Page 1

GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M.

MISSOURI 19]]


OFFICERS OF THE

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI 1917-1918

WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City _ JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan _ JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis _ WM. F. JOHNSON, Boonville : _ W1.L A. HALL, St. Louis _ _ JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis _ J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka _.._..__ JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City ARTHUR MATHER, St. Louis O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City BERT S. LEE, Springfield..__ JOSEPH S. McINTYRE, St. Louis ORESTES },IITCHELL, St. Joseph _ AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla__ W. W. MARTIN, Doniphan _ _ CHARLES C. GARDNER, Kirksville _ JOHN PICKARD, Columbia _ _ FREDERICK D. GARDNER, St. Louis WM. C. HECK, California __ .__ HARRY A. KRUEGER, St. Louis _

Committee

011

Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Grand Senior Warden Grand Junior Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary Grand Lecturer Grand Chaplai1J Grand Chaplain Grand Senior Deacon Grand Junior Deacon Grand Senior Steward Grand Junior Steward Grand Marshal _Grand Marshal Grand Sword Beare1' Grand Pursuivant Grand Orator Grand Orator Grand Tile,"

Fraternal C orrespondenc~,

REv. Drt. CHARLES C. WOODS, St. Louis, Mo. 3504 \Vashington Avenue.


REPORT ON

FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, 191 7

By

REV.

C. C. WOODS, D. D., P. G. M. ST. LOUIS, Mo. .


PROCEEDINGS REVIEWED.

YEAR

Alabama Alberta Arizona Arkansas British Columbia California C.anada Colorado Cuba Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Ireland Kansas Kentucky Louisiana ~ Maine Manitoba Maryland Michigan Minnesota l\1ississippi Montana Nebraska Nevada New Brunswick New Hampshire New Mexico New South Wales New York '.' .."

PAGE

1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 11 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14 1916 : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 17 1916 •.......................... 20 1915 22 1916 24 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 27 1916 ;. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 31 1915. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 35 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 36 1916 39 1917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 43 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 46 '.' .. 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 1916 '. . . . . . .. 53 1917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 56 1916 60 1916 ...........•............... 62 1917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 64 1916 67 1917 70 1916 " 73 1916 .........................•. 76 1916 ~ . . . .. 79 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 80 1917 .•......................... 84· 1917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 87 1916 ..........•......... : . . . . .. 91 1916 , 94 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 96 . 1916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 98 1916 101 1916 , 104 1916 106 1917 108


YEAR

PAGE

North Carolina ~ 1917 North Dakota 1916 Nova Scotia 1916 Oklahoma 1917 Oregon " 1916 Pennsylvania 1916 Philippine Islands 1917 Prince Edward Island 1916 Quebec .: 1917 Queensland " 1916 Rhode Island 1916 Saskatchewan 1916 South Carolina 1916 South Dakota 1916 Tennessee 1917 Utah 1917 Victoria "...•...... 1916 Virginia 1917 Washington " 1916 West Virginia 1916 Wisconsin 1916 Wyoming 1916

112 118 120 123 126 128 132 137 139 ".144 146 150 153 156 158 161 164 168 172 174 178 " 181

"

:

: .. '


STATISTICS OF THE ORDER FOR 1917. Name. Lodges. Alabama 557 Arkansas 565 Arizona 24 California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Colorado . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Connecticut 110 Delaware .....................•.. 22 District of Columbia.............. 30 Florida 243 Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 661 Idaho ............•.............. 63 Illinois 859 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Iowa ...........................• 526 Kansas ......••.................. 412 Kentucky ..............•......... 593 Louisiana .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Maine ..••....................... 205 Maryland 117 Massachusetts .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Michigan 436 Minnesota 264 Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 648 lVlontana 101 Nebraska 270 New Hampshire 80 New Jersey 196 Nevada 23 New Mexico 45 New York ......•................ 861 North Carolina 442 North Dakota .............•..... 113 Ohio 541 Oklahoma ...............•........ 441 Oregon ..................•....... 143 Pennsylvania 497 ·Philippine Islands 38 Rhode Island •................... 37

Members. 28,596 21,456 2,668 57,856 18,175 25,983 3',698 10,526 13,364 42,749 4,811 148,055 77,847 53,969 45,684 44,380 18,314 31,328 17,798 70,254 82,551 33,766 20,467 66,853 9,880 23,664 11,158 42,257 1,977 3,737 203,716 25,910 10,055 101,185 27,520 14,779 120,546 1,839 9,466

Gain. 680 670 103 2,515 758 611 149 355 640 1,252 222 7,306 4,127 2,184 1,622 993 552 444 665 2,353 3,694 1,752 467 2,887 89 1,359 148 1,688 2 173 6,293 880 462 5,110 1,373 565 5,086 1,138 272


Appendix

1917.]

Lodges. Name. South Carolina .................. 268 South Dakota 146 Tennessee 456 Texas ........................... 884 20 Utah ............................ Vermont ........................ 103 Virginia ......................... 326 Washington ..................... 194 West Virginia ................... 157 Wisconsin ....................... 279 Wyoming ........................ 34 •••••

II

•••••••••••

••••••••••••

II

••••••••••

14,962

Members.

Gain.

17,397 11,709 29,258 68,324 2,605 14,241 26,244 21,698 19,693 31,866 3,518

617 546 958 2,515 138 186 496 974 865 1,315 202

1,795,390

70,451

7,166 60,851 3,769 6,855 854 8,491 7,117 2,797 7,242 13,435 2,510

474 1,867 96 90 35 338 346 100

FOREIGN GRAND LODGES.

Alberta Canada .......................... New Brunswick ................. Nova Scotia ..................... Prince Edward Island ............ Quebec .......................... Saskatchewan ................... British Columbia ................ Manitoba ........................ New Zealand .................... Queensland ...................... Tasmania ....................... New South Wales ................ Victoria ......................... Western Australia ............... York-Mexico .................... Ireland .................... ·0····· Scotland ........................ Cuba ............................ •••••

II

•••••••••••••••••••

71 447 39 76 15 66 121 80 77 198 66 31 263 237 96 18 510 (?) 850 (?) 103 (?) 3,364

280 220

22,465 15,812 4,119 1,156 40,000 ( ?) 58,000 ( ?) 5;183 (?) (?) 267,822

959 592 77

117

5,591

Altogether the Masonic census of the world, counting every grade and order, will no doubt exceed two and one-half millions. Not more than three hundred thousand can be counted in foreign lands-possibly much less-and many of these so-called Grand Lodges are not recognized by us.


REPORT ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Ji'ree and Accepted Freemasons of Missouri:

In preparing our Annual Report for your consideration your Correspondent has been burdened with the pressure of the times and has keenly realized the impossi~ility of bringing before you in small, compact, and in any really worthy form, the kaleidoscopic changes transpiring in the great world whose influences • penetrate even the tiled recesses of the lodge room and, more or less strongly, affect Masonic thought and action. With more than twenty nations either actively engaged in war or holding such strained relations and growing enmities that the break may come at any hour-with the best known and most civilized portions of Europe, Asia and Africa in a "welter of blood", while the cry of starving millions is going up to God in protest against "man's inhumanity to man", and while even our own great peace-loving land is shaken through all its borders, not only with preparations to meet the bloody issue forced upon us, but agitated by internal disturbances originated by secret foes or the mouthings of political charlatans, it is but natural that the sympathetic heart o.f Freemasonry should feel the burden of existing conditions. And especially is this true of our Englishspeaking brothers whose lodges have been decimated and whose homes have been made .desolate. A DRASTIC ACTION.

Perhaps the most surprIsmg incident of the year was' that the Grand Lodge of Great Britain by formal action excluded from her subordinate lodges all alien born enemies during the continuance of the war, without any reference to length of residence in England or even to the fact that a son might be fighting under the English flag, and his own loyalty unquestionable! Of course, this action was (is) supported by all Provincial Grand, Lodges dependent on England, and the example was followed by Scotland and doubtless Ireland will take the same position. Needless to say, we are surprised ~nd regretful and are very sure that our American Grand Lodges will quietly repudiate' that course,


8

Appendix

[Sept.

while demanding that our members shall be loyal to the land which gives them shelter, and shall reverence our institutions and our Stars and Stripes. Much more in keeping with the spirit of Freemasonry was the action of the Grand Lodge of England in exempting all members of the Order from lodge dues while serving "under the colors" on land or sea! And we little doubt that this worthy example will be followed by the Grand Lodges of the United States. Every expression coming to us from American lodges has been one of love and loyalty to our country and our government, if we except the utterance. of one Grand Master, who in his report declared Great Britain, France and Germany as "equally guilty". As we are now aligned with France and Great Britain this would certainly reflect upon us. The name of the Grand Master in question as well as the utterance strongly suggest a parentage from, and possibly birth and breeding in, a land with which we are at war路 and which would doubtless destroy us were it possible! A Canadian reviewer denounces this party and his statement in unqualified terms. Beyond this we have heard no note of discord. THE BIENNIAL CELEBRATION.

The anniversary of the organization of the Grand Lodge of England has been generally recognized and observed in greater or less measure in all parts of our Masonic world. The public functions organized in honor of the occasion have, however, been thinly attended in many cases, and lacki~g in that enthusiasm which was hoped for. And this leads us to remark that a public "Masonic occasion" when properly honored in its observance can not fail to strengthen our cause in any community, while a poor and unworthy exhibition of our Masonry amounts to a real misrepresentation and will injure the fraternity in the estimate of the thoughtful. THE RENAISSANCE.

The' new era introduced by the organization of the Grand Lodge of England in 1717 was fortunate for the Order and doubtless for the world. The moral and social conditions then existing were deplorable if we are to accept the statements of a prominent historian. He says:


1917. ]

Appendix

9

'The Grand Lodge was formed at a time when individual and social morality was known only to be scoffed at. Religion seemed dead arid 'worship a farce. The bigotry and intolerance of a cold and formal Church-in which a few devout worshippers only served to mark the drunken ignorance of many of its ministers and the lewd degeneracy of the mass of its adherents-were matched on the other hand by a fierce dogmatism and a narrow and cold religion which spent itself in cruel hatred of all men rather than in pious love of any. Men and women alike were utterly worldly, society utterly base and degenerate. , It was in such a time that Freemasonry received an organized form which, 'in its first general statement of belief, purpose and commana, expressed itself as follows: "A Mason is obliged by his Tenure to obey the moral law; and if he rightly understands the Art he will never be a stupid Atheist nor an irreligious Libertine. But though in ancient times Masons were charged in every country to be of the religion of that country or nation, whatever it was, yet it is now thought more expedient only to oblige them to that religion in which all men agree, leaving their particular opinions to themselves: that is, to be Good Men and True, or Men of Honor and Honesty, by whatever Denomination or Persuasion they may be distinguished; whereby Masonr~' becomes the Centre of Union and the Means of conciliating true Friendship among persons that must have remained at a perpetual distance." B~t in 1722 in response to a manifest need a change was adopted in the general (',re~d ot Freema~'Oon-y, alrr,ost immeasurable in its influence on the future of the Order. Quoting from our worthy Brother of New York, we have the following:

The old charges usually began with an invocation, somewhat as follows: "The might of the Father of Heaven, with the wisdom of His blessed Son, thro' the grace of God, and goodness of the Holy Ghost, that be three persons in one Godhead, be with us at our beginning, and give us grace so to govern路 us here in life, living, that we may come to His eternal bliss, that never shall have ending." And' then came the first charge, which read: "The first charge is that he (or thou) shall be true to God and Holy-Church, and that he use no error or heresy by your understanding, or discreet and wise men's teaching." There' we have it. Now compare with this our present constitutions and the creed of our fraternity and you will know what change took place. One reason for the change is given in the Constitutions of 1722. The Brethren found that, since the Reformation, it was no longer possible for people to get together without quarreling about religion. They had, therefore, dug down to arrive at something fundamental that would unite all Masons and, it was hoped, in the course of time to unite all humanity. That is how they struck upon that wonderful thought, to make the cornerstone of it all the brotherhood of man under the universal fatherhood of. God. When they did t.hat, they laid the foundations not only of Freemasonry, but of democracy.


10

Appendi:1:

[Sept.

Our own country is founded upon this Masonic thought. Every penny has on it the Masonic legend. "In God we trust." That is the American creed; that is the Masonic creed. No one can be a Mason who does not sUbscribe to it; no one is an American that does not subscribe to it. THE PROGRESS OF THE ORDER.

Most of the Grand Jurisdictions report a great and growing interest in the Order and a rapid increase in membership, and, generally speaking, there is unqualified felicitation on this fact. But here and there the Grand East, while gratified with the forward movement, utters a serious warning against the campaign for members now being so extensively waged through all the land. Quality and not quantity is a sentiment which is growing in popularity and one Grand Master emphasiz~s the thought by the statement that he is much more "afraid of the white ball than of the black", as an injury to our Order. And the opinion is growing among older and wiser Masons that it were better to stop "making Masons" and go to' work and improve those we have made. The injunction "never to open or close a lodge without giving a lecture or some part of a lecture in one of the degrees," is no longer an influence with the average Master of a lodge, and so men live and die in the membership of a lodge without ever obtaining an intelligent view of the moral form and beauty thereof: PERPETUAL JURISDICTION.

Little is said with reference to this question or to the modification of the doctrine. by substituting three or five years as the limit. Both seem to be alike regarded with disfavor and disregarded by those Grand Jurisdictions holding to "territorial jurisdiction", but with no other evidence of disrespect and no possible wish to offend those holding opposing views. We have given respectful consideration to every volume of Proceedings that has ~ come to our desk, often regretting that we could not quote more extensively from their interesting pages. We are gratified to have noted many kind expressions touching our State and our Grand Lodge, with no hint of criticism. Our Grand Secretary receives many compliments on. his good work, officially and editorially, and the Correspondent is often quoted and mentioned with ki~dlY approval. C. C. WOODS.


11

AppendiJ,-

1917. ]

ALABAMA. 1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 28,596.

1916. G. M. G. A. 'BEAUCHAMP, G. S. OLIVER D. STREET Lodges, 557. WALTER SMITH,

Gain, 680. ANNUAL. COMMUNICATION.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and. Accepted :Masons of Alabama and its Masonic Jurisdiction commenced its Ninety-sixth Annual Communication in the Masonic Temple in .the City of Montgomery, on the morning of Wednesday, at 9 o'clock, on the 6th day of December, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916, and was opened in Ample Form by the Grand Master, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. Four hundred and twenty-two lodges were represented. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The report of the Grand Master, covering some twenty-seven pages, contains many details of interest to the Craft and is written by a thoughtful man, as is easily evident. He introduces it thus:

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*

*

*

*

*

While we are here let us most sincerely give our thanks to the Great Architect of the Universe for the many blessings that have been showered on us during the past year, both individually as a Fraternity, and as citizens of a great state, and of the greatest country that the sun shines on. Let us be thankful that the whitewinged dove of peace still hovers over our fair land, and also let us pray that the blessings of peace which we now enjoy may soon spread over the whole world, including the war-swept areas of Europe. Let us also be thankful that such sorrows and losses as we may have personally sustained are no greater than they are, that while some of our brethren have been called to the Great Beyond, that none of our offcial family has been路 removed, and with thankfulness for those who have been preserved to us, let our sympathy go out 路to those who have lost more than we. As to the condition of our beloved Fraternity, the various detailed reports that will be submitted to you for information or action will give you a better idea than my own brief resume, but I


[Sept.

Appendix

12

am glad to state that we are growing, and I think and know that such growth is in more ways than one. We are growing stronger numerically, and I believe the Craft as a whole are growing every year in the knowledge of what true Masonry is, and are striving each year to live in closer accordance with the knowledge attained.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*.

•

*

Dispensations were granted for the creation of five new lodges during the year and four lodges were consolidated into two. Two charters were arrested for ¡failure to send in their annual reports after a cautionary order by the Grand Master, and one lodge- surrendered its charter. . As usual many Special Dispensations were asked and granted, some, if not many, doubtless, because of 'carelessness or inefficiency on the part of the officers of lodges-at least, this is often the case. CORNER STONES.

Seven corner stones were laid during the year by the Grand Master or duly appointed proxies. NECROLOGY.

Introducing this subject, the Grand Master speaks as follows: "\Vhile the past year has not deprived us of any of our officials, still the cold hand of dcath has been laid upon many of our dear brethren and they have passed over to the Great Beyond. While we shed a sympathetic tear and are sorrowful on account of the death of perhaps some of our intimate friends or of a well loved brother, let us not withhold from their memory that commendation which their lives entitle them to receive at our hands.

To this he subjoins a long list of distinguished dead of' other Grand Jurisdictions. THE MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Master dwells at length. on this subject, and from the discussion we gather that it is becoming a heavy burden and a serious problem-even in its infancy. The deficit in maintenance fund last year was $10,000, and with other deficits or needs, the Grand Master recommends a bond issue of $22,000 to meet the present emergency. He adds that there is also need of additional room to care for those applying to the Home, etc., etc. Further


1917.]"

Appendix

13

on we learn that the present membership of the Home is 127. In the Hospital attached, 182 patients were treated. The entire maintenance of the Home (proper) was $23,168.70, being a per capita expense of $15.20 per month. The total assets of the Home are a little less than $150,000. There is a small endowment from which the interest received was $1,058.00. The institution seems to be in excellent material condition as to farm, buildings, equipment, etc., and also to be well managed. FOREIGN. CORRESPONDENCE.

This report from the facile pen of our good Brother R. W. Oliver D. Street is unusually comprehensive in its plan and withal very satiSfactory in the result attained. We regret that the Correspondent did not perceive or guess that the estimate of the number of foreign Masons was a misprint. We. intended to say that probably there are not three millions of Masons IN THE WORLD. The data previously given would indicate this intention. The introduction of the report is extensive and philosophic and the conclusion, covering some thirteen pages, contains much useful information as well as judicious opinions, personal in origin. We give the text of his remarks on the liquor question: LIQUOR.

The anti-liquor legislation of Grand Lodges continues a fruitful source of decision and discussion. In the decisions of Grand Masters and the actions of Grand Lodges, there' is seldom visible any of the special pleading, hair-splitting and evasion so often resorted to in the criminal courts to enable the liquor. maker and the liquor vendor to escape punishment and to continue to ply his nefarious business. In rare instances some brother of the old school utters a feeble lament or protest against what h'3 is pleased to call intemperate temperance, but to no avail. American Freemasonry. to its eternal honor and glory, is against liquor-making, liquor-selling, and 路"licker"-drin路king.

Missouri is treated most kindly in some four pages and the Correspondent is complimented with quotations and endorsementsexcept as noted-which was due to our u"nfortunate misprint. He closes with this: . Courtesy.-Brother Woods indorses a proposition to prevent one Lodge conferring the E. - 4. D~:ree by courtesy for another. We do not see wh y.


14

[Sept.

Appendix

Which we do not understand. We hold no such opinion and can not imagine how our Brother got this idea. Nothing of the sort appears in the report under discussion.

ALBERTA. 1917.

1916. S. Y.

M.

E. T. BISHOP, G. M.

G. S.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 7,166.

TAYLOR, G.

GEO. MACDONALD,

GEO. H. HOGBIN

Lodges, 71. Gain, 474.

The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Alberta came to us in the form of a paper-bound volume of 153 pages and it is introduced by a fine photo of M. W. S. Y. Taylor, in the ornate regalia affected by the provincial and foreign Grand Lodges. Also, we have the reports of two Special Grand Communications-one for the purpose of laying corner stone and the other for dedication. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Eleven'th Annual Communication of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Alberta, Ancient Free, and Accepted Masons, was opened in the Masonic Temple in the City of Banff, Province of Alberta, on Wednesday, May 31st, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916, at the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., in Ample Form, and with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. TO HIS MAJESTY.

On motion of R. 'V. Bro. F. S. Selwood (28) seconded by M. 'V. Bro. J. T. Macdonald (9), it was Resolved, that the terms of the following resolution be cabled through the proper channel to His Majesty, the King: "The Grand Lodge of Freemasons of Alberta, now in session, humbly desires at this time to assure His Majesty the King of its loyal fealty to His August Person and to 'the Empire. "As the duration of the present war lengthens from months into years, we realize more fully the justice of the cause for which Our Empire and Our Allies are contending and the necessity for a successful issue of the conflict, if the principles of liberty and justice are to he preserved for civilization and the world.


1917. ]

15

Appendix

"Numbers of oUr brethren under this Grand Jurisdiction are now serving His Majesty at the front, and many more are preparing so to serve. Several of our brave brethren have given their lives while fighting in the trenches for the honor of Canada and the cause of the Empire. "We hereby renew our assurance to His Majesty that the Freemasons of Alberta remain ready and willing to perform their duty to their King. and Empire. God Save the King." S. Y. TAYLOR, Grand Master. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

From this we excerpt a few paragraphs:

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During the year peace and harmony have prevailed within our Subordinate Lodges. Not a single appeal has been made to me in this regard. Our annual records show a net increase in membership of 494, which is highly satisfactory, when we consider the fact that so many of our brethren have enlisted for service at the front, that in some instances it has been difficult to properly officer the Lodge; ten per cent of the total membership in this province have joined the ranks of the Canadian gxpeditionary Forces'.

NECROLOGY.

"Sleep on, dear friends; such lives as thine Have.not been lived in vain; But shed an inftuence rare, divine, On those that here remain." 路Brethren, it is meet that at this time we pause in our deliberations to pay due homage to the memory of our beloved brethren who have answered the summons to appear before the Supreme Grand Master. The dread messenger has invaded the ranks of this Grand Jurisdiction during the past year, and many noble brethren of this and our sister Grand Jurisdictions have solved the mysteries Beyond the Veil-for them the last act in the drama of life has ended. They have completed their allotted tasks-they have fulfilled their destinies. 'Vhile we grieve that they have passed beyond reach or recall, let us remember the teachings of Masonry, which point with infallible accuracy to an existence beyond the skies.

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.*

*

To the relati ves and friends of these .departed Brethren we extend our heartiest hear路tfeIt sympathy. "It is not death to die:

To leave this weary road, And .'midst the Brotherhood on High, To be at home with God."


16

[Sept.

Appendix NEW LODGES.

A number of lodges were instituted,.having received dispensations previously, and several were constituted. Also three received dispensations from the Grand Master. The following from the Grand Master we cordially endorse: INTELLECTUAL MASONRY.

There is no subject connected with our distinguished Fraternity in which I am more deeply interested than that of the study side of Freemasonry. For many years I have embraced ,every available opportunity to know more about this, the greatest moral human institution which the world has ever known. No similar organiza. tion can boast of traditions as ancient, of usages and landmarks as universally known; of symbolism so radiant with brIghtest jewels of philosophies, both ancient and modern; of a ritual In sentiment as lofty, in diction as eloquent and so universally spoken. And yet how little it is studied and understood by many of its loyal members. P~rfection in ritualistic work is highly desirable, and yet I fear there may be some who reci te the work word perfect and remain unconscious of the fact that behind this beautiful work there lies concealed thoughts and meanings which invite investigation and research. What we need is not 路only a wider and more accurate knowledge of the fundamental principles of our order, but also Brethren anxious to display its teachings in their lives and conduct. It is one thing to talk Masonry, but to think it and act it may be quite another. "By their deeds ye shall know them." I fear that our present system teaches men to remember rather than to think. How to retain the attendance and interest of the ninety per cent who hold no office, while the other ten per cent are doing the work is a problem confronting- many City Lodges. Surely the giving of addresses by competent Brethren during the winter months, the forming of study clubs and the reading of carefully prepared papers would help to bring about this much-to-be-desired object. ROLLS OF HONOR.

The Grand Master reports that in many lodges he has had the pleasure of unveiling a roll of .honor-containing the names of those of the lodge who have enlisted in the army. He indulges in beautiful and appropriate remarks touching the great war and concludes his report with these lofty sentiments (in part): During the remaining years of my

life I

shall

cherish the


17

Appendix

1917·1

memories of those halcyon days when I went in and out among you, your honored Grand Master, and if no other laurels deck my brow, the honor of having presided over the Royal Craft in Alberta will be enough for me.

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"He's true to God who's true to men; 'Vherever wrong is done, To the humblest and the weakest 'Neath the all-beholding sun, That wrong is also done to us; and They are slaves most base ·Whose love of right is for themselves, And not for all their race. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

The Chairman of the Committee reported as follows (in part) : With reference to the Proceedings of those Sister those received have been briefly reviewed by the Chairman, the Report as short as possible. Following the custom majority of Grand Lodges we recommend that the reviews pended to the Report of our Proceedings.

Lodges, making of the be ap-

Which was not done.

ARIZONA. 1916. GEO. ALEX BRIDGE, G. GEO. A. ROSKRUGE,

M.

d. S.

Lodges, 24.

1917. W. PERKINS, G. M. Re-elected. Members, 2,668.

FRED

Gain, 103. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Arizona come to us in the form of a neat paper-bound volume of 208 pages, well arranged and printed, with no report on correspondence, except a dozen lines recommending recognition of the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands, and endorsing the action of the Grand Master in refusing· to allow appeals for assistance from a lodge in another Grand Jurisdiction to be considered by any lodges in the Jurisdiction of Arizona. (Which, by the way, we consider wise on the part of the Grand Master.) Following the conventions, the picture of the passing Grand


18

Appendix

[Sept.

Master appears on the initial page, which, we pause to say, makes a fine impression on us. Not the fact that the picture is given, but the picture itself. To us it indicates a most worthy manhood. Next comes the report in extenso of a Special Grand Communication, for the purpose of laying the corner stone of the Scottish Rite Cathedral at Tucson, December 8, 1915. The ceremonies were elaborate and impressive.

THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL

COMMUNICATION.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Arizona commenced its Thirty-fourth Annual Communica. tion in the City of Tucson, on Tuesday, the 14th day of March, A. D. 1916, at 10 o'clock a. m~ The attendance was good and was enlarged by the presence of a number of visitors, including some distinguished Freemasons from other Grand Jurisdictions. The opening ceremonies were as usual, and the Grand Master presented the ANNUAL ADDRESS,

which opens with this worthy sentiment and invocation: Brethren of the M. VV'. Grand Lodge, F. & A. M. of Arizona: By the Grace of Divine Providence we have been permitted to convene once more as Brother Masons to review our year's work and lay .plans for the future. While peace and harmony have marked our progress we have beheld with grief and sympathy the titanic struggle in which our brethren 1:la¡ve been engaged across the sea. May God grant before another year has passed that hate may yield to brotherly love, and that brethren again may dwell together in unity.

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Following which is a long list of the illustrious dead, closing with a recommendation for the usual memorial pages. On account of the unusual weather and bad condition of the railroads the Grand Master deemed it necessary to change the time of the" meeting of Grand Lodge to the 14th of March-which fact he duly reports-also he reports his letter to the Washington Memorial A~sociation, regretting his inability to be present or send a representative.


1917.]

Appendix ,

N~W

19

LpDGES CONSTITUTED.

Three new lodges duly chartered by the last Grand Lodge were duly constituted by proxies appointed by the Grand Master. Nothing unusual in the way of dispensations, decisions, etc., is reported. We can not understand the importance attached to the installation of the officers of a subordinate lodge as is revealed in the correspondenc~ reported by the Grand Master. It seems that a law of the Grand Lodge requires that the new officers shall be installed by a Past Master and the Correspondent evidently takes the position that the retiring Master is not a Past Master. But he is-and no doubt the framers of this law so considered it. The conclusion of the Grand Master that the lodge must first be called to refreshment aIid in this interval the retiring Master becomes a Past Master may be technically correct, but seems to us unnecessary. However, there is no harm in the conclusion. We do not fully agree with the Grand Master in his statement that no emblems of Masonry should be p~aced on the corner stone of any public school building. On' the contrary, it seems to us that if our great Order is deemed worthy to assist in laying the foundation of the building it is eminently proper that its "sign manual" should be left upon the stone. However, we do not criticise. There is no Masonic Home, but the Jurisdiction has a growing charity fund and are awake on the subject. The financial condition is thus reported: TOTAL RESOURCES OF GRAND LODGE.

Thirty-nine bonds, valued at : $40,105.00 Cash in General Fund.................................. 3,711.25 Cash in Widows' and Orphans' Fund '. 2,571.80 $46,388.05

•


[Sept.

Appendix

20

ARKANSAS. 1916. L. P. FAY

1917. J. S.

G. M. HEMPSTEAD, G. S. Lodges, 565.

G. M. Re-elected. Members, 21,456.

KEMPER,

REAMY,

Gain, 670. The photo of Grand Master J. S. Reamy, which serves as frontispiece for the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, is evidence of such character as to merit the distinction conferred in his election to the high position of Grand Master of this Worthy Grand Jurisdiction. The following pages contain the details of the thre.e Special Grand Communications called for the purpose of laying corner stones-two for school buildings and one for Masonic Temple at Pine Bluff. SEVENTY-FIFTH COMMUNICATION.

The M. W. Grand Lodge of F. & A. Masons of the State of Arkansas met at its Seventy-fifth Communication in Grand Lodge Hall in Masonic Temple, in the City of Little Rock, on Tuesday, the 21st day of November, A. D. 1916, the same being the third Tuesday of November, at the hour of 10 o'clock of said day, and was opened with Ample Form, all the Grand Officers, with a majority of lodge representatives and many visitors, being present. The Grand Master introduces his address very happily, as follows: It is indeed with a sense of gratitude to our Heavenly Father that we are again permitted to assemble to hold this, the Seventyfifth Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, and we should all be thankful to Him that we are permitted, in fairly good health, to again assemble here for the purpose of transacting what business may come before this Grand Body. and we should all endeavor to so demean ourselves that when this Grand Body_ shall have closed, that we will have the approbation of the All- \Vise Heavenly Father. We should not cease to thank our Heavenly Father that this glorious land of ours is still at peace with itself and the rest of the world and that we have not become entangled in the great strife and bloody conflict that is now being carried .on throughout the Old World, and we should continually ask Him that such disaster should not come to our own fair land. With the Masonic Fraternity, to a great measure, it seems to me, rests the responsibility of sustaining the head of our government, by our prayers and encouraging words, to keep our country at peace as far as prac-


21

Appendix

1917. ]

tical, to be instrumental in bringing peace to the disturbed elements of Europe, because l\{asonry stands, and has always stood, for right, that which is true and just, not only to individuals, but to 'nations, and we should show to the world at large, that we stand for the benefit of mankind and upholding the dignity "and glory of the land in which we live, and I am especially pleased with the Fraternity of this Grand Jurisdiction, in the action ~t has taken again this year in regard to the liquor question, as to our Fraternity, I believe, is very largely due to the overwhelming defeat of that most notorious Act No.2, and it will be said to the credit of Arkansas Masonry that they took not only the first stand against the liquor business, but have continued along the same lines in every instance where there has been a chance to show where we stand.

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The Grand Master very wisely speaks thus of

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INSURANCE:

I have had reports [rom several lodges who have lost their hall and contents by fire, and, on investigating, I have found that in 99 per cent of cases the Lodge carried no insurance, thus their loss was total. There is not one of you but who would say tl?-at I was NOT a good, conservative hard\,,rare mer~hant if I did not carry insurance on my stocl{, and what is true of me and my hardware business is true of "a Masonic Lodge. When the officers fail to look after the details, the Lodges lose. And I want each representative here to go home, when this session is closed, and see to it that their Lodge is insured, because it is the height of folly to own a building and not have it insured.

No decisions of special interest are reported. Four new lodges were created by dispensation and one was constituted, having been chartered at last Grand Lodge. The Grand Master recommended the building of a home for aged and indigent Masons and their widows, as to which the committee reported, offering a resolution that the matter be referred to a committee of five to investigate and report at next meeting of the Grand Lodge. The report of the Orphans' Home shows that there are 117 inmates-that there are repairs, improvements and extra accommodations needed and that the deficit for maintenance last year was over $8,000. Otherwise the conditions are pleasant and the work is prospering. Since the opening of the Home 165 children have been received. There is no report on Correspondence, the Grand Lodge having abolished this feature.


22

[Sept.

Appendix

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1915. Vhf.. C. DITMAN, G. M. W. A. DEWOLF SMITH, G. S. Also Grand Correspondent. Lodges, 80.

1916.. WM. ASTLEY,

G. M.

Re-elected. Members, 2,797.

Gain, 100. The custom of embellishing the Masonic Annuals with pictures of Grand Officers and other leading Masons is now so common as hardly ever to be noticed by the Reviewer, but to one, at least, it is of special interest. Not only that in a general way there is to the thoughtful mind no study so interesting as that of man in his outward (and inward) presentation, but also because the human face at rest and undisturbed by any special emotion is in large measure an index-a preface-a foreword, to the character. Certainly it is to' us and if the face is unprepossessing-however handsome, we, personally, steer clear of its possessor. And we do not remember to have been mistaken in our preconception. A man may be strong and worthy in much, yet there may be a fatal defect somewhere within and this proclaims itself to the careful eye of him who has studied humanity and appreciates each personality as a volume written by the hand of God. The pictures of the Passing Grand Master, W. C. Ditman, and M. W. E. E. Chipman, Grand Master in 1902, together with the detailed report of two Emergent Communications, to "constitute" and to "consecrate", fitly introduce the Proceedings.

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Forty-fifth Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of British Columbia was opened in Ample Form in the City of Vancouver on Thursday, the 22nd day of June, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916, at the hour of 10 o'clock a. m. There were present besides Grand and Past Grand Officers and visitors the representatives of a legal number of constituent lodges, and the opening ceremonies were as usual.


1917.]

23

Appendix ANNUAL ADDRESS.

From this, which is well written and comprehensive, we select a paragraph:

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May the Great Architect of the Universe be with us and guide and direct us in our deliberations. May brotherly love prevail and may the results of this Communication redound to the, credit and benefit of our beloved Institution. Many of the Lodges are feeling the' effects of this gigantic struggle in which our Empire is now engaged and are working under disadvantages' on account of the absence, in many cases, of their most active members. I find, however, a splendid spirit displayed by those who are left behind and a determination to make the best of present condi~ tions. In many of the Lodges, Honor Holls have been provided upon which' are inscribed the names of those who have heard the call and are now serving their King and Country on active military duty. Some of these brave and noble men have, I regret to say, made the supreme sacrifice and are now "resting from their labors" on the fields of Flanders and elsewhere. Brethren, let us breathe a silent prayer to the Great Ruler of All Things that He may extend comfort and consolation to those mothers, widows and orphans who are thus bereft of their dear ones; and that in His infinite wisdom he may hasten the success which is bound to crown the efforts of those who are fighting in the interests of Justice, Freedom and Honor, and all those high principles and ideals for which Freemasonry has always stood.

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Following a list of the fraternal dead and tions, the Grand Master reports various

* o~

* official visita-

DECISIONS.

1. To the effect that the loss of the index finger of the right hand is a bar to the mysteries of the Order. (We doubt it should be so considered.) 2. The W. M. elect being absent, the rest of the officers were installed. Ruled that the W. M. must be first installed and th~ rest re-invested! (We can see no good reason for this.) 3. Ruled that loss of fingers and part of left hand is a bar to the mysteries of Masonry. (We doubt this, as a general rule.)


24

[Sept.

Appendix

But we do not criticise, however we may differ. In our judgment, every路 such case should be decided on other considerations than these enumerated. The usual dispensations, visitations, appointments, etc., are reported with several recommendations, none of which are of more than local interest. CHARITY.

There is no Masonic Home, but besides specific donations to individuals the Craft are interested in the Sanitarium at Tranquille, and the Grand Lodge made a donation to this of five hundred dollars. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This is the work of our good Brother, the Grand Secretary, who adds new laurels to his well-earned reputation every year in this and other Masonic work. The report covers 172 pages, two of which are accorded to Missouri with no criticism. He gives the Correspondent credit for a "practiced pen"-and "a full and discriminating" report on the work of the various Grand Lodgesfor which, thanks!

CALIFORNIA. 1916. ALBERT

G.

1917.

BURNET,

JOHN WICHEB,

G. M.

FRANCIS

V.

KEESLING,

G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 57,856.

G. S.

EDWARD H. HART

Lodges, 377. Gain, 2,515.

SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the Jurisdiction of California commenced its Sixty-seventh Annual Communication in the Masonic Temple, in the City of San Francisco, on Tuesday, .October 10th, A. L. 5916, at 10 o'clock a. m., and was opened with usual ceremonies, after which the Grand Master presented a report, whi'cb. in the opening pages


1917.]

25

Appendix

indicates a thoughtful mind full of sympathy for all the world and calling attention to the propriety of a careful individual introspection and review of the past. We quote briefly:

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The world is distractE:d by strife, contention, selfishness and brutality, a large part of the human race is waging" a ruthless war of death and destruction, and some of us may be ready" to conclude that fraternity has become a mere" empty phrase and that love as a principle of conduct has iost its charm and power. Not so, my brethren. The principles we teach are the only influence that can save and redeem the world, and their beauty and potency will yet be acknowledged by all' mankind. Out of this bitterness, hatred, devastation and death will come a realization of the futility of violence and war, and the glory of love and peace and fraternity will be revealed to mankind as never before in the history of the world. • This madness will pass away, and yet, as Edwin Markham says, there will be still unrest and contention, b.ut it will have in view, not the destruction of men, but the achiev,ement of real freedom and the highest development of character. "Yet the black smoke of battle it will passSome time, some time-like vapor froJ!! a glass; There will be rest for all the weary flags, And rest for bugles on the battle crags; Still there will be no rest for man's str,ong soul; Before him shines an ever-flying goal; Still must he seek for freedom evermore; No halt for any soul on any shore; Man is the conscript of an endless quest; A long divine adventure without rest; Each hard-earned freedom withers to a bond; Freedom forever is beyond-beyond."

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AN INTERESTING EPISODE.

The Grand Master reports that he had the pleasure of exchanging greetings with the Grand Master of New Jersey, then at Ridgeway, New Jersey, February 16, at a banquet given by Fidelity Lodge, by long-distance telephone, the points being 3,500 miles apart. The conversation was heard, it is stated, as clearly as if in the next room. Such is one of the marvels of this great age.


26

Appendix

[Sept.

DECISIONS.

We note none of special interest, although we may mention that the decision denying Masonic services over the "ashes" of a brother who has been cremated was overruled by the Committee on Jurisprudence. It seems to us that there might with propriety be a special service for such cases.

MASONIC HOMES.

California has two of these, .one for the aged and one for children. Speaking of these, the Grand Master says: My visit to the Homes certainly made a deep impression upon my mind. As far as one can judge from appearances, you would say that conditions are almost ideal. It is unnecessary to go into detail, but they certainly appear to be Homes indeed wherein reside contentment, love and happiness. May they ever be the object of our most earnest and prayerful consideration to the end that we may discharge our full duty to those entrusted to our guardianship.

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These institutions seem to occupy the heart and hand of California Masons in large measure, and the liberality of th~ Craft is worthy of all praise. Improvements are constantly going on, and there seems to be no failure to respond to every indication of need. In the Old People's Home there are 100 men and fifty-two women. In the Children's Home there are thirty-two boys and twenty-four girls. Both Homes have a farm in connection, which seem to be a successful asset. The total receipts were some $80,000, and the expenditures nearly the same. The Endowment Fund is something over $66,000. THE BOARD OF RELIEF OF LOS

ANGET~ES.

This report is extensive and interesting. The Employment Bureau had in 1915 1,378 applications for positions and filled 803. In 1916 there were 1,705 applications and 908 were filled. During the year ninety-two Masons or members of their families having died, they were given Masonic burial or their remains shipped to various points in the United States according to the wishes of themselves or their families.


27

Appendix

1917. ] FOREIGN

CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers 140 pages and our good Brother Hart exhibits his ability as a reviewer in unusual degree, even for him-which is saying much. Missouri is discussed in kindly terms on two pages.

CANADA. 1917. 1916. Re-elected. A. LUKE, G. M. Re-elected. R. L. GUNN, G. S. Grand Correspondent. A. J. FREED Members, 60,851. Lodges, 447. Gain, 1,867.

SYDNEY

The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Canada for 1916 give a detailed report of one Especial Grand Communication held at Russell, Ontario, October 6th, 1915, for the purpose of laying corner stone of Masonic Hall. The Grand Master was the only Grand Officer present; something quite unusual. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Sixty-first Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Canada was held at London, Ontario, beginning Wednesday, July 10th, with a good attendance. His Worship, H. A. Stevenson, Mayor of London, was introduced and delivered an address of welcome, saying, among other things: Masonry occupies a large place in the esteem ot thIs community. The respect and confidence of our people Is based upon the manner In which the Lodges and individuals who compose It carry out the fundamental principles of the Order. When our Motherland, some two years ago, was plunged into the great European war, the Masonic Fraternity of this city proved their . loyalty to' the Empire and the principles of their beloved Order by offering their lives in its defense, and by readily giving money to supply its needs. I feel that your coming among us will further stimulate the loyalty of our citizens, be an' inspiration for good municipal government 'and add to the welfare of our city.

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A p.pendix

28

[Sept.

To which the Grand Master replied in fitting terms. quote a paragraph:

We

We have listened with interest to the recital of the city's progress in appearance, wealth and population; comparisons made, may I say, in an unassuming way and leading one to conclude that you believe in the sentiment..may not boast, And yet, may point with modest pride As e'en becomes a host, Who leads a guest throughout his halls; One who desires to see, and know What of the richest and the best, His master hath to shew.

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The Committee on Credentials reported 1,007 names registered, having a total of 1,544 votes. THE CRAFT IN LONDON.

The Masons of London, through their representatives, made a very pleasant and cordial address to the Grand Lodge after it was opened. We quote only a paragraph: When you last met in London, the world was at peace. Today we regret the war of the nations, the most stupendous struggle the world has ever witnessed, is raging and the flower of our manhood is in this titanic struggle for the right and liberty against the ambitions of a military caste that seek to enthrall the world. Among these who have gone forth in the defense of liberty for which, pre-eminently, Masonry stands in the front rank, are many of our houorable brethren. It is our fervent prayer that the Great Architect of the Universe may watch over and protect, and in the order of His kindness return them safely.

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The reply of the Grand Master was full of lofty sentiment. The Anhual Report of the Grand Master, occupying some thirty pages, is well written and full of interest. In this intro¡ duction he says of the city: Established in 1826 by Peter McGregor, "a Scotch Pioneer", Its position-almost the center of the southwest peninsular of On¡tario, and on one of the most fertile belts for agricultural and other business efforts, the city has become the central and distributing point for a network of railways, which, perhaps, serve the greatest number of thriving towns and villages of any similar


A.ppendix

1917.]

29

area in the Dominion. More than one million people, or oneeighth of the total population of our country, have their homes within this area. Therefore, it is not surprising that the city has spread out and extended its boundary lines to accommodate new industries that have been attracted by unusual transportation facilities and th,e, productiveness of this section of our country.

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Speaking of the war he says: But, another lesson has been suggested; it may be described as the greatest of them all. It is not a new one, but a very old one, although both individuals and nations in their ambitions are apt to forget, and, in' the. case of Germany, to scoff at. It is summed up in the motto of one of the degrees of the "Knight Templar System", ,"Magna est veritas. et prevalebit"-"Great is Truth, and it will prevail". 'rhe realization of this fact is slowly but none the less surely being emphasized in the case of Germany. She began the war with a lie, and continued her falsehoods until at present no nation will believe her spoken word or written bond. Over all the earth-against her own allies, even-she has plotted to gain her nefarious ends; but all her plotting and villainy, conceived in secrecy, will be shouted from "the house-tops" and react aga-inst herself. The Allies are fighting for great principles-principles that are essential to the future welfare of mankind-principles which the Germans have outraged and which must be maintained at all costs. Believing in the God of Truth, we are making sacrifice in order that honor and good faith may once more prevail arnongst the nations of the earth. Relying on the promise that "Whoso sweareth unto his neighbor and disappointeth him not, shall ,receive a biessing", we have, therefore, but to possess our soul in patience, and to wait, though it be under such circumstance, . an anxious task.

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Lamenting the death, of Lord Kitchener, June 5, 1916, he says: In addition to the honors he had won as an administrator, an'd as commander-in-chief of the army, in India, ho~ours of this Fraternity had also heen conferred upon him. He 'was a District Grand Master of Egypt, and was installed District Grand Master of the Punjab 'by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught, on .Tune 7, 1903. He was also a P. D. G. 'Varden of the United Grand Lodge of England. But, we know him chiefly as the soldier, who not only deserved and received the confidence of his own people, but who wlls also an inspiration to other, peoples, particularly our allies in this war, who, I am certain, share iri the nation's sorrow-


30

Appendix

[Sept.

ing for the death of the most distinguished soldier of his time, and to whose memory Robert Stead pays a fine tribute in these words: Weep, waves of England! Nobler clay "Was ne'er to nobler grave consigned; The wild waves weep with us today, "Vho mourn a nation's master "mind, V\Te hoped an honoured age for him, And ashes laid with Eng-land's great; And rapturous music and the dim Deep hush that veils our Tombs of State. But this is better. Let him sleep Where sleep the men who made us free, Fot England's heart is in the deep, And England's glory is the sea. One only vow above his bier, One only oath beside his bed; V\Te swear our flag shall shield him here Until the sea gives up its dead. Leap, waves of England! Boastful be, And fling defiance in the blast, For earth is envious of the sea "Which shelters England's dead, at last.

The financial condition of this Grand Lodge seems to be excellent, and altogether the report is reassuring as to the status and prospects of the Order. The Grand Master concludes with fitting words and touching lines: During the year you have permitted me to rule over this Craft, I have done what in me lay to forward the interests of Masonry in this Province. If I have succeeded in saying one word, or doing one act that has or will have good influence, I am satisfied, for" my creed has been To leave some simple mark behind, That I have lived for men to find; If enmity to aught I show To be an honest, g"enerous foe; To play my little part, nor whine That greater honors are not mine; This, I believe, is all I need For my philosophy and creed. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE,

This-the excellent work of our good Brother A. J. Freed, covers 131 pages in the review of the Proceedings of sixty-six Grand Lodges. Missouri is complimented, not only in the space


1917. ]

31

Appendix

accorded us,_ but in the character of the comments. He quotes from the Grand Chaplain, the Grand Master and the Correspondent-giving to the latter nearly two pages, regarding, in particular, the application of th~ dogma of "perpetual jurisdiction". Re. citing the case mentioned by us, of a candidate rejected in one Grand Jurisdiction, removing to another, and after more than a year's residence being made a Mason, whereupon the first Grand Lodge issued an edict against him, as a clandestine, etc.-concerning which we stated that the pretensions of some Grand Lodges to perpetual jur.isdiction "constitutes a menace to the harmony of the Grand Lodges of the United States." On this Brother Freed comments in these words: But it does not follow that the. incident is a casus belli. The Grand Ledge in question is a sovereign and independent Masonic power. It has an undoubted right to declare the conditions under which it will accept candidates or receive visitors in its Lodges. If it choose to say that a man who has a cast in his eye or an ingrowing toe-nail must not be made a Mason within its jurisdiction, who is to say it nay? There can be no hard and fast rule of physical qualification. While we hold that practices and pretensions such as these constitute a practical denial of the sovereignty of other Masonic Grand Lodges, and are out 'of keeping with Masonic comity, they do not constitute a cause for quarreL Still, let us hope that the Grand Lodge jurisdictions which have so little charity will tn due time learn that extr.eme pretension is inconsistent with Masonic teaching, and that Masonry is not bounded by state lines.

COLORADO. 1916. RonT. M. CRAS. H. LAWRF,NCE

1917.

G. M. JACOBSON, G. S. SIMONS,

N.

GUY V.

GRI<~ENLEAF

Lodges, 132.

STERNBERG,

G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 18,175.

Gain, 758. Together with the picture of the incoming Grand Master, Guy V. Sternberg, the Proceedings are introduced with the detailed r~cord of the personnel and particulars of eight Special Grand Communications-one for funeral' service of the Grand Chaplain, two for dedication, installation, etc., and five for laying corner


[Sept.

Appendix

32

stones, at the last of which for the school building at Frederick the Senior Grand Warden delivered a most forceful address, from which we give the following: "A little while ago I stood at the tomb of the first Napoleon; a magnificent tomb of gilt and gold, where rests at last the ashes of that restless man. I looked at that tomb, and I thought of the career of the greatest soldier of the modern world. As I looked, in imagination, I could see him walking lIP and down the banks of the Seine, contemplating suicide; I could see him at Paris, putting down a mob; I could see him at the head of the army in Italy; I could see him in Egypt, fighting battles un,der the shadow of the pyramids; I saw him conquer the Alps, and mingle the Eagles of France with the Eagles of Italy; I saw him in Russia, where the infantry of' the snow and the blast smote his legions; where death rode on the icy winds of winter; I saw him escape from Elba and retake an empire by the force of his genius; I saw him at the field of vVaterloo, where fate and chance combined to wreck the fortunes of their former king; I saw him at Helena, with his hands behind his back, gazing out upon the sad and solemn sea; and I thought of all the widows he had made; of all the orphans, of all the tears that had been shed for his glory. And I thought of the woman, the only woman who ever loved him, pushed' from his heart by the cold hand of ambition. And I said to myself as I gazed, I would rather have been a French pe~sant and worn wooden shoes, and lived in a small hut with the vines running over the door and the purple grapes growing red in the amorous autum~ sun; to sit in my door, with my wife living by my side, and my children upon my knees with their arms around my neck; I would rather have lived and died unnoticed and unknown, ,except by those who loved me, and gone down in the voiceless silence of the dreamless dust than to have been that imperial impersonation of force and murder who covered Europe with blood and tears."

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This is itself a quotation, as the speaker frankly stated, from one of America's most famous orators.

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. Masons of Colorado, met in its Fifty-sixth Annual Communication in Masonic Temple, in Denver, Colorado, Tuesday, September 19, 1916, at 10 o'clock a. m., and was opened in Ample Form by the M. W. Grand Master Robert M. Simons, with the Grand Officers in their respective stations and places, prayer being 'offered by W. Brother Fred W. Willman, acting Grand Chaplain.


1917. ]

33

Appendix

The introductory ceremonies were as usual-the announcement of Grand Secretary, recognizing the Grand Representatives from other Jurisdictions, etc. In responding to the welcoming words of the Grand Master, Brother John W. Sleeper, representing the Philippine Islands, delivered a most striking address. We give a few lines to show its quality: Civilization really began when a man said: "Ye believe in God, believe also in me." Pantheism, polytheism, monotheism, the unknown gods and other forms of theology had not struck the key to intelligent religious belief which must start with the divine in man and work upwards to a perfect ideal instead of starting from an impossible and absurd ideal and falling helplessly until it comes to the material, which is not man, the dust of the earth. Mankind has the belief in God. The Lodge completes the injunction and confirms the belief in man, and the two together make the perfect theory of the universe. All this is found- in the Bible if we had ever learned to read it. Not until this Great Book is open is the Lodge open, and when we close the Book we close. the Lodge.

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ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The address of the Grand Master is a model in much-notably in its brevity and conciseness. Covering only some ten or eleven pages, it yet includes necessary to a full report of his special work for路 the year. He refers touchingly to the fraternal dead, etc. We give one or two extracts: How easy it is to say kind and loving words of the dead, who, when living, we were-in a measure at least-forgetful of. May our Father teach us to remember our friends while they are here, to sympathize with them in their sorrows and troubles, and to be charitable to one another; life is all too short to permit us to harbor selfish and bitter feelings; let us then strew flowers by the wayside as we journey along to brighten the path for others, and with kindly, helpful words endeavor to bring hope and cheer .to those who are heavy laden. The world beyond will be the brIghter


[Sept.

Appendix

34

if we shall have the memory of having ministered somewhat to our fellows here. "It is a little thing To give a cup of water; yet its draught Of cool refreshment, drained by fevered lips, May give a shock of pleasure to the frame More exquisite than when nectarcan juice Renews the life of joy in happier hours. It is a little thing to speak a phrase Of common comfort, which, by daily use, Has almost lost its sense; yet on the ear Of him who thought to die unmourned 'twill fall Like sweetest music."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Death loves a shining mark, Mortality is the certain fact of life.

*

All men, whatever their rank and however seemingly important their work, must, at the beckoning hand of the Silent Messenger, relinquish fame and wealth, lay aside their work, be it ever so noble and unselfish, and pass through the shadows into eternity. BENEVOLENCE.

The Grand Master refers to the growth of this sacred fund, insisting that every Freemason in the Jurisdiction contribute annually at least twenty-five cents. The report of the committee shows that this fund now aggregates $45,255.28; that it is carefully invested and that the present number on the roll of benefits is twenty-four-three men, nine women and twelve children. To these $1,619.00 was distributed during the year. NEW LODGES.

Dispensations were issued for the creation of three new lodges and several applications were referred. The Grand Master refers to the taxation of the Masonic Temple at Colorado Springs and the legal process now going on to show that Masonic property of that character is and ought to be exempt. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCEâ&#x20AC;˘

. ThIs, by our good Brother Lawrence N. Greenleaf, is exceptionally well written, covering 130 pages in a. review of sixty-six Grand Lodg~s. Missouri is kindly treated in over two pages.


1917.]

3S

Appendix

CUBA. 1915. FRANCISCO SANCHES CURBELO,

1916. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 5,183. (?)

CHARLES, G. S. P. RODRIGUES Lodges, 103. ( ?) Gain, 117. ( ?)

CARLO.S

G.

G. M.

F. DE

From the "Anuario De La Isla De Cuba" we gather but little information owing to our vast ignorance of the Spanish tongue and its derivations. The data we give above is but an approximation, though very close to the facts in the case. Like many of the Provincial Grand Lodges, the business of this one is largely attended to by committees and the meetings of the Grand Lodge only occupy a few hours. In the past year the first triennal or "Trimestral" meeting or "Sesion" was held June 27; the second, September 26; the third, December 26, and a Special or "Sesion Extraordinaria" was held October 22. The Annual Convocation or "Sesion Anual" was held on four several dates, to wit, March 26, April 2, April 9, and the last, or "ultima reunion", on April 13, 1916. At the first of these, "Anuals" the .election of officers was held, and, as already stated, each convocation only lasted a few hours. The comparatively small area occupied by this Grand Jurisdiction enables the members to assemble in a short time and with comparatively little expe~se. So far as we can gather, little of interest to the Masonic world generaUy was revealed in any of the meetings of the Grand Lodge, except the fact that" Cuban Masonry seems to be thoroughly in line and orthodox, and to be in a fairly prosperous condition. FOREIGN

CORRESPONDENCE.

Some forty-seven Grand Jurisdictions are recognized by the reviewer, in thirty-eight pages. Of course, the reviews are short. Missouri does not appear. The reviewer gives a lengthy and strong introduction.


36

[Sept.

Appendix

DELAWARE. 1916. WALTER W. BACON,

V. V.

G. M.

HARRISON, G. S.

1917 J. HORN,

G. M. J. GUTHRIE,' G. S. Grand Correspondent. Members, 3,698.

STUART 'HARRY

J. GUTHRIE Lodges, 22.

HARRY

Gain, 149.

"

Emergent Communications were held February 26th, 1916, for the puh,')ose of laying the corner stone of the post office at Smyna, and also on June 14th, 1916, for the purpose of laying the corner stone of Wolf Hall, Delaware College, at Newark. In both cases the Grand ~aster, Walter W. Bacon, presided, and the Grand Lodge was路 opened in Ample Form. On the first occasion an ~addt-ess was delivered by M. W. L. Irving Handy,' and in the latter case 'the Governor of Delaware and others of prominence addressed the audience. The exercises were well attended and interesting. ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVENTH A~NUAL COMMUNICATION.

The One Hundred and Eleventh Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Delaware convened in the Masonic Temple, in the City of Wilmington, the fourth day of October, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916, and was called to order by the Most W'Orshipful Grand Master at 12 o'clock, all the Grand Officers being present except the Deacons and '. the Senior Steward. The general attendance was good and the Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. John L. Johnson.

DISTINGUISHED VISITORS FROM NEW JERSEY.

.

Most Worshipful William Ralph Meakle, Grand Master of Masons of New Jersey, accompanied by M. W. Josiah W. Ewan, Past Grand Master; R. W. Herbert C. Rorick, Senior Grand Warden; R. W. Theodore B. Townley, Grand Secretary; R. W. Charles C. Scott, Senior Grand Deacon, and W. Gordon G. Walton, Private Secretary to the Grand Master, were introduced, saluted with the Grand Honors and escorted to the Grand East. The M. W. Grand Master and brethren responded in terms of fraternal love.


1917.]

37

Appendix THE ANNUAL ADDRESS

is quite brief, covering only seven pages, but gives a substantial report on the doings and incidents of the year. We quote: One year ago you placed upon my shoulders the honor and responsibility of being your chief executive; and I have great satisfaction in opening this Grand Lodge, because, under the guidance of Divine Providence, progress has marked the year's history and not retrogression; good feeling .and harmony, and not disappointment and strife prevail throughout the Jurisdiction. I have endeavored to perform the important duties of my office . to the best of my ability. The task assign'ed was rendered less difficult because the advice and assistance of the officers of the Grand Lodge, as well as that of the Past Grand Masters, were ever at my service.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The Annual" Communication is always an occasion of great interest to the members of the Craft; because it gives an opportunity to become better acquainted with Masonic work, form and usages. It is a fact, illustrated and emphasized by experience, that nothing but consistent and intelligent Masonic work will give force and power to our Lodges, that the form of its work should never be departed from, but that uniformity should prevail throughout the Lodges, and the fact that the preservation of the usages and landmarks of the Craft should be adhered to, needs no discussion. To have accomplished this important task gives ample reason for assembling in annual session. , In proportion as the Masonic fraternity recognizes these principles and is influenced by the ideal that thc largest indebtedness of life is not owed or paid in money, it will ever grow in power and influence, and thc steady tread of the Craft will be upward and onward. OUR FRATERNAL DEAD.

The summons to pass under the Rod came to a large number of the members of this, and other Jurisdictions, during, the year. We treasure their memory, and with bowed heads acknowledge the right of Him who giveth life to take it away. The firm belief in the immortality of the soul, which is a fundamental truth in Masonry, lessens our grief in their departure.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

THE MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Master, commends this institution in strong terms .and reports that it had received its first bequest from the lamented William Marshall, who recently passed into the unseen. He also reports that the proposed removal of bodies from the


38

Appendi."C

[Sept.

cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church will render it necessary to remove the body of the first Grand Master of the State, Gunning Bedford, and that it had been decided to reinter it on the lawn of the Masonic Home. This seems to us a singular conclusion. Why should this perpetual reminder of the coming inevitable be brought so near to the abode of the living, whom it is proposed to comfort! Furthermore, as to the Masonic Home, one learns that its assets amount to something over $33,000, and that there are ten in the Home family. The operating expenditure being $3,722.04, the cost of maintenance per capita would seem to be $372.20. Touching a decision of the Grand Master, the Committee on Jurisprudence has this to say;

BURIAL Sl<:RVICE AFTgR CRgMATION.

vVe recommend that the decision of the Grand Master that if a brother has made a request for Masonic burial, and intends to have his body cremated, his lodge can perform the ceremonies over his remains or ashes, be approved with restrictions. This decision presents a new question in Masonic jurisprudence. The Masonic burial service of this jurisdiction concerns the burial of the body, but your committee is of the opinion that there is nothing unlawful in holding Masonic services over the body of a deceased Master Mason, whose body is to be cremated, provided the actual services of commitment to the grave are omitted, and such Masonic ceremonies are held at the horne of the deceased brother, or at a church, or the crematory before cremation.

Which does not appeal to us as being very clear.

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

On page 36 the Committee on Correspondence reported that they had prepared a review of the Proceedings of the various Grand Lodges received and recommended that it be printed with the Proceedings. It was moved and seconded-also adopted-that the report be received and "recorded"-whatever that meant. Anyway, nothing further appears on that subject.


. 1917.]

Appendix

39

The Committee on Necrology append to their report a poem, which we do not remember to have seen before. It is striking. We quote--in part: Thrice we'lcome Death! That, after many a painful bleeding step, Conducts us to our home, and lands us safe On the long-wish'd for shore. Prodigious changel Our bane turned to a blessing! Death, disarmed, Loses his fell ness quite; all thanks to Him Who scourged venom out. Sure the last end Of the good man is peace! How calm his exit! Night-dews fall not more gently to the ground. Nor weary worn-out winds expire so soft. Behold him! in the evening tide of life. A life well spent, whose early care it was His riper years should not upbraid his green: By unperceived degrees he wears away; Yet, like the sun, seems longer at his setting! -Robert Blair.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 1916.

1917.

W. W. JERl\1ANl':, G.

A. W.

JOHNSTONE,

M.

JAMES W. WI'l:l'EN, G.

M;

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 10,526.

G. S.

GEO. W. BAIRD

. Lodges, 30. Gain, 355.

The Proceedings for 1916 are neatly illustrated and well arranged, having in addition to the photo ,of the passing Grand Master, those of several Past Grand Masters, each imposing in appearance and clearly indicating the high character which usually accompanies a position so exalted. STATED AND SPECIAL COMMUNICATIONS.

Two Stated Communications were held, one for the purpose of exemplifying the' work and the other for the purpose of hearing the report of Committee on Eastern Star Home, also for considering amendments 'to and revision of the Constitution, etc., etc. Several Special Communications were held for funeral and memorial services and two for the purpose of laying corner stones.


40

Appendi%

[Sept.

CO~lMUNICATION.

ANNUAL

The One Hundred and Sixth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of the District of Columbia, was held at Masonic Temple in Washington, D. C., at 7 'o'clock p., m. on above date, there being a good attendance of delegates and permanent members. The Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form with the usual ceremonies. THE ANNUAL ADDRESS,

covering some twenty-four pages, indulges in some paragraphs of worthy sentiment, especially in the beginning, but for' the most part is closely occupied with a resume of the work and experiences of the year. He thus introduces. the address: To the Granq l.odge: The year now soon to close has been one of the most noteworthy in the history of the jurisdiction. The gross gain in membership was ~23, which is the largest ever recorded. The net gain was 355, the largest since 1908. But we have not been路 devoting all our time to the making of new members, We have been doing things that have far greater value, and, compared with which any record of mere numbers is unimportant. The greatest achievements of the year have been in the realm of the immaterial rather than in that of the material. We are realizing in a larger way than ever before that as the children of a loving Heavenly Father, we are indeed brethren, and each of us his brother's路 keeper. We are trying to make a more liberal use of the talents that have been given us, and in this work the entire jurisdiction lovingly shares. The harmony and good will with which the year began have thus been emphasized and enlarged and made a personal experience in the lives of all the brethren. SOMEWHAT UNIQUE!

Their most important work was the management of the annual baseball game for the benefit of the endowment fund of the Masonic and Eastern Star Home. The net receipts of the game were slightly in excess of five thousand one hundred dollars, and the details were all arranged and carried out in a way that entitles the Association to the thanks of the entire Jurisdiction. I am glad to announce that every dollar received from the sale of tickets has gone into the endowment fund, J n other words, the expenses of the game were more than paid with money received from advertising and concessions. From the Association came the suggestion that the game be played between teams representing Almas Temple on the one hand and Kallipolis Grotto on the other hand. The suggestion had all the force of an inspiration.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*


1917. ]

Appendix

41

We -hardly think the Grand Master meant just exactly what he said in this paragraph. Certainly· the management of a basebill game, however worthy the object, was not the most important work of the year. We suppose he referred in this to the eminent propriety of recouping the funds of the Eastern Star Home. Exactly what was the trouble with the management,~f the Eastern Star Home does not appear, but the examination or investigation appears to have been rather exhaustive, costing the Grand Lodge over seven hundred dollars. And from the statement of the Grand ~aster it appears that if not a lesion there is at least a want of cordial understanding between the Grand Lodge and the Eastern Star touching the future of the Home. Twenty-six members constitute the Home family; eighteen of these are widows or spinsters, seven aged men and one a boy of twelve. The assets of the Home are mostly in real estate and endowment. NECROLOGY.

Referring to the distinguished dead of the year the Grand Master thus speaks: !\ly brethren, that which is good and true in this world does not die, nor can it ever be forgotten. A little child, surrendering a life that scarcely· has been begun will· live in the better thoughts of those who have loved it, and play its parts, through them, in the service of mankind. So it is, but in a ·larger way, with our departed· brethren, who had lived many years 'to bless their fellows and' to be: blessed by them. They sleep, each of them, in "that low green tent whose curtains never ·outward swing", and' we may think at times that their lives no longer affect us·; but we who knew them and loved them are stronger for the struggles of mortality because of what they said and did. Forgotten!' Oh, 'No! Not while memory brings back the days that· are no more. If the good that men do could bc traced to its source, how beautiful would even death appear, and how much of gentieness and' true goodness would be found to have their tap-roots in the silent tomb! And so· we say good-by to these whom we "have ·love·d and lost aWhile", our hearts filled with gratitude to thc Supreme Architect of the Universe because he has permitted their liv·cs to touch ours and make them better. REFERENDUM:.

The Grand Master submitted three propositions to the vote of the lodges during the year-one to change the time of meeting from December to the month of June-the Stated Communications being likewise adjusted to suit the new order; another was to rent


42

Appendix

[Sept.

the top floor of the Temple, or rather to use it for a Masonic Club, it now being occupied by a department of the Washington University. The last was to provide for an Assistant Secretary. The Grand Master was practically endorsed on all three propositions. FOREIGN

CORRESPONDENCE.

The report on Correspondence covers 168 pages and the work is worthy of the Correspondent. He graciously accords to Missouri nearly three pages. We can not resist the temptation to quote a paragraph or two: The report on fraternal correspondence is by the Rev. C. C. vVood, D. D., l'ast Grand Master, and is a review of the proceedings of fifty-three Grand Lodges, besides a tabulated statement of the number of lodges, membership and gain in membership in each .Tl;lrisdiction reviewed. The report estimates a total Masonic membership of more than 2,500,000. The report also gives a tabular statement of cost and maintenance, table expenses, per capita cost, salaries, etc., of :\Iasonic Homes, which is of great value. The reviews are admirably prepared, though brief. The District of Columbia receives nearly two printed pages and correctly states the great advantage we enjoy, of b'eing of small geographic magnitude, quick and convenient transportation, etc., which lightens the burden of the Grand Lodge. He quotes from the address of the Grand .\'faster and he gives the Grand ;\;aster credit for the visitations he made. He notes the creation of an Employment Bureau and commends our correspondence report, though he notes that 1.'1'1 issouri was not included. This is because the Missouri report for ; 915 was not received by the writer: The Missouri report for 1916 possesses unusual merit in its valuable tables, its admirable indexing and excellent editing. It ends with a fine report of the, Home, an illustration of its classic buildings, tableau of its officers, its accounts and its segregated reports. The Missouri lay member has no excuse for not being well posted on the condition of the Fraternity in that historic state, for the report is clear, fUll and complete, a potent contradiction of the traditional Indian derivation of its name.

The Correspondent bows his sincere thanks for these good words-on behalf of M. W. John R. Parson, Grand Secretary, and himself as well.


1917.]

Appendix

43

FLORID'A. 1917. JAMES W.

P.

E.

CRANE,

WEBSTER,

1918. A. S. YORK,' G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 13,364.

G. M. G. S.

B. WRIGH1' Lodges, 243.

SILAS

Gain, 640. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Florida for 1917 appear in good form, the volume being well arranged in contents and sightly in appearance, occupying 392 pages, more than half of which is filled with the report of Committee on Foreign Correspondence. Three Special, Grand Communications are reported in detail in the initial pages-two were for the purpose of laying corner stones for Government buildings at Palatka and St. Petersburg and the last for the dedication of Masonic Temple at St. Petersburg. Grand Master James E. Crane being unavoidably absent, after reading a letter from him, the Grand Lodge having been opened in Ample Form for the EIGHTY-EIGHTH

ANNUAL

COMMUNICATION,

held in Jacksonville, Fla., January 16th, 1917, by the Deputy Grand Masler, the . ANNUAL ADDRESS

was read by the Grand Secretary, a paragraph of which, with the prayer of the Grand Chaplain, we give herewith':

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

'Vhile the ravages of a world war are bringing untold misery and desolation in many lands, laying waste fertile fields, leveling factories and industrial plants, destroying homes, churches, edifices of art and learning, and,. worst of all, drenching Mother Earth in the precious blood of millions of her sons, our land and state, are permitted the inestimable gifts of peace and prosperity. God, in His infinite wisdom and goodness, is bestowing these blessings upon us, and in order that we may render Him our praise and thanks for our happIness, peace and prosperity, as well as that we may cry out to Him that these blessings may be restored to the


44

Appendix'

[Sept.

lands that wallow in blood and mire of war, let us rise and bow our heads, while the Grand Chaplain offers prayer to the Lord God Almighty. PRAYER.

Almighty God, 'the Maker and Huler of all things, Thou dost rule in the armies qf heaven and among the inhabitants of earth, none daring to stay Thy hand from working or say unto Thee, what or why dost Thou? Vie do not know, we can not understand. We stand bewildered amid the weltering chaos, the strife of men and armies, the blood and tears which water the earth, the groans of the wounded and the dying. Our one comfort and stay Is this, that Thou dost know and that in some way, beyond our finite understanding, Thy purposes of wisdom and mercy are being wrought out, that Thou wilt make the wrath of man to praise Thee and the remainder of wrath Thou wilt restrain. We remember, before Thee, the maimed and bruised and crippled, who must begin life anew under conditions that make the strain and struggle harder. We plead for the widows and the orphans bereft of their ea.rthly stay and staff. Wilt Thou comfort and care for them? And we pray for peace, that it may come speedily, if it be 'l'h y Holy Will. Scatter Thou the people that delight in war. Hasten the hour when the sword shall be beaten into the ploughshare and the spear into thc pruning hook, and when nations shall learn the art of war no more; the hour when the inhabitants of the world shall have learned righteousness, and the work of righteousness shall be peace, and the effect of righteousness quietness and assurance forever. The Lord hasten it in His own time. Amen.

Following this we have a long report on Necrology. LODGES CONSTITUTED.

Eight lodges, duly chartered by the last Grand Lodge, were reported as having been duly chartered by proxies appointed by the Grand Master. Eight new lodges were created by dispensation during the year. CORNER STONES.

Besides the corner stone occasions already reported as under the auspices of the Grand Lodge, dispensations were granted' to various lodges-eight in all-to lay corner stones with Masonic honors. We suppose the procedure in this Grand Lodge is different from ours. With us in Missouri every corner stone is laid by


1917.]

Appendix

45

a Special or Emergent Grand Lodge, the individual lodge to which the dispensation is granted keeping on its journal the record of the occasion.

MISCELLANEOUS.

The usual number of miscellaneous (and perhaps needless) dispensations were asked and granted. If every Grand Lodge would exact a penalty in the way of a fee of five or ten dollars when lodges are careless and have to ask permission to do "out of time" what should ha,;e been done "in time", the finances would be improved and the character of the average lodge as well.

DECISIONS.

The Grand Master reports a number of minor decisIons, among which we note that he emphatically (and wisely) repudiates the right of "perpetual jurisdiction"as held by some lodges, and directs that it be ignored in the case in question.

ADDRESS ON MASONIC

HOM~~.

Hon. Charles A. Wilson of Louisville, Ky., having been invite!i to路 address the Grand Lodge on the subject of a Masonic Home, was introduced and delivered a strong address, which was received with appreciation. Among many other striking things, he said: Twenty-nine Grand' Jurisdictions have erected homes and in the name of God the Most High, have dedicated them in His Name, for housing, clothing and educating those intrusted to their care. Some Grand Jurisdictions have two or more. They represent in these United States an investment of over ten millions of dollars. It .is with deep regret that I fail to find the name of Florida in that list of most honorable mentions.

The matter of selecting a site for Masonic Home was intrusted to a committee of seven, with instructions "to erect such a Home as in their judgment will meet the needs of this Grand Jurisdiction. .r ..--: '! ~~iII1 The funds on hand for this purpose are reported as $38~198.71.


Append~x

46

[Sept.

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This report is lengthy, occupying 210 pages, and is well written and worthy. The last ten pages contain a "conclusion" which is of such interest that we would be glad to print it with our report, but we unfortunately are limited in the space to be occupied. Missouri has kindly recognition in four and a half pages, and the Correspondent has a good word.

GEORGIA. 1917. F. O. MILLER, G. M. F. F. BAKER, G. S. Grand Correspondent. Members, 42,749.

1916. N. H. W. A.

G. M. WOLIHIN, G. S.

BALLARD,

RAYMOND DANIEL

Lodges, 661. Gain, 1,252.

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The One Hundred and Thirtieth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the State of Georgia was held in the City Auditorium, in the City of Macon, commencing at 10 o'clock a. m., October 31, A. L. 5916. The Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form on the Master's Degree, and with prayer by Rev. C. D. Ogg, Grand Chaplain, the Grand Secretary reporting a constitutional number of lodge representatives as present, besides permanent members arid visitors. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

In this the Grand Master ignores all precedents and conventions, and plunges at once, "in medias res", by stating The Masonic Home is the most important question that I have to present for your consideration. In its inception it met with lilerious opposition. It took many years for the few who fought so nobly for the realization of their hopes and the fulfillment of their dreams, yet, today, it is firmly implanted in the love and affection of Georgia Masonry. Long may it llve and flourish and ever be our pride and sweet glory". The Grand Master, in his annual address at the last Communi-


1917.]

47

Appendix

cation of the Grand Lodge, recommended the enlargement and improvement of the physical property of the Horne, the establishment of an industrial school for the better training of the children, and other recommendations necessary for the Horne should it ever hope to attain the full purpose for which it was established. He further recommended that since the Grand Lodge was attempting to build a Temple and support the Home, and since they were not able to accomplish both at the same time, that a certain part of the funds collected for the Temple be transferred to the Horne. The idea of giving the Horne precedence in its development met with almost universal approbation when presented to the Craft at large, and, seemingly, was favorably cOllsluared by th'" Grand Lodge.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The commission appointed at the last Grand Lodge with general instructions reported, as will be seen later, recommending that the present site be retained and a. broader, larger plan adopted, which was agreed to, and in addition it was unanimously determined that $50,000 of the Temple Fund' in hand be set aside for the purpose .of carrying forward the work of the Home. This, as appears later, leaves only a little over $20,000 remaining in the Temple Fund. To the Home is unquestionably accorded the "rightof-way." DECISIONS.

These-twenty-four in number-are generally above criticism. One reveals an unusual case: A candidate is initiated and is afterwards found to be unable to r路ead or write. Ruled, that he could not be advanced until he learned to read and write. It seems to us that the lodge was gravely in error and subject to criticism in admitting one who must have been practically unknown to the members. Also the Grand Master states in his decision to the effect that: It is further unlawful for a member of one of the higher bodies to vouch for a Brother in a Masonic Lodge upon the evidence that he has sat with him in one of those bodies or that he has' presented to him documentary evidence of his membership. This is necessary in that it is well known .that many continue their membership in some of the higher bodies long after their suspension and expulsion from their Masonie Lodges.

Not so with us. A Mason suspended or expelled from his lodge is automatically suspended or expelled from other bodies dependent on the lodges for their membership. The Grand Master thus introduces his report on


48

Appendix

[Sept.

NECROLOGY:

"Death .......... Pale Priest Of the mute people" has shri veil many a soul who was bound to us by the mystic tie since last we met. It has ever been thus; it will ever be. "'Tis but a Tent where takes his one day's rest A Sultan to the realm of Death addrest; 'l'he Sultan rises, and the dark Ferrash Strikes, and prepares it for another Guest." Nothing that we may say or do can recall those who have answered the summons before us, or, in any way, change their present condition. Let us, rather, gain strength and consolation as expressed in that beautiful couplet from the gifted pen of that distinguished Mason, Goethe: "The future hides in it Gladness and sorrow; We press still through, Nought that abides in It Daunting us-onward. Here eyes do regard you, In Eternity's stillness; Here is all fullness, Ye brave,' to reward you; "'Nark, and despair not."

Prominent among those who have passed into the unseen, he reports the name of the lamented Grand Secretary, William Alexander Wolihin, a Mason and a Christian of exalted character. In his circular announcing the death he touchingly says: "Soft and safe to thee, my brother, be thy earthly bed! Bright and glorious thy rising from it! Fragrant be the acacia sprig that there shall flourish! May the earliest buds of spring unfold their beauties o'er thy final resting place, and may the sweetness of the summer's last rose linger longest! In that day of days may a Mason's hope be realized and may thy form come forth renewed in . life and light eternal! Until then, my' Brother-until then, fare . thee well!" May the Eternal One guard and protect her to whom thy life was so devotedly consecrated. NEW LODGES.

Dispensations were granted for five lodges during the year and eight duly chartered at the last Grand Lodge were constituted


1917.]

Appendix

49

by proxies. Thirteen corner stones were laid with Masonic honors, but the culmination of these occasions was reached when the Grand Lodge was invoked to' lay the initial st?ne marking the site and beginning of what is to be probably the greatest monumental work of this age. Of this the Grand Master speaks as follows: On May 20th, this Grand Lodge was accorded a great honor in being invited to lay the boundary stone that marked the beginning of one of the most stupendous undertakings of all times. It is the intention of the Stone Mountain Confederate' Monument Association to carve from the perpendic\llar face of that mighty monol1th heroic figures of the great leaders of the Confederacy, and, in addition, companies of cavalry, infantry and artillery, as well as representations of the naval forces of the Confederacy. When this great work is accomplil2hed it will be one of the wonders of the world, indeed, the most collossal monument on earth. To this end they have secured the services of the noted sculptor, Gutzon .Borghlum, to chisel the monument on the mountain commemmorating the valor of the Southern Confederacy.

The Grand Lodge of Georgia is sound on the question of "Perpetual Jurisdiction" and the Grand Master courteously conveyed this to the. Grand Master of Pennsylvania, who complained of a violation of this "law" on the part of. Georgia. UNWORTHY MATERIAL.

The Grand Master laments the reception into the Order of candidates who are not and can not become a credit to us. In this connection he introduces a circular presented by Arconia Lodge No. 87 of Seattle, Washington, to such as indicate a wish to become Freemasons. But for its length we would copy it. Every lodge should exercise extreme care in the introduction of new material to the body of Masonry. The financial report is excellent and the general condition of the Fraternity throughout the JuriSdiction is above the average. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This, from the worthy hand of Brother Raymond Daniel, is equal to the best, and we can see no room for criticism. It covers 167 pages in reviewing eighty-four Proceedings. Missouri is complimented with over two pages, largely quotations, nearly, half of which are from the report on correspondence.


[Sept.

Appendix

50

IDAHO. â&#x20AC;˘

1916. M. G. S.

FRANCIS JENKINS, G. GEO.

E.

KNEPPER,

JOHN

1917. D. BLOOMFIELD, G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 4,811.

E. KNEPPER Lodges, 63.

GEO.

Gain, 222. The initial pages of the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Idaho for 1916 present the portrait of the incoming Grand Master, John D. Bloomfield, and also the record¡ of an Emergent Communication, held April 9th, 1916, for the purpose of paying funeral honors to the late Theophilus W. Randall, Grand Secretary Emeritus. Also a Special Grand Communication held in the City of Moscow-date not given-for the purpose of laying corner stone for Masonic Hall.

FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The M. W. Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Idaho convened in its Forty-ninth Annual Communication in Masonic Temple, in Twin Falls, Idaho, Tuesday, the 12th day of September, 1916, at 10 o'clock a. m., and was opened in Ample Form, in the presence of a constitutional number of delegates, besides Grand and Past Grand Officers, visitors and permanent members. The opening exercises in this Grand Lodge vary somewhat from the ordinary in that a roll of the Past Grand Masters who have died since the organization of the Grand Lodge is called by the Grand Secretary, the Grand Mastel' responding to each name, with the date of his incumbency and death, the Grand Lodge standing at attention meanwhile. At the close the Grand Master said: Brethren, let us bow our heads in a few moments of .silent prayer in honor to the memory of these, our departed Past Grand Masters.

The Grand Representatives were invited to the Grand East and welcomed in courteous words by the Grand Master. After which the Grand Master delivered the


Appendix

1917.]

51

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

After paying a beautiful tribute to Twin Falls, in which the session was held, together with reference to the Author of all beautiful things and all goodness, the Grand Master says: May our deliberations here and now be conducted with harmony. May true love prevail to the end that order and lasting peace be added to bâ&#x201A;Źauty, strength, efficiency and the grandeur of Ancient Free and Accepted Masonry. IN MEMORIAM.

The question is often asked, "Why was this particularly useful and valuable person to his fellows and to humanity not spared?" The answer is qUite plain and clear, for it is the immutable law of nature. W"e reap the ripe grain and we gather the ripest fruit first. So it is with the Grim Reaper continually gathering in those whom we love best, as they are the ones whom God has blessed. is not death to die, To leave this weary road And midst the brotherhood on high, To be at home with God."

'~lt

Following which comes the usual list of the fraternal dead. DISPENSATIONS.

Various dispensations for minor purposes were asked and granted; none for new lodges. DECISIONS.

All of these were approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence with the exception of Nos. 1 and 2-both of which practically asserted that a suspended member was cut off from all rights, privileges and responsibilities in Masonry by his suspension. Very properly, the committee stated, in effect, that a "suspended member" was still a Mason and a member of the lodge, and as sUGh could be arraigned, tried and expelled from the body of Freemasonry. We note from the decisions, etc., that the laws of this Grand Lodge, with reference to withdrawal, affiliation, etc., differ materially from ours and from other Grand Lodges, that we criticise in any measure. The Grand Master refers in condemnatory terms to. the "Chain


S2

Appendix

[Sept.

Letter". It seems that this nuisance and fraud will never die. Doubtless a new crop of weakli~gs and swindlers are born with every generation! GENERAL GRAND LODGE.

The Grand Master approves the idea of a General Grand Lodge. Thus he speaks: GRAND MASTERS' CONVENTION.

No call for a conference of Grand Masters of the various Grand Jurisdictions was made during my term of office. Of this failure I am truly sorry, for I believe that Masonry as now controlled by independent jurisdiction has reached the point of advancement that the whole superstructure should be changed from Grand Independent Jurisdiction as now, to Grand Constituent Jurisdictions whereby all constituent Grand Lodges could send properly accredited delegates with power to form some sort of a Supreme Grand Lodge or a Court of Appeal. Such vexing problems as failed of settlement between the Grand Master in \Vashington, the Grand Master in Pennsylvania and myself, would then have a Grand Forum to appeal to. Under the present system and as the aforementioned controversy now stands, it looks as if we were at a perpetual distance. Why be afraid of the bugaboo, "Innovation"? Did not Prince gdwin, who convened the Freemasons at York in 926 innovate by revising the old constitutions and compiling them and the landmarks Into a wri tten manuscript? Did not the four Lodges in London in "1717 innovate when they organized the first Grand Lodge? Surely no one will in our day attempt to deny but what these two acts of progression redounded to advantage and credit of Freemasonry, yet many of our ancient brethren denounced these acts as mnovations. If Freemasonry is not a progressive science, then will some one tell us what it is?

To this we find no reference in the report of any committee. The financial showing of the Grand Lodge is excellent. Idaho has no Masonic Home, but is building up a Widows' and Orphans' Fund and is evidently in line with the spirit of Masonry in that regard. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This is "a good piece of work", covering 119 pages in a careful review路 of the Proceedings of fifty-seven Grand Lodges. Missouri has a liberal share of the space occupied, being accorded three and a half pages in a路 most kindly spirit.


1917.]

53

Appendix

ILLINOIS. 1916. RALPH

H.

ISAAC

G. G. S.

WHEELER, CUTTER,

CHARLES

H.

1917. Re-elected. (Of course!) Grand Correspondent. Members, 148,055.

M.

MARTIN

Lodges, 859. Gain, 7,306.

As might be well expected th~ Proceedings of this great Grand Lodge appear in imposing form and size and the splendid faces and figures of Past Grand Master (and present Grand Treasurer) Leroy A. Goddard and Isaac Cutter, Grand Secretary, dignify the volume in the opening pages.

SEVENTY-SEVI,NTH

ANNUAL

COMMUNICATION.

The Annual ~ommunication was held in Chicago, commeneing on Tuesday, October 10th, and was opened with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, which we subjoin because of its beauty and rever路 ential tone: Supreme Ruler of the Universe, we would reverently invoke Thy blessing at this time. 'Vould'st Thou be pleased to grant that this meeting thus begun with prayer may be conducted in harmony and closed in peace. -\Ve beseech Thee, our Heavenly Father, that Thou would'st grant unto the members of this assembly the true Masonic spirit of brotherly love and truth, and may all of our deliberations during this convention be conducted in that spirit. . We beseech Thee, oh, most great and mighty God, that Thou wilt guide and bless the Government under which we live Oat this time; and, repr路esenting as we do, the interests of this great state in this meeting, we pray that 'l'hou wilt bless the President of the United States and that Thou wilt endow him with wisdom from On High, in order that at this time, when the world seems to be on fire, when governments and rulers are losing their heads, and nations are filled with fear, we pray that Thou wilt rule, guide and control Thy servant in order that he may rule this nation with justice and with equity; and grant, oh Heavenly Father, Thy spirit upon him; may he pursue the ways of peace and lead the nation aright, in order that at the right time this nation may be used of Thee to restore order to a disordered world, and this we ask in Thy Name and路 to Thy glory. Amen. 掳


54

[Sept.

Appendix

The Grand Master prefaces his Annual Address as follows: My purpose as Grand Master has been to serve rather than to rule and govern, and in serving I have found much pleasure. The duties of a Grand Master are varied and numerous, and at times it seemed as though I should not be able to fulfill, but my many friends have always stood ready and willing to assist, and with their help I have managed to keep up the work. The opportunity to serve at the head of so noble an institution as a Grand Lodge of Ancient' Free and Accepted Masons is one that comes to but few, and I am conscious of a very great honor, but in addition to that, a wonderful benefit to myself. The examples of devotion, loyalty, zeal, sacrifice and enthusiasm that I have witnessed have been a splendid series of object lessons to me and I feel that I am a broader, kinder, tenderer and more devoted man and Mason than I was a year ago.

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And, introducing his remarks on Necrology, he says: Let us bow our heads with reverence to the Supreme Architect of the Universe Who, in His wisdom, has called several of our members to their eternal reward.

LODGES CONSTITUTED AND INSTITUTED.

Twelve lodges were constituted during "the year and the same number instituted, one of these having received a dispensation from the preceding Grand Master. Six Masonic Temples were dedicated by the Grand Master, in person, during the year, and nine corner stones were laid by him, in person, or by duly constituted proxies.

VISITATIONS.

In this the Grand Master made a record, having visited 100 lodges during the year, most of which, however (70), were in Chicago.

THE STARS AND STRIPES.

The Grand Master speaks feelingly and forcibly concerning the flag of our country:


1917.]

Appendix

55

THE FLAG.

Masonry teaches that we "should be loyal to our Government and obedient to its laws". No time in the world's history has been more in 路need of this sentiment than the present. No Government, which human minds have' formulated, is more worthy of loyalty . from its citizens and obedience to its laws than ours. 'With this thought in mind, I took a great deal of pleasure in accepting a recommendation of the Board of Grand Examiners, which resulted in the exemplification of a ceremony at each of the schools of' instruction held under their auspices throughout the year, for presenting and displaying' the Flag of Our Country in the East of oU't Lodges. I am proud to say that this. ceremony has been adopted and practiced by nearly all of the lodges in our jurisdiction and has met with the hearty approval of the craft. In addition thereto, it has aroused a great deal of interest in other jurisdictions, and I am creditably informed, has been adopted by some. Masonry seeks to impress the great and fundamental truths and virtues upon the mind by the use of symbols. Is it then not most fitting that the symbol of patriotism, the emblem of what our nation is and stands for, should float upon the air of our Lodge halls and by its presence and the message of self-sacrifice, manly endeavor and splendid heroism, which breathes from its folds, inspire that undying devotion to our country's cause which shOUld characterize every true Mason? .

He reports at some length touching the prosperous and happy condition of the Homes, and the I"eports of other officials later show that in the Children's Home there are 86 and in the Old Folks' Home 143. The total outlay for both Homes thus appearing to be $79,053.01, an average expenditure per capita of a fraction over $345. FRATERN AL CORRESPONDENCE.

The Grand Correspondent presents a, most worthy report, covering 250 pages. He deals kindly with Missouri and compliments the Correspondent-for which, thanks!


56

Appendix

[Sept.

INDIANA. 1917. HARRY B. TUTHILL, G. CALVIN

W.

PRATHER, G.

1918. L. BRANIGIN, G. M. Re·elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 77,847.

M.

ELBA

S.

F. GAY Lodges, 564.

ELMER

Gain, 4,127. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Indiana introduces itself most patriotically with a beautiful representation of our flag, with this legend underneath: THE FLAG OF OUR COUNTRY

. Should Be Displayed in Every Lodge Room. Furthermore, the volume is brightened by the pictures of the Grand Master for 1917-18, and that of Calvin W. Prather, Grand Secretary, for-a great while, we hope. OPENING EXERCISES.

. As is customary with this Grand Lodge, the opening ceremonies were in the auditorium of the Masonic Temple and were varied with music and addresses. The orator of the hour was Rev. Frank R. Loveland, D. D., pastor of the Meridian Street Methodist Church, whose address is given in extenso. It is striking in many paragraphs and we can not refrain from favoring our readers with some selections:

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We turn from the antiquarian of the past to the resourceful, brilliant and energetic leaders· of the present, and ask them to give us the secrets of this awful age through .which we are stumbling and staggering, suffering and dying, in our pilgrimage across the years. We lift our hands in pathetic pleading to the great leaders in the realms of Government, Religion and Masonry, and pray for them to give us light!-give us light!! But these of the present, like those of the past, only mock our hopes and prayers by telling us that "Clouds and darkness are 'round the Throne," and that the present breakdown of human civilization and the seeming failure of human brotherhood, causes their human reason to stagger, their hu.man calculation to recline its tired head, and their human imagination to fold its wearied pinions. My brothers, may it not be possible that while we have been droning our lectures a ruffian in Rome has been striking at the


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Appendix

1917. ]

throat of the world, to still the voice of freedom and the language of liberty? May it not be true that while we have been engrossed in "letter perfection" another ruffian in Constantinople has been mutilating the breast of mankind and stilling the heart of hope and love? Can it be possible that, while we have been called from labor to refreshment, another ruffian in Potsdam has, with cruel, autocratic setting-maul, stricken civilization itself to the earth, while the world stands aghast at the deed of despotism?

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In the last thirty-four months seven million men have been slain in battle-three million more have perished from starvation,disease and neglect-thirty-five million morc have been wounded, blinded, crippled and broken in both body and mind-and all this iJ? lands and among peoples that for centuries have professed faith in tne Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of Man. ONE

HUNDREDTH

YEAR.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Anciâ&#x201A;Źnt and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Indiana convened in Iiinety-sixth annual meeting in the Grand Lodge hall of the Masonic Temple in the City of Indianapolis at 10 o'clock a. m., Tuesday, the 22nd day of May, A. D. 1917, A. L. 5917, being the fourth Tuesday in May, one hundredth year of the Grand Lodge. THE ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This co'vers thirty-four pages and is full of interest not merely to those .of that Grand Jurisdiction, but to every true Mason. We quote a few paragraphs to show its high quality and also for the thought contained: Brethren of the Grand Lodge: OUR OBLIGATION AND OUR DUTY.

We stand today upon the threshold of an uncertain future. We are not on the verge of war; we are in war; waged the most cruelly and rele'ntlessly since Atilla, "The Scourge of God;" roamed the plains of sunny Italy. with his hordes of Huns and Vandals, fifteen hundred years ago. We stand at a parting of the ways. To the East we behold the scintillating darts of the rising sun of a new righteousness and consequentlY of a new civilization. We shall not go backward. We sfiall not stand still. We shall go forward. It is a profound error to declare we go into this war as to a sacrifice. It would be false to asseverate, even in a limited manner, that we enter this conflict merely to pay a debt. For while we do pay a debt when we enter it we pay a debt, not to any other country,


[Sept.

Appendix

58

not to any other people; we pay a debt to God and to mankind-a debt we contracted when "the Lord God breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and man became a living soul."

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The Grand Master displays a most commendable humility in referring to himself in his relation to the Grand Lodge. He partly says. that the presence of a Grand Master in a lodge-especially in a small lodge-is an event. And he commends the smaller country lodges he has visited in high terms. Incidentally he says: When considering the good work so often observed in the smaller lodges of Indiana, their loyalty to the Craft and the efforts put forth sometimes under not the most favorable circumstances, I am reminded that upon more than one occasion brethren well advanced in years have approached me with a warm grasp of hand and remarked: "You are the first Grand Master I ever saw in my life." Many others have stated: "You are the first Grand Master who ever visited our Lodge."

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The Grand Master rules "that the Social Order called the Grotto is not a Masonic institution, never having been recognized by the Grand Lodge of this Jurisdiction as such. It is, hence, not allowable that the lodge room of a Masonic lodge, or its tackle, furniture, or any part thereof, be occupied or used by this society." The Grand Master makes few rulings-none of note.

THE BLACK DALL.

He speaks strongly on this subject.

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We quote in part:

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In every instance I have declared the Masonic rule to be that any brother who casts¡ a black ball other: than for the good of the Order casts a polluted black ball; and by the same token, any brother who casts a white ball, merely because. he wishes to be a good fellow, is liable to cast a polluted white ball. While, of course, if a brother in either instance follows hi.s obligation and remains silent, it will never be known how he voted, if it could be proved ¡by valid evidence that he cast either a polluted white or polluted black ball he might be tried as for a Masonic offense, and, in the judgment of the Lodge, expelled.

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1917. ]

Appendix

59

DISPENSATIONS.

Four new lodges were created by dispensation and twentyfive corner stones were laid with Masonic honors during the year, the Grand Master officiating in a number of cases. A GREAT DAY.

The dedication of the Masonic Home at Franklin, Indiana, on the 28th day of October, 1916, was a great occasion. A multitude estimated at 5,000 was present and the Grand Master presided in person. We may here remark that this young institution seem~ to be in promising condition, financial and otherwise. The present capacity for adults is 53路 and this is fully occupied. There are some 17 children also in the Home. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

We can honestly say many good things touching this report, which covers 144 pages in a review of the Proceedings of 54 Grand Lodges. Missouri is kindly considered in the use of more than three pages, of which one and a quarter columns is used in a selection from the annual address of Grand Master Jesse. Our good Brother alluded to the extra letter in his name as it appears in our report with evident disapprobation. Our printer calls him Gary-instead of Gay! Now, the printer and proofreader must bear the blame. Yet they may have thought that the name Gay was too hilarious in its suggestion for a dignified Past Grand Master, and changed it on that account. Or he, or they, may have thought that a name of three letters was altogether too abbreviated for a Past Grand Master and present Grand Correspondent and proposed in kindness to add a supplement! If all "this and there" is n~t satisfactory we solemnly promise that if our honored Brother persists in being "Gay"-Gay he shall be, if we have to change our printer!


60

[Sept.

Appendix

IOWA. FRANK NEWTON

1916. S. MOSES, G. M. R. PARVIN, G. S.

1917. G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 53,969.

THOMAS ARTHUR,

LEWIS BLOCK

Lodges, 526. Gain, 2,184.

The picture of the Passing Grand Master, Frank S. Moses, indicates a strong character, and this is confirmed by the biographical sketch that follows. We need strong men as well as good men in these exalted and responsible positions. SEVENTY-THIRD

ANNUAL

CO:i\iMUNICATION.

The Grand Lodge of Iowa convened for its Annual Session in the City of Davenport, in Turner Opera House, on Tuesday, June 13th, 1916, and was opened in Ample Form. From the prayer of the Grand Chaplain we excerpt a paragraph or two, regretting not to copy all. It breathes a most devout and as well a genial spirit and withal is most eloquent in expression: We' pause reverently in Thy presence, our Heavenly Father, as we recall those who since last we met in Grand Lodge session have passed on within the portals of eternal life and are lost to us awhile. Grant them, we beseech Thee, eternal peace and rest at last after the battle of life. They were Thy servants here on earth; they were masters among men, leading and guiding their brethren along the highways of life, may they receive Thy commendation, o Grand Master of us all, "well done thou good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord". And as at this time, 0 Heavenly Father, we are seeking Thy blessing and favor upon us as an organization, we would also implore Thy blessing and guidance upon us as citizens of this state and nation. Guide, we beseech Thee, the people of this country as again we make choice of those who shall lead this nation along the highways of our state and national life, may we choose wisely, sanely and conscientiously, not alone for the present, with its unusual and far-reaching problems, but for the future, so that the destiny of this great land, with its varied peoples, may be attained, our civilization uninterrupted in its progress, and its permanence in the great family of nations maintained.

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From the. address of the Grand Master, which occupies some


1917.]

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Appendix

thirty-eight or thirty-nine pages, and abounds in noble sentiments, we extract a few paragraphs, with regret that路 we can not use more. Such utterances strongly tempt us to lay aside the pen for the scissors: Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Iowa: We again assemble in our Annual Communication, as representatives of the whole craft of this Grand Jurisdiction, acknowledging as our first duty that we reverently return thanks to the Giver of all Good for the peace, harmony and prosperity that prevails, both in our beloved order and the country in which we have the privilege to live.

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\Ve meet today under the beautiful flag whose very colors are symbolic in Masonry-the oldest national banner now floating in the breeze-one on which the sun never sets. It is fitting that this flag waves over a nation whose formation and existence sprang from the earnest determination of the路 early brethren of this continent, that here should be a country under a government founded upon the Masonic principles of equality, liberty and fraternity, where all who believed in these great fundamentals might find a hospitable home. To perpetuate these principles the American people and the institution of Freemasonry. have both striven ever since their foundations, and must continue s.o to do that they may be preserved for our utmost posterity. These purposes of Masonry are altruistic, constructive and conservative. It is emphatically our duty as men and Masons to ever bear in mind these principles and purposes and join heartily with all who believe and practice in the great devel.opment of higher civilization through their application.

The Gra;nd Master records with :feeling the fact that during the past year "six hundred and ninety-two Brethren of this Grand Jurisdiction have put on the robes of immortality", including three Past Grand Masters, besides two Past Junior Grand Wardens. NEW LODGES.

Two lodges duly chartered by the last Grand Lodge were constituted ~y proxy, and seven lodges were created by dispensationall the conditions being carefully considered by the Grand Master. CEREMONIAL.

Several ceremonial occasions, including dedications, the laying bf corner stones, etc., were attended by the Grand Master in; per-

son, and' are formally reported.


62

[Sept.

Appendix

The Grand Master reports a special and large increase in the Grand Charity Fund and urges yet more liberality in this direction. Referring to physical qualifications, he states that in some Grand Jurisdictions healthful restrictions are being laid aside and each individual lodge left to decide as to the qualificaqons of the candidate. We fully agree with him that this is most unwise and must be unhappy in effect. MASONIC CHARITY. This Grand Jurisdiction has no Masonic Home, but the spirit of wholesome charity is abundantly manife.st and to the long list of needy applicants there was contributed during the year over eleven thousand dollars, and doubtless this report is far from complete. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. Our excellent Brother Block gives us in this a strong and sparkling review, covering some 208 pages, and doing it most worthily. For his good words for Missouri and the Correspondent-Thanks-Thanks!

IRELAND. 1916.

1917.

THE EARL OF DONOUGHMORE, G. M. H. E. FLAVELLE, Dep. G. S. Lodges, 510. Gain,

Re-elected. Re-elected. Members, 40,000.

The Grand Lodge Room in Freemasons Hall, City of Dublin, is a most imposing hall, as indicated by the picture whIch introduces this pamphlet of sixty-six pages which contains th~ Pro-' ceedings of the Grand Lodge as reported at the annual meeting, December 27th. The furnishings, including pipe organ, etc., are elaborate. In the absence of the Grand Master,who was detained by Red Cross work in France, the Deputy Grand' Master presided, and


1917.]

Appendix

63

after the opening ceremonies read two letters from Lord Donoughmore, one referring to a local trouble in Ireland and the other to the general state of the Craft. The Deputy Grand Master delivered a careful address, in which he seems to cover almost all matters relating to the work of the , year. From it we quote: Right "Worshipful and 'Worshipful Brethren: Since the beginning of this great war, the Grand Lodge of Ireland has assembled on three occasions in a period of three years, on that particular day that is dedicated to our patron saint. On the last occasion, this time twelve months, I expressed the hope first that the year 1916 would see the termination of this great war, and, secondly, the hope, which I am sure was felt by everyone present on that occasion, that it would end in a glorious victory on our part (hear, hear). Now the third 81. John:s Day has arrived in December, and still nearly all Europe is in arms, and death continues to reap its sad harvest of precious, and I may say, youthful life. The hope that i expr"essed in reference to the termination of the war in 1916 has not been realized, nor has the other hope that it would have ended in victory on our part, but I must now say that the hope I expressed upon the last occasion on which we assembled in this hall has now been converted into absolute certainty (hear, hear)that this war will terminate in the year .that is now so near to us, and also that it will terminate in certain victory for us (applause). Our enemies, I may say, almost admit the failure of their 'objects in their pitiful application for peace conferences. That state of things so far as they are concerned is made cle~rly manifest. They know that they are beaten; they know that the man power against them is enormous and is sure, in the long run, to prove victorious.

The Grand Secretary in his report introduces many communications and various items of interest. We give a paragraph: Notwithstanding the concentration of all thoughts on the prosecution of the great war, the Masonic Order in Ireland during the past year has maintained its hold on the interest of Brethren. Many Lodges have been reduced in numbers by members who have volunteered their services to the Country, no inconsiderable proportion of whom have been fated never to return, but these losses have been, in a great 'measure, counterbalanced by the accession of new members, and the close of the year finds the Order throughout the country as prosperous and numerically as strong as at the beginning. There are so many calls on behalf of different patriotic funds that our charities have.. to some extent, suffered. but on the other hand our own Masonic 'Val' Reli-ef Fund has grown to an extent that will guarantee some reasonable help to our members and their dependents when the war is over and the need becomes acute.


64

[Sept.

Appendix WAR RELIEF }<'UND.

The Grand Secretary warns the Craft of a possible time of want in the future, as follows: At the present time, and probably whilst the war endures, the expenditure of public money upon a gigantic scale causes a temporary condition of plenty amongst many and a general, but deceptive, air of prosperity amongst all. No doubt, the other belligerent nations have the same experience, and it is only when peace comes and this flow of public money ceases that the real pinch will be felt, want of employment, homes ruined by the death of the bread winner and men broken in the war. To pl'ovide for this inevitable time of want and suffering amongst the ranks of our Order, we are carefully nursing this \Var Relief Fund so that it may be available when needed most.

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Five lodges were constituted during the year. The finances of the' Grand Lodge for both genera( and 'charitable purposes seem to be in a healthy condition. There is no report on Correspondence. The figures given as to number of lodges and members is only an approximation, though the number of lodges given is nearly correct.

KANS,AS. 1918.

1917. GILES ALBERT

H. K.

G. M. WILSON, G. S. LAMB,

CHARLES

MATTHEW M. MILLER

Lodges, 412.

E. LORDELL, G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 45,684.

Gain, 1,622. The picture of the Passing Grand Mast~r, Giles H. Lamb, shO"ws him to be of massive proportions physically, and the fact oCthe position he has occupied in this Grand Jurisdiction would seem to show that his mind and heart are builded in the same mould of magnitude. SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. ~he M. W. Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Kansas convened in Annual Communication in the banquet hall


1917.]

65

Appendix

of the Scottish Rite Temple, in th'e City of Wichita, Kansas, Wednesday, the 21st day of February, A. D. 1917, A. L. 5917, at 9 o'clock a. m., and was opened in Ample Form, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, which prayer contains so路 much of -devotion and lofty sentiment that we would be glad to transcribe it in full. The total representation in the Grand Lodge was large, 886.路 After announcement of the standing committees the Grand Master delivered the annual address, which is of high character. We quote an opening paragraph:

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During the past year Freemasonry in Kansas has kept pace with the other institutions of the state that stand for the uplift and betterment of mankind. Growth, development, stability and efficiency have been the characteristics of the year. THE MEMBERSHIP.

Our membership on December 31, 1915, was 44,062. On December 31, 1916, it was 45,6R4-a net gain of 1,622, or 28 less than the gain of the preceding year. No apology is needed for this apparent decrease in net gain. Yet the decrease is not the rcsult of indifference or lack of energy路 on the part of the Craft. DurIng the year 1915 we lost by death 544 members, and during 1916 the number _increased to 646, an excess of 92. Six hundred and forty-six deaths in our Fraternity in one year ~more than two for each working day of the term. Their nearest-, and dearest relatives and friends stood by, appalled and helpless before the Pale Messenger of Death, In the last sad hour a Brother Mason stood at the open grave and pointed out the Mason's hope in the immortality- of the soul. May not we, who yet stand on this side of the great eternity, chant in our hearts a verse from gne of thc hymns of our childhood: "0, that home of the soul, in my visions and dreams Its bright jasper walls I can see, Till I fancy but thinf y the veil intervenes Between that fair city and me."

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DECISIONS.

Among several of these to which we see no objection is one to this effect-we quote the exact language: 4. It is a violation of Masonic Law for a Lodge in Kansas to permit a member or members of it Lodge of another Grand Jurisdiction to confer ahy part of its work on a candidate when the work of the other Jurisdiction -differs in any way from the prescribed ~work in Kansas.


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Appendix

[Sept.

Candidly we see no special reason for this, though as the Committee on Jurisprudence路 approves, it must be in accordance with the law and usage of Kansas. We have seen more than once the officers of' foreign jurisdictions confer a degree according to their ritual, to the edification and profit of the lodge being visited. And we, personally, sometimes, in con~erring a degree, recall ancient forms and expressions, and one may use them without, as we think, ~iolating the law or spirit of Freemasonry-but "N'importe", as the French say. THE MASONIC ROMI<:.

This institution receives great attention and occupies much space in the Proceedings, many pages being filled with matter pertaining to its destruction by fire in the early morning of December 22, 1916. In this calamity five persons lost their lives, while many suffered severely from exposure. There was insurance on the buildings, but not nearly enough to cover the loss, including the expenses consequent on caring for the family thus suddenly evicted. We' sympathize greatly with our brethren in this calamity and appreciate the courage with which they at once set about the work of rebuilding. That to do this will require devotion and sacrifice is manifest. TIlE GRAND ORATOR.

The address of Hon. and Bro. Wm. A. Johnson, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas, is printed in full in the Proceedings and is worthy of a place in the archives of Freemasonry. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

We much regret that the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of MiSsouri were "not received in time" to find notice at the strong hands of our good Brother, M. W:. MatthewW. Miller, the Correspondent of the Grand Lodge of Kansas. The report is full of interest, with no trace of cynicism or egotism at any point. We quote from the CONCLUSION.

Your committee has discussed the various topics of interest to the Craft where the same have been raised in the various Masonic


1917.]

67

Appendix

jurisdictions reviewed by us, and lack of space forbids further reference than to say briefly, that the Masonic outlook in the United States has never been brighter, more cheering or more indicative of zeal for the Craft in increased membership, and- never has there been manifested on the part of the Craft a more tender cal'e for the distressed of the Fraternity, or a more general devotion to the interests of humanity generall~", than there have been during the year just closed. The sympathies of the Craft have been extended not only to the Brethren of the Fraternity, but also to humanity in general in other lands, where there have been suffering and loss from desolation and devastation by reason of war. The signs of promise for the Fraternity for the year 1917 just entered upon are brighter than for any of those which have preceded it.

KENTUCKY. 1917. N. SAUNDERS, G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 44,380.

1916. T.' J. ADAMS, G. M. DAVE JACKSON,

G.

JAMES

S.

W. CLARK Lodges, 593.

WM.

Gain, 993. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky constitute a large volume which 1s but natural, since this is one of the largest and most dignified of all our Grand Bodies. The volume is adorned in its initial pages by excellent photos of M. W. James N. Saunders, the incoming GrandMaster, also that of P. G. M. Thos. Jefferson Adams, whose long and faithful labors in the interests of Freemasonry well entitle him to this distinction. Following these we have a splendidly written biographical sketch of this eminent Mason, who is now holding the difficult position of Superintendent of the Masonic Home. We have also the splendid address of Daniel S. McMillin, Grand Master of Texas, who thus responded to a.special invitation. As a native of Kentucky this was appropriate and pleasant to both speaker and. Grand Lodge. â&#x20AC;˘ ANNUAl, COMMUNICATION.

The One Hundred and Sixteenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, Free and Accepted Masons, was


68

Appendix

[Sept.

he!d in the Masonic Temple, Louisville, Ky., commencing Tuesda.y, October 17, 1916, and was opened in ample form on the Master Mason's degree at 10 o'clock a. m. THE

ANNUAL

ADDRESS.

This covers sixty-four pages and seems to touch every point of possible interest and is a painstaking report of the labors and experiences of the. Grand Master during the year.

*

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~

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*

From a practical, every-day business man, whose only claim to distinction is by reason of your kindness, which has elevated him to the exalted position of Grand Master of one of the greatest Jurisdictions of the world, you -can not expect a report or such finish and completeness as might be expected from one more fortunate in educational opportunities. I trust, therefore, that a plain statement of official acts and existing conditions may satisfy your expectations, and, if so, it will be but another evidence of that fraternal spirit which has brought so much of sunshine into my life. A PLEA FOR UNIVERSAL PEACE.

May I not say that a meeting of the Grand Masters of our own land, and of the world, if possible, might become a mighty influence in the direction of universal peace? No thought or endeavor could be more appropriate for such an assembly. Our orgal1lzation is itself a plea for peace and an argument for peace. Freemasonry makes for the dissemination of the spirit of brotherhood throughout the world, and teaches us that peace and harmony are the strength and beauty of all institutions. Freemasons need not dwell on the fact that seven-tenths of the incom,e of our nation is expended for war and its equipment, and that in other lands th'e tax 1s even greater. As Freemasons, we can not fail to deplore the barbarity of war, the awful sacrifice of human life and human hope, not merely on the field of carnage or in the hospitals of the world filled with groaning victims, but in the widows and orphans left helpless, starving, dying, because their protectors are taken away. Surely it were well for us to consider this, and to support ~very thought and movement calculated to secure the peace of the world. All the Masonic Grand Bodies and individual Freemasons could not engage in a wiser, more righteous, more human or more useful ende::tvor thaJl to try in every proper way, with all their power, to influence their particular governments to make treaties with all other nations looking to the perpetuation of the peace of the world.

We suppose every Grand Lodge and every Mason would join heartily in this sentiment-with the understanding, however, that


1917.]

Appendix

69

the issues for which the gerat majority of the battling nations are contending are first to be settled and settled right! Then-but not until-let us have a peace that will endure to the end of time! DISPENSATIONS.

Four were granted for corner stone occasions, six for dedication of halls, three for new lodges and many for the usual reasons. "OPINIONS."

Such is the term by which the Grand Master reports what are usually known as "Decisions". His modesty here. as well as elsewhere. is worthy of commendation and imitation. These opinions. with the arguments presented, are seventy-seven in number, covering thirty pages. In them we see nothing contrary to the tenets and usages of Masonry. His visits were numerous and his correspondence extensive, though he refuses to consider it as burdensome. which is another indication of a truly Masonic spirit. THE MASONIC HOME.

This is the first established Masonic Home and so may be considered as the forerunner if not in some sort the mother of all that have been established. The north wing of the main building was completed and dedicated October 20th, 1870, and the other portion of the main building was completed and dedicated October 23rd, 1878. The Home family consists of 26 widows, 152 girls and 184 boys, making 362 in all. and the Grand Master reports the number as continually increasing. )'he Home, he says, is greatly in need of repair, but the financial condition will not permit this. He even says that were it not for the voluntary donations, especially noting that of St. John's Day in Louisville, the running expenses of the Home could not be paid. The per capita tax is now seventy-five cents and he hopes that "the time is not far dis-' tant when every Mason in Kentucky will contribute one dollar each year, etc." There is a debt on the Home of over ten thousand dollars. We do not -find a statement of the per capita cost of each inmate, and as the Home is industrial in its autonomy, it is difficult to arrive at this with any exactness.


70

[Sept.

Appendix FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers 117 pages in the review of fifty-two Grand Lodge Proceedings and the work is of exceptional character. We see no indication of a disposition to criticise anywhere, but rather to commend. Missouri is accorded one and one-half pages in a kindly spirit, though the Correspondent objects "frankly" to "4. Decided of jurisdiction that the Lodge a part or all g路ranted."

that when one Lodge requests of another waiver over a candidate for the degrees of Freemasonry, granting the requ~st has a legal right to demand the fees as a condition on which the waIver is

This is his comment: "Prankly, we do not like decision No.4. VVe do not wish to intimate that it does not declare the law as it is in this jurisdiction, but the law smacks strongly of commercialism, and seems to consider every possible candidate for Masonry as a potential fee."

He is complimentary to us in stating that our report "is a good one". Thanks.

LOUISIANA. 1917. B. B. PURSER, G. M. JOHN A. DAVILLA, G. S. HERMAN C. DUNCAN Lodges, 226.

1918. JOHN

W. ARMSTRONG, G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 18,314. Gain, 552.

ANNUAL SESSION.

The One Hundred and Sixth Annual Grand Communication of the M. W. Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Louisiana, convened at the Scottish Rite Cathedral in the City of New Orleans, on Monday night, the 5th of February, 1917, at 7: 30 o'clock, and was opened on the Third or Master's Degree in Ample Form by M. W. Brother B. B. Purser, Grand Master, following prayer by the Rev. Herman Cope Duncan, Grand Chaplain. The attendance was large, 190 lodges being present by their representatives.


71

Appendix

1917.]

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This is unusually long, covering some seventy-one pages, but is full of interest, especially so it must have been to the Craft in that Jurisdiction. It contains much of lofty sentiment and many wise maxims, all calculated to enlarge and enlighten. We quote from the introduction: There is a myth concerning an old painter, that by a happy chance he compounded one day a certain mordant, which, colorless itself, possessed the power of heightening every color with which it was mixed. By the hefp of his discovery, from being a commonplace artist, he rose to the position of a noted master. His works were renowned for the marvelous brilliancy of their tints. On his canvas was produced in exactest hue the waving cmerald of the forest, the silver gleam of the river, the swimming light of the sunset, and the infinite azure of the sky. Everywhere and always the charm of the picture was due to that colorless nurse of color, which, by its strange alchemy, transfigured the crudeness and coarseness of the common tint. Brethren, it is not mere ecclesiastical prejudice which asserts that Freemasonry has silently and similarly wrought vigor and attractiveness and power into .our American life. All fair-minded judges pronounce it our social mordant. The student of legislation, the observer 'of our domestic and social prosperity, the inquirer into the excellences of our educational systems, one and all find everywhere the influence of national reverence for Freemasonry. Unrecognized in its workings, Freemasonry is the element that has wrought out the choice beauty of the best things of which we boast. To it, and largely to it, we are indebted for juster laws, better schools, happier homes, greater security of social order, than can be found in any other land. Freemasonry is before us as a visible and beneficent force, and a veritable benediction; and it predisposes us in favor of Him who sent it to us and to bless our civilization.

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He deI;flores the rapid growth of the Order, involving, as it does, many serious deficiencies, due to the fact that lodges are so often intent on number rather路 than character. Referring to the Shrine and its congeners, he says: In these later days we hear much of the "playground of Freemasonry" and the "flower garden of Freemasonry," catch phrases invented and put forth, often by well-meaning Masons and friends of the org-anizatlons, but Masonry has no playground nor flower garden; it is a progressive, moral science; it respects the Ancient Landmarks; it works silently, but not the less effectively; and it sanctions ethical standards. It has and should have naught to do


72

[Sept.

Appendix

with vaudeville, red and green fire, blatant street parades and that class of notoriety. The conservative and thoughtful Mason,' while not viewing these matters with great alarm, still realizes that sooner or later -and conditions now appear that "it will be sooner"-the picnic idea must be eliminated. These organizations which have crept in and fastened upon the great body of Freemasonry are like vegetable parasites and fungi. Masonry is serious, verging upon the religious. 'Ve, if tru'e Masons, worship the one God who has no . Brother and brooks no rival. I look forward to the rapidly approaching time when the evil effects of organizations which claim to be Masonic, because composed exclusively of Masons, or because fastened upon the Masonic organization, will be innocuous, either because under the ban of the Masons or because of internal refermation.

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The Grand Master wisely states that when lodges are over路 grown in membership new lodges should be organized, and he also deprecates the habit in many lodges of electing and re-electing those who have long held office simply because of that fact. To all of which we say Amen-and Amen! To continue to hold the same office, whether in Grand or subordinate lodges-except, of course, Secretary, Treasurer, Chaplain, etc., is in our estimate an unworthy exhibition of egotism on the part of the individual and of subserviency or indifference on the part of the lodge. New blood should be introduced and younger . members should be encouraged to aspire to positions in the lodge. He recommends recognition <?f the Grand Orient of France. (From which we respectfully dissent.) He declines to favor recognition of the York Grand Lodge of Mexico. (Ditto-as above.) He criticises the Masonic Club, which has become indebted to the Grand Lodge $1,600, insisting that they shall pay the bill, and recommending that the Grand Lodge do not cancel all or any part of the debt. (This was finally decided by consenting to accept $600-in twelve equal installments.) The Grand Master reports many visitations and official acts and 103 decisions, most of which are of local interest and generally in accord with the law and usages of Freemasonry. We object, however, to the one in which he decides that one born out of wedlock can not be admitted-also to his unqualified statement that a Master can be elected from the floor who has never held


1917.]

73

Appendix

inferior offices. Neither of these "go" with us, but we do not criticise our Brethren who differ from us. They MAY be right-but we do not think so! The Board of Relief makes an extended report showing good work in this department during the year. There is no committee or report on Charity, but we doubt not that our Brethren do much in the individual lodges in that. direction. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This report covers fifty pages and, of course, each discussion is necessarily brief. Missouri is unusually distinguished in that we a~e accorded two pages.

MAINE. 1917.

1916. H.

BODGE,

G. M.

STEPHEN

BERRY,

G.

THOS.

G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 31,328.

WALDO PETTINGILL,

S.

A. E. CHASE Lodges, 205.

Gain, 444. NINETY-SEVENTH

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Maine met in Annual Communication in Masonic Temple at.9 in the morning on Tuesday, May 2, all the Grand Officers being in their stations, also 233 delegates, representing 186 of the 205 chartered lodges, four of the eight living Past Grand Masters, with 31 out of the other' 43 permanent members, including 38 of the 59 representatives of other G~aQd Lodges, together with visiting brethren. The Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form, prayer being offered by the Rev. Bro. Henry E. Dunnack, Grand Chaplain. THE

ANNUA~

ADDRESS,

~ which

covers only thirteen pages, is crowded with good things. Its terse and striking style is illustrated in the opening sentence: "What came you here to do?" you who have come from all parts of our state to participate in the work of this Grand Lodge. Many


74

[Sept.

Appendix

are here for the first time, while others have held council together for many years. 'iV"e are convened for a common purpose-to consult upon the work of the past and plan for the future as Masons in all ages have done before us. The labors of those who have assembled in years gone by are perpetuated in our laws and customs; upon the foundations they laid has been builded the Grand Lodge of :Maine with its traditions and record of achievements.

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Masonry in Maine is certainly advancing in the broad noble sense of becoming more and more a part of the life of the members. There has been a gain in numbers, our Grand Secretary will tell you it is 444, and there are now 31,328 affiliated members of our lodges. In this we are to be congratulated. Let us, howev,er, not forget mere numbers is not the mark at which we aim. Initiation is only a small part of the work we should have in hand when we "make a man a Mason." Masonry means more than the assembling in our lodges, reciting, our ritual and making the app~icants into members. It means the teaching of the truths of Holy vVrit which treat of the Fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man. No man can be made a Mason unless he profess belief in Deity, and no man c'an be a Mason unless he recognizes his duty to his fellows and neighbors and discharges that duty with honor to himself. We can not escape the' Fraternity being judged by the' lives of members, and should so live that in our communities each "may be known as one to whom the burdened heart may pour out its sorrows, to whom distress may prefer its suit" whose hand is guided by justice and whose heart is expanded by benevolence." "THEY ARE JUST AWAY;"

The Grand Master refers to the fact that five Past Grand Masters have died in the past bvo years, and continuing his report on the "missing", he closes with the familiar but ever beautiful lines: "I can not say-I will not say That they are dead. They are just away. With the cheery smile and a wave of the hand, They have wandered into an unknown land, And left us dreaming how very fair It needs must be, since they are there. And you-O you who the wildest yearn For the old-time step and the glad return Think ,of them faring on, as dear In the love of there as the love of here; Think of them still as the same, I say, They are not dead-they are just away." "A WORD TO THE WISE."

Referring to lodges which have been destroyed by fire during the year, involving a total loss, the Grand Master insists that


1917.]

Appendix

7S

every lodge with its properties should be insured and kept insured. Another Grand Master, on. this subject, wisely suggests that every lodge should secure a duplicate charter for use in th~ lodge room and keep the original in a safety vault. The "oTiginal" charter can not be restored and it should be esteemed a valuable heritage for co'ming generations. Touching the ballot, the Grand Master deli vel'S a sentiment which might well become an axiom: I am frank to state, brethren, I am more afraid of the misuse of the white than of the black ball.

And he adds to this: If the black ball is used with discrimination it is not likely an~r will be admitted who will later use it viciously. In nearly every case where a member is strongly suspected of interfering with the work" will be expressed the sentiment, "he should never have been admitted."

To both of which we say, Amen! The Grand Secretary in his report gives the. following statement: Your Committee on Heturns would report that returns have been received from all the 205 chartered. lodges. 'l'he gain is 444 or 1.41 per cent, a decrease from last year, when it was 590. The death rate is 20.87 to a thousand, an increase over last year. The average lodge membership is 152.82.

In the recapitulation we find this: Grand Lodge receipts Grand Lodge disbursements Amount of charity fund Income of charity fund

;...... . : $ 9,84 O. 57 ,.................... 9,251.07 , 75,318.12 ,............................ 2,793.32'

FOREIGN CORRESPONDEJIICE.

This work is well done, covering 117 pages in a Sllccinct and courteous review of the Proceedings of the various Grand Lodges received. Missouri is accorded two pages with a number of quotations and no criticism.


76

[Sept.

Appendix

MANITOBA. 1916.

1917. G. M. G. S.

WILLIAM FENWICK,

HENRY

BLETCHER,

G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. . Members, 7,242.

A. OVAS, PERCY E. KELLETT Lodges, 77.

JA:;\fES

E.

Loss,!. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Forty-first Annual Communication of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Manitoba, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, was opened in the Masonic Temple at the City of Winnipeg, Province of Manitoba, on Wednesday, June 14th, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916. The opening exercises were in Ample Form in the presence of the Grand Officers and a co~stitutional number of representative lodges. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

From this we excerpt and comment as' follows:

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In this familiar room, whose air is fragrant with pleasureable recollections, and hollowed by tender memories, we are foregathered in humbleness of spirit' to acknowledge the sense of our littleness and the greatness of God, to render thanks to Him for all His loving kindness, and to supplicate Him to grant us the grace to reflect His word, and the courage to bear our 'trials manfully. DEPARTED BRETHREN.

During the last year we have had many evidences of the immutability of God's laws, and of the uncertainty of all mundane affairs. Our own immediate circle has been broken by the passing of many Brethren to the Grand Lodge Above. While our poignant grief associates with the severing of our earthly chain, yet we are comforted .by the steadfast hope that, under Divine Compassion, the deceased Brethren have gained a happier shore, against whIch the storms of passion and hate never rage, and where, as little children, they may abide in innocence and peace in the service of 路the King of Kings.

Referring to the war, he says in part:


" 1Ppendi.t~

1917. ]

77

THE GREAT WAR.

As loyalty to King and Country is a Masonic maxim, it Is thus becoming that reference here may be made to the great military struggle in which the British Empire is engaged. From reports that have been received it would seem that her foes assumed that the United Kingdom was decadent, that disaffection permeated the Empire, and, that disintegration would be the inevitable路 result of a big display of ar'med force. Little did they dream that their war torch would reveal the British Empire resplendent in its loyalty and devotion to the noblest ideals and traditions of the Anglo-Saxon and standing in peerless solidarity to defend a priceless birthright -the democratic principles or bulwarks of the British body politic -to attain which our forefathers fought and bled. \Vho has the assurance to express in words the extent of the miseries caused by this war? Never. perhaps, in the history of the world has there been greater need for Divine inspiration and guidance and the subordination of selfish propensities and never has there been greater need or opportunity for !<'reemasons to demonstrate their sincerity and worth by co-operating as a whole in ungrudging sacrifice in the cause of suffering humanity. and in unswerving allegiance to the sublime pririciples-Brotherly Lov'e, Relief, Trutb and Charity-which ever strongly appeal to the finer intuitions.

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The Grand Master states that Canada has been called on to raise, if possible, seven millions, and that having called on the Masons of Manitoba for one dollar each and the sum of four thousand having been raised the Grand Lodge should now contribute at least two thousand to this noble charity.

After due examination and consideration the Grand Master granted a dispensation for the formation of one new lodge. He reports that the only occasion of criticism on his administration known to him was that he granted permission to confer the degrees of the Order on a man with one leg. This he justifies by saying that he has known the party for years and is satisfied he will never become a claimant on the charity of the Fraternity. , This might not be productive of evil in on.e case, but, taken as a precedent, it might do great harm. There are far too many now who with all their limbs are either disavowed by relatives or else compelled by other circumstances to ask for aid from the Fraternity. The Grand Master states with commendation the fact that in


78

Appendix

[Sept.

some lodges in the Jurisdiction one-fourth of the members are at the front and doing valiant service for their King and country. The financial condition of the Grand Lodge seems to be good. They have no Masonic Home, but have the nucleus of a Benevolent Fund which they are increasing from year to year. Many suspensions for non-payment of dues are reported; in one lodge fifty-six, another twenty, another seventeen, etc., etc. Frequently this is the fault of the Secretary as much as the parties themselves. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

The committee explains as follows: In place of the practice of many Foreign Correspondence Committees of reporting in detail on each Grand Lodge report, your Committee has culled from many reports such matter as possesses the greatest value in suggestion, encouragement and inspiration and now presents it in such form as it is hoped will enlist the interest of every member of the Grand Lodge.

The report, covering some fourteen pages, is well written and worthy, while, naturally, we do not endorse all his conclusions. He is evidently opposed to Masonic Homes and quotes to that effect from the West Virginia Correspondent: Masonic Homes created by Grand Lodges that were norflnancially able to launch such institutions are causing their owners much anxiety and worry. The necessary expense of maintaining such establishments was not properly considered, or quite a number of them would never have been entered up路on. Many years ago I did my utmost to impress my brethren of the unWisdom of launching such institutions; that they were unduly ex-pensive; that needy brethren could be cared for at far less cost per capita than in Masonic Homes; that homes (individual homes) for Masonic orphans could be found at comparatively a nominal expense, where they could grow up and appreciate. the privileges of home life, without being massed together in a so-calle4 Children's Home, and thus be deprived of the privileges and education of what a real home, under God, was intended to be. But, somehow, all I wrote and urged went for naught, and now we have on our hands a number of half-supportc4 Masonic Homes that were not needed, and' the brethren are being over-taxed to keep them going.

And more to the same effect.


1917.J

79

Appendix

MARYLAND. 1916. Tuos. J.

GEORGF; COOK, REV.

G. M. G. S.

SHRYOCK,

HENRY BRANCH

Lodges, 117.

1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 17,798.

Gain, 665. The lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction are numbered up to 212, but we find, by count, only 117 .on the roll. We suppose the missing numbers were eliminated some time since by the consolidation or death of those that no longer have a record.

OPENING CEREMONIES.

The Grand Lodge met in Semiannual Communication May 9th, 1916, at 3 p. m., and in the regular Annual Communication, being the One Hundred and Thirtieth, November 21st, 1916, at the same hour. The usual formalities were obser'Ved-the Grand Lodge being opened by the Deputy Grand Master and the Grand Master formally escorted from the Ante Room to the G.rand East.

CONDOLENCE.

A resolution of sympathy' was adopted in view of the death of Mrs. Shryock, the wife of the Grand Master. The work of this Grand Lodge is so systematized and arranged that it meets for both Selilliannual and Annual Communications in the evening and the business is concluded wit~in reas~nable hours and without undue haste. The semiannual per capita tax was reduced on members of city lodges from $1.10 to 90 cents and on members of country lodges from 75 cents to 60 cents. Aside from the question of this reduction it has before this occurred to us that there might with eminent propriety be a difference between. the per capita tax on city and country :Masons. We have not, however, sufficiently examined this matter as to be fully established in the opinion indicated.


80

[Sept.

Appendix REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This, as usual, is well written-the work of Bro. and Rev. Henry Branch. It covers eighty pages in reviewing the Proceedings of fifty-four Grand Lodges. Missouri is recognized without criticism in three-fourths of a page.

MICHIG:AN. 1917. 1916. JOHN H. HAWKS, G. M. GEO. L. LusK, G. M. Re-elected. Lou B. WINSOR, G. S. Grand Correspondent. Lou B. WINSOR Lodges, 436. Members, 82,551. Gain, 3,694. No volume of Proceedings comes to us in more imposing form or better arrangement than' that from Michigan, and our worthy Brother M. W. Lou B. Winsor does himself increasing honor in the splendid service he gives. to the Fraternity as Secretary and Correspondent-besfdes his good work as publisher of the Annual, which is no small task, however careful the printer may be. As usual, the volume opens with a fine likeness of the Grand Master, with a full page illustration following containing ex~ellent pictures of the other officers of the Grand Lodge. The biographical sketch of the Grand Master confirms the good impression made by his picture.

â&#x20AC;˘

SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. The Annual Communication was held in the City of Battle Creek, Mich., May 23-24, and was opened in Ample Form, in connection with which an address of welcome was delivered by Bro. J. L. Hooper, on behalf of the lodges of the city-also an address by Hon. and Bro. James W. Marsh, Mayor of the city. To both the Grand Master responded happily and then. introduced Past Grand Master Washer of Texas, whose remarks were heard with appreciation.


1917. ]

Appendix

81

ROLL OF HONOR.

The Grand Secretary called the names of forty-five Past Grand Masters who have journeyed into the unseen, closing with that of Wm. Thos. Mitchell, which. the Grand Master repeated and followed with a beautiful tribute to the memory of this distinguish~d Mason, who died February 6, 1916, aged almost 100 years. Beginning his remarks with the never-to-be-forgotten words of Ingersoll, at the grave of his brother, the Grand Master closed with the lines: "Like some tall cliff that lifts its rugged form, Swells from the vale and midway leaves the storm, Though 'round its breast the rolling clouds are spread; Eternal sunshine settles on its head."

The total attendance at Grand Lodge was 652. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The address of the Grand Master, covering some forty-seven pages, give assurance of faithful consideration of all Masonic interests committed to his hands, and a conscientious discharge of his obligations. Naturally he could not meet every social suggestion, nor give personal attention at every point in this great Jurisdiction, but no serious demand failed to secure the touch of his strong and careful hand. Following the opening remarks we have a long list of the honored dead IN DISPLAY TYPE.

The visitations number fifty-eight, more than one for every week. Four dispensations were granted for new lodges. Four lodges duly chartered by the last Grand Lodge were set to work in due form. Thirteen corner. stones were laid and eight temples and halls were consecrated. Many dispensations for the usual reasons were granted. The amount of fees is reported' at $70-for those. for which a charge of five dollars was made according to custom. (Incidentally w~ maY say that we cordially appr?ve this custom of charging a fee in such cases.) ) .' t:,le

.;.:.


82

[Sept.

Appendix MASONIC HOME.

Of this institution the Grand Master says he has attended every board meeting since his incumbency-also that The special achievement of the past yoar is found in the completed infirmary. This addition to the practical usefulness of the Home can not be overestimated. It affords a medium to promptly and perfectly administer to the physical infirmities of all the afflicted within the Home. It is modernized to a high degree, splendid in its conception and appointments, and architecturally attractive. It would seem to represent full value for its cost.

â&#x20AC;˘

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Your Masonic Home, in all its material aspects, is in first-class condition. It is. in a good state of repair, it is kept in the pink of condition,' cleanly and wholesome; it is inviting and cheerful; it is in the best sense a Home, with such surroundings, maintained to such a degree of excellence it would appear that the per capita cost pel' resident of $4.71 a week is above criticism.

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It has come to the attention of the Grand Master the year past

that some Lodges are greatly distressed financially in providing for unfortunate members in their home town, who could not be accepted at the Home under our present policy. Is it not possible for the Home Board to be given authority to investigate and extend financial aid under such a situation? Other cases will arise where affliction is very great, where it would be human and fraternal to assist a brother in the environs of his home or that of friends. To leave him by choice, where his own kin could minister to him in his physical distress.

This latter especially should be read by all with thoughtful attention. The Grand Master comments at length on the good work and high purposes of the Masonic Relief Association of the United States and Canada, and of the Washington Memorial Association, both of which meet with his hearty approval. Closing his address the Grand Master says, in part: Michigan Masonry is' of the robust, virile type. It takes no second place. Holding to the Landmarks does not imply decadence or impotency. The spirit of the age inspires us forward with unfaltering step. Let Masonry be an exemplar and not. a follower-always honoring our history and our traditions.


1917.]

Appendix

83

War came and the world is deathly sick. Savage emotion fills the heart of man across the seas. Civilization scarred and bleeding. To what depths of infamy hath selfish ambition plunged our brethren beyond the great waters? "Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, lest we forget:' Our country-Masonic America-child of destiny-land of the free-home of the brave: Know ye! That there are no national boundaries to science, righ teousness, fra terni ty, progress? Know ye! The invisible power of co-ordinated human energy; the dynamic force and potential greatness of your institutions; created and preserved by master minds and noble souls? In this crisis of world history, will you learn the lesson of the hour? \Vill you calmly pursue the path of duty, maintain your poise with a world's gaze upon you? Keep yourself within. due bounds, and with the infinite wisdom of Abraham Lincoln: "Seek ever to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves, and with all nations." FINANCIAL.

The Grand Secretary's report shows the financial condition to be excellent and that of the Home Board evidences the most careful attention to details. The number in the Home during the year averaged eighty-six, and the per capita expense per week is reported at $5.71, or nearly $297 per year. :FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

Our good Bro. Winsor magnifies his reputation in the fine reo port he publishes, covering some 310 pages, in his usual brilliant style. He greatly compliments the Grand Lodge of Missouri in according to us eight pages, largely quotations from Mayor Kiel, P. G. M. Boyd, Grand Master Cotton and the Correspondent, to whom he accords the distinction of quoting路 more than three pages. We appreciate this. compliment; from this source it has value, indeed.


84

Appendix

[Sept.

MINNESOTA. REV. ALFRED JOHN

1918.

1917. G. PINKHAM, G. M. FISHEL, G. S.

G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 33,766. ALBERT BERG,

IRVING TODD

Lodges, 264. Gain, 1,752.

The colored photo of the outgoing Grand Master is one of the finest we have seen, and the face indicates a strong character. From the dress and general appearance we conclude that the Reverend Brother is a clergyman of the Episcopal Church, and if our surmise be correct, we are somewhat surprised, as, comparatively, few members of the clergy of that denomination incline to Freemasonry. SIXTY-FOURTH ANNUAl, COMMUNICATION.

The Sixty-fourth Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Minnesota was held in the Masonic Temple, Sixth street and Smith avenue, in the City of St. Paul, commencing at high 12 on Wednesday, January 17, A. D. 1917, A. L. 5917, all the Grand officers being present except the Grand Chaplain. During the session 222 lodges were represented out of 264 on the roll. At 12: 45 the Grand Lodge was called to refreshment until 2: 40, when labor was resumed, and after the appointment of committees and some other preliminary items, the Grand Master delivered the ANNUAL ADDRESS,

which occupies twenty-six pages in a recital of the work and experiences of the year, presenting nothing ~)Ut of the ordinary, though fully equal in character to the best of its kind. We give an extract or two:

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As we meet here today to review our actions for the past year, let us give thanks to Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, for the manifold blessings we have daily received at His hands, and particularly for the health, peace and prosperity that prevails throughout our borders. In all our deliberations and in all our actions may we be guided and directed by Divine Wisdom, so that all our


1917.]

8S

Appendix

work b~gun, continued and ended may redound to God and the honor and welfare of our fraternity.

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It is fitting

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the glory of

*

that we should bow our heads at this time, not so much in sorrow as in reverence, and pay a tribute of love to the memory of those brethren who, during the year just passed, have laid aside the working tools of life and entered into rest. VVhile the line of officers of this Grand Lodge has remained intact, for which we render heartfelt thanks to God, not so the ranks of our subordinate lodges. Three hundred and seventy-eight of their members have answered the final summons. The Committee on Necrology will present a suitable tribute to them and to the honored dead of sister grand jurisdictions. For them: "The Craftsman's work is o'er, Strife and storm of life are past; Now upon the further shore Stand the veterans at last."

The Grand Master does all honor, to the 'Vashington Memorial Association, himself responding to an invitation to attend the annual meeting and recommending the enterprise to the Grand Lodge of Minnesota as most worthy. He insists that it must not fall behind other Grand Lodges in support of the Association. LODGES

CO~STITUTED

AND CREATED.

In person or by proxy the Grand Master constituted several lodges and granted dispensations for the formation of four others. MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Master alludes feelingly to the effort to raise the sum of one hundred thousand dollars for the building of a Masonic Home, and to his disappointment in that, notwithstanding his earnest efforts and ardent hope of being able to lay the corner stone during his administration, he has met with disappointment. Later the Grand Lodge contributed liberally to this fund, and from this and other sources the full amount was pledged. If our Brothers of路 Minnesota, after years of effort, have barely succeeded in raising the hundred thousand, it does not prophesy ease and alacrity in raising the many more multiplied thousands that will be needed to equip and maintain it. No doubt, however, they will succeed. Several decisions are reported, all seemingly in accordance with Masonic law and. usage.


86

[Sept.

Appendix

The Grand Master concludes his address with these worthy lines: "My struggling' soul may never gain the prize it covets so; It may not reach the gates of Paradise at sunset's glow; But I have faith that in the shadows blue, at set of sun I shall be judged by what I've tried to do--not what I've done." CHARITY.

A "Permanent Relief" fund for widows and orphans' is reported as being nearly $120,000. The Grand Orator, W. Bro, John Baden, delivered a splendid address, which is printed in full, so also another delivered at the laying of the corner stone of the new Masonic Temple at Rochester by the same. From this latter we copy a few paragraphs:

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Masonry has also ministered to the bodily needs of men. There has been, and still is, much' of pain and suffering in the world. While many have spent their time in trying to solve the "problem of pain" and suffering, when they might have spent their time doing some positive good for humanity, this great Fraternity, true to its mission, has been occupied with the matter of alleviating much of humanity's sufferings. It is still spending and being spent in this very laudable ¡undertaking. Its kindly mercies are known to many.

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Man has a morai and spiritual nature, and to this' also Masonry has made valuable contributions. Masonry has been called the "handmaid of religion", and rightly so, for it has ever taught the worth of the highest and noblest standards of manhood. It has sought to bring' out, in all of its beauty and glory, the Divine Image stamped upon the children of God's creation, to the end that, being' just and upright in this life, we shall merit an abundant entrance into the Celestial Lodge above where we shall forever rejoice in the blessings of eternal fellowship with the God and Father of us all. 'Ve may well ask the purpose of such teachings. The answer is found in the fact that we are traveling, as Shakespeare tells us, and as we have often and impressively heard, to "The undiscovered country from whose bourn' No traveler returns." This being the case we demand hope. Without it life would be cheerless indeed. The most important question confronting the human mind is that old, yet ever-present one, viz, "If a man die, shall he live again?" Masonry most emphatically answers it in the affirmative. Times almost without number we have had impressed upon our minds the fact of an immortal part within us


1917.]

87

Appendix

which survives the grave, and bears the nearest affinity to that Supreme Intelligence which pervades and animates all nature, and which can never, no never die.

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FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

From this report, covering sixty-six pages in a splendid review of the Proceedings of sixty-four Grand Lodges, we easily perceive that the hand of our W. Brother, Irving Todd, has not lost its cunning. The work is concise, of course, but most worthy. Missouri is most courteously treated in nearly two pages.

MISSISSIPPI. 1918.

1917. G. M.

GEO. BOYD POWER,

F. G. SPEED, G. H. C. YAWN Lodges, 376.

G.

FREDERICK CULLEM,

G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 20,467.

S.

Gain, 467. The incoming Grand Master, as appears from the photo which serves as frontispiece, parts his hair as well as his name in the middle-nevertheless he is really a' handsome man with indica-. Hons of something more than the usual amount of gray matter "under his hat", and his administration justifies the impression made by his "counterfeit presentment".' NINETY-Nl~TH

ANNUAL GRAND COMMUNICATION.

The Ninety-ninth Annual Grand Communication of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, Free and Accepted Masons, was held in the City of Jackson on Tuesday, February 13th, A. L. 5917, A. D. 1917, preceded by a great public reception, in which the ladies of the Eastern Star and the flag played a prominent part: After the music, speeches and general felicitations were finished, the Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form. THE ANNUAL ADDRESS,

which cOvers some thirty-five pages, is a worthy contribution to the annals of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, touching with a strong


88

[Sept.

Appendix

hand every point of experience and official expression worthy of notice, with an occasional paragraph of noble sentiment. We quote: As I stand today at the foot of the long line of Grand Masters who have served this Grand Lodge for the past ninety-nine years and hear echoing through the corridors of Time such names as Israel Loring, John A. Quitman, Robert Stewart, Harvey Walter, Charles Scott, Car not Posey, Giles M. Hillyer. Thos. 8. Gathright, John Y. Murry, Frederic Speed, Geor'ge DeLap, John M. Stone and scores of others, distinguished in the state as men and citizens and in the Craft as Masonic scholars, I feel my own unworthiness; but, my brethren, I appreciate your good will and the good opinion that prompted you to eall me to the East, and I ean only promise you that when I shall have taken my place in the line of Past Grand Masters, I will make it my aim and my endeavor so to live and act that you and those who come after you may, at least, never have cause to regret having called me. The high station of Grand Master offers a great opportunity for service and, after all, that is the greatest opportunity that is given to man-the opportunity to serve his fellowman. He accomplishes most who serves best. The Greatest of All came not to be ministered unto but to minister, and if we, as Masons, can but catch this idea and this spirit of service, we can accomplish much for this institution of ours and, through it, for the world. The year has been a pleasant one for me; it has brought me in touch wi th my brethren, and I have learned to love them better as I came to know them more. It has been a profitable year to me, as it has brought to me a clearer insight into the real mission and purpose of. Freemasonry. I trust, my brethren, that it has been both pleasant and profitable to you and that you and I may look back upon it, through the years that are yet to come, as a year well spent. IN MEMORIAM.

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As we have seen the door of the preparation room open to admit the new members, so, too, have we. heard the Outer Door softly close as the foot falls became fainter and fainter when some brother having completed the Trestle Board of his life and laid down the working tools of this earth, quietly stepped from Time into Eternity; as we have labored on, doing our parts as best we might, some one, by our sides, has ""\Vrapped the draperies of his couch about him And lain down to pleasant dreams." We build and plant and adorn and beautify the little spot of earth whereof we are God's tenants, hoping hereafter to sit down and enjoy it, but death suddenly carries us away and others reap the fruits of our eare and toil; but he who trusteth in the Lord and whose hope the Lord is shall be as a· tree planted by the


89

Appendix

1917. ]

waters and that spreadeth' ou t her roots by the River and suffereth not when the hot days come, but her leaf shall continue green. neither shall be consumed in the year of drought, neither shall cease from bearing fruit. FINANCIAL.

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Just how or when it came about I do not know, but the fact is that the Grand Lodge of Mississippi is just one year behind in its revenues, and in 'addition to that it is carrying a debt of something over $10,000.00 on account of the Digest published two years ago. The result of this is that we have a load of something like $1,000 interest each year to shoulder, and we are always cramped for money and have absolutely no funds with which to do the real work that the Grand Lodge ought to be doing. I shall not here go into detail regarding our financial affairs, leaving that largely to the Finance' Committee, the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer, but I shall call your attention generally to our condition. On July 1, 1916, the Grand Lodge owed the sum of $9;700.00, money borrowed on account of the general fund. and $10,814.36, borrowed on account of the Digest fund.

Discussing the matter of finance yet further the Grand Master reveals a most unusual condition under the head of CHARITY LODGES.

Very closely connected with this question of finances is the question of the number of lodges in the state; while we have increased their number in the last few years, it has, in many instances, been at the expense of other lodges, and. there are now on, the roll of the Grand Lodge. a large number of lodges that pay nothing whatever into the general fund; to be exact, in 1915, thirty-nine lodges paid nothing into the general fund; after allow-. ing mileage and per diem to their representatives, they paid noth" ing but their charity per capita; from my information there will be as many or more in 1916 that will pay nothing to the general fund.

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It would be well for some of the lodges in the state either to

move their location or else to consolidate with neighboring lodges and thus give us more active, even if fewer. lodges. Think over the following statistics that have been compiled for me by the Grand Secretary: Since the organization of the Grand Lodge 560 lodges have been chartered, and 184 of them have become defunct, or a little over thirty per cent. In the year 1915 thirty-eight lodges met only for the purpose of suspending members for non-payment of dues (and incidentally


90

[Sept.

Appendix

to save the lodges from having to pay Grand Lodge dues on them). A few more meetings during the year might have been the means of keeping the members in good standing. In 1915 one hundred and fifty-two lodges lost membership and forty-four remained stationary in their membership; more than one-half of our lodges, you will observe, made no gain in membership during that year. While the statistics for 1916 are not yet available along these lines, they will probably show the same conditions.â&#x20AC;˘ The statistics show that the majority of the lodges chartered in the last five years have done practically no work and they will be joining the other defunct lodges in the next year or two, unless something is done to stimulate life. The remedy very probably lies in changing the lodges to better locations and in consolidating lodges in a number of localities.

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The Grand Master refers to the Masonic Home as being in excellent condition. Elsewhere we learn that the number of children in the Home has been greatly increased during the year, so that accommodations are taxed to the utmost and much improvement is needed. An assessment of $1.00 per capita was urged and accepted for the maintenance of the Home for the ensuing year. I<'OREIGN CORRESPONDENCEâ&#x20AC;˘

.Forty-three Grand Jurisdictions pass under the pen of the Correspondent, who disposes of them in seventy-four pages. Missouri is kindly noticed in one and a quarter pages. The review of Missouri is for 1915. We can not understand why he failed to get the Proceedings for 1916. And, of course, our failure to recognize Mississippi in 1915. was because ,ve did not get the Proceedings of that Grand Jurisdiction.

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1917.]

Appendi%

91

MONTANA. 1916. WM:. H. CORNELIUS

1917.

G. M. HEDGES, G. S.

R.

ALLEN,

W.

GETTY, G.

M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 9,880.

H. S. HEPNEg Lodges, 101.

Gain, 89. Nineteen Special Grand Communications are reported in detail in the beginning of the volume of Proceedings-nine to constitute lodges, five to dedicate halls, four to lay corner stones and one to conduct the funeral services of Past Grand Master John G. Bair. Also splendid photo engravings .of the passing Grand Master W. H. Allen and Sol Star, the eighth in the line of Grand Masters of Montana and the oldest living Past Grand Master. He was received with honors and acclamation at the opening of the Grand Lodge. FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Fifty-second Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Montana began, to be held in the Masonic Temple in the City of Butte at 9: 15 a. m. on Wednesday, August 30th, 1916, and concluded in the Masonic Temple at the Town of Virginia-the place of its birth-on Friday, September 1st, 1916. The Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form, all the Grand Officers and a majority of representatives of constituent lodges being present. After some preliminary exercises the Grand Master presented his annual report, which is a most worthy document. We give a few extracts:

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This Grand Lodge has come to the fiftieth year or its exIstence. Born amidst the turmoil 'and strife incident to the influx into the Territory of men in the search of wealth, to be obtained lawfully by some, and unlawfully by others; :;tnd when we revert to the beginning of this Grand Lodge, note its .smali membership, of, I believe, only nine brethren, and then view this large asseJ1lblage here today, we can hardly realize that this Grand Lodge has made such growth, in subordinate lodges and in membership.

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92

Appendix

[Sept.

"All great movements are anchored in the past"; so the Masonic Anchor was cast forth in those early days of our great Commonwealth, when "the star of empire was moving westward", which has become firmly imbedded in the solid rock of brotherly love, relief and truth, and Masonry today stands as a tower of strength and a great power of 'good, where lawlessness once prevailed, while . its tenets are being taught and practiced more earnestly than ever before.

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Many are knocking at our doors seeking admission. Are our minds and hearts prepared to point, direct and lead them to "light in Masonry", to a higher conception of the duty they owe to God, their country, their neighbor and to themselves? To this country of ours the past year has been one of prosperity. We have been blessed with an abundance of material things, for which we should earnestly render thanks to Him "who doeth all things well". While a gigantic war, unprecedented in its ruthless slaughter and waste, is being waged in other parts of the world, our nation, notwithstanding the efforts of those who would involve this country in war to further their schemes for more extensive looting, is at peace.

LODGES

CONSTITUTED

AND

INSTITUTED.

Nine lodges were constituted during the year by the Grand Master or duly appointed proxies and six were created by dispensation.

DECISIONS.

Many rulings are given by the Grand Master, all of which we may pass without objection except his conclusion-in the absence of any law or edict-that a lodge may assess its members to pay lodge indebtedness. We think such a procedure very doubtful. The consequences may be unfortunate. Also, in Decision No. 9 it appears that the lodge .was fully informed as to who cast the black ball, and the Grand Master, while alluding to the fact and also路 stating that the ballot is "secret and inviolate", does not advert to this manifest and flagrant violation of hiwand usage, and the committee endorsed the first decision, hesitatingly, with provisions-but the last without question. We do not criticise or condemn-we only mention the facts.


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Appendix

1917. ]

REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY.

This contains the following interesting paragraph: MEMBERSHIP OF MASONIC

In 101 Lodges In 25 Chapters In 16 Commanderies In 3 Lodges of Perfection In 3 Chapters, Rose Croix In 3 Councils of Kadosh In 3 Consistories

GRAND BODIES

'

OF MONTANA-1916.

9,880 2,616 1,534 1,237 1,148 1,108 1,086

Master Masons Royal Arch Masons Knights Templar Members Members Members, Members

There are 69 Chapters and 6,699 Members of the Order of the Eastern Star. In Montana are two Temples with a total membership of 1,980 Shriners.;

THE SEMI-CENTENNIAL EXERCISES.

This meeting held at Butte August 31st, 1916, was full of interest, and the historical address of Past Grand Master Lew L. Calloway was the culminating feature. It is so rich in its details that we would be glad to give it entire, but that want of space forbids. Especially is it thrilling in its story of the discovery of gold, followed by the inroad of the "Road Agents", their lawless deeds and the awakening of the citizens, who, led by our Masonic brethren, organized a Vigilance Committee, which in a comparatively short time caught and hanged every member of the lawless band and ,brought about such an era of peace and safety that, as Bro. Callaway expresses it, "after that a man could leave his bag of gold dust lying exposed within his cabin and go out leaving the windows up and the doors open and it would be safe. Such condition continue,d for a considerable time after the appli,cation of Vigilante law." In connection with this interesting period we notice, the name of Wm. Y.. Pemberton, .once well known in Missouri, a friend of our boyhood:" Referring to the first trial by Vigilantes, the speaker said of him: "A young man by the na!lle of William Y. Pemberton was the Court Reporter. He was a Brother Mason and was destined to become one of the' ablest prosecutors of the new territory, a District Judge of the State to be and its second Chief Justice."


94

Appendix

[Sept.

THE MASONIC HOME.

This institution is yet in its infancy and seems to prosper. Its income was a little more than sixteen thousand dollars and the outlay exceeded this slightly. As there are only nineteen in the Home family this would indicate a per capita cost of more than $850.00, but this is misleading, as the repairs, additions, etc., are included. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is a carefully prepared and judicious document, covering 115 pages, in reviewing the Proceedings of fifty-eight Grand Lodges. Missouri is remembered in kindly terms.

NEBRASKA. 1917. H. VIELE, G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 23,664.

1916. SAMUEL S. WHITING, FRANCIS

E.

WHITE,

A~Dlmw

G. M. G. S.

J OIIN H. EHRHARDT

Lodges, 270. Gain, 1,359.

FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL COl\:IMUNICATION.

The Grand Lodge of the. Most Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of Nebraska met in Annual Communication in Freemasons Hall, Omaha, on Tuesday, June 6th, A. L. 5916, A. D. 1916, there being present, besides the Grand Officers, the representatives from two hundred and fifty-four of the two hundred and sixty-seven chartered lodges. The Grand Master thus introduces THE ANNUAL ADDRESS:

To the Members of the Grand Lodge--Brethren: It is my pleasure to welcome you to our Fifty-ninth Annual Communication. The year has passed into history, and I wish to say, with my heart filled with gratitude to the Great and Beneficent Author of our existence, that it has been the happiest year of my life. Deal kindly with my mistakes, for I am human.

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1917.]

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Apprndix

have given a great deal of time to Masonry during the past year; in fact, where my busi ness has interfered with Masonic affairs, I have neglected the business. I have tried to sow the seed for a better life for all, paying no attention to what the harvest may be.

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Extraorainary! Our Grand Chaplain has accompanied me in a great many visitations. He has been a true Shepherd of the flock during the past year.

Many times in the annals of Grand Lodges we have read kindly references to the good work and assistance of other Grand Officers, but this is really the first time we have known the Grand Chaplain to be remembered with commendation for good work. MASONIC HOME.

Of this institution the Grand Master speaks as follows-in part: Our Masonic Home is on a firm foundation. The brethren are willingly contributing to its management and doing so cheerfully. The Trustees have no complaint to mal<e of the liberality of the Grand Lodge in supplying the funds, but, inasmuch as they are doing this work for the good of our Fraternity, I believe they would appreciate words of commendation from the Brethren i'f they are entitled to them. * ~ * * ~

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MASONIC

HOMES

FOR GIRLS AND

BOYS.

In accordance with the instructions given to the committee one year ago, there has been erected on the grounds at Fremont, at the cost of over $] 2,000.00 a substantial cottage for the girls, who occupied it at the beginning of the year. This sum, in addition to that heretofore appropriated, makes a total invested by the Grand Lodge of $17,000.00. There were eleven girls and two small boys at the Home路 at Fremont, and nine boys at the Home at Plattsmouth' on May 1st of this year. The children's ages vary from four to sixteen years. The children of school age are attending the public schools and are doing well. .Their standing in the several' grades equals that of the other children in the same classes, while some of them are at the head of their respective grades. These Homes al'e under the control of a Home Board of three members elected by the Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, of which P. G. M. Frank H. Young is President.


96

[Sept.

Appendix NEW LODGES.

Three lodges were instituted and seven constituted during the year. A good record. Various dispensations, dedications and visitations were reported by the Grand Master. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

The death of Past Grand Master Chas..J. Phelps having left the office of Correspondent vacant, Past Grand Master John H. Ehrhardt was appointed and the present report is from him. It covers fifty-two pages and is well written. Missouri has one and a half pages in a kindly spirit.

NEVADA. 1916. 1917. W. COLEMAN, G. M. ALFRED W. HOLMES, G. M. EDWARD D. VANDERLIETII, G. S. Re-elected. Also Grand Correspondent. Lodges, 23. Members, 1,977. Gain, 2. BENJ.

FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL GRAND COMMUNICATION.

The Fifty-second Annual Grand Communication of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Nevada met at the Masonic Temple, in the City of Reno, commencing on the second Tuesday of June (being the 13th day of the 'month), A. L. 5916, at 12 o'clock m., and after calling the roll of Grand Officers, permanent members and repre,sentatives of lodges, was opened in Ample Form, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Thomas L. Bellam. We clip the following from the ANNUAL ADDRESS:

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Since last we met the ~hilling frosts have come but to be chased away by the life-giving summer zephyrs-each season, through the guidance of an all-wise Providence, bringing with it manifold blessings to manldnd, our Craft and our, country.


1917. ]

~ppendi%

97

The Supreme Grand Master of the Universe has not only blessed and prospered our nation, but has lent inspiration to our Order, and it today stands before the world, as it has always stood, panoplied in the armor of righteousness, inviting the co-operation of all honorable men in the promotion of the loftier sentiments of humanity. We have much to give thanks for. No withering, blighting plague has laid its" heavy hand upon our country; no enemy has set foot upon our shores; peace and harmony prevail in our Fraternity, and though there has been no appreciable growth In numbers, we feel that the true fraternal spirit more thoroughly imbues our ranks than for some years past.

The Grand Master regrets that the work throughout the Grand Jurisdiction has not been brought to that state of efficiency he could desire. He did not find it necessary to make any decisions during the year. His dispensations were comparatively few. He appointed a nuzp.ber of Grand Representatives. He warns the Fraternity against a certain lecturer, whom he does not name, as endorsing, under the" auspices of Masonry, principles he considers dangerous. Referring to the great war, he says: I can not conclude without an allusion to the devast.ating war which is raging abroad. The indescribable suffering which it has caused, is causing, and which will flow from it for decades, makes the thoughtful man wonder if the doctrine of "Peace on earth and good will to man" will ever be a realization. Let us hope that ere long the spirit of Masonry may find lodgment in the hearts of the rulers of nations engaged in this murderous strife, and that, as a consequence, peace may shortly reign. . May the spirit of this great Fraternity so permeate our own nation that the brazen monster of conquest may never rear his head among us, and that this prayer may be realized.

TOUCHING SWITZERLAND.

Brother E. D. Vanderlieth, for the Committee on Correspondence, presented the following report: To the Grand Lodge of Nevada: Brethren: Your Committee on Correspondence with reference to the request for co-operation from the International Bureau of Masonic Affairs of the Grand Lodge Alpina of Switzerland, report as follows: Vie commend 'the magnificent efforts of the International Bureau and the Masons of Switzerland in general for the spread of


98

Appendix

[Sept.

universal Masonry and for the constructive work being done for the uplift of the Craft and the betterment of human kind, and earnestly recommend that our Constituent LOdges lend their hearty support and co-operation to the movement. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers over 200 pages with a skill that is possible to few. The last few pages are occupied entirely with 'decisions from various Grand Lodges. Missouri is recognized with pleasant consideration. We much regret the fact to which Bro. Vanderlieth alludes-that we have made no review of Nevada for two years. The explanation is that we did not receive the volume of Proceedings at all-which was our misfortune.

NEW BRUNSWICK. 1916. HEDLEY

J.

V.

1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Members, 3,769.

G. M. G. S.

B. BRIDGES,

TWINING HARTT,

Lodges, 39. Gain, 96.

The regular meeting of the Grand Lodge was preceded by a meeting of the Masonic Grand Lodge Corporation at 3 p. m. April 25th, at which consideration of necessary repairs on the Masonic Home was brought forward and the Board of Directors was given full power to proceed with all necessary repairs and improvements. FORTY-NINTH

ANNUAL

COMMUNICATION.

The Forty-ninth Annual Communication of "The Grand Lodge of the Antient and. Honourable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of New Brunswick" was held at Freemasons Hall, Germain street, in the City of Saint John, on Tuesday, the 25th day of April, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916. The attendance was good and the interest of the entire convocation was probably unusual. The Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form at the hour of 4 o'clock with prayer by the V. W. Grand Chaplain and the reading of Psalm XXIV.


1917. ]

99

Appendix THE ANNUAL "ADDRESS

covers twenty-three pages and well portrays the work of the year, with some .reflections on existing conditions. We copy a paragraph which we are sure will be read with -interest.

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The year that has passed has been one of supreme importance in the history of the world. Momentous events have occurred since we last met, and while the time has been filled for us with absorbing duties, there has been ever with us a full measure of anxiety. Fondly did we hope, fervently did we pray, when we parted here over a year ago, that the horrors of this awful war would be measurably removed and the horizon路 brightened for us before another annual communication. But the Supreme Architect of the Universe has decreed it otherwise, and this war which has been waged with relentless fury for the past twenty months continues to be carried on by those who deliberately planned it with a cruelty and savagery unsurpassed in the history of warfare, and with a preparation the efficiency of which has astonished the civilized world. In common' with other parts of the British Empire and our Allies, Canada is suffering losses that can not be estimated in the death of so many of her brave sons on the field of battle. It has been estimated that Masons to the number of 10,000 have enlisted for foreign service. I have not, however, statistics at hand to place before you. But we, as Masons, bow reverently to the will of the Supreme Master, calmly awaiting the final result, with supreme confidence that in His hands rests the final arbitrament of the appeal to arms, and that He will still uphold our great Empire battling in defense of liberty and civilization, of treaty obligations and the sacred dghts of humanity, and that truth, the divine attribute, is still mighty and will prevail.

"The Grand Master makes an extended report on Necrology, and in many cases the record ends, "Died of wounds," or "Killed in action." His sympathies are eVidently keen. He reports many visitations and functions of official or social character, evidencing in these his interest in the great work of the Craft. Referring to the attitude of Prussian Masonry preceding the war, as expressed by the following resolution, presented by the three Prussian Grand Masters at the annual diet of the Union of Grand Lodges of Germany, held at Frankfurt, May 31, 1914: That the activiti~s of Masonic organizations must be limited in these matters to education of their members in the spirit of


100

[Sept.

Appendix

Freemasonry. Any other mode of activity would result in political tendencies, to which Masonry, by the terms of its fundamental principles, must remain foreign. It does not, therefore, belong to the domain of Masonry to support directly the modern pacific movement called' Paciflcism. Therefore, this Diet of Grand Lodges invites the German Grand Lodges and Masonic organizations to abstain from expressing an opinion in favor of Pacificism.

He says: It is well worth noting that the proposition was opposed by the five non-Prussian Grand Lodges. The Prussian Grand Masters then thoug-ht fit to forbid the lodges under their several jurisdictions any further official participation in the International Masonic Conference then being held. For some time past the three Prussian Grand Masters have been men of high official positions, and, therefore, share in the secrets of the high councils of' the gmpire. They required no prophetic prevision to note for them what the future held in store. They therefore opposed among German lodges the cultivation of sentiments of universal peace.

There are no decisions and no dispensations' of importance reported. No report on Fraternal Correspondence. The financial condition of this brave little insular Grand Lodge,. seems to be good. The Annual Sermon, June 25th, 1916, in St. David's Church, St. John's Day, by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. J. A. MacKeigan, is most worthy, and we would be glad to quote entire. We must make room for an extract: THE PLUMB LINE OF DIVINE TRUTH.

Ps. 112-4.-"Unto the upright there ariseth light in the darkness." From the dawn of creation, when, obedient to the divine flat, light rippled over the face of the deep, down to the present moment, when路 so much of God's good earth is enshrouded in 'the shadows of man's ambition, the need and desire of mankind has been "light". It is the cry of the infant, the quest of the student, the sob of the sufferer. But amidst the darkness, the confusion of changing standards and the crash of conflicting ideals, national, social and religious, the message breaks upon the listening ear-"Unto the upright there ariseth Light." How much of darkness there is in life! There Is the personal struggle to realize the best that is latent within us; the social problem g-roping for solution; Class and Mass each misunderstand, ing and cursing the other; political vice within, international vice without; neighbours, personal or national, livin~ as beasts of the jungle. Vie can not "see the distant scene".

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19i7.] Tried But That profound

lot.

101

Appendix

and found wanting, confusion worse confounded is our unto the upright there ariseth Light. we may be the children of Light, let us reflect upon the significance of the Plumb line. 0, Warden, with the Plumb upraised, What doth thy emblem teach? Do all the Craft uprightly walk And practice what they preach?

The ford of the Jordan warns us that while we may deceive the very guards by our appearance unless' the password is incarnate within us our accent will destroy us. Likewise unless the word-the Truth of the Great Master-is revealed upon our life we shall drift down the stream of death as did the Ephraimites of old and all our traditions and symbolism will but mock our possible greatness. This truth is being profoundly illustrated tod1iY upon the stage of the world. It is being spelled out in letters of fire, blighting "the best that we breed". Germany crossed the threshold of the century rich in art and science, in legend and in learning, but now the Plumb line of Truth is applied and she is drifting dOwn the dark stream of doom. Seeking a place t"n the sun by means condemned by the Plumb line her fine traditions and bright promises are lost in the gathering gloom. But unto the upright Light.

NEW' HAMPSHIRE. 1916.

1917.

G. M. HARRY M. CHENEY, G. S. HARRY M. CHENEY

STEPHEN S. JEWETT,

Lodges, 80.

GEO. E. BALES, G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 11,158.

Gain, 148. From the initial page of the Proceedings of 1916 the Passing Grand Master, Stephen S. Jewett, looks calmly upon the world through gold-rimmed glasses, indicating' in manner that he is undisturbed by the commotion of the world at war, and that whatever may l;>etide him in the future "the past"-at least-"is secure", Three Special Grand Communications, for the purpose of dedicating halls, and two Lodges of Instruction, besides the Semiannual Communication of the Grand Lodge, are detailed at length, having a fine attendance, but having practically no other business


102

Appendix

[Sept.

than the exemplification of the ritual in conferring the several degrees upon three candi~ates. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Annual Communicati<;>n of the M. W. Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New Hampshire was held at Freemasons Hall, in the City of Concord, on Wednesday, May 17, A. L. 5916, A. D. 1916, and was opened in Ample Form at 11 a. m., with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. The attendance was good. The opening exercises were as usual, after which the Grand Master delivered a most excellent address, from which we select a p~ragraph: The year that has passed has been one of unwonted prosperity to the Masonic Fr'aternity and to the people of this state, and every Mason 'should, from the inmost recesses of his heart, thank Almighty God, He in whom every Mason puts his trust, for His divine favor, which has given to us the many comforts and bless'ings which we have enjoyed. Let us then, brethren, in the work we have to perform at this Communication, keep fully in mind that we are members of the greatest fraternity in the history of mankind, a fraternity whose members are liberty loving, law abiding and God fearing. If we do this, our work can not fail to be of benefit to us all. But, Brethren, before we proceed to the active work of the session, let us pause and pay lovillg tribtite to the memory of those of our Brethren who have laid down the cares of this mortal life and passed to the Great Beyond, there to enjoy the rewards and honors of that life beyond the grave, which all Masons are taught awaits those whose conduct in this life has been pleasing in the sight of God.

He pays loving tribute to several Brothers who have passed into the unseen during the year and their pictures are presented in the same connection. DECISIONS.

As is always the case-except in one Grand Lodge whose Grand Master stated that all the officers of subordinate lodges were so well informed that they needed no decisions or rulings!-this Grand Master had numerous questions presented, most of which he answered by merely referring to the law. Several official ruliIigs following seem to be in accord with ordinary Masonic usage.


1917.]

Appendix DISPENSATIONS,

APPOINTMENTS,

103 I~TC.,

ETC.

The usual manifold requests for dispensations are reportedmany refused-and this we almost invariably endorse-in blank. Far too easy is it to get a special dispensation. We think a "special" fee should be exacted in every case. MASONIC HOME.

This the Grand Master commends in exalted terms, but regrets its limitations: Our greatest need for the Home is sufficIent funds to carryon the work. The accommodations are limited, and many of our brethren who are in actual need of such care as could be given at the Home, are unable to be so cared for, by reason of lack of accommodations. A hospital annex is sadly needed. If larger quarters could be provided, the per capita overhead expenses of the institution could be materially lessened. I have done my best to call to the attention of the Fraternity the needs of the Home.

The Grand Master concludes his address very happily with Tennyson's wonderful poem-"Crossing the Bar", and the following invocation: Brethren, in concluding this address, I give you in all sincerity my best wishes for your happiness and prosperity, and may the Grand Master of Heaven and Earth, in His infinite goodness, bestow His blessings upon you, and give you comfort, happiness and peace beyond measure.

Referring again to Masonic Home-the plant, with furnishings, is appraised at $28,000. The receipts, with balance, amounted to $8,478 and the disbursements to $7,375.02. Two were admitted during the year and the number in the Home fourteen~all old people. The cost per capita is $526.78. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is excellent-as was to be expected from Bro. Cheney. However, in addition to a kindly review of our Proceedings, he proceeds to touch up the Correspondent in great shape.. Just read what he says and behold our magnitude! Past Grand Master \\Toods presents 200 pag-es of correspondence work, a paper that is superbly arrang-ed, with its topical


104

[Sept.

Appendix

headings and one which, when its reading is completed, not only leaves the taste of satisfaction, but creates a longing for more. It is high class in every way-the kind that great Missouri ought to have.

His "modesty bespeaks his merit", since he blushingly says: To Cheney he gives seven lines, none of which do we want our New Hampshire Brethren' ever to read. It says tkings of us which a D. D. ought not to have expressed, because we use the pencil and not the shears in compiling our correspondence. Were it only half true, we should be happy.

NEW MEXICO. 1916. 1917. AMOS W. POLLARD, G. M. ALONZO B. McMILLAN, G. M. ALPHEUS A. KEEN, G. S. Re-eiected. JOHN MILNE Grand Correspondent. Lodges, 45. Members, 3,737. Gain,' 173. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico are introduced by a photo of the Passing Grand Master, and the details of three Emergent Communications. THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. .The Thirty-ninth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of New Mexico was held in the hall, of Chapman Lodge No.2, in the City of East Las Vegas, on Monday, October 9th, 1916, at 10 o'clock a. m., and was opened in Ample Form with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. Twenty-eight chartered lodges were represented, besides permanent members and visitors in attendance. THE ANNUAL ADDRESS. This is a well-written and comprehensive document, covering some twenty-six pages in a careful record of the work and incidents of the year. We quote briefly from the introduction:

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lOS

Appendix

1917.]

Masonry has always been a potent influence for good in every community, a builder of character and of good citizenship, ever subservient and obdient to the laws of the state and never .wavering in its allegiance. It is a leveler of persons in every rank and state of life, recog-nizingevery Mason as a brother and an equal. Our lives are but passing events in the world, pawns in the game of life, living entities today and gone tomorrow, but Masonry will continue in its present high plane so long as this world shall survive. The whole world may be at war and nations and empires crumble and fall, but the ravages of warfare will not affect the principles upon which Masonry is founded and it wi)l rise up frpm the ashes of such devastation and ruin unsullied and unchanged.

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Various dispensations were granted for the usual reasons and some refused. Three new lodges, duly chartered at the last Grand Communication, were consecrated and dedicated by proxies duly authorized. by the Grand Master.. DECISIONS.

These-sixteen in number-seem to be sound-except that we can not agree with the last statement, as a Masonic principle. It seems to us that there is no reason why a lodge may not hold "more than one meeting a day for business or labor, except in case of a funeral." While the necessity or propriety might be of rare occurrence, we can see no reason why a lodge may not call a special meeting or more in one and the same day. But w~ do not criticise. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers 100 pages and does it well. Fifty-five Grand Lodges pass in review and are treated courteously. Missouri is accorded one and a half pages, with expressed regret that New Mexico was not included in our review last year. Our explanation is' that we di.d not receive a copy of their Annual, or it would have received careful consideration.


Appendix

106

[Sept.

NEW SOUTH WALES. 1916. WI''!.

1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 22,465.

G. M. H. BRAY, G. S.

THOMPSON,

ARTHUR

S. SCOTT YOUNG

Lodges, 263. Gain, 959.

This volume introduces itself with no pictures, which is a distinct relief from the ordinary. But it begins its recital by reports of the Grand Lodge Proceedings in the following Communications: Quarterly, 8th September, 1915. . Quarterly, 8th December, 1915. Quarterly, 8th March, 1916.

Special, 13th June, 1916. Quarterly, 14th June, 1916. Special, 7th July, 1916.

The first quarterly, held September 8th, 1915, was occupied principally with the report of the Grand Master, containing names of lodges visited and other matters connected with his technical duties. We copy a paragraph, principally because it indicates one of many differences from our usages and regulations: FlInerals.-A great many dispensations have been granted during the quarter for the wearing of regalia, but these, I regret to say, were almost wholly for Masonic funerals. In this regard, I have always acted strictly upon the precedent laid down in this Grand Lodge that the regalia must be worn only within the cemetery gates, as I am strongly opposed to any public procession of Masons clothed with the badges of the order. I have found it necessary in pursuance of this precedent to admonish one VI. M. for permitting regalia to be worn in the streets, but I am quite convinced he erred fl"Om want of knowledge and the circumstances were such as to render my admonition sufficient action in the matter. I trust that this rule will be strictly observed by our brethren in future.

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Donations amounting to nearly $2,300 were made to various benevolent institutions. Reports of the several D. D. G. Ms. were made and the Grand Treasurer also reported the various funds held by him at nearly $313,000. The Board of Benevolence reported relief extended to the amount of more than $2,000 during the quarter.


1917. ]

Appendix.

107

The second and third quarterly communications exhibited only matters of detail, such as路 were noted in the first, the address of the Grand Master giving only the bare facts of his administrative functions. In the Special Grand Communication, he.ld June 13th, officers were nominated for the ensuing year. The special was really the initial meeting of the fourth quarterly communication, which, like its predecessors, included only_ matters of routine, the annual elections. included. The address contains nothing of sentiment or exhortation-only a bare recital of duties performed. However, in his report on Necrology he makes a kindly allusion to the death of Lord Kitchener, which we copy: Lord KitchcIlCr.-I can not allow this occasion to pass without recording the sincerest regrets of the GI'and Lodge upon the passing away of this great man. \Ve had learnt to regard the very name of Kitchener as synonymous with the might, majesty and power of the British arms, and, shocked oy his untimely death, we felt as if the very foundations of the Empire itself were crumbling. In the annals of the British Empire his name 'will ever be emblazoned in letters of gleaming gold as the silent strong man who, in our darkest hour of difficulty, evolved order out of. chaos, and created almost by magic the magnificent army of four million men now fighting the battle for freedom and for liberty. He was Grand Warden of England in 1897; District Grand Master of Egypt and the Soudan in 1 <S89, and District Grand Master of the Punjaub in 1902. His famous message to his soldiers breathed. the true ~pirit of Freemasonry, and his untiring efforts to promote amongst them our great principles of temperance, sobriety and mOl'ality were an evidence that he ever had before him the high ideals of our glorious Institution. Many of us were privileged to meet him in Sydney some six years ago, and will ever treasure the memory of that great occasion.

REPORT ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

In closing this excellent report our good Brother, among other worthy sentiments, gives the following: v'iTe are apt to wrap ourselves in a cloak of insular conceit, and condemn any practice to which we are not accustomed; this, oecause our mi11d becomes contracted and moves in but a small orbit. If, however, we study the manners and customs of our fraternity in other lands, with a desire for knowledge, we shall soon find that each point of difference is founded on some sound reason or some ancient tradition, has its origin in some fact or legend which, like the familiar symbols common to us all, conveys a high moral lesson.


108

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[Sept.

Of the 116 pages occupied by the report four are given to Missouri, nearly all of .which is given to quotations. Much of the address of the Grand Master'is given verbatim and the prayer of Rev. J. M. Boon, Grand Chaplain, at the laying of the corner stone of the Administration Building is given in full.

NEW YORK. 1917. 1918. Re-elected. THOMAS PENNEY, G. M. EDWARD M. L. EHLERS, G. S. Re-elected. WM. SHERER Grand Correspondent. Lodges, 861. Members, 203,716. Gain, 6,293. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. The One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York was opened in the Grand Lodge Room, Masonic Hall, City of New York, on the afternoon of May 1, A. D. 1917; A. L. 5917, at 2 o'clock, with the usual ceremonies, inclUding prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. S. Parker Cadman. There was a large attendance and the list of Grand Representatives covers every Grand Jurisdiction recognized by us, unless we are mistaken. 'Telegrams of regret for absence were received from several distinguished members of the Grand Lodge. THE ANNUAL ADDRESS. This covers thirty-three pages and is, we think, an improvement on that of last year, ,especially in the exordium, which is essentially patriotic and AMERICAN! We quote a few passages: Brethren of the Grand Lodge; Harmonious is the condition of the Fraternity in this great Jurisdiction, but not so with the world at large. This Country has been brought into the great conflict, and we must each and all do our part as our ancestors did before us. The early days of our history presented problems which tested the courage and tried the souls of the men of that time. Although the great majority were British born, when the question of the Country's welfare was at stake, all nationalities turned from their fatherland. Each to the other said, "This is our com-


1917. ]

109

Appendix

mon Country and will be the land of our children." Shoulder to shoulder they fought and shed their life's blood, to establish upon solid foundations these United States. Since those early days this great continent has made wonderful progress, and its people, coming from all quarters of the globe, has increased many millions. Now we are called upon "to fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts; for democracy; for the ultimate peace of the world; for the rights of nations, great and small; and the privilege of men everywhere to choose their way of life and of obedience."It is our sincere belief that in this crisis, perhaps the greatest in the history of our Country, as in the earlier days, we will stand a united people, irrespective of the place of our birth or that of our forefathers, ready "to dedicate our lives and our fortunes, everything that we are and everything that we have, for this, our beloved Country." Under the stress of these circumstances, we are assembled in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Annual Session of the Grand Lodge, with humble hearts and reverent spirit, asking Almighty God to grant路 us wisdom that we may act wisely and strength that we may meet courageously every call of duty.

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The Grand Master pays personal and tender tribute to many distinguished dead. Referring. to one, he says: The spirit of Abel Crook was reverent. He had no fellowship with cheap skeptics or shallow scoffers who knew just enough to be ignorant. A mind and heart like his could never speak lightly of religion. His deep faith often expressed in God, in Christ, and in immortality found voice in all his deeds, and the word which became his viaticum in the last moments was the triumphant word . of Jesus, "I am the resurrection and the life."

He granted dispensation for the formation of six new lodges during the year. Many dispensations were granted, the lodge to which and the reason for being reported in each case. The Grand Master recites ceremonial visitations and courtesies received on different occasions. THE MASONIC RELIEF ASSOCIATION.

The Grand Master refers to the fact that for several years the Grand Lodge has been paying $400 each year, and that the Association now insists upon the Grand Lodge paying "what itterms its full quota", which would amount to $1,000 at one-half cent per capita! Continuing, the Grand Master says:


110

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[Sept.

There is a serious question in the minds of many 'as to whether or not this large expenditure of money could not be put to a better use by directly helping some worthy charitable cause or educating some worthy child or childrcn, rather than participating in circulating throughout the country the names and pedigrees of a few Masonic frauds.

(With this conclusion many will agree.) The Grand Master, however, referred the matter to the Committee on Finance, by whom it seems to have been ignored, as we find no further reference to the matter. DEGREE WORK.

On this subject the Grand Master delivers himself in a form that we would be glad to have repeated before every lodge in the world! We quote in part: The forms and ceremonies of many of our Lodges are almost constantly in use, turning out nominal Masons. The degree work is done so often that it has become machine-like, without spirit or meaning, either to the officers of the Lodge or the candidates. Som~ Lodges are piling up members until their bulk has become unwieldy. In such cases it is impossible for the members, either as indi. viduals or as a whole, to receive. the benefits 0'1' render the service which, theoretically, our Craft is supposed to afford. It is time to call a halt on quantity and give more attention to quality. We should not only be more careful in the selection of new material, but we should use every effort to improve and develop that which we have. VIc can not do the latter if all our time is taken up in working degrees. 'l.'herefore, I recommend that appropriate constitutional amendments be adopted, limiting the working of degrees to not more than twice a month, so that adequate opportunity may be allowed for the路 moral and spiritual education of our members.

The facts here recited by the Grand Master have been to us a matter of profound concern for years, and while we have so expressed ourself from time to time, we have so far seen no diminution of the evil. The Grand Master concludes as follows: The past three years have wrought tremendous changes on the face of the earth; beautiful works of art that lived through centuries have been entirely destroyed; magnificent structures that withstood the storms of the ages have been blotted out; several countries have been devastated; many thousands of men have been crippled for life and millions have been prematurely sent to their graves.


1917.]

Appendix

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All this has broug'ht and will entail great suffering and deprivations upon those immediately connected with this terrible conflict. No matter who may be the victors there will be pressing calls for help in the near future. Many sufferers will need care. A vast number of widows and orphans will be without homes or wage-earners and must receive assistance. I urge upon you as a Masonic duty to prepare yourselves to ,do your full share of all the work that lies before you, and to give freely of your service and your substance, that we may relieve the suffering and help, aid and assist the widows and orphans to the best of our ability as men and Masons.

This Grand Lodge is one of the most wealthy and enterprising in the world. Besides formal assets amounting to hundreds of thousands it handles various trust funds which it administers among othe,r benevolences. But, as is generally the ease with large possessions, there is more or less of debt, and the growing demands of the Home with other involvements enables those who direct its affairs to sympathize, intelligently, with poorer Grand Lodges.

THE MASONIC HOME.

From the twenty-fourth annual report we copy the following:. The Trustees have admitted to the Home membership since the last report issued, 95 in all, of which 46 were men, 20 ,women, 21 boys and 8 girls. During the year, death has removed 40 men and 15 women, a total of 55. The withdrawal of 9 men, 12 women, 10 boys and 2 girls, included in the above, mal{e a total of 88. The membership at this date consists of 171 men, 117 women, 83 boys and 67 girls, a total of 438. I The Home life is as described in forrriei- reports. The children entertain the household with musicals. During the winter months, moving pictures were produced weekly. The old g-entlemen have their billiard and pool tables, also card rooms; while the old ladies, their card parties and social meetings. On Wednesday evening of each week prftyer service is held by our old members, presided over by a clergyman from the city. Our children to the number of 117 attend the public schools. The smaller ones attend the Home Kindergarten, which is in charge of one of our Home girls who was graduated from the Oswego Normal School in June last. The children are still taught cooking, drcssmal{ing and manual training work at the Home; and also receive musical and vocal instructions. Both boys and girls receive military training, once a. week, from a. very competent drillmaster.

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Appendix

that we can not arrive at the cost per capita, though it approximates $250. This is an interesting fact, that this Grand Lodge pays a salary to more officers and in larger amounts than any other Grand Lodge. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers ninety-eight pages and touches the very "ends of the earth", giving a line or two to many Grand Lodges rarely recognized. Missouri is treated very courteously in one and a half pages. Altogether the report is interesting from start to finish.

NORTH CAROLINA. 1918. L. PRIDGEN, G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 25,910.

1917.

A. B. W1.L

ANDREWS,

M.

WILSON,

G. M. G. S.

CLAUDE

M. DELANCY HAYWOOD

Lodges, 442. Gain, 880.

The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina came to us in fine form in a well arranged volume of 406 pages, 142 of which are occupied by the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. The volume is introduced by a fine picture of the incoming Grand Master, and further b~ a list of PAST GRAND.MASTERS FROM:

1787

TO

1917.

In this period of 130 years we find there have been sixty-two Grand Masters; one of these served seven consecutive terms; one four terms; ten three terms; thirty-six two terms, and the remainder one term each. We suppose that in the early history of the Grand Lodge proper material for Grand Masters was comparatively scarce, hence a suitable man was accorded several terms. Later, by a sort of quasi-political courtesy, a second term was granted as an endorsement of the first路 administration. Still later, as with us for many years, the number of worthy aspirants is so


Appendix

1917. ]

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great that the very tallest can hope for but one term-even if he desires it! ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Grand 'Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of North Carolina convened in its One Hundred and Thirtieth Annual Communication in the hall of the Masonic Temple, in the City of Raleigh, on Tuesday evening, January 16, 1917, at 7: 30 o'clock, and was opened in Ample Form, it appearing that a constitutional number of lodges were represented. Following the ordinary routine, after some preliminaries, the Grand Master delivered the ANNUAL ADDRESS;

In which one of the opening paragraphs is so unusual and striking that it commands our attention. This it is: If, in any way, your servant has succeeded, it has been, not because of his own exertions, but because each night, as the darkness followed the day, and the time for rest comes to a man so that he may prepare for the work of the coming day, on bended knee have I implored the blessing of Almighty God upon this Grand Lodge, its officers, and the Masons of North Carolina, implored His blessing upon their work for the goo'd of our state, the uplift of humanity and that He would bless this great Order in all of its works to that end. JOHN C. DREWRY, GRAND SECRETARY.

Referring to the lameI1ted Grand Secretary in his remarks on Necrology, the Grand Master says, in part: Today, as we meet together, the Grand Secretary's station is vacant. John C. Drewry, the efficient Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge for twenty-two years past, died October 2,' 19] 6, at his home in this city after an' illness of many months. The great service he rendered the Grand Lodge of North Carolina during- the twenty-two years of his term as Grand Secretary speaks for itself in the material growth that has come to the Fraternity in our state. Twenty-two years ago there were less than ll',OOO Masons, the appropriation to the Oxford Orphan Asylum was $2,50 1, there was no Home for aged l\iasons, there was no Masonic Temple owned by the Grand Lodge, Masonry was weak numerically and weaker in influence. ';<"'hat has been the effect of his influence and inspiration upon the Craft in bettering it for good can not be described in words.

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The Grand Secretary was a wealthy man, and after providing for his family, he left a large sum to the Grand Lodge, specifying that the interest was to be used for assisting in paying the Grand Secretary and the expenses of the office. DECISIONS.

These are seventy-four in number and in most cases it would seem that the common sense and Masonic knowledge of the Master of the lodge should have rendered a decision unnecessary, as al~ most everyone is in accordance with the "Common Law" of Freemasonry. No. 29, we cordially approve: 29. A person 'of illegitimate birth, if otherwise qualified, is eligible to the degrees of Freemasonry. The Masonic Order looks to a man's moral character and not his antecedents, and only requires he must be a man of good character and standing in the community.

"1 ! on or and shame from no condition rise, Act well your part,. there the honor lies."

And yet it is contradicted by some Grand Lodges. 42. A Brother lodging an objection with a Master to a Fellow Craft being raised, can do so privately, and it does not have to be made in open Lodge. Reasons against the Fellow Craft being advanced for causes supposed to have been committed seven years may be a valid reason for a Brother objccting to a Fellow Craft being raised.

The committee passed the first mentioned without criticism. They repudiated the last paragraph, however. We would modestly protest against the decision in its entirety unless modified. It partakes' of the star chamber process. However, we would not criticise our Brothers. We only differ in opinion, in which we may be wrong, as we often are. GRAND CHAPLAIN S.

In accordance with the order of the last Grand Lodge, the Grand Master appointed seven Associate Grand Chaplains and reports them by name. We think this a very proper action on the part of the Grand Lodge. Often some function of the Grand Lodge is held at a distance fr9m the Grand Chaplain when there is only


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one and the possibility of attendance is uncertain and the expense sometimes considerable. Referring to this, the Grand Master says: The recognition of the Masonic and Christian worK by these Brethren has meant a great deal to the Craft. In all but one instance, each Associate Grand Chaplain has been Master of his Lodge, and it is fitting that to such workers come these positions. \\'hile this recognition is a splendid one during the length of its appointment, yet could the Grand Lodge not go further and make this, not only one of honor, but such that will be of practical value to the ministers of the Gospel, who, finding out the great worth of our Order, have advanced its interest in their communities, and have zealously worked as its presiding officer. It is, therefore, recommended that the 'Grand Lodge adopt a resolution providing that all ministers of the Gospel who are appointed Grand Chaplain or Associate Grand Chaplain, shall hereafter be placed on the mileage roll and be paid a mileage of five cents one way to the annual session of the Grand Lodge. It will mean a great deal to the Grand Lodge to have present, taking part in its deliberations, these Brethren, and for that reason this recommendation is made.

AN INTERESTING EPISODE.

The first public Masonic procession ever held under the auspices of the Grand Lodge of Korth Carolina, so far as research has shown, was the Masonic procession at Chapel Hill on Saturday, uctober 12, ] 793, when Grand Master William R. Davie laid, with Masonic honors, the corner stone of 'the Old East Building, the first of the buildings erected for the then newly established University of North Carolina. He described it in a letter dated October 30th, as follows: "On the twelfth 'instant, the Commissioners appointed by the Board of Trustees of the University of this State met at Chapel Hill for the purpose of laying the corner stone of the present building and disposing of the lots in the village. A large number of the Brethren of the Masonic Order from Hillsborough, ChathamGranville and Warren attended to assist at the ceremony. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ William Richardson Davie, Grand Master of the Fraternity, etc., in this state, assisted by two Masters of Lodges and four other officers, laid the corner stone, enclosing a plate to commemorate the transaction." During the dark days 'of the University, 1865 to 1875, the corner stone was despoiled and, its contents removed. Recently Thomas B. Foust, Class of 1~1!13, of the University of North Carolina, who conducted a brass foundry in Clarksville, Tenn., had his attention directed by a workman to the strange lettering on a brass plate. The name, William Hiehardson Davie, at once attracted his


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attention, and he had the plate cleaned, _which disclosed the lettering, which was found to be as follows "On one side of the plate:

"Hune Lapidem Honoraris Curatoribus hujus academiae nee non FratTibus Masonicis Hillsboria aliundeque Rite presentibus Gulielmus R. DaVie, equestTis praefeetus Carolinaeque Septentrionalis Arehe-Architieus Anno Lucis 7593, Salutis 1793 Americanae Liberatatis 18 mo. and 12 mo die Oetobris, Multo Cum Ordine LOCAVIT Sit Aere Permuris." "On the other side of the plate: "The Right VVorshipful VVilliam Richardson Davie Grand Master of The most AnCient and Honorable Fraternity of Freemasons in the State of North Carolina Assisted by The other Commissioners, and the Brethren of thl3 Eagle and Independence Lodges on the 12th day of October In the year of Masonry 5793 and in the 1~th year of American Independence, laid the corner . stone of this edifice. R. Huntington, Sculp."

One hundred and twenty-three years later, that is to say, in 1916, Grand Master A. B. Andrews presented this plate to the University of North Carolina with appropriate words, which we would be glad to copy but for ,want of space. Dispensations were granted to form four lodges, and several petitions were refused. THE GRAND OBATOR.

Hon. F. C. Harding, Grand Orator, was introduced and delivered a splendid address, from which we copy ~ few paragraphs in


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spite of our limitation of space. Referring to the massive monolith known as Cleopatra's Needle, presented by France to the United States, he says: This ancient Egyptian shaft of hieroglyphics has' been taken from Egypt's sandy soil through the channels of Sunny' France, has been transported to America and has been re-erected and now stands in Central Park in New York City. In the pI"ocess of taking down this /i;gyptian shaft for removal, it was discovered that its foundations had been laid by lHasonic hands. Some three years ago I had the' privilege, as well as the pleasure, of inspecting this most wonderful piece of Masonic evidence. I could not resist the impulse to tip my hat to the ancient stone giant, and stand in the shadow of its towering shaft with uncovered head and view it wi th reverence, because I l{new its form and its figure had passed under the hand of a Craftsman who had learned his Masonic lesson well. Whence, then, came Masonry? Whence then came Masonry? From out a period dating back thirty centuries beyond the beginning of the Christian era, it existed during the childhood of the race, when man carved from blocks of flint his rude weapons of defense. The sacred temples of India, over whose corners and cornices cling and creep the trailing vines; the statues of Memnon, silent and speechless as the Sphinx, the sanctuaries of the Persian and' the Aztec, where burned the holy flames; the sculptured image of Venus, chilled and chiseled in the untarnished marble, are all mute memories of this Ancient Order of ours. It flourished when Athens was the cradle of learning and the versatile Greek uttered in the Pantheon the masterpieces of human language which you and I reverence today. It flourished when the proud and haughty Romans razed Corinth in ruins, and bowed to Cleopatra, (,Jueen of the Nile. It flourished when the sturdy Germans invaded Britain and contended with the Angle and the Saxon, then laying deep the very foundations of our civllizatio~,and hung in the heavens of the future our star of liberty. ' On their Masonic Altars smouldered the fires of wisdom, truth and justice during the long and dismal night of the Dark Ages, with only the initiated to kindle and feed the consecrated flames. They preserved in cipher and hieroglyphics, carved in stone and clay, the records of antiquity, and transmitted from generation to generation the jewels of progress with which we garner our homes and minds today. These are the evidences of the antiquity of our Order, and I believe it stood sponsor for, and was the sole witness to, the contract when God made His covenant with Abraham, by which the Church of God was established on Earth.

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FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers 112 pages and is a fine piece of work. one break, however. Referring to Missouri, he says:

He makes

The Grand Lodge of Missouri has a Masonic Home in the course of erection which will, doubtless, be a great blessing to the Fraternity when finished.

If he could see our magnificent buildings on Delmar avenue today he would doubtless think the "Masonic Home" is fully completed.

NORTH DAKOTA. 1917.

1916. HARRY LORD, WALTER L.

G. M.

STOCKWELL,

ALEX

G.

S.

E. HOOVER Lodges, 113.

WM.

B.

TAYLOR,

G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 10,055.

Gain, 462. From the "counterfeit presentment" of the Passing Grand Harry Lord, which greets us路 on the initial page of the Proceedings, as well as the brief biographical sketch which follows, we are able to congratulate our Brothers of North Dakota on t~eir choice of a ruler for the past year. Much depends on the Grand Master. May Bro. Lord enjoy henceforth the consciousness of duty faithfully performed. Mast~r,

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

Promptly at 10 a. m., Tuesday, June 20th, 1916, the Twentyseventh Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of North Dakota was called to order by Most Worshipful Brother Harry Lord, Grand Master. The sessions were held in the Masonic Temple arid continued until 5 p. m., Wednesday, June 21st, 1916. The attendance was good and the opening exercises were as usual, varied with letters and telegrams of regret, congratulations, etc.


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THE ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This is to be commended for much; it is something more than merely conventional in form and exhibits the fact路 that the Grand Master has been guided by the impulse of duty. We regret to note, however, that neither at the beginning or close, nor elsewhere, as we have noted, any reference to Him before whom all should bow and without seeking whose blessing no great or important work should be undertaken. This is not intended as a criticism and we are sure the fact was (is) merely an incident arising from no set purpose or conviction. He refers tenderly and at length to the distinguished dead and appoints an hour for a special memorial service. A most worthy thought, in our estimate. As a rule we pass too lightly over our reports on Necrology. DISPENSATIONS, ETC., ETC.

The usual multitude of petitions for various purposes were presented during the year and each considered and treated on its individual merit. Three lodges, chartered by the Grand Lodge at its last session, were duly constituted by the Grand Master in person. NEW LODGES.

After proper examination into and due consideration of all the facts, dispensations were granted for the creation of two new lodges. The Grand Master laid the cornerstone of a new Masonic Temple at Devil's Lake and also officiated at the dedication of the fifty-thousand-dollar Temple when completed. The "beautiful ball room"-in the Temple-is emphasized, as well as the dance which followed. This is new to us, both as to the ball room and the dance, in connection with the solemn service of dedicating a Temple, in the name of "the Supreme and .Eternal God." But we are not fully up to date, doubtless, and our Masonry was learned in the past. Only three decis~ons are reported, and these are unquestionably in accordance with the "Common Law" of Freemasonry. This Grand Jurisdiction is awake on the subject of charity, and in addition to the "cottage" for tuberculous patients and other


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provisions for the worthy indigent of the Order, they are looking forward to a larger future and a greater Home, ample in its accommodations for all who need its shelter. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is brief, covering only some seventy pages, but is well nigh above criticism. We might say the same as to the entire volume containing this report. Evidently the Grand Secretary, as well as the Correspondent, are quite equal to their tasks. Missouri is complimented with extensive quotations, and the Correspondent is mentioned kindly. And we hasten to explain to our good Brother Hoover that the unhappy prefix to "biography" was only one of those accidents which our wisdom, at least, can neither foresee nor prevent. We regret it, however.

NOVA SCOTIA. 1916. DONALD F. FRAZER, THOMAS MOWBRAY,

G. M. G. S.

C. JONES Lodges, 76. â&#x20AC;˘

J.

1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 6,855.

Gain, 90. The Deputy Grand Master, Joseph R. Bennett, graces the initial page of the Proceedings with his fine p,resence, whose effect is heightened by the imposing regalia of the Province. A Special Grand Communication for the purpose of paying funeral honors to the late Past Grand Master T. A. Cossman, who passed into the unseen April 30th, 1916, is duly recorded, with personnel and ceremonies. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Fifty-first Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Nova Scotia was held in the basement rooms of the Baptist Church, Bear River, N. S., beginning at 10 o'clock in the forenoon of Wednesday, the 14th day of June, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916, and was opened


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in Ample Form, several of the Grand Offices being filled temporarily. The attendance was good and the G. A. O. U. was duly recognized with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. After attending to some incidental items, a procession was formed under the direction of V. W~ Bro. W. H. Smith, Grand Director of Ceremonies, and, headed by the Bear River brass band, marched to St. John's Anglican Church, where divine service wils held at 11 o'clock a. m., and an eloquent and instructive sermon was preached by the Grand Chaplain, R. W. Bro. Rev. Edward A. Harris, M. A., which is reported in extenso, and from which we would gladly quote at length, but for our limitations. Returning to the Lodge Hall the Grand Lodge was called to refreshm~nt until 2 :,15 p. m., when, being called to order, the Grand Master delivered the ANNUAL ADDRESS,

from which we select a paragraph or two: It is, perhaps, the more expressive of what our Ancient Order really is, that our Communication should be held in this beautiful and sequestered spot. A place hallowed by nature in the attractiveness and picturesqueness of its surroundings; so typical of the high hill and low dale, as to remind us of the refuge of our Ancient Brethren in their desire for care and watchfulness. In such a restful resort, free from much of the turmoil and strife of the more active centers, we can best deliberate for the progress of Masonry, and our sessions should be distinguished by the 'most amicable relati.ons, so that we shall separate to our respective homes the better equipped to prosecute the work for the incoming year with an eye single to the good of the Craft and the strengthening of the bonds of the Fraternity,

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Referring to the war, he says: When the struggle shall have ceased there will be a greater than ever duty imposed upon members of this world-wide Fraternity. Responsibility will rest heavily on this body for the future peace and securi(y of the world. This institution which has the welfare and good of mankind as a reason for existence must exert its moderating influence;

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Let me emphasize this hope in a closer quotation from a trenchant essay f"om the pen of that talented Canadian Brother, Sir Gilbert Parker, Bart., M. P., recently delivered before a London Lodge. He writes:


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"Tradition says that Masons were first known as 'Noachida', or sons of Noah, and that the actual sons of Noah believed that when the waters which covered the earth subsided, an era of peace would be established for all generations. It also says that Moses was a Grand Master of the Masons, and dreamed that when the Children of Israel reached the Promised Land they would rest there in peace and undisturbed. If there is no history to warrant this tradition, the idea behind it may well give inspiration and hope to Masons -of today, who, in common with millions of people in Europe, are mal'ching through strife and sorrow, and the Shadow of Death, though not without hope, It was not given to Moses to enter the Promised Land, and it can not be given to the Masons of today to walk the field of universal peace; but, in spite of all that is happening, true Masons, strong-hearted and faithful, will still believe they are marching forward, not falling bacl{ward, and that the Masons of tomorrow will, thl'ough the scribes of the Masonic Lodges of the world, write in their archives that the brotherhood of man which they have cultivated has prevailed,

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Many communications are incorporated in the address, evidencing the purpose of the Grand Master to be explicit and exact in reporting the several items in question. MASONIC HOME.

To this institution he pays tribute in such terms as to assure us of its satisfactory condition and also of his personal loyalty. Further on we learn that the present membership of the Home family is seventeen, two having died and one being admitted during the year. The expense as reported by the Treasurer is about $280 per capita. There is a farm in connection with the Home, whose products are reported at about $17.60. If this was consumed by the Home the expense per capita is thereby increased about $100-making the cost $380. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers 184 pages and is well written. Misso.uri is recognized in three pages, which is just our share, as the Correspondent has reviewed the Proceedings of sixty-one Grand Lodges in his report.


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OKLAHOMA. 1917. WM.

MOSES

1918. W. HOGAN, G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 27,520. Gain, 1,373..

G. M. ANDERSON, G. S.

ARTHUR JAMES WEIR,

T. C. HUMPHREY Lodges, 441.

SAMUEL

The opening ceremonies of the Grand Lodge were diversified by the introduction of the children of the Home, who rendered "a most enjoyable program of readings and music." Afterwards the Grand Lodge was convened and purged by the Deputy Grand Master, and the Grand Master, James W. Weir, being introduced and conducted to the East with due ceremony, the Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form, the Committee on Credentials reporting a sufficient quorum' in attendance. A pleasant incident in connection with the opening ceremonies was the presentation of a beautiful apron by Hugo Lodge, of which the Grand Master is a member, to him, through the hand and words of Hon. and Bro. T. C. Humphrey, also a member of that lodge. His brief address was felicitous and the response of the Grand Master was fitting. The prayer of the Grand Chaplain, Rev. W. W. Robinson, wa& eloquent and full of feeling. We quote in part: We are glad, Holy Father, for the promise, that jf found faithful Thou wilt call us unto Thyself, when our earthly pilgrimage shall cease. Blessed Father, we know that men differ in creed and theology, but, as men and Masons, help us ever to take the Holy Bible, which lies open upon our altars, as a guide to our actions, as the light of our councils, as a rule of our life, and as the director of our transactions, one with another. May its golden rays of truth continue to illuminate the pathway of the craftsmen; may it guide us as Thou didst Israel of old, by the pillar of cloud by day and the pillar of fire by night, through the wilderness; help us to remember the moral teachings of the square and compasses that we may ever square our actions by the square of virtue and morality and keep our passions within due bounds with all mankind and so may we lay aside all malice and strife.

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Gracious God! who hast kept the fires of patriotism and liberty aglow, in the hearts of American 'citizens, for generations past, preserve us from the calamities of war and grant that we may pass through this great crisis, now upon us, with honor to ourselves and in a manner acceptable to Thee. In all the griefs and


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afflictions which we must endure in this life may we always put our trust in Thee. follow in Thy precepts and fear no danger.

A well-arranged program on order of business was presented by the committee intrusted with this item. This was adopted and probably the business of the Grand Lodge was expedited thereby, but it seems to us that a definite order of business in such cases may prevent that freedom and spontaneity which is so desirable and may create a stiffness, calculated to hinder rather than assist. Past Grand Master L. D. Kemper, of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, was introduced, and received with due ceremony. His complimentary address was brief, as was the response of the Grand Master, but both w.ere worthy deliverances. THE ANNUAL ADDRESS,

which covers twenty-seven pages, seems to touch and explain all the official acts and incidents of' the year's administration in a thoroughly careful and businesslike way. The tone is modest and reverent and language forceful and fitting. We give an extract or two: Brethren: We are assembled this evening in the ninth annual communication of this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Slate of Oklahoma, and we should feel extremely thanldul for the bounteous measure of peace, happiness and prosperity with which our Divine Father has blessed us. In this great American Republic, do we fully appreciate the great heritage the founders of this Nation have left us, in which each individual is a sovereign, with a voice in all the activities and policies of thc commonwealth in which he lives and in the Nation at large; the liberty of speech and conscience, and freedom <:>f the press, such as few other countries enjoy. As Masons, let us not fall short of our whole duty to God, our country and ourselves, and guard well such splendid privileges. and stand by the colors, the greatest flag of all, the Stars and Stripes. We, the children of many lands. salute thee, symbol of beauty and grandeur and glory, emblem of what we aim to be, and what we have done.

The Grand Master was here interrupted by' a flag demonstration, which ended in the adoption of a resolution to place a flag on the Altar under the Great Lights. The Grand Master further said: Is it possible our twentieth century civilization is at fault? Have we degenerated into barbarism? Or is it a plan of the Great


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Architect of the Universe, which is driving us toward a world-wide democracy?

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The Grand Master reports the usual special dispensations. He makes no rulings of more than local interest. He refers tenderly to the dead and gives the salient points of several Special Communications. His conclusion is very beautiful: Finally, Brethren, since life was given to the germ which grew and developed into the Masonic Order this old world has witnessed many changes. Nations have risen to might and glory on land and sea, have fallen, their heroes enslaved and their banners trailed in the dust; cities of marvelous beauty and wealth have vanished, covered with the ashes of volcanic 路fires and the sands of the desert,. forgotten until some venturous explorer sheds light upon their hidden treasures and reads their story to a wondering world. Men have come and gone and the handwriting on the wall which tells of their having lived is a sculptured bust, a painting rare, or verse of deeds of bravery and daring bold. But the principles of this order change not, nor age, nor decay; shining with the light of Purity within, glowing with the energy and vigor of achievement, heedless alike of the sound of strife and the battle's cry. They are embodied in a spirit, deathless, sublime. Attention, ye Soldiers of Masonry, Present Arms, to the order which has always stood for the good of Man, for the Sanctity of the Home, for our Country, for God, through all eternity.

The Masonic Home seems to be in good condition and general prosperity is reported through the Grand Jurisdiction. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This is written in excellent style and spirit, covering sixtyeight pages, in the review of forty-eight Grand Lodges, two for two years each. Missouri is complimented with two pages, mostly quotations. which is a further compliment. Thanks, Brother Humphrey.


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OREGON. 1916. 1917. FRANK J. MILLER, G. M. WILL MOORE, G. M. JAMES F. ROBINSON, G. S. Re-elected. DAVID P. MASON Grand Correspondent. Lodges, 143. Members; 14,779. Gain, 565. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Sixty-sixth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Oregon, was opened in. the lodge room of St. John's Lodge No. 17, City of Albany, Oregon, Wednesday morning, June 7th, 1916, at the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., and was opened in Ample Form, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. The Grand Representatives present were duly presented at the Altar and welcomed by the Grand Master in appropriate terms. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This begins as follows: Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Oregon: In welcoming you to the Sixty-sixth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge, my beart is filled with gratitude to observe that our ranks remain unbroken. I am thankful that we have not been called upon to mourn the loss of a single member of our official family. Every officer and every Past Grand Officer of this Grand Lodge, who was with us a year ago, is privileged to be with us today, should his inclination and duties permit.

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Further on he says: Looking back over the past and comparing- our record with other organizations of like kind, we can congratulate ourselves upon our achievements. \Ve have done a great work. \Ve have left our stamp indelibly fixed upon the citizenship of our state. Masonry in Oreg-on has been a vital, living force, more potent today than ever before, and we need not blush for the record it has left on the page of our state's development. It made its first appearance west of the Rocky Mountains in Oregon City in the year 1848, and its progress has been steady, its record one to be admired, its


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escutcheon l{ept clean and bright: Faith, Hope and Cha,rity have guided our footsteps in the past and they must be the lamps that light our pathway to the future. No words of mine can enrich Masonic lore, with which you are now so familiar, but I will try to give an account of my stewardship and a recapitulation of what has transpired in our Jurisdiction during the year just passed.

Among other lofty sentiments and admonitions, the Grand Master emphasizes the duty of visiting the sick and afflicted and ministering to such in the measure of ability and opportunity. The Grand Master refers in sympathetic terms to the fraternal dead. DECISIONS.

These, some twelve in number, refer, doubtless, to cases arising in that' particular Jurisdiction, and hence are in no sense academic in character, although they seem to be in accord with the Common La~ of Freemasonry. Among other worthy utterances of the Grand Master we give the following: MASONIC BENEVOLENCES.

During the past year as never before I have been impressed with the need of more adequate provision for furnishing relief to distressed worthy members of our Order, and those dependent upon them. This matter has been delayed long-er than is consistent with the benevolent purposes of the Fraternity, and we can not further neglect the duty incumbent upon us if we are to maintain the dignity which we possess. We are all sent into this life on a mission, and part of that mission is to be helpful to others.

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"I

count this thing to be grandly trueThat a noble deed is a step toward God, Lifting the soul from the common sod To a purer air and the broader view."

During the year just passed numerous calls for help have been made upon your Trustees, to which they were unable to adequately respond, not because we were without funds to do so, but for the reas'on that proper provisions had not been made whereby this could be done. Knowing that the great heart of Masonry beats responsive to the cry of distress, and feeling that it only required some one to point out the way, I appointed a committee consisting of Brothers


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William W路. Youngston, David P. Mason, M. S. Woodcock and Earl C. Bronaugh, to prepare a plan to be submitted for your consideration. NATIONAL GRAND LODGE.

A long and enthusiastic document was presented from the Grand Lodge of Indiana, asking co-operation in the creation of a National or General Grand Lodge-to ,vhich the committee reported respectfully, suggesting that in view of the importance of the matter they be allowed till next session to make report, which was agreed to. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This report covers 175 pages in a thoughtful and courteous review of the Proceedings "of all English speaking 路Jurisdictions with which we are in fraternal relation-to use the words with which Bro. Mason introduces his excellent review. He is kind to Missouri, quoting freely from the address of Bro..W. F. Kuhn and the Grand Master. Quoting from the Correspondent, he brings forward a paragraph in which occurs a notable error. We are made to say that not more than "three millions" (of Masons) can be counted in foreign lands, when we intended to say "three hundred thousand".

PENNSYLVANIA. 1916. A. W ATRES, G. M. JOHN A. PERRY, G. S. THOMAS F. PENMAN

LOUIS

Lodges, 497.

1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 120,546.

Gain, 5,086. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania for 1916 constitute a massive volume and the .contents are well arranged throughout. Not the least of that which we commend is the careful index in the very front, constituting, with the picture of the Grand Master and the beautiful Temple in Philadelphia, a most worthy introduction. We are often annoyed because of the want of any index in the Proceedings that come before us and often


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when there is an index it' is to be found, if found at all, in some impossible place in the body of the volume instead of at the beginning or end. Pennsylvania follows in measure the plan of some of the Continental Grand Lodges in that the business of the Grand Lodge is transacted, not at the Annual. Meeting, but principally at Quarterly or Special Convocations. A Special Grand Communication was held in Philadelphia February 29, 1916, for the purpose of paying funeral honors to M. W. George W. Kendrick, Past Grand Master, who was called into the unseen February 24, 1916, at the age of 74 years. QUARTERLY GRAND COl\LMVNICATlONS

were held in the Temple' at Philadelphia March 1st, 1916; June 7th, 1916; September 6th, 1916, and December 6th, 1916. The attendance was good, the Grand Master being present on all occasions save one. The Grand Lodge was opened in each case at 7 p. m. and the convocation lasted only a few hours. At the first Quarterly, among other minor items, the Committee on Publication reported that the Proceedings were being published to the number of 5,000 volumes, 100 of which were to be in half morocco. At the second Quarterly, held in June, various reports were presented,路 principally that of the committee which had been intrusted with a complicated and troublesome case of rather unusual character. Also a fitting memoir of Past Grand Master Kendrick was presented. At the third, the Grand Secretary presented his annual report of the number and condition of the 路lodges within the Grand Jurisdiction and of the work done during the year. The Committee on Correspondence made a technical report, recommending recognition .of the Grand Lodge of Porto Rico. The committee also presented resolutions touching the death of R. W. Chetwode Crawley, T..JL. D., of Dublin, Ireland, who passed away from his home at Weston Park, 'Sanford Road, in the suburbs of the city already mentioned, i~ the recent past. Of him the report says: From a very early period of his Masonic life, Brother Chetwode Crawley applied himself with industry and perseverance, which have never been surpassed and rarely equaled by. any student of the Craft, to an investigation of the real history of Freemasonry in Ireland. For this purpose it was essential to exhume old records and documents, to rediscover old and forgotten books,


130

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[Sept.

and to present the results of such long-continued and happily conducted research in a guise that would insure their meeting with the close and immediate attention of the critics and scholars of Freemasonry. All this was done in a most splendid and selective manner and placed before his listeners and readers in sound arguments framed in convincing language. His productions as an author cover a wide field, and it might be urged that he has touched every possible topic that Freemasonry suggests or presents." .

The Committee on Masonic Homes made an extended report, showing continued advance in this great field of Masonic Charity. In the magnitude, cost and annual expenditures for its Homes this Grand Lodge is among the first in the world. And in extent, their work in this field is e'Xcelled by none unless it be the Grand Lodge of New York. From a report presented later we find that last year there were over 25,000 visitors to the several Homessix in number; that the number of inmates is 285, of whom only 37 are children! And the cost of maintenance per capita was something over $343.00. ANNUAL COMl\iUKICATION.

This was held December 27th, the Grand Master presiding, and 120 lodges being represented. The Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form at 10 a. m. and closed the same day at 1: 35 p. m. Committee on Library presented an extended report, showing the possession of many rare and valuable mementoes, including an Apron wrought Oy Madame Marquise De Lafayette and presented by her husband to General Washington. Also many valuable jewels and books, newly received by donation or purchase. The report states that the entire expense for the year was $7,520.20, of which the salaries constituted a large part, amounting to $4,441.00. The Employment Bureau reported 264 applications, of whom 132 were placed in positions where they were receiving $71,387.00 per annum. One of these is in a position where he receives .$5,000 per annum. The Board of Almoners reported their fund at $9,425.00, of which they had distributed $8,485.00 to applicants from nine states, besides Pennsylvania, and also to two from England and three from Scotland. Of course, the greater number-740-were from Pennsylvania, while fifty-seven were from all the other states and countries.


1917.]

131

Appendix THE ANNUAL ADDRESS.

In this the Grand Master enters into careful detail of the work of the year, reporting the formation of three new lodges and a list of decisions in which we see nothing of special moment. A circular letter sent to all the lodges, which we give herewith, seems to us to savor strongly of paternalism, and we greatly doubt whether it would meet with general approval, though, personally, we endorse its spirit and substance: In view .of the fact that many Lodges throughout the Jurisdiction are expending such large, and in many instances excessive, sums of money for refreshments, and in order that expenditures along these lines shall be kept within reasonable limits, it is important that the Grand Master shall be fully advised regarding such expenses. You are therefore directed to send to this office immediately after the audit of the accounts of the Lodge 'for the year 1916, a copy of the report of your Auditing Committee, which report shall include receipts under the various heads, and expenses of the Lodge, amounts paid for charity, banquets, cigars, number of banquets held during the year, cost of each banquet, the number present who are members of the Lodge and the number p路resent who are visitors. This report shall be sent to the Grand Master not later than February 1, 1917.

We give the following from the conclusion of the address for its beauty and real worth: Our ancient charges long ago proclaimed that the Holy Bible will guide us in the path of truth, direct us to the temple of happiness, and point out to us the whole duty ol man.

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But the Book of the Law is not a fetish. Whether it lies open on the alter at Isaiah, Jeremiah, Genesis, or Exodus, twenty, it is futile and of none effect, unless we absorb its lessons and live its life. To refuse or neglect its study would make us the losers, and would put in jeopardy both our beloved Fraternity and our country. Upon' it are based our ancient charges, so full of helpfulness and significance. Therefore it is that Freemasons study both the Bible and our ancient charges, for, after all, Freemasonry is an intellectual outlook, a standard of truth, a gospel of light-a light that uplifts. -.At this holy season it is in the hearts of all of us, that that outlook, that standard and that gospel include pre-eminently the spirit of helpfulness. . . Never since the world began was the solidarity of the race so emphasized; never since the morning 路stars sang together was it more clearly seen that man is his brother's keeper; never in all the centuries was the opportunity to lend a hand so eagerly sought; never in all history has there been such need for material


[Sept.

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132

help; never such dire distress. On the other hand, never has there been such power to assist nor such willingn~ss to comfort. This spirit of helpfulness is the "immediate jewel of our souls" and should be kept bright and shining. So long as there shall be weak hands to uphold and trembling knees to strengthen, and until that happy day shall come when men and. women everywhere shall be strong' and self-reliant, so long will the spirit of helpfulness, exemplified, make' life better and sweeter and holier.

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REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

In this worthy document, covering 205 pages, which include a worthy introduction and a yet more valuable conclusion, our good Brother Penman commends himself to us most strongly, not merely for the excellence of his work, but personally as well, in that, referring to an item in our review of Pennsylvania last year, to which he might have replied sharply, he dismisses it with merely a shrug of the shoulders and a pleasant word. His work needs no commendation. It demonstrates its worth.

. PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 1917. WM.

N.

H.

TAYLOR,

C. COMF0R:T,

G. M. G. S.

WALTER W. WEBER

Lodges, 38.

1918. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 1,839.

Gain, 1,138. We are not sure that we understand the record and tabulation of the Grand Secretary, but if so, this Grand Lodge has made a wonderful record within the last 'year or SO, having increased the number of lodges from seven (7) to 38, and the membership from 701 to 1,839, a record unprecedented. THE FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the Jurisdiction of the Philippine Islands convened in Annual Communication in the Masonic Temple, 84-96 Escolta, in the


Appendix

1917.]

133

City of Manila, on Tuesday, the 13'th day of February, A. L. 5917, at 3 o'clock p. m., and was opened in Ample Form, with prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Brother Walter W. Weber, which we transcribe because of its beauty and fitness: Supreme Grand Master. Great Architect of the Universe. We reverently invoke Thy blessing upon us at this time. 'Ve bless Thee for Thy protection over us and Thy Love which has surrounded us during the past year. :May we ever remember that all our h,elp cometh from Thee who made heaven and earth. Remember, we beseech Thee, those in the throes of warfare and strife. Grant that out of all this carnage and bloodshed may come a deeper, realization' of our dependence upon Thee-both in. our individual and national life. â&#x20AC;˘ "Ve ask thy blessing upon those in authority in the Nation and in these Islands. V'lilt Thou give them wisdom and strength and may the work of their hands be adorned with beauty and redound to the glory of Thy great and holy Name. Grant us Thy aid in our present undertaking that all we may do shall be done with an eye single to Thy glory and the good of our Fraternity. Amen.

The Grand Representatives were welcomed in form and a beautiful response to the Grand Master was made by Bro. Chas. C. Cohn. After some other incidental items of business the Grand Master delivered the ANNUAL ADDRESS,

which is a brief but worthy document, covering only some six and a half pages, but giving a sufficient history of the work of the year. We give a few extracts:

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No dOUbt, much of the added impetus from which we have benefited has been due to the fact that we are now located in our splendid new Temple, one of the most magnificent buildings in the entire Far East. Nor has this progress been confined to any one Lodge-all show a splendid growth both numerically and financially. The net gain for the six chartered Lodges is 112, or, taking it on a percentage basis, an increase of sixteen per cent. In addition to those we have the petitioners on the dispensations gran ted to the new Lodges. While with us all is peace and prosperity, let us not forget that death and desolation has eome to many of our brethren beyond the seas. Our hearts go out in sympathy to their widows and orphans and I know we one and all stand ready to contribute our mite both as individuals and as Lodges whenever the opportunity may present itself.

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134

Appendix

[Sept.

There were no decisions and only a fe-N dispensations. Ho-.vever, the number of dispensations issued to form NEW

LOI>G!';S

is, as already intimated, unprecedented. And no locations or number of petitioners are given-only the names-thirty in number, more than four times as many as the original number at the beginning of the year. The explanation of this sudden increase in lodges and members is shown by the fact that some twenty-seven lodges formerly chartered by and confessing allegiance to the Grand Orient of Spain finally concluded to cast in their lot with the American路 Grand Lodge and thus end the anomalous condition which has existed since the cession of these islands to the United States. We congratulate our Philippine Brothers on this happy solution of the problem. The Grand Master complains that persons really residing in the Philippines come to the United States, apply for and receive the degrees of Masonry in clear violation of the rights of that sovereign Grand Lodge. We trust that where this has been done at all it was in ignorance and is not likely to occur again. Among the "recommendations" of the Grand Master we find the following: Resolved, That the Commissions of such Grand Representatives as fail to attend the Annual Communications of this Grand Lodge for two years in succession, and the Commissions of those Grand Representatives who permanently remove from this Jurisdiction, shall, in consequence thereof, be automatically canceled.

This was criticised by the committee, but it seems to us a very proper measure. The Grand Master also recommends: In view of the fact that the Annual Meeting of this Grand Lodge, falling-, as it does, in February, has proven most inconvenient in that it comes too soon after the first of the year, it is recommended that the following resolution be adopted: Resolved, That the time for holding the Annual CommunIcation of this Grand Lodge be changed to the fourth Tuesday of October at 4 o'clock p. m., thus amending Section 1 of Article IV of Part I to read as follows: The Grand Lodge shall hold its Annual Communication for the transaction of its regular business, at the City of Manila, commencing on the fourth Tuesday of October at 4 o'clock p: m.


1917. ]

Appendi.'1:

135

In consequence of the adoption of the foregoing, "September" should be substituted for "December" and ".January" in Section 4 of Article II of Part III. Believing that nothing is to be gained by being too technical and that many good men are debarred from sharing in our labors because of some physical defect immaterial so far as their ability to earn a livelihood is concerned, but such as, under our Constitution, 'would prevent them becoming Masons, we recommend that the action of our foster mother, California, be adopted, and that the word "literally" in line 7 of Section 2 of Article III of Part lIT, be changed to the word "substantially" so that the amended Article will read "and physically able to conform substantially to what the several degrees respectively require of him, etc."

The committee endorsed the change of time and to the latter suggestion responded as follows, in their report: V. The Grand Master has recommended that the word "substantially" be substituted for the word "literally" in the seventh line of Section 2, Article Ill, Part ITI, of the Constitution, so that the said section as amended shall read as follows: "Sec. 2. No Lodge in this Jurisdiction shall receive an applica: tion for the degrees of Masonry unless the applicant be a man: no woman nor eunuch; free born, being neither a slave nor the son of a bond woman; a believer in God and a future existence; of moral conduct capable of reading and writing; having no maim or defe<;:t in his body that may render' him incapable of learning the art, and physically able to conform substantially to what the several degrees respectively require of him; nor unless he shall have been a resident within the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge during twelve months, and within the jurisdiction of the Lodge (i. e., nearer thereto than to any other Lodge existing under this Grand Lodge, during six months next preceding the date of his application."

This seems to us really archaic in part of its verbiage, notably in the inclusion of the word "eunuch". This item is impossible of enforcement, as Masonry does not contemplate a rigid physical examination. It belongs to the dim and distant past, more so if possible than the interdict in some Grand Lodges against one born out of wedlock, and even more unjust. Both these figments should be relegated to the limbo of the past. This, however, is only our opinion, and we express it wi.th the utmost respect for our Brethren. As to the general purpose of the change touching physical qualifications, we heartily approve, with the proviso that this widening of the door into our Order makes it easy for the enthu-


136

[Sept.

Appendix

siastic lodge or partial friends to violate the spirit and intent of the Common Law of Freemasonry. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

Prefacing this report, which is in fine form and shows the financial and general condition of the Grand Lodge to be excellent, our worthy Brother, like Silas Wegg, "drops into poetry", giving two selections which are old but will never be stale: If we sit down atse't of sun

And count the thing's that we have done, And, counting, find One self-denying act, one word That eased the heart of him who heard, One glance most kind, That fell like sunshine where it went, Then we may count the day well spent. It has been 'a great pleasure to work withoUl' Grand Master, and I shall long remember the past year's work with him. I sincerely thank all who have had a part in the year's work, and for the love and esteem of you, my brethren, which I cherish more than great riches or high position.

Let me but do my work from day to day, In field or forest, at the desk or loom, In roaring- market-place or tranquil room; Let me but find it in my heart to say, 'Vhen vagrant wishes beckon me astray "'l'his is my work; ll1Y blessing, not my doom. Of all who live, I am the one by whom This work ean best be done in the right way." Then shall I find it not too great nor small, To suit my spirit and to prove my powers Then shall I cheerful greet the laboring hours, And cheerful turn, when the long shadows fall, At eventide to p'lay and love and rest, Because I know for me my work is best, -Henry Van Dyke. }<'OREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This excellent report, c~vering 180 pages, is the work of our good Brother Walter A. Weber,' and is distinctly strong and worthy. The first four pages are occupied with a modest introduction, two paragraphs of which we present: "Masonry in Action"

as

emphasized

by

Masonic

Homes

and


1917.]

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Appendix

benevolences has not be~n overlooked, and it is indeed inspiring to read the reports of these various Masonic activities. Statistics for the year 1915 sh'ow an investment in such homes of over seven million dollars. During the year 1915 $1,278,:l02 were contributed to the support of such homes, which contain 2,057 old people and 2,282 children, a total of 4,J39.

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The Grand Master is a creation of the Grand Lodge, having only such powers as are deleg-ated to him by that body. Any attempt to misuse those powers or to exceed his authority has met with objection on the part of the Grand Lodge, and in many instances his decisions have been reversed. Apparently "the law's the thing" and must be scrupulously obeyed.

He gives to Missouri four pages, principally quotations from the Grand Master and the oration of Brother Carl M. Vetsburg. He is kind to Missouri and especially so to the Correspondent, who is sincerely appreciative.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 1916. J. D. STEWART, G. M. W. P. DOULL, G. S. Lodges, 15.

GEO.

1917. McKAY, G. ,M. Re-elected. Members, 854.

STERLING

Gain, 35. The Proceedings of this heroic little Grand Lodge-the smallest known to us, are contained in a neat c)oth-bound volume of ninetythree pages, much of which is occupied with statistics and data of only local interest. The volume 'is introduced by a worthy picture' of the Grand Master for 1917-18, attired in the rather elaborate regalia peculiar to provincial and foreign Grand Lodges. We also have in the intial pages the deta-ils of a Special Grand Communication, held October 27th, 1915, for the purpose of paying funeral honors to Past Grand Master Simon William Crabbe. FOR'l'Y-FIRST ANNUAL COllDIUNICATION.

The Most Worshipfpl Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Prince Edward Island, composed of the Grand Lodge Officers, representatives of constituent lodges and Past Masters, convened in the Masonic Temple at Charlottetown, ,in the


138

[Sept.

Appendix

forenoon of June 28th, A. L. 5916, for the purnose of holding the ~orty-first Annual Communication. There being a constitutional representation present, the Grand Lodge was opened in Ample Form. After the usual preliminary forms and notices the Grand Master 'delivered the ANNUAL ADDHESS,

from which we extract as follows: Twelve momentous months have passed into history since the gavel last fell on the deliberations of this Grand body, and again it behooves us to tender devout and hearty thanks to the Supreme Architect of the Universe, at the outset of this, our Forty-first Annual Communication, that we are permitted, amid the storm and strain of these unprecedented times, for a short period to withdraw ourselves to the quiet and seclusion of this Temple of. Peace for the purpose of reviewing the work and condition of the eraft during the past Masonic ~;ear and for making plans and drawing designs for its upbuilding and improvement for the future.

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The shadow of the great war still hangs like a pall over our beloved Empire; and although' we are a Hemisphere's breadth removed from the scene of strife, yet month by month, week by week and day by day some new event, some personal touch, comes. to remind us that we are a party to this great struggle, that this war is our war, whether we like it or not. ,Vhen this Grand Lodg'e was last closed Mount Moriah in the south was oceupied by our Right \Vorshipful brother, the Grand Junior "Varden; today he is away in the Old Land in the service of King and Country. Our lights were last closed by our \Vorshipful brother, the Senior Grand Deacon; today another' fills his station while he is doing his duty as a tr'ue Mason and good citizen in a military training camp. From every part of her far-flung dominions, the Empire's sons have hurried to her aid. Her children, natural and adopted, from every continent and island, have borne witness to their loyalty even to the shedding of their blood, and in the forefront of them all stands our own fair and beloved Canada. Almost immediately on the outbreak of the war her first expeditionary force crossed the Atlantic, This has since been followed by contingent after contingent until at the present time Canada has upwards of three hundred and fifty thousand men under arms. Our own, Province of Prince Edward Island is also doing its part. Our first Provincial Unit, the Ninety-eighth Siege Battery, after demonstrating its efficiency in the training camps of I<;ngland" is now at the front. A few months ago when orders were given that a battalion of infantr'y should be raised in this Province the work was thought by many to be almost an impossible task. Today the One Hundred and Fifth Battalion recruited over strength


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with the finest young men of the Province is in training in Valcartier camp.

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The Grand Master gives a long list of the dead in that and other JurisdictioJ}s. He reports no decisions, but a number of dispensations of minor character. He regrets that lodge attendance is small and insists that "we shall not get more out of' it than we give." From the conclusion we give the following: There never was a time in the history of the world when the practice of the truly :l\1asonic virtues was more sorely needed than today. True Masonry stands for good citizenship. And surely, if ever our Empil'e needed her citizens she needs them now-she needs the best and most that is in them. Self-sacrifice and service must take first place if liber路ty and civilization are to be perpetuated . .

QUEB~C. 1917. 1918. A. EVANS, G. M. W. W. WILLIAMSON, G. M. WILL H. WHY'J')<:, G. S. Re-elected. E. T. D. CrrA~:IBERS Grand Correspondent. Lodges, 66. Members, 8,491. Gain, 338.

EDWARD

As usual, the volume is introduced by a picture of the Grand Master, and the firm lines of the face and especially the pronounced expression of mouth and chin indicate that in firmness of purpose he is well fitted for the high position of Grand Master. The volume of Proceedings is well and tastefully arranged and tge index is properly placed and satisfactory, which is not often the case with the Proceedings received. FORTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COl\iMUNICATIO:\'.

The Most Worshipful, the Grand Lodge of Quebec, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, held its Forty-seventh Annual Communication in the City of Montreal, in the Province of Quebec, on the 14th day of February, A. D. 1917, A. L. 5917, at the Masonic Tem-


Appendix

140

[Sept.

pIe, Dorchester street, and was opened in Ample Form, in the, pres-. ence of a quorum of delegates and many visitors. TilE ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The greater interest in €very annual Masonic Grand Communication gathers about the address of the Grand Master very naturally, hence we give to it special attention. The address in question is brief, covering only some fifteen pages, but is comprehensive, inclUding all that was deemed necessary or proper to be brought before the Grand Lodge. It opens in a reverent spiritthus: My Brethren of Grand Lodge: vVe have been permitted by the goodness of Divine Providence to again assemble for our Forty-seventh Annual Communication and I extend to you all a most cordial welcome, and that this welcome may be made more emphatic, I would request that the senior members of this Grand, Lodge will, upon my behalf, take those' who are here for the first time, under their special guidance and with true fraternal spirit make them feel that thcy are indeed truly welcome.

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Before proceeding to place before you my official acts and the principal events of the past year, I would direct your attention to the fact that upon the 24th of June, 1717 (the Festival of St. John the Baptist), the form~tion of what is now known as the Grand Lodge of England took place. "Before dinner, the oldest Master Mason in the Chair,proposed a list of proper candidates and the Brethren, by a majority of hands, elected' Mr. Anthony Sayer, Gentleman, Grand Master of :\1:asons, who, being forthwith invested with the badges of Office and Power by the said olaest Master, and installed, was duly congratulated by the Assembly who paid him the homage:"

Following this, the Grand Master suggests that the two hundredth anniversary, so near at hand, should be fitly observed.

CHURCH SERVICES.

Throughout the .Jurisdiction our Lodges have not been remiss in continuing the ancient custom of assembling for the purpose of attending Divine Service, at which the offertory has been placed to the benefit of some par·ticular charity. It was my privilege to attend that held by the members of Antiquity No.1, at Trinity Church, l\fontreal, on the 19th :March, and also that held under the direction of the Deputy District Grand Masters of Montreal, Nos.


1917. ]

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Appendix

1 and 2 Districts, at St. James' Methodist Church, on the evening of the Feast of St. .Iohn the Evangelist, the 27th of December. This service was attended by the Brethren of all the Lodges in the two Districts above mentioned, who, recognizing the existence of the stress due to the war, sacrificed their accustomed pleasure and indulgence on this particular evening and cheerfully and generously contributed through the offertory to the funds 0( the Xhaki Club in aid of our brave soldiers.

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.DISPENSATIONS.

Various dispensations for minor purposes were issued during the year, the one we most cordially approve being to shorten the ti.me between degrees for those who were leaving for the seat of war. We have long held that dispensations for many purpo£cs were too easily obtained and have thought it would be well to charge a fee of five or ten dollars except in cases of eminent propriety.

REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY.

From this it appears that there have been 643 additions during the year and a loss of 405, thus showing a gain of 238. He further reports: However; 48 Lodges made a net increase to their membership during the year of 313, while 14 show a decrease of 75, and four no change in membership. Two lodges only had no Initiations.

RECEIPTS.

The total receipts from the lodges amount to $10,112.50, showing an increase over last year of $646.50; of this amount $5,931.50 was received on account of the General Fund and $4,181.00 on account of the Permanent Benevolent Fund, a high-water mark.

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As to the war, he says: Returns from the lodges show that 125 additional Brethren have donned the khaki, making a roll 'of over 500 Brethren from this Province who are doing' their bit for King and Flag. Of these, twenty more laid down their lives. Proudly, but sadly, we m~>urn their loss. May the su'preme sacrifice our gallant Brethren have made be not made in vain.


[Sept.

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THE GRAND ORATOR.

The Grand livered a most scholarship and for the average give an excerpt

Chaplain, Rev. Prof. C. A. Brodie Brockwell, deremarkable and worthy address, eVidencing both painstaking research. It is almost too scholarly M~son'-such as ourself, but it is admirable. We or two to show its high quality:

There can be no doubt that the building of Solomon's Temple was not the beginning, but the end, climax or triumph of a policy which had been in coul'se of gradual and progressive translation into the concrete for a considerable period of time before Solomon and Hyram were born. 'Vhat exactly the year 5~17 means, how its computation was arrived at, how far the earliest ages of Masonry actually lie incorporated in the Bible record, how much of the Biblical historical narrati ve actually corresponds to this large lapse of time, are thin~'s which modern scientific research has failed hopelessly to explain. And the failure is calamitous, because it means that the ear'liest history of the evolution uf lVlasonry is obscured from our vision although as a matter of fact ther'e is no reason to suppose that the facts do not really lie embodied in the Bible text, did we but know how to extract its secrets. The failure is due to a double failure; it is due on the one hand to our inability, up to now, to make a really scientific analysis of the Biblical theory of social structure and relationships, of which I shall say nothing here-and also at the same time to our inability to analyse the principles which lie at the back of all the numbers and time determinations of the Bible and of the ancient Orient generally.

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After the ideals of world citizenship have won their last and greatest battle in this the most colossal war in the history of civilization, when no uncertain victory has been crowned with an amaranthine wreath of peace, when the awful din of the battle and the cries of the wounded and the dying, and the garments rolled in blood fade away from our ears and eyes, it is my finn conviction that we are then destined, almost immediately. to enter upon one of the most remarkable and glorious epochs of exact scientific achievement ever yet l{nown in the entire history of humanitarian research. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is the excellent work of our good Brother Chambers and is preceded by an introduction of such eminent worth that we would be glad to give it entirely did our space permit. As it is, we can not refrain from one or two paragraphs: Canadian and British Freemasons have heen aware of the fact ever since the commencement of the great war that the hearts of


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1917. ]

the great bulk of the American

people, and

especially

those

of

American Freemasons, were on the side of the Allies in the .struggle, and this knowledge only served to increase the regret that has been experinced at such notable exceptions as that of Past Grand Master Freifeld, of New York, who has permitted himself to issue, in a Masonic document; the false and wicl{ed statement, so diametrically opposed to the declaration of President vVilson and of the Congress of his country-that Britain and France were equally guilty with Germany in responsibility for the war.

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AS TO MASONIC IIOl\ui:S.

On this subject he briefly expresses himself, evidently favoring the idea of a broad charity outside of Masonic Homes, and further quotes from Brother Vanderlieth of Nevada, who has evidently made extensive resea~ch on this subject. We give the quotation: The huge proportions of the Masonic Home charity are iorced upon the attention by consideration of the sums of money involved. There are thirt.y-one Masonic Homes, financed by 1.136,080 Masons, whose contributions in 1914-1915 were $838,538.00. The total investment is $5,969,036.00. Twenty-one Jurisdictions have endowment funds totaling $5,891,829.00. Here is a grand total of capital tied up for the maintenance of inst.itutional charity of $11,860,865, an amount which would produce, at 6 per. cent, an income of $711,651.90, were it all in ftui'd shape. Comparing this with the' $637,056 expended for the maintenance of the Homes, it will be seen that the mere interest on the capital would almost care for the 3,588 dependents who are cared for at present in institutions. A little figuring will show that before anyone of' these dependents could be cared for, it was necessary to invest an average of $3,305.70. In addition to that there must be raised annually an average per capita of $250. It is no wonder that the Correspondence Report of South Carolina, 1912, remarks: "Masonic Homes are expensive hobbies, and the interest on the money spent in their erection would go a long way in supporting necessitous Masons, their wives, widows and orphans."

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To Missouri the reviewer accords two pages without criticism, except that with reference to a paragraph of our review of last year he gives a broadening statement, which we fully endorse.


[Sept.

Appendix

144

QUEENSLAND. 1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 2,510.

1916. A. M.

HERSHBERG,

G. M.

CHARLES H. HARLEY,

G. S.

W: TYLER Lodges, 66.

GEO.

Gain, 220. The Grand Lodge of Queensland held two Special and three Stated Grand Communications during the year. The territory occupied being limited in area, and communication easy, these Communications are held in the evening, occupying only an hour or so, and in the amount of business transacted they are ~ot so extended as the ordinary lodge with us. The work is largely done by committees-the report .or address of the Grand Master and other officials being always brief, and there being little debate on any subject. This plan has advantages, but is not possible in a large Jurisdiction. With us only the Grand Lodge of Maryland follows this custom, as we now remember-but only in part. SPECIAL

GRAND

COMMUNICATIONS.

The first of these was held as usual in. Alice Hall, Brisbane, Tuesday, August 10th, 8: 30 p. m., and was opened in Ample Form. The Grand Officers, elected at the closing meeting of last year, were duly installed and the Grand Master read the annual address, from which we excerpt:

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Toleration in its fullest sense must always be a Freemason's platform. Love, charity and hospitality must always prompt us to welcome whatever good we find in others who are not members of our Fraternity, or who differ from us in race or creed. Freemasons should be ready to see the good in all men, and appre- , ciate those truths which every sect stands for. They should readily listen and give a sympathetic ear to any man who has a sincere word to utter. 'Ve, naturally, understand better and sympathize with those whose ideals and ideas have most in common with our OWI1; but, to be truly charitable, we must show love to strangers and welcome messages of truths, no matter whence they emanate.

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*

Among the list appears the names of some Brethren who have occupied the Chair of King Solomon, and have also held Grand Lodge rank; others again who, though occupying humbler posi-


145

Appendix

1917. ]

tions in the Craft, yet played their part wcll and left among the immediate circle in which they movcd, grateful recollections of their good works. Yet other of our Brethren .have laid down their lives in the service of their King and Country, and have become enshrined in· that grand Roll of Honor which the past twelve months has produced for the sons of Britain, and in which we of the Dominions Beyond the Seas have been privileged to participate. May the crowning glory of the 'cfforts of the Sons of the Empire be soon achieved, and leave the escutcheon of the dear Motherland still brighter than before. May she emerge out of this trial -this heroic effort to uphold right and justice-with renewed vigor, supported by the love and devotion of her children, and the gratitude of all right-thinking men who prize the Divine attributes of truth, justice and love of humanity before the vanity of conquest and usurpation by the strong of the rights of the weak. The Motherland stands pI'e-eminently for these high ideals, and those Who have given up their lives in her efforts to maintain these ideals; have died a glorious death and will forever be ,enshrined in the hearts 'of all true Sons of the Empire. "If

He His His He To

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they can say-if they but can; did his best-he played the man. way was straight, his soul was clean, failings not unkind nor mcan, loved his fellow-men, and tried help them. I shall be content. -Whittier.

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*

We heartily commend this: 'While maintaining to the full the "service" the 'Craft enjoins on us, and our loyalty to its teachings, I yvould again suggest to the Brethren that the faithful observance of the teachings of Freemasonry does not warrant our forsaking the religious community into which we were born, and from which we received ·our infant nurture. \-Ve should not claim Freemasonry as our only religion, although its teachings would suffice for a noble life. Yet, adherence to the teachings imbibed at our mothers' knees surmounts all other traits of character. Religion is a necessity for a human being-mandoes not live by bread alone. The impulse to lead human endeavor from infancy onward is religion: In after years those who become Freemasons find therein an additional inspiration to be faithful to their religion;· it gives us a wider outlook as regards other men's religious affiliation and one becomes the handmaid of the other, and leads us on to higher efforts and more noble achieve·ments.

"Past Grand Rank", was conferred on a number of brothers. We know nolhing of this custom.


146

[Sept.

Appendix

LODGE OF SORROW.

The Special Communication held Sunday, May 28th, was for the purpose of doing honor to the memory of Past Grand Master Wm. Jones. The full 'ritual was followed. STATED COMMUNICATIONS.

These were held, September 19th, March, 16th and June 12th, 1916. All these were merely conventional in character, being occupied with formal reports, etc. At the last the Grand Officers were elected for the next Masonic year. The Grand Master reported several functions attended and two most excellent addresses of his are reported in full, both revealing a deeply religious spirit. The eighth annual report on Widows' and Or.phans' Fund shows that the Grand Lodge cherishes a truly charitable spirit. The report on Correspondence is merely formal and occupies only a page or two in recording incidental communications from two or three Grand Lodges.

RHODE ISLAND. . 1916.

1917.

G. M. WILLIAM~, G. S.

REUBEN S. BEMIS, S. PENROSF.

WILBUR

A.

SCOTT,

G. M.

Re-elected. Members, 9,466.

,Lodges, 37. Gain, 272. SEMIANNUAL

COMMUNICATION.

The Grand Lodge of the Most Ancient and Honorable Society of Free and Accepted Masons for the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations was opened in Ample Form in Freemasons Hall, Providence, Monday, November 15, A. L. 5915, at 10 o'clock a. m., the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Brother Reuben S. Bemis, presiding in the East. The entire attendance was reported at 205 and the principal business transacted was hearing the report of Committee on Juris-


1917.]

147

Appendix

prudence, which referred to a decision of the Grand Master of local application. A Special Grand Communication was held at Greenville, May 13th, for the purpose of dedicating" hall. An interesting address was delivered by R. W. Herbert A. Rice, Senior Grand Warden. We give an extract: Under Divine guidance, each of us is the architect and the builder of his own temple. There lies within the resources from which he builds. The highest attributes and the most priceless treasures of human existence are there within his grasp. He is often baffled because he does not recognize and comprehend the greatness, the g-oodness. and the power of Divine simplicity. He then errs. But his errors sooner or later will lead hIm to conclude that there never have been and that there never will be any substitute for common honesty' and innate honor, and that the insight, the strength and the enlightenment which will enable him to follow the plan which th~ Great Architect of the Universe has laid down for his guidance, all come from within. Masonry seeks to imitate the Divine plan in its simplicity. 路It demands little, but it gives much. It requires of no man that he be possessed of rank or title or wealth or power or learning. It requires only that he be a workman in the Divine Temple and of good report. '.rhe everyday virtues are its passports, and it imposes upon him who enters only a universal obligation, the faithful performance of his varied' duties in life, his duty to his God, to his country, his obedience to constituted authority and his upright conduct in his domestic and social relations. In brief, speculative Masonry is concerned in the upbuilding of moral and spiritual character. And as the inner life is the real life of man, so the inner temple is the .real temple of 'our, construction. It is fitting, therefore, while we are dedicating today this outward temple, that we should also dedicate that inner temple of the spirit, that structure which it is the especial province of speculative Masonry to build. Brethren of Temple Lodge, happily n}lmed, your temple is in truth the temple of the spirit, and in this ceremony see that you also dedicate that temple to its high and glorious purposes, service to God and to your country and to your fellowmen.

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A sermon by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Levi Brooks Edwards, followed, from which we again extract, regretting we can not give the whole of this inspiring effort: Zacharias, by education, thought and daily acts, was prepared for the vision which was vouchsafed him in the Temple. We can have only such visions as we prepare ourselves for. Zacharias was accustomed to meet and talk wi th those people who were believers in a Supreme Being and were expecting the fulfillment of His


148

Appendix

[Sept.

promises. He spent time in the Temple erected for worship. Not only the Temple itself, but all its furnishings were calculated to inspire faith in God and high ideals in life. On approaching the Temple he would see the altar of sacrifice where dally the priests stood to minister. On entering' the Temple he would at once see the two pillars recalling such history of the past as would strengthen his faith, then, looking eastward, he would see the smoke curling heavenward from the altar of incense, symbolic of the prayers of the people ascending to the Throne of God. Here on one side stood the seven-branched golden candlestick, and on the other the table with the shew bread thereon. Before him was the veil which separated the Holy Place from the Holy of Holies in which stood the Ark, and over which stood the cherubim in wondering adoration, while above was the Shechinah, the visible presence of Jehovah. All this tended to teach him, to inspire him, to thrill him, to mould and make him. 'Without these things and his honest contact with them, he would. not have been what he was. He would not have had a vision in the' Temple which was observed by the multitude without when he returned to them. ONE HUNDRED AND路 TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Grand Lodge of the Most Ancient and Honorable Society of Free and Accepted Masons for the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations was opened in Ample Form in Freemasons Hall, Providence, Monday, May 15, A. L. 5916, at 10 o'clock a. m., the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Brother Reuben S. Bemis, presiding in the East, assisted by the other' officers of Grand Lodge in their respective stations. There were also 'present representatives from thirty-three lodges. ADDRESS OF THE GRAND MASTER.

Brethren: By the blessings of Almighty God, we are again permitted to assemble in accordance with the provisions of our Masonic law. As we enter upon the business of this, our One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Annual Communication, I am reminded of the words of that eminent American and Mason, Benjamin Franklin: "I have no light to guide my steps to the future, save that shed by the lamp of experience and oftentimes it is profitable to pause in our travels, turn backward and study the road by which we have traveled". In consonance with the spirit of these words, we are today pausing on our journey, that we may have an opportunity of inspecting the work of the past; and from the knowledge there"ly gained, prepare to lay down such perfected designs upon our Trestle Board as will insure the advancement and perpetuation of


149

Appendix

1917.]

all those things necessary for the well being of' our beloved in'stitution, Our first duty today is the inevitably recurring one of paying a tribute to the memory of OUt" Brethren,' who, having wrought in life's quarry and produced good and true worl{, have ceased their labors, leaving their earthly habitations to enter upon the eternal occupancy of their Mansions above,

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Following this the Grand Master, as is the almost invariable custom, refers fittingly to the fraternal dead. Various dispensations are reported, twelve of which are for the purpose of "attending church!" No decisions are reported. MASONIC HOME.

For the proposed Masonic Home the Grand Master makes an earnest plea and reports substantial progress in raising the fifty thousand necessary to inaugurate this movement. While this is ~ne of the smallest Grand Lodges, the reports, proportionately, are up to the best. And the volume of Proceedings is neatly arranged. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is from the pen of R. W. Will. L. Chatterton and is purely technical, covering one and a half pages with a report of communications from various Grand Bodies and recommendations referring thereto.


150

Appendix

[Sept.

SASKATCHEWAN. 1916.

1917.

W. M. THOMPSON, G. M. W. B. TATE, G. S. A. S. GORRELL

Lodges, 121.

J. H.

G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 7,117. ANDERSON,

Gain, 346. The dignified presence of the incoming Grand Master distinguishes the initial page, and the handsome regalia, common to the Provinces and the Old World, adds to the effect. The volume is further introduced by the detail-in outlineof the four Emergent Grand Communications-all of which were for dedicating, installing or consecrating. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Tenth Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Saskatchewan was held in the City of Swift Current, beginning at 10 a. m. on Wednesday, the 21st day of. June, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916, a good attendance being registered. The Mayor of the city welcomed the Grand Lodge in felicitous terms on behalf of the public, and Brother W. A. McPhail also made an address on behalf of the Masons of the city, to both of which addresses suitable response was made by Brothers J. H. Anderson and !'f. B. Williams. From the ANNUAL ADDRESS,

which we can compliment with sincerity, we present a few extracts: Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan, A. F. and A. M.: It affords me great pleasure to welcome y路ou to this, the Tenth Annual Communication of Grand Lodge. The happy conclusion of the first decade of the existence of any body corporate affords a good and sufficient reason for a retrospection of its growth and developmetlt during this period of adolescence, and, since OUI' ol'ganization as a Grand Lodg-e took place in the first year of the admission of our glorious Province


151

Appendix

1917. ]

as one of the self-governing integral portions of this great Dominion of Canada of which we all have good reason to be proud, I trust you will not think wasted the short time taken up in noting a few statistics regarding' the development of our Grand Lodge as well as of the Province itself. Inaugurated on September 4, 1905, Saskatchewa!1 entered upon an era of development and progress hitherto unknown in the advancement of any of the provincps of the Dominion. At that time the population reached only 195,000 persons, while the latest ligures obtainable (those for 1915) show an increase of over 500,000, or approximately 700,000 souls. From three cities, sixteen towns and sixty-three incorporated villages we now have s(~ven cities, seventytwo towns and no fewer than three hundred incorporated villages.

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Saskatchewan is essentially an agricultural province and its progress as such is conditioned by good railroad service, as without means 路of transport there would be little opportunity for growth. However, we find the enterprising promoter'S of our var'ious railroad systems have, during 'the past ten years, been desirous of assisting and sharing in our development by giving us as great a mileage as it wa.s possibh~ to construct in this decennial period. There were in operation in the Province in 1905, 1,176 miles of railroad, whereas at the end of 1915 therc wei-e close on 6,000 miles, so that an increase of 400 per cent in the decadp is evidence that our railroad magnates have been seized of the fact that Saskatchewan is worth looking after. And yet, this mileage is not sufficient for our needs; we hear even now of grain being held over for lack of facilities, and we are all aware that there are many districts which are sadly in need of railroad accommodation, so great has been the agTieultunl1 development d'uring the last few years. In 1905 there was an acreage in crop' of about 1,600,000, with a yield of 42,600,000 bushels, whereas in 1915 the acreag'e had reached 10,500,000, with a crop yield of close Ullon 263,000,000 bushels.

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The Grand Master congratulates the Fraternity on much accomplished, but goes on to regret That the rank and file of the members of the various Lodges do not give their officers that moral support which it is their duty to give. Thc average regular attendance at all of the Lodges I visited, whilc greater than the Mystic number necessary to do business, was very far short of what it ought to have been. There does not appear to be sufficient interest taken by the majority of the members in the routine work of the Lodge; there appears to be much less interest tak(~n in the deeper subjects which go far to improve the moral and mental aspects of the man and the Mason.

The same condition is painfully apparent almost anywhere.


152

Appendix

[Sept.

NEW LODGES.

Five lodges duly chartered by the last Grand Lodge were duly constituted by the Grand Master or his proxy. Nine new lodges were created by dispensation during the year. No decisions of importance are reported. REPORTS

OF DEPUTY GRAND

MASTERS.

The reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters are printed in detail, and they indicate due attention to路 the work of their several districts. . FINANCIAL.

The income of the Grand Lodge for the year is given at $7,200 and the expenditures at $6,770. BENEVOLENT FUND.

The Grand Lodge h~s no Masonic Home, but reports a Benevolent Fund of some thousands, with only two possible applications for aid-$25.00 and $75.00-$100.00 in all-which would seem to indicate that there is little or no destitution or indigence among members or dependents. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is from the excellent pen of Brother A. S. Gorrell, covering 225 pages in a most worthy manner. A most discerning as well as pleasant spirit pervades the whole. Missouri is considered in a most kindly way in four pages and the Correspondent has a good word, which is appreciated.


153

Appendix

1917. ]

SOUTH路 CAROLINA. 1917. Re-elected. Re-elected.. Grand Correspondent. Members, 17,397.

1916. R. A. COOPER, G. M. O. FRANK HART, G. S. J. L. MICHIE Lodges, 268. Gain, 617.

A Special Communication of the Grand Lodge was held in Orangeburg April 14th for the purpose of laying corner stone of High School building. The Grand Master presided in person and the service was largely attended and quite interesting. Several other Special Grand Communications \vere held during the year for the purpose of dedicating hall, laying corner stones and paying funeral honors. The only thing which especially attracts our attention is that in all these communications the Grand Lodge was opened and the work done in the Entered Apprentice Degree! . With us no work can be done in the Entered Apprentice Degree except degree work, and such is our want of information that, up to this time, we did not know it was different in any Grand Lodge. No doubt we are wrong, as is so often the case, but we can not believe that this is in accordance with the "landmarks" or general usage. ANNUAL COl.\fMUNICATION.

-

The One Hundred and Fortieth Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Freemasons of South Carolina convened in the Masonic Temple, in the City of Charleston, S. C., at 11 o'clock on Tuel?day. the 12th day of December, A. L. 5916, and was opened in Ample Form, 258 lodges out of 268 being' represented, besides a number of permanent members and visitors. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This occupies sixty-four pages and is essentially a business document from end to end, opening bluntly with no reference to the G. A. D.-and with no approach to sentiment at any point. He reports the Grand Jurisdiction to be in excellent condition. He makes appropriate and kindly reference to the fraternal dead of that Jurisdiction and gives a long list of dead of other Jurisdictions.


154

[Sept.

Appendix 'VILL NOT BUILD A HOME.

Referring to the tentative project of building a Masonic Home when a sufficient fund has been accumulated, he commends the plan now in use and originally intended to be temporary-that of using the charity fund to help wherever needed and asked by lodges for their wards as eminently ,vorthy, and desires that it may be permanently adopted. And in that case he suggests very properly that the term "Home" be omitted from the name of the fund. Referring to this question the comniittee finally reported as follows:

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On November 30, 1916, the fund amounted to $122,641.89, as against $112,547.02 on the same date in 1915, showing an increase of $10,094.87 in that time, as ag'ainst $12,472.21 increase in 1915. Interest this year $1,806.99. During this year we have contributed to the support of twentyone orphans in the Epworth Orphanage; five in the Connie Maxwell Orphanage and three in the Thornwell Orphanage, making' a total of twenty-nine in orphanages. The expenditure for this purpose 'amounted to $1,740.00. vVe have contributed to the relief and support of twenty-.four Master Masons, amounting to $2,300.00; to Master Masons' wives, one, amounting to $43.00; to Master Masons' widows, sixteen, amounting to $1.,560.00; to orphan children not in orphanages, nineteen, amounting to $1,050.00, making a t9tal of $6,693.00. "\Ve recommend the continuance of the present method of dispensing aid to our worthy distressed brethren, their wives, widows and orphans.

A most worthy showing.

Five lodges were duly constituted in person, or by proxy, and jispensations were granted for the formation of three new lodges. He .disapproves circular letters, asking aid where lodges have been. destroyed by fire, but seems to endorse the custom of thus asking aid for a distressed Worthy Brother. He answered the invitation from the Grand Lodge of Oregon to attend a convention of Grand Masters in May, 1917, in courteous terms, but stated that he, as well as the Grand Lodge, was unalterably opposed to a General Grand Lodge. '.

DECISIONS.

Among these our attention 路is only particularly attracted to one with regard to the position of the representatives of the three


1917.]

Appendi.t"

. lesser lights by or about the altar. question:

155 We give the answer to the

Answer; I have always understood that the proper arrangement of the lesser lights is an equilatel'al triangle around the altar and arranged in such a way as to place the Holy Bible in the center of the triangle-one light in the East, one in the South and one in the 'Vest. I am, therefore, of the opinion that the lesser lights of your lodge room are not properly placed, but they should be placed as I have indicated.

If we understand the above, and the Grand Master is right, we have been,in error from the beginning of our Masonic educa~ tion. But we may not understand the statement. The Committee on Address disapproved the Grand Master's position and give cuts showing their view of the proper position of the lesser lights. And-unhappily for us, no doubt-our Missouri idea differs widely from the committee-if the cuts correctly represent their conclusion. Ho\vever, as the French say, N'importe.

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

Our good Brother, M. W. J. L. Michie, in the use of 207 pages', gives us one of the finest reports we. have seen. He is always judicious and always kind and in this report he goes beyond himself. He'thus introduces his work: "Since it has been my joy to find At every turning of the road The strong arm of a comrade, kind, To help me onward with my load; And since I have no gold to give, And love alone must make amends, My only prayer is, while I live, God make me worthy of my friends."

His review of Missouri is courteous, but discriminating. For instance note the following: He dedicated Ararat Shrine Mosque on May 29th, and afterwards assisted in raising the one-thousandth member of Ivanhoe Lodge. Is a Shriners' Temple, or Mosque, a public building, or is it a Masonic edifice? 'Will Brother Woods kindly give us his opinion on this question?

Now, Brother, you sho,uld not tempt us to express opinions on mooted questions. We can, however, say, most conscientiously, that the aforesaid Shrine-Mosque, or Shrine or Mosque or Temple


156

[Sept.

Appendix

-by whatever name known-is a very cost a good deal! The Correspondent is complimented that he should give expression to his quently. Thanks. But our reputation do this!

handsome building-and by the expressed wish own OpInIOn more fremight suffer should we

SOUTH DAKOTA. 1916.

1917.

MARSHAL R. BROWN, G. M.

G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 11,709.

GEO.

A.

PETTIGREW, G. S.

A. BROWN Lodges, 146.

SAMUEL

JAMES ROANE,

Gain, 546. The Passing Grand Master is ~ost pleasantly introduced by his picture and the biographical sketch, which follows. The Proceedingsare further introduced by the details of two Emergent Communications-one for dedication and the other for ,laying corner stone, at both of which the Grand Master presided in person. CHANGE OF DATE.

An emergency arising, the Grand Master, by proclamation, advanced the date of the Grand Lodge to Ju.ne 7th and 8th, 1916. TIlE FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Most Worshinful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accented Masons of the State of South Dakota commenced its Fortyser.ono Annl1~1 Communication in the Masonic Temple Auditorium at f=;ioU1C Falls, on Wennesdav. June 7, A. D. 1916. A. L. 5916. at 10 o'dock a. m., Dursmmt to the orner of the M W. Grand Master advancing the date of the Communication. The attendance was good aDO the onenin-g- exercises were as usual. Addresses of welcome from representatives of the two city lodges were heard and responded to by P'. G. M. Harvey J. Riceall in fine form.


Appendix

1917.]

157

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This is the shortest on record-at least the shortest that has come under our observation. It covers only seven pages, and of these the report of the Grand Lecturer occupies a page! From the opening paragraphs we exerpt:'

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,Ve meet to review the work of the past year and to plan for the coming one. May the Supreme Architect of the Universe be pleased to guide and direct us in our deliberations. This year, so far as the Grand Master has been concerned, has been a quiet one. With but one exception, all questions submitted to this office have been covered by our laws. Peace and harmony prevails throughout this Grand Jurisdie~ tion, and our fraternal relations with the other Grand Lodges of the world remain undisturbed.

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The Grand Master reports with due respect a long list of fraternal dead. He granted a dispensation for the creation of one new lodge. He granted nine dispensations for the usual reasons-such as special elections, etc., etc. His only decision is that a lodge can not assess a tax for any purpose. He visited five lodges offic~ally and presided at a special function of Zion Lodge, it being the presentation of a jewel to Brother John L. Turner, Honorary Past Grand Master. This sounds strangely to us-but we know it is the custom of some Grand Lodges to confer honorary rank. The Grand Treasurer reports cash on hand, General Fund $20,561.14 And disbursements as.................................. 11,228.79 . Leaving balance of Charity Fund .. ~ Disbursements Leaving balance Total of both funds-balance

$ 9,332.35 $14,548.78 , 14,514.30 $ 34.48 $11,263.27


158

[Sept.

Appendix TOUCHING MASONIC HOME.

The Committee on Charity presented a report which was adopted as a whole, containing the following: Fifth. The Committee, after a somewhat careful examinati'on of the laws and regulations of other Grand Lodges in relation to relief, and a careful analysis of the wol"ldngs of Masonic Homes in different Jurisdictions, are convinced that the wise course to pursue at this time is to preserve the Grand Charity Fund intact, not allowing it to be diverted under any pretext to the buying, building or maintaining any institution whatever under the control or patronage of this Grand Lodge. FOREIGN CORRESPONDE:\,CE.

This is from the worthy pen of Most Worshipful Samuel A. Brown, who gives an excellent report of the Proceedings of sixtyeight Grand Lodges, covering altogether 216 pages. Almost every review is accompanied with a picture of the Correspondent. This evidences the genius of Bro. Brown and ex~ites our curiosity. Where did he get these photos and how did he manage to get them all? Unfortunately, ours is not a "striking" likeness, at this time-though possibly not worse than the reality. We appreciate the kindly words of our good Brother.

TENNESSEE. 1917.

1918.

CHARLES BARHAM:, STITH

M.

CAIN,

G. M. G. S.

H. A. CHAMBERS Lodges, 456.

JOHN

T. PEELER, G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 29~258.

Gain, 958. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

In compliance with the provisions of the Constitution, the One Hundred and Third Annual Communication of the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of Tennessee was begun and held in Freemasons Hall, Nashville, Tennessee, beginning on Wednesday, January 31, 1917, at 10 a. ill, and was opened in Ample Form. Besides the Grand Officers there were present the representatives


1917.]

Appendix

159

of 449 out of the 456 lodges present. The Grand Master presented a list of "delinquent" lodges and recommended that, notwithstanding the law forbade the enrollment of the representatives of 'such lodges the Grand Lodge allow their representatives to be enrolled, and on motion it wa~ so ordered." Seems to us a most "unusual proceeding". But no doubt there is an explanation.

GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS.

To the Most \Vorshipful, the Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Tennessee: Brethren: In coming together for the One Hundred and Third Annual Grand Communication of the :Most 'iVorshipful Grand Lo.dge of Tennessee, our gr'ateful thanks should be given the Great Architect of the Universe for the many blessings He has bestowed upon us during the year-not only as a Fraternity, but as citizens of a common country. V,Te have been brought from under the black shadow of war and of industrial strife. vVe have walked safely as a state and Nation while the world without seemed to rock with the clash of arms. 'iVith us the miseries of other men have been viewed afar· off like spec·ters. Mercifully have we been spared to work out a peaceful destiny while horrors and agony crushed and oppressed our neighbors on every side, For us have been the kindly fruits of the earth; for them a harvest of tears and desola~ tion. How profound should be our gratitude; how humble should be our walk before that Mighty Presence!

Following is a list of, illustrious dead and further on the Grand Master overwhelms us with a report of his

VISITATIONS,

which aggregate the total of 314 for the year! More than one for every day, excluding Sundays, during which he traveled 15,097 miles and met in the lodges 6,785 Masons. He says: Twenty-one were visited in February, thirty-seven in March, twenty-four in April, forty-two in May, forty-five in June, twentyfour in .July, twenty-three in Aug'ust, thirty-nine in September, forty-one in October, eighteen in November 'and one in December.

Surely this is Freemasonry in motion. breath to think of it.

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[Sept.

RELATIVE STATISTICS.

He comments on the numerical increase, but says: Notwithstanding the numerical increase above shown, it is a striking fact that our Masonic growth has failed to keep pace with the growth of the state. In 1870 we had fourteen Masons for each one thousand population. In 1915 (using the census figures of 1910, which are the latest available), there were thirteen per thousand. In Kentucky, immediately 1;0 the north, there are 17.9 Masons per thousand of population, in Georgia, to the south, 14.5; in Missouri, to the west, 18.2, and in the United States as a whole, 17.1. Relatively, therefore, our membership showing is a disappointment, both individually and by comparison.

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In East Tennessee three counties have fewer Masons now than in 1875. But this is true of not less than fifteen counties in Middle Tennessee, and of nine counties in West Tennessee. A

WORTHY

RECOMMI<;NDATION.路

The Grand Master modestly refers to the burden resting on the Grand Master of deciding on questions involved in the lodges for which he is often ill prepared, and suggests "the appointment of a worthy and qualified Mas.on to be associated with the Grand Master in considering and passing on these questions. In effect, a Judge Advocate. MASONIC HOMES.

The Grand Master refers to the opening of the Home for Aged and Indigent Masons and says: There are at this writing six occupants with some twenty-odd applications pending. Naturally, the question of its continued support will come before you, including the necessary ways and means. The Grand Lodge has already declared that to the Widows and Orphans' Home it owes first allegiance, and in this expression I heartily conc.ur.

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In all likelihood the Old Masons' Home will grow to no small proportions. You must expect the demands for ad.mittance to be many, and it is difficult to see how one may be granted and another denied. You must also e!pect the per capita maintenance will


1917.]

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exceed that of the Widows and Orphans'Home, for this is universal experience.

. The receipts of the Widow,s' and Orphans' Home were .. $27,124.27 And expenditures' 27,117.45 'Balance ',' $ 56.82 $ 8,423.27 Old Masons' Home receipts Expenditures . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,968.55 $ 2,454.74 FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This covers 119 pages and is exceptionally well written. Missouri is kindly considered in three pages. The Correspondent is complimented with a quotation.

UTAH. 1918.

19F· M.

CHARLES C. GRIGGS, G. FREEMAN

A.

MCCARTY,

G.

CHARLES F. JENNINGS, G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, ~,605.

S.

SAMUEL HENRY GOODWIN

Lodges, 20. Gain, 138.

FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COl\U:1UNICATION.

The M. W. Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Utah convened in its Forty-sixth Annual Communication in the Masonic Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah, Tuesday, the 16th day of January, A. D. 1916, at 10 o'clock a. m., and was opened in Ample Form with prayer by the Grand Chaplain. GRAND ORATION.

After some preliminaries, the Grand Master introduced the Grand Orator, Brother John E. Carver, who spoke as follows-in part: Apprentice

is

a

word

derived

from

the

Latin

"apprendre,"


162

[Sept.

Appendi.",,-

meaning to learn. Apprenticeship is a contract whereby one person called a master binds himself to teach, and another called an apprentice contracts to learn some trade or profession an"d to serve his master for a certain period. The civilians of Rome are silent on this SUbject, and, as far as can be learned, apprenticeship arose in the peculiar conditions of the craft guilds of the middle ages, and formed a most important part of the guilds and corporations as a means by which men were educated and 'given protection from the feudal lords. In those times it was thought that the arts and sciences would not flourish unless only those who had shown due proficiency and were formed into bodies with certain powers of self-government and monopoly of their branch of their trade were allowed to exercise them.

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Do we not gather knowledge till our death? 'When Masonry ceases to be a' teaching order Masonry is done. It was in teaching that we had our inception and rise to power. Patriotism, morality, fidelity, sociability, service, charity in thought and deed'! universal religion that works, these are some of the lessons we~ have to teach to the oncoming ranks of apprentices. who some day will fill OUl' chairs. A Mason must be a builder or he should drop the name. 'We build not with stone and mortar but with flesh and blood. May we so build that the coming ages shall still have the benefit, the inspiration and the cheer of our true work:

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The apprentice was not only taught in stonework; he" was taught in the greater school of life. His conduct towards his master's wife, daughter, servant and home was a conduct guided by wise instruction. His conduct on the street and in public places, and his decorum in general was the subject of discipline. He was, in short, trained during his apprenticeship to be a man, honorable, honest and true. \Ve of today have dropped the operative instruction. mat if we have no moral and social teaching to take its place? \Ve must teach and make better our new members or we are not worthy to have them, and, what is more, the day will soon come when we will have them, for the only sure basis of Masonry is benefit, not the order, but to the individual member. It is in the apprentice work that Masonry has its safe claim to the childhood of the grand orders of the past. Not our legend of Hiram, not our ancient landmarks, not our unchanged ritual, -but our teaching power, is our mark of lineage to the best of the ages. In Egypt, Greece and all antiquity, the orders that we seek to lay claim to as our fOl'bears, were characterized by the skill in which they developed the best of their novices. They were literally schools of the science of right living. They were colleges of manhood. They made religion not a dogma, but a life. Not the Master's degree, but the entered apprentice degree rightly applied, is what gives the most lasting conception of the


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1917路1

worth of Masonry. It silently teaches the true meaning and purpose of all our life and the underlying motive of all our work. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This covers thirty-six pages. The Grand Master is wise in condensing his report and using no more words than necessary to portray the incidents and experiences of his administration. We give an extract:

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Utah is a wonderful state. Our mountains are higher and grander than anywhere else on earth. Our canyons are narrower and deeper, our valleys are richel' and wider, the coloring of nature is more gorgeous and beautiful, our days are warmer and more sunshiny, and the nights cooler and pleasanter. The moon, shedding its benign rays over highest hill and lowest dale, seems to bear a message from the Infinite. "This is the land of peace and harmony; wake, all ye people, and spread the Light." And as I stand, awe inspired, gazing at the beauties of nature, I behold the wonderful achievements of man. The mountains are torn asunder and toilers are delving for mineral wealth; the canyon torrents are harnessed to wheels of energy dispensing power and warmth; the spreading grain fields lie ripening in the golden sunlight; and lowing herds are quietly grazing over tracts and fields formerly infested by coyotes and rattlesnakes.

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The Grand Master reports the usual variety of official acts, dispensations, visitations, ceremonies, rulings, etc., but nothing of more than local importance. He closes with a very pleasant sentiment: I have planned higher than I have performed, but what composer ever gave expression to his innermost dreams? What artist ever placed on canvas the beauties of his secret visions? Beethoven tells us his polished symphony is but an empty echo of the heavenly music he heard in his dream, and Raphael left his Sistine Madonna with troubled and disappointed heart. I have endeavored to advance the great cause of Masonry as I have seen it in my visions, but as artist and composer fall short of their dreams, so have I in mine, but without apologies, for I have done my best. Master! to do great work for Thee, my hand Is far too weak. Thou givest what may suit, Some little chips to cut with care minute, Or tint, or grave, or polish, * * Yet take the tiny stones which I have wrought, Just one, by one, as they were given by Thee Not knowing what came next in Thy wise thought, Set each stone by Thy master-hand of grace, Form the mosaic as Thou wilt for me, And in Thy temple pavement give it place. Frances Ridley Havergal.


Appendix

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[Sept.

FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL.

The Grand Treasurer reports the General Fund as standing at $7,947.92; Charity Fund as standing at $5,823.07. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This report covers 111 pages and is written in a sprightly and interesting路 style. While in a kindly spirit the Correspondent does not hesitate to express opinions antagonistic to those indicated in the reports in question. To illustrate, he criticises the prayer at the opening of our Grand Lodge. Thus: The prayer of the Grand Chaplain is printed in full. The fault may be entirely ours, but we seem to miss in such prayers the simple spontaneity of vitalizing. communion with our common Father: the careful arrang-ement and phrasing of sentences somehow tell more of consideration for those who hear, and for the printed page, than they do of that which is the soul's sincere desire, Unuttered or expressed; The motion of a hidden fire That trembles in the breasL"

On the whole, Missouri is kindly treated in-nearlY"7"two pages.

VICTORIA. 1916. CHARLES

CARTY SALMON,

CHARLES JAMES BARROW,

G. M. G. S.

Lodges, 237.

1917. Re-elected. Re-elected. Members, 15,812.

Gain, 592. As is usual with this Grand Jurisdiction, the Proceedings are sent out in a neat cloth-bound volume without illustrations or index. And, furthermore, as usual with this and most provincial Grand Lodges, the work of the year is comprised in four quarterly meetings. In this Masonic year the first quarterly was held March 15th,


1917. ]

Appendix

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1916; the second, June 21st; the third, September 20th, and the fourth, December 20th. At each Communication the usual ceremonies of opening and closing were observed' and reports from the Grand Treasurer and Secretary and the several Boards were received. The financial condition is manifestly good and the fraternity is manifestly prospering in spite of the war and other unhappy conditions. It is worthy of note that while there is no Masonic Home, yet the Benevolent Fund is large and growing and the' donations to worthy objects are liberal. HON. SAMUEL J. WAY.

At the First Quarterly Communication the Grand Master-elect was duly installed with the usual cere'mony. He announced the death of Hon. Samuel J. Way, Grand Master of Australia, of whom he said, in part: Initiated fifty-four years ago, our late brother duriDg the whole of that period rendered valuable services to Freemasonry. Upon the formation of the Grand Lodge of South Australia in 1884, he became its first Grand Master, an office whir-h he held, with one short interval, until his death.- His service' as.Grand Master can' best be apprec"iated by his own brethren to whom and on whose behalf he devoted those great talents with which he had been so richly endowed. As a citizen of his State and of the Commonwealth, he also rendered great and valuable services, and he was rewarded not merely by the honors conferred on him by his f-ellow-citizens, but by the unfailing regard and esteem in which he was held by the community. Honored by his Sovereign and country, loved by his brethren, respected and admired by all, he died as he had lived-"a just and upright man and a Freemason."

Lodge dues and fees of brethren in the army were remitted. This seems to be an established custom among all lodges whose members are in the Allied Armies. DISPENSATIONS. :

In all, 266 were reported, of which we note that seventy-four were for permission to wear regalia at路 funerals, choral services, balls and the laying of corner stones. In part, this seems strange to us. We consider funerals and the ceremony of laying a corner stone as Masonic "work", and when "at labor" we always wear regalia. We' would not ask or


'.166

[Sept.

Appendix

receive disp.ensations in this Jurisdiction to attend balls or religious services at all, although some American Grand Lodges permit the subordinate lodges to" attend religious .. services in regalia, In his inaugural address the Grand Master said-in part: I desire to express my, deep regret that the dark cloud of International conflict has not been dispersed. Our anticipations of ~ year ago, that human pal'n and suffering and national loss would be Intensified and extended, fell far short of actual happenings. The Ingenuity of man has b~en strained'to its uttermost to inflict the maximum of death, desolation and destruction over an area never previously affected, and though this tortured world has surely seen the worst, none can foretell the time when peace once more will rei'gn. Victory for our Empire is more certain than ever, and one can but express the hope that when it comes it will be received' with the same dignified self-control as has accompanied loss and temporary disappointments. Our Lodges have magnificently recognized their national duty, and our members are serving with distinction and patriotism 'on every field of imperial action. We know of at least 906 members of the craft from this territo'ry' on active service. Twenty-two have died in defense of all that w~' hold dear ·and fourteen are still suffering from honorable wounds. To the war fund our Lodges have subscribed £3047, and Grand Lodge has donated £1300, making a total of £4347. Thirty-five hundred pounds have been placed at the disposal of the Government through the war loans, and our individual' members have contributed largely to the various funds from time to time.

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At the Second Quarterly held June 21st the Grand Master, in his address, referred to Lord Kitchener in most feeling terms, saying in part: I have with deep regret to officially announce the sudden and lamentable death of a distinguished member of the Craft. The whole world was shocked by the news that Field Marshal Earl Kltchener, Minister for 'Var for GI'eat Britain, had gone down with H. M. S. "Hampshire" off the Orkneys, First incredulity, then hope, gave place to sorrow and 'grief. That the still strong man who had labored so incessantly with such incomparable loyalty and unselfish devotion, supreme ability and marked success to enroll, arm and equip under a voluntary system, the armies of the Empire, should In a moment be snatched from us, was too stupendous for immediate belief, but time confirmed the report. The world has lost one for whom generally it had gen~.line regard. The Empire had lost one of Its most able organizers and administrators, and we, brethren', have lost a distinguished and beloved brother,


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Here it is only' necessary to recall the simple facts of his Masoni~;;;l career. He entered Freemasonry in his early manhood and qualified as a Master. In 1897 (the Diamond Jubilee of H. lVI. Queen Victoria) he was honored by H. R. H. the Prince of Wales, lVI. W. Grand Master of England, by having conferred upon him the rank of Past Grand Warden. In 1899 he was appointed first District Grand Master of Eg-ypt and tJ1e Soudan. He founded the Lord Kitchener Lodge in Cairo, where so many of our Victorian brethren have recentlY' recei ved fraternal hospitality. In 1902路 he was appointed District Grand Master of the Punjaub, ,and at Siml~ there is now a Craft Lodge ,bearing his name. When in'this territory h~ received an address from the Grand Lodge, preserited' by the then Grand Master, Lord Carmichael, who was accompanied by the Pro Grand Master, M. W. Bro. G. E. Emery, and the Deputy Grand Master, R. W. Bro. the Rev. A. T. Holden. The last glimpse we have of him is typical of his life. None could know better the certainty of his end, yet he is 'seen,' standing on the deck of the doomed vessel, talking with the officers, and betraying neither fear nor concern. Truly his Masonic life had' taught him how to die. Like a Viking of old he went with a stately ship from the' view of those who last beheld him, to be .enfo'lded in the embrace of that sea which, while it reaches the far-flung elements of our Empire, defends its center, and is still ruled by Britannia.

In closing the fourth and last quarterly for the year, 'the Orand Master said, in part: ," We have been buoyed up with hope that each quarterly "c;~ni~ munication and each New Year would see the' coming of peace: Surely, our hopes will not be disappointed during,the coming year. Surely in His own good time will the Great Architect of the Universe bring about that peace which is so much desired. So far as we are concerned,' we hope to have peace' with honor, and, above all, peace with certain security for the' future. We, have many of our 'brethren at the front. I do not know of any organization which has done as much as Freemasonry has, done. Only last evening I attended the Australia Felix Lodge {)f Hiram, which has no fewer than 25 per cent of its members serving at the front; but this i's only typical of the fraternity -throughout Australia. Increasingly heavy demands will be made upon us, and there is at the present time urgent need for greater economy, and it is only by individual sacrifice and personal economy that we can hope to meet these demands. As Freemasons we are looked 'upon as men of some substance, and it is generally agreed that we路 justify this by contributing what is expected of us, and it isup to us to show our proper appreciation of our further responsibilities.

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[Sept.

VIRGINIA. 1917. JAMES CHAS.

A.

CABELL,

G. M.

A.

NESBITT, G. S. W. EGGLESTON Lodges, 326.

JOSEPH

1918. K. FIELD, G. M. Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Mexp.bers, 26,244.

HENRY

Gain, 496. We approach the annals of the Grand Lodge of Virginia with emotion. This is our mother State. While we have been adopted by Missouri and in some sort transferred to Florida, we yet hold and will ever hold Virginia !irst in our affections. Although most of our kindred and the friends of early youth who dwelt there have passed away, yet their dust has sanctified the soil of the Grand old State to us. The路 kindly face of Grand Master H. K. Field, as pictured on the initial page, wears a smile not only "childlike and bland," but in its expression it is an epitome of the spirit of the grand old State he so worthily represents. ANNUAL COUM:UNICATION.

The One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Grand Annual Comm..u nication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of AnCient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Virginia was begun and held in the Masonic Temple, in the City of Richmond, on TuesdaY,the 13th day of February, A. L. 5917, A. D. 1917, there being a' good representation of delegates and. visitors. After the usual ceremonies the Grand Master presented his address, beginning as follows: Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Virginia: vVith gratitude and thankfulness to the Supreme Architect of the Universe. for the protection and guidance He has vouchsafed to us and the favors and blessings He has bestowed upon us, we assemble a( this, the one hundred and thirty-ninth Grand Annual Communication, humbly and confidently invoking the continuance of His blessings upon our labors, and His divine guidanCe and direction in our councils, so that we may worthily discharge our duties and measure up to our responsibiiities and obligations, to Masonry in particular and to the world in general. While many of our sister Grand Jurisdictions have been plunged into sorrow and mourning by the loss of their highe~t


1917.]

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and best, I am permitted to stand in this presence today, "with uncovered heaq. and uplifted hands, and lay my sincere offering of thanksgiving at the feet 'of Him, "the Supreme Good, to whom all 'things ill are but as slavish officcrs of vengeance," who has so signally protected us from the. shafts of the' destroying angel.

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The Grand Master wisely says: I have constituted only three new Lodges. Grand Masters 'generally' are glad to have the opportunity to constitute new Lodges whenever it is possible, as It gives the appearance of the success and growth of the institution under their administration. Therefore, the refusal to grant such d'ispensations may be safely attributed to a conscientious belief that it would not be for the good of the institution. I have had to be 'Ccry positive in refusing dispensations for the establishment of new Lodges when the existence of discord was assigned as a reason. I do not believe that discord which arises from an absence of brotherly feeling can be cured by division and a public proclamation that Masons can not live together. It has been tried again and again in t'his jurisdiction, and has always ended in disaster, I refuse to assist in putting further apart those who should, and, .if they are controlled by a spirit of brotherly affection, must dwell together in unity. I want to see Masons !iveup to their great professions of brotherhood, and I am unwilling to admit to myself, and I am certainly unwilling to have the admission made to the world, that these professions aloe the mere expression of beautiful sentiments, and not intcnded to serve us in the storms and stress of everyday life. H is for this reason I have refused all such requests for new Lodges.

CORNER STONES.

The Grand Master gta:nted dispensations for the laying of twenty-seven corner stones under Masonic auspices, himself presi~ing in a number of cases. He refers to these ceremonies thus: Upon nearly all occasions, however, I have given a part of the work to the Worshipful Master of the Lodge whieh laid the cornerstone, as I think he should be entitled to some recognition among his 'own people and in his own home, and upon so important and so interesting a Masonic occasion.

Of course, the Worshipful Master and other officers of the lodge and any distinguished Masons of the vicinity should be recognized as courteously as possible. For that reason, were we Grand M~ster, we would never summon or notify othe; officers of the Grand Lodge" except under unusual circumstances.


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[Sept.

The Grand Master attaches a most proper importance to cial visits-thus:

o~fi足

I am satisfied that nothing I have been able to do has been of so much benefit to the Craft in VirgLnia as the official visits I have made. By considerable sacrifice, by setting aside both social and business demands, and by undergoing frequently no little discomfort and fatigue, I have managed to get in personal touch w;th seventy-seven Lodges, and the results have been such as to cause me regret that I did not make an even greater sacrifice, so that I could ha\'e made moz'e of these visits. 'Vhat has impressed me most deeply was the manifest attention with which I have been listened to everywhere I have spoken, and the serious consideration the brethren have given to what I might !lave to say touching the preservation of our great institution and the high conception of our ideals. This all the more gratifying because I can assure you that wherever and whenever I have thought the situation demanded it, or the good of Masonry suggested it, I have not failed to avail myself of the privilege one brother has of talking frank~y and unreservedly to another.

Among dispensations refused he includes requests to lay corner stones on the Sab-bath. Of these he truly says : "It is work and should not be'done on a legal Sabbath." AN

INTERF:STING

QUESTION.

Referring to physical qualifications and especially to thec:ase of an Entered Apprentice becoming crippled after receiving the degree and before advancement, he says: I am glad no request came to me to permit the advancement of a candidate who had met with misfortune, after having been admitted to our fold as an Entered Apprentic'e, of such a nature as to render him physically unable to conform to our Ritual. Had there been such, I would have been strongly tempted to set aside Section 222 of the Methodical Digest as being out of accord with the principles of our institution. In the case of a Fellow Craft,' it is hardly saying too much to declare such a refusal something close to a breach of our obligation. It has been very truly said that if the process of reasoning by , which a Fellow Craft who is maimed is prevented from' being raised is followed out it will just as inevitahly deprive a Master Mason, who has become maimed after being raised, of the rights and benefits to which a Master Mason may lay claim the wide world bver; and, indeed, may justify the denial upon. the part of those upon whom such claim may be made that the claimant is a Ma.ster Mascrn, because he can not make himself known as such in all the ways which may be lawfully required' of him. From the moment a candidate is brought to light be becomes a brother, to whom and from whom certain obligations are due.


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from which neither he nor the Craft can voluntarily and without cause absolve themselves. He is liable to trial and punishment for offenses committed by him. At each step, indeed, the Lodge must be satisfied of the worthiness and qualification of the candidate; but these are m?ral and not physical requisites.

All of which "we' steadfastly believe." The Grand Master, in closing, delivers this lofty sentiment: By the help of God, J am able to report our jurisdiction has been blessed with pcace and harmony, our influence and power have been enlarged, our membership increased, and our material possessions added to. I have an intense desire-almost a passionfor the prosperity and greatness of our institution, but my conception of that prosperity and greatness is more spiritual than material. I do not. long for an institution .possessed of a large membership and vast wealth so much as for one that can and does command the respect, the ,confidence, and the admiration of mankind; that wields a great influence and power for the good of God's creatures-consoling sorrow, assuaging pain, and " - -bringing gladness To' eyes that fail with wakefulness and tears, And achc for the dark house and the long sleep"; that lifts them to higher and nobler conceptions, and so meets the demands, the cares,and the responsibilities of life that 'mankind must bear testimony that the world is wiser, happier and better -because of its existence and in consequence of its teachings. MASONIC HO:;\:1E.

This is in good condition; solvent and successful. There are now seventy-two children in the Home-thirty-nine girls and thirty-three boys. .The entire receipts were some $30,000, and the cost of maintenance per capita, deducting payments on debts, repairs, additions, etc., thus leaving a balance of possibly $15,000, was approximately ,$200. REPORT

ON

CORRESPONDEKCE.

This is most excellent-it could not be otheridse, since it is written by our most worthy and honored Brother,Joseph W. Eggleston, who has a place very exalted in our regard. In our honest opinion no report of this character comes, to our tahle more entirely meeting the spirit and intent of a report on Correspondence than his-and the one before us is, if possible, even better than usual. He reviews Missouri in kindly spirit in four pages of the t 'NO hundred which his review of sixty-eight Grand Lodges occupies.


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[Sept.

WASHINGTON. 1917. R. MALCOLM, G. M â&#x20AC;˘ .Re-elected; Grand Correspondent. Members, 21,698.

1916. R. L. SEBASTIAN, G. M. H. W. TYLEH, G. S. RALPH C. McALLASTER Lodges, 194.

GEO.

Gain, 974. FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Fifty-ninth Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted IVlasoI1s of Washington convened in the City of TacQma on Tuesday, the 13~h day of June, A: D. 1916, A. L. 5916, and was called to urder by the M. W. Grand Master at the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., with the Grand Officers in their respective stations and a constitutional number of representatives of lodges in attendance. WELCOME-WELCOME.

After the opening ceremonies, W. Brother Earl A. Richardson (197), on behalf of the Masons of Tacoma, tendered a hearty welcome to the officers and members of the Grand Lodge in eloquent words. We give an extract: Since last you gathered here momentous events have taken place in the history. of the world, events which have shaken the faith of men in men. History has been made with startling rapidity; the waters of the Aisne and the Marne have run red with the life's blood of men in morta.l combat; kingdoms have crumbled, empires have been rocked to their very foundations; revolts and rebellion have been nourished and crushed; the civilized world has stood shocked and appalled by the frightful carnage wrought by mighty ~rmies in titanic struggles over the wooded hills and through the fertile valleys of historic Verdun; and, while we blush for the perfidy of kings, and grieve for stricken and devastated Europe, we are yet more profoundly grateful to that Divine Providence which wisely provides that all men should not be bereft of their reason at the same time, and which grants you the gracious. privilege of convening here today in peace and harmony. And may this all-wise and beneficent Providence support you and direct you in your solemn deliberations, and,' when the acid test of time has been applied to all that you accomplish here, may it prove the wisdom of your work and judgment, and record this communication of our Mother Grand Lodge a memorable one in the annals of Freemasonry in this Jurisdiction..

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To this a response was made in fitting terms by R. W. Alonzo E. Emerson, who said in part:

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'Ve are rich in friends and their fellowship, in hope, and in the irnmeasured and immeasurable blessings of peace and liberty; and, as we reflect on the manifold blessings and comforts we enjoy, let us remember that these eloquent words of welcome are not only a welcome to a beautiful city, and a fraternal sojourn together, but are, in their deeper, truer sense, a call to duty.

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ANNUAL ADDRESS.

This is to be commended for much. It is brief, covering only some 'sixteen pages, convent~onal in form, and while wasting no time in unnecessary statements, the Grand Master yet. finds space for wholesome sentiment, especially at the close. He refers tenderly to the fraternal dead. He commends the Washington Memorial Association. He made no decisions-for the reason ordinarily assigned. He constituted four lodges in person and two "by proxy. He dedicated one hall. He granted dispensations for the creati9nof nine lodges. He reports the laying of ten corner stones with Masonic ceremonies, he presiding at three occasions. The Grand Master refers to the inadequacy of the Masonic Home for present needs and recommends substantial changes. He severely-and properly-criticises the method of conferring the Past Master's degree in that-and some other-Jurisdictions! Closing, he says, in part: We are necessitous creatures, and there is no time at which we do not need human ministrations in the way of relief; hence, we should be ready to extend the same. The opportunity to extend relief, whether it be financial or in the way of securing employment or in the visiting of the sick '01' in seeing to the burial of the dead, or in caring for the widow and orphan, is too valuable to be overlooked in such an institution as ours; it 路is not overlool{ed, and, therein, I think, lies the strong' appeal of our institution to ordiHary men. Let us' look well to it, therefore, that we pass by no opportunity wherein we may extend such assistance as we may be called upon to rerider to those who have the strongest possible claims upon us. I do not question for a moment the value of the study of symbolism, even though, in my opinion, if pursued too far, it leads into


[Sept.

Appendix

174

the devious paths of mysticism; I have every admiration for the student of the Jurisprudence, of the History and of the Ritualism of our Institution; but I urge upon you all that, however necessary and attractive these things may be, the principal attraction for ordinary men in the Institution of Freemasonry in the United. States is, in my opinion, the opportunity to do practical and efficient work along the lines of relief indicated above.

Which sentiments we heartily commend. MASONIC HOME.

~,

Twenty-nine old people and eight children constitute the Home family and the cost of maintenance is about $273.00 per capita, not including the products of the farm, amounting to some $2,000, which was consumed at the Home. The budget for next year is reported at $42,000-which in. cludes $26,000 for new dormitory. REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE.

This is peculiar in form-covering some fifty pages, threefourths of which consists of a general discussion of various items referred to in the Proceedings canvassed, and the rest is occupied with quotations from. the various Annuals as to Washington. Doubtless this is altogether satisfactory to Washington, and, of course, it should be to others.

WEST VIRGINIA. 1917.

1916. T.

WILBUR HENNEN, G.

M. COLLINS, G. GEO. W. ATKINSON

JOHN

M. S.

CHAS.

Lodges, 157.

E.

CARRIGAN, G.

M.

Re-elected. Grand Correspondent. Members, 19,693.

Gain, 865. The Grand Master of this Grand Jurisdiction wears a face -and front pleasant and impressive and withal youthful, though he has reached the maturity of life-as appears from his photo and sketch.

The Proceedings report thirteen Special Communications, in


1917. ]

175

Appendix

detail--ten for eorner stone occasions, three for funerals, two for constituting and installing and one for dedicating ball.

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Fifty-second Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of West Virginia was held in the Masonic Temple, at the City of Huntington, commencing on Wednesday, the 15th day of November, A. D. 1916, A. L. 5916,at 7: 30 o'clock p. m., and was opened in Ample Form, all the Grand Officers and a large number of visitors and delegates being pr.esent. Grand Representatives were recognized with the Grand Honors of Freemasonry.

THE

ANNUAL

ADDRESS.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Since last we met the world has passed through one of the most momentous years of history, but in spite of' the turmoil and disaster with which our fellow creatures of many of the great nations of the earth have been and are still surrounded, we return our heartfelt thanks to Almighty God, through whose Divine Guidance we have been' led through paths of peace and unbounded prosperi ty. The past year has been a prosperous one for the Institution of Freemasonry throughout our Grand Jurisdiction, and when the reports have been tabulated, a substantIal increase in membership will be recorded. While our hearts arc .filled with praise and thanl{sgiving for the many evidences of divine favor, yet there comes a feeling of sadness when we look about us and note the absence of the familiar faces路 of many brethren with whom we have associated and worked during the years that have passed. 'Many of those we miss today have been called from their earthly labors to the Supreme Grand Lodge, and it is proper and fitting that due reverence be now paid to their memories; you will,therefore, stand while the list of honored dead of this and sister Grand Jurisdictions is read,

In this connection the Grand Master records the death of four Past Grand Masters of that Jurisdiction, as well as that of many distinguished Freemasons in others.


176

Appendix

[Sept.

DISPENSATIONS, ETC.

Many special .dispensati9ns were granted and many wisely refused. Several dedications are noted and visitat!~ns to various lodges. Six corner stones were laid in person and six by proxy. DECISIONS.

A goodly number of decisions are given, all" of which are approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence, and all seemingly in accord with ordinary Masonic usage, unless it路 be one to the. effect that: No.3. 'When a petition for initiation has laid over for one month, 'ballot must be taken thereon. It can not be postponed until a future communication to secure further information or for any other reason whatsoever.

Personally we could not approve this, and can see no good reason for such interdiction. A SPLENDID DONATION.

The Grand Master reported a donation by the late Brother Henry Krug of $150,000, the income of which is to be used for the purpose of maintaining a Masonic Home. In thi~ interest the Grand Master appointed a special committee, who duly reported, of which report being referred to the Finance Committee, was recommitted with further instructions. A fine photo of Brother Krug appears on page 147, with a biographical sketch on the page preceding. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

This occupies 152 pages and is the good work of Bro. Geo. W. Atkinson. He reviews the Proceedings of sixty-eight lodges, three of which are for two years each. Three and a half pages are given to Missouri in a most kindly spirit. We quote the opening paragraph: This is Lodges of business in the highest

one of the aggressive and progressive M. W. Grand this country and of all countries. It carries on its a business-like way. and prints its proceedings up to standard of "the printers' art". One feels a compunc-


177

Appendix

1917. ]

tion of conscience when he injects his scissors into any of its 'pages, and, after twenty-five years of experience in reviewing Grand Lodge proceedings, I find it necessary-absolutely necessary ---:to scissor some things, or, otherwise, present a dull report. The scissors and the quill are hand-maidens of each other.

*

*'

*

*

*

*

*

â&#x20AC;˘

Further on he says: Grand Secretary Parson submits a report replete with statistics. He reports the burning of two lodge halls. He states that there are 634 Lodges in the Jurisdiction, with a membership of 69,966 Master l\1asons. The net gain for the year was 2,444. This reveals both health and progress. He also reports that three-fifths of per capita tax, 1914, to the Masonic Home, amounting to $45,248.85, was paid by Grand Lodge. Also donation of $5,000.00, appropriated by the Grand Lodge, 1914, was paid; and, on June 2,1915, warrant for $36.45 ,vas issued to cover three-fifths of back dues collected since September 15, 1914, making a grand total of $50,285.30' paid for the use and benefit of the Masonic. Home 'for the year 1913-1914. In addition to this amount, there was collected and turned over to the Masonic Home since September {5, 1914, the sum of $20,005.50 for Masonic Home Improvement Fund, and $80.00 for Hospital Fund. The per capita tax for 1915 to and including September 15th, to. gether with arrears received since June 2, 1915, amounts to $78,255.50, three-fifths of which, $46,953.30, is now due and payable to the Masonic Home of Missouri. From this showing there is no doubt of the stability of the Home for the years to come. A new administration building for the Home was erected during the year, and the same was dedicated by Grand Lodge in solemn form. It appears that the Order of the Eastern Star raised all of' the necessary .funds to purchase the furni ture for the new building. Thus, it appears that the Star is shining brightly in the Commonwealth of Missouri.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

He regrets that West Virginia does not appear in our review of Proceedings. The explanation is that the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of West Virginia were not received by us. We hope to be more fortunate in the future.


178

[Sept.

Appendix

WISCONSIN. 1917.

1916. O. KELLOGG, G. M. WM. W. PERRY, G. S.

GEO.

CYRUS S. STOCKWELL,

G. M.

Re-elected. Grand Cor.respondent. Members, 31,866.

ALDRO JENKS

Lodges, 279. Gain, 1,315.

SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL CO",IMUNICATION.

The Seventy-second Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Wisconsin was opened in Ample Form in the Scottish Rite Cathedral, corner of Van Buren and Oneida, streets, in the City of Milwaukee, at the hour of 2 o'clock p. m., on ~uesday, June 13, 1916, A. L. 5916'. There was a large attendance of perman~nt members and representatives, with a number of visitors. The G. A. O. U. was recognized with prayer by the Grand Chaplain: THE ANNUAL ADDRESS

was-is-a model in much-especially in its beauty. If not the shortest on record it is at least-very short, occupying only some ten pages, but in that small space condensing all really necessary to a statement of the prominent event~ of the administration, together with a page or more of lofty sentiment. We quote a few paragraphs: Brethren of the Grand Lodge: '\Ve have assembled here to take up the labor of the Seventysecond Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge. We extend to you a fraternal welcome, and trust the spirit of Masonry may prevail in all deliberations of this body. 'Let us be duly thankful to the Great Architect of the Universe that peace ,and harmony have generally prevailed among the craft of this 'juriSdiction during the year just closing.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Coming from the quiet and serenity of our homes to this, the Seventy-second Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge, we are reminded that it has been a most eventful year in the world's history. In the Old World the most horrible conflict which the future historian will have to record is still raging with all its havoc anel devastation.


179

Appendix

1917.]

vVhile other countries are suffering under the ravages of war, and many of our brethren across the sea are arrayed against each otn,er in arms, we thank Almighty God that our beloved .country is yet spared the terrible devastation such conflicts always bring, and pray that war may soon cease and the dove of peace again hover over the entire world. God grant the time may soon come when war will be known no more and all nations and all people shall dwell together in peace.

*

*

*

*

.*

*

*

*

You come here today as the accredited delegates from the great and prosperous State of Wisconsin. In eftch of the communities from which you come it is not too muth' to say that you fairly represent its ideal social and civic relations and are among its best citizens. You have come, too; to ··counsel together for the best interests of Craft Masonry. This "high purpose' can only be attained by each" of us· observing and following the' precepts and teachings of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth.'

The Grand Master gives a long 'list of 'distinguishecf'dead and adds the names of three Past Grand Masters· and the Grand Lecturer as having died during the y e a r . " ' ' ' ' He reports seventy-three special dispensations, for which he received $295.00. , He granted dispensations to form and .op~n' thre-e' ne'w IOd'ges.. Eleven Special Grand Communications are r~~~r.~t:~d· ',the .Gr~n'd Master presiding in eight cases. These for thepurpose-.9f dedicating, constituting, funerals and laying corner stones. .Ten decisions are reported, most of which were approved by the committee-some with suggestions and modifications. We suppose No.6 is in accord with law in that Grand Jurisdiction-but certainly not in ours. It is to the effect that a saloonkeeper may be admitted to the mysteries of Freemasonry! LOSSES BY FIRE.

Three lodges lost their property by fire during 'the year and the Grand Master recommends that their dues be remitted. This was kind, but a recommendation to all lodges to keep their property insured would have come in well as a supplement to the recommendation. MASONIC HOME.

The report on Masonic Home is too brief and cursory for our apprehension. HQwever, they report a Dausman Farm Home with recommendations. Also a donation of $200,000 from a worthy


180

Appendix

[Sept.

Brother for the purposes of charity. And the Committee on Charity in the various donations show the worthy spirit of this Grand Lodge. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

M. W. Aldro Jenks is very properly recognized as a prince among Correspondents. His report this year, covering 170 pages, is well up with his best work. In the pages assigned to Missouri he is kind, and the only suggestion of criticism is with reference to the adoption of the amendment to our By-laws requiring documentary evidence not over a year old from a visitor. In this we fully agree with him when the says: \Ve consider it none of the business of another Grand Lodge to know whether a Brother's dues are paid or not so long as he remains in good .standing in his own Lodge. It is a question merely between the Brother's Lodge and himself how long his Lodge will permit him to go without paying his dues.

This law would exclude us from visiting if unknown-as we could not furnish such evidence, having been a veteran, non-paying member for some years, our lodge having a law that after twentyfive years a member shall be exempt from dues.


1917. ]

181

Appendix

WYOMING. 1916. W. H.

G. M. : . JOSEPH M. LOWNDES,' G. S. Also Grand Correspondent Lodges, 34. Gain, 202. DICKINSON,

1917. H. J. KING, G. M. Re-elected. Re-elected. Members, 3,518.

The Proceedings" for 1916 bears as frontispiece the photo of M, W. Herbert J. King, who is "also Past Master ~f Laramie Lodge NO.3. Next appears ·the record of three Special Grand Communications, all for the purpose of laying corner' stones. FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL COl\1l\IUNICATION.

The Forty,second An.nual 'Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient .Free and Ac<:epted i\1asons, of Wyoining was held in' the Masonic. 'Temple at .sheridan, .W'yo;ming, September 13th and 14th, 1916, with the Grand O~ice'rs.'and·a quorum of Grand Lodge members present, :;tnG was op.ened· in Ample Form, with prayer by Grand Chaplain. A fitting address. of welcome was made by Brother Frank H. Fraser of Sheridan Lodge, which was responded to in a worthy mann~r by Brother David' ·R. 'Howell of Acacia Lodge No. 11, Cheyenne. The report of Committee on Credentials gives the name and location of all representati:ves present. The Grand Master pr.esented his Annual Address, .which opens as follows: , .~ GRAND MASTEn's ADDRESS.

Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Wyoming:, The past year has been one of material growth for Masonry in Wyoming-not only in the unusual high character of initiates, or our largely increasing membership, but in the greater influence and respect we command in every community where Lodges are located. Most ·every Lodge reportg progress and prosperity; no dissentions of any"kind have been·hipo·rted, and with peace and harmony prevailing we aTe to draw new designs upon the Trestle Board for the guidance of the workmen during the forty-fourth year of our existence.


182

Appendix

[Sept.

He reports having visited twenty-eight out of the thirty-four lodges of the Grand Jurisdiction, which is certainly a good record. Further on he speaks of the proficienc~ of the work with some enthusiasm-as follows: All Lodges are conferring degrees in a highly satisfactory manner-the candidates are impressed with the lectures; lessons are taught-yet each Lodge, holding strictly to essentials, differ in details. To the affiliatEs, bringing from other Jurisdictions different work, is this largely responsible. In an effort to secure uniformity, the officers of Cheyenne Lodge No. 1 and Acacia Lodge No. 11 spent many hours in preparation for a joint communication where absolutely perfect work was impressibly performed in the presence of Masters and Officers fl'om Colorado ana the Philippine Islands.

DECISIONS.

He ,reports four decisions, all seemingly in accord with Masonic, usage and cOID1p.on sense. The last two, to the effect that the age of a dimit does not affect its validity and also that the examination in the Third Degree can not be enforced, as no penalty is attached to the law.

GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

This is full and satisfactory, concluding as follows: Freemasonry has gone steadily forward in growth. 'ÂŁhe work for the year shows an increase, and has been as large as anyone year in the history of this Grand Lodge. Sheridan Lodge No. 8 has made the largest increase in membership. It ,added. 34 members. Casper Lodge No. 15 increased 25; Laramie Lodge No.3 increased 16; Acacia Lodge No. 11 increased 16, and Rock Springs No. 12 and Chugwater No. 23 each increased 11. Cheyenne Lodge No. 1 with its 360 members remains the Banner Lodge,' but is closely followed by Sheridan No.8, with 348 members.

The Grand Treasurer reports a balance on hand of $14,224.48, and for the Masonic Home Fund, $6,396.50. Which latter is supplemented by the report of the Trustees of the Masonic Home Fund, showing a permanent fund, mostly invested in mortgages, of $11,412.15, and a temporary fund of $4,112.10.


1917. ]

Appendix

183

lfRATERN AL CORRESPONDENCE.

The report on Foreign Correspondence from the worthy pen of the Grand Secretary is full of interest and gives evidence of a careful examination of the Proceedings received. H~ com.pliments Missouri with two pages, consisting largely of quotations. He concludes his work for the year as follows: We have again come to the close of the year's labor and herewith, . for the second time, submit the result of a review of all the volumes of proceedings that have reached me. In reading over these proceedings, one is impressed by the fact that Masonry is putting forth its efforts to assist manldnd, and to make this a better world. Every brother who is true to the principles of Masonry sends forth that message which teaches us to be charitable to our fellow men. "There are three lessons I would wri"te, Three words as with burning pen. In tracings of eternal light, Upon the 'hearts of men. "Have Hope, Though clouds environ now, And gladness hides her face in scorn, Pu t thou the shadow from thc' browNo night but hath its morn. "Have Faith, 'Vhere'er thy barque is drivenThe calm's disport, the temp'est's mirthKnow this: God rules the hosts of heaven, The inhabitants of earth." "Have Love, Not love alone for one, But man as man thy brother call, And scatte~ lik.~ the c}i'cling sun Thy charities on all." -Unknown.


184

Appendix

[Sept.

CONCLUSION. In closing the record of the year we make no' apology for introducing the poem herewith appended. It may not appeal to the taste of the fastidiou~ who hold, to the old masters, but to us it is not only musical in its rhythm, but exquisitely tender in sentiment, an'd it challenges that which is highest and best. THE LODGE

ROOM

OVER SIMPKINS'

STORE.

By Lawrence 'N. Greenleaf, Past Grand Master of Colorado. The plainest lodge room in the land was over Simpkins' store, Where Friendship Lodge had met each month for fifty years or more. When o'er the earth the moon, full-orbed, had cast her brightest beams, The brethren came from miles around on horseback and in teams, And O!' what hearty grasp of hand, what welcome met them there, As mingling with the waiting groups they slowly mount the stair, Exchanging fragmentary news or prophecies of the crop, Until they reach the Tiler's room and current topic drop, '1'0 turn their thought to nobler themes they cherish and adore, And which were heard on meeting night up over Simpkins' store. '.ro city eyes, a cheerless room, long usage had defaced The tell-tale lines of lath and beam on wall and ceiling traced. The light from oil-fed lamps was dim and yellow in its hue, The carpet once could pattern boast, though now 'twas lost to view. '1'he altar and the pedestals that marked the stations three, The gate-post pillars topped with balls, the rude-carved letter G, Were village joiner's clumsy work, with 'many things beside, Where beauty's lines were all effaced and ornament denied. There could be left no lingering doubt, if doubt there was before, The plainest lodge room in the land was over Simpkins' store. While musing thus on outward form the meeting time drew near, And we had glimpse of inner life through watchful eye and ear. When lodge convened at gavel's sound with officers in place, We looked for strange, conglomerate w:ork, but could no errors trace. 'The more we saw, the more we heard, the greater our amaze, To find these country brethren there so skilled in Masons' ways. .But greater marvels were to come before the night was through, ,Where unity was not mere name, but fell on heart like dew, Where tenets had the mind imbued: and truths rich fruitage bore, In plainest lodge room in the land, up over Simpkins' store.


1917. ]

Appendix

185

'.ro hear the record of their acts was music to the ear, We sing of deeds unwritten which on angel's scroll appear. ..\. 'Yfdow's Case-Four Hell.less Ones-lodge funds were running low,_ A dozen brethren sprang to feet and offers were not slow. l"'oOd, raiment, things of needful sort, while one gave load of wood, .Another, shoes for little ones, for each gave what he could. Then spake the last: "1 haven't things like these to give.,..-but then, Some ready money may help out"-and he laid down a 'reno Were brother cast on' darkest square upon life's checkered floor, A beacon light to reach the white-was over Simpkins' store. Like scoffer who remained to pray, impress'ed by sight and sound, 'l'he faded carpet 'neath our feet was now like holy ground. The walls that had such dingy. look were turned celestial blue, 'l'he ceiling chan'ged to canopy where stars were shining through. Bright tongues of flame from altar leaped, the Gwas vivid blaze. All common things seemed glorified by heaven's reflected rays. O! wondrous transformation wrought through ministry of loveBehold the Lodge Room lleautiful!-fair type of that above. 'l'he vision fades--'-the lesson lives! and taught' as ne'er before, In plainest lodge room in the land-up over Simpkins' store.


[Sept.

Appendix

186

RECOGNITION OF GRAND LODGES. The following Foreign Grand Lodges are recognized as regular by the Grand Lodge of Missouri: Grand Lodge.

Grand Secretary.

Address.

Alberta George McDonald Calgary. British Columbia W. A. .ceWolf Smith New Westminster. Canada Ralph L. Gunn , Hamilton, Ont. Chili (at Santiago) Luis de 1a Barra Santiago. Cuba (Island of) Carlos G. Charles Havana. Denmark Rasmus. O. Nielsen Copenhagen. Eclectic Union Philipp Hertz Frankfort-on-l\'Tain. Egypt Jean D. Panayotti. Cairo. P. O. Box 148. England Edward Letchworth London. France (National) and Independent Grand G. L. Jo11ois Paris. Lodge of............ . Germany (National) Wm. Wald Berlin. Ireland H. E. FlaYelle, D. G. S Dublin. Manitoba ............• James A. Ovas Winnipeg. Netherlands .......••• H. P. Van Niewenburg The Hague. New Brunswick John Twining Hartt St. John. New South Wales Arth ur H. Bray Sydney. New Zealand ..' Malcolm Nicco!. Auckland. Nonvay R. Rosenquist. Christiana. Nova Scotia Thomas Mowbray Halifax. Philippine Islands Newton C. Comfort. Manila, Box 990. Porto Rico: Jose G. Torres San Juan. Prince Edward Island. W. P. Doull. Charlottetown. Quebec ·Walter C. Hagar, Acting.Montreal. Queensland .........•. Chas. H. Harley Brisbane. Royal York of Prussia.. G. Mitzlaff Berlin.

f

San Sal~ador

Tomas Soley

Saskatchewan Saxony

W. B. Tate Rudolph Gottschall

j San Salvador, Cent.

I

Am. Regina, Dresden.


1917. ] . Grand Lodge.

Grand Secretary.

Scotland South Australia Sweden Tasmania Three Globes United Grand Lodge Victoria

\ Charles J. Barrow

Western Aust.ralia York ?ran~ Lodge of MexIco,. F. & A. M.. Zur Eintracht Zur Sonne

J. D. Stevenson / Wayne A. White f P. O. Box 1986 Wilhelm Suss J.ulius Fiesenig

of

187

Appendix

David Reid Chas. R. J. Glover Nils Flensburg John Hamilton Erich Meyssner ~

Address. Edinburgh. Adelaide. Stockholm. Hobart. Berlin. Melbourne. Perth. l Mexico City.

f

Darmstadt. Bafreuth.


188 .

[Sept.

Appendix

ADDRESSES OF GRAND SECRETARIES. State.

Name.

Address.

Alabama ..•............George A. Beauchamp Montgomery. Tucson. ' Arizona George J. Roskruge Arkansas Fay Hempstead Little Rock. California John Whicher San Francisco. Colora.do ' , , Chas. H. Jacobson Denveor. Con~ecticut George A. Kies Hartford. Delaware ..\ Harry J. Guthrie Wilmington. Di.strict of Columbia Arvine W. Johnston '. Washington, D. C. Florida Wilbur P. Webster Jacksonville. Georgia Frank F. Baker Macon. Idaho : George E. Knepper Boise. llIinois Isaac Cutter Camp Point. . Indiana Calvin W. Prather Indianapolis. Iowa Newton R. Parvin ....•. Cedar Rapids. Kansas Albert K. Wilson Topeka. Kentucky Daye Jackson Louisville. Louisiana Jno. A. Davilla New Orleans. ; ....•. Charles B. Davis Portland. Maine Maryland George Cook Baltimore. . " J Masonic Temple, Massachusetts Fredenck W. HamIlton I Boston. . Michigan Lou B. Winsor Reed City. Minnesota ..........•. John FisheL St. Paul. Missouri John R. Parson St. Louis. Mississippi Frederic Gordon Speed .. Vicksburg. Montana .............• Cornelius Hedges, Jr Helena. Nebraska ........••.. FranGis E. White Omaha. Nevada ..........••.•• E. D. VanderIieth Carson. Harry M. Cheney Concord. New Hampshire New Jersey Isaac Cherry Trenton. New Mexico .....•..... Alpheus A. Keen AlbuquerQue.


1917.]

Name.

State. New york North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Okla}:lOma Oregon Pennsylvania Rh~de Island South Carolina:.; South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Alberta ~ Britfsh Columbia Canada Chili (~t Santiago) Cuba Denmark Eclectic Union Egypt England ~ France (National and In~ependent Grand Lodge of)......... Germany (National) Ireland Manitoba Netherlands New Brunswick New South Wales ~

189

Appendix Address.

Robt. J. Kenworthy New York. Wm. W. Willson Raleigh. Walter L. StockwelL Fargo. J. H. Bromwell Cincinnati. . Wm. M. Anderson Okiahoma City. James F. Robinson Portland. John A. Perry Philadelphia. S. P. Williams Providence. O. Frank Hart Columbia. Geo. A. Pettigrew Sioux Falls. Stith M. Cain , .. Nashville. W. B. Pearson Waco. F'reeman A. McCarty Salt Lake City. H. H. Ross Burlington. Chas. A. Nesbitt ,Richmond. Horace W. Tyler Tacoma. John M. Collins Charleston. Wm. W. Perry Milwaukee. J. M. Lowndes Lander. George MacDonald Calgary. W. A. De Wolf S路mith New Westminster. Ralph L. Gunn Hamilton, Onto Luis de la Bar.ra Santiago. Carlos G. Charles Havana. Rasmus O. Nielsen Copenhagen. Ph ill ip Hertz Frankfort-on-Main. Jean D. Panayotti. Cairo.. Edward Letchworth London.

f'G. L. Jollois

e Paris. . Wm. Wald Berlin. Henry E. Flavelle, D.G:S.. Dublin. James A. Ov~s Winnipeg. R. P. Van Niewenburg The Hague. John Twining Hartt. St. John. Arthur H. Bray S~dney.

.


190

[Sept.

Appendix l:3tate..

Name.

Address.

New Zealand Malcolm Niccol Auckland. Norway R. Rosenquist Christiana. Nova Scotia Thomas Mowbray Halifax. Philippine Islands Newton C. Comfort .. , Manila, Box 990. Porto Rico Jose G. Torres San Juan. Prince Edward Island .. W. P. Doull Charlotteto :-. n. Walter C. Hagar, Acting.Montreal. Quebec Queensland ; Chas. H. Harley Brisbane. Royal York 'of Prussia.. G. Mitzlaff Berlin. San Salva dOl' Tomas Soley San Salvador, C. A. Saskatchewan W. B. Tate Regina. Saxony Rudolph Gottschall.. Dresden. Scotland David Reid Edinburgh. South Australia Chas. R. .T. Glover Adelaide. Sweden Nils Flensburg Stockholm. Tasmania John Hamilton Hobart. Three Globes Erieh Meyssner Berlin. United G. L. of Victoria. Chas. J. BarroN Melhourne.. Western Australia J. D. Stevenson Perth. York Grand Lodge of (Wayne A White ( .'f â&#x20AC;˘ Mexico, F. & A. M.. \ P. O. Box 1986 f l\.exico CIty. Zur Eintracht. Wilhelm Suss Darmstadt. Zur Sonne Julius Fiesenig Bayreuth.

o


1917.]

,191

Appendix

REPRESENTATIVES. Appointed near Other Grand Lodges by the Grand Lodge of. Missouri. Grand Lodge.

Name.

Alabama H. G. Earnest Arizona ~' Jas. S. Cromb Arkansas M. W. Greeson British Columbia William Astley California Wm. T. Lucas Canada Donald Sutherland Cuba Calixto Fajaroo Colorado Frank G. MIrick Connecticut Leonard J. Nickerson Delaware : Chas. H. Maull District of Columbia Alexander McKenzie Egypt A. C. Garofallo England Braxton Baker Florida ........•...... Irving P. Webster Georgia .•............ T. F., McFarland Idaho .............•.. Jonas W .. Brown Illinois George A. Stadler Indiana Mason J. Niblack Ireland Wm. Hamilton Kansas Perry M. Hoisington Louisiana ; Lee E. Thomas Maine Dan'l P. Boynton Michigan W. S. Linton ' Minnesota .. , ' J. N. Tate ; Mississippi ......•.... John Foggo Dixon Manitoba R. P. Crookshank Maryland B. F. Lucas Montana : W. M. Montgomery Nebraska Samuel S.Whiting Nevada Herman'Davis .. :

o

Address. '. Anniston. Clifton. Prescott. Vancouver. Santa Maria. Princeton. Havana. Pueblo. West Cornwall. Lewis. 'Washington. Cairo. London. Gainesville. ,.Rossville. Boise. Decatur. Vincennes. Dublin. Norton. Shreveport. lVIonmouth. Saginaw. Faribault. Natchez. Rapid City. Baltimore. Anaconda. Lincoln. Dayton.


192. Grand Lodge.

Appendix Name.

[Sept. Address.

New Brunswick John Twining Hartt St. John. New Hampshire Oscar Earle JewelL Warner. ~ew Jersey Chas. C. Scott :. Paterson. New South Wales James T. Smiles Sydney. New york E. Walter Moses Dalton. New Zealand Wm.. Waring De Castro .. Wellington. North Carolina Walter E. Moore Webster. North Dakota Harry Lord Cando. Nova Scotia Israel Edw. Sanford " Halifax. Ohio E. G. Chamberlin Caldwell. Oklahoma Wm. P. Freeman McAlester. Oregon H. Beckwith Portland. Philippine Islands ,Amos G. Bellis .. ; Manila. Porto Rico Chas. O. Lord San Juan. Prince Edward Island.. C. C. Carlton Souris. Quebec T. A. Howard Aylmer.. Queensland Peter Forrest Brisbane. Rhode Island George H. Holmes Providence. Scotland W. Munro Denholm Glasgow. South Australia James Shakespeare Adelaide. South Carolina Geo. T. Bryan Greenville. South Dakota Thomas H. Brown Sioux Falls. Tasmania Herbert Hays Hobart. Tennessee Frank E. Bartley W路hite Pine. Texas Dan S. McMillin Whitewright. Utah Sidney Watson Badcon .. pgden. Vermont $ilas H. Danforth St. Albans. Victoria Baron Marks Melbourne. Virginia George W. Wright Marion. Washington Louis F. Hart Tacoma. Western Australia A. C. Munro Perth. West Virginia P. P. Lester Fort Gay. Wisconsin Chas. E. George ; Weyauwega. York Grand Lodge of L Mexico, F. & A. M. f Hy; Harrison Greenleaf .. Mexico City.


1917. ]

193

Appendix

REPRESENTATIVES. Appointed by Other Grand Lodges Near the Grand Lodge " of ~~is~Ouri. Grand Lodge.

Name:"

Address.

Alab"ama .......•••••• A. M. Hough .. " Jefferson City. Arizona Robert E. Collins St." Louis. Arkansas James ·A.' 'Boone Charleston. British Columbia Gib. W. Carson St. Louis. Canada Xenophon "Ryland Lexington. "Colorado E. F. Hartzell '.. St. Joseph. Connecticut Reuben 'Barney Chillicothe. Cuba": , .' Tb.os. R. -Morrow Kansas City. Delawartl .; George E. MayhalL New London. District of Columbia D. M. Wilson Milan. Egypt : ' Rev. ino. H. Miller Kansas City. England, ' R. F. Stevenson ~ St. Louis. Florida Jacob Lampert. St. Louis. Georgia J. Richard Garstang ~ .Chamois. Idaho' : Carl A. Swenson Mountain Grove. Illinois Wm'. ,F. Johnson Boonville.. Indiana John H. Blirr Kansas City. Ireland ............•... S. W. Hurst. Tipton. Kansas Wm. F'.- Kuhn Kansas City. Louisiana Major J., Lilly Moberly. Maine G. A.Goben Kirksville. Manitoba Charles H. Pope ; St. Louis. Maryland Frank H. W. Krenning .. St. "Louis. Michigan' C. W. Bolster Plattsburg. Minnesota Arch A. Johnson ; .. Springfield. Mississipp( : William Richardson St. Louis. Montana Wm. A. Hall St. Louis. Nebraska Chas.. F. Vogel St. Louis. Nevada Seymour Hoyt. Kansas City. New Brunswick V\Tm. M. Porteous St. Louis. New Hampshire Alexander M. Dockery Gallatin.


194

[Sept.

Appendi.v Grand Lodge.

Name.

Address.

New Jersey Jas. W. Boyd... New South Wales Theoph. L. Carns New york John R. Parson New Zealand Martin T. Balsley North Carolina Geo. W. Walker North Dakota Dorsey A. Jamison Noya Scotia Alexander Pow Ohio Austin L. :McRae Oklahoma Wm. E. Hoke Oregon Philippine Islands Anthony F.· Ittner Prince Edward Island.. Ralph L. Wardin Quebec .: C. C. Woods Queensland A. L. Ross .. : : Rhode Island. ' T. W. Cotton Scotland Andrew J. O'Reilly South Australia John T. ~hort South Carolina V. O. Saunders South Dakota James B. Wright Tasmania C. C. Bigger Tennessee C. H. Brejggs Texas ..............•. C. J. Blackburn ' Utah . A. S. Hickerson Vermont Caesar Wollman Victoria R. R. Kreeger Virginia W. So Allee Washington V. F. Boor .. West Virginia o. Henry W. Wait Western Australia. Edward Higbee Wisconsin Joseph S. McIntyre York Grand Lodge of ~ . Wm. 1.'. JamIson Mexico, F. & A. oM. 0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

St. Joseph. Kansas City. St. Louis. Joplin. Cape Girardeau. St. Louis. St. Louis. Rolla: St. Louis.

0

0

•••••••••••••••

0

0

•••

St. Louis. Nevada. St. Louis. Versailles. Van Buren. St. Louis.. Jefferson City. St. Louis. Trenton. Laclede. Sedalia. Blackburn. Ferguson. Jefferson City. Kansas City. Olean. Kansas City. Independence. Kirksville. : St. Louis. . Kansas CIty.

••••••••

•••

0

••••••••••••••••••

••••

0

0

•••

•••••••••••

0

0


1917. ]

Appendix

DEATHS. No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 1. W. W. Baldwin. Walter Baack. Peter Sorenson. Wm. H. Benson. R. E. L. Winter. L. W. Craig. Thos. S. McInroy. Thos. W. Benoist. 2. J. M. Fassel. J. H. Debrodt. H. L. Garrett. 3. . H. L. Budde. . G. L. Denhard. L. Landvogt. R. H. Graham. J. F. Dohrendorf. Geo. J. Schmidt. 5. F. H. Deeds. W. E. Tousley. W. W. Daniel. V. N. Bray. C. D. Turner. Benj. Toothman. Jno. W. Hoover. Thos. J. Smith. S. C. Hinckley. C. M. George. S. T. Blair. Wm. A. Stone. A. H. Julian. 8. S. M. Grant. 9. Wm. Brandon. Edw. W. Gerstner. R. 1. J efford. Thos. Keith. Jos. H. Lackay. A. B. Muhgall. 10. Henry Tiler. M. W. Farris. Norton Hrooker. T. R. Smith. II. J D. Waller. Robt. Vaughan:. 12. Wm. P.Knox. F. P. Morrow. J. H. Fisher. 13. Loughry Andrew. Wm. W~ Woods.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. O. D. Allen. 14. D~ J. M. Duncan. 16. H. H. Saling. C. H. Tinney. 17. W. M. Chapman. Alex. Lyter. S. F. Mayes. 18. Thos. J .. Lewis, ~r. J. B. Quest. 19. W. K. Poage. 20. Walter Huelsick. Jos. Glaser. Henry Handel. 2I. Josiah Wilson. 22. F. W. Hagenstein. 23. J. W. Hawkins. 24. J. N. Hagood. 25. D. J. Blanke. Marcus Saul. L. C. Smith. Morris Wilbert. F. C. Wood. Wm. Vogel. 26. J. A. Baker. L. O. Hailey. Isaac Story. .28. W. D. Straub. 3l. A. F:Means. Robt. Taylor. J. T. Scott. W. F. Gordon. 32. W. T. Kent. A. Jones. 33. Wm. J. Briscoe. 34. C. S. Martin, Sr. .J. R. Britton. 35. Geo. Miller. Rev. Z. Moore. 36. J. A. Steele. Wm. M. Williams. 37. J. W. Schwaner. 38. C. H. Cole. Jno. C. Collett. Wm. A; Mathis. E. M. Thomas. 40. J. F. Horstman. A. C. Lemkemeier. Chas. Kleemeier.

195


196 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. C. F. Frechmann. E. B. Schoenemann. E. G. Hicks. J. A. Steininger. Jno. Randall. A. L. Thomasson. R. W. Rankin. J. A. Dyer. H. N. Williams. G. L. Erbe. 41. P. N. Pyle. 43. H'oward A. Gass. Abe Heim. 44. Jno. A. Grant. 46. H.,A. Talley. 47. J. F. Burnham. Fielding Marvin. H. C. Sartain. O. C. Hem. T. M. Nicholson. 48. Jno. G. Ratekin. J. P. Stuart. H. D. Mathews. 49. H. C. Ellington. Wm: S. Marsh. 51. Jno. H. Turner. '52. D. M. Beams. L W. Sturges. 53. J. Synnaman. J. E. R. Miller. 57. H. R. Buchanan. W. S. Seymour. 59. Irby J. Head. 62'. G. G. Brown. 63. C. T. Dawes. G. G. Jenkins. Harry Presley. L. A. Smith, Sr. 64. John Shearman. W: S. Harwood. 65. J. E. Grantham. C. R. Nance. Wm. M. Williams. 66. Wm. J. Gibson. T. J. Worster. 69. J. H. Calvirt. Francis Martin. 70'. J. J. Walkup. 71. Jas. Breckenridge. .Joseph W. Johnson. Chas. Henderson.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Geo. W. Walrath. Jno. C. Sutherland. 72. Wm. H. Belt. Sam A. Miller. Geo. W. Buford. 73. Thos. Kincaid. J. M. Peery. J. S. Wallace. 74. J. N. Finnell. 76. Jno. E. Carr. Jno. M. Collier. S. N. Kerr. 77. Edw. Marsh. 78. H. H. Ross. E. Chute.. Joseph Cahn. J. M. Hildebrandt. 79. E.A. Lifka. Julius Saettle. C. M. Forline. C. G. Woods. H. G. Scherman. 80. Raymond Young. 82. J. Will Phillips. 83.' Wm. C. Joslyn. F. S. Clark. 84. C. L. Brooks. L. lVI. Stearns. H. L. Sutton. H. R. Hisey. Edw. McTaggart. Hugh Sterling. 85. J. F. Webster. 86. B. F. Curtis. J. N. Wilber. Wm. H. Kennedy. 87. Sam Cox. J. H. Davidson. 89. Wm. J. Miller. J. G. Robertson. Daniel Williams. A. Wallbrunn. J. H. Matthews. 90. T. J. Scott. 92. J. W. Dreyfus. R. H. Goodman. Wm. F. Hill. P. T. Johnston. H. C. Krebs. F. J. Pollak. Emanuel Urban.

[Sept.


1917.] . No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 94. B. F. Crismon. J. H. Crismon. 97. Campbell Crossan. B. B. Boatright. J. F. Bryant. A. D. Stubbs. A. J. Fuller. 98. W. W. Brannock. C. H. Greer. Wm. H. Moore. W. M. Burchfield. 99. S. M.Mayhew. 100. Roy A. Matthews. A. K. Kirkland. J. D. L. Waddle. Ovas Smith. 101. ' Ed S. Walker. Eo Everhart. 104. Geo. D. Hope. Rade Hardin. Wm. Warner. H. B. Ezekiel. Ben R. Whitney. Thos. J. Hamilton. Chas. S Hagaman. L. G. Rickard. Jno. C. Egelhoff. 105. Wm. R. Archer. Henry Crist. Wm', Graves. 106. W. Whitman. a.A. Nixon. Elwood M. Mann. 108. W. T. Hackney. C. W. Noel. 109. Chas. Hardin. C. a. Hawkins. 110. J. A. London. Wm. Newberry. R. J. Gabriel. 111. Chas H. Alexander. Abram Burkeholder. L. M. Brown. E. B. Cooper. Jno. Flanigan. Wm. Gipson. Chauncey Hall. F. W. Merrill. E. L. Rogers. J. M. Walton.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 112. H. C. Linville. Jno. Applebee. 113. .1 ohn N. Payne. 114. J. W. Carlyle. W. W. Hornberger. W.A. Smith. G. L. Norvell 115. W. H. Beal. 117. Bayless Barnett. Geo. W. Miller. James Enloe. James McNair. Jno. A. McLain. 118. Ed Parker. Geo. Armstrong 119. Leander Mitchell. 121. Emil Hillger. Jno. A. Nies. Chas. F. Busche. Geo. F. Jacobs. W. G. Eversole. Jno. H. Wollbrinck. 122. C. C. Tory. 123. C. F. Butzer. 124. Thomas Shouse. James Murphy. 125. Albert Morgan. R. L. Smith. D. L. Bratcher. 126. Jefferson Swanger. .Tno. C. Chapman. Nathan Henthorn. Gilbert Morrison. 127. Wm.EAdams. C. G. Comstock. C. H. S. Goodman. 129. A., W. Royalty. F. B. Spilman. 130. Jno. Armstrong. 13l路 E. T. Eversole. Hugh McGregor. J. H. Hall. 132. Reuben Fugate. 133. R. E. Purkiss. 134. Wm. S. Allee. 135. A. W. Coyle. Alexander Wells. 136. Wm. F. Mayhall. M. E. Motley. Harrison Hendrick.

197


198 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 137. S. D. Biffle. Thos. H. Clayton. 14I. Joseph Mowry. 144. W. M. Mitchell. W;H. West. 145. Hiram King. J. R. Blankenship. 147. R. L. Foster. 149. Alexander Graves. J. K. Merrifield. L. C. Yates. 156. C. P. Haney. 157. B. W. Warden. 158. W. R. Leonard. 159. Thos. B. McNeal. 160. D. I. Goodnight. 16I. J. L. Brockman. C. W. Shores. E. W. Naylor. 163. S. D. Winter. Ernst Mueller. Thos. O. Moore. R. A. Linde. Wm. H. Glancy. 164. Wm. P. Williams, Sr. 165. B. R. Martin. Robert Ream. 166. Hugh Smith. R. C. Flanary. 167. Wm. C. Calvert. Jno. P. Coovert. 169. Wm. F. Perrin. Wm. L. Elliott. Geo. W. Bradley. J. C. Storie. 170. Philip Smith. 171. Jos. A. Morgan. Geo. Benson. 172. Wm.P.Howe. J. W. McCullough. Ross Larrabee. 174. Geo. W. Batterton. 176. J D. Stine. S. J. Swilley. 177. Wm. H. Clark. J. T. Erwin. Jno. H. Wood. Geo. H. Lewark. 178. S. K. Tippett. 179. J. H. Ratcliff. F. C. Schwaner.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Jacob Zunz. Carl Lindholm. D. W. Sellers. M. Peterson. Julius Wendl. Alex Siegel. 183. J. M. Alexander. Zeno Cloud. Scott Peters. 185. Wm. R. Mercer. h. v. Shobe. 186. J. G. Settle. 187. J. S. Hatten. 188. W. O. Smith. V.H. Whaley. 189. Thos. P. McNish. L. C. Burnes. M. B. Dugdale. 190. E. M. W路ells. 19I. James A. Ross. 193. L. G. Mereness. 195. G. M. Botts. E. H. Potter. 198. David C. Mull. 199. W. B. Reneau. 200. Wm. Clevenger. 20I. James Sawyer. 202. Jno. W. Bell. 204. James Garnaud. 205. G. W. Fellers. W. E. Woodsmall. T. J. Hunter. Jno. G. Miller. E. L. Brown. A. T. Swisher. L. E. Dotson. 207. Jno. F. Hulett~ M. T. Martin. P. B. McCrorey. 209. A. O. Scott. L. C. Lowry. Chas. H. Moss. 210. H. C. Haynes. 21I. C. E. Arnhold. 212. D. E. Logan. 213. Robertus Hutchison. Hamilton Lenox. C. W. Love. 214. W. R. Hopper. Wm. J. Alkire. J. W. McClanahan.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 216. Geo. R. Vaughn. 218. Chas. H. Viehl. 219. Chas. N. Seidlitz. Thos. P. Watts. 220. W. L. Grush. L. H. Waters. Conrad Stumpf. S. H. Black. Wm.E.Lee. Jas. G. Young. Martin Lehman. R. G. Estill. C. L. Hollinghausen. 221. J. W. McLane. 222. C. G. Gregory. J. T. Holmes. Wm. M. Moore. S. J. Thompson. 224. Jno. W. Mathews. Clayton Tiffin. Wm. W. Anderson. 226. H. S.WiIIiams. Thos.. B. Whitledge. 227. Gilbert E. Thomas. 228. Albert F. Huggins. 229. W. W.Moore. S. P. Dotson. 230. Jno. A. Adams. M. M. Newman. R. T. Parker. Philip Riley. 231. John Cockrum. 232. James .Cain. 233. W. L. White. Jno. M. Eastin. 234. Jno. G. Ballard. Grover Rodgers. 236. Jno. H. Brooks. Geo. W. Faust. Wm. M. Usher. 237. S. L. 'Ellis. W. S.Little. 238. R. W. Jones. B. F. Stewart. 239. J. T. Dobbins. W.A. Pogue. 241. R. C. Haeussler. 242. Wm. Boatright. Chas. E. Gill. 243. Hy. W. Hodde. J. Harry Hall.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Wm. K. Spinney. J. W. Pilcher. Wm. J. Lepper. Geo. P. Cassidy. Robt. Sayle. Alex M. White. 244. James S. Chattin. 246. G. A. Palmer. 247. J. H. Hughes. Abraham Maas. A. P. Mason. 249. .Ino. W. Yeakey. Thos. D. White. 251. J~ L. Gregory. 253. O. R. Miller. Frank Kelso. 254. Reuben Marshall. Harrison Philbrick. Jno. Lyle. Jno. M. Vaughan. Jno. Steele. Thos. Brashear. Robt. S. Catron. 255. J. F. Acree. T. J. Boyd. 256. Conrad Wuertz. S. W. Crawford. 257. J. L. Downing. 258. S. R. Lowry. Albert Bruse. 259. Jno. H. Crozier. R. P. Fogle. 260. Geo. Hoffman. C. W. Callaway. U. .T. Cunningham. 261. B. F. Holcombe. 263. C. T. Hamblin. W. B. Hunt. Horace Pratt. 265. Kersey Cook. D. E. Sheldon. A. W. Cantrell. 267. Wm. P. Kron. A. R. Cutler. F.路J. Adams. Beni. Rardenwerper. 269. R. A. Smalling. J. N. Hope. 270. A. N. Harlow. Walter Utley. 271. W. G. Cunningham.

199


200

Appendix

No. of Lod~e.

272. 273. 274. 275. 276. 277. 278. 279. 281. 282.

283. 284.

285. 286. 287. 289.

.

290. 291. 292.

293.

Name of Party. 路S. L. Haynes. Louis Mack. D. B. Farnsworth, Sr. H. D. Baker. R. G. Hinton. G. W. Douthitt. W. L. Purselley. C. H. Guckel. Leslie H. Mercer. Wm. J. Horn. Thos. D. Hancock. J. W. Murray. W. W. Palmer. H. C. Stephens. Thos. F. Prettyman. A. Jackson Bennett. A. B. Wood. Marshall'Rust. Sam W. Roberts. Jno. L. Boyt. R. A. Vance. Dayid Bowles. A. J. Dubach, Sr. Fred C. Bent. Gustave Tuholske. Thos. A. McIntyre. Peter Anton. Jno. F. Kennedy. Wm. F. Wilkerson. M:L. Coleman. T. J. Liles. Jno. Manlove. J. M. McNatt. Chas. Adams. M. A. Hathaway. G. F. Corwine. T. F. Hart. S. D. Morlan. John S. Glaeser. H. A. C. Hasty. Thos. Dyson. Wm. Record. Harrison Bodkins. Elias L. Kozee. Josephus Waldo David M. Hurst. Dennis Springer. George Lafever. J. S. Day. A. J. Stark. Richard Prigmore.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. W. H. Irwin. J. A. Trine. 294. Jno. Q. Shepherd. H. E. Shepherd. 295. H. W. Kneirim. Marion Marshall. 299. W. M. Barringer. W. M. Boyd. Fred Gharst. Edw. S. Hitchins. Jno. R. Keane. C. Fred Kinzel. Louis A. Lehnherr. Wm. O. Miller. Jno. W. Moore. Jos. W.Sanborn. Edw. Stine. Frank T. Taylor. 303. Geo. T. Farrar. Jos. E. Harding. Jno. L. Nuckolls. Arthur Pollard. Wm. T. Rakestraw. Per Swainson. N. L. Winston. C. S. Welton. 305. Wm. T. Bowen. . Geo. W. Boring. James Carty. James Livingston. 306. V. L. Harris. C; I. Anderson. 308. G. B. Duke. S. T. Harris. J. S. Taylor. W. WI. West. 309. Job Slack. Anderson D. Clark. 310. . W. F. Shanks. Wm. H. McKnight. Jno. E. Marshall. 312. Ebb. Rogers. S. G. Pounds. 316. Wm. Barton. C. F. Brower. F. P. Clark. A. E. Erickson. Sanmuel Inman. Julius Jacobs. C. W ..Johnson. Amos D. Johnson.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Jno. W. Kirk. S. L. Rainey. J. F. Spalding. Alfred Taylor. 318. G. D. Shannon. 320. Wm. A. Martin. Isom J. Looney. 321. F. M. Hall. J. C. Carver. 323. C. F. Buchanan.. Isadore M. Wiener. M. C. Reefer. Wm. Dischert. 324. .lames L. Root. Wm. C. Perry. 325. E. C. Williams. Alfred Ward. 326. F. O. Craig. Thos. M. Cooper. 327. W. T. Freeze. Paul Smith. B. B. Carter. C. N. Henry. 328. J. H. Baker. 329. E. M. Bailey. 331. W. G. Seever. Geo. L. Hammer. O. E. Vandeventer. A. P. Clayton. Luther A. Todd. Jno. E. Krucker. 332. Wm. H. Brennan. J. H. Marshall. 333. J. M. Reynolds. M. L. Coad. Jno. W. Toppass. J. W. :Moser. 334. Isaac W. Harris. S. J. Dewey. J. W. Harrold. L. P. Robinson. 335. Wm. H. Mills. Jno. H. Rood. Ira Schweitzer. E. B. Chestnut. 336. N. H. Harden. Wm. F. Roberts. Jno. A. Toalson. 339. J. O. Stoddard. 340. Jno. P. Edwards. C. I. Guy. Leslie Hopkins.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. C. E. Van Deusen. C. A. Sanford. Robt. Anderson. Campbell Chapman. Richard Smith. 341. D. B. Osterhout. 342. H. G. Clyde. 345.. Z. T. Blackwell. Jno. H. Spencer. 348. Geo. W. Wade. L. W. Tandy. 350. J. K. Swegar. 352. Jno. T. Walker. 353. Landon Copeland. 354. R. J. Mitchell. J. F. Llewellyn. Frank Goodson. Jesse Goodson. 355. H. T. Mitchell. 359. Lee Clopton. 360. Alex S. Work. J. W. Bowman. Jno. H. Terry. F. H. Britton. Lewis Lippman. Wm. H. Mayfield. Henry C. Weber. Edw. T. Campbell. Brandt Van Blarcom. Theo. S. Huey. Saml. M. Kennard. Thos. B. Taylor. Ben Blewett. James W. Hall. E. M. Hubbard. A. E. Lindsley. A. M. Weiss. J. B. Cozzens: Abram D. Ross. Dent H. Robert. 363. B. L. Lewis. 364.' Dennis Payne. J. W. Harrison. 366. Chas. E. Heinzman. Henry Nichols. Henry Kehl, Jr. F. C. Mason. 368. W. H. DeArmond. 370. John Ford. 371. J. D. Hendrix. John Croy. 372. Geo. H. Clark.

201


Appendix

202 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 375. Solomon Bartlett. Albert Christeson. 376. Benj. W. Benight. 377. M. E. Pickard. 379. J. E. Williams. 380. A. B. McCormack. 383. W. F. LeFontaine. Jno. T. McCory. 385. Geo. W. McMillan. 388. J. F. Heare. 389. A. O. Harris. S. R. Piles. 390. Arthur Benjamin. Wm. Houston. 393. R..F. Asbury. W. C. James. 399. Am. Fluharty. H. Clay Wright. 400. L. L. L. Allen. Abner Gates. N. J. Perrott.' Jno. W. Taylor. W. W. Rodman. 401. M. V. James. Wm. M. Scott. 402. A. L. Hawkins. 404. R. T. Huffman. 406. Gilbert T. Penny. L. H. Vancleve. 407. Thos. J. Dalton. L. Danforth. 408. E. J. Dearinger. 409. Joseph Young. 411. J. S. Lathrom. James T. Wood. 412. P. C. Mendenhall. C. D. Short. L. L. Laney. 413. J esse Brady. W. P. Hayzlett. 414. A. M. Cowell. David Brown. 415. Wm. P. Janes, Sr. 416. H. C. Sappington. J. M. Maple. F. D. Baldwin. A. Van Clossman. Jno. J. Hare. Irene Lauer. J. M. Rempp.

w...

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. C. E. Bergfeld. Wm. H. Green. J. T. Parker. 417. W. J. Poston. 418. E. H. Moxley. 419. C. S. Reading. 420. Wm. Shults. Fridolin Spraul. Benj. Fath. L. Fuetterer. Louis Bauman. Geo. R. Jansen. H. F. Bennholz. 422. A. J. Combs. Geo. W. Turner. W. B. Robberson. H. C. Sprinkle. Geo. W. Adams.. 426. Chas. T. Underwood. 427. Fred England. Jno. H. Rambo. 428. Benj. F. Simmons. 429. H. McGee. 431. Walter Beaman. 432. Chas. Waterworth. 433. Jno. D. Osborn. 434. Geo. W. Babb. 436. Peter Dell. 437. Wm. B. Cobb. 440. J. V. Slinkard. .J. C. Ridings. J. A. Richards. W.G. Waldo. 442. J. B. Brown. J. J. Davis. 443. Jno. L. Botticher. C. S. Burge. David Coleman. H. J. B. Waldapfel. Thos. Brooks. Chas. V. Mersereau. G. L. Praul. E. McLaughlin. H. G. Milligan. Edw. T. Haase. 444. Napoleon B. Pigg. 445. Chas. J. Fox. R. J. Yeoman. Albert W. Other. Elmer McDermott.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Andrew路 Rawson. E. C. Stubbs. F. F. Bierce. . 446. J. R. Knox. Jno. E. Peschmann.路 Jno. V. Sibley. Julius Pohl. J. R. Kerr. H. E. Mercer. H. J. Heins. Thos. E. Tregemba. A. H. Hartwig. Wm.. J. Morgan. 448.. Byron Robinson. Squire B. Talmadge. 449. Wm. Morton. D. G. Hendrix. Wm. Steele. 450. Wm. N. Young. 453. L. H. McHaffie. W'. B. Coble. 454. J. D. Flanders. 456. F. A. Paxton. 457. H. M. Godfrey. 459. A. Rohrbacher. 460. Wm. Ambruster. Chas. Battersby. Chas. BIitt. 461. H. N. Downing. Chas. E. Martin. 462. Jno. S. Drake. 464. W. C. Sodemann. . 466. iC. L. Washbourne. 467. R. Porter Reed. Moses R. Viles. 468. Jno. D. Patten. 470. J. G. Thornhill. J. H. Killian. 473. Jno. E. Moseley. H. Humphrey. 475. Jacob Cornwell. Geo. W. Holliday. 476. .J. H. Christy. L. F. Benning. 477. Edw. L. Sickles. 478. Owen Webb. J. S. Barrow. 479. Joseph Lewis. D. H. Wilson. J. T. Van Benthusen.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 480. Robt. Bronaugh. Geo. Rowe. E. E. Deaheim. 481. C. E. Beckman. Wm. A. Shelton. O. G. Jordan. Jno. T. Wallar. C. Leppler. Wm. R. McCormick. 482. J. M. White. Jno. W. GilJ.}in. 484. H. S. Morrison. Mark Taylor. Wm. R. May~. 486. Jno. W. Stigall. N. C. Cunningham. H. C. Landrum. 487. H. Pence. 488. J. B. Ferguson. 489. R. D. Capps. 492. S. J. Burch. 494. John 路Copple. W. T. Landreth. W. A. Turpin. 495. Albert A. Pease. 496. L. D. Haskins. 501. J. M. Adams. 502. W. P. Johnson. R. S. Simmons. 504. Wm. P. Brightwell. W. T. Jenkins. Wm. M. Paxton. Campbell Wells. R. P. C. Wilson. 506. J. A. Scruggs. E. K. Bedford. O. B. Sweat. 509. Roy Henderson. Jno. Cooper. 510. W. G. Warren. 511. T. P. Moorhead. A. C. Barber. 512. J. W. Aylor. A. A. Hulett. 513. L. A. Montgomery. M. E. Challaind. 515. Thos. J. Porter. 517. J. H. Carden. 520. Hans Sauermann. Edmond路 J eanneret.

203


204 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Robt. Grunz. 522. Thos. J. Scott. H. H. Reed. A. G. Liddle. B. C. Scott. Ben R. Snell. 524. Wm. H. Brewer. John Moore. 525. Wm. Bristow. 526. J. C. O'Neal. 527. J. E. Rucker. J. C. Cain. 532. Wm. Kirkpatrick. 534. Chas. E. Wood. D. 1. Furbeck. 535. Samuel Cummins. 536. Mathew Scanlon. 536. P. J. Hopkins. J. D. Johnson. 539. A. W. Marple. 543. Moses White. Johnson Cassida. 545. Oscar N. West. James Woods. 547. E. D. McElroy. J. L. McQuary. 548. Wm. Goforth. Peter GuiIloz. E. E. Spore. 549. J. M. Dovey. 550. Walter L. Gilliam. Jno. T. Wallace. Edmond O. Pope. Eugene Kessel. Wm. T. Dowdall. Ernest C. Farley. 552. J. Wm. Brown. 553. W. H. Jobe. F. M. Martin. 554. Sam P. Wilson. H. H. Havely. 555. S. F. Moore. Jno. Q. Hamilton. 556. Albert Woods. 558. Wm. B Cochran. E. T. Foxwell. J. H. Parker. Wm. Scott. 560. Lewis Richardson. 563. S. G. Marshall. Thos. D. Miller.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. M. R. Glaze. E. K. Nelson. 564. Jonathan McClure. Chas. Wilson. 570. L. T. Robertson. Wm. B. Barron. 574. H. Ctay Mitchell. 576. Wm. We Caruthers. F. H. Dinstbeir. 578. C. C. DeWitt. 58l. C. Jesse Rush. 582. Jno. E. Harden. 583. Jno. Payton. 584. Wm. Breuer. 585. Wm. T. Lott. 589. David Smittle. 590. Jno. W. McKinley. 59l. F. M. Strong. Clarence Cox. 593. Geo. W. Link. 594. B. F. Marshall. 595. Jackson Denton. 596. Wm. Carlin. G. T. Waller. 599. Jno. L. Moore. 60l. L. L. Jacobs. Linton Robinson. Lee Barton. Chas. E. Gibson. C. P. Scott. 602. L. G. Courts. 604. S. Y. Thompson. 605. H. Mount. 607. F. M. Chilton. 608. Robt. Thomas. Wm. T. Hankins. 610. R. W. Barry. Lon O'Neal. 612. Mort Stallard. 613. Jno. H. Moore. H. C. Gradwohl. L. R. Hicks. E. A. Auerswald. 614. Newton Bird. 618. Coleman B." Dyer. 620. D. E. Ross. J. T. Watson. 621. G. F. Allman. 622. Geo. W. Ball. 623. 11'. M. Moore. 625. Wm. 1. Hall.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 626. L. V. Cotner. Glen R. Smith. 632. Linn Relfe. 633. J. J. Berry.

Appendix

205

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 635. Samuel Messersmith. 640. Valentine Fuerstenfeld. 641. Isaac A. Kidwell. 642. Alfred S. Reed.

SUSPENDED FOR NON-PAYMENT OF DUES. No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 1. E. J. Batchler. , W. S. Blair. J. W. Dickey. Leon J. Doyon. Alfred' Gfeller. C. S.Jones. Geo. J. C. Larsen. Edw. E. Lee. G. R. Moses. R. A. S. Rishani. W. F. Rolf. W. J. Studt. W. H. Trienens. W. R. Wilkinson. 5. if. H. Black. Wm. S. Dancey. Chas. I. Moore. Frank P. Moore. J. P. Murphy. L. H. Musgrave. F. E. Nason. F. A. Swanger. P. S. Tevis. G. E. Vogle. Wm. R. Walter. F. M. Wolf. C. W. Wray. Raymond Wray. 7. W. W. Hamilton. F. A. S. Brown. 8. Maurice Books. 9. C. S. Biser. W. H. Douglass. W. J. Davis. E. T. Estey. Edw. O. Harrs, Jr. Chas. W. Horn. Geo. O. Luckie. Edw. Thuermer. F. C. White.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 13. J. L. Stanton. 14. J. W. Calloway. 15. G. L. Carey. 16. J. C. Smith. 19. J. L. Fisher. Geo. S. McGee. W. A. Fell. Wm. H. Stone. 20. Leo Rosenberg. 23. J. W. Lyon. R. E. Tipton. C. J. Chappell. A. C. Crabtree. 25. J. H. Long. Wm. G. Slusser. Wm. C. Bischopp. C. F. Baker. 28. R. E. Bridges. Chas. Lindstrom. Jno. C. Martin. A. H. Richmond. 29. W. F. Cooper. 30. O. R. O'Bryan. H. L. Terry. R. G. Terrill. J. W. Taylor. W. Rutherford. N. A. Matlock. J. P. Ruthvin. O. C. Head. 33: N. M. Herron. S. J. Kraft. E. C. Pennington. F. M. Wicks. 36. F. E. Am. J. E. Campbell. H. M. Findley. 37. T. J. Ducoing. '40. Chas. J. Berg. A. W. Turner.


206 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 43. A. L. Minor. D. W. Peters. Wm. S. Eckels. Thos. H. Rogers. 45. C. J. Busch. J; T. Davenport. F. C. Seeger. 47. J. M. McDonald. 18. A. L. Hallquest. L. I. McQueen. C. E. Rowell. 52. B. O. Austin. Gilbert Christmas. B. F. Guy. W. S. Miller. W. R. Powell. Jno. Templeton. Emmett Benson. H. T. Kendrick. F. E. Lovell. Walter Williams. R. C. Williams. 57. Ceo. W. Crowley. Wm. Pickering. 59. J.A. Mimms. Aug. Sanders. G. B. Harshbarger. A. Fowler Connell. 60. P. A. Cain. C. S. Standifer. 62. J. C. Adams. J. C. Daniel. J. S. Davis. J. W. Wright. H. F. Lytle. 66. A. F. Miller. C. M. Thurber. 68. U. A. V. Presnell. 72. M. J. Raines. R. F. Ammons. J. A. Gunnell. 74. C. G. Staples. 77. T. L. Morrison. C. H. Hibler. 78. Harry Clergy. S. W. Corbin. W. C. Seiglar. 79. 1. N. Craig. Stephen Doughton. 80. Louis Haas.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 83. Jno. T. Wark. J. H. Shannon. 84. R. S. Rauschkolb. W. C. Lang. P. H. Roberts. 86. B. E. Noland. 87. D. JiJ, Bowman. John Bell. M. Foncannon. T. D. Finley. J. H. Hulburt. Jno. Harris. E. Krone. Wm. Ladd. S. S: Meade. J. P. McReynolds. J. M. Morris, Jr. J esse Morris. D. R. Miller. Chas. A. Myers. J. W. McBride. Ceo. M. Preston. R. C. Pyle. P. G. Spencer. 88. J. E.Engle. .Ceo. Boatman. C. A. Wake. F. O. Eaton. 89. M. A. Freeman. W. R. Watterson. 92. J. T. Snead. 93. E. C. Dodson. W. C. Bain. 99. O. G. Hillhouse. C. G. Morgan. V,T. L. Boucher. Oliver Harges. J. P. Holland. Mac Finch. C. B. Quinton. 100. , Albert Ca'nnon. Ed S. Finch. Thos. B. Holder. Chas. Koppell. Chas. Murray. Alfred Page. W.B,Weygandt. J. H. Williams. Ross Essex. A. B. Wilkerson.

[Sept.


1917;] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 10l. S. W. Stone. Leslie Snow. Wm. F. Graham. 103. Roscoe Limbaugh. M. B. Limbaugh'. 104. J os. Arnheim. R. 1... Boyd. Samuel Frank. P. F. Mellinghaus. C. H. Croxton. 105. R. H. Giltner. S. M. Pickler. E. A. Roddy. W. F, Sawyer. 106. J. H. Stone. 107. C. W. Wallis. 110. F. A.,Toler. 11l. W. D. Benge. J. A. Hughes. F. M. Pa'rks. H. C. Wlfigh t. 114. N. G. M. Davis. H. H. Davis. A. F. Everhart. C. C. Freely. W. L. Hays. E. C. Hawkins. D. W. B. Kurtz, Jr. Frank Kurtz. Clarence Kerfoot. Oscar McNear. A. W. Pasley. Alex Petty. W. G. Stephenson. J. W. Schwabe. T. T. Scott. Chas. Wingo. O. E. DeWerthern. W. D. Gilstrap. D. H. Rowland. Emmett Hawkins. 115. Thos. J. Roberts. M. B. Paige. 116. L. V. Hassell. 118. Mike Coffman. W. Z. Hubbard. 119. Wm. T. Huskey. .Jno. F. McBroom. Frank路 Pickles. 120. P. T. Ford. R. S. Johnson.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 12l. F. J. Cartall. W. H. Moellman. Isadore Spiro. 126. Geo. W. Emberton. Thos. H. Patterson. Reuben Payne. "Vrn. Johnson. Geo. C. E:rnberton. 130. Eugene Franklin. Wm. Ellis. 13l. R. Q. Allee. 132. C. W. Shannon. B. R. Downing. T. R. Lloyd. 136. F. P. Grau. R. Maxfield. D. L. Nicholas. H. O. Sisson. -137. W. J. Marshall. R. B. Parker. 1. C. Henry. A. B. Carter. 145. A. P. Bowles. Addison V. Bowles. J. A. Craven. O. C. McBride. John Sliger. James West. 146. J. P. Vanskike. J. A. White. )47. M. H. Prewitt. 155. W. H. Anderson. Chas. Cooper. Joe Francis. W.. A. Sparks. 158. J. T. Purselly. M. M. Washburn. 163. W. D. Evans. W. A. McDonald. 164. H. R. Lloyd. Harmon lVIcCulloch. 166. W. H. Hughes. 169. Thos. Fairhurst. M. A. Shortridge. J. A. Vestal. W. S. Perrin. 17l. Jno. P. Bramhall: 177. M. W. Maples. 179. Geo. F. Bader. Harry Stahl. H. C. Buente.

207


208 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. E. S. Ward. Wm. P. Sachs. H. M. Sinnard. 181. A. C. Ely. L. M. Norris. R. A. Poor. S. E. Swan. 188. C. C. Griffith. J. C. Leonard. B. W. Saunders. Geo. L. Hale. H. L. Tate. Geo. B. Treat. C. L. Corin. M. A. Farrell. N. L. Vannoy. 189. Thos. Shaffer. H. A. Doyle. M. Sodowsky. G. A. Everest. E. H: Favor. M. N. Hanna. 195. H. L. Cary. N. N. Kinder. J. B. Logan. 200. James White. Frank Tinney. 204. F. D. Bruce. G. N. Arnold. D. C. Leave!. C. G. Stafford. B. 'V. Stafford. O. C. Stagner. A. Wadell. W. C. Warren. S. G. Jones. 206. Burl VaJ;ner. Wilford Young. 212. W. D. Beasley. Ab. McBride. J. F. Brown. H. B. Short. Otto C Williams. Chas. B. Winston. Oscar Hostettler. 214. Nevil Dickson. 216. W. H. Briscoe. R. E. Calloway. F. E. Coffee. C. J. Dougherty. Lawson Frazier. A. J. Herren.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. W.P.Kemp. C. J. Pearson. 219. H. A. Drake. Henry E. Moss. Wm. G. Eads. Geo. B. Orr. Geo. L. Hathaway. Edwin S. Vincil. 220. Robt. Douglas. W. L. Young. H. L. Williams. P. D. Rouse. '1路hos. W. Ford. Chas. A. Ringo. V. E. Steen. H. S. Heitzberg. H. A. Pontious. 222. Wm. B. Anderson. C. J. Kendrick. 225. E. A. Duncan. Wm. S. Elayer. J. H. Monegan. David Williams. 229. W. B. Holt. W. E. Hall. E. L. Hendryx. J. C. Bledsoe. J. A. Thornton. 232. Jno. T. Hunter. 233. C. L. Hess. G. E. Lathrop. F. C. Stine. Jno.. D. Shook. W. G. Hughes. 236. F. J. Cornelson. 241. Martin Meyers. 243. D. C. Gilleland. Robt. McConnell. P. A. Mansfield. A. A. Myers. C. E. Lazier. Geo. A. Carpenter. Geo. L. Gloor. Chas. F. Haanel. Chas. F. Roberts. D. F. Sheridan. A. G. Sudheimer. 245. D. N. Saults. 247. Melvin Peed. Robt. Cole. D. T. Ward. 250. Peter Bechtle.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Chas. E. Cochran. 252. R. T. Judd. Eli Jennings. J. U. Denham. Robt. Yeager. 253. E. M. Moore. Sherman Wood. J. A. Ziegler. Ge.o. W. McKay. Ray Yambert. Daniel Walters. George Louiselle. Delbert Kelso. J. F. McClanahan. Ben F. Stone. Joseph F. Kemp. 254. L. G. Bynum. C. P. Catron. 255. T. J. Vannoy. 259. C. W. Burnett. Bennett Wardlow. L. B. Wide!. 260. Hugo Dubbert. 265. O. H. Brock. W. C. Duncan. 266. W. G. Talcott. 267. Hugh W. David. 268. E. A. Funkqouser. F. Z. Williamson. S. S. Hanks. C. W. Yost. U. F. Ketchum. C. M.Maggart. 269. W. H. Hendrickson. T. B. Morris. M. F. Johnson. 271. W. J. Althaus. J. W. Brownlow. J. L. Barker. E S. Baity. C. H. Clarke. A. W. Chandler. H. F. Fellows. B. F. Fortner. W. S. Hampton. T. C. Hunter. F. W.Hunt. C. L. Jarrett. R. B. Kite. Wm. H. Kreider.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. L. J. Kent. Leon Kahn. H. A. Lowe. J. H. Morrow. W. A. McClellan. J. T. Neville.. C. M. Paxson. G. H. Packwood. F. E. Rossback. W. H. Sharrett. Roy Stewart. W.M.Tull. R. S. Weddle. A. H. Walker. J. M. Wilkerson. W. B. Elkins. 272. E. D. Bosserman. E. B. Herndon. C. H. Tomer. Walter Pettey. A. Chancey. H. B. Mayhew. D. P. Farrell. 274. J.A.Roney. 277. H. H. Simpson. 279. Josias Ketchum. 281. F. C. Eaves. Jno. E. Nelson. 282. Thos. W. Dolan. Abe Pearl. O. H. Werner. 289. B. F. Carey. 292. Jno. P. Thompson. 293. J. W. Arnold. C. P. Stevens. W. R. Marsden. Walter Mosier. Ed Hudson. F. O. Gustafson. A. P. Borger. M. E. Oliver. 296. F. R. Beamon. W.A. Hale. W. A. Merritt. J. C. St. John. 298. James Brickey. Alex Crumley. Erastus May. Richard J. Rimer. S. D. Robbirds.

209


210 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Geo. W,. Schofield. Enoch路 J. Taylor. 299. Geo. Anderson, Jr. J. G. Bissell. Wm..J. Brady. W.D.Ege. H. P.Green. Geo. P. Hardesty. Wm. R. Hunter. A. W.Lewis. W. A. Logan. W. R. Moshier. H. E. Pearse. John Russell, Jr. W. K. Sellon. S. S. Stitt. H. P. Topping. Jno. A. Yates. 301. M. A. Gray. Frank Pierce. C. A. Perki路ns. Jacob Everhart. Henry Hubbard. O. S. McMillan. Ed Patton. A. S. Blagg. 303. Geo. E. Forney. J. W. Smith. 304. Chas. Hall. E. B. Boydston. 305. Aaron Lewis. Earl 1. Willey. 306. J. M. Jenkins. 307. F. S. Alexander. .Wm. H. Owen. H. A. Bartell. R. S. Cole. Wm. G. Harvey. 308. Oliver Bray. B. A. Clark. R. V. Hart. C. H. Johnston. C. F. Pemberton. Geo. T. Prewitt. Thos. Pittman. Ira B. Williams. 309. Abner B. Bales. W. P. Hunt. Geo. C. Hunt. 313. S. L. Parrott.

Appendix No. of Lodge. . Name of Party. Wm. Morris. Jno. Hall. L. B. Glass. D. A. Nance. W. P. Brega. 316. E. M. Dunphy. W. M. Goold. F. A. Hurlbut. M. M. Pehl. R. H. Simmons. Will R. Thorp. W. O. Tobias. E. W. Tschudy. R. F. Wise. 317. Thos. H. Welch. L. B. Hatch. P. S. Duncan. W. M. Keesaman. D. D. Asbury. Ralph Hughes. J. J. Baxter. Cliff Hawn. 318. O. N. Jones. Jno. Sherrod. 323. H. F. Vogel. Chas. Herd. Geo. H. Hannon. Wm. A. Hardaway. 329. Thos. F. Imel. Van D. Swearingen. C. E. Beaver. R. C. Holliday. Wm. l'. Gray. Jno. E. Scott. 331. Wm. J. Bell. B. C. Biggerstaff. Geo. F. Foster. Geo. W. Frans. Geo. E. Klass. C. C. Pierce. F. F. Sturgis. E. P. Weatherby. A. E. Willis. 333. J. H. Cutten. 335. C. C. Carter. 337. Levi Gore. F. M. Junkins. L. W. Pryor. A. W. Thomas. G. C. Fryatt.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 340. R. B. Edwards. C. M. Lewis. M. A. Berkowitz. R. E. Booth. R. A. Curtis. L. A. Etwein. Stone Hastain. U. H. Hosterman. Wm. Campbell. M. B. Locke. 343. C. N. Shelton. L. N. Tivis. A. L. Trent. 345. J. C. Finke. Jno. T. Hollinger. O. E. Lichliter. Jno. L. Perry. E. C. Pfenning. R. R. Trimble. W. W. '\VJ'illiams. 349. Thos. Franklin. Addison Bartlett. Brandon Saulsberry. 350. Chas. E. Kenney. 351. W. M. Coughlin. 352. E. O. Lawing. M. A. Stapp. J. C. West. C. C. Woody. 353. Wm. H. Botkin. F. B. Moore. 354. C. R. Hanger. W. F. Atkinson. M. B. Guthrie. C. W. Gaither. S. W. Hayne. B. Y. McIntosh. W. J. McLoney. Jno.T.Mason. O. E. Morris. G. F. Rodhouse. A. H. Whitney. T. B. Willis. 355. J. H. Bruce. S. P. Newman. J. S. Boker. D. L. Everly. D. A. Collins. Geo. D. Sympson. A. M. Gustin.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 360. Jno. H. Alexander. ,Wm. C. Erp. Chas.E. Marsh. C. H. MeKeel. Wm. G. Moore, Jr. W. W. Newell. Elmo W. Howell. Wm. F. Scott. 361. A.F.Hunt. B. F. Johnson. 363. Chas. K. Foster. P. B. Spalding. Harvey Pearl, 365. C. M. Nicks. 366. David A. Arnold. W. J. Banning. Henry Calish. 373. W. C. Feuers. M. F. Vaughan. H. W. Alley. C. L. Wright. 376. Benj. H. Threldkeld. 377. Jas. Eubank. 378. J. L. Allenbrand. R. N. Jolly. J. M. Campbell. E. G. Jolly. 380. J. V. Brasfield. E.P.Adams. J. P; Logan. T. L. Floyd. W. A. Hartford. 381. ,H. J. Corwin. Geo. W. McDole. J. E. Cotter. Allan Oviatt. W. R. George. E. D. Stiffles. B. M. Houser. 389. J. C. Bumgarner. G. E. Boyle. L. C. Johnson. Joe Thomas. 390. N. H. McNeal. Geo.. W. Woodward. Henry Eckhart. 397. C. A. Brakeman. Jacob S. Bretz. 403. W.D.Bunch. S.B. Davis.

211


212 No. of' Lodge. Name of Party. J. L. Davis. W. E. Taylor. La Rue Reading.. 407. Geo. W. Barber. Wm. F. Boone. Edw. J. Allen. 410. J. J. Alexander. J. W. Burton. G. E. Watkins. 412. Elmer Middlecoff. 413. S. B. Floyd. 415. W. R. Harvey. R. C. Kent-. F. N. Painter. E. N. Newton. 416. Geo. 路W. Bader. Thos. W. Galbraith. M. B. Sullivan. 417. G. O. Jeffries. 419. Ed .story. 420. W. S. Burrows. H. C. Hartmann. H. L. Heining. A. H. Heisler. H. F. Hines. R. L. Orcutt. Geo. R. Potts. H. W. Swint. J. B. Trimier. 421. Chas. E. Jackson. Jno. W. Moore. 422. Jacob Speer. Roy McKee. 426. Chas. Padgett. Chas. Ring. 428. M. C. Bell. J. S. Fortney. W. S. Hampton. Wm. D. McCarty. R. A. Peery. 430. F. M. Jones. 431. L. W.Hyde. D. C. Johnson. John Yehle. S. L. Brock. D. T. Dryer. W. T. Cowden. W. B. Glover. 435. .Jasper Ans路on. Chas. L. Sherman. Geo. Farris.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Ed Kellicutt. Geo. Price. 437. Jno. D. Peeples. 443. Aug. Bush. H. B. Young. D. P.Ford. 444. Henry Gibson. Thos. Alexander. Fred Buckman. 445. F. M. Chambers. Nicholas Staab. 446. R. S. Fink. F. A. Gavin. Fred E. Geiss. C. M. Harris. C. C. Jones. W. F. Kintz. C. H. Payson. Wm.A.Poe. Harry Pouder. J. W. Ritchey. O. M. Sherman. J. L. Ward. A. F. Whelan. 448. A. J. Boatright. 456. J. W. Dutcher. W.T. Wyano R. L. Hogue. 459. F. A. Williams. Thos. E. Hargus. S. L. Killion. 460. A. N. Sager. L. H. Rotrack. H. W. Femmer. 462. Baxter McCutchen. 463. Wm. Bailey. E. B. Culpepper. Robt. Hall. Sam F. Hall. G. W. Moorhead. E. T. Woldridge. A. L. Walters.' 464. J. L. Hinck. 467. H. V. Grove. M. E. Bryant. 4io. David Munn. Jno. W. Munn. H. A. Denton. L. C. White. 476. Wm. McElmurray. E. D.Fear.

[Sept.


1917. ] No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 477. N. G. Bowers. Paul H. Davis. Wm. H. Farmer. G. B. Holland. S. E. Holland. 478. J. N. Mize. Wm. McDavitt. C. E. Lundy. J. A. Coats. Mike Colgan. S. G. Bass. 479. A. S. Barrows. 481. Alex Leffler. 482. J. C. Nafus. 484. Wm. E. Reed. 493. Omar Blevens. G. R. Butcher. J. S. Childs. Milton Crum.. G. H. Green. C. E. Hudson. J. L. Skaggs. 498. Jno. A. Ford. 508. E. C. Saxton. G. A. Gregory. 509. Jno. Jordan. 516. James O'Connor. Jno. Fisher. 519. Jno. A. Collins. Isaac Lockhart. Alex Wilkins. 520. P. A. Janis. 521. Richard Carter. E. F. Starr. 522. Ben M. Bolton. A. W. 'Edwards. C. F. Gehring. Thos. J. Griffith. H. C. Parkinson. L. C. Richtmyer.. Gus H Saunders. Wm. H. SpiIJer. Qeo. C. Stephens. E. B. Wilkerson. 525. Joseph Barnhart. Ralph Noble. B. F. Northcott. 529. Joseph S. Payne. 534. B. A. Thurmond. Benj. Kochs. 536. J. R. Landrum.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Pilrty. C. W. Ward. 537. F. O. Brothers. Geo. W. Kraft. W. Ed Young. J. H. Bauer. Sylvanus Bragg. J. P. Claggett. Wm. Cotton. O. W. Pickett. 542. Leo Kohn. 543. Wm. H. Moore. 545. W. P. Barnes. E. M. Bess. D. M. Owens. John Thomas. 547. Jno. W. Arnold. Clayton' Bell. O. V. Dodge, Jr. B. H. Findlay. M. E. Kinsley. F. E. McDowell. H. C. Orr. Jno. L. Peppard. A. E. Pursel. R. Reyburn. Fred Schwartz. H. Schwartz. S. H. Smith. M. E. White. 548. J. J.路Chastain. Max Jacoby. Maj. Thos. Day. 550. C. L. Bollinger. A. H. Kohlmeyer. L. H. Campbell. Wm. H. Carruthers. Geo. G. Damon. C. M. McDavis. 556. L, D. Terry. 1. S. Goodwin. Wm. H. Green. 558. Forest Brown. Paul Jeffries. 560. J. R. Barron. 563. A. F ..Bobrink. Jacob Carey. E. T. Combs. J. E. Cooper. J. K. Elwood. A. L. Hearst. Albert H. Lau.

213


Appendix

214 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. M. J. McKinnon. E. C. Peterson. Jno. H. Sharp. Ulysses G. Smith. 564. Jerome Stovall. W. D. Shuler. Davies Hill. 565. H. N. Roberts. W. H. Roberts. 573. W. L. Smith. W. E. Edmonds. 578. E. L. Myers. E. P. Wickersham. G. R. Williams. 579. !:S. F. Bowman. R. D. Kennedy. 581. Hawk Murphy. J. M. Massingale. 582. L. R. Meredith. R. D. Vvely. 583. N. L. Johnson. Geo. N. Walters. L. E. Medlin. 586. W. E. Robbins. R. O. Thomas. 587. N. H. Hartzell. L. T. Michel. M. W. Jones. 590. A. J. Cook. J. H. Vaughn. W. L. Goodman. 594. M. R. Burks. 595. W. S. Roberts.

[Sept.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. C. S. Roberts. Jno. Howard. 602. C. E. Barkshire. Jno. T. Esrey. E. T. Walters. W. W. Garth, Jr. J. D. Lee. H. K. Thatcher. Proctor Thompson. 603. Chas. N. Kelley. 604. Geo. Hortleder. P. A. Kuehneman. 606. Wm. Smith. Emmett Van Wormer. 610. M. M. Pumphrey. 613. P. L. Cameron. Alex Donaldson. 617. B. G. Gray. Albert M. Jackson. W. S. Jarvis. Morris H. Towne. 619. W. E. Burris. H. W. Estes. 621. L. M. Woolley. R. D. Sanders: A. M. Mitchell. 622. F. H. Baskin. J. G. Chadwell. 624:- T. V. Cahill. 627. W. D. Campbell. 630. Edwin Davies. Jno:W. Lubrich.

SUSPENDED FOR UNMASONIC CONDUCT. No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 96. Samuel Robirds. 99. Hub H. Jones. 135. Chas. T. Ellsaesser. 166. Jno. M. Downing. 290. H. Huntley.

No. of Lodge.. Name of Party. 509. Fred M. Moss. 563. Walter E. Sayman. 611. Wm. R. Hodge. 617. Thos. H. Smith.. 623. C. A. Biggs.


1917.]

Appendix

EXPELLED, No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 16. Jno. L. Johnson. 40. Chas. B. Cornwell. 57. Earl R. Cowden. 63. James N. Doak. 77. Wm. J. Key. 158. F. M. Gasperson. C. M. Mitchell. 210. B. H. Bonfoey. 212. Albert Stanley. 226. Jno. M. Shirley. 227. James Frank Weaver. 232. C. C. Hopkins. 256. Aug. Beyer. R. B. Vollmar. 276. Jas. E. Parsons. 299. C. R. Harrison.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 303. M. L. Mertins. 344. H. T. Adams. 354. W. H. C. Deissel. 403. W. E. Hillegas. 420. Geo. R. Pohlman. 460. J. T. Patterson. 461. R. H. Cotham. 484. J. R. Harper. 521. James Gallagher. 522. Wm. E. Merrill 561. Alex Smith. 566. Chas. M. Summers" 581. George Hunt. 597. George Harris. 603. Jno. M. Murphy.

REINSTATED, No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 1. H. C. Harris. A. F. Ranck. J. B. Prichard. Wm. J. Say. Dennis O'Brien.. C. J. Watts. D. L. Park. J. H. Magnus. Thos. S. McInroy. H. Greensfelder. R. H. Dowling. J. W. Pollard. Jos. Plechaty. C. F. Bookman. F. W. Krementz. 5. R. A. Johnston. Wm. Simms. C. M. Bennett. E. M. Hawkins. Jno. C. Day. Jos. Fisher. 9. A. R. Florschutz. R. M. Pringle. W. T. Burdick. 10. Grover Quigley. 12. Irving Bean.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Emmett Bean. 16. C. Bourn. F. B. Quick. O. E. Mankopf. L. H. Secord. R. W. Saunders. 20. Isaac Boasberg. 25. ArmenTraxler. 26. Geo. W. Johnson. 33. Wm. T. Clark. 36. Lafayette Johnson. 40. V. B. Cosby. C. D. Curtis. Herbert Coombs. B. E. Patterson. Jno. E. Eavenfight.路 F. E. Drews. 41. C. T. Wallen. 43. Chas. H. Curry. 52. E. B. McCorkle. J. A. Lovell. 54. J. H. McVicker. 58. Thos. A. Wright. 59. W. B. Ragsdale. 62. J. R. DeLaney. D. R. Ford.

215


216 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 63. N. J. Cameron. R. J. Marshall. R. J. Stafford. 68. A. H. Hughes. 69. Homer Funderburk. J. B. Phillips. 70. C. L. Snyder. 73. R. L. Sasse. 74. L. W. Bishop. 76. A. L. Nichols. C. H. Van Vleck, Jr. 78. P. C. Becker. Theo. G. Chartrand. Chas: A. Felling. H. W. Shorow.. R. N. Malone. J. H. Wisherd. C. B. Harris. 79. Harry Van Soden. J. T. Marlin. F. W. Valliant. Wm. H. Williams. 82. R. H. Dryden. 84. Wm. A. Blackwell. C. L. Burkart. R. L. Mook. F. R. Millhouse. 86. S. P. Hartman. N. L. Enfield. 8~. Jasper Dowis. 92. J. G. Layton. C. T. Lovell. 93. Fred Obacht. 96. Wm. W. Witchell. 100. . Ed D. Reich. 104. J. G. Chapman. Wm. H. Penfold. 105. R. E. Cunningham. C. A. Gross. L. L. Mikel. H. S:Whitaker. 107. M. L. Rhodes. 109. Edwin Lewis. Geo. T. Rogers. H. L. Powell. 111. J. W. Cremeenes. Ira J. Godfrey: J. J. Simmons. 114. C. L. Torbitt. W. E. Smith. C. E. Garey.

Appendix No. of -Lodge. Name of Party. E. N. Kurtz. A.B.Long. Geo. S. Starrett. 115. L. W. Roberts. 116. G. W. Harmon. J. E. Poe. 118. Thos. Brookshire. L. C. Young. 119. Thos. W. Murray. Wm. C. Schmick. C. Ben Stone. 120. W. E. Broadhurst. Frank Ducret. 12l. M. Christi~nsen. Albert Joern. 126. Wm. DeCapito. 127. J. E. Sims. C. W. McHenry. 129. H. H. Westhay. Arth ur Anderson. Jno. F. Kimes. 130. J. KFoote. L. W. Moore. 133. Jno. B. Greene. 135. W. W. Gilmore. 137. F. H. Lizburn. 14l. R. C. Ervin. Ollie Fritts. A. A. Fritts. Ernest路 Smith. F. E. Bigler. M. E. Greene. J. A. Campbell. Ben Whitmore. J. S. Amyx. Walter Moore. B. F. Davis. 145. Wm. J. Davis. John Burnett. 146. J. M. Banta. 147. Henry C. NaIl. M. H. Brocaw. H. C. Brocaw. 149. J. M. Clayton. S. Boyd White. J. M. Winn. 150. Otis Allen. 152. Harry Churchill. 153. Elisha B. Lincoln. 154. J. P. Eaves. C. A. Robinson.

[Sept.


1917. J. No. of Lodge. Name of Party. J. G. Clark. L. A. Reynolds. C. W. Green.. C. D. Toler. 156. J. WI- Young. 158. R. G. Catron. W. Lyle Ellis. 161. S. H. Hardy. J. T. Benton. John Knox. Eugene Perry. 163. Wm. B. Hays, Jr. 167. Richard I. Triplett. 170. A. M. Meek. 171. Geo. S. Latimer. 172. R. A. Samuel. 175. E. H. Weems. 177. Thos. C. Smith. 178. H. L. Hammonds 179. Wm. Franke. A. B. Carroll. Wrn. J. Kenly. 181. D.A. Brown. 182. J. M. Teague. 187. W. O. McIndoo. E. W. Harvey. 189. M. M. Fitzgerald. 195. Boone Henderson. 200. Ellis Benedict. 205. J. H. Craddock. W. P. Dickson. J. E. McDonald. 207. Marquis D. Isley. Albert C. Reed. 210. Chas. Keene. Wm. Love. Ora R. C. McCalment. .F. O. Middleton. 212. J. N. Duckett. J. D. Faughn. Thos. O. Lord. 213. Harry G. Smith. 214. Edw. Hopper. 216. R. E. Bates. D. E. Riley. Henry Norton. 220. H. E. Taylor. E. M. Vickers. Tennyson Thomas. Wm. Griffin. . Chas. L. Greenwell.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. B. W.Adams. Jno. F. Wingfield. W. K. Reeves. D. T. Jobnston. 222. L. V. Hill. F. J. Wilson. 226. Henry Hooss. 231. J. A. Wells. 236. C. W. Daugherty. Jno. Albers. 237. A. E. Park. 238. J. C. Allison. R. J. White. Thos. W. Wilson. C. L. Henman. R. R. Rose. Isaiah Fowler. A. J. Williams. 241. Jno. F. Bates. Henry Carter. Jno. B. Martin. Joseph H. Weaver. 243. T. M. Doellner. Fredk. Schultz. Chas W. Ste" art. Alfred R. Clarke. Saml. C. Archey. Richard Hickman. 244. Geo. B. Bechtel. Jno. T. Marlow. 245. Frank Rothwell. W. T. Hull. 247. Wm. T. Matters. A. G. Ratliff. Phil Ratliff. A. J. Miller. J. G. Steele. M. E. Benton. A. P. Mason. 252. Nick Nelson. G. B. Nelson. Thad Deal. 253. Wm. P. Ishmael. Jno. B. Pew. Thos. M Thompson. 254. Paul Walton. 255. R. N. Simpson. Hasten Allen. A. J. Stairs. J. F. Acree. E. E. Taggart.

217


218 No. of Lodge. Name of Party. 262. Wm. H. McCoy. 267. W. F. Meyer. S. D. Hartog. E. H. Jones. 269. T. W. Wilkerson. 271. J. S. Pinkerton. O. H. McMurray. W. M. Marsh. E. M. Bacon. J. A. Caboniss. 272. H. B. Smith. Jno. T. Cone. 274. C. F. Gilchrist. 276. H. H. Duncan. 279. J. G. Shelley. W. K. Hart. 280. Jesse M. McKnight. 284. D. B. Loy. L. M.Rhea. 286. W. H. Trolinger. 288. J. H. Childers. 289. G. H. Curnutt. 291. Thos. C. Baker. Wm. H. Fickel. Joseph Hardman. 292. W. G. Merrifield. Edson Vandemark. 299. Edw. D. Benton. B. A. Farley. G. A. Kilpatrick. F. C. McNally. B. F. Mattenlee. R. F. Porter. C. B. Wilson. 303.. Jno. J. Tucker. F. O. Wolfing. 304. Geo. Davis. L. M. Gaines. B. V. Crockett. C. F. Smith. H. Koster. Joseph Vetter. Fred Hellman. Andrew McClusky. 307. James H. Megown. 308. Frank A. Andrews. T. G. Riffie. C. C. Carpenter. J. A. Mitchell. 312. S. R. Avery. R. W. Jones.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. H. L.Montray. 314. Sam Webb. T. R. Holland. 316. Ambrose D. Dale. J. L. Harriman. D. H. Kresky. R. Markgraf. J. R. Oldham. F. A. Russell. J. W. Stevens. 323. Evan Gough. H. W. Blackman. A. H. Lauenborg. Edw. A. Bonner. O. G. Nichols. 329. T. M. Spoor. 331. A. B. Weakley. 333. B. B. Stevens. Guy H. Mansur. 334. J. E. McBrayer. 335. J. M. Maret. M. L. Sternberg. W. F. Cort. D. O. Witmer. Albert Arterburn. 336. Z. W. Weldon. L. E. Phillips. 337. O. M. Lewis. E. E. Goodloe. L. W. Pryor. 338. Jno. H. Leakey. J. C. Jones. 340. Robt. E. G. Houston. Jno. A. Kender. C. E. Blackmar. H. A. Smith. O.路W. Hume. 344. 345. C. M. Balsley. A. D. Kelly. Jno. P. Frank. J. W. McAntire, Jr. C. W. Parsons. 346. Wm. P. Brown. 348. Geo.路R. Gregg. .349. Guy Crawford. 350. Hugo Smith. 359. T. E. Stovall. 360. Wm. S. Slifer. Rufus L. Taylor. A. W. Sanders. Jno. L. Pierson.

[Sept.


1917.] No. of 路Lodge. Name of Party. C. E. Lightfoot. 363. Orville Alexander. Wm. Davis. C. W. Thurmond. Lewis Moseley. 365. B. W. Wells. J. M. Kesner. 367. A. S. Burnett. 368. W. H. Twyman. 369. Jno. H. Nunnellee. A. P. Russell. 372. Adolphus Rehder. 375. Wm. P. Trower. 378. L.Q:Long. 380. J. S.'Casper. 38l. W. F. Fogleman. B. L. Johnson. S. B. LaBelle. 383. Thos. McKinney. J. M. Plummer. 388. A. V. Fore. 393. H. C. Garrett. W. T. Walker. 396. Wm. E. Marsh. 400. M. J. Needham. R. F. George. 403. J. W. Phillips. 405. Ed H. Cavender. Geo. H. Cotter. 407. J. C. Crenshaw. 412. R. P. Schuchman. 413. W. A. Rhodes. 417. Ollie Crum. 418. W. E. Benz. Jos. W. Gray. Geo. 1. Dillon. 419. W. B. Hill. M. L. Freeman. 420. J. J. Pfenninger. Sebastian Klein. W. H. Hilgedag. Arthur Wolf. Geo. von Hagel. Ghas. E. White. L. S. Bauman. Wade Hampton. Hy. F. Hines. L. E. Kaltwasser. J. O. B Merkel. 422. H. D. Kelley.

Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Party. Perry T. Allen. R. W. Emery. Geo. E. Dillard. J. L. Jackson. W. W. Schoettlin. 423.- Wm.Holmes: O. H. Sprout. 425. L. L. Brannon. 426. V. W. Yaden.428. S. B. Harris. 429. Louis Hacker. 430. J. J. D. Taylor. 433. D. B. Carmichael. Gus. Hindes. 435. Jno. D. James. Jno. Farris. 438. Erdley B. Aker. 443. Geo. W. Snell. L. L. Horn. 445. H. C. Montgomery. Jos.S. Waldman. 446. L. E. Smith. 449. Geo. H. Redfearn. R. T. Johns. 450. N. E. Pugh. 452. Leo O. Oedekoven. 453. G. F. Richards. 454. T. F. Baker. Frank S. Hunt. 456. C. W. Culley. 459. C. W. Banks. E. B. Julian. 463. E. C. Leeper. 470. C. E. Bartlett. 474. Geo. S. Miller. J: E. Copelin. 475. Clyde L. ~urch. L. P. Williams. E. D. Marshall. 476. Sam T. Roberts. 477. P. W. Todd. Geo. W. Wilkerson. 478. W. E. Moore. 479. Sam Talbert. 480. S. C. Conway. 481. C. A. Enyart. 482. W. T. Sutton. 496. J. N. Ford. 501. Benj. H. Wilcox. 503. B. F. D. Carlos.

219


Appendix No. of Lodge. Name of Patty. 506. A. W. Stonum. 507. L. McCommons. 508. J. L. Martin. 509. C. O. Richardson. 513. J. W. Surber. 516. Geo. T. Casso B. A. Gibbs. 517. Geo. W. Engdhal. 519. E. G. Ashcraft. 52l. Clark McLemore. J. M. Endsley. 522. Chas. G. Avery. Edw. L. Salmon. J. L. Martin. F, F. Cosgrove. H. L. Wilber. J. L. Deckard. O. G. Moline. L. C. Diesing. A. H. Jewell. G. O. Dana. 1. E. McBr.oom. Edw. M. Marvin. 527. J. E. Sherwood. F. H. Dinwiddie. 53l. Joseph Bowles. J. A. Ragan. 532. J. G. Kirby. J. J. Collins. 533. Geo. M. Campbell. 534. E. R. Collins. 540. J. H. Harmon. L. M. Pryor. 545. W.F.Barry. Harvey Grant. L. R. Graves. Frank Stilts. 546. S. D. Compton: 547. J. C. Endicott. Oliver Blythe.

No. of Lodge. Name of Party. A. L. McBride. J. L. Jewell. 549. G. E. Amos. 550. B. A. Rainwater. Jno. I-I. Wilson. 55l. A. J. Bono. H. W. Coffield. 555. Wm. L. Smith. 556. Ed S. Case. 563. Jno. F. Mills. D. P. Hartford. H. L. Knapp. 564. C. W. Warren. Homer Musselman. 566. Jno. R. Fisher. A. D. Willecken. 573. W. D. Cullens. Oscar Bagby. 576. Theron S. Duby. W. A. Brueckner. 578. Wm. T. Trowbridge. J E. Pirtle. Thos. J. Baird. 58l. Ed A. Bennett. 586. J. P. Warren. C. L. Chamberlain. 592. J. E McCreery. 600. W. Lee Dailey. 60l. B,everly C. Stevens. 602. H. Chas. Cox. 607. Frank 'Brown. 612. Gus. Pasquier. 617. Wm. C. Caldwell. Robt. Crossley. Wm. Lorimer. 619. W. M. Newton. W. A. Cullers. 637. S. R. Bailey. 638. Chas. A. Truitt. L. E. Finley.

[Sept.


1917.]

Appendix

221

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LODGES. No.

Name of Lodge.

No.

602. 444. 366. 355. 590. 10. 343. 252. 219. 544. 198. 255. 141. 443. 377. 356. 621. 193. 412. 389. 633. 6. 346. 70. 55. 100. 156. 306. 127. 464. 267. 357. 26.

A. Acacia. .Ada. Adair. Adelphi. Advance. Agency. Agricola.. Alanthus. Albert Pike. AlgabiI. Allensville. Alton. Amsterdam. Anchor. Ancient Craft. Ancient Landmark. Anderson. Angerona. Appleton City. Arcana. Archie. Ark. Arlington. Armstrong. Arrow Rock. Ash Grove. Ashland. Ashlar. Athens. AullviIle. Aurora. Aux Vasse. Ava.

373. 450. 170. 642. 378. 573. 330. 97. 537. 379. 150. 41. 510. 535. 557. 594. 15a. 102. 337. 101. 449. 195. 45. 597. 587. 135. 334. 80. 86. 203. 233. 501. 275. 442. 254.

217. 591. 116. 353. 367. 365. 3. 393. 632.

Barbee. Barnett. Barnes. Barnesville. Barry. Bayou. Beacon. Bee Hive. Belgrade.

B.

Name of Lodge. Belle. Belton. Benevolence. Benjamin Franklin. Berlin. Bernie. Bertrand. Bethany. Bethel. Billings. Birming.. Bismarck. BiswelI. Blackwell. Blairstown. Blodgett. Bloomfield. Bloomington. Blue Springs. Bogard. Bois D'Arc. Bolivar. Bonhomme. Bosworth. Branson. Braymer. Breckenridge. Bridgeton. Brookfield. Brumley. Bucklin. Buckner. Bunker. Burlington. Butler. C.

416. 328. 486. 552. 183. 38. 63. 169. 284.

Cache. Cainsville. Cairo. Calhoun. California. Callao. Cambridge. Camden Point. Canopy.


222 No. 231. 549. 249. 401. 197. 46l. 147. 431. 172. 611. 81. 59; 615. 185. 33l. 407. 487. 333. 392. 388. 342. 229. 305. 610. 553. 559. 17. 248. 207. 60l. 418. 507. 463. 520. 161: 548. 482. 274. 485. 168. 534. 533. 120. 432. 369. 454. 528. 36. 265.

[Sept.

Appendix Name of Lodge. Cardwell. Carl Junction. Carroll. Carterville. Carthage. Caruthersville. Casso Cement. Censer. Centertown. Central. Centralia. Chaffee. Chamois. Charity. Charleston. Chilhowee. Chillicothe. Christian. Chula. Circle. Claflin. Clarence. Clark. Clarksburg. Clarksdale. Clarksville. Clarkton. Clay. Clayton. Clear Creek. Clearmont. Clifton. Clifton Heights. Clifton Hill. Clinton. Clintonville. Cold Spring. Cold Water. Colony. Columbia. Comfort. Compass. Competition. Composite. Continental. Conway. Cooper. Corinthian.

No. 323. 600. 282. 561. 287. 606. 519. 368. 586. 312. 525. 227. 14.

Name of Lodge. Corner Stone. Cosby. Cosmos. Cowgill. Craft. Craig. Crane. Crescent Hill. Criterion. Cuba. Cunningham. Cypress. Cyrene. D.

492. 539. 386. 400. 562. 88. 137. 119. 39. 532. 325. 300.

Daggett. Dawn. Dayton. I:ecatur. Deepwater. Defiance. De~phian.

De Soto. DeWitt. Dexter. Dockery. Doric. E.

285. Earl. 630. East Gate. 384. East Prairie. 575. Easter. 291. Edina. 318. Eldorado. 599. Elvins. 607. Eminence. 595. Emmanuel. 497. Equality. 121. Erwin. 278. Essex. 505. Euclid. 73. Eureka. 27. Evergreen. 405. Everton. 577. Ewing. '332. Excello. 441. Excelsior.


1917.] No.

Name of Lodge. F.

483. 290. 44. 619. 132. 47. 345. 281. 542. 339. 261. 23. 214. 578. 453. 554. 212. 192. 36:3. 352. 89. 48.

Fairfax. Fairmount. Fair Play. Fairview. Farmington. Fayette. Fello\vship. Fenton. Ferguson. Fidelity. Florence. Florida. Forest City. Forest Park. Forsyth. Foster. Four Mile. Frankford. Fraternal. Friend. Friendship. Fulton.

G. 515. 106. 423. 359. 522. 422. 465. 125. 9. 250. 427. 475. 218. 72. 436. 397. 289. 644. 514. 579. 276. 618. 272. 66. 173.

223

Appendix

Galena. Gallatin. Galt. Garrett. Gate City. Gate of the Temple. Gaynor City. Gentry ville. George Washington. Glensted路. Glenwood. Golden. Good Hope. Gorin. Gothic. Gower. Graham. Grain Valley. Granby. Grandin. Grand River. Grandview. Granite. Grant City. Gray Summit.

No. 159. 425. 414. 107. 178. 589. 474.

Name of Lodge. Green City. Green Ridge. Greensburg. Green ville. Griswold. Grove Spring. Guilford. H.

216. Hale City. 336. Hallsville. 224. Hamilton. 188. Hannibal. 322. Hardin. 499. Harmony. 171. Hartford. 395. Hatfield. 21. Havana. 571. Hayti. 459. Hazelwood. 354. Hebron. 37. Hemple. 477. Henderson. 123. Hermann. 288. He路rmitage. 187. Hermon. 104. Heroine. 211. Hickory Hill. 527. Higbee. 364. Higginsville. 455. Hintoh. 362. Hiram. 279. Hogle's Creek. 262. Holden. 49. Holt. 251. Hope. 239. Hopewell. 215. Hornersville. 580. Houston~ 4. Howard. 130. Hume. 32. Humphreys. 415. Hunnewell. 30. Huntsville. I. 410. 581. 76.

Iberia. Illmo. Independence.


No. 54.

536. 381. 154.

143. 420.

446.

Name of Lodge. Index. .Ingomar. Ionia. Ionic. Irondale. Itaska. Ivanhoe.

J. 82. 541. 447. 500. 564. 398. 43.

640. 315. 480. 164. 321. 457. 335. 411.

[Sept.

Appendix

224

Jackson. Jacksonville. Jacoby. Jameson. Jamesport. Jasper. Jefferson. Jennings. Jerusalem. Jewel. Joachim. Jonathan. Jonesburg. Joplin. Joppa.

No. 460. 574 . 531. 237.

253. 506. 145. 598. 77. 494. 149. 31.

302. 138.

326. 152. 51. 521. 488. 257.

259. 268. 128. 409. 403.

394.

Name of Lodge. Lambskin. La Monte. Lane's Prairie. La Plata. Laredo. Lathrop. Latimer. Leadwood. Lebanon. Lewistown. Lexington. Liberty. Lick Creek. Lincoln. Linn. Linn Creek. Livingston. Lockwood. Lock SprIng. Lodge of Light. Lodge of Love. Lodge of Truth. Lorraine. Louisville. Lowry City. Lucerne.

K.

484. 245. 582.

Kansas City. Kearney. Kennedy. Kennett. Keystone. King Hill. King Hiram. Kingston. Kingsville. Kirbyville. Kirksville. Kirkwood. Knob Noster. Koshkonong.

222. 83. 115. 437. 489. 292.

La Belle. Laclede. Laddonia. Lafayette. Lakeville. Lamar.

220. 311. 329. 68. 243.

376. 309. 118. 313. 264.

105.

L.

M. 433. 91. 626. 112. 406. 402. 240. 543. 623.

566. 481. 110. 616.

390. 165.

324. 146. 260. 4fi8. ] 6.

Mack's Creek. Madison. Magnolia. Maitland. Malden. Malta. Manes. Mansfield. Maple. Maplewood. Marceline. Marcus. Marion. Marionville. Maryville. McDonald. McGee. Mechanicsville. Melville. Memphis.


lY17.] . No.

Name of Lodge.

No.

35. Mercer. 2. Meridian. 85. Miami. 244. Middle Fabius. 42. Middle Grove. 516. Milford. 567. Miller. 151. . Milton. 471. Mineral 1. Missouri. 639. Mizpah. 344. Moberly. 144. Modern. 612. Mokane. 129. Monett. 295. Moniteau. 64. 1\10nr08. 490. Montevallo. 246. Montgomery City. 58. Monticello. 408. Montrose. 186. Morality.

429. 270. 175. 529. 473. 470. 372. 643 . 157. 358. 622. 181. 583.

f\03.

Morehouse.

320. Morgan. 184. Morley. 351. Mosaic. 558. Moscow. 294. Mound City. 628. Moundville. 614. Mount Washington. 158. Mountain Grove. 637. Mountain View. 382. Mt. Ararat. 4 7 6. Mt. Hope. 439. Mt. Olive. 40. Mt. Moriah. 99. Mt. Vernon. 227. Mt. Zion. 338. Myrtle. 221. Mystic Tie. N. 25. 568. 560. 247. 60. 199. 307.

225

Appendix

Naphtali. Naylor. Nelson. Neosho. New Bloomfield. New Hope. New London.

Name of Lodge. New Madrid. New Salem. Newton. Niangua. Nineveh. Nodaway. Nonpareil. Northeast. North Star. Northwest. Norwood. Novelty. Novinger.

O. 163. Occidental. 134. Olean. 576. Oli ve Branch. 139. 路Oregon. 518. Oriental. 303. Osage. 317. Osborn. 7. O'Sullivan. 624. Owensville. 297. Ozark.

P. 241. 18. 140. 19. 617. 308. 65. 11. 319. 530. 498. 551. 92. 502. 136. 472. _ 399. 182. 314.

Palestine. Palmyra. Papinsville. Paris Union. Park. Parrott. Pattonsburg. Pauldingville. Paulville.. Peculiar. Pee Dee. Pendleton. Perseverance. Philadelphia. Phoenix. Pickering. Pike. Pilot Knob. Pine.


226

[Sept.

Appendix

No. Name of Lodge.. 108. Pineville. 428. Pittsville. 469. Plato. 504. Platte City. 113. Plattsburg. 160. Pleasant. 142. Pleasant Grove. 467. Pleasant Hope. 176. Point Pleasant. 79. Polar Star. 349. Pollock. 232. Polo. 95. Pomegranate. 209. Poplar Bluff. 166. Portageville. 242. Portland. 131. Potosi. . 556. Prairie. 546. Prairie Hill. 503. Prairie Home. 179. Pride of the West.. 148. Purdy. . 190. Putnam. 596. Puxico. 180. Pyramid. 383. Pythagoras.

Q. 380. 196.

Queen City, Quitman.

478. 33. 258. 201. 451. 391. 584. 468. 280. 570. 167. 479. 38n. 57. 361. 13. (96.

Racine. Ralls. Ravanna. RavenWOOd. Raymore. Raytown. Red Bird.' Red Oak. Reed Spring. Republic. Revere. Rich Hill. Richland. Richmond. Riddick. Rising Sun. Robert Burns.

R.

No. Name of Lodge. 67. Rocheport. 435. Rockbridge. 269. Rock Prairie. 341. Rockville. 213. Rolla. 550. Rose Hill. 404. 路Rosendale. 426. Roth~i1le. 204. Rowley. 316. Rural. 238. Rushville. 90. Russellville. 572. Rutledge. S. 225. 226. 208. 424. 298. 462. 293. 71. 508. 448. 126. 236. 517. 513. 585. 625. 256. 228. 371. 304. 310. 75. 511. 266. 271. 206. 200. 547. 466. 296. 524. 347. 155. 96. 273.

Salem. Saline. Salisbury. Samaritan. Sampson: Santa Fe. Sarcoxie. Savannah. Saxton. Schell City. Seaman. Sedalia. Seligman. Senath. Shamrock. Sheffield. Shekinah. Shelbina. Sheldon. Signal. Sikeston. Silex. Skidmore. Social. Solomon. Somerset. Sonora. South Gate. Southwest. Sparta. Spickardsville. Spring Creek. Spring Hill. St. Andrews. St. Clair.


1917. ] No. 588. 234. 230. 28.

78. 20. 93. 109. 419. 133. 634. 538. 523. 283. 592. 608. 604. 174. 69. 555. 263.

Name of Lodge. St. Francisville. St. Francois. St. James. St. John's. St. Joseph. St. Louis. St. Marks. Stanberry. Star. Star of the West. Steele. Stella. Stinson. Stockton. Stoutsville. Strafford. Strasburg, Sturgeon. Sullivan. Summerville. Summit. T.

565. Tebbetts. 438. Temperance. 299. Temple. 177. Texas. 56\:1. Tiff City. 56. . Tipton. 631. Tower Grove. 111. Trenton. 638. Triangle. 205. Trilumina. 641. Trinity. 122. Triplett. 440. Trowel. 34. Troy. 360. Tuscan. 635. Tuscumbia. 114. Twilight. S:>O. Tyrian. 12. Tyro.

U. b113. 124. ~lO.

5. 4~!l

227

Appendix

Union. Union Star. Unionville. United. Unity.

No. 42l. 286.

Name of Lodge. Urbana. Urich. V.

413. 629. 509. 49l. 493. 452. 117. 94. 62.

Valley. Valley Park. Van Buren. Vandalia. Vernon. Verona. Versailles. Vienna. Vincil. W.

348. Wadesburg. 52. Wakanda. 605. Walker. 456. Wallace. 627. Wallace Park. 74. Warren. 609. Warrenton. 87. Washington. 6l. Waverly. 526. Wayne. 375. Waynesville. 235. Weatherby. 636. Weaubleau. 512. Webb. City. 98. Webster. 84. Webster Groves. 22. Wellington. 613. Wellston. 194. Wellsville. 46. Wentzville. 445. West Gate. 103. West View. 396. Woestern Light. 15. Western Star. 53. Weston. 340. Westport. 202. Westville. 434. Wheeling. 30l. White Hall. 417. White Water. 162. Whitesville. 374. Wilderness.


228 No. 620. 8. 370. 191. 29. 540. 430. 277. 223. 387. 24.

[Sept.

Appendix Name of Lodge. Willard. Williamsburg. Williamstown. Wilson. Windsor. Winigan. Winona. Wm. D. Muir. Woodlawn.. Woodside. Wyaconda.

No.

Name of Lodge. X.

50.

Xenia.

563.

York.

545. 189.

Zalma. Zeredatha.

Y.

z.


• GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT.

N W

o

COMPILED FROM RETURKS. SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1917. NO.-'-

Lodge.

p'rOown and . . J\ddress.

~ Mis~o!!ri

I

County.

I

Mastel'.

,

Secretary.

I

I

Time of Meeting.

St. Lou~s '.r. M. Gibson -A-n-t-h-O-n-Y-F-'-:-It-t-n-e-r-.-... :~st and 3rd Thursdays 2 Mel'ldlan St. Lou~s ···············1 P. C,. Butts 'rhos. C. Kuhnle '1'2d and 4th Thursdays. 3 Beacon St. LOuis · .. ······.· .. ··1 Edg'ar R. Nyroth IF. L. Magoon 2d and 4th Thursdays. 4 Howard ' New Franklin Howard i C. A. Edmonston IC. F. Lee ,2d and 4th Saturdays. :; United ' Springfield · Greene Waltci' E. Becker M. F. Smith :3d Monday each month. 6 Ark ;\/ewark Knox W. Y. Rich IM. J. McEntire Saturday aftct· full moon. 7 O'Sullivan......... vValnut Grove. . . . . .. Greene........ P. E. Parker 'I.Tno. :'vrcLemore Tuesday before full moon. 8 ·Williamsbl;irg i \Villian:sburg Callaway L. E. 'fate Frank ·Weeks Saturday aft,er full moon. 9 Geo. Washington .. , 1 St. LoUIS : Wm. .r. Kennedy 'vVm. L. Reynolds 2d and 4th Tuesdays. 10 Ag-ency i Agency Buchanan Carl H. Farris W. E. Goins 1st and 3d Saturdays ex ..July & Aug. 11 paulding-ville : .. ! vVI'ight ~ity Warr~n E. A. Fluesmier 'Iwm. Heicltmann Frj, on or bef. f. m. and. 2 wks. affer. 12 Tyro Caledoma........... Washington , Edw. Dent 'vVm..r. Dent. Saturday on or before full moon. 13 ~ising Sun ", ~ar~ville. .. .. P!atte '1' Waltel; H3;nsen ,Wm. Givens Saturd~y on or befor~ full moon. 14 Cyrene : Eolia Pike Chas. Robmson 1:\1. 'W. Henry Thursday on or befole full moon. 15 : Western Star. . .. .1 Winston. .. . . . . . . . .. Daviess J. Lester JOhnston"1 E. \V Manlll1g Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 16 l\fem phis Memphis. . . . . . . . . . . Scotland.. . . . .. F. D. Mason C. C. Swift. Friday on or before full moon. 17, Clarksville Clarksville Pike H. B. Garner Geo. H. Ferree 1st and 3d Thursdays. 18 , Palmyra. .. i Palmyra Marion T. M. Barbee Sam!. J. Feaster ...• 2d and 4th ThuI·sdays. 19, Paris Union Paris "I Monroe Marcus W. Caldwell Jas. J. Browmng 2d and 4th Mondays. 20 St. Louis. . .. 1 St. LOUiS············ I H. W. Reller H. A. Steiner 2d and 4th vVednesdays. 21 Havana..... . .. :McFall. Gentry H. C. Jolly, Jr O. R. Hunt. ......• Saturday on or before full moon. 22 I Wellington.... . .. 1 DeKalb 1 Buchanan 1""Vm. C. Call Otto D. Davis 1st Saturday each month. 23 I. F'lorida Florida : :\fon~·oe ",I J. T. MCC. utchan W. H. McCreery ..•.. Saturday on or before full. moon. ~; I vyyaCon~la LaGra~ge"""""'1 Lewis J. O. yager Leslie Edwards 1st and 3d Thursdays. ",;) Il'\aphtall St. LOuis F. J. Hoffman 'IArthur S. ""{orey 2d and 4th Thursdays. ~61 Ava Ava Douglas 1 Chas. H. Coble .Tos. V. Pitts 3d Saturday. i 27 Ever·green.: New Haven Franklin Benj. F. Bailey Aug..J. Sheible lst and 3d Saturdays. 28 St. .John. . .. . . . . . .. Hannibal ! Marion. . . . . . .. Paul Anderson \Wm. H. Blackshaw .. 1st and 3d Mondays. 29 Windsor ,Vindsor Henry J. H. Walton "IHenry C. Churchill.. 1st and 3d Tuesdays. ~ 0 H.untsville......... H.untsville ,' RandO.IPh David C. Griffith J. V. Minor ' 1st and 3d Tuesdays. .)1 Liberty Llberty 1 Cla~ .T. .J. Barkley .Tno. F. De Berry 2d and 4th Mondays. 32 Humphreys Humphreys Sullivan N. H. Jaynes Clyde E. Humphrey .. 2d and 4th Wednesdays. 1 Ralls 33 Halls Centre ~ G. C. Layne 'I'J. W. Doyle 2d and 4th Saturdays. 3·1 'fray Troy .•.............. 1 Lincoln Jesse T. Garrett Otto Hanni 2d and 4th Saturdays.

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"Ie,reel:........... Coopel............ Hemple·........... 38 Callao D,eWitt.: 40 NIt. ::\fonah 41, Bismarck... .. 42 : Middle Grove. . . . .. 43 .Jefferson 4-l Fairplay·.......... 45 Bonhomme 46 \Ventzville <\7 Fayette 48 Fulton 49 Holt 50 Xenia "I [,iving·ston :;2 Wakanda G3 \Veston ,,1 Index ~f.) '. A;I'ow Rock ~)6 TIpton ~7, Richmond ~S . Mont!ce.llo ;)9 C.entIaha 60 ""OW Bloomfteld 61 "Vaverly 62 Vinci!. 63 ' Cambridge 64, ::.\fonroe 6" . Pattonsburg66 Grant City 67 Rocheport. 6S Kennett f;9 Sullivan iO Armstrong 71 Savannah 72 Gorin ~3 EUI·eka • 4 Warren 7;) j.3ilex 76 I Independence 77 ! Lebanon 7S I St. Joseph

.)6

n

391

Princeton , I ~ercer Geo. W. Le::,ft y Howarc~ R. S.pencer. 'ITues. on. or .ber: r. ,m. and 2 wks. arter. BoonvIlle Cooper........ A. J. SchmIdt M. E. Schmldt. 2d and 4th Fndays. Hemple Clinton E. W. Snyder Allen Boyer. 1st and 3d Saturdays. Callao ::\1acon H. L. Bal{er K E. Richal'dson .•• 1st and 3d Fridays. r:eWitt. , ,. Carrol!. Otto B. Schnapp .T. A. \Villiams 'Ilst and 3d Wednesdays. . St. LOuIs Chas. F. Drehmann. Hent·y A. Borg-marin. 1st and 3d Saturdays. Bismarck St. Francois \Vm. McGeorge J. S. Carmical ...••• 1st and 3d Saturdays. Madison Monroe C. C. Fleming .....• 1 Edgar C. Brooks ..•• 1st and 3d Saturdays. J. etIerson City 1 COle 1rl T. Oliver ,Caes.ar ~V.ollman [lst and 3d Mondays. Fair Play Polk.......... Chas. W. Grant. B. \V. Gl'lf[m Thursday on or before full moon. Ballwin·····.·.·····i St. Louis Albert A. Koch C. L. Shotwell ;Saturday on .or befol'e full moon. \Ventzviile \ St. Charles J. A. Reid :OYV'. R. Dalton jSaturday on or before full moon. Fayette Howard T. J. Magruder TeffD. Settle ·Ilst and 3d Tuesdays. 1~ulton.............. Callaway F. A. Hurel. Daniel D. Ford 'Ilst and 3d Fridays. Holt.: C.la y : S. :M. Ha~ris A. J: Eb.Y .. : Saturday before full moon. Hopkms............ Nodaway J. A. AkIn Chal1es S. Evans .•• 1st and 3d Saturdays. Glasgow Howard J. "V. Estus Andrew Blocher :lst and 3d Fridays. Carrollton.......... Carroll. J. A. Heins Harry y.y. Brand 2d and 4th Thursdays. Weston Platte Chas. Dale A. Schneider 1st and 3(1 Thursdays. Garden City........ Cass , J. R. vV'oolery E. ·\V'ithers 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Arrow Rock........ Saliz:e , J. Paul Big.~S: C. E~ W?lls: Saturday on ~r before full moon. TIpton :vIonlteau '\F'rank. De \'llllbus .. Chao>."W. HIckman 1st and, 3d Fndays. RIchmond Ray .lno. F. Baber Dunvard B. Brady 4th Friday each month. f;IOnt.ic~IlO Lewis '!James' W. Lillard ;~ar.e B. Hcnders~n. ",Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2.wks. arter. C.entlaha : Boone ·· j.Tames C. Hunt. ·.• chas; B. iVIeICert. .. 1st and 3d Th:ursdays. Ne\'( Bloomfield ...•. Callaway '10' C. Thompson 'C. \\. Longley '1llst and 3d Fndays. "vaverly Lafayette YV. A. Fletcher !R P. ?>-rotte Saturday before full moon. Cameron Clinton .T. L. Baron 'Henry F. Lawrence. 1st and 3d Mondays. Slater.............. Saline L. F. Hains · J. A. S'tern 1st Tuesday. l\10nroe City Monroe Alexis A. Melson \V. R. P. Jackson 2d and 4th Fridays. Patto'nsburg........ Davies3 R. C. Price L. H. GotschalL 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Grant City \Vorth .•.......•10hn J. Haas ,\Vm. P. Spillman 1st and 3d Mondays. nocheport.......... Boone H. F. Baldwin 'T. T. Huntington Thursday on or before rull moon. Kennett Dunklin J. A. Lowe ,.T. ):. Goldsmith 1st and 3d Fridays. Sullivan Franklin "IHoward G. Landon. lOtto N. Schudde Saturda'" oer. f. m. and 2 wks after. Armstrong Howard GOI'don Batterton L F. Ho\vard 'l'hursday on or before full moon. Savannah Andrew G. C. Sparks r. E Stevenson Sat. on or ber. f. m. and 2 wks. after. ' Gorin Scotland , .Toe Hicks ..•...... /L. P iThll'rs. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. aftr. \' Brunswick Char~ton ,v. S. Rucke; K. Benecke .....• ;lst and 3d Tuesdays. Keytesville 1 Chanton IWm. L. Wnght 'C 0. Sterner ,2d and 4th Tuesdays. , Silex Lincoln VV. D. Middleswartz. Edw. C. Teague 'IFrida y on or before full moon. ' Indep~ndence ......•. Jackson B. A. Hafer : 1'~omas S. Cole 2d and 4th Mondays. 1 SteelvIlle Crawford·······1 Geo. W. Reeves , \\, m. C. Doggett Saturday on or before full moon. St. Joseph , Buchanan 'Harry Baum Joseph Heyman 1st and 3d Tuesdays.

'10'

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1

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.

N w

1-0


N W N

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-Continued. No'1

Town and P. O. Address.

Lodge.

-;; Polar Star , 80 "Bridgeton . 81 , Central . 82 I Jackson , 831 Laclede ~ 84 Webster Groves . 85 Miami . 861 Brookfield . . 87 'Washington 88 Defiance . 89 Friendship . 90 , RussellvllIe , , .. 91: Madison , . 921' Perseverence .. , . 93 St. Marks , .. 94' Vienna ' 95 i Pomegranate ," 96 St. Andrews ,. 97 Bethany . 98 Webster , 99 Mt.Vernon . 100 Ash Grove , .. 101 I Bogard . 102 Bloomington . 103 I West. View . " .

i~~ ! ~r:~~~fli~::: :::: :::

106. 107 I 108 ' 109 110 111 112 113 114

Gallatin Greenvllle PinevlIle Stanberry Marcus Trenton Maitland Plattsburg Twilight.

' . . .

. , . . .

County.

St. Louis Wellston. R. R. 29 St. Louis ••...•. Molino 'Audrain Linneus.•.......•.•. Linn .......•... Lebanon Laclede .•...•.• Webster Groves ..•.•., St. Louis ...•... Miami. ............• Saline .........• Brookfield ........••. Linn Greenfield .......•.•. Dade Sheridan .......•..•. Worth .......•. Chillicothe ........•. Livingston Russellville Cole Madison ..........•.. Monroe Louisiana. . . . . . . .• .• Pike Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau. Vienna , Maries St. Louis Shelbyvllle. . . . . . . . .. Shelby .....•.•• Bethany ..........•.. Harrison ......• Marshfield 'Vebster .•...... Mt. Vernon Lawrence ..•••• Ash Grove ........•. , Greene Bogard Carroll : Bevier Macon .......•. Millersville Cape Girardeau. Kansas City. . . . . . . .. Jackson Kirksville Adair Gallatin Daviess Greenville \Vayne ...•.•... Pinevllle ..........•. McDonald.'.•.•. Stanberry Gentry .....•.•. Fredericktown Madison., Trenton Grundy .••••••• Maitland Holt. Plattsburg ;. Clinton ......••. Columbia Boone .....•....

Master.

Secretary.

Time of Meeting.

A. B. Oeth •..••.•. 'IEdWin P. Ambler 1st and 3d Fridays. J. T. Rothert •....•• ,Wm. J. Goddard ..•.. 1st and 3d Thursdays. Otto Howard I'D. M. Slonaker 2d Saturday. A. L. Pratt .••.....• H. E. Symons ...•.... 1st and 3d Fridays. Claud B. Burley ..•• H. T. Wright. Wednesday before full moon. J. W. Wright •...... Geo. A. Shepardson .. 2d and 4th Tuesdays. R. S. Edmonds ..••. Jno. D. Fristoe Friday on or before full moon. Paul Van Osdol Chas. W. Hoffman 2d and 4th Tuesdays. Otto Wllson •.....• R. M. Sloan Friday on or before full moon. A. J. Curry ...•.•..• V. L. Ambrose .....• Fri. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. .1. W. Ryburn ...••• W. E. ·Walsh 1st and 3d Fridays. B. Ray Franklin .•• J. K. Hunter Saturday on or before full moon. Fred A. Thompson.. T. IJ. Warford , 2d and 4th,Saturdays. R. R. Gast ...•.... "A. C. Behringer 1st and 3d Tuesdays. J. M. Shy "1.1. G. MlIler 2d and 4th Tuesdays. B. F. Branson A. T. Burns , Saturday on or before full moon. Nelson A. Owens Walter H. Luty ••••• 1st and 3d Saturdays. Albert Brant Geo. O. Tannehill. . " Fri. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. Dwight C. Poland .. ,Tno. W. Kenyon 2d and 4th Tuesdays. Chas. W. Dickey W. P. McKnight. Friday on or after full moon. Wm. H. Turk R. C. Sedwick , 1st and 3d Fridays. Edwin E. Shaw W. RRlph Searcy 2d and 4th Thursdays. R. ·L. Carter John W. Minnis '" 2d and 4th Saturdays. Elmer W. Jones D. M. Williams '" 2d and 4th Tuesdays. D. S. MlIler G. H. MlIler Saturday on or after full moon. Hugo Doebler Leo Adler , 3d and 4th Tuesdays. H. E. Allen Claude Hall.. ......• 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Roy A. Dean 'IJOhn T. Cope 2d and 4th Tuesdays. B. A. Mllster C. W. Milster 1st and 3d Thursdays. Gifford Lee Lewis Kelley '" Friday on or before full moon. J. H. Liggett S. M. Hinkley 1st and 3d Saturdays. Floyd E. Gruver Louis Schwaner....• 1st and 3d Thursdays. .las. H. Wilson A. O. Ginn 1st and 3d Thursdays. Chas. Smock E. D. Patterson 2d and 4th Saturdays. T. J. Porter C. W. Chastain Saturday on or before full moon. Maurice Walden C. Moss Edwards 2d and 4th Tuesdays.

~

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·I

E . C. Kennen ......• 'IFrlday on or before tull moon. 115 l.addonla ......•... Laddonia 'I Audrain IWm. K. McCall. 116 Barnes :.' Cabool ~. ~'''. Te.xas ·iC. P. Patton Jesse Lareau ....•... Sat. on or'bef. f. and 2 wks. after. 117 Versailles .......•.. Versailles........... Morgan , Wm. A. Buell. C. W. Biersach 1st and 3d Fridays. 118 Kingston Kingston , Caldwell W. F. McFall Lee BI·idgwater Sat. on "I' bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 119 De Soto .. ~ De,Soto····· Jefferson Geo. A. Auerswald I Wm. Blank 2d and 4th Thursdays. 120 Compass parkvlI.le \ Platte ..•.•..... W. B. Kola.nd 'IM. L. Goodi~ ,' .. Saturday on or before full moon. 121 ErwIn St. LOUIs : Ernst F. W. Meyer. vVm. A. KleInschmIdt 2d and 4th Frlda~..s. 122 Trlplett. Triplett. .......••.•• Chariton C. E. Fleetwood ...• C. C. Stobaugh 1st and 3d Thursdays. 123 Hermann Hermann Gasconade , Geo. C. Guenther ..• IHenry Salzmann 1st and 3d Mondays. 124 Union Star ..•...... Union Star DeKalb ,John ''1'. Moore ....• ~ W. E. Robison ..•• ,. 2d and 4th Fridays. 125; Gentryville Darlington Gentry A. W. Bowman :Geo. VV. Francis Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wk.'J. after. 126' Seaman Milan Sullivan .....•.. Wm., W. Adams T. A. Sandefur ......• 1st and 3d Mondays. 127 Athens Albany Gentry n. V. Smith S. C. Killam 2d and 4th Fridays. 128 Lorraine Ridgeway Harrison ..•.... O. P. Bernet. Elzumer Scott 'IMon. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 129 Monett. Monett. Barry J. H. Swartzel. Sig. Solomon 1st and 3d Fridays. 130 1 Hume Hume ............•.. Bates John B. Bryant J. Gassaway .....••• 1st and 3d Thursdays. 131 Potosi. potosi. ...........•.., ·Washington. '" Wm. B. Settle Henry C. Bell. Friday on or before full moon. 132 Farmington Farmington ! St. Francois Clarence A. 'retley .. O. \V. Bleeck " 1st and 3d Fridays. 133 Stal' of the West. Ironton............. Ir?n Chas. E. Downey Mann Hingo Isat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 134 Olean Olean , MIller L. R. Roark ,.Jas. E. Hite [3d Saturday. 135 1 Braymer Braymer Caldwell. ....•. Lvman' R. Ford ...• ' D. I. Farrar ...•..•• 2d and .4th Tuesdays. 136 Phoenix , Bowling Green ~ pIll:e E. Thompson Cash vVenkle !lst and 3d Tuesdays. 137 D:lphian B.irch Tree Shannon.· Dayid :l<leeker C. O. Lemons 'ISaturday on or before full moon. 138 1 LIncoln .. , .......•. FIllmore , Andrew .. ~ J. E. Barnes C. L. Gilbert. .•••••• ·lst and 3d Tuesdays. 13.9 ! Oregon Oregon Holt. Heny E. Milne Jno. T. Thatcher ',lst Monday and 3d Saturday. 140 papinsyilIe Rockville· Bates D. O. Bradley, JI· .. Jno. A. Hammer Saturday on or before full moon. 141 Amsterdam Amsterdam Bates 'Amos H. Hall. Ino. 'Y\'. Gwinn , 2d and 4th Tuesdays. 142 Pleasant Grove Otterville .•......... Cooper :A. N. Howlett J. W. Gunn Saturday on or before fuB moon. 143. Irondale Irondale vvashington P. Wishon T. 't'T. Kjn~ Saturday nearest full moon. 144 ; Modern........... Humansville Polk 'M. E. Rector \V. P. Carleton Sat. on or bef. f.m. and 2 wks. aft. 145 Latimer Licking Texas :'1'. B. Mitchell. Geo. C. Martin 'ISaturday on or before full moon. 146, McGee CoJlege Mound , Macon !G. E. Poe 'IF. W. Dno)e,,· Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 147 ; Cass Harrisonville ..•..... Cass : ~., R. R. Deacon .......• Ed W. Deane .....•. ,'. jIst and 3d Fridays. 148. Purdy., Purdy Barry A. M. Gurley .Tas. S. Rhea ·,ll;;t and 3d Thursdays. 149 i Lexington Lexington Lafayette Oscar H. Westerman\V. R. Eck!t> ;3d Tuesdays. 150 Birmlng Faucett. Buchanan G. W. Isaacs lEverett E. Mool·e :4th Saturdays. 151 Milton ..•.......... Moberly , Randolph ,W. E. Fleming B. T. Goslin ;lst Saturday. 152 Linn Creek Linn Creek Camde~ '.IohnA. Floyd Chas. M. Davis ...•. ooiS at . on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 153 Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard !E. M. Kunnelee F. A .. Brannock .•• "/'F'rlday nearest full moon. 154 Ionic Desloge St. Francois I.J. M. Wood .......• Albert.T. Clay , 1st and 3d Wednesdays. 155 Spring HIlI. "1 ChiJIicothe, R. R. 3 Livingston .L. White F. E. Stith sat on. or bef.. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 156 Ashland : Ashland Boone C. W. Ellis E. P. Crenshaw 1st Friday and 3d Saturday. 157 North Star Rockport. Atchison Thomas H. Christian Wm. E. Gle.rmann 121 and 4th Thursdays. 158 Mountain Grove Mountain Grove Wright Ray Shollenberger .. H. V. Allgeier 2d and 4th Thursdays.

··1

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-Continued.

N W

...j:::..

0

:-:-,1

- -

Lodge.

159 160

I

~6~

. Clifton 1;£111.

Green City PI~asant.

16u, Wh~tesville

163 164 165: 166 167. 168: 169, 170 171· 172 II

In

Occldental. Joachim Maryville Portageville , Revere Colony Camden Point... .. Benevolence....... Hartford cens.er: :...... GIa}, Summlt. Sturgeon

1~5. Xe~vton

174

116 Pomt Pleasant 177 Texas 17S Griswold 179. Pri:le o.f the "Vest.. ISO I Pylamld.......... lSI' Novelty........... 182 Pil~t Knob........ 183 I California , .. 1S4 i Morley 185 ,Chamois.......... 1S6, MOI'ality 187 I Hel'm.on ISS HannibaL ,. IS!! i Zel'edatha 190 Pu.tnam 191; .\Tllson '192 Frankford......... 19:1 : Angerona 194 WellsVllle

I

I

Toownddand Po. A ress. Greer:

C~ty

County.

I

SUlli~~n.:

Master.

Secretary. .

~avis

Time of Meeting.

ls~

"IEdwo S. Pfeiffer Thos. R. and 3d Thursdays. 'I"Vm. M. Sampson B. W. MitchelL •.•.• Friday on or before full moon. • E. H. Hurt. .T· W. Richeson Tuesday, 1st and 3d week. i Whitesville ,' M. Spohn .T. F. Roberts Saturday on or before full moon. 1 St. LOU1S IWaller Edwards ..•. C. L. Alexander 1st and 3d Mondays. i Hillsboro Jefferson : \V. J. A Schubel.... [<'rank Dietrich Saturday on or before full moon. ' Maryville Kodaway ....•..'Fred "V. Smith [<'red H. French 1st and 3d Saturdays. POI·tageville New Madrid lc. M. Bandy :W. W. Largent. 1st and 3d Thursdays. Revere 1 Clark :1.. P. Mathews ;H ..F. Riley 1st and 3d 'rhursdays. Rutledge Knox fR. H. Carder Edw. C. Ammons Saturday on or before full moon. Camden Point Platte tW. P. Woodson W. K. Bywaters .. : .. , Saturday on or before full moon. Utica................ Livingston ~ Geo. McMillen R. E. Broden Saturday on or before full moon. Livonia Putnam ~P. V. Hart J. L. CaSsidy .......• Saturday on or before full moon. Macon : . . . . . . .. Macon '1'Luth'er E. Wi~hoit.. John A. Cook 1st and 3d Mondays. Gray Summit Franklm B. A. ThOrnhlll. r. H. Blom 1st and 3d Thursdays. Sturgeon Boone T. B. Garn·ett. ·r. "v. Hulett IFriday on or before full moon. j Stark City .....•..... Newton : J. Du.navon E. I. .Ton.es lwednesda y on or before full moon. Conran .......••••... New Madrid Chas. Plkey !R. B. Plkey Saturday on or before full moon. Houston Texas "Vm . .r. McGee Claude P. Johnson . .'Saturdayon or after full moon. Bellflower Montgomery R. L. Usry ........•.Jno. B. Moseley !Monday on or after full moon. St. Loui~ Chas. B. Jansky I;OUiS Tisch 'j'2d and 4th W~dn~sdays. St. LOuis Geo. M. Hart Fennell M. Cole 2d and 4th Fridays. Novelty Knox W. H. Epperson A. Al'nett. Monday on or before full moon. Ric~vill~ Dou~las A. B. "Vheat. /Saturday on before full moon. E . C. Cearley California MOnlteau R. L. Fulks .......• J. IV. Roth 12d and 4th FrI~ays. Morley Scott Otto Bugg C. D. M. Gupton '12d and 4th Fridays. Chamois Osage Dan'j Schowengel'Clt .. \1. T. Ro~'se Friday on or after full moon. Renick Randolph ....•• A.G.. Davis M. M. Brooks 11st and 3d Thursdays. ; Liber~I Barton J. J. Lavery i W. E. ~onclict jist and 3d Thursdays. HannibaL Marlon .......•. I. Dow Moore .....• B. E. BIgger ,Zd and 4th Mondays. St. J0seph '" Buchanan .. : Wm. P. Davis, Jr .. 'Carl Berndt ;2d and 4th Tuesdays. Newtown Sulliva~ Glenn Havn.er 1 r. ~V. Moore ISaturday on or before full moon. Pocahontas c~pe. Girardeau. Ol'over GOlliher ..•.. \.J.Oe.M. Thompson. "'jSaturda y on or before full moon. Frankford .......•... PIke L. T. Tucker ...••.• H. C. Steel 2d and 4th Mondays. M.isso~:i City Clay : E. L. Pigg ..•....... -\. R. Allcol'D.: :;st and 3d Fridays. Wells\llIe .........•. Montgomer) Clarence A. Heckart Robt. G. McKibben Iud and 4th Tuesdays.

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195, Bolivar· , Bolivar " Polk."" '.Ino. V. Braithwait..'Collins E. Bushnell .. ,Wednesday on or before full moon. 196: Quitman ' \. Quitman Kodaway ,I-I. D. McDonald IFred Wright. '1st and 3d Saturdays. 197 , Cartha~e. . . . . . . . .. Carthage J~sper R. C. Griss<?m ~ M. F. '';'"iernow '1' 2d and 4th Thursdays. 198, Allens\,llle Allendale , Worth 'IA. C. Brewlt. /Geo. \\" DIckerson Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 199' )<ew Hope........ Elsberry Lincoln !'N. S. Sanders 1.1. .I. Shaw Saturday before full moon. 200 i Sonora Watson ; Atchison Wm. :vlcCoig !Boville Million 1st and 3d Saturdays. 201 i Ravenwood Ravenwood ' :\Todaway , ; H. J. Beedle 1.1. J. Smith ,. 2d and 4th Saturdays. 202 \Vcstville Marceline Chariton !W. O. Hainds "',:.rames O. Bell 3d Saturday. 203 By'umley Brumley ..•......... Miller IJames A. Bl'ockman John L. Conner Saturday on or before full moon. 204 Rowley Dearborn '.' Platte .. : D. E. Xichols :John W. Oliver Wednesday before full moon. 205, Trilumina Marshall. '" Saline ,\V. Lee Carfer :Hobert D. Johnson .• 1st Thursday. 206 Somerset.......... Powersville ' Putnam ' K. K. Statton ' Fred A. Cozad :Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 3d Mon. after. 207 Clay.............. Excelsior Springs : Clay ;vVallace M. Agin W. A. Craven :lst and 3d Mondays. 20R Salisbury.......... Salisbury.· Chariton " R. T. Copeland S. F. T'1·ammel , 1st and 3d Tuesdays ;09 ~oPlal·..BILlff. ~oJ?lar ~IUff. Butler Harry R. Fritz K. C..Tohnso~ ~d and 4th ~ueSdays. _10 I:.nlOn\,lIle 'UnIOnvIlle Putnam Tames F. Comstock Joseph M. StIlle ·,~d and 4th Mondays. 211 I Hickory Hill Henley , Cole Richard Howard R. R. N"rfteet. 'ISaturday on or before full moon. 212 I FOUl' Mile Campbell Dunklin Percy .r. KeslingJ. R. Pollock 'Ilst and 3d Thursdays. 213 i Rolla Rolla Phelps Floy VV. \Vebb B. F. Culbertson Ilst and 3d Saturd~ys. 214, Forest City Forest City Holt IJohn H. MalTlnet· Geo. F. Hopper lIst Saturday and 3d. Monday. 215 HOl·nersyille " fIornersville Dunklin .....•.. J. M. Ford L. B. Perkins Thurs. on or bef. f. m. and ~ wks. after. 21h ; Hale City Hale Carroll D. Fl. Pal'ish Dell S. Gray ·2d Tuesday and 4th Saturday. 217 Barbee Sweet Springs Saline ·;M. D. Jackson J. D. Smit~ ',Thursday on or before full moon. 21R / Good Hope St. LOUIs E. A. Roworth., Robt. L. DIxon 'IIst and 3d Saturdays. 219 , Albert Pike Kans'as City Jackson ·,Elmer E. Hav O. P. Bloss 2d and 4th Mondays. 220 Kansas City ; .. ' Kansas City .Tacli.son ·P. H. Hodon· Tno.1\1. McDonald j2d and 4th Mondays. 221 Mystic Tie 1 Oak Ridge ' Cape Girardeau·iD. M. Wills D. A. Drum :Saturday on or before fui! moon. 222, La Helle La Belle ' Lewis "Kewton Doran D. L. Bl'Ooking :Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2d Fri. after. 223: \Voodlawn 'l\ladisoll R. 4 Monroe ,iGeo. v'll. Gaines R. G. Woods Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. aft. 224 ' Hamilton Hamilton CaldwelL lvValter ;r. 'Vhitt C. F. Riding-s. '" 1st and 3d Tuesdays. 22" Salem : Salem. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Dent. :.Tohn ,Yo Roberts Spencer H. vVay·e 2cl and Hh Fridays. 226 Saline : St. Mary·s.......... Stc. Genevieve .. :Ed\\". Schaaf. Jno. F. Bartels Saturday on or befor'e full moon. 227 Cypress : Laclede Linn :Harry D. Hall "IMax Jones 1st and 3d Wednesdays. 228 Shelbina , Shelbina Shelby ,Paul J. Dean R. L. Thomas 1st and 3d Fridays. 229 Claflin Protem Taney :W. vY. James ;C. A ..Tames Saturday on or before full moon. 230 St. James St. James Phelp~ E. yowell \-\'m ..H. Roster....• 1st and 3d Fri~ays. . 23] Cardwell.......... Cardwell........... DunkIIn I. A. \Vhlte :-'L BIshop .....•...• 1st and 3d Fridays. 232 Polo Polo Caldwell IChas. B. Jones Sam F. Coole 2d and 4th Saturdays. 233 Bucklin Bucldin Linn 'Thos. W, Burk Elbert Lamkin 2d and 4th Saturdays. 234 St. Francois....... Libertyville St. Francois E. O. Presnell. R. P. Sebastian Saturday on or before full moon. 23:; Weatherby \Veatherby DeKalh ,C. R. !\tlcClure T. F. Rig-gos 2d and 4th Saturdays. 236, Sedalia Sedalia Pettis vVm. T, Wallace ~Vm. E. Brown ,lst Friday. 2:.l7 'La Plata La Plata···· ··· .. 1 Macon ;.I. L. McKinstry r. D. Huston :Thursday on or before full moon. 238 ; Rush\·ille '" Rushville Buchanan !H. C. Page S. B. V\'ells ,2d and 4th Saturdays.

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-Continued.

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Town and P.O. Address.

Lodge.

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253 254 255: 256; 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274

Secl·etary.

:Master.

Time of :Meeting.

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239 , Hopewell. 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250, 2511

County.

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Portland Keystone.......... Middle Fabius Knob Noste Montgomery City Neosho Clarkton Carroll Glensted ; ..' Hope ....•......... Alanthus Laredo .•........... Butler Alton Shekinah Lodge of Light Ravanna Lodge of Love Mechanicsville..... Florence Holden Summit Kirbyville Corinthian SociaL Aurora Lodge of Truth Rock Prairie New Salem Solomon........... Granite St. Clair Cold Spring :..

Lesterville ........•. 'I~Re,~nolds

C. M. ,Fitzpatrick

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'Isaturday on or after full moon.

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:. :: St.Louis !Callaway ,.S. H. Gilbert lo.B.Knox ~ Saturday on or before full moon. Readsville Chas. S. Rich Chas. VV. Speirs 1st and 3d Wednesdays. Downi~g Schuyler J. H. MOrgan: T. Gamble Sat. on or bef. ~. m.· and 2 wks. after. KnobNoster _ Johnson S. L. Adams ......•.TamesHogan lst and 3d Fridays. Montgomery City. . .. Montgomery C. E. Whitehead !H. N. Cason ' 1st Monday on or befor.e full moon. Neosho Newton E. L. Mahan C. E. Prettyman, Sr.. 1st and 3d Thursdays. Clarkton Dunklin Lewis J. Dunn .....• C. J. Elkins !lst and 3d Mondays. Norborne :::arroll A. B. Sawyer, Jr R. E. Parrish 112d and 4th, Mondays. . Glensted : Morgan Thurston Hawks...• John A. Brockman Saturday on or before fUll moon. Washington Franklin F. H. Tieman .....• Edw. 'V. Gallenkamp, 1st and 3d Fridays. Stanberry :Gentry J. T. Grantham R. L. Richardson .. ""Saturday on or before fUll moon. Laredo IGrundy J. E. Murphy .....• A. L. McGuire :2d and 4th Tuesdays. Butler :Bates ......•... C. E. Culver 'A. H. Culver :lst and 3d Saturdays. ,Alton !Oregon C. S. Gohn W. L. Nicks 'Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2d Friday. IFestus iJeffe:son ...•... R. C. Hopkins IH. E. Vaughn 2d. and 4th Tuesday. Eagleville ,Harrison Fred Pearson jHerbertJones Friday on or before full moon. Ravanna 'Mercer Orin Callaway 'J. C. Saylors , Wednesday before full moon. Lancaster ..........• Schuyler ......•. E. L. Attebury 'I'H. C. Burkland 2d and 4th Fridays. Howell ..... : ..•..... St. Charles R. E. S. Fulkerson, .. Henry H. Heusler Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. New Florence Montgomery B. F. Rice ••.••..•• Howard Ellis '" . 2d and 4th Saturdays. Holden .. : .. , ·Johnson R. C. Brownlee .•.• A. E. Mayhew 1st and 3d Thursdays. Lee's Summit. Jackson E. T. Browning ...• H. P. Holbert. •....• 1st and 3d Fridays. Hollister Taney •........ , J. E. Trout. .......•.r. D. Porter Saturday on or before full moon. \Narrensburg Johnson ......•. Geo. E. Favorite O.W. Greer 1st and 3d Mondays. MartinsbUl;g Audrain' L. E. Stephens J. N. Stephens " .. !Saturday ' after full moon. St. Louis Otto W. Arndt. Henrv WlIke "'lIst and 3d Tuesdays. Atlanta Macon Thomas J. Shearer. Paul M. Jones ,2d and 4th Mondays. Halltown Lawrence H. W. Cameron S, M. Clark 2d Saturday. vVinfield .........•... Lincoln A. J. Cannon C. F. Reed !lst and 3d Saturdays. Springfield.......... Greene B. B. Jones .......• ,G. "V. Nonemacher ' 2d Monday. Sedalia ...•.......... Pettis Walter A. Wheal. .. ;5. B. Kennon 3d Friday. Osceola St. Clair .. , G. O. Rockey IGeo. W. Davies !Friday on or before'tull moon. Leeton.............. Johnson L. W. Harris ,C. P. Helphrey Thursday on or before full moon.

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275 Bunker Bunker Reynolds J. R. Dishman "IH. L. Sullivan 1st and 3d Saturdays. 276 Grand River Freeman ..•....•••.. Cass .........•. Geo. O. Ellis Robert G. Keller ...• Saturday on or before full moon. 277 Wm. D. Muir •...•. , Pilot Grove •...••••.. Cooper , .•.. C. M. Shepherd ,R. S. Harriman 2d and 4th Fridays. 278 Essex ...••..•..•... Essex ....•..•••••••. Stoddard Arthur W. Martin .. : R. A. Davidson 2d and 4th Tuesdays. 279 Hogle's Creek Wheatland ...••••.•. Hickory A. S. Johnson P. Scrivener ,. Saturday on or before full moon. 280 Reeds Spring Reeds Spring Stone , Frank W. Bush Homer Campbell. 2d and 4th Wednesdays. 281 ! Fenton •.•••••••••.. Fenton: St. Louis •.•.... F. H. Carter G. Sievers: '1Saturday on or after full moon. 282 Cosmos St. LOuis A. F. Deitsch Max A. Wittman '12d and 4th Mondays. 283 Stockton Stockton .•.•••...... Cedar Clyde Wrenn ' G. L. Walker iThurs. on or aft. f. m. & 2 wks. aft. 284 Canopy Aurora ......•..•.... Lawrence F. L. Robertson E. H. Baumann , 2d and 4th Tuesdays. 285 Earl. Coffey .••.. : ••....... Davless C. W. Githens Eddie Iddings 1st and 3d Wednesdays. 286 Urich Urich ......• , •.... , . Henry .......•.. G. C. Herrold R. E. McDonald Saturday on or before full moon. 287 Craft Canton Lewis C. C. Clark P. N. Hanna , .. 1st and 3d Mondays. 288 Hermitage .•••.•... Hermitage , Hickory W. E. Davis Elmer D. Coon Saturday on or before full moon. 289 Graham Graham Nodaway C. H. Talbott Frank E. McNeal. 1st and 3d Saturdays. 290 Fairmount. 'Vyaconda .. , , Clark .•........ Elmer La Frenz tW. B. McReynolds .. , Sat. bef. f. m. and Mon. 2 wks. after. . 291 Edina Edina Knox James W. I.{eith ' Geo. H. Hickman .•• Friday on or .before full moon. 292 Lamar Lamar ..••.•••.... ,. Barton ..•...... Hoyt Humphrey Gall D.' Allee .•.... ,. Last Friday In each- month. 293 t Sarcoxie .........•. Sarcoxie ,Jasper ..••.•••. W. R. Patton .....•. Geo. W. ,"Vood , 1st and 3d Tuesdays.. 294: Mound City ......•. iMound City •.•....... IHolt IT. J. Bridgmon Delta Greenelsh :2d and 4th Tuesdays. 295: Moniteau ...••••....!Jamestown , Monlteau .....• ·.R. A. Meyer J. P. Seitz ,Saturday on or before full moon. 296 Sparta ISparta ,Christian IJ. A. Roper F. E. Wall. "1'Friday on or before full moon. 297 Ozark ....•...•••• ,.IFair Grove :Greene .•....••. 'C. A. Putman Ray L. Leach Saturday on or before full moon. 298 Sampson .•.....•... /pontiac ..,' iOzark ·IP. V. pugglns Edwin J. Schofield Saturday on or before full moon. 299 Temple Kansas City ,Jackson Henry :vI. Wethy Thos. A, Mllburn 1st and 3d Tuesdays. 300 Doric Elkland .. , Webster .I John F. Miller Geo. J. Hartley ...•. iSaturday before full moon. 301 White Hall , Barnard Nodaway R. W. young P. R. Melvin. Actg , ~lst and 3d Saturdays. . 302 Lick Creek Perry Ralls J. E. Boulware Roy F. Ward "I'Saturday on or before full moon. 303 Osage Nevada Vernon Harry B. Klumph .. Geo. A. Kaupp 2d Friday. 304 Signal ..•....•..... Minden Mines Barton ....•. '" F. W. Chancellor •.. Fred Johnson.....• 'I2d Tuesday. 305 Clarence Clarence Shelby C. L. Ridings ~rm. L. Hamrick Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2d Fri. after. 306 Ashlar Commerce •........•• Scott. T. R. Frazer ...•... C. M. Wylie Monday on or after full moon. 307 New London :\Tew London !Ralls .....•..... M. D. Watson Geo. E. Lear 'lst and 3d Fridays. 308 Parrott Maysvllle iDeKalb C. A. Harvey 'IHY. W. Saunders .I1st and 3d Saturdays. 309 King Hiram Rayvllle. R. R.I 'IRaY C. Wilkerson A. T. Moftl~t :Saturday on or before full moon. 310 Sikeston Sikeston Scott T. W'. Haskin .....• 'W: E. Hollingsworth. lIst and 3d Thursdays. 311 Kearney Kearney 'Clay 'Iclaud M. Thompson.IChas. L. Smith 1st Thursday. 312 Cuba · Cuba ...•............·Crawford John G. Fox Ben.i. H. A'ewman ,Saturday on or nearest full moon. 313 Kingsville Klngsvllle .. ~ , iJ~hnsor_ ·IL. G. yankee ,v. R. Ragsdale Saturday on or before full moon. 314 Pine Bardley IRlpley ..•...... S. W. Hilton .....• F. Franken 3d Saturday. 315 Jerusalem Jerico Springs Cedar ' F ; M. Davis ..•..... A. W. Porter Sat. on or bef. f. m. and::: wks. after.. 316 Rural. Kansas City ••....... .Jackson Walter R. Ashton .. Thos. J. Thornhill 1st a.nd :l<l Mondays. 317 Osborn Osborn DoKll.lb Raymond Brand H. F. Martin 2d and 4th Saturdays. 318 Eld"ado Lu,ay ......••...... 8Imu' CI",n" I ngo I d Tu••. on 0' t. m. au d 2. wko. art".

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-Continued.

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's!ndo'} Town an P. O. Add,ress.

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County.

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Mas.ter.

Secretary.

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Time of Meeting. ~

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319 Paulville........... . I Adair L. C. Sch~nimann.. lchaR. S. Davis Monday on or before full moon. 320 Morgan Lmn Morgan :Elwyn Pnce ,W. B. Tocld 2d and 4th Mondays. 321 Jonathan \Vest Plains .•....... ! Worth :vV. C. Ray IE. F. Cromer 2d and 4th Wednesdays. :l22 Hardin Cainesville 'Ray H. F. Hoover :M.G.Kennedy Sat. bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. ;{2:l Corner Stone Elmo Fred T. Nauma·nn .. Jno. E. Schmid 1st and 3d Mohdays. 324 i McDonald .........• Brashear Jackson M. '1'. Colgan Allan McD. Hoyt. 1st and 3d Mondays. 3251 Dockery Vel·sailles Linn John A. Loomis P. M. Litton Tuesday of each week. 326 Linn.............. Denver ' Osage Chas. F. vVeeks Chas. J. Vaughan Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 327 Mt. Zion " Hardin Howell E. O. Seleceman '.' W. R. Strickland Friday before full moon. 328 Cainsville......... Independence Harriscn A. E. Childs F. M. French .. , list and 3d Thursdays. 329 Kennedy......... :\1eadville Nodaway E. K. Bailey Jno. S. Wood 'Ilst and 3d Saturdays. 330 Bertrand.......... Bertrand Mississippi. Chas. D. Jackson A. R. Childress 1st and 3d Thursdays. 331 Charity........... St. Joseph Buchanan Herbert H. Powell .. Wm. A. Piner 2d and 4th Mondays. 332 Excello Excello ' Macon W. N. Franks Geo. W. Butler 3d Saturday. 333 Chillicothe........ Chillicothe l.ivingston Miles Elliott .las. W. McCormick .. 2d and 4th Fridays. ~3~ I BI·eckinridge Brec~enridge Caldwell .....•. !E. B. Russell 'Icary Ree~ 2d and 4th T~ursdays. .>3~ . Joplin.... . Joplin Jasper IGeo. W. Macphelson \Vm. A. Nickell 1st and 3d Fndays. :l36 H.aIlS\.ille Hallsville Boone T. Pollard 'IR. F. Hulett. Saturday on or aft.e.r full moon. 337; Blue Spl·ings Blue Spring!; Jackson ,R. E. Carel. "V. D. Warren 1st and 3d Fridays. 33R ! Myrtle............ Richmond, R. R Ray I.r. W. Roadcap ehas. L. Renfro Saturday on or before full moon. 339' Fidelity. .. . . .. . . .. Farley Platte · ,11 W. T. Hope ,R. W. Cal·son "Vednesday on or before full moon. 340 Westp01't......... Kansas City , Jackson F. A. ·Marshall H. C. Elberg 2d and 4th Tuesdays. 3H Rockville Rockville Bates r. E. Hook S. H. Bothwell. 1st and 3d Saturdays. 342 Circle Roscoe :;t. Clair James A. Smith W. vV. Spencer Thursday on or before full moon. 343 Agricola Blairstown, R. R. 22 .. Henry G. G. Cates B. L. Gllliam Saturday on or before full moon. 344 Moberly Moberly Randolph Benj. E. Henderson. Jno. W. Tate 2d and 4th Mondays. 34:; i F'ellowship Joplin Jasper VV. P. Armstrong Frank G. Ade 2d and 4th Fridays. :146 Arlington Dixon Pulaski. Chas. J. Kunz S. R. Hale "Thursday on or before full moon. 347 Spring Creek 1 Lec.oma Dent. Sam'l F. Arthur 'IH. K. Br·adford Saturday on or before full moon. 34R Wadesburg Cre'ghton 1 Cass J. ,V. Gregg F. C. Blossom...... Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 4th Saturday. 349 Pollock Pollock Sullivan S. B. Ballard IJohn C. Schnelle 1st and 3d Tuesdays. 350 'J'yl·ian Montrose, R. 35 Bates 'IGeo. S. Porter 'W. H. Dudley ••• '" Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 351 Mosaic.... . Belleview , Iron D. D. Appleberry :--<. Warren Saturday on or after full moon. 352 Friend 1 Oz~rk j :::hristian E. Bradshaw Geo. T. Breazle Saturday on or before full moon. ~~3 BarnesvIlle.... . Ellm.gton ···.·.·.· Reyno~ds E. E. Roberts B. R~lssel1 2d and 4th Saturda)-·s. 1 Audram ,>:>4 Hebl·on Mexico R. C. Strode r. J. l elso 1st Tuesday.

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355 356 357 358 359 360 361

Adelphia Ancient Landmark. Aux Vasse North "Vest. Garre.tt Tuscan Riddick Hir·am

Edgerton ......•.....IPlatte "I.wilford H. Mizener. Edwin Thatcher ;Sat.on or be!. f. m. and 2 wks. after. Harrisburg ....•...•• IBoone. '" J. )J. Farris J. W. Hord [Saturday' on or before full moon. Aux Vasse ~Callaway L. E. Martin ....••• \-V. S. Hopkins IMonday on or before full moon. Tarkio IAtchison E. N. Raines ....••• John Gerlash 2d and 4th Thursdays. Arcola 'IDade E. 0. Kelley .......• H. W. Kitsmiller ..• Thursday on or before full moon. St. Louis Geo. Coslow Alfred H. White 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Buffalo "IDallas R. C. Booth .......• G. L. Davis Friday on or before full moon. ~~2 Kahoka.: ..........• Clark J. P. Scott ........• Geo. V. Calvert. 1st and 3d Fridays. 3 3 ! F~at~rna~ Robe:tsv~lle .......•. Franklin '\Y. Walters ....• A. Glaze Saturday on or after full moon. 3~~ I HIggInsvIlle HlggInsvl1le ·ILafayette \J. M. Edwards A. H. H~efer 2d and Hh'l\;I0ndays. 366 i BaY?ll B~kers.field , ·I)zark , .•.... C. F. Greene ......• W. T. WIles Saturday on or before full moon. ~67 I ~dalr Kirksville IAdair By.ron Cosby.......• John H. Holton 1st and 3d Thursdays. " arry........... Washburn IBarry Thos. Fr .. Hickev .. 'IP' R. Moffatt Sat. on or bef. f, m. and 2 wks. after. 368 CI'escent Hill. Adrian Bates A. C. Bair. .. : Fred Hanley 2d and 4th Saturdays. 369 Composite Doniphan ,Ripley Elbert C. White Chas. 0. Borth 2d and 4th Tuesdays. g~ ~Illiamstown, Williamstown :LeW!s Walter Lassw~Il ...• 1 C. R. Selway ......• Sat. on or after f. m. and 2 wks. after. heldon Sheldon !Vernon Ha.l·old 'vV. Pettlbon., D. S. Fer~y ......••. Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. 1 3:2 NonpareiL East Lynne Cass C. 'vV. ~inote ;wm. E. WIley Saturday on or before full moon. 3/.1 Belle Belle Maries E. A. Lll1dner T. J. Tynes 2d and 4th Saturdays. 374 Wilderness. . Wilderness Ioregon Marion Greene.....• D. T. King , Saturday on or before full moon. 375 vvayneSville:.:::.::: Waynesville •........ PUlaski. IFrank J. Christeson J. L. Mitchell. Saturday on or before full moon. 376 Kin/? Hill. S~uth ~t. Joseph ,Buchanan R. Timerman Jesse Moore 1st and 3d Saturdays ~~7 AnCient Craft KIng- CIty ,Gentry R. M. Stanley .....• Jacob Levy 1st and 3d Thursdays. 18 Berlin King <:;ity. R. R., .. ,. 3entry Peter C. Hubner Clyde H. Carson 2d and 4th Saturdays. 379 Billings Billings IChristian V. VV. Anderson ...• W. L. Hixson Friday on or before full moon. 380 Queen City Queen City ....•..... Schuyler G. L. Lauer .......• J. W. Miller 2d and 4th Tuesdays. 381 Ionia............ 8:ldon Miller ',' D. R. Harrison ....• N. J. Shepherd 2d and 4th Saturdays. 382 ,Mt, Ararat. ·.: ropaz , .•.... Douglas 1". B. Hafner :. Geo. W. Hood Saturday on or before full moon. 383 Pythagoras Cassville Barry W. T. PI·lest. ....•• J. S. Plattenblll'g 2d and 4th Saturdays. 384 East Prairie East Prairie Misslssippi.; C. D. Mitchell. ....• L. B. Cook Every Thursday. 385 Richland Richland PulaskI. E. L, Payne ......•• D. R. McDonald , 2d Wednesday. 386 Dayton ' Garden City. R. R Cass Clyde C. Leslie ...•• H. A. Lenhart. Saturday on or after full moon. 387 .Voodside Thomasville ........• Oregon J. M. Floyd .......• R. H. Franks .••.••• Saturday on or before full moon. 388. Chula Chula ~ •• Livingston , L. L. Lauderdale L. P. Carlyle 1st and 3d Thursdays 389 Arcana ', Harris Sullivan Chas. Sax .........•.J. T. Richardson 1st Monday. 390 Marionville Marionville '" Lawrence George Keast. .•...• James Pine 1st and 3d Fridays. 391 Raytown Raytown Jackson ~ .. A. B. Greene ......• W. B. Dunham Sat. on or bef: f. m. and 2 wks. arter. 393 Christian Oak Grove Jackson N. R. Holcomb '1'. M. Vermillion Fridays before 2d and 4th Sundays. 393 Bee Hive Lawson ............• Ray Geo,. W. Ball. .....• S. L. Gaylord 1st and 3d Saturdays. 394 Lucerne .'Lucerne Putnam T. K. ,Fry A. F. Lowry Thursday on or before full moon. 395 Hatfield IHatfield Harrison S. A. Moore, Jr ..•• S. A. Clark., Wednesday on or before full moon. 396 Western Llght. , Louisburg ..........• Dallas Roscoe S. Lindsey .• J. K . .Jones Saturday on or before full moon. :l97 Gowel· Gowel' Clinton , W. B. Sanders ,H. T. Bowlin 1st and 3d Saturdays. 398 Jasper ' Jasper .............• .Jasper , Chas. L. Hazlett ~C. F. Rex , 1st and 3d Tuesdays.

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-:-Continued. No.

Lodge.

399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421' 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 43.0 431 432 433 434

Pike Decatur Carterville Malta .. '.' Lowry City Rosendale Everton Malden............ Charleston Montrose Louisville Iberia Joppa , Appleton City ,. Valley............. .Greensburg Hunnewell Cache White Water Clear Creek Star Itaska ........•.... Urbana Gate of the Temple. Galt. Samaritan Greer .Ridge Rothville Glenwood Pittsville New Madrid Winona ..........•• Cement ..........•. Competition Mack's Creek Wheellng

Town and P. O. Address.

County.

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Master.

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Secretary.

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Time of Meeting.

'/'.1.

Curryville IPike W. G. Caldwell H. Sisson. ; Thursday on or before full moon. Peirce City •......... Lawrence S. J. Douthltt. E. T. Ecroyd 1st and 3d Thursdays. Carterville IJasper ..•...... J. Arthur DaughertY/J. B. BOYd 1st and 3d Fridays. Malta B~nd , iSaline , .. ,. C. H. Hume'. .....•• J. G. Nye Tu.esday on or before full moon Lowry City ' .. 1St. Clair I. E. Austin H. G. Nail Frlday on or before full moon. Rosendale ;Andrew W. B. Wood "'IA. L. Luellen 2d and 4th Thursdays. 8verton : :Dade T. L. Hankins J. C. Tomson 2d and 4th Wednesdays. Malden 'Dunklin A. S. Metzger George Dalton, Sr Friday on or before full moon. :Charleston ;Mississippi. •... Clyde E. Swank ,Jas. A. Boone 1st and 3d Thursdays. Montrose Henry E. M. Fenimore IC. C. Arnolil 1st and 3d Saturdays. Louisville Lincoln J. D. Motley IH. Clay Wilson Saturday on or before full moon. Iberia Miller Geo. W. Duncan Brose Dickerson ISaturday on or before full moon. Hartville Wright. A. M. Curtis J. H. Farmer 'I Friday on or before full moon, Appleton City , iSt. Clair Wm. V. Ingels Jas. A. White Saturday on or before full moon. Bolckow ; ......•• !Andrew •...•... A. C. Ashford W. L. Wood i2d and 4th Saturdays. Greensburg •......... 1'Knox ..•....... J. VV. Boley Lester Kaser -:Saturday on or before full moon. Hunnewell Shelby •........ H. W. Carr C. W. Howe :Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. St. Louis I. B. E. Thomas A. P. Watkins ,2d and 4th Saturdays. Laflin Bollinger: L. J. Grimsley J. F. Winters :Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks: after. Palo PI.nto Bento~ 'IEmmett Ellis ~Y. H. Comer j4th Saturday. Tab. er:'llle St. Clair .•..... 'I.B.A. Hagan W.' S. Hoover ,'Saturday on or before full moon. St. Louis ,Roy C. Gans, Acting E. C. ·Wm. 9r~mann.. 1st and 3d Mondays. Urbana .....•........ Dallas iG. W. Miller .......• W. C. Ormsby .•...... 2d Saturday. Springfield Greene 'IWm. J. Craig Edw. W. Clark ,3d Thursday. Galt. Grundy ·IJ. W. King 'V. G. Smith '12d and 4th Fridays. Bonne Terre St. Francois IC. R. Hosking C. C. Woodside 1st and 3d Saturdays. Green .Ridge : Pettl~ IE.. E. Bagby Ira L. Lee .....•..... 2d and 4th Fridays. Rothville , Charlton Wm. L. Richeson H. H. Miller 2d and 4th Wednesdays. Glenwood Schuyler E. J. Whitlow F. W. Buckle Sat. on or after f. m. and 2 wks. a.ft. Pittsville Johnson W. G. Shafer ....•.• .T. M. Rice Friday on or before full moon. New Madrid New Madrid .. ,. Chas. Knott Geo. V. Montague 2d and 4th Mondays. Winona Shannon F. O. Smith J. T. Loyd Thursday on or before full moon. Halfway Polk ....•...... G. W. Battreall. E. L. Van Gilder , Saturday on or before full moon. Competition .•......• Laclede Reuben Noble Omar Vermillion Saturday on or after full moon. Mack's Creek Camden J. T. Edwards N. V. Moulder 1st Saturday. Wheeling Livingston Herman W. Shifflet .. Chas. Hawker 2d and 4th Thursdays.

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435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479

'IH.

Rockbridge RockbrJdge Ozark G. James C. H. Ross Saturday on or before full moon. Gothic Alexandria .........• Clark ...•...... H. R. Carver J. D. Rebo Saturday on or before full moon. Lafayette Corder Lafayette iE. M. Moore J. M. Reynolds Saturday on or before full moon. Temperance Smithville Clay .....•..... Frank K. Justus Chas. Lederer 1st and 3d Wednesdays. Mt. Olive , , Rogersvllle, R. R. 3 ••. Webster ,. C. W. Brooks, Jr Otto Brooks , Friday before ful! moon. Trowel. " M.arble Hill Bollinger " G. B. Snider T. W. Chandler 3d and 4th Saturdays. Excelsior Jackson Cape Girardeau. Alvin Penze!. C. E. Williams 2d and 4th Thursdays. Burlington......... Burlington June.; . Nodaway Walter Mendenhall.. A. F. Stitt. 1st and 3d Saturdays. Anchor .. ; 1St. Louis : Walter C. Kruse .. :. R. H. Caffall 2d and 4th Wednesdays. Ada ~ Orrick Ray .. : W. H. Pointer Geo. A. Hall 1st and 3d Fridays. West Gate St. Louis iB. W. Grissom Fred J. Kurtz 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Ivanhoe · Kansas City Jackson :Wm. F. Woodruff Geo. S.McLanahan 2d and 4th Thursdays. Jacoby .. ; Darlington Gentry 'ILark King...•...... Y. Goodman 1st and 3d Fridays. Schell City Schell City ...•...... Vernon S. B. Vickers J. G. B. Marquis. " Saturday on or before full moon. Bois D'Arc Bois D'Arc Greene E. D. Squibb H. R. Brooks /lst and 3d Tuesdays. Belton............ Belton .......•...... Cass S. E. Jerard Call G. Ryden •..••• 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Raymore ,RaymOre Cass Harry Nicely G. L. Brown ....•.. '12d and 4th Tuesdays. Verona Verona Lawrence E. R. Haymes John W. young 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Forsyth Forsyth Taney .. : James B. Hicks J. A. Weatherman Saturday on or after full moon. Continental. Stewartsvllle De Kalb C. F. Mattingley Shelby R. Thornton .. 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Hinton "IHinton ........•...•. Boone Wm. H. Wade .....• Walter Berry Friday on or before full moon. Wallace Bunceton ...........• Cooper H. E. Meeker ' Jno. W. Wilson .•.•• 1st and 3d Fridays. Jone~burg Jonesb.urg Montgomery G. L. Wilson .•....• D. Carter Saturday on or before full moon. MelvIlle ·1·Dadevllle .........•.. Dade Alvin C. Bla.kemore C. F. Lanaers Thurs. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. aft. Hazelwood Seymour '.' Webster F. A. Snyder 'Icarl Garner Thurs. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. aft. Lambskin St. Louis , C. W. Seagrave Fred G. Fuessel. 2d and 4th Wednesdays. Caruthersville ,Caruthersville .....•. Pemiscot. L. B. Holt •••....•• John D. Strohm 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Santa Fe..... .. Santa Fe •......•...• Monroe John J. Johnston ..• Jno. MeN. Cowherd .. Saturday on or before full moon. Clifton ..••......... Thayer ..•.••.••....• Oregon Paul Cockman .....• Robt. L. Williams 2d and 4th Tuesdays. AulviIle .. : AullviIle .........••• Lafayette ..•... Wm. A. Corder ....• J. E. Lohoefeuer 1st and 3d Fridays. . Gaynor City Parnell .........•••.• Nodaway ...•... Hiram Day .......•• H. A. Frawley .••.... 1st and 3d Saturdays. South West South West City ••••. McDonald W. F. Stevenson .•.• W. D. Polson ...•.... Saturday on or.before full moon. PleasantHope ,PleasantHope Polk E.J. Adams L. B. Parrish Thursday on or before full moon. Red Oak Red Oak .•...•••••.• Lawrence C. P. Hagler ....••• D. E. Curry •......... Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. Plato ..•........... Plato ........••••••• Texas .•...•.... Rob't B. Tllley .•.•• S. P. Hicks Saturday before full moon. Nodaway Maryville ••........• Nodaway Wm. H. Gilbert .•.• L. P. Colvin 2d and 4th Saturdays. Mineral ..•......... Oronogo .......•...• Jasper Guy H. Waring .••• W. C. Jolley ..•.••... 1st and 3d Thursdays. Pickering Pickering ..........• Nodaway James L. Clayton .• J. F. Hanna 2d and 4th Saturdays. Ninevah :: Olney ...••••........ Lincoln Mastin M. young W. L. Northcutt 1st Saturda:y. Guilford Guilford Nodaway Chester Wilson ••••• Alex H. Wilson 2d and 4t.h Saturdays. Golden Golden City Barton D. M. Hunter J. W. Mardick .••••• 2d and 4th Tuesdays. Mt. Hope " Odessa Lafayette R. L. Searfoss S. S. Rutan 2d and 4th Fridays. Henderson Rogersville .........• Webster .......• James A. Clift .•..• B. A. Hankins .•.••• Thursday on or before full moon. Racine Seneca.•..••.•.....• Newton Alvy Brown •....•.• W. E. Street 2d and 4th Mondays. Rich Hill. .. Rich Hill ......•....• Bates E. H. Phillips .....• W. W. Ferguson, Jr.. 2d and 4th Mondays~

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-Continued. No.

1- .

Lodge.

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iJ.nd P.Town O. Address.

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Master.

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518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541

Oriental. Blackburn .. Crane Crane .•............. Clifton Heights St. Louis ...........• I,ockwood Lockwood . Gate City. . . . . . . . .. Kansas City . Stinson Miller, R. 1 .. Spickardsville Spickard . Cunningham Sumner ............• Wayne ' Piedmont ' Higbee , Higbee , , Conway Conway . Xiang-ua Niangua , .. Peculiar Peculiar .. Lane's Prairie \ViCbY, R. 2 .. , •.. , .• Dexter ............• Dexter . Comfol·t. , Rocky Comfort. . Columbia Pacific .............• Blackwell Blackwell . Ingomar Willow Springs . Bethel............. Bethel . Stella Stella . Dawn Ludlow ............• Winigan Winigan . Jacksonville Jacksonville .

~12 Ferguson

• 3

Mansfi.eld

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5~2 5:->3

.al~~ PraIrie Hill South Gate Clinton ~arl Junction pose Hill. endleton Calhoun Clarksburg

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,ummerville Prairie

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G46 547 ~4S

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.. cow. . . . . . . 5,,9 Clarksdal<; 560 Nelson...... 561 i Cowgill. . . . . . . . . ..

Saline 'IM. P. Suggett ·IC. J. Blackburn 'ITueSday on or before full moon. Stone John S. Hemphill G. P. Hughes Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. after. ............... Joseph Singer......• Wm. H. Haley 2d and 4th Tuesdays. Dade Cartel' Skaggs .....• H. G. Caldwell. 'IThurs. on or bef. f. m. and 2 wks. aft. Jackson ...•••• M . L. Mills Thos. D. Boatright. .. 1st and 3d Saturdays. Lawrence E. C. Truitt. ......• Wm. J. Adamson: Sat. on or after f. m,' and 2 wks. aft. Grundy .......• N. J. young .......• W. M. Ashbrook , . .1st and 3d Wednesdays. Chariton ..•..•. , Benj. H. smart. ...• ' M. L. Smart. 'l2d and 4th Wednesdays. Wayne i,.T.. S. Berryman, Jr~ .Jno. A. Hammond , 2d and 4th Saturdays. Randolph Lee Thomason .....• J. ,V. Bottoms 1st and 3d Wednesdays. Laclede Thomas u. Gourley. Jno. L. Anderson ,1st Saturday' each month. Webster J. M. Robertson J. B. Davis iF'I'ida y before full moon. Casso J. K. Garten Cyril V. Llggett. .. '12d and 4th Fridays. Maries ".J. A. Coole, Geo. LindnerSaturday before full moon. Stoddard Chas. H. Grissom Ira C. Rogers 1st and 3d Tuesdays. McDon~ld•..•.. Henry P. Lamberson Burton E. Lamberson Saturday on or before full moori. Franklm Wm. B. Parrett Louis M. Roemer 2d and 4th Thursdays. St. Francois Elmer O. Brooks H. E. Brown.· 'Isaturday on or before full moon. Howell. W. L. Forrester Jno. E. Alsup 1st and 3rd ThursLlays. Shelby Sam Zeigler Roy Nicol 1st and 3d Mondays.. Newton W. H. Carnes J. M. Manness Saturday on or before full moon. Livingston ...•.. Albert J. ReIdel F. R. Yahns 2d and 4th Fridays. Sulli van .....•.. S. M. Romine S. Th rasher Saturday on or before full moon. Randolph ..•... Asher Elliott vV-. H. Howerton 2d and 4th Tuesdays Apr. to Oct.2d and 4th Saturdays Oct. to Apr. Ferguson ·ISt. !_ouis : •. , C. L. Falk ·IJ· R. Alderton, Jr 1s.t and 3d Saturdays. Mansfield "Vnght .....•... J. B. Freeman:::, .. ,C. A. Stephens Wednesday on 0.1' before full moon. St. Louis : Carl Philips IChas. E. Cullen 2d and 4th FrIdays. Zalma.............. nollmger H. V. Slinkard ·C. L. Bollinger 1st and 3d Saturdays. IPrairie Hill. C. hariton CIa.renee. A. HoustonlJ. D. ),lcAdam Saturday on or .before full moon. Kansas City Jackson W. S. Montgomery.. H. O. Waters 1st and 3d Thursdays. IClinton Henry ,.r. s. Spore Wm. H. Dorman , 2d and 4th Fridays. Carl Junction Jasper \V. H. Smith A. W. McDowell 2d and 4th Wednesdays. St. Louis....... .. Wm. H. Dickey rChas. C. Jackson 2d and 4th Tu.esdays. Doe Run St. FrancOIs Christ Kassabaum .. ' E. R. Horton ..•.•.. 2d and 4th FrIdays. Calhoun Henry , S. S. Stone ........• [priCe F. Richardson. 'IIst and 3d Thursdays. Clarksburg ?vIoniteau H. E. Allee .......• Geo. W. Watkins 1st and 3d Mondays. Foster.............. Bates J. L. Cope IJ. G. Doolittle 2d and 4th Saturdays. Summervllle Texas Adam .J. Baskett W. E. Brewer Saturday on or before full moon. Gilman City Harrison Floyd ·Eberhart ....• Geo. A. Richardson 2d and 4th Thursdays. Blairstow~ ~ H.enry .T. W. Gallihugh , W. R. Phipps .....•• Sat. on or bef. f. m. and 2wks. after. Moscow Mills. . . . . . .. LIncoln C. F. Hill J. A. Hammond ,Saturday on or before full moon. Clarksdale DeKalb Glade Bradbury A. A. Morton 1st and 3d Thursdays. Nelson ........•..... Saline fohn M. McClelland Howard A. Smith ..• 2d and 4th Fridays: Cowglll Caldwell ' E. M. McCray C. A. Reed. , ". Saturday on or before full moon.

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, Etc.-Continued. No.

562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599

Lodge. Deepwater york ' Jamesport. .. .. Tebbetts Maplewood MUler , Naylor Tiff City Republic ....•...... Hayti " ., .. , Rutledge Bernie , La Monte... .. . Easter Olive Branch Ewing Forest Park Grandin. . . . . . . . . .. Houston Illmo. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Koshkonong : .. Novinger , " .' Red Bird ,

Town and P. O. Address.

County.

Deepwater ..•••..... Henry Kans'as City •••...... Jackson ....•... Jamesport.......... Daviess .•...... Tebbetts ..••••.•.... Callaway •...•.. Maplewood •......... St. Louis •..... , Miller ....•...•.•...• Lawrence •...•. Naylor Ripley TilT City McDonald ..•••• Republic ......•..•.. Greene ..•...... Hayti. .......•...... Pemiscot •....•. Rutledge ..•......... Scotland Bernie.............. Stoddard La Monte < Pettis ...••..... St. Clair ......•....•. Franklin •...... St. Louis .......................•..• ' Ewing ....•......... Lewis ...•...... St. Louis Grandin Carter Thompson, R. R. 2 Audrain Illmo............... Scott Koshkonong ,Oregon Novinger .••......... Adair Red Bird Gasconade Sh~mrock Shamrock Callaway Cnterion Alba Jasper Branson Branson Taney St. Francisville Wayland ;Clark , Grove Spring Grove Spring ....•... I Wright Advance ......•.... Advance .•.......... Stoddard Barnett. Barnett Morgan Stputsville Stoutsville ..........• Monroe .......•• Union Union ...•........... Franklin Blodgett. ; , Blodgett Scott ......•.... Emmanuel. ~ll/lo Texas Puxico , ; ., Puxico Stoddard Bosworth Bosworth Carroll Leadwood Leadwood. . . • • . . • . .. St. Francois , Elving. '" I Elvins :St. Francois ,

Master.

Secretary.

t Time of Meeting.

W. C. England .•• "IE. C. Woodard 1st and 3d Fridays. E. J. Mellanby ...•• .Tames H. Wark 2d and 4th Saturdays. Robert W. Hill ....• iRolla F. Wood tst and 3d Mondays. H. H. Leonard •.... 1 W. W. Griffin ....•• 2d and 4th Saturdays. A. Stratford Fuller., Phil H. Oswald 1st and 3d Mondays. E. G. Webb ..•..... \J. H. Tatum Sat. on or bef.' f. m. and 2 wks. atter. J. D. Spelce E. E. Smith , 1st and 3d Thursdays. Geo. Williams Dennis Burns Saturday on or after full moon. Forrest E. Owen ...• Daniel McAllister 2d and 4th Thursdays. 1. Kohn .•••.•....•• Virgil P. Adams ' 1st and 3d Thursdays. Geo. W. Adams ...• J. R. Comley Sat. on or bet. f. m. and 2 wks. after. Wm. Crutchfield D. B. Abernathy 2d and 4th Thursdays. V. E. Keller .......• E. D. Guthrie ,. F'riday on or before full moon. J. Perry Short John Dierking 2d Saturday. J. J. Kessler Jules J. Wehrli 2d and 4th Tuesdays., Oscar C. Leach "Iwm. H. Nelson Thurs. an or bef. f. m. & 2 wks. aft. Seth B. Worthington Wm. C. Rese 2d and 4th Mondays. A. D. Wiles · J. M. McGhee 2d Saturday. O. P. Craghead E. J. Sims 3d Friday. Jno. Martin..••..... Walter L. Holden tst and 3d Tuesdays. U. G. Davis .•.•... 'IJ. Ed Old :. . . . Wednesday on or before full moon. C. A. Branaman J. C. Gaffield Every Friday. Clarence B. Sewell.. Chas. Brewer Saturday before 4th Sunday. W. S. Armstrong J. S. Lai.I. Thursday on or before full moon. T. H. B. Elliott. .. '. P. F. ShIppen ,. tst and 3d Mondays. Floyd Jones :John H. Baxte[". £"riday on or before full moon. Howard E. Spurgeon Oscar T. Brown 1st and 3d Thursdays. S. O. Shields J. M. Vestal 'ld Saturday. Tim Hosmer E. L. Potter .......• tst and 3d Saturdays. C. P. Tompkins O. C. Weaver .. ' Saturday. on or before full moon. Wm. F. Hurd O. L. Dooley Saturday on or before full moon. J. M. Owen P. W. Vitt. 2d and 4th Tuesdays. Evan Burke 1Wm. D. McBride. tst and 3d Thursdays. Oscar Kelly Jno. J. Robinson ~aturday on or before full moon. Fred Kelley Tno. P. Harlin 3d and 4th FI'idays. S. W. Strange ,"-eo C HOllx ~d and 4th Tuesdays. Chas. B. Acuff Ernest Mason. . . . . .. Zd and 4th Saturdays. Rolla Cozean '.r. C. \Vestover Zd and 4th Thursdays.

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600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 '610 611 612 613 614 615 616 i 617; 618' 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637' 638 639· 640 641 642 643 644

Cosby .......•••••.•'COSb y Andrew C. L. Allen Bernard Green 1st and 3d Saturdays. Clayton .....•••.•.. Clayton •.••......... St. Louis Jno. F. Millman Edward P. Clark, Jr .. lst and 3d Thursdays. Acacia .......•••..• :Columbia Boone ....•..... S. R. Barnett ..••.. J. M. Long 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Morehouse .•....... :Morehouse ..•....... New Madrid B. D. Eaker ......•. E. L. Hindman 3d and 4th Saturdays. Strasbur~•...•••... Strasburg ..•••••.... Cass T. F. Ballard J. W. Seaton Tuesdays on or before full moon. Walker :Walker ••••.••....•.. Vernon Wm. Tuttie T. G. Botsford .•..... 3d Saturday and 2 wks. after. Craig jCraig Holt. Carlisle M. Randall. C. W. Anlbal. 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Eminence .....•.... IEminence .•..•..•.•. Shannon ...• ~ .. J. N. Sparks T. J. Freeman ....•.. ' 1st Saturday; Straffor.d ....••••••. Strafford ..•....•.... Greene Arthur J. Smith J. J. Foster 1st and 3d Saturdays. Warrenton ..••••... Warrenton •••••••••• Warren .•...... J. C; Eisenberg E. L. DelvanthaI. 1st and 3d Mondays: Clark.; Clark .••.......... ;. Randolph ...•.. Wm. B. Graves Smith P. Edwards 1st and 3d Thursdays. Centertown Centertown ...•...... Cole .......••.• Joe N. Smith K. I. Mahan 2d and 4th Saturdays. Mokane ..•....•.... Mokane CallawJ.y R. I. Gowan O. H. Klein 1st and 3d Saturdays. Wellston Wellston ...••....... St. Louis .••••.• Wm. H. Evans A. L. Rutledge ,. 2d and 4th Thursdays. Mt. Washington Mt. Washington Jackson ;. Gregg B. Christy Fred Score 2d and 4th Fridays. Chaffee .••......... Chaffee Scott E. A. Reissans M. H. Stubblefield 1st and 3d Fridays. Marion Mercer ....•..•.• ; ••• Mercer ...•••... C. W. Cunningham. A. A. Alley '2d and 4th Tuesdays. Park ...•••...•...•. Kansas City ...•.•.•• Jackson ..•..••. Allen W. Burton Edwin.J. King 2d and 4th Mondays. Grandview .....•... Grandview ...•.••••.. Jackson •.•.•... Harry S. Truman Gilbert Strode 2d and 4th Fridays. Fairview .•....•..• Fairview ••••..•••••. 'l'ewtcll ...•.•.• C. J. Marrs L. N. Pannell Thursday on or before full moon. Willard ..••....•••• Willard ..••••.•••••.. Greene ...••.•.. E. E. Watson R. B. Cochran , 2d Saturday. . Anderson Anderson •..•.•...••. McDonald C. M. Snell. : J. H. Joseph 2d and 4th Saturdays. Norwood Norwood Wright R. A. Ryan J. M. Ryan Thurs. on or bef. f. m. & 2 wks. aft. Maple Neelyvi~le..'••••••••• Butler ........• M. W. Owen ....•.. W. H. McLean ..••••• 1st 'anq 3d Saturdays. Owensville ....•.•.. OwensvIlle .•••.••••• Gasconade ..... , W. O. Boyd ,•.. Geo. B. Murray ...•. 1st and 3d Fridays. , Sheffield Kansas City .•.•••••• Jackson ••••.... Chas. A. Holcer C. A. Lester 2d and 4th Thursdays. Magnolia St. Louis .•..•••••••...•..........•. Win. T. Pausch H. G. Beedle 2d and 4th Wednesdays. 'Vallace Park Wallace ...•••••••••. Buchanan .•.•.. M. W. Dooley J. A. Sewell ..•...... 2d Saturday. Moundville Moundville ..•.•••• ; ·Ivernon ..•...• " C. V. Ashbaugh .•.. D. B. Hill Saturdays on or before full moon. Valley Park :Valley Park .•••••••• St. Louis .•..... Wm. T. vance 1 John A. Myers. 2d and 4th Wednesdays. East Gate ' Kansas City ,. ,Jackson •••..•••. W. M. Sams Chas. P. KlIlingswortl1st and 3d Tuesdays. Tower Grove St.Louis ..••......•...•.....•..•....Joseph B. Oliver ••. ,Arthur M. Bischoff 3d and 4th Thursdays. Belgrade ......•... Belgrade ....••.••... Washington .•.. B. F. Newcomb .•.• ' L. E. Bartlow 3d Saturday. Archie ........•.... Archie ...••••.•...•. Cass E. W. Longwell !B. E. Lord .•...•..• 1st Tuesday. Steele ; Steele Pemiscot..: Max L. Kelley 'Geo.W.Treece 2d and 4th Wednesdays. Tuscumbia Tuscumbia .•.•...... Miller J. A. Roark F. E. Fendor! .•.••• 1st and 3d Fridays. Weaubleau Weaubleau Hickory E. P. Goodnight M. N. Nelhardt. 3d Saturday. Mountain View Mountain View... Howell ••.•••• Thos. Alexander Jesse Stewart. 2d and 4th Saturdays. Triangle St. Louis ...•................•.•..• Joseph M. Judge John R. Spencer 1st ann ~d ~aturdays. Mizpah , St. Louis .................••.•..... Percy B. Eversden .. Theo. J. F.vers 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Jennings Jennings ..•..•...... St. Louis Geo. L. Walters Henry W. Wiebrock.1st and 3d Tuesdays. Trinity ...........• St. Louis .••••.••................... Wm. P. Morgan 1Theo. W. Kisker 1st and 3d Fridays. Benjamin Franklin. St. Louis E. C. Morgan 'Morris Popper 2d and 4th Thursdays. Northeast Kansas City Jackson C. H. Carman :Geo. R. Hodge 1st and 3d Thursdays. Grain Valley Grain Valley Jackson .•...... H. E. Warren !J. W. Snodgrass 2d and 4th Saturdays.

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT.-Continued;

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265

Appendix

1917. ]

RECAPITULATION OF

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT Chartered Lodges on the Rolls, September, 1916....... Ceased to exist during 1916-1917...................... Chartered September 19, 1917

0

••••

,

644 6 638 6

Total number of Lodges, 1917.....................

644

MEMBERSHIP RETURNS. • Initiated Passed Raised Affiliated Reinstated

5,422 , 5,558 0

5,028 '. . .. 1,209 541

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

:

,

6,778 DiInitted '......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1,363 Suspended for unmasonic conduct..................... 10 Suspended for non-payment of dues 1,006 Expelled 31 Died ,... 1,011 0

••

0

•••••••

0"

••

3,421 Gain in' Chartered Lodges Rejected, 840.

'.'

~

, 3,357

. Note.-The membership obtained from reporting Lodges is 70,144, including Lodges U. D.


OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI. FROM ITS ORGANIZATION APRIL 23d, 1821.

El~:t\~n.

Grand Master.

D. Grand Master.

Grand S. Warden.

I Grand

.i. Warden.

I

Gran.d Treasurer.

April, 1821 Thos. F. Riddick" '.' James Kennerly " Wil.1J.·am Bates • Archibald Gamble.• " Oct., 1821 Nath'l B. Tucker· Thompson Douglass" Edward Bates ·: William Bates • Archibald Gamble.. • Oct.• 1822 Kath'l B. Tucker· Thompson Douglass· Edward Bates *I\Vm. G. Pettus • Arc'hibald Gamble.. ' Oct., 1823 Nath'l B. Tucker· Geo. H. C. )lelody.· Edward Bates ·.·'Wm. G. Pettus iArchibald Gamble.. • Oct., 1824 Nath'l B. Tucker· Geo. H. C. Melody." Wm. G. Pettus *, Thornt. Grimsley ' Archibald Gamble .. " Oct., 1825 Edward Bates ..·.* Geo. H. C. MelodY.*IWm. G. Pettus *:Thornt. Grimsley * Archiblilld Gamble.. ' Oct., 1826.,. Edward Bates ...• Hardage Lane ·IMartin Ruggles., .. *. John F.Ryland • Rich. T ..McKinney .• Oct., 1827 Edward Ba.tes, .. • Hardage Lane ......• IMartin Ruggles * H, R. Gamble '" Thornton Grimsley.· Oct., 1828 Hardage Lane • Geo. H. C. Melody.. • H. R. Gamble • Adam L. Mills • Thornton Grimsley.' Oct., 1829 Hardage Lane • Fred. L. Billon..... • H. R. Gamble • Adam L., Mills • Bernard Pratte • Oct., 1830 ...• IHardage Lane *,Geo.H. C. Melody.. " Sinclair Kirtley • Adam L. Mills * Thomas Andrews • Dec., 1831. IEdward Bates, .. ·; Geo. H. C. Melody .. • Ollver Parker ......• Augustus Jones • Thomas Andrews * Oct., 1832 :H. R. Gamble ,'Geo. H. C. Melody.. • M. J. Koyes ·.Augustus Jones • Thomas Andrews * Dec., 1833 !SinCla.lr Kirtley .. • A. B. Chambers • John '\Vilson ·!G. A.' Tuttle * Geo. H. C. :\1elody.* Nov., 1834 A. B. Chambers.·ISinclair Kirtley • Ollver Parker * S. W. B. Carnegy.. • Geo. H. C. ):[elody.* Oct., 1835tt"j'A. B. Chambers'*iSinclair Kirtley Oliver Parker S. \\'. B. Carnegy.. • Geo. H, C. Melody.· Oct., 1836 .... S. ·W. B. Carnegy· John D. Daggett. .. • Edward Searcey • Granville Snell. * Geo. H. C. Melody." Oct., 1837 .•.. S.· W. B. Carnegy' John D. Dagg,ett. . "1 A. B. Chambers • Thomas Andrews • Geo. H. C. Melody.· Oct., 1838 S. W. B. Carnegy* John D. Daggett. A. B. Chambers • Alex. T. Douglass Geo. H. C. Melody.· Oct., 1839 P. H. McBride • A. B. Chambers • Alex. T. Douglass .. • Wm. C. Vance * Geo. H. C. Melody.· Oct., 1840 P. H. McBride • Joseph Foster Alex. T. Douglass .. ' fohn Orrick • Geo. H. C. Melody.· Oct., 1841 P. H. McBride • Joab Bernard • Joseph Foster ··,C. H. B,)weri'l Geo. H. C. Melody.· Oct., 1842 P. H. McBride • Joab Bernard • Joseph Foster H. Bowers John Simonds , • Oct., 1843. '" P. H. McBride • Joseph Foster • J. W. S. MitcheIL.·;E. S. Ruggles * Fred L. Billon * Oct., 1844 J. w. S. Mitchell' Fred L. Blllon E. S. Ruggles '·I'J. L. F. Jacoby • John S. Watson • Oct., 1845 J. W. S. Mitchell" John D. Taylor • E. S. Ruggles • J. L. F. Jacoby * John S. Watson • Oct.. 1846 John Ralls • John D. Taylor • E. S. Ruggles • .J. L. F. Jacoby • John S. Watson * Oct., 1847 Joseph Foster • E. S. Ruggles • J. L. F. Jacoby * Cyrus Osborn • John S. Watson • May, 1848 Joseph Foster 1 E. S. Ruggles • Cyrus Osborn • Joseph Megguire John .S. Watson: • May, 1849 John F. Ryland.·IE; S. Ruggles Joseph Megguire * P" Draper * John M. Reed ~ May, 1850 John F. Ryland.· B. W. Grover ·,P. Drap·er • S. F. Currie • J. T. Johnson * May, lR51 l B. W. Grover • E. S. Ruggles ·' S. F. Currie • J. H, Turner * J. T: Johnson • May, 1852""IB. W. Grover • S. F. Currie * J. H. Turner • S. H. Saunders • J. T. Johnson • June. 1853 Wllson Brown; ...•• L. S. Cornwell • J. W. Chenoweth .. • R. C. Hill • Joseph Foster • May, 1854 L. S. Cornwell * D. P. Wal1ingford .. • James H. Britton .. • *. Joseph }<'oster • May, 1855 L. S. Cornwell • .T. W. Chenoweth .. • H. E. Van Orsdell.'" John D. Daggett. .. • May. 1856 Benjamin Sharp.' W. A. Cunningham.. S. H. Saunder:s • Marcus Boyd....... • John D. Daggett • May, 1857 S. H. Saunders .. * P. Draper • Marcus Boyd • John F. Houston .. • John D. Daggett * May, 1858 ~. H. Saunders .. * Marcus Boyd ·,John F. Houston • John Decker • John D. D;1ggett • May, 1859.' Marcus Boyd .... • M. H. McFarland .. ··W. R. Penick • John Decker • John D. Daggett. .. * May, 1860 M. H. McFarland* W. R. Penlck ·iJohn Decker Samuel M. Hayes .. ' John D. Daggett. .. • May, 1861. •.. Wm. R. Penick .. • John Decker ·IGeo. Whitcomb • A. L. McGregor • John D. Daggett .•. • May, 1862 Geo. Whitcomb ... • John H. Turner '·Iwm. N. Loker • Samuel Rusl\ell.. • John D. Daggett ... • May,. 1863 John H. Turner.. • Wm. N. Loker • John D. Vlncll * A. L. McGregor .•.. • John D. Daggett. .. • May, 1864 John F. Houston.· John D .. Vlnci! A. L. McGregor ...• • Martin Collins • Wm. N. Loker .•... * May, 1865 John F. Houston.' .John D. Vinci\. • Martin Collins • R. E. Anderson • Wm. N. Loker * May. 1866 John D. Vincll ... • W. E. Dunscomb • R. E. Anderson • A. L. McGregor • Wm. N. Loker • Oct., 1867 W. E. Dunscomb.·, C. A. Rowl~y • T. E. Garrett • Wm. D. Muir • Wm. N. Loker •

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Gr:lnd Secretary. William Renshaw.· William Renshaw.· William Renshaw.· T. Douglas." T. Douglas." John D. Daggett.' JOhn. D. Daggett.' John D. Daggett.· John D. Daggett.' John D. Daggett.· Fred L. Billon.· Fred L. Blllon.· Fred.L. Blllon.· John Garnett.· Thos. W. Conyers.· Thos. W. Conyers.' Richard B. Dallam.· Richard B. Dallam.· Richard B. Dallam.· Richard B. Dallam." Richard B. Dallam.· Richard B. Dallam.· Richard B. Dallam.· Richard B: Dallam.· Richard B. Dallam.· Fred L. Blllon.· Fred L. Billon.· J. W. S. Mitchell.· J. W. S. Mitchell.· C. D. W. Johnson.· C. D. W. Johnson.* C. D. W. Johnson.· A. O'Sullivan.· A. O'Sullivan.' A. O'Sul1ivan.· A. O'Sullivan.' A. O'Sullivan.· A. O'Sul1ivan.· A. O'Sulllvan.· A. O'Sulllvan.* A. O'Sullivan.* A. O'Sulllvan.· A. O'Sul1ivan.· A. O'Sul1ivan.· A. O'Sullivan.· A. O'Sullivan.· A. O'Sullivan.·t G. Frank GouleY.·t

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Oct., 1870 Oct., 1871. Oct., 1872 Oct., 1873 Oct., 1874 Oct., 1875 Oct.; 1876 ..•. Oct.:. 1877 .... dct., 1878,..•. Oct., 1879 .•.. Oct., 1880 Oct., 1881. Oct.; :1882 Oct.; 1883 Oct., 1884 Oct., 1885 Oct.; 1886 Oct., 1887 Oct., 1888 Oct., , 1889 Oct., 1890 Oct." 1891 Oct., 1892 Oct., 1893 Oct.; 1894 Oct., 1895 Oct., 1896 Oct., 1897 Oct., 1898 Oct., '11199 ...• Oct., 1900 Oct., 1901. Oct., 1902 Oct., 1903 Sept'.; 1904 Sept" 1905 Sept., 1906 Sept., 1907 Sept., 1908 Sept., 1909 Sept.• 1910 Sept., 1911. Sept., 1912 Oct., 1913 ..•. Sept., 1914·••.. Sept., 1915

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William lJ. MUlr."i T. E. Garrett • Alex. M~ Dockery .. Sam. H. Owens .... Wm. N. Loker ·, G. Frank Gouley.· Thos. E<. Garrett.·IR. E. Anderson • Sam H. Owens John E. Ryland ....• Wm. N. Loker ·IG. Frank. Gouley.· Thos., E. Garrett.· 1 R. E. Anderson • Sam H. Owens • Juhn E. Ryland • Wm. N. Loker • G. Frank Gouley.· Sam'l H. Owens.. • J. E. Ryland • John W. Luke • Jas. E. Cadle • Wm. N. Loker • G. Frank Gouley.· R. E. Anderson .. • John "V. Luke • Jas. E. Cadle • Xenophon Ryland Wm. N. 'Loker • G. Frank Gouley.· John W. Luke .. ;· Xenophon Ryland Jas. E. Cadle Thos. C. Ready • 'Wm: N: Loker • G. Frank Gouley.· James E. Cadle .. •. Xenophon Ryland Thos'- C. Ready • Xoah M. Givan • :W~. N. Loker • Go' Frank Gouley." Xen. Ryland .•.... Thos. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • M. G. Hubble Wm: N. Loker * G. Frank Gouley.·oil T. C. Ready.. :.... • Noah M. Givan • Jos. S; Browne • W. R. Stubblefield Wm. K: Loker • John' D, Vinci!.· Noah M. Givari .. • Jos. S. Browne ·' W. R. Stubblefield.· Jas. E. Carter • 'John W. Luke • 'John .D. Vinci!.· Jos. S. Browne... • W. R. Stubblefield.· ,Jas. E. Carter ff· Alex. M. Dockery John W. Luke • John D. Vinci!.· W. R. Stubblefield· Alex. M. Dockery Chas.. ,C. Woods Lee A. Hall • John W. Luke ....• • John D. Vincil.· Alex. M. Dockery. Rev. Chas.C. Woods Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson .. 'John W. Luke • John D. Vinci!.· Chas. C. V{oods.·.. Lec A. Hall. • Robt.·F. Stevenson.: James W. Boyd Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vincll.Lee A. Hall. ..... • R. F. Stevenson· James W. Boyd .... Geo. R. Hunt • Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!.Robt. F. Stevenson James W .. Boyd George R. Hunt. .':.· Wm. M. Williams .. • Samuel 'M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!.o Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vincil.James W. BOYd ... George R. Hunt. • Wm. M. Williams .. • .fames P. Wood Geo. R. Hunt., .. • W. M. Williams 1 Jarries P. Wood .. ,.· " Samuel ::\1. Kennard· John D. Vlncll.Wm. M. Willlams· James P. Wood ·r:Theodore Brace Geo. E. Walker Samuel M. Kennard· John -D •. Vinci!.James P. Wood·.. • Theodore Brace Geo. E. Walker ·.. B. H. Ingram Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vincl!.Theodore Brace., .. Geo. E. \OV·alker .. : .. B. H. Ingram ,;. John R. Parson Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!.· Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram ...... • John R. Parson : Harry Keene • Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!:B. H. Ingram • John R. Parson .. ,: .. 'Harry Keene: • J. B. Thomas Samuel M .. Kennard· John D. Vincll.· John R. Parson Harry Keene J. ·B. Thomas • A. M. Hough Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!.Harry Keene' J. B. Thomas ;· A .. M:Hough D. A. Jamison Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vincil.· J. B. Thomas • A. M. Hough .' D. A. Jamison : .. \F. J. Tygard • Samuel M. K;ennard· John D. Vlncll.· A. M. Hough D. A. Jamisun F. J. Tygard • E. F. Allen • Samuel M. Kennard·,John D.' VlnciL·' D. A. Jamison IF. J. Tygard " E. F. Allen .....•.. • C. H. Briggs ,Samuel M. Kennard· John D. 'Vlnci!.F. J. 'TygaI·d.· o,E. F. Allen • C. H. Briggs "ICampbell ·Wells • Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinoil.· E. F. Allen ·ic. H. B1'1ggs Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Flnagin .. Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vincil.· C. H. Briggs ·: .. 'Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin: 'IJOhn C. yocum • Samuel M. Kennard. John D: Vinci!.Campbell Wells .. • Joseph C. Finagin .. John C. yocum • "Vm. F. Kuhn Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!.· Joseph C. Finagin. John C. yocum ~ Wm. F. Kuhn : ., Leroy B. Valliant..· Samuel M.' Kennard •.John D. Vinci!.· ,John C. Yocum .. • Wm. F. Kuhn Leroy ·B. VallIant .. • A. S. Houston Samuel M. Kennard· John D. Vinci!.· 'Wm. F. Kuhn .... Leroy B. Valliant .. • A. S. Houston D. M. \oViison John R. Parsort John D. Vlncll.Luoy B. Valli'ant * A. S. Houston.: D. M:Wilson_ "'IHoward Watson • JohnR. Parson John D. Vinci!.·. A. S. Houston , D. M. Wilson · John ,1'. Short. •.... R.. S. Kreeger '. 'Alph. C.' Stewart**.: John R. Parson. D. M. Wilson ;John T. Short R. R. Kreeger WIlliam A. Hall Alphonso C. Stewart -John R.· Parson. John T. Short. R. Kreeger .. : WilHam A. Hall ! Clay C. Bigger.: Alphonso C. Stewart: John R. Parson. R. R. Kreeger WIlliam A. Hall.. Clay C.' Bigger Arch A .• Johnson Alphonso C. Stewart John R. Parson. Wm. A. Hall ;Clay C. Bigger Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert Alphonso C. Stewart* John R. Parson. Clay C. Bigge,r, lArCh A.' Johnson Jacob L.am. pert Van F. rem.ont 'Boor Alphonso C'.. St,e.wart. John R. par,son. Arch A. Johnson .. Jacob Lampert Van Fremont ·Boor. Chesley A. Mosman· Alphonso C. Stewart· John R. Parson, Jacob Lampert.... Van Fremont Boor .. Chesley A. Mosman· Tolman W. Cotton .. Alphonso C. Stewart· John R. Parson. Van :fremont Boor Cpesley A. Mosman· Tolman W. Cotton .. Frank R.Jesse. ,' Alphonso C. Stewart* .;John R. Parson. Tolman W: Cotton. Frank R. Jesse Edward Higbee Wm. A. Clark .. : Alphonso C. Stewart· John R. Parson. B'rank R ..Tesse !Ec1ward Highee Wm. A. Cla.rk John 'V. Bingham Alphonso C. Stewart· .John 'R. Parson.

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~:~t i~i;::: :I~c;:ar~. Hdf:r~::::!~~ ~.C~~~h~~:: i~~~s~. B~~~~e~r:: ~~~SF?'J~~~~~~::::~:: ~: ~:g:::::::: ~~~~ ~: i,~~~~~'. ---- .. -"-----_.,- ----------·Decea'sed. tDied August 11th, '1866, while in office. tAppointed August 13th, 1866, by John D. Vincll, G. M. °Dled Aprll 11th. 1877, while In oftice. . ···Appointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. Valliant. Grand Master QDled Octoher 12. 1904. while in office. ' "-Died April 22, 1916, while in office.

IIJohn W. Luke servect-;l)y"app'ointment:llS'''Grand Secretary, from , April 11th, 1877, to October 11th, 1877, and died October, 1888. ffDled Within one week after his installation. . ttThere was no Communication In 1835, owing to the anti-masonic "Withdrawn from Masonry. (excitemeut. UAppointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. Vs:llIant, Grand Master

OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATION, FEBRUARY 22d, 1821. EDWARD BATES, Worshipful Master. .JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer.

JAMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden.

WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden. ABRAM BECK. Secretary.

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ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES" UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI ORGANIZED 1821. ~OCUMENTS

COMPILED' FROM ORIGINAL

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BY GEO. FRANK GOULEY, GRAND SECRETARY, 1876.

REVISED AND BROUGHT DOW)[ TO SEPTEMBER, 1917, BY .JOH:\' R. PARSO?->, GRAXD SECRETARY.

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2 ' Joachim.· ...........•..• :-lerculancum i.Jefferson Mo ,Oct'.. 1820. by G. L. of Tenn Arrested April 7. lR25_ 3 ' Hiram .............•.... 't. Charles Ist. Charles Mo ! 1820. by G. L. of Tenn Surrendered April 4, 1826. 4 1 Harmony ~ •.....•. L.oouisiana Pike Mo "Oct. 11.1821. Surrendered April, 1825. Taylor ;pringfield GI·eene Ill >\fay G. 1852 United with "United ;\0. 5." Olive Branch ~lton "-fadison IlL Apr'i! 3. 1822 United with 1st G. L. of Illinois, 1824. Cnity ........••.....•.•• fackson Cape Girardeau. Mo :\ov.25. 1821,disp. G.L.Ind. Surrendered January 7, 1823. Franklin Unipn l'ranklin Howard ........• Mo April 3, 1822 Arrested December 20, 1831. C?rover: ~ ~alhout:.: Henry IMO May, 1852 ? • • • • • • • • • • • Die.d 186~. . Ilandaha Fayette ,111. October8,182~ _. Umted with 1st G. L. of Illinois, 1824. 8 vanda!la 9 Sangamon ; ....• 13 p rin g field Sangamon , .I'IlI. "IOctober 2".1822 "IArrested April 11. 1826. 10 Union fonesboro union 111. October 25,1822 ,United with 1st G. L. of Illinois, 1824. 10 Shawnee \'ewSantaFe Jackson Mo May.1858 Surrendered 1863. 10 Chapel. .•..••..•.•.•• "'I:::hapel Hill. Lafayette Mo May 6, 1852 .. : Surrendered 1855. 11 ; E.den ...•.•...•..•••••• , lovington il"VaShlngt.o.n 111. October 9, 1822 : un. ited with Is't .G. L. of Illinois. 1824. 13 ,Tucker .............•.... "te. GenevIeve .. rSte. Genevieve .. Mo October 10,1826 Surrendered April 6, 1831. 14 Boollville Boonville ,Cooper : :\10 .....•.. April 3,1827 Arrested October 3. 1838. . 14 Auburn \uburn ILinColn , Mo May 8, 1852 Arrested Oct., 1884, by Lee A. Hall. G. M. 1~ Central.: 3mit.J:ville 'Ic!ay Mo Ma~ 6,1852 Went down o.n account of war, 1861. 10 Perseverance LouIsiana Plke Mo , ApI'll 8,1828 , Arrested ApI'll 3. 1838. 16 Columbia .....••.••.•..• :::olumbia iBoone Mo October 5.1830 Arrested October 3, 1838. 21 New London· \lew London Ralls Mo October 5.1337 Surrendered 1362, on account of war. 21 Greencastle ....••.....•. 3reencastle Sullivan :Mo June 2,1866 Arrested April. 1879. 22 Franklin \.Iton Madison! ,Ill October 5,1837 i;nitecl with G. L. of Illinois. 1843. 23 Hiram :;t. Charles St. Charles IMo October 5.1837 ~ , Arrested October 16, 1846. 24 Harmony .....•....•..•. rilcksonville Morgan Ill. October 2.1838 United with G. L. of Illinois, 1840. ~4 Wyaconda. ..••.••.••.••• La Grange .. , .. ' Lewis .. , " Mo Tune 10, 1853 , Surrendered 1876 . . ~6 ' Springfield •••..••••••••• :;pringfleld Sangamon Ill. October 8.1839 United with G. L. of Illlnois. 1840. 26: Ava 'I.va :Douglas Mo :October 13~ 1887 Arrested June, 18!!2. by B. H. Ingram, G. M. ~Audraln.....•.• Mo 'IMay 6.1852 Consolidated 1887 with Hebr~n No. 354. 26-,' Mexico ..•••••.••••••••••• Mexico 27 Ringgold ••.•..•.....•.. :amden Point. 'IPlatte Mo , May 6,1852 , Arrested May, 1855 .. October 9.1839 ~nited With G. L. of Illinois. 1842~ 27 1 Temperance ••••.•..••,' •. V~nd~l!a.•••••• Platte 27 Temple ~, ~ellvllle !Dade ; .. M(} May, 1858................ "urrendered 1863.

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29 29 32 32 32 33 35 37 37 38 39 39; 39 40 41 41 41 42 42 42 44 44 46 46 49 50 50 50 61 54 56 58 59 59 60 61 62 62 63 63 64 65 66 66

68

Far West. .........•.•.. Galena ......•.. Jo Daviess '1 Ill. October 11, 1839 ....•.•.. !Surrendered 1846. Osage ..•.•.•.•.....•••. Little Osage .••. Ver~on Mo ......• May 6.. 1852 ..•.......•...!Destro y ed 1861. by war. Lafayette •.•.•••..•.•... Lexington ....•. Lafayette ..•..•. Mo ••..•.• October 8. 1840 .•.•...... "Arrested December 1. 1866... Lafayette: .•.•..•••••••. Lexing~on.•. : .. Lafayette .•..•. Mo •...•.. October 19, 1867 .., ;. Consol..18S2 w~th, Lexington. No: 1~9. Triangle .............••. Perryville ....•. Perry Mo ...•... October 12, 1882 Consol. 1887 with Triple Tie No. 4:>7. HllIsboroallasMt.Morlah. Hillsboro ...•... Montgomery Mo ...•... October 8. 1840 Arrested October 16, 1846. Independence .. '.......•. Independence Jackson Ill October 8, 1841: •......... Surrendered October, 1846. Dawson ..•............• Wellington 'Lafayette " Mo :\Iay 28. 1858 Surrendered 1864. Cedar Owensville Gasconade Mo October 15. 1868 ........•. Arre'sted January, 1900. Graham ...............• Pleasant Hill. •. Cass ; ••.. Mo June 12. 1853 ....•... ; Destroyed 1R62. bY,war. Tully Tully, Lewis Mo June 9, 1853 Surrendered MaY,1863. Clinton Carlyle Clinton 111. ••••••• October 8, 1841. .....•.... Arrested. October 19, 1846. Modena ....•..•.. ; Modena '" Mercer .......•. Mo .....•. June 2. 1866 .....•. , •. , .. Arreste.d· October, 1876. Coleman ............•...• St. LOUiS .....•................. ' Mo,· 'Ioct.ober 8, .1841. , Change·d. to "Mt. Moriah No. 40." 1844. Des Moines ..•.....•..... Burlington ..••................. Ill.. Ty. '" October 20. 1841 .•••....•. United with G. L. of Iowa. 1844. Bolivar .....•........•.. Bolivar.· ...•.... Polk Mo /June 9. 1853 .....•....... Surrendered 1863. Aetna. ...................• Aetna : Scotland; " Mo ..•.... June 2, 1866 : ........• 'I'cansol. with .Memphls No. 16, 189.0: Houston , •......... Breckenridge .•. Caldwell. , Mo ,.June 2,1866 Arrested April 22, 1869. . Iowa ',' ,BI.O.omington '1.' •••• ,. " : " .•.•• , Ill... Ty 'l'octOber.. 20, 1841. , i. united with G. L .. O.f Iowa, 18H. Middle Grove 'IMlddleG:ove .• 'IMonroe , ,!Mo , .. June 9, 1853 ....••........;Arrested February 29, 1864. JacksonvllIe Jacksonvllle ,Randolph IMO June 2, 1866 .....•....... Surrendered .October, 1899. Rochester ........•...... Rochester 'Andrew Mo June 10, 1853 Surrendered 1865. Sparta, for'ly "Kabzeett".,Sparta Buchanan :. Mo October 8, 1841 ...•...... , Arreste'd October '·19. 1846. Martha Washington I'waShington Franklin ·: Mo :.June 10, 1863 Arrested May; 1863. . Mineral Point. M~neral Point. .. , '.' \Vis. Ty ,o.ctobe; 11,.1843 United with G.L. o! Wisconsin. 1844. Middletown Middletown , Montgomery Mo IMay 20,18<>4,. Arrested May 18, 18<>8. OzarK , Springfield Green·e ,.. Mo :Octob·er 17, 1842 ,. ..,An-ested October 18, 1847. Anderson Chapel Hill Lafayette IMo May. 1858 :Destroyed 1861. hy war. . Livingston Glasgow .. : H.oward Mo October 11, 1842 ISurrendered S.eptember, 1'876.' Douglas Marthas.vllle ',~Warren Mo .•..... October 11. 1842 ....•.....;Surrendered 1'\ovember 15, 1883. Platt~: Platt~Clty '·IPlat~e !Mo October 14, 1842 ...•..... ,·Surrendered 1864. Monticello Monticello :Lewls ,Mo October 12, 1842 ,Arrested hy .Jas. W. Boyd, G. M .. Oct.. 1886. Lancaster iLancaster Schuyler .. : IMo ",May 25, 18!i4. 'l'Arrested 1866. Marlon ISalem: Marlor: ' ,IlI. :October 11, 1842 ~nited with G. L. of -Illinois, 1844 St. Clair ,BellevIlle St. Clair ,Ill Octoher 11. 184.2 Cnlten Wi.th G. L. of Illinois, 1843. O!'jceola !Osceola '.' St. Clair Mo October 15. 1842 Destroyed 1861', hy war. Maysville IMaysville DeKalb Mo May 25, 1854,. .. ,. Destroyed 1862, by war. Dubuque: Dubuque .. ,' Ia. Ty October 10. 1843 ,!United with G. L. of Iowa. 1844. St. Marys .....•......... Perryville Perry Mo May 25. 1854 :Surrendered .Tanuary. 1864. Iowa City ..••........... Iowa City ...............•.....• Ia. Ty October 10, 1843 ;Unlted with G. ,I,. of Iowa. 1844. Landmark Warsaw .....•... Benton Mo Octoher 12. 1843 'jDestroyed 1861, hy war. Melody .....••.••.....•. Platteville \"·is. Ty. ,. October 12, 1843 ;United with G. L. of Wisconsin, 1844. Marshall .•.•............ Marshall ISahne ........•. Mo October 12. 1843 ..•..•....,Arrested 1851, '. . Linn .•..••••••••.••••.•. ILinn .......•... Osage Mo May 28; 1856 Arrested 1894. by Parry Keene, G. M. Tebo \Clinton .....•... Henry ;Mo October 23, 1844 Arrested 1889, by J. P. Wood. G. M.

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. Remarks.

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Alexandria .......•.....•.1M'e-x-a-n-d-ri-a-.-.·-'-'IClark Mo Ioctober 16, 1844 .' Arrested 1864. College , Marion coilege.. Marion Mo '1' October. 16, 1844 ;Changed to "Dlc~erson," 1847. Diekerson 'Narren Marion Mo !Formed from "College Ko. 70." D.anviue :D. anviHe :M.ontgomery ,Mo October 16. 1844 ;Conso!. with Florence. Lodge Ko. 261, 1892. 10. Ashley IAshle Y Plke ..•........ ,Mo October 19, 1846 "'Isurrendered October 18,1897. 75/ Bowling Green ,~owling Green .. !~ike 'IMO October 14, 1846 Chariged to "Ashley :-';0. 75." . '1''\~OShO'"'''' ..;Newton M. 0 0ctOb~r 14., 1846 , su~rendered. 1863; resto~ed as 247, III 1867. 7,5'. N?OShO 81: HlckoryGrove ' Hickory Grove I·cauaway MO IJune ~. 1866 Sunendered March, 189~. 831 Dana , Calhoun Henry , Mo :October 17, 1846 Arrested October 28, 1802. 84 .Multanomah :. Oregor. Cit·y. " .. ' : ' ' Oregon !Octobe~ 19. 1846 ·.llst Lodge on Pac. Coast. . Unite~ G. L, Ore . . 84 Potter ,Longwood PettIs Mo May 2<>, 1854 'jSUrrendered December 2, 189G. 85 Johnson Warrensburg Johnson Mo March 19, 1847 'jDestrOyed 1861, by war. 86, MitC{le.ll ...•............. iColumbus Johns9n Mo ]'v.laY 9, 18.50 Destroyed 1861, by wa.r, 86 : Mo. Mil. 3d Reg't Mo. VoL, ..•............ i : Oct~ber 14,,1847 Closed with Mexican war. . 881 Bates ............•.... "I~U~ler :Bates (Mo .. : !;).fay 28, 18.,8, ':,' .. , ,:Destroyed 1361, ·bY,:var. 88 : Olive Branch UnIon .. , , .. 'IFranklin ...•.. 'IMO .. , ..•. , October 14, 184, A rres.ted about 180;). 88 Dresden ' Dresden Pettis Mo ,'October 19, 1867 •........ IArrested July. 1&18. by T. C. Ready, G. M. 90 Prairie ' Harrisonville Cass Mo October 12, 1847 Destroyed 1861, by war. 90 King.Solomon s. t.. Catharine Linn .....•..•.. Mo \June 2, 1866 ConsoJ. with Brookfield Ko. 86. Jan" 1888. 94 Boone ,Columbia Boone IMo May 8, 1848 Surrendered May 25. 1858. 94 Evening Star •.........•. [Cuba 'Crawfotd .'MO May 29; 1855 Surrendered June 12. 1875. 95' Acacia fackson "Icape Girardeau. Mo IMay 5, 1848 ,Went down during the war. 95: Pleasant Hill ",Pleasant HilL .. Cass ..........• )10 . . . • . . . 'May 8. 1848 ,Arrested 1853. 95 [ Chapman •.••.. , .•. , .••. ' Las Vegas. ; .. " '. Cer. of N. Mex June 2, 1866 i United with G. L. of Xew Mexico. 1877. 95 :. Meramec I,Eureka :St. Louis .•.... , Mo October 17, 1878 !Arrested Sept., 1916, by F. R. Jesse, G. M. ·99 iMt. Vernon •••• ~ ••••• ~ IMt. Vernon iLawrence :\'10 ••..••• May 11. 1848 Surrendered December 27. 1862. . 100 Canton ,\Ca.n.ton ; <"LeWiS ~ M. 0 M.ay 11. 1848 co. r:sol. with ~.r~f~ Lodge X~', 287; Dec., 1898.. 101 Greene ........•.••••.•. , Spnngfield ,Greene iMo May 12, 1848 Umted with 'Cmted No.5. 18,,7. 101 Easton ' Easton· ; ~Buchanan Mo May 28. 1Sf.8 Arrested October, '1886, by J. W. BOYd, G. M. 103 Canhage ...•••...•..•.. Carthage !Jaspt:;- .•....... :Mo 'IMay 12, 1849 Burned out 1861. 105, Relief G. eorgetown Pettis Mo May 10, 1849 Went down.lS60. 106 Macon , •. Macon · Macon Mo May :!8, 1858 Surrendered.·1~73. 106 L~porte••..••• · M~con .. : .. : iMacor: Mo May ~8, 1858 :Changed.to "Macon ~o. 106." 106 MIami. .•.•••.•••.•.•••••• MIami ..•...... , Saline .••..•.••• Mo 'IMay 10, 1849 'lsurrendered February 10, 1857. 107 ~olden Square ••.••.••••• Westport. ....•. Jackson ,., Mo ....•.. ,.MaY 10;.1849 Arreste.d Octo~er, 1886, by J. W. BOYd, G. M. 108 lI;ew Madrid ..•......... , New Madrid :-:lew Madrid Mo ,May 10, 1849 ". . Destroyed durIng the war. 108 Aztec .•.••••••.•••••.••• Las Cruces Tel'. of ~. Mex : '1: October 19, 1867 'C'nlted with G. L. of Xew Mexico, 1877. 108 . Gothic •.•.•••••••••••••• Mobei-ly ...•.... Randolph Mo '.' Oct.ober 17. 1878 ....•... 'lconsol. .with Moberly Lodge No. 344. 1896. 109 I Montezuma Santa Fe Tel'. of N. Mex May 8. 1851. .........•... 'Cnited with G. L. of !\'ew Mexico. 1877. 1"9 . Louisiana ••.•..••••••••• Ste. Genevieve .. Ste. Gene\·ieve. Mo 1807. by G. L. of Pa Arrested by. G. L. of Pennsylvania. 1824. 70 70

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111 112 114 115 115 116 118 119 122 124 124 128 128 129 129 130 130 134 135 135 1"37 137 13.1 14\\ 141 141 141 143 144 145 145 147 148 150 152 153 154 156 158 158 159 159. 160 161 166

St. Louis ......•......... St. Louis St. Louis .....•• \MO ..• :. "11809,. by ~. ·L. of Pa .•... Arrested. Ezell .....•.........•... St. Francisville. Clark Mo May ·9, 1800 ......•....... Surrendered 1860. Waverly .•.............. Waverly Lafayette Mo ..•... 'IMay 9, 1850 ...........••. Surrendered January 28. 1860. Sibley ..••.. , .......••.• Sibley Jackson Mo May 10, 1850~ ...•........ Surrendered 1863. Border ~outh-WestCity MCDonald Mo ...•... !October 15, 1874 .......•.. Surrendered October, 1882. Daviess ....•••...... Gallati1'\ ..•..... Daviess .•.....• ' Mo IMay 10. 1850 Arrested 1876. Hiram ................•. St. Charles St. Charles Mo ..•.... !May 10, 1850 .•........... Surrendered May. 1862. Foster Boston Scott. Mo !May 10. 1850 .....•....... Surrendered 1866. Dover .......•........... Dover Lafayette .....•. Mo iMay 20, 1850 Conso!. with Lafayette No. 437. Feb., 1893. I Cedar Fremont ....••. Cedar .....•.... :vlb !May 10. 1851. ......•..... Surrendered 1863. ; Dardenne ...•.•.....••.. O·Fallon ..•...• St. CharIeR Mo !October 19. 1867 ..•....... Arr. Jan. 15; 1885,· by R. F. Stevenson, G. M. : Kirksville ..•.........•.. Kirksville Adair.: .....•.. MO j May 8. 1851. Arrested 1863. Xew Charter 1864 to No.. i05 .. Live Oak ....•••.......•. Pleasant HilL .. Cass· Mo October 19. 1867 •......... Arrested by G. L. of Missouri, 1877. Constantine Charleston !:.IiSSiSSIPPI. Mo ..•.... May 8. 1851. Surrendered July 28, 1874. . Charleston Charleston.· Misslsslppi. Mo October 12. 1876 ' Surrendered December. 1889. . Barry Cassville Barry .......•.. Mo May. 1852 · Arrested 1852. West Prairie .•...••.•••• Clarkton ...•.•. · Dunklin .......• Mo ; May 28.1858 ...•...•..... Arrested October. 1886, by J. W. Boyd. G: M. Sarcoxie ...•.•.......... Sarcoxie Jasper ..••••••• Mi) : .. May, 1851 Arrested May. 1858. Ridgley Ridgley Platte Mo May 7. 1851 Destroyed 1861. by war. . Warrensburg ·Warrensburg Johnson Mo October 19, B67 · Con so!. with Corinthian Lodge No. 265, 1889. Warrenton •••.•.•....•.. Warrenton., Warren .•......' Mo June. 1851. Surrendered 1856. Prairieville Prairieville Pike Mo May 28. 1859 ........•.... ,Arrested 1895, by J. B. Thomas, G. M. Round Prairie Newark ~ .. " Andrew Mo "1 May 31, 1855 , Arrested 1865. . Smithton.; Smithfield ..................•... , Kan. Ty. '1 May. 1855 ..............• 'Iunited to form G. L. of .Kansas. Middlebury •.•••••••••.. Middlebury Mercer Mo 'jMa y 31, 1855 Arrested 1872. OrientaL Trenton Grundy Mo October 17, 1873 .,!Consolidated with Trenton Lodge No. 111. CI:ain of Rocks O\~en .. ,' Lincoln ., Mo .. " IOctober 14._:880 'I'cons. with Moscow Mills No. 558. Oct., 1905. ,Fllnt Hill ..••.........•. FlInt HilL St. Charles Mo 'iMay 31, 1800 Surrendered 1863. John Dade Cassville Barry Mo.: :June 1. 1855 .....•........ Destroyed 1861, by war. Windsor City ........•... ·Windsor City CarrolL Mo IJune 1. 1855 'Isurrendered 1855. Rising Star ..•.......... Ebenezer '. Green.e MO :; May, 185~ A.rrested by E.. F. AI.len, G. M., 1898. Buffalo Buffalo Dallas ooIMo May. 1850 Arrested 1861. . yancy Pineville McDonald :Mo·.: : June 1.1855 Arrested Jan. 19, 1884, by L. A. Hall, G. M. Leavenworth ..•......... Leavenworth , 'Kan. Ty .. June' 2. 1855 ....•........ , United to form G: L. of Kansas. Linn Creek Linn Creek Camden Mo.' May 26.· 1855 Destroyed ·1861, by war. Kansas Wyandotte Kan. Ty" May; 1855 linited to form G. L. of Kansas. Concord Concord Callaway Mo June 1. 1855 _ Surrendered April, 1901. Giadings Nebraska City .. Otoe Neb. Ty May 29, 1856 ~. Made no returns. CornwelL Rose HilL Johnson Mo ..••... May 28, ·1856 ...........•. Destroyed 1861 by war. Johnson .........•....... Greenville ....•. Wayne Mo October 19. 1867 Surrender.ed April 25, 1885. Pacific ...........••.•... Pacific Franklin Mo May 2<;, 18fi6 ; Arrested Jan., 1878, by T. C. Ready, G. M. Mendota Protem Taney Mo October 11. 1879 ., Arrested June 12. 1884, by L. A. Hall. G. M. Edina Edina Knox Mo ..•.•.. May 29, 1856 /Arrested May. 1866. Robert Morris ooISavannah Andrew. Mo May 28, 1856" Surrendered 1857. • . Mirabile IMirabile ICaldwell .....•.• Mo .•..... May 30. 1857 ......•...... Conso I. with Polo Lodge No. 232. in 1889. 00

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ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES," ETC.-Continued. No. . 107 167 167 168 169 172 173 173 173 177 180, 180 182 183 184 184 184 184 .18G 187 187 191 195 197 200 201' 203 203 204 205 208 211 212 . 216 216 21.7 219 219 219 222

Name ened.e.

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State.,

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Eldorado Luray Clal·k Mo 'May IS, 18;>7 . . . . . . . . . • . .[Surrendered 1861. Orient Francais St. Louis City Mo October 19, 1867 Surrendered January. 1888. Puxico Puxico Stoddard Mo October 11, 1888 : Surrendered June. 1892. Fairmount. .. , F'airmount. , Clark Mo May 18, 1857 Surrendered Jline 12, 1863. Tuscumbia .......•....... Tuscumbia .. , .. Miller Mo May 18, ·1857 Surrendered 1863. Wolf Island ., Wolf Island Mississippi: Mo slay 30, 1857 Surrendered August 22, 1874. Union,form'ly"Bollinger" \oVolford's Store, Bollinger Mo : .' May, 1857 ..........•...• , )<0 records, Union , ...• Union Franklin Mo , October 19, 1867 : Surrendered May, 1892. Powell ............•..... Powell ~ .. McDonald., Mo October 13, 1892 Surrendered September - , 1903. Winchester ......•......' Winchester Clark Mo May, 1857 , Destroyed 1861, by war. Kenner Athens Clark Mo May, 1858 , Destroyed 1862, by war, Des Moines , Athens :Clark Mo October 19, 1867 Arrested by Grand Lodge. 1916. Stewartsvllle Stewartsville DeKalb ' :vIo May 29, 1859 Arrested 1894, by Harry Keene. G. M. California ~aliforni~ ,., IMoniteau : ,. :'vI 0 , . . . • . • j Ma~ 28, _1859 , Surrendered June, 1898. Modern HumansvIlle Polk Mo :.\'1a,\. 18n9 Destroyed 1861, by war. , Mo Calhoun CalhOu? ',Hem· y "Ioctober 19,1867 Arrested by J. ,V. BOYd, Grand Master. 1886. Hale HaleClt:!' Carroll , :vIo October 15,1886 Arrested September, 1892. Fairfield .....•....•..•.. [<'airfield .. , .. , . .' Benton Mo October, 1892 Arr, by E. F, Allen, G. M .• Jan. 18. 1899. Dayton ., Dayton "Cass Mo May, 1859 Destroyed 1861, by war, . "Henry Clay :\lillersburg !C::allaway Mo May. 1859 Arr. June, 1881, by W. R. Stubblefield, G. M. Carter Jefferson City iCole., Mo .. , .. ,. October 13, 1881, Con sol. with Jefferson Lodge No. 43, 1889. Zerubbabel. Platte City., Platte , Moo.. , , May 28. 1859 ..•......... Arrested June, 1879, by N. M. Givan, G, M. Wet Au Glaize ' Wet Au Glaize .. Camden Mo , May, 1860 , Surrendered 1862, Camden Camden ,Ray Mo : May. 1859 \Vent down 1861, by war. Washburn 'Vashburn , Barry Mo May. 1860 Destroyed 1861, by war. Jamesport. Jamesport, ' Daviess 'IMo May 30, 1860 Arr. January, 1892, by B. H. Ingram. G. M. Pleasant Ridge .....••..• Pleasant RIdge. !Harrlson Mo May. 1860 .. : ..........•.. Arrested 1863. Green Ridge •....•..• : ••• Windsor ,Henry, IMO October 19. 1867 ..•...... ' Surrendered 1873. Bent ' Taos, ,:'oi. Mex June 1. 1860 Surrendered 1865. Rocky Mount. .•...•...•. Camp Floyd , Utah Ty .. ,Tune 1, 1860 Surrendered 1862, Alto Vista Alto Vista Daviess Mo May, 1861. Arrested 1865. Orion .........•...••..•. St, Joseph, Buchanan Mo May, 1861. , Surrendered 1863. Austin .....•.•.•....••••IAUStin Cass May, 1861. ......•....... , Destroyed 18Gl, by war. West Plains West Plains Howell , Mo 1 May, 1861. Surrendered 1861. Granby •... , ...•........• Granby , , Newton , Mo i October 17, 1867 ......•.. Surrendered December. 1892. y Quincy ...••..••• ,. ••.••••IQuincy Hic~ory.. , ,.jMo 'IMa • 1861. , Destroyed by war. Emerson .,:-Emerson Manon IMo May, 1861 Destroyed 1861, by war. Everett !Everett , Cass .,tOctober 15, 1868 Cons;, with Coldwater Lodge No. 485. 1894. NewBoston .....•....... jNeWBoston Macon jMo IOctober 12,1869 Surrendered 1871. Farmers ...........•.... Labelle Lewis IMo M:ay 30. 1861. , Surrendered 1887. 1

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Jallper ..•..•••••.•.••••• Sarcoxie Jasper 'Mo 'IMay. 1861 ,Destroyd 1863. by war. Woodlawn .•..••...•.••• \Voodlawn Monroe IMO Octo~er 19. 1867 Arrested 1894. by Harry Keene, G. M. Lamar Barton ....•... Mo May. 1861. .....•......•.. IDestroyed 1861. by .war. 224 T~amar ; -"<evada Grundy .....••. ,'Mo !l\-Iay 29. 1861.; returns. . 229 Nevada Columbus ,Johnson ;Mo :October 13, 1871. Surrendered October,1888. 229 Mitchell Warrenton ••...•.•••••.. \\'arrenton \Van'en :1\10 •..••• ,:'May, 1863 'Isurrendered 1899. 231 DeWitt. Carroll :Mo .;October 27, 1863 Surre.J;ldered 1865. No returns. 232 DeWitt. ' rackson ..•.•.. '1'1\10' ..•.•. 'Octoher 19, 1867 Surrendered 1877. 232 Lone Jack ..••.•••...••. , r~one Jack Rensselaer Ralls , Mo ,\Iay 26, 1864 Arrested in 1889 by J. P. Wood, G. M, 235 Ionic 1 May, 1865, ....•... · Surrendered September, 1881. 239 Spencersburg .••.••••• '" Spencersburg .. '. Pike ....•.... " Mo 240 GI'anville.· Granville ; Monroe Mo IMa y 25, 1865 ; ns, with Woodlawn :'\0. 223., Sept., 1911. 248 Rochester. : .......•..... Helena IAndrew ....•... ·Mo 'Ioctober 17, ~8 67 Arrest~c1 JUly, 19~ 7, by Ec1~v, I:!~gbee. G. M. ~50 Hi~h Hill f-~lgh HII~ Montgomery 1"'10 OctOber, \86, co.~. with Jonesbtl.lg LOdg.e );0.4:)/. Feb., 1899. Fayetteville Johnson ,:1-10 October lv, ,1868 Anested January, 1900. 264 Fa)etteville :Platte "I~lo :October E,. ISGg Sunendered October, 1878. . 274 New Market. .•.••••••• "I-,,<ew Market. OJ'eat·ville :Saline Mo ~October 1~, 1il68 Cons. with C:muridge ."<0. u3. Jan'y 5,1915. 275 Tranquillity 277 Index .•....•............IIndex ·Icass :l-lo October 10, 1868 Arrested 1871. • Bower's Mills Lawrence 1 Mo :October 15, 1868 Arrested by Grand Lodge, 1904. 278 Avilla Johnson :Vlo ,October 15, 1868 Cons. with Chilhowee No. 487, Oct.. 1908. '280 Lodge of Peace .•.•..•••. Chilhowee 284 Lilly ........•.•....•..•..:G.,I'ant City '" Worth ....•.... !~.[0 ..•. " ,,['OctOber, 1868 Arr. Dec., 1~80, by W .. R. StUbblefield, G. M. \.'ew Boston LInn /:\{o October 13, 1881. Arrested 18:19. by J. P. Wood, G. M. 284 New Boston "IVirgil City Cedar .....•.•.. ':',{o October 15, 1868 Surrendered September, 1888 .. 286 Hesperlan · p~radise ; .. Clay IMo IOctober 15, 1868 co~s. wit~ Teo;:perance No. 438, Sept., 1899. 289 Acacla 296 Grove .....•............. ~vebster Gro\es. St.. Louis .•..... !Mo ..•••. . ,O~tober 15, 18~~ ......•.. 'ISuIrendel~<1 1~.14.. T • Cameron Chnton "IMO :October 10, 18") IConso!. With ymcil Lodge No. 62, 1888. 296 Cameron 298 M3:rble Hill l\!arble H~ll .. '" 8?llinl}er ....•.. 1\10 .•••.• :,October 1~, 1868 1\""ollsol. .with Tr'owel No. 440, Dec., 1X99. I:'alr Deahng. '" RIpley ,Mo •.••.. . IOctober L, 1869 'Surrendered June. 1903. 304 FaithfuL Gentl'y :'';10 'October 12, 1869 :Consolidated with Stanberry No. 109. 312 Mt. Pleasant. ..•......... 8Ilington St. Aubert. Callaway Mo .•..... October 12, 1869 -:Surrendered December 14. 1882. 314 St. Aubert. Rome · Douglas ;Mo ~October 11, 1883 [Consol. with Ava No. 26. March,.1888. 314 Rome H5 AltOna .•....•.•...••••.•• Altona Bates 1.l\.IO .'.October 12,1869 '1' Arr. March. 1896, by Ao M. Hough. G. M. ,Mo !October 12, 1869 Surrendered September 14, 1889. 320 Chapel Hill ...........•.. Chapel Hill. •.•. Lafayette 320 Amazoni8:'" Amazonic: Andrew ,Mo ·October 15, 1890 'Icon.. with Savann:;'h ~. Odg~ No. 71~ Apr:, 1907. 320 Many Sprmgs Many Sprmgs [oregon Mo September 26, 1907 Consol. Sept .. 1911, \\Ith Alton No. 2::>5. 326 New . . Home " ••.... Sprague Bates , .. :.;v~o October 16, 1879 Consolidated with Foste.r Lodge No. 554. ,. Mex October 12, 1869 Arrested 1878, by T. C. Ready. G. l\f. 326 Kit Carson .•..••........ r"Ilzabethtown 330 Lathrop : •...•.......Lathro p IClinton [\110 Octob. er 13, 1870 ".\rrested May, 1879, by N. M. Givan, G. M. Clark City Clark .......•.. ;;';10 ..•.... October 12, 1870 Surrendered 1875. 332 Clark City Berlln Gentry :MO .'October 14, 1875 ,Arr. Sept. 10, 1904, byW. F. Kuhn, G. M. 332 Ryland Pink Hill. Jackson IMo.· October 12, 1870 'Su·rrendered October 3, 1873. .' . 336 Oak Grove :Saline :Mo October 12, 1871. Arrested .Tan .. 1887, by G. R. Hunt, G. M. 337 Malta ............•....•. :\1alta Bend 340 Amity ...•..•. ~ ...•••••• Sm~thton Pettis ...•... , .. iMo , .. October 13, 1870 ..•....... Surrendered January; 1884. Jencho -Cedar IMo October 16. 1884 Arrested Oct., 1894. by Harry Keene, G. M. 340 .Terlcho 'Greene :Mo October 13. 1870 Surrendered May. 1899. 341 Relief ....• ; ..••...•..• " Republic Kennett :Dunklin Mo October 13. 1870 Arrested Mar., 1879. by N. M. GIvan, G. M. 147 Landmark '" •..•..•..·\.sh Grove ....•. Greene ,. Mo October 13.1870 ........• .'Arrested 1872.' . 848 Ash Grove 148 Cimarron ......•.....••. Cimarron Colfax , :-\. Mex :October 14. 1875 Surrendered 1879. Lone Star ;Gentry Mo October 13. 1870 Arrested Jan. 25, 1884. by L. A. Hall. G.Y. U9 Lone gtar 223 223

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ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES," ETC.-Continued.

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County.

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353 Ben Franklin _Savannah '. Andrew IMo October 13, 1870 Conso!. with Savannah Lodge No. 7l. 353 Benton , St. Louis Mo October 14, 1886 Arrested 1905, by L. B. Valliant. G. M. 357 Phelps Phelps City .•... Atchison Mo October, 1870 Surrendered 1881. 357' Young's Creek., Rowena Audrain ,Mo October ,13, 1881 Con so!. with Hebron No. 354; July. 1891. 358 Cqmfort. ............•.. Rocky Comfort. McDonald :Mo October 13, 1870 ....•.... Arr. Jan. 19, 1884, by L: A. Hall. G. M. 364 King David · Kansas City Jackson iMo IOctober 13, 1870 Surrendered 1879. 365 Warsaw ; Warsaw Benton ,Mo iOctober 13, 1870 : Arr. Sept., 1888, by W. M .. Williams. G. M. 366 Unanimity We~ton ' Platte "MO IOctober 13, 1870 Surrendered 1879. 371 Craig ...•.•.............,cral g Holt Mo ,October 13, 1870 Arr. .Jan. 10, 1883, by C. C. Woods. G. M. 373 Mandeville Mandeville Carroll Mo !October 13, 1871. Arr. Jan. 14, 1896, by A. M. Hough, G. M. 373 Am, tty Filley ,Cedar Mo., IOctober 22, 1896 ......•.. Cons. with Clintonville No. 482, Feb .• 1906. 374 I Golden Rule ......•..•• ,. Jonesburg jMontgOmer y Mo !October 16, 1872 .•...•... Surrendered June, 1892. 375 Plumb ,Middletown Montgomery Mo October 13, 1871. Arr. Sept., 1888. by W. M. Williams. G. M. 3781 Kllwinning ......•...... ,IDownin g , ..••... Mo IOctobe,r 13, 1871 Cons. with Middle Fabius No. 244, Oct., 1894. 378 Warsaw •.• , •••••••• ,., 'Iwarsaw iBenton Mo : October 10, 1894. A,rr. by Grand Master Houston, Feb., 1906. 379 1,Coatesville , " .. Coatesville !Schuyler , Mo :October, 1871. Conso\. 1881 with Glenwood No. 427. 382 Richland Richland '.. ' Pulaski Mo :October 13, 1871 Arr. by Grand Master Tygard, Feb.,- 1898. 384 Harmony, , Vibbard Ray ........•.•. Mo 'October, 1871 .......•..•.. ,Conso\. with Clay No. 207, June, 1899. 384 Boone .....•.... , .•..... Columbia Boone .......•• , Mo ...•... ;October 17, 1901. ,:CoilsO\' with Twilight No. 114, May 12, 1904. 385 Reynolds CentervfIle Reynolds Mo October 13, 1~87 , Conso!. with Hopewell No. 239, May, 1899. 385 Alexander , •..• " .•• Bedford Livingston ....• _Mo iOctober 13, 1870 .......•.. 'Conso\' with Hale Lodge No. 184. Oct.• 1887. 394 Dagan ......•.•.•...•.•. Mindon Chariton MO , .. ,October 13, 1871. ,!Surrendered December. 1902. 395 Latimer " Licking Texas Mo ;October 13, 1871. iArrested by Grand Lodge, Oct. 21, 1897. 401 Centre Lebanon Laclede Mo ,October 13, 1871. : :Consolidated with Laclede No. 83, 1893. 402 Gavel. ' New Cambria Macon Mo !October 13, 1871. ...•.... , Surrendered October, 1900. 404 Alexandria .......•. : Alexandria Clark Mo October 13, 1871 Arrested Oct. 22, 1896, by Grand Lodge. 405 Meridian Sun , Austi~ Cass [Mo :October 13. 1871 Arr. Aug.,. 1885, by R. F. Steve~son, G. 1\1. 406 Ituraea ..•.. , Hannlbal. Marlon Mo ,October 13, 1871 Conso\. With Hannibal Lodge No. 188. ,(07 Houston Wellington Lafayette Mo jOctober 13. 1871. Destroyed by fire December 19, 1873. 407 Royal. , Mooresville Livingston Mo IOctober 17, 1,878 Arr. Aug., 1893, by John R. Parson, G. M. 409 Unity .........•......... Richmond Ray Mo 'jOctober 13, 1871. ; Surrendered 1876. 409 Civil Bend Civil Bend Davless Mo October 17, 1878 Arrested Oct., 1899, by E. F. Allen. G. M. 417 Covenant Carrollton Carroll. Mo October 12, 1872 Cons·o!. with Wakanda Lodge No. 52,1880. 421 Euclid Versailles Morgan Mo October 12, 1872 Cons6!. with Versailles Lodge No. 117. 423 Newburg Competition Laclede Mo 'loctOber 16, 1872 Arrested March 29, 1890. by T. Brace, ,G. M. 425 CedarCity ...••..•.•.... CedarCity Callaway Mo October 17, 1873 Arrested by Grand Lodge, 1904. 426 Leesville Leesville Henry Mo October 16, 1872 Arrested Oct., 1886, by the Grand Lodge. 426 Sedgwickvllle : ...•... Sedgwickville Bollinger Mo October 14, 1886 Arr. March, 1897, by D. A. Jamison, G. M. 428 Loulsvllle Louisville Lincoln Mo ...•... October 16. 1872 Arr December, 1896, by D. A. Jamison, G. M.

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432 432 433 435 436 436 437 H2

445 446 . 447 449 451 454 454 455 457 463 465 466 479 480 481 485 487 . 491 495 495 497 498 499 606 613 614 619 520 523 630 683 641

543 544

689 695 609

Dauphine ...•.•.••.••••• Dauphine :.:, Osage ......•...• Mo /october 17., 1873 'Isurrendered 1879. Black oak ••.••••.•••••• , Preston ....•... HiCkOry ........• MO,' OC,tO.b, er 13, 1.,88,1, Consol. with Urbana No. 421, Dec.• 189, O. Silent. Temple •.••••••••• Macon ......•••• Macon ...•.•... Mo 'IOctober 16, 1872 Surrendered October, 1877. . . St. Nicholas .••...•..•.•• Cave Spring Greene .....•... Mo iOctober Hi, 1872 Arrested 1897, by D. A. JamIson, G. M. Lamonte ..•••..•....•..• ·Lamonte f'ettis '" Mo iOctober 16,1872 ...•...... Arrested Oct.• 1878, by T. C.·Ready, G. M. Ash Grove .....•....•... Ash Grove Greene Mo IOctober 13; 1881. ;Arrested 1897, by D. A. Jamison, G. M. Tuscu·mbia .. : Tuscumbia Miller Mo ...•. .. [October 16, 1872 'Arrested Oct., 1886, by J. W. Boyd, G. M. Mt. Lebanon .••.•....... Mt. Moriah Harrison .....•. Mo October 16, 1872 :Surrendered 1879. West Gate St. Louis sf Louis City Mo jOctober 16, 1872 'Arrested 1887, by Geo. R. Hunt,' G. M. Greenfield •.•.... ~ ......• Greenfield Dade Mo :October, 187' 'Consol. with 'Washington No. 87, Dec., 1898. Fairview ............•... Browning Sullivan Mo October, 1873 Surrendered August, 1899. . Piedmont. ......•....... Piedmont Wayne Mo October 16, 1872 Arrested Jan. 19, 1884, by L. A. Hall, G. M. Argyle Nevada Vernon, Mo October 11), 1872 Surrendered March, 1892. . Benton Lincoln Benton Mo October 16, 1872· : Arrested May 21, 1884, by L. A. Hall, G. M. Cecll, "Cottonwood Pt. . Pemiscot. , Mo October 16, 1884 .........• Consol. with Caruthersville No. 461, 1903. Barnesville •............. ·Ellington Reynolds Mo October 16, 1872 Arrested Jan .• 1904, by "V.• F. KUhn, G. M. Triple .Tie .....••.. I • • • " , Brazeau .. '....•. Perry : Mo iOctober 17, 1873 ,Surrendered April. 1893. Lake .............•..... ,Cunningham Chariton Mo October 17, 1873 'Arrested ::-<ovember 7. 1876. Silver City ........•..... Silver City Grant ....•..... N. MiX ;October 17; 1873 Sur. char. and unit. with G. L. of N. M .. 1882. Centl·eView : CentreView Johnson MO :October 17, 1873 ;·Arrested by Grand Master Brace, Nov., 1889. Triangle ............•... Butler Bates: Mo October 15, 1874 ·Surrendered October. 1877. Union .•.......••........ La Junta N. Mex October 15, 1874 •........ 'IUnlted with G. L. of ::-<ew Mexico, 1877. Clinton.: Clinton Henry Mo October 15, 1874 Arrested 1889, by J. P. Wood, G. M. Paragon ...•.•.•••••.••. Green Ridge Pettis Mo October 1~, 1874.· Surrendered 1879. Herndon Herndon Saline Mo October 15, 1874 Arr. March, 1906,'by Grand Master Houston.' Pittsville Pittsville ' Johnson Mo October 15, 1874 Arrested 1875. Globe .......••.. , Louisiana Pike Mo October 12, 1876 , .. Consol. with Perseverance No. 92, 1890. West Prairie .•........... Clarkton Dunklin Mo ; October 15, 1890 Arrested Dec.. 1894, by J. B. Thomas, G. M. Strafford .•...•.......... Strafford Greene Mo October 11, 1877 Arr. Sept.• 1906, by Grand Master Houston. Kaseyvllle ...•..•.•..... Kaseyville ....•. Macon ...•.•.•. IMo Octo.bel" 11, 1~77 Surrendered January. 1898. Paynesville , [paynesville P~k~ .......•... ;MO; ..' October 11, 1877 ',' .:Consol. w!th Clarks.ville ,NO. 17, May 5, 1917. Avalon Bedford LIVmgston ,Mo October 12, 1882 Con sol. WIth WheelIng No. 434, Mch. 8, 1917. Charlton ..............•. Guthridge Mills. Chariton tMo October, 1882 .fSurrendered March, 1899. . Exeter ; Exeter ........• Barry ......•.•. Mo October 12,1882 'Arr. March, 1901, by Grand Master Wells. Turney ..............•.. ' Turney Clinton Mo October II, 1883 Surrendered November, 18, 1895. Toltec.·.....•.....•..... Mexico Republic of Mex ..•.•.•.•• October 11, 1883 Surrendered January 31,1894. Kidder Kidder '.' Calhoun Mo October 16, 1884 ...•.•.... Consol. with Hamilton No. 224, 1902. Ritchey ..•.•.•.... : Ritchey Newton ..•..... Mo October 15, 1885 Arrested by F. R. Jesse, G. M. Walker ...•...••..••..•. Walker Vernon .......•. Mo October 12. 1887 Surrendered February 19, 1898. Franklin .•..••••........ St: Clair ....•• '.. Franklin Mo October 16, 1889 .•.•...... Arrested July. 1904, by W. F. Kuhn. G. M. Fides .....••.•••••••.••• Kansas City .•.. Jackson ....•... Mo .....•• October 15, 1890 Consol. with Heroine No. I(H. Dec., 1890. Mexico ....•...•......... Mexico ..•...... Audrain Mo •...... October 15, 1890 Consol. .with Hebron No. 354, Dec. 25. 1916. Duncan ..••••.•••.• : •••• Duncan ...••... ,Webster .....•.. Mo ...•••. September 26, 1907 Name changed to "Grove Spring", 1913. . Cecil ..........•........ '"'nttonwood Pt.. Pemiscot Mo ~eDtemh"r :10. 1908 Arrested Sept .. 1915. by T. W. Cotton. G. ·M.. Victory ; ••• iPomona [Howell Mo September 28, 1910 [Consol. with Mt. Zion No. 327, Apr. 16, 1917.

,...... \0 ,...... .....1

~

~ ~ ('\)

~

~: ~

I

N

....... VI


1917.]

A ppcl1dix,

277

REPORT

MASO'NIC HOME OF MISSOURI }i'ROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1916, TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1917. y

MASONIC HONU: OF MISSOURI, LOCATE!) AT

S'I'.

LOUIS.

OFFICERS. SOL E. WAGGONER, President St. Louis, Mo.. Jefferson City, Mo. JOHN rr. SHORT, First Vice-President. ROBT. R. KREEGER, Second Vice-President. Kansas City, Mo. CAMPBELL WELLS, Treasurer ..................• Platte City, Mo. '......•...... St. Louis, Mo. V. O. SAUNDERS, Secretary DR. A. C. ROBINSON, Physician St. Louis, Mo. DORSEY A. JAMISON, Attorney St. Louis, Mo. MRS. HARRIET E. BAKER, Superintendent St. Louis, Mo. MRS. MABEL E. ENGEL, Matron of the Old People. St. Louis, Mo.


278

Appendix

[Sept.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. JAS. W. BOYD, T. W. COTTON, ALEXANDJ~R M. DOCI\J<~RY, JOHN H. GUNDLACH, A. M. HOUGH, ,D. A. JAMISON, ARCH A. JOHNSON,

ROBT. R. KlmU,J::n. Wl\f. F. KUHN, J ACOn LAMPERT, JOHN T.SHORT, SOL E. WAGGONI~R, D. M. WILSON, *CAMPBELL WELLS.

*Died Dec. 13, 1916.

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS. EDWAHD HIGBEI';, Gra11,d Master, Kirksville. J~-,Wi.f.. A. CLAR!<:, Deputy Grand1l1aster, Jefferson City: '~':'~OHN BINGHAM, Grand Senio1' Warden, Milan. '...:.:ii;tius, C. GARRELL, Gran.d Jun.ior Wa~'den, St. Louis.

w.

Y,f~ \'fi~{~'"

...

.

ADVISORY MEMBERS. MRS. MATTIE P. BARNEY, Chillicothe. MRS. LILLIE L. FLETCHER, SL Louis. MRS. LOUISA J. MOORE, St. Joseph.


1917.]

Appendi_,t:

279

MASONIC 'HOME OF路 ',MISSOURI

PRESIDENT'S REPORT To the Most WorshipfuZ Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: BUETHREN:

I hand you herewith as President of the' Board of Directors a report in detail of the officers qf the Masonic Home of Missouri. At the annual session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, held in St. Louis, Missouri, during the month of September, 1916, the following were elected to serve as Directors of the Home for three years:' Dorsey A. Jamison, Campbell Wells, Sol E. Waggoner, Arthur M. Hough, Jacob Lampert. You elected Tolman W. Cotton for two years to fill the unexpired term of Brother Wm. M. Williams, who died the day before the Grand Lodge met. At the meeting of the full Board, held July 12, 1917, Brother John' H. Gundlach was elected to fill路 the vacancy caused by the death of B~other Campbell Wells. At this meeting you are to elect five Directors-four for three years. The terms of the following Brethren expire: Robert R. Kreeger, David M. Wilson, John T. Short and Arch A. Johnson. You will also elect one for two years, the Board having elected Brother John H,. Gundlach to fill a vacancy until this meeting of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge. At a meeting held in' the, Marquette Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri, Wednesday evening, September .. , 1916, the following officers were elected: Sol E. Waggoner, President, St. Louis. John T. Short, First Vice-President, J.efferson City. Robert R. Kreeger, Second Vice-President, Kansas City. Campbell Wells, Treasurer, Platte City. V. O. Saunders, Secretary, St. Louis. ' Mrs. Harriet E. Baker, Superintendent, St. Louis.


280

[Sept.

Appendix

Mrs. Mapel E. Engel, Matron Old People's Dept., St. Louis. Dr. A. C. Robinson, Physician, St. Louis. Dorsey A. Jamison, Attorney, St. Louis. The Standing Committees for the past year have been as fol· - lows: Trustees of the Endowment Fund-Sol E. Waggoner, *Campbell Wells, James W. Boyd, John T. Short. *Died Dec.

~3,

1916.

Executive Committee-*Campbell Wells" Chairman; Robert R. Kre-eger, Vice-Chairman; John T. Short, Dorsey A. Jamison, Wm. F. Kuhn, - Arch A. Johnson, James W. Boyd. *Died Dec. 13, 1916. Finance Committee-D. M. Wilson, Chairman; James W. Boyd, Arch A. Johnson. _House Committee-Dorsey- A. Jamison, Jacob Lampert, John H. Gundlach, Mrs. Lillie L. Fletcher. OFFICIAL BONDS.

Campbell Wells, Treasurer, $75,000.00; V. O. Saunders,Secretary, $2,500.00; Mrs. Harriet E. Baker, Superintendent, $2,500.00._ Trustees of the Endowment Fund-Campbell Wells, $5,000.00; Sol E. Waggoner, $5,000.00 ; James W. Boyd, $5,000.00. INSURANCE.

Cyclone. $190,600.00

Fire. On all Buildings and Contents $305,000.00 On Steam Boilers :................. 6,000.00 Liability 10,000.QO EST1MATED VALUE OF ASSETS.

Endowment Fund ...................................•. $143,148.59 Home Ground ". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 100,000.00 Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 300,000.00 Furnishings 75,000.00 $618,148.59 I~IPROVEM"~NT

FUND.

Receipts from all sources $153,738.48 Disbursements to date................................. 145,412.25 Balance on hand

$ /

8,326.23


Appendi.'r

]917路1

281

CLASSI:FlIfD.

Hospital Construction Fund For' General Improvement.

,

'

$

.

3,760~78

4,565.45 $

8,326.23

IM:PROVEl\mN~S.

Since last report the children's dormitory, dining rooin, kitchen and serving room has been made fire proof. We can now fe~l. that the, childr.ef!, are safe from a fire hazard. Shrubbery h~s 'been planted and all general improvements contemplated are almost completed. This Grand Lodge should take action necessary so ,that the amounts still due will be paid, then the Board can finish tl1e work.. COST

OF

MAINTE~ ANCF:.

Me'a:ts, Produce:"Pro'visio~s, etc $39,959.60 Dry Goods, Clothing; Boots and Shoes.................. 7,170.74 Dr'ugs, Dental and Hospital Supplies .. " ..... , . . . .. . . . .. 1,929.40 j1'uel, Light and Ice.................................... 5,69'9.98 Laundry '.................................... 1,630.40 Directors' Expense 890.30 Salaries '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,575.00, Wages to Employes.................................... 16,623.45 Miscellaneous-Disinfectants, Phones, Stationery, Investigating of Applications, Entertainment, Petty Expenses .. ; ' ' . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,006.40 Total ExpEnses

'

'

:

$ 81,485.27

Maintenance of Property '.$5,551.07 Attorney's Fees and Legal Expense in Fulton 'and Rice Will Cases.............. 6,440.61 $

93,476.95

This question is of the most vital fnterest to each one, on account of the increased cost of 'clothing, shoes, groceries' and all items that, enter into the general cost of maintenance show an advance in price over last year from fifteen to thirty-five per cent, and' while this is the percentage that is experie~ced in our private homes, . we, think the Masonic Home is to be congratulated that their expenses have increased in the past year over the preceding year only 13 12/100 per cent. This is accounted for by contracting for everything that enters the Home, and especially the Hospital. By your wisdom in increasing the per capita income t.he DiI'ectors were enabled to care for those recommended, and without this additional income many would have' been declined, because the Board can not accept more members to the Home Family than


282

[Sept.

Appendix

what the funds received .will maintain, and until the general living expenses are reduced we can not expect the total cost of the Home to be less than the past year. oRDlm OF THg

EAS1.'I<~RN

STAR.

T.he members of this Order have lost none of the energy shown in the past and have assumed the task of furnishing the children's dormitory with all furniture needed; have taken off the Board's hands the payment for dec~rating all walls with lead and oil; also .purchased the fine refrigerator in the kitchen at a cost of about $900.00. Their total expenditure in this addition alone will amount to several thousand dollars. What a blessing that we have such a band of wives and daughters who look so carefully after the welfare and happiness of the old and young! They' never tire in doing good. The heaviest part of this work done under the supervision of the Advisory Board of the Order' of the Eastern Star necessarily falls on Sister Lillie L. Fletcher, the resident member in St. Louis. Their efforts, I know, are fully appreCiated by each member of this Grand Lodge. \'\')f, l\f. WILLIAMS-DIRECTOR.

Died September 18th, 1916.-A memorial was prepared and spread on the records of the. Home. CAMPBELL WI<:LLS-DIRECTOR.

Died December 14th, 1916.-A memorial was prepared and spread on the records of the Home. ENDOWMENT FUND.

This fund was increased the past year $10,700.00, having received $5,000.00 from Past Grand Master Arthur M. Hough, $5,000.00 from Past Grand Master Jacob Lampert, an additional $500.00 from Past Grand Master T. W. Cotton, and $200.00 from Mrs. Rachael Sinclair, which is all in the hands of the Trustees. Loans ;$139,175;00 U. S. Liberty Bonds...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000.00 Cash in St. Louis Union Bank.......................... 973.59 $143,148.59


1917. ]

Appendix RIC}<~

283

WILL CASE.

Sol E. Waggoner, Esq., Presid~nt ot the Masonic Home ot Missouri, St. Louis, Mis.souri. DEAR SIR AND BROTHER-:

In your letter of recent date you requested me to furnish you the facts and data with reference to the will contest case of Judge Jacob W. Rice, deceased. In pursuance of this request, I, submit the following: Judge Jacob W. Rice of Cowgill, Caldwell County, Missouri, died Novem~ bel' 30th, 1914, leaving a last will and testament dated October 4th, 1913. This will was probated in the Probate Court of Caldwell County on December 4th, 1914. By th{s will he made certain specific. bequests to his relatives and one~half of, the remainder of the estate to his wife, EffieP. Rice, absolutely, and the other half of the remainder to his wife, Effie .p. Rice, during her lifetime, and the remainder to the Masonic Home of Missouri. The estate has been valued at between one hundred. twenty and one hundred fifty thousand dollars. A suit was instituted by his brothers and' sistei's in the Circuit Court of Caldwell County, Missouri, 'on August 31st, 1916, to contest this will. . The grounds alleged for said contest were undue influence of his wife and incapacity to execute the will. It was claimed that he was suffering from arterio-sclerosis, and was, therefor~, incapacitated to execute the same. During the early parlof September, 1916, we learned of this proposed contest of the will, and, in pursuance of arrangement, I met Brothers Campbell Wells and Orville A. Griffey at Chillicothe on September 5th, 1916. Brother Orville A. ,Griffey' was the cashier of the bank at路 Cowgill,. of which .Judge Rice had been president, and was a close friend /)f Judge and Mrs. ,Rice and was familiar with all of his business affairs. At this conference in Chillicothe, on September 5th, there were present Brothers Wells and Griffey, Mrs. Rice and her attorney, Mr. W. W. Davis of Chillicothe. She at that time decided to join with us in upholding the will. We thereupon went to Kingston, the county seat of Caldwell County, and had the' Probate Court appoint Brother Orville A;, Griffey administrator pendente lite of the estate of Jacob W. Rice, in pursuance of the statute in such case made and prOVided, and he is still acting in that capacity. I spent two days from my office on this trip. At this con-


284

Appendix

[Sept.

ference it was decided to have all the principal witnesses interviewed at an early date, to ascertain what the real facts were in the same. In pursuance of this agreement, I sent Mr. Gordon B. Sommers of my office to Caldwell County' on September jlth to interview the various witnesses and take their statements down in writing. On this trip he interviewed about seventy-five witnesses and got their statements, returning to St. Louis on September 19th, having consumed ten days in making this trip. Upon the recommendation 'and suggestion of Brother Campbell Wells and Brother Griffey I thereupon employed Hon. Louis W. Reed of Caldwell County as local attorney to aid me in the trial of this case. Shortly thereafter we learned from reliable sources that the plaintH'fs in the case intended to have well-known expert witnesses from Kansas City, St. Joseph and Caldwell. County to testify on behalf of the plaintiffs in this case. In view of this information in regard to plaintiffs having expert witnesses, and after a conference with several of the members of our Board, we deemed it expedient to have .Dr. W. W. Graves of St. Louis and Dr. G. Wilse Robinson of Kansas City, as well as some local physicians, to testify as experts in behalf of the defendants, and I thereupon made the arrangements accordingly. ' The case was set for trial at Kingston on November 16th. In order to be thoroughly prepared for the trial of this case I left St. Louis on November 11th. Spent the 12th in conference with the expert witnesses at Chillicothe. The following day, the 13th, I spent at Cowgill interviewing a number of witnesses preliminary to the trial, and from there went to Kingston to make further preparations for the trial of the case on the 16th. After spending several days at~ Kingston, the plaintiffs took a change of venue from Caldwell County to Livingston County. I spent four days from my office on this trip. The case was set for trial at Chillicothe for January 15th, 1917. I. leftSt. Louis on January 13th, to be at Chillicothe in time to make preparations for the trial on the Monday following. We went to trial at the appointed time on the morning of january 15th, and consumed the whole of that week in the trial of the case-the case running from 8 o'clock in the morning of each day until 9 or 10 o'clock at night, with the exception of recesses of an hour each day for lunch and an hour each day for supper. After adjournment of the court we were in conference each night until 12 and 1 o'clock. There were sixty-six witnesses who testified 路in this case-twenty-six of whom testified for the plaintiffs and forty in behalf of the defendants.


1917. ]

285

Appendix

At the conclusion of the case the jury rendered a verdict in favor of the defendants, which sustained the will. On this trip I, spent eight days from my office in' the trial of this case. The plaintiffs immediately filed a motion for new trial. The motion for new trial was set fqr 'hearing on January 31st. At t,he appointed time I went to Chillicothe and argued the motion for new trial. After the arguing of the motion for new trial the Court overruled the same, and thereupon the plaintiffs took an appeal to the Supreme Court and obtained time to file an appeal bond' and bill of exceptions. I spent two days from my office on this trip to argue the motion for new trial. I am advised that ~he' plaintiffs have not yet furnished an appeal bond and have ,not served upon me their bill of exceptions in the case. . In addition to the time spent from my office above set forth, in reference to this case, aggregating sixteen days of myself and ten days of Mr. Sommers, I have devoted a great deal of time while at my office in correspondence in regard to this case, examining authorities, preparing instructions, etc. In this connection, and in connection with the Fulton w ill case, I made practically a complete digest of all decisions of the appellate courts ~f this state, bearing upon will contest cases, in order to be thoroughly prepared f,rom the legal standpoint to try these cases. I also spent considerable time in studying the disease of arteriosclerosi'S' from a medical standpoint. I do not believe there is any reversible error in this case, and feel hopeful of an affirmance by the Supreme Court of the judgment of the lower court. If this will, should be sustained the Home will eventually receive under this will from fifty to sixty-five thousand dollars. Fraternally submitted, DORSEY FULTON WILL

A.

JAMISON.

CAS~;.

Sol E. Waggoner, Esq., PTesident ot the Masonic Home ot MissOUTi, St; Louis, 1I1issouTi.

Sm AND BROTHER: In your letters of recent date you desire to be advised by me of some of the facts and data in reference to the suit contesting the will of Mrs. Elzie Fulton, deceased . . In reply thereto, have to say that Mrs. Elzie Fulton, of Parkville, 'Platte Qounty, Missouri, died in Los Angeles, California, on

DEAR


286

Appendix

[Sept.

January 2nd, 1916, leaving a last will and testament, dated August 4th, 1915. This will was probated in the Probate Court of Platte County on January 17th, 1916. After making a number of bequests in behalf of certain of her relatives, she created by this w'll a trust fund of $35,000.00 and appointed Brothers J. P. Tucker of Parkville, Missouri, and George W. Day, Esq., of Kansas City; trustees of this fund. The will provided, further, that out of this fund the trustees should pay her daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Welch, $100.00 per month during her lifetime, and at the death of said daughter the whole of said $35,000.00, with accumulations,should go to the Masonic Home .of Missouri. She further gave to her daughter, Lizzie Welch, the .remainder of her estate, whicp,accor<;ling to valuation, would amount to between fifteen and twenty-five thousand dollars. A suit was instituted by Mrs. Lizzie Welch, her daughter, and W. C. Welch, the' husband of the daughter, on March 22nd, 1916, in the United States District Court of Kansas City, Missouri, to set aside this will. They alleged as grounds for setting aside the will that Brother JamesP. 'Tucker, her financial agent, unduly influenced her in the execution of the will, and that she 'was incapacitated to make the same; that at the time that she executed the will she was suffering from arterio-sclerosis. She was a woman af 路the路 age of about seventy-five ye~rs at the time of' her death, and had r~sided in Los Angeles, California, the greater part of the last th~ee' or four years prior to her death. I learned of the intention of the plaintiffs to apply for a receiver of the estate on April 10th. I went to Kansas. City on April 9th, for the purpose of resisting the. api)Ointrrient of a receiver of the estate. We were successful i.n defeating this application. I spent two days from' my office on this trip. _Thereupon we succeeded in having Mr. ~oland of Parkville, Missouri, appointed administrator pendente lite of this estate by the Probate Court of Platte County, Missouri, who is still acting as such. On May 22nd I made another trip to Kansas. City in regard ,to . this case, 'in order to have a conference with )3rothers Campbell Wells, J. P. Tucker and W. T. Jamison-the latter of whom I employed as local counsel, to assist me in the trial of this case. I spent two days from my office on this trip. It should be mentioned in this connection that by this will Mrs. Fulton also gave $5,000.00 to her sister, Mrs. Mary E. Scott, wife of Dr. W. G. Scott of Los Angeles, with whom she had spent the better portion of her time for' the last three or four years prior to.her -death.. -


1917. ]

Appendix

287

I learned from Brother Tucker that he had been in correspondence with Dr. W. G. Scott, and that the Scotts were in hearty sympathy with us and would join with us' in sustaining the will. Thereupon' I commenced correspondence with Dr. W. G. Scott,' who furnished me with a list of about twenty witnesses, friends of Mrs. Fulton, who lived in Los Angeles, and who would testify that she was capable of making a will. He assured us that there would be no trouble in establishing this, fact by the witnesses in California. To that end I made arrangements for the taking of these depositions. It was thought best that I should make this trip myself in behalf of the Home. We also thought it would be well to take the depositions of the plaintiffs who then were, at Paris,Texas. For that purpose I left St. Louis on June 12th, 1916, and took the depositions of both ,.of the plaintiffs in that case on June 13th. In this connection I may state that for several weeks prior to this I had not been able to receive any' letters from Dr. or Mrs. Scott at Los Angeles. They. totally ignored the. same. I was led to believe, therefore, that there was some collusion which had arisen between Mrs. Scott and Mrs. Welch. I was confirmed in this belief after the deposition of Mrs. ,Welch in Paris, Texas, was taken. I, therefore, considered it important that I should reacli Los Angeles at the earliest date possible, and interview these' witnesses before the' other side had an' opportunity to do so. After leaving Paris I took the first train to Los Angeles and reached there a day ahead of the counsel for the other side. During that day and night I interviewed nea~ly 'all of the witnesses whosenames had been given to me by Dr. Scott, including Dr. and Mrs. Scott. Nearly all of them, excepting Dr. and Mrs. Scott, made favorable statements for our side of the case. Dr. and Mrs. Scott, in my interview with them, became indifferent as to our case, and were rather leaning to the other sidestating that they would not say what position they. would take until they had a talk with the attorney for the plaintiffs. After the attorney for the other side reached there they switched over completely to the side of the plaintiffs, the' night before I commenced the taking of the depositions. It further developed that on that night the attorney for the plaintiffs made arrangements with the Scotts to pay Mrs. Scott her $5,000.00 given her under the will, even if the will should be set aside. Knowing that she had turned against us, we did not take her deposition, but took the depositio'ns of about twelve other wit~ nesses-friends of Mrs. Scott-with whom she had not had time


288'

Appendix

[Sept.

to talk after she had ,made arrangement with Mrs. 'Yelch to pay her $5,000.00 and before they went upon the stand. We got some very valuable testimonY from these witnesses. The other side then took Mrs. Scott's deposition., During the taking of these depositions I learned of another important witness, the nephew of Dr. Scott, who nursed Mrs. Fulton for several months prior to her <leath. He was t.hen somewhere in Texas, and I was satisfied that he would make a valuable witness for one side or the other'. I immediately used t.hewires to the fullest extent and had him located and secured his affidavit, which was then strongly in our favor. In this connection I may say that I secured the services of Brother W. D. Isenberg to aid me in interviewipg and taking the depositions of these witnesses at Los Angeles. In returning from California I stopped over at Denver and interviewed three witnesses路 whom I had learned it was the intention of the plaintiffs to take the depositions of. I reached St. Louis from this trip on June 28th, having spent seventeen days from my office in making this trip. I then made arrangements for the taking of the deposition of the witness in Madisonville, Texas, above referred to. I did not deem it necessary for me to, make this trip, but had it attended to by the attorney who procured the original affidavit of the witness. In the meantime it was evident that Dr. and Mrs. Scott had been writing to this witness and that he had been interviewed by their attorney. When we took his deposition it was on the whole }n our favor, but it was evid~nt that it was somewhat weakened by virtue of the switching of positions of Dr. and Mrs. Scott. The affidavit which we procured evidently prevented hi~ from being a strong witness against us. On September 30th I left for Denver to attend to the crossexamination of the three witnesses,' which the plaintiffs took at that point, and returned from Denver on October 4th, having spent five days from my office in making this trip. On November 18th Brother' W. T. Jamison, my associate in Kansas Cit.y, took the dep'osition o'f Brother 'McAfee at Chicago, consuming three or four days on this trip. On his return from Chicago he stopped over at St. Louis, and we spent two' or three days in going over the case and getting ready for trial-he having consumed about five or six days from his office on this trip. He also spent a week or more time in Platte County interviewing witnesses. V\re, also discovered two other witnesses in Los Angeles, and I had Brother Isenberg attend to the taking of their depositions. He also attended on one

,

.


1917.]

Appendix

or two different occasions to the cross-examination of other witnesses, whose depositions were taken on behalf of the plaintiffs. The first trial of this case was set for Dec. 4th at Kansas City, Mo. I left here on November 30th, in order to reach there and make all preliminary preparations for the trial of this case. It took ten days to try this case, and there was a hung jury on December 20th, the Judge having dismissed the jury, after being out two days, as they were unable to agree upon a verdict-the jury standing four for the plaintiffs and eight for the defendants. It was evident from the evidence at the trial that Dr. and Mrs. Scott and all of the other relatives had conspired together to defeat the will, and the burden of the whole fight was thereupon thrown upon the Masonic Home.

I was absent from my office on this trip twenty days, and during the whole of the twenty days myself and my associates at Kansas City were working night and day on this case--some nights as late as 12 and. 1 o'clock. In. this connection I may say that upon the recommendation and advice of Dr. W. F. Kuhn, of our Board of Directors, I seclired Doctors G..Wilse Robinson, R. E. Castelaw and A. L. Ludwick, as. expert witnesses in behalf of the defendants. The second trial of this case wa~ set for May 11th. I left St. Louis on May 9th, to be there in time to make preparations for the trial. We were actually in the trial of the case for seven days. At the conclUSIon of the plaintiffs' main case the Court gave a peremptory instruction to the effect路 that the jury find in our favor. Thereupon the jury brought in a verdict sustaining路 the will. I was absent. from my office about two weeks trying this case the second time. The plaintiffs thereupon filed a motion for a new trial, but the Court has not yet passed upon this motion for new trial. If the Court should overrule the motion for new trial the plaintiffs will likely take an appeal to the United -States Court of Appeals. If it should be appealed I feel confident that the Court of Appeals will sustain the verdict of the jury. If this will should be sustained the Home will eventually receive from this estate thirty-five thousand dollars and perhaps more.

I have spent. from my offce in taking depositions, and in the


290

Appendix

[Sept.

two trials of the case, sixty days, and my associate, Brother W. T. Jamison, has spent from his office. about thirteen days in taking depositions and interviewing witnesses. While at my office I have spent upon this case a great deal of time in correspondence, examining the law of the case and posting myself from a medical standpoint in reference to the disease of arterio-sclerosis involved in this case. Fraternal~y submitted, DORSEY A. JAMISON. The donations received during the past year are not published, ~hey having been acknowledged in the weekly Kansas City and St.

Louis Masonic journals. IN CONCLUSION.

Brethren, may I suggest that a careful examination of this detail report will enable you to fully understand just what the Directors are accomplishing in handling the trust you have placed in their hands. May God be with you in this great work is the wish of each Director. Fraternally submitted, SOL. E. WAGGONER, President.

. J ~


Appen,dix

1917.]

291

REPORT OF SECRETARY MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI. FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1916, TO AUGUST 31, 1917. GENERAL FUND. ngCEIPTS. 1916.. ·Sept.

Balance on hand · $ 78,726.34 Grand Secretary, per capita . 87,397.57 Gl'and Secretary, O. E. S., per capita . 5,026.80 ' l\1iscellaneous . 4,776.71 Interest on daily balance-Wells Banking Co .. 608.10 Interest on daily balance-Mechanics American National Bank . 197.70 $176,733.22 INTEREST-ENDOvVMENT FUND.

Sept. Nov. Dec. 1917. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mch. Mch. Mch. April April May May June June .Juiy .July Aug. Aug.

26-Loan No. 68 28-Loan No.. 74' 6.,.---Loan No. 69

$180.00 , 402.00 .' 276.00

,

17-Loan No. 42 . 22-Loan No. 17 . 22-Loan No. 70 . 5-Loan No. 43 . 9-Loan No. 75 · ' . 16-Loan No. 39 . 26-Loan No. 36 . 26-Loan No. 73 :. 26-Loan No. 60 . 27-Loan No. 76 . 27-Loan No.2 . 5-Loan No. 71. ' , . 5-Loan No. 47,. . 5-Loan No. 44 ' . 6-Loan No. 77 . 23-Loan No. 55 ' . 2-Loan No. 63 ~ . 21-Loan No. 72.....•....................... 4-Loan No. 66 ~ .. I8-Loan No. 17 . 5-Loan No. 65 . 20-Loan No. 63 ' . 23-Loan No. 67 . 27-Loan No. 39 . Interest on daily balances .

102.00 216.00 180.00 274.50 480.00 432.60 450.00. 240.00 390.00 750.00 150.00 60.00 600.00 276.00 210.00 570.00 252.00 300.00 216.00 87.00 360.00 53.20 180.00 432.60 63.78

8,183.68 $184,916.90

DISBURSEMENTS. Checks Nos. 6951 to 7848, inclusive Balance

'

$ 93,476.95

'

$ 91,439.95

FUNDS DEPOSITED IN FOLLOWING BANKS. Mecha.nics American National Bank-subject to check .... $ Certificate of DepositsNo. 4262-Mechanics American National Bank. ~ . No. 48483-National Bank of Commerce ,. No. 375-Mercantile National Bank :

41,439.95 15,000.00 15,000.00 20,000.00

91,439.95 Fraternally submitted, V. O. SAUNDERS, Secretary.


292

[Sept.

Appendix MECHANICS AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK.

August 31, 1917; Mr. Sol E. 'Vaggoner, President Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, Mo. Dear Sir,: This is to certify that there is on' deposit in this bank to the credit of the Masonic Home 'of Missouri General Fund, $41,439.95. Yours very truly, J. S. CALFEE, Cashier. August 31, 1917. I have examined the foregoing statement and found it correct. I have verified the receipts and vouchers are on file for all disbursements. H. CLAY PERKINS, Public Accountant. IMPROVEMENT FUND. RECEIPTS. 1916. Sept.

1-Balance on hand $ 20,538.38 Grand Secretary, appropriation from Grand ,Lodge 6,000.00 Grand Secretary, 50c assessment............... 7,758.21 Interest on daily balances-'Vells Banking Co.. ,400.71 â&#x20AC;˘ $ 34,697.30 Interest on daily balances-Mechanics American National Bank 92.33 $ 34,789.63

DISBURSEMENTS. Sept. 1, 1916, to August 31, 1917, Checks Nos. 205 to 237 and 239 $ 26,463.40 Balance

:

,

$

8,326.23

Fraternally submitted, V. O. SAUNDERS, Secretary. ME,CHANICS AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK. August 31, 1917. Mr. Sol E. 'Vaggoner, , President Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, Mo. Dear Sir: This is to certify, that there is on deposit in this bank to the credit of the Masonic Home of Missouri Improvement Fund, $8,326.23. Yours very truly, J. S. CALFEE, Cashier. August 31, 1917. I have examined the foregoing statement and found it eorrect. I have verified the receipts and vouchers are on file for, all disbursements. H. CLAY PERKINS, Public Accountant.


1917.]

Appendix

FINAL STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT OF CAMPBELL WELLS, TREASURER, MASONIC HOME GENEHAL FUND WITH WELLS BANKING COMPANY, PLATTE CITY, MISSOURI, 1916. Sept.

FHOM SEPTEMBER 1, 1916, to August 31., 1.917. ~

12 27

Oct.

7

25

Nov.

1.1 11

Dec. 1917. July

28 6

To To To To To To To To To To

Balance Interest one year, Loan Cash il'om Secretary Cash from Secretary Cash from Secretary O. Cash fl'om Secretary Cash from Secretary Cash from Secretary Interest one year, Loan Interest one year, Loan

" No. 68 E ..S. per capita

No. 74 No. 69

. . . . . . . . .

31 To Interest on daily balances, \Vells Banking Co. . . By amount paid to date on numbered canceled warrants herewith listed and submitted , . $ 86,213.12

$ 86,213.12

$ 78,767.59 180.00 424.29 90.24 5,026.80 130.92 165.00 142.18 402.00 276.00

608.1.0

$ 86,213.12

Respectfully submitted, WgLLS BANKING COMPANY, By CHRIS A. SKILLMAN, Asst. Cashier. Examined and found correct by

St. Louis, Aug. 27, 1917. H. CLAY PERKINS, Public Accountant.


-294

[Sept.

Appendix

FINAL STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT OF CAMPBELL WELLS, TREASURER, MASONIC HOME HdPROVEMENT FUND WITH WELLS BANKING COMPANY, PLATTE CITY, MISSOURI, FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1916, to AUGUST 31, 1917.

] 916.

Se.I?t. Oct. Nov.

Dec.

1

12 27 25 26 11 11 20 22 28 12 15

To To To To To To To To To To To To

Balance Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from Cash from

Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary

. . . . . . . . . ;' .. .

$ 20,538.38 77.00 6,165.00 28.50 44.90 53.50 78.50 88.50 141.50 123.00 68.00 92.00

1917. July By

31 To Interest on daily balances, Wells Banking Co. amount paid to date on numbered canceled warrants herewith listed and submitted $ 27,899.49

$ 27,899.49

400.71

$ 27,899.49

Respectfully submitted, WELLS RANKING路 COMPANY, By CHRIS A.. SKILLMAN, Asst. Cashier. St. Louis, Aug. 27, 1917. Examined and found correct by

H. CLAY PERKINS, Public Accountant.


1917,J

295

Appendix MASONIC HOME ENDOWMENT FUND.

List of securities belonging to the "Masonic Home Endowment Fund" September I, ,1917: No. 2 36 39 43 44 47 55 60 63 65 66 67 68 69 70 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

SO

81 U. S. Liberty Bonds .. Cash in St. Louis Union Bank .

$

Amount 2,500.00 7,500.00 7,000.00 路1,575.00 4,600.00 10,000.00 9,fiOO.00 6,800.00 4,200.00 5,400.00 3,600.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 4,600.00 3,000.00 5,000.00 4,000.00 6,700.00 8,000.00 12,500.00 4,000.00 700.00 6,000.00 9,000.00 4,000.00 3,000.00

Int. Paid To Feb. 29, 1917 Mch. I, 1917 Mch. 4, 1917 Feb. 1, 1917 Mch. 3, 1917 Mch. 2, 1917 April 20, 1917 Mch. I, 1917 July 16, 1917 .July 3, 1917 June I, 1917 Aug. 6, 1917 Sept. 7, 1916 Nov. 28, 1916 Jan. 18, 1917 May 18, 1917 Mch. I, 1917 Nov. 24, 1916 Feb. 10, 1917 Feb. 23, 1917 April 3, 1917 May H, 1917 Jan. 10, 1917 April I, 1917 April 12, 1917

973.59

Total Endowment Fund $143,148.59 FUNDS CLASSIFIED. Notes secured by real estate, first mortgage, 6 per cent .. $132,375.00 Notes secured by real estate, first mortgage, 5 per cent.. 6,800.00 United States Liberty Loan Bonds, 3~ per cent.......... 3,000.00 Cash in St. Louis Union Bank............................ 973.59 Total

.,

, $143,148.59

These securities belong to the Endowment Funds as follows: Knights Templar Fund $ 35,114.00 .Tames L. Kirkendall Fund :.......... 13,150.00 'V. S. Smith Fund........................................ 11,730.00 T. W. Higgins Fund...................................... 5,000.00 .Tames 'V. Harrison Fund................................ 1,665.74 Masonic Home Certificate Fund.......................... 1,117.60 Ferdinand Herrold Fund.................................. 500.00 Sarah 13. Coffman Fund................................... 465.89 Samuel A. Gluck Fund................................... 200.00 John B. Croshaw Fund................................... 1,000.00 Charles Reilly Fund...................................... 100.00 .Tacob F. Gmelich Fund................................... 1,000.00 Wellston Lodge Fund..................................... 100.00 Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund................. 3,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal and Select Masons Fund............ 500.00 Past Grand Master T. Vif. Cotton Fund................... 1,000.00 Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund....................... 1,000.00 Past Grand Master A. M. Hough Fund................... 5,000.00 Past Grand Master .Tacob Lampert Fund.................. 5,000.00 Rachael Sinclair Fund.................................... 200.00 General Fund :........................ 56,305.36 $143,148.59 August 31, 1917.


296

Appendix

[;3ept.

Brothers Sol E. Waggoner, D. M. Wilson, John T. Short, V. O. Saunders and I have examined· the securities of the Endowment Fund, which are in a bo:~ in the safe deposit vault of the Mississippi Valley Trust Company, and found them absolutely correct in every particular, and interest due dates as ·stated thereon, all as hereinbefore stated. H. CLAY PERKINS, Public Accountant. St. Louis, Aug. 31, 1917. We hereby certify that the balance, standing in the name of Masonic Home Endowment Fund, as shown by our books at the close of business Aug. 30, 1917, was nine hundred seventy three 59/100 ($973.59) dollars. ST. LOUIS UNION BANK, F. L. DENBY, Asst. Cashier.

REPORT OF FINANCE ·COMMITTEE. St. Louis, Aug. 31, 1917. To the Board of Directors Of the Masonic Horne:

The Finance Committee, through its Chairman, has the honor to make the following report: W. Brother Sol E. Waggoner, President of .the Home and one of the Trustees of the Endowment Fund, M. W. Brother John T. Short, ·one of the· Trustees, Brother V. O. Saunders, Brother H. C. Perkins, Public Accountant, and myself, as Chairman of the Finance Committee, on Friday, the 31st day of August, 1917, met by appointment at the safety vaults of the Mississippi Valley Trust Company of St. Louis to examine the securities of the Endowment Fund. The various papers contained in the box were examined. We found twenty-five loans, ranging from $700.00, the lowest, to $12,500.00, .the highest. These loans are all evidenced by notes secured by first deeds of trust o~ approved real estate, accompanied by abstracts and guaranties of title, shown in each instance to be in the borrower. Principal of -the loans aggregate $139,175.00. Interest due on all loans has been paid. In addition to the loans, $3,000.00 of the Fund is invested in Liberty Bonds, and, in addition to this, the books of the St. Louis Union Bank show cash on hand $973.59, thus making the total amount of the Endowment Fund $143,148.59, an increase of $10,700.00 over last year. The investments of the Fund are most satisfactory, and the Craft and the Home are to be congratulated on its splendid condition. Fraternally submitted, .DAVrD M. WILSON, Ohairman oi Oommittee.


1917.]

297

Appendix

All of the above securities are kept by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund in the safe-deposit box in St. Louis, Mo., rented by the Masonic Home, access to which can be had only by the presence of two or more of the Trustees of the Endowment Fund, or one of said Trustees accompanied by the President of the Masonic Home, or by one of said. Trustees accompanied by one or more members of the Finance Committee of the Masonic Home, or by one of said Trustees accompanied by the Secretary of the Board or the Grand Secretary of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Missouri. Since the report made one year ago, the Endowment Fund has been increased to the extent of $10,700.00, being the $5,000.00 contributed by Past Grand Master A. M. Hough, $5,000.00 contributed by Past Grand Master Jacob Lampert, $500.00 contributed by Past Grand Master T. W. Cotton, and $200.00 contributed by Sister Rachael Sinclair, each of which has been set apart, bearing the names of the contributors, as a separate fund. Brother T. W. Cotton had formerly contributed $500.00, which appeared in last year's report, and now shows his total contribution as $1,000.00. The cash on hand is deposited in the St. Louis Union Bank, St. Louis, Mo., to the credit of the "Masonic Home Endowment Fund," drawing two per cent interest on daily balances, said interest being paid to the Treasurer of the Masonic Home. Fraternally submitted, SOL E. WAGGONER, JAMES W. BOYD, JOHN T. SHORT, Trustees.

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Mr. Sol E. Waggoner, President of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri. DEAR BROTHER WAGGONER:

As Vic~路Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Masonic Home Board and Acting Chairman since the death of M. W. Brother Campbell Wells, I submit the following brief report for the fiscal year ending September 1st, 1917. As you have attended each meeting of the Committee during the year and are familiar with all the details of its action on the various matters considered by it, and as the General Board at its quarterly sessions has approved our actions, it is not deemed necessary to make a full report in detail. Appreciating that this Committee is, by the by-laws of the


298

Appendix

[Sept.

corporation, charged with the responsibility of looking after the welfare of the members of the Home family, care and preservation of the grounds and buildings, passing on all applications for admission to or discharge from the Home, and the judicious and economical expenditure of all moneys for the purposes for which donated and contributed by the Grand Lodge, or individuals, it has endeavored to discharge its duties faithfully, conscientiously and impartially. No application for admission to the Home has been filed which has not received the most serious consideration and disposed of in the spirit of Masonic charity. Neither has any request for the discharge of a member been granted until after a thorough investigation, and taking into' consideration the ability of those making the application to properly care for the loved one desired. In one instance (which is the only one we will mention) a frail and saintly mother of more than 70 years was desired by her daughter, who had obtained the consent for her discharge from the Lodge which had secured her admission. In this case a member of the Committee visited the daughter and found her to be destitute, with two small children depending upon her daily meager wages for a living. She was told that her courage and desire to do something for her mother were commendable and worthy of admiration, yet the wisdom of permitting her to undertake to care for her mother was questionable. To this she agreed and said she would leave the matter to the judgment of the Home Board, which declined to grant the request and so advised the Lodge. Through the generosity of the Grand Lodge and the Eastern Star, as well as the members of these bodies throughout the State, many desirable and substantial itnprovements have been made during the year. The grounds have been made more attractive and inviting by the planting of large quantities of shrubbery, the lives of the children have been made more secure from the muchdreaded danger of fire by the remodeling' and fireproofing of their building, and the members of the entire Home family have been made more comfortable and, we believe, happier by the addition of much new furniture and many articles which make their apartments more homelike. ~s was expected, the demands on <?ur Hospital facilities are increasing. This is the most important part of our equipment so far as the feeble old members of the Home are concerned, and stands as a monument to the generosity and wisdom of the Fraternity in this State. To maintain this department in a manner creditable to those who made it possible to admit to the benefits of the Home the dependents who were not only in destitution, but


Appendix

1917.]

299

sick, involves the expenditure of a considerable sum of money. But as all purchases are made on competitive bids or at wholesale for this, as well as all other departments, it is believed that the expenses are kept down to the minimum and will very favorably compare with the cost of maintaining other similar institutions. Trusting our actions will not only meet with your approval, but also that of the Brethren, I am, Fraternally yours, R. R. KREEGER, Vice-Ohairman of the Executive Oommittee.

REPORT OF HOUSE COMMITTEE. Sol. E. Waggoner, Esq., President of Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:

In behalf of the House Committee, I hereby submit its report for the year ending, September 1st, 1917. The Committee has during the last twelve months held its usual monthly meetings at the Home, and in the meantime held other meetings when it became necessary. At these meetings the full Committee was usually present. By reason of the efficient services of Mrs. Harriet E. Eaker, our Superintendent, and Mrs. Engel, the Matron of our old people, the duties of the Committee have been much lightened. While the Superintendent has at all times kept the Committee fully advised as to what was transpiring in the Home, yet there were times when she and the President deemed it advisable to call the Committee to their assistance in solving important problems which came before them. We are glad to report that all of these questions, after duly considering the same, were solved in such manner as was, in our opinion, for the best interest of our Home family and Mas'onry at large. In this connection, we can not refrain from alluding to the fact that our esteemed sister, Mrs. Lillie Fletcher, the member of our Committee from the Order of the - Eastern Star, has been of inestimable value and assistance in aiding us in the solution of these problems. The House Committee would not be complete without having her as a member thereof. Her whole heart is in the work, and the Masons of Missouri should ever be grateful to her and the Order which she represents for the great work they have done for the Home. No one comes in closer touch with the members of the Home except President, Superintendent and


Appendix

300

'.

[Sept.

Matron of the Old People than the members of the House Committee, The experience that they go through, month after month, should touch the tender chords of the heart of any person. When we see the result of the work done at the Home in building up the characters of our bright and interesting children, and smoothing the paths of the older people, it makes one rejoice to have the privilege of rendering such services for those whom we have undertaken to rear and educate and maintain. During the last year many prominent Masons from all parts of the Un'ited States have visited the Home and have spoken in the highest terms of the management of the Home and of the great work that is being done there. The different Masonic bodies of St. Louis have done so much during the last year for the entertainment and amusement of the members of the Home that we have not the space to mention same in detail. We take this occasion, however, of thanking them for the joy and the pleasure that they have brought to the Home. We shall, however, especially refer to the Christmas Committee, which is always on hand on Christmas morning with their gifts of love to each member of the Home, and for the entertainments in the way of hoat excursions, picnics, etc., which they give to the members of the Home during the spring and summer seasons. We also desire to acknowledge with thanks the many generous donations from the various Masonic and Eastern Star bodies and also individuals throughout the State. For the information of the brethren at large, we report that eight or ten of the boys from our Home are now enlisted for their country in the Army and Navy of the United S'tates. In conclusion, permit us to say that the inner workings of the Home are moving along harmoniously, and never in its previous history has it done a greater or better work than it has done during the last year. Fraternally submitted, DORSEY A. JAMISON, Ohairman Of Oom1nittee.

HOSPITAL REPORT. Mr. Sol E. Waggoner, President Masonic Home of Missouri. DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:

Herewith is submitted for your information a tabulated statement of the number of cases demanding attention of the medical department of the Masonic Home for the year ending September 1, 1917.


301

Appendix

1917.]

The cases under our observation are mostly chronic diseases and ailments, due to infirmity of age, which are in the most part the cause assigned for the admission of the members of the Home family. We have, of course, many cases .such as rheumatism, pneumonia and bronchial trouble among our old people. We have been very fortunate with the children of the Home. The usual number of measles, mumps, chicken pox and pneumonia have occupied our attention, but we are thankful of no, fatalities having met our efforts among the children. Our able and efficient Superintendent, Mrs. H. E. Baker, is very active and· alert and always ready with a helping hand and wise counsel for the good of· this department. Sister Mabel E. Engel, Matron of the old people, has shown most satisfactory efficiency in her work, as evidenced by the comforts and appearance of those under her charge. Miss Hattie Sitton, our head nurse, together with the rest of' the nurses, have been very faithful and patient with those under their care and have done excellent work. I wish to give thanks especially for assistance given me in their several specialties, when called upon, to Dr. L. H. Behrens, consulting physician; Dr. W. B. Shields, ear, nose and throat; Dr. C. C. Morris, consulting gynaecologist; Dr. M. L. Klinefelter, fractures and dislocations; Dr. W. W. Graves, mental and nervous diseases; Dr. W. R. Hewitt, consulting surgeon, and Dr. E. P. North, consulting oculist. Total average in Hospital this year............................ Total average in Hospital last year.............................

83 69

Increase

14

CASES TREATED. AdultsMale Female •.... ChildrenBoys Girls

o{ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

294 398 156 208

692

364 1056

Total

Fraternally submitted, A. C. ROBINSON, Physician in Oharge.


302

Appendix

[Sept.

REPORT OF ATTORNEYS. Sept. 1, 1917. 801. E. Waggoner, Esq., President ot Masonic Home at Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri.

Sm AND BROTHER: We submit the following as our report for the year ending September 1, 1917, as attorneys for the Home. Never during the time that we have been attorneys for the Home has the litigation in which the Home has been interested been so great and so important as during the last fiscal year. (1) The suit of Rice vs. Rice, to contest the will of Judge Jacob W. Rice of Caldwell County, Missouri, was tried at Chillicothe, Mo., in January last, in which the will was sustained, and an appeal has been taken to the Supreme Court. We feel hopeful that the judgment of the lower court will be sustained by the Supreme Court. In such event the Masonic Home will, in our opinion, eventually receive under this will, approximately, from fifty to sixty-five thousand dollars. (2) The case of Welch vs. Scott was tried twice in the United States District Court at Kansas City-the first time in December last, which consumed ten days in the trial thereof and which resulted in a hung jury. The second trial took place in May, which consumed seven days and resulted in a verdict sustaining the will. A motion for a new trial is now pending. In the event that the motion for a new trial be overruled, it is likely that an appeal will be taken therein to the United States Court of Appeals. If this will should be sustained the Home will eventually receive $35,000.00 and perhaps more. A more detailed statement of these two will-contest cases appears in our recent report to you in regard thereto, which we understand will be published in your report to the Grand Lodge. The expenses in these two cases have been unusually large by reason of the fact that the brunt of the fights have been thrown upon the Masonic Home to sustain these wills. Depositions had to be taken at different times in Texas, California, Colorado and Illinois. It is our opinion, however, that not one cent was spent in the defense of these cases but what was absolutely necessary and essential to the winning of said cases. (3) We have been advised by Bro. Jas. A. Boone of Charleston that Bro. Ben F. Busby of Mississippi County left a last wiII and testament by which he gave the remainder of his estate to the DEAlt

I


1917. ]

Appendix.

303

Masonic Home and the Odd Fellows Home. He advises us that the son of Bro. Busby has threatened to bring suit to set aside this will. No such suit has as yet been brought and he is now doubtful" of such a suit being brought. He further advises us that if this will should not be set aside that the Masonic Home will eventually receive from ~his .estate about $7,500.00. The above is all the litigation in which the Home has been interested during the last year. (4) In pursuance of your request, we submit below a form of will which may be used in the event that anyone should desire to will anything to the Masonic Home. It is as follows: Know all men by these presents, that I ' . of sound and disllOsing mind, do make, publish and declare this as and for my last will and testament, hereby revoking any and all wills and testaments by me heretofore made. .

First. It is my will and desire, and I hereby direct, that all my just debts. including the expenses of my last illness and funeral, be paid in full. " Second. I give and bequeath unto the Masonic Home of Missouri, n. corporation organized and existing under and in pursuance of the laws of the State of Missouri, the sum of . ($ ) Dollars. (Testator may also insert such other provisions in his will as he sees fit.) â&#x20AC;˘ In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal on this the day of ' , 191 .. (Seal) Signed, sealed, published n.nd declared by the above-named in the presence of us, who, at his request, and in his presence, and In the presence of each other, have subscribed our names a.s witnesses thereto on this the day of , 191 . At the time of the signing of the same the said . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testator, was of sound and disposing mind.

According to the law of our State, it is absolutely necessary that the signature of the testator be witnessed by two witnesses. We think it better to have three. Yours fraternally, JAMISON & THOMAS.


304

Appendix.

[Sept. .

REPORT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE. ']'0

the President and Board of Directors of the Masonic Home:

BRETHREN:

"Time and tide wait for no man," and once more we are reminded that twelve months have elapsed'since we made our last report, and again we are caIled upon for an accounting of our stewardship. Throughout the year we have taken care of the needs of the Home as we saw them, and while they are too small and too many to enumerate here, they have added largely to the comfort and welfare of the family. An electric mixer, which was purchased some months ago, lias been a valuable addition to our hospital kitchen. A very large refrigerator has been installed in the Administration Building, giving ample room for cold storage. However, the work of the year has in the main been to accumulate a fund with which to furnish the rear portion of the Administration Building, now in course of construction, and it is gratifying to report that most of the furnishings have been purchased and are awaiting the oompletion of the building. Sister Moore of our Advistory Boa~d is still confined to her home in St. Joseph. We trust she will soon be restored to health and strength. Under the direction of our President, Brother Waggoner, and by the faithful and conscientious work of our Superintendent, Sister Baker, and Sister Engel, Matron of the old people, the Home is ably managed. The spirit of comradeship and fraternal good will exists in the Home. The sun is ever shining and the clouds are at most but temporary. The Masonic and Eastern Star fraternities have, through unity of purpose, gone hand in hand in this God,given work of caring for the less fortunate of their members, and, through their efforts and uplifting infiuence, have glorified God and magnified the good, making their loving service apparent to humanity. We are deeply grateful to all who have subscribed to this practical charity. Fraternally submitted, MATTIE P. BARNEY, LOUISA J. MOORE, LILLIE L. FLETCHER.


1917.]

Appendix.

305

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. . The fifth milestone has been passed since I carne to the Home to love and labor for the members of our big family. Words can not tell you the genuine happiness it gives me to know how responsive those under our care are and appreciative of all the kindness shown them by the Masons, who are doing their share to give comfort and cheer to the old and to the younger ones; education and happiness making them know how much each member means to them in our Home life. Their thankful heart says, "God further the cause of Masonry.". The atmosphere of the Home family is pleasant, and the dear old people deserve a world of credit for their united share in having the moral and spiritual behavior as it should be. The older people enjoyed a Literary and Social Club last winter, meeting once a week. These meetings have done much to bring each other in a genuine home circle. They were kind enough to make me an honorary member, an honor I, appreciate. In speaking of the dear old folks, I can not refrain from saying that in Mrs. Mabel Engel, their Matron, they have a true and faithful companion, who is ever mindful of their comforts. CHAPEL SERVICES.

Our Chapel is filled each Sunday' afternoon by those who come t,o worship with us, and a hearty response has been given by those requested to hold the services, and many corne to hear the children of the Masonic Home render their sacred music, each tone entering the hearts of their hearers, giving out the knowledge that "God is Love," our Chapel motto. THE HOME CHILDREN.

When our children return to their schools there will be sE;lven girls and six boys who will attend the Soldan High School, while all but four small childrâ&#x201A;Ź:I1 will attend Clark School. The children have made wonderful progress in school, and all are looking forward to return to their studies. Many times I have wished the members of the Order from all over the State could stand by me as the children pass on their way to day school and Sunday school. You would be repaid for all you do, just to witness the happiness on their faces as they say, "Goodby, Mama Baker." Each child's heart is full of love and


306

Appendix.

[Sept.

gratitude for all the kind deeds extended to them. Ten of the Home boys have gone to the war. Godspeed their safe return. HOSPITAl,.

Our Home without our Hospital would indeed be a mistake, for every care is given those who are ill, or, when too old to take care of a room, are removed to our Hospital, where excellent nurses and attendants are ever watchful for their comfort. We have :bad many sick, but our good Dr. Robinson, physician of the Home, gives them prompt attention. We feel thankful that in all the years of the Masonic Home there have been but two children who have passed away by death, a wonderful record where so many have been cared for, and may we all be blessed with health for the future. We are grateful to the specialists who are giving their services free, but one can well know they are "Masons." OUR NEW BUILDING.

When you visit our Home and see the new fireproof dining room and dormitories, how thankful, as Masons, you will be, in that you have provided the children with so much of safety. When this building is completed then our entire Home has been made fireproof, and we are grateful for the kind protection given us. This building will be, as all others have been, furnished by the O. E. S. Chapters, and it is with joy the Order looks forward to its completion. The Order of Eastern Stars are ever alert to do good and give happiness to the Masonic Home, 路of which they are so proud. DONATIONS.

The donations have been numerous and of a substantial nature. Those given by the Chapters of the Eastern Star have been published from week to week in the St. Louis and Kansas City Freemason. Many donations have come from individuals who were mindful of the pleasures and need of our Home members. ENTERTAINMENTS.

From the number and nature of entertainments given the Home family, both old and young, by the Masonic and Eastern Star Orders, one might judge all the members were trying to see who could do the most for us, for all are untiring in their efforts


1917. ]

Appendix.

307

to bring joy and pleasure into the Home. They begin Christmas with a tree, laden with gifts; then all holidays are obseryed in some manner appropriate to the day. We have the knowledge that the Past Matrons' and Past Patrons' Club has surprises of all kinds, in that they come out and give entertainments of a literary and musical nature, followed by ice cream or strawberry treats. The Christmas Committee, always mindful of their part in our happiness, take the children to the circus, also boat rides, and the watermelon feast for all of the Home members. The kindness from all the fraternity remains in our hearts, never to be forgotten. EMPLOYES.

In all the departments of our Home you will find loyalty to the Home interests. Our one aim is for the betterment of life h'ere in this great work, in this wonderful and good Home, for which we as Home members are truly and fraternally thankful. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR.

Woman's heart beats responsive to the call of want, the cry of the orphan and the piteolls wail of sorrow, so it is that the members of the great and grand Order respond to the needs and the joys of our Home, in so many, many ways, which lack of space forbids me to mention, but all who love this Home bless and love the Order of the Eastern Star for the many kind expressions of their kindness to all. HO:NORABLE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

I can not refrain from writing of -the honorable members of our Home Board, for no one knows better than I how true they all are and just in matters concerning the Home family and the business management. Each member has his own share to do, and they all together accomplish great good. \

MEMBERSHIP STATISTICS.

At end of August, 1916 Admitted since

Men 85 35

120 :QJscharged, past year........... 5 Deaths, past year 11

Women 77 21

Boys 12 10

Girls 53 8

98

52

Pi

11

61. 10

Total 257 74 331

G

16 10 11 10 47 Number in Home Aug. 31, 1917 .. 104 88 11 51 284 Increase for the year ending- Aug. 31, 1917.................... 27

FraternallY, HARRIET E. BAKER, Superintendent.


308

[Sept.

Appendix.

ROST}<~R

OF THE HOME FAMILY, , ---------- - - _.-

======--=--=-=-=-=-=..:.. .. _..:..-=-"----'-['" Name

,

IAge'

SEPTEMBER 1,

!

Admitted '\

------

Lodge

I

1917. Residence

INO.

-\----\

Amanda. M. Roush,.... 77 Eliza A, Robinson..... 87 Ferdina.nd Droz 83 Mattie J. Hobbs....... 80 Harriet Sampey 71 Jael Stearns 79 Elizabeth Koberly 80 Eliza A. Court,........ 82 John R. Culbertson 91 Eliza A. Bartlett....... 88 Elizabeth Jessee 90 James M. Clyde 85 Nelson J. Swayze 83 Frank L. Linn 18 路William McK. Linn 15 Emma P. Smith , 70 Lawrence Lake J.8 Mary E. Heburn 67 Lorine 'Villiams 17 D. J. Roundtree 79 Violet Kershaw 16 Minnettc Kersaw 14 Sarah Watson 87 Opal Sizemore 1'6 Sarah E. Harvey....... 82 Susan K Jamison...... 89 Frank Kershaw 12 Wm. A. Dudgeon...... 77

Dec., May, Nov., April, Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Jan., Dec., May, Aug., Jan., May, May, May, July, Sept., Sept., Sept., Nov., Nov., Mch., April, Mch., Sept., Jan., Jan.,

1890, Wilson 191 I Poc?,hontas. 1899 Clarence 305 Clal ence. 1899, Pride of the 'Vest 179路 St. Louis. 19001 Irondale 143 Irondale. 1901 Solomon 271 spri.ngfield. 1901 Fayette 47 Fayette. 1901 Beacon :..... 3 St. Louis. 1901. Pride of the "Vest '179 St. Louis. 19021BOgard 1011 Bogard. 190~ Kansas City , 220 I Kansas City. 190:) Sturgeon 174: Sturgeon. 1905 Solomon 271: Springfield. 1907,Rural........... 316, Kansas City. 1906 i Bellefontaine Ch.. 69 St. Louis. 1906!Bellefontaine Ch., 691 St. Louis. 19061 Cosmos 282. St. Louis. 1906 Potosi 131 Potosi. 19(}7 Na p thali 25. St. Louis. 1907 l Four Mile 212 Campbell. 1913,Clintonville 482: EI Dorado Spgs. 1907 Forest Park 578. St. Louis. 1907j Forest Park. . . . .. 578; St. Louis. 1908:Columbia.. . . . . .. 534 Pacific. 19081 Star o~ the "Vest. 133 Ironton. 1908 CambrIdge 63 Slater. 19081 Lexington 119 Lexington. 1909 Forest Park.. . . .. 578 St. Louis. 1909 Fayette \ 47 Fayette.

Wm. H. MaxwelL...... Anthony McTeer Vernie A. McTeer...... Martha H. Nelson...... Joseph H. Fleming.... Genevieve Shepard Cary DeLacy Edith DeLacy Louis A. Wagner Curtis Sanders

Feb., July, July,. July, Sept., Sept., Nov., Nov., Nov., Feb.,

1911iLinn 19091sparta 1909 Sparta 1909 Moniteau 1909 Dexter lD09 united 1909 Rural 1909 1Rural 1909iMissouri. 1910IMt. Monah.......

~a{%

K

~~~~~~~:::::: ~~

1

1

~~'{l, gg~I~~~i~ttirnion::::::

84 18 16 78 17 93 14 12 82 13

1~~~en~. ~~:::eers.. ::::: ~~ i;~~:: in~I~:hl~?ri.a.~.............. Phillip Stremmel 69 July, 1910!Beacon.. . . . . . . . . Robert E. Arthur...... 72 Sept., 1910lHannibal Mrs. Robt. E. Arthur.. 73 I Sept., 1910 Hannibal 'V. F. L'Hommedieu... 87 i Nov., ] 910, Hun.tsville Abner E. Adair........ 85 I April, 1911 Agricola Mrs. A. B.Bnglish..... 73 April, 1911 Occidental Silas K. Payne......... 84 ,June, 1911 Independence ... John McCulloch 80 .Tune, 1911 Anchor Mrs. John McCulloch... 80 I ,rune, 1911 Anchor Nellie Mae Daniels..... 13 I Aug., 1911 Potosi Nancy E. Waddell..... 72 Oct., ] 911 Keystone Hester A. Maxwell..... 77 :'ept., 1911 Linn Louverna \Vhitacre '" 15 I rune 1912 Summerville Cora Belle vVhitacl'e ]3 :June; 1912 Summerville .John ,\Vhitacl'e 9 .rune, 1912 Summerville Clara May 路Whitaker 9 ::;ept., 1913 Solomon .. . . . . .. ~re doni~: R 0 bSO_'n_:_:_:~_7..:.0---,_A--=-p_r_i 1...:.,_=-19:.--1-'..2'~:eJ l_e_f_o_n_tai n e Gh..

I

I'

i~ ~~ii~~te.

326 296 296 295 532 5 316 316 ] 40

Linn. Sparta. Sparta. Jamestown. Dexter. Springfield. Kansas C!ty. Kansas City. St. Lou!s. St. LOUIS.

36~: ~~~I~~~s~e

31 St. Louis. 188. Hannibal. 188 Hannibal. 30 Huntsville. 343 Petersbur路g. 163 St. Louis. 76 Independence. 443 St. Louis. ~. 443 St. Louis. 131! Potosi. 243 I St. Louis. 32.6 i Linn. . 555; SummerVille. 5551 Summerville. 555 Summerville. 271 \ Springfield.. 6 9 St. Louis.


A Ppend i.1".

1917.]

309

ROSTER OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued. Name ' - - - Age r--Admitted

,! I May, May,

Lodgc

INo.

'I,'

-----1

Minnie A. Henley . 60 Mary C. Holstein . 16 Bernard H.' Holstein . 14 Bernardina A. Holstein. 12 Allen R. Edison . 14 'Vm. McNeally . 64 Benj. F. Hitt. . 57 Milus A. Henry . 89 88 Eliza O'Bryant Aaron Salkey , 72 66 Alice Boogher Leon Whitley . 14 Hollis Whitley . 12 Geneva 'Whitley . 10 Seebert \楼hitley . 7 Lydia M. Kingsbury .. , 82 Maria McGann . 75 Jijmma H. Baker . 83 Mary Doerr . 85 Catherine Ellis . 62 Mrs. F. Severance . 76 Joseph C. Holstein . 10 Margaret B. Holstein .. 8 Mrs. Jennie P. Haydell 85 Amy A. Kammerer ..... 71 Mrs. Frances RoebucJ<. 72 Geo. W. Shaffer . ,59 \Vm. T. Stansbury . 68 Louise E. Stansbury . 66 Mrs. C . .T. Robinson . 91 Edg-ar C. Bilyeu . 37 Gotlieb Kammerer . 74 T. B. Peebles . 80 Virginia E. Detrich . 12 Mrs. Fannie Stulce . 62 .Jason S. Rafferty . 69 Nancy F. Sinclair . 14 Nellie T. Sinclair . 12 Edith H. Sinclair . 9 .J. H. Forbes . 83 Chas. A. Morrison . 69 Leota M. Stolz . 10 Arthur J. Stolz . 13 Benj. F. \Vhitlock . 12 Alex. Hazen . 64 Mrs. \Vm. R. Faulkncr; 74 Mrs. Martha A. Grigg. 88 Mrs. M. A. McNally . 67 Clara J. Bartlett . 14 Jane F. Bartlett . 13 Mary M. Bartlett . 10 Peter McArthur . 70 Harriett McArthur . 70 E. C. Creley . 76 G. W. Eaton . 70 Sarah Fenwick . 74 Mrs. Mary E. Hurd . 72 Oscar Claypool . 16 Chas. H. Burrell . 60 Mrs. Ella D. Leftwich. 75

: May,

I May, ! June,

, May, Apdl, April, June, .Tune, July, July, July, .July, July, April, .luly, June, Sept., Sept., Oct., Oct., , Oct., Dec., Nov., I Dec., Dec., Dec., Dec., Jan., Jan., Feb.,

'1\1Ch., 1

Feb., April, June, Aug., Aug., Aug., Sept., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Nov., Nov., Nov., Nov., ,Ian., Jan., Jan., Dec., Dec., Dec., Dec., Jan., Jan., Feb., Mch., June,

1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 i912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1912 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 1913 '1913 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1914 1913 1913 1913 1913 1914 1914 1914 1914 1914

Residence --------

Polar Star ! 79 St. Louis. Keystone... 243, St. Lou!s. Keystone 243, St. LoUIS. Keystone 243 St. Lou!s. Geo. Washington. 9 St. LOUIS. Palestine 241 St. Charles. Oriental 518; Blackbul路n. Pittsville 428: Pittsville. Southwest 466; Southwest City. Kirksville 105 :KirksviIle. Tuscan 360 I St. Louis. DeWitt ,... 39 , DeW!tt. DeWitt. .. . . .. . . . 39 ! DeWItt. DeWitt 39 ' DeWitt. DeWitt 39 DeWitt. St. Joseph "1 78 ~ St. Jos~ph. Tuscan Ch....... 68; St. LoUIS. Spring Hill....... 155: Spring Hill. Bellefontaine Ch.. 69 i St. Louis. Beacon 3 : St. Louis. Keystone 243 St. Louis. Keystone 243 I St. Lou!s. Keystone 243 i St. LoUIS. Tuscan 360 I St. Louis. DeSoto Ch........ 15 I DeSoto. Carthage 197 i Carthage. Bogard 101 'Bogard. Ancient Craft.... 377 i King City. Ancient Craft 377: King City. Chamois '1185 : Char,n0is. Iberia 410; Iberia. Shekinah 256 I Festus. South Gate....... 547 I Kansas City. Cornerstone ..... 323 St. Louis. Sullivan Ch....... 105; Franklin. Sparta 296: Sparta. Carthage 197 Carthage. Carthage 197: Carthage. Carthage 1971 Carthage. Centralia 59 Centralia. Lexington 149 LeXIngton. Beacon 3 St. Louis. Beacon 31 St. Louis. Loclrwood 521 Lockwood. Trenton 111 Trenton. Keystone 243 St. Louis. Friend 352 Ozark. Beacon 3 St. Louis. Jefferson 43 Jefferson City. Jefferson 43 1 Jefferson City. Jefferson 43 Jefferson City. Keystone 243 1 St. Louis. Keystone 243 St. Louis. Cache 416 St. Louis. Kansas" 220 Kansas City. Granite 272 Sedalia. Barbee Ch....... 31 St. Louis. Ingomar 536 Willow Springs. Clifton 463 Thayer. Occidental 163 St. Louis. II

City: ::::


310

[Sept.

Appendix. ROSTER OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

Res~dence Lodge ,_N_O_' .1 I l\{rs. Mary R. B-O-Y-d-.-.-.-.I71' A-p-r-il-,-1-9-14- FergUSOn Ch 118 1Fayette. Wm. A. Treadway..... 70 July, 1914 Webb City ' 512 Webb City. Miss Marion Marvin"' 74 July, 1914 Clinton ' 548 Clinton. • Miss Eliza B. l\larvin.. 72 July, 191'1 Clinton , 548 Clinton. l\lrs. E. Hatfield '162 ; July, 1914 Barbee Ch....... 31 St. Louis. Mrs. E. P. Johnston... 72 Aug., 1914 Ashland 156 Ashland. Charles H. Briggs..... 10 Sept., 1914 Polar Star ~ 79 St. Louis. Robert Woody '168 ; Sept., 1914 Fraternal 363 Robertsville. George N. Burch....... 70 Sept., 1914 Laddonia 1 115, Laddonia. George W. Barker..... 82 Sept., 1911 South Gate ' 547: Kansas City. Geneve Martin 14 ; Oct., 1914IAva , 26 i Ava. Otis Martin ' 13 Oct., 1914 Ava ', ' 261 Ava. Opal Martin 9 Oct., 1914 Ava ............ 26 Ava. Sophia Jacobs.......... 69 Oct., 1914 Aurora ,... 267' St. Louis. J. C. Foss 81 Oct., 1914 Hope ,........... 32256~ I LWI'nanSh. ington. Malina C. Lamb....... 55 Oct., 1914 Linn ,., Eliza R. Moore 70 Nov., 1914 Jefferson 43 'Jefferson City. Mary Eo Page......... 72 Nov., 1914iSt. Joseph........ 78 St. Joseph. Charles Hunter 12 Nov., 1914,Morley 184 Morley. Susan Adams 68 Nov., 1914iGood Hope i 218 St.Louis. Elbert M. Kidwell..... 11 Nov., 1914lcuba '1' 312 Cuba. Laura A. Kidwell...... 12 Nov., 1914 Cuba 312 Cuba. Dorris Graupner 6 I Sept, 1914 Keystone 243 St. Louis. 'Vm. Robt. Graupner... 5 Spvt., 1914 Ke y stone , ; 243 St. Louis. George W. Henry...... 56 Dec., 1914 Gate City ; 522: Kansas City. Wm. W. Macfarlane... 83 I Dec., 1914 Auxvasse 357 I Auxvasse. Sylvester E. Smith..... 72 Dec., 1914 1ft. Moriah....... 40 ' St. Louis. Jas. L. Shannon....... 76 'Dec., 1914 jNew Salem ,.. 270; Winfield. Chas. T. Arthur....... 58 : Jan., 1915 Rowley 204 i Dearborn. Bonnie Mauldin 12 ; Jan., ] 915iAlton 2 g'55 ! AAllttoonn'. 2v Ruby Mauldin 8 1 Jan., 1915 Alton Goldie Evans 16 Jan., 1915 King- Hill........ 376; S. St. Joseph. John W. McCanne..... 71 Jan., 1915 Jacksonville ..... 541' Jacksonville. Robt. Stevenson , 73 ,Feb., 1915 1St. Louis......... 20 ' St. Louis. Amanda Klarenaal' 75 ,Feb., 1915'Barbee Ch........ 311 St. Louis. Uriah H. Johnston..... 68 Feb., 1915iMaiden 406 Malden. Vernon E. Price....... 9 Mch., 1915/Bellefontaine Ch. 69 St..Louis. Annie L. Sheehan...... 12 'Mch., 1915 Ingomar 536' Willow Springs. V\Tilhelmina Holstein .. 5 Mch., 1915 Keystone 243 I St. Louis. James A. Mahan....... 24 'Mch., 1915,Lambskin 460 I St. Louis. Mary Booth Reddick... 9 I Mch., 1915jTro y 34, Troy. Hiram H. Hedges...... 72 'Mch., 1915,Westo~":: : : : : :: : 53! Weston. Blanche Claypool 12 Mch., 1915)ngomar 5361' Willow Spring·s. ,Tulia Hamilton 79 May, 1915Iwilliamstown" " 370 Williamstown. David T. Martin....... 69 June, 1915 Hamilton ,....... 224 Hamilton. 'Vm. B. Moss.......... 79 July, 1915 Auxvasse 357 Auxvasse. Oscar Cole 10 July, 1915 Reed Springs..... 280 i Reed Springs. Ruby E. Davis......... 14 Aug., 1915'1'Linn Creek....... 152 Linn Creek. Vautres 1. Johnson.... 8 Aug., 1915.Toplin 335 Joplin. Donald O. Johnson , 10 Aug., 1915 Joplin 335 Joplin. SYlvia Cole .. , ' 13 Sept., 1915 Reed Springs..... 280 Reed Springs. Geo. McIntire 78 Sept., 1915/'FUltOn .. '. . . . . . . . 4'8 Fulton. ' Mrs. Malmene 57 Sept., 1915 Keystone 243 St. Louis. Joshua Kight 89 Sept., 1915Middle Fabius.... 244 Downin/?. Mrs. Eliza Graham 80 Sept., 19151LOdge of Light.. 257 Eaglesvllle. Mrs. Virginia Moore - 68 Sept., 1915 Friendship Ch.... 214 St. Louis. Lemuel Davis :........ 72 I Oct, 1915 Summit 263 Lee Summit. Chas. Jones ,.. 741 Sep·t., 1915 ,seaman .. , '/' 126 Milan. Raymond T. 'Voodhall. 14 Nov., 1915 Beacon 3 St. Louis. Kenneth D. F. Woodhall 10 Nov., 1915 Beacon ,..... 3 St. Louis. Elmer E. Brown....... 56 Nov., 1915 1Mt. Moriah....... 40 St. Louis.

Name

IAge!

Admitted

I'

1

I

1

1

1

!

1


1917.]

Appendix.

311

HOSTJ路;R OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

=:--'-======= _ _ _ _ _N_a_m_e

l

Admitted

Age

Joshua "V. WilhOit. \ Henry C. Partee . Flora Ann Partee. ' . Lou is F. Page . Edward Hogan Mrs. Ann Jane Hogan. John Estes . J~ster C. HalL . H. C. Rowe , .John F. McCormick i MI路s. Ruth \VilIiamson. Frances Carter Thomas B. Moss . Jubial McCoy . Samuel A. Derrick . \Vm. Parson Brown . Herschel Carnaha n Nellie Carnahan Laura Carnahan David \'iT. 'Strickler .... Mrs. Harriet A. Ennis. Henry Cla:y Shook . Mrs. Sarah E. Bell . Mrs. Ann Hicks . Forrest Bradshaw . Edna Bradshaw Virginia Bradshaw Robert Porter Waters.. Christopher C. Duke . Vera 1. Kidwell . Flora M. Kidwell . Charles Gantz Tazewell H. Lainhart .. Lillian K Lainhart. . Fassie Moore . John Moore . Corda Moore . Irey Moore . May Moore . Keeley Moore . Edna Moore . Elizabeth V. Bolster . Leo Cullins . Cleo Cullins . Lotta Rogers . Howard nOgel'S . Sanford H. Spence . Louise Livesey . Gcor~e M. Austin '.. .Tenme Alexandcl' ' Mary E. Mathes . W. H. Grapevine _.. Simon R. Harris . George D. Poucher . Alexander'S. Keller . Emanuel Kinch . David Duey . Briggs P. Sims . Mary Jane Dixon . Mrs. J. B. 'Vilcox . Louisa Smith . 1

70 7S 70 65 76 67 73 70 75 89 74 12 76 57 S2 79 12 10 7 79 82 69 64 69 14 11 9 76 73 4 7

61 68 55 16 14 11 9 7 6 4

77 12 12 5 3 70 75 :,' 54

Sl 7S 77 68 50 75

70 71 70 62 58

Nov., Nov., Nov., Dec., 'Nov., Nov., Dec., Oct., ,Dcc., Jan., Jan., Feb., Mch., ,Mch., Mch., 'Mch., April, April, April, ,May, May, June, June, June, July, .July, July, July, Aug., June, .June, Aug., Aug., Aug'., 'Aug., Aug., ; Aug., : Aug., 'Aug., I Aug" 'Aug I Aug:: 'Sept., I Sept., I Sept., ! Sept., ; Sept., I Sept., I Oct., , Oct., ; Oct., Oct., Sept., Sept., : Oct., '1 Nov., Nov., I

~ov.,

Nov., IOct., i Nov.,

Lodge

I No .

!

-I

1915 Holt . 1915 Tuscan . 1915 Tuscan . 1915 Butler . 1915 Anchor . 1915 Anchor . 1915 Rush ville 1915 Pride of the \Vest 1915 Gorin . 1916 Independence 1916 Occidental . 1916 East Gate . 1916 Joachim . 1916 South Gate . 1916 South Gate . 1916 Clarl>:sville 1916 Lodge of Truth .. 1916 Lodge of Truth .. 1916 Lodge of Truth .. 1916 Pee Dee . 1916 Bonhomme 1916 Bucklin . 1916 New Salem . 1916 Golden . 1916 Carl .Junction . 1916 Carl Junction . 1916 Carl 'Junction . 1916 Ashland 1916 Butler . 1916 Cuba . 1916 Cuba . 1916 Beacon . 1916 Athens . 1916 Athens . 1916 Summerville 1916 Summerville 1916 Summerville 1916 Summerville 1916 Summerville 1916 Summerville 1916 Su mmer'ville 1916 Jonesburg Ch . 1916 Zalma .. 1916 Zalma . 1916 Cuba . 1916 Cuba . 1916 Ozark .. 1916 Grand Lodge. 1916 Hamilton 1916 Venus Ch . 1916 Stockton . 1916 Cache . 1916 Stanberry 1916 McGee . 1916 Geo. \Vashington. 1916 Blairstown . 1916 New Salem . 1916 Bois D'Arc . 19161 Jane Moon Ch . 1916 Ja;ckson . 1916 Hrram .

. Residence

49 Holt. 360 I St. Louis. 360' St. Louis. 254 Butler. 443 St. Louis. 443 St. Louis. 238 Rushville. 179 St. Louis. 72 Gorin. 76 Independence. 163 St. Louis. 630 Kansas City. 164 ' Hillsboro. 547 Kansas City. 547 Kansas City. 17 Clarksville. 268 Atlanta. 26S Atlanta. 268 Atlanta. 498 Musselfork. 45 ' Ballwin. 845 Kirksville. 270 Winfield. 175 Golden City. 549 Carl Junction. 549 Carl Junction. ii49 Carl Junction. 156 Ashland. 254 Butler. 312' Cuba. 312 Cuba. 3 St. Louis. 127 Albany. 127 Albany. 555 Summerville. 555 Summerville. 555 Summerville. 555 Summerville. 5S5 Summerville. 555: Summerville. 555 ' Summerville. 353 Jonesburg'. ;;15: Zalma. 545; Zalma. 31'<l: Cuba. 31~~ I Cuba. 291 I Fair Grove.

2:=:4 ' Hamilton. 153 St. Louis. 283 Stockton. 416 St. Louis. 109 Stanberry. 146 College Mound. 9 St. Louis. 557 Blairstown. 270 \Vinfield. 449 Bois D'Arc. 333 St. Louis. 82 Linneus.

362

Kahoka.

I


[Sept.

Appendix.

312

ROSTEH OF THE HOME FAMILY-Continued.

------=-=====----======"--'--=:-=---=---==,,--,"',,--,-=-======"--'- --=============== Admitted

Name

W. L. Davidson . 73 78 Adolph Schlesinger 73 Josephine Dobyns Mary A. Armstrong- .... 77 Ernestine Schlesinger.. 62 Earl Loftis . 12 60 August Sommers Martin E. Casto . 44 George W. Moore . 81 Wm. T. Wayland . 67 Martha Ann Dickson . 80 .John D. Albers . 69 Louisa Dyer . 66 Caroline M. Austin . 79 5 Bernice Helen Gibson .. Robert H. Smith . 96 Charles Bowles . 61 89 Rosanna Taylor 78 Clarinda Fleming Chas. S. Leeman . 77 William Gietz . 44 8 Burton Cooper . 6 Herbert Cooper . 3 Everett Cooper 65 Carrie Mitchell James Christy CI'ook .. 85 Benjamin D. Jones ..... 73 45 William French Ann Frances Daniel . 82 Harry Bowen . 47 Thos. Isaac Barnes . 72 Arline Barnes . 7 9 Samuel Kelley . Virginia Frazier . 83 . 62 .T hos. D. Harrison John M. Searcy . 72 D. E. C. Ellis . 82 Ann Eliza Moore . 80 62 James Jenkins Edwin B. Polluck . 60 Samuel S. Hare . 84 Theodore J. Beam . 53 Matilda C. Wormington 63

Sept., Nov., Dec., Sept., Nov., Dec., Nov., Jan., Mch., Mch., Jan., Mch., April, April, April, April, April, May, May, April, May, April, April, April, May, May, June, June, .June, June, June, June, July, July, July, July, July, I July, Aug-., Aug., i Aug-., 'I Aug., Jan.,

Lodge

INO.

1916 Wellington 1916 Napthali 1916Mt. Moriah . 1916jSullivan Ch . 19161Napthali . 1916 Joplin . 1916Aurora . 1917lwestport . 1917 Ada . 1917 Fayette . 1917 Grand Lodge. 1917:Sedalia . 1917 Mt. Moriah . 1917 Hamilton 1917 Clayton . 1917 Twilight 1917 Hunnewell . 1917 Sedalia . 1917 Xenia ........•.. 1917'Chamois 1917 Polar Star . 1917 Van Buren . 1917 Van Buren . 1917 Van Buren . 1917 Cache . 1917 Rowley .. 1917 Beacon . 1917 United . 1917 Triplett . 1917\Lewistown . 1917 Sullivan . 1917 Sulliva;ll . 1917 ExcelslOr . 1917!Joachim ,. 19171'Elvins . 1917 Glenwood . 1917.Salem . 1917'Centralia . 1917 Carl Junction . 1917 Athens , . 1917 Rural . 1917 Solomon 1917 Sal'coxi e

Residence

22 25 40 105 25 335 267 340 444 47

DeKalb. St. Louis. St. Louis. Sullivan. St. Louis. i J'oolin_ St. Louis. Kansas City. Orrick. I Fayette.

236 40 224 601 114 415 236 50 185 79 509 509 509 416 204 3 5 122 44'9 69 69 441 164 599 427 225 59 549 127 316 271 293

, Sedalia. St. Louis. Hamilton. . Clayton. • Columbia. . Hunnewell. i Sedalia. Hopkins. Chamois. St. Louis. Van Buren. Van Buren. Van Buren. St. Louis. Dearborn. St. Louis. Springfield. Triplett. Lewistown. Sullivan. Sullivan. Jackson. Hillsboro. . Flat River. Glenwood. Salem. Centralia. Carl Junction. Albany. Kansas City. I Springfield. Sarcoxie.

i

ADMITTED SINCE LAST ANNUAL REPORT. Name

Age

Tazewell H. Lainhart.. LIllian E. Lainhart.... Fassie Moore John Moore Corda Moore Irey Moore May Moore Keeley Moore Edna Moore 'Elizabeth V. Bolster...

68 55 16 14 11 9 7 6 4 77

Admitted

I

Lodg-e

INa.

--1---: Aug., Aug., Aug., Aug., Aug., Aug., Aug., Aug., Aug., Al1~"

I

Residence

1916!Athens 127 Albany. 1916.i Athens 127 Albany. 1916 Summerville .. .. 555 Summerville. 1916 Summerville - .... 555 Summerville. 1916 Summerville . . .. 555 Summerville. 1916 Summerville -.... 555 Summerville. 1916'jSUmmerville 555 Summerville. 1'916 Summerville 555 -Summerville. 1916 Summerville . 555 Summerville. 1916 Jonesbuz:~ Ch.~.~----,-3--,--5_3-----,J_o_nesburg.


313

Appendix.

1917.]

ADMITTED SINCE LAST ANNUAL REPORT

==========-__ c.====;=::...:....::...====::::::::::=======::::;========--=== Name

IAge

Leo Cullins 112 Cleo Cullins 12 Lotta Rogers 5 Howard Rogers "1 3 Sanford H. Spence..... 70 Louise Livesey :....... 75 George M. Austin...... 74 Jennie Alexander 75 Mary E. Mathes '181 V',T. H. Grapevine 78 Simon R. Harris....... 77 George D. Poucher.... 68 Alexander S. Keller '150 ]':manuel Kinch 75 Dayid D~ey 70 Bnggs 1. SIms........ 71 Mary Jane Dixon , 70 Mrs. J. B. "\Vilcox ' 62 Louisa Smith 58 \,V. L. Davidson........ 73 Louis G. Courts....... 61 Adolph Schlesinger .... 78 Josephine Dobyns 73 Mary A. Armstrong.... 77 Ernestine Schlesinger.. 62 Earl Loftis 12 August Sommers 60 Martin E. Casto....... 44 George \V. Moore...... 81 \Vm. T. Wayland...... 67 Martha Ann Dickson.. 80 John D. Albers........ 69 Julius A. Dyer......... 78 Louisa Dyer 66 Caroline M. Austin... 79 Bernice Helen Gibson.. 5 Ho bert n. Smi th . . . . . .. 96 Charles Bowles 61 Hosanna Taylor 89 Clarinda Fleming 78 Chas. S. Leeman....... 77 William Gietz 44 Burton Cooper 8 Herbert Cooper 6 Everett Cooper 3 Carrie Mitchell 65 James Christy Crook.. 85 Benjamin D. Jones ..... 73 \Villiam French"....... 45 Ann Frances Daniel... 82 Harry Bowen ,' 47 'rh,?s. Isa.ac Barnes.... 7~1 Arhne Barnes . Samuel Kelley 9 Virginia Frazier 83 Thos. D. Harrison..... 62 John M. Searcy........ 72 D. E. C. Ellis.......... 82 Ann Eliza Moore 1 80 James Jenkins 62 Edwin B. Polluck...... 60 Samuel S. Hare 84 Theodore J. Beam..... 53 Matilda C. Wormington 63 1:

'Ii

Admitted

Sept., Sept., I Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Oct., IOCt., Oct., Oct., Sept., Sept., Oct., Nov., Nov., Nov., Nov., Oct., Nov., Sept., Dec., Nov., Dec., Sept., Nov., Dec., Nov., Jan., Mch., Mch., .Tan., Mch .. April, April, April, April, April, April, l\iay, May, April, May, April, April, April, May, May, June, June, : June, i June, i June, i June, I July, : July, I July, 路 July, July, I July, Aug., Aug., I! Aug., Aug., I Jan.,

Lodg-e

1916 Zalma " 1916 Zalma " , 1916 CUba 1916 Cuba 1916 Ozark 1916 Grand Lodge. 1916 Hamilton 1916 Venus Ch........ 1916 Stockton 1916 Cache 1916 Stanberry 1916 McGee . . . .. 1916 Geo. 路Washington. 1916 Blairstown 1916 New Salem " .. 1916Bois D'Arc 1916 Jane Moon Ch... 1916 Jackson 1916 Hiram 1916 Wellington 1916 Acacia 1916 Napthali 1916 Mt. Moriah 1916 Sullivan Ch...... 19i6 Napthali .. . . . . . . 1916 Joplin 1916 Aurora 1917 "\Vestport . . . .. .. 1917 Ada 1917 Fayette 1917 Grand Lodge. 1917 Sedalia 1917 Mt. Moriah....... 1917 Mt. Moriah....... 1917 Hamilton . .. 1917 Clayton 1917 Twilight 1917 Hunnewell 1917 Sedalia 1917 Xenia 1917 Chamois . . . . . 1917 Polar Star....... 1917 Van Buren....... 1917 Van Buren....... 1917 Van Buren....... 1917 Cache 1917 Rowley 1917 Beacon 1917 United 1917 Triplett 1917 Lewistown 1917 Sullivan 1917 Sullivan 1917 Excelsior 1917 Joachim 1917 Elvins 1917 Glenwood 1917 Salem 1917 Centralia 1917 Carl Junction.... 1917 Athens 1917 Rural 1917 Solomon . . . . . . .. 1917 Sarcoxie

No.

i

Residence

545 545 312 312 297

Zalma. Zalma. Cuba. Cuba. Fair Grove.

221 153 283 416 109 146 I 9 ' 557 270 449 333 82 362 22 602 25 - 40 105' 25 335 267 340 444 47

Hamilton. St. Louis. Stockton. St. Louis. Stanberry. College Mound. St. Louis. Blairstown. Winfield. Bois D'Arc. St. Louis. Linneus. Kahoka. DeKalb. C::olumbia. St. Louis. St. Louis. Sullivan. St. Louis. Joplin. St. Louis. Kansas City. Orrick. Fayette.

236 Sedalia. 4'0 St. Louis. 40 St. Louis. 224 Hamilton. 601 Clayton. 114 Columbia. 415 Hunnewell. 236 Sedalia. 50 Hopkins. 185 Chamois. 79 St. Louis. &09 Van Buren. 509 Van Buren. 509; Van Buren. 416' St. Louis. 204 Dearborn. 3 St. Louis. 5 Springfield. 122 Triplett. 449 Lewistown. 69 ., Sullivan. 69 Sullivan. 441 Jackson. 164 Hillsboro. 599 i Flat River. 427 Glenwood. 225 Salem. 59 Centralia. 549 Carl Junction. 127 Albany. 316 Kansas City. 271 I'springfield. 293 Sarcoxie;


314

Appendix.

[Sept.

DISCHARGED SINCE LAST ANNUAL REPORT. Name

Age!

-------;-------1 Charles A mos Reed . Minnie D. Green . Nancy Roberts . Myrtle Thomas Marshal Thomas Chas.. P. Thomas . Mary Bell Thomas . 'Walter vVhitacre Robert ,J. HilL . Sarah A. Aldridg-e . Frances Jenkins . Samuel Robirds Thomas 'l'aylol' ..... , .. Leona \Vhitacre Missouri A. vVomack . Edith Price . Ethel Price . I~aTl DeLacy .. , _ " Fred Matlack . Fielden Price '.' Cornelia Matlacl{ 01 i vette Kershaw . Mary Baird . Milford Hunter . Lafayette Wolfe .. _.. '1 G'eorge Holstei n . Dorris Salyer ! ,Josephine \Vhitlock "'1 'Wilber :Mabry . John Mabry . Sherman Mabry .

Admitted

!

70 73 67 16 14 12 11 4

76 73 64 68 69 18 78 16 16 18 20 18 19 17 18 16 68 16 17 16 12 9 7

I

No.1 Date of Discharge

Lodge

------1---------1

I --------

i Jan.,

1916. 1916 Rochester 248[' July, Feb., 1916 T y ro Ch., O. E. S. 321 Sept., 1916. ~ April, 1915 Poplar Bluff...... 209 Sept., 1916. Feb., 1916 Charleston 407 i Oct., 1916. I Feb., 1916 Charleston 407 Oct., 1916. Feb., 1916 1Charleston 407 I Oct., 1916. 1916. I Feb., 1916 Charleston 407 Oct., Sept., 1914 Summerville 555, Oct., 1916. Aug., 1911 Farmington 132; Sept., 1916. Aug., 1914 Tuscan . . . . . . . .. 360 Sept., 1916. 1916. Dec., 1914 Charity 331 I Nov., Aug., 1915 St.. Andrews...... 96. Nov., 1916. 1916. Sept., 1912 Tuscan 36Q Nov., June, 1912 Summerville 55;> Dec., 1916. Aug., 1915 Jonathan 321 Jan., 1917. Oct., 1910 Kansas City. 220 Jan., 1917. Oct., 1910 Kansas City. 220 Jan., 1917. Nov., 1909 Rural. 316 Jan., 1917. 1916. Feb., 1907 Bellefontaine Ch. 69 Dec., May, 1915 Four Mile 212 Mch., 1917. Feb., 1907 Bellefontaine Ch. 69 Mch., 1917. 1917. Nov., 1907 Forest Park...... 578 Jan., 1917. July, 1905 Marceline 481 Mch .. Nov., 1914 Morley 184 April, 1917. ; April, 1914 Seaman 126 April, 1917. May, 1912 Keystone 243 June, 1917. May, 1914 United fi June, ] 917. : Oct., 1913 Lockwood 521 , June. 1917. I Aug., 1915 York 563 I June, 1917. Aug., 1915 York 563: June, 1917. i Aug., 1915 York 563 I June. 1917 . ..•. _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ' - - - - - - - - 1

I'

DEATHS SINCE LAST ANNUAL REPORT. 1

Name

Age

I

Admitted

--1--

Lodge

No.

Date

of

Death

1- - -1-

Charles Kleemeier .... Rebecca Peterson Serilla M. Knox........ Hattie B. Hewes....... David E. Sheldon...... William Young \Villiam P. Knox...... J. VI. Schwaner Mary A. Field......... Louis G. Courfs Sal'ah A. Sylvester..... W'arren A. Smith...... Julius A. Dyer Massena B. Beach..... John F. ·Ballow. . . . . . ..

50 80 84 74 80 83 86 84 76 61 74 79 80 78 84

: Jan., '1916 Mt. Moriah....... : Mch., 1900 Missouri : July, 1913 Tyro I Dec., 1912 Holden ,Feb.. 1912 Corinthian i Feb., 1908 Belton • Dec., 1910 Tyro June, 1902 Hemple July, '1913 Tuscan Dec., 1916 Acacia , .. Sept., 1914,Aul'ora Dec., 1915 1Twilight April, 1917 Mt. Moriah....... Nov., 1910 Gentryville .Tune, 1915 Craft .. . . . . . . . ..

'_V_i1~ __ M_._B_a_x_~~r ._._._._._._I_S_0__l\_f_a_y_,__1_9_1_3_H_a_n_n_ib_a_l

40 I Sept. 1 Sept. 12 o.ct. 262. Oct. 265 ! Oct. 4050 Oct. 12 Jan. 37 Jan. 360 Jan. 602 Jan. 267 I Feb. 114 Feb. 40 April 125 1I July 287 July II

..._ _1_8_8_I_J_U_Iy

1, 1916. 16, 1916. 2, 19] 6. 12, 1916. 22,] 916. 25. 1916. 12, 1917. 12, 1917. 13, 1917. 20, ]917. ] 8, 1917. 19,] 917. 26, 1917. 22, 1917. 23, 1917. 2_9_,_1_9_17_._ _


1917.]

Appendix.

315

LETTER TO THE GRAND LODGE FROM THE MATRON OF THE OLD PEOPLE. A year and a half has come and gone since the beginning of my work in the Masonic Home. Many changes have taken place, but, I am happy to state, a comparatively small number of the large family have been taken away from us. In the dining room the same table-ladies and their assistants are presiding just where they were last year. In the sewing room the familiar faces of the faithful ones who made clothes for the children and old people who can not sew for themselves are to be seen. A number of new faces are scattered throughout the Hospital and old people's buildings. At present we have one hundred and eighty-seven old people, among whom are ten couples spending the evening of their lives together in the comfortable Home the good Masons have provided for them. Our buildings in which our old people live who are able to care for their own rooms are entirely occupied. Every room is steam heated and comfortably furnished. The parlors afford a pleasant resting place for the old people to visit to~ether. A literary society was organized by our old people last winter which afforded them much pleasure. Quite a bit of talent was evident in directions unlooked for. Music, readings and story-telling usually filled the programs. The Superintendent, Mrs. Baker, and myself were made honorary members; the nurses from the Hospital also were made honorary members and contributed largely and often to the interesting programs. The old people are looking forward with great anticipation of much pleasure to the resuming of the meetings of the literary society, which were discontinued during the hot weather. The Hospital, which affords a haven of rest to the infirm and sick, is under the able supervision of Dr. A. C. Robinson, with Miss Sitton as head nurse. The time I devote in this building I count well spent, for it lends outside interest and cheer to the patient sufferers and gives me a lesson in patience and fo.rtitude . .The past year held its usual round of entertainments and feasts given by the Past Matrons' and Patrons' Club and Christmas Committee. Our good friends in Ferguson gave us the annual picnic in June, which was much appreciated and enjoyed by about ninety of our old people. The day was ideal for the occasion and all returned in the evening loud in their praises of the wonderful dinner served on the lawn under the beautiful shade trees, and


316

Appendix.

[Sept.

their very courteous hosts and hostesses. The Ferguson picnic is always anticipated and looked forward to with great pleasure. The boat ride, given in June by the Christmas Committee, was unusually well attended and afforde.d much pleasure to all, and especially our new members of the family, who were experiencing their first boat ride on the Mississippi River. Truly, each and every member of the Masonic Home of Missouri should be happy and contented, for everything possible is done for his or her comfort and pleasure. The Superintendent, Mrs. Baker, is untiring in her efforts for the welfare of every member of the Home family; the good, kind nurses who care for our people in their illnesses and infirmities, and my own feeble efforts in their behalf continue to be a source of pleasure to me. My association with the Honorable Board is indeed a privilege and a pleasure; their courtesy to me is most highly appreciated. Trusting to路 the same Divine Guidance in the future that we have had the past year, I am, Fraternally yours, MABEL E. ENGEL, Matron of the Old People.


1917. ]

317

Appendix.

DISTRICTS AND D. D. GRAND MASTERS. GRAND SECRETARY'S STATEMENT SHOWING LOCATION OF

Lodges According to Districts. FIRST DISTRICT. H. N. Martin, D. D. G. M. Kahoka. County. Clark do do do do do Scotland do do Schuyler do do do

No. Name of Lodge. Location. 167 Revere Revere. Wyaconda. 290 Fairmount Luray. 318 Eldorado Kahoka. 362 Hiram Alexandria. 436 Gothic 588 St. Francisville .. Wayland. 16 Memphis M~mphis. 72 Gorin Gorin. 572 Rutledge Rutledge. ~ . . . . . . . . . . .. 244 Middle Fabius Downing. 259 Lodge of Love .. Lancaster Queen City. 380 Queen City 427 Glenwood Glenwood. SECOND DISTRICT. John H. Holton, D. D. G. M., Kirksville.

Adair do路 do do Knox' do do do do

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

105 319 366 583 6 168 181 291 414

Kirksville Paul ville Adair Novinger Ark Colony Novelty Edina Greensburg

Kirksville. Brashear. Kirksville. Novinger. Newark. Colony. Novelty. Edina. Greensburg.


Appendix.

318

[Sept.

THIRD DISTRICT. John Santee, D. D. G. M., Greencastle. County. Putnam do do do Sullivan do do do do do do

No.

171 206 ................................ .. 210 .............................. .. 394 ................................ .. 32 .............................. .. 126 ................................ 159 ............................ .. 190 ................................ 349 ............................ . 389 .............................. 540 .................................. ................................

'Name of Lodge. Location. Hartford .... '" Hartford. Somerset ....... Powersville. Unionville ..... Unionville. Lucerne Lucerne. Humphreys ..... Humphreys. Seaman ........ Milan. Green City ...... Green City. Putnam ........ Newtown. Pollock ........ Polloel\:. Arcana .............. Harris. Winigan ........ Winigan. •••••••

0

FOURTH DISTRICT. J. H. Clawson, D. D. G. Mo, Trenton. Grundy do do do Mercer do do

111 253 423 524 35 258 616

Trenton Trenton. Laredo Laredo. : Galt , Galt. Spickardsville .. Spi~ard. Mercer Princeton. Ravanna Ravanna. Marion Mercer. 0

0

FIFTH DISTRICT. E. W. Prentiss, D. Do G. Mo, Bethany.

Harrison do do do do do

97 128 257 328 395 556

Bethany Bethany. Lorraine Ridgeway. Lodge of Light .. Eagleville. Cainesville Cainesville. Hatfield Hatfield. Prairie Gilman City.


1917. ]

319

Appendix. SIXTH DISTRICT. J. A. Marsh, D. D. G. M., Albany.

County.

No.

Gentry do do do do do do do Worth do do do

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Name of Lodge. Location.

21 Havana 109 Stanberry 125 Gentryville 127 Athens 252 Alanthus 377 Ancient Craft 378 Berlin 447 Jacoby 66 Grant City 88 Defiance 198 Allensville· 321 Jonathan

McFall. Stanberry. Gentryville. Albany. Alanthus Grove. King City. Berlin. Darlington. Grant City. Sheridan. Allendale. Denver.

SEVENTH DISTRICT. Joseph E. Reese, D. D. G. M., Maryville. Nodaway do do do do do do do do do do do do do

....... , ........ 50 Xenia .......... Hopkins. ................ 165 Maryville · ..... Maryville.

................ 196 Quitman . ....... Quitman. ................ 201

Ravenwood . .... Ravenwood.

................ 289 Graham . ....... Graham. ................ 301 White Hall ...... Barnard. ••••

1

•••••••••••

329

................ 442

................ 465 •••••••••••••

II'

470

................ 472 ................ 474 ................ 507 ................ 511

Kennedy . ...... Elmo. Burlington · ..... Burlington Jet. Gaynor City ..... Parnell. Nodaway . ...... Maryville. Pickering · ..... Pickering. Guilford . ....... Guilford. Clearmont · ..... Clearmont. Skidmore . ...... Skidmore.

EIGHTH DISTRICT. H. S. Teare, D. D. G. M., Oregon.

Atchison do do do

· · . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. · · . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

157 200 358 483

North Star Sonora North-West Fairfax

Rockport. Watson. Tarkio. Fairfax.


320

[Sept.

Appendix.

County.

No.

Name of Lodge.

112 Maitland 139 Oregon 214 Forest City 294 Mound City 606 Craig

Holt do do do do

Location. Maitland. Oregon. Forest City. Mound City. Craig.

NINTH DISTRICT. Chas. M. Thomas, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph. Andrew do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do do . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. Buchanan do do do . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do do . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do do , do , do ,

71 138 162 404 413 600 10 22 78 150 189 238 331 376 508 627

Savannah Lincoln Whitesville Rosendale Valley Cosby Agency Wellington St. Joseph Birming Zeredatha Rushville Charity King HilL Saxton Wallace Park

Savannah. Fillmore. Whitesville. Rosendale. Bolckow. Cosby. Agency. De Kalb. St. Joseph. '. Faucett. St. Joseph. Rushville. St. Josepn. So. St. Joseph. Saxton. Wallace.

TENTH DISTRICT. H. W. Saunders, D. D. G. M., Maysville. De Kalb do do do do do Daviess do do do do do do

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

124 235 308 317 454 559 15 65 106 285 488 500 564

Union Star Weatherby Parrott Osborn Continental Clarksdale Western Star Pattonsburg Gallatin 路Earl Lock Spring Jameson Jamesport

Union Star. Weatherby. Maysville. Osborn. Stewartsville. Clarksdale. Winston. Pattonsburg. Gallatin. Coffey. Lock Spring. Jameson. Jamesport.


321

Appendix.

1917. ]

ELEVENTH DIST;RICT. Emsley C. James, D. D. G. M., Gower. County.

No.

Clay do do do do do Clinton do do do do

0

Name of Lodge.

31 Liberty 49 Holt 193 Angerona 207 Clay 311 Kearney 438 Temperance 37 Hemple 62 Vincil 113· Plattsburg 397 Gower 506 Lathrop

0

Location.

••

Liberty. Holt. Missouri City. Excelsior Springll Kearney. Smithville. Hemple. Cameron. Plattsburg. Gower. Lathrop.

TWELFTH DISTRICT. Richard Caldwell do do do do do Livingston do do do do do do

A.

Tharp, D. D. G. M., Wheeling. . 118 Kingston Kingston. . 135 Braymer Braymer. . 224 Hamilton Hamilton. . 232 Polo Polo. . 334 Breckenridge Breckenridge. . 561 Cowgill Cowgill. . 89' Friendship Chillicothe. . 155 Spring Hill Spring ~il1. . 170· Benevolence Utica. . 333 Chillicothe Chillicotrre. . 388 Chula Chula. . 434 Wheeling Wheeling. . 539 Dawn Ludlow. 0

0

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. E. W. Tayler, D. D. G. Mo, Marceline. Linn 82 Jackson Linneus. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Brookfield Brookfield. do . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. . .. 227 Cypress Laclede. do • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 233 Bucklin Bucklin. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 325 Dockery Meadville. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 481 Marceline Marceline. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 510 Bis",:ell Browning.


322

Appendix.

County.

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT. Geo. F. Brewington, D. D. G. M., Bevier. No. Name ·of Lodge. Location.

Macon " ....... " ...... "" " 38 do " .. "" .... "" ....... 102 146 do " ........ "" ...... , 172 do 237 do 268 do " .. " .. " ........ """ .................. 332 do Shelby " .... "" .... "" ..... 96 do " .. "" ........ "" ... 228 305 do , • • "" •• ,,""" • • • 1"" " 415 do " .. """" ........ "" " do " .. """" ........ " .. 537 •••

[Sept.

•• ' ••••

""

••

II

•••

" • • • • • • I I " " • • • • • ""

Callao ......... Callao. Bloomington .... Bevier. McGee . ....... , College Mound. Censer ......... Macon. La Plata ........ La Plata. Lodge of Truth .. Atlanta. Excello ........ Excello, St. Andrew's .... Shelbyville. Shelbina ........ Shelbina. Clarence ....... Clarence. Hunnewell ..... Hunnewell. Bethel ......... Bethel.

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. B. E. Bigger, D. D. G. M., Hannibal. La Grange. Lewis ................... 24 Wyaconda Monticello. ................... 58 Monticello do La Belle. ................... 222 La Belle do Canton. ................... 287 Craft do ................... 370 Williamstown .. Williamstown. do Lewistown. ................... 494 Le,wistown do Ewing. ................... 577 Ewing do Palmyra. Marion .................. 18 Palmyra Hannibal. do .................. 28 St. John Hannibal. do .................. 188 Hannibal Philadelphia. do ... .... .. .. .. . .... 502 Philadelphia SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. Robert A. May, D. D. G. M., Louisiana. Eolia. Pike . 14 Cyrene Clarksville. do ....•............... 17 Clarksville do . 92 Perseverance Louisiana. Bowling Green. do . 136 Phoenix Frankford. do . 192 Frankford Curryville. do . 399 Pike Ralls . 33 Ralls Centre. Perry. do . 302 Lick Creek New London. do . 307 New London


1917. ]

323

Appendix.

SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT. Thos. F. Hurd, D. D. G. M., Paris. County. No.. Name of Lo路dge. Location. Monroe . . . . . .. i9 Paris Union Paris. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 23 Florida ~"lorida. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 42 Middle Grove Middle Grove. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 64 Monroe Monroe City. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 91 Madison ,Madison. do 223 Woodlawn Woodlawn. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 462 Santa Fe Santa Fe. do 592 Stoutsville Stoutsville. EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. T. H. Walton, D. D. G. M., Higbee. Randolph do do do do do do do do

30

151 161 186 344

486 527 541 610

Huntsville Milton Clifton Hill Morality Moberly Cairo Higbee Jacksonville Clark

Huntsville. Milton. Clifton Hill. Renick. Moberly. Cairo. Higbee. Jacksonville. Clark.

NINETEENTH DISTRICT. Horace L. Mann, D. D. G. M., Brunswick. Chariton do do do do do do do do

.................. 73 Eureka ... , ..... Bruns wick. ................ 74 Warren 路 ....... Keytesville. ..... , ........... 122 ..................... 202 ..............

.o

.....

208

........ - ................ 426 .o

.....................

...............

.o

..........

.o

.o

......

.........

498 525 546

Triplett 路 ....... Triplett. Westville . .. , ... Westville. Salisbury . ...... Salisbury. Rothville . ...... Rothville. Pee Dee 路 ....... Musselfork. Cunningham . ... Sumner. Prairie Hill ..... Prairie Hill.


324

[Sept.

Appendix. TWENTIETH DISTRICT.

County. Carroll do do do do do Ray do do do do do

William Baker, D. D. G. M., Hale. No. Name of Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . .

DeWitt Wakanda Bogard Hale City Carroll 597 Bosworth 57 Richmond 309 King Hiram 322 Hardin 338 Myrtle 393 Bee Hive 444 Ada ~

39 52 101 21.6 249

Location.

DeWitt. Carrollton. Bogard. Hale. Norborne. Bosworth. Richmond. Knoxville. Hardin. Millville. Lawson. Orrick.

·TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. J: P. Tucker, D. D. G. M., Parkville. Platte do do do do do do do

· . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ................

· . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. · · ....••...•..•...•. · • . . . • • • . . •• . . . . . . •.

· ....••............

Rising Sun Barry. Weston .. , Weston. 120 Compass ...•... Parkville. 169 Camden Point .. Camden Point. 204 Rowley Dearborn. 339 Fidelity Farley. 355 Adelphi Edgerton. 504 Platte City Platte City. 13 53

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT. Arthur L. Williams, D. D. G. M., Kansas City. Jackson do do do do do do do do do do do do do

104

Heroine Albert Pike 220 Kansas City 299 Temple 316 Rural 340 Westport 446 Ivanhoe 522 Gate City 547 South Gate 563 York 617 Park 625 Sheffield 630 East Gate 643 Northeast 219

Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas

City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City. City.


1917.]

325

Appendix. TWENTY-THIRD DIS'rRICT. Wm. T. Wernwag, D. D. G. M., Lexington.

Lafayette do do do do do

.. . . . . . . . . . . . • • • ................ ................ .• • • • . • • • • . • • • •• ................

61 149 364 437 464

................ 476

Waverly ' Lexington Higginsville Lafayette .. ; Aullville MOllnt. Hope '

Waverly. Lexington. Higginsville. Corder. Aullville. Odessa.

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTltrCT. J. S. Wilson, D. D. G. ,M., ~arshall. Saline do do do do do do do ~:.:,--

Cooper do do do do Howard do do do

................... • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. · . .. . .. . . . . . . . .. · ................... · •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. • '. .. · .................•

55 Arrow Rock 63 Cambridge 85 Miami 205 'Trilumina . ' 217 Barbee 402 Malta 518 Oriental 560 Nelson

Arrow Rock. Slater.' Miami. Marshall. Sweet Springs. Malta Bend. Blackburn. Nelson.

TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. M. E. Schmidt, D. D. G. M., Boonville. ..............•...

36 142

277

" '.' .,. 456 ; ' 503 ................• 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 47 • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 51 . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . .. 70

Cooper· Boonville. Pleasant Grove . Otterville. Wm. D. Muir Pilot Gr.ove. Wallace Bunceton. Prairie Home Prairie Home. Howard New Franklin. Fayette Fayette. Livingston Glasgow. , Armstrong Armstrong.

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. H. L. Wilson, D. D. G. M., Columbia. Boone do , do do ' do do do do do

59 67 114 156 174 336 356 455 602

Centralia Centralia. Rocheport Rocheport. Twilight Columbia. Ashland Ashland. Sturgeon Sturgeon. Hallsville Hallsville. Ancient Landm'k.Harrisburg. Hinton Hinton. Acacia Columbia.


326

[Sept.

.Appendix.

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. S. P. Cumiingham, D. D. G. M., Mexico. Cou·nty.

No.

AUdrain ; ..do ., do do do do Callaway

:

. . . . . . .

qo

.

81 115 266 354 491 580 8 48

do do do' do do do

. . . ; . .

242 357 565 585 612

"

60

Name of Lodge.

Location.

Central Molino. Laddonia Laddonia. Social Martinsbu.rg. Hebron MexiCo. Vandalia' Vandalia. Houston Gant. Williamsburg Williamsburg. Fulton Ful ton. New Bloomfield . New Bloomfield. Portland; Readsville. Aux Vasse Aux Vasse. Tebbetts Tebbetts. Shamrock ; Shamrock. Mokane Mokane.

TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. John E. Reeds, D. D. G. M., Jonesburg. Montgomery do do do do do

· · .' · · ·

~

178 194 246 : 261' 457 492

Griswold .. : Bellflower. Wellsville Wellsville. Mont"gomery City .Montgomery City. Florence' New Florence. Jonesburg Jonesburg. Daggett McKittrick.

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT. .J. W. Powell, D. D. G. M., Elsberry.

Lincoln do do do do do do

· ·............. ·

,

34 75 199

• ..••.....••.•••• 270

· . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 409 · ..••......••..•• 473 · 558

Troy Silex New Hope New Salem Louisville .. ; Nineyeh Moscow

Troy. Silex. Elsberry. Winfield. Louisville. Olney. Moscow Mills.


1917.]

Appendix.

327

THIRTIETH DISTRICT. E. A. Fluesmeier, D. D. G. M., Wright City. County. St. Charles do do Warren do

No. .

46

241 260 . 11 609

Name of Lodge.

Location.

Wentzville Wentzville. Palestine St. Charles. Mechanicsville .. Howell. Pauldingville Wright City. Warrenton Warrenton.

THIRTY·FIRST DISTRICT. A. T. Dumm, D. D. G. M., Jefferson City.

Cole do do do Moniteau do do do " Osage do . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ..

43 Jefferson 90 Russellville 211 Hickory Hill 611 Centertown 56 Tipton ' , 183 . ,California 295 Moniteau 553 Clarksburg .: 185 Chamois

326

Linn

Jefferson City. Russellville. Hickory Hill. Centertown. Tipton. California. Jamestown. Clarksburg. Chamois. Linn..

THIRTY·SECOND DISTRICT. R. A. Breuer, D. D. G. M., Hermann.

Franklin ................ do .. , . .. do .. . ., do . .. do ................ do ....•.......•... do ................ do Gasconade do do

27 69 173 251 363 534 575 593 123 584

624

Evergreen Sullivan Gray Summit Hope Fraternal' Columbia Easter Union Hermann Red Bird Owensville

New Haven. Sullivan. Gray Summit. Washington. Robertsville. Pacific. St. Clair. Union. Hermann. Red Bird. Owensville.


328

Appendix.

[Sept.

THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT. Andrew J. OReilly, D. D. G. M., St. Louis. County.

No.

Name of Lodge.

St. Louis City............ 1 Missouri St. do ............ 2 Meridian St. do ............ 3 Beacon St. do ............ 9 Geo. Washington . .st. do . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 St. Louis St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 25 Naphthali St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 40 Mount Moriah .. St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 79 Polar Star St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 95 Pomegranate St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 121 Erwin St. do 163 Occidental St. do 1.79 Pride of theWest.St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 180 Pyramid St. do 218 Good Hope St. do 243 Keystone St. do 267 Aurora St. do 282 Cosmos St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 323 Corner Stone St. do 360 Tuscan .. : : St. do 416 Cache St. do 420 Itaska St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 443 Anchor St. do 445 West Gate St. do 460 Lambskin St. do . . .. . . . . . . .. 499 Harmony St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 505 Euclid St. do . . . . . . .. . . .. 520 Clifton Heights St. do 544 Algabil St. do '. 550 Rose Hill St. do ..........•. 576 Olive Branch '" St. do 578 Forest Park St. do .~ 626 Magnolia St. do 631 Tow.er Grove St. do . '" . ~ 638 Triangle St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 639 Mizpah St. do . . . . . . . . . . .. 641 Trinity St.. 'do ·642 BenjaminFranklin.St.

Location. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis" Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis. Louis.


-1917. ]

329

Appendix. ·THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT.

County. Cass do do do do do do do do do do do do

James F. Blair, D. D: G. M.,. Belton. No. Nam~ of Lodge. . Location.

Index Cass · , 276 Grand River · " 348 Wadesburg · 372 Nonpareil · , 386 Dayton · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 450 Belton .................... 451 Raymore .................... 480 Jewel · 485 Coldwater · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 530 Peculiar .................... 604 Strasburg · 633 Archie · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

·

54

147

Garden City. Harrisonville. Freeman. Creighton. East Lynne. ·. . Dayton. Belton. Raymore. Pleasant Hill. Drexel. Peculiar. ·.Strasburg. Archie.

THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. R. B. Campbell, D.D. G. M., Spruce.

Bates 'do do do do do do do do

Hume Papinsville · 141 Amsterdam .; · '.' 254 Butler " ; · " 341 Rockville · '.' 350 Tyrian · 368 Crescent Hill .. · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 479 Rich Hill · 554 Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 130

· . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • .. 140

Hume. Papinsville. Amsterdam. Butler. Rockville. Johnstown. , Adrian. Rich Hill. Foster.

THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. A. M. Harlan, D. D. G. M., Sedalia. Benton Johnson do do do do do do Pettis do do do

. . 245 ·.0 .•...•.••....•

262 265

274 313

428

'

. . . .

487 236

272 425 574

. . . . . . .. . . . . . . " Knob Noster Holden Corinthian Cold Spring ., Kingsville Pittsville Chilhowee Sedalia Granite Green Ridge La Monte ... '

. : . . . . . . .. .. .. .... ~

Knob Noster. Holden. Warrensburg. Leeton. KingSVille. Pittsville. Chilhowee. Sedalia. Sedalia. Green Ridge. La Monte.


330

. [Sept.'

Appendix. THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. H. W.· Fristoe, D. D. G. M., Windsor.

County. Benton Henry do do do do do do do St. Clair do ., do do do

No.

"

" " "

418 29 286 343 408 548 552 557 562 273 342 403 412 419

Name of Lodge. Clea.r Creek ., Windsor Urich Agricola Montrose Clinton Calhoun Blairstown Deepwater St. Clair Circle Lowry City Appleton City Star

Location.

Palo Pinto. Windsor. Urich. Petersburg. Montrose. Clinton. Calhoun. Blairstown. Deepwater. Osceola. Roscoe. Lowry City. Appleton City. Taberville.

. THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. H. T. Wright, D. D. G. M., Lebanon. Camden do Laclede do do Pulaski do Miller .; do

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 152 Linn Creek ..... Linn Creek. " 433 Mack's Creek '" Mack's Creek. 83 Laclede ~ebanon. " 432 Competition Competition. " 528 .conway Conway. 375 Waynesville Waynesville. " 385 Richland Richland. 203 Brumley Brumley. 410 Iberia Iberia. THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT. Edmund J. Koch, D. D. G. M., Rolla.

Crawford do Dent ....•............... do " Phelps do do Pulaski

77 312 225 347 213 230 497 346

Lebanon Cuba Salem Spring Creek Rolla St. James Equality Ariington

Steelville. Cuba. Salem. Lecoma. Rolla. St. James. Newburg. Dixon.


1917.]

331 .

Appendix.

FORTIETH DISTRICT. Chas. E. pyle~ Do b. G. M., De. Sotoo County.

No... Name of Lodge.

Jefferson .do do .. Washington .... do do do St. Francois 0

0

••••••

0

0

•••

119 164 o. 256

•••

••••••••

••••••

0

0

0,0

0.0

•••

•••••••

12 131 143

•••

0

0

••••

0

0

632 535

Location.

De Soto .. De Soto. Joachim : ."Hillsboro. Shekinah' ,Festus. Tyro 0" • . • • • • • • • Caledonia. Potosi Potosi. Irondale Irondale. Belgrade .. Belgrade. Blackwell Blackwell. 0

••••

0

0

0

FORTY-FIRST

0

••

•••••

••••

0

DI~TRICT.

. John M. Chamberlin, D. Do G. M., Bolivar. Dallas do ; do Hickory' : .. do . do Polk do do. o. do do . do ..... 0

0

0

0

0

••

•••••••••••••

•••••••••••••

0

•••••

0

•••••

0

••••

0

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••••••

0

••••••

0

361 Riddick Buffalo. 396' 'Western Light. Louisburg. 421 Urbana Urbana. 279 . Hogle's Creek o' . Wheatland. 288 Hermitage .Her~itage. 636 Weaubleau o. Weaubleau. 44 Fair Play Fair Play. 144 Modern Humansville. 160 Pleasant Morrisville. 195 Bolivar Bolivar. 431 Cemen't Half Way. 467 Pleasant Hope. . Pleasant Hope. 0

0

•••••••••

0

"

•••••••

0

•••••••

0

•••••••

•••••••

••

0

0

0

•••

:

FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT. H. H. Finley, D. D. G. Cedar. do do Dade do do do do

.. .••... ..

0

••••••••

•••••••••••

o o o

0

••••••

0

••••••

••••••

0

"

0

•••••••

0

0

0

••

0

••••••••

'0'

0

0

•••

......• 283 315 482 87 359 405 458 521

0

••

••

M.;

Greenfield.

Stockton Jerusalem Clintonville Washington Garrett Everton Melville Lockwood 0

••

.0

Stockton. Jerico Springs. .... Eldorado Springs. Gr:eenfield. Arcola. Everton. Dadeville. Lockwood.

0

••••

I

0

0

•••

•••

••••••


·332

[Sept.

Appendix. FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT.

Henry Kraft, Jr., D. D. G. M., Nevada. No. Name of Lodge.. Location.

County.

Vernon · " 303 do · 371 do · 448 do · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 490 do · ...............• ·493 do · " 495 do · 605 do · " 628 Barton · " 187 do · 292 do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 304 do · ~ : ~75 do · " 516

Osage Sheldon Schell City Montevallo Vernon Unity : Walker Moundville Hermon Lalnar Signal Golden Milford

Nevada. Sheldon. Schell City. Montevallo. Bronaugh. Richards. Walker. Moundville. Liberal. Lalnar. Minden Mines. Golden City. Milford.

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. B. R. Elliott, D. D. G. M., Carthage. .,

Jasper do do do do do do do do do

'"

... ..... ....

.,

I.

.,

.. ...

., .,

:

"

Carthage. 197 Carthage 293 Sarcoxie Sarcoxie. Joplin. .. 335 Joplin 345 Fellowship Joplin. J~spe~ 398 Jasper 401 Carterville Carterville. Oronogo. 471 Mineral Webb City. .... 5.1 2 Webb City .. 549 Carl Junction .. Carl Junction. Alba. 586 Criterion

FORTY·FIFTH DISTRICT. Edward Clar.k, D. D. G. M., Springfield. Greene do do do do do do do do do.

.. . . . . . . . • . . . . . • • • 5 United ., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 7. O'Sullivan .................. 100 Ash Grove ., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 271 Solonion

....... , .,

...... ,

" 297 '.. "

422

449

., " 570 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . • . .. 608 ., 620

Springfield. Walnut Grove. Ash Grove. Springfield. Ozark •......... FairGrove. Gate of the Temple Springfield. Bois D'Arc Bois D'Arc. Republic Republic. Strafford Strafford. Willard Willard.


1917.] County. Webster do . do do do do

333

Appendix. No. 98 300. 439 459 . .. ; . 477 . . . . . . .. . . . . . . , . ·529 -

Name of Lodge. Webster Doric Mount Olive Hazelwood Henderson Niangua

Location. Marshfield. Elkland. Mt. Olive. Seymour. Rogersville. ~iangua.

FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. Carl A. Swenson, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove. Douglas ..... ,........... do ................. do .................. Texas .. . do ................... do ................... do ................... do ................... do .................... Wright ................. do ................. do ................. do ................. do ................. do .......•...•.....

26 182 382 116 145 177 469 555 595 158 240 411 543 589 622

Ava t\va. Pilot Knob Richville. Mt. Ararat Topaz. Barnes Cabool. . Latimer Licking. Texas Houston . Plato '.' Plato. Summerville Summerville. Emmanuel Bado. Mountain Grove Mountain Grove. Manes Manes. Joppa Hartville. Mansfield Mansfield. Grovespring Grovespring. Norwood N.orwood.

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT.

.

J. M. Carnahan, D. D. G. M., Van Buren. Carter do Reynolds do .. , do Shannon ;. do . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

509 Van Buren 579 G-randin 239 Hopewell 275 Bunker 353 . Barnesville 137 Delphian 430 Winona 607 Eminence

Van Buren. Grandin. Lesterville. Bunker. Ellington. Birch Tree. Winona. Eminence.


[Sept.

Appendix.

334

FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. County.

W. B. Massey, D. D. G. M., Bonne Terre. No. Name of Lodge. Location.

Iron do Madison St. Francois do . . . . . . . . . . . .. do . . . . . . . . . . . .. do do do do do Ste. Genevieve

133 351 110 41 132 154 234 424 551 598 599 226

Star of the West. Ironton. Mosaic Belleview. Marcus Fredericktown. Bismarck Bismarck. Farmington Farmington. Ionic Desloge. St. Francois Libertyville. Samaritan Bonne Terre. Pendleton '.' Doe Run. Leadwood Leadwood. Elvins Elvins. Saline St. ~ary's.

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT. G. W. Miller, D. D. G. M., Millersville.

Bollinger " do do . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Cape Girardeau........... do do do .. . . . . . . . .. do Perry

417 440 545 93 103 191 221 441

White Water Trowel Zalma St~ Marks West View Wilson Mystic Tie Excelsior

Laflin. Marble Hill. Zalma. Gape Girardeau. Millersville. Pocahontas. Oak Ridge. Jackson.

..................................

FIFTIETH DISTRICT. Jas. A. Boone, D. D. G. M., Charleston. Mississippj do do Scott do do do do do

. 330 384 407 . 184 . 306 . 310 . 581 . 594 . 615

Bertrand East Prairie Charleston Morley Ashlar Sikeston Illmo Blodgett Chaffee

Bertrand. East P~airie. Charleston. Morley. Commerce. Sikeston. Illmo. Blodgett. Chaffee.


1917.]

335

Appendix.

County.

No.

Stoddard do do do do do do

Name of Lodge.

153 Bloomfield 278 Essex 489 Lakeville 532 Dexter 573 Bernie 590 Advance 596 Puxico . ~

Location. Bloomfield. Essex. Bell City. Dexter. Bernie. Advance. Puxico.

FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT.

T. Dunklin do do do do do do New Madrid do do' do Pemiscot do . do

R. R. Ely, D. D. G. M., Kennett.

. . . . . . . . . . . .

68 212 215 231 248 406 513 166 176 429 603 461 571 634

Kennett .•....... Kennett. Four Mile Campbell. Hornersville Horners·ville. Cardwell Cardwell. Clarkton Clarkton. Malden Malden. Senath Senath. Portageville Portageville. Point Pleasant Conran. New Madrid New Madrid. Morehouse Morehouse. Caruthersville .. Caruthersville. Hayti ., ~ ., Hayti. Steele Steele.

FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT. E. C. White, D. Butler do Ripley do do Wayne do

290 623 314

369 568 107 526

D~

G. M., Doniphan.

Poplar Bluff Maple Pine Composite Naylor Greenville Wayne .:

Poplar Bluff. Neelyviile. Bardley. Doniphan. Naylor. Greenville. :. Piedmont.


[Sept:

Appendix.

336

FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT. H. A. Stearns, D. D. G. M., West Plains. County.

No.

Howell do do Oregon· do do do do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Ozark do '. do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do .. '.' . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

327 536 637 255 374 387 463 582 298 365 435 496

Name of Lodge.

Loc·ation.

Mt. Zion West Plains. Ingomar Willow Springs. Mountain View .. Mountain View. AIton AIton. Wilderness Wilderness. Woodside Thomasville. Clifton ........• Thayer. .Koshkonong Koshkonong. Sampson Lutie. Bayou Bakersfield. Rockbridge Rockbridge. Robert Burns Gainesville. 0

••

FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. G. J. Vaughan, D. D. G. M., Ozark.

Christian · · . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do · . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do Taney · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. °do · do · " do ................... Stone · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do · do · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

296 352 379 229 264 453 587 280 515 519

Sparta Friend Billings ; Claflin Kirbyville Forsyth Branson Reeds Spring Galena Crane

Sparta. Ozark. Billings. Protem. Kirbyville. Forsyth. :.Branson. Reeds Spring. Galena. Crane. 0

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. W. N. Marbut, D. D. G. Mo, Mount Vernon. Barry do do do do

· · ................... · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. · . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

129 148 367 383 517

Monett Purdy Barry Pythagoras Seligman

Monett.. Purdy. Washburn, Cassville. Seligman.


1917.] County. Lawrence do do do do do do do do

337

Appendix. No. ..... 99 · , 269 · ." , 284 .' 390 · ..............• 400 · , 452 · , 468 · , 523 · . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 567

Name of Lodge. Mt. Vernon Rock Prairie Canopy Marionville Decatur Verona Red Oak Stinson ' Miller

Location. Mt. Vernon. Halltown. Aurora. Marionville. Pierce City. Verona. Red Oak. Stinson. Miller.

FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. W. A. Phipps, D. D. G. M., Neosho. McDonald · . . . . . . . . . . . . .. do · " do · ' , do · , do · , Newton · .•.............. do · do · , do · -do · , do · ,

108 466 533 569 621 175 247 478 514

538 619

Pineviile Southwest Comfort Tiff City Anderson Ne.wton Neosho Racine Granby Stella Fairview

Pineville. Southwest City. Rocky Cqmfort. Tiff City. Anderson. Stark City. Neosho. Seneca. Granby. Stella. Fairview.

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. Wm. A. Meyers, D. D. G. M., Jennings. St. Louis County......... 45 do '. . . . .. 80 do .. . . . . . .. 84 do 281 do . . . . . . . .. 484 do 542 do . . . . . . . .. 566 do . . . . . . . .. 601 do 613 do 629 do 640

Bonhomme Ballwin. Bridgeton Bridgeton. Webster Groves.. Webster Groves. Fenton Fenton. Kirkwood Kirkwood. Ferguson Ferguson." Maplewood Maplewood. Clayton Clayton. Wellston Wellston. Valley Park Valley Park. Jennings Jennings.

\,


338

[Sept.

Appenr)i%. FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. Edwin Nelson, D. D. G. M., Versailles.

County. Morgan do do do Miller do do Maries do do

No.

Name of Lodge.

.................. 117 Versailles 250 Glensted' 320 Morgan 591 134 381

635 94 373 531

Barnett Olean Ionia Tuscumbia Vienna Belle Lane's Prairie

Location. Versailles. Glensted. Versailles. Barnett. Olean. Eldon. Tuscumbia. Vienna. Belle. . Vichy:

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT. Allan McDowell Hoyt, D. D. G. M., Jackson do do do do do do do do do

Indep~ndence.

76 ,Independence .. , Independence. 263 Summit Lee's Summit. 324 . McDonald Independence. 337 Blue Springs Blue Springs. 391 Raytown Raytown. 392 Christian Oak Grove. 501 Buckner Buckner. 614 Mt. Washington .. Mt. Washington. 618 Grandview Grandview.. 644 Grain Valley Grain Valley.


1917.]

339

Appendix.

REPORT COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS,. St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 20, 1917. To the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report: At" the present session of the M. W. Grand Lodge there are present 611 Representatives, from 454 Lodges; also' 19 Grand Lodge Officers, 21 Past Grand Masters, 17 Grand Reprepentati,ves, 56 DistriCt Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers, 471 Past Masters and 4 distinguished visitors. (Those marked with an asterisk [*] a're proxies.)

Representative.

Lodge. l\1ISI'lOlJRI

• • • . . . . . . . • . • • • . . • • No.

1 2

BEAco"

, ..

~

'

'

3

... ' . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . .

4

U"Il'ED' . . . . . . . . . . • • . . • . . . . • . ARK ...•.••' . O'SULLIVAN . WJLLTAMSB1JRG . GEORGE WASHli'\GTO;\" .

5 6 7 8 9

AGEKCY • • • . • • • . • . . . . . • . • . • . . TYRO . . . . . . • • . . . • • . . . . . • . • • • RISING' SUN . • . . • • . • . . • . . . . • • WI,STlmN STAH • • . . • • . . . . . . . • MKilIPIIIS ','

10 12 13 15 16

CLARKSVILLE . . . . . . . . . • . . . . , .. PALJ\fYRA .: • . . . . . . . • • • • . . • • . . PARIS UNION • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . • . ST. LOUIS • . • . . . . . . . • • • • • • . . •

17 18 19 20

WELLINGTON • . • . . . . . • . . . • . . . . WYACONDA • . • . . . • • . • . . . . . . • • NAPHTALI .••••••.•....•.. '"

22 24 25

AVA

26

HO'VARD

Julian M. Gibson, W. M.· A. H. Winkelmeyer, S. W. M. H. Hodgson, J. W. Peter C. Butts, W. M. J. W. Zykan, S. W. Harry G. Balthasar, J. W. E. R.Nyroth, W. M. Otto N. Vossmeyer, S. W. C. A. Edmonston, W. M. W. O. Cox, S. W. Walter E. Becker, W. M. *C. H. Tucker" W. M. *Gene A. Brim, S. W. L. E. Tate, W. M. Wm. J. Kennedy, W. M. Water H. Niestrath, S. W.. J. A. Hubbard, J. W. *Arthur E. Krumme, W. M. R. R. Bean, S. W. Walter Hausen, W. M.. *James Bradford, W. M. ' F. D. Mason, VV. M. 'W. Wayne Wagner, S. W. Geo. W. Moore, J. W. *JohnBartIett, W. M. Thomas M. Barbee, W. M. ' *A. T-.- Vaughn, W. M. Henry W. Reller, W. M. Aug. Barthel, S. W. Irwin Sale, J. W. W. C. Call, W. M. J. O. Yager, W. M. F. J. Hoffman, W. M. J.E. Zelch, S. W. *John C. Bralley, W. M.


340

Representative.

Lodge. ST. JOHN .....•........•.••••• •WINDSOR . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HUNTSVILLE . . . . . . • . . . . . . • • . .

28 29 30

LInER'l'Y •.•••••••••••...•.... RALLS . . . . . . • . . • • . . . . . . . • . . . . TROy • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lVfERCER .... '., . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . COOPER •••..••••..•• ; ..••••.. HEl\fPLE •....••..••.•.••.... CALLAO ..•......•••....•.••.. I)EWITT ..•......•.••.••.•.•.

31 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

MT.

[Sept.'

Appendix.

MORIAH .•••.•••.•••.•...

. 40

•.••..•.........•.

41

MIDDLE GROVE ••.•....••.•.•. JEFFERSON ••••.••...•....••.

42 43

FAIR PLAy • • . • . . . . . . . . . . • • • • BONHOl\{ME . . . . . . • • • • • • . . . . . WENTZVILLE ••..••••••••.••• FAYETTE •.•.•••.......•••... FULTON . . • . . . • . . • . . . . . . • . • . .

44 45 46 47 48

XENIA . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . • • • • . . . WAKANDA •..•.••...•.••••••. WESTON •••••••.•.• ~ .•..•••. INDEX' • . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . ARROW ROCK . . . . . . . . . . • • • . • • TIPTON ..•...•....••••••...• RICHMOND •....••.••••.••... lV[ONTICELLO ••.••••••.•••.•••

50 52 53 54 5fi 56 57 58

CEl'i'TRALIA

••••.........••••• , . VINCIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . • • • • • CAMBRIDGE ...•..•..••••.•..•

59 60 62 63

ROCHEPORT . KENNETT . . • . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67 68

SUI..LIVAN . ARMSTRONG .••....••..••.•• , . SAVANNAH • . • . . . . • . . . • . . . . . . GORIN • . . . . • • • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . EUREKA .•..••...•••..•.•••• WARREN' . . • • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . SILEX . . . . . . . • • • . . . . . . . • • . . . INDEPENDENCE •••.•. : ••••.•.•

69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76

BISl\fARCK

NI';w . BLOOMFIELD

*W. H. Blackshaw, W. M. J. H. Walton, W. M. D. C. Griffiths, W. M. H. Allen Bedford, S. W. JamesJ. Barkley, W. M. G. C. Layne, W. M. Hackley P. Reeds, S. VI. *Howard R. Spencer, W. M. Albin J. Schmidt,W. M. Walter Grimes, J. W. Herman L. Baker, W. M. O. B. Schnapp, W.M. *.J. A. Williams, S. W. Charles F. Drehmann, W. M. John C. Diesel, S. \"'l. n. Clay Perkins, J. W. W. Me. George, W. M. J. F. Strickland, S. W. C. C. Flemings, W. M. J. L. Tate, W. M. *C. Wollman, J. W. . ehas. W. Grant, W. M. *J. M. Brewer, W. M. J. A. Reid, W. M. *Murry H. Davis, W. M. Fred A. Hurd, W. M. *George W. Berry, J. 'V. John A. Akin, W. 1'vl. *Otto Hale, W. M. *W. B. Calvert, S. W. J. R. Woolery, W. M. *T. B. Morris, \V. M. *S. W. Hurst, S. W. John F. J;3aber, W. M. Jas. W. Lillard, W. M. *J. Hawkins, S. W. Jas. C. Hunt, W. M. O. C. Thompson, 'V. :rvI. Joseph L. Baron, W. M. Lamar F. Hains,. W. M. Jas. W. West, S. W. Ralph F. Baldwin, W. M. .Jacob A. Lowe, W. M. *John H. Dunmire, S. W. H. H. Graham,' W. M. Jno. O. Hume, Jr., W. M. G. C. Sparks, W. M. *A. H. Mackey, W. M. *Geo. W. Rucker, W. M. William L. Wright, W .. M. Walter D. Middleswartz,W.M. Bert M. Wbeeler, .J. \V.


1917. ]

Representative.

.Lodge: LEBANON

•••••••••••••....•••

JOS~:PH ••.... : .. :

77

..

78

•...

79

•...•••••••.•••.•.

80

• . • . . . . . • . . '. . . • . . . . . •••••••.•••••..•....

82 83

WP~BSTEI{ GROVES .•..•••••.... BROOKFII<:LD , . WASHINCiTON '. . • . . FJUEl'iDSHIP ..•...•...•..••• '. PERSEVERANCE •••• ~ • • • . . • . . . . ST. MARKS .

84

87 89

VU;;NNA . . . • • . • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . P01\fEGR'ANATE . . • . . . . . . . . . . '.'

94 95

ST. ANDRI.;wS . . . . . . . . • . . . . • . . BI<:THANY . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • WEBSTER ... '. . . . . . • • . . . . . . . . .

97

ST.

~OLAR

STAR

BRIDGETON

J ACT<SO~ J,.. ACLEDl~

,

.~

86 92 93

96

98

•.•••.••.••. , •••.•.•.

99 100 101 102 103 104

KIRKSVILLI'; . GALLATiN . . . . . • • . . . • . • . . • • . . GIU~EIXVILLI'; .

105 106 107

MT. VERl'iON .•..••.••••..••.. ASH GROVE ......•.•••..••.•• BOGARD ' . BLOO:i\lINGTON .

WF:sr

341

Appendix.

Vmw

HEROINE

' .. ;

.

STANBERRY . l\1ARCUS • • • • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . TRENTON . • . . . • . . • • . • . . . . . • • . MAITLANI) .. T'VILIGHT •••..••......••.•.• LADI}()NIA '• • • . . . • • • • • . . . . . . • . BARXES •.•.•••••.•.•.•..••.. VERSAILLES . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KINGSTO:\, . DESOTO ..••......••..•••.•••• COl\fPASS .••......••.•..•••••

109 '110

111 112 114 115 116 117 118 119 120

Geo. W. Reeves, W. M. Herman Lark, S. W. Ashley H. Hamson, J.W. Harry Baum, W. M. W. P. Davis, Sr.,' S. W. Claude Madison, J. W. Alex R Oeth, W. M. E. M. Dragoo, S. W. Raymond C. Grass, J. W. *W. J. Goddard, W. M. Wm. H. Heidorn, S. W. Veme C. Mace, S. W. C. n. Burley, W. M. J. E. Millsap, S. W. J. Willard "Wright, W. M. g. J;J. Cramer, S. W. Otto J. Wilson, W. ,M. *w. E. Walsh, W. M. R. R. Gast, W. M. J. M. Shy, W. M. H. H. Haas, S. W: B. F. Branson, W. M. N. A. Owens,W. M. Adelbert G. R. Gotsch, S. W. Ernest G. Gotsch, .J. W. Albert Brant, W. M. Dwight C. Poland,W. M. J. R. Bruce, S. W. Jess W. Moore, J. W. W. H. Turk, W.M. :B~red R. McAmis, S. W. Robert· L. Carter, W. 'M. John D. Watkins, S. W. D. S. Miller, W. M. Hugo Doebler, W. M. .los. R. Davidson, J. W. *J. F. Miller,. Jr., W. M. *J. T. Cope, W. M. Ben A. Milster, W. M. A. G. Templeton, S. W. Daniel G. Hockinsmith, J. W. *D. L. Glaves, S. W. *J. H. Clawson, W. M. Chas. Smock, W.· M. Maurice Walden, W. M. *E. J.Shobe, W. M. *Jesse La Reau, W. M. Richard H. Woods, S. W. W. F'. McFall, W. M. G. A. Auerswald, W. M. *Thomas A. Brown, J. W.


Appendi.i-.

342

Representative.

Lodge. En\VIN

121

•.•..••.•••••..•......

.••.•....• ' ' ••••••••........ '" UNION STAR .•.•••. : . • . . . . . . . SEA1\IAN . . . . . • . . • • • . . . . . . . . . .

122 123 124 126

LORRAINE

. . • . . . • • • . . ,• . . . . . . . ' . POTOSI . . • . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FARi\ll~GTO~ . . . . . . • • . • . . . . . . STAR OF THE WEST . BRAYJVrER •.... '.•. " , . PHOEXIX • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . ' . DELPHIAN ••....••• , . • • . . . . . OREGON . . . . . . • . . . . . . • • . . . . . . PAPINSVII~L1~ . PLEASANT GROVE . . • • . . . . . . . . .

128 129 131 132 133 135 136 137 139 140 142

MODERN

.

144

LATIlvrER . • • . . • • . . • • • • . . . . . . . l\fCGEE • • • . . . • . . • . . • • . . • . . . . PURDy . . . . • . . • . . • . • • • . . . . . . . L"~XINGTON . MILTON • . . . . • • . . . . . • • . . . . . . . LINN CREEK . . . . . • . • • . . . . • . . . BLOOMFIELD . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . IONIC . . . . . • . . . . • . . . . • . . . . . . . ASHLA~)) . . . . . • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . MOUNTAIN GROVE ' . GREEN CITy . . • • • • • . • • . . . . . . . CLIFTOK 'HILL . • . . • • • • . . . . . . . OCCIDEKTAL • . . . • . • • • • . . • . . . .

145 146 148 149 151 1.52 1.53 154 156 158 159 161 163

MARYVILLE . PORTAGEVILLE • . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . REVERE . . . . . • • • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . COLONy . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . , GHA Y SUMMIT • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . STURGEON • • • • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . POINT PLEASANT .

165 166 167 168 173 174 176

TEXAS

..

177

.

178 179

TnlPLETT

HER~IA~~

MO~ETT

: . . • . . • . . . ' .. "

GRISWOLD PRIDE OF THE "'iVEST

PYRAM.IU

[Sept.

'

.

180

Ernest F. W.Meyer, W. M. Geo. D. Wobbe, S. W. Gustav F. Linhardt, J. W. C. E. Fleetwood, W. M. George C. Guenther, W. M. *William E. Robison, S. W. *E. B. Seitz, W. M. *Walter . R. Shrodes, S. W. O. P. Bennet, W. M. *Cassius E. Vaughn, S. W. W. B. Settle, W. M. Clarance· A. Tetley, W. M. *Wm. R. Edgar, Sr., W. M. *Geo. S. Dowell, W. M. J. E. Thompson, W. M. G. H. King, S. W. .John C. Gifford, J. W. *J. B. Campbell, W. M. *J. H. Gunn, W. M. W. S. Poage, S. W. ·M. E. Rector, W. M. Arthur C. Scroggs, S. W. Travis B. Mitchell, W. M. G. E. Poe, .W. M. , C. E. Williams, J. "'iV. *G. C. Marquis, W. M. W. E. Fleming, W. M. *J. W. Vincent, W. M. Edward M. Nunnelee, W. M. .T. M. "Wood, W. M. C. W. Ellis, W. M. Ray Sholtenbe'rger. W. M. E. S. Pfieffer, W. M. Oscar T. Sears, J. W. Waller Edwards, W. M. Henry H. O'Hara, S. W. F. H. Littlefield, J. W. James A. Smith, S. W. *K. T. Swilley, W. M. L. P. Mathews, W. M. Richard H. Carder, W. M. B. A. Thornhill, W. M. T. B. Garnett, W. M. Chas. Pikey,W.' M. Henry Holdaway, S. W. W. J. McGee, W. M. *E. K. Lyles, S. W. Ralph L. Usry, W., M. Chas. B. Jansky, W. M. John Anderson, S. W. Chas. F. Schuermeyer, J. W. Geo. M. Hart; W. M. W. U. Kennedy, S. W.


Appendix.

1917. ] Lodge.

Representative.

CALIFORKIA

183

MORLI~Y . . • . . . • . . • • . . . . . . . • . . CHAl\fOIS . • • . . . . . . . • . . • . . . . . MORALITy •••.•...•....•. ,. . . . HERl\fON ..••..•.•••...•.•... HANNIBAL . . • . • . • . • . • . . . • . . . ZEREDATHA . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . .

184 185 186 187 188 189

WILSON • • • . • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FRANKFORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . WELLSVILLE . BOLIVAR . . . . . . • . . . . . . • • . • • ,. CARTHAGE • . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . ALLEl\'SVILLE •••......••••••. NE'''· HOPE .

191' 192 194 195 197 198 199

WI<:STVILLE ..•....•....•••••• BRUM,LI~Y . . . . . . • . . . • • . . . . • . . , RO\"LEY : . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . • . . . . TRILU:M:lNA ..•..••••......... SOMERSET ....•.••••.••...••• CLAy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . • . SALISBURy . . . . . . • • . . . • • • • . . . UNIONVILLE • . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . .

202 203 204 205 ,206 207 208 210

FOUR MILE . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . ROLLA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • HALE ,CITy, . . . . . . . . . . . • . • . . . BARBEE .'. . . . . • . . . . . . • . . • . • • . . GOOD HOPE ••...••••.. , . • . . . .

212 213 216 217 218

ALDERI'

.

219

CITy ..•..•.•.•••.•..

220

c

PIKE

KA:\iSAS

MYSTIC J~ABELLE

Tm

343

.

•.........•••..••... HA;)rILTON ., . CYPRESS . . . . . . . . . . • . . .' • . . . . . ST. JA 1"II':S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . • • CAHIH\'ELL . . . . . . . . . • • . . • • • • • . BrCKLIN . S~:J)Ar,IA •.•••••..•.••••••••.. LA PLATA . HOPEWELL . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . . . . PALESTINE •.... '. ..•..••• ••••. PORTLAND .•.......••.•••••••

221 222 224 227 230 231 233 236 237 239 241 242

Robert L. Fulks, W: M. *Thomas M. Fulks, S. W. *R. H. Leslie, W. M. *C. S. Leeman, 'V. M. Arthur G. Davis, W. M. *W. E. Condict, W. M. 1. Dow Moore, W. M. WilliamP. DaVis, Jr., W. M. Edward L. Speer, S. W.· Geo. L. Markley, J. W.' Grover Golliher, W. M. Levy T. Tucker, W. M. *S. S. Cox, W. M.. *w. S. White, W" M. R. C. Grissom, W. M. A. C. Brewit, W. M. *Robt. E. Black, W. M. *C. C. Eastin, J. W. 'V. O. Hainds, W. M. J. A. Brockman, W. M. *Jas. A. Davidson,W. M. Imanuel .Wittrup, S. W. *F. A. Cozad, W. M. Wallace M. Agin, W. M. *S. F. Trammel, W. M. *Thomas B Valentine, W. M. George W. Underwood, S. V.l. Alton H. Otto, J. W. *James R. Pollock, W. M. Floy W. Webb, W. M. C. W. D. Pultz, J. W. M. D. Jackson, W. M. . E. A. Roworth, W. M. French Farrow, S. W. *Orlando 'Powers Bloss, W. M. Chas. Beggs, S. W.' Oscar F. Lander, J. W. Pat H. Horton, W. M. H. B. Manard, S. W. C. H. GoudeI', J. W. D. 1\f. Wills, W. M. A. G. Doran, S. W. W. J. White, W. M. Harry D. Hall, W. M. W. E. Yowell, W. M. James A. White, W. M. R. P. Nickerson, S. W. W. T. Wallace, W. M. Claude A. Flynn, W. M. C. M. Fitzpatrick, W. M. Charles Bortfeld, W. M. S. H. Gilbert, W. M.


344

Appendix. Representative.

Lodge. .

243

MIDDLE FABIUS . . . • • • • . . . . . . . MONTGOMERY CITy..•.......••

244 246

NEOSHO . CARROLL •...•...•••........... GLENSTED . . . . . . . . . . • . . . • • . . . HOPE ..•..........•••••••••• LAREDO . . . . . . . • . . • . . . . . • • • . . . BUTLER . . . • . . . • • . . . • • • . . . . • . ALTON • . . • . . . . . . . . . • • . . • • • . . SHEKINAH.•.••.•........••... RAVANNA •.•.•••...•••...••• LODGE OF LOVE . . . . . • . . . . . . . . HOLDEN ..•••••...••..•.... ~. SUM1-:lIT . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . • . • • . KIRBYVILLE .•.•.••.•......... CORINTHIAN • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . SOCIAL .••......••.•.••.•••.. AUROl~A . • • . . . • . . • • . . . . . . . • . •

247 249 250 251 253 254 255 2f>6 258 259 262 263 264 265

LODGE OF TRUTH . . • . . . . . . . • • NEW SALEM . . • . • • . . . • . . . . • . . SOLOMON •.••••..•.•.•••..• , . GRANITE ..........•••••.•.•. ST. CLAIR . • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • • . COLD SPRING . . . . . . . . . • . . . • • . . GRAND RIVER ....••••.•..•..•

268 270 271 272 273 274 276

W:J\L D. MuIR

:

277

ESSEX • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . HOGLE'S CREEK • • . . . . . . . . . . • • FENTON ••.•..••.•........••..

278 279 281

COSMOS

282

STOCKTON • • . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . CANOPy .......•.••••••.••••• EARL •....••••••••....••••.. URICII •.•••.••.•••.••••••.•• CRAFT •...•••..••...•...•..• FAIRMOUNT •••.•..••..•••••• EDINA •.••.••.•..•••••••...•. LAMAR •.•••••••••..•••••.•• SARCOXIE .••••••••.••.....••• MOUND CITy ...•••••••.•••••• MONITEAU .••••..•••••.•••••. SPARTA •••••••..••••.••••••• OZARK .••....•.•.•..•..••.••

283 284 285

KEYSTONE

[Sept.

266

267

286

287 290 291 292 293 294 295 296

297

C. S. Rich, W. M. Taylor R. Young, S. W. Louis A. H. Sommerich, J. W. James H. Morgan, W. M. Chester E. Whitehead, W. M. Harry E. Ball, S. W. Edwin L. Mahan, W. M. *J. M. Goodrich, W. M. *L. B. Hawks, W. M. F. H. Tieman, W. M. J. E. Murphey, W. M. C. E. Culver, W. M. C. S. Gohn, W. M. Emil Santschi, S. W. *D. M. Foster, W. M. E. L. Atteberry, W. M. Rolla C. Brownlee, W. M. Harry W. Yankee, J. W. John E. Trout, W. M. E. G. Favorite, W. M. Leslie E. Stephens, W. M. Otto W. Arndt, W. M. Richard A. Tubbesing, S. W. *Henry Wilke, J. W. *V. D. Gordon, W. M. Andrew Cannon, W. M. B. B. Jones, W. M. W. A. Wheal, ·W. M. Oliver Brown, J. W. *Elmer Hobson, W. M. G. O. Ellis, W. M. *Daniel ·W. Hopper; S. W. Guy Long, S. W. *R. S. Harriman, J. W. John L. Crutcher, S. W. John B. Taylor, S. W. Fred II. Carter, W. M. Ed J. Torrence, S. W. Albert F. Deitsch, W. M. C. Lew Gallant, J. W. *M. D. Gwinn, W. M. Frank L. Robertson, W. M. *R. D. Kinkade,W. M. Geo. C. Hessold, W. M. C. C. Clark, W. M. Elmer Lafrenz, W. M. *George H. Hickman, W. M. Hoyt Humphrey, W. 'M. *Geo. W. Wood, W. M. T. J. Bridgmon,W. M. H.· A. Meyer, W. M. *P. S. Ladd, W. M. *S. H.Spence, W~ M.


1917. ]

345

Appendix. Representative.

Lodge. '

299

H. M. Wethy, W. M. Elmer L. Legg, S. W. A. H. Cole, J. W. DORIC •••.•••••.••••.•.••..•• 300 J. F; Miller, W. M. 302 *J. Norton McElroy, W. M. LICK CRI<~I<;K ••.••.•.• : .•••• ·•. 303 H. B. Klumph,. W. M. ' OSAGE :'•••••••••• :'. CLARENCE •..••.•••• '••••••• ;'. 305 *Wm. L. Hamrick, W. M. ASHLAR . . . . . :.•..•... : •••.• -.• 306 *George W. Brundrett,. W. J.YI-:. 307 *Geo. E. Mayhall, W.M. " NEW LO.:\'DON .. : .:.: •.••••..•• 308 Charles A. Harvey, W. M. PARRO'IT •.•..••.....•• ; •••• ~ '310 J. Watson Swaim; S'. W:· SIKESTON •••••••..••••.•••.• 311 Claude M. Thompson, W. 1\:1:" KEARNEy •••..• : ...••.••.••.• ;. . .. E. T. Brant, S. W. 312 R. R. Hardesty, S. W. CUBA . PINE '. '" •••• ' •••• '. :' . 314 S. W. Hilton, W.M. . 316 Walter R. Ashton, W. M. RURAL : .•• ~ .••• ; . Charles H. Robinson, S. W. Albert E, Carlton, J. W. ELDORADO •..•... : ...••••. '••••• 318 *John A. Evans, W. M. PAULVILLE '•••••: ..• .- •••• : •• :. 319 L. C. Schenimann, W. M. 3'22 H. F. Hoover, W. M. HARDIN . 323 Fred T.· Naumann, W.-M. CORNER STONE •••• ~ •.••• ',' •• _. George Schmorleitz, S. W. W. Paul Mobley, J. W. . McDONALD , •• 324 *Harrison II. Wait, W. M. DOCKERy ..• : ....•.•••...•••. 325 John A. Loomis, W. M. . 326 *John Feuer, W. M. LINN •.. '.': •• : ••.••.•••• -••••• MT. ZION '.....•. ' . 327 E. O. Se1ecman, W. M. " KENNEDy . 329 *Charles R. Lamar, S. W. CHARITy.: ...••.•..••• ·. .•••• 331 Herbert H. Powell, W. M. *Wm. A. Piner, S. W. Wm.Silverstein, J. W. EXCELLO •••••••.•...•••.•.•• 332 W. N. :B'ranks, W. M. CHILLICOTHE ., -. ••••.•••.•.•• 333 Miles Elliott, W. M. BRECKENRIDGE :.. 334 E. B. Russell, W. M. 'JOPLIN .. ,•••••• -...•• .- ••..•... 335 Geo. W. Macpherson, W. M. Harry D. Evans, S. W. BLUE SPRINGS .•••••••••...... 3:n *W. D. Warren, W. M. FIOELITY •..•••••••••••.•••••• 339 W. T. Hope, W. M. WESTPORT •••••••.••••••••••• 340 Frank A. Marshall, W. M. Darius A. Brown, S. W. Ayers H. Blocher, J. W. ROCKVILLE •..••.•••••.•.•••. 341 J. E. Hook, W. M. 343 *.T. .T. Beaty, W. M. AGRICOLA : ...••••..•• MOBERLy •.•... : ••.•••••••••• 344 Benj. E. Henderson, W. M. FELLO\VSHIP . 315 W. P. Armstrong, W. M. W. L. Perry, S. W. 346 C. J. Kunz, W. M. ARLINGTOj'i •....••...•.•••••• *S, R. Hale, S. W. SPRING CREEK ••••....••..••• 347 *Corrie L. Arthur, W. M. POLLOCK •••••••••••.••••••••• ' 349 Otis Reinhard, W. M. BARNESVILLE •.•••••••••••••• 353 *Henry T. Chitwood, W. M. TI<;MPLE

: ....•.••••••


'346

Appcndi."C. Lodge.

Rep1·esentative.

HEBRON . . . . . . • ~ ., ..•••.•.••• ADELPIII •••••....•••..•.•.. '" ANCIENT LANDMARK .•.•.•.••• TUSCA:"\ .

RIDDICK ............••••.•••. HIRAl\'I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . • FHATER:\'AL ." . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . HIGGI:\"SVILLE . ADAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . CRI~RCENT

[Sept.

Hn.L.

.

COMPOSITE • . . . . . . . • . • • . • • . . . WILLTA::\ISTOW:,,\ . SnJ<:LDO:\, .•......•••....•.•••• NO;';PAREIL . . . . . . . . . • . . . • • • • . BELLE • . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . KIKG HILL ..........•..••••••

ANCIE:"T CRA F'f . . . . . '... '.' . . . . QUEE:"\ CITy .•.•••....•.•••••• IO:\'IA ......•.....•....••.•••. PYTHAGOH'AS . EAST PRAIRIE . RICHLAND ••••.....•..•.••••. ARCANA ..........•.•..•••••• MARIONVILLE .

CHRISTIAN ••••...••••....•••• BEF. HIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . • • • GO\VER . . • . . . . . . . • . . . . , . • • . . . .DECATUR • • • . • . . . . . • . . . . • . . • • CARTERVILLE •.•.•..••••...... l\1ALTA •.•••.••..•.•••.••••.• LOWRY CITy . ROSENDALE •••.•.•••..•.••••• MALDEN . . . . . . . • . • . . • • • . : •... CHARU:ST()N

.

MONTROSE •••..••••..••.••.•• IBERIA .......•.••..•••••••.. JOPPA •.•..••...•••••••••••• ApPLETON CITY .•.•.••••••••• HUNNEWELL .......•••.••••• CACHE .•••...........•••••••.•

354 355 356 360

*William G. Wilkins, W. M. Thos. L. Boydston, S. W. J. N. Farris, W. M. George Coslo',v, W. M. Cary H. Bacon, S. W. Edwin E. Huffman, J. W. 361 *C. A. Finley, W. M. 362 }l'rank'K Greenlee, S. W. . B6:~ A. W. Watters, Jr., W. M. Henry Strothman, J. W. 364 J. M. Edwards, W. M'366 Byron Cosby, W. M. 368 A. C. Baie, W. M. 369 Elbert C.White, W. M. 370 Walter Lasswell, W. M. 371 Harman T. Huston, J. W. 372 Thomas W.Phillips, S. W. Bn K A. Lindner, W. M. 376 . Arthur R. Timerman, W. M. H. M. Lint, S. W. Ernest V. Madden, J. W. 377 R. M. Stanley, W. M. Rufus H. Limpp, S. W. 380 G. L. Lauer, W. M. 381 S. A. Gunn, S. W. 383 W. T. Priest, W. M. *S.M. Cozad, S. W. 384' C. D. Mitchell, W. M. 385 Elmer L. Payne, W. M. 389 Charles S. Stewart, S. W. 390 Geo. Keast, W. M. *Willis A. McCullah, S. W. *Ralph L. McHenry, J. W. 392 N. R. Holcomb, W. M. 393 Geo. W. Ball, W.M. 397 Alpha J. Walkup, W. M. 400 S . .T. Douthitt, W. M. 401 .J. Arthur Daugherty, W. M. 402 *John G. Nye, W. M. 403 I. E. Austin, W. M. 404 W. B. Wood, W. M. 106 Arthur S. Metzger, W. M. *S. E. Mitchell, J. W. 407 Clyde E. Swank, W. M. .T. B. Simpson, S. W. 408 *C. C. Arnold, W. M. 410 *JohnFerguson, W. M. 411 Arthur M. Curtis, W. M. 412 Wm. V. Ingels, W. M. 415 Hugh W. Carr, W. M. 416 Benjamin Ewart Thomas,W.M. . E. Harry Johnston, S. W. William H. Ebrecht, J. W.


1917. ]

347

Appendix.

-Lodge.

Representative. 418

CLEAR CREEK • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ITASKA •.•••.••..........•• -.

420

GATE -OF THE TEMPLE. SAMARITAN •..'

. .

424

RIDGE . . . • . . . . . . . . . • . .

425

ROTHVILLE ••• ; ••••...• .- .••... GLENWOOD' •-••.•••....•. . WINONA . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . .. C,,;l\iENT •.•.•.•...•..•••..•.. COMPETITION . MACK'S CREEK • • . • . . . . . . . . . • . WHE":LING • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LAFAYETTE .... -.. " . . . . . • • . . . TROWEL -••••••••......•..•.••

426 427

GREEN

422

430 431 432 433 434 437

440

EXCELSIOR . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ANCHOR ....••••...•.•.•..••

441 443

WEST

GATE• . . • . . . . . . . . . . . • • .

445

IVANHOE . • • . . . . . . . . . . • • . . . . .

446

SCHELL

448 452 453 454 455

CITy . • . . • • . . . . . . . • . . ..•....•.••.........• FORSYT}-I • . . . • • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . CONTIi'lENTAL . HINTON . . . . . • • . . • . . . . . . . . . . . WALLACE . • • . . • • . . . • . . . . . . . . .

456

HAZELWOOD • . • • • . . . . . . . . . • . • LAMBSKIN . . . . . . . . . • • . . . • . . .

46()

CARUTHEHSVILU;; ...••.•••.••. SANTA F": . . . . • • . . . . . . . . • • • . • CLIFTON ••••••••••••••••••••

461 462 463

VERO~A

AULLVILLE : . PLATO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . NODAWAy • • . . . . . . . • . . . . . • • • • PICKERING •.....••.••...•••• GOLDEN • . . . . . . • • . • . . . . . . • '" MT. HOPE .••••... -......••••• H";NDERSON . RICH HILL .•.•.•. : ..••••.•••

459

464

469 470 472 475 476 477

479

G. W. Thomas, J. W. Roy C. Gans, S. W. Geo. E. Black, J. W. William .J.Craig, W. M. C. Relph Hosking, W. M. *J. .J. Bowman, S. W. E. E. Bagby, W. M. Thos. J. Close, J. W. W. L. Richeson, W. M. *Z. O'Briant, W. M. Frank O. Smith, W. M. G. W. Batreall, W. M. Reuben Noble, W. M. .J. T. Edwards, W. M. *H. D. Clem,W. M. William Wilson, W. M. G. B, Snider. W. M. .J. L. Estes, S. W. Alvin G. Penzer, W. lVI .. Walter C. Kruse, W. M. Wm.Lewerenz, S. W. C. A. Marschel, J. W. B. W. Grissom, W. M. Andrew J. Stansbury, S. W. A. G. Bittner, J. W. William F. Woodruff, W. M. L. L. Hooper, S. W. Kellogg Smith, J. W. *Jas. M. Darrow, W. M. *Robt. J. Mitchell, W. M. James B. Hicks, W. M. John S. Rowell, J. W. William H. Wade, W. M. *Otto H. Cramer, W. M. H D. Carlos, Jr., S. W. F. A. Snyder, W. M. Chauncey W. Seagrave, W.M. William D. Moore, S. W. Geo. W. Longare, .T. W. Luther B. Holt, W. M. John J. Johnston,W. M. Paul Cockman, W. M. H. F. Kirkpatrick, S. W. *Robert L. Williams, J. W. *Ray Phillips, W. M. Rabt. B. Tilley, W. M. W. H. Gilbert, W. M. *J. F. Hanna, J. W. *Charles R. Boone, W. M. Robert L. Searfoss, W' M. James A. Clift, W. M. *Robert Burns, S. ",V.


348

[Sept. '

Appendix. Representative.

Lodge. JE\V~;L .•. : . . . . . . . • • • • . . • • . . . MARCELINE ••••........•••••• CLINTONVILLE .

480 481 182

FAIRFAX KIRK\VOOD

483 484

. •••..••........... '

COLD W ATIm . . . . . . • • • "•••••• , • CAIRO :. CHILHOWEE •••• : .••• ' ••.•.•.•• LOCK SPRING .••...•..•..••• : LAKEVILLE .. , .. , •.. ,., •.•.•• VANDALIA •.•....••••••••••.• UNITY, .•..••..•••••• , ••• , •• EQUALITy, •••...••••.•.••.•• BUCI{:NER .....•' , ....••• PRAIRH; HOME . . . . . • . • . ~ ••.••

485 '486 487 488 489 491 495 497 501 503

PI-A TTE CI;rY ••..••..••.•..•• LATiIROP •••..•.. , . , ......••• SAXTON ••••..••••.•••••••••.

504 506 508

VAN BUREN ••..••••....... '" SKIDl\'IORE .• , •.••.. ,." ••••• '. WEBB CITy ••...•......•••••• SENATH .. GRANBY '. ~ ••••••••••••.• , •.• , SELIGMAN •••.• , ••••..••••• ,. ORIENTAL ••....•......•••••• CRANE .... , ..•..••.••••••••.• CLIFTON H~;IGHTS ••..••....••

509

51.1 512 513

514 517 518 519 520

CITy ••••••••.•.••••••••

522

STINSON ••.••••..•••.••..••. CUNNINGHAM •..••. ' ••••••••.• WAYNE •••••••••••••.•••.••• HIGBEE ..•..••••••.••••••••• CONWAy •..•..•••••..••.•••• LANE'S PRAIRIE .•••.•..•••..• DEXTER •••••••••••••••••.••. COLUMBIA •••••••••••••••.••

523 525 526 G27 528 531 532 534

INGOl\IAR .••....•••••••••.••• BETHEL •••.•••••.••••••••••• STELLA •••••••.•••••••••••••• WINIGAN •••.••••..•....••••• JACKSONVILLE ..•••...•....•• FERGUSON •••.•.........••••• MANSFIl!:LD .•••.••••..••. ' ••••

536 537 538 540 541 542

GATE

543

B. M. Stonestreet,W. M. WilHam E. Parks, W. M, A. V. Gilpin, W. M. Thos. W. Snodgrass, S. W. Fred H. Walk~r, Jr., W. M. A. S. Kinyon, W. M. Herman Schroeder, S. W. L ..J. Barron, W. M. *H. S. McKinney, W. M. W. L. Martin, W. M. *E. B. Day, '.V. M. *A. U. Goodman, VV. M. .John W. Renner, W. M. R. W. Pease, W.M. W. E. Matthews, W. M. Forrest Masterson, W. lVr. .las. B. Shepherd, W. M. H. L. Edwards, S. W. A, P. Fulcher, W. M. Loren R. Weir, W. M. *\V. D. Pyne, W. M. *L. F . .Jeffries, S. W. .J. R. Dawson, W. M. Horace N. McDaniel, W. M. Pierre M. Wallace, W. M. Otis H. Storey, W. M. J. Hutsell, W. M. W. A. Stapleton, J. W. *Churchill J. Dlackburn,W.M. John S. Hemphill, W. M. .Joseph Singer, W. M. Geo. F. H uffington, S: W. H.E. Mort1ana, J. W. Marion L. Mills, W. M. Chas. F. Stiff, J. W. Edward E. Anderson, .T. W. Ralph E. Bennett, .T. W. .J. S. Berryman, Jr., W. M. Lee Thomason, W. M. T. W. Gourley, W. M. Jesse A. Cook, W. M. Charles II. Grissom, W, M. Wm. B. Parrett, W. M. , Andrew T. Brown, S. W. John A. Th;ebes,' J. W. Walter L. Forester, W. M. *Harry C. Bail', W. M. W.' H. Carnes, W. M. S. M. Romine, W. M. *Chas. Woods, W. M. *J. H. Alderton, W. M. J. B. Freeman, W. M.


1917.] .

.Representative.

Lodge. ZAL~:IA •••..• ' ••••.•• : •. ' •• ~ ••... SOUTH GATE .

545 547

CLINTON •••.•.••....•....•.. CAUL JUNCTION .••.••..•••••• ROSE HILL ••..••••••......••

548 549 550

CAr_IIOU~ :' ~ CLARKSBURG •••.•....•••.• : •.' SUl\fMi'RVILLE· .... : ••• , ..••.•

552 55B 555 556 558

'PRAIRm

..............• :.: : .. '

Moscow YORK

; :

. .

.

56~

JAMEsrOln ..•......•..•••••. TICBBETTS .•.•.•........••• : .• MAPLEWOOD •••.•.•••..•••..•

564 565 566

MILLER .....•...••....•.••.....

fi67

REPUBLIC •....••....••.•••.•• HAyTI .•••.••. ' .. '•..•••.•.•... . RUTLFDGI·; . . . . . . . . • • • • • . • . • . . EASTP;R •..•..•....•...•••...• '" OLIVE BRANCH : .

570 571 572 575 576

EVI"ING

349

. Appendix.

..••..•• ' •.....•••.••..•

FORERT PARK .•.•••.. '.'

.

577 578

COSBy •••••••••.•••••••••••.• CLAyTON •.•••....••.•••••..••.

579 581 582 583 584 585 590 59'1 595 596 597 598 599 600 601

CRAIG •..•.... ' . CLARK ••••••••••••••••••••••

606 610

GRAN,'DIN ... '.' '" .......• , .•• : ILL1.:IO • . . . . . • . . . . • . . . • . . • . • • KOSIIKONO~G . . . . . ,' ..•• NOVIXGER .•.. : .......•••.••• RED BIRD ••...••...•..••...... SHAMROCK . . . • . . . • . . . • . . . • .-. AUVANCE . ,BARN":TT ..•.....•...••••••.• E:MMANUVL , . PUXICO . BOSl,VORTI-I . : . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . LEADWOOD .••.•..••..• : ••.•.• ELVINS ~ .

>.....

H. V. Slinkard, W. M. Wilbur S. Montgomery, W.M. Jerry L. Yeagle, J. W. James S. Spore, W. M. W. H. Smith, W. M. W. H. Dickey, W. M. George S. Siddons, S. W. Walter Diehm, J. W .. *B.. F. Richardson, W. M'. H. E. Allee, W. M. Henry Thrasher, S. W. Floyd Eberhart, W. M. Chas. F. Hill; W. M. *Thos.. N.Suttonfield,S. W. E. J. Mellanby, W. M. Irvin F. Strycker,S. W; C. Ed}Vin Overly, .J. W. Robert W. Hill, W. M. -H. H.Leonard, W.M. A. S. Fuller, W. M. *HarryH. Watson, S. W. C. 'V. Conaway, J. W. *J. L. Stinson,W.M. *W. R. Isbell, J. W. Forrest E. Owen, W. M. L Kohn,' W. 1\1. Geo. S. Gragg,·.J. W . J. Perry Short, W. M. .1..J. Kessler, W. M. . Charles 1. Taylor, S. W. Fred L. Oatman, J: W: Oscar Leach, W. M. . Seth B. Worthington, W. 1\1;. John P. Austin, .J. W. . J. M. McGhee, W. M. Jno. Martin, W. M. A.' C. Roach, J. W. Pearl Hatfield, S. W. *John J. Matlock, W. M. W. S.· Armstrong, W. M. Tim Hosmer, W. M. Chas. P.· Tompkins, W. M. Oscar Kelley, W. M. . .T. E. Daugherty', ·W. M. Jno. R. Eisenhour, W. M. C. B. Acuff, W. 1\1. *J. C, Westover, W.M. C. L. Allen, W. M. John F. 'Willmann, W. M.' W. F: R. Hardy, J.' W. Carlisle M. Randall, W. M.: W. B. Graves, W. M.


350

, [Sept.

Appendi.-v... Lodge.

Representative.

CENTERTOWN . MOKANE

:

WELLSTON MT. WASHIKGTON 'CHAFFEE

;

MARION PAUK

611 612

. .

*B. H. Stark, W. M . Robert 1. Gowan, W. M. R. Earl Hodges, S. W. 613 W. H. Evans, W. M. 614 Gregg B. Christy, W. M. 615 *M. H. Stubblefield, W. M. *Geo. A. Sample, S. W. Duncan M. Barter, J. W. 616 Clarence W.Cunn~ngham,W.M. 617 Allen W. Burton, W .. M. Thos. I. Johnson, S. W. William S. McCaulI, J. W. 618 A. C. Wintermute, S. W. 619 B. I. Webb, W. M. 621 John H. Dalton, S. W. 623 *John McCormick, W. M. 625 Chas.A. Halcer, W. M. 626 W. T. Pausch, W. M. R. H. Robinson,. S. W. 629 'V. T. Vance, W. M. 630 Will M. Sams, W. M. J. E. Boas, J. W. 631 J. B. Oliver, W. M. 632 B.' F. Newcomb,W. M. 634 MaK L. Kelley, W. M. 638 .J. M. Judge, W. M. Jno. J. Lucas, S. W. J. M. Chandlee, J. W. 639 P. .B. Eversden, W. M. Walter' H. Vose, S. W. F. B. Howarth, J. W. 640 Geo. L. Walters, W. M. Robert E. Cox, J. W. 641. W. P. Morgan, W. M. D. Cormack, S. W. Walter Beard, J. W. 642 Edwin Clark Morgan, W. M. Elmer Shepard, S. W. 643 Chas. H. Carman, VV. M. 644 H. E. Warren, W. M.

. . . . .

GRANDVIEW FAIRVIEW ANDERSON MAPLE SHEFFIELD

'

. . . . . .

:

MAG~OLIA

:

VALLEY PARK.· EAST GATE

. .

TOWER GROVE BI(l.GUADE STt:ELE TRIAl\'GLE

. . . .

'., '

MIZPAH .. :

.

Jr::]\"1'\INGS

" ..

TRINITY

.

BENJAMIl'i

FRANKLI:"

N ORTJ-n~A8T VALLEy

. '

. .

GUADT

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION. Lodge. '

Representative.

ALGAl3TL

.

EUCLID MORGAN HARl\fONY : WARRK\'TON

~

Carl Philips, W: M. .r. E .• Har~iilg, J. W.· M. C. Robmson, W. M. .T. F. Alcorn, S. W. Edw. G. Peters, J. W. E. Price,W. M. " David C. Hardy, Jr., .T. W. G. E. Poole, W. M. : .. .Tohn C. Eisinberg, W. M. ,


1917. ]

Appendix.

351

GHAND LODGB OFFICI';nS. Edward Higbee, Gl,'and Master. 'Vm. A. Clark, Deputy Grand Mastel'. .John \V. Ding-ham. Gl'and Senior '\Varden. Julius C. Garrell, Grand Junior \Varden. William A. Hall, Grand Treas~ urer. John R. Parson, Grand Secretary. J.' R. McLachlan, Grand Lecturer. John H. Miller, Grand Chaplain. R. W. LiIlIW. C;rand Chaplain. ,V ill. F. .Johnsol1, Gran(l Senior Deacon. .

O. A. Luea>;, Grand .J ulliol' Deacon. Orestes Mitchell, G!'and Marshal. Austin L. McRae, Grand Mar-' shal. VV. Vir. Martin, Grand Sword Bearer. Bert S. Lee, Grand Senior Steward. Joseph S. McIntyre, Grand Junior Steward. ClulI'les C. Gardnel', Grand Pursuivant. Eo Combie Smith, Grand Ol路ator. Harry A. Krueger, Grand Tiit:!:.

PAST GRAND MASTRRS. D. M. vVilson. Robert n. Kreeger.' \Vm. A. Hall. Clay' C. Bigger. Arch A. Johnson, ,Jacob Lampert, Van Fremont Boor. Tolman 'VV. Cotton. Frank H. Jesse. John T. S110rt:

Xenophon Ryland. Alexander, M. Dockery. Chal"1es C. \Voods., Robert F. Stevenson. James ViT, Boyd, ,fohn R. Parson. Arthur M. Hough. Dorsey A. Jamison. Corona H. Brigg~. \Vm. F. Kuhn. A. S. Houston,

DISTINGUISHED VISITORS. F.

B. 'Whitaker; Past Grand Master of Iowa. J. S. Reamey, Griwd Master of路 Arkansas. GRAND

Halph H, ,Vhec:cl', Grand :Master of Illin.ois: Isaac Cutter, Grand Secy., Grand Loclge of Illinois.

[lJ~I'n.ESENTATIV ES.

Gib. \\'. Carson, British Columbia. Robert F. Stl:ven:oon, England. Andrew J. O'Reilly, Scotland. Edward Higbee,Western Australia. C. C. 'VVoods, 路Quebec. D. M. \Vilson, District of Columbia. Geo. E. Mayhall, Delaware. C. A. Swenson, Idaho. 'Vm. F. Kuhn, Kansa:-;,

Alexander M. Dockery, North Carolina. Dorsey A. Jamison, North Dakota. Austin Lee McRa'); Ohio. V. O. Saunders, South Carolina. A. IVl. Hough. Alabama. .John If. Miller, Ii:gypt" W. K Hoke, Oklahoma, Churchin J. Blae路kburn, Texas. John R. Parson, New Yol'1{.


352'

Appendix.

[Sept.

DISTJUCT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. Hiram N. Martin, First ])ist)·iet. B. B. Campbell, Thirty-fifth DisJohn M. Brown, Third Distr·ict. trict. Edgar \.-V. Prentiss, Fifth DisA. M. Harlan, Thirty-sixth District. trict. J. E. neese, Seventh District. H. 'V. FI'istoe, Thirty-seventl: Emmett S. Ballard, Ninth DisDistrict. trict. . Carl.G. Ross, Thirty-eighth DisEmsley C. James, mEn-crith District. trict. Chas. K Pyle, Fortieth District n. 'A. Tharp, Twelfth l)istriet. John M. ·Chamberlin, Forty-first E. \.-V. Tayler, Thirt.eenth DisDistrict. . trict. H. H. Finley, Forty-second DisB. E. Bigger, Fifteenth District. trict. RoM. A. May, Sixteenth District. Samuel B. Vickers, ]<'o)'t~'-thil'(­ Thomas F. Hurd, Seventeent.h District. District. Felix K: Eberlein, F'orty-'fourth H. 11. Mason, Nineteenth DisDistrict. 'trict. Carl A. Swenson, 'Forty-sixth J. P. Tucker, Twenty-first Dis- .' District. trict. J. lVr. Carnahan, Fort.y-seven tll R. J. Smith, 'Twenty-second DisDistrict. trict. W. B. Massey, Forty-eighth Dis· 'Vm. T. 'Vernwag, Twenty-third trict. Distl'ict. Ceo. \'V. Miller, Forty-ninth Dis.J. .S. \'I\Tilson, Twenty-fourth District. trict. .Tas. A. noone, l.'iftieth .District Steve L. Stites, 'l'wenty-fifth DisVirgil P. Adarns, Fifty-fir'st District. trict. John ,Pickard, Twenty-sixth DisHorace' A. Stearns, Fifty-third tl'ict. District. S. P. CllTlninghalTI, Twenty-sevG...J. Vaughan, Fifty-fourth Disenth District.' t.rict. J. E. Reeds, Twenty-eighth Dis'V. N. Marbut,. Fifty-fift.h District. trict. .T. ViT. Powell, Twenty-ninth Dis\.-\T. A. Phipps, Fifty-sixth District. . trict. E. A: Fluesmcicr, Thirtieth DisBernal L. Tatman, Fifty-seventh trict. Distl'ict. R. A. Breuer, Thirty-second DisEd Nelson, Fift.y-eighth Distriet Allan McDowell Hoyt, F'ifty-nint.l! trict. Andrew .T. O'Heilly, Thirt.y-thirll District. Dist.rict. DlSTHTCT LECTURERS. P. O. StansbclTY, First District, . Ch~rlip. C. Ga~dl)er, Second Dist.rict. John Santee, Third District. B.F. Watson, "Ninth District. Geo. F. Brewington, Fourteenth District. . Henry C. Noland, T.wenty-firsi Dist.rict.

Charles T. Kornbrodt, Twentysecond District. James A.' Oliver, Twenty-sixth District. Howard. G. Cook, Thirty-third District. .G. W.' Custer, Forty-fifth Distri ct.


1917.]

Appendix.

353

PAST MASTEHS. Name.

Lodge.

J. S. Mellvaney Missouri James A. Harris · Missouri ""m. n. Gillespie Missouri Artlnlr Snuggs Missouri AnthonyI<'. Ittner Missourl ·,rl'aylor B. Wyricl< Missourl Jno. 'R. Kelly MissoUl·i I'~. A. Mathers :Missoul'i Gregory S. Miller Missouri H. U. Holland. Mlssouri Solon Cameron· Mi'ssouri Paul L . .J. Bertz Meridian Thomas C. Kuhnle Meridian , ................... jno. L. ~ug·enhein , Meridian Berthold A. Lange Meridian Arthur V. Schopp Meridian Henq' Hahn Meridian n. H. Hein Meridian Chas. A. Schill : Beacon Frank L.· Magoon Beaco'n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James Ellicock .' Beacon Henry R. Pfeifer Beacon IT.· Bodine Beac'on J H. A. WinkeL Beacon Alfred J. Kirby Beacon . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A'lfred J. Pratt Heneon II. .D. Piatt. Beacon ' . n. T. Kingsbury : Howa~d Job Newton United : :......... M. F. Smith .. ,' United......................... D. W. Farmer ; '.' .United Robt. H. McMinn ; 1;nitecl ," ,' Ark ,........... C. H. T.ucker Robert Fisher , .George Washington ;........ B V. Chase.: George· ,~rilshington............ W. S. Campbell ',' George Washington............ 'Vm. L. Reynolds............ . .George Washington............ Otto K Mueller George Vvashingtori . George \Vashington............ L ,V. Qulek S. R. Stevenson George Washington............ W. A. Sommers; George Washington . John Kipp George \Vashington............ Eugene McQuillin George \Vashington............ VV. G. Wilderman George "Vashlngton............. W. L. LaBerg'e (;'eorge ''''ashington............ M. Kenner George 'Vashington............ A. E. Krumme Agency James Bradford Western Star................... John Bartlett Clarksville Thomas F. Hurd Paris. Union...................

"T.

No. J 1 1 1 1 J 1 l'

1 J J 2' 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 .4 5 5 5 5 6 9 9 9 f·

9 9 S 9 9 9

9 10 15 17 19


.354 Name.

Appendix.

[Sept.

Lodge.

A. 'r.. Vaughn Paris Union................... Peter Schaffnit St. Louis .. : :...... Henry A. Steiner , .St. Louis :.................. Ifarry Binlon Bt. Louis....................... Phil Isaacson St. Louis....................... Louis Swarts : St. Louis Sam Goldstein St Louis....................... J. N. Stewart Naphtali "WeI'ner Hencke ',' Naphtali Chas. Gietner Naphtali Harry L. Crown Naphtali F. C. G. Lam: Naphtali C.' Rr~eley Ava '. . . . . .. J "-. H. Blackshc.nv : St. John's...................... Windsor J H. Hart Howard H. Spencer Mereer 'Villiam F. Johnson ............• Cooper •........................ W. W. I{ingsbury Cooper E. E. Amick Cooper Wm. ,V. Trigg Cooper L. P. Starke Cooper J. A. ·WilIiams DeWitt C. F. Blomberg Mt. Moriah..................... I". M. Mathewson Mt. Moriah..................... Chas. B. Grimm ·.Mt. Moriah ; H. A. Borgmann Mt. Moriah..................... John C. Hobertson Mt. Moriah..................... Mt. Moriah...................... J If. Gundlach Thomas H. 'Vhit.ehilI. Mt. Moriah ' Alfred A. Eicks wIt. Moriah..................... H. L. Bergen:· · Mt. Moriah : . . . .. D. C. \Veatherby Jefferson 11'1 T. Oli\ier '.' Jeffer.son Jefferson A. T. Dumm John T. Debo Jefferson....................... .Tn mesM. Brewer :·.. Bonhomme Murray H. Davis : . .-Fayette ,'.. Geo. W. Berry l<~ulton Otto Hale .....................• \Vakonda '. .. \Y. B. Calvert. Weston T. B. Morris Arrow Ho,~k................... Tipton S. \V. .Hurst. .J. \V. Hawkins Montlcello \VITI. H. Carpent.er .. ; Centralia Julius R. Edwards ~ .. Centralia.. .. .. .. Homer L. Pruett CE'ntraiia :........ Jc·hn H. Dunmire Kennett Albert Eo Diamant. Kennett H. ,G. Landon Sullivan Gorin A. H. Mackey Geo. ,.y. Rucker F,ureka :.. P. Surririlers : .Lebanon

"T.

Ko. 19 20 20 20 20 2C 20 25 25 25 25 25 26 28 2£ 35 3f 36 36 36 36 39 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 4( 43 43 43 43 45 47 48 52 53 55 56 58 59 59 59 6.8 68 69 72 73 77


1917.] . Name.

-1ppendix. Lodge.

Edwin P. Ambler ' .. Polar Star...................... Joseph C. RoehL: Polar Slar· :............ Henry M. Eckermann Polar Star .....•.. '. . . . .. . . . .. .los. L. Kohner Polar Slar : E. F. Von Gunden ' Polar Star ~.. Frank Eardley Polar Star...................... 'Val tel' G. Nenzel ; Polar Star...................... J IL VanArsdale Polar Star...................... 'Vallel' S. Ashton Polar Star ;... F. H. Mason : :polar Star·.· :......... C. W. T: Matthews ·.polar Star..................... \Y. '.J. Goddard Bridgeton .J.Blum Bridgeton Daniel H. Kremer .'\Vebster Groves ,. '.' . .. G A. Benedict. \Vebster Groves................ VVm. C. Urban vVebster Groves................. 'V. E. \Yalsh "'riendship Albel't C. Behringer Perseverance· .Tames A. Kinder · St. Marks.· :.............. George W. Walker ~St. Marks......... Louis G. Stovall. ; .St. Mal'l{s.: :........... \Y. P. Cal'uthers ~ f3t.· Marks Geo. 'YV. Miller.: ' V,Vest View ; Se;lman Russell ' Heroine Leo Adler , ~ .Heroine Paul D. Higbee : Kirksville .T. T. Cope Gallatin D L .. Glaves Marcus : .T. H. Clawson Tl·enton K .T. Shobe '.' .. Laddonia Jesse 'Lareau Barnes F. 1". 'VITI. Krenning ~· Erwin J-r. Elsner ; Erwin F. Gieselmann ; Elrwin August H. Kamp ·.: Erwin H. \V. Henselmeier F:rwin· ; A.' S. \Nenerneyer ; Erwi'n .Tacoh C. F:ekhardt , Erwin T . .J. Singer grwin Hy. Brockhoff' ..........•....... Erwin 'V. A. Kleinschmidt. Erwin 'Valter R. Shrodes Seaman n. M. 'Vilson Seaman ' E'. B. Seitl': ;Seaman Cassius Eo Vaughn Monett E:dHenderson Farnlingtol1 ' vYm. R. Edgar ; Starof the West. '" D. G. Berry Qlian Geo. S. Dowell Braymer .J H. Campbell Papinville .J H. Gunn; ; Pleasant Grove : G. C. Marquis L~'xington

355 No. 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 80 80 84 84 84 89 92 93 93 93 93 103 104 104 105 106 110

ill 115 116 121 121 121 121 121 121 121 121 121 121 126 126 126 129 132 133 134 135 140"

142 149


356 'Name.

Ap"pendi~.

[Sept.

Lodge.

No,

William Vincent , Li~n' Creek ' , .. : 152 D. A. Sloan .. : Bloomfield 153 Clarence L. Alexander Occidental 163 Fra~k E. Diekneite ' Occidental , 163 John D.Hamilton Occidental 163 vVilliam M. Porteous ' ' Occidental 163 C. G. HiJ't. ,.Occidental '. 163 GeOrge U. Heimburger Occidental 163 Louis H. Abrams Occidental 163 Lee M. Edgar.: : ~ .Occidental 163· Sol E;. ..W aggoner Occidental 163 Edward L, Dillon Occidental 163 George M. \Vagner Occidental 163 Hany A. Krueger : .. Occidental 163 Charles E. Fisher ' Occidental 163 Edward .J. Havold Occidental 163 Goodman King ;Occidental 163 K. T. ·Swilley Portageville : 166 \V. L. Whipple : Pride of the west. 179 Gib W. Carson Pride of the ,Vest 179 T. M. Fulks · California 183 James W. Roth California 183 H. H. Leslie Morley 184 y\,. E;. Condict. Hermon : 187 L€:wis Seegil Zeredatha ' '. , . , , , .. ,. 189 A. F. Braun Zeredatha , 189 Emmett S. .Ballard., ,7,eredatha ,. 189 S. S. Cox , ...........•.... Wellsville : :. 194 ,V. S. White Bolivar 195 Robert Elliott Carthage 197 C. C. Eastin New Hope 199 HobertE;. Black New Hope : .. 199 F. A. Cozad Somerset 206 Salisbury ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 208 S, F. Trammel T. B. Valentine Unionville , 210 Nelson A. Franklin Unionville , 210 James ~. Pollock .' Four Mile 212 R. 'L. Dixon Good Hope 218 .las. Ha,sdie Good Hope : 218 ''''right·M. Powell Good Hope : 211 F. VV. Haertel , Good I-Tope 218 .Tno. Auld Good Hope 218 Henry A. Chapin , .. Good Hope , 218 Orlando P. Bloss Albel't Pike 219 Hubert H. Mathonet , Albert Pike 219 Gus A. ,Vestman , , Kansas City : 220 Henry Hanssen ,Kansas City 220 Nat Neusteter : Kansas City 220 J M. McDonald Kansas City 220 C F. Ridings Hamilton 224 E W. Ousley 8t James , : 230 H. L. Caton Bucklin 233

J


1917.]. Name.

. Appendix' Lodge.

G. L. Faulhaber .••...•••...•.••• Sedalia ! •••••• F. A. RaitheL Keystone H. W. Crosby ·..Keystone .......•.............. Chas. W. Speirs Keystone J. H. Cranfill Keystone H. P. Lynch Keystone R. M. Hanna .........•..........Key·s·tone Walter Cole K€ystone R. H. Myers : Keystone John C. Hess Keystone Gus F. Scharr Keystone Robert A. O'Neil : Keystone John B. Schmidt. Keystone Louis C. Hehl. Keystone T. Mogsee Keystone W. Roessler : Keystone Chas. E. Prettyman Neosho J. M. Goodrich Carroll L. W. Hawks Glensted 'Valter A. Pfantsch Hope Ben F. Wood Laredo John Keating Shekinah D. M. Foster Ravanna Wm. Sessinghaus , Aurora Warren B. Foskett Aul'ora Will Docter Aurora Chas. 'V. Staudinger , Aurora J. A. Arnott Aurora Virm. Myrer Aurora A. L. Pollard , Aurora Y. D. Gordon , .. , ·Lodge of Truth .r. M. Clyde Solomon J. L. Heckenlively Solomon ' M. A. Muratta Solomon ' Elmer Hobson Cold Spring Florian Wolz Fenton Ed N. Kaercher Cosmos Vir-tor H. Falkeinhainer Cosmos Harry Mannist .•............... Cosmos Max A. Wittmann Cosmos CJ:a:s. Bail' : Coslnos I. Landaure ...................• Cosmos Christ Meyer Cosmos Herman Frank Cosnlos R. D. Kinkade .......•....••...• Earl F. R. Lawrenceson Craft Geo. H. Hickman Edina Wm. F. Hall Edina Geo. W. Wood ..............•...Sarcoxie P. S. Ladd Sparta Thad B. La~don Temple Percy A. Budd Temple -.

357 No. 236 243 243 243 243 243 243 243 243 243 243 243 243 242 243 243 247 24'9 250 25] 263 256 258 267 267 267 267 267 26''j 26'7 268 271 27] 271 274 281 282 282 282 28~

282 282 282 28~

285 287 291 291 293 29f 299 299


358 Name.

Appendi.%.

.[ Sept.'

Lodge.

Thos. A. Mr,hurn Temple ".,' .. ,'.,., .. C. C. Woods Temple Thomas A. Reynolds , .. ,., .. ,Temple , Alfred .D. Ludlow , Temple "., .. , J. Norton Md~lroy , , Lick Creek ·., , ""m. L. Hamrick , , Clarence , " A. L. Mills .......• '•............• Ashlar , ,., , George W. Brundrett" Ashlar ,."'.,, Geo. E. MayhalL ;,." New London.. , , , P. E. Mo.unt Sikeston , Fielding Kurley , .. , Kearney "., , ,. Jckshan Freymann , .. ,., Rural ' J. A. Evans : Eldorado , , Frank S. Stumm , , .Cornerstone , Karl M. Vetsburg " Cornerstone '., , '\Vallace A. Kenward , .. ,., .. Cornerstone , .. " " F. Lambe .... , , , .. Cornerstone .. , .. ,., , " Waldo D. Arens, .. , ", .Cornerstone , , .. , Geo, A. Slatery ,.", Cornerstone ,.,., John E. Schmid .. , " ,Cornerstone Jos. H, Schweich " , Cornerstone , " .. , A. C. Robinson , Cornerstone , .. ,." Walter R Seewoster , ,' Coi'nerstone ,' , Wm. T. Newman Cornerstone .. ,' ,., .. , .. 'V. R. Schmitt Cornerstone H. D. Schilling Co'l'nerstone Arthur G. Detrich Cornerstone .. , H. H. Wait. McDonald .. , , , ' I!l. . E, Barr Linn " , , .. .Tchn Feuer , , , Linn " , W. J. Zorn " .. , , ,Mt. Zion ' :,., C. F. Funkhouser , , Mt. Zion ,., , C. R. La Mar Kennedy .. ;.................... ""m. A. Piner Charity Wm. Silve'rstein Charity '\V. D. Wanen ,., Blue Springs H. C. Elberg:. . ,., Westport ,.,.,. J. J,. Beaty." .. , , Agricola ,." , L. Haymen., , Moberly ', Geo. L. Hassett. Moberly , Corrie L. Arthur ..............•. Spring Creek , " , H. J. Chitwood, · Barnesville 0, Poisson , , Hebron ,., , VV. G. Wilkins , , , .. Hebron , Forrest d. DonnelL Tuscan Wm. Walsingham Tuscan , , Walter Wimmer ' Tuscan .. , , , " W. R. Wall Tuscan , , Chas. B. Stark ; Tuscan , ,. Gustave W. Niemann " Tuscan , , James M. Breckenridge, Tuscan ' , ,. C. A. Finley RIddick , , ,.

"'T.

"T.

No. 299 299 299 299 302 305 306 306 307 310 311 316 318 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 323 324

326 326 327 327 329 331 331 :{37 34C 342 344 344

347 353 354

354 360 36e 360 360 360 360 360 361


1917.] ]\Tame.

Append-i~·. ,Lodge.

C. O. Borth Composite S M. Cozad Pythagoras Ralph L' McHenry Marionville 'Willis A. McCullah Marionville S. G. Robinson Ray town R. E. Livesay Christian A. J. Walkup Gower ' " B A. Dumbauld Carterville ~ John G. Nyc ' Malta S. E. Mitchell Malden C. C. Arnold Montrose .Jehn Ferguson : Iberia C.L. McDonald Ca.che Vir. H. Murdock Cache E. C. Creley Cache John E. Gaskin Cache O. G. Mueller ~ Cache J. W. Schuette ·.Cache A. P. Watkins : .. Cache Aug. F. Weeke Itaska W. P. French ltaska Henry J. Filsinger Itaska C. W. Tacke Itaska E. C'. W. Ortmann Itaska Frank Seidel : ..........•. Itaska .Jas. M. Jones Itaska G. R. Gloor " ltaska A. Fuhrmann Itaska Philip A. Wenzel Itaska ................•........ Edw. W. Clark Gate of the Temple J. J. Bowman ......•............ Samaritan Tulis Cunningham Samaritan Zach O'Briant Glenwood Manford Tompkins ,Vheeling Moses Whybark Trowell Chas. J. Graef.: Excelsior ;............... Louis F. Grewe Anchor J. F. Nehrlich · Anchor Andrew J. O'Reilly Anchor William Crouch Anchor C. J. Wendling .................•Anchor ................•........ Charles E. Jones Anchor L. C. McElwee An,chor Garrett F. Coleman Anchor VV. E. Hoke ..............•..... Anchor Fred Halter '.' Anchor Louis Moller West Gate F. W. Sittermann West Gate F. A. Wind West Gate Frank V. Smith Wel)t Gate John N. Denny WelSt Gate Edward McGuigan West Gate :

359 No. 366

383 390 390. 391 392 397 401 402.· 40€ 408 410

41€ 416' 416 416 41€ 416 416 42C 42C 420 42C 42C 42C 42( 42C '420 420 422 424

424 427 434

44( 441

443 443 443

443 443 443 443

443 443 443 445

445 44~

445 445

445


360 Name.

[Sept.

Appendix. Lodge.

Frank Landwehr West Gate Thos. A. Hopkins ·., 'Vest Gate Arthur C. Schutze 'Vest Gate N. J. Fitzhugh '.' , West Gate .Tno. M. Jones Ivanhoe D. B. Willock Ivanhoe H. \.y. Stainaker Ivanhoe Julius O. Christensen Ivanhoe G. S. McLanahan Ivanhoe W. n. Shaw , Ivanhoe Jas. M. Darrow· Schell City Robt. J. Mitchell. Verona \ Otto H. Cramer ~Tallace Robert.J. Loyd Larnbskin Chas. E. Schumacher· Lambskin \-\Tm. H. Evans Lambskin G. J. McCoubrie Lambskin Henry 'Harrington Lambskin M. Eo Sheets lambskin Michael j·'oerstel : .. Lambskin C. P. Browning Caruthersville Robert L. 'VVill iams Clifton Roy L. Phillips Aullville J. F. Hanna Pickering Charles R. Boone Golden Robert Burns Rich HilL Harrison S. McKinney ,Cairo S. R. Sweeney Chilhowee E. B. Day , Lock Springs J. D. Arnold Lewistown Chase Henthorn Buckner' .J. T. Sams : Buckner Jno. Y. Shepard ."Platte City Guy Colman Platte City Chris A. Skillman Platte City L. F . •Teffcries Saxton W. D. Pyne Saxton T. A. Hill '.' Van Buren W. H. Swanson : Granby Churchill J. Blackburn Oriental Joseph C. Mukish Clifton Heights .. ~ Jesse Brand Clifton Heights John Silver Clifton Heights.· C. S. Rogers Gate City T. D. Boatright. .....•.......... Gate Ci*Y w. J. Nicks : Gate City ·Wm. T. Jamison Gate City r. A. House ' Cunningham Wm. T. Powers Wayne n. R. Quinn Higbee Harry C. Bair · .Rethel S. Thrasher ;Winigan

No. 445 HE 4'45 445

44f 446 446

44€ 44€ 44f 448 452

45€ 46C 46C 46C 460

460 46C

46C

461 46f 464

: 472 475 479 486 487 488

494 501 501 504 504 504

50f 508 509

51/ 518 "

52C 52C

520 52:522

522 52f

525 52£ 527 537 540


1917·1 Name Frank 'Wood E. F. Ames Jas. A. Moffitt Chas. 'Woods Le Grand L. Atwood I-Toward G. Cook H. G. Nicks E. K Christopher ; M. V. Green Ed\vin .J. Scott Thos. N. Sutton field H. H. Leonard Alan MacEwan· E Kitchell .J. L. Stinson \'Y". BoO IsbelL Jules J. 'Vehrli. Chas. H. Pope Chas. L. Mattes H .. 13. Crucknell Charles C. vValton .Tohn W. McGee R C. Blackmer George W. Burrows J. M. McGhee : Alexander Johnston John .r. Matlock .r. .E. Daugherty .Tames A. Fox .J. C. Westover. Edward P. Clark, Jr R. S. Todd B. H. Stark B E. Johnson : Henry A. Boye ,Y. M. Collins Frank K Burns M. H. Stubblefield G. A. Sample E. J. I\:ing Austin C. \Vintermqte n .. 1. WeblJ : John McCormick C. A. Lester Horace G. Beedle Frank A. Satterwhite .T. H. Leathers H . .r. Lucksinger Chas. C. Scholl. Ceo. W. Lauderdale E . .J. Senn A. G. Frankel.

Appendic1:.

361

Lodge. \\rinigan W.inigan Winigan Jacksonville Ferg-uson Rose nill nose Hill. ~ose Hill nose Hill. Rose HilL Moscow Tebbetts ·.Maplewood : Maplewood Miller . " Mille~· Olive Branch Olive Branch Olive Braneh Olive Branch Olive Branch : .. Ewing Forest Park Forest Park Grandin Grandin Red Bird Puxico Puxico Elvins Clayton Clark

No. 540 540 540 5.'0

,; ,

~

'

~entertown

Mokane Wellston Wellston \Vellston Chaffee Chaffee Park Gr·andview I,'airview Maple Sheffield Magnolia Magnolia Magnolia valley Park Valley Par·k f<~ast Gate ' ..•Tower Grove Tower Grove

'

542 550 55e 55C 55e 550 558 565 566 566 567 567 576 576 576 576 576 577 578 ; 578 57£ 579 584 596 596 59£ G01 61C 61J 612 61:: 612 613 615 615 617 618 61£ 623 625 62f 626 626 629 62ll 63C 631 631


[Sept.

./1 Ppc/ldix. Lodge.

Name \'v"m. A. Meyers Henry W. Beimdfek Theodore 'V. Kisker Morris Popper Geo. R. Hodge

Jennings Jennings Trinity Benjamin Northeast

No.

Franklin

. . . . .

Fr'aternally submitted,

â&#x20AC;˘

AUGUST F. WEEKI':, CHAS. C. GARDNER, ARTHUH. S. MOrtEY, H. R. MASON, CARL A. SWEN SON. CHAS. T. KORNRHODT. WALTER A. COO~, Committee.

640 640 641 642 643


.1917. ]

hldex

363

INDEX. A PAGE

Address of Grand Master.................................... 7 Address of Grand Master, Committee on..................... 102 Address of Grand Master, Report of Committee on ,. 66 Alphabetical List of Lodges-Appendix _ 221-228 Amendments ·to By-Laws Adopted 267, 268 Amendments to By-Laws-Consideration of 69, 131 Amendments to By-Laws Proposed 105, 106, 131, 228, 269 134-135 . Amendments to By-Laws Lost. Amendment -to ConStitution, Proposed 72-132 Amendment to Constitution, Lost ........•.................... 132 Annual Communication, 1918................................... 266 ............................ 4 Ann'ual Meeting-Opening Annual Meeting-Closing 263 Appeals and Grievances, Committee on (1918) ;........... 259 Appeals and Grievances, Committee on (1917)................ 102 Appeals and Grievances, Committee on-Report. of 180-227 Appointments of Chairmen .Standing Committees (1918) 258 Appointments of District Deputy Grand Masters.............. 264 Appointment of District Lecturers 265 Appointment of Grand Officers............................... 257 Appointments of Special Committees, 1918 : 259 Approved Decisions (Digest).· 287-332 Attendance .....................•............................ 101 Auditor, 1917, Report of...................................... 98 B

Bi-centennial-Grand Lodge of England 99, 149, 167 Biographical Sketch of Edward Higbee i, ii Boards of Relief, Committee on 102 Boards of Relief, Committee on-Report of................... 141 Border Legislation · 30, 235, 273 Burial Lot of Grand Lodge (Digest) 273 269-271 By-Laws, Amendments, Proposed

c Chairmen Standing Committees, 1918, Appointed Charity, Committee on

258 102


364

Index

[Sept.. PAGE

Charity, Committee on, Report of 179 'Charters, Arrested , , 70, 131, 170 Charters, Duplicate ' " 71 Charters, Granted ' 70, 147, 266 Clearmont Lodge No. 507 vs. Masonic Home Board 69, 138 Commissions Issued ;.............. 71 Committee on Arrangements, Report of , , .. 266 Committee, Auditing ,............................. 102 Committee, Auditing, Report of. , ' , 98 Committee on Appeals and Grievances ,.. 102 Committee on Appeals and Grievances, Report of 180-227 Committee on Appeals and Grievances (1918) 259路 Committee on Boards of Relief. ; 102 Committee on Boards of Relief, Report of 141 Committee on Charity 102 Committee on Charity, Report of. ,179 Committee on Chartered Lodges 102 Committee on Chartered Lodges, Report of 170-176 Committee on Credentials 102 Committee on Credentials, Report of. 4, 248; Appendix 339-362 Committee on D. D~ G. Masters' Reports 102 Committee on D. D. G. Masters' Reports, Report of........... 139 Committee on Fraternal Correspondenc~ ; : 102 Committee on Fraternal Correspondence, Report of. .101; App. 1-185 Committee on Fraternal Correspondence Appointed for 1918, .. 258 Committee on Grand Master's Address 102 Committee on Grand Master's Address, Report of............. 66 Committee on Jurisprudence 102 Committee on Jurisprudence, Report of. 131-137, 230-236 Committee on Jurisprudence (1918) \......................... 259 Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation 102 Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation, Report of......... 147 Committee on Manuals 102, 259 Committee on Masonic Home (Visiting) 102 Committee on Masonic Home (Visiting), Report of........... 177 Committee on Necrology 102 Committee on Necrology, Report of. 110 Committee on Pay Roll ;........................ 102 Committee on Pay Roll, Report of.. 236-247 Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges, , '" 102 Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges, Report of 228 Committee on Ritual 102, 259


1917.]

Index

365 PAGE

Committee on Lease of Offices ; 103, 259 Committee on Lease of Offices, Report of , . . . . . . . .. 108 Committee on Transportation and Hotels 102 Committee on Transportation and Hotels, Report of........... 122 Committee on Unfinished Business 102 Committee on Ways and Means 102 Committee on Ways and Means, Report of 140 Condition. of the Craft....................................... 17 Corner-Stones, Laying of. ; 33, 73 Correspondence, Committee on 102 Correspondence, Committee on, Report of 101; Appendix 1-185 Credentials, Committee on 102 Credentials, Committee on, Report of 4, 248; Appendix 339-362 D

Dead Lodges, Roll of. 路 Appendix 268-275 Deaths, List of Appendix 195-205 Decisions of Grand Master................................... 35 Decisions, Past Grand Masters', Not Controlling 231 Delinquent Lodges ,......... 73 Digest of Laws 272-334 Dispensations Granted, Special............................... 73 District Deputy Grand Masters Commissioned 71 District Deputy Grand Masters, List of ..... ;................. 264 District Deputy Grand Masters, Reports Of, Report of Com. on. 139 District Lecturers, List of..................................... 265 Dockery, Alexander M., Oration 150 Dues, Suspension for Non-Payment of. Appendix 205 E

Editing Report of Appeals and Grievances 228 Elected Officers in Past, List of Appendix 266-267 Election of Directors of Masonic Home : 140 Election of G.rand Officers 109-110 Employment Bureau 144 Endowment Fund, Masonic Home............................ 295 Exemplification of Work..................................... 99 Exercises-p'reliminary to Opening........................... iv Expulsions Reported _ Appendix 215


366

Index

[Sept.

F PAGE

Financial Statement _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Financial Tables Appendix 246-263 Foreign Grand Lodges, Recognition of Appendix 186 Fraternal Correspondence, Committee on 102 Fraternal Correspondence, Report. 101; Appendix 1-185 Fraternal Jurisdiction, Recognition of Appendix 186 G

Grand Lodge Burial Lot (Digest)............................. 273 Grand Lodge,_ Closing of 263 Grand Lodge, Financial Statement of......................... 76 Grand Lodge, Opening of 4 Grand Lodge, Property of 75 Grand Lodge, Returns to 73 Grand Lodge Statistics :............................. 73 Grand Lodges, List of Foreign, Recognized Appendix 186 Grand Officers, Appointment of :.............. 257 Grand Officers, Election of 109, 110 Grand Officers, Installation of 257 Grand Officers Present at Opening of Annual Communication.. 3 Grand Lecturer, Report of.................................... 123 Grand Master's Address -6 Grand Master's Address, Committee on 6, 102 Grand Master's Address, Report of Committee on....... . . . . .. 66Grand Masters' Conference ..........•........................ 31 Grand Master's Decisions 35 Grand Master's Jewel, Presented to Wm. A. Clark · 260 Grand Master's Official Visits 17 Grand Representatives Commissioned 71 Grand Representatives appointed near other Gr. Lodges App. 191 Grand Representatives from other Grand Lodges near Grand Lodge of Missouri Appendix 193 Grand Secretary, Recapitulation of Appendix 265 Grand Secretary's Report Presented _ : . . . . . . . . 70 Grand Secretary's Tabular Statements Appendix 230-263 Grand Secretaries, List -of AppeI1dix 188 Grand Treasurer, Report of. ·........ 92


Index

1917.]

367

H PAGE

Home, Home, Home, Home, Home, Home, Home,

Masonic, Masonic, Masonic, Masonic, Masonic, Masonic, Masonic,

Directors Elected 140 Improvement Fund : 78-91 Mentioned by Grand Secretary : . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Report of Officers 66; Appendix 277-316 Sum Contributed to, during year.......... 76 Visiting Committee Appointed 258 Visiting Committee,. Report of. ; 177

Improvement Fund ' 78-91 Indebtedness Authorized ." , 39, 267 Installation of Grand Officers................................. 257 Instruction, Lodges of 路.............. 123 International Bd. of Relief, U. S. and Ca.nada 180 J

Jewel, Grand Master's, Presented to Grand Master-elect. 260 Jewel, Past Grand Master's, Presented to P. G. Master 261 Jurisprudence, Committee on (1918) '.' 259 Jurisprudence, Committee on (1917).......................... 102. Jurisprudence, Report of Cemmittee on 131-137, 230-236 K

. Kennard, Samuel M., P. G. Treas., Death of Kuhn, Wm. F., Oration....................................

112 159

L

List of Foreign Grand Lodges recognized as regular.. Appendix 186 List of Grand Lodges, with Names of Grand Secretaries... App. 188 List of Living Past Grand Masters............................ 259 Lodge Returns 73 Lodges Referred to Grand Master 173, 174 Lodges According to Districts Appendix 317-338 Lodges, Alphabetical List of Appendix 221-228 Lodges, Dead, List of Appendix 268-275 Lodges, New, Chartered 70, 266 Lodges of Instruction........................................ 123 Lodges, Under Dispensation 71


368

fnde:r

[Sept: PAGE

Lodges, Under Dispensation, Committee on 102 Lodges, Under Dispensation, Delegates from, placed on Pay Roll 177 Lodges, Under Dispensation, Report of Committe.e on 147 M

Mandelcorn, Wm., Case of. , " .27, 99,249 Masonic Employment Bureau ~ ,. 144 Masonic Home Board vs. Clearmont Lodge No. 507............ 69 Masonic Home, Committee on 102 Masonic Home, Committee on, Report of..................... 177 Masonic Home, Directors Elected 140 Masonic Home Endowment Fund, Contributions 295 Masonic Home Improvement Fund 78-91 Masonic Home, Mention of, in Grand Secretary's Report...... 75 Masonic Home, Report of Officers 66; Appendix 277-316 Masonic Hospital Fund <0.................. 77 Masonic National Memorial Ass'n, The George Washington.... 19 Masonic Temple, Report of Conimittee on.................... 252 Meeting of Grand Lodge (1918).............................. 266 Memorial Tablets to Deceased Brethren 337-343 Meramec Lodge No. 95................. 75 Mileage and Per Diem, Report of Committee on.............. 236 Mileage and Per Diem for Lodges U. D....................... 177 Minutes Approved 102, 167, 263 Missouri Lodge No.1, Centennial Celebration of.............. 16 N

Necrology, Committee on, Appointed Necrology, Committee on, Report of. New Lodges, List of

258 ; 110 266

o Officers, Officers, Officers, Officers, Officers, Officers, Opening Orations

Grand, Appointed 258 Grand, Elected 109, 110 Grand, Installed 257 Grand, Present at Annual Communication, 3; Appendix 351 Past Grand, in Attendance Appendix 351 Past Grand, in the Past, List of , . Appendix 266-267 of Grand Lodge..................................... 4 ., 150, 154, 15.9


1917.]

Index

369 PAGE

p

Past Grand Masters, List of Living............................ 259 Past Grand Master's Jewel, Presented to Retiring Grand Master Higbee -. . . . . . . . .. 261 Past Masters Present, List of _ AppendiX: 353-362 Pay Roll, Committee on, Appointed " 258 Pay Roll, Committee on, Report of :............ 236 Petition, 2d Missouri Field Artillery ~ '. . â&#x20AC;˘ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 99 Printing Proceedings Authorized ... ;.......................... 262 R

Recapitulation of Grand Secretary's Report. :. Appendix 265 Recognition of Foreign Lodges, Report of Committee.......... 228 Reinstatements, List" of Appendix 215 Removal of Grand Lodge Offices '" " .64, 71, 108 Report of Committee on Appeals and Grievances 180-227 Report of Committee on Arrangements 266 -Report of Committee on Auditing 98 Report of Committee on Boards of Relief :......... 141 Report of Committee on Charity 179 Report of Committee on Chartered Lodges ".: .. 170-176 Report of Committee on Credentials 4,_ 248; Appendix 339-362 Report of. Committee on District Deputy Grand Masters' Reports 139 Report of Committee on Fraternal Correspondence .. 101; . App. 185 Report of Committee on Grand Master's Address............. 66 Report of Committee on Jurisprudence 131-137,230-236 Report of Committee on Lease of Offices..................... 108 147 Report- of Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation Report of Committee on Masonic Boards of Relief 141 Report of Committee on Masonic Home (Visiting)............ 177 Revorf of Committee on Mileage and Per Diem 236 Report of Committeee on Necrology o' 110 Report of Committee on PayRoll 236 Report of Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges 228 Report of Committee on Transportation and Hotels........... 122 Report of Committee on Ways and Means 140-256 Report of Grand Lecturer :....................... 123 Report of Grand Secretary " . . . . . . . .. 70 Report of Grand Treasurer 92 Report of Officers of Masonic Home 66; Appendix 277-316


370

Index

[Sept. PAGE

Representatives of Lodges in Grand Lodge .. : .... Appendix 339-350 Hepresentatives of Other Gr~nd Lodges at Annual Communication : Appendix 351 Representatives of Other Grand Lodges near this Grand Lodge Appendix 193 Representatives of this Grand, Lodge near other Grand Lodges Appendix 191 Resolutions ~ 5-103-104-107-109-180 Returns, Blanks for ~ '" 72, 73 Ritual, Committee on (1918) , ~. 259 Rochester Lodge No. 248 28, 70, 131, 170

s Second' Day 101 Secretary, Grand, Report of, Submitted '. . . . . . 70 Secretaries, Grand, List of : Appendix 188 Section No. 182 132, 268 Smith, Rev.E. Combie, Oration 154 Special Committee on Arrest of Rochester Lodge No. 248 .. 131, 170 Special Committee on Home Board vs. Clearmont Lodge No. 507 ; ,69, 138 Special Committee on Bonds .- 103, 247, 259 Special Committees, 1918, Appointed 259 Standing and Special Committees, 1917 102 Standing and Special Committees, 1918 258, 259 Standing Resolutions : 269, 272-278 Suspensions for Non路Payment of Dues Appendix 205 Suspensions for Unmasonic Conduct Appendix 214 T

TabularStatements : Appendix 230-263 Telegrams " " .5, 167 Third Day 167 Transportation and Hotels, Committee on路 102, 258 Transportation and Hotels, Committee on, Report of.......... 122 'Treasurer, Grand, Report of..................... . . . . . . . . . . . .. 92


1917..]

Index

371

u PAGE

Unmasonic Conduct, Suspensions for.

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Appendix 214

v Valhalla Cemetery, Standing Resolution (Digest) Visitations Visitors, Distinguished Voting, Method of (Digest) 0

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273 0"

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17 6, lQl o' 274

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w Washington Masonic Nat'l Memorial Ass'n Ways and Means, Committee on o' Ways and Means, Committee on, Report of Wells, Campbell, P. G. Mo, Death of. .. o' .. o' Wilson, President Woodrow Work, Exemplification of. ,'

0

0

0

0

19 102 .140, 256 .18, 110, 335-337 5, 167 99 0

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000

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..


Receipts for Dues At the 1914 Communication of the Grand Lodge, the size of Dues Receipts was reduced and style changed. They are printed in Books of 100 Receipts, 2 on page. They can be obtained from the Grand Secretary at the following prices: Book of 100 Receipts with name, number and location of Lodge left blank to be filled in by Secretary of Lodge, 30 cents per copy. 3 Books (300 Receipts) printed in

with name, number and location ~ $3.00

5 Books (500 Receipts) with name, number and location printed in : 3.75 10 Books (1000 Receipts) with name, .number and location printed in ~ 5.00 15 Books (1500 Receipts) with name, number and location . printed in........................................................................................ 6.50

Masonic Manual of Missouri The Grand Lodge has adopted a Manual containing all the Mi!\souri Monitorial work. Pocket Edition, sold at SO cents per c-Opy. Library Edition,S y;ix8 inches, $1.00 per copy.

Book of Constitutions and Supplement The Grand Lodge Book of Constitutions is bound in cloth and sold at SO cents pe.r copy. Any of the above will be sent by mail, postage prepaid, on recQipt of Draft on St. Louis, Post Office or Express Money Order. If local checks are sent, cost of collection must be added.

Payment must accompany orders. Fraternally, JOHN R. PARSON, Grand Secretary, Board of Education Bldg., 9th and Locust Sts. St. Louis.


GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M.

MISSOURI

WM. A. CLARK,

JOHN R. PARSO ,

Gro"d Master JEFFERSON CITY, MO.

Gro"d Secretar:l Board of EducatioD Bid,., 9th aDd Locust Su. SAINT LOUIS. O.

THE GRA D LODGE WILL CO VENE ST. LOUIS, SEPTEMBER 17. 1918

1917 Proceedings - Grand Lodge of Missouri, Volume 2 - Appendixes  

MISSOURI 19]] A.F. &amp; A.M. 1917-1918 REv. Drt. CHARLES C. WOODS, St. Louis, Mo. 3504 \VashingtonAvenue. OF THE Committee 011 Fraternal C...

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