Issuu on Google+


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION OF THE

M. 'V. GRAND LODGE A. F. AND A. M. OF THE

\'

S'fAl'E OF MISSOUl{I, CONVENED AT

-.

KANSAS CITY, OCTOBER 13, A. D., 1891; A. L., 5891.

ST. LOUIS: WOODWARD & TIERXAN PRINTING COMPANY,

1891.

309 to 3t9 N. Third SL


O:FFICIAI.J PROCEEDINGS OF THE

. SEVI~NTY-FIRST

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION OF THE

M. W. GRAND LODGE, A. F. & A, M., STATE OF MISSOURI.

The Seventy-First Annual Communication of the :Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri, convened in Strope's Hall, in Kansas City, October 13, 1891, at 10 o'clock A. M. The following Grand Officers were present: GEORGE E. WALKER. : B. H. INGRAM : JOHN R. PARSON HARRY KEENE JOHN D. VINCIL REVS. C. H. BRIGGS lind J. W. ROBINSON ALLAN McDOWELL J. B. THOMAS JOHN W. FARRIS WM. RICHARDSON and A. M. HOUGH ELWYN PRICE R. M. EADS GEO. E. MAYHALL llnd E. F. ALLEN .JOHN ,Yo ~WEN

M. W. Grand }'faster. R. W. Deputy Grand !tfMtcr. R. W. Senior Grand Warden. R. W. Junior Grand Warden. R. W. Grand Sccrctal路y. R. W. Grand Clwplains. R. W. Grand Leet1trer. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Marshals. Gl'and Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. Gmnd Stewards. Grand Tyler.


4

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

. OPENING.

The Grand l\1aster then proceeded to open the Grand Lodge in AMPLE FORM. Follmving the rendering of appropriate music, prayer was offered by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Bro. C. H. Briggs. T'he Grand Lodge was then declared ready for business, a constitutional num bel' of Lodges being represented.,'

CREDENTIALS.

The Grand :Master announced the Committee on Credentials as composed of the following Brethren :. Seymour Hoyt, J. F. Rhea, Wm. Sessinghaus, W. V. Hay, 1\1. F. Browne, R. E. L. Smith, John B. Ross, C. Hanger, L. G. Taylor. This comlnittee reported 196 Lodges represented at the opening, which number was increased during the session to 270. A report in full will be found in the Appendix.

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The Most \Vorshipful Grand Master then pre~ented his Annual Address, which, on being read, was referred to a Committee of Past Grand Masters, consisting of the following: John D. Vincil, R. E. Anderson, Jos. S. Browne, Alex. M. Dockery, Lee A. Hall, J. VV. Boyd, \Vm. M. Williams, 'rhos. -E. Garrett, Noah 1\1. GiYan, \V. R. Stubblefield, C. C. \Voods, Robt. F. Stevenson, Geo. R. I-Iunt, J. P. \VQod. .

.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

5

ANNU AI., ADDRESS. To the ]!ost Wm'sllipful Grand Lodge of .Missouri, A. F. ((; A . .Ll!.:

BRETHREN :-Through the blessing of Divine Providence, the Craft of this Jurisdiction is again assembled in representative character, in an Annual Communication. Before proceeding with the business which brings us together, it is . proper that we recQgnize the protecting care of the Snpreme Architect of the Universe during the past year. Bountiful harvests have blessed our land; no epidemics of disease have scourged onr people, but health, peace and prosperity prevail. Our beloved institution has shared in the general well doing, and with hearts filled with gratitude, we return thanks to Him who is the source of every blessing, the one living and true God. , On this, the Seventy-first Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge, I trust it will not be deemed inappropriate for me to call attention to the paralleled growth of our Fraternity in this Jurisdiction, ,dtll that of the population of the State. The population of Missouri in 1820, according to the census, was 66,557. The Grand Lodge was formed in April, 1821, by three Lodges, with a membership of eighty-four. In 1890, the State had within its borders, 2,679,184 souls, while the Grand Lodge to-day has on its roll 556 Lodges, chartered and under Dispensation, vv"ith a membership in round figures of 28,000. B!1t it is not alone in numerical growth that we have cause for congratulation; it is also to be found in the steady elevation of the :moral standard of the institution; in the quality of the material of ,vhich our membership is in the main composed; and in the intelligent comprehension and fulfilling of Masonic duties. NECROLOGY.

Time, in its untiring voyage, though even for the short space of a year, while laden with much to gladden our hearts, and cause us to rejoice, has also been fraught with bereavements; faces which were


6

Proceedings of the

[bct.

familiar ones in this Grand Lodge, are missing; voices which have been heard in our councils, are silent, and we know that the scythe of the grim reaper has been in our midst. Amongst the number who passed away during the year, were two who served the Craft of this Jurisdiction as Grand Master. Brother M. H. McFarland, ,~..ho was elected to that office May, 1860, died October 4th, 1890. Brother John H. Turner, who was elected, May, 1863, died December 14th, 1890. I regret that I was unable to attend the funerals of these distinguished Brethren; in the one case, want of knowledge of the sad event in time, prevented, and in the other, imperati"ve duties elsewhere claimed my attention. I recommend that a committee be appointed to prepare suitable memorials of these Brethren, to be printed in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge; and that the usual pages be set apart in their memory, and in memory of the others of our Brethren who have taken leave of earth and its inhabitants, and entered into the Infinite and EternalThere is no death; the stars go down To rise upon some fairer shore, And bright in Heaven's jeweled crown They shine forevermore.

I feel that jllstice will not have been done to this branch of n~y Address, if mention is failed路 of the death of our illustrious Brother, Albert Pike, whose earthly career closed April 2d, 1891, at the ripe age of eighty-one years. Brother Pike was a remarkable man. Lawyer, Author, Soldier, Poet and Scholar ;-he was best known through his Masonic erudition and writings. His fame was world-wide-his death regretted in both hemispheres. Full of honors, the inexorable fiat of nature prevailed; but his works live after him; the thoughts of some men never die, they are imperishable. FOREIGN RELA nONS.

I am gratified to be able to report that our relations with all the Grand Jurisdictions with which we are in fraternal correspondence


.1891.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

7

continue to be of the most amicable character. Not a cloud has arisen during the pas't year, to cast a shadow over the perfect comity which prevailed at the close of the last administration. The prosperity with which Vi~e have been blessed, seems to have been general, and from all sections come reports of thrift and well-doing. Asylums for the widow and orphan are being erected, and the benef!t of the institution to mankind put to more practical demonstration each year. For full and detailed information on all embraced under this head, I refer you to the report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES.

Brother W路m. Hacker, who represented this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Indiana, died July 28th, 1891. He 'had served the Craft of that Jurisdiction as Grand Master and Grand Secretary. Missouri was ably represented by him. To fill the vacancy caused by the death of this distinguished Brother, I appointed Brother M. J. Niblack of Vincennes, who was properly recommended, and caused his commission to be issued and forwarded to him. Brother Thomas H. McMullin, Representative of this Grand I~odge near the Grand Lodge of. Arizona, died two years since, but information of the sad occurrence did not reach this office until late in the present term. Brother McMullin was one of our Missouri Masons, and was appointed Grand Senior Deacon of this Grand Lodge in 1881. Soon as apprised of the vacancy, .communication was had .with the Grand Master of Arizona, but no response has as yet been received. Vacancies existing in the representation of Ohio and Maryland, near this Grand Lodge, I recommended the appointment of R. 'V. Bro. Robert S. Browne, of Potosi, from Ohio, and R. W. Bro. E. H. Phelps, of Kansas City, from Maryland. Commissions were received in due time from these Jurisdictions, and forwarded to their respective appointees. W. Bro. F. A. Kage, of Cape Girardeau, was appointed Representative to this Grand Lodge by Florida, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Brother Edward Spencer. LITIGIOUS.

It is seldom that the Grand Lodge appears in the Courts of the Land, but an instance arose early in the present term, in which it became necessary.


8

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

. The St. Patrick's School Association having sold certain property in the City of St. Louis, to the Public School Board of that city, it developed, upon examination of the title, that a Deed of Trust on the property, in favor of the Grand Lodge, had never been release.;!. I was requested by parties in interest, to make a Deed of Release, in order to quiet the title. I refused. but appointed a committee consisting of Brothers Lee A~ Hall, Dorsey A. Jamison and Leroy B. Valliant, to investigate the matter, with instructions to report, recommending what . was best for the interest of the Grand Lodge. This committee met, investigated and submitted the following report: ST. Loms, Mo., December 9,1890. George E. Walke1', Esq., Grand Nas/c)':

1\1. W. SIR A~J)'OBROTHER: -The undersigned committee, appointed under your order of December 4th, hereto attached, beg leave to report: We find that in 1853, pp. 37, 38 and 39, the Grand Lodge, through its commissioners, Brothers Coons, Rowe and Allen, held a certain note given by Mr. William F. Stacey, for $1,441.00 on the property in question. That afterwards, at various times, a portion of the principal and the annual interest was collected and duly accounted for. That in 18!)5, see pages 109-113, the College Fun1 Commissioners reported as being in their hands, belonging to the Grand Lodge, the sum of $1,9H.13, including a balance of $1,400.00 due on the Stacey 10aJl. That at the time the Board of Fund Commissioners was dissolved and ordered to pay over to the Grand Treasurer all .moneys and assets in their hands, belonging to the Grand Lodge, same being as per the Commissioners' report, $1,941.13, as stated. That afterwards, in 1856, pages 79-80, we find in the report of the Committee on Ways and Means, referring to the Grand TreasJU'er's report, in which the Grand Treasurer acknowledges the receipt from the Fund Commissioners of the above named item, viz.: $1,941.13. In the report it is treated as having heen a cash item, and the balance shown by 'the same rcport, amounting to $4,507.79, is explicitl~' stated to be in the hands of the Grand Treasurer, in cash. Again on page 80, this item is referred to by the Committee on Ways and Means, with the remark that the amount should have been loaned ont, and the interest only appropriated to the College. From all the facts in the case, as shown by the records, the Committee has unanimously comc to the conclusion that the Stacey loan was actually collected and duly accounted for, and that in our judgment, the Grand Lodge has no claim whatever growing out of the transaction. As to the matter of making the Deed of Release asked for, we advise that this be not done; but inasmuch as it has been intimated by the parties in interest, that it is their intention to institute an amicable suit for the purpose of quieting the title to the property in question, we respectfully recommend that if such suit is instituted, that an answer be made on behal f of the Grand Lodge, admitting the facts shown by our record, and let the parties take a decree in due course. This course will quiet the title effectually, will not involve the Grand Lodge in any responsibility whatever, nor, in our judgment, will any of its interests suffer by so doing. All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. . LEE A. HALL, DORSEY A. .JAMISON, L. B. VALLIANT, Committee


.1891.J

Gran.d Lodge of Missouri.

9

The suit, as intimated, was brought, and came up at the February, 1891, Term of Court in the City of St. Louis. At my request, Brothers Lee A. Hall and Dorsey A. Jamison appeared for the Grand Lodge, and made answer to the suit in accordance with the facts recited. The decree was granted by the Court, th~ title quieted, and the Grand Lodge involved in no responsibility for the future, and put to no expense for costs at the time. I think it but right that I should' express my thanks and appreciation to Brothers Hall, Jamison and Valliant for their prompt and cheerfully rendered services in this matter; through them, the'Grand Master was relieved of much embarrassment, and enabled to act intelligently. I recommend that for legal services, as Attorneys of the Grand Lodge, Brothers Hall and Jamison be paid such fee as they may snggest and the Grand Lodge direct.

CHARTERS.

Immediately after the close of the last Grand Lodge, the Charters granted at that session were issued and sent to the proper District Deputies, and the Lodges set to work according to law. LODGES CONSOLIDATED.

During the year, two Lodges have consolidated. Heroine, No. 104, and Fides, No. 543, under the name and number of t.he elder Lodge. DUPLICATE CHARTERS.

Duplicate Charters were issued to a number of Lodges, whose originals had either been destroyed or become illegible. NEW LODGES.

I have granted Dispensations to form nine new Lodges, as follows: Bismarck, at Bismarck, St. Francois County. Aux Vasse, at A,ux Vasse, Callaway County. Competition, at Competition, Laclede Connty. Mansfield, at Mansfield, 'Wright County. Carl Junction, at Carl Junction, Jasper County. Pendleton, at Doe Run, St. Francois County. Rose Hill, at St. Louis. Calhoun, at Calhoun, Henry County. Gorin, at Gorin, Scotland County.

I


10

P1'oceedings of the

[Oct.

In each of these, the requirements of our law were fully complied with, and I was convinced that the necessity existed for the formation of a Lodge. In several instances, in which either the papers were incomplete, the need for a Lodge doubtful, or the time too short for probation, before the session of the Grand Lodge, I declined to grant the desired authority. • ROUTINE DJSPENSATIO NS.

I have granted a number of the necessary Dispensations for election of officers, removal into new Halls and laying of corner-stones, in all cases keeping within the limits of the law. The report of the Grand Secretary will furnish a detailed account of all these routine duties. SPECIAL DEPUTIES.

In several cases it was necessary that special use be made of the services of the District Deputy. An appropriation is annually made to cover the actual expenses in these emergency cases, and no more. The services of these Brethren are sometimes indispensable, and I submit that in justice, a reasonable per diem should also be allowed them in the future. DISTRICT DEPUTIES.

I have received reports from all the Deputies except those of the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Districts, and am informed that sickness prevented in these instances. With one or two exceptions, those who have reported have given time and labor to the duties of the office, and I doubt not their respective Districts show good results commensurate with their efforts. Were it not that special mention might be considered invidious, I would take pleasure in naming' some as fulfilling my ideal of a model District Deputy. CORNER-STONES.

I officiated at the laying of three corner-stones, as follows: Ap1'il11, 1891. That of a new Hall building being erected by Anchor Lodge, No. 443, in the city of St. LOllis.

June 11, 1891. That of a Hall building for Rolla Lodge, No. 213, at Rolla, Mo.


1891.J

,a'rand Lodge of Missouri.

11

June 6,18.91. I laid the corner-stone of the new City Hall in the city of St. Louis. This 'was a memorable occasion. I issued Dispensations to all the Lodges in the city, allowing them to attend in Lodge capacity, and invited the several Commanderies of Knights Templar to act as escort. A special ses'sion of the 1\1. W. Grand Lodge was opened in :Freemasons' Hall, Seventh and Market streets, and escorted by the Lodges and Knights Templar, marched under direction of VV. Bro. Jay L. Torrey, as Grand Marshal, to the site of the new City Hall, where, assisted by the Grand Officers, I laid the corner-stone according to our ancient form and usage, in the presence of an immense concourse of citizens.

The Masons of St. Louis deserve great credit for the large turnout; notwithstanding .the unpropitious weather, they covered themselves with glory. HALL DEDICATION.

On September 30th, I convened a special session of the Grand Lodge, in the new building erected by An"chor Lodge, No. 443, in the city of St. Louis, and, assisted by the Grand ,Officers, dedicated the Lodge Hall according to our established custom. A large and representative gathering of St. Louis Masons attended this formal occupation of its new and elegant home by Anchor Lodge; and were entertai~ed'by addresses from Brother VincH and others, and by the host of the occasion at an elegant banquet, which followed the close of the Grand Lodge. LODGES OF INSTRUCTION.

In obedience to the expression of the last Grand Lodge, no State Lodges of Instruction have been held during the present term; I have, however, availed myself of opportunities presented, and attended several District Lodges of Instruction, which afforded me the pleasure of meeting with many of the Brethren. They are as follows: February 4th, 5th and 6th, at Jefferson CIty, called by R. W. Bro. A. M. Hough, D. D. G. 1\1., of the Twenty-second District. Deputy Grand Master Ingram, Grand' Secretary VincH and Grand . Lecturer McDowell were also in attendance. It was a good meeting and a profitable one. May 11th, 12th and 13th, at St. Joseph. Held by R. W. Bro. Harry Keene, D. D. G. M. of the Twelfth District, Past Grand Masters Browne and Boyd being among those who attended.


12

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

May 14th, 15th and 16th, at Kansas City, under the auspices of R. W. Bro. E. H. Phelps, D. D. G. M. of the Twenty-fifth District. Grind Senior 'Varden Parson, Grand Secretary Vinci! and Grand Lecturer McDowell were with me at both these meetings. The membership was large and great interest shown in the work . A Joint Lodge of Instruction was held at De Soto by R. "V. Bros. Dorsey A. Jamison and R. S. Browne, District Deputy Grand Masters of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Districts, which I visited in company with the Grand Secretary and Grand Lecturer. At all of these meetings appropriate and instructive addresses were made.

I recommend that the holding of State Lodges of Instruction in the future, be left to the discretion of the Grand Master. VISIT A TIONS.

I have made official visits to between thirty-five and forty Lodges during the term. These are not many as compared with the large number in the Jurisdiction, and I regret the lack of time to pay more attention to this line of duty . . In all instances, much kindness was shown me, and every respect accorded my official position. I assisted in the conferring of many degrees, and esteemed it my duty to labor with the Craft in any capacity for the welfare of the institution. In the talks which the Grand Master is called upon to make, I have tried to' impress the Brethren with a proper conception of Masonic duties and responsibilities. Holding that Lodges are responsible to an enlightened public sentiment, for the practical illustration of the religious, moral and benevolent professions of the Fraternity, I have counselled the individual members to carry its precepts into the concerns of daily life, and let their deeds be a living testimony of the sincerity' of our pretensions. Reminding them that prosperity was not evidenced by the number of members, but rather in the character of the membership, I urged unremitted vigilance in admissions from without, and prompt treatment for disease within, tempering justice with mercy. EXECUTIVE ACTS.

The Grand Master is frequently called upon, in his administrative capacity, to settle questions which arise both within and between


1891.J

G-rand Lodge of lIfissouri.

13

Lodges; the great majority of these isst;les are plainly settled by our law, and are of only local interest. Of the many passed upon during the present term, I shall report only those of major imp~rtance, and in which exception may be taken to the ruling made. Amazonia Lodge, No. 320. This Lodge having 19st its Hall by fire, asked for permission to occupy the Hall of Savannah Lodge, No. 71 (which had been tendered in the true fraternal spirit), until another could be erected. I at first felt constrained to refuse the request, on the ground that the Charter authorized the Lodge to meet at Amazonia only, and besides, questioned the good policy of two Lodges withseparate territorial jurisdictions, meeting in the same place. However, upon the earnest solicitation of Brother Harry Keene, the District Deputy, and the information that such a procedure had been followed before, I granted the Dispensation desired. I am happy to state that Amazonia Lodge, in a short time, rebuilt and moved into its own Hall. Laclede Lodge, No. 83. This Lodge, acting under a misapprehensiqn, held a communication on a date other than that fixed by the By-laws, and transacted all the business of a regular communication, including the reception and balloting on petitions, and the conferring of the Third De~ree. Soon as aware of the error, the Worshipful Mastel' wrote, askin~ what should be done to rectify it. I answered him that all business pertaining to their regular communications must be re-transacted at once; and that if the candidate upon whom the degree was conferred, had. not been examined and elected at some previous and regular communication, then the action of the Lodge in this behalf was null and void, and the work must be done over again. I have not been informed whether my advice was followed, or not. Au1'o1'a Lodge, No. 267. At a regular communication of this Lodge, action ,vas sought to be had on a petition for initiation; one ballot was taken arid the petitioner declared rejected; the Lodge was then called to refreshment, and several路 members left the Hall. 'Vhen called to labor, tl~e \Vorshipful Master announced that he had made a mistake; that there was only one black ball in the previous ballot, and ordered another. It was had, and the petitioner declared elected. At a subsequent meeting, objection was made to conferring the degree, on the ground that the candidate was not legally elected. The matter was referred to me for decision as to validity of the objection, the petitioner's status, if valid, and the remedy for the complication.

I decided the objection to conferring the degree valid, and that the petitioner was not elected. Had the retiring members known that


14

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

there was to be another ballot, their absence would not have vitiated the result. As they did not, it did. Also-that the petitioner was not rejected, legally, for if there was only one black ball in the ballot, another lawful ballot should have been taken immediately. As it was not, the Master's declaration of rejection was in violation of the law, and in consequence, null and void. Holding that both ballots were illegal and void, my opinion was that it was as if no ballot at all had been taken, and I instructed the Lodge that it might be had at some future stated communication, on condition that every meml;>er of the Lodge be notified, by sealed letter, at least two weeks in advance, that a ballot would be had on the petition, naming the petitioner, care being taken that this notice reach all the members present when the first ballot was had; and that under this restriction, and only in this particular instance, might this rectification be made. I am informed that this direction was obeyed, and the petitioner elected. TRIAL RE-OPENED.

In the hoIaing of a trial by Salem Lodge, No. 225, there was much irregularity. A copy of the record was sent me, which showed that a member of the Lodge, charged with gross unmasonic conduct, was allowed to plead guilty, and without hearing any evidence, or even the form of a trial, the Lodge proceeded to ballot on the charge, which resulted in a verdict of not guilty.

• and receiving the I declared all the proceedings, except the making charges, illegal, and ordered the case tried anew, basing my action not upon opinion of guilt or innocence of the accused, but upon the irregularity of the proceedings. PLEASANT GROVE LODGE, NO. 142, VS.

HOWARD LODGE, NO.4.

Early in February, I received a voluminous complaint from Pleasant Grove Lodge, No. 142, that Howard Lodge, No.4, had conferred the degrees upon one whose residence was in the jurisdiction of the complaining Lodge; that Howard Lodge, No.4, had asked for a waiver of jurisdiction over the material, but without obtaining it, had gone ahead and conferred the degrees; Howard Lodge, No.4, admitted having asked for the waiver, as Taking this as establishing the fact of complainant's case, I

claim~d.


1891.]

Grand Lodge of lIfissoU'ri.

15

instructed Howard Lodge, No.4, to pay the fees collected, over to Pleasant Grove Lodge. After much correspondence, running the matter late into the summer, this was done; the latter Lodge, however, returned the money, and wrote the Grand Master, that in its opinion, such irregularities could not be healed by a money consideration. Having no authority to impose any penalty, and all the reparation contemplated by our law having been made, the matter rests, the time and labor of the Grand Master going for naught. OTHER INVASIONS.

Other complaints of invasion of jurisdiction have been preferred, but with the exception of one now' pending, have all been amicably adjusted. This is as it should be. Mistakes will occur, and rectification should be made with fraternal reciprocity. DISCIPLINE.

It is with pleasure I report that no necessity has arisen for the arrest of any Charters; though in a few instances, it has seemed imminent on first impressions; but making haste slowly, investigating thoroughly, through the District Deputies, has resulted in either disproving the charges, or in correcting errors without resorting to this extreme measure. • BARBEE LODGE, NO. 217.

. I received information that there had been an irregularity in balloting in Barbee Lodge, No. 217, and upon investigation, found the facts to be as follows: At the regular communication, held !n May, 1891, a Fellow Craft was examined as to proficiency, and in due course of business, a ballot was taken on his application for advancement to the third degree; one black-ball appearing, after some discussion, the conclusion was reached that the ballot-box was defective, and a resolution was passed to consider this procedure no ballot. Another box was brought into use, and the ballot was taken with the same result as before-one black-ball again appearing. Further discussion was indulged in, and a member of the Lodge remonstrated with for his supposed negative vote, and upon his defiant acknowledgment, giving purely personal reasons therefor; a committee was appointed, which retired with the objecting Brother to the anteroom, where the candidate was in waiting, and sought, by means of a


16

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

joint conference, to reconcile the differences between them. This effort was a failure, and the objecting Brother becoming incensed, took off the jewel of a minor office which he filled, and left the Hall. The Lodge then took another ballot, the candidate was declared elected, and the Third Degree then and there conferred upon him. The Lodge was guilty of a flagrant violation of law; and the election and conferring of the degree upon the candidate invalid, and I notified the 'Vorshipful :Master to that effect. There are circumstances in connection with this case, which the Brethren of Barbee Lodge think go far in extenuation of the offense; they are penitent and ask for leniency; in consideration of these, and the near approach of the Grand Lodge session, I withheld disciplinary action, but informed the Lodge that report of the matter would be laid before the Grand Lodge for consideration, and such action as might be deemed best. CHARGES AGAINST W. M.

As required by Section 21, Article XIX., Grand Lodge By-Laws, I report that in December last, charges were preferred against Brother 1. A. Trantham, Acting Worshipful Master of Robert Burns Lodge, No. 496. I caused the same to be investigated by Brother E. C. Steele, D. D.路G. :l\1. of the Thirty-second District, who reported very fully thereon, with the recommendation that the charges be dismissed, which advice was followed and no further action taken. DECISIONS.

Actual cases which I had to pass on officially, necessitated a numb~r of decisions, which are submitted, with the reasoning upon which they are based. No. 1. Lodges U. D. should be represented in Boards of Relief, and contribute to the Relief Fund, th路e same as chartered Lodges. There is little difference in the po\ver or authority of each, and they should share alike the burden of dispensing charity to the needy. No.2. An Entered Apprentice, who has violated our law by engaging in the saloon business, cannot be granted a dimit. The dimit of an Entered Apprentice is, in reality, a waiver of juris- C) diction, requiring unanimous consent, and is a certificate of good standing. See Note 4, p. 38. Note 8, p. 39. P. 163, Book of Constitutions.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of lJfissouri.

17

No.3. A Lodge has power to impose an affiliation fee upon petitioners,

original members of a Lodge which has been extinct more than one year, no matter how reGent the date may be of their Grand Lodge dimits . .A Grand Lodge dimit is simply a certificate of good standing in the Lodge at the time of its extinction, and confers no more right pel' se, than a Lodge dimit, and the period of non-affiliation dates from the extinction of the Lodge. No.4. Statement. A petition asking for a Dispensation to form a new Lodge, included the names of three Brethren, who had been non:affiliates for periods of eight, twelve and fifteen years, respectively, as shown by their accompanying dimits. I refused to grrnt the Dispensation.

Decision. (a) Signatures and dimits of non-affiliates of long standing, should not be necessary in order to have the requisite number of members to form a new Lodge, as prescribed by our law. (0) Non-affiliates who have been such more than one year, are not eligible to be parties to the formation of a new Lodge. The policy of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is to discourage non-affiliation, and to encourage affiliation, but its policy is also to place every safeguard around the formation 9f new Lodges, so that the chances of' their failure be reduced to the least possible minimum. It is contrary to that policy for that kind of material to be necessary, in order to have the requisite number to form a new Lodge. And I question the power of a Grand Master to invest non-affiliates, (not in good standing), with Masonic privileges and Lodge membership, which the acceptance of their names on a petition to form a new Lodge would do. Let them first affiliate with an established Lodge.

No.5. A dirnitted Master Mason, being such by reason of the law

of the Grand Lodge which prohibited his retaining membership and good standing, while engaged in a proscribed business, is not eligible to bea petitioner for affiliation, if still in the business which necessitated his withdrawal from Masonry, and the Lodge should refuse to receive the petition. No.6. It is the duty of the "\Vorshipful Master to invite in the Tyler, , if a member of the Lodge, to ballot upon a petition for the Mysteries or G. L. PRo.-2.


18

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

membership, or upon the application of a candidate for advancement; but, at his own request, he may be excused from voting upon the application for advancement, on the gronnd that he was not present during the examination of the candidate. The Tyler should not, by reason of his office, be excluded from the rights, or relieved of the duties, which he shares in common with the other members; to rule otherwise, would be, in effect, to place a penalty upon service in that very important and indispensable position. No.7. No Lodge can move from one to,vn or place, to another, without having, (in addition to requirements of Decision n, p. 27, Book of Constitutions), obtained the consent of all the Lodges whose territory would be encroaooed upon by the'removal. 'Vhen a Lodge moves, the act carries with it a change of jurisdiction, such as would accompany the establishment of a nev,' Lodge; it takes possession of territory which formerly belonged to some other Lodge. I fail to see the eqnity of allowing a Lodge, simply because it is already established, to move into and occupy the territory of another Lodge, without its consent, when our law is plain in regard to territorial jurisdiction, when legitimately acquired.

No.8. The By-Laws of a Lodge should specify a certain hour for meeting. To have a sliding scale, allowing the time of meeting to be at any hour on a given date, is injudicious and contrary to good policy. No.9. Statement.-A Lodge, acting upon the request of a Lodge in another jurisdiction. conferred the three degrees upon one whom, the requesting Lodge stated, had been elected to receive the same.

1\:1y attention being called,to the occurrence, I pronounced the work irregular, and 'forbade its repetition in any similar case. Deci.~ion. The law of the Grand Lodge, concerning examination, ballot and conferring of degrees, is equally applicable to those cominl! with requests from Lodges in other jU~isdictions,as to our ,own material; and, consequently, a candidate cannot lawfully receive two or three degrees, consecutively, in and from a Lodge of which he is not a member, without first having been examined on, and duly elected for, each :legree, by the requesting Lodge of which he is a member.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of Jlfisso'UTi.

19

Argument. Section 13, Grand Lodge By-laws, says, "The ballot shall be spread for each degree, ~nd shall be unanimous in all, upon the moral, intellectual and :i\iasonic qualifications of the candidate." Here is a three-fold scrutiny, the second and third being upon the moral and intellectual worth of the candidate, as well as upon his proficiency. And again: Note 4, page 36, a decision of 1871, says, "It is not competent for any Lodge to examine or ballot upon any candidate upon a request from another Lodge." Thus the law plainly directs a ballot for each degree, and as plainly forbids an examination or ballot by one Lodge for another. Masonic comity, as between sister jurisdictions, will not justify a J.Jodge in doing contrary to the law of its own jurisdiction; it call1lot excnse it in doing for another jurisdiction, that which it cannot do for itself, or for another Lodge in the same jurisdiction. In civil matters, the observance of comity bet\veen States, is not a matter of obligation, ordinarily, but is a xnatter of voluntary courtesy or favor, to be extended or withheld at pleasure, and is impliedly permitted, in so far as it does not conflict with the local policy, or differ from the local law. In short, the rule of comity is not enforced as against domestic law. Should the idea obtain that Masonic comity can render inoperative and void our law on this question, why not in others? A parity of reasoning would justify a waiver in other matters, in which our law may differ ,,,ith the laws of sister jurisdicti.ons. APPEALS.

I received two appeals from rulings of' Masters of Lodges. In passing upon them, no principle for general application was uttered; my decisions were for the individual cases on the facts presented. No.1. A member of West Gate Lodge, No. 445, appealed from the ruling of the Worshipful Master, in entertaining and allowing to go on record, the written objection to the future reception of the petition of a non-affiliate, and in refusing at a subsequent communication, to entertain a motion to change the records by striking out this objection, on the ground of its il~egality. The facts, as set forth in the appeal, are briefly, that a non-affiliate petitioned the Lodge three times for membership, and was each time rejected. On the occasion of the last rejection, a member of the Lodge presented a written objection to the reception of this Brother's petition again, which was entertained by the Worshipful Master, and recorded


20

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

in the minutes of the Lod~e. I decided that under the circumstances, the Master had the right to entertain the objection, and that the minutes of the Lodge should show this in common with other transactions proper to be written. No.2. A member of Grand River Lodge, No. 276, appealed from the action of the W'orshipful Master of said Lodge, in ruling out of order, a motion to remit the dues of a member of the Lodge. The appeal is based upon the assumption that the Worshipful Master has no power to say whose dues shall not be remitted.

In defense of his refusal to put the motion, the Worshipful Master states that the Brother whose dues it was proposed to remit, is so financially situated, as to be more able, perhaps, to pay his dues, than any other member of the Lodge; that a statement was made by the Secretary that the BrothAr informed him, at the time approached, that he had not th,e money with him, but would pay at any other time; that he, the Worshipful Master, believed it a jocular motion, made to get up a little mirth in the L01ge, and for these reasons, refused to entertain it. Assuming this statement to be of

facts, I decided that the

W' orshipful Master was justifiable in his refusal to entertain the

motion, and that there was no ground for appeal. KEW CODE.

The committee appointed at the last Grand Lodge, will submit for your consideration a new code of laws; much care has been exercised in its preparation; it is fully expected that every requirement will be filled, and that our new code, when properly indexed, will be so complete, that '1decisions" will be a rarity for some years to come. R. W. Bro. Allan :M:cDowell declined the formal appointment as a member of -the committee, but his services were indispensable, and were availed of to a very liberal extent; for which, in advance of the committee's report, the Grand Mast~r renders official recognition. MASONIC HOME.

I congratulate the Craft upon the possession of a Home for our Widand Orphans.

{)WS

The doubt and uncertainty concerning its establishment, are things .of the past; the duty of the present, is to provide for its future. It is


1891.J

Grand Lodge of

~1I1i880uri.

21

not an experiment, but a fixed reality, and 'Missouri :l\Iasonry is committed to its welfare and perpetuity. The question for determination, is the best method of assuring results proportionate in magnitude with the size of the Jurisdiction, and the needs of the institution, so far as compatible with the general welfare of the Fraternity. I repeat the language of my distinguished predecessor in saying, "that in the Grand Lodge alone, is to be found the agency through which all the Lodges in the State may act." Contributions from lodges and individuals, liberal in the past, will not answer as a dependence for the future .• There are many lodges which have failed to identify themselves in a financial way with the Home, yet the burden of its maintenance should be distributed alike with all. Celebrations, festivals and entertainments to raise money for its support, are alike contrary to correct Masonic usage, and derogatory to Masonic dignity; we have done none of these things before; let not the Home be made an ex;cuse for them now. I therefore recommend that the annual dues payable to this Grand Lodge, as provided for in Sec. 21, Art. XVr., G. L. By-laws, be increased to such sum as may be deemed expedient; and the Grand Lodge be thereby enabled to appropriate for the Home, in proportion to its needs and the condition of the general treasury. I would also call your attention to the fact that though practically created by the Grand Lodge, and an integral part of Missouri l\'[asonry, the Home is entirely separate and distinct from Grand Lodge influence, except during the Annual Communication. In my opinion, the Grand "Master should be, by virtue of his office, at least a member of the Board of Directors. On this subject, Kentncky has the following regulation: "It is the duty of the Grand Master and Grl:!-nd ,'Wardens, who are e:J;- o.tricio members of the Board of Directors of the Home, to attend at least one meeting annually of said Board, and they are requested to report the same to the Grand Lodge.. "

This defect in our system was doubtless an accidental omission, and should be remedied; the Grand Master should not be a nonentity in this important branch of the institution, and should be able to say sonlething of his own knowledge of its workings. .


22

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

FINANCIAL

The money on hand in the Treasury of the Grand Lodge, amounts to the sum of $9,570.47. This may be slightly increased by the payment of some small amounts yet to be collected. Herewith are appended the figures by which this result is reached: On hand Oct. 14, 1890 Receipts since that time............................ Total. Deduct disbursements during the term Leaves balance on hand as stated

$

6, 429 07 14,429 00

$

20,858 07 11,287 60

$

9,570 47

.

The usual expenditures of the Grand Lodge .run in the neighborhood of $ 11,500 00 If the new code'is adopted, its printing and distribution will entail an expense of fully. ..... 1,500 00 Total needed for ensuing year, Deduct the amount now available,............

$ 13,000 00

Leaves a probable deficit of................

$

9,570 47 3,429 53

which it is desirable that you authorize paid out of moneys to be received during the coming year. The contingent and discretionary appropriation of five thousand dollars, made by the last Grand Lodge for the benefit of the Home, has not been paid; a glance at the fi~ures presented above, 'will show that the condition of the Grand Treasury would not admit the withdrawal of the amount, even for so worthy an object. For a ~etailed account of monetary and other matters pertaining to his office, I refer you to the comprehensive report of the Grand Secretary. TRIBUTES TO OFFICIAL WORTH.

In the administration of the sometimes perplexing duties of Grand Master, I frequently availed myself ot the general knowledge and ripe experience of the Grand Secretary and Grand Lecturer. I have always found them ready and willing, and make this public acknowledgment of my indebtedness to them. A deserved tribute, which as a business man, I can pay Grand Secretary Vincil, is to say that "his house is always in order," and the affairs of his office executed with promptness and fidelity'.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of MisSOU1路i.

23

For thoroughness in ritualistic knowledge, zeal and patience in teaching the work, and in profundity of research in the literature of Masonry, I think thif:' .Jurisdiction 路may 'well claim the precedence in Grand Lectnrer McDowell. GENERAL REFLECTIONS.

This is an era of moral, intellectual and material progress; never before, perhaps, in the world's history, were such ra.pid advances made in all that pertains to the welfare of the human raee; ideas which seemed UtQpian in the past, have attained fruition; dreams once termed chimerical, are developing into practical realities. Education is becoming universal, and ignora.nce is the exception. Labor receives honorable recognition, while idleness is contemned. Moral worth and rectitude of character are at a premium; vice and its kin are relegated to obscurity. Infidelity, which once raised its hydra-headed front with unblushing temerity, slinks in the shadows of its own iniquity, while the truths of revealed religion and the teachings of the Holy Bible, are disseminated in every clime. Has l\1asonr); had aught to do with the mighty influences in motion evolving these results? Has it been any factor in the great uplifting of the human race? It has; if there is a land where these conditions do not obtain, where the hands of the great dial piece of civilization hav~ been tnrned back instead of forward, that land is not the home of Freemasonry. Educating the moral thought, expanding the mental capacity, enlarging the individual conception of duties, civil, religious and politica.l, its mission is 'not yet accomplished. The future, with limitless possibilities, beckons still onward and upward, and the inspiration of its past achievements, strengthens our belief in its abiding influence for the welfare of mankind. CONCLUSION.

Ha'"ing rendered an account of my 'official acts worthy 路of mention, and recommended for consideration, such matters as..1 deemed of import to the welfare of the Jurisdiction, it rema.ins for me to assure you Q~ my sense of tile great honor done me, i.n selecting me for this high qffice. I have endeayored not to prove unworthy. of the confidence bestowed, and have given my best efforts to the adlllinistra.tion of its


24

[Oct

Proceedings of the

affairs. In this, I have had the cordial and hearty support of the Craft throughout the State. . No protest will come from me, if disapproval is voiced of any act of the Grand :J'Iaster; secure in the knowledge of the singleness of pnrpose, and sincerity of motive which controlled the direction of all the affairs entrusted to my care, I am content to abide your verdict; with the conviction that the best endeavors of all my future life can, only in a small measure, meet the debt lowe to the Masons of Missouri. GEORGE E. WALKER, Grand Master.

REPORTS.

The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were presented and ordered printed among the Proceedings, and are as follows: GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT. To the

.Mo.~t

Worshiliful Grand Lodge oj MissoU?'i, A. F. & A. loE.:

:-In obedience to the law of the Grand Lodge, I herewith submit my Annual Report, as )'our Grand Secretary. BnETHHEN

It has been my custom for years, following the close of the Grand Lodge session, to issue, first of all, commissions to the Deputy Grand Masters appointed in charge of the various Districts in the State. This rule works well and is proper, because these officers, having charge of the interests in their several Districts, should at once be placed in commission, so that all business affairs may be looked after by them.

The Grand Lodge closed its session on the afternoon of Thursday, the 161h of October, last; on Saturday afternoon, two days following, the proceedings were printed and being mailed. The edition was forwarded as rapidly as possible and the mailing completed within a very brief period. The publication of the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge has been reduced to the minimum. It will hardly be possible, in view of the location of the present session, to publish the Proceedings in so short a time as heretofore. All matter, composing the Journal of the Grand Lodge affairs, will be in print, except the mere business transpiring while the Body is in session. It is hoped, that the delay in bringing out the work, will not be long, or prove a tax upon the patience and expectation of the Fraternity. After commissioning the Deputies of the thirty-four Districts in the Jurisdiction, I issued Charters to the several Lodges created by the Grand Lodge, and forwarded the same to the D.eputies in whose Districts the Lodges were located.


1891.J

GTand Lodge of MisSOUTi.

25

I herewith append a list of the Lodges chartered, their numbers and 10eatlOlU; : :M:onett Lodge, No. 129. Monett, Barry County. Portageville Lodge, No. 166, Portngeville, New 2\ladrid County. Amazonia Lodge, Ko. 320, Amazonia, Andrew County. Galt Lodge, Ko. 423, Galt. Grundy County. Southwest Lodge, No. 466, Southwest City, J\IeDonald County. West Prairie Lodge, No. 495, Clarkton, Dunklin County. Fides Lodge, No. 543, Kansas City, Jackson County. Mexico Lodge, No. 544, Mexico, Audrain County. Zalma Lodge, No. 545, Bollinger's Mills, Rollinger County. Prairie Hill Lodge, No. 546, Prairie Hill, Chariton County. South Gate Lodge, No. 54i, Kansas City, Jackson County. , Clinton Lodge. No. 548, Clinton, Henry Couuty.

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATlOK. Below will be found a list of Lodges created during the term of the Most Worshipfnl Grand Master, George E. Walker: Bismllrck Lodge, Bismllfck, St. Francois County. Aux Vasse Lodge, Aux Vasse', Callaway County. Competition Lodge, Competition, Laclede County. J\fatlsfield Lodge, Mansfield, Wright County. Carl Junction Lodge, Carl .Junctioll, Jasper County. Pendleton Lodge, Doe Run, St. Francois County. Rose Hill Lodge, City of St. Louis. Calhoun Lodge, Calhoun, Henry Coullty. Gorin Lodge, Gorin, Scotland County. The last nllmed Lodge was created so late in the season that the Brethreu agreed to accept the Dispensation, with the understanding that a Charter would not be asked for at the present session. It will be for the Grand Lodge to say whether the Dispensation shall be continued, or not. The Lodges at Summerville, Texas county, Foster, Bates county, and Clarksburg, Moniteau county, were created last year, but continued under Dii'lpensation to the present term. All the above named Lodges working under Dispensation forwarded to the office, in due time, their records, returns and Dispensations, which have been placed in charge 01 the proper committee. These Lodges all show a considerable amount of work done during the term of their probation. The initiations, passings and raisings in them show fidelity and progresi'l. These Lodges under Di~pensation have reported a membership of over 300. During the year now closing, no Charters have been arrested. The fol1o,,"ing consolidations have taken place: "Etna Lodge, Xo. 41, consolidated with Memphis Lodge, No. 16. Young's Creek Lodge, No. 35i, consolidated with Hebron Lodge, No. 354. Black Oak Lodge, No. 432, consolidated with Urbana Lodge, No. 42l. Fides Lodge, No. 543. chartered at the last Session, consolidated with Heroine, No. 104, located at Kansas City.


26

PToceedings of the

[Oct.

By order of the Grand }laster, duplicate Charters were issued to the folloWing Lodges:

Kirksville, 1'0. 105, and Adair, No. 366, both located in Kirksville, the originals haying been destroyed by the disastrous fire which consumed the hall filld properly of the .Ma~onic Bodies in that beautiful city. It is with pleasure that I record the fact that these Lodges have not only resumed work, but have shown great fidelity and energy since their misfortune. Conway Lodge, No. 528, and White Water Lodge, No. 417, lost their Charters by fire, and duplicates were issned by order of the Grand Master. CO;\l:MISSIONS ISSUED. By direction of the Grand ~laster, commissions were duly issued to the following Representatives of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, ncar the Grand Lodges named: John F. Boyd, Manitoba, vice James Monroe, resigned. Charles H. Bryan, of California, vice Alex Abell, Grand Secretary, deceased. Alfred F. Hall, New Jersey, vice Joseph Hough, G'rand Master, deceased. l\lason J. Niblack, Indiana, vice William Hacker, Past Grand Master, deceased. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS. The Grand l\Iaster, during his term, ordered the issuance of a very large number of special Dispensations, for the election of officers, removal of Lodges into new Halls, laying corner-stones, aud for the protection of other interests such as claimed hii; attention. REMOV AI.. OF LODGES.

r gh'e the numbers of follo\\'s: 70 258 263 443 459 and Carl ,Tu'nction, U. D.

Lodges which were permitted to change their location as 101 104 105 12;) 130 135 147 159 187 278 297 301 310 320 326 366 374 397 465 4n 4R7 4RS 491 524 536 539 543

ELECTION OF OFFICERS. Authority \\'as issued by order of the Grand Master, to the following named Lodges to pold elections of officers: 6 20 36. 'i2 96 145 16i 212 257 345 353 366 374 402 518 520 530 In a number of instances where the above permission was gran te.d , it \ras to fill vacancies in Lodges where parties elected declined to be installed. CORNER-STONES. The Grand Master directed the issuance of authority to lay corner-stones as follo\\'s : '1'0 C. Q. Woods, P. G. M., to lay the corner-stone of a college building at Neosho. To the Master of Shekinah Lodge, No. 256, to lay the corner-stone of a church at Crystal City.


1891.J

G1'and Lodge of Jlfissouri.

27

E. C. Steele, D. D. G. 1\1., to lay comer-stone of school building. .James F, Rhea, D. D; G. 1'1., to lay corner-stone of Masonic Hall at Conway. Edward Higbee, to lay corner-stone of college at Memphis, 1\10. During the term, the Grand Master laid the corner-stones of Masonic Halls at Rolla, and of Anchor Lodge, Ko. 443, St. Louis; and of the new City Hall, St. Louis.

Permission wa.':i granted" in several cases hy the Grand "Master for Lodges to occupy Halls temporarily, which had been approve<1, until new Halls were completed. Authority was likewise granted to Lodges to appear in public procession on proper occasions. From the above it will be seen that a very large number of the Lodges in Missouri have changed their domicile, moving into and occupying new and improved quarters. This is one ot the evidences of decided growth and improvement. Nothing contributes more to the interest, or increases attendance of members than the attractions of handsome and well equipped Masonic Lodge rooms. Thc Lodges in Missouri in this respect have been steadily advancing through a numbcr of years past. IKSURA~CE.

Year after year occasion is presented creuting the necessity of urging upon the Lodges to insure their Halls and effects. A number of tires have occurred among the Lodges of the State the past term, and but very few carried any insurance. The prosperity and perpetuity of Lodges depend, largely, upon this feature of business economy. When a Lodge loses all its propert~', being without insurance, it requires a very se\'ere and exhamting struggle to reinstate itself in condition for comfort and work. The question incorporated in the blank for returns, still stands, and it would surprise tp.e G1'llJld Lodge to look over the reports of v.50 Lodges and tind how few carry any insurance. It is very comfortable to. the Brethren, after suffering disaster from tire, to have an amount guaranteed by an insurance policy to build their Hall and furnish it fur future use. I repeat what I have said on other occasions, that the Grand Lodge should enjoin it upon its Subordinates, to carry sullicient insurance to protect them against absolute loss, if not bankruptcy. RETURXS. I have kept before the Grand Lodge for a number of years, the subject of Lodge delinquellcy as to makillg returns. It has been It fond hope路. long entertained and warmly cherished, that all the. Lodges might be brought to a faithful compliance with the law of the Grand Lodge on this subject. Last year, I was able to report returns from all Lodges, except two, in the Jurisdiction. This year, tinding tardiness and delinquency still abroad among the Lodges, I sent repeated notices to the derelict Subordinates, urging them to immediate action.

The law of the Grand Lodge requires returIls to be made by each Subordinate, immediately after the close of the tiscal year, which is July 81st. Blank returns are mailed to each Lodge on the tirst day of that month, with a letter of instruction to the Secretary, directing how to proceed. It. might be expected, under these conditions, that returns would all be furnished during the month of August. This, however, is very far from being the case. On the 1st day of September, a notice was sent to 150 Lodges that had not responded to the claims of the law. By persistent effort, I succeeded in securing returns from all the Lodges up to the 1st of October, with the exception of the following:

Madison Lodge, No. 91. MarionYille Lodge, No. 390. Royal Lodge, NO.40i.

Ash Grove Lodge, No. 436. Red Oak Lodge, No. 468. Ris\\:ell Lodge, No. 510.


[Oct.

PToceedings of the

28

It is proper that the Grand Secretary should recognize the fidelity and capacity of the large number of Lodge Secretaries in the Jurisdiction. It is needless to say that this officer is invaluable in conducting the business of a Lodge. Defective work ill this department, coupled with neglect路 of duty, will do more to impair the usefulness and prevent the success of a Lodge, than almost anything connected with its history. The great majority of Lodge Secretaries in Missouri, are competent, prompt and faithful. I herewith append It list of the Lodges whose returns have IJeen received, withont payment of the required amount of Grand Lodge dues:

Name. Bridgeton Lodge.. Jackson Lodge.......................... Bethany Lodge.... .. De Soto Lodge Woodlawn Lodge :Malden Lodge West Prairie Lodge Osborn Lodge

No. 80 82 !)i

1Hl 223

406 4!J5 318

Am.ount. $1450 21 00 3150 4600 12 00 1600 1050 18 00

It will be thus seen that six are delinquent as to returns and eIght as to dnes.

I .shallnot complain of this delinquency, because, in looking back over the vast labor lleeessary to secure results, there is much satisfaction in tbe fact that so few are behind as to returns and dues.

STATE OF THE CRA FT. From the point of observation occupied by the Grand Secretary, it is but natural that he should be cognizant of tlie condition of the Fraternity in the Jurisdiction. Aside from extended travel, personal association with the Lodges and Brethren, frequent opportunity to witness the work and progress oft.he Lodges ill thl' State, I am possessed of the necessary additional information from the retnrns. to formulate a statement as to the status of the Craft in this Jurisdiction. In my report one year ago, I announced that the work done in the Lodges that term exceeded the previous year very considerably. It is with pleasure that I ('an say that the reports show a still larger increase in work and membership. The past has been a year of the most extensive ingathering into the folds of :Masonry known to the present writer since his connection with the office. Affiliations and reinstatements exceed the number reported last year. Adding the raisings to the above, we have a gain of abont :3,000 during the year. Subtract therefrom the loss by death, suspension, &c., 2,001, there is an actual gain of over 990. Added to the number of members reported last year, we have a membership amounting to 28,814. It will be readily seen that this has been the most prosperous year in the history of the Grand Lodge, so fill' liS the consideration of numbers is concerned. Having been in close touch with the Fraternity for more than thirty yellrs, profoundly interested in its progress and condition, along other lines than mere numerical gain, I am satisfied that the advancement of Freemasonry in I\Iissouri, has been to a higher plane of intelligence, moral character. and larger views as to nuty to God and Immunity, than ever known :n this Grand Jurisdiction.


1891.J

G1'and Lodge of Missour{

29

It has been said that we live in a practical age. While this is true in other departments of life, it is not less so in the realm of our Ancient and Honorable Institution. As a conservative organization, it employs none of the methods in vogue and used by other societies to increase its numbers, consequently, its work. like the operation of nature's laws, moves on well fixed lines and operates forcefully, without seeking to attract and draw to its folds members by superficial methods.

FIKA~CIAL.

The financial condition of the Gl'llnd Lodge" differs but little from that of last year. When the books of the Grand t:iccrctary and Grand Treasurer were balanced, October 1, 1890, there was on hand a cash balance of $6,429.0i; to thiR amount has been added during the term, thc sum of $14,429, us shown by my receipts from the Grand Treasurer, from 1 to 3'1 inclusive. The disbursements as shown by wan-an.ts from 633 to 719, inclusive, amount to $11,28i.60; this leaves a cash balance in the hands of the Grand Treasurer, of $9,5i0.4i as shown by his books and mine. It will be seen that the disbursements are less than last year by $5,000. This is owing to the fact that in 1890, the Grand Lodge paid to the l\fasonic Home, out of its funds, the sum of $5,000. The expenses of the office for the present term, amount to $54.81 more than in 1890. Expenses of Special Deputies and appropriations for charity, amounted to a larger sum, the pust year, than any previous term.. The running expenses of the office have been less than the previous year.

The lunollllt received during the term just closed, is $58i.15 above that of 1890. Including outstanding dues, and a small balance in hand, received since the books were â&#x20AC;˘ closed, the funds of the Grand Lodge will aggregate $10,000, cash in hand. The Ilmount appropriated at the lust session for the Masonic Home, was not ordered paid oy the Grand 'Master, who alone was authorized to direct its payment during the year. He will assign reasons in his Address for not authorizing the payment of said amount. If the funds of the Grand Lodge had been drawn upon at any time during the year, for said amount, previous to the coming in of dues for 1891, the Treasury would have bCE>n exhausted. If he had ordered the payment of the $5,000 appropriation, after the receipt of new funds for the year, it would have reduced the amount in the Treasury at present, less than $5,000. The Committee on !lfasonie Home last yE>ar (see page /5, Grand Lodge Proceedings), guarded the financial interests of the Grand Lodge by withholding the payment of the $5,000, should such payment reduce the fund in. the Treasury below the amount needed for the legitimate annual expenses of the Grand Lodge. It is not for the Grand Secretary to indicate the policy of the Grand Lodge in reference to the foregoing matters, but simply to point out the exact state of the finances.

The net increase over last year's balance is some $4,000. It is proper to state that there will be a heav)' increase of expenses for the incoming term, owing to the publication of the new laws of the Grand Lodge. The necessary outlay in this direction will be large. Including' this in the running expense account for the year, aild all incidental


[Oct.

P1'oceedings of the

matters, the Grand Lodge will not have a surplus at the close of the ensuing term. It is proper to remember that a considerable amount is included in the running expenses ot the office, that pertains to charity Ilud other appropriations not strictly pertinent to office cxpenses. If the Grand Lodge orders the publication of an edition of the Constitution aud By-Laws suflicicnt to meet the rlenllll1d for a term of years, it will require at least $2,000 to pay the bill. This should be remembered. as such bill will havc to be met during the next few months. The printing of Grand Lodge Proceedings, and all supplies for the office for the entire year, are paid after each session of the Grand Lodge closes. This item of expense goes over into the account for the year following the close of the sessioll. Our printer very gcnerously carries the Grand Lodge account for stationery and incidental printing through the entire year, including the bill with the account rendered for printing the Grand Lodge Journal. This is to be kept in view as a large item of expellse for the subsequent term. With the increase of Lodgeg, and the various items necessary to run tl;is department of work each year, the labor and expenses must necessarily increase. The office is run as carefully and as cheaply as possible. I close this report with the folloiring

RECAl'ITljLATIO:'< .

Balance on hand October, 1890 Paid Grand Treasurer for 1891

$ 6,429 07

14.429 00

Total DisbursClnents

_

$20,858 07 11,287 60

Balance on hand

$ 9,570 47

Fmternally submitted, JOH:\' D. VIKCIL, Gmncl 8eaefo)'1j.

GRAND TREASURER'S REPORT. SA:\J.

~I.

KENNARD, GRAND TREAS\:REH,

In neeount witli GRA"D LODGE OF :\IISSOUJlI, A. F. A).;J) A. )J.: October 8, 1890, To balance as per last report By cash from John D. VincH, Grand Secretary...............

$ 6,429 07 14,42900 $20,85807

Disbursements as per checks, 632 to 719 inclusive

$11,287 60

Balance due Grand Lodge

$ 9,570 47

Fraternally submitted, SA~I.

M. KEXNARD, Grand Treasnl"cr.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

31

'GRAND LECTURER.

Brother Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer, presented his annual report, which \\,as received, and is as follows: ST. LOUIS, October, lS()l.

To the Most Worshipful Gmnd Lodge of M'iSS01wi, A. F. & A. flf. Herewith I pre"ent my Twenty-first Annual Report as Grand Lecturer:

During the year I have held, or assisted at holding, a la.rge number of District Lodges of Instruction. which, with few exceptions, were well attended, and without exception, were characterized by zeal, energy and enthusiasm. Some of the more important of these, each of which lasted for several days, were held at the following points, viz: Llltesville, Oak Ridge, Kennett, Point Pleasant, Jeflerson City, Higbee, Harrisonville, Carrollton, Odessa, Tipton, Gallatin, Salisbury, Burlington Junction, Booll ville, Kansas City, St. Joseph, Bethany, ~round City, De Soto, Paris and Aurora. There were generally from about six to twelve or more Lodges represented at these various meetings. At S1. Joseph and Jefferson City there "'ere thirty-five Lodges each, and nearly the same number in Kansas City. At all these meetings two objects were held steadily in view, instruction in the ritual and the dissemination of useful knowledge concerning the symbolic and moral lessons tan~ht in Freemasonry. At these meetings, llnd in furtherance of thcse objects, I have had the hearty co-operation of a number of the Grand Officers, to whom my gratefUl acknowledgements arc due-particularly the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Senior Warden and Grand Secretary-who have not only assisted me in the work, but, as occasion offcrcd, delivered interesting and instructive addresses on subjects connected with the history and philosophy, as well as the moral and religious teachings of Freemasonry. That th'ese meetings were productive of great good, we have the united testimony of those in attendance. . I have, however, devoted the past year principally to visiting individual Lodges. particularly those that had not been visited for several years past. This course was pursued at the instance of thc Grand Master, and in accordance with my own judgment; and the rcsult was that much time has been spent in obscure localities, away from railroad facilities, and which had consequently been somewhat neglected heretofore.. I do not considf'r the time misspent, nor the fatigue and labor of travel.uselessly expended. J find the Brethren at such points, if not so bright as those of more favored localities, at least as well imbued with the principles of Freemasonry, and as anxions. according to. their opportunities, to learn and practice the correct work. Tn rnany of these visitations I have beenfavorcd with the invalua.ble assistance of the various District Leeturers. In this connection, permit me to say tha.t, while the--District Lectnrers throughout the State 81re well versed in the Ritual, and are active and energetic teachers of the WOl k, yet it is impossible under our present arrangemellts, that all should have the work minutely alike. This is not important in the Master or other officers of a Lodge, but is with the authorized teachers of the work. I have been often told, and truly, that "Our District Lecturers do 110t give the work as yon do." Now the difference referred to, would. be small and unimportant, but yet noticeable. To remedy this difficulty. several years ago, I called a meeting of all the District Lecturers in the State, to meet at St. Loui~ in a School of Instruction. About one-third attended find became thoroughly proficient. In another year I called a similar meeting at I


32

Proceedings of the .

LOct.

Kansas City, with like results. But a number of the Lecturers wrote to me that they Gould not afford pecullillrily to attend these meeting's, and notwithstanding the great results for good attending them, I felt bound to abandon them. The Lecturers hold their pol;:itions from their love of the Institution and the desire to do good, and there are few of them that at the end of the year aTC not actually out of cash by reason of their serviees. I think a few hundred dollars could not be better Hpent by the Grand Lodge, than for the purpose of thoroughly fitting them for the work. I therefore recommend that the Grand Lecturer be authorized, during the coming year, at such time and place as may bc found convenient, to call the District Lecturers together in a School of Instruction, and that upon his certificate to the Grand Secretary of the actual and necessary expenses of each of said Lecturers so attending, the Grand Secretary shall be authorized to issue warrants to such Lecturers for amounts covering such expenses. Appended is an abstract of the reports of District Lecturers. R. W. Bro. E. Higbee, of the First District, has held a Lodge ofInstruction at which the attendance was good and much interest manifested. ~e has also vi~ited all the Lodges, requiring his services, some of them several times. The condition of Masonry in his District is good. A Standard Team has been formed, consisting of some of the brightest Masons in the District, which has done much good, directly, by conferring degrees and tbus instructing in the proper manner of doing the work, and, indirectl)', by incit. ing emula.tion in the Lodges. R. W. Bro. A. Fisher, of the Second District, held a Lodge of Instruction at Greensburgh, which was well attended b)' the Brethren there and also of several of the neighboring Lodges. He never held a meeting where more intere5t was manifested, And he is sure all were 路benefited. He has visited several Lodges at their regular meetings, and gave them such instruction as time permitted. R. W. Bro. Geo. E. Mayhall, of the Third District. held a Lodge of Instruction at Hunnewell, with very gratifying results. Four Lodges were represented. All were thoroughly in earnest, and took hold as though they meant bnsiness, and, in consequence, good work was accomplished. The Brethren of Hunnewell Lodge, No. 415, are a "wide awake" body of Masons, and keep up with thc work. At its request, he visited RaUs Lodge, No. 33, at Centre;路 but the attendance was small, and the results vcry unsatisfactory. A District Lodge of Instruction was called to meet at Paris, and all the Lodges were duly notified, but, from some unexplained cause, the attendance was small, and as a Lodge of Instruction, it was a signai failure. lIe visited Bethel IJodge, No. 537, and had very'interesting and prootable sessions. He left thc Lodge in good working order. All are zealous, and it does one good to note the proficiency they have attained. _ Other Lodges could profitably emulate their example. He has also given considerable private instruction to individual officers and Brethren of various Lodges, has answered promptly all calls made upon him for instruetion, and, \vhile some of the Lodges in the District are still sadly deficient, he is pleased to note a marked improvement as a whole. R. W. Bro. .T. A. Thomason, of the Fourth District, has not had the opportunity to visit many Lodges this year. He instructed the Brethren at Olney. He held several sessions, at which there were present about thirty rep,resentatives, from about three Lodges. The Lodge at Olney is in good working order. He was with New Hope Lodge six nights, and thinks they are in good condition to do the work. Some of the Lodges in the District are prospering. and others are in a condition that does not present a cheering aspect.

R. W. Bro. Charles J. Walker, of the Fifth District, has visited most of his Lodges, and has held some Lodges of Instruction that were very well attended. He thinks the Masons in the District are more earnest and zealous than formerly. The social, fraternal


1891.J

G't.and Lodge of 1J'fissouri.

33

and charitable features of'our noble Brotherhood, have ~ho"'n themseh'es quite prominently, and very large gatherings of the Brethren have been seen at Montgomery, New Florence, St. Charles and Wentzville. The work is very well done in all the Lodges that he has had the pleasure of seeing confet: degrce~. Peace and harmony prevail, and upon the whole, he thinks an advauce has been made in fi knowledge of the letter and spirit of the principles of the Fraternity. R. W. Bro. Wm. H. Carpenter, of the Sixth District, has visited the Lodges at Vandalia, Centralia, Sturgeon, Harrisburg, Rocheport, Hallsville and Auxvasse. He gives the praise to Stmgeon and Hallsville Lodges, for taking more interest in the work of instruction, than any others visited durillg the year.

路R. W. Bro. S. Lessley, of the Seventh District, has visited eight Lodges. lIe found a goodly number of the Bretl1fl~n anxious to learn the work, and if the interest now manifested contillues the Lodges will be in such condition, that when a candidate presents himself for initiation, he will be put through in order and in an intelligible manner. R. W. Bro. J. J. Dillinger, of the Eighth District, has visited all his Lodges but five. 'rhe Lodges are doing considerable work, his visitations were pleasant, and attendance fair, and in most of the Lodges, that "nuble emulation" exists as to "who can best work and best agree." With a few exceptions, the Lodges are occupying good Halls, which are "'ell furnished. On the whole, the outlook in the District is bright. He held one District Lodge of Instruction, which was well attended. R. W. Bro. Geo. W. Deatherage, of the Ninth District, held a District Lodge of Instruction at Carrollton, which was well attended by representatives of Lodges in the District. He also held meetings for instruction at Millville, Hamiltoil and Lawson. As far as he is informed, he thinks, the work done in the District will compare favorably with that done in any other "backwoods" District in the State.

R. W. Bro. C. S. Glaspell, of the Tenth District, has visited the Lodges at Galt, Spickardsvi11e, Lock Springs, Havanlla and Laredo. He remained with each several days. They are all well posted, and have good Ifalls, which are well furnished. Spickardsville is the best working Lodge in the District. All the officers are thoroughly versed in the work. He held a District Lodge of Instruction at Gallatin, which was well attended, and was very interesting and profitable. All the Lodges in the District, with two or three exceptions, ate well versed in the work. The mode of work in the District is steadily improving. R. W. Bro. S. H. Black, of the Eleventh District, held a District Lodge of Instruction at Liberty, at which quite a number of Lodges were represented. The attendance was fair, and he had a good class of students. He has visited several of the Lodges. The most of the Lodges in his District arc well posted in the work.

R. W. Bro. IIarry Keene, of the Twelfth District, held a District Lodge of Instruction at St. Josepli; at which thirty-five Lodges were represented. The Grand Master, Grand Senior Warden, Grand Junior Warden, Grand Secretary, Grand Lecturer, and several District Deputy Grand M asters, as aJso P. G. M. Joseph S. Browne, were present and assisted in the work. It is tho ught that much good resulted from the meeting. During the months of December, January and February he held weekly meetings for instruction, in the city of St. Joseph, ably assisted by W. Bro. Penick, Assistant Lecturer. He has also visited many of the Lodges. The Lodges in the District are in good working order, and harmony exists all along the line. R. W. Bro. J. B. Thomas, of the Fourteenth District, held a Lodgp. of Instruction at Bethany, which rcsultcd in great good to the Fraternity. He has also visited and

G. L. Pno.-..'l.


34

PToceedings of the .

instructed several Lodgcs during the year. his District.

[Oct.

nInsonry is ill a fair condition as to work ill

R. W. Bro. A. Moore Berry, of the Fifteenth District, reports that the District Deputy Grand :Master held a District Lodge of Ii1sfruction in St. Louis each Saturday eycning during the months of January and February, which was de\"oted to the exemplification of the ritualistic work of Ancient Craft Masonry, under direction of the District Lectuter. The attendance was fairly good, and the interest manifested in the work I>rOyed that there arc many earnest seekers after "true l'l'Iasonic light llnd knowleoge" in tbisDistrict, and that there arc others, who, being capable of imparting the same, are "'illing to devote their time and energies to the end that the work shall be uniformly correct. He says he is personally deeply grateful for thc much needed assistance and the generous support freely given him by several Brothers, notably the District Deputy Grand ~laster, and those composing what is generally known as the "Standard Team." A Joint Lodge ofInstruC't.ion was held at De Soto for the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Districts: Twelve Lodges from t.he two Districts were represented. A Lodge of Instruction was held at Fenton for t.he ],cnefit. of Fenton, :;\'[eramec and Kirkwood Lodges. The attendance was small, but the members who attended manifested a very great interest in the work, and he is conyinCell that this meeting was productive of mueh good. R. W. Bro. Chas. W. Loomis, of the Sixteenth District, has visited the Lodges at Bismarck, Irondale, Zalma, Libertyville, Sedgewickvillc, Farmington, Bonne Terre, Doe H.un, Marble Hill and Lutesville. In nearly all the places he has visited, he found the Brethren ellergetic and anxious to perfect t.hemselves in the correct work. The Lodge at Doe Run is t.he most enterprising and best working Lodge in the District. The Brethren of Zalma Lodge, No. 545, deserve especial mention for their zeal and devotion to the principles of Masonry. His District is in good shape. H.. W. Bro. W. B. Wilson, of the Seventeent.h District, has not been in good health during a portion of the year, and hence has not visited the Lodges, but he has seen some of the members of most of the Lodges, and thinks they are all doing well, have plenty of work, and are doillg it in the best manner, .and are prospering. W. Bro. Jno. '1.'. Short, of the Twenty-second District, reports t.hat It District Lodge of Instruction was held at Jefferson City at which the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Lecturer and other Grand om eel'S assisted. The meeting was largely attended, many Lodges being represented, and was, in every respect, a perfect success. He has visited scveral Lodges. The attendance was good, and considerable proficiency made. W. Bro. John B. Dunkerson, of the Twenty-fifth District, reports that a District Lodge of Instruction was held weekly in Kansas City during the months of January and February, whieh was very well attended by members of the city Lodges, with a representation also from the country Lodges. He has also instructed several of the city Lodges at different times. He has visited all the Lodges located in the couutry that expressed a desire for a visitation. The city Lodges which attended the District Lodge of Instruction are in good working order. The Grand Lecturer can state of his own personal knowledge that W. Bro. Dunkerson has labored faithfully to advance the interests of Masonry in his District, and that a marked improvement in the mallller of conferring the degrees has becn the result. R. W. Bro. T. J. Buchanan, of the Twenty-sixth District, held a Lodge of Instruction at Harrisonville, which was well attended. He has also visited flve Lodges. At some places he found some little irregularities, but at every point the Brethren were anxious to make the necessary corrections.


1891.J

G'tand Lodge of Missouri.

35

H. W. Bro. Seymour Hoyt, of the Twcllt.y-sevent.h Dist.rict, has instl'llcted Washington, Greenfield, Garrett an<;l Lockwood Lo'dges, and has the satisfaction of knowing that he has accomplished some good in those bodies. All thesc Lodges are doing some "'ork in an improved manner. R. W. Bro. Flavius A. Affleck, of the Twenty~eighthDistrict, held a District Lodge of Instruction at Bolivar, at which there were representatbies from all the Lodges in Polk county and from thrcc Lodges in Dallas county. Those who attended e)".l)ressed themselves as bcing well satisfied and milch benefitcd thereby. He also visited Riddick Lodge, at Ruffalo. As a rule the work is well undcrst.ood, and in nearly all the Lodges there are teams that can do work crcditably.

W. Bro. C. W. Carter, of the Twenty-ninth District, has visited quite a number of his Lodges, and reports all the Lodges in the District, with one or two exceptions, in good working order. R. ,V. Bro. W. W. Fewell, of the Thirtieth District, has visited all his Lodgcs bllt three, which did not indicate a desire for his assistance. There are some well posted and good working Lodges in his District, quite a number are in fair working condition, but he regrets that there are a few that seem to take very ~ittle interest. ill the work.

W. Bro. H. E. Kearing, of the Thirty-first District, report.s that, owing to sickness in his family lLnd other reasons, he has not been able to visit extensively the Lodges in his Dist~ict. He has, however, seen the officers of different Lodges, and given them instruction in the work. He has also visited several Lodges, and can say that they have improved in the work since last year. IL W. Bro. E. C. Steele, of the Thirty-second District, has visited twelve Lodges, alld held two District Lodges of Instruction, at which most of his Lodges were represented. He is pleased to be able to report. that the Craft is improving in the work, and a general interest prevails.

H. W. Bro. J. F. Rhea, of the Thirty路third District, has responded to all calls made upon him (except one made during intcnsely hot weather), and in each case instmcted the Lodges in the work. He found them all in fair working order, but in need of more instruction. He has also given private illst.ruction in every case, \Yhen called upon. R. W. Bro. .T. B. Ross, of the Thirty-fourth District, i'eports, that his Lodges are fairly \Yell up in the work. Fraternallr submitted, ALLAN :McDOWELL, Gr~md LcctW'cr.

BOARDS OF RELIEF.

Reports froluthc following :Masonic Boards of Relief were presented and ordered printed: REPORT OF THE

M~_SONIC

BOARD OF RELIEF OF KANSAS CITY, MO.

To the ~Most lVorshipJul Grand Lodge oj 11[isS0U1路i. A. F. & A. 11f. .The growth of :l\fasonry in Kansas City during the past year has been phenomenal'. Not only in the increased membership of the r;odges, is this growth manifest, but also in the method of conferring the Degrees, where remarkable proficiency is now shown by


36

[Oct.

Proceedings of the

nearly evcry Lodge in thc city. In this year of progress and prosperity, it would bl' strange, indced, if we could not also report to this Grand Lodge., that the trne Masonic character has kept pace with the progress in othcr directions. Under the kind sumhine of prosperity, this character has budded and unfolded its blossoms with unllsual frRgrauce. For what is more fmgrant than charity? It is with a glad heart th9t we are able to report that the Masonic Board of Relief of Kansas City is again fully organized and actively at work in the cause of Masonic charity. 'fhis Board was reorganized on the 29th of April. A. L. 5891, hence this report is from that date, up to and including the 12th of October, A. L. 5891, a little over five months. During this time, on account of the incompletcncss of our methods, some few applications for aid and assistance were not recorded; but our records disclose 23 applications. Of these, 14 wcre given financial aid, 5 were assisted to obtain positions, and 4 were refused aid on account of not being in good Masonic standing.

Our present membership is as follows: Bro. E. F. ALLE~, Heroine Lodge, 104, President. Bf0. RALPH E. SCOFIET,D, Temple Lodge, ~99, .see'y ol1d Bro. H. P. LO\\'E"STEIN, Heroine Lodge, lOi. Bro. 1. C. McNEILL, Kansas City Lodge, 220. Bro. JAS. G. YOUNG, Kansas City Lodge, 220. Bro. E. STl~E, Temple Lodge, 299. Bro. W. O. HUCKETT, Ruml Lodge, 316. Bro. P. E. BURHo{JGH, Rllral Lodge, 316. Bro. F. :U. SHELL, Gate City Lodge, 522. Bro. T. G. WINSHIP, Gate City Lodge, 522. Bro. AMOS H. KAGY, South Gate Lodge, 517. Bro. F. IVr. DEARDOFF, SOllth Gate Lodge, 517.

1')'('(18.

RECEIPTS.

Temple Lodge, 299 Heroine Lodge, 104..... Rural Lodge, 316.............. Kansas City, 220............................. Gate City Lodge, 5:22..... South Gate Lodge, 547............................. Totalfrom Kansas City

$ 85 00

80 00 50 00 85 00 75 00 70 00 $ 445 00

Walter G. Wise, Wisconsin.............. Ottawa Lodge, 128, Kansas......................... Social Lodge, 86, Indiana........ Grand TotaL

20 00 8 00 30 00 :$ 503 00

DISBURSE~lEl\TS.

Back accounts General Relief Association. Expense account.............. Aid rendered applicants Total disbursed Balance on hand

$

:

57 22 35 170

25 00 40 50

$ 285 15 $ 217 85

I cannot close this report without stating to this Grand Body that it is the earnest hope of this Board of Relief to secure, during the coming year, a suitable Masonic burial ground for the interment of worthy Brothers who die away from home and friends.


1891.J

37

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

This we have not yet b.een able to do for lack of the necessary funds. Should the Grand Lodge deem it charitable to repeat their gift of the year 1884 with this Board (a donation of S:300), we would then be able to accomplish this much to be desired object; find it "ould redound much to the good of charity and the name of l\Iasonry in Kansas City. Fraternally and respectfully submitted, RALPH E. SCOFIELD, Seeretary lo!asonic Board oj Reliej oj Kansas City, Mo.

ST. LOUIS BOARD OF RELIEF. Tv the Most Worshipjnl Grand Lodge oj lrfi.~souri, A. F. &: A. It!. ;.

Herewith is filed the report of the St. Louis :Masonic Board of Relief, from October 1st, 1890, to October 1st, 1891: . Balance cash on hand October 1st, 1890 $681 39 Refunded by sundry Lodges.... 38 50 Sil989 Disbursed during the year Balance cash on hand October 1st, 1891.

70 342 19

$377

~719

OFFICERS )IARTIN COLLINS EDEN REED JNO. GLENNY Gus. V. R. 1\IEcHIN

OCTOBER 12th, 1891.

FOR

89

1891.

;

J>resident. Vice-President.

Treasurer. Secreta1路y.

Respectfully SUbmitted, GUS. V. R. 1\IECHIN, Secreta!'y.

CORRESPONDENCE.

John D. Vincil, Chairlnan of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence, submitted his Annual Review, which was ordered printed among the Proceedings, and will' be found in the Appendix.

MEMORIALS.

The following named parties who had been suspended by their respective Lodges for non-payment of dues, being duly recommended, mc~orialized the Gr~~d Lodge for re-instate-


38

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

mellt, the Lodges which suspended theln having ceased to~ exist: E. F. Collins, of the late ""Vest Gate Lodge, No. 445 ; C. I-I. Carpenter, of the late Clinton Lodge, No. 481; \V. \V. Granger, of the late \Vyaconda Lodge, No. 24, and H. C. Shook, of Greencastle Lodge, No. 21. These memorials were duly considered, and, on illotion, the prayer of the petitioners was granted, and the Grand Secretary directed to issue certificates of standing to the above named Brethren. it nlemorial, signed by R.. 1\lollencott,praying for restoration to good 1\/fasonic standing was read, he having been suspended for five years by the Grand Lodge, at its session one year ago. On motion, the paper was referred to the Committee on Appeals and Grievances.

Brother E. I-I. Phelps, D. D. Grand 1\1aster, presented his credentials as Representative of the Grand Lodge of l\Iaryland, and was duly recognized and ,,,elcomed by the Grand Master. Various notices were given, and the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 2 o'clock this afternoon.

FIRST DAY-AFTEHNOOX SESSION.

KANSAS CITY, 110., October 13, 1891. . The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 2 o'clock P. ~r., by the 1\1. \\!. Grand Master, Brother George E. 'Valker. Grand Officers in their several stations. Prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Brother John \r. l{,obinson. Brother Fred A. Kage presented his credentials .as the Representative of the Grand Lodge of Florida, near the


Grand Lodge

1891.J

~f

lIfi.'3souri.

39

Grand Lodge of' :Missouri. He was duly recognized and welcomed as such by the 1\1. ",V. Grand 1\1aster.

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION.

The follmving amendments were presented and read for the first time: To the Jfost Worshinfnl Grand Lodge 0/ Missouri, A. 1': &: A. Itl.:

1 offer the following amendment to the Constitution, by adding a new section to Article 11., which new section shall read as follows: "SEC. 4. A Master :Mason. within the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodgc, shall not be deprived of any Masonic rights or privileges he rnay have acquired" as such, without first having been tried on charges in writing and found guilty of unmasonic conduct.." OCTOBER

13th, 1891.

ALEXAKDER ROSS, 0/ St. J,Iark's Lodge, No. 93, A. F. &: A.

],f.

10 the Jfost Worship/nl Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F. If· A ••~f. :

I offer the following amehdment to Section 2, Article II., of the Constitution: By striking ont the following words after Lodge, in the sixth line of said section, towit: "who is of equal or snperior rank with themselves." Leaving said section to read: SEC. 2. Pro.ries-IJow Appointed-Duties oJ.-Whenever the Worshipful Master and Wardens of any Lodge (or either of them) shall be unablc to attend the Communications of the Grand Lodge, they, or eithel' of them who cannot so attend, may depute any member of their Lodge, as a proxy, to represent their Lodge in the Grand Lodge, and the proxy so depnted shaH be entitled to the same privileges and perform the duties of him or them deputing him. Such deputation shall be in writing, and signed by the officer . so deputing him.

ALEXANDER HOSS, OCTOBER

13th, 1891.

0/ St. ]'lark's Lodge, No. 93, A. F. (\: A. ]'f.

REPORT ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS.

The Committee 011' the Address of the Gr~nd Master presented the following report which, on 1110tiol1, 'vas adopted: To the JIost WOl'shill!'ul Grand Lr;dgc oj Jfissoul'i, A. F. <to A. J[. "

The Committee on the. Grand Master's Address recommend that the mntters presented therein be disposed of a.E follows: First-That a committee of three be appointed to prepare suitable memorials of our honored dead, as recommended by the Grand Master.


40

prroceedings of the

[Oct.

Second-The appointment of Grand Representatives, and the action of the Grund Master in reference thereto, are hereby approved. ThiJ路d路-The matter in reference to the litigation as to the St. Patrick school property, is referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. Pourth-The recommendation that a per diem be paid to Special Deputies, is referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. Fifth-The matter of State Lodges of Instruction is referred to the Committee on Ways and Means. SLtih-The actions of the Grand Master, and his rulings, in the cases of Amazonia Lodge, No. 320, Laclcde Lodge, No. 83, Aurora Lodge, No. 267. Salem Lodge, No.225, and the several decisions reported by the Grand Master, and the appeals in the matter of West Gate Lodge, No. 445, and Grand Hiver Lodge, No. 276, are referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. Seventh-The complaint of Pleasant Grove Lodge, No. 142, against Howard Lodge, ?\o. 4, and also the action of Barbee Lodge, No. 217, be referred to the Committee on Chartered Lodges: Eighth-All the recommendations of the Grand Master, in reference to the Masonic Home, are referred to a special committee of five members. We commend the Grand Master for his able administration of the affairs of the Jurisdiction during the past )'ear. He has been careful, prudent and conservative in the disposition of the various matters requiring his attention .. He has, at all times, upheld the dignity of the Fraternity, and impressed upon the members the high standard of morality that it enjoys. Peace and prosperity prevail throughout our borders, and the Grand Master is entitled to the commendation of the Craft for the faithful and zealous performance of the arduous duties of his high office. Fraternally SUbmitted, W. !If. \'\'ILLIAMS, Qhairman, A. M. DOCKERY, 'rHOS. E. GARRETT, R. E. ANDERSON, :NOAH GIVA);', C. C. WOODS, GEO. R. HUNT, J.EE A. HALL, R. F. STEVENSON, J. W. BOYD, .T. P. WOOD, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, .T. D.VINUIL, Committee.

STANDING COMMITTEES.

The Grand :Master announced the following Standing Committees: STANDINGCOM:MITTEl~S .

.TURli5PHUDENCE.-W. ~r.

Williams, Chairman: L. B. Valliant, D. A. DeArmond, Jas. W. Boyd, Geo. E. ~iayhall, R. S. Browne, E. H. Phelps.


1891.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

41

Al'I'};ALS A;\D GHIEYANCES.-Koall M. Givan, Chairman; Geo. H. Hunt, A. l\r00re Berry, John J. Dillinger, R. E. Culver, J. A. Parker, D. A. Ely. LODGES U:\DEH DISPENSATIO}i.-James B. Au!;t.ill, Chainnan; J. C. Finagin, Porter ~J. Austin, G. W. Lilly, Chas. D. McCoy, E. Fowkes, F. L. Keith, Thea. Newburn, H. S. Eddy. CHARTERED LODGES.-Lee A. Hall, Chairman: G. L. Faulhaber, J. T. Craig, J. T. Short, Joseph Pollock, Martin Westover, M. T. Davis. REPORTS ON DISTRICT DEPUTY GltA1\"D )rASTEHs.-Xenophon Ryland, Chairman: James T. Wood, Geo. W. Henderson, C. P. King-sbury, D. J. Heaston, V. O. Saunders, Rufus M. Eades. CHARITY.-R. E. Anderson, Chairman; Joseph S. Browne, S. T. Lyne, John H. Pohlman, E. C. Steele, Jacob Levy, J. A. Thomason. WAYS AND l\{EANS.-":R. E. Collins, Chairman ;F. J. Tygard, A. M. Hough, Erwin Ellis, J. B. Thomas, R. F. Stevenson, Seymour Hoyt. BY-LAWS.-W. R Stubblefield, Chairrnan; John Greenough, E. F. Allen, Walden Kelley, Geo. W. Deatherage, E. M. Logan, J. F. McAfee. ACCOUNTS.-F. W. Mott, Chairman; John H. Deems, Phil. J. Heuer. TIlANSPORTATTON AND HOTEJ.'i.-W. P. Haneoek, Chairman: S. L. C. Rhodes, John ,Yo Peck.

MEMORIAL.

A memorial froll1 Osborn Lodge, No. B17, ,vas read, asking the remission of dues to the Grand Lodge for the year 1891, O\ving to various misfortunes caused by fire. The same was referred to the Committee on ,Vays and ~1eans.

GRAND TREASURER.

Brother Sam. M. Kennard, Grand Treasurer, addressed the following communication to the Grand Lodge, whic~l was read: To the Most Worshipjul Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A.. F. & A. J[... I regret, exceedingly, that my duties at the Exposition find at my store are so numerous, that it will be impossible for me to attend the Session of the Grand Lodge now being held at Kansas City, and I trust )'OU will excuse me for not being present.

Yours fraternally. SA~I. ~f.

. KEKNARD, Gmnd TrC08urcr.


42

[Oct. REPORT ON ACCOUNTS.

The following Report on Accounts was submitted by the committee, and adopted: To the _V'lst Worshipful Grand Lodge of

'\[is.~ouri,

A. F. & A. lof.:

The undersigned, your Committee on Accounts, would respectfllll~' report: That we have carefully examined the financial records of Rev. Brother John D. Vincil, Grand Secretary and of Brother S. l\f. Kennard, Grand Treasurer, and tind that all moneys received by the former have been paid to the Grand Treasurer. The books of both of these Grand Officer" balance to a cent. III the opinion of this committee it is only right and proper to say that om labor in examining all of the reports from Subordinate Lodges to compare their returns with the receipts turned over to the Grand Treasurer through the Grand Secretary, was facilitated by the perfect system of book-keeping in the office of the Grand Secretary.

The result of our examination is shown as follows, to-wit: Balance on hand at the close of the last session of the Grand Lodge in 1890 '3 6,42907 HeceiptsfromallsoureestoOctober3d, 18~n " 14,42900 Total Disbursements as per vouchers for each- item Balance on hand October 3d, 1891...: Fraternally submitted,

,,~~0,858

:...................

07

11,287 60 ':!-

9,570 17

F. W. MOTT, .JOH~ H. DEEMS, PHIL. J. HEUER, Commiflec. ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 10, 189J.

MEMORIAL.

A memorial was presented in favor of J. F. Scott, praying for his restoration, he having been expelled by Sarcoxie Lodge. The petition was referred to the Committee on Appeals and Grievances.

REVISION.

The Committee on Revision of the By-Laws of the' Grand Lodge, appointed at the last session, made a preliminary statement as to the progress of the work. Several motions


1891.J

Grand Lodge oj lWissouri.

43

#

were made, pro and con, when, on Illotion, the subject was Inade the special order of the day for to-morrow morning at nine of the clock. . On motion, the claim of the Grand Lodge against S. 'V. B. Carnegy was placed in charge of the Committee on 'Vays and :Means. .A, motion was made and carried that the Grand Lecturer be requested to exemplify the work In the Third Degree this evening at 7 :'30. Notices were given, and the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 7: 30 this evening.

FIRST DAY-EVENING SESSIOK.

KANSASCI'1'Y, October I;), 1891. The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 7:30 P. M' l by R. \TV. Bro. B. H. Ingram, Deputy Grand l\.faster, in the absenc,e of the Grand :Master. Other Grand Officers in their stations.

SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

The following Special Committees, provided for by the Committee on Grand l\1aster's Address, were announced: )fDrOIRs.-L. A. Hall, C. C. 'Woods and Geo. H. Hunt. )f.-\sol']c IlO~lE.-J. W. Boyd, A. 1\1. Dockery, L. B. Yallial1t, Gco. W. Dcathcrage and Erwin Ellis.

â&#x20AC;˘


44

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION.

The following was offered as an amendment to the Constitution and read for the first time: Amendment to Constitution, Article IlL, Section 1: That Article 3, Section 1, of Book of Constitutions, be amended, by striking out the words, "as have attained to the Degree of Past :Master," in the second line thereof, and inserting in lieu thereof the words, "as have been regularly elected and installed Master of a Subordinate Lodge," so that said section, as amended, shall read: "None except such as have been regularly elected and installed Master of a Subordinate Lodge, and are, at the time of their election or appointment, member of some Lodge, shall be eligible to any office in the Grand Lodge, etc." • C. D. McCOY.

The exemplification of the work in the Third Degree having been ordered, R. W. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer, took charge of the Grand Lodge and proceeded to exemplify the work, assisted by the officers selected for that purpose. Following the exemplification and lecture, the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 9. o'clock to-lnOlTOW B10rning.

SECOND DAY-MORNING SESSION. ·KANSAS

CITY, October 14, 189].

The Grand Lodge convened, pursuant to order, at 9 o'clock and was called to labor by the M. 'V. Grand ·Master, Brother \Valker, \"ith the other Grand Officers in their respective stations. A. M.,

Prayer was offered by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. C. H. Briggs. The minutes of the several sessions of yesterday were read and approved. Brother Alexander Ross presented a paper concerning the interests of the Masonic Home, which was read, and, on motion, referred to the Special Committee on the Home.


1891.J

45

Grand Lodge of Missouri. . AMENDMENT TO BV-LAWS.

Brother I-Ial'ry Keene, Junior Grand Warden, offered an amendment to the Grand Lodge By-Laws, which was read and referred to the Committee on Revision of the By-Laws. It is as follows: Resolution to change Section two (2), Article sixteen (16), of the By¡ Laws as follows: Fces j01' Dcgrccs-No Lodge shall confer the Three Degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry for a less sum than thirty-five dollars ($35.00), and five dollars from every initiation shall be forwarded quarterly to the Grand Secretary and by him deposited with the Grand Treasurer, into a separate fund for the maintenance of the Masonic Home of Missouri. The remainder of tlie thirty dollars ($30.00) to be divided as the Lodge may direct, and from this rule there shall be no deviation on any pretext whatever; provided, that no degree shall be conferred nor ballot spread for the same until the degree is paid for.

HARRY KEENE, S. II. BLACK.

Amendments to the Constitution were read the second time.

SPECIAL ORDER.

1'he hour having arrived for the consideration of the revised code of By-Laws of the Grand Lodge, the speci.al order nlade yesterday was taken up. Brother Allan McDowell offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

â&#x20AC;˘

Rcsolvcd, That the report of the Committee of Revision, as printed, be re-referred to the Committee, with directions to complete and perfect the same, and that five thousand copies thereof be printed, and distributed by the Grand Secretary to the several Lodges, and further consideration of same b~ postponed until the next session of this Grand Lodge. ALLAN :McDOWELL.

On motion, Brothers George E. Walkei' and Allan :McDowell were added to the Committee on Revision of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge.


Proceedings of the

46

[Oct.

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION.

The Committee on Lodges under Dispensation presented the following report, which was adopted: To lhe Nosl Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. P. & A. M. :

Your Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation beg leave to report that they have examined the records of the following Lodges, and recomllltmd that Charters be gran ted to same: Nanw., Aux Vasse............................ Bismarck Calhoun Carl Junction Competition Clarksburg Foster Mansfield : Pendleton Rose I-Iill .." Summeryille

[,oealion.

:

Cunni!!.

Aux Vasse..... Bismarck Calhoun Carl Junction Competition Clarksburg Foster Mansfield Doc Run St. Louis Summerville

..

Callaway. St. Francois. Henry. Jasper. Laclede. l\Ioniteau. Bates. Wright.. St. Francois. . Texas.

Gorin Lodgc, at Gorin, Scotland County, was set to work on June 3, 1891; we, therefore, recommcnd its dispensation be continued until the next Communication of this Grand Lodge. We find that. in one or two cases, a portion of the minutes have been written upon slips and attached to the records. We recommend that they be properly recorded. We also recommend that those Lodges which have failed to do so, should {nsw'C their property without further delay. We recommend thltt all applications now pending for dispcnsation to form new Lodges, 1). D., be referred to the incoming Grand :Mnster. Fraternally submitted, JAS. R. AUSTIX, J. C. FINAGlN, PORTER 1\1. AUSTlX, C. D. McCOY, R. F. G. Eo T.

S. EDDY, L. KEITH,

W. LILLY,

FmVKES, NEWBURN, CommiUf;e.

EXPENSES.

The follO\ving "vas adopted respecting the expenses incurred in connection with revising the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge:


1891.J r

Grand Lodge of JlfisSOUTi.

47

Rcsolvcd, That the Grand Master be instructed to audit the necessary expenses of the Committee on Revision of the By-Laws, and that the Grand Secretary issue warrants for the same. C. H. BRIGGS, JOSEPH S. BROWNE.

INVITATION.

\Vorshipful Brother E. F. Allen, Chairman of Committee of Arrangements, appeared before the Grand Lodge and tendered a most cordial and fraternal invitation from the com111ittee, and fr0111 the Fraternity of Kansas City, to attend the banquet this evening, to be given the members of the Grand Lodge. On motion, the invitation was accepted, and the thanks of the Grand Lodge accorded the generous Brethren of Kansas City for this evidence of their courtesy. APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES.

Brother Noah I\1. Givan, Chairman of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances, presented a report on that subject. The report was read by numbers and approved, until number eight \,vas reached, when a Illotion was made to postpone action on that case, and refer it to the Committee on J urisprudence for an opinion as to whether an accuser in a I\1asonic trial shall Yote in the case. '1'he Grand Lodge declined to postpone and refer. A 111otion followed to reconsider the Yote refusing to postpone. The motion to reconsider did not prevail. After prolonged discussion, the Grand Lodge adopted number eight. 'rhe consideration of the remainder of the report路 followed and the several numbers were appro~ed, when the report, as a \yhole, was adopted, and is as follows: To tlte Most WorskipJu,l Grand Lodge of Missou,ri, A. F. ((; A. ].[.

BRETHREN :-Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances beg leave to report, that thcy have carefully considered all cases which havc been appealed to the Grand Lodge during the past year. 'Hle number of appeals is gratifyingly small, when it is remembered that there are nearly 550 Lodges in the Statc. In disposing of the cases which have becn presented to us, we have endeavored to do justice between the parties, and to decide the several cases upon their merits, keeping in view the rights of all the parties


48

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

and the best interests of the Fraternity, at the same time, following the law, as it now is, ,llld the well seWed precedents established by the Grand Lodge. We report as follows:

Ko. 1. JESSE RATCLIFFE, Appellant,

'1.'s. IONIA LODGE,

No. 381.

1 J

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspending him for five years.

The appeal in this case will have to be di"missed, for several reasons. The appellant, in taking his appeal, uses the form given on page 111 of the Constitution literally, so much so, that he simply says "(here insert)", asgiven in the form, without giving any reasons whatever for the appea I. It seems, from the statemen ts sen t up as the record of the case, that he had two attorneys at the trial, and yet 110 reasons are given in his appeal why the case sliould be reversed. The record is in very imperfect condition; enongh is stated. in narrativc form to indicate the nature ofthc charge, which, if sustained by the evidence.,would warrant the punishment inflicted. We arc unable to gct a very cIeRI' idea of the merits of the case, from the statements sent up as evidence, but the record shows that he wus found guilty by a vote of]S to 8. and .the vote suspending him for five years was 20 to 7. From this it would seem that 110 very great injustice will be done him in dismissing the appeal, and not considering the case on its merits. The appellant in all cases should sec that a perfect transcript of the record and proceedings of the Lodge, together with the original papers in the case, are all sent up to the Grand Lodge. Without these his case cannot be intelligently considcred, and all there is left for us to do is to dismiss the appeal. We, therefore, recommend that the appeal be dismissed, which leaves the judgment of the Lodge in force. No. II. JAMFA'>

L. SHEETZ, Appellant, VS.

LIBERTY LODGE,

.

No. 31.

}

Appeal fron; the judgment of the' Lodge expelling him.

The accused in this case was charged with having illicit carnal intercourse with one Mrs. Lennie Lewton, and wife of John Lewton, and with killing John I.ewton on January 7th, 1890. He was expelled by the Lodge, and has appealed to the Grand Lodge from the judgment expelling him. He complai.ns of various errors committed in the trial of the case. The transcript does not purport to give a copy of the Lodge proceedings; docs not state when the charge and specifications were preferred; what officers and members were present; what disposition was made of the charge; what time ,"as set for the trial, or whether the members had been notified; and nothing appears in the record to show when or under what circumstances the testimony was takcn. The Secretary certifies, "That this is a true copy of the evidence as given in the trial of James L. Sheetz, on the ]st day of January, ]891, held at the Lodge Room in Liberty, Mo." There is nothing in the whole transcript which gives us the name of the Master, or any other officer of the Lodgc, except the Secretary and the Junior Warden, who presented the charge. ' It will not be necessary to notice all of the cleven reasons given by appellant for reversal of the judgment, as most of them are technical, and without merit. His first is,


1891.J

49

Orand Lodge of JrhSS01tTi.

"that It true copy of the charges and specifications, under the seal of the Lodge, find attested by the Secretary, were not delivered to him ten days before the trial." 'rhere is no merit in this objection, as he announccd ready for trial after being notified that he could huve further time if he desired. The statement of the Junior Warden is, "That a copy of thc charge mid specificutions, under seal of thc Lodge, attested by the Secretary, was sent to the accused within thc timc required by law." His second reason for reversal of the case is as follows: "2. The hearsay testimony of Master l\fasons, James Shouse and Georgc Bedford, 'rho were members of the Grand Jury that inquired into the homieide'of John Lewton, wus allowed to go in evidence before the Lodge at my said trial, when ill truth and in fact, I WIlS not notified to be present and cross-examine the witncsses, and I would not have been allowed in thc said Grand Jury room under the laws of the Statc of Missouri, to makc the necessary cross-examination in my behalf." The record shows that thcse witnesscs tcstified to the fact that they were members of the Grund Jury that investigated the charge of murder against the accused, and they each statcd what the testimony of 1111'S. Lewton was before thc Gmnd Jury. This is clcarly crroneous. The evidence is hearsay, and should 110t be admitted at al\fasonic trial. Thc (leposition of Mrs. Lewton was read at the trial in the Lodge, and she flatly contradicts, what was said to be hcr testimony, beforc thc Grnnd Jury. If 5he testified before the Grand Jury to the facts stated by the witnessc~, and thcn afterwards, under oath, testified to facts dircctly oppositc, her testimony should not convict a Brother of thc gravc charge of " illicit carnal intcrcourse." rrhere is no other evidence of the guilt of thc accused of that specification, except the statcment of the Grand Jurors as to what her testimony was hcfore that body. Both her tcstimony il) her deposition and the testimony of thc accused is that the chfirge is not true. Excluding the testimony of the Grand Jurors, there would be absolutely no testimony whatever tending to support this ~pecification. Thc Lodge, however, by almost II unllnimolls votc, found the accuse<i guilty. The improper testimony of the Grand Jurors must have influenced the finding. It may be that other facts and circumstances givcn at the trial justificd the verdict, but if so, thcy arc not givcn in the trari3cript. The error in admittiug this testimony is such as must clluse a reversal of the case. As to the other specification, if it is correctly giYen in thc transcript, it should be amendcd. The specification (lacs not purport to bc copied vcrbatim, but is given in the tflluscript as follows: "2. The killing" of John Lewton on January 7th, 1890, fit thc Liberty, MQ."

otTi~c

.

of said Slleetz in

This docs not st.ate fin offcnse. A killing in self dcfcnse. is not. a violation of the laws of the land or the laws of lIfasonry. As thc case will have to bc tried again bcfore the Lodge, the second specification should be amendcd, if the above is a true copy of it. The accused was indictcd for murder, t.ried and acquitted in Court. The record of the proceedings and the judgment of the Court is competent evidencc for or Ilgllinst him at his Masonic trial, but the evidence givcll for or against him at the trial in Court or before the Grand Jury, is not competcnt evidence at the Lodge trial. The witnesses who testified in Court or heforc the Grand Jury arc competent witnesses to give evidence for thc Lodge trial, and it should not be given second handed. The Chllfg~ in this case is a gra\'e one, and thc' party thus charged :::hould not be convictcd upon illegal or incompetent evidence. Nothing but competent and legal cvidcnce, introduced at the t.rial, should bc considered by the members "in determining thc question of his guilt or innocencc. For thc errors above pointed out, we recommcnd that the judgmcnt of the Lodge be revcrsed and the CilSC remanded for a new trial. G. L. Pno.-4.


PToceedings of the

50

t< >Ct. '.

No. III. .rA~IES

I-I. PAINTER, AppcUant, 11.~.

VERSAILLES LODGE,

Xo. lli.

}

Appeal from the action of the Lodge acquitting Bro. James l\L 'Vray.

The record in this case is in excellent shape, and Versailles Lodge is to be congratulatcd on having an efficient Secretary. The accused is charged '''ith making an assault with intent to commit a rape, and with making improper proposals to a married lady, and the charge is stated in three separate specifications. The evidence is conflicting. The proceedings are regular until the taking of the vote. The record in regard to that is as follows, after all the evidence was in: "A ballot being taken upon the question of the guilt of Bro. James M. Wray, he was declared not guilty by the following vote: 18 members voting, guilty; and 11 voting, not guilty." The law (note 1, page (1) governing the manner of disposing of the charge and specifications, is a." follows: " The vote shall be taken by ballot on each specification separately, commencing with the first, and then upon the charge. The result in each particular shall be noted upon the record." It

The ballot was irregular in not being taken separately on each specification. ballot might have changed the result.

Such

If there had been but one specification, or if evidence had been introduced on only one of the specifications, then that irregularity would not be reversible error, but in the case at bar, there were three specifications, and evidence heard on each, and the vote should have been taken separately. on each. This was not done, and for failure to comply with the law in that regard, the judgment of the Lodge will have to be reversed, and the case remanded for a new trial. We recommend accordingly.

Xo. IV. WILEY

F.

DYER, Appcllanl,

VS. Pl:TNA)[ LoDGE. No. 190.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspending him for 12 years.

The accused, iu this case, is charged with "obtaining Lodge funds, September 8th ISiS, by misrepresentation; that is, while Master of this Lodge, he represented to Brothel' E. M. Strauser, then Seeretary, that he, as Master, had a right to handle and use the Lodge funds, and that he did take and usc the said funds and never returned them." The accused lives in .Buchanan County, more than ten miles from the place of meeting of the Lodge, which is in Putnam County. The notice was mailed to him on May 11th, and received by him on the 15th, and the trial had on May 23d, 1891. The law (Sec. 3, page 63) requires that, if the residence of the accused be not within ten miles of the place of meeting of the Lodge, an flttested copy of the charge and specifications shall be sent to him twenty days before the day of trial. . From this it is manifest that the trial was illegal, for want of the notice required by law, and the case will, therefore, ha,e to be reversed and remanded.


GTand Lodge of Missouri.

1891.J

51

The accused was not present at the trial and it was, therefore, in the nature of an e.t parle proceeding, although he was represented by a Brother, appointed by the Master to defend him. The evidence of the B-rother who was Secretary in 1878, is, that "Brother Wiley Dyer asked him to loan him or let him have $20.00 until next regular communication, and he would return it to me. I asked him if! had a right to let him have the money without an action of the Lodge, and he distinctly stated to me that he, as Master of the Lodge, had a perfect right to the Lodge funds, and upon this statement I let him have it. "' ,;: "' After some time had elapsed, I do not know how long. as our records have since becn burtled, there was a committee appointed to investigate the matter, and, aft.er hearing all the farts in the ca.<;e, it was decided that the Lodge, and not myself, should lose the amount. I did not understand that the action of the committee, or the Lodge, released Brother Wiley Dyer, but that it released me, on the ground that I thought that Brother Dyer knew the law on the matter." This is substantially all the evidence upon the specification. A motion was then made to dismiss the case on the ground that it had been settled by the Lodge, but the motion was overruled by the Master. The record then proceeds as follows: "To establish the character and manner of his (Bro. Dyer) doing business, the following statements by Brethren present were made." Then follows statements made by several Brethren in regard to business transactions of Bro. Dyer with differcnt persons, had many years ago, when he lived in the neighborhood of Putnam Lodge, none of the transactions having any relation whatever to the charge for which he was on trial. This is clearly erroneous. It is very remarkable, indeed, that this charge should not have been presented until twelye years after the facts had trampired. It would have been much better, if the facts were true, that the Lodge !5hould have caused the charge to be preferred while he resided in its Jurisdiction. It should have been at l1. time when he could defend against the accusation in person, and whcn he was known to the members ofthe Lodge. A period of twelvc years materially changes the membership of any Lodge, and erases from the memory many of the details of allY transaction. The Brother should not be convicted under such circumstances without having an unquestioned opportunity to defend himself, and then only upon the clearest proof of the offense charged, and he should not be tried and the evidence should not be hcard, for transactions other than those charged in the specification.

The judgment is clearly wrong, and we recommend that it be reyersed and the case remanded for it new trial.

No. V. HEl'RY

J.

PHIE.,>T, Appellant, . v.~.

;\EW LONDON LODGE,

No. 207.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspendingGeo. W. Bra..,hears.

The record in this case is in excellent shape. The accused is charged with taking improper liberlies, and having illicit carnal ~intercoursewith a young lady who was staying at the home of the Brother who preferred the chnrge. .\t the trial, the accused admitted the truth of the specification and threw himself upon the mercy of the Lodge. He WllS found guilty and his punishment assessed at sus路 pemion for one year. The vote on the question was, yes, 2.'3; no, 8. Brother Priest and scveral others havc appcaled, for the reason that the punishment was inadequate. The statement made by the accused in open Lodge, in admitting the charge to be true, was a manly one, and manifested sincere. genuine repentance and regret at what


52

P?'oceedings of the

[(kt.

had happcned, ~tllting that he had apologized to thc Brother and his family, find oftered to do evcrything in his power, as far as possible, to repair the' great wrong he hfid done him, and said; "And I now here, in open Lodge, in the presence of him And you, my l\fasonk Brethren, publicly apologize to him and the Lodge, and ask forgiveness, in ~o ffir as yon can forgive me, consistent with your obligations of Masonic duty." . 'fhe members of thc Lodge know the Brother better than we do; they heurd his statement, and, Py an almost Ilnanimons vote, fixed his punishmcnt at one year's sns)Jen. sion. V~"e cannot say, in the facc of these facts, that thc Lodge committcd reversible error in tempering its justicc with mercy. We, therefore, rccommend that the judgment of the Lodge be affirmcd. .

Xo. VI.

.T. C.

HEARl'm,

Appellant,

1.'.~.

HANNIBAL, LODGE, No. IRS.

}

Appeal from the judgment of thc Lodge acquitting Brothet J.F. Davidson.

The accused in this case is charged. in three specifications, substantially as follows: YO\1. claim that property, you are stealing it;" (2) that he "did make an aS3ltult on said Brother .Joll11 L. RoBards, find struck him w'ith his fist;" (3) that he did, "in an angry find boisterous manner, apply to him an otTcnsive epithet." (1) That he said to Brother John L. RoBards, "If

Brothers Davidson lind RoBards are brothers-in-law, having married sister"" and the difficulty bet\yccn them originated in a misunderstanding about certfiin property in Hannibal, which had bcen inherited by their respective wi\'l~s. At the trial, Brother RoBards, aller some preliminfiry cvidence ill reg-m'd to the property: testified as follo\\'s : "He (David:o;on) said, 'Do you claim that pltrt of the barn?' I said, 'Yes, I do.' He said, 'If you claim that property, you are stealing it;' I said, 'You are It liar.' He then struck me. I received the blow on my firm, warding it off. I returncd the blow striking him. He struck at me scveral times; I wllrded all' his blows, stepping back. As I did so, Brother Hance J'Ilshed between us, saying, 'Brothers, this should not be,' or words to that effect. Davidson said, 'Let me at him, he called me a liar. As soon as he said this, I impulsively put lIly hand in my front pocket; but, realiZing the person between 11S, withdrew it, and, as I did so, Dayidson said: 'Hc called me a liar.' He then turned and walked away." Brothcr I-Iallce testilied substantially fiS follows: "1 saw them talking, as also did ]\fl'. Bowles, find soon they be~an 'scrapping-,' and elawing at each other. I stepped between them, and Davidson slUd : 'He called me a. liar. I finfilly parted them. 1 did not sce Brother Davidson strike Brother RoBards, nor did I see Brother RoBfirds make a move to get his pistoL" Brother Davidson testifies substantially fiS fol1ows: "that he told Brothel' RoBards that , If he claimed the property, he was claiming that which was not his,' and that thereBrother RoBards called him a liar." He the,n said "I then struck at him but the h 1ow fell short and I did not touch him." Continuing he sllid "RoBards stepped back and I stopped, intending to turn and leave him, but saw him put his hand into his pocket, as 1 believed to draw a pistol to shoot me. Being unarmed, I rushed at him mtending to clinch him before he could usc a weapon. He withdrew his hand, and seeing he had nothing in it, I stopped. Brother Hancc then stepp-cd between us. RoBards remarked to me, 1 will see yon later, sir. I replied, 'I am WIlling to see yon, he c:tl1ed me 11 liar.' I then turned and left them."

11 1)On

l'

,J


GTand Lodge of lIfi8smlTi.

1891.J

53

This i~ substantially all the evidence contained in the record inregard to the mutters mentioned in the specifications. Both parties nre prominent citizens of Hallnibal. After the evidence was heard the vote was taken rcsulting as follows: on the first specification, guilty 11, not guilty 32. On thc second specification, guilty 20, not guilty 22. On the third, guilty 24, not guilty 19, and upon the general charge, 'guilty 11, not guilty 32. Brother Hearne appeals from the judgment of the Lodge for the reasons, that it is, (1) against the evidence, (2) against the law, (3) against the law aud evidence, (4) that under the evidence, aud admission Of defendant, he was guilty, and though there may have been palliating circumstances, yet he should have at least been reprimanded, 0) the Masonic standing of the parties and publicity of the place, the assault and language used arc calculated to bring the Order into disgmce and ought to have heen rebuked. There is a material difference hetween the testimony of Brothers RoBards and Davidson as to what the latter said, as charged in the specification. Brother RoBards testifies that he said c; If you claim that property, yon are stealillg it," and Brother Davidson claims that he said" If he claimed the property, he was claiming that which was IlOt his." The vote of the Lodge indicates that a large mlljority of the members believed Brothel: Davidson instead of Brother RoBards in regard to that matter as there was no other evidence on that speciflc'ltioll. Brother Hance did not appear npon the scene until after this part of it had occurred. Both pmtics agree that after this statement, which ever it was, Brother RoBards called Brother Davidson a liar. Those who believed Brother Davidson's version of the, beginning of the difficulty, would hardly justify Brother RoBards in calling him a liar, and if they then believed the evideuce of Brother Davidson as to the circumstances of the striking, they would not be likely to find him guilty of the second specification, and a majority of those voting se~m to sll'itain Bl'other Davidson's verRion of it. Aftel' sustaining him in the first and second, the majority found him guoilty of the charge contGined in the third specification, but the vote was not such, as under our law, convicts' hirn Wc presume, the members of the Lodge made due allowance for the excitement of the occasion. Doubtless both parties used language under the excitement of the moment, which wa~ not intended, and for which doubtless they have experienced regret. \Ve CiU1l10t justify the conduct of either of I. he parties to the difficulty, but we must recogni:r.e the common frailty of our humanity, and to some extent overlook the unfortunate lauguage used under a high state of excitement: We presume this explains the action of the Lodge, and as it is the deliberate judgment of the triers of fact, those who heard the evidence, who know the parties, we cannot, without deviating from Ii well settled rule of practice, advise the reversal of the case. We therefore recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. VII. THO)[AS

LEEKE, Appel/cw/. 7路S.

CLAY

LODGE, Ko. 207.

1.

J

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge reprimanding him.

The charge in this case is as follows: "I hereby prefer charges against Brother Thomas Leeke. Specl/ication 1st: Accusing me, Hiram Gould, of wrongfully defrauding Brother Richard Jones out of two weeks work." Concerning the trial the record is as follows: "The case was then closed. Brother Thomas Leeke retired and the ballot was spl'ead on the question: Is Brother Thomas Leeke guilty'? The Master appointed \"17. E.,


Proceedings of the

54

[Oct.

Fowler and H. W. Belt, Tellers, who collected the ballots, they being checked and tallied by the Secretary, with the following result, to-wit: Yes. or guilty, 13, no, or not guilty, 6. )Ioved by S. R. Gittings and seconded by T. H. Beattie, that the motion be re-considered; in support of the above motion Brother S. R. Gittinl0 said: 'that he had misunderstood the purpose on which we were voting and now saw. that he had voted differentlv from what he had intended.' Brother H. W. Belt said: 'that he had misunderstood the -purpose, and that he had so informed the Master before the vote was counted, and asked permission to change his Yote, but was not allowed to do so.' After some discussion by others, the Master ruled, that a motion by ballot could not be reconsidered, and refused to put the mot,ion. The ballot Wll.'; then spread on the question, shall Brother Leeke be expelled'? Yeas, 2 : nays, 17. The ballot was then spread on the question, shalL Brother Thomas Leeke be suspended'? Yes, 5: no,14. The ballot was then spread on the question, shall Brother Thomas Leeke be reprimauded? Yes, 10; no, 9." , Brother Leeke appeals from this judgment for several reasons, among which is, that Brother Belt having cast his ballot contrary to his wishes, asked permission to change the same, before the vote was counted, but was refused, and that other Brethren, nam路 ing them, who voted guilty, m~ant to vote, not guilty. We think the facts stated in the record of the proceedings of the Lodge at the trial, fire sufficient to entitle the Brother to a new trill!. The record shows, that Brother Belt notified the Master, before the vote WIl.S counted, that he had misunderstood the purpose, and asked permission to change his vote. Whether or not, it was competent for the Master to permit him to select his ballot and chauge it, it was certainly competent before the Yote was counted and the result announced, for the Master to state, that a mistake had been made, without stating what it was, and to order, that the ballot "'ould not be counted, but that a new ballot would be taken. It is not necessary here to determine, whether the motion made to reconsider should haye been entertained or not, as the change of one vote would haye changed the result as to the guilt of the accused. The vq,te on the question of the gliilt or innocence of an accused should rellect the sentiments of the Brethren present, voting upon the question, and, if an honest mistake has been made, it should 'be corrected, 'when it can be done before the vote is counted. There are other questions in the case not necessary to discuss. The papers that have been filed show considerable feeling, and some foolish things have been said. The charge is indefinite, and, as the case will be remanded, shoul,l be amended, so as to state the facts which are relied upon to establish the accusation. The record of the Lodge proceeding:; is plainly written 'with a typewriter, but the evidence sent up is almost unintelligible, as it is not signed by anybody, and there is nothing to indicate who the witness is, with but one exception. \Ve recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be reversed, and the case remanded for a new tria!.

1'\0. VIII. JOHl\'

T.

SHANNON,.

Appellant,

t'S. Bt:TLEH

LODGE, No. 254.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the J.odge snspending him.

The charge, in this case, which on the record is entitled John Steele, Complainant, J. T. Shannon, Defendant, is unusually full and formal, setting out, in detail, transactions beginning with the sale of a mill in 1886, by Brother Steele to Brother Shannon, for $10,000.00, on which $4,000.00 had been paid, and an indebtedness, for the balance of the路 purchase money, of $6,000.00 existed; that the accused had the mill insured for a considerable sum, and, as Brother Steele understood, for his benefit to the extent of his debt. The mill was destroyed by fire in February last, and the accused collected insur1:8.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of JlfissoUTi.

55

Ilnce larg-ely in cxcess of the amount due Brother Steele: that after collectiug thc llluncy lUid placing it where it could not be reached by his creditors, he forced a settlement by which Brother Steele was defrauded out of $4,000.00. The substance of the charge being, that the accused, by his false statements, deceived Brother Steele, and thus enabled him to carry out his alleged premeditated plan to defraud him: that he relied upon the representations made by the accused, and that he wilfully and intentionally wronged and defrauded him out of his money. The answer i~ equally formal, denying the charge and alleging that his settlement with Brother Steele wa.'> Yolulltary and amicable, which is denied by Brother Steele. The pleadings are asformal as though it were a case pending in Court, and both parties were represented by counsel. At the trial, the accused testified in his own behalf. After being cross-examined for some time, he refused to further testify. The record of that is as follows:

â&#x20AC;˘

" Brother Shannon refuses to be fnrther cross-examined. Complainant's attorney Brother.J. H. Norton, asks the Lodge to compel him to submit to such cross-examination as he shall propound. Brother Shannon asks to be permitted to rctire, and he is granted permission. Exeunt Brother Shannon. Brother D. A. DeArmond, who was assisting Brother Shannon in the defense, stated to the Lodge that Brother Sha.nnon has taken the course that he has, withollt his consent. and he had never heard of any such purpose until Brother Shannon made this scene in open Lodge, and. woulll, had he been advised with, have advised him to have submitted to the cross-examination." The trial, however, proceeded, and after all the evidence was heard, the defendant was found guilty by a Yote of18 to 9, the record showing that Brother John Steele voted. After balloting on expulsion, which was 17 "yes" to 10 'no," the ballot was had on sns pension, and was 20 "yes" to i "no." Onthe.proposition to fix the time at 1h-e years, the vote was 18 "yes" and 9 "no," and he was accordingly declared suspended for fivc years. He appeals to the Grand Lodge, and assigns as errors that: (1) The basis of the charge is a business matter, which could not be the subject of a Masonic trial, but should be investigated in Court. if at all. (2) The complaint, charges and specifications, Rnd eVidence, show that there was a fair, full and amicable settlement, &c. (3) The cYidence is insufficient to sustain the judgment of the Lodge. (4) The accuser, Brother John Steele, who assumed the role of plaintiff, voted upon the "question of guilty or not guilty, &c. While it is true that the Grand Lodge discourages the bringing of business transactions and business differences into the Lodge, on the theory that "Masonry is not a business institution. yet when a Brother is cha.rged with fraud, or with having wrongcd another, these have at all times been regarded as Masonic offenses and proper subjects for charge and specifications. Where a fraudulent transaction is charged, business must necessarily be connected with it. When a brother cheats, wrongs or dcfrauds another, the offense must necessarily grow out of a business transaction, und it would be encouraging a wrong to take the position that no accusation or triRI of the offense could be 11ad., simply because it grew out ?f a business transaction. As to the second and third reasons for reversal, the questions raised there "'ere properly decided by the Lodge. The members are the triers of the facts and weighers of the evidence. The most serious objection is the one that Bro. Steele, who preferred the charge, voted upon the question of the guilt of the accused, as also upon his punishment. There is an apparent injustice in this. but the law, u.'> it now stands, is well settled that he is en-


56

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

titled. tOll vote. Section 6, page 65, of the Constitution,. provides that after a trial i~ concluded the accused. shall be requested to retire and "all the members present shall be required to vote hy ballot." It has been repeatedly held by the Grund Lodge that every member present shall be required to vote un the que~tion of guilt, as well as of punishment. While Bro. Steele, in his charge, which was presented to the Lodge, .Clllls himself "Complainant" and Bro. Shannon "Defendant," yet such is not the proper style of the case. The form for charges and specifications is given on page 152, of the Book of COIlstitutions. On appeal, after trial, we have been in the habit of designating cases of this chamcter "J. T. Shannon, Appellant, 'Us. Butler Lodge, No. 2:>4." Theff~ is nothing in onr law concerning Masonic trials, as it now is, which makcs the party preferring the charge a. plaintiff. Indeed, there is a theory that, for offenses committed while the Lodge is not in session, the charges should be preferred by the Junior Wllrden. When he prosecutcs the case, he is not d.isqualified from voting, neither arc the witnesses who testify for or against the llccused, disqualified, neither llre the attorneys, if members of the Lodge, disqualili.ed, nor is the :Master who passes upon all questions which arise in the tr~al, disqualified. The rule that would deprive Bro. Steele in the case at bar, from voting, would also deprive the witnesses and attorneys from voting. It may be that such should be the law, but we cannot construe away Section 6, abovc quoted, by judicial intcrpretation. We recolllmend that thc judgmcnt of the Lodgc be alfirmect.

Ko. IX.

}

J.D1ES:\1. LE\'EJ:JCJI, Al'1icllaol, 1'8.

FIUTERXAL LODGE, :\0.36:::.

Appeal from .the judgment of thc Lodge sllspen<ling him.

The accused in thi~ case was charged with wrongfully accusing 11 Brother with dilihonest.y ; also with drunkenness. He was tried and suspended for two years. The record shows that he admitted having been drunk ill the Lodge several times. He presented a motiou to the Lodge for a new trial, and asked that, if it was overruled, that it be sent to the Grand Lodge. This is not in complillnce with the lnw, in taking an appeal, and the case is, therefore, improperly here. If the record is correct as to his drunkenness in open Lodge, no serious injustice has been done him, but it is unnecessary to di"CIlSS the merits of the case, as it is improperly here. Let the attempted appeal be dismissed, which leaves the. judgment of the Lodge in force. l\O. X .

.-\ •.:VI. HCBIm, A)I]iellal1t, v,':. BELTO~ LODGE,

No. 450.

}

.

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling Brother P. Mullins.

The charge in tlJ is ease is, "that the accused on March 18th, 1886, married Miss Rhoda l~rancis, and· on the 20th of March, 1886, did wantonly and maliciously, and without cause, desert her, his wife; wllen he married Miss Francis, he did so with the intention of deserting her," There is a statement, ill the blank form, that the County School Commissioner had refused to grant him It certificate bccause of immoral character, but this does not amount to a specification and there is but one specification, stated above, in the charge.


57

Grand Lodge of J.1fis80uri.

1891.J

He was tried, and by it vote of 15 to ') found guilty, and by a vote of 15 to

(j

expelled

Brother Huber presents a pa"per, which is intended as an appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him, and alleg-es the follo\ving reasons for reversal: (1) that the affidavits read in evidence were takell without the knowledge of the accused; (2) that they do Ilot bear the seal of the officer taking them; (3) that no trial was had on the specification in regard to the school certificate; (4) that the hallot was not taken on each specification separately. The appeal taken by Brother Huber is irregular, and might properly be entirely disregarded, but we will dispose of the case 011 it.c;"merits. The aftidavits read in evidence were not objected to by the accused, who was present at the trial, and it is too late now to object. It was unnecessary to investigate the specification in regard to the school certificate, as it did not amount to a charge, and it was properly ignored. As to the last objection, that the vote was not taken separately on each specification, it is suJIicient to say, that there was, practically, but one specification, so that one ballot covered the whole case. Every member who voted knew exactly what he was voting upon, alld there can be no question but that the facts stated in the specification constHnted a Masonic offense. No illjustice was done" the accused by reason of this irregularity, and it would be useless to reverse the case on that account. He admitted having married the girl, and the evidence sustains the action of t"he Lodge and its judgment is right. Let it be affirmed. No. XI. This,is a petition, from David E. Cowan, for restoration. He was suspended by Spring Creek Lodg-e, No; 34i, for six months, in 1889, and on app<::al to the Grand Lodge, was expelled. On August 18th, 1891, he petitioned said Lodge to recommend him to the Grand Lodge that he be restored to good Masonic stand-" ing. In his petition he states: c. When the decree expelling me was issued by the Grand Lodge, I did not murmur against it, but submitted to it with the determinatlOn to conduct myself so as to enable me to regain the regard and confidence of all good Masons, and at some future time to be permitted to enjoy again the rights and privileges of the Fraternity, I love so well ; yon arc at liberty to investigate my conduct since that time, to judge whether I have the , right to ask this, to me, great favor of you, and I promise, if restored, to make amends for the past, and to comply strictly with the laws of the Grand Lodge and the reg-ulatiotls of any Lodge I)f which 1 may become a member." . -

This petition laid over onc month, and on September 19th, 1891, was acted on by said Lodge, and by unanimous vote, the (~rand Lodge is requested to restore the petitioner. The petition of the Lodge recites that they feel that he has been sufficiently punished for his offense, and that his repentance is sincere and lasting; that his conduct, since hi~ expulsion, has been without It blemish; his habits sober and industrious, etc.

We think the showing is sufficient to justify his restoration and we, therefore, re.commend that he be n~storc<1 to good Masonic stan<1ing. 1'0.

,I. F. Scott, who

WILS

XU.

expelled by Sarcoxie todge,

1'0.

293, petitions for restoration.

He presents a certificate from that Lodge, stating that he was recommended to the C;rand Lodge for restoration to Masonic life. There is nothing to indicate that he had


58

Proceedings of the

LOd.

petitioned Sarcoxie Lodge to restore him, and that his petition had lain o\-er one month, and the members notified to attend, and that thereupon a vote by ballot was taken, as required by law. (See note 8, p. 72, Constitution.) If this had been dOIlC, und the vote of the Lodge had been unanimous in favor of his restoration, then he ,,'auld thereby becomc a member of Sarcoxie Lodge; if the votein f<lsor of his restoration had been two-thirds of those present, :then such vote would restore him to good "rasonic standing, but not to mcmbcrship-which is all the Grand Lodge can do. If the \'ote for his restoration had been less tban two-thirds of those present, then, and not until then, he could petition the Grand Lodge. Xot having complied with this law, his petition cannot be entertained. We recommend that it be dismissed, without prejudice, so that he may yet comply with the law, if he wishes, and then present his petition.

No. XIII. Luke Firth presents a petition for restoration. He was expelled by )Iarabile Lodge, -No. ]66, in 1874, for disobeying a summons. l\Iarabile Lodge is not in existence. His petition is recommended by Polo Lodge, No. 232, in whose Jurisdiction he resides. Having complied with the law, we recommend that his petition be granted, fwd he be restored to good Masonic standing.

Xo. XIV. Brother R. Mollencott was suspended for five years by the Grand Lodge last year on the charge of saloon-keeping preferred against him while ::\fastcr of Itaska Lodge. He petitions for restoration, alleging that he bas quit the business. We think his petition should be rccommended by the Lodge of which hc was a mcmber. Hc should not be restored to membership in the Lodge before the expiration of his suspension, without its conscnt. We recommend that the petition be dismisscd without prejudice. No. XV. Theodore Schweriner was formerly a member of st. John's Longe. Xo. 28, and in 1882 was expelled by Livingston Lodgc, No.5], on a serious charge. He has petitioned St. John's Lodge to recommend to the Grand Lodge that it restore him to good Masonic' standing, and that J.J0dge has complied with his request, aud he has presented evidence of good moral standing in Germantown, Pa.., where he has liven for nine year~. The law (note 8, page 72, Constitution), requires him to petition the Lodge ,,-hich expelled him, if it is in existence. This he has not done, nor has the said law been otherwise complied with, as stated in case No. XIL For these reasons the petition ~hould be dismissed without prejudice. Fraternally submitted, NOAH ~I. GIVAX. GEORGE R. HUNT, A. MOORE BERRY. .INO. J. DILLINGER. R. E. CCLVER, .J. A. PARKER, D. A. n,Y, Cam ill illec.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of .Mis80UTi.

59

During the morning session, the Grand 'Master announced that the Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge of Kansas were in waiting, anq directed the Grand Secretary to retire and introduce them. The following distinguished visitors ,vere then introduced to the Grand Lodge and duly \velcomed by M. YV. Bro. Walker, Grand 'Master, who ,,'as responded to by the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the Jurisdiction of Kansas:

GRAND OFFICERS OF KANSAS.

ANDREW l\I. CALLAHAM DAVID B. FULLER WM. D. THOMPSON CHRISTIAN BECK .JOHN H. BROWN .JACOB DEWITT B. H. BEATTE DWIGHT BYINGTO'N

Gmnd lIfastcr. Dc]Juty Gmnd 1'(fastcr. Senior Grand }Vm路den. Grand Trcasurer. Grand secretary. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Sword Rem路cr. Past Deputy Grand lIfaster.

Nothing further appearing before the Grand Lodge, it was called from Utbor until 2:30 this afternooh.

SECOND DAY-AFTERNOON SESSION.

KANSAS CITY,

October 14, 1891.

The :Most ",Vorshipful Grand Lodge ,vas .called to labor at 2:30 P. M., by Brother Walker, Grand :Master. Grand Officers all present.


Proceed路ings of the

60

Oct.

CHARTERED LODGES. NI:. '\T. Bro. I-Iall, Chairman Committee on Chartered Lodges presented a report from said committee, which was adopted and IS as fQllows: To the Most Wo)'shipful Grand Lodge of Nis801ll'i, A.

~P.

&. A. 111. :

The Committee on Chart.ered Lodges respectfully submits the following report: Total 'number on regi8ter ............................................................ 5i8 Accounted for as follows: Lodges that have reported .......................................................... 337 Lod?;es that loIave not reported .................................................... Lodges vacant by eon:-!olidation ................................................. 4-548 )lumber of Lodges actually reporting ....... .... , ........................... 337 Of these the committee tlnd : Correct....................... .............................. ....... ....................... 483 :\'ot correct ................................................................................ 54-[;37 -

As stated, out of 537 Lodges that have made returns 483 were correct, or so nearly so that the committee, by letter of inqUiry; were ll.ble to obtain the necessary information to complete same and report them as eonect and shown n..c; follows: 1, 15, 3') 49, 64, 78, 93, 107, 122,

1:3.'1, 15;:;, 168, 183, 197, 213, 229, 244, 263, 279, 296, 310, .326, 340, 3;);), ~'i1.

2, 16, .)~,

;:>0, 6.), 79, 94, 108, 123, 139, 155, 169, 184. Hl8, 214, 230, 245, 264, 280, 297, 311, 327, 341, 35G, 372,

0,

17, 34, .51, G6, 80, 95, 109, 124,

14D. 156, 170, 18.5, Ill9, 217, 231, 24u, 265, 282, 298, 312, 328, 342, 358, 374,

4, 19, 3;3, 52~

67, 81, 9(j, 11O, 125, 141, D7, 171, 186, 200. 218, 232, 247, 267, 283, 299. 310, 329, 343, 3;)9, 375.

5, 20, 36, ;,)3, GS, 1'2, :)7, Ill,

6, 22, 37,

54,

1l9, 1'3, !18, 112. 1.27, 128, 148, 144, 158, 15!1, 172,

liS,

187, 188, 202, 203, 219, 220, 233, 234, 24~, 251, 268, 269, 284, 285, 300, :>01, 314, 315, 330, 331, :H4, 345, 360. 361, :-,76, 378,

7, 8, 2:1, 24, 3S, 39, 5,), tl(>, 70, 71, 84, 85, 99, 100, 113, 114, 12U, 131, 145, 14u, luO, Ili1, 174, 175, 189. 190, 204, 205, 221, 222, 2:~\ 236, 2:)2, 253, 270, 271, 286, 288, 302, 303, 316, :>17, 332, 333, 316, 347, :>62, 364, 379, 381,

9, 25, 40, 5S, 72, 86, 101, 115, 132, 147, 162, 176, 191, 206, 223, 237, 255, 2i2, 2S9, 304. 318, 334, 348, 365, 383,

10, 26, 4:],

59, 10,

87. 102, 117, 13:3. 148, 1(i3, 178, 192, 207, 2'24, 238, 2;'>6, 2i:),

290, 305, 320, 335, 349, 366, :1&J,

11, 27, 44, 60, 74, 88, 108, 111', 131, 149, 164, 179, 193, 208, 22:'>, 239, 257, 274, 292, 306, 322, 336, 351, 367,

12, 28, 45, 61, i:J,

89, 104, 1l0, 135, 150, 16;'>, 180, ]\14, 209, 22G. 240, 259, 276, 293, 307, 323, 337, 352, 3G8, aS5, 386,

13, 14, 30, 31, 46, 48, 62, 63, 7G, 77, 92, !10, 1O;'>, 106, 120, 121. 13o, 137, 1;:)1, 152, 166, 167, 181, 182, 195, 196, 211, 212, 227, 228, 241, 243, 260, 262, 277, 278, 294, 295, 308, 309, 324, 325, 338, 339, 353, 354, 369, 370, 387. 388


Grand Lodge of Mi8S0U1¡i.

1891.J :38!1, 409, 427, 444, 464, 481, 495, 509, 524, ;>41,

393, 410, 428, 44.5, 46,5, 482, 496, 510, 525. ;3'J2,

394, 411, '129, 446, 466, '183, 497, 512, 526, :344.

61

:.,95, 396, 397, 398, 399, ' 400, 401, 403, 404, 405, 408, 412, 430, 447, 467, 484, 498, 513, 527, [,4:3,

413, 431, 448, 470, 485, 499, 514, 528, 546,

416, 434, 449, 471, 486, 500, 515, 530, 547,

418, 419, 420, 421, 435, 437, 438. 439, 450, ' 453, 454, 455, 472, 473, 474, 475, 487, 488, 489, 490, 501, 502, 503, 5C4, 516, 517, 518, 519, 531, 532, 533, 534, [,48.-Total, 4S:\.

422, 440, 45H, 476, 4!H, 505, 520, 53:3,

423, 441, 4HO, 477, 492, 500, ii21 , 536,

424, 442, 461, 478, 493, 507, 522, 538,

426, 443, 462, 480, 494, 508, 523, 539,

It gives the committee great pleasure to note thc constant improvement among the mass of the Lodges in the manner of keeping up their business, and in no place will it show so plainly as in the annual returns made to this Grand Body; and the committee d@sire to acknowledge the painstaking care with which the Secretaries of these several Lodges have presented their rep'orts, same 'being in such shape that their correctness could be determined without difiiculty. But all are 110t entitled to commendation as will be seen .by the fact that fifty-fotirLodges llre reported as not correct; details of which are as follows:

Twenty-eight Lodges are incorrect in one 01' more following pllrticulaTs, yi,,: No seal attached to l;eturns: Nos. 47, 126, lBO, 242, 249, 254, 266, 291, 363, 380, 382, 402, 451,511, :340. No financial statement: Nos. 57, 142, 154, 287, 452, 537. List not correct: No. 201. Not signed by Worshipful l\laster : , Nos. 261, 414. 458. Not signed by Secretary: No. 415. Not alphabetically arranged: Nos. 425, 529. Twenty-six Lodges appeal' in this report as having been written tv for information in regard¡ tb their returns, and in their cases either no answer WIIS made to the inquiry sent, or it was in s\l~h :,:hape as to convey no information that would enable the committee to complete the returns in question. They are as follows: Nos. 18, 29, 42. 116, Ii7, 210. 21:), 2IG,' 406, 417, 43:1. 4:37, 4'i!), 46:~, 46!), 479.

~JO,

2:38, 275, 2S1, :Wl, :}21 , :::50, :373, 391, :392,

No report has been received from the tbllowing Lo<'lges : Nos. 9], 390, 407, 43G, 4GS. Lodges. Kos. 21 and 377 sent reports, and same were l'etul'1led to them for correction, but the corrected returns, if made, have not come to hand. During the year, four Lodges have consolidated with other Lodge;;, viz.: Nos. 41, 357, 'J32,

5l:~.

Two special cases claim the attention of the committee.

II

Four Mile Lodge, i'o. 212, reports the Ilame of J. W. Frazor, a saloon-keeper, as being member in good standing, apparently forgetting that, if the law of this Grand Lodge

â&#x20AC;˘


62

Proceedings oj the

rOct.

ill that behalf had been properly enforced. the Lodge would not have had a s11100nkeeping member on its rolls to report. The Brother in question is the Secretary of the Lodge. Paynesville Lodge, No. 499, reports 13 members with outstanding dues amounting to $199.50, being equal to an average indebtedness of $15.35 for each member, representing a probable average arrearage of about five years on its entire membership. While it is true that the Lodge reports no indebtedness, yet the committee are of the opinion that such a state of facts bodes no good to the Lodge, and that it is a proper subject for investigation. The Committee, therefore, recommend that the cases of Four l\'1ile Lodge, No. 212, and Paynesville Lodge, No. 499, be referred to the incoming Grand Master, for such action as he may, upon investigation, deem advisable. In regard to the twenty-six Lodges who were written to for data, with which to correct their returns, and who failed to answer, or to give the matter such proper attention as would enable the Committee to obtain such information as was necessary to complete the records in the office of the Grand Secretary, your Committee has a very decided opinion. While we do not pretend to determine whether this is the result of carelessness or design, on the part oft-hose whose duty it is to make proper reports, we do know that it does make a difference, so far as the result to the Grand Lodge records are concerned, and we are of the opinion that this trouble will not be remedied until a few examples are made, and such Lodges taught that, if they will persist in electing incolllpetent officers, the Lodge itself Dlllst be responsible for such officers' official shortcomings. We, therefore, present the following resolution: Resolved, That the several matters herein referred to, concerning Lodges which have made no reports and Lodges which have failed to answer proper enquiries as shown, be refered to the incoming Grand Master, and that he be requested to take such steps in these several matters as may be necessary to enforce the law and orders of this Grand) Lodge. ,.

In the matter of Pleasant Grove Lodge, No. 142, VB. Howard Lodge, No.o4, no one has appeared on behalf of. Pleasant Grove Lodge. We, therefore, recommend that the action of the Grand Master in the matter be afIirmed. . In the matter of Barbec Lodge, i\o. 21i, yOllr committee have read the papers in the case, and have heard the statements of the Brethren present representing that Lodge. From all the circumstance!'!. we are of the opinion that there is no excuse for the proceedings had in this matter. There was an evident disposition 011 the part of the Lodge to disregard the law. It does not matter what WilS the motive, nor was the misconduct of Bro. Brady any excuse. Graham Lodge, No. ]12, asks that its name be changed to Maitland Lodge, No. 112. We recommend that the prayer be granted. LEE A. HALL, J. T. CRAIG. M. H. WESTOVER, GEO. L. FAULHABER, J. '1'. SHORT.


1891.J

63

Grand Lodge of lIfissouri.

CHARITY.

The Committee on Charity, through its Chainnan, reported, and the same was adopted as follows: KANSAS CITY, Mo., October 14, Ul91.

To lite .lEost Worshipful Grand Lodge oj ]'[issouri, A. F. ,(; A. ]'f.:

Your Committee on Charity would fraternally report : Past Grand Master Stephen 路W. B. Carnegy, Past Grand Master Thomas E. Garrett and Brother John F. Alberti, a member of Wyaconda Lodge, No. 240, have severally renewed their applications for assistance from this Grand Body. These applicatiollS were made within the time prescribed by law, .and the petition of Brother Alberti is accompanied by the recommendation of the Lodge under whose jurisdiction he resides. The needs of these Brethren have increased with their advancing years and consequent infirmities, and we cannot now refuse their requests. We recommend that the sum of two hundred dollars be donated to the l\f. W. Bro. to be paid in quarterly installments, first installment at the close ofthi8 Grand Communication.

Carneg~'

Wc recommend the sum of one hundred dollars be paid to the Worshipful l\Iaster of Pride the West Lodge, No. li9, to be by him appropriated to the payment of house rent of:'r. W. Bro. Thos. :E. Garrett.

of

\Ye recomm~nd the sum of one hundred dollars be paid the Worshipful Master of Alexandria Lodge, No. 404, for the benefit of Brother John F. Alberti. Another application was before your committee for a donation to enable a Brother to pay his doctor and nurse bill. This application came long after the time prescribed by law for filing it, and is without the recommendation of the Brother's Lodge. Hence we do not feel authorized to consider it. Fraternally submitted, R. E. ANDERSON, .TOS. S. BROWNE, S. F. LYNE, .TOHN H. POHLMAN. E. C. STEELE, .JACOB LEVY, .JACOB THOMASON, C01llmilll'e.


64

PToceedings of the

[Oct.

MASONIC HOME.

Brother Noah 1\1. Givan, President of 路the Board of Directors of the 1\1asonic Home, sublnitted a report from the Board which was ordered printed among the Proceedings of this Grand Lodge Session. REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. To the

~fost

Worshipful Grand Lodge of ~fissou1"i, A. F. (tnd A. llf.:

BRETHREN :-Another year of prosperity and favor to our Masonic Home has come and gone. Its happy inmates greet you, at your annual gathering, with bright smiles and joyous hearts. You have made glad the lives of the widows and orphans of OUl' departed Brethren. You have transplanted them from houses of mourning, of gloom, of sadness, of hopelessness, to the bright sunshine of home, with all the joys that can be crowded into that sacred place, and have inspired them with hope for time and for eternity. You have made it possible that the orphan children of our Brother Masons may become men and women of character and usefulness. You have drawn some of them froll1 lives of crime and shame to lives of industry, honor and service. From leading others down to degradation and destruction, they will, because of what you have done for them, lead others up to a higher and better life. Infinite Wisdom alone can estimate the magnitude of the change for good to the world, caused by your establishment of the Masonic Home of Missouri. Its refiex benefit to you is also worthy of consideration. In this work, you labor along the line of the Good Samaritan, and instead of working exclusively for self, you work for others. You have experienced the joys of selfish acquirements, but you have also' experienced the higher and holier joys of unselfish labor for others. You have been made happier by looking into the faces of the "little ones" whom you, under God, have been permitted to bless. You have realized from your own experience, that it is.more blessed to give -than to receive. In this ,vork of serving others, you have been permitted to walk in the footsteps of the 80n of Man, whose every act and deed, whose whole life work, was serving others.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of MisSOUTi.

65

If this world gives any foretaste of the bliss.of eternal glory, it must arise from the consciousness of having benefited others. Not only does this work benefit you, by adding to your joys, but it makes you better men. By reason of the tender influences growing out of the 'York in which you are engaged, you are better citizens, better Masons, better husbands and better fathers. Like the rays of light from the sun, the influences from the Home go out in all directions and bless all wi.thin its reach. I submit herewith the reports of 'the Officers of the Home, and bespeak for them a careful reading. The Fraternity in the State can best obtain correct information as to its workings, from those who do the work. The reports of the Secretary and Treasurer show the condition of its financcs. From them it will be seen, that we have means for its present wants, but the increase from last year's balance is principally derived from the Grand Lodge donation, and from the Lodge subscriptions made five years ago. They were payable in five annual installments. Of these, four payments have been made, and the fifth will be due within the next few months. When that is paid, our receipts from that source will cease, unless they are renewed. These reports show, that there have been but few new subscriptions during the past year. The income of the Grand Lodge will probably not allow of its making its usual donation at this session. The report of the Superintendent shows, that additional improvements will soon be needed. Those during the past year have been fortunately made with but little expense, but the increasing J?umber of inmates, will necessarily increase the demands and necessities of the Home, and it will not be wise to wait until the emergency is upon us, before we begin to provide means.

I sincerely hope every Mason in Missouri will read the report of the Superintendent of the Home. It conveys some idea of its real workings, ~nd of the influences which surround our wards. The term of office of the following directors expires with this session of the Grand Lodge, and it will be necessary for )'ou to elect their successors, viz: John D. Vincil, Noah 1\1. Givan, Joseph S. Browne and 'Vm. lV拢. 路Williams. I trust, that you will at all times embrace every opportunity to visit the Home, and thereby increase your interest in it. Those who visit it, and see its workings, and look into the bright faces of its inmates, become enthusiastic friends of the enterprise. The Superintendent and Matron, "rill, at all times, be delighted to welcome you there. Fraternally submitted, NOAH IVr. GIVAN, President. G. L. PRO.-5.


66

[Oct.

PToceedin,qs of the

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. ST.

LOUIS,

:1\10., Sept. 1, 189l.

To the Board of Dil'ectors of the ][asonic Home of Missouri: BRETHREN :-We believe that the Divine Arehitect continues to approve your benevolent work and skillful designs for our dearly loved ::Hasonic Home. He has abundantly blessed us during the year which has just closed; and the success which has attended your zealous labor in its behalf must be gratifying to yourselves, and should cause every true .:.\lasonic heart to swell with pride, until it bursts forth with substantial aid for its future support.

\Ve believe the Craft throughout the State 'are being roused to a livelier interest in the success and welfare of our Home, and we trust it will not be long ere every Mason in the State will be an earnest worker and contributor in the building up of this perpetual monument to :Missouri :Masonry. During the year, the'capacity of the Home has been doubled, at a very trifling expense, by converting the barn into dining-room, kitchen, supply and play rooms, and the gardener's cabin and the coal house into dormitories .â&#x20AC;˘ This increased accommodation will soon be insufficient, and we would recommend the building of additional dormitories, rooms for the sick, etc., as soon as practicable. , Fifteen inmates have entered during the year, making the total number forty admitted'to the Home up to date, and we hear of quite a number who will soon be applicants for admission. The inmates comprise eighteen girls, eleven boys, ten widows and one maiden lady, One widow was discharged at her own request, .T anuary 5th, 1891; and we have lost another by death-Mrs. Harriet J. Elberfield, who was admitted from St. Louis, November 11th, 1890, died August 29th, 1891. This old lady was consumptive, and came into the Home recently discharged from one of our City Hospitals, pitiably friendless and helpless, and we may rejoice that we we.re able to give her the quiet and comfort of the Home, during the last few months of her life, and still more that her thoughts were here turned to God. 'Ve trust He approved her application for admission into that "Home in the Skies where the weary are at rest."


1891.J

Grand Lodge of lJ!JissQuri.

67

The evening before she died, she asked for reading from the Bible, prayer, and songs from the children. This death of the one and the withdrawal of the other still leaves us with thirty-eight inmates, two from the City of St. Louis, and thirty-six from country Lodges. Twenty-one of onr inmates are now in attendance at the Dozier Public School. They are quiet, orderiy and studious children, and their reports and advancement, during the past year, were very satisfactory. Indeed, I am very proud of our girls and boys, for they ranked first in their school, both in deportment and studies. This reminds me to ask, with our continued increase in numbers, should we not take some steps to pro~Tide for educating onr children in the Home? The converting of our large barn into a dining-room gave us a suitable room in which to hold religious exercises, and early this spring, ' we extended invitations to our various city Lodges to visit ns Sunday afternoons, and hold religious services; most of them accepted our invitation, and ,ve have had very interesting and enjoyable meet.ings nearly every Sunday afternoon during the spring and summer. By these exercises and visits, the Home has added largely to her already long list of warm friends in St. Louis. Brother V. O. Saunders organized a Sunday School for us, which holds its regular session every Sunday at 10 :30 A.;\f. This school was greatly needed, and we pray God will bless it and make it the means of much good for the Home. Last Christmas, Tuscan Chapter, No. 68, O. E. S., visited the Home in a body, bringing with theni a Santa Claus laden with lovely and useful gifts for every member of the Home, including IV[atron and Superintendent'; but the best ,gift of all was the sweet and motherly bearing of these. dear Sisters towards our little ones, that made it, perhaps, the happiest and brightest Christmas they had ever known. 'We have gratefully acknowledged the receipt of the following gifts to the Home during the year: One barrel apples and a quantity of blackberry and raspberry root8Mrs. Broka'v. One dozen pair children's shoes-Brown-Desnoyer Shoe Co. One dozen pair boys' shoes-Mr. E. F. Williams, of Hamilton-Brown Shoe Co.


68

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

Five dollars to buy Christmas sundries-Eo Sir A. A. Bernand, Leadville, Col. Picture-Brother Frank Holtzlaw. Old Masonic book of last century (very desirable addition to our library);---,Mr. John Saxton. Oil Painting, painted and presented to the Home June 24th-,.-Mrs. Leander Stone. Box of valuable books, cards, etc.-Mrs. W路. H. King, New Haven, Conn. Collection book-Logan D. Dameron's estate. Box of books, papers, etc.-Bessie Austin, Butler (Bates County), 1\10. The beautiful story by J. W. Buel-Brother John D. Vincil. In addition to the above, we have received from Sisters Gillespie, Heimburger, Niedringhaus and Merrill, of the O. E. S., some very acceptable clothing for the children. The Home is now very accessible to the business.centersof this city. The completion of the Lindell Electric Road, which passes the front gate, enables us to reach Broadway and 'Yashington Avenue in thirtyeight minutes. In conclusion, permit me to thank you for the support you have given me in the management of the Home during the year. 路With an earnest prayer that God will continue to protect and bless every interest connected \yith our loved Home,路 I am Fraternally yours, MORRIS LE:ETWICI-I,路 Superintendent. 'Yharton Palmore, a youth fifteen years old, from Springfield, Mo., recommended by Solomon Lodge, No. 271, admitted to the Home November 24th, 1889, left with some friends that called to see him, July 8th, 1891, and has never returned.

REPORT OF SECRETARY. ST. LOUIS, July 31st, 1891. To the President and Board oj Directors oj the J.lfasonic Rome of J.lfissouri : BRETHREN :-Herewith I submit for your approval my Annual Report for the current year, ending July 31st. As our President, Sllperintend-


1891.J

69

Grand. Lodge of Missouri.

ent and Chairman of the Home Committee will submit elaborate reports covering fully the workings of the Home, I confine my report 路to a full and complete expose of the finances of the Home. Thanking you and the members of the Fraternity generally for the uniform courtesy with which I have been treated, I remain, fraternally yours, S. C. BUNN, Sec'y.

BALANCE SHEET, JULY 31st, 1891. DR. Bonds Account $ Real Estate Account .. Improyement Account.. .. Furniture Account.. . Live Stock Account.. .. Insurance Account .. Salary Account (Sup't, Matron, Housekeeper, Cook, Gardener, and 'Assistant Secretal')' from opening of Home to date) ........ Expense Account, from opening of Home to date. (See "Itemized Expense" for the year) .. Unpaid Subscriptions .. Cash .

35,400 00 40,000 00 4,034 66 1,526 94 27540 12500

3,274 25

9,174 58 14,31270 16,00993

CR. 'Lodge Subscriptions $ Chapter Subscriptions .. Council Subscriptions .. Commandery Subscriptions . Individual Subscriptions . Donation Account .. Orphans' Day and Entertainment Account.. . Interest Account .. Sundries (See Itemized Cash Receipts) . Farm and Dairy Account.. . Estate of J. E. Loomis . Superintendent and Matron .. Endowment Account ..

44,158 66 6,362 14 10000 2,409 00 9,59545 6,764 76 12,5;)7 19 4,913 23 158 13 9553 9 37 1,200 00 35,800 00

;3124,133 46

$124,133 46 Cash in hands of Treasurer

$

15,9:~6

Cash in hands of Secretary.........

84

73 09 $16,000 9;1 ASSETS.

Bonds Real Estate and Improvements............... Furniture and Fixtures Liye Stock...... Unpaid Subscriptions Ca.<;h........

$ 35,400 00

44,034 1',526 275 14,312 16,009

66 94 40 70 93

$111,55963 LIABILITIES. Superintendent and Matron (Undrawn Salnry) Xct Assets.....

$ 1,200 00

..

$110,359 6:)


70

[Oct.

Proceedings of the CASH RECEIP1'S FOR THE YEAR ENDING .JULY 31st. 1891. From Yearly Subscriptions S From Donations . From Orphans' Day Donations and Entertainmcnts .. From Interest on Bonds and Deposits . From Bills Receivable . From Sales of Produce, Fruit, etc . From" Home" ::\fite Box .. From Tuscan Lodge )1ite Box . From l\{atron, Surplus of Organ Fund .. From Estate of.T. E. Loomis . From Protest Fee on Hills Receivable, llefunded . From Rebate on Leg-al Expenses of Improving Delmar A yenne Refunded by Superintcndent, Bill of ~,aundering. chargcd by mistake to HOIue .. From Entertainment-"Engaged"-giYen to defray Expenses of Entertaining Grand Lodge, Oct. 14, 1890 ..

5,189 50 6,764 76 2,70528 2,19980 30440 294 50 '5205 4 00 100 00 9 37 2 75 1020 â&#x20AC;˘ 4 49

36270

:$ 18,00380

Balance on hand July 31st, ]8f10

.

6,148 72

S 24,15252

CASH EXPENDITURES FOR YEAR E)WING JULY 31st, 1891 Groceries, Flour, Meat and Vegetablcs Clothing, Shoes, Dry Goods, etc Coal, Ice and Kindling Drugs and l\Iedicines Labor and Repairs Electric Light Servicc Telephone Service . Stationery (Letter Heads, Circulars, etc.) Printing and Wrapping 10,000 Reports .. Postage 011 10,500 Reports Postage on Calls for Payment, and Orphans' Day Circulars Postage for Secretary's Office : Postage Ilnd Registering Warrant Book Hardware, Nails, Scre'''s, Hinges, etc Horse Shoeing Surveying Property before Pnrehase, bill neyer before paid presented Taxes"for 1890 Water License Sprinkling License i Vehicle License Nurse for Sick Inmates "'eather Strips Stack for Cooking Range Papering Walls Seamstress Cleaning Carpets Rent of Safe Deposit. Box

S 1,62372 .. 611 04 426 1~1 . .. 11545 117 18 .. 1254] .. 5000 36 75 .. 15500 .. .. 4750 2480 .. .. 300 . 108 1909 . . 1825 or .. 3000 .. 52954 . 12350 Hl97 .. . 300 .. 2000 11 52 . .. 1900 2230 . 26 75 . . 15 00 .. 3000


189] .J

71

G1'and Lodge oj lIfissOUTi.

Drayage on 10,000 Reports....... S 1 50 Clearing Deed of Trust . 1 00 Carriago for Directors from Night Meeting at the Home . 200 Exchange on Draft : . 10 Wll-<:hing, School Books, CarFare and Small Expenses advanced 214 5!) by Superintendent . Entertaining Grand Lodâ&#x201A;Źe at ihc Home, Oct. 14th, 18!)0 . 36272 Spectacles .. G 50 Furniture, Glassware, Crockery, Stoves and Furnishing Goods.. 453 GG Improvements-New Dining Haom, Dormitory and Barn . 1,301 00 Plumbing and Fitting New Dining Room . 19403 Guttering and Spouting New Dining Room . 5655 Plumbing and Fitting other Rooms . 4475 Luri1ber for Repairs . 998 . tabor for lllakillg Hay . 18 75 Jelly Jars, Plants, Seeds, Onions, etc., for Planting . 87 27 Purchase of Bonds . 14800 Salary Assistant Secretary . 30000 590 1:) Salaries of Assistants at Home, Cook and Gardener '" Superintendent, on Account of Salary . 12:> 00 $ 8,142 59 IG,OO!) 93

Balance Cash on hand

$' 24,152 52

CASH DONATIOKS FOR THE YEAR ENDING JULY :1lst, 1891. Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., J\fissouri. Grand Chu.pter,.R. A. M., Grand Chapter, O. Eo S., Ash Grove Lodge, No. 43G, Ash Grove, l\1issouri. Adelphi Lodge, No. 355, Edgarton, Alexandria Lodge, No. 401, Alexandria," Blackwell Lodge, No. 535, Blackwell, Breckenridge Lodge, 1\0. 334, Breckenridge, Missouri. Bolivar R. A. C., No.5, Bolivar, Copestone R. A. C., No. 33, De Soto, Composite Lodge, No. 36!), Doniphan, Forest City Lodge, No. 214, Forest City, Golden Lodge, No. 475, Golden City, Hickory Hill Lodge, No. 211, Hickory Hill, La Plata Lodge, No. 237, La Plata, :Muir, Wm. D., Lodge, No. 2ii, Freeman, Naomi Chapter, No. 174, O. E. S., StUl;geoli, Parson Chapter, No. 189, O. E. S., 'frentOll, Palmyra Lodge, No. 18, Palmyra, Perseverance Lodge, No. 92, Louisiana, Paris Union Lodge, No. 19, Paris, Rolla Lodge, No. 213, Rolla, St. Mark's Lodge, No. 93, Cape Girardeau, St. Clair Lodge, No. 273, Osceola, Shelbina R. A. C., No. 99, Shelbina, SaUne H. A. C., No. 74, Marshall,

$ 5,000 00 .500 00

,

. . . . . . .

28860 4000

2500 500 3300 1000 2500 5000 5000 47 00 350 1000 .2500 2500

2000 1000 2500 10000 2500 2141 5000

500 2500

2500


72

[Oct.

Proceedings of the Salem Chapter, No. 18/), O. E. S., Salem, Tipton Lodge. No. 156, Tipton, Van Buren Lodge, No. 50fl, Van Buren, Xenia Lodge, No. 50, Hopkins, Bond, W..1., Hickory Hill, Missouri. Bond, J. W.. Hickory Hill, Brown, W. W., Blackburn, Brown, J. D., Blackburn, Barr, B. X., Blackburn, Banks, C. W., Blackburn, Rurk, Jos., Blackburn; Beumer, M., Blackburn, Brown, W. H., Kingsville, Cable, Jos., Blackburn, Cook, M. H., Blackburn, Creel. F. C., Kingsville, Cox, T. C., Kingsville, Dierking, Aug., Blackburn, Dill, J. G., Blackburn, Drane, J. E., Blackburn, Fitzpatrick, \V.A., Blackburn," Fitzpatrick, J. T., Blackburn," Gibson, W. P., Kings\'ille, Glover, R. B., Hickory Hill, Glover, J ..1., Hickory Hill, Handeley, J. J .â&#x20AC;˘ Kingsville, Harle~', \Vm Hitt, R. E. L., Blackburn, Missouri Hitt, J. S., Blackburn, Holt, Abner. New Bloomfield," Howard, J08., Kingsville, Harsley, "M., Kingsville, Langavie, A. S., Kingsville, Lynds, Benj., St. Louis, Morse, Thos. P., St. Louis, :;\1ahan, A. A., Hickory Hill, )Iollenbrock, F. W., Blackburn, " )Iasterson, J. D., Blackburn, Nichols. F. J., Kingsville, Plummer, Frank Pinkerton, D. M., Blackburn, Missouri Rippe, Joshua, Seymour, Rogers, F. G., Cainsville, Spencer, H. C., Blackburn, Sweeney, W. "V., Blackburn, Selby, J. W., New Bloomfield, Sexton, Dr. M. P., New Bloomfield, Smith, J. S., Kingsville, Taylor, B. T., Kingsville, Taylor, J. P., Blackburn, Wood, J. P., Blackbnrn, \Vaddell, .J. B

:Missouri.

S

.. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. . . .. . . .. .. .. . .. . . . .. . . .. .. .. . .. . .. . . .. ..

13 00 2500 2500 10 00 1 00 1 00 1 00 1 00 100 l_QO 1 00 100 50 100 100

100 1 1 1 1 1

00 00 00 00 00

1 OU 1 00 I 00

100 50 5000 100 1 2 1 1

00 00 00 00 50

5000 100 00 1 00 100 100 1 00 1 00 100 25 500 100 100 100 200

100 100

100 50 100

$ 6,764 76


1891.J

Grand Lodge of

jlfissOt~ri.

73

ORPHANS' DAY DONATIONS AND ENTERTAINMENT PROCEEDS, FOR YEAR ENDING JULY 31st. 1891. Alexandria Lodge, No. 404 Ancient Landmark Lodge, No. 356 Anllville Lodge, No. 464 : Alton Lodge, No. 255 Armstrong Lodge, No. 70 Bethany Lodge, No. 97 Brookfield Lodge, No. 86, and Ladies of O. E. S Bloomington Lodge, No. 102 Buckner Lodge, No. 501. Claflin Lodge, No. 229 Charity Lodge, No. 331 Cyrene Lodge, No. 14 : Columbia Lodge, No. 534.. Eureka Lodge, No. 73 , Farmington Lodge, No. 132 Fairmount Lodg-e, No. 2aO : Gallatin Lodge, No~ 106 Golden Lodge, No. 475 Huntsville Lodge, No. 30 Hornersville Lodge. No. 215 High Hill Lodge, No. 250 Hannibal Lodge, No.1S8, and St. John's Lodge, No. 28 Higbee Lodge, No. 527 Havannl1 Lodge, No. 21 Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 430 Jacksonville Lodge, No. 44 Jefferson Lodge, No. 43 : Kingsville Lodge, No. 313 Kirkwood Lodge, No. 484 Louisville Lodge, No..428 Lakeville Lodge, No. 489 Laclede Lodge, No. 83 Lock Springs Lodge, No. 488 Morality Lodge, No. 186 : , Memphis Lodge. No. 16 :l\foberly Lodge, No. 344.. Montevallo Lodge, No. 490 l\fonroe Lodge, No. 64 Nineveh Lodge, No. 473 ; Pike Lodge, No.路399 Pleasant Hope Lodge, No. 467 Paul,me I-,odge, No. 319 : . Stella I,odge, No. 53S : Santa Fe Lodge, No. 462 St. Francois Lodge. No. 234 St. Joseph Lodge, No. 178 Social Lodge, No. 266 Twilight Lodge, No. 114.. Temple Lodge, No.299 Trilumina Lodge, No. 205 'Union Star Lodge, No. 174.. .. :

,

S .. .. . . ..

16 10 2500 1200 450 100 00

.

6380 1000 1000 1000 2500 1000 7 10 6000 2500 500 3000 500 1000 750 500 1871 5870 200 ]000 ]000 9350 500 2500 500 500

.. .. .. .. . . .. . .

. .. . .. .. ..

.. .. . .

.. . . .

. . .

. .. . . . .. . ..

.. .. .. . .. .. . .. . .

]000

500 11 00

25 00 1200 2500 700 500

1075 1000 1250 ]640 750 10 00 500 2500 700

2500 111 62 2500

1000


74

PToceedings oj the

[Oct.

'Voodside Lodge, No. 387 $ 500 Wheeling LodgE\ No. 484 .. 2:~ 65 Wellsville Lodge, No. 1!J4 . 500 Adah Chapter, No. 17, O. E. S .., , . 2700 Holden Chapter, No. lil, O. E. S . 500 Xeosho Chapter, No. 192, O. E. S . 3300 O. E. S. Chapter, Piedmont, Mo . 5000 Fraternity of Wentzville, 1\[0 , . 66 75 Fraternity of Chillicothe, Mo .. 2500 Fraternity of La Plata, l\fo .. 109 35 Fraternity of Springfield, Mo . 3360 Fraternity of Southwest Missouri, through Springfield .. 6200 Jno. R. Parson, Chairman, through Sales of Photos and Mednls 3575 路".John H. Deems, Chairman, Orphans' Day, St. Louis, 1890 . 631 50 John II. Deems, Sec'y, Orphans' Day, St. Louis, 1891, on acct. .. 350 00 tSurplus of Entertainment-"Engaged"-given to defray Expense of Entertaining Grand Lodge, at "I'lome," Oct, 14, 1890 19300

S

2.70~,

28

:!oTotal Amount of Orphan'S' Day, 1890, St. Louis, $1,131.50. . tTolal Amount of "Engaged," $555.70.

~EW

SUBSClUPTIOXS FOR YEAR EXDIXG JULY 31st, 1891.

)Iilton Lodge, No. 151.. S 20 Wayne Lodge, No. 526 '" 125 Cox, Albert, Springfield, l\fo..................... 10 Ferguson, .J. R., Springfield, 1\拢0......... 10 Woods, C. C., Neosho, 1\10................................................................. 25

00 00

00 00 00

S190 00 SUPPLEMENTARY CASH

ACCOU~T.

Prom July 31, 1891, to October 1, 1891:

Cash on hand, July 3Ist.. ~16,009 93 Received from donations............... 591 00 Received from subseriptions ;........ 173 00 Received from Orphan,'s Day dOllations and entertainments....................... 593 35 Received from Tnterest on Butler Trust Co.'s Bond............................................. 70 00 Received from sales of grapes, "Home Vineyard" ;........... 14960 Sli,586 S8 EXPENDITURES.

Prom July 31, 1891, to October 1, 1891 :

Grocel'ie:::, clothing, shoes, dry goods, coal, meat, vegetables, labor, repairs, furniture, etc '.l Nursing and atten'ding scarlet fever , .. Burial of Mrs. Elberficld .. Salary A~sistant Secretary, 2 months . Postage and printing . Moving trunk for Mrs. Lee (nurse) . Cash on hand October 1st, 18'.)1..

..

82365 487;')

7300 5000 7 06 100- 1,00346 ~16,583

42


• 1891.J

Grand Lodge of Jl1issoUTi.

Cash in hands of Trea>;urer Cash in hands of Secretary..

75 $16,Oi4 14 509 211

..

$'16,58342 NEW DONATIONS.

Prom July 31,1891, to October 1, 1891.

Grand Chapter, O. E. S $300 00 Jericho Chapter, No. 20i, O. E. S...................................................... 5 00 Jericho Lodge, No. 340 :........ 10 00 Shelbina Lodge, No. 228 ~ 00 Vienna Lodge, No. 94............................................................... 1500 Wilson Lodge, No. 191....................................... 7 25 Hacine Lodge, .Ko. 4i8 '....... ;; 25 Mystic Tie Lodge, No. 221............................ 25 00 Paynesville Lod~e, No. 499 :.. 10 00 Star of the West Lodge, No. ]33................................................ 'i 50 Pendleton Lodge, U. D · 25 00 Tyro Lodge, No, 12.. 3 00 Warrenton Lodge. No. 231.......... .. 5 00 i\Iontrose Lodge, No. 408......... 50 00 Cosmos Lodge, No. 282 : 100 00 $591 00

OIU'HANS' DAY DONATIOl'S AND E"TEHTAIlOfENTS.

From July 31st to October

1.~t,

IS£ll.

Salem Lodge, No. 225 $ ]ti 00 Clear Creek Lodge, No. 418 10 00 Brookfield Lodge, No. 86, and Lndies of 0. E. S............................... 42 4:) Blackwell Lodge, No. 535.................................... 39 00 Daggett Lodge, No. 492........... 5 00 Star Lodge, No. 419 ~.......... 5000 Appleton City Lodge, No. 412 50 00 ~ew Salem Chapter, 0. E. S .. 25 90 Waverly Lodge, No. 61................................................................... 5 00 '"-Orphans' Day, St. Louis, 1891.. :. 350 00 $::>\);"1 35

*Total of Orphans' Day, St. Louis, 1891, to date, '.fiOO.OO.

Fraternally yours,

S. C. BUNN, Secretary.


â&#x20AC;˘ [Oct.

P1'oceedings of the

76

TREASURER'S REPORT. REPORT OF F. J. TYGARD, TREASURER,

MASOXIC HOME OF l\hssoum,

FRO)! AUGUST 1ST, 1890, TO JULY 31sT, 1891. RECEIPTS.

1890.

July 31, To balance on hand, per report . August 31, To cash from S. C. Bunn, Suc .. September 3, Interest Trust Co: Bond, Endowment Fund, October, 2, from S. C. Bunn, Sec . 15, Endow't F'nd, J. P. Wood, November I, .. 22, Interest on warrants, acct. Endow'nt F'nd, December 3, from S. C. Bunn, Sec : .. January 1, . February v, . II, Interest on $11,000 Cass Co. Bonds, account Endowment Fund . :March 2, . from'S. C. Bunn, Sec 9, Int. on warrants, acct. Endowment Fund .. Interest on $20,000 Henry Co. Bonds, flcct. 12, Endowment Fund : .. from S. C. Bunn, Sec .. April I, 4, , Interest on $1,000 Linn Co. Bonds, account Endowment Fund . :May 1, from S. C. Bunn, Sec . 12, Interest on $2,000 Pettis Co. Bonds, account Endowment Fund . from S. C. Bunn, Sec .. I, June July I, 31, Interest received on time deposits .. 31, Total receipts.......

DI'. ,$6,011 60 32210

7000 6,46894 5000 2,11670

400 1,246 75 1,368 90

76840 55000 30050

1830 1,00000 2500

6000 700 00 100 00 175 (lO 77645 1,58100 397 50

$24,111 20 CREDITS.

1890. August

DI'. 2, By Warrant No. 60, paid

16,

September 8,

11, October

" 61, " 62, 63,

6,

64,

8, 22,

65,

22, November 5,

Ct.

66,

I,

67, 68, 69,

15, 22,

70, 71,

:!4,

72,

"

..

Ct. $ 228 62

12500 22844 3035 277 71 100 00 4800 2000

29511 47 50

10272 10000 26000


77

GTand Lodge of Missouri.

1891.J

155 00 67 50 52954 335 70 19 97 2300 7252 5000 10000

November'24, By warrant No. 73, paid 74, 24, 75, " 24, " 76, " December 8, " 77, " 8, If 78, U 8, 11, " 79, " 30, " 80, " 30, " 81, " H

~891.

January

6, 8, 12, 26, February 14, 14, l\Iarch 2, 23, 24, April 5, 9, 10, 17,

" ., " " " " " " " " " " "

82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, ga, 94,

" " " " " " " " " " " " "

25,

"

95,

"

.

" 96, " 97,

" "

.. ..

" 98, " " 99, " "100, " "101, " "102, " "103, " "104, " "105, " "106, " "107, " By Balance on,hand

.. . .. .. . .. . . .. .. ..

l\Iay

June

2, 8, 9, 9, 22, 23, 9, 18,

22, 25,

July

2, 18, ::II,

31509 1000 6028 37866 4900 3300 31434 26398 2729 150 00 5655 54 67 40731 10000 1,250 05 5095 5600 4770 38731 3000 2243 39164 44 75 4667 100 00 30998 $15,93684

. .. . . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. ..

824,111 20 July 31, 1891, To Balance on hand

$24,111 20

$15,936 84

STATE)IENT OF BONDS HELD FOR ACCOUNT OF "KNIGHTS TEm'LAR TRIENNIAl, E~DOW足 IIIENT FUND."

Henry County, Missouri, 8 Bonds, $1,000 each $ 8,000 00 Henry County, Missouri, 24 Bonds, $500 each 12,000 00 Grand River Township, Cass County, Missouri, 11 Bonds, $1,000 each, 11,000 00 Brookfield Township, Linn County, Missouri, 1 Bond, $1,000 each.... 1,000 00 Pettis County, Missouri, 2 Bonds, $1,000 each.................................... 2,000 00 Butler, Missouri, Trust Company Bond, secured, 1, Sl,OOO each......... 1,000 00 Bates County, Missouri, Warrants...................................................... 400 00 Total Endowment Fund

$35,400 00


7t)

P1'oceedings of the

[Oct.

Bonds are deposited with St. Louis Safe Deposit Company.. I also hold for account of Masonic Home, Certificate No. 34, for 16 shares stock, $100 each, Anchor Milling and Mining Cpmplln)', East St. Louis. Certificate No. 21, for one share sto<;k of $1,000, The Harkaway Milling lind Mining Company, si:. Louis. These stocks were donated to the Masonic Home. See report of Secretary Bunn ; but so far as )ve have been able to learn, they have no value. Fraternally submitted, To Hol'. NOAH M. GIVA:\, PrclOidcnt Mownic Home oj JIissonri.

F. J. TYGARD, Trcasu1'C1'.

SPECIAL REPORT 'ON MASONIC HOME.

The special cOlnlnittee created by the Grand Lodge to report upon the interests of the Masonic HOUle, submitted a report which elicited an animated discussion. At length a vote by Lodges was ordered, and resulted in favor of the proposed change in the lav{ increasing the Grand Lodge dues to one dollar per member, one-half of which is to be路 appropriated to the support of the l-1ome. Following the adoption of the contested proposition (increasing the per capita), Brother J. '\T. Boyd Inoved that the report be adopted as whole. On this motion the vote ,vas unanimous, no dissent being expressed when the negative ,vas called. The vote by which the law was changed, increasing Grand Lodge dues, stood as follows: Aye. Lodge Vote Individual Vote

No.

::>3;) 2G7

Lodge Vote Individual Vote

62;:> 138

802 7GS

Majority...........

39

763 802

Total

1-1ere is the report of the committee:

.

..1,565


1891.J

Grand Lodg,! oj J}fissouri.

79

To the Most WorsliipJul Grand Lodge oj Jlfissouri, A. P. & A. J[. :

Your Committee on the Masouic Home, hereby submit the following report: I.-We concur in the Grand Master's suggestion, that the Grand l\I-aster ought to be, ex-0.fJicio, a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home, and we hereby recommend that, from and after' the election of Grand Officers at this Comm~miClllioJlof the Grand Lodge, the Most \Vorshipful Grand :Master and the Right \\'orshipful Senior find Junior Grand Wardens be, ex-officio, members of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home; and it shull be their duty to attend at least one mceting annually of said Board. II.-That, as a substitute for the proposed amendment to Section 21, Article X VIo, of the By-Laws now pending, we recommend that said section be amended us follows, towit: By striking out the words, "fifty cents," in the third line thereof, and inserting in lieu thereof the words, "one dollar," and by adding to said section, at the present conclusion thereof, the following words, to-wit: "One half of which sum shall be for the ~Iasollic Home, unless the Gralld Lodge other~rise order." So that said section, when amended, shall read as follows: SEC. 21.-Every Chartered Lodge, under this jurisdiction, shall annually pay to the Grand Lodge the sum of one dollar for each Ma~ter l\Iason returned as a member in the annual returns, except those whose dues have been, for good cause, remitted, one half' of which sum shall be for the Masonic Home, unlessthe Grand Lodge otherwhe order.

III. That, the resolution of Brother Alex. Ross, referred to this committee, be referred to the Board of Directors of said I lome, fol' their consideration. ' IV. That we do not understand that the Grand ~faster in his Annual Address, means to condemn, as contrary to Masonic usage and derogatory to Masonic dignity, nIl celebrations, festivals and eiltertainments given to raise money for the support of the Masonic Home. We think that such celebrations and entertainments, propcrly conducted, have heretofore been beneficial to the interests of the Home and we hope they will continue to be useful and beneficial to that cause. Many of onf friends-ladies and others-who have in this way actively exerted themselves in behalf of this cause, deserve our hearty commendations; but we concur with the Grand Master, that these entertainments, and assistance rendered in this manner, ought not to be relied upon to maintain the Home, but that definite plllllS should be adopted for that purPOSf>. JAMES W. BOYD, ALEX. ~f. DOCKERY, GEO. W. DEATHERAGE, L. B. VALLIANT, ERWIN ELLIS, Onnmittcc. '

No further business appearing, the Grand Lodge was called frOln labor until [) o'clock to-morrow morning.


80

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

THIRD DAY-l\IORNING SESSION. KANSAS CITY,

October 15, 189l.

The Grand Lodge assâ&#x201A;Źlnbled pursuant to order, and was called to labor by the 1\1. VV'. Grand :Master, Brother "\Valker, with Grand Officers present as heretofore. The labors of the session were conlmenced ,,,ith prayer, Rev. John "\V. Robinson, Grand Chaplain, officiating. :Minutes of yesterday's session were read and approved. Thc Grand 1\IIaster annQunced that he had received a communication from a certain party at Rolla. "\Vishing to show no disrespect to the party, he submitted -the paper. On nlotion of Brother Briggs, the Grand Lodge declined to receive the comn1unication. It was then thrown alllong the rubbish. JURISPRUDENCE.

Brother W. M. vVillian1s, Chairman, presented a report fronl the Committee on Jurisprudence. The report "vas considered and approved, except the fifteenth item. Pending consideration of this item, the hour for the election of Grand Officers arrived, and the report was sent over to the afternoon session.

ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS.

The Grand Master appointed "\Vorshipful Brothers E.

II. Phelps, D. A. Jalnison, Jas. A. IIarris and R. S. Browne as Tellers.


,/

1891.J

Grand Lodge of Missoun:.

81

The election resulted in the choice'of BRo. B. H. INGRAl\I, Sedalia, Grand l\iaster. BRO.' JOHN R. PAHSON, St. Louis, Deputy GrandMaster. BRO. HARRY KEENE, St. Joseph, Grand Senior 'Varden. BRO. J. B. THOMAS, Albany, Grand Junior 'Varden. BRO. SAM. M. KENNARD, St. Louis, Grand Treasurer. BRO. JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis, Grand Secretary. The Grand Lodge was called from labor until 3 o'clock this afternoon.

THIRD DAY-AFTERNOO:K SESSION. KANSAS CITY, October 15, 1891. The 'Grand Lodge was called to labor at three 0 'clock P. ;\f., by Grand 'Master ,V a~k_er, with Grand Officers as heretofore. Amendments to Constitution read a third time. 'I'JURISPRUDENCE. , "d

The report of the Committee on Jurisprudence, pending when the election cOlnnlenced, was called up and discussed ,for a time, when the fifteenth iteul was adopted and the report adopted as a whole. It is hereto appended. To the Most WOl'ship.ful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F. &- A. ill.:

The Committee on Jurisprudence bas carefully considered the severa) matters refelTed to said committee, and recommends that the following disposition be made of the same: ' 1. The Grand Master properly permitted Amazonia Lodge, No. 320, to temporarily meet in the Hall of Savannah Lodge, No. 71, while the former was rebuilding its Hall, that had been destroyed by fire, and his action is hereby approved.


82

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

2. Wc agree with thc Grand ?lIaster, that the proceedings of Lacledc Lodge, No. 83, in holding, by mistake, a communication on a date other than that fixed by its By-Laws. and transacting business at said meeting that could only be attended to at It stated communkation, was illegal. The Grand ~Iltster so ruled, and his decisiOl.l is affirmed. 3. In the case of Aurora !~odge, No. 26i, where a petition for initiation was voted on, and one black ball appeared. and the Lodge was then called off, and, when called to labor, a second ballot was taken. resulting favorably to the petitioner, several members having, however, left thc Hall in the meantime, the Grand Master ruled that the candidate was not legally rejected; that, as onlf olle black ball appeared, the ballot should have been retaken at once. He further ruled that, a.<; several members had left the Hall under the belief that there would be no further ballot in the case, the subsequent proceedings were irregular, llnd the candidate not propely elected. He ordered another bll]lot, after proper notice to the members. His decision wltscorrect, and his action is approved. 4. It is needless to say that the Grand Master correctly held, that the proceedings, in Salem Lodge, No. 22:>, in the trial reported by him, wherein the accused admitted his guilt. bllt the Lodge, withollt hCluing any evidence, voted him not guilty, were illegal. His actioll in setting aside the procecdings and ordering a retrial, is hereby affirmed. :'. We approve the decision that "Lodges U. D. should be represented in the Hoards of Relief and contributc to the relief fund, the same as chartered Lodges." G. The ruling of the Grand l\!aster, "that an entered apl}rentice, who has violated our law by engaging in the saloon business, can not be granted a dimit," while engaged in that business, is in accordance with the previous action of this Grand Lodge and is affirmed.

i. The路 decision, that a Lodge has power to impose an afliliation fee upon petitiouers who were members of a Lodge that has becn extinct more than one year, no matter how recent the date of their Grand Lodge dimits, is hereby approved.

S. While we are not prepared to say, that it would be iUegal for the Grand Master to receive a petition for dispensation to form a new Lodge, upon which some of the petitioners held dimits more than one year old, and that his action in granting a dispensation, as to such parties, would be WJid, and that they would not become legal mem.bers of such new Lodge, .still we think that the Grand Master exercised a sound discretion in the case reported hy )lim, and that ordinarily it would bc unsafe and unwise to entrust the life of It new Lodge in the hands of those who had for years thought so little of their Masonic priYileges a,s to remain non-affiliates. and the Grand Master is commended fOJ: the prudent course adopted in the case referred to in his address.. g. The decision of the Grand )Iaster, that the petition for affiliation of a dimitted Mason. who is ineligible to membership under the laws of the Grand Lodge, should not be received by a Lodge, is approved. 10. \\'e concur in the sixth decision reported by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, as to the right and duty of the Tyler to vote upon petitions for initiation and applications for advancement; and also that he may be properly excused at his own request from voting upon applications for advaneement, when he has not been present at the examination of the candidate. This decision does not impair the force of previous rulings, that, while it is the right of the Tyler to vote, and the duty of the \VorshipfnlMRster to give him that opportunity, still, the omission, through oversight to do so, will not vitiate the result of the ballot. 11. The Grand Master decides that no Lodge CRn remove into the jurisdiction of another Lodge without the cOllSent of the latter. llnd his decision i~ approved.


1891.J

(hand Lodge of ltfissouri.

83

12. The decision that" The By-laws of a Lodge should specify a certain hour for meeting," is correct:. ]3. A member" of tl Lodge has the right to submit a motion to remit the dues of a 131"O\her. It is for the Lodge to determine, whether the financial condition of the party, whose dues are sought to be remitted, will justify that action. As the member of Grand River Lodge, No. 276, in the case reported by the Grand Muster, insisted upon having his motion submitted to the Lodge, and was so far in earnest as to appeal from the refusal of the Worshipfull\fasterto entertain it, and as the motion was one that he had the right to make, we do not think that the ~faster had the authority to refuse to put it before the Lodge. The ruling of the Worshipful Master of Grand River Lodge, No. 276, in refusing to entertain the motion, is disapproved. 14. Some rule should be laid down in regard to the conferring of degrees by our Lodges, at the request of Lodges of other Grand Jurisdictions, that will prevent unnecessary complications, and, at the same time, permit our Lodges to exercise that Masonic comity that should always exist between the several Grand .Jurisdictions. Some of the Grand Lodges require an examination in open Lodge, and an election to each degree; others only provide for one ballot for all of the degrees. We do not think that our laws, reqniring an examination in open Lodge, and im election to each degree, applies to cases where the work is done for a foreign Lodge. In the latter ease, it is the same as if the foreign Lodge had done the work itself. But suppose the foreign Grand Lodge ha~ a similar law to ours, and the caudidate is made a Master Mason by one of our Lodges, where there has been only one ballot in the Lodge preferring the request. In that ease, his own Grand Lodge might repudiate him, and he would be a Master Mason, in fact, although without a home. Such complications can and should be avoided. It would be well for our Lodges to proceed upon the theory that the laws of the other Grand Lodges are similar to ours, until the contrary is shown. We think that the following rule would be sufficient to govern such cases, and we recommend its adoptiou : 1'0 L'odge can confer the Degree of Entered Apprentice upon a candidate at the request of a Lodge in another Grand Jurisdiction, unless a certificate in writing, unde'r the seat of such Lodge, be presented, stating that the candidate has been duly elected in the Lodge preferring the request, and asking that the Degree be conferred by our Lodge; and no Lodge CUll confer the Degree of Fellow Craft or Master Mason for a Lodge in another Jurisdiction, unless the Lodge preferriilg the request shall certify, under its seal, that the candidate has been examined in open Lodge us required by our law, and elected to receive such degree; (or unless such Lodge shall certify that, under the laws of its Jurisdiction, one ballot elects the candidate to receive all of the Degrees, and that the candidate hilS made suitable proficiency, and that uU the requirements of said law have been complied with, and the candidate is entitled to receive the Degree which our Lodge is requested to confer, and this fact shall be further attested by the Grand Secretary of that Jurisdiction).

15.--We think that the ruling of the Worshipful Master of West Gate Lodge, No. 145, under the peculiar circumst.ances stated by the Grand Mas路ter,路 was c'arrect. We do not hold, as appellant contends we must, in approving this decision, that a member of a Lodge may file objections against receiving the petition of any unaffiliated Mason in the State. whether or not there is any probability of his petitioning this Lodge. In this case a petition for affiliation hud been presented, and the applicant had been rejected three times. The objecting member might not be able to attend all of the meetings of his Lodge, and the petition might be presented and acted upon during his enforced absence. We think that a member should have the right to protect himself, when unable to attend, by filing his objection to the reception of the petition, where, as in this case, t.here have beeil repeated applications and rejections.


84

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

16. The action of the Grand Master, in reference to the St. Patrick school property, is approved, and Brothers Hall and Jamison decline to accept any fee for the legal services rendered by them. The members of the committee, appointed by the Grand Master to investigate the title to this property, are entitled to the thanks of the Grand Lodge for tlle careful and pain!itaking examination made by them. Fraternally submitted. W. M. WILLIAMS, Chairman, L. B. VALLIANT, D. A. DEARMAND. J. \V.BOYD, R. S. BROWKE, G. :E. $IAYHALL, E. H. PHELPS,

REPORT ON D. D. G. M. REPORTS路

The COn1111ittee on District Deputy Grand Masters' reports subll1itted the following report, and it V\T~tS adopted: ']"0

the .Jl[osl Worshipful Gmnd Lod,qe of

Mis.~onl'i,

Your Committee on Reports of District the following:

A.

Deput~路

~P.

& A. Jf.:

Grand Masters beg leave to submit

All of the Deputies have made the report required by law, except t.hose in the Seventeenth and Nineteenth districts, who were prevented by sickness from making out and forwarding their reports. From these reports the gratifying a.'isurancc comes to us, that great interest and renewed zeal have been manifested by the Fraternity in the several districts during the past year, and that peace and harmony reign supreme in our Jurisdiction; the DepuHes have performed well that portion of the work assigned to them, and deserve the praise of the Fraternity for their labors well and faithfully done. Fraternall)' submitt.ed, JAMES P. WOOD, GEO. W. HENDERSOK, C. P. KINGSBURY, D..J. HEASTON, V. O. SAUNDERS, RUFUS l\f. EADES.

WAYS AND MEANS.

The following report fron1 the Committee on Ways and Means was read and adopted: To the Most Worshipful G1'Iwd Lodgenj Missom'i, A. F. & A. M. Your Committee on Ways and Means, respectfully submits the following report: We respectfully recommend that Deputies sent by the Most Worshipful G.i.:and ~Iaster to attend to special Masonic business at places other than their respective resi-


1891.J

Orand Lodge of Missouri.

85

deuces, be allowed thc sum of$3.00 per diem for each day actually spent iu attending to such business, in addition to their actual expenses; such per diem and expenses to be paid on the certificate of the:Most Worshipful Grand l\'1aster out of the fund hereinafter approprialed for that purpose. We respcctfully recommend that it be left to the discretion of the :i\fost Worshipful Grand Master to call and hold State Lodges 01 Instruction, at such times and places as he may deem to be of greatest benefit to the Craft.â&#x20AC;˘ We respectfully recommend that the Grand Lecturer be authorized to call and hold Schools of Instruction for the bencfit of the District Lecturers of the several Masonic Districts, at such times and places as may be deemed best and convenient, and that the actual and necessary expenses .of each of the District Lecturers attending such Schools of Instruction bc paid out of the fund hereinafter appropriated for that purpose upon the certificate of the Grand Lecturer. Wc make this recommendation with thc hope that it will be the means of making the work more uniform throughout the State. Osborn Lodge, No. 317, asks the Grand Lodge to remit its Grand Lodge dues for the year, 1891. Its petition states that its Hall has been burned three times within the last nine years, and that on two occasions it has lost its furniture and records from the same cause. In view of the fact, that the Grand Lodge has for a long time urged, and business policy suggested, that the SUbordinate Lodges shall protect themselves against calamity by tirc, by carrying insurance upon their property, and Osborn Lodge has becn derelictin its duty in til is respect, we deem it inadvisable to set a precedent derogatory to the principle heretofore adopted, and therefore respectfully recommend that the prayer contained iu the memorial of Osborn Lodge, No. 317, be not granted. But in view of the fact that the Lodge is endeavoring to recover from its loss, we recommend that said Lodge be granted time until the end of the present fiscal year in which to pay its dues now accrued. ' We respectfully recommend that the Grand l\1asterappoint a committee of one whose duty it shall be to examine into and look after the matter of the loan by the Grand Lodge to Mrs. Gibson. the daughter of Past Grand Master Stephen W. B. Carnegy, with full power in such committee to do or perform all acts necessary and proper, to protect and preserve the lien in favor of the Grand Lodge securing the loan. We respectfully recommend that the Grand Secretary and the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence curtail, to as great a.n extent as possible, the matter usually printed in the appendix to the Grand Lodge Proceedings, to the end that the expense of printing the proceedings may be reducect. We respectfully recommend that the Grand Secretary open an account with each matter of appropriation made by the Grand Lodge, and that in future his report to the Grand Lodge shall show each item of expenditure made in behalf of the Grand I..odge. specifically stating to which of such accounts each item of expenditure belongs. ''\'e further respectfully recommend that no moneys shall be expendect without a specific Il.ppropriation made by the Grand Lodge, and that in no event shall such appropriations be exceeded, except, in cases of special emergency, the Grand Master may order any expenditure he may deem proper and advisable. We find that the cash on hand in the Treasury of the Grand Lodge amonnts to the sum of$9,5i0.47.


[Oct.

P1'oceedings oj the

86

We recommend the following appropriations: Printing Proceedings of 18~11.. Rent of Grand Secretary's office Postage, printing, stationery and incid('ntals Salary of the Grand Secretary Salary of the Chairman on Foreign Correspondence Salary of the Grand 1'reasurer Sa11).ry and expenses of the Grand Lecturer.. J<:xpenses of the M. W. Grand Master Expenses and per diem of Special Deputies.................. Printing and distribntion for Committee on By-Laws Expenses for'Di8trict Lecturers' 8choo1s of Instruction Pay Roll, hereto attacheo

. ::;l,:WO 00

1.100 00 iOO 00 2,500 00 ,j(JO 00 1;>0 00 ~,250 00 25000 20000 2;')000 50000 251 i5

. .. . . . . . .. .. . ..

TotaL

$ 9.851 i5

PAY ROLL OF PAST GHA:'\D l\I.-\STEW,.

Past Grand :i\faster C. C. Woods, 188 miles, 3 days.......................... Geo. R. Hunt, 70 miles, 3 days...... N. M. Givan, 45 miles, 3 days..................... T. E. Garrett, 2i5 miles, 3 days W. R. Stubblefield, 275 miles, 3 days.............. A. :M. Dockery, 76 miles, 3 day~.............................................. R. Eo Anderson, 206 miles. 3 days............. J. W. Boyd, 68 miles, ::> days Jos. S. Browne. 68 miles, 3 days..................................... Lee A. Hall, 2i5 miles, 3 days W. l\L Williams, 15.5 miles, 3 days ;........................ J. P. \Vood, 216 miles, 3 days R. F. Stevenson, 3 days............... Grand Chaplain C. H. Briggs, 143 miles, 3 days......... .T. W. Robinson, 275 miles. 3 days

18 12 11 22 22 12 19

40 50 2;)

7,j i,j RO 30 1~ 40 12 10 22 i5 16 i5 1980 9 00 16 15 227,j

Whereas a small deficiency may be occasioned by reason of the above appropria, tions, together with other appropriations made at this session, we recommend, that snch deficiency mil.)' be paid Ollt of moneys to be received during the coming year. F1'llternally submitted,

â&#x20AC;˘

ROBERT Eo COLLINS, F. J. TYGARD, A. l\f. HOUGH, ERWIN ELLIS, J. B. THOMAS, R. F. STEVENSON, SEYMOFR HOYT, Comm'iJfI;¡f'.


1891.J

Grand Lodge of Jlfissouri.

87

RESOLUTION.

The following was adopted: WHEHEA~, The Grand Lodge, at its present Grand Communication, has made ample provision for the futurc financial status of thc "Masonic Home of Missouri;" therefore,

Resolved. That it is the scnse of thIs Grand Body, that if thcre bc llny obligation to the Board of Directors of said Home, on account of SUbscriptions, by any of the Subordinatc Lodgcs, that said Board of Directors should rclieve such Lodges from any such obligations; and thc Grand Lodge recommends that thc Board of Dircctor路s of the Home, take such action at once, with sl1ch Lodges as dcsirc to bc so relieved: LESLIE OHEA I{.

MEMOIRS.

The Committee on l\lemoirs reported as follmvs, and the same was adopted: To the Most WOl'shipfal Grand Lodge of Aiisso~tl'i, A. 1': &-

A. ,1[. :

The Committee on Memorial respectfully submit the following rcport : Year by year we are called upon to mourn the loss of those who are near and dear to us, and as the sad news comes we realize that somet.hing has gone out of our li \'es that can ncy!:'r come again. Here amI there -we note a vacant chair, and as we unfold memory's golden pages, we find inscribed therein a record of the lives and virtues of those who once occupied them. But, although lost to sight, their good deeds remain as a precious heritage to those to whom our departed friends were bound in the golden chain of brotherhood. The past year has been 110 exception, and in pursnance of his appointed task, the grim Reaper has been busy in our midst. Two of our Brothers, 011 wh()Jn this Grand Lodge had conferred the most distinguished honors it could confer, have been called hence. ?If. W. BRO. MARCUS H.

McFARLA~(),

P. G. :\1.

Most Worshipful Bro. M. H. McFarland died at the horne of his son in Texas, on the 4th day of November. 1890, and was buried by Troy Lodge, No. 34, at Troy, :il:fisSOUl'i, of which Lodge he had long been an honored member. The Committee arc not advised as to when Brother McFarland was made a :Mason. He was a member of Clarksville Lodge, Ko. 17. in 1847. dimitting.from that Lodge in the fall of that year, and affiliated with Ashley Lodge; was elected iti> Worshipful :\Iai>ter, appearing Oll the rolls of the Grand Lodge in May, 1848. After a long and honorable service in this Grand Lodge, he wa.,> elected Deputy Grand Master in 18::>9 lind Grand Master in 1860.


88

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

In 1861, in his address as Grand Master, he said, speaking of the Holy Bible and its relations to Masons and l\fasonry: "The first thing that you see in a Lodge is that great revealed light: The first thing that you profess in a Lodge is a trust in the God whom you learn to know in that revelation. Let us, therefore, as Masons, ever remember this fact, when in our Lodges we offer devotions at our Altar, looking to Him whom the Altar represents. and I take this occasion to observe that no man who doubts the existence of God or His providence over the world-and no man who disbelieves or doubts that our Bible is His revelation-and no man who does not intend thenceforth to poli~h the AshIer according to the teachings of the Bible, can ever become what Masonry contemplates." No truer words could have been spoken, nor could anything more clearly reveal the inner life of the man or the motive that actuated him.

Brother McFarland was a physician of more than ordinary ability, and having chosen this as his life work, devoted himself to it with a singleness of purpose and so intelligent a judgment, that he took high rank among his professional brethren. He was a man of marked character, strong willed and inflexible in purposc and opinion; yet withal kindly hcarted and generous, and was always rcady to minister to the wants of the sufferer, and with ready handed charity to relieve distress wherever he encountered it. M. W. BRO.

JKO.

H. 'fURNER, P. G. M.

?II. W. Bro. Turner died December 14,1890. He was an old and honored member of the Grand Lodge, having first appearcd on its register as Worshipfnl Master of Livingston Lodge, No.. 51, in 1848, at which session he served as chairman of the Committee on Chartered Lodges; was selected as one of the curators of the Masonic Collegc, at I~xing足 ton, and was appointed District Deputy Grand Mastcr of his District.

The Grand Lodgc records show that Brother Turner was l1 working member of this Graild Body, and for years we find him serving on its most important committees. In rccognition of his services to the Craft. he was elected to the highest office in our gift. being called to the c;rand East in 1863. Rrother 'furncr succeedcd to that high office during the most troublous times of our Civil War, and at a time when skill and sagacity to plan, and firmness to execute, were requisite in a presiding officer. The committee regrets that it has no definite knowledge of his individuallllasonic history. or of hi.s life, but those who knew him, rcmcmber him as a genial companion, It courteous gentleman. And so our Brothers have passed away. During the later years of their lives-age; with its infirmities, pressing- upon them-they were not able to attend the scssions of this Grand Body, and to most of them now with us, they were but a mCliory. Shall a man's good deeds live after him? Aye, indecd! And by them shall wc bc enabled to preserye thei;' memory, and treasure up their yirtlles. LEE A. HALL, GEO. R. HUNT, C. C. WOODS.

MEMORiAL.

Brother J. P. \\Tood presented a memorial fr0111 rr. s; Davis, asking the Gra.nd Lodge to re-open his case, which


1891.J

G1'and Lodge of fifissouri.

89

had been disposed of one year ago upon an appeal from the action of Sturgeon Lodge, No. 174, which expelled him for selling liquor. The Grand Lodge refused to re-open the case, or consider it furthcr, unless thc menlorialist COInes reconlnlended by said Sturgeon Lodge, No. 174. CREDENTIALS.

R. \V. Robert S .. Browne, presented his credentials as the representative of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, near this Grand Lodge. He was recognized as such and welcomed by the Grand Master. He then offered the following paper concerning the illegitimate organization formed in Ohio: . \VHJ<;REAS, This Grand Lodge has been (officially notified of the organi1.ation of a so-called Grand Lodge, at Worthington,.in the State of Ohio, and, WHEREAS, The principle of the integrity of each Grand Lodge's Sovereignty within State limits has ever been maintained in this Jurisdiction, and, â&#x20AC;˘ WHEREAS, This Grand Lodge is on terms of fraternal comity with the onl~' Grand IAldge of Ohio, of which ]\fost Worseipful Levi C. Goodale is Grand Master, therefore be it, Rcsolvcd, That all Lod.ge~ in this Jurisdiction be and are hereby notified of the existence of the Spurious Grand Lodge, at. Worthington, Ohio, and are instructed to allow no one owing allegiance to said pretended bod~' to visit them; that all Masons of this Jurisdiction are hereby forbidden to visit any Lodge connected with said pretended Grand Body, or to hold allY Masonic intercourse, whatever, with anyone connected in any manner with any of said Lodges. R . BROWNE. C. H. BRIGGS.

THANKS .

. The thanks of the Grand Lodge to the Masonic Fraternity of Kansas City, were expressed in the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted with much enthusiasnl by a rising vote: Resolved, That our Mlllionic:Brethren of Kansas City have the thanks of this Grand Lodge for the right royal hospitality which they have extended to us, and that we return to our homes with best wishes for the continued prosperity of their great city in which we, as Missourians, have a personal intere~t and pride, and with hearts full of lIfasonic love for the Kansas City Masons. L. B. VALLIANT, JOHN D. VINCIL.


90

PToceed'ings of the

[Oct.

HOME DIRECTORS路

. On motion of Brother 'Vallace, Brothers Noah 1\-1. Givan, John D. "Vincil, 'V. M:. Williams and Joseph S. Browne were elected members of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home for the terJl1 of three years. BY-LAWS.

M:. \V. Bro. 'V. R. 'Stubblefield presented the following, ,vhich was adopted: . To tlle Jfost Worshipful Grand Lodge of ilfi.i;.~onri, A. F. & A. ]'f. :

Your Committee on By-Laws begs leave to repOlt, that no business has been prescnted for its consideration. Hespectfully submitted, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD.

PRINTED PROCEEDINGS.

R. VV. Bro. Thomas offered the following resolution, ,vhich was adopted: Resolved., That the Grand Secretary be instructed to have printed, for distribution, twenty-five hundred (2,500) copies of the Proceedings of this Grand Lodge Session. J. B. THOMAS.'

APPOINTMENTS.

The Grand :Master elect, Bro. B. H. Ingram, announced the appointed officers for the term. INSTALLAT.ION.

The Grand ~1aster, :M. vV'. Bro. Geo. :E. Walker, requested Bro. Allan :McDowell to' assist Brother 'Vrn.


Grand Lodge oj Missouri.

1891.J

91

Richardson, Gra.nd :Marshal~ in making preparations. for the installation of the. Grand Officers, and proceeded to install hi~ successor, lVI. '\T. Bro. B. H. Ingram, who installed the remai n ing officers .

./

ELECTIVE GllAND OFFICERS.

B. II. INGRAM, Sedalia .lOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis. HARRY KEENE, St. Joseph

GRAXD MASTER . DEPUTY GRAXD MASTEl{. GRAND SENIOR WARDEN.

..

J. R. THOMAS, Albany

GRAND JUNIOR WARDEN.

SAl\!. )f. KENNARD, * St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Lonis

GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECRETARY.

"'Brother Kellnard being absent was not installed. His installation was ordered hy the Grand Master, and took place in St. Louis by Bro. John R. Parson.

A PPOINTED OFFICERS.

The following appointed officers were duly installed: ALLAN 1fcDOWELL, St. Louis

Grand Lecturcr.

REV. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette REV ..J. W. ROBINSON, Bridgeton

:

Gmnd Chaplain. Gmlld Chap{{lin.

A. M. HOUGH, .Jefferson City

Grand Senior Dca<:()ll.

D. A..JAMISON, St. Louis

Grand Ju.ni01路 Deacon.

D. A. DEARMAND, Butler

Grand Omlor.

GEO. F. PUTNAM, Kansas City E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City

:

Grand Oralor. Gmn.d ll[arshal.

WM. RICHARDSON, St. Louis

Grand MarShal.

W. V. HAY, Lamar

Grand Swol'd BcarC}'.

J. C. HEARNE, St..Joseph C. D. McCOY, Independence

:

A. H. KOLL"SlEYER, New Florence ,JOHN W. OWEN, St. J"ouis

Grand Pursui路vanl. Grand Senior Steward. Grand JuniOl' SI('/(.'a1'l1.

; Grand 'l?Jla.


92

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 1st District-EDWARD HIGBEE. Lancaster. 2d A. FISHER, La Belle. 3d GEO. E. MAYHALL, New London. 4th J. H. ORR, Frankford. 5th CHAS. J. WALKER, \VentzviIle. 6th WM. H. CARPENTER, Centralia. 7th R. E. WITT, Fayette. 8th. JNO. J. DILLINGER, Owasco. 9th GEO. W. DEATHERAGE, Carrollton. 10th CRAS. S. GLASPELL, Trenton. 11th NORTON B. ANDERSON, Platte City. 12th HARRY KEENE, St. Joseph. lath A. C. HOPKINS, Burlington Junction. 14th J. B. THOMAS, Albany. 15th A. MOORE BERRY, St. Louis. 16th ROB"!' S. BROWNE, Potosi. 17th F. A. KAGE, Cape Girardeau. 18th WELTON O'BANNON, New Madrid. 19th .lAS. 1\1. McGHEE, Van Buren. 20th FERD. W. WEBB, Steelville. 21st 22d J: T. SHORT, Jefferson City. 23d O. A. CRANDALL, Sedalia. 24th S. T. LYNE, Slater. 25th JAMES GIBSON, Kani'!L.<; City. 26th F. H. CLARK, Harrisonville. 27th SEYMOUR HOYT, GrcellfielO.. 28th FLAVIUS A. AFFLECK, Bolivar. 29th C. W. CARTER, Exeter. 30th 1\L T. DAVIS, Aurora. 31st F. W. LAKER, Springfield. 32d E. C. STEELE, Hartville. 33d J. F. RHEA, Dixon. 31th JNO. B. ROSS, l\iound City.

CHAIR:\fEN OF STANDING CmDHTTEE路S. FOREIGN COHHESPONDENCE ACCOUNTS APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES BY路LAWS CHARITY ON REPORTS OF D. D. GRAND JURISPRUDENCE LODGES U. D CHARTERED LODGES WAYS AND MEANS

:

MA~T.ERS

REV. Jl\O. D. VINCIL, D. D., SI. Louis. FRED. W. MOTT, St. Louis. NOAH ,,1. GIVAN, Harrisonville. LESLIE OREAR, Marshall. R. Q. ROACHE, California. JAS. P. WOOD, New London. LEROy P. VALLIANT, St. Louis. P. J. HEUER, St. Loui8. LEE A. HALL, St. Louis. R E. COLLINS, St. Louis.


1891.J

G?'and Lodge of 1I1i.ssouri.

93

CLOSING.

The business of the session having been disposed of, the lninutes of the day were read and approved. M:. VV. Bro. Walker, the retiring Grand ~laster, took occasion to express to the Brethren his sense of obligation for the honor confelTe~ at the comnlencement of his tenn in being chosen Grand l\laster, and for the courteous and fraternal treatment received during his administration now closed. Brother Ingram, the new incumbent, addressed the Grand . Lodge, acknowledging, with gratitude, the high con1pliment paid him, and urged the co-operation of all, in order to the advancement of the Craft and its elevation to a higher plane of morality and virtue. He then proceeded to close, and did close the l\/r. 'V. Grand Lodge in AMPT.JE FORM, .prayer being made by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Brother C. H. Briggs. JOIIX D. VINCIL,

G?'and Secretary.

NOTE BY THE GRAND SECRETARY. Owing to the Grand Lodge Session being ,held in Kansas City-so far from this office-there has been an unavoidable delay in delivering .the Proceedings. It was impossible to furnish copy to my printer in St. Louis with the same facility as heretofore. However, the delay has been a brief one. The Grand Lodge closed on Thursday, the 15th of October, and the work of mailing Proceedings began on the 21st. JOHN D. VINCIL.


ANNUAL

COM~IUNICATION IN

1892.

The Seventy-second Annual Conununication of the. Grand Lodge will be held in St. Louis, commencing at 10 o'clock on the 1110rning of the First 'ruesday after the Second Monday (viz., the 11 th day) in October, 1892.


97


99


101


103


-1-------------------------11105


APPENDIX.


REPOR'r

ON

CORRESPONDENCE. -_e路_----:

ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 1st, 1891. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of J.lfissmm:, A. F. & A. M. I herewith submit my Annual Report on Correspondence:

ALABAMA,

1890.

The Seventieth Annual Communication was opened in the city of. Montgomery, on the 1st day of December, 1890. l\L ,V. Bro. Henry Hart Brown was Grand Master. and Dr. MyleS'. Jefferson Greene, Grand Secretary. ' Brother Greene, since becoming the successor of the late venerable Brother Sayre, has written me asking how I manage to deliver theGrand Lodge Proceedings so soon after the close of our Annual Sessions. It seems that he has acquired this knowledge by experience al}d vigorous effort, as a handsome annual of 240 pages was printed and delivered in a short space of time following the close of their Seventieth. Session. I begin to fear he has learned so rapidly how to dispateh his work that he may soon leave me behind. From his excellent recap~tulation I learn that there are 320 chartered Lodges on the roll; 305 of these made returns, and 2GO paid dues. There were present representatives from 240 Lodges, besides representatives of quite a number of Grand Lodges. Seven Past Grand :i\fasters appear on the list. I do not understand why Missouri was not marked as among the Grand Lodges represented, as Brother Henry Clay Thompkins, our Representative neal"the Grand Lodge of Alabama, was present at this session. The Address of Grand Master Brown, covering some fourteen pages, is an able document. He announced the continued growth of their State in population and wealth, and prophesied that Alabama is destinel to take its place among the leading States of the American Union. G. L. Ap.-l.


2

Appendix.

[Oct.

He urged that effort should be made to place l\:Iasonry fully abreast with the rapid growth and material prosperity of the State. He stated that while not depreciating Masonry in Alabama, he. was compelled to say that they fell very far short of what ought and what might be done by the Fraternity. One of the defects emphasized is a want of :;\iasonic knowlege among a large majorfty of the membership in the Subordinate Lodges. The consequence of this, be said, was a great lack of interest in the workings of the Lodges on the part of many who were initiated. He recommended as a cure for this evil that the Grand Lodge should establish a more efficient system of lecturing the Lodges, and that the Lodges themselves should adopt methods for the instruction of their members. Another point to which he gave special attention was that there is not in Alabama Masonry that close bond of union, brotherly Jove and friendship that should exist. The wants of the indigent and 11eedy among the Brotherhood, together with the claims of the ,vidows and orphans of the fraternal dead, are not c~lfed and provided for as they should be. This he ascribes to the lack of organized and systeInatic effort on the part of many Lodges. He presented a number of practical recominendations respecting the nature and application of their laws. His final recommendation was that a committee of five members be created for the purpose of considering the question of establishing a IVlasonic Home for widows and orphans. Then followed a list of official acts which are purely local and need not be referred to here. Seventeen decisions were reported. The Committee on Jurisprudence approved all the rulings of the Grand l\1:aster except two. The death of Past Grand Master George D. Narrows was announced. The Grand :l\faster said that he was one of the oldest and brightest stars in the Masonic constellation of Alabama. The Grand Lodge recognized the legal status of a new Body created in Australia, known as the Grand Lodge of Tasmania. I find a tribute rendered by a committee to the memory of their Junior Grand 'Varden, Brother Augustus L. Milliken.

Brother Greene presented a report full and complete. The Grand Lodge tendered a vote of thanks to Mrs. Daniel Sayre, widow of their late Grand Secretary, for contributions of valuable Masonic literature to the library. . A committee of three was appointed and assigned the duty of collecting and codifying all the laws and edicts of the Grand Lodge, including


1891.J

Appendi;r.

,3

therewith their Constitution, and report the same to the next regular Communication. Seventeen Lodges were charterE;ld during the session. A paper was adopted declaring that it is desirable that the Masonic Fraternity of Alabama should establish a Home for indigent widows and orphans of deceased :Masons. The paper provided that a committee of five members be appointed to consider the subject and report to the next session of the Grand Lodge with a plan to carry out the idea. A resolution was adopted authorizing the appointment of a committee to procure a testimonial to be presented to the retiring Grand Master, Brother Brown, and the sum of $100 was set apart to carry out that object. This Grand Lodge has a permanent ~rust Fund, amounting to $21,000. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother Palmer J. Pillans presented a report covering 122 pages. It contains a summary of the doings of the several Grand Lodges reviewed, and is largely filled with extracts. Missouri was not noticed. GEORGE M. MORROW, Birmingham, Grand Master. lVIYLES J. GREENE, Montgomery, Grand Secretary.

ARIZONA,

1890.

The Ninth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge convened in the City of Phcenix, on the 11th day of November. Brother George J. Roskruge, Grand Master, presided. No Grand Secretary being present, Brother lVIorris Goldwater filled that position by appointment during the session. Six Lodges were represented. Three Past Grand Masters, and Representatives of fifteen Grand Lodges were enrolled. A Journal of less than fifty pages, handsomely gotten up and neatly printed, came to hand four months after the close of the session. I find eight chartered Lodges on the roll, with one under dispensation. The membership is reported at 429, showing a gain路over last yearof five.


Appendix.

[Oct,

Past Grand Master Isaac S. Titus, of California, being present as a visitor, was introduced and welcomed by the Grand Lodge. The Address of Grand Master Roskruge was very brief, covering only four pages. It contains little of general interest. ITe annou'nced one ruling, which was approved, to the effect that seven Master Masons and members of a Lodge, were. required to be present in order to transact business. Permission had been granted by him to some Lodge to confer degrees out of time.' lIe submitted several recol1unen"dations to the consideration of the Grand Lodge. His suggestion was approved, requiring 'Wardens to be proficient in the work before they are eligible for installation as Masters of Lodges. A brief financial statement was presented as emanating from the office of the Grand Secretary. Reports of Committees on Jurisprudence and Appeals presented and approved. One new Lodge had been created under dispensation. It was announced in one of the reports of a Committee, that peace and harmony prevailed throughout the Jurisdiction.

The Grand :Master was tendered a vote of thanks. The Grand Lodge of New South 'Wales was recognized, while the request for recognition coming from the Grand Lodge of Ne,v Zealand was postponed. There is no report on Correspondence. The City of Phcenix was chosen as the seat of the next session. The retiring Grand Master, Brother George J. Roskruge, was elected Grand Secretary and returns to his former station. He lives at Tucson. Brother' George W', Cheyney, of Tombstone, was elected Grand Master.


1891.J

Appendix.

5

ARKANSAS, 1890. The Fifty-first Annual Communication commenced its labors in I . ittle Rock, on the 18th day of November. lVI. "'V. Bro. J. "'V. Sorrells, Grand Master, presided. Brother Fay Hempstead was Grand Secretary. Inote the presence of eight Past Grand .l\fasters and the Representatives of twenty-two G'rand Lodges. Missouri was represented by our distinguished Brother, John J. Sumpter, P. G. l\L Representatives were reported as present from 358 Lodges. There are 426 LO,dges on the roll. The membership, as shown by the Statistical Table, amounted to 12,654, a gain of 331. ADDRESS.

Grand Master Sorrells pres~nted a plain, unpretentious, business document, covering fourteen pages. He said the past year had been one of great prosperity along all lines of material growth and industry, while peace and harmony had prevailed throughout the State, and they had been exempt from the ravages of pestilence and famine. In this general prosperity of the State, Masonry had largely shared. In reporting his official acts, he stated that dispensations had been granted for the formation of eleven Lodges. The records show that sixteen Lodges received charters during the session. The Grand Master announced the death of their Grand 'l'reasurer, Brother George H. Meade, who died in Little Rock the 18th day of October, 1890. At a subsequent part of the session, a very appropriate memorial was rendered by a committee, and adopted by the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master reported six decisions, which I consider sound and correct. His rulings were approved, except some little doctoring was given one of them, while one ,vas not approved. I agree with the Grand Master, rather than with the Committee on one point. The Committee decided that a petition, accompanied by a dimit, should be received by any Lodge ,,,,hen presented, and referred to a cDmmittee, 路withont the party having been examined or vouched for. It then said that such petition should' not be Teported on, until the applicant had


6

Appendix.

[Oct.

been examined or vouched for. To this view of the case I file my objection. In my judgment, no petition for affiliation should be received by any Lodge until the petitioner has been vouched for, and thereby known to the Lodge as a Master Mason. To hold otherwise, would be to admit that a man may become a petitioner for membership who is not known to anyone as a Mason. If it should turn out that he could not pass an examination, or be vouched for by some one who knew him to be a Mason, the Lodge will have committed the blunder of considering a petition on which it can take no action. The case would then have to be summarily thrown out of court. The Grand Master's decision was defective in one point, wherein he says~ "A dimit, of ttself, is no evidence that its possessor is a Mason." It may be said in reply to this statement, that a dimit is documentary evidence and nothing more. This documentary proof of good Masonic standing when it was received by the party, will justify a committee to examine him, and if found in possession of the requisite knowledge, his petition may legally be presented and considered. This I hold to be the true mode of procedure in such matters. Grand Master Sorrells, in his sixth decision, exhibits eminent ability and soundness as to doing Masonic work on the Sabbath. He decided against all ritualistic work on that holy day, and furnished arguments clear and unanswerable. I1is views are so much like my own, enunciated a few years ago, that I accord to him a true knowledge of the principles governing this question. Arkansas Masons have an anti-saloon regulation, which the Grand l\iaster alluded to in his Address. In 1886, the Grand Lodge said that no saloon-keeper should be initiated into the Masonic Fraternity, and no person should be retained in membership, who entered into that business after becoming a Mason. This is a pretty sound doctrine. The only objection I have to it is that saloon-keepers who continue in the degrading business are not put out, and hav.e done with recognizing those as Brethren, who continue in that disreputable calling. The Grand Master in his recommendations commended to the Fraternity, "Masonic insurance," as represented by their "Mutual Relief Association i" and also endorsed the "Jfa.sonic Trowel" as the organ of the Grand Lodge. This journal is published by Brother George Thornburg, P. G. 1\1. The Grand l\Iaster closed his very business-like Address in appropriate terms. The committee having considered the subject, reported against the recognition of the Grand Lodge of New Zealarid.


1891.J

Appendix.

7

Brother Fay Hempstead, Grand Secretary, presented a very full and able report, in which it is shown that the income of tbe Grand Lodge for the year amounted to $9,487. The expense account, including a large pay roll, footed up to S8,458, leaving a balance in the Treasury of about $1,000. ST. Jorr~'s COLLEGE.

From the report of a committee on this interest, it is learned that their college has been disposed of at last by the Grand Lodge of Arkansas. The Committee stated that shortly after the last session, the Trustees effected a sale of the college buildings and ground. The Grand Lodge of Arkansas is to be路 congratulated upon having disposed of this elephant so long on hand, but now done for forever. Grand Lodges have learned wisdom of late years, and it is to be hoped they will not experiment in future, in attempting to run an educational insti tution at the expense of the Fraternity. The State and churches furnish all the opportunities the people need for complete and thorough education. The mission of Masonry is to build up, establish and maintain charity and morality. If the money lost by some of the Jurisdictions in the erection of Masonic colleges, had been invested in the present grand work of the Craft, that of building Masonic Homes for widows and orphans, greater fruits would now be harvested to the glory of the institution. The Proceedings under review show that as a result of the sale of the college, a Masonic Temple is to be 'erected in Little Rock. The announcement was made that the Temple would be finished and ready for use by November, 1891. It would be more to the glory of Arkansas Masonry to have invested the proceeds of the sale of their college property in a Masonic Home. ORATIO~.

The Grand Orator, Brother C. C. Hamby, delivered an address covering some eight pages. It is a very practical and pertinent oration. In it he urged most eloquently his plea in behalf of a home for destitute widows and helpless orphans. I hope that the good seed already sown will produce happy results in the coming time. Quite extensive reports were rendered by the Committees on Appeals and Jurisprudence. There ,vas no report on Foreign Correspondence. 'V. H. RA:;\ISEY, Camden, Grand Master. FAY HEMPSTEAD, Little Rock, re-elected Grand Secretary. Since the foregoing review was completed, I have received a circular from the Grand East of Arkansas, formally announcing the death of Brother Albert Pike.


8

[Oct.

Appendix.

This distinguished Mason first entered the institution in that Jurisdiction, and according to the statement of the Grand Master, was, at the time of his death, a member of one of their Lodges. It is therefore most appropriate that a notice of our distinguished Brother should be made in connection with the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas. No tribute emanating from me, can do jusHce to the greatness of this eminent character. Albert Pike was one of the brainy men of the century. As a poet and chaste writer, he had but few equals, and ranked high in culture and valued scholarship. It is with sad pleasure that I append the circular sent out by Grand Master Ramsey, to my report, thereby placing upon record a fraternal tribute to the memory of the distinguished dead: OFFICE OF TilE GnAND MASTER OF THE GHA~m LODGE F. &: A. M'} OF ARKA~SAS. CAMJ)E~, ARK., April1th, 1891.

To the

HTol'.~hinfall1{aster, Wardens and Brethren of the several Lodges of lids Grand Jltrisdiction, and the Crafl at large :

BHETIlREN: -The sad inLc'1ligence is borne to us of the death, in Washington, D. C., the evening of April 2d, 11:191. of our beloved Brother ALBERT PIKE, in the 82d year of his age. His prominence as It :l\Iason and lIS a man calls for something more thall an ordinary expression on our part; parti.cularly since he was not only received into our Fruternity within this Gran(l Jurisdiction, but at the time of his death \ras in full fellowship and affiliation with one of the Lodges thereof. . 011

He was made It lIfason ill Western Star Lodge No.2, of Little Rock, in 1850; became It charter member of i\laO'llolia Lodge, No. 60, Little Hock, at its formation, and held membership in that Lodge at the time of his death; circumstanccs which we reg1ud with feeliugs of just pride. He WllS the supreme head of certain branches of l\fasonry in all the world, and his scholarship alld profound erudition, earned for him a world-wide fame. The greatness of hi~ mental gifts has become a matter of general history, alld he has left behilld him mallY works to ellrich the literature of the age, both that which pertains to our Order, and that which relates to the world at large. Trnly, Brethren, a strong man has fll11en in our midst. There lies It broken column in the lalld, whose greatness will seem greater as the years shall roll aWHY. As a present recognition of his emillence, find a testimonial of our regard alld affection for him, I hereby direct that the various Lodges of this .Jurisdiction shall cause the Altar, and the .Jewels thereoll, to be suitably draped in mourning, immediately after the receipt of this circular, and so to remain tor a period of Ilinety days. W. K. RA11SEY, Gmnd ].faster.

BRITISH COLUMBIA,

1890.

The Nineteenth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge was held at the city of Vancouver, commencing June 19th. A pamphlet of seventy-two pages, containing the business of that session, came to hand too late for notice by me last year, though my report was not closed till autumn. There are ten chartered Lodges with a membership of 6i8 in t.his jurisdiction.


1891.J

Appendix.

9

Brother J. S. Clute, Grand :Master, presided over the Nineteenth Session, and all of the Lodges were represented. Brother Henry Brown ,vas Grand Secretary. A brief business Address recounted the official acts of the Grand Master. He reported the last year as a prosperous one in the Jurisdiction. Ko disturbance of any kind impaired their fraternal relations with sister Grand Lodges. It is the cnstom of this Grand Body, during its session, to attend church in a body and participate in divine services. During the session under consideration the Grand Lodge repaired to the church, when the Grand Chaplain preached what was pronounced "a very interesting and impressive sermon."

The reports of the various officers occupied most of the J oumal. Nothing of general interest is found claiming attention here. There was no Report on Correspondence. A.. ::.vlcKEO'iVK, Victoria, Grand l\Iaster. HENRY BROWN, Victoria, Grand ~ecretary.

CALIFORNIA,

1890.

The Forty-first Annual Communication opened in the :Masonic Temple, San l'rancisco, October 14th. 1\1. 'iV. Bro. l\1. l\f. Estee, Grand Master, present and presiding. Brother George Johnson, Assistant Grand Secretary, held the position of his chief, who was absent. Six new charters were granted dnring the session' and, added to the former list of Lodges, made a total of 247, of which ~06 were represented. The membership in the jurisdiction was reported at 15,83], sho\ving a gain of some 400. Ten Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers were enrolled as present, with ~{epresentatives of a large number of Grand Lodges. The large and snperb Journal of Proceedings now under review is signed by the venerable Grand Secretary, Brother Alexander G. Abell, though he was not present during the session. His absence is accounted for by the Grand Master, who stated that one year ago the dangerous illness of Brother Abell had been reported. It was then hardly expected that he 'would long continue in actual service. However, he had remained at his post of duty with great regularity until two months prior to the session. rr:he Grand :Master regretfully announced that the


10

Appendix.

[Oct.

Grand Secretary was unable longer to perform the duties of his office and that for the first time in thirty-five years his face was not seen in the Grand Lodge of California. In view of the fact that soon after this session Brother Abell passed away, the following tribute from the Address of the Grand l\faster is appropriate: I cannot find words strong enough to express my sense of obligation to him or to bear to him, in his confinement at home, the extent of the gratitude of the Brethren within this Jurisdiction for the eminent services which he has rendered in the great office he has held for over It third of a century. Even now, in his infirmities, he fills the first place among the leuding Masons of our country. He has done more to build up ~asonry on the Pacific slope than any ot.her man. lIe was here in the infancy of this Grand Body, and for thirty-five years he has stood at the helm of the ?lfasonic ship and guided its course. Olle by one of his early and old time }Ia.~onic associates have crossed to the other shore until he and Past Grand Master Stevenson are left almost alone among the founders of )oIasonry in California. Tn ?lIasonry the good that mcn do lives after them, so 0111' illustriolls Brother has not lived in vain. Afay his days be };iWltl~I~~~v~I~~sh~J~I~~eo~~l~~~nue to receive the merited rewards due the good and

Grand Secretary Abell has produced his last report and surrendered the responsible position so long and faithfully filled to another. He died in December following the close of the Grand Lodge and was duly honored by the Fraternity of California, who accorded him the largest funeral ever seen on the Pacific Coast. ADDRESS.

The Annual Address of Grand )fastel' Estee was unusually brief, covering only four pages. His introduction is suggestive and thoughtful. The announcement was made that the Fraternity in California is "prosperous and peaceful." Six new Lodges had been created under dispensation .. The sick and distressed had been cared for and assisted. The Grand Master said that the various Boards of Relief had done their full duty and that they could not be too kindly mentioned and approbated. In reviewing the finances of the Body the Grand Master approved an amendment, heretofore submitted, to cut down the Grand Lodge dues to one dollar per member. The per capita had formerly been one dollar and twenty-five cents. He further recommended that the salary of the Grand Secretary be decreased $600 per annum, fixing it at $3,000, and that the salary of the Assistant Grand Secretary be fixed at $1,500. . He commended the. faithful labors of the Grand Lecturer and recommended that his compensation be fixed at $600, with a small amount

I


1891.J

Appendix.

11

for traveling expenses. A further recommendation was presented, cutting down appropriations to the Boards of Relief ten per cent. These various reductions were suggested that the expenses might be brought within their income. A recommendation was submitte'd that the minimum fee for degrees be fixed at 830, instead of 850. The Grand Orator, Dr. Barrows, was reported as dangerously ill with brain fever, in consequence of which he was unable to discharge the duties of his appointment. The Grand Master condemned the custom which obtains in that Jurisdiction of using what he terms the "Black Book." This seems to be published throughout the Jurisdiction, containing the names of all persons who have been rejected by the Lodges. The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were full and quite extended. Owing- to the illness of Grand Secretary Abell and his absence, the Assistant Grand Secretary presented the annual report of that officer. Brother Abell said that owing to extreme illness his report had been prepared by the Assistant Grand Secretary. That venerable officer tleemed to have a premonition of his coming death. The Grand Lecturer, Brother J. ",V. Anderson, furnished an elaborate and detailed statement of his labors. The reports of the several Boards of Relief in that Jurisdiction find a place in the Journal of Proceedings. The Grand Lodge presented to Past Grand Master Tinnin a handsome gold watch and chain. These testimonials' heretofore have been made from the funds of the Grand Lodge. The committee having charge of the question of expenditures, appointed last year, recommended a reduction of expenses, so far as the officers are concerned. The salary of the Grand Secretary was fixed at $3,000; that of the Assistant, $1,800. This committee recommended that the salary of the Grand Lecturer be discontinued. This was not done, however, as the Grand Lodge voted him $500 salary, out of which he is to pay his own expenses. The custom of paying for testimonials for retiring Grand Masters out of the funds of the Grand Lodge was discontinued. MASONIC HOME.

The committee appointed to consider. this important question presented an excellent report, which was made the special order of the


12

AppendÂŁx.

[Oct.

day following its presentation. On said day the matter was discussed and the report rejected: It was subsequently referred to a special committee, with instructions to report at the next Annual Session. The appropriations for next year were quite liberal, amounting to $13,000, besides a pay roll of over $3,000, and $1,640 to two indigent Brethren. The reports of the Grievance Committee were quite numerous and extended. An oration covering eight pages 'was delivered by Brother Voorsanger. This is one of the readable and thoughtful productions furnished on Grand Lodge occasions. COlmEsPoNDENCE. An unusually brief report, coveriilg sixty-three pages, was furnished by a new committee, Brother 'Williain A. Robertson, chairman. He reviewed the Proceedings of fifty-five Grand Lodges. There is a great deal of matter embraced within the short limits the committee allowed itself. He did not use the scissors to any extent, but' gave a brief review of the transactions examined. I take the following extract from his closing remarks, which will explain his appointment to the position filled: ÂŁ\0'" that our work i~ done we are free to confess that we little realized the magnitude of the task assigned us. The only failure that our Ai. lV. Grand Master has made during his t,,"o years' administration ,,'as his ellort to fit the mantle of our dbtinguished predecessor upon' shoulders unused to literary burdens of any character; and we accepted the onerous responsibility only when he had exhausted cvery effort to find any other who was willing to assumc it. Sincc June 1st we have carefully reviewed more than Iii,OOO pages of Grand Lodge Proceedings, and each Jurisdiction has received such notice as our limited time would permit.

Missouri was favored with a page of complimentary notices, his tribute to our work being of a very high order. The Journal of Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of California was finished before Grand Secretary A bell laid down to rest. There is no lack of interest or falling off in the character of the work. His successor is Brother George Johnson, of San Francisco. Alvah Russell Conklin, of Independence, is Grand Master.


1891.J

Appendix.

CANADA,

13

1890.

The Journal of the Thirty-fifth Annual Communication is before me. The session was held in Kingston, commencing July 16th. Quite a number of special communications were held during the term, at which corner-stones of various buildings had been laid. The Annual Session was opened and presided over by l\f. 'V. Bro. R. T. 'Walkem, Grand Master. Brother J. J . .:\iason was Grand Secretary. A large number of Past Grand Officers, District Deputies, Representatives of Grand Lodges and of Subordinate Lodges of the Jurisdiction were present. The Annual Address of the Grand Master covered nine pages and was pre-eminently a business document, embracing and setting forth in detail official acts touching the various interests claiming attention. The reports of the Distric.t Deputy Grand l\Tasters were printed and took up ninety-three pages of the Journal. These teem with information and afford a large stock of facts with regard to the condition of the Lodges in their respective Districts. A report on these papers congratulated the Grand Lodge in possessing District Deputies who industriously devoted time and attention to the best interests of the Craft. There are about 350 Lodges in this Jurisdiction with a reported membership of over 20,000. Our Brethren have successfully created and enlarged a Grand Lodge Fund, which amounts to some $74,000. Out of this there is annually drawn large amounts for purposes of benevolence. The report under review shows an outlay for charity of some $10,000. The annual income, as shown by the reports of the fiscal officers, is $26,000. The Address of the Grand l\faster was highly complimented and commended by the Board of General Purposes. The Grand Lodge ordered a testimonial to be prepared by the next session, for the retiring Grand Master, Brother vValkem. The business transacted during the session was local. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of forty-eight pages by Past Grand Master Henry Robertson, Chairman, was presented, in which he reviewed very briefly the


14

Appendix.

[Oct.

proceedings of fifty-four Grand Lodges. The review was almost wholly made up of extracts from the Proeeedings examined. The Journal for Missouri for 1889 ,vas assigned a half page.

J. ROSS ROBERTSON, Toronto, Grand Master. J. J. MASON, Hamilton, Grand Secretary.

COLORADO,

1890.

The Journal of Proceedings opens with an account of the dedication of a Masonic Temple on the 3d day of July, 1890. The ceremonies were conducted by M. ,V. Bro. 'William T: Bridwell, Grand Master. The occasion was one of rare interest. Following the dedication, brief and appropriate ltddresses were delivered by the Grand :Master and other Brethren. The" corn, wine and oil" used on the occasion was furnished by Brother Greenleaf ~n behalf of the "Masonic Veterans' Association of the Pacific Coast." These necessary articles for the dedication were produced in California. The day following the dedication, the Grand Lodge by invitation laid the corner-stone of the State Capitol. This was done with the beautiful ceremonies of the Fraternity, Grand Master Bridwell officiating. A very able address was delivered on the occasion by Ex-Governor Adams. Addresses were delivered by Governor Cooper and others. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

The Thirtieth Annual Communication began its labors at the Masonic Temple in Denver, September H), 1890. The Grand Secretary reported that sixty-four of the sixty-eight Lodges in the Jurisdiction 'were represented. Grand Master Bridwell presided, and E. C. Parmelee was Grand Secretary. The report shows the presence of thirteen Past' Grand Masters and Representatives of twenty-six Grand Lodges. Missouri was represented by Brother Parmelee, Grand Secretary. The membership was reported at 5,252, showing an increase of over 500. ADDRESS.

Grand Master Bridwell presented an Address which amounted to eighteen pages. He opened by offering congratulations to the Grand Lodge upon the the general prosperity of the Craft and the exalted position attained, in this Jurisdiction, by Masonry. lIe said that


1891.J

Appendi;t:;

"peace, harmony and prosperity" had prevailed among them. paid an appropriate tribute to the fraternal dead.

15 He'

The Address eontained an exhibit of official work performed by the Grand Master, covering quite a large field. He rendered twenty-one decisions, which were approved, with slight modifications. Brother Bridwell is a strict constructionist, and adheres rigidly to the law of physical perfection, as shown in three of his rulings.

\

No. IX. of his Decisions, which was approved, declared that it was contrary to Masonic custom for l\iasons to lease Lodge rooms for dancing, or any other secular purpose. He said, "A Masonic Lodge room is a sacred place, and should be regarded with the same degree of respect, whether the Fraternity owns the building, or leases it." This ruling is in full accord with my principles, maintained through lllany years. I raise no question here as to the morality of dancing, or the right of people to enjoy themselves in this way, who desire to, but I do maintain that it is little short of sacrilege to C011vert a Masonic I-Tall, dedicated to God, into a ball room. The Lodge room represents the "holy of holies" of the original Temple. It is fair to assume that that sacred place was never invaded by dancing parties. If people desire to indulge in this class of amusement, let them find a place dedicated 'to pleasure and not. to l\Iasonry. The Grand Master of Colorado maintains very vigorously the supremacy of the Landmarks of Free :Masonry. In his plea for such maintenance, he applied the rule to candidates for Masonry, showing the requirements to be moral, physical and mental. During his term, the Grand Master had received a letter from the Grand Orient of France, requesting that a Representative be appointed by the Grand Lodge of Colorado to attend the" 'World's National Masonic Convention to be held in Paris," at some future time. He referred to the fact that years ago the Grand Orient ,had become false to Free Masonry by striking from its Ritual the requirements made of a candidate to profess belief in the eternal God. The Grand Lodge of Colorado had long since severed its connection with that branch of Masonry and no such Representative would be appointed. The former action of the Grand Lodge was reaffirmed by simply quoting one of its By-Laws. MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Master called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the fact that in 1888 a movement bad been set on foot to provide a home for those who might need such an asylum. He stated that the funds for this purpose had already amounted to $4,000, and recommended vigor' ous attention to this necessity.


16

Appendi;i;.

[Oct.

He closed his interesting and valuable address by complimenting Brother Parmelee, the Grand Secretary, and others, for their cordial and valuable assistance during his term of office. The reports of the Grand 'l'~'easurer and Grand Secretary were presented. That of Brother Parmelee was very fnll and complete. A report was rendered by the Grand Lecturer, Brother 路Wyman. The Grand Orator, Brother De Long, being absent, sent his oration, which was read by Brother Greenleaf and was printed. It covered six pages. A very considerable amount of business was transacted during the session. A special cOlllmittee was appointed to secnre and present a testimonial to Brother Ed. C. Parmelee, who had been elected Grand Secretary for the twenty路fifth time. CORRESPONDENCB.

Brother Lawrence :\1. Greenleaf, for the Committee, furnished the annual review of the Proceedings of forty-eight Grand Lodges-some of them for two years. Our Proceedings for 1889, received a four-page notice; three of them were used in comments on my views of the Scotch Rite question. He says I am "cranky" on that subject. If to hold and express positive opinions on any subject is to justify his designation, then indeed I am "cranky." From what little I learned of Scotch Riteism, at one sitting, I have no use for it, and do not hesitate to say so. If what I received be a specimen of this Rite, my abandonment of it was timely. As to the views presented by me concerning Albert Pike, and his attitude towards the three degrees of Symbolic l\lasonry, I had his utterances in my possession long before the present Rite embroglio gained such notoriety. I quoted from his famous letter to the" Supreme Council o(Peru." As to any disclaimer of Brother Pike or modification of his views, I have never met with them. The hope expressed by Brother Greenleaf that I "will not continue to give aid and comfort to the enemies of legitimate bodies," would not be noticed but for the fact that it is a misrepresentation of my position. I think it is generally considered, and it is beyond question true, that the legitimacy of Scotch Rite bodies in this conntry is still in doubt, as well as in dispute. I have never written a Jine which could he considered to give aid or comfort to any branch or body of Scotch Riteism in this country. This includes the :Korthern and Southern Jurisdictions, the Gorman and the Gorgas branches of the contestants. :My position, which has been often announced and repeated, is for this question of supremacy to be settled among the contending factions, and not drag it into the bodies of Symbolic Masons. Holding this view, I am not less opposed to the meddling with such questions now than formerly. It is not the business, nor do I believe


17

1891.J

it to be the right, of Grand Lodges to determine the supremacy of other contending bodies in any Jurisdiction. The Scotch Rite people have their Grand Bodies. Let them settle their o"m disputes within the limits of their own Jurisdiction. Brother Greenleaf made a very general review of the Proceedings examined, quoting and commenting quite extensively. He is a good reviewer and a very careful guardian of the interest committed to his care. ERNEST LE NEVE .FOSTER; Georgetown, Grand Master. ED'. C. PARMELEE, Pueblo, Grand Secretary.

CONNECTICUT,

1891.

A very handsomely gotten up Annual greets us from the Grand Lodge above named. The Journal contains an account of the dedication of a Masonic Hall at Bethel, June 24th, 1890, with an historical sketch of Eureka Lodge, No. 83, prepared by Brother E. D. Smith, followed by an address delivered by Rev. A. C. Hubbard. Both wer~ productions of merit and contain much interesting matter. The One Hundred and Third Annual Communication was held in New Haven, commencin~ January 21st, 1891. 1\1. ",\T. Bro. Clark Buckingham, Grand )Iaster; Brother Joseph K. 'Wheeler, Grand Secretary. :From the very Qomplete recapitulation I learn that there were llO Lodges represented at the session out of 111 on the roll. The membership was reported at 15,505. The revenue for the year amounted to $4,500. The per capita in that Jurisdic~ion is very small, the maximum being twenty cents. At the opening of the session an ode was sung, which had been written by the Grand Secretary, Brother 路Wheeler. His poetical genius still finds expression,and as evidence of my appreciation of his ability as a poetic writer, I transfer the poem to these pages: OPENING ODE.

G. L. AF.-2.

Come, let our anthems rise, And pierce the vaulted skies, To Him above; Let all our voices blend, Our joyful song ascend To Him, our truest friend, The God of love.


18

Appendix.

[Oct.

Come, let our voices raise, Our earnest prayer and praise, With pure desire; That heaven's sacred dower May consecrate this hour With true celestial power, A fiaming fire. . Father, to Thee we bring Our humble offering With one accord: O! may we through this day, In all we do or say, To Thee all honor pay, Jehovah, Lorq.

I notice that nine Past Grand Masters were enrolled as present, with other Past Grand Officers, and Representatives of thirty Grand Lodges. The Address of Grand Master Buckingham wasa business document, pure and simple, and covered eleven pages. He reported, with regret, the death of their Grand Senior Deacon, Brother James E. Coer, whose funeral the Grand Master attended in person and rendered the Masonic burial service, as requested by the deceased while living. The Grand Master presented a summary of the work in the Jurisdiction by counties, gleaned from the reports of the several District Deputy Grand Masters. One decision was reported and subsequently approved. It was a simple statement of the rights of the Lodge to material over which it had jurisdiction. The report contains the account of divers and sundry visitations, dedications, and dispensations granted. In conclusion, the Grand Master gave expression of unqualified opposition to what is known as Masonic work on the Sabbath. The Address was confined exclusively to local affairs. Brother 'Wheeler, Grand Secretary, presented a very complete and thoughtful general report, in addition to his statistical exhibit. He mentioned the publication of their "Centennial Volume," a ha~dsome work of over three hundred pages of printed matter. It is my pleasure to record here the receipt of said volume, through the courtesy of Brother 'Vheeler, which will make a handsome addition to our library. As Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, Brother '''heeler announces that in consequence of a severe illness, which prostrated him for several weeks, the Report on Correspondence ha9 not been written. He suggested that the report be omitted this year. I


â&#x20AC;˘ 1891.J

Appendix.

19

regret the non-appearance of his interesting and valuable contributions to Masonic literatur~. Brother 'Wheeler is a good reviewer, and I al ways peruse his productions with pleasurable interest. He recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Peru, and furnished, in connection with that recommendation, a history of l\1asonryin that ~ountry. The Grand Lodge of Connecticut has a Charity Fund amounting to some $11,000, which is managed by a corporation acting under a charter granted by the Legislature. The ~nterprise was endorsed' and commended by the committee on"that interest. The Journal under review is graced by quite a number of beautiful memorial tablets, inscribed to .the fraternal dead. I close this brief review of Connecticut matters by an additional expression of regret that no Report on Correspondence claims my attention as a reviewer. HUGH STIRLING, Bridgeport, Conn., Grand :i\iaster. JOSEPH ~. 'WHEELER, Hartford, re-elected Grand Secretary.

DELAWARE, 1890. The Eighty-fourth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge was opened in the city of 'Wilmington on the first day of October. M. W. Grand Master James S. Dobb presided, and Brother 'Villiam S" Hayes was Grand Secretary. There are twenty-one Lodges in this Jurisdiction, with a membership of some 1,700. The Address of the Grand l\1aster, covering ten pages, treated of local matters. He congratulated the Grand L'adge that none of its members' had died during the term. He expressed vigorous opposition to the Lodges occ~pying halls jointly with non-masonic societies. In this view he was ably sustained by the Grand Lodge. The General Masonic Relief Association was liberally commended. The Grand Master announced that their Grand Lodge was at peace with all sister Jurisdictions. Speaking as to the ground of promotion in office, he uttered a very practical sentiment, saying, "Merit should be the test of advancement. ,i


â&#x20AC;˘ 20

Appendix.

[Oct.

He reported most gratifying improvement in ritualistic work among the Lodges, and a report of a committee on that subject gave much encouragement as to the future work among the Lodges. The Grand .:Master reported one decision to which I take exceptions. The Grand Lodge approved his ruling and it now becomes their law. The question was presented to him as follows: "Can we receive an applicant into our Fraternity who refuses to swear, but who will affirm?" He decided that their "obligations forbade anything of the kind, and that they should not make special obligations to meet special cases." This rule lacks flexibility. There are good men who are conscientious about taking th.e obligation in the manner usually required, who would affirm at the altars of )1asonry, thereby placing themselves uuder the obligations of the Fraternity as much as any person in it. The rule adopted above is too exclusive. The Grand Secretary, Brother Hayes, presented a very excellent report. Past Grand Master's jewels were voted to Brothers Davidson and Marshall. The proceedings of the session were brief and local. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of sixty pages, by Rev. Louis H. Jackson, Grand Chaplain, contains a summary culled from the many Proceedings reviewed. During a short acquaintance (reportorially speaking) with Brother Jackson, I have learned to look for and expect a feast of good thing~ in his reviews. He culls \vell and comments admirably. The present review is in keeping with his former acceptable work. I notice that he occupies no questionable ground respecting public . installation of officers, but is positively opposed to the same. In this view of matters we differ very widely. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected and both reside in Wilmington.


1891.J

21

Appendi:c.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 1890. A very handsomely gotten up volume of 250 pages, furnished in good time, contains the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia for the year 1890, being the eightieth annual report. I

This Grand Lodge held Semi-Annual, Special, Annual and Installation CommunicatioJ,ls, the records of which are contained in the J ournal now under review.

\'

The Semi-Annual Communication opened in Washington City, May 14, 1890. Brother James A. Sample \'1'as Grand Master, and Brother 'Villiam R Singleton, Grand Secretary. I notice the presence of seven Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers, with a large attendance of Past Masters and Representatives of twenty-one Lodges. There are twenty-two Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 3,832, a gain of over 300 in that small territory. This is certainly a remarkable showing. The Address of the Grand :Master was quite brief. Only one matter of interest was mentioned by him. A petition for the formation of a, ne\v Lodge had been presented and considered. The application contained thirty-seven names and was well recommended. After due consultation he had granted the dispensation. A vigorous protest against granting a charter \\o:as filed at the Grand Lodge session, with some very earnest arguments used by the Brethren of the protesting Lodge. However, the charter was granted. This session of the. Grand Lodge was called to refreshment until the 21st of the same month, when labor was resumed for the purpose of constituting Osiris Lodge, Ko. 26, recently chartered .. At this session a handsom~ thing was done by the members of the Lodge which protested against a charter being granted to Osiris Lodge. 'J;'he protesting Lodge appeared before the Grand Lodge, by its Representative, and accepted the situation with grace, announcing that past differences had been forgotten. A floral offering was presented to Osiris Lodge, which was followed by handshaking and a banquet, at which several interesting speeches were made. A Special Communication was convened for the purpose of burying a Past Grand Secretary, Brother James Lawrenson.


22

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Annual Communication was held on the 12th day of November, the usual Grand Officers being present, as at the. former meetings. T\venty-two Lodges were represented. Grand Master Sample presented a most excell,ent Address, which contained tributes to the honored dead, among whom were mentioned their Past Grand Secretary and Brother E. L. Stevens. Grand :i\faster Sample, during his ter-m, had issued an edict, relieving Brethren, who had joined the Cerneau Order, from the disabilities imposed by a former session of the Grand I... odgc. He concluded the matter by saying that he entertained the hope that this question might never again, in any shape, come before the Grand Lodge. The following extract will meet a hearty response from all conservative members of our Fraternity throughout the country. Referring to the cause which gave rise to Grand Lodge action against the adherents of Oerneauism, he said: The circumstances under which it was introduced last year, viz., the direct or indirect violation of some of our constitutional provisions or standing resolutions, being-, in my opinion, the only legitimate grollnd on which to base action. In other Jurisdictions it has been carried into the civil courts, and caused bitter estrangements between men who had been life-long friends and Brethren. Let us wait until we are assailed before we fly to arms, for the war, if it comes, must be ll. fratricidal one, and such quarrels are always the bitterest and most to he abhorred. Let us be Brethren in Ancient Craft .M:aso路nry whatever we may be interested in outside of it, npver allowing our路 differences elsewhere to eross the thresholds of our Lodges, that we may truly say we meet upon the level and part upon the square.

He communicated the fact to the Grand Lodge that Brother 'William R. Singleton, the Grand Secretary, had been made a Mason fifty years ago 路in January last. A purpose was formed among the BretLren to give Brother Singleton a surprise, he having been kept in ignorance of what was in store him. A banquet was prepared, to which the victim was invited, and informed of the occasion of the gathering. After supper Past Grand :Master Parker delivered a graceful address and presented Brother Singleton a Past Master's jewel, appropriately engraved as to date and meaning. Grand Master-elect Brother Gibbs read an original poem, which was followed by remarks of fraternal affection. Brother Singleton replied in terms of warm appreciation. The Comm.ittee on Jurisprudence recommend'ed the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Tasmania. The election of Grand Officers occurred at this session, but ~pe installation did not take place until the 27th of December. 'When the installation was held twenty-one Lodges were represented and Grand Officers present as before.


1891.J

Appendix.

23

A financial exhibit was rendered at this session, sho'wing the cop-dition of the fiscal affairs of the Grand Lodge. An extended Report on Jurisprudence was also presented. At this session a report of the committee was adopted, recommending the establishing of an "Employment Bureau. The Grand Lodge expressed its sympathy, through a committee, to the Grand Lodge of :M:aryland in the great loss sustained in the destruction by fire of their magnificent Masonic Temple. A beautiful tribute was rendered to the memory of the late Grand Master Haller, of Tennessee. The installation of Grand Officers then took place, on which occasion the newly inducted Grand Master, Brother Thomas F. Gibbs, delivered a very pertinent and well-designed inaugural address. The occasion was rendered interesting by the presentation of a Past Grand :l\1aster's jewel to Brother James A. Sample, the retiring Grand l\fastel', \vho received the same with expressions of sincere gratitude to the Grand Lodge. CORRESPON DENCE.

The Report on Correspondence was prepared by Brother 'William R. Singleton, the Grand Secretary. This is the twenty-first annual review. presented by him, as chairman of the cominittee. Who will say that he is not a veteran? The report covers a little over 100 pages. It abounds in extracts taken from the Journals reviewed. Being so largely made up of excerpts, the reader is disappointed in not meeting with more comments and original thought from this very able committee. Brother Singleton is quite liberal in his views 'with respect to the admission of Brethren into Lodges upon application. He holds that when a Brother, with a proper certificate, presents himself for affiliation, there should be at least three unfavorable votes to reject him. How far a rule of this kind \~rould operate practically I am not prepared to say. I agree with Brother Singleton that it is degrading to a Master Mason in good standing to be rejected for membership in a Lodge bec.ause one unfavorable ballot places him on a level with a prof:me. I have held and taught the doctrine for twenty-five years that the reason for black-balling a Br.other Mason, who seeks to affiliate with a Lodge, ought to be sufficient to prompt charges against the applicant. He


24

Appendi:c.

[Oct.

wOl!ld thereby have an opportunity to vindicate himself, and thus a good inan would be saved to the Lodge. On the contrary, if found umvorthy and deserving rejection, the charges would develop his un wor'thiness, and result in ridding the Craft of an undeserving and unsuited member. The difficulty attending this matter, however, is a very great one, owing to the power lod~ed in each member, through the secrecy of the ballot. The right to vote in a :l\iasonic Lodge carries "with it the right to vote as you please. That this right is grossly abused in many cases none will question. Each member of a Lodge in casting his ballot, should be governed by strict moral principle, acting from a good conscience. Personal feeling should not be allowed to control the action of anyone in exercising his suffrage in hallohing upon applications for the degrees or membership. However, there are those in Lodges who never rise to this exalted view of duty and right. It is often the case that a Brother 2.\'fason, possessed of a certificate of good standing, visits a Lodge, associates with the Brethren pleasantly and fraternally, and concludes to petition the Lodge for membership. A proper reference of his application and due consideration of the same is followed by a ballot, when some one of that very body of Brethren with whom the petitioner has been associating fraternally for a considerable time, deposits a black ball. Is it not true that this petitioner is worthy of membership among these Brethren if he has been associating with them in Lodge fellowship? Especially when his application has been endorsed by a competent committee, followed by a favorable vote of nineteen of the twenty members present. This is a delicate and difficult question to mana~e 'iIi. Lodges. Whenever it is discussed, "immediately the cry is raised that the party who cast the black ball had a right to do so, and that you must not inquire into the "secrecy of the ballot." This is all" readily admitted. But the conscience of the objector ought to be as ready to accord justice to the p~titioner as he ,vas to reject him. Therefore, if he has grounds sufficient to reject him these grounds ought to be amply sufficient to prompt him to prefer charges and put the unfortunate Mason on trial. Of course, exceptions must exist, and thus prevent this rule from becoming general. There are members in the Fraternity whose identification with Lodges may not be desirable, for reasons satisfactory to the individual members of the Lodges. Such applicants might be rejected on general principles, without reason sufficient to justify charges or sustain an action against them. "What are we to do in such instances? The right to vote in this case, as in all others, carries with it the right to reject such undesirable material. Bo it is. In reply to Brother Stevenson, the Committee on Correspondence of the Grand Lodge of Idaho, Brother Singleton said some very pertinent


1891.J

Appendi:r.

25

things. It seems that said Idaho committee had charged that Brother Singleton "affected great c0ntempt for landmarks and old regulations." Brother Singleton challenges the committee aforesaid to mention a single instance where such had ever been done, and advh,ed him, if he could not find the evidence, he "had better step down and out." The reply of Brother Singleton is so well timed and just that I must appropriate it by way of a spicy extract: No chairman of so important a committee can dare to do so nnconrteow;: an act as yon have ill this instance been guilty of.. Perhaps what ?!(!1t may call landmarks, gott(>n up withm the period since we were initiated, may have met 0111' disapprobation, but in the many years in which we have been lhought worthy toreprescnt the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, we never, never afiecte(l contempt for anything or anybody, although we sometimes are almost led lip 10 that point fot' some who, forgetting their official position, make use of it to hurt the proper feelings of others: which charge we challenge the world to Sll~', either in :Masonry or out of it, we have ever done,

The only comment I have to offer is, "served him right."

\

I ani. very much pleased with the accurate and conservative views expressed by Brother Singleton respecting the prerogatives of Grand Master. I make the following extract as representing his opinion very clearly and cogently: We nre very much plellsed with this very lucid explanation of the prerog-atives of a Grand Master, about which there have been so many mistakes. Some, many years ago, and a few yet, suppose that the Grand :Master bas absolute power in all matters, and Clln, if he please, dispense with any provision of the local constimtion, which in his oath of office and ceremony of installation he solemnly promised to conserve and obey. The Grand Master in vac!1tion is the constitutioual agent of the Grand Lodge, acting for that Body in recess, but as much governed by the letter of the law as the Body itself. Such prerogatives as he should have to govern the Craft are expressly set forth in the constiwtion, and the "General Regulations" oflnS, in which latter certain sections expressly declare in "vhat mutters his" dispensation)l may be IIsed. This is also the case in regard to the absolnte power of a Worshipful Master in his Lodge. He is路for the term of his office the agent ofthe Grand Lodge, responsible to that Body only for his conduct in ofiice, yet he is bound to obey ever~' prodsion of the Grand Constitution where applicable to his Lodge or himself, and abo snffer no infringement upon the by-laws of his Lodge. For it is not in the power of the Lodge. the Worshipful Master, or even the Grand Master himself to set aside a by-Ill.w unless so provided in the by-laws themsel\'es, Hence the frequent applications to Grand Masters to set. aside or evade the provisions of the uy-Iaws of Lodges are all wrong and in utter violation of the true principles by which the bl'st interests of the Institntion are to be conserved.

Nothing need be added to these clear and tersely uttered truths, expressed by Brother Singleton. Speaking of the Proceedings of Michigan for 1890, Brother Singleton made mention that Grand )faster Babcock had devoted fifteen pages to the record of his seventy-seven decisions rendered. He approved a number of these rulings as presented, which shows an accurate knowledge of the law governing in those particuhtr cases. Brother Singleton gave our last Gra.nd Lodge Journal courteous and fraternal notice, as he always does, according us three full pages. The


26

Appendix.

[Oct.

Address of Grand Master Brace was complimented by a sufllcient amount of extracts to occupy nearly all the space allotted to Missouri. His compliment to the Grand Secretary of this Jurisdiction was handsome and is gratefully appreciated. He shrinks from the compliment paid him by myself, and says that it is more than his merits deserve. He seems to possess a sort of dread of vanity, claiming already to have a full share. At the risk of disturbing his equanimity on this point I repeat that Brother Singleton is a first-class reviewer, an able Masonic jurist, fully up on all questions appertaining to bistory, philosophy and la\v, besides being a first-class Grand Secretary. I find in some of his comnients an emphatic denial of the right of a Granrl Lodge, through its Committee, to inflict a greater punishment than was awarded by a Lodge in the original trial. JIe holds that the right of a fair trial must be by the "peers" of the accused. Hence, his conclusion that the trial by a Grand Lodge committee is not right, because they are not the fellow members and "peers" of the accused. He asserts positively that when a Grand Lodge undertakes to assess original punishment, greater than that inflicted by the Subordinate Lodge; it "violates the rights of all :lHasons," Upon this proposition Brother Singleton and myself differ widely. In our Jurisdidion we require a very complete transcript of the trial to be sent with the appeal, including testimony taken in the court below. That being furnished, with the findings of the Lodge, I submit. that it is as competent for the Grand Lodge to pass upon tbe guilt or innocence of the accused and assess higher punishment than was done by the L:)dge, as it is for the same Grand Body to send. the case back for a new trial. It has become current history in Missouri Lodges for guilty parties to receive light punishment for the most grave Masonic offenses. The evidence furnished with the appeal demonstrates the necessity of a penalty in correspondence with the crime. The fact that the Lodge, with that testimony before it, failed to inflict a penalty in keeping with the offense committed, proves that the case should not be sent back there for further trifling, which would be but a mockery of justice. The Grand Lodge has original power in passing upon a case submitted to it, and may do for Masonry what badly managed and illy-governed Lodges would never do. There is no violation of rights of Masons by the Grand Lodge reviewing such cases and rendering punishment merited by wrong-doing .

. Brother Singleton approves cordially of public entertainments, such as the dedication of balls, where Masons and their lady friends partake of such refreshments as the occasion "justifies. He is justly and correctly


1881.J

Appendix.

27

liberal at this point. How some of his "close corporation" Brethren will view this remains to be seen. The Pennsylvania Brethren belong to that class that he calls a "close corporation." Brother Vaux will be heard from in due time.

FLORIDA,

1891.

A neatly gotten up Journal of Proceedings of this Grand Lodge, containing 265 pages, came to hand soon after the close of the Sixty-second Annual Communication, which was held in the City of Jacksonville, commencing January 20th. Brother De\Vitt C. Dawkins, Grand Secretary, did his work with dispatch and seems to be in the race for the first place among rapid workers in the list of American Grand Secretaries. M. W. Bro. Henry\V. Long, Grand )faster, presided during the session. '-,

The record shows as present eight Past Grand Masters, with Representatives of thhty-three Grand Lodges, Missouri being represented by Brother Dawkins, the Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from 103 Lodges. This statement is authorized by a careful count made by this writer, as Orand Secretary Dawkins furnished no footings of any kind. 路What the membership in that Jurisdiction amounts to; I am unable to determine. I find from the Statistical Table that they have 125 Lodges on the roll. The Grand Secretary reports the income for the term as amounting to $4,700. ADDRESS.

1\11:. 'V. Bro. Long furnished an address which covered ten pages. The document is full of business throughout, being prefaced by an elegant exordium. He stated that their relations with other Grand Lodges continued to be friendly. He had granted dispensations to form ten new Lodges, and nine of them were chartered during the session. He made several rulings, which were passed upon by the Committee on Jurisprudence. The Committee differed with the Grand Master on several points. He had ruled that a Lodge could call off to some future day, without closing. The Committee overruled this decision and held that the Lodge must be regularly closed in all the degrees at the expiration of the session. The Grand :Master also decided that it was his right to suspend the 'Vorshipful Master of a Lodge for incompetency or continued absence from the Jurisdiction. The Committee very properly and wisely ignored this decision.


28

Appendix.

[Oct.

I see from the Proceedings, that the law ln Florida requires a ballot for each separate degree. This is in harmony with Missouri procedure. The Grand Lodge reaffirmed its action of one year ago, respecting the Cerneau disturbance. As I did not give them the benefit of that decision last year, I now incorporate it here: The committee has given careful attcntion and consideration to thc matters submitted to thcm ill the Address of the Grand Master relatillg to what is termed the " CernCalt Rite." They have made carcful inquiry as to whether the organizations workin~ under this Rite claim the authority to confer the three degrees of :Masonry which th18 Grand Lod.g-e has within its Jurisdiction, and, so far as they call ascertain, no such authority is claimcd. This being the clIse, the committee are unable to see any ground upon which this Grand Lodge can assume jurisdiction of the subject. They have no means of making an intelligent investigation as to the dpg-rees of this so-called Cerneau Rite, or the A, & A. Scottish Rite, or as to who has the power to confer them. There are serions dil1erences betweell 'Masons as to the reg"ularity of the organizations which claim the authority to confer these degrees. It is not to the advantage of symbolic Masonry in this Jurisdictioll to open the doors of our Lodges to these ditferences. They should be left to our Brethren who arc skilled in these hidden IU)'steries, which are not revealed to the Brethren of our Lodges,

The Grand Lodge of Porto Rico was duly recognized. A letter from Past Grand Master Pasco was received, expressing regret at his absence, on account of official duties in the United States Senate. An oration of three pages was delivered by Rev. R. H. 路Weller. A complimentary vote was accorded the orator, with the request that the address be printed in the Proceedings, which was done. Th'e business of the session was limited and local. Grand Secretary was brief and practical.

The report of

CORRESPOXDEKCE.

The annual review of a large list of Grand Lodge Proceedings was made by Brother D. C. pawk~ns, Grand Secretary and Past Grand Master. The report is the largest I have ever seen coming from that Jurisdiction, covering, as it does, 230 pages. There is an unusually large number of extracts; that these are well selected, goes without saying, as Brother Dawkins is a very careful revie"..-er, making appropriate selections and discreet comments. Missouri was most fraternally treated, seven pages being employed in reviewing the transactions of the Seventieth Annual Communication, October, 1890.


1891.J

Appendix.

29

Brother DawkhlS said that his attention was arrested bv the astounding announcement that within two days after the close ~f the Annual Session, the Grand Secretary of Missouri \vas mailing the printed Proceedings. He then paid a very kind tribute to the character of the book thus rapidly produced as to the style, material, design and workmanship. Resaid I am ahead and likely to remain so in this race, so far as he is concerned. I may remark that Brother Dawkins has made admirable speed in the production of his last Proceedings, furnishing the Craft a book handsomely gotten up and containing over three hundred pages. I can conceive of nothing astounding in the \vork done on my part in bringing out our Proceedings within two days after the close of the Grand Lodge Session. All there is about it is just simply to go and do it. Raving accomplished the work so easily, there is no occasion for any demonstration on the subject.

\

Brother Dawkins copied three pages of the Address of Grand Master Brace. Commenting upon our Grand Lodge action on the subject of Masonic comity between Grand Lodges, he said that Florida was ahead . of Missouri on that point, as she and her neighbors, Georgia and Alabama, have practiced such fraternal relations for nearly sixty years. 路While my preference is for such relations between Grand Lodges, my judgment is not fully in accord with my sentiments. I would rejoice to see the same rule established between Missouri and adjoining Grand Lodges if i could be fully satisfied that such relationship would be for the best. I may be able to reach the point where I can view the subject in the same light with Brother Dawkins. After copying extensively from the Address of Grand Master Brace concerning our :l\'Iissouri Masonic Home, Brother Da\vkins offered a few comments. I do 路not suppose he was aware of the fact that he had slightly misunderstood Grand Master Brace's statements about the value of our Home property, and the cost of running it. It is therefore proper that I should correct his mis~pprehension on this point. He said that our Home cost $125,000 an.d that it requires an annual contribution of $15,000 to run it, while we have the care of only" five widows and twenty-five orphans." If this represented the state of the case, his remarks would be most pertinent, and his advice worth sober consideration. He suggests to us of Missouri, as well as to the Kentucky Masons and those of Mississippi, the "practical business propostion," as he terms it, to sell out our Home, consecrate the money received from the sale, as a sinking fund, ~onsecrate it to charity, and let the interest thereon be faithfully, discreetly and economically handled for the benefit of the widows and orphans and other beneficiaries of the Craft. I shall note this view of his report in its proper place. Before


30

Appen,dix.

[Oct.

doing ~o, I must be allowed to correct his misunderstanding as to our property and expenses. In the first place, we bought fifteen acres of the finest suburban real estate in the City of St. Louis, with a large mansion and well equipped premises for the sum of $40,000. Brother Brace stated that our property represented a cash value of $125,000, but he did not say that our property cost that amonnt. Since our investment of 540,000, the property has appreciated in valne, until now it could be sold for the sum mentioned by Brother Brace. 'We have over thirty inmates in our elegant Home, who are properly provided for, as to the comforts of life; the aged 'widows being well taken care of, the orphans clothed, fed, educated and trained in every particular, as if they were the children of the managers of that institution. Indeed, we Directors all feel that they are our children, and a tender sentiment obtains that is touching to witness, as our Directors visit and associate with these dear little ones almost every week. How in the ,.. . orld Brother Dawkins made such a mistake as to declare that our Home requires an annual sum of $15,000 to run it, is. something I cannot understand. He had the printed report before him, showing the outlay for the year closing July 31, 1890, which shows the expense account, itemized, for the year, to be less than $3,000. Several iternsin this exhibit of considerable amount, will not occur in the future expense account of the Home. Allowing full $3,000 for the expenses of the year, and deducti!1g this from the assumed amount presented; by Brother Dawkins, he committed a blunder of only $12,000. Perhaps Brother Dawkins jumped at conclusions as to the expenses necessary in running our Home amounting to $15,000 from something Brother Brace said in his Address. He suggested an annual contribution of fifty. cents per member,' from the Lodges in the State, and concluded that such an insignificant amount from each member would aggregate an annual incoIlle of $15,000. But Grand Master Brace did not intimidate that such a sum was, or would be, required to support and maintain . the institution. Hence, I must s~y to my good Brother Dawkins, review your examinations and you will reach a different conclusion. I hold the view of Brother Dawkins to be impracticable and unsuited to the management of a systematized and well-organized charity for the relief of as many beneficiaries as belong either to the Kentucky. Home or our own. His plan is to fund the money invested in our own property, and let it be expended in charity by properly organized Boards of Relief. There are two objections which I commend to Brother Dawkins for his thoughtful consideration. In the first place, the" needy beneficiaries" of such charity, scattered aU over the State,

/


1~91.J

Appendix.

31

would possess none of .the advantages that our organized methods afford to those that are in the Home. The income from the invested funds would have to be distributed among those proposed Boards of Relief in the different localities of the country. It would not be long until a howl would come up to the managers of such interests, that some beneficiaries were receiving more than others, and having advantages not duly accorded to them. If we are to have the beneficiaries in such c~ses l~o~ed after and provided for by those Boards of Relief, where helpless orphans are without parents and without homes, they \vould of necessity be placed in the charge of families to take care of them. The money pro~ided for their benefit, and dispensed through these Boards of Relief, would be placed in the hands of the families having charge of these orphans. How much of that money the little ones would receive, or the benefits from the fund, would be best known by the God and Father of the fatherless. In addition to this view, these orphans would be placed in the care of some who, in all probability, would mistreat them, and these helpless children of our deceased Brethren have no right or opportunity of redress from cruel taskmasters that would lay burdens upon them that ,human sympathy and human indignation would justly condemn. I never will give my consent to place a child of any deceased Brother at the mcrcy of the very people who 'would seek control of these children, in order to get the money for keeping them. Another thought is commended to Brother Dawkins, as showing the impracticability of his method. These orphans that he would have provided for by Boards of Relief, would be cut off from many of the advantages and opportunities desirable to fit them for positions and usefulness in the field of aetive life through coming years. How well they mig}lt be fed and clothed and trained and educated, would be a question wider open to doubt and suspicion than anyone subject ever proposed for consideration. In our Masonic Homes, these helpless ones are housed and placed within a refuge where their bodies and minds and souls are cared for, and every influence is orought to bear to elevate and ennoble their natures. And it may be said, furthermore, of the widows of our deceased Masons, that they would fare but little, if any, better under the management of Boards of Rclief, a,'3 proposed by Brother Dawkins. I will not enlarge upon this thought, though it pre~ sents a most fruitful subject for consideration. I niay say, in conclusion, upon this point, that I have observed the operations of Boards of Relief for quite a long term of years, and if they are all constituted after the pattern of one with which I am most intimate, I would pray God, in advance, to deliver destitute widows and helpless orphans from th~ ~nanagement of su~h a combination of cruelty and injustice.


32

Appendix.

[Oct.

Brother Da"..kins, in his review of Mississippi, wrote a sentence that might make me cry, if I were in the proper mood. Indeed, it seems to me, thete were tears in his words when he wrote the following, speaking of the" needy beneficiaries:" ... "Many of them are far away from the soothing influences. and happiness of family and friendly affection, association and care." The above quotation is a splendid exhibition of sentiment, but What are the cold facts in regard to these "needy beneficiaries?" In our Home there are those who knew nothing of "soothing influences, of happiness of family and friendly affection," much less" association and care." vVe have matriculated orphans who were without any of the sentimental conditions described in the above quotation from Brother Dav.rkins' report. They have been fed and clothed and are being educated in our schools, and some of them stand "first among their equals," having won the highest prizes for good deportment and progress in study. vVhere were the soothing influences of family and friendly affection when we took hold of sOlpe of these needy beneficiaries? They were without homes and without families. vVho cared for them? Nobody. But now they are provided for and happy, because our charities and benevolences have been placed in charge of men who have the welfale of the helpless at heart, and who feel for these needy ones as if they were their O\vn. And 1 may add, in dismissing this subject, that our work is being done as cheaply as it could be carried on by any irresponsible Board of Relief that ever handled. or ever ma" handle sacred trust funds. , . The Grand Lodge of Missouri has donated to the Home, within the last three years, over $30,000, and paid more than $25,000 of this amount. The funds thus appropriated to the Home, have been the steady accumulations in the Grand Lodge Treasury from the annual dues of the membel'S of our Lodges. "We have money enough on hand now to run our Home for a few years, without drawing upon the funds of the Grand Lodge until such time as its Treasury shall be again, as in the past, full and overflowing. I call the attention of Brother Dawkins to another misapprehension on his part. 路While his kind feeling for the Grand Secretary of Missouri led him into the error, an equal kindness on my part must be路 exercised in disabusing his mind. He says the salary of the Grand Secretary of Missouri appears to be $1,000, and expresses the belief that it should be more than doubled, if not trebled. He then said the" holy incubus" prevents just compensation 'of a faithful and thorough officer.


1891.J

Appendi;t~

33

If Brother Dawkins supposes that the Grand Secretary of Missouri

could do the work conneeted with his oflke, as he has performed these labors for thirteen years, for the sum of $1,000 per annum, he greatly misunderstands this writer. The l\fasons of lVlissouri are generous and liberal. They understand the heavy labors that fall to the lot of their Grand Secretary and have eompensated him aecordingly. I may be allowed to inform Brother Dawkins that my compensation, as Grand Secretary and Committee on Foreign Correspondence, is just three times what he supposes, and has been for an indefinite time.路 Therefore, the "holy incubus" mentioned, whatever that may be, does not press upon our Grand Lodge Treasury to snch an extent as to curtail the compensation of its Grand Secretary. Referring to my report, Brother Dawkins says, " Passing over a vast amount of business, well done and well reported, we come to Brother Vincil's Report on Correspondence." !Ie was very complimentary indeed, for which he has the sincere ~ppreciation of this writer, but again he falls into error in speaking of my report in saying it contains 119 pages. If hewj1] examine the l\Iissouri Annual for 1890, he ""ill discover that he was just one hundred pages away from the facts. Extracts of considerable length were then made from my review of Florida for 1890, touching part.icularly 011 Cerneauism. Brother Dawkins, like myself, is clearly opposed to Cerneauism, but he seems to be deeply enlisted in behalf and in defense of some other branch of High Riteism. He says I do not deny that" Cerneau was ever a thirtythird." I did not deny and did not aflirm anything on the subject, because simply I know nothing about it and the game is not worth the candle to discover whether Cerneau was a thirty-third or not. He further says that I "aceept. the prejudicial sarcasm of 'Pike Rite' as a designation of. the Supreme Council that was fifty-four years old when Brother Pike became a member of it." The truth is, I have to confess the accuracy of this charge, for the simple reason that, in my ignorance of terms, I did not know how else to designate Scotch Riteism, except as the" Pike Rite." I presnme if Brother Pike had not taken hold of the Rite and given it the present commanding prominence it occupies, said Rite would, in all probability, have remained where it was when that grand old man became its Commander in Chief. Brother Dawkins speaks of the" Grand Lodge of Missonri, during its enthe existence, as . ha\~ing always been peaceably 1))ithin the fiCOpC of the .Turisdiction of the Pike Rite." This is very true, so far as the peaceable disposition of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is concerned. That Body has never been at war with, or a party路to any of the factional contests waged by the four Grand Divisions of High Riteism. That the Grand Lodge of Missouri lies 1/iithin the scope of the Scotch Hite .T urisdict.ion in this G. L. Ap.-3.


34

Appendix.

[Oct.

State, is just a little amusing. ]~t has been seventy years since the Grand Lodge of M.issouri .vas organized. Since its organization, it has had fnll,' complete and sovereign jurisdiction over the territory within the bounds of this Commonwealth. It has. not been many years since the Scotch Rite institution was established 11./tthin the scope of our Jurisdiction. How it comes to pass that the Grand Lodge of Missouri is within the scope of the Scotch Rite .TU1'isdiction is one of the phases of the subject that Brother Dawkins will have to explain. As a loyal subject of the Jurisdiction of the Scotch Rite under the government of Albert Pike, he has a right to render true faith and allegiance to that institution, and I accord him all sincerity and honesty in his preferences. I am very happy to inform the Masonic public that my position in regard to Scotch Hiteism is in full harmony with the views entertained by my Grand Lodge. T slJallnot assume here that this is true of Brother Dawkins as to the views entertained by bis own Grand Lodge. If I am not at fault in my construction of what his Grand Lodge intended to say, and did say, I believe that the Grand Lodge of Florida in its declaration of 1890 and in its reaffirmation of the same deliverance recently, holds views entirely different from those of its Grand Secretary. 1. must take leave of Brother Dawkins, with the same kindly fraternal regards that have obtained between us through the years of our reportorial association. I employ his own words in this conclusion, and say that "I lay down my pen in fraternal love" and kindly feeiings with Brother Dawkins, who was honored with a re-election as Grand Secretary and still resides at Jacksonville.

ANGUS PATTERSON, Madison, Grand ::\faster.

GEORGIA,

1890.

Masonry in this Jurisdiction, in an organized form, dates back into the past century. The Communication held October 28th last passed, was the one hundred and fourth meeting of that Grand Lodge. M. 路W. Bro. John S. Davidson, Grand Master, was present and presided. He has been in office for quite a number of years. Brother A. M. Wolihin ,vas Grand Secretary. The Grand Chaplain furnished as usual a prepared address to the Lord, which ,vas printed in the Proceedings. The only defect con-


Appendix.

1891.]

35

nected with this paper is that the Grand Chaplain did not sign his name to it. In telling tlie Lord of their sad loss in the death of "one who had for a long time been punctual in his attendance," he said; "Now we are all thinking of Brother David Mayer." The inference might be raised from the foregoing that the Lord did not know. Brother Mayer and appreciated the information communicated by the Grand Chaplain. The record shows that twelve Emergent Communications had been held for various purposes during the year. The Annual Session was well attended by Grand and Past Grand Officers, Past Mas~ers and Representatives of sister Grand Lodges. There are 305 Lodges reported on the roll, 292 of which were represented, and 295 had made returns. The membership is reported at 13,450, showing a gain of 1,000. This is a remarkable advancement made by onr sister Grand Lodge of Georgia, and the Fraternity is to be congratulated in that Empire State of the South upon its grand progress. .

\

A D,DRESS.

Brother Davidson, the-Grand Master, presented an able and quite an extended document covering twenty-three pages. Following an eloquent exordium, he reported fourteen rulings made by him during the term. These were all he deemed of sufficient importance or general interest to require submission to the Grand r.. odge. It may be observed with perfect assurance that Brother Davidson is a clear-headed, wellinformed and able Masonic jurist. His decisions showed a masterful comprehension of the principles belonging to Masonic Jurisprudence. There is not one of his rulings but has the clear ring of right and justice. The Committee on Jurisprudence approved his decisions and declared them based on the regulations and edicts of the Grand Lodge, as well as upon sound Masonic doctrine. . Under the head of dispensations, he reported a large number of instances where permission had been granted to confer degrees out of time. From the Address of the Grand Master it is learned that quite a number of new Lodges had been created under dispensation, the large majority of which received charters at the session now under consideration. Grand Master Davidson made the pleasing announcemont that in a short time the last dollar of their indebtedness will be paid. When he first became Grand Master he found a debt of $10,000 on their property, the interest on which consumed a considerable portion of the Grand Lodge ineome. He said that when the time arrives and the last pay-


36

Appendix.

[Oct~

ment is made, they crtn have a "Masonic Jubilee." A foot note by the Grand Secretary found in the Proceedings shows that since the adjournment of the Grand Lodge all their outstanding bonds have been paid, so that the Grand Lodge now does not owe a single dollar, but is entirely out of debt. This is occasion for congratulation, and I would say to the Fraternity of Georgia, have your jubilee and rejoice over this happy result. Surely advancement and prosperity will crown the Fraternity there more than ever. The closing pages of the Address were devoted to beautiful and eloquent tributes to the memory of two deceased Masons, Brother David Mayer, Past Grand Senior 'Varden, and Past Grand. Master Samuel Lawrence. It was my pleasure to have known Brother Lawrence in other years, and enjoyed the satisfaction of his friendship and fraternal regard. I cannot refrain from placing in this report a paragraph taken from the eloquent tribute of Grand Master Davidson: Of sturdy race inheritance) with strength unusual and imposing presence, Brother Lawrence bore a sound mind m a sound body for many )'ears of his earthly pilgrimage. Of splendid mental caliber and with intellectual equipment of a rare and attractive character, his erudition, like a generous almoner, brought :Masonry treasures almost unnumbered. A close student ofits history, he portrayed its triumphs and recounted its story with the enthusiasm of a lover and the slIgacity of a sage. Devoted to the beauties of its ritual, he brought increased enjoyment to tbo~e. who witnessed the impressive ceremonial which he directed in the conferring of the degrees; moved by its lofty purpose, he gave to his Brethren the results of long study and diligent researches in

~~~i~~~u~~~sro;;l~~~t짜~ef~~~ho~x~~~i~:b~~~;'t;eh~~~i~~t~~~Kel~fi~~~~:ft~el~~~;~1ut~~

its practices, he illustrated with the acts of daily existence the bounden duty laid npon every member ofthe Order, and, devoted to its principles, he reached to lofty height of eloquent speech in advocacy of their claim or in defense of their right. In aU things its champion, he stood like a warrior fu)] armed with both mental and moral weapons to assaultjts enemies and protect its friends.

Immediately following the closing ofJhe Grand Master's Address, a committee furnished memorial tributes [inA-honor of the :deceased Brethren above mentioned. M. "V. Bro.~Lawrence was nearly seventyfive years of age. He was ,veIl known to the Craft in Georgia, having long been a conspieuous figure in the Grand Lodge. He served that Body for four terms as its Grand Master, and for a number of years was Chairman of its Committee on Foreign Correspondence. His writings, prose and poetic, constitute brilliant contributions to Masonic literature. Brother Mayer bad been Senior Grand 'Warden during his connection with the Grand Lodge, and was nearly the same age of Brother Lawrence. The business transacted during the session of the Grand Lodge was local and of no general interest. I notice that the Senior Grand Warden reported the name of a Brother who attempted to enter the hall of the Grand Lodge in an intoxicated con~ition. Supposing that the


1891.)

Appendix.

37

unfortunate Brother was a member of the Gran<.\ Lodge, a committee was appointed to investigate the matter. A report was subsequently rendered, which stated that after 'the investigation the Brother was found guilty, but was not a member of the Grand Body. His case was Teferred to his Lodge for trial. There was a report rendered by a Committee on "General 'Velfare," in which a recommendation was presented that what is termed "Cerneau Masonry" is still under severe condemnation of the Grand Lodge 2,S being unmasonic. I have searched very carefully through the Grand Lodge Proceedings for a report from the Grand Secretary, but have been unable to nnd such statement. Perhaps the printer overlooked it. I learn from the report of the Committee on Finance that the income for the year, including dues, rents, etc., amounted to $16,000. The most astonishing fact is stated in the report of this committee that the -pay roll account amounted to over $10,000. \

The Committee on Grand Master's Address pronounced it chaste, -Ql"nate and instructive, saying that it was a masterly paper, that could only emanate from the head and heart of a pure and brilliant Mason. . This is a just tribute to Grand Master Davidson. He seems to. be in great favor with the Craft of Georgia, and wields a commanding influence. CORRESPONDE~CE.

The labor of preparing the Report on Correspondence was performed by three of the Brethren, namely, B. H. Bingham, ,V. E. Mumford and 'V. S. RaPlsay. Their united labors covered 114 pages. Brother Mumiord had charge of the work of reviewing our Missouri Proceedings for ]889. He accorded us the benefit of nearly six pages, complimenting -Grand Master 路Wood's Address as "a very able one." From that Address he made a number of extracts. In his comments upon the Address, he made the following happy and appropriate remarks: If Masonry has one duty in this world 'above another, that duty is to keep God the hearts orher votaries, Ilnd let His worship ascend from the fires kindled in every altar of her Lodge rooms. There is no room in her tenets, her ranks, her families, her Lodges. or her circling bands of brotherhood for the skeptic, the infidel, the atheist, or agnostic. God is in Masonry, and may He ever guide its destiny and work.

~mthroned in

SA LOO:!'- K EE1'1I\ (; .

:Missouri l\:lasonry leads the fi~ht in American Masonry against the admission of ~1l100n-keepers to the privileges of Freemasonr~路. on the pure and simple ground that the bU'line!'ls they follow is immoral, hurtful to society, and llllworth~' the life of a true, good .Mason.


38

Append'ix.

[Oct.

Brother Mumford .was very complimentary to the Grand Secretary of Missouri. Speaking 'of the expeditious publication of our Grand Lodge Proceedings, he said that no handsomer, better arranged, better printed or more readable volume of Proceedings comes to his desk than that'ofthe Grand Lodge of Missouri. He did me the credit to copy very largely from my report on the state of the Craft. Paying attention to my work on correspondence, he said I was rather hard upon their venerable Grand Chaplain in my criticism of his prayer at the opening of the Grand Lodge. He thinks I am rather "hypercritical" both as to the Grand Chaplain and Grand Secretary. Concerning the prayer that I mentioned, it was more in a spirit of humor than of criticism that I employed in introducing it. 1 said then what I think still, that the Grand Secretary should furnish rather than conceal information such as Grand Secretaries and Committees on C<?rrespondence delight to find in Grand Lodge Proceedings. I am delighted to learn from Brother Mumford that their obnoxious law expelling members of Lodges for non-payment of dues has been expunged from their statute books. His hope that "Broth~r Vincil will rest easy" is fully realized. The labors of the joint committee are to be commended, both as to selections and comments. The report is in keeping with the former efforts of the committee. I repeat a statement contained in my report, , of last 'year, that the Grand Lodge of Georgia knows when it has a good thing, therefore it has continued Brother John S. Davidson as its Grand Master for still another term. His address is Augusta. The Grand Secretary, Brother A. N. ",Volihin, was also re-elected and resideE at Macon.

IDAHO,

1890.

The beautiful Annual sent out by this Grand Lodge contains the record of a Special Communication held June 7th, for the purpose of 'laying the corner-stone of a Masonic Temple at Caldwell. The ceremonies were conducted by Grand .Master Shoup. On that occasion Past Grand Master Jonas W. Brown delivered an eloquent and instructive address, followed by Charles C. Stevenson in a short talk. The Twenty-third Annual Communication was held at Boise City. commencing September 9, 1890. 1\1:. W. Bro. George L. Shoup, Grand Master, presided. Brother James H. 'Wickersham was Grand Secretary.


1891.J

09

I notice the presence of three Past Grand Masters, with Representatives of eighteen Grand Lodges, Missouri being- represented by Brothel' Jonas 'V. Brown, P. G. M. Thel'e are nineteen Lodges on the roll, reporting a membership of 7-51. Seventeen Lodges were represented. The Address of Grand Master Shoup covered eleven pages, opening with a very appropriate exordium, followed by an historical sketch of the life and progress of Masonry in Idaho. He announced that the increase in membership had not been large for the past year, but that the additions made to the Lodges had been of good material. He reported a number of dedications, dispensations granted and other matters of local interest. A. few decisions were rendered and the same duly approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence. One Lodge under dispensation had been created. He stated that their relations 'with other Grand Lodges were most fraternal. The acts of the Grand l\laster were fully approved and his administration shown to be thoroughly representative. The Deputy Grand Master, Brother .Ainslee, subli1itted a report of his official acts perforll'led'during the absence of the Grand Master from the State. He had rendered some decisions and granted dispensations when necessary. His' acts were all endorsed. Brother 'Vickersham, Grand Secretary, furnished an admirable rep<;>rt, containing general and statistical matters connected with his office. The Grand Lecturer, Brother C. C. Stev-enson, presented which was printed. Owing to the expensiveness of securing - of work and the instruction of the several Lodges, together present financial condition, the lecture system proposed did favorable consideration.

his report, uniformity with their not receive

Brother Stevenson, Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence, submitted some special reports, which were approved.' He recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota and of the Federal District of Mexico. The Grand Lodges of Victoria and New South 'Vales were not recognized. The above committee may...not have been in possession of the facts desired, but it occurs to me, from my knowledge of the situation, that there were far better reasons for recognizing the two last named Grand J.Jodges than the Grand J~odge of :Mexico. Occupying the position I do, I have r~commended and secured


Appendix.

40

[Oct.

the recognition of the Grand Lodges of New ~outh Wales and Victoria, but am by no means prepared to recommend the recognition of the Grand Lodge of the Federal District of Mexico. There was no business transacted by the Grand Lodge of general interest to anyone outside of that .hlrisdiction. :No

g~neral

Report on Correspondence.

GEORGE AINSLEE, Boise City, Grand Master. .r AMES H. vVICKERSHA l\'f, Boise City, Grand Secretary.

ILLINOIS,

1890.

The Journal. of this Grand Lodge retains its usual size, and presents the same neatness in execution and interest of the matter it contains, as in former years. Brother l\'Iunn, the Grand Secretary, brought his work from the press in excellent time. In this particular, he leads all the Grand Secretaries of the country, except one. The Proceedings properly containing the business transactions of the Gr~nd Lodge, amounted to some twenty pages more than our doings in the Missouri Proceedings. The Report on Correspondence is much larger than ours. This report, the tabular work, reports of District Deputy Grand Masters and similar matter, can be printed in advance of the session and be in readiness for binding with the business proceedings. Therefore, the difference in time in bringing out our.rournals is not justified by the difference in the amount of matter contained. Therefore, ?llissouri still leads Illinois in the work of producing its Journal of Proceedings, by C]nite a number of days. The Fifty-first Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Illinois convened in the City of Chicago on the 7th day of October, lSHO. M. ,Y. Bro. John 1\1:. Pearson, Grand '1\:[a8ter, presided, and R. 'V. Bro. Loyal L. Munn was Grand Secretary. I notice that the various Committees were announced immediately after opening the Grand Lodge, and before the Grand 1\'1aster's Address ,vas presented. From the Report of the Committee on Credentials it is learned that eleven Past Grand Officers, and Repre::;entatives of forty-four Grand


A ppendi.0.

1891.J

41

Lodges were present. I find no footings as to the number of Lodges represented. The Committee on Chartered Lodges furnished the information that the whole number of Lodges in the Jurisdiction amounted to 678, with a total membership of 42,369, showing a gain of 893 for the year. The total accessions from all sources was 3,568. 路With this large addition, the loss mu~t have been very heavy, in view of the small gain already mentioned. That gain amounted to only fourteen more {,han the increase in Missouri for the same term. ADDRESS.

\

Brother Pearson, the Grand Master, presented simply ~ business paper, his report covering twelve pages. In his opening he rendered grateful acknowledgment to Almighty God for the kind care he had shown them during the year. None of the officers of the Grand Lodge had been called away by death. This 路was cause for gratitude, as well as the fact stated that no serious confusion had arisen among them and no crying evils had called for discipline. He said, "Our trestle board has been full of designs and a vast amount of good work has been done." He expressed the hope that the time is not distant when every Lodge can own its o\-vn Home and have full and exclusive use of such. He said his labors for the past year had been to conserve the good results already achieved, to prevent injury to their beautiful fabric, and to see that the wOl~kaccomplishedshould be along the lines laid down in our ancient charges and in the Holy Scriptures. He then paused long enough to utter a few memorial words, and paid a beautiful and tender tribute to the eminent dead of sister Jurisdictions. The remaining portion of the Address was made up of matters claiming official attention during his term of office, in which he mentioned visitations, official ceremonies, schools of instrnction and the creation of five Lodges under dispensation. He commended very highly the work accomplished by the different schools of instruction. Other matters of local interest were mentioned and Brother Pearson closed his thoroughly practical business Address by saying, ""r e close our Fiftieth Session and enter with the full strength of manhood the second half of the century of our Masonic life. A glorious past behind us and a glorious future before us, if we maintain our integrity and live up to our opportunities. " \

The Address was followed by an extended and very elaborate general and financial report rendered by Grand Secretary Munn. It embraced numerous and various details, showing that the Secretary was master of all the departments of work assigned him. The Grand Master, recognizing his valuable services and untiring zeal, tendered Brother Munn his warmest thanks, saying of him, "Prompt and faithful, he


42

Appendix.

[Oct.

may well serve as a model fOr all Secretaries, Grand or Subordinate." This compliment was as well deserved as it was eloquently rendered. The Grand Lodge was favored with invitations, which were accepted, to visit the Board of Trade, the Order of Eastern Star and the Masonic Orphans' Home. Brother Joseph Robbins, P. G. M., moved the reference to the Committee on Jurisprudence the following: "Re.~olved, That the Committee on .Jurisprudence be instructed to inquire into the expediency of reporting an amendment to the Constitution, permitting an increase in the pCI' diem, rate established by this Grand Lodge."

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported that it was expedient to amend the Constitution in this particular, and recommended the reference of said amendment to the several Subordinate Lodges for their action. Grand Master Pearson, in his Address, called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the importance of doing something to reduce expenses, illld thereby lessen the amount collected from the Lodges. He ment.ioned the fact that their pay-roll, mileage and per diem" had been estimated for that Communication at $17,800. The Grand.Master could not understand why the Representatives should receive ten cents per mile when the railroad rate was only Jour cents per mile. The Grand Lodge declined to consider the question of reducing expenses. Consequently, the pay-roll flourishes like a green bay tree. On motion of Brother Hobbins, Committee on Correspondence, the Grand Lodge of New South 'Vales was duly recognized. The Memorial Committee paid a just and appropriate tribute to the memory of the dead of other Jurisdidions. During the session, the Representatives of' the Grand Lodges of Florida, Iowa, Kansas and North Dakota near the Grand Lodge of Illinois, were duly welcomed and each made an appropriate response. Brother John C. Sinith, P. G. M., appeared as the Representative of the Grand Lodge of Iowa, in place of Brother Joseph Robbins, who was summarily removed by the Grand Master of Iowa, because he, R,obbins, did not hold views on the Scotch Rite question agreeable to the Iowa standard. Brother Frederic Speed, P. G. ~I. of ~lississippi, and Representative of Illinois in his Jurisdiction, was introduced to the Grand Lodge and delivered a very beaut.iful and pertinent address. Brother Louis


1891.J

Appendix.

43

Ziegler, P. G. IV!. of the Grand Lodge of Washington, was introduced and accorded a cordial welcome back to his old home and friends in Illinois. His response was very appropriate and eloquent. A brief oration was deiivered by Rev. Dr. A. T. Wolff. The address covered some seven pages. It was thoroughly practical and pertinerit.路 He received the thanks of the Grand Lodge and was complimented by having his address printed.

\

I notice in the report of the Committee on Finance, that the expenses connected with the office of Grand Secretary are vastly in excess of those of Missouri. The expenses of the office for printing, postage and incidental items, foot up within a fraction of $5,000. This does not include the Grand Secretary's salary. I refer to this for the pnrpose of meeting an);' criticism that has arisen respecting the expenses of carrying on the office of Grand Secretary of l\Iissouri". In thejreport of the same Committee, I find)nention made of a petition of Br6t11er Harmon G. Reynolds, now of Kansas, who, for many years, was Grand Secretary and afterwards Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. This petition prayed for an appropriation of $200 per annum, payable quarterly, and to continue during his natnrallife. The Committee did not report in favor of the application. Brother Pearson reported in his Address that dnring the year, he had drawn upon their Treasury for $50 for the relief of Brother Reynolds, which act the Grand Lodge approved. In its estimate of expenses for the ensuing year, the same Committee fixed the probable outlay at $27,400. Numerous amendments to the laws of the Grand Lodge were submitted, and went over, under the law, for consideration at the next session. The Grand Lodge closed its business on the third day of the session, peace and harnwny prevailing. CORRESPONDENCE.

~1. "V. Bro. Joseph Robbins, P. G. M., the Committee on Correspondence, presented the annual review, which covered 264 pages. The report embraced the consideration of sixty Grand Lodge Proceedings.

In his introduction, Brother Robbins pays his respects in no doubtful terms to the subject of continued agitation known as Scotch Hiteism.


44

Appendix.

[Oct.

The report of Brother Robbins. is quite full of extracts from the Grand Lodge Proceedings reviewed. He accords Missouri for 1889, a notice covering some four pages. Some extracts were made from the Address of the Grand Master, Brother J. P. ~ood. Brother Robbins has the right to be hypercritical and seems to enjoy the exercise of -that right. Speaking of the dedication of our Masonic Home on the 15th of June, 1889, he characterizes the address of Past Grand :\:1aster Givan as an eloquent one, "pitched and sustained in a lofty key but marred with the outworn anachronism of Solomon figuring as the Grand Master of Masons." Speaking of the Grand Secretary's connection with that dedication, he styles him" the Ajax of .Missouri Masonry and the silver-tongued orator, who, as master of ceremonies of the occasion, contributed his mite and might to the enjoyment of the occasion." He said further: "After so auspICIOUS a day, the Deputy Grand Master was quite . excusable for closing the Grand Lodge in ' A)[PTJE FORM.''' 'While this was a slight error 路on the part of the Acting Grand Master in closing the Grand Lodge on that" happy day," it occurs to this writer that Brother Robbins was hunting for something Ilmall to carp at, ,,,hen he lugged into his review the simple mistake of a Grand Officer. Referring to the Report on Correspondence of this Committee, Brother Robbins says that, "as usual, it bristles gIl over with his characteristics." After crit'icising my comments respeeting the action of the Grand Lodge of Illinois through Brother Robbins, its Committee, a few years ago, concerning the Bible, he says, "That was no new expression of the Grand Lodge of Illinois on the sllbject.." He further says, "Neither Brother VincH. nor anybody else had e'ver seen anything in law or action of the Grand Lodge, that savored in the slightest degree of inconsistency of this restatement of its laws. The Grand Lodge of Illinois has always stood firmly by the landmarks in this respect, neither setting them aside by the admission of atheists on the one hand, like the' Grand Orient of France, nor by the expulsion of (wou'cd believers in God, on religious grounds, like the Grand Lodge of Missouri." I can appreciate the reason which influences Brother Robbins in making this declaration. He has been so severely handled on account of the position he took some years ago in reference to the case of Krum, that he is evidently sensitive and sore. If to sustain a Mason, as he did, and led his Grand Lodge to do, who declares the Bible to be a "falsehood," is standing by the law and the landmarks, then I am at fau路It in my understanding of what constitutes true l\f asonic loyalty. He says that the Grand Lodge of Illinois would not admit atheists, like the Grand Orient France. Perhaps the at.heist in Illinois Masonry, championed and.


1891.J

Appendix.

45

defended by Brother Robbins, is like our .M.issouri Brother, ,..-ho said he "believed in God when made a Mason, as much as anyone, but had now learned better." If that man Krum, defended and saved to Masonry by Brother Robbins is not an atheist, it would be difficult to find one who is. Brother Robbins is determined to keep alive his dissatisfaction with M.issouri Masonry, because of its expulsion of a man who had" learned better than to believe in God." This spirit of dissatisfaction with our Missouri methods finds its expression on aU possible occasions by Brother Robbins. I know of no better method in which to treat this peculiar condition of our distinguished Brother of Illinois, than by allowing him to roll this sweet morsel under his tongue continually, and cherish a misrepresentation as an angel of light. In reply to an expression in the foregoing quotation, I wish to announce to Brother Robbins and the M.asonic Fraternity, that Missouri never expelled any "o,vou;ed beliel;er in God on religious grounds." Our Grand Lodge did affirm the expulsion of a man who declared his disbelief in. God, when challenged before the trial court. He" believed in God as much as anyone when made a Mason," but with an increase of wisdom he "had learned better." .Fearing that this enlargement of knowledge might be detrimental to those who were less informed than himself, if allowed to continue his Masonic associatiot:1, it was deemed the proper thing to rebuke that spirit, by expelling him from .all the rights and lights of Freemasonry. . , JOHN M. PEARSON, Godfrey, was re-elected Grand Master. L. L. l\lUNN, Freeport, re-elected Grand Secretary.

INDIANA, 1891. The Grand Lodge of Indiana convened in the city of Indianapolis, 路May 27th, and was in session two days. On the 23d of June I received a handsome volume of Proceedings covering about 300 pages. Brother Smythe has succeeded in bringing his work down to a fine point, and may yet distance some of the other Grand Secretaries in the race for the front rank. The excellence of his work and the brief tinie in which it was executed must commend him. as a first-class officer. The Seventieth Session convened on the 27th of May, with M. W. Bro. Jacob J. Todd, Grand Master, present and presiding, while Brothel~ William H. Smythe was Grand Secretary. The information is luet with that' 'Representatives of 460 of the 469 Lodges were present." The membership is announced at 24,776, exhibiting a gain ~of 886 during the year pre-


Appendix.

46

[Oct.

vious. This looks well for that Grand Jurisdiction, and shows \vhat inayyet be accomplished by the Craft. Following the opening exercises a touching letter was read from the venerable and venerated Past Grand Master, Brother William Hacker. As this esteemed Brother is the Representative of Missouri near the Grand Lodge of Indiana, I feel justified in transferring his communication to these pages: For the first time in forty-six years past I find, myself unable to meet with my Brethren in Grand Lodge and participate with them in its labors. No one can regret this bodily affliction that has come upon me more than I do myself. Having passed my four score years of natural life, my work, in all human probability, is done. How well it has been done others must determine. I may never be permitted to meet again with my Brethren in Grand Lodge. but I am consoled with the knowledge that the interest and welfare of our grand old Institution is in good and safe hands, and that it will be pre"erved .and handed down through them to future generations to help the world of mankind more gloriously than in the past. Please convey to our M. W. Grand Master, and to the members of the Grand Lodge, the reason for my absence on this occasion, and may the good Lord bless you, everyone, with that wisdom which will enable you to reach just and proper conclusions in all . matters presented for consideration; that peace and harmony may continue to prevail among the Fraternity in this Jurisdiction, as it has been our glorious privilege in the past. .

My veneration for this veteran can find no words which will convey adequately a sense of regret at his enforced absence from the association and labors he loves so much, and the prospect of his being called to the undiscovered land. This may never reach his eye, but my heart goes out to one so highly valued and deeply reverenced, \",ith all the tenderness and affection of my nature. ADDRESS .

.,

The Grand Master presented an Address covering twenty-one pages, with a charming exordium, followed by a list of prominent names, representing Brethren called fromlaborin sister Jurisdictions, to whom he paid proper tribute. He said that the lives of their Grand and Past Grand Officers had been graciously spared the past year, but'that34'6 members of their Lodges had been called from labor, causing. vacant chairs, desolate homes and sorrowing hearts. Fraternal relations with other Grand Jurisdictions were reported as pleasant and cordial. He recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand. Recognition was withheld upon the report of the Committee on Correspondence. The Grand Lodge of Tasma~ia was accorded due recognition and an exchange of Representatives recommended. The Grand Master reported quite extensive lines of business performed by him pertaining. to the local interests of the Craft. His announcement of the suspension of the Master of a Lodge was worthy of its author, because said Master had, "in a testimonial to the memory of one of the deceased members, injected a reference to partisan politics." The creation of


1891.J

Appendi;t;.

47

four Lodges U. D. was reported, with many other business matters of no general interest. Begging letters were properly characterized and condemned. Under the head of Decisions, Grand Master Todd said he decided about 300 questions of Masonic law, but did not enCllIll bel' his report with them. He wisely uttered the following: In some of the Lodges there is still extant a belief that the Grand :Master has the right to set aside any law, rule or regulation of the Grand Lodge at his option. The ancient landmarks must stand as a safeguard against innovation. The prerogatives of the Grand Master must be upheld to preserve the rights-and dignity, if you please-of his honorable station. But the laws, rules and regulations of the Grand Lodge must not be set aside to suit the eonyenience of any person or of any Lodge. Let it be understood in all our Lodges that ~he Grrind Master must obey, as well ns enforce the luws, not break them. I N"TEM PERANCE.

The following strong and striking terms are found unde.; the above caption: . A number of letters have been received concerning the violation by a few of ollr members of Sections 85 and 86. General Regulations. Liquor saloons are the foes of our Institution. Masonry in Indiana stands opposed to the nefarions traffic, Dram drinking is the grinding, consuming and damning curse of the age. Let us see to it thnt it is no longer permitted, in violation of our rules, to enter the sacred precincts of Masonry, to mar the soul, sear the conscience, deform the character and ruin the reputation of our members. I express the hope that not many years hence not one of those who gathel' around our altars and takc our vows to sustain our laws will traflic in or use intoxicating liquors as a beverage.

The very excellent Address of Brother Todd was concluded by reference to the state of the Craft in the Jurisdiction, which he said was "prosperous and vigorous." I admire the tone and character of his Address. It shows soundness of heart and clearness of thought. He adds another to the number of representative Brethren who have served ably the Fraternity in Indiana. The official acts of Grand Master rodq. were endorsed and commended upon recommendation of the Committee on Jurisprudence and a vote of thanks accorded him. The Grand Secretary, Brother William H. Smyt.he, presented a brief report, giving an exhibit of the finances of the Body, and recommended that the" Star Spangled Banner," "under which we live and prosper" should be placed upon the" top of the Masonic Temple upon all proper occasions." The Committee on 'Vays and Means reported in favor of having the flag of the free float from the Temple flag staff. Neither the Committee nor the Grand IJodge defined, what is a "proper occasion" for thus displaying the United States flag over a Masonic Hall. The Grand Secretary said" the occasions for decorating thebuildi11gs of the city, both public and private, aTe numerons." If these ".occasions"


48

Appendix.

[Oct.

for decorating the buildings of the city are improved by the citi~ens, it is fair to assume that each citizen has his private decorations displayed for himself, and thus meets the demand for the expression of his loyalty. City buildings are likewise decorated. Then if the .Masonic Temple is decorated, it must be in its Masonic character and not to gratify the desire of the citizen for personal display. Decorating a )tasonic building with secular emblems secularizes that which is )iasonic. \Vhy not on " proper occasions" float the United States flag from the spires of the churches? "As you like it." The financial report made to the Grand Lodge of Indiana-shows a most gratifying condition. Some years ago that Body was much embarrassed by debt growing out of the erection of their Temple. By wise financial management, and by holding biennial sessions the Grand Lodge disembarrassed itself, and now meets annually, reporting an interest drawing fund amounting to $12,000. I record this result, accomplishwd in a few years, with great satisfaction, showing as it does superior capacity and business ability on the part of our Brethre~. The report of the Committee on Appeals, in two cases, presented their findings concerning some violators of Masonic purity and law, which will satisfy aU lovers of good order and genuine Masonry. Such application of law against evil doers will purify the Lodges and give a healthy tone to the Fraternity. A proposition was submitted and considered to reduce the fees for the three degrees to $15 as a minimum. The Committee reporting on the question said, "that the minimum fee of $20, now established, is quite as low as the value of the degrees is worth and the dignity of i\'Iasonry .will permit." The price was not lowered. Our Brethren of Indiana maintain a good sized pay-roll, as shown by the report. Over $7,000 were paid out at the recent session. That Grand Lodge can afford it as its financial condition is so strong. The Grand Lodge wound up its business and closed on the morning of the second day. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother \Villiall1. Commons, Chairman, prepared the review for the year. It covered 150 pages, being a written document having but few extracts. The Committee reviewed the Proceedings considered. I am more than pleased with the work of Brother Commons, and only regret that he will not be heard from again, as a new Committee was appointed .by a new Grand Master. The new Committtee is "Long" and not "Common.'路' Brother Commons said many good things, among them this conce~ning Cerneauism :


1891.J

49

Appendix.

Let rank in Masonry depend on Masonic merit, \Ve believe that the best Blue Lodge Mason in the world should be regarded as the highest Mason in the world. If those who have the means, the time and opportunity, desire to take a number of degrees, we make no objections; but let their" zeal and attachment for :Masonry," be commensurate with their pretensions. We believe with Brother Pettit, that "no Mason can be higher than a third degree Mason," and further than the Royal Arch Degree, we know nothing of the le~itimacy or illegitimacy of any of the so-called higher degrees, either fiS a Mason or in fact. When we see :Masons fretting and irritating themselves about "high" degrees, we fire reminded of the remark made by "Josiah Allen's. wife's" husband, and with him" wonder what the durn fools are worryin' about; why can't they be jest common every-day folks; why can't they be jest "-Freemasons '! '

lHissouri for 1890 received very fraternal consideration at the hands of Brother Commons, three pages being used by hini in noticing the administration of our Grand 1\1'aster Brace. N. R. RUCKLE, Indianapolis, Grand Master. WM. H. SMYTHE, Indianapolis, Grand Secretary.

INDIAN TERRITORY,

\

1890.

The Grand Lodge met in Muskogee November 5, 1890, to hold its Sixteenth Annual Communication, with Brother Leo E. Bennett, Grand Master. Brother Joseph S. Murrow, Grand Secretary, reported at the opening of the session that there were Representatives present from thirty-five Lodges. I note the presence of five Past Grand Masters and Representatives of sixteen Grand Lodges. I learn from the statistical table that there are thirty-six Lodges in the Territory, reporting a membership of 1,357. Grand Master Bennett presented an Address of twenty pages. It is a strong, sensible business paper, pure in spirit and elevated in tone. In his introduction, I fifld the following, which is of sufficient interest to justify its transfer to this review: The Craft in our Grand jurisdiction has been generally prospered during the year now drawing to a close. Not only that our numbers have been materially added to, though the spirit and life of Masonry cannot be gauged by statistics, but there is 1m awakened interest among those already members of our beloved Institution, and the exercise of more vigilance in the acceptation of new material for the building of 0111' Temple. Our Lodges generally, so far as I am advised, are enjoying pellce and prosperity-are progressive and healthy. Masonry requires obedience, and finding that among our Brethren we also have prosperity and harmony ILnd unity.

A number of visits were reported by the Grand Master, together with numerous official acts performed. The fraternal dead were mentioned in appropriate terms, and memorial pages recommended in their behalf. Two I,odges under dispensation had been created by the Grand Master, while a number of special dispensations had been granted. T\vo applications for the formation of new Lodges were refused. The Grand Master wisely said that there was "a ~rowing .tendency toward too mct1'ly G. L. Ap.-4.


50

Appendix.

[Oct.

Lodges." He thought that the zeal and influence of the Fraternity should be directed to improve the Lodges already chartered, rather than to multiply new ones. The injury resulting from the increase of Lodges in many portions of the Jurisdictions of this country is found in the curtailment of the territory of Lodges already in existence. Brother Bennett suggested that there should be a rule requiring twenty names to each petition for a dispensation to form a new Lodge. Our rule in Missouri is not less than fifteen. All over and above that only will increase the proQability of a strong Lodge. DECISIONS.

Grand Master Bennett reported ten rulings, which were submitted to the Committee on Law and Usage. All of his rulings were approved except two. These ,vere somewhat modified. He announced the follo,ving decision as to the control of rejected candidates; "The Grand Lodge of the Indian Territory recognizes.perpetualjurisdiction over rejected material"

To which I reply, if this ruling refers to his own Jurisdiction alone, it is all right. If intended to reach beyond the Grand Lodge of the Indian Territory, it is impracticable and worthless. I would ask how he would enforce such a rule as against other Grand Jurisdictions? If a rejected candidate should come from his Jurisdiction into Missouri, and reside among us for twelve months, under our law we would have a perfect right to receive his petition and make a Mason of the party, if found worthy. What becomes of the claim of Brother Bennett as to his perpetual'il'i1n? He would hardly assume to call the Grand Lodge of ' Missouri to account for making a Mason out of material that was legally its own by the laws governing its Jurisdiction. It follows that as he cannot enforce his claim to such material against Missouri, that the law is a failure. I do not stop to argue the impracticable and unmasonic' principle of the school of perpetnalists to which Brother Bennett seems to belong. After I had examined his ruling and prepared my comments on the same, I found that the Committee on Jurisprudence defined the law to be that their Grand Lodge recognizes jurisdiction over rejected material as long as the material remains resident within that Jurisdiction. So it turns out that a good and competent committee is a very proper thing to have in ~ Grand Lodge. When they sift the chaff out of Grand Masters' addresses the pure grain remaining is generally a very commendable commodity. In one of his decisions the Grand Master says a Lodge has the right and ought to prohibit the use of tobacco in its Lodge room. I do not find that the Grand Lodge legislated upon this new view of things. While I do not believe that such a sacred place should be polluted by

â&#x20AC;˘


Appendix.

1891.J

51

the presence of the filthy weed, used as it may be in various ways, especially filling the hall with smoke until candidates, when "brought to the light," cannot behold the Three Great Lights of Masonry, yet I regard this as a question upon which the Lodges should take action and not the Grand Lodge. ~ One of the rulings of Grand Master Bennett reads as follows: "That it is unmasonic and forbidden to confer degrees upon the Sabbath." This is as proper as anything uttered by our Most 'lVorshipful Brother in his excellent Address. The holy Sabbath day was not ordained for any such purposes. The Grand L~dge approved his ruling and made it the law of their Grand JUl'is'diction. Brother Bennett was quite elaborate in his deliverances against Cerneauism, and I accord him full credit for' his able and conservative treatme~t of the subject. He presented two propositions' as follows: First. Two Grand Bodies claiming exclusive jurisdiction of the same degrees cannot both lawfully exist m the same territory at the same time. I

Second. The first lawfully constituted Body working Masonic degrees, established within a territory, and duly recognized by corresponding Bodies, thereby obtains and is entitled to exclusive jurisdiction in such territory, and any other body of the same degree or rite entering later within such occupied territory is a trespasser and unlawful.

As to the correctness of his views in the above statement no question can arise. J oint occupancy of the same territory at the same time by Sovereign Grand Bodies is absurd. It follows that the first lawfully 'constituted Masonic Body in a territory has exclusive right and possession, and any other Body of like character invading its territory should be condemned as being an unlawfu,l trespasser. These are the views held by all Grand Lodges in this country, and by no one more tenaciously than myself. We have absolute and sovereign control 'within the State of Missouri as a Grand Lodge. Any other. Body entering this territory and attempting to confer the degrees of Symbolic Masonry would be an interloper and traitorous to the rights of a Supreme Body. Such interloper would be rejected, and all members adhering' to that Instituti~n disfranchised. From such premises I draw these conclusions: That the Scotch Rite Bodies, ~egally constituted and occupying given territory or jurisdiction, have the preference by the law of preoccupancy or pre-emption. As our Grand Lodge would resist the invasion of any such Body, calling itself a Grand Lodge, that might attempt to set up its altars in Missouri, so should the Scotch Rite Body having possession of a certain territory or jurisdiction resist the inc.ursions of another and obnoxious branch of the same Rite. This is, I hold, the true doctrine, and this the method of procedure by which the Cerneaui tes should be treated when they invade Jurisdictions already estab-


52

Appendix.

[Oct.

Jished within the States and Territories of this country. Let the Rite Jurisdictions do their own fighting and settle their own claims among themselves. Having said this much, I dismiss Cerneauism from further consideration. The Grand Master treated very ably and practically the snbjectof the secret ballot. His views were approved by the Committee .. He called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the fact that for several years past the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer had not given bonds with good and sufficient security. He enforced the requirement during his term and caused a compliance with the law on the part of those officers. He referred to the matter of their late Grand Treasurer, who had failed to render a report at the last session of the Grand Lodge. I see from the report of the Committee, made during the session, that an adjustment had been effected with the Past Grand Treasurer and sa6sfactory arrangements agreed upon. Grand Master Bennett urged most vigorously upon the Craft the necessity of uniform work. This was made a special subject for consideration during the session, and his views fully carried out. He recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Victori~, which was subset'J.uently approved. The aimouncement was made in the Address that some Lodge had held a funeral service over the remains of a Brother who had been some time in his grave. The Grand .Master opposed such sham ceremony and suggested to the Fraternity that they hold a Lodge of Sorrow, instead of a kind of mock performance at the .grave of a Brother who had long since been consigned to mother earth. The Grand Master declared himself unqualifiedly opposed to the "unnecessary and useless" thing called the Past Master's Degree, and recommended that it no longer be conferred upon Masters-elect. His recommendation was not approved, but the use of the degree as authorized still continues. Grand Master Bennett put himself upon record and urged his Grand Lodge to take steps against such Masons as engage and persist in the sale of intoxicating liquors. He suggested also that Lodges "refuse the petitions for initiation of all those who keep dram shops and other.liquor dens." It is proper to observe at this point that his admirable recommendation was approved by the Grand Lodge, as shown by the adoption of the following: Resolved, That it shall be a Masonic offense for a Mason in this Jurisdiction to engage in the dram shop or saloon business, and npon three months' notice to discontinue the . same, and, upon failure to do so, Masons continuing in the business shall upon trial and conviction be expelled from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. â&#x20AC;˘ Resolved, second. That every person engaged in the saloon business .eithcr as owner or bartender, shall be ineligible to receive the degrees of Freemasonry in this Jurisdic. tion.


1891.J

Appendix.

53

Thus another Grand Lodge has fallen into line with Missouri, which heads the column. The leaven continues to work. ~uch Masons as Brothers Hill, Murrow and Bennett have determined to make Masonry respectable and respected in that Jurisdiction. A most felicitous compliment was paid to Brother Murrow, the Grand Secretary. The Grand Master declared that to him more than to any other member of the Craft is due the general prosperity and high standing of their Grand Lodge with other Jurisdictions. He recommended that the salary of the Grand Secretary should be increased, even doubled. I notice that the Committee recommended an inc;ease of salary, reaching the sum of $600. The Grand Lodge, a few years ago, inaugurated a Masonic Home movement and established an Orphan Fund. It seems that this enterprise has not progressed as satisfactorily as was desired. A resolution was adopted urging upon the consideration of Lodges and members of the Craft this important claim and asking donations to the full extent of their ability.

â&#x20AC;˘

The Grand Lodge, during its session, changed the time of its annual meetings. Hereafter the session will be held on the third Tuesday in August, instead of November. The next session is to be held at Muskogee. The Grand Master closed his Address with an earnest and eloquent exhortation. CORRESPOKDEXCE.

A review of a large number of Grand Lodge Proceedings amounting to 130 pages, was furnished by Brothers J. S. Murrow and H.obert W. Hill. The work is divided between them. Missouri was examined and reported upon by Brother Murrow, who gave us the benefit of three pages. He noticed the transactions of our session of 1889, and complimented Grand Master 'Wood upon having delivered "a carefully prepared Address." H~ approved the decision of Brother \Vo~d as to the propriety of the Tyler voting on petitions of candidates. He says that in such cases the Tyler should not only be invited, but required to vote. Brother Murrow is very courteous and kind to this writer, saying that my review possesses wisdom, strength and beauty. I appreciate his compliment, as I believe him to be one of the pure and just members of the Fraternity of this country. He says that in my tilts with able and experienced men of the Guild he has never seen me routed. His' explanation of this is found in the fact, as he puts it, that I am always on the side of "godliness and morality." Quoting from my revie,v of their progress and prosperity, he commended my views to the Lodges of that Territory, and concluded as follows: . Every word of this is as t.rue as the Gospel. If the present excellent standing of the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory is to be maintained and increased it must be by


54

Appendix.

[Oct.

enforcing our excellent regulations against intemperance, and immorality of every kind. There are intemperate men in our Lodges that should be expelled without any further delay in hope of reformation. Positive morality instead of " he is a good fellow and I do not know anythingagainst him," should be insisted upon at the outer door. The success attending the efforts of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to purify Masonry and break up nests of wrong-doing in the Lodges should encoura~e us to continue our effort!:! in that same direction. The standard of morality is not as hIgh in some of our Lodges as it should be. Evils are tolerated and winked at that should be dragged to the light and heroically handled. Let us, Brethren, continue to improve" along the lines of moral cleansing" in the Indian Territory, and take still higher rank" as to the clements of good character and respectability."

The review of the Committee throughout is in keeping with the hi~h standard of intellectual and moral worth which has heretofore characterized these two able and representative Brethren. LEO E. BENNETT, Muskogee, Grand Master. JOSEPH S. MURRO"W, Atoka, Grand Secretary.

IOWA,

1891.

A handsome volume of over 500 pages, received in good time, attests the laborious skill and ability of the Grand Secretary of Iowa Masonry. Of the many proceedings received and reviewed, none surpass the work of Brother Parvin in all the qualities which make up an attractive Grand Lodge Journal. The forty-eighth Annual Communication was opened in the City of Cedar Rapids, June 2d, with Most Worshipful Ja:ines B. Ganible,"Grand Master, and Right \Vorshipful Brother Theodore S. Parvin, Grand Secretary. The body was warmly welcomed in a brief address by Brother Dr. Cogswell, which was replied to appropriately by Grand Master Gamble. The Grand Secretary reported that 423 Lodges were represented. In addition, there were numerous Past Grand Officers present, with Representatives of twenty-four Grand Lodges. The, Representative of Missouri, Brother Newton R. Parvin, was present. From the recapitulation furnished, I learn that there are 444 working Lodges on the roll, with a total membership of 22,525. This shows a gain of only sixty-two for the previous year. Eight Lodges received charters during the session. Grand Master Gamble presented an able and extended Address, covering twenty-six pages of solid matter. He announced that the past year had been, "in many respects, pleasant and profitable." Of the Lodges he said, that' 'generally, they are in a healthy and prosperous condition." The Addrefis embraces a statement of official acts performed


1891.J

Appendix.

55

during the year. Eight. Lodges had been created under dispensation. Corner-stones had been laid, Grand Representatives commissioned, and other matters of local interest attended to. Several requests to ballot upon applications for the degrees out of time, had been received, but refused. He quoted the law against allowing such privileges, and announced that under their Constitution, the Grand Master had no power nor authority to grant such requests. He expressed himself as opposed to railroading men through the (~eremo'nies of Masonry. It is gratifying to know that Iowa does not make laws to be suspended or broken by prerogatives. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master reported three fulings made by him, which were considered by the Committee on Jurisprudence, and affirmed. Grand Master Gamble called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the importance of requiring insurance to be carried by the constituent Lodges of the Ju路risdiction. He urged legal enactment requiring all Subordinate Lodges to provide against loss by fire. No action was taken on the subject. CHARTER ARRESTED.

In the Address, the announcement is made, that the charter of one of the. Lodges had been arrested by the Grand :Master. The ground for this action was that said Lodge had granted a dimit. to one of its members while under suspension, and subsequently expelled. The Grand "Master's act was approved. In considering the subject of non-affiliates, the Grand Master said that he had received information in mor~ than one instance, that Master }fasons had taken their dimits for the purpose of avoiding the payment of dues. He well said that a Mason who was not willing to pay dues to a Lodge, is unworthy of the recognition of good Masons. MASONIC HOME.

Grand Master Gamble brought this subject to the attention of the Grand Lodge in very earnest and exceedingly proper language. He recommended that some active and tangible action be taken looking to the building of a suitable Masonic Home, worthy of the Masonic spil'it of Iowa Masons. A very practicable and appropriate essay is found in the Address, on "Brotherly Love." Brother Gamble announced the loss of four prominent Brethren, who had been called from labor in that Jurisdiction during the past


56

Appendix.

[Oct.

year. These members 'were honored with memorial pages in the prQceedings. The conclusion of the Grand Master's Address 'was touchingly beautiful, expressing the hope that when he and the Brethren are called from labor, they may find an abundant entrance into the Suprem~ Grand Lodge, and strike hands around the altar in the presence of the Author and Founder of all things. The Address of Grand Master G.amble places him by the side of other distinguished and leading Masons of Iowa, who have filled that high station so recently vacated by him .. GRAND CUSTODIAN.

Brother Geo!ge B. Van Saum, Past Grand Master, Custodian of tlre 'York, submitted a brief report. He said the method of instructing the Craft had been tested for three years, and that the Brethren should now be able to judge whether it is practicable and successful. He reported 343 sessions, held in 123 different places, in seventy-one counties of the State, during the term just closed. He was reappointed and his work thus approved. IN MEMORIAM.

Brother Parvin furnished an excellent biographical sketch of the following distinguished Masons: Brothers Albert Pike, Charles Roome, Alfred F. Chapman, Joseph H. Hough, Alexander G. Abell, George H. Hand, Norman T. Gassette, Caleb H. Benton and James E. Cadle, the last named being our own Past Grand Master of Missouri. In addit.ion to the foregoing, he recorded the names of J. A. Allen, of Vermont; Hiram Bassett, of Kentucky; Samuel Lawrence, of Georgia; John S. Tyson, of Maryland; 'William M. Moore and James A. Henderson, of Canada, and Rev. Joseph A. Galbraith, of Ireland. These memorial tributes were followed by an extended business report, rendered by the Grand Aecretary, Brother Parvin, a paper that embraces full and complete details connected with his office. Then followed his report as Librarian. This report shows the admirable condition路 of their magnificent Masonic Library, complete in all its appointments, to which additions are being steadily made, a complete catalogue of which.is furnished in the report. Financial exhibits are found in the J oumal, rendered by the Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary and Grand Librarian. The income, as shown by the report of the Grand Secretary, amounts to nearly $20,000. The Committee on Grand Master's Address reported approvingly, and offered congratulations that the Grand Lodge and the Craft had been


1891.J

Appendix..

57

favored for the past two years with a Grand Master who faithfully, honestly and fearlessly discharged the diiflcult and arduous duties imposed upon him. His various recommendations were considered and courteously treated. Respecting his suggestions about the /"Masonic Home, the committee asked for more light, and recommended the appointment of a Special Committee to make due and diligent inquiry as to the necessity of such a home, and report at the next sessioli of the Grand Lodge. A substitute was offered and adopted, declaring that a Masonic Home is not a necessity at the present time, hut that Masonic charity can be more satisfactorily, economically an.d equitably dispensed by the Lodges. Propositions were submitted during the session looking to the repeal of Chapter XXXVII. of the Code, in relation to Cerneau Masons. The matter was ably considered and fully reported upon by a committeeThe action of the Grand Lodge was adverse to the proposition, and largely in favor of retaining the la路w against Cerneauism. The J ournai shows the expulsion of thirteen Master Masons by the Grand Lodge, who had adhered to Cerneauism, acting in disobedience to the deliverances of the Grand Lodge against that branch of so-called Masonry. An extended and carefully prepared Report on Appeals was submitted and approved. The Journal contains what the Grand Secretary styles "An Episode.". The venerable Grand Tyler, Brot.her Schreiner, tendered the members of the Grand Lodge an invitation to a reception to be given him on the eightieth anniversary of his birth. A motion was adopted authorizing the Finance Committee to appropriate eighty dollars in gold, to be presented to this venerated and venerable Brother.. The Grand Master, at the dose of the session, reappointed Brother Schreiner, Grand Tyler for the ensuing term. After the installation of the new Grand Master, he called the Grand Tyler to the floor, who presented to the retiring Grand :l\:Iaster, as he had to each of his predecessors, a handsome Master's apron. This presentation was followed by an appropriate address路 by Past Grand Master Gamble. The pay-roll this session of the Grand Lodge of Iowa footed up a little over $5,000. The Report of the Committee on Finance awarded to Bro. Newton H.. Parvin, Assistant Grand Secretary, the salary of $1,200 per year. This sum, with the salary of the venerable Grand Secretary, makes $3,200 annually paid out for secretarial service. This includes compensation for the Report on Foreign Correspondence. The Grand Lodge closed its labors on the third day of the session in . peace and harmony. The Journal shows that a very large amount of business claimed attention, and was duly transacted. .


58

Appendi;t;.

[Oct.

Having given all the time and space allowable to a review of the transactions of the Grand Lodge of Iowa, which have interested me greatly, I must briefly notice the Report on Correspondence. This work, as usual, was prepared by the tireless, laborious and irrepressible Parvin, a veteran in this, as in all departments of Masonic labor. The report prepared by him covers 188 pages, and is peculiarly his own, being accurately characteristic of its author. He reviewed the Journals of fifty-six Gra'nd Lodges, devoting more or less space to each, as the matter路 justified. In his introduction, he estimates the value of reportoriallabor very highly; saying, that "in the discussion of various subjects, errors are eliminated, truth vindicated, and principles established." This is a just interpretation of the worth of the service rendered by the reportorial guild of this country. Speaking of the "disturbing element" in Grand Lodges of the land, he defines it as Cerneauism, and characterizes it as the one disturbing element throughout the several Jurisdictions. I presume our venerable Brother means that it is a disturbing element in those Jurisdictions where it has been actively and offensively operative. It certainly has not been a "disturbing element" in the Jurisdiction of :Missouri, because, unknown to us. The same may be said of numerous other Grand Jurisdictions. I have heretofore characterized this disturbing element as a pestiferous "ism." :My estimate of it remains unchanged. Those who adhere to the Cerneau faction, and advocate its claims in oppositiqn to the deliverances of Grand Lodges, place themselves in direct antagonism to the law of their own Jurisdiction. There can be no justification for this dis~bedieIice to Grand Lodge authority. I have never, to my knowledge, met with a Cerneauite, and therefore do not know the spirit of opposition that governs' them. What justification they have for defying their own local Grand Lodge authority, is something with which I am not familiar: Their opposition to the other branches of Scottish Rite :Masonry, is a matter to be settled between the contending factions. I have nothing to do with it. Brother Parvin reviewed the various Journals claiming his attention, making a record in keeping with his past labors. He gives admirable summaries of Grand Lodge doings, and moves on serenely, until he reaches Illinois and :Missouri; then he puts on steam and booms. Having disposed of Brother Robbins, he paid ample attention to this writer. In his review of Missouri, thirteen pages were accorded our Journal of 1890. Brief and complimentary reference is made to the Address of Grand Master Brace. About one page was devoted to a fraterna1 notice of my work as Grand Secretary. In taking up my Report on Correspondence, he awarded me the compliment of ten full pages. He said he approached "with fear and trembling the master-


1891.J

Appendix.

59

piece of the volume, the Report on Correspondence." From the tenor of his remarks, and the well-known spirit of Brother Parvin, one could readily accept the statement that it was with "trembling" he performed the task assumed. Taking the style of his language, his bitter personalities and general manner of expression, it is. evident that he was "trembling" with passion. With his proverbial unfairness, he labors to place me in a false light respecting Cerneauism. He said that I devoted eleven pages to Iowa in my last report, and was 'amused that I found so much in Iowa to command attention. From his statement, the evident purpose was to make the impression that I devoted the eleven pages of my review of Iowa to criticism upon Grand Lodge action respecting the Cerneau question. I may reply that it was not a matter of amusement, but interest, that prompted me in those eleven pages, to pay just tribute and sincere compliments to the.Iowa Journal, amounting to more than six pages. It is not necessary to state the fact to those who know Brother Parvin, that he designed to create the belief that I had done nothing but reflect upon the Iowa proceedings, and employed eleven pages in animadversions upon their action in dealing , with Cerneauism. I refer to the foregoing as an illustration of the unfairness of Brother Parvin, as a controversialist. And here I may be allowed to say that I cannot allow myself to indulge in the exhibition of spleen and personalities characteristic of my distinguished Brother. His personalities are his own assets in debate. vVith the Grand Lodge of Iowa, I have no controversy or quarrel; with Brother Parvin, I have no disposition to indulge in strictures or abuse, and it is my opinion that the less anyone has to do with him in debate, the more quiet and peaceful will be the state of feeling. Brother Parvin continues his zealous labor to ,prove that I have constantly favored Cerneauism, and continuously written in its interest. My disclaimer as published, and repeated frequently, will be sufficient -to satisfy any reasonable man, except the author of the report I am now reviewing. He parades the opinions of a number of writers, from whom he quotes, and offers these opinions as evidence that I have favored this "disturbing element" and pestiferous "ism," called Cernauism. Brother Parvin is welcome to all that he can make out of such statements offered as testimony. The opinions of his witnesses are without force as against my published disclaimers and repeated repudiation of that "ism." As to my connection with Scottish Rite Masonry, I have simply to say that, at the request of the chief of that branch of Masonry in Missouri, who claimed to represent and speak for the head of the Order in the Southern Jurisdiction, I entered the local body in this city, being


60

Appendix.

[Oct.

informed and assured that it was the desire of both the parties named that I should receive the degrees, and the inducement offered was that it would be without cost. I have the proof, which is not any part of this report, that the head functionary of the Scottish Rite in the Southern Jurisdiction said to me that he hoped to see me a Thirty-third Degree member before he died. This does not look like I had applied for advancement and been refused. The statement is false that I was declined further advancement, for the simple reason that I never applied or desired to go further. The statement is equally false that I served as Orator in the Lodge for a number of years. I was never in the Lodge a half dozen times in my life. The statement is true that suspension followed for non-payment of dues, because I refused to attend. Brother Parvin is at liberty to make out of this all that he desires. I conclude my review of his characteristic address by a reference to the statement made by Brother Parvin, which he gives as the ground of my opposition to Scottish Rite Masonry. He says the motive prompting said opposition is "DISAPPOINTED AlIfBITION." I presume he intends to convey the idea that I have been disap- . pointed in not reaching some high place in High Riteism. This is allthat can be made out 'of his withering assertion. Brother Parvin must alIa,,," me to say that as a " Mind Reader" he is not a success. Through the many years of my Masonic life, I never had any" ambition" to be a member of the High Rite Order, much less to gain position in the ranks of said Order. What there is in the Scottish Rite 'Order to ambitiously seek, I have yet to learn .. After trying some of the degrees and finding nothing in them to enlist my appreciation, I ceased to attend, having been present at only a few meetings of the body, and suffered ' myself to J)e suspended rather than belong to a concern that had no attraetions for me. 1\1y" ambition" led me the other way, and my' critics need'not give themselves any trouble over severance of connection with their Order, as I am not unhappy about being out of the ranks of that Institution. "Disappointed Ambition" can only be realized by those who desire what they cannot obtain, or lose what they desire to keep. Brother Parvin is quite competent to judge of the pertinency of this view. My" ambition" never led me to seek place or preferment in the High Rite bodies, or desire to hold a position from which I was dislodged. I am very happy and contented in the department of Masonic work where I have labored for many years. The only disappointment I have realized is in finding in Brother Parvin a spirit of personal vindictiveness and venom which has marked his recent deliverances. However, he is well known, and others appreciate his temper, and" pity the sorrows of a poor old man" . RALPH G. PHELPS, Atlantic, Grand Master. THEODORE S. PARVIN, Cedar Rapids, Grand Secretary.

/


1891.J

Appendix.

KANSAS,

61

1891.

The Journal of this Grand Lodge was received some two months after the close of the Thirty-fifth Annual Communication. It represents the handhYork of that vet~ran Grand Secretary, Broth~r John H. Brown. This Annual is in keeping with his former issues, being admirably arranged, showing elegance of execution and perfection of details. The session under review was held in the city of :1"ort Scott, commencing on the 18th of February, and lasting two days. A vast amount of business was transacted within that short time. 1\1. 路W. Bro. John C. Postlethwaite was Grand Master. Of course Brother Brown, the invincible and irrepressible, was at his post of duty as Grand Seeretary.

The excellent recapitulation contains various items of interest, show.jng that there were 331 Lodges working under charters previous to this session, and ten received charters, making a total of 341 Lodges路 on the roll, besides one under dispensation. The membership was reported at 18,089, being a net gain over the previous year of 766. The income as reported by the Grand Secretary was within路 a fraction of $9,000. A large number of Lodges were represented. This is gathered from the pay roll, which amounted to some $2,500. There were present a number of Past Grand Officers and Representatives of twenty Grand Lodges. The Address of the Grand Master was of medium length and good ability. After due acknowledgement to the Almighty for His innumerable blessings, he called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the loss the Fraternity had sustained throughout the country in the death of many able and representative Craftsmen. Speaking of the relations between the Grand Lodge of Kansas and other Grand Lodges, he said that there existed only friendship and brotherly love. Ten Lodges had been authorized to commence work under dispensation. A report of official acts, such as laying corner-stones, dedications of Masonic halls, and other local matters, was furnished. He reported nine decisions rendered, which, being considered by the Committee on


62

Appendix.

[Oct.

Jurisprudence, were severally approved. I find one ruling that does not agree with general custom among Grand Lodges. He decided that a Lodge of Fellow Crafts, can pass on the proficiency of an Entered Apprentice seeking advancement. It naturally follows that if such is allowed, a ballot may be taken in a Lodge opened in the Second Degree. This the Grand Master said could be done. If this ruling was intended to apply to Fellow Crafts as such, it is unusual and foreign to genuine business procedure. A bod)' of Master Masons in a I_odge of Fellow Crafts路 may examine a candidate for advancement and pass on the proficiency, but the ballot, for his advancement, should certainly be taken in the 1\'1asters' Lodge. Here is a rule tha.t I do not fancy nor accept as legitimate or proper. He said: "Masonic Halls leased for a term of years cannot be dedicated." This is a strange view of the proprieties connected 路with the 110mes of Masonic Lodges. Our law in Missouri requires all Masonic Halls to be dedicated. Very many of them are leased for a greater or less period. I have in mind a Lodge hall recently occupied by a Lodge of Masons in this city, secured by lease of ten years. To apply the 路above rule, that that hall cannot be dedicated, is to say that the Lodge may work for ten years in a place not set apart to sacred Masonic uses. The other rulings of the Grand Master were unobjectionable. The Grand Master took occasion to deliver a most wholesome and high-toned exhortation, from which the following extract is made: During the year several Lodges have appealed to me for my decision on the propriety of a Brother engaging in the busincss ot selling' intoxicating liquors in original packages, and under the so-called Original Packal:\'e Decision. In all cases they were answered in emphatic terms. The Grand Lodge has trequently held that the keeping of a dram shop or the selling of intoxicatin~ liquors as a beverage was a Masonic offense, and these declarations 路wcre made at a tlIne when the laws of the State recognized these acts as lawful by licensing the same; but since the laws of the State have been changed, prohibiting the general traffic in intoxicating liquors, the keeping of a dram shop or the selling of intoxicating liq.uors is not only a Masonic offense. but un offense against the laws of the country, ltnd IS therefore dOUbly censurable. And the Mason who attempts to shield himself under the provisions of the so-callcd Original Package Decision, or any other technicality of law, is guilty of a gross offense against society, an offense that has no palliating excuse for its commission. It is a mere contrivance to evade the will of the people of the State, as well as the great body of Masons, and no punishment short of expulsion should be meted out to the offender, who seeks to build himself up on the rums of his neighbor. The Brother who persists in turning himself into a walking beer cask, to the disgust of his friends, by the immoderate use of intoxicants, should have no part in Masonry, and. I shall hail the day with delight when our Lodges will act promptly to rid themselves of the burden of such membership. .

It is not necessary for me to announce my unqualified approval of the above utterances, whether applied to the drunkard or the drunkard maker. The principles enunciated in the above statements are so sound and accurate that I take pleasure in commending them to all who may read this review.

/


1891.]

4-ppendix.

63

The Addressof the Grand Master was well styled by the committee on that document, "a very able and interesting paper." *'

Brother John II. Brown, Grand Secretary, presented, what is nothing new for him, an excellent report, both general and financial, showing great care and ability. An extensive paper emanated from the Board of Custodians, giving a history of the work done by those teachers of the Ritual. A paper was presented and approved,announcing that the Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern ~tar had appointed a committee to confer 'with a like committee of the Grand Lodge, to devise some feasible plan for the establishment of an institution for the care of widows and orphans of deceased Masons. A committee of three 'Past Grand Masters was created to confer with the committee of Eastern Star. . On a special report rendered by the Grand Secretary, Brother John H. Brown, the Grand Lodges of New Zealand and Tasmania were duly recognized. From the report of the Grand Secretary, and also of the Committee on Lodge Returns, it was learnel that a large amount of labor and trouble had been patiently borne by reason of neglect, indifference and inaccuracy of Lodge Secretaries concerning returns. AN ORATION.

Grand Orator Rev. James G. Dougherty delivered an address covering seven pages. The oration bristles with practical thought and Masonic truth. He defined Masonry as an ancient and honorable institution. "Masonry is beneficent." "Masonry is religious." "Masonry is fellowship." "Masonry is cosmopolitan." ":VIasonry is conservative." "Masonry is radical." These several propositions were discussed and elaborated by the Grand Orator in a very satisfactory manner. An interesting report was rendered bjr the Committee on Necrology. A committee appointed to examine and report upon the Masonic Mutual Benefit Society of Kansas, stated, that this organization had paid during its history to beneficiaries largely over $400,000. The Committee on Jurisprudence having approved the decisions of the Grand Master submitted its findings upon other questions COIlsidered.


64

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Committee on Finance and Mileage took occasion to state that there had been a large increase in the expenses of that session over the one .of the previous year. The increase was largely owing to the pay roll. From the statements of this committee it is learned that a small balance is on hand, and that it will not be long, with the present heavy current expenses, until it will be necessary to take steps to increase the revenue. I have thus glanced at all the points of interest found in the scope of Grand Lodge business. CORRESPONDENCE.

"Broth~:r John

H. Brown, for the Committee," furnished one of his strong, vigorous and readable reviews, amounting to 172 pages. There is much of interest to be found in this report. Brother Brown writes and uses the scissors judiciously throughout his entire labors. Referring to the manner of opening the Grand Lodge of Colorado, he made the following plain and solid remarks: We confess that we are not by any means favorably impressed with the new dep.trture of our Brethren of the Centennial State, in following in the wake of ollr Maryland Brethren, in the opening ceremonies of their Grand Lodge. All such pomp and show has no place in our Masonic ceremonies, and Grand Lodges which indulge in such dress parades are, in our judgment, drifting away from the ancient moorings of our Fraternity. We are inclined to think. from the "Young America" style they have of running things, that there is young blood at the head of the Order in these Jurisdictions, a'nd the boys are in a fair way to have things their own way, and arc in for a good time at least once a year. The attempt of the Grand Master to justify his course in this new departure is rather thin, to say the least: but we will forgive him this time, if he does not do so any more, or encourage his successor in doing so.

He agrees with Grand Master Todd, of Colorado, that the expenditure of large amounts of money in building up :i\fasonic homes is not a wise policy. The ground of this objection seems to be against Grand Lodges embarking in such enterprise. It may be proper to remark in -this connection, that his objection cannot apply to the establishment and maintenance of the Masonic Home of Missouri. Our Home is not the creature of the Grand Lodge, although that Body is incidentally connected with the institution. Yet it is in no sense responsible for the management or support of the Home. The Grand Lodge granted us permission to create this asylum for destitute widows and helpless orphans, and appointed a Board of Directors. This Board was incorporated and is, in a general view, independent of the Grand Lodge, notwithstanding that Body graciously and kindly encourages the Board in its ~reat ,,,ork, and has shown its appreciation of our enterprise by donations amounting to the present date to more than $25,000. Brother Brown, like this writer, does not take kindly to the views of Brother Singleton, of the District of Columbia, on the subject of doing Masonic ,,,ark on the Sabbath.


Appendix.

1891.J

65

The review of Brother Brown thronghout is able, practical and fraternaL In his review of Maryland, concerning the saloon question mentioned by Brother Shult~, Brother Brown said: Do not get frightened, my good Brother, you will hear of other old musty records being unearthed. If we are not very greatly mistaken, the time is not far distant when it will be a well settled principle of :'>lasonic law, that the business of keeping It dram shop or what is more commonly known as a "saloon," will be held to be immoral and in violation of the spirit of Masonic law. An persons engaged in such business will be deemed unfit to participate in our labors and privileges. In other words, such persons will be declared ineligible, and Lodges will be forbidden to receive their petitions.

The end in view will amply justify the effort to make all such persons as keep saloons" ineligible." Before closing this hurried examination of the work of Brother Brown, I must note his kind treatment of Missouri. Five full pages were devoted to a review of our Proceedings for 1890. He said, "The Missouri Journal is always a ,...elcome visitor." Speaking of our eminent Brother, Theodore Brace, Grand Master, he had this to say: Just think of it! the Grand Lodge of A. F. & A. M., was this year l?,0verned by one of the members of the supreme bench of the State of r.Jissouri, Han. rheodore Brace. What will that little bevy of saintly cranks, iust outside of Chicago, think of this sort of doings of the sovereign people of MissQuri? It is the way the Missourians have of doing things; they are a little lawless at times, especially when they are casting about for some good mau and true Mason to preside over the ltffairs of the Grand Lodge. They never stop to enquire whether he is a governor, judge of the supreme court, doctor, attorney at law, preacher of the gospel, or the ordinary business man. The important prerequisites are, a man of good morals, one thoroughly imbued with the grand principles of Freema..sonry, and otherwise well-qualified to fill the exalted position of Grand ~laster.

The annual Address of Grand Master Brace is able and practical, giving a resume of official duties performed during the past year. He reports that the most friendly and fraternal relations exist between the Grand Lodge of r.lbsouri and each of the sixty Grand Lodges whose Proceedings are conducted in the English language, and with which this Grand Lodge is in fraternal correspondence.

Referring t.o 0111' Masonic Home, Brother Brown sa.id that its success is assured. "Brethren of Missouri, you have our best wishes for a grand success in the laudable work in which you are engaged." After making a lengthy extract from my business report, as Grand Secretary, Brother Brown commended Missouri in this style: From thc foregoing showing. it would scem to a casual observer that there is no particular occasion for fear of the downfall of Masonry in :\:lissouri, or of its going lIlto decay and being numbered among one of the institlltions of the past, as has been so oftcn predicted by those outside of that Jurisdiction. Certainly the Craft in old mother Missouri has abundant reasons for congratulation upon its grand achievements in the past five years. Notwithstanding the many difficulties to be overcome, the law has been strictly enforced, and, as a result, she has been steadily increasing the number ot Lodges, augmenting her membership, and, best of all, increasing in interest. All this has cume to the :Masons of Missouri by reason of the supposed evil elrects of the anti-saloon law. If such be true, let us have more of the some kind of evil effect, and let the standard of the grand old Institution go up higher and higher. G. L. Ap.-5.

â&#x20AC;˘


66

Appendi;f.

[Oct.

Brother Givan, Past Grand Master, ~'as complimented by the Kansas Committee, very highly. He said that Brother Givan may be safely classed as an adept in his kind of Grand Lodge work, and worthily fills the place so long and ably filled by the lamented Owens. Our Grand Lodge action was commended in which we reinstated an expelled saloon-keeper, who had repented and promised amendment. This action is in keeping with the spirit of Masonry as practiced by the Fraternity in Missouri. We make no war upon individuals engaged in the saloon business, but simply say to them, "Quit the business, or quit :Masonry." If they abandon the abominable traffic, it is all right; if they do not, we abandon. them. When reformation follows abandonment, we show the true spirit of l\fasonic charity by restoring them to good Masonic standing and fellowship. He commends my last year's Report on Correspondence, saying it was equal to any of its predecessors. The difference, he thinks, if there is any, is found in the fact that I have increased the sharf> points in my review of matters and things. I beg to differ with Brother Bro\vn concerning my 路last year's work, for I thought that report was more amiable and conservative than some of its predecessors. The work of the present year will not bristle with the" sharp points" mentioned by Brother Brown, as heretofore, owing to the fact that the cruel war is about over. Brother Brown is admonitory in his expressions, and I most cheerfully accept his kind suggestions in the following extract: It is beg-innin~ to look ll~ though many of us were growing a little too p('r~onal in what we have to say in these annual reviews, lLnd it might be well to call a halL and see if we cannot get along without indulging in so many personalities. ThIS does not seem in keeping with the grand and elevating principles of Freemasonry. We are not expected to agree upon all mooted questions now being so freely discussed by the guild. In all things we say and do let us Hot forget that we are Brethren, bound by tics not to be broken.

A number of extraets from my Report on Correspondence appears in the columns of his report, with approving comments made thereon. He thinks I made a great mistake in taking any part in the discussion now going on upon the question of "High Riteism." Like 1;1any of my . Brethren of the Guild, I have entertained strong convictions and positIve opinions respecting the controversy, and have given utterances to the same with less hesitation than, perhaps, was wise or disereet.路 I have done with that. controversy and relegate it to the past. Brother Brown in concluding his remarks of Missouri, seemed to be a little surprised that our Grand Lodge had been put on wheels; and was to leave the East and travel towards the 'Vest, by holding its next session in Kansas City. He said, "Kansas Will not fail to drop in and embrace her mother, l\fissouri." He will be warmly welcomed by all.


1891.J

Appendix.

67

Brother Brown closed his extended and commendable labors in the following terms: Thus we close this our Nineteenth Annual Review with the hope that our labor has not been spent路 for naught. It has been our earnest desire in presenting this brief epitome of the proceedings of other Grand Lodges to produce somethiRg that would be of interest, and serve to enlighten' and benefit the members of our Order. How well we have accomplished our work we leave our readers to judge. In commenting upon the transactions of other Grand Lodges, we have not been unmindful of the delicate and sometimes very important duty we were required to perform. In the performance of the.duty imposed upon us we have endeavored to the best of our ability to discharge it in a way ana manner that would seem to draw us closer together if possible in the bonds of Masonic fellowship. and more closely unite the interests of the several Grand Lodges. Instances have occurred that seemed to make it necessary for us to give plain and unmistakable expressions of our views upon matters 'of vital importance to the well being of our Masonic Institution; yet in all we have endeavored to make such expressions respectful and fraternal, and in the end we hope that our endeavors will conserve the best interests of an Institution. founded on principles that have stood the test of ages. If these objects haye in any wise been accomplished through our humble efforts. surely we shall be content.

ANDRE'V M: CALLAHAN, Topeka, Grand Master. .JOHX H. BROvVN, Kansas City,Grand Secretary.

KENTUCKY,

1890.

The Ninety-first Annual Communication opened in the 'Masonic Temple, I..Ionisville, October 1st. M.. 'V. Bro. vVm. W. Clarke, Grand )fastel', present and presiding. Brother I-1. B. Grant, Grand Secretary. I notice the enrollment of fifteen Past Grand Masters, with Representatives of thirty-one Grand Lodges, Missouri being represented by Brother II. B. Grant, Grand Secretary. Brother Grant 'stated in his recapitulation, that 380 Representatives had been in attendance. There are. something over 400 Lodges in Kentucky, with a membership of nearly 16,000. The statistics show an increase of about 700. Over 1,400 had been initiated. This Grand Lodge does not give in its Statistical Exhibit the nurnber of those passed and raised. The income from Grand Lodge dues, as shown by the Grand Secretary's report, and the amonnts received on assessment for the Masonic Home is quite large. But for the annual outlay on mileage. and per diem account, the funds of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky would soon be sufficient to furnish an eildowment for their Masonic Home. The pay-roll annually amounts to nearly $10,000. The Address of Grand Master Clarke, covering nineteen pages, opened with expressions of profound sorrow at the loss sustained by the Craft in Kentucky in the death of Past Grand Master Charles Eginton, which occurred at Covington, a few days before the session opened. He very beautifully said, "Thus, one by one, the fathers of


68

Appendix.

[Oct.

the Grand Lodge are passing away, leaving in their memory a splendid heritage." Since that session closed, and soon after, another one of the prominent figures of Kentucky Masonry was called to his reward. Brother Hiram Bassett, P. G..2\1. and P. G. S., has ceased to labor here and passed to the conditions of the great future. The Grand Master stated that during the year, nothing had occurred to disturb the peace and harmony of the sisterhood of Grand Lodg"es. He then entered upon an enlarged statement of business transactions connected with his station. Mention was made of the terrible cyclone which passed through Louisville the preceding spring, producing desolation and want, to relieve which he had donated $250 from the Grand Lodge fund. A number of Lodges had been created during his term and by his order, under dispensation. From the statement of the Grand :Master, followed by the rendering' of fifty decisions, one might conclude that the Lodges of Kentucky were greatly in need of jurisprudence. The decisions rendered were examined and reported upon by the Committee on Jurisprudence and the statement was made that, "We heartily endorse each and everyone." But the Grand Lodge did not endorse the Committee. His fiftieth decision was especially commended. The report of the Committee was made a special order for a given hour, when it was taken up and the aforesaid fiftieth decision made the subject of consideration in advance of any other ruling. The Committee on Jurisprudence having approved this decision, the contest seemed to have been sharp and well defined and was decided by a call of Lodges. The ayes and noes being taken, a motion to lay the report on the table was carried, and the report was tabled. The aniimuoS of this subject may be stated briefly. A f~w路 years since, the Grand Lodge of Kentucky made a vigorous deliverance against a certain so-called branch of Masonry styled Cerneauism, and incorp'orated in its Constitution an amendment, recognhing certain bodies of l\fasonry as legitimate and genuine. Also declaring that any Mason who should receive or communicate any of the forbidden degrees, should be expelled from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. Moreover, that the legitimate bodies enumerated must amend their Constitutions, requiring that each member of their bodies should be in affiliation with some Subordinate Lodge. The Grand Master decided that the terms of their amendment not having been complied 路with, the law was without force or effe~t, and not obligatory upon the Craft. This decision, meeting the approval of the Committee on .Jurisprudence, was the subject of debate, which was finally determined against the Grand Master. If I understand the status of the case, the Grand Lodge of Kentucky made an amendment to its Constitution and that Hrnendment was to be operative npon cer-

/


1891.J

Appendix.

69

tain contingencies. It seems to me that the law, being made dependent upon that contingency, could not apply or have any force until the happening of such event as ,vas provided for. If these premises be correct, then it follows that the Grand Lodge has a law in operation, without the terms of its enactment having been complied with. This presents a rather singular phase to my mind in the legislation of a Grand Body. One other decision was, on motion, reversed. No.8 was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, and No. 11 properly amended. After .this doctoring of the decisions mentioned, the entire lot was approved. It is the judgment of this writer that Grand Master Clarke had bestowed great labor on the preparation of his extended rulings, as well as the entire Address. He did not forget the interest of that most important work of Kentucky Masons, the Masonic Home. A recommendation was submitted by him to the Grand Lodge proposing the donation, by that Body, of its preferred and common stock in the Masonic Temple Company, representing assets amounting to nearly $20,000. A similar recommendation was submitted by the Grand Treasurer, Brother John H. Leathers, and ipcorporated in the Grand :M:aster's Address. This matter was duly considered by the Finance Committee and upon due recommendation thereof, the Grand Lodge adopted a resolution transferring to the Endowment Fund of the Home all the stock held by the Grand Lodge in the Masonic Temple Company. This munificent donation, from which a good revenue will be derived, will be of vast benefit to their Home. It is. needless for me to say how highly I appreciate the. generous spirit and devotion of Kentucky Masons to their grand enterprise. Brother.J. ,V. Staton, Committee on Correspondence, submitted two special reports, one proposing the recognition of the Grand Lodge of :North Dakota, which report was adopted. The other was in reference to the Grand Lodge of Vera Cruz. The Committee said, touching this subject, that it was not the proper time to recognize any of the Bodies within the territory of the Republic of Mexico. The Grand Lodge of San Domingo, in the Republic of Hayti, was not recognized. A beautiful memorial tribute was paid to Past Grand Master Charles H. Eginton, recently deceased, and a page set apart to his memory. A report of the Masonic Home was presented by Brother E. S. P. G. M. From this lengthy and able report, I beg leave to make the following extracts, incorporating them into my own review, that the Masons of Missouri may see and appreciate what has been done by our Kentucky Brethren: }~itch,

The last report of the Home, submitted for the inspection of the Craft, your committee finct to be replete with enconragement to its friends, and containing nothing to


70

Appendix.

[Oct.

justify or extenuate the sinister efforts of the few ?'cmaining malcoll1ents, who seem en'l' on the alert to obstruct its progress, embarrass its policy, and destroy its usefulness. Its continued e,"Ce1n]Jtionfrom debt, il.s sl.eadily-increasing patTonage, jis c.tJi,cient and 1L?l.scJji.sh manarlemcnt by a zealons, eV(T路walc!(ful. tlwu.gh nnrenwneratcd, Directory; the o:ecptiunally guod !walth of its inmrrle,' .. the ample yet ]J/路ot'idcnt provisions for theil' physicrr.l r:omjOl't and employ?/I.ent, as well as l'ecreafion and a1nuse1lwnt, together wiJ.h the eduealional facilili('s, mental (Old nWTal, for the development. and cullil'a!ion of the mind and heal'l-have signally, and in a fcw years, converted what was once regarded as an c.rperiment of doubtful propriety into

a very decided, if not phenomenal success, Less than a score of yearshaYr. elapsed since the dedication and opening of our Home, yet it has already receh-ed, protected and maintained more than forty of the bereaved widows, lind fed and clothed and educated Hnd prcpared for the active duties of life sL"C hundred and l1/lenty~fi'I'e of the orphan children of our Masonic dead in this .Jurisdiction. Each revolving yellr attcsts the wisdom and expediency of this organized charity. and increases the number of its beneficillries: and, from our knowledge of its general management, we hesitate not to affirm that it is our beau ideal of a training . school for our :Ml1sonic charge-where they are brought under a genial, lunne-like influence and companionship, where culture and labor are happily blended, and both alike dignified, and where an acknowled!!ed social equality restrains all the uprisingi' of sodal pride or caste, and effectually prevents the domination of pelf over the children of misfortune llnd WlUlL. In this regard it is wholly unlike any other charitable institution known to your committee, for. although our beneficiaries are thus sustained and educated without finy resources of their own, they are never made to feel that they are ]JattPcr dependr.nl.~ or the recipients of public charity, NAY VE1ULY !but on the contrary are taught to contemplate their relations to the Home in its true light-as honored gnesf.s of a liberal-minded philanlhl'opic brolherhood, which, in its turn, feels itself alike honored in being thus permitted to aid llnd bless the hapless lot of the !iring while redeeming its fraternal vows to the dead.

A very appropriate and complimentary resolution was tendered to the retiring Grand Master, Brother Clarke, for" t.he able, dignified and fraternal manner" in which he had discharged the varied duties of his office. Brother H. B. Grant, Grand Secretary, submitted an extended business report, showing superior knowledge and admirable ability in the conduct of that important office. He may well be classed among the first class Grand Secretaries of our Ameriean Jurisdictions. The business of the Grand Lodge, though quite extensive, was tl'ansacted with evident care and the session closed its labors in the afternoon of the third day. The Grand Lodge of .Kentucky continues to furnish the Masonic world its membership by Lodges. The printing of the names of 16,000 Masons must cost right smart money. 'What practical good results from this expensive and additional labor imposed on a Grand Secretary, I have never been able to discover. One hundred and sixty-three pages are occupied ,,'ith the names of members of the Lodges. The printing of these names can be omitted without loss to anyone and much financial benefit to the Grand Body. 'Ve tried the experiment in Missouri for two or three terms, and found that we were publishing a Masonic directory for the convenience and information of traveling dead beats. The custom was abandoned, never to be resumed.


1891.J

. Appendix.

71

COHHESPONDENCE.

A review embracing 115 pages was furnished by that elegant writer and accomplished reporter, Brother James 'V. Staton. The report, as in fanner years, was almost wholly written, the very fewest number of extracts being made. I have space only to note what he says of Missouri for 1889. In his review of our Proceedings he gives us the'benefit of more than four pages. He presented a full review of the Address of Grand Master 'Wood, commenting fovorably thereon; mentioned with kindness our young and growing Masonic Home; complimented Brother McDowell as being one of the best Grand Lecturers on the continent; like\vise, gave the Grand Secretary of Missouri ample credit for producing a report full and complete. Referring to our Brother Givan he styles him "the prince of Masons," in connection with his labors for the Home. In reference to his work as Chairman of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances, says: "He is noted for his masterl~' reports.'" Noting the presence of a long list of .Past Masters at our Grand Lodge session, Brother Staton says, whether they have a vote in the Grand Lodge or not he is not informed. He further remarks: "If they each have one vote they may prove troublesome some day." To which I reply that under the law of our Grand Lodge each Past Master is entitled to one vote. The question presented by Brother Staton is a grave one, and may prove, as he and other able thinkers and competent judges believe, a serious trouble in Grand Lodge legislation in the future. For my own part, I believe tha;t a Grand Lodge should be composed of its Grand Officers, the Masters and Wardens of chartered Lodges, or their legally appoi!1ted proxies. Referring to my comments upon the action of Grand Master Smith in his Address concerning Cerneauism, Brother ~taton offered some views which I desire to present here, and give him the benefit of a hearing: He seems to think there is inconsistency in that part of Grand ~[aster Smith's Address relating to CerneauislIl. When Grand Master Smith declared' that" I do not believe that this Grand Lodge, or its executive head, the Grand Master, has the right to control any degrees of Masonry, whether real or spurious, except the first three degrees of the York Rite," he uttered a truth that is incontrovertible; but, while h~ disclaims all control except over the Blue degrees, as we shall term them, he does affirm that the Grand Lodge has exclusive control of the latter, and upon that hinges the fight of Grand Lodge to legislate on the Cerneau question. The Cerneaus, as well a.s all the other bodies of the Scottish Rite, and we might say aU the so-called higher degrees of the York Rite, claim to build on the foundation laid and controlled by the Gra,nd Lodge exclusively, and so long as any of the so-called higher degrees carry the esotery of the Blue degrees into their systems Grand Lodges havc, and will and should claim, the right to say who shall use them.

Speaking of my treatment of the Scottish Rite question, he says: "Brother Vincil may'or may not be a Scottish Rite Mason." To which I reply with great pleasnre, that I am not and do not desire to be a member of that Hite.


72

Appendix.路

[Oct.

LOTTERY BUSI:"ESS.

I have had occasion more than once in the past to mention the fact that the Grand Lodge of Kentucky has been the beneficiary of a lottery scheme, receiving annually therefrom more or less funds. I am fully aware that Brother Staton has as little use for lotteries as he has for saloons, and on this ground we meet as on many others, and arc in hearty accord. An .explanation is due on this subject, both to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky and the Fraternity of that State. This explanation I permit Brother Staton to make in his own words: Brother Vineil may also rest in peace as relates to the lottery business. There may be an item in the forthcoming report of the Grand Treasurer relative thereto, but it will certainly be the last, lor the Legislature repealed the grant at its last session. Grand Lodge became involved in this matter as far back as, say about 1815, without looking for the exact date, for the purpose of assisting in bUilding a Masonic Hall in Lexington, and it has existed to this day. It was inaugurated at a time when lotteries were not so obnoxious as they are now, when even churches in some parts of the country did not hesitate to engage in them, and they were a most popular medium for raising money to build public buildings of every class and kind. Grand Lodge sold out its grant years and years ago, and it has been a question, legally speaking, as to whether the grant could be terminated at the pleasure of the L~gislature. However, at the last session, that body reRealed the grant, and, so far as we are concerned, we are glad of it, for our (lonsent could have been obtained many years ago.

None can be more gratified than myself to learn the fact that the Grand Lodge of Kentucky has ended its connection with the lottery business. The information is as gratifying to me as it is creditable to our Kentucky Brethren. .. Brother Staton speaks in cordial terms respecting our ?\1issollri ::Vlasonic Home. He said: "God bless the good work begun and so enthusiastically carried on by our Missouri Brethren, and may it prove as great a blessing to the Craft as is our Home to the Craft of Kentucky." To the above grateful expression and prayer this writer utters a hearty, old-fashioned, Amen. Brother Staton says he loves Brother Vinci! and reads his writings with great interest, though sometimes a little too much acid is put in the ink. I must be allowed to record my hearty reciprocation of his brotherly sentiInents, and conelude this review by saying that ink without a little acid would not be of much service in our department of work. Brother Staton concludes his able review by referring to the disquietude caused in some Jurisdietions by the presence of CerneauislU. It is not necessary for me to announce to my good Brother that I have no partiality for the Cerneau branch, nor a.ny other branch of High Riteism. I join with him in expressing the hope that the disturbances caused directly or remotely by this pestiferous "ism" may soon pass away, and that all matters tonding to discord among the members of th~ Craft be banished forever.

;


1891.J

73

Appendix.

I take a pleasant and fraternal leave of Brother Staton, hoping some day to meet him personally and cultivate the social and fraternal amenities of life. I am glad to announce that he is continued in charge of the important work so well performed in the past, and that his Grand Lodge recognh~ed his worth by electing him Grand Junior 'Warden. :May the day come when he will be honored by his Brethren with a seat in the Grand East, and preside over the Craft of Kentucky as Grand Master. CHARLES H. FISK, Covington, Grand Master. H. B. GRANT, Louisville, Grand Secretary.

LOUISIANA,

1891.

A Special Communication of the Grand Lodge convened in New Orleans, September 29, 1890, and was presided over by Grand Master Charles F. Buck. The object of the session was to consider the demolition of the present Grand Hall and the erection on the site of a Masonic Temple. An address bearing upon the subject was presented, containing a statement of affairs. A special committee was deemed necessary, and accordingiy created. This committee reported in favor of an investment, if necessary, amounting to $100,000. The funds required to carry forward the undertaking, amounting to some $70,000, were provided for by an issue of bonds, which are to run for twenty years. To guarantee these bonds a mortgage on the Grand Lodge Hall property is to be executed. From the record, I judge the above plan received very enthusiastic support, and the same was adopted by a large majority. The Seventy-ninth Annual Session opened in the city of New Orleans, February 9, 1891. Brother\ Charles F. Buck, Grand Abster; J. C. Batchellor, Grand Secretary. . Out of the 114 Lodges on the roll sixty were represented. a reported membership in that Jurisdiction of 4,314.

There is

An Address of twenty-four pages emanated from the Grand East, in which Grand Master Buck referred to the action of the Grand Lodge in disposing of the old haJl property and the prospects of a new home. Fraternal mention of the eminent dead of other Jurisdietions was made by the Grand :Master at some length.


74

[Oct.

He presented an extensive sehedule of official acts performed by him. A fcw very practical rulings were reported in the Address, and the same were declared by the Committee on Jurisprudence to be in "consonance with the la\ys of Masonry" in that Jurisdiction. Grand Master Buck expressed himself as decidedly opposed to joint occupancy, and iufavor of Lodges lnaintaining their dignity and indeperidence by holding their meetings in Lodge rooms sacred to themselves. Enlarged mention was made of their new hall enterprise. It is found in the Address that the estimated cost of the same will be more than was at first supposed. He presented the subject of work and the need of a Grand Lecturer, and systematized efforts to disseminate a correct knmvledge of the ritual. . He closed his eminently practical business paper by speakihg of the state of the Order. Improvement in the work and activity in the Lodges were announced as good tidings and indications of a much desired revival of Masonry in that Jurisdiction. On this subject T make t!le following extract: The indications of the present teem with promises of future pro!>perity. The very energy which the Grand Lodge has rlisplayed. as in breaking loose from the embarrassments of the past it has not hesitated to as>ume heavy burdens in the future, is a pledge Of success. Ere this time next year the temple will be completed. We will have a large debt to carry, but we will have the mClll1S whcrewith to meet it. For my part I l1ave not the slightest apprehension. Even should the Grand Lodge be embarrassed, I feel, Hay, I know that the means are in our hands to overcome everything.

The reports of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary followed the Address. The Grand Secretary was quite elaborate, showing the run of business that had passed through his hands. From his report I gather that a number of Lodges had been created under dispensation. These, for the most part, were chartered by the Grand Lodge. A fnll report was furnished by the Board of Directors of the Grand Lodge Hall, and presented about the same facts as wcre exhibited on the part of the Grand l\'1aster. Divers and sundry matters of a local interest were considered and passed upon. A proposition was submitted to inaugurate a )fasonic HOlne movement. It was finally decided to postpone consideration of this subject until the next annual session.


1891.J

Appendix.

75

I notice the presence of a distinguished visitor, Brother J. C. Smith, Past Grand Master, of Illinois. A resolution was passed declaring it to be the proper thing for Subordinate Lodges to celebrate the 24th day of June, and in connection therewith, to raise money, so far as possible, to form the nncleus for a Masonic Home. The membership in'the .Jurisdiction was published in full by Lodges. The salary of the Grand Secretary of that Jurisdiction was redueed to the sum of $1,500. Following the election, Grand Secretary Batchelor, who had been superseded by a new officer, asked permission to say a few words to the Grand Lodge. II e opened his remarks by saying: "Under the circumstances it is but natural that I should feel a little annoyed at the result of the election." He had been in service for twenty-four years. I have no means of learning why a change was made. It is sufficient to say that a new and more vital man seemed necessary to fill that important position. I may be permitted to express the hope that the venerable Grand Secretary was not defeated on the gronnd of unacceptability. He was certainly not incompetent, so far as business management is concerned. If his general bearing .towards others has been such as I realized when, for the first. and for the last time, I visited the office, his displacement is not to be \rondered at. CORRESPONDENCE.

The report covers eighty-two pages, and was prepared by the same Committee that has' had charge of this work' for some year~ past. The same style and method obtain as heretofore. "As you like it," may be used in this connection, so far as the report of said Committee goes. Brother Charles F. Buck, Grand Master, was re-elected and resides in :New Orleans. Brother Richard Lambert succeeded the retiring Grand Secretary, J. C. Batchelor. He likewise dwells in the Crescent City.


76

Appendi~G.

MAINE,

lOct.

1890.

As heretofore, the Journal of this Grand Lodge was received too late in the season for review last year, and of necessity had to go over to the next term. The Grand Lodge of Maine holgs its session in the early part of May. It seems to me that a Journal whose business transactions cover only 68 pages, ought to be printed and delivered in two months at least. That would give us the Journal of Maine in July, affording ample time for a review while the Proceedings are ne,.." and fresh. Perhaps it is the Committee on Correspondence that delays the Grand Secretary in bringing out his annual. As the Report on Correspondence is lengthy, covering nearly 200 pages, any tardiness on the part of the Committee would necessarily obstruct tJ:1e progress of work on the part of the Grand Secretary. If he has everything else ready when the annual session convenes, as is my rule, there is no occasion for this lengthy delay. It is not my purpose to read a lecture to the Brethren of Maine, but I regret this break in my work. I have proceeded, of late years, upon the idea of giving a very brief notice to the old Journals, hoping that the new would reach me in time for lengthy consideration. This rule shall govern me in the present instance. The Seventy-first Annual Communication ,vas held in the City of Portland, commencing on the 6th day of May, 1890. Brother A. E. Chase was Grand Master and Brother I ra Berry, Grand Secretary. From the very complete recapitulation of Brother Berry, I learn that there are 'on the roll 191 working Lodges-l72 being represented at the meeting now under consideration. Two new Lodges were granted charters. All the Lodges were reported as making returns in time. The membership is shown by the roster to be 20,675, being a net gain of 335. In addition to the representation menti~ned, there were present ten Past Grand Masters, and a number of other Past Grand Officers, together with District Deputy Grand Masters and the Representatives of thirtyeight Grand Lodges. The Address of Grand Master Chase was quite a lengthy document, covering twenty pages. Following a very appropriate exordium, he recorded the death of two Past Grand Wardens, Brothers C. 'V. Haney and W. II. Smith. The latter was nearly ninety years of age, and for more than sixty-five years a "Mason. Due mention was made of the distinguished dead of other Jurisdictions.


1891.]"

Appendix.

77

Brother Josiah H. Drummond, Chairman of the Committee on Memoirs, presented a lengthy and m05t interesting tribute to the meniory of Brother William H. Smith. The Grand Master announced the" condition of the Fraternity, as a whole, in an excellent state." He recorded with evident satisfaction, the return of Hiram Lodge, No.1, in Connecticut, to its Masonic allegiance. He called attention to the formation of the Grand Lodges of North Dakota, New South "'Vales and Victoria, submitting the claims of each for recognition. Brother Drummond, Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence, subsequently reported upon these claims, recommending their recognition, which was accorded them severally. The Aadre:3s of Brother Chase contains amplified statements of various matters to which he had given attention officially, such as appointment of路 Grand Representatives, laying corner-stones, dedication of halls, creation of new Lodges, installations and granting dispensations. He reported a number of rulings on local questions. It is my understanding that decisions'rendered at one session of the Grand Lodge, are referred, and a report rendered on theIn at the next annual Communication. The Address of Grand Master Chase was a good business document, embracing a great variety of subjects of local interest. The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer followed, furnishing an exhibit of the fiscal affairs of that Body. I gather from the Proceedings that two new Lodges had been erected, under dispensation. I find nothing further in the Proceedings of general interest to the reader outside of the Jurisdiction of that Grand Lodge. CORRESPO~DENCE.

As already indicated, the r:port is rendered by Brother Josiah Drummond, for the Committee, and embraces some 200 pages. It contains a superabundance of extracts from other Grand Lodge Proceedings. He gave our Journal for 1889 a review of three pages. I cannot understand his complaint that much of our Journal is printed in such small type as to make it hard reading. He copied considerable matter from the Address of Grand Master ",Vood. In noticing the action of our Grand Lodge in respect to the trial of 'a party for a very gross offense, he complimented our action in taking the matter from the Committee on Appeals and expelling the offender outright.


78 .

[Oct.

Appendix.

Speaking of our Home, Brother Drummond says that" Missouri is probably large enough and populous enough to sustain such an institution." IIesays that Maine is not large enough for such a work, and therefore, does not deal at length with the subject. Brother Drummond gave my report of 223 pages on Correspondence, a very courteous notice. Commenting upon my classing saloon-keeping as immoral conduct, and therefore unmasonic, he said that few, if any, of my opponents have ever met me on this ground. The truth is, the position we occupy in Missouri on that question cannot be assailed; therefore, our opponents do not attempt it. He commented upon my position and arguments against the atheistic tendencies of some of the Craft and offered a slight amendment to my postulate. I said in 1889, " No God, no obligation; no obligation, no responsibility." . He says, "No God, no obligation; no obligation, no Masor~ry." I accept the amendment. He treats very kindly my controversy respeeting the claims of the Scottish Rite. 1 have nothing further to say in respect to that branch of so-called )1" asonry. It may be all right; I shall nei ther condemn nor commend it.

.

Brother Drummond thinks' that I have gotten Brother Vaux in a eorner. As Brother Vaux himself introduced the term ":Masonic flail," and then tried to palm off its introduction into Masonry upon me, the tables were turned on the venerable Pennsylvania Brother, to his discomfiture. Brother Drummond did not laugh in referring to this matter, but in reading between the lines, I see a very luminous smile playing about. I cannot review Maine further at present, but I still hope to have the Journal for 1891 for consideration¡ before ending my work for the present year.

â&#x20AC;˘

Brother Chase, the Grand Master, and Brother Berry, Grand Secretary, both re-elected. Brother Drummond was reappointed Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence. All reside at Portland.


1891.J

Appendix.

79

MARYLAND, 1890. The Journal before me openea with a mournful announcement. .There is a record of a Special Communication, held in Baltimore, July 28, 18!)O, presided ovel' by the Grand 1\'faster, Brother Thomas J. Shryock. He stated the object of the Communication in the following terms: The habiliments of mourning surrounding us too well betoken the object of our meeting. Brother .!ohn Snowden Tyson, Junior Past Gl'and Master, has passed from our midst to the Cele~tlal Lodge above. In seeming perfect health, without It moment's premonition, our Brother met his death,. on Saturday ev.ening last. by drowning, while fishing a short distance from the shore lJl Gunpowder flyer . . As in life the Fruternity had selected Brothel' Tyson for its highest honors, so in death it is fitting that we should gather around his bier and manifest our admiration for his life and character, our respect for his memory and our heartfelt sorroW for his loss.

From the sketch given by the Grand Master, I learn that Brother Tyson was elected Grand Master in 1880, and served for five years, he being the immediate predecessor of Grand Master Shryock. The committee appointed for that purpose presented a beautiful memor~ ial tribute in honor of the deeeased. Addresses were made on the occasion by some of the Brethren. The record says: "The Grand Lodge then called off until the day following, when it repaired to the late residence of the deceased, where religious services were conducted and an address delivered by the Grand Chaplain." The interment followed, which took place at Loudon Park Cemetery. A memorial page marks the Proceedings in honor of the deceased Past Grand Master, ,,,hom I remember well as one of the vital and efficient workers in that .J urisdiction, whose labors contributed greatly towards the emancipation of the Craft from the fetters of a "Temple debt." The Annual Communication was held in Baltimore, cOlllmencing November 18, ]890. Grand .Master Shryock presided, and Brother Jacob H. Medairy was Grand Secretary. The representation of Lodges, together with Representatives of sister Grand Lodges, was large. From the abstracts of the Grand Secretary I learn that there are 5,491 members in the Jurisdiction. The membership is printed by Lodges, furnishing a. convenient guide book for :Masonic tramps.


80

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Address of the Grand Master opens with an exuberant reference to the late :i\1asonic Fair, held in Baltimore in the interest of the Masonic Temple. He announced the receipts of the Fair as amounting to $60,000. He said: "This magnificent sum practically removes the shadow which has so long overhung the Fraternity." He gives the credit of this result to the women of the Masonic Fraternity, a<nd announces that the work done by them was prodigi~us. He then complained of the Craft negleeting to co-operate in the work, and said that if the Masons had worked as well as the ladies the affair would have realized three times as much. His expression of disappointment at the indifference of the Brethren at large was strong and to the point. A very high compliment was paid to the ladies in expressing his gratitude for the work they had,accomplished. The Grand Master stated that from the reports of the Inspector he learned that the Craft still continued in a prosperous condition. Only one decision ,Vas reported. He ruled, correctly too, that the disclosure of a secret ballot was a Masonic offense. He also recommended the expulsion of snch as might be guilty of this offense. A similar case was tried by the Committee on Grievances, ,vhich condemned the act of the Brother for revealing the manner in which he voted, for which he was expelled. The committee, however, expressed the opinion that the evidence in the case was not such a wilful violation of the landmark as to justify the severe penalty inflicted. It therefore recommended the <suspension of ~he party for one year. The Grand :Master reported a number of dispensations granted, many of them being to confer degrees out of time. Quite a portion of the J onrnal is taken up with reports of the Grand Lecturer and District Inspectors. The Grand Secretary submitted his usual report. The M. ,V. Grand Master stated that all the surviving Past Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge had been in the Temple during the evening, hut that Past Grand ::\laster John H. 13. Latrobe, now in his eightyeighth year, who was made a l\lason in 1827, felt unequal to the excitement of attending the session of the Grand Lodge and had retired to his home after dining with the others. Tl)l~ venerable Brethren were then introduced to the Grand Lodge and severally delivered interesting addresses, each filled with reminiscences and reviews of the past.

...


1891.J

Appendix.

bl

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence had considered the request of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand for recognition. The subject was postponed: . During the session Grand Master Shryock was surprised, perhaps, and made the recipie.nt of a very beautiful silver service. The Grand Secretary, Brother Medairy, made the presentation address, from which I take the following closing remarks: Most Worshipful Sir, the Brethren of the Baltimore Lodges, profoundly sensible of your noble and unselfish devotion to the interests of our Order in accomplishing ~o many grand and beneficial results, have m!lde me the happy medium of presenting you with this beautiful silver service, as a token of their brotherly love and lasting esteem, tru~t足 ing that it may serve through life to keep ever alive in your memory your grand and good work for the Masons of Maryland.

The Grand Master accepted the present in terms expressing both gratitude and appreciation. The report of the Committee on his Annual Address was quite complimentary. There was no Report on Correspondence in this issue of the Annual Proceedings. This report is usually found in the semi-annual Journal. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were both re-elected and reside in Baltimore.

MARYLAND, 1891. The Semi-Annual Journal contains the minutes of a Special Communication held January 1st, at which mention was made of the great loss sustained one week before in the destruction of their fine Temple. The session was held in the old United States Court House, which had been secured as a me~ting place for the Fraternity until the proposed new Temple is completed. The Grand Maste~ said that many valuable archives and jewels had been saved by the courage and bravery of some of the Brethren. One of the greatest losses sustained by the fire was the destruction of the portraits of the Past Grand Masters who had served the Grand Lodge during the century. The Grand Master was authorized to replace the portraits. The Semi-Annual Session was held May 13th; presided over by the Grand Master, Brother Thomas J. Shry-ock. Brother Jacob H. Medairy was Grand Secretary. G. L. Ap.-5.


82

Appendix.

~ [Oct.

The record mentions the presence of a due representation of Lodges and representatives of thirty-four Grand Lodges. An Address of sixteen pages was furnished by the Grand Master, in路 which he mentioned, at some length, the loss of their Temple by fire on Christmas day. Truly, it was a sad Christmas time. He urged immediate steps to rebuild, on an enlarged scale, a Temple that shall stand as the representative of the courage and liberal Masonic spirit of the Craft in Maryland. Medals were ordered furnished to each of the heroic and brave spirits that labored to save property during the Temple fire. The Address of Grand Master Shryock is a fine business paper. It possesses one striking element. The- Grand Master shows the spirit of the unconquered and unconquerable hero. Doubtless he is the man for the time and place. I notice that he refuses, in all instances, the request to permit degrees to be conferred out of time. The address contains a recommendation to abandon the custom of printing the semi-annual reports of their proceedings, on account of expense, and' to have but one report compiled and printed, which should be the Annual Report .. Further on in the proceedings, a committee reported in favor of such recommendation, but the Grand Lodge refused to adopt it. It follows that the Annual and Semi-Annual Reports will continue to appear. The Grand Master reports the receipts from the fair, held by the Masonic women of Baltimore, amounting to $61,000. "'ith such coworkers as these noble ,,,omen, and the heroic Masons, which make up the Fraternity of Maryland, the new Temple will soon be an accomplished fact. May the glory of this latter house exceed that of the former. Reports of the Grand Lecturer and Inspectors of the various districts were rendered and printed. The Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer furnished full exhibits of their respective labors. The medals previously ordered prepared, to be awarded to the brave and courageous Brethren, were presented at this session to the parties entitled to them. Brother 1\1. M. Parker, Past Grand Master of the District of Columbia, was awarded a medal as a token of fraternal respect for the services rendered in securing the old United States Court House for the Fraternity in Baltimore. It seems to have been a medal occasion. Grand Master Shryock received a medal, struck in steel, as a token of appreCiation by the members of the Grand Lodge, for his valuable services during the trials through which they have been called to pass.


1891.]

Appendix.

83

The Grand Master called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the importance and necessity of establishing a Masonic Home or Hospital for indigent and suffering members of the Fraternity. .A. committee reported favorably on this recommendation, and suggested the appointment of a Special Committee to report upon the 路subject at the next communication of the Grand Lodge. This recommendation was approved. A resolution to rebuild the Temple was adopted, and the Board of Managers authorized to adopt plans, execute contracts, and superintend the construction of the' building. The membership in Maryland is a little less than 6,000. The session under consideration was a brief one, and the business transacted local. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother E. T. Schultz, for the committee, presented a report covering 143 pages, in which he reviewed "the Journals of fifty Grand Lodges. The work consists, for the most part, of extracts and brief comments. Two pages were devoted to Missouri, in which the committee kindly noticed the address of Grand Master Brace, and the report of the Grand Secretary. Brother Shultz is a courteous and fraternal reviewer, and .ended his labor by a very practical and conservative conclusion. He said that the Cerneau question had ceased to be a matter of sufficient interest in that Jurisdiction to claim any consideration at his hands. THOMAS J. SHRYOCK, Baltimore, Grand Master. .JACOB H. MEDAIRY, Baltimore, Grand Secretary.

MASSACHUSETTS, \1890. The Journal under consideration contains the transactions of Special, Quarterly arid Stated Communications. This Jurisdiction has a reported membership of 30,880, with 232 Lodges, an increase shown for the year 1890 of 770. The Lodges in Massachusetts have names but no numbers. M. 'V. Bro. Samuel Wells, Grand Master, presided at all of the sessions whose bU'siness is recorded in the Journal under review, and Brother Serono D. Nickerson was Grand Secretary.


84

Appendix.

[Oct.

Special Communications were held in February, May, July and October. Quarterly Communications in March, June, September and December. A Special Session was held October 11, 1890, for the purpose of laying the corner-stone of the new City Hall in Lowell. A brief address was delivered by Grand Master Wells on the occasion. A Quarterly Communication was held December 10, 1890, with Representatives present from 134 Lodges. An Address of twenty-two pages was delivered by the Grand Master. From the contents of his paper it appears that he performs clerical labor as wed as official duty. There is nothing which I can conceive as belonging to the office of Grand Secretary that the Grand Master of Massachusetts does not embrace in his annual message. As a consequence, the Grand Secretary presents to the Body a very limited report, and must have an easy time. Grand Master Wells announced in the opening of his Address that the condition of the Lodges on the whole was very satisfactory. He further stated: "The prosperity of Freemasonry in this Jurisdiction is good and still improving. Our financial condition is so sound and the prospects of future iinprovement so great that we need have no fear of any future embarrassment. Harmony prevails among our Lodges, and our relations with sister Grand Lodges are pleasant and friendly." The Address is occupied and largely taken up with an account of visits made, special dispensations granted, and a financial exhibit showing receipts and expenditures for the year. In making this financial statement so full and ample he relieveQ. the Grand Secretary of that necessary duty. He reported the creation, under dispensation, of one new Lodge. Dual membership was commended, and a recommendation made to change the Constitution so as to enable a Brother to be a member of more than one Lodge. He recommended legislation against those who remain non-affiliated for two years, suggesting that they be denied any benefits of the Charity Fund. The Grand Lodge made an appropriation of $10,000 out of its surplus moneys to the "Masonic Education and Charity Trust." -The election of Grand Officers occurred early in the session, though they were not installed until the 30th of December. On that day the Grand Lodge assembled in Stated Communication, when the installation of officers took place. This was followed by the" Annual Feast, presided over by the Grand Master, Brother Wells.


Appendix.

1891.]

85

At this annual gathering, always noted as a most delightful occasion among the Brethren of the Grand .Jurisdiction, numerous addresses were made of a very high order. The Grand Secl:etary, Brother Nickerson, was one of the speakers who delivered a lengthy and interesting talk to the Brethren. The occasion was one of rare interest, an account of which covers forty-six pages. The Grand Lodge closed in

AMPLE FORM.

M. W. Br~. Samuel 路Wells was re-elected Grand Master, as was Brother Nickerson, Grand Secretary, both of Boston, ",here they have headquarters in the Masonic Temple, and where all sessions of the Grand Lodge are held.

MICHIGAN. 1891. The Forty-seventh Annual Communication was opened in the City of Grand Rapids, January 27th. Brother John S. Cross was Grand Master, and Brother William P. Innes, Grand Secretary. The Journal of Proceedings is quite ~arge, containing some 560 pages, 387 of which are taken up with the Report on Foreign Correspondence. When the Grand Lodge assembled, the Grand Master announced that he had received and accepted a very cordial invitation from the " Trustees of the Michigan Masonic IIorne Association" to dedicate the Home. The Grand Lodge was formed in procession and moved to the premises, where the building was ." consecrated to universal benevolence and virtue." An able Address was delivered on the occasion by Past Grand Master, Hugh McCurdy, which abounded in bright thoughts, practical views, and wise suggestions. The occasion was a grand one and will long be remembered. The representation from Lodges was very large. I notice the presence of seventeen Past Grand l\iasters. The record shows that during the history of that Grand Lodge, 400 Lodges have been created. The present number on the roster is 367, with a membership of 31,864. The increa:se was gratifying, as a large路 amount of work had been done during the year. Nearly 2,000 initiations, and 1,.764 raisings were reported.


86

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Address of Grand Master Cross covered sixteen pages and embraced a large amount of matter of local' interest. He mentioned as items of business interest, the institution of Lodges, Lodge removals, joint occupancy, laying of corner-stones, and the granting of special and general dispensations. The death of Past Grand Master J. A. Allen was brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge, with a recommendation that a memorial page be set apart as a tribute to the deceased, which was done. A number of prominent Masons who had passed away in other Jurisdictions received like tribute. Among them, Past Grand Master Cadle, of Missouri, whom I see the record calls Cable. The GrandMaster treated with favor the subject of Masonic Schools of Instruction. His Address contains thirty-seven Masonic decisions, rendered while he was in office. A careful examination of these rulings Jeads to the conclusion that they embody correct principles of Masonic jurisprudence, and evidence a thorough acquaintance with the laws of Masonry. Tho Committee on Jurisprudence, of which Brother McCurdy 路was Chairman, approved the decisions entire, offering only a slight correction of one, which the Grand Master readily conceded. The Michigan Masonic Home was referred to in terms of high commendation by the Grand Master, stating that it was the cro~'ning achievement of the system of Masonic benevolence. He commended the enterprise and its interest to the serious consideration of the Grand Lodge and left them to pass upon its claims. The subject was referred to a Special Committee, consisting of three Brethren. Said Committee commended the Grand Master's treatment of the subject asserting that \ the Home, was not only worthy of support, but entitled to the hearty endorsement of the Masonic J.. . raternity in Michigan. The Committee recommended a change in the law, whereby a stated amount should be collected and applied to the support of the Home. Immediately following the rendition of this report, Brother McGrath, a Past Grand Master, moved to lay the matter upon the table, which was adopted and a resolution offered by him approved, postponing the whole subject until the n~xt session of the Grand Lodge. Subsequently a paper was submitted reciting the facts in the case and proposing to donate to the Home the sum of $5,000 for the expenses of the current year. This paper was referred to the Committee on Finance. The subject was reported back to the Grand Lodge, without recommendation. The record shows that the discussion of the subject took a


1891.J

Appendix.

87

wide range. A vote was had to adopt the resolution to appropriate $5,000, and was lost. Other motions were made and amendments offered, and finally a substitute was carried, voting $3,000 to the Masonic Home Association to aid in its labors the coming year. The friends of this enterprise seem to have been ,vorsted in the conflict, and the refusal of the Grand Lodge to accept the institution would indicate that the Home did not meet with deserved favor. A paper was finally adopted creating a Committee of ten, members of the Grand Lodge, with power to examine into the whole subject and to report conclusions at the next annual session. This Committee will have power in its investigation, to decide whether the Grand Lodge shall accept the Home, or not. If it is accepted, as provided for above, the aforesaid Committee is required todevise a plan by which the benefits of the Home may be enjoyed and how the, institution shall be supported. The Grand Secretary, Brother Innes, presented his annual report, which, like former documents issuing from his office, was a fine business paper. As Committee on Correspondence, he presented a special report, recommending the recognition of the Grand Lodges of Victoria and Tasmania. He says this last Grand Lodge is located in a British island, situated off the southern coast of the Australian Continent. I am not yet in possession of the necessary documents to pass upon the claims of this new candidate for Grand Lodge favor. Brother Innes, as Chairman .aforesaid, declined to recommend the recognition of the Grand Lodge of New Ze,aland. The Grand Lecturer, Brothâ&#x201A;Źr A. l\f. Clark, submitted a very interesting report, concerning the progress of that department. He had held a large number of Schools of Instruction, at which several hundred Lodges had been represented. From the full and complete report furnished by Brother Clark, it is manifest that this interest of Michi~an Masonry is ,in good hands. The report of the Committee on Appeals, covering seven pages, showed very close and thorough attention to an important trial that had taken place in one of the Lodges of that Jurisdiction known as "the Rupert case." This Brother had been expelled, and on appeal, the case was examined and reported upon at great length, when the Grand Lodge adopted a resolution, asserting the innocence of the accused, thereby restoring him to all the rights and benefits of Masonry.


Appendix.

88

[Oct.

The transactions of the Grand Lo,dge, covering some eighty pages, occupied two days, when the Body closed with a vote of thanks to the retiring Grand Master, Brother John S. Cross. A Past Grand Master's jewel was ordered and is .to be presented to Brother Cross as a testimonial of gratitude and appreciation: . CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother 'William P. Innes, the Committee, furnished an annual review of fifty-two American and seven foreign Grand Lodges. The report covers 387 pages. It is almost wholly composed of' extracts from the Journals reviewed. .F'rom his exordium, I cull the following interesting remarks concerning that great work now claiming the attention of many Grand Lodges, the Masonic Home: A commendable zeal appears to be manifest throughout our land in the direction and line of benevolence; which has taken shape in the building of Masonic Homes, for the education of the Mason's orphan and the maintenance of his widow, as well as the care of the unfortunate Brothers. Truly these things are in the riRht direction, find we hope the time is not far di~tant when every State in the Union WI)) contain a Masonic Home, dedicated and set apart to benevolence. Such monuments will live and show the fruits of the lessons taught us from the first entrance into the Lodge-)'ea, even to the highest pinnacle attained by any. Our Michigan" has much to be proud of in this direction. From a small beginning a fewJears ago, it can now point with pride to a magnificent structure, ready for its intende work, and ere spring time Comes and goes we hope to see within its walls the happy and sweet 路faces of the little ones, .romping around in their innocence; contented faces of Brothers, who, through mIsfortune, have been forced to make a home with us, and the calm and dignified faces of those Brothers' widows who are within our walls. l<

. The Craft-those whom God has blessed, and thfit have aided in this work-have reason to rejoice that their labors have not been in vain, and their efforts have been crowned with success.

In the brief comments made upon matters claiming his consideration as a reviewer, Brother Innes writes sonie very bright and forcible sentences. I conclude from brief expressions found in his comments, that he is not troubled about the claims of the High Rite people. His references to the Rite agitation are rather amusing. Speaking of the author of a report on what he calls the "Cerneau bug-a~boo," he concluded that the writer of said report was not onJy a 330., but a 1330., and said that such learned essays on Scotch Rite Masonry, in the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, seemed "very funny to him." To which this writer would reply that the "fun" in the case might be entertaining, if it had not been made ridiculous. Complimenting Brother l\1unn, the Grand Secretary of Illinois, Brother Innes said he .was seeking all the patents possible, and wanted to know how such work (as bringing out Grand Lodge proceedings in a few days) is accomplished. Treating of the same subject, in 路his review of Missouri, in equally complimentary terms, he remarked, "The report


1891.J

Appendix.

89

rea~hed us, we had almost said .within it few hours after the adjournment of the Grand Lodge.' We have got to go to .Missouri to learn h9w to do it." From this courteous mention of my 路work, I conclude that Brother Innes will become a pupil of mine, rather than of Brother Munn.

Commenting qn the proposition of furnishing the Grand Master of Nebraska with a Private Secretary, Brother Innes said that "Michigan has 361 Lodges, with a membership of 30,000, and never had a Private Secretary for the Grand Master, and has not in years paid their Grand Master $500 pet year." The amusing part of this matter is found in the fact that a Nebraska Grand Master wanted a Private Secretary on 'a salary of $500, with only 167. Lodge,S in the Jurisdiction. Missouri pay~ , her Grand Master's expenses and furnishes him with a full supply of stationery. A Private Secretary to a Missouri Grand Master would be a useless article. ' I,n the review of MissoQri for 1890, Brother Innes quoted the decisions of Gl'and 'Master Brace, and the report of our Committee on Jurisprudence, rendered by Past Grand Master Williams. Our Home interest is quoted from and complimented very highly. He said, "Brothers of Missouri, the way to build a Masonic Home,. is to build it." This is certainly the plan pursued by the Craft in 'Missouri. 'V'e resolved to have a Home for our widows and orphans and we have it. Brother Innes said that they had a few fault-finders in Michigan, just as we have in Missouri, and says, " Sit on them; Brother Vincil; sit on them." I would reply to this advice, that the job would be so small as not to pay for either time or labor in placing official dignity, or personal ponderosity upon such -\.veaklings and specime~ls of the ." kicking " family . The Michigan Committee says he was delighted to find that in many instances their doings had met with my approval. This has been true in the past, but in this review that excellent opinion entertained of Michigan Masons would be intensified and raise,d still higher, if their Grand Lodge had not refused to accept the munificent gift of the Masonic Home at Grand Rapids. However, this is a local question and shall draw from me no criticism. I am pleased to note that Brother Innes says, I I 'Ve are a heliever in the Order of the Eastern Star." He holds that to be an important auxiliary of the great work of the Masonic Fraternity. This is true. To enlist the female relatives of Maso'ns in behalf of the great charity known as the Masonic Home, shows the highest wisdom and the most discreet judgment to be found in the Fraternity.

~


90

Appendix.

[Oct.

In his review of the Proceedings ~ ~ebraska, he said that" twenty two pages of the Grand }\:laster's Address 'were taken up cussing "and discussing Scottish Rite Masonry in that Jurisdiction." I hope in the use of his terms Brother Innes does no"t ascribe to a Nebraska Brother any intention to be profane, but can a man be guilty of "cussing," without swearing? Brother Innes must settle the question .â&#x20AC;˘ In the kind and considerate attention paid the ri'oceedings of this Grand Lodge, Brother Innes gave us the benefit of twelve pages. This is a most generous exhibition of reportorial liberality , for which he has the equally generous acknowledgment of this Committee. ¡While Brother Innes shows admirable taste in his selections and commendable generosity in his appropriations of matter, it is to be regretted that he does not give the reading public the benefit of his talents and experience as a writer. I take leave of my good Broth~I: Innes, and hope to meet him again in this interesting field of labor, as he was reappointed Committee on Correspondence, and was also re-elected Grand Secretary' and holds forth at Grand Rapids. Brother John Q. Look, of Lowell, ,vas elected Grand Master.

MINNESOTA. 1891. The new Grand Secretary, Brother Montgomery, successor to the late Brother Pierson, shows both adaptation and facility in the work of publishing a Journal of Grand Lodge Proceedings. A very handsome annual of 240 pages came to hand in good time. The Thirty-eighth Annual Communication was held in the city of St. Paul, beginning January 14, 1891. M. W. Bro. Jacob A. Kiester, Grand Master; Brother James Montgomery, Grand Secretary. The record says there were present "Representatives of 163 Lodges out of the 114 active working Lodges on the roll." This shows that all were represented but eleven. Six Past Grand Masters, with a dozen Past Grand Officers and Representatives of twenty Grand Lodges, were in attendance. The statistical table shows that eleven Lodges were chartered during the session, making a total of 185 on the roster, with a membership of b,168, being a net gain of 562. The income from all sources reached the sum of nearly $8,009.


1891.]

Appendix.

91

A thoroughly business Address of ten pages was furnished by the Grand Master. It opened \vith a very handsome exordium, in which he stated that "the past year had been one of great advancement and prosperity." The announcement was made that immediately after the close of the Grand Lodge one of their venerable Past Grand Masters, Brother J. H. Brown, had been called from life's labors. He was sixty-seven years old, and had closed his official work as Grand Master one year before, being the predecessor of Brother Kiester. The death was reported and due mention made of another Past Grand Master, Brother Caleb H. Benton. Grand Master Kiester said that within twelve months three of their Past Grand Masters had ceased to labor, namely, Brothers Pierson, Brown and Benton. Twelve Lodges had been created during the year, under dispensation. Quite a number of dispensations had been granted and as many declined.

â&#x20AC;˘

The Grand Master stated that nothing had occurred during the term to mar the fraternal and amicable relations which had existed for many years past between that and other Grand Lodges. Special mention was made by him of their Grand Lodge Library. During his term it was proposed to carry out the recommendation of the Grand Lodge to purchase the Masonic library owned by their late grand Secretary, Brother Pierson. This purpose being communicated to Mrs.. Pierson, she was informed that she would be paid for the library as its value might be agreed upon. For the great generosity of the Grand Lodge shown her since the death of her husband, she regarded that Body as the proper party to have charge of the library. She therefore determined to present it to the Grand Lodge and ask its acceptance as a gift. This being done, the donation was accepted in fitting terms by the Grand Master. The collection contains many rare and valuable works and adds very greatly to the usefulness of the library already in existence. Upon this portion of the Grand Master's Address a report was rendered by the Committee on Library, expressing appreciation of the gift and acceptance of the same in the spirit in which it was tendered. Grand Master Kiester reported four decisions. He ruled against the use of our symbols in connection with business purposes and advertisement. This, of course, was approved by the Grand Lodg¡e, which could not do otherwise. To allow such use of our symbols as signs in connection With business, is not only reprehensible, but degrading. When Grand Master of Masons of Missouri years ago I found our symbols being used by hotels, saloons, and other lines of business. My order embraced the idea that if the parties using these symbols were Masons,


92

Appendix.,

[Oct.

they were violating onr law, as such: and must either take down their signs or answer to the law which they were breaking. If they were not Masons they had no right to sail unde'r our colors. The signs were taken down. The Grand Master reported an instance where a very eligible gentleman desired to apply for the degrees in Masonry, but did not wish to assume the obligation as usually administered, proposing simply to affirm. The ruling was that he could not be received. Another decision contains a well settled principle of Masonic law in operation in Michigan, as also in Missouri, namely, that the Senior Warden could not dimit during his term of office. He announced another ruling, which is in accord with Missouri provisions, that a man who has no home or place of residence is not eligible as .a petitioner. All these decisions were approved by the Grand Lodge. I gather from the presentation of a matter in' the Address that in the Jurisdiction of Minnesota there have been in use certain rituals written in a cipher. The Grand Master made very positive and plain deliverances against the use of such works. The matter was condemned without qualification", After delivering a very practical admonition to the Masters of the Lodges, Grand .Master Kiester retired most gracefully from his station.

The new Gr~~d Secretary, Brother Montgomery, furnished an admirable business exhibit, setting forth in detail the affairs incident to his office. He is commending himself to the appreciation of the Craft in that Jurisdiction as an efficient and capable officer. The financial affairs of the Grand Lodge are shown to be in a" very satisfactory condition. The Committee on Jurisprudence submitted a resolution, which was adopted, that any Mason indefinitely suspended or expelled can be restored to Masonic rights and privileges only by the favorable action of the Grand Lodge, when in session. This excludes the possibility of a Lodge restoring an expelled or an indefinitely suspended member. A resolution proposIng the reference of such application to the Lodge which expelled 01" suspended a member, was laid upon the table. The business of t1).e session was briefly disposed of in good order, and on the second day the session closed its labors.


1891.J

Appendix.

93

CORRESPONDENCE.

A report covering 135 pages was furnished by Brother Irving Todd, "for the Committee." The Proceedin'gs of fifty-four Grand Lodges had passed under consideration, the report being made up of extensive extracts from the Journals reviewed. Brother Todd is a careful and thoughtful reviewer. His notice for Missouri for 1890 embraces three pages. He said that the labor of printing .our..Grandl,-odge Proceedings in two days after the close of the session was "unusually quick work. Although by having everything in type beforehand, it is not so difficult a matter as might be supposed." BrotherTodd seems to understand the way things are done at this office. Referring to the action of our Grand Lodge on Masonic comity, he said that Minnesota occupied the same ground as Missouri. It is strange ho\v our Brethren fall into error about the expenses connected with our Masonic Home. Brother Todd says: "Various reports on the l\1a,sonic Home, showing that twenty-five inmates had been provided for during the first year at an expense of about $500 each, was read and accepted." It would astonish the Board of Direetors of our Home, as well as the Craft in Missouri, to learn that we had paid out :512,500 for the maintenance o~ twe~ty-five inmates during one year. I have shown elsewhere, in reply to Brother Dawkins, of Florida, that the whole expense of running the Home for one year, including a great many matters that do not properly belong to the outlay in maintaining the inmates, amounted to less than $3,000. As a member of the Board of Directors Of the Missouri Home I am as proud of the financial management and inexpensiveness of the institution as I am of the great work we are doing. Brother Todd says his regard for Masonic Proceedings is such that he would no more think of using the scissors and mutilating these valuable pamphlets than I would think of cutting my Bible or hymn book. His plan is to mark his passages and send the books along with copy. 'J'his is not always a very convenient way, and adds work which can be aVOIded by making excerpts from one copy of the Grand Lodge Proceedings, which is always intended for the Committee on路 Correspondence. Brother Todd seems to be a newspaper man, and says: "The experience of thirty years in such work has taught me that路 there is a great difference between the person who writes articles and the one who does the clipping. It is known that a good exchange editor is born not made." This writer does not claim to have been born or made an exchange editor, or any other kind. Yet the duty assigned me by my Grand Lodge for fourteen years has led to the work of preparing an annual review on correspondence, which I have done to the best of my


94

[Oct.

Appendix.

ability, both as a writer andas a clipper. Brother Todd seems inclined to make capital over the paragraph in my review of New Hampshire. Referring to my want of appreciation of the so-called "High Degrees," he quotes my statement that where a Grand Lodge has uttered its views against any organization claiming to be Masonic, the members of Lodges in that Jurisdiction should obey the Grand Lodge. There is mighty little comfort to the "High Degree" folks in this position of mine. I teach, as I feel, that my first and highest obligation is to the Grand Lodge of Symbolic Masons. Such should be the spirit governing every member of Subordinate Lodges. In thus maintaining true allegiance to the parent Body, the members of Lodges are not likely to be led off after strange gods. If a Grand Lodge makes a deliverance against Cerneauism, or any form of High Riteism, the duty of members of Symbolic Lodges is to obey the mandates of the parent Body. ALPHONSO BARTO, Sauk Center, Grand :Master. THOMAS MONTGOMERY, St. Paul, Grand Secretary.

MISSISSIPPI,

1891.

The Journal of this Grand Lodge-a volume of over 300 pages, handsomely gotten up and well arranged-was received路 two months following the close of the Seventy-third Annual Communication, which was held in the City of Aberdeen, commencing February 12th. Considering the size of the Journal, and the limited facilities for its execution in cities of ordinary printing appliances, the Grand Secretary succeeded very well. A fir.st rate recapitulation is found in the Journal, which furnishes all desirable particulars. The total number of Lodges now on the roll is 275, with a membership of 8,390. The increase for the year amounted to 1,1~n; reduced by the usual losses, leaves an actual gain of 424. This is a good showing and evidences new life in that Jurisdiction. The Lodges nearly all made returns and paid dues. The revenues amounted to about $9,000. The attendance on the session was good, 223 Lodges being represented. Ten Past Grand Masters were present, with other Past Grand Officers and representatives of twenty-five Grand Lodges. Missouri was not among the elect. M. W. Bro. John Riley, Grand Master, presided, and Brother John L. Power was Grand Secretary.


1891.J

Appendix.

95

An Address of merit, covering seven pages, was submitted by Grand' Master Riley. He announced the prevalence of peace and harmony in the Jurisdiction, and the outlook for general prosperity was encouraging. Pleasant and fraternal relations 'with all other Grand Lodges continued to exist. He chronicled the general loss realized by the community.at la.rg.~J, and the Masonic Fraternity especially, in the death of Past Grand. Master Robert C. Patty. He said, "The loss has created a void in State, Church and Masonry." A beautiful memorial tribute in honor of the deceased Brother was rendered by a Committee on Necrology. I think it appropriate to incorporate at this point the following from the general report of Brother Power, Grand Secretar)'. It may not be the province of the Grand Secretary to notice in his report the death of any member of this Grand Lodge-that being the peculiar duty and the sad privilege of the Grand :Master or Committee on Necrology. But I may be pardoned for referring briefly to the great loss sustained by the Craft and by the people of :Mississippi in the death of Past Grand Master Robert C. Patty. In lR79 and 1880, he was Chailluan of the Special Committee to pass upon my labors cOilIlected with the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, and I then learned to know and admire him for his kindness, courtesy and scrupulollS care in making such all exhibit of that work that every disbursemel1l should be sustained by a proper voucher. During his term as Grand Mltster, and his several years of service as a member of the Finance Committee, he was ever kind and considerate in correspondence and personal intercourse; and it is to his careful study of our finances, and his timely recommendations, that our improved financial.condition is in great part due. Among the many expressions of regret elicited by his death, is one from a Brother Secretary, who said: "The tallest cedar in our Masonic Lebanon has fallen." Farewell, dear Brother! lIIar it be our happy lot to meet and greet you in the Grand Lodge above t

The Grand Master scheduled his work and presented the usua-lroutine of official business. Two Lodges had been created under dispensation and were chartered at that session. The charter of one dormant Lodge was restored. No decisions were announced. Grand Master Riley called attention to the interesting enterprise now engaging the best thought of that Grand Lodge, namely, the Masonic Home. From his Address, I make the following extract: ]I[ASOI\[C

HOllIE.

To onc who witnessed the great enthusiasm which characterized the action of the Brethren at our last Grand Conllnuni~ation toueillng this .. Home," it would seem almost useless to say all)'thing further on this subjept, and yet I dcem it a matter of so much importance to thc .widows and orphans of our deceased Brethren, that I crave your indulgcnce whilst I endeavor to impress upon your minds the necessity for giving all diligcnce to this work, that we lllay speedily proYide an asylulll for the needy ones of our own household.

A special order was adopted setting apart an hour for an address on the Masonic Home, which was delivered by Brother Barkley, Past Grand :Master. From it I feel justified in appropriating the following: The widows and orphans of our deceased Brethren need food, raiment and shelter, and they have nowhere else to look for them but to us, and shall they look and plead in yain? These appeals reached and stirred the heart of one grand woman who has gone

:...

,.~"

..'


96

Appendix.

[Oct.

home to her reward, but e'l'e she passed over the river she brought forth a little alabaster box of ointment, broke it and poured its contents upon this Widows' and Orphans' Home. whose perfume will be wafted down through the corridors of coming time; and when this Home is complcted, .. this thing which she hath done will be spoken of as a memorial of her" at its dedication. She had a fellOW-feeling for her sex, and moved thereto by that grand,est of all powers, love, "she did what she could." But one week ago I listened to the recital of a sad story in real life. A fond mother, poor in this world's goods, bnt blessed with six bright, beautiful little children, suddenly fell sick and died. The father, a hard-working man, wrought with might and main to support these children, but ere the beginnilJR of this year he also" slept the sleep that knows no waking," and these six little children, without father, without mother, and without home, were left with no one to care for them. No one wanted them, and to-day they are living upon charity doled out to them by unwilling hearts and hands; and I wished that this Home had been completed, that I might come here and ask this Grand Lodge to give them a home.

A report was rendered by the Committee on the Home, recommending this enterprise to the favorable consideration of the Craft. I notice that Grand ~iaster Riley exercises the high powers in him vested, in frequent instances, by allowing degrees to be conferred out of time. The thing called" Prerogative," is a great factor in the administrations of some Grand Masters. Brother Riiey called special attention, in very commendatory terms, to the reports of th'e Committees on Jurisprudence and Correspondence. Also to the inv.aluable labors of Grand Secretary Powers. Brother Powers presented, as Grand Secretary, a valuable business document, embracing both general and statistical matter of interest. A report on the state of the Craft was presented, and was a good paper, covering much ground. It said, "Interest in Symbolic Masonry is on the increase." A proposition had been submitted and was reported upon, concerning biennial sessions. The report was adverse to any change, so the Grand Lodge will continue to meet annually. A recommendation was adopted to incorporate the Masonic Home, and the funds already raised for that institution are to be safely invested. A report from Brother A. H. Barkley, "Custodian of the Masonic Home," was a very interesting document. Everything shows deep interest and great earnestness in behalf of this true object of Masonic effort. There are grand men in Mississippi, and the time will come when they will be heard from along the line of Masonic charity. A very elaborate and lengthy report on "Masonic Law and Jurisprudence" was furnished by the Committee, of which Brother Frederic Speed was Chairman. A large number of questions had been submitted to the Committee during the year, and carefully considered. The'Com-


18~n.J

Appendix.

97

mittee said many good things and the report is almost above criticism. I differ with the Committee on one point treated; namely, "that a petition having been referred to an Investigating Committee and reported upon favorably, may be withdrawn with the consent of twothirds of the members present." This may be a good law for Mississippi, but it is not desirable for Missouri. It is fair to presume that the petitioner would be elected to receive the Mysteries of Masonry, after a favorable report by the Committee. 'What I:eason, then, would justify the withdrawal of the petition? If the party had changed his mind, and desired to back out, thus showing a spirit that would disqualify him for Masonic confidence, he should be subjected to a ballot. If elected, then his fee can be retained as some 'compensation for the trouble and labor undergone by the Lodge in its investigation. This would fall into line and hai路monize with the position taken by Brother Speed in another portion of his able report, thus giving the Lodge ,,,hat he contends for, perpetual jurisdiction over a candidate once elected, though he may never claim the benefit of his election. Brother Speed maintained, correctly, that if a rep9rt be unfavorable, the petition cannot be withprawn. I cannot find a reason to justify the difference he makes between one who was honored by afavoi"able report) and one who is discarded by the Committee in its report. A question had beep. presented to tne Committee, desiring to know if a Mason could engage in saloon-keeping and retain his membership in the Lodge. Brother Speed answered emphatically, "NO," and said if he persists in violating the law, charges should be preferred against him. Later in the session, Brother Speed moved to reconsider the affirmative action on his ruling. He sought to exonerate such members who had belonged to the-Lodges, prior to a certa'in date. In other words, if a man was a Mason before the Grand Lodge declared saloon-keeping a Masonic offense, he should not be disturbed in his nefarious business; but if any Mason became a saloon-keeper after the enactment of their law, he was liable to punishment. The Grand Lodge did not agree with Brother Speed and defeated his motion. I have only to say that to exempt a man from the penalty of wrong-doing, who was a Mason before the Grand Lodge defined its position on that question, is to condone Masonic offenses, and cherish in the Fraternity those who are constantly violating the laws of God and Masonry. A :Mason who engages in saloon-keeping, perpetrates a daily crime against good morals,. and therefore should not be tolerated in the Order. He may have been a Mason forty years, for all I care, before the Grand Lodge made its deliverance against that particular form of vice. And G. L. Ap.-7.


98

Appendix.

[Oct.

he may have been engaged in such a vicious life for tbirty years or forty years of his Masonic career in advance of the Grand Lodge enactment. The fact tl1at he had been so engaged for such a long period, furnishes a strong argument why he should be punished for such a life of iniquity. The Grand Lodge of Mississippi is all right so far, on this question. There was a case considered by the Committee on Appeals, wherein a Brother of a Lodge had been expelled therefrom as a liquor seller. The ground of his appeal was, "That the law under which he was convicted is unconstitutional and subversive of the true principles of Masonry." No doubt saloon-keepers take that view of our Masonic legislation. Any enaetment of a Grand Lodge that interferes with the pestilent calling of these destroyers of human happiness and life, is unconstitutional, as viewed by them. They wish to be let alone. So does the hissing viper, with spreading head, as it ambushes its victim and sends the poison of death into his body, and crawls back into obscurity. It wishes to be let alone. The Grand Lodges of this country are fast reaching the true ground of morals, where they will declare that liquor selling, though authorized by the law of the land, is .violative of every moral principle in the code of the institution. The thanks of the Grand Lodge were accorded to the retiring Grand Master, Brother Riley, for his faithful and efficient administr~tion while in office. The Committee on Correspondence declined to recognize the Lodge of New Zealand, at least for the present.

~rand

The membership of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi is printed by Lodges. CORRESPONDENCE.

The review was made by "Brother Andrew H. Barkley, Reporter on Foreign Correspondence," and consists of 106 pages. An examination of the work of Brother Barkley suggests a thought as to the great value of these annual productions. Competent reviewers become gleaners from a vast field. They harvest much from the rich fruitage found in the broad domain of Masonic thought. 'With their powers of condensation, together with the analyses made of teachings and pl'incipIes formulated by others, they become, in the truest sense, benefactors of the Craft. Thus, Reports on Correspondence, from able and pure reviewers, furnish solid substance for the readers of these annual


1891.J

Appendix.

99

reports. The true worth of such men to the Fraternity cannot be estimated, and I wish here to record my exalted estimate of these pioneers who lead the thoughts of thousands of our Brethren out into new and inviting realms, where fresh and appetizing truths are gathered. And in this connection I wish to record my unqualified approbation of the great leaders of our Masonic hosts, not only in this department of labor, but in other representative characters in the Institution. Surely the Craft can never become corrupt and demoralized while guided and influenced by an army of true, cqnscientious leaders. 'What an array of names of God-fearing men may be found in the high places of the Masonic Fraternity. I would make no invidious distinctions, but may be permitted to mention those upon whom my thoughts rest in this connection as worthy of such an expression of consideration. Society, the . State, the Government and the Church need have no fears while such men as Barkley and Power, Staton, Drinkard, Singleton, Parvin, Drummond and Matthews, and a host of kindred spirits maintain and defend the moral character and purity of the Institution. Throughout the whole of Brother Barkley's review there is found the presence and expression of pure thought, refined sentiment and moral principle. From the able introduction of his work I make a few extracts: There must be an exact correspondence between our profession and actions, otherwise we shall be found teaching that which is not supported by our deeds. It is not so much what a Mason professes. as what he does. that, by the standard of measurement, is applied by the profane, and the living question which confront'> us to-day is, what are the fruits of Freemasonry in the lives and conduct of those who profess it? The true Mason lives what he professes, and thus silently yet surely commends the Institution to others around him. The manners find customs of a people mllv, and oftentimes do change, and the caprices of men, fired by a spirit of ambItion, or thirst for plaeo and power, may lead them to attempt the overthrow of that which has become established by long usage, but the principles which lie at the foundation of all good government ever remain the same, and are unchangeable. These are the foundations on which the superstructure is built, and without these the edifice cannot stand. l\IllSonic history always has been, and always will be. a record of the conflict between truth and error. As the sons of light, therefore, we should ever be found on the side of truth battling manfully for the right. Freemasonry has accomplished much in the past; it is doing more now for the good of mankind than at any former period of its history. Its future none can tell, for if we are allowed to forecast" hy making the past tell 011 the present, the present on the future," the harvest which remains to be rea.ped will be still more abundant, and we should ever stand ready to give our hearts and hands to this good work. It is a fixed principle, and one, too, which has never been called in question, and is numbered among the landmarks, "that no innovations can be made in the body of Masonry." This is the grand bulwark of Freemasonry, and, setting at defiance ever)' approaching foe, says to him. "Touch not "-" Thus far shalt thou go, but llO farther "-" Take thes"e things hence." The only improvement necessary to be made-the only progress which is admissible. is on the part of those who enjoy its rights and partake of its privileges. Purity oflife and rectitude of conduct is lmperatively demanded at the hand of every oue who professes its principles. '


100

Appendix.

[Oct.

The review is mostly written, but few extracts appearing in the report. T.he follo\ving paragraph, taken from his comments on the Proceedings of Arkansas, \dll be of interest to those who are interested in the work of a Masonic Home: Brethren of the Grand Lodge of :Mississippi, the orphan children of our worthy deccn.'ied Brethren are ca.lling to us to-day for help. They need to be sheltered, fcd, clothed and educated. To whom else call they look now but to us? Let us carry out the plan already projected, and build for them a Home where we may provide for their needs and minister to their comfort, and they, out of the fullness of their hearts, will rise up and call us blessed. We shall be unworthy of the name of Masons if we do not do for th~l11 'U!hat w~ can. The present is a r~re opportunity for doing good. Let us embrace It WIth 10vlIlg hands and hearts and do our whole duty.

Brother Barkley is all aglow with interest in behalf of the "Home" movement. His interest will thrill others. In my last review of Mississippi I asked Brother Barkley to explain "why a Lodge under dispensation cannot a.tJibate Masons" in his Jurisdiction? I a~sumed that as a Lodge U. D. can make Masons, it certainly ought to do what was less, viz., admit to membership those already made. Here is his reply: Under the head of Decisions, Brother Vincil desires me to answer for my Gmnd Lodge why a Lodge unde,' dispensation cannot (~tJUilLll' members? The answer is plain and simple. Section 82, Rules and Regulations, says of sup.h Lodges: "They are constituted simply for the purpose of making Masons and conferring dcgrees." Section 83 says: "They call1lot be represented in Grand Lodge; cannot le~islate in any way; CSllnot elect officers or m.ember8." The Regulations say Lodges unuer dispensation cannot a.tfiliatc members, and so long as the Regulations stand I and all other i\Iasons in l\lississippi must render due obedience thereto.

Brother Barkley is all right in standing by the law as it is. But it is strange that a body composed of such leaders as belong to the Grand Lodge of Mississippi should permit that law to remain in existence. The law prevents a mighty good thing from being done by the Lodge working U. D. It would not require any labor to show how impracticable that law is, and what a drawback it is to a Lodge in preventing its increase of members by affiliation. But it is not my Grand Lodge that fetters its probationers. Brother Barkley is thoroughly sound, as well as reliable, on all questions. I extract the following from his work as illustrating the ahove sentiment: And just here I wish to say once for all that I am not now, that I never have been. nor do I ever expect to be a member of the Prohibition Association (I believe this is what it is called) but I do claim to be a Mason" of the strictest sort," and in considering this question I always confine myself to Masonic principles and view it from a purely Masonic standpoint. Being a moral institution, 1<'reemasollry always has and always must inculcate the purest principles of morality.

"Them's my sentiments." The selliug of intoxicating liquors has a character. '1'110 act is either moral or it is immoral. Will anyone contend that it is moral? r trow not. The act has a character and every man, whether he be a )Iason or not, knows what that character is. So far as the Mason who enga~es in the salc of it hn.'> an influence, his act impairs the usefulness of the Institution of Freemasonry, and degrades it in the cstima,tion of good people.


1891.]

Appendix.

]01

Being therefore immoral, it is a l\Iasonic offense, and the doer of the deed should receive the just recompense of reward. We don't try Masons by the statutes of the State, nor do we go to the statute book of the State to find out whether they have intentionally violated any particular statute written therein before we decide that they are guilty of l\:1asonic oflenses. No, we have oUT own statutes, our own codes, and these are based upon the moral law, and whatever '/,8 contrary to its teachings in the act ofthe Mason is a fr[aBOnic offense. If the definition here given of an offense is the correct one, then the Mason who has his license and conducts his business in accordance with thc provisions of the law, without an " intentional violation of its statutes," rna)' stand behind his bar and deal out liquid poison to the husband and father, which will send him home maddened with a fiend-like spirit to maltreat, perhaps to murder his wife and helpless children, and yet be free from the charge of having committed a Masonic offense, simply because he has not intentionall?1 violated the statute of thc State. If this be Masonry, then I have not so learned it. If this be the correct interpretation of the great moral principles which underlie the institution of Freemasonry, then I am free to confess that I never was a pupil of this school of interpreters.

Referring to the criticism of a certain Committee in Louisiana who classed Brother Barkley among the "one idea men," the Mississippi Committee replied as follov,rs: The presumption from the above is that all the others who 'are not members of this class, are men of many ideas. of which Brother J. Q. A. Fellows is one. Is not this a .. just grammatical or log-ical interpretation of the words?" If so, it is'a piece of the boldest presumption and the grandest parade of one's individuality that we have ever had the good fortune to meet with in all our reading. If we belong to the 路one-idea class we find ourselves in good company with snch grand men as Brothers Vincil, of Missouri, and Brown, of Kansas, and many others whom we might mention.

Brother Barkley expended a good deal of time and energy, as well as space, in replying to the Louisiana Committee on the saloon question. It seems that said Louisiana Committee feels disposed to belittle Brother Barkley, on the ground that he ha.s ta.ken the same position occupied by myself on that subject. In doing so, he says that. Brother Barkley seems desirous of rivaling Brother Vincil, of Missonri, in his discussion of this subject, and that we are "one-idea men, with certain peculiarities attached.;' 路I must say to Brother Barkley, as I have said elsewhere, that the game in this case is not worth the ammunition expended. I have learned to pay but little attention to, and bestow less labor upon, the vaporings of writers who prefer the evil of drunkard-making and vice of intemperance to pure morals and Masonic decency. Brother Barkley accorded our Missouri Proceedings for 1890 the benefit of several pages of his interesting work. Conimenting upon the rapidity with which I furnished our Grand Lodge Journal to the .Craft after the close of the session he proposes to have the printing of the Mississippi Journal done in St. Louis some of these years, "when the flying ship is completed" and in motion. The following paragraph will express his hopes in this direction: We are looking forward to the time when the fiying ship shall be completed which will move at the rate of two hundred miles an hour, and when this is done we shall just ask our Grand Secretary to bundle up his copy, get aboard for St. Louis and路 have his


102

Appendix.

[Oct.

work done on one of those mammoth presses, so that instead of waiting six months, as the Lodges have had to do this year, the Brethren will have the Proceedings in their possession in the space of ten days.

Come. West and see hoVJ it is done. the worry caused by long delays.

The labor is rest compared with

A neat compliment was paid Grand Master Brace respecting his Address. An extract was made from the report concerning our }Iasonic Home, an enterprise that is as dear to Brother Barkley in Mississippi as our Home in Missouri is to myself. A most courteous treatment was accorded my Report on Correspondence. Speaking in reference to what may be considered the Cerneau invasion, he saiel that they proposed to keep it out of that Jurisdiction. I am glad to see from his report that they have a revival in Freemasonry in Mississippi just now, which surpasses anything that has ever occurred within his knowledge as a Mason. His conclusion is a wise one, in view of the progress of the Fraternity, when he said: "'Ve have neither time nor the desire to think of new things. The old is better, and we are satisfied with it." I have not the time nor space to copy from his admirable work much that I would like to appropriate. He closed his labors in a most fraternal spirit to the reportorial corps. In taking leave of him, I reciprocate -the sentiment he uttered and am happy in the knowledge of his re-appointment as ~'.Reporter on Correspondence" for the next year. JOHN M. 1VARE, Starkville, Grand Master. JOHN L. POWER, Jackson, Grand' Secretary.

MONTANA, 1890. This Grand Lodge heretofore has met only a few weeks in advance of Missouri, consequently, the Journal of Proceedings does not reach me until our year's work is closed. Owing to this fact, there must al ways be one year between the review of their Proceedings and the time when the Grand Lodge holds its session. Brother Hedges, the Grand Secretary, sent out in good time, his very bright and neat looking annual for 1890, consisting of some 200 pages. The Journal contains the Proceedings of the Twenty-sixth Annual Communication. Tpe session lasted two days, and the transactions covered thirty-seven pages.


1891.]

Append'ix.

103

From the very convenient summary furnished by the Grand Secretai'y, I glean the following items: There are thirty-three Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 1,833, being a gain over the previous year of 163. The summary says that thirteen Lodges were chartered. The revenue amounted to $3,600. The per capita is 82. The pay-roll footed up to $] ,465. The representation was good, made up of Past Grand Masters, Representatives of Lodges and Grand Lodges. The session was held at Livingston, commencing September 24,1890. In the absence of Brother John Anderson, Grand Master, Brother ¡W. T. Boardman, Deputy Grand Master, presided. Brother Cornelius Hedges was Grand Secretary, which position he has ably filled since 1872. The following extract from the Journal will explain the situation as connected 'with the absence of Grand Master Anderson: The acting Grand l\Iaster then stated the circumstances under which the Grand Communication opened. Grand Mll.<;ter Anderson was ta.ken down dangerously sick. only a very few days before the opening of the session, and it was generally supposed that he had prepared his Address before he was stricken down, an<.l that it would be brought by the Missoula representative. Under such circumstances the session opened without an address from any source.

It was resolved that if any address could be obtained it should be inserted in the Proceedings. Brother Hedges, Grand Secretary, by â&#x20AC;˘ visiting the sick Grand Master secured an incomplete document which appeared in the Journal.

I find' in it some excellent moralizings, especially the following on profanity: In my association with my Brethren I am almost daily reminded of a pernicious habit in common use O:Inong them, a habit which I believe could be as easily refrained from as it seems to be as ea.sily and thoughtlessly acquired; a habit which seems to me to be entirely unnecessary. degrading in its effects and contrary to our teachings and beneath the dignity of our professions as Masons a.s well as gentlemen. I refer to the continuous use of profane langual5e, not only in daily busmess affairs, but at times within the Lodge room. I believe lt to be the duty of Worshipful Masters of Lodges not only themselves to refrain from the habit, but to call the attention of members to it and ask them to refrain from it.

He reported some few official acts. On motion, the Grand Secretary was directed to telegraph Brother Anderson the sympathy and regrets of the Grand Lodge in consequence of his illness and absence. Brother Hedges presented his annual report as Grand Secretary, which furnishes a brief financial exhibit anv a very fine general statement of Grand Lodge interests.


104

Appendix.

The Grand Lecturer submitted a report, which was ordered

[Oct. printe~l.

The Grand Lodge of New Zealand was formally recognized. The Committee appointed at a former session reported that testimonials had been prepared and presented to ten Past Grand Masters, consisting of a silver tea service for each one. . The Grand Lodge failed to adopt the proposed change in the law allowing one ballot for the three degrees. The time of the annual meeting was changed from September to the second 'Wednesday in October. A Committee was created and assigned the duty of "considering and reporting at the next Annual Communication, the desirability and practicability of establishing a Masonic Home in Montana." "The Grand and District Lecturer system was approved, and made a part of the work of Montana Masonry. At the close of the session, the Grand Officers were publicly installed when a "throng of ladies filed in and filled the large hall to its utmost capacity. " After the Body was closed, the Grand Master "announced that a banquet and ball were awaiting attention." CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother Cornelius Hedges, Grand Secretary, prepared the annual review, aI'nounting to 108 pages. As heretofore in the preparation of his reports, everything found therein is written. I have not met in the present report a single extract. I like this method, arid it has grown upon me to such an extent, that graduall); the extract business is giving place to the Hedges plan of passing everything through a mental mill, and giving the result in my own terms. Brother Hedges is a pleasant writer and an observant one. He gives attention to what transpires in Grand Lodge sessions, condensing into small compass what is needed for his readers, and then thoroughly reviews the work of Committees on Correspondence. Our Missouri Journal for 1889, received the kindest consideration from Brother Hedges, being accorded some three pages of his valuable


1891.]

Appendi:r.

105

space. He mentions the fact already referred to by me, that the Proceedings of our respective Grand Lodges are always one year old when taken up for review, owing to the time of meeting of these two Bodies. I join in the regret of Brother Hedges that snch is the case, as there is mnch in Grand Lodge ,Journals claiming attention, and that should receive more consideration, if reviewed immediately after the close of the session. Brother Hedges referred very tenderly to the former Grand Secretaryof this Body, Brother Gauley, and mentioned his sad fate. He says that something is always found in the matter and arrangement of our Proceedings, just as he left. the \vork. This is true in several important respects, as the present Grand Secretary does not assume to have better methods in the arrangement of much of the matter of a. Grand Lodge Journal, than he found in existence, on taking charge of the office. Brother Gouley was an able and vigorous \vorker in his department. His greatest strength was in the work of Fraternal Correspondence and as an editorial writer. In the management of office details, he was not a Sllccess. He ,vas strong in generalit.ies, bnt defective in detail. A very complimentary review of the Address of our Brother \Vood, Grand Master, is found in the report of Brother Hedges, and showed particular pleasure with the spirit and character of our work in the establishment and maintenance of the Masonic Horne. Referring to the dedication of that institution, he gave utterance to the following most beautiful sentiments. Speaking of our enterprise, he said: It ~ets out in a moderate, cOllservllth:e way, carefully avoidin~ to be a burden upon any person or portion of the Craft. It does not trust its destinies to borrowed fllllds or draw its support from unwilling taxation. Sprung from such pure hopes and benevolent desires, it hardly needed a dl~diclltion. The spirit in which all the ofIerings 'oNere made, was a consecrating one and diffused around the spot, the structure and its furnishin~s, a halo of ~lory such as neither poet nor sculptor could call forth from canvas or marble, or breathe mto winged words.

In further considering the subject, he treated the question of endowment. He said it was natural for those who had pledged heart and hand at:ld hope to the enterprise, to desire it permanently endowed, fearing that the time might come in the future, when the institution may be neglected. Brother Hedges says, "It is at this point where faith has fallen in its flight and done injllstiee to posterity." I give him the benefit of his own strong suggestions, hoping that the time may never come when Missouri l\:Iasons will fa.il to do their duty to the Masonic Home they love so dearly. We have not lived where we have seen the necessity for such institutions and have doubted their abilit~路, but we are well aware that there are sections where even ill our own prosperous land there is want, and sufferil1~, hearts hreaking with sorrow and sink-


106

Appendix.

[Oct.

ing under burdens. What seems to be needed more is a timely lift at the critical time, a hand ready to help those disposed but unable from want of knowledge or opportunity to help themselves. We have faith that out of all the tril1ls that are being made, the model Home will appel1r. Let it not be supposed, however, that these Homes however numerous, well endowed or efficient they may become, are going to relieve each Brother from the constant duty of supplying brotherly love or relief. S.ome of the most needy have too much pride to ask for aid or allow their necessities to be known. Charity not only" sulfereth long and is kind" but discriminatingchl1rity is quick of discernment and delicate in its approach ll.'i \vell as subtle to devise remedies for uncomplaining suffering.

I live where "the necessity for such an Institution" as our Masonic Home is seen and felt. It is the one great ,,,ant of the times among the Masons of Missouri. We are struggling al1:d praying for its success. It is succeeding to a gratifying degree. Brother Wood, our Grand Master, was congratulated as an officer, and his work highly commended, as is also Brother Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer. This writer was commended by Brother Hedges with expressions of personal gratitude for moving the expulsion of the man "Cowan," whose conduct had brought reproach upon the name of Masonry, discredit upon his family and disgrace upon himself. Brother Hedges said that" the ladies of the Eastern Star shine just as brightly as in the West," and treated our Grand Lodge to a Home dinner. He pays the following compliment to myself in reference to the rapidity with which the Proceedings are printed and delivered: "Brother Vincil is a driver. His ,vork is done upon time, and is not allowed to catch him at a disadvantage, as it often does us poor fellows who have to work for a living at something, and cultivate our Masonic vineyard at odd times, for recreation." Brother Hedges concludes his very readable and pleasant review by saying that the work was furnished just one month after their Grand Lodge closed. From his conclusion, I take the following thoughtful moralizings: To write such a report as one would care to subscribe and publish is getting to be more of a task every year. Not only are Grand Lodges multiplying, but some of the ablest,talent in the COUI\try is enlisted in wl'iting these reports or reviews. It is becoming a conspicuous arena for the Davids and Goliaths of Masonic lore and law, with an increasing, more discriminating and exacting crowd of interested spectators, not overinclined to turn up the thumb in behalf of the discomforted gladiator. It requires not only the reading of an increased volume of :Mll.'ionie literature of increased calibre, and rifled at that, but it requires outside stud)' and resort to such articles of Mll.<;onic lore liS Brother Parvin is gathering at Cedar Rapids. It is abollt the same in our domain as we witness among- the nations of Europe in multiplyin~ their armies llnd improving their weapons, each trying to outdo the other. Only, thIS strife of ours is not a burden on the masses, but is altogether elevating. Still it also requires labor, and more of it.


Appendix.

1891.J

107

r-...

The Grand Lodge closed'::''to meet in the City of Bntte, Oetober 14, 1891, at which time the Grand Lodge of Missouri will ltJe in session also. ,Villiam T. Boardman, Helena, was elected Grand :l\Iaster.' Cornelins Hedges, Helena, re-elected Grand Secretary, and reappointed Chairman Committee on Correspondence.

NEBRASKA, 1890. In my review of the Proceedings of Nebraska for 1889 I expressed the hope that the Journal of that Grand Lodge lor 1890 might reaeh me before closing the labors for the year. This hope was not realized. The Nebraska Grand Lodge meets in June. My work as reviewer closes in September. 'Whya small volume of 160 pages is not received in three months is a prohlem this writer does not attempt to solve. Brother Bowen gets up a neat volume, and, from a careful examination of it, it is manifest that much of the matter which it contains is printed in advance of the session. The present .Tournal, like its predecessors, is\vithout index. The Thirty-third Annual Communication was opened in the city of Omaha on the 18th of June. Brother John J. Mercer, Grand Master, presided. Brother William R. Bowen was Grand Secretary. The record shows that Representatives of 151 of the 179 chartered Lodges 'were present. The roll shows the presence of sixteen Past Grand Masters, with Representatives of thirty-eight Grand Lodges. Missouri was honered by her Representative in the person of Brother George B. France, P. G. 1\'1. The footings found in the Journal show a membership of 9,282, being a gain of 659. The report of the Treasurer shows available funds to the amount of $8,551. The pay roll cuts an important figure in the outlay of this Grand Lodge, amounting to nearly $3,000. The finandal exhibit of the Grand Secretary shows an expense account of $16,460. Among the items mentioned, I notice Grand Master's clerk hire, $500. Grand Secretary's clerk hire, $600. From the statement of the Grand Master the finances of the Body seem to be at a very low ebb; In consequence of the existing condition of the treasury, he had authorized the Grand Treasurer to borrow $3,000 for current expenses.


108

Appendi;-c.

[Oct.

The Address of Grand Master Mercer w1rl, of unusual length, covering thirty-eight pages. He announced general prosperity among the Lodges in growth, finances and Masonic standing, and stated that harmony generally prevailed. He made some vigorous comments on the existence of "confusion and discord resulting from the abuse and misuse of the ballot, and an unseemly desire for office in the Lodges." The results of such condition were "careless action in the admission of members and anxiety for work and increase of members, at the expense of almost all the other essentials of Masonic principles and practice." He reported the constitution of t,velve Lodges chartered at the former session. One Lodge had been continued under dispensation and thirteen new Lodges had been created by him. Quite a large number of special dispensations had been granted, some of ,vhich permitted degrees to be conferred out of time; others for the election of officers, laying of corner-stones, dedicating Masonic Halls, etc. He submitted nineteen decisions rendered during his term of office. them of practical value and well adapted to the government of the Craft. Of cour~e some of them are of local application. He held it to be the duty of every Subordinate Lodge to "correct the evils of intemperance in路its members, and if there is no reformation upon the first or second admonition, the offender should be suspended or expelled promptly."

r have examined these 路with care and consider

He recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota. Quite a number of recommendations were submitted, such as the codification of their laws-the requirement路 that not less than fifteen petitioners should be signed to an application to form a new Lodge, and that the two nearest chartered Lodges should recommend the application. Grand Master Mercer expressed unqualified opposition to the joint occupancy by Lodges of Masonic Halls with non-masonic associations. One recommendation, it seems to me, would bear hardly, if not unjustly upon the Lodges. He said a fee for granting a special dispensation to any Lodge for the purpose of electing and installing its officers, amounting to $10, should be required. Having presented a general report as to the business interests of the Craft in that .Jurisdiction, he then entered upon the considenition of a very troublesome subject among them. I allude to the Scottish Rite


1891.J

Appendix.

109

embroglio. He devoted twenty-two pages of his Address to the diseussion of this pestiferous "ism." Upon taking up the subject an9- considering it, the thought occurred to me that the game is not worth the ammunition, and I pl"oposed to ignore the subject entirely. But that lVIasons of .Missouri may understand how the disturbing question is breaking up the peace and harmony of the Brethren in other Jurisdictions, I give a brief summary of the subject. In 1889 the Grand Lodge of Nebraska made the following deliverance: WHEREAS, A Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Ma,.<;ons is an independent and sovereign body, recognizing and having supreme jurisdiction over no other degrees than those of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and Master Mason, as illustrated and taught by the rituals and secret work adopted by such Grand Lodge; therefore be it

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge expressly declines to enter upon any discussion of the history, use or legitimacy of any bodics claiming to confer what is known as the Scottish Rite degrees, or to be committed to thc recognition of any such body, or to the recognition of any body conferrin/? any degrees over which this Grand Lodge has no control, as being lIfasonic, or as bemg a part of Ancient Craft lIfasonry.

That we cordially endorse the law as recognized and promulgated by our Grand ~Iaster.

First, That two bodies claiming to be Masonic, of the same grade, cannot lawfully exist in the same State at the same time. Second, That the first lawfully constituted authority established in a State thereby obtains exclusive jurisdiction in such territory, and that any other body of the same grade or rite enterillg later within such territory is in itself unlawful.

According to the Address of Grand Master. Mercer, the Cerneauites sent out a circular to the Lodges of the State, containing a garbled statement of what the Grand Lodge had said and done. This caused the Grand ::vraster to issue an edict, in which he officially declared that his Grand Lodge had endorsed as the only legitimate and lawfully constituted body of Scotch Rite Masons the "Southern Jurisdiction, presided over by Albert Pike," and that all others "not acknowledging allegiance to said Southern Jurisdiction were unlawful and clandestine." To this decree of the Grand Master, Nebraska Lodge, No.1, entered a protest and sent it out to the Lodges of the Jurisdiction. Thi~ caused 'the Grand Master to exercise :m authority that he assumed belonged to him, and he arrested the charter of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, and suspended the :Master and Wardens from office. Grand Master Mercer declared that said action of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, had caused widespread discord and strife in the Jurisdiction. He held that the Lodge had been guided into insubordination ,by the prompting of the Grand Commander of Cerneauism, John J.Gorman, the leader of ~me of the Cerneau factions. He then published, side by side, Gorman's letter of 1889 and the.circular of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, showing that the two documents were so much alike that evidently one had been prompted by, if not copied from, the other. Follo,:\'ing this the Grand


110

Appendix.

[Oct.

Master proceeded with his arguments, and divers and sundry quotations, sustaining his action against Nebraska Lodge, No.1, and in favor of what he represented as legitimate Scottish Rite Masonry. It is very evident from the record that this introduction of the wooden horse of Troy into the camp caused dire confusion and conflict. Subsequently a committee reported a resolution unequivocally approving, sustaining and endorsing the Grand Master in his edict and in the arrest of the charter of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, as well as the suspension of its three principal officers. Then a struggle began. Resolutionsand substitutes and amendments and speeches followed. Roll calls and votes were the order of the day, until finally a vote was reached by yeas and nays, adopting, by a large majority, a resolution as follows: Resolved, That we unequivocally approve, sustain and endorse the Grand Master in the issuance of Edict No.1, of July 20,5889, his subsequent arrest of the charter of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, and the suspension from office of the three principal officers thereof for insubordination and contumacy.

At a later stage in the meeting, a report was adopted, authorizing the Grand l\faster to restore the charter of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, to such of the members as should, within sixty days, file their renunciation of the action contained in the circular which caused the arrest of its charter. It was further ordered by the Grand Lodge that unless the Master and Wardens of Nebraska Lodge, No.1, should file their renunciation within sixty days, the Grand Master should cause charges for unmasonic conduct to be preferred against them, and the said accused officers to be tried before a commission appointed for that purpose. The committee on the Grand Master's Address submitted a report, approving his recommendation requiring not less than fifteen names to a petition for a Lodge under dispensation. The same committee reported against his suggestion as to joint occupancy of halls. His recommendation that a fee of $10 be charged for dispensations to elect officers was adopted. This question is one the Grand Lodge of Nebraska can determine for itself, but it occurs to this writer that an act of greater injustice could not be done Lodges, especially those of the weaker class, than to charge them $10 for permission to elect and install officers, when the default was caused by circumstances entirely beyond their control. Upon the recommendation of Brother Bowen, Grand Secretary, the Grand Lodge of New Zealand may receive recognition at the hands of the Grand Master at his discretion. The Committee on Jurisprudence recommended the approval of nearly all the decisions of the Grand Master. Some they doctored, and one ,vas disapproved.


1891.J

Appendix.

111

The name of Grand Custodian was change(i to that of Grand Lecturer. ORATION.

The Grand Orator, Brother JamesBlack, delivered an address covering nine pages, \vhich was declared by resolution to be "very able and instructive." A copy was requested for ,publication and appears in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. . The Grand Master, Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary were authorized and empowered to borrow funds to meet the current expenses of the Grand Lodge. A proposed amendment, offered one year before, requiring but one ballot for the three degrees, was indefinitely postponed. The Grand Lodge of Nebraska never furnishes a Report on Correspondence. ROBERT E. FRENCH, Kearney, Grand Master. 'WILLIAM R. BOWEN, Omaha, re-elected Grand Secretary.

NEVADA, 1890路 The Twenty-sixth annual session of this Grand Lodge \yas opened in Carson City, June 10, 1890. M. W. Bro. Charles vV. Hinchcliffe, was Grand Master, and Brother C. N. Noteware, Grand Secretary. Representatives of seventeen Lodges were present with a full attendance of Grahd and Past Grand Officers. There are nineteen Lodges on the roll with a reported membership of 998, showing a difference of twenty-six as compared with the report of the previous year. No evidence appears indicating any marked progress or activity among the Lodges. The journal under notice contains 132 pages,. neatly gotten up, bllt was so far behind time as to be omitted from my list of Grand Lodges reviewed for 1890. The Address of the Grand Master was justifiably brief, amounting to three pages. He noted the death of one of their Past Grand Officers, Brother DevVitt C. Kenney, who passed away at the age of fifty-five years. He served as Grand Master in 1879. The Grand Master announced a: list of Representatives appointed near other Grand Lodges, among them was our excellent Brother Judge Seymour Hoyt at our own Grand Lodge. But few offiCial acts had been performed by


112

Append'ix.

[Oct.

the Grand }faster and hIs short Address was closed with thanks for the honor conferred upon him by his Brethren. The Grand Secretary, Brother Noteware, furnished a good business paper which contained the doings of his office for the term. He reported himself as the duly commissioned Representative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri at the Grand Lodge of Nevada, and ,vas accorded, ,vith others, a fraternal welcome in that character. A Committee reported that returns had been received from all the constituent Lodges of the Jurisdiction, and that dues had been paid by each one on the 1'011. This is good news from a far country. On a report from the proper Committee the路 Grand Lodges of North Dakota and New Zealand were accorded a fraternal recognition as Sovereign Bodies, and welcomed, as such, among the Grand Lodges of the world. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report covering some seventy pages was rendered by Brother R. L. Fulton, "for the Committee." He reviewed the Proceedings of sixty American Grand Lodges, and devoted a number of pages to noticing what was styled" Foreign Tongues." His report contains numerous extracts from the Journals examined, and reasons are given for the free use of the scissors as follows: The fact has not escaped the keen eye of t.he report.orial staff that the report of the Committee 011 Foreign Correspondence for this Jurisdiction has been made up of many facts and few opinions. 'fhispolicy was adopted after mature deliberation and considera!)le consultation, as being the right course, all things considered. A large experience in journalism taught us that .opinions were cheap, but that real facts made a solid foundation for a writer. We have found the. people able to generalize from current events as sensibly lLnd correctly as the majority of the self-appointed leaders, and we certainly have felt no anxiety about the capacity of the .Masons of Nevada to correctly sum up and give due weight to t.he movements in t.he Masonic world, if properly placed before t.hem. It would he far easier to fill out. sixty pages with editorial matt.er and friendlv notices of pur fellow scribes, than to sift, classify !lnd shorten the reports of proceedings made from the Grand Loages of the world, but It would not be nearly as useful to our readers, and we should not feel justified in putting them to the expense of pllyillg for printing such stuff when it might be replaced by a concise history of the eYents of the year. The field \vhich opens to a Foreign Correspondent, in any of the Grand Bodies, is one of such commanding interest and beauty and power, and one whieh so invites an(l blesses the best literary skill and breadth which can be employed, that we have often wond(~red that this oflice should be served, and sometimes for years, by a reporter who cannot bring to his duties the offerings of wise counsels, generous and impartial observation, the culture ofafraternal spirit, and the grace and charms ofa simple (liction, as well in the manner as in the matter of it. . We appreciate DlOSt highly the fraternal treatment accorded us upon our entrance into this distinguished circle, and if we have not seemed to respond as freely as we might, it has been from lack of literary talent rather than Masonic sentiment. We have been more and more entertained and benefited by t.he reviewing of the different reports, and have felt verv often the loss our Brethren sustained by not having access to the originals instead of to a report of the reports.

I have given Brother Fulton the full benefit of his preference in the foregoing extract. As a gleaner he has shown good judgment, and might commend himself as a thinker if not so hesitant. He ,vas


1891..J

Appendix.

113

assigned the same line of work for another year. 'Whether I will have the privilege of examining his work for 1891, depends upon the speed with which the Grand Secretary brings forth his Proceedings this year. Missouri for 1889 received courteous conside~tion, extracts being made from our Journal covering a much larger space than should have been allotted to us. JOHN 'V. ECKLEY, Virginia City, was chosen Grand Master. C. N. NOTEWARE, of Carson City, re-elected Grand Secretary.

NEW BRUNSWICK, 1890. A Journal of less than fifty pages, containing the transactions of the Twenty-third Annual Session of the above Grand Lodge, is before me for consideration. The meeting was held April 22d, and the Proceedings were received late in the season of 18\:!O. M. W. Bro. Thomas Walker was Grand Master, and Brother Edwin J. 'Vetmore, Grand Secretary. Out of the thirty-two Lodges on the roll, nineteen were represented. A membership of 1,885 was reported, with a gain of five over the previous year. Grand Master 'Valker submitted a brief business paper, saying that "harmony, peace and unity" prevailed among the Craft. He reported a somewhat lengthy abse.n.ce from the Jurisdiction, which was spent in Scotland and England, \~~h"ere he~-received marked courtesies from the Brotherhood. A numbel' of deaths were noted by him in his Address, among them was that of Past Grand MasterB. R. Stevenson. The Address contained mention of many local matters of no interest to the general reader. The Address was conlplimented by a committee as "thoughtful and well timed." The report of business matters by Brother Wetmore, Grand Secretary, was a very good paper. The office held by him is an appointive one. The Grand Lodges of North Dakota and Victoria were duly recognized. Relations with sister Grand Lodges were announced as "friendly." The business of the session was both brief and local. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected and both reside at St. John.

NEW BRUNSWICK, 1891. The Twenty-fourth Annual Communication opened at the Masonic Temple, in the city of St. John, April 28th, M. W. Bro. James Walker, Grand Master; Edwin J. Wetmore, Grand Secretary. G. L. Ap.-8.


114

Appendix.

[Oct.

Twenty-two Lodges were represented out of the thirty-two on the roll. The statistics show a membership of 1,851. A goodhusiness Address was presented by the Grand Master, in which he mentions the death of a number of their Brethren, as well as distinguished Masons of other Jurisdictions. He reported the laying of the corner-stone of the Hall of the Young Men's Christian Association. Various matters of local interest were brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge in the Address. The report of Grand Secretary 路Wetmore was a good business paper. The Address of Grand Master 路Walker, was approved. and hi~hly complimented by a committee. Many matters of local interest were considered and disposed of. The Journal contains the reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters. No report on Correspondence. The Grand Master and ;Grand Secretary were both re-elected and reside at St..roIm ..

NEW

HAMPSHIRE, 1891.

Two months following the close of the One Hundred and Second Annual Communication, I received a large, handsome volume, containing the transactions of that and the Semi~annual Session. The latter was held in December, 1890, the purpose being, "the exemplification of the work of the three degrees." The Annual Communication was held in the city of Concord, commencing May 20, 1891. M. W. Bro. Frank D. 路Woodbury, Grand Master; Brother George P. Cleaves, Grand Secretary. From the excellent summary furnished by the Grand Secretary, I glean the following facts: There are 78 Lodges on the roll, 47 of which were represented at the Annual Session. The membership of the Jurisdiction amounts to 8,542, beihg a gain of 209 over the previous year. Grand Master 'Voodbury furnished an account of his official labors in a document of twelve pages. It is a plain, simple business paper, without any flourish or dress parade. He. announced the decease of two prominent Past Orand Officers, and recommended memorial pages, which were accord.ed the deceased.


~891.J

Appendix.

115

He stated that no decisions had been made which he deemed of sufficient importance for a place in his Address. He expressed himself as opposed to granting dispensations to confer degrees out of time simply to ;, suit the convenience of the candidate," Two new Lodges, chartered at the former session, were duly constituted by him during pis term of office. He reported the laying of corner-stones, dedications of halls, official visits, and other local matters. He closed his practical Address with thanks for the honor conferred. . This was duly followed by the printed reports of the several District Deputy Grand Masters. The official acts of the Grand Master were approved by a Committee. The Journal contains lengthy and elaborate reports of the Committee on Appeals, touching the case submitted to its consideration. A revision of the constitution was ordered. The report on that matter will be submitted at the next session. There is but little of general interest in the transactions under review. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother A. S. 'Vait presented a very full and elaborate review of fifty-five Grand Lodge Journals. Missouri was" not in it." . Why, it does not appear, as the Committee makes no mention of our Jurisdiction and assigns no reason for the omission. Possibly, the GrandSecretary failed to forward our Journal to the Committee. Brother 'Vait is 路a very delightful reviewer. His treatment of the landmark question is both lengthy and elaborate. Touching the Cerneau question, Brother Wait is sound, conservative and safe. In his conclusion, he says that he was thoroughly satisfied of the wisdom and conservative attitude assumed by their Grand Lodge on the subject. He then defined their position, and declared the exclusive power of the Grand Lodge over the three symbolic degrees of Masonry, and of its right to prohibit the use of these degrees in connection with any and all other rites assumed to be Masonic. He said that it belonged to the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire to determine the proper occasion for the exercise of the power of exclusion, but that as yet, no such occasion had arisen among them. It is ther.efore


116

Appendix.

[Oct..

claimed that the Grand Lodge of .New Hampshire has made no deliverance for or against" Riteism." This is precisely the attitude of Missouri. This Grand Lodge hag, proclaimed firm and unyielding adhesion to the doctrine of exclusive Masonic jurisdiction. This declaration has not only been incorporated in the Constitution, wherein it is said" the Grand Lodge is the supreme Masonic authority within the State路 of Missouri," but for nearly half a. century the declaration has stood, that this Grand Lodge has jurisdiction, within its own limits, over the first threedegrees of Masonry, and that all bodies, established in Missouri without our authority, attempting to work the three degrees, are clandestine. With this law as the governing rule in Missouri, we have no fears of the operation or work by anybody claiming to be Masonic, attempting to work the three symbolic路 degrees of Masonry. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were both re-elected and reside at Concord.

NEW JERSEY, 1891. The Grand Lodge held its One Hundred :and :Fourth Annual Communication in the city of Trenton, commencing January 28th. Fourmonths after the close of the session I received a very handsome volume路 gotten up by the Grand Secretary. / M. \V. Bro. Charles H. Mann, Grand Master, presided, and the chair of the Grand Secretary, so long filled by the venerable and venerated Joseph H. Hough, was filled by Brother Thomas H. R. Redway~ This Brother had been appointed by the Grand Master to fill out the unexpired term of the deceased Grand Secretary. Of the 164 Lodges on the roll, 159 were represented. A large number of Past Masters were present, with seven Past Grand Masters and Representatives of thirty-nine Grand Lodges. The membership i.s; reported at 13,981, being a few hundred in advance of the previouS' year. ADDRESS.

A lengthy business document, covering more than twenty pages,. emanated from the Grand East.


1891.J

117

Appendix.

The Grand Lodge had been bereft by death of its Grand SecretarY, 13rother Joseph H. Hough, who was called from labor December 15th, 1890, in the seventy-fifth year of his age. This venerable servant of the 路Craft had been Grand Secretary for something over forty-eight years. He entered the Grand I . odge in November, 1838, and was chosen Deputy Grand Secretary. He had been made a Master Mason in the May 'previous. He served as Deputy Grand Secretary five years, ,and was then elected Grand Secretary. Thus his connection with the office was -shown to have run through a period of mOre than fifty-three years. This is, perhaps, the most remarkable service in the history of the' Grand Lodges of the world. His official career was almost equal to his entire Masonic life. The Grand Master said that Brother Hough was "buried by the Grand Lodge with impressive ceremonies." A committee of Past Grand :Masters was appointed by the Grand Master "to prepare a 路suitable testimonial," which was rendered during the session, and the .same ordered to be suitably engrossed. The Grand Master mentioned the death of a number of members of the Fraternity in the State, and expressed sympathy with other Grand Jurisdictions deprived by death of leading 'Masonic lights. In the Jurisdictions named by him twenty-six Past Grand Masters had fallen. This is an unprecedented mortality among the distinguished men of the .Fraternity in one year. Grand Master Mann offered congratulations upon the condition of Freemasonry. He said: "For the most part, the Lodges are路 prosper,ous, their financial condition good, and harmony prevails to an unusual extent." Lodges of Instruction had been held in each of the twelve districts, at which "the attendance was good, the attention close and the results satisfactory." Divers and sundry matters of a local bearing of his official administration.

'v ere presented

as part

MASONIC HOME.

At some former session a committee had been created to solicit sub-scriptions and donations for the purpose of establishing a Home for widows and orphans of deceased :Masons. The Grand Master annoullced that a diversity of opinion prevailed as to whether it would be better to .establish and maintain a Home, or create a General Charity Fund, to he used in aiding the Subordinate Lodges in the care of all needy ,claimants. The committee on this interest presented a report, which was accepted and the committee continued. It. was announced that over $6,000 had been subscribed for the Home.


118

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Grand Master reported one decision which was approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence. He declared a by-law null and void which permitted members of Lodges to be exempt from the payment of dues who had been contributing members for a specified number of years. Some valuable recommendations and practical suggestions were offered by -the Grand Master. He 'said that nothing had occurred during the 'year to disturb the peaceful relations existing between other Grand Jurisdictions and the Grand Lodge of New Jersey. He reviewed at some length the question of invasion of jurisdiction t and announced the happy settlement of the famous Lemm controversy between his own Grand Lodge and that of New York. Having served the Craft faithfuily and efficiently for two years t Grand Master Mann closed his Address in beautifully eloquent terms. The acting Grand Secretary, Brother Redway, furnished a capital report covering general and statistical grounds. He made a very touching allusion to the death of Brother Hough, with whom he had been intimately associated, and whom he had served as Assistant Secretary. The Address ~f the' Grand Master was commended by the Committee and his official acts approved. A resolution' was presented and adopted as follows: Re$olved, That the petition of a rejected candidate cannot be renewed until the expiration of four weeks from the time of such rejection, nor until official notice thereof shall have been sent to him and his proposition fee returned. Lodges rna)', bya bv-law, enlarge the above stated time. .

The above resolution does not define what kind of a candidate is' referred to. I am left in the dark as to whether the candidate mentioned is one who has applied for the degrees, or is an applicant for advancement. If reference is intended to a candidate for the mysteries t the above resolution is a most singular provision, allowing the rejected candidate to renew his petition after the lapse of four weeks. To say the least, the resolution, as to its meaning, creates doubt by being S0' very indefinite. The financial condition of the Grand Lodge, as shown by the variouS. reports, appears to be good.


1891.]

Appendix.

119

The portrait of the late Grand Secretary, fBrother Hough, was ordered painted, to .be hung in the office of the Grand Secretary. " The usual Past Grand Master's Jewel was voted to Brother Mann, "the retiring Grand Master, as an expression of respect and affection. The business of the session was brief and local. CORRESPONDENCE,

A review of the Proceedings of fifty-t',,"o Grand I.Jodges, covering 106 pages, was furnished by Rev. Henry Vehslage, D. D. The notice of each Grand Lodge Journal was necessarily brief, owing to the number examined and the limited space used by the reviewer. The report is composed of extracts, accompanied by a synopsis of the various transactions. But few comments are found in the report. The Missouri Proceedings for 1890 were accorded two full pages. Speaking of the Address of Grand Master Brace, he said: "It was a masterly document, showing a clear eye and firm hand." The reviewer quoted at some length from the Address of Brother Brace respecting onr Masonic Home. He commended very highly the business report of the Grand Secretary of Missouri, as :well as his ,vork on Correspondence, making extracts from both. Brother Vehslage is a courteous reviewer and gleans well from the field he occupies. He does not grapple issues, but makes his work what many think to be the best type of correspondence, namely, an epitome of Grand Lodge doings; In this respect he is a superior Grand Lodge Reporter. In concluding his report, he said the pleasure incident thereto had been sadly shaded. Since he commenced his" report Brother Joseph Hough, their Grand Secretary, had been called from service and quietly given up the labors of life. CHARLES W. TILDEN, Jersey City, Grand Master. THOMAS H. R. RED'VAY, Trenton, Grand Secretary.

NEW MEXICO, 189L . The Thirteenth Annual Communication opened in the City of Albuquerque, January 26, Brother F. H. Kent being Grand Master, andA. A. Keen, Grand Secretary. â&#x20AC;˘ The seventeen Lodges on the roll have a membership of about 700. Fifteen Lodges were represented.


120

Appendix.

[Oct.

An Address of six pages was presented by the Grand Master. He congratulated the Craft on its continued prosperity. Having laid, with proper ceremonies, the corner-stone of an Agricultural College at Las Cruces, due report made of the same was made by the Grand Master. He had created one Lodge, during the term, under dispensation. The dead of the Jurisdiction were fraternally mentioned by him. A number of applications for special dispensations had been refused. Four decisions were reported, all of which were approved by the proper Com- , mittee, and were sound expositions of Masonic principles. The other matters treated by him were purely local. The Grand Secretary, Brother Keen, furnished a brief report of local interest. The Grand Lodge of Tasmania, having claimed recognition, was accorded that distinction upon the recommendation of the Committe, prov'ided, its organization was found to be regular. The Grand Lodge, by unanimous vote, resolved to locate itself permanently at Albuquerque. A rule was adopted at this session, requiring each Lodge to pay into the Grand Lodge Treasury $1 for each Master Mason raised. The Grand Lecturer, Brother J. D. Bush, submitted a report, in which he said that the Missouri work had been acquired by him as far as possible, and communicated to the Lodges. Said work as exemplified by him, was, on motion, approved by the Grand Lodge, and adoptee:: as the standard of the Jurisdiction. THE CHAP)fAN CASE.

A member of one of the Lodges, T. F. Chapman, had been tried, 'and, I suppose, acquitted, upon a grave charge. The case was taken up to the Grand Lodge on appeal. The report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances presented the case as follows: That in their opinion the action of Chapman Lodge should bp reversed, and that the 'finding should have been guilty of un-Masonic conduct, as charged, and the sentence should have been expulsion. The finding of your Committee is based upon the simple proposition that the Bible, by the usages of the Craft, is recognized as the book of the law referred to in landmark XXI., and that when the accused wrote to his Lodge a letter contajning such expressions as-" I believe the Holy Bible to be a dangerous book, one that has been directly the cause of more outrages upon innocence and helplessness than any other cause in the history of mankind. It should be taken from the altar of Masonry as a mali~ner of the Glorious Architect of the Universe, the God of Nature," etc" etc., he was gUllty of contempt for the laws, usages and customs of the Order., That the expression of such opinions in the manner in which they were expressed constituted insubordination.


1891.J

121

Appendix.

Maintaining such views as he did, witboutregard to whether or not the same were permitted by Masonic law, and the expression of them in the manner a.<; expressed by him, make it impossible for the accused to further continue proper fraternal relations with the Order, however conscienti OilS he may have been in his. actions. There is no other way for his relations to be severed than by expulsion.

This report was followed by a motion that the aforesaid party, T. F. Chapman by name, be expelled from all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry. This action is to be commended by all who prefer Light and Truth to darkness and error. There will be an outcry by some in our Fraternity, but let them decry this action as they have that of Missouri in a similar case. The sun will continue to shine. I find nothing further in the Proceedings claiming attention here .

• CORRESPONDENCE".

A report covering 112 pages, was rendered by Brother Max Frost, in which he reviewed the t.ransactions· of fifty-six Grand Lodges. The report is almost entirely made. up of extracts from the Journals reviewed. Missouri was accorded two full pages, in which quotations were made, with approval, from the Address of Grand Master Brace. After complimenting my Report on Correspondence, Brother Frost made an extract of one page frolll my review. Brother Frost has acquired the commendable fa~ulty of gleaning judiciemsly from the reports of Committees on Correspondence, thereby furnishing to his readers as full a view as possible of what other Grand Lodges are saying and doing. CIT ARLES H. DANE, Deming, Grand Master. A. A. KEEN. Albuquerque, Grand Secretary.

NEW SOUTH ..WALES,

1890·

A small Journal from the "United Grand Lodge ~of New South Wales" contains matters and things considered at four quarterly sessions, and one Annual Communication. I suppose these sessions were . held in Sydney, though the" headings of the minutes do not indicate any place of meeting, and the ~bsence of the name of the Secretary is a marked feature of the" JournaL I presume there was on"e present, but he seems to have been too modest to print his name. Brother C. F. Stokes,


122

Appendix.

[Oct.

Deputy Grand Master, presided at one meeting and H. J. Tarrant, Pro Grand Master, at some others. The Annual Communication convened June 12, 1890 (in Sydney I presume), when" the .Grand Lodge was opened in ample form, by the Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, His Excellency, Lord Carrington." So says the record. The secretarial presence was conspicuous by its absence, so far as any information goes. "His Excellency" delivered a brief Address. From it I glean some little information usually found in reports of Grand Secretaries. He stated that there are 185 Lodges oli the rolls with a membership amounting to nearly 12,000. Fifteen new Lodges had been created. " An Orphan Fund" had been established with 16,000 pounds to its credit, which would amount to some $80,000 in om: money. This is a wonderful showing for a young Grand Lodge. It is one of the striking characteristics of English Masons that they always look after the charity feature of the Craft. "His Excellency" said his term as Governor of the Colony would soon expire, when he would return to the mother country leaving Brother Harman J. Tarrant, Pro Grand Master, in charge of the Masonic interests of the Jurisdiction. This is all I can make out of the JournaL

NEW

YORK, 1891.

A large and well arranged volume of nearly five hundred pages came to hand within a short time after the close of the One Hundred and Tenth Annual Session, which was held in the Masonic Temple, New York City, commencing June 2d. M. W. Bro. John 'V. Vrooman, Grand Master, present and presiding; R. W. Bro. Edward 1\1. L. Ehlers, Grand Secretary. REPRESENTATION.

In addition to the Grand Officers and numerous Past Grand Officers, there were present Representatives of over 700 Lodges, besides District Deputy Grand Masters and the Representatives of 61 Grand Lodges. Missouri was represented by R. ,V. Bro.John Stewart. The recapitulation of the Grand Secretary shows 721 Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 77,923. New York is well named the "Empire Jurisdiction," in Masonry, as in many other respects. ADDRESS.

In closing his official labors as Grand Master, Brother Vrooman presented an unusually lengthy, as well as interesting, document, cov'-


1891.J

Appendix.

123

ering sixty-five pages. It is a paper, while claiming the amplest consideration, defies the best effort of the reviewer to do it justice. In rendering this, his final official report, Grand Master Vrooman sur.; passed his former efficient labors. His Address in 1890 was sincerely commended by myself as a model in every respect, and the Fraternity of New York made no mistake in the selection of Brother Vrooman as their Grand Master. He adds but one more to the list of grand men who have served the Fraternity in that Jurisdiction. Brother Parvin, of Iowa, well said of New York, "This Jurisdiction has had the most able men at her head." Brother Vrooman is one of them. In ability, he has shown himself the peer of his illustrious predecessors. In purity of thought, he stands'in the front rank; and in the expression of true Masonic sentiment, admits of no superior. His opening was both reverent and devout, as shown by a brief extract herewith submitted: Let us reverently, with the simplicity born of holy purpose and unselfish ambition, invoke the blessing of the Supreme Architect of the Universe upon this our onc hundred and tenth Annual Communication. Let us fervently ask His wisdom to enlightcn our minds, and to give direction in 1L1l our doings. Never did the G'rand Lodgc a..<;scmble under more favorable auspices. Never did the Grand Lodge assemble amid the flush of greaterl.rosperity. Never did the Grand Lodge have greater cause for gratItude to Almighty Go . The countless blessings, past and present, the brilliant prospects, aye, the certainty of the future, devoutly attuned our appreciative hearts to sing at the opcning ceremonies with one acclaim, "Praise God from whom all blessings flow."

Following his exordium is a loving and touching tribute to the memory of two eminent Masons and Past Grand Masters of New York, Brothers Charles Roome and Elwood E. Thorne. Other Jurisdictions were kindly remembered and their illustrious dead duly honored.

CONDITION OF THE CRAFT.

He said their 721 Lodges, and nearly 80,000 members, sent fraternal greetings to the Masonic world, announcing harmony, happiness, peace and prosperity throughout that Jurisdiction. Returns from every Lodge in the State were on file, and complete. No charter had been suspended or arrested, their property was free from incumbrance, and devotion to Masonic principles unabated; As in his former Address, he announced a strong disinclination to form new LOdges, believing the number in existence sufficient to meet all necessary demands. To this view one exception was made, and a dispensation granted to create a new Lodge.


124

Appendix.'

[Oct.

Brother Vrooman fayors conservative public displays by Masons, and said, " I am unalterably opposed to making our Institution solely one of mystery." He said he was in sympathy with banquets and entertainments, hospitable and inexpensive, upon all suitable occasions, such being calculated to increase fraternity and create a closer acquaintance and fellowship, resulting in true brotherly love. He would guard carefully the sanctuary of our Lodge rooms against the introduction of anything that would impair the dignity and moral character of the Lodge. He urged that the Lodge room be heated as a solemn sanctuary, where too much honor and reverence cannot be brought. !lis sentiments on this subject are the well uttered and clearly expressed views of this writer. I may allude to the fact just here that in' company with a Grand Lodge Officer, I visited a Lodge not remote from St. Louis, to participate in the dedication of a new Masonic Hall. I was to deliver the address following the installation. It was a beautiful room, handsomely furnished. I noticed the elegant carpet was covered with a tarpaulin. I at first supposed this was done to preserve, the carpet from being soiled. At length, I asked the Master of the Lodge why they had covered their carpet. His reply was, "We expect" to dance after the Masonic ceremonies are closed." I asked the question, " Would you have been allowed to dance in the Holy of Holies of King Solomon's Temple?" and added, "As the Lodge room dedicated to Masonic uses, wherein Masons are made, represents that holy place of the Temple, I would no more dance in a Masonic ,Hall than I would in a church. If you intend to have a balJ in this Lodge room, I will not be a party either to the dedication or to the desecration of the place. Therefore, you must excuse me and I will retire." The Grand Lodge Officer, finding out the purpose to desecrate the place, positively interdicted any such diversion there. The hall was solemnly dedicated, the address was delivered, and in due time, the Lodge was closed. The dancers repaired to some public hall and enjoyed themselves at will. I join Brother Vrooman in his earnest defense of the sanctity of such places, and hold them.to be sanctuaries that must be kept free from aU things contrary to the spirit and purposes of the Masonic Institution. Last year Brother Vrooman visited in person each Masonic District in the Jurisdiction, 'and was received and welcomed by the representatives of 586 Lodges. During the recent term, he informs us, the work had been again accomplished. The success and progress of Masonry in New York under such efficient supervision and personal oversight, cannot be wondered at. There is one aspect of his labors that is peculiarly gratifying. While visiting among the Fra~ernity, he announced that the time had arrived when the work of elevating the Craft to a


1891.J

Appendix.

125

higher plane than ever before must be performed. He said, "I therefore pleaded with the Brethren to build up the moral and religious character of each member of the Fraternity in hisindividual capacity, teaching them the duty we owe to God, our neighbor and ourselves." I am not surprised at his statement that such remarks were listened to with deep attention, and that he enlisted the hearty sympathy of all those who heard him. In rendering .like services during two terms as Grand Master of Missouri Masons, I was both gratified and encouraged by the ready response of the Fraternity to every appeal to raise our standard and lift the Institution to a higher moral plane. The overwhelming majority of our Brethren are good and true men. Masonry has made them better men than the profane world. This good element in the Order desires to see vice driven from the ranks of the Craft, and gladly welcomes every movement that will produce such result. Finding the Grand Lodge and Grand Officers in sympathy with their spirit of reform, the Lodges enforce the laws, purify the Institution, and raise the moral standard higher year after year. Much depends on our Grand Officers and especially our Grand Masters. Brother Vrooman gave an interesting account of his visit to the Grand Jurisdiction of England durin~ his last year's term of service. His reception was all that could be desired, and his tribute to English Masonry, just and lofty. He said that Freemasonry was the pride and glory of that Jurisdiction, grand in principles, grand in character r grand in interest in the Craft, and grand In the good accomplished. I find in his reference to this mlltter the statement that the Grand Master of England issued the charter which gave the Grand Lodge of New 'York its existence. He announced that the Grand Lodge of England was once opened, by authority, in the City of New York, on February 21, 1782. The records of that session are now i.n the archives of the United Grand Lodge of England. Brothe.r Vrooman obtained a copy of the record of that session, and has placed it on file in the Grand Secretary's office. Brother Vrooman reported the relations of the Grand Lodge of New York with other Grand Lodges, with whi~h they are in correspondence,. as most cordial and fraternal. The famous controversy between the Grand Lodge of New York and the Grand Lodge of New Jersey hasbeen amicably settled. Fort Ed ward Lodge had made a Mason of a. party by the name of Lemm, who was the material of Mystic Tie Lodge, in New Jersey. The facts being ascertained, the New York .Lodge promptly apologized to the New Jersey Lodge, and thus ended the controversy.


126

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Grand Master announced that fraternal relations had been established with the Grand Lodges of New South 'Vales and Tasmania, and representatives duly appointed. . . Under the head of "Decisions," Brother Vrooman stated that he had none to report, all questions settled by him having been merely local and involving nothing of general interest. He accounts for this happy state of things by saying, "The unity of our Brethren in this Jurisdiction is so complete that but few matters of difference have arisen. It has been my aim to engage the Craft in other directions than that of controversy." Valuable recommendations and suggestions were submitted. Grand Master Vrooman had sent out路to the Lodges a circular, asking a series of practical questions. Much valuable information had been furnished, as nearly 700 Lodges had replied to his questions. One item showed that 15,840 communications had been held during the year. It was found from the facts obtained, that 5,347 communications had been held, where nothing whatever was done beyond the formal opening and closing of the Lodges. He regarded such condition as deplorable. In view of the fact that about one-third of the Lodges had done nothing but meet, open and close, he deemed a remedy necessary to awaken and keep alive interest enough in these Lodges to make the meetings attractive. He furnished a large number of suggestions and recommendations received from Masters of Lodges, as to how Lodge meetings can be made more attractive and desirable. I can only say that these suggestions are very suggestive. Brother Vrooman recommended that one day in each year be set apart and designated by the Craft as '" M~sonic Thanksgiving Day." He suggested that it would be most appropriate to thus commemorate a day similar to the Jubilee Day of April 24, 1889. The Grand Master devoted several pages to "Religion and Freemasonry." His utterances on this subject deserve not only to be recognized, but to be widely circulated. I therefore, with great pleasure, appropriate the following extracts: I differ from those Masonic writers and orators who purposely abstain from mentioning Religion in connection with Freemasonry, or who frequently make the statement that there is no Religion in our Institution. I boldly proclaim with all the force of language at my command that there is Religion in Freema.sonry. Not the narrow Religion of sect or creed, but that broad Religion which teaches" Thou shalt have no other Gods before me;" that Religion which teaches us from childhood to old age reverently to say "Our Father which art in heaven;" that Religion which teaches us to protect and preserve the Great Light in Masonry which is given as a "rule and ~ide for our faith and practice." And so long as the ten thousand Lodges cxist in this fau land of ours, so long will ten thousand Holy Bibles be preserved, as silent but all-powerful witnesses before the world that there is Religion in Freemasonry.


1891.]

Appendi:r.

127

Our Grand Institution lives, moves, and has its .being in that beautiful and broad Religion which conveys to us the command, ,. Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and with all thy mind and with all thy strength, and thy neighbor as thyself." Docs not this declare with ~eat force and power the truth we so love to teach, " The Fatherhood of God, the Brotherhood of man?" Freemasonry becomes It part of Religion, because it teaches" Faith in God, hope in immortality, charity to all mankind." Freemasonry becomes a part of Religion, because it teaches" Duty to God, to your neighbor, and yourself." These eternal principles, vital to our very existence, should at all times be proclaimed to and by the Craft WIth no uncertain sound; and especially should the candidate be given to understand in thunder tones that he is expected to lead a religious life; that he violates 路his vows if he does not always live upright before God' and man. He should be taught that Freemosonryand Religion are so interwoven that it is nothin~ less than criminal for him to make application to become a member of the Fraternity if he be an immoral man, if he be a profane man, if he be an irreligious man, lacking in love for his fellows and devoid of the love of God in his heart. We are grateful that the Craft has been controlled by such a spirit in the past, and that its teachings have brought us to the present high plane of honor and usefUlness, which was the ambition of our Masonic fathers and is our brightest hope. Lest I be misunderstood. I will here state explicitly that" Religion and Freemasonry" should not be confounded with" The Church and FreemaSonry." We should never seek to unite the Church and State, nor should we seck to unite the Church and Freemasonry. Keep separate: each working in its own way for the good of a common cause. I am utterly opposed to that class of Freemasons-thank God we have few-who state that the Lodge is good enough Church for them, and that to be a good Mason is to be a good Church member. Away with that doctrine! I am as zealous a Mason as lives, and yet with all my zeal I desire here and now to record mv belief that there are two things over, aboYe aild beyond FreemasonrY,-one, the Church; the other, the family. Never substitute Freemasonry for the Church. Let us have a common religious platform where all Free and Accepted 'Masons can meet; in addition to Lhis, let us have a Church where each individual Mason may select his Church home.

The foregoing ringing utterances, 'which eXllress 'and represent the views of hundreds of thousands of Masons in our land, are furnished as an answer to the slander of a St. Louis clergyman. Said clerical traducer of his superiors declared from the pulpit that" Secret societies are the curse of the home, and next to the saloon in evil influence." It is most grateful to Illy feelings to find a man so thoroughly representative as Brother Vrooman, contending for the grand principles connected with the highest and best development of. moral character. I endorse the sentiments uttered by him that" Religion and Freemasonry" should not be confounded with the" Church and Freemasonry."

Following his dissertation upon this subject, he made extracts from the official deliverances of forty-nine Grand Masters in the United States, all of whom reverently recognize man's obligation A and duty to the one living and true God. He might well have concluded his remarks b~~ a qnotation from that wise ruler, who built the Temple and gave character and prestige to our Institution,-" Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter. Fear God and keep his commandments; for this is the whole duty of man."


128

Appendix.

[Oct.

Brother Vrooman defined the position of the Grand Lodge of New York in reference to this great question, in the following language: Our Jurisdiction has always been front among the foremost in honoring God, and respecting with reverence the teachings of His Holy Word. The first Grand :Master of this Grand Lodge, the Reverend WILLIAM WALTER, was a Clergyman, respected and honored. If time would permit, I could quote from the long line of his distinguished successors, acknowledgments of faith and belief in God, "in thoughts that breathe and words that burn." . I dismiss this subject in the earnest hope that it will ever be our aim to remain true to Religion and Freemasonry, "without variableness, neither shadow of turning."

In very clear and vigorous terms, he delivered his.views against politics in Freemasonry. The announcement was made that in numerous instances, parties had issued letters or circulars, requesting Masons to vote in behalf of some Brother who was a candidate for political office. This unwarranted conduct was justly reprehended by the Grand Master, and sternly rebuked. Speaking of their Hall, sometimes called" Masonic Temple," he said the property was free from incumbrance, and produced an annual income amounting to some $50,000. Propositions were under consideration to add two stories to the building, thereby making more room and increasing the income, as the principal revenues for the support of their \ Asylum or Masonic Home are to be derived from the Hall. It is but fair to say in this connection that the Asylum claims a large share of the best thought and attention of Grand Master Vrooman. The freedom of their Hall from debt had relieved the Craft from burden, and now the attention and zeal of the Brethren turn to the greater work of building up a grander institntion as a home for aged and indigent Masons, widows and orphans. He truly said, "We must not measure Masonry by money. True charity has loftier aim~, and endeavors to do noble things. The real loving, giving spirit of Freemasonry is not only to relieve want and alleviate suffering, but likewise to lead up to highest manhood and build up strongest char~cter." This grand institution of our New York Brethren was first inaugurated as an Asylum enterprise. in 1842. The success of that enterprise has been rendered certain by laying the corner-stone May 21, 1891. It is worthy of note in this connection, that the inception of that undertaking was in 1842, when some Brother subscribed a single dollar, that being the first subscription made. The subscription paper thus started, is found in the Address of the Grand Master, in the hand-writing of all the subscribers. Brother Vrooman gave a table of receipts and disbursements connected with the building of their Hall, showing the amounts received to be nearly three million and a half ~ollars, the disbursements being


1891.J

Appendix.

129

nearly the same amount, leaving in 1891, a' cash balance on hand of about $140,000. He well characterizes the institution now claiming their attention and labor as the" ASYLUM, the HOME, and the SCHOOL." The corner-stone of this grand institution was laid the 21st day of May, 1891, which was called by the Grand Master, a "red-letter day in the Masonic history of New York." Brother Vrooman closed his treatment of this subject in touchingly eloquent terms in behalf of the aged and helpless for whom the Home is provided, as well as for the little ones, to whom it shall be a school as well as a home. The Grand Master paid an exalted tribute to the Grand Secretary,. Brother Ehlers, who has been characterized as "the路 grandest Grand Secretary of the grandest Grand Lodge." I am sure that there can be no competition for this honor, thus elegantly awarded to the Grand Secretary of New York. Brother Vrooman closed his lengthy, elaborate and able Address in very appropriate p~lfaseology. I quote the following: And no{v, after constant service as a member of this Grand Lodge extending over a period of twenty years, I look forward to the time when there shall come rest from officiallabor, and I so earnestly hope that some good may follow. As a humble member of the Craft, your welfare will always be mine, and I shall not cease to labor with you to guard the legacy of a wonderful past and the hope of a brilliant future. My final word to you, my beloved Brethren: Never lower the standard of Freemasonry; keep sacred the purity of its principles. My prayer is, and ever shall be, to ask for the entire Frate:nity the guidance lind blessing of Almighty God.

The Journal of Proceedings contained a full account of the laying of the corner-stone of the Asylum or Masonic Home at Utica, May 21st, 1891. The attendance was large,' the enthusiasm high, and the joy unbounded. A very appropriate address of welcornewas delivered to the Brethren by His Honor, the Mayor .of Utica. Able and telling addresses were made on the occasion by Brother Chauncey M. Depew, John "V. Vrooman, Grand Master, and Frank R. Lawrence, Past Grand Master. These addresses were in keeping with the grand occasion and grander enterprise inaugurated. It was shown by one of the speakers, Brother Vrooman, that Masonry in New York had accomplished wonders in fifty years. It has raised more than three and a half millions of money, built and equipped a Temple, paid off an immense debt, purchased a magnificent site for the Masonic Home, and has $226,000 in bank, drawing in~erest. G. L. Ap.-9.


130

Appendix.

[Oct.

THE GRAKD SECRETARY.

Brother Ehlers has shown himself to be master of the situation in connection with the office he has filled so ably for ten years. In making an exhibit of the work done in the Jurisdiction, he shows nearly 5,000 Master Masons made during the year, being a gain of more than 2,000 over the previous year. He gave a brief retrospect of things during the ten years of his service, and. announced that twelve Past Grand Masters had been called from labor during that time, and over 10,000 members had joined the great majority, while more tlian 37,000 had been initiated. 'Ten years ago, a crushing debt of over $600,000, rested like a nightmare upon the Fraternity. Now they are out of debt, with a quarter of a million dollars at interest, and ample funds to meet all current expenses. The Craft in New York leads the country. 'With all embarrassments removed, and new life infused into the Fraternity, there is no telling what will be accomplished in the great and good woork they have enterprised, within the next fifty years. The Journal contains numerous and extended reports, touching various interests, such as insurance on the Hall', Grand Lecturer, Grand Librarian, Grand Historian, Board of Relief, together with numerous other reports, full and complete. The Committee on Grand Master's address, paid him a simple, yet expressive, compliment, by saying that his was "a noble life, well spent." Brother Vrooman was re-elected Grand Master, but declined the honor, preferring to retire to private l.ife. Appropriate tributes were paid to the departed dead, Brothers Roome and Thorne, Past Grand Masters, and memorial pages were set apart in honor of these illustrious Masons. The following just and well deserved tribute was paid to the retiring Grand Master, Brother Vrooman: R~olved, That recognizing the signal ability displayed by M. W. JOHN W. VROO~IAN, . as Grand Master of Masons in the State of New York, the Grand Lodge desires to plaCe on permanent record, its appreciation of his unselfish services~ his unswerving adherence to Masonic precept and practice. To extend to him its gratcIul appreciation of his arduous duties and personal sacrifices, which have raised even higher the already high standard of the Craft.

He said in individual Ufe and official station, by act, word, and deed, "I want to make men and Masonry better." The united voice of the Craft responds, "You have done it!"

The very readable and interesting reports of the Deputies of thirty Districts of the Jurisdiction are found in the Journal.


1891.]

131

Appendix.

The Grand Lodge closed its varied and ,important work on the third day of the session. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report covering 130 pages was presented by Brother Jesse B. Anthony, Past Grand Master. It is in keeping with the 'broad and practical labor路of this excellent man and Mason, heretofore rendered. Brother Anthony is a conservative writer, amiable and fraternal. Numerous extracts are found in the work, showing that he is a good gleaner. Our Missouri J ourp.al for 1890, received the compliment of a three page notice from Brother Anthony. Speaking of the address of Grand Master Brace, he said it was "a comprehensive exhibit of official work," and extracted quite freely from it. He paid the Grand Secretary of Missouri a very pleasant compliment, saying that my work is quite complete, and that in delivering the Grand Lodge Proceedings in two days after the close of the session, I stood at the head of the list. He is kind in his l;eference to my Report on Correspondence, and showed his appreciation thereof by several quotations. I take the liberty of extracting his kind reference to myself and work: We are pleased to note that our work met his approval and favorable consideration. We do not often indulge in personal words, but we must express our admiration for the outspoken utterances of our Brother in the maintenance of right, and of his labors for the elevation and purification of Masonry, his sound judgment, and (if we may be permitted) his fighting q\lalities.

Brother Anthony, like many others who do not know me, has been led to a mistaken conclusion, as evidenced by his reference to my "fighting qualities." "Fighting qualities," indeed. This expression betrays the humor of our New York Brother. Brother Anthony, either by oversight or misprint, did injustice to Missoliri in the statement as to the numerical standing of Grand Lodges. He evidently intended Missouri for Mississippi; the latter has only a little over 8,000 members, while Missouri has nearly 28,000. In his table of statistics, he correctly assigns Missouri the seventh place, but in the rating of 'Grand Lodges, he left our Jurisdiction out, giving Mississippi, Indiana, Iowa and Texas the preference. The review furnished by Brother Anthony contains the fullest and largest report upon Foreign Grand Lodges of any I have yet seen. I am indebted to him for information concerning the liberality of the

..


102

Appendix.

[Oct.

Grand Lodge of England. The amount contributed to their four great charities within one year footed up to $:315,100. These charities are named the "Royal Masonic Institution for Girls," the "Royal Masonic Institution for Boys," "Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution" and "Board of Benevolence." It is stated that, during the past seven years, the aggregate contributions to the first three institutions named, amounted to nearly $2,000,000. Our English Brethren are noted and proverbial for their great Masonic liberality. Brother Anthony furnishes a sketch which contains the names of Jurisdictions which have established Masonic Homes, or are moving in that direction. The list also includes Grand Lodges which have not yet taken steps for the fonnding of Masonic Homes, but have large and increasing funds, either for the purpose of building up such institutions, or for the disbursement of charity to widows and orphans. The number shown thus engaged amounts to thirty. The marvellous progress madc along this line affords one of the most cheering signs of Masonic路 development and attention to the true line of Masonic work that has ever been presented. Only a few years ago, Kentucky stood ahnost alone in the great work of Masonic charity, as represented by these numerous and rapidly multiplying sanctuaries for the needy and helpless. The conclusion drawn from these facts, is simple and natural. Masonry in this country is addressing itself to the true mission and labor for which it exists. With the growth of this spirit of true benevolence, well organized and thoroughly systematized, so that the greatest good may accure to the greatest number, Masonry has been elevated in the estimation of the people of this country, and is growing upon their confidence. With this enlargement of the humane feature and charitable purposes of the Institution, there has been created and amplified another spirit that must go hand in hand with our benevolences. That is the elevation and maintenance of a high moral standard. Charity and morality must ever be the distinguishing attributes of our ancient and honorable Fraternity. These constitute the two Grand pillars in the Temple of Freemasonry. With the same courteous appreciation of, and fraternal esteem for, Brother Anthony, and his superior work, as expressed heretofore, I take leave of him with expressions of highest personal regard. 'VILLIAM SHERER, Brooklyn, Grand Master. EDWARD 1\1. L. EHLERS, New York, Grand Secretary.


189L]

133

Appendix.

NORTH CAROLINA,

1891.

The 104th Annual Session commenced its labors in the City of Raleigh, January 13, 1891, and continued three days. M. W. Brother Samuel H. Smith, Grand Master; Donald W. Bain, Grand Secretary.

.

From the recapitulation furnished by the Grand Secretary, I learn that 184'out of 259 Lodges in that Jurisdiction, were represented. The estimated number of Masons in the Jurisdiction amounted to some 10,000. This includes" a number of resident Masons, not members." We never take account of "resident Masons, not members" of Missouri Lodges. They are resident among us, but not of us. The table shows 484 more added to the Lodges than were lost. The Address of Grand Master Smith was strikingly brief, being but little over two pages in length. The Committee on Address said it was "free from pompous verbosity." Considering its brevity, "pomposity" would not have been in order. . The Grand Master paid tributes to the Brethren who had passed away. Among the number was their Grand Treasurer, Brother William E. Anderson; also the venerable Past Grand Secretary, John J. Christophel's; The only matter of路 business mentioned by the Grand Master, was " the dissemination of the work," which he announced had been successfully carried on. Grand Secretary Bain's report was more lengthy and entered largely

into details. Eight Lodges had been created under dispensation and the charters of nine had been restored. amounting to. $4,673.

The revenues were reported as

Brother Bain mentioned the death of Brother John J. Christophel'S, " Past Grand Secretary, as the only surviving predecessor of the present Grand Secretary." This venerable Brother was called from labor in the eighty-eighth yeaI' of his age. The reports of the Grand' Secretary and Grand路 Treasurer were approved by the proper Committee. A memorial service was held in honor of their departed Brethren, at which appropriate addresses were delivered.


134

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Asylum or Masonic Home in North Carolina, continues to flourish and do a good work. Some confusion in financial conditions had gro,,,,n up incident to a change in the management. The Superintendent, who had served for a number of years resigned, and a new Qfficer was appointed to fill his place. Not long after entering upon his work, he was called from the duties and labors of the position to the rest and rewards of the faithful above. A new Superintendent was chosen and from his report I learn that 264 inmates were in the Home. It was said in a report upon the institution, that there was" neither room nor means to provide for so many." It was ordered that hereafter, not over 200 inmates be permitted to remain in the Home at one time. The institution seems to be doing well, and is backed by the patronage of the State to the amount of $1'0,000, and the Grand Lodge annually appropriates $2,000 to its support. A singular proposition to amend the law of the Grand Lodge was submitted and made a special order of the day during the session. Fortunately, and to the credit of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina, the proposition was defeated. It is as follows: " Any man who has lost one hand or foot, and who is otherwise physically sound, shall be eligible to membership." .

It is not necessary to characterize this proposition. It is so foreign to all ideas of compliance with the requirements of our Ritual, that it assures its own repudiation.

There was a conclusion reached by the Committee on Jurisprudence, and approved by the Grand Lodge, as follows: " That it be declared that a Mason convicted in a Subordinate Lodge, is entitled to no privileges during the pending of the appeal." .

This finding places an expelled or suspended Mason at the mercy of the whims and prejudices of many who belong to Lodges and who would take deUght in depriving a Brother of all his rights and privileges. If a member is suspended or expelled, and takes an appeal, he should have all the rights and privileges of the Institution, until the Grand Lodge passes upon the question. Suppose' such an appellant, whose case has gone to the Grand Lodge, should die during the pendency of the appeal. He would be denied the right of Masonic burial and his family o~ all recognition by the Craft. At the Grand Lodge session following his death, an examination of the appeal might disclose the fact that he had been most unjustly treated, and an outrageous injustice perpetrated. The Brother is dead and buried, and the Grand Lodge cannot resurrect him and right the wrongs he had suf-


1891.J

Appendix.

135

fered, by placing him in good 'Masonic standing. The law is unjust and inimical to every right guaranteed to our members by the laws of Masonry. I was surprised to find such an enactment in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina. CORRESPON DE:-iCE.

Brother E. S. Martin, Chairman of the Committee, presented a report covering seventy-five pages, embracing notices of fifty-seven· Grand Lodge Proceedings. The short space allotted to each Grand I..Iodge .Journal reviewed, is mostly filled up with extracts and attended with but few comments. I learn from the complimentary resolution adopted by the Grand Lodge, that Brother :Martin retires from the Chairmanship of the Committee. HEZEKIAH A. GUDGER, Asheville, Grand :M:aster. DONALD 'V. BAIN, Raleigh, Grand Secretary. .

NORTH DAKOTA, 1891. • This Grand Lodge held its Second Annual Communication in the city of Fargo, commencing July 16th. The body was in session two days. Early ·in August, I received a handsome volume of some two hundred pages, elegantly gotten up and admirably arranged. The Grand Secretary, Brother Thomas .J . Wilder, has shown superior ability, taste and dispatch in the preparation and delivery of his Journal. His tabular statement shows 34 lodges on the roll, with a membership of 1594. The session was presided over by Brother Frank.T. Thompson, Grand Master, who delivered an address covering 16 pages. His exordium . was historical and poetic, containing extended moralizings and reflections. A very beautiful tribute was paid to the fraternal dead. He made spedal mention of the death of 1\1. 'V. Bro. 'George .Ii, Hand, who was Grand Master of the Territory of Dakota four different terms, and an honorary member of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota at the time of his death. The Grand Master said, that in the death of Brother Hand, North Dakota bad lost one of its greatest friends, and in that of Brother Albert Pike, the world lost its most profound Masonic scholar. One Lodge had been created during the year under dispensation, and received a charter at the above named session.


136

Apperrulix.

[Oct.

Grand Ma~ter Thompson reported quite a number of rulings made by him, which were duly considered by the Committee on Jurisprudence. He holds the doctrine that officers may not only dimit, but that . they may resign their different stations. He likewise favors the examination of candidates for advancement at special communications. He recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand. Divers and sundry recommendations were made by him in his very business paper. In speaking of the state of the Craft, he announced that nothing in the way of grievance or appeals had claimed attention, and regarded this condition of affairs as indicating a very happy state of the Craft in that Jurisdiction.

exc~llent

During his term of office, he had made an extended visit west through l\fontana, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah and Nebraska, meeting in his journey a number of eminent members of the Craft. The pleasure of his traveling "in foreign countries" and associating with the Brethren, is expressed at length by the Grand l\1aster. Due acknowledgments were made to the Granl! Secretary for assistance and advice rendered so courteously to the Grand Master. In concluding his Address, he said his aim at all times had been to promote the good and well-being of' the Craft. The Grand Secretary, Brother 'Vilder, furnished a very admirable general business report, as well as a statistical exhibit. He announced that returns had been received from all the Lodges, and that they were full and complete. As' already intimated, the Committee on Appeals and Grievances had nothing to do. The Grand Lecturer presented a report indicating activity and efficient labor during the term. In passing upon the rulings of the Grand Master, the Committee OIl Jurisprudence recommended, and the same was adopted, that Lodges under dispensation should be allowed to receive members by affiliation. Such had not been the law heretofore. This I regard as an admirable provision. . The labors of the session were brought to a close on the second day, the Grand ~Jodge having given attention to all matters of interest. CORRESPONDE~CE.

A report cov~ring 122 pages contains, notices of the proceedings of thirty-two Grand Lodges, a portion of which were 'reviewed by the Grand Secretary, Brother Wilder, and some by Frank J. Thompson.


1891.J

Appendix.

137 .

In his review of Missouri, Brother Wilder critieises the decision of Grand ~laster Brace, who declared two Entered Apprentices, made in De.Witt Lodge, not entitled to recognition until formally healed. Brother \Vilder paid passing attention to our 'Grand Lodge affairs, mentioned with favor our Masonic Home, and smiled a smile at the action taken in the suspension of two 路Worshipful 1\1 asters. He slfys one was suspended for being a drunkard, the other for assisting to Inake drunkards. Quoting from the report of the Committee, he says he cannot disapprove the punishment meted out to these parties. He criticises my views respecting the statement contained in my last a party who had threatened to black-ball another in my presence for political reasons. Brother 'Wilder will please keep down tile brakes and not judge the actions Qf Missouri Masons from his standpoint, as we have a law in Missouri governing such questio'ns. ~eport concerning

I do not understand the meaning of Brother \Vilder when he says I take" every occasion to open batteries on his former reporter." I was not aware that any Report on Correspondence had ever been made to his Grand Lodge. The first annual Communication of North Dakota was held in 1890. No Report on Correspondence was presented at that session. Hence, no "batteries" were opened on a "former reporter," because there was none to fire upon. My review of the Proceedings of his Grand Lodge for 1890 contained no reference to Brother \Vilder, or any report made on Correspondence, for the reason that there was none. Said review was courteous and fraternal, even to the extent of commending one" Thompson" who presented a report preventing the affiliation of saloon-keepers. Brother \Vilder said in speaking of me: "This Grand Secretary takes every occasion to open his batteries on our former reporter." From what follo",'s it is ,plain that he referred to one "Thompsoil" whose report to aaother 路Grand Lodge evoked the condemnation of the Body as well as the candid reprehensions of various writers on Correspondence. Other" batteries" than mine were opened on said "former reporter," and his vaporings were justly characterized and criticised. The only fear I entertain respeeting the "aforesaid Thompson" is that he may "die young," and not be spared to "enlighten the world" with his genius and brilliancy. Jc)HN F. SELBY, Hillsboro,Grand Master. THOS. J. \VILDER, Casselton, Grand Seeretal'y.


138

[Oct.

Appendix. NOVA SCOTIA,

1890路

The Twenty-fifth Annual Communication was opened in the City of Halifax, June 11, 1890, with Rev. David C. Moore, Grand Master, and Brother 'Vm. Ross, Grand Secretary. The Journal contains records of two special meetings held for dedication purposes. Forty-seven Lodges were represented at the annual meeting, and twenty-three Grand Lodges. Following the usual custom, the Grand Lodge repaired to church and participated in divine service where (( an eloquent and instructive sermon" was delivered by some one on the text, (( Love the Brotherhood." The Journal shows a membership amounting to 2,839 in sixty-four Lodges. An Addi'ess covering twenty pages was presented by Brother Moore. It is a business document, showing much attention to official duty reported in the form of a diary. He announced the loss sustained by the Craft in the death of two prominent Masons of the Jurisdiction, viz., Brothers A. W. Mackinlay and James Poyntz. The Address does not furnish anything claiming notice in this review, as every matter was of local application and without general interest. This is true of the transactions of the Body. The Grand Lodges of Victoria and New South Wales were duly rec路ognized. After twentyone years services in the Grand Lodge, two of which were spent in the office of Grand Ma:;;ter, Brother Moore retired with expressions of gratitude from his Brethren, and was by unanimous vote, "placed at the head of the list of Grand Chaplains." CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother David Neish prepared and submitted a large review of Grand Lodgc' Proceedings, embracing notices of fifty-one Journals, the report covering 223 pages. Much lahor was expended by the Committee in preparing the work, as is sho'''n by the very extensive extracts made from Proceedings examined. The review is almost wholly composed of excerpts, there being but very little thought expressed by our co-laborer in the ficld of correspondencc. He seems familiar with the scissors. He gave our Journal of 1889 the benefit and compliment of ten pages of his space, making large drafts on the WOrk of Grand Master Wood. He copied two cases passed upon by our Committee on Appeals, as rendered by Past Grand Master, Brother Givan. He was very kind to this writer and drew largely upon my business report, comments oli the (( State of the Craft" and review on Correspondence. For this courtesy he is entitled, to my thanks, which are hereby tendered. The Grand Secretary says that" Lieutenant Colonel Charles J. :i\1acDonald " of Halifax was chosen Grand Master. William Ross, uf the same city, was re-elected Grand Secretary.


1891.]

Appendix.

OHIO,

139

1890.

The examination of the Journal of Ohio affords real pleasure. The matter of the Proceedings is not only interesting, but the make up of the Journal is admirable. The attractIVe style of typography renders the work particularly pleasing to the eye, and the whole is eminently creditable to the Grand Secretary. The work contains 460 pages, every part of which is in clear, open type, making the matter most agreeable to the reader. The Eighty-first Annual Communication was held at Sandusky, commencing October 15, 1890. M. W. Brother Leander Burdick was Grand Master, and Brother J. H. Bromwell, Grand Secretary.

'-,

The record says that "an eloquent and impressive address of welcome was delivered by Brother .Merrill in behalf of the Fraternity and citizens of Sandusky." The same was ~eplied to in "an appropriate manner by the Grand Master." The opening was followed by the introduction of a number of Masonic dignitaries. The attention of the Grand Lodge was called to the fact that the Grand Lodge of Calif'ornia was in session at the same time. On motion, the Grand Secretary was authorized to send a telegram to the California Body, tendering the greetings of Ohio. This was done, and a cordial response received from the Grand Secretary, Brother Abell, returning "fraternal greetings."

I find on the roll of the Grand Lodge of Ohio 488 chartered Lodges, 462 of which were represented. The membership is reported at 34,660, showing a gain of 364. A large number of Past Grand Officers were present, with Representatives of thirty-two Grand Lodges. Missouri's Representative was present in the person of Brother Charles Stroud. Ohio has a pay roll. over $10,000.

I notice that there ,vas paid out on this account ADDRESS.

Grand Master Burdick presented an unusually lengthy report of his offiCial doings for the term, amounting to forty-six pages. His opening was bright and cheery, containing congratulations "upon the general prosperity of the Craft.'~ He announced that "peace and harmony prevailed in all parts of the State." Under the head of "Necrology," he mentioned quite a number of deceased members in the ranks of the Brotherhoodâ&#x20AC;˘

.,


140

Appendix.

[Oct.

Speaking of fraternal relations, he said: "It is with sincere gratification on my part that I am able to report that" no unpleasant correspondence or event has occurred during the past year to strain in any way our fraternal relation with our sister Grand IJodges." Respecting the matter of difference between his Grand Lodge and that of Tennessse, he said the unpleasant relations still remain unreconciled. He expressed regret that the Grand Lodge of Tennessee should have been led into a misunderstanding of the facts in the case. Brother Burdick said that it "is not the duty or even the part of the Grand Lodge. of Ohio to make any concessions, until the Grand Lodge of Tennessee 'shall see proper to recall the obnoxious language of its Grand l\:Iaster." The utterances of Brother Burdick on this unfortunate misunderstanding between sister Grand Lodges were conservative and well tempered. MASOKIC HOlliE.

The Grand Master referred to this interest with much earnestness and feeling. The Grand Lodge having the previous year taken steps towards the permanent organization of such an institution, the Grand Master had given his attention to the matter and speaks of the enterprise in very vigorous terms. From his well-timed and noble utterances on this subject I desire to appr~priate the following: If the grcat army of thoughtf\1l, prudent, considerate and charitably inclined l\Iasons of Ohio could be made to realize how easily this lasting monument to the Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons can be erected, the work would go forward with such energy and zeal that the necessary funds would be provided without any apparent loss or labor on the part of any single individual.

Masons of Ohio, think of this; the saving, or payment of one cent per day by each Mason in Ohio for the period of one year will accomplish the desired end. Three dollars and sixty-five cents from each Mason holding membership in our Lodges will produce more than one hundred thousand dollars. I venture the proud assertion that there is not a true Mason within this Grand Jurisdiction who would not willingly, yea gladly, contribute this small sum toward erecting a .. Home" that would provide shelter, food and raiment for those who are worthy and require the protecting care of fin institution bound by an indissoluble chain to aid and assist each other, especially when in adversity or need.

Many who arc now in the enjoyment of health and prosperity may live to see adver¡ sity, sickness and want; and the day may come when those dependent up-on us, those most dear to us on account of the relationship existing, may dcsIre to avaIl themselves of the home which we are now proposing to erect for them. Officers und members of the Subordinate Lodges of Ohio, the success of this great Masonic work rests with you. It can and will be accomplished. Every dollar that you place in this fund to establish a permanent monument to the liberality of Ohio Masons will stand forth as a bright .star to guide you in your declining years, and to make you feel proud of the fact that you were a contributor to so worthy an enterprise. I As the Grand Master of thirty-five thousand Masons in Ohio, let me earnestly urge the officers of Lodges to interest themselves in the accomplishment of this grand undertaking. I ' â&#x20AC;˘ .


1891.J

Appendix.

141

The Grand Master reported the creation of two Lodges under dispensation. His Address contains much matter to which he had given attention, embracing appointments made, Lodges constituted, dispensations granted, corner-stones laid, dedications performed and official visits enjoyed. He announced the suspension of the Masters of two Lodges, for cause. There is one case in addition to the foregoing, worthy of passing notice. Some Brother had written 路::t.n iII-timed article in a secular newspaper, which contained what the Grand .Master classed, "abuse of the vilest character against the Grand Lodge and its officers." The Grand ::\1aster investigated the matter by correspondence with the Master of the Lodge, and found out who the author of the libelous article was. It turns out that he was a member of the Cerneau concern, and that his fellow members were either members or sympathizers with the same organization. Charges were preferred against the writer of this attack, the case ordered tried, the offender pleaded guilty, and, on motion of a member, the accusation was dismissed. The Grand Master interposed and set aside the action of the Lodge, requiring the case to be taken up and proceeded with according to law. The accused was again tried, and, in determining the grade of punishment, the Lodge refused to expel or suspend, but voted a reprimand. The Grand Master thought this action of the Lodge was short of its duty and referred the case to the Grand Lodge. During the session the matter was路 reported upon by a committee, which declared the act of reprimand insufficient and set it aside, suspending the life of the Lodge, until a full investigation can be made by'the Grand Master, a,uthorizing him, if deemed proper, to arrest the charter. This is a result and the fruit of the contest between Cerneauism and the other branch of High Riteism. The Grand Master reported a number of rulings. His interpreta~ tions of the law are clear, and his findings accurately and clearly presented. They were approved by the Committee on .l\fasonic Jurisprudence. I find one of his rulings to be as follows, in reply to questions by the Grand Secretary: 18t. A Brother who has been a member of the Lod~e for a number of years has路 engaged in the business of retailing liquors in a saloon-IS he amenable to disciplinc?' 2d. In case he should dimit and remain unaffiliated, is he amenable?

A11.<u;er 1st. Public sentiment as well as statute law in regard to that subject has changcd materially during the past twenty years. It is now held that the traffic in intoxicating liquors for purposes ot.her than medicinal or mechanical uses is it Masonic offense. The construction heret.ofore given to l\fasonic law prevents any Lodge from initiating or admitting to membership a saloon-keeper, or a part.y who traffics in intoxicating liquors. Held, therefore, that a member of a Lodge who traffics in intoxicating liquors, to bc drunk where sold, is subject to the charge of unmasonic conduct. 2d. Yes.


142

Appendix.

[Oct.

The above rulings were approved by the Grand Lodge and place the Ohio Masons in line with l\fissouri. Thus another grand and representati ve body of the Craft has said, in effect, what we declared some years since, "Quit ,the business or quit Masonry." Missouri says to Ohio, ~'All hail." SIDE DEGREES.

The attention of the Grand Master was called to the existence of an institution known as the "Owls." The Grand Lodge of Ohio has a rule forbidding any Brother to confer the so-called "side degrees." Under this head it seems that the Order of Eastern Star was classed. Concerning the "Owls," and the Order of Mystic Shrine, the Grand Master made the following statements: While I have no knowledge that we have the" Order of Owls" in Ohio, I am credibly informed that the Order of the" :Mystie Shrine" does exist in Ohio, that the Order does make membership in a :Masonic Body a prerequisite, and, in one instance, at least, does occupy apartments in a Masonic Temple that has been dedicated to Masonry by this Grand Lodge. Now, my Brethren, I submit the proposition to vou: Are we consistent in this matter? Docs not the resolution adopted by this Grand Lodge as to Side Degrees apply as well to the Mystic Shrine, or the Owls (providing it is true that membership in a Masonic Body is a prerequisite), as it does to the Order of the Eastern Star? Here is an institution fostered and recognized by several Grand Longef> with whom we are in fraternal correspondence; an Order whose membership is composed of mothers. wives, sisters and daughters of Masons, whose presence aud social influence would be beneficial at aiI times-they are proscribed, while another whose offices are filled by a Sapient Screecher, Sapient Bag-holder, Lord High Executioner, Tooter, Hooter, Blinker, etc., is permitted to attach itself to the Masonic Body.

The above was well put and pertinent. The "Owls" and "Shriners" have about as much claim to Masonic c~nsideration as the much puffed concern of Various 'Wilson and Burt & Co., with their one hundred and ninety-six degree show. The Committee on Jurisprudence reported upon the "Owlish" question and incidental societies, ,and recommended a change in one feature of their law which would seem to justify the recognition of the Eastern Star Order, but the proposed amendment was objected to and went over to the next annual session. Attention was called by the Grand Master tcrthe subject of printed ritual, or a " cipher key" to the same. A circular had been issued and distributed throughout the State in the interest of the -key. He was enabled to run the thing down and locate it in a certain city, and found that some 500 copies had been printed and distributed. The Committee on Jurisprudence, treating this part of the Grand Master's Address, said that the evidence ,vas clear that the party charged had participated in the production and distribution of the so-called" Key to the

.


1891.]

Appendix.

1

14 3

Ritual." The law of that Grand Lodge for thirty years, has been positive and emphatic against such abuse or misuse of the ritual. The action of the author of the" Key" was regarded as a violation of the law. The whole matter was referred to the Grand Master for settlement. Brother Burdick announced that the litigation commenced by the Cerneaus, "still remains undetermined by the courts." The Grand Master said the correspondence between the Lodges and the office of the Grand Master du~ingthe year, had been miusually large. Brother Burdick is eminently sound and conservative on the question of prerogatives, stating it as his opinion that the principal prerogative of a Grand Master is to determine and comply with the laws of his Grand Lodge. That he may be fully understood and properly appreciated, I make the following extract from his admirable state-' ment of the subject: Numerous requests have been made for permission to receive applications for degrees wit.hout the necessary year's residence; to ballot for and confer degrees wit.hout waiting the prescribed time; or to perform some act not provided for by the Constitution, By-laws, or Code of this Grand Lodge. Dispensations for all Sllch purposes have been courteollsly but firmly refused. While I am a firm believer in the "prerogatives of Grand Masters," I am of the opinion that the principal prerogative possessed by a Grand Master is t.o correctly determine and comply with the laws, rules and regulations governing within the Grand Jurisdiction over WhICh he may have the honor to preside.

Brother Burdick closed his second term with grateful expressions to the Officers and Brethren of the Grand Lodge for honors conferred and assistance rendered. He has certainly performed ably and well the duties of Orand Master. The Grand Lodge gave expression to its appreciation of his services by ordering printed in the Proceedings of the session, an engraved portrait of the retiring Grand Master. The picture is a very fine one, and presents the "shadow" of a路 handsome and intelligent official. In addition, the usual Past Grand l\faster's jewel was ordered and is to be presented to him. GHAKD SECRETARY.

A lengthy and very able business paper emanated from the office of the Grand Secretary, Brother J. II. Bromwell. r notice in the business transactions of the Body, that his salary was raised from $1,000 per year to $1,500. It is not the province of this writer to criticise the Grand Lodge .of Ohio, but I will venture the suggestion that an efficient officer, such as Brother Bromwell proves himself to be, deserves larger compensation than his Brethren have accorded him.

rr


144

Appendix.

路.[Oct.

It wtmld be a pleasure to me to he able to say what I find in the Proceedings, as comin~ from Brother Brolmvell. The record shows" out of 486 returns, not more than fifteen or twenty can be seriously:criticised for lack of neatness or accuracy." The Committee on Retm'ns of Lodges paid Brother Bromwell a deserved compliment and said, "that the best interests of Masonry have been industriously and faithfully protected and enforced by your Grand Secretary, to facilitate the business of the Grand Lodge."

A Committee on Masonic History reported that steps had been taken for the preparation of a history o.f Masonry in Ohio. It was further recommended that a Committee be appointed to be known as the "Committee on History," to have charge of said work. Brother S. Stacker 1Nilliams, P. G. M., was made Chairman of that Committee. I know of none there or elsewhere who will more y,ealously address himself to this important undertaking. The large amount of business claiming attention, was carefully attended to, and the Grand Lodge closed its labors on the second day. CORRESPOKDENCE.

Brother W. :VI. Cunningham, P. G. 1\'[" "for the Committee," presented a review of fifty-seven Grand Lodge Proceedings, covering over 200 pages. The report, for the most part, is a compilation, being made up of extracts. Occasionally he enlarged upon some subject, especially 路where the Cerneau controversy claimed his attention. He paid his respects to Brother Robbins, of Illinois,and to the Tennessee Brethren, touching ~lpon the break in the fraternal relations between the t,,,o Gr,and Lodges. Brother Cunningham is very pronounced in his expression of opposition to profanity by Masons. Our Missouri Proceedings for H~8n, received due attention, six pages being devoted to the work of review by that Committee. References to, and quotations from, the Address of the Grand Master, Brother J. P. ,Vood, constitute part of the fraternal notke of our .T ournal. Courteous . mention was made of my work as Grand Secretary, and of our Home and its dedication. Four pages of his review are filled with extra~ts from, and comments upon, my Report on Correspondence. He, like some other writers, will insist that r "defend Cerneauism," regardless of the rights of others. If Brother Cunningham, 01' any other writer, will point out a single expression in all my reviews, that defends CerneauisIll, or favors it .in the least degree, I make ample apology,

,,,ill


路1891.J

Appendix.

145

and as publicly correct my error, as I have charged High Riteism with being a disturbing factor in the great Brotherhood of Masons in this' country. I have stoutly and persistently proclaimed and maintained my non-adherence to any form of Scottish Riteism. I am not only non-allegiant to any form of Scottish Rite Masonry, but oppose, unqualifiedly, the institution. As to the spurious character or legitimacy of any of the various factions, I am not concerned. This question should be settled by the \varring claili1ants of these different branches. As to the contest between Tennessee and Ohio, each party is of age and competent to speak for itself. From the representations made by Grand Mastcr Ingersoll, of Tcnncssce, I felt justified in giving expres~ sion to my opinions of Ohio methods. I am not prepared to say that Brother Ingersoll falsified facts in his statement. That he may have been mistaken in the vie".'s he expressed concerning the attitude of Ohio, I am now prepared to admit. Brother Cunningham seems to have the proof that Brother Ingersoll belonged to the Scotch Rite Order and was a high official in that branch of so-called Masonry in Tennessee, as planted there by the Cerneau propagandists. That being true, his declaration that he had no connection or relation with either branch of the Scotti~h Rite factions, places him at a disadvantage, morally and Masonically, in ~this controversy. He must explain the disparity and account for the contradiction in any way that may suit himself. Brother Cunningham is an able reviewer and a good writer. I appreciate his ability, worth and high character; and I am not wanting in fraternal appreciation of. the charader and eminent standing of the Grand Lodge he so ably represents. LEVI C. GOODALE, Cincinnati, was elected Grand Master. J. H. BROl\fWELL, Cincinnati, re-elected Grand Secretary.

OREGON,

1890.

'拢his Grand l.odge commenced the labors of its Fortieth Annual Communication in the city of Portland, on the 11th day of June. Brother Christopher Taylor, Grand Master; Brother Stephen H. Chadwick, Grand Secretary. In the enrollment I notice the presence of eleven Past Grand Masters, with other Grand Officers, and Representatives of thirty-eight Grand Lodges. There are eighty-two Lodges on the roll, all of which were represented, except six. The memberspip of the Jurisdiction was reported at 3,364. G. L. Al'.-lO.


146

Appendix.

[Oct:

ADDRESS.

Brother Taylor furnished quite a lengthy report of official matters claiming his attention as Grand Master. He opened in a very pleasing manner, and stated that the Craft in that Jurisdiction had increased in numbers and material prosperity. Harmony and the best of feeling prevailed among the Brethren all. over the Jurisdiction. Peace existed with all fore~gn Jurisdictions, and not a case of grievance was on file. He reported officially the death of Brother 路William M. Fowler, P. G. :M., who had served the Craft as its Grand l\faster in 1862. The prominent dead of other Jurisdictions ,,,ere mentioned in the Address. Quite a variety of subjects of local bearing were treated by him officially. Twenty-three decisions had been rendered and were reported to the Grand Lodge. These were all approved, excepting three. lIe deeided that a Master-elect must take the Past Master's degree in a convention of Past :Masters. This ruling was slightly corrected by the Committee, and, as amended, it does not differ materially from the original decision. The other ruling was over-ruled by the Committee. He decided "that a saloon-keeper or liquor-seller cannot be a contributing member of any Lodge, nor can he visit Lodges." This decision was held to be impractical, on the gronnd that the party named could not be deprived of Masonic privileges without due process of law. One other ruling was slightly doctored by the Committee. Taking the entire list of rulings rendered by the Grand Master, I am impressed ,,,ith the strong, vigorous' and practical trea~ment of the questions submitted. He was certainly master of the various points submitted to his . consideration. Two Lodges had been created by dispensation and received路 their charters during the session. Quite a number of special dispensations were reported and quite a number of applications had been refused. The Grand Lodge of Oregon, at its last session, finding its funds exhausted and an existing deficiency, had levied a special tax upon the members of the Fraternity of seventy cents per head. This subject was brought up and considered at considerable length in the business transactions of the Grand Lodge. The question of receiving dne~ from non-affiliated Masons claimed consideration and was passed upon by the Grand T.. odge. Grand Secretary Chadwick had refused to receive dues from the non-affiliates, holding that such action would not confer membership, nor be an evidence of good Masonic standing on the part of the Brother paying such dues. The Grand Master ,mentioned this


1891.J

Appendix.

147

action in his report, and referred the matter to the Committee on Jurisprudence, which approved the action of the Grand Secretary. The Grand Master 1,vound up his administration with a very pleasing conclusion. In the course of the session a conulJ.ittee reported upon the subject submitted at the last session, instructing them to purchase suitable ground in the city of Portland for a Masonic Temple. Such site had been bought at the cost of $25,000. The committee, in reporting upon this matter, announced tha~ a suitable Temple could not be erected at a less cost than probably $200,000. In view of the existing conditions, whether it were advisable to proceed with the erection of the building or not, the committee being divided in its opinion, submitted no recommendation. The Grand Lodge approved of the purchase of the ground, but nothing else was done in the direction of building .the proposed Temple. From the communications furnished in connection with this matter, it is the opinion of this writer that the Brethren of Oregon had better steer clear of that dangerous undertaking that is most likely to prove a very costly elephant on their hands. Grand Secretary Chadwick presented a very superior business report, both as to general matters and statistical details. He announced that their history is one of continual prosperity. No appeals for the consideration of the Grand Lodge had been received., Truly the Fraterity in Oregon must be at peace among themselves, and realize how good and how pleasant it is for Brethren to dwell t<?gether in unity. The Grand Lodge voted $300 of its funds to the Masonic Board of Relief of the city of Portland. The Grand Lodges of North Dakota and Victoria were fQrmally recognized. I find an oration of very decided merit in the Journal, covering nine pages, delivered by their Grand Orator, Brother F. A. Moore. The Body was in session for three days, and dispatched a large amount of business. Further notice need 'not be taken of their transactions, as they were mostly local. The Journal is graced by the pictures of Past Grand Masters Ainsworth, Stark and Taylor, accompanied by a brief and interesting historical sketch of each of these distingui.shed Brethren.


148

Append'ix.

[Oct.

CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of some 200 pages was furnished by the Chairman of the Committee, Brother S. F. Chadwick, in which he reviews the Proceedings of fifty-four Grand Lodges. My experience is the same as last year; no Proceedings from Oregon' for revie",. for the present year, though the Grand Lodge meets in June. Brother Chadwick says if I had delayed a little longer in printing my Journal "Oregon would have received her place in the make-up." It is but just to say in reply that if the Oregon Journal had been received a little sooner I would not have been called upon to delay a little longer. lVly work on correspondence is completed in advance of our session, as well as all other matters possible. To delay my report or business matters for anything would place me in the list of tardy officials, whose Proceedings reach me at dates quite remote from the close of their Grand Lodge sessions. Brother Chadwick treated our Journal for 1889 \vith great consideration, awarding us nine pages in his review. The administration of Grand Master ""Yood was complimented very highly and quoted from extensively. Speaking of the relationship existing bctwcen Missouri and Oregon r Brother Chadwick says: Now, right here we beg to notify Brother Vinctl there is a daughter in Oregon-a half sister, at least, to Iowa. Multanomah, No.1, of Ol'~~gon City, Oregon. received its charter from the Grand Lodge of l"lhsouri, a." Multanomah, No. 84, under which the first Lodge of Masons on the Pacific Coast convened at Oregon City, Oregon Territory, the 11th day of September, 1848. Multanomab, No. 1)4, wa.~ one of the three Lodges that formed tbe Grand Lodge of Oregon. .

Our Home, and its dedication, being mcntioned with such favor, justifies me in appropriating thc following from the courteolls review of Brother Chadwick: Right. on the heels of the report of the dedication of the Home comes the statement, in the report of Brother Vincil, that, from the returns, the Masonic Fraternity ha.c; never' been in a more prosperous conrlition than at present. Never before has there been the same promptness exhibited in tbe payment of the dues to the Grand Lodge: The increase of membership amounts to 3UU. The Brethren arc loyal to Symbolic Masonry and have not become lIlfatuated with a desire to follow after strange gods and give prominence to modern .• Riteism." Indeed, our blessed old Missouri does enjoy -a •• hapf.Y freedom from all complications and rlisturbances." Brother Vinci! is at the whee, and as long as this is the case, the good uld Craft will continue to run on an even keel. .

There is one sentence in his report that is unsustained by the facts, and I eannot understand why he should have written it. Speaking of our finances, he said: "The financial eondition is strong, a large surplus in the treasury, but not enougl~ to make an app:opriation for the.


1891.J

,

Appendix.

149

Masonic Home this year." I ascribe this statement to an oversight on the part of my good Brother Chadwick, and must request him to examine the Proceedings of 1889, at page 53, wher~ he will discover that a recommendation was submitted, proposing the usual appropriation of $5,000 for the Masonic Home. On page 51 of the same Journal he will find that tile report was adopted by the Grand Lodge. I may add, by way of confirmation, that said SUIll of $5,000 was paid oyer to the Home during the term following. Brother Chadwick did me the-honor to say that my views on the" Cerneau controversy harmonize with his opinions. There is so much of interest in the splendid re'port of Brother Chadwick that I desire to quote that I anl forced to abandon all. I hope, by delaying "a little longer," to receive his Journal of 1891 in time for, at least, a brief notice. JAMES F. ROBINSON, Eugene, Grand Master. STEPHEN F. CHAD"\VICK, Portland,.G. S. and Com. on Cor.

PENNSYLVANIA, 1890. Upon .opening the Journal of this Grand Lodge, the reader is greeted with a superb engraving of that vetel;an worker, able scholar and profound thinker, Brother Richard Vaux. The Journal furnishes路 reports on various communications held during the year. They ,,,ere special, emergent, quarterly and annual. The June Quarterly Communication was presided over by Brother .McCalla, Grand Master. At this session, the Egyptian :Masonic Rite of Memphis was declared to be a clandestine body. An edict was ordered, requiring all Brethren of Free and Accepted Masons to sever their connection therewith, and renounce allegiance thereto, within ninety days. 'The September Quarterly Communication was presided over by the Deputy Grand Master, J. Simpson Africa. One hundred and five. Lodges were represented. Brother :McCalla, the Grand :Master, being absent (in Europe), sent a cablegram to the Grand Lodge, tendering his cordial greetings. He said that for the second time in 159 years, a Grand Master of Pennsylvania visited the mother Grand Lodge of England, and was warmly greeted.


150

Appendix.

[Oct.

At the December Quarterly Session, Brother Clifford P. McCalla, Grand Master, was present and presided; Brother Michael Nesbit, Grand Secretary. Two hundred and ninety-six Lorlges were represented. At this session the Grand Ofllcers were elected, but not installed, until the Annual Session on the 27th of December. The Lodges in Pennsylvania are not named, but go by numbers. The /Grand Secretary said that the last report showed 391 Lodges on the roll, with a membership of over 40,000, indicating a gain of more than 1,300. At this session, reports on various interests were made~ The Grand Lodge Charity Fund, amounting to $73,000, is still intact, the interest arising therefrom being used for relief. The Girard bequest was reported at $62,200. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, handles l_arge m~)lleyed interests. The A.nnual Session convened in the Masonic Temple inPhiladelphia, December 27., 1890, the Grand Master and Grand Secretary; with other Grand Officers, being in attendance. Sixty Lodges were represented. The Grand Tre~surer, Brother路 Thomas R. Patton, made a second donation of $25,000, for charitable purposes. This makes a complete endowment of $50,000, well secured, the interest arising from which is to be applied to the relief of worthy poor, distressed l\1asons and their families. The Grand Lodge, on motion of Brother J. Simpson Africa, adopted very complimentary .resolutions, and ordered the same to be suitably engrossed and presented to Brother. Patton.. Various other interests were reported upon during the session, when the Annual Address was presented by the Grand Master. This is the longest document of its kind on record, amounting to 63 pages. 'Weq might the record. state that the "Address was listened to with deep interest by the Brethren." After acknowledgments to God for His blessings bestowed upon them during the year, the Grand Master treated of the stability of Masonry in very eloquent terms. He said, "its corner-stone is God's Word, its spiritual temple, a House not made with hands, and the great source of its light, the Grand Architect of the Universe."


1891.J

Appendix.

151

'With such vie'ws held by the Craft and the great leaders of its thought, unbelief can find no place in our Brotherhood. Freemasonry and Atheism are such opposites as to admit of no unity between them in our great Institution. He mentioned the relation of their Grand Lodge with other J urisdictions as being very fraternal. His comments upon the landmarks of Masonry, the necessity of living up to them, were very pertinent. His deliverances against modern innovations were positive and distinct.. I fully concur in his views respecting the duties of Committees of Inquiry. He said such inquiry should be sifting and thorough. I select one paragraph from his admirable utterances touching this point. The beautiful system of Morality, which Freemas'onry veils in allegory and illustrates by symbol, can only be successfully upheld by moral men. The profane should be left among the profane. The immoral should be classed with them, not admitted among us. 1'he dishone~t should be limited to prey upon the world, and not upon the "sons of li~ht," disguised as one of them. In vain do we watch the outer door, if the Committees of Inquiry in whom we so largely trust, through either ignorance or carelessness fail to thoroughly perform the duty intrusted to them of ascertaining whether the applicant for Freemasonry is, or is not, positively qualified to have. the prayer of his petition granted. PROFICIENCY.

The following extract from the Address was most timely: Proficiency before advancement, is a necessity in order to do full justice to both' parties, the Fraternity and the candida'te. The Grand Master, having issued a circular letter to the Lodges in that Jurisdiction, requiring proficiency on the part of candidates to be sho\vn by examination in the Lodges, will result in great improvement in the work of Pennsylvania Masonry. It is not for me to say how the lack of this proficiency has marked the membership of their lodges as shown by examinations in sister lodges, when Pennsylvania Masons propose to visit. Here follow the remarks of the Grand Master: It is equally an injustice to the Craft and to the individual Brother to advance him

Qefore he has mastered the degree previously conferred .upon him, and henceforth this regulation will be strictly enforced. If a candidate be not taught Freemasonry as he proceeds, in the majority of cases he will never be taught it at fill. It requires more time to examine candidates in open Lodge, but it is time well employed, and everr Brother is entitled to receive the instruction, thus previously given, to render him proficient.

Reference has already been' made in the foregoing part of this review, to the condemnation of the "Egyptian Masonic Rite of Memphis" by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. Grand Master McCalla mentioned this subjeet in his Address, and assigped three reasons why said Rite could not be recognized, but is a clandestine body.


152

Appendix.

[Oct.

The first reason is, that "its so-called Grand .Master assumed the right to make Masons at sight:" That it "unlawfully assumed in its title to be Masonic;" and "illegally addressed, to all Free an.d Accepted Masons, ofl1cial certificates issued to its members." After this deliverance and the decree of the Grand Lodge, the aforesaid Rite of "iVlemphis will be at a discount in Pennsylvania. The Grand Master furnished a lengthy diary of his official visits, which occupies a large portion of his Address. He mentioned with much pleasure, his recent visit to Europe, and spoke of the warm welcome received from the Fraternity in England and Scotland. The cordial treatment accorded him, evidenced more clearly, than ever, the universalityof the growth and strength of the mystic tie which binds the whole Masonic family in one great Brotherhood. His visit to the Grand Lodge of England was made an interesting. portion of his very readable Address. After reciting his travels and visits among the Craft abroad, he closed this branch of the excellent paper submitted, with the following thoughts on :Masonic unity: The absolute oneness of the Craft is a glorious thought, which no one fully comprehemls until he has traveled through numerous Masonic jurisdictions. Neither boundaries of States 1I0r vast oceans separate the Masonic Fratemity. "Everywhere it is one, - in symbolie.language, in Landmarks, llnn in the cordial welcome accorded to the Brother :;\fason.. There is no universal chnrch. no universal body politic, but there i"S a universal.Fraternity, that of Freemasonry, and every Brother, who is a worthy member, may feel proud of it.

Mention was made qf the distribution of Masonic relief to the sufferers by the J ohnstownfiood. Some $50,000 had been received and disbursed so satisfactorily that not a dollar of the sum had been bestowed upon anyone unworthy of the charity. He rendered ~nd reported a number of official rulings, which seem to be in full accord with the standards of Masonic Jurisprudence in Pennsylvania. He properly held, that an examination of candidates for advancement, must be made -in open Lodge, and that said proficiency must be satisfactory, thorough and complete. His deliverance was timely against the use of any writing, book or which sets forth Or contains the Ritual of :F'reemasonry.

~ey,

The electioneering for Masonic office was pronounced unmasonic. This rule evidently applies to office seeking in Subordinate Lodges, as well as the Grand Lodge. He said that a Lodge could not assess its members upon the death of one of their number, to pay a funeral benefit.


,1891.J

Appendix.

153

Here is a decision that fully maintains the Pennsylvania doctrine of physical perfection. "A Brother, who has lost the greater part of the thumb of his right hand, is ineligible to be installed Junior 'Varden of a Lodge." He decided that black cubes are not lawful Maso,nic black balls and cannot be used as such in a Lodge. Black balls, like white balls, must be round. The Masonic Home of that Jurisdiction was mentioned with much favor. The Home now has twenty-six inmates, all worthy Master Masons. The property is free of debt, and amounts to some $40,000, with $15,000 securely invested. The Home was earnestly commended to the favor and support of the Fraternity throughout the Jurisdiction. The Grand l\faster announceci, that all the members of the clandestine Cerneau Rite, belonging to Lodges in Pennsylvania, had voluntarily withdrawn therefrom, except three. One Lodge had failed to enforce the edict of the Grand Lodge against Cerneauites belonging to it, in consequence of which, the Grand Master arrested its charter. He closed his reference to this subject by saying, '''The Cerneau Rite is as dead as the Memphis R.itc, in Pennsylvania." He stated, that the three Grand T.. odge Charity Funds, amounting in all to over $160,000, were in a healthy and prosperous condition, and were continually and liberally dispensing Masonic charity to worthy, distressed Master Masons and to the needy widows and orphans of deceased Brethren. Mention was made of the additional donation of their Grand Treasurer, Brother Thomas R. Patton, of $25,000, to the fund already given by him for charitable purposes. Brother McCalla closed his lengthy and able Address in very beautiful and eloquent language, as follows: Ended arc my official labors; endea your too favorable approval of them; and gratefully I return to you the Grand Master's Jewel alia Gavel, which you first intrusted to my keeping on St. .fohn's Day, 1888. During both of my official terms I have been in-debted to you, far more than I can express, for ceaseless confidence, support, and esteem. Your fraternal good-will will always be treasured in my memory. We have made Masonic history together. 'Ve have seen the Craft prosper in all portions of the Jurisdiction. The Lodges have steadily and healthfully increased, both in number and in membership. Masonic light has been more and more widely diffused. Harmony prevails. Masonry is exemplified in action a..<; well as taught by symbol and allegory. Charity is superabounding. From the East of every Lodge light streams. The Grand Architect of the Universe has prospered us in all of our undertakings. So long as He smiles upon us from the East of the Lodge above. aU will be well. He is our Sun and our Shield. Our trust is in Him. As a Craft we have faith in God, hope in immortality, and charity for thc Brcthrcn and for all men. Under these circumstances, with success


154

Appertdix.

[Oct.

in our vocation as Freemasons, with a good conscience towards the Grand Architect, our Brethren, and all mankind, with the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania respect.ed and loved at home, and honored abroad. it is less difficult than under other circumstances it might be for me to officially say. farewell.

This being the session when the Grand Officers, previously elected, were severally installed, Brother J. Simpson Africa, Grand Master, just installed, delivered a very appropriate and well-timed Address. Much may be expected of this able and efficient officer and capable Mason. I am proud to record the fact that he is the Representative of the Grand Lodge of Missou~i near the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. I have thus hurriedly presented a summary of the transactions of this old and representative Grand Jurisdiction. I now turn my attention to the Report on Correspondence, rendered by M. ""V. Brother Richard Vaux, Past Grand Master. The review covers 230 pages, embracing notice of the transactions of fifty-seven Grand Lodges, Missouri for 1890, being included in the number. The usual introduction appears. A number of topics receive the thoughtful consideration of Brother Vaux. "Physical disqualfication" was given very close attention. Brother Vaux maintains that the "mysteries embodied in the symbolism of Freemasonry, are derivedmust have been originally derived-from the ancient mysteries." The "tests" in these mysteries were "severe and prolonged," and were "intended to demonstrate the physical and mental capacity" of the candidate. To carry out the same idea in speculative l\iason~y, we should make our tests"severe and prolonged," in order .to determine the "physical and mental capacity of the candidates." Brother Vaux' rests his views on this subject upon the landmarks. He speaks of "unwritten law" and calls it "tradition." He assumes that as "it is a tradition," it therefore cannot be changed and must not be tampered with by Grand Lodges. If this law governing physical qualification is only a tradition, may not Grand Lodges, as the. supreme Masonic authority, in any Jurisdiction, enact a fixed law, defining what oral tradition may have left in doubt and uncertainty, coming to us through the ages. I do not believe in disturbing the foundation, or ignoring fundam.ental principles of Freemasonry. I join Brother Vaux in the well uttered sentiment, "our ancient and honorable Fraternity must be protected against innovations." The standard reared by Brother Vaux, and maintained by his Grand Lodge, concerning physical qualifications, is too severely rigid and exacting. A small nick in the ear, a slight defect in one eye, the absence of the end of a thumb on the left hand, the loss of ~ little toe, and kindred minor physical defects, will bar any


1891.J

.Appendix.

155

man's admission into Pennsylvania Masonry, hmvever superior his mental and moral qualifications. Brother Vaux cited the outlaw of Freemasonry of France in support of his viewoS. Masonry in France lost its character and became an outlaw from the commonwealth of Freemasonry on moral issues, and not in reference to "physical disqualifications." In making a survey of the able report furnished by Brother Vaux, I find much of interest, as shown by the original and vigorous thought of the writer, ,,,hile numerous extracts indicate his appreciation of the valuable utterances of others. In the review of Colorado, he protests against Grand Lodge Gscorts of any kind. The reason assigned is, that a Grand Lodge can only be a Grand Lodge when tyled. Hence he said, "a parade of a Grand Lodge is not possible." If this be true, the Grand Lodges of this country have performed an immense amount of illegal demonstrating in public, and have made many attempts at the impossible. Our Missouri Proceedings for 1890 received extensive consideration, thirteen pages being accorded us. In view of the shorter notices given very many other Jurisdictions, Missouri is under obligations to Brother Vaux, and hereby tenders him fraternal thanks for his courtesy. His recognition of the superior ability and worth of our eminent Grand Master, Brother Brace, entitles him to special thanks. I was not a,;vare that my work on Correspondence through the years, and especially my last report, had gained such eminence as Brother Vaux assigned me, or justified the lengthy and critical review', covering ten pages. Yet, such seems to be the fact. Brother Vaux is kind, while critical, saying that he does not always agree with some of the views expressed by myself. That is not strange. "Great minds think alike." Brother Vaux is a "great" thinker. How can I be expected to think like him in everything? Hence, this frequent diversity in views. Brother Vaux has assigned me a standing hitherto unknown, and has classed me with the humorists of the day. Wh~ther humorous or not, my review of Brother Vaux's position required extended effort on his part to answer it. And for myself, I am willing to submit the discussion of his untenable positions to the candid judgment of our readers. Brother Vaux has the happy faculty of avoiding points, and makes a vigorous attempt to turn a point made against him, upon his adversary. He still assigns to myself the use of an implement, which he introduced some years ago, called the Masonic flail. I insist that he claim and appropriate his own property. Whilst the term was unheard of by me


156

Appendix.

[Oct.

until introduced in his reply to a point I made, he shall not enjoy the pleasure of making an assignment of such useless assets to me. Brother Vaux kindly quoted quite extensively from my review of his positions last year, and closed his extended review in a. very courteous manner, which I fraternally reciprocate. J. SIMPSON AFRICA, Philadelphia, Grand Master. :MICHAEL NESBIT, Philadelphia, Grand Secretary.

PRINCE' EDWARD ISLAND. 1890. The Fifteenth Annual Session of this Body convened in the City of Cha~lottetown, June 24, ]890; with l\f. W. Bro. Neil MacKelvie, Grand Master, present and presiding, and B. Wilson Higgs, Grand Secretary. The twelve Lodges on the roll were all represented. "Their membership was reported at 505. Representatives of twenty-nine Grand Lodges were enrolled. The Address of the Grand Master was quite brief and of local bearing. The Grand Secretary presented a very short report. The Grand Master having been unable to visit but three Lodges, had commissioned as his representatives the necessary number of. Brethren to visit all the other Lodges. 'Why not adopt a system of District supervision, appointing the needed number of Deputies for the purpose? The Grand Lodge of North Dakota was accorded due recognition, while the application of New Zealand was deferred. The business of the session was quite brief and of no general interest. Brother J olm W. Morrison was elected Grand Master, and Brother B. 'Wilson Higgs, re-elected'Grand Secretary. Both live at Charlottetown.

QUEBEC,

1891.

The Thirty-first Annual Communication was held in the City of Montreal, commencing the 28th of January. Isaac H. Stearns, Grand l\1aster; Jolin II. Isaacson, Grand Secretary. The representation was large, made up of present and past Grand Officers, and representatives of fifty-four Lodges and thirty-three Grand Lodges. There are fifty-seven Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 3,060. The Grand Master rendered a brief account of his official actions. He announced the prevalence of harmony and fraternal love through-


1891.J

Appendix.

157

out the Jurisdiction. The fraternal relations with all recognized Freemasons of the world were declared to be amicable. He particularized the death of a number of distinguished Masons in that and other Jurisdictions. The loss sustained by the Fraternity in that JuriSdiction, and throughout the world, was particularized.. He stated the death of Col. McLeod Moore, Honorary Past Grand Master and SHpreme Grand Master of Knights Templar of the Dominion. A just and eloquent tribute was paid to the memory of' this distinguished man and Mason. The Grand Master reported the constitution of Lodges chartered at the previous session. He had created one new Lodge under dispensation during his term of office. Dispensations ,,,ere reported as having been granted for various purposes, such as conferring degrees out of time, etc. The matters at issue between the Grand Lodges of England and Quebec remain as heretofore, unsettled. It was recommended by Brother 'V'all-:em, who had volunteered to mediate between the two 'Bodies, that matters be allowed to rest in their present condition. The mediator was hopeful of ultimately accomplishing satisfactory results; The Grand Master reported visits made by him, and recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Tasmania. He likewise recommended the preparation of a Masonic history for that Jurisdiction. Attention was called to the desirability and necessity of establishing a Masonic Home for the Province. His recommendation on this subject was commended by a committee, and the Fraternity urged to push forward the enterprise. The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were full and complete, and showed a very satisfactory financial condition. The Journal contains extended and elaborate reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters. A discourse was delivered by the Grand Chaplain, which is printed in the Journal. The proceedings of the session were generally of local character and not of general interest. The Grand Master's recommendations were uniformly approved, and the labors of the Grand Secretary duly co~mended.


158

.Appendix.

[Oct.

CORRESPONDENCE.

One hundred and three pages contain a good and conservative review, furnished by Brother E. T. D. Chambers, Committee. The report is about equally divided between extracts and comments, showing the Committee to be well versed in gleaning and condensing. Less than two pages were accorded to the Proceedings of Missouri for 1890. Extracts were made from the Address of Grand Master Brace, and favorable mention made of our grand enterprise, the Masonic Home. A passing allusion was made to the report of this Committee on Correspondence. The late hour at which the Journal of Quebec came t? hand forbids an extended notice. FRANK EDGAR, Montreal, Grand Master. JOHN H. ISAACSON, Montrea), Grand Secretary.

RHODE ISLAND,

1890.

The Semi-annual Communication was held in the City of Providence, Noyember 18, ]889. The business was brief and local. I

The 100th annual session was held in Providence, commencing May 19,1890. Brother George H. Kenyon, Grand Master, Edwin Baker, Grand Secretary. Representatives of twenty-nine Lodges were present. There aTe thirty-five Lodges on the roll, with a membership of some 4,000. The Address of the Grand Master covered seven pages. dium, I find the following:

In his exor-

We are forcibly reminded of the rapid flight of time, when we recall the fact that this Grand Lodge has reached the venerable age of ninety-nine years, and that we arc now holding the One Hundredth Annual Communication. We arc assembled for the purpose of reviewing the events of the past year; of considering the present condition of the Craft in our Jurisdiction; and making such provisions and regulations as we may deem expedient for its welfare in the future. The year just passed has been one of peace and quiet in the Fraternity, and whHeit has been marked by no startling events or unusual experiences, we rejoice in a steady and healthful growth from all sections of the State, by the addition to our numbers of good men and true who will aid in maintaining and preserving the honor and reputation of our noble Institution. While we have been blessed with general health and prosperity, we have not been suffered to pass through the year without our share ot ailliction. Since our last Annual Communication eight members of this Grand Lodge have been called from their labors here to the realm of eternal rest and peace.

The death of one of their Past Grand Masters was duly noted. Brother Lyman Klapp had passed away at the age of sixty-two years.


1891.J

Appendix.

.159

He was elected Grand Master in 1883, re-elected in 1884 and 1885. An appropriate memorial tribute was paid to the deceased Past Grand Officer. Various matters of local interest are found in the Address of Grand Master Kenyon. He reported two decisions, both of which were approved: They are of no general importance. A number of dispensations had been granted during his term of office. He urged uniformity of work among the Lodges. Reports of the Deputy Grand Master and the 'District Deputy Grand Masters, followed the Address of the Grand Master. Brother Baker, Grand Secretary, presented a very practical exhibit of official business. The Committee on Correspondence submitted a report covering half a page. It contained recommendations for the recognition of the Grand Lodges of North Dakota, New South Wales and Victoria. The report was approved. CENTENNIAL.

A special Committee on the Centennial of the Grand Lodge submitted a report. The same was adopted. Said report contains a recommendation to observe the 24th of June, 1891, as Centennial Day. This celebration will mark the. close of the lOOth year of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island. A very interesting eulogy was submitted by the Memorial Committee, in which the labors and services of their deceased I~ast Grand Master, Brother Lyman Klapp, were fully set forth. The widow of the deceased Brother presented, through the Committee, an elegant lifesize portrait of her husband, suitably framed, and asked the Grand Lodge to accept the same. A vote of thanks was tendered Mrs. Klapp by the Grand Lodge. I find nothing further deserving mention in the Journal. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were both re-elected, and reside in Providence.


160

Appendil;,

SOUTH CAROLINA,

[Oct.

1890.

The 114th Annual Communication was hel(l in the City of Anderson, embracing the 9th and 10th days of December. Brother R. Furman Divver, 1\1. D., Grand Master; Brother Charles lnglesby, Grand Secretary. The Journal shows. 177 Lodges on the roll, with membership of 5,702, 155 Lodges were represented. A brief Address covering six pages, emanated from the Grand N'rastel'. His exordium sounds like a jubilee song. He stated that the session then opened was the largest by far of any he had "ever witnessed." He made extended remarks respecting the state of the Craft in the Jurisdiction. I make the following extract therefrom: I am ~ratified to report, that in this Jurisdiction :Masonry has taken no step backward dUrIng the past year. Our Lodges are taking a deeper interest in the work of the Order than I have ever witnessed among them. and although a larger number of candidates have been admitted into the Order than ever before in the same length of time, yet I find that the. outer door has been more closely !l'uarded and only good material allowed to. enter. I also find that there is a dispositlOn among the Brethren to have better Lodge rooms, making them brighter and more comfortable, and their meetings are pleasant and more social. This is, indeed, truly gratifying. I believe the social feature of our Lodge meetings has been too long neglected; it is high time that it should be revived.

He reported the laying of a number of corner-stones, dedications of halls, special dispensations granted路 and Grand Representatives appointed. Two Lodges had been created under dispensation, which were duly chartered at this session. One Lodge was revived from its slumbers, and again imbued 'with life. Speaking of the relations with. other Grand Lodges, he announced them as most harmonious and fraternal. One very gratifying statement I quote as follows: "The Cerneau heresy, which has been such a prolific source of discord and dissension in some Jurisdictions, has not found its way to us, and I trust never will do so." It affords me much pleasure to report the same condition of things as existing in .Missouri, and I join in his expression of hope that we may never be annoyed by the presence of this" prolific source" of evil. Respecting their finances, the Grand 1\faster was pleased to state that the debt on their Temple was gradually decreasing. Speaking of the valuable services al'ld needed presence of Past Grand Masters, Brother Divver had ,the following to say: There is one matter I would most earnestly call to yonr attention, which I consider of great interest to this Grand Body. It is the absence from our Annual Communications of our Past Grand :\iasters. These worthy Brethren have served us faithfully and


Appendix.

1891.J

161

well in days gone by, and have acquired a vast amount of information and experience in Masonic matters which I am satisfied would make their presence at our Annual Communications invaluable to us, but we cannot expect these Brothers to lose their time from their private business and at their own expense attend our grand Communications and assist us in the work without being allowed even the privilege of a vote in this Grand Body. I would therefore suggest that we take this matter into consideration at this communication and sec if some arrangement can be made so that our worthy Past Grand Masters will again be among the most regular attendants at the Annual Communications of this Grand Body.

I may be permitted to say that Missouri has provided means by which these eminent Brethren, who have served the Craft faithfully and well, can attend our Grand Lodge sessions without expense. 'fhe only pay-roll our Grand Lodge tolerates, is in favor of Past Grand Masters. . Grand NIagter Divver having served the Craft in South Carolina for two terms, retired inost gracefully, with expressions of thanks for favors received and honors conferred. A supplementary report was presented by the Grand Master, announcing the death of their Senior Grand Warden, as of recent occurrence. Brother A. Doty, who had filled the West for the past year, died only a short time before the session above mentioned. The Grand Master paid a beautiful tribute to his worth, and a Committee subsequently presented an adlpirable sketch of his life, which was adopted, and a memorial page ordered to his memory. An excellent report was furnished by the Grand Secretary, Brother Inglesby, and the same was approved. A special Report on Correspondence was submitted by Brother Inglesby, recommending the recognition of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota. Said report was adopted. The reports of the several District Deputy Grand Masters were presented and printed. A very just and proper compliment was paid to the retiring Grand Master, Brother Divver, by a Committee. The Committee on .Jurisprudence submitted a brief statement of their findings. A resolution was adopted asking for the appointment of a Committee on Masonic Orphanage, looking to the creati9n of an institution for the benefit of the orphans of deceased Masons. A Committee was appointed, consisting of the Deputy Grand Masters of the ten Districts in the State. A Past Grand Master's jewel was ordered for Brother Divver, the retiring Grand l\'1aster. â&#x20AC;˘ G. L. Ap.-ll.

â&#x20AC;˘


162

[Oct.

Appendix, '.

The Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary were authorized to borrow money for the use of the Grand Lodge, not to exceed $500. . CORRl<~SPONDENCE.

Brother Charles Inglesby, the Grand Secretary, said that he had "reviewed a11 the Grahd Lodges in the United States and Canada, except the Grand Lodge of Mississippi," which Proceedings had not reached him. The report covers eighty pag~s. It is a work that reviews. Brother lnglesby runs the matter reviewed through his mental mill, and brings it out with his own stamp upon it. Very few extracts appear in his - report. He is a very courteous reviewer, and still deserves his we11earned reputation as a condenser. This is evidenced by the amount of matter compressed into eighty pages. In reviewing Missouri, there was an error as to date. He printed 1890 instead of 1889. A very complimentary notice was given the Address of our Grand Master, Brother "Wood. He likewise complimented Illy business report by making an extract therefrom. The printer or proof reader having charge of the review, places me in a singular attitude before the "Masonic world. In noticing my Report on Correspondence, Brother Inglesby pronounced it a tt splendid" one, and then said, "His views are always decided, and there is do-ubt as to what he means." There now! If others judge me by what Brother Inglesby says of me, there is much more doubt in my mind as to my standing in the Masonic world than has heretofore existed. I think the statement that there is t< doubt" as to my meaning on any subject will be news to those who know me, either as a writer or speaker. Of conrse Brother Inglesby did not intend to convey snch an idea; but taking his meaning from his words, it would seem that I have labored for many years in vain to make myself understood. '\That havoc printers do make of our labors! Brother Inglesby neither intended to have me misunderstood, or to misrepresent me by the omission of the little word" no." The reader may insert it and the sentence will be complete. "There is no doubt as to what he means." Brother Inglesby and myself hold very similar views, for the most part, respecting the Cerneau controversy. I copy the following from his comments on my position relative to that subject: The business of saloon keeping receives his strongest animadversion, and he says, ana says truly, that the saloon keeper in his business, kindles pu..'ision and furnishes fuel to keep alive the worst clements in human nature, resulting in the death of the victim, and often sending the innocent ullbidden, into the presence of God! He is opposed to taking action against Ccrneanism, not because he endorses it, but because he says that Ancient Craft Masons know nothing of these so-called Higher Rite Bodies, and therefore had best be hands olT with reference to them. He is opposed to all "!titeism," so are

.


1891.]

Appendix.

163

we, but we do not think that it is wise for us to tolerate any Body outside of Ancient Craft Masonry, which assumes jurisdiction over the thre(~ degrees, as the Cerneaus do~ or any Body claiming to be Masonic, which fraternizes with the Atheistical Grana Orient of France. Our opposition is not because we wish to sustain the A, & A. S. R. of the Northern or Southern Jurisdiction, for we know nothing about them and care less, but it is because the Ccrneaus do these things which these other Bodies do not attempt to do.

Brother Inglesby says I am "opposed to taking action against Cerneauism," not beca\1se I favor it, but for other reasons. He, not being a High Riter, is competent to :deal justly with a Brother reviewer, who declines to sneeze when others take snuff. Unlike some of the High Rite leaders, he does not charge me with favoring the Cerneau.abomination, because I do not champion the o\her faction. That I may not be misunderstood, this explicit statement is again offered. I am "opposed to taking action against Cerneauism," until it invades the domain of Symbolic Masonry. 路When this disturbing element comes into Missouri, and rears its altars against our altars of Symbolic Masonry, and assumes to confer our Symbolic degrees, then our Grand Lodge will have cause for action. And it will be found that Missouri Masonry will defend its premises and its rights against the encroachment of all such invaders. An'd we will not call upon the Bodies of Scottish Rite :Masonry, or any other branch of Masonry, to help us maintain our cause or defend our rights. If the High Rite Bodies had done the same in Jurisdictions where they had the precedence, and fought the invading Cerneauites, their resistance would have ,been justified and approved by the Symbolic Body, and its moral support would have been given to stamp out the Cerneau faction, which seeks to set up "altar against altar" already reared and recognized. Instead of the High Rite Bodies excommunicating the invaders, they invoked the powers of the Grand Lodge against them, and embroiled peaceable communities in a struggle that does not concern them. Scottish Rite Masonry is of such lofty pretensions and so high-toned (and high priced), that none but the select few can become identified with the institution. Considering themselves as the" ELECT," the commodity of High Riteism is so valuableas to demand a "high protective tariff." This costly commodity places the higher degrees within the reach of comparatively few. The Cerneauites, knowing this, saw their opportunity to furnish a cheaper article of the same brand, and thus push their wares upon the inarket and fight for territory of franchises. Some, finding that they could obtain the same goods without paying the "high tariff" required by the protected party, have entered the Cerneau combination. There they can receive an immense number of degrees, decorate themselves with titles, wear their big eagles and sport their loftiness to the amazement of the Fraternity, who are only" common" Masons. My opposition, like that of Brother Inglesby, does not arise from the desire to sustain the Scottish Rite claim, whether of the Northern or ~outhern


164

Appendt:x.

[Oct..

Jurisdiction, 01" the Cerneauites, or any other branch of the concern, "about ",hich I know nothing and care less," bnt it is an opposition founded upon an irreconcilable, abounding and abiding dislike to all such lofty pretensions as belong to this so-called branch of Masonry. I join with Brother Inglesby in saying that Cerneauism, as a "cloud in the Masonic firmament," has not reached or darkened the sky of Missouri Masonry. 'With my usual appreciation of Brother Tnglesby as a Mason and a writer, I take an affectionate and fraternal leave of him for the present. May we meet again; if not her8O, in the" Sweet By-and-bye." L. T. IZLAR, Blackville, Grand Master. CHARLES INGLESBY, Charleston, Grand Secretary.

SOUTH D!\KOTA, 1891. The Seventeenth Annual Communication convened in Watertown, June 9th, and was held in the Opera House. Thomas D. Kanouse was Grand Master, and Charles T. McCoy, Grand Secretary. There were representati ves present from sixty-six out of the seventyfour Lodges on the roll, with four Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers. An Address of five pages \vas presented by the Grand Master. He said, "harmony has prevailed throughout our borders, and consequent peace has reigned with her beneficent sway. Our Lodges are almost without excej)tion, so far as known, in a reasonably prosperous condition." He reported uninterrupted fraternal relations with other Grand Lodges. One ruling was reported of local bearing, which was approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence.. The laying of the corner-stone of a church was mentioned as a part of his official work. Sad mention was made of the loss sustained by that Grand Jurisdiction in the death of Past Grand Master George Harper Hand. A very beautiful tribute was paid to the memory of this excellent Brother, by the Grand Master. I make the following extract from that tribute路: The voice of Brother Hand is forever stilled. His earnest words will no more ~rect us in our aTlnual meetings. His eloqnent pleading' for It careful observance ot the ancif'nt "Landmarks" of our Craft, will be now a matter of record and remembrance, but the earnestness of his soul flashing in his tempered words. exhorting us to ",,\Verve not," will, let us hope and trust, ever be our "timely warning." As a citizen of our eommonwc?,lth, Brother Hand was honored, and his counsel in affairs of State was


1891.j

165

Appendix.

sOllght after. As a' friend, his mrmon' will be cheri~hed bv Il1uUit.udes, because of his hclpful words and (l!~eds. As a hu~baTl(1 and father, he was that those sacred words imply, affection ute, strong, helpful; a HO)LE KIISG. As a Brother :Mason, he was all our tenets requirc; not mechanically, but he had drunk so deeply of their spirit that they 'were naturally a part and parcel of his every day life. He was fit for the Builder's lise, and we have no right to refuse him to the GfI~at Architect. It is a glorious rcmembrance that he himself was ready to obey the call. As a Christian, his pastor bore cheerful testimony to his faithful life.

aU

'Past Grand Master Hand! Hail! Farewell!

The Memorial Committee presented a lengthy report in honor of the deceased Brother, and a picture of him graces the Proceedings. Brother Hand was an excellent gentleman, a pure Mason and a representative citizen. The Grand Master closed his Address with expressions of thanks for the honor of having served the Craft, and said, "may our legislation be wise, and stand the test of time." The Address was highly complimented and commended by the Committee. An admirable report from Grand Secretary McCoy was furnished, containing general and financial information. He reported having issued dispensations to create four new Lodges. Gratifying information is found in his report, that all of the seventy-four Lodges in the Jurisdiction had made returns and paid dues for the year. This has been true of the Lodges for the past six years. It is a wonderful result achieved by an efficie~t and capable Grand Secretary. He reported a net gain of one hundred and nineteen members, and shows an average of about forty-five members to the Lodge. The report of -the Grand Lecturer is an interesting document. Upon the recommendation of Brother 'William Blatt, Committ~e on Correspondence, the Grand Lodge of Tasmania was recognized, while the organization in New Zealand ,vas not granted that honor. The Grand Lodge closed its labors on the second day of the session, after numerous votes of thanks had been passed. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother \Villiam' Blatt, Committee, submitted a report. covering ninety-seven pages, in which he review.ed the transactions of fifty-six Grand Lodges. Of course, in tIle space allotted, 路he was necessarily limited to extracts and brief comments. -:\fissouri was assigned three pages in the notice of our transactions for 1890. Quite a number of extracts were made from the Address of Grand Master Brace. 'With regard to the Cerneau question, he assumes a position which no one,

.


166

[Oct.

Appendi:r.

with sufficient Masonic intelligence to write a report on correspondence, ,,,ould ever question, namely, that the Grand Lodge is the supreme Masonic authority in its own Jurisdiction. On such a premise, he ~nd other writers draw the conclusion that a Grand Lodge should legislate upon a question entirely foreign to its own affairs. I have said, and still maintain, \"ithout variableness or shadow of turning, that the Grand Lodge has nothing to do, as a supreme power, with determining questions and antagonisms between factions of another branch of Masonry. Its business in the maintenance of its own dghts and integrity, is to prevent Cerneallism, or any othet: High Riteisrn, from meddling ,,,,ith the degrees of Symbolic Masonry. Brother Blatt commented upon my view, respecting prayers in Lodges. His criticfsm fails to convince this writer of any error in the premises I laid down. Brother Blatt gleans well, comments kindly and criticises.indepcndently. GEORGE A.. JOHNSTON, Mitchell, Grand Master. CHARLES T. McCOY,路 Aberdeen, Grand Secretary.

TENNESSEE.

1891~

The Grand I.'odge ~of Tennessee held its Seventy-seventh Annual Communication in the city of Nashville, commencing on. the 28th day of January, 1891. R. 'V. William S. Smith, Deputy Grand Master, was present and presided in the absence of the late deeply mourned Benjamin F. Haller, Grand Master, who died soon after his installation. Brother John Frizzell was Grand Secretary. I notice the presence of seven Past Grand Masters, with other Past Grand Officers and Past Masters. The Represenhttives of twenty-two Grand Lodges were reported as in attendance, Missouri being represented by our Brother, Dr. D. J. Roberts. Out of the 407 Lodges in that Jurisdiction 380 were represented.

The r{)capitulation of the Grand Secretary furnishes information that the membership of the .Turisdiction amounts to 16,743, being a gain of some 600. The Address of the Acting Grand :l\laster, Brother Smith, was eminently a business o.ocument, embracing some eleven pages. He opened .with sad mention of the death of their Grand Master, .M:. W. Bro. IIal~


1891.J

Appendix.

1.67

ler, who died April 4, 1890. By reason of t.his heavy berea'vement to the Craft in Tennessee, Brother Smith succeeded to the duties and responsibilities of the office made vacant. His report embraced a number of items, gleaned from the record made by the Gmnd Master, while living, showing what he had done. Soon after the decease of Brother Haller, Acting Grand Master Smith issued a circular to the Lodges in the State, announcing their misfortune. He repQrted officially a number of matters to 'which he had given attention during his term, such as granting dispensations, making visits and issuing commissions. A number of new Lodges had been created under dispensation by him. These were severally chartered by the Grand Lodge. A few decisions were reported, some of which were approved and some were not concurred in. lIe mentioned their Masonic Home enterprise with much favor, and ;nnounced that the building was approaching completion. The G'rand Master urged upon the attention of the Craft, as worthy of their support, this noble enterprise. I notice that during the Proceedings the officers of the Home submitted their reports and statements, and some $2,000 were pledged by Lodges and individuals. A proposition was submitted and sent over to the next session of the Grand Lodge, to amend the Constitution, allowing assessments to be made on Subordinate Lodges for the support and maintenance of the Home, Grand Master Smith said that there had been no changes in the fraternal relations existing between the Grand Lodge of Tennessee and other Grand Lodges. Concerning the condition of the Craft, he announced that information received indicated a very favorable state of affairs in the Jurisdiction. A modetate, but healthy increase of members was shown by the returns, and general peace and harmony prevailed. The Grand Lodge, during this session, created a number of new Lodges under dispensation. There seems to exist a healthy growth and improved condition in the Fraternity in Tennessee. During the session a Lodge of Sorrow was prllvided for and held, presided overby Brother GeorgeC: Connor, Past Grand Master. Tributes to the memory of Brother Benjamin F. Haller were presented, and a most touching memoir was submitted and read, provided by a committee, followed by addresses from Brother John Frizzell and others. Reports of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary were received and referred to the Committee on Accounts.


168

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Report of the Comrnittee on Jurisprudence paid a very high tribute to the acting Grand :lHaster, Brother SmHh, on whom, for the time being, had fallen the mantle of the Grand :Master. Said Committee overruled some of the decisions of Brother Smith, as already indicated, and approved others. The Proceedings of the session were brief and local for the most part, and the session dosed on the second day. There is a full and extended report from the Secretary of the :Masonic Home, ,vhich contains a financial exhibit of the enterprise. The outlay so far amounts to something over $15,000; the assets remaining foot up a little more than $5,000. The Horne premises cover ten acres of land wHhin three rpiles of the city, on the railroad, in one of the most beautiful portions of Tennessee. The structure being rea.red upon the ground is a four-story building, capable, when finished, o路f accommodating seventy-five or one hundred inmates. The estimated cost of the house is $2G,000, of which $14,000 has been paid. This will leave, then, an indebtedness of $12,000 to provide for .. The Board of Directors of the Home estimate the cost of maintaining the institution at about $100 for each inmate. It is to be hoped that our Tennessee Brethren will realize their fondest expectations, and that no embarrassment may hinder their great and glorious undertaking. CORRESPOKDEXCE.

For a number of years T have read with pleasure and profit the productions of Tennessee Committees on Correspondence. Commencing with. the works of the scholarly Dr. Blackie, until now, there have been annual reports emanating from that Grand Jurisdiction in every sense of the word creditable and representative. Sueh ahle men as Brothers Frizzell, Foster~ and Smith have furnished the Masonic public with excellent reviews in the past. A ne'w light has arisen in that Jurisdiction, and, judging from his ,vork as a reviewer, the prestige of Tennessee correspondents will be fully maintained and its former sta.ndard will not be lowered. It has been Illy good fortune to know personally several of the Committees of that Jurisdietion, whose friendship and association I greatly appreciated. '1'he new COlUmittee, Brother George C. Connor, Past Grand Master, takes a front rank in the "Guild," and fllrnishesareport covering 155 pages. From the opening page of his work I glean some very int.eresting matter. In December, li9G, the first Lodge in Tennessee was created by the Gra.nd Lodge of ~orth Carolina. The Commit-


1891.J

Appendix.

169

tee says that Lodge "was the cradle of Freemasonry in Tennessee." Tn December, 1813" the Grand Lodge was constituted at Knoxville, eight Lodges being represented. During the seventy-seven years following; the Grand Lodge of Tennessee has persevered through peace and war, prosperity and adversity. Fifty-one Grand :Masters have presided over the Craft during these years, thirty-two of whom have passed to the undiscovered land. I notice in the list of Past Grand Masters of that Jurisdiction the names of eminent citizens and representative Masons that would give character to any body of men in the nation. I may be allowed to specify one name, the luster of which hrightenswith the roll of years. Andrew Jackson, the hero of New Orleans, was elected Grand Master in 1822, and re-elected in 1823. \Vhile Andrew Jackson was a hero ,IIi battle, a patriot in the nation, a statesman in government, and an incorruptible cit17:en throughout his entire life, he is not less to be remembered and honored as having served the Crait, in his own Jurisdiction, as Grand Master of the ancient and honorable Fraternity of Freemasons. The report furnished by Brother Connor contains the statement that in 1825 their Grand Lodge was visited by the distinguished patriot and soldier, and the friend of the illustrious \Vashington, Lafayette, who was introduced to the Grand Lodge by Gen. Jackson, when he was elected to honorary membership in the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. Brother Connor pays a graceful tribute to their leaders in the past by saying: "Not one of the fifty-one chiefs has brought disgrace upon the Craft, or died dishonored or unsung.," Brother Connor gives evidence of superior ability and admirable adaptation to the ,',:ark of a reviewer. He is spicy, bright, comprehensive and strong. There is much in the report worthy of notice and appropriation by this Committee. To undertake to transfer to my pages all that has interested me \\'ouM be little less than excerpting the whole. Brother Connor g~ves Missouri the benefit of two pages of his work, most of which is taken up in appropriating and commenting upon portions of the Address of Grand Master Brace, which he says is "vigorous in statement and unmistakable in composition." He speaks of Brother Brace as a "clear-headed Grand Master." His reference to this Committee is amusing, as well as entertaining. Some time I shall step over to Chattanooga and gently tap on' the door of Brother Connor, where the latch string ought to ,hang, and prove to him, in personal intercourse,


170

[Oct.

that I do not possess the ferocity and "blood-curdling" manner with which he endows me. Speaking of the breaking off of fraternal relations with the Grand Lodge of Ohio, Brother Connor says: "If diplomatic relations are to be restored, Ohio's act of restoration will be promptly acknowledged by Tennessee. The Grand Lodge of Tennessee makes no concessions to the Grand Lodge of Ohio and makes no demand of any kind." From the foregoing announcement it seems that Tennessee is very co-mplacent and well satisfied with its attitude in this controversy. I infer from the expressions of the Committee that the Grand Lodge of Tennessee will not say Jr do anything more about the matter until some pverture is made by the Grand Lodge of Ohio. It is very manifest from the utterances of Brother Connor that he is not a believer in the sup~rlative degree known as Past Master. He characterizes such degree as a "disgusting farce," and seems to think it should be wiped out utterly. I take pleasure in informing the Tennessee C~mmittee tl?at we are in full accord upon this question, as upon many, very many, utterances found in his work.

Brother Connor furnishes a lengthy conclusion, in which he treated various subjects, such as temperan路ce, Masonic charity, dissemination of the work, non-affiliation, Cerneauism, guarding of the portals of Masonry, and other subjects of interest which cl.aimed his attention. Speaking of the moral tone of Masonry, he said: "There is a great improvement in the morals of the Craft compared with twenty years ago." To this statement I give fullest assent, and this opinion grows out of close observation and study of, as well as intimate connection with, the Fraternity for thirty years. I am pleased with and commend the high moral tone of this excellent Masonic writer, Brother Connor. Speaking of temperance, he said: "This cardinal virtue is best enforced by the creation of a moral sentiment that will make drunkenness disreputable." This has been my teaching for many years. To put the brand of condemnation upon anything it must first be made disreputable in order to be discountenanced. The creation of this "moral sentiment" is by a proper and healthy educating of the minds of those who are to aid in the desired reform. This "moral sentiment" has been growing in :Missomi through a ~eries of years, and I have given to it the best thought and energy of by life, seeking to promote and enlarge the domain of that sentiment, l?oking to the end mentioned by Brother Connor. We have made drunkenness and drunkard-making disreputable among the Craft in Missou'ri by the enlargement of this "moral


1891.J

Appendix.

171

sentiment." Brother Connor says that he does not believe that a saloon-keeper could gain admission to a Lodge in the State. The "moral sentiment" has evidently obtained in the Lodges of Tennessee to such an extent, a_nd the Grand Lodge has so much confidence in its existence, that it does not deem legislation necessary. I can appreciate such a state of things in an old, well trained, properly governed Jurisdiction, like Tennessee. In a State like Missouri, that has a thoroughly mixed population, it is quite different; con~equently we had, of necessity, to push this moral sentiment to the front, and keep it there, and there it will be maintained until Missouri, like Tennessee, becomes more thoroughly unified with refe:rence to a healthy moral tone. Brother Connor treated at length the troublesome thing known as "Cerneauism.". He occupies the same ground with this writer. I am gratified to learn that the Grand Lodge of Tennessee has wisely and prudently, like Missouri, refrained from expressing an opinion on the claims of the contending organizations. I commend the wise and conservative course of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, as represented in the well expressed sentiments of its Committee on Correspond~nce. RULES.

Brother Connor formulated the following rules which should govern Lodges in the admission of candidates alllong the "Children of Light:" 1. 'rhe applicant hould be a gentleman, as Americans interpret that word. He should be of refined manners and tastes, no matter his standing in the so-called social world. We have known hod-carriers to be more refined than some Senators of the United States.

2. He should believe in the existence of It ,Supreme Being, Creator and Master of all. 3. He should believe in the Immortality of the Soul. An annihilationist cannot participate in our Mysteries, and would be an atom of foreign matter in our Ceremonials. 4. He sh'ould be able to make himself known to the Craft by the Means of Recog-nition unknown to the profane. The details of that ability should be entrusted to the individual Lodges. ' 5. He should be known to be a good citizen, a true friend. husband. or brother.

It

kind father, or son, or

6. lIe should be It man who seeks the general good of his kind, and is not a greedy or selfish person to the known detriment of others. " 7. He should be a temp~rate man in eating, drinking, and in Ispeech; orderly, forbearing, not contentious, nor inclined to speak evil of others. Such men are worthy of admission within our portals; aye, such are capable of' " holding the ~fystery of the Faith in a pure conscience."

In concluding his labors as a reviewer, Brother Connor gave utterance to sentiments as touching as they are devout. I appropriate the following beautiful expressions: one

I was placed at the head of the Committee of Correspondence by the partiality of ~vho in a very short time was called to his reward, alld my heart's regret to-day is


172

[Oct.

Appendix.

that he is not here to approve TIl)' work. Rut having full faith in the doctrine of Future Recognition, I lift my thoughts to the Paradise of the Blest, and rell!i;r,e that his spirit is with us in Grand Lodge. And to the memory of the beloved Benjamin Franklin Haller, our departed Grand Master, I dedicate this labor of love, my first Report on Correspondence. Next to the approval of my own Brethren of Tennessee I yearn for you,s, beloved of the Reportorial Committees. If we shall all never again sit down at the same round table, may we be enabled, through the grace of Emmalluel, to renew our associations on the green fields of Eden, and, arm in arm, recount the joys of the years that we were Children of Light.

Brother Smith, the acting Grand Master, not only received a formal endorsement for his "prompt and faithful discharge of the duties and responsibilities so unexpectedly placed upon.him," but was awarded hig-her honors by being chosen as Grand Master of Masons in Tennessee for the term ensuing. Brother John Frizzell was re-elected Grand Secretary, and has an assistant in the person of A. Clendening. I am gratified to note the re-appointment of Brother Geo. C. Connor as Committee on Correspondence.

"T.

TEXAS,

1890.

The Fifty-fifth Annual Communication opened in the city of Houston, December 9. A. S. Richardson, Grand Master; \Villiam F. Swain, Grand Secretary. The record says that Representatives of 276 Subordinate Lodges were present. Nine Past Grand ::\fasters, a large number of Past Masters, District Deputies and Representatives of Grand Lodges were in attendance. I have sought in vain for information which is desirable in collecting facts as to the membe"rship of that Jurisdiction. The Journal is without statistical tables or data of any kind, having no recapitulation or other information necessary to guide a reviewer. Incidentally, I learn from some expression of the Grand Master, that there are over 600 active Lodges in Texas. The Grand Seeretary, in his report, said that he had been suddenly taken sick, and had to cut short his work. I presume this acconnts for the condition of the Journal. He complained of the delays on the part of a number of Lodges as to their returns.


1891.J

Appendix.

The Journal of this Grand Lodge is much smaller than been cut down, according to the statement of the Grand 276 pages, at a saving of nearly $800 over the former year. Brethren would leave ,out the membership, printed by would be much better off in a financial point of view.

173 usual, having Secretary, to If our Texas Lodges, they

ADDRESS.

The document presented by Grand Master Richardson, covering some twenty-eight pages, was pronounced by the Oommittee, as a " carefully prepared, elaborate and perspicuous Address." In his exordium, he called the meeting an "Annual Oonclave." It seems to me that the term" Oommunication," would have been more appropriate for a Grand Lodge, as the term" Oonclave" has been monopolil';ed by the Knight Templar bodies. Appropriate mention was made of their loss by death of two Past Grand Masters. Brother George W. Van Vleck, had passed away at the ripe age of seventy-six years, having served as Grand Master in 1862. It was said in the Address, that for forty yeaTS he had been an attendant upon the sessions of the Grand Lodge. 'William Stedman, who \vas Grand Master in 1857, died at the age of sixty-eight years. A beautiful and touching tribute was paid to these departed Brethren by a Oommittee, of which Brother Thomas Matthews was Ohairnian. Memorial tablets were ordered printed in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. From reports received from the District Deputy Grand Masters, the Grand Master said he felt warranted in saYlhg that the Order was in a healthy condition and quite prosperous. He further remarked that a lack of interest Jl1 the ritual was apparent, cansing great lack of zeal among the Fraternity. A synopsis from the reports of the Distriet Deputy Grand Masters was incorporated in the annual Address. Twelve new Lodges had been created under dispensation. Numerous dispensations of various kinds were granted by the Grand Master during the term. He reported thirty-six decisions, the most of which were approved by the Oommittee on Jurisprudence. The others were more or less doctored by the Oommittee. He certainly got off very well after rendering so many rulings. The Oommittee said, respecting his decisions, "A number of the decisions of the Grand Master, were but repetitions of edicts and previous decisions." He strangely said, "It is the ballot not the announcement, that operates as a rejection." It is very true that the ballot rejects,


174

Appendix.

[Oct.

but if the result obtained by the ballot is not announced, how can it be known? The Committee wisely corrected this singular deliverance. A STRANGE LAW.

In decisions 27-8, which were approved, the law is recognized that "any member of any Lodge in Texas, may object to the conferring of the degrees upon any person in any other Lodge in the State." It is further'6aid that.he may signify his objection by black baU or protest, and that protest must be respected. This is new doctrine to me, and I am very glad to say that it does not obtain in Missouri. It may not be gracious to make the remark, but I must say that I know of no such rule anywhere in the Masonk world, except in Texas. The idea is a very strange one that a member ofa Lodge in Houston may -enter his objections to a candidate in a Galveston Lodge, and claim the right to enjoy the privilege of a ballot in said Lodge .. I ask the question, " what business has a member of a Houston Lodge to cast a ballot in a Lodge at Galveston?" Grand Master Richardson delivered a very lengthy dissertation about the Bible and its place in Masonry. My obtuseness prevents me from clearly comprehending the state of the question when he 路finished. Several concluding pages of the Address were deyoted to divers and sundry suggestions of a practical sort. The Deputy Grand Master furnished a report in which he announced the rendering of two decisions ; the same were approved by the Committtee. In Missouri we l;ave but one Grand Master at a time. He does all the official and legal business of the Grand Lodge during vacation. I cannot understand how it is that a Deputy Grand ::\1aster can be endowed with powers equal to the Grand Master. That there must bE' equality in authority, is evidenced by the fact in the Texas case that the Deputy Grand Master exercises rights and powers that alone belong to the Grand Master in this Jurisdiction. A number of Lodges were chartered during the session, and some dispensations granted for the creation of new Lodges. There is a very extensive report showing a large number of cases passed upon by the Committee on Appeals. Much business of a local character was transacted during the session. A report from the Committee on Correspondence treated of the


1891.]

Appendix.

175

claims of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand. The recognition of that Body was not accorded, but the subject went over for future consideration. A special report was made by a Committee on the subject of Masonry in Mexico. It was the conclusion of the Committee that the time had come when the matter of fraternal intercourse between the Lodges of Texas and the Lodges across the Rio Grande may be safely committed to the. Lodges interested. A resolution to that effect was adopted. A resolution was presented and approved creating a Committee to consider propositions to move the Grand Lodge from Houston. After said Committee reports to the Grand Secretary, the question is to be submitted to the Lodges for their action.

The Masons of Texas are moving along the line of establishing a Home for widows and orphans. The Directors of that interest report that" From the rapidity with which funds hav~ accumulated, we hope soon to be in a condition to ask for plans and donations and for the location of the Home." All matters of local interest were well considered during the session, the newly elected officers were installed, and the Grand Lodge closed its labors in ample form. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report was furnished, covering 118 pages, by Brother Thomas M. Matthews, P. G. M. Fifty-eight Journals had been reviewed, necessitating considerable condensing on the part of the Committee, as he started out with the announced pnrpose to be brief. 1 infer that his motto, "Brevity," was furnished by the powers that be. Brother Matthews is alw~ys interesting, because always fraternal, frank and independent. I glean from the hurried survey of his work that he holds views quite similar to those entertained by myself respecting a great many questions.

, Speaking on the subject of conferring degrees out of time, he says, "That even the action of a Texas Grand l\Iaster does not make it right, and that he would condemn such a departure just as soon, if done by his Grand Lodge, as if performed by any other." In revie~;ing Louisiana, he speaks of a certain Committee, which he says treated me unkindly, and quoted a paragraph from the review of said Committee. I am sorry that Brother Matthe,Ys dignified said crit-


176

Appendix.

[Oct.

icism 6f the Louisiana Committee by giving it a place in his excellent review. If he had read my revie\" of Louisiana for 1890, he would have seen a reference to the same. I complimented the Louisiana Committee as follows: " His reference to this Committee was most gratifying. A compliment from him would have been humiliating!" I can only request Brother Matthews to allow me to say that I consider the source from which the" slap in the face," as he called it, emanated. From the brief conclusion of Brother Matthews, I make the following extract:. :My year's work is now done, and I am glad of it. The work is truly a pleasant one, but to one who feels as I do, a very responsible, as also a very laborious one. 'fhe most difficult problem to me has been, not so much what to bring to the attention of my Brethren, as what not to bring. I have shortened my work considerably this year, for two reasons: First. I was gently, but very plainly, admonished by those ill authority to do so; second. I had, ere receiving the admonition, myself determined to indulge less in comments, having in former reports fUlly expressed my own views and plainly set forth the attitude of our Grand Lodge upon all or most of the questions agitl:l.tlllg the Masonic mind. Nothing new has presented itself causing me to vary from the line proposed.

That Masonry .is 'growing in strength and influence almost every路where is beyond question. ~ia~hatnrfJ:uencebe ever exerted for the advancement, socially and morally, of man. . To that end let us one and all. with BROTHERLY LOVE. RELIEF AND TRUTH inscribed upon our banners, press nobly forward. till the now dappling' dawn shall have broadened and brightened into the perfect day, and all peoples and tongues recognize and acknowledge the ,. FATHERHOOD of God and the BROTHERHOOD of man."

GEORGE 'V'. TYLER, Belton, Grand Master, WILLIA.M F. SvVAIN, Houston, Grand Secretary.

UTAH,

1891.

The Annual sent out by Brother Diehl, the Grand Secretary, has a bright ane cheery look. It seems to partake of the freshness and airy surrollndings of that lofty region. The Journal contains the record of two Special Communications, held for the purpose of laying corner-stones. The Grand Master officiated in both instances. The Twentieth Annual Communication was held in Salt Lake:"City, beginning January 20th. Arthur M. Grant was Grand Master and Brother Christopher Diehl, Grand Secretary.


1891.]

Appendix.

177

The seven Lodges in the Jurisdiction were represented. These Lodges have a ~embership of 486. There were in attendance nine Past Grand Masters, "rith a number of Past Masters and Representatives of thirty-nine Grand Lodges. The Address of the Grand Master, covering six pages, was devoted to a presentation of such business matters as had required his official consideration. He opened with congratulations, and said that eighteen years ago three Lodges held "a convention, which gave to the Masonic Fraternity of Utah a Grand Lodge." I cannot understand how this Communication was the twentieth, when the Grand Lodge was organized eighteen years before. The Grand Master announced the decease of two Past Grand Officers, Brother F. H. Church and William H. Randall; one had been Junior Grand Warden and the other Grand Chaplain. An obituary notice appears in the Journal, paying due tribute to these worthy deceased Brethren. The Grand Master said that he had visited officially every Lodge in the Jurisdiction. The statement is found in the Address that their relations with sister Grand Jurisdictions remain friendly and undisturbed, except with Nevada. There has been another disturbance between these Grand Lodges, growing out of the making of some one a Mason by som.e Lodge, in violation of Masonic rights. Two decisions were reported, which were sustained by the Committee on Jurisprudence. The first ruling was "that blank ballots are not to be counted in electing Grand Officers." The second decision declares tJ"lat a Worshipful Master has two votes on any question coming before the Lodge, aside from balloting for the degrees. "He has one in his own right, and has the right路to give the casting vote where a tie occurs." I have no disposition to criticise such finding, but do not believe that the policy is a good one. Indeed, I know of no law., and can conceive of none, founded in justice, that will permit such procedure. The Worshipful Master should give the casting vote where there is a tie, but should not vote in advance of such test. He refers somewhat extensively to their Grand Lodge Library. This adjunct to the Grand Lodge has some "eight thousand well selected volumes." From statements made in reference to the Library, it seems to be a luxury more expensive than profitable, as it requires $75 a month for room, besides other expenses, such as salaries, light, fuel, etc. G. L. Ap.-12.


178

Appendix.

[Oct.

These expenses have consumed the funds of the Library. The Committee, in reporting upon the matter, said the Fraternity was unable to provide for the further growth of the Library. It was recommended that a "General Library Association" be organized, into which their Library is to be merged, retaining such strictly Masonic books as they own. The Grand Master made reference to Cerneauism in the following terms: Myself and the nrand Secretary have received scores of circulars and pamphlets treating uI?on that parasite in Freemasonry known as the Cerneau Rite. In many sister JurisdictIOns it nas ruptured the fraternal ties heretofore existing betwecn Lodges and mcmbers. Wherever it has gained a shadow of a foothold quarrels and dissensions have followed its path. It has not hesitated t.o clamor for public favor in pm/ane newspapers, and to appeal to courts of common law t.o decide it.s illegitimate cause. So far our Jurisdiction ha.o;; been free from the disturbing element, and I hope that the resolution passed in 1889, and these few words of mine, in which I am convinced I do but voice the !'\entiments of every mcmber of this Grand Lodge, will prevent it from ever planting its Upa" Tree upon Utah soil.

May this hope be fully realized. The Grand Secretary, Brother Diehl, as usual, furnished a very interesting report, both as to statistical matters and general affairs~ I learn from the statements two things that indicate a very gratifying condition. The returns had been received from, and dues paid by, all the Lod~es, and no appeals had been presented for consideration. The Grand Lodge dues amounted to some $1,500. There had been expended for charity in the Jurisdiction $1,300. Money in the treasuriesof the several Lodges amounted to nearly $13,000. The value of property owned by the Lodges, over $8,000. The work of Brother Diehl, as Grand Secretary, was highly commended by the Committee. He presented a special report concerning the formation of the Grand of New Zealand and Tasmania. The former was not recognized. The latter received a hearty welcome into the sisterhood of Grand Lodges, and an exchange of Grand Representatives was recommended. Lod~es

During the session the work in the Third Degree was exemplified by the Grand Lecturer. The candidate who was raised to the sublime degree of ,Master Mason was Brother Charles S. Blackmar, the son of our distinguished Brother and friend, Edwin C. Blackmar, now of St. Louis, Past Grand Master of Masons of Iowa. The Grand Lodge very fraternally requested the retiring Grand Master, Brother Grant, to furnish his portrait, to be placed among the


1891.]

Appendix.

179

likenesses of his illustrious predecessors. In Missouri the Grand Lodge secures the portraits of its Past Grand Masters and foots the bill. CORRESPONDENCE.

The work of review for the year was prepared by Brother Diehl, and covers seventy-nine pages, embracing an examination of the Journals of fifty-five Grand Lodges. He reviews carefully, comments freely, extracts discreetly, and writes pleasantly .. He holds with myself that Cerneauism "ought to have been left alone from the beginning." He is kind in his notice of the Aq.dress of Grand Master Brace, and the work of myself as Grand Secretary and Committee on Correspo~d足 ence. Having accomplished the work assigned him as Committee, he completed his report in the following terms: And now, having reviewed the Proceedings of the fifty-five American sister Granl! Lodges, we have once more reached the end -and fraternally submit the result of ourlabor to our Utah Brethren. For its many imperfections we ask the indulgence of the generolls readers. We have done the best we could, and hope the report will, at least, merit a perusal, and repay all who may take the time to examine it. If it is of any benefit to the Craft in Utah we shall consider it a liberal recompense for loss of sleep and wear)' hours. The present status of Freemasonry is encouraging. Progress is noticed all along the line. The Institution advances constantly and not only in numbers, but also in moral-

ity and purity of principles.

Brother Diehl is to be congratulated, not only as to his work as a Committee, but respecting his facility in bringing out the Grand L~dge Proceedings, and their excellence. He calls our attention to the fact that the Journal of his Grand Lodge for 1891 had been printe~ and issued in thirty working'days after the close of the session. He said: "It is the best we can do in the Mormon Isle." If all other Grand Secretaries would do as well, the Missouri Committee would have no occasion to grumble, criticise or complain about their tardiness. I again take a regretful leave of Brother Diehl, hoping we may meet, as of yore, in the pleasant fields of correspondence. He was re-elected Grand Secretary and re-appoiilted Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence. The Grand Master-elect is William Grant Van Horne, Salt -Lake City.


180

Append.ix.

[Oct.

VERMONT, 1890. In my review last year of the Vermont Proceedings for 1889, I expressed the hope that the Journal for 1890 would reach me in time for consideration. That hope was not realized. If hope deferred maketh the heart sick every time Committees on Correspondence fail to receive Grand Lodge Proceedings, there must be general dilapidation among the Guild. The Ninety-seventh Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Vermont, opened in the City of Burlington, June 11, 1890. M. W. Bro. George W. vYing, Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. Lavant M. Read, Grand Secretary. Ninety Lodges were represented, out of one hundred on the roll. The membership of that Jurisdiction amounts to 8,742. There were six Past Grana. Masters present and Representatives of thirty Grand Lodges. Brother H. H. Smith, P. G. M., the Missouri Representative, was in attendance. An Address covering nine pages, presented by Grand Master Wing, opened with grateful mention of their exemption from flood and fire, cyclone and pestilence. He said they were free from dissensions and were at peace among themselves, general harmony prevailing. He referred fraternally to the dead of sister Jurisdictions. Some special dispensations had been granted, which he reported. From the reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters, he said that" all the Jurisdiction was alive with earnestness and zeal." Visits made by him to the Lodges were reported with much satisfaction. The Address was brief and local. The Grand Lodge accepted an invitation to take a boat ride, during its session, and seems to have had a good time. The report of the Grand Lecturer was quite extended and full. Grand Secretary Read submitted a brief report, announcing that the . Grand Lodge finances are so reduced, that the balance would soon be on the wrong side of the ledger. A Committee was appointed to consider the financial interests of the Body, and report at its next session. The Grand Secretary announced in his report an intention to retire from the office, which he did.


1891.J

Appendix.

181

Brother M. O. Perkins, Committee on Correspondence, submitted a special report, recommending the recognition of the Grand Lodges of South Dakota, New South Wales and Victoria. The report was adopted and these Grand Lodges duly recognized among the Grand Lodges of the world. There is nothing of general interest further claiming attention. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Committee, Brother Marsh O. Perkins, presented a review of some fifty Grand Lodge Proceedings, covering 107 pages. Brother Perkins, like others of us, ornaments his review liberally with extracts . from the Journals examined, and summarizes the matter studied very well. Our Missouri Journal for 1889 was assign,ed some four pages in his review. He was kind and complimentary to the work of onr Grand Lodge. The Address of Grand Master Wood was characterized as "a carefully prepared" document. Several extracts were made\ from our Journal, sJ:towing that the Committee had read the work. Alluding to the facility with which I brought out the Grand Lodge Journal of that year, he said I "had broken the record," and must have" powers of persuasion with the printer." Yes, my "printer" is susceptible, and always does what I wish performed, not only as I want it, but 'When I want it, done. Brothel' Perkins was very complimentary to my work as a reviewer. He closes his labors with fraternal expressions of good will toward the Guild. Brother George W. Wing, Montpelier, Grand Master. The new Grand Secretary, Brother Warren G. Reynolds, lives at Burlington. Brother Marsh O. Perkins; reappointed Committee on Correspondence.

VERMONT,

1891.

The Ninety-eighth Annual Communication was held in the City of Burlington, commencing July 10th. A handsomely prepared volume containing 374 pages, was received by me in thirty days. M. W. Bro. George 'V. Wing was Grand Master. Brother Warren G. Reynolds was Grand Secretary. The attendance was quite f~ll, being a large list


182

[Oct.

Appendix.

of present and past Grand Officers, representatives of Lodges, and of thirty-nine Grand Lodges. Missouri was represented by our Brother Henry H. Smith, P. G. M. An Address of fifteen pages was furnished by the Grand Master, being his second report from the Grand East of Vermont. After presenting a very attractive exordium, the Grand Master enumerated the fraternal dead of the Jurisdiction. Among them was the venerable and honored John D. Hollenbeck, P. G. M. This greatly venerated Brother died in May, 1891, being ninety-nine years and three months old. In the admirable sketch furnished by Grand Master Wing, I learn that Brother Hollenbeck was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was made a Mason on May 14, 1814, and had been identified with the fraternity for seventy-seven years. He had served- the Craft in his Jurisdiction as Grand Secretary and Grand Recorder of all the Grand Bodies for a greater or less number of years. He was Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge for twenty-nine years. Adding up all the years of his service in those four Bodies, they amount to eighty-three years. The .Grand Secretary said in the following sketch, that he had been in active service for forty years: At the ai!e of four score years, after active services for forty years in these Grand Bodies he laid aside the cares of office, but to the very last retained his interest in all that pertained to the conduct and welfare of the Grand Lodge of Vermont.. He had been the custodian of its archives and records at a time when it required moral courage to be known a..<; a Mason, or to avow one's self as such. But he quailed not before the anti-masonic storm, and was one of the faithful who kept the altar fires alight during that dark period, and lived to see it once more take its place among those institutions laboring for the advancement and upbuilding of humanity, honored and respected by ~l

.

Grand Master Wing reported divers dispensations, dedications, and other official 路acts performed during his term. He announced that numerous decisions had been rendered, but none of them of such importance as to deserve mention, or being reported. In treating of the condition of the Craft he said that the facts available furnished reason for congratulation as to the admirable condition of the Fraternity in the Jurisdiction. The year had been a fairly prosperous one, peace and harmony having prevaHed among the Lodges. Nothing had occurred to interrupt fraternal relations between that Grand Lodge and other Jurisdictions. In closing his very able and practical Address, at the end of two years' faithful service, he tendered his grateful acknowledgements to the Grand Lodge for honors conferred u'pon him, as their chief officer. The ieport of the Grand Lecturer, Brother Nicholson, indicates a competent officer and a practical ,vorker.


1891.]

Appendix.

183

. The report of Brother Reynolds, .Grand Secretary, evidences that the Grand Lodge of Vermont has the right man in the right place. His report was brief, but a thorough business paper. He announced that there had been a larger numbeT of initiations during the term than for twenty years, 463 having received the mysteries. The total income for the year was over $3,000. All the Lodges) 103 in number, had reported, with the exception of one. The membership in the foregoing Lodges amounts to 8,889. The Address of Grand Master Wing was pronounced by the Committee "a masterly and finished paper." His work, with that of the Grand Lecturer and District Deputy Grand Masters, was highly commended. Something was said by a committee respecting the finances. In order that this branch of the Grand Lodge business might be carefully 'determined at each session, and to prevent expenses bein~ larger than the income, a resolution was adopted fixing the salaries at a permanent figure. The Grand Master was allowed $150; the Grand Secretary, $350; Committee on Correspondence, $100. Other small amounts were provided for. The whole outlay for the year footed up' about $800. The Grand Lodge of Vermont, in 1887, had issued an order to its Subordinate Lodges to hold no Masonic intercourse with the Grand Lodge of England and its Subordinates. This order was vacated and annulled on the report of the Committee on Correspondence. The purpose contemplated by this action was to exercise, if possible, some influence in securing an adjustment of the contest between the Grand Lodges of England and Quebec. The labors of the Ninety-eighth Annual Communication closed on the second day, various thanks being voted by the Grand Lodge. The Journal under consideration contains an account of meetings of what we should call "State Lodges of Instruction," at which Brother D. N. Nicholson, Grand Lecturer, presided. An address of rare merit was deli vered by him at one of these sessions. The various District Deputies furnished their annual reports, which 5:Lre incorporated in the Journal .. Beautiful memorial tablets commemorate the life路 and . worth of a number of deceased Brethren of that and other Jurisdictions. CORRESPOXDENCE.

Brother Marsh O. Perkins, Committee, rendered another capital report, covering 110 pages, in which he reviewed the Journals of fift.y-


184

Appendix.

[Oct.

one Grand Lodges, some of them for two years. Brother Perkins is an admirable reviewer. He is a candid and conservative writer, gleans wisely and comments discreetly. ,His report is well filled with excerpts, accompanied by strong and clear expressions of his own views. Our Journal of 1890 recehred a three page notice. In it, he quoted from the Address of Grand Master Brace and alluded to our Home enterprise as the" brightness of the crowning glory of Missouri Masonry." He said that my Report on Corresponden~e was the ablest he had seen from my pen; and did me the credit to make liberal extracts therefrom. I do not understand one remark in his courteous allusions to our Missouri Proceedings. He mentions the lateness of the hour in which they were received, April 29th. It must be that Brother Reynolds, the Grand Secretary, failed to forward the Journal to Brother Perkins. The Proceedings were forwarded to and received by Brother Reynolds, Grand Secretary, ih October. Why the Committee on Correspondence should not have received them for six months, is more than I can understand. It would be a capital arrangement if all the Committees on Correspondence were known to the Grand Secretaries so that in sending out the Proceedings to the different Grand Lodges, copies might be sent directly to the Chairman of the Committee. Brother Perkins, in concluding his very interesting labors, mentions the fact that he could not recommend the recognition, at that time, of either the Grand Lodge路of Tasmania or New Zealand. From the light before me, I endorse his views, and am not ready to ask the Grand Lodge of Missouri to accord to these distant Grand Bodies a fraternal welcome into the family of Grand Lodges. I take leave of Brother Perkins with best fraternal regards, and am to recoz:d the fact that he was continued as Committee on Correspondence, with headquarters at 路Windsor. DELOS M. BACON, St. Johnsbury Center, Grand Master. WARREN G. REYNOLDS, Burlington, Grand Secretary. ~lad

VIRGINIA, 1890. In entering upon the work of reviewing the Virginia Journal, I feel, as has often been my experience, like visiting familiar places, where I expect to meet old and familiar faces. Virginia is the sunny spot of the Southland to me. Whether'! visit the" Old Dominion" in person, hold communication with her people in spirit, or ramble over her m.ountains and through her vales in dreams, it is always a delight and


~891.J

Appendix.

185

a joy. I路 路begin the work of reviewing the J Qurnal for 1890 with pleasureable anticipations, though somewhat lessened by the fact that I shall not have a season of fraternal converse with a valued friend and Brother in the realm of correspondence. The 113th Annual Communication was opened in " Richmond on the James," December 9, 1890. 1\:1. W. Bro. Robert T. Craighill, Grand Master; Brother William B. Isaacs, Grand Secretary. In addition to a large representation from Subordinate Lodges, th'ere were present Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers, with Representatives of eighteen Grand Lodges. An Address of some five pages contained such matters as the Grand Master deemed proper to present to the Body. He said the Grand Jurisdiction was in a highly satisfactory condition. The year had been marked by quiet and orderly progress, like the movement of the planets. Peace, plenty and prosperity had blessed the Commonwealth, while material development had crowned the hopes and efforts of the people. With this onward march of the State, the Masonic Fraternity had' kept pace. He said that路 ten Lodges had been created under dispensation. These were chartered by the Grand Lodge. Special dispensations, corner-stone layings in several instances, and other local matters were duly reported. He called special attention to their cherished enterprise now engaging the best thought of Virginia Masons; namely, the Masonic Home. From his remarks, I make the following extract: This noble charity-the child of our belovcd Brother Babcock's bencficence-has, in the short space of a year, taken its place among the institutions of our State and country, and bids fair already to rival the greatest and best of them in the near future. I invite your attention to'the report which will be submitted at this Grand Communication by the Board of Governors, that yOll may judge for yourselvcs of the hold which the" Masonic Home of Virginia" has taken upon the minds and hcarts of the Masons of Virginia, in whose hands, under Providence, it is safe to predict that its progress and development are assured bcyond all peradventure. :My own appreciation of the importance of the Institution is abundantly shown by the character of the mcn and Masons I have appointed as its Board of Governors. viz.: A. G. Babcock. Hon. Beverly R. Wellford, Jr.. A: R. Courtnev, David .J. Weisiger. J. Thompson Brown, John S. Ellett, Hon. Wm. Lovenslein, 1. S. Tower, and Rev. George H. Ray. With such managers, and with such aims, the" Masonic Home" needs no suggestion or words of commendation from me, but is its own best appeal to the Lodges and Masons of Virginia.

A report on this interest was rendered by the Managers, from which I gather some interesting facts. The organization has acquired, by gift, something over forty acres of excellent land, worth not less than $10,000. Upon these premises it is proposed to erect an imposing brick' structure, which, with the buildings now in use, will be suffieient to


186

Appendi:c:

[O~t.

meet the probable wants of the Home for a number of years. From the report of the Managing Board, I make the following extract, which will be read with interest: There is little doubt but that, in the near future, Masonic Homes will be established in every State in this country. Our Vir~inia Home, being comparatively new,its objects, wants and needs have not yet been Impressed, lIS we desire that they should be, upon some of our Lodges. and we doubt not that when this is done, and sustained by the .unqualified endorsement of the Grand Lodge, that the Lodges throughout the State will, without exception, come to the support of the Home.

The Grand Lodge adopted a recommendation that the 24th of June shall be set apart as the time when the Lodges of Virginia shall endeavor to raise the needed funds to aid the Masonic Home. Grand Master Craighill reported three decisions, which were approved. He ruled, what is received as current law, that service in a Lodge under dispensation, however long it may be, cannot constitute the Master of said Lodge a Past Master. He further decided, what is common law among the Jurisdictions of this country, that the Wardens, in the order of succession, have all the powers of the 'Worshipful Master, in his absence. This ruling is practical and provides Lodges, at all times, with an official head, unless the 'Wardens, like the Master, should be absent. The Journal contains the reports of the Grand and District Lecturers, and of the several District Deputy Grand Masters. These reports occupied considerable space in the Proceedings. The intelligence having reached the Grand Lodge that Past Grand Master Francis H. Hill had been sorely bereaved by the death of his 路cherished wife, resolutions of sympathy were adopted and forwarded to the stricken Brother. An extended report on the condition and progress of their grand hall in Richmond, was rendered. Delays and disappointments had occurred, preventing the occupancy of the building at the time expected. The announcement was made that they hoped to be in it during the year 1891. An intertesting and pleasing report was presented by the Committee on Grand Master's Addrese, complimenting that official very highly, and deservedly so. In the report of the Committee on Doings of Grand Officers, Brother Isaacs, the Grand Secretary, received a flattering notice. He was called a "model Grand Secretary." They further said, "He is a faithful, efficient and valuable officer of the Grand Lodge."


Appendix.

1891.J

. 187

The Report oil Jurisprudence was an extended one, and embraced many findings of interest.

.-

The Committee on Appeals said that nothing had been presented for action during the term. This is a .good :sign. It evidences harmony among the Brethren. The Grand Lodge of Virginia has a Committee on History. An extended and interesting history had been prepared by Brother S. J. Quinn, of Fredericksburg Lodge, No. 4.. It was resolved to print said history with the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. I find the work in the Journal, and have read it with much interest. It covers sixty-five pages of the Journal, and affords valuable information, as well as profit in its perusal. This Lodge has had a long and varied history. The writer states that it had survived three wars, and is in a flourishing condition to-day. A list of names of the old members is furnished. Among these stands pre-eminently the name of Washington. Looking over this lir:st, I meet with names, many of whose descendants I have' known. And it was well said by the writer that many of them distinguished themselves in the civil and military service of the State and country. Brother Quinn, author of this historical sketch, will receive the appreciative commendations' of many Masons outside of the "Old Dominion." The Grand Lodge of Virginia continues to furnish a guide book to tramps by publishing the membership of the State by Lodges. The Journal contains no Report on Correspondence this -year. The reason is furnished by the Grand Master in his Address, and is as follows: Owing to the continued ill health of our beloved Brother, Most Worshipful Wm. F. Drinkard, Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. I reg-ret to say, that no report on that suhject will be submitted at this meeting of the Grand Lodge. While a ~eneral regret will be felt at this omission in our own and many other Grand .Jurisdictions, yct I am confident that a much more poignant regret will prcvail because of the indisposition of our gifted Chairman. I pray God he may soon be restored to good health and to his pre-eminent usefulness amoug 11S. â&#x20AC;˘

The absence of Brother J;:>rinkard's ch~ery words and genial spirit from the Journal of Virginia, causes a blank that nothing will fill . .From personal considerations and reportorial association, I feel that his inability to furnish a review for the past year, is a serious loss and one to, be deplored by all. I join sincerely in the prayer of the Grand Master in' the above extract, "~hat God may soon restore him to good health and pre-eminent usefulness." J.. H. W AYT, Staunton, Grand Master. WILLIAM B. JSAACS, Richmond, Grand Secretary.


188

Appendix.

WASHINGTON.

[Oct. 1890.

For some years past the Journal of the Grand Lodge of Washington has failed to reach me in time for review during the year of its publication. Hence the Proceedings go over for another term. Such was the case respecting the Journal of 1890. The Thirty-third Annual Communication was held in Ellensburg, June 10th. Brother William A. Fairweather was Grand Master, and Brother Thomas M. Reed, Grand Secretary. A good list of Past Grand Officers, with Representatives of twentyfour Grand Lodges, were present at the opening of the session. The record shows the presence of Representatives of fifty-five Subordinate Lodges. From the recapitulation of the Grand Secretary, it is learned that there are sixty-two ,,';orking Lodges in that Jurisdiction, with a total membership of over 3,000. The gain for the year is reported at .478. . The Grand Lodge laid the corner-stone of a Masonic Temple during the first day's session. A docnment covering ten pages, full of busi ness , represented the official labor of the Grand Master. The Address was pronounced "a very able one" by the Committee. The Grand Master mentioned in pathetic terms the death of Brother Thomas T. Minor, Past Grand Master, who was drowned accidentally on Puget Sound. lIe was Grand Master in '1875. Very touching and eloquent tributes were paid to his memory during the session, as shown by the report of a committee and the addresses of Brethren personally. Ten new Lodges had been created during the term, under dispensation. The Grand Master scheduled his official acts in the order of their performance. He announced that no decisions would be reported, as all questions submitted to him had been adjusted according to the law in existence. He argued forcibly and earnestly against the custom of Subordinate Lodges jointly occupying halls with non-masonic associations.

It was announced that the relations of the Grand Lodge of Washington with other Jurisdictions were harmonious.


1891.J

Appendix.

189

The Grand :Master 'stated that he had visited quite a number of Lodges, and found them enjoying a good degree of prosperity ~nd harmony. He submitted some practical recommendations and closed his Address by offering, in complimentary terms, his thanks to the Grand Secretary, Brother Reed, for "wise counsel and good judgment." The report of Brother Reed, Grand Secretary, is a thorough business document. He stated that the Lodges are in a very prosperous condition generally. This was evidenced by a large increase of members and general fi.r:tancial prosperity. The statement is found in his report that t:p.e Grand Lodge is in a better financial condition than ever before in its t~irty-two yea~s of existence. The balance on hand amOUlits to $5,000. Brother Reed is a very efficient and competent Secretary, and received a just compliment from the Committee on "Doings of the Grand Officers." The Committee said that he was entitled to the thanks of the Grand Lodge for his honest and efficient services for the past thirtytwo years. From this it is inferred that Brother Reed has been Grand Secretary since the organization of the Grand Lo'dge. Ten charters were granted.

The pay roll amounted to $2,000.

Much business of minor note was transacted. I see from the record that myoId friend and companion of other years is still Grand Chaplain. For twenty-five years I have kno"nl and loved Rev. H. W. Ragan with a brotherly feeling and sincerity of affection which time cannot abate.

The Proceedings under review contain a picture of Brother Thomas M. Reed, Grand Secretary. The membership of the Jurisdiction is published by Lodges. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report covering sixty-three pages appears in the Journal. Brother Reed was the Committee appointed, and Brother Louis Ziegler did the work. The review contains an examination of fifty Grand Lodge Journals. Brother Ziegler opens his report with the following explanation: We herewith again present our Report on Correspondence. As In time past, this duty was assigned to Brother Reed, Chairman, but he is again occupied by duties of thc commonwealth which consnme all his time: he, therefore. at a late hour, requested us to prepare this report in his stead and in his behalf, to which we reluctantly cOllsented, knowing as we do that the purposes of this report are not so fully met, and the best interests of the Craft not so well served b)' us, as they would be had Brother Reed performed that duty. .


190

Appendix.

[Oct.

He is a very vigorous writer, a good gleaner and an outspoken reviewer. His criticisms are numerous and often just, but sometimes tinged with a carping color. He is definite in his opposition to the spirit of Grand I.. odge meddlesomeness concerning the Cerneau business. Speaking of his own relation to the Scotch Rite Institution, he announced his good standing in all the bodies of the Rite. Yet he cannot see why the controversy should concern Symbolic Masons, or Grand Lodges thereof. He wisely says: "Therefore, let us keep our fingers out of the fire that burns upon our neighbors' hearthstones, lest we burn them." Let me add that we should not allow ourselves to be used by monkeys to pull their chestnnts out of the fire. He commended the good sense exhibited by the Grand Lodge of Delaware for "refusing to be embroiled in this unholy controversy of the so-called Orders." Elsewhere in his report Brother Ziegler characterizes Grand Lodge meddling with the Cerneau question as "a farce." I have had my say on this subject, and have said as many and as vigorous things as need be nttered on that question. ' I notice that Brother Ziegler took in hand M. W. Bro. John C. Smith, Past Grand Master of Illinois. He was very vigorous in his methods of treating the views held by that eminent Brother. In reviewing Missouri he paid very kind compliments to Brother Wood, Grand Master, and his work. At the same time he quoted a compliment of Brother Wood paid to the Grand Secretary of Missouri, and called it a beautiful one. He said in reference to my publishing the Grand Lodge Proceedings in 1889, so soon after the close of the session, that it was the "quickest' work on record." I may reply that it was the quickest work then "on record," but that "record" has since been broken. I Brother Ziegler believes in punishing lewd fellows of the baser sort, as shown by the following comment, which I transfer to this report: Past Grand Master Givan presented a very able report from the Committee on Appeals, who reviewed and very properly disposed of seventeen cases. Here Brother Vincil showed his worth to his Grand Lodge and his excellent moral qualities. When the committee reported to remand the appeal froIn Spring Creek Lodge, ~o. 347, back to said Lodge for a new trial-in which case one Brother D. E. Cowan was sllspended for six months by said Lodge for attempting to seduce a Master Mason's daughter. and that, too, his own cousin-Brother Vincil promptly moved to amend said report by expelling said D. E. Cowlln from all the rIghts and privileges of Masonry, and the Grand Lodge adopted the amendment. We say amen to all such good work.

Brother Ziegler concludes his labor of love thus: Our task is done, our work is finished, with all its attractions (if anv there are), and all its imperfections (of which we know there are many). For the' former we can scarcely hope for; of the latter we know there are many. We ask the indulgence of the generous Inllld. We have done our b~st for the time allotted. This report was. written during the short evening hours of the three summer monthS, which were often stretched


1891.)

Appendix.

191

to the "wee sma" hours of the morning. We often burned the midnight oil in writing this, whilst the Chairman of this Committee enjoyed the sweet repose within the bosom of his family (we hope). Yet, whilst he insisted lind claimed utter inability for want of time to writ,e the same, we assumed the task reluctantly.

Desiring to reserve some space for a possible review of the Proceedings of 1891, I close my notice of 'Vashington for the present. JAMES E. EDMISTON, Dayton, Grand Master. THOMAS M. REED, Olympia, Grand Secretary.

WEST VIRGINIA,

1890.

I am in possession of this Grand Lodge Journal, which came to hand just six months after the Twenty-sixth Annual Communication closed its labors. The session was held in the city of Charleston, commencing on the 11th day of November. M. "V. Brother Frank Burt, Grand Master, presided, and Past Grand Master George 'V. Atkinson was Grand Secretary. The Journal contains the record of nine Special Communications. From a very complete recapitulation furnished by the Grand Secretary, I learn that there are eighty-seven working Lodges in that Jurisdiction. Of these eighty-six were represented and eighty-five had made returns. The membership amounts to 4,131. There were present a number of Past Grand Officers and Representatives of Grand Lodges. An Address of seventeen pages was furnished by the Grand Master, with an admirable exol;dium, followed by a schedule of business affairs which had claimed his attention. Two IJodges had been created under dispensation. North Dakota was'duly recognized. Numerous dispensations had been granted for special purposes. This, with a number of official matters, bearing upon the interests of the Craft, made up the body of the Address. Eighteen decisions were formulated by the Grand Master. The Committee on Jurisprudence passed upon these rulings and said that the Grand 'Master had, for the most part, correctly declared the law as it exists in that Grand Jurisdiction, and was well sustained by authority. They called in question Decision No. 12, which touches upon physical perfection. The Committee well said that this vexed question of physical perfection of a candidate should be settled finally by a decision, and then require compliance therewith. The Grand Master decided that a person whose right leg was three inches shorter' than the left is


192

Appendix.

[Oct.

eligible for the mysteries of Freemasonry. The Committee overruled the decision, basing its action upon two former rulings bearing upon the physical condition of a'pplicants. A motion was made by Grand Secretary Atkinson to disagree with the report of the Committee. His motion was lost. He then moved a substitute for that portion of the Committee's report which differed from the Grand "Master. This substitute was likewise defeated. Brother Atkinson got left in both cases. He, like the present writer, believes in a liberal interpretation of the law governing physical qualifications. He is a liberal constructionist. The Grand Master decided, and the Grand Lodge approved the ruling, that Lodges under dispensation cannot give dimits, collect dues, affiliate Masons, or bury a deceased Brother. May I be allowed to ask the question, what do such Lodges exist for? I will be met with the reply that they are created to make Masons. The answer is accepted. Then they are denied all authority to do what is less than that for which they were created. It will not be denied that to affiliate Masons already made, or to bury a brother Master Arason, is less important and involves less responsibility than making Masons. I regard the law, as presented above, found in the code of 'Vest Virginia, as well as in that of some other Jurisdictions, a very peculiar thing. The Grand Master announced fraternal accord existing between his Grand Lodge and all other sister Jurisdictions. The condition of the Craft is indicated by him as one of average activity and healthfulness. I close my review of his very superior report by making the following extract therefrom, and giving his utterances unqualified commendation: You will observe from the reports of the District Deputy Grand 'Master that a large majority of the Lodges are in good shape, and of necessity casting an influence for the betterment of their fellows, and the moral welfare of their respective communities. To uphold and perpetuate our Institution, such must be the character and influence of indio VIdual Masons, A genuine 'Nfason must be a good man. When the precepts of Freemasonry are trampled under foot, then the Institution will sink to the level of modern societies. Then I beseech you, my Brethren, while we are taking heed to walk squarely before God and man, that heed be taken also of the character of those who may knock at our doors. It should be so to-day, and always, that :Masonry and true manhood are synonymous. Is it so? Is the name of the Most High always reverenced? Are there none with brain steeped by intoxicants? God pity them and justly punish those others who, for the sake of gain, make brutes of human beings. I do not ask for perfection, but I do cxpect of Masons such a manhood as will not dishonor an Institution that teaches moralit)'. â&#x20AC;˘

Over thirty pages of the Journal are occupied with reports of District Deputy Grand Masters. Nearly thirty pages are filled with reports of the Committee on By-Laws of Subordinate Lodges.


1891.]

Appendix.

193

I notice in the Proceedings that the l\Iaster of a given Lodge, who was present during the session of the Grand Lodge, was accused of unmasonic conduct. In consequence of this charg~, the Grand Master appointed a Committee of Investigation. The aforesaid Master was suspended from office until the conclusion of the investigation. Perhaps this unfortunate Brother had followed the example of one in Texas, a few years ago, who visited the "Blind Tiger" and became disgracefully familiar with resorts of "lewd fellows of the baser sort~" Perhaps he was not in favor of that necessary cardinal virtue in Masonry known as "Temperance." The Journal under review contains pictures of Grand Master Hamilton, recently installed, and Past Grand Master William H. H. Flick. Brief sketches of the lives and characters of these distinguished Brethren were furnished by Brother George W. Atkinson, Grand Secretary. CORRESPONDENCE.

A very brief report was submitted by the Committee, Brother Atkinson, covering fifty-seven pages. Missouri was courteously recognized by the Committee, and two pages allotted us in his brief space. His quotations from Grand Master Brace and from this Committee made up his notice of Missouri. Brother Atkinson accounted for the brevity of his report in the following language, which I clip from the opening page of his review: Past Grand Master Geo. W. Atkinson, the Chairman of the Committee, presented the following brief report on Foreign Correspondence. His custom hitherto, for a number of years, has been to prepare a review of all the Grand Lodges of the world; bnt this year, circumstances, over which he had no control, prevented him from presenting his usual extended review of each Grand Lodge, which duty he has performed with no small degree of plcasure. He is frank in his admission that no man, however great his energy and industry may be, can fill a seat in the American Congress, and perform his duties at all satisfactory to his constituents, and find time to write a systematic review of aU the Grand Lodges of the world. As .Josh Billings Ilsed to say, "The thing can't be did." Next year, Providence permitting, his usual "long-winded" report may be expected, as the writer has retired to the shades of private life. and, for some time to come, will carr)' on business" at the old stand" in the enterprising city of Wheeling.

I hope that he may appropriate both time and space in future to the preparation of a Report on Correspondence, such as he is capable of producing. JOHN M. HAMILTON, Grantsville, Grand Master. GEORGE 路W. ATKINSON, P. G. M., Wheeling, Grand Secretary.

G. L. Ap.-13.


194

Appendix.

[Oct.

WISCONSIN, 1891. The Journal of this Grand Lodge is always attractive, being neat as a spring flower, bright as sunshine, and elegantly arranged. The Forty-seventh Annual Communication met in the City of Milwaukee on the 9th day of June. In a few weeks thereafter, a Journal of more than 200 pages was received. 1\1. ",V. Bro. N. M. Littlejohn, was Grand Master; John W. Laflin, the Grand Secretary, knows how to do things, and does them. The recapitulation furnished by the Grand Secretary shows a membership of 13,889, in 217 Lodges, being an increase of 253. The attendance was. large, consisting of representatives of 200 Lodges, and Past Grand officers, together with permanent members, and Representatives of Grand Lodges. A particularly interesting Address, of twenty pages, was delivered by Grand Master Littlejohn. In his exordium, he said, "most of our constituent Lodges are in a strong and healthy condition, and many of them have made unusual advancement, not only in membership, but in the excellent and impressive manner in which they conduct the work of the Lodge." The Grand Master expressed the belief that the material being wrought into the Temple, is selected with care and great fidelity, to the interest of the Craft. I must make another quotation from'his bright and sparkling Address. The Grand Master said, that "members of the Order are beginning to realize more fully, that something beyond mere membership in the Lodge is necessary to distinguish them as true Masons." I am glad to meet with such a sentiment emanating from one high in authority, and in the estimation of his Brethren. 'When this lesson is well learned, Masonry ,,,ill mean more to its members than heretofore. It is to be feared that many of our Brethren regard Masonry more as a mere social organization, than for wh~t it really is. If the principles of the Institution are incarnated in our nature, and control our lives, we will be better men by reason of connection with ~~ft.

'

Brother Littlejohn stated that the death roll in their Jurisdiction was a large one, embracing two Past Grand Officers of the Body, as well as over 200 members of different Lodges. He recorded at considerable length the life history of a veteran Mason and citizen, recently deceased. Brother John H. Rountree, who had been a member of


1891.J

Appendix.

195

the Fraternity for sixty-two years, died at the advanced age of eightyfive. He had filled prominent positions in the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter in that State', having been at one time, Grand High Priest of the latter body. He had also occupied important positions in the State, and was recognized as an excellent man, a good Christian, and an eminent ~itizen. The prominent dead of other Jurisdictions were fraternally remembered. . DECISIONS.

The Grand Master said that from a largenumber of decisions made, he had selected a few of general interest. Fifteen rulings were reported and subsequently approved by the Committee on Jnrisprudence. I have read and studied carefully these decisions. The man who wrote them was certainly familiar with the principles of Masonic law,' and gave expression to sound thought, making a clear exposition of Mason'ic Jurisprudence. I am not sure that I understand the meaning of one ruling. To the question presented, "whether an objection would be entertained to the petition of a member for affiliation," he replied, "there is no Masonic law, authorbdng an objection to affiliation." I presume he intended to convey the idea that there is no Masonic law in that Jurisdiction; allowing objection to affiliation. It is otherwise in Missouri. An objection filed to the affiliation of a Master Mason seeking membership in a Lodge, is as valid with us as an objection to the advancement of a candidate. I believe the principle is right, and that an objectionable party should be barred admission into the Lodge on his petition for affiliation, and that the objection should hold good as against him so long as the objector permits it to stand. There are cogent reasons why such objections should obtain and prevent the affiliation of persons whose presence, among the members of the Lodge, would be offensive. To depend alone upon the possibilities of rejection by ballot, would render it difficult to prevent the admission of such objectionable material. ,The objector cannot always be present at a Lodge meeting when the ballot is spread upon applications, and the objectionable party might thus become affiliated against the wish of someone whose will should control in the case. ' On a proposition to change the meetings of a ,Lodge from one place to another, the Grand Master decided that "such change is an amendment to the charter," and c~m be approved only by the Grand Lodge; and added, "the Grand Master has no authority to act in the matter." I presume that this ruling is in harmony with the laws of the Grand Lodge of \Visconsin. I question its practical working, and I certainly do not agree in the expression that the "Grand Master has no authority t.o act" in such cases.


196

Appendix.

[Oct.

路With these slight exceptions, the decisions of Grand Master Littlejohn furnished an admirable exhibit of the principles of Masonic law and custom. I do not criticise the rulings named from his standpoint, as doubtless they conform to the standards of their local government. He reported that sixty-four special dispensations had been granted during the year. Thirty-nine of these were to "dispense" with certain "provisions in the Constitution." That is a power belonging to, and exercised by, "Prerogative" Grand Masters, There may have been justification for all such dispensations, setting aside the Constitution by the Grand Master in 路Wisconsin. 路We have found in Missouri, no emergencies arising, justifying the suspension of any provision of our Constitution and By-Laws. Our Lodges have been so thoroughly educated with reference to this matter, that applications to dispense with the la~, are rarely ever heard of. We have a plain statute, \vhich declares that the Grand Master shall not sl,lspend any provision of our law. The B;ethren, being aware of this rule, do not hunt for opportunities to invoke the power of the Grand ::\iaster. In my observation, for thirty years, very few instances have ever existed where the power to suspend established laws should be exercised. The Grand Master granted permission in fourteen'instances, to the Order of Eastern Star to occupy Lodge rooms. This exercise of his official authority was warranted by an action of the Grand Lodge at its former session. He said that he was not a member of the Eastern Star, and not well qualified to speak of the results of its introduction in the State. My observation, for quite a number of years, has been that the organization and presence of Eastern Star Chapters in communities resulted in a new interest in Masonry, removing the prejudices of our sister women, entertained against the Order, and proved in every sense beneficial. The membership of that Order in Missouri is large and growing. To-day we have no more active and efficient workers in behaleof our great Masonic charity, the Masonic Home, than the noble women who are identified with Masonry, and who are operatin~ through the agency of the Order of the Eastern Star. The Grand Master said that the most fruitful source of loss in membership in that Jurisdiction, is "exclusion for non-payment of dues." He regards this as a growing evil, and that it should be tn some way corrected. Quoting a rei3olution adopted two years before, that the intemperate use of intoxicating liquors is a Masonic crime that ought to be restrained by trial and punishment, the Grand Master delivered a most interesting and appropriate homily.


1891.J

Appendix.

197

Another evil was vigorously reprobated by Gr~nd l\'laster Littlejohn. He justly condemned the practice existing in some Lodges, as destructive to the harmony and subversive to the true principles of Masonry, namely, the custom of soliciting votes for official position. The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin has been in existence for nearly fifty years. Year by year it has increased in numbers and influence, until now the membership reaches nearly 14,000. A most instructive and delightful essay was furnished by the Grand Master upon the "Principles and Mission of the Institution of Freemasonry," with which he closed his capital Address. Brief reports were rendered by the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer and Grand Trustees, furnishing a full and complete exhibit of the financial affairs of the Jurisdiction. The report of the Grand Lecturer is a very interesting and valuable paper. The Board of Trustees, in submitting its report, proposed the adoption of a series of resolutions, looking to the establishment and maintenance of an "Emergency Fund," from which charity might be drawn and disbursed. The report of the Committee was adopted, but the resolutions respecting the "Emergency Fund" were indefinitely postponed. From a detailed report of the Commi~tee on Returns of Lodges, I reach the conclnsion that Missouri is' not alone as to defective reports sent up by incompetent secretaries. The report just named furnishes about as many errors as we ordinarily find in such documents. The Lodges, created during the term under dispensations, were severally chartered. A brief and appropriate me.morial tribute was paid to the deceased members, mentioned by the Grand l\faster in his Address. The business路of the session was completed on the third day; a brief synopsis of which I路 have presented, so far as any matters of interest are concerned. The Jonrnal contains the minutes of Special Sessions, convened for the purposes of laying the corner-stone of a public library building, and of dedicating a hall. Appropriate and interesting addresses were made on both those occasions. CORRESPONDENCE.

The report submitted was sixt.y-four pages in length, containing brief reviews of forty~five Grand Lodge Journals. Brother D. McGregor, as


198

Appendix.

[Oct.

the Committee, performed the task admirably, in' view of the limited space occupied. The work is an epitome. In the limits occupied, the forty-five Grand Lodges were necessarily put on short rations. Missouri for 1890, received a courteous notice amounting to something over one page. The Address of Grand Master Brace was summarized, and the Missouri Grand Secretary called a "hustler." Brother McGregor is a pleasant writer and a good condenser. He quits when he is done. Grand :Master Littlejohn was honored by a re-election and has headquarters at White Water. The Grand Secretary, Brother John W. Laflin, is continued in office. His address is Milwaukee.

WYOMING,

1890路

A neat little annual of 120 pages, from Wyoming, does credit to the Grand Secretary, both as to style and the time of its preparation. It contains the transactions of the Sixteenth Annual Communication, which was held at Cheyenne, December 2, 1890.. The membership in that Juri'sdiction is given by Lodges, twelve in number, and amonnts to 650. Ten Lodges were represented, in addition to the presence of Past Grand Officers and Representatives of several Grand Lodges. Brother Leroy S. Barnes was Grand Master; Brother 'William L. Kuykendall, Grand Secretary. The Address of the Grand Master, consisting of three pages, mentioned the death ofa Past Deputy Grand Master, Brother O. P. Yelton. Speaking of the condition of things, the Grand M~ster said, "The past year has been one of peace and good will in our Jurisdi路ction." He also stated that nothing had transpired to disturb the fraternal relations between his and other Grand Jurisdictions. One decision was announced. The case was a novel one. A party had been elected and presented himself for initiation, but" through fright, refnsed to submit to the ceremonies." The question was, "Shall we return his fee?" The Grand Master responded, "Return the money." The decision was approved. There is nothing else in the Address claiming attention.


1891.J

Appendix.

199

The Grand Secretary presented, as usual, a ve~r clear and admirable business report. No appeal cases came before the Grand Lodge during the session. The Grand Lodges of North Dakota and Tasmania were recognized. There is nothing further that merits notice in the Proceedings. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of fifty-four pages was rendered by Brother Kuykendall, as Committee. The report was written throughout, being devoid of extracts. Our Proceedings for 1890 receiveq th'- consideration ~f the Committee to the extent of two pages .. He said, "the Address of Grand Master, Brother Theodore Brace, is a good Masonic paper." Cordial approbation was given to the several rulings of our Grand Master. l?rother Kuykendall felt disposed to criticise our Missouri law in regard to saloon-keepers, and referred to the case of a 'Worshipful Master, who was suspended for five years for engaging in that business. His criticism was directed against our law, which does not permit officers to dimit, while in office. It is not necessary to discuss this proposition, nor shall I defend our law on the question. It is sufficient to say that such is the law of this Jurisdiction, and while it is in existence, its enforcement is of more importance than questioning its bearings. Brother Kuykendall thinks it an act of great injustice to allow a saloon-keeper to dimit who is not an officer, and refuse to permit a Worshipful路 Master to dimit to escape the penalty enforced against saloon-keepers. I simply call attention of my Brother to the fact that the \Vorshipful YIaster in the case mentioned was not allowed to go unpunished, because of his official position. There is a difference between the Master of a Lodge who violates Masonic law, a'hd one of the rank and file. Our law holds the Master of a Lodge responsible to the Grand Lodge for any violation of the principles of Masonry. He is charged and brought before the Grand Lodge for trial. In view of his high station, he deserves reprehension and punishment beyond the ordinary membership. Another fact is to be taken into consideration here. The Master in question entered upon theforbidrlen and unlawful calling of a saloonkeeper after he was elected and installed Master. At his installation, he took upon himself an obligation that is never taken by an ordinary meinber. His entrance upon the business of a saloon-keeper was in


200

Appendix.

[Oct.

open violation of a (solemn enactment of our路 Grand Lodge, and he knew it. He therefore acted in defiance of the law, and of the welldefined and clearly expressed sentiments of the Grand Lodge and of the Fraternity in Missouri. A local fact is connected with the case, not shown by the record, that he engaged in the saloon-keeping business with the avowed purpose of breaking the law and defying the Grand Lodge. He deserved what he received. This is the way the Grand Lodge treats all such. offenders. Brother Kuykendall found many things in my review in which he heartily concurs. He takes exception to some remarks I made in the review of Colorado last year.1I This is in respect to mixed funerals. He certainly did not clearly unde'rstand my position on that subject. We have a regulation in Missouri which is rigid, if followed to the letter, but a liberal construction of it has obtained that does justice to other charitable and benevolent associations. Our custom is, where other societies wish to participate in the funeral of a Brother Mason, to appoint pall-bearers from the :iVlasonic Lodge. Other associations are allowed to join in the procession, attend the burial and perform such ceremonies as may be common ,vith them, after the Masonic Lodge has performed its work.

In his conclusion, Brother Kuykendall expresses the opinion that the Brethren in and out of "Tyorning, do not read the Reports on Correspondence as they should. I may be allowed to present an exception, so far as the Fraternity is concerned in Missouri. Our Brethren generally throughout this Jurisdiction, clamor for the Report on. Correspondence and it is very generally read. :E. A. ABRY, Cheyenne, Grand Master. 路WILLIAM L. KUYKENDALL, Cheyenne, Grand Secretary.


202

Appendix.

[Oct.

Brother Scott, as Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence, reported concerning the Grand Lodge of New Zealand, that their information was not such as to justify its recognition for the present. Five new Lodges had been created' under dispensation, and were chartered during the session. The fad appears in the Proceedings that the late eminent Sir John MacDonald, Governor-General of Canada, was a Mason. A telegram was sent by the Grand Lodge conveying its heartfelt sympathy to Lady MacDonald and family. From the information furnished, I learn that there are thirty-nine Lodges in that Jurisdiction, with a membership of 1,878. There is no Report on Correspondence. 'WILLIAM G. BELL, Winnipeg, Grand Master. WILLIAM G. SCOTT, Winnipeg, Gl~and Secretary. ./

OREGON,

1891.

After my review was completed,and in print, I received a large and elegant volume containing the transacti9ns of the Forty-first Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Oregon. The session was held in the City of Portland, commencing .Tune 10th; 1VI. \V. Bro. James F. Robinson, Grand Master, and Brother S. F. Chadwick, Grand Secretary. The Journal shows a large attendance made up of Representatives of Grand Lodges, Past Grand Officers and Representatives of seventynine .Lodges. The membership, as gathered from the Statistical Table, amounts to about 4,000. After the opening of the session, the Grand Master read a telegram just received, announcing the death of Past Grand Master Bro. Andrew Nashburg. The information received stated that the funeral would take place at Marshfield on the following Thursday. It was immedia tely resolved that a Lodge of Sorrow be held by the Grand Lodge at


1891.J

Appendi;c.

201

ADDENDA.

The Journals reviewed under this caption were not received in time to be given their alphabetical assignment.

MANITOBA, 1891.

""-

The Sixteenth Annual Communication was held in the City of vVinnipcg, commencing June 10th. The session was presided over by M. W. Bro. James A. Ovas, Grand Master. Brother 'William G. Scott, was Grand Secretary. The attendance of Past Grand Officers, Past Masters, Representatives of Grand Lodges and of Subordinate Lodges, was quite large. The Address of the Grand Master embraced nine pages, and contained a representation of various business interests considered by him during the term. It was simply and strictly a business paper. During the year he had visited as many of the Subordinate Lodges as time wonld permit. The state of the' Craft was represented as generally prosperous. Foreign relations were announced harmonious as in the past. :iVIention was made of the fraternal dead, both at home and in other Jurisdictions. Divers and sundry official labors had been performed' by him, such as laying corner-stones and other matters of local interest. The Address was interesting to his own Jurisdiction. The several Deputies of the Jurisdiction submitted their reports, which '\'ere printed. The Annual Reports of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary followed in their order. The Grand Secretary announced that returns from all the Lodges had been received, showing an average prosperity among the Fraternity. The Report of the Grand Librarian was an interesting document, showing the state of that important branch of Masonic work.


1891.]

Appendix.

203

the same hour, which was accordingly done. The affliction of Past Grand Master Taylor was announced, when a resolution of sympathy was adopted and the Grand Secretary directed to telegraph Brother Taylor the sentiment of the q-rand Lodge. Grand Master Robinson presented an Address covering twenty pages. It contains the statenient that relations with foreign Jurisdictions are pleasant and that the condition of the Craft in their own Jurisdiction was most satisfactory. The Address furnishes information of the death of Past Grand Master A. W. Ferguson, and is accompanied by an interesting biography of the deceased. Quite a n'umber of distinguished Masons who had passed away during the year, were feelingly mentioned by the Grand Master, such as Brothers Pike, Abell, and others. The Grand Master said that owing to business engagements; requiring almost constant attention, he had visited but very few Lodges. A good list of officia:l decisions was presented. They are admirable rulings concerning the questions presented. Some dispensations were granted to do work out of time. He reported the dedication of the new l\1asonic Temple in the City of Albany, and the laying of the corner-stone of the City Hall in Portland. A few recommendations were submitted of a practical character. A lengthy history was given of their Educational Fund, showing an amount invested of over $100,000. The pleasant announcement was made that the Grand Lodge is practically out of debt. The conclusion of the Grand Master's Address was marked by special mention and hearty commendation of the Grand Secretary, Brother Chadwick. From my knowledge of this Brother, I do not hesitate to. say that the compliment is well deserved. The election of officers took place on the first day of the session. The Committee on Grand l\Iaster's Address pronounced the document an able and exhaustive one, and tendered him their compliments for his superior and impartial administration. The" Report of the Committee on Jurisprudence differed somewhat from the Grand Master's


204

Appendix.

[Oct.

rulings. I presume they governed their actions by their local regulations. On general principles, the Grand Master was right. Brother Chadwick, the Grand Secretary, preJented a most interesting statement connected with the work of his office. From sai,d report it is learned that there was an increase in the membei'ship of the Jurisdiction during the last year of 243. The Committee on Obituaries presented a lengthy and very readable report, signed by myoId friend and Brother, Rev. J. R. N. Bell, Grand Chaplain. Various matters of local interest were considered and determined. The Grand Lodge closed its labors on the third day. A number of memorial tablets are furnished as tributes to the honored dead. Biographical sketches, with pictures of Past Grand Masters Bagley, McCraken and Chadwick, the present Grand Secretary,grace t.he Journal. CORRESPONDENCE.

The review by Brother Chadwick, Committee, covers 197 pages and contains notices of the transactions of fifty-five Grand Lodges. I turn with special pleasure to this department of work, performed by Brother Chadwick. He always interests me and nearly always pleases me. His work is ' . .路ell done, showing him to be a vigorous reviewer and gifted writer. I regret that the lateness of the receipt of the Proceedings will not permit an extended journey through the inviting field opened up before me. It evidences cultivation, and is rich with the fruitage of his well skilled hand. The work is plentifully seasoned with extracts, and contains many thoughts elaborated by the writer. Brother Cpadwick paid our Missouri Journal for 1890 the nice compliment of a five paged review. Three pages were devoted to extracts from the able Address of Grand Master Brace. He paid kind attention to other matters which had claimed consideration during our session. His courtesy to this writer gives him a higher place in my heart than even heretofore. The Journal furnishes a striking phototype and a sketch of our excellent Brother. I shall glean from the brief history of Brother Chadwick a few items, believing them to be of more interest than anything I can write. He began his Masonic career in 1856, in Oregon. Reached the station of Grand Master in 1865, and served one term. Two years later he was appointed Chairman of the Committee on Fraternal Correspondence, and has served in that character ever since, nearly a quarter of a


1891.]

Appendix.

205

century. In 1889 he was chosen to succeed Grand Secretary Babcock, who retired from the position to fill some public station, and to seek bodily health. Brother Chadwick has been in public life in a highly representative character, having served as Judge, a member of the Constitutional Convention which framed the Constitution of the State of Oregon, two terms as State elector, Secretary of State for eight years, and Governor one term. The picture of him indicates a very sturdy and vigorous manhood. I hope he may long be spared to direct in Masonic affairs in a jurisdiction with which he has been actively connected for more than thirty years. May his "bow abide in strength." He was continued as Grand Secretary and Committee on Fraternal Correspondence. The Grand Master)or the present year is Brother B. VanDusen, and lives at Astoria.


206

Appendix.

[Oct.

CONCLUSION. I close my year's labor as a revie\'ver September 1st. The few Proceedings not received in time for notice must go over until another term. In the foregoing pages I have paid attention to fifty-five Grand Lodge Journals. It was my purpose, when this work was commenced, to reduce the size of the volume and make a much shorter report. In this, failure again marks my effort. I have yet to master the art of condensing. In winding up the labors of the year, I must express the satisfaction enjoyed in my work, and record the general prosperity and harmony abroad among the Jurisciictions, whose Proceedings I have examined. With slight exceptions, unity and brotherly love obtain among the Craft. The past year has been marked by a satisfactory increase as to numbers and the development of a true Masonic spirit. The growth of the broad feeling of benevolence, as taking shape in the "HOME" work being done and projected, adds increasing evidence that Masonry is operating along the line of its true mission among men. Very many of the Grand Jurisdictions of this country are moving forward in this great and blessed charity. Distinctive movements create and furnish distinctive epochs in the history of Masonry. We are now enjoying the most redeeming and commanding period of Masonic progress. We have reached that happy period in our Missouri Masonry. Our "HOME" absorbs the best thought and purpose of the best minds and hearts of the Craft in this Jurisdiction. With such engrossment, our Brethren are too busy to be bothered by incidents of lesser moment. Harmony prevails among the workmen, and the rivalry of the hour is, "who can 1?est work and best agree." Fraternally submitted, JOHN D. VINCIL.


1891.J

Appendix.

207

GRAND LODGES HEVIKWED.

AI.ABAl'IA,1890

NEW BRUNSWICK,1890-1891.

ARIZONA, 1890.

NEW HAltIPSHIRE, llii90.

ARKANSAS, 1890.

NEW JERSEY, 1891.

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 1890.

NEW MEXICO, 1891.

CALIFORNIA, 1890.

NEW SOUTH WALES, 1890.

CANADA, 1890.

NEW YORK, 1891.

COLORADO, 1890.

N~VADA,

CONNECTICUT, 1891.

NORTH CARULIN.1, 1891.

BELA WARE, 1890.

NORTH I)AKOTA, 1891.

DIS'I'RICT 01" COLUlIBIA, 1890.

NOVA SCOTIA, 1890.

FLORIDA, 1891.

OHIO, 1890.

1890.

GEORGIA, 1890.

OREGON,1890.1891.

IDAHO, 1890.

PENNSYLVANIA,1890.

ILLINOIS, 1890.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, 1890.

INDIAN A, 1891.

4lUEBEC, 1891.

INDIA....~

'I'ERRITORY, 1890.

RHODE ISLAND, 1890.

IO\VA, ]891.

SOUTH CAROLIXA, 1890.

KANSAS, 1891.

SOUTH DAKOTA, 1891.

KENTUCKY, 1890.

TENNESSEE, 1891.

LOUISIANA, 1891.

TEXAS, 1890.

MAINE, 1890.

U'I'AH, 1891.

MASSACHUSETTS, 1890.

VERMONT, 1890路91.

MARYLAND,1890-91.

VIRGIXIA, 1890.

ltIICHIGA....~,

1891.

MINNESOTA,IS91. MISSISSIPPI, I S91. MONTANA, 1890. NEBRASKA,1890.

WASHINGTON, 1890. WEST VIRGINIA, 1890. . WISCONSIN, 1891. WYOMING, 1890.


208

Appendix.

[Oct.

ADDRESSES OF GRAND SECRETARIES.

State. Alabama Arizona Arkansas , California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Indian Territory Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana l\laine Maryland Massachusetts : Michigan Minnesota Mississippi.. Montana '" , Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire : New Jersey New Mexico New York

Name. Address. Dr. Myles J. Greene~ Montgomery. John M. Ormsby Tucson. Fay lIempstead Little Rock. San 路Francisco. George Johnson Edward C. Parmelee Denver. Joseph K. \Yheeler Hartford.