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KANSAS

CITY~

MO.

GRAND MASTER? 1929-1930


BIOGRAPHICAL

SAMUEL R. FREET.

Grand Master, 1929-1930.

Our 86th Grand Master is a native Missourian to the manor born. Saline County, among the foremost of the fine counties of central Missouri, and unequaled perhaps in the world for the richness and productiveness of its soil, and the outstanding caliber of its people; and Slater, located in one of its choicest sections, has the honor of being his birthplace-the event having taken place on St. John the Evangelist's Day, December 27, 1884. Of course it goes without saying that our Grand Master was raised on a farm, and that his forefathers, who hailed from Virginia and Pennsylvania, were among the pioneer settlers of his native county. His great-grandfather, Abner Gwinn, Baptist Preacher, 'and first Moderator of Saline County Baptist Association, which was founded in 1842, suggests a clear index to the future success of our 86th Grand Master. Heredity and environment seem to have blended into the making of 路a man whose memory will go .down in the annals of Freemasonry in Missouri as one of the most lovable, attractive, level-headed, useful Grand Masters in the long line of distinguished brethren who have gone this way before him. True to his state and country, loyal to the religious denomination of his choice, foursquare as a Freemason, Samuel R. Freet has proven himself altogether worthy of the confidence reposed in him by his brethren and has made full proof of his stewardship. Most Worshipful Brother Freet was educated in the public and high schools of Slater, and the University of Missouri. Prior to embarking on his life calling, like ma~y other young men, he taught school for a short period in his native county. In 19(}9, the lure of the big city attracted him, and he found himself in Kansas City, where he hung out his shingle and began the practice


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Biographical

of law; and has continued in his profession with ever-increasing success, until today he is recognized as among the foremost lawyers practicing in the courts of western Missouri. Most Worshipful Brother Freet is a memher, and we may say the leading layman, of the First Baptist ,Church of Kansas City. He is Vice-Chairman of the Board of Deacons, Chairman of the Finance Committee-and everything else that an active Christian gentleman might be expected to be in the Church of his choice. Mrs. Freet, who was Miss Gertrude Rainalter, formerly a teacher in the schools of Kansas City, has long been his guiding star; and their daughter, Gertrude Nell, is undoubtedly the sunshine and center of attraction in their happy home. It is often said that all really great men have one hobby in life aside from their usual vocations. Our Grand Master has at least three. First, his home, and to him and his this is as nearly ideal as can well be imagined. - Next, and following closely thereto (indeed apparently bracketed equal), comes the First Baptist Church in Kansas City-and Freemasonry.

The influences of these three factors seem to have united in developing the outstanding personality which has made Samuel R. Freet so successful in everything that he has hitherto undertaken, and his brethren regar~ him路 and honor him as a distinguished "Prince in our Israel". His going in and out among tho Lodges scattered over our Commonwealth, during his term of office as Grand Master, has left a fragrance which will long be remembered and an impression which will not fade away. The altogether unlooked-for sickness which overtook our Grand Master in the latter weeks of his administration, necessitating an immediate major operation, from which he has emerged almost as by miracle, has, if that were possible, bound him still more closely to the hearts of his brethren throughout our Grand Jurisdiction, whose earnest hope and fervent prayer is that he may long be spared to go in and out among us and thus carry out the greatest longing of his life路-that of being serviceable to humanity. Most Worshipful Brother Freet was Raised in Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 in Kansas City, December 10, 1910. He served as its . Worshipful Master in 1920; and is at the present time President of.


Biographical

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the Ivanhoe Masonic Temple Company, which is the holding corporation of the Ivanhoe York Rite Bodies. At the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge held at Kansas City in 1920, Brother Freet was appointed Grand Pursuivant and thereafter, year by year, regularly advanced station by station until in 192,9 he was elected Grand Master. He is a member of Kansas ,City Chapter No. 28, R. A. M.; Shekinah Council No. 24, R.. & S. M., and Kansas City Commandery No. 10, K. T. In the A. A. S. R., his membership is in the Consistory at Kansas City. In the A. A. O. N. M. S., he belongs to Ararat Temple at Kansas City. In the M. O. V. P. E. R., his membership is in Elysian Grotto at Kansas City. A. M.


ENTERTAINMENT.

Prior to the opening of the Grand Lodge, 140 children from the Masonic Home at St. Louis, Missouri, assembled on the platform under the direction of the President, William W. Martin, and an interesting program was rendered with the assistance of Mrs. \Vilmoth \iValler and Edw. V. Williams, Mrs. Henry Falkenhainer at the piano. This program was made possible through the courtesy of the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company, who furnished transportation for the Home family to and from Kansas City. The program was greatly enjoyed by the brethren of the Grand Lodge, and suitable acknowledgment was made by the Deputy Grand Master, R.\V. Bro. William R. Gentry..


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

ONE HUNDRED AND TENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION路 OF THE

GRAND LODGE ANCIENT FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS OF THE

STATE OF MISSOURI

HELD IN KANSAS CITY

Commencing September 30, A. D. 1930 A. L. 5930


ONE HUNDRED TENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION

FIRST DAY.

The One Hundred Tenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened in Ivanhoe Temple, corner of Linwood Boulevard and Park Avenue, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, at 10:00 A. M. on Tuesday, the Thirtieth day of September, 1930. PRESENT. SAMUI':L R. FRI~ET) Kansas City

M. W. Grand Master R. ,W. Deput'jl Grand 1I1aster RAY V. DENSLOW} Trenton !? W. Senior Gral'td Warden, THAD B. LANDON} Kansas City R. lifl. Junior Grand Warden EDMUND E. l\10RRIS) Kansas City R. W. Grand Treasurer ARTHUR l\1ATIIER} Fergllson R. W. Grand Secretary JAMES R. McLACHLAN} Kahoka R. W. Grand Lecturer EMMET L: ROBISON} St. Joseph R. liV. Grand Chaplain Z.' M. WILLIAMS) Versailles R. fV. Grand Chaplain A. RAY PETTY) Kansas City R. W. Grand Chaplain FRANK C. BARNHILL) Marshall. R. W. Grand Senior Deacon DUVAL SMITH} St. Joseph R. W. Grand Junior Deacon JAMES Vv. SKELLY} St. LOllis R. W. Grand SeniorSteward GEO. \lv. WALK"f,R} Cape Girardeau .. R.W. Grand Junior Steward HAROLD L. READER} \iVebstcr Groves .!?. W. Grand Marshal HENRY C. CHIU:S} Lexington R. W. Gra1td Marshal ELWYN S. \iVOODS) Springfield R. W. Grand Sword Bearer KARL 1\11. VETS13URG) St. Louis R. W. Grand Pursuivant FRED M. SMITH) Inclependence R. W. Grand Orator D. \iV. PARKER) Kansas City R. W. Grand Tiler WILLIAM R. GENTRY) S1. Louis


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OPENING.

At 10 A. M. September 30, 1930, at Ivanhoe Temple, the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Samuel R. Freet, opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of M.issouri in AMPLE FORM in its One Hundred and 'J'enth Annual Communication aided by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of Representatives. INVOCATION.

Following the singing of "America", R.. \lv. Brother the Reverend Dr. A. Ray Petty, Grand Chaplain, delivered the following Invocation: "Almighty God, Architect, Builder, Sustainer, Ruler of the Universe, Father of Men, we pray Thy blessing upon this gathering together of Brethren for the discussion of plans and the transaction of business and for the advancement of brotherhood. We thank Thee for the obligations we have accepted which makes Brothers and we pray that in all of the experience of these days those obligations shall become deepened in our heart, and that our response to them shall become more active and more acute. "We thank Thee as we are gathered here this morning for the special blessing that comes to us in the restoration to health of our Most Worshipful Grand Master. We thank Thee that in his life he has so beautifully embodied before us the virtues of our fellowship. The beauty of his life, the depth of his in~egrity, the beauty of his fellowship and the understanding of his love have made us all better men, and his leadership has helped to make us better Masons, and we thank Thee that he is restored. Bring him back to us in complete restoration of health we pray; and 路bless all of the work that is accomplished. Bless Masons here and throughout the World as together, loving each other and serving each other in the line of our obligations, we build the Kingdom of Brotherhood, which shall be Thy Kingdom. We ask it in Thy Name. Amen." CREDE.NTIALS.

\"1\r. Bro. Charles M. Christie, Chairman of the Committee on Credentials, reported a constitutional number of lodges represented, and the 1\1. W. Grand 1\1aster declared the Grand Lodge ready to discharge its duties.


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DISTINGUISHED VISITORS.

R. \"1. Senior Grand Warden, Ray V. Denslow, thereupon introduced the following distinguished visitors who were cordially welcomed by the M .. W. Grand Master, received with appropriate honors, and seated in the Grand E9-st. R. \"1. Bro. John 1V1. Kinkel, Deputy GrandMaster of the Grand Lodge of Kansas and personal representative of the Grand Master of Kansas (who at this time was ill in the hospital inKansas City). M. W. Bro. Elmer F. Strain, Past Grand Master, and present Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Kansas. 1\1. W. Bro. Orville A. Andrews, Grand Master of Nebraska. R. \"1. Bro. John R. Tapster, Deputy Grand 1\1aster of Nebraska. M. VV..Bro. Ira C. Freet, Past Grand Master of Nebraska. M. W. Bro. Lewis E. Smith, Past Grand Master, and present Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. R. E. Sir Taylor B. \"Iyrick, Grand Commander, Grand Commandery K. '1'. of Missouri. 1\11. E. Companion Fred O. Wood, Grand High Priest, Grand Chapter R. A. 1\1. of :Missouri. M. Ill. Henry C. Elberg, Illustrious Grand Master of the Grand Council R. and S. 1\1. of :Missouri. M. W. Grand Master Freet: Brethren, as the Grand Master's Address is going to be rather short, I am going to take a few moments to hear ju~t a word from our distinguished visitors. I am sure that at a later hour in the session we will have an opportunity to let them have a little more extended time. We are very sorry indeed that M. W. Bro. John B. Carter, Grand Master of Kansas, is confined to his room at St. Luke's Hospital in this city. We never do things by halves in either Missouri or Kansas and so when the Grand Master of Kansas pulls'a party in the hospital, the Grand Master of Missouri will not be outdone and so he does the same thing. I know that it is your feeling that we send some word to our dear Brother Carter, and if there is a motion to that effect, I will entertain it now. M. W. Bro. Bert S. Lee: M. W. Grand Master, I would like very much to make that motion, and I would like that our distinguished


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guests convey to Brother Carter our sincere wish for his speedy and permanent recovery. (Which motion was duly seconded and adopted.) M. W. Grand Master. Ji'reet: Brethren, I know you would not路 forgive me if we did not have an opportunity to have a word from the Deputy Grand Master of Kansas who brings us a word from his Grand Master, M. W. Bro. John M. Kinkel: M. W. Grand Master and Brethren: After listening to the magnificent program rendered by the children this morning and feeling this thrill of fine brotherly love and affection that prevails in this magnificent company, I hesitate to bring a note of mournful tone, and ,yet that seems to be inevita'ble. In addition to the pleasure of being here in person, I am directed by M. \V. Bro. J. B. Carter, Grand Master of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Kansas, to pay special respect and extend the most profound appreciation to your distinguished M. W. Grand Master for a very fine demonstration of brotherly love and interest which he displayed here several weeks ago when he conveyed his greetings to the Grand Master of Kansas through his personal representative, he himself being physically un~ble to call upon him; and so the Grand Master of Kansas directs me in the most sincere and at the same time profound miwner possible, to express his appreciation of that courtesy, M. W. Sir, and to extend through you to this "Home Lodge" of yours (Ivanhoe Lodge), his thanks for that beautiful bouquet of flowers that they later on conveyed to him. The facts are, Brethren, that our Grand Master is seriously ill; and the facts are, too, that the greetings from the Grand Master of this Grand Lodge and the beautiful bouquet of flowers from this distinguished Lodge proved both an inspiration and a joy and a solace; and as he lay on his couch of pain, the pain was assuaged and he was thrilled with the manifest demonstration of brotherly love and affection that your action conveyed to him. I wish I could say more, 'but time passes 'and you have other matters on hand. It will be my pleasure, M. W. Sir, to convey to him the sentiments of this resolution that you have just ~dopted. He, in conclusion, wanted me to be especially sure to say that it was his most urgent hope that the unfailing arms of the Supreme Architect of the Universe will comfort the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri and that he would be able to dr:aw strength from that inexhaustible source of strength and power found at the throne of Almighty God which will sustain him in his illness and finally restore him to full and. complete health. M. W. Grand Master Freet: Brethren, it is useless fOT me to try to comment upon that beautiful tribute. I know that you will


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want to hear from our M. W. Brother, the Grand Master of Nebraska. M. W. Grand Master Andrews (of Nebraska): M. W. Grand Master, distinguished guests, and Brethren ,of Missouri: I wish that I might have the ability to express my great appreciation of the sentiments so beautifully voiced by our good brother, your Grand Master. We thank you most sincerely for your very cordial reception. It is a real delight to be here. We appreciate the splendid fraternal relation existing between Missouri and Nebraska. I am glad to know that you are already acquainted somewhat with our M. W. Bro. Smith, the Grand Secretary. There are路 many things that I might say here this morning and that I would delight to say, but you have your program arranged and it is not my purpose to encroach on the valuable time of your M. W. Grand Master and your Grand Lodge. There are a few things I would like to tell you about Brother Smith that perhaps you don't know. You know in Nebraska we probably appreciate Brother Smith more than you do in Missouri, although I know he has a place in the heart of every brother who knows him. Brother Smith served. us as Grand Master some few years -ago. When we needed a Grand Secretary afterwards, we looked around among our Past Grand Masters and we selected one of the very best to serve us as Grand Secretary. (Applause.) Now, you Brethren know that preplexing questions necessarily come to the Grand Master and you men also appreciate how much the Grand Master appreciates the services of a real Grand Secretary-which we have in Ne'braska and which I know you have in Missouri, because it has been my very great pleasure to have met Brother Mather. In Nebraska this year there has been a number-while the year is yet young, for our Masonic yea~-there has been a number <?f questions that have come to the Grand Master that he has found necessary to refer to the Grand Secretary for reply and for, we might say, decision. Of course, there are some things that the Grand Master must assume to act upon, but we have such great confidence in Our Grand Secretary that we call upon him for these answers in many cases. One question that came up and which I found it necessary to refer to the Grand Secretary was, "Can you tell a Grand Master?" And Brother Smith very readily said, "Yes, you can tell a Grand Master but you can't tell him much." (Applause.) Another question that came up and that was, "How does a Mason get down off of an elephant?" Well, Brother Smith was able to answer that. I couldn't answer it. He says, "You can't get down off of an elephant," he says, "you get it off of a goose or a thistle." (Laughter.)


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So you may not know that some years ago Brother Smith served in the capacity of a judge in his local community. I don't know whether he recalls this incident or not-this was a number of years ago, I am told, but I am going to tell it to you as it was given to me. It was reported that a young Italian was arrested for some misdemeanor and was brought up before our worthy brother and was fined 'in the ordinary course of administering the laws as were on the ordinances of the city, and the young Italian paid the fine. Brother Smith says to him, "Tony, you may go now, that is all, you have paid your fine." But Tony remained. Brother Smith couldn't understand quite why he was ,lingering there, and he says to him again, "You may retire." He says, "That's all, Tony." . And still he remained. Then Brother Smith says, "Well, what are you waiting for?" Well, the young Italian says, "Tony want a receipt. Tony want a receipt." "What in the world do you want a receipt for?" says Judge Smith, "you have paid your fine and that's all there is to it. You can't be tried again for th,e same offense." So the Italian says: ."Tony maybe die and he got up to St. Peter and St. Peter say, 'Tony, you paid all your debts?' and Tony say, Yes,' and S.t. Peter say, 'Show me receipt.' What Tony going to do? Got to look all over creation to find the judge." (Laughter. ) Brethren of Missouri, I bring you greetings from 42,000 Masons of Nebraska. 'We appreciate, as I remarked before, the splendid fraternal relationship. We recognize the part that Missouri had in the formation of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, and we honor you for your assistance in the formation of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. We congratulate Missouri on 110 years of service for Masonry. It is a real inspiration to me, Brethren, to look into the faces of you brethren here on this morning, a splendid delegation of the finest of the men of the State of Missouri. I appreciate this privilege, M. W. Grand Master. It is a real delight. I am very happy that we do have a large delegation from Nebraska here today, in the persons of the Deputy Grand Master, our Past Grand Master, Brother Freet, and Brother Smith. Brother Morris this morning remarl{ed that 'it was-what was it he said-"A mess from Nebraska," that is the way he expressed

it; and then he was diplomatic enough to say he meant "A mass from Nebraska." We appreciate you brethren, we appreciate the visitations and we hope that these relationships will continue. We are all striving for the same purpose, Brethren. We are in a real service for the uplift of humanity. It is not my desire to take your time further and I will close with just some sentiment from Edgar Guest, which to me expresses real Masonic inspiration. He says:


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Grand Lodge of Alissouri

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"I'd rather see a sermon than to hear one any day, I'd r'ather one should walk with me than merely tell the way, The eye's a better pupil and more willing than the ear, Fine counsel is confusing, but example's always clear, And the best of all the preachel's are the men. who live their creeds, For tG see good put in action is what everybody needs. "I can soon learn how to do it if you'll let me s.ee it done, I can watch your hands in action, but your tongue too fast may run, And the lectures you deliver may be very wise and true, But I'd rather get my lessons by observing what you do, For I may misunderstand you and the high advice you give, But there's no misunderstanding how you act and how you live. "When I see a deed of kindness I am eager to be kind, When a weal,er brother stumbles, and a strong man stays behind Just to see if he can help him, then the wish grows strong in me To become as big and thoughtful as I l{now that friend to be. And all travelers can witness that the best of guides today Is not the one who tells them, but the one who shows the way. "One good man teaches many, men believe what they behold, One deed of kindness noticed is worth forty that are told. Who stands with me of honor learns to hold his honor dear, For right living speaks a language which to everyone is clear. Though an able spea!{er charms me with his eloquence, I say, I'd rather see a sermon than to hear one any day."

GREETINGS.

The Grand Secretary read the following telegram from 1\1. W. Bro. Joseph S. :McIntyre, Past Grand Master, and Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in Missouri, whose absence from our annual communication was deeply regretted: "Please convey the following messages: "First-Give my fraternal regards to Grand Master Freet with my sincere hope for his speedy and permanent recovery. "Second-Please say to the Grand Lodge and the Brethren that I regret exceedingly not to be able to be with them at this session and wish them a prosperous and successful meeting. "Third-Sir Alfred Robbins of London, the only living honorary member of this Grand Lodge, has asked me in a communication just received to convey to the Grand Lodge his warmest fraternal greetings. ".T. S. McINTYRE."

M. W. Grand Master Freet: Now, Brethren, the time has co.me for you to listen, and for the Grand Master to deliver his Report. I shall' read just a few paragraphs and then surrender the gavel to our R. W. Deputy Grand Master, but before surrendertng the gavel to him and retiring, as I am required to do by my


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physician, at the conclusion of the Address, I want to say just one or two very personal words to you. In the first place, on behalf of all the Lodges of Kansas City, I want to bid you a hearty welcome. On behalf of Ivanhoe Lodge, my mother Lodge, I bid you a welcome to this Temple; 'but you are being entertained not by Ivanhoe Lodge, but you are being entertained by all of the Lodges of Kansas City, and I can assure you that I, as your Grand Master, and the Lodges of Kansas City, and my own Lodge, deeply appreciate the honor that you have conferred upon us by coming here to hold this, the One Hundred and 'Tenth Annual Communication. I cannot express to you the emotion which rises in my heart at this time. I knew that I had the love of the brethren throughout ,the State, but never did I realize the depth of it nor could I have realized the depth of it had it not been for the unpleasant experience through which I have passed during the last month and a little more. Just 26 days ago this morning'my dear friend and your Grand Chaplain, Bro. A. Ray Petty, went into the operating room with me and stayed there while the skilled physicians plowed a furrow about 10 inches long, and some question as to whether 4 or 5 inches deep----Jbecause you will remember my waist line prior to this session-and removed a vital organ. I cannot account for my being here today except in one way: It seems impossible that just 26 days ago that occurred and yet I am permitted to stand before you today. In the first place, I was so fortunate in having such skilful surgeons and physicians. I was also fortunate, I think, in having a fairly good constitution that was given me by the Great Father, but I cannot account for this modern miracle by those two facts alone; and I think I have begun to understand what caused it when strong man after strong man came to the hospital and came to my room in the few days that I have been there and they have told me with tears in their eyes that while I was suffering at the hospital, he was on his knees praying the Great Architect and our Supreme Grand Master that, if it might be His will, I might be restored to health. Brethren, I do not know how to account for prayer. I cannot reason it out logically, but somehow a miracle has happened and that is the only way that I can account for it. I am delighted to ,be here, to have this opportunity of looking into your faces and of welcoming you to our city and to our Temple. I trust that you will enjoy your stay with us and that everthing may be done to make it pleasant and agreeable and that you may go away feeling that something real has been accomplished for Freemasonry because of your having been here.


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Cral1d ,Lodge of Missouri

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GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS.

Brethren: It is impossible for me to express to you my keen disappointment at not being able personally to preside over your deliberations at this 1l0th annual communication.' However, I am profoundly grateful to Divine Providence for my remarkable recovery from my recent illness, and expect within a few weeks to be able to resume my usual duties. Even the worst misfortunes seem to have their compensations, and one of the compensations that has come to me through my illness has been the realiz"ation that I have had the love and solicit.ude of so many of my Masonic friends throughout the State. I want to take this opportunity publicly to express to the brethren and to the Lodges my sincere appreciation for the many kind expressions of sympathy and good wishes which I have received. In due time, as my strength returns, I shall endeavor to make acknowledgement in writing of each such expression.

My disappointment at not being able to preside personally at your sessions is greatly mitigated by the knowledge that the business of the Grand Lodge will be ably handled under the direction of the Deputy Grand Master, R: W. Brother Wm. R. Gentry. GENERAL OONDITION OF FREEMASONRY IN MISSOURI. While the Grand Secretary's Report will indicate a slight numerical loss in membership, yet I do not feel that that is any indication that Freemasonry is losing ground in this Grand Jurisdiction. The losses are largely accounted for by suspensions for non-payment of dues, and this I am satisfied is due to the general financial depression which exists at this time. The most of these Brethren who have been so suspended are not permanently lost to the fraternity, but will doubtless in time take the" necessary 'Oteps fOT reinstatement. With the exception of the southeastern portion, I have visited Lodges in all other parts of the State. I was prevented from going into the southeastern section because of my illness. In these various visitations I found a fine Masonic enthusiasm to exist among the Brethren, and in many Lodges, both in the city and country, there has been a substantial growth during the past year. No dissension exists among the Brethren, but there seems to prevail an excellent spirit of harmony not only among the members of the Lodges, but as between the Lodges as such. If there ever existed any spirit of sectionalism, it has long since disappeared, and the Lodges of the city and the country, of the East and the West, are anxious to co-operate for the "best interests of the Order.


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It may very well be that this cessation of growth is a blessing in disguise, -in that it will give opportunity for us to consolidate our forces and to imbue our membership with the fundamental principles of the fraternity. It has been my purpose, as I have journeyed about the State,. to revitalize our principles and to make them a power for spiritual good in every community. I have always received a ready response from the Brethren. (Now, Brethren, I am pleased to surrender the gavel for the remainder of the session to my dear friend, and your good Brother, R. W. Wm. R. Gentry, Deputy Grand Master, who will conclude the reading of the Address.)

CORNERSTONES. There exists substantial evidence of material prosperity among the Lodges. I had the pleasure of laying the cornerstones of new Lodge Halls for the following Lodges: Adair Lodge No. 366, and Kirksville Lodge No. 105 at Kirksville, on April 1, 1930. Memphis Lodge No. 16 at Memphis, on May 2, 1930. Ionia Lodge No. 381 at Eldon, on May 23, 1930. DEDICATIONS. I was also present at a public celebration following the dedication of the new Temple of Hope Lodge No. 251, at Washington, Missouri. I was prevented by illness from attending the dedications of the new buildings of Lexington Lodge No. 149, at Lexington, and Ionia Lodge No. 381, at Eldon. Several Lodges have purchased new homes during the past year, all of which gives further evidence that Freemasonry in this Grand Jurisdiction is upon a firm foundation. VISITATION TO ILLINOIS GRAND LODGE. On October 10, 1929, at the invitation of M. W. Brother Louis L. Emmerson, Grand Master of Illinois, I attended the annual communication of that Grand Lodge, at Chicago, where I was received with all due courtesy. I particularly regret that I was prevented from accepting the invitation of M. W. Brother Ira C. Freet, Grand Master of Nebraska, to attend the annual communication of that Grand Lodge in June. Our relations with the Grand Lodge of Nebraska have been unusually cordial, and the coincidence that the Gt:and Masters of the two Grand Jurisdictions both bore the same name would have made the visit particularly interesting.


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

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THE SMALL LODGE. One of our serious problems is found in the small country Lodge, which, because of changing community conditions, has lost its vitality. On several occasions I have recommended consolidation of such a Lodge with a stronger Lodge in the same community. I believe this to be the advisable thing to do. If conditions change, then Masonry must be versatile enough to change with them. Good roads have eliminated distance, and it is much 'better to have one strong Lodge in a community than two weak ones. I do not believe that even feelings of sentiment for the old Lodge should stand in the way of such consolidation when it would be for the good of the Brethren. CHANGES IN MASONIC DISTRICTS. On account of changes in road conditions several changes in the Masonic districts seem to be advisable. It is better that the Lodges be districted more in view of accessibility than of strict geographical boundary lines. Certain requests will doubtless be made to this Grand Lodge that such changes be made, and where there is no substantial objection I trust that the request will be granted. NECROLOGY. We have been particularly blessed this year, in that no member of the Line of Grand Lodge Officers, no Past Grand Master, and no District Deputy Grand Master has been called to' the Supreme Lodge, and for this we give reverent thanks to the Great Architect. BONDS OF GRAND OFFICERS. I received from M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, my immediate predecessor, the bonds of the Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, and the Depository, and these have been continued in force by proper payment of premiums. CONFERl<jNCES WITH DISTRICT DEPUTIES. Although appropriation was made for that purpose, after consultation with the Grand Lecturer, I decided, in the interest of economy, not to hold the conferences of the District Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers. By this action I do not mean to discountenance such conferences, nor do I expect my action to be taken as a precedent by any succeeding Grand Master. It merely seemed advisable this year not to hold the conferences. VISITATIONS AMONG LODGES. A number of Lodges during the year have made visitations to sister Lodges. Upon the occasion of my official visits, as a rule,


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all the Lodges in the Masonic District were formally invited to be present. I believe these interchanges of visits to be highly desirable, and that they will be productive not only of much good fellowship, but of better understanding between the Brethren. VISITATION OF THE ST. LOUIS LODGE,S TO THE GRAND MASTER: On March 8th a large Masonic delegation from the City and County of St. Louis chartered a special train and made a formal visit to, Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, as a special mark of courtesy to the Grand Master. A very fine meeting resulted, and an OPPOl'tunity was thus afforded for the Freemasons of Kansas City and St. Louis to become better acquainted. I want to take this opportunity to express to the St. Louis Brethren my deep appreciation of this evidence of their esteem. Clifton Heights Lodge No. ,5'20, of St. Louis, on May 24, 1930, made a visit to Orient Lodge No. 546, of Kansas City. Unfortunately, another engagement prevented my being present, but this visit also I am sure was productive of much good. GRAND MASTERS' CONFERENCE AND GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION. On February 20, 1930, accompanied by R. W. Brother Wm. R. Gentry, Deputy Grand Master, R. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, Senior Grand Warden, R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, R. W. Brother J. R McLachlan, Grand Lecturer, M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, and M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, I attended the annual conference of Grand Masters held in Washington, D. C. Because of the signal honor which had been conferred the preceding year upon M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, when he was elected Chairman of the conference, he returned this yea~ in order properly to set the conference at work. The meeting was full of interest, and several subjects of importance were discussed. While this conference has no real official status, I believe the participation of the Grand Lodge of Missouri therein to be of inestimable value to Freemasonry, and I am in hearty accord with the continuance of our practice of joining in these conferences. On the day following the Grand Masters' Conference, the annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association was held at Alexandria, Virginia, and this meeting continued for two days. Your Grand Master was pleased to deliver to the President check for $3,600.(}(), representing, according to our standing resolution, $1.00 for each candidate Raised during the preceding year. Through the efforts of M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, who is one of the Vice-Presidents of the Association, Missouri has long


1930

Grand Lodge of ]vIissouri

15

since contributed her original quota, and, in addition, a special fund of $25,()I;)0.00 was raised and paid over the preceding year through the efforts of M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner. It was decided that the Memorial would be dedicated on February 22, 1932, the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Washington. When completed, this structure will be one of the magnificent wonders of the civilized world, and a suitable memorial to George Washington, the Mason and the man. MASONIC HOME. puring the four years in which I have been an ex-officio member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home, I have attended the meetings of the Board, except when unavoidably prevented. I have become more and more impressed with the earnest, loyal service which the members of the Board are giving to that great work of our Craft. â&#x20AC;˘ Following the long and successful administ.ration of Brother Sol E. Waggoner, which was terminated by his death last year, the Board was most fortunate in being able to induce M. W. Brother Wm. W. Martin to take the presidency. I cannot speak too highly of his administration of the affairs of the Home. During the past year I have spent considerable time at the Home, and have had an opportunity to observe its routine. Brother Martin has brought about many needed changes, but has been handicapped by the ever-increasing number of the' Home family and the lack of facilities. So pressing had the need become for ¡the adoption of some well-considered plan for the future welfare of the Home, that on April 9, 1930, the Board of Directors empowered the President to appoint a special committee to make a survey of the situation and to report its recommendations. This committee consisted of M. W. Brother Orestes Mitchell, Chairman, M. W. Brother Arch A. Johnson, W. Brother Wm. S.Campbell, Mrs. Ella J. Flanders, representing the Order of the Eastern Star, and your Grand Master. After several meetings, and after careful study, on August 12, 1930, a report was made by the Committee to the Board of Directors. In accordance with the settled policy of the Board, and in view of the importance of the steps proposed, the Board took no action upon the report except to receive it and to request the Grand Master to present the situation to the Grand Lodge at this session, and I recommend that the report be referred to a special committee for study and report to this session of the Grand Lodge, to the end that it may express its will to the Board of Directors. In order that the situation may be fully before you, I present herewith the report in full, as follows, to wit:


16

Proceedings of the

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St. Louis, Mo., August 12, 1930. To the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home: Your special survey committee appointed 'at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on April 9, 1930, for the purpose of making a survey of the property of the Home, and to recommend such improvements or chan~es therein as may be found necessary to meet the requirements of the Home, for a period of ten years or more, beg leave to make the following report: On June 'I, 1930, the Home family comprised four hundred fourteen souls, divided as follows: One hundred forty-one men, one hundred forty women, sixty-two boys and seventy-one girls, with five men, eight women, and one boy admitted, yet to arrive, and with a large number of applications on file under investigation. The Masonic Home records show that there has been an average increase of thirty-six in each five-year period for twenty years in the old people. However, during the last five and one-half years the membership of the old people has increased seventy-five. The total number of boys and girls has not increased so rapidly. In 1909 we had seventy boys and girls in the Home, and. in 1929, We had one hundred thirty-five. Our' records show that we are not holding the boys and girls long enough to lay the foundation for an adequate education and properly fit them for life's work. At this time the rooms in the Matron's hall are all filled, with four women on the waiting list for rooms, and in the Masters' Lodge there were only fifteen vacant rooms, and there are about twentyfive applications for membership under investigation. In making its investigation, and in arriving at its conclusions, your committee has endeavored to keep in mind the future needs of the Home, considering the age and character of the present Home buildings, the .,annual increase in the different classes of memberships in the Home family during the last twenty years, and the need of additional facilities, which are not now provided in the Home. The first subject considered was the advisability of remodeling and enlarging the buildings on the present Home property, but our investigation developed that the present buildings were of such a character that they could not be increased in size economically, nor could additional stories be added thereto, without an expense which would be prohibitive. The question of tearing down the Matrons' hall and the building occupied by the older boys, and the erection of a larger building on the space was considered, but our investigation developed that this would cost between $275,000.00 and $300,000.00, and would only provide additional room for about thirty-five women. By the time the work could be completed, the additional space would be filled, and we would be left with our problem unsolved. The physical property of the Home at this time possesses few of the modern attributes necessary to make the place at all homelike for an intelligent, child. We have no adequate playgrounds, no gymnasium, no library, no assembly hall, no indoor play rooms, or recreational rooms for use in inclement weather, and so far as the children are concerned, our M'asonic Home is a boarding house, with little to attract a child, or to inspire it with self-respect and a desire for the worthwhile things of life. The lack of these present day necessities no doubt causes the child to look anxiously forward


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

17

to the day when he or she is old enough to get away. This offers but little encouragement to boys and girls to stay there and acquire a high school education, as the records show a minimum of high schoOl attendance from our Home children. Your committee has seriously considered the question of the separation of the old people from the children,and in solving this question, it was necessary to determine whether or not the present quarters should be. used for the old people, or the children, and the needs of the two different groups were therefore considered. We have arrived at the conclusion that it would be best to keep the old people in the present quarters, as the buildings are constructed more along the line of the needs of adults than of children, considering size and situation of rooms, types of stairways and many other details not necessary to mention, and besides, the eccentricities of many of the old people are such that it seems necess'ary to have immediately present the executive heads of the Masonic Home. Another thing-the hospital is located on the present grounds, and is continuously occupied by numbers of the old people, and the old people are constantly in need of hospitalization, attention of nurses and physicians, which is not equally true in the case of the children. The removal of the children from the present quarters will release beds for approximately eighty-five to one hundred old people, at ;; small expense for the remodeling of the rooms in the buildings now occupied by the children. Even by the removal of the children, and the re-arrangement of the rooms, the present Home premises will SOon be completely filled with old people, if the average increase keeps up. The neces~ity for the general re-arrangement and enlargement of the Masonic Home pl'an is therefore clearly apparent. Your committee believes that it would be improvident to attempt to move the old people to distant quarters away from close proximity to the hospital, nurses and doctors, because that would leave the present Home properties entirely too large for occupancy by the children, would not furnish the many things needed for a children's home, and would necessitate the immediate expenditure of a very large amount of money in erecting buildings sufficient to take care of thc old people in the Home at this time. We believe that the economical thing to do, 'and the wise thing to do, considering the welfare of the children, is to buy a tract of land in St. ,Louis or in close proximity thereto, where good public school facilities are furnished, and then to begin to erect buildings of the cottage or unit type, along the line followed by the Grand Lodges of Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Kentucky. In this way, modern buildings, housing twenty to thirty children per building, can be constructed, and homelike facilities furnished, without a very large initial outlay of money. Ample playgrounds would be furnished, as well as those othcr things necessary for the proper development of the children, who are placed in our care, and for whose future lives we arc largely responsible. By adopting this plan, Masons of wealth a nd standing in our State may become interested and perhaps be glad to contribute tow'ard the construction of memorial cottages for boys and girls, as has been done in other states which have adopted the cottage plan. In attempting to solve this problem, we believe that it is the duty of thi::; Board to use 'its vision and business acumen, and look


18

Proceedings of the

1930

to the needs of the Masonic fraternity in the State of Missouri in the far distant future. We know from our records that there is very little room now left in the children's quarters; only a few rooms left in the men's building, and that the women's building is filled to capacity, with several women on the waiting list. We believe that the Masonic fraternity, as well as the Order of the Eastern Star, will constantly grow in Missouri, and as our membership grows older, the larger the membership, and the older the organization is, the greater will be the number of dependents who will be 'calling upon the Masonic fraternity and the Order of the Eastern Star for help.' It is the duty of the fraternity to make provision now so that these worthy but unfortunate men and women may be respectably cared for as they 'approach the sunset of life. With respect to the children, it seems to your committee that a still greater burden and responsihility rests upon the fraternity. These orphans appeal to us for parental care, and the Masonic fraternity has the responsibility, through us as its representatives, of not only furnishing these children with bed and board, but to use every reasonable effort to supply them with paternal care and love; to inspire them with a hope for the future, and instill in their hearts and minds a desire for a respectable place in society, and courage to ende'avor to succeed. To do this we must not only furnish them with competent matrons and supervisors, but also with modern homelike surroundings, so that they will be happy, and glad to stay with us until they have had an opportunity for adequate education, and to make themselves self-supporting citizens of our State. The quality or type of citizen they develop into depends upon us, and ours is the responsibility to meet the issue. In considering this question we must lool{ into the future, for in ten or fifteen years from now the present Home buildings will be of such age and condition that probably they will have to be replaced with larger buildings, or remodeled, at tremendous cost. The City of St. Louis is one of the largest cities in the nation. Real estate situated as is the Masonic Home property will doubtless grow in value in that period of time, and the grounds upon which our present buildings are located will no doubt be of greater value. We therefore recommend that a tract of allproximately forty acres of land in the City of St. Louis, or in close proximity thereto, be purchased and that buildings of the cottage or. unit type, for the housing of M'asonic Home children be erected thereon as the need requires and as moneys can be provided for that purpose. We recommend the purchase of approximately forty acres for the reason that at this time land values are very low, and with this much ground we can be assured of ample playgrounds and garden plots for use of the children and old people, with room for expansion. In the future years, as the present Masonic Home buildings det.eriorate, buildings can be erected on the forty-acre tract for the hous'ing of the old people, and for the construction of a new hospital, and when that is necessary to be done, in all probability the value of the present Masonic Home grounds will be such that they can be sold for almost enough to construct the buildings which may be needed for the old people at the new location. We have considered the various ways and means of raising funds for the purchase of land, and the construction of proper and neces-


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

19

sary buildings for the children, and believe that in view of the financial depression which now generally prevails, and which, no doubt, prevails among the membership of the Masonic fraternity, it would be inadvisable to ask for an assessment upon the Masons of the State for the purpose of raising these funds. We, therefore, suggest that the situation be brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge at its coming session for such action as it may deem wise and for the best interests of all concerned.

Respectfully submitted, ORESTES MITCHELL, Chairman, ARCH A. JOHNSON, ELLA J. FLANDERS, WM. S. CAMPBELL, SAMUEL R. FREET. MASONIC RELIEF. Last year M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, then Grand Master, called attention to the increased calls that were being made upon the Grand Lodge for relief to members outside of the Masonic Home. He recommended that a special committee be appointed by the incoming Grand Master, to make a路 study of this situation, and to make report to this Grand Lodge. While no affirmative action seems to have been taken by the Grand Lodge at its last session upon this recommendation, nevertheless I assumed the authority to appoint a committee, consisting of R. W. Brother Andrew J. O'Reilly, as Chairman, M. W. Brother Tolman W. Cotton, and M. W. Brother Arch Johnson. These Brethren will doubtless make report to you at this session of the Grand Lodge. In this connection, I carmot refrain from calling atfention to a feeling which seems to exist in some Lodges to the effect that whenever a call for charity is made upon the Lodge by its own members all that the Lodge has to do is to refer the matter to the Grand Lodge a.nd step aside. There is no fund beyond the small amount appropriated each year for general charity with which the Grand Lodge can meet these demands, nor does it seem to me advisable for the Grand Lodge to enter too largely upon this field; but there does rest upon each individual Lodge the high duty of dispensing necessary charity to its own members. Each Lodge should have a sufficient fund available at all times to meet emergencies of this kind. The dues of some of the Lodges are not sufficiently large to provide for such necessities, and I earnestly recommend to every Lodge which does not have a sufficient amount of ready cash with which to meet such demands that it raise its dues in a sufficient amount to provide such a fund. While I will not go so far as to recommend, of my own motion, a by-law to that effect, I would like to suggest, for the considera-


20

Proceedings of the

1930

tion of the above mentioned committee, the advisability of gIvmg the Grand Master power, under proper circumstanc~s, to direct a local Lodge to meet demands upon it for charity where, in the opinion of the Grand Master, such demands are just and the Lodge is able to provide the relief. â&#x20AC;˘ GRAND SECRETARY. I am deeply grateful to R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, for all of his many courtesies to me as Grand Master. He has relieved me of every possible clerical detail. He has cooperated to the fullest in the execution of the plans of the Grand Master. His office is conducted in a business-like way and at a minimum of expense. For the past two years, the Grand Secretary has been giving careful thought and attention to the methods of keeping our Grand Lodge Records and has made an extensive study of these, and also the methods employed by a number of other Grand Jurisdictions. Special attention has been centered on the method of compiling Lodge Returns. This has resulted in the introduction of a new form of Return, embodying substantially all the details hitherto asked for, together with the addition of certain other items necessary to a complete report. The introduction of this new method has produced most gratifying results. The secretaries of our Lodges have co-operated splendidly with the Grand Secretary's office, and very many of them have written' in terms of appreciation, declaring the new form to be a great advance on the old. The Grand Secretary himself says that the information which has come to his office through the medium of these reports this year is of the utmost value to the permanent records of the Grand Lodge,and that the new method has resulted in the saving of much valuable time of the office force, as well as ~ontributing to the greater effectiveness of his work. REQUESTS FROM ONE GRAND JURISDICTION TO ANOTHER FOR THE CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 'My experience during the past year, in complying with Section 182, page 103, of the Grand Lodge by-laws of 192'5, has demon-

strated that a great deal of unnecessary routine labor is cast upon the Grand Master in making requests for the conferring of degrees in other Grand Jurisdictions, and in granting requests of other Grand Jur~sdictions for the conferring of the degrees by our own Lodges. In practice, these requests first come to the Grand Secretary. He in turn forwards the request to the Grand Master. The requests are always granted, where made by or to Grand


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

21

Jurisdictions with which we have fraternal relations. This work can be done in the Grand Secretary's office as a matter of routine and thus relieve the Grand Master of this burden. The Grand Master's time can be used to much better advantage. I 'therefore propose the following amendment to Section 182: "That Section 182 be amended by adding the words: 'Provided, however, that the Grand Master, in his discretion, may delegate to the Grand Secretary power to grant or refuse such requests, in which event, the Grand Secretary shall have such power.'''

So

th~t

when amended, said Section 182 shall read as follows:

"REQUESTS FROM ONE GRAND' JURISDICTION TO ANOTHER. All requests, from or to ,Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction, from or to Lodges of another Grand Jurisdiction, to confer a degree or degrees, shall be made through the Grand Master; provided, however, that the Grand Master, in his discretion, may delegate to the Grand Secretary power to grant or refuse such requests, in which event, the Grand Secretary shall have such power."

'GRAND LECTURER. It is scarcely necessary for me to call your attention to the con-

tinued efficient work of our Grand Lecturer, R. W. Brother James R. McLachlan. He has become almost an institution within the Freemasonry of Missouri. To him all credit is due for the efficiency in the ritual, which, on the whole, is found to prevail in the Lodges of the State, both city and country. It is my prayer, as I am sure it is yours, that he may be spared to us for many years to come, not only for the happiness which his work brings to him, but for the continued good of the Craft of this Grand Jurisdiction. GRAND LODGE OFFICERS. I should feel that I had been ungrateful if I did not call attention to the loyal support which I have received from every 路Grand Lodge officer, including the District Deputy Grand Masters. Following the custom established a few years ago, I have consulted most freely with the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, and the Junior Grand Warden on all important matters, and have been ably assisted by their co-operation and advice. USE OF MASONIC NAME. Last year, by the approval of the report of the CDmmittee on Jurisprudence, the Grand .Master and his successors were authorized and directed to take such legal means as in his or their opinion should be proper to prohibit the use of the word "Masonic", or any of the symbols, emblems, Dr insignia of the Masonic Order in connection with any commercial enterprise. With this your Grand Master is in most hearty accord. However, he has met with some practical difficulties in carrying out the spirit of the same.


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Proceedings of the

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During the past year it has been called to my attention that certain business organizations, particularly insurance companies and cemetery associations, claim to limit their custom, clientele, or membership to members of the Masonic fraternity. They claim that they are not violating our Masonic law when they state that simple fact in their advertising matter. I have felt and do feel that this is an insidious evasion of our Grand Lodge law, and is an attempt to do by indirection what cannot be done directly. I asked for an opinion upon this situation by R. W. Brother Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman of the 'Committee on Jurisprudence, and, after careful study, he gave his view to the effect that such statements, when made in newspaper or other advertising, constitute a violation of Sec. 204 of our Grand Lodge By-Laws. The question was then proposed to me by those interested in such companies: "If we cannot make the statement in advertising matter that our membership or clientele is limited to members of the Masonic fraternity, may we make such statements orally to prospective customers, or in correspondence?" This question presented such difficulties that, after consultation with my brother Grand Lodge officers, I determined not to pass upon the question, but to present the situation to this Grand Lodge, to the end that it may itself 路place the proper interpretation upon Sec. 204. I therefore recommend that this matter be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, and that it give its consideration to two questions, as follows, to-wit: (1) Does the statement made in newspaper, or other. advertising, that a company or association limits its custom, membership, or clientele to members of the Masonic fraternity, constitute a violation of Section 204 of our By-Laws? (2) Is it a violation of said by-laws for a Freemason interested in such company or association, to state orally, or by letter, that such association or company limits its custom, membership or clientele to members of the Masonic fraternity?

DECISIONS. I have been called upon to answer many questions with respect to Masonic law, the majority of which involve no new principle, but call only for the citation of some specific section of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. However, some novel questions were presented. I therefore present the same, with my decisions thereon, for the consideration of this Grand Lodge. 1. Question: The Senior Warden of a Lodge was suspended for non-payment of dues. Upon such suspension, can the Lodge declare the office vacant and elect another as Senior Warden? In the event that the suspended Senior Warden should pay up his dues and be reinstated, does that reinstate him in his office as Senior Warden?


Grand Lodge of A1issouri

1930

23

Answer: When the Senior Warden was suspended for non-payment of dues, his office became vacant, and the Lodge could then elect another as Senior Warden. In the event that the suspended Senior Warden should pay his ~ues and be reinstated, he is not thereby reinstated in office as Senior Warden. (This decision was made after consultation with the Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence.) 2. Question: A member of "A" Lodge requested a certificate of good standing for the purpose of affiliating with "B" Lodge. He was duly elected to membership in "B" Lodge, but after such election, and before his dimit was received from "A" Lodge, changed his mind and decided that he wanted his membership to. remain in "A" Lodge, and he instructed the secretary of "B" Lodge not to write to "A" Lodge for the dimit.路 Has the member the right to do this, and what is his status? Answer: Upon his election to membership in "B" Lodge, he immediately became a member thereof, and could not change his status except as provided by the Grand Lodge By-Laws. He could not shift his membership back to "A" Lodge merely by instructing the secretary of "B" Lodge not to write for his dimit. 3. Question: Can a dimit be granted to one who stands suspended for non-payment of dues? Answer: No. 4. Question:. A Fellow. Craft of a Kansas Lodge, who was denied advancement some years ago, and who has been a resident of Missouri for the required time, desires to petition a Missouri Lodge for all the degrees. Has the Missouri Lodge Jurisdiction to accept the petition? Answer: No. The Kansas Lodge having refused to grant a dim it or to waive jurisdiction, thereby retained jurisdiction over the petitioner as against the Missouri Lodge. 5. Question: Maya Lodge rent its hall to the Christian Science Church for the purpose of having lectures upon Christian Science delivered therein? Answer: Yes. &. Question: Should a Lodge or group of Lodges establish a Masonic hour upon a radio broadcasting station? Answer: No. This would seem to be in the nature of an advertisement of Freemasonry, which is not desirable. 7. Question: Can the Grand Master authorize a Lodge, or group of Lodges, to solicit funds to celebrate George Washington's 200th birthday in 1932? Answer: mission.

No.

Only the Grand Lodge itself can grant such per-


24

Proceedings of the

1930

8. Question: A collective ballot was taken upon several petitioners. A black cube appeared. The Master then spread the ballot separately upon each petitioner. On the first ballot upon one of the petitioners a black c~be appeared. The Master then had the ballot respread as to such petitioner, with the result that it was clear.â&#x20AC;˘Was the election legal? Answer: Yes. When a black cube appeared in the collective ballot, that ballot became void. Then the separate ballot was taken as though no collective ballot had ever been taken, and where but one black cube appeared the Master was authorized to respread the ballot by Section 138 of the By-Laws. 9. Question: A Master Mason had received his Third Degree in 1913, but he never passed his proficiency examination. Is he entitled to a dimit in view of the lapse of time? Answer: No. Section 1'29 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws admits of no exception. 10. Question: A Lodge desires, on special occasions, to convene a Lodge meeting in a room formerly used as a dining room, but within the walls of the building containing the regular Lodge Hall which had been duly dedicated to Masonic purposes. Is it necessary to have a separate dedication of this room? Answer: No. The dedication of the main Lodge Hall constituted a dedication of the entire building for Masonic purposes. 11. Question: May a Lodge organize a club composed of such of its own members as shall desire to join, whereby each shall pay $1.00 upon the death of any member, and which assessment shall be paid to the wife or other beneficiary of the deceased? Answer: The Lodge as such would have no authority to conduct such a club, but there is nothing in the Grand Lodge Law that would prevent the members from forming such a circle or club and allowing the secretary to attend to the clerical work of it so long as it was understood that he was doing so as an individual and not officially as secretary of the Lodge. The purpose to be attained seems to be a worthy one. 12. Question: A Request was made by "A" Lodge to "B" Lodge to confer the Fellow Craft Degree upon an Entered' Apprentice of "A" Lodge. The Entered Apprentice did not present himself for the Degree until more than a year had elapsed from the time he had received his Entered Apprentice Degree. He had not petitioned for advancement. The Entered Apprentice' WlfS ignorant of the Grand Lodge By-Law. What is his status? Answer: The conferring of the Fellow ,Craft Degree was without force, and the candidate should regularly petition his own Lodge for advancement. If his petition for advancement is granted, then


1930

Grand Lodge of J.1!Iissouri

25

there is no necessity for re-conferring the Fellow Craft Degree, and he may be declared a Fellow Craft, but if his petition for advancement is denied, then he remains an Entered Apprentice. I sent two letters, addressed to all of the Lodges in the State, which in part constituted decisions on Masonic Law. I therefore attach copies thereof hereto for your consideration. CONCLUSION. I can never pay to you Brethren the tremendous obligation under which you have placed me. As I have visited you in your Lodges you have extended to me every possible courtesy and consideration. I have made new friendships and cemented old ones that I know will last throughout my entire life and which will be a source of constant joy to me. As I look back over the year I am appalled at how little I can see that I have done for you, although I have given you the best within me. I particularly regret that on account of illness and other unavoidable situations I was compelled to cancel a number of my engagements with you. Notwithstanding the disappointments, however, I am sustained by the belief that your love and affection will overlook the failures and take the spirit for the accomplishments which I had really hoped to make. In view of the delightful harmony which now prevails throughout this entire jurisdiction, I feel no fear for the future of Freemasonry. However, in times like this there should be a renewal of our loyalties and a rededication of our lives to the great principles of our Order. As my strength returns, and in the years of usefulness which I trust are still ahead of me, my services will ever be at your command. Fraternally submitted,

dD"--"--~/f?~~ Grand Master.

APPENDIX.

November 15, 1929. To the Secretaries of the Constituent Lodges of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: My Dear Brother Secretary: It has been called to my attention that frequently the District Deputy Grand Masters are embarrassed because of the necessity of asking a Lodge to pay the actual expenses of their official visits.


26

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1930

I, therefore, call your attention to Section 23, Paragraph A, of the Grand Lodge By-Laws, which provides that the District Deputy Grand Master shall visit officially the Lodges in his District, as far as practicable, and his actual expenses shall be paid by each Lodge visited. I shall greatly appreciate it if, whenever your Lodge is visited by your District Deputy Grand Master, you will promptly tender to him a sufficient amount of m{mey to reimburse him for his actual expenses. Such visits are well worth the small amount that it will cost your Lodge. Thanking you for your co-operation, and with kindest regards, I am

Sincerely and fraternally yours, SAMUEL R. FREET, Grand Master. July 14, 1930.

To All Lodges of Ancient Free and Accepted llIasoJts of the State of Missouri: Brethren:

It has been called to my attention' that in several instances campaign cards of candidates for office have been placed in conspicuous places in the anterooms of our Lodge Halls; also that allvertising matter presenting the qualifications of candidates for office has been prominently displayed at Masonic picnics and other gatherings. In some instances Lodges have accepted money for placing banners or placards advertising such candidacies in prominent places at Masonic gatherings. All such practices are clearly violative of the spirit of Freemasonry and should not be permitted. Freemasonry as such has always kept aloof from political, religious and sectarian controversies. It is entirely proper for a Freemason as an individual to take an active part in politics, but a Masonic Lodge should 'not be used to further the personal fortunes of any candidate for o'ffice. I therefore request you to see that this sort of thing is not allowed to occur in your Lodge. In the event that there is a persistent violation, then you should cause the matter to be presented to your -Grievance Committee for such action as may be proper in the premises. If any Lodge has taken money for this kind of advertising it should be returned. The Secretaries of Lodges are directed to see that this communi-


1930

Grand Lodge of .Alissouri

27

cation is read in open Lodge and officers of the Lodge are charged with the responsibility of carrying out its intention. With all good wishes, I am Sincerely and fraternally yours, SAMUEL R. FREET, Grand Master. M. W. Acting Grand Master Gentry: Brethren, I want you to rise as an act of courtesy and recognition to our M. W. Grand Master, who is now obliged to retire at this time by order of his physicians. In response thereto the whole Grand Lodge arose and sympathetically witnessed the retirement of its b~loved Grand Master. According to our usage, the Address of the Grand Master was referred to the Committee of Past Grand Masters, M. W. Brother C. H. Briggs, P. G. M., Chairman. R. W. Grand Secretary: M. W. Grand Master, in compliance with the request made in the Grand Master's Address asking for the authorization of a committee to be appointed by you on the Ma.sonic Home matter referred to therein, I move that the said Committee be appointed by you. (Adopted.) M. W. Acting Grand Master: Brethren, anticipating that it would be necessary to appoint such a committee I have selected the following, and they are hereby appointed at this time: M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman; M. W. Brother John Pickard; R. Vol. Brother James A. Kinder; R. W.Brother F. C. Barnhill, and R. W. Brother Kipp -C. Johnson.


28

Proceedings of the

1930

REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY,

R. W. Bro. Arthur :Mather, Grand Secretary, presented his report covering official action in the office of Grand Secretary for the period September 11, 1929, to September 10, 1930, which was received and ordered printed in the Proceedings. DUPLICATE CHARTERS. Charters were issued to the following Lodges: Jameson Lodge No. 500, fire October 9; duplicate issued. October 12, 1929, Urbana Lodge No. 421, fire December 1; duplicate issued December 14, 1929. Lock Springs Lodge No. 488, fire January 12, 1930; duplicate issued March 5, 1930. Bois D'Arc Lodge No. 449, fire December 12, 1929, insurance $500; duplicate issued January 28, 1930. Pittsville Lodge No. 428, fire February 23, 1930, total loss; duplicate issued March 26, 1930. Jerusalem Lodge No. 315, accidentally destroyed; duplicate is~ued March 26, 1930. Richland Lodge No. 385, fire, $1,000 insurance, July 23, 1930, duplicate issued August 12, 1930. PROCEEDINGS DISTRIBUTED. The 1929 Proceedings were printed and distributed 30 days after the Grand Lodge session. COMMISSIONS TO DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. By order of M. W. Bro. Samuel R. Freet, Grand Master, commissions were issued to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters, by him appointed in the'59 Masonic Districts; the 33d district having two District Deputy Grand M'asters. CHANGE IN DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. R. W. Bro. Charles A. Harvey of the Tenth District having resigned, R. W. Bro. Thos. D. Williams was appointed to fill the vacancy. COMMISSIONS TO GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. Grand Master Freet appointed as Grand Representatives of Missouri near the Grand Lodges ofDistrict of Columbia Leonard P. SteuarL Washington England Sir Alfred Ro b b ins _.._._ _ _..London New York. James R. Newman....................â&#x20AC;˘................. Buffalo Roumania _ Dr. Leo Salzman_ ~ _ Bucharest Saskatchewan J. Orville Clark. _ _ Govan REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. Blanks for these reports were sent to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters, and their reports have been turned over to the Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters.


1930

29

Grand Lodge of Missouri BLANKS FOR ANNUAL RETURNS.

. Two copies were mailed June 5th with accompanying circular giving full directions to Secretaries. There were five delinquent Lodges on August 1st. DELINQUENT LODGES. No.

Lodge

139 152 374 489 496 280

Oregon Sept. 10 Linn Creek Aug. 15 Wilderness Aug. 15 Lakeville Aug. 30 Robert Burns Aug. 15 Reeds Spring-in Process of Consolidation

Date Paid

Amount

District

$161.70 163.80 69.30 96.60 93.91

8 38 53 50 53 54

STATISTICAL. Number of Chartered Lodges in this Jurisdiction (1929)............ Ceased to Exist (1929-30) Nos. 8, 240, 248........................................

659 3

Non-Reporting Lodge

280)............................

656 1

Number of Lodges making returns (1930)........................................

655

(Reeds Springs No.

MEMBERSHIP RETURNS. M'embership June 30, 1929

113,791 1930.

Ini tiated Passed Raised Affiliated Reinstated

2,949 2,944

~

2,983 914 845

4,742 118,533

Defunct Lodges (members 00 · · ···.. 81 Dimitted 860 Suspended U. M. C ,..................................... 10 Suspended N. P. D 2,920 Expelled 13 Died 1,478 Net Loss

5,362 113,171 620

Membership June 30, 1930 (inclUding 28 M. M.'s in Reeds Spring Lodge No. 280) Per capita tax on 113,143 M. M.'s from 655 reporting Lodges : Arrears

$23 7,600.30 1,720.00

Overpaid,

$239,320.30 48.30

1929...............

Dues Remitted

113,171

$239,272.00 3,719.10 $235,552.90

".'

,

~~

..


1930

P1'oceedings of the

30

147.24

Balance Due

Credit for 1930

_...............

Total per capita tax received to Sept. 10, 1930

$235,405.66 176.75 $235,582.41

CHARTER SURRENDERED Williamsburg Lodge No.8, located at Williamsburg, Callaway County, voted to surrender their charter on December 31, 1929, and the D. D. G. M., R. W. Bro. Louis J. Graue, of the 27th Masonic District, accordingly took charge and directed the sending of a list of members in good standing in the defunct Lodge, 19 in number, to whom Grand Lodge certificates were issued, their dues having been paid to December 31, 1929. R. Vi. Bro. Graue assisted in' the distribution. There was no property of value, the Secretary, W. Bro. O. Garrett, sending books, charter and $5.89 to the office of Grand Secretary, Arthur l\l.'ather. LODGES CONSOLIDATED. Manes Lodge No. 240, located at Manes, Wright County, yoted to consolidate with Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, at Mountain Grove, September 27, 1929, which was accordingly done. Clarkton Lodge No. 248, located at Clarkton, Dunklin County, voted to consolidate with 'Malden Lodge, at Malden, April 1, 1930, the Lodge paying $75.60 on its 1929 per capita tax. REEDS SPRING LODGE No. 280. Reeds Spring Lodge No. 280, located at Reeds Spring, Stone County, with a membership of 28, in process of consolidation with another Lodge, has paid nothing on per capita tax for 1930. COURTESIES RECEIVED AND GRANTED. By direction of Grand Master Freet, 43 requests have been made to sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer Degrees for Missouri Lodges, and 64 requests have been received to confer Degrees for sist'er Grand Jurisdictions. TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS. On September 9th, circular letters were mailed to all Lodges with the information that railroads in the State had agreed to sell roundtrip tickets at reduced rates on the certificate plan. Also list of leading hotels with location and rates was given. Copies of this circular may be found at Grand Lodge. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS. Laying Cornerstones. C. H. Briggs, High School, Schnell City, October 12, 1929. Arthur Mather,Lodge Hall, Washington, October 15, 1929. C. H. Briggs, High School, Flemington, May 16, 1930. C. H. Briggs, Public School, Wheatland, June 17, 1930. Arthur Mather, Baptist Church, Herculaneum, August 9, 1930. Dedications. Frank R. Elton, Hall of' Cl'aig Lodge No. 606, Craig, October 14. 1929.


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

31

Thos. D. Williams, Hall of ,Jameson Lodge No. 500, Jameson, December 30, 1929. G. D'Amato, Anton's Hall, Eureka, Mo., January 4, 1930. C. H. Briggs, Hall of Republic Lodge No. 570, Republic, January 9, 1930. Morris E. Ewing, Temporary Hall of Urbana Lodge No. 421, Urbana, January 25, 1930. R. A. Breuer, Hall of Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington, February 7, 1930. Thos. D. Williams, Temporary Hall of Lock Spring Lodge No. 488, February 6, 1930. H. H. Finley, Modern Woodmen Hall at Jerico Springs, April 16, 1930. H. L. Mann, New Hall of Warren Lodge No. 74, Keytesville, April -14, 1930. W. F. Wigginton, New Masonic Temple of M'oberly Lodge No. 344, April 25, 1930. Otto Hale, New Hall of DeWitt Lodge No. 39, May 14, 1930. G. C. Bishop, Hall of Steele Lodge No. 634, June 12, 1930. Louis J. Graue. Hall of Vandalia Lodge No. 491, .Tune 12, 1930. Warren H. May, Opera House, ,Louisiana, Mo., June 14, 1930. G. J. Vaughn, Hall of Branson Lodge No. 587, June 14, 1930. J. W. Morgan, Hall of Oriental Lodge No. 518, Blackburn, May 31, 1930. Thad B. Landon, Hall of Lexington Lodge No. 149, June 24, 1930. Election of Officers. Florida (23), September 21, 1929. Winigan (540), May 8, 1930. Livingston (51) December 19, 1929. Novelty (181), December 23, 1929. Lodge of Truth (268), January 6, 1930. Equality (497), January 14, 1930. Clifton (463), January 14, 1930. Hemple (37), January 2, 1930. Installation

Berlin (378), January 11, 1930. Jameson (500), January 16, 1930. Barnes (116), February I, 1930. Urich (286), February 7, 1 no. Braymer (135), February 11, 1930. Portland (242), April 12, 1930, Rutledge (572), May 31, 1930. Ravanna (258), JUly 9, 1930. Waverly (61), July 31, 1930. Rocheport (67), August 7, 1930. ~f

Officers.

Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, December 28, 1929, at Moolah Temple. Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520, January 4, 1930, at Lambskin Hall. Cosmos Lodge No. 282, January 11, 1930, at Moolah Temple. M'eramec Lodge No. 313, January 4, 1930, Anton's Hall. East Gate Lodge No. 630, December 28, 1929, at Old Shrine Temple, Kansas City. Reballot. Independence (76) Illmo (581)

Cache (416) Hamilton (224)

Branson (587)

To Meet in Other Halls. Clarkton Lodge No. 248 in Hall of Malden Lodge No. 406, August 31, 1929'Beacon Lodge No.3 in Alhambra Grotto Hall, January 9, 1930. Steele Lodge No. 634 in Hall of Hayti Lodge No. 571, February 13, 1930. Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 in Hall 380 Masonic Temple, St. Louis, April 8, 1930.


32

Proceedings of the

1930

Jerusalem Lodge No. 315 in Hall of Modern ~Toodmen, April 16, 1930. Perseverance Lodge No. 92 in Opera House, Louisiana, Mo., June 14, 1930. Special Meetings. West Gate Lodge No. 445 in Commandery Hall, New Masonic Temple, St. Louis, August 7, 1930. MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI. Warrant No. 167 for $116.10 was issued to the Masonic Home on June 30, 1930, to cover five-sevenths of back-dues collected since September 11, 1929. The per capita tax for 1930, to and including September 10, 1930, amounts to $235,582.41, five-sevenths of which has been turned over to the Home. Recapitulation. Five-sevenths of back-dues to June 30, 1930 Five-sevenths of 1930 per capita tax to September 10 Grand total paid to the Home on THIS account SINCE September 11, 1929

$

:

116.10 168,273.15

$168,389.25

SUMMARY OF SPECIAL INITIATION FUND. Total amount reported to September 11, 1929 $422,980.00 Receipts. *From September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930, inc __ .$33,560.00 Less Check $30.00 Vernon Lodge No. 493 held up by closing of their Bank.................... 30.00 33,530.00 Grand total paid to Masonic Home on this account from October 15, 1920, to and inclUding September 10, 1930.... $456,510.00 *For amounts paid by individual Lodges, see Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement in Appendix' of Proceedings for 1930. GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND. Collected from Petitioners According to Standing Resolution -1927, which reads as follows: "THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THIS GRAND LODGE NOW IN ANNUAL COMMUNICATION: That in order to maintain the Freemasons of Missouri in the One Hundred Per Cent Class and that the Brethren coming in from now on shall have a part in this great Masonic Memorial, each Lodge shall require the petitioner for the Degrees to pay at the time his petition is received the sum of one dollar, which amount shall be forwarded to the Grand Secretary with the annual report on June 30th of each year, this to remain in force until the completion of the Memorial." Cash Balance in Bank, September 12, 1929 __ $2,917.45 Receipts. *Amount received from September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930, inc: $3,586.00 Less Check $5.00 Vernon Lodge No. 493, held up by closing of their Bank........................... 5.00 Net Receipts for year 1929-1930 $3,581.00 Interest on Bank Deposits................................................ 29.17

3,610.17 $6,527.62


1930

Grand

J~odge

33

of Missouri

payments. Check paid to J. Claude Keiper February 15, 1930.. 3,600.00 Collection charges on checks........................... 1.44

3,601.44

September 10, 1930, Balance in Bank to Credit on this Accoun L $2,926.18 路For amounts paid by individual Lodges, see Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement in Appendix of Proceedings for 1930. Total amount contributed from all sources on this account and paid to J. Claude Keiper, Treasurer, George Washington Memorial Fund to February 15, 1930 $149,077.01 THE DR. WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND. Inaugurated by donation of $500 by Bro. M'arcus A. Loevy at Grand Lodge session, October 17, 1922. This fund, since exchange of bond was made July 18, 1929, consists of: One $500 U. S. Treasury 3% Bond held in Grand Lodge safe deposit box, Kansas City, Mo $500.00 Total Library Fund as reported September 8, 1928 $674.51 Interest on bond and savings account................................................ 19.45 $693.96 Withdrawn for binding 23 volumes "Ars Quatuor Coronatorum", donated by Bro. Marcus A. Loevy...... Total fund, September 11, 1929 December, 1929, intel;est on savings account.. June, 1930, interest on savings account June,' 1930, interest on bond __ July, 1930, interest on bond

80.50 $613.46

$1.65 1.72 8.44 8.44

Total Fund September 10, 1930

20.25 $633.71

GRAND LODGE PROPERTY. Fully described in report of Auditor of Accounts of Grand Lodge. GRAND LODGE FINANCES. September 11, 1929, to September 10, 1930. Cash in Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Sept. 11, 1929.......................................... Receipts. 1930 Per Capita Tax . Back Dues-Balances $ 86.95 75.60 Back Dues-Clarkton Lodge No. 248.. Dead Lodges Sale of Manuals Sale of. Dues Receipts Sale of By-laws Sale of 1929 Proceedings Williamsburg Lodge No.8, Defunct Fine, Oregon Lodge No. 139 Interest on Daily Balances Interest on Government Bonds

. . 1,308.25 . 1,118.17 . 62.00 4.50 . .. . .. 970.73 . 3,042.50 .

$235,582.41 162.55 15.00

2,492.92 5.89 10.00 4,013.23

$ 82,152.42


34

1930

Proceedings of the

RefundsFirst National Bank, St. Louis, 1929 Pay RolL . Burroughs Adding Machine Co . Insurance . New Hampton Lodge No. 510, to cover vVan'ant No. 192 for Check returned, failure of Bank.

811.10 3.95 1.54

817.29

.70

243,099.29 $325,251.71

Disbursements. Pay Roll Check (1929) Printing 1929 Proceedings Salary, Grand Master Expenses, Grand Master Maintenance, Grand Lodge Offices Masonic Service Ass'n of Missouri, Ray V. Denslow, Sec'y Masonic Service Ass'n of Mo., "The Bulletin" Masonic Temple Ass'n of St. Louis Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers, order G. M Salary, Grand Secretary Office Help Printing, Postage, Stationery, inc Salary, Grand Lecturer Expenses, Grand Lecturer Salary, Grand Treasurer Fraternal Correspondent ." Masonic Relief Ass'n U. S. and Canada Committe on Charity Office Equipment (filing cases) Past Grand Master's JeweL Telephone-JEfferson 4877 Committee on Obituaries Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer Bond for Depository, Kansas City Reporter, 1929, K Kummer Chairman, Committee Mileage and Per Diem Chairman, Committee on Chartered Lodges District Deputy Grand Masters' Dinner Expense, Grand Lodge Session (1929 ) Perkins Audit Co Expense, G. 'V. Memorial and G. M.'s Conference Library Committee Mendle Prtg. Co., 10 M Manuals __ Becktold Binding Co., 10 M Manuals 'Walker Lodge No. 605, ale 1927 P. R. Glenwood Lodge No.4, a/c 1928 P. R Rockville Lodge No. 341, a/c 1928 P. R. Strafford Lodge No. 608,' a/c 1928 P. R. Per Diem, 4 Assistant Tilers, Kansas City Case & Thomas, Insurance 3 years ~ Spalding Stationery Co., Printing and Supplies Spalding Sta. Co., 1930 Dues Rec. and Postage Mendle Prtg. Co., Blanks and Supplies Postal Telegraph & Cable Co

$ 22,000.00

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3,893.45 1,000.00 1,500.00 1,800.00

500.00 533.70 8,000.00 157.24 5,000.00 5,185.00 953.05 4,200.00 611.01 500.00 . 750.00 285.00 . . 1,695.00 763.25 . 200.00 . 173.12 . .. 75.00 . 350.00 . 210.72 . 75.00 . 100.00 . 50.00 . 132.50 . 908.25 . 200.00 678.20 . . 132.40 .. 495.00 . 2,254.23 . 26.10 . 37.90 . 41.00 . 37.80 . 60.00 . 111.40 . 534.08 . 1,085.32 . 822.75 . 20.46


1930

35

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Investment, Five $1,000.00 Bonds $ 4,993.23 Safe Deposit Box, Kansas City, 1 year...................... 7.50 C. H. BriggR, Exp. to St. Louis Masonic Temple Association 25.00 Gibson Bros., Printing, Washington, D. C................. 27.83 Anderson's Laundry, Aprons........................................ 19.07 Victor Towel Co :<.................. 27.00 Underwood Coupon Book ,.......................... 11.00 Burroughs Adding Machine Co ~~............................ 3.95 E. Eo Morris, Ck. No. 192, to "Cover" Lodge 510.... .70 J. Claude Keiper, Exp. G. M.'s Conference............ 50.00 Western Passenger Association, Certificates.............. 13.50 Pantagraph Prtg. Co., K. C., for Charity Com......... t'.50 Masonic Home of Mo., 5/7 Back Dues, 1929............ 116.10 Masonic Home of Mo., 5/7 Per Cap. Tax for 1930....168,273.15 Total Disbursements

.

241,707.46

Cash Balance, Grand Sec'y Cash Book

$ 83,5H.25

RECAPITULATION ~ Total Receipts to September 10, 1930 Total Disbursements to September 10, 1930 Cash Balance

$325,251.71 241,707.46 $ 83,544.25

ADDENDA Grand Secretary's Cash Book Balance, September 10, 1930........$ 83,544.25 Outstanding Checks Nos. 199 $ 285.00 200.......................................... 1.50 201.......................................... 10.84 202.......................................... 13.50 203.......................................... 19.05 204.......................................... 60.00 205.......................................... 200.00 206.......................................... 30.00 207 3,990.15 4,610.04 $ 88,154.29

Deposit made September 10, 1930, on Per Capita Tax M'anuals, etc Agreeing with Fidelity Sav. Tr. Co., September 10, 1930

$180.60 24.95

205.55

$ 87,948.74

The Grand Secretary and his office' staff desire to express their appreciation for the splendid co-operation on the part of our Lodge Secretaries in connection with the introduction of the new Report Form. The letters of commendation of these blanks which have reached us from all parts of the Grand Jurisdiction are much appreciated, and the work done by the


36

Proceedings of the

1930

individual Lodge Secretaries will greatly enhance the value of the Grand Lodge records for the years that are to come. The Grand Secretary also desires to acknowledge the many courtesies received from the Most Worshipful Grand. Master, Grand Lodge Officers, District Deputy Grand Masters, Lodge Secreta~ies, and all other brethren who have always been ready to co-operate with him and render any assistance or advice for the advancement of our Great Institution. Fraternally submitted,

Grand Secretary.


1930

37

Grand Lodge of Missouri REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER.

R. W. Bro. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, presented his report covering the period from September 11, 1929, to September 10th, 1930, which was received as follows, together with report of Auditor, and both ordered printed in the Proceedings. 1929 Sept. 11

Cash on hand in Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo

$ 82,802.42

RECEIPTS.

Oct. .. .. .. Nov. .. Dec. .. Jan. .. Feb. .. Mar. .. Apr. .. .. May .. June .. .. July

1 16 16 26 1 19 2 16 2 16 1

17 3 5 17 1 7 18 18 1 16 3 16 23 1 2

3 5 7 7 8 9 " 10 " 11 .. 12 " 14 .. 14 .. 15 .. 16 .. ' 17

"

18

Receipt No. 251 Arthur Mather. Grand Secy.. _ 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270

271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291

$

75.80 72.25 65.26 892.50 88.65 47.45 40.65 41.35 43.15 92.60 106.85 51.75 70.35 811.10 106.00 62.75 75.60 1,574.37 56.81 84.75 44.50 108.10 '77.00 575.63 99.55 2,906.40 5,764.50 5,646.50 6,461.85 76.95 4,544.40 7,907.75 9,855.30 10,172.80 4,047.10 3,047.00 171.88 7,071.25 3,620.00 16,002.50 6.283.10


38

Proceedings of the

July .. .. .. .. "

19 21 21 21 22 23 24 25 " 26 " 28 .. 28 .. 28 .. 28 29 " 30 31 Aug. 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 7 16 .. 16

2 2 Aug. 21 Sept.

292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 322

... $

1929 Sept. 26 Oct. 26 Nov. 26 Dec. 26

1930 7,679.60 3,954.30 78.77 180.26 4,479.40 20,993.90 14,256.05 8,063.50 12,998.90 7,622.35 93.50 118.11 100.87 15,326.60 12,256.60 15,472.30 13,562:25 4,220.30 64.96 55.41 72.94 65.07 21.60 625.30 386.31 24.8l. 173.70 30.53 .77

Interest on Bank BalanceFidelity Savings Trust Company

$

140.47 94.53 69.73 57.19

1930 Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug.

26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26

53.79 50.97 43.93 44.58 40.16 38.87 119.68 216.83 242,893.74 $325,696.16 DISBURSEMENTS. Warrant

No.

1929 Sept. 6 21

267

27 27

2 3

1

Masonic Home of Missouri, Per Capita Tax .... $ 650.00 W. R. Shrodes, Chairman, Mileage & Per Diem . 22,000.00 Samuel R. Freet, Grand Master ale Salary _ 500.00 Arthur M'ather, Salary Grand Secretary . 424.00


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri 4 5

Sept. 27 27 27 27 27 27 27

6 7 8 9 10

27

11

27 27 27 29

12 .13 14 15

29

16

29

17

29

18

29 29 23 23 23 23 23 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31

19 20

Oct.

Nov.

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

13 13

37 38 39 40

13 13 13 13 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

1 1

J. R. McLachlan, Salary Grand Lecturer .$ J. R. McLachlan, Expense Grand Lecturer_路_.. Masonic Temple Assn. Maintenance __ _ .. M. Gibear, Salary.. _ _ _ . F. Berger, Salary __ _ __ .. C. L. Munson, Salary _ .. W. R. Shrodes, ale Chairman M. and P. D. Com _ __ .. C. L. Alexander, ale Chairman Chartered Lodges _.. _.._ _ . Perkins Audit Co., Auditing Books __ . Arthur Mather, Prtg. Postage & Sta . E. Kummer, Reporting session .. T. W. Botsford, M. & P. D., Strafford Lodge No. 605 _ . Luther McGoldrick, M. & P. D., Lodge No. 427 .. _ __ .__ . S. H. Bothwell, M'ileage & P. D., ale Rockville Lodge No. 341.. . D. C. Yarbaugh, M. & P. D., ale Lodge No. 608 ---_ _ _ __ .. __ . Mendle Prtg, Co., Printing Manuals . Becktold Company, Binding Manuals __ .. Solon Cameron, Exp. G. L. Session _. R. O. Rumer, Dinner ale D. D. G. M.s _ Barr & Dunn, P. G. Master's JeweL : . John Pickard, ale Necrology Com __ _ S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service . Masonic Temple Assn" M路aintenance . Masonic Temple Assn., Annual PaymenL_ . Arthur Mather, Salary _ _. J. R. McLachlan, Salary . M. Gibear, Salary_ __ ---------. F. Berger, Salary __ . C. L. Munson, Salary __ __ . Spalding Sta. Co., Printing & Supplies . Ray V. Denslow, Secy. Mas. Servo Ass'n Mo . Arthur Mather, Postage........ __ ...... ..........-. Fidelity Savings Trust Co., for $5,000.00 Liberty Bonds _ . Mendle Prtg. Co., Printing Proceedings_ . Case & Thomas, Bonds Grand Secy. & Treas S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service_ . Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Rental Safe Dep. Box __ _.. _.. __ _ _ . J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Gr. Lecturer . Postal Tel. Cable Co., Service _ . J. Arthur Anderson Laundry, Service .. Victor Linen & Towel Service Co . Case & Thomas, Insurance Office Equip .. Masonic Temple Assn., Maintenance .. Arthur Mather, Salary . J. R. M'cLachlan, Salary .. M. Gibear, Salary .. F. Berger, Salary : . C. L. Munson, Salary __ . J. R. McLachlan, Exp. G. L __ .

39 350.00 55.52 150.00 120.00 120.00 200.00 100.00 50.00 200.00 100.00 75.00 26.10 37.90 41.00 37.80 495.00 1,154.14 908.25 132.50 200.00 75.00 17.38 150.00 8,GOO.00 416.00 350.00 120.00 120.00 200.00 136.11 500.00 110.00 4,993.23 3,893.45 350.00 20.53 7.50 75.50 1.83 19.07 4.50 111.40 150.00 416.00 350.00 120.00 120.00 200.00 31.21


Proceedings of the Dec.

1930

3

53

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 24 24 24 24 24 24 31

54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

31

68

31

69

31

70

31 31

71 72

31 31 31 31

73 74 75 76

Aetna. Casualty & Surety Co., Depository Bond $ S. R. Freet, Exp. Grand Master . Spalding Sta. Co., Dues Receipts etc .. S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service .. Underwood T. W. Co., Ribbons . Burroughs Adding- Machine Co., Repairs .. W. J. Kennedy Sta. Co., Filing Cases .. Spaulding Sta. Co., Prtg. & Supplies .. Arthur Mather, Salary.., .. J. R. McLachlan, Salary .. L. Moskop, Stenog. Salary .. F. Berger, Salary .. C. L. Munson, Salary .. Arthur Mather, Prtg., Postage, etc .. White Hall Lodg-e No. 301, alc Bro. C. A. Perkins .. D. R. Cheney, Gr. Secy., Benefit Mrs. S. M. Tyler .. Bogard Lodge No. 101, alc Bro. Geo. F. Calvert .. Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, alc Bro. W. W. Bradley .. Gate City Lodge No. 522, alc Bro. T. J. Hord Bucklin Lodge No. 233, ale Bro. R. P. Riehardson .. Green City Lodge No. 73, alc Bro. R. E. Ash Masonic Temple Assn., M'ainte·nance . Mendle Prtg. Co., Supplies .. Wm. Heike Elec. Co., Office Equipment.. ..

1930 Jan. 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31

77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84

Arthur Mather, Gr. Secy. Salary J. R. McLachlan, Salary , C. H. Briggs, Fraternal Correspondent.. Masonic Temple Assn., Maintenance .. L. Moskop, Salary F. Berger, Salary .. C. L. Munson, Salary Arthur Mather, Prtg., Postage, Sta

Feb.

7

85

7 7 7

20

86 87 88 89

24

90

24

91

24

92

24 28 28 28 28

93 94 95 96 97

C. H, Briggs, Exp. to Meeting Masonic Temple Assn. . . S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service . J. R. M'cLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer .. Spalding Sta. Co., Prtg. & Supplies..... J. Claude Keiper, Exp. Grand Masters' Conference .. J. R. McLachlan, Exp. to G. Washington Memorial . W. R. Gentry, Exp. to G. Washington Memorial . Arthur Mather, Exp. to G. Washington Memorial . W. R. Gentry, Exp. Grand Officers .. St. Louis Masonic Temple Assn., Maintenance Arthur Mather, Salary .. J. R. McLachlan, Salary • .. L. Moskop, Salary ..

.. . . .. .. ..

210.72 500.00 1,085.32 15.65 11.00 3.95 307.25 70.37 416.00 350.00 100.00 120.00 200.00 100.00 20.00 15.00 25.00 75.00 100.00 100.00 40.00 150.00 HO.25 52.30 416.00 350.00 250.00 150.00 100.00 120.00 200.00 100.00 25.00 24.90 44.64 121.57 50.00 127.70 118.14 123.10 34.70 150.00 116.00 350.00 100.00


1930 Feb.

Grand Lodge of Missouri 28 28 28 28

98 99 100 101

Mar. 20

102

20 20 20 20 25

103 104 105 106 107

31 31 31 31 31 13 31 31 Apr. 3 3

3 7 15

108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122

15

123

30 30 30 30 31 30 30 30 30

124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132

5 23 23 23 23 23 31 31 31 31 31 31 .Tune 2 2

133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 14 3 144 145 146 147 148 149

3 3

May

9

9 9

F. Berger, Salary $ c. L. Munson, Salary . R. V. Denslow, Exp. alc G. 'Vashington . S. R. Freet, Gr. M'aster, Exp. alc G. Washington _ . Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, alc Bro. W. W. Bradley.: _ _ __ . Gate City Lodge No. 522, alc T . .T. Hord _ Bucklin Lodge No. 233, alc R. R. Richardson Green City Lodge No. 159, alc R. E. Ash . .T. R, McLachlan, Trav, Expenses .. Masonic Temple Assn. of St. Louis, Maintenance _.. _.. __ _ .. Arthur Mather, Salary _ _ _ _ .. .T. R. McLachlan, Salary_ __ ._ .. L. Moskop, Salary_.. _ _ _ _ .. F. Berger, Salary _.. _._ _.. C. L. Munson, Salary._ _ Victor Linen & Towel Service Co., Service . M'enke Prtg. Co., Envelopes & Postage __ .. S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service- .. _ _ _ .. Becktold Co., Binding Manuals . Samuel R. Freet, Gr. Master Expense a/c .. C. H. Briggs, Fraternal Correspondent .. Menke Prtg. Co" Prtg. & Supplies _ _ Spalding Sta. Co., Prtg. & Supplies.. .. .T. R. M'cLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer _ . Kansas City Lodge No. 220, alc Bro. Max Stock _ __ _ __ - _ . Perseverance Lodge No. 92, alc Bro. E. E. Powell _ _ _ _ . Masonic Temple Assn. Maintenance .. Arthur Mather, Gr. Secy. Salary _ _ .T. R. McLachlan, Salary _. __ .. L. Moskop, Salary __ .. F. Berger, Salary__ _ . C. L. Munson, Salary _ __ .. W . .T. Kennedy Sta. Co., Office Equipment.... W . .T, Kennedy Sta. Co., Office Supplies....._.. Arthur Mather, Gr. Secy., Prtg., Postage & Sundries _._ _ _ _ __ .. .T. R. McLachlan, Expense a/c __ .. S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service __ _._ .. Arthur Mather, Exp. Grand Librarian .. Arthur Mather, Exp. to Moberly Dedication .. Steiner Eng. & Badge Co., Office Supplies . G. L. Bishop, alc Clarkton Lodge No. 248._ .. Masonic Temple Assn., Maintenance_.. _ .. Arthur Mather, Salary., _.. _ : .. '.T. R. MoLachlan, Salary _ .. L. Moskop, Salary _ .. F. Berger, Salary _ .. C. L. Munson, Salary _ _.. __ _ Pine Lodge No. 314, a/c Bro. C. F. Franken .. .T. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer .. Arthur Mather, Exp. to Grand L. of Nebr .. E. K Morris, Exp. to Grand L. of Nebr .. Gibson Bro., Letter Heads etc .

41 120.00 200.00 163,54 145.72 75.00 75.00 75.00 60.00 51.72 150.00 416.00 350.00 120.00 120.00 200.00 9.00 430.79 12.65 1,100.09 500.00 250.00 77.25 63.71 106.70 200.00 45.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 110.00 120.00 200.00 456.00 29.25 150.00 78.06 27.56 132.40 is.50 11.50 7.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 55.00 120.00 200.00 25.00 87.71 41.20 25.S4 27.83


42

Proceedings of the

June 21 24 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30

150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159

30 30

160 161

30

162

30 30

163 164

30 30

165 166

30 30 July 8 10 10

167 168 169 170

10 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 31 Aug. 13 13

172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183

13 13

184 185

13

186

13

187

13 13 13 13 15

188 189 190 191 192

30 30 30 30

193 194 195 196

171

1930

E. E. Morris, Salary Grand Treas. $ 500.00 S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service __ . 12.15 Masonic Temple Assn., Maintenance . 150.00 Arthur Mather, Salary . 416.00 J. R. M'cLachlan, Salary . 350.00 L. Moskop, Salary __ _ . 110.00 F. Berger, Salary _ _ _ . 120.00 C. L. Munson, Salary . 200.00 75.00 Gate City Lodge No. 522, alc Bro. T. J. Hord Bucklin Lodge No. 233, alc Bro. R. P. Richardson __ __ .. __ __ .__ .. 75.00 K. C. Lodge No. 220, alc Bro. Max Stock __ 50.00 Perseverance Lodge No. 92, alc Bro. E. E. Powell __ _ __ .. 30.00 Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, alc Bro. D. B. Tedrick __ .. __ __ __ __ _.. 40.00 40.00 Granite Lodge No. 272, alc Bro. J. W. Eckles Somerset Lodge No. 206, alc Bro. R. Robinson ... .. _. ...... ..... __ . .__ ........ .._ . 50.00 Postal Tel. Cable Co., Service __ .... __ . . .. __ . 7.79 Arthur Mather, Gr. Secy., Prtg., Postage & Sundries ._.. ._ __ ._ _ __ . 100.00 116.10 Masonic Home of Mo." 5/7 of Back Dues__ ._. __ . 79.95 J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer __ .. S. R. Freet, Exp. Grand Master.. .- __ . __ . 500.00 Spalding Sta. Co., Printing, etc__ _. __ __ __. 142.32 Western Passenger Assn., 3,000 Ry. Certificates __ .__ __ _ _.. __ .__ .. _ 13.50 S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service _ .__ .. __ .. .. 13.45 Masonic Temple Assn., Maintenance.. . . 150.00 Arthur Mather, Salary __ .. 416.00 J. R. McLachlan, Salary. . . __ 350.00 C. H. Briggs, Fraternal Correspondent __ . 250.00 h M'oskop, Salary. __ ..... ._. . . . . 110.00 M. Gibear, Salary .__ ._ .. __ . 60.00 120.00 F. Berger, Salary __ . .._ ------ ---- .. -. C. L. Munson, Salary __ .. . __ .. .__ .__. 200.00 Masonic Home of Missouri, Per Capita Tax__ 164,283.00 75.00 Gate City Lodge No. 522, alc Bro. T. J. Hord Bucklin Lodge No. 233, alc Bro. R. P. Richardson __ _ .. __ 75.00 K. C. Lodge No. 220, alc Bro. Max Stock. _ 75.00 Perseverance Lodge No. 92, alc Bro. E. E. Powell ._... _.. __ ... . .. _._ ... __ .__ ..... __ .... . ._ 45.00 Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, alc Bro. ]). B. Tedrick... __ .__ ... __ .. ....._._._._. __ ._.... ... ... _.. 60.00 Somerset Lodge No. 206, alc Bro. Robt. 75.00 Robinson -.--.------------.----..--.-.-.----.-- .. --------. Mendle Prtg. Co., Office Supplies, etc __ 535.25 S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service ... _... . _ 9.80 Samuel R. Freet, Exp. Grand Master. __ . .. 500.00 Menke Prtg. Co., Bulletin & Postage .. 102.91 E. E. Morris, Gr. Treas., alc Retd. Ch. New Hampton, Mo. . . .__ .__ _ __ ._ .70 Masonic Temple Assn., M'aintenance . __ 150.00 Arthur Mather, Salary .. __ .. __ __ .. 416.00 J. R. McLachlan, Salary _ . 350.00 M. Gibear, Salary ,.,.,,, .. ,.,,.,,..,, . 120.00


Grand Lodge of 111issouri

1930 Aug. 30 30 30

197 198 199

30 Sept. 8 8 8 8

200 201 202 203 204

8 9 10

205 206 207

43

F. Berger, Salary $ C. L. Munson, Salary __ _ . Masonic Relief Assn. U. S. & Canada, 1A, P. C. Year Ending January 1, 1930._ __ .. Pantagraph Prtg. Co., Prtg _ __ . Postal Tel. Cable Co., Service .. Victor Linen & Towel Co., Service _.. __ .. S. Wn. Bell Tel. Co., Service . D. W. Parker, Grand Tiler, ale Assistant Tilers _ _ _ __ __ _ .. Arthur Mather, Prtg., Postage, etc __ . Arthur M'ather, Traveling Exp.. _ _. Masonic Home of Mo., Per Capita Tax __ .

120.00 200.00 285.00 1.50 10.84 13.50 19.05 60.00 200.00 30.00 3,990.15

$242,357.46 Less check No. 199 outstanding.... $ 285.00 .. 200 1.50 10.84 " 201 13,50 202 19.05 " 203 60.00 204 200.00 205 30.00 206 .. 207 3,990.15

4,610.04

$237,747.42 Cash Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company Kansas City, September 10, 1~30............................................ 87,948.74 $325,696.16

Respectful.ly submitted,

EDMUND E. MORRIS, Grand Treasurer.


44

Proceedings of the

1930

REPORT OF AUDITOR. September 24,' 1930. To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Gentlemen: In compliance with instructions received, we have examined and checked the book records of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of M'issouri for the period from September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930; also, the Masonic Home Initiation Fee Fund; the George Washington Memorial Fund; and the William F. Kuhn Library Fund for the same period, and respectfully present the following as the result of our findings, viz.: GENERAL FUND PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS. Balance, September 12, 1929 Receipts: Per Capita Tax, 1930 $235,582.41 Due from Two Dead Lodges................................ 15.00 Back Dues 162.55 Sale Of: Manuals $1,308.25 Dues Receipts 1,118.17 By-Laws 62.00 1929 Proceedings 4.50 2,492.92 Balance in Treasury of Defunct Lodge _ . Fine , .. Interest on Daily Bank Balances $ 970.73 Interest on Government Bonds 3,042.50

$ 82,152.42

5.89 10.00 4,013.23

Refunds: Pay Roll $ 811.10 Insurance 1.54 Replacing Cheque Returned on Account of Bank Failure...... .70 Burroughs Adding Machine Company................................. 3.95

817.29

243,099.29 $325,251.71

Disbursements: Cheques Numbers 1-207, inclusive Balance, September 10, 1930

..

241,707.46 ................................. $ 83,544.25

GRAND TREASURER'S BOOKS. Balance, September 12, 1929: Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo ....... $ 82,802.42 Add-Receipts Forwarded by Grand Secretary Deposited in Bank-September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930...... 242,893.74 $325,6~6.16

Deduct-Cheques Issued by Grand Secretary, Cleared by Bank-September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930....... 237,747.42 Balance, September 10, 1930, Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, MissourL

$ 87,9411.74


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

45

RECONCILIATION. Balance. per Grand Treasurer's Books, Deduct-Outstanding Cheques. Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques, Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques, Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques. Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques, Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques. Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques. Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques, Number Deduct-Outstanding Cheques. Number

September 10, 1930 .. $ 87.948.74 1.99 $ 285.00 200............ 1.50 201............ 10.84 202............ 13.50 203 _.. 19.05 204............ 60.00 205 .. __ 200.00 206............ 30.00 207.. 3,990.15 4,610.04 83,338.70

Add-Remittance, No. 320, Remittance. No. 321,

September 10, 1930, Receipt Credited by Bank 9/11/30 $ 180.60 September 10, 1930. Receipt Credited by Bank 9/11/30........ 24.95

Balance. per Grand Secretary's Books. September 10. 1930.... .

~05.55

$ 83,544.25

BONDS. On September 19. 1930, in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, G!'and Treasurer, A. F. & A. M. of M'issouri. we counted and examined the following securities on deposit in the Grand Lodge safe deposit box of the Fidelity Savings Trust Company of Kansas City. Missouri. All interest income accruing from these securities was accounted for. PERMANENT FUND. Fourth Fourth Fourth Fourth Fourth Fourth Fourth Fourth Fourth

Liberty Liberty Liberty Liberty Liberty Liberty Liberty Liberty Liberty

414% 4%% 414% 4%% 4%,% 4%% 4%,% 4%% 414 %

C02026283 .... $ 1,000.00 D01306564.... 1,000.00 FOOI41826 .... 5,000.00 A00264711.. .. 10.000.00 GOI534387 .... 1.000.00 H01534388 .... 1.000.00 JOI534389 .... 1,000.00 K01534390 .... 1,000.00 F00991756 .... 1,000.00

United States Treasury Bonds 4% United States Treasury Bonds 4%

COOOO0803 .... $ 5.000.00 COOO02873~... 1,000.00

6.000.00

United United United United

States States States States

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

Bonds Bonds Bonds Bonds

41,4% 414% 41,4% 4%%

GOO026327.. .. $ 5,000.00 HOO026328 .... 5,000.00 JOO026329 .... 5.000.00 KOO038060 .... 10.000.00

25.001':.00

United United United United United

States States States States States

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

Bonds Bonds Bonds Bonds Bonds

3%% COOO 13 673 .... $10.000.00 3%% D00013674 .... 10.000.00 3%% JOO048489 .... 1,000.00 3%% KOO048490 .... 1,000.00 4911A.... 5.000.00 3%%

27,000.00

Loan Loan Loan Loan Loan Loan Loan Loan Loan

Bond Bond Bond Bond Bond Bond Bond Bond Bond

$22,000.00 $22,0 1)0.00

$80,000.00


46

Proceedings of the

1930

THE WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND. United States Treasury Bond 3 % %-7451A MASONIC

HOMI~

$5GO.00

INITIATION FUND.

The Grand Secretary has received from the Masonic Lodges of Missouri, September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930, the sum of $33,530.00 and has paid this amount to the Masonic Home semimon thly as evidenced by cancelled cheques for a like sum. There is a balance in this fund of $9.98 representing the interest received on daily balances during the fiscal year ending September 10, 1930. GEORGE WASHINGTON M'EMORIAL FUND. Balance on Hand, September 12, 1929

_.. _._

$2,917.45

Receipts: Collections of $1.00 per Initiate $3,581.00 Interest on Bank Deposits....................................... 29.17

3,610.17 $6,527.62

Disbursements: February 15, 1930-Remittance to J. Claude Keiper, Treasurer, George Washington Memorial Fund _ _ _ _$3,600.00 Bank Exchange ._ _. 1.44 Balance, September 10, 1930, as Shown by Franklin American Trust _Company Certificate_ _

3,601.44

$2,92Ii.I ~

THE WM: F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND. Balance, September 12, 1929

_

Add: Interest on Bond _ _ _ _ Interest on Savings Account.. _ Balance, September 10, 1930

__

_ __ _

_

_ __ .._ $ 16.88 _........ 3.37 _..........

Consisting of: Cash in Savings Account, First National Bank, St. Louis, MissourL __ United States Treasury Bond No. 7451A

_

$133.71 _ 500.00

$613.411

20.25 $fl3 3.71

$63::l.71

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer and refiect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri from September 12, 1929, to September 10, 1930, and the securities on hand, in the above state.d funds, as at September 10, 1930. Respectfully submitted, PERKINS & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountantl'l.


1930

Grand Lodge of ]",1issouri

47

REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF MrASONIC HOME.

M. W. Bro. William W. Martin presented report of .the Masonic Home Board which was ordered printed in the Proceedings. (See Appendix.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE.

M. W. Bro. C. H. Briggs, Chairman of Committee on Fraternal Correspondence, presented his report which was ordered printed in the Proceedings. (See Appendix.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS.

M. W. Brother C. H. Briggs, Chairman, presented the following report. Adopted. To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., State of Missouri: Brethren: Your Special Committee .on the Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis submits the following report: Your Chairman, as has been his custom, attended the annual meeting of the Association in St. Louis last January. The business of the Association is carefully managed, and the debt is being decreased. The bonded indebtedness at the last session of the Grand Lodge was $565,000.00 June 1, 1930, then was paid on this debt $20,000.00. The St. Louis Union Trust Company has been notified that December I, 1930, a further payment will be made of $40,000.00, which will leave a debt of $495,000.00. This will represent all the Association will owe after that date excepting current monthly bills which are paid each month. The eighteen Lodges in the Temple Association sustained a loss of 170 members during the past Masonic year. This will affect the income of the Association in a small measure but the decrease each year in the debt means a corresponding decrease in the interest account, and the Grand Lodge may confidently expect that in a few years' time the entire debt wiII be removed. Fraternally submitted, CORONA H. BRIGGS, Chairman.

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

Appointed by the Grand Master, announced by the Grand Secretary and the full list posted for the information of the Representatives. Here follows the list of Committees:


48

Proceedings of the

19.30

CHAIRMEN OF STANDING COMMITTEES.

1930. JURISPRUDENCE FORREST C. DONNELL, St. Louis APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES WM. F. WOODRUFF, Kansas City WAYS AND MEANS JAS. A. KINDER, Cape Girardeau CREDENTIALS CHAS. M. CHRISTIE, Kansas City PAY ROLL vVALTER R. SHRODES, Milan CHARTERED IJODGES : C. L. ALEXANDER, St. Louis LODGES U. D A. LINXWEILER, Jefferson City CHARITY T. W. COTTON, Van Buren REPORTS OI<' D. D. G. M.'s R. L. TATMAN, Webster Groves MASONIC BOARDS OF RELIEF ANDREW J. O'REILLY, St. Louis RITUAL J. C. GARRELL, Webster Groves MASONIC HOM'E (Visiting Com.) ..A. S. DEXHEIMER, St. Louis CORRESPONDENCE CORONA H. BRIGGS, Springfield NECROLOGY JOHN PICKARD, Columbia AUDITING.. ~ H. CLAY PERKINS, St. Louis GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS CORONA H. BRIGGS, Springfield UNFINISHED BUSINESS THOS. A. HARBAUGH, Webb City TRANSPORTATION & HOTELS SAM GILLILAND, Kansas City

COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE. FORREST C. DONNELL, Chairman Hl<;NRI L. WARREN C. LEW GALLANT

JOHN C. ROBERTSON R. B. STRADER

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. WM. F. WOODRUFF, Chairman CHAS. A. FITZGERALD RICHARD O. RUMER

R. E. KAVANAUGH JAS. H. BARNES

WAYS AND MEANS. JAMES A. KINDER, Chairman

.T. W. CHRISTIAN C. D. STRUBLE

B. C. HUNT, D. W. ROBERT

CREDENTIALS. CHARLES M. CHRISTIE, Chairman WALTER A. WEBB HENRY F. WOERTHER L. H .. ABRAMS

FRED H. KNIGHT THOS. S. EVILSIZER

PAY ROLL WALTER R. SHRODES, Chairman HARRY B. WANDELL DUNCAN MELLIER

ROY ROBERTS J. R. BAKER


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

49

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION. ALBERT LINXWEILER, Chairman CHARLES H. APPEI.J E. L. HARRISON

CHARITY. . R. R. KREEGER W. W. M'ARTIN

T. W. COTTON, Chairman W. S. CAMPBELL ARCH A. JOHNSON

REPORTS OF D. D. G. M.'s. ROE CLEMENS

B. L. TATMAN, Chairman HARRY CHAPIN

J. R McLACHLAN JOHN PICKARD

.JULIUS C. GARRELL, Chairman R. R. KREEGER ANTHONY F. ITTNER

RITUAL.

TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS. SAM GILLILAND, Chairman ROBERT Y. GOGGIN J. RENICK JONES

SPECIAL COMMITTEES. MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION OF MISSOURI-Thad R. Smith, Chairman; Ray V. Denslow, Secretary. MANUALS-Arthur Mather, Chairman. MEETING OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS-Harry S. Truman, Chairman; ThOR. H. Reynolds, Kleber C. Jones. RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman; Joseph S. McIntyre, C. H. Briggs, Van F. Boor, Orestes Mitchell. l\IASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS-Corona H. Briggs, Chairman; Sam Wilcox, Guy C. Million. FATHERLESS CHILDREN OF FRANCE-R. R. Kreeger, Chairman. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION-Bert S. Lee, Chairman; Orestes M'itch~ll, Anthony I". Ittner. LIBRARY-W. B. Massey, Chairman; W. P. Mason, Kirkwood, Robert S. Calder. HURRICANE RELIEF-Andrew J. O'Reilly, Chairman; Arthur Mather, G. W. Walker. COMMITTEg; ENTERTAINMENT DISTINGUISHED VISITORSE. E. Morris.

CALLED FROM LABOR.

After various announcements the M. W. Gr~nd Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR to refreshment, at High Meridian, to reconvene at 1 :30 o'clock p. m., prayer being offered by R. W. Grand Chaplain A. Ray Petty.


50

Proceedings of the

1930

FIRST DAY-AFTERNOON SESSION.

At 1 :30 P. M. the M. "YV. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by the R. \71/. Deputy Grand l\1aster. Prayer was offered by R. VV. Grand Chaplain Rev. Z. M. \iVilliams. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARITY.

The following Report of the Committee on Charity was presented by M. W. Brother T. "Y\!. Cotton and was adopted: To the Most W01'shi.bful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons in the State of MissOU1'i: Your Committee on Charity, appointed by M. W. Grand Master Samuel R. Freet, in accordance with the provisions of the Grand Lodge By-laws, respectfully submits the following: M. W. Bro. T. W. Cotton having been designated by the Grand Master as Chairman, called the first meeting of such committee at the Masonic Home, 5351 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, Mo., on November 6, 1929. All the members were present. M. W. Bro. R. R. Kreeger was re-elected Secretary. During the year eleven meetings were held and applications for assistance were all acted upon until the funds set aside by' this Grand Lodge at its last Annual Communication were exhausted. Contributions to the lodges mentioned in the committee's report to the Grand Lodge during its last Annual Communication held in the City of St. Louis, Mo., September 24 to 26, 1929, were continued during the Masonic Year 1930, as follows: Kansas City Lodge No. 220, Kansas City, Mo., for the benefit of M'ax Stock, $300.00. Gate City Lodge No. 522, Kansas City, Mo., for the benefit of Thos. J. Hord, $300.00. Bucklin Lodge No. 233, Bucklin,. Mo., for the benefit of R. P. Richardson, $300.00. Linn Lodge No. 326, Linn, Mo., for the benefit of R. H. Bryan, $300.00. In addition to the above, applications were received from and contributions authorized to the following lodges: Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield, Mo., for the benefit of W. W. Bradley, $300.00. Green City Lodge No. 159, Gr,een City, Mo" for the benefit of Robert E. Ash, $120.00. Perseverance Lodge No. 92, Louisiana, Mo" for the benefit of E. E. Powell, $120.00. Pine Lodge No. 314, Bardley, Mo., for the benefit of Chas. F. Franken, $25.00. Somerset Lodge No. 206, Powersville, Mo., for the benefit of Robert Robinson, $1,25.00. Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia, Mo., for the benefit of J. W. Eckles, $100.00. M'ountain Grove Lodge No: 158, Mountain Grove, Mo., for the benefit of D. B. Tedrick, $100.00. The aggregate amount of the contributions authorized being


1930

Grand Lodge of Atissou,ri

51

$2,090.00, or $90.00 in excess of the amount placed at the disposition of your Committee by the Grand Lodge in 1929. The committee thought that in view of the urgent necessity and in the interest of charity, it was necessary to exceed the amount appropriated by this sum and recommends that this Grand Lodge approve its action.. The maximum amount per month allowed to any applicant was $25.00. In some cases only $15.00 per month was appropriated, the difference depending on conditions surrounding the applicants. In accordance with the determination by the Committee in 1928 (Page 149, G. L. Proc~edings 1928) that the funds placed at its disposal should be left in the Grand Lodge Treasury, we instructed the Grand Secretary to issue checks in favor of the lodges whose applications had been approved, and asked that the payments be made monthly, consequently the Committee has not withdrawn any portion of the amount appropriated. In addition to the number above mentioned, applications for assistance have been received and are now on file with the Committ.ee from seven different Lodges requesting that donations be made in the interest of some of their unfortunates. So far as our investigation has gone in each one of these cases it appears that they are worthy and in destitute circumst.ances but due to the lack of funds, of course, your Committee could not give any relief. In each case where aid was given to a lodge the committee made it a rule that the lodge applying contribute an equal amount. This act.ion was taken on the part of your committee, first: To enlist the co-operation of t.he Lodge to effectually and economically administer relief to their needy members and again we feel that this Grand 'Lodge should not attempt t.o assume all the burden of relief, thus permitting- the "Standing Aside" mentioned by the Most Worshipful Grand Master in his address, but rather that we share that burden with the Lodge and work together, to the end that the resources of the Grand Lodge set aside for this purpose, may extend relief to greater numbers in need, and that the Lodge may not be deprived of the real pleasure afforded by engaging in a measure with the Grand Lodge in this splendid service of assisting their worthy and distressed brethren. In addition to the formal applications which we have been unable to handle for want of funds, a number of cases reported to us did not file formal applications when informed of the lack of funds at the disposal of the Committee. In view of the many calls for assistance from the lodges we recommend that an appropriation be made by the Grand Lodge which will rea:-;onably meet the demands. Had the worthy cases presented to us during the year been given the assistance the facts called for, approximately $7,500.00 would have been required.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON CHARITY.

R. W. Bro. A. J. O'Reilly, Chairman of the Special Committee appointed by the M. W. Grand l\1aster to investigate and report to this session of the Grand Lodge recommendations for broadening and extending the dispensing of Masonic charity, respectfully reports:


52

1930

Proceedings of the

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of the State of MissOU1'i: We, the Special Committee, appointed by the M. W. Grand Master to investigate and report to this session of the Grand Lodge recommendations for broadening and extending the dispensing of Masonic charity, respectfully report: That the Charity Committee of this Grand Lodge is now authorized to extend relief to only those who would be eligible to admission to the Masonic Home of Missouri, except for certain mental or physical disqualifications as provided in the resolution adopted by this Grand Lodge at its annual communication in the year 1927. Our investigation leads us to believe that the limitation placed upon the Charity Committee by the authority above referred to prevents the Committee from extending relief to worthy cases calling for the- exercise of Masonic charity; and we further believe that such limitation of authority prevents the fraternity, in numerous instances, from extending limited assistance which would meet the necessities of the case, with the result that many applicants are received as members of the Masonic Home family with the attendant expenses to the M'asonie Home, which could be more economically handled by extending limited assistance to the applicant which would render their admission to the Home unnecessary and work a benefit, not only to the Craft in the matter of economy, but in many instances would permit of the applicant remaining in their own home and among their own people. Your Committee further reports that an amendment to the Grand Lodge By-laws introduced at our last annual communication will, if adopted, authorize the Charity Committee in conjunction with the Masonic Home Board to extend Masonic aid to many worthy cases in accordance with the finding of your Committee. And we recommend the adoption of the proposed amendment. Respectfully and fraternally submitted,

(Adopted.)

A. J. O'REILLY, T. W. COTTON, ARCH A. JOHNSON. PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO BY -LAWS.

M. W. Bro. Orestes Mitchell: M. W. Grand Master and Brethren: In view of the report of the two foregoing committees, it becomes necessary to offer some amendments to the By-laws. At the last session of the Grand Lodge an amendment was offered to Section 27 limiting the powers of the Committee. As it stands now, the Committee has only very limited powers and this report you have heard read says there are many cases you desire to relieve, and, therefore, we now desire to offer this amendment to the amendment now pending: To amend the amendment offered to Section 27- (i) -1 of Article IV, so that said Section when amended will read as follows: "Section 27-(i)-1. (a) The number of said Committee shall be five, composed of members selected from the Masonic Home Board. (b) Said Committee shall have full and exclusive authority


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

53

to expend moneys, which路 may be appropriated for its use by the Grand Lodge,for the relief of worthy applicants for M'asonic relief, whenever in the opinion of said Committee it would not be advisable for any reason to admit such applicant to the Masonic Home. All of said money shall be kept in a separate fund and never mingled with Masonic Home funds. (c) Said Committee shall meet on call of its Chairman for' the transaction of business, and its members shall not receive any compensation whatsoever for their services or be reimbursed for any expense incurred in attending the meeting of said committee. (d) A majority of said Committee shall constitute a quorum." ORESTES MITCHELL, THOMAS H. REYNOLDS, ARCH A. JOHNSON. I move this amendment to the amendment be referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. (Which motion was duly seconded and adopted.) M. W. Bro. Mitchell: Further responding to the report of the. Charity Committee, I desire to offer the following resolution: RI<~SOLUTION.

"RESOLVED that the sum of Seven Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($7,500.00) be appropriated for the use of the Charity Committee." ORESTES MITCHELL, T. W. COTTON, ARCH A. JOHNSON, I move this be referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. (Which motion was duly seconded and adopted,) M. W. Bro. M'itcheIl: For several years among Masons there has been quite a discussion of the idea of intimation respecting the matter of Masons being the subject of charity. In other words, that we ought to use some other name for the relief of our brethren instead of the .expression "a brother Mason being an object of charity," and it has been thought well to change the name to "The Committee on Welfare," and so we now offer this amendment: "To amend Section 27 of Article IV by striking out paragra})h i, and adopting a new paragraph i in the place thereof, to read as follows: "'(i) Welfare. A Committee on Welfare to whom shall be referred, all apl))ications for Masonic relief.''' ORESTES MITCHELL, THOMAS H. REYNOLDS, ARCH A. JOHNSON.

REPORT OF MASONIC HOME VISITING COMMITTEE.

W. Bro. A. S. Dexheimer presented the following Report, which was adopted:


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Proceedings of the

1930

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge} Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri: Brethren: Pursuant to appointment by our M. W. Grand Master and in conformity to the By-laws the following report is respectfully submitted: I have attended several of the meetings of the Masonic Home Board and have made numerous visits to the home, not only this year, but for the past three years, therefore I am able to note the improvement in the help and general management. The Help in general appear to be better satisfied and more efficient. The Laundry and Kitchens have been improved upon as much as the crowded -conditions will permit. The Hospital and Women's quarters are crowded beyond capacity. The Men and Children's quarters are filled to capacity, and with the increasing applications coming in, it is a problem for the management to know what to do. These conditions are the same as they were a year ago, but the necessity for more room is more evident than ever, because of the ever-increasing demands On the Home. The Home Board and management are to be complimented for the improvement shown during the past eighteen months, in spite of the facilities they have and the crowded condition of the Home. It is my opinion and hope that these conditions be remedied as quickly as possible. Fraternally submitted, ALBERT S. DEXHEIM'ER.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON MASONIC HOME INITIATION FUND.

To the Most WorshiMHI Gmnd Lodge} A. F; & A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee, appointed by the Most Worshipful Grand Master to ascertain the present status of the Masonic Home Initiation Fund, begs leave to report as follows: The total number of adjustments with Lodges made to date is 142. These adjustments have resulted in the sum of $2,550.00 being' turned over to the Masonic Home on this account, representing arrears due from the Lodges checked up, from October 15, 1920, to June 30, 1929. These adjustments have been made in a commendable way and the Secretaries have co-operated cheerfully in this work. As this checking involves very considerable labor on the part of individual Lodge Secretaries, as well as on the part of the Grand Secretary's Office force, it will probably be sometime before the entire task is completed; and your Committee would suggest that this work be continued until finally consummated. I<~raternally

submitted, JAMES W. SKELLY, JULIUS C. GARRELL, Committee.


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

S5

REPORT OF COM M ITTEE ON NECROLOGY.

M. W. 'Brother John Pickard presented the Report of the Cornmittee on Necrology, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. &. A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The Committee on Necrology begs leave to present its report. Just a week ago today I stood on the heights above the valley of the Red River of New Mexico. Twelve hundred feet -below, hidden by the trees, the little stream went its musical course to join the larger waters of the Rio Grande. The lofty mountains opposite presented the most gorgeous spectacle my eyes ever beheld. The somber green of the clumps of spruce and of fir scattered over the entire slope presented a most effective contrast to the brilliant foliage of the aspens, for the frost had come and that vast mountain was aflame with the golden glory of the yellow aspens. This splendid spectacle announced the coming of the end of the present year, but it prophesies the eternal renewal of life. It told us of immortality, for we know that in a few short months the tender quivering green will again clothe the mountainside. It symbolized the beauty of immortality. What are the greatest things of the world? The greatest things in the world are not the corn and the wine, not the coal and the iron, not the silver and the gold. The greatest things in the world cannot be weighed in a balance, laid off on a scale or estimated in the coin of the realm. _ The greatest things in the world are not the material things; they are the spiritual things. They are the things beyond price. They are the Priceless things. What is more beautiful than a mother's love? But this cannot be weighed in a balance. What is more glorious than patriotism? But this is not a commodity of the market place. What is the most wonderful thing in the world? It is not the rarest pearl of wisdom, it is not the most marvelous achievement of science; it is not the aeroplane, not the radio. The most mysterious, the most wonderful thing in the world is LifeLife, whose mystery is outside the confines of knowledge and beyond the reaches of .science. What is the most important question for man? It is the relation of man to his Maker. What is the Freemason's highest faith? It is faith in the being and existence of the Eternal God. What is the Freemason's loftiest hope? It is the hope of immortal Life. What is the Freemason's divinest love? It is the love for fellowman. As we read the records of the companions who have passed on, we judge them with a righteous judgment, not by what they accomplished; not by their failures, but by their successes; not by their weaknesses, but by their visions of the eternal Truth. We mourn, not because they have passed, but because "we sigh for the touch of a vanished hand, and for the sound of a voice that is still." The sum total of life is larger because they have lived, and still live. As we remember their brave deeds, we will say in the deepest recesses of our being:


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"Build thee more stately mansions, 0 my soul, aH the swift seasons roll. Leave thy low-vaulted past, let each new temple, nobler than the last, shut us from heaven with a dome more vast, Ull thou, at length, art free, leaving thine outgrown shell by time's unresting sea." IUISSOURI.

REV. F. V. LOSS-1861, West Virginia-1930, Missouri. Past Grand Chaplain. A graduate of the University of Kentucky, he had for many years been an able minister of the Christian Church. He was for years a Mason and very active, especially in the Scottish Rite Bodies of Kansas City. A gifted speaker of ready wit, rare eloquence and convincing power, he was much in demand before Masonic audiences and as a representative of Masonic Bodies, journeying far and wide in response to numerous engagements. DELAWARE.

HARRY l\IAYER-1871-1930. Master, 1910-Deputy Grand Master, 1918-Grand Master, 1919. FLORIDA.

LAM'AR C. CARTER-1877, Florida-1929, Florida.. Grand Master, 1925. Member of the Blue Lodge and of the Royal Arch, he had the honor of succeeding his illustrious father, who was Grand Master in 1888. The memory of his earnest and loyal service to the Craft, of his kind deeds and faithful friendship, remain to stimulate and to encourage. He was for many years a distinguished figure in Florida Masonry. He was conspicuous for his earnestness, zeal and devotion to duty. He loved the Order and gave it the highest service of which he was capable. His administration as Grand Master was marked by a profound and intricate knowledge of Masonic lore, and his interest was ever with the things which make for the common good and the highest interests of his fellowmen. INDIANA.

OLIN E. HOLLOWAY-1856,' Indiana-1929, Grand Master, 1900.

Indiana.

Past Master, Past High Priest, Past Illustrious Master, Past Commander, Thirty-third Degree Mason, Grand Patron, O. E. S. During his term as Grand Master he collected the first data relative to Masonic Relief on a state-wide scale. This movement resulted in establishing the Indiana Masonic Home. He was Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Home from the beginning to the date of his death. He was also Chairman of the Board of Grand IJodge Trustees, and of the Grand Lodge Ritual Committee. For forty years he was a physician in charge of the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans Home. He was the friend and ad-


1930

57

Grand Lodge of A1issouri

visor of these children and many a graduate of that home remembers Dr. Holloway with tender love and appreciation. IOU'A.

CHARLES WESLEY WALTON'-1870, Wisconsin-1930, California. Grand Master, 1914-Grand Commander, 1908-32째 K. C. C. H.High Priest, 1900. His devoted and best services were given for many years to the work of the Board of Trustees of the Grand Charity Fund. In all capacities his work was well and faithfully done. His sense of duty led him to give the best of his abilities to every cause in which he was engaged-often in later years to an extent really beyond a just regard for his physical condition. In Dubuque, his home for the greater portion of his active life, he won deserved re8ognition as a citizen of character, ability and public spirit. 1'IAINE.

CHARLES FLETCHER JOHNSON-1859, Maine-B30, Florida, Grand Master, 1906. Member of Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council, Commandery, Scottish Rite. He served as Commander and was a 33째 Mason. His greatest love and deepest interest in the Fraternity centered in the Symbolic Degree of the Blue Lodge. By his death a long and honorable' career was ended. He was a man of outstanding ability at the bar, in public life, and on the bench. ~'hile he was a man of abili ty and learning, he was a man who delighted in the c'ompanionship of his fellows, who were ever at ease in his democratic presence. He was mayor of his city, tWice represented it in the Legislature, was U. S. Senator during the period of the World War and Judge of the United States Court of Appeals. MICHIGAN.

FRANK O. GILBERT-1854, Ontario-1929, Michigan. Grand Master, 1901-Grand Lecturer, 1907-1929. Member of Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council, Commandery. High Pritst, Illustrious Master, Commander, 33째 M'ason, Shriner. Most Illustrious Grand Master, 1907. He gave most of his life to Masonry and was ever loyal and devoted to the interests of the Fraternity. Its friendships, its opportunities for service, its traditions and high standing all appealed to him with force and power. His fond wish to remain active to the end of his life was gratified. OWEN MORRIS-1858, vVales-1930, Grand Master, 1912._

Minnesota.

Member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council, Commandery, Scottish Rite and Shrine. A college graduate, a lawyer of distinction, he was a man of brilliant attainments and a polished orator. He was kind, genial,


58

Proceed1:ngs of the

unassuming and man.

modest,

a

pUblic-spirited,

1930 generous-hearted,

true

l\IINNESO'I'A.

SHELDON L. FRAZER-1845, Ohio-1929, Minnesota. Junior Grand Warden, 1907. Member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, the Scottish Rite and the Shrine. He had charge of the safe deposit vaults of the First National Bank of Duluth and because of his cordiality in doing business with the patrons of the banI{, built up the strongest business of this type in Duluth. He was helpful to the community in every good work that was undertaken, and tried at all times t.o show that the lessons he learned in Masonry were Ilut to practical use for the benefit not only of the members of the Fraternity, but for many people outside of it. GEORGE MARSHALl, STOWE-1856, New York-1929 Minnesota. Grand Master, 1919-Grand High Priest, 1918Grand Commander, 1912. Member of the Blue Lodge, Royal Arch, Commandery, Scottish Rite and was Past Potentate of the Shrine; member of the Red Cross of Constantine. He served his Lodge 24 years as Secretary, his Chapter 22 years as Secretary and his Commandery 20 years as Recorder. From boyhood his life was crowded with many fond and meritorious services for others. His devotion to duty, strong convictions, and loyalty to principles made him an ally of sincerity and noble purpose. Any duty assigned to him could be safely left with the assurance that it would be well and promptly performed. He cherished no malice and nursed no grievance. All who knew him. loved him. Always cheery, companionable. courteous, he was the soul of honor and integrity. l\flSSISSIPPI.

HAHRY TURNER HOWARD, 1856-1930. Grand Master, 1902-Grand High Priest, 1912Grand Commander, 1901. l\IONTANA.

GEORGE THOMAS SLACK-1854, Maryland-1929, Utah. Grand Master, 1901-Grand High Priest, 1901. Member of Blue Lodge, Chapter, Commandery, and was Grand Patron O. E. S. He was always a gentleman, considerate of others' welfare and well being; sympathetic to the nth degree, a brother who saw only the good and deliberately passed up the shortcomings of his brothers. He turned a deaf ear to tales of slander and never gave currency to faults and failings of his brothers. He was a lovable, gentlemanly being. Simplicity itself in all his relations with his fellowmen and sincerity as the guiding beaGon light governing all his actions, were the dominant traits of his life. To his Masonic honors he brought a dignity well worthy of emulation.


1930

59

Grand Lodge of Missouri NEW YORI\:.

WILLIAM S. FARMER-1861, New York-1930, New York. Grand Master, 1918. Member of the Blue Lodge. As Grand Master during the period of the World War he was a leader in studying the plan and scope of Masonic service during the war and in raising funds by which might be m~t the obligations of the Fraternity to Brethren in the service and their dependents. At the close of the war, ever zealous for the good name of the Fraternity, he sounded the note of warning: "We must have good material, men of courage, men of thought, men of conviction. We do not want and must not elect to membership the unworthy, cowards, grafters, trimmers, weal{lings, men lacking backbone, floaters with the popular tide, no matter whither they may trend. Direct your Lodge to see to it that no man is elected to membership who does not measure up to the full standard of a man." He was Chairman of the New York Committee on the George Washington Memorial, and to this project he gave his tireless energy and enthusiasm. JOHN W. VROOMAN-18H, New York-1929, New York. Senior Past Grand Master. Member of Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery. 33 Mason. For sixty-four of the eighty-five years he lived he was a Freemason, not only in name but in thought, deed and accomplishment. He served as Senior Deacon of the Grand Lodge under five consecutive Grand Masters, as Junior Grand Warden two years, as Senior Grand 'Varden two years, as Deputy Grand Master four years, as Grand Master two years. He declined a unanimous re-election for a third term as Grand Master. From then (1891) until his death, he was a member and for many years Chairman of the Grand Lodge Committee on Jurisprudence, and for many years a member of the Committee on Charity. As Grand Master he brought to a successful conclusion the efforts which for nearly fifty years the Fraternity had put forth to construct a home for the dependent brethren, their widows and orphans. In recognition of his services, his brethren, two years ago, built the magnificent, fire-proof building for the old people and dedicated it as 0

THE JOHN W. VROOMAN MEMORIAL. The custom of presenting to each newly-made Mason a copy of the Great Light had its inception in one of his recol?mendations as Grand Master. The last Grand Lodge was his fifty-sixth Grand Lodge Communication. 'Vc are told that in all these years he was not only a part of the history of Freemasonry, but that ~n the .Jurisdiction of New York, to ~ considerable extent, its history was shaped by him. He was accustomed to say that Freemasonry was not a church, but that God had inspired it as the handservant of His church. During the years of his maturity his splendid enel'gy and lofty idealism were devoted to the service of God and his fellowmen.


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1930

NOR'}'H CAROLINA.

HEVERLY SAMPSON ROYSTER-1865, North Carolina1929, North Carolina. Gmnd Master, 1900 and 1901. He was a member of the York Rite Bodies, but his greatest interest was in the Symbolic Blue Lodge. For nearly forty years he was a commanding figure in the l\Iasonic affairs of his State. He was interested in politics and held several offices in his State and Country. He was Adjutant-General of his State under three separate appointments. For many years he was identified with the Oxford Orphanage and no institution eVt)r had a more faithful friend or devoted servant. DR. H. 1. CLARK-1930. Grand Master in 1902 and 1903.

DR. R. J. NOBLE-1853-1930. Grand Master in 1899. SOUTH nAIi:OTA.

HENRY COLE THORPE-1842, New York-1930, South Dakota. Grand Treasurer, 1890. OHIO.

EDWIN S. GRIFFITHS-1872-1930. Past Grand Master.

Eo C. GULLIFORD-1855-1930. Past Grand Master,

LEVI GRAFTON GOODALE-1843-1929. Past Grand Master. OIH.AHOMA.

JOSEPH SAMUEL MURROW-1835, Georgia-1929, Oklahoma. Grand Master, 1877-1879 (Indian Territory)-Grand High Pr'iest1890 (Indian Territory). The Grand Old M'an of Oklahoma Freemasonry, he served Masonry faithfully and well more than sixty years. He helped in the organization of the first Masonic Lodge in Indian Territory. He was the guiding spirit in the organization of its Grand Lodge. He organized the first Royal Arch Chapter and the Grand Chapter. He called the meeting Which formed the Grand Council. In the General Grand Bodies he succeed'ed in gaining recognition and universal respect for the Masonry of Indian Territory. He was for many years Grand Secretary and Grand Recorder of the Grand York Rite Bodies. In the spiritual, social and educational development of Oklahoma he performed a part and wielded an influence which made him one of the m~st useful citizens of the State, As a minister a,nd mis-


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

61

sionary he baptized more than three thousand persons. With his own hands he helped to build more than seventy permanent church edifices. He trained teachers and ministers Hnd ordained them and through these suecessors' he will continue to work and to live for generations to come. The crowning glory of his a.chievements is Murrow Indian Orphans' home, whose beneficiaries repr-esent nearly every Indian tribe in the United States. OREGON.

WILLIAM HUTTON FLANAGAN-1855, West Virginia---1930, Oregon. Grand Master, 1905. TENNESSEE.

CHARLES HENRY BYRN-1856-1930. Grand Master, 1910-Grand High Priest, 1928.

JAMES HENRY McCLISTBR-1844-1930. Grand Master, 1900-Grand High Priest, 1894Illustrious Grand Master, 1893. TEXAS.

DAN SCOTT McMILLIN-1858, M'issouri-1930 Texas. Grand :Master. He was a member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Comrhandery, was a 32掳 K. C. C. H. in the Scottish Rite and a Shriner. He was active in the fraternal, civil 'and commercial life of his city and took an active part in his church and its religious development. He served his city as mayor and served his country and state as a member of the Legislature and as State Senator, He remained active in Masonry till his death and during his membership of thirty-four years in the Grand Lodge of Texas he was路 absent from only one Annual Communication. For many years he was a member of the Jurisprudence Committee. He also served the Grand Royal Arch Chapter as a member of its Board for the Home of aged Masons. He lived by the precepts and principles taught in Masonry. JOHN WATSON-1844, Kentucky-1930, Texas, Grand Master, 1892-Grand Secretary, 1895-1913Chairman of the Committee on 'Vork, 1882-1895. This Masonic veteran will be missed not only by the Grand Lodg-e of Texas, which depended so much on his presence and counsel, but his passing will be mourned by the entire State of Texas in which he had such an important part during the early days of its development. In the Grand Lodge through the years he held many appointive offices and was a member of many important committees. He remained active till three years before his death. Though unable to attend in person the last three Annual Communications, he was there in spirit and the Grand Lodge, by formal action, actually recorded him as present.


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1930

VIRGINIA.

WILLIAM BAYLOR McCHESNEY-1849, Virginia-1930, Virginia, Grand Master, 1910-Grand High Priest, 1908Grand Commander, 1910. M'ember of the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery. He was an enthusiastic Mason, skilled in its ritual, learned in its lessons and literature, and in his daily walk and conversation he illustrated before all men its lofty tenets. For many years he was a constant attendant on the Grand Lodge and watchful of its proceedings, none being held in higher esteem or more affectionate veneration. At every Annual Communication he mingled with the brethren, contributing much usefully and efficiently in sound judgment and wise counsel. He leaves the memory of a well-spent life to be affectionately cherished by all who knew and loved him. WASHING'rON.

WILLIAM RAY BAKER-1876, Minnesota-1930, California. Grand Master, 1909. WEST VIRGINIA.

SAMUEL NATHANIEL MYERS-1846, Pennsylvania1929 W. Virginia. Grand l\'1aster, 1897-Grand Treasurer, 1!l02-1925-Grand High Priest, 1895-Grand Commander, 1904. Member of the Blue Lodge. Chapter, Commandery and of the Scottish Rite Bodies, a 33째 Mason and a Shriner. As a physician he became a beloved and respected citizen and held many important positions. He was a member of Pension Examining Board, Chief Surgeon of the B. & 0, R. R" member and President of the State Board of Health, member of many other important Boards, and at the time of his death President of the Merchants and Farmers Bank. He filled nearly all the official positions in the g-ift of the Fraternity and received all the honors possible as a member of the Craft. WISCONSIN.

WILLIAM WATSON PERRY-1853, Wisconsin-1929, Wisconsin. Grand Master, 1925-Grand Secretary, 1900-1927-Grand Secretary Emeritus, 1927-1929-Grand Secretary of the Grand ChapterGrand Recorder of the Grand Council-Grand Recorder of the Grand Commandery. He was an active 33째 Scottish Rite l\i'ason and Deputy for ,Visconsin. He was most Illustrious Grand Master in 1899. His sincerity, uniform courtesY,Masonic knowledge and readiness to respond to every call for service made him universally beloved among the Brotherhood throughout the state, as well as a wise counselor to those who were almost daily seeking his advice.

Respectfully submitted, JOHN PICKARD.


1930

Grand Lodge of !'vIissouri

63

ANNOUNCEMENT.

R. W. Arthur I\1ather called attention to the book on "Freemasonry During the Civil War" by Ray V. Denslow, which has just come off the press and is published by the Grand Lodge under the auspices of the Committee on Masonic Service Association. 1\11. W. Bro. B. E. Bigger supp'lemented the announcement respecting the same publication. CALLED FROM LABOR.

At 3 o'clock P. M., the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM -LABOR until 8 :30 o'clock P. M. Prayer was offered by R. W. Grand Chaplain Rev. Z. 1\1. Williams. FIRST DAY-EVENING SESSION.

At 7 :30 o'clock P. M:., prior to the Grand Lodge resuming labor, a choice musical program was rendered by the Royal Arch Chorus, under direction of Prof. Claude L. Fitchthorn, Dean of Music, Missouri Valley College, and Grand Organist . of the Grand Chapter R. A. M. of Missouri. At 8 :30 o'clock P. 1\1.. the Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by the R. VV. Deputy Grand Master, prayer being offered by the Rev. E. L. Robison, Grand Chaplain. EXEMPLIFICATION OF WORK.

The First and Second Degrees of Freemasonry were exemplified by a selected team of Kansas City Freemasons under direction of the Grand Lecturer, R. W. Bro. James R. McLachlan. CALLED FROM LABOR.

At 11 o'clock P. M. the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 9 o'clock A. 1\1. tomorrow. Prayer was offered by R. W. Grand Chaplain, E. L. Robison.


64

Proceedings of the

1930

SECOND DAY-MORNING SESSION. /

Kansas City, October 1, 1930. At 9 o'clock A. M. the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by the R. W. Deputy Grand ,Master William R. Gentry, R. W. Grand Chaplain Z. M. Williams offering the invocation. COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS-SUBSTITUTE MEMBERSHIP.

Due to absence of W. Bros. Hunt and Christian, who were not in attendance upon this session of the Grand Lodge, the names of M. VI/. Julius C. Garrell and R. Vv. Harry Hightower were announced as having been substituted in their stead on this Committee. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES.

To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: During the past year few matters have been presented to your committee requiring immediate action. Our relations with those Grand Lodges to whom Missouri has extended recognition continue to be harmonious. Missouri, at the present time, recognizes every legitimate Grand Lodge in the United States and the British Empire; these are the Grand Lodges which appear to be generally recognized the world over. P ARAHYBA DO NORTE:On November 29, 1929, your committee was In receipt of correspondence forwarded by Grand Master Freet, asking recognition by the Grand Lodge of Missouri of the Grande Loja Symbolica Escoceza Soberana, Para 0 Bstado da Parahyba, Brazil. The application is signed by Brother Jose Calis to Correa Nobrega, as Secretary to the Grand Master, Dr. Joao Arlindo Correa. This organization appears to have been founded August 24, 1927, and to have united with the Grand Lodge Parahyba Do Norte August 18, 1929. Its provisional seat is given as Ave. General Osirlo, 128 Palaceta "Branca Dias" Caixa, Postal 44. The Committee is supplied with a complete roster of the officers of the organization, but with no information as to its general character. Your Chairman addressed a letter to this Grand Lodge under date of November 29, 1929, suggesting that this Grand Lodge supply us with information as to whether they could properly meet the requirements set forth by our Grand Lodge in the matter of recognition and asking for further Information concerning the organization and gcnel'al character of their Grand Lodge, so that your committee might be thoroughly informed. To our communication the Grand Master replied: "Our Grand Lodge was fOl'med by three symbolic lodges, the original charters of the three lodges were received from the Grand Orient of


1930

Grand Lodge of lv! issouri

65

Brazil, at the time in confederation with the Supreme Council of Free and Accepted Masons for the U. S. of Brazil. When relations between the two bodies were broken, originated by the acts of the Grand Orient wanting to usurp privileges of the Grand Council and also of the symbolical bodies. breaking thus the resolutions of the Congress of Lausanne, held in 1875, these three lodges broke up relations with that body; on account of this the said Lodges kept the original charters received from the Grand Orient because, at the time (1927), there was no Grand Lodge in Brazil that was able to exehange the original charters. In a general meeting that took piace at the time the three said lodges engaged themselves to respect and practice the laws that ruled the Scottish Rite throughout the world, and especially the twenty-five landmarks quoted by Hon. Brother Albert G. Mackey, and constituted themselves in the Grand Lodge for the State of Parahyba, today a body sovereign, independent and duly recognized as regular and autonomous. Its decisions cannot be overruled by any other Masonic bodies. * * â&#x20AC;˘ It only confers the three symbolic degrees of E. A., F. C. and M. M. The membership of the symbolic lodges of this Grand Lodge were men exclusively, no woman has been admittcd into fellowship and no relations exist with mixed lodges or bodies. All candidates were admitted under such jurisdiction and expressed the unfaltering beliefs (God and the immortality of the soul). This Grand Lodge and its subordinate lodges adhere in principle to the ancient landmarks, customs and usages of the Craft in the Constitution of 1723, except as modified by the Grand Lodge of England. The Holy Bible, or the Book of the Sacred Law is kept open in all the lodges during their sessions and all candidates are thereon obligated. The fundamental law of the Grand Lodge, says its Constitution, fo~bids discussion of politics or religious matters in open lodge, proclaims the existence of a Supreme Being, does not impose limit to free investigation of the truth, is accessible to men of all classes, all religitms and political creeds, fights ignorance, obeys the laws of the country, lives in accordance with honor. * * * Exchanging representatives with all the Grand Lodges of the world." Your committee has been unable to receive from other sources more than general information concerning the conditions in Brazil. Symbolic Masonry in Brazil was French in origin and in spirit; their Scottish Rite came from Belgium and their system of government appears to be complicated. 'l¡he Grand Orient and Supreme Council of Brazil consists of four Grand Bodies: (1) 'The Supreme Council, exercising ritualistic jurisdiction over Scottish Rite bodies and consisting of 33 active members, chosen by the body itself from those who have been regularly invested with the highest degree of the Rite. (2) The Grand Chapter of the modern Rite, exercising control over the seven degrees of the French modern Rite and having 33 active members. (3) The Grand Chapter of the Noachites, exercising control of the thirteen degrees of the Adonihiramite Rite and composed of 33 active members. (4) Grand Chapter of the York Rite, three degrees, exercising control over this Rite and consisting of 33 active Master Masons .

.

There is a General Assembly in Brazil, composed of the members of the Council General of the Order, representatives of the bodies of the seat of the Central power, representatives of the bodies away from the seat of the Central power, and representatives of each of the above Grand Bodies, heads of the Rites above mentioned. This General Assembly corresponds with the Communications of our own Grand Lodge and is the general legislative body for Brazilian Masonry of all Rites controlled by the Grand Body. The State Grand Lodges in Brazil are only two in number and are subordinates of the Grand Orient. The only


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Proceedings of the

1930

statistics which we have are for 1915, which showed 330 lodges with a membership of more than 20,000. The Grand Orient, at that time had two lodges in Parahyba do Norte; its organization in 1927, or 1929, shows it to be a rather recent organization. Pamphlets issued by brethren in other Grand Lodges of that jurisdiction intimate that there has been a schism in Brazilian Masonry and that their whole system has been torn asimde,r. Under these circumstances your committee feel that the present policy of non-recognition should be continued. It is unfortunate that our brethren in the Latin countries cannot carryon their duties without friction, for it would be a pleasure for us to recognize legitimate bodies of the Rite in those jurisdictions. but until such a time as this is possible, we recommend that the Grand Lodge of Missouri continue with its present policy. NUEVO LRON:On December 23, 1929, your committee was in receipt of a communication from Joel Rocha, Grand Master of the Gran Logia del Estado de Nuevo Leon, asking that the Grand Lodge of Missouri grant to his Grand Lodge fraternal recognition. This Grand Lodge claims to have been working regularly since its foundation in 1904, but submitted no papers or statements as to its character, aims and ideas. In a letter of December 23, 1929, asking for further information, your committee cited the fact that article 2, page 4, of their Constitution defined their jurisdiction, "Sin invadir derechos de otras G. Gr. Llog Universal mente Reconcidas." Notwithstanding this statement that they respected the rights and privileges of other Grand Lodges, our information is that this Grand Lodge maintains probably three lodges in the City of San Antonio, Texas, within the jurisdiction of a Grand Lodge universally recognized. This policy conflicts with our policy of recognition in that our laws do not permit us to go into organized territory and establish lodges. In our letter to the Grand Secretary of this applying Grand Lodge, we stated: "In justice to the Grand Lodge of Texas, we could not recognize your Grand Lodge. The Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Texas, writing in 1921, said of your lodges in San Antonio, 'I beg to state that these lodges are considered clanClestine and we have no fraternal intercourse with same.''' Another additional feature which your committee flnds in the Constitution of this Grand Lodge is article 4, the said article being a treaty with the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite wherein expulsion from that Rite. prevented admission to lodges of the symbolic Rite, evidently without an opportunity to be heard in their own lodge. Under these conditions, and with this knowledge, your committee do not feel that this Grand Lodge should be recognized at this time, and so recommended. GENERAL MASONIC LEAGUE:On March 18, 1930, your committee received from an organization known as the "Allgemeine Freimaurer-Liga:" considerable material relative to an Annual Congress of that organization which was to convene at Geneva, Switzerland, August 21-24, 1930. This league, of which Brother Eugene Lennhoff is managing director, appears to be an association of individual "regular" Masons and not a league of Grand Lodges. From the stationery of the letter it would appear it advocates world peace, universal brotherhood and regularity. Your committee has not been advised as to what was accomplished at the August meeting, but since there is no application for recognition, we


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

67

merely present this statement of its purpose and aims, without recommendation. Fraternally submitted, RAY V. DENSLOW, Chairman,

(Adopted.)

C. H. BRIGGS, ORESTES MITCHELL, V. F. BOOR.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS.

:M. VV. Brother C. H. Briggs, Chairman, presented the following report for the Committee. (Adopted.) We cannot speak too highly of the industry and zeal which characterized the administration of our Grand Master until his health gave way and he went down very near the shadows of the grave. Not only was he wise and successful in his work as Grand M'aster, but his addresses to Masonic gatherings were of great benefit to the Craft. The thousands of his brethren who heard him were led to a higher appreciation of the great principles for which our Order stands, and we are confident that many were made better men and better Freemasons as the result of listening to the words of wisdom which fell from his lips. We are profoundly gratefUl to Almighty God for sparing the life of our Grand Master and that he has so far recovered his health that he was able to open the Grand Lodge yesterday, and we pray that he may be fUlly restored to health and strength and that his useful life may be long spared to serve the Craft which he loves so well. We are glad he was able to visit the Grand Lodge of Illinois, attend the Grand Masters' Conference at Washington City, the Washington Memorial Association at Alexandria, and visit so many of our Lodges before his health gave way. He has commanded the respect and love of his brethren by doing his best to serve his God by serving his fellowmen, We recommend that his decisions and the portion of the Address referring to the use of the Masonic name in business be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. We recommend that all matters referring to the Masonic Home be referred to the Special Committee on the Home already appointed by thi~ Grand Lodge. Fraternally submitted, CORONA H. BRIGGS, Chairman, R. R. KREEGER, ARCH A. JOHNSON, V AN FREMONT BOOn, T. W. COTTON, W. A. CLARK, JULIUS C. GARRELL,

BERT S. LEE, OnESTH:S MITCHELL, W. W, MARTIN, JOHN PICKARD, .A NTHONY F. ITTNgn, BYRNE E. BIGGER.


68

Proceedings of the

1930

INVITATION.

R. W. Bro. James W. Skelly presented the following tation to the M. VV. Grand Lodge:

InVI-

The M. W. Grand Lodge} A. F. & A. M. of Missow'i: Dear Brethren: On behalf of the Scottish Rite Cathedral Association of St. Louis, I desire to tender this Grand Lodge a most cordial and fraternal invitation to hold its session beginning September 29, 1931, in the Scottish Rite Cathedral in St. Louis. Cordially and fraternally, LEWIS T. TUNE, President.

ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS.

The hour for election of Grand Officers having arrived, the Grand l'vIaster appointed the following brethren to act as tellers: Erwin L. Ocker, Chairman, C. Duggan, Warren May, F. Madden, A. D. Tilson, M. E. Ewing, Thomas Harbaugh, K. C. Johnson, Bruce Carl, A. D. Ludlow, Fred H. Knight, Elmer E. Hay, H. S. Truman, Fred Hach, F. M. Agorn. The following were elected: 1\1. W. BRO. WM. R. GENTRy R. VV. BRO. RAY V. DENSLOW

R. R. R. R.

W. W. \lV. W.

BRO. THAD B. LANDON BRO. FRANK

C.

BARNHILL

BRO. EDMUND E. 1\1oRRIS BRO. ARTHUR MATHER

Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Senior Grand ll1arden .Junior Grand Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES.

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge} Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri: Your Committee on Chartered Lodges submits the following report: The Chairman of this Committee takes this opportunity to express his appreciation to the Grand Secretary and his assistants for courtesies extended to him while in the Grand Lodge office compiling this report. There are 656 Chartered Lodges in this jurisdiction, three less than last year, the decrease being caused by two consolidations and one surrender of charter. . Williamsburg Lodge No. 8 surrendered路 its charter Dec. 31, 1929. Manes Lodge No. 240 consolidated with M'ountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Sept. 27, 1929, and Clarkton Lodge No. 248, consolidated with Malden Lodge No. 406, April 1, 1930.


1930

69

Grand Lodge of Missourl,

Returns and remittances were received on time from all Lodges with the following exceptions: DELINQUENT LODGES. No. Lodge 139-0regon 152-Linn Creek 374-Wilderness 489-Lakeville 496-Robert Burns 280-Reed Springs

:

Date Paid Sept. 10 August 15 August 15 August 30 August 15.......... No Report........

District 8 38 53 50 53 54

. .

Sec. 75 of Grand Lodge Law provides a 'fine of Ten Dollars for each period of thirty days or a fraction thereof that returns are withheld. We are informed that Reeds Spring Lodge No. 280 intends consolidating with another Lodge, but this is no reason why 1930 report should not be made up. We therefore sugg-est to the incoming Grand Master that he request the District Deputy Grand Master for the 54th District to obtain this report in order to complete -the records of the Grand Secretary. PER. CAPITA TAX, Amount of Per Capita Tax collected 1929 Amount of Per Capita Tax collected 1930........ Decrease

. .

$237,157.85 235,582.41 ... $

2,575.44

DUPLICATl<: CHARTERS. Duplicate Charters were issued to following lodges: Jameson No. 500, Charter destroyed by fire. Urbana No. 421, Charter destroyed by fire. Lock Springs No. 488, Charter destroyed by fire. Bois D'Arc No. 449, Charter destroyed by fire, insurance $500 on property. Pittsville No. 428, Charter destroyed by fire, total loss on property, No insurance. Richland No. 385, Charter destroyed by fire, insurance $1,000 on property. Jerusalem No. 315, Charter accidentally destroyed. REPORTED BY CHARTERED LODGES. 1929 1930 Initiated 2,949 3,235 Passed 2,944 3,133 Raised 2,983 3,261 Affiliated 914 965 Reinstated 845 863 Total membership 1929 . Total membership 1930 Net Loss

1930 1929 Dimitted 860 1,054 Suspended U. M. C....... 10 3 Suspended N. P. D 2,920 2,407 Expelled 13 27 Died , 1,478 1,508 ................. . 113,791 . . 113,171 620

The number Raised this year is 278 less than last year, but the principal cause for the loss in membership is the increase of 513 in suspensions for non-payment of dues. The number suspended is 2,907, and this is only 76 less than were Raised,


Proceedings of the

70

1930

278 lodges show increase in membership, 304 lodges .show loss and 73 lodges break even. The loss in membership does not appear to be in anyone section of the state, as every district has one or more lodges showing lo:::;s. We are informed that our neighboring Grand Jurisdictions of Kentucky, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Iowa also show loss in membership. Illinois, however, reports gain of 1,000. MEMBERSHIP IN LARGE TOWNS. Total Member St. Louis, 46 Lodges .... 26,657 Kansas City, 18 Lodges 18,106 St. Joseph, 5 Lodges.... 3,016 Springfield, 3 Lodges.. 2,457 Joplin, 2 Lodges............ 1,387 934 Sedalia, 2 Lodges.......... 895 Hannibal, 2 Lodges......

Gain or Loss Loss 8 Loss 296 Gain :H Loss 53 Gain 20 Loss 11 8 Gain

Susp. Dues OutRaised N.P.D. standing 621 453 123 48 41 24 11

366 813 74 97 25 15 15

$5,795 9,086 3,439 790 540 842 150

St. Louis County shows increase in membership of 65. Jackson County, outside of Kansas City, shows increase of 59. The total membership in St. Louis City and St. Louis County is 30,499. The total membership in Kansas City and Jackson County is 20,022. Orient Lodge No. 546 of Kansas City shows the largest increase in membership, 105. 133 lodges report not even one member Raised. OUTSTANDING DUES. Total amount of outstanding dues reported in 1930 Total amount of outstanding dues reported in 1929 Increase

__

__

$99,586 83,573 __ $16,013

The average amount of Annual Dues per Lodge is $5.18, so that this large amount of outstanding dues may indicate that there are almost 20,000 members who have not paid their dues. However, some of these members may owe an accumulation of two or three years, which would reduce the total number of delinquents. We don't !{now which is worse, to have 20,000 in arrears for one year's dues, or a smaller number, with some owing two or three years. We believe that prompt collection of dues will reduce the number of suspensions for non-payment of dues. Gate City Lodge No. 522 of Kansas City with almost] .700 members for the third successive year rep<.>:'ts no dues outstanding. This lodge is the fifth largest in the state and is the only lodge of more than 900 members reporting no dues out. No. 656 of Kansas City also reports no outstanding dues. Mizpah Lodge No. 639 of St. Louis with almost 600 members for the third successive year reports no dues outstanding. This lodge has only suspended for non-payment of dues a total of eight members in the last four years. Does not this indicate that prompt collection of d.ues does reduce the number of suspensions? Ten more lodge~ in St. Louis report no dues outstanding: Nos. 1, 95, 330, 443, 499, 576 641, 652, 654, 661. Nos. 4 and 271 of Springfield, No. 28 of Hannibal, No. 602 of Columbus, No~ 247 of Neosho and No. 52 of Carrollton. Also the following smaller lodges: Nos. 11, 24, 45, 58, 101, 102, 156, 166, 169, 173, 192, 211, 215, 230, 263, 277, 292, 304, 310, 312, 343, 349, 367, 384, 393, 395, 406, 407, 417, 426, 441, 491, 518, 525, 531, 532, 534, 570, 581, 590, 592, 597, 615, 620, 628, and 664. Only lodges who


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

71

specifically answered the question regarding outstanding dues are included in the above ligt. A lodge cannot properly function if any considerable number of its members are in arrears for dues, therefore it would be well if lodges gave more attention to prompt payment of dues. REINSTATEMENTS. Section 74, Grand Lodge Law provides "If any Lodge shall collect from a suspended member, dues, for non-payment or' which he was suspended, such Lodg-e shall pay to the Grand Lodge $2.10 for each year's dues so collected, if not previously accounted for." As usual many lodges failed to comply with this law, thus requiring the Grand Secretary to write many letters to collect these arrears. OLDEST SECRETARY. Bro. R. H. Caffall is serving his 49th year as Secretary of Anchor Lodge No. 443 of St. Louis. Only a short time now until his golden jubilee. This "young" man reports no dues outstanding for 1930, and there are never any mistakes in his report. . VERY SMALL LODGES. The following lodges report no work, are very small and it might be advisable to see if consolidations can be effected with other lodges: Reeds Spring Lodge No. 280. No report for 1930. 28 members reported in 1929. Bayou Lodge No. 365. 21 members, net loss 11. Hatfield Lodge No. 395. 11 members, net loss 9. No cash on hand. Total assets $25.00. This lodge reports 11 members and 12 officers. Pike Lodge No. 399. 23 members, net loss 2. Hinton Lodge No. 455. 23 members, net loss 2. ERRORS AND OMTSSIONS. The Grand Secretary adopted a new form of report blank this year, which does not require the Lodge to furnish a list of its members, thus lessening the work of the Secretary. The Secretaries should have shown their appreciation to the Grand Secretary by making a greater effort to have their reports correct. Some Lodges cannot understand that the fiscal year of the Grand Lodge closes on June 30, and wait until July to act on delinquents. They then include suspensions and remissions under July datings, thereby reducing the amount of per capita tax to the Grand Lodge. Of course the Grand Secretary cannot approve such reports and it takes much correspondence to get them corrected. Please remember that the fiscal 'year of the Grand Lodg-e is from July 1 to June 30, and nothing that occurs after the latter date may be included in the return for the current year. The Grand Secretary had to write several times to some lodges urging them to correct discrepancies in their returns. Three letters were written to No. 622, yet at the time this report was compiled, the return of that lodge had not been corrected. When the Grand Secretary calls attention to errors in your returns, please extend to him the courtesy of a prompt reply. Under our law the Worshipful Master is head of the Lodge, but the Secretary is the business officer of the Lodge, and if he fails in his duties more harm may be done to the Lodge than through the failure of any other officer.


72

1930

Proceedings of the

To be right, or not to be right-that is the question, Whether 'tis nobler in a Secretary to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous criticism, Or to take arms against a sea of errors, And by correcting end them? To correctNo more; and by correcting to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks The Grand S.ecretary is heir to-'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished. To correct-to work! Ay, there's the rub; For it does take work to keep lodge records straight. There's the respect that makes error of so long life; For who would suffer the whips, the jibes, The spurns of the Grand Secretary, When he himself might their quietus make With a good typewriter? Who would bear The scornful remarks of the Committee on Chartered Lodges, But that the dread of further work makes us Rather keep those mistakes we have Than fly to others we know not of? But conscience may make Heroes of us all, And thus the native hue of resolution Be strengthened by hard work and thought, And the goal of the Grand Secretary, A perfect return from every lodge, Be at last attained. Soft you now! The Grand Secretary. Right Worshipful Sir, Mayall thine errors be forgotten. Fraternally sUbmitted,

(Adopted.)

c. L. ALEXANDER, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BOARDS OF RELIEF AND MASONIC EMPLOYM.ENT BUREAUS.

R. W. Bra: Andrew J. O'Reilly, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Boards of Relief, which was adopted as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. & A.M., State of Missouri: Your Committee on Boards of Relief. and Employment Bureaus fraternally report, we have before us the reports of the Board of Kansas City, Springfield and St. Louis. No other reports have been received. We also have the report of the St. Louis Employment Bureau. All have been carefully examined and they are in substance as follows: STATEMENT KANSAS CITY MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF KANSAS CITY, MO. Cash Receipts and Disbursements; July I, 1929, to June 30. 1930. RECEIPTS. From Lodges in Kansas City, Mo., as follows: Kansas City No. 220 Gate City No. 522

,$ 62.50 . 115.00


1930

Grand Lodge of 111issouri

Sheffield No. 620 _ Orient No. 54.6 _ Rural No. 316 Temple No. 299 _ Westport No. 340 __ East Gate No. 630 _ Albert Pike No. 219 _ Heroine No. 104 _ _ _. _ _.

73 .

. _ __

_ _

_ _ __

. . . . _.. _ _..

100.00 100.00 25.00 112.50 155.00 162.50 62.50 127.50

$1.022.51)

Refund on Teleg-ram._ :.. _ _ ~ _._ _ . .54 Refund on Telephone AccounL __ _ __ ._..__ . 1.00 Amount collected from outside Lodges and individuals on fraternal assistance rendered _.._ _.._ _.._""'_ 2.503.65 Cash Balance. July 1. 1929. as per last report _._._ .._.. _._ _ . 1.871.05 Grand Total

_

,. __

_

__

.'

__ ..$5.412.87

DIsnURSEMgNTS. On Fraternal Assistance Accounts._ _.._ _._ _ $3.050.95 . Postage and Printing _ _ _ _ _ _._ .._........ 36.40 Telegrams _._ _ __ _._ .. _ _ _._ _.. 42.13 Telephone _ _ _ _ _ __ _... 90.29 Auto Expense _ __ _.._ _ _ _ _._ 300.00 Miscellaneous: Physician, $25.00; Office Sup.• etc _... 45.01 Secretary's Salary __ .__ __ __ ._ _._ .. .._ 1.500.00 Cash Balance. July 1. 1930 . __ .. . .... _ 348.09 $5.412.87 Lodges in Kansas City in arrear'S July 1st as follows: Sheffield No. 625 . .__ . _ ._ .. _.... __ __ .. __ .$ 50.00 Swope Park No. 617 .. __ _ __ . . __ .. 160.00 Rockhill No. 663 .. .. __ .. __ .. . 52.50 Ivanhoe No. 446 . .._. __ . . . .. __.. 555.00

$5.412.87

All Lodges in arrears. except Ivanhoe No. 446. paid up between July 1st and the date of making out this report. Respectfully submitted to the M. "V. Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri. August 10. 1930. VI. S. LANE. Secretary-Treasurer. REPORT OF SPRINGFIELD MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF FOR THE YEAR ENDING. JUNE 30, 1930. DISBURSEMI~NTS.

8-2-29-Relief to O. G. Halliburton. Birmingham Lodge No. 757. Ala _. .. ._ __ . ._. _ -- --.-..--.$ 2-9-29-Relief to Chas. G. Dominic. Peninsula Command cry No. 8. Mich .. ...... _._ ...... _.... __ .__ ....... __ ... ...__ ... __._ . 9-17-29-Telegrams for 1928 and 1929 to M. F. Smith. Sec·y __ . 9-17-29-Relief to C. A. Walker by Geo. W. Custer__ .. .__ ....._._ .. 10-9-29-Relief to Rolf R. Noll. Living-ston Lodge No. 51. Mo. . 12-16-29-Relief to J. n. Nalle. Clifton Lodge No. 463. Mo _ . 12-18-29-Relief to Geo. ·W. Eaker. Poplar Bluff I-,odge No. 209. Mo. _. __ __ ._ _ - - . 12-19-29-Relief to Carl E. Geier. Joplin Lodge No. 335. Mo. __ _. 1-ll-30-Relief to Miss Clara Lanning. account Fair Play Lodge No. 44. Mo. .._., _ _ _ _._ .

10.00 20.00 29.24 3.&0 25.00 2.50 50.00 6.M

14.00


74

1930

Proceedings of the

2-6-30-Pantagraph Printing Co., for one List of Lodges 4-3-30-Relief to' Roy Clifton, Sapulpa Lodge No. 170, Okla Total Disbursements

__

_

.. _

. _..

_. __

1.00 75.00 $2 36. 2 4

RECEIPTS. 8-20-29-Received from Westport Lodge No. 340, Kansas City, Mo., account John Kmety _ 8-20-29-Received from Birmingham Lodge No. 757, Ala., account O. G. Halliburton 12-3-29-Received from Peninsula Commandery No.8, Mich., Account Chas. G. Dominic _ 3-26-30-Rcceived from Livingston Lodge No. 51, Mo., account Rolf R NoIL _ 1-16-30-Received from Clifton Lodge No. 463, Mo., account .1. B. Nalle 2-6-30-Received from Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, Mo., account Geo. W. Eaker _ 2-6-30-Received from Fair Play Lodge No. 44, Mo., account Miss Clara Lanning _ 2-6-30-Interest on time deposit from McDaniel Nat'l Bank 4-15-30-Reccived from Sapulpa Lodge No. 170, Okla., account Roy Clifton Total Receipts

$ 50.00

.

10.00

__ .

20.00

.

25.00

.

2.50

.

50.00

.

14.00 22.00

.

75.00

.

$268.50 RI<:CAPITULA TION.

Balance cash on hand, July 1, 1929, in Farmers and Merchants Bank Time deposit in McDaniel Natioanl Bank, July I, 1929 Receipts during the rear

$ 356.01 . 550.00 . 268.50

Grand Total. $1,174.51 Less Warrants from 97 to 107, inc., amounL............................ 236.24 Leaving balance on hand, July 1, 1930 July 1, 1930, money deposited in banks as follows: Time Certificate in McDaniel National Bank Checking Acc't in Farmers and Merchants Bank TotaL.

-

$ 938.27

$550.00 388.27 $938.27

$ 938.27

During the past ycar thc Board has conducted Masonic funerals for the following transient brethren: July 8, 1929, Wm. E. Sullens, member of Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, .1'.. F. & A. M., Kirkwood, Mo., funeral conducted by United Lodge No.5. Burial in Greenlawn Cemetery. August 12, 1929, Dr. Emmett Bostel, member of Rural Lodge No. 316, A. F. & A. M .. Kansas City, Mo., funeral conducted by Solomon Lodge No. 271. Burial in Maple Park .Cemetery. October 15. 1929, Barton F. Stone, member of Hiram Lodge No. 494, A. F. & A. M., Oklahoma City, Okla., funeral conducted by Gate of the Temple Lodg'e No. 422. November 29. 1929, "\Vm. H. Allen, member of Acacia Lodge No. 602, A. F. & A. M., Columbia, Mo. funeral conducted by United Lodge No.5. Burial on Masonic lot in Hazelwood Cemetery.


1930

7S

Grand Lodge of Missouri

December 22, 1929, Arthur Bowles, member of Belle Point Lodge No. 20, A. F. & A. M., Fort Smith, Ark., funeral conducted by Solomon Lodge No. 271. Burial in Greenlawn Cemetery. March 6, 1930, Geo. Burwell, member of Fellowship Lodge No. 89, A. F. & A. M., Marion, Ill., funeral conducted by Gate of Temple Lodge No. 422. March 20, 1930, Frederick Hosford, member of Lincoln Lodg-e No. 19, A. F. & A. M., Lincoln, Neb'. , funeral conducted by United Lodge No.5. Burial in Memorial Park. April 17, 1930, Roy Clifton, member of Sapulpa Lodge No. 170, A. F. & A. M., Sapulpa, Okla., funeral conducted by Solomon Lodge No. 271. Burial on Masonic lot in Hazelwood Cemetery. April 28, 1930, John F. Winn, member of Kansas City Lodge No. 220, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City, Mo., funeral conducted by Gate of Temple Lodge No. 422. Burial in Memorial Park. May 9, 1930, Arvel D. Kesterson, member of Wyandotte Lodge No.3, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City, Kan., funeral conducted by United Lodge No.5. Funeral at East Avenue Baptist Church and burial in Greenlawn Cemetery. There have been numerous calls for relief during the. year which the Board has taken up with the lodges of the applicants and relief has been sent direct to the applicants from their respective lodges. BERT S. LEE, President, M. F. SMITH, Secretary. REPORT OF ST. LOUIS MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF.

To the Most Worshihfu,[ Grand Lodge, A. F.' & Missouri:

A. M., State of

The Masonic Board of Relief of St. Louis reports functioning as follows: Applicants giving clandestine Lodges............................................................ 4 Expelled __ __ ..__ __ : _ __ _.................. 6 Fictitious Lodges __ __ _..__ ._ _ .. _ __. 2 Frauds ._ __ __ _ 27 Sick members visited in hospitals.. _ __..__ __ .. .. __ _ __ : 99 Impostors __ __ __ .__ .. __ 20 Investigations made for St. Louis Lodges of members, who were reported sick and in distress at some distant poinL 78 Applicants giving defunct Lodges __ __ l Number of receipts reported 10sL __ __ __ 10 Members or their dependents reported missing 21 Applicants for relief having no recognized claim 81 Applicants residing outside jurisdiction of this Board __ 26 Suspended _ , 33 Unaffiliated , _............................................... 5 Applicants whose Masonic affiliation was unknown __ __ .. __ 33 Applicants found unworthy __ _ .. __ 38 Applicants who withdrew their appeal for relief.. __ __ __ 6 Applicants found worthy and assisted __ 318 Total applications for relief __

__

__ ..__.:

__

808

Masonic Burial Services were arranged over the remains of twentyfive transients as follows: July 2, 1929-John W. Johnson, Lewis Lodge' 191, Louisville, Ky., by Apollo Lodge No. 529.


76

Proceedings of the

1930

July 30, 1929-Arthur T. Wilcox, Paramount Lodge 1015, Chicago, Ill., by Polar Star Lodge No. 79. August 8, 1929-John R. Corwin, EI Paso Lodge 13, Colorado Springs, Colo., by Beacon Lodge No.3. August 23, 1929-David MacLean, Perfect Union Lodge 1, New Orleans, La., by Aurora Lodge 267. September 21, 1929-Wm. M. Alexander, Temple Lodge 46, Peoria, IlL, by Lambskin Lodge No. 460. October 14, 1929-Wm. K. Hedges, Las Animas Lodge 28, Trinidad, Colo., by Meridian Lodge No.2. October 24, 1929-Henry R. Menefee, Richmond Lodge 57, Richmond, M路o., by Theo. Roosevelt Lodge No. 661. November 7, 1929-Capt. F. W. T. Strechi, Mt. Hermon Lodge 304, Columbus, Ga., by Itaska Lodge No. 420. November 8, 1929-Stephen Joska, Sackets Harbor Lodge 135, Sackets Harbor, N. Y., by Olive Branch Lodge No. 576. November 18, 1929-Jacob Lax, Fidelity Lodge 152, Medora, IlL, by Forest Park Lodge No. 578. December 3, 1929-George T. Kulp, Garden City Lodge 141, Chicago, Ill., by Erwin. Lodge No. 121. January 21, 1930-Albert H. Schultz, Gate of the Temple Lodge 422, Springfield, Mo., by Missouri Lodge No.!. January 21, 1930---'John Overstreet, Silex Lodge 75, Silex, Mo., by Cosmos Lodge No. 282. . April 1, 1930-Roy T. McFarland, Washington Lodge 1117, Dallas, Texas, by Cache Lodge No. 416. April 2, 1930-Dave Mendelsolm, Shreveport Lodge 115, Shreveport, La., by Rose Hill Lodge No. 550. April 28, 1930-Hugh L. Fitzpatrick, Hannibal Lodge 188, Hannibal, Mo., by Harmony Lodge No. 499. May 2, 1930-Edgar Williams, Hoxie Lodge 692, Hoxie, 路Ark., by Keystone Lodge No. 243. April 29, 1930-Alfred C. Nye, Gate of the Temple Lodge 422, Springfield, Mo., by Triangle Lodge No. 638. May 12, 1930-Dominick LaRue, Nitram Lodge 188, St. Petersburg, Fla., by St. Louis Lodge No. 20. M'ay 29, 1930-W. E. Turner, Chamois Lodge 185, Chamois, Mo., by Algabil Lodge No. 544. May 31, 1930-Chas. H. Reith, Sr., Shekinah Lodge No. 241, Carbondale, Ill., by Pilgrim Lodge No. 652. June 2, 1930-Robt. M. Hall, Albert Pike Lodge No. 303, Wichita, Kansas, b.y Good Hope Lodge No. 218. June 6, 1930-Arthur 'Veil, Carthage Lodge 19-7, Carthage, Mo., by Commonwealth Lodge No. 654. June 25, 1930-Eugene Scheffels, Humboldt Lodge 114, Hawthorne, N. J., by Mizpah Lodge No. 639. There were eight graves opened in the Masonic Board of Relief Lot in Valhalla Cemetery for the following Brcthern: No. 65-Samuel L. Smith, Lepanta Lodge 667, Lepanta, Ark. No. 66-John Wm. Johnson, Lewis Lodge 191, Louisville, Ky. No. 67-Tree. No. 68-John R. Corwin, El Paso Lodge 13, Colorado Spring's, Colo. No. 69-Geo. O. Sunday, Geo. Washington Lodge 9, St. Louis. No. 70-Elbert V. Kring, Aurora Lodge 267, St. Louis. No. 71-Harry W. Pulliam, Kaw Lodge 272, Kansas City, Kan. No. 72-Benj. C. Simmons, Osage Valley Lodge 24, Osawatomie, Kan.


1930

77

Grand Lodge of Missouri

No. 73-Rev. James D. Simmons. White Plains Lodge 473, White Plains. N. Y. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. To To To To

Receipts: Balance on hand July 1. 1929 . .$ 414.98 Refunds .... __ . ...... $2.213.25 Initiations . . .__ 2,755.00 Interest. .____ _ .. 23.02 4.991.27

By By By By By By By By

Relief . .. . . .. $3,484.28 Funerals. ... . ..... . .____ 374.16 Telegraph and Telephone .. .. 204.09 Office Expense . .__ . __ . .__ 500.00 Printing and Stationery ... __ . 38.50 Secretary . . . .... _.______ 235.00 Secretary pro tem __ . .... . ... 25.00 $5,059.53 Balance on hand June 30, 1930 ... . .__ .. .. .. 346.72

DISBURSEMENTS.

$5,406.25 $5.406.25 Approved, Attest: A. J. O'REILLY, President. C. H. SCHUREMAN. Secretary. SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE ST. LOUIS M'ASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF. The St. Louis Lodges make report to the Grand Secretary of the work done during the Masonic Year ending June 30th. 1930. and according to these reports. there was a total of 699 initiations during the year and at $5.00, the receipts of the St. Louis Board of Relief would be $3,495.00, but $2,700.00 has been paid, leaving a balance due of $795.00. This should be paid up as soon as possible, as demands for relief of transient Masons in that city are very great and will undoubtedly be greater during the ensuing winter than ever before. It is al!'o a fact that several Lodges are not only delinquent for the past current year, but are in arrears for one or two years previous. However, these caRes are very few and the majority of the_Lodges are paid up in full. A. J. O'REILLY, President. REPORT OF MASONIC EMPLOYMENT BUREAU, ST. LOUIS.

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri: . The Masonic Employment Bureau of the City of St. Louis, Missouri. herewith presents the following report of its labors ending June 30th, 1930, for your consideration and approval. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. Receipts: Balance on hand July 1, 1929 __ .. .___ R.eceipts to June 30th, 1930 Interest on Deposits to June 30th, 1930

_

$1,995.25 6.805.75 97.27 $8,898.27


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1930

Proceedings of the DISBURSEMENTS.

Salaries _.. _ _ _ __ __ Office RenL_ _ __ Telephone Service _ _ _._ __ ._ Printing, Stationery and Supplies Postage, Equipment and General Expense

Balance on hand July I, 1930

_. .

$5,281.00 600.00 211.45 199.61 571.04

. .

$6,863.10 2,035.17

. $8,898.27

$8,898.27

STATISTICAL RECORD.

July, 1929-June 30, 1930

Applicants Placed 1,767

Cost $6,863.10

Av. Cost Per Posi tion Secured $3.88

There were 1,767 placements for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1930, at a cost of $6,863.10 or $3.88 per position secured, of this number 711 were placed in permanent positions at a yearly salary of $673,764.00; 222 for 30 days or more at a salary of $26,710.00; ?laking a total of 933 earning for the year, $700,474.00. For every dollar spent by the Bureau $103.50 was realized by the applicant placed, there were also 834 placed in positions of less than 30 days of which no record was kept as far as salary was concerned. Our grateful appreciation is acknowledged to Right Worshipful Brothers Chas. F. Drehmann and Leroy Wei dIe, District Deputy Grand M'asters, who have evidenced their continued interest in the progress and welfare of the Bureau by invariably inclUding in their addresses to the Masonic bodies a forceful reminder and urgent request to help, aid and assist the Employment Bureau in placing applicants in positions to enable them to support themselves and families. Our efficient Secretary is also commended for his persistent cffor~s to serve the Fraternity, having made 820 calls during the fiscal year and secured many positions for Master Masons and their dependents. The highest form of service is to help another to help himself. Fraternally submitted, I. L. JONES, Presiden t. It is a noteworthy fact that the business of all these Boards show a marked' increase in their activities, due undOUbtedly to the increased number of members of the fraternity that are seeking employment. It is astonishing how much the actual worthy have increased in number and yet a deplorable fact that there are more Lodges unable to help their own members than ever before. This Is undoubtedly due to the lack of thought many of the Lodges gave when times were more prosperous and doing much work, not to lay aside sufficient funds for relief work when lack of employment, sickness and distress come upon their members and dependents. Each Lodge in our State should be prepared to meet the needs of any of their members when distress overtakes them.


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We can congratulate the Masons of the cities above named, in the selection of their representatives that form each of the Boards and Bureaus, bearing in !!lind the Masonic law of our Grand Lodge, that requires each to help an applicant路 for relief if found worthy. This does not exclude the member of a Lodge that is itself penniless, but no Lodge should be in that condition. ' Fraternally submitted, A. J. O'REILLY, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON HURRICANE AND FLOOD RELIEF.

R. W. Bro. Andrew J. O'Reilly, Chairman, presented the following report for the Committee, which was adopted: To the Most Worshipful. Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, State of Missouri: Your Special Committee in charge of Hurricane and Flood Relief Fund report that on September 30th, 1929, there was a balance of $2,861.85 in the United States Bank and Trust Company in St. Louis. There was but one request for relief and that was on October 17th, 1929, and Twenty-five Dollars was expended. The interest accrued since the last report to date amounted to $50.97, making the total balance on hand August 30, 1930, $2,887.82. Fraternally submitted, A. J. O'REILLY, Chairman, ARTHUR MATHER, GEO. W. WALKER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES.

R. W. Brother Wm. F. Woodruff, Chairman, presented the following report of this Committee, section by section, which were adopted, and the report then adopted as a whole: No.1. In rc: Lonnie J. King, Petition for Reinstatement. On June 19, 1926, the petitioner, Lonnie J. King, was suspended from Weaubleau Lodge No. 636 for nonpayment of dues. Thereafter, towit, on September 17, 1927, said Lodge surrendered its Charter, the accused still being under suspension. He has petitioned for reinstatement and that he be restored to good Masonic standing. Weaubleau Lodge, having surrendered its Charter and being now out of existence, the petition is properly presented to this Grand Lodge. Petitioner's application was filed with this Grand Lodge just before its last l'egular communication and on account of the lateness of its presentation was, on recommendation of the then Appeals and Grievances Committee, continued to this communication of the Grand Lodge. The petition for reinstatement is not accompanied by any rccommen-


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dation from a Lodge within whose jurisdiction petitioner resides. While this procedure is not specifically required by our by-laws in case of application to the Grand Lodge for 1'cinstatement, it is required in proceedings for TestoTation after suspension or expulsion under the trial code (Sec. 275). Your Committee feels that the only safe way for the Grand Lodge to grant a petition for reinstatement is after there has been filed with the petition, a formal recommendation from a Lodge in . whose jurisdiction the petitioner resides, similar to that required by Sec. 275 of the Trial Code. By examining the procedure that has been followed heretofore, your Committee finds that such a recommendation has been presented with applications made direct to the Grand Lodge for Teinstatemcnt. See-In re: J. W. Pearson, Proceedings 1923, p. 112; In re: John P. Scott, Proceedings 1928, p. 141. Accordingly, your Committee recommends that the application for reinstatement now pending be disallowed. No.2. Paul Revere Lodge No. 330} vs. Ralph K Foster Charges were preferred against accused by the Junior Warden of the Lodge, May 9, 1930, the specifications in the charge being (1) that accused was arrested April 6, 1928, under an indictment in the Federal Court of Arkansas, charging violation the United States Criminal 'Code prohibiting use of the mails to defraud; (2) that on November 1, 1928, accused was convicted of the charge on which the indictment was based and sentenced to serve a term of one year and one day in the United States Penitentiary at Atlanta, Georgia, and to pay a fine of Five Hundred ($500.00) Dollars; (3) That on November 4, 1928, accused was received at the Federal Penitentiary and commenced service of his sentence. The proper preliminary steps were taken in accordance with the trial code and accused filed an answer admitting the indictment, the conviction and the incarceration, but asserted that this did not constitute a Masonic offense, and further, "That he did not at any time, wilfully or knowingly, do any act or acts contrary to the law of the land or his duties as a Mason, either as charged in said indictment or otherwise." A proper trial was had under the provisions of the trial code, the Lodge appearing by counsel and accused appearing in person and by counsel. The jury returned a verdict of "Guilty" on specifications 2 and 3 of the charge, that is, the specifications of conviction and incarceration, but returned a verdict of "Not Guilty" on the first specification, the charge of arrest, although the accused admitted the arrest in his answer. The punishment asseBSed by the jury in the Lodge was two years' suspension. The Lodge has appealed on the gr'ounds that the punishment assessed is insufficient. The evidence on the part of the Lodge consisted of certified copies of the indictment, the conviction, and commitment from the Federal Court of Arkansas. The only evidence on behalf of the accused was his own testimony in which he claimed that his indictment and conviction was the result of attacks on him by his competitors in the fur business in St. Louis. The indictment, a closely-typed, six-page document, charges in detail that accused was party' to a scheme to mislead and defraud trappers of


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fur-bearing animals in Arkansas. It is in six counts, each count specifying a particular person who was defrauded. There is absolutely nothing in the record to justify a belief that the Government did not proceed in good faith or that accused did not have a fair trial. and on the hearing before your Committee, counsel for accused, (the same counsel who represented him in the criminal case) stated with commendable frankness that there was a fair trial. Under the admissions of the accused in his answer, the verdict of the jury should have been "Guilty" on all three specifications of the charge. The punishment assessed by the jury, suspension for a period of two years, is entirely inadequate and contrary to many and long established precedents of this Grand Lodge. The most prominent recent decision directly controlling is that of Naphtali Lodge No. 25 against Nathan Goldstein, Grand Lodge Proceedings 1928, page 145. The Committee recommends that the verdict in the Lodge be set aside and that the accused be expelled from all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry. No.3. Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439} vs. E. M. Bumgarner The charge in this case was filed by the Junior Warden, July 25, 1929, the only specification in the charge being that the accused "is charged with being implicated with bank robbery on the 30th day of October, 1928, in the robbery of Niangua State Bank of Niangua, Mo... 路 The preliminary proceedings were proper and sufficient. The accused filed an answer pleading "Not Guilty" and apparently appeared in person and testified at that tr路ial. The verdict of the jury was "Guilty" and the punishment assessed was expulsion. The accused has appealed, reciting eight different grounds for his appeal to the effect that he did not have a fair trial; that the jury was prejudiced; that the evidence introduced was not competent or material under the charge; that the verdict is not supported by any substantial evidence; and that the. "offense charged is not known to Masonic Law." After the most careful consideration of this case, your Committee is forced to the conclusion that the record before it is entirely insufficient to sustain the verdict of the Lodge jury. It appears that the accused was indicted in Webster County on the charge of being an accomplice to the robbery of the Niangua State Bank of that County. He was tried in the Circuit Court of Pulaski County and acquitted by a jury on July 9, 1929. Sixteen days after this acquittal, namely on July 25, 1929, the complaint was filed in the Lodge, specifying simply that the accused "Is charged" with being implicated in the bank robbery. The only evidence of any consequence introduced on behalf of the Lodge consisted of ex-parte affidavits, the principal one being an affidavit by the Prosecuting Attorney of Webster County, reciting the fact that he had talked to one Louis Petty after Petty had been convicted of the same robbery and was serving sentence in the penitentiary at Jefferson City, and that Petty told him (the Prosecuting Attorney) that the accused was a party to planning the bank robbery. Our Trial Code does not authorize the use of ex parte' affidavits as evidence, and experience teaches us that this is not a trustworthy or reliable form of evidence in any trial. Furthermore, the affidavits, if considered as proper and competent evidence, are neither sufficient nor convincing.


82

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1930

.The accused introduced the records of the Circuit Court of Pulaski County, showing his trial and acquittal. He himself gave testimony in explanation of his supposed connection with the robbery, and, while this explanation was not entirely satisfactory, the verdict of the Lodge jury cannot be upheld because the specification in the char·ge is insufficient to charge a Masonic offense; the evidence disproves entirely the specification in the charge; and even if the specification is construed as charging expressly that the accused was a party to the bank robbery, there is no competent evidence to support such a charge. Accordingly, the Committee recommends that the verdict and judgment of the Lodge be reversed and the case against accused be and the same is hereby dismissed. No.4. Itaska Lodge No. 420} vs. Ralph L. Riggs Charges were filed on October 12, 1929, against the accused by the Junior \-Varden Of ltaska Lodge No. 420, charging in separate specifications, first, that the accused on or about October 1, 1928, deserted his wife and two minor children, ages 7 and 9 years; second·, ·that. he procured certain property from a certain tire company on misrepresentations; and third, that he made certain disparaging statements with reference to his Masonic Lodge and its members. After due service of notice in accordance with the provisions of the code, the accused was brought to trial at a meeting called for that purpose on the 4th day of November, 1929, at which trial Right Worshipful Brother Charles F. Drehmann presided by appointment of the Grand Master. The accused, altpough notified,. made no appearance, but wrote a letter to the Lodge stating that he no longer considered himself a member of the Lodge and saw no reason for trial or for his appearance. By order of the trial chairman, counsel· was appointed to represent the j;l.ccused. Trial resulted in a verdict of "Guilty" on specifications numbered 1.. and 3, and the penalty was assessed at suspension for five years. The verdict was "Not Guilty" as to specification NO.2. An application for appeal was filed by a member of Itaska Lodge for the reason that the penalty was, in the opinion of appellant, wholly inadequate for the offenses. The accused appeared before the Committee in person and the Lodge was represented by one of its members. Full and complete hearing was given to both the accused and to the Lodge on the question of adequacy or inadequacy of the punishment assessed by the jury. The Committee has gone over the transcript of evidence filed before it and after hearing both sides, as stated, came to the conclusion that the verdict of "Guilty" on specifications 1 and 3, desertion and non-support of wife and minor children, and disparaging remarks ·against his Lodge and its members, are fully justified by the evidence, and that the offense of desertion and nonsupport of the children in this case is of such a nature as to require a punishment of expulsion rather than of a suspension as fixed by the jury. On the hearing before the Committee, accused expressed his regret for having made derogatory statements against the members of the Lodge. The accused. however, on presentation of his own case, did not convince the Committee that he had a proper conception of his duties to his family or to his Lodge, such as would warrant leniency or justify the continuance of his Masonic membership. Accordingly, your Committee recommends that under the provisions of Section 268, that portion of the verdict of the jury wherein it fixes a


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83

punishment of suspension for five years, be set aside, and the accused be, and he is hereby expelled from all of the rights and . privileges of Freemasonry. W. F. WOODRUFF, Chairman, RICHARD O. RUMER, R. E. KAVANAUGH, J. H. BARNES, CHAS. A. FITZGERALD.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS' REPORTS.

R. W. Brother Bernal L. Tatman, Chairman, reported for the Committee. Adopted as follows: To the Most Worship/1~i Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on District Deputy Grand Masters' Reports has gone carefully over the information submitted from forty-six of the sixty districts in Missouri. No reports were received from Districts 2, 3, 5, 6, 12, 15, 18, 19, 38, 39, 47, 52 and 56-in one case due to the illness of the District Deputy. Of 533 Lodges in the Districts reporting, a total of 393, or 73 per cent, were officially visited during the year. Each Lodge in Districts 9, 13, 14, 24, 28, 30, 33-A, 33-B, 36, 40, 41, 43, 44 and 57 was visited at least once by the District Deputy Grand Master-a highly satisfactory record. In a few cases Deputies stated they did not have time to visit all Lodges and in one or two other instances road-building interfered with visits. Many of the Deputies make these visitations at their own expense. The great majority are to be commended for the thoroughness with which they investigate conditions in' the Lodges under their immediate supervision. Their findings and comments furnish such an excellent cross-section of state-wide activities among the Craft that your Committee considers it advisable to briefiy present to the Grand Lodge the picture as seen through their eyes. In a goodly proportion of cases attendance at stated communications averaged well, halls were neat and clean, ade-. quate insurance was carried, Lodge books were regularly audited, the Secretary and Treasurer were bonded; dues were collected regularly. In many instances favorable reports have been made as to proficiency in the ritual and enthusiasm and ability among the officers. Quite a number of Lodges engage in social activities that increase interest and attendance; some regularly visit other Lodges; a few do educational work and a lesser number have libraries or study clubs. Now we turn to the other side of the picture. Too often the District Deputy is obliged to refer to one or several matters inimical to the welfare and usefulness of a Lodge. A lack of harmony is reported in an occasional instance; the Brethren in a few Lodges are said to be discouraged; poor crops and dry weather have had ill effects; an excessive amount of dues is in arrears. In frequent cases we read such comments as these: No library; no study club; no insurance; no quorum; no audit of books; no ritualistic proficiency; no visiting of other Lodges; no social activities; few applicants ; diminishing attendance. More serious, perhaps, than any of these things are the reportshappily but few in number-that "an absence of leadership exists" or


84

Proceedings of the

1930

that "members have lost interest." Our great Fraternity offers so many avenues of pr.aiseworthy activity that lack of degre(~ work, instead of creating apathy, may furnish the very opportunity most needed by which the educational and social life of the Lodge may be revived, anu dormant members awakened to new lines of leadership. It is refreshing to find an occasional bit of unconscious humor in the otherwise rather solid material composin~ the reports. One Deputy recommended that the members of the Lodge visited should wash their supply of tin cups after banquets. Another suggested that the Lodge stove be given a coat of blacking. Another closed his report with the glad tiding that peace and "hominy" prevailed throughout his District. May these corn-fed Brethl'en lon~ enjoy this auspicious state. We are able to add to this report one item which may be news to most of the Craft. From the statistics submitted by the Deputies, we find that the Freemasons of Missouri own over $10,000,000.00 worth of prop'erty. Surely the administration of such a splendid financial estate by over 113,000 enlightened men and Brethren acts as a moral, social and patriotic influence far beyond our power to estimate. Fraternally submitted, BERNAL L. TATMAN, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION.

W. Brother A. Linxwiler, Chairman, Committee on Lodge U. D., presented his report, which was unanimously adopted as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. &. A. M. of Missouri: No new Lodges having been formed during the year, your Committee has had no matters referred to it for attention, and therefore has no report to make. Fraternally submitted, A. LINXWILRR, Chairman, CHAS. H. APPEL, E. L. HARRISON.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON MASONIC HOME.

M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented the report of the Special Committee on l\1asonic Home, which is as follows: (Adopted.) To the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missou1'i: Brethren: Your Committee'to whom was referred that portion of the Address of the Grand Master covering the report of the Special Committee from the Masonic Home Board, having carefully considered the report and conferred with the members of the Special Committee, would make the follo~ing report:


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

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First: That the crowded condition of the Home make it necessary to provide additional housing accommodations. Second: That it is not practical or advisable either to add stories to present buildings or to tear down buildings now on the ground to make room for new buildings. Third: That the plan submitted to buy a tract of approximately forty acres in or near St. Louis, upon which to erect buildings of the cottage or unit type, to be occupied by the children of 'the Home family be approved. Fourth: That the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home be authorized to solicit and receive contributions from Lodges, other Masonic organizations, the Order of the Eastern Star, and individuals to be applied to carrying out such plans. Fifth: That we approve the expenditure by the Masonic Home Board of any funds they may have available for such purpose in the purchase of the necessary real estate and in improving the same by erecting suitable buildings thereon. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, KIPP C. JOHNSON, F. C. BARNHILL, JOHN PICKARD, J AS. A .. KINDER.

RE,PORT OF COMMITTEE ON GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION.

M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented the following report, for the Committee: (Adopted.) To the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons: I herewith submit my report as State Chairman for the George Washington M'asonic National Memorial Association for the last year. The attendance at the annual meeting of the association held in . Alexandria, Virginia, on February 21st and 22nd this year was the largest every held. The interest throughout the nation continues to get stronger each year and the brethren are all filled with one idea, that of the completion of the Memorial at the earliest possible date. Missouri was represented by the Grand Officers as well as your State Chairman. Our percentage of payments is 131. We stand eighth in the list of the Grand Lodges. On March 27th I mailed to each of the Lodges and the Grand Officers a letter outlining the work done, so will not repeat that information in this report only to say that the work on the last two units of the Tower is progressing very satisfactorily and should be completed before the cold weather stops the work. I trust every Lodge in the state is looking forward to having a good representation at the Dedication on February 22nd, 1932, at which time there will be assembled in Alexandria the largest concourse of Freemasons ever' assembled at one time. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE.


86

1930

Proceedings of the RESOLUTION.

M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee presented the following resolution, which was adopted and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means: WHEREAS, on February 22nd, 1932, the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the birth of George Washington,there will be held in Alexandria, Virginia, the Dedication of the Memorial erected by the Freemasons of the United States to honor that great Freemason and Father of our Country, at which time there will be assembled in Alexandria the largest concourse of Freemasons ever held, and WHEREAS, the Freemasons of Missouri have had a great part in making possible the completion of the Memorial, having met every call made upon them by the officers and directors of the Association, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that we arrange to send to the Dedication our Grand Lodge Officers at that time and the Past Grand Masters, and that we request the Committee on Ways and Means to make the necessary appropriation. BERT S. LEE, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, ORESTES MITCHELL.

REPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE.

R. \"1. Brother Arthur IVlather, Grand Secretary, presented the report of the Library Committee for the. Committee. Adopted as follows: To the Most Worshi.hful Grand Lodge, A. F.

(C:;-

A. M. of Missouri:

Brethren: Your Committee on Libarary beg leave to report as follows: During the year just closing, through the continued kindness of M'ost Worshipful Brother Marcus A. Loevy, the remaining volumes of AI'S Quatuor Coronatorum required to complete the full issue from the beginning have been received and placed on the shelves of the Grand Lodge Reference Library in the Doctor Wm. F. Kuhn Collection; and the assurance is given by Brother Loevy that copies of all further issues will be sent to us at his expense, for which we desire to acknowledge our great indebtedness to this warm friend of our late beloved P. G. M., Doctor Kuhn. The report of our Grand Librarian, which is attached hereto, sets forth the work that has been accomplished during the year, and we are happy to report that the number of those directly interested in the Lending Department of our Library has increased nearly threefold over the preceding year and that the interest is gradually increasing in this Department. It has been the policy of your Library Committee to endeavor to make the largest possible use of what路 we already possess rather than to incur expense in matters that would, to say the least, be problematical; and we are glad to say that these efforts have not been in vain. The institution of the Lending Department is justify-


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

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ing itself, and we hope to see it extended to the largest degree possible; and evidences have been received by the Grand Librarian showing appreciation of the efforts put forth. The work connected with the IJending Department is beginning to commcnd itself to the brethren of Lodges in the remote sections of our Grand Jurisdiction, and we feel that our labors are by no means in vain. Naturally, most of this work falls on the shoulders of the Grand Librarian, who is instant in season and out of season in ~triving to popularize this phase of our work, and this Grand Lodge is indebted to him for his tireless efforts in carrying forward our work. Under our instructions, Doctor Mather attended the Grand Librarians' Conference at Philadelphia in May last and brought back with him much valuable information which will serve us in good stead in the future. In conclusion, we feel sure that the future will develop still greater service to the Craft and this with but little cost to the Grand Lodge. Out of the appropriation of $200.00 made by the Grand Lodge last year, $132.40 has been expended, and the Committee respectfully asks that the sum of $200.00 be appropriated for use of the Committee during the coming year. Fraternally submitted, WM'. B. MASSEY, Chairman, WM. P. MASON, ROBT. S. CALDER, Committee.

REPORT OF GRAND LIBRARIAN.

Wm ..B. l\1assey, Chairman, 'ATm. P. l\1ason, Rabt. S. Calder, Committee on Grand Lodge Library. Dear Brethren: I have the honor to submit to you the Grand Librarian's report for the Masonic year closing September 30, 1930. WM. F, KUHN LIBRARY. I am pleased to report that the remaining volumes of AI'S Quatuor Coronatorum given by Most Worshipful Brother Marcus A. Loevy have come to hand and are now on the shelves of the Grand' Lodge Reference Library in the Doctor William F. Kuhn Collection. Brother Loevy has generously made arrangements for the succeeding volumes of this invaluable work to come to our Library as published. LENDING LIBRARY. I -am pleased to report that since the Lending Department was instituted on May 29, 1929, 134 brethren have availed themselves of its privileges, and this number is steadily increasing. It is also a pleasure to report that quite a large correspondence has grown in connection with individual readers who have not hesitated to ask questions and advice from the Grand Librarian; and


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1930

it has been an equal pleasure on his part to co-operate with these brethren in every way possible. In the near future another bulletin list will be issued of different books that are available and will be mailed to the Secretaries of all our Lodges. This work, in the opinion of the Grand Librarian, is laying the foundation for study in a most useful way; and it is refreshing to know that here and there over the entire Grand Jurisdiction there are individual brethren who are endeavoring to acquaint themselves to a larger degree with the great Institution with which they are connected. GRAND LIBRARIANS' CONFERENCE. In accordance with your instructions, I attended the Grand Librarians" Conference at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 6, 7 and 8, and am glad to report that the Conference was the best that has hitherto been ohel-d. The topics were of a high order, and many valuable suggestions were brought to light, some of which will be of great service to us in Missouri. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania extended a most generous hospitality to the delegates, and under the Presidency of the Grand Librarian of Pennsylvania, Worshipful Brother William Dick and his most efficient assistant, William J. Paterson, a most successful Conference was held. By invitation of the Grand Lodge of New York, the next Conference will be held in connection with the Sesqui-Centennial communication of the Grand Lodge of New York some time in the month of May, 1931. In conclusion, it is a matter of great pleasure to note that the work of our Library is slowly but surely maldng itself felt and most especially among the brethren of Lodges that are far removed from the great centers of our population. Fraternally submitted, ARTHUR MATHER, Grand Librarian.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FATHERLESS CHILDREN OF FRANCE.

M. W. Brother R. R. Kreeger, Chairman, presented the' following report: (Adopted.) To the M. W. Grand Lodge} A. F.

(7'

A. M. of Missouri:

On September 17, 1918, this Grand Lodge in a desire, as expressed in the preamble, to show in a modest way its appreciation of the helpful service rendered by France to our forefathers at a time when they were in dire distress, by sending to their aid the noble and magnanimous Marquis de Lafayette, passed a resolution to render some assistance to fifty of the fatherless children of that country. As stated in this resolution, which was signed by five Past Grand Masters, four of whom have since completed their work and passed into the Beyond, into the place of wages and rest, the contribution was for only one year. At the next succeeding annual communication it was decided to continue the contribution, and


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

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subsequently determined to prolong the period of assistance indefinitely. A t the last communication of this Grand Lodge we had only five children on our list. Since then each one of this number has reached the age, sixteen, when donations were discontinued. Consequently our work in this particular is finished. R. "\\r. Bro. Edmund Heisch in his last letter under date of September 4, 1930, states that all of the children are now of age, and that he assumed that it was our intention to close the fund. Re also reported that there remained in his hands Fcs. 1088.95, and asked for its disposition. As this fund was contributed by this Grand Body for. the benefit of destitute c)lill)ren, it occurs to us that the magnanimous thing to do would be to direct that the balance now in his hands be turned over to some charity organization in Paris as a Christma's offering for purchasing presents for poor children; children who without the kindly consideration of others than their immediate family would not enjoy this happy event to the same extent that more fortunate little ones do. lt is, therefore, our recommendation that the balance now in the hands of R. W. Bro. Edmund Reisch, 1088.95 Francs, be paid over to the Treasurer of the Special Christmas Fund of the National Independent Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., in France for providing toys and small articles of clothing to poor children who happen to be in the hospitals of Paris, at Christmas. The balance of $11.75 in my hands, as shown by my report of last year, was all expended for translations, postage and presents for the children. For twelve years we have been corresponding with some of our wards; as well as R. W. Bro. Edmund Reisch, Grand Junior Warden of the National Independent Grand Lodge of A. F. & A. M., in France; Mme. J. Seligmann Lui, Secretary General of the Fraternite Franco-Americane, Paris, France. All this has been in an effort to exemplify, in a modest way, the spirit of charity on which Freemasonry places so much emphasis, by relieving the distress of a few unfortunates, none of whom do we ever expect to meet or see. We cannot close this final report without expressing the thought that R. W. Bro. Reisch and Mme. Seligmann Lui have impressed us with their thoroughness, frankness and sincerity. They have cheerfully joined in the work of carrying a little sunshine into a few of earth's dark spots, and good cheer into hearts made sad by man's cruelty. Fraternally submitted, R. R. KREEGER, Chairman.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO BY-LAWS.

vV. Brother C. M. Barnes offered the following Amendment, which was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence: To the Most Worshipful Gmnd Master, Grand Wardens, and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: The following is submitted as an amendment to the By-laws of this Grand Lodge:


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"To amend Section 46 of the By-laws by striking out words, 'The whole amount must accompany the petition,' inserting in lieu thereof the following: "'One half of the amount must accompany the petition. balance shall be divided as the Lodge may direct, and no gree shall be conferred until the sum required therefor been paid,'

the and The dehas

So that the entire Section shall then read as follows: "'Section 46. -Fees. A Lodge shall not confer the three degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry ,for a less sum than twenty dollars, nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where more than one Lodge and less than ten Lodges are located confer the three degrees, for a less sum than thirty dollars; nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where more than ten Lodges are located confer the three degrees for a less sum than fifty dollars; but more may be charged at the discretion of any Lodge. One half of the amount must accompany the petition. The balance shall be divided as the Lodge may direct, and no degree shall be conferred until the sum required therefor has been' paid. Exemption from the payment of fees shall not be made in favor of any candidate, under any circumstances, by the return of all or part of said fees, as donations, loans or otherwise.' " Respectfully submitted by C. M. BARNES, New Madrid Lodge No. 429.

PETITION OF W. BRO. ELIAS WILLIAM LAWSON.

R. VV. Grand Secretary read the following petition: To the Most W orshipfu.l Gran.d Master, W m'dens and Brethren of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of the State of Missou.ri: Dear Brethren: Elias William Lawson, aged 73, residing at 3310 Broadway, Kansas City, Missouri, is an affiliated member, in good standing, of Orient Lodge No. 546, A. F. & A. M. of Kansas City, Missouri. Brother Lawson has served as Master during two years, namely 1893 and 1894, of Stella Lodge No. 105, A. F. & A. M., in the Grand Jurisdiction of Nebraska, and by virtue of said office he is a member of the Grand Lodge of the Grand Jurisdiction of Nebraska. Brother Lawson respectfully petitions this Grand Lodge to become a member of this Grand Jurisdiction as set forth in i~s proceedings of 1929, page 203. Attached is a certificate under the seal of the Lodge of his having served as its Master. RespectfuIly and fraternally, F. M. HUFFM'AN, Secretary, Orient Lodge No. 546.


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ELECTION OF DIRE,CTORS OF MASONIC HOME BOARD.

Tolman 'N. Cotton, William A. Clark, Joseph S. McIntyre, and Thomas H. Reynolds, whose terms expire at this annual communication, were re-elected to serve for three years as Di. rectors on the JVIasonic, Home Board. A PLEASING INCIDENT.

Immediately following the electiot:J. of Grand Master, R. W. Brother Charles A. Fitz-Gerald presented to M. W. Brother Gentry a magnificant bouquet of flowers on behalf of his mother Lodge, Bridgeton No. 80, to which presentation the Grand Master Elect replied in graceful and appropriate terms. CALLED FROM LABOR.

At 12 o'clock, High 1\1eridian, the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROlVI LABOR until 2 o'clock P. :M. Prayer was offered by R. W. Grand Chaplain Z. M. Williams.


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SECOND DAY-AFTERNOON SESSION.

Kansas City, IVlissouri, October 1, 1930. At 2 o'clock P. M. the ]VI. \V. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LAHOR by the M. VV. Grand Master elect, following prayer by R. W. Z. M. \iVilliams, Grand Chaplain. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RITUAL.

M. W. Brother Julius report. Adopted.

~.

Garrell presented the following

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of the State of Missouri: . Brethren: Your Committee on Ritual beg leave to report that they have had nothing before them during the past year. Fraternally submitted, JULIUS C. GARRELL, Chairman, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, JOHN PICKARD, R. R. KREEGER, J. R. McLACHLAN.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MANUALS.

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee. Adopted. To the M os! Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of the State of Missouri: The new edition of the Monitor, reported last year, is now on hand, and more than 1,700 copies have been sold to June 30, 1930. Fraternally submitted, ARTHUR MATHER, Chairman.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO BY-LAWS.

R. 'iV. Arthur :Mather, Grand Secretary, read the following proposed Amendment to By-Laws, which lays over until next annual communication: Proposal to Amend Sec. 66 of By-Laws: Propose to amend By-Law 66 by striking out the word "twenty" on the second line thereof and inserting in lieu thereof the word "fifteen" so that when amended said section shall read as follows: Sec. 66. Employment Bureau. In cities where there are fifteen or more Lodges, each ~odge shall appoint or elect one of its


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members, who shall constitute a General Employment Bureau whose duty shall be to aid unemployed members to secure employment. Such Bureau shall adopt rules for its government; and each Lodge in such city shall contribute the sum of (25c) twentyfive cents per capita per annum to the Employment Bureau, such contribution to be calculated on, and payable with, the annual Grand Lodge returns. Provided, That no contributions shall be called for when the amount on hand exceeds the sum of ($3,000.00) Th'ree Thousand Dollars. Such Bureau shall employ a Secretary and maintain a permanent office, where applicants may apply for employment. PROPOSED BY W. S. Lane, Thomas H. Reynolds, R. R. Kreeger, Chas. M. Christie.

REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER. (

R. VV. Bro. JamesR. IVIcLachlan, Grand Lecturer, presented his report, which was ordered printed in the Proceedings as follows: To the Most WorshiPful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missow'i: Brethren: This is my twenty-fifth annual report to this Grand Body. Nothing unusual has occurred that is worth being chronicled nor has there been anything to detract from or mar the peace and harmony which prevails generally throughout this jurisdiction. The regular program of worl;: was followed until on account of illness, I was compelled to take a rest during the month of December. Soon after the first of the year, however, work was resumed and continued until the summer heat caused a halt in my activities. The following places were visited and instruction given: Louisiana, Clarksville, Elsberry, Moscow, Keytesville, Wellsville, Jonesburg, Vandalia, Kirksville, Brookfield, Laclede, Chillicothe, Wellston, Wayland, Palmyra, Columbia, Mexico, Marshall, Lexington, Kansas City, La Plata, St. Louis, Kahoka, Ridgeway, Albany, Maysville, Warrensburg, Tipton, Jefferson City, Versailles, Glensted, Olean, Barnett, Oarnsville, Union, Boonville, Fulton, Hillsboro, DeSoto, St. Charles, Warrenton, Harrisonville, Rich Hill, Pierce City, Aurora, Mt. Vernon, Stella, Joplin, Carthage, Ozark, Marshfield, Ash Grove, Springfield, Cabool, West Plains, Ellington, Lebanon, Bismarck, Farmington, Flat River, Cape Girardeau, Illmo, Dexter, Poplar Bluff, Campbell, Portageville, Jackson, Kennett. A number of places on my schedule were eliminated for lack of time. In most instances, however, these places were well cared for by my deputies. While not every"district was visited, no particular section of the State was' slighted. The Lodges of Instruction were in most instances very well attended and notwithstanding the lack of degree work, the usual degree of interest was manifested. Some very interesting information is contained in some of the reports of my deputies in regard to the manner of their procedure in giving instruction and maintaining interest among the Lodges. All of them are vcry good and serve the purpose in their respective districts and the brethren are to be commended for their efforts to a.dva.nce tne cause of l"reema!:ionry. One of the~e a,ttra,.cts my


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attention particularly and could be practiced in the rural districts, especially those in which the Lodges are widely separated. It is presented by R. W. Bro. Thornton Jennings of the 37th District. He divided his district into two groups for the convenience of himself and the Lodges interested. Semi-monthly meetings were held with each group alternating with the Lodges as to the place. The first part of the meeting was devoted to instruction, followed by a social hour, during which refreshments were served. Thes.e meetings were well attended and served the double purpose of improvement and promoting good fellowship among the Lodges. I believe if this plan is accepted by the deputies generally, they will find their work easier and productive of good results. Another event that occurred in the city of St. Louis was a contest between the workers in the 33rd and 57th Districts in the work on the first degree. The teams selected consisted of brethren occupying the same stations held by them in their respective Lodges. Neither team made a single ritualistic mistake. When this was announced M. W. Bro. Julius C. Garrell, who was the dean of the judges, said, "The impossible has been accomplished." Only five mistakes were noticed jn the floor work, three by the county and two by the city team. Neither side has any reason to be ashamed of this record and the occasion may be the means of inspiring others to greater efforts. Many of the Lodges were inactive during the year, but from my own observation and the reports of the deputies, I believe the general condition is as good as could be expected. M'y deputies and the brethren with whom I have labored, have made the year's work very pleasant and easy for me, and I have many happy recollections of the courtesies shown me. The deputies have been faithful to the trust reposed in them and I gratefully acknowledge their helpfulness. Below is found a summary of their work for the year. ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF THE DISTRICT LECTURERS. Brother Harold M. Jayne of the First District made eight visits to the Lodges in the west part of the District and the D. D. G. M. looked after the eastern part. Weekly Lodges of Im;truction were held at Memphis during the winter months and as this Lodge has moved into its new temple the interest in that Lodge has been very much increased and a wonderful growth in membership has resulted. He says that the Lodges are doing very well and that in each of them there are one or more brethren who are proficient and under their direction the interest is maintained and a fair degree of proficiency has resulted. Brother Grover C. Chambers of the Second District visited and gave instruction in the following Lodges: Novinger, Edina, Paulville, Adair, Ark, Kirksville and Novelty. He found some brethren in each Lodge very proficient, but lack of work has affected the smoothness and efficiency of many of the workers. Brother J. W. Moore of the Third District held Lodges of Instruction in each Lodge in the District with the exceptions of Green City and Hartford. He reports that the Lodges are in good condition, some are very active and some showing very little interest. There has been an awakening in some of the smaller Lodges and taking the District as a whole, the outlook is encouraging. He was regular in his attendance at his own Lodge and made many visits to other Lodges, assisting in the work and performing other duttes pertaining to the office.


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Brother E. M. Wilson of the Fourth District says that on account of business and some sickness, he was unable to accomplish as much as he had hoped. He visited four Lodges and found the brethren doing the usual quality of work. Brother Jonathan Stark of the Seventh District visited and assisted in work in the following Lodges: Burlington, Kennedy, Xenia, Ravenwood, Pickerin'g, Quitman, Maryville, and NOdaway. Special Lodg-es of Instruction were held with Kennedy, Maryville and Nodaway Lodges. He was called upon' and responded to many other calls in performance of his duties. He reports the Lodges in as g-ood condition as the circumstances warrant. Brother Frank R. Elton of the Eighth District held Lodges of Instruction at: Tarkio, Rockport, Craig, Forest City and Fairfax. From fourteen to thirty-two brethren from all Lodges in the District attended these schools and he thinks much good was accomplished. Other visitations were made when work was being done in the different deg-rees, and assistance rendered in that manner. With the possible exception of one or two Lodges, all had some work and the brethren performed their duties very creditably. Brother Frank A. Miller of the Ninth District visited every Lodge in the District, some of them seven or eight times. Lodges of Instruction were held at: Helena, Cosby, Agency, Rushville, Wallace, Whitesville, Savannah, Fillmore, and Faucett. Also held School for Instruction at St. ,Joseph one night each week during the fir,st three months of the year with an average attendance of forty-three. His Masonic activities extended beyond his own District and I've no doubt but what his services were appreciated. He says that with the, exception of Valley Lodge, all had some work and they seem to be in a good condition. Brother Thos. D. Williams of the Tenth District visited the Lodges at Gallatin, Jameson, Lock Spring, Clarksdale, Stewartsville, Weatherby and Osborn. At the time of his appointment, the Lodges at Weatherby and Osborn were dormant, but the brethren at Weatherby are now manifesting signs of life, meeting regularly and are able to do very creditable work. The officers of all the Lodges named above with the exception of Osborn are regular in their attendance and are reasonably proficient. Considering the general depression in all lines of endeavor, all the Lodges, with the one exception, are in good condition. Brother D. M. Foster of the Eleventh District visited the Lodges at Excelsior Springs, Lathrop, Cameron, Kearney and Gower. He assisted in degree work and gave instruction in all of them. They all seem to, be taking good interest in the work and are doing it in a very impressive manner. The halls are well kept. The Lodge路 at Cameron has discarded its old furniture and greatly beautified the interior by the installing of new and attractive designs for the stations and seats. 'Brother E. E. Divinia of the Twelfth District visited every Lodge under his care. He gives a very comprehensive report of each Lodge and its condition. Several of the Lodges have a small membership and the attendance and interest is at a low ebb. These Lodges have received considerable attention from him and in some instances he feels Romewhat encouraged for his efforts. While some Lodges have not measured up to his standard, he cites the following Lodges as showing improvement: Hamilton, Kingston, Breckenridge, Friendship and Chillicothe. He thinks that, taking the District as a whole, the conditions are better than they were


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a year ago. Very little work was done, and the attendance was poor. Brother Luther E. Wilhoit of the Fourteenth District visited every Lodge in the District and reports that he found the Lodges in better condition than on previous visits. On account of the financial depression, no increase in membership is reported. Lodges of Instruction were held at Bethel, Hunnewell, Shelbyville, Elmer and La Plata. All these were fairly well attended and the work do~e was praiseworthy. Nearly all of the Lodges show improvement and special mention is made of Bethel, St. Andrews and La Plata for the excellency of their work. Good workers are found in all Lodges, but some of them are not exerting themselves according to their ability. Brother Warren H. May of the Sixteenth District reports that all the Lodgcs in his charge, with the exception of Pike Lodge No. 399, are in an excellent condition. The degrees are conferred very creditably and the general business of the Lodges is conducted in an orderly manner. Lodges of Instruction were held at Louisiana and Clarksv ille by the Grand Lecturer. He was presen t and assisted- at both of these places. All the Lodges, but one, were visited and instruction given on all such occasions. He says the brethren are trying to be proficient and he is assisting them in every way possible. Brother Thomas F. Hurd of the Seventeenth District visited the Lodges at Florida, Santa Fe, Holliday, and Paris, and spent much time instructing the officers of the other Lodges as they came to him at his office. Much good was accomplished in this manner. The excessive cold of last winter and the extreme heat of' the summer made it vcry difficult to find a seasonable time for any meetings. He says there is a revival of interest and the attendance is becoming more regular. Brother Horace L. Mann of the Nineteenth District visited the following Lodges: Triplett, Warren, Mendon, Eureka and Salisbury. In addition to the above, the two meetings of the District Association enabled him to meet and talk with the brethren from all the Lodges and learn of their activities. "There has been no outstanaing events. The year has been quiet and nothing has occurred to mar the peace and harmony among the brethren and Freemasonry is holding its own with other organizations-fraternal, religious and business." Brother Edgar F. Smith of the Twenty-second District held nine meetings of the School of Instruction during the months of January, and February. These meetings were all well attended by the various officers and quite a number of the lay members. All meetings were opened and closed in full form and work in all degrees was exemplified. During March, April and May, he accompanied the D. D. G. M. in all his official visits and found the officers, with a few exceptions, well acquainted with the ritual. The Lodges are working together in harmony and any suggestions made were cheerfUlly followed. He gratefully acknowledges the valuable assistance rendered him by R. W. Brother Charles Kombrodtand others during the service of the past year. Brother C. B. Waddell of the Twenty-third District held a Lodge of Instruction one night each week for eight weeks during February and M'arch in the hall of Lexington Lodge for the entire District. These meetings were well attended by some of the Lodges, especially Concordia, one of the farthest from Lexington. The


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Lodges generally are in good working condition although some of them have very little to do. Brother J. W. Morgan of the Twenty-fourth District visited all the Lodges on their regular meeting night and instructed each one of them. On later visits to these Lodges, he found them much improved. Held Lodges of Instruction at Slater, Miami, Sweet Springs, and Blackburn in addition to the one held by the Grand Lecturer at Marshall. All the Lodges are in good condition except the one at Arrow Rock, which is weak in numbers and deficient in their work. There are several faithful and proficient brethren there, who are laboring for better work. Four meetings of the County Association were held where more or less informal instructions was given. In general, the condition of the Lodges throughout the District is good. Brother .J. E. Hawkins of the Twenty-sixth District reports that the condition of the Lodges in his District is very good considering the financial depression and the drought. Ancient Landmark, a small Lodge at Harrisburg that has hitherto caused some uneasiness, has initiated nine members. All of the smaller Lodges are doing very satisfactory work. Brother Louis J. Graue of the Twenty-seventh District reports that Lodgoes of Instruction were held by the Grand Lecturer at Vandalia, Mexico and Fulton, on which occasions all the Lodges of the District were accessible to at least one of these places. In addition to the above, meetings were held at Mexico and with Central Lodge. All the Lodges were visited except Portland, Shamrock and Aux Vasse. From his personal observation and from reliable information, he reports that the Lodges generally are in good working condition. Brother L. T. Baskett of the Twenty-ninth District visited every Lodge in the District except Troy. Gave instruction and assisted in the work at each meeting. Lodges of Instruction wcre held with the Lodges at Louisville and Moscow Mills. He observes that there is more evidence of prosperity a mong the Lodges and feels that he is justified in saying that the work in the ritual is much improved. Brother Edwin H; Barklage of the Thirtieth District reports visitaâ&#x20AC;˘ tions made in all Lodges in the District and gave instruction at each place. Held monthly meetings in Palestine Lodge during the fall and winter months. He notes quite an improvement in the ritualistic work and the general condition of the Lodges very satisfactory. Brother W. D. Rogers of the Thirty-first District held Lodges of Instruction at: California, Clarksburg, Linn and Chamois, all of which were well attended and considerable interest was manifested. There has been considerable interchanging of visitations among the Lodges and by this means, much information is gained and interest revived among the brethren. An event of importance was the visitation of the Grand Master when nearly every Lodge in the District was represented. A small gain was made in membership and conditions generally are very satisfactory. Brother R. A. Breuer of the Thirty-second District says that the past year has shown an increased interest in the work. The Craft is alert, eager to improve and receive instruction. The work is given in a very creditable manner throughout the District. A splendid new Temple has been dedicated at "\Vashington and has increased the interest and enthusiasm of the brethren of that Lodge and stimulated Masonic interest throughout the District. The increase in


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membership has been fair and serves as an incentive to further improvement. Brother Erwin L. Ocker of the Thirty-third District reports as follows: "The Lodge of Instruction for this District was convened thirty times between October 2, 1929, and June 4, 1930. The attendance varied from 50 to 281, averaging 134. All the forty-six Lodges of this District were well represented at the various sessions and thirteen Lodges availed themselves of the opportunity of being instructed as Lodges with their own officers in their respective stations. Besides the exemplification of the work in the main Lodge room, separate classes were held in the various candidate and curtain lectures, raising, and funeral service, as well as a large class for Deacons and Stewards. "A night was set aside in honor of R. W. Brother Louis H. Abrams, who for twenty-five years has been actively identified with the Craftsmen's Club and the Lodge of Instruction. On this particular night, a contest was held by the 33rd and 57th districts in exemplifying the first degree. The teams selected consisted of brethren occupying the actual stations held by them this year, no two brethren coming from the same Lodge. Neither team made a single ritualistic mistake, and only five mistakes were noticed in the floor work, three by the county and two by the city team. "A fitting flnale for a year full of keen interest consisted of a competition in the candidates lectures. All brethren were eligible except present and past D. D. G. M.'s and D. L.'s. Three prizes were offered. Abotit sixty-five brethren started and were gradually eliminated until finally, having completely gone through the three degrees, and having started again with the first, the second degree was about two-thirds finished before Brother John T. Heard of Theo. Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 was declared victor. "Throughout the year, I was assisted by a splendid Board of Governors, consisting of W. Bros. Ernest H. Wessell, Ray V. Thompson, T. C. Teel, J. Gwynn Gough, W. Bros. John Bishop, Harvey V. Hutchison, Wm. Zavadil, and numerous others, including of course the present D. D. G. M.'s, R. W. Bros. Drehmann and Weidle, all of whom deserve the highest commendation for their untiring efforts. "The ritualistic work in all the Lodges in this District is very' good," Brother James F: Blair of the Thirty-fourth District reports as follows: ~'The fourteen Lodges ~f this District forwarded their reports to the Grand Lodge by August 1st. The general condition of the Lodges of this District is satisfactory, with the exception that three or four of the Lodges are not in first-class working condition in view of the fact that the membership is small and they experience considerable difficulty in holding their meetings regularly. Most of the Lodges are doing comparatively little work. The net loss of members in this district in the last fiscal year was seven. Several of the individual members of this district have indicated a willingness and inclination to become proficient in the work, yet th ~re is not that activity which is to be desired. "Brother R. A. Padgett of the Thirty-fifth District visited four of the eight Lodges in his charge. This is the brother's first year in the work and he has proceeded very cautiously. He reports the general condition of the Craft as satisfactory as present conditions will warrant.


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"Brother H. E. Allee of the Thirty-sixth District reports that all the Lodges, except La Monte No. 574 are prospering. This Lodge was very deficient in the knowledge of the ritual. All Lodges were visited except Cole Camp No. 595 and Chilhowee No. 487. Lodges of Instruction were held with the following Lodges: Knob Noster, Shawnee, La Monte, Holden, Green Ridge, Cold Spring and Corinthian. The Lodge at Knob Noster was visited several times and as a result of their proficiency, they are now very active. This indicates that 'Proficiency bears fruit.' The ritualistic work in the District as a whole, will average fairly well with other Lodges under like conditions and circumstances. "Brother Thornton Jennings of the Thirty-seventh District visited eleven of the fourteen Lodges and made a total of twenty-four visits. For the convenience of the Lodges in the District, he divided th~m into two groups and held semi-monthly meetings alter-nating among the Lodges. The first part of these meetings was devoted to the exemplification of the work, followed by a social session during which light refreshments were served. The average attendance during the first six months was seventy. The Lodges enumerated in this group are: Clinton, Deepwater, Lowry City, St. Clair, Appleton City and Montrose. The other group comprised the Lodges at Urich, Blairstown and Petersburg. The interest and attendance in both groups were good and the condition of all the Lodges is much improved. An event of considerable importance was a Masonic picnic near Osceola, with an attendance of about 1,200. The addresses of M. W. Brother Corona H. Briggs and R. W. Brother Thad B. Landon were much appreciated and were the principal features of the program. "Brother Winan I. Mayfield of the Thirty-eighth District visited the Lodges at Linn Creek, Competition, Conway, Waynesville and Richland. Some of these Lodges were visited three times, instruction was given and assistance rendered in the conferring of degrees. Other visitations would have been made, but the highway was closed for construction and the detour . too bad for travel. He found the Lodges visited very much interested in the work and with an earnest desire to improve themselves in the .work. "Brother Charles E. Pyle of the Fortieth District visited all of his Lodges and held instruction with Joachim, DeSoto, Herculaneum, Shekinah and Belgrade. He assisted in the work of all the Lodges visited and reports that, as a whole, the Lodges are doing better work than ever before. Some Lodges have been more active than others, but all have met regularly and have maintained their interest in the work. ~'Brother M. E. Ewing of the Forty-first District visited every Lodge under his care and rendered whatever services were necessary under the circumstances. Instruction was given to the Lodges at Bolivar, Louisburg and Morrisville. On account of the excessive heat and drought of the greater part of the summer, all Masonic work was suspended and there was no work to stimulate interest. A district meeting was held at Morrisville on June 24th, in honor of Brother B. W. MiteheIl, the oldest and most beloved Mason of that Lodge, which was well attended. This token' of their love for this' brother was not tendered any too soon, as he was killed by a falling timber less than one month later."Brother H. H. Finley of the Forty-second District visited all but two of his Lodges, gave instruction whenever needed and assisted in the work. The attendance has been very good, but owing to


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the fact that there was but very little work, there has not been much improvement in the work. "Brother John C. Senate of the Forty-third District held Lodges of Instruction at Mindenmines and Richards. At both of these places, he had good attendance, the brethren were interested and were materially benefitted. The Lodge at Mindenmines is somewhat handicapped in having several of their active workers on the night shifts, but the officers are doing nicely and they have considerable work. Other Lodges were visited; assistance was given and various duties pertaining to the office were cheerfully performed. M'ore informal instruction was given than ever before to delegations coming to his home. "Brother Dean R. Lynde of the Forty-fifth District was commissioned at the last meeting of the Grand Lodge and immediately thereafter entered upon his duties and visited a number of the l,odges in company with the D. D. G. M., gave instruction and rendered whatever assistance was necessary. He started out well, and I regret that he deemed it best to resign on account of his business requiring his absence from home so much of the time. "Brother E. F. Hannah of the Forty-fifth District was appointed late in the spring to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of R. W. Bro. Lynde. He lost no time, however, as he visited all of the Lodges except Ozark, Bois D'Arc, Mt. Olive and Henderson. He. found them all reasonably active and doing fairly good work. The financial stringency has caused considerable falling off in the work. He expresses the fear that some unnecessary suspensions for non-payment of dues are made and thinks it best to hold on to those we have proven and tried, rather than seeking for new membership. "Brother Carl A. Swenson of the Forty-sixth District visited nine of the t~elve Lodges and gave instruction to some of the officers of Lodges not visited. He now has one less Lodge to look after as Manes Lodge No. 240 consolidated with Mountain Grove Lodge. He says that Freemasonry is progressing about as usual in the District and that the membership is holding its own. "Brother Clyde Akers of the Forty-eighth District held Lodges of Instruction at Bonne Terre, Desloge, Libertyville and Farmington. He has instructed, although not in the Lodge rooms, in Doe Run, Bismarck, Flat River and Ironton. He visited practically all of the Lodges, assisted in the work and performed many other duties pertaining to the office. At all of these meetings, the true Masonic spirit has prevailed and while the so-called "hard times" has lessened the number of petitions, the deficiency seems to be more than balanced by the interest taken in the ritualistic work. "Brother James A. Kinder of the Forty-ninth District visited all the Lodges except Zalma No. 545. He, however, spent the afternoon with some of the officers of that Lodge. Lodges of Instruction were held with the following Lodges: St. Marks, Mystic Tie, Excelsior, Whitewater and Trowel. In every instance, the Lodges in the District are quite competent to' render the ritual in a fairly creditable manner, except No. 191. This Lodge recently lost by death their most active an.} proficient member and they are left helpless for the time being. He says he cannot observe much change in the attendance or interest during the year, There is nothing to be enthusiastic over and nothing to be alarmed about 路when the general condition of the country is taken into consi deration. "Brother G. A. Sample of the Fiftieth District visited the following Lodges: Morley, Sikeston, Morehouse and Ashlar, gave instruction


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and performed other official duties. He wlis also with the Grand Lecturer at Illmo and Dexter. He has urged the brethren of the different Lodges to come to him for instruction, with gratifying- result, that they have come in groups, of evenings and mueh good was accomplished in that way. A very interesting event to the brethren of the district, was the fraternal visit of a Cairo Lodge to Sikeston. A large crowd was in attendance and the occasion has stiniulated those present to greater activity. He says that the Lodges are maintaining- a fair standard of efficiency. "Brother G. C. Bishop of the Fifty-first District reports that the Lodges in his district are in a very healthy condition. Several visits were made in an official capacity and Lodges of Instruction were held at Campbell, Portageville and Kennett by the Grand Lecturer. These visits were profitable and much appreciated by the brethren. "Brother Kipp C. Johnson of the Fifty-second District was present and assisted the Grand Lecturer in a District Lodge of Instruction at Poplar Bluff. He also visited the Lodg-es at Eardley and Piedmont, in his official capacity. He reports that the Lodges are in a very satisfactory condition. "Brother C. E. Armstrong of the Fifty-third District visited and gave instruction in the majority of the twelve Lodges in the pistrict and gave instruction to one or two Lodges not visited. Interest in the better Lodges is very good, but the rural Lodges are having a hard struggle with poor attendance and no interest in the wOI路k. "Brother G. J." Vaughan of the Fifty-fourth District visited and held Lodges of Instruction of from one to three days' duration in the following Lodges: Billings, Clever, Claflin, Crane, Kirbyville, Galena, Branson, Forsyth, Sparta and Ozark. He notes that the Lodges are all doing fairly good work. "Brother \V. N. Marbut of the Fifty-fifth District visited every Lodg-e in the District and gave instruction in all but two. He was also present and assisted the Grand Lecturer in his visitations to Pierce City, Aurora and Mt. Vernon. Considering general con"ditions, he says that the Lodges are in a fair condition, peace and harmony prevail throughout the District. .' "Brother F. G. Fulkerson of the Fifty-seventh District gives a very comprehensive report of the twenty-nine weekly meetings of the Lodge of Instruction for the year. A total attendance of 2,119 was recorded, being an average of 73 at each meeting. These meetings were helll alternately with the various Lodges in the District. A very encouragingfeature of these meetings was the attendance of the line officers, which is an indication that they were alive to the interest of their Lodges and a desire to acquit themselves creditably and with satisfaction to their brethren. F~ach Lodge was visited twice with the Lodge of Instruction, and he accompanied the D. D. G. M. at each of his official visits. At these meetings, instruction and exemplification was given in all the phases of the work, including opening, closing-, lectures and the ritual, with most stress placed on the ritual anI) floor work of the E. A. Degree. All of the Lodges have some g-ood officers, some more proficient than others, varying with the individual application and interest in th~ work. A contest was held with the Thirty-third District on the E. A. Degree, preceded by a special Lodge of Instruction in preparation for this event, which was very interesting and beneficial to the District. "He gratefully acknowledges the assistance given him by many of the Present and Past Grand Officers and Past Deputies of both Districts. "Brother K. C. Jones of the Fifty-eighth District officially visited all of the" Lodges in his District, except Belle and Vienna. In addition to


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the above, he visited the same Lodges many times unofficially, both at regular and special communications. He held at least a dozen nights of instruction at Versailles and almost that many at Glensted. A fair improvement is being made in both these Lodges, and Olean is also improving. Eldon has recently dedicated a new Temple and more attention will be given it in the future. He expresses the belief that a gradual improvement is being made in all of the Lodges." Fraternally submitted, JAMES R. McLACHLAN, Grand Lecturer.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON HOTELS AND TRANSPORTATION.

W. Bro. Samuel A. Gilliland, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee, which was adopted: The usual list of Hotels and Identification Certificates were sent to each Lodge, according to custom. S. A. GILLILAND, Chairman.

R ESOLUTION--.I NVESTM ENTS.

R. W. Brother E. E. Morris moved the following Resolution, which was adopted: "BE IT RESOLVED: That the Grand Treasurer, with the approval of the Grand Master, shall be and hereby is, authorized to invest in U. S. Government Bonds the sum of Five Thousand' Dollars, or fraction thereof, if in their judgment such sum or sums can salely be spared from Grand Lodge funds wi tho'ut jeopardizing the annual budget."

ELECTIONS TO GRAND LODGE MEMBERSHIP.

The Petition of W. Bro. Elias William L,a~""son (See page .... Proceedings) was brought up and on motion duly made and seconded, W. Brother Lawson was elected to become a member of this Grand Jurisdiction according to the provisions of the Amendment to the Constitution. (See Proceedings 1929, page 203.) On motion of R. W. Brother E. E. Morris, W. Brother Samuel A. Gilliland of Westport Lodge 340, and formerly from the Grand Jurisdiction of Nebraska, was likewise e~ec(,=d to membership in this Grand Body. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC SERVICE.

R. W. Brother Thad R. Smith, Chairman, presented the report of this Committee, which was adopted as follows:


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

To the Grand Lodge, A. F.

{7'

A. M. of Missouri:

Brethren: For the past year your Committee on Masonic Service continued to carryon the work begun in previous years. To our brethren who feel that the committee has little to report as to specific accomplishment, we may add that whatever has been accomplished has been done with little or no expense. Grand Lodges throughout the United -States have been experimenting these last few years with committees on Masonic Service. Grand .Lodges thought that something must be done in the way of offering assistance, service and education to its members; various plans have been proposed; many ideas have been attempted to be worked out, but most of these jurisdictions have eventually reached the point where they have found that the best service which may be rendered to the Craft is that which the Craft itself demands. Masonic service and education is not a remedy, neither is it an antidote; it is not a material thing which may be conferred upon another. It is a different something which each individual brother must feel the personal need for and which he must largely work out to his own satisfaction. Your committee has attempted to co-operate with individual brethren, who have their own plans to work out. Advice, co-operation and assistance have been rendered on occasions when asked for, and at small expense. In our large cities we have continually urged the observance of "Flag Day" by proper exercises in Masonic Temples, Including speeches by men of prominence in civic and fraternal life. Wherever thcse have been held, they have been universally successful and we trust the policy begun so many years ago may be continued. . The Grand Lodge Bulletin, begun almost eight years ago, has been continued throughout the }'ear; four numbers have been issued by its editor, Dr. Arthur Mather, who is making it a medium for the dissemination of news concerning our Grand Lodge and its activities. While it has been somewhat restricted in size, your committee feels that this Is more than compensated for by the historical pamphlets and volumes which it is attempting to produce. Our historical contribution for the year is a volume of more than two hundred pages, handsomely路 bound in blue cloth. It has been given the title "Civil War and Masonry in Missouri." It has been written by thE' Secretary of our Committee as a contribution to the educational work of the Grand Lodge, and the committee feel sure that no Freemason in Missouri can read the volume without having in his heart a greater appreciation of that g-reat fraternity of which he is a member. Whether . additional volumes of this size and character shall be continued to be published is a matter for the consideration of the Grand Lodge. Since the organization of this committee it has continued to secure and compile historical information and data and these historical pamphlets are the direct result of the committee's work. In addition to the matters above enumerated, the committee has had certain other ideas as to matters, that only part of its time may be given'to this work and as our appropriation for such services is somewhat limited, the committee feels that it is be~t to make haste slowly and asks your further indulgence in the carrying out of its policies. Fraternally submitted, THAD R. SMITH.


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A PLEASING INTERLUDE.

Upon invitation of the M. W. Grand Master, R. W. Bro. John R. Tapster, Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, briefly and felicitously addressed the Grand Lodge. M. W. Brother Ira C. Freet, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, also responded to the call of the Grand Master with appropriate words of cheer. R. Em. Sir Taylor B. Wyrick, Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery K. T. of Missouri, brought the felicitations of the Knights Templar and spoke briefly on the work which was being done. throughout the borders of the Grand Commandery. R. Em. Sir Ray V. Denslow, General Grand Captain of the Host, upon invitation, briefly addressed the Grand Lodge as the Representative of the General Grand Chapter, R. A. M. of the United States of America. CALLED FROM LABOR.

At 3 o'clock P. M. the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 7 :30 o'clock P. M., prayer being offered by R. W. Grand Chaplain Z. M. Williams. SECOND DAY-EVENING SESSION.

Kansas City, October 1, 1930. MUSICAL PROGRAM.

At 7 o'clock P. M. a musical program was rendered by the. Royal Arch Chorus under the direction of Professor Claude L. Fitchthorn, which ~as greatly enjoyed. GRAND ORATOR.

At 7 :30 o'clock P. M. Rev. Dr. Frederick M. Smith, Grand Orator, was introduced by the M. W. Grand Master-elect and delivered an eloquent and appropriate address, which was most cordially received and enthusiastically applauded. At 8 o'clock P. M. the Grand Lodge 路was CALLED FROM


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REFRESHMENT TO LABOR. Prayer was offered by R. W. Brother Rev. Z. lVI. Williams, Grand Chaplain. EXEMPLIFICATION OF WORK.

The Third Degree was -exemplified by picked teams from the 33rd and 57th l\1asonic Districts under -the direction of the Grand Lecturer, R. W. Brother James R. McLachlan. At IIo'clock P. M. the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 8 :30 o'clock A. M. tomorrow, prayer being offered by R. W. Grand Chaplain Z. M. \iVilliams.


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THIRD DAY-MORNING SESSION.

Kansas City, Mo., October 2, 1930. The M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR at 8 :30 o'clock A. 11. by the 1\1. W. Grand Master-elect, follow~ ing invocation by R. W. Brother E. L. Robison, Grand Chaplain. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE. The report of the Committee on Jurisprudence was presented by the members of said Committee, namely C. Lew Gallant, John C. Robertson, R. B. Strader, Henri L. Warren and Forrest C. Donnell, each of said members reading to the Grand Lodge a portion of said report. The Grand Lodge adopted the report, section by section, except, however, that the Grand Lodge rejected a motion to adopt the recommendation of the Committee (to which recommendation its Chairman dissented) that Decision No. 12 of the Grand Master be not affirmed and that the brother therein referred to be declared a Fellow Craft. Instead of approving the motion to adopt said recommendation of the Committee, the Grand Lodge adopted the following resolution which was offered by the Chairman of the Committee: "That the decision of the Gmnd Master, in so far as it reads: 'The conferring of the Fellow Craft Degree was without force and the candidate should regularly petition his own Lodge for advancement' BE APPROVED, but that so far as the language reads that 'if his petition fqr advancement is granted, then there is no necessity for reconferring the Fellow Craft Degree and he may be declared a Fellow Craft: BE DISAPPROVED." The report of the Committee was thereafter adopted in its entirety (except said recommendation of the Committee respecting said Decision No. 12, which recommendation was not adopted by the Grand Lodge) and reads as follows:

To the Grand Lodge, A, F.

(1'

A. M. of Missouri:

Brethren: This Committee met on Monday, September 29, 1930, and has been in session on each day thereafter, in Kansas City, Missouri. Pursuant to the requirements of the By-laws of the Grand Lodge, there have been referred to us the decisions of the Most Worshipful Grand Master during the current Masonic year, and certain propositions to amend its By-laws. No proposition to amend the Constitution of the Grand Lodge was referred to us. The above mentioned decisions of the Most Worshipful Grand Master are set forth in his annual address, delivered on the 30th day of September, 1930, to the Grand Lodge. PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. FiTst.'

It was proposed in 1929 (see pages 180 and 205, Proceedings of

1929) to amend Section 27-(1)-1 of Article IV of the By-laws, (which Section appears at page 206 of the Pro~eedings of 1927) by adding the


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following paragraph before the last sentence in paragraph (b) of said Section: .. 'Provided, however. said Committee may extend relief to any applicant whenever in the opinion of said Committee and the Masonic Home Board it would not be advisable for any x:eason to admit such applicant to the Home: " So that said f'ection when amended will read as follows: .. 'Section 27-0)-1. .. '(a) The number of said Committee shall be five, composed of members selected from the Masonic Home Board. " '(b) Said Committee shall have full and exclusive authority to spend for the relief of distressed worthy cases of Masonic Charity. suffering from contagious or infectious diseases or mental condition, all monies which may at any time be appropriated to it by this Grand Lodge, provided always that no money shall be given by said Committee to any applicant who is eligible for admission to the Masonic Home of Missouri; provided. however, said Committee may extend relief to any applicant whenever, in the opinion of said "Committee and the Masonic Home Board, it would not be advisable for any reason to admit such applicant to the Home. All of said money shall be maintained in a separate fund and never mingled with Masonic Home Funds. . .. '(c) Said Committee shall meet on call of its Chairman for the trangaction of business, and its h1embers shall not receive any compensation whatsoever for their services or be reimbursed for any expense incurred in attending the meetings of said Committee. .. '( d) A majority of said Committee shall constitute a quorum: " In the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge in 1929, the opinion was expressed that it was desirable that the foregoing amendment should be adopted. but attention was called to the fact that inasmuch as the proposed amendment conflicts with the present provisions of the By-laws, it must lie over until the next (i. e. the 1930) Annual Communication. (Proceedings 1929, page 181.)- vVe, therefore. now call attention to the fact that said amendment may be acted upon by the Grand Lodge at the present Communication. There has been transmitted to us. at the present Communication, an amendment to the foregoing amendment. The amendment now transmitted to us reads as follows: "To amend the amendment offered to Section 27-(i)-1 of Article IV, so that said Section when amended will read as follows: .. 'Section 27-0)-l. .. '(a) The number of said Committee shall be flve. composed of members selected from the Masonic Home Board. " '(b) Said Committee shall have full and exclusive authority to expend monies, which may be appropriated for its use by the Grand Lodge, for the relief of worthy applicants for Masonic relief, whenever in the opinion of said Committee it would not be advisable for any reason to admit such applicant to the Masonic Home. All of said money shall be kept in a separate fund and never mingled with Masonic Home funds . .. '(c) Said Committee shall meet on call of its Chairman for the transaction of business. and its members shall not receive any compensation whatsoever for their services or be reimbursed for any expense incurred in attending the meeting-s of said Committee. " '( d) A majority of said Committee shall constitute a quorum: "


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We have considered the amendment transmitted to us at this Communication and are of the opinion that it is germane to the original amendment. "\\Te suggest that in the amendment so transmitted it would be well to substitute, for the words "whenever in the opinion of said Committee it would not be advisable fOl' any reason to admit such applicant to the Masonic Home." the words, "whom in the opinion of said Committee it would not be advisable for any reason to admit to the Masonic Home." In view of modern tendencies, we also recommend that Sub-Section 27-(0, which now reads, "(i) ChaTity. A Committee on Charity, to whom shall be referred all applications for charity" be repealed路 and that in lieu thereof there be adopted the following Section to be known as SubSection 27-(i) to read as follows: "(i) WeI/aTe. A Committee on Welfare, to whom shall be referred all applications for Masonic relief." Vie accordingly recommend the adoption of the following Sub-Section 27-(i), which shall supersede the existing Sub-Section 27-(i), the amendment proposed in 1929 to Sub-Section 27-1-(1) and the amendment transmitted as above stated to us at the present Communication: "'(i) WeI/aTe. A Committee on Welfare, to whom shall be referred all applications for Masonic relief. "'1. The number of said Committee shall be five, composed of members selected from the Masonic Home Board. "'2. Said Committee shall have full and exclusive authority to expend monies, which may be appropriated for its use by the Grand Lodge, for the relief of worthy applicants for Masonic relief, whom in the opinion of said Committee it would not be advisable for any reason to admit to the Masonic Home. All of said money shall be kept in a separate fund and路 never mingled with Masonic Home funds. "'3. Said. Committee shall meet on call of its Chairman for the transaction of business, and its members shall not receive any compensation whatsoever for their services or be reimbursed for any expense incurred in attending the meetings of said Committee. "'4. A majority of said Committee shall constitute a quorum.' " In order that the record may not indicate any other amendments to be yet pending and undisposed of to said Sub-Section 27-(i) of Article IV, and may also show the repeal of the existing Sub-Section 27-(1), we recommend that the adoption of the Sub-Section 27-(i) last above quoted . shall constitute a rejection of the amendment proposed in 1929 and of that above mentioned as having been transmitted to us at the present Communication and the repeal of Sub-Section 27-(1) and of Sub-Section 27-1-(i), which latter Sub-Section was adopted at the 1927 Annual Communication. Second: At the 1929 Annual Communication a draft of a proposell new Section to be known as Section 56-A was offered by Most Worshipful Brother Byrne E. Bigger, which draft reads as follows: "'From and aft~r the adoption of this By-law no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or occupy a Masonic Temple or building until the plans for the building and for the financing thereof shall have first been submitted to and consented to by the Supervisory Board. Said Board shall consist of three members of the Grand Lodge and shall be appointed by the Grand Master for his term of office, and they shall have access to all records of any Lodge in thc Grand Secretary's office or elsewhere.


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"'The members of said Board shall serve without pay, but shall receive their actual and necessary expenses. "'Nothing herein stated shall apply to any Masonic Temple already erected or purchased. .. 'Neither the Grand Lodge nor any officer or member thereof, as such, nor thc Supervisory Board, shall be liable for any indebtedness hitherto, now or hereafter incurred by any Lodge or Temple Association.''' (See pages 178 and 204, Proceedings of 1929.) In addition, at the request of Most Worshipful Brother Bigger, there was prepared an amendmen t to the existing Section 56 of the By-laws. (See page 178 of the Proceedings of 1929.) The purpose of the proposed new Section 56-A and said amendment was to insure such limitations upon the contracting of indebtedness for the building of halls and Temples as seems proper, and to hold the Grand Lodge fr'ce from liability. (Ibid.) The Committee on Jurisprudence considered, during the 1929 Communication, the proposed Section 56-A and the amendment to Section 56 and from them evolved the proposed amended Section 56, which the Committee then submitted for the consideration of the Grand Lodge. (Ibid.) The Committee also expressed the opinion that the proposed amended Section is one which, under the By-laws, is required to lie over until the next (i. e. the 1930) Annual Communication. (Ibid.) Said amended Section and its Preamble, as proposed by the Committee, are as follows: "Amend the By-laws by repealing Section 56 and by enacting, in lieu thereof, a new Section to be known as Section 56, to read as follows: .. 'Section 56. Cont1"actin.q of Debts. Except as hereinafter provided, a Lodge shall not be permitted to contract debts for any purpose until sufficient available assets are on hand to meet the payment thereof. There is hereby created a Board, to be known as the Building- Supervisory Board. Said Board shall consist of three members of the Grand Lodge and shall be appointed by the Grand Master. Upon the adoption of this By-law, it shall be the duty of the Grand Master forthwith to appoint the first three members of said Board, one of whom shall serve for three years. Thereafter, each succeeding Grand Master shall appoint one member each year for three years to fill the vacancy of the one whose term has expired. The Grand M'aster shall also have the power to fill all other vacancies caused by death or otherwise. "'The members of such Board shall serve without compensation, but shall receive their actual and necessary expenscs, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. "'Said Board shall have access to all records having to do with the matters submitted to said Board hereunder, whether such records be the property of the local Lodge or of the Grand Lodge. "'From and after the adoption of this By-law, no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or occupy a building or Temple until the plans' for the purchase, construction and financing thereof shall first have been submitted to the Building Supervisory Board and its permission obtained. Nothing herein set forth shall apply to any Masonic Temple already erected or purchased or to


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any case in which a Lodge is making a bona fide lease of quarters privately owned by a person or corporation acting in the usual course of business and not directly or indirectly acting for or connected with the Lodges. Or its members. .. 'Neither the Grand Lodge nor any officer or member thereof, as such, nor the Building Supervisory Board, shall be liable for any indebtedness hitherto, now or hereafter incurred by any Lodge or Temple Association. .. 'A Lodge may be permitted to contract a debt for the purpose of purchasing a cemetery, provided the written consent of the Grand Master shaH be previously secured. Any Lodge obtaining permit;sion to contract a debt for the purchase of a cemetery shall at once notify the Grand Secretary of the amount of the debt incurred, the security given, and the date of maturity of the debt. When any debt contracted for a building or cemetery shall have been paid, the Lodge' shall notify the Grand Secretary of such payment. .. 'A record of all such debts shall be furnished to the Grand Secretary by the respective Lodges and by the Building Supervisory Board, and such record, together with the r.ecord of payment thereof, shall be kept in the office of the Grand Secretary.' " The Committee recommends that the Grand Lodge, at the present Annual Communication, adopt said above amended Section 56 and Preamble as they were proposed by the Committee at the 1929 Communication. Inasmuch as said amended Section 56 and Preamble are recommended by the Committee in lieu of said proposed new Section 56-A and of said proposed amendment to Section 56, it becomes unnecessary for either said proposed new Section 56-A or said proposed amendment to Section 56 to be adopted, and we therefore recommend that said proposed new Section 56-A and said proposed amendment to Section 56 be rejected. We desire it understood that by the foregoi ng recommendation that the proposed new Section 56-A and proposed amendment to Section 56 be rejected, and by the recommendation which hereafter appears in this report that a proposed Section 261 % set forth on pages 98 and 99 of the Proceedings of 1929 be rejected, we 'mean only to clear the record of pending proposals which, in view of the provisions respectively set out in the amended Section 56 and Preamble proposed by the Committee in 1929 and in the re-draft, prepared in 1929 by the Committee of the proposed Section 261 %, will be unnecessary if said amended Section 56 and Preamble and said re-draft be respectively adopted by the Grand Lodge. We also desire it understood that by a recommendation which hereafter appears in this report that a proposed Section 56-B and a proposed Section 106-A be rejected, we me,an only to clear the record of any ambiguity resulting- from thos'e Sections appearing to be pending although their subject matter has been covered by the adoption in 1929 of Section 72 % and the Scction 106-A which were ,then approved by the Grand Lodge. (See pages 175, 180 and 202, Proceedings of 1929.) We acknowledge with gratitude the valuable service of Most Worshipful Brother Byrne E. Bigger in offering said proposed Sections 56-A and 56-B, in requesting the preparation of an amendment to the existing Section 56, and in offering the original proposed Section 106-A (see page 97, Proceedings of 1929), and the original Section 261 % (see page 98, Proceedings of 1929). Brother Bigger's services and the drafts submitted by him have been exceedingly


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valuable and to him in largest part is due the credit for the legislation recommended and/or adopted with respect to the sUbject matter of Sections 56, 721;2, 106-A and 261 th. Third: It was proposed in 1929 (see pages 97 and 179. Proceedings of 1929) that there be adopted a new Section to be known as Section 56-B to be entitled "Trustees." The Committee on Jurisprudence rephrased said new Section, in 1929, into the language set forth in Section 721;2, which latter Section was adopted by the Grand Lodge at its 1929 Annual Communication (see pages 179. 180 and 202, Proceedings of 1929). The proceedings of 1929 do not include action. expressly rejecting said proposed Section 56-B. Although we have no doubt that it was the intention of the Grand Lodge. by adopting said Section <[21jz, to do so in lieu of Section 56-B and thereby eliminate Section 56-B from further consideration, nevertheless in order that the record may be clear of any possible ambiguity, we recommend that the Grand Lodge at this time reject said Section 56-B. i :" Fourth: It was proposed in 1929 (see pages 97 and 174, Proceedings of 1929) that there be adopted a new Section to be known as Section 106-A entitled, "Notice of Installation." ,The Committee on Jurisprudence re-phrased said new Section, in 1929, into the language set forth in the Section 106-A which was adopted by the Grand Lodge at its 1929 Annual Communication (see pages 175 and 202, Proceedings of 1929). The Proceedings for 1929 do not include aCtion expressly rejecting said first above mentioned Section 106-A. Although we have no doubt that it was the intention of the Grand Lodge, by adopting the Section 106-A set out on Page 202 of the Proceedings for 1929, to do so in lieu of the first above mentioned Section 106-A and thereby eliminate said first above mentioned Section 106-A from further consideration, nevertheless in order that the record may be clear of any possible ambiguity, we recommend that the Grand Lodge at this time reject said first above mentioned Section 106-A, to-wit, the one set forth on page 97 of the Proceedings of 1929. Fifth: It was proposed in 1929 (see pages 98, 175 and 206, Proceedings of 1929)' that there be adopted a new Section, to be known as Section 26172, entitled "Trial by Commission." The Committee on Jurisprudence re-phrased said new Section, into the language set forth in a proposed Section 26172, which latter Section is set forth on pages 207 and 208 (see also pages 177 and 178) of the Proceedings for 1929. The following is an excerpt from the report of the Committee in 1929 with respect to the subject matter of said proposed Section 26172 : "We are of the opinion that an improvement can be made in the present law respecting Masonic trials by adopting the optional plan of Trial by Commission. In the smaller Lodges it is especially difficult to secure juries which will be free from embarrassment in the trial of a fellow member. By reason of the close personal acquaintance which exists in many of the smaller Lodges in the State, it is embarrassing and difficult as well for the fellow members of an accused to perform the duty of juryman in a case brought against him. This embarrassment and difficulty would be largely obviated by the appointment of a Trial Commission whose members are selected from beyond the membership of the Lodge.


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"Moreover, it is doubtless true in many instances that the requirements of the Trial Code, as the same nOw exists, are not properly complied with. Many details must be carefully watched in order that strict compliance with it may be had, and in many Lodges it is our judgment that this compliance is not found." The re-draft of the proposed amendment, as such re-draft was prepared by the 1929 Jurisprudence Committee, is as follows, with appropriate correction in punctuation: "Section 2611;2. T1"ial by ,Commission. The Lodge (by a majority vote) or the accused may make request, in writing, that the case be tried by a Commission, which request shall be voted or filed with the Worshipful Master not less than two days before the day fixed for trial. "When said vote is so taken or said request so filed, the Worshipful Master shall refer the matter to the Grand Master, who, if he approves the request, shall appoint a Trial Commission to take charge of and try the case, and pending the determination of the Grand Master the trial shall be postponed to a time fixed in the order of postponement. "Each Trial Commission appointed by the Grand Master shall consist of three disinterested and experienced brethren, members of Lodges in Missouri, residing outside the jurisdiction of the Lodge interested, excepting that in the cities having three or more Lodges, such Trial Commission may be appointed from brethren residing in the respective cities, not members of the trial lodge. "The Trial Commission shall hear all evidence submitted and make a shorthand record of such evidence and testimony. They shall observe the same rules of evidence and practice as are prescribed by the Grand Lodge By-laws for Trial Committees. "The Commission shall prepare a brief statement of the facts found, its conclusions thereon, and the punishment, if any, affixed by it, which shall be filed with the Lodge in the same manner and with the same effect as is provided for a verdict by jury. "The Trial Commission shall be entitled to reimbursement from t.he Lodge for actual expenses paid. "In trials ordered by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, by the Grand Lodge or any Committee of the Grand Lodge with the approval of the Grand Lodge, such Grand Master, Grand Lodge or Committee may designate that the trial is to be had by Commission." We recommend the adoption of the re-draft of the proposed Section 261lh as said re-draft is hereinabove set forth. In order that the record may be completed on the subject matter of said Section we recommend that the original draft of Section 261lh, as said original draft is set forth on page 206 and the first half of page 207 of the Proceedings of 1929, be rejected. Sixth: There was proposed in 1929 (see pages 98, 174 and 203, Proceedings of 1929) an amendment to Section 192 of the By-laws, which amendment would consist of the addition, to said Section, of the following words: "In townships now having, or which hereafter have a population of thirty thousand or more and haVing within their


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boundaries three or more Lodges, such Lodges shall have concurrent jurisdiction, and the boundary of such township shall be considered the same as the corporate limits of a city, as liable for any indebtedness hitherto, now or hereafter inused above." The Committee on Jurisprudence in 1929 stated that the amendment is in proper form and that "inasmuch as it will have to come up at the next meeting- of the Grand Lodge, and other areas may wish to come in on or be excluded from it, the Committee at this time makes no recommendation thereon." (Proceedings, 1929, page 174.) Our Committee has heard delegations from the area desiring this change and are of the opinion that a substitute amendment as hereinafter set forth should be adopted. As far as the Committee knows the matter is one of local importance, but the change may be beneficial to other areas in the State. Accordingly, the substitute amendment is worded so that such other areas mayor may not take advantage of it as they choose. The Committee therefore recommends the rejection of the amendment as set out above. and the adoption of the following to be as an additional part of Section 192 and following the end of the Section as now constituted: "Provided that, in townships now having or which may hereafter have a population of thirty thousand or more and having within their boundaries three or more Lodges, such Lodges by an affirmative vote of all Lodges concerned may adopt and have concurrent judsdiction within the territory held by the several Lodges concerned." Seventh: In the above mentioned Annual Address' of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, delivered on the 30th day of September, 1930, to the Grand Lodge, it is proposed by him that Section 182 be amended bY' adding the words, "Provided, however, that the Grand Master, in his discretion, may delegate the same to the Grand Secretary, in which event, the Grand ~ecretary shall have power to grant or refuse such requests", so that, when amended, said Section 182 sha:ll read as follows: "Requests from one Grand Jurisdiction to Anothe1'. All requests, from or to Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction, from or to Lodges of another Grand Jurisd iction, to confer a degree or degrees, shall be made through the Grand Master; provided, however, that the Grand Master, in his discretion, may delega'te the same to the Grand Secretary, in which event, the Grand Secretary shall have power to grant or refuse such requests."

This proposed addition calf be acted on by the Grand Lodge. at the present session, inasmuch as said addition is not in conflict with the present By-laws, but merely supplements the requirement that requests be made through the Grand Master by a provision which gives him authority, after the receipt of any such request, to delegate the same to the Grand Secretary who is by the proposed addition, given authority to grant or refuse requests. 'Ve do not favor the proposed amendment. Our reasons are two: 1. The present duties of the Grand Secretary are of a ministerial nature, not involving the exercise of a discretionary power unless perhaps to a limited extent in conducting the correspondence of the Grand Lodge. We do not think it advisable to establish a llrecedent of granting further discretionary power to the Grand Secretary.


114

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Doubtless it is true that the usual case of request for the conferring of degrees involves little or no question of law or fact. It is, however, easily possible that legal questions may arise as to the sufficiency, under Section 181, of the accompanying certificate, and that there may also be pt'esented questions of fact as, for example, whether the reputation and character of the candidate are such as would warrant a Missouri Lodge in complying with the request. An error in refusing a request for the conferring of degrees might easily result in an embarrassing situation with respect to our relations to a foreign jurisdiction. We think the chief officer of the Grand Lodge should be the one charged with responsibility in this connection. 2. In dealing on matters of this nature with foreign jurisdictions, we think it best for the transaction to be had by the chief officer of the Missouri Grand Lodge for the reason that another jurisdiction, requests from Lodges within the boundaries of which shall come to us over the signature of the Grand Master of such other juriSdiction, may feel that there is due to it the courtesy of a response to its request being over the signature of the Missouri Grand M'aster rather than over that of a subordinate officer. We recommend that the proposed amendment to Section 182 be disapproved. Ei,qhth: It was proposed in 1927 (see pages 223 and 238 of the Proceedings of 1927) that the existing Section 46 of the By-laws be amended by striking out the words: "Nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where ten or more Lodges are located confer the three degrees for a less sum than fifty dollars," and by substituting in lieu thereof (obViously meaning ,to insert in lieu thereof words which, when so inserted, will cause the entire section to read) as follows: "Section 46. Fees. A Lodge shall not confer the three degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry for a less sum than twenty dollars, nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where more than one Lodge, and less than ten Lodges are located,' confer the three degrees for a less sum than thirty dollars; nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where as many as ten and less than thirty Lodges are located confer the three degrees for a less sum than fifty doilars; nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where thirty or more Lodges are located confer. the three degrees for a less sum than one hundred dollars; but more may be charged at the d'lscretion of the Lodge. The whole amount must accompany the petition. Exemption from the payment of fees shall not be made in favor of any candidate, under any circumstances, by the return of all or part of said fees as donations, loans or otherwise." The Committee on Jurisprudence in 1928 informed the Grand Lodge (page 158, Proceedings of 1928) that, in the opinion of the Committee, the proposed amendment is in proper form, but the Committee made no recommendation as to whether the same' should or should not be adopted. At the 1929 Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge (page 189, Proceedings of 1929) Worshipful Brother Edward McGuigan moved that the amendment fixing a minimum fee for petitions, which was presented in the 1928 Annual Communication and has yet not been acted upon by the 1929 Juris-


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

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prudence Committee, be considered by the Grand Lodge at that time (1929). The motion failed, and the Grand Master ordered the matter referred to the incoming Jurisprudence Committee for repOl"t at the 1930 Annual Communication (page 189, Proceedings of 1929). We affirm the view of the 1928 Committee that the proposed amendment is in proper form, but we do not think any legal question is involved in the matter of whether the fee for conferring degrees shall be one figure or another. We therefore make no recommendation as to whether the amendment shall be or not be adopted. Ninth: On page 159 of the Proceedings of the 1929 Annual Communication, it is stated that there were presented and ordered referred to the incoming Jurisprudence Committee three proposed amendmen ts as follows: "To amend Sec. Eleven, Art. 2-offered by Byrne E. Bigger. "To amend Sec. Twelve, Art. 2-Sub-division ('i')-offered by Byrne E. Bigger. "To amend Sec. Forty-seven, Art. 5-offered by L. H. Abrams and o,thers." The contents of said three proposed amendments were not pub~lished, however, in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge for 1929. We have exami\1ed each of the proposed amendments and find that neither of said proposed amendments could properly be acted upon in the Communication at which offered. Inasmuch as neither of said amendments was published in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, we are of the opinion. that said amendments cannot even at the 1930 Communication be acted upon although they were introduced at the 1929 Communication. The three amend men ts . referred to were presented on the third day of the session of 1929, but the record does not show that they were read. In view of the foregoing we recommend that each of said proposed amendmen ts be read one day of the present session of the 1930 Annual Communication, be referred to the incoming Committee on Jurisprudence, be published in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge and lie over until the next Annual Communication to' be thereupon read and acted upon as provided in Section 225 of Article ~XX of the By-laws. Tenth: A proposed amendment to Section 46 of the By-laws has been transmitted to us, being offered by Brother C. M. BarnBs of New Madrid Lodge No. 429. Said amendment reads as follows: "To amend Section 46 of the By-laws by striking out the words, 'The whole amount must accompany the petition,' and inserting in lieu thereof the following: " 'One half of the amount must accompany the petition. The balance shall be divideq as the Lodge may direct, and no degree shall be conferred until the sum required therefor has been paid,' "So that the entire Section shall then read as follows: "Section 46. Fees. 'A Lodge shall not confer the three degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry for a less sum than twenty dollars, nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where more than one Lodge and less than ten Lodges are located confer the three degrees, for a less sum than thirty dollars; nor shall any Lodge in ci ty or town where more than ten Lodges are located

a


116

Proceedings of the

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confer the three degrees for a less sum than fifty dollars; but more may be charged at the discretion of any Lodge. One half of the amount must accompany the petition. The balance shall be divided as the Lodge may direct, and no degree shall be conferred until the sum required therefor has been paid. Exemption from the payment of fees shall not be made in favor of any candidate, under any circumstances, by the return of all or part of said fees, as donations, loans or otherwise.''' Said amendment under the By-laws is required to lie over until the next Annual Communication. We therefore recommend that no action by way of approval or disapproval of the said proposed amendment be taken at the 1930 Annual Communication. DECISIONS BY THE MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND MASTER.

First:

This Committee has examined the twelve Decisions presented by the Most Worshipful Grand Master for the consideration of this Grand Lodg-e. The Committee recommends the approval of Decisions Nos. 1, 3, 4,- 5, 8 and 9. Second: In Decision No.2 the Grand Master was confronted with the following statement of facts and inquiries: "A meJllber of 'A' Lodg-e requested a certificate of good standing for the purpose of affiliating with 'B' Lodge. He was dUly elected to membership in 'B' Lodge, but after such election, and before his dimit was received from 'A' Lodge, changed his mind and decided that he wanted his membership to remain in 'A' Lodge, and he instructed the secretary of 'B' Lodge not to write to 'A' Lodge for the dimit. Has the member the right to do this and what is his status?" To the inquiries so made the Grand Master responds: "Upon his election to membership in 'B' Lodge, he immediately became a member thereof, and could not change his status except as provided by the Grand Lodge By-laws. He could not shift his membership back to 'A' I"odge merely by instructing the secretary of 'B' Lodge not to write for his dimit." We concur in the view of the Grand Master that after election to membership in "B" Lodge, the Brother had no power over his dimit and that, therefore, his instruction to the secretary was of no avail. Section 171 of the By-laws makes it the duty of the Lodge electing the petitioner -"To notify his former Lodge of his election or rejection immediately thereafter," and the notice is to be substantially inform set forth in said Section, included in which form is a direction to the officers named in the notice to forward to the electing Lodge the dim it. From said Section it seems clear that the Brother himself has no right, after election by the electing Lodge, to control the issuance' or non-issuance of the dimit. Although we concur in the Grand Master's view as to the inability of the Brother himself with respect to the di~it after his election, we think the language of the decision that, "Upon his election to membership in "B" Lodge, he immediately became a member thereof," is not in accord with the By-laws. Section] 66 provides that "After the petitioner be elected, he shall become a member of the Lodge he petitioned at the time of the issuance of his dim,it by his fonner - Lodge." (Italics ours.) The form of dimit permitted under Section 172 reads, in part: "He


1930

Gmnd Lodge of Missouri

117

ceases to be a member of this Lodge from the date of this dimit." Section 173 reads: "The Lodge from which the member transfers shall remit to the other Lodge the pro rata part of the dues fTorn the date of the dimit. JJ (Italics ours.) Section 176 reads: "A Freemason ceases to be a member of the Lodge at the time the dimit is granted, as shown by the Lodge record, notwithstanding he may fail ,to take or receive his dimit." With the above re-statement concerning the time at which the Brother becomes a member of "B" Lodge, we recommend the approval of Decision No.2. Third: In Decision No.6, the Grand Master, being asked whether a Lodge or a group of Lodges should establish a Masonic Hour upon a radio broadcasting station, responded: "No. This would seem to be in the nature of an advertisement of Freemasonry, which is not desirable." We observe no pr'ovision in the Masonic Law which renders a Lodge or a group of Lodges legally incapable of establishing a Masonic Hour upon a radio broadca~ting station. We 'do not understand that the Grand Master is ruling that such legal incapacity exists. As we understand his decision, he is only expressing his view as to the policy involved in the inquiry. We are of the opinion that there may be circumstances and conditions under which it would be proper for a Lodge or group of Lodges to establish such a Masonic Hour, but we think the greatest of care should be employed not to use the radio as a means of Masonic advertising. Before any radio broadcasting is undertaken by a Lodge or Lodges, we think it highly adviEable for the Lodges contemplating so doing to submit the plans to the Grand Master. \Ve concur with the Grand Master in his ruling in the instant case, for we assume that sufficient showing was not made to him that the proposed Masonic Hour would not be utilized in a way which would be in the nature of an advertisement of Freemasonry. . 'Ve, therefore, recommend the approval of Decision No.6, without prejudice, however, to the right of the Grand Master hereafter to rule to the contrary upon proper showing of facts. Fourth: In Decision No. 7 the Grand Master decides that only the Grand Lodge itself can grant permission to' a Lodge, or group of Lodges to solicit funds to celebrate George vVashington's two hundredth birthday in 1932. He takes the view that the Grand Master has no such power. It seems to us that a solicitation of this character might well be considered as involving the issuance 'and sending of circular applications for donations of money, within the meanir';g of Section 203 of the By-laws. If so, the Grand Master is" under the terms of said Section, authorized to grant permission to issue and send such applications. If, however, the said Section shall not be deemed applicable, we are of the opinion that inasmuch as the solicitation referred to in the Decision is one which is for the celebration of the birthday of a great and beloved member of the Masonic Order, the Grand Master would, nevertheless, be entitled to grant the permission under Sub-division (j) of Section 9, Article II of the By-laws, which provides that, during the recess of the Grand Lodge, "He may exercise such powers as are warranted, and perform such duties as are required of him by the Ancient Regulations or Customs of the Craft; provided, that he shall have no power to suspend the operation of any law of the Grand Lodge."

We recommend, therefore, that the Grand Lodge go on record to the


118

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effect that the Grand Master may himself authorize the solicitation of funds for the celebration above mentioned, if he deems such路 action advisable. Fifth: In Decision No. 10 the Grand Master was confronted by the following inquiry: "A lodge'desires, on special occasions, to convene a lodge meeting in a room formerly used as a dining room, but within the walls of the building containihg the reg-ular lodge hall, which has been duly dedicated to Masonic purposes. Is it necessary to have a separate dedication of this room?" To the inquiry the Grand Master responded: "No. The dedication of the main lodge hall constituted the dedication of the entire building for Masonic purposes." We are not entirely certaIn that we have before us all of the facts which were before the Grand Master when he made this ruling. If the exact .language of the inquiry, as set forth in the Address, contains all the facts, we do not see that the conclusion drawn by the Grand Master follows, for we do not think that the dedication of a specific room in a building constitutes the deuication of the entire builuing. Our view is that, if the facts are that only the regular lodge hall had been dedicated, a lodge meeting cannot be properly held in some other room even though the same be contained within the walls of the building in which is located the lodge hall; but if, on the other hand, the entire building was dedicated to Masonic uses and purposes, there is no reason why a portion of it, once used for a dining room, cannot subsequently be used for lodge meetings without further dedication. Sixth: In Decision No. 12, we understand the facts to have been as follows: A request was made by "A" Lodge to "B" Lodge to confer the Fellow Craft Degree upon .an Entered Apprentice of "A" Lodge. The Entered Apprentice did not present himself for the Fellow Craft Degree until more than a year had elam'ed from the time he had received the Entered Apprentice Degree. He did not petition for advancement, but presented himself for the Fellow Craft Degree, which was thereupon conferred upon him. He was not aware of the Grand Lodge By-law which provides that if an Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft fails to present himself for advancement within one year after having received the Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft Degree, he shall regularly petition for the remaining Degree or Degrees and his .petition shall take the regular course of petitions for the Mysteries of Freemasonry and the requirements of investigation by a Committee and that the petition be recommended by two members of the Lodge in good standing must be complied with (see Section 115 of By-laws). We hold that under the above statement of fact, "B" Lodge had jurisdiction both of the person and of the subject matter; that under the authority of the decisions of the Grand Lodge, first the case passed upon as appears in the Proceedings of 1921 as reported on page 60 of the Constitution and By-laws of 1925 and second and the decision of the Grand Lodge of 1929, (Proceedings 1929, page 143) the Brother is a Fellow Craft and should be so regarded. We, therefore, recommend that the decision of the Grand Master be not affirmeu and that the Brother be declared a Fellow Craft. To this recommendation the Chairman of the Committee, Brother Forrest C. Donnell, respectfully dissents. Seventh. Decision No. 11 reads as follows: "Q. May a lodge organize a club composed of such of its own members as shall desire to join, whereby each shall pay $1.00


â&#x20AC;˘ 1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

119

upon the death of any member, and which assessment shall be paid to the wife or other beneficiary of the deceased?" "A. The lodge, as such, would have no authority to conduct such "a club, but there is nothing in the Grand Lodge Law that would prevent the members from forming such a circle or club and allowing the secretary to attend to the clerical work of it, so long as it wa.s understood that he was doing so as an individual and not officially as secretary of the lodge. The purpose to be attained se~ms to be a worthy one." We agree with, and recommend the approval of, the decision of the Grand Master. We call attention, however, to the fact that members should exercise the utmost care not to conduct such a club in a manner which would" either lead to the idea on the part of members or the public that the Order is itself engaged directly or indirectly in the conduct of such club, thereby engaging in commercial activity, or would tend to bring reproach upon the Fraternity. Especial attention is also called to the fact that no act of any member in conduct of such a club should be performed which offends against the provisions of Section 204 which prohibits the usc of the word "Masonic" or any other term, sign or symbol of Freemasonry for commercial or other business enterprise. etc., We also advise that no pressure whatsoever should be brought upon the members of the Lodge through the Lodge or its officers to join the club or circle. USE OF THE WORD MASONIC, OR ANY OTHER TERM, SIGN OR SYMBOL OF FREEMASONRY FOR COMMERCIAL OR OTHER BUSINESS ENTERPRISES. The Grand Master, in the portion of his Address re~a.tive to business organixations which claim to limit their custom, clientele or membership to members of the Masonic Fr'aternity says, "I therefore recommend that this matter be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, and that it give its consideration to two questions, as follows, to-wit: "(1) Does the statement mad:e in newspaper, or other advertising, that a company or association limits its custom, membership, or clientele to members of the Masonic Fraternity, constitute a violation of Sec. 204 of our By-laws? "(2) Is it a violation of said By-laws for a Freemason interested in such "company or association, to state orally, or by letter, that such association or company limits its custom, membership. or clientele to members of the M'asonic Fraternity?" We are of the opinion" that a statement made by a Freemason either in newsliaper, or other advertisement, or orally, or by letter, that a company or association limits its custom, membership or clientele to members of the Masonic Fraternity, if said statement is made in furtherance of any commercial or other business enterprise (subject only to the proviso of Section 204 with respect to Masonic books, journals or periodicals, etc.), is a violation of said Section 204. In this connection we call attention to the following excerpt from the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence in 1927 (Proceedings of 1927, page 177) which report was adopted by the Grand Lodge: "We recommend the approval of Decision No. 15 of the Most Worshipful Grand Master in which he rules that the use


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Proceedings of the

1930

by a member of the Masonic Fraternity of the word 'Masonic' and reference by him to the fact that a certain accident insurance and life insurance company deals in insurance 'for Masons only' and 'for members of the Masonic 'Fraternity only' constitutes a violation of Section 204 of the By-laws of the Grand Lodge. We note also the view of the Most Worshipful Grand Master that the same rules of Masonic law are applicable to hospitals, cemeteries, automobile insurance companies and othcr commercial and business enterprises as applied to life, accident or health insurance companies. We concur in th.is opinion. The use by a Freemason of the word 'Masonic' or any other term, sign or symbol of Freemasonry for commercial or other business enterprises constitutes un¡ Masonic conduct on thc part of such F,'cemason, regardless of the nature of the company (subject only to the provisions specifically contained in said Section 204). It is well, however, in ordcr that there may be no misunderstanding as to the extent of the Masonic law of Missouri, to say that, in our opinion the decision of the Most Worshipful Grand Master should not be interpreted to condemn the operation by a Freemason of such, cemeteries, hospitals or other organizations as are not commercial or business enterprises. We are of the opinion that with the explanation of this limitation of Missouri Masonic law, the decision should receive the commendation of this Grand Lodge and should be observed by members of the Masonic Fraternity of Missouri. We also call attention to the fact that Section 204 of the Grand Lodge By-laws provides also that "any Freemason engaged in the business of publishing any Masonic book, journal or periodical, who permits the printing of any advertisement in any such publication using the word 'Masonic', or any other term, sign or symbol of Freemasonry for commercial or other business enterprises, the use of which is prohibited by the Grand Lodge By-laws, shall be deemed guilty of un-Masonic condueL" We recommend that the incoming Grand Master take steps to ascertain what violation of Masonic law in the respects above mentioned may be taking place, utilizing for the purpose of his investigation either his District Deputy Grand Masters, a Committee and/or other means as to him shall seem proper, and that he shall be by this Grand Lodge at the present Annual Communication authorized to take such action, either by causing charges to be preferred or otherwise, as he may deem proper to the end that further violation of Masonic law shall cease. Respectfully submitted, BURNS STRADER, HENRI L. WARREN, JOHN C. ROBERTSON, C. LEW GALLANT, FORREST C. DONNELL, Committee on Jurisprudence.


1930

Grand Lodge of 1vlissouri

121

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS.

R. W. Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, read three proposed amendments to the ,By-Laws, which, according to the rule, lie over until the路 next Annual Communication. (For text of same see pages 147-148.) PLACE OF M EETI NG-1931.

The Grand Lodge by unanimous vote accepted the invitation of the Scottish Rite Cathedral Association of St. Louis to hold its I11th Annual Communication in the Scottish Rite Temple, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, on the last Tuesday in September, 1931, being the 29th day of that month, beginning at 10 o'clock A. M. A WELCOME SURPRISE.

M. \lV. Grand l\1aster-elect: Brethren, I wish you to nse. I have a surprise for you. At this moment our beloved Grand M'aster, M. W. Brother Samuel R. Freet, entered the Grand Lodge and was received by the brethren standing with enthusiaRm and applause.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS.

R. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg presented the following report, which was unanimously adopted: To the Most vVorsh1"Pfu! Grand Lodge, A. F. <..S' A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The llOth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge will soon pass into history. Three days fruitful in benefit and abounding in pleasure have been vouchsafed to us. Many and varied have been the courtesies extended and the expressions, by word and act, of true brotherhood and fellowship. Ere we depart, therefore, for our respective places of abode, it is but meet and proper that we express our appreciation of the many acts of kindness which have been showered upon us. Therefore, BE IT RESOLVED that the sincere路 thanks and deep appreciation of thiR Gran(j Lodge be, and they are hereby extended: 1. To Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 for itR generosity in extending to us the use of its beautiful Temple.


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Proceedings of the

1930

2. To the W. M. and Secy. of Ivanhoe Lodge for their untiring and constant efforts in our behalf. 3. To the Cammi ttee on Arrangements for their thoughtfulness and attention to every detail looking to the- dispatch of our business and the comfort and pleasure of the brethren. 4. To all the Lodges of Kansas City for the excellent luncheon served to the members of this Grand Lodge. 5. To the many Brethren, who so kindly placed their automobiles at the disposal of the Grand Lodge for the sight-seeing trip and for general transportation purposes. 6. To Brothers Claude L. Fitchthorn, Paul R. Utt, Sam Gilliland George C. Marquis, the Quartette and the Chorus for the magnificent, inspiring and appropriate music rendered for us. 7. To the children of the. Masonic Home of Missouri for the delightful entertainment before the opening of this Communication. 8. To the M路issouri Pacific R. R. Co., for their kindness in transporting the children of the Home from St. Louis to Kansas City and return. 9. To the First Baptist Church of Kansas City for their kindness in granting the use of their premises for the entertainment of the Brethren. 10. To all the Freemasons of Kansas City who through their active expressions of fraternal fellowship have helped to make this Communication both enjoyable and successful. To all of them we say: "Mizpah"-May God be with you till we meet again. M. W. Grand Master-elect: I want to say that I appreciate very deeply the service of the degree team of Kansas City, the services of the degree team of St. LOUis County and those of the degree team from St. Louis. All three of those teams are entitled to a very great deal of consideration and to. our sincere thanks, which I tender to all of them now, because they all did their work in a manner which was edifying, helpful, beautiful, and inspiring; and we are delighted to have had the privilege of seeing them and hearing them do this beautiful degree work; and we thank them all. (Applause.)


1930

123

Grand Lodge of Missouri REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PAY ROLL.

W. Brother Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Pay Roll, which was adopted as follows: Kansas City, Mo., October 2, 1930.

To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Pay Roll, at this session of the Grand Lodge, begs to report the following allowances paid for Mileage and Per Diem, have been distributed as follows: Grand Officers

$

Past Grand Masters

:

564.60

.

429.00

District Deputy Grand Masters

.

1,449.30

District Lecturers

.

398.30

,

Chairmen Committees

.

233.70

Commi t tee on Juri sprudence

.

184.10

Committee on Appeals and Grievances

.

258.70

Committee on Credentials

.

203.10

Chartered Lodges

. 17,886.60

TotaL

,

$21 ,607.40

Respectfully SUbmitted, WALTER R. SHRODES, Chairman. GRAND OFFICERS. S. R. Freet..:

$15.00

H. C. Chiles

$19.40

42.70

E. S. Woods

34.40

25.40

J. R. McLachlan

34.20

Thad B. Landon

15.00

K. M路. Vetsburg-

42.70

E. E. Morris

15.00

D. W. Parker............

15.00

W. R. Gentry R.

V.

Denslow

Arthur Mather

42.70

E. L. Robison

F. C. BarnhilL

23.40

Z. M. Williams

:

20.20 27.10

DuVal Smith F. M. Smith

20.20 16.00

A. Ray Petty

15.00

J. W. Skelly

42.70

H. L. Reader

42.70

G. W. Walker................

55.80

PAST GRAND MASTERS. C. H. Briggs

$34.40

R. R. Kreeger

15.00

A. A. Johnson

34.40

Van F. Boor

15.00

B. S. Lee

$34.40

Orestes Mitchell W. W. Martin John Pickard _.

20.20 42.70 _ 32.10 _ 42.70

T. W. Cotton

49.70

A. F. Ittner

W. A. Clark J. C. GarrelL

30.80 42.70

B. E. Bigger..

34.90


124

Proceedings of the

1930

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. G. V. Calvert (1) J. W. Moore (3) E. M. Wilson (4) J. Stark (7) ~ F. R. Elton (8) A. D. Tilson (9)...... D. M. Foster (11) E. E. Divinia (12) F. L. Madden (13) L. E. Wilhoit (14) W. H. May (16) T. F. Hurd (17) Otto Hale (20) J. P. 'Tucker (21) C. B. Waddell (23) Jas. Morgan (24) G. C. Million (25) R. R. Wright (26) L. J. Graue (27) L. T. Baskett (29) E. H. Barklage (30) W. D. Rogers (31) C. F. Drehmann (33-A)

$34.20 28.30 25.70 24.80 26.90 20.20 20.40 22.90 26.40 28.50 36.40 30.50 21.60 16.50 19.40 21.80 26.90 32.10 31.30 39.00 40.00 30.80 42.70

L. A. Weidle (33-B) J. F. Blair (34) R. A. Padgett' (35) H. E. Allee (36) T. Jennings (37) W. I. M'ayfield (38) C. L. Woods (39) C. E. Pyle (40) M. Eo Ewing (41) H. H. Finley (42) D. V. M'orris (43) Ray Bond (44) C. A. Swenson (46) J. N. Sparks (47) J. A. Kinder (49) J. A. Boone (50) K. C. Johnson (52) G. J. Vaughan (54) W. N. Marbut (55) G. D'Amato (57) K. C. Jones (58) H. S. Truman (59)

$42.70 17.80 23.40 21.50 23.80 40.10 47.20 47.30 30.90 30.90 25.30 30.50 41.10 51.60 55.80 60.50 56.60 36.20 33.00 42.70 27.10 16.00

DISTRICT LECTURERS. H. M. Jayne (1) G. C. Chambers (2) F. A. Miller (9) H. C. Noland (21) E. F. Smith (22) J. E. Hawkins (26)

$35.40 30.50 20.20 16.50 15.00 32.10

E. E. J. H. G. F.

L. J. C. S. A. G.

Ocker (33) Koch (39) Senate (43) Hightower (44) Sample (50) Fulkerson (57)

$42.70 47.20 27.80 30.50 57.10 43.30

CHAIRMEN STANDING COMMITTEES. • W. R. Shrodes C. L. Alexander A. LinxweiIer B. L. Tatman

$28.20 42.70 30.80 43.30

A. J. O·Reilly T. A. Harbaugh~ Sam Gilliland

$42.70 31.00 15.00

COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE. F. C. Donnell... H. L. Warren C. L. GallanL

$47.70 20.00 47.70

J. C. Robertson R. B. Strader

;

$47.70 21.00

COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. W. F. WoodrufL C. A. Fitzgerald R. O. Rumer

$40.00 67.70 47.70

R. E. Kavanaugh J. H. Barnes

$50.40 52.90

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. C. M. Christie L. H. Abrams F. H. Knight..

$20.00 47.70 20.00

T. S. Evilsizer W. A. Webb H. F. Woerther

$20.00 47.70 47.70


Grand Lodge of A!issouri

1930 No. 1 2 3 4 5 7 9 10 11 13 14 16 17 18 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 85 36 37 39 40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 62 63 64 66 67

LODGE

REPRESENTATIVE

125 PAID

MissourL. M. P. Kline .. __ ..-------------$42.70 Meridian __.. __ __ C. H. Stock -- ..__.. __ .. __ __ 42.70 Beacon. M. Schneider .. __ 42.70 Howard__ Mert Wood __ __.. 27.10 United __ G. C. Proctor__ __ .. __. 34.40 O·Sullivan J. G. Page .__ __ .__ .. __ 32.00 Geo. Washington __ R. C. Duffin __ __ .__ 42.70 Agency __ W. C. White ..__ . .__ 20.70 Pauldingville W. E. Lang__ .. __ __ 31.90 Rising Sun__ J. A. Williams __ 16.60 Eolia__ ..__.. __ ..__ .. __ .. .. A. M. Reynolds .. . 36.50 Memphis W. H. Roberts __.. . . .. 35.40 Clarksville ----. __ R. B. SchoIL __ .. . .. 37.40 Palmyra __ .. W. H. Potter__ : .. __ 34.20 St. Louis Sam Pasternak . 42.70 Havanna. __ J. A. Childers __ __ __ ; .. __ 23.80 Wyaconda-__ . D. P. Wiseman . .__ 36.30 NaphtalL. ..__ __ L. A. Gerber__ __ . __ __ .__ .. 42.70 Ava..·.· ·-· --· H. S. Wilson_ .. __ __ .. __ 40.50 Evergreen ------..-------· Edw. Hebbeler __ .. __ 36.60 St. John __ W. E. Graves- __ . ---- __ 34.90 Windsor .. __ E. D. Carter __ __ . _ 23.20 Huntsville J. R. Leathers __ :__ __ __ __ .:. 27.20 Liberty __ .. R. F. Mason._ ..__ .. __ .. __ 16.40 Humphreys..__ __ : J. S. Harding __ .. __ .. __ .. __ .. __ 26.80 Ralls-- __ __ ·J. S. Cupp .. .. __ __ ..: 36.80 Troy ----···--·T. R. Chewning__ .. __ 37.30 Mercer __· L. B. ·Mabee __ . 26.30 Cooper ---l\I. E. Schmidt.. .. 26.90 Hemple __..__ __ Albert Krafft __ .. 21.70 DeWltt. G. R. Craig __ .. 23.40 Mt. MorlahJ. W. Jones -__ 42.70 Bismarck __ .. .. R. J. Barger __ 50.60 Jefferson __ C. G. Bartlett.. 30.80 Fair Play __ W. M. Price . __ 28.90 Bonhomme H. L. J. Koch __ __ .. __ 41.90 Wentzville R. C. M. M·illar__ .__ .. __ __ . 37.90 Fayette __ __ __ D. E. Miller _._ __ 28.10 Fulton R. L. Brown .. .. __ 33.50 Holt. H. E. Reece __.__ .__ . 18.00 Livingston-C. C. Wahe __ .. __ 25.70 Wakanda W. C. Maupin __ 21.60 Weston O. Blackburn .. __ __ 18.10 Index W. L. Gilkerson_ .. __ __ __ __ 20.70 Arrow Rock..· ·..· ·· A. B. Hogge __ .. .. 25.10 Tipton · · · ···W. n. Canfield __ __ 27.00 Richmond : R. H. Nutter.. __ .. __ .__.. __ 19.80 Monticello ·..· ·A. E. Wri~ht.. __ __ 33.70 Centralia R. G. Blanton 29.90 New Bloomtleld F. J. Nichols : __ __ .. __ 32.00 VlnclL B. E. Bangs __ __ __ 20.40 Cambridge __ W. J. , Hockaday __ __ 24.50 Monroe _ __ · _G. E. Chipman 27.70 Grant City V. M. Goff---__ 27.30 Rocheport.. · ·· ·S. :po Cunningham __ . 213.30


126 No.

Proceedings of the LODGE

1930

REPRESENTATIVE

69 ·Sullivan J. H. Mueller 70 Armstrong A. M. Green 71 Savannah D. H. Stephens 72 Gorin C. L. Herm 73 Eureka C. A. La Hue 74 Warren T. A. Michael. P. Landfried 76 Independence G. W. Reeves 77 Lebanon S. M. Hirzch, 78 St. IJoseph A. B. Oeth 79 Polar Star C. C. Wuest 80 Bridgeton 81 CentraL ··· _.H. E. Roland F. D. Gartner 82 Jackson 83 Laclede J. A. Buster 84 Webster Groves C. H. Appel 86 Brookfield D. L. Richards 87 Washington··· ····..·..··· · E. J. Howard 88 Defiance O. H. Bond 89 Friendship···· · ·.L. W. Brown 90 Russellville J. H. Hunter 92 Perseverance H. B. Chilton A. S. Reed 93 St. Marks 94 Vienna ···..·····,..·· T. B. Palmer 95 Pomegranate J. J. Graff 96 St. Andrews···.····.· ····· ·C. L. Ralls l\1. C. Cole 97 Bethany P. V. Rathburn 98 Webster D. 'Richardson 99 Mt. Vernon L. C. Snoddy 100 Ash Grove W. B. Henderson 101 Bogard D. R. Peck 102 Bloomington lI. P. Sagand 104 Heroine E. D. Martin 105 Kirksville C. R. Osborn 106 Gallatin E. L. Williamson 107 Greenville ~ E. W. Pron ty 108 AltamonL M·. E. Miller 109 Stanberry E. P. Francis 110 Marcus J. R. I{ernahan 111 Trenton R. M. Luther 112 Maitland J. W. Biggerstaff 113 Plattsburg E. Graves 114 Twilight A. J. McKinney 116 Barnes M. Wyatt 117 Helena E. ·A. Chaskers 119 DeSoto R. R. Field : 120 Compass W. C. Mueller 121 Erwin Wm. Nasse 123 Hermann J. W. Miller 124 Union Star O. C. Riggins 125 Gentryville C. A. Stockwell 127 Athens J. P. Ragan 128 Lorraine W. F. Davis 129 Monett ·J. R. Quinn 130 Hume M. W. MaxwelL 131 Potost.

PAID . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . .

43.00 26.60 21.50 32.60 24.00 25.10 16.00 45.70 20.20 42.70 41.10 32.30 26.10 40.10 43.30 26.00 30.90 25.80 23.90 32.70 36.40 55.80 33.00 42.70 31.80 26.80 37.00 33.00 31.40 22.40 28.10 15.00 30.50 22.60 54.60 22.10 25.60 53.10 25.40 25.60 19.10 32.10 42.10 22.10 47.30 16.00 42.70 35.20 22.70 26.10 25.10 27.90 33.00 23.10 49.60


1930 No. 133 134 136 137 138 139 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 165 168 169 172 173 174 177 178 179 ] 80 ] 81 183 184 187 188 189 190 192 193 194 195 197 199 201 202 203 204 205

Grand Lodge of Missouri LODGE

Star of the WesL Olean Phoenix Delphian Lincoln Oregon Irondale Modern Latimer __ McGee Cass Purdy Lexington Birming Milton Linn Creek Bloomfield Ionic Spring HilL Ashland North Star Mountain Grove Green Clty Pleasant Clifton HilL. Whitesville OccidentaL Maryville __ ._ Colony __ Camden PoinL Censer Gray Summit Sturgeon __ Texas Griswold Pride of the WesL Pyramid : Novelty Californla Morley Hermon HannibaL Zeredatha Putnam Frankford __ Angerona Wellsville Bolivar Carthage New Hope Ravenwood Westvllle Brumley._ Rowley Trilumina~

REPRESENTATIVE T. E. BelL J. E. Wiser W. G.' Wil1iams ~ Q. L. Wallis M. S. Cushman J. P. Lacy _ J. A. Robinson P. W. Hays _ A. C. Stair _ W. A. Green W. C. Deacon __ F. N. McIntosh E. D. Holman _ C. ,L. Mays .. _ __ E. G. Patton T. R. Anderson K. W. Blomeyer C. G. Dressen H. A. young G. K. Crump __ A. McMichael H. H. McGee _ D. L. Busick._ _ Edw. Becl(er J. T. Knox J. F. Roberts _ E. G. Widdicombe I". J. Canon R. E. MoffetL John Pinckard __ R. W. Cresman A. J. HoI t'haus _ F. W. Owings J. M. Crawford : Frank Spiers _ D. F. Hassmer A. L. Rymer :.~ W. E. Throckmartin L. P. Emory R. H. Leslie C~ H. Hatten_ O. r..-:. Bailey R. F. Erder A .. H. Suming __ _ R. N. Fonts A. R. Allcorn n. G. Smith L. B. Parrish _ A. M. Wood C. W. PowelL , T. W. Kirkbride W. L. Ray_ _ C. H. WrighL _.. -C. W. Stafford D. G. DunetL

127 PAID 51.80 29.40 35.20 , 46.40 22.50 23.50 50.00 27.80 50.90 _. 28.10 _._ 19.40 33.80 19.40 _ __ 20.00 28.50 31.50 : 60.70 _ 49.90 24.60 30.70 27.00 _ 41.10 __ 29.30 30.90 26.60 _._ 22.60 42.70 24.80 _ 32.90 _ 18.60 28.50 39.20 29.50 _.. 43.60 34.40 42.70 42.70 32.20 28.30 _ 58.40 _.. _ 27.90 34.90 20.20 28.30 _ 36.90 17.10 33.10 30.10 __ _ 30.00 39.00 24.50 25.50 31.30 _.. _ 19.40 23.40


128

1930

Proceedings of the

No.

LODGE

206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 215 217 218 219 220 221 223 224 225 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 241 242 243 244 246 247 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267

Somerset Clay Salisbury : Poplar Bluff Unionville Hickory HilL..: Four Mile Rolla Hornersville Barbee Good Hope Albert Pike Kansas City Mystic Tie Ray Hamilton Salem Cypress Shelbina Claftin St. James CardweIL Polo Bucklin St. Francois Weatherby Sedalla La Plata RushvilIe HopeweIL PaIestine Portland Keystone Middle Fabius Montgomery Neosho Carroll. ; Glensted Hope __ Alanthus Laredo Butler Al ton Shekinah Lodge of LighL Ravanna Lodge of Love Mechanicsville Florence Holden Summit Kirbyville Corinthian Social. Aurora

REPRESENTATIVE

__

__

A. B. Shelton S. C. Sherwood T. H. Edwards C. H. Hendrickson G. A. Tate. __ O. E. NorfteeL C. W. DavenporL J. P. Gallahon Earl Pope __ J. E. White E. O. Suhm L. H. McArthur A. J. Rogers R. D. Drum W. T. Brinkley J. R. Hemry L. L. McSpadden R. W. Henton .r. P. PowelL. Virgil Rozell W. C. 'Jacobs W. H. Lockard J. H. Hendren R. P. Nickerson P. A. Cashion W. M. Roberts B. K. Higgins L. A. Carter O. C. Jones __ C. R. Burroughs E. ,J. Pundmann A. J. Holzhauser J. J. Buhlman J. O. Morgan J. W. Cook Frank Waymire E. R. Cox M. W. Klein W. N. Rau __ H. E. Rainey., J. E. Murphey..: Perry BourqUin Arth ur Rice A. Jun~kes L. 'J. caster Orin Calloway E. L. Atteberry H. S. Fulkerson A. C. Schroeder O. T. M路iller M. C. Wolfe W. C. Hurley V. T. Wood W. P. Moser W. L. Tamme

PAID ,

__

__

__

,

__

__

_ __

29.60 17.80 25.80 56.60 30.80 24.60 60.60 47.20 __ .. 64.20 22.40 42.70 15.00 ; 15.00 53.70 18.40 21.90 48.90 25.50 30.90 39.20 46.20 63.80 20.50 26.20 54.40 21.90 24.50 29.10 19.70 52.60 40.00 35.10 42.70 34.30 34.50 32.40 20.60 27.10 37.90 26.30 25.70 22.20 48.80 46.60 29.20 27.10 3.3.30 39.80 34.40 20.10 17.40 34.40 21.50 32.60 42.70


1930 No. 268 269 270 271 272 273 276 277 278 279 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 298 299 300 302 303 . 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 323 324 325 326 327 328 330 331

129

Grand Lodge of Missouri LODGE

Lodge of Truth Brotherhood New Salem Solomon Granite St. Clair Grand River Wm. D. Muir Essex Hogle's Creek. Fenton Cosmos Stockton Canopy EarL Urich CrafL Hermitage Graham Fairmount Edina Lamar Sarcoxie Mound City Moniteau Sampson Temple Doric Lick Creek Osage Signal. Cecile-Daylight Ashlar New London ParrotL King Hiram Sikeston Kearney Cuba Meramec Jerusalem RuraL Osborn Eldorado Paulville Versailles : Jonathan Cornerstone McDonald Dockery Linn ML Zion Cainsville Paul Revere Charity

PAID

REPRESENTATIVE G. M. Elsea..................... E. E. CadwelL l'~. W. Lanford G. G. WesL J. B. Hancock W. L. Foster J. Van Meeter !'. E. Hays L. E. Estes Roy LaFaver l<~. H. Carter : A. S. Dexheimer L. A. Bruce F. A. Davis C. W. Githens I-I. P. Smith A. C. Stork E. J. Miller R. E. Geyer A. Glaser J. M. Sens J. W. Gray C. F. La Furjah F. E. Cottier C. D. HeysseL P. Y. Duggins O. A. Teague H. C. King : J. E. Moore J. C. Howard J. C. Nelson A. D. Nordberg H. M. Zaricor Drake Watson Reuben Dunlap C. McCullough C. L. Francis E. L. Zion A. B. Rodgers J. E. PummilL Guy Farmer W. J. Lopp L. B. Doak A. M. Davidson C. H. Gelbach L. E. De Vinna F. H. Taylor E. S. Warner H. A. Thorpe R. B. Smiley L. P. Wills L. R. Dudley Fred Harrison W. C. Hayes V. B. M·illion

.

c••••••.•••

29.70 20.20 38.10 34.40 24.50 26.20 20.30 28.00 61.30 28.80 41.80 42.70 29.60 33.90 24.00 22.00 37.00 29.20 25.90 33.10 31.00 27.80 31.40 24.50 29.90 41.00 15.00 38.10 37.80 25.30 28.40 15.00 57.10 35.90 23.40 21.20 59.30 17.50 44.90 42.70 28.80 15.00 21.30 34.50 30.70 27.10 27.40 42.70 16.00 26.40 32.90 45.60 33.30 42.70 20.20


130 No.

332 333 334 335

337 338 339 340 341 344

345 347 348 349

350 351

352 353 354

355 356 358 360 361 362 363 364 365 366

367 368

369 370 371

372

373 375 376

377 378 380

381 383 384 385 387 388 389 390 391

392 393 394

397 398

1930

Proceedings of the LODGE Excello Chillicothe Breckenridge Joplin Blue Springs Herculaneum Fidelity Westport.. Rockville Moberly , FelIowship America Wadesburg PolIock Tyrian IVlosaic Friend BarnesvilIe Hebron AdelphL Ancient Landmark North west Tuscan Riddick Hiram FraternaL Higginsville Bayou Adair Barry···.·· · ·· Crescen t Hill. Composite Williamstown Sheldon NonpareiL Belle Waynesville King HilL Ancient Craft Berlin Queen City Ionia Pythagoras East Prairie Richland , Woodside Chula Arcana Marionville Raytown Christian Bee Hive Lucerne Gower Jasper

PAID

REPRESENTATIVE

:

H. J. Coulter R. M. DeaL J. L. Walker C. D. Bennett. R. J. McGuire G. C. Evens W. J. Portor C. Anderson S. H. BothwelL T. D. Barnes C. W. Helm H. C. Schroeder J. L. Parker W. J. Banner W. McComb R. S. McClary C. Shollenberger H. T. Chitwood E. W. Meng I. M. Newman C. M. Goslin J. M. Davis T. B. Morton R. A. Ramsey J. O. Brown ·· W. D. CresswelL J. A. Simpson Virgil Wiles C. S. Crawford C. G. Via A. C. Bail J. L. ShemmeIL D. A. Leslie H. L. Burney E. M. Leslie T. ,T. Tynes C. H. M·organ Leo Fletcher M. D. Maupin D. P. Burton H. M. young __ O. D. Taylor R. Kring W. D. Cain S. H. Winsor __ G. 1-I. Griffith __ : A. H. Gale E. Rhoades B. F. Smith J. H. Greene M. G. Ewing G. W. Moore __ R. Schoeck A. J. Walkup __ J. S. Grisham

. . . . . . . .

····

,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . ···· . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .

29.30 23.90 22.90 30.50 17.10 45.90 17.10 15.00 26.50 27.90 30.50 42.70 21.50 29.80 26.00 52.20 36.20 59.30

31.30 19.10 30.80 26.90 42.70 31.90 34.20 40.30 20.50 47.90 30.50 35.50 21.30 60.10 33.70 26.60 20.00 34.30 43.50 20.20 23.40 23.40 32.10 28.90 35.40 62.10 42.30 48.30 24.90 27.80 34.40 16.70 18.00 18.50 29.00 19.10 28.90


1930 No. 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 410

411 412 413

414 415 416 420 421 422 423 424 426 427 428 429 430 432 433 434 435 438 439 442 443 445

446 4407 449 450 452 453 454 455 456 457 458

459 460 461 462 463

464 468

469" 470

Grand Lodge of Missouri LODGE

Decatur Carterville l"lalta Lowry City Rosendale Everton Malden Charleston Montrose Iberia Joppa Appleton City Valley Greensburg HunnewelL Cache Itaska Urbana Gate of the Temple Galt Samaritan Rothvillc Glenwood Pittsville New Madrid Winona Competition Mack's Creek Wheeling __ Rockbridg-e Temperancc Mt. 01 ive Burlington Anchor West Gate Ivanhoe Jacoby Bois D路Arc Belton Verona Forsyth ContinentaL Hlnton Wallace Jonesburg , Mclville Hazelwood Lambskin Caruthersville Santa Fe Clifton Concordia Red Oak Plato Nodaway

REPRESENTATIVE E. M. Looney .. G. L. Graves L. \V'. Nye _J. H. Titus................. . W. B. Wood A. 1Vlallory B. S. I.acy H. S. Cochran C. P. Gardner..... . \V. M. Scott J. J. Hunter J. E. Herrmann __ G. J. Townsend C. E. Rice _ W. C. McElroy H. J. Heidman G. E. Black B. R. Butts V. J. Rutherford R. E. Evans Paul Paulsen A. H. Wilson Chas. Chattin C. T. Jarman __ C. M. Barncs __ V. O. Ballew F. E. Dougan J. T. Edwards __ N. L. \Villiams Otto Enloe E. C. Hill J. L. Bruton __ G. A. yates B. E. Carter C. F. J. Dietrich __ G. S. North M'. C. Miller W. T. Jennings J. S. 1V[iller __ S. P. Timmons W. M. Manes , S. R. Thornton __ E. E. Goslin A. Blomquist __ G. 1V[. SharI' T. ,J. McConnelL \V'. McAnally-__ H. H. Kleyboecker N. C. Hawkins __ G. D .. Talley __ C. A. Reef H. P .. Oetting __ __ F. Hagler __ .T. n. Morgan .. __ C. C. Tebow

131 PAID . .. . .. . . .. .. __ .. .. . .. .. .. . . __ .. . . . .. .. . . .. . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . . .. .. .. . . . .. . .. ..

32.50 31.00 22.40 25.50 22.50 32.10 59.10 60.50 25.20 43.20 40.20 25.70 23.00 31.60 31.90 42.70 42.70 30.50 34.40 26.40 49.40 24.90 32.90 20.30 61.20 47.40 42.10 42.60 25.50 42.50 17.40 37.00 27.40 42.70 42.70 15.00 24.70 32.00 17.80 34.40 34.70 21.20 31.90 28.40 35.30 32.40 37.90 42.70 64.70 31.90 48.20 21. 70 33.30 43.60 24.80


132

Proceedings of the

No.

LODGE

471 473 475 476 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 490 491 492 494 495 497 498 499 500 501 502 504 505 507 508 509 510 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 522 523 524 525 526 528 529 531 532 533 534 535 536 538 640

MineraL Nineveh Golden Mt. Hope Rich HllL. JeweL Marceline Clintonville Falrfax Klrkwood Cold Water Cairo Chilhowee Lock Spring MontevaIlo Vandalia Daggett

1930

REPRESENTATIVE

PAID

W. O. Poundstone E. C. LovelL Arthur Farr R. G. PowelL Albert Wiek L. M. Seymour R. B. Murray L. S. Emison Geo. Green G. V. Signor J. E. Turner H. L. Shaw H. H. Benezette Thos. Bills R. F. Moffatt Edw. Kurz J. B. M·cKissick. Le~lstown S. S. Silvey Unity A. M. Benedict Equality A. B. Cottle Pee Dee A. E. Lain Harmony J. W. Kessinger Jameson Roy Dickerson Buckner C. F. McPherson Phlladelphia T. J. Bleigh Platte City -:- Herman Klein EucIid J. Dillingham ClearmonL J. B. Newton Sax ton ,T. B. Hun t. Van Buren E. R. Burrows New Hampton R. L. Green Webb City J. W. BalL. Senath A. A. Caneer Granby D. E. Wildman Galena H. J. Warren Mllford C. L. Dale Seligman L. W eaver OrientaL...............................• S. F~ Pape Crane A. L. Peters Clifton Heights A. J. Goulden Gate City P. E. Nelson Stinson A. Adcock Spickardsville R. W. Ashbrook Cunningham L. O. Allen Wayne S. E. Barr Conway F. Bingham Apollo W. H.' Dann Lane's Prairie J . .T. Woodruff Dexter : L. A. Ulen ComforL J. A. Frazier Columbia J. L. Thiebes Blackwc1L S. M'cKinstry Ingomar J. A. Armstrong SteIla J. A. Weems Winigan T. M. Crowder

30.20 35.20 29.00 19.00 23.40 18.40 25.60 27.50 26.20 41.90 20.30 28.60 21.30 24.80 27.00 33.70 36.00 33.00 25.30 46.40 26.80 42.70 23.30 17.40 34.90 18.30 42.70 27.90 20.90 49.70 26.00 31.00 62.70 34.60 35.00 27.80 36.10 21.80 34.00 42.70 15.00 35.90 26.30 24.40 55.80 38.50 42.70 35.50 60.70 34.90 39.60 48.20 43.50 35.20 28.40


No. 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 553 55路5 557 558 559 560 561 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 576 577 578 579 580 582 583 585 587 588 690 591 592 5-93 594 595 696 697 600 601 602 603 605 606 607 608 609

133

Grand Lodge of Missouri

1930

Jacksonville Ferguson Mansfield AIgabiL. Zalma Orient.. South Gate Clinton Carl Junction Rose HilL Pendleton Clarksburg Summersville Blairstown Moscow 'Clarksdale Nelson CowgilL York Jamesport Tebbetts Maplewood Miller Naylor Marlborough Republic HaytL. Rutledge Olive Branch Ewing Forest Park Grandin Houston Koshkonong Novinger Shamrock Branson St. Francisville Advance Barnett~

La RusseIL Union Blodgett.. Cole Camp Puxico Bosworth Cosby Clayton Acacia Morehouse Walker Craig Eminence Strafford Warrenton

PAID

REPRESENTATIVE

LODGE

:

H. G. Kidd R. B. Durham M. E. Gorman A. L. Fischer : H. D. Nichols F. O. Baldwin M. B. Jenkins E. N. Brandenburg J. W. Fowler C. G. Duggan H. Herbst J. C. Martin J. C. Grieg Jenning Counts Reid Powelson O. W. Thorn ton R. B. Finley P. H. PercifuIL F. Wooldridge Homer Walker F. A. Leonard D. E. Weiss C. W. Nicholson J. C. Brown G. W. KnechL W. T. Barron _ J. B. Buckley G. C. McDonald G. J. Fischer S. B. Shackelford Harry Schulz A. S. J. Carnahan T. Du nn G. R. Hilt Fred Kob W. I. Armstrong B. A. ParnelL H. d. McDanieL J. H. Revelle O. C. Weaver F. E. young G. O. Busch : R. A. Green C. P. Junge R .. L. Punch E. C. CarrolL M. Schwalm J. Grueninger B. J. CarL C. H. Pease T. G. Botsford _ E. F. Green Frank Hyde _ H. E. Grier W. H. DrunerL

__

29.10 41.50 " 39.10 42.70 62.70 15.00 15.00 23.80 29.80 42.70 50.30 27.70 46.50 22.00 36.80 :.. 22.20 24.80 21.10 15.00 23.60 33.00 43.40 31.70 58.60 15.00 35.80 64.00 31.90 42.70 33.80 42.70 51.60 31. 30 47.30 31.30 33.40 34.00 34.70 58.40 28.20 32.40 38.80 59.40 26.30 60.20 22.90 21.70 42.20 .' 32.10 60.00 26.10 23.90 49.00 35.50 36.80


134

Proceedings of the

No.

LODGE

610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 621 622 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 634 635 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644

Clark Cen tertown Mokane Wellston Mt. Washington Chaffee Marion Swope Park Grandview F5iirview An derson Norwood Owensville Sheffield Magnolia Wallace Park __ Mendon Valley Park Eastgate Tower Grove Belgrade Steele Greentop Mountain View Triangle Mizpah Jennings Trinity Benj. Franklin Northeast. Grain Valley

646

Shaveh

647

NoeL

648

Elmer

!. H. Grubbs

649

University

A. B. Park.

650

Parma

651

Cleveland

652 653

Pilgrim Shawnee

__

__

__

__

__ ·

~

REPRESENTATIVE

PAID

F. L. Ornburn J. N. Son S. W. Hazlett E. C. Smith J. N. Johnson A. A. Klages A. A. Alley Fred Ellis A. Marcus S. A. Russell C. A. Allman_ Fred McMillian J. A. HoIL J. C. Henderson O. B. Klein L. C. Cox S. L. Leipard E. T. Hiscox N. T. Bond J· 1. Maag __ __ J. I·~. Hanson G. H. Northcutt W. J. Kelley E. Le Raron F. H. Anger H. E. Wiehe H. F. Sylvester P. E. Greitzer W. B. Barry A. L. Fox E. F. PentecosL

28.60 29.30 33.60 42.70 15.00 57.10 28.40 15.00 17.30 34.10 34.20 40.20 35.70 15.00 42.70 -20.00 24.10 41.40 15.00 42.70 51.20 65.70 31.60 41.90 42.70 42.70 42.70 42.70 42.70 15.00 17.50

__

__ __ __

__

__

__

__

__

35.00 27.80 __

42.70

_

62.00

Shaw, Jr

18.80

C. A. Ebling J. A. Logan

654

Commonwealth

H. H.

655

Gardenville

F.

Wolz

656

Country Club

G.

H.

657

Progress

F. J. Niemann

658

Purity

E.

659

Alpha

W.

660

Holliday

T. E. Sparks

661

Theodore RooseveIL

H. B. Givens

662

Clarence

C. W. Layne

663

RockhilL.

A. A. Joliff

664

Aldrich

A.

42.70 28.50

Hutton

42.70 __

Temple

42.70 __

15:00' 42.70

H. WesselL. E.

__

42.70

__ R. Rope

· ···· A. ·

__

W'm· Jackels

E. J. Hoke

,

1930

42.70

Macken

B .. Hensley

20.00 30.30 __

42.70 31.90

__

15.00 30.60


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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS.

The report of the Committee on Ways and Means was presented by R. VV. Brother James A. Kinder and adopted. The report is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Ways and Means desires to report as follows: Before submitting the list of items which this Committee has decided to recommend to this Grand Lodge for appropriation, we desire to call attention to the fact that our appropriations have slowly but surely mounted each year until now we find ourselves in the position of appropriating more money than our anticipated income. A number of resolutions have been introduced at this session calling for appropriations and we have been compelled by the rules of good b.usiness to reduce or eliminate entirely some of these proposed expenditures. Especially do we regret being unable to recommend the amount asked for by the Committee on Charity, for the reason that the per capita tax now barely provides for the actual fixed expenses of this Grand Lodge. We recommend that if it is proposed to enter upon an extensive plan of Charity and Relief outside of that provided through the Masonic Home funds, a means be devised for providing money for that purpose. With reference to the proposed appropriation for the purpose of sending all Grand Lodge officers and all Past Grand Masters to the dedication of the George Washington Memorial at Alexandria, Virginia, in February, 1932, we recommend that action thereon be postponed until the Grand Lodge Session of 1931. We recommend the following appropriations: Pay Roll Proceedings Salary Grand Master Expense Maintenance, Grand Lodge Offices Masonic Service Association Masonic Temple Association Expense, G. L. Officers, Order of G. M Salary, Grand Secretary Office Help Printing, Postage, Stationery, Incidentals Salary, Grand Lecturer Expense, Grand Lecturer Salary, Grand Treasurer .-Fraternal Correspondent Masonic Relief Ass'n, U. S. and Canada Committee on Charity . Past Grand M'aster's Jewel Telephone, Jefferson 4877 Committee on Necrology Bonds, G. Secretary and G. Treasurer Bond for Depository

$21,607.40 3,900.00 1,000.00 : . 1,500.00 . 1,800:00 , . 1,000.00 . 8,000.00 . 500.00 . 5,000.00 . 5,280.00 . 2,000.00 . 4,200.00 . 1,200.00 . 500.00 . 750.00 . 285.00 . 3,000.00 . 200.00 200.00 . . 75.00 . 350.00 , . 175.00


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Proceedings of the

Reporter -_ _ Chairman, Mileag'e and Per Diem Chairman, Com. On Chartered Lodges __ District Deputy Grand Masters' Dinner Expense, Grand Lodge Session EXp. G. W. Mem'l and Grand Masters' Conference Regional Conferences __ Contingent G. L. Expense, Funerals, Etc. _ Library Committee _: _ _ Perkins Audit Company

_. . . _ . . _ . . _._._._ . . .

75.00 100.00 50.00 179.50 650.00 700.00 1,300.00 500.00 200.00 200.00 $66,476.90

Fraternally SUbmitted, J. A. KINDER, C. D. STRUBLE, HARRY S. HIGHTOWER, DOUGLAS W. ROBERT.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS.

To the Grand Lodge: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report: At the present session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge there are represented 543 Subordinate Lodges, and there are present: Grand ~odge Officers 20路 Past Grand Masters_._ _ _ _ 13 Grand Representatives ._._. _. __ ., _ _.. _. __ _ _ 44 District Deputy Grand Masters _ _ _ 44 District Lecturers .__ .__ _ _._._ _ _. __ _ __ __ _ 45 Past Masters _ _._ .. _.._ _ _ __.__ ._ _._ .._._ 611 Worshipful Masters _ _.. _ __ _._ _ _.. 495 Senior vVardens _ _ __ __ _ _._ .__ _. __ _ 13 9 Junior vVardens _ _ _ _ __.._ _ _.._. __ __ _. 79 Chairmen of Committees __ _ _ _ _ __ _ 17 Distinguished Visitors ._._..__ __ _ __ _ _ 8 Actual attendance is: Past Masters _. __._.._.. _ _._ _ vVorshipful Masters _ _ _ _.. Senior Wardens __ .._ _. __ _._._ Junior Wardens __ _ _ _ Total.._

_

_

.

_

_ __ .611 _ _495 ._ __139 _ _ 79 1,324

Fraternally submitted, CHAS. M. CHRISTIE, WALTER A. WEBB, LOUIS H. ABRAMS, HENRY F. WOERTHER, FRED H. KNIGHT, T. S. EVILSIZER, Committee.

(Adopted.)


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137

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS.

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of the State of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Unfinished Business desires to report to you that there is none. Respectfully submitted, THOMAS A. HARBAUGH, Chairman.

APPOINTMENTS.

The Grand Secretary read the following list of Appointments made by the M. VV. Grand Master-elect: GRAND LECTURER- _ __ .. J AMES R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka GRAND CHAPLAIN.. __ W ALTER M. LANGTRY, Clayton GRAND CHAPLAIN.. __ .__ .__ .BMMET L. ROBISON, St. Joseph GRAND CHAPLAIN __ .... ._ .. ..sAMUEL THURMAN, St. Louis GRAND CHAPLAIN ...... .IV AN LEE HOLT, St. Louis GRAND CHAPLAIN.. .. .A. RAY PETTY, Kansas City GRAND SENIOR DEACON DUVAL SMITH, St. Joseph GRAND JUNIOR DEACON .JAMES W. SKELLY, St. Louis GRAND SENIOR STEWARD ...GEO. W. WALKER, Cape Girardeau GRAND JUNIOR STEWARD.. HAROLD L. READER, Webster Groves GRAND MARSHAL__ __ .. HENRy C. CHILES, Lexington GRAND MARSHAL__ : ELWYN S. WOODS, Springfield GRAND SWORD BEARER- KARL M. VETSBURG, St~ Louis GRAND PURSUIVANT __ HARRY S. TRUMAN, Independence GRAND ORATOR. __ FORREST C. DONNELL, St. Louis GRAND TILER. W ALTER E. SEEWOSTER, St. Louis

INSTALLATION.

The hour for Installation having arrived, M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, P. G. M., at the request of the Grand Master, was introduced as the Installing Officer, who in turn requested 1VI. W. Brother John Pickard, P. G. M., to act as Grand Marshal. The following Grand Officers were then duly installed for the ensuing year: WILLIAM R. GENTRY, St. Louis. .. ...__ .GRAND MASTER RAY V. DENSLOW, Trenton ...... ._. .DEPUTY GRAND MASTER THAD B. LANDON, Kansas City__ .. . .SENIOR GRAND WARDEN FRANK C. BARNHILL, MarshaL. .. ... JUNIOR GRAND WARDBN EDMUND E. MORRIS, Kansas City. .GRAND TREASURER ARTHUR MATHER, St. Louis.... . ... __ GRAND SECRETARY JAMES R. M'cLACHI,AN, Kahoka .. __ GRAND LECTURER WALTER M. LANGTRY, Clayton GRAND CHAPLAIN EMMET L. ROBISON, St. Joseph GRAND CHAPLAIN SAMUEL THURMAN, St. Louis __ .. .. __ GRAND CHAPLAIN


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Proceedings of the

IVAN LEE HOLT, Sf. Louis GRAND A. RAY PETTY, Kansas City GRAND DUVAL SMITH, St. Joseph GRAND JAMES W. SKELLY, St. Louis GRAND GEO. W. WALKER, Cape Girardeau GRAND HAROLD L. READER, Webster Groves ..GRAND HENRY C. CHILES, Lexington GRAND ELWYN S. WOODS, Springfield GHAND KARL M. VETSBURG, St. Louis GRAND HAHRY S. TRUMAN, Independence GRAND FORREST C. DONNELL, St. Louis GRAND WALTER E. SEE'WOSTER, St. Louis GRAND

CHAPLAIN CHAPLAIN SENIOR DEACON JUNIOR DEACON SENIOR STEWARD JUNIOR STEWA'RD M'ARSHAL MARSHAL SWORD BEARER PURSUIVANT ORATOR TILER

PRESENTATION OF GRAND MASTER'S AND PAST GRAND MASTER'S JEWELS.

Past Grand :Master Freet then addressed Grand Master Gentry as follows: "Many years ago our revered Brother, M. W. Bro. Kuhn, presented the Grand Lodge with an official jewel to be worn by each succeeding Grand Master. It now becomes my duty and my pleasure to pass on to you that jewel which was presented to me one year ago. Many good men, and true, have worn this' jewel since it was first presented by M. W. Bro. Kuhn a quarter of a century and more ago. But I say to you in all sincerity and to you, my brethren, that it has never been worn by anyone who is more entitled to its distinction than are you, our beloved Grand Master. Throughout the years that I have been associated with you in our (lrand Lodge work and as brother officers, I have. learned to love you as I have learned to love few men; not only because of your delightful personality, because of your attainment in your chosen profession, not only because of the position that you occupy in your community, but because of those high qualities of your mind and heart Which are ever so apparent to those with whom you come in contact. I bespeak for you a happy and busy and useful year among your brethren. I know that you will wear this jewel with pleasure to yourself and I am equally certain that you will wear it with honor to this great fraternity, I have never performed any act in my brief career in Masonry which has afforded me more pleasure than to transmit this jewel to you." (Applause.)

IVL W. Grand l\1aster Gentry replied as follows: M. W. Bro. Freet, the words that you have spoken go clear down to my heart and touch me so deeply that I can scarcely control my voice as I attempt to reply. These words that our retiring Grand Master has spoken, my brethren, are indeed beautiful words which any man may feel proud to have spoken to him, and yet I must say that as I listened to these beautifUl compliments that he has paid me and considered these beautiful emblems of esteem and affection that my brethren have sent me, and above all, as I view this exalted position to which you brethren have exalted me, I am fined with a sense of the deepest possible humility. I would that I might indeed be worthy of the words that have been spoken, of the honors that have been bestowed and the gifts that have been given to me. The most beautiful part of Brother Freet's address is not


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merely in the words themselves, but in the knowledge and full consciousness on my part that they do sincerely come from his very heart. And I want to say, brethren, that no man could reciprocate to any other man more fully than I do to M. 'V. Bro. Freet all that he has said to me and all the affection that he has shown to· me in these remarks that he has made. Day after day and night after night during the dark period when messages were coming slowly and when there was grave doubt about the condition and the outcome of the condition of our Grand Master, I, with many another Master Mason, carried my prayer to the Throne of Grace that he might be spared and might come back to us, and God ·in His infinite mercy answered that prayer, to our great satisfaction, delight, and happiness. May God's continued blessing rest upon you, my brother, may you recover your full strength and health very soon and may you long be spared to serve your fellowmen as you have so well done in the years gone by. And in closing let me perform the most pleasing duty that has been mine in many a long day. It has been the custom here in this Grand Lodge for a beautiful jewel known as the Past Grand Master's jewel to be presented to the outgoing Past Grand Masternot to be returned by him in another year, as the Grand Master's jewel is when presented to him while in office-but that it may be his very own, to be worn by him so long as he lives and handed down by him to those who are dear to him when he is called to join the celestial Lodge above. My brethren, I take the greatest pleasure in presenting this jewel to our retiring Grand Master, knowing that in every grain of the gold, that in every stroke made by the engraver in the process of engraving and in every emblem there represented there is imperishably linked the love and affection of the 113,000 odd Masons who compose the fraternity in this state. And as I see you, brethren, standing here raising your arms and hands, what a wonderful sight it was as you gave those grand honors and I saw in every one of those hands support and help and a desire to' aid the Grand M'aster in the coming year and in the heart of everyone of you I know there rests the wish that Heaven's richest blessing may rest upon him who today steps down from active control of the fraternity as its Grand Master and that you all join with me in the prayer that Heaven's richest blessing may be his. (Applause.)

M. W. Bro. Freet: M. W. Grand Master and brethren, it is so difficult for one to express the innermost thoughts that come to one at a time like this, when my dearly beloved Brother Gentry presents me with this emblem, that is more honorable and more exalted than any other insignia that I know anything about that could be conferred upon one by mortal man, beautiful in itself, intrinsic· value of no small amount, but that fades into insignificance when I contemplate what it represents. To have been your Grand Master for a year is an honor that comes to but few men in the entire lifetime of our generation. I have enjoye·d every moment of it. My sole regret is that I have not been able to serve you better, but may I now pledge every ounce of strength that remains in me, that is there I firmly believe today because of your sincere prayers-let me pledge that strength so long as 'it shall last, to the Freemasons of Missouri. And let me say· in conclusion, M. W. Grand Master, that I sincerely appreciate all of the good things that you have said and


140

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1930

have done for me not only during the past years, but: during this Grand Lodge session-for' relieving me of the necessity of the slightest worry about the conduct of the business of the Grand Lodge, and I sincerely thank you for all that you have done and for the excellent way in which you have presided over the deliberations of the Grand Lodge. And I may say this: that I think a very high compliment has been passed upon you .and to you when the brethren have elected you Grand Master after having had a sample of the way in which you have presided over them. (Applause.) Now, with the rest of us, so far as I know, the brethren took us, as we used to say in our knee-trouser days, "sight' unseen." We were afraid to show our wares because of the result that might follow-but you have not been afraid. You have shown them what you can and will do and they have elected you nevertheless. That is the highest compliment that I know of that could be paid to you. (Applause.)

M. VV. Grand Master Gentry: It is their own fault if they don't like my ways now.

M. W. Bro. Freet: Exactly. Brethren, I shall not take more of your time. I cannot say what is in my heart. All I can say is, may God's richest blessings rest upon you, our M. W. Grand Master, and crown your every effort with success. Thank you.

CHAIRM.EN OF STANDING COMMITTEES. JURISPRUDENCK APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES WAYS AND MEANS CREDENTIALS PAY ROLL CHARTERED LODGES LODGES U. D CHARITY REPORTS OF D. D. G. M.'S MASONIC BOARDS OF RELIEF RITUAL MASONIC HOME (Visiting Com.) CORRESPONDENCK NECROLOGY AUDITING GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS UNFINISHE"D BUSINESS TRANSPORTATION & HOT1路}LS

JOHN C. ROBERTSON, St. Louis WM. F. WOODRUFF, Kansas City DOUGLAS W. ROBERT, St. Louis L. H. ABRAMS, St. Louis W ALTER R. SHRODES, Milan C. L. ALEXANDER, St. Louis GIB W. CARSON, St. Louis ~T. W. COTTON, Van Buren CHAS.- J. FITZGERALD, Overland ANDREW 'J. O'REILLY, St. Louis J. C. GARRELL, Webster Groves A. S. DEXHEIMER, St. Louis CORONA H. BRIGGS, Springfield JOHN PICKARD, Col um bia H. CI.>AY PERKINS, st. Louis CORONA H. BRIGGS, Spring-field THOS. A. HARBAUGH, Webb City JAMES L. FLAVEN, St. Louis

COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENCE. JOHN C. ROBERTSON, Chairman, St. Louis HENRI L. WARREN, Kansas City JACOB CHASNOFF, St. Louis WALTER E. BAILEY, Springfield R. E. KAVANAUGH, Trenton

COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES. WM. F. WOODRUFF, Chairman, Kansas City A. H. MANN, Kansas City LEO路T. JOHNSON, Neosho RICHARD O. RUMER, St. Louis GROVER C. JAMES, Joplin


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

141

COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS. DOUGLAS W. ROBERT. Chairman, St. Louis GEO. C. MARQUIS. Independence J AS. A. KINDER, Cape Girardeau B. C. HUNT, Columbia THOS. A. HARBAUGH, Webb City

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. L. H. ABRAMS, Chairman, St. Louis WALTER WEBB, St. Louis FRED H. KNIGHT, Kansas City BYRON CHAPHE, St. Louis DAVIn 'V. PARKER, Kansas City

COMMITTEE ON PAY ROLL. 'VALTER R. SHRODES, Chairman, Milan CHAS. F. DREHMANN, St. Louis ROY C. ROBERTS, Fayette DUNCAN G. MELLIER, St. Louis .J. R. BAKER, Fulton

COM MITTEE ON LODGES U. D. GIB W. CARSON, Chairman, St. Louis CECIL C. REED, Benton Eo L. HARRISON, Harrisonville

COMMITTEE ON CHARITY. T. W. COTTON, Chairman, Van Buren R. R. KREEGER. Kansas City v\'. S. CAMPBELL. St. Louis THOS. H. REYNOLDS, Kansas City ARCH A. JOHNSON, Springfield

COMMITTEE ON REPORTS OF D. D. G. M'S. CHAS. A. FITZGERALD, Chairman, Overland GENTRY S. NORTH, Kansas City LeROY A. WEIDLE, St. Louis

COMMITTEE ON RITUAL. JULIUS C. GARRELL, Chairman, 'Webster Groves J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka SAMUEL R. FREET, Kansas City J. GWYNN GOUGH, St. Louis JAS. A. KINDgR, Cape Girardeau

COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS. JAMES L. FLAVEN, Chairman, St. Louis JOHN D. SLOAT, St. Louis H. F. BECKER, St. Louis

SPECIAL COMMITTEES. MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION OF MISSOURI-Thad R. Smith, Chairman, Palmyra; Ray V. Denslow, Secretary, Trenton: MANUALS-Arthur Mather, Chairman. MEETING OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS-F. L. Magoon, St. Louis; Duncan G. MellieI', St. Louis; Kleber C. Jones. Versailles. RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman, Trenton; Joseph S. McIntyre, St. Louis; C. H. Briggs, Springfield: Van F. Boor, Kansas City; Orestes Mitchell, St. Joseph. MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS-Corona H. Briggs, Chairman, Springfield; Sam Wilcox, St. Joseph; Guy C. Million, Boonville. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION-Bert S. Lee. Chairman. Springfield. LIBRARY-'V. B. Massey, Chairman, Bonne Terre; Wm. P. Mason; Robert S. Calder.


142

1930

Proceedings of the

LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION. CORONA H. BRIGGS ROBERT R. KREEGER ARCH A. JOHNSON VAN FREMONT BOOR TOLMAN W. CO.TTON WM. A. CLARK JULIUS C. GARRELL BERT S. LEE

JOSEPH S. McINTYRE ORESTES MITCHELL WM. W. MARTIN JOHN PICKARD ANTHONY F. ITTNER BYRNE E. BIGGER SAMUEL R. FREET

. . . ;11{~'

~ ~nd

Secretary.


Proceedings of the

144

DISTRICT DEPUTY.GRAND MASTERS. 1st District 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd-A 33rd-B 34th 35th 36th 37th 38th 39th 40th 41st 42nd 43rd 44th 45th 46th 47th 48th 49th 50th 51st 52nd 53rd 54th 55th 56th 57th 58th 59th

H. M. JAYNE, Memphis CHARLES F. LINK, Kirksville JOSEPH W. MOORE, Newtown E. M. 'WILSON, Laredo HENDRIX NEWMAN, New Hampton CURTIS F. SMITH, Darlington JONATHAN STARK, Maryville FRANK R. ELTON, Tarkio PBRHY W. PECK, St. Joseph THOS. D. WILLIAMS, Maysville D. M. FOSTER, Cameron E. K DIVINIA, Breckenridge FORREST L. MADDBN, Meadville LUTHER E. WILHOIT, Macon DONALD H. SOSE~ P~myrn "VARREN H. MAY, Louisiana G.I!;ORGfD Eo CHIPMAN, Monroe City WM. F. WIGGINTON, Moberly T. H. EDWARDS, Salisbury OTTO HALE, Carrollton J. P. TUCKER, Parkville DARIUS A. BROWN, Kansas City C. B. W ADD.I!;LL, Lexington JAMES MORGAN, Blackburn ROY C.'ROBERTS, Fayette J. EMMETT HAWKINS, Columbia LOUIS J. GRAUE, Mexico S. S. COX, Wellsville L. T. BASKETT, Elsberry EDWIN H. BARKLAG E, St. Charles W. D. ROGERS, Jefferson City R. A. BREUER, Hermann ERWIN L. OCKER, St. Louis ABRAHAM ROMANSKY, St. Louis JAMES F. BLAIR, Belton R. A. PADGETT, Rich Hill S. B. KENNON, Sedalia THORNTON JENNINGS, Clinton WIN AN I. MAYFIELD, Lebanon CHARLES L. WOODS, Rolla H. H. BALSIGER. Crystal City M. E. EWING, Morrisville M. D. GWINN. Eldorado Springs D. V. MORRIS, Nevada RAY BOND, Joplin JEWELL E. WINDLE. Springfield CARL A. SWENSON, Mountain Grove J. N. SPARKS, Grandin JOHN J. BO\VMAN, Bonne Terre JAMES A. KINDEll, Cape Girardeau G. A. SAMPLE. Chaffee G. C. BISHOP, Caruthersville K. C. JOHNSON, Poplar Bluff C. E. ARMSTRONG, West Plains G. J. VAUGHAN, Ozark W. N. MARBUT, Mt. Vernon "V. A. PHIPPS. Neosho 1. ERLE ROSS, Clayton KLEBER C. JONES, Versailles JOHN S. CARMICAL, Independence

1930


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri DISTRICT LECT:URERS. 1st District 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd-A 33rd-B 34th 35th 36th 37th 38th 39th 40th 41st 42nd 43rd 44th 45th 46th 47th 48th 49th 50th 51st 52nd 53rd 54th 55th 56th 57th 58th 59th

II. M. JAYNE, Memphis LOUIS W. OSBORNE, Kirksville JOSEPH W. MOORE, Newtown E. M. WILSON, Laredo HENDRIX NEWMAN, New Hampton CURTIS F. SMITH, Darlington JONATHAN STARK, Maryville FRANK R ELTON, Tarkio FRANK A. MILLER, St. Joseph THOS. D. WILLIAMS, ::.vlaysville D. M. FOSTER, Cameron B. E. DIVINIA, Breckenridge FORREST L. MADDEN. Meadville LUTHER E. WILHOIT, Macon DONALD H. SOSEY, Palmyra WARRI~N H. MAY, Louisiana GEORGE E. CHIPMAN, Monroe City 'WM: F. 'VIGGINTON,Moberly T. H. ED"\VARDS, Salisbury OTTO HALE, Carrollton H. C. NOLAND, Parkville EDGAR F. SMITH, Kansas City C. B. WADDELL, Lexington JAMES MORGAN, Blackburn ROY C. ROBERTS, Fayette ROY R. WRIGHT, Columbia LOUIS J. GRAUE, Mexico S. S. COX, Wellsville L. T. BASKETT, Elsberry gDWIN H. BARKLAGE, St. Charles W. D. ROGERS, Jefferson City R. A. BREUER, Hermann ERNEST H. WESSELl" St. Louis ERNEST H. WESSELL, St. Louis JAMES F. BLAIR, Belton R. A. PADGETT, Rich Hill S. B. KENNON, Sedalia THORNTON JENNINGS, Clinton WINAN I. MAYFIELD, Lebanon EDMUND J. KOCH, Rolla CHAS. E. PYLE, De Soto M. E. EWING. Morrisville M. D. GWINN, Eldorado Springs JOHN C. SENATE, Lamar HARRY S. HIGHTOWER, Joplin E. F. HANNAH, Springfield CARL A. SWENSON, Mountain Grove .J. N. SPARKS, Grandin .J. CLYDE AKl'~RS, Farmington JAMES A. KINDER, Cape Girardeau G. A. SAMPLE, Chaffee B. P. PARKS, Hornersville K. C. JOHNSON, Poplar Bluff C. E. AHMSTRONG, 'Vest Plains G. J. VAUGHAN, Ozal'k ,V. N. MARBUT, Mt. Vernon VV. A. PHIPPS, Neosho FAY G. FULKERSON, Vl ebster Groves KLEBER C. JONES, Versailles JOHN S. CARMICAL, Independence

145


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Proceedings of the

1930

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS ADOPTED.

The following amendments to the Grand Lodge By-laws were adopted subsequent to reference to and approval by the Committee on Jurisprudence. We accordingly recommend the adoption of the following new SubSection 27-(1), Article IV, which shall supersede the existing Sub-Section 27-(1), Article IV, the amendment proposed in 1929 to Sub-Section 27-1-(1), Article IV and the amendment transmitted as above stated to us at the present Communication: .. '(I) Welfare. A Committee on Welfare, to whom shaH be referred all applications for Masonic relief. .. '1. The number of said Committee shall be five, composed of members selected from the Masonic Home Board. "'2. Said Committee shall have full and exclusive authority to expend monies, which may be appropriated for its use by the Grand Lodge for the relief of worthy applicants for Masonic relief, whom in the opinion of said Committee it would not be allvisable for any reason to admit to the Masonic Home. All of said money shall be kept in a separate fund and never mingled with Masonic Home funds. "'3. Said C.ommittee shall meet on call of its Chairman for the transaction of business, and its members shall not receive any compensation whatsoever for their services or be reimbursed for any expense incurred in attending the meetings of said Committee. "'4. A majority of said Committee shaH constitute a quorum.' "

"Amend the By-laws by repealing Section 56 and by enacting, in lieu thereof, a ne'w Section to be known as Section 56, to read as follows: .. 'Section 56. Cont,'(wting of DelJts. Except as hereinafter provided, a Lodge shall not be permitted to contract debts for any purpose until sufficient available assets are on hand to meet the payment thereof. There is hereby created a Board, to be known as the Building Supervisory Board. Said Board shall consist of three members of the Grand Lodge and shall be appointed by the Grand Master. Upon the adoption of this By-law, it shall be the duty of the Grand Master forthwith to appoint the first three members of said Board, one of whom shall serve for three years. Thereafter, each succeeding Grand Master shall appoint one member each year for three years to fill the vacancy of the one whose term has expired. The Grand Master shall also have the power to fill all other vacancies caused by death or otherwise. " 'The members of such Board shall serve without compensation, but shall receive their actual and necessary expenses, to be paid by the Grand Lodge. .. 'Said Board shall have access to all records having to do with the matters submitted to said Board hereunder, whether such records be the property of the local Lodge or of the Grand Lodge. "'From and after the adoption of this By-law, no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or OCCUP)' a building or Temple until the p:ans for the purchase, construction and financing thereof shall first have been submitted to the Building Supervisory Board and its permission obtained. Nothing herein


1930

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147

set forth shall apply to any Masonic Temple already erected or purchased or to any case In which a Lodge is making a bona. fide lease of quarters privately owned by a person or corporation acting in the usual course of business and not directly or indirectly acting for or connected with the Lodges or its members. .. 'Neither the Grand Lodge nor any officer or member thereof, as such, nor the Building Supervisory Board, shall be liable for any indebtedness hitherto now or hereafter inc!lrred by any Lodge or Temple Association. " 'A Lodge may be permitted to contract a debt for the purpose of purchasing a cemetery, provided the written consent of the Grand Master shall be previously secured. Any Lodge obtaining permission to contract a debt for the purchase of a cemetery shall at once notify the Grand Secretary of the amount of the debt incurred, the security given, and the date of maturity. of the debt. When any debt contracted for a building or cemetery shall have been paid, the Lodge shall notify the Grand Secretary of such payment. "'A record of all such debts shall be furnished to the Grand Secretary by the respective Lodges and by the Building Supervisory Board, and such record, together with the record of payment thereof, shall be kept in the office of the Grand Secretary: .. The re-draft of the proposed new amendment, as such re-draft was prepared by the 1929 Jurisprudence Committee, is as follows, with appropriate correction in punctuation: "Section 2611;2. Trial by Commission. The Lodge (by a majority vote) or the accused may make request, in writing, that the case be tried by a Commission, which request shall be voted or filed with the Worshipful Master not less than two days before the day fixed for trial. "When said vote is so taken or said request so filed, the Worshipful Master shall refer the matter to the Grand Master, who, if he approves the request, shall appoint a Trial Commission to take charge of and try the case, and pending the determination of the Grand Master the trial shall be postponed to a time fj.xed in the order of postponement. "Each Trial Commission appointed by the Grand Master shall consist of three disinterested and experienced brethren, members of Lodges in Missouri, residing outside the jurisdiction of the Lodge interested, excepting that in the cities having three or more Lodges, such Trial Commission may be appointed from brethren residing in the respective cities, not members of the trial lodge. "The Trial Commission shall hear all evidence submitted and make a shorthand record of such evidence and testimony. They shall observe the same rules of evidence and practice as are prescribed by the Grand Lodge By-laws for Trial Committees. "The Commission shall prepare a brief statement of the facts found, its conclusions thereon, and the punishment, if any, affixed by it, which shall be filed with the Lodge in the


148

Proceedings of the

1930

same manner and with the same effect as is provided for a verdict by jury. "The Trial Commission shall be entitled to reimbursement from the Lodg-e for actual expenses paid. "In trials ordered by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, by the Grand Lodge or any Committee of the Grand Lodge with the approval of the Grand Lodge, such Grand Master, Grand Lodge or Committee may designate that the trial is to be had by Commission." Sec. 192-Concurrent Jurisdiction. In cities or towns where there are two or more Lodges, they shall have concurrent jurisdiction over the territory therein, and also路 the territory lying equi-distant between the corporate limits of such city or town, and the nearest Lodge or Lodges in 路the various directions therefrom, except that they shall not have jurisdiction within the corporate limits of another city or town where there is a Lodge. ((P1'ovidcd that, in townships now having or which may hereafter have a population of thirty thousand or more and having within their boundaries three or morc Lodges, such Lodges by an affirmative vote of all Lodges concerned may adopt and have concurrent jurisdiction within the territory held by the several Lodges concerned."

APPROVED DECISIONS OF GRAND MASTER FREET. List of these decisions may be found in the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence.

STANDING RESOLUTION.

M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee presented the following resolution, which was adopted and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means: WHEREAS, on February 22nd, 1932, the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the birth of George Washington, there will be held in Alexandria, Virginia, the Dedication of the Memorial erected by the Freemasons of the United St.ates to honor that great Freemason and Father of our Country, at which time there will be assembled in Alexandria the largest concourse of Freemasons ever held, and WHEREAS, the Freemasons of Missouri have had a great part in making possible the completion of the Memorial, having met every call made upon them by the officers and directors of the Association, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that we arrange to send to the Dedication our Grand Lodge Officers at that time and the Past Grand Masters, and that we request the Committee on Ways and Means to make the necessary appropriation. BERT S. LEE, ANTHONY .P. ITTNER, ORESTES MITCHELL.


1930

Grand Lodge of "fl.!issouri

149

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS. The following amendments to Grand Lodge By-laws, as shown below, lie over until the next Annual Session according to Law. To amend the Grand Lodge By-Laws by striking out Section Eleven, Article 2 and inserting the following in lieu thereof: Section Eleven. Grand Treasurer: The Grand Treasurer shall receive from the Grand Secretary all funds and securities of the Grand Lodge, and deposit the same in the name of this Grand Lodge in some bank or trust company, to be approved by the Grand Master and Chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means; said bank or trust company to furnish the Grand Lodge a good and sufficient bond to secure the same for the sum of $50,000.00, which bond shall be approved by the Grand Master 'and Chairman of the Committee on Ways and M'eans. He shall attend the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, and when required, meet the Grand Officers and Committees with his books, and all necessary documents relating to his office; make a full report at the Annual Communication; pay all warrants drawn on him by authority of the Grand Lodge; and at the commencement of his term of office, each year, execute and file with the Grand Master his official bond, with some reliable company as surety thereon, in such sum as the Grand Lodge shall determine, to be renewed as to amount of surety when required by the Grand Master or Grand Lodge; the cost of such bond to be paid by the Grand Lodge. SUch bond to be conditioned that he will faithfully discharg-e the duties of his office, account for all money or property of the Grand Lodge that may come into his hand; the said bond of the depository and of the Grand Treasurer may be increased at the direction of the Grand Master and consent thereto of the Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee; produce on demand of the Grand Master, or the Grand Lodge, or his successor in office all money and property of the Grand Lodge in his possession and deliver to his successor in office the same, together with all books, papers, vouchers, securities, jewels, etc., belonging to the Grand Lodge. He shall tal{e duplicate receipts for same, one of which shall be delivered to the Grand Secretary. He shall receive for his services the sum of five hundred dollars ($500.00) per annum. BYRNE E. BIGGER.

To amend Sec. 12, Article 2, subdivision (I) by striking out said subdivision and inserting in lieu thereof the following: (1) He shall cause the proceedings of the Grand Lodge to be printed, and promptly forward one copy to each of the Lodges in the jurisdiction, and two copies to each of the Grand Lodges In the United States, and the Grand Lodges of such foreign countries as may be in correspondence with this Grand Lodge, and one copy to each officer of the Grand Lodge and one copy" to each Past Grand Master.

BYRNE E. BIGGER.


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Proceedings of the

1930

Resolved that Sec. 47 of Article V of the Grand Lodge By-Laws be amended by striking out the word "Ten" in the third line of said section and inserting in lieu thereof the word "Fifteen," so that said Section when so amended shall read as follows: "Sec. 47. Same. Each petition for the degrees in addi tion to the fee required by the By-Laws of the Lodge, shall be accompanied by the sum of Fifteen Dollars for the use and benefit of the Masonic Home. In the event of the election of the petitioner, the Secretary of the Lodge shall immediately remit such sum to the Grand Secretary, who in turn shall immediately pay the same over to the Secretary of the Masonic Home. If the petitioner be rejected such amount shall be returned to him." Fraternally, LOUIS H. ABRAMS, WALTER A. WEBB, JOHN A. WITTHAUS, WALTER R. SHRODES. "To amend Section 46 of the By-laws by striking out the words, 'The whole amount must accompany the petition,' and inserting in lieu thereof the following: "'One hatf of the amount must accompany the petition. The balance shall be divided as the Lodge may direct, and no degree shall be conferred until the sum required therefor has been paid,' So that the entire Section shall then read as follows: "'Section 46. Fees. A Lodge shall not confer the three degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry for a less sum than twenty dollars, nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where more than one Lodge and less than ten Lodges are located confer the three degrees, for a less sum than thirty dollars; nor shall any Lodge in a city or town where more than ten Lodges are located confer the three. degrees for a less sum than fifty dollars; but more may be charged at the discretion of any Lodge. One half of the amount must accompany the petition. The balance shall be divided as the Lodge may direct, and no degree shall be conferred until the sum required therefor has been paid. Exemption from the payment of fees shall not be made in favor of any candidate, under any circumstances, by the return of all or part of said fees, a路s donations, loans or otherwise.' " C. M. BARNES, New Madrid Lodge No. 429. Proposal to Amend Sec. 66 of By-Laws: Propose to amend By-Law 66 by striking out the word "twenty" on the second line thereof and inserting in lieu thereof the word "fifteen" so that when amended said section shall read as follows: Sec. 66. Employment Bureau. In cities where there are fifteen or more Lodges, each Lodge shall appoint or elect one of


1930

Grand Lodge of Missouri

151

its members, who shall constitute a General Employment Bureau whose duty shall be to aid unemployed members to secure employment. Such Bureau shall adopt rules for its government; and each Lodge in such city shall contribute the sum of (25c) twenty-five cents per capita per annum to the Employment Bureau, such contribution to be calculated on, and payable with, the annual Grand Lodge returns. Provided, That no contribution shall be called for when the amount on hand exceeds the sum of ($3,000.00) Three Thousand Dollars. Such Bureau shall employ a Secretary and maintain a permanent office, where applicants may apply for employment. PROPOSED BY W. S. LANE, THOMAS H. REYNOLDS, R. R. KREEGER, CHAS. M. CHRISTIE.

--


1930

G1'and Lodge of lvIissouri

153


1930

Grand Lodge of 111issouri

155


REPORT ON FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, 1930 By

REV.

C. H.

BRIGGS,

D. D.,

PAST GRAND MASTER

SPRINGFIELD, Mo.


REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE. ~

.

To the Most Worshipful Gralld Lodge of Mis.souri, A. F. &, A. M.:

Your correspondent herewith presents his Third Annual Report. Proceedings from a number of foreign Grand Lodges have been reviewed, and all proceedings from all of the Grand Lodges in the United States except New Mexico. The serious illness of Grand Secretary Alpheus A. Keen has delayed the publication of the proceedings of that Grand Jurisdiction. In the statistical table which follows we have used for New Mexico last year's figures. The increase in membership in the United States has been small, because so many have been suspended for non-payment of dues. Yet more than a hundred thousand men of lawful age and bearing the tongue of good report have been raised in a year's time to the, sublime degree of Master Mason in these United States. There never was a time in American history when our institution entered more largely into the life of this nation or exerted greater influence for good than today. And there never was a time when its work was more needed to stand against demoralizing influences at work in modern society. By fidelity to our obligations and intelligent zeal for our Order we can best serve our God, our neighbors and ourselves. Fraternally submitted, CORONA H. BRIGGS, Correspondent.


PROCEEDINGS REVIEWED

Year Page Alabama 1929 :................................................. 7 Al berta , 1929...................................................... 9 Arizona : 193 O , ~...... 12 Arkansas : .1929 13 Bri tish Col urn bia..................................• 19 2 9 _........................................ 14 Cal ifo rn ia 19 2 9 16 Canada : 1929 , 17 Colorado 1929....................................... 19 Con necticu 1. 19 3 0.. 20 Delaware 1929 22 District of Columbia 1929 23 En gland 19 29 ...•............... 25 "'FI orida 19 2 9. 25 Georg1a 1929 29 I dah 0 19 2 9 "'" .'.' '.. 32 Illinois : 19 2 9.. 33 Indiana 193 0 :............................................ 35 Iowa 19 29..................•................................ 37 Ireland " .19 29 , 39 !{an sas 19 3 0............................. 40 Ken tuck y 19 2 9........ 42 Lo uisiana 19 3 0 ·....................... 44 Maine 1929 : 45 l\ian i to ba 19 2 9.............................................. 4i Maryland " 19 2 9...........•....•................ 49 Ma8sach uset ts 19 29...............•.................... , :... 50 M·ichigan 1929 52 Minn eso ta 19 3 0 54 Mississi ppi "' 19 30...................................... 56 Montana 1929 _ 58 Nebraska 1929 60 N evada : 1929... 64 New Brunswick ; 1928 : 65 New Brunswick 1929...................................... 66 New Hampshire 1929 66 New Jersey , 1929 68· New South Wales 1929 69 New York 1930 70 New Zealand 19 29............................................. 72 North Caroli na 19 30 72 N orth Dakota 1929 74 Nova Scotia 1929 77 Oh i o 19 29. 78 Oklahoma 1930 80 Orego n 19 29.. . 82 Panama 1929 8il Pennsylvania 1929............................. 85 Philippine Islands 1930............................. 89


Year Prince Edward Island Quebec 路 Queensl and "'" Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.. . Saskatchewan Scotland """""""" . South Australia....................... . South Carolina............... . South Dakota........... . Tasmania.:................... . Tennessee............... . Texas................... "'" Utah..................... Vermont..... . Victoria.................. . Virginia.................. . Washington Western Australia ""Vest Virginia Wisconsin............... Wyoming York Grand Lodg-e-Mexico

1929 1930 .19 29

. .

.

_..

.

1929 1929 19 30 , 1929 1930 . .1929 1930 .. 1930 . ..1929 1930 1929 . .1929 1929 . 1929 1929 1929 19-29 . 1929 .. 1929 .

Page 89

.

. .

__ ..

90

.

91

. .

91 92

................... 94

. .

. . . . . .

"""""""'" 94 95 96 . 99 -99 101 . ............... 103 . 105 . 106 . 107 . 108 ........... 111 . 113 . 115 . 116 ..117


MASONIC STATISTICS-1930.

Alabama: ......... Arizona ............ Arkansas ............... California.............. Colorado......................... Con nectlcu t ..... Delaware......................... District of Columbia..... Florida...................... ,..... Georgia................................ Idaho.................................... III i no is .................... Indiana................... Iowa.................. Kansas .............. Kentucky......... Louisiana........................ Maine................... Maryland..................... Massachusetts......... Michigan ................. Minnesota................ Mississippl... .......... Missouri. ... M·ontana.................... Nebraska................ Nevada........................... New Hampshire.......... New Jersey .............. New Mexico .......... New york ................. North Carolina........ Nort.h Dakota.......... Ohio ...................... Oklahoma ........ Oregon ................. Pennsylvania......... Rhode Island .......... South Carolina...... South Dakota............... Tennessee ................... . Texas.................................. Utah .............................. Vermont......................... Virginia..................... Washington ................ West Virginia....... Wisconsin ................... _.. \Vyoming................

.

Members

Raised

51,443 6,612 38,373 ........... 138,652 33,610 46,046 6,104 23,362 52,301 65,588 10,340 ......... 293,110 .......... 129,900 86,416 82.22i 62,087 32,841 43,935 39,949 .... 134,709 ..... 151,896 ..... 61,766 35,301 ......... 113,171 20,905 41,978 3,039 15,486 94,773 6,692 .... 346,413 --._- 40,307 15,470 ...... 206,720 68,871 30,742 . .......... 214,195 19.021

1,200 290 1.750 6,624 1,085 1,390 156 625 1,831 1,895 351 8,703 3,944 2,509 "2,470 1,879 1,019 1,368 1,005 3,313 5,189 1,641 1,156 2,983 757 1,327 129 404 3,766

29,0~2

19,779 50,067 .... 138,096 5,174 19,588 46,762 40,421 34,380 61,509 . ............ _-. 8,361 :~,317.514

TotaL ....

• /

11,332 976 533 6,257 2,935 1,112 5,709 627 1,112 671 1,6"65 5,892 163 617 1,766 1,730

Increase

Decrease 1,860

180 2,114 4,380 346 251 48 71 102· 1,1.89 33 1,099 547 70 1.487 1,180 .1,3.63 58 141 588 1,336 151 9.24 620 274 50 85 74 2,208 115 2,713 1,061 11

2,082 2,098 414 1,439 169 662 72 .6.65 260

2,404 361

126 220 381 332 1,204 216

106,621

22,975

14,097


1930

Appendix.

7路

ALABAMA. One Hundnd Sixth Annual. l\1ontg'omery, December 3-4, 1929. 567 Lodges. 51,433 l\femhers. 1,230 Raised, 1,860 Loss. 329 Lodges represented. Grand MaRter, James ':V. Pearson. Grand Master elected, Robel路t F. Lovelady, Birmingham. Grand Secl'etary, George A. Beaucham!l, Montgomery. Corresporident, 'Villiam B. Clemmons, {<'airfield.

Present: 13 Grand Officers; 7 Past Grand l\IIasters; 1 Past Grand Secretary; 537 Lodge Representatives. 56 Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by Hesariah G. Earnest. Distinguished Visitors: Francis Augustus Johnson, Past Grand J\1aster of the Grand Council of Georgia; Clarence H. Andrew, Deputy Grand Master of Georgia, and Robert 1. Clegg, Past Grand Historian of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, were introduced. \Villiam Cole Davis, Grand Commander; James M. Frazier, Grand High Priest; Vlilliam \\1. \tV aldo, Grand Master of the Grand Council; Claude Edward Hamilton, Jr., Grand Patron of the Eastern Star; Philip S. l\leyer, Past Grand Commander; vVoolsey Finnell, Past Grand High Priest, Past Grand :Master of the Grand Council and Past Grand Commander, and Charles A. Moffett, 33rd degr~e Deputy of the Scottish Rite, \vere presented to the Grand Lodge. Grand Master's Address: One Lodge was Constituted and a Dispensation was issued for the forming of a new Lodge. Cornerstones: The Grand :Master laid five Cornerstones. Two were laid by others acting for him. He very properly refused to lay the Cornerstone of a church on Sunday. He also refused to lay the Cornerstone of an office building and also refused to lay the Cornerstone of a building "after the \vall had been built up over the corner vvhere the stone was to be laid." Financial: The Grand Secretary paid to the Grand Treasurer for all purposes during the year $87,143.01. Masonic Home: 12 men, 51 women, 175 boys, 165 girls were in the Home October 1, 1929. The value of the Home and its equipment was $411,344.73. The expense account was $75,100.66. During the year it became necessary to borrow $44,500.00 to pay operating expenses. Plans were adopted to increase the income of the Home.


8

Appcndi.l路.

1930

lVIasonic Ritualism: Hobert 1. Clegg. Past Grand Historian of Ohio, delivered a great address on. the above subject which is published in the Proceedings. He said: "As Entered Apprentices we are taught what a Freemason should be. As Fellow Crafts we are informed of what a Freemason should know. As Master Masons we are instructed in what a Freemason should do. A Freemason is accepted because of his qualifications, esteemed for his knowledge, and judged by his deeds."

There is much in the address \\,oorth quoting, hut we have only space for his conclusion: "With this right hand I greet you in the fellowship of your Lodge and mine and in the ranks of our ancient and honorable Fraternity whose cornerstone is Charity. Charity is the brightest jewel in the Masonic crown. Charity is the Corinthian pillar whose entablature adds strength, beauty and grace to the' Masonic fabric. Charity is the radiant spark emanating from God the inexhaustible source of love. If we attempt to eulogize its charms the cooler powers of the mind melt into ecstasy, the heart is an empire and every discordant passion bows before its lenient sovereIgnty. Not the Charity circumscribed by the narrow limits of feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, binding up the wounds of the afflicted, but that broader, nobler Charity that regards all men as brothers. The Charity that is swift of foot, ready of hand, in the cause of a common humanity. The Charity that writes a brother's faults in water and his virtues in enduring brass. The Charity of which He who spoke as never man spoke was the illustrious example. Let this the Mason's ,Charity burn upon the altar of your heart a living fire, whose superstructure is friendship, morality, brotherly love, whose capstone is Holiness to the Lord. Liturgies and creeds, articles of faith and rules of discipline stain the rubric page of history and speculative points of doctrine have occasioned more misery in the world than all the crimes, for which nations have been punished and recalled to their duty. We arraign no man's political opinions nor do we interfere with his religious creed. To himself and his country we leave the one and to his conscience and his God we commit the other. To the Altar of Masonry all men bring their votive offerings. Around it all men, whether they have received their teachings from Confucius, Moses, Zoroaster, Mahomet or the Founder of the Christian religion, if they believe in the universality of the Fatherhood of God and the universality of the Brotherhood of Man, here meet upon a common level. The rich man, the poor man, the sovereign, the subject, are lost in the common brother. The Christian returns to his temple, the .Jew to his synagogue, the


1930

Appendix.

9

Mohammedan to his mosque, each better prepared to perform the duties of life by the路 association of this universal brotherhood. It is to this Institution born of Heaven in the gray of the world's morning and before poets sang or historians wrote that I am privileged to accord- you a Craftman's greeting and we as ritualists may well charge one another by the noblest instinct of our manhood, by all that we are and revere, by the ties that bind us to earth, by our hope of heaven, so to live and so to act that our Masonic lives may be an open book known and read of all men. Finally, my brethren, I do assure you that whatever good we do is but duty done. If a sorrow we have lightened or a tear wiped away, if of poverty's load we have taken a share from some we;ary burdened soul, if we have lifted the cup of cold water to the lips of a famishing mortal, then so far we have illustrated the divine teachings of Masonry, then in so far we have done as the Master commanded. May He without whose knowledge not even a sparrow falls, bless our路 fellowship in our Lodges 'and to His great name shall be all tue praise."

Correspondence: The Report of 179 pages is by William B. Clemmons who had served the Grand Lodge as Grand Chaplain. lIe gives nearly three pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. He has words of commendation for Grand Master Ittner and Grand Secretary, Dr. Arthur l\1ather, thinks Judge Bigger will prove a vvorthy successor of Judge Ittner and has a kind word for the report on Correspondence. V.,re are pleased to note that our friend Dr. Arthur J. l\'foore is Grand Chaplain of Alabama. He is pastor of a great Church in Birmingham in which the writer attended a General Conference of his Church in May, 1906.. He passed some pleasant evenings 111 the Masonic Temple across the street from the Church. ALBERTA. Twenty-fourth Annual. Lethbridge, June 12-13, 1929. 155 Lodges, 13,752 Members, 645 Raised, 433 Illcrease. 118 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Alexander M. Mitchell. Grand Master elected, Samuel H. Middleton, Cardston. Grand Secretary, J. H.W. S. Kemmis, Calgary. Correspondent . F. S. Selwood.

Present: 29 Grand Officers; 9 Past Grand :Masters; 184 Past M路asters; 341 l\'fasters, \Vardens ancI Proxies; 22 Grand Lodges were represented. 路Missouri was not represented.


10

Appendix.

1930

Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master laid the Cornerstone .of one Masonic Temple. Another was laid by Past Grand l\iIaster F. S. Selwood. Dispensations were granted for the forming of two new Lodges. Charters were granted four I lodges which 'were constituted by the Grand J\!Iaster. Visitations: In company with the Grand Secretary, he attended the fi fteen District Meetings. He reported a number of visits to Lodges. One of his rulings surprises us. "I ruled that a candidate could not be initiated without his name having first appeared on the notice of the meeting." Common Honesty.

The Grand :Master says: "In spite of reiterated expressions of disapproval of the practice, I found one Lodge - conducting a raffle and peremptorily ordered cessation of the sale of the tickets. I am not called upon to rule on the ethics of games of chance, but suffice it to say, they are contrary to the Criminal Code of the Dominion of Canada and entirely foreign to the spirit of our Fraternity which in all things undertakes support of common law in word and spirit. In the face of repeated warnings this practice seems to break out occasionally, and, in spite of the merits of the particular cause, I am of opinion it should be firmly suppressed."

The Committee on Grand l\1aster's Address reported: "We suggest that all Lodges be notified that raffles are unMasonic and illegal."

The Grand Lodge approved this recommendation. Common sense ought to teach every Freemason that we stand for honesty. Raffles, lotteries, games of chance of every kind, including card playing for prizes in high society are violations of the Eighth Commandment. District Deputies: The reports of the fi fteen District Deputy Grand Masters fill more than fifty pages in the Proceedlngs. evidently our brethren in the regions north of us expect their District Deputies to make themselves useful as well as ornamental. Financial: Receipts from the Lodges amounted to a little more than twenty-five thousand dollars. "Working Tools of a Master Mason."

The Rt. Rev. Coadjutor Bishop of l\10ntana, Herbert H. H. Fox gave an addr~ss on the above subject. From it we quote:


1930

Append1·.t·.

11

"One of the characteristics of Masonry is in the use of symbols. The Masonic carpet· is full· of them. They are cabalistic signs to the uninitiated, full of mystery and magic. From the preparation of the Candidate in the ante-room for the Entered Apprentice degree to the end of the third degree, his attention is continually directed to objects that are symbolic of something for which Masonry stands. To the initiated, each step, each act has a meaning and a purpose that is intended to impress upon the minds of the candidate lessons that in mere recital he would hardly remember. J3ut clothed in tangible and concrete form it is fastened in his memory. "This brings me to a thought to which I would direct your attention. We human creatures are dependent on symbols for all our knowledge and for the progress that our race has made. When our primeval ancestors learned by groups of s01,lnds to indicate objects, they were laying the foundation for the upward progress of the race. FDr the spoken word is merely a symbol of an idea that is expressed. H. G. Wells says in his 'Outline of History' that 'the elaboration of articulate sounds gave men a mental hand hold for consecutive thought and a vast enlargement of their powers of co-operation,' Articulate speech is composed of vocal symbols of ideas and things,"

\Ve agree with what this distinguished prelate says about the use of symbols by Freemas.onry, but if he and H. G. v..rells think that man learned to speak only through long evolutionary processes we must dissent. An Ancient Book that the writer was told to take as the rule and guide of his faith and practice when he was initiated in a Masonic Lodge a hal f century ago tells us that God created man in his own image and talked with man revealing to him his w·ill.· Language was God's gift from the beginning. VVe have no evidence that there was ever a time when man had not the gift of language or was without the k~owledge of the one true God. It was not the r11ission of the Hebrew people to give Monotheism to the world, but to preserve a faith which was being corrupted all around them. Abraham's kindred were sharers of his faith and in his sojournings he met a Pharaoh who owned God, a King of Gerar Abimelech, who feared God and l\Iekhisedec, King of Salem and Priest of the 1\l(ost High God. But as we follow the stream of history we find this faith is disappearing. In Moses' time we' find a Pharaoh who not only knew not Joseph, but knew not Jehovah, there is trace of a King


12

Appendi.r.

1930

like Abimelech who feared God, and Melchisedec has no successor. At the close of IVIoses' leadership of Israel the only trace we find of the faith which was shared by others in the time of Abraham is a torch going out in the darkness, a backsliding prophet, Balaam, who loved the wages of unrighteousness, and we see him last, stark and gory, on the battlefield in the war against Midian "Balaam also the son of Beor they slew with the sword". Your theories of evolution break down when you deal with religion. Every great religion in the world's history is loftier intellectually and nobler morally in its earlier years than in its later' stages. Correspondence: F. S. Selwood, Past Grand Master, presented a report of 150 pages which gives more than a page to a fraternal reviev.... of our Proceedings for 1928. It notes our failure to reyiew the Proceedings of Alberta. That was because their Proceedings were not received that year. ARIZONA. :F'orty-eighth Annual. Douglas, :F'ebruary 11-1:~, 1930. 38 Lodges, 6,612 Members, '290 Raised, 180 Gain. 37 I~odges represented. Grand Master, William Townley MacDonald. Grand Master elected, Amos Arthur Betts, Phoenix. Grand Secretary, Harry A. Drachman, Tucson.

Present: 20 Grand Officers; 14 Past Grand l\1asters; 69 Past Masters; 50 Lodge Representatives; 45 Grand Lodges were represented, but Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: O. Frank Hart, Most Puissant General Grand Master of the General Grand Council. and Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, was introduced. Brother Basilio N. Hage, Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge del Pacifico, with a number of brethren from路 that Grand Lodge was also introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand :Master made 35 official visits. In three of these visits two Lodges were represented so that he reached every Lodge during the year. Cornerstones: He laid three cornerstones and another was laid by Past Grand Master Bledsoe. He attended the Grand Master's Conference at \iVashington City and the meeting of the \Vashington Memorial Association.


1930

Appendix.

13

Flood Relief: Arizona contributed $250.00 'for the relief of sufferers from the floods in some of the Southeastern states during the sunimer of 1929. Finances: The Grand Treasurer reported a balance on hand of $7,258.10. Receipts during the year was $11,578.70. The Grand Lodge has a Masonic HOlne Endowment Fund of $122,086.50. Correspondence: There is no report on Correspondence. ARKANSAS. Eighty-seventh Annual. Little Rock, November 19-20, 192!l. 519 Lodges, 38,:'l78 Members, 1,750 Raised, 2,114 Gain. 415 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Hamp Williams. Grand Master elected, G. A. vVarren, Black Rock. Grand Secretary, Fay Hempstead, Little Rock.

Present: 12 Grand Officers; 13 Past Grand Masters: 25 District Deputy GrandMasters; 482 I -lodge Representatives. 51 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri was not represented. Grand l\tfaster's Address: Visitation: The Grand Master reported that he had visited twenty-three of the, twenty-six l\1asonic Districts of the State. He attended the Grand :Masters' Conference at \\1 ashington City and the meeting of the \;Yashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. He made t'wo visits to the Masonic Orphans' Home at Batesville. New Lodge: 1\ Dispensation was issued for the forming of one new Lodge. Financial: The Grand Treasurer received from the Grand Secretary $62,160.76. :Masonic Relief: Arkansas has no Masonic Home for Adults but 60 Master l\tIasons and 30 Vlidows received :Masonic Relief. The Orphans' Home has about 135 children. There is also a Childrens' vVard at the State Sanitarium at Booneville, which was built by the Freemasons. An Open Meeting.

On Tuesday evening, November 19th, members of the Grand Lodge and of the Order of the Eastern Sta.r assembled in the


14

Appendix.

1930

auditorium of the Scottish Rite Consistory and lVIrs. Sarah V. Stover, Grand Matron of the Eastern Star, was introduced and gave an address foll(,)\\iing an address by \\T. H. Dunham, Grand Orator. His address was interesting and instructive. From it \ve quote two paragraphs: "America needs today a new baptism of the spirit of citizenship of public mindedness, of devotion to the State for what we can put into it and not fo\' what we can get out of it. So, and only so, .can we make our form of Government effective for its high ends, and vindicate the wisdom of our fathers. Today hardly. half of our people who are entitled to vote ever vote on any issue. Even the excitement of a Presidential campaign does not bestir them from their lethargy. It is not the foreign element who fail to vote, but those of American ancestry and training. "The increase of lawlessness in America in. the last twenty-five years has been appalling. For anyone to think lightly of our Constitution, or any part of it, either State or National, and the laws enacted under them, is to strike a blow at the basis of ordered civil life. To obey only such laws as suit our fancy or intereRt our appetite, is to lead the way to anarchy. Others by the same principle may disregard other laws-even those protecting life and the ownership of property-and the result will be chaos. The American citizen wh'o disregards and tramples under foot the laws of this land which do not meet .his fancy is a .traitor to his Government and an enemy to society. I have just as much respect for the man who will turn his back to the flag of his country and flee in the heat of battle as I have for the American citizen who habitually and deliberately patronizes or shares in the illgotten gain of those engaged in trampling under foot the laws that give them protection. And the Mason who engages in such practices has never been made a Mason at heart, he has never caught the spirit of Masonry, and he is a drone in our Fraternity."

\Ve find no Report on Corr~spondence. BRITISH COLUMBIA. Fifty-eighth Annual, Victoria, June 20-21, UJ29. 112 Lodg'es, 15,170 :MemlJers, 613 Raised, 2::;8 Gain. Grand Master, Robert Bail'd. Grand Master elected, Robie L, Reid, Vancouver. Grand Secretary, Dl路. 'V, A. De'Volf-Smith, New Westminster. COlTespondent, DI', 'V. A. De Wolf-Smith,

Present: 31 Grand Officers; 18 Past Grand :Masters; 3 Past Grand \Vardens; 2 Past Grand Secretaries; 45 Past


1930

Appendi-r.

15

District Deput)r Grand Masters; 276 Past :Masters; 233 Lodge Representatives. 43 Grand Lodges were rcpresented, :Missouri by Past Grand IVlaster \IVm. Astley. Grand IVlaster's Address: The Grand 路Master reported 38 visits to Lodges. He laid the Cornerstone of a :Masonic Temple and of the Shrine Temple at Victoria. The Deputy Grand Tvlaster laid the Cornerstone of a Masonic Temple. Dispensations for two ncw Lodges were issued and one Lodge was constituted. Dispensations to attend Divine Service in :Masonic clothing were granted to 15 Lodges. District Dcputies: . The reports of 18 District Deputy Grand Masters fill 1110re than fi fty closely printed pages. No Decisions: The Committee on Grand l\,Iaster's Address noting that he was 110t called upon to make any rulings during the year, referred to that fact in the following words: "We take the liberty of presenting to our Most Worshipful Grand Master a silk hat as a token of felicitation at this very unusual experience in the history of Grand Lodges."

\iVould it be fair to call this an unusual proceedi;1g? Financial: Fees received from the Lodges were $18,490.70. The Benevolent Fund received from the Lodges \vas $9,954.12, and $12,032.06 was received as interest in investment.s. The total for lVlasonic Charity for the year was $10.090.00 Relief by Board of Benevolence Relief Granted to IVlembers..................... 6,681.04 Relief Granted to \Vidows...................... 3,606.84 Relief Granted to Transients.................. 4,197.11

$24,574.99 Correspondence: The H.eport is from \\1. A. De \iVolf-Smith, Grand Secretary. Four and a half of his 147 pages are given to a review of our Proceedings for 1927 and 1928. He regrets that British Columbia did not appear in our report in 1928. That was because their Proceedings did not reach us. l\1issouri receiYed good treatment from our British Columbia reviewer. \Ve read \'Vith intcrest all he says about us. He learned a new word from us when he read that on several occasions a "Specific" Grand Lodge was convened. 1\1an)' Foreign Grana Lodges hold "Emergent" Commttnications.


16

Appendix.

1930

Several are reported in the Proceedings of British Columbia for 1929. One week ago this scribe opened a "Specific" Grand Lodge for' the purpose of laying the Cornerstone of a Public Scho?I. Both words are of the same length and appear to' have about the same meaning. CALIFORNIA. Eighteenth. Annual. Los Angeles, October 8-10, 192~). 578 Lodges, 138,652 Members, 6,624 Raised, 4,350 Gain. 572 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Gustav A. Hutaff. Grand Master elected, Charles Wollenberg, San FJ~ancisco. Grand Secretary, John Whicher, San Francisco. Correspondent, Jesse M. Whited, Sa:n Francisco.

Present: 19 Grand Officers; 18 Past Grand Masters; 589 Past :Masters; 936 l\1asters, \iVardens and Lodge Representatives. Distinguished Visitors: R. R. Baker, Past Grand Master of \Vashington; Chas. J. Orbison, Past Grand Master of Indiana and Franci~ E. White, Past Grand Secretary of Nebraska, were introduced. Grand. Master's Address: V'isit~tions: The Grand :Master says: "We have 572 Lodges working under Charters and six under dispensation, and during my term of office, by adopting the plan of holding district meetings and joint installations I have been able to contact with 512 Lodges in 105 Masonic districts."

in

He visited the eight路 Lodges the Hawaiian Islands, attended the Grand l\1asters' Con ference in Washington City and the meeting of the George Washington Memorial Association at Alexandria. He also visited the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star. New Lodges: Early in the year he constituted nine Lodges and later gave dispensations for forming six new Lodges. Dedications: He dedicated eight Masonic Temples. Cornerstones: The Grand Master laid four and two were laid by others acting for him. Finances: The Grand Tre~surer reports receipts from the Grand Secretary $156,477.64. The balance on hand at the first of the year was $66,080.37. Intc~est on funds made a total for the year of $239,450.16.


1930

17

Appendix.

lVlasonic Homes: The .average number of residents in the two Homes was 444. The average,cost of maintenance per resident in the Home for adults was $360.95 and in the Home for Children $515.20. The Endowment Fund is $603,471.29. The Trustees report one case where they denied admi~sion to the Home of "a member who had been elected to membership two years ago at the age of 72 fro111 a Lodge of another Jurisdiction that had been remitting his dues and furnishing him food. Our Lodge attempt,ed to justify its action by the lame statement that the investigation showed that it was having a hard pull since the erection of its Temple and is not in a position to answer calls for relief." Correspondence: The Report of 139 pages is by Jesse Tvr. \iVhifed, Past l\/Taster of California Lodge No.1. He treats of Masonic Topics from "Advertising" to "Bouquets and Brick Bats", follmiVed with a dish of "Olla-Podrida". In this is the only reference to I\1issouri we find in the report (except in statistical tables) and we quote it in full.

of

"Missouri has been very generous in the support the Washington Memorial. Besides exceeding. her quota they voted another $25,000.00 for which the Grand Lodge will have a granite column in the portico of the building set aside as its permanent memorial. The money turned in up to September 8, 1928, was $119,472.26. "The Order of the Eastern Star erected and equipped a new chapel on the grounds of the Ma~onic Home."

He gives several pages of interesting statistical tables showing a total membership in the United States of 3,303,629, an increase for the year of 30,134. He gives statistics of Foreig11 Grand Lodges showing more than a million members in British Lodges. CANADA. In the Province of Ontario., Seventy-fourth Annual. Ottawa, July 17-18, 1929. 563 Lodges, 114,237 Members, 4,188 Raised, 1,836 Gain. 470 Lodg'es represented. Grand Master, Hon. JOhn S. IVi:artin (;\bsent 011 account of illness). Aeting Grand Mastel', Roderick B. Dal'garal, Deputy Grand Master. Grand Master elected, Rodericl< B. Dargaral, TOI~on to. Grand Seel'etary, \Vm. M. L~g-all, Hamilton. Correspondent, \Villiam Ne~bit Pcnton, Belleville.

Present;

39 Grand Officers; 2 Past Grand lVlasters; l,367


18

Appendix.

1930

Lodge Representatives. 28 Grand .Lodges ,,,ere represented. Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: They were-From Quebec, Henry \Villis, Grand :Mastcr, and \V. \\T. \Villiamson, Grand Secretary. from Connecticut, George R. Sturges, Grand Master, and \iVinthrop Buck, Grand Secretary. From Alberta, Judge Taylor, Past Grand l\/[aster. From the Grand Chapter of Canada, Edwin Smith, Grand First' Principal, also A. F. V/ebster, Sovereign Grand Commander of the Supreme Council of Canada of the Scottish Rite. Grand Master's Address: The Address was read by the Acting Grand "Master. Visits and Visitations: The Grand Master says "lVly visits were many and all pleasant." . He reports three Cornerstones laid, three Lodges Constituted and Consecrated, eight Lodge rooms dedicated and one Dispensation issued for a ne\v Lodge-the Grand Master laid one of the Cornerstones, Constituted two of the Lodges and dedicated four of the Lodge rooms. Financial Statistics: The Gross receipts for the past year on General Account \vere about $150,000.00. Expenditure for General Charges were about $37,000.00 and Benevolent Grants $107,000.00. Assets were General Fund $372,000.00, SemiCentennial Fund $107,000.00. Reports of District Deputies: Thirty-two reports fill more than 250 pages in the Proceedings. Evidently those District Deputy Grand l\1asters were busy men. Correspondence: Past Grand l\/[aster William Nesbil Ponton reviews the Proceedings of 64 Grand Lodges in a report which fills 268 pages. He gives five pages to a fine review of our Proceedings for 1928. Like many other reviewers he seems to recognize the faithfulness and efficiency of Judge Ittner's administration and r{otices salient points in his address. He gives two pages to our first report as Correspondent and regrets that Canada was not included in that report. (That was because Canada's Proceedings did not reach us.) Ina pointed, vet fraternal wav, he refers to various comments this scribe ~nade upon certain doing~ in other Grand Jurisdictions. Evidently re has decided opinions of his own, yet as far as we


1930

Appendix.

19

can judge, they are not 'lightly formed. Vle think Canadian and Missouri Freemasonry are very much alike, and we shall await with interest his next report. COLORADO. Sixty-ninth Annual. Denver, September 17-18, 192!J. 148 Lodges, 33,610 Members, 1,085 R,lised, 345 Gain. 134 Lodge~ repI'esented. Grand Mastel'. 1. Ernest Newsom. Grand l\Iaster elected, Reuben 'V. Hershey, Denver. G~and Secretary, 'William W. Cooper, Pueblo. Correspondent, Stanley C. 'Varner, Denver.

Present: 15 Grand Officers; 21 Past Grand .Masters; 291 l.. . odge H.epresentatives; 55 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri by Frank G. 路Mirick. 35 members of Standing Committees were present. Distinguished Visitors: Charles Clark Davis, General Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter; O. Frank I-Iart, General Grand Master of the General Grand Council; Lewis E. Smith, Past Grand I\![aster and Grand Secretary of N ebraska; Guy J. Gay, Past Grand 'Master and H..eprescntative of the Grand Master of \"lyoming, and H. H. Merrill, Representative of the Grand I\,Jaster of the District of Columbia. were introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master reported that he had made sixty-nine official and seven unofficial visitations. He attended the Grand Masters' Conference at \iVashington City and the meeting of the \Vashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. He dedicated one 'Masonic Temple; Constituted one Lodge and laid five Cornerstones. Three of these were for churches. Oration: \\1 c quote the conclusion of an oration by George A, Luxford, Grand Orator: "Study our Masonic forebears and you will hear the shock of arms at Bunker Hill and see Warren as he falls. You will walk the snows of Valley Forge and have the crimson footprints painted on your heart. You will cross the Delaware with Washington and see him crush the enemy at dawn, and ride into the midst of battle at Princeton and see him hidden from view in the smoke and dust of conflict only to reappear and command, 'Away, dear Colonel, and bring up the troops, the day is ours.' You will see . the well-dressed British troops march between poorly clad lines


20

Appelldix.

1930

of our soldiers at Yorktown and lay down their arms. Yes, you will stand in Independence Hall and see Washington presiding and hear the Immortal Document discussed. Indeed to know the Mason of that day is to know the Soldier and the Statesman of that day-his deed and thought and dream, his song and toil and' battlefield. Little wonder that the Masonry of Washington's day bound men together with golden chains. It is the same mystic tie today. What Masonry was, it is. What Masonry did, it can and should do. "Yes, brethren, we must reckon not so much with numbers as with sentiments, and every. worthy member of the Craft must support his Country's Constitution and obey her laws, and insist upon the same support and obedience from others."

Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported a balance on hand from last year of $63,113.36 and received from the Grand Secretary $54,434.02. Correspondence: The Report of 9S pages by Stanley C. \Varner gives a little over a page to our Proceedings for 1928. The revie\'Ver notes our special gift of more than twenty-five thousand dollars for the \7\,1 ashington Memorial, speaks approvingly of Judge Bigger's report on survey of Lodges, quotes f rom the Report on Hecognition of Foreign Grand Lodges and cl?ses by saying: "The Afternoon .Session, September 25th, was called to labor in an apartment of the Masonic Home. The beautiful new Chapel, erected under the auspices of the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star, was then dedicated by the Grand Master." CONNECTICUT. One Hundred Forty-third AnnuaL Hartford, February 5-6, 125 Lodges, 46,046 Members, 1,390 Raised, 251 Gain. 125 Lodges represented. Grand Master, George A. Sturgis. Grand Master elected, Elbert L. Darbie, Danielson. Grand Secrerary, Winthrop Buck, Hartford. Correspondent, George A. Kies, Hartford.

1no.

Present: 14 Grand Officers; 17 Past Grand Masters; 9 District Deputies; 16 Past District Deputies; 3 Associate Grand Chaplains; 36 l'v1embcrs Standing Committees; 357 Lodge Representatives; 48 Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by Leonard J. VVickerson, Past Grand 路Master. Distinguished Visitors: They were: From the Grand Lodge .of Quebec, Henry \iVillis, Grand Master, and \iValter \\!. \Vil-


1930

Appendix.

21

liamson, Grand Secretary. From the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario, YVilliam M. Logan, Grand Secretary. From the Grand Lodge of Texas, Andrew Randell, Past Grand l\1aster. From the Grand J__ odge of the District of Columbia, Carl H. Claudy, Executive Secretary of the Masonic Service Assorlation. From the Grand Lodge of Delaware, vVilliam. E. Valliant, Past Grand 路Master. From the Grand Lodge of Vermont, Archie S. Harrison, Grand Secretary, Past Grand Master. From theG!-:md Lodge of Rhode Island, Arthur S. Vaughl1, Grand Master, and Harold McAnslan, Grand Secretary. From the Orand Lodge of l\1assachusetts, D. Bert Wakelee, Grand Representative of Connecticut: From the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, Benjamin F. Haven~, Grand l\IIaster. From the Grand Chapter of Co!mecticut, Lewis C. Hull, Grand High Priest: Grand Master's Address: New Lodges: Four Lodges, granted charters by the last Grand Lodge, were duly instituted. Dispensations were granted for three ne\\! Lodges. Decisions: "No.4. Lodges are not to turn out in regalia to attend funerals, except when Lodge has charge of the funeral. "No.5. We are opposed to Masonic Bodies offering prizes to be drawn for. They are lotteries within the broad meaning of the term. Masons do not need to enter this field in order to finance themselves."

Good decisions. Visitation: The Grand :Master visited the Grand Lodges of New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario, and the Grand Lodge of Texas.. He _also' attended a meeting of Gra~d Officers of New York, New Jersey, and New England, held in Boston, and the Grand Council of Royal arid Select l\1asters of Con~ necticut. He reports a nl1m~er of visits to Lodges. . Financial: The Grand Secretary reported Grand Lodge dues $20,559.42 for current expenses. But the dues received for Masonic charities .were $53,868.33 .. Masonic Home: December 31, 1929, there were 419 members in' the Home Family, 164 were in the Home, 84 in the


22

Appelldix.

1930

Hospital. 54 adults and 117 children were cared for outside the home. Nearly five hundred pages of the Proceedings are given to "Returns of the Constitucnt Lodges." A full roster of membership is given, all changes in membership during the year are reported, officers are named and a list of Past 1\1asters is given. Correspondence: The report of 155 pages by Past Grand :Master, George A. Kies, gives three and onc-half pages to our Proceedings for 1929. He has this to say of Grand :Master Bigger: "His long record of路 visits to Lodges, correctly confined largely to the smaller Lodges, impels the suspicion that his law business must have materially suffered. Missouri's area is nearly 14 times that of Connecticut."

He \vrites that "Missouri's payment of quota to the Washington Memorial is now over 127%."

He devotes some space to :Missouri's report on Correspondence, and endorses our stand on moral issues, and the observance of Sunday as a day of rest. \Ve trust that M. \V. Bro. Kies may long be permitted to serve Connecticut as reviewer. DELAWARE. One HundJ路ed. Twenty-fourth Annual. Wilmington, October 2-3, 1929. 22 Lodges, 6,104 Members, 156 Raised, 48 Gain. 22 Lodg'es represented. Grand Master, J. Bayard Hearn. Grand Master elected, Harry V. Holloway, Dover. Grand Secretary; John F. Robinson, Wilmington. Correspondent; Thomas J. Day, Wilmington.

Present: 13 Grand Officers; 16 Past Grand :Masters; 14 Past Senior Grand \iVardens; 8 Past Junior Grand .'Vardens; 3 Past Grand 'l'reasurers; 108 Past 'Masters; 41 Lodge Representativf3. 54 Grand Lodges were represented. lvlissouri was not represented. Di~tinguished Visitors: Benjamin F. Havens, Grand .Master ; Donald J. Sargent, Deputy Grand :Master, and Frank C. Sayrs, Past Grand .Master of New Jersey, and O. Frank Hart, Grand Secretary of South Caroli~a, were introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master reported that he had laid seven Cornerstones.


1930

Appendix.

23

Official Visitations: The Grand Master visited 19 of the 22 Lodges. The three others were visited by the Deputy Grand Master. The Grand Master visited the Grand Lodges of Maryland and New Jersey and attended the Grand l\tIasters' Conf erence at \iVashil1gton City and the meeting of the \Vashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. Decision: The Grand :Master ruled that a man who had lost the entire second and third fingers of his right hand was not eligible to receive the degrees of Freemasonry. This decision was approved by the Grand Lodge. Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported the balance from the previous year at $17,434.11. $22,762.94 was received from the Grand Secretary. l\1asonic Home: There were 29 guests in the Home and one was being cared for outside. The expense account amounted to $18,676.42. The income for the year including a bequest of over ten thousand dollars and appreciation in the value of securities was $37,174.63. Correspondence': The Report of 60 pages. by Past Grand Master Thomas J. Day gives nearly a page to a well condensed review of our Proceedings for 1928. He quotes this sentence from the writer~s review of the York Grand Lodge of Mexico. "There is 110 good reason why any American Grand Lodge should withhold recognition of the York Grand Lodge of Mexico. These brethren are our kind of Freemasons.'''

'Ve still stand by that opinion. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. One Hundred Nineteenth Annual. 'Vashington, December 18, 1929. 44 Lodges, 23,352 Members, 625 Raised, 71 Gain, 43 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Wisdom D. Brown. . Grand M'aster elected, James A.Vvest, Washington. Grand Secretary,路 J. Claude Keiper, Washington. Correspondent, George W. Baird, Washington.

Present: 16 Grand Officers; 15 Past Grand 'Masters; 131 Lodge Representatives. Distinguished Visitors: John H. Cowles,Past Grand' l\llaster of Kentucky, Soverign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite, Southern J uriscliction; Charles F. Roberts, Grand Com-


24

Appendix.

1930

mander Knights Templar and Arthur M. Poynton, Monarch of Kallipolis Grotto, were introduced. Grand Master's Address: As required by law the Grand Master visited all the Lodges in October and November. Some of these were joint visitations. Cornerstone Laying: October 11, 1929, he laid the Cornerstone of the Club House for Almas Temple of the Mystic Shrine. In this ceremony he used his historic gavel used by Brother George \Vashington, when he laid the Cornerstone of the United States Capitol. Leo V. Youngsworth, Imperial Potentate delivered the .address. One new Lodge was Constituted. Financial: The Grand Secretary reported receipts from all sources $59,078.51. $26,207.00 was for the l\1asonic and Eastern Star Home. Presentation: The Grand Chaplain Bro. John C. Palmer, D. D., was presented with a watch and chain. Temple Heights: Our V/ ashington Brethren are planning for a magnificent Temple on Temple Heights. The site costs $900,000 on which $544.000 has been paid. St. J olm's Day Communication: A Communication was held on St. John's Day which was attended by 17 Grand Officers: 17 Past Grand l\/Iasters; 242 Past lVIasters and Lodge Representatives. 46 Grand Lodges were represented, but Missouri was not represented. At this Communication the Grand Officers for the ensuing year were elected and installed. l\1asonic Home: There were in the Home 16 men, 33 women, 30 boys and 21 girls. The Treasurer received from the Grand Secretary $80,238.47. Correspondence: The report of about 80 pages is by Past Grand Master G. \V. Baird. He reviews our Proceedmgs for 1929. He thinks our Committee on Recognition of Grand Lodges ,-vas misled in regard to the recognition of certain Lodges in Paris by New York. VYe will refer this matter to our Chairman Ray V. Denslow, Grand Secretary of OUf Grand 'Chapter and Grand Recorder of the Grand Council and Grand Commandery. He will clear the matter up in due time. vVe are glad to note that our Proceedings for 1929 reached


1930

Appendix.

the revie\'v"er of District of Columbia, for we are always terested in reading his reports.

25 111-

ENGLAND.

\\1 e have a "Report of the Finance Committee and Audited Statement of Accounts and Balance Sheet, together with the Accounts of the :Masonic :Million :Memorial Fund, December 31, 1929", also a program for "Business to be transacted路 in Grand Lodge to be holden at Kingsway Hall, Great Queen Street, London, \\T. C. Q. at 6 o'clock P. M. \Vednesday, 5th .March, 1930." No statistics of Lodges or :Membership are given, but we note that at the Grand Lodge in December. 1929, there was an attendance of 1,442 Grand Office~s, Masters, Vi ardens and Past :Masters. FLORIDA. One Hundredth Annual. 'Jacksonville, April 16-18, 1929. 256 Lodges, 32,301 Members, 1,831 Raised, 102 Loss, 228 Lodges represented Grand Master, Leroy Brandon. Grand Master elected, Stafford Caldwell, Jacksonville. C1rand Secretary, \Vilber P. Webster, Jacksonville. Corresponrlent, El~' P. Hubbell, Bradenton.

Present: 16 Grand Officers; 9 Past Grand Masters; 15 District Deputy Grand Mast~rs; 281 Lodge Representatives: 43 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri by Richard B. Lovett. Distinguished Visitors: J. Lloyd Head, Grand Commander of Florida; C. S. Hammatt, Deputy of the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite; Robert J. Travis, Past Grand :Master, representing the Grand IV[aster of Georgia, and Remigio Lopez: Representative of the Grand Lodge of Cuba, were introduced. On the Second Day the Grand Lodge was called from labor to refreshment and a large delegation from the Order of the Eastern Star was introduced. The Grand Matron, Miss, Verna Bullard, was accompanied by six other Grand Officers. ten Past Grand Matrons and others. . Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master tells us: "One of the best definitions of Freemasonry which I have seen is contained in the report of the Committee on Fraternal Corre-


26

Append'ix.

1930

spondence of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina in a review of the Grand Lodge of Holland."

He fills a page viith a quotation from that report. the first paragraph .

\,Ve give

." Freemasonry is the spiritual trend born out of an inner urge, which reveals itself in a continuous striving for the development of all those qualities of mind and heart which are capable of raising the individual and mankind generally to a higher degree of spirituality and a more elevated moral standard. It finds its practical application in the cultivation of the highest art of living."

All this we steadfastly believe and we are in full accord with all the Grand l\/Iaster quotes from our North Carolina reviewer. It tells us that Freemasonry "proceeds from a firm belief in the reality of a spiritual and moral world urging man and mankind forward", yet it does not name "The Fatherhood of God", "The Immortality of the Soul" or "The Book of the Law" we are taught to receive as the ri.lle and guide of our faith and practice. Lodges Constituted: The Grand Master constituted four, and the District Deputy Grand l\路Iasters constituted tvw which were later visited by the Grand l\.faster who "found the officers quite proficient in the work and the Lodges making excellent progress." Lodges U. D.: The Grand l\Iaster granted one Dispensation, recommended that in one case a Dispensation be withdrawn, in another case that the Lodge be granted a Charter, and in the case of another I~dge that the Dispensation be continued an'other year. He says there are approximately fifty Lodges in the State struggling for a mere existence and recommends that in the future no Dispensation be granted to less than twenty'five petitioners and then only when the nearest Lodge to such proposed location shall have a membership of not less than one hundred. Charters Surrendered: The Grand Master reported that some Charters had been surrendered and recommended the consolidation of other Lodges. Visitations: The Grand :Master visited' the Grand Lodges of Cuba, Georgia and Alabama. He attended the Grand Masters' Conference at \V'ashington .City and the George \~T ashington Memorial IVleeting at Alex-


1930

2i

Appendix.

andria. In December, 1928, he served notice on the Masonic Service Association of the United States that Florida would withdraw from the Association. Order of De Molay: He says: "I desire to recommend in the strongest terms possible that our membership in Florida use their best efforts to encourage and promote the usefulness of the Order of De Molay, understanding always, however, that it is not and should not be used as a school or stepping stone for Masonry. The organization is intrinsically good for what it accomplishes in the building of character and that is sufficient."

There are certain other organizations that he does not commend so highly. "During the past year I have had several requests from various parasite organizations basing their membership upon membership in Masonic Lodges, asking for permission to organize their organizations, clubs, or societies in Florida, and I have been advised that several of the same kind of parasite organizations have organized in various parts of the State without taking the matter up with the Grand Lodge. One such parasite organization wrote a letter to our Grand Secretary requesting that he give them a list of names of prominent Masons who might be induced to assist in establishing their organization in Florida, suggesting to our Grand Secretary that such compliance with their request might prove very remunerative in the future."

After expressing his opinion in words that are plain the Grand l\1aster quotes an Edict which he issued March 1, 1929, which hangs a sentence of expulsion over any Brother joining such organizations as shall not have the approval of the Grand Lodge. Past Master's Degree: VVe find a list 0 f 112 W orshipfttl Masters who received the Past l\1aster's Degree. Missouri no longer requires that Degree. It leaves it \vholly with the Chapters. Finances: The Grand Treasurer reported that he had received from the Grand Secretary $35,496.35. Masonic Home: The' Trustees reported the average number of guests at 135 and the cost of maintainance at $63,83i.1i. Oration: The Grand Orator, lVlajor Augustus E. Barnett, delivered an oration on the theme "\iVhat Freemasonry Means to l\/Ie" , from which we quote in part his answer to his question. I

"It deepens my reverence for the Supreme Being.

The Hook


28

A ppendi_'r.

1930

of Genesis and Freemasonry begin at precise the same :point: 'In the beginning God.' A man does not have to be taught that there is a God. Every missionary to even cannibal tribes has found that some kind of a god got there before him. .The. instinct, intuition, belief in a god, call it what you. will, is imbedded in man's nature, it is part of the woof and warp of his original constitution. He brings it with him. It is his native endowment. It is the astounding work of the Divine Spirit 'who' lighteth every man that cometh into the world.' "Let a man tell you that he does not believe in a God and' you have before you a product of devolution, one who for a mess of pottage of materialism has sold his birthright; wandered from his ancestral heritage, another prodigal leaving his benign father and in the far off country feeding upon husks fit only for swine. "lowe a debt to Freemasonry for revealing God to me under two sublime and satisfying aspects. The Supreme Architect of the Universe and the Father of All M,en. We could easily name great religions whose gods on their Olympian Heights or in their Sodomic valleys were savage, base, selfish, cruel and sensual, the mere reflections of men's meaner nature and bestial selves. "But greater virtues can no man or system ascribe to the Supreme Being than those that are embodied in Freemasonry; that He is the Architect of the Universe and the Father of Mankind. "In all the great religions of the world there are errors that have to be sloughed off in order to make them conformable to modern thought, satisfactory to human reason, alignable with the human heart and conscience. This is true of Judaism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Mohammedanism and even Christianity. There are schools of Modernists and Fundamentalists in all of these great systems of religious thought. "While the struggle is going on between these fierce warriors, Freemasonry goes unru,ffled and serenely on its way in the certain belief that what is essential to know of God she has in her system and that her teaching about God can never be nullified or superseded. "1 was taught by my mother to pray and growing to manhood did not路 forsake the habit. But I remember as if it happened yesterday the moment when, as a neophyte, groping in darkness at the portals of the Lodge, that Masonic voice which solemnly bade me pray for myself and adjured me never to enter upon any great or important undertaking without first invoking the aid of 1?eity. "Even greater must be the thrill of such an admonition to a man whose life has been prayerless, and, therefore, practically Godless. Freemasonry meets us in our flippancy or mulishness and through all the stages of our initiation reminds us of our relation and consequent obligation to the Supreme Being."


1930

Appeudi:r.

29

"Freemasonry goes unruffled and serenely on its :\~-ay". as Major Barnett tells us because we admit none except those who agree withus on our great fundamentals. The deepest problems which occasion religious controversy we let alone. The profoundest problem of human life is the problem of. sin. With that Freeinasonry does not deal directly. It leaves it where it belongs with the Church of God. It teaches a pure morality because it is drawn from the Bible. The Jew and the Christian meet on an equal footing in the Lodge, hut pe,ace and harmony prevail because in the Lodge they, and members of different Churches, let along the deeper problems concerning which they may differ. Correspondence: The Report of 279 pages is by Ely P. Hubbell, of Bradenton, who is Past Grand High Priest of Florida and Correspondent for the Grand Chapter and Grand Commandery. He gives four and one-half pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. He very properly gives the credit for securing $25,000.00 in addition to our dollar per member to the Washington lVIemorial, largely to Judge Ittner, our efficient Grand Master. Our. Florida reviewer during the year passed some hours in Springfield. As in duty bound, he called up the l\1issouri .Correspondent, and they had two hours together which strengthened the bonds of friendship already existing.. 'Most Worshipful Brother Bert S. Lee, who'is not only a Past Grand in all the路 Grand Bodies of 'Missouri, but most Puissant Past General Grand l\1aster of the General Grand Council, was with us part of the time. All Correspondents who pass this way are instructed to report as did Brother Hubbell. GEORGIA. One Hundred Forty-Third Annual. Macon, October 29-30, 1929. 624 Lodges, 65,588 Members, 1,895 Raised, 1,189 Loss. 526 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Raymund Daniel. Grand l\fasterclected, Hugh W. Taylor, Cuthbert. Grand Secretary, Frank F. Ba!,er, Macon.

Present: 16 Grand Officers; 11 Past Grand i\Iasters: 8 Trustees .Masonic Home; 13 Custodians of the \-\fork; 526 Lodge Representatives; 620 Past l\1asters; 63 Grand Lodges


30

Appendix.

1930

were represented-Missouri by \tVilliam B. Clarke of Savannah. Distinguished Visitors: They were: \iVilliam' A. Giles, Grand路 :Master of South Carolina; J olm J. Phoenix, Grand Master of North Carolina; \Vallace Cheves, Deputy Grand .Master of Florida; O. Frank Hart, Grand Secretary of South Carolina and General Grand l\1aster of the General Grand Council; John H. Anderson, Grand Secretary of North Carolina: Charles S. VVooel, Grand Recorder of the Grand Commander.y of Georgia; Frank O. l\1iller, Grand Master of the Grand Council of Georgia, and \VilIia111 B. Graham, Grand High Priest of Georgia. Grand Chaplain's Address: At the opening of the Grand Lodge the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Gilbert Dobbs, gave a brief address. We quote his conclusion: "It is fine to have great programs and definite objectives in the service of humanity. As long as we continue to build hospitals for the afflicted, establish great homes for orphan children, refuges for the aged and infirm, and provide opportunities of useful education for ambitious boys and girls, so long will our altars continue to shed their holy light, and an admiring world will continue to knock at our door. "We also boast the unity of a strong and purposeful manhood and of a good warfare to wage. Freemasonry demands and deserves good men and true, men of good character, honorable and sober and upright, men of courage, men of sterling integrity, who will not truckle for popu!ar applause nor bow the knee to Baal; men who, like the legendary hero of our order, would rather die than betray his路 trust! As Holland says, 'Tall men, sun crowned, who live above the fog in public and in private thinking.' "And this good manhood has a good warfare. The Masonic order fights for the light and for the right. "So long as there are left among men injustice, cruelty and oppression, let the light shine! So long as intemperance, immorality and infidelity abound, let it shine! So long as ignorance, superstition and error abide let our light shine and bring liberty to these bondsmen of the night! So long as there are destitute widows and helpless orphans crying to us out of the night of their desolation and distress, our vows must remain inviolate, and we must run errands of brotherly love and relief. "My brethren, we must move on like a wave of light against the encroaching darkness of a world's callous indifference. Such a mission is worthy of the most dauntless courage, indomitable faith, unconquerable hope and incomparable love.


1930 "Thel'e'~

.路4/) pendix.

31

a warmth ahout to glow,

There's a. Hower abont to blow, There's a fount ahout to stream, There's a light about to gleam, There's a midnight darkness changing into gray, Men of thought and men of action, clear the way! "Aid the dawning, tongue or pen, Aid it hopes of honest men, Aid it paper, aid it type, Aid it for the hour is ripe, Anel our earnest must not slacken into play, Men of thought and men of action, clear the way!"

Grand l\:Jaster's Address: The Crand Master reported 105 official visitations, involving more than lj fteen thousand miles of travel. 1-1 e also visited the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. He reported that ten Lodges had' surrendered their charters and he had arrested the Charters of seven for failure to function properly. Many District and County Conventions were held during the year. . l\Jasonic Home: Past Grand l\laster, Hev. Chas. L. Bass, Director of :Masonic\Velfare, reported that there were 106 boys and 101 girls in the l\Iasonic Home. $63,000 was re,ceived f r0111 the Grand Treasurer for the support of the Home. The Home ,vas fulf and 16 children were on the waiting list. Board of Relief: The Board of H.elief had 103 applications for aid and expended $11,641.25. Of this amount $4.482.25 was contributed by l ..odges and $7,159.00 was paid from Grand Lodge funds. l:<'inancial. The receipts on the General Fund for the year were $103,078.69. Receipts for the Charity Fund were $10,374.50. Receipts for the Educational Loan Fund were $2,868.74. The loan 1路'tll1d holds notes for $18,940.00. For the Alto Sanitarium Fund the receipts were $48,725.62. The Grand Lodge has in Endowment Funds $166',500.00. vVe find 110 report on Correspondence.


32

Appendix.

.

1930

IDAHO. Sixty-seCI)nd Annual.

Nampa, September 10-12, 1929.

80 Lodge:;;, 10,340 Members, 351 Raised, 38 Gain, i 8 Lodges represen ted.

Grand Ma!';ter, Roy N. Gilbert. Grand Master elected, FrankD. Mumford, Caldwell. Grand Secretary, Curtis F. Pike, Boise. COITespondent, Percy Jones, Black fort.

Present: 17 Grand Officers; 18 Past Grand Masters; 1 Past Junior Grand \Varden; 1 Past Grand Lecturer; 7 District Deputies; 38 Past Masters; 96 Lodge Representatives. 34 Grand Lodges were represented-lVr issotlri by Clarence D. Purkhiser, of Caldwell. Grand l\.faster's Address: The Grand Master visited more than one third of the Loclgesand attended the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star. Key: The Grand Master reported that the supply of "Keys" would soon be exhausted路 and recommended that the incoming Grand l\flaster be authorized to appoint a committee of three to revise the "Key". This recommendation was approved. Vle have a printed Monitor in Missouri that anybody can read, but our Rittial is not printed and we have no "Key". District :Meetings: The GrandMaster with the Grand Secretary attended the ten District meetings. He constituted one Lodge and installed the officers. No Cornerstone laying on Sunday: He refused a request to have a Cornerstone laid on Sunday, but later gave a Dispensation for the laying of that Cornerstone on a week day. It was a Church Cornerstone. His action was approved by the Grand Lodge. Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported the balance on hand the first of the year was $23,779.68 and the cash received from the Grand Secretary was $29,778.91. Correspondence: The Report of 80 pages by. Percy Jones, Junior Grand \Varden does not review Missouri.


1930

APPCl1di:L

33

ILLINOIS. ;\"inetieth Annual. Chicago, October S-J 0, B2!J. 1,014 Lodges, 2!):{,110 Memben;, 8,703 Haised, 1,099 Gain, 949 Lodges l'epl'esented. Grand Master, Governor Louis L. Emmerson. G)'and Mastel' elected, Ed ward C. Mullen, Chieag路o. G.'and Secretary, Richard C. Davenport, Harrisburg-. Correspondent, Delmar D. Darrah, Blooming-ton.

Present: 22 Grand Officers; 8 Past Grand Masters; 99 District Deputy Grand Masters; 70 :Members of Committees; 1,333 Lodge Representatives. SS Grand Lodges were represented, lVlissouri by S. 1. Bragg, Quincy. Distinguished Visitors: They were: Charles Clark Davis, Gel1e~-al Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter; David \\T. Isenhour, Grand Commander of Illinois; and Frank Jenks, Grand l\laster, arid Fred \V right and Charles E. Lamb, Past Grand :Mastcrs of \/Visconsin. Grand Master's Address: \\' e quote a few lines, "Peace and harmony prevail. Notwithstanding the alleged widespread indifference to fraternalism, Masonry in Illinois continues in strength and beneficent influence. We are pleased to report a net growth in membership of more than one thousand during the year. "Our obligation in the future is threefold; to continue that peace and harmony which we now enjoy; to keep inviolable and secure the ancient landmarks; and to so enlarge our sphere of service by an appreciation of modern conditions that the unchanging truths of Masonry may have even greater opportunity to influence and benefit mankind."

. Death of Grand Secretary Owen Scott: He died December 21, 1928, in his eighty-first year after fifty-seven years of :Masonic service. The Grand Master appointed Richard C. Davenport to fill the vacancy, and he was elected to that office by the Grand Lodge. Visitations: The Grand Master did not report in detail the Lodges visited by him. The pressure of duties as Governor of the State prevented him from accepting many courteous invitations fro111 Lodges of the states which bound Illinois. New Lodges: Four Lodges were constituted, and dispensations were issued for forming three new Lodges. Dedications: The Grand l\1aster dedicated three Masonic Temples and two were dedicated by others acting for him.


34

APPclldix.

1930

Cornerstones: Nine Cornerstones were laid. \\1 e are pleased to note that one was for the Christian Church at La Harpe. Two years ago we called attention to thc fact that the Grand :Master oflllinois had declined to lay the Cornerstone of a Church on the ground "That a Church is not a public huilding as ,contemplated in the regulations of Freemasons", and that the Grand Lodge approved his action. This writer has laid the Cornerstones of at least thirty-five Churches and commended lvlissouri's example to our Illinois' hrethren. - \Ve find in the Proceedings no condemnation of Governor Emmerson's action in permitting a Cornerstone of a Church to be laid with Masonic Ceremonies and trust that the good work will g~ on. lVlasonic Schools: Six Schools of Instruction were held by the Board of Examiners during the year. At these schools there was a total attendance of 4,512, with 869 Lodges represented. Financial: Balance from previous year was $269.050.30. Dues for the year were $182,797.37. 'Masonic Home: tfhe total mcmbership was 234 and the per capita cost was $534.08. In the Orphan's Home there were 237 children and the- average cost of maintenance was $455.04. Correspondence: The H.etx>rt of 170 pages is by Past Grand Mastcr Delmar D. Darrah. He gives four and one-half pages to a very courteous review of ourProceeclings for 1928. He quotes at length from Judgc Bigger's report on Survey of Lodges and notes the meeting of three Grand :Masters at Quincy, Illinois, September 8th, 1928. But he n~akes one singular slip which calls for correction. He says, "Brother C. I-I. Briggs, 90 years of age and 60 years a :Mason was presented to the Crand Loclge."C. H. Briggs was born July 27th, 1849, and "raised" January 9th. 1880. But it was his privilege in 1928 to present to the Grand Lodge his friend whom he had knovvn S8 years, Rev. J. E. Godbey, D. D., who was in his ninetieth year and had been a Freemason 60 years. He is a Past l\laster, and as these lines are written is serving his Lodge as Chaplain.


,1930

A ppendÂŁ.-r.

35

INDIANA. One Hundred Thirteenth Annual. Indianapolis, May 27-28, 1930. 557 Lodges, 129,990 Members, 3,944 Raised, 547 Gain. 540 Lodges represented. G,'and Master. Jere West. Grand Master, elected, Roscoe Kiper, Boonville. Grand Secretary, \Villiam H. Swintz, Indianapolis. Correspondent, Elmer F. Gay.

Present:' 12 Grand Officers; 18 Past Grand 1lasters; 540 Lodge l<.epresentatives; 40 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri by Herbert A. Graham. Grand l\ilaster's Address: The Grand l\/Iaster attended the Grand :Master's Conference at \Vashington and the meeting of the \Vashington :Memorial Association at Alexandria. He also attcnded the Annual l\Ieeting of the Order of the Eastern Star of Indiana. Ceremonies: The Grand Master laid one Cornerstone and dedicated one 1vIasonic Tcmple. Two were dedicated by others acting for him. Visitations: The Grand l\/Iaster reports visits to eleven Lodges. He also attended a Past Master's Meeting in one county and the meeting of the 1-1asters and \Vardens Association in another county. "Bootlegging": It is somctimes practiced in Indiana, as \veJI as in :Missouri. The Secretary of a lodge wrote the Grand :Master that a mcmber had been convicted of that offense and had served sentence in the penal farm and wanted to know what action should be taken by the I.. odge. The Grand :Master held that "Bootlegging is a very grave offense against 1\1asonry" and that the offendcr should be tried by his Lodge. In time the Secretary reported that the member was tried and found guilty but the Lodge did not vote upon the penalty. The GrandMaster set aside the proceedings in the case and ordered the Lodge to inflict a penalty if the man was found guilty. Two or three years ago a member of a Lodge not a hundred miles from Springfield \-vas imprisoned three months in a county jail for bootlegging. His Lodge took no action in his case. until warned by the District Deputy that they were in danger of losing their Charter. Then they tried him and suspended him for six nlonths. The writer has occasionally since then


36

Appendix.

1930

visited the town where the Lodge is located and the best information he can get is to the effect that this man has learned his lesson. Chain ]~etter: One of them has appeared in fndiana. The Grand l\1aster says, "The letter is an insult to the intelligencc of our mcmbers. It is founded on ignorance and superstition. It is beneath the dignity of our great Fraternity." . So say we all of us. Sunday Observance: A Lodge wanted to celebrate its one hundredth anniversary by holding a picnic on Sunday. Several other Lodges asked for dispensations to hold Lodge picnics on Sunday. The Grand :Master's answer was, "I held that Lodge picnics could not be held on Sunday." V.,Te add a Methodist "Amen !" \Ve quote a paragraph from his conclusion: "As time goes on you and I will pass to our reward. Our memory will fade away but this grand institution, now so ancient and honorable, will live on and on. Let each of us ever keep in mind the dignity and high importance of Masonry and so live as not to disgrace it but so live according to its principles and teachings as to lay up a crown of rejoicing which shall continue when time shall be no more. We are all proud of the glorious history of -Masonry and of the high and honorable position it occupies in the world. We love this great Order for the high standard it requires for human life, for the sublime principles it inculcates and for the great lessons it teaches. A great trust is reposed in us and we are in duty bound by the most sacred obligations to see that it is duly executed. We have an inheritance more precious, more valuable than silver and gold."

Financial: Balance on hand first of the year was $46,917.61. Revenue for the year was $80,452.91. Masonic Home: April 30, 1930, there were 214 adults and 220 children in the Home. The cost of maintenance was $120,000.00. The Endowment Fund was $412,802.46, and the Home property was valued at $1,350,000.00. Correspondence: Past Grand :Master Elmer F. Gay presented a report of 185 pages. He gives four and one-third pages to a review of Missouri's Proceedings for 1929. Three pages are filled with pertinent quotations from Grand lVlaster Bigger's address. I-Ie notes the death of the oldest Freemason in the United States, \Villiam Fitzhugh Buckner, who was


1930

37

Appendix.

more than one hundred and two years old, more than ninetysix years a resident of Ivlonroe County, Missouri, and a Freemason more than eighty years. IOWA. Eighty-sixth Annual.

Burlington, June 11-13, 1929.

557 Lodges, 86,416 Members, 2,509' Raised, 70 Loss, 409 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Charles Edward Wright. Grand Master elected, Charles A. Dewey, Des Moinet;. Grand Secretaryâ&#x20AC;˘. Charles Clyde Hunt, Cedar Rapids. Correspondent, Louis Block, Davenport.

Present: 14 Grand Officers; 14 Past Grand Masters; 7 Past Senior Grand \Vardens; 11 Past Junior Grand \Vardens; 7 Past Grand Treasurers; 125 District Lecturers; 313 :Masters and \Vardens; 262 Proxies. Distinguished Visitors: Byrne B. Bigger, Grand :Master of IHissottri; Ira C. Freet, Grand :Master of Nebraska; Lewis E. Smith, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary of Nebraska; George Lawler, Past Grand :Master of \Vashington; Charles A. Schlichter, Deputy Grand High Priest of Iowa; \V. F. Holler, Grand ¡IVlaster of the Grand Council of Iowa; and John F. Hannon, Grand Commander of Iowa, v..' ere introduced. In the public exercises prior to the opening of the Grand Lodge, l\Irs. Ethel Seidler, \Vorthy Grand :Matron of the Eastern Star, was introduced and gave a brief address. Grand Master's Address: The Grand lVIaster visited 92 Lodges and the Grand Lodges of IVIissouri, Illinois and N ebraska. He also visited the Grand Commandery and Grand Chapter and the Crand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star. He attended the Grand .Masters' Conference at vVashington City and the meeting of the George \\lashington :Masonic,National :Memorial Association at Alexandria. He was present at a joint meeting of three Lodges at Cedar Rapids when the Grand :Master and other Grand Officers from Missouri were present, accompanied by a number of the officers and members of George \Vashington Lodge No.9 of St. Louis. Two Third Degrees were conferred by teams fr0111 the two States. J.. ater there was a meeting at Quincy, Illinois, of Bodley Lodge


38

Appendix.

1930

No. 1 of Illinois and l'vlissouri Lodge. No. 1 of St. Louis. Several hundred Master Masons were present-among them, the Grand I\tIaster and Grand Secretary of Illinois, the Grand :Master and Deputy Grand 1Vlaster of Missouri, and the Grand Master, Deputy Grand l\laster and Grand Secretary of Iowa. The 1\1issouri Brethren conferred the Third Degree. l'vlay the number of these fraternal visits across jurisdictional lines 1l1crease. Cornerstones: The Grand Master laid four Cornerstonesfor a City Hall, a School, a Church and a Court House. He also dedicated two Masonic Temples. Sanitarium: The Grand Master says: "I would again remind the Brethren that our Sanitarium at Bettendorf is not intended to be a 'home' in the ordinary acceptance of that word among the Craft. It is intended solely for the care of those few unfortunate cases which can not well be cared for elsewhere. The time-tried method of Iowa, the 'Iowa Plan', of contributing from the Grand Charity Fund toward the maintenance in their home environment of those needing our help, is to be continued except for the few who need constant nurse care."

He warns Lodges to be careful in re-instating members who have long been non-affiliates and tells of cases '~There re-instatement had been granted after 10, 15, 20. even 28 years. In one case a Brother had been re-instated who had been dead SIX months. Finances: The Grand Lodge Dues received for 1929 were $92,215.10. Dues for the Sanitarium were $87,550.00 and the Charity Fund received was $24,950.00. The cost of conducting the Sanitarium for the year was nearly forty-hvo thousand dollars. The Order of the Eastern Star is conducting a I-lome, and in her remarks just before the opening of the Grand Lodge, the \iVorthy :Matrol1 said: "I am happy to tell you that we are furnishing the comforts of life to fifty-three aged Sisters and Brothers in our Home at Boone."

Appropriations recommended for the year from the Charity Fund of the Grand Lodge amounted to $21,420.47. Correspondence: Louis Block, Past Grand l\1aster, gives a report of 213 pages. He devotes nearly four pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928; quotes the conclusion of the


1930

39

opening prayer of Dr. Z. IVL \Villiams, Grand Chaplain, quotes freely from the Address of Grand 'Master Ittner, commends Past Grand :Master Lee's report on our :Masonic Service Association \'Vork, and notes our work for the fatherless children of France. He greets Missouri's new Correspondent very kindly and quotes f rom our report on IO\va. Ou~ neighbor on the North is fortunate in having as Correspondent a man of the ability and experience of 1\1. \lV. Bro~ Louis Block. \?\,T e quoted freely from him in both our previous reports, and find much in his "Foreword" and "Afterword" this year which we wish our :Missouri Freemasons could read. In his "Foreword" he deals in a masterly way with "The Latest Fashions In Atheism". VYe commend what he writes to the Iowa Brother who some months ago objected to an article this writer published in "The Builder", on lVI asonic Fundamentals. Bro. Block and the writer are in accord concerning the Fundamentals of Free. masonry. The IVlodernists who want to transmogrify Ancient Craft "Masonry into the Grand Imperial Order of Snollygosters will do \veJI to give Davenport a wide berth. 11. \lV. Bro. Block stands for the Ancient Craft Masonry Missouri planted in Iowa ninety years ago. IRELAND. Stated Communication. Dublin, Decembel' 27, 1929. 731 Lodg"es. Dues Paid 7,758 pounds, 16 shilling, 4 pence. Grand Mastel', The Rt. Hon. The Earl of Donoughmore K. P. Grand Secretary, Henry C. Shellard, Dublin.

Colonel Claude Cane, Deputy Grand :Master, delivered his tenth annual address. Some 'of the more than seven hundred Lodges are scattered over the earth, in India, Africa and the islands of the sea. It is well known that our British brethren draw no color line in their Lodges. There was a Lodge in Old Calabar. "Ever since that Lodge was constituted in 1897, it has been a thorn in the side of the Grand Secretary and whoever was Deputy to the Grand Master of Ireland. It has been one continual record of internal dissentions and bickerings and fighting aJllOng themselves, and it has been a most shocking example to those other Lodges belonging to our sister Grand Lodges of Scotland and E'ngland which are established on the Gold Coast. Two years ago matters got to such a pitch that, with the assistance of the Grand


40

1930

Lodge of England, we had a commission appointed to go into what ,vas happening in this Lodge of ours. The Commission went very thoroughly into it and finally recommended that they should be given another chance. We did give them another chance and the result of that was, that emholdened, I suppose, by getting off without the punishment that they had so deservedly earned, things became worse than ever, and finally I came to the conclusion that it was my bounden duty to recommend the Grand Lodge that the warrant of this Lodge should be suspended, and that unless there were very substantial guarantees to me of future improvement, the warrant should be cancelled next March. I hate to have to do such a thing about any Lodge in our .Jurisdiction, but it was absolutely unavoidable. It was unfortunate in one way. inasmuch as this Lodge is a Lodge composed of colored men and half castes. \Ve, and also England and Scotland. make no distinction of color and race. We admit all colors and all races to the benefits of Masonry. It is otherwise in America. The Americans have always told us that we should have trouble with our colored Brethren. Well, we have always said that we would not; that we had sufficient trust and confidence in them, but now I do not know what路 we will say."

IVIasonic Benevolent [nstitutions: The :Masonic Female Orphan School had 105 pupils and there v,'-ere 104 in the l\1asonic Orphan Boys' School. N early three thousand pounds was raised for the Victoria Jubilee l\tfasonic Annuity Fund. 1,563 pounds was rais<:'d for the Grand Lodge Charity Fund. KANSAS. Seventy-fourth Annual. Topeka, Februal'y 19-20, 19:10. 446 Lodge::>, 82,221 Members, 2,470 Raised, 1,487 Loss, 327 Lodges represented. Grand Master, George W. Beezley. Grand M'aster elected, J. B. Kirl" lola. . Grand Secretary Emeritus. Albert K. Wilson. GI'and Secretary elected, Elmer F. Strain, Topel,a. Correspondent, Albert K. Wilson, Topeka,

Present: 15 Grand Officers; 8 Sub-Officers; 15 Past Grand Masters; 48 District Deputy Grand 1\1:asters; 473 Past l\tlasters; 459 T.. oclge representatives; 51 G~nd Lodges were represented. Missouri by Past Grand Master Perry 1\1. Hoisington. Grand :Master's Address: 'the Grand l\路1aster reported that he had made a large number of official visitations. He met ~rand Master Bigger at the laying of the Cornerstone of the


1930

Appendix.

41

Scottish Rite Temple at Kansas City, 1\1a)' 16, 1929, and ,'vas also present at the seventy-fi fth anniversary of Independence Lodge No. 76. Richard R. Rees was a charter member and the first IVI aster of this Lodge and he \'Vas the first Grand .Master of the Grand Lodge of Kansas. Cornerstones: The Grand :Master laid the Cornerstones of three Court Houses during the year. /\. Ruling: Be ruled that a Lodge could not legally contribute a portion of its funds toward the erection of a Community Hospital or for the maintenance of a Boy Scout Troop. This ruling was approved by the Grand Lodge. District :Meetings: Meetings were held in each of the seventy-six Districts \vhich were attended by 3,182 officers and 3,714 members. Masonic flome: There were 227 guests in the Home. The cost of maintenance for 1929 was $62,734.81. The Endowment Fund December 31, 1929, was $519,833.38and there was a Guardianship Fund of $22,841.32. Finances: The Grand Treasurer reported a balance on hand February 1, 1929, $121,346.73. He-received during the year $186,849.40. Correspondence: The report of nearly two hundred pages \\Jas made by Grand Secretary, Emeritus Albert K. \iVilson. He gives six pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928 and 1929. In reviewing Proceedings for 1928 he notes the introduction of Dr. John E. Godbey, a Freemason of more than sixty years standing, who has been a 'Methodist preacher seventy years and now serves Kirkwood Lodge as chaplain. He quotes freely from Grand Master Ittner's "very interesting and instructive address" and elevotes some space to the tragic death of Past Grand Master O. A. Lucas on the floor of the Grand Lodge of whom he says: "The writer of this report wishes to express his personal feeling of sadness at the loss of Judge Lucas whom he numbered among . his warmest personal friends in the Grand Jurisdiction of Missouri."

In his rcviev,: of our Proceedings for 1929 the writer, refelTing to a picture taken at the \Vhite I-louse which includes a likeness of President Coolidge, infers that the President was a member of the Craft. In that he is mistaken. \'Vhen Calvin


42

1930

Coolidge was Governor of Massachusetts, he filled out a petition for the mysteries of Freemasonry and had written out his check. Just then the police riot broke out which interrupted proceedings. The Grand 'Master of Massachusetts referred to the old days when Massachusetts Freemasons like Paul Revere and Grand Master \Varren stood for the best things and said there \vere more than eighty thousand of them then who would stand for law and order. Encouraged by this utterance the governor took his stand. But he never presented his petition to the Lodge. A well knovm Past Grand :Master of Massachusetts gave these facts to the writer. Quoting from Grand :Master Bigger's option that "There should be an annual audit of the books of the Secretary and 'Treasurer not only for the protection of the Lodge, but for the protection of the brethren who occupy the offices of Secretary and Treasurer", R. \\T. Bro. \Vilson says: "We might say as a matter of information to our Missouri brethren that it would be well for them to adopt the laws of the Grand Lodge of Kansas on this subject."

The kind feeling expressed toward 'Missouri's Correspondent is reciprocated. Vie have known each other more than thirty years, He thinks our reports are too brieLPerhaps he does not know that a limit is set to the report by this \"Titer and this limit is ever before us as we vvrite. KENTUCKY. One Hundl'ed Twenty-ninth Annual. Loubwille, October 15-17, 1929. 587 Lodges, 62.087 Members, 1,879 Initiated, 1,180 Loss, 558 Lodges represented. Grand Master, John W. Juett. Grand Master elected, Frank D. Hash. Grand Secretary, :F'red W. Hardwick. Correspondent, \V. Clarke.

"T.

Present: 14 Grand Officers; 25 Past Grand I\Iasters; 113 Past I\'fasters ; 551 Lodge R,epresentatives. Distinguished Vis'itors: Charles Clark Davis. General Grand High Priest of the General Crand Chapter, \vas int rocluced. Grand I\laster's Address: 'rhe Grand Master attended 15 District meetings. 297 Lodges were represented aild the attendance was 3,415. He also visited 13 Lodges. He dedicated


1930

43

Appendix. '

one :Masonic Temple and laid one Cornerstone. One new Lodge was formed under Dispensation. A Gift:

A Past :Master gave a chcck to the Grand Lodge

for $10,000, the proceeds of ,,,hich are to be used for cases of Masonic Charity. A bequest that is expected to amount to $150,-

A Bequest:

000 was left for the Endowment Fund of the \Vidow and Orphan's Home. Financial: Balance shown by last statement.. Receipts

$264,142.07 545,244.00

Disbursements

809,386.07 639,907.44

Balance

$169,478.63

1'otal

Old 1\'1ason's Homc: There were 69 residents August 31, 1929, with an average age of 75.5 years. The average cost of maintenancc ,'Vas $289.83.

In the \iVidow and Orphan's Home

there were 46 widows, 292 girls and 276 hoys.

The cost per

capita for maintaining the Homc ,vas $221.90 with a daily average of 606 residcnts. Correspondence:

The H.cport of 93 pages b)': Past Grand

Master \iV. \iV. Clarke gives two pages to our Proceedings for 192t~. 1\'1ore than half of this space is filled with quotations from the able address of Grand Master Ittner. He adds this brief comment: "We have quoted the introduction and conclusion of the Grand Master's Address and we are strongly of the opinion that a careful reading of these will provide the clue to the Grand Master's phenomenal success.

His inspiration was drawn from a higher

source than man-from God."

He notes our gi ft of $25,000 for the \iV ashington 路Memorial and has a kind word for the report on Correspondence.


44

Appendi:r.

1930

LOUISIANA. One Hundred Nineteenth Annual. New Orleans, F'ebruary 3-5, 1930. 267 Lodges, 32,841 Members, 1,019 Raised, 1,363 Loss, 244 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Phil G. Ricks. Grand Master elected, Leon Haas, Opelousas. Grand Secretary, John A. Davilla, New Orleans. â&#x20AC;˘ Correspondent, Edwin F. Gayle, Calcasieu.

Presen t : 23 Grand Officers; 15 Past Grand :Masters; 719 Lodge Representatives; 49 Grand Lodges were represented; :Missouri was represented. Distinguished Visitors: Charles Clark Davis, General Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter, and O. Frank Hart, General Grand l\laster of the General Grand Council were. introduced. Grand l\1aster's Address: The Grand Master reported 57 official vis!ts to lodges. He attended the Grand :Masters' Conference at \Vashington, the meeting of the \iVashington Memorial Association, and the l\1asonic Relief Association of the United States and Canada. Dedications: Four Masonic Halls were dedica,ted. Flood Relief: $500.00 \vas sent to the Grand Secretary of Alabama for flood relief. Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported a balance on hand of $93,844.00. He received from the Grand Secretary $245,352.67 for the General Fund and $230,774.78 for the Temple Fund. lVIasonic Home for Children: The Home represents an investn;ent of -$286,206.91. The income for the year was $56,~ 377.20. The expense of operating the Home was $47,160.34. There were 101 children in the home. Correspondence: Past Grand Master Edwin F. Gagyle pre~ sented a report of 123 pages. Two pages were given to our Proceedings for 1929. Our reviev,¡er was evidently impressed with the activity of GrandMaster Bigger. \iV ell, we expected a very efficient administration when \~e elected him and were not disappointed. He notes the efficient service of the Eastern Star through its Advisory Board in looking after the interests of the l\IIasonic Home. Too much praise cannot be given to the Eastern Star for their good work for our l\1asonic Home.


1930

A ppcndiJ:.

4S

Another matter which interested 1\1. \".1. Bro. Gayle was the good work of our :Masonic Employment Bureau. Jt secured 1,741 placements in the year ending June 30, 1929. He quotes fro111 our report on Correspondence, that there was an increase of 30,000 in membership in the United States in a year. vVe fear out next report will not make so good a showing. MAINE. One Hundred Tenth Annual. Portland, May 7-10, 1929. 207 Lodges, 43,935 Members, 1,368 Raised, 38 Gain, 196 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Harold g. Cooke, Gardiner, Re-elected. Grand Secretary, Charles B. Davis, Portland. Correspondent, Rev. Ashley A. Smith, D. D., Bangor.

Present: 46 Grand Officers; 7 Past Grand Iviasters; 17 Past' Senior Grand \iVardens; 17 Past Junior Grand \iVardens; 269 Lodge Representatives. Distinguished Visitor: Past Grand Master Arthur D. Prince of .Massachusetts was introduced. In a brief address he told the Grand Lodge that his own Grand Lodge was spending, this year, about $225,000.00 in benevolence. He told them that a Lodge in his own city had rejected the petition for re-instatement of a man seventy-two years old who had been a nonaffiliate thirty or forty years. Investigation warranted the conclusion that he was seeking a shelter for his old age. Grand l\1aster's Address: The Grand Master laid one Cornerstone. He reported four }\fasonic Temples dedicated and made twelve visits to Lqdges in answer to their invitations. He also attended the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary ceIe~ bration of one Lodge-the hundredth anniversaries of' two Lodges and the fiftieth of another Lodge. _ He attended the Grand Masters' Conference at \Vashington City and the meeting of the \\1ashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. He says: "One of the features of those meetings was a pilgrimage to Mount Vernon, a journey always abounding in the richness of its associations and memories. It so happened that, the day being Washington's Birthday, hundreds of lads of the Order of De Molay were making their annual pilgrimage to this center of Masonic interest. I was very much impressed with the interest, dignity, and gentlemanly bearing shown by these young men, Personally,


46

1930

Appendix.

I was proud of them, and, while I do not wish in any way to influence the Grand Lodge of Maine in this matter, I do bespeak from Maine Masons individually their friendly toleration of this Order."

Decisions: \lIl e quote three questions and his answers: "Can the banquet hall of a Lodge be used for parties? Yes,' but, the hall itself, together with the preparation room and any other rooms used for Masonic work cannot be." "Can the Lodge room be used for musical and other social parties? Answer, No. The Lodge room and other rooms used for Masonic purposes should be used for Masonic purposes only." "May a dining room and kitchen belonging to a Masonic Lodge be rented to a Lions' Club for their meeting? Answer, Yes, provided the Masonic Hall is not us€d by them."

Address: The Eev. Frederick S. '''Talker of Gardiner delivered an address on "The Business of :Masonry" of which only e quote it. the closing paragraph appears in the Proceedings.

'''T

"But that the origin of Masonry is somewhat obscure troubles us not at all. The glory of our Order is not in its antiquity. The glory of our Order is not in the form of symbolism that it uses. But it is, rather, in those great ideals of life, standing unchallenged before the world today and drawing within the mystic circle of its membership staunch and stalwart manhood-men tried and true and worthy, desiring and. looking up to the 1?est things in life-and these great ideals, so cherished in our minds and in our hearts, living in the souls of men, produce, we believe, the finest type of fndividuals and wrought into the great interna, tional relations of mankind, will bring peace on earth and good will among men."

Charity Fund: 'fhe receipts from the per capita tax were $21,966.50 and expenditures for the year $15,318.88. The securities and funds on hand amo~nt to $123,808.66. Correspondence: The Report of 90 pages reviewing the Proceedings of 53 Grand Lodges is by l~ev. Ashley A. Smith, D. D., of Bangor, one of the Grand Chaplains. He gives a page and a half to a fraternal review of our Proceedings for ,1928. He notes our addition of $25,000.00 to the dollar per capita we had recently paid on the '\lashington 11emorial Fund. From Grand :Master Ittner's Address he quotes these \vords concerning our lVfasonic Home. "If the increase in the Home family continues at its present rate, our buildings will soon be overcrowded and we will be hard pressed for funds to carry 011 this great and important under· taking."


1930

Appendix.

47

He adds this comment: "That is the story of 80 per cent of the Masonic Homes of the land, and many of these Grand Lodges which are maintaining magnificent homes are taking thought along the very lines of our conservative, economical, Maine plan in caring for the rapidly increasing number of dependents that cannot be cared for in these crowded institutions." MANITOBA. F'ifty-fourth Annual. Winnipeg, June 12-13, 1n9, 103 Lodges, 12,068 Members, 505 Raised, 193 Gain. Grand Master. M'urdo A. 'Vhimster. Grand Master elected, William Douglas, Winnipeg. Grand Secretary, James A. Ovas, Winnipeg. Correspondent, J. C. 'Valker Reid.

Present: 27 Grand Officers; 15 Past Grand IVlasters; 267 Past :Masters; 152 ,Masters and Vvardens. 54 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri \\Tas not represented. Distinguished Visitor: 1\1. VI. Bro. Justice VI. M. l\1artin, Past Grand 1\/Iaster of the Grand Lodge of Saskatchev,Tan, ,vas introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Masters says: "The year that has passed has been one wonderfully free from all contentious questions. No differences of opinion, nothing that might in any way mar the good understallding existing in this Grand Jurisdiction has come before me for decision."

He says that there have been many important meetings during the year, but does not name all he visited. He attended all the District Meetings except one from which he was kept by the state of the roads. District Deputies' Reports: The reports of eleven District Deputy Grand Masters appear in the Proceedings. They indicate careful supervision of the Lodges. A meeting of District Deputies with the Committee on the Condition of Freemasonry is held the day following the close of the Grand Lodge and the expense is borne by the Grand Lodge. Church Attendance: 39 Lodges were granted Dispensations "To Attend Divine Service In Hegalia." Finances: Receiv~d for Dues, Fees and Dispensations $14~足 471.98.


48

ApjJCl1di.r.

1930

Grand Chaplain's Address: From the address by Rev. George \".T. Findlay, Grand Chaplain, we quote: "The criticism is sometimes offered that with some Masons their Masonry is what their religion is to some professing Christians; just as the latter are sometimes accused of reserving their religion for Sundays, so Eome of the former are at times accused of reserving their Masonry for Lodge nights. No Mason should, of course, bring his business into his Lodge, but that need not preclude him from bringing his Masonry into his business. Nay, that is his duty. The very name Mason should be a guarantee. not only to the Fraternity, but to the whole world, of uncorruptible honesty, strict integrity, and that personal fidelity upon which everyone may, with the utmost confidence. rely. To do and to be this, however, first things must come first. It is not by accident that in the economy of God our duty to God takes precedence over our duty to our neighbor. And it is not by accident that we as Masons are continually directed to the G. A. O. U., to God Almighty, as the source and inspiration of all things, and whose revealed will must be the law of our life. "The recognition that 'God is in His Heaven, therefore all is right with the world' is as true for us as it was for Browning. You have entered at some time some great city by train on one of our high路level railway lines, and have looked down upon the crowded roofs, each roof covering some little home or homes filled with teeming human lives: and as you have observed, you have recalled that over that mass of life, and love, and disease, and hatred, and misery, and poverty, and squalor, and work, over every street and every home, over every man and woman and child . in ev~ry street, just as once over the darkness of chaos, the Spirit of Almighty God is brooding, working still to bring light out of darkness, and order out of con~usion, and life out of death. "Moreover, this faith is the ground of our optimism for ourselves, for our brothers, and for the world. Our conviction is that no one has yet stood up and struck a blow for the right and true, but there, fighting beside him, were all the permanent forces of the Universe; that no one ever yet lived in the spirit of unselfishness and [unny self-sacrifice, but his life was already made one with that love which moves the sun and stars. "And though, as you look here and there, as you watch at this point of the battlefield 01' at that. it may seem there is no progress, no victory at all, yet when you climb to higher ground and take a wider view, you will not doubt that God's day is long enough, and God's arm strong enough, for Goers battle.


1930

A ppcndi.'I:.

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" 'For while the tired waves, vainly breaking, Seem here no painful inch to gain, Far back. through creeks and inlets making, Comes silent, flooding in, the main. And not by Eastern windows only, 'V'hen daylight路 comes, comes in the light; In front the sun climbs slow, how slowly, But westward, look, the land is bright.' "It is our function, being ourselves leaven, to help leaven the lump of society, to help make the world a better world, to reflect the Light which we know is shining, to help in bringing in the Perfect Day."

' '1

Correspondence: Past Grand l\/Iaster J. C. ~lker Reid givcs a report of eighty-two pages, but :Missouri is not reviewed. MARYLAND. One Hundred Forty-third Annual. Baltimore. Novembel' 19-20, 1929. 122 Lodges, 33,999 Members, 1,005 Raised, 141 Gain, 121 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Vlarren S. Seipp, Re-elected, Baltimol路e. Grand Secretary, George Cook, Baltimore. Correspondent, John L. Sanford, Baltimore.

Present: 21 Grand Officers; 1 Past Deputy Grand lVlaster; 12 Past Senior Grand '''lardens; 15 Past Grand ",rardens; 16 Grand Inspectors; 6 Members Committee on ork; 23 District Grand Inspectors; 356 Lodge Representatives. 39 Grand Lodges were represented. Grand l\/Iaster's Address: A Semi-Annual Communication was held in Baltimore May 14th. The Grand Master gave a short Address at each Grand Communication. He stated that l\1ay 9, 1929, the 'fund on hand for the l\1asonic Home soon to be built amounted to $316,06L93. November 15th the Fund had increased to $343,660.98. Financial: The Grand Secretary reported $83,435,65 received for Dues and Initiations. Our Maryland brethren seem to have fallen into the habit of keeping a Grand :Master in Office "during life or good behavior". \Varren S. Seipp is very much alive and has shown himsel f a very efficient Grand l\1aster and of course he was reelected. The Deputy Grand Master, George H. Gorsuch was also re-elected, but ne'v" mcn were elected Senior and Junior

,,,r


50

A ppcl1dix.

1930

Grand \~Tardens. So 1Vlaryland is one of the few Grand Jurisdictions which has a long list of Past Senior Grand \Vardens and Past Junior Grand \iVardens. Correspondence: The Report of 254 pages is by John L, Sanford of Baltimore. He gives more than four pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1927 and 1928. Referring to Dr. :Mather's report on Correspondence in 1927 he calls attention to Dr. C. C. \iVood's poem ".1'.1 usings at Eventide" written in his eighty-seventh year "vhich lle says: "Is the description of a man who has grown old, but whol'Oe age is sustained by the happy reflections consequent upon a wellspent life and looks forward to the future with trust in the Lord."

He gi\'es Grand Master Htner credit for the appeal which raised $25,000.00 for the \iVashington :Memorial in addition to the dollar per member which our Grand Lodge had already paid for that enterprise. \Ve are not through. Every petitioner for the mysteries of Freemasonry in IVlissouri contributes one dollar for that purpose. \Ve note that Brother Sanford says: "We could find no mention that our Grand Representative. Brother James W. Skelly. was present."

I f Brother Sanford had turned to the third page of his copy of our Proceedings, he would have found that J arnes VV. Skelly was reported present-he at that time being our Right \lI..Torshipful Grand Junior Steward. He now is our "Right \iVorshipful Grand Senior Steward. Brother Skelly was not only present at both Communications under Review, hut was also an active participant in the business of both Sessions of the Grand Lodge, serving in the latter Session on a Committee specially appointed by the Grand Master in connection vlith our 1Tasonic Home Initiation Fund. The Grano Lodge of Maryland could not have a better Representative ncar the Grand Lodge of lVlissouri than James \iV. Skelly! MASSACHUSETTS. One Hundred Ninety-sixth Annual. Boston, December 27, 1929. ~26 Lodg'es, 124,70:3 Members, 3,:::13 Raised, 585 Loss. Grand Master (Re-elected), Rel'bert \-V. Dean, , Gl',lIH] Se(;l'etal'j', l.... rederick \:v路. Hamilton.

Present: 20 Grand Officers; 5 Past Grand 1/fasters; 4 Past Deputy Grand 1,1asters; 10 Past Grand \Vardens; 43


1930

51

District Deputy Grand ~Jasters. , 21 Grand Lodges were represented. l\!lissouri was not repi-esented. Quarterly Communications were held March 13, June 12th, September 11 and December 11 tho The Grand Officers were elected at the December Quarterly and installed at the Annual Communication. At the December Quarterly there were present 66 Grand Officers including District Depl1ty Grand Masters, 5 Past Grand lV1.asters, 10 Past Deputy Grand .Masters, 21 Past Grand \I\'arclens and 753 Representatives of 251 Lodges. Guests of the Grand Lodge: At the Annual Communication the follO\ving guests were present: From New York, John A. Dutton, Grand l\Iaster; Charles H. Johnson, Deputy Grand Master; R. J. Kenworthy, Grand Secretary, Past Grand Master and Henry C. Turner, Judge Advocate. From lVIassachusetts: \iVinthrop J. Cushing, Grand High Priest; Alden B. Hefler, Grand ,Master of the Grand Council;' Charles F. \iVhite, Grand Commander. Grand l\1aster's Address: At the December Quarterly the Grand Master reported thirty-three Masonic visits in Massachusetts. He also visited the Grand Chapter and Grand Council. He visited the Grand Lodges of New York and New Jersey and attended the meetings of the IVIasonic Service Association at Chicago, the Grand l\1asters' Conference at \Vashington and the V..,rashington l\lemorial :Meeting at Alexandria. Financial: Grand Lodge Dues were $232,884.00 Initiates Fees were , 18,470.00 Income from Rents................................ 98.927.85 The Masonic Temple and contents is insured for $880,000.00. The Masonic Home Building with contents is {nsured for $594,800.00. The 'Masonic Hospital Building with contents is insured for $291,500.00. The l\'Iasonie Education and Charity Trust, November 1. 1929, amounted to $1,701,596.54. \Ve se~ no signs that the Grand Lodge of l\1assachusetts is about to go into a H.cceivers' hands. At the Annual Communication December 27th, after the in-


52

AplJendi.t-.

1930

stallation of Grand Officers, the Grand Lodge was called from labor to refreshment and proceeded to the Banquet Hall to celebrate the Feast of St. John, the Evangelist, in accordance with the ancient custom. Forty-five pages are given to a report of the "feast of reason" in which a number of excellent speeches vvere made. V\fe only noted three old chestnuts-the hoy that gave a perfect answer"Two and two are four," the preacher that won the dog by telling some boys he had never told an untruth, and the corpse that lost an expensive burial by opening his mouth. These are old out west. In the list of these present at the Feast of St. John we find the l~ame of A. G. Pollard, Past Deputy Grand :Master. He was General Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter twenty~seven years ago. We met him first at l\1inneapolisin 1891 and hope to have the pleasure of meeting him again at Tacoma in August, 1930-after this report was written, but before it will appear in print. The Proceedings fill 478 pages, but we find no report on . Correspondence. MICHIGAN. Eighty-fifth AnnuaL Pontiac, May 28-29, 1929. 504 Lodges, 151,896 Members, 5,189 Raised, 1,336 Gain, . 473 Lodges represented. Grand Master, F. Homer Newton. Grand Master elected, Roscoe E. Bonisteel, Ann Arbor. Grand SeCI"etary, LOll B. Winsor, Grand Rapids.

Present: 14 Grand Officers; 18 Past Grand l\ifasters; 15 Members of Comtnittees; 473 Lodge Representatives. 57 Grand Lodges were represented. l\/Iissouri was not represented. 416 Visitors were present. Distingu'ished Visitors: They were-From the Grand Commandery of Michigan, Charles E. Boyce, Grand Commander. From the Grand Council,' John P. Vvood, Past Grand Master. From the Grand Chapter, Dr. Francis Lambie, Grand King, . representing the Grand High Priest, and :Elgin Mifflin, Past Grand High Priest. Grand Master's Address: Cqrnerstones : The Grand Master路 laid two. Dedications: He dedicated fourteen Masonic Temples.


1930

Appendi.v.

53

New Lodges: Dispensations were issued for five new Lodges. The Grand Master attended the Grand Masters' Conference at 'vVashington City and the \Vashington l\1emorial lVleeting at Alexandria. :Masonic Home: December 31, 1928, there were 52 women in the Home and 78 men. The actual per capita maintenance cost was $1.54 per day. The cost of maintaining the Home from l\1ay 1, 1928 to December 31, 1928, was $59.774.63. For Outside Relief there was paid out during the same months the sum of $33,265.81. For the enlargement of the Home additional ground had been purchased. There is a building fund of nearly one hundred and fifty thousand on hand and it is proposed to increase this to three quarters of a million in five years. In his address the Grand M:aster says: "Many bequests have been left by brethren and friends to the Masonic Home Endowment Fund-the principal of which shall be forever left intact and invested by our financial agent in approved securities, while the income only, from the same shall be used for the maintenance of our Masonic Home."

Masonic Service Commission: A year ago the Grand Lodge planned such a Commission. At the first meeting the name was changed to "Grand Lodge Service Commission". A leading thought with the Commission has been "How to Help the Newly Raised lVIason". Ten District meetings were held with an average attendance of 240 at each conference. 32 County rallies were held with an attendance路 of 2,942. The total attendance at all the meetings was 22,472 Masons. "During the past year the Commission has been domiciled in beautiful quarters on the fourth mezzanine floor in the new Masonic Temple, Detroit. Our reading room and office will accommodate upwards of thirty readers at a time. The reading tables in this room have been fairly well occupied nearly all of the time, and this would indicate that the work of the Commission is. beginning to be highly appreciated. The room has been kept open all week days and at least two nights a week during the season. Our hope is to keep it open every week night. During the evenings it has been in charge of a corps of volunteer brethren from the various Detroit Lodges, whose interest and faithfulness has been greatly appreciated."


S4

Appel1dix.

1930

It might be worth \vhile for any Masonic pilgrim who breaks journey at Detroit to look in upon this good work. Correspondence: l~ev. \Villiam H. Gallagher of Allegan, Grand Chaplain, gives a report of more than four hundred pages. He gives seven and one-hal f pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. He complains that this Correspondent in his first report failed to give Michigan two full pages of the 125 his report contained. The same complaint can lie ag~linst our report in 1929. \Vhen a Correspondent is limited to 1SO pages and gets hints to keep well inside that limit, he il1Ust be on his guard against prolixity. Our J\iichigan Correspondent has treated "Missouri in a most fraternal \vay. He renders a worthy tribute to Judge Ittner, our Grand 1 /laster, and says: "His special for the year was raising $25,000.00 for the George "Washington National Memorial from the Jurisdiction of Missouri."

This was in addition to the dollar per capita we had already paid and we collect for that purpose one dollar fr0111 each Candidate. Our revie\",er quotes nearly a page from the report of our Missouri :Masonic Service Association as indicating a little dif- . ference between the hvo Grand Jurisdictions in working out the problem of Masonic Service. MINNESOTA. Scventy-l';eventh Annual. St. Paul, .January 15-16, 1930. 310 Lodges, 61,766 Members, 1,641 Rai"ed, 1:)1 Loss. 269 Lodges represented. Grand Mastel', Edwin J. Simon. Grand Mastel' elected, \Villiam K. Gill, Duluth. GI'und Secretary, John Fishel, St. Pa u1. Correspondent, Edmund A. Montgomery, Minneapolis.

Present: 16 Grand Officers; 15 Past Grand l\iasters; 343 I.-odge l~epresentati ves; 41 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri by Past Grand Master Albert F. Pray. Distinguished Visitors: Grand Master Cox of North Dakota and Grand Secretary Hanberg- of 1ifontana were introduced. Grand l\1aster's Address: The Grand l\/Iaster reported one l\J1asonic Hall dedicated and one cornerstone laid. This corner-


1930

Appendix.

55

stone was the tenth laid in Virginia, lVrinnesota, a record held by no other city in the state. Visitations: The Grand :Master made a number of visits to Lodges, but does not give details. He attended the Grand Lodges of North Dakota and :Montana, and the Grand Commandery, and Grand Chapter of :rvlinnesota. Oration: Carl \V. Cummins, Grand 01"ator, gave a thoughtful and thought-provoking oration on "Human Liberty". He seems somewhat exercised over \vhat he calls the trend to paternalism in government in this country which in part at least he accounts for in the following paragraph: "Discrimination and secret rebates on the part of railway companies led to the fixing of rates by law. The stifling of competition by the organization of powerful trusts and monopolies gave birth to the Sherman Act and the various trust statutes of the states. Watering of milk and, unsanitary practices, the sale of unwholesome meats and adulterated foods, made legislation necessary to protect the public health. The life insurance scandal in New York led to the regulation of that business. The palming off upon the public of worthless securities by blue-sky promoters caused the states to talre a hand in private business. Professional shysters and charlatans made it necessary, for the protection of the public that professional men be brought under the jurisdiction of the law. The nation-wide influence of the liquor business in politics, the flagrant violation of law by the licensed saloon and the general abuses of that highly organized industry, more than its product, wrote the eighteenth amendment into the Constitution of the United States. The employment of thousands of boys, girls and women in the so-called sweat shops of the nation at starvation wages, under immoral and unhealthful conditions, made child labor laws, minimum wage laws, and laws regulating the hours of employment imperative to the well-being of the nation. The drifting from the rural to the urban communities of thousands of our people resulting in the building of great !Uetropolitan centers" has materially increased the complexities of of our social life. The city and the state, under the guise of the police power, have deemed it necessary to pass countless thousand~ of ordinances and statutes dealing with the most personal and intimate affairs of human existence."

He might have added that the automobile which is here to stay, is becoming the handmaid of every form of vice and crime and is increasing the perplexities of modern life. Robinson Crusoe when alone, could say:


56

Appendix.

"I am monarch of all I survey. pute."

1930

My right there is none to dis-

Rut when his man Friday became a denizen of that isle, Robinson Crusoe's rights were limited by the rights of another. I f a man insists on his right to do as he pleases, let him find a universe of his o\vn a\vay from God and man and then work out his own sweet will. Financial: The Grand Secretary reports disbursements for the year at $168,977.46 of which amount $78,732.00 was paid to the Masonic Home. Masonic Home: The total income of the Home was $110,720.20. The tqtal assets were $1,304,503.46. Fifty-five men and sixty-four women were guests in the Home. Correspondence: The report of 187 pages was made by Past Grand lVlaster Edmund A. 1\10ntgomery. He gives about six pages to an excellent review of our Proceedings for 1929. He quotes freely from the address of Grand Master Bigger of whom he says: "The路 address of the Grand Master was excellent. His report shows that he m_aintained the dignity of his office by meeting all responsibilities with a judicious firmness, which put the good of the Fraternity above all personal considerations."

He quotes from our report on recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges what he calls a "careful sound and judicious statement". Minnesota and Missouri seem to be in full accord in their views. He has a kind word for l\ilissouri's report on Correspondence. MISSISSIPPI. One Hundred Twelfth Annual. Vicl,sburg, February 11-12, 1930. 379 Lodges, 35,301 Members, 1,156 Raised, 924 Loss. 338 Lodges represented. Gl'and Master, 路'William Harrison Cal路ter. Grand Master elected, V\Tilliam T. Deuman, McComb City. Grand Secretary, Edward L. Faucette, Meridian. Correspondent, Henry C. Yawn, Lumberton.

Present: 37 Grand Officers; 24 District Deputy Grand Lecturers; 457 Past Masters, Masters and V\iardens; 36 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: 1\J. H. Grant, Inspector General of Mississippi of the Scottish Rite; E. E. Lykes, Deputy Grand l\!Iaster of Loulsiana; Hoger G. Fuller, Grand Commander of


1930

Appcnd路j:r.

57

Mississippi; and J. C. Paden, Acting Grand Patron of the Eastern Star of :Mississippi, were introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master attended the Conference of Grand Masters at \iVashington- and the meeting of the \iVashington l\1"emorial Association. He made some official visits to Lodges and attended several Schools of Instruction. He dedicated one Masonic Hall and laid the Cornerstone of a Methodist Church. Past Grand Master Henry C. Yawn laid the Cornerstone of a Presbyterian Church. He declined to lay the Cornerstone of a school because the walls had already been raised. Charters Surrendered: 4 Lodges with an aggregate membership of less than one hundred, surrendered their Charters. Masonic Homes: There \vere 102 girls in the Home at IVleridian, and 70 hoys in the Home at Columbus. The Girls' Home was conducted at a cost of $29,518.80 \vhile the cost of conducting the Boys' Home was $27,654.85. The Endowment Fund was $160,794.62. The total value of Grand Lodge property including the Homes and Endowments was given as $725,094.30. Correspondence: The report of 127 pages by Past Grand Master Henry C. Yawn gives two pages to our Proceedings for 1929. He quotes about half a page from the address of Grand Master Bigger. In a very fraternal way he notes what he calls a mild criticism on a Mississippi By-Law which couples "dancing" and "religious services" as affairs which cannot be held in a Lodge room and copies the item in which we tell of the Church \vhich permitted a Lodge to use for a time one of its rooms. The l\lississippi By-Law,is right in shutting Lodge rooms against "fashionable amusements", but we still remain of the opinion that a religious service conducted by a Jewish Rabbi or a Baptist preacher would not desecrate a 'Masonic Hall. But the occasions when a Lodge room would be needed for such services are exceedingly rare.


58

Appendix.

1930

MONTANA. Sixt~'-fifth

Annual. Great Falls, Aug-ust 21-22, 1!l2rJ. 135 Lodges, 20.905 Members, 757 Raised, 274 Gain. 127 Lodges represented. Grand Mastel', Francis Hag-strom. Grand Master elected, Daniel J. Muri, Helena: Grand Secretary, Luther T. Hauberg, Helena. Correspondent, H. S. Hepner, Helena.

Present: 16 Grand Otlicers; 17 Past Grand :Masters; 111 Past :Masters; 313 Lodge Representatives. 46 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: Robert B. Cox, Grand 11aster of North Dakota; Edwin J. Simon, Grand Master of l\1innesota, and Canon S. H. l\Iiddleton, Grand :Master of Alberta, were introduced, and were elected Honorary Past Grand Masters of l\.fontana. Joseph M.Lo\vndes. Grand Secretary and C. H. Townsend, Past Grand l\laster of \Vyoming were also introduced. Frank Haskins, Grand High Priest; Hay l\1. Armour, Grancl :Master of the Grand Council; Daniel J. l\/Iuri, Grand Generalissimo of the Grand Commandery and Lewis Terwilliger, 33rd degree, of the Scottish Rite, were presented to the Grand Lodge. Grand :Master's Address: The Grand Master reported 17 vISItations. He conducted seven installation ceremonies at which the officers of twenty-three Lodges were installed. He visited the Grand Lodge of North Dakota June 19, 1~29. He dedicated two :Masonic Temples and one was dedicated by Past Grand Nlaster William J. 路Marshall. A Dispensation was issued for one new Lodge. One Cornerstone was laid during the year. He attended the Grand Masters' Conference at \Vashington City, February 20, 1929, and the meeting of the \~Tashington Nlei110rial Association at Alexandria. He commends the De l\:Iolay and Rainbow Organizations. A discreditable scheme for raising money was reported to the Grand l\-Iaster too late for him to stop it. He. says: "During the year attention was called to an effort by a club of Master Masons to raise money to payoff indebtedness on their club house. Their plan was not in accord with our idea of Masonic practice. "The plan of this Masonic Club was the blanket scheme. It is


1930

A ppcl1di.'v.

59

true that with each dance ticket sold a chance on a blanket was given, but, of course, it was not expected that each one who bought a ticket and took his chance on a blanket would attend the dance. Probably not all who bought a ticket could have been accommodated had they appeared. Supplies of tickets were sent to Lodge Secretaries together with a book of chances on a blanket, and when all the chances had been pulled from the book, the money collected and the name of the person winning the blanket were to be forwarded to the club and the hlanket then sent to the '"innet.. No doubt, this scheme raised the money, but it is not such a scheme as should have the sanction of bodies or groups of Masons. Certainly, our Lodges should not be made parties to such schemes which verge too near to lotteries and gambling."

VVe think our Grand l\1:aster roared very gently when he said such schemes "verge too near to lotteries and gambling". \Ve do not kno\v what l\1:ontana law says about such devices, but 'such schemes are as much a violation of the l\/Ioral Law as the crap-shooting of roustabouts on the Levee at New Orleans. Hon. D. V/ Shackelford, at one time a Congressman from Missouri, \vas initiated in Cooper Lodge No. 36 at Boonville, Missouri, December 12, 1879, just after the vvriter was initiated. Once while presiding as Judge at Jefferson City, l\1:issouri, a group of sports were brought before him charged with crapshooting. l\1:ost of them \\,ere "colored", but two of them were "plain". He fined the negroes two dollars each. Their paler brothers began to feel easy. But he fined them twenty dollars each and told them it was a negroes game and they had no business in it. The Grand Lodge passed upon the scheme in these words: "We heartily concur in the opinion expressed by the Most Worshipful Grand Master and recommend that any scheme of lottery or game of chance for raising money for any Masonic purpose be looked upon by this Grand Body as unworthy of the dignity of Masonry and as contrary to the ideals of this Fraternity."

l\!Iasonic I-lome: There \vere 49 guests in the Home June 30, 1929. Buildings, Equipment and the Home Ranch are valued at $158,547.47. The Home also holds as an Endowment a tract of land valued 路at$97,410.00 and has in Endowment Securities $71,300.00. Financial: The Grand Treasurer received from the Grand Secretary for various ft1l1ds $68,580.48. l\10ntana has ah:eady


60

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1930

paid more than a dollar per member for the vVashington lVIemorial Fund. Correspondence: The Report of 179 pages was made by Past Grand Master H. S. Hepner. He gives a page and a half to a fraternal review of our Proceedings for 1928. \"!I,T e quote a paragraph which might be construed as a hint to our Grand Secretary. "We note an item in the volume to the effect that the Grand Master introduced the two Grand Orators and their instructive addresses were most heartily appreciated; now we looked and looked in the volume for the chance to be similarly affected, but could find no orations." °

He also notes:

"The Grand Masters efforts to secure the additional $25,OQO.00 pledged to the Washington Memorial Association, and, by way of appreciation he is to go to the meeting on the next trip at the exl>ense of the Grand Lodge."

Missouri had already paid more than a dolla,r per member when in 1928 Judge Ittner pledged our Grand Lodge for $25,000.00. Our !eviewer has a kind word for :Missouri's Correspondent. NEBRASKA. Omaha.

June 4-6, 1929. 293 Lodges, 41,978 MOembers, 1,327 Raised, 30 Gain. 267 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Franko H. 'Voodland. Gr"and Master elected, Ira C. Freet, York. Grand Secretary, Louis E. Smith, Omaha. Correspondent, Edward D. Crites.

Present: 12 Grand Officers; 14 Past Grand Masters; 435 Lodge Representatives; 39 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri by Samuel S. \Vhiting. Distinguished Visitors: Byrne E. Bigger, Grand Master of :Missouri, was ii1troduced, also the following Nebraska Brethren: James .M. Robertson, President of the Masonic Home; Edwin C. Yont, President of the lVlasonic Eastern Star Home for Children; Arthur C. Stein, President of the Nebraska Veteran Freemasons Association; George E. Thompson, \\forthy Grand Patron of the Eastern Star; James \"1. Vvynkoop, Grand :Master of the Grand Cottncil; Harry S. Villars, Gran? High Priest.


1930

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61

Grand 'Master's Address: Ten Cornerstones were laid, eight of thcm by the Grand Master. Five l\1asonic Halls were dedicated. Visitations: The Grand :Master reported that his official visits were fewcr than he \vould have wished. He visited the Grand Lodge of Missouri, accompanied by Grand Secretary Le\vis E. Smith, who a year later accompanied Grand Master Freet on his visit to our Grand Lodge. In February, 1929,- accompanied by the Grand Secretary, he attended the Grand l\1asters' Confcrence at Washington City and the meeting of the \Vashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. Masonic Homes: The amount expended for the mainten~ ance of the l\,Iasonic Home at Plattsmouth in 1928 was $30,542.03. The ~xpense of maintaining the Children's Home at Fremont is borne equally by the Grand Lodge and the Grand Chapter of' the Eastern Star and as we understand reporh" made amounted to about $32,000.00. \Ve failed to find a report of the number of guests in the two Homes. Oration: The Grand Orator was V.,r. Bro. Norris Brown, who after two terms ~s Attorncy General of the State, served in the United States Senate. \\7 e have only room for some quotations from his strong and manly adlh-ess on "l\1asonry As An Institution." He said: "A man is measured by what he is-not by what he says he is. The same rule applies to organizations of every kind. The rule is inexorable. It began with creation and has never relaxed. "By way of illustration. The Immortal Declaration of Independence declared American independence, but it did not make America independent. It was a declaration only. It cost life and sacrifice to make it a fact as well as a sentiment. The American Constitution provided in words the plan for a new goVerIlment; but it did not establish a government. It has taken a century and a half to build a Republic on that foundation, and the work is still unfinished. Every decade has marked the efforts of our people by industry and sacrifice to make it stronger and better. Every year has brought us new problems and new difficultiesdangers from without and threats from within-all designed to impair its life and its security. It has required a vigilant and a brave citizenship, with, as I believe, Providential sanction to bringAmerican institutions to their present high estate.


62

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"Indifference on the part of the people is the one danger above all others to the future life and usefulness of the American Republic. By indifference I mean inattention-the result of preoccupation with individual affairs to the exclusion of public affairs. The same principle applies to our beloved Order. If it is to justify its existence and carry to fruition its purpose, its members must be alive .and attentive to their duties and obligations. Nothing injures the good name of the Order or defeats its aspirations so much as the laxity and negligence of its members to remember daily the obligations taken at the altar. The one great, towering lefson taught by Masonry, the one that overshadows all othersis the common, homely virtue of being on the square. That virtue covers and embraces every duty that one man owes to another, to his family, to his country and to his God. It is the snpremest and sublimest test of the Order. The man who keeps that Covenant is a good man and a good citizen, worthy of respect and emulation. "Masonry in its best sense is a public institution. It has always been such. Its duties to the public are as they have always been, imperative and unescapable. There never has been a crisis in our country's life or in the struggle of civilization for better things that Masonry has failed to take its stand on the right side of every controversy and to be~r its share of the burdens incurred. In all its activities it has been a force for the public good, and in the exercife or that force it has kept itself out of party politics. 'Ve are glad of that. We do not want our institution to be political in a partisan sense. But Masons must remember that they are citizens as well as Masons. It is their right and their duty not to forget that fact. They have no right to shirk an obligation to either their government or to their Order. They have as little right to mistreat one as the other. "In this connection, examine for a moment the Eituation today confronting every home and fireside of the land-a situation, in my judgment. which challenges the life and perpetuity of this Republic. America as a government is organized and exists according to certa'in rules and laws-the rules and laws calculated to foster and establish a democratic form of government. They were conceived and, adopted by the forefathers and have been accepted and agreed to by the people for more than a century and a quarter. These rules and laws are binding on every citizen. In recent days, however, the' cry is heard that while the government is bound by these rules and laws, 'a citizen is free to choose the rule or the law that shall bind him. The cry is not limited to one man or to one newspaper. It comes from many men beside Clarence Darrow and from many newspapers beside the one you have in mind.


63

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"'V"hat does this new doctrine portend?

What does it promise

for the future of America? If we are at liberty to violate one law, we are bound to obey none. If no law binds the citizen except the one he may choose, there is no need of legislatures or of Congresses.. Each citizen becomes his own law maker. "This new formula for the conduct of the citizen does not involve the wisdom or merit of any law, either statutory or of the Constitution.

It goes much deeper than that.

It does not argue for any

change or for any repeal, or for any amendment of existing laws. It passes by with supFeme indifference any suggestion of that kind.

It proposes to break all laws, as a matter of fact. as if they had

never been enacted, for the citizen is given the privilege of choosing the course he

wi~hes

to follow, regardless of either the statute

or the Constitution. "This new creed goes further than the question of enforcement by public officers.

Enforcement becomes a trivial and minor sub-

ject because if a man has the right to choose the law he will obey, it would be a crime to put him in jail for violating a to disobey.

~aw

he chooses

"The fallacy and fraud of this new declaration of personal independence is too obvious and apparent to requi.re other answer or condemnation than to state it. Its mere mention is its own complete impeachment. Of course, it would never have been suggested, but for the fact that there is one particular law and one particular amendment to the Constitution that a great many people do not like and do not obey.

They are too impatient and too discouraged

to argue for its repeal-that remedy is too far off-too remote. The immediate thing they propose, the important and dangerous thing they propose by this new dispensation is open and deliberate nullification."

He said much more worth quoting, bnt we have not the space for it.

Any man \vith an idea above an oyster can

apply what we have already given . . Correspondence; The report of 115 pages by Past Grand lVlaster Edv"in D. Crites gives a page to our Proceedings for 1928. The reviewer路 notes that we quoted from the Oration of their grand Orator. \,Vell, we fonnd something \'\'orth quoting then and now.


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NEVADA. Sixty-fifth .,'ull1ual.

Heno, June 1:{-14, ,:,039 MembeJ"S. ] 29 RaiRed, 85 Gain. 23 Lodg'es !'epresen ted. Grand Master, Charles F. Cutts. Grand Master elected, Andrew L. Haight, Fallon .. Grand Secretary, Frank D. King, Reno. Correspondent, F)'an\{ D. King.

1~29.

23Lodge~,

Present: 19 Grand Officers; 15 Past Grand lVlasters; 1 Past Deputy Grand ~.Jaster; 1 Past Senior Grand VI/ arden; 1 Past Junior Grand \Varden; 75 Past ~/[asters and Lodge Representatives. Distinguished Visitors: Chas. H. Goodman, Grand Commander, Horace J. Brown, Grand High Priest, and Henry VV. }\/Iiles, Grand l\!Iaster of the Grand Council, were introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master laid the Cornerstone of the Post Office at Fallon. Official Visitations: The Grand l\!Iaster made official "isits to the twenty-three Lodges. IIe visited the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star, ate a Christmas breakfast and attended an Baster banquet with a Commandery of Knights Templar. Good Advice to a Shrine: The Grand Commandery and the Grand Lodge joined in asking a Nevada Shrine to cease allowing non-members and profanes to appear in public in Shrine regalia, and proposed to go to the Imperial Potentate with their cOfnplaint if the evil was not corrected. Financial: The Grand Secretary paid over to the Grand Treasurer $4,299.10. Standards of Recognition: The Grand Lodge adopted the Report prepared by the Grand Secretary. \\r e quote: "Fourth, That every candidate under said jurisdiction shall have and express an unfaltering belief in a Supreme Being as the Father, of all Mankind. "( d) The legend of the Third Degree. "Sixth, That the Sacred Book of the Divine Law shall be always and indispensably present in the Lodges when at work."

Nevada and Missouri are in harmony on these points. Correspondence: The Grand Secretary, Frank D. King, gIves his third Report, 130 pages-which devotes more than a


1930

65

Appendix.

page to our Proceedings for 1928. Grand Master:

He has this to say of our

"Because of a change in Missouri Masonic law fixing the date of the annual meeting, Bro. Ittner was in office only eleven months, but, nevertheless, succeeded in visiting 161 of his Lodges. To top it all off, he conferred degrees and delivered lectures in nearly everyone he visited. He did this great work because he preached a thorough knowledge of the ritual to all, and felt that his message would fail of its effect if he were not always willing to do his share of the work. A great message and a great work from a great Mason of whom Missouri should be sincerely proud."

Yes, we are proud of him and his work. NEW BRUNSWICK. Sixty-first Annual. Saint John, August 28, 1928.' 43 Lodges, 6,034 Members, 226 Raised, 13 Gain. Grahd Master, James Vroom. Grand Master elected, J: Fred Edgett, Moncton. Grand Secretary, J. Twining Hartt, Saint John.

Present: 20 Grand Officers; 5 Past Grand Masters; 4 Past Deputy Grand lYfasters; 171 Lodge Representatives; 27 Grand Lodges were represented, l\i[issouri by J. Twining Hartt, Grand Secretary. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master regretted that illness had prevented him from calling the District Deputies together early in the year. He fears there is an evil custom increasing-"that of admitting applicants who are not in a position to meet the cost of membership and to become regular contributors to Masonic Charities. I have known at least one case when the applicant borrovved money to pay his initiation fee." He visited the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia at Halifax. He dedicated one J.\!Iasonic Temple. St. John's Day, 1928: "Saint John's Day in June, falling on Sunday, I invited the members of the Grand Lodge to assemble at Saint Andrew's and join Saint Mark's Lodge No. 5 in attending divine service at All Saints Church. There was a large gathering of the Fraternity, including members of Saint Croix Lodge, Calais, Sussex Lodge, Saint Stephen and Victoria Lodge, Milltown, who omitted their usual service on that day for the purpose of going to Saint Andrew路s."

Many years ago, St. John's Day, falling on Sunday, the writer on the invitation of a Lodge preached two :Masonic


66

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1930

sermons to large audiences. Four months later he was informed the Lodge had received twenty petitions. in those four 1110nths. But he does not claim any responsibility in the case. Finances: Grand Lodge Fees and Dues, $5,525.75. Rents from :Masonic Building, $7,94.3.05. VVe find no report on Correspondence. NEW BRUNSWICK-1929. Sixty-second Annual. Moncton, August 22. 43 Lodges, 6,065 Members, 2] 5 Raised, 1 Loss. 71 Lodges Represented. Grand Master, J. Fred Edgett (He-elected), Moncton. Grand Secretary, J. Twining Hartt, Saint John.

Present: 19 Grand Officers; 3 Past Grand Masters; 4 Past Deputy Grand Masters; 1 Past Grand Chaplain; 3 District Deputy Grand l\lasters; 101 Lodge Representatives; 17 Grand Lodges were represented, Missottri by J. Twining Hartt, Grand Secretary. Grand .Master's Address: The Grarid Master reported visits . to 28 Lodges. On Sunday, June 23d, a special Communication of the Grand Lodge was held "for the purpose of attending Divine Service at St. 'John's United Church. The Right Worshipful Senior Grand \i\rarden, the I~everencl Hugh Miller delivered the address which was greatly enjoyed by the large number of Brethren present; his subject being, '\Vhat manner of man are you'? Brother.. the Reverend J. A. Ramsay, assisted in the service, and thus was St. John's Day fittingly celebrated." Financial: The Grand Secretary received during the year $13,739.31. Four reports of District Deputy Grand 'Masters appear ill the Proceedings. \Ve find. no report on Correspondence. NEW HAMPSHIRE. One Hundred Fortieth Annual. Concord, May 15, 1929. 81 Lodges, 15,486 Members, 404 Initiated, 74 Loss. 80 Lodges Represented. Grand Mastel路, J. Melvin Dresser. Grand M'aster, elected, George E. Danforth, Nashua. Grand Secretary, Harry M. Cheney, Concord. Correspondent, Harry M. Cheney.

Present: 32 Grand Officers; 6 Past Grand Masters; 25 Past


1930

67

District Deputy Grand :Masters; 207 Lodge Representatives. 31 Grand Lodges were represented, l\!Iissouri by Oscar E.

Jewell,

Past District Deputy Grand 1\1aster. Grand ]\'Iaster's, Address: The Grand :Master laid one Cornerstone, dedicated four :Masonic Temples and constituted one ne\v Lodge. Visitations: The Grand 1\/Iaster visited the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star and reports four visits to Lodges. He presided over Lodges of Instruction held in Four of the Masonic Districts. He attended the Meeting of the lVlasonic Service Association at Chicago in N O\"ember, 1928. Semi-Annual Communication: December 27, 1928, he presided over the Semi-Annual Communication held at Manchester. Sixty-two Lodges were represented. Three Lodges exemplified the work of the Three Degrees and over four hundred brethren enjoyed the banquet held in the evening. District Deputies: The rel')orts of seven District Deputy Grand Masters appear in the Proceedings. George VV'ashington :Memorial Association: M. YA,T. Bro. Harry 1\,1. Cheney, Grand Secretary, represel:J.ted the Grand Lodge at the meeting of the Association. V'le quote from his report to the Grand Master. "I had the pleasure of handing in a check for $3,568.00, the money realized from our Lodges under the regulation adopted in 1928. This raised the amount contributed' by New Hampshire to a sum very slightly in excess of two dollars for every Master Mason upon our roll of membership. Our zeal and interest in this great undertaking has given to our state an enviable position with compliments expressed to your representative, to be passed on to his brethren, expressive of gratitude for what we have done. Our contribution has seemingly been more than the dollars that we have paid; it has been an incentive for others, as they have attempted to raise funds."

VVe could have some Grand Lodges that have not been much influenced by New Hampshire's noble example. Finances: The Grand Lodge received in Dues $18,280.30. The receipts for the :Masonic Home were $38,592.40. January, 1929, marked the twenty~fifth Anniversary of the formal opening of the Home. Correspondence: 1V1. \V. Bro. Harry 1\1. Cheney, Grand


68

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1930

Secretary, presents his twenty-third report as Correspondent. He gives a little mqre than two of his one hundred and thirty pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. VVe receive very courteous treatment at his hands and he is very kind to 1\1issouri's new Correspondent. We have met on sundry oc-casions and have taken a liking to each other. He is the Senior Past Grand Master of New Hampshire and is rendering very efficient service to the Craft as Secretary of both Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter. NEW JERSEY. One Hundred Forty-second Annual. Trenton, April 17-18, 1929. 267 Lodges, 94,773 Members, 3,766 Raised, 2,208 Gain. 262 Lodges Represented. Grand Master, William T. Vanderlipp. Grand Master, elected, Benjamin F. Havens, Trenton. Grand Secretary, Isaac Cherry, Trenton. Correspondent, Ernest A. Reed.

Present: 30 Grand Officers ;1i Past Grand Masters; 1 Past Senior Grand \Varden; 1 Past Deputy Grand Secretary; 24 District Deputy Grand Masters; 989 Past Masters; 632 Lodge Representatives. 53 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: They \-",ere: From l'vlassachusetts. Herbert '''.T. Dean, Grand Master, and Leroy E. Shaw, Grand Sword Bearer. From New York, John A. Dutton, Grand Master; Henry C. Turner, Judge Advocate, and George R. Irving, Grand Marshal. From Vermont, Christie B. Crowell, Grand Master. From Connecticut, George R. Sturges, Grand Master, and Albert M. Meredith, Commissioner of Education. From Rhode Island, Edwin O. Chase, Grand Master, and Arthur S. Vaughn, Dep!1ty Grand J\1aster. From Mississippi, George D. Riley, Past Grand :Master. From Deleware, ]. Bayard Hearn, Grand Master; Leonard L. Purks, Junior Grand Vvarden; John F. Robinson, Grand Secretary; J. Wallace \Voodford, Senior Grand Deacon; Paul Watkin, Grand Marshal; 'Vest A. Troller, Grand Sword Bearer; \Valter Dent Smith, Junior Grand Steward, Rev. Philip Cook, Grand Chaplain; Harry Galbraith, P. G. 1\'1., Grand 'filer, and Thomas J. Day and - Vv"ildon C. vVaples, Past GrandMasters. Grand l\1aster's Address: The Grand l\1aster reported that


69

1930

he had Constituted four Lodges, laid seven Cornerstones and issued two Dispensations for new Lodges. Visitations: He reported more than seventy IVlasonic visits in New Jersey. He also visited the Grand Lodges of New York, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Connecticut. He attempted to visit the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island, but an attack of illness when within a block of the Grand Lodge defeated him. He attended the l\Jleeting of the ]Vlasonic Service Association at Chicago, the Conference of Grand Masters at vVashington and the Meeting of the \,Vashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported that he had re~ ceived from the Grand Secretary $332,592.91. Masonic Home: F'ebrllary 28, 1929, there were in the Home 142 Adults and 46 Children. The income for the year was estimated at $139,350.00. The per capita cost for maintenance was given at $637.63 for the year 1928. The value of the Home-Land, Buildings, Furnishing-all Equipments, is given as $825,533.80.' Correspondence: The Report of 137 pages reviews 65 Grand Jurisdictions. Two-thirds or more ,,,,,ere reviewed by Past Grand Master Ernest A.Reed, Chairman. Bro. \,\,Tilliam S. Hunt gives nearly two pages to a Fraternal Review of Missouri -1928. He notes the fact that our Report had quoted his Grand .Master's condemnation of gambling and lottery devices by :Masons. Yes, Freemasons are expected to be honest. Lotteries. raffles, gambling devices of every kind, including card playing for prizes in high society are violations of the Eighth Commandment. NEW SOUTH WALES. Fort~'-first

Annual Re!)ort United G)'and Lodge of New South Wales for year ending June, 1929, 581 Lodges, 69,229 Members, 4,851 Initiated, 1,956 Gain. Retiring G)'and Master, John Goulson. Grand Master Installed, His Excellency Lord Sonehaven. Grand Secretary, David Cunningham, Sidney. Besides the special Communication in which the Grand Master elect was installed in .July, I!l2S, we have reports of Quarterly Communications held in September and Decemher, . ] 928, and March and June, 1929.

The amount collected for the year was 12,728 pounds sterling


A PP(?Ildix.

70

1930

for general purposes. 20,443 pounds for Schools and 13,629 pounds for Benevolence. Correspondence: The Report of one hundred and fifty pages is topical and devotes considerable space to Freemasonry in Continental Europe. Its historical statements are interesting. but we have not space to quote them. NEW YORK. One Hundred Forty-ninth Annual. New York, May 6-8, 1,015 Lodges, 346,413 Members, 11,332 Raised, 2,713 Gain. Grand Master, John A. Dutton. Grand Master, elected, Charles H. Johnson, New York. Grand Secretary, Robert .Judson Kenworthy, New York. Correspondent, S. Nelson Sawyer.

1no.

P,resent: 62 Grand Officers; 8 Past Grand Masters; 5 Past Grand Treasurers; 57 Dstrict Deputy Grand Masters; 1,012 Lodge Representatives. 79 Grand Lodges were represented, lVlissouri by James R. Newman. Distinguished Visitors: \Villiam S. Snyder, Grand Master of Pennsylvania, Donald I. Sargent, Grand l\1aster of New Jersey and l\.tIelvin 1\1. Johnson, Past Grand Master of l\Jassachusetts, were introduced. Grand :Master's Address: 'f"he GrandMaster reported eight Dispensations issued to form new Lodges in New York and one for a new Lodge at Baakline, Syria. He constituted one New Lodge and dedicated eight l\1asonic Temples. He laid two Cornerstones. In company with other Grand Lodge Officers he attended the Grand Masters' Conference at \Vashington City and the meeting of the George Washington IVlemorial Association at Alexandria. Sunday Observances: The Grand l\1aster says: "While there have been instances of assemblies of the Lodges on Sunday that should not have been held, and other instances when such assemblies have been proposed, but have been abandoned at my direction, where I have been informed of the contemplated gatherings, yet on the whole, I think that an improvement with respect to this important conduct of our Fraternity can be reported."

Religious Services:

He reports:

"In keeping with our principles and customs from time immemorial, our relations with religious bodies have continued most


1930

Appendix.

il

cordial and harmonious. During the year four or five outstanding services were held in our churches and cathedrals. On Sunday, October 27. 1929. Masonic services were beld in the Cathedral of St. .John the Divine, this city. More than six thousand Masons and their families were present. the largest gathering ever assembled in the Cathedral. An excellent sermon was delivered by our lamented Brother and Grand Chaplain, Bishop and R. VI. Herbert Shipman, whose death has since路 occurred. "On Palm Sunday, April 13. 1930, the. Reverend Doctor and R. W., S. Parkes Cadman, our Senior Grand Chaplain, conducted his twenty-fifth annual service for Masons in his church in Brooklyn. Dr. Cadman's forceful and highly interesting sermon was preceded by tributes paid to him by members of the Grand Lodge for his long and valuable services to the Fraternity."

Finances: The Grand Secretary reported the receipts of the year at $604,664.48. Masonic Home: The average number of members of the Home Family during the year was 595, and the average cost per clay for each n-:ember was $2.04. During the year there were admitted to the Home and Hospital 112 men, 40 women, 22 boys and 9 girls. Correspondence: A report of 210 pages was presented by S. Nelson Sawyer, Past Grand l\1aster. Two closely printed pages review our Proceedings for 1929. This report says of our Grand Master: "M. W. Bro. the Hon. Justice Byrne E. Bigger, presided over the Conference of American Grand Masters at Washington, D. C., in 1929, in a manner that won him the respect and friendship of the many leaders in attendance at that time. He has taken pleasure in visiting other Jurisdictions, thereby establishing contacts that are sure to be of great value in future co-operation between Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Arkansas and other States."

A discriminating survey of our Proceedings is given and our reviewer thus notes one of our charities ,;vhich is closing up路 its work. "Of the eleven children reported last year as being aided by funds administered by. the Committee on Fatherless Children of I<~rance. five are continuing to receive aid. As these five will be sixteen years old in 1930, the work in this direction will then have come to an end. It was a tho]ghtful and noteworthy undertaking."

There is a kind reference to the work of Missouri's Correspondent.


72

Appendix.

1930

NEW ZEALAND. Fortieth Annual. 2!).3 Lodges. 26,9:'14

Auckland. November 27, ] ,401 Initiated, 727 Gain. 2G4 Lodges Hepresented. Grand Master, General Sir Charles Fel'gusson, Bart. Grand M'aster, elected, James John Clark, Dunedin. Grand Secretary, Col. George Barclay, Dunedin.

1~29.

M.ember~,

Present: 118 Grand Officers and Past Grand Officers; 558 l\1embers (including Grand Officers and Past Grand Officers). 38 Grand Lodges were represented. IVlissouri was not represented. \,yidows and Orphans and Aged Masons' Fund: The amount contributed for the year \-vas 6.942.-9-10-an average of more than one dollar per member. New Lodges: Three new Lodges \:vere Consecrated during the year. Official Visits: The Grand :Master made more than thirty official visits. There is no report on Correspondence. NORTH CAROLINA. One Hundred Forty-third Annual. Raleigh, January 21-23, 1930. 406 Lodges, 40,307 Members, 976 Raised, 1,061 Loss. 298 Lodges Represented. Grand Master, .I. .I. Phoenix. Grand Master, elected, E. W. Timberlake, Jr., Wake Forest. Grand Secretary, John H. Anderson, Raleigh. Correspondent, J, Edward Allen, Warrenton.

Present: 19 Grand Officers; 9 Past Grand Masters; 1 Edl,lcational Field Secretary; 2 Grand Custodians; 5 Assistant Grand Lecturers; 37 District Deputy Grand :Masters; 507 Lodge Representatives. 46 Grand Lodges were represented. :Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: \Villiam A. Giles, Grand IVIaster of South Carolina and O. Frank Hart, Grand Secretary and Past Grand Master, and John H. Cowles, Grar:d Commander of the Scottish Rite, \vere introduced. Grand :rVlaster's Address: The Grand Master reported that he had visited 44 11asonic Districts making 49 visits and had made 37 visits to subordinate Lodges. He also met with the Board of Directors of the Oxford Orphanage and the IVrasonic


1930

Appendix.

73

and Eastern Star Home in quarterly meetings. His VISIts to the 44 Nlasonic Districts involved 27,400 miles of travel. Order of De Molay: The Grand Master says: "This splendid Order, devoted to constructive. work in behalf of the youth of our country is worthy the support and encouragement of Masons."

Use of Masonic Emblems: Concerning what he regards as a growing evil, the Grand :Master says: "I deplore the increasing use of Masonic emblems on automobiles and in advertising. I suggest that this Grand Lodge enact some legislation that will reduce a custom which lowers the dignity of our Order."

I f any action was taken all this recommendation we failed to note it. Oration: \Ve quote the conclusion of an address by Grand Orator E. J. Britt who gave as his subject "The Mission of Masonry". "In his influences that survive him, man becomes immortal before the general resurrection. The thoughts Of the past are the laws of the present and future. That which we say and do, if its effects last not beyond our lives, is of slight importance. That which shall live when are are dead, as part of the great body of law enacted by the dead, is the only act worth doing, the only thought worth uttering. The desire to do something that shall benefit the world, when neither praise nor obloquy will reach US when we sleep soundly in the grave, is the noblest ambition entertained by man. "To sow that others may reap; to work and plant for those who are to occupy the earth when we are dead; to project our good influence far into the future, and to live beyond our time; to rule as the Kings of Thought over men yet unborn; to bless with the glorious gifts of Truth and Light and Liberty, those who may never know the name of the giver, nor care in what grave his unguarded ashes repose, is the true office of a Mason, and the proudest destiny of a man."

Financial: The Grand Secretary reports receipts from all sources $118,578.16. Of this amount $50,000 was given for the support of the Oxford Orphanage and $15,000 for the :l\1asonic and Eastern Star Home. $10,000 went to the VVashington Memorial, making $63,720.87 which North Carolina has paid on that great enterprise. This is an average of more than a dollar and a half for every member. A good showing' for North Carolina.


74

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l\lasonic and Eastern Star Home: There were 61 guests in the Home December 31, 1929. The budg~t for 1930 was estimated at $35,175.00. Oxford Orphanage: There were 441 Children in the Home during the year 1929. The budget for 1930 was estimated at $50,000.00. Correspondence: The Heport of J. Edward Allen, Correspondent, is printed in a separate volume of 445 pages and gives some very interesting statistical tables. He gives four and a half pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1929. Three pages are devoted to the address of Grand Master Bigger from which he quotes freely. His comments on what we did make interesting reading. He holds a grievance against Dr. Mather, our Grand Secretary, and charges that in printing the picture of the Grand l\Jlaster's Conference at \iVashington City, over which Judge Bigger presided, the Grand Secretary cut off the right end of the picture which cut off our North Carolina reviewer. Our Grand Secretary is near the left end. vVe suggest that the next time Bro. Allen get in line close to Dr. "Mather and then all will be well. Surely Bro. Allen did not expect Bro. l\1ather to cut himself 'off that he might show us how Bro. Allen looks. \iVe are reminded of some poetry we heard when a youth, "The Ins, They grins, The Outs, They pout.s." NORTH DAKOTA. Fortieth Annual. Grand Forks, June 18-20, 1929. 128 Lodges, 15,470 Members, 533 Raised, 11 Gain. 122 Lodges Represented. Grand Master, Herbert A. Merrifield. Grand Master, elected, Robert B. Cox, Wimbleton. Grand Secretary, Walter L. Stockwell, Fargo. Correspondent, Walter H. Murfin, Fargo.

Present: 18 Grand Officers; 13 Past Grand Masters; 4 other Past Grand Officers; 18 District Deputies; 38 Members of Standing Committees; 52 Past Masters; 5 Fifty Year ~Iasons; 143 Lodge H.epresentati ves; 51 Grand Lodges ,vere represented, Missouri by Harry Lord.


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Distinguished Visitors: Edwin J. Simon, Grand Master of Minnesota; Francis Hagstrom, Grand Master of Montana, and \iV. lVfarkSexoll, Past Grand Master of Oklahoma, were intro~ duced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand :Master reported thirteen visits to Lodges and that he had attended the meeting of the :Masonic Service Association in November, 1928, and the Grand Masters' Con ference at \~Tashington and the 'Meeting of the \IVashington 1\1emorial Association at Alexandria in February. 1929. The Grand Lodge adopted the recommendation of the ]l1risprucleilce Committee to this effect: "In view of the conditions, we recommend that this Grand Lodge withdraw from membership in said National Masonic Service Association on September 1, 1929, unless the Grand Master is satisfied there is an improved reorganization and assurance of efficient management by such date, he is authorized and empowerpd to execute such withdrawal."

Visits to Other Grand Bodies: The Grand :Master visited the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star, of North Dakota, and the Grand Lodges of :Montana, Minnesota and South Dakota. Such fraternal visits strengthen the bond of fellowship between ,the Grand Juris<lictions. .Decisions: VVe note only one: "It was brought to my attention in October, 1928, that one Lodge in our Jurisdiction had mailed out to every other Lodge in the Jurisdiction a number of dance tickets, asking the Lodges to sell the tickets for them. With each ticket, the purchaser received a chance on an automobile to be given away on the evening of the dance. After investigation, I ordered this Lodge to recall every ticket that had been sent out to other Lodges. I am of the opinion that such a practice would be entirely contrary to precedent and to Masonic law."

The Grand Lodge approved the Grand Master's action. But why object to gambling by a Masonic Lodge if you permit dancing in the Lodge room? Let the camel's nose in at the window and he can soon push in. Order' of De :Molay: He says: "A matter that has been brought to my attention on a number of 路occasions 1s the matter of the Order of De Molay for boys. It teaches high i~eals fOF boys and, when it is properly sponsored, is doing much good for the boys who join its ranks."

Finances:

The Grand Lodge received for Dues and Fees


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$17,924.00. The five dollar fee from each l\1aster l\!Iason raised for the Relief Fund amounted to $2,665.00. ' Correspondence: Past Grand Master \Valter H. l\tltlrfin, of Fargo, is the new Correspondent. He gives about a page and a half of his 78 pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. Of Grand Master Ittner he says: "His address shows a year of great accomplishment."

He notes the fact that under his efficient lead'ership Missouri added $25,000.00 to the dollar per capita it has already paid for the Washington Memorial. He praises the work of Missouri's Correspondent, and yet is frank eriough to note one subject on which they are not quite in accord. Quoting our disapproval of the use of l\1asonic Halls for dances, he challenges our remark "As well might your Churches be so used" and says: "Personally, we don't believe it would hurt the Church a mite, and we are Methodist, too, and proud of it, but we would much prefer knowing that our children were attending a dance in a Masonic hall or a chureh, than that they were in a public dance over Jim Brown's [,001 hall."

...

\iVhy should they attend dances at all ? A few years ago a Missouri Grand l\1aster ruled:

"If the Lodge has but one room suitable for dancing, the members of the Lodge and their families may dance in the Lodge room itself, provided the Lodge legally consents and no dancing is permitted on the Lord's Day, or Sunday."

The Committee on J urisprudel1ce approved this ruling, but the Proceedings show that the Committee's Report "was adopted subject to amendment to Decision No. 10 of the Grand Master, made on motion of M. \\1. Bro. Briggs, forbidding dancing in the Lodge room." The mover of that motion which overruled the Grand Master and Committee on Jurisprudence used very little time in his remarks. A quotation from Thomas' "Source Book of Social Origins" was evidently what called out the strong vote of the Grand Lodge against dancing in a Lodge room. Thomas says that it can scarcely be doubted that dancing originated as an adjunct to sexual stimulation. that as such it is openly practiced among primitive peoples and while among civilized nations is not openly acknowledged, yet it doubtless


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serves the same purpose. The Literary Digest was the writer's authority for this reference to Thomas. VVe think his analysis of the matter is a keen and clear one. NOVA SCOTIA. Sixty-fourth Annual. Sydney, June 12, 1929. 81 Lodges, 9,892 Members, 357 Raised, 67 Gain. 48 Lodges Represented. Grand Master, John C. Mackay. Grand Master, elected, Martin L. Fraser, New Glasgow. Grand Secretary. James Clarence Jones, Halifax. Correspondent, James Clarence Jones.

Present: 14 Grand Officers; 3 Past Grand Masters; 2 Past Deputy Grand l\Iasters; 5 Past Senior Grand Wardens; 2 Past Junior Grand \Vardens; 121 Lodge Representatives. 24 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitor: M. R. McKinnon, Past Grand Master of Prince Edward Island, was introduced. After the opening: "The Grand Lodge then formed in procession and marched to St. Andrew's United Church, preceded by the Sidney Citizen's' Band, where a sermon was preached by the Rev. J. R. Miller, Grand Chaplain. A collection was taken in aid, of the N. S. Freemasons' Home. The procession then reformed and returned to the Lodge Room, where Labor was resumed."

District :Meetings: The Grand Jurisdiction is divided into ten Districts. District l\1eetings were held in each and were all attended by the Grand Master. He also visited thirty-one Lodges. These visitations are reâ&#x20AC;˘ ported at some length. Masonic Home: The Grand lVlaster said that the increasing needs of the Home called for enlargement an.d a fund of $24,000 for that purpose was on hand, but more was needed. The Endowment Fund of the Home 'was $53,737.29. Correspondence: The report of 138 pages is from the pen of James C. Jones, Grand Secretary. He reviews the Proceedings of 69 Grand Lodges and gives two pages to lVlissouri for 1928. He was evidently impressed with the personality of our Grand Master Judge' A. F. Ittner. ~Tel1, we in l\1issouri recognize his fine qualities and heartily approved his administration. True, as he stated in his Address, only one Grand


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NIaster had been removed by death, but as the closing hour of . the third day of our Annual Communication drew near, Past Grand :Master Olaf A. Lucas was suddenly stricken. He was a Circuit J udgc in Kansas City who fill~d honorably that high position. The writer was elccted Grand l\1:aster in 1899. Thirty years later, but fourteen Past Grand 'Masters were with us. Eight who followed the writer have crossed the River. Our reviewer has a kind word for :Missouri's new Correspondent and the feeling is ccrtainly reciprocated. OHIO. One Hundred Twentieth Annual. Toledo, Octobel' 16-17, 1il2!l. 612 Lodges, 206,720 Members, 6,257 Raised, 2,082 Gain. 605 Lodges Represented. Gnind Master, Otto H. Hohly. Grand Master, elected, James W. Morgan, Jackson. Grand Secretary, Harry S. Johnson, Cincinnati. Corresponden t, O. P. Soerra, Ravenna.

Present: 11 Grand Officers; 19 Past Grand Masters; 25 District Lecturers; 1,043 Lodge Representatives. 48 Grand Lodges were represented, lVlissouri by James Vl. :Morgan, who was elected Grand ·Master. Distinguished Visitors: Fred L. Vvright, Past Grand Master of \Visconsin and Robert L. Queisser, Grand Commandcr of Ohio, were introduced. Grand I\.faster's Address: Eighteen Masonic Halls were dedicated during the year and eleven Cornerstones were laid. Detailed reports of these ceremonies appear in the appendix to the Procecdings. A Dispensation was issued for the forming of a new Lodge. Under the head of "Campaigns for New Temples" the Grand i\1aster has· this to say: "This is a delicate subject, but from the year's correspondence some ~deas on most of our activities are formed. "It is most laudable ,...hen an enthusiastic membership desire a new home and in almost every case where a new Temple has been erected, the interest has always increased. "However, high-powered salesmanship for new Temples has entered the field of Masonry. These campaigns ate generally·· conducted by companies or individuals for profit to themselves. They are usually unaware of local conditions and no further interested than tliat the campaign goes over the top. Then the aftermath:


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pledge cards signed lInder more 01' less pressure, carrying a legal obligation to pay, neglect, of which is followed bycollrt action. Consult the legal records of one of Ohio's largest cities. At least ten to fifteen Masons before a court, sued for non-payment of pledges. In come cases, possibly, they were able to pay. In others, positively unable to pay. I have made a personal investigation of this situation and am well aware of the facts. "In a number of cases where correspondence took place relative to charity work or a request by the Grand Master that a Lodge assist in performing its obligation to a sick member in care of a Sister Jurisdiction, the answer was, 'We have built a Temple and are EO financially embarrassed that we have been unable to render further assistance.' Another Lodge doubted their ability to pay the Grand Lodge Tax for the same reason. "Before a Lodge proceeds by the 'Intensive Campaign Method', led by strangers to the community, permission should first be obtained from the Grand Lodge. There are enough able business men in every community who are Masons to conduct their own campaign without embarrassing a single member of the 'F'raternity."

Some other matters ha vc exercised the mind of the Grand .Master, for further along in the Address we read: "It seems incredible that with the generai rules of Masonry, so clearly marked for every officer, for every individual for that matter, in the smallest hamlet, or Ohio's largest cities, that a Grand Master should be flooded with protests from every quarter of the state regarding a pamphlet circulated in favor of a candidate for the state's highest office. The protestors knew a Masonic law had been violated and were correct in making their objection. How much better ano quicker action if the Lecturer in particular could have been appealed to directly. "Post cards, advertising the sender's business. On the bottom the 'square and compass, number and name of Lodge. In both cases the Laws of Masonry and good taste were grossly violated. "Clubs and organizations having Masonic membership as a requisite, organizing for social purposes and then going to the extreme in everythilig that masquerades under the name of modern amusement. The uninitiated, not knowing the difference between fundamental Masonry and these organizations, is apt to form a poor opinion of the Institution. "Boxing matches taken under serioUs consideration or sponsoring by Lodges holding all unsullied Charter, saved only by the timely advice of a determined Lecturer. "Raffles, public and private, to raise money for one thing and another. In the name of common pride, if we cannot pay our own way, all but accept charity for our amusement.


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"Why should we, who boast of the uplifting, refining infiuence of the Fraternity, longer permit these and other violations to continue if we really desire Masonry to live. Cheapen it, drag its banners in the mire, expose it to ridicule and misunderstanding, and you write its epitaph."

Masonic Home: The Home received a per capita tax of $206,720.00 from the membership and $100,000.00 from路 the eight dollar fee paid hy all petitioners for initiation, and applicants for affiliation. Financial: The Grand Secretary reported the total dues received for the year were $274,808.60. Correspondence: The report of 147 pages is by Past Grand l\lfaster O. P. Sperra. He gives more than two pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. More than half of this space is given to pertinent quotations from the able address of our Grand lVlaster, Judge A. F. Ittner. From the report on Correspondence he quotes one sentence: "The oneness of English-speaking Freemasonry the world over is very evident to him who scans these reports from our Brethren beyond the seas." OKLAHOMA. TwentY-lSeCond Annual. Enid, February 11-13, 1930. 451 Lodges, 68,871 Member::;, 2,935 Raised, 2,098 Loss. 349 Lodges Represented. Grand Master. Rufus O. Renfrew. Grand Master, elected, Samuel H. Lattimore, l\fuskog-ee. Grand Secretan', "V. M. Anderson, Guthrie. Correspondent, Thomas Chauncey Humphrey, Hug'o.

Present: 17 Grand Officers; 16 Past Grand Masters. From 349 Lodges representatives registered who were entitled to cast路 1,240 votes. Grand l\:laster's Address: The Grand Nlastc'r attended the Conference of Grand Masters at \Vashington City and the meeting of the Vvashington l\1emorial Association at Alexandria. Cornerstones: Five were laid by the Grand 'Master and twelve by others acting for him. Four of these cornerstones were for churches. Four Masonic Halls \vere dedicated. One New Lodge was constituted. Tv,,'o Lodges were con~oli颅 dated. Three Charters were taken up, and two Lodges voluntarily surrendered their Charters.


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Conferring Degrees- in Less Than Statutory Time: Nine Dispensations were issued to enable Lodges to confer Degrees in less than Statutory Time. The Grand Master of Missouri has no such authority. lVlasonic Homes: There are two; one for children and one for the aged. The cost of maintenance for the year was $79,964.35. $18,923.75 was expended in caring for the aged, and $60,140.83 in caring for childrc!1. The total membership in both Homes January 1, 1930, was 190. Finailcial: The Grand Treasurer held a balance of $16,-. 323.40, January 1, 1929. During the year he received from the Grand Secretary $123,512.28. Of this amount the Per Capita Tax was $99,550.64, and the Masonic Home Fund was $7,160.25. Orations: An address was delivered by the Grand Orator, Rev. John R. Abernathy, Pastor of Epworth Methodist Episcopa} Church, South, in Oklahoma City. He began his ministry in the Soutlnvest Missouri Can ference, some years ago. e are pleased to note that he is now serving a church of 660 members which last year paid a salary of four thousand dollars. His address makes good reading. His theme was "Fundamentals of Masonry as Found in the Entered Apprentice Degrees." This reminds us of a remark we once heard an erudite Brother make to a class in the Scottish Rite. "There is nothing in the York or Scottish ]~ite which is not found in the Entered Apprentice Degree, either directly or by implication." 'Ve quote one paragraph from the Oration:

,,,r

"Masonry has no place for the drone. Masonry has no place for 'Communism. That is for the lazy at the expense of the industrious. Masonry has no place for Class. No one but the demagogue goes out to drive the wedge between the great mass of the American people. If a man gives his sweat, his toil, his strength to till the fields he is a worker helping God to feed us. If a man goes about as a physician, a clean man with a clean soul, he is following along with the great teacher who went about healing the bodies of men. How glorious our work becomes when we get out of the little conception that a doctor, a merchant, or banker, or a te路acher is following what we call a secular profession. My brethren, I do not exaggerate when I say if every man would take the teaching of Freemasonry and apply it down to his own business and profession, he would transform it into a Calling. As I do this I am. helping God make a better world."


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Correspondence: The Report of about 130 pages is by Past Grand Master, Thomas Chauncey Humphry, whom we met ten years ago at Guthrie, on a visit to the Grand Lodge, of Oklahoma in the interests of the Masonic Service Association of the United States. He was a live wire then and though now he is eIghty-three years young he does not appear to have lost his virility. He devotes four pages to a revie~v of our Proceedings for 1929. He notes the fact that Grand l\1aster Bigger, whose father was Grand :Master in 1910, presided at ,the Conference of Grand Masters at \IVashington City. He records important features of our work, is most kind to :rvlissouri~s Correspondent and quotes our account of the Birthday dinner given by Masonic friends in honor of the eightieth birthday. He mentions the fact that Missouri's Representative, Past Grand l\1aster \11/. P. Freeman, who was made a Freemason in "Missouri, has not forgotten us. Many Oklahoma Freemasons were made in l\1issouri and the ties uniting the two Grand] urisdictions are strong. OREGON. Seventy-ninth Annual. Portland, June 12-14, 1929. 172 Lodges, 30,742 Members, 1,112 Raised, 414 Gain. 159 Lodges Represented. Grand Master, Rex W. Davis. Grand Master, elected, Millin L. Meyers, Salem. Grand Secretary, D. Rufus Cheney, Portland. Correspondent, David P. Mason, Albany.

Present: 17 ~rand Officers; 17 Past Grand :Masters; 15 District Deputy Grand l\1asters; 2 Past Elective l\1embers Home Committee; 36 Committee l\/Iembers; 302 Lodge Representatives. 44 Grarid Lodges were represented. l\lI issouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: They were: Herbert L. Toney, Grand High Priest of Oregon; \;Villiam ]. Huber, District Deputy for the 1\venty-third District of North Dakota; Charles E. l\-finsinger, Illustrious Potentate of Al Kader Temple of the l\1ystic Shrine, and fr0111 the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star, Pauline Moore H.iley and TVI:argaret Barnes, Past Grand l\1atrons, and George T. Cochran, Grand Patron elect. Grand Master's Address:


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Visitations: The Grand 1'1aster visited the Grand Lodge of \Va,shington, and also visited Van Couver, vVashington, at the time ali 'official visit was made by the Grand 11aster of \Vashington. He rei)o~ts 16 visits made to District Meetings in Oregon and 12 visits made to Lodges. Cornerstones: He laid one Cornerstone and another was laid bv a Past Grand Master . . Dedications: He dedicated four 1/Iasonic Halls. He also dedicated the Reeder Gulch Dam at Ashland. \Ve trust the Dam was made of good solid masonry. Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported $59,541.39 received from the Grand Secretary. The Grand Lodge has on hand, in its different funds, in bonds and securities $367,135.04. ,Masonic and Eastern Star Hom~: There were in the Home 40 men, 24 \-vomen, 4 boys and 6 girls. 12 members of the Home family were maintained outside the Home, making a total membership of 86: in the Home family. The cost of maintenance for the year ,was $49,754.32. Oration: \Ve quote from the address by David J. Ferguson, Grand Orator. His theme was "Masonry in 110dern Civilization". In concluding he said: ."

"We are in a day and an age of ext:a0rdinary activity. We are sacrificing our bodies to the god of speed, our minds to the god of size, and our souls to what we consider to be the god of success. These are the, false gods of the present age, and yet there is something fundamentally alike in American ideals and 'Masonic ideals and this inner light gleams with a greater lustre as the days and the years go by, of that there is no doubt. "I think one of the greatest expressions of it is possibly that of George Matthewson-and he belonged to the Craft-who had a true vision of light when he said: " '0 light that followest all my way, I yield my flickering torch to Thee; My heart restores its borrowed ray, That in Thy sunshine's blaze its day May brighter, fairer be,'

"The ideals of Masonry and the inner light consist in a true conception of God and a recognition' of the universal brotherhood, the principles and the right of man,' the greater words liberty, equality, fraternity. VIe have no greater vision in Masonry than


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service and the greatest purpose of the human soul is in service, the giving of one's self. It is an ideal that is far away I know, but we are reaching toward it slowly and surely, moving forward along that line. The development of the ideal of light and love will certainly solve all the problems of mankind. I don't know who it was that wrote it, but when you get a little bit downhearted, think about the poetic minds that have given us light and love in a great measure. One wrote: "'Love with no doubts and no demands, but generous as a southern June, Vast brotherhood of hearts and hands, choir of a world imperfect tune, No shallow sunset films to guild, far summits that we dare not climb, But ceaseless charms of hope fulfilled, making a miracle of time. How calm, how sure the picture seems, how near it comes, beheld possessed, It is not only in my dreams I feel that touch upon my breast; It thrills me through the common day; it holds me in the heart of strife, No phantom grasp that melts away, it seems, it is the touch of Light.' "And that is essentially the light and glory of the Masonic Order. We have so many creeds and so many faiths thaI we are beWildered. The only fundamental organization I know containing the high principles of unity and the high purpose of service and brotherhood represented in an international manner at the present time is the Masonic Order and around its fold all the nationalities of the world can cling. Masonry is like a mighty tree rooted in the soil of mankind and the spirit of men, spreading its branches through the ages and under the shadow thereof, the orphans and children or Masons s!lelter at the present time. This mighty tree is one of t~e glories of American civilization and one of the cementing inftuences of law and order on this planet of God. And if ever in the province of God, rift by the storm and rain, by the wind and lightning, this tree shall totter to its fall, around its trunk will cling the ivy of filiai affection and human brotherhood so well elucidated and so highly developed in the Masonic Order." o

I

Correspondence: Past Grand Master David. P ..Mason gives a report of 137 pages. About three pages are given to an excellent review of our Proceedings for 1928. After quoting from the biographical sketch of Grand Master Ittner he says: "Perhaps the most noteworthy accomplishment of Grand Master Ittner's administration was the raising of the special $25,000 fund for the Washington Memorial, which he brought to a successful


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issue in spite of many obstacles. The authorities at Washington say that Most Worshipful Brother Ittner's efforts have resiIlted in stimulating large interest in the Washington Memorial throughout the'Masonic Jurisdictions of America."

This tribute was deserved, but he did many other things well. The reviewer says pleasant things about the Correspondence report from Missouri. PANAMA. Thirteenth Annual. Panama, March 9. 1929, 9 Lodg-es, 370 Members, 5 Lodges represented. Grand M'aster, Davis Leslie Sasso. Grand Secretary, Jose Oller.

The Proceedings are in Spanish. For the items given above, the writer is indebted to the kindness of a friend. PENNSYLVANIA. 147 Lodges represented at Annual Communication held at Philadelphia, December 27, 1929. 566 Lodge~, 214.1% Members, 5.708 Initiated. 1,439 Gain. Qua.rterly Communications were held March 6, June fi, September' and December 4. 4:>7 Lodges were represented at the December Quarterly. Grand Master, J. Willson Smith. Grand Master elected, William S: Snyder, Philadelphia. Grand Secretary. John A. Perry, Philadelphia. Correspondent, \Yilliam Dick, Philadelphia.

Present at Annual Communication: 19 Grand Officers; 4 Past Grand l\!Iasters; 30 District Deputy Grand l\/Iasters. A Special Communication was held at Pittsburg, December 29, 1928, for the purpose of making three persons l'vIasons at sight. One of these was Andrew VV. Mellon, Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. 129 Lodges were represented and 17 Grand Officers. 2 Past Grand 1\1asters and 23 District Deputy Grand Masters were present. \Villiam T. Vanderlipp, Grand Master of New Jersey, was present. The Grand Lodge was opened in ample form at 12 o'clock, 35 minutes P. 1\1. and closed at 6 o'clock, 45 minutes P. 11. The three degrees were can f erred on the three candidates. Distinguished Visitor: . Brother John S. Fisher, Governor of


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Pennsylvania, who was made a l\-Iason at sight, l\tlarch 7, 1928. was introduced. Grand Master's Address: Visitations: The Grand l\.faster reported 8 Grand Visitations and 14 Visitations to l--<odges. Cornerstones: The Grand l\iaster laid three and three were laid by others. One Lodge was constituted. The Grand l\!Iaster reported that he made a Mason at sight of his son, aged twenty, June 13, 1929. The year he was Grand Master, the writer conferred all three degrees upon his elder son, but the candidate was past twentyone and the usual course provided by Missouri law was fol100ved. Some six years later he conferred the first and third degrees upon his younger son. A substantial gold headed cane presen~ed by the Lodge at l\1arshall, 'Missouri, is a reminder of the "raising". J.<.esources: 'rhe Grand Master seems to be of the opinion that the Grand l . . odge is in a fairly good financial condition. He says: "In unicon \vith our increase in membership, we note with much appreciation t.he increase in the financial resources of Grand Lodge, whieh over the period 1914-1929 represents an increase in the resources from $4,216.709.18 to approximately $18,000,000.00, independent of the reSO:Irces 0: the subordinate Lodges."

George \Vashington l\'Iemorial: Pennsylvania has already paid $295,501.00 for this Memorial and has appropriated $25.000.00 more to be paid during 1930. Past Grand Master \Vatres, of Pennsylvania, is President of the \lI,Tashington Memorial Association and his Grand L.odge believes in standing hy him. The 路Grand Master gives some space to a recotd of a service' on St. John's Day, December 27, 1928. when a sermon was delivered by Hev. Joseph Fort Newton, D. D., Litt. D .. D. H. L. \Ve quote a few paragraphs: "History is the memory of mankind. Calmly she sets down the movements and achievements of the race, while her sister, Legend, who is a port, records the radiance of romance which invests events, like. the halo about the heads of the Saints. Our observance of the Feast of St. John the Evangelist today, made historic by the presence of the Grand' Lodge of Pennsylvania and


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impressive by its tribute to the Deloved Apostle of light; also commemorates an historic celebration of the Feast of one hundred and fifty years ago which must be accounted one of the most famous Masonic assemblies in America, or in the annals of Old Christ Church, about which so many Masonic memories cluster. Thus by the mystic continuity of history our worship today is joined with a great tradition of the past. "As St. John, the Evangelist's Day, December 27, 1778, fell upon a Sunday, the Masonic celebration of the feast was held upon Monday, the twenty-eighth, and we must look at the scene in its historic setting in order to see its full import. It was in the midst of the War of Revolution, just following its most critical and desperate ordeal, ten months after the signing of the treaty with France in February, news of which reached Valley Forge in May, when it was received with festive joy and frolic. It had been the military strategy of Washington to prevent his foes from dividing the Colonies, and that explains the battles he fought in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. At the same time it had been the diplomatic strategy of Franklin to 'divide Europe against itself, and he had done so, France, following the lead of Lafayette, having become our ally. The triumph of American independence seemed assured, and such an hour of high hope added its own quality to the observation of the Feast of St. John. "The story of the service in the Pennsylvania Packet of the General Advertiser for January 2, 1779, is most interesting as showing how carefully, not to say elaborately, the observance had been planned. At nine o'clock in the morning some three hundred Brethren of the Craft assembled at the College-the beginning of the University of Pennsylvania-on the west side of Fourth Street below Arch, under the leadership of the Grand Master and his Officers. Shortly before eleven, by special invitation, they were joined by Brother General Washington, who became the central figure of the procession, as well as 'of the service. Dressed in full regalia, the brethren then marched to Christ Church, where the prayers were read by the Reverend Mr. White, as he is called in the record, later the first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania. At the proper place in the service a Masonic anthem-described 'as""A Grand Symphony'~and which we have used as a responsive reading today. was sung by sundry of the Brethren. An offering of four hundred pound's was made 'for the benefit of the poor,' an item worthy of remembrance as well as of imitation. "The sermon. of the day, which the chronicle reports as 'most excellent and well 'adapted,' was preached by the Reverend and Worthy Brothel' William Smith, D, D., Provost of the College and Academy of Philadelphia, and later-from 1779 to 1784, Grand Secretary of the Provincial Grand Lodge. Happily the sermon


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was published in a pamphlet, by order of the Brethren and the copy of it in the archives of the Grand Lodge is a precious document in which one reads the following appropriate inscription: 'To his Excellency,' George Washington, EÂŁq., General and Commander-in-Chief of the Armies of the United States of North America; the Friend of his Country and Mankind, ambitious of no high,er title, if higher was possible; the following sermon honored with his presence when delivered, is dedicated, in testimony of the sincerest brotherly affection and esteem of his merit.' "

Masonic Homes: The average daily number of guests for the year was 447 and the operating cost was $273,918.49. There is a Reserve Fund for the Homes of $500,000.00. Large bequests for the Homes were received during the year. Correspondence: The Report of 283 pages by William Dick, devotes four and one-half pages to a review of Missouri's Proceedings for 1928 and 1929. He has this to say of Judge Ittner: "Brother Ittner, whom we had the privilege of meeting at a Masonic Library Conference in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1928, impressed us as one capable of having a tremendous power of energy and executive ability."

He notes our special gift of $25,000.00 to the Washington Memorial, for \vhich Grand Master Ittn'er was largely responsible. Of Judge Ittner's successor he has this to say: "The difficulty in reviewing the Proceedings of this Jurisdiction is to find a way of getting beyond the annual address of Grand Master Bigger-there is so much of interest contained therein. It must have been with some degree of pride that he held the same exalted station filled by his father a score of years ago in the same Grand Lodge. "We congratulate the Grand Lodge of Missouri upon having placed such a distinguished Jurist in the Grand East and fully appreciate the force of the statement of Grand Secretary Mather, when he says of him, 'Perhaps the crowning honor of Judge Bigger's year as Grand Master was his being called upon to preside over the Grand Masters' Conference at Washington, D. C., on February 20, 1929'."

It has a kind reference to l\1issouri'sCorrespondent which is appreciated.


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89

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. Annual. Manlla, January 28-30, 1930. 102 Lodges, 6,646 l\fcmber~, :n2 Raised, 21 Loss. 75 Lodges were represented. Grand Master, Seldon 'V. O'Brien. Gl'and Master elected, Vicente Carmona, Manila. Grand Secretary, Newton C. Comfort, 楼anila. Correspondent, Newton C. Comfort.

l~ighteenth

Present: 22 Grand Officers; 12 Past Grand Masters; 1 Past Grand Treasurer; 1 Past Grand Secretary; 2 Past Grand Lecturers; 343 Lodge Representatives. 79 Grand'Lodges were represented. Missouri was not represented. Grand Master's Address: The Grand :Master reported 39 visits made to Lodges. June 1, 1929, the Grand :Master Constituted Leonard '\Tood Lodge No. 105. Hospital for Crippled Children: The Grand Master has this to say of this Charity conducted by the Shrine: 路'It is a pleasure to report that the Ma~onic Hospital for Crippled Children is continuing with even greater success its good work in reclaiming little, unfortunate children and fitting them for future usefulness for the good of society."

A Future Ivlasonic Home: The Home Board reported that the Fund is now 100,000 pesos and recomnlended continued efforts to increase this funcI. Finances: Receipts from all sources during the year were 45,000 pesos. : Correspondence: The Report of 128 pages by the Grand Secretary Newton C. Comfort gives 'more than three pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1929. He says: "Grand Master Bigger presented an address of unusual interest and comprehensiveness."

The greater part of his space is given to quotations from this address. He has some ki~cI words for our report on Correspondence. PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. Fifty-fourth Annual. Hunter River, June 26, 1929. 15 Lodges, 1,226 Members, 44 Raised, 2 Gain. 14 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Peter Sinclair. Grand Master elected, G. Elliott Full, Charlottetown. Gl'and Secretary, Ernest Kemp, Charlottetown.

Present:

14 Grand Officers; 11 Past Grand Masters; 3


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Past Deputy Grand .Masters; 1 Past Senior Grand 'Varden; 1 Past Junior Grand \iVarden; 106 Lodge Representatives. 36 Grand Lodges were represented. IVlissouri was not represented. Visitations: The Grand Master visited all the Lodges but one. Financial: The Grand Treasurer reported that he had received from the Grand Secretary $1,338.50. The per capita tax for the Benevolent Fund was $295.75. The total amount of the Fund on hand was $11 ,100.00 in securities anel $897.55 in cash. There is no report on Correspondence. QUEBEC. Sixtieth Annual. Montreal, February 12, 1930.' 89 Lodges, 15,822 Members, 660 Initiations, 310 Gain. 87 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Henry Willis. Gl'and Master elected, \\To Mo Couper, Montreal. Grand Secretary, \V. 'Vo \Villiamson, Montreal.

Present: 24 Grand Officers; 7 Past Grand :Masters; 5 Past Grand Senior \/Varden; 1 Past Grand Junior \iVarden; 60 Past District Deputy Grand l\1asters; 15 Past Grand Registrars; 237 Past Masters; 144 Masters and \iVardens. 44 Grand Lodges were represented. l\lissouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: R. B. Dargavel, Grand Master, VV. M. Logan, Grand Secretary; A. Heron, Past Grand Junior \iVarden of the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario; \iVinthrop Buck, Past Grand l\1aster .and Grand Secretary of Connecticut, and Cady Earle, District Deputy Grand Master representing the Grand l\1aster of Vermont, were introduced. Grand lVlaster's Address: The Grand IVlaster reported that three new Lodges had been instituted. He dedicated one l\Iasonic Hall and laid the Cornerstone for a new IVlasonic Temple. oHe attended two District l\1eetings. Visitations: He visited the Grand Lodge of Canada 111 Ontario and the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. Finances: The receipts for dues were $8,036.50. The per capita tax for the Permanent Benevolent Fund was $7,349.25. The total assets of that Fund are more than three hundred thousand dollars. There is no report on Correspondence.


1930

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QUEENSLAND. Grand Master, C. Stumm, K. C. Grand Master elected, W. H. Green .. Grand Secretary, _C. H. Parley.

VVe have before us the Eighth Annual Report. It gives brief reports of four special and four Quarterly Communications for the year ending June, 1929. Vie find no record of the number or Lodges or of Members. \\le find a short record of the Third Australian Masonic Conference at Sidney, July 16, 1928. There were present fOUf representatives from South Australia, four from Victoria, four from Tasmania, one from Western Australia, four from Queenslanc(and five from New South Wales. vVe find recommendations: "That no Freemason be permitted to attend any meeting of or be a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. That no meeting of the Order of the Eastern Star be permitted in any Lodge room."

Another recommendation 'was: "That not more than two candidates be initiated, passed or raised at any meeting unless by Dispensation of t.he Grand Master."

A resolution adopted declares: "That this Conference is of opinion that the membership of a Lodge shoul.d not exceed 150."

Another Conference will be held in. Hobart, Tasmania, in February, 1931.' RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. One Hundred Thirty-ninth Annual. Providence, May 20, 1929. 43 Lodges, 19,021 Members, 627 Raised, 169 Gain. 38 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Edwin O. Chase. Grand M'aster elected, Arthur S. Vaughn, Providence. Grand Secretary, Harold L. McAuslan, Providence.

Present: 24 G~and Officers; 9 Past Grand 1\1asters; 137 Past :Masters; 30 l\Iasters; 28 Senior \Vardens; 20 Junior \Vardens; 6 Proxies. 2S Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by Henry S. See, Senior Grand Warden. Distinguished Visitors: They were: From New Jersey: Benjamin F. Havens, Grand 'Master; Donald J. Sargent, Deputy Grand 1\-Taster; \\1. Stanley N aug-hright, Senior Grand \Varden; Floyd J. Kilpatrick, Junior Grand \i\Tarden, and \\lilliam F. Vanclerslip, Past Grand 1\1aster. From Connecticut:


Appendi.1,~.

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1930

George R. Sturges, Grand Master; Elbert L. Darby, Deputy Grand Master, ana Arthur N. Nash, Past Grand Master, Representative of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island near the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master laid the Cornerstone of a Masonic Temple Sunday, May 19, 1929. We lay no Cornerstones in :Missouri on Sunday. \Ve forbid the holding of any Lodge meeting on Sunday (except for funeral purposes) and hold that it is inconsistent for the Grand Lodge to do what it forbids a subordinate Lodge to do. He dedicated a Masonic Temple Sunday, June 24, 1928. Three Masonic Lodges were Constituted. Visitations: The Grand :Master visited the Grand Commandery of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and the Grand J--Iodges of Connecticut and New Jersey. \Vith the Deputy Grand Master he attended a Grand Masters' Conference at Hoston, at which the Grand Lodges of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey were represented. He reports thirty-nine official visits in his own Grand Jurisdiction. District Deputy Grand Masters: The reports of seven appear in the Proceedings. \Ve have one county in ]\lissouri "nearly as large as Rhode Island and our State could be carved into fifty-five as large as our small sister and then we would have nearly half a million acres left. Last Saturday in order to lay a Cornerstone he~e in Southwest l\1issouri, the writer left Springfield at four o'clock in the morning, rode 250 'miles on five trains and was back in Springfield at midnight. Finances: Receipts from the Lodges were $18,852.00. The Trustees, of the Masonic Home Fund reported $76,016.11 on hand. The increase in the Fund for the year was $7,091.51. $960.00 was distrihuted in Relief \!Vork during the year. SASKATCHEWAN. Twenty-third Annual. Prince Albert, June 19-20, 1929. 196 Lodges, 14,585 Members, 697 Initiated, 742 Gain. 139 Lodges rel)reSen ted. Grand Master, Rev. Canon J. K. Irwin. Grand Master elected, J. Orville Clarl{e, Govan. Grand Secretay, 'V. B. Tate, Regina.

Present:

31 Granel Officers; 12 Past Grand Masters; 299


1930

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93

Lodge Representatives. 41 Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by J. Orville Clarke, Deputy Grand Master, now Grand Master. Distinguished Visitors: \V. Douglas, Grand l\1aster of NIanit~ba, and W. H. \~Tardrope, representing the Grand Master of Canada in Ontario, were introduced. Grand l\1:aster's Address: The Grand l\1:aster reported that he, accompanied by the Grand Secretary, had attended all the District Meetings. One new l\iJasonic District was formed. Three new Lodges were Constituted. He laid one Cornerstone and dedicated one :Masonic Temple-one was dedicated by the Grand Secretary. Visitations: He says: "During the year I received many kind invitations to be present at social functions of various kinds. I also received numerous requests to conduct Divine Service. I. gladly accepted as many of these invitations as possible; indeed, I feel I shall never again give as many addresses as I have done during the past year. As we all know, the religious side of the lives of the Masons should never be neglected, although this fact is often overworked. Nor should the clean, pure, social side of our lives be ignored as we travel the journey of life. "We never know a man until we have broken hread with him around the festive board, and on this account I love the social hour with my brethren after the Lodge is closed. The friendships then made are well worth while."

District Deputies: 'fhe reports of 17 appear in the Proceedings. New Lodges: The Grand Secretary reported that Dispensations for two new Lodges had been issued. Financial: The receipts for Fees, Dues, and Dispensations, $12,630.80. For the Benevolent Fund the receipts were $18,032.30. $6,970 of this amount was paid by the 697 candidates . initiated. The amount expended by the Trustees was $10,812.50. Correspondence: A report of 54 pages was presented by \V. B. \Villoughby, Past Grand l\tIaster, and l\1:. A. Mackay, Past District Deputy Grand Master. They review Proceedings of 57 Grand Lodges and give a page and a half to our Proceedings for 1928. Quotations from Judge Ittner's address fill about half of this space. A fraternal meeting is thus reported: .


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"An interesting meeting was held at Bodley Lodge No. 1 at Quincy, Illinois, on September 8, 1928, at which the Grand Master was received by the Grand Master, Louis L. Emmerson, of Illinois, and at the same time Grand Master Fred L. 'Wright, of Iowa, was received. The Grand Masters were a.ttended by the Grand Secretaries of lUinois and Iowa and many other' Grand Officers."

rvlissouri Brethren conferred the Third Degree on that occaSIOn. 'May such invasions of other Jurisdictions Increase. SCOTLAND.

The Grand Lodge meets quarterly in February, l\1ay, August. and November. A. A. Hagart Speirs, of Elderslie, V. P., J. P., is "most worshipful Grand l\1aster Mason". T. G. \iVinlling, of Edinburgh. is Grand Secretary. \iVe find no statistics of membership, but a long list of Lodges in Asia,. A £rica, South America, and the islands of the Sea. Arabia Feliz, Mesopotamia, Turkey, Korea, and Japan, the Fiji Islands, the Philip- . pine Islands, and Republic of Panama were not overlooked. The income received was £ 3844-1.5-3 from 568 Home Lodges and £ 1120-6-5 from 199 Lodges overseas. This was a gain of less than ten pounds sterling from Home Lodges and a loss of 85 pounds in the amount paid by the Overseas Lodges. . The report of the Annuity Fund shows that that Charity is a practical feature of Scottish Freemasonry. If the Scotchmen we meet in our American Lodges are fair samples, Scottish Freemasonry is of a stalwart character. SOUTH AUSTRALIA. Yeal'ly Communication, Adelaide, April 17, 1929. 144 Lodges, 14,576 Members, 1,031 Initiated, 918 Gain. Grand Master, The Hon. 1\11'. Justice Napier, L. L. B., Re-elected. Grand Secretary, Charles R. J. Glover, Adelaide.

Present: 80 Grand Officers and Past Grand Officers; 93 Past l\'fasters; 48 Masters.: 36 Senior \iVardens; 36 Junior \iVardens. 32 Grand Lodges were represented. l\.fissouri was not represented. The Grand l\ilaster laid one Cornerstone, dedicated one Lodge Room and consecrated three lodges. CorreslJOndence: There is a report of 100 pages, but Missouri is not reviewed. \Ve find this entry: "Mi!::sonri Report not yet to hand."


1930

A jlP e'ndix.

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SOUTH CAROLINA. One Hundred Ninety-third Annual. Charleston, March 12-13, 1no. 28!l Lodges, 29,032 Members, 1,112 Raised, 662 Loss. 271 Lodges represented. Grand Master, 'V. A. Giles. Grand Master elected, 1. C. Blacln""'ood, Spartanburg. Grand Secretary, O. Frank Hart, Columbia. Con'espondent, Rev. George T. Harmon, Sumtel~.

Present: 12 Grand Officers; 7 Past Grand l\lasters; 20 District Deputy Grand :Masters; 271 Lodge Representatives. 48 Grand Lodges were represented , :Missouri by Past Grand 'Master, George T. Bryan. ~ Distinguished Visitors: E. v.,r. Timberlake, Jr., Grand ?\'Iastel' and John H. Anderson, Grand Secretary of North Carolina, were introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master laid the Cornerstone of the \\70man's Building at State Park, October 10, 1929. He declined to lay th'e Cornerstone of a school building hecause the building was practically completed. He granted a Dispensation to form one new Lodge. Visitations: The Grand :Master visited the Grand Lodges of Georgia and North Carolina. He visited about 35 South Carolina Lodges. November 6, 1929, he visited a special communication of John S. Davidson Lodge No. 677 at Augusta, Georgia, where he met Grand :Master Hugh vv. Taylor of Georgia. He attended the Grand l\ilasters' Conference at \iVashington , City, the George \Vashington Memorial Association at Alexandria and the meeting of the Masonic Service Association at Chicago, and a later meeting of the Association held in Washington City, Reports of District Deputies: The rePl?rts of the twentyfive District Deputy Grand Masters fill twenty pages in -the Proceedings. Finances: The income for the year was $118,100.59. Of this amount dues for the year were $58,796.30. $40.220.14 was for the vVomen's Infirmary. Correspondence: Rev. George T. Harmon, Grand Chaplain, who is pastor of the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, SO~lth, of Sumter, South Carolina, a church of 1AOO members,


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presented the report of 246 pages. He gives four pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. \\!e quote several items touching the work of Judge Ittner: "Grand Master Ittner certainly took his jo'b seriously and gave himself in continuous service to his Jurisdiction. He visited one hundred and sixty-one Lodges, laid four Cornerstones, held eighteen Special Grand Communications for various purposes and 路wrote over four thousand letters. This is a record." "Grand Master Ittner was so enthusiastic over the meeting of the George Washington Memorial undertaking that he returned with the determination to move his Jurisdiction to do something financially worthy. He launched a campaign and raised the splendid sum of $25,000.00. In appreciation of his efforts the Grand Lodge voted to meet his expen~es to the next meeting of the Association and send him as a special representative." "The Grand Master was honored by his own Lodge, Missouri No.1, by a reception. There was a large attendance of his Brethren, who were desirous of. showing their regard for him. A beautiful Howard watch was presented to him as a token of the esteem in which he is held by his home Brethren."

He quotes this interesting item from the Grand lVlaster's Address: "On Februai:y 15, 1928, I attended a large meeting of Keystone Lodge in the St. Louis Masonic Temple, in the course of which Brother Charles A. Lindbergh entered the hall and was accorded an enthusiastic reception. It became my pleasant privilege to present Brother Lindbergh with a gold life membership card from his Mother Lodge."

There were present on that occasion the Grand lVlasters and Grand Secretaries of Iowa and Nebraska, Governor John E. Erickson and Congressman Scott Leavitt of Montana. The Correspondents of South Carolina and l\1issouri are members of the two oldest Labor Unions. in the world-the Masonic Fraternity and the Methodist Itinerancy. Of course each has a kindly feeling for the other. SOUTH DAKOTA. Fifty-fifth Annual. Mitchell, June 11-12, 1929. 177 Lodges, 19,779 Members, 671 Raised, 72 Gain. Grand Master, St. Clair Smith. Grand Master elected, W路m. F. Sargent, Yankton. Grand Secretary, Geo. A. Pettigrew, Sioux Falls. Correspondent, A. H. Tufts, Sioux Falls.

Present:

17 Grand Officers; 10 Past Grand Masters; 22


1930

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. Committee :Members; 185 Lodge Representatives .. 30. Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by J. K. Kutnewsky. Distinguished Visitors: They were: From North Dakota, Herbert A. :Merrifield, Grand Master ; James McDonald"Past Grand Master; \Nalter L. Stockwell, Grand Secret'.l.ry;. Ralph L. Miller, Assistant Grand Secretary, and Bro. Lewis B. Hanna. Also, Archibald B. Lithgow, Grand Representative of South Dakota ncar the Grand Lodge of New York. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master granted one Dispensation for a New Lodge. He dedicated two Masonic Temples and a third was dedicated by Past Grand Master . GeorgeO. Goodman. Grand Treasurer: John C. Bryan, Grand Treasurer, died December 20; 1928. The Grand 1\1aster appointed Arthur A. Blomquist to fi 11 the vacancy and he was elected Grand Treasurer by the Grand ].odge. . The Grand lVIaster asks hvo questions and attempts, at least. a partial answer. "Would not the Craft be strengthened if all of its manpower, finances and activities were marshalled and controlled by one parent organization? If we, as Brothers, have lessons to teach that will contribute to successful living, is there any reason why we cannot teach them in a Lodge of Master Masons? "These considerations cause me to conclude that the tendency to cl:eate degrees should be discouraged and that the best interests of the Craft as a whole will be served if the Brethren will rededicate themselves as Master Masons and give an increased proportion of their time, thought and energy to the activities of synlbolic Masonry."

. Forty-seven years experience as a Royal Arch Masori and a Knight Templar have not lessened the writer's interest in the work of Symbolic :Masonry. He was Grand High Priest 1l.1Ore than a third of a century ago and had several years experience as Prelate and Commander and is now Grand Prelate of lVIissouri, yet he has found time to lay between eighty and ninety Cornerstones, has delivered :Masonic addresses all over Missouri and has frequently gone away fro111 home to conduct Masonic funerals. Thirteen years ago as he was about to remove from Sedalia to Springfield, at a reception given him a brother asked everyone present on whom this Scribe had helped to confer any of the degrees in the York Rite to rise~


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and about one hundred answered that call. In l\fissouri the men who have been leaders in the other York Rite Bodies have generally been active workers in the Symbolic Lodge. Amended Articles of Incorporation: By a unanimous vote of the Lodges Amended Articles of Incorporation were adopted. Among the purposes are the following: "K To provide for the maintenance and care of the aged, needy, helpless, crippled or incapacitated, with, or independently of other organizations. "F. To provide for the maintenance, tuition and education of children and young people by loan or otherwise. "G. To establish, operate and maintain homes, orphanages, asylums, hospitals and similar institutions and to endow or con路 tribute to like institutions. "H. To establish, own and operate and maintain libraries and museums. "I. To establish, own, manage, edit and publish journals and other pu blications."

\Ve can say of all these objects, what Old I.ad)' Partington said of the doctrine of Total Depravity: "It is a good thing if only lived up to."

But may it not be possible for our Grand l.. . odges to undertake too many good enterprises at the same time? VI e in lVlissouri are facing a growing problem in the increasing needs of our :Masonic Home. Our Grand Commandery is doing a noble work in helping worthy young people obtain a good education. The Grand Lodge will not compete \vith the Grand Commandery in that work. Districts: The Grand Lodge authorized the Trustees to divide the Grand Jurisdiction into Districts of approximately seven Lodges each. Financial: The Grand Lodge has a Permanent Charity Fund of $153,864.23. Appropriations for the next year recommended amounted to $812.50 per month. The Committee on Finance reported $15,888.03 received from all sources. Correspondence: Arthur H. Tufts reviews the Proceedings of 64 Grand Lodges in a report of 133 pages. Two and onehalf pages review our Proceedings for 1928. He notes salient features in the work of Judge Ittner, of whom he says: "The Grand Master attended the Grand Masters' Conference and the annual meeting of the G.' W. M. N. A. Upon his return home, he at once promulgated a campaign to raise $25,000.00 as


1930

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a special contribution to the cause. He made a success of it and the Grand Lodge, in recognition and appreciation voted to send him to the next meeting at Grand Lodge's expense."

This special contribution was in addition to the dollar per • member we had already paid for the Washington Memorial, and every C<1.ndidate initiated pays his dollar for that purpose. He has a courteous word for Missouri's Correspondent. TASMANIA. Annual Communication. Launceston, March 1, 1930. 44 Lodges, 4,024 Members, Initiations in 6 months 109. 49 Gain in 6 months. Grand Master, Frank P. Bowden, ·Re-elected. Grand Secretary, W. H. Strutt, Hobart.

Present: 33 Grand Officers "Also the \Vor. :Masters, Wardens, and Past Masters of various Lodges in the Jurisdiction". Financial: The income for the' year was £ 2,312-16-10. The Board of Benevolence reported an income of £ 2,359-13-1. The Grand Secretary reported Proceedings received from 68 Grand Lodges. Missouri was included in that number. Dedication: The Grand :Master dedicated one Masonic Temple. There are only four Lodges in Tasmania which have not Lodge Rooms of their own. In June, 1920, there were 2,073 members in Tasmania. In June, 1930, there were 4,024. TENNESSEE. One Hundred Sixtieth Annual. Nashville, January 29-30, ] 930. 456 Lo'dges, 50,067 Members, 1,665 Raised, 665 Loss. 441 Lodges represen ted. Grand Master, QUincy .A. Tipton. Grand Master elected, E. R. Burr, Nashville. Grand Secretary, Stith M. Cain, Nashville. Correspondent, John J. Peeler, Huntingdon.

Present: 13 Grand Officers; 14 Past Grand Masters; 5 Custodians of the \Vork; 149 Past Nlasters; 47 Members of Standing Committees; 3 Lecturers; 471 Lodge Representatives. 52 Grand !.. . odges were represented, Missouri by Frank _E. Bartley. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master reported more than forty Lodge visitations.· . 1\10st of these were to joint meetings at which many Lodges were represented. A number


.

'lOa

Appendix.

1930

of Lodges were visited by the Deputy Grand l\ifaster and the Senior Grand Vvarden. It appears that there are some Freemasons in Tennessee who drink sot11ething stronger than coffee. The Grand l\1aster said: "We are having, throughout the State, more or less trouble in . the matter of Master Masons being charged with and found guilty in many cases, of illegal transportation and posession of intoxicating liquors. This is not covered by Edjct 61, but it appears to me that it should be, and I recommend that Edict 61 be so amended."

The Committee on Jurisprudence, to which the matter was referreCl, said 'in a report which the Grand Lodge adopted: "Neither, in the opinion of your Committee, is it necessary to amend Edict 61 to specifically include the illegal transportation and possession of intoxicating liquors. Our Masonic law is ample and clearly 'requires obedience to the moral law and the laws of our country.' It further provides that a violation of either is a Masonic offense, subjecting the offender to Masonic punishment. "In another Code provision it is provided that a 'violator of the civil or criminal laws of the State involving moral turpitude' is a Masonic offense. It should be remembered that when Edict 61 was originally adopted, the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors, under the laws of the State, could be lawfully engaged in. For that reason specific treatment, and mention was needed" to 'outlaw them Masonically, but this is no longer true and, strictly speaking, Edict 61 is surplusage. Clearly, the whole matter is now covered, nor can doubt obtain that the Lodge neglecting or refusing to observe and enforce the law, whether with regar~ to manufacture, sale, transportation or possession, subjects it.self to the possibility of severest discipline."

'Masonic Home: In his address the Grand Master says: "Personally, I have never been and am not now an advocate of the Home, for I have always thought that there was a better and less expensive way in which to take care of our widows, orphans and aged Ma拢ons, and now, from the experience which the Board of Control has had in the past two or three years in caring for these in their home communities, I know that there is a better and less expensive way."

The -Grand Lodge adopted the fonowing resolution: "That this -Grand Lodge authorize the Board of Control to solicit th~ sale of the Widows and Orphans Home and report back at the next Annual Communication."

\Vatched: "Tennessee Lodge No. 204 presented the Grand Master, Q. A. Tipton, with a beautiful engraved 'gold watch."

Financial:

The Grand Treasurer reported that the Grand


1930

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Lodge had on hand in January, 1929, $108,278.92 in cash and $80,000.00 in Bonds. The income for the year in Dues and Interest was $144,345.77. Correspondence: Past GrandMaster John T. Peeler gives a Report of 113 pages. His review of our Proceedings for 1929 covers three pages. He quotes freely from the address of Grand :Master Bigger whose efficient administration evidently commanded his respect. A page is given to our report on Correspondence, but that space is mainly filled with Rudyard Kipling's poem which we quoted one year ago. This scribe has the honor of representing Tennessee near the Grand Lodge of Missouri and is interested in the prosperity of our Mother Grand Lodge. Since this Review was written we have received the unwelcome news that our good Brother Stith M. Cain, Grand Secretary, passed away on July 22, 1930. 'ATe mourn his loss as that of a dear friend. TEXAS. Ninety-fourth Annual. Waco, December 4-5, 1929, 990 Lodges, 138,096 Members, 5,892 Raised, 260 Gain. 469 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Frank Hartgraves. Grand M'aster elected, Hiram 1<..... Lively, Dallas. Grand Secretary, W. B. Pearson, Waco. Correspondent, W. M. Fly.

Present' 1S Grand Officers; 17 Past Grand Masters; 2 Past Grand Treasurers; 1 Past Grand Secretary; 3S District Deputy Grand Masters; 521 Past Masters; 469 Lodge Representatives. 40 Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by Dan S. ,Mc:Millin of \Vhitewright. Distinguished Visitors: George R. Sturges, Grand Master; \~Tinthrop Buck, Past Grand Master, Grand Secretary, and Oscar Fitzsimmons, a member of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut, were introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Gr'and 'Master reported that six Lodges to which Charters were granted by the Grand Lodge in 1928hacl been duly constituted. One new I.. odge had been set to work under a Dispensation. Cornerstones: 12 Cornerstones were leveled. One was for a Church. Four Dispensations were refused. One for a Pres-


102

Appel/dix.

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byterian Church "because the inscription on the stone prohibited same". One for a High School "because stone to be used was 110t cubical in shape". One for Baylor College "because building had been completed above place where stone should be laid". One for a Lodge huilding "because building was nearly completed". The Grand lVlaster made the discovery that under modern methods of steel construction it is difficult to fit old methods of Cornerstone laying into present building plans. The writer has laid between eighty and ninety' Cornerstones with Masonic ceremonies. Some of these he could not have laid had he conformed rigidly to Texas regulations. Eastern Star Card Parties: Several requests reached him asking permission for Eastern Star members to hold benefit carel games, chicken dinners, pie sales, etc.. in Lodge banquet halls. He says: "I held that none of these things were permissible. That benefit card games usually carried with them some form of the prize to the players and that there was always a question as to whether the criminal laws of the State were being violated by such practices. And in the words of the late Joseph D. Sayers, 'Be it said to the credit of the great majority of the Masons of Texas, that they are Christian gentlemen and would not care to be a party to anything that carried with it a semblance of law violatiOl!S.' In addition to that, I felt that the Lodge would be commercializing its practices and that Masonry shouid not be subject to .either the practices of the card games, or to the sales of chicken dinners, etc., as suggested."

\Vholesome doctrine. No Foreign Work in Texas: The Grand Master ruled that an Oklahoma l\fasonic team. could not be permitted to bring their own candidate into a Texas Lodge and confer the work according to the Oklahoma ritual. All work done in Texas Lodges must be according to the Texas ritual. Another Decisiop: "Held that a Lodge cannot maintain a ballroom as a part of its anterooms, but that there is no law against a ballroom being on the same floor that the Lodge room is on, provided it is not a part of the Lodge room and in no way connected with it."

Financial: The Grand Secretary received in Dues from Lodges $91,636.80 for General Fund and in Dues for vVidows and Orphans' Fund $172;817.40. For 11asonic Service As-


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sociation Fund $34,564.50. For Dues for lVIaster Mason Degrees $58,182.00. For Grand Charity Fund $44,587.34. lIe paid to the Grand Treasurer more than four hundred thousand dollars. For general charity work, the amount received last year, was over three hundred thousand dollars, and the balance on hand at the first of the year was more than eight hundred thousand dollars. Correspondence: The Report of 236 pages is by Past Grand Master W. 1\1. Fly. He gives-more than four pages to a full and fraternal review of our Proceedings for 1928. He thinks that two decisions by Grand Master Ittner, involve points on which Grand Lodge laws differ in the two states. I n Texas if a Lodge violates the law in conferring a degree, the degree stands. Texas law docs not permit a dispensation for a rehallot on a petition. :More than half his space is given to a review of the Grand IvIaster's work and a page is devoted to the work of Missouri's Correspondent. The two Correspondents are acquainted with each other and the relations between the two Grand Lodges are cordial. UTAH. Fifty-ninth Annual. Salt La]{e City, Januar~' 21-22. 1930. 25 Lodges, 5,174 Members, 163 Raised, 3 Loss. 25 Lodges represented. Grand Master, Arthur Edward Smith. Grand Master elected, Charles Francis Barrett, Salt Lake City. Grand Secretary, Sam Henry Goodwin, Salt Lake City. Correspondent, Sam Henry Goodwill.

Present: 16 Grand Officers; 17 Past Grand Masters: 39 Past l\1asters: 75 Lodge Representatives. 27 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri was not represented. Distinguished Visitors: H. O. Sanford, Illustrious Potentate of E1 Kalah Temp1e- of the Mystic Shrine; Roderick \\1. 1\1cDonald, Grand Commander, Knights Templar and F. C. Schramm, Sovereign Grand Inspector of the Scottish Rite in Utah and Nevada v,rere presented to the Grand Lodge. Grand lVlaster's Address: The Grand lVlaster reported that he had visited each one of the 25 Subordinate Lodges. He says: "Without exception, we found the various Lodges healthy and financially sound. If some have not grown as much as could be hoped, all were carrying on satisfactorily and inanfully holding the _


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Several of them had purchased new Lodge furniture and equipment and everywhere a true Masonic spirit was manifest."

fort.

'rhere are wide open spaces in Utah. At one of the Lodges visited by the Gl~and IV[aster four brethren came eighty miles to be present; at another meeting six came fifty miles. The Grand Master informally gave this advice to the officers of a Salt Lake City Lodge: "The Lodge was about to' confer a Master Mason路 degree and desired to use on one of the Degree Teams, a Brother holding membership in another Jurisdiction, pe.rmitting him to interpolate two soliloquies used ,in his Jurisdiction, but which路 were not part of the Utah Standard work. I路 advised that under Section 154 of our Code the proposed action was not proper."

A sensible conclusion. Finances: The Grand Treasurer reports receipts for the year for the General Fund $14,392.65 and for the Charity Fund $4,570.47. The Charity Fund in the hands of the Grand Treasurer is $16,286.60 which is a little more than three dollars per capita for the membership of the Grand Lodge. Correspondence: The report of 112 pages is by Sam II. Goodwin, Grand Secretary and Past Grand lVlaster. He gives five pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928 and 1929. He notes Grand Master Ittner's success in raising that special gift of $25.000 for the \Vashington Memorial and his presentation of a gold life membership card to Charles A. Lindbergh f rom Keystone Lodg-e of St. Louis. In reviewing Judge Bigger's administration he quotes with approval the Grand Master's statement that Freemasonry is路 "a progressive sciencc" not in the sense of progression in degrees or offices, "but it is a qucstion whether we are better today than we \\-'ere yesterday." In both reviews he refers kindly to the work of lVlissouri's correspondent. We met in Cedar Rapids in 1919. As this scribe expects to be on that General Grand Train en route to Tacoma which will tarry for a while in Salt Lake City, August 21st. we hope to renew that a~quaintance.


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VERMONT. One Hundred Thirt)'-sixth Annual. Burlington, June 12-13, 1929. 103 Lodges, 19,5fi8 Members, 617 Raised, 126 Gain. 82 Lodges represented. GrandMaster, Edwin F. Greene, Richford, Re-elected. Grand Secretary, Archie S. Harriman, Burling-ton. Correspondent, Archie S. Harriman.

Present: 17 Grand Officers; 10 Past Grand Masters; 13 other Past Grand Officers; 13 District Deputy Grand Masters; 219 Lodge Representatives. 33 Grand Lodges were represented, :Missouri by Seymour C. Harel. Distinguished Visitors: They were: From Connecticut: \Valter F. Sturgis, Grand IVlaster, and Andrew H. Hallock, Past Grand :Master.Froll1 :Maine: Charles B. Davis, Grand Secretary. l':"rom New Jersey: BenjaminF. Harcus, Grand l\1aster, and Donald J. Sargent, Deputy Grand Master. Grand Master's Address: The Grand Master accompanied by his five other Grand Officers attended the Annual Meeting of the District Deputies. He attended all the Distri'ct wI eetings. \Vith the Deputy Grand Master and Grand Secretary he attended the Conference of Grand :Masters of New England, Ne\v York and New Jersey at Boston. Financial: Receipts from the Lodges from Dues and Fees were $17,314.50. Vermont has on hand a Charity Fund of $86,737.10. The Charity Fund dishursed during the year was $9,436.25. District Deputies: H.cports of the thirteen District Deputy Grand l\1asters appear in. the Pruceedings. Correspondence: The Report of 145 pages by A. S. Han-iman, Grand Secretary, reviews the Proceedings of 69 Grand Lodges. Six of these are reviewed for two years, and Missouri is one of that number. lIe gives five pages to a reviev.' of our Proceedings for 1927 and 1928. Of Dr. Pickard he writes "His address -is an able paper devoted to a report of his years activities", and then quotes at some length from the report on the Committee commending his administration. He quotes in full from the Report of our Committee on R.ecognition of Foreign Grand Lodges the points we lay down as the basis of recognition anel adds this comment路:


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"These principles are such as have already been promulgated by several Grand Lodges. The above emphasizes particulars rather more than some, but most of them are usually implied in the rules adopted."

He makes several quotations from Judge Ittner's Address and notes that: "The Grand Master was not' above working the degrees himself."

He greets fraternally Missouri's new Correspondent and quotes our hearty approval of Vermont's action in granting fraternal recognition to the York Grand Lodge of Mexico. A large numher of the members of that body were made Masons in Great Britain and in the United States and they are worthy of recognition by every Grand Lodge in this Country. Have visited them and know them. On one point we and our Vermont reviewer are not in full accord. In revie\ving the District of Columbia he speaks of "the prohibition farce." It may he a farce in Vermont. but it is not iIi. Misso11ri. The writer travels thousands of miles each by rail and by auto: It has been years since he has seen a drunken fellow passenger. Nor has he seen a drunken man on the streets of Springfield, a city of 60,000, for many moons. Tn the good old days some of our thirsty friends arc sighing for, he has seen on the same streets a policeman with two drunken women in his keeping-one colored. the other plain. The colored woman was crying, the white woman was swearing. The other day he gave Masonic burial to an engineer. Railroad men in the. same auto with him spoke of the way they were annoyed in former years by drunken men on their trains. Now they are rarely seen. There is still drunkenness. but not as in former years. In recent months we have seen two hotels padlocked by Federal officers. VICTORIA. Quarterly Communications were held at Melbourne, .March 30, .Tune J 9,. September 18, and December 18, 1929. His Excellency Lord Somers, K. C., M. G., D. S. 0 .â&#x20AC;˘ M. C., is Grand Master and William Stewart is Grand Secretary and Correspondent. .. 462 Lodges, 50,725 Members, 3,974 Gain.

Present at December Convocation: 37 Grand Officers; 146 Past Grand Officers, and "The Masters, Past Masters, ancl


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V/ardens of Subordinate Lodges; 37 Grand Lodges were represented, lVIissouri by Bro. B..Marks". Finallces: The receipts for the General Fund for three months were 1. 2,888-6-9 and for the Benevolent Fund 1. 6,879-16-5. The Grand Lodge has on hand in its vanous Funds 1. 176,813-14-9. Correspondence: Grand Secretary \Villiam Stewart gives a report of 44 pages which reviews the Proceedings of 47 Grand Lodges. Baron Marks, our Representative, gives a hal f page review of our Proceedings for 1928. He says of Judge Ittner's work: "The report of the Decisions pertaining to Masonic Law is very interesting, and well worth comparing with our Laws here."

Evidently he was impressed with the report of our. very efficient Grand Lecturer]. R. IVlcLachlan who had visited 85' Lodges. He thinks our volume of Proceedings: "Gives a most complete account of the business of the Grand Lodge for the year, and shows that the Missouri Grand Lodge has the interest and welfare of the Craft at heart in every way." VIRGINIA. One Hundred Fifty-first Annual. Richmond, February 12-14, 1:)29. 352 Lodg-es, 48,782 Members, 1,766 Raised, 220 Gain. Grand l\lastel', \Villiam L. Davis. Grand Master elected, John T. Cochran, The Plains. Grand Seeretary, .James M. Clift. Richmond. Correspondent. James M. Clift.

Present: 15 Grand Officers; 9 Past Grand Masters; 30 District Deputy Grand IVlasters; 330 Past 'Masters; 476 l...odge Representatives. 44 Grand Lodges were represented, IVlissouri by Rev. F. T. McFaden, D. D., of Vlinchester. Grand l\1aster's Address: The Grand Master reported about thirty official visits made duringtJ1e year. Cornerstones:. 28 Cornerstones were laid, but only a路 few were laid by the Grand l\IIaster. 23 of these Corner.stones were for churches. l\1asonic Homes: The l\llasonic Home for Children with 240 inmates was conducted at a cost of $88,998.24. The George \\!. \Vright Pavilion for Tubercular patients at Charlottesville has been in service since April, 1927. 110 patients have been admitted, of whom 61 have been discharged as "arrested", 2


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have died ang 47 were in the Pavilion January 1, 1929. The Committee on Charity distributed to the Lodges for relief $7,197.58. It is proposed to build an Old Folks Home at Lynchburg to accommodate fi fty persons as soon as the money can be raised. Masonic Relief Foundation of Virginia: After building the George \\1. \Vright Pavilion, the Foundation has on hand assets amounting to $136,588.68 with uncollected pledges amounting to more than one hundred thousand dollars. H.eports of District Deputies: The Reports of 55 District Deputy Grand Masters are printed in the Proceedings. Correspondence: The Report of 91 pages is f rom the pen of James :;\1. Clift, Grand Secretary. He gives more than a page路 to a fraternal revie'w of our Proceedings for 1928. He quotes from the Address of Grand Master Ittner, and calls attention to the ten dollar fee we require from each initiate for the benefit of our Masonic Home, and the dollar we collect from each petitioner for the \Vashington l\1emorial. WASHINGTON. Seventy-second Annual. Tacoma, June 18-20, 1929. 265 Lodges, 40,421 l\fembers, 1,730 Raised, 381 Gain. 240 Lodges represented. Grand Master, John E. Fowler. Grand Master elected, Arthur W. Davis, Spokane. GI'and Secretary, Horace W. Tyler, Tacoma. Corre~pondent, E. I-I. Van Patten.

Present: 15 Grand Officers; 17 Past Grand Masters; 1 Honorary Past Grand -Master; 1 Past Senior Grand \Varden; 237 Past l\1asters; 434 Lodge Representatives. 52 Grand Lodges\vere represented, Missouri by Louis F. Hart. Address of VVelcome: VVOL Bro. Edward B. King, of Tacoma, delivered an interesting address of welcome, who quoted from a rec~nt article by Stanley High entitled "A Guess or a God". From it we quote: "DO'''''n in our hearts, we want one realm, at least, in which we can be sure. We want that sureness to concern the things that matter. To provide such certainty about the things that matter is the business of religion. And when the facts from all the , laboratories and lecture halls are all in, it seems pretty clear that


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it is only in the realm of religion that路 this certainty is available. Everything eise, from the theory of evolution to the price of winter wheat was one thing yesterday, is another today, and will be something else tomorrow. "Educators will tell you that the facts of science chang'e so rapidly. that it is next to impossible to keep a text book up to date. What my children will learn about physics and biology will differ a vast deal from the things I learned. This is simply because physics and biology, themselves, are different today from what they were a decade ago. And all of this is to the good. We are finding out. W.e need to. But we are a long way yet from unravellfng the last mystery. Some of our intellectuals-who guarantee to be startling at $500 a lecture-tell us, of course, that we need a new God to be made in the image of Science. But it would be difficult, it seems to me, to make an image out of a flowing stream and highly unsatisfactory to worship a kaleidoscope. "Most of US need something abiding to tie to. We need a final reality in our lives that gives to the day's work some permanent meaning and assures us from whence we came, whither we are going and why. To secure that certainty is a religious experience. And this reality of religious experience does not change."

Freemasonry builds on the Eternal Verities that do not change. Truth never changes. The Forty-seventh of Euclid is what. it was in the days of Pythagoras. Grand lVlaster's Address: The Grand lV[aster constituted one new Lodge in Seattle and installed its officers. Vvor. Bro. John H. Dunn acting for him iaid in Juneau, Alaska, July 28, 1928, the Cornerstones of the Scottish Rite Temple and the High School of Juneau. He attended the Grand 1'1asters' Conference at \iVashington and the meeting of the \V'ashington Memorial Association at Alexandria. Visitations: .He reported visits to a score or more of Lodges. Three Masonic Halls were dedicated. Masonic Home: The Grarld Master ruled that a brother who was a member of a California Lodge, yet who had resided in Washington thirty years and was member of a Shrine, COtlsistory and COl11mandery, could not legally be admitted into the Washington :Masonic Home. The Grand Lodge disapproved this ruling and yet adopted an amendment to the 11asonic Code of the Grand Jurisdiction which provided that in the future one must be a member of a Lodge in \iVashington to be eligible for


110

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admission into the Home. The total assets of the Home were reported as $910,511.67. There \vere 107 guests in the I-Iome and 21 offlcials and employees. The cost of maintenance for the year was $47,218.47. Grand Lodge Finances: The income from Dues was $41,914.75. Total income including Home Fund for building ancI maintenance was $156,700.75. Oration: VV. Bro. James P. H. Callahan gave a very interesting oration in which he showed the shallO\vness of the clamor for l\Iodernism which is making a little stir in the 1\1asonic world. \Ve have only room for his concluding paragraphs: "All citizens. all right-thinking men have no hesitancy in condemning the efforts of the Communists, the Reds, the Bolshevists and all others who try to set aside the Constitution of the United States and set up some untried system of government. Such are described as a serious menace to the country's welfare. Why, then, should we as Masons fail to condemn those who would tear clown ollr Constitution and landmarks? Just as truly, they are a serious menace to our Masonic welfare. "So far, I am satisfied that the Modernist has met with no particular success in his efforts to bring in a new order of things. I have noted that the socalled Masonic periodicals which seriously advocated the theories of the Modernist are of short life, passing out from lack of interest in what they have to offer. Nevertheless, J am satisfied that Freemasonry should exercise the greatest care in commitments of a public nature, for in an institution so large as ours, there are bad men who sometimes conceal their selfish designs so skillfully that the closest scrutiny may fail to unmask them. "It is true that there are problems to be solved today, but there were problems in the past, and there will always be problems in the future just as urgently needing solution, for such is the. penalty of progress. Freemasonry, with her wonderful tenets and principles and without departure therefrom, has ever been found in the lead of an enlightened and progressive civilization, and has therefore aided in the solution of such problems. Countless thousands have passed through her portals in the past two hundred years, and we may rest assured that if our foundation had not been well grounded. we would long since have gone out of existence. Masonry has constantly labored to make its votaries wiser and better men, men who are capable of coping with the problems of life. Nowhere is this better exemplified than during the years of the Revolution, and路 during the years immediately following when the splendid government of the United States was


1930

A ppc1/.d路i:r.

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brought into existence. Masons were ever at the fore, and their influence is so clearly marked as to need no argument. "Therefore, my brethren, let us turn our backs upon those who would destroy our landmarks. Let us hold fast to the old traditions, 'and faithfully preserve them. Let us not sell our birthright. the heritage of more than two hundred years for a mess of pottage. But let us go forward slowly and firmly, strong in the conviction that the time will come when a universal Brotherhood among men will be a reality and ilOt a theory." .

Correspondence: E. H. Van Patten, Past Grand l\1aster, presented a report of 175 pages. Three pages are given to our Proceedings for 1928. He says of Grand Master Ittner: "The address of. the Grand Master is full and shows a commendable zeal for Masonry in general and for the Craft at large."

He commends his efficiehcy in visiting 161 Lodges in the eleven months of his Masonic year. One pleasing incident he mentions: "On February 15, 1928, the Grand Master visited Keystone Lodge No. 243, located in St. Louis, Mo., and at that meeting had the pleasure of presenting Brother Charles A. Lindbergh with a gold life membership card from his mother Lodge."

l-le h<ls a kind word for Missouri's Correspondent. WESTERN AUSTRALIA. Thirtieth路 Annual Communication. Perth, May 29, 1929. ]25 Lodges, 8,508 Membel's, 539 Raised, 391 Gain. Grand Master, Most Rev. C. O. L. H.iley, Archbishop of Perth. Grand Secretary, .J. D. Stevenson. Correspondent, .Tames W. E. Arehdeacon.

Present: 113 Grand Officers and Past Grand Officers: 67 Past '1'1asters; 48 \Vorshipful 'Masters; 35 Senior \Vardens; 34 Junior \J\1ardens. 49 Grand Lodges were represented, Missouri by A. C. :Munro, Past Senior Grand \Varden. The Following Distingllished Visitors were received: \iV. H. Green, Deputy Grand Master, and Granel Master Elect, Queensland; A. D. Freet)1an (0. B. E.), Past Junior Grand \Varden; Rev. A. P. Bladen, Past Grand Chaplain, Victoria; Rev. H. E. Andrews, New South \Vales; V.,T. R. Bayly, Past Grand Warden, and J. J. Peart (B. A.), Past Junior Grand Deacon, South Australia; Rev. Robert \Villiams, Grand Chaplain, Tasmania; \\1. \\1. Rand. District Grand Master Deputy of 'the Scottish


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Rite, \Vestern Australia, with other Grand Lodge Officers, and S. C. Rosman, District Grand 1\1aster, Goldfields. Three Quarterly Communications were held in August and November, 1928, and in February, 1929. The Grand Master was elected in February. He \vas ill and unable to attend the Annual Communication, and the Deputy Grand lVlaster, A. C. 1\tIcCallut11, 111. ~. E. (Mil), presided over the Grand Lod~c and read the Grand Master's Address: He reported 36 official visitations. Six Lodges were consecrated during the quarter. District Reports: Reports of eight District Inspectors appear in the Proceedings. lVlasonic Relief: 2,858 pounds sterling was expended during the year for the relief of 117 Children, 13 Aged Freemasons, and 18 Aged vVidows. Correspondence: James \7".,7. E. Archdeacon, Past Senior Grand Deacon, presented his third Report of 164 pages. He gives two and one-half pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. He received his layv degree from an American University and knows something of our \vays. \Ve get fraternal treatment at his hands. . He says that Grand Master Ittner's Address: "Is a remarkably concise and business-like document. It points to a strenuous year of office for in addition to those matters which usually fall to the lot of United States Grand Masters, Bro. Ittner is found in more than a hundred Lod?;es conferring degrees and delivering the lectures in each degree, a work in which he appears . to have experienced the utmost pleasure. This seems almost a unique class of work for a Grand Master to perform."

In 1\ lissouri we are in the habit of electing Grand Masters who know how to confer degrees .. He has this to say of Dr. John Pickard's report on Obituaries: t

"There is a tine and distin?;uishing feature of the report of the Committee on Obituaries. Not only does it give biographical sketches of the lives of local brethren of rank, but brief and deer)ly interesting memoirs of the distinguished dead of other Jurisdictions, a striking testimony to the splendid brotherliness .of Missouri . Masonry." .

Dr. Pickard will be seventy-one years old tomorrow, October 12, 1929. This evening, as I write, his friends are gathering at Columbia, :Missouri, for a banquet in his honor. The writer can


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not attend as he has to lay a Cornerstone tomorrow for the Grand l\Iaster in another part of the State. For years he has been a notable figure in Missouri. For a third of a century he has served as a Professor of Art and Archeology in our State University. For many years he has been an active worker in all Branches of Freemasonry in both York and Scottish Rite and has presided over our Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter and Grand Council. As, President of the Capitol Decorating Commission be has rendered great service to the Commonwealth. It is o~ving to his work and that of Brother IVlasons who had charge of the building of our New Capitol, that IVlissouri has the best Capitol Building in the United States for the money it has cost. It has been good work, true work, square work from its foundation to its interior decoration. WEST VIRGINIA. Sixty-fifth Annual. Clarksburg, October 9-10, 1929. 167 Lodges, 34,380 Members, 332 Gain, 153 Lodges represented. Grand Master; Boyd Wees. Grand Master elected, Dorsey C. Peck, Grafton. Grand Secretary, George S. Laidly, Charleston. Correspondent, Lewis N. Tavenner.

Present: 13 Grand Officers; 17 Past Grand Masters; 13 District Deputy Grand l\!Jasters; 20 Deputy Grand Lecturers; 51 Past l\Jlasters; 157 Lodge Representatives. 41 Grand Lodges were represented, l\Iis.souri by P. P. Lester, of vVayne. Distinguished Visitor : James M. eli ft, Grand Secretary of Virginia, "vas introduced. Grand l\rlaster's Address: The Grand Master reported that he had laid one Cornerstone and fourteen were laid by others acting for him. Three of these were Cornerstones of churches and three f01' 'Masonic I-falls. Request Refused: One was "to permit" an organization known as "Jobs' Daughters to assemble and exemplify their Degree work in a Blue Lodge ]~00111". Permissions Granted :' "To Wheeling Lodge NO.5 to have a 'Degree Team from Friendship No. 89', Barnesville, Ohio, take part in the raising of a candidate in Wheeling Lodge No.5."

Also: "To Bluefield Lodge No. 85 to 'permit a degree team from North


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Carolina to 'exemplify' the Third Degree according to the North Carolina Ritual.'"

A Decision: "Asked for a decision as to whether it was proper to play cards in the Lodge room, the writer stating that it was 'the custom of some of the members to meet early and play till the Lodge met and then seem to hurry through in order to continue the game.' I 'held that it was improper to use the Lodge Room for any purpose other than strictly Lodge matters, and that t.he use thereof as a Cluh Room is forbidden." ,

Official Heports: "Fourteen District Deputy Grand Masters returned 145- reports which proves that the District Deputies were on the job."

:Masonic Home: August 31, 1929, there were in the Home, 18 men, 6 women, 23 boys, 25 girls, The per capita cost of maintenance for the year \\;as $438.38. The Grand Secretary reported receipts for the "Masonic I-lome Fund $20,407.25. He received for Grand Lodge Dues $25,881.50. Correspondence: The Report of 185 pages was made by Lewis N. Tavenner, Past Grand :Master. He gives three and one hal f pages to a review of OUf Proceedings for 1928. He notes our special gift of $25,000 to the \Vashington Memorial. which was largely due to the skill and patience of Grand :Master Ittncr and records the generosity of the Order of the Eastern Star in building the I-lomc Chapel at the cost of $8,500. :Many other items of interest fill his closely priritcd pages. He has a kind word for .l\Iissouri's Correspondent and has someho~v reached the conclusion, apparently, that this writer is a "Fundamentalist". So far as Freemasonry is concerned he pleads guilty. For many years he has been installing Lodge officers and has never yct installcd a Master elect without requiring him to "admit that it is not in the power of any man or body of mcn to make innovations in the body of lVIasonry." \Vhcn the 1.~"'orty-seventh of Euclid becomes obsolete, and the law of Gravitation no longer holds the mountains on their bases, it will be time to inquire if there is any change in.l\Tasonic Fundamentals. .l\-fore than fi fty years ago, kneeling at a .l\1asonic Altar, he was taught that in the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. He was taught the brotherhood of man based upon the Fatherhood of God, the Immortality of the Soul. and that the Book of the Law was God's inestimable


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gi 拢t to man. Truth never changes. Freemasonry is a progressive science only in the sense that the l\1asonic student progresses in his understanding of the fundamental truths which are communicated to him. WISCONSIN. Eighty-fifth Annual. Milwaukee, June 11-13, 192:). 31.2 Lodges, 61,509 Members, 2,404 Raised, 1,204 Gain. 308 Lodges represented. Grand Master Fred L. Wright. Grand ~l.'aster elected, Frank Jenks, Madison. GJ'and SecretaJ'~', 'Villiam F. 'Veiler, Milwaukee.. Correspondence, Aldro Jenks, Dodgeville.

Present: 17 Grand Officers; 14 Past Grand l\'lasters; 4 Past Senior Grand \'Vardens; 4 Past Junior Grand \iVardens; 490 Lodge Hepresentativcs. 42 Grand Lodges were represented, l\Jissouriby Charles E. George of \IVeyallwega. Distinguished Visitor: Robert 1. Clegg, Past Grand Master of Ohio, was introduced. Grand Master's Address: The Grand l\1aster laid the Cornerstones of t\vo Masonic Temples and dedicated three l\1asonic Temples. Four Masonic Temples \vere dedicated by others acting for him. Five Lodges 'were constituted. Dispensations were given to open and fonil 1\-vo new Lodges. The l\1asonic Home:, The Grand l\/Iaster claims much for their Home: "It is pertinent to state, for your information, that up to the present time-of all the Grand Jurisdictions in the United States maintaining Masonic Homes-the Masons, of Wisconsin pay less

per capit~ tax for the maintenance of its Masonic Home than any other Grand Jurisdiction. Moreover, the 'Visconsin Masonic Home

is the only Home in this country, that was wholly erected, completed and furnished, not founded on a debt."路

Dare anyone challenge this claim? The total expenses of the Home for the year were $60,707.52. There were 76 guests in the Home. The Board of. Directors asked for an increase of the per capita tax for the I-Iome fro111 fifty cents to one dollar, suggesting a reduction of the per capita tax for the Charity Fund fro111 twenty cents to ten cents. On the recommendation of the J urisprudence COlllmittee the Granel Lodge ordered a per capita tax


Appendix.

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1930

for the Home of seventy-five cents, and fifteen cents for the Charity Fund. The VVashington Memorial: The Grand l\'Iaster attended the meeting at Alexandria in 1929 "without expense to the Grand Lodge". He says: "There are perhaps many things in connection with this movement in which we are not in full accord,"

yet recommended that the Gral1d Lodge pledge $10,000 to the l\1emorial to be paid in four annual instalments. The Grand Lodge declined to make any appropriation. From the criticism vVisconsin's Correspondent passed upon our Grand l\1aster IVIartin's hearty approval of the movement several years ago, \ve inferred there was no undue enthusiasm over this great project in \iVisconsin. Order of De II/Iolay: Vve note \vith pleasure the Grand l\''faster's hearty approval of this Order. He says: "Not since the organization of the Masonic Fraternity back in the centuries has the .craft had an opportunity of doing so much good in anyone of its activities as is offered in the promotion of the Order of De Molay."

Visitations:

He says:

"It has been my pleasure to visit many Lodges and become ac-

quainted with great numbers of the Craft during the past year. My visits have always been pleasant, and I trust of some profit and satisfaction to the Lodges visited."

Correspondence: That veteran, Past Grand Master Aldro Jenks, presented his thirty~second l<.eport, which covers 170 pages. He gives nearly three pages to a fraternal review of our Proceedings of 1928. He says that Grand :Master Ittner was evidently a busy man. ' Thirty years ago when this Scribe was Grand Master, we had less than thirty-four thousand members. Now \ve have nearly one hundred and fourteen thousand. vVe have plenty of talent in our ranks and are well served year by year. WYOMING. Fifty-fifth Annual. Sheridan, August 28-29, 1929. 48 Lodges, 8,361 Members, 361 Raised, 216 Gain. 43 Lodges represented. Grand Mastel', Guy .J. Gay. Grand l\Taster elected, Robert H. Hopkins, Rawlins. Grand Secretary, Joseph 1\1. Lowndes, Casper. Correspondent, Joseph ~L Lowndes.

Present:

16 Grand Officers; 13 Past Grand Masters; 77 181 Lodge Representatives.

Past~/Iasters;


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Grand :Master'~ Address: The Grand Master reported dispensations for forming two new Lodges. Cornerstones: He laid one COl'nerstone and two were laid by others. Visitations: The Grand ~1aster visited the Grand Lodge of Colorado. In company with the Grand Secretary he visited alI the Lodges during the year. Financial: $10,820.26 was paid to the Grand Treasurer and $4,170.50 to the Treasurer of 'the "Masonic Home Fund. The total resources of this fund are $62,677.60. Correspondence: The Report 0 f 135 pages is by Joseph ~/I. Lowndes, Grand Secretary. He gives about two pages to a fraternal review of our Proceedings for 1928. He quotes with evident approval the conclusion of Grand ~1astcr Ittner's address, and also quotes a recommendation made by our Committee on survey of Lodges. He notes our special contribution of $25,000.00 for the \i\lashington :Memorial Fund. YORK GRAND LODGE-MEXICO, Sixty-ninth Annual. Mexico, March 29, 1929. 13 Lo(lges, !)27 Membel'f;, 59 Raised, 20 Gain. 11 Lodges represen ted. Grand l\laster, Chas. Brueggerhoff. Grand Master elected, H. Edward Nyberg. Grand Secretary, A. Percival Hughes, Mexico, D. F. Correspondent, l\farcus A. Loevy, Mexico, D. F.

Present: 9 Grand Officers; 5 Past Grand :Masters ; 29 ~fel11足 bers and 13 Visitors \vere present. 23 Grand Lodges were represented. Missouri was represented by Past Grand Master :Marcus A. Loevy who was made a Nlason in St. Louis and is an occasional and welcome visitor to our Grand Lodge. Grand l\Taster's Address: The Grand ~Taster reported official visits to six of the subordinate Lodges. RecognitiOli.: He reported that the Grand Lodges of ~.Jaine, Rhode Island and South Carolina had recognized the York Grand Lodge. Let the good work go on. There is no good reason why any American Grand Lodge should hesitate to recognize the York Grand Lodge. This writer visited three of


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these subordinate Lodges eight years ago and found the same kind of Freemasonry he finds in this country". vVe are glad to note that 59 were raised in the thirteen Lodges anel that there was an increase of 20 in the membership. Correspondence: The Report of 138 pages is by Past Grand :Master .Marcus A. Loevy. He gives two pages to a review of our Proceedings for 1928. Of course we have a right to expect fraternal treatil1ent at his hands. He is the Brother who sent to Missouri Grand Lodge eight years ago a check for $500 to start a Library in honor of our mutual friend Dr. \iVm. F. Kuhn, \vho was then General Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter of the United States.


REPORT

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI FROM

S~PTEMI3ER 1,

1929, TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1930.

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI, LOCATED AT ST. LOUIS

OFFICERS W. W. Martin, President.. Robt. R. Kreeger, 1st Vice-President..

St. Louis, Mo. Kansas City, Mo.

Joseph S. McIntyre, 2nd Vice-President..

St. Louis, Mo.

VV. S. Campbell, Treasurer

St. Louis, Mo.

Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary

St. Louis, Mo.

Dr. Solon Cameron, Physician

St. Louis, Mo.

Mrs. W. Waller, Matron of Children

St. Louis, Mo .

.Mrs. Luella McCue. Matron of Old People

St. Louis, Mo.


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120

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. T. W. Cotton.; W. A. Clark Jos. S. McIntyre Thos. H. Reynolds W. S. CampbelI... Chas. T. Kornbrodt.. Orestes NIitchelI... F. H. \Vielandy Herman Mauch Arch A. Johnson R. R.Kreeger W. W. Martin Jas. R. McLachlan

"

Van Buren, Jefferson City, St. Louis, Kansas City,

MO.} Mo. Term expires, 1930. Mo. Mo.

St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis, St. Louis,

MO.) Mo. Mo. Term expires, 1931. Mo. Mo.

Springfield, Kansas City, St. Louis, Kahoka,

MO.} Mo. Term expires, 1932. Mo. Mo.

EX路OFFICIO MEMBERS Samuel R. Freet, Grand Master William R. Gentry, Deputy Grand Master Ray V. Denslow, Grand Senior Warden Thad B. Landon, Grand Junior Warden

Kansas City) St. Louis, Trent<?n, Kansas City,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

ADVISORY MEMBERS Mrs. Ella Jean Flanders Mrs. Edith V. Bader Mrs. Georgia S. Bondurant..

Excelsior Springs, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Kirksville, Mo.


1930

A Ppel1dLr.

121

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1930 PRESIDENT'S LETTER To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masvlts the State of Missouri:

0/

Brethren: I hand you a report in detail of the officers of the Masonic Home of Missouri. At the Annual Session of .the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, held on September 24th, 25th and 26th, 1929, in the Scottish Rite Cathedral, S1. Louis, Missouri, the following directors were elected for three years: Brother A. A. Johnson, Brother R. R. Kreeger, Brother J. R. McLachlan and Brother W. W. Martin. Brother Herman Mauch was elected for two years. At this meeting you are to elect four directors for three years. The terms of the following directors expire: Brother T. W. Cotton, Brother W. A. Clark, Brother Jos. S. McInt.yre, Brother Thos. H. Reynolds. At the meeting held in the Scottish Rite Cathedral at st. Louis, September 25th, 1929, the following officers were elected: W. ,V. Martin, PresidenL St. Louis, Mo. R. R. Kreeger, First Vice-PresidenL , Kansas City, Mo. Joseph S. McIntyre, Second Vice-PresidenL S1. Louis, Mo. W. S. Campbell, Treasurer St. Louis, Mo. C. L. Alexander, Secretary St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician Mrs. ,V. Waller, Mat.ron of Children St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old People St. Louis, Mo. The Standing Committees for the past year have been as follows: Trustees of the Endowment Fund-W. W. Martin, R. R. Kreeger, Wm. S. Campbell. . Executive Committee-oR. R. Kreeger, Chairman; A. A. Johnson, Vice-Chairman; T. 'V. Cotton, J. S. Mcintyre, V-l. S. Campbell, T. H. Reynolds and Herman l\iauch.


122

1930

Appendix.

Finance Committee-To W. Cotton, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell, C. T. Kornhrodt. House Committee-\V. S.Campbell, Chairman; 'J. S. McIntyre, Vice-Chairman; F. II. Wielandy, Mrs. Edith V. Bader. Legal Committee-A. A. Johnson, Chairman; .J. S. McIntyre, Orestes Mitchell, T. H. Reynolds, W. S. Campbell. Administration Committee-Orestes Mitchell, Chairman; F. H. Wielandy, Herman Mauch, J. R. McLachlan. Hospital Committee-To W. Cotton, Chairman; W. A. Clark. Medical Staff: Dr. . Dr. Dr. Dr.

Rudolph Buhman Frank Morse Thomas A. Hopkins D. L. Harris

St. St. St. St.

Louis, Louis, Louis, Louis,

Mo. ) Mo. \ Mo. (Term expires, 1930.

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Francis Reader E. Lee Myers J. B. \Vright.. A. H. Conrad

St. St. St. St.

Louis, Louis, Louis, Louis,

Mo. } Mo. Mo.' Term expires, 1931. Mo.

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Louis VI. A. Solon \V. A.

H. Behrens BIiss Cameron Clark

St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, Jefferson 'City,

Mo. )

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

.

expires, 1932.

OFFICIAL BONDS. \V. W. Martin, President, $5,000.00'; W. S. Campbell, Treasurer, $135,000.00; Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary, $2,500.00; Mrs. W. Waller, Matron, $2,500.00; Tru&tees of the Endowment Fund: \V. W. Martin, $5,000.00; R. R. Kreeger, $5,000.00; Wm. S. Campbell, $5,000.00. COMMITTEE ON SURVEY.

The problem demanding I11l1ch time and consideration of the Board during the past year was the crmvded condition of the l-lome. To find a ,vay to solve this problcm a Survey Committee was appointcd, ,",vho gave much time and thought to this question, and offered the following report as the solution: To the Board of Directors of the Maso11ic Home: Your special survey committee appointed at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on April 9, 1930, for the purpose of making a survey of the property of the Home, and to recommend such


1930

Appendi;L

123

improvements or changes therein as may be found necessary to meet the requirements of the Home, for a period of ten years or more, beg leave to ma1\:e the following report: On June 1, 1930, the HDl11e family comprised four hundred fourteen souls, divided as follows: One hundred forty-one men, one hundred forty women, sixty-two boys and seventy-one girls, with five men, eight women and one boy admitted, yet to arrive, and with a large number of applications on file under investigation. The Masonic Home records show that there has been an average increase of thirty-six in each five-year period for twenty years in the old people. However, during the last five and one-half years the membership of the old people has increased seventy-five. The total number of boys and girls has not increased so rapidly. In 1909 we had seventy boys and girls in the Home, and in 1929 we had one hundred thirty-five. Our records show that we are not holding the boys and girls long enough to lay the foundation for an adequate education and properly fit them for life's work. At this time the .rooms in the Matrons' hall are all filled, with four women on the waiting list for rooms, and in the Masters' lodge there were only fifteen vacant rooms, and there are a bout t.wenty-five applications for membership under investigation. In making its investigation, and in arriving at its conclusions, your committee has endeavored to keep in mind the future needs of the Home,_ considering the age and character of the present Home buildings, the annual increase in the different classes of memberships in the Home family during the last twenty years, and the need of additional facilities, which are not now provided in the Home. The first subject considered was the advisability of remodeling and enlarging the buildings on the present Home property, but our investigation developed that the present buildings were of such a character that they could not be increased in size economically, nor could additional stories be added thereto, without an expense which would be prohibitive. The question of tearing down the Matrons' hall and the building occupied by the older boys, and the erection of a larger building on the space was considered, but our investigation developed that this would cost between ~275,000.00 and $30'0,000.00 and would only provide additional room for about thirty-five women. By the time the work could be' completed, the additional space would be filled, and we would be left with our problem unsolved. The physical property of the Home at this time possesses few of the modern attributes necessary to make the place at all home li!{e, for an intelligent child. We have no adequate play grounds, no gymnasium, no library, no assembly hall, no indoor play rooms,


124

Appel/dt,t".

1930

or recreational rooms for use in inclement weather, and so far as the children are concerned, our Masonic Home is a boarding house with little to attract a child, or to inspire it with self respect and a desire for the worth while things of life. The lack of these present day necessities 110 doubt causes the child to l-ook anxiously forward to the day when he or she is old enough to get away. This offers but little encouragement to boys and girls to stay there and acquire a high school education, as the records show a minimum of high school attendance from our Home children. Your committee has seriously considered the question of the separation of the old people from the children, and in solving this question, it was necessary to determine whether or not the present quarters should be used for the old people, or the children, and the needs of the two different groups were therefore considered. We have arrived at the conclusion that it would be best to keep the old people in the present quarters, as the buildings are constructed more along the line of the needs of adults than of children, considering size and situation of rooms, types of stairways and many other details not necessary to mentiqn, and besides, the eccentricities of many of the old people are such that it seems necessary to have immediately present the executive heads of the Masonic Home. Another thing-the hospital is located on the present grounds, and it is continuously occupied by numbers of the old people and the old Ileople are constantly hi need of hospitalization, attention of nurses and physicians, which is not equally true in the case of the children. The removal of the children from the present quarters will release beds for approximately eighty-five to one hundred old people, at a small expense for the remodeling of the rooms in the buildings now occupied by the children. Even by the removal of the children, and the re-arrangement of the rooms, the present Home premises will soon be completely filled with old people, if the average increase keeps up. The necessity for the general rearrangement and en"largement of the Masonic Home plan is therefore clearly apparent. Your committee believes that it would be improvident to attempt to move the old people to distant quarters away from close proximity to the hospital, nurses and doctors, because that would leave the present Home properties entirely too large for occupancy by the children, would not furnish the many things needed for a ÂŁhildren's home, and would necessitate the immediate expenditure of a very large amount of money in erecting buildings sufficient to take care of the old people in the Home at this time. We believe that the economical thing to 'do, and the wise thing to do, considering the welfare of the children, is to buy a tract of land in


1930

Appendix.

125

St. Louis or in close proximity thereto, where good public school facilities are furnished, and then to begin' to erect bu.iIdings of the cottage or unit type, along the lines followed by the Grand Lodges of Pennsylvania, Indiana and Kentucky. In this way, modern buildings, housing twenty to thirty children per building, can be constructed, and home-like facilities furnished, without a very large initial outlay of money. Ample play grounds would be furnished, as well as those other things necessary for the proper development of the children, who are placed in our care, and for whose future lives we are largely responsible. By adopting this plan, Masons of wealth and standing in our State may become interested and perhaps be glad to contribute toward the construction of memorial cottages for boys and girls, as has been done in other States, which have adopted the cottage plan. In attempting to solve this problem, we believe that it is the duty of this Board to use its vision and business acumen, and look to the needs of the Masonic fraternity in the State of Missouri in the far distant future. We know路 from our records that there is very Ii ttle room now left in the children's quarters;' only a few rooms left in the men's building, and that the women's building is filled to capacity, with several women on the waiting list. We believe that t.he Masonic fraternity, as well as the Order of the Eastern Star will constantly grow in Missouri, and as our membership grows, the larger the membership, and the older the organization is, the greater will be the number of dependents who will be calling upon the Masonic fracternity and the Order of the Eastern Star for help. It is the duty of the Fraternity to make provision now so that these worthy but unfortunate men and women may be respectably cared for as they approach the sunset of life. With respect to the children-it seems to your committee that a still greater burden and responsibility rests. upon the Fraternity. These orphans appeal to us for parental care, and the Masonic fraternity has the responsibility, through us as its representatives, of not only furnishing these children with bed and board, but to use every reasonable effort to supply to them paternal care and love; to inspire them with a hope for the future, and instill in their hearts and minds a desire for a respectable place in society, and courage to endeavor to succeed. To do this we must not .only furnish them with competent matrons and supervisors, but also with modern homelike surroundings, so that they will be happy, and glad to stay with us until they have had an opportunity for adequate education, and to make themselves self-sl.lpporting citizens of our State. The quality or type of citizens they


126

.Appendix.

1930

develop into depend upon us, and ours is the responsibility to meet the issue. In considering this question we must look into the future, for jn ten or fifteen years from now the present Home buildings will be of such age and condition that probably they will have to be replaced with larger buildings, or remodeled at tremendous cost. The City of St. Louis is one of the largest cities in the nation. Real estate situated as is the Masonic Home property will doubtless grow in value in that period of time, and the ground upon which our present buildings are located will no doubt be of greater value. We therefore recommend that a tract of approximately forty acres of land in the City of St. Louis, or in close proximity thereto, be purchased and that buildings of the cottage or unit type, for the housing of Masonic Home children, be erected thereon as the need requires and as monies can be provided for that purpose. We recommend the purchase of approximately 40 acres for the reason that at this time land values are very low and '''ith this much ground we can be assured of ample play grounds and garden plots for use of the children and old people, with room for expansion. In the future years, as the present Masonic Home buildings deteriorate, buildings can be erected on the forty-acre tract for the housing of the old people, and for the construction of a new hospital, and when that is necessary to be done, in all probability the value of the present Masonic Home grounds will be such that they can be sold for almost enough to construct the buildings which may then be needed for the old people at the new location. We have considered the various ways and means of raising funds for the purchase of land, and the construction of路 proper and necessary buildings for the children, and believe that in view of the financial depression which now generally prevails, and which, no doubt, prevails among the membership of the Masonic fraternity, it would be inadvisable to ask for an assessment upon the Masons of the State for the purpose of raising these funds. We, therefore, suggest that the situation be brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge at its coming session for such action as it may deem wise and for the best interests of all concerned. Respectfully submitted, ORESTES MITCHELL, Chairman. 'VM. S. CAMPBELL, ARCH A. JOHNSON, SAMUEL R. FREET, ELLA JEAN FLANDERS.


1930

127

Appcndi.'l:. INSURANCE.

TOI'nado

!i'ire

On all buildings and contents...... $896,660.00 Steam Boiler Insurance.................. 20,000.00 Contingent LiabilityCompensation 20,000.00-$40,000.00 General Liability-Compensation 25,000.00- 50,000.00 Electrical Machinery.................... 1,000.00

$895,700.00

ESTIMATED VALUE OF ASSETS.

Endowment Fund cash and securities Hori1e Grounds Improven1ents Furnishings

$ 881,005.91 240,000.00 . 775,OQO.OO .. . 165,()()0.00

$ 2,061,005.91 MEMBER STATISTICS. Men \Vomen Boys Girls

Members in the Home September 1, 1929 Admitted during the past year

Discharged during the year Deaths during the year

;

141

路128

42

34

1183

162 3 21

12 27

59 18

77 14

o

144 138 63 Total memhership September 1, 1930 Net increase during year Admitted during the past year, but who have not yet arrived

76 5

.81 15

o &6 411

; 7 17

ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR.

Not only has the Advisory Board ~11ost gladly met 'every request of the Home for necessary furnishings and linens as they were needed, but they have sought' opportunities for doing good and have rendered much valuable service., They are already anticipating the future needs of the Home and preparing to have the necessary funds to supply the furnishings for any and all new. buildings the Masons of Missouri may find necessary in the immediate future. The Masons of Missouri owe a debt of gratitude to the E路astern Star of Missouri for the work they are doing through the Ad路 visory Board, and especially for the splendid interest they are taking in the education of our boys and girls.


128

AppeHdi.1:.

1930

The Board of Directors and Management appreciate the fine spirit of co-operation, harmony and sympathy of the Advisory Board and count it a privilege to work with them. GIFTS.

We gratefully acknowledge many useful gifts during the past year. Cash to subscribe for magazines, and to purchase play equipment, books and many other things. These gifts have come from individuals, lodges and other organizations, many of whom have asked that their names be withheld, but we are taking the liberty to' mention three outstanding gifts. EDUCATION FUND.

During the year a wonderful friend of the Home sent us scvfH'al substantial gifts to establish a separate fund for helping to defray the expenses of Masonic Home boys or girls who desire to attend College or University. As soon as this became known other gifts were made and with the help of the Scholarship funds, of the Eastern Star of Missouri we are expecting to have one young man and two young ladies in College or Univers'ity this year. LIBRARY FUND,

While the Masonic Home has many books yet it has greatly needed a working library. Reference books adapted to the use of our school children and reading books selected to meet the needs of all ages of our growing family. During the year Job's Daughters and others presented us with some valuable reference books. The 1929 Matrons and Patrons Club of St. Louis and St. Louis County made us a gift of $2,027.00 to meet this need. The gift is a real blessing. BOYS' WORK SHOP.

The need of the home for a Manual Training Shop has been felt for many years, but it was not supplied until this past year. Brother Albert Dexheimer completed during the' year a splendid work shop and then furnished a competent instructor to train the boys in the use of the tools and machines. The Board is most grateful for this interest 路and help, ENDOWMENT FUND.

The follOWing is a list of the securities in the Endowment Fund: First Mortgage Real Estate Loans $338,307.40 Real Estate owned........................................................................ 15,480.00


1930

Appendix.

129

Federal Land Bank Bonds . Joint Stock Land Bank Bonds : .. United States Liberty Bonds .. Rice Estate . Rife Securities Erdhaus Estate .. Comstock Estate-Bonds . Comstock Estate-Bonds in Default . George B. Mills Estate-Stocks and Bonds .. Municipal and other Bonds . Cash in First National Bank Sept. 1, 1930 $33,635.09 Less interest due General Fund............................ 891.59 Total

197,5S5.00 90,000.00 3,500.00 4,600.00 6,000.00 500.00 70,692.51 5,500.00 11,600.00 104,497.50 32,743.50

$881,005.91

Masons are realizing more and mOl~e each year the excellent opportunity of living and doing good through the generations by including the Masonic Horne in their will. We are doing a great work and through the years 路you can share in it by making a permanent investment in the Endowment Fundan investment that will continue to bear fruit and perpetuate your name as long as time shall last. CONCLUSION.

In the past year ninety-nine carne into the Home. Seventeen more were admitted who are expected soon. While the figures only show a net increase of seven, the actual increase of residents in the Home was more than double that figure. Quite a number had been carried on the Roster who had not been in the Home for more than a year and the discharge of these during the year reduces the net increase as shown by the statistics. We have a tremendous responsibil'ity-greatly increased by the crowded condition of the Home, and your Board of Directors cannot continue to meet the needs with the continual increase of guests without the whole-hearted support of every Mason in the state. A great foundation has been laid and we have the opportunity now to catch the vision of brotherhood and do such an outstanding work for humanity that the good name of our fraternity will con路 tinue to grow in favor with God and man. Fraternally submitted, W. W. MARTIN.


)930

Appendi.1;.

130

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE MASONIC HOME. FRO?lJ SEPTEMBER 1, I92!), TO AUGUST 21. 1930..

GgNEHAL FUND. Septemher 1, 1929, Balance on hand September 1, 1929, Cash on hand

. .

$194,259,04 706.47 $194,965.51

REC]~IPTS.

Grand Secretary, Per Capita Tax $165,049.10 GI'and Secretary, O. E. S. Per Capita Tax.......... 19,328.25 Interest on Daily Balances $ 1,043.:)8 Interest on Endowment Bonds 21,225.70 In tel'est Real Estate Loans 18,848.72 Interest on Certificates of DepoRit.... 4,134.93 Mis<:ellaneous Income 11,028.62 Interest on Liberty Bonds.................... 1,269.29 Profit on Bonds Sold.............................. 21.87 $ 57,572.71

$241,950 ..06 $436,915.57

DISBURSEMENTS. Provisions . ... $ Dry Goods and Clothing . Laundry . Ice, Light and 'Vater . Fuel . Salaries . '\Vages . Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory Board attending- Board Meetings . Hospital Suppl ies . Carfare for Members of Home FamiI~路 . Telephone . Legal and Auditing : . Interest paid to Donors of Bonds.. In su ra 11 ce . Miscellaneous .

96.3(18.03 9,427.9:) 10,845.47 8,249.32 11,632.98 16,683.44 39,555.18 2,172.80 2.043.18 814.60 479.07 413.00 2.905.00 2,400.86 17,647.45

$221,668.33

Transferred to Improvement Fund

$21:),247.24 20, 0 OO.~OO

Balance August 31, 1 no ....

$195,2-17.24

INITIATION FUND. September 1, 1929, Balance on hand . Receipts from Grand Secl路etary . Interest on daily balances Interest on Libert~路 Bonds .

2::>,897.56 .$ 34,660.00 90.63 849.61

~5,600.24

6I,4n.80

IMPROVEMgNT FUND. September 1, 1929, Bala nee on hand Transferred from General Fund $ 20,000.00 Interest on Daily Balances.....路. 101.72 Disbursements

.

August. 31, 1!120, Balailce..

20,556.16 20,101.72 $ 40,657.88

$ 14,706.56

$ 25,951:.32

C. L. ALEXANDER Secretary.


路 19.30

13t

AppclIdi.'V. TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT.

GIQ\EHAL FUND. Balance August' 28, 1n9 Heceived from Secl路etary ] nten~st on Treasurer's :F'unds.................... Total

Receipts

$194,259.04 $234,760.6~

5,777.!l0

:

$240,538.5!l

240,538.59 $ 43 4, 79 7.6:{

Disbursements . Transferred. to Improvement Fund. Total Disbursements.....

........... $223,022.68 20,000.00 ................... $243,022.68

Balance Aug-ust 30, 1930

243,022.G8

................. $191,774.!l5

INITIATION FUN]). Balance August 28, 1929............................................ . $ 25,8!l7.56 Received from Secretary $ 34,li60.00 Interest on TreasuI'er's Funds 940.24' Total

Receipts

$ 3:i,600.24

Total on hand August 30, 1nO

.

35,600.24

..... $ 61,497.8U

}MPROVEMENT FUND. Balance August 28, 1929........................................................ ... $ 20,556.16 Intel'est on Treasurer's Funds.. .. .... $ 101.72 TI'ansferred to Improvement Fund......... 20,000.00 Total Receipts

..

...... $ 20,101.72

20,101.,72

$ 14,706.56

40,657.88 14,706:56

Disbursements Balance August 30, 1930

$ 25,!151.a2

Respectfully submitted, W. S.

CAMPB~LL,

Treasurer. REPORT OF AUDITOR.

September 13, 1930. To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of l\'1issouri,. St. Louis, Missouri. Gentlemen: In accordance with instructions received, we have examined the books of the Secretary, Mr. Clarence L. Alexander, for the fiscal year ended August 31, 1930, on the General, Initiation and Improvement Funds. 'Ve have also checked the statement of the Treasurer, Mr. W. S. Campbell, on these funds and have verified the balance at August 31, 1930, by obtaining certificates from the depos'itories as to cash balances and by examining the securities forming part of these funds. We submit the following summary:


]930 .

Appendix.

132

GEN~HAI~ FUND. Cash in Telegraphers Bank $ 19.321.75 1.062.00 Cash in Saving Trust Co .• Pay Roll Acct . 92.50 Cash in Savings Trust Co.. President's Acct.. . 601.99 Cash in First National Bank. President's Acct.... Cash in President's Cash Drawer . 60.41 200.00 Cash in l\1.'atron·s Cash Fund . Certificates- of Deposit in Safe Deposit· Box .. 35.000.00 Securities in Safe Deposit Box . 136.27Vi9 Accrued Interest at Time of Purchase . 1.743.41 891.59 Due from Endowment Fund ..

INITIATION FUND. Cash in Telegraphers Bank :

$

~:~·~~.7~re~es ~.~ ~.~.~.~.~~ ~'. :

'.'.:::'.'.'. ::::'.'.::::::'.:::::::::::::::::.. Accrued Interest on Securities at Time of Purchase .

$195.247.24

3,722.11 15.000.00 42.714.69 61.00

61.497 ..80

IMPROVEMENT !<'UND. Cash in Telegraphers Bank $ 5.951.32 'Certificates of Deposit 20,000.00

$ 25.951.32

We have also examined the securities in the Endowment Fund and have obtained a certificate from the depositary as to the cash balance in this fund. The following is a summary of the Endowment Fund at August 31, 1930: Heal Estate Loans $338,307.40 Real Estate Owned...................................................... 15.480.00 F'edel'al Land Bank Bonds 197.585.00 U. S. Liberty Bonds.................................................... 3,500.00 Joint Stock Land Bank Bonds 90.000.00 Municipal and other Bonds 104.497.50 Rice Estate....................................................................... 4.600.00 Rife Securities................................................................ 6,000.00 Comstock Estate............................................................ 70,692.51 Comstock Estate Bonds in DefauIL...................... 5.500.00 Erdhaus Estate.............................................................. 500.00 Geo. B. Mills Estate.................................................... 11.600.00 Cash in Fil'st National Banlc $33.635.09 Less Due General Fund........................ 891.59 32.743.fiO

$881.005 ..91

Respectfully submitted, PERKINS & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountants. REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE.

St. Louis. Missouri, September 3rd, 1930. To the Board of Di,'cctors of the Masonic Home:

Your Finance Committee begs leave to make the following report: Your Committee. accompanied by the President and Secretary and the Certified Public Accountant, met at the Mississippi Valley


1930

133

Appendix.

Trust Company in St. Louis, Missouri, on September 3rd, 1930, and checked the securities belonging to the Endowment Fund and found the securities as follows: First Mortgage Real Estate Loans $338,307 ..40 Real Estate Owned __ 15,480 ..00 Federal Land Bank Bonds __ _ _ 197,585.00 Joint Stock Land Bank Bonds __ 90,000.00 United States Liberty Bonds __ __ _.............. 3,fiOO..00 ~ice EHtate _ _........................ 4,600 ..00 Ri fe Secu ri t i es __ _ :.................. 6,000.00 Erdhaus Estate _ _................................................ 500.00 Comstock Estate-Bonds _ 70,692.51 Comstock Estate-Bonds in Default._ _.. __ __ _. 5,500.00 George B. Mills Estate-Stocks and Bonds _.. 11,600.00 Municipal and other Bonds _ _._. 104,497 ..50 Cash in First National Bank Sept. 1st, 1930 __ $33,635.09 Less Interest due General l"und................................ 891.59 32,743 ..50 Total.

__

_

$881,005.91

We find a splendid accounting system and a careful followup of all interest installments and the loans and securities to be in splendid condition. Fraternally submitted, T. VV. COTTON, HERMAN MAUCH, Committee. GIFTS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND AS FOLLOWS; Knights Templar Fund __ $ 35,114.00 James L. Kirkendall. . 13,150~00 ,:V. S. Smith Fund _ __ __ . 11.730.00 '1'. W. Higgins Fund_ _ _ . 5,000.00 James VV. Harris Fund __ __ ._ : _. 1,66~ ..74 Masonic Home Certificate Fund _ _ . 1,117,.60 Ferdinand Herrold Fund : __ .. 500.00 John B. Cro::::haw l"und._ _ _ _ . 1,000.00 Jacob F. Gemlich Fund __ _ __ . 1,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal AI'ch Masons Fund . 3,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal and Selected Masters Fund . 2,500,,00 T. W. Cotton l<'und _ _. 1,000 ..00 Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund _.. 1,000.00 A. M. Houg'h Fund __ . 5,000 ..00 Ja.cob Lampert Fund .. __ __ __ .. 30,000.00 1\1.'rs. E. WUI'Z Fund __ .. __ __ _ __ . 500.00 Adolph Gluck Fund _ __ .. __ __ __ __ .. 500.00 Parralle Massengale' Fund _ ._ .. __ __ _. 806.60 Mrs. Lillie L. Fletcher l..' und.. _. __ .. .. . 1,000.00 Fredericl{ A. Logan Fund .. _ __ .__ __ __ _.. 500.00 Robert Elliott Black Fund __ __ _ . 1,000.00 Nathan Schloss !"und .. __ __ _ .. . ._._ .. __ - .. 932.83 A. P. Christianson Fund .. __ _ __ __ .. 2,067.91 Rice Estate __ __ __ __ _ . 51,096.35 2,327.75 Hugh Hartshorn l.'und _ __ _ _.. _ . vVm. Pamprin Fund __ __ __ . 1,000..00 1\1orgena Peterson Fu nd _ __ __ .. _ .. 500.00 1,000.00 Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund __ .. _ __ . 128,749.03 General Fund __ __ . Julius C. Garrell Fund _ . . __ __ . 1,000.00 7,107.50 'Val' Relief Loyal Service l<'und _ _ _ __ __ .Tames "V. Boyd Fund __ . ._ __ __ .. __ __ 500.00 500.00 Al'arat Temple, Kansas City, Fund __ _ .


134

Appendix.

1930

Mrs. "\Villie A. ·Woods.Fun(L . 3,000.00 Grotto and Shrine Fund . 17,056.!JG l\lorris and -Ella Leftwich Fund _. __ .. I,SOO.OO Mrs. May Lynch Fund : _ _._ . 1,000.00 A. P. J<'letchel' Fund _. __ . ._ __ .. ._. __ _ 1,000.00 Frank Beecher Fund _._ _ __ . 1,442.48 A.. M. Dockery Fund _ _ . 1,000.00 Edward H. Meier Fund _ __ __ .. __ ., 500.00 Wm. H. Potter Estate l<""'und _ _ _ _. 13,305 ..50 J. C. J acquith Estate Fund __ _ _ __ ._ .. . 19,122.61 Initiation Fund __ __ __ _ _. 246,700.00 Nicholas R. Wall Fund _ _._...................... _ . 500.00 Abraham l'alan Fund _ _ _ ~ _.. 584.70 Bonds from a Friend of the Home, sold for . 52,218.75 Maggie Nicholson Fund __ __ .. _. 550.36 Louisa Yott Fund_ __ _ __ __ _ _. ::'00.00 Gustav Bischoff Fund._ .. _._ _ _ _ _ 500:00 liV. L. Tamme Fund __ _ _ _ . 550.00 I~rdhaus Esta te-secured and unsecured . 7,665.32 Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund_ _... __ 2,000.00 \-Ym. A. Hall Fund __ _ . ;;00.00 Henry Siegfl'ied __ __ _ . 1,000.00 Ed,vard 1\1.'cyer _ _ _.. _ _ . SOO.OO Chas. V. B. Slade. __ _ _ _.. _ . 9,548.75 Robert F. Stevenson __ _ . 14,9!l2.13 Glen 1\:1arquis __ . 1,105.14 Frank L. Schofield _ _ __ . 1,000:00 D. M. vVilson. __ _......_ _ 528.00 Mary Eo Clapp _ _ :\,405.09 Samuel Rife , . 7,500.00 E. C. Robinson _ 2,500.00 B. S. Sch warz __ _ . . G!!2.83 BI'ocket A. Dickeson .. _._ _ . 1,000.00 Geo. F. Bel·gfeld __ _ _ _ _ 500.ll0 Sarah B. Coffman. __ _ _ _ __ .__ _ _ _ . 465.89 Samuel A. Gluck _ __ .. _ _ _ __ 200.00 Charles Reilly _ . 100~00 \Vellston Lodge No. 613 __ _ _. 100.00 Richard Sinclair __ . 200.00 Karl Bal"row _ _ . 100.01l 286:00 Robert Lungstrass _ _.. June Lee Cotton _ _. __ __ . 250.00 450.00 St..Joseph Chapter No. 198 O. E. S .. ,0:00 Marcus A. Lovey._ _ _.. Sam Pian __ __ __ _._ .. 100.00 \-V. J. Scherck __ _ _ _ . 46.00 310:95 Myrtle Lodge No. 338_ _ _...................... .. Ludwig- Katany .. _._ __ . 200.00 300:00 Charles E. Koken _ _._ .. ~ . Phillip Stremmel, Jr __ _ __ ._ __ _ _ 137.40 Boo.'" Fletc]ler _ .. -- __ .__ . 400.00 100.00 Alphonzo \Vhipple __ . 400.00 A. Bolin Fund __ _._ --__ . 25.00 M. A. Covey Fund _ __ _._ _. ---10,000.00 William F. Kier Fund_ .. __ __ _. - __ __ ----.-200.00 John T. Short l.-'und _ _ __ . 2,OOO~00 Paul Keiser Fund_ _. __ _ _ __ . 371:36 John Olivers Fund_ __ ._ __ _ __ . 5,000.00 .r. l\1. Dan'Ow Fund_ __ __ __ ._ _.. 1,000 .•00 '1.'. W. PI·it.chett Fund __ __ . 259.98 Annie Man'in Fund _ .. __ .. - __ _. __ .. 10,607.31 Comst.ock Estate Cash __ .. .--- __ .__ ._._ . 59,973.30 Comstock Estate Securities .. _ _ __ _ __ .__ 2.500.00 Comstock Estate (securities doubtful value} . 200.()() .Julia C. Norton Fund_ - __ . 1,000.00 Fred Hahn _ _ _. --- .. -- --ADD1TIONS TO THE El'\DO\VMENT 1'-'l}ND THE PAST YEAH: J. M. DalTo,v Estatc __ . vVm. Lotham, .II'., Estate __ John M. 'Woodson Estate Sol E. 'Waggoner Estate Jacob C. C. "\Valdeck Estate

__

_ _

__

__ . __ . .

_

$

5,000.00 1.000.00 5,467.91 1,000.00 ;;00.00


1930

APPCl1dix.

135

COl11stoek Estate, Cash _ __ __ . Comstock Estate, Stocks and Rands . Adam Herold Estate _._ _ _ _ James Vinyard Estate._ _....................... Geo. B. Mills Estate, Stocks and Bonds

31,269.49 13,719.21 211. (JS n3.2<1

. _ _

_

11,600.00

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

Kansas City, Mo., September 3: 1930. Mr. W. W. Marlin, President, ;lJasonic lIome, 5351 Delmar Blvd.,

St. Louis, Missouri. My Dear Brother Martin: The following is submitted by me as chairman of the Bxecutive Committee of the Masonic Home Board for the Masonic year now drawing to a close. It is quite difficult to submit a detailed report of the activities of such committee without covering many points that will be discussed in your report to the Grand Lodge as president of the Home Board. All subjects considered by the committee and its action in connection therewith are covered by 'the minutes of the meetings which are, as you are aware, read t.o the full board at its meetings, and the individual members thereof fully advised as to the action of the committee. Some questions of vital importance to the Masonic Home and its f.amily, as well as the fraternity of the State, have been given tentative consideration by the committee but final action on all such matters has been by the full board, and, of course, will be dealt with by you in your report. The committee up to this time has held six different meetings. During these sessions an aggregate of 129 applications for admission into the Home were given consideration. The total number admitted by the committee was 39 and 9 rejected. Not all applications were finally acted upon at the first meeting of the committee after filing with the secretary of the Home Board. This resulted in 73 continuances during the year. While these figures may indicate a greater number of applications thaI1 were actually received, the numbers given show the number of limes the applications were before the committee. To ill~strat.e, on November 6, 1929, the committee had before it 30 applications. It admitted 11, continued 14 for further information and investigation, rejected 4, and had a report of the death of one of. the applicants. The 14 continued applications were included in the 21 which were before the committee at its next meeting, December 4, 1929. During the year the form of application for a(lmission into the Home ,vas revised and an entirely new set of hlanks prepared which are in lIse at the present time. It was thought that the best interest of the fraternity, as well as the individual members


Appel/eli).:.

136

1930

thereof, would be better served by obtaining more detailed information from lodges and applicants in connection with the necessity for asking for admission into the Home. As you are aware, the question of adequate accommodation fOT the increasing number of applicants has given the committee and the full board much concern during the past year. The committee has' given .its best thought to this subject and it is believed that in your report the question will be fully discussed and presented to the Grand Lodge as the judgment of the full board in regard to the future of our glorious institution. In view of the congested" conditions at the Home it is believed that the members of the family are as satisfactorily cared for a;:; is possible, and in the main, each individual is happy and contented. Every need is being looked "after and the thanks of the Home Board, as well as the beneficiaries are due the" fraternity and O. E. S. for their generosity. We" cannot refrain from expressing our appreciation of the helpful. ministration of the advisory members of the board, and generosity of the Eastern Star in assisting in caring for the members of the Home family. The activity of the advisory members seems to increase with each year and their efforts in the best interest of old and young show a devotion and loyalty to their welfare which is gratifying. Fraternally yours, R. R. KREEGER, Chairman. REPORT OF ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE.

st. Joseph, Mo., August 30, 1930.

Mr. W. W. Martin, President Masonic Home, St. Louis, M issonri. Dear Sir and Brother: Your Administration Committee reports a successful year in the administration of the affairs of the Home. A splendid spirit has permeated the entire organization during the year. The only serious problem which has confronted us is the crowded condition of the Home, and the consideration of the various means of remedying conditions. It is hoped that many months will not pass until we are able to take steps to make provision for the care of the children. along


1930

Appendix.

137

the lines recolllmended by the Special Survey Committee, which committee recently made its report to this board. We want to eXllress our thanks to the entire official family for their splendid co-operation during the last year. Respectfully submitted, ORESTES MITCHELL, Chairman. REPORT OF HOUSE COMMITTEE.

Mr. W. IV. Marti1l, PresidclIt, M asollic H 01llC, St. L01lis. Missol/ri.

St. Louis,路 Mo., August 30, 1930.

Dear Brother Martin: Since the House Committee has made its report from time to time to the Board of Directors and to the Executive Committee, upon matters considered by it, a further report does not appear necessary at this time. The House Committee, during the past year, has held regular monthly meetings at which time matters pertaining to the Home family have been considered and recommendations made to the Board and to the Executive Committee. The crowded condition of the Home during the last year has increased the problems of the management, and of this committee, but notwithstanding this, every effort possible has been made to secure the comfort and happiness of the old people, and to place the children in an environment that will inspire them to attain to higher and nobler ideals. The Home family consists at this time of 138 women, 144 men, 66 girls and 63 boys, a total of 411 persons. The entire membership of the House Committee have been loyal in their co-operation in the work of the committee, and we have had the advice and assistance of Sister Bader of the Advisory Board, who has met with the committee whenever possible. Complete unanimity of purpose and harmony has prevailed at all times. Fraternally submitted, W. S. CAMPBELL, Chairman of House Committee. REPORT OF LEGAL COMMITTEE..

Mr. HI'. W. Marti1l, Presidcllt, 111asollic H 0111C of 111iSSOUI"i, St. Louis. Missouri.

Dear Sir and Brother: The plan adopted some years ago, whereby the Legal Comittee of the Home Board handles the routine matters calling for the


138

Appendi:F:

1930

services of an attorney, has worked very satisfactorily. By pursuing this course we have avoided the expense of a regular paid attorney for the Home and have only been required to employ counsel in a few instances to represent the Home in matters pending in court. We believe that the legal affairs of the Home are in excellent condition. The following form may he used hy anyone desiring to make â&#x20AC;˘ a 'bequest to the Home: WILL.

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESFJ PRESENTS that I, . of sound mind and disposing memory, do make, publish and declare this as and far my last will and testament, hereby revoJdng any and all wills and testaments .by me heretofore made. FIRST: It is my will and desire, and I hereby direct that all my just debts, induding the expense of my last illness and funeral be paid in full. SECOND: I give and bequeath unto the Masonic Home of Missouri, a corporation. orgaliized and existing under and in pursuance of the laws of the State of Missouri, the sum of.. . Dollal:s. ('Testator may also insert such other provisions in his will as he sees fi t.) lN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this day of , 19 . Signed, sealed, published and declared by the above named ............................................Testator, in the presence of us, who at his request, and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto on this . day of , 19 . At the time of the signing of same the said . Testator was of sound and disposing mind.

According to the law of our State, it is absolutely necessary that the signature of the testator be witnessed by two witnesses. Respectfully, ARCH A. JOHNSON, JOSEPH S. McINTYRE, ORESTES MITCHELL, THOMAS H. REYNOLDS, WM. S. CAMPBELL, Committee.


1930

.Appendi.t路.

139

HOSPITAL REPORT.

SL Louis, Mo., August 31, 1930.

To the Board of Directors) Masonic Home of

Misso1/r~:

I herewith submit a report of the work done in the Masonic Home Hospital during the Masonic year just ended. 'Ve have had splendid assistance and co-operation from the members of the Medical Staff. It is largely due to their ready aid that the number of hospital days for the Children of the Home is smaller than it has been for several years. Due to the necessity of placing new arrivals in the Hospital until rooms can be arranged for them we are sometimes crowded, but it is hoped that 'in the near future some way will be found to overcome this difficulty. We have an excellent corps' of nurses and the patients are all well cared for. Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of the Ch'ildren; and Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of the Old People, have been ever ready and untiring in their efforts to aid the successful administration of the Hospital work. Our President, Brother W. W. Martin, has been a tower of. strength throughout the year. At any hour of the night or day he may be found visiting some one who is seriously ill in the Hospital. We know that his cheery presence is a great benefit to the sick, and a constant stimulus to better effort on the part of all connected with the Hospital. I am grateful to the Members of the Board of Directors and the Members of the Advisory Board for the assistance and support they have given to me during the entire year. REPORT OF MASONIC INFIRMARY FROM SEPT. 1, 1929 TO SEPT. 1, 1930. Total patients in Hospital at beginning of year.......................... Total patients admitted during year..............................................

82 481

Total patients treated during year.................................................... Total patients discharged during year............................................

563 485

Total patients in hospital at end of year........................................ 78 Total patient days in HDspital.. 32,435 Average patients per day............. 89 No. of out-patient treatments given : 23,362 Fraternally submitted, SOLON CAMERON, M. D. Home Physician.


140

Appendix.

1930

REPORT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

Mr. W. W. Martin, President, Masonic Howe of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. Dear Brother: In reviewing the year's work of the Order of the Eastern Star at the Masonic Home of Missouri, we find the outstanding achievement was the establishment of a permanent scholarship at Washington University for the sole benefit of the children of the Masonic Home. Two hundred and fifty dollars per annum was also pledged to provide tuition for an additional girl or boy in the event there was more than one deserving this assistance. Nestor Duval, one of our bright boys, will have the scholarship the coming year. Marie Boyle, who hopes to prepare for miss'ionary work, will have the additional scholarship. The Order of the Eastern Star, in its years of work for the . Masonic Home, has perhaps done nothing finer than this-nothing of greater permanent value. As the Home expands, the work of furnishing, which the O. E. S. has for some years assumed, grows proportionately. It is now something of an undertaking to furnish carpets, furniture, draperies, linens, etc., for so large an institution. This the O. E. S. continues to do with voluntary contributions, and with the money voted annually by the Grand Chapter for this purpose. That this has been sufficient has been attested by the fact that all requisitions have been promptly and fully met. As the Masonic fraternity reaches out to give more and better care to those committed to it, so must the Order of the Eastern Star measure up to its full responsibilities. January 1, "0. E. S. Day" at the Masonic Home, was another happy occasion-made memorable by the presence of the Grand Master and other officers of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M.-the members of the Masonic Home Board-the Grand Matron and many other officers of t.he Grand Chapter. Again we wish to express our thanks to you and the members of the Masonic Home Board for unfailing courtesy and intelligent co-operation. Fraternally submitted, ELLA JEAN FLANDERS, President, EDITH V. BADER, Secretary, GEORGIA S. BONDURANT, Treasurer.


Appendi.1:.

1930

141

HOSTEH OF THE HOME FAMILY, SEPTJ<.;MBER 1, 1930.

NAME L'buis A. Wagner . Wm. H. MaxwelL . Hester A. MaxwelL . Minnie A. Henley . Catherine Ellis . Mrs. Frances Roebuck . Edgar C. Bilyeu . Mrs. Fannie Stulce . Alex. Hazen . Mrs. E. Hatfield .. Susan Adams .. Chas. T. Arthur . John W. McCanne . David T. Martin . Elmer E. Brown .. Mrs. Ann Jane Hogan . Mrs. Ruth Williamson . Thomas B. Moss . Charles Gantz . Thos. Isaac Barnes .. David Y. Morris . Chas. Amos Reed . Chas. Goldstein .. James H. 'l'illman . Sarah E. Schofield . Eliza P. Kirkham . Eliza J. Jones .. James 'V. CraiL .. Laura Venable .. Albert M. Smilie .. Irene Z. Smilie .. Mildred Clifton .. Mrs. G. E. BelL .. Ml·S. Anna R. Fodrea .. Evaline Clifton . Earnestine Schlissingcr. Robert D. VechiL . Walter P. VechiL. __ .. Mrs. Anna F .• Stevens . Alma G. Stapleton . Earle E. Smilie : .. Kathcrine L. James . Catherine J. Key .. Marie Edna Boyle . Dorothy Elsie Boylc . Ruth E. Boylc .. James Boyle .. Geo. H. PaschalL . Fannie W. HalL . James ,V. Moore . Doris King . .Joseph P. Livesay . ~lary Helen Stark . David 'Vayne Stark . Margaret Moir . Charles P. Grissom . Edna Grissom . Earl Herbert Ryan .

I

Agel Admitted 95 97 90 73 75 85 50 75 77 75 81 71 84 82 69 80 87 89 74 86 83 84 73 81 83 78 77 84 69 14 13 15 61 6,'i

17 75 14 13 87 14 15 78 94 18 16 14 12 83 69 84 18 79 15 14 79 14 17 15

I I

INov. IFeb., ISept., [May, ISept., IDee., IJan., IApril, INov., IJuly, INov., IJan., IJan., IJune, INov., INov., IJan., IlVIarch, IAug., IJune IOct., IDec., IDee., IFeb., IJune, IDee., IMarch. IMay, IJuly, ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept., IDee., IDee., IJan., IMay, IMay, IJune, [Nov., ISept., IDee., [Feb., I April, IApril, IApril, IApril, IApril, IJuly, IJuly, ISept., IOct., IOct., IOct., IDee., IFeb., IFeb., IFeb.,

I

Lodge

I

No. [

Residence

I

1909 1911 1911 1912 1912 1912 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1915 1915 1915 1915 1915 1916 1916 1916 1917 1917 1917 1917 1918 1918 1918 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1919 1920 1920 1920 1920 1920 1920 1920 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1922 1922 1922

M.lssouri. . Linn . Linn . Polar Star . Heacon .. Carthage . Iberia . Sullivan Cll. O.KS.. Trenton . Barbee Ch. O.E.S .. Good Hope . Rowley . .J acksonville .. Hamil ton . Mt. Moriah .. Anchor . OccidentaL . Joachim .. Beacon .. Sullivan . Cyrene . Grand Lodge . St. Louis . Enited . Craft ··· .. """ Linn' Creek . Ava .. \gricola . Rose Hill, O. E. S .. Dagogett. . DaggetL .. St. John . Fulton . Tuscan, O. E. S . St. Johns . Napthalla . Trenton . Tren ton .. West Gate . Forest Parlc . DaggetL .. Bellefontaine OES Lebanon . Meridian .. Meridian . Mel·idlan . lVleridian . Gate City . Oriental, O. I'.:. S . Hising Sun . Beacon . Paris Union.: . Grand River . Grand River . Star of 'VesL .. 'Vest Gate . 'Vest Gate . Miami .

I 1 1St. Louis 326 ILinn 326 [Linn 79 1St. LouiS 31St. Louis 197 ICarthage 410 lIberia 105 ISullivan 111 ITrenton 31 [St. Louis 218 1St. Louis 201 IDearbol'l1 541 [Jacksonville 224 IHamilton 40 1St. Louis 443 1St. Louis 163 1St. Louis 164 IHillshoro 3,St. LouiH 69 ISullivan 14 IEolia ... [St. Joseph 20 1St. Louis 5 ISpringfield 287 [Canton 152 !Linn Creel, 26 lAva 3~3 !Petersburg 120 1St. Louis 492 [McKittrick 492 IMcKittl"ick 2R !Hannibal 4!1 IFulton 6!1 1St. Louis 28 !Hannibal 25 1St. LouiS 111 ITI'enton 111 ITre n ton 445 1St. Louis ;:;78 1St. Louis 492 IMcKittrick 69 1st. Louis 77 [Steelville 21St. Louis 2 [St. Louis ') 1St. T~ouis

21St. 'Louis 522 IKansas City 22!1 1st. Louis 13 lRarry 31St. Louis ] 9 IParis 2ill IFreeman 2ill IFreeman 133 [Ironton 445 1St. Louis 445 1St. Louis 8?i IMiami I


142

Appendix.

1930

HOSTEH. OF THE JlO:\iE l"AMILY-Cuntinued.

NAME

I

Age I Admitted

Lodge

No.

Mary E. IVlcCoy .. Frederick Henry Curtis Teddie :MilIer Curtis . Mercedes Berlin . .-\cla Berlin .. Silas B. Ballard . Alexander CampbelL .. Mrs. Rose Laumand . Clara Lou Smith .. Sterling Price HilL . Han'iet 'V. Symonds . John Hoover __ __ . Owen B. Hudson . Effie 1\'1. Holm-es .. .James K. P. Ragland . Ruth Holmes .. "Tay Holmes . Hertial l< ord .. Edna Ford , . Burnett Ford __ . Mildred Verniee Ford .. John P. Kelso . Edwin H. Pease . Sallie K. Bowen . Hattie Cottrill ..

I 79 IMay,

1922 1922 78 IAug., 1922 68 ISept., 1922 1922 80 IOet., 1922 75 IOet., 1922 15 IDee.. 1923 11 IJan., 72 IMareh, 1923 1923 74 IApril, 1923 18 IApril, 16 \April, 1923 1923 12 I April, 1923 84 IJuly, 72 IAug., 1923 1923 70 ISept., 1923 61 IOet., 1923 78 IOet., 1923 72 IOct., 1923 71 INov., HI24 17 \Jan., 1924 14 IJan., 1924 12 IJan., 1924 10 l.Tan., 1924 13 lFeb., 1924 10 IFeb., 78 IMarch, 1924 1924 94 I May, 1924 85 IMay, 1924 16 \May, 59 I'Mal'ch, 1924 I 1924 77 IJuly, 1924 15 IAug., 1924 11 [Aug'., 1924 14 ISept., 1924 65 ISept., 1924 79 INov., 70 . \Dec., 1924 1924 78 INov.; 1925 9 IJan., 1925 68 !,Jan., 1925 73 I.Jan., 1925 82 IJan., 1925 81 I.Jan., 56 I.Jan., 1925 1925 84 lFeb., 1925 21 IFeb.• 1925 18 IFeb., 15 IApril, 1925 12 IApril, 1925 9 I April, 1925 9 IApril, 1925 1925 77 IMay, 1925 76 IMay, 1925 69 Il\-fay, 1925 14 IJune, 77 IAug.,

I

I

I

I

Alvin Drummond . Geo. "V. Chittenden .. Mrs. FloI'. L. McIntyre . Mrs. R. A. Pethehridge. Robt. 'V. Saunders .. John W. Medley . Bertha Taylor . Robt. Ross Smith .. Elizabeth 'Yest.. .. Wm. H. Remsen . Bernice W'hitwell . Leila WhitwelL . Georgiana. VlhitweIL .. Andrew J. Journey . Albert F. Morris . Josie McCallister .. Wm. R. White .. 'Ym. B. Townsend . Tone Townsend .. James A. McFarland .. Altony N. Corbin .. Zada N. Crowell . Arthur F. CrowelL . James F. CrowelL . Edwin Lee Ryan . Philip Henry Ryan . John H. Matthews .. Thomas J. 'Yilson .. Mary A. Kidder . Myrtle H. Riley __ , .. K Gertrude James .

I

Neosho

.- ..

~~ ~~a~i~~::::::::~.::::::::

West Gate :\lemphis Jochim Sampson I<.:ast Gate Trowel Westport.. Pine Pine Pine Palestine Forsyth Palestine Palestine \Vhi tesville Whitesville Hermon Ulmo :VTagnolia :'dagnolia

.. .. . '-. .. .. .. . . .

.. .. . . .. . .. .. . . .

247 [l\"eosho 522 [Kansas Citv 360 1St. Louis 44~

lfi

164 298 630 H0

340 314 314 314 241

453 241 241

162 162 187

581

626 626 . 621; ~~~g~f~.i.~::::::.::::::::: .. 85

:\1"iami . Four :!\'Iile . Plato .. Hesperia, O. E. So. Daggett .. Riverview. O. E. S .. Laddonia " .. \Vakanda . \Val,anda . Centralia . Centralia .. Pollock . Ashlar . Cornerstone .. fo~ast Gate .. :\{oscow Mills .. Polar Star __ .. Criterion . Centel·town . Vienna .

Residence

8fi

212 469 172

492

. 1st. Louis IMemphii', :\'10. IHillsboro ILutie [Kansas Cit\' IMarble Hili IKansas Cit\' IBardlev . !Bardley IBardley [St. Charles IForsyth 1St. Charles [St. Charles IWhitesville "Vhitesville ILibel'al ITllmo 1St. Louir-; [St. Louis 1St. Louis IMiami IMiami ICampbell IPlato IKansas City IMcKiUricl,

I

315 [Hermann 11?i [Laddonia

52 ICanollton 52 ICnrrollton 59 ICentralia 59 [Centralia

349 IPolloel, :106 \Commerce 3~3

1St. Louis

630 IKansns City 558 IMosco,.". Mills

79 [St. Louis ::;86 IAlba 6] 1 ICentertown 94 IVienna 566 1l\'Japlewood ~i~~l~~y.o.~.~:::::::::::::: 94 \Vienna Vienna . 94 IVienna Cardwell . 231 ICard well Cardwell . 231 ICardwell Cardwell .. 231 ICardwell Cardwell .' .. 231 ICardwell Kirkwood .. 484 IKirkwood Kennedy . 329 IElmo Orient Ch. O. E. S . 491 IKansas City 248 IClarl{ton Clarkton . I


1930

143

Appcnd';x.

ROSTER OF THE HOl\lE FAl\llLY--Colltillued.

I

Age I Admitted

NA1VIE

Lodge

~ o.

I

Belle H. Dean

..

12 74 95 73 82 79

IJune. IJune, IJuly, IJune, !Aug., IAug., I 80 IAug.,

I

Catherine A. VanDover. Jos. H. Van Dover " . Helen Van Dover .. Doris J. VanDover .. Elizabeth Kirkpatrick .. Geo. \Y. BramhalL ..." .. " Francis M. Johnson" " Ray A. Bonnott, JI". . .James T. Craig-head"..". John T. Trabue.... " " Addie ·Woodson .. "."" :..

1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1925

Clarkton " ... " " Golden" ". "" .. Butler""" " ". Trilumlna ". Grant City " Golden Cate Chapter, O. E. S. Barn'es Chapter, O. E. S..... " "". Fenton"" .. """ ". [<'enton" ..... """""" .. Fenton .. ".".""" .. " .. Fenton"".""" .. " " .. Dexter " """" " Hartford " . Seaman... .. " .. Gate City.. "" " La Monte ... """""'" St. Johns ......... __ ~ew Madrid Chapter, O. E. S.. ftavenwood .. " .. " Ravenwood"" " . ~elson " " .. Weston "." Crescent Chapter, O. E. S " Bertrand" "" .. Bertrand " " Bertrand . Perseverance " Polar Star.. .." .. Mercer " . Mercer " . Caru thersville " .. FairmonL " ". Whitewater " .. Whitewater " Whitewater.. " . Whitewater ".". Whitewater. " " Moberly "" . Carterville """ Sturgeon .. " .. Aurora " .. ~loberly . Beacon . Perseve I'a nee.." . Rowley" . St. Johns . Bridgeton " .. " . Joppa " " . Joppa." .. " " .. ".

17 ISept., 14 ISept., 13 ISept., 11 ISept., 83 ISept., 73 ISept., 64 IOct., 11 IOct., 81 INov.• 77 IJan., 71 IDee., I James \Y. Tate....,....,,:... 75 IJan., Ella C. Tate.. """............... 68 IJan., Abram Trigg " .. "...... 81 IFeb., Lewis W. SlIer................ 87 J,Jan., Mary A. Cruce .... " ....... ".. 77 IFeb:,

1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1925 1926 1925

Homer Nestor Duvall... Wm. Chester DuvalL" ... Mary Frances DuvalL. Julius Haas " " .. John C. Bowman ". Wm. L. Starr .. Martha A. Starr .. Wm. J. HilL . Chas. A. Simmonds .. Edith Poston .. Bertha Poston" .. Roy Walter Poston .. Robert I·;arnest Poston. Helen Ruth Poston . 'Wallace M. Rucker .. Eugene Hackett .. Mrs. Anna PicketL " Sarah E. Howard . \Vm. Taylor Botts .. Dorothy M. Hartman . Emma B. McAlister .. Robert C. Veach .. Ida M. Johnson .. " . Margaret A. Craig .. Lalla C. Winningham .. Alice Winningham .. \Vm. T. Winningham .. Richard L. Holmes """ Victoria E. Bryan . l\lary E. Carty . Janet Carty .

1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1926 1927 t~~~~~·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.~·.·.·.·.~·.·.· 1927 Paris Union " . 1927 Greenville " .. 1927 Greenville " .. ".

,

18 14 10 75 80 66 66 61 8:~

17 15 13 10 6 7S 73 73 81 82 13 72 78 65 87 17 14 12 66 76 17 15

IFeb., IFeb., IFeb., IFeb., IApril, IMarch, IMarch, IMay, IMay, IMay, jMay, jMay. IMay, !May, IJuly, IJuly, IAug., IJune, IOct" IOct., IOct.. IOct., IOct., INov., IDee.. IDee., IDee., I.Jan., !Jan., IJan., IJan., I

I

Hesidence

I

I

Virg-inia CottrilL " .. l\Ialindah Stephens "" .. "" Margaret S. Kipp " . Frances R. Smith" " Alexander J. DeharL". Olive E. Teed ....... " ........

I

1926 1926 1926 1926 1926

I

248 475 254 205 66

IClark ton IGolden City IButler IMarshall IGrant City

I

58 IKansas City I 252 ICabool 281 IFenton 281 IFenton 281 IFenton 281 !Fenton ;-;32 IDexter 171 IHartford 121i IMilan 522 IKansas City 574, ILa,.Monte 2R IHannibal I 293 INew l\ladl'id 201 IRavenwood 201 IRavenwood ;-;60 INelson 53 IWeston I 21 ISpringfield 330 IBertrand 330 IBcr·trand 330 IBertrand . 92 ILouisiana 79 1St. Louis 3;) IPrinceton 35 IPr'inceton 461 ICaruthcrl>ville 290 I Wyaconda 417 ILaflin 417 ILaflin 417 ILatlin 417 ILaflin 417 ILaflin :lH I:VJoberly 401 ICarterville 174 ISturgeon 267 1St. Louis :~H IMoberly 31St. Louis 92 ILoui~iana 204 IDearbol'n 28 IHannihal 80 IBridgeton 4111Hartville -Ill IHartville 411 IHartville 94 IVienna 19 IParis 107 IGreenville 107 IGreenville

I


1930

Appendix.

144

ROSTER OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

I

.-\gel Admitted

NAME \Vol. J. Carty Wm. L. King \Vm. L. Baker John R. Webber Mary C. Webber Bettie Batts James C. Calloway Annie HenkeL

.. . . .. .. . .. ..

Julius L. Martin Willa Massena.................. Mary

"V.

Tinker

11 14 9 84 73 82 73 76

I I

IJan.. IFeb.. IFeb.. IJan.. IJan.. IDee.. IMarch. IMarch.

I

74 IJan..

76 \April.

I

76 IApril,

I

Elmer E. Boling . Ellen V. McCormick . Louise A. HulL . Frederick H. Harrington Sarah Bolton . Robt. C. MitchelL .. Charles Ehrengart. Sr .. Robt. A. Smock .. Margaret Turley ..

69 77 68 85 76 81 84 70 79

Lewis LaiL .. Bertha M. Spaethe . Mary Ann Shocklee . Cora B. MadilL .. Chas. \V. Nor.wood .. Mary Allee Porteous . Almina Frederick .. Mrs. Lester O·NeaL .. James A. Rucker . Jno. Wm. Combs .. Mary Noland . Everett Noland .. Paul Noland . Floyd T. Smith . Claude H. W. Smith .. Jessie May Smith .. Jeannette M. Kramer . Jevita A. Kramer . Robert J. BelL .. WlIliam McCammon .. William A. CampbelL . John Y. Stone .. Gpo. E. Stuck~· . Winfield Colvin . Edward J. Galloway .. Eleanor A. Brundage .. Mrs. Hallie J. Lee .

73 70 75 64 84 4 81 76 73 88 16 14 10 13 10 7 14 13 74 70 82 84

Agnes D. GranL... ........

60 IOct.•

Anna J. Eldred........ ......

80 INa,·.•

~frs. Lucy Presson :\Irs. Sophie E. Phillips ..

73 IDee.. 66 iDee.. I

74

69 13 74 67

IApril. IApril. IMay. IMay. IJune, IMay, IJuly. IJuly. [July.

I

IJuly, IJuly. !Aug.• IAug.• IAug.• \Aug.• !July, IJuly. I~ept.• [Sept.. ISept.• ISept.• ISept.• ISept.• jSept.. ISept.• ISept.• ISept., IOct.• IOct.• IOct.. INov .• INov.• IOct.• INov.• INov.• INov.•

I

I

I

Lodge

I

No. I

Residence

I 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1926 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 1927 ,1927

Greenville . Beacon . Su 11 ivan . Mt. MorIah .. Mt. Moriah . Hale .. Howard . Beacon Chapter. O. E. S .. Saxton . Golden Gate Chapter. O. E. S ... Occidental Chapter. O. E. S . Rose Hill .. Anchor .. Tuscan . \.urora . Williamsburg . La Plata . West Gate .. Puxico . Vincil Chapter. O. E. S . RuraL . Tuscan . Silex . Lambskin . Southwest . Occidental . Bevier, O. E. S .. Irondale . Huntsville . Ralls . BarnetL . BarnetL .. BarnetL .. Four Mile .. Four Mile .. Four Mile .. St. John·s . St. John·s . Cornerstone . United . Magnolia .. Pine . :\1aplewood . Un i ted . Temple .. Kansas City .. Maplewood, O. E. S .. Ceo. '\Vashington, O. E. S .. Eminence O. E. S . Bertrand .. Mt. Moriah ..

I

107 IGreenville 31St. Louis 69 ISullivan 40 1St. LouiS 40 1st. Louis 216 IHale 4 INew Franklin

I

256 1St. Louis 508 ISaxton

I

58 IKansas City

I

1st.

185 550 443 ::l60 267 8 237 445 596

Louis 1St. LouiS 1St. LouIs 1St. Louis 1St. Louis IWiIliamshurg ILa Plata 1St. Louis IPuxico

43 316 360 75 460 466

IEonne Terre IKansas City 1st. Louis \Silex 1St. Louis ISouthwest City 1St. Louis IBevier IIrondale IHuntsville ICenter IBarnett IBarnett IBarnett ICampbell ICampbell ICampbell IHannibal IHannlbal 1St. Louis ISprlngfield 1St. Louis IBardley IMaplewood ISnringfield IKansas City IKansas City

163

289 143

30 33 591 G!l1 591 212 212 212 28 28 323 5 626 314 566 5 299 220

I

I

264 IMaplewood

I 333 1St. Louis

I

93 ICarthage 330 IBertrand 40 1St. Louis I


145

Appendix.

1930

ROSTER of' THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

NAME

I

Agel Admitted

I I

Mrs. Caroline G. Hansen .. 73 IJan., Mrs. Ada J. Douglas . Mrs. Ella McCoy . Mrs. Sallie A. Lee . Alice A. BakeL . H.osa Lee BakeL .. Sarah Bell Baker .. Mrs. Mattie A. yost.. .. Jacob Wybrow .. Mrs. Frances Hamilton .. Mrs. Ann E. Ramsey. Mary Hequembourg.........

84 77 77 85 76

Mrs. Kate R. Skaggs .. Theodore F. Ternetz .. Ethel T. Ternetz .. Elijah L. Tredway路 .. John W. Dennis . 1\1rs. Sarah D. Dennis . Miss Ella B. Welsh . Wm. A. Gordon .. Ruby Brool{s . Elzora Brooks . Fay Brooks .. Mrs. Mary R McDougalL.. Augustine Rohning . James T. Archambeau .. Mrs. Kate B. Snyder.. .. Lodiedell H, Scobey .. George J. Ruppert . Edgar M. Dingle . Margaret A. DerfIer ~ .. David B. Lowenstein .. Edwin S. TeaL 路 .. Mrs. Flora J. Prigmore Anna M. Baty .. John D. Baty . Mildred Brooks .. Ruth Tumbleson .. John F. LasswelL .. Mrs. Marg. J. Rodgers .. Earl B. Kellogg . Frances May Ruppert.. .. Anna E. ScotL . Delpha I. Scott. .. Marie Sommer .. Charles E. Reid . Ethel L. Reid .. Mattie Smith .. Paul .J. Ragland .. William Baum . Franklin A. Archibald .. Cornell Curtis .. \VilJiam C. Fee .. Mary E. Fee .. Orinda Eddy .. Josephine Maddox .

78 8 6 90 69 67 61 72 9 8 6 75 81 88 66 74 51 75 13 76 74 77 12 9 12 63 78 66 73 16 15 13 71 73 72 78 65 67 73 7 72 64 71 66

70 76 61 12 6 4

I

IJan., IOct., jJan., Feb., IFeb., lFeb., lFeb., IFeb., IDee., IFeb., IFeb.,

1928 1927 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1927 1928 1928

IFeb., 1928 IMarch, 1928 IMarch, 1928 IFeb., 1928 IMarch, 1928 IMarch, 1928 IApril, 1928 IMay, 1928 IMay, 1928 IMay, 1928 IMay, 1928 IMay, 1928 IJune, 1928 !June, 1928 IJune, 1928 IJuly, 1928 IJuly, 1928 IAprll, 1928 IJuly. 1928 !July, 1928

July, IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IAug., IJune, IAug., IAug., IAug., ISept., ISept., jSept., ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept., I

Residence

1928 Gate of the

I

IJUl Y,

Lodge

1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928 1928

Temple . Barbee, O. E. S .. Rural. .. East Gate, O. E. S . Sullivan .. Sullivan .. Sullivan .. Tuscan . Friendship .. Granby .. Tyro, O. E. S .. Maplewood, O. E. S .. Clayton, O. E. S . Good Hope .. Good Hope.. . Chula . Higbee .. Higbee . Rose Croix, O. E. S. Moberly . Hornersville . Hornersville . H 0 rnersv i lie . East Gate, O. E. S .. Corinthian . Lick Creek . Venus, O. E. S . Malden . rndependence .. Moberly .. Novinger .. RuraL . Centertown . United .. MonetL .. Monett . Hornersville .. Sabylla O. E. S .. Four Mile .. Rose HilL .. Warren . Independence .. Composite .. Composite .. Barbee Ch. O.E.S .. Friend .. Friend . Vincil . Paris Union .. United . Purdy . Wakanda .. Ewing . Ewing .. Unionville .. Saint IJoseph O.E.S.

422 31 316 367 69 69 69 360 89 514 321 264 304 218 218 388 527 527 372 344 215 215 21fi 367 265 302 153 406 76 344

583 316 611 5 129 129 215 276 212 550 74 76 369 369 31

352 352 62 19

5 148 52 577 577 210 198

I I

ISpringfield 1St. Louis IKansas City IKansas City ISullivan ISullivan ISullivan 1St. Louis IChillicothe IGranbY ICaledonia

I

IMaplewood IClayton 1St. Louis 1St. Louis IChula IHigbee IHigbee 1St. Louis IMoberly IHornersville IHornersville IHornersville IKansas City !Warrensburg /Perry 1St. Louis IMalden IIndependence IMoberly INovinger IKansas City ICentertown ISpring-field路 IMonett 'IMonett IHornersville IBismarck ICamnbell 1St. Louis IKeytesville IIndependence IDoninhan IDoniphan ISaint Louis IOzark IOzark ICameron IParis /Springfield IPurdy ICarrolltor. IEwing IEwing . IUnionvllle ISaint Joseph

I


1930

Appendix.

146

ROSTER 01<' THE HOME :F'AMILY-Continued.

I Agel Admitted I I 1928 ;, INov.• Betty Jane Ward . 1928 3 INov., John Byrd Ward . 1928 Minnie WindhorsL . 81 INov.• 1928 77 INov., Julia I.J. Whitemore . 1928 Elizabeth Thornham . 85 ISept., 1928 Mildred M. SwifL . 13 INov., 1928 11 INov., Charles A. Swift 1928 Emma Jean Swift . 9 INov., 1928 7 INov., Robert DeVall SwifL . James P. Kinsley . 85 INov.. 1928 Elizabeth M. Turley . 71 IDee., 1928 1928 Pleasant L. Freeland . 78 IDee., 1928 Esther E. Allen . 76 10ct., 1929 Ed ward T. Joyce . 74 IJan.; Margaret A. Shenda!.. . 84 INov., 1929 1929 Samuela. Shields . 81 IFeb., Thomas B. Whitworth . 81 IFeb.. 1929 Virginia E. McCanne . 77 jFeb., 1929 George Ira Lane . 48 IFeb., 1929 John Bryan Marshall, Jr. 1929 8 IApril, Emily Jean Marshal!.. . 1929 6 IApril, Richard M. MarshalL . 1929 4 /Apl'il. Daniel L. Bradshaw . 76 IApdl, 1929 Joseph B. Gathright . 76 I April, 1929 Etna A. Dixon . 70 IMaY, 1929 Sarah F. Porter . 90 IMay, 1929 James C. Mitchel!.. . 71 IMaY, 1929 Robert H. Duncan . 77 IMay, 1929 Annie L. Askin . 65 !May, 1929 William P. McCollom . 81 IMaY, 1929 Annie McCollom . 69 IMay, 1929 Joseph E. Wood . 81 IApril, 1929 James T. Alexander . 79 IJune, 1929 Edna Montague . 73 IMaY, 1929 Maria J. Mills . 75 IJune. 1929 Owen H. Loyd . 12 !July, 1929 Bonnie June Loyd __ . 1929 9 IJulY, Donnie Mae Loyd . 7 IJuly, 1929 Henri Albert Loyd . ;, jJuly, 1929 Robert M. PetitL . 76 IJuly, ' 1929 Martha E. Pendleton . 74 !July, 1929 Joseph A. BonduranL . 73 [May, 1929 1929 Gertrude Kathrens . 62 IJuly, Joseph E. Stark . 64 IAug., 1929 1929 Emma S. Rakestraw . 86 IAug., 1929 Paul Heinie . 7 IAug'., 1929 Lavern Goetz . 12 IAug., I 1929 Clarence Goetz . 9 IAug., NAME

J area Varney

V'l arren Barrett

Lucille Goetz Milton Hahn Mrs. Jennie Flen:Jming

. . . . . ..

69 12 8 15 13 45

Geo. Vl. Vaughn

..

81

Elmo Barrett

I

IAug., ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept.,

I

July,

1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929

I

Lodge

No.

Lakeville . Lakeville . Tuscan . Chilhowee O.E.S. .. Missourl.. . Reeds Spring . Reeds Spring . ~ecds Spr!ng . Reeds Sprmg . Kirkwood _ . rtaska . Fairview .. Zeredatha . Saint Marks . Occidental O.E.S . Grove Springs . Bismarck. . Censer . Ivanhoe . Hebron . Hebron . Hebron . O·Sullivan . Appleton City . Mount Moriah . Ivanhoe . Ralls __ . Nodaway . West Plains O.E.S.. Unionville . Unionville . Hebron . East Gate . Temple . Yo rk. . Gate City . Gate City__ . Gate City . Gate City . Morehouse . Knob Noster . South Gate . Heroine . Erwin . Warren . Seaman . Gate of the Temple . Gate of the Temple . Liberty . Zalma _ Zalma . Gate of the Temple Pyramid . Meramec Springs, a E. S . Livingston .

489 489 68 121 1 280 280 280 280 484 420 619 189 93 185 589 41 172 446 354 354 354

7 412 40 446

33 470, 193 210 210 354 630 299 563 522 522 522 522 603 245 547 104 121 74

126 422

i

Residence I I IBell City IBell City ISaint Louis IChilhowee ISaint Louis IReeds Spring IReeds Spring IReeds Spring IReeds Spring IKirkwood ISain t Louis \Fairview ISaint Joseph ICape Girardeau ISaint Louis IGrove Springs IBismarck IMacon IKansas City IMexico IMexico IMexico IvValnut Grove I Appleton City ISaint Louis IKansas City ICenter IMaysVille l'Vest Plains IUnionville . lUnionville IMexico IKansas City IKansas City [Kansas City_ IKansas Citv IKansas City IKansas City IKansas City IMorehouse IKnob Noster IKansas City IKansas City ISaint Louis IKeytesville IMilan I \Springfteld

,

422 ISpring-field 31 ILiber.t y :;45 Zalma 545 Zalma 422 Spl"ing-ftcltl 180 1St. Louis

I

406 1St. .James 51 jGlasg-ow


1930

147

Appendix.

ROSTEH. OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

I

Age I Admitted I James Manning August Schrlck __ Mrs. Mary Barada James A. Thompson Mrs. Ella Thompson Miss Rosa Mack Miss Anna Mack Mrs. Alice Honeyman Harry H. McLean B. Newton Harvin Dinter Rink Audrey Rink Herbert Leonard Robert Leonard ":' Grant Leonard v\T. Log-an Davidson .Tohn路R. Ray Geo. 路W. Ray Leslie E. Ray .Tames H. Ray Mrs. Anna SchobeL

.. .. . . , . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .. ..

I 65 ISept., 72 lSept.,

65 /Sept.,

75 )Sept.,

69 ISept., 70 ISept., 72 ISept.,

69 ISept., 78 'Sept., 88 INov., 13 INov., 7 INov., 11 INov., 8 INov., 7 INoy., 87 INov., 14 INov., 10 INov., 8 INov., 4 INov., 77 Nov.,

I

1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1929

Oregon Keystone york Elvina Elvina Anchor, O. E. S Anchor. O. E. S Sullivan, O. E. S Olive BI路anch Paris Unlon __ Cornerstone Cornerstone Sheffield Sheffield __ Sheffield \Villington Chaffee Chaffee __ Chaffee Chaffee Erwin Chapter, O. E. ~ Beacon Chapter, O. E. S Rural MlssourL __ Alanthus Sarcoxie Sarcoxie 1\1t. Moriah Lewistown Irondale Saxton Beacon Light,

Mrs. Josephine Rehfus ......

64 IDee.,

1929

'Vm. E. McClain Silas B. Muriheid ~Tln. Poff : Guy Strock __ Elizabeth Strock __ Mrs. Ellen Tontrup Lewis C. True John Thompson Alexander VV. HunL Henrietta Rowland

73 IDee.,

81 IDee., 83 IDee., 82 l.Tan.,

1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 1930 1930 1929 1929 1930

Robert C. Vance Mrs. Mal'y CoweIL ..__

77 IJan., 72 IFeb.,

1930 Rural 1930 Venus Chapter,

Sanford M. Mead Mrs. Ella Skinner James K. Reno................... Mrs. Carrie Burton

84 IFeb..

1930 77 IFeb.. 1930 81 IMarch. 1930 71 IMarch, 1930

Harry L. Cary 1\1.rs. Alice Cary 'Vm. Gordon House Harry J. Callen Mrs. Martha Callen Beatrice Ody l\'faxine Ody vVm. 0. Roper Mrs. Mary Roper James L. Jackson Mrs. :Mary E. Spain Chas. A. Thompson Minnie Christie........__

74 IMarch. 75 IMarch, 12 \Sept.. 74 !March, 73 IMarch, 11 IMarch, 9 IMarch, 72 IMarch, 66 IMarch, 82 IMarch, 78 IMarch, 56 IMarch. 69 IMarch,

Albert .T. HulL Herschel T. Springer

. . . . . . .. .. .. .

.. . . .. :. . . .. .. . .. . ..

I

62 IDee., 81 IDee., 74 INov.,

68 INov., 64 l.Jan., 7fi I.Tan.,

I I

I

I

1930 1930 1929 1930 1930 1930 1930 1930 1930 1930 1930 1930 1930

50 I March, 1930 __.. 路70 IMaY, 1930 I

I

No. I I

Lodge

O.

]~.

S

O. E. S Maryville Zeredatha Rising Sun Occidental, 0. E. S Bolivar Bolivar Van Buren South Gate South Gate Sullivan Sullivan Clifton Heights Clifton Heights Malden Lockwood Rural Northeast. 0. E. S Salisbury East Gate

.. .. . . .. .. .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . ..

139 243 563 599 599 54 54 105 576

19 323 323 625 625 625 22

615 615 615 615

I

Residence oreg-on

St. Louis l!I{ansas City IFlat River Flat River \ St. Louis 1St. Louis ISullivan 1St. Louis IParis St. Louis St. Louis Kansas City Kansas City Kansas City DeKalb "Chaffee Chaffee Chaffee lChaffee

I I

194 1St. LoulH

.. 256 St. Louis . 316 Kansas City . 1 St. Louis .. 2;;2 Alanthus . 293 Sarcoxie . 2!13 jSarcoxie .. 40 1St. Louis . 494 IT ,ewistown .. 143 IIrondale . 508 ISaxton ..

..

I

308 IAlba 316 IKansas City

I

.. 153 1St. Louis .. 165 IMaryville . 189 1St. Joseph .. 13 /Barry

.. .. .. . .. . . .. .. .. . . ..

185 195 195 509 547 547 69 69 520 520 406 521 316

I

. -

1St. LoUIS Bolivar (Bolivar Van Buren Kansas City /Kansas City .Sullivan Sullivan St. Louis St. Louis Malden Lockwood Kansas City

I

.. 300 IKansas City .. 208 Salisbury .. 630 \ Kansas City I


148

Appendix.

1930

ROSTER OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

NAME Mrs. Sarah MoiL..............

I Age I Admitted

,

73

IMay. I

I.

75 74 71 61

69

74 68 11 10 10 7 10 13 73 75 61

71 60 64

No. I I

I

John C. Henry.................... 72 IApril, Mrs. Anna Purdy............... 69 IJune. Julius W. Koch . Richard C. Blackburn . Pleasant Snider .. Margaret Snider . Dr. Verbena McMullen .. Malinda C. Black :. Robert Klein . Kenneth W. Stuart . lone StuarL __ . Alvin Fred 'Vohlschlaeger. E. Henry Wohlschlaeger.. Kenneth Breeden ~ . Ray Thompson . Mrs. E. J. Hamilton .. Chas. E. Phillips . Mrs. Gertrude Wood .. Geo. W. Burnside.. __ . Mrs. Sarah Burnside . Mrs. Mary Greene . Mrs. E. F. TruxeL .. Gene L. Cochran .. __ . Geo. W. Bradford .. Mrs. E. T. Hayward .. John F. CarrolL .. Mrs. Vera Martin .

I

LODGE

IJune. IJune, \July. IJuly. IJuly. [JulY, IJuly. IJuly. IJuly. IJuly, IJuly, [July. IJuly. IMay. IJuly. IAug.• IAug'.• [Aug.• IAug.•

~~ II~~~:" 65

Aug'., 70 Aug., 75 IAug.,

I

Residence

I

1930 Oriental Chapter, O. E. S .. 1930 Gate of the Temple 1930 Magnolia Chapter, O. E. S __ .. 1930 Rose HilL .. 1930 Portland .. 1930 Excelsior .. 1930 Excelsior .. 1930 South Gate .. 1930 Ingomar . 1930 Pride of the West.. 1930 Coldwater .. 1930 ColdwatcL . 1930 Fenton __ .. 1930 Fenton . 1930 Webb City . 1930 Lexington .. 1930 Temple.: __ . 1930 st. .Tohns . 1930 Hebron __ .. 1930 Sheklnah.. __ .. 1930 Sheklnah .. 1930 OccidentaL . 1930 United . 1930 Bethany .. 1930 St. John's .. 19'30 HannibaL. . 1930 Keystone . 1930 Westport.. ..

I

228 1St. Louis 422 ISpringfield 375 550 242 441 441 547 536 179 485 485 281 281 512 149 299 28 345 256 256 163 5 97

28

188

243

340

I

1St. Louis 1St. Louis ReadSVlIIe \ Jackson [Jackson jKansas City William Spgs. St. Louis Drexel Drexel Fenton "Fenton 'Webb City LeXington j Kansas City Hannibal Mexico Festus Festus St. Louis Springfield Bethany Hannibal Hannibal St. Louis Kansas City


A PjJ end i.r.

1930

149

ADMITTED SINCE LAST ANNUAL REPORT.

I

Age I Admitted

NAME

I Jared Varney Elmo Barrett \Varren Barrett Lucille Goetz _ Milton Hahn _ _ _ MI路s. Jennie Fleming-

. . . _. . _.

Polly Harrison _.. _ . Albert Munday _._ . Geo. 路W. Vaughn _. __ . James Manring_ _._ _ . August Schrick _, _._ . Mrs. Mary Barbara_ . James A. Thompson . Ella 1. Thompson _ . Rosa Macle _._ _ Anna Mack ._. __ _ . Geo. F. Calvert _._ . Bessie CalverL .. _._ . Allee E. Honeyman_ _ . Harry H. McLean .. . Vlm. T. Harper . B. Newton Harvin . J. Dinter Rink __ . Audrey Rink _ __ . Herbert A. Leonard . Robert Leonard . GI'ant F. Leonard . \V. Logan Davidson.. _ _. John R. Ray_ _._._ . Geo. \V. Ray._ . Leslie E. Ray __ . James H. Ray _ _ __ . James B. \Vells __ ._ _ . Louis Seeburger _ . Mrs. Anna Schober.. .. _ . Josephine Rehfuss_ _ . Wm. E. McClain __ _ . Silas B. Muriheid .. __ . Christine D. HoberL . Wn1. Poff_ __ . Guy Strock _ __ . Elizabeth Strock . Ellen J. Tontrup .. _ _.._ . Lewis C. True _._ . Clark M. Roberts._ .._._ _ . ,John Thompson .._ _. Alexander W. HunL . Henrietta Rowland._ _.. Robert \V. Vance __ _ . Mary K. CoweIL _. Sanford M. Mead . Ella C. Skinner.. _._.. Ellen Fry.. _ _._ _.. _.. _ . James J. Reno _.. __ . Carrie H. Burton _ __ . Harry L. Cary__ _._ _ _ . Alice M. Cary . \Vm. Gordon House.._ _ . Harry J. Callen __ _ .

69 11 7 14 12 44

IAUg., ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept., ISept.,

I

1929 1929 1929 1929 1929 192.9

1929 1929 81 IJuly, 1929 1929 64 ISept., 1929 71 ISept., '65 ISept., 1929 1929 74 ISept., 1929 68 ISept., 69 ISept., 1929 1929 71 ISept., 52 ISept., 1929 50 ISept., 192 9 68 ISept., 1929 77 ISept., 1929 81 ISept., 1929 1929 87 INov., 12 INov., 1929 6 [Nov., 1929 10 INov., 1929 1929 7 INov., 1929 6 INov., 85 INov., 1929 13 INov., 1929 9 INov., 1929 8 INov., 1929 3 INov., 1929 68 INov., 1929 68 INov., 1929 76 INov., 1929 63 IDee., 1929 1929 73 IDee., 61 . IDee., 1929 !j8 IDee., 1929 80 IDee., 1929 74 iNov., 1929 67 INov., 1929 63 IJan., 1930 74 IJan., 1930 63 IDee., 1929 80 IDee., 1929 82 IDee., 1929 81 l.Jan., 1930 76 l.Jan., 1930 71 lFeb., 1930 1930 83 IFeb., 1930 76 lFeb., 1930 86 lFeb., 80 IMarch, 1930 70 IMarch, 1930 73 IMarch. 1930 74 ll\:1arch, 1930 1929 12 ISept., 73 IMarch, 1930

61 ISept. 63 ISept.,

I

Lodge

No.

I I

Residence

I I

Liberty__ .__ ._ . 31 ILiberty ~ Zalma _ . 545 IZalma Zalma . 545 l7.:alma Gate of the Temple.. 422 ISpl'ingfield Pyramid _._._ . 180 1St. Louis Meramec Springs I O. E. SOo"""_""_'_" 532 IDextCl' Dexter O. E. S._ _.. 197 ICarthagc Carthage _ _ .. 406 1St. James Livingston : _. 51 Glasgow Oregon.. _ _. 139 IOregon Kcystone _ __ . 243 [St. Louis York __ . 563 [Kansas City Elvins _ _ . 599 [Flat HiveI' Blvins __ . 599 IFlat River Anchor O.E.S . 54 1St. Louis Anchor O.E.S. . !j4 1St. Louis Bogard _._ . 101 IBogard Bogard _ . 101 [Bogard Sullivan O.E.S._ .. _._ .. 105 ISullivan Olive Branch . 576 1St. Louis Benevolence _ _. 170 IUtica Paris Union _ _ .. 19 IParis Cornerstone. __ . 323 1St. Louis Cornerstone.. _ _ _. 323 1St. Louis Sheffield _ . 625 [Kansas City Sheffield _ __ ._ . 625 IKansas City Sheffield. __ __ . 625 IKansas City Wellington._ _.. 22 IDeKalb Chaffee _ __ . 615 IChaffee Chaffee _ . 615 IChaffee Chaffee _ . 615 IChaffee Chaffee _ . 615 [Chaffee Jonesburg _._ . 457 IJonesburg Shaveh . 646 1St. Louis Erwin O.E.S.. _.._._ . 194 1St. Louis Beacon O.S.E . 256 1St. Louis RuraL_._ _ __ ._. . 316 IKansas City Missouri.. _ _. 1 St. Louis Roosevelt _ . 661 1 St. Louis Alanthus _._ _.. 252 IAlanthus Sarcoxie..__ _ _.. 293 ISarcoxie Sarcoxie.._ _ . 293 Mt. Moriah_ _._.. 40 i~r.r~~~is Lewistown _ . 494 IEwing Wellston __ . 613 IWellston Irondale .. 143 IIrondale Sa.xton _.. _ _ . 508 ISaxton Beacon Light O.E.S. 308 IAlba RuraL _ 316 [Kansas City Venue O.KS _.. 153 1St. Louis Maryville. __ . 165 I Maryville Zeredatha.. _._ _ . 189 1St. Joseph Cornerstone.._ _. 323 1St. Louis Rising Sun . 13 IKansas City Occidental O.E.S. __ .. 185 1St. Louis Bolivar. __ _ _ . 195 IBolivar Bolivar __ _._ _ . 195 IBolivar Va.n 13U1路en._.. _ _ _. 509 [Van Buren South Gate_ ... _ .. 547 IKansas City 1


Appendix.

150

1930

ADMITTED SINCE LAST ANNUAL REPORT-Continued.

NAME

I Agel Admitted

Lodge

No.

\

Martha E.~ Callen