F. H. Wielandy, Byrne E. Bigger, J. R. McLachlan. Hospital Committee--T. W. Cotton, Chairman, Thad B. Landon.


1936

51

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

MEDICAL STAFF Dr. Solon Cameron Dr. Harry Moore Dr. James Forsen Dr. C. E. Burford Dr. Joseph Glenn Dr. Hugo R.eim Dr. Carl T. Eber Dr. Phillip Leudde Dr. Ralph Cook Dr. R. K. Kimmel .. ' Dr. O. W. Koch Dr. R. J. Payne Dr. R. S. Weis Dr. A. H. Conrad Dr. L. G. McCutcheon Dr. M. L. Klinefelter Dr. Wm. R. Bohne Dr. Bert O. Owens Dr. D. L. Harris Dr. Charles L. Klenk Dr. James Barrett Brown Dr. Val Satterfield Dr. Frederick A. Baldwin Dr. Herman S. Major Dr. J. B. Wright

'

St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Kansas .City, Trenton,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

OFFICIAL BONDS W. W. Marlin President; $75,000.00; W. S. Campbell, Treasurer, $75,000.00; Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary, $75,000.00; Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron, $2,000.00; Trustees of the Endowment Fund: W. W. Martin, $75,000.00; W. S. Campbell, $75,000.00; R. R. Kreeger, $10,000.00. APPLICATIONS

During the past year 111 applications for admission to the Home were considered, and the following disposition was made of them: Admitted to the Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 61 Withdrawn by Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 Died while the application was being investigated. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5 Referred to Welfare Committee of the Grand Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Rejected because of ineligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Continued for further investigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 29


52

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

There were 20 applications carried over from last year which are not included in the above number, making a total of 49 applications continued for further investigation. MEMBER STATISTICS

Women

Boys

Girls

Members in the Home September 1, 1935 .. 130 Admitted during the past year. . . . . . . . . .. 26

Men

136 20

67 7

65 8

156 Discharged during the past year. . . . . . . .. 3 Deaths during the year. . . . . â&#x20AC;˘ . . . . . . . . . .. 24

156 5 11

74 7

73 17

129

140

67

56

Total Membership September 1, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 392 Net loss during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Admitted during the year, but who have not yet arrived. . . . . . .. 21 The average number in the Home during the year. . . . . . . . . . . .. 393 CONDITIONS IN THE HOME

The conditions in the Home have changed very little for several years. We are badly crowded. Five women and two men are living in the hospital waiting for rooms and twenty-three boys are living in basement rooms. Eight men, ten women and three boys have been admitted who have not yet arrived. During the past year, we have tried to take applicants who were destitute and most advanced in years. It has been impossible for us to take all the worthy applicants who knocked at our door. Weare taking care of all the people in our present buildings that can be cared for with any comfort at all. As a matter of fact, we are too crowded for comfort. Weare sure that the Grand Lodge is fully aware of the conditions in the Home as we have repeatedly made mention of them. Methods of caring for the young and the aged have undergone many changes for the better in the past twenty-five years and likewise there have been many changes in building plans. Every building on our grounds is over twenty years of age and some do not meet conditions of our day and generation. Nothing but a building program will correct some of our difficulties. COSTS

There has been only a small increase in the per capita cost of our Home, notwithstanding the fact that we have been faced with constantly rising food prices. Per capita cost usually represents service rendered. If only food and clothing is furnished, this can be done


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

53

very cheaply. Medical care and hospitalization adds considerably and to undertake to fit the boys and girls for earning a livelihood adds still more. Weare trying to conduct the Home economically but we are also trying to take good care of the people who are committed to our care. A comparison of per capita costs for several years will prove interesting: 1928-1929 1929-1930 1930-1931 1931-1932 1932-1933 1933-1934 1934-1935 1935-1936

Per Per Per Per Per Per Per Per

Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost

of of of of of of of of

Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home

Family $558.89 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 543.00 Family 467.06 Family 459.53 Family 439.41 Family " 451.45 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 486.42 Family 494.30

EDUCATION

The past year is marked as a year of accomplishments for our boys and girls. School work has been very satisfactory. Sixteen graduated from high school; ten from business school, all have satisfactory jobs and are self-supporting; two from Ranken Mechanical Trade School; one from School of Nursing and two from Washington University. With the help.of friends we have been able to get every boy and girl a job as soon as they have completed their studies. We keep them in the Home until they have some money saved for a "rainy day" and then give them an honorable discharge. At the present time we have four boys in Washington University, taking the Engineering course; two girls in Harris Teachers' College preparing to teach school; four boys in Ranken Mechanical Trade School and nine boys and girls in business college. In the public schools, we have twenty-six boys and girls in high school and ninetyfour in grade schools. There are only three children in the Home under school age. The Advisory Board, Order of the Eastern Star, make it possible for our boys to be in Washington University. They take care of the tuition. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR

This has been a busy year for the Advisory Board of the Order of the Eastern Star. We have made many requests of them and every request has been granted. They have not only made their usual purchases of linens and supplies and supplied the tuition of our Washington University students,


54

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

but they have completely refurnished the children's dining room with new chairs and new tables and much other refurnishing in the Home. Following their custom, they furnished a turkey dinner with all the trimmings on New Year's day for our entire family, and in addition gave many gifts to the members of our family. Our relationships have been most cordial and they have been ready at all times to render every service that was within their power. We are most deeply grateful for their help and kindly services. ST. LOUIS CHRISTMAS COMMITTEE

As we have often reported, this Committee is made up of representatives of the Lodges and other Masonic bodies of St. Louis and St. Louis County. â&#x20AC;˘ Every Lodge in the city and county make a contribution to the work. Some of the contributions are most generous. Christmas is always the big day: A turkey dinner for everyone, presents for every child and money for all of the old folks. But their good services are not confined to Christmas Day. All thlough the year they are trying to make our family happy, special programs, trips to the shows, always the circus for the children, watermelon feasts, boat excursions and many other pleasures for our family. We express our deepest appreciation for the wonderful services of this committee. MASONIC HOME ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Perhaps for the first time in the history of the Home, the Grand Master, M. W. Brother Skelly, wrote a letter to all the Lodges in the state offering an opportunity to make a free-will offering to the entertainment fund of the Home. The results of this letter were so gratifying that we have been able to buy a complete moving picture outfit and every Saturday night through the winter and spring we had a picture show in the Masonic Home chapel. Nothing that has been done in recent years has brought more pleasure to the children and old people. The Lodges of St. Louis and St. Louis County were not expected to contribute as they carryon their own work through their own Christmas Committee. Reference to their work has already been made. 'Ve are pleased to list below the names of the Lodges who contributed to this fund. Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City $ Temple Lodge No. 446, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City. .. Winigan Looge No. 540, A. F. & A. M., Winigan................ Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, A. F. & A. M., Poplar Bluff...... .. Sedalia Lodge No. 236, A. F. & A. M., Sedalia... . .. York Lodge No. 563, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City........... Edina Lodge No. 291, A. F. & A. M., Edina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50.00 25.00 20.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 10.25


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Shekinah Lodge No. 256, A. F. & A. M., Festus.. . Hebron Lodge No. 354, A. F. & A. M., Mexico.................. Howard Lodge No.4, A. F. & A. M., New Franklin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Owensville Lodge No. 624, A. F. & A. M., Owensville............ Charleston Lodge No. 407, A. F. & A. M., Charleston... .. Sullivan Lodge No. 69, A. F. & A. M., Sullivan...... Malta Lodge No. 402, A. F. & A. M., Malta Bend. Rolla Lodge No. 213, A. F. & A. M., Rolla..... Advance Lodge No. 590, A. F. & A. M., Advance........ Salem Lodge No. 225, A. F. & A. M., Salem...... Albert Pike Lodge No. 219, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City.... Adair Lodge No. 366, A. F. & A. M., Kirksville. ..... .... . .. . .. Clintonville Lodge No. 482, A. F. & A. M., Eldorado Springs..... Hannibal Lodge No. 188, A. F. & A. M., Hannibal. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Columbia Lodge No. 534, A. F. & A. M., Pacific. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heroine Lodge No. 104, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City....... Greensburg Lodge No. 414, A. F. & A. M., Greensburg. . . . . . . . .. Charity Lodge No. 331, A. F. & A. M., St. Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Cooper Lodge No. 36, A. F. & A. M., Boonville.......... Novinger Lodge No. 583, A. F. & A. M., Novinger.. . . . . . . . . . . . . La Plata Lodge No. 237, A. F. & A. M., La Plata.... Lebanon Lodge No. 77, A. F. & A. M., Steelville...... . Gray Summit Lodge No. 173, A. F. & A. M., Gray Summit....... Latimer Lodge No. 145, A. F. & A. M., Licking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Leadwood Lodge No. 598, A. }~. & A. M., Leadwood.......... ... Clifton Lodge No. 463, A. F. & A. M., Thayer.................. Seaman Lodge No. 126, A. F. & A. M., Milan.................. Rushville Lodge No. 238, A. F. & A. M., Rushville. . . . . .. . . . . . .. Brotherhood Lodge No. 269, A. F. & A. M., St. Joseph... Mokane Lodge No. 612, A. F. & A. M., Mokane................. Bethel Lodge No. 537, A. F. & A. M., BetheL........ Neosho Lodge No. 247, A. F. & A. M., Neosho '. . . St. Johns Lodge No. 28, A. F. & A. M., HannibaL.............. Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, A. F. & A. M., St. Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . . Wakanda Lodge No. 52, A. F. & A. M., Carrollton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mechanicsville Lodge No. 260, A. F. & A. M., Defiance. . . . . . . . . . Twilight Lodge No. 114, A. F. & A. M., Columbia. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Kennett Lodge No. 68, A. F. & A. M., Kennett '" Lexington Lodge No. 149, A. F. & A. M., Lexington. . . . . . . . . . .. Swope Park Lodge No. 617, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City......... Ada Lodge No. 444, A. F. & A. M., Orrick....... Triune Chapter No. 93, R. A. M., Wellsville .... :. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granby Lodge No. 514, A. F. & A. M., Granby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cardwell Lodge No. 231, A. F. & A. M., Cardwell.......... .. Palestine Lodge No. 241, A. F. & A. M., St. Charles.... ... Craig Lodge No. 606, A. F. & A. M., Craig. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. James Lodge No. 230, A. F. & A. M., St. James... Wm. D. Muir Lodge No. 277, A. F. & A. M, Pilot Grove.......... Nineveh Lodge No. 473, A. F. & A. M., Olney................... Williamstown Lodge No. 370, A. F. & A. M., Williamstown. . . . . . Hamilton Lodge No. 224, A. F. & A. M., Hamilton.... Tyro Lodge No. 12, A. F. & A. M., Caledonia.................. Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377, A. F. & A. M., King City.... .. Unity Lodge No. 495, A. F. & A. M., Richards.......... Weston Lodge No. 53, A. F. & A. M., Weston..................

55 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00


56

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Hunnewell Lodge No. 415, A. F. & A. M., Hunnewell. . . . . . . . . . . . Steele Lodge No. 634, A. F. & A. M., Steele. Webb City Lodge No. 512, A. F. & A. M., Webb City............ Adelphi Lodge No. 355, A. F. & A. M., Edgerton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stanberry Lodge No. 109, A. F. & A. M., Stanberry. . . . . . . . . . . . . Branson Lodge No. 587, A. F. & A. M., Branson...... Friend Lodge No. 352, A. F. & A. M., Ozark..... Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327, A. F. & A. M., West Plains. . . . . . . . . . . . Foster Lodge No. 554, A. F. & A. M., Foster.................. Butler Lodge No. 254, A. F. & A. M., Butler...... Stella Lodge No. 538, A. F. & A. M., Stella... .. . Iberia Lodge No. 410, A. F. & A. M., Iberia............... . .. . Hope Lodge No. 251, A. F. & A. M., Washington. .. Wellington Lodge No. 22, A. F. & A. M., DeKalb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Callao Lodge No. 38, A. F. & A. M., Callao............... Barnes Lodge No. 116, A. F. & A. M., CabooL... .. Mount Hope Lodge No. 476, A. F. & A. M., Odessa. . .. .. .. Fellowship Lodge No. 345, A. F. & A. M., Joplin. Republic Lodge No. 570, A. F. & A. M., Republic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Southwest Lodge No. 466, A. F. & A. M., Southwest City.. .. Ralls Lodge No. 33, A. F. & A. M., Center...... . ... . . .. .. .. New Salem Lodge No. 270, A. F. & A. M., Winfield. .. Independence Lodge No. 76, A. F. & A. M., Independence.. . .. Paulville Lodge No. 319, A. F. & A. M., Brashear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carl Junction No. 549, A. F. & A. M., Carl Junction. . . . . . . . . . . . Rising Sun Lodge No. 13, A. F. & A. M., Gashland...... . Cunningham Lodge No. 525, A. F. & A. M., Summer... . .. .. . Dexter Lodge No. 532, A. F. & A. M., Dexter... . ... .. Clever Lodge No. 645, A. F. & A. M., Clever...... Rockbridge Lodge No. 436, A. F. & A. M., Rockbridge..... . .. Bee Hive Lodge No. 393, A. F. & A. M., Lawson................ Continental Lodge No. 454, A. F. & A. M., Stewartsville. . . . . . . . . Middle Fabius Lodge No. 244, A. F. & A. M., Downing... . Osage Lodge No. 303, A. F. & A. M., Neva.da................... Rockhill Lodge No. 663, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City. . .. Versailles Lodge No. 320, A. F. & A. M., Versailles... Buckner Lodge No. 501, A. F. & A. M., Buckner................ Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 99, A. F. & A. M., Mt. Vernon........... Jackson Lodge No. 82, A. F. & A. M., Linneus... Alpha Lodge No. 659, A. F. & A. M., North Kansas City........ Webster Lodge No. 98, A. F. & A. M., Marshfield. . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hope Lodge No. 199, A. F. & A. M., Elsberry ,. Skidmore Lodge No. 511, A. F. & A. M., Skidmore... . . Malden Lodge No. 406, A. F. & A. M., Malden..... Cairo Lodge No. 486, A. F. & A. M., Cairo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Strafford Lodge No. 608, A. F. & A. M., Strafford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . California Lodge No. 183, A. F. & A. M., California. . . . . . . . . . . . Irondale Lodge No. 143, A. F. & A. M., Irondale.. Richland Lodge No. 385, A. F. & A. M., Richland... . Appleton City Lodge No. 412, A. F. & A. M., Appleton City...... Lorraine Lodge No. 128, A. F. & A. M., Ridgeway...... Essex Lodge No. 278, A. F. & A. M., Essex...... ... . .. Olean Lodge No. 134, A. F. & A. M., Olean.................... Country Club Lodge No. 656, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City...... .. Moscow Lodge No. 558, A. F. & A. M., Moscow Mills. . . . . . . . . . . .

1936 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00


1936

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Grant City Lodge No. 66, A. F. & A. M., Grant City Sonora Lodge No. 200, A. F. & A. M., Watson United Lodge No.5, A. F. & A. M., Springfield Rural Lodge No. 316, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City Sarcoxie Lodge No. 293, A. F. & A. M., Sarcoxie Troy Lodge No. 34, A. F. & A. M., Troy Holt Lodge No. 49, A. F. & A. M., Holt Joplin Lodge No. 335, A. F. & A. M., Joplin Valley Lodge No. 413, A. F. & A. M., Bolckow Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, A. F. & A. M., Herculaneum Arlington Lodge No. 346, A. F. & A. M., Dixon New Madrid Lodge No. 429, A. F. & A. M., New Madrid Compass Lodge No. 120, A. F. & A. M., Parkville Wellsville Nodge No. 194, A. F. & A. M., Wellsville Poplar Bluff Commandery No. 67, K. T., Poplar Bluff Ewing Lodge No. 577, A. F. & A. M., Ewing Hickory Hill Lodge No. 211, A. F. & A. M., Eugene Censer Lodge No. 172, A. F. & A. M., Macon Whitesville Lodge No. 162, A. F. & A. M., Whitesville Waverly Lodge No. 61, A. F. & A. M., Waverly Central Lodge No. 81, A. F. & A. M., Mexico Sturgeon Lodge No. 174, A. F. & A. M., Sturgeon Gaynor City Lodge No. 465, A. F. & A. M., Parnell. Montevallo 'Lodge No. 490, A. F. & A. M., Montevallo DeWitt Lodge No. 39, A. F. & A. M., DeWitt Jacoby Lodge No. 447, A. F. & A. M., Darlington Rosendale Lodge No. 404, A. F. & A. M., Rosendale Daggett Lodge No. 492, A. F. & A. M., McKittrick Blue Star Chapter No. 387, O. E. S., St. Louis Judge Sterling H. McCarty, Caruthersville H. Koopmann, Wright City E. T. Noland, St. Louis Mrs. Julia Lewis, St. Louis Gootlieb Eyermann, St. Louis F. R. Boone, Holt '" W. L. Tamme, St. Louis Walter Freund Bread Co., St. Louis Masters and Wardens Club of St. Louis

"

. 5.00 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . . 5.00 4.35 . 3.50 . . 3.00 3.00 . . 2.50 2.50 . . 2.50 2.50 . 2.00 . . 2.00 . 2.00 1.00 . . 1.00 . 100.00 . 10.00 . 5.00 . 50.00 . 100.00 . 25.00 . 1.00 . 25.00 . 10.00 . 80.00

FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Masonic Home. At the Grand Lodge session of 1885 a committee was appointed, "to take charge of and examine into the project of establishing a Masonic Home," and at the Grand Lodge session of 1886, they reported as follows: "We 'have held a number of meetings during the year. Correct minutes of our proceedings were kept by our Secretary, and these are herewith submitted. On December 7, 1885, Bros. Woods, Anderson, Givan and Dyer, of this Committee, proceeded to perform your direction 'to visit similar institutions elsewhere' by visiting and inspecting the Orphans' Home, at Louisville, Ky. This visit was pleasant and added renewed zeal to the hearts of the Brethren who made it. It was also profit路 able in that it furnished valuable information and disclosed a number of


58

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

points in which profit could well be gathered from the experience of others. The general results of the visit are shown in the Report of Bro. Woods, which was found to embody substantially the views of his associates. That report is also herewith submitted. , , We were also directed to take the necessary steps to make the organization of the Home a body known to and recognized by the law of this State. This Grand Lodge is organized by a special act of the Legislature and its amendments. Under the present Constitution of Missouri, these cannot be amended as such-special legislation in that respect being forbidden. Recognizing the necessity for a legal standing, we proceeded to take the only steps authorized by the laws of Missouri, and formed a corporation under them, by name of 'Masonic Home of Missouri.' The articles of association, by-laws and certificate of corporate existence are herewith submitted. It will be observed from them that they place the entire matter in the hands and control of this Grand Lodge. The terms .of all the Directors expire just as soon as you can elect their successors. The body and its papers are submitted to you. They are yours. Do with them as you may deem wise and in accordance with Masonic teachings and principles. This matter was the subject of very full and careful consideration at our hands, and was finally decided upon by an unanimous vote. The By-Laws embody, as we think, the proper rules for the government of the corporation and the home. They can be changed, however, at any time. "On May 11, 1886, the Grand Commandery .of this State; K. T., convened and, pursuant to our instructions to confer with other Masonic bodies, we presented a memorial to that body asking its assistance and cooperation. We were warmly welCQmed and our request most cheerfully granted and the substantial aid of that body pledged to us. , 'On the 13th of that month we presented a similar memorial to the Grand Chapter of R. A. M., which met with a cordial response. The earnest of this is evidenced by the resolution contributing five hundred dollars to the H.ome, from the funds of that body. "Soon after our appointment, we caused a circular letter to be prepared and sent to the several subordinate Masonic bodies of the State. The purpose was to ascertain the sense of the Fraternity, and to what extent contributions would be made. "Greatest and best of all, however, is the magnificent contribution made by the Triennial Committee of the Grand Commandery of Missouri, on behalf of the Knights Templars of the United States. As is well known, the Grand Encampment holds its conclave triennially. Eighteen eighty-six was the year for its twenty-third conclave, and St. Louis the place of holding the same. From far and near the members of the organization of Templar Masonry attended this occasion, which was made one of pleasure and celebration. Thi:l time, the element of doing practical good was added by the CQmmittee having the management in charge. Wednesday, September 21st, was sct apart as Charity Day. A drill, by a number of the well-drilled Commanderies from other States, and a concert on a grander scale than ever before attempted, constituted the programme. The cause for whose benefit the matter was arranged and the attractions offered, combined to move CQuntless thousands to the scene. It was one never to be forgotten nor to ever be the cause of regret. The Committee have placed the entire net proceeds of Charity Day, approximating the munificent sum of $20,000 (the proceeds of Charity Day finally reached $35,114) at the disposal of this Grand Lodge to aid in establishing and maintaining its 'Masonic Home.'


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

59

"We find available at present for the Home, the following sums: Heretofore set apart and invested by this body for that purpose $10,000.00 Contributions paid..................................... 300.00 Contr~butio~s pledged and payable in installments, at varIOUS tImes........................................ 18,525.00 Proceeds of Charity Day (probably)..................... 20,000.00 Grand Total..................................... $48,825.00"

The years of 1887 and 1888 were given to raising funds with which to build the Home, and also to the selection of a location for the Home. At the Grand Lodge session of 1888, the following paragraph on the question of location is most interesting: "At the May meeting, the question of location was again postponed until the present time. The postponements have been made solely because of the earnest desire on the part of the Board to make no mistakes in this most important question of location. It involves, not simply the present benefits to the Home, but its permanent prosperity and success. If located where it cannot receive the continued careful and gratuitous attention of our Brethren, though present liberal inducements are offered, it cannot continue to grow and prosper as it should. In view of the very many questions to be decided and considered, you will appreciate the great difficulties which are involved in its location. It should be where it can be easily visited by the largest number of Masons; where the Grand Bodies can visit it at their Annual Sessions; where there are the best facilities for educating and caring for its inmates; where, in emergencies, money can be readily raised; where the greatest advantages are offered for finding employment for the young, as well as where there are the greatest opportunities for their engaging in business, when they leave the Home. These are considerations of far greater moment than any offers of money for location, that do not confer these advantages. , 'While the Board has been seemingly dilatory in locating the Home, they are free to say that the delay has been the result of their sincere desire to select such location as will insure, not only the present, but the future maintenance of this noble monument to the generosity and loyalty of Missouri Masons. And after mature deliberation, looking, at it not from one, but from all standpoints, and carefully studying the experience of similar enterprises in other states, they are forced to the conclusion that at or near the City of St. Louis-the great commercial center of the West, and the home of so many earnest and large-hearted Masons, as indicated by the fact that their SUbscriptions already made are nearly one-third of the whole amount now subscribed-is the place where the Home should be situated."

The site for the Home was not selected until after the Grand Lodge session in 1888 and the following paragraph from the 1889 Proceedings is very interesting: , 'Soon after the last session (j,f the Grand Lodge, steps were taken by the Board to secure property suitable for the Home, at or near St. Louis, the place selected for its location, and so unanimously ratified by this Grand Body at its last session. In this important work great care was


60

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

exercised that no mistake should be made financially or otherwise. After examining very thoroughly the several properties offered, the Board selected the property now known as the Home, consisting of fifteen acres of ground, most favorably situated on Delmar Avenue, near Union Avenue, and near Forest Park in western St. Louis. The building is a large twostory brick with mansard roof, containing some twenty rooms, with stables and other outbuildings and improvements. The tract of land is rich soil, well improved, and has a good growth of various kinds of fruit. It is one of the most eligible and healthy locations in St. Louis. The purchase price was forty thousand dollars of which fifteen thousand dol路 lars was paid cash the balance being due December 10, next. "On June 15, 1889, the Home was dedicated by the Grand Lodge. It was memorable day in the history of our work. God smiled upon us by giving us a pleasant day of sunshine without, and joy and gladness within. Grand Secretary Brother John D. Vincil, has compiled the proceedings of that day, including the dedicatory services, addresses, etc., in excellent shape, a copy of which I herewith submit, and recommend that it be published with the proceedings of the Grand Lodge, and with the report of the officers of the home."

RESULTS

AOO~MPLISHED

It would be impossible to measure the results accomplished by the Masonic Home through the past fifty years, but some measure of the results accomplished can be estimated by the fact that 2271 people have been admitted to the Home and cared for during this fifty-year period. JOSEPH S. McINTYRE

On June 17, 1936, Brother Joseph S. McIntyre passed to his reward in the Celestial Lodge on high. For more than a quarter of a century he had been active in Freemasonry and was an outstanding leader among his brethren. He had been actively interested in the Masonic Home for many years and became a member of its Board of Directors in 1924, at the close of his year as Grand Master. Brother McIntyre gave much of his time to the Home and worked constantly for its betterment and advancement. His judgment was excellent, his work always constructive and his counsel will be greatly missed. In his will, he left the Home one thousand dollars. Appropriate resolutions appear on the records of the Masonic Home and will also appear in the proceedings of this Grand Lodge. ENDOWMENT FUND

Our Endowment Fund has increased in cash $4,695.14. One very substantial gift was made during the year, but because of life estates will not reach us for some years. The steady increase of our Endowment Fund means much to our


路1936

61

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Home. One out of every four of the members of our family are supported by the income from our Endowment Fund. ESTIMATE VALUE OF ASSETS

Endowment Fund cash and securities. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $1,104,279.96 Home Grounds.................................. 240,000.00 Improvements 775,000.00 Furnishings 165,000.00 $2,284,279.96 INSURANCE

Fire

Tornado

On all buildings and contents $896,660.00 Steam Boiler Insurance...... 20,000.00 Contingent LiabilityCompensation 20,000.00-$40,000.00 Public Liability............. 25,000.00- 50,000.00 5,000.00 Electric Machinery...........

$895,700.00

MRS. MARY HUTHMAXER MEMORIAL

This consists of an eighty-acre tract of land located in Kirkwood, Missouri, and St. Louis County, to be used for a Children's Home. As soon as business conditions improve, we hope to improve this property. MASONIC INFmMARY

The following gives an account of the work done during the year: Total patients in hospital at beginning of year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Total patients admitted during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 Total patients discharged during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Total patients treated during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 Total number of deaths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 96 Total patients in hospital at tpe end of the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total patients' days in hospitaL 32,243 Average patients per day.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Total number of out-patients' treatments given during the year 21,536 CONCLUSION

Our year has been a very satisfactory one and we are grateful to Almighty God for His blessing and benediction. Fraternally submitted,

'V. W.

MARTIN,

President.


62

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

REPORT OF SECRETARY September 1, 1935, to August 31, 1936 GENERAL FUND

Receipts Grand Lodge per capita tax $133,969.78 Grand Chapter O. E. S. per capita tax 15,315.50 $149,285.28 Interest on General Fund Securities Profit on sale of General Fund Securities

. .

1,226.25 36.25 $150,547.78

Disbursements Provisions $ 66,900.81 6,711.73 Dry Goods and Clothing . Laundry . 8,728.37 lee, light and water . 8,396.40 9,894.14 Fuel . Salaries . 15,993.00 Wages . 49,962.27 Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory Board, attending Board meetings . 1,881.14 Hospital supplies . 3,501.51 Carfare for members of the Home family . 360.00 Telephone . 506.76 Legal and Auditing . 250.00 3,023.77 Insurance . Repairs and maintenance .. 1,499.13 10,124.81 Supplies . Printing, stationery and postage . 1,463.02 Miscellaneous expenses . 5,063.46 $194,260.32 Excess of disbursements over receipts.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 43,712.54 Transferred to Welfare Committee Grand Lodge.... 3,780.00 Transfer from Income Fund

.

$ 47,492.54 33,609.75

Add: Balance on hand September 1, 1935

.

$ 13,882.79 133,259.58

Balance on hand August 31, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $119,376.79 INCOME FUND

Receipts Interest {)n Endowment Fund Bonds. . . . . . . . . .. $ 30,659.81 Interest on Endowment Fund Real Estate Loans 19,996.53 Received from members of Home family . 1,569.46 Pensions . 942.00 Rent of farms . 1,552.91 Sale of cemetery lots . 200.00


1936

â&#x20AC;˘

63

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Interest on Income Fund Securities Profit on sale of Inpome Fund Securities

. .

3,128.49 33.75 $58,082.95

Disbursements Annuities $ Taxes and other expenses on real estate loans, etc Taxes and other expenses on estate members of Home family . Legal expenses . Bank charges .

2,144.98 3,799.89 709.30 19.04 17.21 $

Excess of receipts over disbursements

$ 51,392.53

Deduct: Transfer to General Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Add: Balance on hand September 1, 1935 Balance on hand August

3~,

6,690.42

.

1936

33,609.75 $ 17,782.78 83,157.66 $10U,940.44

INITIATION FUND

Receipts Interest on securities.............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

6,394.14

Disbursements Legal expenses............................. $ Loss on sale of securities .

102.26 23.75 $

126.01

Excess of receipts over disbursements.......... . . . . . . . . .. $

6,268.13

Add: Balance on hand September 1, 1935... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $134,104.39 . Balance on hand August 31, 1936

,

$140,372.52

IMPROVEMENT FUND

Receipts Interest on securities...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Profit on sale of securities .

3,273.42 1,550.00 $

4,S23.42

Repairs and improvements

$

7,569.52

Exeess of disbursements over receipts

$

2,746.10

Disbursements

Add: Balance 011 hand September 1, 1935. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75,915.62

Balance on hand August 31, 1936........................ $ 73,169.52


64

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT GENERAL FUND Balance August 31, 1935 $133,013.06 $ 152,943.75 Received from secretary 1,226.25 Received interest on Treasurer's funds........ 36.25 Received profit on securities sold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transferred from Income Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,609.75 $187,816.00

187,816.00 $320,829.06 201,593.72

Disbursements

Balance August 31, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $119,2"35.34 INCOME FUND Balance August 31, 1935 ' $ 79,275.07 $ 55,727.77 Received from Secretary 2,374.83 Received interest on Treasurer's funds.......... 33.75 Received profit on securities sold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 58,136.35

58,136.35 $137,411.42

Transferred to General Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miscellaneous disbursements................. Balance August 31, 1936

33,609.75 8,119.38

41,729.13

: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 95,682.29 INITIATION FUND

Balance August 31, 1935. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $134,104.39 Received interest on Treasurer's funds.... . . .. $ 6,423.94 Less-net loss on sale of securities. . . . . . . . . . . . 23.75 $

6,400.19

6,400.19 $140,504.58 102.26

Disbursements

Balance August 31, 1936.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 140,402.32 IMPROVEMENT FUND Balance August 31, 1935 Received from Secretary..................... $ Received interest on Treasurer's funds..... . . . Received profit on securities sold. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

300.00 3,173.42 1,550.00

$

5,023.42

Disbursements

$ 75,715.62

5,023.42 $ 80,739.04 7,569.52

Balance August 31, 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 73,169.52

â&#x20AC;˘


1936

GRAND LODGE

O~"

65

MISSOURI

REOONOILIATION OF TREASURER'S BALANOE WI'PH SEORETARY'S BALANCE, AUGUST 31, 1936 GENERAL FUND Balance per Treasurer's report.. . . . . â&#x20AC;˘ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $119,235.34 Deduct: Outstanding check No. 21261-4/8/36 Laundry payroll-8/29/36 from payroll account

$

29.00 144.00 $

173.00

$119,062.34 Add: Petty cash not on Treasurer's report. . . . . . . . .. $ Amount due from Income Fund for Refund of wages .

260.41 54.04 $

Balance per Secretary's report

314.45

$119,376.79

INCOME FUND Balance per Treasurer's report.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 95,682.29 . . Deduct: Amount due General Fund for wages refunded. . . . . . . . . . . .

54.04 $ 95,628.25

Add: Cash in First National Bank-President's Account $ Interest Coupons $25,000.00 H. O. L. C. Bondsdue but not collected.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accrued Interest on Endowment Fund securities at time of purchase........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4,328.51 750.00 233.68 $

5,312.19

Balance per Secretary's report.......................... $100,940.44 INITIATION FUND Balance per Treasurer's report......................... $140,402.32 Deduct: Accrued interest in Shirley T. Ashby Loanpaid in August...................................... Balance per Secretary's report

2~.80

$140,372.52

IMPROVEMENT FUND Balance per Treasurer's report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 73,169.52 Balance per Secretary's report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73,169.52


66

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

REPORT OF AUDITOR

PERKINS & COMPANY Certified Public Accountants SUITE

851-854

408

PINE ST.

SAINT LoUIS, MISSOURI

September 16, 1936. To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. Gentlemen: In accordance with instructions received, we have made the following examination of the accounts and records of your Secretary, Mr: Clarence L. Alexander, for the fiscal year ended August 31, 1936. Our examination covered the General Fund, Income Fund, Initiation Fund, Improvement Fund, and the Endowment Fund. We verified the balances of the above funds as at August 31, 1936, by obtaining certificates direct from the depositaries as to cash balances and by examining the securities constituting a part of these funds. We have shown the securities listed in the General, Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds at cost. We submit the following summary of .assets comprising the General, Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds at the close of the fiscal year ended August 31, 1936. GENERAL FUND Cash in Telegraphers' National Bank . $ 55,160.99 Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company 25,665.71 . Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank-savings ac25,338.35 count . Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank-pay roll ac3,743.73 count . Cash in Savings Trust Company-pay roll account-bank 753.56 closed January 14, 1933, in liquidation . Cash in President's Cash Drawer 60.41 . Cash in Matron's Cash Drawer . 200.00 Securities (at cost) $16,900.00 Less Balance Due on Purchase of Securities. . . . 8,500.00 8,400.00 Due from Income Fund

.

Total General Fund

54.04 $119,376.79

INCOME FUND Cash in First National Bank-President's Account Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Co Securities (at cost) Interest Coupons Due but not collected

$ . . .

4,328.51 12,454.15 83,228.14 750.00


1936

67

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Accrued Interest on Endowment Fund Securities at time of purchase .

233.68 $100,994.48

Deduct Amount Due General Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54.04

Total Income Fund................................ $100,940.44 INITIATION FUND Cash in Telegraphers' National Bank $ 7,828.81 Securities (at cost)..................................... 132,235.12 Accrued Interest on Securities at time of purchase. . . . . . . . . . 308.59 Total Initiation Fund.............................. $140,372.52 IMPROVEMENT FUND Cash in Telegraphers ' National Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 1,463.83 Investments (at cost).................................. 71,705.69 Total Improvement Fund........................... $ 73,169.52

The securities of the Endowment Fund which are not in default are stated at the values placed thereon by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund at the date of acquisition of the securities by the Home. Bonds in default are carried at market or at an appraised value believed by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund to be market. The following is a summary of the Endowment Fund assets as at August 31, 1936. Real Estate Loans Real Estate Owned-farms at appraised value Federal Land Bank Bonds United States Treasury Bonds J oint Stock Land Bank Bonds J oint Stock Land Bank Bonds in default, market value Municipal and Other Bonds Other Bonds in Default Rice Estate Notes Receivable, secured by deeds of trust Modra Estate Securities Rife Estate Securities in Default Comstock Estate Securities Comstock Estate Securities in Default Erdhaus Estate Securities Geo. B. Mills Estate Securities Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate Securities Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate Securities in Default Hy. C. Grenner Estate Securities Hy. C. Grenner Estate Securities in Default Home Owners Loan Corporation Bonds Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation Bonds Cash in First National Bank Total Endowment Fund

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 566.840.93 44,000.00 36,230.00 17,194.25 1,000.00 100.00 141,659.62 450.00 400.00 1.00 438.00 42,492.51 3,392.00 500.00 10,500.00 530.00 300.00 179,971.00 10,110.00 6,000.00 15,700.00 26,470.65 $1,104,279.96


68

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

This report is preliminary to our formal detail report to be submitted later to the Board of Directors. Respectfully submitted, PERKINS & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountants. GIFTS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND AS FOLLOWS Knights Templar Fund................................. $ 35,114.00 James L. Kirkendall :........ .. 13,150.00 W. S. Smith Fund............. 11,730.00 T. W. Higgins Fund.................................... 5,000.00 James W. Harris Fund..................... 1,665.74 Masonic Home Certificate Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,117.60 Ferdinand Herold Fund................................ 500.00 John B. Croshaw Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 Jacob F. Gmelich Fund................................ 1,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal and Selected Masters Fund. . . . . . . . . . . 2,500.00 1,000.00 T. W. Cotton Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund...................... 1,000.00 A. M. Hough Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,000.00 Jacob Lampert Fund................................... 30,000.00 Mrs. E. Wurz Fund.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 Adolph Gluck Fund.................................... 500.00 Parralle Massengale Fund.............................. 806.60 1,000.00 Mrs. Lillie L. Fletcher Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frederick A. Logan Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 Robert Elliott Black Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 Nathan Schloss Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932.83 2,067.91 A. P. Christianson Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rice Estate........................................... 51,096.35 Hugh Hartshorn Fund........ 2,327.75 William Pamprin Fund................................. 1,000.00 Morgena Peterson Fund................................ 500.00 Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 General Fund......................................... 128,740.03 Julius C. Garrell Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 War Relief Loyal Service Fund.................. 7,107.50 James W. Boyd Fund 路 '" 500.00 Ararat Temple, Kansas City, Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 Mrs. Willie A. Woods Fund... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000.00 Grotto and Shrine Fund........................ . . . . . . . . 17,056.95 Morris and Ella Leftwich Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800.00 Mrs. Mary Lynch Fund :................ 1,000.00 A. P. Fletcher Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 Frank Beecher Fund................................... 1,442.48 1,000.00 A. M. Dockery Fund.......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edward H. Meier Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 William H. Potter Estate Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,305.50 J. C. Jacquith Estate Fund............................. 19,122.61 Initiation Fund........................................ 246.700.00 500.00 Nicholas R. Wall Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abraham Palan Fund.................................. 584.70


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Bonds from a friend of the Home sold for Maggie Nicholson Fund Louisa Yott Fund Gustav Bischo:ff Fund W. L. Tamme Fund Erdhaus Estate, secured and unsecured Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund William A. Hall Fund Henry Siegfried Edward Meyer Charles V. B. Slade Robert F. Stevenson , Glen Marquis Frank L. Schofield D. M. Wilson Mary E. Clapp Samuel Rife E. C. Robinson B. S. Schwartz Brockett A. Dickson George F. Bergfield Sarah B. Co:ffman , Samuel A. Gluck Charles Reilly Wellston Lodge No. 613 Richard Sinclair Karl Backrow Robert Lungstrass June Lee Cotton St. Joseph Chapter No. 198, O. E. S Marcus A. Loevy Sam Plan W. J. Scherck Myrtle Lodge No. 338 Ludwig Katany Charles E. Koken Phillip Stremmel, Jr Boor Fletcher Alphonso Whipple A. Bolin Fund M. A. Covey Fund William F. Kier Fund John T. Short Fund Paul Keiser Fund J obn Oliver Fund J. M. Darrow Fund T. W. Prichett Fund Annie Martin Fund Comstock Estate Comstock Estate (doubtful value) Julia C. Norton Fund J. M. Darrow Estate William Latham, Jr., Estate J obn M. Woodson Estate Sol E. Waggoner Estate ,

'

69 . 52,218.75 550.36 . . 500.00 500.00 . 550.00 . 7,665.32 . 2,000.00 . 500.00 . 1,000.00 . 500.00 . 9,548.75 . 14,992.13 . 1,105.14 . 1,000.00 . 528.00 . 3,405.09 . . 7,500.00 . 2,500.00 692.83 . 1,000.00 . . 500.00 465.89 . 200.00 . 100.00 . 100.00 . . 200.00 100.00 . . 286.00 250.00 . 450.00 . 70.00 . 100.00 . 46.00 . . 310.95 200.00 . . 300.00 . 137.40 . 400.00 . 100.00 . 400.00 . 25.00 . 10,000.00 . 200.00 . 2,000.00 . 371.36 . 5,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 259.98 . 115,569,31 . 2,500.00 . 1,000.00 5,000.00 . . 1,000.00 5,467.91 . . 1,000.00


70

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF TH}<j

Jacob C. C. Waldeck Estate . Adam Herold Estate . J ames Vinyard Estate . . George B. Mills Estate, stocks and honds John Rehrs Estate : . William Russell Estate, cash . William Russell Estate, bonds and other securities . Joseph Kronachcr Estate . William A. Raming Estate . Fred Herket Estate . . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, cash Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, stocks and bonds . Ed,vard F. W. Kaiser . Henry W. Huning Estate . Dr. Louis F. Bode Estate . Fred Segelke Estate . Charles Gietner Estate . William B. Archer Estate . James Ward-Nixon MemoriaL . Henry C. Grenner Estate, market value, stocks, bonds and cash Berthold Linder Estate . . Charles H. Schureman Estate Charles A. Brown Estate . Ernest Breunemann . . A. S. Hudson Estate Myrtle Kipp Estate . John Cunningham Estate . . Mrs. Pearl Kaiser Annuity Estate of William Modra . George W. Leeak gift . Louis L. Boehmen gift . Fred D. Gardner Estate . . George H. Wolt,ien Estate Mrs. Virginia AlIen Church Estate (in memory of Ethelbert }'orrester Allen) .

500.00 211.08 933.24 11,600.00 250.00 1,901.39 4,392.00 431.05 1,000.00 2,000.00 285.00 2,780.00 25,000.00 100.00 300.00 214.47 1,000.00 5,000.00 1,000.00 261,152.94 200.00 365.67 1,000.00 100.00 314.28 707.16 9,720.98 1,500.00 4,201.68 500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00

ADDITIONS TO ENDOWMENT FUND THE PAST YEAR Irvin Levosier Page Estate Wm. B. Archer Estate (final settlement) Gift in memory of William T. Coombs A. S. Hudson Estate Barbara Seaman bequest Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate (final settlement) Mrs. Pearl Kaiser (annuity)

. . . . . . .

25.00 85.00 50.00 314.28 100.00 120.86 4,000.00

RESOLUTIONS

1\1. W. BROTHEH ORESTES MITCHELL: I desire to present a very important resolution so that the Grand Master may refer it to a committee for prompt report to this Grand Lodge. I move that it be referred to the \Vays and Means Committee. Referred accordingly. Whereas, there is a great need at the Masonic Home in St. Louis for tlle erection of a uew fire-proof building to provide additional and sanitary quarters for the Masonic Home Family:


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

71

Be it therefore resolved, that the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Missouri consents to the Masonic Home Board erecting a new fire-proof building of sufficient size to provide proper accommodations for the present and additional members of the Masonic Home Family, and consents to the Masonic Home Board using its funds, namely-its Building and Improvement Funds which it may have on hand for that purpose (in which funds it now has on hand the sum of $213,571.84), provided that no part of the General Fund, the per capita tax from the Grand Lodge, the Endowment Fund or income from the Endowment Fund shall be used for that purpose; And the Grand Lodge further consents that the Masonic Home Board may solicit voluntary gifts from the Lodges, if it be found necessary; Provided further that no contract shall be awarded for the construction of such building until the Board shall have on hand sufficient cash -with which to pay in full for such building, and no money shall be borrowed for that purpose; And provided further that no contraet shall be let to any contractor for the construction of said building until a good and sufficient Contractor'8 Surety Bond shall have been furnished to guarantee the fulfillment of sain. building contract. ORESTES MITCHELL R. R. KREEGER T. W. COTTON BYRNE E. BIGGER RAY V. DENSLOW W. W. MARTIN THAD. B. LANDON

M. W路. BROTHER THAD LANDON: Most \Vorshipful Grand Master and Brethren, I have here a short resolution, pretty near overlooked, which I thought ought to be presented: "Be it resolved that the Ways and Means Committee shall in the making of its budget make proper provision to secure the payment by the Grand Lodge of the tax imposed upon employees of the Grand Lodge and the tax imposed upon the Grand Lodge assessed upon its employees under the provisions of the Social Securities Act enacted by the Congress of the United States in 1935, if it is determined that fraternal organizations and their employees are subject thereto. Be it further resolved that' the incoming Grand Masters advise each subordinate lodge to make suitable provision to pay said tax if it shall be determined that subordinate lodges are subject to said Act." Just a word in explanation: the Social Security Act as passed by the Congress in August of 1935 provides exemption from the terms thereof only as follows, religious and charitable organizations organized exclusively for religious and charitable purposes, and it exempts literary societies and associations formed to prevent cruelty to animals, but it does not exempt fraternal organizations. Now, we have attempted to have the Act amended so as to make -it comply with the provisions of the Income Tax Law and the Federal Estate Law which exempts fraternal organizations together with charitable organizations. A bill had been introduced in both houses but never came to a head and never was acted upon. Another word of explanation: a year ago, December 31, 1935, for the year 1936, employers of eight


72

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

or more were required to pay a tax this year of one per cent. Commencing December 31 of this year employers of any number, don't make any difference what they are, are subject to the tax of one per cent and the employees are subject to such tax. Fraternal organizations not being exempted, if the Act is given a strict construction, it will mean that every subordinate lodge will have to pay, as the employer and the employees will have to suffer a deduction also of one per cent, and likewise the Grand Lodge and likewise every fraternal organization in the country. I move that this be referred to the Ways and Means Committee and that the latter portion of the resolution with reference to advising the lodges, should be referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. Motion adopted. Be it resolved that the Ways and Means Committee shall, in the making of the Budget, make proper provision to secure the payment by the Grand Lodge of the tax imposed upon employees of the Grand Lodge, and the tax imposed upon the Grand Lodge, assessed upon its employees, under the provisions of the Social Security Act, enacted by the Congress of the United States in 1935, if it is determined that Fraternal organizations and their employees are subject thereto. Be it further resolved that the incoming Grand Master advise each Subbordinate Lodge to make suitable provisions to pay such tax if it shall be determined that subordinate Lodges are subject to said act. THAD.

B.

LANDON.

RE MRS. LARISON

R. 'V. BROTHER A. J. O'REILLY: Most Worshipful Grand Master, a matter was referred to me last March, the application for relief, or rather assistance, for Mrs. Larison, she is the daughter of a Past Grand Master of Missouri, William R. Penick, and I move that the matter as it now is he referred to the Committee on 'Velfare. Motion adopted. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS To the M. W. Grand Lodge, .Lt. F. 4" .Lt. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The Grand Lodge has listened with great interest to the splendid report of the Grand Master and congratulates him on the valuable service which he has rendered to the Craft during his year of office. He has given great care and attention to the various phases of our Masonic enterprise, and he will long be remembered for his fidelity and sincerity in his dealings with the Brethren throughout our Grand Jurisdiction. We note with pleasure the account of his visitations to our Lodges in Missouri, and to the Grand Lodges of other Jurisdictions, and we trust that the Brethren in our Lodges will carefully read his address when the Official Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri reach our individual Lodges. We recommend the following references to Committees: First-All matters pertaining to finances and expenditures of money to the Ways and Means Committee.


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

73

Second-All decisions and dispensations to the Jurisprudence Committee. Third-All matters pertaining to Masonic discipline to the Committee on Appeals and Grievances. We approve the action of the Grand Master in all other matters, and commend. him for his endeavors to build up a true Masonic spirit within our boundaries. Fraternally submitted, W. W. MARTIN V. F. BOOR T. W. COTTON BYRNE E. BIGGER ANTHONY F. ITTNER BERT S. LEE

DUVAL SMITH, Chairman, R.. R.. KREEGER RAY V. DENSLOW ORESTES MITCHELL THAD. B. LANDON WM. R.. GENTRY

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow presented the Report on Foreign Correspondence which was adopted and ordered printed in the Proceedings. See page 205. APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES

The Grand Secretary called attention to the . list of Committees which had been appointed to serve during the 1936 Communication. They are as follows: STANDING COMMITTEES

Jurisprudence-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Henri L. Warren, C. Lew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer and Sam Wilcox. Appecds and Grievances-Ray Bond, Chairman; William F. Woodruff, Harry Baum, Eugene L. McGee and John C. Robertson. Ways and M eans--J ames A. Kinder, two years, Chairman; George C. Marquis, one year; Edmund E. Morris, one year; R. A. Breuer, three years; Solon Cameron, three years. Credentials-Walter A. Webb, Chairman; Fred H. Knight, Henry F. Woerther, Charles M. Barnes, Fred B. Howarth. Pay Roll-Walter R.. Shrodes, Chairman; Oliver F. Peters, Olin A. Newman. Chartered Lodges-Charles G. Duggan, Chairman; Gus O. Nations, Reinh~ld H. Rodegast, Fred A. Miller. Lodges U. D.-Louis J. Graue, Chairman; Warren H. May, Fred W. Bendick, Albert Theis, Jr., Arnold Just. Welfare---Tolman W. Cotton, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, William S. Campbell, Arch A. Johnson, Thomas H. Reynolds. Reports of D. D. G. M. 's-Nathaniel D. Jackson, Chairman; Harry H. Balsiger, Fay G. Fulkerson, Charles L. Woods, G. A. Sample. Masonic Boords of Relief-Edward H. Loffhagen, one year, Chairman; Andrew J. 0 'Reilly, three years; William A. Piner, two years; Albert Linxwiler, three years; Morris E. Ewing, one year. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, three years, Chairman; John Pickard, two years; Theodore C. Teel, five years; James A. Kinder, four years. Masonic Home (Visiting Committee)-Alfred P. Fletcher, Chairman; Ransom A. Breuer, W. A. Phipps, Emsley C. James, Sterling H. McCarty. Correspondence---Ray V. Denslow, Chairman.


74

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

N ecrology-John Pickard, Chairman. Auditing-Perkins Audit Company. Grand Master's Address-DuVal Smith, Chairman, and all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business-C. A. Tolin, Chairman. Transportatwn and Hotels-William F. Miller, Chairman. SPECIAL COMMITTEES

Masonic Service Assn. of Mo.-Chairman; John R. Davis, Robert Wright. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Arthur Mather, Chairman; James R. McLachlan, Frank C. Barnhill, Charles T. Kornbrodt, Buell P. Parks. Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Edward McGuigan, John Wohradsky, Jr. George Washington Masonic Natio-nal Memorial Association--Bert S. Lee, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell. Library-William B. Massey, Chairman; William P. Mason, William C. Rese. Printing of Proceedings-Arthur Mather, Chairman; James A. Kinder. Masonic Publications-Frank C. Barnhill, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Frederick M. Smith. Building Supervisory Boord-Cecil A. Tolin, three years, Chairman; Guy C. Million, two years; F. William Kuehl, one year. Revision of By-Laws-路Henry C. Chiles, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Ray V. Denslow. . Trial by Other State Jurisdictions-Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles, J. M. Fisher. D. D. G. M. Dinner-Ben H. Lahrman, Chairman; Charles G. Duggan, Eugene J. Altheimer, G. D'Amato. Mark Twain Memorial-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Frank C. Barnhill.

OALLED FROM LABOR

The M. 'V. Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR to refreshments at 12 :00 noon, to reconvene at 1 :30 o'clock P.M. of the same day.

FIRST DAY, AFTERNOON SESSION OALLED TO LABOR

At 1 :30 o'clock P.M., the M. 'V. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by M. 'V. Grand Master James W. Skelly, the Grand Officers heing in their respedive stations as at the morning session. REPORT OF THE MASONIO HOME VISITING OOMMITTEE

R. 'V. BIW'l'HER ARTHrR MATIIEH, Grand Secretary, reao the report for the Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the M. JV. Grand Lodge, A. F. cf A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee begs leave to report briefly that on the several visits to the Masonic Home they found that the large family of adults


1936

75

QRAND LODGE OF MI~~OURI

and children are comfortable and well provided for. Their many wishes and needs are given consideration under kind and competent supervision. We glean from talks with the a.dults of our Home family that satisfaction seems to abound and that most of them are happy. The children without exception are cheerful and happy. They seem grateful for the many advantages and blessings they are privileged to enjoy. The adults and children all enjoy company and a visit to the Home is the best way to become acquainted with the members of the Family. Any brother will not regret the time thus spent and the Home will profit by the visit. Fraternally submitted, ALFRED P. FLETCHER RANSOM A. BREUER W. Aâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘PHIPPS EMSLEY C. JAMES STERLING H. MCCARTY

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES U. D.

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, read the report of this committee. The same was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, Lt. F. ,f Lt. M. of Missouri: Brethren: There has been no business referred to the committee this year, no Lodges reported under dispensation. LOUIS J. GRAUE WARREN H. MAY

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY

The Grand Secretary, R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, read the report of this committee, the same being adopted, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A.. F. ,f A. M. of Mi.<;souri: Brethren: Your Committee begs to report that the lending department of our Library is still being used by Brethren in various parts of the State, and although the number of borrowers this year has fallen off to some extent, yet this is probably accountable by reason of the drouth and other contingencies, and is no sign of dimunition of interest. We have something over one hundred Brethren who are availing themselves of this privilege, and the Committee emphasizes the fact that any Brother in good standing can obtain a book from our lending department if he is willing to pay the return postage at the expiration of the time for reading. The Committee is cheered by the fact that the late M. W. Brother Joseph S. McIntyre, has left a bequest of $1,000.00 for the purchase of books under certain conditions, and when this bequest comes to our hands this will be of great help to the future up-building of our Library. Necessarily the work of this Committee is somewhat restricted for the time being, due to conditions over which we have no control, but it is confidentially hoped that in coordination with the Committee on Masonic Service, a larger program may be undertaken in the near future. Respectfully submitted, W.

B.

MASSEY,

Chairman.


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1936

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES

R. 'N. Brother Arthur Mather, Chairman, read the following report, which was adopted. To the M. W. Grand Lodge, .Lt.. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The Committee on Foreign Recognition has nothing to report at this Session of our Grand Lodge, although a sharp out-look is being kept up as to the doings of other Grand Lodges and events that are constantly transpiring in connection therewith. The disturbed conditions throughout the world require extra vigilance, and the Committee is of the opinion that nothing should be done in haste in connection with the sphere in which they operate. Respectfully submitted, ARTHUR MATHER, Chairman.

R. W. BROTHER E. E. MORRIS: Most Worshipful Grand Master, in connection with the Report of the Library Committee, there is a matter which I think the members of this Grand Lodge should know about. The 'Villiam F. Kuhn Library Committee received a number of years ago, a contribution of five hundred dollars from a Jewish admirer of Dr. Kuhn, this brother living in the City of Mexico. This $500.00 is invested in a Government bond. I hope that in the process of time the Grand Lodge will be munificent enough to at least match this gift of Marcus A. Loevy, a fine Mason, who formerly lived in the City of St. Louis. THE GRAND SECRETARY: Most Worshipful Grand Master, will you allow me the privilege of adding a word in commendation of Brother Morris on the relationship of Brother Marcus Loevy to this wonderful thing' THE GRAND MASTER: Certainly. THE GRAND SECRETARY: Brother Marcus A. Loevy, Past Grand Master of the York Grand Lodge of Mexico, was initiated, passed and raised in our Occidental lodge No. 163 by Most 'Vorshipful Brother Julius C. Garrell, years ago. He has lived in Mexico for many years, is a successful business man, and a great admirer of Missouri Freemasonry, particularly of capitular Freemasonry, in which Dr. Kuhn was so wonderfully interested. He gave this money a number of years ago, but he didn't stop there and he hasn't stopped yet. Whenever Mark makes a trip to Europe, if he can find anything that is worth while, Masonically speaking, either for our Museum or Library, he is sure to present it to us. Now, Brother Morris has said the right thing, and we are beginning in the right direction. Most Worshipful Brother McIntyre has left us a bequest of a thousand dollars for this same work, which will come to us ultimately. We are now moving out of the slump that we have been in through the past few years and are going to have something that is worth while,


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

of which, we shall all be proud. We have been marking time. have lost nothing, however, but we have gained something.

77 We

REPORT OF OOMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

Most Worshipful Brother John Pickard, in presenting the report of the Committee, spoke as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master, Brother Joseph Shelby McIntyre, Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the Scottish Rite in Missouri, a born leader of men. My knowledge of Brother McIntyre goes back to the time when he was a student in the University of Missouri. There he was levelheaded, he was able, he was sincere, he was honest and he was dependable. These splendid qualities he took with him out from the University into his active life, and wherever a group of citizens were gathered together, and Joe McIntyre was among them, he was a leader, and his leadership was sound, was sane. We all remember the wonderful courage and fortitude with which he bore five major operations that failed to stop him or to break him down. He has lived a life which speaks well for Missouri. In his loss we have lost one of our great men. It is well for us to stop and think what Masonry stands for when exemplified in such men as Joseph Shelby McIntyre. Alberta: Frederick Shelton Selwood, Grand Master, died August 8, 1935. Arizona: Edwin Seymour Miller, Grand Master, died April 29, 1936. Colorado: William S. Pickerill, Grand Master, died June 15, 1936. William Wiseman Cooper, Grand Secretary, died N()vember 16, 1935. Connecticut: George A. Kies, Grand Master, died February 5, 1936. Delaware: Edward C. Walls, Grand Master, died April 22, 1936.. Edward B. Mode, Grand Master,. died April 26, 1936. A. Victor Hughes, Grand Master, died July 22, 1936. Florida: Elmer F. Haskell, Grand Master, died February 19, 1936. Illinois: Leroy Albert Goddard, Grand Master, died January 22, 1936. Indiana: Robert Woodson Phillips, Grand Master, died April 7, 1936. John Lee Dinwiddie, Grand Master, died May 11, 1936. Harry Yeo, Grand Master, died July 4, 1936. Iowa: Frank Seward Moses, Grand Master, died September 20, 1935. Kansas: Marion K. Brundage, Grand Master, died July 18, 1936. Ke1~tuc7cy: William W. Clarks, Grand Master, died May 24, 1935. LO'Uisiana: Philip George Ricks, Grand Master, died August 5, 1936. Samuel George Gainsburgh, Grand Treasurer, died July 20, 1936. Maine: Hugh R. Chaplin, Grand Master, died September 22, 1935. Augustus Edwin Campbell, Senior Grand Warden, died May 19, 1935. William Stewart Davidson, Senior Grand Warden, died August 20, 1936. Minnesota: William N. Kendrick, Grand Master, died January 21, 1936. William Andrew Elliott, Grand Master, died May 6, 1936. Mississippi: William Harrison Carter, Grand Master, died July 27, 1936. Henry Clay Yawn, Grand Master, died August 3, 1936. Missouri: John H. Sante, Past District Deputy Grand Master of the Third District, died June 25, 1936. Thad R. Smith, Chairman Grand Lodge Committee on Masonic Service Association, died August 29, 1936. James W. Christian, District Deputy Grand Master of the 15th District, died May 5, 1936. Joseph Shelby McIntyre, Past Grand Master, died June 17, 1936. Montana: Edward Cason Day, Grand Master, died June 7, 1936. George Warren Craven, Grand Master, died July 30, 1936.


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1936

Nevada: Charles L. Fulstone, Grand Master, died November 16, 1935. V. M. Henderson, Grand Secretary, died July 11, 1936. New York: Robert Elliott Owens, Grand Master, died July 13, 1936. Ohio: Barton Smith, Grand Master, died November 16, 1935. Charles L. Minor, Grand Master, died February 18, 1936. Oregon: Andy Paul Davis, District Deputy Grand Master, died February 28, 1936. South Carolina: Albra Charles Blackwood, Grand Master, died February 12, 1936. George Twiggs Bryan, Grand Master, died September 10, 1935. South Dakota: WaIter Bissell Burr, Grand Master, died April 16, 1936. Tennessee: George Eddie Bennett, Past Senior Grand Deacon, died November 23, 1935. Texas: S. M. Bradley, Grand Master, died December 23, 1935. Samuel Poyntz Cochran, Grand Master, died February 11, 1936. Virginia: William Luther Andrews, Grand Master, died July 19, 1936. West Virginia: Samuel Tilden Spears, Grand Master, died January 25, 1936. Clyde Tennyson Dutton, Grand Master, died February 21, 1936. Wisconsin: John E. Bast, Assistant Grand Secretary, died September 23, 1935. Harry C. Dittmar, Senior Grand Warden, died June 21, 1935. Wyoming: Charles C. Mitchell, Grand Master, died January 20, 1936. Hugh Hynds, Grand Master, died February 13, 1936. Marion Porter Wheeler, Grand Master, died August 18, 1936.

The report was adopted: THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, if there is no objection you will maintain silence for a moment. BROTHER THOMAS MATHER: Almighty God, in this silence we pour out our hearts in gratitude, saddened b}' the passing of men, and yet gladdened by the vision that life is not wrapped up in what we see but unfolded in the glory of our own relationship to Thee. As they pass one by one, may our hearts be tuned to that deeper melody, may our eyes be keen enough to pierce beyond the horizon, knowing that life itself is in Thy hands and with Thee life does not end. Bless the memory of this good mBtIl, bless us all so that as we live day by day we may make an humble contribution to the establishment of that eternal Kingdom which has no limits and in which Thou dost call Thine own one by one. For Thy name's sake we ask it all. Amen. IN MEMORIAM M. W.

JOSEPH SHELBY McINTYRE

To the Worshipful "Masters, Wardens and Brethren of all the Lodges, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in Missouri, and to all Master Masons in Fraternal Relations: Dear Brethren: "What is excellent, As God lives, is permanent; Hearts are dust, hearts' loves remain; Hearts' love will meet thee again."


JOSEPH SHELBY McINTYRE APRIL 4, IB7l-JUNE 17, 1936


â&#x20AC;˘ 1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

79

At the dawning of the morning of Wednesday, June 17, the spirit of our beloved Past Grand Master, Joseph Shelby McIntyre, took its flight to that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns. Years ago he underwent a succession of major operations; and while for a time, he appeared to have recovered therefrom, the strain was too much, and about seven years ago his health began gradually to fail-although, in spite of intense suffering and great weariness, he carried on his work without complaint. M. W. Brother McIntyre, was born in Audrain County, Missouri, April 4, 1871. His father, Thomas A. McIntyre, was one of the first white children born in that county. His mother was Helen Sayres. On February 3, 1909, Brother McIntyre was married to Miss Ida Langenberg of St. Louis, who with one son, Henry L., now twenty-four, survives him. . Our distinguished Brother, graduated from the High School in Mexico, Missouri, and after teaehing in the county schools for a time, entered the University of Missouri, at Columbia, graduating therefrom in the Academic course in 1897. Proceeding to the Law Department of the University, he graduated in 1899, being the valedictorian of his class. During his vacations, he worked as deputy to the Assessor of Audrain County, in order to meet his educational obli~ations. At the turn of the century he came to St. Louis, engaged in the practice of law, and continued until his retirement in 1928. M. W. Brother McIntyre first saw light in Freemasonry on January 12, 1900, and at the time of his death was intimately identified with all the Masonic bodies, both York and Scottish Rites. He served Tuscan Lodge No. 360 as its Worshipful Master for two years, during which time its present beautiful temple was erected. His year of administration as Grand Master in 1924 was signalized by the memorable visit of Sir Alfred Robbins, who as President of the Board of General Purposes of the United Grand Lodge of Engiand, made a notable tour of American Grand Jurisdictions, and was made an Honorary Member of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, he being the fourth distinguished Brother to receive that honor in our entire history. In 1925 Brother McIntyre made a trip abroad, visiting Southern Europe, The Holy Land and E~ypt, also attending a Communication of the United Grand Lodge of England, at which he was most cordially received. On his return he published, for private e.irculation among his friends, a " Travelog, " descriptive of his tour. In May, 1928, he was appointed Deputy of the Supreme Council in Missouri of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Southern Jurisdiction; and in October, 1929, he was crowned Sovereign Grand Inspector General in Missouri, which position he held until December, 1935, resigning by reason of failing health. Brother McIntyre was distinguished for his sound judgment and breadth of thought. His advice was eagerly sought on matters of importance--even in his school days his very presence inspired confidence and the feeling that everything would be all right. He will be sorely missed, especially by the Directorate of the Masonic Home Board, of which he was a member from 1924 until his death. Above all else he was a friend whose devotion never wavered. The funeral was held June 19, from the Scottish Rite Cathedral in St. Louis, the Rose Croix Service of the Rite being preceded by a brief eulogy from the Grand Master. A large concourse of friends and business associates was present. Interment was in the family lot in Bellefontaine Cemetery.


80

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

It is ordered that this memorial be read in all the Lodges in this Jurisdiction, and that entry be made in the records thereof. Done in the City of St. Louis, this 24th day of June, 1936. JAMES W. SKELLY, Attest: Grand Master. ARTHUR MATHER,

Grand Secretary. MASONIC RECORD

Symbolio: Raised, Mexico Lodge No. 544, January 12, 1900; affiliated, Tuscan Lodge No. 360, February 19, 1901; Worshipful Master, 1907, 1908; District Deputy Grand Master, 33rd District 1908, 1909; Grand Master, Grand Lodge of Missouri 1923-1924. Capitular: Exalted, St. Louis No.8, R. A. M., April 2, 1915. Cryptic: Passed the Circle, Hiram Council No.1, R. & S. M., February 2, 1921. Chivalric: Knighted, Ascalon Commandery No. 16, K. T., December 8, 1922; St. Louis Conclave No. 42, R. C. of C., October 28, 1924. A. A. S. R.: Missouri Consistory No.1, 32째, May 28,1904; 32째 Knight Commander of the Court of Honour, October 16, 1917; 33째 Inspector General Honorary, October 21, 1921; Crowned Sovereign Grand Inspector General in Missouri, October 26, 1929. A. A. O. N. M. S.: Moolah Temple 1904.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WELFARE

R. \V. Brother T. \V. Cotton presented the report of the Welfare Committee which was adopted and is as follows: During the year, the Welfare Committee has held regular monthly meetings and considered all applications coming before the committee in which request for assistance and relief was made by the Lodges. Appropriations were made for relief in 113 cases during the year. This relief extended to 159 persons. These 159 ~rsons were made up as follows: 18 couples, representing 36 people; 54 men; 39 women and 30 children, a total of 159. The 113 cases where relief was granted came from 90 Lodges; 4 Lodges had 3 cases each, representing 12 people; 15 Lodges had 2 cases each, representing 30 people and 71 Lodges had 1 case each. The Committee has felt, on account of the large number of applications and the uncertainty of funds, that it was not justified in granting relief to anyone Lodge of more than $25.00 per month, and that amount has not been exceeded during the year. Two Lodges one with three cases and one a widow and five children, have each received $300.00 during the year. In one of these cases, that of Mrs. Myrtle Bucher and five children of Waynesville Lodge No. 375, the Lodge has contributed $5.00 per month, leaving the amount contributed by the Welfare Committee in this case, $240.00. During the year, several that have received relief from this committee have been admitted to the Masonic Home and a number have died. In the last two months, two have received Old-Age Assistance, but we find in checking over the list, that 65 of these cases have been continuously before the Committee and appropriations made for every month during the year. A large majority of this number have been on the list for a number of years and it appears from the facts the Committee has, that a large number of these will continue as applicants for assistance and it will be necessary to grant relief during the coming ;year and possibly until such time as


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

81

they may be relieved by death or receive Old-Age Assistance, or admission to the Masonic Home. The Committee has requested, where the Lodge is able to do so, that it contribute an equal amount with the Welfare Committee and quite a number of Lodges have met this requirement. However, the larger majority throughout the state have stated that they were not financially able to contribute an equal amount with the Welfare Committee and have contributed a small amount and furnished food and fuel in some instances, which helped in caring fOl' the applicant. In quite a number of cases throughout the state, the Lodges have said that they were unable to contribute anything and in a large number of cases, no contributions have been made by the Lodges. The Committee has said to the Lodges that the question of extending relief to their members, widows and children, is primarily the duty of the Lodges and that in no instance should they expect the Grand Lodge to take the entire burden of caring for their unfortunate members, through the Welfare Committee. In 路many cases where the Lodges have stated that they were unable to do anything, we have found ~hat it was because of the fact that they were collecting dues in insufficient amount, in a number of cases the dues being fixed at $2.50 per year. Our experience in dealing with this question of relief leads us to believe that the time is coming, as conditions improve, when every Lodge should make some provision in its budget for relief for its distres~d members. Many of the Lodges at the present time place tlris in their budget and are able, with the assistance of the Welfare Committee, to care for their distressed members. 'fhe Lodges that are not collecting more than $2.50 per year dues of course can have no fund for that purpose after they pay their Grand Lodge per capita. In many instances, the membership in these Lodges is small. One of the most serious handicaps with which the Secretary-Treasurer of the Committee has met during the year is the difficulty in getting responses from the Secretaries of the Lodges that have made application for relief. The Committee has insisted that in order that it may keep in touch with the situation in every case, that acknowledgment of receipt of cheek sent by the Secretary-Treasurer must be made and a statement as to whether or not there is necessity for further relief. The Secretary-Treasurer has been instructed to put into his letters the statement that if no acknowledgement of check is made or information given regarding the necessity for further relief, that no appropriation will be made for the following month. This has resulted in letters coming from the person who is being assisted, sometimes living in other states, making inquiry as to why they did not receive a check from the Welfare Committee for the month. This of course requires unnecessary correspondence on the part of the SecretaryTreasurer and no doubt in some instances, where there is dire need for relief, Buffering upon the part of an aged Mason, a widow or children. In some instances, the Secretary-Treasurer has been compelled to write the District Deputy in order to get information which should have been furnished by the Secretary and Master of the Lodge. If anyone hearing or reading this report can suggest a way or method by which a Secretary and Master of a Lodge can be impressed with the duty that rests upon them to answer correspondence, and especially where the Lodge is receiving the benefit of the relief, we shall be pleased to have the suggestion. We believe as a rule where the Lodge has asked for and received relief 1 that the Lodge has remitted the dues. However, we have been surprised to learn that some Lodges that are contributing nothing for the assistance of their members and to whom the Welfare Committee is making contributions, have required the member to pay to the Lodge his dues. We cannot understand the reasoning upon the part of the Lodge that asks the Welfare Committee for relief for one of its members and contributes


82

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

nothing itself and then requires out of this relief received from the Welfare Committee that the member shall pay his dues. We do not care here to give the name of the Lodge, or Lodges, but we suggest that if this report comes to the attention of those Lodges that have been guilty of this un-Masonic procedure that they make restitution either to the Welfare Committee or to the member. The total amount contributed during the j'ear for relief, including $65.00 refunded by Waynesville Lodge No. 375, was $7,720.50. The total expenses of the Committee for printing and p08tage was $46.05, making a net expenditure of the committee from its funds for the year $7,701.55. At the beginning of the Masonic year, the committee had borrowed, in order to pay appropriations last year, the sum of $1,300.00. This amount was paid back to the fund from which it was borrowed. SUMMARY OF ]'UNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED, OCTOBER 1, 1935, SEPTEMBER 22, 1936

TO

35.92 Balance on hand, October 1, 1935. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Received from General Fund of Masonic Home, 3% of per cap3,780.00 ita tax . 6,900.00 Received from Grand Lodge during the year . Received from Waynesville Lodge No. 375, account Mrs. Myrtle Bucher and children . 65.00 Total receipts

'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $10,780.92

Disbursements Paid back to the Improvement Fund of the Masonic Home account of money borrowed last year . $1,300.00 46.05 Stationery, printing and postage . Paid for relief . 7,720.50

9,066.55

Balance on hand September 22, 1936--date of audit .... , $ 1,714.37 The following is a list of the Lodge assisted, with the names of the person or persons for whom appropriations were made, and the amount of appropriation. Apollo Lodge No. 529, for Herbert W. Powers and wife " $ 70.00 90.00 Arlington Lodge No. 346, for Squire E. Bryant . 120.00 Aurora Lodge No. 267, for Mrs. Marie H. Anderson . 60.00 Aurora Lodge No. 267, for Wm. Roulston and wife . 55.00 Barnesville Lodge No. 353, for Mrs. J. A. Griggs . 20.00 Barnett Lodge No. 591, for William T. Jackson . 150.g0 Beacon Lodge No.3, for Mrs. Corinne CadwelL . 120.00 Benevolence Lodge No. 170, for Mrs. Catherine Clyde Brown . 25.00 Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642, for J oseph Wolf . 12.50 Bloomfield Lodge No. 153, for Sidney Wilson . 75.00 Bucklin Lodge No. 233, for Elbert Lamkin and wife . 67.50 Cache Lodge No. 416, for William Rebbing . 90.00 Cairo Lodge No. 486, for Elisha McDaniel. . 60.00 Callao Lodge No. 38, for Mrs. Finis Williams . 60.00 Callao Lodge No. 38, for Mrs. A. J. Mathis . 120.00 Cardwell Lodge No. 231, or Mrs. Edgar Harper . 60.00 Censer Lodge No. 172, for C. G. Howe and wife . 60.00 Censer Lodge No. 172, for Mrs. Emma D. Williams . 10.00 Centralia Lodge No. 59, for J olm F. Betz and wife . 20.00 Clarksdale Lodge No. 559, for Claybourne Jackson . 44.00 Composite Lodge No. 369, for Mrs. George Smith .


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Composite Lodge No. 369, for Mrs. W. A. Henderson . Continental Lodge No. 454, for Alex. D. McCrosky . Cornerstone Lodge No. 323, for Mrs. Anna Lindsley . Crane Lodge No. 519, for Mrs. Sarah E. Sherwin . Daggett Lodge No. 492, for Mrs. Jessie Edwards and four children . Eldorado Lodge No. 318, for Mrs. Luella Buckley and children Everton Lodge No. 405, for W. H. Grace . Everton Lodge No. 405, for Luther York . Farmington Lodge No. 132, or Mrs. Rebecca Fleming . Forsythe Lodge No. 453, for Mrs. George B. Stiffler and children Four Mile Lodge No. 212, for J. F. Laswell . Four Mile Lodge No. 212, for Mrs. Melvina Walker . Friend Lodge No. 352, for John David Inman . Fulton Lodge No. 48, for Mrs. Eliza Helen Bartle;}" :. Gate City Lodge No. 522, for Sidney M. Jones and wife . Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for George Ransdale . Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for Walter Strong . Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for Edward B. Browne . Gentryville Lodge No. 125, for Mrs. Cora Riggins . George Washington Lodge No.9, for William J. Otto and wife George Washington Lodge No.9, for Leonard Nagel. . Granite Lodge No. 272, for Mrs. Theodore Schwartz . Henderson Lodge No. 477, for George Wilkel路son . Heroine Lodge No. 104, for Otho E. Seager and wife . Hinton Lodge No. 455, for Walter W. Berry . Illmo Lodge No. 581, for Mrs. Barney August . Ingomar Lodge No. 536, for H. A. Uterman . Itaska Lodge No. 420, William M. Ward and wife .. " . Jackson Lodge No. 82, for Mrs. Orilla J. Luyster . Jefferson Lodge No. 43, for John E. Gorman . Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Mrs. Minne B. Morrow . Jonesburg Lodge No. 457, for Alfred A. Churchill and wife . Keystone Lodge No. 243, for Edward Stephan : .. Keystone Lodge No. 243, for Mrs. Elizabeth Pomeroy . King Hill Lodge No. 376, for Marion McVey . Lambskin Lodge No. 460, for William J. Stevenson . Livingstone Lodge No. 51, for Samuel R. Quinley . Lock Springs Lodge No. 488, for Samuel Wehner . Maitland Lodge No. 112, for Francis M. Coyle . McDonald Lodge No. 324, for George H. Burton . Mount Moriah Lodge No. 40, for Mrs. Walter Orsech and children . Mizpah Lodge No. 639, for Mrs. Sotier and children. " . Naphtali Lodge No. 25, for Mrs. Mabel May . Nodaway Lodge No. 470, for C. J. Alderman and wife . Nodaway Lodge No. 470, for Mrs. John H. Thorpe . Nodaway Lodge No. 470, for J. H. Bunger . Norwood Lodge No. 622, for Charles T. Schoonover . Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, for Mrs. Theodore and children . . Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, for William H. Athey Pauldingville Lodge No. 11, for William E. Bryan . Pee Dee Lodge No. 498, for William H. Owens . Perseverance Lodge No. 492, for Mrs. Cora Wise Sloan . Pine Lodge No. 314, for Lee Simpson . Polar Star Lodge No. 79, for Hugo S. Sievers and wife . Polar Star Lodge No. 79, for Leon Behr . Polar Star Lodge No. 79, for Mrs. Jessie Belle Roseborough .

83 110.00 48.00 8.00 55.00 75.00 90.00 60.00 90.00 50.00 120.00 140.00 5.00 55.00 15.00 142.50 90.00 30.00 142.50 60.00 90.00 24.00 27.50 120.00 120.00 180.00 17.50 128.00 180.00 120.00 87.50 45.00 110.00 30.00 140.00 140.00 120.00 90.00 5.00 40.00 45.00 36.00 40.00 30.00 60.00 100.00 57.50 120.00 15.00 35.00 40.00 120.00 100.00 14.00 120.00 120.00 60.00


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Puxico Lodge No. 596, for Mrs. Eva Clark . Puxico Lodge No. 596, for Robert A. Smock . Pyramid Lodge No. 180, for Harry Claypool. . Pythagoras Lodge No. 383, for Michael H. Tribble . Ralls Lodge No. 33, for James P. Dowell . Ralls Lodge No. 33, for George W. Wybrant . Ralls Lodge No. 33, for R. E. Herron and wift:' . Rocheport Ilodge No. 67, for Henry Spillman . Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, for William C. Eyster . Rose Hill I.Jodge No. 550, for Andrew W. Aubrey . Rural Lodge No. 316, for .J oseph N. Kidd and wife . Salisbury Lodge No. 208, for Joshua Terrill Bunton . Santa Fe Lodge No. 462, for Mrs. J. S. Drake . Sampson Lodge No. 298, for Elliott Stockton . Solomon Lodge No. 271, for Herschel Ingram . South Gate Lodge No. 547, for Edwin Downs . South Gate Lodge No. 547, for Earl D. May . St. James Lodge No. 230, for Oliver H. Ohlson and wife . St. James Lodge No. 230, for Herbert Clapp and wife . St. J olms Lodge No. 28, for Mrs. Lucille Fitzpatrick . St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, for Albert P. Uhlinger . Strafford Lodge No. 608, for Mrs. Emma Haines . Summersville IJodge No. 555, for Marion W. Pittman . Tower Grove Lodge No. 631, for Robert F. Franks . Trowell Lodge No. 440, for Mrs. Virginia Morgan . Tuscan Lodge No. 260, for Alexander W. Payne . Twilight Lodge No. 114, for Virgil Hawkins . Twilight Lodge No. 114, for William and Keith Corey (children) . Valley Lodge No. 413, for J. H. Goforth . Van Buren Lodge No. 509, for Mrs. Marion Harris . Washington Lodge No. 87, for Horace Howard . Waynesville Lodge No. 375, for Mrs. Myrtle Bucher and five children . Webstcr Groves Lodge No. 84, for Adolphe C. Lewis . Weston Lodge No. 53, for Mrs. Anna Murdock . Wilderness Lodge No. 374, for Lee Simpson . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. Robert Edwards . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. William B. Polk, Sr .

1936 88.00 80.00 22.50 48.00 5.00 145.00 36.00 30.00 60.00 30.00 50.00 75.00 12.50 7.50 12.50 20.00 45.00 90.00 17.00 15.00 130.00 60.00 35.00 67.50 60.00 37.50 40.00 60.00 15.00 57.50 90.00 300.00 20.00 32.50路 24.50 50.00 50.00

Total appropriations for relief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $7,720.50 Respectfully submitted, T. W. COTTON, Chairman R. R. KREEGER THOMAS H. REYNOLDS CAMPBELL

W. S.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MARK TWAm MEMORIAL

This report was presented by R. \V. Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, was adopted and is as follows: 1'0 the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. 拢f A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee appointed at the last communication of the Grand Lodge to ercct a memorial tablet to Brother Samuel L. Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, in rccognition of the eentennial of the birth of that distinguished Missourian reports as follows:


1936

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GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

A memorial tablet of bronze 24 inches by 30 inches, was duly obtained by your Committee at the Southeast corner of the Masonic Temple at Hannibal, Missouri, the inscription thereon being as follows: 1835 1935 ERECTED BY THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. OF MISSOURI NOVEMBER 19, 1935 IN COMMEMORATION OF THE CENTENNIAL OF THE BIRTH OF SAMUEL L. CLEMENS (Mark Twain) MEMBER OF POLAR STAR LODGE No. 79 A. F. & A. M., ST. LOUIS, MO. Initiated May 22, 1861 Passed June 12, 1861 Raised July 10, 1861 He was promoted to solicit the prIvIleges of the Masonic Fraternity while a Mississippi River Stea~boat Pilot because of a favorable opinion conceived of the Fraternity, a desire for knowledge and a sincere wish of being serviceable to his fellow creatures. The memorial was unveiled and dedicated by Most Worshipful Brother James W. Skelly, Grand Master, with appropriate ceremonies, on the afternoon of November 19,. 1935, because of inclement weather the ceremonies, except the unveiling ceremony, were held in the auditorium of the Park Methodist Episcopal Church South, which is immediately across the street from the Masonic Temple. An impressive part of these ceremonies was the use by the Grand Master in convening the special communication of the Grand Lodge of the gavel made of cedar from the forests of Lebanon, presented by Mark Twain to his Mother Lodge, Polar Star Lodge No. 79 A. F. & A. M., St. Louis, Missouri. Polar Star Lodge sent the gavel to Ha.nnibal for this occasion in charge of the following committee, Brothers Leroy Weidle, Harry Gershenson, Joseph L. Kohner and Benjamin Wolf. Mark Twain obtained the wood out of which this gavel was made, while on his famous "Quaker City" trip and had the gavel made at Alexandria, Egypt. It is with considerable regret that we mention the fact that Brother Thad R. Smith, who was a member of the Committee and who assisted in making arrangements and carrying them out, has since died. Fraternally submitted, BYRNE FRANK

E. C.

BIGGER BARNHILL

M. W. BROTHER HAL O. McLOUD, GRAND MASTER, GRAND LODGE OF ILLINOIS THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, among the bright spots in any session of the Grand Lodge is the presence of visitors from other Grand jurisdictions. On this occasion we have been favored by the presence


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of Brethren from several of our sister Grand jurisdictions, and at this time I am going to ask the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Illinois, Most Worshipful Brother Hal C. McLoud, to speak to this audience. Most Worshipful Brother McLoud: M. W. BROTHER McLoUD: Most Worshipful Grand Master, distinguished visitors to the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri. I can assure you all of my deep gratification with the courteous reception I ha.ve received, the kindly entertainment and my enjoyment of this session in which I have been pleased to observe very few significant differences from those things which occur in the Grand Lodge of the State of Illinois where I have a habit of being present for more than twenty years. Your Most Worshipful Grand Master spoke of the great barrier that lies between our two Grand Jurisdictions. The weather during the last season did a great deal to remove that barrier, we could almost waJk across at times, but I am reminded of the fact that this great institution of which we are all members sprang from a craft of builders, and shortly after this Grand Lodge assisted in starting the Grand Lodge of Illinois, the builders removed the barrier and great bridges spanned the stream so that today it is comparatively simple for anyone to cross the jurisdictional boundary into the fellowship of the fraternitJi in the other State. It has been my good fortune to cross thus Masonically in pilgrimage a number of times. I have always greatly enjoyed it. I am enjoying it on this occasion. Being as we are sprung from a craft, it is incumbent upon us always to remember that we must be true to our heritage and build, and "to each is given a bag of tools, an hour glass and a book of rules and we each must build ere his hour be flown, a stumbling block or a stepping-stone." We have built stepping-stones between Missouri and Illinois and we are still building them. I am glad to extend to you on behalf of the fraternity in Illinois our very cordial greetings, and to extend to you also, those who have the privilege of being in our great City of Chicago October 13 and 14, a cordial invitation to visit our Grand Lodge on those dates, and I wish to the Masonic fraternity in the great State of Missouri that meed of growth and culture in our mystic art which your labors and your intelligence deserve. Most Worshipful Grand Master, I thank you for the courtesy of this opportunity of speaking to your brethren.

THE GRAND MASTER: Most Worshipful Brother McLoud, we are glad you are here. We are always glad to meet with our brethren from other Grand Jurisdictions. Brethren, there is another brother here from Illinois, a Grand Master of several years ago, Most \Vorshipful Brother Davenport, Grand Secretary. We shall be glad to hear from him, and I might say, Brethren, his accomplishments are such that at the end of a session of their Grand Lodge he is able to produee a book of proceedings, I think, about two times the size of ours. That is a real accomplishment and I am sure we shall be glad to hear from Most '\Vorshipful Brother Davenport. M. W. BROTHER DAVENPORT: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: It is a genuine pleasure for me t<1 accompany my Grand Master and to come again to your Grand Lodge. I say come again to your Grand Lodge because this is not the first time I have been with you. I have been here on three or four other


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occasions, and while most of the brethren whom I am facing now are perhaps strangers to me, yet practically all of these on the platform I have known for quite some time. It is always a pleasure to go to the Grand Lodge where my good friend Brother Mather is the Grand Secretary. He and I have worked side by side for a number of years and I really am always glad when I can come to St. Louis. I want to congratulate you, Most Worshipful Grand Master, on the splendid address which you read to this Grand Lodge this morning and I would suggest that each representatIve here take time off and read it, because I am convinced after listening to it that your Grand Lodge is confronted with the same problems that we are in Illinois, and if you brethren will study that I am sure you can assist the Grand Lodge officers in correcting any difficulties with which you may be confronted. I want to congratulate you on what I know has been a most wonderful administration and I want to take this opportunity to wish for my personal friend, Dr. Walker of Cape Girardeau, whom I have every reason to believe will succeed you, that he will have an equally useful and successful year as Most Worshipful Grand Master, and I hope that I will have the pleasure of coming back next year when you meet, and when Dr. Walker presides.

THE GRAND MASTER: Most 'tV orshipful Brother Davenport, we hope that you may return many more times. vVe understand that you and Most Worshipful Brother McLoud must leave shortly. \Ve regret you cannot remain longer. Weare glad you have been here and wish you Godspeed on your return. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC PUBLICATIONS

In the absence of the chairman, R. W. Brother Frederick M. Smith, presented the Report of the Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand LodglJ, A.. F. go A.. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The Committee on Masonic Publications, respectfully submits the following report: The Committee originally was assigned the task of considering some problems growing out of Masonic publications, but in the Grand Lodge period ending September, 1935, nothing was presented to the Committee that seemed to demand consideration and action. However, just following the last session of Grand Lodge the matter of Masonic Directories was referred to the Committee and it has studied the question carefully both in this and other jurisdictions. By letters to, and personal contacts with officials of other jurisdictions, the practices and customs and prevailing ideas as to directories were ascertained. After careful consideration, by exchange of thought, in committee meetings and by correspondence, and personal contact of committee members, the committee reached unanimous opinion that from the standpoint of the welfare of the fraternity, lists of names of lodge members, either with or without addresses should not be printed, and that rolls of membership should exist only in lodge offices and Grand Lodge offices where needed. We, therefore, recommend that lodges within this jurisdiction be forbidden to print such lists of members or to contribute in any way to the financial support of, or furnish the list for a Masonic Directory of its members. To carry out this recommendation the committee will introduce a by-law to this effect.


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Some of the reasons for reaching the foregoing conclusions may be of interest to Grand Lodge members. The utility of printed lists of names and addresses in Masonic circles is limited, so limited in fact as not to warrant the issue; and such lists where issued are likely to be used for commercial purposes, and sold as , 'sucker lists." The cost of printing such lists has in cases where printed, usually been borne by securing pay for advertisements. The value of such ads from a business standpoint is small because of the small circulation and use of such directories and business men are prone to look upon the cost of them of such ads as merely donations to the cause.. The custom of securing ads for directories is wrong and should not continue. That there is a limited field for directories giving names of lodges, together with dates and places of meetings, names of officers and addresses of secretaries, may be apparent in some quarters; but where such necd appears, it should be met by Grand Lodge either issuing such directories or authorizing them, and they should be free from advertisem.ents. The cost should be borne by. the Grand Lodge, or by prorating the cost among the lodges served. Paying for directories by selling ads is too much in the nature of commercialization. In the printing and distribution of such directories as indicated in the foregoing, only printing concerns owned and controlled by members of the Craft should be employed. This is to avoid improper use of the information necessarily imparted in printing. Directories containing lists of names and addresses of members quickly become out of date, and useless except as histories. Because of the above set out reasons, and others considered by the committee, we recommend as we have. Fraternally submitted, FRANK C. BARNHILL, Chairman, FREDERICK M. SMITH, BYRNE E. BIGGER.

The following Supplemental Report of the Committee on Masonic Publications was also read by R. W. Brother Frederick M. Smith, was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, ...4. F. ~ ...4. M. of Missouri: Brethren: In addition to the report made by the committee on Masonic publications on the question of Masonic Directories, and our recommendation thereon, we desire to report in addition on the matter of Masonic periodicals within the jurisdiction. That there is need for periodic Masonic literature of a high order can scarcely be denied. We are disposed at present to think that this need should be supplied only by publication or publications upon which the imprimatur of the Grand Lodge can be placed. More speeifically put, the Grand Lodge should assume the responsibility of supplying such literature. This may be privately printed or issued literature under Grand Lodge supervision or by the Grand Lodge assuming full control and responsibility. The privately issued literature could be subsidized until put on a paying basis. It doubtless can ultimately be made to pay. The chief control needed to be exercised by the Grand Lodge is editorial. This could be done by a board of editors appointed by the Grand Lodge, the board to elect an editor-in-chief, or by selecting an editor, he to select what assistants may be needed.


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The paper should be high class in appearance as well as content, and the chief objects in view should be to furnish educational material to the lodges for instruction and stimulate a wider study of the principles and landmarks of the craft, and to promote finer and greater solidarity by publishing proper news of Masonic activities in the jurisdiction, and promoting fraternal exchanges. Under present financial conditions prevailing in the Grand Lodge and its subordinate lodges, it is probably inadvisable路 to launch now a move to publish such literature or publication indicated in the foregoing, but the work of preparing for such periodical literature may well be started now. The committee, therefore, suggests the advisability of continuing the Committee on Masonic Publications, and instructed to study further this question for later report, and that the members of the fraternity cooperate with the committee by contributing suggestions on what is best to do and the best way to accomplish it. All of this should help make a better fraternity and an expanded conception of Freemasonry. We feel, too, that the work of this committee might well link up with the educational work some of the other grand bodies are attempting and doing. Fraternally submitted, FRANK C. BARNHILL, Chairman, FREDERICK M. SMITH, BYRNE E. BIGGER.

R. W. BROTHER FREDERICK M. SMITH: One other item and then we are through. A by-law recommended by the Committee on Masonic Publications. Amend the Grand Lodge by-laws by inserting a new section to be known as Section 204%, same being as follows: SEC. 204%. No lodge shall publish or distribute a directory or list of its membership, nor shall any lodge or member thereof furnish or permit to be furnished, a list of its members or their addresses for publication. This provision shall not apply to the annual returns by a lodge to the Grand Lodge, or to any such information ordered or requested by the Grand Lodge or the Grand Master.

Most Worshipful Grand Master, I move the reference of this proposed amendment to the Committee on Jurisprudence. THE GRAND MASTER: If there is no objection, it will be so referred. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

M. 'V. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented his report, which was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: I herewith submit my annual report as State Chairman of the George Washington Masonic Memorial Association. The twenty-sixth annual convention of the Association was held in Alexandria, Virginia, on Saturday, February 22. Forty-three Grand Lodges were represented by their Grand Masters


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and otlJer Grand Officers. Missouri was represented by our Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Senior Steward and Grand Lecturer. During the last year there was paid out for building construction, maintenance and general expenses a total of $18,195.62. The Treasurer reported a balance of $61,476.74 in the Building Fund. Work was resumed upon the finishing of Memorial Hall shortly after the annual meeting and the President wrote me under date of September 11 that all the work in that part of the Memorial had been completed. The Association had prepared a beautiful booklet for the information of the brethren. I have secured one thousand copies and have distributed them to the brethren in attendance at the Grand Lodge that they may see what has been done and the problems still eonfronting us in the final completion of the Memorial. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, ORESTES MITCHELL. MILTON L. MYERS, PAST GRAND MASTER, GRAND LODGE OF OREGON THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, we have with us today, an unexpected but none the less welcome visitor from far-away Oregon, Most Worshipful Brother Myers, Past Grand Master. We should like very much to hear from 'Vorshipful Brother Myers at this time and will welcome a message from our sister jurisdiction on the Pacific Coast.

M. W. BROTHER MILTON L. MYERS: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri and distinguished guests: I don't know whether or not you can appreciate the thrill I get out of attending this meeting. I feel like a child that has come back homenot that I am a native of Missouri or anywhere near Missouri, because I am a native of the Northwest, having been born and raised within the sound of the Pacific Ocean; but it is to the Grand Lodge of Missouri that ,r owe the fact that I am a Master Mason. In the year of 1846 a small group of men, half a dozen, I believe, met in Oregon City, and deeided to ask the Grand Lodge of Missouri for a charter to open a lodge in that city. That message did not reaeh Missouri until late in that year when your Grand Lodge was in session at St. Joseph, Missouri. The Platte City Lodge recommended that the charter be granted. It was nearly two years later before that charter reached Oregon. On the day that the charter arrived in Oregon City, Joseph Hull called the brethl'en together and they proceeded to organize under the name of Multnomah Lodge No. 84, under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. r am not going to vouch for tlle aecuracy of this statement, but I have been told that the furniture of the lodgeroom was indeed crude. The aItar was a rough packing case, the Worshipful Master's pedestal was a barrel of corn, the Senior Warden had a barrel of whiskey and the Junior Warden a barrel of pork, emblematic, I presume, of the corner of refreshment, the wine of nourishment and the oil of joy. From that day forward, however, Masonry in Oregon has progressed. Today we have a hundred and ninety-seven lodges and a membership of a little more than twenty-five thousand. We were above the thirty thousand mark until the depression came along and then we slid back, but I am mighty happy to say that today Masonry in Oregon is on the upgrade, and


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all our lodges are doing work. Now, brethren, I am not going to take up more of your time as I know you have a lot of business, but I want you to know that I fully appreciate the courtesy that has been extended to me, and I can assure each and everyone of you, should you ever visit Oregon in the month of June, remember the Grand Lodge of Oregon meets in the City of Portland, and you will be more than welcome.

THE GRAND MASTER: Most Worshipful Brother Meyers, we appreciate that message and when you return to Oregon, take with you our kindest regards to our brethren on the Pacific Coast. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS

W. BROTIIER MCGUIGAN: On behalf of the Committee on Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis, and by request of its Chairman, Most Worshipful Brother Byrne E. Bigger, I beg leave to read the following report. To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your members appointed by the Grand Master to represent the Grand Lodge in the Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis, submit the following report: Last year in our report we called attention to the outstanding bonds of the Association as being in the sum of $336,000.00. On December 1, 1935, the Association paid the interest due at that time and retired bonds of the par value of $11,000.00. On June 1, 1936, the Association paid the interest due on that date and in addition thereto retired bonds of the par value of $10,000.00. This leaves the outstanding bonded indebtedness of the Association in the sum of $315,000.00. On June 1, 1936, the entire bond issue was refinanced on a basis of 4lh per cent interest charge instead of 5 per cent. This saving of lh of 1 per cent will mean considerable to the Association in years to come. We believe that the officers of the Association and the member bodies are to be commended for their good work and it is gratifying to see the bonded indebtedness substantially decreased year after yeal'. Respectively submitted, BRYNE E. BIGGER,

EDWARD MCGUIGAM, JOHN WOHRADSKY, JR. Most Worshipful Grand Master, I would just like to make an explanation: this bonded indebtedness now carries over to June, 1946. It is merely an extension of the original loan. The Report was adopted. MOST WORSHIPFUL CHANCELLOR C. PHILLIPS, GRAND MASTER GRAND LODGE OF NEBRASKA

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, as I said, we have been favored by the presence of visitors from a number of sister jurisdictions. Our brethren from the State of Nebraska, whose Grand Lodge, as I men-


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tioned this morning, may he considered to be a grand-daughter of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, are here today, as we are glad to say they have been on several previous occasions. At this time we should be glad indeed to hear from the Grand Master of Nebraska, Most W orshipful Brother Chancellor C. Phillips. M. W. BROTHER CHANCELLOR C. PHILLIPS: Most Worshipful Brother Skelly and brethren of this Grand Jurisdiction: It is my very happy pleasure to bring to you the greetings of about thirty thousand Masons of Nebraska, composing two hundred and ninety-one constituent lodges. I consider it an honor to be their commissioned delegate to bring you that greeting. I am certain that even a casual observer listening to the wonderful address of your Worshipful Grand Master would conclude that you have had a very efficient and successful year. At high twelve today as we passed from this building I was very much impressed by the sight of all of the brethren out on the steps of the building, and as they dispersed I thought what a wonderful army of fine men espousing the cause of the most wonderful ideals and principles known to men, and I thought that if each of us could but realize how important it is that we make some honest effort to live a life that is useful, truthful, and sincere, what a wonderfully effective group it would be. Brethren, you cannot have a successful Grand Lodge without the hanest and efficient support of the constituent lodges. You brethren who are here as the Masters of your lodges or as Past Masters, Wardens, or perhaps all of those offices, know you cannot have successful constituent lodges without honest effort to do the things that we expect Masons to do. Let us remember, brethren, that all Masons are really doubly obligated to be good citizens. We are obligated to do the things that we know we should do, and the things that we profess that we will do, when we become associated with this body. But enough of that: Most Worshipful Sir, I realize that in one hundred and sixteen years of life and activity there are many things that could happen of worthy note in a grand body such as this. I am unable to mention anything in particular except that in Nebraska we are very proud that in an early day of your Grand Lodge we received inspiration from you--Qne of our lodges being commissioned by your Grand Lodge. Now, this is rather personal: many years ago I happened to be a small boy in this State. I lived here until I was almost grown. My early schooling, of course, was naturally received in the country schools of this great State. When I went to Nebraska with my parents, I couldn't believe there was any other State in the world like Missouri.

THE GRAND MASTER : You may have been right, early impressions are often right. M. W. BROTHER PHILLIPS (continuing): For many years after I went to Nebraska I was a loyal admirer of Missouri. I haven't lost the admiration, brethren, I still think of Missouri as a wonderful State. You have a fine group of men, and efficiency in the administration of your Grand Lodge that has impressed me most favorably. Your Grand Chaplain invoked the blessings of the great architect of the universe upon your work. We are taught that we should not enter upon any great or important work without first doing it. Brethren, in all discussions let us ever keep in mind that the all-seeing eye is watching, and there will be fewer mistakes made. I now wish to extend to all members of this Grand Jurisdiction a most cordial and sincere invitation to be present at any of our Annual Communications. We shall, of course, make the formal invitation at the proper time, but I want you to know that we


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will be glad to reeeive any of the brethren of this Grand Lodge at any time, at any of our Annual Communications, particularly the one to be held in June, 1937, in the City of Omaha. I sin~rely thank you for this opportunity of saying these few words, and I want you to know brethren, they come from my heart. I wish you well, and I hope you have a wonderfully successful meeting here. I thank you.

THE GRAN D MASTER: Most W orshipful Brother Phillips, we are glad you were able to be here. We received a cordial invitation from your Grand Lodge last June, but due to the fact that the session of the Grand Lodge of Iowa was held at the same time, made it impossible for us to attend. 1Ne did the next best thing, however, we sent Brother Edmund E. Morris, our Grand Treasurer, to you. He is the Grand representative of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska ne1tr the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and we think it was a happy selection. Also from the Grand Lodge of Nebraska we have had a visitor for many years; formerly Grand Master, and present Grand Secretary, M. W. Brother Lewis E. Smith. We know a great deal of the progress, the successful prosperity and usefulness of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska is due to his efficient work, and ";e will be very glad to hear from M. W. Brother Smith at this time. M. W. BROTHER LEWIS E. SMITH: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: I am here with quite mixed emotions today. I have known our Grand Master for a good many years, thirty at least, and it was quite a shock to find out that he had ever lived in Missouri. There is just one thought I would like to leave. My work in Nebraska is quite different from most other Grand Secretaries. Nebraska is one of two jurisdictions in the United States, the State of Washington being the other, who have no Grand Treasurer, so that I am charged not only with the responsibility ordinarily carried on by a Grand Secretary hut also I have charge of all the funds. It brings to me, I believe, a deeper realization of finances than is possessed by the average Grand Secretary. I am convinced in my own mind of this. People take no pride in belonging to an institution that is not solvent, and a lodge, or Grand Lodge, that can't pay its debts, and pay them when they are due, is going to lose members. N ow, brethren, think about that. I realize that today is perhaps not the day to start to save, and yet no great thing has ever come in this world to any organization or to any individual except through struggle. Right now is the time for lodges and Grand Lodges to place themselves in such a position that if and when a depression strikes again our houses will be in order, so that when our brethren and their families need assistance, we will be in a position to answer the call. I thank you very much for your kind reception and I am delighted to be here at your Grand Lodge. I hope I may be permitted to come again. Thank you very much.

The GRAND MASTER: Most Worshipful Brother Smith, we certainly appreciate the message you have brought to us. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 3 :30 o'clock P.M., the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until &:00 o'clock P.M. this evening.


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FIRST DAY, EVENING SESSION CALLED TO LABOR

At 8 :00 o'cloek P.M., the M. 'V. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by the M. 'V. Grand Master. Prayer was offered by R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, acting as Grand Chaplain. EXEMPLIFICATION OF WORK

An exemplification of the Third Degree of Freemasonry was given under the direction of M. 'V. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, Grand Lecturer. OALLED FROM LABOR

At 11 :00 P.M. the M. W. Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 8 :30 o'clock A.M., Wednesday morning, September 30, 1936.

SECOND DAY, MORNING SESSION CALLED TO LABOR

At 8 :30 o'clock A.M., the M. 'V. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by M. W. Grand Master James 'V. Skelly, the Grand Officers being in their respective stations as on the preceding day. Prayer was offered by R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, acting as Grand Chaplain. REPORT OF BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

R. W. Brother Cecil A. Tolin read the report of the Building Supervisory Board, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A.. F. go A.. M. of MissO'Uri: Brethren: The Building Supervisory Board submits the following report on activities of the Board for the year 1935-1936: WEATHERBY LODGE

235,

WEATHERBY, MISSOURI

October 17, 1935. Granted Weatherby Lodge No. 235 permission to purchase a two-story building, the lower floor to be rented for commercial purposes and second floor to be used for Masonic purposes, cost not to exceed $1,000, and Lodge has sufficient cash in the treasury to make this payment. SHELDON LODGE

No. 371,

SHELDON, MISSOURI

October 25, 1935. Sheldon Lodge No. 371 reported that the building which they were occupying was sold at a partition sale and the the Lodge bid in the property at a very nominal price, they having sufficient cash to make the payment, and inquired in whose Hamp. the title of the property should be taken, stating that they had no Board of Trustees. Their action in this regard was approved and they were requested to take title


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in the name of the Trustees of the Lodge, and that if none were provided in their By-Laws, then the Master and two Wardens constituted the Board pursuant to the Grand Lodge By-Laws. GOLDEN LODGE No. 475, GOLDEN CITY, MISSOURI November 30, 1935. In reply to the communication from Right Worshipful Brother D. V. Morris, D. D. G. M., 43rd District, stating that Golden Lodge No. 475 desired to purchase a two-story building on the main street of the town, the first floor to be used for commercial purposes, rent of $16.00 per month, and Lodge to occupy the second floor, but that the Lodge had no funds whatever on hand and had arranged with one of the brethren to secure a loan for the entire purchase price, the Board declined to grant permission to make the purchase unless the Lodge could increase their dues to enable them to make a reduction in principal each year. The Lodge being unwilling to do this the deal was not consummated. POLLOCK LODGE No. 349, POLLOCK, MISSOURI January 7, 1936. Granted Pollock Lodge No. 349 permission to acquire title to building, the second floor of which they had been occupying for the sum of $700.00 and to borrow $500 from a member of the lodge to be secured by a deed of trust on the property due in five years. CARROLL LODGE No. 249, NORBORNE, MISSOURI January 25, 1936. Granted Carroll Lodge No. 249, permission to purchase the building formerly known as the Citizens Bank Building for $3500 cash, the lodge having sufficient cash on hand to make this payment. BARNESVILLE LODGE No. 353, ELLINGTON, MISSOURI April 3, 1936. Granted permission to Barnesville Lodge No. 353 to borrow $490 to be secured by Deed of Trust on the Temple to enable the Lodge to satisfy an obligation to the Ellington Bank, which had been closed and was in course of liquidation. MINERAL LODGE No. 471, ORONOGO, MISSOURI April 25, 1936. Granted permission to Mineral Lodge No. 471 to enter into a lease covering Mineral Rights under the Lodge property, provided they were dealing with responsible people and making provisions in the lease that the lessee would use every precaution to avoid cave-ins which might damage the building. MOBERLY TEMPLE ASSOCIATION, MOBERLY, MISSOURI May 15, 1936. The Building Supervisory Board accompanied by the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary met with the officers of the Temple Association and the Blue Lodge, and undertook to devise some plan whereby suit against some 25 individual co-makers with the Temple Association on an indebtedness of some $42,000 might be avoided, and foreclosure of the Temple might be prevented, as the Board felt eonfident the mortgagee would compromise if a reasonable settlement was proposed. On May 19, 1936, four members of the Lodge met with a representative of the mortgagee and this Board and stated emphatically that unless the mortgagee would accept $18,000 in full settlement that they would have nothing further to do with the proposal. We felt that the Association should raise their offer to $30,000 but they refused to do so, and as a result, suit has been filed against the co-makers. . The thing uppermost in the minds of the brethren is that the co-makers were not liable as the


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proposition had been misrepresented to them and the Board is informed that no' further efforts have been made by the brethren to increase the amount of their compromise, after having been turned down by the mortgagee on their first proposal to settle for $18,000. CLINTON LODGE No. 548, CLINTON, Mo. At the request of Right Worshipful Brother, Thornton Jennings, D. D. G. M., 37th District, on July 15, Chairman visited Clinton, Missouri, and consulted the Chairman of the Finance Committee, Brother Marseilles in connection with a proposal to re-purchase the Temple at Clinton, which had been sold at foreclosure for a debt of $10,000. The Brethren of this Lodge had submitted a proposal to the Bondholders Committee to acquire title to the property to pay them $4800 to regain possession of the building. One of the bondholders, a lady, who resides in Kansas City, Missouri, had written to the Grand Master, complaining of the fact that she had loaned $4,000 on the Temple and that the debt to her including past due interest amounted to $5,000, she feeling that this proposition was unfair. I found the building in unfavorable condition having never been nearly completed and now badly in need of repairs, and could plainly see that if the brethren as they contemplated raised $4,800 in cash to redeem the building, they would still be obliged to expend a substantial amount to make the building tenantable for lodge purposes and informed the brethren that if the $4,800 could be raised, the Building Supervisory Board would look with favor on the proposal. MONTGOMERY LODGE No. 246, MONTGOMERY CITY, Mo. May 16, 1936. Lodge No. 246 to remodel the lower Post Office for 10

On May 16, 1936, granted permission to Montgomery borrow $4,000 with which to pay debt of $1,500, and floor of their building to enable them to lease it to the years at rental of $720 per annum.

CLAY LODGE No. 207, EXCELSIOR SPRINGS, Mo. July 11, 1936. Granted permission to Clay Lodge No. 207 in conjunction with Excelsior Springs Masonic Building and Realty Company to contract a debt of $13,000 to enable them to acquire and remodel a building which they had agreed to purchase; the first floor to be leased for 15 years for commercial purposes at a rental of $145 a month, the lodge to occupy the second floor. CLARK MASONIC BUILDING ASSOCIATION, CLARK, Mo. August 13, 1936. Granted permission to Clark Lodge No. 610 A. F. & A. M. in conjunction with Clark Masonic Building Association to place a mortgage of $3,500 on their building to take care of an unsecured debt which the Association owed, the building being clear of indebtedness, having recently been remodeled and rebuilt on account of fire which occurred in June, 1935. Through the insurance collected from this fire, they were able to pay oft' their mortgage and repair the building. KING HILL MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION, ST. JOSEPH, Mo. September 29, 1936. This Association was formed by King Hill Lodge No. 376 A. F. & A. M. solely for the purpose of holding title to their Temple property, and is under absolute supervision by the Lodge. In 1926 the Association borrowed $37,500, which was to be paid off serially. In 1932 they defaulted in principal payments and since that time have fallen behind with their interest. At the present time interest and principal unpaid and in default amounts to approximately $35,000. This


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debt is in bond form and is held by outsiders, the issue having been 80ld by a bond house in St. Louis. A bondholders' Committee has been formed and the Committee has agreed to accept $20,000 in full settlement of the debt. The Association has $2,500 cash, and the Scottish Rite Cathedral Association of St. Joseph, Missouri, has agreed to loan the Temple Association $17,500 at 5 per cent interest, with a principal pay-off of $500 annually. The Building Supervisory Board being convinced that the Association should accept compromise settlement, has approved the re-financing plan.

Chairman, Building

C. A. TOLIN, Grand Lodge.

Supervi.~ory Board,

R. 'N. BROTHER FORREST C. DO~NELL: Most Worshipful Grand Master, I would like to just add a word to what has been said by the Chairman of the Building Supervisory Board. It was mentioned in the Grand Master's address that in some instances the lodges affected by the action of this Board have been slow in courtesy and cooperation with respect to the Board. I think, Most Worshipful Grand Master, that it is not unappropriate to make mention of the tremendous importance of this Board. This very careful and detailed report which has been so splendidly given by Worshipful Brother Tolin is in itself evidence of the importance of this work. It has been my privilege to know the members of this Board and to observe their work in certain past connections in a way which gives me the opportunity to vouch for the thoroughness and the capabilities of the Board. May I say this also, that this Board is confronted with many problems. It is confronted with financial problems, legal problems, questions of policy, questions of the financial ability of the various lodges and bodies involved, and it requires a tremendous amount of work on the part of the Board to carry out so carefully and skillfully as it has been done, the very fine services that it has rendered, but it is not so much as a compliment to the members of this Board that I speak for the moment as it is to accent the tremendous importance of the lodges of the State giving the courtesy and co-operation to which the Grand Master refers as in some instances somewhat slowly coming forth from the lodges. This Board has a difficult task, it has an important task and it is one that needs courtesy and co-operation of the lodges. The Grand Lodge appreciates the importance of a board which is not swayed particularly by local sentiment, which is not perhaps overenthusiastic because of an overrated judgment as to the ability of the particular community to progress satisfactorily with the work at hand. It is able to come in with an unprejudiced and unbiased consideration of the problems involved. It is one of the most important boards, in my opinion, of the Grand Lodge and I believe that every member of the Grand Lodge when he appreciates the importance of the Board and their fine work will be pleased, Most Worshipful Grand Master, to extend the courtesy and the co-operation which the Grand Master in his address bespeaks for the Board. THE GRAND MASTER: Thank you, R. W. Brother Donnell. Any


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further discussion' If not, all in favor of the motion will signify the same by raising the right hand. RESOLUTION

R. W. BROTHER CECIL A. TOLIN: Most Worshipful Grand Master, I have a resolution I should like to present: In accordance with the recommendation of the Grand Master, approved by the Committee on Grand Master's address, I submit the following resolution: "Resolved: That hereafter, regardless of any resolution heretofore adopted, only the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, and the Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge shall be its representatives at the Grand Masters' Conference and at. the meetings of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, the expenses of such attendance to be paid by this Grand Lodge." C. A. TOLIN.

The Resolution was adopted and referred to the Ways and Means Committee. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BOARDS OF RELIEF

R. W. Brother Andrew J. O'Reilly read the report of the Committee on Boards of Relief, the same was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of M~8ouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Boards of Relief makes report that individual reports referred to this Committee from the St. Louis Employment Bureau and the Masonic Boards of Relief of Springfield, Kansas City, St. Joseph, and St. Louis have been examined and studied. We find that the St. Louis Masonic Employment Bureau has made an excellent record and is economical in the performance of its difficult duties. The work involved in placing one thousand ninety-three persons in employment cost but $4.95 each, or a total of $5,427.98. This included all items of expense in conducting the Bureau. The Bureau closes its accounts as of June 30, 1936, with a balance on hand of $1,920.37; of this $1,500.00 is invested in Government Bonds and $420.37 cash in bank. It is more than gratifying to note that the yearly salaries of four hundred thirty-three persons placed will amount to $312,438.00 and that three hundred fifty-eight employed for short duration will receive $22,081.00. There were three hundred two placed in employment for a week or less, of these no record of compensation was kept. The Bureau gives much credit, and properly so to the District Deputies of the Thirty-third District and Worshipful Brother Edward H. Loffhagen for their help and cooperation in bringing about the effectiveness of the Bureau. The Springfield Masonic Board of Relief shows their activities for the year cost $16.97 and $12.50 were their receipts for the year. They close with a balance on hand of $890.09. The Kansas City Masonic Board of Relief show receipts from the Kansas City Lodges of $1,212.90 and $1,849.33 from other sources. Their disbursements amounted to $2,386.58 for all accounts, leaving a cash balance as of June 30, 1936, of $675.65. This Board completes its reports by explaining several arrangements into which they have entered with cemeteries for the burial of deceased sojourning Masons.


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St. Joseph Masonic Board of Relief report receipts of $5.40 and disbursements of $20.00; their balance on hand as of June 30, 1936, was $293.36. They report that they had but few applicants and only one funeral. Among the applicants, they had only three imposters; all other applicants were taken care of without any expenditures. The St. Louis Masonic Board of Relief opened its office July 1, 1935, with an indebtedness of $3,036.77, but through the generosity of the St. Louis Lodges in making a voluntary contribution of 10c per capita $2,069.55 was received. There were donations received amounting to $341.00. These payments enabled to Board to function. The total receipts from all sources amounted to $7,814.45 with a total expenditure of $4,480.15. After paying off the indebtedness, there remained cash on hand as of June 30, 1936, $297.53. The work of the St. Louis Board during the year was the consideration of five hundred ninety-seven new applicants and attention to forty that were carried over from the previous year. Two hundred seventy-one were worthy and required assistance. The balance were applicants that were found to be either unworthy, not in need, or where only an invefltigation was needed and did not involve the expenditure of cash. The Order of the Eastern Star was a great help to this Board of Relief and helped by supplying many articles of clothing. This Board distributed to needy Masons and their families twenty-three thousand seven hundred forty-nine articles of clothing. Almost every lodge in St. Louis sent clothing to the Board for this purpose and undoubtedly saved much cash and helped many needy families. Fraternally submitted, A. J. 0 'REILLY, Acting Chairman, W. A. PINER.

BEPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TRIAL BY OTHER STATE JURISDICTIONS

R. W. BROTHER FORREST DONNELL: Most Worshipful Grand Master, there was a committee appointed in 1932, a committee which has been entitled "The Committee on Trial by Other State J urisdictions." â&#x20AC;˘ The Committee properly has two subjects committed to its consideration which I shall mention in a moment very briefly. At this time as the Chairman of that Committee, which is composed of Right Worshipful Brother Henry Chiles and Worshipful Brother J. W. Fisher of Kansas City and myself, I rise to ask, notwithstanding the lapse of time since the appointment of the Committee, for one year's further term for the consideration of the questions involved. I may state that the two questions which are involved are, first the question of the right of a foreign jurisdiction to retain permanent jurisdiction over a person who shall have applied for membership in the Masonic Order in that jurisdiction and subsequently moved to another. As for illustration, a man applies for membership in Maryland, is rejected, comes to Missouri. Query: does the Grand Lodge of Maryland retain jurisdiction over the individual so that the lodges in Missouri are precluded from receiving his petition. That is the one question. The other question is as to this situation: I can best give it by illustrating it. A Missouri Mason, member of


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any lodge among us, moves to Oklahoma, retains his membership in the Missouri lodge, however. He commits some Masonic offense in Oklahoma. The legal question involved is as to whether or not the lodge in Oklahoma has the legal power to deprive him of his Masonic rights and privileges back in Missouri, that is to say whether the lodge in Oklahoma has any power to interfere other than locally in Oklahoma with the Masonic status of the brother. We can all readily see, Most Worshipful Grand Master, the importance and possibly the delicacy of these questions, because they affect the relationship of this Grand Lodge with every other Grand Lodge in the United States. Our Committee is not prepared to report. I think we doubtless should have been by this time, but we are not, and we most respedfully ask leave for the continuance of the Committee or the continuance of the report, I should say, for one further year. (Request grnnted.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON REVISION OF BY-LAWS

R. W. Brother Henry C. Chiles, Chairman of the Committee, moved the continuance of the Committee, and there being no objection thereto, the same was adopted, and the Committee continued. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES

The Report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances was presented by its Chairman, H. W. Brother Ray Bond, was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. 4' A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances begs leave to report on the one matter that has been referred to the Committee for its consideration at this Session of the Grand Lodge, which is: The matter of the application of THEODORE N AUDIN DOBBIN for restoration to good Masonic standing. The petition of Mr. THEODORE N AUDIN DOBBIN disclolres that prior to April 21, 1924, he was a Master Mason and member in good standing of Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. On that date following a trial before a lodge jury he was found guilty of certain Masonic offenses against Brother Master Masons, and his punishment fixed at suspension for one year. An appeal was taken by the complaining brothers to the Grand Lodge, where on recommendation of the Committee on Appeals and Griev::lllCes for the year 1924 Mr. Dobhin was expelled from all the rights and privileges of Precmasonry. (Grand Lodge Proceedings 1924, pages 142 and 143.) The petition for restoration is accompanied by a written request that the petitioner be restored to good Masonic standing, signed by three of the Masonic brethren against whom the offenses were committed; the fourth of the offended Masons having, since the date of the order of expulsion ceased to be a member of the Fraternity, and his present whereabouts being unknown. Your Committee interviewed the petitioner and satisfactory proof was presented to the Committee that the petitioner has done everything in his power to right the wrongs committed against his Brethren.


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Your Committee has interviewed the three ~a80ns against whom the original offenses were committed, and other Master Masons who are acquainted with the petitioner and familiar with his life, conduct, and general reputation during the past 12 years. These Master Masons without exception or qualification, have advised your Committee that the petitioner has, since his expulsion, lived an upright, moral life, and that he bears an excellent reputation of such character as to qualify him for Masonic membership. Your Committee is convinced that the petitioner is duly repentant, that he has been sufficiently punished, and that his life since his expulsion has been such as to entitle him to be restored to good Masonic standing. It is, therefore, the recommendation of your Committee that THEODORE NAUDIN DOBBIN be restored to good Masonic standing, and that the Grand Secretary be directed to issue and deliver to the petitioner a proper certificate to that effect. Fraternally submitted, Members of Committee, HARRY A. BAUM, EUGENE L. MCGEE, JOHN C. ROBERTSON, W. F. WOODRUFF, RAY BOND, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIO SERVIOE ASSOOIATION

W. Brother John R. Davis, presented the report of the Masonic Service Association, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. go A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Our Committee has suffered an irreparable loss during the year by the passing of its Chairman, Worshipful Brother Thad R. Smith, who died at his home in Palmyra, on August 29, 1936. As is well known, Brother Smith was a most enthusiastic worker in our field of endeavor, and his efforts are greatly appreciated by his Brethren. The main item to report this year is the placing of the Mark Twain Memorial on the front of the Masonic Temple in Hannibal, Missouri, by our M. W. Grand Master, James W. Skelly, and proper ceremony, mention of which will doubtless be made in a special report by a Committee appointed for that purpose. The Committee recommends that the Grand Lodge continue its marking of Masonic historical spots, and in this connection is especially desirous that this year a marker be placed to the memory of Lewis and Clark, the pioneer explorers, and the plaque should be placed on the fa<;ade of the New Masonic Temple in St. Louis. The Committee reports the splendid work of the Research Council, which is functioning so well under the enthusiastic direction of M. W. Brother John Pickard, P. G. M. Part of this work has to do with the collation of historical matter looking ultimately to the compilation of a full and complete history of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and although some twelve or fifteen years of effort will be necessary to achieve this object, we are gratified to report that it is taken up with great earnestness and with the expectation of final completion.

Report of Masonic Service Association of the Thirty-Third and Fifty-Seventh Districts The membership consists of sixty who are the delegates from the sixty lodges of the 33rd and 57th Masonic Districts. The delegates are ap-


102

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pointed yearly by the Worshipful Master of each lodge. Their term of office therefore is one year, from January to January, many of whom, however, have been reappointed ~'ear after year. In fact, the personnel of the association does not change very much. The association meets once a month, the third Monday of each month, with the exception of July and August. January 29, 1936, was the first meeting of the yea", 1936. Meeting preceded by dinner. Election of officers: Wor. Bro. Gus O. Nations, Pres. Wor. Bro. Olin A. Newman, Vice-Pres. Wor. Bro. John R. Davis, Sec.-Treas.

Executive Committee Wor. Bro. William V. Kopfstein Wor. Bro. Edward P. Walsh From January to June, 1936, had six regular meetings, well attended. September, 1936, will resume for the fall term. The Association has a speakers' bureau and study club; most of the activities center around them. For the last six months the Association sponsored the following: DATE

LoDGE

SPEAKER

SUB.JECT

Jan. 13, 1936. Forest Park 578 Jan. 17, 1936. Ferguson 642 Jan. 24, 1936. Pres. Church

Henry C. Burnham Ben. Wolf Edwin C. Luedde

Feb. 12, 1936 . .Magnolia 626 Feb. 13, 1936 ..St. Matthews Ev. Church Feb. 13, 1936 . .Naphtali 26 Feb. 15, 1936 ..Triangle 688 Feb. 18. 1936. Aurora Feb. 20. 1986 ..Clayton 601 Feb. 22,1936 ..Cache 416 Feb. 24. 1936 ..Forest Park 678

Ben. Wolf

Feb. 27, 1936 ..Shechinah C. 132 Mar. 9, 1936. Forest Park 678 Mar. 13. 1936. Pres. Church Mar. 19. 1936. Missouri one Mar. 19, 1936. Oriental C. R. A. M. 78 Mar. 25,1936. Magnolia 626

Problems in Real Estate Masonic Jurisprudence Women, Then, Now and Evermore Abraham Lincoln

Ben. Wolf Civil War President Harry B. Wandall Relief Milton C. Lauenstein .. Abraham Lincoln William V. Kopfstein .. George Washington Edwin C. Luedde Who Was H. A.? Boaz Watkins George Washington Harold L. Reader The Greatness of Great Men H. C. Burnham Problems in Real Estate Edwin C. Luedde Philosophy of F. M. Wm. V, Kopfstein Chemistry. the Genii of Science , Edwin C. Luedde Philosophy of F. M. H. C. Burnham Herman Wohler

Problems in Real Estate Crypts, Signs, and Symbols of Indian Lore Symbolism of the Pillars Andrew Johnson Olympic Games Philosophy of F. M. Letter G

Apr. 16, 1936. Clayton 601 Harry E. Wiehe Apr. 27, 1936. Forest Park 678 J. C. Robertson Apr. 28, 1936. America 847 Chas. J. Gevecker May 11, 1936 ..Cosmos 282 Edwin C. Luedde May 12. 1936 ..George Washington Lowell Morris 9-A May 16,1936 ..Triangle 688 Edwin C. Luedde Philosophy of F. M. May 21, 1936 ..Progress 657 Milton C. Lauenstein .. Memorial Service May 24, 1936 ..Job's Daughters Edwin C. Luedde Friendship May 26. 1936 ..Ritenour School Dist.. Edwin C. Luedde Sail On May 28, 1936 ..Shechinah C. 182 B. L. Tatman Trip to So. America June 6. 1936. Pomegranate 96 Harry E. Wiehe E. A. Degree June 11, 1936. Beacon 3 Jesse W. Barrett Government June 12. 1936. Erwin 121 Harry E.-Wiehe Pillars June 19, 1936. St. Louis C. 8 Edwin C. Luedde Traditions of F. M. June 27. 1936. Pomegranate 96 Shepard R. Evans Holy St. John's June 27, 1936. Meramec 313 B. L. Tatman Travels in So. America

Respectfully submitted, JOHN

R.

DA.VIS,

Sec'y-Treas.


1936

103

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

R. W. Brother Charles C. Duggan, Chairman, read the Report of the Committee on Chartered Lodges; the same was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. 'Grand Lodge, A. F. cf A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee begs to submit the following report: LODGES

The number of chartered lodges as of June,30, 1935, was 644, since which time 5 10dgeB have been consolidated, 1 charter arrested and 1 surrendered, leaving the number of chartered lodges as of September 15, 1936-637. 622 Lodges reported, and 18 failed so to do. MEMBERSHIP RETURNS

Total Membership as of September 15, 1935 Total Membership as of September 15, 1936 Net Loss

94,259 92,026 2,233

We are glad to report, however, that the general condition of our lodges shows a continued improvement over the last three years, and indications are such as to warrant the belief that we are on the up-grade, and our membership is now definitely on the increase. The records show that 1,869 have been raised, 569 affiliated and 1,339 reinstated; while per contra the deaths during the year have been 1,610, dimissions 739, suspensions N. P. D. 3,576, suspensions U. M. C. 3, and expulsions 5. Thus it will be seen that our suspensions N. P. D. this year are much less than last year, and indications are that these various items are nearing the normal stage. It is also pleasing to note a substantial reduction in the remission of dues over last year, there being 733 less this year. On August 1, 1936, which is the last day for reporting, there were still 175 lodge reports missing, out of which 156 were received before the closing of the books, leaving 18 lodges unreported. We again, as in previous years, call attention of these delinquent lodges to the fact that the Grand Lodge Law must be complied with, and insist that lodges send in their reports on August 1, each year at the latest, otherwise the fine provided for in See. 75 of the Book of Constitution and By-Laws will be neceBsarily enforced. We cannot urge too strongly the observance of this law, as the neglect thereof throws the whole system out of gear, and we calIon our Worshipful Masters and Wardens here present, when they return home, to so inform their lodges. Again we eall attention to the request made last year that the District Deputy Grand Master, when making their official visits, emphasize that part of their duty relating to the examination of the books and records of the lodges v~sited, so as to enable them to give a true showing of their lodge statistical and financial affairs. We further eall attention to the necessity of the collection of dues, and strongly urge that at the beginning of each year lodges make due provision for seeing that every member is properly approached, and acquainted with his financial obligation to his lodge. Due care in this matter will help wonderfully to reduce the aggregate amount of dues owing to the individual lodge, and in this connection we note a considerable improvement over last year, inasmuch as the figures show a decrease of $9,831.24. It is a distinct pleasure to note that the work of our Secretaries in com-


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1936

piling their reports has shown wonderful improvement in the last three or four years, and the standard is rapidly advancing, which means 80 much for the accuracy of our Grand Lodge archives. Due to the fact that our delinquent lodges are showing increased interest and striving hard to pull themselves out of the red by facing heroically the circumstances by which they are surrounded, we feel sure that the time is near at hand when once again they shall be able to make full and clear reports to the Grand Lodge. C. S. DUGGAN, Gus O. NATIONS.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS' REPORTS

R. 'V. Brother Nat D. Jackson, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on District Deputy Grand Master's Reports, the same ,vas adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge A. F. 9- A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters beg leave to submit the following report: At the time of writing this report, 46 reports had been received out of the 60 districts in this Grand Jurisdiction. The 14 that have failed to reach the Committee are the 4, 12, 15, 18, 31, 34, 35, 38, 39, 40, 45, 46, 53 and 58 Districts. Of the 47 Reports received there are 47 varieties, good, bad and indifferent. There are 12 that have visited every Lodge in their District, and made a report on each one, using the form furnished by the Grand Secretary. They are the 3, 13, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, 30, 33-A, 33-B, 37 and 57th Districts. Many of the reports are very carefully made and give in detail all the information required in the printed form, and in addition such information as will enable anyone to form a good opinion of conditions in any particular lodge in their district. Special mention should be made of the reports from Districts 22, 33-A, 33-B and 57. ThcSâ&#x201A;Ź reports are very complete in regard to detailed information furnished, and show that much time and care has been taken in their preparation. Many of the other reports are so meager in detail that it is almost impossible to form an opinion with any degree of intelligence. Of the District Deputy Grand Masters reporting, the majority made visits varying from one lodge on up to the small number who were able to report having visited all in their districts. In analyzing and tabulating these reports some idea may be formed as to conditions. There are 637 lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction and we have" form" reports from 287, which is about 45 per cent. From this tabulation the following conditions are found. Insurance on property: of 287 lodges, 223 carry insurance; 45 do not. Audit of Accounts during past year: of 259 lodges, 204 "Yes" and 55 "No." lIave adequate safe: of 281 lodges, 98 H Yes," and 183 "No." Dues Charged: of 287 Lodges, 55 under $4.00, 5 under $3.00.


1936

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From the reports, the total amount of dues outstanding owing to the lodges is enormous. It varies from a small amount in some lodges to as high as $12.00 per capita in one. This condition can be corrected if the proper effort is made by the lodge officers, which is clearly shown by the reports. There are 30 lodges divided among 11 districts, which report no dues in arrears. There is no doubt that the District Deputy Grand Masters of this Grand Jurisdiction are well fitted and qualified for the positions they hold, and have the welfare of the Fraternity at heart. All they need is a guiding hand, and some instructions in the matter of their duties, and the requirements of their office. Your ('.tOmmittee feels that the report forms now used might well be revised, that they may the better meet the requirements of present-day conditions. It is suggested that there be prepared a detailed outline of the duties and requirements of this important office to be sent out with the Commissions to each District Deputy Grand Master. It is further suggested and recommended that a Committee be appointed to work out a suitable report form to properly cover the needs of this important duty. Respectfully submitted, N. D. JACKSON, Chairman, F. G. FULKERSON, CHARLES L. WOODS, GEO. A. SAMPLE. M. W. BROTHER T. B. THROOKMORTON, GRAND MASTER, GRAND LODGE OF IOWA

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, we are honored today by the presence of visitors from other Grand Jurisdictions, among the latest" arrivals is the Grand Master of Iowa, who was introduced a short time ago. Most Worshipful Brother Throckmorton, we welcome you here, and we are glad you were able to visit us. We would be very glad to hear from you at this time. M. W. BROTHER T. B. THROCKMORTON: Most Worshipful Grand Master, distinguished Masons and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: it is needless for me to tell you how happy I am to be present on this occasion and to fraternize with the brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. I am deligllted indeed to bring you greetings from seventy thousand Blue Lodge Masons of the Grand Jurisdiction of Iowa, and by my presence, to assure you of our love and affection, and filial esteem which those of us who belong to the Grand Jurisdiction of Iowa have towards our brethren of Missouri. We are under deep obligations to the Grand Lodge of Missouri because we come from the same stock, Masonically speaking, that you come from. When Robert Lucas, who was sent out by President Van Buren to become the first territorial governor of the territory of Iowa, came to Burlington in 1838, he brought with him a young attorney, Theodore S. Parvin, who played a tremendous role in Masonry in our Grand Jurisdiction. Lucas and Parvin were both Masons. In 1840 the few Masons, who were then living in Burlington, petitioned the Grand Lodge of Missouri for a dispensation to start a lodge in the territory of Io,ya, and the Grand Master listened to the prayer of the Iowa Masons, and a dispensation was granted. On November 30, 1848, the Masons met in Burlington and under the dispensation granted by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, formed the first lodge on the soil of Iowa.


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Soon thereafter, the Grand Lodge of Missouri likewise granted dispensations to the Masons of what is now Muscatine, Dubuque, and Iowa City, so that the first four lodges to be established in the State of Iowa, all came through the good graces of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. In January, 1844, these four lodges met in convention in Iowa City and formed the Grand Lodge of Iowa. N ow, my brethren, while all of these facts, no doubt to most of you, are well known, I bring them to you for this reason. I want to let you know that we Masons of Iowa are proud to be the offspring of you Missouri Masons, for your lineage is perfectly clear back to the Mother Lodge of England, through Tennessee and Carolina.

THE GRAND MASTER: Most Worshipful Brother Throckmorton, we thank you for that kindly and eloquent message. Brethren, our session would not be complete without hearing from the Grand Secretary of Iowa, who has been our visitor on a number of occasions, and of whose work we have heard a great deal. Right Worshipful Brother Charles C. Hunt, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Iowa: R. W. BROTHER CHARLES C. HUNT, GRAND SECRETARY, GRAND LODGE OF IOWA

R. W. BROTHER C. C. HUNT: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren, I don't feel that I am a stranger here. I haven't been coming quite as regularly as Lew Smith, but I know a number of the brethren here and a large number of you know me, so it is not necessary for me to say very much regarding our connections, especially after the words of our Grand Master regarding the lineage of our Grand Lodge from Missouri. Masonry is a world force, and among the Masons of the world there is a tie that binds us together, especially in this country, and I hope and pray that that tie will never be broken and that no impassable harrier will ever be established between Grand Masonic Jurisdictions throughout the world. I thank you. A PLEASANT INTERLUDE

THE GRAND SECRETARY: Most Worshipful Grand Master, may 1 trespass on your time for one moment. The associates with whom you are daily in contact in this building-in your office, etc., have asked me to present to you a token of their affection. Why they want it done just at this moment is not known to me, but it is a mighty pleasant thing to do. All that are employed in this wonderful building, who are with you from day to day, begged me to hand you these flowers, and I was asked by the messenger who brought them to "Lay it on thick." What that means, I presume you know best. Here are the flowers. THE GRAND MASTER: Right Worshipful Brother Mather, I thank you and ask you to pass on my sincere thanks to those who have given this beautiful tribute. I don't know how to express myself better than to say that I appreciate it, because I know the sincere good wishes of those who presented it.


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RESOLUTION

R. W. Brother James A. Kinder read a partial report of the Committee on Ways and Means and moved the adoption of this part of the Report. The same being as follows, was adopted. To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. tf A. M. of MissO'Uri: Brethren: There has been referred to this Committee, a resolution offered by the Boaxd of Directors of the Masonic Home, asking consent of this Grand Lodge to proceed with the erection of a new building on the Masonic Home property on Delmax Boulevard, in this city. In view of the splendid business management of these directors, your Committee recommends that this Grand Lodge authorize said Board of Directors to solicit voluntary contributions, if necessary, and as soon as cash and marketable securities, independent of the general fund and the annual per capita income, sufficient to pay in full for such building shall .be on hand, said Boaxd of Directors be then authorized to proceed with the erection of the building, provided, however, that no part of the general fund, the per capita tax from the Grand Lodge, the Endowment fund or income from the endowment fund shall be used for that purpose. J. A. G. C.

KINDER, MARQUIS, EDMUND E. MORRIS, R. A. BREUER, SOLON CAMERON,

Committee em Ways and Means. ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS

M. W. Grand Master Skelly announced the appointment of the following brethren to act as Tellers: Solon Cameron, Chairman, R. Winklemaier, Stanley Horn, L. J. Graue, M. E. Ewing, Harry Hightower, A. J. Michener, Kipp C. Johnson, N. D. Jackson, E. P. Walsh, A. D. Ludlow, F. H. Knight, Fay Fulkerson, Jewel Windle, Carl A. Swenson, Eugene Altheimer, and Walter Simon. The following were elected: M. W. BRo'rHER GEORGE W. WALKER Grand Master R. W. BROTHER HAROLD L. READER . • • . . . . . . . . • . . Deputy Grand Master R. W. BROTHER HENRY C. CHILES ...•.•..••••.• Senior Grand Warden R. W. BROTHER ELWYN S. WOODS .•..•.....•...•• Junior Grand Warden R. W. BROTHER EDMUND E. MORRIS .•.••..•...••..... Grand Treasurer R. W. BROTHER ARTHUR MATHER .•....•...••.•..•••. Grand Secretary

ELECTION OF BOARD OF DmECTORS FOR MASONIC HOME

The following brethren were nominated and elected to serve as directors for the Masonic Home for the next three years: Brothers Tolman W. Cotton, Thad B. Landon, Thomas H. Reynolds, James \V. Skelly.


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R. E. BROTHER R. BURNS STRADER, GRAND COMMANDER, KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OF MISSOURI

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, I appreciate the patience you have shown and your co-operation, and in a few minutes I will give you time for recreation. At this time I wish to present a brother here representing one of the other Grand bodies in the State, the Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery K. T. of Missouri, Right Eminent Sir R. Burns Strader. R. E. BROTHER R. BURNS STRADER: Most Worshipful Grand Master, the matter of titles and nomenclature is of rather small importance. There was a statement made yesterday in the report of the Grand Master to the effect that there is a tendency today to bring Masonry up to date, and he left you with the suggestion that to do this might tend to bring it down. May I give you this suggestion. We are passing today through a period of transition which is more marked and pronounced than anything that has gone before, so far as it affects the fortunes of this institution in which we hold membership. There is no such thing as permanency. There is but one thing that is permanent, and that is the purpose of the Almighty. All things else are transient, including all human institutions. There is nothing sacred in the divine scheme of things-they fadeand as far as the purpose of the Almighty, He can and may declare even his church dissolved and substitute some other institution for the carrying on of His divine plan. So I want to give you this thought: if Freemasonry is to persist, it must not only hold to the ancient landmarks and to the fundamental principles on which it was established, but it must stress more and more the principles which are outstanding in its place, and in its stead. Masonry is the handmaiden of the church, and the form and purpose of the expression of brotherhood and fraternal relationship; and if Masonry is brought up to date, and if it becomes encumbered with some of the conditions "'hich mark the period through which we are passing, Freemasonry itself is on the way to the limbo of things forgotten. There is but one salvation, and that is to hold to the thing that characterizes the order in times past. I repeat, there is but one thing that is permanent, that is the purpose of the divine will of Almighty God. You may turn this purpose aside and impede its progress, but it cannot be defeated. Men may work with Him, men may serve His purpose always as associates, co-laborers and servants. The most beautiful thing we have in this institution is the working out of the fundamental principles, the Fatherhood of God and its concomitant, the Brotherhood of Man. May I say that after the beautiful tributes that have been paid to the Grand Lodge of Missouri and the character of its officers, I can only say that we revere and respect the Grand Lodge of Missouri most highly, and Most Worshipful Grand Master, I am glad to be here.

THE GRAND MASTER: Right Eminent Sir, we share your happiness. We are glad you are here also. RESOLUTION

'V. Brother R. Y. Goggin, read the following Resolution and moved that it be referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, which was adopted.


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"Be it resolved that the tcn dollars paid by petitioners for the benefit of the Masonic Home be postponed and not become effective until January 1, 1938."

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON CONDUCTING OF LOTTERIES, ETC.

M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee read the report of this Special Committee which is as follows, recommending that the resolution contained therein be adopted, and the amendment contained therein be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, which was done. To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. 9" A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your special committee to whom has been referred that portion of the address of our Grand Master designated as "The Voice of the Grand Lodge Should Be Heard,." dealing with the question of the conducting of lotteries and games of chance by l50dies which predicate their membership on membership in the Lodge have carefully considered this matter. We fully agree with our Grand Master that the very life and reputation of Frcemasonry is at stake in the decision made by this Grand Lodge on this most important question. Our Grand Lodge as early as 1853 declared (see page 65, Proceedings of 1853) "All that is contained in the 'Old Charges' and 'Old Regulations' as collected by Dr. Anderson, and approved by the committee appointed for that purpose by the Grand Lodge of England; these we hold to be the only landmarks of Ancient Craft Masonry now extant." The "Old Charges" start out with the proposition "A Mason is obliged by his tenure to obey the moral law. " It further states" A Mason This is a peaceable subject to the civil powers wherever he resides." is a part of the Common Law of Masonry and imposes a greater restriction upon members of our Order than any statute law or specific code requirements. Of course, it goes without saying that one of the first principles of Freemasonry is an observance of the laws of the country in which we reside, but whether there be any violation of the law of the land or other specific statute or code requirement, the test is, are the acts of the member of a character that tend to reflect upon the good name of our Order and thus bring Freemasonry into disrepute' If the answer is "Yes" then in the opinion of your committee a Masonic offense has been committed that can and should be dealt with bv the Grand Master, or the Grand Lodge, regardless of whether the offenders are operating as a subordinate lodge or as members of allied or dependent bodies which derive their membership wholly from Freemasonry. The brethren who believe that they are justified in going ahead with lotteries and other questionable schemes to raise money if they can bring them within the letter of the law entirely miss the whole point. They overlook the fact that they may still be guilty of a Masonic offense even though they comply with the letter of the law, if they evade the spirit of the law in such a manner as to bring Freemasonry into disrepute; or to go a step further, whether they violate either the letter or the spirit of the law is no consequence, if their act reflects upon the good name of Freemasonry. In 1932 the Department of Justice at Washington sent a communication to the heads of all fraternal organizations in the country stating in substance that it had come to the attention of that department that lottery schemes were being promoted among fraternal organizations by


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persons making a business thereof as a means of raising revenues, etc., and that it was becoming a common practice to distribute books of numbered tickets purporting to entitle purchasers to attend some entertainment, the holder of the winning ticket to receive a substantial prize; in some instances separate tickets being sold to admit the purchaser to an entertainment and a lottery ticket being presented to him with the admission. This statement was followed by a quotation of the United States Criminal Code applying to lotteries, and the closing paragraph of the communication contained a warning against subterfuges and attempts to evade the statutes. The schemes resorted to in an attempt to get around the statute prohibiting lotteries and games of chance have in a few instances been attempted on a nationwide basis to the serious injury of Freemasonry. Your Committee are of the opinion that the conducting, or assistance, or aid, in conducting a lottery, or game of chance, or any other act which would bring the reputation of Freemasonry in disrepute, by Freemasons, or allied or dependent bodies which derive their membership wholly from Freemasonry is fully covered by Paragraph B of Section 229 of our Trial Code as adopted in 1925 as it is an act "tending to impair the good name of the Masonic institution and its usefulness" and that in the adoption of this report the Grand Lodge does so declare. Your Committee in most emphatic terms condemns this attempt to bring the fraternity into disrepute. We feel that our present laws are sufficient for the prosecution of any member of the Fraternity who becomes a party to any of these schemes to make money but to the detriment of the Fraternity. Your Committee recommends that this Grand Lodge and every officer and member thereof be on the alert to expose any attempt to violate our Grand Lodge Law on this subject. That the Grand Lodge does hereby instruct the Grand Master to use every possible endeavor to strike down this growing evil; that he rigidly and fearlessly enforce our laws on this subject in particular. As an additional assistance to the Grand Master we propose and offer the following amendment to the Grand Lodge By-Laws: Amend Section 261112 as amended (Proceedings 1933, page 125) by adding at the end of the above By-Law the following: , 'In Trials ordered by the Grand Master or by the Grand Lodge, the Grand Master or Committee thereof may designate that the trial is to be had by Commission." With this authority, the Grand Master can and will see that violations are fairly and forcibly prosecuted; that when he orders a trial for such violations, the accused will be tried, and speedily. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, GEORGE W. WALKER, BYRNE E. BIGGER, RA Y V. DENSLOW, THAD B. LANDON.

M. 'V. BIWTHER RAY V. DENSLOW: M. W. Grand Master and Brethren: It oceurs to me, because of the salutary effect it might have, that such part of this reports as has been read and adopted, the Grand Lodge authorizes to be released under the direction of the Grand Lodge. I think it will have great effect upon the citizenry of Missouri. (Motion carried.)


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ILLUSTRIOUS BROTHER THOMAS H. REYNOLDS, DEPUTY OF THE SUPREME COUNCIL IN MISSOURI, A. A. S. R.

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, at this time it gives me pleasure to present Illustrious Brother Thomas H. Reynolds, Past Grand Commander, Past Illustrious Master of the Grand Council, and at this time Deputy of the Supreme Council in Missouri for the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. We welcome you here, Illustrious Sir. BROTHER REYNOLDS: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren: it would be, very inappropriate for me, being one of the bune-h, to make a speech to my brethren. I am not going to comment upon the eloquent addresses that we have had from other distinguished guests. I won't even attempt to reply to Lew Smith'S humorous but sensible talk or to the eloquent address we had from Brother Throckmorton this morning. Let me present three things for you to think about. One of them is the growing concord between all branches of Masonry. I am sure that you have noticed it. It is very evident that the feeling that formerly existed between your body and the Scottish Rite is fast disappearing. Next week the General Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters and the General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons will meet in St. Louis. Three years ago they met in the City of Washington, D. C., and at the time the Scottish Rite tendered a banquet, under the leadership of Grand Commander Cowles which helped considerably to wipe out any feeling that might have existed between the organizations before. In 1934 at the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar in San Francisco, for the first time in the history of Masonry, Grand Commander Cowles of the Southern Jurisdiction, and Grand Commander Johnson of the Northern Jurisdiction of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, were llOnored guests. I am sure that we all feel the need of working together with the Blue Lodge, which contains the fundamental and basic principles that run through all of our organizations, and which we are all aiming to make effective. Our aims are the same, our purposes are the same, and I am sure that you will rejoice as I am rejoicing in the concord that now exists between all the different branches and orders of Freemasonry. Second, I am very tired of hearing about depression, as I think all of us are. I am happy to note that the Appeals and Grievances Committee of this Grand Lodge has no appeal before it. That is accounted for possibly by many reasons, but particularly two. One is the fact that the commission method of trial is proving very effective and satisfactory, and is, in a large measure, doing away with trials in the various lodges where local influence and the popularity of a member oftentimes cuts a determining influence in the verdict that may be rendered. Another thing that possibly you may not have thought about, is the fact that this loss of membership, which has been deplored so constantly, has been getting rid of a whole lot of people who were doing questionable things, and who were not really Freemasons at heart, and that in turn has had its influence in getting rid of many of the orrasions for dissension and possible wrongdoing. Now, brethren, let us determine to write and speak upon the fundamental principles of Freemasonry, going forward constantly toward the end that we all have in view, with reference to showing the world we are deeply sincere in our beliefs, and that we have no occasion to doubt or feel uncertain about the outcome. The principles of Freemasonry are as basic as the principles of natural laws, or of honest dealing, and must prevail. We are under the leadership of a great leader, for everyone of us has declared our belief in the one true and living God, and to Him we look and to Him we can justly trust the outcome, confidently and fear-


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lessly. Let us go ahead joyfully on our way, talking optimism, and not pessimism. Third, I am sorry that Brother McLoud, the Grand Master of Illinois, had to leave before the Grand Lodge closed. He was too courteous to tell you what he told the Grand Council in Illinois, but it is something that you all ought to know aoout. There he was talking to his own people, and he told them that Freemasonry WlUl just what the members of Freemasonry make it. The people on the outside Know nothing about the principles of Freemasonry, except as they see it exemplified in the lives of the members of the order, and whenever a Mason cheats or lies or does anything else that is un-Masonic, the people on the outside all know it, and they point to him and say, "Well, that fellow is no different from the rest of us." His message was this: "let every man in his thoughts, in his words and in his deeds, remember the principles of Freemasonry which have been taught him, and let him exemplify it in his daily life, so that the people in the outer world may know, and feel, and realize, what Freemasonry is, and have a favorable opinion, created with the opportunity of becoming members of the order."

THE GRAND MASTER: Illustrious Brother Reynolds, we thank you. Brethren, our Grand Chaplain, 'Vorshipful Brother Samuel Thurman, has arrived. 'N e regret he was not here at the opening, but you can depend on it that Dr. Thurman will make good. Now, he will have an opportunity. R. W. BROTHER SAMUEL THURMAN: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren: I think it is a great privilege, a high privilege, that we can meet in this solemn, silent, yet also peaceful, confines of this beautiful cathedral, and in the most harmonious brotherly family way, cast our ballots for our leaders, elect them to the highest office within the gift of our hearts and hands, and thus express our own confidence and trust that they will not abuse the authority of their office, but that they arc really looking to us and to our voluntary and free election of them that they might thus serve us in leadership. I am grateful for the opportunity, Most Worshipful Grand Master, to say these words during the balloting that is going on. I am grateful for it because I believe that we Americans, though alas we do it only periodically, perhaps annually or biannually or quadrennially as the case may be, do wake up to the great sovereign rights and privileges that are ours in casting the ballot that makes this nation a democracy, and that our fraternity is thus in keeping and in consonance with the great spirit of the nation which our fraternity seeks to serve. My regret is, that we do make these expressions of our interest and of our service only periodic. The great concern of Freemasons is to carry away the inspiration, and the instruction, and the interest in the cause of brotherhood from these meetings into our every day, every week, and every month of the year life and labor. It is high time that we build the great pillars that shall support the temples of love, justice, truth, and of peace, that shape the abiding fortresses, and the great bulwarks against the threatening and invidious forces that from all sides seem to surround us. I see you are ready to announce the vote, and I am grateful for this opportunity to address the brethren.

THE GRAND MASTER: I thank you. R. W. BROTHER THURMAN: Thank you. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS

The Following report of the Committee on Credentials was presented by its Chairman, R. W. Brother Walter Webb, and adopted.


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To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of M~souri: Brethren: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report: At the present session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge there are represented 539 subordinate lodges, and there are present: 19 Grand Lodge Officers, 13 Past Grand Masters, 11 Grand Representatives, 55 District Deputy Grand Masters, 15 District Lecturers, 552 Past Masters, 492 Worshipful Masters, 130 Senior Wardens, 79 Junior Wardens, 17 Chairmen of Committees, 7 Distinguished Visitors. Actual attendance 1,253. Fraternally submitted, WALTER A. WEBB, Chairman, HENRY F. WOERTHER, C. M. BARNES, F. B. HOWARTH, FRED

H. KNIGHT.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE

M. 'V. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence, which, with the exception of Section 65-A, was adopted, section by section, and as a whole, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge A. F. ~ A. M. of M~sQUri: Brethren: Your Committee on Jurisprudence submits the following report: DECISIONS

We approve Decisions 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8. As to Decision No.1, this decision is approved with the understanding that it is decided under Section 166-B as shown in the Supplement to the Book of Constitution, and as adopted by the Grand Lodge in 1932. As to Decision No.3, we have examined into the facts on which this decision is based, and upon the facts as presented we hereby approve the decision of the Grand Master. As to Decision No.6, the wording of the question is a little misleading, as the word "remoyed" should have been used instead of the word , , removing, " and with that correction in the question the decision of the Grand Master is approved. AMENDMENTS TO By-LAWS

Section 65-A was offered by the Committee on Boards of Relief, as appears on page 85 of the Proceedings of 1935. We have rewritten the Section to read as follows: "Section 65-A. In case of an emergency involving financial difficulties and demands and requests for relief in the cities with more than three Lodges and Masonic Boards of Relief as provided for in Section 65 of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge, and if their funds derived from initiation fees of Five ($5.00) Dollars each becomes exhausted, the Grand Master is authorized to issue dispensations to either such Board of Relief to assess each Lodge in the jurisdiction of the Board of Relief. Such assessments shall be on a per capita basis and shall not in the aggregate exceed Ten (10c) Cents pâ&#x201A;Źr member a year. The right to assess shall expire with each Masonic year." We recommend that said section as amended be adopted. Above Section 65-A was not adopted.


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In regard to Sections 65 and 66, appearing on pages 112 and 113 of the Proceedings of 1935, we find from the Minutes in the Grand Secretary's Office, that these sections were adopted at the Session of, tbe Grand Lodge in 1935, but that the printed Proceedings thereof, failed to show such adoption, and that they are erroneously carried as sections to be passed upon at this session. 'fhese sections were presented by the Committee on Revision of the Grand Lodge By-Laws, and as such were adopted in 1935. We, therefore, recommend that they be considered as adopted in 1935, and that the Printed Proceedings of 1935 be amended so as to consider said sections adopted, and not as pending amendments. The propoS<ld amendment to Section 192, found on pages 113 and 114 of the Proceedings of 1935, is merely an Enabling Act, and carries no liability until acted upon by the lodges effected, and approved by the Grand Master. Vve, therefore, recommend that said amendment be adopted. The Commit.tee on Jurisprudence in 1935 proposed an amendment known as Article II-A, providing for an Executive Council of the Grand Lodge, said proposed amendment being found on page 98 of the Proceedings of 1935. Your Committee is of the opinion that while there may be merit to the idea attempted to be promulgated by said proposed amendment, we believe that in its present form it should not be adopted, and we, therefore, recommend that it be not adopted. Last year tbree amendments were offered, appearing on pages 111 and 112 of the Pr9ceedings of 1935, and being Sections 22, 24 and 30. These sections were offered with the idea that there might possibly be at tbis session of the Grand Lodge, a merger of Districts No. 33 and 57, and said sections having been proposed to be effective in case of such merger, and in view of the fad that no such attempt at this Grand Lodge is to be made, we recommend that all three of these proposed amendments be referred to the incoming Jurisprudence Committee for such action as may be necessary at the meeting of the Grand Lodge to be held in 1937. DISPENSATIONS

The Committee on Grarld Master's Address, having referred to this Committee the dispensations issued by the Grand Master, and as reported in the report of the Grand Secretary, covering Dedications, Election of Officers, Iristallation of Officers, Meetings in Other Halls, Laying Cornerstones, and Re-Balloting on Petitions. These matters are within the discretion of the Grand Master, and appear to be regular, and they are hereby approved. Under the question of Visits to Otber Lodges, we find from an investigation of the record, that two dispensations were issued, one to George Washington Lodge No.9, and one to Polar Star Lodge No. 79, to visit a lodge in Terre Haute, Indiana, and a lodge in Granite City, Illinois. We find that from an examination of the facts that all necessary steps for the conferring of the degree on the candidates were regularly taken. But, it has been the policy in Missouri for many years, that the members of a Missouri lodge may visit any lodge in another Grand Jurisdiction without a dispensation, and also our Grand Lodge Laws provide the manner for conferring the degree upon a Missouri candidate in another Grand .Jurisdiction. In view of the present status of our law, and the fact that these degrees were conferred in conformity with that law, such dispensations were not necessary, and we, therefore, recommend that the Grand Master should not issue dispensations to confer degrees


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on a candidate, either a member of a Missouri lodge, or of any other lodge, when the degree is conferred in another Grand Jusdiction. In regard to the portion of the resolution offered by Past Grand Master Landon, referred to this Committee, we recommend that if it shall be determined that subordinate lodges are subject to said act, that the Grand Master shall then advise the subordinate lodges to make suitable provision to pay tIle same. Respectfully submitted, Members of the C()'1)'I,.Iffl.ittee,

RICHARD O. RUMER, SAM WILCOX, HENRI L. WARREN, C. LEW GALLANT, BYRNE E. BIGGER, Chairman. R. W. BROTHER JOHN T. RICE, GRAND SENIOR WARDEN OF THE GRAND LODGE OF TEXAS, BEARING THE COMMISSION OF THE GRAND MASTER AS HIS REPRESENTATIVE

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, yesterday we greeted a visitor from the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Texas, the representative of the Most Worshipful Grand Master. We are glad today that we have Right Worshipful Brother Rice with us, and at this time we would appreciate a message from him. R. W. BROTHER JOHN T. RICE: Most Worshipful Grand Master and my brethren of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State of Missouri: I assure you it is a very happy privilege that is offered me to appear this morning to bring the greetings of the Masons of the great State of Texas. Really it does not appear or seem to be in a different Jurisdiction, I rather had thought on my arrival in St. Louis that it was almost the Grand Lodge of Texas in Grand Communication. It has been quite an inspiration. Your policies of the Grand Lodge are certainly constructive and some of the legislation that was passed during yesterday and today certainly will be of inestimable value not only to the Masons of this Grand Jurisdiction but to Masonry in general over all the Jurisdictions. I was particularly interested in that great piece of work that you are carrying on here in your home for the boys and girls, and for the aged and the widows, a beautiful manifestation of the principles for which this great order stands, Masonry in action, not just to talk about, but actually carrying out that important provision of your obligation. I am always interested in those homes. Our home in Texas is conducted largely on the same plan as yours. We don't keep the boys and girls in the same home, however, they are over in another home farther away and our school, of course, is conducted right at the class and it is an independent district of that State. I shall be delighted to take back to Texas the happy memories of my visit to this Grand Lodge. Last December at our Communication we were honored by the presence of your Grand Master and your Grand Secretary. I want to assure you, Most Worshipful Grand Master and the brethren, that Texas was very appreciative of your visit on that occasion. We certainly hope that this happy relationship may exist long. We just held our hundredth Grand Communication, and in December of next year we complete a hundred years of Masonry in Texas. A cordial invitation is extended to each and every one of you to visit us. There are nine hundred lodges in the Lone Star State, and


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I know I can speak for the brethren of those lodges that a very sincere, cordial Masonic reception awaits you. I thank you, Most Worshipful Grand Master, for the privilege of conveying the greetings of the Grand Lodge of Texas to the Grand Lodge of Missouri. I shall go back with very happy remembrances of the occasion.

THE GRAND MASTER: Right 'N orshipful Brother Rice, when you return, we ask you to carry with you to our brethren in Texas and the Grand Lodge our greetings, and, you know from those of us who have been there, how warm they will be. They come from the heart. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, read the following report of this Committee, which was adopted.

go A. M. of Missouri: Brethren.: The Committee on Hotels and Transportation reports that their duties were duly performed. WM. F. MILLER, Chairman. Tn the M. W. Grand Lodge A. F.

REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER

M. 'V. Brother Anthony F. Ittner presented his report as Grand Lecturer, which was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. go A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: As Grand Lecturer I beg leave to submit the following report: A marked revival in the interest taken in Freemasonry has been noticeable throughout the state during the past year, both on the part of mâ&#x201A;Źmbers of the Fraternity and on the part of young men desirous of entering our ranks. Consequently there has been a large increase in the number of degrees conferred, resulting eventually in a marked increase in the membership of many of our lodges. One small lodge has had as many as twenty petitions and another had thirteen candidates ready to receive the Third Degree at one time. Naturally this increase in petitions and degree work has inspired a corresponding revival of interest in our beautiful ritual. There have been so many requests from individual lodges for visits from the Grand Lecturer that it has been impossible to comply with them all. The difficulty was aggravated by the extraordinary cold weather whicl] was so general and so long continued last winter, and during which also a virulent form of influenza invaded and took its toll in most of our communities. The summer, too, which was the hottest in ninety-nine years impeded the work of both the lodges and the Grand Lecturer. I do not speak of these untoward conditions by way of complaint, for complaining never gets one very far. 1 mention them merely to show the indomitable spirit of the lodges, which with some exceptions have forged ahead and made great progress in spite of all obstacles. I have visited and imparted instruction in eighty-eight lodges and have given individual instruction to many of the District Lecturers and other brethren eager to learn the work. On May 25 and 26, by the Grand Master's authority I held a School of Instruction for District Leeturers at Springfield at which there were


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ten District Lecturers present and in the work of which we were assisted by Most Worshipful Brothers Bert S. Lee and Arch A. Johnson and Right Worshipful Brother Elwyn S. Woods, Grand Senoir Deacon. The Grand Master was present and was greeted by a very large gathering of brethren eager to do him honor. The results of this School of Instruction were most encouraging. The entire work of the three degrees was exemplified and the District Lecturc.r:s present, who were already highly proficient in the work, were encouraged by this happy opportunity for association with members of their own group, and enabled to clear up the doubtful questions that had been raised in their districts from time to time. Though the great value of instruction in individual districts and lodges, with the District Lecturer usually present, has been proved by time and experience and must be energetically continued, yet an occasional school of instruction for District Lecturers, with as many of them present as possible, constitutes a valuable adjunct to the general plan and accomplishes results which cannot otherwise be attained. I trust that the Grand Lodge will see its way clear in the near future to permit the holding of more of these schools of instruction for District Lecturers. My association with the Committee on Ritual which is made the permanent custodian of the Ritual and Work has been both pleasant and valuable. The members have earnestly endeavored to perfect their knowl.edge of the work and to come into entire agreement, a result which I feel lias been fully accomplished. There has never been a definitely prescribed Ritual for balloting on petitions. Certain similarities run through the forms used in all the lodges, but there are also wide divergences. A great many officers of lodges have expressed a desire to have a uniform ceremony adopted and the seal of approval of the Grand Lodge placed upon it. If it develops that this desire is unanimous, or nearly so, I am sure that the Committee on Ritual will be glad to work out a form of balloting which will be dignified, reasonably short, and in keeping with the best traditions of Freemasonry. It would not be the devising of something new but a careful selection of what seems best from forms long in use. Another matter in which there has never been a definitely prescribed ritual is the form for receiving the Graltd Master on his official visits. He has certain rights in this connection and is entitled to certain courtesies, but the exact form for according them varies considerably. Tn almost every lodge I visit I am asked how the Grand Master should be received. There is a beautiful form in use in many lodges which I am always glad to explain to my questioners but which I cannot require of them because it has never been adopted by the Grand Lodge. If the desire to have a set ceremony of this kind is sufficiently general I will gladly recommend to the Committee on Ritual that they work one out and submit it to the Grand Lodge. Most Worshipful Brother Skelly has been very anxious to have his District Deputy Grand Masters on their official visits to the lodges received with the same courtesy which would be accorded him if he were personally present. He is entirely right in this for the D. D. G. M. on his official visit is the personal representative of the Grand Master, and any lack of courtesy to him is a lack of courtesy to the Grand Master. Let not the old adage that "a prophet is not without honor save in his own country" cause the Worshipful Masters to withhold any right or courtesy due the personal representative of the Grand Master. The Grand Master has constantly admonished the lodges not to tolerate anything in the nature of levity, buffoonery, or roughness in the conferring of the degrees. All who have the slightest appreciation of our beautiful ritual necessarily agree with him on this important point. I have


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always counseled the lodges to refrain from anything of this character, and I am happy to report that the instances in which the counsel is disregarded are comparatively few. My warmest thanks are again due the District Deputy Grand Masters, District Lectures and the Worshipful Masters, officers and brethren of the lodges, for the kindness they have shown me and the valuable assistance they have given me. Death invaded the ranks of my District Lecturers in the passing of Right Worshipful Brother James W. Christian of Palmyra, District Lecturer of the fifteenth district who died in May and whose funeral I attended in company with the Grand Master, the Grand Secretary, and other brethren. The Grand Master conducted the Masonic burial service in a beautiful and impressive manner. A multitude of Freemasons and other citizens will long mourn the death of Right Worshipful Brother James W. Christian. My final word shall be one of appreciation of Most Worshipful Brother James W. Skelly, our retiring Grand Master, and of thanks for his assistance and encouragement. He has an astounding capacity for hard work and the Craft received the full benefit of it during his year of office which is about to close. With love in his heart for Freemasonry, and an ~ntelligent understanding 0'1: its beautiful precepts, coupled with a deepseated love for all his brethren he has traveled over the entire state accomplishing an amount of good that has never been surpassed by any Grand Master. Indeed, I am inclined to believe that he has attained" a new high" in Masonic achievement. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY

F. ITTNER, Grand Lecturer.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RITUAL

M. 'V. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Ritual, wbich was adopted, as foIIows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. tf A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Ritual begs leave to submit the following brief report-brief not because of inactivity but rather because most of the work of the Committee is necessarily of a secret and confidential nature, and cannot appear in print. One meeting was held in October in the New Masonic Temple in St. Louis, when a number of vigourously contested points pertaining to the Ritual were considered and passed upon. The Committee determined in each instance what is and has been the work. As it has always done in the past the Committee discouraged and will continue to discourage any changes in the Ritual unless compelling reaSOlUI appear for such action. The Committee realizes that its chief function is "to conserve and preserve the work," and it will be constantly on guard to see that nothing prevents it from discharging that obligation in full. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, JOHN PICKARD, JAMES A. KINDER, THEODORE C. TEEL, HENRY C. CHILES.


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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

R. W. Brother James A. Kinder, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on 'Vays and Means which was adopted and is as follows:

To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The officers of this Grand Lodge have kept expenditures well within the budget appropriation set up one year ago and have turned back into our General Fund the sum of $1,799.29, out of a total appropriation at that time of $174,611.20. This is commendable and proves that good business methods and care were exercised by our officers in conducting the affairs of this Grand Lodge. There has been referred to this Committee from the address of the Grand Master, a recommendation to amend Section 76 of our By-Laws. Attached hereto is a proposed amendment which is offered without recommendation by the Committee and will lie over for the action of this Grand Lodge next year. We approve the resolution presented by W. Brother John R. Davis providing for marker to the memory of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. We approve the resolution offered by W. Brother Cecil A. Tolin, providing for the expenses of the Deputy Grand Master in attendance on the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association meeting. We approve the resolution offered by W. Brother E. A. Roemer, again cancelling the fee of $10.00 provided for in Grand Lodge law to be collected from each petitioner for the benefit of the Masonic Home. We recommend the adoption of resolutions embodied in the report of this Committee one year ago, which were then adopted and were operative for a period of one year, and are as follows:

1. " Be It Resolved, that the directors of the Masonic Home be instructed, if ~eenied to be advisable, to use 3 per cent of the dues payable to the Masonic Home in accordance with Section 74 of the By-Laws, for relief of indigent Master Masons, their widows and orphans, either at the Masonic Home or elsewhere, and regardless of whether the beneficiary would be entitled to admission to the Masonic Home or not, and to transfer such amounts as the board may deem advisable for relief for those not entitled to admission to the Home, to the Welfare Committee." 2. "Be It Resolved, that the Ways and Means Committee, by and with the consent of the Grand Master, be authorized, the funds of the Grand Lodge being available, to transfer to the Welfare Committee from time to time, moneys from the General Fund for the operation and maintenance of the Welfare Committee not exceeding however the sum of $5,000. Unless continued by the 1937 Communication of this Grand Lodge, this resolution shall be of no force and effect beyond the first day of the 1937 Grand Lodge Communication." We recommend the following appropriations: Printing Proceedings $ 1,600.00 1,000.00 Salary, Grand Master . . Expenses, Grand Master 1,500.00 Maintenance, Grand Lodge Office . 1,800.00 Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers (Order Grand Master) . 300.00 Salary, Grand Secretary . 5,000.00


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Offie(! Help (Grand Secretary's Office) Printing, Postage and Stationery Salary, Grand Lecturer Expenses, Grand Lecturer Gr-and Lecturer, Emeritus Salary, Grand Treasurer Grand Correspondent Masonic Relief Association, United States and Canada Past Grand Master's Jewel Lewis and Clark Marker Telephone, Jefferson 4877 Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer Reporter, Grand Lodge Session Expenses, Grand Lodge Session Contingent, Grand Lodge Expenses, Funerals, etc. . Perkins Audit Company Expenses, Geo. Washington Mem. and Grand Master Conf Grand Lodge Officers' Conference Pay Roll ] 936 Masonic Home Board, per capita

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,880.00 3,000.00 4,200.00 1,200.00 1,500.00 500.00 500.00 250.00 195.00 60.00 225.00 300.00 75.00 500.00 750.00 150.00 300.00 300.00 19,474.30 133,969.78 $181,529.08

Grand Total Fraternally submitted, J. A.

KINDER, Chairman, GEO. C. MARQUIS, R. A. BREUER, EDMUND E. MORRIS, SOLON CAMERON.

REPORT OF OOMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM

\V. Brother W'alter R. Shrodes, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Mileage and Per Diem, which was adopted as ÂŁ011O'f8: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Mileage and Per Diem, at this session of the Grand Lodge, begs to report allowances paid for Mileage and Per Diem, which have been distributed as follows: Grand Officers Past Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Masters District Lecturers Chairmen of Committees Committee on Jurisprudence Committee on Appeals and Grievance Committee on Credentials Chartered Lodges Total

$

. . . . . . . .

447.90 337.90 1,649.30 436.20 74.20 145.50 158.50 124.00 16,100.80

$19,474.30 Respectfully submitted, WALTER R. SHRODES, Chairman, OLIVER F. PETERS, OLIN A. NEWMAN.

Note: The itemized report of the Committee in full is in the archives of the Grand Secretary's office.


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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS

THE GRAND SECRETARY: The Committee on Unfinished Business reported nothing remaining on the calendar. APPOINTMENTS

The Grand Secretary read the following list of appointments made by the M. 'V. Grand Master-Elect: ANTHONY F. ITTNER R. W. Grand Lecturer WM. A. HUMPHREYS W. Grand Chaplain THOMAS B. MATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • W. Grand Chaplain EMMET L. ROBISON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . W. Grand Chaplain SAMUEL THURMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . • . • W. Grand Chaplain KARL M. VETSBVRG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . Grand Senior Deacon HARRY S. TRUMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . Grand Junior Deacon HARRIS C. JOHNSTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . Grand Senim Steward FORREST C. DONNELL Grand Junior Steward GROVER C. SPARKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . • . Grand Marshal LEO H. JOHNSON Grand Marshal ELI S. HAYNES Grand Sword Bearer WM. F. WOODRUFF Grand Pursuivant CHAS. H. MORTON Grand Orator THOMAS NEEDHAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . Grand Tiler

INSTALLATION

The hour for installation having arrived, M. W. Brother W. W. Martin was presented as the Installing Officer, and M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, as Grand Marshal. The following Grand Officers were then duly installed for the ensuing year: GEORGE W. WALKER M. W. Grand Master HAROLD L. READER . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . R. W. Deputy Grand Master HENRY C. CHILES .. , , " , R. W. Senior Grand Warden EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. Grand Treasurer ARTHUR MATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . '" .R. W. Grand Secretary ANTHONY F. ITTNER.: R. W. Grand Lecturer WM. A. HUMPHREYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . W. Grand Chaplain SAMUEL THURMAN . . . . . . . . • . . . . . • • . . • . . . • . • . . . . . . W. Grand Chaplain KARL M. VETSBURG: . . . . . . . • . . . • . . . • . . • . • . • . • . . . Grand SeniM Deacon HARRY S. TRUMAN . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . • . Grand Junior Deacon HARRIS C. JOHNSTON . . • . . . . . . . • . . • . . . • . • . . . . . . Grand Senior Steward FORREST C. DONNELL . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . • . • . . . . • . . • Grand Junior Steward GROVER C. SPARKS ............••.••.••.•••..•..•.••••• Grand Marshal LEO H. JOHNSON . . . . • . . . . . . . • . . • . . . . . . . . . . • . . • . . . • . . . Grand Marshal ELI S. HAYNES ••.••..•......•...••.•..•.•••••. Grand Sword Bearere REV. CHAS. H. MORTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • • • • . . . . Grand Orator THOMAS NEEDHAM • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . Grand Tiler

Elwyn S. Woods, R. W. Junior Grand Warden,. Thoma8 B. Mather, W. Grand Chaplain, Emmet L. Robison, W. Grand Chaplain, and Wm. F. Woodruff, Grand Pursuivant, were later installed in their respective lodges.


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1936

PRESENTATION TO GRAND MASTER AND PAST GRAND MASTER

R. W. BROTHER STOVALL: Most Worshipful Brother Walker, on behalf of the members of St. Mark's Lodge and the friends from Southeast Missouri, your brethren, I assure you that this is a very great pleasure conferred on me to ask you to allow us the honor of presenting you with this crown, hat or sky piece to cover your dome during your official year as Grand Master, and it is the desire and the prayer of the brethren from Southeast Missouri that he who should direct all presiding officers may grant you wisdom to preside over this Grand Lodge in a manner that will endear you to them, as you have endeared yourself to us. M. W. BROTHER GEORGE W. WALKER: Worshipful Brother Stovall, and brethren: my cup indeed runneth over. All I can say to you at this time, brethren, is I thank you. THE GRAND SECRETARY: Most Worshipful Grand Master, to complete your equipment, symbolically, it gives me the greatest pleasure to invest you with the Grand Master's apron, symbolic, of course, from its very start to its great and wonderful decoration of those high virtues which you have and which you will exemplify, and to give encouragement at all times to all the brethren who see it to bow reverently in humility to the Grand Master of the universe as they greet you and treat you as His representative. May you wear it with pleasure. M. W. BROTHER JAMES W. SKELLY: Most Worshipful Brother Walker, I have here the jewel of the Grand Master presented to this Grand Lodge thirty-two years ago by Most \Vorshipful Brother \Villiam F. Kuhn to be transmitted by each Grand Master to his suecessor. Our close relation during the past year, the support you have given me, makes it indeed a labor of love in transmitting to you this jewel of office. It has been worn by many great and good men through these years, and I am sure you will maintain the high reputation of these brethren and indeed will add to the luster of this jewel. Permit me to pin it on your lapel. M. \V. BROTHER GEORGE W. WALKER: Most Worshipful Brother Skelly, it is with a deep sense of humility that -I accept this jewel which has been worn by so many prominent and capable Grand Masters. 1 feel, brethren, that 1 shall fall far short of the achievements of many of my eminent predecessors, but 1 assure you, and you, Most Worshipful Brother Skelly, that I shall ever be found trying. M. W. BROTHER BYRNE E. BIGGER: 1 would like to have a little private session with you, Most Worshipful Brother Skelly, right here. Most Worshipful Brother SkeJly, it is a very pleasant duty that has been assigned to me and 1 appreciate the fact that I am standing in the place of one that is very near and dear to you, and


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I am saying this for him and for you. You have served the craft for twelve months faithfully and well. I sincerely hope that the representatives that have come up from the several Masonic Lodges in our Grand Jurisdiction have caught the inspiration, the devotion to duty, painful and careful consideration of the rights and welfare of others, and above all the rights and welfare of the craft at large. My association with you during the past twelve months in an official capacity has shown me that you have all of these qualifications, and now at the end of that time, in recognition of the service that you have performed, the Grand Lodge desires to present to you this beautiful Past Grand Master's jewel. It is a thing of beauty, earned by careful and patient labor. May you never disgrace it as you have not done up to now, and enjoy the pleasure of having served faithfully and well. Let me congratulate you on your fine work. (Applause.) M. W. BROTHER. JAMES W. SKELLY: Most \Vorshipful Brother Bigger and brethren of this Grand Lodge: your words bring up a note of sadness at the absence of M. W. Brother Joseph S. McIntyre, who was my friend. The end of the year, however, brethren, is to me not a time of sadness but rather I am glad today not that I am relieved from the responsibilities, because with the help of so many brethren in the forefront of whom was Most Worshipful Brother Bigger, the year has been one in which I am glad for the opportunity to have rendered service. I am glad for the fine spirit you brethren have shown here and for the many "acts you have shown me of your kindly consideration. It has been my ambition that when I should come to the end of the year and step out, that I might have found a place in the affections of you brethren, tpat I might be useful in the future. Your kindly tribute today supplies that, and with the kindest wishes to my friend here who has worked with me so faithfully throughout the year and other years, I look forward to a good year, and many good years for this Grand Lodge, and I thank the brethren from the bottom of my heart for the consideration they have given me all these years. (Applause. ) STANDING COMMITTEES 1936-1937

Jurisprudence-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Henri L. Warren, C. Lew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer, Sam Wilcox. . Appeals and Grievances-Ray Bond, Chairman; Ed P. Walsh, Eugene L. McGee, John C. Robertson, Harry Baum. Ways and Means-James A. Kinder, one year, Chairman; George C. Marquis, three years; Edmund E. Morris, three years; Ransom A. Breuer, two years; Solon Cameron, hvo years. Credentials-Walter A. \Vebb, Chairman; Jacob Abaecherli, Fred H. Knight, Henry F. W oerther.. Fred B. Howarth.


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1936

Mileage and Per Diem-Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman; Arthur W. Reiter, Harry A. Magoon, George Black, Arthur V. Schopp. Chartered Lodges-Charles G. Duggan, Chairman; Gus 0 . Nations, Reinhold H. Rodegast, Fred A. Miller. Lodges U. D.-Louis J. Graue, Chairman; Warren H. May, Fred W. Bendick, Albert Theis, Jr., Arnold Just. Welfare-Tolman ,V. Cotton, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, William S. Campbell, Arch A. Johnson, Thomas H. Reynolds. Reports of D. D. G. M.'s-Nathaniel D. Jackson, Chairman; Harry H. Balsiger, Fay G. Fulkerson, Charles L. 'Voods, G. A. Sample. Masonic Boards of Relief-Edward H. Loffhagen, three years, Chairman; Andrew J. O'Reilly, two years; William A. Piner, one year; Albert Linxwiler, two years; Morris E. Ewing, three years. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, two years, Chairman; John Pickard, one year; Theodore C. Teel, four years; James A. Kinder, three years; Harry P. Hovey, five years. Masonic Home (Visiting Committee)-AIfred P. Fletcher, Chairman; 'V. A. Phipps, Emsley C. James, Sterling H. McCarty. Correspondence-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman. Necrology-John Pickard, Chairman. Auditin.q-Perkins Audit Company. Grand Master's A.ddress-James W. Skelly, Chairman; and all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business-C. A. Tolin, Chairman. Transportation and H otels-William F. Miller, Chairman. SPECIAL COMMITTEES 1936-1937

Masonic Service Association of Missouri-Robert C. Winkelmaier, Chairman; John R. Davis, Robert R. Wright. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Arthur Mather, Chairman; James R. McLachlan, Frank C. Barnhill, DuVal Smith, Buell P. Parks. Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Edward McGuigan, John Wohradsky, Jr. George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association-Bert S. Lee, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell. Library- 'Villiam B. Massey, Chairman; William P. Mason, William C. Rese. Printing of Proceedings-Arthur Mather, Chairman; James A. Kinder. Masonic Publications-Frank C. Barnhill, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Frederick M. Smith.


1936

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Building Supervisory Board-Cecil A. Tolin, two years, Chairman; Guy C. Million, one year; F. 'William Kuehl, three years. Revision of By-Laws-Henry C. Chiles, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Ray V. Denslow. Trial by Other State Jurisdictions-Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles, J. M. Fisher. LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION Name and Location Year of Serviu Robert R. Kreeger, 3404 Morrell Avenue, Kansas City 1908-09 Arch A. Johnson, Landers Building, Springfield 1911-12 Van Fremont Boor, 1201 Commerce Building, Kansas City 1913-14 Tolman W. Cotton, Van Buren 1914-15 Julius C. Garrell, 251 Twenty-Fourth Street, Santa Monica, Calif 1919-20 Bert S. Lee, 1224 Washington, Springfield 1922-23 Orestes Mitchell, Corby Building, St. Joseph 1924-25 William W. Martin, 5351 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis 1925-26 John Pickard, Columbia 1926-27 Anthony F. Ittner, 1530 Telephone Building, St. Louis 1927-28 Byrne E. Bigger, Courthouse, Hannibal. 1928-29 William R. Gentry, 717 Louderman Building, St. Louis 1930-31 Ray V. Denslow, Trenton 1931-32 Thad B. Landon, 1902 Power and Light Building, Kansas City .. 1932-33 F. C. Barnhill, Marshall 1933-34 DuVal Smith, 517 Corby Building, St. Joseph 1934-35 James W. Skelly, 3637 Lindell Blvd 1935-36 MINUTES APPROVED

On motion made by M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, the Minutes as reported were ordered printed in the Proceedings. PRINTING PROCEEDINGS

On motion, the Grand Secretary was directed to print and distribute the necessary number of proceedings of this Session of the Grand Lodge. BENEDICTION

Reverend Grand Chaplain, Wm. A. Humphreys, after invoking the Divine Blessing, pronounced the benediction. C'LOSING

The M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, rested from its labors and was closed in AMPLE FORM at 1 :00 o'clock P.M. this day, the 30th of September, 1936, no further business appearing, to meet again at St. Louis, Missouri, the last Tuesday, viz., the 28th day of September, 1937.


126

PROCEEDINGS OF TH.l<.:

DISTRICT DEPUTY G. M.'S 1936-1937 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. ] O. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

Harold M. Jayne, Memphis Willis J. Bray, Kirksville Walter E. Singley, Green City Clyde E. Evans, Trenton Hendrix Newman, Bethany Ourtis F. Smith, Darlington George Houchens, Ravenwood Fred L. Binder, Bigelow Edward Baker, St. Joseph Thomas D. Williams, Maysville Emsley C. James, Plattsburg John M. Gallatin, Chillicothe Herman D. Taggart, Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon David A. Leslie, Williamstown Warren H. May, Louisiana Chas. S. Hicks, Monroe City Claude L. Dale, Huntsville Arthur G. Lyneh, Brunswick L. Herbert Thomas, Carrollton Henry C. Noland, Parkville Charles T. Kornbrodt, 5607 Rockhill Road, Kansas City 23. Camillus B. Waddell, Lexington 24. John W. Adams, Marshall 25. Samuel L. Jewett, Boonville 26. Julius R. Edwards, Centralia 27. Louis J. Graue, Mexico 28. Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City 29. William Ulery, Elsberry 30. Wm. E. Lange, Wright City 31. Albert Linxwiler, Jefferson City 32. Ransom A. Breuer, Hermann 33-A. Robert C. Duffin, 6186 Waterman, St. Louis 33-B. Walter J. Simon, 7259 Cornell, St. Louis 34. Wm. C. Deacon, Harrisonville 35. Dudley O. Bradley, Butler 36. Jolly P. Hurtt, Sedalia 37. Thornton Jennings, Clinton 38. Oren Simpson, Richland 39. Chas. L. Woods, Rolla 40. Harry H. Balsiger, Crystal City 41. Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville 42. Mark D. Gwinn, Eldorado Springs 43. David V. Morris, Nevada 44. Sidney Ralph Main, Joplin 45. Jewell E. Windle, Springfield 46. Carl A. Swenson, Mountain Grove

1936

DISTRICT LECTURERS 1936-1937 Homer G. McDaniel, Wayland Walter H. Epperson, Hurdland Walter E. Singley, Green City Emett M. Wilson, Laredo Hendrix Newman, Bethany Curtis F. Smitll, Darlington George Houchens, Ravenwood Fred L. Binder, Bigelow Frank A. Miller, St. Joseph Thomas D. Williams, Maysville Emsley C. James, Plattsburg John R. Blackman, Chillicothe Herman D. Taggart, Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon David A. Leslie, Williamstown Warren H. May, Louisiana Charles S. Hicks, Monroe City Claude L. Dale, Huntsville Arthur G. Lynch, Brunswick L. Herbert Thomas, Carrollton Henry C. Noland, Parkville Harry P. Hovey, 845 W. Gregory Blvd., Kansas City Camillus B. Waddell, Lexington John W. Adams, Marshall Samuel L. Jewett, Boonville Robert N. Hall, Columbia Louis J. Graue, Mexico Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City William A. Ulery, Jr., Elsberry Wm. E. Lange, Wright City Wm. D. Rogers, Jefferson City Ransom A. Breuer, Hermann Rex E. Dewhirst, 738 Belt, St. Louis Wm. C. Deacon, Harrisonville Dudley O. Bradley, Butler Jolly P. Hurtt, Sedalia Thornton Jennings, Clinton Oren Simpson, Richland George W. Reeves, Steeleville Charles E. Pyle, De Soto Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville Mark D. Gwinn, Eldorado Springs John C. Senate, Milo Sidney Ralph Main, Joplin Frank F. Freeman, Springfield Carl A. Swenson, Mountain Grove


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DISTRICT DEPUTY G. M.'S 1936-37

DISTRICT LECTURERS 1936-37

47. John N. Sparks, Grandin 48. J. Clyde Akers, Farmington 49. James A. Kinder, Cape Girardeau 50. George A. Sample, Chaffee 51. Buell P. Parks, Hornersville 52. Kipp C. Johnson, Poplar Bluff 53. C. Earl Armstrong, West Plains 54. Granville J. Vaughan, Ozark 55. Wm. N. Marbut, Mt. Vernon 56. Walter A. Phipps, Neosho 57. William H. Stein, 5100 Wise, St. Louis 58. Andrew B. Stanley, Eldon 59. Nat D. Jackson, Independence

John N. Sparks, Grandin J. Clyde Akers, Farmington James A. Kinder, Cape Girardeau Alonzo A. Harrison, Sikeston Buell P. Parks, Hornersville Kipp C. Johnson, Poplar Bluff C. Earl Armstrong, West Plains Granville J. Vaughan, Ozark Wm. N. Marbut, Mt. Vernon Walter A. Phipps, Neosho Morrison W. Rinkel, 6235 Creston, Wellston Andrew B. Stanley, Eldon John S. Carmical, Independence

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS, WHICH LIE OVER UNTIL 1937 COMMUNICATION PROPOSED AMENDMENT OF SECTION 76 OF By-LAWS OF 1925. That Section 76, of the By-Laws of 1925, be amended as follows: , 'SEC. 76. MILEAGE AND PER DIEM. The Past Grand Masters, Grand Officers, District Deputy Grand Masters, District Lecturers, and one Representative from each Chartered Lodge and each Lodge U. D., and the Chairman of each Standing Committee, who do not draw mileage and per diem in any other capacity, shall be paid the sum of Four ($4) Dollars for each day they may be in actual attendance upon the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, and three cents per mile for each mile necessarily traveled in going to and returning therefrom, provided, that no Representative shall receive mileage or per diem in a double capacity." SEC. 204lh. No lodge shall publish or distribute a directory or list of its membership, nor shall any lodge or member thereof furnish or permit to be furnished, a list of its members or their addresses for publication. This provision shall not apply to the annual returns by a lodge to the Grand Lodge, or to any such information ordered or requested by the Grand Lodge or the Grand Master. AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS ADOPTED "Sec. 65. BOARDS OF RELIEF. In cities where there are three or more Lodges, and in areas where thirty or more Lodges have concurrent jurisdiction, the Master of each Lodge shall appoint two of its members, who shall constitute a General Board of Relief, to whom applicants 'for charity shall be referred, and if found worthy, relieved. And each Lodge in such city or area shall contribute Five ($5.00) Dollars, or such part thereof from each initiation fee as the members shall deem necessary for the work of relief herein contemplated; provided, that such assessment shall be for periods of one year and when deemed necessary; provided, further that such contributions shall not be made when the amount on hand equals Five Thousand ($5,000) Dollars, except in cities or areas with more than three and less than twenty-five Lodges. In su,ch cities, or areas, the assessment shall not be made when the amount on hand is equal to One Thousand


128

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

($1,000) Dollars. Such Board of Relief may adopt rules for its government. , 'In cities where there are two Lodges, except in cities and areas, as hereinbefore provided, each Lodge, shall appoint not less than three nor more than five members, who shall compose a Board of Relief for that city. This Board shall organize and adopt rules for its government. Each Lodge in such city shall contribute the sum of Five Dollars from each initiation fee to the Board of Relief, provided, that such contribution shall not be made when the sum on hand exceeds Two Hundl'ed Dollars. , , Each Lodge in this Jurisdiction, other than those above specified, shall appoint one or more of its members as a Board of Relief and shall provide sufficient funds for the relief of transient applicants, if found worthy." "Sec. 66. EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. In cities where there are twenty or more Lodges, and in areas where thirty or more Lodges have concurrent jurisdiction, each Lodge shall appoint or elect one of its members, who shall constitute a General Employment Bureau, whose duty shall be to aid unemployed members to secure employment. Such Bureau shall adopt rules for its government; and each Lodge in such city or area shall contribute the sum of (25c) twenty-five cents per capita per annum to the Employment Bureau, such contribution to be calculated on, and payable with, the annual Grand Lodge returns. Provided, that no contributions shall be called for when the amount on hand exceeds the sum of ($3,000.00) three thousand dollars. "Such Bureau shall employ a Secretary and maintain a permanent office, where applicants may apply for employment." Section 192 of the By-Laws of 1925, as amended by the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge in 1930 (Proceedings 1930, page 113) is amended by adding a sub-paragraph thereto at the end of the amendment of 1930, reading as follows: "The Lodges in cities, towns or areas whose jurisdictional boundaries are contiguous, not already having concurrent jurisdiction, by affirmative vote of two-thirds of the Lodges in each such city, town or area and the approval of the Grand Master, may create concurrent jurisdiction within the jurisdictional limits of such cities, towns or areas."


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

129

NUMERICAL LIST OF LODGES-1936 I-Missouri 2-Meridian 3-Beacon 4-Howard 5-United 6-Ark 7-0 'Sullivan 8. 9--{}eo. VVashington lo-Agency ll-Pauldingville l2-Tyro 13-Rising Sun l4-Eolia 15-VVestern Star l6-Memphis l7-Clarksville l8-Palmyra 19-Paris Union 20-St. Louis 2l-Havana 22-VVellington 23-Florida 24-VVyaconda 25-Naphtali 26-Ava 27-Evergreen 28-St. John's 29-VVindsor 30-Huntsville 31-Liberty 32-Humphreys 33-Ralls 34-Troy 35-Mercer 36-Cooper 37-Hemple 38--Callao 39-DeVVitt 40-Mt. Moriah 41-Bismarck 42-Middle Grove 43-Je:fferson 44-Fair Play 45-Bonhomme 46-VVentzville 47-Fayette 48--Fulton 49-Holt

50-Xenia 51-Livingston 52-Wakanda 53-Weston 54-Index 55-Arrow Rock 56-Tipton 57-Richmond 58-Monticello 59-Centralia 60-New Bloomfield 6l-Waverly 62-Vincil 63-Cambridge 64-Monroe 65-Pattonsburg 66-Grant City 67-Rocheport 68-Kennett 69-Sullivan 70-Armstrong 71-Savannah 72-Gorin 73-Eureka 74-Warren 75-Silex 76-Independence 77-Lebanon 78-St. Joseph 79-Polar Star 80-Bridgeton 81-Central 82-Jackson 83-Laclede 84-Webster Groves ·85-Miami 8G-Brookfield 87-VVashington 88-Defiance 89-Friendship 90-Russellville 91-Madison 92-Perseveranee 93-8t. Mark's 94-Vienna 95-Pomegranate 96-8t. Andrews 97-Bethany 98-VVebster

99-Mt. Vernon lOO-Ash Grove 101-Bogard 102-Bloomington lOS-West View lO4-Heroine lO5-Kirksville lOG-Gallatin l07-Greenville lO8-Altamont l09-Stanberry llO-Marcus 11l-Trenton lI2-Maitland lIS-Plattsburg lI4-Twilight lI5-Laddonia lI6-Barnes 1I7-Helena 1I8-Kingston 1I9-DeSoto 120-Compass 121-Erwin 122-Triplett l2S-Hermann l24-Union Star 125--{}entryville l26-Seaman l27-Athens l28-Lorraine 129-Monett 130-Hume 131-Potosi 132-Farmington 133-Sta.r of the VVest 134-Olean l35-Braymer l36-Phoenix 137-Delphian lS8-Lincoln 139-0regon 140-......•..•.. l41-Amsterdam 142-Pleasant Grove U3-Irondale 144-Modern 145-Latimer l46-MeGee 147-Cass


130

200-Sonora 20l-Ravenwood 202-Westville 203-Brumley 204-Rowley 205-Trilumina 206-Somerset 207-Clay 208-Salisbury 209-Poplar Bluff 210-Unionville 158-~ountainGrove 159-G'reen City 211-Hickory Hill 212-Four Mile 160-Pleasant 161-Clifton Hill 2l3-Rolla 162-Whi tesville 214-Forest City 163-0ccidental 215-Hornersville 164-Joachim 2l6-Hale City 165. 217-Barbee 166-Portageville 2l8-Good Hope 167. 2l9-Albert Pike 168-Colony 220-Kansas City 221-Mystic Tie 169-Camden Point 222-1.a Belle 170-Benevolence 223-Ray 171-Hartford 172-Censer 224-Hamilton 225-Salem 173-Gray Summit 226-Saline 174-Sturgeon 227-Cypress 175-...........â&#x20AC;˘ 228-Shelbina 176-Point Pleasant 229-Cla:fiin 177-Texas 178-Griswold 230-St. James 179-Pride of the West 231-Cardwell 232-Polo 180-Pyramid 233-Bucklin 181-Novelty 182-Pilot Knob 234-St. Francois 183-California 235-Weatherby 184-Morley 236-Sedalia l85-Chamois 237-La Plata 238-Rushville 186. 239-Hopewell l87-Hermon 188-Hannibal 240. 241-Palestine l89-Zeredatha 242-Portland 190-Putnam 191-Wilson 243-Keystone 244-Middle Fabius 192-Frankford 193-Angerona 245-Knobnoster 194-Wellsville 246-Montgomery 247-Neosho 195-Bolivar 196-Quitman 248. 197-Carthage 249-Carroll 250-Glensted 198-Allensville 25l-Hope 199-New Hope

148-Purdy 149-Lexington 150-Birming 151-Milton 152-Linn Creek 153-Bloomfield 1M-Ionic 155-Spring Hill 156-Ashland 157-North Star

1936

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

252-Alanthu8 253-Laredo 254-Butler 255-Alton 256-Shekinah 257-Lodge of Light 258. 259-Lodge of Love 260-Mechanicsville 261-Florence 262-Holden 263-Summit 264-Kirbyville 265-Corinthian 266-Social 267-Aurora 268-Lodge of Truth 269-Brotherhood 270-New Salem 271-Solomon 272-Granite 273-St. Clair 274-Cold Spring 275. 276-Grand River 277-Wm. D. Muir 278-Essex 279-Hogle's Creek 280. 281-Fenton 282-Cosmos 283-Stockton 284-Canopy 285-Earl 286-Urich 287-Craft 288-Hermitage 289-Graham 290-Fairmount 29l-Edina 292-Lamar 293-Sarcoxie 294-Mound City 295-Moniteau 296-Sparta 297-0zark 298-Sampson 299-Temple 300~Dorie

30l-White Hall 302-Lick Creek 303-0sage


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

304-Signal 305-Cecile Daylight 306-Ashlar 307-New London 308-Parrott 309. 310-Sikeston 3ll-Kearney 312-Cuba 313-Meramec 314-Pine 315-Jerusalem 3I6-Rural 3I7-0sborn 31S-Eldorado 3I9-Paulville 320-Versailles 32I-Jonathan 322-Hardin 323-Cornerstone 324-McDonald 325-Dockery 326-Linn 327-Mt. Zion 328-Cainsville 329-Kennedy 330-Paul Revere 33l-Charity 332-Excello 333-Chillicothe 334-Breckcnridge 335-Joplin 336-HalIsville 337-Blue Springs 338-Herculaneum 339-Fidelity 340-Westport 34l-Rockville 342-Circle 343-Agricola 344-Moberly 345-Fellowship 346-Arlington 347-America 34B-Wadesburg 349-Pollock 350-Tyrian 351-Mosaic 352-Friend 353-Barnesville 354-Hebron 355-Adelphi

356-Ancient Landmark 357. 358-Northwest 3159-Garrett 360-Tuscan 36l-Riddick 362-Hiram 363-Fraternal 364-Higginsville 365-Bayou 366-Adair 367-Barry 368-Crescent Hill 369-Composite 370-Williamstown 371-Sheldon 372-Nonpareil 373-Belle 374. 375-Waynesville 376-King Hill 377-Ancient Craft 378-Berlin 379-Billings 380-Queen City 38l-Ionia 382-Mt.Ararat 383-Pythagoras 384-East Prairie 385-Richland 386-Dayton 387-Woodside 38S-Chula 38o-Arcana 390-Marionville 39l-Raytown 392-Christian 393-Beehive 394. 395. 396-Western Light 397-Gower 39B-Jasper 390-Pike 400-Decatur 40l-Carterville 402-]'falta 403-Lowry City 404-Rosen dale 405-Everton 406-Malden

131

407-Charleston 408-Montrose 409-Louisville 4l0-Iberia 411-Joppa 4l2-Appleton City 413-Valley 414-Greensburg 415-Hunnewell 416-Cache 417-Whitewater 418. 419-Star 420-Itaska 421-Urbana 422-Gate of the Templo 423-Galt 424-Samaritan 425-Green Ridge 426-Roth ville 427-Glenwood 428. 429-New Madrid 430-Winona 431- .......â&#x20AC;˘.... 432-Competition 433-Mack's Creek 434-Wheeling 435-Rockbridge 436-Gothic 437-Lafayette 438-'l'emperance 439-Mt. Olive 440-Trowel 441-Excelsior 442-Burlington 443-Anchor 444-Ada 445-West Gate 446-Ivanhoe 447-Jacoby 44B-Schell City 449. 450-Belton 451--':Raymore 452-Verona 453-Forsyth 454-Continental 455-Hinton 456-Wallace 457-Jonesburg


132 458-Melville 459-Hazelwood 460-Lambskin 461-Caruthersville 462-Santa Fe 463-Clifton 464-Concordia 465-G"aynor City 466-Southwest 461-Pleasant Hope 468-RedOak 469-Plato 410-Nodaway 411-Mineral 412-Pickering '73-Nineveh 474-Guilford 475--Golden 476-Mt. Hope 477-Henderson 418-Racine 479-Rich Hill 480-Jewel 481-Marceline 482-Clintonville 483-Fairfax 484-Kirkwood 485-Coldwater 486-Cairo 481-Chilhowee 488-Lock Spring 489-Lakeville 490-Montevallo 491-Vandalia 492-Daggett 493-Vernon 494-Lewistown 495-Unity 496-Robert Burns 491-Equality 498-PeeDee 499-Harmony 500-Jameson 501-Buckner 502-Philadelphia 503-Prairie Home 504-PIatte City 505-Euclid 506-Lathrop 501-Clearmont 508-Saxton 509-Van Buren

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 510-New Hampton 511-Skidmore 512-Webb City 513-Senath 514-Granby 515-Galena 516-Milford 517-Seligman 518-0riental 519-Crane 520-Clifton Heights 521-Lockwood 522-Gate City 523-Stinson 524-Spickardsville 525-Cunningham 526-Wayne 521-Higbee 528-Conway 529-Apollo 530-..â&#x20AC;˘.....â&#x20AC;˘... 531-Lane's Prairie 532-Dexter 533-Comfort ,534-Columbia 535-Blackwell 536-Ingomar 531-Bethel 538-Stella 539-Dawn 540-Winigan 541-Jacksonville 542-Ferguson 543-Mansfield 544-Algabil 545-Zalma 546-0rient 541-South Gate 548-Clinton 549-Carl Junction 550-Rose Hill 551-Pendleton 552-Calhoun 553-Clarksburg 554-Foster 555-Summersville 556-Prairie 551-Blairstown 558-Moscow 559-Clarksdale 560-Nelson 561-Cowgill

1936 562-Deepwater 563-York 564-Jamesport 565-Tebbetts 566-Maplewood 567-Miller 568-Naylor 569-Marlborough 570-Republic 571-Hayti 572-Rutledge 573-Bernie 514-La Monte 575-Easter 576-0live Branch 571-Ewing 518-Forest Park 579-Grandin 580-Houston 581-lllmo 582-Koshkonong 583-Novinger 584. 585-Shamrock 586-Criterion 587-Branson 588-St. Francisville 589-Grovespring 590-Advance 591-Barnett 592-La Russell 593-Union 594-Blodgett 595-Cole Camp 596-Puxico 591-Bosworth 598-Leadwood 599-Elvins 600-Cosby 60I-Clayton 602-Acacia 603-Morehouse 604. 605-Walker 606-Craig 607-Eminence 608-Strafford 609-Warrenton 610-Clark 611-Centertown 612-Mokane 613-Wellston


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

614--!{t. VVashington 615-Chaffee 616. 617-Swope Park 618-Grandview 619-.••••......• 62o-VVillard 621-Anderson 622-Norwood 623- ...•......•• 624--0wensville 625-Sheffield 626-!{agnolia 627-Wallace Park 628-!{endon 629-Valley Park 63O-East Gate 631-Tower Grove

632-Belgrade 633-Archie 634-Steele 635-Greentop 636- ..•..•.••..• 637-!{ountain View 63S-Triangle 639-!{izpah 64Q-Jennings 641-Trinity 642-Benj. Franklin 643-Northeast 644--Grain Valley 645-Clever 646-Shaveh 647-Noel 648-Elmer

133

649-University 65O-Parma 651-Cleveland 652-Pilgrim 653-Shawnee 654--Commonwealth 655-Gardenville 656-Country Club 657-Progress 65S-Purity 659-Alpha 660-Holliday 661-Theodore Roosevelt 662-Clarence 663-Rockhill 664--Aldrich

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LODGES-LOOATIONS-DISTRICTS A No.

602 444 366 355 590 10 343 252 219 664 544 198 659 108 255 347 141 443 377 356 621 193 529 412 389 633 6 346

Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

Acacia Columbia Ada Orrick Adair Kirksville Edgerton Adelphi Advanee Advanee Agency Agency Petersburg Agricola Alanthus Alanthus Grove Albert Pike Kansas City Aldrich Aldrich Algabil St. Louis Allensville Allendale Alpha N. Kansas City Altamont Altamont Alton Alton Ameriea St. Louis "Amsterdam Amsterdam Anehor .•.......•...St. Louis Ancient Craft King City Harrisburg Aneient Landmark Anderson Anderson Angerona Missouri City Apollo St. Louis Appleton City Appleton City Arcana Harris Archie Arehie Ark Newark Arlington Dixon

County

District

Boone 26 ,Ray •.............. 23 Adair •......... . . .. 2 Platte 21 Stoddard 50 .Buchanan 9 Henry 37 Gentry 6 .J aekson 22 .Polk 41 33-B Worth 6 Clay 22 Daviess 10 Oregon 53 33-B Bates 35 33-B Gentry 6 Boone 26 McDonald 56 Clay 11 33-B St. Clair 37 Sullivan . . . . . . .. 3 Cass 34 Knox 2 Pulaski 39


134 No.

70 55 100 156 306 127 267 26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Gro\'e Ashland Ashlar Athens Aurora Ava

Location of LOdge

Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland , Commerce Albany St. Louis Ava

County

1936 District

Howard 25 Saline 24 Greene .45 Boone 26 Scott 50 Gentry ............• 6 33-A Douglas 46

B

217 591 116 353 367 365 3 393 6-32 373 450 170 642 378 573 97 537 379 150 41 535 557 594 153 102 337 101 195 45 597 587 135 334 80 86 269 203 233 501

Barbee Sweet Springs Saline 24 Barnett Barnett Morgan 58 Barnes Cabool. Texas 46 Ellington Reynolds 47 Barnesville Barry Washburn Barry 55 Bayou Bakersfield Ozark 53 Beacon St. Louis 33-A Beehive Lawson .Ray 23 Belgrade Belgrade Washington .40 Belle Belle Maries •............ 39 Belton Belton Cass ••............. 34 Benevolence Utica Livingston 12 Benjamin Franklin .•.St. Louis 33-B Berlin Berlin Gentry 6 Bernie Bernie Stoddard 51 Bethany Bethany Harrison 5 Bethel •.............Bethel Shelby 14 Billings Billings Christian 54 Birming Faucett Buchanan 9 Bismarck Bismarck St. Francois .48 Blackwell Blackwell St. Francois 40 Blairstown .Blairstown Henry 37 Blodgett .Blodgett Scott 50 Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard 50 Bloomington Bevier Macon •............ 14 Blue Springs Blue Springs ......•rackson 59 Bogard Bogard Carroll 20 Bolivar Bolivar .Polk .41 Bonhomme .Ballwin St. Louis 57 Bosworth Bosworth Carroll 20 Branson Branson Taney 54 Braymer Braymer Caldwell 12 Breckenridge .Breckenridge Caldwell 12 Bridgeton .st. John's Station. St. Louis 57 Brookfield Brookfield Linn 13 Brotherhood St. Joseph Buchanan 9 Brumley Brumley Miller 38 Bucklin Bucklin Linn 13 Buckner Buckner Jackson 59


1936 No.

442 254

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Burlington Butler

Location of Lodge

.Burlington Jct .Butler

County

135 District

Nodaway .......â&#x20AC;˘.. 7 .Bates 35

C 416 328 486 552 183 38 63 169 284 231 549 249 401 191 461 141 305 172 611 81 59 615 185 331 401 487 333 392 388 342 229 662 610 553 559 11 201 601 507 651 645 463 520 161 548 482

Cache St. Louis Cainsville Cainsville Harrison Cairo Cairo Randolph Calhoun Calhoun Henry California California Moniteau Callao Callao Macon Cambridge Slater Saline Camden Point Camden Point Platte Canopy Aurora Lawrence Cardwell Cardwell Dunklin 'Carl Junction Jasper Carl Junction Carroll Norborne Carroll Carterville Carterville J asper Carthage Carthage Jasper Caruthersville Caruthersville Pemiscot Cass Harrisonville Cass Cecile-Daylight Kansas City Jackson .: Censer Macon Macon Centertown Centertown Cole CentraL Molino Audrain Centralia Centralia Boone Chaffee Chaffee .scott Chamois Chamois Osage Charity St. Joseph Buchanan Charleston Charleston Mississippi Chilhowee Chilhowee Johnson Chillicothe Chillicothe Livingston Christian Oak Grove Jackson Chula Chula Livingston Circle Roscoe St. Clair Claflin Protem Taney Clarence Clarence Shelby Clark Clark Randolph Clarksburg Clarksburg Moniteau Clarksdale Clarksdale De Kalb Clarksville Clarksville Pike Clay ...â&#x20AC;˘........... Excelsior Springs ..Clay Clayton Clayton St. Louis Clearmont Clearmont Nodaway Cleveland Cleveland Cass Clever Clever Christian Clifton Thayer Oregon Clifton Heights St. Louis Clifton Hill Clifton Hill Randolph Henry Clinton Clinton Clintonville El Dorado Springs. Cedar

a3-D 5 18 31 31 14 24 21 55 51 44 20 .44 44 51 34 22 14 31 27 26 50 31 9 50 36 12 59 12 31 54 14 18 31 10 16 11 51 1 34 54 53 33-A 18 31 42


136 No.

274 485 595 168 534 533 654 120 432 369 464 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519 368 586 312 525 227

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Cold Spring Cold Water Cole Camp Colony Columbia Comfort Commonwealth Compass Competition Composite Concordia Continental Conway Cooper Corinthian Cornerstone Cosby Cosmos Country Club Cowgill Craft Craig Crane Crescent Hill Criterion Cuba Cunningham Cypress

Location of Lodge

County

1936 District

Leeton Johnson 36 Drexel Cass 34 Cole Camp Benton 36 Colony Knox 2 Pacific Franklin 32 Wheaton Barry ............• 55 St. Louis : 33-A Parkville Platte 21 Competition Laclede 38 Doniphan .Ripley 52 Concordia Lafayette 23 Stewartsville De Kalb 10 Conway Laclede 38 Boonville Cooper 25 Warrensburg .Johnson 36 St. Louis .............•............... 33-B Cosby Andrew 9 St. Louis 33-B Kansas City .Jackson 22 Cowgill Caldwell 12 Canton Lewis 15 Craig Holt . . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Crane Stone 54 Adrian Bates 35 Alba J asper 44 CUoa Crawford ........•. 39 Sumner Chariton 19 Laclede Linn 13 D

492 539 386 400 562 88 137 119 39 532 325 300

Daggett McKittrick Dawn Ludlow Dayton Dayton Decatur Pierce City Deepwater Deepwater Defiance Sheridan Delphian Birch Tree De Soto De Soto ~ DeWitt DeWitt Dexter Dexter Dockery Meadville Doric .............• Elkland

Montgomery Livingston Cass Lawrence Henry Worth Shannon Jefferson Carroll Stoddard Linn Webster

28 12 34 55 37 6 47 40 20 50 13 45

E

285 Earl 630 East Gate 384 East Prairie 575 Easter 291 Edina

Coffey Kansas City East Prairie St. Clair Edina

Daviess 10 .Jackson 22 Mississippi 50 Franklin 32 Knox .............• 2


1936 No.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of ~e

Location of Lod~e

County

137 District

318 648 599 607 14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

Eldorado ...•....... Luray Clark •...........•• 1 Elmer Elmer Macon •........••.. 14 Elvins ............• .Flat River St. Francois 48 .47 Eminence Eminence Shannon Eolia .Eolia Pike .............•. 16 Equality .Newburg Phelps 39 Erwin St. Louis 33-A Stoddard 50 Essex Essex Euclid .st. Louis ..........•.................. 33-.'\ Eureka Brunswick Chariton 19 Franklin 32 Evergreen New Haven Everton Everton Dade 42 Ewing Ewing Lewis .............• 15 14 Excello Excello Macon Excelsior Jackson Cape Girardeau .49

483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542 339 261 23 214 578 453 554 212 192 363 352 89 48

Fairfax Fairfax Atchison .........•• 8 Fairmount Wyaconda Clark .•...........• 1 Fair Play Fair Play .Polk 41 Farmington Farmington St. Francois 48 Fayette Fayette Howard 25 Fellowship J oplin .Jasper 44 Fenton .•........... Fenton St. Louis 57 Ferguson Ferguson St. Louis ~ •......... 57 Fidelity .•.......... Farley '" Platte 21 Florence New Florenec Montgomery 28 Florida .Florida ...•...... .Monroe 17 Forest City Forest City Holt 8 Forest Park St. Louis 33·B Forsyth Forsyth Taney •............ 54 Foster .Foster Bates 35 Four Mile .........• Campbell Dunklin 51 Frankford Frankford Pike 16 Fraternal. .Robertsville Franklin 32 Friend .•........... Ozark Christian 54 Friendship Chillicothe Livingston 12 Fulton Fulton Callaway 21

515 106 423 655 359 522 422 465 125

Galena Galena Stone 54 Gallatin Gallatin Daviess 10 Galt Galt Grundy 4 Gardenville Gardenville St. Louis 57 Garrett Arcola Dade 42 Gate City Kansas City .Jackson 22 Gate of the Temple ..•Springfield Greene 45 Gaynor City .Parnell.•.........Nodaway 7 Gentry .. . . . . . . . . . •• 6 Gentryville Gentryville

F

G


138 No.

9 250 427 475 218 72 436 397 289 644 514 579 276 618 272 66 173 159 425 414 635 107 178 589 474

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

1936 District

George Washington .. St. Louis ..........••................. 33·B Glensted Glensted .Morgan 58 Glenwood Glenwood Schuyler 1 Golden Golden City Barton 43 Good Hope St. Louis 33-B Gorin Gorin Scotland 1 Gothic Alexandria Clark 1 Gower Gower Clinton 11 Graham Graham Nodaway 7 Grain Valley Grain Valley Jackson 59 Granby Granby Newton 56 Grandin Grandin Carter .47 Grand River .Freeman Cass 34 Grandview Grandview Jackson 59 Granite Sedalia .Pettis 36 Grant City Grant City Worth 6 Gray Summit Gray Summit Franklin 32 Sullivan 3 Green City Green City Green Ridge Green Ridge Pettis 36 Greensburg Greensburg Knox 2 Greentop Greentop Schuyler 1 Wayne 52 Greenville Greenville Griswold Bellflower Montgomery 28 Grovespring Grovespring Wright 46 Guilford Guilford Nodaway 7 H

216 Hale City 336 Hallsville 224 Hamilton 188 HannibaL 322 Hardin 499 Harmony 171 Hartford 21 Havana 571 Hayti. 459 Hazelwood 354 Hebron 117 Helena 37 Hemple 477 Henderson 338 Herculaneum 123 Hermann 288 Hermitage 187 Hermon 104 Heroine 211 Hickory Hill 52 7 Higbee 364 Higginsville 455 Hinton

Hale Hallsville Hamilton Hannibal. Hardin St. Louis Hartford McFall Hayti. Seymour Mexico Rochester Hemple Rogersville Herculaneum Hermann Hermitage Liberal Kansas City Eugene Higbee Higginsville Hinton

Carroll Boone Caldwell Marion , .Ray

20 26 12 15 20 33-B Putnam 3 Gentry 6 Pemiscot 51 Webster 45 Audrain 27 .Andrew 9 \Clinton 11 Webster 45 J"efferson .40 Gasconade 32 Hickory .41 .Barton 43 J"ackson 22 Cole ••............. 31 Randolph 18 Lafayette 23 Boone 26


1936

GRAND LODGE O]i MtSSOtrRi

No.

Name of Lodge

362 279 262 660 49 251 239 215 580 4 130 32 415 30

Hiram Hogle's Creek Holden Holliday Hdlt Hope HopewelL Hornersville Houston Howard Hume Humphreys Hunnewell Huntsville

Location of Lodge

Kahoka Wheatland Holden Holliday Holt Washington Lesterville Hornersville Gant New Franklin Hume Humphreys Hunnewell Huntsville

County

139 District

Clark 1 Rickory .41 .Johnson 36 Monroe 17 Clay 11 .Franklin 32 .47 Reynolds Dunklin 51 Audrain 27 Howard ...........• 25 Bates ............•. 35 Sullivan 3 Shelby 14 Randolph 18

I

410 581 76 54 536 381 154 143 420 446

Iberia Illmo Independence Index Ingomar Ionia Ionic Irondale Itaska Ivanhoe

Iberia lllmo Independence Garden City Willow Springs .Eldon .Desloge Irondale St. Louis Kansas City

82 541 447 500 564 398 43 640 315 480 164 321 457 335 411

Jackson Jacksonville Jacoby Jameson Jamesport Jasper Jefferson Jennings Jerusalem Jewel Joachim Jonathan Jonesburg Joplin Joppa

Linneus ..Jacksonville Darlington ..Jameson Jamesport Jasper JeffersonCity Jennings Jerico Springs Pleasant Hill Hillsboro Denver Jonesburg .Joplin Hartville

220 311 329

Kansas City Kearney Kennedy

Kansas City Kearney Elmo

.Miller 'Scott Jackson Cass Howell Miller St. Francois Washington Jackson

38 50 59 34 53 58 48 .40 33-A 22

J Linn 13 .Randolph 18 Gentry 6 .Daviess 10 Daviess 10 Jasper 44 Cole 31 St. Louis 57 Cedar .42 Cass ..•............ 34 J efferson 40 Worth 6 Montgomery 28 ..Jasper 44 Wright 46

K

Jackson 22 Clay •.............. 11 Nodaway 7


140 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

68 Kennett 243 Keystone 376 King Hill 118 Kingston 264 Kirbyville 105 Kirksville 484 Kirkwood 245 Knobnoster 582 Koshkonong

Location of Lodge

County

1936 District

Kennett Dunklin 51 St. Louis ...........•................. 33·A St.Joseph Buchanan 9 Kingston Caldwell ..........• 12 Hollister Taney 54 Adair ............•• 2 ,Kirksville St. Louis .........•• 57 Kirkwood Knobnoster .•.....Johnson 36 ,Koshkonong Oregon 53

L 222 83 115 437 489 292 460 574 531 237 253 592 506 145 598 77 494 149 31 302 138 326 152 51 521 488 257 259 268 128 409 403

La Belle ..........•.La Belle Laclede Lebanon Laddonia Laddonia Lafayette Corder Lakeville Bell City Lamar Lamar St. Louis Lambskin La Monte La Monte Lane's Prairie Vichy La Plata La Plata Laredo ...•.........Laredo La Russell La Russell Lathrop Lathrop Latimer Licking Leadwood Leadwood Lebanon ...........•Steelville Lewistown Lewistown Lexington Lexington Liberty Liberty Lick Creek Perry Lincoln .Fillmore Linn Linn Linn Creek Camdenton Livingston .•.....•..Glasgow Lockwood Lockwood Lock Spring Lock Spring Lodge of Light Eagleville Lancaster Lodge of Love Lodge of Truth ...•..Atlanta Lorraine .Ridgeway Louisville Louisville Lowry City Lowry City

Lewis Laclede Audrain Lafayette Stoddard Barton .Pettis Maries Macon Grundy Jasper Clinton Texas St. Francois Crawford Lewis Lafayette Clay Ralls .Andrew Osage Camden Howard Dade Daviess , . Harrison. " .schuyler Macon Harrison Lincoln St. Clair

15 38 27 23 50 43 33·B 36 39 14 4 44 11 39 .48 39 15 23 11 15 9 31 38 25 42 10 5 1 14 5 29 37

M

433 91 . 626

Mack's Creek Madison Magnolia

Mack's Creek Camden 38 Madison .Monroe 17 St. Louis ...........................•. 33·A


1936 No.

112 406 402 543 566 481 110 390 569 324 146 260 458 16 628 313 35 2 85 244 42 516 567 151 471 1 639 344 144 612 129 295 64 490 246 58 408 603 184 351 558 294 614 158 637 382 476 439 40 99

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

141 District

Maitland Maitland Holt 8 Malden Malden Dunklin 51 Malta Malta Bend Saline 24 Wright 46 Mansfield Mansfield Maplewood Maplewood St. Louis 57 Marceline Marceline ,Linn 13 Marcus Fredericktown Madison .48 Marionville Marionville Lawrence 55 (Jackson Co.) Jackson 59 Marlborough McDonald lndependence Jackson 59 McGee College Mound Macon 14 St. Charles 30 Mechanicsville Howell Melville Dadeville Dade 42 Memphis Memphis Scotland 1 Mendon Mendon Chariton 19 Meramec Eureka St. Louis 57 Princeton. : Mercer 4 Mercer Meridian St. Louis 33-B Miami. ,Miami. Saline 24 Middle Fabius .-. Downing Schuyler 1 Middle Grove Middle Grove Monroe 17 Milford Milford Barton 43 Miller Miller Lawrence 55 Milton Milton Randolph 18 MineraL Oronogo J asper 44 Missouri St. Louis 33-A Mizpah St. Louis 33-B Moberly Moberly Randolph 18 Modern Humansville Polk 41 Mokane Mokane Callaway 27 Monett Monett Barry 55 Moniteau Jamestown Moniteau 31 Monroe Monroe City Monroe 17 Montevallo Montevallo Vernon 43 Montgomery Montgomery City .. Montgomery 28 Monticello Monticello Lewis 15 Montrose Montrose Henry 37 Morehouse :Morehouse New Madrid 50 Morley Morley Scott 50 Mosaic ..........••• Belleview Iron 48 Moscow Moscow Mills Lincoln 29 Mound City Mound City Holt . . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Mount Washington Mt. Washington Jackson 59 Mountain Grove Mountain Grove Wright .46 Mountain View Mountain View Howell 53 Mt. Ararat Topaz .Douglas .46 Mt. Hope Odessa Lafayette 23 Mt. Olive Rogersville, R. 3 Webster 45 Mt. Moriah St. Louis 33-A Mt. Vernon Mt. Vernon Lawrence ........•. 55


142 No.

327 221

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Mt. Zion Mystic Tie

Location of Lodge

West Plains Oak Ridge

County

1936 District

Howell ...•........• 53 Cape Girardeau 49

N

25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 372 643 157 358 622 181 583

Naphtali Naylor Nelson Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton New Hope New London New Madrid New Salem Nineveh Nodaway NoeL Nonpareil Northeast North Star Northwest Norwood Novelty Novinger

St. Louis 33-B Naylor Ripley 52 Nelson Saline 24 Neosho Newton 56 New Bloomfield Callaway 27 New Hampton Harrison 5 Elsberry Lincoln 29 New London Ralls 15 New Madrid New Madrid 51 Winfield Lincoln 29 Olney Lincoln 29 Maryville Nodaway 7 NoeL •........... McDonald 56 East Lynne Cass 34 Kansas City .Jackson 22 .Rockport Atchison 8 Tarkio ••......... Atchison 8 Norwood Wright 46 Novelty •......... Knox ............•. 2 Novinger Adair 2

o 163 134 576 139 546 518 303 317 7 624 297

OccidentaL St. Louis 33-A Olean Olean Miller 58 Olive Branch St. Louis 33·A Oregon Oregon Holt . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Orient Kansas City J ackson 22 OrientaL Blackburn Saline 24 Osage Nevada Vernon 43 Osborn Osborn De Kalb 10 0 'Sullivan Walnut Grove Greene 45 Owensville •......... Owensville •.......Gasconade 32 Ozark Fair Grove Greene 45 P

241 18 19 650 308 65 11 330

Palestine Palmyra Paris Union Parma Parrott Pattonsburg Pauldingville Paul Revere

St. Charles Palmyra Paris Parma Maysville Pattonsburg Wright City St. Louis

St. Charles Marion Monroe New Madrid De Kalb Daviess Warren

30 15 17 51 10 10 30 33-A


1936 No.

319 498 551 92 502 136 472 399 652 182 314 469 504 113 160 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 166 242 131 556 503 179 657 148 658 190 596 180 383

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Paulville Pee Dee ~ Pendleton Perseverance Philadelphia Phoenix Pickering Pike Pilgrim Pilot Knob Pine Plato Platte Cit)· Plattsburg Pleasant Pleasant Grove Pleasant Hope Point Pleasant Polar Star Pollock Polo Pomegranate Poplar Bluff Portageville Portland Potosi. Prairie Prairie Home Pride of the West Progress Purdy Purity Putnam Puxico Pyramid Pythagoras

Location of Lodge

County

143 District

Hurdland Adair .............• 2 Musselfork Chariton 19 Doe Run St. Francois .48 Louisiana. Pike 16 Philadelphia Marion 15 Bowling Green Pike 16 Pickering Nodaway 7 Curryville Pike 16 St. Louis 33-B Richville Douglas .46 Bardley Ripley 52 Plato Texas 46 Platte City Platte 21 Plattsburg Clinton 11 Morrisville Polk 41 Otterville Cooper 25 Pleasant Hope Polk 41 Conran NewMadrid 51 St. Louis 33-B Pollock Sullivan 3 Polo Caldwell 12 St. Louis 33·A Poplar Bluff Butler 52 Portageville New Madrid 51 Readsville Callaway 27 Potosi. •.•....... Washington .40 Gilman City Harrison 5 Prairie Home Cooper 25 St. Louis 33-B St. Louis 33·B Purdy Barry 55 St. Louis 33-A Newtown Sullivan . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 Stoddard 50 Puxico St. Louis 33-A Cassville .Barry 55 Q

380 196

Queen City Quitman

Queen City Quitman

Schuyler ........... 1 N odaway 7

R

478 33 201 223 451 391

Racine Ralls Ravenwood Ray Raymore Raytown

Seneca Center Ravenwood Camden. " Raymore Raytown

Newton Ralls Nodaway Ray Cass Jackson

56 15 7 23 34 59


144 No.

468 570 479 385 57 361 13 496 67 435 663 341 213 550 404 426 204 316 238 90 572

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

Red Oak Red Oak Republic Republic Rich Hill Rich Hill Richland Richland Richmond Richmond Riddick Buffalo Rising Sun Barry Robert Burns ,Gainesville Rocheport Rocheport Rockbridge Rockbridge Kansas City Rockhill Rockville Rockville Rolla Rolla St. Louis Rose Hill R,osendale Rosendale Rothville Rothville Rowley Dearborn RuraL Kansas City Rushville Rushville Russellville Russellville Rutledge ....•...... Rutledge

County

Lawrence Greene Bates Pulaski Ray Dallas Platte .ozark Boone Ozark .Jackson Bates Phelps Andrew Chariton Platte Jackson Buchanan Cole Scotland

1936 District

55 45 35 38 23 41 21 53 26 53 22 35 39 33-A 9 19 21 22 9 31 1

S

225 226 208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448 126 2315 517 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 304 310 75 511 266

Salem Salem Dent 39 Ste. Genevieve .48 Saline St. Mary's Salisbury Salisbury Chariton 19 Samaritan Bonne Terre St. Francois 48 Lutie Ozark ..•........... 53 Sampson Santa Fe Santa Fe Monroe 17 Jasper 44 Sarcoxie Sarcoxie Savannah Savannah Andrew ..........•. 9 Saxton Saxton Buchanan 9 Schell City Schell City Vernon 43 Seaman Milan Sullivan 3 Sedalia Sedalia Pettis 36 Barry 55 Seligman Seligman Senath Senath Dunklin 51 Shamrock .shamrock Callaway 27 Shaveh St. Louis 33-A Warsaw Benton 36 Shawnee Sheffield Kansas City .Jackson 22 Shekinah Festus Jefferson 40 Shelbina Shelbina Shelby 14 Sheldon Sheldon Vernon 43 Signal .Mindenmines Barton 43 Scott 50 Sikeston Sikeston Silex •.............. Silex •............Lincoln 29 Skidmore Skidmore Nodaway 7 Martinsburg Audrain 27 Social.


1936 No.

271 206 200 547 466 296 524 155 96 273 588 234 230 28 78 20 93 109 419 133 634 538 523 283 608 174 69 555 263 617

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

145 District

Solomon .•..........Springfield Greene 45 Putnam ........•.•• 3 Somerset '.' Powersville Sonora Watson Atchison 8 South Gate Kansas City J ackson 22 Southwest Southwest City McDonald ........•. 56 Sparta Sparta Christian 54 Spickardsville Spickard Grundy 4 Spring Hill Spring Hill Livingston 12 St. Andrews Shelbyville Shelby 14 St. Clair Osceola St. Clair 37 St. Francisville Wayland Clark 1 St. Francois Libertyville St. Francois 48 St. James St. James Phelps 39 St. John's Hannibal Marion •........... 15 St.Joseph St.Joseph Buchanan 9 St. Louis St. Louis 33-B St. Mark's .•.......•Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau ...• .49 Stanberry Stanberry Gentry ...........• 6 Star Taberville St. Clair 31 Star of the West Ironton : . Iron •.....•........ 48 Steele Steele ..........•. Pemiscot •......... 51 Stella Stella Newton 56 Stinson Stinson Lawrence 55 Stockton ,Stockton .......•..Cedar 42 Strafford Strafford Greene ..........•.. 45 Sturgeon Sturgeon Boone 26 Franklin 32 Sullivan Sullivan Summersville Summersville Texas 46 Summit Lee's Summit Jackson ..........•. 59 Swope Park Kansas City J ackson 22 T

565 Tebbetts Tebbetts Callaway .........•. 27 . 438 Temperance Smithville Clay 11 299 Temple K ansas City J aekson 22 177 Texas Houston Texas .46 661 Theodore Roosevelt .. St. Louis 33-A 56 Tipton Tipton ...•....... Moniteau 31 631 Tower Grove St. Louis ...................•..•...... 33-B 111 Trenton Trenton Grundy ........•... 4 638 Triangle .........•• .st. Louis .........••..•..••........... 33-A Marshall Saline 24 205 Trilumina St. Louis ...........•................. 33·A 641 Trinity 122 Triplett Triplett Chariton 19 440 TroweL Marble Hill. Bollinger .49 34 Troy Troy Lincoln 29 360 Tuscan St. Louis 33-A 114 Twilight Columbia Boone 26 Johnstown Bates 35 350 Tyrian 12 Tyro Caledonia ,Washington .40


146

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1936

U No.

593 124 210 5 495 649 421 286 413 629 509 491 493 452 320 94 62

Name of Lodge

Union Union Star Unionville United Unity University Urbana Urich Valley Valley Park Van Buren Vandalia Vernon Verona Versailles Vienna Vincil

Location of Lodge

Union Union Star Unionville Springfield Richards University City Urbana Urich Bolckow Valley Park Van Buren Vandalia Bronaugh Verona Versailles Vienna Cameron

County

District

Franklin 32 De Kalb 10 Putnam 3 Greene .45 Vernon 43 .st. Louis 57 Dallas .41 Henry 37 Andrew 9 St. Louis 57 Carter .47 Audrain 27 Vernon 43 Lawrence 55 Morgan 58 Maries •............ 39 Clinton 11

W 348 52 605 456 627 74 609 87 61 526 375 235 512 98 84 22 613 194 46 445 103 396 15 53 340 202 434 301 417

Wadesburg Wakanda Walker Wallace Wallace Park Warren Warrenton Washington Waverly Wayne Waynesville Weatherby Webb City Webster Webster Groves Wellington Wellston Wellsville Wentzville West Gate West View Western Light Western Star Weston Westport Westville Wheeling White Hall Whitewater

Creighton Cass 34 Carrollton Carroll 20 Walker Vernon 43 Bunceton Cooper 25 Wallace Buchanan 9 Keytesville Chariton 19 Warrenton Warren 30 Greenfield Dade 42 Waverly Lafayette 23 Piedmont Wayne 52 Pulaski 38 Waynesville Weatherby De Kalb 10 Webb City .Jasper .44 Marshfield Webster 45 Webster Groves St. Louis 57 De Kalb Buchanan 9 St. Lonis 57 Wellston Wellsville Montgomery 28 St. Charles 30 Wentzville St. Louis .................••.......... 33·D Millersville Cape Girardeau 49 Louisburg Dallas .41 Winston Daviess 10 Platte 21 Weston Kansas City .Jackson 22 Westville Chariton 19 Livingston 12 Wheeling Barnard Nodaway 7 Whitewater Cape Girardeau 49


1936

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

147

v No.

Name of Lodge

162 Whitesville 620 Willard 370 Williamstown 191 Wilson 29 Windsor 540 Winigan 430 Winona 277 Wm. D. Muir 387 Woodside 24 Wyaconda

Location of Lodge

Whitesville Willard Williamstown Pocahontas Windsor Winigan Winona Pilot Grove Thomasville La Grange

County

District

Andrew 9 Greene 45 Lewis 15 Cape Girardeau ...•. 49 Henry 37 Sullivan 3 Shannon 47 Cooper 25 Oregon 53 Lewis 15

x 50

Xenia

Hopkins

Nodaway

7

y 563

york

Kansas City

Jackson ..........•. 22

Z

545 189

Zalma Zeredatha

Zalma St. Joseph

.Bollinger 49 Buchanan ......•..• 9


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT FIRST DIS'l'RIOT-HAROLD M. JAYNE, D. D. G. M., Memphis, Mo. "Cl

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

"Cl

"Cl

III

~

...

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~:s ~~~ ::sOl A>( •.., III

:5til

:§ < ~ Q A A rn rnf;l:l~ Revere, 167 ........ · .. 1· .. 1· .. 1.. 1.. ·1 31 21 11 41· ·1· ·1·· Fairmount, 290 •••.. 31 31 31 .. 1· .. [ 61 1[ 11 21 .. 1.. 1.. 5[ 51 51· ·1·· ·1··· ·1·· .J .•. J... ·1· ·1· ·1·· Eldorado, 318 ..•••. Hiram, 862 •.••.••• 31 31 21 1 1... 1 11 21 3 1"''1'.1 .. 1.. Gothic, 436 •.•.••••• "'1' .. 1... 1.. 1... 1 81· .. 1.. ·1 2 .. ).. 1.. St. Francisville, 588 • • " . . . 1 . . ·1 .. 1 11 41 11 .. ·1 .... 1. . 1··1 .. Memphis, 16 .•••••• ~ Gorin, 72 •••••••••• If>. Rutledge, 672 •••••• 31 31 3 .. \... \ 11 31 11 21 .. 1.. 1.. 00 Middle Fabius, 244 .• 21 1[ 2 .... ·1 41· .. 1 21 1.. 1.. Lodge of Love, 259 .. 2 21 21 4 1 21 .... 1 11 .. ·1 6 .. 1.. 1.. Queen City, 380 •..• 11 1 11 11 11 61 11 .. ·1 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Glenwood, 427 ••••.• ... [... 1... 1"1 I . . . 1 11 3 1 ''1'.1 .. t Greentop, 635 ..... · .. I.. ·1 .. ·1 .... , .... I.. ·1· .. 1.... 1.... I.. TOTAL ........ 251 221 211 11 1 81 421 121 131 371 .. 1.. 1.. lIS ~

<II

III

·.'\..'\.·'1 i\.. '1 ....\.. '1 ..'\. .. 'I::I::I:: 101 ..

l·..

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721

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94.501$ ..... 1$ .... \$ 98.701 ...... 1 .....

151.201 ...... 1.... ·1

94.50\$ 98.70

gj2

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6.30 $ 12.M

151.20 1.......

96 32 52 1681 561 551

201.601 ...... ! ..... 1 67.20/ ...... 1 . '.' . . 109.20 2.101· .... 1 362.801 6.301· .... 1 117.601· .. ···1 ..... 1 115.501 ...... 1 ..... 1

201.601 2.10 67.201 16.80 111.301 8.40 359.10 18.90 117.601 ....... 115.601 2.10

112 50

236.201 106.00

239.401 ... , ... 107.101 12.60

761

167.'01 ...... 1..... 1

... ~~I ....8.1:~~1

4.201 ..... / 2.101 ..... 1

6:~~1

167.601

';

'.40

I ... ~.8:~~1

tl/; 41

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0

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88.201$ ...... J$ 86. 10 1 ·······1 151. 20 1 .······1 199.60 ....... 1 60.401 ... · .. ·1 102. 90 1 .. · . . . . 1 340.20 .....•. 117. 60 1 . . · . . . . 1 113.40 ....... 1 149.101 ....... 1

239.401 ....... 1 94.50 .... ···1

~.= ~

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20.001$ '" .. ·1$ ..... 41.00 ....... 1 ...... 164.60 1 . . . . . . ·1 ...... 646.00 ....... [ ...... 89.001 .. · .... 1 ...... 440.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . 218.001 .. · .... 1 . . . . . . 168.00\ ....... \ ...... 77.60 •...... 1 •••••• 60.001 .. · .... 1 ...... 117. 76 1 ••••••• 1...... 78.50t ..... ··1 ...... 48.00. , ..... 1 ••••••

88.20 ... . . . . ... ::::: ::::::: ........ ....... 1 ........ 1 ....... 1 ...... 8991$ 1,887.901$ 21.001$ .... 1$ 1,908.901$ 88.20 $ 1,820.701$ ...... 1$ 2,167.251$ ...... 1$ .....

SECOND DISTRICT-WILLIS J. BRAY, D. D. G. Mo, Kirksville, Mo.

1" 001

'I

39.90 $ 606.901$ ...... 1$ Nonel$ ...... 1$ ..... Ki",svm., 106...... "I 17 21 19 1 21 301·t·I.. .0611 '42.001' 4.2011 .... I 646.801$ 134.401 ....... 134.401 ....... 1 47.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . Paulville, .319....... 31 3 3 2 ......... ·1 1 51 .... I.. 641 134.401 ...... I .... 48.30 312.001 ....... 1 ...... 674.101 ....... 1 Adair, 366......... 27/ 27 4/ 23 61 31 344 722.401 ...... I .... 722.401 14.70 140.70 Novinger,583 ...... 1 1[ ..... 111 7 8111 8 .. 1. . . . 66 138.6 0 1 2.10[ .... 126.001 .... · .. 1 280.001" .... ·1 ...... 123.90 8.40 ........ \ 116.501 300.00 ....... 1 ...... Ark, 6 ................ 1... I.. · .. 1... 1 41 .. · 51 231 .. 1.. 1.. 59 123.901 ...... 1 .... . . . . . . . . I . . . . . . ·1 ............ · .. 1 . . . . . . tColony, 168 ........ " ... 1..... 1... 1.... 1.. ·1· ...... 1.. 1.. 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I .... tNovelty,181. ......... 1 . . ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1· .. ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1 .. · ·1· ·1· ·1·· ..... . ............. \ .... .. ...... 1 .. · .... \ ....... ·1 .. ·· .. ·1 ...... 8.40 126.001 117.60 ....... 105.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . Edina,291 ......... 151 15/15 2/ ... 1 4/ 21 11 5\ .. 1.. 1.. 601 126.00/ .......... 149.101 ....... 149.10 ....... / 260.00/ •...... 1 •••••• Greensburg,414 .... 171 13 111.. 11.... 11 ....... 1.. 1.. 1.. 70 147.00 2.101 .... 9691$ 2,034.901$ 8.401$ '" 1$ 2,043.301$ 119.70 $ 1,808.101$ 115.601$ 1,304.001$ ...... 1$ ..... TOTAL ........ 771 761 701 51 81 671 141 16\ 781 .. 1.. 1 1

271

1/

'I'

t No

report received.

l'" '11

::::::::1 :::::::


THIRD DISTRICT-WALTER E.SINGLEY, D. D. G. M., Green City, Mo. Hartford, 171. ..... . . . J •• ·'···1 11 11· .··1···1 .. ·1 51· ·1· ·1.. Somerset, 206 •...•. 11 11 1111 1 1... 1 11··· ·1· ·1· ·1·· Unionville, 210 ••••. tLueerne, 894 •••... Humphreys, 32 •..•. 10 1 1 11··· ·1· ·1··1.. 11 11 11 .. 1... Seaman, 126 .•••••• 11 21 1 11... 61 11···1 21 .. J. ·1.. Green City, 169 ••.•. 6\ 4\ 2"1 11 91· .. \ 51 7\ .. j •• \. • Putnam, 190 •..•••. 4 21 11... . . 2 ... 1 61. ·1· ·1. . tPolIoek, 349 . .. . 1.. ·1·· ·1 1 1 1 ·1· ·1· ·1 Arcana, 389 ••.••... 51 41 41"1"'1 41 .. ·1 11····1··1··1.. Winigan, 640 .••.• 71 71 9.. 1 21 11 11 .. ·.1 .. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 261 221 201 41 61 401 21 171 201 .. 1•• 1· .1

.. ~l..l.~ .~l .. ~

~I:::I ..:I::::I::I::I::

85 $ 42

73.601$ 88.201

.. ~~~ ...2.9.1:~~

2.101$ 2.101

4:~~1

1$ 1

75.601$ 4.20 $ 90. 80 1..

2.9.6:~~I l~:~~

:::::/ ... 106.00 1 1 106.001 1 340.201 1 840.201 142.801 2. 10 1 ·1 144.901 231.00. . . . .. . 1 231.001 1 1 1 ••·•• .. ·1·· 84 176.401······ .. ···1 176.401 69 144.90 2.101 ..... 1 147.001 7591$ 1,593.90/$ 12.601$ .... 1$ 1,606.501$

50 162 68 110

21.00 12.60 18.90 4.20

71.401$ ...... ,$ 90.301

2~.3:~~1

...

84.001 327.601 142.80 226.801 , 8.40 168.00 4.20 144.90 86.10' $ 1,539.301$

86.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 40.00 68.00, . 126.00 772.001' . 88.1>0 . 3.001· .. ·· .

..······1·· ....

••

385.001···· .. 32.00 . 1$ 1,598.001$ ..... ·1$ .....

FOURTH DISTRICT-eLYDE E. EVANS, D. D. G. M., Trenton, Mo. I-' ~ (0

Trenton, I l l ....... Laredo, 258 •••••.•. Galt, 423 ........... Spiekardsville, 624 •• Mercer, 86 •••.•.••• TOTAL ........

11

I'I

11 51

41 11 21 .. 1... 1 1 .. 1.. ·1 3\28\ 2\ 71331 71

···J···'···I··I 11 11 6\ 91

11 11 3\ 61

781 51 31 21 42 1... I 11· .. I 15\ 1\ 1391 81

81 11· 31· 41 3\ 19 1

13 1. ·1· ·1· . .. ·1· ·1· ·1· . .. ·1 .. 1.. 1.. 14 1 4\ .... \ .. 3 11.. 1.. 1..

.'!'.I..

317 $ 665.701$ .... ·1$ .. "1$ 665.701$ 163.80 $ 601.901$ ...... 1$ 390.001$ .... "1$ ..... 59 126.001 6.30 128.901 2.101· .... 116.001 ............. 119.701 ....... 1 108 216.301 88.20 487.001 ....... J...... 128.101 ....... 1 216.301 .. · .. ·1 ··· .. 1 30 2.10 30 58 200.001 ....... 1 •••••• 111. 1 .. · .. ·1 .... ·1 109.20\ ....... 1 111. 1 432.60 81.60 401.10 ....... 204 428.40\ 285.001 ....... 1 ...... 4.201· .... I 7361$ 1,545.601$ 6.301$ .... 1$ 1,551.901$ 291.90 $ 1.260.001$ ...... 1$ 1,478.001$ ...... 1$ .....

FIFTH DISTRICT-HENDRIX NEWMAN, D. D. G. M., Bethany, Mo. Bethany, 97 .•••••• 11 .. ·i .. ·/ .. 1.. ·1 51 11 41 51 .. 1.. 1.. 99 $ Lorraine, 128 •••... 21 21 21 .. \ 31 2\ ... 1 11 1\ .. \ .. \.. 66 Lodge of Light, 257 . .. . 1.. ·1 .. ·1 .. 1.. ·1· .. ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1 .. · ·1· ·1· ·1.. 40 Cainesville, 328 .••.. 21 41 41 .. 1.. ·1 11 11 21 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 33 New Hampton, 610. 11 11 1 .. 1.. ·1 11 11 .. ·1 21 .. 1.... 36 Prairie, 556 .•...•.. ... 1 I 111 1 11 21 1 11 .. 1 . . 1.. 33 TOTAL ........ 61 71 71 11 31 101 51 71 91 .. 1.. 1.. 2961$ ... Credit T No report received. • Credit $16.80. Credit $2.10.

*.

207.90 $ 116.50 84.00· 69.30 76.60 69.80 621.60/$ .90.

..... 1$ 8.501$ 6.301..... .... · ·1 2.10/ 1 1 1 1 1 8.401$ 8.501$

199.40j$ 10.50 $ 121.80 4.20 84.0 0 71.40 ....... 75.60 2.10 69.301 2.10 621.601$ 18.90 $

1.......

188.90 $ 1$ 633.001$· 117.60 \ 123.331 84.00 ·1 320.1>01· 72.30 100.001 73.50....... 60.001 67.20....... 64.001 603.501$ .. · ... 1$ 1,300.331$

I

·1$ ···\

.. .

·1·

·· .

I

1 1$

..

.

..


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued SIXTH DISTRICT-CURTIS F. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Darlington, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

] .~ ... ]

~~ ~ gj

Po.

QI

.~

~ 'i 2

~

S

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Qj .~ ~ ia·~

~ 0

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.s ~en ~en ~QI otl

~ Q 0 0 1.. ·1· ·1 .. ·1· .. ·1· .. 1·· ·1

&! :;:

2

al ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.. 1··1·· Po

Ql

Po

Po •..,

Havana, 21. 1 Stanberry, 109..... 31 21 21 11 .. ·1 151· .. 1 11 1.. 1··1·· Gentryville,125.... 1 11 11 .. 1... 1 31···J 11 1.. 1.. [.. Athens, 127........ 31 2/ 21 2/ 31 2\ 11 51 81 .. 1.. /· . Alanthus, 252...... . .. 1 1· 1 6 5 31 21·· .. I•• 1.. 1.. Ancient Craft, 377.. 21 11 41··/ 11 41···1 31 31 .. 1.. 1.. Berlin, 378 1 1.. 1 11 .. · ·1· .. 1···1· .. ·1 .. 1.. 1.. Jacoby, 447 J.. 1 2J 71· .. ·1 11 11 .. ··[ .. 1.. 1·· 51 5 41 .. 1· .. 1 11· .. 1.. ·1 3; .. 1.. 1.. ~ Grant City, 66...... c:.n Defiance, 88........ 1 2 3 11 4[ 21 ... j ••• , 61 .. 1 . . [ . . o tAlIensville, 198 1 1. ·1 J '1" '1 1 I.. ,. Jonathan, 821. I I /.. I· .. I 2 ·1· I·· .. .. TOTAL. .. ...•. 151 131 161 61 221 341 51 131 201 .. 1.. 1. .

'j

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77. 70 1$ ··1$ ·· .. 1$ 77. 70 1$ ,. $ 77.70\$ · .. 1$ 230.001$· .. ···1$ . 189.{)01 1 189.001 31.50 157.50 1 None \ .. 84.001 .. · .. ·1··· .. 1 84.001 6.30 77.70 1 1 98.501 ' . 216.301 6.301 2.70/ 219.90/ 4.20 215.7°1' ....•. 1 None / . 63.00 12. 60 1••.•. 1 75.601 10.50 65.10 1 100.001 \ . 189.001 2.10 1 ..... 1 191.101 8.40 182.70 \ 213.761 1 ··· 63.001 2.101 .. ·.. 65. 10 1....... 65.101 1 28.001···· J . 107. 10 1 · .. 1 1 107.10....... 107.10 1 320.001 .. ··· .. 1· . 117.601 1 1 117.601 2.10 115.50 .·· 1 65.~01·······1······ 113.401 8.40 1 121.80 4.20 117.601....... 96.99 1 ...... 1 •.. •• .. ·1 •.. 1 .. · ·1 • , I ) ·1 .. •• .. 341 71.401 / 1 71.401 4.20 44.10 28.101 None / . 6151$ 1,291.501$ 31.501$ 2.701$ 1,320.301$ 71.40 $ 1,225.801$ 23.101$ 1,152.251$ 1$ . 37 1$ 901 401 1031 301 90 301 511 561 541

'1" ..·..

Xenia, 50 •••••.•... Quitman, 196 ....•. Ravenwood, 201 .... Graham, 289 ••..... White HalI, 801. . Kennedy, 329 . Burlington, 442 .••• Gaynor City, 465 .... Nodaway, 470 ..••.. t Pickering, 472 .... Guilford, 474 ..•..•. t Clearmont, 507 .... Skidmore, 511. •.•.. TOTAL .

t No report received.

SEVENTH DISTRICT-GEORGE HOUCHENS, D. D. G. M., Ravenwood, Mo. 1161$ 243.601$ .. · .. 1$ ... ·1$ 243.601$ 16.80 $ 226.80[$

41 21 21 .. 1.. ·1 8J 21 11· 1· ·1 .. 1.. 1/ ... 1... 1.. 1 [... 1 11 1.. 1•• 1.. ... .. • j .. ·I··I /.... 1/ ... / 1.. 1.. 1.. ... 1.. ·j ... I.. I.. ·1 11· .. 1 21 151 .. / .. '.. 11 I! 11 .. 1... 1 4 1... \ 2 ...... 1.. 1.. ...... 1· .. 1 11 .. ·1 31... 21 61 .. [.. 1.. .. . 1 1 1.. 1.. ·1 1 11 11 131"1"1" ... 1 1 1.. 1 31· 1 11 .. ·/ .. ·· .. I....

'j ...

371 93/ 40\ 33 26 25 25

77.701· 195.30/ 84.00\ 69.80 54.60 52.5il 52.50

..:I..:I.. :I.~I .. ~I .. ~~i:::I .. ~I ... 3/\:I::I:: .. ~~~ ...5.5.6:~~ .. 1.. / 1/ "'1 1 1.. 1.. ·1 . 1.. ·1· .1 .. ·1 151 121 121 51 51 .. • 1

/

61 ... 1 11 1· .. 1···1 61 1.. ·1 431 51 151

1.. /..

1.. 1.. 1 81· .1· ·1· . 531 .. 1•• 1.. 1

42

88.20

..

,....

I

77.701·· 195.30/ .. 84.001 2.10 69.301 8.40 54.601 6.30 52.501··..... 52.501·· ·

,....

I....

I ...5.5.8:~~1 ····1 ..·.. \ I· ~:~~I :::: 2.101 ....

I

90.30/

48 100.80. . . . .. 100.801 75 0 1$ 1,575.001$ 4.201$.·· .1$ 1,579.201$

3.1:~~

12.60

1$ 77.701· 1 195.301 1 ........ 81.901 60.901 ....... 1 ........ 1 48.301 52.501 .... ···1 52.501· .. ····1

5~.7:~~1

...

77.70/

,

:::::::1

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.

I ·.. 1

..

12.60 88.20. . . . . . . 500.00 1 . 90.301 $ 1,358. 7~1$ 130.201$ 2,900.481$ ..... ·1$ .....


EIGHTH DISTRICT-FRED H. BINDER, D. D. G. M., Bigelow, Mo. NorthStar. 157 •.... Sonora. 200........ Northwest. 358 Fairfax, 483....... Maitland.112...... Oregon. 139........ Forest City. 214 ..... Mound City, 294.... Craig, 606......... TOTAL

21 11

21 21 ..-1.-.-.\-21 ... 1 31 .... 1.. 1•• 1.. 1 11' .1... 1 · .. 1·· ·1 .. ··1 .. 1·· .. 1.. ·1 .. · . ·1···1 11···1 21 51· ·1 .. 1.. 3 31 31 .. 1 21 3\ 21 2 111 .. 1.. 1.. 1 1 ... 1.. 1 1 3 1 11 41··1 .. 1.. 2 1 11 .. , 1.... \ 1... 1 Ii· ·1 .. 1•• 1 2 2\"1"'1 6 \ 21 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 4 4 2..... 6 1 1 61 .. 1.... 1 1 1 1 31 .. 1.. 1.. 141 141 11/ .. 1 31 221 41 12/ 301 .. 1.. 1..

1.......

1001$ 210.001$ ·1$ ·1$ 210.001$ 4.20 $ 205.801$ 321 67.201 I ·1 67.201 2.10 65. 10 67 140.701 I ··1 140.701 2.10 138.60 .. · 78 163.801 4.201 1 168.001 6.30 161.70 55\ 115.501 ...... \ 1 115.501 6.30 109.20 651 136.501· .. · .. 1 ·\ 136.501 ....... 136.50 1 751 157. 50 8.401 149.10\ 12.60 136.501. . . . .. 91 191.10 " •••.. 191.10 12.60 178.50\ 46 96.60 2.10.. .. . 98.70 I ....... 98.70 6091$ 1,278.901$ 6.301$ 8.401$ 1.276.801$ 46.20 $ 1,230.60/$

1'" ,

\$

300.001$·· ·1$ 197.60\ · 1 1 35.001 1 1 8.001 1 I 184.001 · .. 1 \ 404.001 ·· .. 1 . 275.001 1 1 302.50\ 1 I 156.50 I 1 /$ 1,862.60/$ /$

. . ..

.. .. ..

. ..

.. •••..

NINTH DISTRICT-RICHARD F. ESDERS, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph, Mo. f-I 01 f-I

'1$

Savannah, 71...... 5\ 51 6.. 31 61· .. 1 21·· .. 1.. 1.. 1.. 1671$ 350.701$ 10.501$ .. , Helena, 117........ 1 1 1...... . .. 11 1 31 .. 1.. 1.. 24 50.401 I 49 102.901 1 \ Lincoln, 188 •••.•..... 1. . . 1........ 51 ... 1 1.... 1.. 1 . . 1.. 52 109.201 1 .. ···1 Whitesville, 162..... 1 11 1 1... 11 11 .. ·1 81 .. 1"11 39 81.901 1 ..... \ Rosendale, 404...... . .. 1 •• 1 1 .. ·1 ... I 21 .. 1.... 49 102.901 1 .·· .. 1 Valley, 413 1 ·1 11· .. 1 21 21 .. 1· ·1 .. 69 123.901' ··1 .···.1 Cosby. 600......... 3 1111 1 11 ... 1 11 31 .. 1.. 1.. i3 195.30 4.201 ..... \ Agency, 10......... 2 2 2.. 51101 11 ... 1 71 .. 1.. 1 •• Wellington, 22..... 2 2 2.. 1 71 11 2\ 31 .. 1.. 1.. 57 119.70 2.101 4.131 St. Joseph, 78...... 16 12 8.. 5 3 21 71 111 .. 1.. 1 498 1,035.301 23.101 1 Binning, 150....... 2 2..... 1 51 11 41· ... 1.. 1 • 56 117.60 2.101 1 783 1,639.30. 18.901 \ Zeredatha,189..... 51 7 6 1 9 211 31 91 331 .. 1 . . 1.. 85 178.50 ..... ·1 •..•. 1 Rushville.238...... 61 5 6 1... 31 11 ... /.... 1.. \.. \ .. 255 535.50 6.30 1 ..... \ Brotherhood,269... 9 8 10 2 2 51 11 6 61 .. 1.. 1 1 93111.965.10 6.301. . . . . Charity, 831....... 17 18 17 7 3 111 51 91171 .. 1. . 1 . . King Hill. 876...... 9 11 9 .. 6 5 2 4 61 .. 1.. 1.. 233 489.30 12.601· 1 Saxton, 508........ 5 5 6... • • 1 .,. ••• .... .. I •• 1•• 47 98.70 ...... / / 27 66.70........... Wallace Park, 627 ......••.•.. " •.. . ...•..••..... 1.. 1.. 1•• TOTAL ........I 881 801 741121 351 861 191 461 1011 .. 1.. 1 8 3,4491$ 7.242.901$ 86.101$ 4.131$

'1'" .. ·..

.I. .

361.201$ 12.60 $ 50.401 102.901 10.50 10,9.201 2.10 81.901 2.10 102.901 2.10 123.901 2.10 199.601 21.00 117.671 14.70 1,058.401 6.80 119.701 10.50 1,568.20\ 44.10 178.601 6.30 541.801 10.50 1.961.40\ 23.10 501.901 10.50 98.701 2.10 66.701 7.324.871$ 180.601$

348.601$····· ·1$ 140.001$· .... ·1$ . 60.40 .. · 1 96.00·······1 . 92.40.. . . .. . 168.001 j •••••• 107.10 .. · 1 60.001 · .. · .. ·1 .. 79.80 I 130.001· 1 .. 100.80 1 105.001· ··1 . 121.80 1 165.001" ·1 .. 178.50 1 172.00 1 .. 102.97·······1 92.001 .. 1 1,052.10 ....... 1 660.00 ·1 .. 109. 20 1 276.951 ·1 .. 1,514.10 1 867.201· 1 .....• 172.201 \ 160.001· · ·1 . 531.30....... 417.501 1 .. 1.938.301' . . . . . . 472.101 · 1 ....•• 491.40. . . . .. . 480.001 1 .. · . 96.601....... 245.001 .•...•..•..•• 45.00 11.70 58.501 .. 7,132.571$ 11.701$ 4,764.251$ 1$ .

1".. ·..


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TENTH DISTRICT-THOMAS D. WILLIAMS, D. D. G. M., Maysville, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER

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Union Star, 124..... 11 2[ 2i· ./ [ 51"'1 11 .... 1· ·\ .. 1.. Weatherby. 235 1 1 1.. 1 1 21 .. · 21 16 1.. 1.. 1.. Parrott, 308....... 41 2/ 1/1 1 21 21 11 21 31 .. 1.. 1.. Osborn, 317........ 11 2 3 21 11 31 ... 1 21 21 .. 1.. 1·· Continental, 454... . .. I· . ·1 ... [. ·1 .. ·1 11 11· • ·1· ... [. ·1· ·1· . Clarksdale, 559..... .. ·1 ... I.. ·1· ·1 .. ·1 3\ 21·· ·1· .. ·1· ·1· ·1· . Western Star, 15 ..•. ···1·· '1 ... 1.. 1 [ 251···1···1····1··1··1·· Pattonsburg. 65..... 11 1 11· ·1 [.. 001 ... 1 11· .. ·1 .. 1··1 .. Gallatin. 106....... 41 41 41 .. 1 11 71 1/ 21 .. ··1 .. 1.. 1·· Altamont, 108 1 1 100 100.1 41 .. ·1 31 13 1. ·1 .. 1.. Earl, 285 I I 1.. 1.. ·1 1.. ·1 11·· .. 1.. 1· ·1 .. Lock Spring, 488. . • 11 11 11 .. I 1[ 1· .. 1 11· .. ·1 .. 1.. I.. Jameson, 500...... 2 2 21 .. 1... 1 21 11 .. ·1 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Jamesport, 564 1.. ·1 .. 1.. ·1 81 11 21 11··1 .. 1.. TOTAL ........ I 141 141 141 31 51 621 71 17 1 351 .. 1.. 1··

Liberty, 31 •••••.••. Holt, 49 •.•.• , ••••. Angerona, 193 ••••• Clay, 207 •••••••••• Kearney, 811 ••••••• Temperance, 438 ••• Hemple, 87 •••••••• Vinci!. 62 .......... Plattsburg, 113 ••••. Gower, 897 ••••••••. Lathrop, 506 .•••••• TOTAL ........ •• Credit $4.30. •

21 11

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::;l 0 < ~ ...::I < ~ ~ ~. 79[$ 165.901$ ..... /$ .. , . 165.901$ 10.50 $ 155.401$ ~~I$ 94.501$ ., ... ·1$ . . 73.501 4.20 73. 601 . . I· ··1 ·······1 . 36[ 73.60\ .·····1 1441 302.40 12.601.. . .. 315.001 4.20 310.8{) 1 180.001 1 .. 371 77.701 6.301..... 84.001 6.30 77.70 1 50.001 .. · 1 .. 451 94.501 I ..... 94.501 2.10 92.40 1 205.001 · .. ·\ .. 44 92.401 1..... 92.401 6.30 ........ 86.10/ 170.001 1 .. 481 100.801 4.00[.... 104.801 52.50 52.30 ....... 1 190.001 ·1 .. 531 111.301 I 111.301 121.30/ • I Nonel ··1 . 1061 222.601 2.101.. 224.701 14.70 210.00 1 649.501 ·1 .. 471 98.701 1..... ,98.7{)1 8.40 90.301 1 Nonel ·I .. 491 102.901· ·.1 102.901 102.901 1 66.001 .······1 .....• 721 151.201 2.101. . . . . 153.301 151.201 2.101 385.501· ·.·1 . 61 128.101 1 .. .. . 128.101 4.20 123.90 I 258.831 · .. 1 . ..... 153.301 16.80 136.50 1 240.601 1 . 73 153.301 8931$ 1.875.301$ 27.101$ .. , .1$ 1,902.401$ 130.201$ 1,698.801$ 88.201$ 2,489.931$ 1$ .

ELEVENTH DISTRICT-EMSLEY C. JAMES, D. D. G. M., Plattsburg, Mo. 4 51 31 .... 1.. 1.. 1· . 178 $ 378.8{)1$ 10.501$ .... 1$ 884.80 1$ 8.40 $ 375.901$ 11 ... 151 51

11 11 .. 1... 1 18 1/ 11 .... 1· ·1 .. 1·· .. ·1· .. I.. ·1 .. 1.. ·1 .. ·· ..... ·1 .... 1 1.. 1.. 2\ 11 l · I ... 1 21 11 81 11 .. 1. . 1·· ........... 1···1 1 81 11 41· ·1 .. ... • .. 1.. ·1 .. 1.. ·1 81 .. ·1 4 .... 1.... I.. ... .. • 1... 1.. 1 21 11 ... 1... 1 21· ·1 .. 1.. 3 21 l.1 81 31 31· .. 1 91··1 .. 1. . ... ...... 11 ... 1 81 11 21 61 .. 1.. 1. . I.. ·1· .. ·1· .. I· .. I·· .. 1.. 1.. 1.. ... ... .. . 1.. 1... 1 21 11 11 111··1 .. 1·· 81 51 41 61 101 611 151 151 381 .. 1.. 1..

~

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...... 1$ 356.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 57 119.701 ...... 1 .... Nonel ..... ·.1·· .... 92.401 ....... 1 119.701 27.80 35 78.50 .....•. 725.001 ....... 1 ...... 78.501 .·..... 1 .. 00 73. 50 1 .. · . . . . 1 157 44.10 329.701 ...... I .... 329.701 285.60 ....... 1 260.001 ... ···.1 ...... 66 2.10 138.601 ...... 1 .... 188.601 132.501 ...... ·1 ....•• 186. 50 1 ...... ·1 16.80 103 199.50 ....... 1 216.801 ...... 1 .... 680.001 •...... 1 ...•.• 216.801 33 80 2.10 71.40 4.201 .... ....... 1 73.501 170.501 ... · .. ·1 ...... 69. 1 252.{)0 6.30 120 258.301 6.301 .. · . 262.001······ ·1, 175.001 ....... 1 .00 ... 16.80 0 174.30 ....... 91/ 191.101 191.1 1 . . . . . . 1 . . . . 164.001" .... ·1 ....•• 123.90 ....... 115.00 ....... 1 ...... 591 123.90 ...... 1 . . . . 123.901 .. · .... 4.20 25.80 89.70 21.50 ....... 1 •••••• 119.701 .......... 571 119.701 956!$ 2.007.601$ 21.001$ .. , 1$ 2,028.601$ 128.10 $ 1,810.801$ 89.701$ 2.799.501$ ...... 1$ ....•


TWELFTH DISTRICT-JOHN M. GALLATIN, D. D. G. M., Ch11licothe, Mo.

"'1

Kingston, 118 .•.... 78 $ 163.80 $ 1$ .. "1$ 163.8 0 1$ 12.60 $ \$ 151.20/$ Nonel$ 1$ . 2 61 11 21·· .. \· .1 .. \.. 5 6 6 4 1 25 51 11··· .1. ·1· ... Braymer, 185 ••••••• 104 218.40 2.101.. .. . 220.50/ 52.50 168.001 •.... , . 96.60\ 1 . Hamilton, 224 •••••• 110 281.00 6.301" .. . 287.30 25.20 212.10/ •.. , 1 150.00 1 •••••• 8 2 1 2 31 12 11 11 71 .. I· .I· . 1 2 1 1 1 3 31 121. ·1 .. \•• 79 165.90 2.10 ..... 1 168.001 2.10 165.90 I 182.651 I . Polo, 282 ••••••••••• ... 1 2 3..... 6 31 .. ·1 71· ·1 .. 1•• Breckenridge, 884 •. 101 212.10. .. .. . 2.101 210.001 12.60 197.401· 1 247.50 1 . Cowgill, 561. .•••••. 55 115.50 ...... ·····1 115.50. . . . . . . 115.501· 110.00 J . . 1 1 1 1 2 .. ·· .. ·1 11 ... ·1· ·1 .. Friendship, 89 ••••• 2 2 2 2 3 71 1 41··· .J .... 1•• 165 346.5{) 6.30 1 352.801 14.70 338. 1°1' . . . . . . 234.501 1 . Spring Hill, 165 ••••. .. . / .... ,. .. 1 1 85.701 6.30........ 29.40\ 50.001 1 . 17 35.70 1 31 1.. ·1 51·· .. I·· Benevolence, 170 ••• 1 1 1..... 11 1 11 .. · ·1 .. 1.. 1•• 94.50....... 76.901 1 . 46 96.601 1· 1 96.601 2.10 Chillicothe, 883 ••••• 1 81 .. ·1 21 IOj .. l· .j •• 1281 268.801 4.201 6.301 266.70j 16.80 259.90 ••• 270.0°1" ·1 .. 33 69.30. . . . .. •.... 69.30 39.90 29.40. . . . . . . 76.25 1 ....•. Chula. 888 ......... 1 ... .. ... 191 ... 1....... 1. . 1.. 1•• ...... Wheeling, 484 •••.•• 11'" 2 4···1 1 91 .. 1· ·1·· ... ... ::::: .... ... .. .. . ::::::: ~ t Dawn, 589 •....... . , I.. ·1 .. ·1·· .. 1.. 1.. 1·· ... TOTAL .. 171 151 161101 141 921 131 161 50J .. I.. I.. 9721$ 2,041.201$ 27.801$ 8.401$ 2,060.101$ 193.20 $1,698.401$ 180.601$ 1,494.301$ 1$ •...•

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THIRTEENTH DISTRICT-HERMAN D. TAGGART, D. D. G. M., Linneus, Mo.

t

...1' .....[... 1...1

1 •.. 10 10 4 4 2 2 1 1 4 3 221 20, • •• No report received.

Jackson, 82 ..••..•• Brookfield, 86 ....... CYPress, 227 .•••••• Bucklin, 233 .•••••• Dockery, 325 .•••••• Marceline, 481 ••••.. TOTAL ........

12 1.

·1· ·1··

10 2 7 81 11 41 15\""'1" 4 1 2 11"" 21 2 .. 1••.. 11 2 31 1. ·1 ..•• 1 1 8 111... 11 .. · ... 1.... 1.. 1.. 1•• 51 31 21 91 .. 1 . . 1•• 3 3 8 191 91 281 161 61 111 391 .. 1.. 1.. Credit $10.00. • Credit $2.10.

••

1$ ...... ·1$ ...... 1$ ..... 176.401$ 50. 40 1$ ... '1$ 226.80 1$ ...... $ 228.401$ 281.401 14.701 ..... 279.301 ....... 431.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . 296. 10 1 16.80 132.30 2.10 130.201 ....... 150.001· ...... 1 .. · ... 1 4.201 2. 10 1 2.10 142.80 16.80 1 ..... 68 159.60 1 157.501 ....... 21.001 ....... 1 ...... 130.20 62 2.10 130.201 ....... 166.001 ....... , ...... 132. 30 1 2. 10 1 .... 317.10 16.801 ..... 151 333.90 10.50 323.401 ....... None.............. 5611$ 1,178.101$105.001$ 2.101$ 1,281.001$ 33.60 $ 1,249.001$ ...... 1$ 758.001$ ...... 1$ ..... .. Credit $1.60. 84 1$ 134 1

.21 ,.0.20

·1


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-LUTHER E. WILHOIT, D. D. G. M., Macon, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Callao. 38.... ...... 2\· 11 11"",,1 51 11 11 91' ·1· ·1 .. Bloomington. 102... 2 2 2.. 1 5 •.. 2 \.. \ .. MeGee. 146 1\ 21 11 1.. Censer. 172........ 11 21 21.. 21 91 81 51 I·· La Plata. 287 ..... 4 41 41 .. 1 11 41 11 61····' I·· Lodge of Truth. 268. ... . .. 1.. ·1 11 1 I.. · ... .... ..1 .. 1.. Excello. 832........ 41 11 11 .. 1... 1 ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1.... ..I· ·1· . Elmer. 648 ·J I 1131· .. 1 31 1 1 1 \ .. 1.. 1 . . St.Andrews.96 \ 1. . . \ . . 1 11 13\ , 1\ 11 .. \ .. \ .. ..... Shelbina. 228...... 41 41 41 1\ , 811 21 .... 1.. 1. . . . Ol Hunnewell. 415 •••••... / •.. , ... ,.. 1 11 11 61. 1.. ~ Bethel. 537.. ...... 2 1 1 .. , 1.... 31 11 21 11 Clarence. 662.. . . . . . 5 21 1 2 1 81 4 1•• TOTAL ........ I 241 171 161 51 81 521 121 231 821 .. 1.. 1 1

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c:l ~ ~ ..:l -< ~ ~ 81/$ 170.101$·· ... 1$ 1$ 170.101$ 10.50 $ 159.601$ 1$ 340.001$ •.... ·1$ . 55 115.501 2.101" , 117.601 10.60 107.101' 1 20.00. . . . .. . . 86.10.. . . .. . 56.00.. . . . . . . 41 86.10 4.20 1 90.30 4.20 373.80 18.90 354.90 1 988.001" .. .. .. .. 176 369.60 4.20 •.... 1 117 246.70\ 2.10 1 1 247.801 8.40 241.10.· 222.50 . . 2.101' . . . . 94.501 •...... 94.50 1 25.00. . . . . . . . 44 92.40 86 75.601 .. J 75.601 ....... 75.60 I 68.30.. .. .. .. .. 66 117.601 · 1 117.601 6.80 111.80 100.001 .. .. ". 74 166.401 8.40 1 163.80 27.30 136.50.. .. 130.00. .. .. 107 224.701 1 1 224.701 16.80 207.90....... 190.001........ .. 37 77.701 1 1 77.701 2.10 77.601. 100.00 . . 32 67.201 2.10.. . .. 69.30 ....... 69.30 1 4.00 .. .. 561 117.601 ...... I . . . . . 1 117.60/ 4.20 118.40 1 150.001...... . .. 9121$ 1,915.201$ 26.201$ 1$ 1.940.401$ 109.201$ 1.834.901$ 1$ 2.398.801$ 1$ .

e5

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FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-DAVID A. LESLIE, D. D. G. M., Williamstown, Mo. Wyaconda. 24 ....•. Monticello. 58 ...•.• LaBelle, 222 .•....•. Craft. 287 ••••..... Williamstown. 370 •• Lewistown. 494 ••.•. Ewing, 577 .•••.••. Palmyra. 18 .. St. John's. 28 •••••.. Hannibal, 188 ..•.•. Philadelphia, 502 •.. Ralls. 83 .•••••••••• Lick Creek, 302 •.••• t New London, 307 .. TOTAL ........

6/ 61 61·· 4.. 11 51 41 · 31 1. .. I·· 5 31 31..... 2 1121 11231 1

., '1"

'1· ..,.. 1",1 1 11 11· ..

1 11 6

91 61

3

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.. 1 21 4. '1 .. 1.. 8 1... 5 , .. 8 1 4 1. . 5 5 1 6 ., . 4 1 ... 5 .. , .. 1.. 7 1 2 .. ·· 1.. 6 1 I.. 81 .. ·1 1 35 201 21 5 . 26 4 61 15 .....•

91 11 31 61 2 1 11 ..... 1 4\.. 1 13\ 3..... 3

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1

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1

81· ...6 ,.. 1..

3\ 1

6

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... .. ./.. ·1 ..... /.... I.. ·1· .. I.... 1.. / .. 1.. . .

80 $ 42 111 116 49 67 39 101 433 353 36 96

168.001$ 8.401$ .... 1$ 88.201' ., 1 ··· .. 1 283.10. .. .. 1 248.60 \ 1 102.901" .. I 119.70. .. . 1 81.90.. . .. 1 212.101' . . . .. • 1 909.30 6.301' 1 1 741.30 2.10 75.60 '1" .. ·1 201.60 2.10 1

~~~I 2.1.6:~~1

"I'

176.401$ ...... $ 88.20 6.30 233.101 6.30 243.601 10.60 102.90\ 8.40 119.70 I 14.70 81.901 12.60 212.101 16.80 915.601 42.00 743.401 54.60 76.601 203.701 27.30

I ...2.1.6:~~1

176.401$ ...... 1$ ,• 81.901 226.80 J 283.10 1 94.50 106.00.. . .. .. 69.80.. .. .. . 195.80. . .. . • . 878.60. . . . . . . 688.80. . .. . . . 76.60. . . . . . . 176.40.......

6:~~ 2.1.0:~~

"I

Nonel$ 115.751· 570.00.. .. 250.QO( None 840.00 None 270.001 126.00 653.001" 164.40 •... 268.00

2:~~1

1$

.

1

. .. .. .

.. / \

1

..

1

.

I

..

"'1

....

1 1

. ..

I::::::

... :::::: ::::: .... ... ::::::: •.... ::::::: 431 411 411 41 91 981 171 281 831 .. 1.. 1.. 1,6161$ 3,893.601$ 18.901$ 1$ 3,412.601$ 205.801$ 3,124.801$ 81.901$ Jf.759.151$ 1$ ....• t No report received. •• Credit $1.70. • Credit $2.00.


SIXTEENTH DISTRICT-WARREN H. MAY, D. D. G. M., LoUisia.na, Mo. Eolia. 14 ........... Clarksville. 17 •••••• Perseverance. 92 .•• Phoenix. 136 .•••••• Frankford, 192 ••••• Pike. 399 ••.•••••.• TOTAL ........

l"

1 .. 1••• 1 2 1 1.. ·1·· ·1··· ·1·· .. I.. 1 21 •.. 31 11·· .. \ 4 4 ...... ..I·· 2 " 1 119... ••• 2 41'" 3 4 .. 2... 1 ...... .... 81 101 101 61 31 521 ... 1 151 5J .. I··I ..

1 1 2 2 2

1 1 4 2 2

r

:: .. ~

l'r "1" ..

50 $ 105.001$ ..... 1$ .... 1$ 105.00\$ 44.10 $ 161.70 10.60 77 201 424. 20 1 23.10 235.20 18.90 109 228.90 6.30 •... 49 102.90 2.10 •.... 105.00 8.40 18 37.801 ........... 1 4.20 37.801 5041$ 1.068.401$ 10.501$ •... 1$ 1.068.901$ 109.20 $

161.7°1 ......1.... 422.10 2.,°1 .... ··'111

60.901$ ..... '1$ Nonel$ .... "1$ ..... 151.20 ... . . . . 112.001 •••.... • ••.•• 50.00 351.101 749.75 ....... 1 ...... 216.30 •••..•. 142.00·······1 ..•••• 96.60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ....... 1 ...... 33.60 . ....•. 1 None .••. ···1· ..... 608.601$ 351.101$ 1.003.751$ ...... 1$ .....

SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT-eHARLES S. mCKS, D. D. G. M., Monroe City, Mo. Paris Union. 19 ••••. 11 11 1/ .. Florida. 23 ••.•.••.. Middle Grove, 42 .... , ......... Monroe, 64 •••.••••. Madison, 91. ••••••. Santa Fe, 462 ••.•••. Holliday. 660 ..••..• .. ·1· .... · .. TOTAL ........ 31 31 31· ·1

... ,

... ·.. . 1· .. ·....

+-'

I:J1

~l

"r l . ·......

H 121.··1 41 l'l"" I 21 ... 1... 1· .. 1

.. '1 'I..I.· j l-l-·· . . 1..1..1.. ~ .. ~ ~::

31

21

1

2 .•...•.•.•

11 1 ... 1.... j .. , .. / .. 1 ...... 1 21 .. 1 . . 00 311 21 71 41 .. 1.. 1..

91 $ 16 27 70 29 48 281 3091$

191.1 0 1$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 33.60 ...... 1 ..... 1 56.70 • .. · .. 1 1

..

..

147.001 2.101·····1

60.90 4.20 ..... I 100.80 ...... 1 . . . . . 1 68.80 · .. · .. 1 .. ···1 648.901$ 6.301$ .... 1$

191.101$ 33.601 66.701 149. 10 1 65.10 100.801 58.801 655.20 1$

25.20 $ 4.20 2.10 4.20 4.20 23.10 2.10 65.10 $

m"T ······1$

29.40 ••..... 21.87 32.73 144.90 •..•••• 60.90/ ....... 77.70 ....... 56.70 ....... 557.371$ 32.731$

125.001$ ..... ·1$ ...... 25.00 •...... 1 ...••• 125.001 •...... 1 .... , . 265.95 ....... 1 .....• 60.00 •...... 1 •••••• 64.901 ....... 1 ...... None I ••••••• 1 •• · •.• 665.851$ ...... 1$ .....

EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT-TURNER D. BARNES, D. D. G. M., Moberly, Mo. Huntsville, SO •••••. Milton. 151. •••.••• Clifton Hill. 161 •... Moberly, 844 ••••••• Cairo, 486 •••••••••. Higbee, 527 ........ JacksonVille. 641. .. Clark, 610 ......... TOTAL ........

•.. 1 1 1 2 21 1 ..

1 1 ............ 21'°\'1 SI 61' ·1·I.... '1" 1.... 11 21''1" .1 .. 1.· 6 "61"9 :: 13 16/ 7 13 26 001.. 2 1 1 .. 7 ...21, 2 4 ...... I.... "'112 8SI1... 11 41 .. 1....

..;I.. ~I:~

... 161 151 16/ 21 201

"'"I".I·l

141 ... 1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 531 111 261 47 1.. 1.. 1 2

$

1$

144 802.40 21.00 $ 285.60\$ ...... \$ 395.50 $ ..... ·1$ •.... 4.201$ .... 1$ 306. 60 23 1$ 50.40 2.10 48.30 9.00 .... · .. 1·· .... 48.30 •....•. 2.101 ..... 1 39 81.90 74.50 ...... ·1· .... · 84.001 ....... 84.001······ . 432 907.20 934.50 33.60 750.00 .... · .. 1 ...... 900.90 63 132.30 . 6.30 126.00 72.00 .... · .. 1· .... · 112 235.20 237.30 16.80 220.50 260.70 \ ...... 2.10 •.... 1 46 96.60 100.80 2.10 98.70 108.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . ••. ::::: 63 132.30 132.30 29.40 102.90 368.00 ••..•.. 1 ...... 9221$ 1,936.201$ 42.001$ ••.. 1$ 1,978.201$ 111.30 $ 1,866.901$ ...... 1$ 2,037.701$ ..... ·1$ .....

2'l'" ~.7:~~ :::::1 4::~1

Iss.sol

.......

....... ....... ....... .......

.......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued NINETEENTH DISTRIOT-THOMAS H. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Salisbury, Mo.

'i

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Eureka, 73 ••••••••• tWarren. 74 •..••.. Triplett. 122 ••••••• Westville, 202 •••••• I-' Salisbury, 208 ••• : •. at Q) Rothville, 426 •••.•• Pee Dee, 498 •••••••• Cunningham, 525 ••. Mendon, 628 .•••••• TOTAL ........

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1 1. .. 3 21 8 1 1 1 111 101 81 41

1

31

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···l·

1

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1 ...... 1•• •• ···1 .. 1··

'''1 ... 311 . 71 71

1''1'.1 •• 4 .... I.. 31 1.. 1.. 1..

fl

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220.60

60 126.00 ...... ..... 126.00 44 92.40 . . . . .• •.... 92.40 316.00 160 815.00 . . . . .. ..•.. 77.70 37 77.70 ...... ..... 37.80 18 37.80 ...... ..... 56 117.60 121.201 3.60 •.... 41 86.10 ...... 1 ..... 86.10 6111$ 1,078.101$ 7.801$ .... 1$ 1,080.901$

~Q.s

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............. $...4:~~1$. : : : :!$ .•.2~.4::~ $•..•6:~~ $.. 2.~8:4T.:::::: 1061$

l o1I llo1I.9 lB

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$...'.':"(::::::1$.::::: 108.00 ....... I ......

113.40 ....... 12.60 10.60 294.00 ....... 21.00 4.20 73.50 ....... 1 2.10 35.70 ....... 6.80 114.90 ....... 1 84.00 ....... , 2.10 66.10 $ 1,017.901$ ...... 1$

84.00'

l::",

~~'tl

Non" ....... 1 ...... 202.50 ............. None·······1 ...... 60.00 ..... 001 ...... 30.001 35.001 .. . . . .. . ..... 592.151$ ...... 1$ .....

·······1 ......

TWENTIETH DISTRIOT-L. H. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Carrollton, Mo. De Witt, 89 •••••••• Wakanda, 62 ••••••. Bogard, 101. ••••••• Hale City, 216 •.•••• Carroll, 249 •••••••• Bosworth, 597 •••••• Hardin, 822 •••••••. TOTAL ........

t No report received.

1 2 1 11 3 3 1 8 3 1 .. 2 2 2 1 422 8"'1 1 '"1''' 1 1 ... 151 121 101 81 71

~I

":1

1 •.. 1 14 2 4 4 1 8 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 .,. 1 1 311 71 111

·2 .. ~ ...:

• Credit $2.10.

6- .. 1. . 1 1 3 .. \.. \ .. 4 .. /00 1 . . 7 .... I·· 2 2 ::1::1::

......

231 .. 1.. 1 1

"1'

121.80 $ 2.10\$ .... 1$ 128.90\$ 2.10 $ 121.80 $ •.... 58 611.10 29.4il 681.70 ....... 602.70 287 8.40 .. 00.' ..... 212. 10 1 8.40 203.70 212.10 101 109.20 111.30 117.60 8.40 53 6.30 ..... 1 159.60 ..... \ ..... 2.10 157.50 · . . . . . . 1 76 159. 60 1 138.60 147.00 14.70 132.30 ....... 66 ... 197.40 197.40 197.401 ........ 94 7361$ 1.643.601$ 25.201$ .... 1$ 1,668.701$ 65.10 $ 1,503.601$ ...•.. 1$

...... , :

8:~~1 :::::1

30.80\$ ...... 1$ ..... None ....... 1 •••••• 200.001 ....... 1 ...... 42.50 ....... 1 ...... 124.001 ....... , ...... 45.001 ...... · ...... 545.00 ....... . ..... 987.301$ ...... 1$ •....


TWENTY-FmST DISTRIC'l'-EARL W. FOLEY, D. D. G. M., Weston, Mo.

I"j'''1

Rising Sun, 13 ••.•• 11 ... 1. . . Weston, 53 ••••••.•. 31 11 1..... Compass, 120 .•.•.•. 11 11·.. 1... Camden Point, 169 .• Rowley, 204 •••••••. Fidelity, 339 •••.•••. i .. ~ Adelphi, 855 •••••••. Platte City, 504 ••••• ...... 1... 1 1 TOTAL ........ 171 13 1 91 31 41

.. il"

~ "~l7 "~""i

21 ... 1 161 .. 1.. 1.. 11 41 3 1.. 1.",. 1 11 41. 1 21 61 .... I.. • .. 1 11 61 .. 1.'/". : ••• 1... 1.... 1.. 1.... 11 2 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 2 2 21 61 .. 1.... 211 81 12 1 3 9 1. ·1 .. 1.. 3 6 3

'1"' ..

i:: ... 3

6.30 $ 169.601$ .....• $ 185.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 79 $ 166. 90 1$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 166. 90 1$ 218.40 1 ....... 110 231.00 ...... 1 ••••• 1 231.00 1 12.60 180.001 ....... 1 ...... 6.30 74 165.401 ...... , · .... 1 149. 10 1 . . . . . . . 156. 20 1 ....... 1 ...... 155. 40 1 105.00 2.10 102.90 ....... 50 105.00 ........... 1 None ....... / ...... 130.00 ............. 6.30 57 119.701 2.101 ..... 1 121.801 115.601 ....... 52 109.201 372.001 ....... . ..... 111.301 ....... 2.101 ..... 1 111.301 ....... 1 6.30 36 71.401 ....... 2.101 ..... 1 77.701 75.6QI Nonel ., ·····1······ 140.70 2.101 ..... , 4.20 138.601 ....... 142.801 96.001 ....... 1 ...... 671 5261$ 1,102.501$ 8.401$ .... 1$ 1,110.901$ .44.10 $ 1,066.801$ ...... 1$ 1,119.201$ ..... ·1$ ....•

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT-W. F. WOODRUFF, D. D. G. M., Kansas City, Mo. Heroine, 104....... 181 201 221 61 2111001 21 161 201. ·j··1 1 958 $ 2,011.801$ 42.001$ " .. 1$ 2,063.801$ 210.00 $ 1,843.801$ ...... '1$ 1,624.001$ 1$ . '" . Albert Pike, 219..... 2 21 2 11 6 19 3\ 51 261 .. 1.. 1. . 339 711.90 12.601' 1 724.501 39.90 694.60·· 275.001 1 . 1-& Kansas City, 220.... 7 8 8 11 11 64 6 161 801 .. 1•• 1. • 758 1,591.801 23.10 1 1,614.901 134.40 1,480.60 870.001 .· 1 ....•• en Temple, 299 .•••.•.. 16 141151712911321 71 301 31/ .. 1.. 1 1 1,425 2,992.501 54.00 1 3,046.501 265.80 2,780.701.··· \1,526.00' 1 . ~ Cecile-Daylhrht,305. 5 3 312 1 12 61 11 51 .. 1.. 1.. 117 245.70 2.101 1 247.801 25.20 210.501 12.10 126.00 1 . Rural, 316......... 4 4 6.. 101 61 71 131 211 .. 1•• 1. • 511 1,073.10 27.301' 1 1,100.401 107.10 993.30 ......• / 1,040.20 1 •••••• Westport, 340...... 8 8 81 21 37 29 81 231 431 .. 1.. 1.. 881 1,850.10 1 1,850.10 60.90 1,789.20 705.00 1 .. Ivanhoe, 446....... 88 76\7420/ 37/171 531 351 116111 •• 1.. 3,051 6,407.10\ 33.60 2.101 6,438.601 359.10 3,577.40 2,502.10\ 6,232.981 1 . Gate City, 522...... 14 12 14.. 7 144 61 201 22 .. 1.. /.. 1'3261 2,784.601 13.851 1 2,798.451 302.40 2,496.05 ....... 672.00 1 . Orient, 546 .• , • • • • .. 35 85132 81 21 211 91 31 281' .1 .. 1. . 948 1,990.80 4.201' ·1 1,995.001 443.10 1,551.90 •••.... 1 None ·1 . SOuthGate,547 ..... 4 3 5 .. 11 23 51181 21 .. 1.. 1.. 757 1,589.70 23.10 1 1,612.801 48.30 1,564.50 ....... 1 787.001 .. 1 York, 563.......... 3 3 3 3 61 19 41111 331 .. 1.. 1. . 453 951.80 12.601·· 1 963.901 39.90 924.00. . . . .. • 103.00 ·1 ••...• SwopePark,617 .... 13 13 11 7 8 22 ... 61 171 .. 1.. 1•• 814 669.40 16.801 1 676.20 46.20 632.10· 411.00 1 . Sheffield, 625....... 16 19 12 4 31 61 8 51 421 .. 1.. 1. . 459 963.90 6.301·· . 970.201 128.10 842.10. . . . . . . 600.001 .······1 . East Gate, 630...... 43 38 37 7 281 44 111 101 58\ .. 1.. ,.. 1,082 2,167.20 56.401. . . . . 2,223.601 92.40 2,131.20 ......• 1'671.251" 1 .. Northeast, 643...... 8 10 11 .. 161 53 21141 25 1.. 891 821.10 33.601 1 854.701 111.30 74:UO ....... 1,200.00 1 .. Country Club, 656. .. 9 10 9 2 9 11 1 31 71 .. 251 527.10 4.201 I 531.30 28.10 508.20.. .. . . . 325.00 ·1 .. Rockhill, 668....... 22 16 16 2 1 3 2 2 91...... 145 304.50 2.10 1 306.60 6.30 300.30....... 148.00 1 .. Alpha, 659......... 4 4 4.. 1 \ 191 .. 1.. 1.. 102 214.20 2.101 1 216.80\....... 216.30....... 231.501 1 .. TOTAL .•..•••. 31912981292172124411169113412301 6031 11 .. 1 214,2181$29,857.80 1$369.951$ 2.101$30,225.651$2443.50 $26,28Q.051$2,514.201$18,647.93 1$ ·1$ .••.•

j.... "I"

•• Credit $10.00.

"I


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TWENTY-THmD DISTRICT-eAMILLUS B. WADDELL, D. D. G. M., Lexington, Mo. "Cl QI

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Lexington, 149 ...•. Hicginsville, 364 .•• Lafayette, 437 ..... Concordia, 464 ..... Mount Hope, 476 •••. ~ c.n Richmond, 67 •••••• 00 Ray, 223 ••••••••... Bee Hive, 393 ••••••. Ada, 444 .......... Waverly, 61. ...•.•. TOTAL ........

"Cl "Cl QI

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61 61.. 1'1 3[ 2.. 3[

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1 1 371 ...'I1 331 •.•. 17 ..•••• 71 ... 1... 1 141 . . . . . . 31 ... 1 11 61 .. 1. . . .

1011 ...... 8 7'1181 'I 'I 5 ..2y 2.....2 1... ·1'1 341

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61· .. 5 ...1--1 1.. [ ..

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21 ... •• 1.... 1. . . . . . 61 4 4.. 1.... 11 21 31 . . . . . . 41 61 3..... ....... 11· ... 1.. 1.. 1.. 331 291 251 71 161 361 91 201 501··1 .. 1..

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Q:l Il< 0 ~ ~ 0 Il< < 327.601$ 2.101$ .... 1$ 329.701$ 14.70 $ 315.001$ ....•• 1$ 560.001$ ...... $ ..... 6.30 930.50 •..... • ••••• 94 216.301 197.401 18.901 ..•.. 1 210.00\ ....... 1 15'1' 14.70 ........ 51 107.101 92.401 107.101 ........... 1 516. 57 1 . . . . . . 192.00 ...... 6.30 ........ 53 107.101 2.101 ..... 1 113.401 111.301 8.40 173.001 ...... ...... 2.101 ..... [ 273.001 1291 264.60 ....... \ 270.90 1 182 10.50 388.50 ....... 399.001 382.201 16.80 1 . . . . . 1 696.001·· .. · . ...... 175.00 ...... 29 8.40 60.90 2.10 ..... 1 54.60 63.001 153.30 6.30 147.00 ....... 73 Nonel······ ...... 153.30\ .... ··1 ..... 1 113.40 53 113.401 ••.•••. 111.30 2.101· .... 1 90.001 .. ··· . 160.00 •..••• ...... 66 136.601 ....... 136.60 136.60 ······1 .. ···1 8851$ 1,858.501$ 46.201$ .... /$ 1,904.701$ 75.60 $ 1.629.60/$ 199.50/$ 3,483.071$ ..••• 1$ ••..•

~

~

...... ......

·······1

...... ......

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-JOHN W. ADAMS, D. D. G. M., Marshall, Mo. Arrow Rock, 65 ••••• .. . 1... \ ... \ 1 1... ' .... 1... 1 11 31 .... \.. Cambridge, 63 •••.•. 21 2 2\ 11... 131 31 1 111 . . . . . . Miami, 86 •••••••••• ... 1 11 1 .. 1.. · 31· .. 1 4 21 .... \ .. Trilumina, 206 ••••. 9\ 6\ 3 21 21 11\ 51 1 31 . . . . . . Barbee, 217 •••••••. 1 1 1 11 ... 1 3 ... , 3 .... 1.... I.. Malta, 402 ••••••••. 3 2 2 ..... 1 2\... 2 .... 1. . . . . . Oriental, 518 ••••••. 21··· .. ·· .. ·, .. 1.. / .. Nelson, 660 ........ 1 1 1..... 31 11 •.........•.. TOTAL ........ 161 121 101 61 21 371 91 12 1 19 1.. 1.. 1.•

'''1'' ./...../...,

48.301$ ...... $ 23 48.301$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 17.501$ ...... 1$ ..... 48. 30 1$ ..... ·1$ 27.30 366.40 .•..... 1 187 1$ 392.701 ...... I .... ·1 392.7{)I 282.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . 6.80 119.701 113.401 .. · .... 1 671 119.7°1 ...... 1 • .. ··1 129.5°1 •. ·····1 ...... 360.00 ....... 1 ...... 472.60 1 23.10 2191 459.90 12.601·· ... 1 449.401 ....... 1 6.30 264.601 ....... 270.901 231.001 ....... 1 ...... 270.90\ .... ··1 · .... 1 129\ 4.20 62 130.20 1 126.001 ....... 1 130.20 ...... I .. · .. 1 163.70j ....... 1 ...... 4.20 103.50 •...... 1 •...•. 641 113.4°1 113.401 ...... / ..... / 109.20/ ....... / 6.30 77.70 ....... 84.001 ........... 84.001 108.60 ....... 1 ...... 401 7711$ 1.619.101$ 12.601$ .... 1$ 1,631.70\$ 77.70 $ 1,654.001 •...... 1$ 1,380.701$ ...... 1$ ....•


TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-SAMUEL L. JEWETT, D. D. G. Mo, Boonville, Mo.

'1"

Cooper. 36 ......... _ 11 ... 1... 1 11 .. ·1 81 5j 61 61· ·1··1.. Pleasant Grove. 142. . .. I... 1.. ·1 11 .. · r 11 .. ·1 Ii 21· ·1· Wm. D. Muir. 277... 51 51 31 2\ 11 31 11 21 3\. ·1·· .. Wallace. 456 .......... 1.. ·1 .. ·I .. j.. ·1 .... 1.. ·' 41 .... [.. 1.. 1.. Prairie Home. 503.. 31 11 11 .. 1... 1 21 .. ·1 .. ·1 31 .. 1.. 1.. Howard.4 ..•••••••. 21 21 21 .. 1... 1 31 11 51 21 .. 1··1.. t Fayette. 47....... . .. I... \•.. 1.. I... I.... I.. ·1 ... I... ·1 . ·1 . ·1·· Livingston. 51. •••• · 41 31 3111"'1 13 1 11 11 3! .. 1.. 1·· Armstrong. 70...... 31 3 3 .. I·.. 3 ... I.. ·1 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 181 141 121 51 11 431 81 191 19 1.. 1. ·1 ..

Centralia. 59 .•••.•• Rocheport. 67 •.••.. Twilight. 114 ....... Ashland. 156 .•••••. Sturgeon. 174 .••••. Hallsville. 836 ..•••. ~ (0 Ancient Landmark. 856 •••••... Hinton. 455 .•••••.• Acacia. 602 .••..•.. TOTAL ........

..

11

359.101$ .. ·· ·1$· · .. 1$ 359.101$ 16.80 $ 342.301$ ...... 1$ 134.401 ...... I .... ·1 134.401 23.10 18.301 93.001 153.30 2.101 ..... 1 155.401 6.80 149.101 ....... 1 102.901· .... ·1 ..... 1 102.901 ....... ..· .... ·1 102.901 77.701· .... ·1 ..... 1 77.701 4.20 73.501 · ...... 1 165.901 ...... 1 ..... 1 165.901 6.80 I •.... ·1 ·····1 ........ I ....... ...1.5.9.. ::::::: 57 119. 70 1 ...... 1 ..... 1 119.701 27.30 92.401 • ...... 1 531 111.301· .... ·1 ..... 1 111.301 6.30 66.22 38.781 5831$ 1,224.301$ 2.101$ .... 1$ 1.226.401$ 90.30 $ 901.421$ 234.681$

·····1 ........

~~

""11.21."ll'~1 11

111 .. ·1 41 .... 1.. 1 .. 1. . 101· .. I 11· .. ·1· ·1· ·1· . 1 1 .. 1 21 111·· ·1 11 101· .1. ·1·· 31'''\ 21··· ·1. ·1· ·1·· t""1 I 2 2111 ... 1 11\ ... \ 31 .... / .. 1.. / .. 11 11· ·1· .. 1 21 .. ·1 11 11 .. / .. 1.. 61 61 91 81 111 91 51 101· .1. ·1·· 131 151151 351 661 121 191 24 1. ·1· ·1··

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382. 20 1 31.501 ..... j 107.10 2.101 ..... 1 4.201 ..... j 214.201 67.201 ...... 1 .. · .. 1

413. 70 1 109.20 1 218.401 67.20 1

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431 23.10 90.301 ...... 1 .... ·1 90.301 4.20 231 48. 30 1 ...... 1 ..... I 48.30 1 3341 701.401 18. 90 1 ·····1 23.10 720.301 8881$ 1.864.801$ 75.601$ 1.801$ 1,938.601$ 188.60

180.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 242.501 ...... ·1 ...... 3.50 1....... 1...... 370.001 ....... 1 ...... 105.00 ....... I ......

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TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JULIUS R. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Centralia, Mo. 3\ .. 1.. 1.. 51 31 Ii 91/$ 191.101$ 18.901$ 1.801$ 208.20 1$ 10.50 $ 197.70j$ ...... 1$ 30 63.001 4.20 21· .. 1 11 .... ;.. 1 .. 1. . 63.001 .. · .. ·1 .. · .. I 58.801 ....... 1

11 11 41 91 ·1 .. ·1· .. 1.. 1· .. 1

11 61 121

171 1$ 64 731 49 371 79

388.60 1 2.001 88. 20 1 ·······1 195.301 ....... 1 60.901 ....... 1 1 I 67. 20 1 .. ·····1 44.101 ....... 1 697. 20 1 .... ···1 $ 1,798.001$ 2.001$

48.00 .... · .. 1 ...... Nonel ....... 1 ...... 989.001$' 20.001$ 2.00

2.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 40.001 ...... ·1 ...... 123.001 ....... 1 ...... Nonel 10.001· ..... 123.50 1 ...... ·1 ...... 28.001 ....... 1 ......

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None·······1 ...... 321.501$ 30.001$ 2.00

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRIQMl'-LOUIS J. GRAUE, D. D. G. M., Mexico, Mo. .. ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1 .. /· .. 1 61 .. ·1 .. ·1· .. ·1· ·1· ·1 .. .. ·1·· ·1 .. ·1· ·1 ... /... ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1· .. ·1· ·1· ·1·· .. . 1.. ·1· .. 1.. 1.. ·1 81 .. ·1 .. ·1· .. ·1 .. 1.. 1.. 3[ 41- 31 41 21 14 1 31 31 91 .. 1.. 1 . . 21 11 81''1' .. 1 41· .. 1 41 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 11 .. 1 . . 1.. · .. 1.. ·1 .. ·1 .... ·1 11· 001 31 · .. 1.. ·1 11 21 11 10 1 11 31· .. ·1· ·1 .. 1 . . 11 11 l·I ... I.... j 11 21··· ·1· ·1· ·1·· · .. 1.. ·1· .... 1 11 .... 1· .. / 31 .... 1.. / .. 1·· •.. I· • 1.. 1...J 21 ... I· .. I 91 .. I.. I.. ... 1... · .. 1.. 1.. ·1· .. ·1 .. ·1 31 .... ' .. 1.. 1.. .. ·1 41 4\ .. 1.. ·\ 6\ 11 .. ·· .. ·\ .. 1.. 1.. 61 101 171 61 41 501 61 2 1 / 191· ·1· ·1·· t No report received.

Central. 81. ..•••••. t Laddonia. 115 ..... Social. 266 ......... Hebron. 354 .••.••.. Vandalia. 491. .•••• Houston. 580 •••••.. Fulton. 48 •.••••.•• New Bloomfield. 60 .. Portland. 242 •.•... Tebbetts. 565 ••••.•. Shamrock. 585 ••••• Mokane. 612 ..•.•.. TOTAL ........

'I' ..

331$ 69.301$ ..... 1$ .... 1$ 69.301$ 12.60 $ 56.701$ ...... $ 138.6 0 1$ ..... ·1$ ...... ........ 1 ...... 1 .... ·1 .. · .... ·1 .... · .. ........ I ...... .. ...... 1 ...... ·1 .. • .. • 49 102.901 16.80 102.901 ..... ·1 .. · .. 1 86. 10 1 ...... 7.001 ....... 1 ...... 276 579.601 588.001 29.40 8.401· .... I 736.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . 558. 60 1 ...... 102 214.20/ 6.301 ..... 1 220.501 8.40 212.10 ...... 260.001 ....... I ...... 20 2.10 42.001 ...... 100· .. 1 42.001 39.90 ...... 30.001 ............. 237 499.801 21.00 2.101 ..... 1 478.80 1 ...... 497.70\ 350.001· ...... 1·· .... 83 174.301 ....... 174.30 1 ...... 174.30 ······1 .... ·1 252.001 .... · .. 1 ...... 29 6.301 ..... 1 67.201 ....... 67.201 ...... 98.00\ ....... 1 ...... 60. 90 1 39 81.90 6.301 ..... 1 4.20 88.201 84.001 ...... 72.00 ....... 1 ...... 21 44.101 ....... 44.101 ...... 44.10\ ...... 1 . . . . . 1 47.001 ....... 1 ...... 92 193.20 ........... 1 10.50 193.201 182.701 ...... 148.001 ....... 1 •. , .•• 9811$ 2,060.101$ 29.401$ .... 1$ 2.089.501$ 105.00 $ 1,984.501$ ..... 1$ 2,138.601$ ...... 1$ .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-P. A. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Griswold, 178...... 11· .. 1.. ·1 11 1 11 21 .... Wellsville, 194.. .••. 31 2 2111 1 201... 11 0) Montgomery, 246... 21 2 2 1 21·.. 31 Florence, 261 / 1. .. . 1 21 Jonesburg, 457 ••••.... 11 11 .. 1'''1 12 1 , 11· Daggett, 492....... 1 1 11 .. 1... 2 11 TOTAL... ..... 71 61 61 21.··1 371 11 101

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56/$ 117.601$ ·1$· .. ·1$ 117. 60 1$ 155 325.50\ 1 325.501 981 205.80........... 205.80 59 123.901 1 123.901 67 140.701 .. · .. ·1 · 1 140. 70 1 66 138.601 I 1 188.601 5011$ 1,052.101$ 1$ 1$ 1,052.101$

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115.50 $ ... '''1$ 97.50\$ •.. ···1$ •.... 283.50....... 428.40 •...... J • • • • • • 201.60....... 164.001 1 . 123.90 116.001 1 . 115.50 .... 360.001 .. · ' .. 136.50· 1 . 976.501$ .. · ... 1$ 1,165.901 1 ..

' '1

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-WILLIAM ULERY, D. D. G. M., Elsberry, Mo. Troy, 84 •.•••••.••• 21 21 11 2 1 11 41 .. ·1 1 1.... I .'!'.I .. Silex, 75 ........... ... .. ·1· ....... · .. ·1 3I I.. New Hope, 199 ••.•• 7 6Il""'1 21 1 1 11 .. 1.. 1.. New Salem, 270 •.••. 8 3 3.. 1 71 1 21 4 .. 1.. 1.. Louisville, 409 •..•. 1 , ... 21 " ... 1 Nineveh, 473 •••.... 1 11 11..... 1 ...... 1 11 .. 1.. 1 . . Moscow, 558 ...•••• 1 11 11.. 1 31 1 ... 1 21 .. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 151 141 121 31 51 181 61 61 81 .. 1.. 1.. •• Credit $2.10. • Credit $2.10.

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121 $ 33 74 78 47 49 71 4731$

256.201$ 8.40 $ 247.80 $ ...... 1$ 166.501$ ...... 1$ ..... 69.30 ••..... 49.30 20.00 178.001 ....... 1 ...... 153.30 4.20 52.50 ....... 1 •...•• 151.20 165.90 14.70 "'.4°1 ... \ 235.001 •..... 2.10 98.70 28.001 •......•..... 100.80 , 100.80 102.90 2.10 144.001 ............. 144.90 6.80 ........ 151.201 204.001· ...... 1 ...... 993.301$ 10.501$ 2.101$ 1,001.701$ 37.80 $ 801.101$ 164.901$ 1,008.001$ .. , ... 1$ .....

2""T 2"°IS'" 69.80 ...•....... 155.40 •.....•.... '63.80 2.101' ••.. 98.70 4.20 2.10 90 102. 149.10 2.10 ••...

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THIRTIETH DISTRIOT-WILLIAM E. LANGE, D. D. G. M., Wright Oity, Mo.

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46 ••••. •• ·1·· ·1·· .\ .. 1... , .... I.. I.. · ·1· .j. ·1 .. ·····1$ •••. ···1$···· ·1$· ···1$ •••. ···1$ •.•••• $ •..... ·1$ . ·····1$ ... ····1$ ..•.. ·1$·· .•. Palestine. 241 ••.••• 1441 30•.401 ······1 30'.401 18..0 '83.601· ..... ,8.001' .... ··1 ...... 41 41 4 .. 1.. · 91'" 41 14 1.. 1.. 1.. Mechanicsville, 260 •• 811 170.10 ..... ·1 ..... 170.101 2.10 168.001.. .. .. . 123.00 ...... 31 3 31 .. 1.. ·1 1 ... \....... 1.. 1.. 1.. 58 121.80 •..... 1 ..... 121.801 6.30 115.50. . . • . . . 70.00. . . . . •• • .•••. 1 1 1 .. 1... 31... 11 11 .. 1.. 1.. Pauldin~lle, 11 .... Warrenton, 609 •••• ... ... , ... 111 ... 1 11 ... 1.. ·1 61 .. 1.. 1 . . 57 119.701 ...... 1 ..... ' 119.701 2.10 117.601....... 50.001 ............. 21 $ 684.601$ ...... 1$ 1.461.00 1$ ...... 1$ ..... 4 29.40 TOTAL ........ 340 714.001$ 714.001$ ..... 1$ .... 1$ 1.. 1.. 1.. 81 81 81 11· .. 1 1 1.. ·1 51 1$

'1' .....

THIRTY-FmST DISTRICT-ALBERT LINXWILER, D. D. G. M., Jefferson Oity, Mo.

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441 $ 926. 10 1$ .... ·1$ .... 1$ 926.101$ 46.20 $ 879.90 $ ...... \$ 1.262.001$ ...... 1$ ..... Jefferson. 43 .•..••• 171171171 81 11 •• 81 '0 1 101--1. ·1· . 4.20 1 2 2 ..... 2 ... 3 .... \.. 1.. 1.. 64 76.001 •. .... . ..... 130.20 ....... Russellville. 90 ••••• 134.40 ··1 ·····1 134,401 28 63.001 ....... 40.00 23.00 21.001 .... .. .. .... Hickory Hill, 211 •••. ......... 1.. 1 21 ....... 1 11 4.201·· ... 1 58.80 61001 .. 1.. 6.30 60 128.101 ....... 263.601 ...... .. .... 121.80 Centertown. 611 •••• 126.00 2.101' .... 1 1 1 11111 3... 11 ... ·1 .. 1.. 1.. 4.20 57 119.70 12.60 ..... 1 132.301 256.401 ...... .. .... 128.10 ....... Tipton, 56 •••.•••.• 11 1 1 1 21 2 2 21·· .. 1· ·1 .. 100 6.30 161 338.101 ...... .. · .. 1 768.701 ...... . ..... 338.101 331.80 ....... 2 2 3 1... 31. .. 2 231001 .. 1.. California. 183 •.••• 74 155.401 •..... .... ·1 166.401 ....... 165.40 •...... 404.00\ ••.... . ..... 1 1 .1 .. 1....... 1 , ... 1.... 1--1 .. [.. Moniteau, 296 ••••.• 49 2.10 .... ·1 106.001 ....... 105.00 •....•. , 84.00. • . . . . . ...•• Clarksburg, 553 •••• ... ... .. ·1 .. 1 1 11· .. ·1001 .. 1.. 102.90\ 116 243.60 2.10 · . . . . 1 246.701 .. • .... 245.701 ....... 248.001 ...... .. .... Chamois, 185 ••••••. 3 4 31"1 1 ....... \ 21 31 .. 1 . . 1.. 143 300.30 18.90 .... 4.20 319.201 294.00 21.00 343.001 •••••. • •.... 4 3 2 2 91 21... 4 .... 1.. \ .. \ .. Linn, 326 .•••••.••• TOTAL ........ 301 311 311131 171 361 71 261 421 .• 1. ·1·· 1,1931$ 2.505.301$ 42.001$ •... 1$ 2,547.301$ 71.40 $ 2.431.901$ 44.001$ 3.716.701$ ....• 1$ •...•

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THIRTY-SECOND DISTRIOT-B.

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Evergreen, 27...... 3 .1···1 Sullivan, 69........ 7 6 '1· 71 1\ 5 1 Gray Summit, 173. • . 4 21 21 ... Hope, 251.......... 10 Fraternal, 363...... . .. .. Columbia, 634...... • .. , ..... Easter, 576......... 1 1 11 11 ... Union, 698......... 3 3 61 11 .. · 7 Hermann, 123 •••••• Red Bird, 684 ...... Owensville, 624 ••••. 10 10 91 21 ... TOTAL ........ 461 371 411 91 131 t No report received.

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BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo.

72 $ 151.20 $ · .... 1$ .... $ 151. 20 1$ 363.30 173 373.80 159.60 76 159. 60 1 151 329.70 317.10 12.601 .... 76 159.60 ......•... 159.60 98 206.80 206. 80 1 . . . . . . . . . . 70 147.00 ...... I .... 147.00 92 193.201 ...... 1 .... 193.20 119 254.10 4.201· .. · 249.901 38 79.80 •••••••••• 79.80 120 252.00 252.00 ....•. 1 .... 10851$ 2.278.501$ 27.801$ ••. 1$ 2,305.801$

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4.20 $ 147.00 $ • .. · .. 1$ 4.20 369.60 2.10 157.50 · . . . . . . 1 10.50 319.20 4.20 165.40 6.30 199.60 4.20 142.80 ....... 2.10 191.10 2.10 252.00 77.70 2.10 247.80 ....... 4.20 46.20 $ 2,259.601$ •..... 1$

....... ....... ....... ....... .......

44.001$ •..... 1$ •..•• None •...... 1 .••••. None .... • .. 1 ...... 133.00 ...... ·1 ...... None . . . . · .. 1 . . . . . . None ...... ·1 .... ·· 110.00 276.00 100.00 10.00 1.00 80.00 248.55 · .... ··1· .. · .. 990.551$ 10.001$ 1.OQ

. ·.. l··..· .............

.............


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THmTY-THIRD DISTRICT (A)-ROBERT C. WINKELMAIER, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo.

N AME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Missouri. 1......... 71 61 51 .. 1 5 Beacon.3 25 26127121 9 St. Louis, 20. .. .. .. . 31 7 7.. 3 Mount Moriah, 40... 111 11 1113/ 1 Pomegranate, 95 41 41 5 .. 2 Pride of the West, 179 9[ 9 101 .. [ 6 Keystone. 243.. 221 20 141 .. 1 9 Paul Revere, 330.... 41 3 31 21 31 Tuscan.a60 41 3 3151 61 Cache. 416.. . .. .. 10 9 91 21 ... 1 Euclid.505......... 7 6 5\ 11 31 Clifton Heights, 620. 4 6 6[ .. 2 Apollo, 529......... 1 1 11 .. 1 11 AIgabil, 544.. .•.... 6 41 41 .. 1.. ·1 RoseHiIl.550 ....... 4 2 2111 9 Olive Branch. 576.. . 7 5 51 .. 1 6\ Triangle,638....... 1\ 1 21 .. 1 2\ Trinity. 641. . . . . . . . 5 31 21"1131 Shaveh. 646.. . .. . .. 2 1 11... .. University. 649..... 2/ a 2151 / Pilgrim,652........ 11 11 .. 1 21 Commonwealth. 654. 9 101 101 .. ,... Purity.658......... 5 71 511 11 Theo.RooseveIt,661. 31 2 3111 21 Total. 156114911431231 851

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~ 00 00 IiJ et: ~ ~ < 0 ~ ..::l < l%l 0 0.. 741111171 211 .. 1.. 1·· 6101$ 1,281.001$ 23.101$ '" .1$ 1,304.101$ 155.40 $ 1,148.701$ ·1$ 432.001$····· $ . 67 5 19 251 .. 1.. 11 1,515 3,181.501 18.901 1 3,200.401 140.70 3,059.701 1 1,750.001· .. · .. 23 41 7 21\ .. 1 . . 1.. 5221 1.096.201 6.301 I 1,102.501 48.30 1,054.20 1 340.001.. .. .. .. .. 78 31 231 811 .. [.. 1.. 1,5651 3.286.501 3.601 1 3,290.101 163.80 3.126.301 ·1 1.051.501······ .....• 61 21 3 71 .. 1.. \.. 6281 1,108.801 3.601 1 1,112.401 12.60 1.099.80/ .· ··1 376.001······ . 91 41 81 91 .. 1.. 1.. 4001 840.001 12.601 1 862.601 18.90 833.70 ·1 228.001...... . . 601 21141 411 .. \ .. 1. . 6821 1.222.201 18.901 1 1,241.101 126.00 1.115.101· i 1.008.001· , . 4... 2 51 .. 1.. 1.. 2051 430.501 ...... 1 1 430.501 8.40 422.10\ 1 288.00\...... .. .. 461 31261 71 .. 1.. \ .. 9781 2.063.801 17.101 1.00[ 2.069.901 94.50 1.975.401 1 None . 261... 91 11/ .. 1.. 1 1 716/ 1,503.601.· .... .. ... 1 1,503.601 52.50 1.461.10 1 I 248.601 I . 21 .. ·1 51 81 .. 1.. 1.. 3551 745.601 6.301.·· .. 1 761.801 4.20 747.601 .·.····1 Nonel·······I······ 221 41 81 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 621 1,094.101 4.201 1 1.098.301 46.20 1.052.101 1 353.601· ...... 1· .. · .. 61 41 21 8\ 11 .. 1.. 196 411.601 2.101 \ 413.701 12.60 401.101 .· ·1 170.001 .. ·· .. ·1 .. 15/ 1 al .... I.. I.. I.. 3221 676.201 .2a 2.621 673.8 1 1 2'9.17 644.64 \ 392.001· 1 .. 221 6 71 191 .. 1.. 1.. 529 1.110.901 10.501 ..... 1 1,121.401 46.20 1.075.20' 1 150.001 1 5.00 41 ... \ 6\ .... 1.. \··1 1 449/ 942.901 12.601.·· .. 1 955.501 8.40 947.101' ·1 1.169.001·······[······ 101 11 41 8[ .. [.. 1.. 242[ 508.201 4.201· [ 512.401 21.00 491.40 \ 471.001 · 1 . 111 3 21 101· ·1· ·1· . 2891 606.901 22.501 1 629.401 23.10 606.30 · .. 1 225.001 I .. 6 2 61 61 .. 1.. 1.. 259 543.901 . .. . 1 543.90/ 12.6tl 53l.80 ·1 656.001 ·1 .. 171 51 41 6\ .. 1.. 1.. 3001 630.001 1 1 630.001 35.70 594.30\ .· ·1 580.001.······1······ 141 4\ 21 51·.1 .. \.. 211 443.101 4.201 \ 447.301 29.40 417.90 \ 240.001· .. · .. ·1 .. 151 3 31 11 .. 1.. 1.. 1431 300.301 1 300.301 31.60 268.801 1 347.001· I .. 1 111 .. ·1 41 31 .. 1.. /.. 2051 430.501 4.20 1 434.701 23.10 411.60/ ·······1 368.00/ .. 111 21 ....... I.. t.. l.. 145 304.501 4.20 1 '308.701 23.10 285.60 ·1 210.50 ·1· · 5571 6911841 8021 11 .. 1 811,7871$24,752.701$179.331$ 3.621$24.928.411$1167.37 $23,761.041$ ·1$11,054.001$ ·1$ 5.00 ~


THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT (B)-EDWARD P. WALSH, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. Meridian. 2 ......... 61 31 21 ••. 1 Geo. Washington. 9. 31 41.. 31 N aphtali. 26 ........ 4 4 41.. 9 Polar Star. 79 ...... 4 6 61 1 81 Erwin. 121 ......... 14 14 14 1•• 11 Occidental. 163 ..... 2 2 21 .. Pyramid. 180 ....... 11 12 121" Good Hope. 218 ..... 10 81 8 5 Aurora. 267 ........ 21 2 41 .. Cosmos. 282 ........ 2 11 21 4 21 Cornerstone, 323 .... 7 81 America. 347 ....... 7 Itaska. 420 ......... 4 3 ., .. ·1 Anchor. 443 ........ 6 West Gate. 445 ...... 4/ Lambskin. 460 ...... 81 Harmony. 499 ...... Forest Park, 678 .... 11 11 11 3) Magnolia. 626 ....... 91 3 31 1 2 Tower Grove, 631 ... 41 2 21·· 61 Mizpah. 639 ........ 131 11 Benj. Franklin. 642. 71 3 Progress. 657 ....... 71 5 11 TotaL .. " ..... 140112511291271 591

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41 .. 1.. 1 2 6011$ 1.262.101$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 1,262.101$ 92.40 $ 1.169.701$ ...... 1$ Nonel$ ...... $ ..... 71 .. 1··1 .. 679 1.426.901 6.301 •.... 1 1.432.201 31.60 1.400.701 ....... 1 1,230.001 ...... ...... 71 1[ .. 1.. 349 732.901 18.901 ..... 1 761.801 14.70 242.001 ...... 737.101 ....... 1 20 1.. [. ·1·· 816 1.713.60 16.801 ..... 1 1.730.401 98.70 640.001 ...... 1.631.701 ....... 1 171 .. 1.. 1 1 666 1,167. 60 1 80.001 ..... [ 1.247.601 86.10 1.161.601 ....... 1 26.001 ...... 31 .. 1.. 1.. 246 614.60 6.701 ..... 1 620.201 37.80 163.001 ...... 482.401 ....... 1 10 1. ·1· ·1·· 326 684.60 23.10 666.701 ....... 1 4.20\ ..... I 445.001 ...... I ...... 688. 80 1 91 .. 1.. 1 4 1. 007 1 2.114.701 2.10 ..... 1 2,116.80 23.10 2.093.70[ ....... 1 180.001 ............. 321 1 251 .. 1.. 1.. 674.HlI ...... 1 ..... j 674. 101 37.80 636.301 ....... 1 498.001 ...... 457 181 .. [.. 1.. 969.70 1 4.201 ..... 1 963. 90 1 65.40 898.5 0 1 .... · .. 1 1,404.001 ...... 540 1.134.001 10.601· ... ·1 1,144.50 1 88.20 1.056.301 ....... [ 121 .. 1 . . 1.. 470.001 ...... , ...... 266 71 .. [.. 1 . . 558.601 12.60 546.00i ....... 1 727.001 .. .... . ..... 558.60 ······1 .. ···1 414 41 .. 1 . . 1 . . 869.401 869.401 ..... ·1 .... ·1 71.40 798.001 ....... [ 534.501...... . ..... 473 91· ·1 .. [.. 993.30 1 25.20 968.101 ....... 1 993.301 ······1 ..... [ 521. 67 1 ....... , ...... 631 1.325.10 181 .. 1 . . 1 1 8.401· .... 1 1,333.60 1 67.80 1.266.701 ....... 1 1.710.001 ............. 765 1.606.50\ 26.201 ..... 1 1.631.701 61 .. 1.. 1.. 60.40 1,581.301 ....... 1 1,572.001 ....... 1 •••••• 305 111 .. 1 . . [ . . 640.50 7.801· .... 1 648.30 1 27.30 621.001 ....... 1 268.60 1 • ...... 1 ...... 223 468.301 31 .. 1.. 1.. 2.101 ..... J 14.70 455.701 ....... 1 716.501 ....... 1 . . . . . . 470. 40 1 888 1.864.80\ 71 .. 1.. [.. 4.201 ..... 1 1,869.00 67.20 1,801. 8 °1 ·······1 240.001 ....... 1 ...... 379 101 .. [.. 1 1 806.401 8.40 798.001 ....... 795.90\ 10.501 ..... 1 1,148.70 4.201 ..... 1 1.152.901 14.70 1,138.201 ....... 1 51· .[. ·1·· 360.00 ............. 647/ 361 766.50 1 10.50 756.001 ....... [ 2.762.00 ....... 1 ...... 758.101 8.401· .... 1 141· ·1· ·1· . 207 21 .. [.. 1 1 434.701 18.90 415.80[ ....... 1 64.00 ............. 434.70 ·.····1 .... ·1 2281 11 .. 1 911,3661$23,847.601$219.501$ .... 1$24,067.101$ 987.90 $23,079.201$ ...... 1$14.998.171$ ...... 1$ .....

...... ...... ...... ......

J

THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-WM. C. DE-4\.CON, D. D. G. M., Harrisonville, Mo.

Index. 54 •••••••••• Casso 147 •.•••••••• Grand River, 276 •.. Wadesburg. 348 •..• Nonpareil, 372 ••••. t Dayton. 386 ....... Belton, 450 ••••••••. Raymore, 451 •••••• Jewel, 480 ......... Coldwater. 485 .•••• Archie. 683 •••.•••• Cleveland. 651. •••• TOTAL ........

t No

report received.

···I···I··"!""I...I····I

..4.001'"

·1······

T.....

92.40 $ ..... '1$ 266.001$· .... 92.40\$ ..... \$ .... \$ 92.401$ ...... $ 31····1··1··1·· " $ 275.10 5 6 5. . 41 7 21 21 21 31 .. 1 . . 1. . 131 283.601 14.70 268.80 ....... 8.40 ..... 1 60.001 .......••.... 1 1 1/.. 7 4 ... 1 3 4[ .. I.. I.. 68 147.00 " ..... \ 11.251 ....... . ..... 142.801 14.701 2.10 155.40 8.40 ... ... ... . , ... 31 11 31 51 .. 1.. 1.. 26 54.60 ...... .... 54.60 I 6.30 18.53 29.771 27.001 ............. 1 1..... 4 21... 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 28 63.00 ....... 1 Nonel .. ·····1······ ... :::: .... .; .. ... ... ... .. ... .... 1· .. 1.. ·1 .... 1.. 1.. 1....... ... .... ·1 ...... 163.80 ·...... 168.001 ...... .... 168.001 4.20 ....... \ .. ·.... None·'·· ............. 7 4 3 11··· 11 31 .. 1··1·· 80 1 1 1.. 8 2 21.. . 41 .. 1.. 1.. 25 71.40 4.20 52.50 18.901. . . . 67.20 ....... / 16.00\ ....... 1...... 1 1 1 2... 10 1 21 101 .. 1.. 1 1 134 281.401 21.00 281.401 ...... , .... 260.40 "6.00·······1 ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . / 2( 31 .. 1.. 1.. 56 117.60 ....... 76.001 ....... 1 •..... 117.60' ....... 117.601 ...... .... 76.60 ....... ... ... ... .. ... 21 21 11 31 .. 1.. 1.. 38 79.801 ...... 79.80 4.20 16.001 .. · .... 1 1 1..... 3 ... 1... 61 .. 1.. 1.. 24 50.40 6.30 50.401 ...... .... 44.10 ....... 80.00 ............. 171 151 121 31 231 861 101 181 401 .. 1.. 1 1 6541$ 1,373.401$ 50.401$ 2.101$ 1,421.701$ 73.50 $ 1.318.431$ 29.771$ 745.251$ ...... 1$ .....

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THmTY-FD'TH DISTRICT-DUDLEY O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo. "'c::l

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ell

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Hurne, 130 ••••••••• Amsterdam, 141. ••• Butler, 264 ••••••••. Rockville, 841. ••••• Tyrian, 360 ........ Crescent HilI, 868 ••• Rich Hill, 479 .••• , •. Foster, 664 •••••••.. TOTAL ........

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61·.... I.. •• ...61 141 1 1 1 ..... ··1 .... I.. 3 ·I .. I.. ,.. 2 231 31 ·l·61" i4 1 : ." 1 0 1.. 1.... 18 13 12 2 1 1 ... ... 71 .. 1.. 13 301 261 241 81 18 1 271 81 10 1 451 .. 1.. 1 3

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~ ~ ~ H I:l:l 0 ~ < 0 < 2.10 $ 147.001$ ...... 1$ 147.00/$ ...... 1$ ..... 70 $ 147.001$ 2.101$ •••. $ 149.101$ 20.00 ..•..•• 1 .....• 69.301 ........... 69.30 1 ....... 33 69.301 ...... ·1 142 298.20 12.60 ••.•. 310.801 18.90 Nonel ....... 1 .... ·· 291. 90 1 .... · .. 1 4.20 Nonel ....... 1 ...... 56.70 ....... 24 50.40 10.601 ..... 60.901 66.70 30.00\ ....... 1 .. 00 .. 27 66.701 ....... 66.70 ....... 1 207.90 99 207.901 ....... 207.90\ ... 00 .. 1 216.001 ....... 1 ...... 76.00 ....•.. 1 ...... 29.40 236.20 80 112 20 1 . . . . . . ·1 206. 236. 1 178.32 ....... 1 .....• 182.30 "'2:iil 134.40 . 2.10 132.30 ....... 1 631 5701$ 1,197.001$ 27.301$ ...• 1$ 1,224.301$ 66.70 $ 1,167.601$ ...... 1$ 666.3 2 1$ ..... ·1$ .....

. . l :::::1. .

THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOLLY P. HURTT, D. D. G. M., Sedalia, Mo.

Cole Camp, 696 ••••.•.. , ...... , ..... 1 17 1... 61 .. 1 .. 1.. 44j$ 92.401$ •... ·1$.··· '1$ 92.401$ 86.70 $ 66. 70 1$ ...... 1$ 260.001$····· ·1$ •.... 79 165.901 2.10..... 168.001 168.00....... 273.80. 00 00 .. 1 .. Shawnee, 663.. ..... 1 1 2.. 11.... 3 2 4 •. J . . I.. 36 76.601 10.601 65.101 65.10....... 120.001' 00 00 001 .. Knobn08ter, 246.... 1. . . . . . .. . 2 3 4/ .. 1.. 1.. Holden, 262........ 2 1 11. . 2 9 ••. 4 4 " .. 1.. 157 329.70 4.20. . . . . 333.90/ 18.90 315.00 I •.•.... 1 196.60 ·1 . Corinthian, 265..... 2 4 2 1 1 3 1 6 6 .. . .1 •. 188 394.80 2.101 1 396.90 6.30 390.60/. . .. . . . 466.00 ·1 •....• Cold Spring, 274 •••......... 11 ... 4 1 11 21 .. 1 .. 1.. 64 134.40 ...... 1 1 134.401 8.40 126.00 · .. 1 66.501 001 . 101 212.10........ 1 212.101 68.80 153.30 I 696.00 I 00 . Chilhowee, 487..... 3 S 31..... 28 2 31 ...... 1"1" 413 867.30 2.10 •.... 1 869.401 44.10 816.30 10.001· 1,636.001 00 .. 1 .. Sedalia,2SG ........ 716 612 1211131 4 .. 1 . . . . Granite, 272........ 8 8 8 3 10 7 S 8 12... .1 .. 328 688.80 21.00 ..... \ 709.80 14.70 695.10 ....••• \ 450.00 .....•• \ . 41 86.10... •.. ••..• 86.101 •••.••• 86.10.... .. . 135.00 •...• ,. . ...•• Green Ridge, 426. . . . 2 1. " .. ••. ...• ••• .,. •••. .. . .1 .. 43 90.30..... • .351 89.951 ....... 89.96.. ..... 66.20 ....... 1 ...... LaMonte, 674 \ I.. TOTAL ........I 26125123171 151 891 141311 401 .. 1.. 1.. 1,4941$ 8,137.401$ 31.601$10.861$ 3,158.051$ 186.901$ 2.961.151$ 10.001$ 4,243.001$ ....•• 1$ .....

1 1...

• Paid Sept. 16, 1936.

J I.. I..


THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-THORNTON JENNINGS, D. D. G. M., Clinton, Mo. 1j .. I··I .. 245.701$·· ···1$· · .. 1$ 245. 70 1$ 16.80 $ 228.90\$ .•••.. 1$ 3

Windsor, 29........ 71 71 61· ·1·· . \ 8 2 Urich, 286 ............ \... J . . . I.. I... ....... Agricola, 343....... 3) 3\ 31"\ 11 21 2

2 .... 1."1".1 .. 11 .... J . . 2 M.ntroo.. '08...... ... ... ... ·1 2 ... ·1 .... I.. Clinton, 548........ 8 8 8 1\ 5\ 10 1 5 21 .. 1··1 .. Calhoun, 552....... 3 3 3..... 2 •••••. 81 .. 1.. 1.. Blairstown, 557 ........ 1... 1.. 1... 1.... ... 3 . . . . 1.. 1.. 1.. Deepwater, 562... •. . .. I.• ·1 • •. . ·1· .. ·1 . .. . .. .... I.. I.'!'. 91 .. 1.... St. Clair, 273....... 7/ 4 6 2 ... / 71 ... 1 3 Circle, 342......... 1 1 1...... ... J ••• \ 2 . . . . 1. . 1. . 1.. 71 .. 1.. 1.. Lowry City, 403.... 11 1 1 .. \ ... 1 1 ... Appleton City, 412 . . . . ·1 .. • ... 21 4 31 31'" ... '!'.I .. '.. Star, 419........... 11 1 1..... 21 ...... .... .. 1··1 .. TOTAL ........ 311 281 291 61 101 531 101 221 281··1 .. / ..

1.. 1911

1. ..

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l....

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C)

01

95.00($ ..... $ ..... 100.80 1 ....... 100.80 •...•.. 1 None I ...... ...... 100.801 ..... ·1 .... ·1 4.20 79.801 25 2.101 ..... 1 129.60 1 ...... ...... 77.70\ 40.351 35. 1 49 102.90 1 39.90 63.00 ..•••.. 102.90 •. ····1 .····1 40.001····· . ...... 184 21.00 396.901 210.00 ...... ...... 375.90 ....... 1 386.40/ 10.501 •..•• 1 46 4.20 96.60 ...... 1 ..... 1 92.40 • ...... 1 96.60 1 125.00 •..... ...... 36 75.601 ....... 75.60 •··· .. ·1 75. 60 1 ...... 1·· .. ·1 Nonel······ ...... 65 136.501 ....... 100.00 226.001 •..... ...... 36.501 136.50/ .... ··1 ·····1 130 273.00 ...... 1 18.90 1 14.70 254.101 239.40 .... • .. 1 333.001 ...... ...... 33 69.30 ...... j . . . . . 1 69.301 ....... 69.30 • · .... ·1 94.751 ...... 67 140.701 ........... 1 140.70\ ....... 140.70 .. ·· .. ·1 84.001 ...... I ...... 6.30 96 210.001 205.80 201.60/ 8. 40 1 •.... 1 I 182.90 1 . . . . . . . 1 ..••.• 4.20 29 60.90 ...... 1 ..... / 60.901 56.70 ••• .... 1 27.00 ....... 1 ...••• 9371$ 1,967.701$ 21.001$18.901$ 1,969.801$ 111.30 $ 1,788.851$ 71.751$ 1,547.251 ....... 1 . . . . . .

48 11'1' 37

THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-WINAN I. MAYFIELD, D. D. G. M., Lebanon, Mo. Linn Creek, 152 ...•. 70 $ 147.001$ 1$ 1$ 147.001$ 7 31 412 1\ 31 1.. ·1 121 .. 1.. 1.. Mack's Creek, 433 ••. 78 163.80\ 1 . 2 2 1 1... 3 11 4\ .. \.. \.. 163.801 Laclede, 83 ••••••••. 294.001 2 11 21 3 ....... 1 1. . . 1 1. . 1. . 1•• 140 294.001 ••... 68 142.80 2.10 •... 144.901 Competition, 432 ••• . ••• •.. .. ' 1 121 11 11 1. ·1 .. 1·· 53 111.30 8.40 ...• 119.701 Conway, 528 ••••••• 1 1..... 4 21'" 1 1\. ·1 .. 1·· Waynesville, 875 •••• 170.101 2 1 1 •. , 2 5 .. ·1 11 7\"1 .. 1.. 791 165.90 4.201' ... 3 3 3..... 10 1 4 81 .... I•• Richland, 385 •••••• t Brumley, 203 ..... . .. . 1. . . /. ·1· 1. ·1· ·1 .. . . ~~~ ...2.6.2:~~ :::::: :::: •• ~.6~:~~ 69 144.90 . 144.901 Iberia, 410 ••••••••• 3 51 6111... 21 1 ... 1 1•. 1.. 1 • • TOTAL .••••••• 201 16 1 17171 81 371 21 81 321 .. 1.. 1.. 6821$ 1,482.201$ 14.701$ •. , 1$ 1,446.901$ t No report received. • Credit $2.10.

'1' .

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6.30 $ 6.30 25.20 4.20 10.50

140.701$ 157.50.. .. 294.00 119.70 115.50 159.60

I.. ~.1:~~ ...2.4.1:~~

:::::::

\$ 1 1 1 1

53.60 $ 33.00 None 100.00 None 144.00

I ...2.4.4:~~

4.20 140.70 1 77.701$ 1,369.201$ ...... 1$

:::::::

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204.101 . 778.701$-·-..... 1$ .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THIRTY-NINTH DISTRIOT-eHARLES L. WOODS, D. D. G. M., Rolla, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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Lebanon, 77 •••...• 1761$ 369.601$ 4.201$.·· .1$ 91 51 51··1 21 181 21 21 31 .. 1 . . 1.. Cuba, 312 •••..•.•.. 41 51 81 3 1... 1 7 .. ·1 21 31 .. 1.. 1.. 1141 289.401 j ·····1 Salem, 225 .•.•....• 166 348.601 25.20 1 ••••• , 51 51 5111 121 21 11 51 71 .. 1.. 1.. Lane's Prairie, 531.. 11 11 ..... 1 1 .... 1.. ·1 11 .... 1.. 1.. / .. 481 100.801 2.101.· . . . Rolla, 213 ....••.••. 399 887.901 21.001 1 81 111 12 181 101 91 4\ 61 171 .. 1.. 1 . . 1061 222.601 4.201 1 21 21 21 .. 1 21 3... 11 41 .. 1.. 1.. .... St. James, 230 ..... 511 107.101 56.701 .. ·· .. 1 ~ Equality, 497 ••.•... ... 1... 1... 1.. 1 22 1.... 1 1/ 11 271 .. 1.. 1.. 2 Arlington, 846 ....• 751 167.60 1 ·1 .. ···1 81 61 51 1 1 11 .. · 21 21 .. 1.. 1.. 106 222.601 1 .. ···1 Latimer, 145 ••.•.•• 11 11 11 11 1 31 31 41 14\ .. 1 . . 1.. Belle, 873 .......••. 41 11 ... 1.. 1 161 .... 1 11 11 11 .. 1.. 1.. 941 197.401 31.60/ / 63 132.30. . . . .. Vienna, 94 ••.•.•... 41 41 41 .. 1.. ·1 31 11 21 21 .. 1.. 1.. TOTAL . 461 41 1 37110\ 661 411 131 27 1 801 .. 1. ·1·· 1,3981$ 2,936.801$144.901$ .... 1$

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E-4 ...:l < I:I:l ~ ~ 373.801$ 27.30 $ 346.501$ .. · 1$ 21.101$ ..... ·1$ . 239.401 14070 224.70\ Nonel ·······1 . 373.801 4.20 369.60 , ... 355.001 .·· ·1 . 102.901 102.901' / Nonel ··1 . 858.901 18.90 840.00 1 610.001 · .. 1 .. 226.801 6.30 220.50 1 32.00\ · .. 1 .. 163.801 ....... 163.80 1 Nonel .. · 1 .. 167.601 2.10 166.40 1 60.001 · .. 1 . 222.601 6.30 216.30 1 279.601· ··1 ;. 228.901. . . . . . . 228.90 , 80.001 .······1 . 132.301 6.30 126.00. . . . . . . 180.001 1 .•..•• 3,080.701$ 86.101$ 2,994.601$ ...... 1$ 1,617.601$ ..... ·1$ .....

"I

FORTIETH DISTRIOT-HARRY H. BALSIGER, D. D. G. M., Crystal City, Mo. De Soto, 119....... Joachim, 164....... Shekinah, 256 ...... Herculaneum, 338 •• Tyro, 12 •..••••••.. Potosi, 131 ..•••••.. Irondale, 143 •.••••. Belgrade, 632 .•.••• Blackwell, 535 .•.... TOTAL ........

'1' .

.,. I... I.. ·1 . ·1 71 11 61 121· .1· ·1 .. 71 61 61 1 · .. 1 21· .. 1 41 31· ·1 .. 1·· 13 131 141 .. 1 11 11 .. 1.. 1.. 21· .. 1 31 31 31 31 .. 1 41 21 11 .. ·1 131··1 11·· . .. I.. ·1 .. ·1 .. 1· .. 1 31·· ·1·· ·1· ·1· ·1·· 21'''\'' ·1 .. 1· .. 1 11 .. ·1 .. · .... 1.. 1.. 1.. ... ... .. '111"'1 11 .. ·J .. ·I 31 .. 1.. 1.. ... 1... 1..... I .. • .... 1.. ·1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. ... 1· .. 1.. ·1 .. 1.. ·1 21 .. ·1 31 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 251 221 231 21 51 201 21 17\ 321··1 11··

'1'"

520. 80 1$ 14.70 $ 506.101$ ...... 1$ 398.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 4.20 189.001 64.001 ... · ... 1 •••••• 184.801 ....... j 4.20 455.701 292.001 .··· ... 1 •••••• 451. 50 1 . . . . . . . 216\ 4.20 49 107.10 ....... 1 111.301 6.001· ...... I ...... 245.451 ....... \ ...... 6.30 113.401 ....... 1 57 1 119.701 119.701····· 380.001 ....... 1 ...... 2.10 207.90 1 . .. . .. . .... , 80 207.901 1 . . . . . . ·1 205. 991 2.1Q 147.00 ....... 1 400.001 ... · ... 1 ...... 71 149.101 ........... 149.101 70 56.701 ........... 56.701 ....... · .. ·····1 133.001 .·· .... 1 •••••• 271 56. 1 4.20 86.101 ....... 90.801 431 Nonel·· ··.··1 .... ·· 90.301 ······1 ·····1 9001$ 1,890.001$ 10.501$ .... 1$ 1,900.601$ 42.00 $ 1,801.801$ 56.701$ 1,918.451 ....... 1 ...... 248 90 1$

620.801$ ..... 1$ .... 1$ 189.001 .. · .. ·1 .... ·1 453.60 1 2.101 ..... 1 102.901 8.401· .... 1

.1 .....


FORTY-FmST DISTRICT-MORRIS E. EWING, D. D. G. M., Morrisville, Mo. Riddick, 361 ........ 41 41 41 31 61 11 11 11 41· ·1 .. 1·· Western Light, 896 •. 111 111 111 .. 1· ...... 2 2/ .... 1. . / .• 1. . Urbana, 421. ••.••. 11 31 31 .. 1.. ·1 21 1 ... 1.... \.. 1.. 12 Hogle's Creek, 279 .. 21 .. 1.. 1.. 21 21 21 .. 1.. ·1 61· .. 1 11 Hermitage, 288 .••.. 61 .. 1.. 1 1 21 21 21 .. 1· .. 1 61· .. 1.. ·1 Fair Play, 44 ••..••• .. . 1... I·· .1· ·1·.,1·., ·1···1 11· .. ·1 .. 1· ·1 .. Modern, 144 ••••••.. 11· .. 1· .. 1.. 1.. ·1 21 11 11 9[ .. 1.. 1.. Pleasant, 160 ••..... .. . 1... 1... 1 3 1 11 11 .. ·1 11 .... I· ·1 .. 1.. Bolivar, 193 •••••••• 31 31 31 11 41 21 21 51·., ·[ .. 1.. 1.. Pleasant Hope, 467 .. 41 11 ·1 .. 1 11 131· ·1 .. 1 . . Aldrich, 664 •.•..•.. .. . 1.. ·1 .. • .. 1 61 ...... ·1 .. ·1 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 281 261 261 71 161 18\ .71 131 331 .. 1.. 1 3

l·l.. "1...

2.10 $ .. ., ... 1$ 147.001$ 80.001$ ... ., .1$ ..... 661$ 136.601$ 12.60[$ .... 1$ 149. 10 1$ 84.001 ....... 84.001 ....... j 401 84.00 1...... 1 .... ·1 100.001" ·····1 ...... 70 67 4.20 119. 1 116.601 ....... 1 177.00 ....... 1...... 119. 70 1 ·.,···1 .... ·1 166.401 .... .,.1 79 1 166. 90 1 10.60 166.90\ .... ··1 .... ·1 Nonel ., ·····1······ 128.10 1 10.50 61 64.001 ....... 1 •••••• 117.60 1 ., .... ·1 128.101 .... ··1 ·····1 37 77.70 1 ....... 77.701 ....... 1 72.001 ....... 1 ...... 77.701· .. .,·1 ..... [ 79 166.901 4.20 164. 21 1 ...... ·1 ...... 161. 70 1 · ...... 1 166.901 ······1 ·····1 2.10 26 1 66. 70 1 64.601 ..... ·.1 1,362.491 ....... , .....• 2.101·· ... 1 142 1 298.20 8.401 ..... \ 4.20 814.001 ...........•• 306. 60 1 302.401 ....... 1 76.60 1 ....... 64.76\ ....... 1 ...... 361 75.60 .. · .. ·1 .. · .. 1 76.951 • 20 66.70 10.601 ..... 1 67. 1 ....... 67.201 ....... Nonel ....... 1 •••••• 271 6491$ 1,362.901$ 33.601$ .... 1$ 1,396.501$ 37.80 $ 1,212.061$ 147.001$ 2,868.461 ., ..... 1 ••••••

...601

FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT-MARK D. GWINN, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo.

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Stockton, 283 .•••.. 21 11" ·1·· ·1· .. ·1···1 31· ... 1.. [.. 1 1 Jerusalem, 316 ...•. 1 11 .. ·\ 11 ... 1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 11 1 Clintonville, 482 •.•• 51 6\ 41 1\ 21 61 2 1 51 .. 1.. 1 . . Washington, 87 ...• .. ·1 .. · .. ·1 1 · .. 1 61 11 1 11 .. 1.. 1.. Garrett, 869 .•••.•. 11 11 11 .. 1... 1.... 1... 11 .... 1 . . 1.. 1.. Everton, 406 •••..•. 11 11 11 .. 1 11 1 12 1. . 1.. 1.. Melville, 468 ••.•••. 31 71 .. 1"'1 1 ... 1... ' .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Lockwood, 621. .... 2 21 21 4 1....... 11 .. · .... 1.. 1.. 1·· TOTAL ........ 121 141 161 71 31 171 41 61 18/ .. 1.. 1 1

' '1

l··I...

' '1

98 $ 205.801$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 206.80 1$ ...... $ 206.801$ ...... 1$ 424.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 44 2.10 120.00 •.·..... 1 ..•••• 92.40\ 90.301 ....... 1 92.401· .... ·1· .... I 81 170.101 174.30 1 10.60 163.801 ....... 1 30.00 ...... ·1 ...... 4.201 ..... 1 90 129 12.60 30 270. 1 270.90/ .···.·1 ·····1 268. 1 . . . . . . . . .. • .... 1 ...... · .. ·· .. ·1 43 90. 30 1 ....... 90.30 .. ····1 ·····1 .... · .. 1 .. • .. • 51 8.40 100.80 ....... 170.00 ...... ·1 ...... 107.101 109.20 1 2. 10 1 .... ·1 30 63 2.10 132. 1 . . . . . . . . 130.201 402.80 • ...... 1 ...... 132.30/ · .. · .. 1 .. · .. 1 35 73.60 ........... 1 73.60 1 ....... 73.60 ... . . . . 80.00 .... · .. 1· .... • 6441$ 1,142.401$ 6.301$ .... 1$ 1,148.70 1$ 36.70 $ 724.601$ 388.601$ 1,286.801$ .....• 1$ ..•.•

...301 .......

60.00

FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT-DAVID V. MORRIS, D, D. G. M., Nevada, Mo. Osage, 803 •••.••... .. ·1 31 31 21 21 31 .. 1.. 1 1 81 .. ·1 21 Sheldon, 871 ........ 31 .. 1.. 1.. 21 21 21 .. 1.. ·1 31 .. ·1 21 Schell City, 448 •••.• .. ·1 .. ·1 .. ·1 .. 1.. ·1 11 11 11 21 .. 1.. 1.. Montevallo, 490 •..•. 21 .. 1.. 1 . . Ii 11·,t·I ... 1 11· .. 1 11 Vernon, 498 ••....•. 51 .. 1.. 1.. 3111 ..... 1· .. 1 11 ... \ 21 Unity, 495 ......... 71 .. 1.. [ .. 1 21 .. '111 41 31 11 11 Walker, 605 .•..••.. 2 21 2 .. 1... 1 1 ... 1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Hermon, 187 ••.•••• 21 61 .. 1.. 1.. 31 31 11· .. 1 21 Lamar, 292 ••••.•.. 31 11 21 41 .. 1 . . 1.. 31 41 ~ .21 11 Signal, 304 ......... 11 .. ·1 71 .. 1.. 1.. , Golden, 476 •..•.... ... 41·· ·1··· ·1· ·1· ·1·· Milford, 516 ..•..... 21 31 .. ·1 21 31 .. 1··1 .. TOTAL ........ 181 191 141 61 221 3 1 1 81 161 411 .. 1.. 1 1

: ~I:: ~I:: ~

• Credit $.36.

.... ~I

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643.90 167.60 88.20 69.30 62.60

$.. ~::~I$.I~:~~I$ ...... I 2.101

637.60[$ 16.80 $ 620.801$ .. , ... 1$ 606.67/$ ..... '1$ ..... 6.30 7.00 ............. 167.601 161. 20 1 ....... 1 2.10 84.00 ....... 1 86. 10 1 80.001 ...... 2.10 67.20 ....... 1 69. 30 1 36.601 ...... • . . . . . . . • .. 1 ...... .... ·1 2.10 60.40 ....... 1 62. 60 1 38.701 ...... 6.80 184.4QI 136.001 ...... 128. 10 1 8.<0 .... ·1 84.00 ...... .. · .. 1 2.10 84.001 81.90 ....... 1 110.001 ...... 98.70 4.20 .... ·1 2.10 100.80 ....... 1 102.90 1 100.00' ...... 212.10 2.10 .... ·1 207.9(} ....... 1 6.30 None •..... 214. 20 1 79.8QI 18.90 .... ·1 98.701 12.60 86.101 ....... 1 None ...... 3RI 66 142.801 ....... 26.001 ...... 138. 60 1 4.201 ..... 1 142. 80 1 ·······1 26 64.60 4.201 ..... 62.60 ....... 1 6.80 68. 80 1 27.001 ...... 8121$ 1,706.201$ 46.201$12.601$ 1,788.801$ 66.10 $ 1,673.701$ ...... 1$ 1,064.771$ ..... 1$ .....

2691$ 76 42 33 26 60 40 47 101 1

126.001

1.......

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... . ..... . .....

...... ...... ......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-LEONARD L. PURKHISER, D. D. G. M., Webb City, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER Ol<'LODGE

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Carthage. 197...... 91 41 61 61 24 1 14 1 21 31 21 1. ·1· ·1.. 2 78 1$ 583. 80 1$ 50.401$ ·1$ 634. 20 1$ 29.40 $ . 614.801$ * $ ...... ·1$ ...... 1$ . Sarcoxie. 293....... 1 2 11 2 ....... I I·.. • 131 .. 1.. 1.. 841 176.401 ...... 1 1 176.401 ... · .. · 176.401...... 354.501···· · .. 1 ·· Joplin. 335......... 71 6 6 21331 121 110 201 .. 1 . . 1 1 4881 1.{)14.301 69.301" 1 1,083.601 25.20 1,058.401...... 230.001 .. ·· ... 1·· · Fellowship. 845.... 41 41 41 81 81 241 21 9 2 7 1. ·1 .. 1 1 5461 1,146.601 16.80 .. ·.·1 1,163.401 50.40 1,113.001 ...... 600.001 .. · .. ··1· .. Jasper. 398........ 2 ... 1... , .. 1 21 .... 1... 1 1 .... 1.. 1.. 561 117. 60 1 4.201 .. · .. 1 121.801· .. · .. · 121. 80 1...... 70.001" · .. ··1···· .. Carterville, 401..... 31 31 3 .. 1 41 161 31 1 101 .. 1. . •· 1111 233.101 .. · 1 13.501 219.601 33.60 186.001...... 289.00 .,1· .. · .. Mineral. 471 1 1.. ·1 11· .. 1 3\ I.. • 1.. 1·· .. 511 107.101· ·1 ·····1 107.101 6.30 100.801· . . . .. 224.001" ·1 . Webb City. 512 ·J •• ·I I 11481 281 1 61 171 .. 1.. 1.. 211 448.10/ 70.201 1 513.301 48.30 465.001 None ··1·· .. ·· Carl Junction. 549.. 41 41 4111 61 61 1 21 21 .. 1.. 1.. 721 161.20 8.401 .. · .. 1 159.601 10.60 149.101 28.00 ·1· .. · .. I-' Criterion. 586 ·1··· I· .1 , 31"'1 11 1.. 1.. 1.. 46i 96. 60 1 96.601 6.30 90.301···· .. 210.00 ·1 . 1 1• ~ • La Russell. 592.. .. . .. 1... 1.. ·1· ·1· •• ····1··· •. ·1· .. ·1· ·1 . ·1·· ..... ! •••••••• ······1·····1 ········1······· •...•• ··1 ·······1 ········1·······1······ TOTAL ........ 3012312411611241 1001 71331 1101 .. 1··12 1,9381$ 4,069.801$219.301$18.501$ 4,275.601$ 210.00 $ 4,075.601$ ...... 1$ 1.955.601$· ..... 1$ .....

1..

FORTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-J. E. WINDLE, D. D. G. M., Springfield, Mo. United, 6 ••••...... 61 51 61 41 261 2'1 '1'9 1 381· ·1··1 2 671 $ 1,409.101$ 52.501$ ... '1$ 1,461.60 1$ 56.70 $ 1.404.901$ ...... $ Nonel$ ...... 1$ ..... 67 O'Sullivan, 7 ••••••. 21 21 ... 1.. 1... 61 .. · 21 .. ··1 .. 1.. 1.. 140.70 1 12.60 140.701 •..... 1 •.... 128.30 1 96.00j ....... 1 ...... 136 285.60 10.501 ..... 1 296.101 50.40 Ash Grove. 100 ..... 71 31 ... 1 11 51 241 1 21 61 .. 1.. 1.. 245.70 1 ...... Nonel .... · .. 1 ...... 463 30 28.101 16.801 Solomon. 271 ••••••. 161 191 141 21 11/ 151 6 81 211 .. 1.. 1 . . 31.50 Nonel ....... 1 ••.... 947.101 ...... 978.60) 972. Ozark. 297 ......... ... / ... : ... , .. , 1 29 60.90 1 2. 10 1 . . . . . \ 63.00 2.10 60.901 ...... 24.501· ...... I ...... 11 1 11 5\"\"1" Gate of the I I I I 71.40 1,465.80[ ..•.... Temple, 422 •••.•. 121 91 101 21 111 341 4 17 10 7 1.. 1. . . . 7211 1,514.10 23.101 ...•. \ 1.537.201 1.160.001 •...... 1 ...... 199.501 ....... Republic, 570 ••••••. 31 3[ 31 11 51 ...... · 21 .... 1. . 1.. 1. . 901 24.001 ....... 1 ...... 189.001 10.501· ..• ·1 199.50/ ...... 88.20 ...... , ..... 1 8.40 88.201 79.80 •.•... Stratford, 608 ••••.. 421 51 5[ 41 .. 1"'1 41 .. · 11 .... 1 . . 1··1 .. 36.001 ...... ·1 .. · ... 6.8{) 62[ 109.20 6.30 •.... 1 Willard. 620 •••••••. 115.501 109.20\ ...... .. ...... I 20.001 2.00 2 21 21 .. 1 3 31 2111 1[ .. 1 . . 1.. 159.60 [ 4.20 ....• \ 168.801 ....... Webster, 98 ..•.•... 761 163.80 ...... 87.00[ ....... 1 ...... 51 51 5111 11 .. ·· .. · ... [ 51 .. 1.. 1·· Doric, 800 •••••••••. 10.50 441 92.401 81.901 ...... 1 11 1 .. 1 21 51'" 11 .... 1 . . 1.. 1. . 92."1 ...... 1.... ·1 Nonel ·······1······ Mount Olive. 489 •••. 34 6.80 71.401 21 21 21 .. 1... 3 .. ·1· .. 1 11 .. 1.. 1. Nonel ....... 1 ..•... 65.10\ ...... 71.40 ·····1 46 26 96.60 Hazelwood. 459 •.••• ••....•..•• 1 14.70 •. .. ... 81.90 96.601 . 115.50 1 . . . . . . . 1 ..••.. 1 3\ 21 21 .. 1'''1 8\ 1.. 1.. 1.. Henderson, 477 .•.• . 8 2 ... 1.. 1 4 144.90 8.401 •...• 1 6.30 691 153.801 3... 81 .... ' .. 1.. 1.. 80.00 •....•• , ...... 147.001 ....... 1 TOTAL ........ 661 601 491111 681 1321 211 601 2101 .. 1.. 1 2 2,540[$ 5.384.001$140.701$16.801$ 5,457.901$ 277.20 $ 5,099.001$ 81.90[$ 1,623.001$ 20.001$ 2.00 t No report received. •• Credit .20. • Credit $10.00.

••

l"1

······1

I


FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-oABL A. SWENSON, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo.

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Ava. 26 •••••.•.••.• .. ·j 41 21 1 .... 1.. I.. I.. Pilot Knob, 182 •.•. ..•411•..111..... 3 3···1 1·· ,.. .. Mt. Ararat, 382 •.•. " .. I··t··\·· 6 ···1··· 6 1· t · · Barnes, 116 •••••.•• '1 1 181 21 22 21.. 21 31·· ··1·· Texas, 177 ••••.•••• 21 1 8 21 21 .. 1··1 .. Plato, 469 .......... 81 6 511... 1 11 41 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Summersville, 555 ••. 3 3 1... 1 .. ·1 11 21 .. 1.. 1.. 41 21 41 12 001 .. 1.. 2 8 2 8 4 Mountain Grove, 158 Joppa, 411 ......... ...... 31..... 31 ... 1'001 101 00 1 2 8 Mansfield, 543 •••••. 11 1 11 ... 1 81 91 .. 1··1 .. Grovespring, 589 ••• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . 1 . . . . 1.. 1 . . 1.. Norwood, 622 ••••.• 11... ... ..... 21... 21 61 .. 1.. 1·· TOTAL ........ 201 181 171 91 111 331 81 191 651 .. 1· ·1··

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124 $ 260.401$ ••.•. 1$ 6.301$ 25U OI$ 8.40 $ 245.7 0 1$ •.•.• ·1$ 6.301 ••••. , 21 6.30 10 44.101 50. 40 1 44. 71.40 12.60 49.70 9.10 84 71.401·· .... \ ..... 1 126.00 60 •.•.... 126.001 ..... ·1 • .... 1 126.001··· .. • . 270.90 16.80 128 268.801 2.101 ..... 1 254. 10 1 ....... , 82 2.10 172.201 ...... \ ... 001 172. 20 1 170. 117.60 2.10 115.50 ....... 56 117.60/ ........... 1 316.00 8.40 806.60 •...... 146 806.60 8.401 •.... 1 6.30 48 90.301 84.00 ....... 90.301··· .. ·1 • .... 1 48 2.10 107.101 105.001 •...... 100.801 6.30/ •.... 1 26 54.60 •.•...•••.. 39.00 15.60 64.60 1 ....... 4.20 50 1 105.001 ........... / 105.001 100.801 ....... 69.30 $ 1,640.601$ 24.701$ 8181$ 1,717.801$ 23.101$ 6.801$ 1,734.601$

1.... ···1

°1 .......

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-JOHN N. SPARKS, D. D. G. M., Grandin, Mo. Van Buren, 509 •••• Grandin, 579 ••••••• Hopewell, 289 •••••. Bunker, 275 •••••••. Barnesville, 853 •••• Delphian, 137 •••••• Winona. 430 ••••.•• Eminence, 607 •••••. TOTAL .•••••••

241 2 1

22 2 1

... ... 3 121

2 1 9 2 2 •• 8 1 1 ... 1

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3 71 111 41 181

9 3 4

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24 ...... 2 ...... 241 61 11

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.... I...... 81" .. I·· .. .... ··1 .. · .. ·1 .... \.. 1/ .... I•• ...... .. I··

16/ .. 1··1· • 201 .. 1.. 1..

103 1$ 216.30\$ 18.90 $ .••• $ 285.20 $ ...... $ 72 161.20 18.90 170.10 18.90 61 128.10 6.30 128. 10 1 . . . . . . 44.10 ...... 21 44.10 60 126.00 8.40 126.00 69 8.40 2.101' ...• 123.90 4.20 42 88.20 ••••...•... 88.20 4.20 67 140.701 140.70 .. ··.·1· .... I 4861$ 1,018.501$ 89.901$ •.•. 1$ 1,068.401$ 50.40 $

.....

126.0°1······ .....

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285.201$ ••.•.. 161.201 ....... 121.801 ....... 44.10 ••..... 117.60 117.60 61.00 33.00 186.50 857.401$ 160.601$

.......

Nonel$ ...... 1$ ••••• None •...... 1 ..•••• Nonel ....... 1 . . . . . . Nonel ..... , .•...•• 94.00 ·· .. · .. 1······ None 158.40 220.00 82.75 24.00 1.00 10.001 75.00/ ....... / ...... 140.00 •••.••.•••••• 902.651$ 10.001$ 1.00

Nonel$ ...... 1$ ....•

80.00 •......••.••• None .....•. 1 ..•••• 40.00 •....•• 1 •••••• 20.001 •....•. 1 •••••• 92.001 ...... 98.00 •••....••.••• 298.901$ ...... 1$ .....

'1' .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRIOT-J. OLYDE AKERS, D. D. G. M., Farmington, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Star of the West, 188. Mosaic, 351. ••••••• Marcus, 110 •••••.•. Bismarck, 41. ...••. Farmington, 182 .•• Ionic, 154 ••••.•.••• ~ --l St. Francois, 234 •••• o Samaritan, 424 •••• Pendleton, 651. ••.. Leadwood, 598 ...... Elvina, 699 •.••••••. Saline, 226 .••••.•• TOTAL ....••..

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l:Gl ~j::: .;~)! gj~ t::~>t ~~.s ~~ >CJ gj l< l: OJ ~ ..:l ~ ooril ~ )! ~ ~ 0 0 ~ < < 2.10 $ 165.901$ ...... 1$0 64.QO I$ ...... 1$ ..... 801$ 168.001$ .... '1$ .... $ 168.001$ 11 .. 1.. 1.. 11 .. ·1 21 21 21 1 102.901 8.40 94.501 ...... ·1 102.90\ .......... Nonel ., .. ···1······ 61 51 251 .. ···1l 41 ... 1 11· ... 1.. 1"1" 155 888.901 14.70 825.50 8.401 .... Nonel .···.··1· ..... 819.20j ....... 1 71 61 1 41 71 11 81 11··\ .... 14.70 104 218.401 208.70 ....... 218.401 ...... I .... 100.001 .. · .. ··1 ...... 51 51 1 .. ·1 I... 21 .. 1.. 1.. 27.80 153 321.301 294.00 ....... \ 304.871 ..... ··1 ...... 321.301 ...... 1 .... 11 11 .. ·1 81· .. 1 18· .. 1 51 .... 1.. 1· ·1 .. 6.80 116 1 243.601 249.901 243.60 ....... 6.801· ... 435.001 .. ··· .. 1 ...... 31 11 21 51 51 51 .. 1 81 51· ·1 .. 1·· 6.30 67.20 · .. ·· .. 1 78.501 73.501 ...... \ .... 351 32.251 .. ··· .. 1 ...... 31· .. 1 3 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. 31 11 11 11 .. ·1 40 134 16.80 150.00 114.601 281.401 ...... I .... 281. 1 .... ···1 ...... 1,272.001 81 31 71 61 .. 1.. 1.. 1 • .. 1 Ii 11 11 21 4.20 ........ I 90.301 ...... 1 .... 90.301 431 177.001····· .. 1 ...... ... I· .. I.. ·1 .... ·1 21 21 .. · .... 1.. 1· ·1 .. 86. 10 1 6.30 252.00 20 ....... 1211 258.30 1 337.001 ....... 1 ...... 31 11 21 181· .1. ·1·· 254.101 4. 18.90 289.80 ....... 1 308.701 .......... 308.701 75.001 ....... 1 ...... 1471 .. 91 31 2\ 21 .. 1.. 1 . . ....... 1 ...... 90.00 31.50 249.90/ 254.101 222.601 ....... 1 1191 4.201 .... .. ·1 11 21 11 1[ 151 21 3 .... 1. . 1. . 1.. 401 391 371161 121 751 181 301 301 .. 1. ·1·· 1.2561$ 2,687.601$ 23.101$ ... 1$ 2,660.701$ 157.50 $ 2,802.501$ 200.701$ 2,877.121$ ...... 1$ ..... gj

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FORTY-NINTH DISTRIOT-JAMES A. KINDER, D. D. G. M., Oape Girardeau, Mo. Trowel, 440........ 51 51 51 21 11 21 11 21 11 .. 1.. 1.. Zalma, 646......... 3 3 11 .. 1 81 6 .. ·1 .. ·1 21 .. 1.. 1.. St. Marks, 93...... 11 7 7 2 11 19 31 8 61 .. 1.. 1 3 West View, 103..... 21 21 2 .. I . . ·1· 1 1 1 41· ·1· ·1·· Wilson, 191 " .. 1 \ 41 .. ·1 .. ·1 41 .. 1· ·1.. ltbstic Tie, 221..... 1\ 11 1 21... 1· .. 1 11 21 .. 1.. 1.. Whitewater,417.... 5 4 4 .. 1 11 4 ... 1 21 1 . . 1.. 1.. Excelsior, 441. ........ 1... 1 . . . 1.. 1... 1 7111 ... 1 1.. 1.. 1.. TOTAL........ 271 221 201 61 111 431 51 181 191 .. 1.. 1 3

114 1$ 239.40 $ 2. 10 1$ 50 105.00 12.601 369 774.90 2.101 53 111.30· .. ···1 591 123.90 ·1 74 155.40\ .. · .. ·1 68 132.801 2.101 111 238.101 .. · .. ·1 8931$ 1,875.301$ 18.901$

·1$

241.501$ 117.601 777.001 111.301 ·1 123.901 1 155.401 1 184.401 ·1 233.101 1$ 1,894.201$ 1

1 ·1

4.20 $ 237.301$····· ·1$ 12.60 105.001 ....... 1 39.90 737.101.. .. .. . · 111.801 / 8.40 115.501·· ·1 2.10 158.301 1 8.40 126.001 ·.. 14.70 218.401 1 90.30 $ 1,803.901$ 1$

320.001$· .... ·1$ . 3.001· .. · .. ·1 .. 142.001 .... ···1 . 158.0.01 .. ·····1 . 3.001 1 . 158.QOI I .. 82.00 .. · 1· .. · .. Nonel 1 .. 886.001$· .. · .. 1$ .


EastPrairie,884 .... &1 61 61 .. 1 Charleston, 407..... 61 41 21 1 1 Morley, 184........ 1 1 1 2 Ashlar, 806 '" 1... .. Sikeston, 810....... 81 71 71 21 IUmo, 681.......... 9 9 9.. Blodgett, 694 1 \ 1\ .. , Chaffee, 615....... 41 11 11.. Bloomfield, 163..... 6 7 13 1 Essex, 278 1 1 1.. Lakeville, 489...... 21 61 31 1 Dexter,582........ 81 7 7.. Advance,590....... 3 21 2.. Puxico, 596.. 1 1 11 Morehouse, 603 1 11 11 TOTAL........ 611 601 631 61

"1

1-1 ""l 1-1

FIFTIETH DISTRICT-GEORGE A. SAMPLE, D. D. G. M., Chaffee, Mo. 81 61 .. ·1 .. ·1· .. ·1 .. 1.. 1·· 63$ 132.301$ 6.3 0 1$ ·· .. 1$ 138.601$ 10.60$ 128.101$

·· 1$ 164.181$ 1$ . 41 31 31 101 .. 1.. 1.. 161 317.101 37.801 .. · .. 1 364.901 8.40 346.601 ···1 20.001 \ . 6 41 21 71 .. 1.. 1.. 63 111.301 16.801 1 128.101 12.60 116.601 1 Nonel .. 111 11 11 71 .. 1. ·1·· 34 71.401 "'1 ·1 71.4 0 1 23.10 48.301·······1 10.001 ·······1 . 11 .... 1· .. 1 61 4\ .. 1.. 1·: 169 333.901 2.10.... . 336.001 ....... 336.001 ···1 67.76 1 ·1 . 2 21 31 5\ 31 .. 1.. 1.. 120 262.00 4.201 \ 266.201 4.20 262.001 .. · 1 Nonel 1 .. 1 1 1 21 18 1.. 1.. 1.. 22 46.20 ' 1 1 46.201 · 46.201 1 40.001·······1······ 11 41· .. 1 11 31 .. 1.. 1.. 112 236.20 2.101 1 237. 30 1 8.40 228.90 1 Nonel · 1 ...... 11 161 ... 1 11 61 .. 1.. 1.. 104 218.40 8.441 .. 226.8 4 1 31.60 196.34 ·······1 120.001·· ··1· ..•.. 11 1· .. 1· .. 1 1.. 1.. 1.. 44 92.40 2.101 • 94.601.. 94.60 · .. 1 110.001 · .. 1 .. · .. · 71 31 11 1 91 .. 1 . . 1.. 391 81.90 14.701 .361 96.261 6.30 89.96....... 60.001· .. 21 .... 1 11 21 21 .. 1.. 1.. 1071 224.70 4. 20 1 .. · .. 1 228.901 .. ·.... 228.90 ....... 186.001 · 1 .. 41 3\ 11 11 61 .. 1.. 1.. 63 111.30 8.401· .... I 119.701 6.30 113.40 30.001 1 .. · .. · 1 1 1 . . 1.. 1.. 38 79.80 I .. ·.. 79.80\ 79.80 66.00 1 .. 1 11· .. 1 11 1.. 1.. 1.. 47 98.701 1 ..... I 98.701 2.10 96.60 ....... 630.001 .. · 1 .. ·· .. 441 641 141 241 761 .. 1.. 1.. 1,1461$ 2,406.601$107.141$ .361$ 2,613.391$ 113.40 $ 2,320.191$ 79.801$ 1,483.931$ ·1$ .....

18 4

'''1

FIFTY-FmST DISTRICT-BUELL P. PARKS, D. D. G. M., Hornersville, Mo.

1~1

Kennett, 68 ••••••.. 131 101 101 31 6 31 .. 1.. 1 6 41 11 1 Four Mile, 212 .••••• 41··1 .. 1.. 1\ 11 3 61 61 61 Hornersville, 216 .•• 21 .. 1 11 .. 11 21 Cardwell, 231. ••.•• .. 31 ·1··· . 61 .. 1.. 1.. 11 11 .. ·1 8 Malden, 406 ••.••.•. 41 .. 1.. 1.. 3\ 4 411 2 1 11 4 11 1 ..... 7 21 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Senath, 518 •••.•••. Portageville, 166 •.• ... \ ... 1"'1 11 61 91 .. 1.. 1.. 1 21 1 '''1 Point Pleasant, 176. ... ... 1... 11 11 ...... ·1 ... 31 .. 1.. 1.. 1 New Madrid, 429 .••. 41 .. 1.. 1.. 11 2121 21 31 .. ·1 4 Parma, 660 •••••••• 4 1 ... 1.... 1 11 21 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Caruthersville, 461 •. 31 41 11 11 201· ·1. ·1·· Hayti, 671 ••••••••• 11 3\ .. ·1· .. 1 31 .. 1.. 1.. Steele, 684 ......... 7 7 61 21 61 .... 1 1\· .. 1 41 .. 1.. 1.. 4 .... 1. .,1 11 Bernie. 673 ........ 21 21 21 .. 61 .. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ...•..•. 601 431 371161 371 491 131 111 681 .. 1 11 6

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.. Credit $6.00.

"S"T ......

273.001$ 12.601$ .... 1$ 286. 60 1$ 27.80 $ 436.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 91 16.80 160.001 ...........•. 208.601 191.70 ....... 11$ 191.1 0 1 18.901 1.601 69 144.90 2.10 144.90 ..... ;.1 147.001 2.101 ..... 1 82.601 ...... 43 2.10 Nonel ., .... 90.301 94.60 ....... 1 96.601 6.301 ..... 1 112 14.70 300.001 ...... 236.201 4.20 I ··· .. 1 224. 70 1 ·······1 239.401 97 203.70 14.70 298.761 ...... 203.701 ...... I · .... 1 189.00 ....... \ 4.20 40 94.60 90.801 ....... Nonel ...... 84.001 10.601··· . ·1 32 69.30 1 ....... 74.301 2.101· ... '1 I .. · .. · .. 1· .... · 67.20 6.30 44 96.601 90.301 ....... 1 46.001 ...... 92.40 I 4.20 \ •.... 68 121.801 ... ... .., .. 1 121.801 ....... 276.001 ...... 121. 80 1 . . . . . . . , 8.40 212.10 ....... 102/ 214.201 6.301 ..... 1 220.601 6.001 ...... 6.80 138.601 ....... 142.801 144.901 100.001 ...... 681 2.10\ ..... 1 107.101 12.60 ..... \ 126.001 ....... 1 ...... 119. 70 1 . . . . . . . ..· .. · .. 1 119. 70 1 61/ 42 98.70 ....... 98.70 ....... None .....•. 1 ...... 88.201 10.601 ..... 1 9791$ 2,066.901$ 92.401$ 1.60\$ 2,146.801$ 102.90 $ 1,929.201$ 119.701$ 1,817.261$ ...... 1$ .....

13T

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ..... ......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT-KIPP C. JOHNSON, D. D. G. M., Poplar Blu1f, Mo.

'1:l NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

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FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT-C. EARL ARMSTRONG, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo. Mt. Zion, 827 •..•.. Ingomar, 636 •...... Mountain View, 637 . Alton, 266 ......... Woodside, 887 .••... Clifton, 463 ....••.. Koshkonong. 682 •.• Sampson, 298 .••... t Bayou. 866 ....... Rockbridge, 436 ..•. Robert Burns. 496 ... TOTAL ........

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Il4 ~ < ~ A A A rn rnrzl ~::a A < 0 Eo! ..::l l%l 0 Il4 Il4 81 8 81 21 2 16 2 71171"1" 1-----S23 $-678.30 $ 4.2~ .. 1$-682:501$-81.50 $ 661.001$ ...... $ 642.001$.· 1$ ....• 60 22 20 1 1 11 1'" 6 ...•..... ·1·· .. .• 62 130.20 1 1 130. 1 12.60 117.601······· 64. 1 I .. 8 7 7 1 1 9 ... 3 ... '1" " .. 89 186.90 2.10 1 189.00 18.90 170.101....... 190.00 •............ . ... "'111... 1... 1.......... 38 79.80 ...... 79.801 2.10 77.70. ...... 26.001 ....... 1· .. •.. 9 8 8 .. , 4....... 81 12 1.. \.... 69 144.90 8.401'" .. I 163.3 0 1.. .. .. . 168.301' .. , .. . None •••.. ··1 . 4 3 3 1 3 1 21 71...... 123 268.30 1 268.301 6.30 262.00....... 66.00 1 .. 301271271261 71 341 81161 361 .. 1.. 11 7041$ 1,478.40/$ 14.701$ 1$ 1,493.10/$ 71.40$ 1,421.701$ ...... 1$ 977.60 1$ .····.1$ .

~

Poplar Bluft', 209 .•.. Pine, 314 .. Composite, 369 .•... Naylor, 668 •.••.••. .... Greenville, 107 •••.. ~ Wayne, 526 . TOTAL ..

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11 31

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74

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12 6 1 21 21 . .71. . . . . ."\"1 . . . . .2

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11 ....· 31 11 ...... 11 .. I.... 71. 1 .. 1. . . 1. . . . 1 2 1 11 ''1'.1 .. 10 10 10 1 2 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . \ .. 6

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·1 .. .. 1 1 11"1 1 3\ 1 .. 11 4 7 6 ......... I 1 ........... I.. 341 361 381 31 191 891 91 161 201 .. 1112 • Credit $4.20.

20.•01$ ••.. $ 606.6 0 1$ 26.20 $ 480.801$ .. · .. · $ 16.601$ .•... 30.001 .....•....... 163.80 ....... 8.40.. .. . 176.401 12.60 ...... 1 ..... 68.80 4.20 64.60 ....... 66.001······· ...... None •............ ...... 1 ..... 166.90 10.60 166.40 ....... 60.40 24.601 ....... 1 •••••• ...... ,. . . . . 62.601 2.10 ........ 24.00 •...... 1 •••••• 10.60 ..... 1 268.30 14;70 243.60 ....... 112.00 20 ....... 1 . . . . . . 92.40 • ...... .. .. ·1 88. 112.00 ....... . ..... 102.90 ....... .. 10.6:~ .. ~:201 ::::: 1 .. ~0::20 ... 8:~0 ............... ::::::: 44 92.40 2.10 ..... , 94.60 6.30 88.20 ....... ... 142.80 ....... 68 142.80 ...... ..... 142.801 ....... 166.001· ...... I .. · .. · 7661$ 1.606.601$ 46.601$ .... 1$ 1,662.101$ 81.90 $ 1.624.001$ 60.401$ 640.001$ ...... 1$ .....

231 $ 80 28 79 26 118 42 60

.... 168.00 68.80 166.90 62.60 247.80 88.20

1".....

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I::::::


FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-GRANVILLE J. VAUGHAN, D. D. G. M., Ozark, Mo. Sparta, 296 ........ 41 41 31 .. 1· .. 1··· .1 .. ·1 11··· .1 .. 1.·1 1 Friend, 852 ..•..•.. °1 .1--1 .. Billings, 379 ••••..• •..411.. 'I ·1 3 31 .. · ... J . . . ·1··1 .. 1·· Clever, 645 ••.••.•.. 41 4/ 4 ......... 1. . . 1.· ·j .... I.. I .. I .. Claftin, 229 .••••..• 1 1.... 11 11 .. 1 . . 1.. Kirbyville, 264 ••... 4 51 3"1 11 ...... ·1· .. 1 11 .. 1.. 12 Forsyth, 453 .••••.. 21 2 2 1 21 31 .. ·1 11 l.I .. I.. Branson, 587 .•••... 1 31 51 .. ·1 21 3 .. 1.. 1.. 1 3 21 Galena, 515 ••••••.. • " ... / ..... / 1 .... 1... 1 11 15 1.. 1•. 1.. Crane, 519 .•....... 3 3 3..... 61 11 31 31 .. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 241 201 221 51 61 221 21 111 301 .. 1.. 1 3

'1'1"'1 "I'"

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Purdy, 148 .. tBarry, 367 .. Pythagoras, 383 ...• Seligman, 517 ...... Comfort, 533 •...... Mount Vernon, 99 ... Canopy, 284 •.•••••. Marionville, 890 .••. Decatur, 400 •••••.. Verona, 452 ..•••••. Red Oak, 468 ...... Stinson, 523 •••.•••. Miller, 667 •..••.... TOTAL ........

t No report received.

1...

481$ 100.80 102. 90 1$ ...... $ 102.901$ ..... ·1$ 222.60 $.. ~:~~I$. : :: : 1$ 222.60 10.50 212. 10 1 ...... 106/ 27 56.70 30 25.00 ............. 56. 70 1 . . . . . . . 63.001 6.30 6. 1 .... ·1 32 67.20 .. . . . . · . . . . 1 67.20 •...•.. 67.20 ....... 36.00 ....... 1 ••..•• 27 56.70 ...... 56.70 •...••. 70 20.001 ....... 1 ...... 56. 1 ....... 34 71.40 73.50 ....... 2.101 ..... 1 42.01 1 . . . . . . . 1 ...... 73·.. 1 ...... · 41 1 86.10 90.30 6.30 84.00 ....... 4.201 ..... 1 None ....... 1 ...... 80 168.00 172.20 10.50 4.201 ..... 1 100.001 ....... 1 ...... 161. 70 1 ....... 53 111.30 •.... ·1 .. · .. 1 111.30 •...... 111.30 ....... 139.50/ ....... 1 ...... 121 1 254.10 .· .... ·1 · .... 1 241.50 ....... 384.00 ..•.... 1 •••••• 254.10 1 12.60 5691$ 1,194.901$ 18.901$ .... 1$ 1,213.801$ 46.20 $ 1,167.601$ ..•... 1$ 1,046.511$ 30.001$ 3.00

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.....

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-WILLIAM N. MARBUT, D. D. G. M., Mt. Vernon, Mo.

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7 31 3 2 23 17 3 91 38 1.. 1•• 1.. Nonel$ ...... 1$ ..... 2381$ 499.801$ 62.501$ .... j$ 652.30/$ 36.70 $ 616. 60 1$ ..... '1$ 2 21 2..... 10... 3 2 1.. 1 ... :::::: ::::: .. ....6.3:?? ::: : :: : I ... :::::: : : : : : : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , .. ·1 .... 1.. 1.... . .. 4.201 I 380.101 12.60 367.50 ....... I 1,040.001...... .. .. 179 376.90 40 84.00 2.101" 1 86.10... . .. . 86.101 •.... , ./ 327.001.. .. . . . . 2 2 2 2... 11... 5 ...... 1.. 1.. 105.00. . . . .. . 1 105.00 23.10 81.90 1' . . . . . . 44.001 ••.... . . 50 110 231.00 ...... 1 231.00 8.4il 224.70'· 811.601 . . 3 •. . 1.... . 4 1 2 171 .. 1.. 1.. 161 317.10 8.401' ·1 825.50 12.60 312.901' . . . . . . 800.001 • ..••• 10 2 8 11 4 6 3 1 12 .. 1. 56 117.60 4.20. . . . . 121.80 12.60. . . . . . . . 109.20 166.001 .. .. . ... 2 6 2 2 81 .. \.... 94 197.40........... 197.40 8.40 189.00....... 168.00........ .. 223 4 ... 2 2"1"1" 34 71.40 2.101' . . . . 73.50. . .. .• . 73.50. . .. . . . 44.001 . ....• i :: .. :::: I: :I: : 18 37.80. • . . .. 87.8ill" .. . .. 37.80.. . .. .. 101. 76 1 1 1 1... .... ...... 4 1.. 1.. , •• 40 84.00 ••.... 1 84.00. . . . . . . 84.00. . . . . . . 60.00 •..... . .•••• 58 121.80 4.201 1 126.00 8.40 117.60....... 295.00 ....... 1 ...... 1 1 1.. 21 41 1 21 .... 1.. 1.. 2 381 241 211 71 361 681 131 291 841 .. 1 11 3 1,1081$ 2,326.801$ 77.701$ .... 1$ 2,404.601$ 142.801$ 2,154.601$ 109.201$ 3,941.261$ ...... 1$ .....

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I......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

FITTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-WALTER A. PHIPPS, D. D. G. M., Neosho, Mo. '1:l

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6.30 $ 113.401$ ...... 1$ 571$ 119.701$·· .. ·1$ .. · ·1$ 119.701$ 21.00 178.501 174.301 4.201 ..... 1 157.501 ....... 1 831 31 1 65.101 ....... 65.101 ....... , 65.101· .... ·1 ..... 1 18.90 459.901 2131 447.301 12.601 ..... 1 441.001 ....... 6.30 140.701 144.901 4.201 ..... 1 138.601 ....... 671 14.70 193.201 178.501 ....... 1 921 193.201 ...... I .... ·1 75.60 1 10.50 361 75.601 ...... I •.... 1 65.101 ... · ... 1 5791$ 1,215.901$ 21.001$ .... 1$ 1,236.901$ 77.70 $ 1,159.20 1$ ..... ·1$ 1

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74.00!$ ...... 1$ ..... 191.651 ..... ··1 ...... 140.001 ...... ·1 ...... 23.001 .... · .. 1 ...... 40.901 ....... \ ...... 200.001 " ..... 1 ...... 88.751 · ..... ·1 ...... 758.301$ ..... ·1$ •.•..

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-STANLEY HORN, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. Bonhomme, 45..... 11 11 2111 41 21 .. ·1 .. ·1 71 .. 1· ·1.. 101\$ 212.101$ 8.401$.·· .1$ 220.501$ 4.20 $ 216.301$ Bridgeton, 80 •••••• 51514411 711131 41 .. 1.. l .. 270 567.001 2.101 ·[ 569.101 14.70 554.401 WebsterGroves,84.. 4 71 71 2 91 31 1 101 10 1 28 1.. 1.. 1.. 6211 1,304.101 14.701 1 1,318.801 65.10 1,253.701 .. · Fenton. 281........ 2 1 .. '121"'1 41 .. ·1 21 .... 1 . . 1.. 1·. 1371 287.701 ...... 1 1 287.701 8.40 279.301...... Meramec.313 ••••••...... 1.·· 21··· 41 ... 1 11 31· ·1· ·1·· 491 102.901 2.101·····1 105.001 8.40 96.601...... Kirkwood. 484...... 3 51 4 51 ... ' 4 31' 41 12 1 . . 1.. 1 1 2771 581.701 .. · .. ·1 ·1 581.701 12.60 569.10.. .... Ferguson, 542...... 2 21 4 1/... 13 2 21 41 .. 1.. 1.. 1281 268.801 ...... 1 1 268.801 27.30 241.50...... Maplewood, 566..... 2 41 514 31 3 5 51 61. ·1· ·1.. 351 737.10 6.301.· 1 743.401 6.30 737.10.. .... Clayton, 601....... 16 14 13 2 31.... 2 41 13\ .. 1.. 1.. 2941 617.40\ 6.301 1 623.701....... 623.701...... Wellston, 613 ....... 14 12 14 7 5 21 1 4 211 .. 1.. 1 1 560 1,176.{)0 10.501 1 1,186.501 44.10 1,142.401. Valley Park. 629 •••• 12 9 9 .. 1 , 1 1 1.. , .. 1.. 691 144.90 1 ' 1 144.901....... 144.901 Jennings, 640...... 11 11 12/1 1 1 12\ 11 21 41 .. 1.. 1.. 180\ 378.001 2.10 1 380.101 25.20 354.90.... .. Gardenville, 655.... 7 7 5 .. 1 31 2 ... 1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1 1 126 264.60 6.30 1 270.901 4.20 266.701...... TOTAL........ 791 781 791311 291 1031 251 381 1021. ·1··1 3 3,163/$ 6,642.301$ 58.801$ 1$ 6,701.101$ 220.50 $ 6,480.601$ .....

1$ 17.501·······1· . 120.001· 1 .. 1 1,128.001 ·1 .. 240.001 1 .. 42.001.······\ ....•. 465.001 · ·1 .. 132.001 1 . 375.001 .. 1 724.20 1 .. 653.00 1 .. 80.001 1 ••••.• 60.001 1 .. 108.001 1 .. 1$ 4,144.701$ ., ·1$ .

1


FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-ANDREW B. STANLEY, D. D. G. M., Eldon, Mo.

l ..

Glensted, 260 •••••. •.. 1.. ·1 ••. 1"1 21· · .. 1· .. 1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. Versailles, 320 ••••• 11 ll 31 61 11 11 31 .. 1.. 1.. Barnett, 591. •••.•• 00 .1 ..... ·1 .. 1.. ·1 41 11 11 41 .. 1.. 1.. Olean, 184 •••••••.• .. . 1... 1.. ·1001 11 61· .. 1· .. 1.... 1.. 1.. 1.. Ionia, 381 .••.•.•.•. 91 91 91 21 41 61 31 31 61 .. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 101 101 91 31 101 211 51 61 131 .. 1.. 1..

391$ 80 28 65 1 2201 4221$

81. 90 1$ .... ·1$ .... 1$ 168.00 .·.· .. 1 ·····1 68.801 ...... 1 . . . . ·1 115.60 2.101· .... 1 462.001 16.801 · .... 1 886.201$ 18.901$ ... ·1$

81.90 1$ ...... $ 12.60 168.001 8.40 68.801 117.601 10.50 478.80 1 12.60 905.101$ 44.10 $

81.901$ ...... 1$ 165.40/ ....... , 50.40 ....... 1 107.101 ....... 1 466.201 ....... 1 861.001$ ...... /$

88.001$ ..... '1$ ..... 200.001 •.....•••••.. 9.001·· .... ·1··· ... 196.001·· .. · .. 1 ...... 314.001 .. ·.· •. 1 .....• 807.001$ ...... 1$ .....

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT-NAT. D. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo. I-"

Independence, 76 ••. 353 1$ 741.30/$ 29.401$ ... ·1$ 770.701$ 69.30 $ 701.40 1$ ..... ·1$ 340.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 61 51 41 21 14/ 33/· .. 1 51 31 .. 1001 .. c.n Summit, 263 •.••... · .. 1· .... · 11 1 .... 1 11 31· .. ·1 .. 1.. 1·· 210.001 ....... 207.90 2.101 ..... \ 210.001 ....... 1 284.001 ...... ·1 ...... 991 4.20 198 424.201 525.501 ....... 1 •..... McDonald, 324 ••••• 420.001 ....... 1 21 1 1 3 41 21 21 61 20/ .. 1.. 1 . . 415. 80 1 8.401 ..... 1 39.90 Blue Springs, 887 ••• . . . 1 . . . I . . ·1· ·1 .. ·1 .. ··\· .. 1 11 188.301 87 1 182.70 295.001 .... · .. 1 •••••• 5.601 .00 .. 1 148.401 ....... 1 41 .. 1.. 1.. Raytown, 891. ..... 111 51 514100.1 121 1 4.20 254. 10 / 249.901 ....... 1 132.001 ....... 1 ...... 254. 10 1 .. ·· .. 1 .. · .. 1 21 11 31· .. ·1 .. 1.. 1.. 18.90 Christian, 392 •••••. ... 1...... 001 21 147.001 101.601 ., . . . .. . ..••. 142.801 4.201 ..... 1 128.10/ ....... 1 681 91 ... 1... 1 21 .. 1.. 1.. Buckner. 501 .•••••. 2.10 69 147.001 Nonel ....... 1 .•.•.. 144.90/ ....... 1 41 21 1 .. 1 11 11 11 11 61 .. 1.. 1·· 144.901 2.101· ... ·1 Marlborough. 569 ••. 101 1 212.10/ 6.30 .... · .. ·1 205.801 165.001 ...... ·1 ...... 71 61 6 31 .. · 31 .. ·1 ... 1 131 .. 1.. /.. 212.10 ······1 .... ·1 14.70 546.00 6.30 I ..... I Mt. Washington. 614. 181 91 6 21 31 637.601 ....... 1 552.30 1 86.001 .. · .... 1 ...... 71 71 31 35/ .. 1.. /·· 26°1 6.30 127 Grandview. 618 ••• ,. 268.20 1 266.701 l.601 ..... 1 261.901 ....... 1 71 8 7 1 1 31 ... 1 21 81001 .. 1.. 76.001 ....... / ...... Grain Valley, 644 .•. 73 153.301 ....... 212.00/ ............. 163.301 ... 00 .1 · .... 1 163.301 ....... 1 11 31 3 .. 1. . . . . . ·1· .. 1... /.... 1.. 1.. /.. TOTAL ........ 561 391 331161 261 601 121 241 911 .. 1 . . / . · 1,5561$ 3,267.601$ 59.601$ .... [$ 3,327.201$ 165.90 $ 2,955.501$ 205.801$ 2,215.001$ .... , .1$ ..... ~


RECAPITULATION DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER AND DISTRICT NUMBER

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:s H. M. Jayne, 1. . W. J. Bray, 2 . W. E. Singley, 3 . . C. E. Evans, 4 H. Newman, 6 . C. F. Smith, 6 . GeO. Houchens, 7 . F. H. Binder, 8 . . R. F. Esders, 9 .... T. D. Williams, 10 . ~ E. C. James, 11 , . J. M. Gallatin. 12 . H. D. Taggart, 13 . L. E. Wilhoit, 14 . David A. Leslie, 16 . W. H. May,16 . C. S. Hicks, 17 ...•... T. D. Barnes, 18 . T. H. Edwards, 19 . L. H. Thomas, 20 . .E. W. Foley, 21. . Wm. F. Woodruff, 22 .. C. B. Waddell, 23 ..... J. W. Adams, 24 .•.... S. L. Jewett, 25 . J. R. Edwards, 26 ...• L. J. Graue, 27 ...•... P. A. Thomas, 28 .•... Wm. Ulery, 29 . Wm. E. Lange, 30 .

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15 1 15\ 10 111 151 121 17 1 131 3191 2981 29 331 161 12 1 14 181 13 1 121 61 1671

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26 42 A. Linxwiler, 31 ...... 1 •.... 1'1991 2.606.801 42.001 00. 00\ 2,647.301 71.40 2,431.801 4'.00 3,716. 990.66 10.00 1.00 27.30 I ••••• 2,306.80 46.20 2,269.60 •. . . . . 80\ 46 37 31 41 131 9 17[ 13 221 351 771 1711 21 .. 1 4 1,086 2,278.60 R. A. Breuer, 32 ...... R. C.Winkelmaier,33A 166 149 143 23 86 5671 691 1841 302 11 .. 1 8 11,787 24,752.70/179.33 1 3.62 24,928.41 1,167.37 23,761.04 ...... 11,064.00 ...... \ 6.00 E. P. Walsh, 33B ..... 140 126 129 27 591 4731 641 185 228 11 .• 1 9 11'356123'847.60 219.601..... 24,067.10 987.90 23,079.201 ...... 14,998.17 ...... / ..... 29.77 745.251 ...... • .... 664 1,373.40 60.401 2.101 1,421.70 73.60 1,318.43 Wm. C. Deacon, 34 ... 17 161 12 91 361 10 1 181.401" H 1 665.32\ ...... \ ..... 670 1,197.00 27.30\ ..... \ 1,224.30 66.70 1,167.60 ...... D. O. Bradley, 35 ..... 30 26 24 8 18 271 81 10 45 3 4,243.001· ..... J • • • • • 2,961.15 10.00 81.501 10.851 3,168.06 186.90 J. P. Hurtt, 36 ....... 26 25 23 7 15 891 141 311 401 .... I.. 1,4941 3,137.40 937 1,967.70 21.001 18.901 1,969.80 111.30 1,788.86 T. Jennings, 87 ....... 31 28 29 6 10 631 101 221 28 .... , .. 71.76\1,647.261 ..... ·1 •..•• 778.701 ...... 1 ..... W. I. Mayfield, 38 ..... 682 1,432.20 14.70\ ..... 1 1,446.90 77.70 1,369.20 ...... 20 16 17 7 81 371 21 81 32 1,617.60 I ...... \ ..... 1,398 2,936.80 144.90 ..•.. 1 8,080.70 86.10 2,994.60 ..... . C. L. Woods, 39 ...... 65 1 41\ 13\ 27 1 80 .. 46 41 37 10 66.70 1,918.461· ..... 1 ••••• 900 1,890.00 10.60 ... "1 1,900.50 42.00 1,801.80 H. H. Balsiger, 40 .... 26 22 23 2 5 20 I 21 17 32.. 1 •• 33.601. . . . . 1,396.50 37.80 1,212.05 147.00 2,868.451· ..... 1 •.... 649 1,362.90 M. E. Ewing, 41. ...•. 28 26 26\ 7 161 181 7 131 33.... 8 724.60 388.60 1,286.80 I .... ··1 ...•• 1 M. D. Gwinn, 42 ...... 35.70 644 1,142.40 6.30\ ..... \ 1,148.70 12 14 16 71 81 17 41 6 18 1" 1 1,064.77\ ........... 812 1,705.20 46.20 12.60 1,788.80 65.10 1,673.70 ...... D. V. Morris, 43 ...... 18 19 14 5 221 31/ 8 16 41 .. 1.. 1 4,075.60 •. . . . . 1,966.50. . . . .. • .... L. L. Purkhiser, 44 ... 30 23 24 161 1241 1001 71 331 1101. 2 4,069.80 219.80113.601 4,276.60 210.00 6,099.00 81.90 1,623.00 20.00 2.00 2,540 5,334.00 140.70 16.80 5,467.90 277.20 J. E. Windle, 45 ...... 66 60 49 111 681 1321 211 601210100 001 2 24.70 902.561 10.00 1.00 818 1,717.80 23.10 6.301 1,734.60 69.30 1,640.60 C. A. Swenson, 46 .... 20 18 17 9 111 331 81 19 65 .. 1.. 1•• 867.40 160.60 298.90 •... ,. . .... 486 1,018.60 39.90. • . . . 1,068.40 60.40 J. N. Sparks, 47 ...... 12 7 11 164 131 241 131 61 301 20[. J. C. Akers, 48 •...... 40 39 37 121 751 30 . . . . . . 1,266 2.637.601 23.101" 00" 2,660.70 167.60 2,302.60 200.70 2,877.12 ...... 1 ••••• 893 1,876.30 18.90. . . . . 1,894.20 90.30 1,803.90 .. .. .. 886.001 ·• .... 1 ..... J. A. Kinder, 49 ...... 27 22 20 6 11\ 431 51 131 19 8 79.80 1,483.93 ...... 1 ••••• .351 2,613.39 113.40 2,320.19 Geo. A. Sample, 60 .... 51 60 63 6 44 641 141 24 751 . . . . . . 1,146 2,406.60 107.141 B. P. Parks, 61. ...... 979 2,066.90 92.401 1.601 2,146.80 102.90 1.929.201 119.70 1.817.25 1' ... ·.1 •...• 60 43 37 16 87 491131 681·· 11 6 977.60 ...... 704 1,478.401 14.701' . .. . 1,493.10 71.40 1,421.701 ...... K. C. Johnson, 62 ..... 30 27 271 26 71 34 31 16 361 .... 1 1 60.40 640.001 ...... . .... 45.601. . . . . 1,662.10 81.90 1,624.00 766 1,606.60 C. E. Armstrong, 53 .. 84 86 38 3 191 391 91 161 201.. 11 2 1,046.611 30.001 8.00 669 1,194.90 18.901.. . . . 1,213.80 46.20 1,167.60 ...... G. J. Vaughn. 54 ..... 24 20 22 6 6 221 2\ 111 801 .... ," 77.701..... 2,404.60/ 142.80 2.164.60 109.20 3,941.261' . . . .. • .... W. N. Marbut, 66 ..... 38 24 21 7 36 681 13 291 841.. 1 8 1,108 2,326.80 768.30. . . . .. • .... W. A. Phipps, 66 ..... 26 29 28 9 10 871 4 121 281.... 2 679 1.216.90 21.001' . . . . 1,236.90 77.70 1,169.20 . . . . . . 4,144.701. • . . .. . .... S. Hom, 67 .......... 68.80.. .• . 6'701.101 220.60 6,480.60 ...... 79 78 79 81 "11031 26 381 1021· 1 8 8,163\ 6,642.30 807.001 •...•. . ...• 861.001 ...... 422 886.20 18.90. . . . . 906.10 44.10 A. B. Stanley, 68 ..... 10 10 9 3 10 21161 61 13/ .... 1.. 69.601.. .. . 3,227.20 166.90 2,966.60 206.80 2,216.00. • . . .. . .... N. D. Jackson, 69 ..... 66 39 33 16 26 60 12 241 911 .. 1•• 1.. 1,666 3.267.60 TotaL ..•........•. 2,11011,92611,869166911,33914.932173911,61013.6761 31 6161 91,1201191,362.0012,890.121126.761194,116.87110,296.07 177,922.6216,990.631133,315.671 120.001 16.00

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FmST DISTRICT-HAROLD M. JAYNE, D. D. G. M., Memphis, Mo. County Lodge No. I Location Clark , Revere.......... 1671 Revere. . . . . . . . .. .. . ...•.... Fairmont ......• , 290lwyaconda ...•... .. . Eldorado ......•• 318 Luray •.......... .. . . . . . . .. Hiram.......... 362 Kahoka. . . . . . . . .. Gothic .••......• 0 436IAlexandria : " .. • .••..•.. St. Francisville •• 588IWayland Scotland Memphis........ 16 Memphis. . . . . . .. Gorin 72IGorin " " •..... Rutledge 572lRutledge Schuyler Middle Fabius ' 244IDowning•..•..... Lodge of Love .•• ' 259ILaneaster ....•.. , " ...... Queen City ...•.. 8801 Queen City •...... ..•... Glenwood ..••••• 427 Glenwood .•.•.... .. , Greentop •. '" G35IGreentop........ 0

Master George Ivins J. C. Bowman Charlie Snyder Russell L. Nelson W. C. Rebo Wilton Semones Phillip D. Payne Arthur G. Huff R. D. Westcott Cleo L. Garrett Wm. F. Shepherd .. Donald Fraser Chas. V. Chaltin . 0

Secretary Time of Meetinst Geo. Hardy 3rd Thursday.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. W. H. Pulliam 2nd and 4th Fridays Roy L. Stevens 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Alvah C. Bridges 1st and 3rd Fridays 0'1. P. Foley ...•..•. 2nd Tuesday ...• ; N. N. Frazee 1st Thursday , Ralph Y. Ladd ...•. 1st Friday R. E. Shacklett 1st and 3rd Thursdays oJ. A. Bailey ......•. 1st and 8rd Fridays J. B. Bridges...... 2nd and 4th Thursdays.......... H. C. Burkland 2nd and 4th Fridays ........•.... G. L. Lauer ..••..• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays H. W. Roberts ...• 1st Saturday on or after full moon.. 0

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Charter Date Oct. 1. 1892 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 12,1869 Oct. 17, 1870 Oct. 19,1898 Sept.2G, 1907 May G, 1852 Oct. 13,1892 Sept. 28, 1905 May 26, 1865 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 10,1871 1872 Oct. 22, 1924

SECOND DISTRICT-WILLIS J. BRAY, D. D. G. M., Kirksv:p1e, Mo.

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Kirksville . Paulville . Adair .........•. Novinger •...•.•. Ark •••••.•..... Colony ...•.....• Novelty •••...... Edina ••..•...... Greensburg ..... 0

lOiiIKirksvil1e 319lBrashear. . . . . 366IKirksville ...•..•. 5831 Novinger •.•••... 6 Newark ........• 168 Colony .•••.••..• 181 Novelty.. ••• • .••. 291IEdina 414IGreensburg 0

0

Wm. D. Pitts Robert R. Raush Theo. H. Travers Clemintino Rock Homer R. Rich

June 30,1864 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 13,1881 Sept. 27, 1906 May 8,1852 May 24, 1864 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .........•....•.........•....•••......•.....•...... May 28, 1859 F. D. Cornelius I. D. Williams 2nd Friday Oct. 15,1866 L. A. Corbin C. R. Slocum 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•..... Oct. 13,1871 •••••••

0

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G. C. F. R. Chas. C. R. R. G.

Chambers ...• Moore F. Link ...•. Truitt ...•... Hayden

•••••••••••••••••••

1st and 8rd Tuesdays ...•........ 1st Tuesday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ......•..•• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ....•...• Saturday on or after full moon •

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THIRD DISTRICT-WALTER E. SINGLEY, D. D. G. M., Green City, Mo. Putnam Hartford .. , ..•.. .. . Somerset." ••... ....... Unionville .•..... ....... Lucerne ......••. Sullivan •...... Humphreys .. '" . .. . ...•.. Seaman . ....... Green City . .', .•.. Putnam .•....•.. ....... Pollock ...•..•.. , ....... Arcana .....••... .... , .. Winigan ... , ....

171 IHartford , 206Ipowersville 210 Unionville 394 Lucerne. . . • . . . •• 82IHumphreys 136IMilan 169 Green City ......•

Zora Smith........ 1st Saturday M. L. Brown ..••.. 1st and 3rd Mondays J. U. Brown ....•• "2nd and 4th Mondays ..........•........ . D. H. Humphreys .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Chas. E. Smith 1st and 3rd Mondays J. M. Border...... 1st and 3rd Thursdays

::::::: ~ ~~~, ~'. ~~.~~~ "'. '. ' '.' ~~: .~'..r.:.~.r.e::::

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389 Harris 640 Winigan

Forrest Smith..... . . .. Glen A. Bruner Noah F. Matthews .., , F. C. Pratt O. O. Mettle Roy M. Luyster.......

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Wm. T. McCallister... Tom D. Purdy J. B. McCollum R. R. Crist.

30,1857 29,1861 30,1861 21, 1903 13,1887 9,1857 , 16,1884 28,1859 16,1884 , •... Oct. 13,1871 Oct. 14,1889 May May May Oct. Oct. May , .. Oct.

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FOURTH DISTRICT-eLYDE C. EVANS, D. D. G. M" Trenton, Mo. Grundy .. .. .. • .. • Mercer,

·ITrenton '1 ll1lTrenton .•...••.. ISamuel M. Rissler , . Laredo 253 Laredo John E. Thomas Galt..... . . . . . . .. 423 Galt R. H. Pollock......... Spickardsville .•. " 524 Spickard ......•. R. W. Ashbrook" , Mercer.......... 35Iprinceton ......•. O. M. Seeley

IF. J. A. R. C.

M. McKinney .. 'Ilst and 3rd Thursdays ,, 'IMay 9,1850 S. Kelso 2nd and 4th Mondays Oct. 15,1868 R. McKay...... 2nd and 4th Fridays............. Oct. 15, 1890 B. Kennedy 1st and 3rd Wednesdays " Oct. 16,1886 S. King 1st and 3rd Tuesdays June 9,1853

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FIFTH DISTRICT-HENDRIX NEWMAN, D, D, G. M., Bethany, Mo. Harrison .. , .. .. . ...... ...•.. ..... , .,

Bethany........ 97lBethany Lorraine 128 Ridgeway , Lodge of Light •. 257 Eagleville Cainsville 328 Cainsville New Hampton 510lNew Hampton •.. Prairie 5561Gilman City

J. O. McQuarry John A. Dale P. R. Vanzant L. R. Thompson Wm. F. Weed Geo. S. Guanell

,. Ohas. T. Bridges J. L. Mirgon ..••.• E. O. Martin C. E. Glaye R. L. Grun .. , Wm. E. Richter

2nd and 4th Tuesdays May 1st and 3rd Mondays Oct. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays , Oct. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•....•.... Oct. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays •..•......... Oct. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Oct.

H

25,1854 7,1878 15,1868 13,1870 28, 1925 19,1892 1--0

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o LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SIXTH DISTRICT-cURTIS F. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Darlington, Mo. County Gentry ......•. .. • ..•..•. .. • .. • ..

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.. • .. • .. • .....•. Worth ......•. .. . ........ •.......

Lodge Havana.. .•..... Stanberry. . . . . .. Gentryville ....•• Athens Alanthus ...•.... Ancient Craft Berlin .•........ Jacoby ...•...... Grant City...... Defiance........ Allensville ...•.•. Jonathan

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No.1 Location Master 21IMcFall W. R. Willis 109 Stanberry ...••.. ' Roy Wineinger •....... 125 Gentryville ••••.. , Hugh Jameson 127IAIbany....•••••. Walter W. Quigley, 252 AIanthus Grove .. C. R. Trump 3771King City .•••... B. F. Lindley 378IBerlin ...••.••.•. C. H. Carson 447IDarlington •••.•.. Curtis Harris 66 Grant City •.•..•. Louis Esterkyn 88 Sheridan S. M. Churchill 198 Allendale ...••.•......•................ 321IDenver T. J. Jones

Secretary Time of Meeting Charter Date R. T. Kidney .•.... 1st Saturday Oct. 6,1879 S. A. Goodding.... 1st and 3rd Saturdays ......•..... Oct. 17, 1879 Alex Patton ......• 2nd and 4th Saturdays Mar. 10,1850 L. F. Smith 2nd and 4th Fridays , May 8,1851 L. W. Morris 2nd and 4th Saturdays •.......... , Oct. 15,1868 J. F. Heath 1st and 3rd Thursdays ' Oct. 13,1871 J. B. Owens, Jr 2nd and 4th Fridays Sept. 24, 1906 Fred Minkner ...••. 1st and 3rd Fridays Oct. 17,1901 Geo. Hunt .••••••• 1st and 3rd MondayS ...•......... Oct. 10,1894 Wm. C. Walker , 2nd and 4th Mondays Oct. 17,1878 , .........•.•.•.•...•......•...••....•.•..•..•...... May 30,1860 C. M. Craven 2nd and 4th Wednesdays , Oct. 12,1869 o

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SEVENTH DISTRICT-GEORGE HOUCHENS, D. D. G. M., Ravenwood, Mo. Nodaway .••.. Xenia..... .•.••. .. . ...•. Quitman ...•.... ...... Ravenwood •..... •..... Graham .....•.•. ...... White HalL .•..• ...... Kennedy ..•..•.. ..... , Burlington. . • . •• ...... Gaynor City ...... Nodaway ....•. Pickering .•..•.. ...•.. Guilford ....•... , ...... Clearmont ...... Skidmore ..•.....

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50IHopkins ...•.•... Richard P. Chaney Fred J. Yeomans .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays 196IQuitman .••.•..•. S. W. Bilby ...•....... J. J. McDonald .... 1st and 3rd SaturdayS ...•....... 201\Ravenwood •..••. Clyde Adcock J. J. Smith ..•.•.•• 2nd and 4th Thursdays 289 Graham ••••..... Harry C. Haun F. E. McNeal .•••.. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS 301IBarnard .•.•••••. William Hartman Paul D. Stalling .•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays 329IEImO •..•.....•.• Z. R. Alexander L. R. Pruitt ......• 1st and 3rd Mondays 442 Burlington J ct•••. Edwin Lewis •......... Henry S. Staples ... 1st and 3rd Fridays ............• 465 Parnell ..••.•..•• Geo. L. Felton W. C. Timmerman. 1st and Srd Wednesdays .........• 470IMaryvilIe ••...••. Melvin Vale F. R. Marcell ••••.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays 472 j Pickering••••.••......•..............................••.•...•.............................. 474IGuilford C. C. Bledsoe Alex. H. Wilson 2nd and 4th Thursdays 5071 Clearmont ...••......•................. 511 Skidmore .••.••.• F. M. Caston Enos D. French 2nd and 4th Mondays

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••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

June May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

2,1866 30,1861 13,1892 18,1900 15,1886 30,1870 13, 1881 12,1882 17,1877 11,1873 15,1874 17,1874 12,1888

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EIGHTH DISTRICT-FRED L. BINDER, D. D. G. M., Bigelow, Mo. Atchison .. . ...•. ...... ...... Holt .. . ............ .. .. .. ..

North Star•.... Sonora Northwest •..... Fairfax Maitland .•••.... Oregon......... Forest City •..... Mound City Craig ,

157IRockPort Glenn C. McNall ....•.. 200 Watson •......... Luther W. Hudson ..•• 858 Tarkio ••.......•. Loyd E. Hills ........• 488IFairfax F. C. Whitford 112IMaitland.....•... Claud W. Ellis .....•.. 13910regon •..•..•... James M. Curry 2141Forest City .•.... John Beasley 2941Mount City Fred H. Bender 606ICraig F. M. Ward

J. E. Welch A. W. Landon Alvin E. Andersen. 1. C. Senft Hiram L. Leeper Silas W. Skelton Chas. H. Williams .• W. R. Swope Wayne A. Sharp, Jr.

1st and 3rd Thursdays May 29,1856 1st and 3rd Thursdays Oct. 19,1876 2nd and 4th Thursdays .........•. Oct. 17,1884 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Oct. 15,1874 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•........... Oct. 19,1867 1st and 8rd Mondays ......•....... May 31,1855 1st.and 8rd Thursdays .........•. May 30,1861 2nd and 4th TuesdaYB Oct. 14, 1868 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Sept. 29, 1909

NINTH DISTRICT-EDWARD BAKER, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph, Mo. Andrew .. . ...•.. ....••. ....... .....•• •....•. ....... Buchanan .. . ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

Savannah....... Helena .•..•.•... Lincoln. • • • . . • .. Whitesville ...... Rosendale •.•..•• Valley •..•..•..• Cosby. • • • . . . • . •. Agency.......... Wellington...... St. Joseph....... Birming ••••..••. Zeredatha .•..... Rushville Brotherhood Charity .•••.•... King Hill .•..•.. Saxton .••.•.••.. Wallace Park

71lsavannah ...•.... 117 Rochester ..•..... 138 Fillmore 162 Whitesville 404 Rosendale •..•••.. 413IBoICkOW 600 Cosby. . • • . . • • • .. 10IAgency .•••...... 22IDeKaib •••••••.•• 78jSt. Joseph ....... 1501 Faucett ••....•••. 189 St. Joseph 288IRushville •.....•.. 269 St. Joseph ...•... 3811St. Joseph .•..... 3761St. Joseph •...... 508ISaxton ..•••...•. 627IWallace

Basil L. Workman W. W. Hall E. W. Tracksel H. E. Shanks Clyde Bradford.. . . . . .. F. N. Foster...... Clinton O. Morris Fisher Potts ...... M. H. Lewellen W. B. Wood ...•... Wm. F. Dodds .......• McF. Price John Heller Willis Durant Chas. Lee Campbell John T. Marteny .•. R. B. Sampson H. V. Redmon Everett G. Woolleiner. W. L. Mulvania Allen S. Warren Chas. S. Mays Mobson Hoar •......... Geo. L. Markley Elmer Moore S. G. Hiner Edgar R. Kelly B. T. Andrews ...•. Chas. F. Strap, Jr Wm. A. Piner ...•. Arthur D. Berkshire Jesse Moore ...•..• James E. Edwards Milton Edwards .... Daniel R. Mizzell F. M. Pemberton ..

1st and 8rd Thursdays .....••.•.. Oct. 24,1844 2nd Monday and 4th Saturday ••••. Oct. 20,1929 1st and 8rd TuesdaYB ...•••.•.•... Jan. 2, 1866 1st Saturday and 3rd Wednesday .. May 28,1858 2nd and 4th ThursdaYB ........••. Oct. 22,1896 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•........•. Oct. 17,1873 1st and 3rd Saturdays Sept. 30, 1908 1st and 3rd Saturdays ........•..• June 1,1866 1st Saturday ..••................. May 6,1852 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ... .'........ Oct. 14,1846 4th Saturday .•.•......•......... May 22,1858 2nd and'4th Tuesdays •........... May 28,1859 2nd and 4th Mondays ...........•. May 26,1865 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 19,1922 2nd and 4th Mondays .....••••••.. Oct. 13,1870 1st and 3rd Thursdays ........•... Oct. 13,1870 1st and 3rd Saturdays ......•..••. Oct. 12,1882 2nd Thursdays Oct. 2,1918

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TENTH DISTRICT-THOMAS D. WILLIAMS, D. D. G. M., Maysville, Mo. County

DeKalb .. . ..... " ....... · · Daviess " ., .. ....... ....... ....... · ....... ......

Lodge Union Star . Weatherby . Parrott ......•.. Osborn . Continental. . Clarksdale . Western Star . Pattonsburg . Gallatin . Altamont •....... EarL . Lock Spring . Jameson . Jamesport. .

I

No.1 Location' I Master I Secretary 124jUnion Star John T. Roberts · R. A. Johnson 236IWeatherby John R. Dean R. F. Cope 308 IMaysville •••..•.. Clifford C. Combs Richard F. Brant 31710sborn .........• Lewis E. Doak Raymond Brand 454IStewartsville Freeman R. Schlup Roy W. Kibbey 559IClarksdale ••..... John H. Mann....... Donald Barrow 16IWinston Allan H. Hooker E. C. Creekmore .. 66 IPattonsburg W. N. Gromer Roy Weber 106IGallatin .......•• J. C. Ferguson Wm. O. Tague 108IAltamont ......•. M. W. Shaffer Elmer Kirkendoll. " Wm. T. Pugh, Jr W. GUY Weldon 285ICoffey 488ILockSpring J. R. Stanley John Bills 500IJameson Frank L. Scott J. E. Robison 5641J amesport •...... Frank R. Gay W. K. Dinwiddie..

I

Time of Meeting I Charter Date 2nd and 4th Saturdays Oct. 16,1885 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 11,1888 1st and 3rd Mondays Oct. 12,1869 2nd and 4th Saturdays Oct. 12,1869 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ' Oct. 21,1908 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......•.... Oct. 12,1893 1st and 3rd Wednesdays June 1,1886 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .......••.... May 29,1854 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...•.....•... Oct. 16,1879 2nd and 4th Thursdays Sept. 18, 1919 1st and 3rd Wednesdays Oct. 16,1868 1st and 3rd Thursdays Oct. 16,1874 1st and 3rd Thursdays Oct. 11,1877 1st and 3rd Mondays Oct. 9, 1898

CIi~ton

Liberty Holt Angerona Clay Kearney Temperance

. 31ILiberty ....•..... . 49IHolt . 193iMissouri City . 2071Excelsior Springs . 311IKearney . 438\Smithville H~mple . 37IHemple •......... VlncI1 ...•••..•.. 62ICameron ..•...... Plattsburg ...•.. 113\PlattsbUrg Gower . 397 Gower ...•.•.••.. Lathrop . 506ILathrop

Mathias S. Coleman John B. Burris John F. Wheeler J. A. Moles H. W. Hallar Silva B. Tawn Bert McCann Will Leutzinger Akey R. Smith F. G. Hawkins R. B. Robinson

Edgar Archers A. C. Eby R. E. Hicklin W. A. Craven John N. Shouse A. O. Lowman J. M. Boyer J. F. Poland ...•.. R. W. Hayward H. T. Bowlin J. L. Taylor

2nd and 4th Mondays 3rd·Friday 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Mondays ............• 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Mondays .....•....... 1st Thursday 1st and 3rd Saturdays 1st and 3rd Mondays

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ELEVENTH DISTRICT-EMSLEY C. JAMES, D. D. G. M., Plattsburg, Mo. Clay " ............ ............ ............ .. .. .

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8 Oct. May May May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. May Oct. Oct.

9,1840 26,1853 28,1869 30, 1861 12,1869 16,1872 18,1900 19,1868 9,1860 16,1872 12,1882

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TWELFTH DISTRICT-JOHN M. GALLATIN, D. D. G. Mo, Chillicothe, Mo. Caldwell ...•.. IKingston .....•.. " Braymer ...••••. Hamilton •.••.••. Polo•..•......•. Breckenridge . ...... Cowgill . Livingston .•.. Friendship ..•..• " •... Spring Hill ...•.. .... Benevolence ...•. .... Chillicothe ....... •••. Chula •••......•. •... Wheeling ...••••. .... Dawn ...•.......

.

118 Kingston ......•. D. P. Wolf 135 Braymer ....•.... C. B. Woolsey 224 Hamilton J. W. Ward •.......... 282 Polo ...•..•..••.. Chas. Bathgate 384 Breckenridge ...•. J. O. McCormick 561 Cowgill ......•... P. H. Percifull. 89 Chillicothe ...•••• Crusen G. Updyke 1551Spring HilL ..•.. William Black 170IUtica ••.......... W. T. Stone 333 Chillicothe Earl E. Bowen 388 Chula ......•.... James May 434 Wheeling Roy E. Ogan 539 Ludlow. . • . . . • . ..

A. E. Malotte D. Irving Farrar J. E. Deems ....••. W. R. Spicer .....•. Jesse L. Walker ..•. R. A. Thomson Martin L. Nerly J. T. Nash A. J. Stamper F. W. Cornue •..•. Omar J. Owen H. J. Barnes •.••.. ..........•.•......

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1st and 3rd Thursdays Oct. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays •......•.••. Oct. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............• Oct. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .......•• , Oct. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .•.......•. Oct. 2nd and 4th Fridays .........•..• Oct. 1st and 3rd Fridays ..••.••..•..•• Oct. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ......•..... June 1st Saturday ............•........ May 2nd and 4th Fridays ...•......... Oct. 1st and 3rd Thursdays •....•...•. Oct. 2nd and 4th Thursdays Oct. . ...•..•.....•.•................. Oct.

19,1867 17,1889 10,1869 16,1878 30,1870 12,1893 12,1847 2,1855 30,1857 12,1867 3,1871 17,1873 17. 1889

82ILinneus 86IBrookfield 227ILaclede ••••..•••• 238IBucklin 325IMeadville 481IMarceline

R. G. Dray F. L. Sensenhaffer T. T. Lamme Jessie H. Pet~it C. R. Keith Harry D. Foster

A. J. Knapp E. J. Faut Lyle Savage E. L. Nickerson D. F. Grose Wm. E. Parks

2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ......•..... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .....•.... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Every Tuesday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•.......

•..•..•. .. • •..•••.. •••.•.•. •....•.. ........ ........ Shelby •••...•. .. • •••••••. ••••..•. •.••..•.

Callao: Bloommgton. . . .. McGee Censer ..••..•... La Plata •..•...• Lodge of Truth .. Excello Elmer St. Andrews..... Shelbina Hunnewell ••.•... Bethel ..•••.••... Clarence

88ICall~......•.... 102 Bevier 1461College Mound 172/Macon 237 La Plata .•••..... 268 Atlanta .•••... '" 332IExcello 648IElmer 96IShelbyville •..•... 228IShelbina 415iHunneweIl •....•. 537IBethel. •......... 662 Clarence •........

Berno J. Billeter Elmer Jones Emmett Rector R. B. Hansen Ray F. Begole Claude Attebury Geo. G. Miller C. L. Cochran Clyde L. Ralls I. W. Caldwell, Jr S. H. Brown Claude W. Musgrove Oliver O. Hedrick

Ransom ~'. Wood 1st and 3rdTh-ursdays , D.M. WllhaIru!.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays L. J. Kamp 2nd and 4th Tuesdays B. B. Stock 1st and 2nd Fridays L. A. Carter•••••• 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...•.....•• P. Conduitte ...••• · 1st and 3rd Mondays ........•••.. Ross King 1st and 3rd Wednesdays C. I. Murry 2nd and 4th Mondays Samuel P. Engle 2nd and 4th Fridays .••.....•.••• E. E. Key lst and 3rd Fridays R. F. Lyell 1st and 3rd Fridays ....•.•..•••.. Sam Ziegler 1st and 3rd Mondays ••••..••••.•• Chas. W. Layne 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ....•.......

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5,1846 29,1869 29,1862 26,1864 12.1869 17,1889

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FOURTEENTH DISTRIC'l'-LUTHER E. WILHOIT, D. D. G. Mo, Macon, Mo. Ma.~on

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THmTEENTH DISTRICT-HERMAN D. TAGGART, D. D. G. M., Linneus, Mo.

Linn Jackson......... ,••••...•... Brookfield....... .. • •........ Cypress ..•...... ............ Bucklin ............ Dockery ............ Marceline

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June 2.1866 May 10, 1849 June 1,1855 June 14, 1875 June 22.1866 Oct. 15, 1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 20. 1920 May 10.1848 May 29.1882 Oct. 18.1871 Feb. 22.1888 Oct. 22,1924

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued

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FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-DAVID A. LESLIE, D. D. G. M., Williamstown, Mo. County Lewis

Marion

Ralls

Lodge INo., Location I Master I Secretary I Time of Meeting I Charter Date . Wyaconda~...... 24/La Grange willis-A. Mussetter Leslie Edwards .••.. 1st and 2nd Thursdays ...•...... Oct. 11,1877 Monticello....... 68 Monticello ..•.... Berkley D. Million J. W. Hawkins .•.. , 2nd and 4th Thursdays Oct. 12,1887 LaBelle ••••..... 222jLaBelle •.•.••.•.. John A. Leslie A. L. Boone ......• 2nd and 4th FridayS ......•...... Oct. 11,1888 Craft. . • • . . . . . .. 287 Canton. . . • . . • • •• Goo. D. Constanty A. Clyde Stork.... 1st and 3rd Mondays ......•...... Oct. 16, 1868 Williamstown 870 Williamstown C. H. Samples J. S. Smith ......•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays Oct. 18,1870 Lewistown .•.... 494 Lewistown ....••............•................................•.......•..•..••••.••...•...•. Oct. 12,1876 Ewing ...•..•... 677 Ewing ...•..•..•. John S. Vickers Frank Bugh •....... 1st and 3rd ThursdayS ...•.....•.. Sept. 7,1906 . Palmyra........ 18 Palmyra ...•..•.. Ed. F. Wright R. L. Hayden 2nd and 4th Thursdays Apr. 26,1881 St. John's....... 28IHannibal. Roy S. Painter Wm. H. Blackshaw, 1st and 3rd Mondays , May 30,1861 HannibaL ..•.••. 188IHannibal••.•... , Thomas Simpkin Julius Brown 2nd and 4th MondayS ••.•..•..... , May 80,1860 Philadelphia ...•. 6021 Philadelphia Ernest Ward Thos. J. Bleigh ...• 1st Thursday ...•••••••..•..•...• Oct. 11,1877 . Ralls............ 33ICenter R. J. Rice G. C. Layne 2nd and 4th Wednesdays May 27,1863 Lick Creek 302IPerry C. W. Peckerd W. D. Morris 2nd Tuesday Oct. 16,1868 New London.... 8071New London .•.............................•...................•........................... Oct. 12,1869

Eolia . 14IEolia....••...••. Clarksville ....•. ' 17IClarksville Perseverance ..•. 92ILouisiana Phoenix ...•••... 136 IBowling Green .•• ~ .. F?-,ankford .. 192Frankford PIke . 399 Curryville. . . . . ..

Monroe .. . •..... ..••... .•..... ..•...• ••..... .•.....

Paris Union .•... Florida .•..•..... Middle Grove .•.• Monroe •..•••... Madison ...•••.. , Santa Fe •..•..•. Holliday ....•....

J. C. Mitchell •........ E. R. Spence Wm. P. Haley Thos. R. Turpin ...•... C. M. Brown R. K. Rose

Wharton Schooler K. C. Patton W. H. yaeger H. M. Strother R. J. Parkham J. H. Sisson

Saturday on or before full moon ..•. Oct. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS Oct. 1st and 3rd Mondays Oct. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ...........•. May 2nd and 4th MondayS ,May 2nd Thursday................... Jan.

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SIXTEENTH DISTRICT-WARREN H. MAY, D. D. G. M., Louisiana, Mo. Pike ......•... .. . .. . ............ :: .. .. ,

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16,1884 8,1880 12,1847 9,1867 26, 1869 24,1871

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SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT-CHARLES S. mOKS, D. D. G. M., Monroe City, Mo. 19/Paris 23 Florida 421Middle Grove 641Monroe City •.••. 91 IMadison 4621Santa Fe 660 Holliday

J. F. Flynt W. E. Thornton E. H. Engle E. Ross Dirigo •....... Harve Hall C. O. Powers L. L. Curtwright

J. L. Gwynn Arch Bousman F. H. Newman Christy A. Gentry .. C. O. Farris r. N. Bailey T. E. Sparks

2nd and 4th Mondays March, 1836 4th Saturday · May 6,1852 1st Friday June 2,1866 2nd and 4th Mondays .........•... June 2,1866 2nd Tuesday Oct. 12, 1847 4th Friday Oct. 17,1873 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Oct. 17,1923

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EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT---oLAUDE ·L. DALE, D. D. G. M., Huntsville, Mo. Ran?,olph •...• Huntsville .....•. Milton .. Clifton Hill . Moberly ..•.•.... Cairo .•.•••....• Higbee . Jacksonville . Clark .

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30IHuntsville ...•..• Claude L. Dale ....••.. 151 Milton .....•.•.•. J. M. Meals .........•. 161\Clifton Hill .•.... E. E. Hurt 344IMoberly Ralph N. Blake 4861 Cairo ...•....... Harry L. Shaw 527 Higbee W. A. Daugherty 541 Jacksonville H. J. McKinney 610IClark Ray Walker .•.........

M. D. Evans ....•.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ...........• Arthur Haak..... 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..........•. H. C. Eubank •..... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .........•. John W. Tate 2nd and 4th Mondays Uel L. Dameron 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•••..•. Edwin B. Hawkins. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays W. N. Miles 2nd and 4th Saturdays ...•.....•. l:<~. L. Ornburn 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..........•

Oct. 8,1840 Nov., 1865 May 28,1869 Oct. 13,1870 Oct. 14,1874 Oct. 15,1885 Sept.24,1902 Sep.t.28,1910

Eureka......... Warren......... Triplett ••••..... Westville Salisbury Rothville •....... Pee Dee Cunningham.... Mendon ......•..

73IBrunswick Jasper M. Peery A. G. Lynch 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 74IKeytesville .............•.....••.••.....................•....•..•..............•.....•..••.. 122jTriplett ......•.. W. P. Gaines •••••.•... C. C. Stobaugh 1st and 3rd Thursdays ...•.••.•.. 202\westville Caleb Colyer Walter Haines 3rd Saturday 208 Salisbury Geo. M. Prescott John Mode 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 426/Rothville Leslie E. Cameron Lee Clair •••••••••• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ....•..•. 498iMusselfork A. E. Lains J. E. Prather 4th Saturday 525ISumner •.....•.. Clyde Stoner A. Stobaugh ..•...• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•...... 628IMendon Ronald McGilbray S. L. Leipard 2nd and 4th Mondays ...•........

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NINETEENTH DISTRICT-ARTHUR G. LYNCH, D. D. G. M., Brunswick, Mo. Chariton .. • ..••. ...... ...... ...... •...•. ...... ...... ......

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Oct. Oct. Oct. June Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

16,1845 20,1845 12,1896 2,1866 19,1867 21,1897 19,1888 16,1884 28,1925

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TWENTIETH DISTRICT-L. HERBERT THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Carrollton, Mo. Carroll ...•... " ....•••. ........ .....•.. ........ " Ray. . . . . . . . ..

De Witt......... Wakanda........ Bogard Hale City •..•••.. Carroll Bosworth Hardin..........

39lDe Witt 52 I Carrollton ••••..• 101lBogard 216IHale ....•....... 249INorborne 597 IBosworth 322THardin

Johrf W. Beningfield Eugene D. Ashbrook L. R. Jacoby Earl L. Deardorff ....•. Leo Vinyard J. H. Riggs ......•.... Boyd Myers

Ross E. Jones T. L. Herbert •..... D. W. Minnis D. E. Parish .•..... R. E. Parrish Clinton Simpson O. C. Grimes

1st and 3rd Thursdays .•........ 2nd and 4th Thursdays .••...•••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Mondays ••.•.•••...• 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd and 4th Thursdays.......... 1st and 2nd Tuesdays.. . . . . . . • . ..

Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 17,1842 Oct. 14,1866 Oct. 12,1893 Oct. 19,1867 Sept.30, 1908 Oct. 12. 1869

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-FmST DISTRICT-HENRY G. NOLAND, D. D. G. M., Parkville, Mo. County Platte

..

No. I Lodge Location . Rising Sun . 13lBarry " Weston . 53 Weston Compass . 120IParkville .. Camden Point . 1691Camden Point Rowley . 204!Dearborn .•.•.... Fidelity .••...... 339 IFarley ...•..•... Adelphi . 355/Edg erton Platte City . 504 Platte City

0

Master E. R. Williams Harry Vail Jesse L. Borden A. J. Hillis Geo. W. Kuby, Jr Guy Kamphef Edgar Gaines Robt. B. Baker

Secretary F. R. Williams Earl W. Foley J. W. Fleming W. K. Bywater Donald C. Dean Sam Ray W. H. Mizener " Arthur Ham

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Time of Meeting 1st Saturday ...•................. 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd Monday 3rd Tuesday 2nd Wednesday .................• 2nd Wednesday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays

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Charter Date May 8, 1852 Oct. 11,1842 May 10,1850 Oct. 18,1867 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 18,1888 Oct. 13, 1881

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TWENTY·SECOND DISTRICT-eHARLES T. KORNBRODT, D. D. G. M., Kansas City, Mo. Jackson

1Heroine . Albert Pike .•.... Kansas City •... Temple . Cecile-Daylight .. Rural ...•....... Westport •...•... Ivanhoe . Gate City . Orient . ..South Gate •..... York '" .. Swope Park . Sheffield East Gate . Northeast ....•.. Country Club . Rockhill . Alpha 0

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104jKansas City 2191Kansas City ...•. 220lKansas City 2991Kansas City •..... 305 IKansas City 3161Kansas City 340lKansas City 446 I Kansas City 5221Kansas City 5461Kansas City 547JKansas City •.... 5631Kansas City 6171Kansas City 6251Kansas City 630 i Kansas City. . . .. 6431Kansas City ...•. 6561Kansas City 663iKansas City 6591N. Kansas City 0

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Abe M. Shafton Carl L. Soderstram Paul Kennedy Wm. J. Gladish Earl A. Cave Melvin V. Dooly Chas. W. Gerard Nelson F. Lyon Conger R. Smith Claude E. Axley Earl C. Crago John C. Skagj.ts Homer M. Kuny W. E. Netherton Collier R. Gibbs Robert F. Parkes Frank W. Goodnow Bernard B. Cohen Robt. E. Anderson

J. S. Epstein L. V. Knapp ....•. J. W. Schlaegel ...• A. D. Ludlow S. C. Hoyt Geo. W. Paddock .. Frank Haswell J. O. Christensen .. Fred H. Knight F. M. Huffman Thos. M. Pratt r. F. Strycker L. Verne Hosie •... Len. F. Owens E. W. Berry....... Geo. R. Hodge ..••. R. E. Robertson •... J. Weinsaft ehas. L. Shippee 0

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2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd and 4th Mondays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...•........ 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Fridays............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays " 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays .........•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Mondays

H

May 10,1849 Oct. 17,1895 May 30, 1861 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 17,1923 Oct. 12,1869 Oct. 11,1894 Oct. 17,1901 Oct. H,1883 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15,1890 Oct. 17, 1895 Sept.H, 1911 Sept. 25, 1912 Oct. 21, 1913 Sept. 2,1916 Sept. 21, 1921 Oct. 28,1925 Sept. 21, 1921

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TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT-eAMILLUS B. WADDELL, D. D. G. M., Lexington, Mo. Laf~rette

..... ..... ..... ..... . . . .. Ray. . . . . . . . .. ............ .......... ..........

Wa!er!y . LE;XI~gtO~ . HIggmsville . Lafayette . Concordia ••..... Mount Hope •.... Richmond ......• Ray ..........•.. Bee Hive •••....• Ada .

61IWaver}y Ernest Peters 149ILexington Edwin R. McKean 364 Higginsville Gustav W. Stegen 437 Corder ...•...... Lloyd F. Slusher 464ICOncordia Delmar O. Elling 47610dessa .•........ James R. Gammon 67IRichmond Andrew Blair 223 Camden. . . . . . . .. John Bailey.. . . . . . . . .. 393ILawson .•••..... , J. S. Smith 44410rrick M. R. Clark

J. A. Allison W. R. Eckle H. E. Gladish S. M. Reynolds Everett O. Pape C. D. Newhard R. B. Hughes W. T. Brinkley T. E. Manso J. H. J. Clare

2nd Thursday 3rd Tuesday ...•................. 2nd and 4th Mondays 3rd Tuesday 2nd Monday 2nd and 4th Fridays 4th Monday 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd Thursday

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June 2.1866 June 4,1866 Oct. 14,1884 April 6,1887 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 16.1874 Oct. 11,1842 Sept. I, 1921 Oct. 13,1871 Oct. 16,1872

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-JOHN W. ADAMS, D. D. G. M., Marshall, Mo. Saline

. Arrow Rock ...•. C~mb~idge..•... MIamI . Trilumina ...••.• Barbee ....•..... Malta .....•..... Oriental •.....•.. Nelson .

66\ArrOW Rock. . . .. C. L. Lawless 63 Slater ...•....... E. L. Gordon 86IMiami. J. M. Hanna 2061 Marshall '.' .. Harry M. Buck 217lSweet Springs J. Elmer White 402 Malta Bend •..... L. W. Nye 618/Blackburn ......• Geo. T. John 660 Nelson Webster W. Walker

B. C. Bradshaw T. R. Haynie, Jr F. M. Burruss Geo. H. Fuller Will C. Pelot E. H. Wilson W. C. Borchers R. B. Finley

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2nd Thursday Oct. 1st Tuesday June 4th Friday June 1st Thursday Dee. Last Friday , Oct. 1st Tuesday Oct. 3rd Tuesday .............•....... Oct. , 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Oct.

11, 1842 2,1866 2,1866 9, 1867 19,1867 17,1901 11,1883 12,1893

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TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-SAMUEL L. JEWETT, D. D. G. M., Boonville, Mo. Cooper ......•. Cooper . Pleasant Grove . .. • .. . .•. Wm. D. Muir •..• .. ........ Wallace ... , . . . . . • . . . . Prairie Home Howard Howard ...•••... .. .. Fayette ......... . . . . . . . Livingston .•.... , ....... Armstrong .

36IBoonville Frederick L. Shields Clarence L. Hurt .. 2nd and 4th Fridays 14210tterville Harry S. Ramseyer A. N. Howlett 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 277IPilotGrove Arthur Wolfe Earl Hays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 466IBunceton C. T. Nelson H. L. Shirley 1st and 3rd Fridays ............• 6031prairie Home W. Ray Ferguson Fred L. Schilb 1st and 3rd Thursdays 4 New Franklin , H. H. Bushmeyer C. L. Painter .•••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays 47IFayette ...•.••...................................•...................•...................•. 61 Glasgow Wm. C. Jones Jewell W. Audsley .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays Y. F. Malone A. M. Green 1st Thursday 70 Armstrong

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Oct. May Feb. Oct. Oct. May Oct. Oct. May

9, 1841 31,1866 6,1878 16,1872 13,1882 6,1862 11,1842 12,1876 26,1864

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JULIUS R. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Centralia, Mo. County I Lodge NO.1 Location I Master I Secretary I Time of Meeting I Charter Date O. B. Tribble J. C. Hunt lst and 3rd Thursdays Oct. 19,1867 Boone ...•.... ICentralia ...•.... 591 Centralia ...•..... Rocheport •.••... 67 Rocheport. • . • . .• George Harper...... .. J. P. Huntington.. Thursday on or before full moon. .. Oct. 20, 1848 .......•. Twilight ••••••.. 114 Columbia N. T. Gentry J. F. Oliver 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Oct. 1~, 1867 Ashland . 156 Ashland •••••..•. Arthur Jensen A. F. Martin ••..... 1st and 3rd Fridays May 28,1859 Sturgeon ..•..•.. 174 Sturgeon Wren Owings A. E •. Boothe 1st Friday May 30,1856 Hallsville . 336IHallsville A. S. Owens F. L. Faucett 1st Friday Oct. 17,1878 Ancient Landm'k 356IHarrisburg •••••• Robert G. White E. S. Watson 1st and 3rd Saturdays ...•..•..••. Oct. 27,1873 Hinton ..... \ .... 455IHinton ..••..•.•• W. C. Phillipe Tilford Goslin ••••.. 1st and 8rd Saturdays Sept. 6,1904 Acacia ......•... 602IColumbia ...••... G. H. Gribble R. R. Wright 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Sept. 29, 1909

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TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-LOUIS J. GRAUE, D. D. G. M., Mexico, Mo.

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Audrain. . . . .• CentraL . ••..... Laddonia••.•.... ••.... Social •.••••..... ...... Hebron .. •...... Vandalia . ••..... Houston ••••..•.. Callaway •..... Fulton .•........ " •..••. New Bloomfield .. •...•. Portland •••••.•• ...... Tebbetts ..••..•. •..••. Shamrock .•••... ...... Mokane ••.......

81 Molino Samuel S. Rowe Clyde W. Ellis 2nd Saturday Oct. 12,1893 115 Laddonia ••.•••••.................................•...............•.......••............... Oct. 28, 1882 266 Martinsburg ..••. J. W. Mackey.. . . . . . .. Carl Johnson...... 2nd Friday ....................•. Oct. 15, 1868 354 Mexico ..•...•..• Chas. M. Fox .•........ B. C. Denton ...••. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ..........•.. Oct. 13,1870 491 Vandalia Otis S. Williams A. L. Motley 2nd Friday Oct. 12,1876 580 Gant ••.•••.•.••• A. R. Brown •....•.... H. W. Groves .••... 3rd Friday .........•...•..••..... Sept. 27, 1906 48 Fulton W. E. Rowe Wm. L. Meng 1st and 3rd Friday Oct. 17,1841 60 New Bloomfield .. Marvin E. Woody Wade F. Enloe 2nd and 4th Mondays May 25. 1854 242JReadsville .•••... Marshall Gibson •...... J. C. Garrett 1st and 3rd Fridays .•....•..•... May 26,1865 565ITebbetts ••••••••. W. W. Griffin .......•• S. T. Huffmaster 2nd and 4th Saturdays ....•...... Oct. 22,1902 585 Shamrock ...•.... J. N. McKibben W. S. Armstrong •• Thursday on or before full moon Sept. 27, 1906 612IMokane ....••.... H. F. Buechner T. F. Hafner 1st and 3rd Thursday Sept.n, 1911

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TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRIOT-PAUL A. THOMAS, D. D. G. Mo, Montgomery Oity, Mo. Montl!,0mery .. Griswold ..•••.•. Wellsville ...••••. Montgomery ••... Florence •••.•... Jonesburg .••.... Daggett •...•....

178ILiege ......•••... Wm. H. Aydelott Chas. C. Maxwell .• 194 Wellsville H. L. Burwell Geo. R. Barton 246jMontgomeryCity. V. R. Donling Hugh N. Cason 2611New Florence Roger L. Ellis E. H. Duehbert 457IJonesburg•.••... R. H. Snarr ....••...•. J. E. Reeds ••.•.... 492 McKittrick .••.... Virgil Zumsteg .•...... Wm. F. Huenefeld ..

2nd Monday ...•........••.••..•. 2nd and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 1st and 8rd Mondays 3rd Monday •.••••.••••.•.••...••. 1st and 3rd Saturdays

May 28,1858 May 80,1860 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 12,1893 Oct. 12,1876

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TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-WILLIAM ULERY, JR., D. D. G. M., Elsberry, Mo. Lin,~oln •......

•..... , •...... •....•. ....... ....... .......

T!oy ...•.•••.... SIlex ...••.•..... New Hope •....• New Salem ...•. Louisville ....... Nineveh ......•. , Moscow .

34ITroy J. Hugh James Andy J. Blair 2nd and 4th Mondays Oct. 7,1841 75Isilex .•••........ Orva Z. Lovell •.....•.. E. C. Teague Friday on or before full moon ...• , Oct. 21,1899 199 Elsberry Carlyle Galloway H. K. Cunningham .. 2nd Thursday ...•..............•. May 81, 1860 270 Winfield ......•.. C. H. Johnston ......•. H. H. Arnhold ...•. 1st and 2nd Saturday............ Oct.' 15, 1868 409 Louisville ...•..•. Herbert Boston •....... H. Higginbotham •. 3rd Saturday •...•................ Oct. 17,1901 47310lney ' Chas. Wombles •....... D. G. Hazzard ...•. 1st Saturday .•.....•.......•...•• Oct. 15,1874 5581Moscow Mills Reed Powelson F. Karrenbrock 4th Saturday ....•.............••. Oct. 13.1892

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THIRTIETH DISTRICT-WILLIAM E. LANGE, D. D. G. M., Wright Oity, Mo. St. Charles ..•. " .••. " •••• Warren .....•• "

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June Wentzville...... 46IWentzVllle ••••••.................................•....... ~~ Palestine •...•••. 241 St. Charles .•..... George Schuster ......• E. R. Engholm ..... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays •.....•...... May Mechanicsville •.. 260IHowell .........• H. S. Fulkerson R. L. Fulkerson ••. , 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ...••.... , Oct. Pauldingville.... 11 Wright City , G. C. Schmitt C. H. Feix ..•...••. 1st Tuesday, 3rd Saturday •...... May Warrenton ...•.. 609 Warrenton ....•• , Marvin Feuring A. H. Koelling .•... 2nd and 4th Fridays .........•... , Oct.

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2,1866 25.1865 30,1868 8,1852 1,1917

THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT-ALBERT LINXWILER, D, D. G. M., Jefferson City, Mo. Cole. . . • • . . • .• J etferson •..••.•. " •••••..... Russellville .••••• " ••••••.... Hickory Hill ..••. " •..•....•. Centertown ••.•. Mo~~teau•..•• Tip~on. ~ •••..... Cahforma ...•••. Moniteau •.••.... Clarksburg . Os,~ge ...••.• 'IC~amois••...... LInn ...•.....••.

481Jetferson City H. H. Darling .•....... R. L. Gwinn .....• 1st and 8rd Mondays .......•..... Nov. I!), 1841 2nd Friday ..••..•..••••..•••.... , Oct. 11,1888 90 Russellville , E. W. Plummer ...•... W. B. Thompson 211 Eugene W. L. Scrivener J. E. Dooley 1st Thursday ' Oct. 19,1867 611 Centertown J. H. Son Hermon Miller 1st Monday June '18, 1910 June 2,1866 56 Tipton .•.•.....• Roscoe L. Collier .....• J. A. Conn •••....• 2nd and 4th Thursdays 183 California ...•.•. R. H. Mueller .......•• R. L. Fulks •..•.... 2nd and 4th Fridays .......•...•• Oct. 19.1898 295IJamestown ....•. Otto Fullrich ........•• S. R. Johnson ...••. Saturday on or before full moon •••. Oct. 15,1868 563IClarksburg ••.••.. Earl Donley •••........ Fred Bailey ......•. 1st and 3rd MondayS •.••..••...• Oct. 15,1891 185IChamois .....•••• August Langendoerfer .. Arthur H. Sieburn .. 4th Friday ....••••....•........... May 28,1857 826 Linn .........•.. J. Arthur Moore...... Clyde Morton.. . . .. On or before f. m. and 2 weeks after Oct. 19. 1892

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICT8--Continued THmTY-SECOND DISTRICT-RANSOM A. BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo. County Franklin " •..... •..... ...... •..... ;, ...... ...... Gasconade "

Lodge Evergreen...... Sullivan......... Gray Summit Hope Fraternal. Columbia ......•. Easter Union Hermann....... Red Bird ....••.. Owensville......

No.1 Location 271New ~aven 69ISullivan 1731Gray Summit ..•. 251 Washington ...•.. 363IROberteville 584 Pacific •.......•.. 5751St. Clair 693IUnion 123IHermann ......•. 684/Red Bird ...•.... 62410wensville

Master D. W. Kappelmann E. A. Benson Robert J. Holekamp Franklin G. Gaebler S. U. Pritchard J. M. Pullin E. C. Johnston. Dan Shepard Fred A. Jackisch L. E. Licklider H. Underwood

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Secretary Time of Meeting W. I. Cassidy, Sr 2nd and 4th Thursdays C. S. Betz lst and 3rd Saturdays Aug. J. Holthaus 1st and 3rd Thursdays W. A. Pfautsch 1st and 3rd Fridays H. P. Radeacker .•. 1st Saturday L. M. Roemer 2nd and 4th Thursdays R. C. Murphy 2nd Tuesday. Paul W. Vitt 2nd and 4th Fridays W. D. Stoenner 1st and 3rd Mondays .......•.... C. G. Sewell ......•. Saturday on or before full moon .. J. H. Hansen 1st and 3rd Thursdays

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Charter Date May 26,1864 June 25,1866 Sept. 23, 1903 Oct. 16,1867 Oct. 12,1870 Oct. 13,1887 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 7,1907 May 10,1860 Sept. 27, 1905 Sept. 25, 1912

THmTY-THIRD (A) DISTRICT-ROBERT C. DUFFIN, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. City. Missouri........ Geo. Washington. Mt. Moriah...... Pomegranate.... Erwin.......... Occidental Pyramid Keystone Aurora......... Paul Revere Tuscan " Itaska.......... Euclid Clifton Heights .. Rose Hill Olive Branch Magnolia Triangle Trinity Shaveh St. Louis Co... University St. Lo~is City. Commonwealth .. Purity. . . . . . . . .. Theo. Roosevelt ..

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liSt. Louis 91St. Louis 40:St. Louis 951St. Louis 1211St. Louis 1631St. Louis 1801St. Louis 2431St. Louis 2671St. Louis 330ISt. Louis 360 St. Louis. . . . . . .. 4201St. Louis 5061St. Louis 520\St. Louis 660 St. Louis 676 St. Louis 6261St. Louis 6381St. Louis 641 St. Louis 646 St. Louis 6491St. Louis 6641St. Louis 658 St. Louis. . . . . . .. 661 St. Louis

Thomas B. Cooper Robt. C. Brinkman Edw. F. Schilling Hugo J. Beiseman John C. Wicker Hans Buechele Cecil H. Miller Geo. R. Lanty A. D. Kessler Harrison L. Bucher Geo. F. Morrison Louis H. Huetteman Arthur Davisson J. E. Winterton, Sr•.... Earl H. Pleitech Edward H. Schmitt Chas. A. Hofer John A. Baumgartner .. Alfred D. Bodamer Theo. H. Nolte James E. Baker. Fred J. Jeffrey R. S. Reamer......... John T. Heard 00

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J. Wohradsky, Jr Robt. C. Duffin H. A. Borgmann Emile E. Vetter A.A.Blankenmeister C. L. Alexander R. S. Lorimer Chas. W. Speirs Harry Wandell Wade H. Funk William C. Hilmer.. G. E. Black Merle E. Campbell .. J. E. Winterton,Jr.. Chas. C. Jackson Emilio V. Corte James H. Leathers .. Henry G. Diller W. P. Morgan H. W. Williams Alfred A. NaIl Duval O'Neal. John Heines. . . . . .. R. W. MacDonald ..

1st and 3rd Thursdays Sept. 4,1821 2nd and 4th Tuesdays May 10,1849 1st and 3rd Saturdays Oct. 14,1841 1st and 3rd Saturdays Sept. 21, 1916 2nd and 4th Fridays May 9,1861 1st and 3rd Mondays May 29,1856 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 13,1916 1st and 3rd Wednesdays May 26,1865 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Oct. 19,1868 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 26,1928 1st and 3rd Tuesdays........ . . .. Oct. 13, 1870 1st and 8rd Mondays Oct. 16,1872 1st and 3rd Mondays Sept. 21, 1917 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Oct. 10,1894 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Oct•• 15, 1891 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Sept. 26, 1906 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Oct. 15,1913 1st and 3rd Saturdays Sept.29, 1915 2nd and 4th Thursdays Sept.21,1916 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Sept. 22, 1920 1st and 3rd Mondays Sept. 22, 1921 1st and 3rd Thursdays Sept. 21, 1921 1st and 3rd Mondays. . . . . . . . . . . .. Sept. 12, 1921 2nd and 4th Mondays .........•..• Oct. 17,1923

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THmTY-THIRD (B) DISTRICT-WALTER J. SIMON, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo.. 21St. Louis St. Louis City. Meridian.. . . . .. . Beacon , 31St. Louis St Louis..... . . . 20 St. Louis Naphtali.. 251St. Louis Polar Star. . . . . . . 79 St. Louis Pride of the West 179 St. Louis 2181St. Louis Good Hope Cosmos. .. . . . . .. 2821St. Louis Cornerstone. . . .. 323 St. Louis America 3471St. Louis Cache 416 St. Louis Anchor. . . . . . . .. 443 St. Louis West Gate 445 St. Louis Lambskin. . . . . .. 460ISt. Louis Harmony. . . . . .. 4991St. Louis Apollo. . . . . . . . .. 529 St. Louis Algabil. . . . . . . .. 544 St. Louis Forest Park , .578ISt. Louis Tower Grove. . .. 631 St. Louis Mizpah. . . . . . . .. 639 St. Louis Ben Franklin. . .. 6421St. Louis Pilgrim. . . . . . . .. 652 St. Louis Pro~ress. . . . . . .. 657 St. Louis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Eo W. Muellhaupt Arthur V. Schopp .. 2nd and 4th' Thursdays Louis G. Theby Frank L. Magoon .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays.......... Joseph Kohn Henry A. Steiner 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Geo. Wertich Paul E. Eckardt 2nd and 4th ThursdayS Francis G. Hyke Joseph L. Kohner .. 1st and Srd Fridays Wm. G. Jenkin Wm. M. Schisler 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Arthur L. Weber Robert L. Dixon 1st and 3rd Saturdays Chas. Siegel Sam Broadbent •.... 2nd and 4th Mondays Walter Nentwig W. R. Schmitt 1st and Srd Mondays Felix A. Sucher F. Wm. Kuehl 2nd and 4th Tuesdays August Schmidt JosephW. Schuette. 2nd and 4th Saturdays John W. Calhoun A. W. Reiter 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Edwin B. Partenheimer. Edward McGuigan .. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays. . . . . . . . . . .. , B. C. Burroughs 2nd and 4th Wednesdays W. A. Nolde Walter E. Taube Cecil Street 1st and Srd Mondays Wm. Ellison George Ruths 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Louis H. Hoffman Edwin W. Mueller .. 2nd and 4th Fridays Chester W. Rese Wm. C. Rese 2nd and 4th Mondays Arthur M. Jacobs 2nd and 4th Thursdays Leo G. Bayless De Forrest L. Provost .. Walter H. Voss 2nd and 4th Tuesdays •.......... Herman S. Hollander Morris Popper 1st and 3rd Thursdays E. J. Koestner Theo. C. Teel 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Wm. A. Tomforde Fred J. Mahner 1st and 3rd Thursdays

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May 5,1802 May 10, 1849 Oct. 24,1836 Oct. 14,1839 Oct. 14,1846 May 28,1858 May 30, 1861 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 12,1869 Sept. 17, 1919 Oct. 14,1871 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 19, 1917 Sept.18,1918 Sept. 19, 1917 Sept. 26, 1906 Oct. 2,1918 Sept. 29, 1915 Sept. 26, 1916 Sept. 21, 1921 Oct. 5,1921

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THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-WM. C. DEACON, D. D. G. M., Harrisonville, Mo. Cass. • . . . . . . .. ... , •••..... · •..•••..• .. .••••....• · •..•..... . . . , ..••.... .••.•••... .•.••.•..• •....•.... .. • ..••..... ............ · .•.•.....

Index ........•.. Cass ...•...••••• Grand River •..•• Wadesbu!g ••.••. NonpareIl. . Dayton •.••..•.•• Belton ...•••.••. Raymore ..•.•.•. Jewel .•••.••..•. Coldwater .•..... Archie ...••••..• Cleveland .

54/Garden City ...•• H. P. Dyar G. C. Kimberlin 1st and 8rd Tuesdays ...•........ Oct. 15, 1884 Wm. P. McCooL ..• 1st and 2nd Fridays ......•....... Oct. 17,1867 147 Harrisonville ..... Edward L. Kennedy 276IFreeman •••..•.. Geo. C. Nelson Leon R. Mitchell 8rd Saturday ......•............. Oct. 15,1868 848 Creighton ..••... Clarence W. Eggers F. C. Blossom •..... Friday on or before full moon ..... Oct. 14,1880 872 East Lynne .••••. Hial H. Miller Wm. H. Schader Saturday on or before full moon .. Oct. 17,1873 386IDayton ••.•..••••................................•....................................•.... Oct. 18,1871 450IBelton ..•...•..•. John M. Farrell R. L. Johnston ...• 1st and Srd Tuesdays ......•...•.. Oct. 6,1872 451 Raymore .•...... C. V. Liggett Ira M. Davis 2nd and 4th TuesdayS ...•........ Oct. 13,1892 480lPIeasant Hill ...•. Earl A. Williams R06S Thomas ....••. 2nd Friday .............•...•.... Dec. 20,1887 485IDrexel ••••••••••. Gloyd W. Phillips E. C. Swearngin .•.. 1st and 8rd MondayS ....•......• Oct. 3,1881 633 Archie ..••••..••. J. K. McDonnell E. M. Goodrich Last Tuesday.. . . . . . . . . . . . • • • . . .. Oct. I, 1914 , .. G. W. Cole 2nd Tuesday •.................... Sept. 20, 1920 651 Cleveland .•...... C. W. Frazee

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-DUDLEY O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo. County Bates .•....••• " •..•..•.. •..•..•.. •.....•.. •.••..••. •..•..•.. ......... •........

Lodge Hume Amsterdam..... Butler. . . . • • . . .. Rockville •••..... Tyrian. . . . . . • . .• Crescent Hill •... Rich Hill Foster

No.1 Location Master Secretary Time of Meeting 130IHume.......•••• C. F. Porter ........•.. W. A. Bewley .....• 1st and 3rd Thursdays .........•. 141IAmsterdam••••.. Jessee Kipper E. A. Smiser .....•. 2nd and 4th TuesdayS ......•...• 254IButler•..•••..... Chas. E. Trosper ...•.. H. M. Cannon ••••. 1st and 8rd SaturdayS. . . • . • . . . . .. 341\Roekville E. L. Midkiff S. H. Bothwell 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 350 Johnstown J. P. Herrmann B. E. Gilliland Saturday before full moon....... 868IAdrian ...••••... Leslie D. Harper J. E. Gr088hart 2nd and 4th MondayS ...•..•..•.•. 479\Rich Hill J. A. White L. F. Anthony 2nd and 4th FridayS 554 Foster •.....•.•.. C. B. Vickers O. D. Jennings Every Fric\ay

Charter Date Oct. 14,1886 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 15, 1868 Nov. 18,1900 Oct. 12, 1870 Oct. 13,1878 Oct. 18,1881 Oct. 15,1891

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THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOLLY P. HtJRTT, D. D. G. :M., Sedalia, Mo.

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Benton .. • ••••••. Johnson •..•.. .. .. " •.•.••. ....... ....... Pettis ..

Cole Camp Shawnee ......•• Knobnoster .•.... Holden Corinthian ••..•. Cold Spring Chilhowee Sedalia Granite ...••.... Green Ridge La Monte

5951Cole Camp 653\Warsaw 245 Knobnoster ••••.. 262 Holden 265Iwarrensburg •... 274 Leeton 487IChilhowee 236ISedalia 272ISedalia .•.•...... 425 Green Ridge 6741La Monte

Lester W. Taylor J. R. Ashinhurst S. L. Adams ...•...... Clyde Jones John E. Cross W. H. Abington ...•... Marcus Wallace W. Merle Elliott J. R. Smetana G. D. Rayburn R. L. Tucker

E. H. Preuitt J. A. Logan O. F. Elliott ....•.. J. T. Glass, Jr H. M. Cash ••..••.. E. E. Courtney W. H. Tempel. W. J. Kennedy Sid B. Kennon L. E. Nicholson G. B. Wellman

1st and 8rd MondayS 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Fridays 1st and 8rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Fridays 1st Friday 3rd Friday .......••.....•........ 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd Friday

Oct. 28,1926 Sept. 21, 1921 May 26,1865 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 16,1877 Sept.27,1906 May 29,1864 Oct. 15,1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 28, 1906

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THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRIC'l'-THORNTON JENNINGS, D. D. G. M., Clinton, Mo. y He,?r

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Agricola .....••• Montrose .•...... Clinton .....•..• Calhoun .......•. Blairstown ...•.. Deepwater . St. Clair. . . . .. St. Clair . .. . ..... Circle ...•.....•. ...... Lowry City .•..... Appleton City . ...... Star ....•.......

29IWindsor •.•.•.•.. E. D. Allen .•......... O. F. Weiss ..•.... 286IUrich W. A. Weidman R. E. McDonald 343IPetersburg ...••.. H. H. Ross •••......... R. E. Waugh •..•. 408IMontrose ...•.... Glen S. Elliston Chas. P. Gardner .. 548IClinton Chas. C. Calvin ..•..•.. C. C. Canan 552ICalhoun •........ J. A. Morgan •.......• M. R. Munday 567IBlairstown J. W. Stansbury L. H. Fisher 5621 Deepwater ...•... Snyder Bailey......... A. S. Croner 27310sceola ....•••... John Logan Peery ....•. Geo. W. Davies 342IRoscoe ......•... R. V. Kelly C. A. Weinlig 403 Lowry City J. L. Irvin U. L. Davis 4121APPIeton City C. C. Browning .....•.. R. F. Powell 419 Taberville R. E. Colson T. M. Sandage

1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st Friday ....•.•..............•. Wednesday on or before full moon 1st and 3rd Mondays ....•....•... 2nd and 4th Fridays ......•..... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ....•...... 1st and 2nd Thursdays .....•..... 1st and 3rd Fridays.............. 4th Thursdays ....•.............. Thursdayonorbeforefullmoon •.. 1st Friday 1st Monday ...•..•..•.•.••...•... 4th Saturday

June Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. July Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

2,1866 19,1889 13,1870 13,1871 15,1890 16,1891 4,1882 17, 1896 15,1869 13,1870 13,1873 18,1871 16,1872

THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-OREN SIMPSON, D. D. G. M., Richland, Mo. Camden .•..... .. . ..•... Laclede. . . . . .. :: .....•. ....••. Pulaski. ..•... .. ..

Linn Creek . Mack's Creek •... Laclede ••.•..... Competition •.... Conway •..••••.. Waynesville .•... Richland . M~~ler Bru~ey . ......... Ibena ......•....

152\Camdenton 433 Mack's Creek 83ILebanon 432ICompetition 528 Conway. . . . . . • •. 375IWaynesville 385 Richland 2081 Brumley. • . . • • • •. 410 Iberia

O. W. Myers D. B. Claiborne O. Ray Fowler ••...... Roy A. True W. I. Mayfield D. D. Joslyn Arthur Schneider Orr Van Stavern Otis B. Miller......... E. H. Harris...... Roy C. Wilson J. L. Mitchell Ross Dodd H. B. Warren ...............•...... ..........••..••••. Fred Spearman Chas. E. Brown

2nd Thursday 1st Saturday ...•....•............ 1st Wednesday 2nd Monday ....................•. Saturday on or before full moon.. 2nd Saturday ................•.... 2nd Wednesday ..•..•.....••.......•...•.•..•... 1st Friday

77ISteelville J. W. Cushing 312 Cuba ...•...•.... Paul T. Carr 225ISalem ......•.... V. E. Davidson •...... 94 Vienna .....•.... Clay Bullock 378IBelle .....•....•. C. J. Tackett 531 Vichy.. . • • • • . • .. Frank L. Hodge ......• 213 Rolla ......•..•.. Harry Bolon ........•. 230 St. James R. L. Kirgan ......•... 497INewburg Albert Williams ...•... Chas. K. Martin 346JDixon 145 ILicking ......•... Ira Keeney ......•.....

T. H. Roberts C. F. Wilmesher Rex Miner L. O. Nichols A. J. Wofford ...•.. R. M. Copeland ...• R. E. Stedman ..... Wm. J. Moreland .. O. C. Fordyce ...•. C. W. Schillinger L. Smith ••.••••••

1st Saturday 2nd Saturday ............•..••.•• 1st and and 3rd Fridays ..•..•.... 1st Saturday .................•..• 2nd and 4th Saturdays .........•• Saturday before full moon.. . . . • .. 1st and 3rd Saturdays .........••. 1st Thursday ......•••••..•...... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays •••••.•..•.. 3rd Thursday 2nd and 4th Thursdays..........

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12, 1869 17,1876 25,1854 21,1908 15, 1885 11,1888 17, 1901 17, 1878 13,1871

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THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT-CHARLES L. WOODS, D. D. G. M., Rolla, Mo. Crawford •.... Lebanon . to ••••• Cuba .••••..••••. Dent ...•...... Salem ••.•....... Maries Vienna ••..•..... .. . Belle .. .. . ....•.. Lane's Prairie •.. Phelps Rolla .•••.•...•.. .. • •.••.•. St. James . .. . ...•.•. Equality ••.•..•• Pulaski. . • . . .• Arlington •.....• Texas. . . . . . .. Latimer .

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Oct. 14,1846 Oct. 13,1887 Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 17,1878 Mar. 6,1906 Oct. 15, 1886 May 80,1861 May 27,1863 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 18,1870 Oct. 19, 1899

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FORTIETH DISTRICT-HARRY H. BALSIGER, D. D. G. Mo, Crystal City, Mo. County Lodge Jefferson ..... De Soto •....•... ...... Joachim ..•..... " Sheklnah .••.•... Herculaneum. . .. " wash!~srtd~:: : Tyro. . . • • • • . . • • . Potosi. • • • • . . . .. Irondale •.•..... ' Belgrade ..••.... St. Francois: : : Blackwell.......

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Charter Date Secretary Time of Meeting Location NO.1 Master 119/De Soto .......... M. A. Bay ............ D. L. Rouggly •...• 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... Nov. 16. 1867 May 31,1856 1st Saturday ..................... W. P. Buffington ...... E. M. Williams ...• 164 Hillsboro •..•.... t~ .••••.••... John V. De Geare. . . .. Joe Bennett ........ 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............ Oct. 17,1868 338 Herculaneum •... Emil N. Becker ....... Joe. V. Cassiedy ... 2nd and 4th Fridays ...•.....•... Oct. 19, 1922 12 Caledonia .•.••••. Frank Wallis .......... Iva Queen ..••....• ' Saturday on or before full moon ... Aug. 7.1825 181 Potosi. .•••••.•.. Samuel Richeson ....... Geo. Carr ...•..•... Friday on or before full moon .... May 10,1861 143IIrondale ••••..•.• Luther Montgomery .... J. B. Robinson •.•• 1st and 8rd Saturdays .........•. May 6.1864 682IBelgrade ......... Jas. T. Garrett ........ E. R. Breckenridge. 3rd Saturday .................... , Oct. 1,1914 635 Blackwell ••.••..• R. B. Blackwell ........ Howard E. Brown. 1st Saturday ..................... Oct. 13, 1887

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FORTY-FIRST DISTRICT-MORRIS E. EWING, D. D. G. M., Morrisville, Mo. IRiddick . Western Light . •.....•. , Urbana .•....... Hic,~ory Hogle:s Creek . •..••• ' Hermitage . Polk Fair Play •...... ............ Modern . . " •..•..•... Pleasant ............ Bolivar .•........ .. . .....•..• ~leasant Hope . . " •......... Aldrich

Dallas

361 896 421 279 288 44 144 160 195 467 664

Buffalo ...•.....• Louisburg. . . • . .. Urbana •..•.•••.. Wheatland Hermitage ..•.... Fair Play Humansville •.•.. Morrisville .•••... Bolivar•..•...... Pleasant Hope .•. Aldrich "

Frank Petrie D. A. Lindsey Edwin A. Reser Geo. H. Tilford J. Olin Taylor F. W. Barker J. Oscar Stark Denver Dodd D. C. McCraw A. E. Wilson Dean Tygart..........

W. C. Hawkins, Jr.. 1st Friday on or before full moon. Oct. R. S. Lindsey.. . . .. Saturday on or before full moon.. Oct. Marion T. Clymore. 4th Saturday Oct. J. M. Murphy ...•.· 1st Saturday .............•..•.... Oct. I. R. Chrisope Saturday on or before full moon .. Oct. H. O. Curl. 4th Thursday Oct. Monroe A. Fields 2nd Friday .•..•.............•.... Oct. C. L. Hamilton 2nd Tuesday ..........•......•... Oct. Chas. E. Schooley 2nd Wednesday •................. Oct. F. P. Slagle ...•... , Thursday on or before full moon. Dec. J. S. Toalson...... 1st Tuesday Oct.

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13,1871 13,1891 14.1886 15,1868 15,1868 18,1900 19,1867 27,1867 19,1867 17,1898 26,1927

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FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT-MARK D. GWINN, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo. Cedar Stockton •....•.. " ...••.••• Jerusalem .•..... " •..•..••• Clintonville .•..•. Dade .•.•..... Washington •..•. " •.•...•••. Garrett .•.•..•.. " •.•....... Everton •••••••.. " •...•...•. Melville .....•... " Lockwood , ..

283IStoekton G. W. Mahler 3151Jerico Springs H. A. Garrett 482lEldoradoSprings. E. V. Pickell 87IGreenfield James M. Ward 359IArcola Geo. W. Gambill 405IEverton ..•...... W. K. Grisham 458IDadeville ...•.... Geo. A. Blakemore 521ILockwood ......•. S. M. Bishop

M. T. Carender 1st and 3rd Thursdays GUY Farmer 1st and 3rd Tuesdays F. W. Elliott .•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays Wyatt Edwards 4th Tuesday T. R. Owens 2nd Thursday H. C. Jerome ...••.. 1st and 2nd Tuesdays A. C. Blakemore Thursday on or before full moon .. W. Henry Davis 2nd and 4th Thursdays

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Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

16,1869 23,1896 15,1874 12,1847 13,1870 15,1885 17,1873 11,1883

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FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT-DAVID V. MORRIS, D. D. G. M., Nevada, Mo. Vernon ..•••. , Osage ...•....... " Sheldon .•....... . . . . . .. Schell City •..••• • . . • • •• Montevallo •..••. ....••. Vernon ...•..•.. ....... Unity ...••••••.. •..••.• Walker ..•.•••••. Barton ..•...•. Hermon ....•..•. " ......•. Lamar .•.••••..• •....... SignaL .•••.•••• ......•. Golden ...•...... ........ Milford .

303INevada ..•....... Alfred H. Barton 371 Sheldon. . . . • • • •. W. E. Kabler 448 Schell City •..•... I. S. Graham 490IMontevallo G. D. Palmer 493IBrOnaUgh T. D. Lambs 495 Richards , J. H. Gross 605 IWalker John A. Jones 187ILiberal. Julius J. Wolfe 292ILamar Ralph G. Kirsch 304IMindenmines Sam L. Herrell 475 Golden City A. F. Camp 516IMilford Jas. A. Bass

D. V. Morris W. G. Jones....... C. P. Finks W. S. Kokendoffer S. P. Linn C. H. Newland .•••. S. R. Harvey...... E. H. Roselle J. W. Hagny Ray Goff ......•.••. Arthur Farr J. C. Thomas

2nd Friday ' Oct. 15,1868 1st and 3rd Thursdays........... May 23, 1895 2nd Thursdays Oct. 17,1873 1st and 3rd Saturdays •.•........ Oct. 15,1874 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Oct. 12,1876 1st and 3rd Wednesdays Oct. 17,1895 3rd Saturday and two weeks after .. Sept. 29, 1909 1st and 3rd Thursdays ...•..•••... Oct. 17,1889 2nd and 4th Fridays Oct. 15,1868 2nd Tuesdays ...•................ Oct. 81,1905 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Oct. 15,1874 3rd Saturdlly Oct. 12,1882

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-SIDNEY R. MAIN, D. D. G. M., Joplin, Mo. J ~per

Cartha~e

W. B. Pingree 2nd and 4th Thursdays Oct. 19,1867 .. 197ICarthage ....•... Tom Hendrickson 293 Sarcoxie ......•.. Logan A. Travis C. F. Le Furjah .•• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Oct. 15,1868 335IJoplin •..•..••.•. Robert E. Bealmear Sherman A. Smith. 1st and 3rd Fridays ...•......... Oct. 13,1871 · ..•..•. Fellowship .•..•. 345IJoPlin ..••••••... Arthur D. Lame Frank G. Ade •..••• 2nd and 4th Fridays ....•........ Oct. 13,1870 •..•..•. Jasper •.....•... 398 Jasper ......••.. Paul Weatherby C. E. Brown ..•..•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays "Oct. 17,1873 • .....•. Carterville .•..•. 401ICarterville R. D. Bivens C. E. Ault .•..•..•. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays Oct. 12,1893 •..•..•. MineraL ..•.•••. 471I0ronogo ...•..... A. L. Hosman Fred M. Sears 1st and 3rd Thursdays .........•. Oct. 17,1873 ..••• ••. Webb City ...•... 512 Webb City Ray Gent. T. A. Harbaugh 2nd and 4th Thursdays Oct. 12,1882 · Carl Junction •... 5491Carl Junction C. B. Elliott J. B. Coons 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Oct. 15,1891 · .....•. Criterion .•••••.. 586IAlba ...•..•..•.• R. V. Fox J. W. Hart 1st and 3rd Mondays ......••..... Sept. 26, 1907 •..•.... La Russell . 5921La Russell .............................................................................•... Sept. 21, 1921

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LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICT8-Continued FORTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-JEWELL E. WINDLE, D. D. G. rd., Springfield, Mo. County Lodge Greene ......•. United.. . • . . • • . . ." O·Sullivan....... Ash Grove " " Solomon ........ Ozark ........ Gate of Temple .. ......•. Republic. . . . . . .. ........ Strafford .•.••••. ........ Willard ••••••... Webster Webster......... " Doric ....... Mount Olive ....... Hazelwood ...•.. ....... Henderson

No.1 Location Master Secretary Time of Meeting 5/s p rin g field .• '. •••. A. Dean Wright ..•.... Merritt F. Smith.. 3rd Monday ..............•...•.•. 7 Walnut Grove A. B. Edmondson J. G. Page 2nd Tuesday 100 Ash Grove Edward E. Watson Joe H. Turk 4th Thursday 271ISpringfield Geo. R. Reed V. F. Anderson 2nd Monday 2971Fair Grove .••.•• Hubert Womack .•..... J. M. Gardner ....•. 2nd Thursday 422 Springfield J. F. Slenty E. W. Clark 3rd Thursday 570 Republic .•.•••••. E. L. Britian ........•. W. H. Owen 2nd Thursday.................... 608lStrafford Geo. L. Johnson H. E. Grier 1st Thursday 620 Willard: ......••. V. L. Blankenship Phonso Fortner••. 1st Thursday ..................•. 98 Marshfield ...•.•• Paul E. Watters P. V. Rathbun ...•. 2nd Friday 300IElkland .•••..•... L. M. Hoover G. F. Price ....•..• 1st Saturday after full moon 439 Rogersville, R.R.3 R. E. Morris W. F. Atkinson ..•• Friday before full moon 459 Seymour ....••.•. R. E. McMahan ......• E. M. Mayfield •.... On or before f. m. and 2 wks. after. 477 IRogersville J. Edgar Leming A. H. Farmer •..... 3rd Thursday

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Charter Date May 80, 185." Oct. 19, 1867 Dec. 19.1899 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1910 Sept. 25, 1912 May 28,1858 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 16,1872 May 8,1874

FORTY.. .S IXTH DISTRICT-QARL A. SWENSON, D. D. G. rd., Mountain Grove, Mo. Douglas ,Ava. ...•......... " Pilot Knob . Mt. Ararat . " Texas ...•..... Barnes •••....... " ...•...•. Texas . Plato .•.......•• ·Isummersville .... Wright Mountain Grove. " Joppa . Mansfield . Grovespring . Norwood .

26IAva .•...•.•..•.. Cecil L. Harley L. E. Reynolds 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .......•.. 182 Richville ...•.••.. C. M. Cearley L. O. Dickison.... Saturday on or before full moon.. 382ITopaz J. B. Ford A. A. Barnes Saturday on or after full moon 1161 Cabool. ~ .. H. R. Cartwright..... A. J. McKinney... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays............ 177\Houston John W. Paulson John A. Rhea. ...••• 2nd Saturday 469 Plato R. B. Tilley, Jr R. E. Daniels 1st Monday 555 Summersville H. P. Massie Lee Bell .........•. 3rd Saturday .............•....... 1581Mountain Grove .. Lloyd Atchley C. A. Swenson .••. 2nd and 4th Fridays ......•....... 411 IHartville ...•.... Cecil young ...•....... J. J. Hunter 1st and 3rd Fridays 543 IMansfield Claude N. Clark Chas. A. Stephens .. 2nd Wednesday 6S9IGrovespring•.... John L. Hudson John M. VestaL 3rd Saturday 622INorwood Earnest Miller Oscar Freeman 1st and 3rd Thursdays

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Oct. 1,1887 Oct. 17, 1895 Oct. 19,1898 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 19.1867 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 15,1891 Oct. 15,1885 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 16. 1891 Oct. 26,1907 Sept. 15. 1912

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FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-JOHN N. SPARKS, D. D. G. M., Grandin, Mo. Carter ....•.•. .. . ..•.... Reynolds •..... .. .. .. • Shannon ..

VanBuren ..•... Grandin .•.•..•.. Hopewell. • • • • . •. Bunker Barnesville Delphian Winona .•••••... Eminence

609IVanBuren .•.... 579IGrandin 239 Lesterville .•.•. " 275 Bunker 853 Ellington 137 Birch Tree 430 Winona ...•...... 607 Eminence

Luther Bucy ...•...... Alex Johnson Bryon Reed........... J. A. Hulsey J. A. Macy W. O. Brown J. Talmadge Lloyd J. Virgil Thompson

R. L. Coleman W. E. McKinney J. C. McHenry..... C. C. Wilkins P. B. Smith C. O. Lemons J. T. Lloyd ......•. Claude Smith

Saturday on or after full moon ... 2nd Saturday •................... On or after full moon... . . . . . . .. 1st and 3rd Saturday 4th Tuesday 8rd Saturday Thursday on or before full moon 1st Saturday

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Aug.12.1882 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 13, 1881 Sept. 29, 1915 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 17,1895 Oct. 10,1894 Sept. 29, 1909

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FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-J. CLYDE AKERS, D. D. G. Mo, Farmington, Mo. Iron. . . . . . • • •• ............ Madison. . . . •• St. Francois ... .. • .. ... • •• · .. • .• •.. ••• Ste. Genevieve

Star of the West. Mosaic ....•••..• Marcus ...•..•.. Bismarck ..••..•. Farmington . Ionic .. St. Francois ...•• Samaritan ..••... Pendleton .••••.• Leadwood ..••••• Elvins ...•..•.•• Saline ....•..•...

133IIronton ..•...... 351 Belleview ......•. 110 Fredericktown 41 Bismarck 132IFarmington 164IDesIOge•..••.•..• 234 Libertyville .••... 4241Bonne Terre ...•. 5511Doe Run ..•..... 598 Leadwood. • • • . .. 599 Flat River •..•.•. 226 1St. Mary's

Elsa L. Whitworth Frank H. Comfort. J. W. Boring V. O. Sutton D. D. Phillips ...•..... E. B. Graham James McGeorge M. W. Baker Roy W. Wagoner J. Clyde Akers Wm. Holland .•........ J. L. Blunt ...••.•. Russell Mullen ......•.. P. A. Cashion Rayamond A. Willa H. C. Thompson C. G. Franklin Blondie R. Hunt ..• Russell Lesh ...•..•.•.. J. M. Link Elmer W. Shelton ....•. J. E. La Breyere Clarence B. Perry... .. John F. Bartels.. ..

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2nd and 4th Fridays •............ " May 1,1851 1st Saturday Oct. 13,1870 1st and 3rd Thursdays..... . . . • •. May 24, 1862 1st and 8rd Saturdays Dec. 15,1891 2nd and 4th Thursdays May 10,1851 1st and 3rd Mondays Oct. 17,1901 1st Thursday ...•..•...........•.. May 26,1864 1st and 3rd Saturdays Oct. 16,1872 2nd and 4th Saturdays ........••. Oct. 15,1891 2nd a~d 4th Saturdays.. . . . . . . . •. Sept. 18, 1908 Every Tuesday ..•................ Sept. 80, 1908 1st Saturday on or before full moon May 29, 1862

...... ..

E. J. Taylor .•.•... Cuba B. Clubb ..•.. W. Glenn McCain .. Geo. W. Miller .•.•. H. R. Stevenson ••• J. R. Jenkins ...•.. J. M. Slagle ...•... H. M. James ......

2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... 1st and 3rd Saturdays .••.......• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .•.......... Saturday on or after full moon ... 2nd Friday .••................... 1st and 8rd Saturdays ............ 2nd and 4th Fridays .......•...•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .........•.

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FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT-JAMEs A. KINDER, D. D. G. Mo, Cape Girardeau, Mo. Bollinger ...••. Trowel.......... 440lMarble Hill. ..... H. G. Tinnin ...•..•••. .. .. .... Zalma.......... 545IZalma ........... E. A. Shrader .....••.. Cape Gi,~ardeau St. Mark's ...•.. 931Cape Girardeau •• Martin E. Sander .•••. West View ...... 103 Millersville ...••.. Vernon Heinbach ..•••• Wilson .•.••••••• 1911 Pocahontas ..••.. J. R. Thompson •...••• Mystic Tie .•.•.. 221 Oak Ridge .....•. W. A. Bowers .......•. Whitewater •.... 417IWhitewater ...... D. F. Jones •.•....•.•• Excelsior ...••••. 441 Jackson. . . • . . • •. Chas. C. Macke ...•....

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16, 1872 15, 1890 14, 1847 8,1866 16, 1879 30,1861 18, 1881 16, 1872

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DISTRICT~Continued

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FIFTIETH DISTRICT-GEORGE A. SAMPLE, D. D. G. M., Chaffee, Mo.

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County Mississippi. .•. .. • Scott ...•..... "

Lodge East Prairie Charleston ...•.. Morley ....•..... Ashlar ......•... Sikeston ......•. IIImo. . . . . . . . • •. Blodgett .•....•.. Chaffee Stoddard Bloomfield .. .. Essex ...... Lakeville ...... Dexter ••.••. Advance ...•.... •..••• Puxico ....••..•. New Madrid Morehouse ....•.

No. I Location 3841East Prairie .•••• 407ICharleston •••••.. 184IMorley...••••..• 306Icommerce .....•. 310 Sikeston ••••..•.. 681 IlImo •..••.•..•.. 694 Blodgett ••.•..••• 616IChaffee 168IBloomfield .....•. 278 Essex 4891Bell City 632\Dexter ......•..• 690 Advance ...•..••. 6961 Puxico 608 Morehouse

Master J. L. Sisk E. J. Deal, Jr James A. Sikes A. G. Mills Ben Ritter RoscOe C. Carr........ Roy A. Green Enos H. Gettings J. A. Poe E. Y. Launius D. C. Wilson Homer C. Smith Edward H. Zimmer •... Earl Wagner C. H. Pease

Secretary A. L. Webb

Time of Meeting Thursday of each week ......•.... 1st and 3rd Thursdays H. F. Kirkpatrick .. 2nd and 4th Fridays H. M. Zaricor ....•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays A. A. Harrison .••• 1st and 8rd Thursdays Ben Hill 2nd and 4th Thursdays Geo. W. Pearman .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays M. H. Stubblefield •. , 1st and 8rd Thursdays George L. Fopay 1st and 3rd Wednesdays L. E. Estes 2nd and 4th Tuesdays W. G. Pyle 3rd Saturday Wm. C. Harris ••... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Wm. F. Morgan 1st and 8rd Thursdays J. C. Rhodes 2nd and 4th Fridays F. W. Leming 2nd and 4th Tuesdays

J. A. Boone

Charter Date Dec. 29,1904 Oct. 13,1893 Oct. 19,1899 Oct. 14,1869 Oct. 12,1869 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 17,1907 Sept. 28, 1911 May 28,1869 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 12,1874 Oct. 18,1887 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 30, 1908 Sept. 29, 1909

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FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT-BUELL P. PARKS, D. D. G. M., Hornersville, Mo. Dunklin .•...• , Kennett . .. • .••... Four Mile •..••.. •.••... Hornersville ...•. ••••.. ' Cardwell . •.•••.. Malden .•....... ' •..••.. Senath ...•••••.• New Madrid ••. Portageville . .. •. Point Pleasant . •. New Madrid . •. Parma ...•..•..• Pemiscot •...•. Caruthersville •.. .. .. Hayti . .. . •. , .. Steele ..••••.•... Stoddard •..... Bernie ........•.

68jKennett ...•..... 212 Campbell ..•..... 216IHornersville •.••. 231 Cardwell .•.••.•. , 406IMalden 6181 Senath •......••. 1661 Portageville 176IConran ••••...•.. 4291New Madrid ...•. 660lparma •...•..... 461 Caruthersville .•. , 671 Hayti. • • • • • • . . •. 634 Steele. . • • . . . . . .. 67SIBernie

Dave Roy Elmer D. Goodman Th08. A. Ray James A. White A. L. Underhill John L. Sando R. N. Foster Charles Pikey Edward F. Sharp H. R. Woodside Harold S. Jones. . . . . .. Blair Buckley......... N. Kancy W. C. Thurston

M. F. Simer R. D. Whiteaker Walter C. Wicker .. W. H. Lockard L. O. Wicecarver O. H. Storey A. L. Carnahan L. F. La Font Chas. M. Barnes J. P. Salyer Ralph J. Baker. . . .. H. B. Bryant H. Ballentine B. H. Johnson

2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 1st and 8rd Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 8rd Thursdays ...•.....•. 1st and 8rd Thursdays Saturday on or before full moon .• 2nd and 4th Mondays .....•...••• 1st and 8rd Tuesdays ......•..... 1st and 8rd Tuesdays............ 1st and Srd Thursdays.. . . . . • . . .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...•....... 1st and 8rd Fridays

Oct. 17.1889 Oct. 19,1867 May 30,1861 Oct. 19,1899 Oct. 18,1881 Oct. 27,1902 Oct. 11,1890 May 80,1867 Oct. 17,1878 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 28, 1906 Oct. 1, 191,( Sept. 8,1905

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FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT-KIPP O. JOHNSON, D. D. G. M., Poplar BIU1f, Mo. Butler .......• Ripley .. . ..•..•• .. . Wayne ...•..• .. .

Poplar Bluff .••.. Pine .....••..•.. Composite ..••... Naylor ..•..••••• Greenville .•••..• Wayne ......•...

209jPopiar Bluff •.... Wm. O. Brower 314IBardley John W. Pigg 369IDoniPhan •..•••.. E. C. White 668 Naylor Wm. D. Rodgers 107 Greenville ...•... Chas. L. Ellinghouse 626IPiedmont James C. Lance

Art H. HarwelL •.. Clyde Turner .•.•.. A. L. Showman W. C. Koehler A. G. Templeton •.. Sidney E. Barr

2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st Saturday after full moon 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st Thursday 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Mondays

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31,1861 11,1888 13,1871 29,1904 14,1886 16,1886 Cj:)

FD'TY-THIRD DISTRICT-C. EARL ARMSTRONG, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo.

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Howell •..•..• Mt. Zion .•.•..•. Ingomar ••.•..•. Mountain View •. Oregon .•.•..• Alton •...•...... Woodside •••...•. Clifton . Koshkonong ...•• Ozark ......•. Sampson ••••..•. Bayou •..•.•••...

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3271W~t Plain~ Corbett E .. Watts 636jWilIow Sprmgs .. O. A. McDJlI. 6371Mountain View .. Milton E. Smith 265IAlton ..•......... W. C. Johnson 387IThomasville C. P. Perkins.: 468 Thayer ......•••. L. A. Wilkerson 682IKoshkonong ...•. Harry P. Ramsey 298ILutie J. W. Jones 366IBakersfield.. .•. .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. 436IRockbridge J. Vernie Hicks 496 IGainesville R. O. Edmonds

Eugene ~. Laird .. 1st and 3rd Fridays J. S. Whitten 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Frank Todd •...•... 2nd Tuesday ...................•. Geo. C. Martin Saturday on or before full moon .. John Griffith On or before full moon A. A. Taber...... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays.... . . . . . . .. Chas. Thoman 2nd Wednesday .............•.... C. J. Hogan Saturday before first Sunday . ...•............................................... L. G. Hicks 2nd Saturday E. W. Ebrite 2nd Friday

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Oct. 18,1870 Oct. 13,1887 Sept. 29, 1916 May 24,1868 Oct. 18,1871 Oct. 13, 1881 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 18,1900 Oct. II, 1888 Oct. 21,1897 Oct. 11, 1877

ISp!"rta .•......•. Friend .•••••.... Billings ...•..•.. •• "·IClever ...••..... Taney. . . . . . •• Claflin ...••..•.. .. Kirbyville •..•••. Forsyth •..•..... ...... "IBraIl80n ••••.•.• Stone Galena .•.•...••. .. . ....•... Crane .........•.

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FD'TY-FOURTH DISTRICT-GRANVILLE J. VAUGHAN, D. D. G. M., Ozark, Mo. Chr~tian....•

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296ISparta 36210zark •.••..•..•. 379IBiIlings 646 Clever 229IProtem ......•... 264 Hollister •.....••. 463IForsyth 687IBranson 616IGalena 619ICrane

Ross L. Bradley F. T. Wernet Henry W. Garbee T. W. Maples Nathan K. Blakey Royal J. Bushnell Le Roy Smith Manford Casey Tray Stone Clarence Benage

H. J. Wise Goo. T. Breazeale .. Colmore Gray C. M. Kerr ......•. Virgil R. Rozell .... Carl Cane......... H. M. Blunk ••.... S. P. Winch ..••... R. S. Tromly D. A. Holderman

Last Friday Saturday on or before full moon .. 2nd Thursday }<'riday before full moon Saturday on or before full moon .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays'.. . . . . • . . •. 1st Saturday 1st and 3rd Fridays ............•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays

Oct. 21,1888 Oct. 13,1870 Oct. 13,1881 Sept. 18, 1918 Oct. 17,1889 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 26,1907 Oct. 12,1882 Oct. 22,1896

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8 LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-WILLIAM N. MARBUT, D. D. G. M., Mt. Vernon, Mo. County Barry ..

Lawrence .. . ..••. ..... ..... •..•. ..... .....

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Lodge Monett Purdy Barry Pythagoras Seligman Comfort........ Mount Vernon... Canopy ...•..... Marionville Decatur Verona......... Red Oak Stinson Miller

No.1 Location Master Secretary Time of Meeting 129jMOnett•••••••..• John W. Sturdevant R. C. Farrow 1st and 3rd Fridays 148 Purdy L. W. Whittington W. F. Carter · 1st and 3rd Thursdays 367IWashburn ...•..................•....................................................••.... 3831 Cassville .......•. B. F. Hatcher W. T. Priest 2nd and 4th Saturdays 517ISeligman .•••.... L. C. Tatman F. E. Fawner ....•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays 533IWheaton Leighton C. Holder J. W. l<'ox 2nd and 4th Thursdays 99 Mt. Vernon M. E. Pendleton Leon Pugh 1st and Srd Fridays 284IAurora Chas. Werdein W. H. Lloyd 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 390IMarionville Willard Raleigh I. D. McCulloch 1st and 3rd Fridays 400lPierce City Orvie M. Freer E. T. Ecroyd 1st and 3rd Thursdays 452Iverona ..•....... A. B. Cook E. young 1st and 8rd Tuesdays 468 Red Oak •...•... C. C. Patton Arthur Boyd 2nd and 4th Thursdays 523 Stinson •..•...... Paul Carnahan Lee J. Yingst Saturday on or after full moon 567IMiller Norman Garner Chas. Henry 1st and 3rd Wednesdays

Charter Date Oct. 15,1890 Oct. 7,1884 Oct. 18,1858 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 12,1882 Oct. 19,1898 Oct. 19,1868 Oct. 17,1889 Oct. 17,1871 Oct. 18,1871 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 22,1902 Sept. 29, 1904

Southwest Anderson NoeL Racine Neosho Granby •......... Stella

4661·southwestCity 621 Anderson 647 Noel 478ISeneca ...••••..• 247INe08ho 514 Granby ......•.•• 538IStella

A. B. Thompson Wallace M. Roger ArIa H. Madden C. M. Russell ........•. Frank H. Gulick Joe Poland W. L. Richardson

W. F. Stevenson H. Eppard ....•••.. B. F. St. Clair C. J. Lawson A. C. Wright W. H. Williams N. Jessee

1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Fridays 1st and 8rd Tuesdays

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FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-WALTER A. PHIPPS, D. D. G. M., Neosho, Mo. McDonald •.... .. • ..•. .. • Newton .. • •.....• .......

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Jan. 22,1892 Sept. 25. 1912 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15,1874 May 28,1856 Oct. 22,1902 Oct. 17,1889

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FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-WM. H. STEIN, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis

Bonhomme ...•.. • Bridgeton . Webster Groves .. ., ...... Fenton .•••...... ...... Meramee ...•..•. ...... Kirkwood ..•..•. ...... Ferguson ..•..... · Maplewood . ...... Clayton •..•...•. •..... Wellston . ...... Valley Park .. ...... Jennings ..•..•.. · .•... Gardenville .

45IBallwin Paul T. Beard H. F. Woerther 1st and 3rd Saturdays .•....•.... 801St. John's Station Walter L. Fox Walter Reinemer 1st and 3rd Thursdays ....•...... 84jWebster Groves .. Curt C. Mack Goo. A. Shepardson 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...•..•..... 281IFenton .•....•... Paul Koerner Goo. F. Fuchs .•.•.. 2nd and 4th Saturdays .........•.. 313IEureka .....•••.. John M. Payne J. F. Howell 2nd and 4th Saturdays .•......... 484 Kirkwood Chas. F. Baldeck H. Schroeder 2nd and 4th Mondays .......••... 542jFerguson Robert H. Groppe Harry A. Magoon .. 1st and 3rd Fridays ..........•.•. 566IMaPlewood A. E. Feigel .........• J. W. Menaugh 1st and 3rd Fridays ..........•.•. 601 Clayton Edward Toy •.......... E. P. Clark, Jr 1st and 3rd Thursdays 613iWellston Alfred E. Spencer C. A. Tolin 2nd and 4th Thursdays B. A. Feldman 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ......•...... 6291Valley Park ...•.. C. C. Frost 640IJennings Henry B. Frerichs Harry F. Sylvester. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ...........•. 655iGardenviUe ..•... Adam Seif Florian Wolz 1st and 3rd Saturdays

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Oct. 9,1841 Oct. 14,1846 Oct. 21,1897. Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 19,1923 Oct. 5,1874 Oct. 16,1889 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 30, 1008 Sept. 28, 1911 Oct. ~,1913 Sept.21,1916 Sept. 21, 1921

260IGlensted 32olversailles ....•... 591 Barnett 13410Iean .•..•....•. 381IEldon

Morris Lammert .....• L. E. De Vinna A. R. White Austin Roark Lynn J. Castle

C. A. Gerhart Saturday on or before full moon .. W. B. Todd ......•. 2nd and 4th Mondays Chas. R. Tompkins .. 2nd Saturday Carl Wiser 3rd Saturday Ford Vaughan 2nd and 4th Mondays

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FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-ANDREW B. STANLEY, D. D. G. M., Eldon, Mo. Morgan ....•.. Glensted .....••. " Versailles " Barnett Miller ...•..... Olean .. . Ionia

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Oct. 18,1900 Oct. 18,1923 Sept. 6,1907 June 30,1860 Oct. 18,1871

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FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT-NAT D. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo. Jackson

IIndependence . . Summit ..•...... McDonald ......• .. • ... Blue Springs .•.. •...... Raytown ....•... · Christian .•.••.•. ....... Buckner ....•.•. · .'.•... Marlborough •... •...... Mt. Washington. • •.•. , Grandview ...••• •..•... Grain Valley .....

761Independence 2681 Lee's Summit. • •• 3241Independence 3371Blue Springs 391IRaytown ••..•••• 892iOak Grove 501 I Buckner 569/8584WOodl'd,K.C. 614 Mt. Washington •• 618IGrandview •..•.•• 644 Grain Valley

Wm. Bessmer Johnnie Willsey....... Rochester C. Colgan Thomas Portwood Thad W. Greene •...•.. Vivian G. Perry Tom A. Lee Clifford C. Grosch Fred K. Booth R. E. Gott .....•...... Clyde A. Fristone

Burns Strader J esse Boyd W. Lee Whitmire .. F. W. Tuttle G. W. Cassell ...•.• Robt. E. Livesay J. Ahrens J. C. Hagood ...•.. Gregg B. Christy M. V. Long ....•.. Paul Farley ...•....

2nd and 4th Mondays ......•..... , 1st and 3rd Tuesdays... ••••..... 1st and 3rd Mondays ...•......... 1st and 3rd Fridays 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•..•.....• , 1st and 3rd Fridays ............•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Mondays ..•.......... 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Thursdays .....••...• ' 2nd and 4th Tuesdays

Oct. 14,1846 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 12,1869 Oct. 13,1887 Oct. 13,1871 Oct. 18,1871 Oct. 11,1877 Oct. 26,1927 Oct. 17,1911 Sept.28,1911 Sept.21, 1916

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LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 28, 1821 Date Election Grand Master D. Grand Master Senior G. Warden Junior G. Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary April, 1821. ••. Thos. F. Riddick .. - ........•.....•..•••• James Kennerly .•. • William Bates • Archibald Gamble •. • William Renshaw· Oct., 1821 ..•. Nath') B. Tucker ..• Thompson Douglass· Edward Bates ••.• • William Bates .•....• Archibald Gamble ..• William Renshaw· Oct., 1822 ..•. Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Thompson Douglass· Edward Bates •••. • Wm. G. Pettus ...••• Archibald Gamble .. • William RenshawOct., 1823 Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Goo. H. C. Melody ... • Edward Bates .•.. • Wm. G. Pettus ...•. • Archibald Gamble •. • T. DouglasOct., 1824 Nath'l B. "Tucker .. • Geo. H. C. Melody .•• • Wm. G. Pettus .••. • Thornt. Grimsley .•• • Archibald Gamble .. • T. Douglas· Oct., 1825 .•.. Edward Bates • Geo. H. C. Melody .••• Wm. G. Pettus Thornt. Grimsley .•• • Archibald Gamble .. • John D. Daggett· Oct., 1826 Edward Bates • Hardage Lane .•..•• • Martin Rug~les • John F. Ryland ....• Rich. T. McKinney.- John D. DaggettOct., 1827 Edward Bates ....• Hardage Lane - Martin Rug~les • H. R. Gamble ••..•• • Thornton Grimsley.· John D. DaggettOct., 1828 •••• Hardage Lane .•.. • Goo. H. C. Melody .. • H. R. Gamble ....•• Adam L. Mills .•..••• Thornton Grimsley.· John D. Daggett· Oct., 1829 .••. Hardage Lane .... • Fred L. Billon ....•• • H. R. Gamble ....• • Adam L. Mills .....•• Bernard Pratte .•.•• • John D. Daggett· Oct., 1830 .••. Hardage Lane .•.. • Goo. H. C. Melody .. • Sinclair Kirtley .•• • Adam L. Mills .•...•• Thomas Andrews .•. • Fred L. Billon· Dec., 1881 ..•. Edward Bates ....• Goo. H. C. Melody .. • Oliver Parker •.••• • Augustus Jones.: .. • Thomas Andrews ..• • Fred L. Billon· Oct., 1882 .••. H. R. Gamble .••.. • Goo. H. C. Melody .. • M. J. Noyes •..... • Augustus Jones .•.. • Thomas Andrews ..• • Fred L. Billon· Dec., 1883 Sinelair Kirtley • A. B. Chambers • John Wilson • G. A. Tuttle ....•••• Goo. H. C. Melody .. • John Garnett· Nov., 1884 1 A. B. Chambers ..• • Sinclair Kirtley ..•.•• Oliver Parker ....•• S. W. B. Carnegy .••• Goo. H. C. Melody .. • Thos. W. Conyers· Oct., 1885 .. tt A. B. Chambers ... • Sinelair Kirtley ..••• • Oliver Parker ...•.• S. W. B. Carnegy ..•• Goo. H. C. Melody .. • Thos. W. Conyers· Oct., 1836 ..•. S. W. B. Carnegy.· John D. Daggett ..•.• Edward Searcey .. • Granville Snell ..... • Geo. H. C. Melody .•• Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 1837 .... S. W. B. Carnegy.· John D. Daggett ..••• A. B. Chambers .•• • Thomas Andrews ..•• Goo. H. C. Melody ••• Riehard B. Dallam· Oct., 1838 •••. S. W. B. Carnegy.· John D. Daggett •.••• A. B. Chambers ••• • Alex. T. Douglass ..•• Geo. H. C. Melody .•• Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 1889 P. H. McBride • A. B. Chambers .•••• Alex. T. Douglass .• Wm. C. Vance .••.• • Goo. H. C. Melody ..• Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 1840 P. H. McBride • Joseph Foster ••.... • Alex. T. Douglass.· John Orrick .•...... • Goo. H. C. Melody ..• Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 1841 ..•. P. H. McBride ...• • J oab Bernard • Joseph Foster •... • C. H. Bowers ...•..•. Goo. H. C. Melody ..• Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 1842 .•.. P. H. McBride • J oab Bernard • Joseph Foster •... • C. H. Bowers........ John Simonds ......• Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 184S P. H. McBride • Joseph Foster • J. W. S. Mitchell .. • E. S. Ruggles ;· Fred L. Billon • Richard B. Dallam· Oct., 1844 J. W. S. MitchelL.· Fred L. Billon E. S. Ruggles • J. L. F. Jacoby John S. Watson • Richard B. Dallam· Oet., 1845 J. W. S. Mitchell .. • John D. Taylor ....•• E. S. Ruggles .....• J. L. F. Jacoby .....• John S. Watson • Fred L. Billon· Oct., 1846 ..•. John Ralls • John D. Taylor • E. S. Ruggles - J. L. F. Jacoby .....• John S. Watson ....• Fred L. Billon· Oct., 1847 ..•. Joseph Foster • E. S. Ruggles .......• J. L. F. Jacoby • Cyrus Osborn ......• John S. Watson ....• J. W. S. Mitchell· May, 1848 .•.. Joseph Fostel' ••.. • E. S. Ruggles .......• Cyrus Osborn • Joseph Megguire .••• John S. Watson .... • J. W. S. Mitchell· May, 1849 •••• John F. Ryland • E. S. Ru~gles • Joseph Megguire .. • P. Draper ....••.•••• John M. Reed .....•• C. D. W. Johnson· May, 1850 •••. John F. Ryland B. W. Grover .••...•• P. Draper ...••... • S. F. Currie ........• J. T. Johnson ••.... • C. D. W. Johnson· May, 1851:..•• B. W. Grover • E. S. Ruggles • S. F. Currie .•..•• • J. H. Turner....•.•• J. T. Johnson • C. D. W. Johnson· May, 1852 ..•. B. W. Grover ....•• S. F. Currie .......•• J. H. Turner ....• • S. H. Saunders .....• J. T. Johnson ••.... • A. O'Sullivan· June, 185S •••. Wilson Brown ...•• L. S. Cornwell ..•.••• J. W. Chenoweth.· R. C. Hill .•..••.... • Joseph Foster •.••••• A. O'Sullivan· May, 1854 L. S. Cornwell D. P. Wallinlrford .. • James H. Britton.· ..•..•..••..•••.•..•• Joseph Foster ...•.. • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1855 L. S. Cornwell , J. W. Chenoweth.· H. E. Van Orsdell .. • John D. Daggett .•. • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1856 Benjamin Sharp ..• W. A. Cunningham .. S. H. Saunders • Marcus Boyd • John D. Daggett • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1857 ••.. S. H. Saunders ...• • P. Draper •.••.•••. • Marcus Boyd .•... • John F. Houston ..•• John D. Da~gett .•• • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1858 ..•. S. H. Saunders ....• Marcus Boyd ......• • John F. Houston .. • John Deeker •..•..•• John D. Daggett ..• • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1859 .... Marcus Boyd ...... M. H. McFarland • W. R. Penick • John Deeker ...•..•• John D. Daggett .•• • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1860 .•.. M. H. McFarland .• W. R. Penick • John Decker Samuel M. Hayes John D. Daggett .••• A. O'Sullivan· May, 1861. Wm. R. Penick John Decker Geo. Whiteomb .•.• A. L. MeGregor - John D. Daggett A. O'Sullivan·

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May, May, May, May, May, Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct.,

1862 .••. 1863 .••. 1864 1866 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871. 1872 1873 1874 .•.. 1875 1876 1877 1878 .•.• 1879 1880 1881. 1882 1883 1884•... 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 ..•• 1891. 1892 ••.. 1893 .••• 1894 .•.. 1896 1896 1897 1898 ..•. 1899 1900 1901. 1902 .••. 1903 ....

Geo. Whitcomb.-~~.John H. Turner • John H. Turner •..• Wm. N. Loker • John F. Houston ... John D. VincU • John F. Houston ..• John D. Vineil. ...•• John D. Vincil ..... W. E. Dunscomb • W. E. Dunscomb ••• C. A. Rowley • John D. Vincil ....• R. E. Anderson • William D. Muir..• T. E. Garrett • Thos. E. Garrett... R. E. Anderson • Thos. E. Garrett ..• R. E. Anderson Samuel H. Owens .• J. E. Ryland • R. E. Anderson .••• John W. Luke ......• John W. Luke .•..• Xenophon Ryland ..• James E. Cadle •••• Xenophon Ryland Xen. Ryland Thos. C. Ready • T. C. Ready Noah M. Givan Noah M. Givan Joseph S. Browne Jos. S. Browne W. R. Stubblefield ..• W. R. Stubblefield .• Alex. M. Dockery Alex. M. Dockery•• Chas. C. Woods .....• Chas. C. Woods Lee A. Hall Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson .• Robt. F. Stevenson. James W. Boyd ...... James W. Boyd George R. Hunt ....• Geo. R. Hunt W. M. Williams Wm. M. Williams .• James P. Wood .....• James P. Wood ••• ' Theodore Brace ..... Theodore Brace .••• Geo. E. Walker ..•••• Geo. E. Walker •••• B. H. Ingram ......• B. H. Ingram John R. Parson •...• John R. Parson •.•• Harry Keene .....••• Harry Keene ...•. • J. B. Thomas ......•• J. B. Thomas ..••.• A. M. Hough .....••• A. M. Hough • D. A. Jamison D. A. Jamison F. J. Tygard F. J. Tygard....•• E. F. Allen ......•.• E. F. Allen •••....• C. H. Briggs ....•••• C. H. Briggs •.•••• Campbell Wells .....• Campbell Wells .... Joseph C. Finagin Joseph C. Finagin. John C. yocum John C. yocum Wm. F. Kuhn Wm. F. Kuhn ....• Leroy B. Valliant ...•

Wm. N. Loker ••.. • John D. Vincil A. L. McGregor Martin Collins ....• R. E. Anderson T. E. Garrett • Wm. D. Muir ....• A. M. Dockery ....• Sam H. Owens Sam H. Owens John W. Luke • Jas. E. Cadle ...•. • Jas. E. Cadle • Thos. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan Jos. S. Browne .•.• W. R. Stubblefield· Jas. E. Carter 'II. Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall. .....• • Robt. F. Stevenson· James W. Boyd George R. Hunt Wm. M. Williams .• James P. Wood • Theodore Brace • Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram ....• John R. Parson ..•• Harry Keene J. B. Thomas •....• A. M. Hough .•.••• D. A. Jamison ....• F. J. Tygard E. F. Allen C. H. Briggs •..... • Campbell Wells .••• Joseph C. Finagin. John C. yocum Wm. F. Kuhn Leroy B. Valliant •• A. S. Houston .•..•

Samuel Russell .....• A. L. McGregor ...•• Martin Collins ...... • R. E. Anderson .....• A. L. McGregor • Wm. D. Muir Alex. M. Dockery • Sam H. Owens .....• John E. Ryland John E. Ryland • Jas. E. Cadle • Xenophon Ryland ...• Thos. C. Ready .....• Noah M. Givan • M. G. Hubble W. R. Stubblefield ..• Jas. E. Carter Alex. M. Dockery • Lee A. Hall. • Robt. F. Stevenson.· James W. Boyd • Geo. R. Hunt Wm. M. Williams • James P. Wood .•...• Geo. E. Walker ..•..• B. H. Ingram ....... John R. Parson ....• Harry Keene .......• J. B. Thomas A. M. Hough • D. A. Jamison ......• F. J. Tygard ...••••• E. F. Allen C. H. Briggs Campbell Wells ....•• Joseph C. Finagin ..• John C. yocum .••••• Wm. F. Kuhn Leroy B. Valliant A. S. Houston D. M. Wilson .•.....•

John D. Daggett .••• A. O'Sullivan. John D. Daggett.••• A. O'Sullivan. Wm. N. Loker ....... A. O'Sullivan. Wm. N. Loker ....••• A. O'Sullivan· Wm. N. Loker A. O'Sullivan.t Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley·* Wm. N. Loker •...•.• G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker ......• G. Frank Gouley. Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley. Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker ......• G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker ....•.• G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker ..•.•.• G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley•• K Wm. N. Loker John D. Vinci!· John W. Luke John D. Vinci!· John W. Luke John D. VincU· John W. Luke 11 John D. Vinci!· John W. Luke ......• John D. VincU. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!.· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. VincU. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. VincU· Samuel M. Kennard· John D. VincU· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. VincU· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vinci!. John R. Parson ..••• John D. Vinci!·

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LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 28, 1821 Date Election Grand Master D. Grand Master Grand S. Warden Grand J. Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary Sept., 1904 Leroy B. Valliant .• A. S. Houston •••••• • D. M. Wilson ..•••• Howard Watson ••.. • John R. Parson •••.• John D. VincU.'lI' Sept., 1905 A. S. Houston D. M. Wilson • John T. Short R. R. Kreeger Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. ParsonU. Sept., 1906 •••. D. M. Wilson John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger William A. Hall Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1907 •••. John T. Short ...•• R. R. Kreeger....... William A. Hall •••• Clay C. Bigger ...•• * Alphonso C. Stewart * John R. Parson· Sept., 1908 R. R. Kreeger William A. Hall. Clay C. Bigger Arch A. Johnson Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson. Sept., 1909 Wm. A. Hall * Clay C. Bigger Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1910 Clay C. Bigger Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert. ..• Van Fremont Boor .. Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1911 Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert Van Fremont Boor. Chesley A. Mosman.* Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson* Sept., 1912 Jacob Lampert ..•• Van Fremont Boor •• Chesley A. Mosman. Tolman W. Cotton ... Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Oct., 1918 Van Fremont Boor. Chesley A. Mosman •• Tolman W. Cotton. Frank R. Jesse .•... • Alphonso C. Stewart· John R. Parson· Sept., 1914 •••. Tolman W. Cotton. Frank R. Jesse .•••• Edward Higbee ••.• Wm. A. Clark * Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1915 Frank R. Jesse Edward Higbee Wm. A. Clark .... • John W. Bingham Alph. C. Stewart ••• John R. Parson. Sept., 1916 Edward Higbee Wm. A. Clark John W. Bingham. Julius C. Garrell Wm. A. Hall John R. Parson· Sept., 1917 •••. Wm. A. Clark .....• John W. Bingham .. - Julius C. Garrell ••• Wm. F. Johnson - Wm. A. Hall - John R. ParsonSept., 1918 •••. John W. Bingham. Julius C. Garrell Wm. F. Johnson ..• O. A. Lucas * Wm. A. Hall ..•••••• John R. Parson* Sept., 1919 Julius C. Garrell Wm. F. Johnson O. A. Lucas Bert S. Lee Wm. A. Hall John R. Parson· Sept., 1920 Wm. F. Johnson ..• O. A. Lucas Bert S. Lee Jos. S. McIntyre Wm. A. Hall. .••...• John R. Parsontt* Sept., 1921. O. A. Lucas Bert S. Lee Jos. S. McIntyre Orestes Mitchell Wm. A. Hall Frank R. Jesse* Oct., 1922 Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre .. Orestes Mitchell W. W. Martin Wm. A. Hall * Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1923 Joseph S. McIntyre Orestes Mitchell W. W. Martin John Piekard Wm. A. Hall Frank R. Jesse* Oct., 1924 Orestes Mitchell ... W. W. Martin John Pickard A. F. Ittner Wm. A. Hall. *ttt Frank R. Jesse* Oct., 1925 .••• W. W. Martin ••... John Pickard ..••.••. A. F. Ittner .....•• B. E. Bigger ..•...•. E. E. Morris ......•. Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1926 John Pickard A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet E. E. Morris Frank R. Jesse.·tt Oct., 1927 Anthony F. Ittner. B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet - Wm. R. Gentry, Sr E. E. Morris Arthur Matherttt Sept., 1928 Byrne E. Bigger ... S. R. Freet * Wm. R. Gentry, Sr. Ray V. Denslow E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1929 ••.. S. R. Freet ..•••.. * Wm. R. Gentry ....•• Ray V. Denslow .•• Thad B. Landon E. E. Morris ......•. Arthur Mather Oct., 1930 Wm. R. Gentry Ray V. Denslow Thad B. Landon ... Frank C. Barnhill E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1931. Ray V. Denslow Thad B. Landon Frank C. Barnhill .. Du Val Smith E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1982 Thad B. Landon... Frank C. Barnhill... Du Val Smith ••••• J as. W. Skelly ......• E. E. Morris ......•. Arthur Mather Sept., 1933 ...• F. C. Barnhill ...•• Du Val Smith •.••••. Jas. W. Skelly .•••• Goo. W. Walker E. E. Morris ......•. Arthur Mather Sept., 1984 ..•. Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader E. E. Morris ......•. Arthur Mather Sept., 1935 James W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader •...... Henry C. Chiles E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1936 Goo. W. Walker H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods E. E. Morris Arthur Mather ·Deceased. ·IIJohn W. Luke served, by appointment, as Grand Secretary, from April 11, 1877, to §Was not installed. ·tDied August 11, 1866, while in office. October 11, 1877, and died Oetober, 1888. ·*Appointed August 13, 1866, by John D. 'lIDied within week after his installation. Vincil, Grand Master. ttThere was no Communication in 1835, • ·\lDied April 11, 1877, while in office. owing to the anti-Masonic excitement• • 'lI'lIDied October 12, 1904, while in office. ··Withdrawn from Masonry. ··.Died April 22, 1916, while in office. OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATION, FEBRUARY 22, EDWARD BATES, Worshipful Master JAMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer

tt.Resigned May 20. 1921, account ill health. .tttDied November 7, 1924, while in office. • ••Appointed Oetober 22, 1904, by Leroy B. Valliant, Grand Master. *·ttDied August 29, 1927, while in office. tttAppointed September I, 1927, by John Pickard, Grand Master.

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1821 WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden ABRAM BECK, Secretary


GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING AT THE CORNERSTONE LAYING OF THE HIGH SCHOOL AT LACLEDE, MO., MAY 2, 1936.


THE MASONIC WORLD By

RAY

V.

DENSLOW,

P. G. M.

The outstanding Masonic ceremony of the Masonic year, in our estimation was the laying of the cornerstone of a public school building in the little city of Laclede, Missouri, May 2, 1936, by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and the address of General John J. Pershing on that occasion. \Vhy was it outstanding' Because of the momentous words uttered by General Pershing on that occasion, and in the lodge preceding the ceremonies; and again, because the ceremony brought home to us the fact that the Masonic fraternity is not being invited to perform its age-old ceremonies as once it was wont to do. In this sovereign state of Missouri during the past few years, according to our information, there has not been laid a single federal or state building cornerstone with Masonic ceremonies. No construction work going on' Take a look at the memorial plazas in St. Louis and in Kansas City. We could tell our brethren some very interesting and entertaining stories about some of these cornerstones but it is neither the time nor the place in this article. These things only show the general c~rrent of thought and the standing of our fraternity. In Massachusetts a so-called Governor threatens to direct police to enter Masonic lodge rooms. The condition of the fraternity in dictator-ruled nations such as Italy, Germany, Russia, Portugal and a few other continental countries is such as to merit the sympathy of all those who are in love with free speech and freedom of thought and conscience. Whether these ideas shall spread to the United States is now, or soon will be, a subject for discussion among those who are interested in the future of humanity. RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES

It is unfortunate that there exists no agreement between the various recognized Grand Lodges as to what shall be done in the recognition of other Grand Lodges newly formed or unrecognized. Here is one State that recognizes a number of Grand Lodges, which it seemingly regards as regular and legitimate, while another Grand Lodge, which is a neighbor, may refuse to recognize beca~se of lack of investigation, in-


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fonnation or other apparently good reason. It would appear that the English-speaking Grand Lodges at least should come to an agreement so that there will be uniformity in English-speaking lodges. Such an organization would be a vital force in fixing the policy and trend in Grand Lodge in other rountries. English-speaking MasollrY no doubt numbers approximately four million members, which by far constitutes the largest group of organized Masons in the world. Too frequently recognition is left to a group of two or three individuals in a single Grand Lodge who are not content to make the full investigation that should be required before extending the hand of fellowship. Committees will learn after bitter experience that they cannot always take the statements expressed by those who are seeking recognition. Too often the best foot is set forward and a little more than careful investigation will show that the Grand Lodge is the antithesis of what it is thought to be. On the other hand, there are a large number of splendid small Grand Lodges who are not recognized by Grand Lodges of the United States, simply because they have failed to ask for recognition or have had no friend at court. It is hoped that at the next conference of Grand Masters this question of recognition may be thoroughly discussed and a committee formed for the purpose of digging out the necessary information showing the regularity or irregularity, legality or illegality of various Grand Lodges. Then the Grand Lodges of the United States, with this information before them, may be in a position to recognize or reject claims for recognition. Fortunately, we have an organization that should be in a position to give us definite information-we refer to the National Masonic Service Association. W~ agree with the Grand Master of Pennsylvania, who said: "International relationship, business dealings, and transportation all demand a better understanding of the people of our continent. Masonry should do its part in promoting the good neighbor feeling and I recommend that the Grand Lodge express its willingness to look with favor on the recognition of outstanding Grand Lodges of South and Central America. There is a considerable number of members who believe that, since these Grand Lodges do not conform in every particular to the regulations that govern us, perhaps, we should have nothing to do with them. Some claim that politics playa great part in lodges in South America. That may be true, but remember-there was a time in our own country when there were political groups fighting Masonry. I assume American lodges discussed politics in those days. Conditions in some foreign jurisdictions may now justify political discussions. I do not believe we should parade the shortcomings of any Grand Lodge before this Grand Lodge."

OUR FOREIGN RELATIVES

There is little in the reports that come to us from foreign jurisdictions which will give comfort and satisfaction to the Freemasons of the United States. The assault upon the liberties of the people by communistic and socialistic elements, monarchial groups and clerical


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establishments have had their effed upon the membership of the fraternity, particularly on the Continent of Europe. Where dictators such as Mussolini, Hitler and Dollfuss assume the reins of government, Freemasonry will be found vanishing from the scene, just as dew evaporates v.'ith the rays of the morning sun. The first waves of this on-rushing tide of anti-Masonry have only reached the shores of the American Continent, but in time we shall see more, and until that time shall come it is the duty of every patriotic and home-loving American to thoroughly understand the various elements antagonistic to Masonry, the reason for their activity, and the best means of combating the enemies of a free people. Let us first journey to the Continent of Europe, taking the various nations alphabetically: \Ve first come to Belgium, never a very strong country Masonically by reason of the religious element there prevailing. The Grand Orient once contained the names of celebrated characters known throughout the Masonic W orId. In 1925, the Grand Orient removed from its constitution two of the landmarks thought essential by world Freemasonry; many jurisdictions have severed fraternal relations on this aecount. Because of such irregular action, many jurisdictions regarded the territory as open for the establishment of legitimate Freemasonry and one of the former lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand Orient appealed to the Grand Lodge of Scotland for aid and was rewarded by the granting of a charter to Wellington-Antwerp Lodge No. 1385; the lodge was reconstituted on January 20, 1934, and, according to all accounts, is prospering. In Bulgaria, we find Major General Midileff serving the Craft as Grand Master. Here again, the fraternity is compelled to combat anti-Masonic agitation. In recent years we find the enmity more pronounced, necessitating the issuance of a number of pamphlets enlightening the general public upon the nature and character of the Masonic Institution. The government does not look with disfavor upon the fraternity. In faet, many of the best citizens hold official positions in the lodges of the Order. Requirements for admission are said to be very exact, and yet during the past year there was a small increase in membership. In this Grand Lodge, emphasis seems to be laid on lectures, by intelligent members of the Craft, upon the various arts and sciences. In Czechoslovakia we find two Grand Lodges, the National Grand Lodge and Lessing Zu Den Drei Ringen. Both Grand Lodges have their headquarters in Prague, and apparently live in entire harmony with each other. The former Grand Lodge consists largely of Slavicspeaking members, while the latter includes German and an element of Magyar nationalities. Karel Vfeigner is Grand Master of the former, and Dr. Ernst Steinert is Grand Master of the latter. The former Grand Lodge recently granted a charter to a town in subCarpathian Russia, in the neighborhood of the Rumal}ian and Rus-


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sian frontier. The latter Grand Lodge appears to have a larger number of lodges, as well as a larger number of members, although neither Grand Lodge is noted for its numbers. We find only a few references in American proceedings to the two Grand Lodges. In fact, the first of our information is taken from the Grand Lodge of New York. The Grand Lodge of Kansas considered recognition of the Grand Lodge Lessing. They had previously refused recognition in 1932 because both Grand Lodges appeared to be occupying the same territory; their request was denied in 1934. It appears that because of one of the landmarks in Kansas, in which no two jurisdictions may share the same territory, they are prohibited from recognizing this Grand Lodge and it has been suggested that the basis of recognition be changed so as to permit such recognition. In the meantime, intervisitation has been legalized by resolution. It is noted that recognition has been granted by Alberta, Maine, New Zealand, Texas, Ohio, Virginia, Manitoba, Prince Edward Island, Arizona, South Australia, \Visconsin, but refused in Oklahoma, and postponed in Nevada. The fraternity in Denmark is under the special protection of His Majesty Christian X, who is serving as Grand Master. Past Grand Master Melvin Johnson, of Massachusetts, visited Denmark at the time of the international conference of Supreme Councils and was presented with several interesting Masonic medals, one commemorating the Fiftieth Masonic Anniversary of King Gustav V, another the Twenty-fifth Masonic Anniversary of King Christian X. South Carolina failed to recognize Denmark because of the absence of information. Indiana felt satisfied that the Grand Lodge conformed to all the requirements and accorded recognition. New Hampshire was somewhat confused, finding two aspirants for recognition with almost similar names; it finally settled upon the one known as Danish National Grand Lodge, of which His Royal Highness was the regular sovereign Masonic authority. Texas discovered the application of the two Grand Lodges and accepted the one generally regarded as legitimate. The Grand Lodge of Storlogen of Denmark was refused recognition by the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario. Virginia recognized the Grand Lodge of Denmark which was established November 15, 1931, which, its committee states, is recognized by the Grand Lodge of England and several of the Grand Lodge in the United States. Saskatchewan in 1934 extended recognition to the Grand Lodge of Denmark in the belief the application was from the National Grand Lodge recognized by Missouri and many other jurisdictions; the committee now finds that an error was made and has withdrawn the recognition once extended. \Visconsin recognized the Grand Lodge of Denmark, apparently the illegal Grand Lodge of which H. E. Iversen is Grand Secretary. Kansas discovered the two Grand Lodges, does not recognize either and has deferred the request until a future date. Finland is one of the smallest jurisdictions. It has but five lodges and 250 members. I t was established thirteen years ago through the


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efforts of the Grand Lodge of New York. The United States is particularly interested in welcoming this Grand Lodge into its midst because it is apparently the only one of the nations which has tried to carry out its moral obligation in payment of its just debts. Conditions in France are somewhat disturbed by reason of the existence of three Masonic Grand Jurisdictions. The smallest of the three is the National Grand Lodge, which is the one generally recognized throughout the English-speaking jurisdictions. The headquarters of this Grand Lodge is at 42 Rue de Rochechouart, Paris; it numbers thirty lodges. Oklahoma recently refused recognition, while Virginia recognized them. Grand Master Brown of Virginia visited this Grand Lodge and found France a hotbed of anti-Masonic sentiment. It was his opinion that this Grand Lodge, estllblished in 1913, conforms in every particular to the basic principles for recognition; the most of its lodges work in the English language. Past Grand Master Melvin Johnson (Mass.) reported that there was a schism in the Grand Orient, the most numerous of the three Masonic groups; he tells us that all unpopular and unfortunate occurrences are blamed upon the Masons. This is done in public print and by the circulation of handbills or large posters. 'Vith the advent of Hitler, Masonry in Germany has ceased to exist, at least officially. An attempt has been made to establish a so-called Grand Lodge of Germany in Exile, but in practically all instances recognition has been deferred because of the irregularity of its origin. The following jurisdictions have either deferred action or refused to recognize this Grand Lodge: Oklahoma, Maryland, New Hampshire, Nova Scotia, Nevada, South Carolina, Indiana. The proceedings for 1936 of the Grand Lodge of Holland are not at hand. This lodge has had sixty years of continuous existence and its one hundred forty-seven lodges, with more than 8,000 members, show a substantial gain. vVe learn that attacks still continue from antiMasonic sources. One of the routine acts of the Grand Lodge is the sending of a telegram of loyalty to Her Majesty, the Queen, during the opening session of the Grand Lodge. This jurisdiction is exercising great care in the admission of initiates. Hungary has experienced vicissitudes of time and fortune, beginning in 1921 with the seizure of their property by the go"vernment, a seizure which did not prevent the holding of informal meetings. There are a number of Hungarian lodges outside Hungary proper and these are active and carryon a certain amount of contact with the Mother Grand Lodge. Austrian Grand Lodges are regularly descended from the Grand Lodge of Hungary and a lodge of Vienna still works in the Hungarian language. There is no immediate possibility of Freemasonry resuming its labors as an organized institution in this nation. In Italy, where at one time there were 150,000 Freemasons, we find little to give encouragement in a Masonic way. This jurisdiction

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1936

is mentioned in only two instances: The Grand Lodge of Alberta has asked for an extension of another year to continue its investigation into its relationship with Italy, and Oklahoma recommended an exchange of Grand Representatives with the Grand Orient of Italy, our first intimation that the Grand Orient is endeavoring to carryon. Oklahoma deferred recognition of the Grand Lodge of Jugoslavia. The Grand Master is Douchan Militschevitch, and his Grand Lodge exists amidst much anti-Masonic agitation. \Ve have no proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Netherlands, but the Grand Lodge of Alberta is reported investigating the question of its recognition. Norway reports 10,441 members, which represents a slight gain in membership. This Grand Lodge works what is known as the Swedish system of ritual consisting of nine degrees. A conference was held a year ago, attended by the Grand Lodges of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Many matters of mutual interest were discussed and future conferences are assured. The Grand Lodge of Denmark was represented by Grand Chancellor Schmidth, a Justice of the Supreme Court, while Rear Admiral and Prime Minister of State Lindman represented the Swedish brethren. Maine recently extended recognition to Norway, while South Carolina postponed it. Masonry is prohibited in Portugal. Rhode Island recently admitted to dual membership three members who were reported as having received degrees in the Azores and in Portugal. When it was found that there was no recognized Grand Lodge in Portugal, the dual membership was withdrawn. Mihal Sadoveanu is Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Rumania, reporting 1,024 members in twenty-eight lodges. The problem of this Grand Lodge appears to be the defense against attack from outside. The agitation appears to be synonymous with anti-Semitism. The membership of the various lodges is made up largely of intellectualswriters, professors and members of other learned professions. Official information confirms the belief that the Grand Lodge, known as the National Grand Lodge of Rumania, is dependent on the Supreme Council, presided over by one Jean Pangal. Apparently the Supreme Council nominates the Grand Officers, which are confirmed by the Grand Lodge. Alberta recognizes the Grand Orient; South Carolina postponed recognition of the National Grand Lodge; Philippine Islands recognized the Grand Lodge Romana Unita; Maryland found the same Grand Lodge irregular. We are anxiously awaiting further news from Spain. Previous to the revolution, Masonry was not prohibited. Following the downfall of the monarchy, however, it is not favored. Officers of the army and navy are permitted to be Masons. It is the opinion that most of our brethren will be found on the side of legitimate government, known as the Party of Leftists. Rebels, or Revolutionists, appear to be made up largely of clericals and monarchials, both forces antagonistic to


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Freemasonry. Both France and England .appear to recognize the established government. For a time Masonic elements were represented in the Cabinet; within the last few days a change has been made in the Cabinet and we are not informed as to its status at the present time. South Carolina is the only jurisdiction which mentioned Spain, postponing its recognition. In Sweden we find King Gustav V Grand Master, although active duties are carried on by Admiral Arvid Lindman. Fifty-one lodges report more than 23,000 members, and a very substantial increase in membership. In December a new chapel connected with the Children's Home was dedicated by Archbishop Eiden. A delegation from Sweden recently visited the Grand Lodges of England, Ireland, Scotland and Norway. The King recently accepted honorary membership in the Grand Lodge of Ireland. Ireland entertained the distinguished party with an inspection of Freemasons' Hall, a lecture on Irish Freemasonry, a visit to various churches and cathedrals, and a special meeting of the Grand Master's Lodge, at which time Admiral Lindman delivered a short address on Freemasonry in Sweden. Later a visit was made to the Orphans' Home, and motor drives through sections of Ireland. Alberta is investigating the regularity of this Grand Lodge; Maine has recently recognized it, as have both Texas and Nebraska. Massachusetts recently presented the King with the Henry Price medal. Many of the jurisdictions have been invited to attend the 1936 Bicentenary services in Stockholm. Switzerland met in its Eighty-fourth Annual Communication, the report showing forty-one lodges and approximately 5,000 members. Freemasonry in Switzerland is undergoing severe attacks at the hands of its critics and many slanders are being circulated with the idea of driving the fraternity from the state. About a year ago a petition was circulated with apparently sufficient signatures to secure the fixing of a date for a vote through whieh the people of Switzerland might outlaw Freemasonry and other societies. Later developments showed that many forgeries had been committed and that the full number of names was not appended. Just what the future is remains to be seen. One regulation which was adopted, and which might well be copied in this country, was that prohibiting members from talking in public about the inner affairs of lodges or of Grand Lodge. Dr. Brown, of Virginia, tells us that it is difficult for us in America to conceive a situation such as exists in that country, where Protestantism and liberty â&#x20AC;˘ have existed for so many centuries. At last reports, Dr. Richard Schlesinger was serving as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge at Vienna. Conditions appear to be more favorable in this country than in many of its neighbors, particularly the absence of the usual anti-Masonic activity. The present Grand Master has served six terms of three years each. The backbone of English-speaking Masonry is the British Isles, and here we find three Grand Lodges carrying on their Masonic ac-


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1936

tivities with the hearty cooperation of the government, the Royal Family and subject to little attack from the usual anti-Masonic sources. The death of the late Lord Ampthill and Lord Cornwallis was a severe blow to the Craft, but their places have been agreeably filled by others of distinction and Masonic reputation. The Prince of Wales, who attained a certain amount of activity in Masonic affairs and who was to have been made the Grand Master of Masons of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, was compelled by turn of affairs (the death of his father), to relinquish his aspirations in a Masonic way and give way to his distinguished brother. However, he is to retain the title of Patron of Masonry, a title once borne by his eminent grandfather, King Edward VII. The Two Hundred Twentieth Communication of the Grand Lodge was held in April of this year. It was reported that a deputation from the Grand Lodge, in furtherance of a treaty with the Grand Orient of Brazil, would visit that country for the purpose of inaugurating the District of South America, Northern Division. The present Grand Master is his Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught and Strathern. In Ireland, we find the Right Honorable, the Earl of Donoughmore, as Grand Master. The membership of the jurisdiction is 50,000. We have referred in another paragraph to the visit of the Swedish delegation to this Grand Lodge. Our Irish brethren are noted for their benevolences, especially the Orphans' Welfare Committee. Widows' grants are made to 610 widows. The center of interest during the year 1936 will be the Grand Lodge of Scotland which holds its Two Hundredth Annual Communication during the month of November. Invitations have already been extended to all jurisdictions in fraternal relation. At the present time, Sir Ian Colquohn is Grand Master Mason, with Brig. Gen. Ewing as Deputy. Now we turn our attention to Africa: In Egypt we learn that the Grand Lodge of New York has suspended its recognition, the committee reporting that there are two rival organizations, each claiming Masonic regularity. Official documents seem to prove that the Grand Lodge presided over by Dr. Mohamed Pasha Chachine indicate that in 1935 it was formed in an un-Masonic manner. At the same time no satisfactory information has been supplied as to the regularity of the other Grand Lodge, of which R. W. Bro. Youins is Grand Secretary. England has a number of lodges chartered in Africa, all under District Grand Lodges. We find one in East Africa, another in Nigeria, and a third in the Transvaal. There are twenty-one lodges in East Africa, seventeen in Nigeria, and sixtythree in the Transvaal. Ireland has chartered a number of lodges in South Africa, in the Southern Cape, and in New Zealand, Rhodesia and Natal. It is reported that the relationship of the Irish, Scottish and English brethren is of a most harmonious nature. In New Zea-


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land we find that one Deputy visited a lodge one thousand miles from his home, requiring forty hours of travel spread over three days and three nights. The Deputy for Rhodesia reports that he has been having trouble in keeping the ritual purely Irish, owing to the close connection with city constitutions. A conference of Provincial Grand Masters was held at Johannesburg, at which time the ritual was discussed with the object of effecting a uniform working. There was also an annual conference of English, Irish, Scottish and Netherlands at Pietermartzburg, and we learn, as a result, that there is "most sincere cooperation and good will between these four constitutions." Distressing reports come from Turkey. The most of our information is that contained in newspaper reports from which we learn of anti-Masonic agitation and persecution of the Masonic fraternity. Apparently all lodges have been closed and the government has seized their property, although the latter is disputed from other sources. A few years ago Turkey had the prospect of becoming a bright star in the Masonic galaxy, the membership numbering the most eminent men of the country and induding a large portion of the intellectual class. In Palestine we find two or three Masonic bodies mentioned, some of them exceedingly questionable in their regularity. Maryland regards the National Grand Lodge of Palestine and the Grand Orient of Lebanon as irregular; South Carolina postponed recognition of the National Grand Lodge; Indiana and Texas both postponed recognition. The Philippine Islands withheld recognition of the Grand Lodge of Lebanon, and New York attempted to rectify matters and legitimatize Masonry in that section by issuing a dispensation for the establishment of a lodge to be known as EI Merj, located at Merdjayoun, County of South Lebanon, Syria. A disturbing situation has existed in China since the organization by the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands of a lodge under their constitution. At the present time, Massachusetts, Scotland, England, Ireland and the Philippine Islands each have lodges located in that territory. The Grand Lodge of the Philippines granted charters over the protest of English and Massachusetts Grand Lodges and the best feeling has not prevailed since that event. The Grand Master of the Philippines feels it is not compatible with the dignity of his Grand Lodge to take up the charter, nor to persist in attempting to persuade other jurisdictions to change their attitude. The two Philippine lodges are known as Szechuen, made up of fourteen Canadians and Americans, and West Lake, largely of Chinese membership. There are twenty-six college graduates and two missionaries in the latter lodge located at Hangchow. It may be interesting to Missourians to know that lodge dues are $34.00 a year. England has a District Grand Lodge, with headquarters at Shanghai. Massachusetts had reason to suspend a number of its members of Chinese lodges, five of whom ap-


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peared to be native Chinese. \Ve learn from the District Deputy's report to Massachusetts that the lodges under the Massachusetts constitution are widely separated. Many difficult and perplexing questions constantly arise, calling for tact and diplomacy. Political conditions there are still unstable, but do not directly affect the lodges. Three of these lodges draw their initiates for the most part from soldiers and marines on duty in China, which creates a lack of permanence in membership and withdrawal of these military units would seriously deplete the lodges. Japanese treat the lodges with the same tolerance extended British lodges in Japan and while secret assemblages are forbidden, the authorities ignore Masonic lodges with the understanding that Japanese subjects are not admitted to membership. Lodges in Manchuria are seriously threatened by the withdrawal of American and British business houses. The Deputy further reports and recommends that no new lodges be chartered in the China district. Massachusetts has five lodges in China, two in Manchuko and one in Southern Manchuria. The oldest of the lodges is Ancient Mark Lodge located at Shanghai and chartered in 1863. There is said to be a lodge of the Vienna constitution and one of the Irish constitution working in China. The American Masonic temple in Shanghai pays dividends (American membership take note). Talien Lodge, in Darien, had as one of its members an American Consul. In the Japanese earthquake of 1923, he and his wife were kilied, leaving two children with no one to look after them. Talien Lodge educated the two children, although having no hall of its own, and only homemade paraphernalia. Manuel Camus, Grand Master of the Philippine Islands held a special communication of his Grand Lodge in the hall of Pearl River Lodge at Canton, China, in February, 1934, for the purpose of constituting a lodge, being assisted by Bro. Hua-Chuen Mei, District Deputy Grand Master. The largest of South American States is Brazil. This jurisdiction appears in recent years to have divided itself into a number of smaller units, representing State lines. It is also our understanding that a District Grand Lodge of the English constitution claims jurisdiction over English-speaking Masons in that territory. The Grand Lodge of Amazonas e Acre satisfied the Grand Lodge of Indiana as to its regularity and reports that many of the individual States of Brazil have recently separated from the Grand Orient of Brazil, organizing Grand Lodges limited to each particular state, much as is current in the United States. Nova Scotia took no' action in reference to this Grand Lodge, postponing without prejudice. The Philippine Islands recognized this Grand Orient, which it states was founded September 22, 1904, exercising jurisdiction over the State of Amazonas and the Federal Territory of Acre, having twenty-three lodges with an aggregate membership of 1,440. This same lodge was recognized by Nevada. Oklahoma deferred recognition of the Grand Orient of Brazil, as did Indiana. The Grand Lodge of Rio de Janeiro


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was recognized by Connecticut, Michigan and Arizona. Action was deferred by Oklahoma, postponed by South Carolina, not recognized by New Hampshire. Maryland regarded the Grand Orient Rio de Janeiro as irregular. Parahyba recognition was postponed by Alberta, called irregular by Maryland, not recognized by New Hamp-' shire, recognized by Michigan, Nova Scotia and Canada. Rio Grande do SuI was not recognized by New York. The Arkansas correspondent gives an account of conditions in Brazil; it tends to show the condition of the country many years ago. Arkansas granted recognition to the Grand Orient of Brazil, which at that time \vas thought to be a regular Grand Lodge. Grand Commander John H. Cowles of the Scottish Rite, stated that the Grand Orient had declined in power and no longer exercised jurisdiction in the country, that the Grand Orient is now composed of several different Rites, four of which do not require a belief in the one living and true God. Masonry in the Canal Zone appears to be under the domination of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, which has constituted that territory a Masonic District. The relationship of the Masons of the Zone with those of Panama are cordial in the extreme. District Grand Lodge officers were recent guests of the Grand Lodge of Panama. When the Grand Lodge of Chile was formed in 1862, there were three lodges in that territory under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, two at Valparaiso and one at Copiapo. Massachusetts lodges did not join the new Chilean Grand Lodge, the latter constituted other lodges in Chile without complaint of invasion of jurisdiction, purely for the reason that the Grand Lodge of Chile was organized as a Scottish Rite Grand Lodge, claiming no authority over York Rite or its lodges. When the Grand Lodge of Chile threw off Supreme Council control and set up as a Sovereign Grand Lodge, it did not question the independent rights of lodges in its territory in the obedience of other Grand Lodges but very properly refused to allow the creation of any new ones, hence the number of Massachusetts lodges in Chile cannot be increased. In the Republic of Colombia, misunderstandings have disorganized the fraternity and there exist Grand Lodges at Bogota, Cartegena, and Barranquilla. New York cancelled its fraternal relations 'with the Grand Lodges at Bogota and Cartegena, but continued its relationship with the one at Barranquilla. Oklahoma deferred action in case of the Grand Lodge at Bogota; Connecticut denied recognition ; New Zealand recognized them; South Carolina postponed recognition, as did Ne\v Hampshire; Texas deferred action; Canada recognized; Kansas deferred recognition. Canada also recognized Barranquilla and Cartegena. New York postponed recognition of the Grand Lodge Occidental, as did Nevada. The only mention of Ecuador is that contained in the proceedings of South Dakota, which show that various lodges were in receipt of re-


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quests for assistance from lodges in that jurisdiction. Its headquarters are at Guaraquil. Guatemala is up for investigation by the Grand Lodge of Alberta; her neighbor, Saskatchewan, has recognized the jurisdiction. Little is to be learned elsewhere of this Grand Lodge. Conditions in Mexico are the same as in former years. A number of states in that territory are applying for recognition at the hands of their American brethren. The only English-speaking lodge in the entire Territory of Mexico is the York "Grand Lodge, with headquarters in Mexico City. Nevada postponed recognition of the Grand Lodge Cosmos of Chihuahua; Kansas deferred action ; New York recognized the Grand Lodge Oriental Peninsular, located in Yucatan, but postponed action in the case of Unida Mexicana. Action in the case of Grand Lodge Cosmos was postponed by South Carolina; not recognized by New Hampshire. The Independent Grand Lodge of Chihuahua was refused recognition temporarily by Oklahoma, regarded as irregular by Maryland, and recognized by Indiana. Connecticut postponed recognition of Grand Lodge Pacifico and Grand Lodge Independent. New Zealand recognized York Grand Lodge. South Carolina postponed recognition of the Masonic Confederation, as well as Grand Lodge Pacifico. The Grand Lodge of Texas, which neighbors the Grand Lodges of Mexico, attempted to secure information as to regularity from the York Grand Lodge. Later it addressed the United Mexican Grand Lodge of Vera Cruz, said to be of unquestionable regularity. Seventeen Grand Lodges were listed in the reply, each representing Sovereign States and the Federail District. These are the Grand Logia Unida Mexicana, Benito Juarez, Campeche, Cosmos, Chiapas, Guadalupe, Nuevo Leon, Oaxaca, La Oriental Peninsular, Occidental Mexicana, El Potosi, Restauracion, Tamaulipas, del Territorie Norte De La Baja California, Valle De Mexico, Queretaro, del Pacifico. From the reply we learn that a National Masonic Congress has been held, known as the Confederation of Regular Grand Lodges of the Republic of Mexico. All of the above Grand Lodges work in their native language. Recognition of only one Grand Lodge in Mexico by Texas has produced an unusual situation. Since Texas does not recognize any other jurisdiction than the York Grand Lodge in Mexico, other Mexican Grand Lodges have been chartering lodges in the State of Texas, engendering quite a bit of feeling on the part of Texas brethren. The Mexican lodges feel that since they are regarded as clandestine by the Grand Lodge of Texas they are not under obligation to respect its sovereignty. New York has denied recognition to the Grand Lodge of Paraguay. This is the only reference we find to this jurisdiction. Alberta is investigating recognition of the Grand Lodge of Peru. This Grand Lodge has twenty-seven lodges; its headquarters are in the City of Lima. Scotland has also chartered three lodges in this ter-


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ritory. New Zealand has granted recognition to the Grand Lodge of Peru; Texas and Saskatchewan have deferred action. In British Guiana we find nine lodges; six under the English constitution, three under the Scottish constitution. In Costa Rica, the Grand Lodge recently met in Thirty-sixth Annual Communication. We have no figures or statistics. We have not received proceedings from the Grand Lodge of Cuba, but are informed they have one hundred ninety-eight lodges, with approximately 8,000 members. Disturbing conditions affect the fraternity, as well as the nation itself, and only time will show the stability of the Masonic Fraternity there. Copying the example of their American brethren, many lodges built temples without making proper provision for payment. A large amount of money has been spent by the Grand Lodge on benevolences. An attempt is being made to unite all Masons in the Republic under one head. The present Secretary, recently elected, is Gonzalo Garcia Pedroso. We have no report from the Grand Lodge of Hayti and it is our understanding that lodges there are made up of representatives from the colored race. Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Panama for 1936 report the election of Guillermo Andreve as Grand Master. The Grand Lodge of Porto Rico has failed to submit its proceedings, although generally regarded as a regular Grand Lodge. The only mention we have found is in the proceedings of Alberta, where investigation is being made as to its regularity. Salvador has four lodges, with 192 members. It is known as the Grand Lodge of Cuscatlan, organized in .1912. Originally it had nine lodges. The brethren there seem to be struggling valiantly to preserve their organization. Venezuela has five lodges, but we have no information as to their activity. The only mention of the Grand Lodge of Uruguay is that in the Connecticut proceedings, where recognition has been postponed. A similar situation prevails in Argentine. New York has recognized the jurisdiction, while Texas has deferred action. Various of the Australian Grand Lodges have begun the holding of annual conferences with the idea of securing uniform procedure. The fourth Masonic conference was sponsored by the Grand Lodge of Tasmania. The agenda covered such topics as proper salutation to be given Grand Officers; clothes to be worn on various occasions, specifying that the apron should always be worn on the outside of the coat; visiting unaffiliated brethren must indicate in the attendance register their status; preparation of a funeral service for cremation; not recognizing or withdrawing recognition from any Grand Lodge, the attitude of the United Grand Lodge of England must be taken into consideration. The next conference is to be at Melbourne in March,


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1939. The conference was attended by representatives from South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria, New Zealand, \Vestern Australia, Queensland and Tasmania. Gov. Ernest Clark, of Tasmania, presided. A conference of Grand Masters, Deputy Grand Masters, and Grand Secretaries of the Grand Lodges of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, was held in Calgary in 1935. The representative from British Columbia was detained by strike trouble. The Grand Lodge of Manitoba believes the gathering was fully justified, recommends the addition of the Grand Senior and J unior Wardens, but suggests a delay of future gatherings until normal financial conditions return. PHYSICAL QUALIFICATIONS

Maryand refuses to consider a resolution fixing qualifications since it was contrary to landmark No. 18. It would provide that a petitioner's twenty-first birthday should occur within ninety days after receipt of his petition and would have permitted those incapacitated in the service of the army or navy to have their physical disabilities waived. The Grand Master of Montana sympathizes with a petitioner whose right hand had been amputated above the wrist, but refused to permit him to petition. One lodge asked the Grand Master, in 1929, about a petitioner who had lost his right hand and was refused; later, the same lodge asked for permission to advance the brother. A committee decided it was the province of the Grand Master to decide facts referred to him by lodges and his expression does not become a rule for the determination of other cases upon other facts: , 'A candidate must have the required physical, intellectual and moral qualifications. Noone is perfect in either of these qualities. What degree of excellence in either or all of these will fit a candidate for Masonry must be determined by the lodge. The Grand Master is probably remotely situated and a stranger to the candidate; he can only state the law and give the rules, leaving it to the lodge to apply them."

In Texas, where physical qualification is required, the Grand Master insists upon a pencil sketch of the defect, or a certificate from a reputable physician in each case. The Grand Lodge of England, writing to the Grand Lodge of British Columbia, gives the opinion of the Board of General Purposes to the effect that"When a defect does not render a candidate incapable of learning our art, there is no reason why he should not be initiated, provided he is able to understand our secrets and mysteries and to explain or exemplify them when properly called upon. Each case must be decided on its merits by the members of the lodge to whom the candidate is personally known, subject to the investigation and approval of the Master of the lodge, who is officially responsible that the candidate is in a condition to comply with requirements. "


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In London, we learn that Capt. Lowry, who was wounded in action in 1914, was initiated in 1925 and served as Master in 1932. A glass eye bars a petitioner in Wisconsin. CONFERENCE OF GRAND MASTERS

The annual conference of Grand Masters of Masons in the United States was' held in \Vashington, D. C., February 20-21, 1936. Missouri was officially represented by Grand Master Skelly, Deputy Grand Master Walker, Past Grand Master Ittner and Gralld Secretary Mather. William C. Ramsey of Nebraska was elected chairman of the conference. The agenda covered gambling devices and lotteries, Boards of General Purposes, social clubs, citizenship, attitude toward subversive activities, conferring of the degrees, training of Masters of lodges. The discussion of the latter was opened by Grand Master Skelly. During the same meeting a conference of Grand Lodge Secretaries was held and a number of matters of vital importance discussed. There was a strong sentiment for a uniform dimit and transfer. A few favored the current receipt for dues as sufficient certificate of good standing on which to apply for membership; others thought there should be a regular form of certificate to be presented with the application. The necessity for lodge and Grand Lodge histories came in for discussion, as well as the discussion of sale of forms and supplies through the Grand Secretary's office. Many Grand Lodges furnish supplies gratis; others at cost. The question of adjusting difficulties which arise because of conflict between laws of Grand Lodges was broached. Another subject was the discussion of Masonic funerals accorded affiliates of other jurisdictions. The conference favored the writing and publication of correspondenee reports. The 1937 meeting will be held ill \Vashington, D. C. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

This Association has now been in existence for more than a quarter of a century; it held its twenty-sixth annual convention in the Memorial Building in Alexandria, Va., February 22, 1936. Missouri was represented by Grand Master Skelly, Deputy Grand Master Walker, Past Grand Master Ittner, Grand Secretary Mather, and Grand Senior Steward Harry S. Truman. The present officers of the . Association were continued, including Bert S. Lee of Missouri, who is serving as Third Vice-President. Directors elected for a term of three years were Melvin Johnson of Massachusetts, Arthur Lee of Wyoming, Ralph Lum of New Jersey, Charles C. Clark of Iowa, William H. Carter (deceased) of Mississippi, John A. Dutton of New York, and Anthony F. Ittner of Missouri. The Advisory Board


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now consists of Frank O. Lowden of Illinois, John A. Lejuene of the U. S. Marine Corps, Judge Townsend S<'udder of New York, Carter Glass of Virginia, Philip Goldsborough of Maryland, Simeon D. Fess of Ohio, and Andrew W. Mellon of Pennsylvania". I t fell to the lot of Past Grand Master Ittner of Missouri to respond to the address of welcome delivered by the Grand Master of Virginia. President 'Yatres reported that the first work to be done was the finishing and completing of Memorial Hall; this will require $80,000.00. It is estimated that $458,000.00 will be needed to finish the interior, and it is hoped that later there may be added a milliondollar endowment fund. It is unfortunate that the building designed to house the 'Yashington relics does not at the present time contain a single 'Yashington relic. New Hampshire has paid in $3.35 per capita; it is hoped that each jurisdiction will contribute at least $1.70 per capita. Many jurisdictions have contributed little or nothing. It is estimated that one hundred fifty thousand visitors view the building annually, and the general opinion at the meeting was that the failure to complete the Memorial was a disgrace to the Masonic Fraternity in the United States. MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION

The seventeenth annual meeting of the Masonic Service Association of the United States was held February 21,1936, at the Raleigh Hotel, 'Yashington, D. C., at the same time as the conference of Grand Masters. The Association has carried on under difficulties for several years, but its work appears to be meriting the consideration of the various Grand Lodges and many proceedings contain references to the Association and its work, and many jurisdictions have rejoined. The Grand Masters of Vermont, Washington, Idaho and Nebraska recommended a reaffiliation; Oregon has deferred action for the present; Virginia, Montana, Mississippi, Iowa, Maryland and Rhode Island have rejoined. For the fifth consecutive meeting no member jurisdiction has withdrawn. The Association has its affairs audited by a certified accountant and shows no liabilities. The reserve fund has been substantially increased. Offers of assistance were made to flood sufferers in New York, storm sufferers in Florida, and earthquake disaster in Montana. One of the most inspiring Masonic addresses yet heard was delivered during the meeting by Dr. Joseph Fort Newton, and the address has been widely published. M. W. Bro. George R. Sturges, of Connecticut, was unanimously elected chairman of the Executive Commission. The Commission now consists of Holt Apgar (New Jersey), W. M. Fly (Texas), W. H. Murfin (North Dakota), A. M. 'Vilson (New York), Hubert M. Poteat (North Carolina), Sam H. Goodwin (Utah).


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Some very valuable digests and pamphlets have been issued by the Association, one of which particularly appeals to Missouri Freemasons, being a condensed version of R. W. Bro. Henry C. Chiles' !'Baltimore Convention." A digest of the "Powers of Grand Masters of the Forty-nine Jurisdictions" constitutes a valuable reference work and affords an interesting comparison of the various powers granted Grand Masters by their Grand Lodges. Carl H. Claudy, the versatile Secretary of the Commission, issued a Masonic play in two acts, "He That Believeth," which met with general approval throughout the country. A Masonic questionnaire, "What's Your Score'" provided many evenings of entertainment for Masonic lodges. Most interesting of the historical series was the story of "Famous American Lodges" in which the writer has selected the outstanding lodges of the 160,000 lodges in the United States. In Missouri, we note that Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 of Kansas City, Louisiana Lodge No 109 of Ste. Genevieve, and St. Louis Lodge No. 111 were selected as the outstanding lodges of this jurisdiction; the first because of its size, the latter two because of their historical interest. Other digests of importance are "Consolidation of Lodges," showing the laws and practices in the various jurisdictions; "Grand Lodge Honors," showing official action in the award of medals, certificates, honorary memberships, life memberships, and fifty-year buttons; "Dual and Plural Membership" as practiced or forbidden in the various jurisdictions. A summary of the information gleaned shows that dual membership has been tried in nineteen jurisdictions, the period of trial ranging from three to two hundred three years; fifteen jurisdictions report that it has been proposed but has been defeated for various reasons; four lodges are now considering it. The number of members who took advantage of dual membership appears to be small, ranging from two in one jurisdiction to one hundred in the largest jurisdiction. Several jurisdictions have no figures; the average per jurisdiction appears to be about 17.1. Seven jurisdictions feel that dual membership makes inaccuracy in statistics and returns; fourteen do not agree. Two jurisdictions believe that dual membership imposes a burden on Grand Secretary and Lodge Secretary; fourteen jurisdictions believe dual membership of value, thirteen do not. DISTINGUISHED MASONS

The Right Hon. The Earl of Donoughmore, addressing the Grand Lodge of Ireland, said: "At the meeting of the Grand Lodge of England, successors were appointed to Lord Ampthill and Lord Cornwallis; they were the Earl of Harewood路 and Gen. Sir Francis J. Davies. I have informed you before now that I was initiated in England, owing to an accident of geography. My father had me initiated in his own lodge, I think five days after I came of age. There are two supreme events in a Mason's lifehis initiation and his first installation, and the fact that I was initiated


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in an English lodge is balanced by the fact that I was installed in the Master's chair in an Irish lodge."

The Grand Master of Tasmania is Gov. Ernest Clark, who appears to be very active in his fraternal relations. During a banquet of the Grand Lodge of Texas, the brethren were entertained by the Baylor University Band, and were addressed by Bro. Pat M. Neff, former Governor of Texas and President of the University. He told his hearers that the Baylor University charter was written by a Mason and that Anson Jones, a Mason, the last President of the Republic of Texas, signed the charter. The University was also named for a great mason, and for nearly fifty years a Mason served as its President. The Grand Master of the District of Columbia is Robert S. Regal', former Assistant Postmaster General. Capt. 'Villiam 'Vilson Galt, Pay Director of the United States Navy, receives a memorial page in the Grand Lodge of Virginia proceedings. He had been a Mason since 1877. His duties took him to all parts of the world. He was with Dewey at Manila Bay and was, at the time, paymaster on the U. S. SS. "Raleigh." During an historical address before the Grand Lodge of British Columbia, we learn that in the Grand Lodge of 1717 there were two generals, ten colonels and four officers of lower rank out of a total of 71. There were Masonic lodges in nine of the Regiments under Gen. Wolfe when he conquered the French under Montcalm in 1759, and the first Provincial Grand Master in Canada was Col. Simon Fraser who commanded the 78th Highlanders in that fight. He afterwards became Lieut. Gen. Sir Simon Fraser. In recent years, the Craft numbers Lords 'Volsley, Roberts, Kitchener, Haig and Jellicoe. The opening prayer at the Grand Lodge of New York was given by the late Rev. S. Parkes Cadman. The Grand Orator of Kansas is Henry J. Allen, former Governor and United States Senator. HISTORIOAL

'l'he Grand Lodge of Alberta has been presented with a set of gavels made of wood shattered by shrapnel at Cambrai during the World 'Val'. The Grand Lodge of Colorado is having Bro. George B. Clark write a history of Masonry in that jurisdiction. The volume as now compiled consists of three hundred pages. Connecticut waived jurisdiction on one of its residents in favor of a Vermont lodge. The first section of the degree was conferred by the oldest member of the Vermont lodge, who, forty-five years previous, had conferred the degree upon the father of the present candidate.


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The Grand Master of Washington visited subordinate lodges in Alaska and the Yukon, traveling approximately 5,000 miles. He found a Masonic Club at Wrangell. He visited Fairbanks, the farthest north lodge of the Continent; this lodge tendered a reception, banquet and dance. A social club of Masons has been organized at the Grand Coulee Dam, under the name of the "Spade and Maul Club." Investigation is being made as to the transfer of one of the less active lodges in that area to the Grand Coulee Dam during the period of construction. The Grand Historian presented to the Grand Lodge of W ashingto~ a very interesting story of the growth of Masonry in that jurisdiction. A Grand Lodge history is being written. A search of the archives of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts disclosed in the Samuel C. Lawrence collection, a Scottish Rite manuscript of 316 pages, in the handwriting of Henry A. Francken, under date 1783, and containing the entire ritual of the Rite of Perfection from the fourth to twenty-fifth degree, inclusive. The manuscript was given to the Scottish Rite of the Northern Jurisdiction. This jurisdiction also has a Henry Clay letter, written by him when the fraternity was at low ebb, addressed to Gen. Joseph Vance. Clay writes that he was never a very ardent or bright Mason, although he was Grand Master in 1820, but says: "It must not be said that I concur in the denunciation of Masonry. Nor must it be expected that I will make any formal renunciation of it. I believe it does more good than harm, although it does not practically effect all that it theoretically promises. I would not denounce and formally renounce it to be made President of the U. S."

Connecticut investigated the burial place of their Past Grand Masters and now have on file a complete list showing the city, cemetery and lot number where each of the sixty-six deceased Past Grands is buried and the nature of the marker. Each subordinate lodge in Maine is filing its history with the Grand Secretary. Several lodges are failing to cooperate. A committee is preparing a program for the 200th anniversary of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. On the committee we notice the name of Bro. Riddick, bringing to our attention the name of Missouri's first Grand Master. Already acceptances have been received from twenty-five jurisdictions. It is expected to expend $6,000.00 and the committee promises some distinctly original entertainment. Solomon Lodge No.1, of this jurisdiction, observed its 200th anniversary on October 28, 1935; it was originally No. 41 on the Grand Lodge roster of England. This jurisdiction has lost one of its historical relics, the Old Tiler's Sword. It has a history, for we read: , 'The Provincial Grand Master presented the Grand Lodge with the sword of state, which Dalcho describes as being 'a large, elegant and curious, two-edged sword, in a rich, velvet scabbard, highly ornamented with Masonic emblems, and the Grand Master's Arms.' It is said to have


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once belonged to Oliver Cromwell. From the time of the presentation it continued in the possession of the Grand Lodge and was borne by the Grand Sword Bearer, or in the later times, the Grand Pursuivant. It was saved during the burning of the Masonic Hall by the Grand Tiler, with the loss of the hilt, the scabbard, and a small part of the blade. In 1852, a committee investigated and it was accidently found by the Grand Tiler and restored to the Grand Lodge."

New Mexico erected a memorial at the grave of a Past Grand Master "corresponding with those erected on the graves of other Past Grand Masters." A committee on history and research in Delaware, functioned at a cost of $8.75. The Grand Lodge of Scotland erected a bronze heraldic plate on one of the pillars in Grand Lodge Hall in commemoration of the services as Grand Master Mason of Rt. Hon. the Lord Saltoun. A Mississippi Lodge, which was. about to celebrate its centennial, found itself financially unable to do so and appealed to the Grand Lodge for permission to circularize Mississippi brethren. Their appeal read: , 'Brethren, we need a lodge hall. The rain, the wind mixed with the sunshine and father time have shown heavy on our building and if we don't get a new hall, we will have to celebrate our centennial on the brow of a hill under the canopy of a friendly heaven bedecked with its sunshine and twinkling stars."

North Dakota has two brethren now living who were charter members of the Grand Lodge. On May 21, 1935, the Grand Lodge gave its approval to a group of brethren charged with the erection of a marker on the camp site selected by Lewis and Clark during the winter 1804-05. The dedicatory ceremonies were attended by acting Governor Walter Welford. The inscription reads: "In this vicinity the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped from October 27th, 1804- to April 7th, 1805. "Captain Meriwether Lewis, a member of St. Louis Lodge No. 111 A. F. & A. M., was probably the first Mason to tread upon what is now North Dakota soil. Captain William Clark was made a Mason in this lodge upon his return to St. Louis. "This marker is erected by the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of the State of North Dakota in cooperation with constituent lodges as a lasting tribute to the courage, the heroism, the fidelity to trust, and the enduring service to country of these distinguished Masons. "A. D. 1935-A. L. 5935"

The marker is built of native granite, erected in a pyramidal figure, superimposed upon a concrete base. It is five feet square at the base, tapering upward to a height of eight feet and is two feet square at the top. The total height of the monument is nine feet. It is situated on a high bluff overlooking the Missouri river. The tract surrounding the monument is the property of the North Dakota Historical Society.


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Bro. Curtis Pike had prepared and read before the Grand Lodge of Idaho an excellent historical article on "Masons of Boise Basin in the Early Sixties." Utah is distributing pamphlets, "Early Days and Ways of Damascus Lodge No. 10." The work is that of Bro. Samuel H. Goodwin, whose work is outstanding in that jurisdiction. Goodwin refers to the failure of lodge secretaries to properly record the minutes of a lodge. He says: , 'Lodges elect as Secretary Borne popular young man, or older members, who has no background of Masonic knowledge or experience. How can he record what is proper to be written' Instances are on record in which a candidate was raised at one meeting and chosen as Secretary a month later. What could he know about Masonic procedure and custom and law' "

A Lewis and Clark traveling memento is to move through Masonic lodges from Seaside, Ore., over the Lewis and Clark Trail, to Alexandria, Va., and there be placed in the George Washington National Memorial building, if the plans of the Grand Lodge of Oregon are carried out. The Grand Master urges that Secretaries of lodges prepare their minutes so that all that goes to make history for the lodge is recorded. A San Jacinto memorial, in memory of the pioneer Masons of Texas, was dedicated by the Grand Lodge in 1935. It is a solid block of polished red Texas granite, seven feet square, five feet high, on a pedestal of three steps of granite twelve feet square at the base. A bronze plaque reads: "A tribute to the fidelity of pioneer Masons under whose outstanding leadership was laid the cornerstone of the Republic of Texas. This Memorial erected and dedicated by the Grand Lodge of Texas, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. Foundation stone erected and dedicated by the lodges of the 30th Masonic District. ' ,

Its cost was $4,000.00. A shaft is to be erected upon this foundation stone at an expense of $9,500.00, to be the contribution of the Grand Lodge to the Texas Centennial celebration. Past Grand Master Lightfoot (Texas) recalled that ninety-eight years ago the Grand Lodge was presided over by an illustrious patriot, Gen. Sam Houston, and thereupon introduced a distinguished grandson of the illustrious patriot, a son of the oldest daughter of Gen. Houston; he is Temple Houston Morrow, Master of Landmark Lodge No. 1168 in Dallas, Scribe of his Chapter, Prelate of his Commandery, and a Mason of the 33td degree. Bro. Morrow then presented to the Grand Lodge a photographic reproduction of a photograph of his ancestor, taken when he was in the United States Senate. Among the distinguished Masons, of whom Texas is proud, are listed Stephen F. Austin, father of Texas, Anson Jones, hero of San Jacinto and later President of the Republic, Travis and Crockett, Fannin, T. J. Chambers, and many others.


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The Grand Lodge of Tasmania has sold 330 of its 500 copies of the history to brethren of that jurisdiction. Georgia observed its Bicentennial in 1936. A committee was appointed to raise the necessary funds to defray the expenses of the celebration, no Grand Lodge fund being available. It appeared that a brother would provide the necessary funds, but in the meantime he was called to Europe. A bronze tablet was erected by the Grand Lodge of Ohio over the grave of John D. Caldwell, Grand Secretary 1882-1902 and an officer of many other bodies in that jurisdiction. Dr. J. J. Tyler of Warren, Ohio, has been appointed Grand Historian, replacing Bro. Chas. S. Plumb. An interesting article by Plumb, describing the John Snow homestead and its acquirement by the Grand Lodge of Ohio, appears in the proceedings. The Grand Lodge historian in Nova Scotia reports four lodges having completed their histories. He also quotes for the information of lodges the expense of tablets which may be used in commemorating historical events. A 10 by 18 tablet, with plain raised border and edges slightly rounded, with letters half inch high, costs $12.00, exclusive of tax. If aluminum is not desired, the cost is $18.00. The Bicentenary history is being completed, covering the period from the beginning. This celebration is to be observed in 1938. Virginia is desirous 'of erecting a memorial tablet at Williamsburg, on the site where the Grand Lodge of Virginia was organized, October 13, 1778. This jurisdiction is attempting to preserve the building of Richmond-Randolph Lodge No. 19, the oldest in the United States in constant Masonic use. A committee on history is preparing much interesting material: An article on Freemasonry at Fort Monroe, Freemasonry at Yorktown, new Masonic evidence relating to John Marshall, and many 18th century records. California has been unsuccessful in the publication of a Masonic history; the publisher failed to receive the necessary subscriptions. The committee has attempted to distinguish fact from fiction. The life histories of Fifty-Year Masons are being prepared; lodges are urged to commit in writing Masonic experiences of aged individuals. The naming of lodges is receiving attention and all are urged to place in scrapbook form all current and early material contained in local newspapers. One of the first official acts of the Grand Lodge of British Columbia was the laying of a cornerstone for a mortuary chapel in 1872. The copper cylinder deposited by the Grand Lodge at that time was this year returned to the Grand Lodge museum. A lodge in this jurisdiction, after applying for a charter, finally received it, but, noting an irregularity, returned it to the Grand Secretary in England for correction, and received it again a year later, or two years after the meeting was held to draft the petition. The mails at that time went by way


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of San Francisco and Panama by steamer across the Isthmus, while slower mails went around Cape Horn. Fifty lodges in Saskatchewan were found to have incomplete historical records. Past Grand Master Woods delivered an address before the Grand Lodge of Manitoba on "Some Early Beginnings of Freemasonry in Canada." Arizona's Grand Master was presented with a gavel made from the door sill of the first Arizona State Capitol. This jurisdiction is chartering a lodge at Grand Canyon, under the name of Grand Canyon Lodge. The first Master of Lander Lodge No. 172 (Nev.) chartered in 1864, was the father of Emma Wixom, who acquired international fame as an operatic singer under the name Emma Nevada. A Wisconsin brother, at the request of the Grand Lodge, journeyed to Mt. Sterling, where Benjamin T. Kavanaugh, their first Grand Master, is buried; it is located near the grave of a former Grand Master of Kentucky. The erection of a permanent marker is to be carried over until the next annual communication. The year 1937 will mark the 200th anniversary of the founding of the Grand Lodge of New York (Provincial Grand Lodge). It will be properly celebrated. MASONIC VETERANS

A perusal of the proceedings shows a gradual trend toward the giving of veterans' jewels and the honoring of those who have held membership for long periods of time. In Georgia, all Masons who have reached the age of seventy and contributed to Masonry for a period of twenty years, regardless of the jurisdiction from which they may have demitted, shall be known as Emeritus Masons. In the Grand Lodge of Ohio, two brethren were introduced, each serving as Master of his lodge. One was the well-known Dr. Francis W. Shepardson, once President of the Beta Theta Pi and Acacia fraternities. In Nova Scotia, a special jewel is to be awarded to all who can show fifty years' membership in the Craft. The jewel is a replica of the seal of the Grand Lodge, suspended by a dark blue ribbon from a bar. The Grand Lodge defrays cost. During the Grand Lodge communication in Ontario, the names of Past Masters qualified to receive the long service medal were read and those who were in attendance were invited to seats in the East, the Grand Master pinning the medals upon their breasts. Virginia is awarding veteran jewels for fifty years' service, the award being made in Grand Lodge, in a subordinate lodge or privately. In California, 96 Fifty-Year gold tokens were issued during the


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year, and a total of 1,088 since 1929. The oldest veteran is a brother who has been a member for sixty-one years. Tennessee issues certificates and 236 have been issued to date; 20 during the year 1935. The Jordan medal for the oldest member of a Masonic lodge ill Nebraska this year went to Albert E. Baker, resident of the Nebraska Masonic Home. Holders of the Jordan medals are usually afforded seats in the East during Grand Lodge. The story of Past Grand Master Jordan has recently been printed in pamphlet form and distributed among the lodges. During the year 56 Fifty-Year buttons were issued and we learn: " Nothing that the Grand Lodge has done, with the exception of providing for the Jordan medals, has been so much appreciated by our elder brethren as this recognitio~ of fifty-year Master Masons."

In presenting Fifty-Year buttons to members on Prince Edward Island, the Grand Master discovered that two of the brothers present were there when the first Grand Lodge was formed in June, 1875. Since 1925, the Grand Lodge of South Dakota has presented 174 Fifty-Year medals, exhausting the present supply. West Virginia discovered 119 brethren who had been fifty-year Masons. The Grand Master urged the adoption of a suitable veterans' medal or pin. Arizona reports that the Fifty-Year button has proven very successful. The neighboring Grand Lodge of Nevada has adopted a similar plan. In that jurisdiction an attempt is made to present the button as nearly as possible on the day on which the member is entitled to it.路 Colorado ordered 100 Fifty-Year medals and the supply was soon exhausted. To date they have purchased 250, and we learn that the joy brought to the recipients cannot be described. Vermont presented 18 Fifty-Year emblems, and the Grand Master was pleased to learn how they were appreciated. One brother was in great distress, having lost his emblem and fearing he would never be able to obtain another. He is now happy again. Washington presents Fifty-Year certificates. Connecticut im;estigated and found the number of fifty-year brethren too large for the pocketbook of the Grand Lodge, but an appropriation was made, a suitable die secured and 100 buttons ordered. Lodges are purchasing them through the Grand Secretary. Following the adoption of the veterans' medal in Maine, more than 600 members claimed its recognition. The first presentation was to the father of the artist who had prepared the design. The oldest member had been a Mason seventy-four years. South Carolina adopted, in 1936, the Fifty-Year button, apparently at the expense of the Grand Lodge. Quebec bears the expense of the veterans' jewel and the intention


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is to present the jewels at the annual communication. Where a member is unable to be present, some Grand Lodge Officer makes the presentation. The only requirement is that the last twenty-five of the fifty years must have been in the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. Fifty-Year Masons were presented during the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota, and were given the Grand Honors. Four of these brethren were over eighty-five years of age. Veteran Masons were asked to step forward in the Grand Lodge of Montana and three availed themselves of this privilege and were greeted by the Grand Master. In Michigan, Bro. Miles Carpenter, eighty-six years old, was introduced by the Grand Master and assigned a seat in the Grand East. Oregon presented 26 of the Fifty-Year buttons. In Texas, 64 brethren were present in Grand Lodge who had been Masons in good standing for forty years or more. The oldest of these appeared to be eighty-eight years old and a Mason for sixty-four years. Fifty years ago Arkansas elected T. C. Humphry Grand Master. Brother Humphry for many years has been a resident of Oklahoma. During the Grand Lodge of Arkansas a program was arranged in his honor. Brother Humphry once attended the Missouri Medical College in St. Louis, graduating in 1869. New York awarded 340 Grand Lodge Fifty-Year service medals, 76 bearing the sixty-year, and two the seventy-year bars. This Grand Lodge requires evidence of interest in the fraternity, without very long periods of unaffiliation. At the moment when a Deputy Grand Master was pinning the medal upon the breast of one brother, eighty-seven years old, the emotion felt by this splendid old brother proved too strong and he fell to the floor, dying a few seconds later. In Kansas, 170 Fifty-Year buttons were conferred, including five Past Grand Masters, all lawyers. The Grand Lodge of Maine presents a veteran's medal, the medal hanging from a piece of grosgrain ribbon suspended from a bar. MISSOURIANS AT HOME AND ABROAD

Under another heading we have referred to Past Grand Master Perry Freeman, of Oklahoma, who responded on behalf of the Grand Representatives. Perry was, at one time, a representative in the Missouri Legislature from Miller County. Grand Master Drouot, addressing Bro. Freeman, our Grand Representative, said: "Will you convey to the Grand Master of Missouri my sincere appreciation in having you represent them. During the last year, I came to know and love Grand Master Duval Smith of Missouri; he is a mountain of strength and we had a very successful meeting in Joplin. ' ,


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Grand Secretary Mather represented the Grand Lodge of Missouri at Illinois. He told the brethren that he had great respect and reverence for Illinois Masonry. As to Missouri Masonry, he said: "We believe most confidently that the biggest blessing that has come to Masonry was the so-called depression of the last five years."

At the Grand Lodge of Texas, we note the attendance of Grand Master James \V. Skelly, accompanied by his Grand Secretary, Arthur Mather. Grand Master Skelly, being called upon, said: I I I come from a state which is not as large as路Texas-it never will be. . . . In Missouri we raise almost everything you do here. True, we do not have sugar, the squirting grapefruit, nor oranges, but we do have cotton; and we also have some oil wells. During the World War we raised our quotas, just as you did, and I met many of your Texas men during the period of the World War. Earlier in our State's history, we raised Stephen F. Austin and the several hundred families who came down here before 1820. Therefore, we feel very near to you. In several localities our brethren raised large buildings, but since then we have been reaping some trouble.' ,

When the roll of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky was called, Bro. Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary of Missouri, responded and "delivered a most interesting talk." Later on, we read "the Grand Secretary was authorized to provide for the entertainment of the R. W. Grand Secretary of Missouri." We are still wondering just what sort of entertainment our Grand Secretary required. In Iowa, we read of the presence of Grand Secretary Mather, Grand Senior Deacon Chiles, and Grand Orator Smith. All were accorded Grand Honors, but only Grand Orator Smith responded. Dr. Smith refered to his residence in the southern part of Iowa, wandering back and forth across the State line, coming to the conclusion that nature never placed the line there. Later on in the meeting, Grand Secretary Mather arose to present the greeting of Grand Master Duval Smith. Response to the address of welcome in Wyoming was by Elwood Anderson, Past Grand Master. HO. K," as he is known in Missouri, was for a long time a resident of Columbia and a member of the Masonic Fraternity here. Representing Missouri at the Grand Lodge of Nebraska was Grand Treasurer Edmund K Morris. Later on in the proceedings we learn that the committee on Masonic education secured, during the year, the services of Grand Senior Warden Harold L. Reader, termed "an outstanding Masonic orator and scholar." BUILDINGS AND CORNERSTONES

\Ve still read in various proceedings of the aftermath of the building sprees in which many lodges and Masonic groups engaged following the World \Var. The fraternity will be generations in living down the reputation acquired by a lot of our enthusiastic but overzealous members during the period 1919-1930.


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Grand Master Whiting (Calif.) reflects our opinions: "During the depression, Masonry has naturally suffered with all other institutions, and, unfortunately many building enterprises were started during good times for which large obligations were assumed by Masonic groups and which, with the coming of the financial crash, they were unable to meet. My attention has been called to one or two instances where the attitude of such groups toward their obligations has been criticized as not. reflecting any credit upon Masonry. In this connection I desire to say that I have no sympathy with any Masonic group which does not meet such a situation squarely and perform its obligation to the full extent of its ability. Any other course by a group or individual Masons reflects no credit upon the craft."

We find a similar sentiment echoed from the Atlantic Coast by Grand Master Newcomb (N. C.) : "It is to be regretted that many lodges have spent so much of their funds and incurred such heavy debts in the construction and decoration of expensive buildings. Masonry is a charitable Institution. It had rather dwell in an humble cottage with its rude shelter and accommodations, with its latchstring hanging outside the door welcoming the poor, distressed brother, or his widow and orphans, than in a stately edifice whose marble exterior too often bespeaks the chilling selfishness of its occupants. We should caution our lodges against a too lavish expenditure of their funds or the incurring of debts beyond their ability to pay, for their own luxurious comfort and convenience or for the purposes of useless display."

Grand Master Willis (W. Va.) echoes the opinion of these other Grand Masters: , 'Exception must be made to some of our lodges which are burdened with building projects, the obligations in respect to which are in default by reason of nonpayment of assessments, interest, or principal. The demoralizing influence of debt was never more ohvious than in the disintegration of some of our lodges. The ruinous effects of these ill-fated ventures extend beyond the lodges and individuals immediately involved, to the whole fraternity. The obligations were contracted in the name of Masonry, were sold upon the faith of the purchaser in the integrity and soundness of Masonic undertakings, and default in their payment casts upon the fraternity the stigma which necessarily attaches to failure to meet any obligation. "Promoters of these enterprises, having pledged the name of Masonry, should look through the legal liability to the moral responsibility, and exert every effort to discharge it to the utmost limit. , 'The Grand Lodge owes a duty to protect the good name of Masonry, even though it should become necessary to prohibit the incurring of any indebtedness in connection with any building enterprise conducted for or on behalf of Masons, or any group of Masons, as such, or in the name of which the word of Masonry is used. "

Grand Master Dean ('Vis.), investigating the condition of Masonic building associations, found: , 'Without exception, every investigated case of delinquent per capita showed the cause to be a building debt, which, in some cases, is crushing


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the very life of the lodge. The condition is made more sad by tht:! knowledge that the need was not acute, but was prompted solely by a desire for a more pretentious home. ' ,

He recommended the adoption of an amendment providing that no lodge should erect a building without submitting to the Grand Lodge its plans and method of financing. These conditions are not confined to the American continent, for in Southern Australia we learn: "Many officers are experiencing unhappiness through anxiety caused by harassing burdens arising over building schemes based upon optimism and enthusiasm which took too little account of future possibilities."

The District of Columbia still has its Temple Heights, also its indebtedness upon the same. The Grand Lodge has been lending the Temple committee money to meet the interest on the mortgage and bank loan, $32,000.00 annually. Over $600,000.00 was pledged for the proposition, but during the year $633.00 was all that was paid on pledges. An attempt was made to curtail the $1.00 per capita tax applied to the Temple project, but the Grand Lodge refused to instruct the Temple committee to sell the property at the present time. Reviewer West of District of Columbia .believes that it is only reasonable that Grand Lodge should have supervision over all lodge affairs and the right to examine into the merits of building projects where such are likely to become Grand Lodge responsibilities. In many instances lodges were bankrupt by overambitious projects, surrendered their charter, and in taking over the assets, the Grand Lodge was saddled with building liabilities which they had no part in incurring. Vermont is considering the adoption of a resolution restricting the use of Masonic lodge rooms. New Zealand requires that building projects be approved by the Board of General Purposes. The plans must be presented in detail. Secrecy and ventilation are essential, walls must be soundproof, there must be fire escapes. Much other information is required in detail. In New Mexico, twenty-one lodges own their homes outright; seven own their homes through building corporations; six of the remaining lodges own lots on which they may build at some future time. Real estate owned amounts to $310,000.00; mortgages, $20,642.00. Pennsylvania is the owner of a new Masonic temple site. It demolished the buildings which stood upon the site and today the ground is vacant. In 1930, in view of existing business conditions, erection of a temple was postponed. The cost of the ground was approximately $2,000,000.00; annual taxes amount to $179,000.00; the only income received is $600.00 rental received from a filling station. The Grand Lodge of Victoria has adopted resolutions in connection with dedication of Masonic temples: (a) The only portion of a building'affected by dedication is that in which its rites and ceremonies are


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conducted; (b) This portion of the building shall not be used fo~ any other purpose whatever; (c) Other portions of the building may be used for social purposes not inconsistent with the dignity of Freemasonry, but shall be designated as a hall and not as a temple; (d) When it is proposed to erect or alter a building, the approval of the Board must be first obtained. A special committee in Mississippi presented a report, recommending no change in the established ritual and practice prescribed for laying of cornerstones and Masonic hall dedications. The Grand Lodge is to recommend a general plan for a uniform lodge room for the information of building committees. The plan shall contain proportions, station dimensio"ns, elevators, emblems, symbols, wiring, diagrams, and other pertinent information. The Grand Lodge of North Dakota has recently locked the barn door, a committee on by-laws presenting some ironclad amendments " requiring approval of building plans. Montana is preparing to erect a Grand Lodge building; they have a site with 275-foot front and 150 feet deep. Actual building has not commenced. The Grand Master finds that Montana has too many ground floor rooms and while soundproof they are hard to tile and poorly ventilated. The Grand Master of Michigan finds that restrictions as to occupancy of Masonic lodge rooms in Michigan have been violated from time to time. Four lodges in Detroit are reported to be violating the law of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master feels that too many organizations are attached to Freemasonry, and recommends that the practice either be prohibited or that the former resolution be rescinded. Grand Master Niemeyer (Ill.) finds Illinois lodges still suffering the consequences of defaulted building obligations. He reports receiving inquiries constantly from men and women, past the selfsupporting age, who invested money in building undertakings because of their faith in Masonry. 'Vhile, legally, the Grand Lodge had no responsibility, it did have a moral obligation which requires the prohibition of the use of the name of Masonry in connection with unsound financial undertakings. Hereafter, investors will be apprised of the fact that the Grand Lodge accepts no liability for any Masonic building project except its own. This reviewer has very definite ideas concerning Masonic cornerstones and the rites and ceremonies which accompany their laying. Notwithstanding the increased number of buildings being erected by public funds in recent years, there is a growing decrease in the number of cornerstones which are laid with Masonic rites and ceremonies. Again, the reviewer has his own opinions as to why. We have purposely made a study of the number of cornerstones laid in the United States during the past year and find that the number is largely dependent upon the weakness or strength of the fraternity in the com-


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munity in which the building is being erected. In other words, if there are Masonic votes to be secured, the probabilities are the project will secure favorable consideration. The Grand Master of Washington officiated at the laying of two Federal building cornerstones, one at Prosser, the other at Montesano. The Grand Master of Oklahoma laid the cornerstone of the Custer Council and Pottawatomie County courthouses. He also laid the cornerstone of the high school at Commerce. Alabama laid the cornerstone of a new post office building in Huntsville. Minnesota laid a cornerstone of the Municipal Hospital at Virginia, the post office at Eveleth, and the post office and school building at I-Iibbing. New Zealand has a ritual for the cornerstone ceremony, but it must be used only for a foundation stone-an integral part of the foundation of a building. New Mexico laid the cornerstone of a post office at Carlsbad, and a post office at Silver City. A feature of the latter was an address on the development of the postal department by Postmaster White, Speaker of the House of Representatives of the State of New Mexico. In Indiana, the cornerstone of a post office was laid in the City of Auburn; another stone was laid at the Indiana State Teachers' College, the gymnasium of the West Terre Haute high school, and the Jackson County Historical Museum. In Pennsylvania, the cornerstone of a new post office at Scottdale was laid, a new high school at Reading, and a post office at Philipsburg. In Delaware, the cornerstone of a public school building at Wilmington, and one at Christiana were laid with Masonic auspices. In Texas, but one Federal cornerstone was laid (Pecos), although the cornerstones of a school building at Star, a gymnasium at Junction, and a city hall at Taylor were laid. Ohio received four requests for cornerstone layings-a Federal building at Sebring, a Presbyterian church at Hamilton, a Baptist church at Rossmoyne and a Masonic temple at Conneaut. In California, cornerstone of a high school, a post office at Elmonte, and a post office at Santa Paula were laid. In Iowa, cornerstone of a Memorial Armory at Des Moines, and a Federal building at Osage were laid. In Nebraska, an Art Library at Chappell, high schools at McGrew, Lodgepole and Stapleton, the courthouse at Chadron, and a Masonic temple at Cambridge represented the work of the year. In Florida, a Federal building cornerstone was laid at Tallahassee. POLITICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE

The Grand Master of Mississippi made what might have been termed some political allusions in his address. Later on he suggested the


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sending of a telegram to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, but one of the Mississippi. brethren arose, saying: "I would object to it being sent in the exact language of the speaker. We must hold it to such wording that it will not have even remotely any political bearing. One phrase you used was a wholesale endorsement of everything he has done, which puts it purely in the realm of politics. Send greetings, thank him for a big heart, or anything else you want to say, but do not even hint of anything of a political nature."

The text of the telegram was not printed. Brethren of this jurisdiction find much propaganda going over the world espousing particular forms of government. Next year being the 150th anniversary of the adoption of the Constitution, the Grand Lodge approved the celebration of this historic event and pledged "its unswerving loyalty and devotion to the Constitution of the United States," because it was the handiwork of our Masonic forefathers. Montana, by resolution, prohibits the electioneering for any Masonic office and declares it to be a Masonic offense. The Grand Master of Oregon received an appeal for moral aid and assistance from the Masonic International Association at Luxemburg, Germany. It set forth "the oppression, attempted suppression, and actual suppression of the Masonic Fraternity in some dictatorial nations." The Grand Master added: , 'Under democratic forms of government where the people are enlightened and have a voice in the choice of rulers and in the making of laws there is no controversy over individual or personal rights. It may be understood that it is not so much oppression of Masonry in these dictatorial countries as it is oppression of humanity and opposition to the principles of individual freedom of thought and action. Suppression of Masonry is but the suppression of the teaching of these principles whether it be through Masonic or other instructive channels. This suppression means life to dictators and oppressors while education means to them their political destruction."

Tasmania had an argument over nomination or election of officers. One brother said: "We live in a democratic country and it is wrong to deprive forty per cent of those who vote for Grand Lodge Officers of their privilege and right. It is placing too much responsibility on the shoulders of a Grand Master to appoint his officers."

On the other hand, others thought the Grand Master knew more about the capabilities of brethren than the average member did. A Reverend Brother, referring to English precedent, said: "We must remember the traditions of the United Grand Lodge of England are quite different to those of the Grand Lodge of Tasmania. This is a democratic country, and I think it would be a mistake to experiment in the direction named. Let us continue to elect our own officers, if we elect a bad lot, it serves us right. ' ,


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A Master and Secretary of a Georgia lodge prepared an appeal, which they signed as individuals, on lodge stationery bearing their names and titles, asking for executive clemency for a brother who had been convicted in the court. The letter did not get in the mails and the Grand Master brought the error to the attention of the erring brothers. The ancient charges are quoted by the Grand Master of Ohio, who refers to "well-meaning Masons, prone to use their Masonic membership to further social or political ideas which they themselves may hold, or to condemn diverse views held by others." An instance of the endorsement of a certain candidate for local political office by a related Masonic organization in an Ohio city, came to the attention of the Grand Master. He refers his brethren to the time-honored law of Masonry not to meddle in politics. A better system of Grand Lodge administration is urged in Nova Scotia, especially the adoption of a Board of General Purposes, a system current in the British Empire and seven of the nine Canadian jurisdictions. The Grand Master's powers are in no way affected, the Board acting as a Cabinet of Advisers. A committee on Grand Master's address in California, discussed the disrespect for constituted authority and the protection of the rights of the individual developed at untold cost of sacrifice and blood through the centuries of our Anglo-Saxon civilization. They said: "The system of checks and balances of power and guaranteed protection of the rights of the individual which has been written into the Constitution of the United States, constitutes the most adequate declaration and defense of those principles which is to be found in any document yet known to man. Through our century and a half the courts of this land, and above all the Supreme Court of the United States, have remained an invincible bulwark between the rights of the individual and the temporary and sometimes passionate desire of the mass to encroach upon those rights; when any man attacks, directly or indirectly, the integrity or ability of the courts of the land, or seeks to deprive us of our confidence in their efficiency, he attacks the cornerstone of that foundation. If the fundamentals of our system must be changed, it should be only upon mature reflection and in the exercise of sober judgment."

Before the opening of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee the edict governing the attendance of representatives was read. It specifies that no information of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge may be given to newspapers, and condemns electioneering as illegal and un-Masonic. Grand Orator Caldwell delivered "a most able and eloquent address on the Constitution of the United States and the influence of our Masonie brethren in its formation," before the Grand Lodge of Florida. Past Grand Master Henry Wilson, of Nebraska, well-known legal authority discusses the Constitution: , 'The critics of our system are saying three things: First, the people have never given the courts the power to declare laws void as unconstitu-


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tional, therefore the Supreme Court of the United States is usurping powers never given it by the people. Second, they say on four separate occasions it was proposed in the Philadelphia Convention to give that power to the courts, but it was four times voted down. Third, that the courts of no other civilized country in the world are permitted to exercise that power. All three of those propositions are plainly erroneous. The first ten amendments to the Federal Constitution were really the price paid for its ratification. Friends of the Constitution said: 'Join with us in the ratification and we will join with you at once in bringing into the constitution a bill of rights.' Therefore, the first Congress that convened after the ratification proposed the amendments that have becomes the first ten amendments. Everyone of them contains a restriction upon the powers of the Federal Government."

After arguing the case extensively, he concludes: , 'If the time ever should come that the majority of the American people

should be convinced that the Supreme Court of the United States is ursurp' ing powers that were never given by the people, when they are convinced that the nine men of that court stand between them and what they conceive to be their rights, we will have cultivated a fertile soil for revolution, because men will not long favor what they feel is usurpation and oppression if they are convinced they are being denied their rights."

RITUAL, CEREMONIES AND DEGREES

The Masonic ritual is what distinguishes it from other societies. Here and there we learn of additions that are being made to the standard work, new monitors being published, and occasionally the addition of some ritual for an allied or closely connected association. In Vermont, we read that a new ritual for the Masonic Veterans' Association of Vermont, written and prepared by Archie S. Harriman, was adopted. Twelve veterans were initiated with the new ritual. The recommendation of District Deputy Grand Masters in Washington was to the effect that each member of the Grand Lodge who was the holder of a certificate of proficiency should become custodian of the work. The Grand Master of Maine said: "It is from the exemplification of the ritual that the candidate obtains his first knowledge of Freemasonry. If the ritual be correctly and impressively rendered by the officers and the members shall maintain dignity worthy of the occasion, the candidate will receive the proper impression of Freemasonry and be influenced to study and learn the lessons which it has for him."

In New Zealand, a member of another lodge is not allowed to take the chair when giving the obligation or communicating the secrets. New Mexico refuses to permit a degree team to come from another jurisdiction to confer the degree on aNew Mexico candidate, using the ritual of the other jurisdiction. This jurisdiction has sold 1,445 monitors since its adoption, or one monitor to each four members in the jurisdiction.


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In Quebec, a Deputy found a tendency to make innovations in the work. In no two lodges was the floor work identical. Grand Lecturer 'Villiams, of Mississippi, says: "The ritual is the foundation of Masonic teaching and the perpetuity of the fraternity is dependent on the propagation of the ritual, but if we do not translate into our daily lives the teaching of the ritual, we have memorized in vain. Why preach temperance if we do not restrain our own passions and prejudices'"

North Dakota required the exemplification of the three degrees during the year 1935 upon at least a substitute candidate. The Grand Master recommends that the third section of the third degree be given in classes, because of the usual lateness of the hour at which it is given. A new monitor has recently been published in Wisconsin, including the burial service "considered one of the most expressive and sympathetic among those of the forty-nine Grand Lodges." A specially bound Masonic monitor was presented by the Grand Lodge to a brother who had coached more than two hundred candidates in the past seventeen years. In Oregon, to obtain a certificate of proficiency, one must be able to give the three lectures from memory and to read the balance of the ritual. All lodges have the privilege of appointing a member to act as Deputy Grand Lodge Instruetor. Restoration was denied a brother who had been found guilty in 1930 of writing out certain secrets, words and signs of the fraternity. Lightfoot's manual has been adopted by the Grand Lodge of Texas. It was printed by the Masonic Home printery; 3,500 copies cost $5,835.00. Your reviewer has a personal copy which he greatly appreciates, and Past Grand Master Lightfoot is deserving of the approval of the Craft for the work he has done in this connection. The Grand Lodge of Ohio has one written ritual, retained by the Grand Master. This jurisdiction refuses dispensation to lodges to exchange visitation. The present Grand Master recommended that the restriction be modified to permit exemplification. Nova Scotia recognizes, officially, two rituals-the Ancient York Rite and the English Lodge of Emulation. An attempt is being made to secure uniformity. The Grand Lecturer reports that a certain amount of horse-play is taking place. Virginia is placing emphasis upon the teaching of the ritual, but the Grand Master says: , 'We should not stop there. The ritual is but the starting point from which the earnest seeker after truth may travel in a thousand different ways, each of which will lead him to the discovery of some new fact to add to his search for knowledge. "

California perpetuates its ritual through a Grand Lecturer and four assistants, feeling that more schools of instruction may be held and


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more individual instruction given. The Grand Lecturer propounds questions to the Masters and Wardens to ascertain their knowledge of the constitution and regulations. Tennessee has two lecturers who have visited 335 lodges during the year; 947 certificates are in effect. Saskatchewan is revising the opening and closing ceremonies by eliminating the tiresome standing to order. They have also prepared a ceremony of installation for Grand Lodge Officers. Iowa opposes the admission of extraneous matter into the ritual. "Such innovations explain nothing, have no recognized origin, and are invariably out of character. Their novelty mayor may not be justified." The Grand Lecturer of Prince Edward Island tells his brethren: "Precision in the opening and closing of lodge, as well as in the work of degrees, will not fail to attract increased attendance. One wonders if we really heed the import of what we seek to convey to our initiates."

We read in the North Carolina proceedings: "It is utterly impossible to make a serious impression on a candidate brought laughing to the door by friends who have spent their leisure time for weeks telling him they will carry his mangled remains home on a shutter to his weeping wife and fatherless children. Masonry is no joke. If a few of these self-appointed comedians were brought before the lodge some night by a Master with the courage to do it, and given a good reprimand, it would materially benefit the order."

In the Philippine Islands, it was urged that the Grand Master be made an appointive officer. The office has become a football for Grand Lodge politics, being used to place candidates in a position to be elected Junior Grand Warden. A Tagalog version of the installation of officers' ritual was recently printed and placed on sale. This Grand Lodges recently considered a resolution, the intent of which was to shorten the third degree. In New York, it was decided: "Masonic tradition has it that the Master of a lodge shall remain covered. The Master's hat is almost the symbol of his office as the jewel appropriate to that station."

The installation of Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand is very dignified and ceremonial, and might well be followed by other jurisdictions. Indiana recently i~ued new editions of the monitor, the funeral service, and the Masonic hall dedication ceremony. In general, the wording is made clearer and the arrangements plainer. Massachusetts Masters are charged with exemplifying the three degrees at least once during each lodge year, even though there be no candidates. Maine now requires fourteen days to elapse between the conferring of degrees.


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The Grand Master of New Zealand expressed himself as having no sympathy with young men who wished to become Masons on the eve of their departure from New Zealand. South Carolina held that a candidate might be elected to a higher degree before called upon to show his proficiency, but he could not receive the degree. Only Master Masons in good standing in Pennsylvania lodges may confer degrees in that jurisdiction. The Grand Master asserted that it would not be his policy to make use of the prerogative of making Masons at sight except in most unusual instances. He adds: "We feel that the road that has been traveled by all of us is the proper way to approach and enter the portals of Masonry, and that man is truly great who walks on a level with his fellowman, nor seeks nor desires an undue influence to obtain a special privilege."

The committee on work and lectures in the District of Columbia assisted in the conferring of the Past Master degree on Masters-elect in emergent lodge of Past Masters convened under warrant given by the Grand Master. In Vermont, fifty-five Past Masters met for the purpose of opening a Past Master's Lodge and conferring the Past Master degree on Worshipful Masters-elect. In Washington we read: , 'The Grand Master announced that the secrets of the chair would be communicated to all entitled thereto by the Past Masters of Missouri Lodge No. 158."

Prince Edward Island reports: "Very few Past Masters have received the installed Master's ceremony. I mention this with a view to having the proper ceremony placed in the hands of subordinate lodges for their guidance."

Delaware prepared a new Past Master degree, which was "received with much enthusiasm and we believe is a vast improvement over the old type of degree." The failure to issue certificates for the Past Master degree, conferred during Grand Lodge in 1933, came up for discussion before the Philippine Grand Lodge. It appears that several were merely invested with the name of Past Master. West Virginia says: , 'The degree of Past Master is a recognized a~cient institution and is a prerequisite to installation into the office of Master or Warden in this jurisdiction. ' ,

In New York, at the Grand Master's request, the ceremony of investiture for Masters-elect was amplified by the Board of Custodians. The committee informs us that there is no such thing as a Past Master degree.


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SUSPENSION, REINSTATEMENT, DIMISSION, PETITION

Oklahoma is wrestling with the subject of automatic suspension. The Grand Master feels that it is the major cause of Oklahoma losses. No provision is made in that jurisdiction for the notification of suspended members: "Common courtesy demands that the suspended member be notified and procedure for reinstatement included in such notice. The element of pride must be taken into consideration. Some feel they have been unjustly suspended after years of prompt paying of dues. ' ,

In Tennessee, 50 per cent of the suspensions n.p.d. are those of brethren who have formerly been suspended and reinstated. The Grand Master advises that great care should be taken in the restoration of brethren so that we may be assured that the reinstatements are of brethren really in earnest and sincere in their application. Florida also feels that more investigation should be made. A member initiated in 1889 was suspended in 1897. The question came up as to his reinstatement. The Grand Master decided: "It seemed to me inadvisable to reinstate a member who had shown no interest in the fraternity for this great number of years."

The Grand Master of Nebraska approved application for reinstatement of thirty-five members who had been suspended for three years or more, the applications having been passed upon favorably by a Grand Lodge Committee on Reinstatements. The Grand Master feels that the matter should not be presented to him, but the report of the Committee on Reinstatements should suffice. Nebraska holds that a Nebraska lodge has the power and jurisdiction to prefer charges against a Mason who was a member of a Wyoming lodge, but who resided within Nebraska territory. Vermont has amended its form of dimit. Hereafter the dimit will contain detachable sections to be sent to the Secretary of his mother lodge following his affiliation and requesting the dimit. North Dakota lodges are given dimit books issued by the Grand Secretary. Each dimit bears the Grand Secretary's seal. Current year dues cards are equivalent to a certificate of good standing. In Arkansas, the Grand Lodge authorized certified dues cards. Some dimits were presented to lodges in that territory and the members were elected; later it developed that the dimits were issued by clandestine lodges. Hence the adoption of the idea of certified dues cards or dimits. New Mexico is issuing a new form of petition blank for degrees; they are furnished by the Grand Lodge without cost. They require the petitioner to give his residence and occupation for the past ten years, the names of his employers, the address of his wife and all dependent children. It asks as to whether provision has been made for dependents in the event of sickness or death. Another inquiry reads:


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"Do you understand that Freemasonry is a fraternal society and not an insurance or burial organization' Does your family understand this' Will expense of entrance be a hardship to your family' To what other fraternal organizations do you, or have you belonged' Are you still a member f ' ,

Manitoba, by recent resolution, forbids the soliciting of petitions for the degrees of Masonry, and the violation of the article is a Masonic offense. This same jurisdiction has had a secret committee on petitions; none of the members are known to the others. In some instances, all members of this committ~e have written the same individual asking for information. The primary object is for the protection of the committeeman who may not care to have his identity as an investigator disclosed because of business reasons. It also insures more thorough investigation. Again, he cannot rely on what some other committeeman mayor may not do. In Oregon, the Grand Master said: "The reputation and harmony of the fraternity depend upon receiving only the highest type of men within our ranks. There is but one way to keep the fraternity clear of undesirables and disturbers and that is by a thorough inspection of all candidates. Every member should be an inspector seeking and divulging such information as he may gather for the benefit of his lodge. If there is doubt of a candidate '8 character give the lodge and not the candidate the benefit thereof. "

TRIALS

The trial by commission, whether at order of subordinate or Grand Lodge, appears to be becoming more common and apparently meets with general approval wherever employed over a period of time. Oklahoma reported five Grand Lodge trials, practically all of which were for drunkenness. Tennessee reports the use of the trial commission. In that jurisdiction it was held that the appointment of a trial commission expires with the term of the Grand Master who appointed it. The jurisprudence committee believes this an error and that the termination of the Grand Master's term does not affect the personnel or responsibility of the committee. Several pages of the Iowa proceedings are employed in presenting the recommendations of committees reporting upon the adoption of trial by commission. The Grand Master of North Carolina recommended the commission form of trial for Masonic offenses, and we note that his recommendation was adopted. The trial by commission is current in the Philippine Islands. A lodge there requested the Grand Lodge to amend its constitution by reducing the number of commissioners to not less than three, nor more than seven members. The committee investigating the matter found twenty-three American Grand Lodges having some form of Grand


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Lodge trial by commISSIOn. The committee recommended that the system composed of three Past Masters, preferably but not necessarily from lodges other than the one in which the trial is being held, be appointed by the Grand Master. In Connecticut, the commissioners of trials make report, the Grand Lodge voting as to the acceptance of their findings. The Grand Master of Illinois devotes considerable attention to the subject of trials. He recommends the purging our membership of the unworthy: "We cannot expect to hold or attract the honorable so long as we harbor and protect the dishonorable. Officers of some lodges are still reluctant to take action, even though the offenders are in the penitentiary or the offense such as embezzlement of lodge funds has extended over a long period of time. In some cases this reluctance is due to the excessive cost of a Masonic trial. Under present conditions when most lodge treasuries are sadly depleted, trials often seem impossible. There is room for simplification of procedure. (The Grand Master is a lawyer.) No one should be disciplined except upon clear and satisfactory evidence of his guilt, after being informed of the charge against him and being afforded a reasonable opportunity to defend. But Masonic trials are not criminal proceedings. Neither' are they of a criminal nature. They are not always conducted by lawyers, and the officers called upon to interpret the code are not lawyers. Charges should be simple and general, and if, after receiving reasonable notice of the time and place of hearing, the accused fails to appear the trial should proceed as in case of default in civil proceedings without appointment of a representative of the accused. When a Mason has been convicted in a federal court of a felony, conspiracy or any offense involving moral turpitude such conviction should automatically result in his expulsion from the fraternity until set aside or reversed, or until a trial commission appointed by the Grand Master on application of the defendant should find such conviction to be unfounded in fact. t 'This recommendation is made in the interest of economy and simple procedure. Also because it is sometimes impossible to prove such offenses in a Masonic trial because of inability to compel attendance of witnesses who are not Masons and because the transactions out of which the charges grew are too involved. This gives respect and credit to the judgments of the courts of the land, and preserves to the fraternity the final judgment if the accused persists in asserting his innocence."

An Ohio lodge, after a regular trial of a member who had served a sentence in the penitentiary for embezzlement, voted to suspend him for one year. The Grand Master ordered the lodge to reopen the case and inflict a penalty commensurate with the offense. The lodge voted for an indefinite suspension. The Grand Master reopened the case, and, under direction of a District Lecturer, the lodge voted to expel. The Grand Master forced another lodge, which had a member in the penitentiary, to reopen the case following indefinite suspension; the lodge expelled the brother. Even in Canada the Grand Master notes that it is increasingly I:.oticeable that few lodges are willing to assume responsibility of conducting trials, resort being' had to the Grand Master for appoint-


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ment of a commission. As a result of experience, the Grand Master believed the whole system of Masonic trial procedure should be investigated, believing"We should have some official of Grand Lodge or some committee that will examine all charges before the machinery of Masonic justice is set in motion. It is often the cause of much anxiety that we are unable at these trials to compel the attendance of non-Masonic witnesses, with the result that serious injustice may possibly ensue."

Virginia's Grand Master appointed a number of trial commissions. In all instances, the findings of the commissions were in accordance with the evidence presented. Some brethren there do not seem to differentiate between Masonic and non-Masonic offenses. It is held that equity or civil proceedings in courts are not proper to be brought before lodges, except in certain instances. "Justice is not the satisfaction of personal malice." ADDRESSES AND ORATIONS

The Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan listened to a number of addresses prepared by their Committee on Masonic Education, covering such topics as "The Place and Purpose of the Fellowcraft Degree," "Growth," "Great Discoveries," "More Enlightenment," "The Craftsman at Work," "Rewards, Material and Spiritual," "The Brazen Pillars," "The Winding Stair," "Founders of Modern Masonry." Grand Orator Durden addressed the Grand Lodge of Nebraska on "Islands of Safety." The first of these Islands he termed the individual liberty of conscience; second, separation of church and state; and last, the constitution of the United States. We quote a small paragraph: , 'We are in a day when the test of a man's religious faith is a test of his political rights. We are in a day when one great Church reaches out to get its grip upon everything that it can grip for itself. We are living in a day when even relief has been administered in many places with regard to religious distinction. We are living in a time when public funds are being spent for parochial schools, and when denominations of various sorts are asking for governmental money for schools. It is time for us to hold aloft the standard that in America Church and State are separate. It is one of the islands of safety that will deliver us from complications or troubles that would wreck this Republic."

The Grand Chaplain of Manitoba, addressing the Grand Lodge, said: "The names of MUBsolini, Stalin, and Hitler are all symbols of man's craving to be led. Powerless, men turn to those who will promise them power. In fact, they turn from one authority to another hoping at last to find something that will satisfy their insatiable longing."

Out in Arizona, Grand Orator Leonard addressed the Grand Lodge at some length on "The Forty-Seventh Problem of Euclid."


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The Grand Master of Nevada offers a patriotic address, in which he says: "That a Republic or Democracy best expresses, in governm'ent, this brotherhood of man and those principles to which we as Masons are committed. That路 all forms of injustice, special privilege, avarice and greed, fostered and defended by powerful beneficiaries are subversive of the effectiveness and even of the survival of a Democracy. That their attendant trail of crime and lack of respect for law is of greater danger in a Democracy than in other forms of government; and that our interest as an organization, as well as individuals, demands action and not mere condemnation. That we cannot live in the present or build for the future upon our past reputation and our past achievements. That we must put vigor and vitality into our present and with an aroused interest and with manly vigor support, defend and perpetuate this our government. For in Democracy only can Freemasonry survive."

The well known Henry J. Allen was Grand Orator in Kansas and what he said is apropos: , , My mind goes back to a building which I knew in Manhattan, Kansas, forty years ago. Above a central window of the second story facing Main Street, on certain nights a transparent sign bore the legend' A. F. & A. M.,' and below, the square and compasses. The whole community knew it as the lodge room of the Masonic Order. "To that building one night in my young manhood, with a spirit of utter devotion, I went to receive my Entered Apprentice degree. I think I recall that night as I recall nothing else in all my life. In equally poignant mood I recall the inspiring symbolism which led me entranced through the three solemn journeys that brought me to my citizenship in the degree of a Master Mason. "I was a young business man with a wife and baby, and an ambition to live the normal life of a useful free citizen. Times were bitter, although I did not know it then. Those were the only times I had ever tried to do business in. I thought they were regular times. We were emerging from the depression of the early nineties and getting ready for the great contest political of 1896. "Many of my neighbors I did not know. I knew my competitor by sight, and deemed him a man undesirable in all ways. But when, after the elevation my thought and spirit had experienced through the degrees, I came to receive the congratulations of these neighbors and fellow citizens upon my entrance into full fellowship as a craftsman, I detected in them a. new dignity. Manhattan became to me a new sort of place because these older men had made me a brother to themselves, and had interested me with them in their dreams of individual behavior and a better social order. A new mien sat upon them and upon the town. "And today when I think of the physical manifestations of Masonry, I do not visualize the beautiful temples our Order has builded. I have progressed through the degrees of two great rites, I have caught the beauty and purpose of their unrivaled symbolisms. My knowledge of history has been enriched by the traditions of antiquity through which I have been led by incomparable actors who have bestowed our solemn rites. "I have seen in bronze and marble gorgeous temples of our growth as an Order. But when I think of Masonry, I am back in a modest rectangular lodge room above a store in Manhattan, where the bankers, the merchants, the lawyers, the teachers, and the farmers gave me the sign, pass word, and grip of a fellow craftsman, and made me Master of those


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gentle mysteries which set apart in a sacred chamber of my life a new chapter of resolutions and a new sense of human obligations. I , To me all these ordinary men of my daily life, with their straight and simple faiths, took on a new nobility. I see them now as I stand before you at this formal instant, and through them I see Masonry. . . . "We are being tested as in America we have not been tested. Only the worthy will abide. We stand at a point of rejection when dross is being burned out of all forms in order that utility may be made the more manifest. ' ,

Grand Orator Hilliard of Colorado, speaking on "The Gentle Spirit of Freemasonry," refers to the situation following the World War when the nations of Europe met to perfect a treaty. He said: I I Their feet were of clay and their effort unavailing, did not come from their lack as statesmen, for in capacity they equalled their kind of any time. Their work failed because they were not motivated by the gentle spirit, nor could they be so moved. They came immediately from the battlefields of a mighty conflict. Their minds were maddened, their hearts hardened. On the one hand, the treaty was written in bitterness, and on the other it was accepted in sullenness. Lasting accord may not be predicated so. Indeed, th~ victorious allies have not been able to curb the rapacity of their own members. The conception was not of the spirit."

Grand Master Newcomb (N. C.) advises: We must see to it that every shadow of an attempt to introduce into our Order the so-called liberal tendencies of the day, be frowned upon and stamped out, and that the beautiful, simple teachings of our fathers be adhered to, unimpaired and undiminished. It is due to the honor and dignity of our Order that those we place in prominent position should be more than good fellows or glib ritualists. Let the men we honor with positions in our lodges be men of moral worth and high character, who command respect in other positions of life, however humble, and we will always be entitled to the respect of those who are not numbered among us." I I

The Grand Master of South Australia suggested to Masters that when there were no degrees the time should be filled in in some other way, advising them that danger might lie in any attempt to make their lodge attractive by a departure from the original scheme of Freemasonry, that the subject of any lecture delivered in the lodge should be one of Masonic interest, and they should guard against turning the lodge into something like a literary society and avoid subjects which had no bearing on the purpose for which the lodge had been assembled. Grand Master Yeo (Ind.) is not pessimistic as to the survival of Freemasonry, but adds: 'I If it is to have as much influence in the future as its marvelous influence has been in the past you and I must give constructive leadership in the guidance of thought and action and we must give ourselves, wholeheartedly, to the task of promoting the usefulness and to increasing the influence of our time-honored Fraternity."


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Grand Master Rubel (Miss.) finds exceptional opportunities for a Grand Master: , 'To do many acts of usefulness; to prevent ill feelings and differences between brethren; to keep -them in peace and fraternal relationship; to keep harmony in the various subordinate lodges; these, and many other rights and privileges, which the Grand Master has, have repaid me many times over for all the labors of my year's service. ' ,

Grand Master Gould (Mich.) notes rapidly changing conditions. Seeing the disappearance of old customs and methods of thought, he urges service on the part of the fraternity, but"I do not mean that we should follow every passing fancy that attracts our attention, but we should play such a vital part in the life of these times that our Order will be able to provide sound and courageous leadership in the promotion of faith, patriotism, loyalty, and service. The lasting appeal of Masonry is not to be found in its mysterious rites or social functions. Many tire of a continuous repetition of ritual and social relations alone cannot provide the strength required for the bonds of service. Through being ever alert to sense social and economic changes about us, and being mindful of the high standards of our fraternity, we can and should lead the way back to well-balanced life, in a spirit of sanity and understanding."

In his opinion no lodge should contract or perform as to bring criticism upon the fraternity; each lodge is responsible to the Grand Lodge for its existence. Grand Master Wilson (Ore.) finds three objectives in Masonry: "Search for spiritual truth is our first objective and must progress to the end of our lives in accord with our own consciences and Divine inspiration, and the truth to us will be finally determined by our final convictions. The second objective is service and every Mason must build his own temple of service either on a foundation of stone or of sand. His success as a builder depends much on the influence of the Masonic lessons taught him. Men are honored not for what they have but for what they give and do for others."

His third objective was social intercourse, bringing us to a closer realization of our brother's virtues. Grand Master Ellenwood (Ohio) visited many rural lodges. In fact, forty which had never been visited by a Grand Master, although some of the lodges had been in existence seventy-five years: , 'It seems likely that many of the smaller lodges, and especially those in the more remote sections, may be inclined to think they do not have the facilities for the proper entertainment of the Grand Master and therefore simply do not invite the Grand Master or other Grand Lodge officers to come. Nothing could be further form the intent of Masonry or the thought of the Grand Lodge Officers. The Level is symbolic of the equality of all Masons and of all lodges."

Grand Master Copus (Canada) discovers that it is no small matter to be a man among men in the year 1935. He adds:


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"Not he who has never trembled in the face of imminent danger, but he who conquers his fear and presses forward is the truly brave man. It is for us as good Masons and good citizens to face forward with courage, with faith and with imagination. As Masons we are thrice armed in that we are followers of the only doctrine of life that offers a permanent solution to the problems that trouble mankind. The world is deluged with panaceas for the cure of its ills-tariffs, moratoriums, repudiations, doles, paternalism, individualism, collectivism, socialism, communism. Each and everyone of them has its earnest and well-meaning apostles. Let us give them credit for sincerity, but each and all of them are an illusion to the extent that they lose sight of the Masonic law, that men can find permanent happiness only as they predicate their relations with each other on the thought that God is our loving Father and that all of us, because of that common Fatherhood, are brothers. , 'The danger is very real. Periods of economic distress have always provided a happy hunting ground for cranks and agitators and demogogues, and today we have preachers of the mad-dog theories of a false democracy. We have the doctrine that all men are equal in the ability to govern themselves and others, notwithstanding all the experience of humanity to the contrary. We have the creed that a majority opinion is mandatory no matter how much it may be contrary to common sense. We have a fantastic situation developing in which it would appear that man may ultimately have no security to reap what he has sown in the way of financial safeguards for his family and for his old age. We have destructive criticisms of what for want of a better name is loosely labelled , capitalism' by people many of whom know no more about political science than they do about the mountains or the moon. , 'Let us recognize that the last word has not yet been spoken in the science of economics or in the art of self-government for mankind, that a system so clumsy, so expensive and so inefficient as is our own must be improved and that it never will be improved until plain, ordinary citizens, men just like you and me, insist upon such improvements and insist also that our legislators should face the facts of a serious situation with minds centered less upon the interests of a political party and more on the needs of the country as a whole. , 'Thousands of our fellow citizens are drinking of the bitter waters. They have a just complaint against a dead weight of almost unbearable social conditions. It is a soul-searing experience to tramp the streets looking for work that does not exist, to hear wife and children crying for bread and shelter and clothes and the decencies of life and to be unable to provide them. We shall never get anywhere in the solution of these pressing, immediate problems if we shut our eyes to the heartbreak that is all around us. . . . "It would appear that it is high time we Canadians revised Our ideas on municipal and governmental finance and especially the theory that we may to a large extent leave to the future the task of actually paying our obligations. It is the boys and girls of today and their children who will ultimately have to deal with a crushing load of debt incurred by the present generation for expenditures, much of which should have been paid by ourselves at the time or else not incurred at all. Our children will have little reason to admire the fairness or the honesty of their fathers in this matter of public financing. The gayly unconcerned manner in which interest obligations are being disregarded by certain municipalities is not the least ominous symptom of a dangerous degeneration of public morals. "

Grand Master Taylor (Florida) is in full accord with the form of government as established by our forefathers, but-


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"During the past few years an observer of the attitude or state of mind of our people could not help but feel concerned for the continued existence of our American institutions. We do not have to go far back to find them living in an era of spurious prosperity, becoming accustomed to luxury not ordinarily available and to leisure not theretofore enjoyed. Along with other institutions our fraternity increased its membership and assumed obligations commensurate with its income. It is a human characteristic that once we become accustomed to luxuries they become, in our own minds, necessities. Subsequent to the Florida 'boom' and during general depression, economic conditions did not permit the enjoyment of any great amount of luxury or leisure. In an effort to provide these necessities it is my impression that the great masses sacrificed principle to almost any expediency. That sacrifice of principle was so general it seemed our old standard of civilization was in jeopardy and that politically and economically the first concern was to serve selfish interest with little regard for the public welfare."

Grand Master Saxton (Iowa), in a message to the Craft read at a rededication meeting held throughout the jurisdiction, refers to the "Altar of Freemasonry": "From time immemorial, the altar has been a symbol of profound significance. It came into being so long ago that it was probably ancient when the first temple was erected. Upon it incense has been burned and sacrifices have been offered up to a thousand gods. It had its place in Egypt six thousand years ago; it served the savage purposes of the Aztec priests in their human sacrifices; in ancient Greece the pagan gods and goddesses were addressed with entreaty, pledges and gratitude from its myriad altars; at the dawn of the Christian era Rome likewise was offering up its sacrifices; and, as Paul records, one Athenian altar was inscribed 'To the Unknown God '-an inscription as dramatic as it was honest. , 'The altar of Freemasonry is not one of sacrifice, nor is the incense of entreaty burned thereon, nor of fear, nor of propitiation. In its simplicity lies its greatness, and in its purity, strength. It is an altar of obligation and of dedication-the highest purpose to which an altar could be put. It most fittingly supports our three Great Lights: the Holy Bible, Square and Compass. "The Holy Bible represents the sacred Book of the Law, and has not exclusive rights as such on the altar of Freemasonry, for the supremely sane reason that no one religion has exclusive rights within the Fraternity. The Vedas of the Brahman, the Zend-Avesta of the Parsee, the Koran of the Mohammedan, have, among Masons of these faiths, as rightful a place upon our altar as the Holy Bible. In any faith, however, the sacred Book of the Law is the symbol of man's acknowledgment of and his relation to Deity. And in this universality of Masonry we find one of our greatest lessons: Toleration."

Grand Master Stansbury (Wyo.) refers to the large number of suspensions for nonpayment of dues. Many lodges have overlooked the law in regard to suspensions because of what was apparently a true Masonic feeling, and have carried many brethren four and five years. In his opinion"When a man is able and earning a good salary or wages and can afford to buy new automobiles and be able to attend with his family places of amusement several times a month, but fails to attend his lodge or pay


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his dues, such one, in my opinion, has no right to Masonic charity. It is the brother who through stress of circumstances and conditions is barely able to keep the wolf from the door to whom our Masonic charity should be extended and to those in every instance I have recommended leniency and forbearance. "

AMENDMENTS, LAWS AND JURISDIOTION

The District of Columbia refused to adopt an amendment changing the present requirements with reference to the appointment of certain Grand Lodge officers, making them elective instead of appointive. The jurisprudence committee advised the Grand Lodge: "In view of the frequency with which the committee has been called upon to consider changes in the constitution, and with regard to the stability of its law, it is suggested that the Grand Lodge be cautious and careful in any effort to change existing law before same has prevailed for a sufficient length of time to enable its workings to be thoroughly tested. The constitution should remain a somewhat fixed and recognized law rather than one of uncertain or temporary duration subject to repeated modification. ' ,

The Law of Idaho was amended providing that all candidates must receive the Entered Apprentice degree in the lodge in which they are elected, unless by written authority of the Grand Master. No lodge in that jurisdiction may confer the first degree as a courtesy to lodges in other jurisdictions without such authority. Brethren of Washington have been confused at various times in voting upon important subjects as a result of referring matters to committees and having the committee make recommendation carrying with it the adoption or rejection of the original proposition. Ofttimes, those who are in favor of the proposition vote in the affirmative, not understanding that an affirmative vote negatives the proposition. Hereafter each question will be presented as originally introduced. The official name of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut was changed at a special communication held in April, 1935; the title was formerly "The Grand Lodge of Connecticut," because there was no other Grand Lodge in Connecticut at that time. The need was apparent for clarification in case of legacies. Hereafter the name will be "The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Connecticut." Tasmania amended its constitution to provide for the nomination and election of the Grand Master and the Grand Treasurer, and the appointment by the Grand Master of all other officers, subject to consultation with the Board of General Purposes. During the discussion it developed that Tasmania was the only Grand Lodge in Australia that followed the present system of election: Victoria had appointments by the Grand Master ; New South Wales by the annual communication; South Australia by the annual communication, and mem-


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bers attending voting; Western Australia follows the principle of appointments by the Grand Master; and in Queensland, a ballot was taken at the meeting of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master of Oregon discussed the question of Masonic law. He found the old charges concerned particularly the individual brother. He had been asked the question as to whether the Grand Lodge legislated too much in detail. The response in most jurisdictions is that it does not. The Grand Master of Texas believes that the laws of that jurisdiction are generally satisfactory and refrains from proposing any amendments. He opposes hasty changes in law, but does recommend two changes. The jurisprudence committee of that Grand Lodge finds that every lodge receiving dispensation or charter from the Grand Lodge is a lodge of Master Masons. That lodges of Entered Apprentices or Fellowcrafts have no separate existence, for no warrant or charter is ever granted them, nor do such lodges have officers, keep no separate minutes as such, nor transact any business except the conferring of the degree, or the examination of a candidate. Therefore, such lodges could not vote upon or elect candidates or vote upon the proficiency of candidates, all such matter being under the authority of the Masters' lodge in which all members are Master Masons. The committee asks: "Where is the warrant under which a lodge of Entered Apprentices can be independently opened, and how can such a lodge, in which there is not probably a single Apprentice, but where all the officers and all the members present are Master Masons, be called a lodge of Apprentices, with an independent legal existence through which it may separately function on occasion'"

The District of Columbia grants to the Grand Master power of issuing a dispensation waiving requirement of twelve months' residence in its entirety, where a waiver of jurisdiction has first been obtained. It reports good results since the adoption of the amendment. The Grand Lodge of Alberta finds the Northwest territories of Canada in the course of development and Masonically unoccupied. The Grand Master recommended that the Grand Lodge of Alberta formally declare its claim to jurisdiction oyer all that part of the territories lying west of the fourth meridian of longitude. His action was approved. In Vermont, waivers of jurisdiction were generally granted. The Grand Master decided that in the event a lodge granted a waiver, all right or title to the initiation passes with the granting of the waiver to the grantee. Minnesota finds no excuse for invasion of territorial jurisdiction by any lodge. It is unfair to the lodge having jurisdiction and unfair to the petitioner. It is the duty of the Master and Secretary of the jurisdiction to determine the fact of jurisdiction over the petitioner before his petition is presented. It is the duty of the investigating committee


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to ascertain the correct residence, for the wishes or convenience of the petitioner do not justify an invasion of jurisdiction. There was proposed in the Grand Lodge of Oregon a resolution, which comes up next year, providing that lodges may receive petitions from those residing within the territorial jurisdiction of other lodges, but shall not act upon the petition without first receiving a waiver or a special dispensation from the Grand Master. The Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan, by resolution, notified all Grand Lodges that it laid claim to and would forthwith proceed to include within its jurisdiction all that portion of the Northwest territories lying and situate north of the northern boundary of the Province of Saskatchewan, between the second meridian east and the fourth meridian west. CHARITY, RELIEF AND THE :MASONIC HOME

The biggest problem which has confronted Freemasonry in recent years is charity and relief. In former years, most Masonic charity was extended through the medium of Masonic Homes, but the depression of the last few years rendered the Homes incapable of supplying aid to the large number of indigent brethren, their widows and orphans. Consequently, there has grown up the question of outside relief, which is even more of a problem than the question of maintaining the Home. In recent months we have heard much of security legislation, the old age pension, the Townsend plan, and various other well-meaning but visionary schemes, all of which will eventually have to be considered. In California it is thought that many factors will lighten the relief burden, most important of which is an old age pension law. The Grand Lodge finance committee feels that it cannot continue exceeding its income and use its capital funds, and that if the relief load is to continue additional per capita will have to be levied. Lewis Smith, influential Nebraska Mason, speaking before the Grand Lodge of Iowa, remembers the first time his lodge voted funds out of the treasury for the relief of distressed brethren. An old Past Master got up and warned the brethren that it was a dangerous precedent, that relief was our individual duty: , , We went along for a few years and finally lodges assumed all the responsibility and the brethren quit putting their hands in their pockets. It was not very long before the Grand Lodge wanted to do something, and they established the Grand Lodge Charity Fund, and now it is the Grand Lodge that assumes the relief expenses."

He offers some good logic: "In two generations we have become so soft that we cannot stand up to a little hard times, cannot deny ourselves a few of the luxuries that we think we ought to have, and stand up for the things that we should stand up for. If we are of that type, we ought not to bear the name of a Freemason or an American."


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The Grand Master of Nebraska discovers a new danger, in that if we are able to regain our lost membership by reinstatement of suspended members, the per capita cost for our direct relief will probably decrease. In our opinion, it will probably increase; suspended members have little promise of becoming future paying members. Four years ago Nebraska got exceedingly generous. It offered loans of money for drouth relief. The surplus funds were paid out of the Grand Lodge, leaving nothing for emergency relief and those who borrowed are not repaying. Arizona is still carrying on the work of relief among the ex-soldiers through its Sojourners' Club and Wayfarers' Club. An instance which should probably be listed under the heading of humor, although it lacks several elements of humor, was the request for a decision by a Wisconsin lodge in the case of a member who had embezzled several hundred dollars. The inquiry asked whether the lodge could loan him the amount, taking his note, or whether the amount could be taken from the lodge funds as a charity case. The committee on outside relief distributed $23,920.00. It became necessary to recommend the levy of an additional assessment to carryon the work. The committee felt that the burden of disbursing charity belonged to the individual first, a fact which had been lost sight of by many lodges, permitting the Grand Lodge to carry the entire burden. North Dakota maintains a Masonic Cottage at San Haven for tuberculars. Over 100 applicants are awaiting rooms in this hospital. A Masonic Cabin has recently been erected at Camp Grassick, a tubercular camp. New Hampshire has a War Relief Fund. The .fund has recently accumulated with little regard for the motives that made it possible. The Grand Master recommended that the income be added to the Masonic Charity Fund. Montana has a general relief fund; thirty persons were helped during the year. Oregon makes monthly payment for education and relief outside the Home through lodge Secretaries, believing that the manner of remitting brings the lodge in closer contact with the individuals. They do not give relief where there are sons and daughters able to support their parents. Educational relief to minor children amounts to $1,200.00 per month. Arkansas grants pensions ranging from $5.00 to $20.00 per month. They are looking forward anxiously for relief through the Social Security Act. The committee seems perfectly willing to saddle the obligation upon the nation and the state; they urge the Grand Lodge to use every effort to see that those now receiving aid be placed on the government roll, "thereby receiving larger benefits and at the same time relieving this Grand Lodge." The committee offers the following alibi: "In doing this we are not trying to shirk our duty, nor evade our responsibility. On the contrary, we shall be helping them to receive


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greater benefits under the State and National laws that are derived by taxation which is paid by all the people and in which all our dependents are entitled to share."

Grand Master Brown (Va.) informs his brethren that our fraternity is not a charity organization, that it does not profess to operate eleemosynary institutions as such, nor is a group which dispenses public benevolences. We do not operate an insurance company; we are not a fraternal benefit society: , , No promise, either expressed or implied, is ever made to a petitioner for the mysteries of Masonry to the effect that he will be taken care of in his old age or that his dependents will be provided for in case of necessity as an inducement for him to become a member of the fraternity. We reserve the right to elect voluntarily those to whom our charity will be made available. . . . "Those who accept most from the fraternity in times of distress make the smallest contribution to the welfare of our institution in more prosperous times. We are an institution whose primary function is to ineulcate into its members certain great moral and social truths, of which charity is but one aspect. Its mission in the world is to aid in the building of human character and the development of human ideals. The practical application of its principles on the part of its adherents will, in time, influence the trend of their lives. Freemasonry does not claim to regenerate and reclaim the moral pervert. It does not pretend to take the bad man and make a good man of him. That is the function of the church. The primary function of our fraternity, as I see it, is to take good men and to make better men of them."

Brethren in other countries have the same problems. In British Columbia a Board of Benevolences eontributed to the support of more than one hundred members, widows and orphans. The Board recognizes that annual dues are purely a lodge matter, but when assistance is applied for, in fairness to the craft, consideration must be given those lodges who are operating on a sound financial basis and whose members are contributing dues adequate for general lodge purposes. In Manitoba, sixty-four cases are on relief. The brethren of Prince Edward Island apparently have a misconception of the proper use of their initiation fee, according to the Grand Master. It is generally regarded as intended for charitable purposes. They were informed that calls for assistance were first an individual matter. Lodges of that jurisdiction are apparently limited to the amount which may be applied for from the benevolent fund. Brethren of the Philippine Islands are attempting to operate a Masonic Hospital for chippled children. It is the one organized Masonic charity of the Philippine Islands. It is independent of the Grand Lodge and in recent years has received only minor support from them. South Australia has decided that because of heavy demands, Masonic charities should have the first call on Masonic funds. The Grand Lodge of Victoria has recently purchased property adjoining its hospital site. The Grand Master interprets Masonic Re-


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lief as not a "more or less casual dispensation of accumulated surplus, but an intelligent recognition of, and a considered effort to alleviate the distress of the aged." This Grand Lodge is maintaining a War Relief Fund of approximately $100,000.00; last year $80,000.00 were paid out. In Tasmania, financial assistance was given twenty-five brethren and twenty-eight widows, in addition to funeral expenses voted. The Grand Lodge of Canada views with alarm the shrinkage of funds and the increase in applications for relief. In Alberta we learn: , 'Grand Lodge grants to a brother or to relatives of a deeeased brother, are to be considered as supplementary aid to that given by the lodge. This clause is based on the foundation principle of Masonic charity. It is an established fundament~l principle that the granting of Masonic charity is primarily the care of the individual brother or of the lodge."

The Board has a committee or representative in each lodge to investigate applications for relief arising within the lodge. This requirement is now considered unnecessary. In New Zealand, we learn that the growth of benevolent funds stimulates the demands upon them, that well-to-do persons are inclined to allow applications for the relief of indigent relatives to go forward, due to an erroneous impression regarding the purposes of Freemasonry. Pennsylvania reports that applications for admission to the Home are still being made in substantial numbers. Only the most needy are admitted. Mississippi finds the Homes the greatest problems and greatest asset. They are being operated at $20,000.00 per annum cheaper than six years ago. In Montana, members of the Home family have not been denied any comforts and yet there has been a large saving in expenses in six months. Efforts are being made to build a permanent endowment fund of at least $500,000.00. The insurance plan is being attempted. In Michigan, Saladin Temple of the Shrine notified the Grand Lodge that it had purchased a life insurance policy on one of its members, in the sum of $5,000.00, payable to the Grand Lodge for use of the Masonic Home. The Grand Master regretted that a former superintendent of the Home in reporting expense of operation last year failed to list a certain amount of expense which should properly have been included. An attempt was made to assess a $10.00 fee on all initiates for the Masonic Home endowment fund; the committee felt that $5.00 was sufficient. The amendment lacked the two-thirds to carry. Col. Walter S. Butterfield furnishes free of rental, once a week, a two-hour run of films for the Home; he has been doing this since 1932. Col. Butterfield recently visited the Home with his chief engineer, and voluntarily offered to complete the projection ap-


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paratus at his own expense and to continue furnishing the films. In considering applications for the Masonic Home or relief, that jurisdiction is confronted with the law of the State, which provides penalties for anyone bringing poor persons into Michigan, or from one county into another, making the Grand Lodge wholly responsible for these individuals the balance of their lives, regardless of their mental condition. The Consistory at Grand Rapids is reported to have donated $1,000.00 to the endowment fund. Oregon has discovered a new source of revenue for the Home in the form of old age pensions. The money is being placed in the Home maintenance fund. Several counties refused to grant the pensions, giving for their reason that the parties were being cared for in a charitable institution. The amount' reported to date is $2,661.00; it is expected that this will be increased by $1,000.00. Expenditures exceed income in Washington. They are being cut down in outside relief and this relief was eliminated entirely in J anuary. Old age pensions have assisted. Expenditures from the charity fund are less than $100.00 per month, as compared with $800.00 under the previous system. Among the disbursements of the Home we note $604.00 for tobacco. The Home is supporting forty-seven members from the O. E. S. and the Board feels that the Order of the Eastern Star should increase their per capita in order to care for their proportionate part of the expense. Lodges and Chapters having members in the Home pay at the rate of $5.00 per month if the membership be 150 or more; at the rate of 25c per capita per annum where less than 150 members. In Oklahoma, the legislature made an appropriation on the basis of $100.00 per year per child to assist in the maintenance of institutions not being'supported by taxation. Alabama had an issue of $35,000.00 Home bonds, maturing in 1935, which were exchanged for new bonds, the Grand Lodge not being in a position to pay bonds on maturity. Minnesota has a Masonic Home assessment; $177,000.00 has not been collected, representing payments by 10,545 members. The large part state no reason for nonpayment; 126 refused to pay; 548 are opposed to payment; and a large per cent show neglect or indifference. The Grand Master in Connecticut made an appeal for a motion picture outfit and the manufacturers agreed to furnish and install it at cost. New Haven agreed to furnish a full program one or more nights a week without cost. Almost immediately they received $1,161.38. In 1935, $46,558.00 was added to the endowment fund, largely legacies. Assets of the fund are now more than one-half million; the objective is one million. Income from this fund has just about offset the loss of per capita tax in recent years. Indiana has a Home membership of 456 persons. There is a large waiting list, the period of waiting averaging approximately


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eighteen months. There are thirty-six cases of outside relief. Home funds are used to extend home relief. The endowment fund is $571,897.00. Two years ago, the Board made a general reduction in salaries and wages of Home employees; they have recently been restored. The Davis Fund in Pennsylvania is used for the purpose of caring for minor children amid their own home surroundings. This has met with such satisfaction that the committee is urging the establishment of a fund covering the same purpose for adults, restricting institutional life for those physically afflicted and requiring hospitalization; it is thought it will produce economy and meet the same satisfaction as the childrens' fund. The St. Louis Film Board of Trade last year supplied twenty-nine moving pictures withQut charge for use in the Illinois Masonic Home. The Superintendent of the Home receives some cooperation from members of the Home family, but is "sorry to say there are a few who are able to that do not take kindly to helping in the Home." Arkansas reports per capita cost of $219.50, the lowest per capita ever obtained during the twenty-six years operation of the Home. Several of the Georgia Home pupils graduated from high school and college and many are taking special courses in hospitals and trade schools. Georgia operates a Masonic Home print shop and school of industries. Ohio operates a woodworking shop for the boys and the proceedings carry pictures showing some of the work. The Home also operates a farm and garden and the value of farm products raised last year amounted to $20,121.00. In 1931, Kentucky appropriated $55,000.00 for the use of educational purposes, giving vocational training to girls and boys leaving the Orphans' Home. It developed that the expense of maintaining the Educational Trustees is approximately $12,000.00. The finance committee of the Grand Lodge is uncertain as to whether the money is securing results. It has been proposed that the Grand Secretary's office be moved to the Home. There is a possibility that Grand Lodge sessions may be held on the Masonic Home premises. The industries committee of the Home report the operation of a shoe shop, the manufacture of more than 500 pairs and the repairing of 2600 pairs of shoes. The department has repaired and made all the window shades needed in the Home. The woodworking department, in addition to general repairs, has built an addition to the barn and has painted two cottages. The District Council of the local Labor Union has given the boys credit for their hours in apprenticeship. A printing office is being operated and the children are taught the use of linotype, hand composition, job press and cylinder press feeding, addressographing, folding machine, and miscellaneous printing office work. The office earned an income of $11,399.00. Virginia has a committee on Education; its duties are to keep

a


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Masonic Home students in college. They pay all the college expenses for the first and second years, not exceeding $600.00. For the third and fourth years, they pay $300.00, the remainder being borrowed by the student from the committee. The loans are not being repaid as promptly as expected; probably due to the inability of students to obtain employment. California applicants must be in destitute circumstances, unable to earn a livelihood because of age or physical disability, and without relatives who can be compelled by law to support them. It is not the purpose of the Home to relieve children of legal and moral duty to eare for their aged parents. If they cannot entirely support an applicant, they are expected to aid financially in maintaining the applicant. The number of members from any on~ lodge in the Home is restricted. Outside relief is granted, except for temporary needs, that being the duty of the lodge. The five-year membership requirement is being enforced. Lodges are indifferent in the matter of lboking after children who have been honorably dismissed. Residents of the Home who render assistance in general routine work have increased. A farm is being maintained. Many graduates of the Masonic Home in Florida are being given higher education. The F'lorida Military Academy gave a full scholarship to several of the boys. Every child is given some training in various vocational departments. The Home has a printing plant. Nebraska reports that the Board is supporting several people out in the state, bringing the cost of maintenance materially below what it would have been, that the trend of the program of Home management to take care of people outside is not only beneficial to the individual in his satisfaction, but beneficial to the Home in their own financial program. Rhode Island finds that tax on membership for the proper support of Masonic Homes throughout the United States has been a real hardship. The Eastern Star have recently erected a new home in West Virginia. A supervisor of the Masonic Home in that state submits a splendid report as to the proposed program for the children, covering social, religious, physical and mental activities. The prohlem with children seems to be to train them to meet world problems and make adjustment with the outside world when they are dismissed from the Home. New York finds that only when other means fail and when the applicant is found to be a worthy indigent or destitute should the facilities of the Craft be afforded in the way of admittance to the Home. Unless the fraternity realizes this, it will be faced with many more applicants than it can care for. In this jurisdiction, membership in public homes is decreasing, due to the accumulative effect of the old age security law. While private homes show a decline, it is not to the


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same extent. Organized charities in New York cost the Craft at the rate of $1,361.00 per day. The Grand Master called attention to the fact that a Masonic Camp, maintained for the children of the Masonic Home, has never cost the Grand Lodge one penny, the money having been paid, the grounds paid for and improvements made through contributions received through and from the Superintendent of the Home, a total of $100,000.00. Several of the children are attending colleges and academies. The Manual Training School instructs in printing, carpentry, electrical, tile setting, brick laying, plastering, and metal work. The hospital handles cases of accidents to strangers on the streets in the immediate neighborhood, regardless of creed or color, when they are emergency cases. The Grand Master of Kansas finds mistaken ideas in the minds of many of the brethren. That is that the Home is a place where any Mason can go any time he feels like quitting work: , 'They seem to feel that any Mason has the right to' demand admission and that it is some sort of an insurance pledge. The Home has no place for any of these, but the Board has endeavored to admit all who were legitimately entitled to admission. The Masonic Fraternity is not an insurance society. It does not conduct an old age pension system. It does not guarantee or pledge itself to relieve want. It has no contract with its members by which it agrees to supply food, clothing, care or a home for its members. Privileges that are conferred do not constitute rights that may be demanded. A few of our members of the Home forget they are under any obligation and feel free to criticize everything about it. They forget that during these strenuous times they have had better care and attention than the majority of the members of the fraternity who are paying the bills for their expenses. The people who have had the least before coming to the Home seem to be the loudest complainers. There is too much silly sentimentality about the duties of a Mason to support his brethren. ' , COMMUNISM

Communism has raised its head in the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, where a special committee on atheistic propaganda made a report to the Grand Lodge. It has more to do with the report of a legislative committee, which investigated a radical, socalled labor college near Mena, Ark., known as Commonwealth College, suspected of being a hotbed of atheism and a focus of infection for that school of thought. The Grand Lodge cooperated with the legislature in making the investigation. Like many reports to the legislature, it was read on the afternoon preceding adjournment, when probably not one in twenty-five members knew what the report contained. On the witness stand, Lucien Koch, head of Commonwealth College, testified that he taught Greek Sociology in the University of Wisconsin. His predecessor in the college was Dr. E. W. Zeuch, now chief of the Planning Division of the Subsistence Homesteads in the Department of AgriCUlture in Washington, one of the


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"brain trust"; that the Federal Emergency Relief Association is financing four scholarships in Commonwealth. He admitted he was not a believer in God, refused to answer questions as to respect for the American flag, while Charlotte Moskowitz, Secretary of the College, also testified that she did not believe in the Supreme Being and that she did not respect symbols. Shortly after the legislature adjourned, Lucien Koch gave up his position as head of Commonwealth "and went to vVashington, where he now occupies an important executive position in the welfare work of the Federal Government." In Georgia, the Grand Master is authority for the statement: "Communists are endeavoring to plant their disciples and members in Masonic lodges."

Grand Master Regar, of the District of Columbia, speaking before the Grand Lodge of Virginia, said:

'I Masonry is having its testing right now. Among my duties (as an employee of the postal department) is that of issuing postage stamps, and I issued a certain commeII].orative stamp called 'The Valley Forge Stamp,.' and I chose for the design the painting of Washington at prayer at Valley Forge, and underneath, I had these words, 'In God We Trust.' The second day after the issuance of the stamp, the communistic or atheistic societies, through their spokesman, had articles on the editorial pages of a certain paper, criticising me for the issuance of that stamp, saying that I was entirely uninformed, tllat Washington never prayed in his life, and that it was trying to force religion down the throats of the American people." California steered clear of references to communism, while heartily commending and endorsing resolutions presented by Masters and 'Vardens of a number of lodges. They were of the opinion: , 'It would be impolitic for the Grand Lodge to go on public record in matters that might be construed as being politically partisan, having last :'ear adopted a resolution of fealty to government."

In Canada, a number of citizens recently refused to honor the Na1ional Anthem by rising; It shocked the public conscience. The Grand Master said: "It was the thought that that action was symptomatic, sinister. It was the thought of what it meant to Canada's future to have among us those o.vho, claiming the protection of our laws and the privileges of our free nstitutions, yet seek the overthrow of those laws and the destruction of ';}lOse institutions. It was the thought that it is possible to have in our :nidst, insidiously burrowing at the foundations of the state, the disciples ,)f a foreign creed absoluely abhorrent to all that the British people hold 路lear."

DEOISIONS

The Grand Master of Minnesota was called upon to decide whether a group of Christian Scientists could use the lodge room for their


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Sunday services. Objection had been made to its use as "headquarters for an organization which secures the most of its growth by proselyting from these churches." The answer was that it would be best for the lodge to meet and talk it over, but that the hall should not be rented to any organization if it caused friction among the members, peace and hannony of the lodge being first. Promissory notes for lodge dues do not in themselves pay the debt, as only final settlement of notes entitles a member to receipt, according to the Grand Lodge of Alberta. In Washington, there is a legal presumption that a person disappearing for seven years or more is dead. The Grand Master holds that the lodge Secretary should inform the Grand Secretary of the presumption, giving the latest date and address. Prize fighting in lodge halls is strictly forbidden by the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma. There is no objection in Quebec to the holding of Military Nights, where members of military organizations wear their military medals, but the wearing of Masonic jewels or medals at church services of this nature is entirely inconsistent and never considered in good taste. Tilers of Mississippi lodges have the abstract right to vote on all questions, but this is subordinate to the duties he may be required to perform in the lodge. When he is not in the lodge room when a question is being considered, he waives his right to vote thereon by accepting his office, but when voting for candidates he should be invited to cast his vote. One who has been elected to membership need not be examined for admission to his lodge, the Grand Master ruling that the lodge should have satisfied itself that he was in fact a Master Mason before electing him to membership and that it was the imperative duty of the committee on application to satisfy itself by examination or information. The Grand Master of Idaho, after an investigation, found that all jurisdictions in the United States and Canada, with the exception of three, allow the holding of lodge meetings on ground floors, if the building is safeguarded as to Masonic privacy. Michigan lodges may not turn delinquent dues over to a bank for collection, such infonnation belongs within the lodge. The Secretary and Treasurer of a lodge were upheld in their refusal to attest or sign a warrant for a bill incurred by the Master until it was authorized by vote of the lodge. Arkansas held that Masonry does not bar any man because of his membership in any church and that employees of the government can petition for membership in the lodge nearest the place where they are stationed in their work. Georgia refused to approve a dispensation given to a lodge to receive and act upon a petition for affiliation at the same communication. This Grand Lodge also decided that for gross violation of duty as pre-


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scribed by law, the Grand Master can and it would be his duty to remove a Secretary from office and prescribe the method of appointment of an acting Secretary. In Nova Scotia, the Grand Master decided that a lodge could not elect its Master a life member of the lodge, that honorary membership had been abolished except in the case of distinguished brethren from other jurisdictions and under authority of a dispensation from the Grand Master. Kentucky decided that a lodge had a right to form a Masonic Club composed of Master Masons and to sponsor a Masonic ball team, but that the use of the square and compasses was prohibited. The Grand Master held that it was unconstitutional for a member of a lodge to deliver the chart lecture to a candidate in the presence of women. He informed a lodge that a brother who was in the Federal prison should have charges preferred against him. The Grand Master of California ruled that neither the Secretary nor Master had a right to issue information to the sister of a member for the purpose of joining the Eastern Star. He further decided that lodge funds could only be invested in securities prescribed as legal by the laws of the state. The absence of the Grand Master of Saskatchewan from the Province caused some anxiety on the part of some of his brethren. Some felt that his duties should have been delegated to his Deputy Grand Master. The Grand Master ruled that the word "absence" was to be interpreted as inaccessibility, and that at no time had he been inaccessible to communications from the jurisdiction. He also ruled that lodges might not be released from liability for per capita except for the current year, that the provision of law was not retroactive because, according to the constitution, no member of a lodge could be more than twelve months in arrears and that if it were retroactive all lodges which remitted dues for years past would be entitled to claim on the Treasurer for refund. Florida's Grand Master held "there is no requirement that Masonic proceedings await final action in the civil courts," he having been asked to postpone a Masonic trial for the reason that the case pending in the circuit court would not be considered during that year. The brother had contended in 1934 that testimony which would be introduced in his civil trial would have to be introduced in his Masonic trial and might prejudice his defense in civil courts. The Grand Master had granted a stay until the eivil suit might be tried. Ten months later, the case not having been set for trial, the Grand Master set aside the stay of lodge proceedings and ordered the lodge to proceed with the trial. It later developed that the lodge convicted the brother and the civil courts exonerated him. The Grand Lodge denied him the right of a new trial. It is not against the rules of the Grand Lodge of Florida "to mention the name of Christ in a lodge." This jurisdiction, by Grand Lodge


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action, does not recognize the perpetual jurisdiction of any other jurisdiction, and decided that the petition of a former resident of Pennsylvania, who had been rejected by Pennsylvania, could be received. Florida lodges are not pennitted to join in a request or petition to have a local post office building constructed, or for the financing of their public improvements under the P. W. A. Money tendered by a member indebted to the lodge for loans, assessments or charges, other than annual dues, cannot be applied to any other purposes than that for which it is tendered (Philippine Islands) and a member who persistently refuses to pay just debts to his lodge, being able to pay, is guilty of un-Masonic conduct. (New York) A Secretary is a constitutional officer of a lodge, charged with definite obligations and duties. His personal acquaintance and knowledge of circumstances are all factors in his usefulness and enter largely into a matter of his choice by his brethren. A lodge may not, therefore, divest a Secretary of his duties and turn them over to any outside agency, or to anyone other than a member of the lodge, and a Secretary may not divest himself of tlie responsibilities of his office. A bill providing for a classification of candidates by age, for the purpose of determining the initiation fee, is not unconstitutional. Unaffiliation is not a penalty and no lodge may unaffiliate a brother for failure to pay an assessment. A clandestinely made Mason may not be admitted to membership without permission from the Grand Lodge; such petitions must be for initiation and not for affiliation, the Grand Lodge or Grand Master deciding as to whether the petitioner shall go through the entire ritual of the degrees. A brother in Wisconsin pledged $50.00 to a lodge for the purpose of erecting a temple. Being hit by business conditions, he became unable to pay and asked for a dimit in order to curtail expenses. The dimit was denied because the pledge remained unpaid. The Grand Master decided that there was nothing in the law stating that a pledge is a lodge assessment and that the dimit should be granted. DISPENSATIONS

The District of Columbia has construed its constitution as granting to the Grand Master the power to issue a dispensation waiving the requirement of twelve-month residence in its entirety, a waiver of jurisdiction having been first obtained. Where such a waiver is not obtainable by reason of lack of jurisdiction, the Grand Master may grant a dispensation to receive a petition. In Vermont, the Grand Master issued a dispensation to a lodge to meet in the town hall, but the jurisprudence committee decided such was not necessary since a lodge has the right to hold its meeting for temporary purposes elsewhere than in its regular lodge room. Washington gave dispensation to confer degrees out of time on seafaring men, to attend Divine Service on Easter Sunday, and to one


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lodge to confer the Master Mason degree in a lodge hall at the Masonic Home. Alabama, on the other hand, refused a dispensation to ballot on a seaman, citing that the Grand Master had no such authority. In Minnesota, a dispensation was given to a lodge to form a public procession on Palm Sunday on condition that the procession be participated in by Masons only and that the lodge is not opened or rlosed and that members do not clothe themselves as Masons. Several dispensations were granted to confer degrees upon more than five and not more than ten candidates at the same communication. In Connecticut, the Superintendent of the Masonic Home was given dispensation to conduct Masonic burial service for all deceased members. A lodge was given authority to confer the Master Mason degree in the German language. Another dispensation was to a lodge to hold its stated communication "although the charter is locked in a safe in the anteroom, no one being present to open it." Another lodge was permitted to dispense with its stated communication because it occurred on a Jewish Holy Day. In Pennsylvania, we note a dispensation for a Master to inter with Masonic ceremonies an unaffiliated Past Master of a lodge. In Victoria, 108 dispensations were granted to enable petitions to be received, the proposer not having twelve months' personal knowledge of the candidate. In North Dakota, -dispensation was given for the granting of four life memberships to brethren who had given exemplary service to Masonry. In Idaho, the Grand Master gave dispensation to the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, authorizing it to <'onfer the three degrees as a courtesy to a 'Vashington lodge and we read with amazement his explanation: , 'Permission to confer the degrees was cheerfully granted by the Grand Master to the District of Columbia, even though I was careful to explain to him that I could not reciprocate if a like request were made of me. "

ANew Hampshire lodge received dispensation to invite a Massachusetts lodge to exemplify a degree, subject to permission from the Grand Master of Massachusetts. The Grand Master of Texas, in all cases where permission was sought to hold meetings in other than regular lodge room, required a full showing that there was some urgent necessity and that the place was entirely safe for Masonic purposes. The Grand Master of Nova Scotia refused a dispensation to hold a raffle of an automobile. The Grand Master of Kentucky refused dispensation to a lodge to conduct Masonic funeral services in July of a deceased brother who had died in February. In Kansas, the Grand Master limited special dispensations for


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conferring degrees out of time to young men in the army and navy service, or those attending college, who were home for the holidays, believing "that Masonry ought to be a benefit to them in molding the trend of their lives and that they should' have its help as soon as possible." DUAL, PLURAL AND HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

Much is being heard these days of dual and plural membership. Most Grand Lodges do not favor; those who do, find. such a small percentage of members who avail themselves of the privilege that the effort is not worth the expense. Next year the Grand Lodge of Vermont will consider a resolution providing that no dispensation allowing membership in two lodges shall be considered. Even the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands denied a request to consider dual membership inasmuch as "it had been thoroughly considered at the last communication and no arguments in favor had been advanced." New York affiliated, or restored, forty-nine dual members, and lost fifty-four. This jurisdiction finds that the affiliation fee discourages dual membership. The Grand Lodge of Colorado voted Herbert S. Sands a permanent member of the Grand Lodge because of his work as chairman of Trustees of Benevolent Funds. In Massachusetts we find Grand Secretary Frederick W. Hamilton made an honorary Past Grand Master by vote of Grand Lodge. In making the suggestion, the Grand Master quoted extensively from English, Scottish, Irish and United States jurisprudence. New Zealand, like other Grand Lodges of similar constitution, confers Past Grand rank upon certain members of Grand Lodge distinguished by years in service. On the contrary, the Grand Lodge of Wyoming did not accept the suggestion of the Grand Master that the title of Past Grand Master be conferred upon the Grand Secretary for "in its search of Masonic law and tradition regrets it finds no precedent for such action and therefore feels it cannot so act." Nevada greeted as honorary members Past Grand Masters Talley and Faucett of Mississippi, and Pike and Goodwin of Utah. W. J. Wiley, who had been Superintendent of the Masonic Home at Utica, N. Y., for more than thirty years was awarded the title of Past Grand Master and given permanent membership in the Grand Lodge of New York. Alberta will consider next year the basis on which life memberships might be granted by lodges and suitable fees to be paid therefor to the Grand Lodge. We have previously mentioned the situation existing in the Grand


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Lodge of 'Vashington. Life membership is there purchased for $150.00 from twenty-one to thirty-five years; $125.00, thirty-six years to fifty; "$100.00, fifty-one years or over. These sums are transmitted to the Grand Secretary, who places them in a life membership fund. Lodges may not donate or sell life memberships in any other manner. The investment of the funds is restricted to 25 per cent cash, State bonds, State warrants, first mortgages. Indiana rejects life membership for the reason "anY member who has reached the age of sixty-five and who has been a member in good standing for a period of twenty-five years and unable to pay lodge dues, can find relief by the action of his lodge in the remission of his dues." In North Dakota it is feared there is a tendency to use life membership as a dignified means of remitting dues without regard to age requirements or Masonic service. -Oregon is fast becoming familiar with the endowment feature of life membership. They now have thirty-two life memberships, with a fund of $13,937.00. Last year lodges were paid 5 per cent on their investment. Other lodges pay money in for a permanent investment. One lodge has placed its charity fund with the Grand Lodge. In Texas, life membership bobs 'up continually. In one lodge life, or non-paying, members constitute over 30 per cent of the membership and it is found no lodge can possibly survive under such burden. A committee finds that the matter is unsound in principle, except where conferred for long and distinguished service, or where a reserve fund is placed in trust properly safeguarded as to insure an annual income equivalent to the dues. California requires money transferred from general to life membership fund whenever a life membership is granted. It cautions against the transfer of an undue percentage of its membership. Florida cautions against creation of life memberships, but advises that Masonic law does not permit a violation of the contract when once entered into. North Carolina feels that any life membership provision is unwise and fraught with danger, unless specifically protected. The jurisprudence committee proposed a section that no lodge could hereafter create a life membership merely for continuous membership. Arizona rejected a provision which would have enabled those paying dues for twenty-five years to be exempt. Nevada reported unfavorable, although looking with favor upon the granting of such membership after a fifty-year button had been presented. Wisconsin prohibits lodges from making life members. A few lodges in New York have adequate life membership plans, which the committee states are not sound from an actuarial standpoint, and "an unscientific plan forebodes trouble and financial distress for the future."


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In Kansas, two Grand Masters ruled that life memberships for incidental service are void. The present Grand Master says: "It is a well settled rule of law that if a thing is void it was never in actual operation, but void from the beginning, and consequently the rule of retroaction could not apply."

The Grand Lodge found: "Brethren who have served their lodges as Masters have not rendered such exceptional service as to entitle them to life memberships. The Master is honored by his brethren by being elevated by them to that high office, which should be and is sufficient compensation for such service as he may render. There is no doubt in the judgment of your committee that this Grand Lodge has authority to regulate and control the action of subordinate lodges in regard to life memberships."

DUES AND FEES

Lowering the dues does not decrease the number of brethren who become in arrears, according to the experience of the Grand Lodge of Alberta, and, generally speaking, the amount of dues is in no way exorbitant. The Grand Master finds that the present form of notice to a member regarding delinquency is worded in a harsh, preemptory manner that is out of place. In Colorado, annual dues range from $2.00 to $12.00; the majority of lodges have $5.00 or $6.00 dues. A number of lodges fix their dues at a certain price up to sixty years. Another lodge has a special non-resident plan. Fees range from $50.00 to $150.00; the majority of lodges have $60.00 fees. An affiliation fee, ranging from $5.00 to $25.00 is charged by forty-three lodges. The Grand Lodge of Minnesota decided that no lodge could receive credit for payment of dues for any specific year when there were unpaid dues for a previous year, and"If at the time of remittance of dues by any lodge to the Grand Lodge there are unpaid dues for any previous year than the one for which the dues are remitted, the payment is first credited on the dues in arrears for the previous year or years."

The Grand Master of Massachusetts finds the ordinary bill for dues, followed up by a coldly impersonal letter, hardly sufficing, the procedure smacking of an ordinary club. He suggests that the lodge first ascertain the individual's Masonic interest, then his ability to pay, then the lodge may decide whether they are merely removing from membership one who is not interested in Masonry, or whether they are depriving a worthy brother of moral and spiritual support which the lodge can give him in his time of trouble. The collection of dues requires hard work and perseverance, tact and diplomacy, according to Grand Master of Maine. We learn also: "No member should be carried on the rolls who is over two years in arrears and even this period is subject to the criticism of being t66 long.


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Each case should receive individual attention and be dealt with in true Masonic spirit."

Foreign jurisdictions have their troubles. The Grand Master of New Zealand advised his brethren to give sympathetic assistance to those who were struggling to rehabilitate themselves. In New Mexico, arrearages have dropped from $29,000.00 in 1932 to $200.00 in 1935, as a result of a law which requires dues to be collected, or the member suspended before a certain date. In reporting to the Grand Lodge, one New Mexico lodge reported as assets the amount of dues owed by brethren, one of whom owed $58.00; other amounts ranged from $9.00 to $36.00. It was the opinion of the committee that accounts like that would not pay for many buildings. One lodge took a note for $26.00, balance on fees and dues. Indiana wants a specific order requiring all subordinate lodges having delinquent members to clear up such delinquencies within six months, either by payment or remission. The Grand Master believes in salvaging as many of the worthwhile brethren as possible "because of the sentiment on later generations." A committee decided that no new legislation was needed and could see no justification for a proposal that members be let off by payment of fifty per cent of their dues. Those able to should pay in full; others should pay when funds are on hand. The Grand Lodge refused to approve a resolution exempting from payment of dues the Master and Past Masters, since there were anywhere from five to ten thousand Past Masters in the jurisdiction and the financial conditions would be affected accordingly. The Grand Master of Quebec finds a type of man who through no fault of his own is in need, but shuns charity. Though unable to pay his dues, too proud to ask for leniency, it is he who demands and holds respect and sympathy. Idaho has recently provided for automatic suspension. Failure to pay for a period of two years automatically suspends any member. The Secretary is charged with notifying the individual by registered mail sixty days in advance. The Grand Master of Oregon recommended a study of automatic suspension, because-"There is a tendency to carry some members for years, and others for only the minimum period before suspension. Lodges generally reluctant to suspend do themselves injustice at times."

In Illinois the Grand Master finds a growing sentiment in favor of reducing the membership to the worthwhile Mason, the deserving man who is desirous of remaining a member of the fraternity, thereby plaeing us upon a more substantial basis than mere paper membership. The office of the Grand Master of Texas was flooded with an avalanche of letters of inquiry, criticism and condemnation relative to new amendments ('overing minimum dues and automatic suspension. He found a few lodges whieh did not heed the provision for minimum


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dues. The Grand Master informed his inquirers that Grand Lodge still had the power to remit dues in all worthy cases and it was the duty of officers to collect all dues possible. Their law requires the payment of minimum dues not less than $5.00, for it has been found that over a period of years lodges cannot live properly and prosper on less than amount. Lodges in financial distress lose membership and ultimately die. The old system maintained on the books of the lodge fictitious assets. It was unfair to the willingly paying member in that it did not insist on and enforce all members that were able to pay promptly. I t relieves the officers of the lodge of embarrassment. They can point to Grand Lodge law that leaves them no discretion in the matter of collection of dues. The Grand Lodge of Ohio claims as its province the regulation of three phases of lodge dues: (1) to establish a minimum sum; (2) to set a unifonn time when dues are due; (3) to prescribe the length of the period dues may be paid without penalty, and the penalty for failure to pay within that period. In Virginia, lodge dues are said to be too low in most instances. One lodge has dues of $2.75, leaving only 25c per member for local expenses. A minimum of $5.00 is apparently needed. The Grand Master urges that the expense of a lodge should be borne by dues alone, fees remaining untouched. In Alberta, fees range from $40.00 to $150.00; 'in most instances $50.00. In Oklahoma, it was found that a number of lodges were charging only $25.00 for the three degrees, when the law required $30.00, to which should be added the $15.00 Entered Apprentice contribution. Asked as to whether a reduction in fees would increase the number of applications, and, if so, whether they would be from equally desirable candidates, the Grand Master of Massachusetts expressed no opinion, but believed that under present conditions it might be well to consider whether such a plan would be desirable in connection with applicants for Masonic degrees. A questionnaire elicited the information that, with two exceptions, localities in which the higher initation fees were collected were opposed to any reduction; only three districts were of the opinion that lower fees would substantially increase the number of applicants. Most districts expressed complete confidence in the future and in loyalty to Freemasonry. The question of fees being brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand, the President of the Board strongly opposed the motion, regarding it as a retrograde step: , , Nobody could claim to be more sympathetic to those who had fallen upon evil times, but he did not feel it was the duty of Grand Lodge to admit as members of the Craft men who were not in a position to pay the entrance fee or their dues. One of the first things to be remembered in Freemasonry was charity. How could a candidate undertake to give to charity when he had to scrape money together to pay his entrance feef


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Unfortunately, there had been admitted to our lodges in the past men who were really never in a position to become Freemasons, and had now become a burden upon the Craft, really because at the beginning they were not in a position to join its ranks."

Proposed amendments introduced at the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania would fix the affiliation fee at $20.00. It would also fix the minimum fee for lodges in Philadelphia at $75.00, and in the country districts at $40.00. Mississippi proposed the reduction of fees to a minimum of $30.00, $10.00 of which should go to the Masonic Home fund. Doubt existed in Oregon as to the minimum fee for the degrees. One Grand Master held it to be $50.00, which included the Home fee. The general understanding was that the $50.00 was the fee, but that the Home fee was additional. Rural lodges wanted a reduction. The proposed amendment will be voted upon next year. California refused to consider a reduction in fees, "fearing that the lowering of fees tends to cheapen our fraternity and to lower the high standard of membership which has always been maintained." Nevada refused to adopt a proposed change providing for a fee for the @onferring of courtesy degrees upon candidates from other jurisdictions, believing it contrary to good policy and resulting in reciprocal charges from other jurisdictions. New York discovered much discussion and room for doubt as to whether a reduction of the initiation fee would cause an increase in the number of candidates. The committee was of the opinion that men who really desired and could afford Freemasonry were not deterred by its cost if the fees be kept within reason. EXTRANEOUS SOCIETIES

The Board of General Purposes of New Zealand advises its lodges that a spurious and clandestine organization, known as Co-Masonry, is operating in that territory. It professes to work the three degrees of Craft Masonry, admit women, confer signs and secrets and endeavors in different ways to copy the practices of Freemasonry, and from time to time members of the Craft are invited to attend the meetings. The Grand Master advises them that attendance will be a violation of their obligation, rendering them liable to Masonic discipline. The Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia authorized the subscription of $1,000.00 to the Shrine Convention Fund upon the same terms as were applicable to subscriptions made by commercial firms. In Ohio, clandestine lodges are still operating aggressively. The regular Grand Lodge is known as "The Grand Lodge F. & A. M. of Ohio." The clandestine Grand Lodge is "The M. W. Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M." Efforts are apparently being made by the clandestine Grand Lodge to obtain recognition, and all regular Grand Lodges have been advised to said irregularity. Reports show that several


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members of the clandestine Grand Lodge had joined lodges in Arkansas and one clandestine brother had visited a lodge in the region of Akron. The Grand Lodge of Alberta received a communication signed by Rev. Joseph K. Falls, Grand Master, Kent, Ohio. One of these clandestine members visited the Grand Lodge in Alberta a few years ago until he was excluded. New Hampshire reports that the Ohio clandestine Grand Lodge's application for charter stated it was a corporation for profit and declined "to recognize this latter arrival in the Masonic World." Texas appointed a committee, of which three members are Past Grand Masters, to investigate clandestine Masonry, especially along the Mexican border. We learn: "There are at least seventy-nine or more clandestine lodges working in Texas. In the City of El Paso, one known as Co-Masonic Lodge admits both men and women to membership. It now occupies space in the building formerly occupied by one of our regular lodges and its sign on the window and its newspaper advertisements mislead visiting Masons and is most embarrassing to the regular bodies in EI Paso."

The committee recommended that. the Grand Lodge authorize subordinate lodges to work in the Spanish language at their option and that the Grand Master be authorized to employ counsel and to bring proper legal proceedings to protect the Grand Lodge and drive out of the state all clandestine grand and subordinate lodges, especially the so-called Co-Masonic Lodge, and that all jewels, emblems and symbols be properly protected by trademark and copyright. California has a committee on clandestine Masonry. At one time the Rito Nacional Mexicana had twenty lodges operating in that state; the number is now negligible. Samuel W. Kelly, listed as Grand Master, was succeeded by his wife, Josephine, and she by Christobal Aguillon, a capable, influential gentleman teaching English in a normal school, and who harbored the idea of organizing a special Mexican Grand Lodge in California. He expected to secure recognition by the legitimate Grand Lodge there. When he found that this could not be, he abandoned his interest in the Mexican rite and recently most of these former existing lodges have surrendered their charters. Four lodges operate in the City of Los Angeles-Marcabah, Hiram Abiff, Patria, and Urania. The latter lodge is composed entirely of women. There is said to be strict segregation of sexes during the conferring of the degrees. These lodges meet at 128 N. Main Street, Los Angeles. There is a Mexican social organization, composed of Masons, known as Resureccion No.1, organized to stimulate interest among Spanish-speaking Masons. In San Francisco are two clandestine lodges-Renacimiento at 1419 Howard Street, and De Tejada meeting at 538 Hayes Street. Ten disgruntled members of the above lodges recently applied for and received a charter from the "Gran Logia Mexicana del Estado de Texas, Inc." The Grand Lodge Benito


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,Juarez (Coahuila) at one time had three lodges in Southern California; charters were surrendered in 1933. Filipino residents have a so-called Masonic Grand Lodge, known as Cabaleros de Demas Alang. Two negro Grand Lodges are operating: Hiram of Tyre Grand Lodge has nine subordinates. They recently had a factional row which was brought to the attention of the Superior Court of Los Angeles. The other negro organization is the M. \V. Sovereign Grand Lodge of F. & A. M. One of these organizations recently met in the Scottish Rite temple at Oakland-but no more. New York gives us a definition of clandestine lodges and clandestine Masons. The former is one professing to be a lodge acting under authority from any source not recognized as regular and legitimate by and not having Masonic intercourse with the Grand Lodge of New York. A clandestine Mason is one who has received degrees in, or is a member, of such a body. Consequently, there are many socalled Grand Lodges seemingly legitimate in their own territory that are not eligible to recognition for the reason that they may not be free and independent, owing allegiance to some other body or may not eonform with the landmarks; some have illegitimate birth, or legitimacy difficult to ascertain. The District of Columbia finds Grand Masters"Suffer from pestering by organizations which base their eligibility to membership on membership in blue lodge. In one state one of these organizations organized a far-flung lottery campaign for the raising of money for their own purposes, giving it a little flavor of charity to save their faces. It may be said with great satisfaction that Grand Masters, without exception, are maintaining the position that Masons are responsible to the Grand Lodge for any un-Masonic conduct or infraction of Grand Lodge law, no matter to what organization they may belong."

The brethren of that juriSdiction are apparently obeying the act of the Grand Lodge forbidding any connection with the so-called Order of the Golden Chain or Order of the Amaranth. In Alabama, "the brethren of the Grand Lodge assembled in the Grand Lodge hall for the purpose of receiving a visit from the Grand Matron of the Order of the Eastern Star and her staff of officers." The program included calling of the assembly to order by the Grand Master, the entrance of the Grand Chapter officers, an address by the \Vorthy Grand Matron, followed by one by the Worthy Grand Patron, and the retirement of the deputation. The Grand Master of Connecticut "was given the honor on January 8 of being made a Prophet of Syria Grotto at sight by the Grand Monarch of that Order." Reviewer Evans (Quebec) finds: , 'Grand Lodges are beginning to realize that unrelated or extraneous organizations are not in the best interests of Freemasonry, that the public at large are not generally in a position to distinguish the difference


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in the relations and are therefore losing their respect for the Masonic Order."

Our readers may recall the incident of the critic of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania who had worked himself up to steam heat over the Order of the Eastern Star trouble in that jurisdiction, and the proceedings of the current year show that charges were preferred against the critic, that he was tried and suspended. His defense was that he might have been guilty "of possible reckless use of the English language." The committee does not view it in that light. The letters showed gross disrespect for Masonic law and tradition and "if a like spirit should prevail among any substantial number of the membership, the fraternity could not long survive." As to the radical difference of opinion existing between the accused and the Grand Lodge respecting the propriety of the edict relating to the Order of the Eastern Star, the Grand Lodge said: "We know of no rule or regulation in Masonic jurisprudence which restricts freedom of individual opinion upon any matter relating to the welfare of the fraternity. The brother is free to have and hold his own opinion, but when that opinion is opposed to an edict duly promulgated by proper Masonic authority, he is bound to respect and obey it until changed by orderly process. . . . Brother G. did not merely entertain this opinion, but he acted upon it in a very practical way. He wrote to members of other lodges counselling resistance by litigation in the courts, in which litigation the Grand Master would be restrained by injunction from enforcing the edict, and he wrote to the Grand Master threatening such litigation. ' ,

The committee was not convinced that the brother was sincere in his retraction and apology, neither his correspondence, his testimony, nor his manner at the trial giving such assurance. After considering his age, his temperamental condition, and the fact that he is a Past Master and a Mason in good standing for more than forty years, reduced what might have been expulsion to suspension from membership. Pennsylvania, while not attempting control over extraneous societies: "Insists that these organizations and their members do not violate the fundamental principles and practices of Freemasonry and must also insist that the individual conduct of their members shall be such that the good opinion and respect of the public at large shall not be destroyed thereby. In the meantime members of these bodies who indulge in conduct unbecoming a Mason should be held to strict accountability."

North Dakota received a communication from an organization known as National Federated Craft, consisting apparently of Masons employed in the United States Federal service and claiming local branches in nearly every state west of the Allegheny Mountains. Reports come to the Grand Master of Oregon that, 'Brethren maintain their standing in Shrine and other bodies while under suspension or whose blue lodge dues remain for several years unpaid."


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According to the Grand Master of Texas: "It becomes more apparent with each passing year that certain appendant organizations appear to be usurping the place and sapping the strength of Ancient Craft MasonrJr. So-called side degree Masonry is assuming considerable proportions. In certain cases, the families of Masons and the public are led to believe that they are in fact Masonic, and some as being the very highest round in the Masonic ladder. We have a responsibility to the public and to ourselves in this matter, and it seems high time that we concern ourselves with its discharge. We seemed to function very well for quite some time without any of these appendages. Then some enthusiastic brethren seem to have conceived the idea of other organizations with side degrees for us, other organizations for our wives, for our sons, for our daughters, etc. I raise no question about the right of any of these organizations to exist and function as they really are, but the right and authority to practice Ancient Craft Masonry is possessed only by the Grand Lodge of Texas." ~rhe Grand Lodge of New Brunswick reported adversely to the O. E. S. finding: , 'The Order is not and cannot be Masonic. It is not and cannot be affiliated in any respect. It is undesirable that Masons, particularly Sec-

retaries, should give to anyone, for use in connection with such Order, any information as to the standing of members of our lodges. It is urged that Masons devote their energies to the upbuilding of their own lodges, which they can best do through regular attendance and participation in its activities."

In Ohio, the Grotto recently held a circus in the City of Cleveland on Sunday. It was apparently in the guise of an oversale of tickets for week days. Later the Shrine was reported contemplating the . operation of a circus on Sunday in Akron. The Potentate there assured the Grand Master that the only excuse for holding the circus on Sunday would be to care for the possible oversale of tickets and gave further assurance that there was no prospect of such a situation arising.. The circus was held on Sunday. The Grand Master added: , , We ought perhaps to be patient and encourage any effort which the leaders of these organizations are making looking toward clearing up this condition, but patience, in some i~stances, has almost ceased to be a virtue.' ,

The Grand Master of Ohio visited a number of Eastern Star functions and noted "with satisfaction, the teamwork between lodges and chapters of Eastern Star." Appendant organizations come in for discussion in Tennessee where the Grand Master "does not believe that we as Masons have a right to withdraw our support from our own lodge and render our fuller service through some other organization." He came in contact with the Chattanooga Valley Club (for Masons only), where political activities seem to be emanating. All lodges in Hamilton County, in which the club was located, were directed to sever their connections


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at once with the Chattanooga Valley Club, and the Grand Lodge backed up his action by the adoption of an edict empowering the Grand Master to dissolve and abate any organization which encourages gambling, raffling, or any other immoral practice. Nebraska, which is the home of Job's Daughters, or at least a small percentage of them, decided that contributions could not lawfully be made to this organization from Masonic funds. The Grand Lodge of South Dakota was declared "at ease," whereupon the Worthy Grand Matron and associate officers entered. Permission was refused to a West Virginia lodge to sponsor a boy scout troop or a Chapter of DeMolay, the Grand Master feeling"That a Masonic lodge had all it could do to take care of its own attairs.' ,

In Kansas, the Grand Master tells us: "Some members of certain organizations, predicating their membership upon Masonic affiliation, hold out to the individual Mason a false notion of social activity, and lead him to think his actions are justified because he has the cloak of the fraternity 'round him. My attention has been called to the consideration by one organization, which admits only Masons to its membership, of the advisability of adopting a rule permitting its members to drop their Masonic llffiliation upon obtaining membership in that body. This clearly shows the lack of regard the proposers of such a scheme have for the fraternity. The adoption of such a rule would cause edicts to be issued by Grand Masters requiring all Masons to withdraw from that organization, and while the internal strife would be severe, the results would eventually be beneficial." FINANCES

Nothing is more important to the welfare of the fraternity than its finances. The Grand Master of Florida finds that the problem of financing charitable enterprises, undertaken when the revenue was at its peak, is now causing serious concern in many Grand Lodges. His reply was increased per capita tax, special assessments, drawing on reserve funds, and borrowing. Florida raised per capita tax and borrowed too. He foresees no considerable increase in revenues in the near future, but a possibility of further reduction. He said: "We are not justmed in spending for benevolent or other usual activities funds we do not have."

The most important administrative problem in Iowa is said by the Grand Master of that jurisdiction to be finance, and adds: , 'It is a wise lodge which takes no account of fees in its estimate of receipts and if its wisdom dictates the establishment of a reserve fund in which all or part of the fees are deposited, so much the better. A good Secretary can be immensely helpful in most difficult situations, but a poor one can make two difficulties grow where one grew before. Proper audits are necessary. Committees sometimes make a perfunctory and incomplete


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audit, and when this neglect persists over a period of years, complications are likely to ensue. Officers should, for their own protection, insist that their accounts have a thorough audit annually."

In an effort to reduce expense, the Grand Master recommended that annual communications be held either at Cedar Rapids, or Des Moines, which would save the Grand Lodge in ten years more than $15,000.00. The Grand Lodge apparently did not care to save the money. Irregularities in the office of the Grand Secretary were brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands. It appears that the Assistant Grand Secretary had been attending to financial transactions for several years without supervision. No system of accounting had ever been established and audits were inadequate. The brother was charged with un-Masonic conduct; he was found guilty and suspended. The Gratid Lodge auditor deemed the penalty inadequate and filed an appeal. Hereafter there will be no Assistant Grand Secretary. The Grand Lodge auditor visits each of the lodges, auditing their books and instructing the lodge secretaries. The former Grand Secretary is to be required to explain the whereabouts of $500.00 missing bonds. Changes in market conditions and new methods of financing prompted the Grand Master of Rhode Island to recommend to the committee on finance that they employ the service of some large trust company to handle their various investments. From what we have observed, some of the larger trust companies made about as poor investments as the average individual. At any rate, trustees of one of the funds reported that the market value of bonds was more than $10,000.00 higher than the cost at which they had been carried. The Pacific Mutual Insurance Company of California brought suit in August, 1934, against Yuma Lodge No. 17, Yuma, Ariz., to foreclose a first mortgage on a new building of Yuma Lodge. Th~ complaint was in such form as to have permitted the insurance company to recover a money judgment against the lodge, its officers and trustees in the way of deficiency judgment, and also against the trustees of the Grand Lodge if the mortgage proper did not seem to satisfy the judgment and costs. The Grand Lodge secured an agreement with the company, Yuma Lodge lost its property, and the Grand Lodge lost its $6,000.00 loan it had made to Yuma Lodge in 1930. Stocks and bonds carried on the books of the Grand Lodge of New York at a cost of $725,415.00 had a market value in 1936 of $33,837.39, an increase in equity of $24,303.00. A committee in this Grand Lodge reported on lodge records and finances. It is interesting to know how some lodges manage to balance the budget, ranging from cuts in salaries of Secretaries to increase of dues, drives for new members, drives for dues, and cancellation of arrearages. Ninety lodges report no audit of accounts. The committee advised that the time is not far distant when Grand Lodge must take action to insure adequate audit. As to the question of minute books, we learn:


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"It may be said that the permanently bound book is preferable, because its pages do not become lost and it is impossible to change the minutes when once recorded without the alteration being detected."

The District of Columbia finds the most practicable way of safeguarding lodge securities and other property is by placing them in the custody of a Board of Trustees of three members elected by the lodge, and that they be required to keep the securities in a safety deposit box, opened only in the presence of at least two of the trustees, or one trustee altd a fiscal officer of the lodge. The interest returned on the cost of investments of the Grand Lodge of Alberta was 5.1 per cent. The investments are made up of Canadiana Dominion, Province and city bonds. Because of increased expenditures, the Grand Lodge of Washington approved no appropriations not absolutely necessary and omitted payment of expenses to district Deputy Grand Masters. The Grand Master of Oklahoma, although authorized to borrow, did not regard it as good business to take money to pay operating expense and to repay the amount from income for the next year, which would only lead to another deficit. The lodge hall at Anadarko is being erected at a cost of $25,000.00, as the result of a benefaction received from an old brother, 'v. A. Dixon. The Grand Master of Minnesota informed a lodge it was not permissible to give funds out of lodge treasuries to public projects. In Connecticut, the use of monies received from candidates for fees are being used to meet operating expenses, and the present lack of candidates has produced an embarrassing situation in many lodges. The per capita tax of this Grand Lodge was recently increased to $2.50. Lodges of Maine are divided into three classes: 63 had sufficient revenue from dues to pay cost of operation, without use of fees; 32 had insufficient revenue from these sources to pay cost of operation, but received sufficient fees from candidates to balance accounts; 44 had insufficient income and a deficit after using all fees and revenue. , 'The present time is not propitious to increase dues, and the major remedy must be found in better collection of dues."

The auditor reports that the Grand Treasurer is bonded for $25,000.00, but is custodian of more than $260,000.00 of liquid assets, $51,000.00 being in cash. In South Carolina, the Grand Master expressed his opinion that the proper place to reduce expenses was in the amount appropriated for mileage and per diem. A few years ago, one-third of the income was being expended for mileage and per diem; at the present time over one-half of the income is being expended for the same item. The Grand Lodge of Quebec exists upon a 50c per capita tax, which has never been increased since the formation of the Grand Lodge sixty-six years ago.


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The Grand Master of North Dakota cites the budget plan of a North Dakota lodge which is worked out on a percentage plan, which he says is the only way to keep a lodge solvent financially, and unless it be solvent financially, it cannot be solvent fraternally, socially and spiritually. This jurisdiction has come to the conclusion that they arc in a far better position than a year ago, that while the membership may be done, numbers are l~ot the sole criterion: "We must understand that no longer will any organization run itself. Better planning, better organization, more effort, mean success."

This Grand Lodge invested in mortgage bonds of apartment and business buildings and are now presenting problems of serious import, for increasing taxes and lower rents ha\re struck hard at the stability of bond issues of this nature. Apparently "Guaranteed Mortgage Bonds" were no better than some of those not guaranteed. Other utility issues are "clouded by adverse federal legislation and continued demand in many directions for further rate reduction." The Finance Committee in Idaho presented a motion that representatives traveling in their own cars be paid mileage at the rate of 6c per mile, while those riding with them be allowed nothing. Due to certain unfortunate incidents with which the Grand Master had been acquainted during his early Masonic life, he directed an inquiry into every New Hampshire lodge to ascertain how the financial affairs were cared for and protected by bonds. To his surprise, only thirty-five lodges had bonds. He recommended a blanket form of bond. Secretaries are not measuring up to the standard accepted by the Grand Master of Oregon who finds that Secretary's qualifications require some accounting ability and accuracy and diligence in keeping the records up to the minute. When necessary, the Grand Lodge assists in unraveling distorted accounts. This Grand Lodge is requiring bonds of all Secretaries, since the year 1933 saw $10,000.00 lost to Oregon lodges through involved Treasurers. A special committee on delinquent dues reported. , 'The payment of dues is the barometer by which the standing of the lodge may be determined, a large number of members owing dues indicates inefficiency or inattention of officers."

A new law in that jurisdiction requires the Master to appoint an auditing committee of three members; copy of the audit goes to the Grand Lodge and the purpose of the amendment is to make it the duty of the Master of a lodge to appoint a committee each year to audit the lodge books. The inadequacy of the dues rate of certain Illinois lodges is emphasized by the committee on lodge finance. Nine lodges in Cook County, in which Chicago is located, with a dues rate of $6.00 or less, show that they fail to meet operating expenses by $3,000.00, even if


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dues were collected from each member. Last year, actual collections failed to cover operating expenses by $10,000.00; this year by $6,000.00. Outside of Cook County, 328 lodges failed to meet their expenses by $5,000.00 theoretically, but actually by $44,000.00. Ohio lodges are coming to the budget system. Financial difficulties of the past are attributed to lack of any well defined plan of distributing lodge income. In many instances financial outgo has been planned in anticipation of fees which never materialized. The Grand Treasurer is much disturbed over the interest dropping from 4%, per cent on bonds to as low as 2% per cent. This Grand Lodge is the owner of $310,000.00 government obligations. Nova Scotia protected its investments by restricting them to government or municipal bonds; the Grand Lodge must approve their purchase. Dwindling of Kentucky membership from 72,000 to 44,000 has created a financial problem, for they have one of the largest Masonic Homes to support. The Grand Master of Virginia declined to approve provisions in the by-laws by attempting to fix compensation of the Secretary on the basis of percentage of funds handled, being of the opinion that a fraternal organization officer should receive a fixed sum for his services in the light of the available resources. In Vennont, payment of mileage and per diem is made on the basis of concentric circular zone system, each of a width of ten airline miles; each zone carries mileage in apportionment equal in dollars to its designated number. In Arkansas, we learn that at the 1934 session of the Grand Lodge, there were representatives from ninety-four lodges who were paid more mileage and per diem than they paid in Grand Lodge dues. BEQUESTS

Bro. Julius Heineke recently gave the Grand Lodge of Alabama $5,000.00 for endowment fund, to which his wife, in her will, added another $5,000.00. There was recently presented to the Masonic Home of Maryland a portrait of the late Grand Master Warren Seipp, the gift of Bro. Seipp's lodge. Bro. Thomas B. Epron gave to the Home a Westminster peal bells and tower clock in memory of his wife, son and daughter; it cost $4,250.00. Mrs. Rose Johnson, widow of a deceased member, donated $1,000.00 toward a chapel fund. Minnesota reported more donations and bequests received during the year than from assessments. A Minnesota brother gave, through the Grand Master, $1,005.00 in currency to be placed in the bequest fund. The donor was Bro. Cadwallader, ninety-six years of age and seventy years a Mason.


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The Grand Master of Pennsylvania reported receipt of $1,000.00 from the widow of Bro. Ralph Minehart, former Grand Commander of that jurisdiction. Another $500.00 was received from the estate of William Dick, former librarian and curator of the Grand Lodge. FUNERALS

A brother must have been a subscribing member of a lodge at the time of his death and must have expressed a wish for Masonic burial to secure it in New Zealand. Utah is wrestling with the cremation ceremony. A committee recommended the doing away with responsive reading. The service haR been greatly shortened. Oregon's Grand Master did not feel that there was any lack of feeling or sympathy, but contended that lack of attention usually prevails at Masonic funerals and too few of the brethren give their presence in the last human aet we can extend. He adds: "May our brethren r~alize that some time, some day, somewhere, someone must lay them away in peaceful rest. I hope there will be more than the pallbearers present when the time comes to perform this duty for you and for me, that there will be some expression of evidence that our lives have been worthwhile."

A questionnaire to Nova Scotia lodges showed a preponderance of opinion in favor of the procession being made optional, and that provision be made for the shortening of the funeral service. The Grand Lodge of Canada refuses to permit its members to participate in funeral services where other bodies participate, except in military funerals. Kentucky reported a new funeral service, which was adopted. It is said to be more practical and brief, and consequently more desirable. Superfluous eulogy and quotations are eliminated, and a simple yet comprehensive procession is inserted. Masonic funerals have been mentioned more in the reports to the Grand Lodge than any other lodge activity, according to the Grand Master of California. He urges more careful performance of this sacred duty. All Masters of lodges are not qualified to conduct funerals, "conferring a degree is one thing, to conduct a funeral is something different." The Grand Master of West Virginia says: , , A Templar escort is to guard and protect a Masonic lodge in its labor in the burial of a brother, and not to perform that labor or any part thereof.' ,

The Grand Lodge of South Australia finds the Lodges of Sorrow being less in favor. Minnesota, through a committee, presented two suggested funeral services. One is for use at the church, the other at the grave.


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JEWELS AND REGALIA

In Massachusetts, the Master, by inviting another to preside in his presence, surrenders no sovereignty over his lodge; to retain his collar and jewel has been considered discourteous to the guest. The Secretaries' Association considered the adoption of a design for a Past Secretary's medal, given after twenty-five years of service. South Carolina has adopted the Albert Gallatin Mackey medal, a circle of bronze hung from a blue ribbon and a bar, the face of the medal bearing a likeness of Mackey, and the obverse the seal of the Grand Lodge. It is to be given for distinguished service to country or Freemasonry, without regard to state, nation or Grand Lodge, the Grand Master to select those to receive the medal. In Canada, it is prohibited to wear jewels in a lodge, other than those specified for officers, except the jewel of a Past Master, a Grand Representative, a Royal Arch Mason, or medal authorized by Grand Lodge. In New York, the Grand Master's medal for distinguished achievement in the field of art was this year awarded by the Grand Master to John W. Evans, artist, philosopher and idealist, nationally known because of his understanding of the art of wood-engraving. In closing the Grand Lodge of New York, the Grand Master admonished his brethren that during hard times Freemasons should set an example of restraint: , , It is not fitting that money be spent to gratify pride in the display of costly jewels that may tickle vanity, but which breed jealousies, and lead to competition in vulgar extravagances."

In New Zealand, Provincial Grand Masters and Assistant Grand Directors of Ceremonies were recently provided with regalia. Every brother of this Grand Lodge, appointed to Grand Office, is expected when his term of office expires to equip himself with a suit of undress regalia. The Masters of lodges may wear in the center of the collar an appropriate silver chain not more than one inch wide. The white tie is in use on all occasions, and especially when regalia is worn. If evening dress, the apron is worn under the coat, but on all other occasions, outside the coat. White waistcoats are not worn. Regalia is never worn in public ceremonies. In Pennsylvania, every Master and Warden is required to wear his appropriate jewel and apron while attending communications of the Grand Lodge. Oregon found that there were no specifications governing the size and shape of a Mason's apron in that jurisdiction, whereupon a resolution was proposed specifying an apron 16 inches square, with the sides of the flap measuring 10 inches. In Tasmania, the Grand Master urges uniform practice in wearing of aprons-outside the coat, unless it be a full dress one, and to be eorrect, the white tie.


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MISCELLANEOUS

A ((Lewis": In this country we know little of the Masonic word "Lewis." It is current in many of the English-speaking countries. The Grand Lodge of New Zealand gives a definition: t t A t Lewis' must have been born after his father became a Master Mason and both father and son must comply with other requirements of the rule. "

Annual Communication: The time of annual communication was a matter considered by the Iowa Grand Lodge. For eight-nine years, June had become the traditional month. The Grand Master says it is too hot a month, that he sits through the session in acute discomfort, dulling his interest and lessening his enjoyment in the proceedings; his headquarters are stifling. Again, it is normally a rainy month, and rain means bad roads. It is the busiest season of the farm year and the time of graduation of our children. He suggested the month of Odober, when the Iowa brethren will be physically comfortable and mentally alert. Apparently, the Iowa brethren prefer heat and diseomfort to physical enjoyment and mental alertness, for they turned thumbs down on the proposal. Anti-Masonry: A New York committee finds there has been no let-up in agitation against Freemasonry. It offers adventurers an easy road to power and has even invaded countries like Great Britain and the Scandinavian countries where the rulers are personally identified with the Craft. At the start, the plan was to persuade the masses that Freemasonry brought on the World War. Then it charged that the failure of the League of Nations was the result of antagonism of Freemasons. In Italy there is yet to be found anti-Masonic prop~足 ganda. In France, a strong anti-Masonic organization, backed by powerful influences, is dominant among the aristocracy and rural sections. Prejudice does not reason, and unthinking masses are counted upon to accept without question what is given them from pulpits and political rostrums. Press dispat('hes recently told of American Fascists permitting anti-Masonic propaganda by street and indoor meetings, pamphlets and handbills. The enemies we have to fear most are those within the fraternity, men who misrepresent its purposes by their public conduct or by their dissemination of false conceptions of the principles on which it is founded. The advice of the committee is: t t Assailing a religious organization which to its adherents is the most precious thing, and often the only comfort the great majority of the people have in life, is worse than waging a political fight. Our fraternity is pledged by solemn vows not to interfere with the religious or political belief by either official initiative or by endorsement of attacks directed against the church."

Board of General Purposes: The Board of General Purposes of the Grand Lodge of South Australia is made up of the usually elected


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Grand Officers, the President of the Board of General Purposes, Director of Ceremonies, and Trustees of Masonic property. Candidates in New Zealand: New Zealand lists what are regarded . essential qualifications for Masonic candidates: (1) unblemished character; (2) financial ability to meet all Masonic charges and obligations without detriment to self or connections; (3) the ability to understand and value the principles and tenets of Freemasonry. This Grand Lodge suggests that candidates for admission should be asked to make satisfactory provision for their dependents through life insurance policies. In voting upon candidates, lodges are instructed to have the Deacon who carries the ballot box count the number of members voting, informing the Master, who, in the event of the ballot not being clear, shall count the number of cubes and balls cast to satisfy himself that they correspond with the number of members voting as reported by the Deacon. In that jurisdiction, Entered Apprentices are seated in the Northeast, and FelIowcrafts in the Southeast part of the lodge. Masters are charged with explaining to the candidates. their proper places and the Directors of Ceremonies and Deacons are eharged to see that they are correctly seated. Cemeteries: Reviewer West, of the District of Columbia, finds no Masonic cemeteries in his territory. Such enterprises, he regards as simply real estate promotions, using Masonic prestige for the sale of lots. One association wanted to have the square and compasses over the gate. Charter of Lodge: The original charter of a lodge, or a photostatic copy thereof duly certified by the Grand Master and Grand Secretary, under seal of the Grand Lodge, must be present in the lodge room at all meetings of Nebraska lodges. Commercialism: There is a class of business men who are Masons and who would, if they were permitted, display the square and compasses on their show windows, according to the District of Columbia reviewer, for after all, Masons are only human beings and many applicants have been innocently led to believe that Masonry had some magic property for its votaries. He suggests that we cut out ninety per cent of the publicity accorded our activities that is now displayed in public print, including street parades and minstrel shows with the name of Masonry attached. Discourage the idea that we are a benevolent or protective order and that we are not a reform school. In fact "employ our time attending to our own business in our own way, so far as Masonry is concerned." Masonic publications in Washington are apparently making use of the Masonic name and emblem in order to secure advertising along a plan which is nothing more nor less than a racket. The Grand Master proposes that Grand Lodge consider restricting the use of Masonic name or emblem in publications to those approved by the Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge followed the recommendation by adopting an amend-


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ment providing that befo