Page 1


- ..---------------------...OFFICERS -OF THE-

GRAND .LODGE OF

Mo.

1887 -- 8. WILLIAM M. WILLIAMS, Boonville Gmnd Master. JAMES P. WOOD, New London D. G. Mastel'. THEODORE BRACE, Paris G. Sen. Wm·den.· GEORGE E. W ALB.:EJR, Potosi. 0.. Jl'. Wal'den. SAMUEL M. KEN~ARD, St. Louis G. Treaslll'e1'. REV. JOHN D. VINCIL, D. D.• St. Louis * 0.. Secretary. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis 0.. Lect~{rer. REV. C. H. BRIGGS, Kansas City G. Chaplain. REV. B.. G. TUTT, D. D., Liberty " " REV. J. J. WILKINS, Sedalia " " REV. J. M. CHANEY, D. D., Independence.. " ,~ REV. CHARLES B. POWERS, St. Joseph " " REV. ALFRED E. ROGERS, Fulton " "REV. T. E. SHEPHERD, Buffalo " -H TRUSTEN P: DYER, St. Louis G. Sen. Deacon. B. H. INGRAl\I, Sedalia G. Jr. Deacon. W. R. EDGAR, Ironton G. Marshal. JAY L. TORREY, St. Louis " " CHARLES J. WALKER, Wentzville G. Sword Bem·er. R. E. WITT, Fayette G. Sen. Steward. W. A. THOMS, Springfield G. Jr. Steward. F. E. BRUTON, Sturgeon 0.. Pursuivant. J. P. BLANTON, Kirksville" G. Omtor. JOHN 'V. FARRIS, Lebanon " " JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis G. Tyler.

* Also Committee on Foreign Correspondence. KOTE.-Allletters for the Grand Lecturer should be addressed to care of the Grand tiecretary, 510 ?ine Street, who will promptly deliver them.

- ...--------------------1-


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OI<' THE

SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION " OF TIlE

M. W. "GRAND LODGE A. F.

AND

A. M.

01" THE

STATE OF MISSOURI, CONVENED AT

ST. LOUIS, OCTOBER 11, A. D. 1887; A. L. 5887.

ST. LOUIS: HUGH R. HILDRETH PRINTING COMPANY, 407 & 405 NORTH FOURTH STREET.

1887.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

8 IX rry -8 EVENT H

ANNUAI~

COMMUNICATION OF THE

M, W, GRAND LODGE, A. F, & A. M" STATE OF MISSOURI.

The Sixty-seventh Annual Communication of the Most 'Vorsbipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of l\Iissouri, convened in Freemasons' Hall, in the City of St,. Louis, October 11, 1887, at 10 o'clock A. M. rrhere were present the following Grand Officers: GEORGE R. HUNT W. M. WILLIAl\IS JAMES P. WOOD HENRY L. ROGERS.................................... SAMUEL M. KENNARD JOHN D. VINCIL ALLAN McDOWELL...... REV. C. H. BRIGGS..................................... GEO. E. WALKER....................................... SEYMOUR HOYT :........ W. II. CARPENTER.................................... A. B. MARTINDALE.................................... HARRY KEENE.......................................... THEODORE BRACE.................................... JOHN W. OWEN

M. W. Grand Master. R. lV. Deputy Grand Mastel路. R. IV. Senior Grand Warden. R. W. Junior Gmnd Wa1路den. R. W. Grand Treasu1'er. R. W. Grand Secretary. R. W. Grand Lecturer. W. Grand Chaplain. W. Grand Senior Deacon. W. Juniv!' Grand Deacon. W. Grand :/ofarshal. W. Grand ftfar.~hal. W. Grand Senior Steward. W. Grand Orator. W. Grand Tyler.


4

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

OPENING.

The Grand 1\iaster proeeeded to open the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge in AMPLE FORi\i, a constitutional number of Lodges being represented. After the rendering of a pieee of sacred music, prayer was offered by the Grq,nd Chaplain, Rev. Bro. C. H. Briggs. The Grand Lodge was then declared ready for business. The Grand 1\iaster appointed the following Brethren as a Committee on CREDENTIALS.

Bros. A. Fisher, 'Vm. H. Carpenter and F. E. Bruton. The Committee"afterwards reportedRepresentatives present from 215 Lodges,' besides permanent members and Grand Officers. [The Report is found in Appendix.] 'fhe M. 'V. Grand Master then proceeded to read his

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

Following the presentation of the Address, it was, on motion, referred by the Deputy Grand Master to a Committee of Past Grand Masters, consisting of Bros. S. W. B. Carnegy, S. H. Saunders, John D. Vincil, R.E. Anderson, J. E. Cadle, N. M. Givan, J. S. Browne, W. R: Stubblefield, A. 1\1:. Dockery, Chas. E. Woods, Lee A. Hall, R. F. Stevenson, Jas. W. Boyd. M. W. Bro. A. M. Dockery was appointed Chairman of the Committee.


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

5

ANNUAL ADDRESS. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of .MiB$ouri, A. F. & A. M.:

BRETHREN-Another year has gone its way into the unreturning past, and we meet again in Annual Communication. Pause we a moment ere we enter further upon the responsibilities of this hour to recogniie .the unnumbered mercies of the Supreme Architect of the universe, whose wide-spreading wing has sheltered, and whose everlasting arm has sustained us on our pilgrim march from the womb of the past to the shadowy future where the grave, the sexton and the dirge are waiting-ever waiting-to dismiss us from the quarry and the temple walls, either to enter with joy into the everlasting refreshment of the skies, or to meet a dread doom without the west gate: Pause we a moment and glancing backward at the dangers through which we have passed, let us lift our hearts with swelling gratitude to Him before whom every true Mason" humbly and re\'erently bows," and unite our spirits to repeat with our Brethren of old"For He is good, for His mercy endureth forever." But while we have been kept, yet has the cruel slayer journeyed here and there through all our borders, and many have died; many who have been equally faithful and worthy with you; who, content to toil in humble lot, aspired not to the ensignia of position or the distinction of rank; who, unkrlOwn路 and unnoted, have "born the burdens and heat of the day." ~Many of these are gone since last we met. From every Lodge-room there is a path to the graveyard, and along this mournful way many times the sad procession has journeyed while " Solemn struck the funeral chime." They were unknown to fame, and no historian will ever num bel' their virtues, but" their record is on high," and as we stood about their lowly graves looking with wistful eye upon the sweet acacia and pondering its mighty promise there fell upon our ear a voice sweeter than the music'oflaughing water-" I am the resurrection and the life; he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live, and he that liveth and believeth in me shall never die." Let a page be set apart in memory of all those who died in the faith, and venerating their memory, let us emulate all that 路was good and beautiful in their lives, that we, when qUI' summons comes, may go in peace.


6

Proceedin~8

of the

'[Oct.

Through our M. VV'. Bro. Xen. Ryland, Representative of the Grand Lodge of Canada near this Grand Lodge, I am officially informed of , the death of Joshua G. Burns, a distinguished Mason of that Grand Jurisdiction, who passed into the unknown on the 28th of May, 1887. We tender our sympathies to the Grand Lodge of Canada in her bereavement and unite with our Brethren in planting above his grave the evergreen emblem of our common hope. During the year the usual amount of routine matter has presented itself and has been looked after with careful reference to the interests of the Order. Much of this is of such character that no record is necessary, and other items of greater importance will appear in the Report of the Grand Secretary, without claiming your attention or wearying your patience here. Dispensations have been asked and granted for various purposes, such as moving into new halls, holding special elections, laying cornerstones, etc., etc., all of which will appear in the Grand Secretary's Report. In no case has the Grand Master refused to grant anything asked by the Fraternity, except as compelled to do so by the existing laws and edicts of the Grand Lodge. Among those which have been refused,are requests to open and work with less than seven Master Masons, members of the Lodge; to elect W. M. or Wardens after regular elections; to confer degrees out of time, and to grant a Lodge the privilege of holding rfgular meetings at other times than prescribed by the ByLaws of said Lodge. Three Dispensations to form new Lodges were continued by the Grand Lodge at its last session, and during the year eleven Dispensations have been granted for the same purpose. In every case the most careful attention has been gi ven to the spiri t and letter of the law, and the Grand Master has not acted without the strongest reasons to believe that the interests of the Fraternity w.ould be ad vanced by the new organizations. All of these Lodges have' been properly set to work and seem to prosper. DELINQUENT'LODGES.

Soon after my election as Grand Master, it being represented to me that certain Lodges had been delinquent for years, and that others were' very negligent in the matter of making returns and paying, dues to the Grand Lodge, thereby hindering the Report of the Grand Secretary and generally impeding the work, I issued to such Lodges a circular (a copy of which is herewith submitted), calling attention to their delinquency and directing them to obey the law of the Grand Lodge, or expect the consequences. The effect was salutary, and the temporary suspension of several Charters will doubtless have lasting effect for good.


1887.J

Grand

Lod~e

of Missouri.

7

GRAND LODGE, A. F. & A. MASONS. STATE OF MISSOURI. OFFICE OF GRAND MASTER, WARRENSBURG, October 21st, 1886. TVol'shipj1tl },[aste1' oj Masonic Lodge No

.. DEAR BROTHER: You are hereby notified that your Lodge is delinquent as to . for the year 1886. You are also informed that the Grand Lodge, at its Session on the 14th instant, required all delinquent Lodges to show cause why they had not complied with the requiremmlts of the Grand Lodge. Unless this is done IMMEDIATELY, yonr Charter will be suspended according to the order of the G rand Lod~e. Yon were twice notified by the Grand Secretary to send in your Returns and Grand Lodge dues during the month of August, as required by law. Being in disobedience to that law. you must obey it at once. or take the consequences. No further notice will be given. Explain at once and send Report to Grand Secretary. Fraternally Yours, GEO. R. HUNT, Grand MaRter..

When the law was complied with I restored the suspended Charters. JURISDICTION.

Several times during the year I have been consulted on questions of territorial jurisdiction. It seems a little hard to impress upon the minds of our Brethren the fact, that according to the uniform ruling of the Grand Lodge,,jurisdiction is determined by air lines, and not by the d~stance measured on "usually traveled routes." Early in the Masonic year we were so fortunate as to secure fo. olir Grand Secretary, the commodious quarters which he now occupies on Pine street, amid whose elegant surroundings his usual urbanity will magnify itself in large measure as he welcomes those who do themselves the honor to call upon him. Correspondence with different parties during the year has developed a fact which merits the attention of the Grand Lodge. From the Proceedings of 1884 and 1885, as well.as incidental allusions in the Book of Constitutions, it would seem that s.ubordinate Lodges who wish to own their hall areI expected. to have the deed conveying such property to , the Grand Lodge for the use and benefit of the subordinate Lodge so purchasing. If this be the intent and meaning of the law, it must be confessed that the law is not carefully observed, and there is dissatisfaction and misunderstanding in some quarters touching the matter. If the members.of this Grand Lodge deem any action necessary, I trust it will be such as to settle this question forever. On the 19th day of October I appointed Bros. C. C. Rainwater, S. C. Bunn and J. D. 'Vinci! as a ~oard of Finance, and trust that their Report


8

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

~ill be before the Grand Lodge, and doubt not it will be satisfactory in its character. On the 15th of .Tune, in answer to a seeming necessity, I appointed Bro. R. E. Collins a member of the Committee on Chartered Lodges. SURRENDER 01:<' CHARTER.

The last of June I received a letter from\Bro. A. Fisher, D. D. G. M. of the Second District, detailing an unhappy condition of affairs in Farmers' Lodge, No'. 222, at Labelle in'Lewis Co. From causes in themselves insignificant and not necessary to enumerate, so much ill-feeling had been engendered, that it became impossible for anyone to obtain membership in the Lodge. Asthe ballot box went its helpless round, the statement was unvarying" Cloudy in the South." In the hope of bringing about a better state of affairs, the D. D. G. M. presented his dimit to this Lodge and made formal application for membership, and he likewise, met the fate of all that had gone that way before him for the past two years. Under the circumstances, it was ni.anifest that the usefulness of the Lodge in its present condition was destroyed. After formal notification, it was decided by a vote of thirty-seven to two to surrender the Charter. The case is singular and calculated to awaken the sympathy of the Grand Lodge, and satisfied as I am that the interests of our noble Order will be promoted thereby, I trust that the kindness of the Grand Lodge will show such consideration to the 11Jorthy Brethren, late mem bel's of Farmers' Lodge, as they deserve, and grant them such favors as may be asked for in their petition for a new Lodge-which petition will claim attention of the proper committee, being now on hand.

s.

C. HERNDON.

The last of January, I received from J. T. Maupin, Junior "Varden of Robert Burns Lodge, No. 496, a formal charge and specifications, alleging conduct on the part of S. C. Herndon, W. M. of said Lodge, almqst too gross to be beli~ved of our fallen and depraved nature, i. e., of having d~liberately debauched oneal' more of his own daughters. I immediately forwarded to E. C. Steel, D. D. G. M. of the district, the papers in the case, and ordered .~n investigation .withmit delay, and in due process of time I received from him a detai'led statement of the investigation which adjudged him to have been guilty. I at once directed the Grand Secretary to issue a mandate suspending the miserable wretch from the high position which he had formerly occupied as "V. M., and citing him to' appear before this Grand Lodge for trial, as provided for in Section twenty-one, page seventy-two, in our By-Laws. I also ordered the Senior Warden to take charge of the Lodge. I do not for amoment suppose that the culprit will present himself for trial, yet your outraged dignity can vindicate itself in only one way.


1887.J

Grand' Lod~e of Missouri.

9

ARREST OF CHARTER.

Ascertaining early in the year that Malta Lodge, No. 33i, was doing no good, I requested Bro. M. J. Chinn, D. D. G. M., to visit and investigate, and satisfied from his report that the best interest of our Order demanded this course, I ordered the Charter arrested and the Lodge property turned over to the Grand Secretary. Doubtless there is no complaint in the mind of any member of the Lodge because of this, as they have held no meeting for nearly two years and there seemed no hope of a resurrection. The Charter, books and jewels of the Lodge are in the custody of the Grand Secretary, with a small sum of money amounting to $14.45. On the lIth of June I received a communication from Bro. R. E. Collins, D. D. G. M., informing me of a sad condition of affairs in West Gate Lodge, No. 445. It is not necessary to detail all the circumstances, much less to bring before this body the causes producing this unhappy condition. Suffice it to say that opposing factions had sprung up in the Lodge, between whom such disagreement had arisen as to produce the most disgraceful quarrels, even in the sacred precincts of the Lodgeroom, and the presence of the D. D. G. M. was scarcely sufficient to prevent blows. Satisfied from all I could gather, that the usefulness of the Lodge was gone, and believing that this course would be endorsed by the better elements in the Lodge as well as all others interested in maintaining the reputation and purity of the Order, I directed the D. D. G. M. to visit the Lodge and take possession of the Charter, which was accordingly done. The books, notes of considerable value, and other effects are in charge of the Grand Secretary. ' NAPHTALILODGE,NQ2~

It is unnecessary to give all the facts in the case of this Lodge. Suffice to say that in the proposed attempt to deal with certain saloon keepers, some four members of the Lodge were put on trial, and believ. ing that, from threats made by members, the result would be a defiance of law, I directed the D. D. G. M. to attend the meeting, hoping that his presence might have a good effect. At the same time, however, I instructed him, that in case of refusal to obey the law of the Grand Lodge, he should arrest the Charter and properly report the case. My worst fears were verified and in the language of the ,D. D. G. M., "the whole trial was a'farce." The accused Brethren were acquitted by a vote of some twenty-three to seven, although there was no doubt of the facts alleged and the only plea offered was that there were other saloon keepers in the Lodge, and that the law would be repealed at the next session of the Grand Lodge any way. The D. D. G. M. therefore took possession of the Charter and deposited it with the Grand Secretary, leaving the other Lodge property in charge of the Grand Tyler, who has the


10

Proceeding 8 of 'the

~

[Oct.

care'of the Masonic hall where the Lodge held its meetings. I need not state that this as well as other cases of this character has been extremely painful to me. . ARREST OF CHARTER OF CENTER LODGE, NO. 401.

During the month of August I received a communication from J. 路W. Farris, D. D. G. M. of the Thirty-third District, stating that Center Lodge, No. 401, had, on the evening of August 1, tried a member for ul1masonic conduct, in keeping a saloori. The accused admitted the chatge, but denied that it was unmasonic conduct, and the Lodge endorsed his opinion by acquitting him, thereby taking issue with the Grand Lodge and denying its authority. In view of this. and other fads detailed in the same communication, the D. D. G. M. advised the arrest of the Charter, and, after careful consideration, I ordered said Charter arrested and the case to be certified to the Grand Lodge. IMPORTANT QUESTION.

A Brother of promise and character among us requests me to consider a certain question, which I gladly refer to you, hoping that your wisdom and kindness will decide a point which has perplexed many, viz: A Master Mason beco.mes addicted to strong drink' until his life is a reproach to Masonry, and before he is dealt with by the Lodge he dies. Now he is technically in "good standing." Does this fact render it imperative that the Lodge shall accord to him the honors of Masonry, and, before the eyes of the world that well understand his fallen and debauched condition. perform about the gl:ave the beautiful and solemn rites of the Order? For the sake of many I ask that you will formulate an answer to this question. SALOON-KEEPING MASONS.

For the past several years the utterances of this Grand Lodge on the subject of Intemperance, and especially of ~aloon keeping, have been路 gro\~ing more and more emphatic. While doubtless there were those who criticised the deliverances of the Grand Lodge, yet no intelligent Mason could possibly doubt its spirit or meaning. While the Grand Master reserved to himself the right of opinion as to the propriety of the Grand Lodge law, or any supposed explanation of the same, yet he has not for one moment doubted that the law should be observed, and that S0 far as his ability enabled, he should, as the servant of the Grand Lodge, faithfully carry out its edicts, and being satisfied from evidence coming to me from variouf'l quarters that your will was being ignored, or deliberately set aside, after careful thought, I issued to all the Lodges in the State a circular, a copy of which is herewith presented. As you perceive in this circular, I attempt no elucidation of law, but simply


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1887.]

11

present your own interpretation, and insist that this law should be obeyed until repealed, for it is a very well understood fad that every good law ought to be observed because of its inherent justice, and the strict observance of a bad law will speedily bring a remedy in its repeal. That this circular has borne fruit of some sort there is no possible question in any mind, and especially bas it been tbe occasion of much unkind criticism on the part of those affected thereby. But sustained by the consciousness of a high purpose, and a sincere desire to carry out the wish and will of the Grand Lodge, I come before you with no apology or palliation of my action and place the case (which is your canse) in your hands. â&#x20AC;˘ GRAND LODGE, ANCIENT, FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS. STATE OF lI11SWURI. \ To the WorshipJul

OFFICE OF GRAND MASTER, WARRENiilRURG, Mo" May 2d, 1887. ~fasters,

Wardens and Brethren oj the several Lodges oj Missouri, Greeting:

Your attention is hereby called to the Laws of the Grand Lodge against UNlIIASONIC CONDUCT, and also the absolute necessity of enforcing the same. These laws are parts of the RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE GRA?>D LODGE, which every :Mason in this jurisdiction is bound, by his Obligation, to support and maintain. Here is the injunction contained 'in the law: UNlIIASONIC CONDUCT. All Lodges in this jurisdiction shall enforce the l\lasonic law in referE:nce to all unmasonic conduct, As ALL Lodges are thus enjoined to ENFORCE the law, there is no escaping the responsibility of its enforcement. To fail or neglect to enforce the law of the Grand Lodge is to RREAK that law, for all have vowed to support and maintain the same. That none may pretend or plead ignorance of the laws which govern UNMASO:-lIC CONDUCT, the Grand Lodge has plainly defined the whole matter. The Grand Lodge By-Laws declare that " habitual drunkenness, gambling, blasphemy and practices of a kindred character" are UNMASONIC, (See Sec/ion 29~ oj Article 16, page 51, Book oj Const.iiutions.) That section says: " ALL LODGES SHALT, El\'FORCF. THE LA II' AGAINST SUCH UNMASONIC CONDUCT." There is, therefore, no choice left the Lodges but to obey the law by enforcing it. When the Grand Lodge says" SHALL," it means" SHALL." The law is, therefore, mandatory and must be obeyed, SALOON KEEPING. In 1882 the Grand Lodge declared saloon keeping to be UNlI1ASONIC in these words: Resolved,That the business of saloon keeping is hereby dec!ared to be a IIfasonicoffense. \

The by-law above quoted (Section 29) applies to the business of saloon keeping, as well as to "drunkenn~ss, gambling, etc." It must, therefore, be enforced against saloon-keeping Masons. The Lodges SHAU. enforce toe :i\1asonic law agoainst all unmasonic conduct, says the by-law. "Saloon keeping is hereby declared to be a MASONIC OFFENSE,'" said the Grand Lodge. Therefore AU, Lodges MUST and SHALL enforce the law against saloon-keeping members of the Order in Missouri. The Grand Lodge has spoken. There must be no evading of the law, because the Grand Lodge has said it SHALL be ENFORCED, Liquor selling, for drinking purposes, is sternly forbidden, and cannot be tolerated by the Lodges. To permit members of our Lodges


12

Proceeding8 of the

[Oct.

to continue a business, declared to be UNMASONIC, is to allow an open defiance of the Grand Lodge and its laws. This the Lodges must not tolerate, because they thereby encourage wrong by exempting such as thus violate and defy the law. The saloon-keeping Mason would thus be made a privileged character, and allowed to do with impunity what the Grand Lodge has declared to be UNlIIASONIC. They are exempted from the penalty of a law they are violating every day, while drunkenness caused by them is pronounced gross UN1I1ASONIC CONDUCT. We punish those guilty of" habitual drunkenness," while we spare the saloon-keeping Mason, whose businesss is to make drunkards, It is unjust to punish a fallen Brother and screen thp, one who causes his fall. The GrRnd Lqdge has declared it to " be a strange rule that would punish the victim and not the vic-

timize1'." The Grand Lodge has put itself upon record against saloon keepillg or selling liquor fO,r drinking purposes, declaring the business to be UNMASONIC. It has affirmed the law to be good and right in every case where Lodges have expelled or suspended the violators of the laW. The Grand Lodge has suspended several parties, where the Lodges failed to convict them, when the evidence was plain and strong, The Charters of such Lodges have been arrested" The law has been in existence so long that none may plead either ig-norance or want of time to change' their business. Their continllailce in a business declared to be .. Ul"lIlASONIC," is open defiance of the law. The Grand Lodge has laid down the rule that any member affected by our law," has the option to QUIT TilE BusmESS OR QUIT MASONRY." This being the law of the Grand Lodge, the Lodges of thisjurisdiction are hereby enjoined, by these presents, to see that the rule is obeyed. QUIT THE BUSINESS OR QUIT MASONRY, is the mandate of the Grand Lodge, The Grand Lodge at its last session, ordered that the Secretaries of Lodges report to the Grand Secretary, in the annual returns, the names of all Masons who may be violating the law as saloon keepers, You are hereby directed to see this order obeyed, and the name of every such person placed in your reports. Blank spaces are provided for this purpose in the returns. With the law and the purposes of the Grand Lodge so funy known, it remains for the Lodges to say that the laws and edicts SHALL be enforced against all UNMASONIC CONDUCT, If the Lodges do not enforce them, the Grand Lodge will do it. The Grand Lodge says it SHALL be done. The Lodges have no election. They are not judges of the law. The Grand Lodge made the law. The subordinates are not to judge the law, hut are judges only of the facts, as charged against the violators of the law. Remember that the Grand Lodge has waited long and patiently on the violators of the law to change their business. Failing to do so, the law SHALL BE ENFORCED, and they MU:;T QUIT THE BUSINESS OR QljIT MASOl"RY, Every member of the Order promised, when received, to abide by the law. A constant violation of the law is a repudiation of the' obligation taken. Such must change their course, by giving up their business, or else QUIT MASONRY. The Masters of all Lodges in this jurisdiction are hereby enjoined and directed to see that this Circular is read in the Lodg-es, and that the law of the Grand Lodge is dulyenforced respecting the matters and things herein specified. The Deputy Grand !\fasters of the several Districts in this Grand ,Jurisdiction, are hereby charged with the special duty of seeing that the purposes of this Circular are observed and carried into elrect by the various Lodges under their official control. Thcy '~ill report any disregard of these laws in their Lodges, concerning' UNlIIASONIC CONDUCT, and furnish me fU,l1 particulars in each case. Fraternally, GEO. R. HUNT, Grand

~faster.


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missour:io

13

MASONIC HOMEI

In hearty sympathy, as I am, personally, with this enterprise, I have sought and obtained from the President of the Board of Directors, M. '\T. Bro. N. M. Givan, information which is full of encouragement, and satisfies me that this great interest of our Order is lodged in the hands of men who, while avoiding all rashness, will yet push it forward as rapidly as possible. The principal work accomplished during the year has been that of securing subscriptions, as directed by the Grand Lodge, and to this end the Board of Directors issued to all Masonic bodies in the State a circular which was satisfactory in its detail of the history of the wOl:k and pathetic and stirring in its appeal for aid. It should have reached the heart and unloosed the purse strings of every Mason as well as found a formal response in the vote of Lodge, Chapter and Commandery. All of this, however, and more will be presented to this body in the form al report of the Board. I desire only to endorse the work as far as possible and exhort you to earnest co-operation therein. And it seems to me that the restrictions which hitherto have fettered the operations of the Board, should be路 removed and we should grant them the largest liberty necessary to the completion of the work, without compromising the sovereignty of the Grand Lodge. Give to the Board the aid of your most enlightened wisdom. Let us direct them to go forward in the prosecution of the enterprise, without however presuming to involve the credit of the Grand I_odge or originate a debt which might become a burden, if not a stigma, upon our noble Order. And let the Grand Lodge place at the disposal of the Board all the funds hitherto dedicated to this work and such as now or at any future time may be spared for that purpose.

REPORTS OF D. D. GRAND MASTERS.

The Reports'from the D. D. Grand Masters of the various Districts, which are herewith presented, indicate a good degree of prosperity throughout our entire jurisdiction. The following Districts have been heard from: 1, 2, 6,8,9,11,13,14,1.5,']6, 18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26, 27,28,29,30,31,32,33.

LODGES OF INSTRUCTION.

Lodges of Instruction have ,been held at such times and places as the wish of the Brethren and the ability of the Grand Lecturer indicated, and these, while generally presided' over by the Grand Master or other


14

Proceedin~ s

of the

[Oct.

Grand Officers under his appointment, haye been uniformly under the direction of our most efficient Grand Lecturer. They were well attended and successful, ~s will appear with other facts from his report. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES.

During the year several vacancies have occurred in om list of Representatives near other Grand Lodges by death, resignation or expiration of term, and these have been filled upon proper nomination from those jurisdictions.路 Likewise nominations of suitable Brethren have been forwarded to other Grand Lodges that they might have proper representation with us. These nominations have been mutually recognized and commissions issued. All of which will appear in the report of the Grand Secretary and the printed Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. Thus, my Brethren, I lay before you a recital of my official acts, and the more prominent incidents which have marked the history of my administration. No doubt but there have been grave errors and many reminders of that weakness and frailty which is common to flesh and blood. Many, if not all of you, would have done better, but none could have more earnestly desired to do his whole duty in loyalty and devotion to Freemasonry and zeal for the advancemerit of our noble Order. Your kindness and justice will acquit me of willfully failing in duty, or being actuated by any thing else than a sincere and honest conviction of duty, and with this assurance on my part, I confidently leave myself in your hands. The lifetime of a generation has elapsed since first I sat in this Grand Lodge, an humble member of the body and yet with honest pride thrilling my heart as I felt that even the humblest position here was a high distinction, and cheaply purchased by the years of labor already given to our Order, and through all the weary years since that distant day, I have never faltered in my love for Masonry. Many of my comrades of the olden time have been placed in the silent tomb, and over them I have breathed a Brother's prayer. Age has sl.owly crept upon me,Jand marching armies and battle shocks have disturbed the peaceful serenity of my life.. But through all the experiences of the past, I have ever cherished love for all my Brethren and a profound veneration for the Supreme and Holy One, in ,whom, in the long ago, I professed to put my trust. Before Him in the" sanctum sanctorum" of my inner life the altar fires have unceasingly burned, and though the march of years may whiten my hair, and disease may lay its palsying touch upon my body, until the gavel falls from the nerveless hand, yet never, never, will this heart fail to throb with kind sympathy for my Brethren who with me make their pilgrim march to the tomb. I thank you, my Brethren, for the honor you con~erred on me in the bestowal of the high office of Grand Master. And I now surrender this sacred trust, with regret that I have not dorie more-with pain that I have in


1887.J

Grand L.odje of Missouri.

15

the discharge of my duty inflicted pain upon others, and yet with a glad consciousness of honest intent and ,an assuraRce that even those aggrieved, when the inevitable hour comes and, the "low twelve" sounds its sorrowful numbers for me, will help to plant the evergreen' and scatter with kind hand the dust which hides my frail body while they consent that the ashes of forget,fulness shall cover all my faults. Fraternally submitted,

GEO. R. HUNT, Grand .!Ifaster.

REPORT OF GRAND LEC'rlJRER.

Bro. Allan l\icDowell, Grand Lecturer, presented the following report, which was received and ordered printed: ST. LOUIS, October, 1887. To the },[ost Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A, F. and A. M.: Herewith I submit report as Grand Lecturer for year ending October, 1887 : During the year I have held State and District Lodges of Instruction at the following places, viz: Crystal City, Oak Ridge, Farmington, Williamsville, Greenfield, Peirce City, Joplin, Jefferson City, Cassville, Hannibal, St. Joseph, Rockport, Monroe City, Pattonsburg, Miami, Marshall, Hamilton, Lexington, Eagleville, Jamestown, Potosi, California, Piedmont and Bowling Green. These meetings were in general well attended, and the interest in the work was all that could be asked for. I have, in addition, visited and instructed or conferred degrees . in a large number of individual Lodges. I find the Lodges generally in fair working order. Special attention has been paid to t he Lectures, as I find the .officers of Lodges much more deficient in this respect than in anything else. The work, when unaccompanied by a proper rendition of the Lectures is apt to strike the mind of an intelligent candidate as unsatisfactory and wanting in some essential element. .A weekly Lodge of Instruction was held in the city of St: Louis during last winter and spring. The instruction was under the skillful management of W. Bro. Simon Suss, District Lecturer of the Fifteenth District, and resulted in much benefit to the Fraternity in St. Louis and vicinity. A similar Lodge of Instruction was conducted in the city of St. Joseph by R. W. Bro. Harry Keene. District Lecturer of the Twelfth District, which also resulted in much good. From reports of District Lecturers as well as personal observation I think I can say, truly, that the Craft in Missouri were never in better condition as tQ work than at the present time. Fraternally submitted, ALLAN McDOWELL, Grand .Lecturer.


16

Proceedin~s

of the

[Oct.

GRAND SE(JRETARY'S REPORT.

The Grand Secretary presented his General Report, which was ordered printed and i~ as follows: BUSINESS. Following the close of the Grand Lodge session, Grand Master Hunt appointed Deputies for the various Districts of the State. They received their commissions immediately, lind entered upon the discharge of their official duties. This was followed by the issuance of Charters to the six new Lodges created by order. of the Grand Lodge. These Lodges were severally constituted in due time. The names, numbers and locations are herewith given: Bogard Lodge, No. 101, Bogard, Carroll County. Williamsville Lodge, No. 10i, Williamsville, Wayne County. Hume Lodge, No. 130, Hume, Bates County. HaleCity Lodge, No. 184., Hale City, Carroll County. Bcnton Lodge. No. 353, Benton, St. Louis City. Urbana Lodge, No. 421, Urbana:, Dallas County. LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION. The following Lodges were continued under Dispensation for one year by order of the Grand Lodge: Humphrey Lodge, at Humphrey, Sullivan County. Russelville Lodge, at Russelville, Cole County. Ava Lodge, at Ava, Douglas County. DISPENSATIONS GRANTED. The Most Worshipful Grand Mastcr granted and directed the issuance of Dispensations for the formation of the following new Lodges: Cuba Lodge, at Cuba, Crawford County. Blue Springs Lodge, at Blue Springs, .Jackson County. Black Lodge, at Black, Reynolds County. Monticello Lodge, at Monticello, Lewis County. Sedgwickville, at Sedgwickville, Bollinger County. Lafayette Lodge, at Corder, Lafayette County. Dexter Lodge, at Dexter, Stoddard County. Walker Lodge, at Walker, Vernon County. Columbia Lodge, at Pacific, Franklin County. Blackwell Lodge, at Blackwell, St. Francois County. Ingomar Lodge, at Willow Spring, Howell County. CHARTERS

ARR~STED.

The Charters of the following Lodges have been received, the Slime having been arrested by proper authority: Leesville Lodge, No. 426, located at Leesville, Henry County, was arrested by order of the Grand Lodge at its last session. The Grand Master arrested the Charter of Malta Lodge, No. 33i, located at Malta Bend, Saline County. The books, papers and jewels of said Lodge were received, in connection with a small sum of money, amounting to $14.45. The Grand Master directed the arrest of the Charter of West Gate Lodge, No. 4路15, located in the City of St. Louis. The order was executed by


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

17

Bro. R. E. Collins, District Deputy Grand Master of the Fifteenth District. Bro. Collins placed in my hands the Charter, jewels and books of said Lodge, together with wellsecured notes amounting to $1,000. The Charter of Naphtali Lodge, No. 25, St. Louis, was arrested for disobeying the law of the Grand Lodge; and also the Charter of Centre Lodge,No. 401, at Lebanon, Mo. CONSOLIDATED. The consolidation of the following Lodges have been reported to this office: Mexico Lodge, No. 26, united with Hebron Lodge, No. 354, at Mexico, Mo.; Triangle Lodge, No. 32, located at Perryville, Perry County, consolidated with Triple Tie Lodge, No. 457, loclltedat Brazeau, Perry County; Mount Pleasant Lodge, No. 312, united with Island City Lod~e, No. 109, at Sranberry; Gentry County; Alexander Lodge, No. 385, at Bedford, consolidated with HalcCity Lodge, ,No. 184, at Hale City. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS. The Grand Master appointed and ordered me to commission Bro. D. J. Allen to organize Williil,lllsyille Lodge, No. 107, at Williamsville, Wayne County-a Charter having been granted to said Lodge by the Grand Lodge at its last session. The District Deputy GralJd Muster being the Mw,ter of said Lodge, Bro. Allen wa." assigned the duty of organizin~ the same. Bro. A. R. Jaques was commissioned to dedicate the hall of Trowel Lodge, No..440, alfioto direct the removal of Whitewater Lodge, No. 417, from Stroderville to Laflin, and to dedicate said hall. The District Deputy, Bro. F. R. Newberry, being absent from the District, serving in the Legislature of the State, Bro. H. L. Rogers, Grand Junior Warden, was <ieputized by the Grand Master to institute Blackwell Lodge, under Dispensation, at Blackwell, :Mo. DISTRICT DEPUTY APPOINTED. During the year, Bro. T. P. Berry, Deputy of the Twenty-first District, tendered his resignation, as he was about to move away. Upon his recommeudation the Grand Master directed me to commission Bro. H. Marquand deputy of said District. Bro. Marquand accepted the commission, and at once entered upon the discharge of his official duties. LODGE REMOVALS. A number of Lodges during the term now closing, made application in due form, for permission to change their place of meeting. The law having been complied with in each case, the Grand Master directed me to issue the necessary permission. The following embraces the list of removals: Lorraine Lodge, No. 128, to remove to a new hall at Ridgway in Harrison County; Whitewater Lodge, No. 417, to move from Stroderville to Laflin. in Bollinger County; Jericho Lodge, No. 340, to move into a new hall in the same town; Island City Lodge, No. 109, to move into a new hall in Stranberry; .Jameson Lodge, No. 500. to occupy a new'hall in the same town; Union Star Lodge, No. 124, to occupy a new hall in the same town; Arlington Lodge, No. 316, to move into a new hall in the 1'ft,me ,town; Quitman Lodge, No. 196, to' move into a new hall in the same to'ivn; Putnam Lodge, No. 190, to move into a new hall in the same town; Kansas City Lodge, No. 220, to move into a hall with the Elks ill same city; Everett Lodge, No. 219, to move to hall with the 1. O. of O. F. in same town; Vienna Lodge, No. 94, to move to new hall in same town; Forsyth Lodge, No. '453, to remove to new hall in same town; Index Lodge, No. 54, to move to new hall in Garden City; Aullville Lodge, tt) move to new hall in the same town; Ancient Craft Lodge, No. 377, to move to new hall in same town; United Lodge, No.5, to move to new hall, and Solomon Lodge, No. 271, to move to new hall, both of Springfield; Seaman Lodge, No. 126, to move to new hall in same town; Dockery Lodge, No. 325, to move to new hall in same town; Defiance Lodge, No. 88, to move to new hall in the town of Sheridan; Chapel Hill 'Lodge, No. 320, to meet temporarily in a onestory buildillg, but to do no work; Sturgeon Lodge, No. 174, to move into new hall in same town.

G. L. PRo.-2.


18

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

GRAND LODGE REPRESENTATIVES. The Grand Master ordered the issuance of commissions to the following Brethren, as Represen tatives of the Grand Lodge of Missouri near the Grand Lodges hereinafter named: Bro. Albert D. McConaughy, Atchison, Kansas; Bro. Thomas H. Mcl\Iullen, Phcenix, Arizona; Bro. S. F. Chadwick, Salem, Oregon; Bro. R. E. Collins, of St. Louis. has received a commission as representative of the Grand Lodge of Arizona; Bro. Theodore Brace, of Jefferson City, has been a.ppointed representative of the Grand Lodg-e of Briti!'h Columbia.; Bro. Isa.a.c M. Abra.bam, of Harrisonville, received the commission as representative of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia.; Bro. J. P. Richardson has been commissioned as representative of the Grand Lodge of Kansas; Bro. Lee A. Hall has been a.ppointed representative of the Grand Lodge of Oregon. ELECTION OF OFFICERS.. The Gra.ndMaster granted permission to a few Lodges to bold special elections to fill vacancies caused by death, or by refusal of parties to serve who had been elected: viz: Nos. 219,485,189, 199, 211 and 360. CORNER-STONES. The Grand Master directed commissions to be issued, in a few instances, to proper persons to lay corner-stones of two churches, a college and two court houses. GRAND LOD,GE REGISTER. This work, which the Grand Lodge ordered two years ago, and wbich was completed and submitted for inspection at our last session, has proved invaluable. Its benefits are seen in many ways. In the first place, the Secretaries of Lodges, finding that a correct register is to be kept in the oflice of the Grand Secretary, of the names of all members in this jurisdiction, exercise much greater care in making their returns. The value of the work is chiefly found in enabling the Grand Secretary to ascertain the stllndingof Mll.<;ons, about whom inquiries are made.. It bas frequently occurred during the year, that telegrams have been received and inquiries made from distant points, as to the Masonic standing of parties seeking recognition. It generally turns out that such parties are not Masons at all. Inquiries being made as to their standing in Lodges in Missouri, it is soon found from the register that they are not connected with our Lodges. In numerous instances information is sought by interested parties, as to the whereabouts of individual members of the Brotherhood, when it is easily ascertained from the register as to their Lodge membership. Their names being found enrolled, the fact is communicated to those who are concerned, and the parties sought after ate thus.easily found. Aside from all this, the value of the register will be very great in the future, as a source of historical information. It became necessary during the past ~'ear, to add another volume to the number already in use. This grew out of the fact that certain names in the alphabet were more numerous than others, and an extra book became neceSsary to preserve them. The work is very complete and satisfactory in all its details. Other Grand Lodges having seen an account of our register and method of keeping a correct list of the names of all Masons in this jurisdiction, have written for information and for sheets, showing how our register is made and kept. The expressions of approval from other Grand Lodges, have furnished additional evidence of the use and value of our system. GRAND SECRETARY'S OFFICE. Two years ago the Grand Lodge appointed a Committee to secure a new office for the Grand Secretary. This was done in view of the fact that the lease on the office then occupied was soon to expire. One year ago, that Committee, not having completed its

"-


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

19

labors, was continued. The lease on the old office expired November 30,1886. Soon after Grand Lodge closed, the Committee finding it necessary to act promptly, entered upon the work of finding new quarters for the Grand Secretary. That Committee will report the result of their labors to this session of the Grand Lodge. It is proper to say in this place, that a suite of rooms was selected in what is known as the Roe building, at the corner of Fifth and Pine Streets. The rooms, three in number, are on the third floor, easily reached, as there are two superior elcvators running all the time. These rooms are of the very best quality that could be found, .and admirably suited to the purpose for which they were selected. The building is as near fire-proof as any structure can be made. There is therefore afforded the most satisfactory security to all the properties of the Grand Lodge kept in the office of the Grand Secretary. In addition, there is a large, commodious and well-arranged vault, which is considered absolutely fire-proof. In this vault, which is most conveniently arranged with boxes for the papers of each Lodge in the State, all the returns of the various Lodges are secured, as well as all the valuables of the Grand Lodge. A sense of security has thus been gained in refercnce to our books, papers, portraits and valuables of cvery description. So secure are all our properties thus protected in the new office, that the heavy expense arising from insurance heretofore is avoided. The rooms are heated by steam, thus. doing away with the necessity of purchasing stoves and fuel, thereby saving a large and heavy outlay each year, as well as avoiding danger from the presence ,of fires in the different rooms. The difference in expenses, owing to the saving on account of insurance, heating apparatus and fuel, is but very little more than was incurred in the old office. The advantages of the new quarters over any other place occupied as an office for the Grand Secretary, during the past history of this Grand Lodge, are very great, both as to security, convenience and space. Thc Committee appointed to attend to this interest acted wisely in the selection of the present quarters, as the office is now a credit to the Grand Lod~e of Masons in Missouri. It is the place to which any visitor from abroad may come without causing Missouri Masons to blush for the unattractive and uninviting headquarters of Missouri Masonry. The lease taken by the Committee was for a term of thrce years. A longer term could not be secured. The library, books, pictures and other effects of the Grand Lodge are so arranged as to present a respectable appearance. It was necessary to secure three rooms in order to make place for our large book-cases, and for the accommodation of our library. I consider the office sufficiently well equipped for all necessary purposes. The expense in taking down, moving and re-adjusting the book-cases, and fitting up the office, was notso heavy as formerly. The contractor who did the work was reasonable in his charges, and being a good Brother Mason, did not seek to make a fortune outof the Grand Lodge. The work was well and satisfactorily done at reasonable prices. RETURNS. At the last session of this Grand Lodge, the Committee on Chartered Lodges presented numerous changes in the .form of Returns frqm subordinate Lodges, and recommended their adoption. The same having been approved, it became necessary for the Grand Secretary to prepare and have printed new blanks for Returns. This change caused no loss to the Grand Lodge, as the supply of the old blanks was nearly exhausted. The new form prepared and sent to the Lodges seems to have met general approval. It is evident, from the manner in which Returns arc made, that the present blank is much more simple and business-like than the one formerly in use. At this point the Secretaries of Lodges deserve the commendation of the Grand Secretary for the improved and more accurate methods shown in making their Returns. DELAY. Two years ago the Grand Lodge changed the time of closing the fiscal year, and required the Lodges to make up and forward their Returns to the Grand Secretary imme-


20

Proceeding 8 of the

[Oct.

diately after the first meeting in August. As the fiscal year closed with July, I mailed Blanks for Returns to every Lodge on the Pirst day of July, enclosing a circular showing the law and urging promptness Ion the part of Secretaries. It was expected that the Lodges wotj.ld make their Reports accordiugly, and all Returns would be received duriug the month of August. On the first day of September one hundred and fifty Lodges had failed to respond. On that date I mailed a circular to the tardy Lodges, again urghlK compliance with the law. During September over one hundred of the dela)'ed Returns were received. Being compelled by the Grand Lodge to print my Report in advllIlce of the session, the delinquent Lodges were necessarily omitted from the tables. Such Lodges will understand Why. A statement of delinquency will appear iu another part of the Proceedings. It is certainly very desirable that Lodges send in their Returns and dues in time,for the Grand Secretary to furnish a complete and perfect report of the membership and finances, as required by law. The only apology that can be made for many of the tardy Lodges, is that the moon did not full at the rlg'ht time. I hope the moon and the Lodges will be at a better understanding hereafter. As the financial informatiun for the use of the Grand Lodge is furnished from the Returns, the Committee on Accounts last year said there was no other method of opening the eyes of delinquent Lodges than to suspend them, and the recommendation was ILdopted. ActinK under this recommendation, the Grand l\'[as~r suspended, for a time, the Charters of some Lodges during his term, until their Returns and dues were duly furnished. It is to be regretted that a few Lodges, by neglect or indifference, defeat the purposes of the Grand Lodge, delay its business and prevent a full and accurate statement of its affairs being furnished in the printed Proceedings. The following Lodges have not made Returns or paid Dues: Gentryville Lodge, No. 125. Robert Burns Lodge, No, 496.

Lockwood Lodge, No. 521. Gate City Lodge, No. 522.

The following Lodges have made Returns without pa)'ing Dues. Cyrene Lodge, No. 14. Middle Grove Lodge, No. 42. 'Marcus Lodge, No 110. Seaman Lodge, No. 126. Athens Lodge, No. 127. Charleston Lodge, No. 129. Guilford Lodge, No. 474. Jonathan Lodge, No. 321.

Iberia Lodge, No. 410. Clear Creek Lodge, No. 418. Louisvllle Lodge, No. 428. Triple Tic Lodge, No. 457. Center View Lodge, No. 466. Rich Hill Lodge, No. 479. Clearmont Lodge, No. 507.

BOND OF GI{AND TREASUlmR. The Grand Lodge. at its last session, adopted a resolution to the"effect that the Grand Treasurer be permitted to give a continuing bond, to be examined and approved by the Board of Finance, at least once every six months, and when required by the Board the Grand Treasurer must give a new bond, or additional securHy. At the close of the session the Grand Master appointed as such Board of Finance: C. C. Rainwater, S. C. Bunn, and John D. Vincil. Bro. Samuel M. Kennard, Grand Treasurer, submitted his bond with three securities in the sum of $25,000. in view of the financial standing and trustworthiness of the Grand Treasurer, as well as the commercial and financial ability of his securities, the Board of Finance approved the bond. The Grand Lodge may feel well assured that its funds arc in safe hands, well-secnred and carefully guarded. The principal in the bond and his securities are men of first路class business standing, and possessed of ample resources far above the value of any funds thus to be accounted tor. BOOKS. A number of valuable additions have been made to the Grand Lodge Library during

,


21

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1887.J

the year, consisting of Masonic and M.iseellaneous works. By correspondence with the Commissioner of Education at Washington City, I succeeded in having our Grand Lodge Library placed on the list of beneficiaries of the Government. As a result we路 have received from the Bureau of Education, through its Commissioner, donations of books, valuable and interesting. These, in the course of years, will make a large and important addition to our Library. EARTHQUAKE SUFFERERS. Near the close of his official term, last year, the Grand Master, Bro. Boyd, issued an appeal to the Masons of Missouri, in behalf of our distressed Brethern and their families in Charleston, South Carolina. The appeal was sent out but a short time before the Grand Lodge met, consequently but few responses were received before the session. I therefore could not make a report to that session of the Grand Lodge. It is proper that the matter should be men'tioned here and put upon record. I received responses from one hundred and twelve Lodges, in sums ranging from two to fifty dollars. A few individual contributions were made. One Chapter contributed $50, the whole amounting to $1,301.45. The Committee on Charity, at the last session, recommended that the incominK Grand Master be directed to a.<;certain what had been contributed, and whether aUf Brethren at Charleston were still in need, and if so, that he be authorized to make an appropriation, such as, in his judgment, the Grand Lodge ought to give in that direction. After I had forwarded to the Grand Master of South Carolina nearly $1,200, he informed me that it was not necessary for us to remit any further sums. A small balance in my hands I distributed among the suffering in the drought-stricken portions of Texas. The contributions of Missouri Masons, in this instance, were nearly equal to the largest amounts raised by any oJ the Grand Lodges of this country. STATE OF TIlE CRAFT. A recapitulation will be furnished at the close of the proceedings of the session, .which will contain an exhibit of the work done and other items of interest. It will be seen that the initiations are less than last year. The additions to membership will not equal last Report. The loss by Suspension for Non-Payment of Ducs this year will exceed that of last year considerably. It need not surpriiie anyone to learn, therefore, that the total membership the present term falls slightly below the last Report.' The condition of the Fraternity in this jurisdiction is good and improving. The moral tone of the Craft is being elevated. There have been fewer conflicts and less friction in the Lodges than usual. Hence there have been fewer trials, and not so many useless appeals. The growing- sentiment of the Order' is for a higher standard of morals in the Lodges. FINANCIAL. I herewith submit my fiscal Report, showing the iitate of Grand Lodge finances to date. At the close of our last session, when the Committee closed my books, there was on hand a cash balance of $13,092.11. During the present fiscal year I have received and paid over to the Grand Treasurer the following sums as shown by his receipts and my cash account: Receipt No. 1. 2

t.

$8i8 50 141 i5

3.......................................................................................... 195 00 4.......................................................................................... 144 i4

5.......................................................................................... 33i 90 The above sums were received on outstanding claims, before Grand Lodge dues for 1887 were paid in, amounting to ..

$1,69i 89


22

Proceedin~ s

of the

[Oct.

On account of dues for the present fiscal term I have received thc following: Receipt No. 6 $638 00 .. 7 :....................................................................... 292 00 .. 8.......................................................................................... 766 00 .. 9.......................................................................................... 241 50 " 10.......................................................................................... 823 50 " 11. 64250 " 12 65200 " 13.......................................................................................... 422 50 " 14 508 50 .. 15 457 50 " 16........................ 297 00 " 17.......................................................................................... 676 50 " 18 87500 " 19........................... 712 00 " 20 510 50 "21.......................................................................................... 331 50 "22.......................................................................................... 271 00 " 23 :. 790 50 " 24 :....................... 821 50 "25 403 00 " 26 233 50 " 27 296 50 - - - $11 ,G65 50

Income for 1887 " Cash on hand last Report Sale of Henry County Bonds Coupons Henry County Bonds

.. . .. .

1~,363 39 13,092 11 5,350 00 . 24000

Less disbursements

..

$32.0-15 50 12,155 17

Cash on hand Cole County Bonds

.. ..

$19.890 33 4,00000

Total Assets

.

$23.890 33

DISBURSEMEN'l'S. I have issued warrants on the Grand Treasurer for the following sums: DATE.

1886. October

WARRANT.

26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 28. 29. 30.

No. 295. 296. 297. 298. 299. 300. 301. 302. 303. 304. 305.

PAYEE.

AMOUNT.

Rent of Hall for Grand Lodge Session $ Geo. R. Hunt, Grand Master-Salary and Postage.............. John Alberty-Charity...................................................... G. W. Trent-Charity......................................................... Mistress T. M. Herndon-Charity...................................... John Goff-Charity..................... Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 430-Charity............................. Lodge No. 246-Funcral Ex. H. C. Pocoke John W, Owen-Grand Tyler............................................. Pay Roll, Postage, paid Carnegy, etc................................... M. H. l\fcFarland-Mileage................................................

75 00 27500 100 00 10000 10000 100 00 300 00 84 00 . 143 00 472 70 12 75


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1887.] November 1. 1. 1. 3. 3. 6. 19. 30. December 1. 1

11.

n. 17.

22. 22.

23

306. 307. 308. 309. 310. 311. 312. 313. 314. 315. 316. 317. 318. 319. 320.

H. R. Hildreth-Printing and Stationery, 18R6 Office Rent for October...................................................... 'Salary of Grand Secretary for October .. Insurance Repairing Office Stove................................ Allan McDowell's Salary................................................... Books for Library oo.... Books for Library.............................................................. Office Rent for November and Gas..................................... Salary of Grand Secretary for November............................ Allan McDowell, Expense Account................................... Work in l'vIoving Library................................................... Telephone..... Expense of Special Deputy................................................ Expense Account...

321. 322. 323. 324. 325. 326. 327. 328. 329. 330. 331. 332. 333. 33i. 335. 336. 337. 338. 339. 340. 341. 342. 343. 344. 345. 346. 347. 348. 349. 350. 351. 352. 353. 351. 355. 356. 357. 358. 359. 360,

Grand Secretary's Salary for December Kennard Carpet Co Gas Fixtures for office Books for Library : \Vork fitting up office OtlIce Rent and Gas two months Furniture for Office S. W. B. Carnegy-Second Donation Allan McDowell's Salary Tyler Desk Co.-Boxes for Vault.. Grand Secretary's Salary for January Office Ren.t Gas and Fixtures Withmar & Gray Allan McDo\vell's Salary H. R. Hildreth-Printing and Stationery Fee Returned Pineville Petitioners Office Rent Sa.lary of Grand Secretary Allan, McDowelL Painting and Lettering Office Doors II. R. Hildreth-Printing for Masonic Home Telephone Grand Lodge Register, Volume 4 Work on Grand Lodge Register City Directory Salary of Grand Secretary Office Rent Expense of Special Deputy S. W. B. Carnegy-Third Donation ; Work on Grand Lodge Register Office Rent Salary of Grand Secretary Allan McDowell's Salary

$636 52 250 51

25 00 00 50 5 90 â&#x20AC;˘ 100 00

5 ()() 4 50 5260 250 00 250 00 16 00 25 00 12 ()() 33 50

1887.

January

5. 6. 6. 6. 6. 10. 12. 18. 24. February 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 4.. 11. 18. March 1. 1. 3. 8. 8. 14. 14. 26. 30. April 1. 1.

11. 14. May

30. 1. 2. 2. 2.

June

20. 25. 1. 2. 2-'),

:

Posta~e

Expense of Special Deputy History of :Masonry Salary of Grand Secretary Office Rent Telephone

:

:. . .. .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. . . . .. .. . . .. .. . .. . . . .. .. .. . .

25000 102 37 4050 15 00 222 35 18830 61 50 5000 20000 7800 250 ()() 94 00 8 10 1000 200 ()() 181 75 3000 9400 25000 20000 3300 100 00 25 00 5000 5000 500 2iiO 00 9400 4650 5000 6000 9400 25000 30000 3000 280 500 25000 9400 2500


Proceedings of the

24 July

1. 1.' 1.

i. 12.

August

1. 1. 9.

September 2. 2. 3. 19.

29. October

1. 1. 1. 1. 3.

361. 362. 363. 364. 365. 366.

36i. 368. 369.

3iO. 3i1. 3i2. 3i3. 3i4. 3i5. 3i6. 3ii. 3i8.

[Oct.

Salary of Grand Secretary OfficeRcnt Allan McDowell's Salary Postage and Incidentals S. W. B. Carnegy's Fourth Donation Salary of Grand Secretary Office Rent Allan McDowell's Expense : : Salary of Grand Secretary , Office Rent Allan McDowell's Salary Telephone H. R. Hildreth-Printing and Stationery Office Rent Salary Grand Secretary S. M. Kcimard-Salary Incidental Expenses Allan MeDowell-Salary

. .. '" . .. . . . .. .. .. . .. . .. . ..

Total Disbursements

$2[10 au 94 00 300 00 30 00

5000 25000 91 00

250 00 250 00 94 00 200 00

2500 569 80 9400 25000

15000 10750 25000

$12,155 17 RECAPITU LATION.

Cash on hand last Report Income for 188i........ Sale of Henry County Bonds.. Coupons " 'Cole County Bonds..................

S13.092" 11 13.363 69 5,350 00 210 00 4.000 00

Less Disbursements

$:>6,045 50 12,15517

Total Assets

$23.890 33 Fraternally submitted, JOHN D. VINCIL, Gmnd Secretary.


1887.]

I

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

25

GRAND TREASURER'S REPORT. ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 12th, 1887. To the Most Worsltipfnl Grand Lodge of Missouri. A. F. and A. )[.:

BRETHREN-I herewith submit my report as Grand Treasurer, to this date, showingBalance on hand October 9, 1886 $13,092 11 Receipts from Grand Secretary : $13,361 89 Receipts from Henry County Bonds and Interest 5,350 00 Receipts from COllpons....................................................................... 2tO 00 $18,951 89 Total Warrants paid, Nos. 295 to 378, inclusive

$32,044 00 12.155 22

Leaving Balance on hand, this date

$19,888 78

AI.SO,

$1,000 00 One Cole County Bond, No. 61, six per cent.. ................................. 1,000 00 One 6~ ................................. 1,000 00 One ' 63, One Cass County Bond, 83, ................................. 500 00 ................................. 50000 One 8~ $4,00000 The Coupons on all of above Bonds due to July 1st, 1887, inclusive, and collected and Respectfully submitted, SAM. M. KENNARD, included in amount above. Grand Tr('asurer. SAM. M. KENNARD, GIUND TREAS"l;RER,

In Account with GRAND LODGE, A. F. AND A. M., of DEBIT. 1886. Oct:9, To Hal. as per IllSt report, $13,092 11 " 29, To Cash ......... $878'50 Nov.5, 141 75 do 19500 Dec.17, do 1887. Apr. 27, 14474 do 33790 Aug. 4, do 63800 do 5. 272 00 do " 8, 76600 " 10, do 281 00 do " 13, 8!350 " 16, do 64250 " 16, do 65200 " Ii, do 42250 " 19, do 50::; 50 " 22, do II 45700 25, do II 297 00 27, do 5,32000 do Sept. 1,

MISSOURI:

CREDIT. 1886. Oct. 28, By Cash War. No. " 29, do do .1 29, do do do do " 29, do do " 29, do do " 29, Nov. 1, do do 3, do do :~, do do do do ", 5, do do '6, do do 6, do do 8, do do 9, do do do " 17, do do " 19, do do do " 20, Dec. 2, do do

31)2..... $14300 296..... 275 00 297..... 10000 298 ..... 100 00 300 ..... 100 00 304..... 472 70 306 ..... 1,6::\6 25 395..... 12 75 307..... 5200 308..... 25000 310..... 5 90 309..... 51 50 311 ..... 100 00 295 ..... 7500 299 ..... 100 00 302..... 8400 301..... 30000 312..... 500 315..... 25000


26

Proceeclin.ds of the CREDIT.-Continlled.

DEBIT.-Continued.

Sept. 2, To Cash ......... $280 00 do 67650 .2, " 5, do 87500 ,. 5, do 71200 do 510 50 " 6, do 334 50 " 7. 790 50 " li. do 16, do 271 00 " do 821 00 " 21, do 40300 " 30, Oct. I, do 235 15 29650 " 6, do

[Oct.

Dec. 3. By Cash War. No. do do " 11, do " 11, do do " 20, do do " 21, do do do " 24, 1887. Jan. 6, do do 6, do do 7, do do 8, do do 8, do do do do " 13, do do " 14, do do " 18, do " 21, do do do " 25, Feb. 2, do do 2, do do 2, do do g, do do do do " 3, 5, do do do " 11, do Mar. 2, do do 2, do do 4, do do S, do do do do " 11, 16, do do " 16, do " do do " 22, do do do " 29, Apr. 2, do do 4, do do 9, do do do do " 18, May 2, do do 3, do do 3, do do 3, do do do do " 12, do do " 20, do do " 30, June 2, do do 3, do do do do 4. do " 28, do July 2, do do 2, do do 2, do do do do " 16, do " 16, do Aug. 2, do do

..

$1,895 89 $3:2,044 00

314 ..... :U6..... 317..... 318.....

:n:L... 320 ..... 321..... 322..... 325..... 323.....

3:24..... 326..... 327..... 319..... 328.....

329..... 330 ..... 331..... 332..... :)33 ..... 334 ..... 335..... 336 ..... 338 ..... :139..... 340 ..... 342..... 341.. ... 343..... 344..... 337 ..... 345 ..... 347 ..... :148 ..... 346..... 350..... 351.. ... 352 ..... 353 ..... 354.. ... :155 ..... 3;'i6 ..... 357..... 358 ..... 359 ..... 349 ..... :)60..... 361..... 362..... 363..... :165 ..... 367 ..... 366.....

$5260 25000 16 00 25 00 450 3355 25000 102 37 22235 4050 15 00 188 30 61 flO 12 00 5000 20000 7800 25000 9400 810 10'00 20000 18175 94 00 25000 20000 10000 3300 25 00 5000 3000 5000 25000 94 00 5 00 5000 6000 9400 250 00 30000 3000 280 500 25000 9400 4650 2::; 00 2.';000 9400 300 00 5000 3000 25000


1887.J

27

Grand Lodge of Missouri. CREDIT .-Continued. Aug. 4, Ry Cash War. No. "10, do do Sept. 3, do do • " 3, do do 5, do do "20, do do "30, do do Oct. 1, do do 1, do do " " 3, do do •• 4, do do 5, do do

3Gi ..... 3G8..... 369. .... 3iO..... 3i1..... 3i2..... 3iS..... 376..... 377..... 375..... 'liS..... 3i4.....

$D4 250 250 94 200 25 fiG9 150 107 250 2;)0

00 00 00 00 00 00 SO 00 50 00 00 94 00

$12,155 22 $1\1,1:;88 78

MASONIC nOME OF MISSOURI.

1\1:. W. Bro. Noah 1\1". Givan, President of the Boa.rd of Directors of the" Masonic Home of 1\1issouri," presented a Report, which had been approved by said Board. 'l'he same was read, and, on motion, referred to the Committee on Grand Master's Address. The Committee was instructed to indicate a cOIlnnittee to report upon the same, and the bour of ten o'clock to-morrow fixed for its consideration. The Grand Secretary was ordered to have the Report prin~ed and ready for distribution by to-morrow llloruing.

lVORK..

On motion of Bro. B. H. Ingram, the Grand IJcetnrer, Bro. rcqucsted to Ex(~mplifythe"Vork, this evening, in the first and second degl'ees. It was so ordered.

1\:fcDow~l1, was

'l'he Grand Lodge wa..,; then called from labor until 2: 30 o'elock this P. M.


28

Proceeding8 of the'

[Oct.

TUESDA Y-AFTERNOON SESSION.

ST.

LOUIS,

Mo., Oct. 1.1th, 1887.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 2: 30 o'clock by the Grand Master.

P. IVL,

Grand Officers in their respective stations. REPORT ON

GR~ND

MASTER'S ADDRESS.

The Committee on Grand 1\'faster's Address, through 1\1:. W. Bro. A. 1\'1. Dockery, Chairman, presented the following Report, which, on motion, was adopted: To the ftfO.9t Worshipful Grand Lodge of J.fisso7tri, A. F. and A.

],f.:

Your Committee, to whom was referred the Grand Mllster's Address, beg leave to report as follows: We approve of the action of the Grand Master in granting and refusing Special Dispensations. We approve his action in issuing circular letter calling upon Lodges to comply with the law in regard to payment of dues and plaking returns. We recommend that the questions submitted to the Grand Master, in reference to the title to Halls, be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. In tbe matter of the suspension of Bro. S. C. Herndon, Worshipful "Master of Robert Bprns Lodge, No. 496, and Robert Frazier, Wor~hipful Master of Point Pleasant Lodge, No. ]76, we recommend that all the papers and questions involved in these cases be referred to a special committee of th~ee. We recommend that the action of the Grand Master in arresting Charters, together with his circular letter in reference to saloon keeping, be referred to a committee of five. We recommend that all that part of liis Address referring to Masonic Home, together with the Report of the Board of Directors of said Home, be referred to a committee of seven, to report as directed by the Grand Lodge. We recommend that the Reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters be referred to the Committee on District Deputy Grand Masters. We approve of the action of the Grand Master, in appointing Representatives of this Grapd Body near the various Grand Lodges mentioned in his Address. Your Committee take great pleasure in referring to the success of the administration of the Grand Master; and we regard his Address as able, eloquent and practical. It


1887.J

29

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

breathes the true Musonic spirit, and is calculated to infuse renewed zeal and energy into the Brethren throughout the Grand Jurisdiction, as well as in other portions of the world where it will doubtless be read and admired. Fraternally submitted, A. M. DOCKERY, Chairman, S. H. SAUNDERS, JOlIN D. VINCIL, JOSEPH S. BROWNE, JAMES E. CADLE, NOAH M. GIVAN, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, R. E. ANDERSON, It. F. S'TEVENSON, C. C. WOODS, LEE A. HALL, JAMES W. BOYD, Committee.

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

The Grand Master anllounced the following Committees: J"'1'~prudence.-W.M.

Williams, A. W. Rogers, Erwin Ellis, J. S. Browne. I'. G. Woods.

Grievance.-Noah M. Givan, S. H. Saunders, John R. Hull, W. H. Carpenter, A. J.

Lambright, J. W. Boyd. SOil,

Chartered Lod{}ts.-L. A. Hall, R. E. Collius,.J. B. Thomas, C. A. Boyles, R. F. Steven'f. P. Dyer, Harry Keene, B. H. Ingram.

Lodges Under Di.spensation.-W. H. Mayo, P. P. Ellis, J. B. Austin, George E. Walker, Stephen Chapman, H. L. Rogers, W. T. Lamkin, F. E. Bybee, James Horrocks. Clwrity.-R. E. Anderson, Martin Collins, S. H. Saunders, John W. Farris, J. R. Ferguson, James Edwards. Accounts.-F. W. Mott, M. Cook, Robert A. Long, Jno. II. Deems. Ways and Jfeans.-Charles F. Vogel, Theodore Brace, F. J. Tygard, J. E. Cadle, A. M.

Dockery, John R. Parson. District Deputy Grand

.Ma.~ters.-C. C.

Drake, R. M. Henderson, Z. T. Marlin.

Woods, F. H. Clarke, John H. Bunger, James E. â&#x20AC;˘ -

By-Laws.-W. R. Stubblefield, James A. Shaw, Tyson S. Dines, M. C. Lewis, R. M.

Flynt. Unfinished Business.-James G. Howe, William Wilmott, John Brown, J. W. Purvis, J. N. Boydston. SPECIA L COIlDUTTEES.

Committee on Masonic llome.-W. M. Williams, S. H. Saunders, J. E. Cadle, L. A. Hall,

J. P. Blanton, C. II. Briggs, J. W. Farris. Committee on SlIspended Jlfastel's.-Seymonr Hoyt, Charles J. Walker, A. B. Martindale, Committee on A?'rested Charter.s.-Noah l\L Givan, J. W. Boyd, J. P. Blanton, Theodore

Brace, R. F. Stevenson.


Proceedin.t8 of the

30

[Oct.

MEMORIALS.

A memorial from Seaman Lodge, No. "126, was presented, asking the remission of Grand Lodge dues for the present year. It was referred to the Committee on Chartered Lodges. •John G. Miller presented a petition, praying the Grand Lodge to reimburse him to the amount of $74, money paid as an endorser for· the late Dardenne Lodge, No. 124.. The paper was referred to the Committee on Accounts.

A paper from the Lodges of St. Louis County, praying to be taken into concurrent jurisdiction with the Lodges in the city of St. Louis, was read by title and referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. A resolution, duly signed, was referred to the same committee, asking a construction of Section 27 of. Article XVI of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge. Petitions were presented from members of Naphtali Lodge, No. 25, and West Gate Lodge, N Q. 445, praying for the restora-

tions of their Charters, arrested sometime since by the Grand }\faster. Said petitions were referred to the Special Committee on Arrested Charters. GRAND ORATOR.

Bro. Theodore Brace, Grand Orator, was called. on for an address, but excused himself on the ground of not being prepared·. He made some very felicitous remarks, which were well received. . Various notices were given and annonncements made, when the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 8 o'clock this eve~ing.

EXEMPLIFICATION.

At the night session the Work was Exemplified in the first and second degrees by the Grand Lecturer, Bro. Allan


1887.J

31

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

lVlcDowell, with the Grand Officers present and in their places. The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until to-morrow at 10 o'clock.

WEDNESDAY-l\10RNING SESSION.

ST. LOUIS, 1\'1:0., October 12, 1887. The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 10 o'elock M. W. Bro. Geo. R. Hunt, Grand 1\'l:aster.

A.

M.,

by

Grand Officers in their respective s,tations. Prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Bro. Briggs. IHinutes of yesterday's session read and approved. MASONIC HOME.

'rhe Report of the Special Committee on the Report of the Board of Directors of the ".Masonic Home of 1\'l:issouri," was presented by C. H. Briggs. 'rhe same was adopted, and is as follows: 1b the Most Worsllipjul Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F. and A. 路N. :

Your Committee on Masonic Home submit the follOWing as their Report: We recommend that the $10,000, heretofore pledged to the Home, be paid at once to the Board of Directors. 1.

2. We recommend an additional appropriation of $5,000 to be paid when needed. 3. The matter of further appropriations to the Home, we deem best to leave to the wisdom of the Grand Lodge at its future sessions. W. M. WILLIAMS, S. H SAUNDERS, J. E. CADLE, LEE A. HALL, J. P. BLANTON, C. H. BRIGGS, J. W. FARRIS, C,ommittee.

The same was ordered printed for distribution.


Proceedings of the

32

[Oct.

The Report of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Homc, prcsentcd yesterday, as modified by the Report of Special Committee, was approved and ordered printed in the journal of Proceedings. To the Most Worshiliful Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A. F. and A. M.:

BRETHREN-Among the duties imposed upon the President of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home. by its By-Laws, is, that he should" report annually to the Grand Lodge, the income and expenses of the Home, work accomplishcd, together with' such recommendations as he may make with regard to the future operations of the Home." In compliance with this req.uirement, I herewith report, that the "Instructions to Home Directors," adopted at the last session路 of the Grand Lodge (see Proceedings of 188G, page fJ9), have practically confined the labors of the Directors during the past year to "soliciting contributions and bequest.,> from Lodges, Chapters, Commanderies amI individuals." This work has been prosecuted with such facilities as the Board had at their command. They have not felt at liberty to employ agents to visit the Masonic bodies of the State and personally present the claims of the Home to the Brethren, but have issued an appeal for the Home, with the history of its organization, articles of incorporation and by-law:;. This has secured voluntary pledges from a large number of Lodges, Chapters, Commanderies and Brethren. I submit herewith a list of such subscriptions as are now in the hands of the Secretary of the B()ard. This does not include all subscription:; made, as we have personal knowledge of others which have not as yet been forwarded to the Secretary. This list shows an aggregate amount of subscriptions: By Lodges " Chapters....... " Commanderies.................. . "Individuals....... Total

$17,725 2,975 1,675 2,567

00 00 00 00

$24,942 00

This, together with the amount already donated by the Grand Lodge, $10,000, and of the Grand Chapter, $2,500, and the proceeds of Charity Day, $32,000, makes a total of SG9,442. The Lodge, Chapter, Commandery, Grand Chapter, and individual subscriptions are payable in five installments: the first installment being payable on demand after Octobcr 15th, 1887. The payments of these installments, together with the donation of the Grand Lodge and proceeds of Charity Da.y, will make the sum of about $;)0,000, aVlLilable for immediate use in securing property for the Home and in putting in operation the long cherished enterprise. The Board are of opinion that for one half of the above assets, property can be secured which will be suitable for the IIome, and will answer every purpose for a few years. If so, they will be enabled to open the Home for inmates within a brief period. It is thought best not to expend all the available fUllds for buildings, but to so manage the aflil.irs of the Institutipn that we may be able to pay for the property and have means left with which to carry it on. As the demands upon the Home shall in time increase, we hope to be able to meet them, without encumbering what may already be secured. The Board feel the responsibility resting upon them, and will pursue a safe, conservative course. We may reasonably expect a large number of subscrip~ionsboth from Masonic bodies and individuals who have not yet subscribed, but who will the more readily give when assurl;ld that the enterprise will be crowned with success.


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

33

The expenses thus far incurred amount to $558.36, and were solely for printing and distributing the pamphlets containing information referred to above. At the present writing (October 8th), no requests for location of the new Home have been received. All applications that may be made will receive due consideration by the Board. At a meeting of the Board, in May last, a committee, consisting of Bros. C. C. Woods, F. J. Tygard and R. Q. Roach, was appointed to investigate plans for building, etc., in pursuance of the Grand Lod~e instructions aforesaid. The Report of that Committee is herewith submitted, and sets forth the difficulties of complying With your instructions until it is known what amount of money will be at the disposal of those who have charge of the work. On May, 1pth, 1887, Bro. L. C. Krauthoffresigned as a member of the Board, owing to his inability, on account of professional engagements, to discharge the duties of the position. His resignation was accepted with regrets, and Past Grand Master R. F. Stevenson was elected to till the vacancy. The term of office of the following Directors expire with the present session, which you should fill by election, viz: .R. E. Anderson, F. J. Tygard, S. M. Kcnnard and T. P. Dyer. RECOMMENDAnONS.

Under this head I feel at liberty to call upon the Grand. Lodge to do all within its power to aid in this work. It has already pledged $10,000. From its income it can contribute annually a good amount without becoming involved in any manner. It can stimulate the subordinate Lodges and the Masons of Missouri to a realizing sense of the importance of the work. A Home for our indigent Masons and for our widows and orphans will be a grander monument to Masonic charity than the most magnificent temple erected since the one built by King Solomon. I therefore recommend: First, the immediate payment of the $10,000 already pledged; Second, the appropriation and payment of an additional amount of $5,000 ont of the funds now on hand, and that the Grand Lodge pledge the further sum of $5,000 annually for the support of the Home; and, Third, that the Grand Lodge urge upon all subordinate Lodges and upon all Masons in Missouri to work, pray and pay, now, henceforth and forever, for the welfare of the Masonic Home. Brethren, a compliance with these recommendations will insure success. The undertaking in which we have engaged is not a small one. It involves not the work of a day, or year, or a generation even, but the united efIorts of every Mason in the State for all time to come. It involves labor, sacrifice, anxiety, devotion, liberality, confidence, faith, hope and charity. Personal gain, selfishness, ill-will or jealousy should tind no place ill this work. Every Mason in -Missouri should feel that he has a personal interest in the Home. He should esteem it a privilege rather than a duty to give to its aid. not only now but every year tbat God ma)路 spare his life. If everyone of the thirty thousand Masons in Missouri will voluntarily make small annual offerings to the Home it will become an incalculable blessing to our Order and to all its members.." The Lord loveth a路 cheedul giver," and our Home should be the free-will offering of our Brethren. Such a Home will become the pride of the Order and receive the blessings of Almighty God. CONCLUSION.

In conclusion, the Board of Directors have, so far as it was possible, compiled with the instructions given them by the Grand Lodge at its last annual communication: and they G. L. PRo.-3.


34

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

feel now that they may safely proceed with the work under such precautions as care, prudence and an earnest desire to do great good may dictate, and, unless instructed otherwise, we will, in the near future, take such steps as will open tbe IIome, relying upon the fruit of our labors to warrant the liberal support of the Craft. Fraternally SUbmitted, NOAH M. GIVAN,

President.

To the Board of Managers of the Masonic Home of 1Jfissouri:

Your Committee, appointed to report a "plan for the erection of suitable buildings and the management of the" Masonic Home of Missouri," would beg leave respectfully to report: That after conferring together and due deliberation on the subject, they are at a very great loss to formulate any report at all, from the fact that the plans for building and the .management of the institution will be so entirely dependent upon the amount of funds which it may hereafter be found can be applied for such purposes, that we have no starting point. What would be very proper and desirable for the proper buildings, if we had a large fund secured, would not do at all if only a small amount could be obtained; and so in regard to plans for utilizing a farm. There may be ten, twenty or a hundred acres, and the plans would vary for each amount. Neither can we know what buildings can be pnrchased with the land, which may be made available for the purposes of a Home. We think, therefore, it would be ,vise to defer any plans for the purposes for which our Committee was appointed until after the Board makes a purchase of lands, and determines how much money can be expended on the necessary buildings and improvements. We might state, in general terms, that, in our opinion, the cheapest plans on which a Home would be practicable at all, would be about as follows: A central building of not more than two stories in height, with one large room, say 2,'i x: 40 feet, which could be used until better accommodations could be provided, for a school room, chapel and Sunday-school, with seating accommodation for forty pupils, and, by the aid of extra benches, could be made to seat the widows and employes. A Reception Room, say 16 x 20; Library, 16 x 20; Kitchen, 16 x 20; Dining Room,16 x 30; and sleeping rooms for about forty orphans-the boys and girls at opposite ends of the build~ ing, entirely detached-and four or five rooms for the use of manager and matron, teacher, farmer, etc. Detached from the main building we would recommend as a beginning six small cottages, of three rooms each, each a little apart, so as to give privacy' and a home-like appearance, for the use of widows who have children, all ncar enough to be reached by the Manager in a few minutes' walk. We would suggest that the persons required for the control would be: 1. A M'lnager, who should keep a close personal supervision of all the widows and orphans, to whom obedience should be given; and who should look after the health and comfort of all under his charge; who should see that the houses are kept clean and healthy; that good and wholesome food is provided; that all are comfortably clad; look after the morals'and education of the young, and generally to be the executive officer of the Board.


1887.J

35

Grand Lodge of J!fissouri.

2. A Matron (who ought to be the wife of the Manager), who should superintend the internal arrangements of the houses, and under whose direction the widows and orphans, who were able, should keep the house scrubbed. the rooms and bedding cleaned, the clothing washed and laundered, and such clothing made up in the house the Board deemed proper.

as

3. A Lady Teachel', who would soon train a few of the older orphans to assist in teaching all the branches taught in city schools.

4. A Cook, who, with the assistance of such orphans as the Matron should designate, should prepare excellent living for the institution.

5. A Farmer, under whose control the lands (with the help of such orphans as were able) ought to be made to produce all the vegetables, milk and poultry that may be required, and, in time, a surplus product for market.

Respectfully submitted,

R. Q. ROACH, C. C. WOODS, F. J. TYGARD, Committee.

SUBSCRIPTIONS TO MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI. LODGE SUBSCRIPTIONS.

Name oj Lodge. Ancient Landmark Alanthus Altona Bee Hill Butler Beacon............................ Bertrand Barbee Barnesville Corner-stone Chillicothe Cecil. Conway Censer Chariton Cairo Cold water Cedar City Cache Civil Bend Cainsville Corinthian Carroll Carter Cass Cedar Callao

No. 356 252 315 393 254 3

330 217 455

323 333 454

528 172 513 486

485 425 416 409

328 265 219 ]R7

147 37 38

Post Office. Harrisburg . Alanthus . Altona .. Lawson .. Butler . .. St. Louis Bertrand .. Brownsville .. Logan's Creek .. St. Louis . Chillicothe .. Cotton Wood Point... .. Conway Macon .. Guthridge Mills . Cairo .. .. Brosley Cedar City : .. St. Louis .. Civil Bend .. Cainsville .. Warrensburg . Norborne . .. Jefferson City Harrisonville .. Owensville . Callao .

Am't. Mem's. County. Boone $100 00 48 Gentry................... 10 00 30 Bates...................... 5000 32 Ray 125 00 5R Bates. 250 00 117 .............................. 60000

136

Mississippi........ ...... 25 00 Saline.................... 100 00 Reynolds.. 25 00

42

.............................. 500 Livingston 2.')0 Mississippi 50 Laclede 25

Macon........... Chariton.... Randolph

27 62

00 00 00

85 67 15

00 125 00 100 00

62

15 00 Cass 5000 Calloway......... 25 00 .............................. 10000 Davies.............. 100 00 Harrison......... 50 00 Johnson 100 00

Carroll 200 00 Cole....................... 100 00 Cass 50000 Gasconade.............. 50 00 Macon.................... 5000

25

38 42 24 19 63 48 26

67 54

33 111 23 52


36

Proceeding 8 of the

Name oj Lodge. No. Dl1ggett 492 Decatur 400 Dayton 386 Des Moines 180 Earl 285 Exeter 514 Friendship 8!) Fayetteville 264 Fayette 47 Fulton. 48 Fairmouut... 290 Greenfield 446 Good Hope 218 Golden Rule 374 Grand River 276 GrisWold 178 Gentryville 125 Havana.......................... 21 Herman 123 Hume 130 Higbee 527 Henderson 477 IIigginsville 31\4 Hebron 3.54 Hardin 322 Hogle's Creek : 279 Hannibal 188 Howard 4 Irondale 143 Ita.ska 420 Jewel 480 Jasper 398 Jacksonville 44 Kirksville 105 Lamar 292 Light '257 Lewiston 494 Lambskin 460 Louisville 428 Laddonia 115 MineraL 471 Mechanicsville 260 lIH. :Moriah...................... 40 Meridian.......................... 2 Missouri 1 Milford 516 Memphis......................... 16 Meramec 95 l\Iountain Grove 158 Mirabile 166 Moberly 344 Mitchell 22!) Mound City 294 l\:ledoc 335

Post o'(fiee. Loutre Island Pierce City Dayton Athens Coffeysburg Exeter Chillicothe Fayetteville Fayette Fulton Fairmount.~

Greenfield South St. Louis Jonesburg Freeman Price Branch Gentryville McFall .. ; Herman IIume Higbee Henderson Higginsville Mexico Hardin Quincy Hannibal New Franklin Irondale St. Louis Pleasant Hill Midway Jacksonville Kirksville LaTuar Eaglesville Lewiston St. Louis Louisville Laddonia Oronogo Mechansc;;ville St. Louis St. Louis St. Louis Milford Memphis Eureka Mountain Grove Mirabile Moberly Columbus Mound City Joplin .:

.. . .. .. .. .. .. . . . : . . . . .. . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . .. .. . . . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . .. ;.. .. . . .. .. .. . . ..

[Oct. Am't. Uem's.

County. Montgomery Lawrence Cass Clark Davies Barry Livingston Johnson Howard Calloway Clark : Dade

. .. . . . . . . . . . ..

Mohtgomery Cuss Montgomery Gentry Gentry Gasconade Bates Randolph Webster Lafayette Audrain Ray.: Hickory lIfarion Howard Washington

.. . .. .. . . .. .. . . .. .. . .. . .

Cass Jasper Randolph Adair Barton Harrison Lewis

. . .. . . . .

Lincoln Adrian Jasper St. Charles

. . .. .

Barton Scotland St. Louis Wright CaldwelL Randolph Johnson Iiolt Jasper

.. . . . . . .. .. .

$4000 125 00 10000 5000 5000 2500 25000 5000 20000 30 00 50 00 100 00 250 00

'28 35 29 39 30 29 67 34 89 125 32 40 107

10 00

39

100 00 2500 25 00 25 00 10000 200 00 5000 25 00 125 00 12.''> 00 100 00 25 00 500 00 150 00 5000 500 00 25000 5000 50 00 10000 5000 5000 75 00 300 00 25 00 125 00 5000 50 00 25000 20 00 50000 2500 500 00 5000 100 00 50 00 100 00 25 00 50 00 100 00

SO 20 42 39 35 32

30 43 77 43 19 !J6

19 40 107 82 28 45 100 100 27 26 47 35 50 28 35 90 72 157 27 118 28 21 108 20 54 36


1887.J

Grand

Name oj Lodge. New Salem New Home New Bloomfield....... Melville Ninevah Oriental. Orient Francais Occidental Plato Panlville Pickering Philadelphia Prairie Home Paynesville Pike Pythagoras Plumb Peace Portland Palestine Poplar Bluff Phcenix Potter Pauldingville...... Relief Richmond..... Rushville Richland Spring Creek St. Joseph...... Tyro Vandalia West View Wentzville........ Wadesburg Wellsvill~

Lod~e

No. 270 326 60 458 4i3 518 167 163 469 319 472 502 503 499 399 383 :.. 375 280 2J2 241 209 136 84

11 341 57 238 382

347 78 12 491 103 46

348 194 512

Webb City West Gate 445 Wilson 191 Wellington 22 Wakanda 52 Warrensburg 135 Woodlawn 223 Wm. D. Muir 277 'Vaverly 61 Wallace 456 Zeredatha , 189 Sturgeon 174 Cooper 36 New Bloomfield 60 Savannah......................... i l

Post Office.

New Salem............... New Home............... New Bloomfield........ Docteville :........... Olney....................... Blackburn St. Louis St. Louis Plato Brashear.. Pkkering................. Philadelphia Prairie Home............ P;1ynesville Curryville................. Cassville........ Middleton................. Chilhowee Portland.............. St. Charles Poplar Bluff.............. Bowling Green.......... Longwood........... Wri~ht

37

of Missouri.

City...............

Bro路okline...... Richmond.. Rushville................... Richland Edgar Spring............ St. Joseph.................. Caledonia Vandalia Millersville Went7.ville................. Creighton Wellsville ' 路ebb City ' St. Louis.................... Pocahontas............... DeKalb Carr911toll . Warrensburg Woodlawn... .. Pilot Grove............... \'Vaverly Bunceton.................. St. Joseph.................. Sturgeon.................... Boonville New Bloomfield Savannah

COU~tty.

Lincoln Bates Calloway............... Dode Lincoln.................. Saline

Texas..................... Adrian Nodaway Marion ;................. Cooper...... Pike Pike Barry Montgomery......... Johnson Calloway... St. Charles........ Butler Pike........... Pettis Warren.................. Green RAy... Buchanan.............. Pulaski........... Phelps.................... Buchanan.............. Washington Adrian Cape Girardeau...... St. Charles Cass Montgomery......... .Jasper

Am't.

$lOO 150 100 25 30 100 125 500 25 10 100 50 100 25 200 50 2.5 25 50 1:25 25 150 25 50 50 250 100 25 25 500 100 50 50 50 10 100 100 500 125 100 100 100

Cape Girardeau...... Buchanan.............. Carroll.. Johnson.. Monroe... 2;) Cooper 50 Lafayette............... 100 Cooper 25 Buchanan 500 Randolph........ 25 Cooper 100 Andrew...........

100 50

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

Mem's. 63 52 61 27 31 43 132 14,1 41 34 40 25 33 22 41 62

14 43 42

46 47 57 28 路34 27 43 51 24 127 39 51 29 49 40 53 36 76 35

54 145 48

29 39 36

43 102

47 84


38

Proceedings· of the

[Oct.

SUPI'LEMENTARY SUBSCRIPTIONS.

Name.. Breckinridge, George Cornelius, Jesse Dyer, Trusten P Gilliam, John A Hickok, E. E Nelson, N. 0 Partee, H. C Payne, Robert A Tredway, Manning Torrey, Jay L , Tuscan Lodge, No. 360

Add,·ess.

:

"" :

. . . .. . .. .. ..

.. .. ..

620 Garrison Ave Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 417 Pine St : Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Tuscan Lodge, No. :~60 Twenty-Ninth and Washington Ave

Amount.

.. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. ..

$20000 100 00 10000 25 00 2500 500 00 25 00 5000 .2500 109 00 1,000 00 $2,15000·

INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS.

Name. Anderson, John A Baldwin, Charles P Bezold, Herlnan B('zold, G Black, Sinclair Bartlett, E. P Bentsck, John Creighton,.T. H Caldwell, George Callicott, J. P Craig,S. P Cochran, VI'. F Carr, J. E Carter, D. N Clobes, ·William Crane, C. C Curtman, Charles 0 ])alton, F. P Dodd, William Elliott, E. E Eyster, \V. C Elliott, J. M Estill, J. T Gauer, G. 'V Goodrich,!. C Hicks, Jesse E Head, John C Hackett, John B Hendrick. A. 1\1 Hunt, Dr. L. W Herring, C. L Hall, Dr. George W Hubbell, C. .1 Jarrett, R. P Kyte, E. V Lawson, Douglass

Address. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. ..

;

:

.. . .. . .. . . .. . .. .. ..

.. . . .. . ..

.. .. .. .. .

Lexington, Mo Twenty-Sixth and Penn Loutre Island, Mo LoutreIsland,1\1o 3606 N. 19th St 3929 N. 20th St St. Lonis, Mo 'Vadesburg, ·Mo VI'adesburg, Mo Chamois, Mo Chamois, 1\10 Chamois, 1\10 Wentzville, l\Io VI'entzville, 1\10 VI'entzville, :Mo ; 3612 North Broadway 3718 North 9th St 2331 Dodier St 1911 Bremen Ave Oronago, 1\Io 921 Salisbury St Chamois, :Mo Turney, :Mo Rhineland,1\fo Went;r,ville, Mo W. U. T. Co Georgia City, 1\10 Chamois, Mo 'Vadesburg, 1\10 Dllggett Lodge, No. 492 2125 Olive St 3615 North 9th St Oronogo, Mo

.. 2212 University St .. Turney St

Amount.

.. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . .. . . .. .. . .. . .. . . .. . . .. :.. .. .. .. . . . .. .. .

$5 00 5000 250 500 10 00 10 00 500 100 1 00 500 10 00 500 250 500 250 2500 2500 1000 2500 2500 25 00 500 500 250 500 2500 10 00 500 1 00 300 10 00 2500 15 00 10 00 2500 500


39

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1887.J Name.

Amount.

Address.

Leeman, C. S Chamois, Mo Lewis, W. C ;................. 5200 North Broadway Lewis, W. G Main and Terry Lewis, H. E 3704 North 9th St Landgogt, Wm. E................................. 3436 North 11th St.. lIfcFarland, Robert............................... Daggett Lodge, No. 492 Marquand, Henry Chamois, lifo ]\,[urry, Charles...................................... Oronogo, 1\{0 Moore, William.................................... Turney, Mo Messerley, S. A...................................... 3919 North 20th St Newcome, John.................................... Piketon, Mo Pease, Albion P 217 Clark Ave Phelps, E. R......................................... 121 North 61·h St Price, Ben....... Loutre Islll.nd, Mo Price, LemueL ,............................. Loutre Island, Mo PIaU, Harry B.................. 3730 North 9th St Peasser, J. P. Lehigh, Mo Ritckie, James St. Joseph, :1\10 Rebman, A. 'V...................................... Kansas City, l\{o Richard:.;, J. J....................................... Chanlois, 1\10 Reese. Edward...................................... 921 Salisbnry St Simon, Alfred D.................................... Kansas City, 1'v[0 Stine, E.............................. Kansas City, l\{o Scruggs, J. A......................................... Turney, 1\1"0 Sexton, H. H. J..................................... Chamois, Mo Smiley, S. W 'Ventzville, Mo Sinclair, C. A · 1117 Salisbnry St.. Shrumm-, ""'illiam ;. Piketon, 1\10 Scholz. PhiL Fourteenth and AnglerodtSts Tomkins, O. R...................................... Urich, ·1\10 Turner, R. M........................................ Chamois, 1\Jo Ude, George.......................................... 3612 North 11th St Wade, Vo/. A.......................... Wadesburg, lifo Wright, George R . Wild, Louis . Loutre Island, ]\fo ",,'etteroth, L .. White, Alf.H .. Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 Kennard, Samuel M .. St. Louis Givan, Noah l\{ .. St. Louis Anderson,.R. E . Hannibal Daughaday, H .. Broadway and St. Charles St Kotthhff, II .. 612 Washington Ave Beckman, Charles . Rhinland, :Mo ",,'ray, W. J .. Rhinland, 1\10

.. . .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. . .. . .. . .

.. .. .. ..

.. .. .. . .. .. .. ..

.. .. . . .. . .. . . .. :. ..

$10 00 10 00 2500 2ii 00 2500, 250 1000 1000 500 25 00 500 2500 10000 250 2[,00 1000 1000 10 00 2500 500 25 00 25 00 2500 5 00 1000 500 500 500 2500 1 00 500 500 100 250 250 • 2500 2500 20000 10000 10000 ~5 00 2500 200 200

COMMANDERY SUBSCHlPTIONS.

Commande1'Y Name.

No.

Post Office.

Bayard 26 Harrisonville Constantine........................... 27 Greenfield.............. De Molay 3 Lexington... Ivanhoe................................. 8 St. Louis......

Amount. $350 100 300 250

00 00 00 00

Members. 78 55 32 111


Proceedin,gs of the

40 Commandery Name. Mt. Olive Navarro Oriental Temple

. .. . .

[Oct.

1;0. Post Office. 46 Lamar......... ;.................................. 45 Carrollton...................................... 35 Kansas City................................... 38 Fayette

Amo1Lnt. Members. $25 00 25 50 00 30 500 00 103 100 00 49

$1,675 00

CHAPTER SUBSCRIPTIONS.

Chapter Name. Bellefontaine R. A. C............. Cyrus R. A. C.......... De Molay R. A. C.................. Greenfield R. A. C Jermalem R. A. C Kilwinning R. A. C Lamar R. A. C Milan R. A. C Moberly R. A. C............. 8t. Louis R. A. C.............. Tyrian R. A. C.. Temple R. A. C George Washington R. A. C... Signet R. A. C........................

No. Post o.ffice. Amount. 25 St. Louis $650 00 36 Richmond...................................... 150 00 26 Warrensburg 10000 38 Greenfield...................................... 100 00 100 Poplar Bluff................................... 50 00 50 St. Louis :................... 125 00 101 Lamar............................................ 5000 103 l\lilan 50 00' 79 l\:loberly :. 100 00 1,000'00 8 81. Louis 52 Neosho 50 00 51 South St. Louis.............................. 5000 150 00 24 Carrollton............ 68 Harrisonville ..:............................... 350 00 .

~fcmbe1'S.

175

60 73 68

29 61 49

52 68 277 37

â&#x20AC;˘

66 50 73

$2,971) 00

Subscriptions received during the present session of the Grand Lodge, and that may be received during the coming y'ear, will be reported in the next Annual Report to the Grand Lodge., . NOAH M. GIVAN, President.

HOltlE DIREC'rORS ELECTED.

On motion of Bro. T. P. Dyer, M. W. Bro. R. F. Stevenson was chosen as a Director for one year to fill the unexpired term of L. C. Krauthoff. On further motion, Bros. R. E. Anderson, Samuel M. Kennard, F. J. rrygard and T. P. Dyer were elected Directors of the Masonic Home for the term of three years. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND ltIASTERS.

Bro. C. C. Woods, Chairman of the Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand J\'Iasters, presented the following, which was adopted:


Grand

1887.]

Lod~e

of Missouri.

41

To路the lIfost Worshipf~~l Grand Lodge oj 1Ilissouri, A. F. and A. lIf. :

Your Committee, to whom was referred the reports of the District Deputy Grand l\1aster~ of the several Districts, beg leave to report that they have carefully examined the reports from twenty-six Districts, to wit: 1, 2, 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14,15,16,18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24,2.\ 26, 27,28, 29,30,31,32,33; Districts 3, 4, 5, 7, 10,12 and 17 made no report, and we are without any information whatever in regard to the condition of the Craft so far a~ these District Deputy Grand Ma~ters are concerned. The reports before us are encouraging, and indicate a good degree of prosperity in g-eneral, and some of the reports show conclusively that the D. D. Grand Master has honored his office, but in some cases, even among those reporting, there are indications that a new appointee might do more for c. tbe good of the Order "-he certainly could not do less than his predecessor, One Brother states with charming frankness tbat the only work done in his Di~trict, was setting a Lodge to work under Dispensation, and this be deputized another to do. Several frankly state tbat they have visited no Lodges, and give no apology therefor, except that one states he has not been" called on" to visit any Lodges during the year. We consider this office and work of great importance to the Craft, and tberefore recogni7Al the propriety in every case of selecting only our very best and most zealous Brethren for the position, who will feel" called upon" always to visit any Lodge, and do any work by which to build up our noble Order. Respectfully sUbmitted, C. C. WOODS, JAS. E. DRAKE, R. M. HENDERSON, F. H. CLARK, Z. T. MARTIN, Committee.

APPEALS AND GRIEVAN(JES.

M. W. Bro. Noah :1\1:. Givan, Chairman of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances, presented the following R.eport, w.hich was approved seriatim" and then adopted as a whole: To the Most

WOl'shipf~tl

Grand Lodge of lIfissow'i, A. F. and A. lIf.:

Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances fraternally submit the following rE:port of the cases submitted to and carefully considered by them: No. I. JOHN

H.

SHERIFF, AppeUant,

vs. GATE CITY LODG E,

No. 522.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspending him for five years.

The accused in this case was charged with adultery. He was tried and found guilty, and his punishment fixed at indefinite suspension. Grand l\'faster Boyd set aside the jUdgment for irregularity, and ordered a new trial. When the case was again presented


Proceeding8 0/" the

42

[Oct.

to the Lodge, the accused'consented that it might be tried on the evidence v,iven at the former triaL The case was set for trial September 18th, 1886. At this meeting there was no quorum present on account of a storm. At the next regular meeting of the TAldge, which was October 2d, the case was tried in his' absence; he was found guilty and suspended for five years. He appeals on the ground that the judgment was against the evidence, and that he had no notice of the second trial, and that it occurred while he was in Illinois. The record shows that he was notiiied of the trial, and the Acting Secretary states that he was present in Kansas City the evening the trial took place. The record is very voluminous, covering some ninety pages. The evidence sustains the charge, and we think no injustice has been done him in the trial and therefore recommend that the jUdgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. II. L. C. LA UGHLIN, Appellant,

vs. SOMERSET LODGE,

No. 206.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling Samuel R. Stewart.

The Junior Warden of Somerset Lodge preferred charges against Samuel R. Stewart, charging him, First, with deserting his wife and family, and leaving them unprovided for, about the year'1884, and, Second, that he had married a woman in the State of Texas, in the year 1886, without having a divorce from his former wife. The record is somewhat imperfect, but enough appears to establish that the accused had lived with his wife in Missouri ten or twelve years, and that he recogni7,cd the woman with whom he lived as his wife; that he went to Texas, and in a letter written January 30th, 1887, by him to a member of the Lodge, he admitted having married another woman in that State. At the trial he was found guilty on both specifications, and expelled by a vote of sixteen to two. Bro. Laughlin appeals for the reason that the evidence was insufficient and improper, and that it was principally hearsay. The evidence, which was competent, established the facts as above stated. If he had lived with a woman in Missouri for ten or twelve years as his wife, and then left her and went to Texas and married another woman, he was guilty, whether he was lawfully married to the Missouri woman or not. We fail to see any reason for the reversal of the case, and therefore recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. III. JOHN

B. HIGHLEY, AppeUant,

vs. SAMARITAN LODGE,

No. 424.

}

Appeal from the action of the Lodge acquitting Bro. Z. P. Cole.

The appellant preferred charges against Bro. Z. P. Cole, charging him with circulating reports calculated to injure a Brother Mason, etc. The difficulty grew outof a primary election, at which Bro. Cole was a defeated canditate, in 1880. The reports complained of were circulated some two years before the charges were preferred.


1881.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

,

43

A great deal of evidence was heard by the Lodge, and at the trial the accused was acquitted by a decided Yote. Bro. Highley appeals for the reason alone that the verdict was not in accordance with the evidence.

From all that we can see, a fair trial was had. The Brethren who heard the evidence are the best judges of its weight. Quite a large attendance of the members was present at the trial. No other complaint is made than that above stated. We cannot, under these circumstances, di'3turb the verdict. Let the judgment qf the Lodge be affirmed. No. IV. THOMAS BEARD, Appella'nt, VB.

STAR OF THE WEST LODGE,

No.

) 133.

J

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge aequitting Bro. William 8earle.

The charges in this case are, in substance, that the accused wrote a letter to the Lodge, falsely charging that the Secretary and other members of the Lodge were asking and receiving payout of the Lodge funds for services not rendered by them, and also that he had threatened that no man should j{>in the Lodge or receive Masonic degrees in the future. The record shows that the letter was written as charged, and that it ,vas untrue, and the weight of the evidence sustains the charge in regard to the threat made by the accused. The vote on both spccifications was: thirteen, guilty; ten, not guilty. The mem bership of the Lodge, as shown by the last year's report, is fifty-three; less than onehalf were present, although notified as required by law. Unless there was some good reason for this, which does not appear in the record, the absent members deserve a reprimand. Charges of this character involve the welfare of the Jj()dge in a peculiar degree, Its members should take enough interest in its welfare to be present upon occasions of this character. If there were no probability of a different result we should nut favor sending the case back for another trial, although we might not concur in the finding of the Lodge. But we feel that the peculiar character of these charges"affecting, as they must, to a great degree, the future welfare of the Lodge, should be investigated by a full Lodge. If, after a full and fair investigation, with at least a majority of its members present, the accused is again acquitted. the judgment will have to' stand. 'Without assuming to direct the Lodge in a re-trial of the case, what its judgment shall be, we, for the reasons stated, recommend that the judgment in this case be reversed and the cause be remanded for a new trial. No.V. S. W.

GERARD, Appellant, VB.

XENIA LODGE,

No; 50.

}

Appeai from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The charge in this case is of the most serious and heinous character; it is in effect, that the accused ravished a girl thirteen years of age, in the back room of his drug store. The only competent testimony in this case given at the trial against the accused, is that of the girl, and there are some circumstances connected with her evidence. tending' to impair its force. The accused himself did not make any statement at the trial, for the reason, as he says, that he did not think he had the legal or moral right to disclose the treatment of a female patient, he being a practising physician. A witness who was present in the store during the time, testified that the door was partly open between the

,


Proceedin~s

44

of the

[Oct.

back room and the drug store, and that the part.ies were in the back room not more than five minutes, and that he was in a position to hear, and heard no disturbance. The Lodge found the accused guilty by a vote of twenty-four to twelve, and he was expelled by a vote of twenty-five to eleven. He appeals, asserting his innocence, and giving as the reason for not testifying in the case, as above stated, and states in addition thereto that he did not think or believe that it was necessary to make a statement of the facts, and that if a new trial is granted, he will be able to produce the testimony of another witness, who was in the store at the time, and which he was unable to do at the former trial, not knowing the name of the person present. This is a most serious charge, and, if the accuscd is' guilty, he deserves the severest punishment. If he is not guilty, then, he and his family should not rest under the disgrace which a conviction implies. â&#x20AC;˘ While we are in the habit of affirming the judgment of the Lodge where the proceedings arc regular, yet we feel that, under the peculiar circumstances of this case, no injustice will be done by remanding the case for re-trial. The accused made a mistake in not testifying in his own behalf, the failure to do so may itself havc caused his conviction. He should only be convicted upon the fullest and fairest investigation of so serious an accusation. If, after a full examination of the matter, the members of the Lodge believe him guilty, they should not hesitate to convict. If he is innocent, then acquit. The fact that the case is sent back for a new trial should not influence them one way or the other; it is only done in the iilterest of fair dealing and in the belief that possibly, and only possibly, injustice may have been done him in the former trial. Let the judgment of the Lodge be reversed and the case be remanded for a new trial. VI. F. M. KING, AppcUant, VS.

ROCHESTER LODGE,

No. 248.

}

Appeal from ruling of the Worshipful Master.

'1'he facts in this case are as follows: In 18i5, a member of Rochester Lodge died, leaving three minor children. It being reported to the Lodge that the e..c;tate was being mismanaged and'the children likely to be deprived thereof, the Lodge appointed a com'mittee to investigate it and to secure the appointment of a guardian for the children. Bro. King was a member of that committee. and, in obedience to the instructions of the Lodge, secured the appointment of Bro. C. P. Lion, who, at that time, was a member of the Lodge, and Bro. King, and one John W. Pemberton, became sureties on the bond. The guardian made settlement with the two eldest children, as they became of age, but before the youngest child became of age he removed to the State of Nebraska, and by reason of some¡ misfortune, which does not appear in the record, he failed to settle with the youngest child for its portion of the estate. Suit was brought against the sureties on the bond and a judgment for $609.15 rendered against them. The other surety being insolvent, the burden of paying the entire jUdgment falls upon Bro. King. His statement is, that to pay the judgment now, will deprive him of his home, and in his old age, leave him in want. He appealed to the Lodge to pay the judgment for him as he became involved at their instance and direction. The matter was brought before the Lodge at a special meeting, held March 19th, 1887, . called for the purpose of considering his claim. At that meeting, the Lodge decided to take no fnrther action in the case. Thus the matter\ stood until a subsequent special meeting, held July 16th, 188i, called for that purpose, when, after discussion of the matter, the M.aster ruled" that according to our By-Laws, it would be illegal to vote on reconsidering the question in controversy."


45

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1887.J

The only question of law presented for consideration of your committee is the correctness of the ruling of the Worshipful Master last quoted. It is true that the Lodge could not at a subsequent meeting, reconsider its final action at a previous mceting. It seems, however, no action on this subject was had at the previous meeting, and it was 1I0t nece:;sary to reconsider the action of the Lodge. No action having been taken, there was nothing to reconsider. It could have aided Bro. King in July, or may yet do so. We cannot pass upon the propriety of the Lodge's refusing to pay the claim, because it has not yet refused to pay, and we think it will not refuse to render Bro. King aid

in the premises, if the facts arc as stated by him. While the Lodge may not be legally liable for this debt, yet the members will hardly fail to recogni7.e a very strong moral obligation on the part of the Lodge to aid Bro. King in his troubles, which they were the cause of his becoming invol ved in. All that the Grand Lodge can do in the premises at present is to hold that the W. M. erred in his ruling at the July meeting. 0

We therefore recommend that his ruling be held to be error, and that the matter of helpiug Bro. Killg be referred to the further con5iderlltion of the Lodge.

No. VII. HENRY

C. MUHPlIY, A1Jpclkwt, V8.

RICHLAND LODGE,

No. 382.

}

Appealed from the action of the Lodge suspending him.

The charge in this case is of a serious nature, and need not be here stated. The accused was suspended for ten years, and appeals for the reasons, among others, that the resident members of the Lodge were not notified of the trial, and that hearsay evidence was lIsed against him. The objection is also made that the specification is indefinite and uncertain. While the specification is not as definite and certain as it might be, yet we apprehend that the accused was thereby advised of the nature of the charge. ' As to the objection that the members were not notified of the trial, it has been the law of the Grand Lodge since 1870 that it is ,,0 the duty of the Master of the Lodge to notify every resident member of his Lodge to attend the trial of a Brother." While this is true, it is a further fact in this case that all the resident members were present at the trial except two, so that no harm could have resulted to the accused on this account. A good deal of hearsay evidence was admitted. but we think that there was enough competent evidenr,e in the case to justify the finding of the Lodge. We therefore recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. VIII. L.

E.

PANCOST, Appellant, V8.

WESTVILLE LODGE,

No. 202.

}

Appeal from the action of the Lodge acquitting Bro. N. B. Hicks.

The charge in this case was drunkenness. It was preferred by the Master of tbe Lodge, as he says, in obedience to the circular letter of the Grand Master, requiring the enforcement of Section 29, Article 16, of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. A trial was had and the accused was acquitted. The vote being ten guilty, thirteen not guilty. 0


Proceedin.ds of the

46

[Oct.

The Master, in taking his appeal, bases it upon the ground that the members, in voting, did not take into proper consideration their personal knowledge of the case. The :Master is in error in supposing that the members. in voting upon the guilt or innocence of a Brother on trial, should be governed by their personal knowledge. If !lny member has any personal knowledge upon the question at issue, he should be made a witness upon that question. All the evidence should be had and then the Brethren should vote on the question of the guilt or innocence under the evidence as it is presented. The Master in his statement, accompanying the appeal, says: .. I was also impelled to do so (prefer the charges), from the fact that drunkenness was increasing in the Lodge among the members, to the detriment and disgrace of the Fraternity." If this be true, the condition of the Lodge should be inquired into, and as it is a statement coming from the Master of the Lodge, we think the Grand Master should inquire into the condition of the Lodge, and take such action as the facts may require.

We recommend that this be done, and that the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. IX. G. W.

HAGLE, AppeUant, VB.

FOUR MILE LODGE,

No. 212.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The accused in this case was charged with adultery and general lascivious conduct. At the trial he was found guilty on all of the specifications and of the charge by a unanimous vote, except that on one specification there was one vote of 110t guilty. He was expelled by a unanimous vote. with the one exception. He appcals because he did not have sufficient notice of the time of taking outside testimony; that the charges and specifications were not explicit enough, and that the punishment was too severe. He had four days notice of the time of taking the testimony. At the trial he announced ready, and presented the testimony of his witnesses. The charge and specifications advised him of the nature of the oftimse. The evidence was overwhelming against hini. The punishment is not too severe. The offense is a serious one, and needs heroic treatment. Let the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No.X. H. T.

CHITWOOD, AppeUant, VB.

BARNESVILLE LODGE,

No. 455.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspending him.

The record in this CMe is very imperfect. The accused is charged with wronging and defrauding a Brother. He was found guilty by a vote of twenty-five to four, and suspended Jor fiye years by a vote of nineteen to nine. He appeals for the reason, "that there was no evidence to justify such a decision." The evidence sent up is very imperfect, but it is manifest that it was the fault of those who took down the testimony. It would appear from the decisive vote upon which he was found guilty, that the evidence must have been sufficient to establish the charge. We presume a re-trial of the case would not result differently, and we, therefore, recommend that the jUdgment of the Lodge be affirmed.


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1887.]

47

No. XI. J. W.

BROGAN, Appellant, VB.

JACKSO?\VILLE LODGE,

No. 14.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The charge in this case is (1) saloon keeping, and (2) unmasonic conduct with a woman not his wife. The record is, if possible, more imperfect than in the other. If by scolding the S('cretaries of the Lodges they could be made to send up complete records, we would be inclined to indulge in that pastime, but we think that remedy has been exhaUEted, and accomplishes no good. The accused was found guilty and expelled by a vote of fourteen to four. ~He did not deny being a saloon keeper, and there is no question of his guilt on the other specification from the evidence presented. He appeals for the reason "that the decision was rendered without evidence sufficient." We cannot agree with him, and, therefore, recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed. No. XII. MORGAN

D.

GRIFFITHS, Appellant, 7)S.

HUNTSVILLE LoDGE,

No. 30:

}

Appealed from the action of the Lodge acquitting Bro. Jas. D. Head.

The charge in this case was drunkenness. The proceedings were regular; the evidence strongly supported the charge; the vote was eight guilty, and eight not guilty. Under these circumstances we cannot recommend a reversal of the case, but we think the circumstances justify an investigation into the affairs of the Lodge. We therefore recommend that the judgment be affirmed, and that the incoming Grand Master cause an investigation to be had into the condition of the Lodge with reference to drunkenness. No. XIII. F. E.

KELLOGG, Appellant, VS.

RICH HILL LoDGE,

No. 479.

}

Appealed from the action of the Lodge acquitting Bro. J. L. Keedy.

The charge in this case was saloon keeping. At the trial the accused admitted that he was a saloon keeper. The vote upon the specification waS twenty-nine guilty, one not guilty. On the charge the vote was nine guilty and twenty-one not guilty. This fact shows an unfortunate state of affairs in that Lodge. How Brethren, after all that has been said by the Grand Lodge upon the subject of saloon keeping as a Masonic offense, can reach the conclusion indicated by the above vote, we are unable to determine. They say, by this vote, that saloon keeping is not a Masonic offense. The Grand Lodge, however, has repeatedly declared otherwise. We cannot believe that the Brethren who voted not guilty on the charge in this elISe intended to defy tl~e law of the Grand Lodge. At least, we are disposed to give the Lodge the benefit of the doubt. and, a8 the Grand Lodge has jurisdiction of this case and may inflict the proper punishment, we recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be reversed, and that Bro. J. L. Keedy be suspended for five years. No. XIV.

This is a memorial from P. Gentry for restoration. He was expelled from his Lodgc in 18~, and on appeal to the Grand Lodge the judgment was affirmed. (See Proceedings


48

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

of 1885, page 56.) We cannot grant his request at this time, for the reason that he has not complied with the law. He petitioned the Lodge that expelled him to recommend him to the Grand Lodge for restoration. He should have petitioned his Lodge for restoration, and then proceeded as directed in Note 8, page 72, of the Book of Constitution. Fraternally submitt,ed, NOAH M. GIVAN, SAM'L H. SAUNDERS, JOHN R. HCLL, WM. H. CARPENTlm, A. J. LAMBRIGHT, J. W. BOYD, J. P. WOOD, Committee. James W. Boyd feeling an interest in Rochester Lodge, No. 248, did not act with the Committee in the case of F. M. King vs. said Lodge.

CHARITY~

l\L W. Bro. R. E. Anderson, Chairman of the Committee on Charity presented a Report, which was adopted, and is as follows: MASONIC HALL, ST. LOUIS, October 12,1887. '1'0 lhe .Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F. and A. M. :

Your Committee on Charity would submit the following as their Report: 1. The first petition presented to your Committee is one from Chamois Lodge, No. 18::>, to which we appropriated $100 last year, for the support of the widow of Thomas M. Herndon. She has since died, and the Lodge which is represented as having a small membership, and occupying a rented hall, has expended a hundred dollars over and above the amount appropriated, for board, medical attention and burial of the widow. We therefore recommend that the sum of one hundred dollars be appropriated to Chamois Lodge, No. 185, to reimburse them for the money thus expended.

2. The petition in due form from New Bloomfield Lodge, No. 60, asking for an appropriation for Bro. John Goff, was filed within the time prescribed by law, and as his condition has not improved since our last appropriation, we recommend an appropriation of $100, to be paid to Fulton Lodge, No. 48, for the benefit of Bro. John Goff, to. be by it disbursed as in the judgment of the Lodge his necessities require. . 3. The petition of Aullville Lodge, No. 464, for a renewal of the appropriation in behalf of Bro. G. W. Trent, was filed, as prescribed by law, and as we cannot turn a deaf ear to one who for fifty-one years has defended the Craft and" borne the burden and heat of the day," and with palsied hand and stammering voice asks for bread, we recommend an appropriation of $100 to be paid to Aullville Lodge, No. 464, to be disbursed by it as his necessities may require. 4. The petition of Jobn F. Alberty, endorsed by both Craft Lodge, No. 287, and Alexandria Lodge, No. 404, is again presented in due form, and with increasing years bis ( necessities are no less. We therefore recommend the appropriation of $100 in his behalf, to be. paid to Alexandria Lodge, No. 401, to be disbursed by it as his necessities may demand.


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri. ..

49

5. Our Venerable Past-Grand Master, Stephen W. R. Carnegy, in additioil to the infirmities incident to his extreme old age, now ninety-one years, has, since our last Grand Communication, been stricken with paralysis. He says, "My ability to attend the next Grand Lodge looks yery slim, if indeed I should live to that time, and not depart and relieve the Grand Lodge from this burthen, and you from your care over me." From what your Chairman knows of his mental sorrows, and their cause, in comparison with which his physical sufferings must pale into insignificance," the only wonder is that he still lingers on the shore. We recommend an appropriation of $200, to be paid to him in quarterly installments, upon warrants drawn by the Grand Secretary. The first installment to be paid at the close of this Grand Communication. II

6. The application of Versailles Lodge, No. 117, shows that they have under their charge an old Brother whom they have supported for the last six or seven ycars, and that they hose during the last year suffered the loss by a disastrous fire, which swept away a large portion of the town, their hall and furniture; that they had tried to protect themselves with insurance, but were unable to obtain it. We therefore recommend an appropriation to said Lodge of $45, the amount paid into the Grand Lodge by them the last year. 7. A letter from a Brother in behalf of the widow of Bro. B. O. Austin, asking for an appropriation" to assisit in educating her daughter," under date of October 3d, has been referred to us. It is not accompanied by the endorsement of the Lodge under whose jnrisdiction the widow resides; is not ill proper form; nor filed within the time plainly prescribed by law; and, considering that the facilities now afforded by our public school system (which is as good as any in the United States) for obtaining an education j1'CC are unlimited, wc do not feel authorized to rccommend an appropriation for that purpose. Since the foregoing was prepared, and during the sitting of this Grau.d Body, a Memorial from a Committee of North Star Lodge, No. 157, asking for an appropriation for Bro. Geary, has b~en handed our Chairman. The Rule of the Grand Lodge as to the manner and time of presenting such petitions is very plain, and the paper comes too late for us to consider it. R. E. ANDERSON, Cltui1'1nan. MARTIN COLLINS, J. R. FERGUSON, JAMES F. EDWARDS, JOHN W. PURVIS, J. W. FARRIS, SAMUEL H. SAUNDERS, Committee.

On motion of Bro. A. M. Dockery, the following, from the Address of the Grand Master, was refe'rred to the Committee on Jurisprudence: A Brother of promise and charactâ&#x201A;Źr among us requests me to consider a certain question, which I gladly refer to you, hoping that your wisdom and kindness will decide a point which has perplexed many, yiz: A 'Master Mason becomes addicted to stron~ drink until his life is a reproach to Masonry, and before he is ,dealt with by the Lodge, he dies. Now he is techniCally in "good standing." 'Does this fact render it imperative that the Lodge shallll.ccord to him the honors of Masonry, and, before the eyes of the world that well understand his fallen and debauched condition, perform about the grave the beautiful and solemn rites of the Order? For the sake of many I ask that you will formulate an answer to this question. G. L. PRO.-4.


Proceedings of the

,50

[Oct.

The above matter had be~n overlooked by the Committee on Distribution. The Grand I..Jecturer was requested to Exemplify the Work this evening in the third degree. The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until 7: 30 o'clock this evening. WEDNESDAY-EVENING SESSION. ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 12, 1887. The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 7:30, by Bro: W. M. Williams, Deputy Grand l\faster, for exemplification of the work. Grand Officers in their stations. R. W. Bro. Allan l\lcDowell, Grand Lecturer, proceeded to Exemplify the Work in the third degree, assisted by the Grand Officers. The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until to-morrow morning, at 9 o'clock. THURSDAY-l\10RNING SESSION. ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 13, 1887. The M. W. Grand I"odge was called to labor at 9 o'clock by the Grand Master, Bro. Geo. R. Hunt. Grand Officers in their respective stations. .

A. l\L,

l\1inutes of yesterday's session were read and approved. REPORT ON SELECTION OF OFFICE.

The Committee, heretofore appointed to secure a suitable office for the use of 'the Grand' Secretary, reported as follows: To the flfost Worshipful Grand Lodge of Mi.osouri, A. P. and A. flf.:

Your Committee, to whom was referred the matter of procuring a suitable office for the use of the Grand Secretary, would respectfully ask leave to report: That they have'secured suitable offices for Grand Lodge purposes in the fire-proof building on the south-west corner of Broadway and Pine street, known as the Roe Building. That they have procured a lease of said premises for the term of three years, from December 1st, 1886, at a monthly rent of $94, inclUding heat and attention.


1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

51

That they camed a regular lease to be prepared, and forwarded to the Grand Master, who signed the same on the part of the Grand Lodge. All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted. LEE A. lIALL, JOHN R. PARSON, JOHN D. VlNClL, Committee.

CHARTERED LODGES.

Report of Committee on Chartered Lodges was presented and adopted, as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of ltfissouri, A. F. and A. M.:

Your Committee on Chartered Lodges beg leave to submit the following Report: LODGE RETURNS.

Total number of Lodges on Register Of which the following number have reported.... have not reported

527 512 10

Of the Lodges reporting, the following are substantially correct, except in respect to the financial statements : Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,12,13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,20,21,22,23,24,25, 27, ~8, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 54, 55, 56, 57,59,60,61,63, 61, 65, 66, 67, 69, 70, il, 72, 73, 74, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86,87, 88,89,90,92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97. 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 1Oi, 106, 107, 108, 110,111,114,115,116,117,118, 120, 121, 123, 124,127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, H3, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 153, 154, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164. 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, Ii7, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 189, 190, 191, J92, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197. 198, 199, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 20g, 210, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 223, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 236, 237, 239, 240, 241, 242, 213, 244, 246, 247,248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, -270, 271, 272, 274, 275, 276, 277, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 338, 339, 341, 342, 543, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 36i, M~M~M~M~~,~~M~~,~~~~~~m,~~~~~~~~~~m,3~~,

382, 405, 427, 450, 472, 495, 520,

383, 406, 428, 452, 473, 497, 523,

384, 386, 387, 407,408,409, 429, 4:l0, 431, 453, 454, 455, 474, {75, 476, 198, 499, 500, 524, 525, 526,

388, 410, 432, 456, 477, 501, 527,

389, 390, 391, 411, 412, 113, 433, 434, 435, 457, 458, 459, 478, 479, 480, 502, 503, 505, 528, 529, 530,

392, 414, 436, 460, 481, 506,

393, 415, 438, 461, 483, 509, and 531.

394, :l95, 416,417. 439, 440, 462, 463, 481, 485, 510, 512,

396, 418, 4.41, 464, 487, 513,

397, 420, 442, 465, 488, 514,

398, 421, 443, 467, 489, 515,

399, 402, 403, 422,423,124, 416, 447, 448, 468, 469, 470, 490, 491, 492, 516, 517, 518, Total number correct, 470.

404, 425, 449, 471, 494, 519,

Of the Lodges reporting, the following are incorrect in one or more of the following particulars: Not signed by the Worshipful Master. Not signed by the Secretary.


Proceedin~ 8

52

of the

[Oct.

No Recapitulation of Membership. Imperfect recapitulation of Membership. Not signed by either the Worshipful Master or Secretary. Not under Seal, and absence of Seal not accounted for. Not alphabetically arranged. Raisings, admissions, restorations, or those whose dues have been remitted, not included in list of members. Entered Apprentices, Fellow Crafts, deaths or suspensions included in list of members. ~ailure to

make out Financial Statement.

Nos. 19, 30, 45,52,53, 62, 75, 68, 91, ](15, ]09, 112, 113, 119, 122, ]2(i, ]34, If>2, 155, ]88, 200, 204, 211, 224, 235, 238, 245, 254, 273, 278, 320, 340, 400, 419, 444, 466, 482, 486, 193, 504, 508 and 511. 'rotal number incorrect, 42. Three Lodges have failed to make any report, as follows: Nos. 4D6, 521 and 522. Of the 470 Lodges herein report<ld as substllntially correct, a very large proportion have improperly made out the Financial Statements. It is evident to your Committee, from an exnminat.ion of the Lodge reports, that no corrcct or satisfactory summary can be made of the financial condition of the Lodges.

Your Committee ask leave to prepare and submit a form for a cirCUlar, to be sent out by the Grand Secretary, with the blanks, for the Returns of next year, giving to Lodge

Secretaries specific information as to the proper method of filling out the Finllncial Statements in the Returns. SEA~IAN

LODGE, KO. ]26.

With respect to the petition of Seaman Lodge, No. 126, to have Grand Lodge dues for the year 1887 remitted, your Committee would respectfully report that they sec no good reason wby tbe prayer of the petition should be granted. Respectfully and fraternally submitted, ROBERT E. COLLI NS, TRUSTEN P. DYER, Committee.

GRAND 1,ODGE, AKcrENT, FHEE AND ACCEPTED MASONS OF

~IlSS0URI.

OFFICE OF Gl~AND SECRETARY, ST. Locrs, 1\10.

1'0 the .":ecretaries oj the val'ious Lodges, A. F. and A. ],f.:

BRETHREN: The Financial Statements in many of the Lodge Returns last yenr were so imperfect that it is considered necessary t<l give specific instructions as to the proper method of filling out sa.id statements. You will therefore observe the following rules: Rule I.-In the first line place the a.ggregate value of all real and personal property, except cash and dues outstanding, owned by the Lodge. By personal property is meant: jewels, furniture, stock in incorporated companies, bonds, notes, and all amounts due to the Lodge.'


1887.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

53

Rule H.-In the second line place the amount of cash on hand on July 31st of the year for which the Report is made. Rule IlL-In the third line place the amount of dues owing to the Lodge on the 31st day of July of the year for which the Report is made. Rule IV.-In the fourth line place the exact amount the Lodge owes on July 31st of the year for which the Report is made. Rule V.-If the aggregate of the first three lines exceeds the amount in the fourth line, place the difference in the fifth line. Rule VI.-If the amount in the fourth line exceeds the aggregate amount of the first three lines, place the difference in the sixth line.

.

LODGES UNDER

DISPENSATION.'~.

Report of Committee on Lodges under Dispensation, was read and approved. To the Most Worshipjul Gmnd Lodge oj ftfiss07.1ri, A. F. and A. It!.:

Your Committee on Lodges under Dispensation would report that we have carefully examined the records of the following Lodges under Dispensation, and recommend that Charters be granted the same: -

Name. Donglas Hulllphreys Cuba Blue Springs Reynolds â&#x20AC;˘Monticello Sedgwickville Lafayette Dexter Walker Columbia Blackwell Ingomar

, ;

Location. Ava Humphreys Cuba Blue Springs Black l\10nUcello Sedgwickville Corder Dexter \\'alker Pacific Blackwell \\'illow Springs

County. Douglas. Sullivan. Crawford. Jackson. Reynolds. Lewis. Bollinger. Lafayette. Stoddard. Vernon. Franklin. S1. Francois. Howell.

We recommend that the Dispensation of Russellville Lodge, at Russellville, in Cole County, be continued. In the case of Russellville Lodge, under Dispensation, granted over a year ago and continued at our last annual communication, we find the records in very bad shape. There is no record of the adoption of any By-Laws. The first record of a meeting is under date of August 7,11186, and says" the minutes of last communication were read and approved." There is no record of the meeting referred to. The proceedings of September 11, 1886, show that James R. Taylor was initiated before he was elected. Tbis. however, is probably due to the fact that tht: minutes bave been made in a printed form provided by a Masonic furnishing house, the use


54

Proceedin~8

of the

[Oct.

of which is very apt to mislead a Secretary, and is emphatically disapproved by this committee. A printed form of even the very best construction cannot be made available for the proceedings of all meetings, or probably for even a single communication, without erasures and intcrlineations, all of which are exceedingly objectionable. We find in their return to the Grand Lodge that S. L. Short was initiated August 27, 1887, but there is no record of that meeting. There is no copy of the Dispensation on the records of this Lodge, as required by this Grand Lodge. (See Proceedings 1869, page 75.) This is also due, as stated by the Secretary to the Grand Secretary in his letter advising him of the forwarding of the books, etc., of this Lodge, that a printed form of minute book is used. It is an additional reason for reprehending the use of such printed forms for minutes. There are very many other imperfections in the minutes. The Lodge hasoeen in existence over one year, and has raised only one candidate to the degree of Master Mason. We therefore recommend that the District Deputy Grand Master confer with the officers of the Lodge and have the irregularities mentioned corrected, and let the Dispensation be continued. We further recommend that a .Dispensation be granted Bros. R. H. Gosney, J. T. Holmes, M. V. B. Morton and other Brethren who have signed the application to this Most WorshipfUl Grand.Lodge to open a Lodge at La Belle, Lewis County, and that the Grand Secretary be instructed to turn over all property and effects of Farmers' Lodge, No. 222, of La Belle, Lewis Connty, who recently surrendered their Charter to the Grand Lodge, to La Belle Lodge, under Dispensation. We further recommend that all petitions for new Lodges be referred to the incoming Grand Master for his examination and disposal. We would be very derelict in our duty as a Committee on Lodges under Dispensation of this Most Worshipful Grand Body if we failed to call the attention of District Deputy Grand Masters to the responsibilities of the sacred trusts conferred upon them. In this connection permit us to say that from long experience and observation in Masonic matters we find that a very large majority of the errors and irregularities in new Lodges are directly traceable to the failure of District Deputies, or other officer who has set them to work, to give them proper instructions as to their powers and duties as a Lodge, and we mo~t earnestly recommend that each District Deputy or other oflicer be reqUired to give tbe Secretary of eacb Lodge he may set to work a correct form for keeping his rocords, and to see that Lodges under Dispensation in their Districts follow the printed instructions furnished them by the Grand Secretary. We further recommend that the name of Black Lodge be changed to Reynolds Lodge, in compliance with the request of said Lodge. Fraternally submitted, WM. H. MAYO, GEO. E. WALKER, JAMES HORROCKS, H. L. ROGERS, STEPHEN CHAPMAN, JAS. B. AUSTIN, W. T. LAMKIN, F. E. BYBEE, P. P. ELLIS, CommiUee.


Grand Lod.de of Missouri.

1887.J

55

BY.LA.WS.

Report of follows:

Committe~ on

By-Laws was read and adopted as

To the .ftfost W01'shipful Grand Lodge of lIfis.~ouri, A. F. and A. J.f.:

Your Committee on By-Laws beg leave to report that they have examined the By-Laws of the following Lodges, and find them to be in accordance with the By-Laws prescribed by the Grand Lodge, viz: Polar Star Lodge, No. 79, St. Louis, Mo. Cypress Lodge, No. 227, Laclede, Mo. Sedgwickville Lodge, U. D., Sedgwickville, Mo. Lafayette Lodge. U. D., Corder, Mo. Ava Lodge. U. D., Ava, Mo. Cuba Lodge, U. Cuba, Mo.

D.;

Your Committee deems it its duty to call attention to the fll.ct that a number of Lodges nnder Dispensation have failed to send in their By-Laws for the approval of the Grand Lodge. Fraternally submitted, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, JAMES A. SHAW, R. M. FLYNT, TYSON S. DINES, M. C. LEWIS, Committee.

WA.YS AND MEANS.

Committee was adopted:

(~)ll

Ways and Means reported as follows, which

To the lIfost Worshipful Gmnd Lodge oj lIfissouri, A. F. and A. M.:

Your Committee on Ways and Means beg leave to submit the following report: By reference to report of Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer, we find cash on hand $19,890.33.

We recommend the following appropriations: Printing Proceedings of 1887 Rent of Grand Secretary's Office ,.................. Salary of Grand Secretary :.. Chairman of Committee on Foreign Correspondence.......................... Salary of Grand 'l'reasurer ~................................... Printing and Stationery.......................

~~:~8eTYie~路.::: . 路.. .::::..:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Grand Lecturer................................................................................................... Expenses of Grand Lecturer............. Grand Master's Expenses for 1887-8 ~........

$1.000 1,000 2,500 500 150

00 00 00 00

00 200 00

~gg gg

1,750 00 500 00 2!lO 00

~~~_~~fsh~~e~e;l~cR~~~.:~~.~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::_~gg~q Total Appropriations

__SiR 8~ 80


Proceeding8 of the

56

[Oct.

PAY ROLL-PAST GRAND MASTERS.

Past Grand Master S. R. Saunders, 175 miles, 3 days $ 17 75 " " J. E. Cadle, 350 miles, 3 days 26 50 Lee A. Hall, 3 days............................................... 9 00 Jos. S. Browne. 350 miles,3 days............................................... 26 50

~~l\~~~~~~~~~l~ir~,al~a:ys:::::: :::::: :::::: :::'.:'.::::::::::::::::::::::::::: S. W. B. Carnegy, IHO miles. 3 days............................................ N. 1\1:. Givan, 3 days R. E. Anderson, 135 miles, 3 days A. M. Dockery. 250 miles, 2 days J. W. Boyd, 350 miles, 3 days..................................................... R. F. Stevenson, 283 miles, 3 days.......................

Total

2~ ~g

18 9 15 ]8 26 23

00 00 75 flO 50 [jO

$223 80 Fraternally submitted,

CRAS. F. VOGEL, A. 1\1. DOCKERY, JNO. R. PARSON, THEO. BRACE, J. E. CADLE, F. ,J. TYGARD,

Committ/x.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS.

Report presented by the Committee, and adopted as follows: To the !JIos! Worshinful Gmnd Lodge of !llissoul'i, A.

r:

and A. M.:

Your Committee on Unfinished Business would respectfully report

8S

follows:

That they find that the Special Committee to which was referred the matter of " Lodge Indebtedness and Lodge Incorporation" in 1884., with direction to report at the session of the Grand Lodge in 1885, and to which Committee the same matter was re-committed at said session, with instructions to report at the session of 1886, failed to make any report at the last session of this Grand Lodge. They also find, on page 52, Proceedings of last Grand Lodge, that "Resolution" requiring visitors from foreign jurisdictions to present diploma or Grand Lodge Certil1cate before being permitted to visit any Lodge in the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was postponed one year. Your Committee also find in the report of the Committee on the Grand Master's Address, the following: In regard to the.Grand Lodge in the State of Oaxaca, in Mexico, your Committee on the Grand Master's Address, not being conversant with all the facts, would recommend that the matter be referred to the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, with instructions to report the facts at the next session of this Grand Lodge, there being no report from the Committee on Foreign Correspondence on Mexico. The Committee on Unfinished Business would therefore recommend that the subject matter of recognition of the Grand Lodge of Oaxaca be continued in the hands Of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, awaiting further light from this new claimant for recognition. Fraternally submitted, JAS. G. ROWE, J. N. BOYDSTON, JOlIN BROWN, J. W. PURVIS, WM:WILMOTT,

Committee.


1887.]

Grand Lodie of Missouri.

57

THE <JOMltIITTEE ON A<J<JOUNTS

Presented their Report, which was adopted, as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of /ofissouri, A. F. and A. /of. : Your Committee on Accounts respectfully report that we have examined the books and statements of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer; we also checked off the cash returns from the reports of the subordinate Lodges, and compared them with the cash book of the Secretary, and find them properly entered. The detailed financial statements presented by the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer, to the Grand Lodge, are correct, and require no repetition in this report. PETITION OF BRO. JNO. G. MILLER.

In reference to the petition of Bro. Jno. G. Miller, to reimburse him to the extent of $74.00, we respectfully report that the evidence gleaned by your Committee proves the following facts: Prior to the session of 1876, of the Grand Lodge, he was one Qf the officers of Dardenne Lodge, No. 124, and, as SUCh, endorsed anote for the balance of debt incurred by building for his Lodge. Subsequen tly the Cbarter of tbe Lodge was arrested for nonpayment of dues, the note remaining unpaid. The property of the Lodge was then sold, and the amount credited on the note, leaving a balance due of $74.00. His brother officers who signed the note with him, are all insolvent, leaVing the burden resting on Bro. Miller, who is unable, without a sacrifice of his property, to meet this obligation that he contracted, not for himself alone but for his love for Masonry. We take the ground that all the members of the Lodge are individually responsible to pay their portion of the debt, and that some action should be taken by the Grand Lodge to bring them to a reali;7,ation of their pecuniary responsibilities to each other, as well as to their Lodge. The action of the Grand Lodge, of 1876, has happily put an end to a Lodge to contract a debt (See Proc. 1876, p. 28,) for building purposes until the money is secured; but under the circumstances, and inasmuch as this occurred prior to such action of the Grand Lodge, we would recommend that the petition of Bro. Miller be granted, and the amount of $74..00 be paid him out of the fund on band, to the credit of Dcad Lodges. F. W. MOTT, ROBT. A. LONG, JOHN H. DEEMS, MICHAEL COOK, Committee.

ELE<JTION.

The hour having arrived for the election ,of Grand Officers, the Grand Lodge proceeded with that work. rrbe Grand Master appointed as Tellers, Bros. J Oh11 R. Parson and William R. :Edgar. The election resulted as follows: W. M. WILLIAMS, Boonville, M. W. Grand Master. JAMES P. WOOD, New London, Deputy Grand Master.


58

[Oct.

Proceedings 'ofthe THEODORE BRACE, Paris, Senior Grand V\Tarden. GEO. E. WALKER, Potosi, Junior Grand Warden. SAMUEL M. KENNARD, St. Louis, Grand Treasurer. JOHN路 D. VINCIL, St. I.Jouis, Grand Secretary.

SUSPENDED MASTERS.

The Special Committee on the above subject, presented the following Report, which was adopted: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F. and A. ltf. : Your Special Committee to whom was referred that portion of the Grand ~faster's Address relating to Suspended Masters, respectfully report that in the case of S. C. Herndon, W. M. of Robert Burns Lodge, No. 496, the evidence fully sustains the charges and specifications made in the case. How any man, especially a Mason, could be guilty of the offense charged, your Committee cannot conceive. We recommend that the action of the Grand Master in suspending S. C. Herndon from office be approved, and that he be expelled from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. In the case of Robert Frazier, W. M. of Point Pleasant Lodge, No. 176, charged with gross un masonic conduct by the Junior Warden, under six specifications; one of which was for perjury committed on the trial of an indictment against him for selling liquor as a dramshop keeper without license. The evidence is before us, and while it clearly discloses the fact that the chief grievance against him is of a business nature. yet he admits in his testimony that while keeping a drug store without a license to sell liquor in qU!LJItities ofless than one gallon, he sold liquor by the drink to Masons" on the square," who are only a little less guilty than he. He was indicted and tried for the offense, the result of which we are not advised, yet we are led to infer that he was acquitted, if not by his fll.lse swearing, at least by stretching his conscience to its utmost limit. Concerning his business transactions with some of his Brethren, which constitute the basis of the other specifications, we do not feel disposed to condemn him. We are unable to determine where the business ends and Masonry begins, but for his acknowledged violation of Masonic and statute law, and his questionable method of avoiding its consequence, he should not go unrebuked. We recommend his suspension for two years. Fraternally submitted;

SEYMOUR HOYT, CRAS. J. WALKER, A. B. MARTINDALE, Commmee.

'.rhe Grand Lodge was called from labor until 2: 30

P. M.


1887.]

Grand

Lod~e

of .Missouri.

59

THURSDAY-AFTERNOON SESSION. ST. IJOUIS,

:M.o., October 13, 1887.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Bro. Geo. U. Hunt. Grand Officers in their respective stations.

JURISPRUDENCE.

The Committee on Jurisprudence, through its Chairman, Bro. W. :M. Williams, presented the following Report, which was adopted: To the J,fost W01'shipjul Grand Lodge oj Missouri; A. F. (tnd A. M.:

Your Committee on Jurisprudence have given careful consideration to the various matters submitted to them, and, after examination, report as follows: No. I. TITLE TO LODGE PROPERTY.

The Grand Lodge has declared that its Lodges shall not become incorporated under the State laws. It necessarily follows that the legal title to Lodge property cannot be held by the Lodges as SUCh. There are also serious objections to vesting the title to all of such property in the Grand Lodge, although it is an incorporated body. Great inconveniencf!s would arise in the case of transfers, etc., and questions of indebtedness existing and incurred by the subordinate Lodges might cause serious embarrassments. In the opinion of your Committee, the best policy would be to have the legal title to all Lodge property vested in trustees to hold for the use and benefit of the Lodge during its existence, and upon its ceasing to exist, the surplus, if any, after the payment of its debts to be held subject to the order of the Grand Lodge. The conveyance to the trustees should also provide for transfers by them, etc. The Lodges are constantly asking advice and instruction upon this matter. It involves a' discussion of the legal effect of such conveyances. We therefore recommend the appointment of a committee of three. who "shall be learned in the law," to formulate a plan by which the Lodges may hold the title to their property, and which plan such Lodges as desire to do so may adopt. FUNERAl,S.

The question is submitted of the right to Masonic burial of a member who dies in good standing, bU~ who should have been dealt with while living for" drunkenness." Your Committee can well imagine a case where a member might be guilty of such revolting conduct near the date of his death as would cause all Masons, by common consent, to concur in the propriety of denying a Masonic burial. Such cases must necessarily be left to the sound discretion and common sense of the Master.


60

Proceedin~s

of the

[Oct.

We are, however, clearly of the opinion that a Mason should not be l1'icd for drunkenness, or any other offense, after his death,. and much less should a dead Brother be deprived of Masonic burial without trial, when ample opportunity therefor existed during his life. Our laws deal with the living, and not the dead. .The question in actual practice ought never to arise, and cannot if the Lodge does its full duty. However, if a Lodge receives the dues from a Brother, grants him all the privileges of Masonry during his life, and holds him out to the world as one of the Craft, it ought not, after shirking its duty to an unfortunate Brother, dishonor his memory and cast odium upon his family by inflicting punishment upon his lifeless corpse. It is wrong in Principle and bad in practice. It deprives a Mason of the right of burial without trial, and encourages looseness in the exercise of discipline by the Lodges. Such a rule should not prevail. No. III. CONCURRENT JURISDICTION BETWEEN LODGES IN THE CITY AND COUNTY. OF ST. LOUIS.

The petition referred to us in the above matter may be worthy of consideration. We do not doubt that pure motives and an earnest desire for the prosperity of the Craft prompted its presentation. We have given no consideratiO!1 whatever to the merits of the application however. It must be denied, as by no fair construction can it be said that Lodges in the county and those in the city of St. Louis are in the" same place," within the meaning of the proviso of Section 6, Article 16, of the By-Laws. In all other cases the laws of this Grand Lodge say that the petition must be presented to the Lodge nearest the applicant's residence. The matter can only be brought to the attention of the Grand Lodge by an offer to amend the By-Laws. No. IV. RIGHT OF

NON~AFFILIATES TO

VISIT.

The lan~uage of Section 2i, of Article 16, is plain and is susceptible of but one interpretation, "No Lodge shall permit a non-affiliating Mason, who has continued as such for twelve months, to visit more than three times." This means, of course, that 110 Lodge shall permit a non-affiliate of over twelve months' standing to visit such Lodge more than three times. The following question has been referred to us, to wit: "A Master Mason takes a dimit from his Lodge for the purpose of assisting in forming a new Lodge. After the expiration of twelve months from date of said dimit the petitioners for the new Lodge receive a Dispensation, but before the Lodge is organized and set to work the dimited Brother referred to (and a petitioner) dies. Is he entitled to Masonic burial? If so, whose duty is it to perform the rites?" We think the Brother, under the circumstances mentioned in the above inquiry. is entitled to Masonic burial, and that not being a member of any Lodge at the time of his death, the fnneral services should be performed as in the cage ora non-affiliate of less than twe1\'e months' standing. Fraternally snbmitted, W. M. WILLIAMS, JOS .. S. BROWNE, P. G. WOODS, ERWIN ELLIS, A. W. ROGERS, Committee.

â&#x20AC;˘


1887.J

Grand

Lod~e

of .Missouri.

61

REPORT ON ARRESTED CHARTERS.

The Special Committee on Arrested Charters, through its Chairman, l\L W.Bro. Noah 1\'1. Givan, presented the following Report, which was read: .. To the ,Vost Wor.slzipflll Grand Lodge oj Afissouri, A. F. and .A. AI. : Your Special Committee to whom was referred the action of the Grand Master in arresting Charters of Lodges, together with his circular in reference to saloon keeping, beg leave to report: That the circular letter of the Grand Master is a plain and forcible statement of what the law of the Grand Lodge is in regard to saloon keeping, and is also a strong appeal to the Lodges to enforce the law. The Grand Master does not discuss the propriety of the law, but insists that while it is the law, it should be obeyed. With this sentiment all must agree. Defiance of law is disloyalty to the Order. The Constitution of the Grand Lodge declares that "The Grand Lodge shall be the supreme Masonic authority within the State of Missouri." As such, it must be respected. We approve the action of the Grand Master in arresting the Charters of Centre Lodge, No. 401, Naphtali Lodge, No. 25, West Gate Lodge, No. 445, and Malta Lodge, No. 337. The open defiance of law on the part of these Lodges fUlly justified his action. All of these, except Malta Lodge, ask to have their Charters restored. We have heard and carefully considered the statements of those who represent these Lodges. The representatives of West Gate Lodge state that it would not be best to restore its Charter unless the Grand Lodge will leave out certain designated members who are 1'aid to have caused trouble in the Lodge. We think it would not be proper for the Grand Lodge to arbitrarily name the parties in good standing in the Lodge when the Charter was arrested, who should be deprived of membership should the Charter be restored. The language of Grand Master Garrett, in 1872, (see Proceedings of 1872, page 22, and cited in the Book of Constitutions, page 57, note 4), does not warrant the position that the Grand Lodge in restoring a Charter ma.y except certain members in good standing. The decision is that tl]e membership of a Lodge, whose Charter has been restored, "consists of all its former members, in good standing, not dimitted by the Grand Lodge during suspension." We cannot recommend the.restoration of this Charter upon the terms indicated. We are assured that Centre Lodge, if restored, will be obedient to the law of the Grand Lodge, and will be able to purge itself of any unworthy elements that may have been in it; that if g-iven an opportunity they will bring forth fruits meet for repentance. The disobedience to law there was not as flagrant as in the other cases. One additional vote would have secured conviction. There"'are no serious factions in the Lodge. The members regret its unfortunate action. With these facts before us, we recommend that the Charter of Centre Lodge, No. 401, be restored, with the injunction, "sin no more." With respect to Naphtali Lodge, the facts seem to be that there has existed a sentiment among many of its members th!lt~he law in regard to saloon keeping should 110t apply to those who were engaged in the business before 1882; that there was strong opposition to any prosecutions under the law until it should be determined that the Grand Lodge would not modify it, so that it should not apply to saloon keepers who were in the business when they were made Masons, or who were such prior to 1882; that the Master


62~

JOroceeaings of the

[Oct.

was in sympathy with this sentiment, but, believing it to be his duty to enforce the law, directed that charges should be preferred, which was accordingly done. At the trial many ludicrous scenes werc enacted, much excitement prevailed and many foolish things said. Your Committee have listened patiently to all that has been said by the members, and we are assurcd by all that if the Charter .be restored the Lodge will respect and enforce the law. That its former action was not the result of any intentional disloyalty to the Grand Lodge, but rather of a combination of circumstanccs. Naphtali is one of the oldest Lodges in the State, being nearly a half-century old, and contains among its membership some who have spent the greater portion of their lives within its sacred portals. These facts appeal strongly for a charitable view of the errors committed by them, for which their Charter was properly arrested. However venerable it may be with age, it should know that defiance of law cannot be toleratcd; that the interpretation placed upon any law by the Grand Lodge must be the law to the subordinate Lodge; that when the Grand Lodge has declared, in express terms, as it has repeatedly dOlle, that saloon-keeping is a Masonic offense, then that is the law for the government of the subordill8.te Lodge upon that question. When charges are preferred against any member for that offense, and there is no question of guilt, a refusal to so find and inflict adequate punishmcnt is a defiance of the authority of the Grand Lodge. Such conduct places a Lodge in contempt of the Grand Lodge. It thereby arrogates to itself the prerogatives of the Grand Lodge. It becomes a law unto itself, and does not deserve existence as a Lodge. In view of the circumstances of this case, and especially with the assurances that the law of the Grand Lodge in regard to saloon-keeping Masons will be enforced in Naphtali Lodge, we r~commcnd that its Charter be restored. The restoration of these Charters must not be construed as a disapproval of the action of the Grand Master in arresting them, but is simply a merciful exercisc of the prerogatives of the Grand Lodge in its sovereign capacity in dcalin~ with its subordinate Lodges.' Its laws must be enforced, and while the Grand Lodge will not interfere with the reasonable discretion with which carh Lodge is invested in enforcing thc law, at the same time each Lodge be held responsible for the manner in which that duty is performed. '''hen charges are preferred against a Brother for any Masonic offense, then the Lodge has no alternative but to go on with the trial, and if it fails to punish when guilt is clearly established, that will be such defiancc of the law of the Grand Lodge as will forfeit the right of the Lodge to exist. Fraternally submitted, NOAH l\L GIVAN, THEO. BRACE, R. F. STEVENSON, JAMES W. BOYD, J.P. BLANTON, Committee.

As the above matter embraced the action of the Grand Master in arresting certain Charters for disobeying the law of the Grand Lodge respecting 'saloon-keeping members, as well as his Circular to the Lodges against saloon-keeping, it is proper to give the whole subject in consecutive order.


1887.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

63

M. W. Bro. R. E. Anderson offered the following as a substitute for so much of the foregoing Report as refers to the _Circular of the Grand Master calling upon the several Lodges to enforce the law in regard to saloon-keeping Masons:

SUBSTITU'l'E. As a. substitute forso much of the report of the Committee as refers to the circular of the Grand Master, it is the sense of this Grand Lodge that the Grand Master in said circular was mistaken in his interpretation of the law and the rights of subordinate Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction. The circular, while it proposes to promulgate the law on the subject of saloon-keeping, goes farther than the law, and if enforced takes from the subordinate Lodge a right and privilege which we are satisfied this Grand Lodge has ever regarded as sacred and has never sought to interfere with, and that is the inherent right to judge of the worthiness of its members, and determine for itself when and to what extent it shall discipline them. The law (if law it can be termed), referred to in the eircnlar; docs not say that the saloon-keeper shall be dealt with for unmasonie COllduct, and we regret that the Grand Master did not quote the whole of the resolution and add the clause which sa)'s, "And those engaged in that business are Uable to be dealt wHh for un masonic conduct." The force and effect of this resolutIon has been interpreted by this Grand Body, and its last utterance on that subject was made in 1884, when, upon the report of five of its Past Grand Masters as the Committee on Jurisprudence which was unanimously adopted, it said: "Under the terms of the declaration it is competent for any Lodge to try its saloon-keepers for unmasonic conduct:although it docs not, except by implication, say they shall be so disciplined." In l8iO, when there was no agitation outside on this subject, and the true spirit of Masonry, unbiased by outside pressure, was uppermost in the hearts of its members, this Grand Lodge endorsed the views of its Grand :Master on this subject as follows: " Although having no special commendations to pass on the business of dram-shop keeping, yet as to those therein engaged as well as to all others, the rule ought to be fairly applied. No one is bound to patronize it, and if any shall choose this evil way and pursue it to habitual drunkenness, such, of course, bring themselves under the penalty of our law. * * * At the same time I should be far from saying that a Mason in this business may not so conduct it, in reference to individuals, as to violate the positive duty he owes his Brother, and in such wise as to call forth the discipline of the Lodge. To instances of wilful enticement be offered to or advantage taken of a Brother to lead him astray, such conduct would be within the scope of Lodge discipline; not as a charge against a general business, but as criminal conduct practised by one Mason against another, to his injury." This we regard as the only true, fair and MasonIc interpretation of the resolution in question when it says the saloon-keeper is liable to be dealt with. This" circular" goes beyond what we believe to be a fair interpretation of the law, and not only requires the Lodge, at. its peril and without discrimination, to declare anyone who directly deals in liquor a saloon-keeper, and deprive him of his Masonic life, but demand that the members of the Lodge shall, whatever may be their conscientious convictions on the subject, vote him guilty and punish him, or lose their Masonic life, and this, too, notwithstanding the Brother was engaged in the business at the time he was made a Mason and -before the resolution was adopted. We cannot think the Grand Lodge intended it to be retroactive in its operation, or that it is consonant with the true spirit of Masonry to so interpret it. Be it therefore resolved that the action of the Grand Master in issuing said circular be not concurred in. R. E. ANDERSON.


Proceedings of the

64

.[Oct.

The foregoing substitute was fully discussed and the same was r~jeeted. 'rhe vote being taken by Lodges, with the following result: LODGE VOTE. Aye.

No.

1,2,3,9,11, 16, 18,20,40, 43,52,79, 80,84, 92, 121, 123, 167, 177, 179, 1R3, 187, 188, 197, 218, 220, 226, 230, 243,263,207, 281,282, ::>00, 311i, 323, 335, 360, 392.406,415, 420,425, 4l3, 471. 4~1, 482, 491, 495. Total-19 Lodges, 245 votes.

4, 19, 30, 31. 33, 36, 44, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 55, 59, 60,61, G2, 67,71, 73,74, 75,77,78, 81, 83, 89,10.5,107, 108, 114, 115, 11fl, 117, 119,120, 124, 131, 133, 141,147,149,151, 15::>,160,163, 165, 172, 174, 186, 189,194,195, 205,208, 213, 224, 227, 239, 241, 242,245,246, 251,254, 261, 264, 265, 260, 270, 271,272,275, 276,280, 283, m,~~~,w~~~~~~~~~~,~,

354, 355, 359, 364, ::>75,377,378, 379,382, 383, 386, 390, '101, 411, 422,427,4::>0, 433,446, 450, 456, 4GO, 46::>, 470, 484,485,480, 492,494, 500, 503, 518, 523, 525, 526,527,528.' Total-12:1 Lodges, 615 votes.

INDIVIDUAL VOTE. GRAKD OFFICLHS.

Geo. R. Hunt, Graud Aye.

Henry L. Rogers, Grand Junior Warden.

:Ma~ter, not

voting.

No. Wm. M. Williams, Deputy Grand Master. Jas. P. Wood, Senior Grand Warden. Samuel -r.L Kennard, Grand Treasurer. John D. Vincil, Grand Secretary. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer. C. H. Brig~s, Grand Chaplain. Geo. E. Walker, Senior Grand Deacon. Seymour Hoyt, Junior Grand Deacon. W. II. Carpenter, Grand Marshal. Harry Keene, Grand Senior Steward. Theodore Brace, Grand Orator.

PAST GRAND OFFICF.RS.-PAST GRAND )IASTERS.

Aye. Rufu~

E. Anderson, Sam'l H. Saunders.

No. Joseph S.Browne, N. M. Givan, C. C. Woods, W. R. Stubblefield, R. F. Stevenson, Lee A. Hall, Jas. W. Boyd, Jas. E. Cadle.


路1887.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

65

PAST GRAND WARDENS.

Aye.-Martin Collins. MASTEHS AND WARDENS OR THEIR PROXIES.

Aye. No.1, A. II. Wallis, J. B. Farmer. No.2, William II. Scott, John Spencer. Henry J. Stolfel. No.3, Geo. Strodtman. Eugene Gross. No.9, A. Douglas, Geo. R. Moore, C. D. Kelly. No. 11, J. \,路l. Tice. No. 16, J. P. Nesbit. No. 18, J. W. Boulware. No. 20, J. Koperlik. No. 40, S. A. Messerly. No. 43, W. S. Brotherton, J. M. Oldham. No. 52, James E. Drake. No. 79, F. H. Mason, Robert Burnie. No. 80, Geo. W. Heidorn. 路No. Si, V. E. Kellar, S. G. Barley. No. 92, J. A. Thomason. No. 121, W. H. Hensdmeier. No. 123, Chas. D. Eitzen. No. 149, R. E. Smith. No. 167, E. Grandjean, A. Paris. No. 177, B. Ross. No. 179, M. Peterson, Chas. Steinmann. No. 187. John Twedie, J. H. Kaiser. No. 188, John II. Davis. No. 197, D. A. Innes. No. 218, J. C. Owen. No. 220, P. Casey. No. 22fi, Henry Roseman. No. 230, S. H. Headlee. No. 243, Jas. Horrocks, Geo. Milford. No. 263, Jas. A. Shaw. No. 267, Jas. IL McEwen, ChM. H. Pellet. S. B. Potter. No. 281, Chas. Williams. No. 300, Spencer Marlin. No. 302, S. T. Kauble. No. 316, John T. Butler, B. W. Warner. No. 323, L. L. Lippman. No. 335, J. S. McDonald. No. 360, Alf. H. White, Chas. B. Stark. No. 420, John F. Taubold, Ernest W. Evers. No. 443, Wm. Reipschlreger, H. O. Christo路 pher. No. 456, Wm. F. Wyano No. 471, Isaac Fountain, C. E. Elliott. No. 481, A. Judge. No. 482, J. B. Warren. No. 491, C. G. Daniel. G. L. PRo:-5.

No.

No.4, W. E. McKinly, No. 19, Joe Burnette, J. S. McGhee, No. 30, John R. Hull, No. 31, S. H. Black, No. 33, A. M. Sears, No. 36, D. W. Shackleford, No. 40, G. W. Hall, No. 44, G. W. Butler, No. 46, Chas. J. Walker, No. 47, R. E. Witt, No. 48, Peter Godfrey, B. P. Bailey, No. 49, P. Wilhoit, No. 51, J. M. Norris, No. 52, Geo. W. Deatherage, No. 55, A. M. Hall, No. 59, Wm. H. Carpenter, No. GO, Jno. P. Cave, No. 61, C. Krauss, No. 62, J. S. Nelson, No. 67, Chas. Meyer, No. 73, Tyson S. Dines, No. 74, M. H. Holcomb, No. 75, J. W. McGarvey, L. F. Simmons, No. 77, J. M. Sanders, No. 78, Hurry Keene, J. W. Batcheller, No. 80, S. W. Henley, No. 81, R. M. Flynt, No. 83, J. W. Mayfield, No. 89, Fred H. Hoppe, No. 107, A. B. Martindale, No. 108, Jno. W. Hoover, No. 114, J. C. OrJ:, No. 115, C. A. Smith, No. 116, J. W. Mires, No. 119, A. F. Slawson, J. A. Tuttle. No. 120, J. W. Brink, No. 124, Geo. H. Prince, No. 131, A. W. Scott, No. 133, W. R. Edgar, No. 141, J. M. Wilson, No. 149, J. A. Price, No. 151, C. W. Grimes, Jason Moberly, No. 153, Stephen Chapman, C. L. Keeton, No. 160, B. W. Mitchell, No. 163, Dorsey A. Jameson, No. 165, Jno. H. Bunger, No. 172, A. W. Gilstrap, No. 171, F. E. Bruton, S. S. Graves, No. 183, J. W. Ramsey,


66

(Oct'.

Proceedings of the No.

No. 184..J. H, Topass, No. 186, Geo. A. Settle, No. 189, A. F. Braun, No. 194, M. H. Garwood, No. 195, F. A. Affleck, No. 20~, L. F. Fawks, No. 213, Wm. Pauisell, T. D. Smith, No. 224, Geo. F. Rogers, No. 239, W. E. Sizemore, No. 241, .los. H. Alexander, No. 212, S. A. D'avis, No. 245, V. Hughes, NO.,251, Jno.W. Purvis, No. 261, P. P. Ellis, No. 26'1, C. A. HoyleS, No. 265, A. W. Rogers, 1\0.266, S. D. McGrew, No. 270, C. L. Alloway, A. Brimm, No. 271, J. R. Ferguson, No. 272, Archibald Campbell, No. 275, Andrew Jackson, No. 276, l( E. Bybee, T. F. Reynolds, C. M:. Majors. No. 280, Jno. Brown, No. 283, C. S. Younger, J. W. Corbin, No. 295, J. C. Meyers, No. 299, Samuel L. C. Rhodes, No. 303, E. A. Dulin, No. 322, W..J. Roach, No. 327, H. T. Smith, No. 333, G. W. Putnan, No. 344. H. A. Hatfield, No. 351, A. J. Harral, No. :{53, C. C. Walton, No. 354, A. C. Barnes, J. H. Haydon, No. 355, J. N. Boydston, Thos. J. Doke, No. 359, R. A. Church, No. 360, Trusten P. Dyer, No. 364, J. J. Fulkerson, No. 375. Chrs. Pearson, No. 377, .1no. PrestQn, E. W. Salsberry, No. ::l78, Eli Barickman, No, 379, W. T. Lamkin, .1no. R. Garbee, No. 382, W. T. Wright, No. 383, Chas. W. Carter, No. 386, R. H. Chandler, No. 390, Edward Sinclair, No. 401, L. D. Gleason, T. B. Burley. No. 411, E. C. Steele, No. 422, F. W. Laker, No. 425, M. R. Tarlton, No. 430, J. D. Webb, J. N. Parker, No. 433, Jno. W. Fost~r, No. 446,' Mason Talbutt,


1887.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

67

No.

No. 450, W. N. Evins, No. 460, J. B. Thompson, No. 463, J. A. Fraley, No. 470, W. H. Totterdale, No. 484, J. G. Hawken, Oswald Sturdy, W. R. Bissell, No. 485, G. L. Sayles, No. 486, J. B. Gooding, No. 492, L. Price, No. 494, J. K. Stroup, No. 495, J. M. Guile, No. 500, S. T. Howell, No. 503, H. D. Carlos, No. 518, J. P. Taylor, No. 523, Wm. Wilmott, No. 525, J. B. Bedell, No. 526, Lee M. Pettit, No. 527, J. V. Adams, No. 528, Thos. Anderson.

PAST MASTERS.

Aye. No.1, Chas. F. Vogel, Wm. H. Mayo. No.2, Wm. Reinholt. No.9, Wm. H. Stone, B. V. Chase, R. F. Garrettson, John S. Beggs, John Buchanan. No. 11, J. M. Edwards. No. 20, A. Spiro, P. J. Hendgen. No. 25, George Pierce. No. 43, A. M. Hough. No. 79,' Philip Rodan, Chas. L. Bates. No. 163, Wm. Bosbyshell. No. 179, Peter Steinmann. No. 199, James Long. No. 218, Fred. W. Mott, Chas. R. Rochow. No. 243, Moses Ely, W. H. Fox. No. 267, S. B. Potter. No. 281, G. W. Anderson, No. 282, Simon Suss, Eden Reed. No. 323, Jacob Furth, O. S. Dixon, W. F. Lambe. .: No. 351, E. M. Logan. No. 420, Jacob Lampert, H. J. Filsinger. No. 443, Thos. J. Stone, John H. Krippen. No. 460, Alexander Graha~. No. 495, W. W. Anderson.

No.

No.6, A. Fisher. No. 19, J. S. McGee. No. 20, J. H. Will路iamson. No. 25, L. F. Mitchell. No. 51, J. M. Norris. No. 52, Geo. W. Deatherage. No. 77, F. W. Webb. No. 105, David Baird. No. 163, Robert E. Collins. No. 172, Sol E. Waggener. No. 179, W. P. Hancock. No. 222, Alexander Smith. No. 254, F. J. Tygard. No. 267, John R. Parson, Michael Cooke. No. 364,C. W. Seeber. No. 401, John W. Farris, J. V. Fleck, I. Hoskinson, Erwin Ellis. No. 460, A. B. Barbee. No. 527, J. S. Dysart. Lafayette, U. D., J. L. Riddick, John Price. Dexter, U. D., J. A. Sisler.


Proceedings of the

68

[Oct.

¥0

RECAPITUIJATION.

Aye.

Lodge vore Individual vore

~

Total Aye

No.

245 105 350

~

Lodge vore Individual vore Total No

0

1 d> 615 185 800

The substiture offered by Most Worshipful Bro. R. E. Anderson having been declared rejected, the report of the Committee on Arresred Charters and Circular of the Grand Master sustaining the Grand Master and reaffirming the law of the Grand Lodge in relation to saloon-keeping, was adopted. •

HALL

"~OR

GRAND LODGE MEETINGS.

The following was presented and adopted: Resolved, That a Special Committee of three be appointed to procure a suitable hall for the meeting of this Grand Lodge at its next Annual Session.

The following were appointed as the Committee. Lee A. Hall, John D. Vinci! and John It Parson.

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

R. W. Bro. John D. Vincil, the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, presented his annual Review. The same was received and ordered printed in the journal of .Proceedings. [See Appendix.]

GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS.

M. W. Bro.•Joseph S. Browne moved that the Grand Secretary be directed to have printed 2,500 copies of the journal of Proceedings of the present session. THA.NI~S.

The usual vote of thanks was accorded Railroads and Hotels for courtesies granted the members of this Grand Lodge.


1887.J

Grand

Lod~e

of Missouri.

69

Also a vote of thanks to Bro. Jobn R. Parson for the large supply of "Voting Pads," donated the Grand Lodge for tbe election this forenoon.

INSTAI.4LA.TION.

The Business of the Session baving been completed, the Grand Lodge proceeded to close its labors. The Grand Master made his appointments which apljear below. He then requested M. W. Bro. "V~ R. Stubblefield to install the Grand Officers. R. W. Bro. W. H. Carpentet, Grand Marshal, presented the several officers, who were installed as follows: GRAND OFFICERS. WILLIAM M. wrLLlAMS, Boonville JAMES P. WOOD, New London THEODORE BRACE, Paris GEORGE E. WALKER, PotosL SAM'L M. KENNARD, St. LOllis JOHK D. VINCIL, St. Louis

GRAND MASTER. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER GRAND SENIOR WARDEN. GRAJ1IDJUNIOR WARDEN. GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECRETARY.

APPOINTMENTS.

'.rhe following are the appointments made by the Grand Master. Those present were im.;talled wbo bad been appointed to fill offices. . APPOINTED OFFICERS. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis 路Rlw. C. H. BRIGGS, Kansas Citj REV. B. G. TUTT, D. D., Liberty REV. J. J: WILKINS, Sedalia REV. J. M. CHANEY, D. D., Independence REV. CHARLES B. POWERS, St. Joseph REV. ALFRED E. ROGERS, Fulton ; REv. T. E. SHEPHERD, Buffalo , TRUSTEN P. DYEH.,;-;t. Louis B. H. INGRAM, Sedalia .: :

GRAND LECTURER. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND SENIOR DEACON. GRAND JUNIOR DEACON.


70

[Ocf

Proceedin.ds of the

W. R. EDGAR, Ironton ~ .J AY L. TORREY, St. Louis CHARLES J. WALKER, Wentzville R. E. WITT, Fayette W. A. THOMS. Spriugfield.: F. E. BRUTON, Sturgeon J. P. BLANTON, Kirksville JOHN W. FARRIS, Lebanon JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis:

GRANn MARSHAL. GRAN~MARSHAL.

:

GRAND SWORD BEARER. GRAND SENIOR STEWARD. GRAND JUNIOR STEWARD. GRAND PURSUIVANT. GRAND ORATOR. GRAND ORATOR. GRAND TYLER.

CHAIRMEN OF STANDING COMMITTEES. FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis. JURISPRUDENCE ; J. W. BOYD, St. Joseph. GRIEVANCE NOAH M. GIVAN, St. Louis. RETURNS OF LODGES U. D W. H. MAYO, St. Louis. RETURNS OF CHARTERED LODGES ROBERT E. COLLINS, St. Louis. TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS JOHN R. PARSON,St. Louis. REPORTS ON D. D. GRAND MASTERS' REPORTS..C. C. WOODS, Nevada. CHARITY R. E. ANDERSON, Hannibal. ACCOUNTS F. W. :M:OTT, St. Louis. WAYS AND MEANS C. F. VOGEL, St. Louis. BY-LAWS WM. R. STUBBLEFIELD, St.Louis.

BOARD OF FINANCE. C. C. RAINWATER.

S. C. BUNN.

JOHN D. VINCIL.

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND M路A.STERS. 1st DISTRICT-J. '1'. LAUGHLIN, Fairmount. A. FISHER, LaBelle. 2d GEO. E. MAYHALL, New London. 3d J. A.l'HOMASON, Louisiana. 4th CHARLESJ. WALKER, Wentzville. 5th 路WM. H. CARPENTER, Centralia. 6th JOHN W. BARNETT, Moberly. 7th JOHN J. DILLINGER,Owasco. 8th GEO. W. DEATHERIDGE, Carrollton. 9th C. S. GLASPELL, Trenton. lOth NORTON B. ANDERSON, Platte City. 11th HARRY KEE~E, St..Joseph, 12th IRA V. McMILLAN, Maryville. 13th J. B. THOMAS, Albany. 14th ROBERT E. COLLINS, St. Louis. 15th FRANK R. NEWBERRY, Fredericktown. 16th WM. B. WILSON, Cape Girardeau. 17th STEPHEN CHAPMAN, Bloomfield. 18th A. B. MARTINDALE, Williamsville. 19th 20th FRED W. WEBB, Steelville.


1887.]

Grand

Lod~e

of Missouri.

71

21st DISTRICT-H. MARQUAND, Chamois. 22d L. F. WOOD, California. 23d B. H. INGRAM, Sedalia. 24th J. A. GORDON, Marshall. 2Mh BEN WARNER. Kansas City. 26th F. E. BYBEE, Harrisonville. 27th SEYMOUR HOYT, Greenfield. F. A. AFFLECK, Bolivar. 28th 29th WM. TALBERT, Cassville. E. P. LINZEE, Peirce City 30th 31st JOHN R. FERGUSON, Springfield. 32d E. C. STEELE, Hartville. 33d JOHN W. FARRIS, Lebanon.

CLOSING.

The Journal of Proceedings of the day was .read and approved, when the labors of the Sixty-seventh Session were brought to a close, prayer being offered by the Grapd Chaplain, Rev. Bro. C. H. Briggs.

\


- ...-------------------173


-...------------------------1,-

75


ANNUAL COMMUNICATION IN 1888. The Sixty-eighth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held in St. Louis, commencing at 10 o'clock on the morning of the First Tuesday after the Second Monday (viz. the 9th day) in October, 1888.


APPENDIX.


REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE. ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 1st, 1887. To the .Most Worshipfnl Grand Lodge of

~Missouri,

A. F. & A. M.

I herewith submit my Annual Report on Correspondence:

ALABAMA, 1886. The Sixty-sixth Annual Session was held in the city of Montgomery, commencing on the sixth day of December, ]886. M. W. Bro. John Gideon Har~is, Grand Master, presided; R. W. Bro. Daniel Sayre was Grand Secretary. 160 Lodges were represented. There is a reported membership of 6,724, though eighty-two Lodges had not made,Returns. Out of the 294 Lodges on the roll, we suppose there is a larger membership than is shown in the Recapitulation~ Missouri was represented by the venerable Grand Secretary, Bro. Sayre. The Address of Grand Master Harris was a very creditable document of some nine pages in length. }'rom his opening, the following bit of history is taken, which will be of interest to readers outside of that Grand Jurisdiction. He said: On the 11th day of June, 1821, in the town of Cahaba and county of Dallas, a Masonic convention was held, composcd of seven subordinatc Lodges. This convention organized the Grand Lodge of Alabama, drafted a constitution, and on the 11th day of December of the same year, in the same town, the first Annual Communication was held. At this pcriod in Alabama there were eleven Lodges; now we have 250; then our membership aggregated about 130: now we number over 12,000 active members, not in-' eluding a large numbcr who hold dimits. Since its organization this Grand Lodge has been presided ovcr by thirty-two Grand Masters; twcnty-threc of. whom have. laid aside the wo.rking tools of the Craft, and gone to give an account of their stewardshIp at the great aSSIze above. A gracious and kind Providence has spared to us our honored and highly esteemed Past Grand Mast.ers, David Clopton, Wm. H. Norris, Geo, D. Norris. Jos. H. Johnson, Palmer Job Pillans, H. Clay Armstrong, H. Clay Tompkins, Rufus W. Cobb and John H. Bankhead, as representatives of our beloved Order, and to whom we can point with a just pride, and say: These are our Brethren who have been and are now true exponents of our principles and the virtues we teach. G. L. Ap.-l.


2

Appendix.

[Oct.

Our present Grand Secretary has held his office for twenty-nine years, being present at every Session. His continued re-election to the ofIice is sufficient evidence of his appreciation by this body.

The perusal of the above extract suggests the thought that the Gral;d Lodge of Missouri was organized about the same time as the Alabama Brethren. Our organization was perfected in April, 1821, while that of Alabama was completed in December following. In this jurisdiction, since the formation of the Grand Lodge, there have been elected fortythree Grand Masters, all of whom have crossed the silent river except twenty-one. During the term of sixty-six years of our history, there have been in service twelve Grand Secretaries. The shortest term of ~erviee of any of them was one year, and the longest was fifteen years, being the venerable O'Sullivan, whose life closed so suddenly, in 1866, when the cholera devastated the city of St. Louis. The Grand Lodge of Missouri, at its organization, April 24th, 1821, was composed of Hepresentatives from three Lodges-this number embraced all the constituent Lodges in the jurisdiction. In the intervening sixty-six years there have been upon the Roster 732 Lodges, 209 of which have ceased to exist, leaving an active list of 523 Lodges at this writing, with twelve under Dispensation. And still they come. The membership amounts to 27,000, and 'is steadily yet healthily growing, so that we may expeet an aggregate of 30,000 members in the near future. Our sister jurisdiction, Alabama, starting at the same time as Missouri, has about one-third of the membership that we have. The Grand Master, in his Address, reported the past year as a prosperous one in some respects, and said that there had been seasons of refreshment in given portions of the jurisdiction. Before entering upon business details, our M. 'V. Brother moralized thus: A Mason is judged by the company be keeps. That member who seeks and keeps the company of the low. the vulgar, the obscene. the blasphemer, the drunkard, the black leg, the libertine, the ~landerer, will bring reproach upon the Order he has espoused. In Masoiuy. as in all social life. evil communications will corrupt good morals. Therefore, being an institution, based upon every moral precept, we cannot be too cautious in our words, our actions, our associations; remembering that we arc a component part of a great Brotherhood. each dependent on the other for the maintenance and elevation of II. high character. What affects a part, affects the entire body Masonic.

I copy the above for the reason that it contains sound sense, correct reasoning, healthy doctrine and true Masonic prineiples; as such, I want to commend it to all who m'ay see this Report. The associations of men inevitably determine their moral whereabouts; give them a classification from which there is no appeal, and, as a rule, settle their future. It were well if many of the members of this great Brotherhood could be brought to realize that their conduct disfranchises them from the recognition and association of good men and true. "Non-inter-


1887.]

Appendix.

3

course" is a doctrine that has been proclaimed and put in force more than once by Grand Lodges in this country, respecting those who were regarded as transgressors of given laws. Being a law unto myself, I have long practised" non-intercourse" concerning those who" keep the company of the low, the vulgar, the obscene, the blasphemer, the drunkard, the libertin~, the slanderer," for the reason that those who prefer such association could not enjoy my company, and I surely could not symphatize with their preference and taste. If such will not reform their lives, and become fit for decent companionship, let them be joined to their idols and herd together. They do not deserve the recognition of that element of moral and social life from which they ostracize themselves. The sentiment above, uttered by the Alabama Grand Master, should be uniYersally inculcated. This writer has spoken and published similar sentiments for a quarter of a century, and his voice and pen will never cease the warfare while vice infests the Institution and degrades its membership. Vice has benefited none, but cursed all it has touched. Those professing the moralities of Masonry cahnot afford to tolerate its presence and influence. Reform or quit. The Grand Master submitted a series of rulings, which were approved by the Committee on his Address and declared as "eminently in accordance with Masonic usage" in that jurisdiction. 'rhe Grand Lodge of Alabama deelared, in 1885, "that the Grand Master of Masons in the State of Alabama does possess and 1nay exercise po,,, ERS and prerogatives out.'ride of those given by the written Constitution. f ' Of course to act outside of the "written Constitution" is to act independently of said Constitution. The term" POWERS" in said deliverance settles the question and establishes the "Higher Law" doctrine in Alabama. The Grand Master received a telegram from the Master of one of the Lodges, asking for a Dispensation, by telegraph, to confer a degree out of the regular time. He flatly refused the application. He said: I refused the application. because no specific reasons were assigned showing the urgency by which I could determine whether it was a meritoriQus case or not. Dispensations of this kind shoukl not be granted, except whcre the good of the Order would be advanced.

â&#x20AC;˘

This brings this Committee back to the oft-repeated statement that in thirty years he never met with an instance where" the good of the Order," or the necessities of the case demanded the exercise of "powers outside of the written Constitution." Bro. Harris, in the above case, based the whole subject on "the good of the Order." 'rhis is reducing the high claims of "Prerogativism" to a minimum. If left to the good of the Order, prerogative would stay inside of the written Constitution.

â&#x20AC;˘


4

.I1ppendix.

[Oct.

Grand Master Harris in closing his very practical Address, has something to say against the two monster evils of the day, Profanity and Intemperance. Hear him: It is charged that some subordinate Lodges within this jurisdiction retain members who profane the name of Deity, and who blaspheme the name of that God in whom we are taught. in the most solemn manner, to .. put our trust." The Lodge that tolerates such conduct is at variance with the very fundamental principles and doctrines of the Order. No Mason who properly regards his Masonic character, will so far forget himself as to speak lightly of that Divine Being of whom we arc reminded when within the walls of a Masonic Hall. Profanity is wrong in any man, but in a Mason it is a crime.

George Washington, first Presidcnt of these United States, and for many yearsWorshipful Master of a Masonic Lodge in Virginia, whilc commanding the army of the Revolution. observing that profanity was prevalent among the troops, on the :ld day of August,l776, issued an order in reference thereto, in which he said: "It is a vice, so mean and low. without any temptation, that every man of sense and character detests and despises it." There is another vice, to some extent prevalent, and I should be recreant to duty were I not to raise my voice against it, and warn the Brethren of its consequences. Whilst we are satisfied this monstrous evil is on the decrease. yet it is still amongst us. I allude to intemperance or drunkenness. It is a vice that carries with it wreck and ruin -ruin socially, ruin morally, ruin intellectually, ruin financially, and therefore ruin Masonically.

The effect of such teachings as are presented to the Craft in Alabama by Grand Master Harris in his Address, ought to tell upon the character of the Brethren, and produce" abundant fruit." Profanity is disgusting and Intemperance is degrading. That MASONS should be guilty of either vice is not only strange but unpardonable. Brethren who indulge in such vices are well nigh lost to shame, and constitute Ii ving libels upon the Masonic name. As Masonry is a "beautiful system of MORALS," the vices of Intemperance and Profanity on the part of Masons must be grossly unmasonic because grossly immoral. These vices are either parts of this" system of morals" or they are not. If recognized as parts of the system, then the system is not a ~IORAL one, and we utter a falsehood every time a candidate is initiated. If these vices are not parts of this" beautiful system of morals," what business have such vices in the Institution? I was once invited to deliver a Masonic Address in a sister State. 'When the Address was finished, a mem bel' of the Craft said to me, "Brother, you knocked the scales off of us to-day." The reply was, "'Vhat business has a Mason with scales on him?" In view of the character a Mason represents, he should be without scales. One of two conclusions n,ust be accepted respecting the scaly Mason. Either the work was imperfectly done on the "Rough Ashlar," or else there was not enough material in the block, out of whieh to make a" Perfect Ashlar." It is cause for deep regret that so much of this kind of material finds its way into the Temple. There is nothing recorded in the transactions of the Grand Lodge claiming special notice or comment. .


1887.J

Appendix.

5

CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report was furnished by M. W路. Bro. P. J. Pillans, Past Grand Master, and covers less than one hundred pages. Copious extracts from Grand Lodge journals appear, accompanied with brief comments. The Missouri journal for 1886 received courteolls attention, nearly four pages being accorded it. Grand Master Boyd's Address was highly complimented, and some three pages of extracts were made therefrom. The Committee recognized the thriving condition of Masonry in Missouri; noted the presence of Bro. Rob Morris, of Kentucky, at our Session, and styled the Report of this Committee as "excellent and vigorous." Bro.,Pillans made an extract from said review, touching the prerogative doctrine promulgated by Alabama, and ~aid: We do not propose to argue the question, for, in our opinion, the position of the Grand Lodge of Alabama is the correct one, and the arguments of her Committee on Jurisprndence, on this SUbject, unanswerable.

This Committee does (( not propose to argue the question" further, resting in the belief that the case as presented, has not been met. Concerning the "Masonic Home" Bro. Pillans had these kind words: The Committee on "Masonic Home," appointed at the last Communication, made a report showing the formation by' charter of the association of Masonic Home. and a fund prepared of more than $48,000. With this beginning, and equal zeal for a score of )Tears, Missouri may yet rival Kentucky.

At the present writing our" Horne" fund may be counted as $45,000 in cash, and nearly as much in well-secured pledges. 'We hope for $100, 000 by our Grand Lodge meeting in 路October. With Kentucky zeal for a score of years, and the same success as realized during our first effort, Missouri will pass all competition in the' great race of doing good. Oh, for a 'million of dollars! Bro. Pillans conduded his annual rounds in terms which this writer most heartily approbates: We have handled some of the Proceedings of the vu.rious foreign bodies seeking recognition; they have not been be'fore us, though we have had some in the German. Magyar and other unknown tongues which have demonstrated the universality of Masonry. But how these work, we know not; whence they sprung, we know not; to whom or what they are of obedience, we know not; then how could we be expected to write of what we neither know, nor understand? With this we make our bow and retire.

This Committee being in like condition a!; to the "unknown tongues" of some documents received, can only refer them, for translation, to a learned Committee of other bodies in this jurisdiction who speaks more tongues than he can write. r leave the Alabama Brethren with pleasurable feelings, having caught some of the warm sunshine peculiar to that lovely South land. Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected, and both are residents of Montgomery.


6

Appendix.

[Oct.

ARIZONA, IS86. The Grand Lodge held its Fifth Annual Session at the Masonic Hall, in the city of Phamix, commencing the 9th day of November, 1886. M. W. Bro. Benjamin Titus, Grand. Master, presiding; the Grand Secretary seems to have been" absent. There were Representatives ptesent from four Lodges. There are five Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 357; being a gain of four. The Grand Master delivered a very brief Address, covering less than three pages, in which he presented a few business matters. He noted the death of Past Grand Master, John '1'. Alsap; he was the second Grand Master in that jurisdiction, and has been present at all its Sessions from the beginning. He was an earnest, devoted Mason, and beloved of all. In his death the Grand Lodge has lost one of its ablest members. The Grand Master reported only one Decision, and that of local importance. He reported that peace and harmony prevailed throughout the entire jurisdiction. There is nothing of any further interest claiming attention in the Address. The Grand Secretary rendered a very brief statement of business matters, and said that the Returns of all the Lodges had been duly made, and that they were correct and neat in appearance. He stated that there .had been a small increase in the membership of the Lodges. He was unable to attend the Session of the Grand Lodge, being in the employment of United States government. The CommittE;)e on Correspondence presented a Report, giving the names of such Grand Lodge Proceedings as he had received. Aside from this, his Report covers less than one page. He said that politics and other causes had prevented him from making a larger review. Th~ Committee on Resolutions from the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, reported them as impracticable, ill-advised and contrary to the spirit of exclusive Grand Lodge Jurisdiction. Thus" it would seem that the Grand Lodge of Arizona did not think much of the resolutions of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. The Grand Lodge declared that it was necessary to adopt a standard work or ritual of the degrees, and voted iii favor of adopting the ritual of路the Grand Lodge of California. The Grand Orator, Bro. James A. Zabinskie, delivered the Annual Oration. It covered more than four pages of the Proceedings, and was a well worded Address. The Grand Master-elect, Bro. Martin 'Vm. Kales, resides at Phronix, and the Grand Secretary, Bro. George J. Roskruge, was re-elected, and Ii ves at 'Tucson.


1887.]

Appendix.

7

ARKANSAS, 1886. An Emergency Communication was held at Little Rock, June 15th, 1886, for the purpose of attending the funeral of the late Grand Secretary, Luke E. Barber. Grand Master T. C. Humphry, presided. Concerning the occasion and the deceased I find this; The Grand Lodge being dilly at labor the M. W. Grand Master stated that the object of the Session was to attend the funeral of our beloved Brother, Luke E. Barber, who was Grand Master of this Grand Lodge in the yearg 1852-54. and 1857-59, and Grand Secretary from 1869 to 1881, and who had departed this life, at Little Rock, on the morning of Sunday, June 1:3th, in the eightieth year of his age; that in accordance with the request of the family, in pursuance of the understood wishes of our deceased Brother, the funeral services at the grave would be conducted by Hugh de Payens Cornmandery of Knight.,> Templar, of which he was a member, but that the Grand Lodge would accompany the procession. At the church, the solemn and impressive burial service of the Episcopal form was said, and a funeral discourse of unusual eloquence and pathos was delivered by Rev. Bro. T. C. Tupper, D. D. On that very day, one week previous, Bro. Tupper had bidden farewell to his old-time friend and close associate, Bro. Barber, to take up a new charge at Leavenworth, Kamas, to which he had been ('..aIled. He had but just reached his new home when the telegraph brought to him the hasty snmmons to return and bury his beloved Brother: and without a moment's hesitation he made the long journey to perform the sad duty. It was a touching occurrence, and there were few present but felt the sacredness of it.

The Forty-seventh Stated Communication convened in Little Rock, on the 23d day of November, 1886, and was presided over by the Grand Master, M. W. Bro. T. C. Humphry; the Grand Secretary, R. W. Bro. Fay Hempstead,.was on duty as usual. The occasion was graced by the presence of six Past Grand Masters. Representatives of twentyeight Grand Lodges were present. Missouri was served in that character by our Bro. John J. Sumpter. Out of 382 Lodges on the roll, Representatives were present from ?84. The membership was reported at 10,495. An Address, amounting to some fifteen pages, was presented by the Grand Master. It was a good business document. Following the opening, came the due notice of "OUR DEAD."

'1'hose mentioned by him under this head were two Past Grand Masters, two Past Grand Wardens, and a Past Grand Lecturer. Of the first the Grand Master had this to say; lIf. W. LUKE E. BARBER

Departed this life in the city of Little Rock on the 13th day of last June, in the eightieth year of his age. Bro. Barber was Grand Master of this Lodge as early as 1852, and filled this office several times since that date. But most of us young men remember him ll.S Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge, which office he held from November, A. D. 1869, to November, A. D. 1881, continuously. Many of you doubtless bade him farewell at the last Annual Communication with tears in your eyes. How well I remember when he stood near where I stand and shook the hand of so many Brethren, telling them that he mi~ht never see them again. "God bless you, Bro. Barber," was the fervent prayer of scores of Brethren of the Grand Lodge at that time. The Grand Lodge was convened on the 15th day of June and attended in procession the last sad rites paid our departed Brother.


8

Appendix.

[Oct.

A special Committee presented a very interesting historical sketch of the deceased. He was tenderly loved by his Brethren. Of the other deceased Brethren,. a ~ommittee said: That the demise of Bros. 1. C. Mills, Robert E. Salle, John W. Rison and M. M. McGuire has taken from us some of the strongest pillars of Masonry. and has taken from the several communities, in which they lived, lives which were replete with the fruits of good deeds done. The theory of Masonry is beautiful and Godlike, but it is from the practical Mason, whose everyday life exemplifies the teachings of the Order, that universal good comes. Our departed Brothers were such men and Masons. They won laurels for themselyes by distinguished services to the Craft, and tke Craft obtained warm-hearted workers through their instrumentalities.

The Grand Master announced that he had granted twelve Dispensations for the formation of new Lodges. The laying. of cornerstones, reports of, Special Dispensations issued, Decisions rendered and a review of the Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters made up the rest of the Address. The" Committee on Masonic Law and Usage" reported favorably upon the twelve Decisions rendered" by the Grand Master. Bro. Fay Hempstead, Grand Secretary, furnished in detail and at some length, the transactions of his office. It is a complete exhibit of the business of his term. The Committee on Appeals and Grievances had plenty of work on hand, judging from the number of cases passed. This is a Committee of the first importance in the Grand Lodges of the land. The service rendered is, as a rule, invaluable, and cannot be dispensed with. It requires mind of high order. A .JUDICIAL mind is the need of every Grand Lodge for said Committee. A heart to feel kindly and a mind to judge impartially, must be found in such Committees. It is a source of pride to this Committee to say that in Missouri our Committee on Appeals for years has commanded the best talent of the jurisdiction. THE SALOON BUSINESS

Is put under the proper condemnation by the following: Resolved, That it shall be a Masonic offense worthy of expulsion for a member to keep a saloon for the sale of intoxicating liquors.

Truly the leaven is working, and the whole lump will yet feel the moral force of true Masonic opposition to the crime of drunkard making by Masons. This war is not against the men engaged in the nefarious traffic, but against their business, which is a curse and a curse only and a curse continually. If anyone can show a particle of good in the business, let it be done. As only harm can be shown, let that which is wholly evil be driven from the Masonic Fraternity. In Missouri it has to go. The decree has gone forth to saloon-keeping Masons, "QUIT THE BUSINESS OR QUI'f MASONRY."


1887:]

Appendix.

9

In less than twelve months from this writing there will not be a saloon keeper or seller of liquor for drinking purposes in a Masonic Lodge under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. And none will ever gain admission in the future. Here is what the Grand Master of Missouri Masons says: Liquor selling, for drinking purposes, is sternly forbidden, and cannot be tolerated by the Lodges. '1'0 permit members of our Lodges to continue a business. declared to be is to allow an open defiance of the Grand Lodge and its laws. This the Lodges must not tolerate, because they thereby encourage wrong by exempting such as thus violate and defy the law. The saloon-keeping Mason would thus be made a privileged character, and allowed to do, with impulIlty, what the Grand, Lodge has declared to be UNJlfASONIC. They are exempted from the penalty of a law they are Violating every day, while drunkenness, caused by them, is pronounced gross TJN1IIASONIC CONDUCT. We punish those guilty of" habitual drunkenness." while we spare the saloon-keeping Mason, whose business is to make drunkards. It is unjust to pUnIsh a fallen Brother and screen the one who causes his fall. The Grand Lodge has declared it to "be a strange rule that would punish the victirn and not the victirnizer." UN MASONIC,

The Grand Lodge has put itself upon record against saloon keeping or selling liquor for drinking purposes, declaring the business to be UNJlfASONIC. It has affirmed the law to be good and right in every case where Lodges have expelled orsnspended the violators of the law. The Grand Lodge has suspended several parties where the Lodges failed to convict them, when the evidence was plain and strong. The Charters of such Lodges have been arrested. The law has been in existence so long that none may plead either ignorance or want of time to change their business. Their continuance ill a business declared to be" UNMASONIC," is open defiance of the law. The Grand Lodge has laid down the rule that any member affected by our law, "has the option to QUIT THE BUSINESS OR QUIT MASONRY." This being the law of the Grand Lodge, the Lodges of this jurisdiction are hereby enjoined, by these presents, to see that the rule is obeyed. QUIT THE BUSINESS OR QUIT MASONRY, is the manJiate of the Grand Loilge.

Arkansas went beyond the Missouri rule, and Resolvedl That hereafter it f;hall not be lawful for subordinate Lodges to initiate any

man whose ousiness is that of keeping a liquor saloon.

It certainly is a good rule to kr:pp out those who would have to be pnt out. Missouri began by putting out those who were in. This is required of the Lodges. No Lodge will receive a saloon keeper, knowing he will be prosecuted as soon as admitted. Hence we l:ill the evil in the Lodges, and

thereby educate the membership in a very practical way. The deliberations of the Arkansas Grand Lodge show ability and facility. Much was done and well done. Being local, the business of .the session need not claim further notice or comment.

It is to be regretted that no路 Report on Correspondence appears in the journal. W. H. GEE, Dardanelle, G. M' FAY HEMPSTEAD, Little Rock, G. Sec.


10

Appendix.

[Oct.

BRITISH 路COLUJIBIA, 18S6. The Fifteenth Annual Communication was opened in the Masonic 'remple in the city of Victoria, June 19th,1886. Twelve months from that date the Journal of Proceedings, covering sixty pages, came to this office. M. 路W. Bro. Thomas Trounce, Grand Master, presided, and R. 'V. Bro. E. C. Neufelder was Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from all tile Lodges-six in number. In these six Lodges there are enrolled 333 members, showing a gain of twenty-one for the closing year. The revenue for the year amounted to $577.25. The Address of the Grand Master was brief, covering four pages. One new Lodge had been formed during his administration. He announced that the jurisdiction had happily been exempted from affliction and calamities, and that more prosperity had been enjoyed by Ma..<;onry than in any former year. He reported the granting of Dispensation.s to bury .the Masonic dead, and to attend church on a certain occasion. There must be a great deal of power vested in the Grand Masters of that jurisdiction, and very little outside of him, when it becomes necessary to obtain his permission to bury Masons or go to church. There is nothing of any interest in the Proceedings requiring the attention of this Committee. There is no Report on Correspondence. From the Conclusion of his Address this extract is made: In conclusion, Brethrcn, permit me to say, as I am about to place this gavel into the hands of my successor, that although we may not have been able to see eye to eye in all things, I do claim that in all my Masonic life, my guiding thought and aim has been, above all other cOll8iderations, to sustain the honor and integrity of our beloved Order, and notwithstanding there may have been times of friction in some matters of rUlin~, I can conscientiously say that I have been guided by a feeling of duty to the Cratt. based on the solemnity of my obligation to preserve the Landmarks of our Order, and maintain the Ancient Charges and Constitution on which I was obligated. And I believe that when Masonry is conducted in the proper spirit, it will present such an example of brotherly love to the world as to draw all men to it that may now be unaffiliated Masons.

WILLIAM DALBY was elected G. M. E. C. NEUFELDER was re-elected G. Sec.

CALIFORNIA, ISS6. The Grand Lodge of the State of California commenced its Thirtyseventh Annual Communication on the 12th day of Odober, 1886,-same day as Missouri. The Session was held at the Masonic Temple, in the city of San Francisco. M. 'V. Bro. 'Viley James Tinnin, Grand Master, presided; and R. W. Bro. Alex. G. Abell was Grand Secretary. The occasion was graced by the presence of eight Past Grand Masters,


1887.]

Appendix.

11

several' other Past Grand Officers and a large number of Past Masters. Representatives from 179 Chartered Lodges were in attendance. The membership of the jurisdietionis reported at 14,441. Grand Master Tinnin presented a short Address-the shortest we have ever seen from the Grand East of that jurisdiction--only four pages. From the character of it, the inference is fair that he said all he wished, or had to say. Outside of his own jurisdiction there is nothing in the Address of moment to the general reader. He opened thus:

.

.

Twenty-nine years ago I commenced to attend and observe the proceedings of this Grand Lodge, and, when I compare the small number who then met in convocation with the numerous body now before me, I am forcibly reminded of the grand success, prosperit)· and influence of our Order in the Golden State. These are matters for Our earnest and serious consideration, and should admonish us to continue in the well-beaten path.• Through the united wisdom of the Craft our acts and legislation have been kept within the bounds of reason and common sense, and the vast army of cranks and irreconcilables, who now so largely punish mankind by the introductIOn of their departures from the laws of civilization, have been unable to sow the seeds of their discord here. • Let us, then, rejoice for the wisdom of the past, and let it be a bright example for the future. '

The Grand'Master reported that two Dispensations had been granted for the formation of new Lodges, He said also that he had granted permission to one of the Lodges" to confer the degrees of Masonry on a candidate without reference of his petition to a Committee." He is certainly not liable to the charge of going slow. The making of a Mason out of material, without due enquiry into his charaeter, through a Committee, must be regarded as making haste hastily. The Grand Master rendered eight rulings during his term of office. They were rendered for California and not for Missouri. Hence no notice will be taken of any of them except one, which for striking strangeness surpasses all others in the range of mind of this Committee. Here it is: Qllestio'n. What disposition should the Lodge make of a petition for the de&,rees of Masonry in case a Brother of the Lodge objects to the reception of such pctltion at the time of presentation?

Answer. The 'Master of the Lodge should appoint a committee who should report on the petition at the next regular meeting of the Lodge. The objecting Brother can then be present and exercise the privilege that every member of the Lodge has. TRIALS,

The following sound utterances were made by Grand Master Tinnin, concerning trials. They are worthy of a place in this Report: A careful investigation of the matter of trials, and other proceedings connected therewith, has convinced me that we are rapidly dei?arting from the ancient Ilsages and customs of the Craft, and that we arc drifting mto the customs of the criminal courts, wliere paid attorneys, stays of proceedings, and legal quibbles and demurrers are the rules of practice. We want justice plainly administered, not legal technicalities and delays.


12

Appendix.

[Oct.

The mechanical mind and Master Workman who is by the vote of his Lodge elected a Commissioner to try one of his Brethren for an offense against our laws, sits there in a different position from a juror summoned in one of our criminal courts to try a criminal for an offense against the State laws. The Commissioner is not inclined to deal harshly and unjustly with the. defendant, for there are sympathies and obligations between him and his defendant that do not exist with the juror and his defendant. Then why should the Commissioner, his judgment and his verdict, be subject to the same procedure as the juror and his verdict in our State courts? ORATION.

The Grand Orator, Bro. M. M. Estee, delivered an Oration, which, being printed, COVEllI'S some three pages of the journal. Brevity is a merit not to be despised. REPORTS

'Were presented by the Grand Secretary, the Grand Treasurer and the Grand Lecturer. These were full and extended, particularly that of Bro. Abell, the able Grand Secretary. Iiis details are many and minute. '1'he receipts and disbursements, shown by the fiscal exhibits, were large. The California Brethren go upon the principle that the liberal soul shall be made fat. They certainly "provide liberal things" over . there and spend money freely. They pay their Grand Secretary $3,600 per annum as a salary, and give him an assistant at $2,000 per year. The Grand Secretary does not prepare the Report on Correspondence. A Grand Lodge which pays $5,600 per annum for official work alone, of a clerical sort, must be characterized as liberal indeed. The Brethren at their last Session donated $1,200 to PaRt Grand Master J. D. Stevenson, a dependent Brother to whom the same amonnt had been given the previous year. To another Past Grand Master, John Ashby'rutt, the snm of $40 per month was voted. Another Past _Grand Master, Leonidas E. Pratt, was taken charge of, and a committee appointed, with power to furnish him, or his family, such pecuniary assistance as might be deemed necessary. This action was had on the 16tq of the month. On the 28th the Grand Lodge was convened to bury the Brother. The Grand Lodge of California maintains its well-earned reputation for charity. Appropriations, besides those mentioned above, were made to Boards of Relief, amounting to $5,650. The Board in San Fra.ncisco received $4,000 of the above sum. 'fhis Board received $3,749.10 from eight city Lodges. 'rotal income from all sources, $11,G4(i84. Total outlay, $11,062.89. A small balance, less than $600, was left in the Treasury. That Board acts upon the idea that capital should not be idle. Masonic money should be placed where it will do the most good. If not actively employed, such funds should be returned to the parties who contributed them, or else stop any further drainage upon the contributing Lodges until the surplus in the hands of the Board is reduced to a figure requiring additional calls. The fiscal


1887.]

A.ppendix.

13

affairs of the Grand Lodge of California must-be ably managed, because a large amount of money -is annually expended for good and worthy purposes. It appears to this Committee that the taxes are pretty weighty upon the Craft in that jurisdiction. It may be that thCl'e is some .fi:inching, as a proposition was submitted to reduce the per capita twenty-five per cent. The measure did not pass. In addition to the annual dues, $1 per member, there is a levy of twenty-five cents per member for the Representative Fund, out of which Representatives to the Grand Lodge are paid. The mileage and per diem will foot up, annually, about $3,500. The business of the Thirty-seventh Session received careful attention and the work of the committees evidenced much painstaking labor. Five days were spent in the work. MEXICO.

There is said to be a Grand Lodge of symbolical Masons in the Republic of Mexico, organized at the city of Mexico. It is called the Grand Lodge of the Federal District. Bro. Wm. C. Belcher, Past Grand Master 'of California and Chairman of the Committee on .Jurisprudence, reported in favor of recognizing Raid Federal District Grand Lodge. His recommendation was approved. In the course of his Report, he said: '1'he new Grand Lodge claims jurisdiction only over the three symbolic degrees and within the territory of the Federal District. The Supreme Council of the 33째 has formally relinquished to it all conttol over those degrees, and has thus made it what it professes to be-an independent Grand Lodge. By its Constitution it asserts absolute jurisdiction over all Lodges of Master Masons, and over the three deg-rees of Entered Apprentice, FellOW Craft, and l\'laster :M:ason, within the territory of the Federal District. It complains, therefore. that the Grand Lodge of Missouri has not recogni7-ed its authority, but has permitted the Lodge" Toltec, No. 520." upon its register, located in the city of Mexico, to continue to work under its obedience. This it terms an invasion of its jurisdiction. It also complains of a like invasion by the Grand Lodge of Hamburg. The Lodges in regard to which these complaints arc made were chartered and established in the city of l\Iexico prior to the organization of this new Grand Lodge. As your Committee have had frequent occasion to say. they do I1bt understand that it is an established law. or a universally recognized rule, that a Grand Lodge which has rightfully established a subordinate Lodge. liS the Grand Lodge of Missouri established its Toltcc I_odge in the city of Mexico, must, upon the organization of a new Grand Lodge asSerting jurisdiction over the territory within which such Lodge is located, immediately compel its subordinate to transfer its allegiance to that new Grand Lodge or surrender its charter. But, on the contrary, they do understand the rule in such cases, elsewhere than in the United States of America, to be that the parent Grand Lodge ma~' of right permit and is in du.ty !J0?nd to per!nit, its subordinate to <?ontinue its wor~ and its allegiance; and to sustam It III the mamtenance of that alleglallce so long" as It shall desire to continue its work under its original charter. It is a matter of comity to permit the subordinate to trallsfer its allegiance, if it choose so to do; but the Grand Lodge which should abandon a subordinate in such a case, would prove recreant to a solemn duty which it assumed when it gI:anted the charter, and which it ought faithfUlly to perform. Your Committee need not discuss the proposition here. but it is proper that it should be mentioned, in order that it may not be supposed that, in extending recognition to the Grand Lodge of the Federal District of Mexico and entering into friendly relations therewith, the Grand Lodge of California assents to all th~ claims preferred by that new Grand Lod~e in respect to exclusive juriSdiction, or that it will necessarily or probably sever its friendl)' relations with the Grand Lodge of Missouri should that body persist in sustaining its Lodge 'l'ollcc in the cit~, of Mexico.


14

Appendix.

[Oct.

Being cognizant of the organization of Toltec Lodge, No. 520, in the city of Mexico, by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and in possession of all the facts, it is proper that this Committee should make a statement here. Early in the year 1883, a constitutional number of Master Masons' petitioned, in due form, for a Dispensation to open a J.. . odge of Masons in the city of Mexico, Republic of Mexico, to be known as a Lodge working the York Rite. A body in the city of Mexico ' . . orking the Scottish Rite recommended the formation of the proposed Lodge. The Dispensation was granted by M. W. Bro. C. C. Woods, Grand Master. At the following Session in October, 1883, the Grand Lodge granted a Charter to said petitioners, and created Toltec Lodge, No. 520, which was subsequently organized. The names to the petition showed that the petitioners hailed from five different American States. They were American Masons. It was desired that an English-speaking Lod~e should be created at the Mexican Capital for the benefit of Englishspeaking Brethren, who could not work with or enjoy the bodies of the Rite worked in the city of Mexico. It was not known that there was a Grand Lodge of any kind in existence at the Capital or ~n that District when Toltec Lodge was created by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. In fact there was none there at the time. The Grand Lodge of the }<'ederal District was organized afterwards. The Grand Lodge of Missouri was assured at the time Toltec Lodge was started that there was no Grand Body in existence in that country. The Grand Lodge of Missouri has no purpose to antagonize the rights of the legally constituted authorities of the Republic of Mexico. As there was no Grand Body there when l'oltec Lodge was 路instituted, the field was regarded as open to all comers. This has been the custom in all territory unoccupied by Grand Lodges. Until a Grand Lodge is organized the field is regarded as common property, and open to those jurisdictions that might wish to establish Lodges therein. Since the organization of the Grand Lodge of the Federal District of Mexico, a new question comes to the front. Bro. Belcher, of California, alludes to it. Must the Grand Lodge of Missouri abandon the Lodge in Mexico, when she had a right to creat~ it.? She is under no obligations to leave that Lodge without her fostering care and protection. As a question of policy and fraternity, the matter may assume a different shape. When that issue is brought up the Grand Lodge of Missouri will be ready to meet it. Personally this writer would prefer that Toltec Lodge should transfer its allegiance to the Legal Grand Lodge where it is located, and hold connection where it can render service to the home government. Toltec Lodge can thus preserve an existence just the same as if in ob~dience to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, pay its dues to that body, make its reports and be recognized as a factor in Masonry, yet maintain its present form of work and ceremony, afford-


1887.]

Appendix.

15

ing all that was desired or contemplated in its creation. These are the views of the Missouri Committee, and it is believed by the writer that he reflects the sentiments of his Grand Lodge. One thing is certain, Missouri s~eks and desires no controversy on this subject. It will not be profitable. This is all the present writer has to say now. CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. "James Wright Anderson, chairman," served up a most acceptable Report, of about 120 pages, reviewing transactions of nearly sixty Grand Lodges. It is an appetizing" menu," and is full of original matter, with numerous well-chosen extracts. Four full pages were devoted to notices of the Missouri Proceedings for 1885. Of the Address of our Grand Master Stevenson, Bro. Anderson said: The Address of the Grand Master is a very unique production-one of the most thoughtful and suggestive that has at any time come under our notice. He had made many Decisions. but reports none. All questions had been clearly and completely covered in the Book of Constitutions. The cause of temperance had been supported with fortitude, Applications for Dispensations had been numerous, and he had granted such as came within the limits of the law, refusing those repugnant thereto. ' One Lodge had labored under a debt until all interest was lost (that on the debt probably included), the Grand Lodge dues were not paid, and its usefulness had departed. The Grand Master ordered a funeral. Another had ceased to meet, and the members found themselves tied to a carcass, from which only the knife could relieve them; and it was applied. Still another had been trying to prepare the corpse of the Lodge for burial, without effect. The Brethren were relieved to the fullest extent. The Grand Master forcibly urges the necessity for insuring Lodge property. He complains of the fraudulent peddling- of rituals in cipher. and recommends an emphatic declaration by the Grand Lodge that any Mason havinl{ such in his possession should be summarily dealt with. He also complains that the Blue Lod~e is used for the purpose of advertising and propagating reputed higher degrees. He belIeves in the enforcement of proper discipline. and hence had caused a Master charged with drunkellnel'S to be suspended and cited to answer before the Grand Lodge.

" Unique production" is good and pithily descriptive. Of our Grand Lecturer, Bro. McDowell, the Committee said: The Grand Lecturer, Bro. Allan McDowell, presented a Report which is creditable to the Craft, The Brethren of Mil'souri are to be congratulated on the zeal and efficiency of their Grand Lecturer and District Lecturers.

, Bro. Anderson endorsed the views of the Missouri Committee concerning Lodge Investigating Committees thus: We are strong in the conviction that Bro. Vincil is about right. We are almost persuaded to believe that the appointment and reports of these Committees have de~ellerated into mere form. We fear that too often the parties selected for the important duty of investigation are named on the Committee in consequence of some predilection for the applicant.

Concerning this writer, the California Committee said some plain things: Bro. Vincil says that he never goes round the corner ,,;hen an objectionable opinion is in front, We are ple8:~ed to see that he c,ombats ~'hat he considers erroneous opmions, and that, however caustiC he may become !Il OPPOSlllg them, he pays due deference to


16

Appendix.

[Oct.

the principle of justice. He is not particularly" seeking whom he may devour," but preferring to shun even a "free fight." When he does" go in," he hits" from the shoulder." He is an able defender of what he believes to be right, but an uncompromising foe to what he considers wron~. Masonry needs such men. We do not mean to assert that we coincide with Bro. VinCiI in all that he utters. nor altogether in the manner of utterltnce. We have read this Report with great inter~t and profit; we place it for the time upon the ~cl[ .

Uniformity of views may never be attained in this life among Brethren, but unity of spirit is always possible with those who strive to do good, elevate humanity and glorify God. Who need care for applause when doing right? God approves. 'Tis well. CONCLUSION.

With the Conclusion of Bro. Anderson, this notice of California Masonry must conclude: Once more our task is completed. We reach the end with feelings of pleasure somewhat mingled with those of regret-pleasure in the fact that our weary brain will secure its needed rest-regret that we must leave the companionship of those with whom we have passed so many pleasant and profitable hours. We make no pretension as an expert, and shall feel entirely satisfied if we have succeeded in our effort to interest and inform. Our opinion of the magnitUde and the importance of the work imposed upon the Correspondent of a Grand Lodge has received additional strength, as has that of our inability to do justice to all the interests involved. We have endeavored to abbreviate as much as possible, and. hence, have been compelled to pass many things that we would like to have notic{ld. We are pleased to be able to represent that the year has been one of fair progrcss-financiJl,l and otherwise. Harmony and prosperity have prevailed, and our noble Order is ready to enter upon another year with increased interest and efficiency.

EDMUND C. ATKINSON, Sacramento, G. M. ALEX. G. ABELL, San Francisco, G. Sec.

COI..ORADO, lSS6. This Grand Lodge assembled on the 26th day of October, ]886, in the city of Denver, it being the Twenty-sixth Annual Communication. M.W. Bro. George 'Vyman, Grand Master, presided, and R. W. Bro. Ed. C. Parmelee was Grand Secretary. Nine Past Grand Masters were present, with the Representatives' of nineteen sister Grand Lodges. Fifty-one subordinate Lodges were represented, out of fifty-five on the . roll. All the Lodges in the jurisdiction had made Returns. Anot her Grand Secretary is happy, no doubt. The Heport of Bro. Parmelee, Grand Secretary, shows a membership of nearly 4,000 in the fifty-five Lodges. The business of the session was transacted in two days, and was well done, judging from the character of the work contained in the journal of Proceedings. The journal is, as lIsual, a good job of work, neatly executed, showing taste and skill on the part of the Grand Secretary. It contains the Transactions, (thirty-eight pages), Members by Lodges, Tables, qonstitution and By-Laws and Decisions pf the Grand Lodge.


1887.J

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THE ADDRESS

Of Grand Master Wyman covered seven pages, mostly taken up with matters of a local interest. The following extract will show the growth of the Order in that jurisdiction: The growth of the Lodges, during the year, has been generally of a satisfactory character. No disputes or liisagreements of a serious nature have arisen, and I believe the quality of work done to be steadily improving. I am glad to report that our relations with sister Grand Lodges continue to be of the most harmonious character. DECISIONS

'Vere reported by the Grand Master, four in number. They were approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence. Two of his rnlings are herewith presented for the interest of the general reader: "It was asserted in open Lodge that the Tyler has no right to vote on any question coming before the Lodge; I would like to be informed upon that question." I replied that the Tyler of a Lodge. when a member thereof. forfeits none of his rights by accepting that office; that. while much inconvenience might arise, in consequence of that officer's demand to be admitted to vote upon every questionthftt came before the Lodge, his privileges were those of any other member. ' I have been asked to state whether, upon the request of a Lodge, regularly preferred, I would grant a Dispensation for the burial of a non-affiliate with Masonic rites. I replied that I thought the matter could safely be left to the discretion of a Lodge acquainted with the circumstances, and that when the Lodge vouched. as it were, for the merits of the case, I should grant the Dispensation. Upon further consideration. however, I feel satisfied that in such cases no DiSpensation is required. Admitting the validity of our by-law depriving non-affiliates of al the rights and benefits of Masonry withoutjtrial, it seems to be negative in its application so far as the Lodg-es are concerned; that is. while it would cut off the non-affiliate's right to demand MasOlllC burial, it would not interfere with the right of the Lodge to confer it.

The balance of the Address was occupied with matters incident to the administration of affairs in the jurisdiction. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Parmelee, presented a full and complete exhibit of the fiscal affairs of the Grand Lodge. His work is always first class. The Grand Lodge donated $150 to the sufferers in South Carolina, caused by the Earthquake. The Grand Master had sent out an appeal to the Lodges in behalf of the distressed ones, to which responses had been received, and the amounts realized forwarded to Charleston.. ORATION.

A three-page Oration appears in the journal, which Bro. Foster, the G~and Orator, delivered during. the session. INTEMPERANCE.

The following was introduced by Bro. B. finally referred to a special Committee: G. L. Ap.-2.

c:

Adams, discussed and


18

Appendix.

[Oct.

Resolved, That it shall be unlawful for any subordinate Lodge, working in the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, to receive the petition or confer any of the degrees upon a man engaged in the liquor business, or to allow a Brother ellgaged in the liquor business to become a member by affiliation.

Subsequently the Comlnittee reported a proposition as a by-law, whieh was adopted by more than a two-thirds vote, says the record. Here is the law; / It is hereby made the imperative duty of all Lodges to restrain as far as 'possible the MliSollic crime ofintemperance, by trial and punishment, as the case may require. and to exclude from Lodge and ante rooms all intoxicating liquors, and for the faithful performance of these duties they will be held strictly accountable to the Grand Lodge. It shall be unlawful to initiate or affiliate an)' person engaged in the sale of intoxicating liquors. All Masons are therefore fraternally advised to refrain from engaging in the liquor traffic.

Upon the action of the Grand Lodge of Colorado, as formulated in the above by-law, this Cbmmittee has somewhat to say; First of all, the leaven is working at/all points. Five years ago Missouri stood alone in her advanced position respecting the "Masonic crime of intemperance," as expressed in the law above quoted. Now she is not alone by many. Quite a number of the Grand Jurisdictions of this country have taken similar ground, and some have advant:ed beyond us. Colorado, for instance. To-day Kentucky, Ohio, Oregon, 'Vashington, Arkansas and other Grand Lodges are marching in solid column with Missouri. The one aim is the regeneration of Mason.ry from the curse of the whisky blight. The States are fighting the battles of "High License," "Local Option," "Prohibition" and other questions. Our warfare is agains't the vice of intemperance in Masonry. The Grand Lodge of Colorado has taken high and true ground in her enactment above quoted, because she calls drunkenness among Masons" The Masonic eRIlIIE of intemperance." That is the way to designate the evil. Call things by their proper names. A spade is a spade the world over. Intemperance is a '" Masonic crime" the world over. The above-named Grand Lodge has resolved that it is a crime and a punishable one at that. So let it be. It follows as a necessity that prevention is proper. Therefore their law has excluded all intoxicants from Lodge premises. Now let our Lodges be removed from any close proximity to these places of resort where intoxicants are kept. Many Lodge-rooms are over saloons, and the share of the custom furnished the saloon keeper is not small, owing to the ready service rendered by the gentlemanly (?) liquor seller to those who want refreshments after Lodge meetings. This is especially so where the saloon keeper has managed to secure membership in the Lodge. He is a good fellow, and the Brethren desire to patronize him. But here follows the killing clause of the law of Colorado. It goes beyond the position taken by Missouri, but not further than is favored by many-a position tha~ will be reached in good time; "IT SHALL BE UNLAWFUL TO INITIATE OR AFFILIATE ANY PERSON ENGAGED IN THE SALE OF INTOXICATING LIQ,UORS,"


1887.]

Appendix.

19

Such is the law of Colorado. The Committee mildly admonished and warned all persons after this sort: "ALL MASONS are therefore fraternally advised to refrain from engaging in the liquor traffic." As none are eligible to initiation who are engaged in the traffic, and none are allowed to affiliate who follow the business of liquor selling, it would appear that Colorado has only to get rid of such as now sell liquor, in order to be free from the presence of this "crime of intemperance." Missouri hails the movement of Colorado Masons as the augury of a bright and glorious future for that jurisdiction. Greetings are hereby sent to the Brethren from this Grand Lodge, with the statement that by the time this Report is seen and read, there will not be a saloon keeper in any Lodge in the State of Missouri. They are going out fairly fast now, and the near future will see a general hegira. This writer has been reg~rded as belonging to the so-called Prohibition Party of the day. Such has never been the case. But if there is anyone thing that would drive him into the ranks of that party it is the prominence, impudence and defiance of the liquor-selling Mason, who is always at the front, making himself offensive to good morals and decency by his immenseness and his forwardness. He must be representative or he is nothing, even aspiring to be a leader in Masonry. The Grand Lodge of Missouri has declared the business of saloon-keeping to be UNMASONIC. This writer does not propose to be measured as the equal of such, in UNMASONIC <!onduct, by the world, or by the laws of Masonry. Therefore such violators of our laws cannot be recognized as the companions of this writer, because he keeps the laws of Masonry in all good conscience, while such saloon keepers violate the law of the Grand Lodge every day and every hour of the day in the year. They took the same obligation as myself, and instead of supporting and maintaining the law, they live in constant violation of it. This is not just to those who keep the law. It makes privileged classes in Masonry; and the worst feature of this class favoritism, is, that those thus favored are the very persons who do more to destroy society than any other class in community. I have not learned my lessons in Masonry after this fashion. CORRESPONDENCE. The Report on Correspondence was rendered for the Committee by Bro..Tames H. Peabody, and covers 125 pages. He reviewed the Proceedings of fifty-one Grand Lodges. Missouri for 1885 received due attention, his notice covering three pages. The review throughout shows attention to the work in hand, and evidences the fact that the reviewer had his eyes open to what had transpired in the Masonic world. Many very judicious comments are found in the Report, while numerous extracts from the Proceedings examined, are found in his


20

Appendix.

[Oct.

work. Of' our Bro. Stevenson, Grand Master for 1885, Bro. Peabody had kind words, and made several extracts from the Address .of that year. This concerning Bro. Stevenson personally: Grand Master Stevenson presented a finely worded Annnal Address of unusual length, in which he reviews his year's work in a thorough and cumprehen~ive manner. Reports no Decisions, though admitting that he made many. Granted Dispensations for the formation of seven new Lodges. Does not believ路e in Grand Master's" prerogatives," hence only issued special Dispensations for the purpose of laying corner-stones and a few other like instances, strictly within the limits.of the law. Good idea.

Of this Committee the reviewer had a few good words to say: The Report on Foreign Correspondeuce is from the" willing" pen of Rev. Bro. J oh n D. Vincil, and covers 143 pages of their printed Proceedings. Hc writes from firm belief and personal experience, and is splclldid rcadiilg throughout. In some places his words are 8.'1 tender as a child's, and in others he is bitter-almost vindictive. Drunkards and gamblers, who have in some manner succeeded in wormin~ themselvcs into the Masonic Order, are anathematizcd in a most mercilcss manncr. A nd while we do not believe in amalgamating the Masonic Fraternity and the Prohibition Party, we do bclicve the writings of Bro. Vinci] will be the means of doing good in his own as well as in other jurisdictions. Colorado receives a four-page notice, devoted chiefly to criticisms of Bro. Woodbury's Report, and excuses for the Grand Lodge of Missouri in extenuation of its action in granting a Charter to a Lodge in the city of Mexico on the plea of" unoccupied territory." We think Bro. Woodbury has much the best of the argument thus far, so will not extend this Report by furthcr argument.

"Many men of many Minds." Hence the difference of opinion as to who had the best of the argument in the question raised by Bro. 路Woodbury. Missouri was defended in the argnment made by her Committee, and some think that Bro. 路Woodbury did not have the best of the argument in the ease. However, victory was not the objeet of either writer. But was Missouri right and was h~' position defensible? It is assumed that she violated no law or right by planting a York Rite Lodge in unoccupied territory, because there was no Grand Lodge in the Republic of Mexico, working the Rite named. This has since been admitted by the Committee of California. The only question to be settled now is, Shall the Lodge created by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, at the Capital of the Republic of Mexico, when there was no Grand Lodge there, be allowed to remain-a Grand Lodge having since becn formed there? 'rhis is a question for the future to determine. Mis~ souri has 110 idea of infracting the jurisdiction of any Grand Lodge in the world, but only desired to serve the best interests of the Brethren at the Capital of Mexico when Toltec Lodge was created, and to ad vance the Fraternity in that country. Show us that these interests have been fully served, and that the child placed there by Missouri will be provided for,and then our presence will no longer cause any one to carp or criticise. ALBERT H. BRANCH, Leadville, G. M. ED. C. PARMELEE, Pueblo, G. Sec.


1887.]

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21

CONNECTICUT, 1887. The Journal of this Grand Lodge is always welcome, because it is neat in appearance, full of interest and never behind time. It is not necessary to wait ten or eleven months for the Proceedings of Bro, 'Wheeler, and then have to send several postal cards to find out when to expect the journal. The herculean task performed by one Grand Official known to this writer deserves the universal sympathy of mankind and the prayers of the Secretarial Corps of Masonry, that he may survive the labor of his position. It required just eleven months .to deliver to the body he serves an insignificant pamphlet of forty pages of Minutes, with a Report or something called Correspondence, covering just two pages. The whole could have been done ~y a competent officer in six days, except the Report or the thing called Correspondence, which no other mind ever could equal or produce. Bro. 'Wheeler is on time and equal to anyone in the kind of work done. He reports an Emergency Session of the Grand Lodge, held in Norwalk, for the purpose of laying the corner-stone of a Masonic building. Grand Master Henry H. Green officiated. The principal address on the occasion was delivered by Rev. Bro. K Anderson.. He was quite facetious indeed, as the following will evidence:

r Mr. Anderson here gave several stories into which, by gestures, he wove the various signs of several orders, to the amusement of men who recognb:ed them.] I give you my pledge, whatever YOll may hear to the contrary, that the letters on the Masonic key-stone in the Mark-Master's degree, do not read .. Kin~ Solomon had two wives, some say ten." So, too, the mark has no relation to Mark Twam.

The Ninety-ninth Annual Co~munication convened in the city of New Haven, January 19th, 1887, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. H. II. Green, Grand Master; R. Vol. Bro. Joseph K. 'Wheeler, Grand Secretary, was actively present, .as shown by his record. Twenty-four Grand Lodges were represented by those holding commissions as Representati ves at the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. Nine Past Grand Masters aided in the important deliberations of the session by their presence. Every Lodge in the jurisdiction was represented, there being III on the roll. The membership amounts to about 15,000. The per capita tax per member in Connecticut is twenty cents. Of course the income is small, amounting to no more than $2,500. The Address of the Grand Master was of sufficient length, fOl)rteen pages, and possessed business merit. He noted the loss sustained by the Craft in that jurisdiction, in the death of M. W'. Bro. 'Villiam L. Brewe~, Past Grand Master, and of Bro. L. E. Hunt, Past Grand Secre-


22

Appendix.

[Oct.

tary. These were honored Brethren, to whom just and full tributes were paid. The Grand Master recited in detail his official work, showing that he had at least been busy. He rendered only two Decisions, which were duly approved by the Committee and Grand I~odge. They are hereto appended: An unfavorable ballot for degrees cannot be set aside or reconsidered, if but one black ballot appear, or if the Master be of the opinion a mistake has been made, he may order a new ballot to be spread; but this power must be exercised at once. and not at a subsequent communication, and all who expressed their opinion on the fir~t ballot must be prcscnt to express it on the second. After the Lodge is closed the decision of the ballot is final. Can a man be dealt with for unmasonie conduct who hM been convicted of selling liquor contrary to law'! Yes; MMOllfy requires her followers to be law-abiding citizens. The law of our State makes thc selling of intoxicating liquor, without a license, a crime. The unwritten moral law regards it as a crime. If Masonic Lodges fail to punish this offense, first by admonition, next by suspension. and lastly by expulsion, then they fail in the discharge of their duty, and are untrue to their trust.

TNTElIfPERANCE.

The Grand Master properly characterized intemperanee as" one of the worst of Masonic offenses" and gave the subject a lengthy consideration. The following extracts from his Address will show how he viewed the evils that are so degrading to members of our Fraternity: In the present awakened state of public sentiment, I feel more than justified in calling your attention to one Masonic offense which, I fear, more than any other, calls for Masonic discipline in some of our Lodges, and which if tolerated in any degree, cannot fail to lessen the efliciency of our Order, if not to threaten its perpetuity. I refer to the Masonic offense of intemperance. As temperance is one of the cardinal virtues of Masonry, so intemperance, of nece..c;sity, is one of the worst of Masonic offenses. It is so because it is the prolific source from which flows corruption and from which crime receives its inspiration; and while Masonry labors for the elevation of man, the improvement of his physical, mental, and moral condition. and is engaged in practical charity, feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, burying' the dead and educating the orphan, intemperance degrades man, destroys his physical. intellectual and moral q.ualifications, without which a man can never rightfUlly cross the threshold of a Lodge. It moreover impoverishes and ruins its votaries, makes widows and orphans. blasts the drunkard's hopes for the future and entails disgrace upon his posterity. This is a question upon which the voice of Masonry, of all true philanthropy. of morality. ahd of the enlightened sentiment of the age, give no uncertain sound. Consisteney, duty, the security and perpetuity of our Jnstitution, the law of self preservation, the spirit of our teachings and the laws of our Order require, that .. the outer door of our Temple be more strongly guarded, and the inner Temple purged, if need be," from this vice. Our desire is that the organic life of our beloved Institution, may not only be maintained, but kept in vigorous activity, and that its inliuence for ~ood may not be in the least diminished. Therefore, allow me to ur~e upon your attention, the necessity of taking sueh action as shall protect our Institution against this increasing evil. and in the name of the scores of our Brethren who have been ruined by this vice, in behalf of the wives and children who will ere long become widows and orphans, and so become a charge upon the Fraternity, and also in the name of our beloved Institution which is being dIshonored by this vice, I recommend prompt and decisive action.

THE CENTENNIAL

Year of Masonry in the Grand Lodge of Connecticut having dawned upon the Craft, the Grand ,Master had this to say on the subject:


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23

Appendix.

This Communication closes the ninety-ninth, and we are just entering upon the one hundredth year of our existence as a Grand Lodge. The record of the past is before us; what that of the future shall be, depends upon us and our successors. If we are true to the teachings of the past and faithful to the Landmarks which have been left us for our ~uidance and instruction, then all will be well. Let us therefore sincerely and heartIly resolve to hand down to our successors this precious legacy, this Grand Lodge, with its teachings, its principles and its Freemasonry, unshaken in its integrity and unsullied in its purity. just as we received it at the hands of its fouuders, with not a star dimmed, not a pillar fallen. . I submit for your consideration the propriety of celebrating our Centennial with appropriate ceremonies, and I recommend that the necessary arrangements be made at this Communication.

A committee was appointed with power to arrange for the proper observance of the coming Centennial. The Grand Master received a vote of thanks for his faithful and able services as chief offieer of the Craft, and was honored with a re-election. The Grand Lodge passed a resolution declaring it to be a Masonic offense for anyone to make known the rejection of a candidate to any but Masons, except the candidate himself. If this law should become general and be enforeed, there would be squally times in many Lodges in this country. The profane world knows as much as the Masons in numerous cases as to the rejection of applicants for the mysteries. HIRAM LODGE, NO.

1.

The Grand Master made some allusions, in his Address, to Hiram Lodge, No.1, which had proved refractory concerning certain actions of the Grand Lodge as to the work. Whereupon a committee was raised to consider the subject, and subsequently rendered their report, as follows: 'l'he committee to whom that portion of the M. W. Grand Master's Address, relating to Hiram Lodge, No.1, was referred, beg leave to report, that after a hearing of the Representatives of HiramLod~e, your committee are of the opinion. that the regulation of the Grand Lodge in questIOn was willfully violated by the Brethren acting as Worshipful Master, Senior Warden and Junior Warden of said Lodge, January 13th, 1887, and recommend the adoption of the follOWing resolution: Resolved, That John R. Hutchinson. Senior Warden, Newell T. Bassett, Junior Warden and George E. Frisbie, Treasurer, of Hiram Lodge, No. I, be and are hereby deposed from their respective offices in said Lodge, and that an election be ordered by the M. W. Grand Master to fill the vacancies occasioned by the action of the Grand Lodge.

'fhe Report was adopted "after considerable discussion." A resolution was then adopted to the following effect: WHEREAS, There arc many differences of opinion among Master Masons in this jurisdiction concerning the method of giving the D. G. & S. of a M. M., Resolved, 'l'hat a committee of three be appointed to take testimony, hear witnesses and report to the next Grand Lodge.

Doubtless hopes were entertained that the break would be closed and harm~n'y be restored aD1o~g the workmen. But these hopes were soon dispelled. The. act recorded above, depo.sing the officers of Hiram


24

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Appendix.

Lodge, No.1, and the ordering a new election, brought on the "irrepressible conflict" which now rages fiercely in that old and steady jurisdiction. The officers deposed by the act of the Grand Lodge refused to be deposed, and, in some measure, defied the Grand Lodge. Hiram Lodge seems to have sustained the recusant officers, and the fight between the subordinate and the Grand Lodge had to come. The Grand Lodge did not shrink from the issue, but met it squarely. An emergency session was convened on the 20th of April, at the city of Hartford, by Grand Master Green. A very large number of the Lodges responded to the call and met to consider the very grave question presented. The Grand Master recited the cause for which he had convened the Grand Lodge, and then laid before the body the correspondence which had passed between him and the dissentient officers. A letter from the Secretary and one from the Worshipful Master of said Lodge will show the animus of these parties. It is proper to say that the letters of the Grand Master were courteous and very kind. As much cannot be said of the replies he received. Here they are: LETTER OF SECRETARY TO GRAND MASTER.

My DEAR SIR-Yours of the 19th inst. just recei'ved, and in answer will say that while I entertain the greatest respcct for you and other of the Grand Officers, I must acknowledge I am fully convinced that you have far exceeded your authority as Grand Master in attempting to deprive" Old Hiram," No. I-a Lodge born and old in years-of one of the Ancient Landmarks of the Order. a measure that is frowned upon by our large membership. and many of the leading Masons of thc State; and again in your attempt to depose our officers that you might the better brandish your authority as Grand Master in the face of many of the quivering Lodges, who have not been rightfully informed, throughout this State. but who are most patiently waiting the results of this unjust ontbreak and a declaration from "Old Hiram," that their assistance may be accepted in the form,ation of another Grand Lodge, whose foundation will be builded on no other than that of Ancient Masonry, "pure and undefiled, and which fadeth not away."

LETTER OF THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER TO TilE GRAND MASTER. HENRY H. GREEN, Esq.: . DEAR SIR-I have seen certain irregular notices addressed "To whom it may concern." and purportin~ to affcct Hiram Lodge, No.!, F. and A. M., and purporting to be' signed by you, in WhICh you claim to act as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Connccticut. I have also seen what purported to be a copy of charges against me. purporting t6 be signed by Clark Buckingham. There has come into my hands a postal card with printed matter on its back. purporting to be signed by you, and giving notice of a communication of Hiram Lodge, No.1. F..and A. M.â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, February 24th, 1887. I hereby notify you that I am the Master of Hiram Lodge, No.1, 10'. and A. M.' As such Master I give yon notice that you have attempted to usurp an authority which you do not possess. Your attempted jurisdiction over me as Master over Hiram Lodge is repudiated and denied. The right to put me on trial is denied, and the attempted jurisdiction over me will not be recognized nor submitted to. Charges have been preferred against you for umnasonic conduct and violations of Masonic law. A copy of these char~es will be served upon yon in due season. Until these have been finally disposed of neIther I nor Hiram Lodge will from henceforth recogni7.e you as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Connecticnt, nor any communication from you as such except sue}} answers as you may make to such charges.

I remain very respectfully yours, F. M. WISER.


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25

REMARKS.

But for the gravity of the situation, the above "Bull" would be amusing. There is more "Masonic treason" in the above than is usually found in the same space. The writer was unfortunate in his selection and use of language. He evidenced a bad spirit. Hard words can never serve the purpose of strong arguments. A cause must be weak, if not bad, which evokes such replies as were made to the kind and conciliatory letters of Grand Master Green. The Worshipful Master, Wiser, displayed venom, vindictiveness and ignorance. After such a dare as these Brethren made, it is a matter of no surprise to this writer that the Grand Master convened his Grand Lodge. 'fhe result of the session proved that the Grand Lodge meant business. This is shown by the fact that Hiram Lodge was declared in rebellion against the Grand Lodge, its Charter was revoked, and the members thereof put under the penalty of non-Masonic intercourse. The recusant officers were severally tried and expelled. Thus ends for the present, at least, a most unfortunate affair. It may well be feared that the end is not yet. The case above cited. reminds the writer of this Report of experiences had when Grand Master of Masons in this jurisdiction in other years. A certain Lodge refused by a large majority to accept the work and lectures of the several degrees, as formulated and inculcated by the Grand Lodge and its Grand Lecturer. Gentle measures were resorted to but without effect. Orders were disregarded. The Charter was arrested. 'fhe Grand Lodge very readily endorsed the act of its Grand Master, administered a just rebllke to the officers, and accepted their penitence and restored the Lodge to favor. It has been loyal to the Grand Lodge ever since. Connecticut could not have done less than proceed against the disloyal and recalcitrant Hiram I.Jodge. It is to be regretted that such things occur among Brethren. But authority must be maintained. The Grand Lodge is the supreme authority. Therefore the Grand Lodge must be obeyed. The cause of complaint was too small, so far as can be ascertained at this writing, to justify the course of Hiram Lodge, No. 1. CORRESPONDENCE.

The annual Revi~w was prepared by Bro. Joseph K. 'Wheeler, the Grand Secretary, and covers 144 pages. It is in keeping with his former efforts, and is a good, practical review. He gave Missouri for 1886 a full and fair hearing, making several extracts from the Address of Grand Master Boyd. Of Bro. Boyd the Committee said:


26

Appendix.

[Oct.

While the Address of Grand Master James W. Boyd so far as duties are concerned is a thorough. business-like document, yet he finds time and space to promulgate ideas that are of vast importance to the Craft and to the world. We recogni7.e the force of his remarks regarding innovation, false doctrines, and dangerous ideas that are leading onward in the path of Agnosticism, with nothing but a blind and cold materialism for its goal. Freema.~onry stands firm against all such theories, resting on her firm and indestructible Landmark, "Belief in a Supreme Being. in some revelation of His will, in the resurrection of the body, and the immortality of the soul." We quote a portion of his most excellent remarks.

Then follow excerpts from the Address. Of the Missouri Committee Bro. 'Wheeler had this to say: In his review of Oregon he enters into the discussion of the resurrection question; and though he argues from a theological standpoint, we feel inclined to incorporate his views for the sake of the argument, he having been a preacher. The question, however. as originally presented, was. whether l\lasonry or any recognized Masomc authority, tanght such a dogma? Wc claimed that it did. and still so insist; without which the legend would be disrobed entirely of its symbolism and left a cold and lifeless statue, without force or meaning. We do not propose to enter into the field of theology to discuss this question in its detail. In the first place we do not feel competent, and in the second place we do not deem it necessary. We are willing to leave that part in the hands of " Him that doeth all things well," with a firm faith that in some way, it will be. Over 1,800 years ago, there lived one whose intellect was more powerful and acute than ours (and we use this word collectively, including others besides ourselves), who then foresaw that such questions would arise: "that some man would say, how are the dead raised? and with what body do they come?" His answer was: "Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened except it die," etc. We are willing to abide by his testimony, revealed in that wonderful fourth chapter of 1st Corinthians.

The time for leave-taking has come, and this interview with Bro. 'Wheeler must close. God only knows when, if ever, another will occur. Al ways affable' and companionable, Bro. Wheele.r: grows upon this writer, with the passing years. Is not such fraternal affection, increasing bere with time, a grand prophecy of what is to be in the bright forever? Grand Master and Grand Secretary both re-elected.

DELAWARE,

ISS6.

A Special Session was held in February, at Smyrna, for the purpose of dedicating a hall. The Eightieth Annual Communication convened in the city of Wilmington, on the lith day of October, 1886, and was presided over by the M.W. Grand Master, Bro. Thomas Davidson. The record says that the Grand Secretary was R. VV. Bro. Lewi~ B. Jarvis, acting. Nothing is said about R. 'V. Bro. Hayes or his absence. Twenty-one Lodges, about 1,000 members, and an income of $1,000, give the state of the Grand Lodge, as gathered from the tables. The Address of Grand ~aster Davidson was quite brief, being only four pages in extent,


1887.]

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but was devoted to business. He announced' that all the Lodges had been visited by him officially. There is a rule in that jurisdiction requiring all Masters of Lodgcs to be examined by a committce as to their qualifications before installation. This rule is rigidly enforccd, as shown by the Grand Master's Report. The uniformity of work claimed the attention of the Grand Master, and called forth the state'ment that outsidc of the city of Wilmington there were not two Lodges which worked alike. He therefore recommended the creation of a Committee on'Vork. A committee was accordingly raised, of which the Grand Master, incoming, was made chairman. The three Decisions reported by Grand Master Davidson, were approved. They ,,,ere simple explanations of well-known customs of the Fraternity. The Repo.rt of the Grand Secretary was short and inclusive. The business of the session was purely local, and not of sufficient interest, generally, to claim attention here. The following was adopted; Resolved, That the use of Cypher or other written secret work in this jurisdiction is a Mll.Sonic offense, punishable by suspension or expUlsion, and that the Grand Master is hereby directed to enforce this resolution.

The Grand Lodge of the Federal District of Mexico prayed for the fav-or of a recognition. The prayer was referrcd to the Committee on Correspondence, and went over to the next session. In the opinion of this Committee, the time has hardly come yet for the recognition of the bodies in that peculiar country, which claim to be Grand and Masonic. More must be known of tl1cm before Missouri will aceord her recognition. Delaware did just what Missouri will do ,,,hen like application is made. Wait and see. CORRESPONDENCE.

A l{eport, covering twenty-three pages, was submitted by Bro. Thomas N. Williams, chairman. He had noticed the Proceedings of fifty-one Grand Lodges in the space mentioned. Of course the work .was simply synoptical. A few short excerpts will show how the Committee did the work assigned him. The Committee recorded several instances where Committees in sister jurisdictions had over-looked and slighted" Little Delaware," Arizona, Arkansas, District of Colulllbia, Indian Territory and others. Territorially, Delaware may be "Little," but Masonically she is not to be ignored. She deserves notice and mentioning for what she is. Bro. V\Tilliams commends himself to this Committee because of his independence. He has views and expresses them. He taps Committees and Grand Masters as if they were common mortals. This from his notice of California: " Wlw in mercy and loving kindness enumerates and watche.~ over every living soul, although, in the world's vast aggregate, we count no rrwre than the JaUing teave.s."


28

Appendix.

[Oct.

We cannot think the Grand Master meant that the immortal soul was of no more value in the eyes of the Great Architect than the leaf which falls from a tree. No! Bro. Hines we accept the true construction, and say your Address shows a true conception of the genius of Masonry.

Bro. Williams admonished Bro. Dodge, of Arkansas, not to dodge any more, and advised Bro. Baker, of British Columbia, to abbrev'iate his Address, as "a sweetness long drawn out" becomes unpalatable. Bro. ",Villiams agrees with the views of this Committee, enunciated some years since, respecting" Masonic Honors" paid the Governor of a . State, who happened to be a Mason, or by accident became Governor. Such things savor of toadyism! This extract from his notice of Manitoba, is characteristic: Several Dispensations were granted during the year, viz: "to wear regalia in public at Masonic festivals and church services;" .. to confer degrees in less than a month;" "to initiate a candidate eighteen years of age." And yet a Dispensation" to wear regalia at an excursion" was refused. This seems a g-reat inconsistency. If the laws of the Grand Lodge of Manitoba approve of such things, I am glad to know that the laws of the Grand Lodge of Delaware do not. The Grand Secretary reports that he received from the Masons a magnificent silver service as a marriage present. Good! we received a bettel' one than any silver service about a month ago, from our better half-a bouncing little girl of twelve pounds.

Was the" bouncing little girl of twel ve pounds" a marriage present? Missouri for 1885 was kindly reviewed, and Bro. Stevenson's utterances were eomplimented with a hearty" Amen." In speaking of Pennsylvania, the Delaware Committee said: Our Brethren in Pennsylvania seem to "put candidates through," on the FAST EXPRE5S. The Bishop above' referred to, it seems, went through all the degrees on the "lightning train, two hours and twenty minutes for the three degrees." If this had been done in Delaware, there would have been a "rumpus." Too fast entirely, we think, even to make a B1SHOl' a Mason. but Pennsylvania has her own way of doing things, and we will not quarrel, provided she will allow little Delaware to enjoy the belief that there are Masons in the Diamond State who know something of the Landmarks of Masonry as well as her sister jurisdiction.

This Committee would say "Amen" to above criticism, but for a healthy fear of Bro. Vaux. GEO. W. MARSHALL, Milford, G. 짜. WM. S. HAYES, Wihnington, G. Sec.

DISTRICT 0:1' COL"lJUBIA, ISS6. The journal of Proceedings contains the minutes of six special sesl"lions, one semi-annual and one annual communication. Grand Master Thomas P. Chiffelle presided at all'of the above sessions except the last. There are twenty-one Lodges and ;:tbout 3,000 members in that Grand Lodge. The annual session was held November 10th, 1886, and was presided over by the Deputy Grand Master, Bro. Jose M. Yznaga, the


1.887.]

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Grand Master being too ill to attend.

29

All the Lodges were represented.

It ",V. Bro. 'V. R. Singleton, Grand Secretary, was present, and an Address was read by him in the absence of the Grand Master, and duly' referred to the proper committee. Various reports common to such sessions were presented and acted upon. Nothing of any moment is found in the Proceedings. The Grand Officers were elected at this s~s足 sion, but not installed until the 27th of December following, at which time some routine business was presented. CORRESPONDENCE.

H. 'V. Bro. 'V. R. Singleton, Grand Secretary and Chairman of the Committee, presented a Report, covering, eighty-five pages, in which he reviewed the Proceedings of some fifty Grand Lodges. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri for 1886 did not reach him in time to be noticed. This seems a little singular to the present writer. Our Proceedings were finished and mailed in seven days after Grand Lodge closed, and should have reached him by the 21st of October. From then until Novamber 10th, it is presumable, he did not have time to examine or report upon the work. The Report of Bro. Singleton is mostly written; contains some extracts, and, upon the whole, is a good review, from which the following extracts are made. In re,:iewing Alabama, Bro. Singleton said: In regard to the Prerogatives of a Grand Master, the Constitutions are very clear in defining them, and tbe above-mentioned committee, as far as they could, have defined them; but when we come to say what are Landmarks we arc'very much amused, for we doubt not that if that vcry committee of four distinguished Masons who wrote the report, and all the distinguished Masons who voted in Grand Lodge to adopt the report, were to be scparately 9ue~tioned upon the Landmarks and asked to define them, there would be as many opimons as there are individuals, for it is well known by every searcher after the truth, quoad hoc, that the more he searched for it the further be got from it, and the more writers he consulted the less he new and the more confused he would become on Ole Landmarks as to their numbers and what they were.

In noting the doings of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, Bro. Singleton. said this about the Masonic College failure in that jurisdiction: We did not intend to cast any reflections whatever upon the wisdom or want of forethought of those who in Arkansas or Missouri at an early day inaugurated those benevolent enterprises, but from their sad experience in thc failure thereof we were led to our remarks, havin~ been personally connected with the very 'first one ever started, which was in Missouri, m1842.

On a Decision of the Grand Master of Arizona, Bro. Singleton made the following sensible comments: To thifl we remark that if the Grand Master does render a Decision upon tbe private application of R member, his course, as su~gested, is correct; but we doubt the propriety of any Grand Master responding to such inquiries. If upon his decision a case is to be brought before a Lo~ge, as he suggests, the impropriety is . manifest. No one should propound such questJO!ls to any Grand lI'1aster but the Worshlpful Master of the Lodge. for his own guidance, or b)' a vote of the Lodge, where the Constitution of the Grand Lodge, the By-Laws of the Lodge, or the general uSllges of Masonry will !lot determine the issue. If Masters of Lodges and others pretending to govern the Institution would try to qualify themselves for governing, Grand Masters would seldom be troubled to answer questions in Masonry. '


30

Appendix.

[Oct.

It should be snggested to Bro. Singleton that the Arizona Committee may be very good Gold water, but not much "God water." A single letter often makes a wide difference in a name.

Bro. Singleton disagreed with the Louisiana Committee after this fashion: We disagree with our good Brother when he says" the convention of 1843 hurt practical Masonry more than anything that has occurred in North American Masonic history, barring the adoption of the Webb Ritual." As we at that time had been a Mason nearly three years, was an officer of the Grand IJodge of Missouri, and was present when S. W. B. Carnegy and Joseph Foster made their Report of the doings of that Convention upon their return from it. We know that great good resulted from that Convention. But that has nothing to do with a convention for the purpose of adjusting certain international laws, wbereby there may be concurrence upon most important and essential matters now left entirely at the will and pleasure of individual Ideas and prejudices, and by which great trouble, and oftentimes difficulties, arise between the ditlerent jurisdictions.

In reviewing Maryland Bro. Singleton said: The Grand Master, in his Address, refers to a Lodge where two Worshipful Masters in succession had been installed into office without having received the Past Master's degree. The law of Maryland says that the Past Master's degrce is a necessary part of the installation ceremony. We noticed that in Nevada two Past Masters had communicated the Past Master's degree to a Worshipful Master, elected and' then installed him. The Grand Master of that Grand Lodge had called attention to the fact that in many instances it would be impossible to comply with the law requiring three Past Masters. Is it not time that all of our Grand Lodges should adopt either the rule of allowing a Worshipful Master to be' installed where the rule of three cannot be worked, or permitting the retiring Worshipful Master to confer the degree to the best of his ability? In most States, in places far away from the centers of Masonic intelligence, and in sparsely-settled communities it is sometimes impossible to get three Past Masters together. Now, what is it that the Past Master's degree generally qualifies a Master to do? In nearly every State, no one can be made a Master except a Brother who has sE>rved twelve months as a Warden. Query: If a Brother be qualified as a Warden to fill the chair of Worshipful Master, has he not in twelve months learned every lesson necessary for him to know how to govern his Lodge? If he has not, the secrets of the chair will not instruct him much more. Onr own private opinion is that the" ancients" introdnced it into the Lodge abont the middle of the last century. We had better remand it to the tomb of the ancients which was erected in 1813, at the union of the ancients and the moderns.

In the estimation of this Committee, the whole subject may be .haracterized as "much ado about nothing." JOSE M. YZN AGA, G. M. WM. R. SINGLETON, G. Sec. Both of \Vashington.

FLORIDA. 1887. The Fifty-fifth Annual Session was held in the city of Jacksonville, beginning on the 18th day of January, 1887, and was presided over by by M. W. Bro. George S. Hallmark, Grand Master; R. W. Bro. DeWitt Clinton Dawkins was Grand Secretary. The Representatives of twenty-


1887.]

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nine Grand Lodges were enrolled; seventy-three Lodges were representeOd, while numerous Past Grand Officers were in attendance. The list indicates that there are ninety-four Lodges in that jurisdiction, with a membership of 2,686. The Address of Grand Master Hallmark was eight pages long-mostly devoted to local matters. He noted the destructive fire which had desolated the city of Key West, and stated that an appeal'had been sent to the Lodges asking for aid in behalf of the unfortunate Brethren who had suffered, among others, the loss of everything. The responses amounted to some $500. After presenting the line of business attended to during his ter"m of office, the Grand Master employed the balance of his very excellent Address in moralizing. He said many good things. Four new Lodges had been created during the year. There is shown a slight gain in membership, amounting to 158. The condition of the Craftin Florida appears to be satisfactory. The Grand Master reported that he had granted a number of permissions the past year. Principal among them was permission to confer degrees out of time. From the frequency of these reports by our American Grand Masters, the conclusion is forced upon this writer that Prerogative, like St. Paul of the early church, was BORN OUT of DUE TIMEo But unlike that distinguished apostle, Prerogative is not likely ever to be converted or saved. The Report of the Grand Secretary, Bro. Dawkins, was an excellent one, and makes a fine showing of all the lines of work in his department. He is a valuable officer, and has proved himself an indispensable factor in Florida Masonry for thirty yeats. He is to be congratulated upon the snccess achieved in the Grand Lodge of Florida. His Journal of Proceedings, eighty pages, was printed and delivered in thirty days after the close of the Grand Lodge. There lies before this Committee now, a journal of seventy pages, which came to hand in just eleven months after the body closed its very laborious labors. The wonder is that the Grand Secretary of that body did not die from sheer exhaustion, owing to his excessive work. The Grand Lodge Proceedings of Missouri for 1886, 340 pages, were printed and mailed in seven days after the session closed. And the Grand Secretary is still living, not hurt by the work done in such short time. During the session now under consideration there were some ni.ce presents made to Grand dignitaries. Past Grand Master Perry recei.ved a Jewel appropriate to his rank as a Past Grand Master. The speech at the presentation was made by Grand Master Hallmark. It and the response were pleasant incidents of the session. Bro. Dawkins having served the Craft in that jurisdiction, as Grand Master, in other years for a number of 路terms, the Grand Lodge had been want-


32

Appendix.

[Oct.

ing to jewel him, but he had declined the honor twice. Finally the Brethren caught him where he could not dodge any more, and fastened the jewel upon him for good. The Address of presentation made by the Grand Master was a very fine recognition of his past services. The response and speech of acceptance of Bro. Dawkins, had the true Masonic ring. He acquitted himself in a manner at once able and creditable. 'fhe following excerpts will show his sentiments, in part, as to the Institution of Freemasonry: Brethren of the Grand Lodge-in accepting this magnificent token of your continued brotherly love at this period of my Masonic life, I feel as though I were called upon to span the past in briefmentnl review, and to answer to my Masonic Brethren a mental demand. What have I found in Masonry to thus claim my time and attention for more than a third of a century, with no signs of abatement? And if, in answer to such a con路 ceived inquiry, I can say something. if only to clothe even an old thought in apparently a new garment, that will do some good, by furnishing even a crumb of food formy Brethren of less experience to profitably think upon, it is as much as I can hope to do, espccially upon an occasion such as this, when mental activity must give way to emotions of indescribable gratitude. Masonry encompasses, even beyond human contemplation, all the spheres of existence; hence its origm, beyond finite conception, even Divine. It embraces every object and subject of useful education. It points aloft to Infinity, and spreads its wings of benevolence over the universe. Its symbolical system of three degrees, correlative with human existence in three stages, portrays infantile darkness, manhood growth and usefulness, and truth's illumination of the ripcned sonl. Masonry, therefore, furnishes a larger tield for thought and study than anyone human invention. Entering upon its threshold at the earliest possible period of my life. and ever remaining a devotee and adherent upon the basis already spoken, I may truthfully say Masonry has taught me how to live. It has taught me that my greatest study is myself, directing my mind into the channel of thought. whence came you? What arc you here for? And whither are you going? It has taught me that the Invisible, which thinks and forever lives. is the' real man which must gain and retain absolute control over the visible man or mortal body. and thus holdinl( in discreet subjection all the human appetites and passions. Have I a right to love Masonry? It has taught me to be free-,-free in politics and reli~ion alike-thus forbidding me to bow down to the enslavers of the souls of men; and It has taught me to concede to others the freedom that I would claim to myself. Have I right to love Masonry?

No Report on Correspondence. Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.

GEORGIA, IS86. The Grand Lodge met in the Masonic Temple in the city of Macon, October 26th, 1886. M. 路W. Bro..John L. Davidson, Grand Master, presiding, and R. 'V. Bro. A. M. Wolihin, Grand Secretary. There were present Representatives of twenty-three Grand.Lodges, 258 subordinate Lodges, besides Past Grand Officers and Past Masters. The Tables of the Grand Secretary show 275 Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 11,258, being a small gain over last year.


1887.J

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The Address of the Grand Master covered thirteen pages, and ,vas devoted to business common to the Grand Lodge. He reported eleven Decisions. Some of his rulings would not suit Missouri, but may do very well for Georgia. Various Dispensations had been granted by the Grand Master for different purposes, such as opening new Lodges, conferring degrees out of time, laying corner-stones, and electing officers. The Grand Master announ(~ed that the condition of the Craft had been prosperous during the past year. He stated that Tllany and valuable additions had been made to the Brotherhood; that disturbing elements had been removed, and that the good work had gone on steadily. He reported the death of Past Grand Master David E. Butler, who had served in various offices for sixteen years in the Grand Lodge. The tribute paid to the deceased Brother by the Grand Master, was a very heautiful one. The Finances of the Grand Lodge are reported in a more healthy condition. The Grand Master said that they are gradually reducing their indebtedness, and expect in a few years to reach the end of their embarrassment. The Grand Master commended the Committee on 'York, also the Grand Secretary who had performed his duties in a very satisfaetory manner. The Address of Grand Master Davidson closes in the following terms: My Brethren, the duty imposed by my office is discharged, and you now enter upon the performance of yours. In your keeping- rests with confidence the prosperity of the Craft. May the trust be well reposed llnd the confidence secure. The contemplation of your responsibility moves to serious thought. The voice of this Institution comes to us throu~h centuries, and generations join in the words which tell of its labors for the good of man. From " vanbhed years, deep toned. like some cllthedral chant," the music swells into a mighty chorus of harmonious speech, touching the heart of the earnest listener with tbe story it hears in its rythmic lines of brotherly love, relief ann truth. With such a trinity it must go on conquering- and to conquer. Selfishness shall flee from its presence, prejudice vanish from its sight, evil disappear on its approach, and men, with reverent mien: bend the head in admiration as it pa~ses down the years. ~oiseless as the march of thought, and stron~ as the Temple of Truth, it has found its way into every land where suffering abides, where want needs a haven or humanity a prayer. Its faithful disciples bearing its banner broad ami bright, wave the symbol in the rays of the rising sun and hold it aloft to be kissed by the soft light of the twinkling stars. Its benefactions know no slumber, and for their duties make" all seasons summer." '1'0 the great of earth it offers the joy and peace which with impartial hand it tenders to the humble and tile poor. Of all who seck to serve lit its tables :tnd guard its altars, it asks but one question, "Is he worthy and well qualified'?" Were he king-without this qualification he could not enter. ,Were he peasant-with it, as a sesame, the bolts fty hack, the gates open to his approach, and all the hidden wealth which its Temples hold are uncovered to his view. Through war and pestilence and famine, it holds its way, turning the sword of the soldier into the ploughshare of good deeds, the breath of ~he scourge into whispered words of fraternal comfort, and the cry of hunger into the prayer of gratitude. Its living subjects hear as a talisman against all evil the compass and the square made radiant by the effulgence of its greatest light. Its dead sleep with the emblem of innocence upon their breasts, that it may bear witness of their lives, which the evergreen, its close companion, tells us will be eternal.

Past Grand Master Lawrence sent the following touching letter to the Gra.nd Lodge: To the Grand Lodge F. A. AI., oj' Geol'gia-GREETING : DEAR BRETHREN: I am unable to express my regret at not being able to meet with you at this your Annual Communication, having been a constant attendant on your annual Feasts of love for more than thirty years.

G. L. Ap.-3.


34

Appendix.

[Oct.

It ha.,> plellsed our Heavenly Father. in His iIlScrutable Providcnce, to deprive me of so t!"Jl;lt I could not see your faces if we met. :But though ab:sent in body, I am with )'ou m Spinto

sigh~,

'l'o the will of our Father I feel resigned, " for He is good: for His mercy endureth forever." If at any time in the past, my dear Brethren, I have offended, or done wrong to any of you. I beg your forgivness, a:s I freely forgive any who may have done me wrong. I wish you every enjoyment at your communication, and peace and comfort at your several bomes. And my prayer is, that we may all meet at last in the celestial Lodge abo,'e, wbere. without crror or misjudgment, in the light of the pr~sence of our Heavenly Master and Father, we shall see eacb other face to face as we are, and enjoy His peace and comfort forever more. Fraternally, SAMUEL LAWRENCE, P. G. M.

The above was responded to by the Grand Lodge, in tender terms. APPEALS.

The Committee on Appeals presented a full report in which there appear several strange things. They reeommended the expulsion from the Lodges ofa number of members for the non-payment of dues. The number thus expelled was quite large. This is certainly a strange proceeding. To expel a member for not paying his dues to the Lodge, puts him in the same class with those who were expelled for drunkenness, stealing, adultry, fraud, profanity, etc. It certainly cannot be a gross :Masonic crime for a meniber not to pay dues to a Lodge, especially if he be in poor circnmstances, financially. From the Report of the Committee on Appeals, it appears that the Lodges suspend members for non-payment of dues, and report the case to the Grand Lodge, when it takes up the matter and expels the unfortunate Brethren. CORRESPONDENCE.

A review, covering fifty-two pages, appears in the journal. Who wrote it, might be difficult to determine from the opening paragrapb: The Grand Master, at the last Annual Communication, appointed a Committee of five on Forei~n Correspondence, with the understanding that each member thereof should have ajinger in the pie. He certainly does not subscribe to the idea that" too many cooks spoil the broth," and it is to be hoped that, in this case, he will not have cause to change his mind.

Judging from the want of arrangement, the conclusion is easily reached that the" broth" had more" cooks" than plans, and the" pie" was badly mixed. The first installment of "pie" or "broth" was furnished by Bro. J. Emmett Blackshear, forri1er Grand Secretary, and einbraced twenty pages, made up of extracts and a few comments. Twel ve pages were prepared by Bro. Anslem Stone in a synaptical style. The remainder was furnished by Bro. James A. Gray. In handling Grand Lodge Journals by so many" cooks" Missouri was let fall, perhaps in the fire, and lost sight of. Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.


1887.J

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IDAHO, 1886. The Nineteenth Annual Communication was held in the city of Boise, September 14th, 1886. M. 'V. Bro. George H. Davis, Grand Master, and R. 'V. Bro. James n. Wickersham, Grand Se路cretary. Twelve Lodges were represented, and there were present four Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers. There are sixteen Chartered Lodges on the roll, with three under Dispensation. The membership amounts to 540, being a gain of forty-five. The income from all sources foots up ahout $2,000. The Grand Secretary furnished the fullest and most complete recapitulation found in any Grand J..Jodge Proceedings. ADDRESS.

The Addre8s of Grand Master Davis, covering ten pages, opens in the customary style, and presents a very pleasant exordium. He had granted Dispensations for the formation of three new Lodges. He reported that the sum of $317 had been paid out of their orphan fund for the relief of several orphan children. He rendered a few Decisions which were approved by the Grand Lodge. One of his rulings seems very strange to this writer. He had been asked the question how long a rejected candidate for the degrees must wait before he could renew his petition. The Grand Master replied that in the absence of any lll,W on the subject, it "vas proper for any J..Jodge to receive the petition of such a rejected candidate at any time following the .rejection. He said he was doubtfnl as to the wisdom of such a rule, but did not hold himself responsible for the law. It is the opinion of this Committee that if they have no law defining that subject, they ought to make one. The following extract, taken from the Address, will explain itself: In three cases I hlLVC declined to approve By-Laws provi'ding that the fee deposited with the application for degrees shall be forfeited unless the applicant present himsclf for such degrees within a specified, time. r object to a provision of this kind. ina~much as I can see no justice in rctaining a petitioner's money and refusing to render him an equivalent. When the deposit is made with the petition there is no stated contract that it shall be forfeited within a certain period. While it is reasonable to expect the candidate to be ready for initiation within three or four months. circumstances may often arise which would render this exceedingly inconvenient, if not impo~sible. Should the candidate. after election. be guilty of such misconduct as to disqualify him for the degref>s, the Mastcr would be bound to deel ine to con fer them; and in such case the Lodge would be justified in retaining the fee deposited. It has selected good material and has been ready to work it; but the good material has been defaced throngh 110 fault of the Lodge, which may thus be said to have suffered loss. Again, should a candidate decline to receive the de~rees. he cannot demand the return of the fee deposited. The fee WRS deposited as an evidence of good faith. The Lodge stands ready to do its part. Should the candidate refuse to do his part, the deposit becomes forfeit under a common business rule.

The Address of Grand Master Davis is a plain document, and possesses a conservative tone. He announ(~ed the death of one of their Past Grand Masters, Bro. John A. Post, in the following language;


36

Appendix.

â&#x20AC;˘

[Oct.

'fhe pleasure of our meeting is clouded by the absence of him who only a year ago presided over the Craft of this Grand Jurisdiction. On the 8th of August, just passed, ,John A. Post. M. W. Past Grand "Master, was instantaneousl)' killed by the discharge of a gun in his own hands. A most careful investigation by a coroner's jury resulted in a verdict of .. accidental death." We mourn the death of one who was endeared to us by many virtues. Bro. Post was possessed of most estimable traits of character. He was an earnest and devoted l\fason, a kind husband, a loving father, a generous friend and all honored citi7-en. 'rhe Grand Lodge will take the proper steps for placing upon record its estimlition of the character and services of our lamented Brother, and its¡heartfelt sympathy for his bercaved wife and children. I

It seems that this Grand Lodge has a provision in its law which forbids officers of the Grand Lodge, holding offices or serving as Masters and Wardens in other Lodges. After a careful examination of all the laws and regulations within his reach, he decided that their law could not debar any present Master or 'Varden from the position of Grand Master or other offices in the Grand Lodge. The Decision was referred to the Committee on .Jurisprudence, and by that committee approved. REIMBURSKM EN'!.

An able committee composed of Past Grand Masters, rendered a report upon the subject of charity. From that report the following conclusions were taken: "Resolved, That in the opinion of this Grand Lodge, that when a Lodge responds to the request of a sojourniny, Brother asking for relief, it is the duty of the Lodge to which he belongs to reimburse the Lodge granting the relief, so far as it can do so without material injury to itself." If a Lodge assists a sojourning Brother beyond his immediate necessities, and expects reimbursement from the Lodge to which the Brother belonw.>, it is the bounden duty of the Lodge so 8'ssisting to immediately notify his Lod~e of the fact, in order to ascertain to what extent the Lodge is willing to assist this partlCular member.

If this is done~ we do not understand the assisting Lodge has done a deed of Masonic charity, nor can it claim it as such. It must be considered a business loan, and staud upon that basis alone.

'rhere is no Report on Correspondence. A committee on that interest was created for next year. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected, and both reside at Boise City.

ILLINOIS, 1886. This journal is approached with a sense of sadness and feeling of sacred tenderness. Since its publication, the name of one long-known and loved in that jurisdiction, as well as in the Masonic world' at large,


1887.J

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37

has disappeared from the records of life. But it does not form a part of my purpose to allude to this distinguished Mason and citizen at the present time. The Forty-seventh Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Illinois was held in Chicago, beginning on the 5th day of October, 1886. M.W. Bro. Alex. T. Darrah, Grand Master, presided, and R. ,V. Bro. Loyal L. Munn was Grand Secretary. '1'he follo,ving information is gleaned from the journal now under consideration. There are over 700 Lodges in that jurisdiction, with a membership of something more than 40,000. The. record shows a small gain over the previous year. The reve'nues were reported at about $30,000. All the Lodges except one had made Returns, and dues had been paid by all except nine. This was rather remarkable for so large a jurisdiction. One feature is noticeable in the Heport of the Grand Secretary, it is the unusual, if not alarming number of dimits granted by Lodges, amounting to over ] ,300. The number of admissions by affiliation is about one half the num bel' lost by dimissions. Four new Lodges had been instituted, during the year, under Dispensation. That Grand Lodge charges $100 for a Dispensation fee. The Address of Grand Master Darrah was quite lengthy, covering SOlne thirty pages. It is not to be wondered at that such a document should be lengthy in view of the immense interests reported by the Grand Master in that jurisdiction, which is second in size among the American Grand Lodges. Grand Master Darrah, in his Address, talked like a business man, one who was master of the situation. He opened with the announcement that there were present Representatives from nearly 700 Lodges. The opening paragraph is herewith ¡given: We have assembled this morning in our Forty-seventh Annual Communication. We greet the Representatives of nearly 700 Lodges. This is an assembly of which we may well feel proud. What an influence for good this large number of Masons, good and true. can, and doubtless does, exert. Let us, at the beginning of our labors, as our fathers have done before, cheerfully acknowledge the loving hand of that Divine Providence who has thus far safely brought us on our way, and who, if we are faithful to our trusts-the tenets of our profession--will go with us, comfort, sustain, and gently â&#x20AC;˘ lead us into that heaven" where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary arc at rest."

Reverent mention was made of the fraternal dead. The Grand Master reported that the relations of the Grand Lodge of Illinois with other Grand Jurisdictions of the :i\Iasonic world, with a single exception, were of the most fraternal and satisfactory character. The condition of the Craft was reported as being prosperous, and a satisfactory increase in Lodge membership, of good material, had resulted from the labors of the year. The Grand Lodge and the Craft feel proud of the gratifying condition of Masonry in that Grand Jurisdiction.


38

Appendix.

[Oct.

EDICT.

The Grand Master, in obeying the instructions of the Grand Lodge, had issued an Edict against the Grand Lodge of England. On account of this Edict the Grand Lodge of England withdrew its Representative from the Grand Lodge of Illinois, and thereby severed all fraternal relations with Illinois Masons. Here is the conclusion of the Edict: T, therefore. by virtue of authority in me vested as Grand Master of Musons in Illinois, and by virtue of the action hiken by the Grand Lodge at its last se~si()n, do hereby issue this, my EDICT, commanding all Brethren acknowledging the authority of the Most Worshipful, the Grand Lodge of the StIlte of Illinois, to hold no Masonic intercourse with any member or members of any Lodge existing in the Province of Quebec eurolled on the register of any foreign Grand Lodge other than that of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, It is further ordered that, in the examination of visitors from the above路 specified Province, in addition to the usual questions, the question of whether the Lodge from which they hail, acknowledges the authority of the Most Worshipful, the Grand Lodge of Quebec, must be specifically answered in the affirmative as a prerequisite to Masonic intercourse of any kind whatsoever. TRIAL OF SO,JOURNING BRETHREN.

This subject was considered of such importance as to call forth a very earnest declaration of the Grand Master's views: the law of this Grand Lodge which prevents any Lodge in this jurisdiction from placing on trial any sojourning Brother, no matter what the offense may be, until the right to try the case has been waived by the Lodge of which he may be a member. while in theory is all satisfactory, yet practically it is as far from subserving the ends of justice, at least in the few cases that have come to my knowledge, as anything could well be; in fact, this law has simply had the effect of shielding the offending Brethren, The proper place to try an offender is in the community where the offense has been committed. This is a matter of so much importance that every StIlte ill the Vnion, so far as I know. has provided by le~al enactment that offenders shall be so tried. Takc the case of a Brother whosc membership is with a Lodge in ~{assachllRetts, and is sojourning in Illinois. Suppose he commits a Masonic offense; he cannot be tried by the Lodge in whose jurisdiction he resides unless his Lodge waives its right in the premises; the result is that the offender is so far from his Lodge, and the Lodge so far from the place wnere the crime was committed. that bnt little interest is taken in the case. and finally the matter is dropped, The result is disastrous to the Lodge where the offense is committed; the offender can boast of his success in defeating the ends of justice, and proceed in open violation of Masonic law.

Instead of the law of Missouri pre1Jenting the trial of sojourning Brethren, it claims and exercises jurisdiction over such. This is right. Where crime is committed is the place to try the criminal. The State acts upon this principle. The evidenee is available where the offense occurs, and Masonic justice will be meted out to a sojourner just as well as to a member of the Lodge that takes cognizanee of the sojourner. VOLUNTARY DJMISSION.

Under this caption Grand Master Darrah treats a subject of great moment at considerable length, as will be shown by the following extract:


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39

Appendix.

Whatever may be said of the theorr of voluntary dimi~sion, 8S provided by our organic law, the facts are that its practical effects are not uniformly satisfactory, at least to the Lodges from which the dimits issue. The law as framed was intended to prevent Lodges from retaining members 'against tbeir will; and, so far 8S this feature is concerned, I believe it to be just and proper. I do not believe it to be desirable to retain members in our Lodges against their will and plea.~ure. Membership ought to be entirely voluntary. Those who are not Masons at heart. and who do not love and respect the Institution sufficiently to cheerfully retain their Lodge membership, will not likely be of any very great service or benefit to the Fraternity, and ought to be permitted to retire. This they may do of their own free will and accord. and if they would remain away from Lodge meetings and other Masonk gatherings, there would be but little room for complaint; this they fail to do, and hence the unsatisfactory working of the law. At almost every Lodge meeting..and especially when a collation or banquet is to be spread, dimitted Ma.o;ons are to be found. They arc very zealous on such occasions I bave beard them boast of the glorious Institution of Frcemasonry, and dilate on ito;; grand tcachings and principles, and of the distinguished members who have in all timc patronized its assemblies. until one might think they were not only willing to help support one. but a dozen Lodges. They never miss the banqnet, but always fliil to see the contribution box. . Every conceivable excuse i~ offered for non-membership. Not long since my attention was called to a case in point. The Lodge had incurred some expense which seemed to be for the best interests of all; twelve of the most wealthy members applied for and took their dimits. rather than pay dues to help liquidate the indebtedness. although no more was asked of them than of the poorest member of the Lodge. 'I'hese same Brethren failed not to be present at all the festive occasions. and especially when it was likely that there would be something to eat. The Master of the Lodge appealed to me to know what should be done under such circumstances, to which I replied that, under the present status of affairs, there was but one remedy, and that was to object to the Brethren visiting the Lodge or other Masonic gatherings, and make it so uncomfortable for them that they would either remain away or petition for membersbip.

The law should be so framed that a member, when taking a dimit, must file an application, in writing, stating the purposes for which he is seeking dimission. If not to join another Looge, aid in forming a new Lodge, 01' to move out of the juriSdiction, then gi ve him one without privileges. Here is the Missouri law: No Lodge shall grant it dimit to any of its members until a.! I oues are paid; and, unless the application for a dimit state that it is for the purpQse of joining allother Lodge. forming a new Lodge. or with a view of removing out of the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge, the applicant shall be deemed a non-affiliate from the date'of said dimit, and subject to all disabilities as SUCh. INTE~IPERANCE

AND PROP/\NI'['Y.

The Grand Master handled this subject at length and with great force. So important and val uable are his views that they are given in fllll: Among the common evils of the times, both in and out of Lodg-e membership, are those of intemperance and profanity. It is with no small degree ot shame tbat I refer to these immoralities as being practised by Masons, and while I would dismiss the subject and fain believe that such are not the facts, I cannot do so, for the reason that 011 every hand the evidence is but too plain and positive to he disputed. That any Brother who has been charged solemnly never to mention the Ilame of his Maker except with that reverence which is due from the creature to his Creator, could profane the Bame of Deity, is humiliating in the extreme and only equaled by the fact that this same profane Brother is likely to so far forget the first of the four cardinal virtues as to become addicted to the use of intoxicating drinks to a degree that very far surpasses tbe boundry line of temperance. These evils have crept into our Lodges, and to such a degree that it is time to .. cry aloud and spare not." 'I'hese offenders may be found in almost every Lodge, and give more trouble and annoyance than all other causes combined. Not only so, but threaten the peace, prosperity and even the perpetuity of our Fraternity as a noble, grand and moral institution.

.-


40

Appendix.

[Oct.

.

'I'hese crimes have come to be looked upon, by so large It proportion of many Lodges. as merely indiscretions, and not as serious offensâ&#x201A;Ź'.8, that it is wholly impossible for some Lodges to discipline members for the common habit of drunkenness and profanity. So lost are some Lodges to a sense of propriety, di~nity and the character of Masonry, as to be guilty of according public mortuary cercmollles to deceased members whose lives had been characterized by vile and vicious practices of drunkenness and debauchery. I trust that the like may never happen again in the State of J1Iinois. In some cases this has grown out of It misapprehension of the duties of the Lodges towards deceased members. The impression seems to prevail, that a Brother who is, technically, in good standing in the Lodge, although the most disreptuable, profane and debauched persoll in the community, is entitled, in case of death, to public Masonic mortuary services. No greater mi~take could be made. A Masonic Lodge is not obliged to accord a public Masonic burial to any Brother, no mattcr what his standing may be in the community. A Lodge mayor may not perform such services. It remains for the Lodge or Master to decide whether it is porper or not to turn out as a Lodge on the death of a Brother. Any other hypothesis would only be on a par with a growing sentiment that l1a.<;ons have vested rights in the Lodge, and under circumstances of adversity, entitled to draw support from the LOdge funds. This claim has but one tendency, and that is to degrade the Institution into lUI ordinary insurance society. The fact is lost sight of that we are simply a charitable organization, contributing at will, and always and only according to covenants. which should be fll.miliar to all. Prompted by this same principle of charity, we should, when an erring and degraded Brother dies, gently and softly, not as Masons in the garb of Masonry, but as citizens, convey his remlLins to their last rcsting place, and having done so, commend them to the care of that merciful Father, one of whose principal attribwtes is charity. on.JECTIOI\S TO VISrfORS.

This snbject is likewise treated quite fully, as will be seen by the following; The time \Va." when there was but one Lodge. No one then thought of objecting to any member being present. In time the Craft prospered and spread over the nice of the earth. For the sake of convenience, it became necessary to divide up and establish more Lodges. Not that they might antagonize each other; not that they mig-ht vent petty spite and malice by objecting to visitations, but solely as a matter of convenience. This is, as I believe, the broad view that should be taken to-day: We are a Craft, a Brotherhood, dispersed over the face of the globe; divided up into Lodges for the sake of cOIlvenience and pleasure; each Lodge, or member thereof, being interested in all the other Lodges; in all the rules and regulations establiii'hed; in all the transactions and of the material admitted to the several Lodges, and all combined to uphold and perpetuate the noble tenets of our profession. If this is not the correct view, how comes it that a member of one Lodge may object to the material being admitted into another Lodge? I fear that we have dcparted from the faith of our fathers. Is it not reasonable that a visitor who belongs to the same Brotherhood, the same Craft, or calling, should be entitled to the same consideration accorded an E. A. or F. C., whcn objection is filed to advancement, and given an opportunity to be heard in his defense, or at least the Lodge or Worshipful Master be permitted to judge of the validity of the objections? Looking at this question as it appears to my judgment, I belicve that our law on this subject ought to bc modified, and 1 sinCerely trust that the Grand Lodge will gi ve it that consideration which its merits demand. DECISIONS.

From the Decisions of the Grand Master, reported in his Address, the following extracts are made; 1. A dimitted Mason is amenable, for his conduct, to the Lodge in whose jurisdiction he residcs, until he is elected to membership in some other Lodge. The fact of his having petitioned some other Lodge for membership, does not relieve him from responsibility to the Lodge in whose jurisdiction he resides. This can only .cease after he has been elected to membership in some other Lodge.


Appendix.

1887.]

41

2. A District Deputy Grand Master is not amenable to his Lodge for his official acts; for these, he is responsible alone to the Grand Lodge or Grand Master. 3. After a candidate for the degrees in Masonry has been rejected, the rejecting Lodge may at any time waive jurisdiction in favor of another Lodge; and, if nece~sary, the Lodge may vote at each stated Communication on the question of waiving jurisdiction. The waiver, if granted. cannot confer upon the candidate the right to again petition for the degrees in less time than one year from the date of his rejection. 4. In the formation of a new Lodge, the recommending Lodges must be Chartered Lodges.

Number one is in perfect accord with the law of Missouri. Number two is proper so far as it applies to the OFFICIAL acts of a District Deputy, but his other acts may be passed upon by his Lodge. Number three is good law for Illinois. Number four is correct beyond any cavil. co~nnTTEE

ON CORRESPONDENCE.

The following announcement concerning the Chairman of the Committee, Bro. Gurney, was made by the Grand 1\laster: It becomes my unpleasant duty to announce the very serious illness of M. W. Bro. Theodore T. Gurney, Committee on Correspondence. who has been prostrated for months with paralysis. No fulsome praisc of his merits is needed from me. No Brother on the AmerIcan continent stands hIgher in the e..'\timation of the Craft than does Bro. Gurney. His services to this Grand Lodge have been invaluable. Brethren, let us indulge the hope that he may speedily be restored to health find usefulness among his Brethren. '.Bro. Gurney had not concluded his Report on Correspondence. which is one of the best ever prepared by him. when he was SUddenly compelled to cease from his labors. M. W. Bro. Joseph Robbins very kindly consented to complete the Report. which insures a complete review of the doings of various Grand Lodges during the past year, and fully up to its usual standard of excellence.

Concerning Bro. Gurney, Bro. Cregier said: M. W. GRAND MASTER-I have been requested by an absent Brother to submit to this Grand Body. his Report on Masonic Correspondence. The circumstances that deprive M. W. Bro. Theodore T. Gurney. the author of this Report. of the priVilege of prcsenting the result of his labors in person are so sad that I am sure they will cause a deep feeling of regret on the part of every Representative present.

V".

The absence of our M. Brother from the Sessions of the Grand Lodge, for the first time in many years, is caused. as you are aware. by his being ~tricken down with paralysis. The severity of the attack will. I fear, at least terminate his active labors in Freemasonry, with which he has been so closely and zealously identified for nearly forty years. Should our fears be realized. the Grand Lodge of 1l1inois will lose from her Councils one of her brightest lights, lI. Brother who has oC<'upied her East for two years with marked ability, and one who has contributed as much to the literature of lllinois Masonry as any man in the State; a Brother who ha." proved himself at all times and under all circumstances to be a Christian gentleman, a high-minded honorable citi7..en, a public officer of fearless and exalted integrity. and a dcvoted and distingUished Freemason. These elements of character have molded Bro. Gurney's long and useful life, and have governed him in all bis relations with his fellow-man. And now, M. W. Grand l\faster, as we ~semble here on this beautiful autumn day, with a cloudless sky, permitting the rays of the sun at this hour of high twelve to make our surroundings cheerful and pleasant. and give a warmth and force to our fraternal affection for all who are in affliction', let I1S not forget our good Bro. Gurney, who lies on his couch at home, his vision circumscribed by the limits of the chamber of sickness. But not so with his thoughts. 1\1. W. Sir-they doubtless revert to this Grand Lodge and to those who compose it, and his pntyers, I am sure, go forth to the Supreme Ruler of the universe for his blessing on our labors and on the Institution of Freemasonry everywhere. Let us indulge the hope that .Bro. Gurney may soon be restored to health and usefulness.

More notice will be taken of the dear Brother mentioned when his last work 011 Correspondence passes under review.


42

Appendix.

[Oct.

Bro. Darrah seemed to have met with experiences on a large scale, common to all Grand Masters. He reported that evidence of guilt on the part of a Master of one of the Lodges had been furnished him, showing that he was unworthy of the position he filled; and that, exercising his power in the premises, the recusant Master was suspended from his office. The Grand Master found, in the course of his administration, that one of the Lodges was without a Charter. The Charter had been destroyed at some former time by fire, but had been working under Dispensation for five years. Failing to secure a Charter, because of the expense in obtaining a duplicate, the Grand Master said that he did not arrest the Charter of the Lodge, because it had none to arrest, but he ordered it not to meet any more until it obtained a Charter. He reported the arrest of several Charters, one was in a case where a Lodge became very rebellious and refused to obey the law of the Grand Lodge. A rather amusing case is mentioned where a young man, during his nonage, was made a Mason in one of the Lodges of the jurisdiction. An investigation was ordered, when it was found that the family record had been altered so as to show that the candidate ,vas of la\vful age before his petition was presented. From the very full statement, made by the Grand Master, of the case, it appears that there was a large amount of wholesale lying done by the candidate himself, his mother and his. grandfather, who had evidently <loctored the family record. The Grand Master ordered the candidate, who had taken only two degrees, to be put on his trial, at which he pleaded guilty. The Lodge voted him not guilty. Why the Charter was not arrested in this case, the Grand Master does not state. The Grand Master made some very clear and pointed statements on the subject of the physical qualifications of Candidates. He recommended that careful consideration be given the subjeet, and it was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. From the Conclusion of this very ably and commendable Address of Grand Master Darrah, the following extract is taken: In concludin~ my Report, I wish again to thank the Grand Lodge for the honor conferred upon me one year ago. by its kind partiality. As your servant I have labored, to the extent of my ability, in the interests of the Craft in Illinois. What I have conceived to be my duty, that I faithfully tried to perform. It has been a source of great pleasure to me to labor for the interests of our grand Institution. My duties during the year must have been much more imperfectly performed, had it not bee11 for the very valuable assistance rendered by our very efficient Grand Secretary, R. \\T. Bro. L. L. Munl1; who very kindly and promptly not only discharged the laborious duties of his owu office, but very materially assisted in the discharge of th: duties of the otlice of Grand Master. In submittin~ my Report I have purposely gone more into detail than many of my Brethreu may think desirable or advisable. I am of the opinion that the Grand Lodge ought to know more of the doin~s of the several Lodges. '1'hat l.be best interests of all will best be subserved by a candid statement of facts in each given CMe, and that the mistakes of Lodges may best be avoided by others kuowing what those mistakes were. I am fully persuaded that there are many things going on among the Lodges of this jurisdiction that ought to be known, to the end that serious abuses might be remedied,


1887.]

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43

and the Craft generally benefited thereby. Finally, for the uniform kindness and consideration shown me by my Brethren I shall only again thank you.

In closing this imperfect review of the admirable and commendable paper furnished by Grand Master Darrah, Missouri, through this Committee, would accord honor and praise to him for the commanding manner and noble spirit evinced in his work. The moral tone of the Address shows its author to be possessed of the first endowment of Masonic character-preparation in the Heart. Coneerning his able Address, the Committee said : In conclusion, your Committee desire to congratulate the Grand :Master and the Grand Lodge on the thorou~h and satisfactory manner in which the duties of the office of Grand Master have been dIscharged. The labors and responsibilities of the office are a severe tax npon the time and strcngth of the Grand Master. but a careful perusal of the Report will convince all that the responsibilities have been wisely and firmly met, and the duties 1aithfully performed 'during the past year.

Respecting the two prevalent vices among Masons, so justly reprobated by the Grand Master, the Committee on his Address mildly said: Your Committee deplore the fact that such immoralpractires should exist anywhere among Masons as are mentioned by the Grand Master, and while we hope that the evil is not Widespread, we would say that Lod~es and individual Brethren cannot be too careful in maintaining the dignity and purity of Masonic character, and we commend his remarks on this subject to the thoughtful consideration of thc members of this' Grand Lodge and of the Craft at large.

No man of observation can entertain the hope that the evils of intemperance and profanity are" not widespread." They are" widespread" and far-reaching. That immorality among MasonR is the blight of the Illstitution to-day, no man can deny. Masons should be better men than those who are not. Truth demands the"'statement that many members of the Craft are the worst characters in community. They gamble, they blaspheme, they get drunk, or rather arc never Rober. They lie, practise fraud and live by it, they are vulgar and vicious. Their name is legion. 'Vhile these are the exceptions to the rule, the exceptions are alarmingly large and increasing. These evils are unmlJsonic because they are immoral. Instead of mildly reminding individual Brethren that the dignity and purity of Masonic character should be maintained, something more than commendation of good exhortation by GraIid Lodge officials should be done. The Grand Lodge should make deliverances, thereby encouraging the" Lodges and individual Brethren." Very Roon it would be found that these ,,,ould, 路with the Grand Lodge at their back, work a reform worthy of the moral character of Masonry and the advancement of the age. ORATION.

An Oration, of considerable length .and some merit, was presented by Bro. Isaac Clements, Grand Orator. It was well received, as shown by the remarks of Bro. John C. Smith, Deputy Grand Master. He said:


44

Appendix.

[Oct.

The compliment of requesting a copy of the Oration is so common-place that I almost hesitate to ask it at this time, but the Oration that we have listened to Qas so much of thonght and research in it, that I feel it' would be but the unanimous desire that our Grand Orator should furnish a copy of the same for publication in the Proceedings. I move that our Orator be requested to do so.

Full and complete Reports were rendered by the Grand Secretary, Bro. Loyal L. Munn, and Wiley M. Egan, Grand Treasurer. Bro. 1\'1unn is at the front as a Grand Officer, and likely to remain there. No one will have the temerity to dispute his pre-eminence, or contest his right to be "the first among his equals." CORRESPONDENCE.

I

The review, now under notice, is the last Masonic work of the lamented Bro. Gurney. It covers over 200 pages, and is one of the ablest of his many great productions. To this writer the work of reviewing the Report on Correspondence, made to his Grand Lodge at its last session, by Bro. Gurney, is a .sad undertaking. The deeply affecting fact crowds upon the thought "he is gone from us forever," while the living presence of the author blazes upon every page and in every line. The difIicnlty is too great to realize what is true-" Bro. Gurney is dead." No, not dead, but only passed on before to realms of light and life, where there is no death. The promptings of the moment are to elaborately express the appreciation, admiration and and affection long entertained by this committee for the illustriou's departed. But it is so much easier to think than to write, as the pen almost refuses to obey the will in this short tribute. To confess incapacity to perform such a work of love is to be honest, as it is truly felt that very fe\\' can do justice to tile memory of the departed. Hence, this writer shrinks from the undertaking lest he trench upon the sacred domain which belongs alone to those who are competent to present a correct portrait of the most philosophical thinker of the American Masonic Grand Lodges. Let some Illinois writer, who, while performing a work of love, paint the deceased as he was, because knou:n to the author. Bro. Gurney did not belong to Illinois alone. The intelligent, reading, thinking Masonic world claimed him. His light did shine beyond the limits of his own jurisdiction, and could not be oonfine.d by State lines. Others saw it, and many rejoiced in that light, and glorified" our Father in Heaven," because of the truths he taught and the iife he lived. The world was bettered by such a life, and humanity canght grander and higher inpirations from the-potent forces and elevating influences thrown forth by the massive mind and noble heart of our beloved Bro. Gurney. Some extracts must be made from his last production, that they may serve as fresh reminders to the readers of this Report that Bro. Gurney Ii ved and thought and labored. He was strong au"d cogent in his a~gumel?-ts against modern "Riteism," after


Appendix.

1887.]

45

which many have gone, as Israel of old followed "strange gods." He opposed recognizing, as legitimate, such Grand Bodies as claim great powers, and act independently of the original Craft. Here are his views and they are mighty to the pulling 'down of the lofty and pretentious fabrics of "Councils" and "Orients." He said: We cannot admit that a CONSTITUTIONAL GRAND LODGE can be aught else than the sequence of Lodges deriving their powers from a body authorized by law of the primal Grand Body to confer the degrees of E. A., F. C. and M. M. This is a law of the Institution, and from which there cannot be an authorized recession.

The above extract forms the basis of an argument that no sophistry or pretentions can ever answer or shake. Then follows some interesting reading called history: For many years after the establishment of the Mother Grand Lodge in 1717, no other degrees or orders were known to Masonry, and it remained for a schismatic congregation of l\Jasons to make the first departure, in the middle of the ei~hteenth century, resulting in organizations that now claim control of the degrees of tile Lodge, and that practice . the rites thereunto appertaining. We do not object to degrees and orders beyond the Lodge. We are in pleasant communion with many; but we do insist that they shall not assume an exclusive inheritance of the Lodge, and that Grand Lodges deny assumptions that are not only without validity, but sug~estive of positive degeneration from the "original plan." We are furthermore of the opmion that Grand Lodges should inhibit their constituency, members of Lodges, from associations with any congregation of Masons that recognize, in others, the Authority that Masonic right and reason condemns. It is lamentably true that the claims of the numerous families of Masonic associations now thrust upon the attention of the Craft have attained prominence through the unthinking leniency of the Lodge. The growth of the Institution has been so enormous, and the literature of the Craft so meager relating to the inauguration of associations of Masons that feign the prerogatives of the Lodge, that it has taken it for granted that their claims to relations therewith are to be respected. We have but one purpose in this discmsion. We emphatically protest against the assumption that there is a lawful Grand Lodge upon earth that did not have Its foundations laid by the original Craft and their constitutional successors. We therefore contend that the recognition of "Grand Lodges" that exist by virtue' of associations that are without this inherent right or authority to establish Lodges, is not only an error in jUdgment, but an unequivocal desecration of the fundamental law of Masonry. ny this we mean that" Grand Lodges" recognized as Masonic by a large number of legitimate Grand Bodies are without claims to the distinction and should not be tolerated, for the reason, that by accepting them into the fraternal family calories an acknowledgment that Lodges instUuted by Supreme Councils (G1"and Orienls,

01'

other governing associations), hO'l.'e a like legitimate parentage wUh evcry

constitutional Lodge in existence. A NOTE OJ<' WARNING is sOllnded, Brethren. Beware, and be in haste to withdraw recognitions that peril the exclusive jurisdiction of the Lodge over the symbolic degrees.

Why were the" Grand Lodges" of the Mexican States recognized by the Brethren of the District of Columbia and other jurisdictions? Can Brother Singleton give us an assurance that such "Grand Lodges" are not the issue of bodies as foreign to the Lodge as arc Commanderies, or any other association of Masons outside the Lodge.

Yes, why? This Committee has been urged and pressed to recommend the recognition of bodies in the" Mexican States" believed to be the issue of sources foreign to legitimate Masonry. The answer has been "Nay, verily." 'With Bros. Gurney and Vaux this Committee announces that "he will 'stand still upon the eternal foundations of Masonry' in this regard, and will never concede a point that strikes a blow at every feature of our original Institution." In replying to Bro. Drummond, of Maine, Bro. Gurney said:


46

Appendix.

[Oct.

It is found upon examination that t.here are (if we understand a correspondence upon the subject) TWELvE/Supreme Councils, assuming government of the three symbolic degrees of their jurisdictions. We had intended a further review of this matter, but our space is exhausted. We want to ask Bro. D., however, how he reconciles his loyalty to the Lodge while in another association of Masons he is in fraternal communication with TWELVE kindred organizations that a..<sume control over its functions'! The root of this whole matter will be fully apprehended by and by. Grand Lodges at no distant day will propound like questions; bence we would suggest that all associations of the Fraternity take steps to aftirm their devotion to the Lodge, by discarding any relations with bodies that openly, or covertly, trench upon its immemorial and acknowledged prerogatives.

Bro. Drummond, in concluding his Report, on "special ~ubjects" (just received) says, speaking of the writer, "that he denies our proposition' that the Grand Lodg-e has the power to decide what Masonry is.''' If he had added our oft-repeated assertions, "except as touching that Masonry embraced in the three symbolic degrees," he would have given a correct representation of our views. Upon the question of the propriety of public ceremonials by J.Jo<1ge, he gives Bro. Vaux, of Pehnsylvania, an aggregation of historical facts which. a.." it would seem to work for their welfare while we live; but we cannot consent that they are" dUly constituted Masonic bodies," for two principal reasons: First, they are not authorized by the primitve Masonry of the world, a..~ handed down to us in unbroken succession by the first and primary Grand Lodge; second, extending recognition to them as Masonic bodies-is a justification for a claim, that they may hereafter raise, that they are invested with authority to assume the government of the Lodge and practise its rights in jurisdictions that have awarded them Masonic legitimacy.

As to the degree of Past Master, Bro. Gurney said, "Better l~iek the abnormity out. It has no plaee in the Craft, no more than the degree of Kadosh." Allo'", the Missouri Committee to say (, Amen." Seven pages of the Report of Bro. Gurney were accorded to our own Missouri Proecedings for 1885. He said of the Address of Grand M.aster Stevenson, that it was" a cultured production, and in rhetorical display the peer of the best." Extracts therefrom were made, also from reports of our cOl1'lmittees. Concerning charity he said: His remarks upon the question of "Relief" are, in one point of view, objectionable, because they seem to fun counter to well-established Masonie law-law that comes from God. and thus hll.'; its foundations deep down in the best alld most manly sympathies of the fraternal heart. We may fail of a correct understallding of Bro. Stevenson's meaning. but from the drift of his remarks we gather the impression that he insists upon the rule of reciprocity or compensation. If we are mistaken in this, we do not /illd a solitary objection to this beautiful illustration of the subject. In former reports we have held. and now hold, that char-it?! did 110t demand any return for her ministrations. While this is true. we should not court membership in a Lodge that. being able, should decline an appeal from a sister orl{anization that had exhausted its treasury in behalf of a distressed member; neither should we have a particle of respect for a Mason who had been the recipient of Masonic bounty, who neglected, when opportunity offered, to express bis gratitude by some tangible evidence of his appreciation of the Samaritan that had cared fOf him. Neither does charity know anything of jurisdictional lines. We bold primarily, that a Lodge cannot be held for disbursements to its members without its assent. It follows, therefore, in fraternal as well as in e\villaw. that there must be two parties to a contract-that it is not admi&<ilJle for A to obligate B to the payment of money in the absence of his consent thereto. Missouri may endorse the views of the committee, and ellact that one Lodge mas thus be held for the expenditures of another; but would not such legislation be antagonistic to the fundament.!!.l law of the Institution, touching the" principal tenets" of our professions? If it should be thought wise to introduce a distinction between" relief" and" charity," as suggested by the Grand Master and approved by the committee, there does not appear remote justification that the Lodge should be legally beld for a contract made by a member, except with its authority. We know bow to sympathize with Rrethren of Boards of Relief. Years ago we represented our Lodge in an organization of the kind in this city. It was the experience in those days that not to exceed two of twenty applications were worthy of a friendly


1887.J

Appendix.

47

thought. It was also another experience. that the more money at our disposal the more We had one of the most cautious and best of Brethren as the representative of tbe board, nevertheless路be was so frequently imposed upon that it was often thought wise to dispense with the organization. and but for the sudden precipitation of its dissolution through the misfortunes of its financial head, it would have disappeared through the weight of imposition constantly thronging its approaches. We are not by any means hostile to this class of benevolence, nevertheless it is undeniably the fact that where there is publicly advertised prey, 1JU,ltures congregate. We admire the pluck of our Missouri Brcthren. but if experience is of allY value we are inclined to the belief that they will ere long find it tbe better plan to throw such responsibilities upon Lodges.

plenty and persistent were leeches.

This writer heartily endorses the views expressed concerning Boards of Relief. Bro. Gurney, always amiable and fraternal, courteously reviewed the work of this Committee on Correspondence, and closed thus: The good Lord permitting, we shall be in St. Louis next year, when we expect to meet the hundreds of Brethren who have given our sister jurisdiction its deserved distinction. Give us a plank upon which to rest our sixty-five-year-old bones and we will be contcnt. Securing forage is the least of our propensities, at home or abl'Oad.

But it was not to be so. 'When the Brethren gathered at the Triennial, onr dear Brother was prostrated upon a bed from which soon after he was borne to his last rest. CONCLliSION.

Before his work was completed, Bro. Gurney was stricken down and another was called upon to write the Conclusion. That one was the friend of the disabled Committee, M. W. Bro. Joseph Robbins, Past Grand Master. He said: The hand that essays to write the Conclusion to this report is not the hand that wrote the report itself. That was the work of Bro. Gurney. In the actual order of writing, though not of arrangement, the last jurisdiction reviewed by him was New York, and It is a singular coincidence that in the closing words of that review, referring to the rumored serious illness of Past Grand l\'1aster Simons, of which he had before spoken, he said what not only every Illinois Craftsman, but scores of thousands elsewhere will echo with reference to himself: "W~ll, Bro. S. has given his readers one of his comprehensive pHpers. and it is our sincere prayer that he may be preserved to the Fraternity for many years to come." No band is quite fit to finish another's work, and we can claim but one ,qualification for takiuf? up the pen that dropJ)ed f~om <?ur beloved Pas~ Grand Master's palsied hand, and that IS a complete accord WIth blm of sympathy and Judgment 011 the chief matters which he had at heart. This may enable us to forecast in a measure the points on which he would probably have dwelt in his summing up, and on which he would certainly have dwelt could he have been forewarned that his utterance might be-whHt in spite of <1ur hopes it may prove to be-his last legacy to the Craft he has served so well. Although much yet remains to be done in educating the Craft upon these subjects. much has already been accC?~plished ; ~o muc~l that we ~ope it may be safely doubted whether we shall have a repetitIOn of the nnpertlllence exhIbIted by the Grand Chapter of Wisconsin alld the Grand Commandery of Ohio in assuming to declare what are and what are not" duly constituted Masonic bodies," a function which call only be properly exercised by the Grand Lodge, 0 I' a repetition of the spectacle presented by the Grand Lodge . of Massachusetts when, in tbe pretended exercise of this function, it abdicated its position as the conservator of genuine Masonry, a)ld assumed to add forty-odd degrees to that in the body of which the unalterable law, upon whose acceptance in good faith and maintenallce unehallged the very existence of Grand Lodges is predicated, declares it to be not in the power of allY man or body of men to make innovations.


48

Appendix.

[Oct.

To this enlightened condition of the Craft Bro. Gurney's discussions have very largely contributed. If, unhappily, he should now be compelled to lay down the pen, he can do so with thc consciousness that he has fought the good fight; and with the eehoes of his ability, fraternal courtesy, and moral earnestness ringing in his ears from thc mouths of all his Brother reviewers, he can feel assured that in his own person and work the high standard of Masonic character which he demanded of others has been fully realized.

It is a sad thought that the pen laid down by the illustrious Gurney will never be taken up again. Others may write reports for the jurisdiction he served and honored. But they will not be the repoi路ts he would have written. The eultured Christian gentleman, the philosophical thinker, the learned Mason and fearless champion of the right has ceased to labor. "lIe TeSts from his labors," and has entered upon higher, grander ministries. Peace to his dust--honor to his memory. ALEX. T. DARRAH, Bloomington, G. M. LOYAL L. MUNN, Freeport, G. Sec.

INDIAN TERRITORY, 1886. The Twelfth Annual Communication ,vas held in A-tok-a, Choctaw Nation, beginning November 2d, ]88G. l\I. W. Bro. Florian H. Nash, Grand Master; R. W. Bro. Joseph S. Murrow, Grand Secretary. There were Representatives present of seventeen Grand Lodges, and seventeen subordinate Lodges, with several Past J.\1asters There are twcntyone Chartered Lodges, and four under Dispensation in that jurisdietion, with a membership of 748. 1.'he Grand Master's Address coven; six pages, and is a good practical paper. He' presented several Decisions, which were all approved by the proper committee. The Deputy Grand M.aster presented a brief report. The Grand Secretary furnished, as usual, a complete statement of all the business affairs belonging to his office. He announced that the Lodges had all made Returns except one. He called attention to the importance of a Grand Lodge Hegister in the following terms; GRAND LODGE REGISTER.

Some Grand Lodges are making registers, containing the statistical history of every Mason connected with every Lodge in the jurisdiction. Some have had thcse registers for yelirs, as Maine. Minnesota and others. Grand ~ecretary Vincil, of :i\1issouri. has just completed a register which cost $425 for the books and clerical work, and the Grand Lodge congratulates itself on the accomplishment of the work. It is a tedious and difficult work at first, and requires a great deal of patience, labor and pains, but, when thoroughlyand accurately prepared, it can bc kept up with not a great deal of labor. The name of every Mason is engrossed in this register, and followed up with every change in his standing until death, or his removal from the jurisdiction, and if he retnrns it is taken up and continued. It will be much easier to prepare such a register now than any time in the future, as our Lodges and membership are constantly increasing. I doubt if we are ready yet to undertake it, for my salary is not sufficient to justify my undertaking it now. and your income is not sufficient to justify an increase of salary. I mention the subject at this time, however, to bring it before your minds for information


1887.]

49

Appendix.

and remembrance, and when the time does come that we can see our way to prepare such a register, we may understand its value and be ready for action. I understand Bro. E. A. Berry has, after considerable labor and pains, completed such a register of Savanna Lodge. No. 20. If each Lodge would do this it would not be costly nor difficult to compile a Grand Lodge Register form the Lodge Registers, and the value is scarcely calculable. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report on Correspondence was prepared and submitted by Bro. J. S. Murrow, the Grand Secretary, who said at the opening: " Hobson" once more presents a Report on Correspondence. He had great hopes at the commencement of the year that his fellow appointees on the committee this year would do their share of the work, if not relieve him entirely. Alas! "The best laid schemes o'mice and men, aft gang aglee." Bro. Berry begged off early in the year, pleading press of business. Bro. Coyles report has been awaited until the assembling of Grand Lodge. but it has not put in an appearance yet. Here is " Hobson's" midnight toils.

Bro. Murrow said many good things in his review. will indicate his spirit and style. This for instance:

A

fe~v

clippings

The Masons of this Territory are not only closely watched by the people hercof, but our Brethren in other jurisdictions have their eyes upon us to see if we are being true to our grcat and peculiar mission, vb:: A potent factor in the civilization, education and moral development of the Indians of this Territory. Thus far we have secured the confidence and approbation generally of our Brethren in the States, but greater advances can and must be made in the future, if we are to receive their continued sympathy and approval.

He heads off the "irrepressible" Committee of Kansas in this fashion: It is very amusing and refreshing to us to catch Bro. Brown in a curious blunder. Referring to Bro. Doyle's Address, be says: "He reports the following Decision," and then quotes a lengthy matter from some other Grand Lodge Proceedings Robout burying "a Mason whose life has been notoriously licentious," on which SUbject Bro. Doyle did not utter a syllable. But the fun comes in when, in his remarks on this quotation about the wicked dead, he belabors Bro. Doyle for his" Pcrpetual Jurisdiction" doctrine. Now we wish to say to Bro. Brown that although Bro. Doyle is a strong advocate of Perpetual Jurisdiction here on earth, he surrenders all claim upon" rejected candidates," especially the" notoriously licentious," when they remove into the jurisdiction of the "Old Nick." Bro. Doyle is too good a man and too afraid of fire to ever go in that direction for " rejected material."

Quoting a Decision from Grand Master Day, of Maine, Bro. Murrow said: There are too many :Masons who disgrace themselves and the Fraternity by acts of intoxication, and their conduct is overlooked. We believe in patience, but when patience ceases to be a virtue we believe in discipline,-strong, just, hearty discipline. A dissipated :Ma-~on should neither be retained in membership nor given a dimit. Grand Master Day is right; "charges should be preferred and a trial had." One trouble is, good men, lawhonoring and abiding Masons are too cowardly about this matter. They are afrRoid to enforce the laws, prefer charges or take any active part in a trial, lest they make enemies of these drinking Masons, and suffer in their business or something else. Then. too, in some Lodges, the drinking, immoral Masons, and their friends, are in a majority and either defv or defeat the enforceruent of law. Show us a healthy, united, respected and useful Lodge of Masons, and we will at once show you one composed of temperate, moral, God-fearing and Bible-respecting men.

In his Review of Oregon, this occurS: Bro. Chadwick asks us a question on this wise: Oregon suspends all Masons engaged in the saloon business, California does not. If a Mason, holding membership in California, moves into Oregon and opens a saloon, can he be suspended? \"t'e t~ink he can. G. L. Ap.-4.


50

Appendix.

[Oct.

If a man, citizen of California, should go over into Oregon and violate the civil law

there, he would be arrested and punished. We cannot sec why he should have more license, as a Mason, to violate the Masonic regulations of Oregon, than. as a miLD, to violate its civil laws. Other reasons occur to us confirming this view, but we lack space.

The Missouri law says that our Lodges shall exercise penal jurisdiction over ALL Masons residing in their limits. Bro. Murrow is right. If a saloon-keeping Mason from a whiskey State moves into Missouri and opens a murdei mill, he soon finds charges pending against him, and a trial follows, re.sulting in conviction and punishment, notwithstandil)g his membership is in a Lodge beyond our limits. He is a mem bel' of the Masonic family, and must answer to that portion of said family where he lives and outrages decency and good morals. Missouri I.odges punish sueh Masons, so-ealled, of necessity. The Grand Lodge has declared that the business of saloon keeping is" UNi\IASONIC." Having so decla.red, it leaves the I.odges no choice but to proceed against the offender. .Indeed they have no election, and are judges of the facts only. This State is not ruled by any Prohibition party, and is very far from that doctrine. But the Legislature has given us Local Option. The people are allowed to vote "Wet" or "Dry." The Grand Lodge of . Missouri enacted an option law five years ago, and said to saloon-keeping Masons, "You have the OPTION to quit your business, or to quit MASONRY." They are qui.ting Masonry because Masonry is putting them out. So mote it be. His Report covers fifty pages, and is in keeping with his former productions, both in its tone and moral character. The following extract is made respecting our Grand Master J. W. Boyd: Well written, Bro. Boyd, vou are a man after our own heart. We once heard a minister of the Gospel state pUblicly at a convention that there had been a ~lorious revival in his church the past year. for there bad been over fifty exclusions of worthless members. and the old, gray-haired, experienced preachers responded as we do to you, with a loud and hearty Amen.

It is hardly allowable for Bro. Murrow to take away the privilege of this writer as to the" Amen" business. But as he loves our Bro. Boyd, and says "Amen" at the right time, and in such a good cause, the Missouri Committee hereby accords him a share of the "Amen" investment. It is only required that Bro. Murrow utter one loud, deep and long "Amen" on being informed that there is "a glorious revival" going on in Missouri Masonry, which will result in the "exclusion of worthless members," until not one saloon keeper will be found in this jurisdiction by January 1st, 1888, who belongs to a Lodge.

Bro. Murrow concluded his clever review as follows: And now we cease our labors. We have enjoyed reading the Proceedings and Reviews of sister juriSdictions, for they are worthy of enjoyment. We doubt if the writers of any other institutions of like character as Maf;onry do, as a general thing, produce more interesting or profitable reading, considering the quantIty, than the Masonic reportorial corps. These reviews are "From grave to gay, from lively to severe.'


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One may find sound theology, the purest morality, the liveliest humor, the sharpest wit, the loftiest imag-ination. all clothed most generally in the most elegant language. All honor to the :Masonic reviewers of America. Our own labors have been almost entirely for the benefit of our Brethren in the Indian Territory. The good of Masonry in this Territory has been before our mind constantly. If our Brethren will appreciate this truth and give us credit for unselfish efrorts to promote the highest and best interests of :Masonry in our jurisdiction, we shall be more than satisfied, and feel repaid for long and weary hours of labor.

Bro. Murrow is always sensible, amiable and practicable. Long may he be spared to elevate the standard of christianity, morality and Masonry in the Indian country. Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected. The latter resides at A-tok-a.

KANSAS, 1887. The Thirty-first Session of the Grand Lodge of Kansas convened in the city of Atchison, February 16th, 1887. M. W. Bro. Silas E. Sheldon, the Grand Master, was present and presided; R. 路VV'. Bro. John H. Brown was Grand Secretary. REPRESENTATION.

From the excellent make-up of the journal, furnished by Grand Secretary Brown, it is easy to present a synopsis. There were in attendance nine Past Grand Officers, seventy-four Past Masters, and Representati ves from 191 Lodges, showing a total representation present of 281, and a total number of Brethren present,376. The Secretary states that the previous year there were 268 Chartered Lodges on the roll. One of them surrendered its Charter during the year. The Grand Lodge granted Charters to twenty Lodges which had been working under Dispensation. This shows the total number of Lodges working under Charter to be 287 at this time. 'rhe total membership is reported to be 14,638, showing a net gain of ],361. The revenues are reported due from Lodges, $7,319. Masonry is certainly advancing with the growth of that young and vigorous jurisdiction. ADDRESS.

A desire to see the production of Bro. Sheldon, Grand Master, and the high expectations concerning its quality, prompted immediate attention to his Address. This Committee has no cause to express disappointment in respect to the work of Grand Master Sheldon. It is a document of merit, ably written, and admirably arranged under


52

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[Oct..

propel' headings. Extracts therefrom will furnish a better evidence of the appreciation of this Committee than any words of Commendation. From the exordium, this extract is made: Another Masonic year, freighted with all its cares and perplexities, as well as its joys and pleasures, has drawn to a close, and, in the providence of God, we are again permitted, in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution of this Grand Lodge, to assemble in annual communication, to review and revise the work done in the paHt. and if defects be found, to correct them, and devise measures for the future prosperity of our Order. And, whatever we do, let it be done for the purpose of building up, and increasing the usefulness of our Institution, in bettering the condition of our fellow men. My Brethren. let us all, with one accord and prayerful hearts, unite in returning thanks to our Supreme Grand Master above, for the preservation of our lives and for the many choice blessings that have been vouchsafed to us the past year, and especially so, whell we realize the fact that no member of this Grand Lodge has been called from labor on earth .. to that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns." While the members of this Grand Lodge have been thus blessed, we should not forget that many of our constituent Lodges have been clothed in the habiliments of mourning over the loss of some esteemed Brother, and thus a vacancy is found at the fireside of a once happy family, now left to mourn the loss of one most dear to them; let us all unite in extending to the widows and the orphans of the departed Brethren our heart-felt sympathy and condolence in this hour of their sad affliction, and ever pray that our" Heavenly Father will have them in his holy keeping."

He paid just and proper tributes to th'e memory of deceased Brethren in other jurisdictions, especially to Bro. Gurney, of Illinois, and Bro. Barber, of Arkansas. DISPENSATIONS.

The following extract will show the pressure upon the Grand Master of Kansas for the privilege of starting new Lodges, and accounts for the seemingly large number granted by him. Permission to establish twenty new Lodges out of sixty applications, shows that the Grand Master had care, prudence and caution. It requires nerve to refuse such applications and resist the pressure brought to bear. In some .cases the Lodges that recommend the petitioners cannot be depended upon as guides to the Grand Master. A Lodge in Missou.ri recently voted to recommend the formation of a Lodge under Dispensation. Before the petition, thus recommended, could reach the Grand Master, the acting Master, and others, of the recommending Lodge, filed a protest with this writer against granting the Dispensation recommended. A similar incident occurred twenty years ago, when I was Grand Master. Here is Bro. Sheldon's remarks: The question of or~anizing new Lodges has always been a perplexing one to every Grand Master. and the pa~t year has not been an exception to the general rule. To determine just how many should be formed, and where they should be located, so as to accommodate the greatest number,路 and thus furnish Masonic homes for the Brethren, has been my earnest endeavor. The unprecedented growth of the Western portion of this State has created a corresponding demand for new Lodges. One of the first things thou~bt of by the Brethren who have found new homes upon our Western prairies. and who have been accustomed to the comforts and advantages of a Masonic Lodge in their former homes, is-let us erect here a Masonic altar, around which we can gather as Brethren.

Numerous Special Dispensations were granted, such as the election and installation of officers, the dedication of halls, laying corner-stones


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etc. A little less than a dozen permits were granted to confer degrees out of the regular time. There is hope for that jurisdiction in view of the small number of Dispensations granted for the above purpose. The time may come-"and the wisest knows not how soon"-when Grand Masters in Kansas will conclude to let the law take its course, and candidates for special favors wait the legal time. Other matters of local interest only were rep.orted by the Grand Master. He had made three rulings, and submitted them for consideration. Under the law, it seems, an applicant for advancement may be examined at a special communication -at least the Grand Master so ruled, and dted a law to sustain his decision. Such-is not the law in Missouri, which, to this writer, is greatly preferred. A GOOD IDEA.

The following extract contains a most worthy recommendation: The founders of our Order in this State. and those Grand Officers who have born the heat and burden of the day, are fast passing away. Some of them have been called from labor on earth to the refreshments in that Celestial Lodge above. As a token of respect for their memory, and as a testimonial of our appreciation of the valuable labors of those worthy Fraters who have served this Grand Lodge as Grand Masters so faithfully. I would recommend that, commencing with the first two Grand Masters. the Grand Secretary be instructed to procure suitable engravings of them. and cause them to be published in our Proceedings. and at least two each succeeding year, until all are publi::;hed, the expense to be borne by the Grand Lodge; and. furthermore, each Grand Master be requested to furnish the Grand Secretary with a suitable photograph of himself, and that a brief biographical sketch of each of these Brethren, which shall also contain a record of their services in the Order, be published in connection therewith.

Missouri honors her Past Grand Masters by having oil portraits made, framed and placed in the Grand Secretary's office. These paintings run back to the beginning of our Grand Lodge in 1821. RECOGNITION.

The Grand Master recommended the recognition of, and the establishment of fraternal relations with the Grand I~odge of the Federal District of Mexico, and the Grand Lodge of Peru. He presented a recommendation, asking that an amendment be adopted as follows: I would recommend that our Constitution be amended so that only the chairman of each committee be appointed by the GrandMaster at the close of each annual communication, and that the other members of the committee be appointed at the opening of the subsequent annual communication from among the Brothers present.

Missouri adopted this custom twenty years ago. It works well;' much of the work being done ad interim, while time is saved and labor lessened. Grand Master Sheldon reported that the relations of his Grand Lodge, with other Grand Jurisdictions were of the most fraternal character.


[Oct.

54

From all the reports examined, it appears that this same condition obtains generally. Physicians sometimes complain of given seasons of the year that it "is distressingly healthy." Unless a craze starts up soon, Committees on Correspondence may complain of things being very dull. From the remaining portion of his excellent Address the following extracts are made: J,BSONIC CHARITY-EARTHQUAKE SUFFERERS.

August, 188G, the whole world was startled by the telegraphic announcement that a terrible earthquake had razed the city of Charleston. South Carolina, to the ground, and that suttering and want was the portion of many of the citizens of that ill-fated city. Anticipating the needs of these unfortunate people and of the members of the Fraternity there. I at once telegraphed our Grand Secretary to notify the Grand Master of South Carolina to draw on him for the sum of $25(), to aid in the relief of those destitute people. This action was approved by the council of administration and I trust will meet with your approval. It was very gratifying to me, as it doubtless was to all of you, to observe with what promptness and liberality aid was proffered the people of that ill-fated city. From the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the Gulf to Maine, donations were poured in upon them until their immediate wants were supptied, so far as money could do it, and at the same time they had the sympathies and prayers of all good people in every portion of the land.

Masonry does much to make the family of man a brotherhood, and the whole round world to feel akin. Such acts and words as are contained in the above must augment the feeling. INSTRUCTIONS.

Feeling the need of an improvement in the work of the degrees, and better facilities for its more general dissemination, the Grand Master urged a system of instruction, th us: Therefore it seems to me that a more general system of instruction of subordinate Lodges should be {lrovided fur, to the end that the Craft in general and especially all officers of the vanous Lodges may receive the benefit of these schools of instruction, and will, if efficient, insure uniformity and correctness in the work. I would recommend that the State be divided into districts corresponding with the Judicial districts of the State, and that one of the Custodians of the work, or one of the Assistant Lecturers, hold a school of instruction in each district at least one wcek each year, at such time and place as will best accommodate the several Lodges within each district, and that every Master of a Lodge within said district, or one of the first three officers, be required to attend such school.

Adopt the Missoilfi system, the best in the land. In concluding this review of the eminently creditable Address of Grand Master Sheldon, the following extracts deserve a place: And now, my Brethren, the work is done and the harvest ended, and whether it be good or bad, I submit it to you for your inspection and generous criticism. Should it prove to be such work as will meet with your kind favor and fraternal approval, my highest ambition will be fully gratified. In my official acts I have endeavored in aU things, to the best of my ability, to dischar~e the duties devolving upon me, with promptness and fidelity; with only one object 1JI view, that of promoting the best interests of our time-honored Institution. Brethren of the Grand Lodge, I shall soon return the badge of authority with which you were pleased to clothe me one year ago, and in doing so, permit me to return my sincere thanks for this mark of your favor and esteem, the recollection of which will be kindly and fraternally remembered by me in my declining years. â&#x20AC;˘


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In closing the report of my official work, I take this occasion to tender my grateful acknowledgments to my Brother officers, for the valuable assistance they have so generously and cheerfully rendered me in the discharge of the duties of the highly honorable station you called me to, and to the Craft in general for their uniform courtesy. Allow me to express the hope that perfect harmony will characterize the deliberations of our present Annual Communication,and that each and every act of ours will bc such as to meet the approval of our own consciences and the approbation of our Supreme Grand Master.

'fhe foregoing Address v.:as highly commended by the proper committee, who spoke of it as an excellent paper, containing much valuable information. The various acts of the Grand Master were approved, and his recommendations endorsed. The Decisions reported by him received the approbation of the Committee and the Grand Lodge. An Oration was delivered by Bro. Owen A. Bassett, Past Grand Master. It was rendered at a banquet given the members of the Grand Lodge by the Masons of Atchison. It covers eight pages in the printed Proeeedings. The subject, "'VHAT IS FREElI1ASO~RY?" was abl~ discussed under the head: "Masonry is a beautiful system of morality veiled in allegory, and illustrated by symbols." While it cannot be occupied as a whole, and its beauty would be destroyed by giving detached portions, this much must be said here: It is the most readable, sensible and instructive Oration found by this writer in any Grand Lodge journal examined by him.' The Orator talked common sense, and presented things of to-day with which we are acquainted and about which we are supposed to know something. REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY.

This is, of course, a business paper, like all of the productions of Bro. John Brown. He is both a busy and a business man, severely correct and intensely practical in all he does. His journal of Proceedings is proof of his ability and fitness for the place he has so long and so well filled. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering 138 pages, was furnished by Bro. John H. Brown for the Committee. In examining the work, it is found that extracts and comments, in due proportion, make up the Report. In reviewi!lg California, Bro. Brown noticed a very objectionable rule in that jurisdiction, as follows: By a regulation of the Grand Lodge, 路Lodges are forbidden to expend any part of their funds for dinners and collations. This some of the Lodges thought a hardship, especially after a hard night's work when many members had to travel far to reach home, and at their request he suggested to the Grand Body a relaxation of the rule so far as to permit Lodges under sllch circumstances to 8erve plain collation at the expense of the Lod~e. This was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, who reported in favor ofmaintallling the rule, and were sustained by Grand Lodge. .


56

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Upon this subject we have heretofore expresscd the opinion-which is yet unchanged -that when a Lodge had paid its Grand Lodge dues. and discharged its other obligations, it could use its funds for any purpose to which a majority saw fit to appropriate them or any part thereof, provided such appropriation was not made to promote dissipation or any other unmasonic end. Such is the usage in this jurisdiction, and after years of intimate acquaintance with our Lodges, we have yet to hear of any use of their funds meriting blame or reprehension. Perhaps our opinion is the outgrowth of the view we entertain of the relation of Lodge..c; to a Grand Lodge, which, in strict terms, is that they are constituents of, and not subordinates to a Grand Lodge.

This subject, like others, has two sides. It is an interference with the rights of Lodges to forbid them using their funds for legitimate end and purposes. Lodges have rights. This writer has, of record, a standing protest against Grand Lodge meddling with the rights of subordinates. But it has been found necessary in Missouri for the Grand Lodge to regulate things at the very point criticised by Bro. Brown. Social-harmless-enjoyment ran into excess, followed by debauch. Beer and whiskey found their way into the collations. In noticing the views of the Grand Master of Masons in Canada, ~onc~ning papal deliverances against Masonry, Bro. Brown paid his respects to "the big man at the Holy See" in words as follows: The big man at the Holy See, in the city of Rome, has for years been in the habit of issuing his Bulls against Freemasonry, and so far these bulls have had about as much effect on the Institution of Freemasonry as the foolish bull that attempted to butt the locomotive off the track. We can see no occasion for alarlIl from this source. All we ha\"e to do is to plod along our own prudent way unobtrusively as we have been doing for centuries and we need have no fears from the promUlgation of such documents as that issued by Cardinal TASCHEREAU. They are harmless. Let us look well to our own household and sec that the members of the family are living up to their professions as Masons should do, and give but little heed to what may be said by those who know nothing about the noble principles that are inculca.ted in the several sublime lectures so forcibly brought to our attention in the several degrecs of Ancient Craft Masonry.

If "the big man" at "the city of Rome" had wisdom enough to appreciate how utterly ridiculous he has made him~elf in the eyes of millions, he might feel some sense of shame for having lied about his equals and superiors. But Ephraim loves his idols-lies-false gods. Let him alone. He may gnash in fury and howl in continued impotency. People mnst have something and somebody to laugh at. "The big man" at Rome is a good subject.

Respecting the Bible, Bro. Peabody, of Colorado, had said:. Vte strongly endorse the words of Bro. Hall, which we consider" sound to the core."

If thc Bible is not the Word of GOD, written by inspiration, and containing the funda-

mental truths of Musonry, and the inestimable gift of GOD to man, for the rule and guide for his faith and practice, why display it upon our altars as one of the three" great light.~." and so impressively call the neophyte's attention to its importance'! Why not displace it, and in its stead use" Macaulay's History of England" or" Michaud's History of the Crusades?" For shame! l\Iasonry without the Word of GOD, under whatever title or llame it may be called, is but a bare and worthless skeleton.

To the above, Bro. Brown added some very terse utterances. him:

Hear

We say unhesitatingly, and without fear or favor, that any man who does not believe in the authenticity of the Holy Scriptures should never seek admission into our Order; and if perchance we have any among us who do llot so believe, our advice to all such would be to do as an acquaintance of ours, who had been a consistent member of the


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Order for many years, did. Unfortunately for him. in an evil hour he joined Col. Ingersoll's baud of disbelievers in the authenticity of the Holy Scriptures, and knowing well that he could not carry water on both shoulders with safety, he did what any honest man and Mason would do. His belief in Il1gersollism being the strongest, he severed his connection with Masonry. \

As a reader and teacher of the Bible from a standpoint other than Masonry, this writer is glad to say that the Word of God is veTy safe in the care and. custody of the English-speaking Masons of the vVorld. That Holy Book will never fall into disuse among them, but it will be as well preserved as was the "Book of the L31W," so long lost but brought to light by the ;'eal and diligence of the Craft. Bro. Brown is as sound in his views of the evils of Intemperance and Profanity as any Committee in the land. After quoting from the noble utterances of Grand Master Darrah, of Illinois, Bro. Brown said "Amen ". as follows; . Every word of the above quotation is as true as the Gospel, and all know it well, yet the evil still exists in our ranks, without let or hindrance. in defiance of moral and Masonic law as well as common decency. The question is often asked, why is this state of affairs allowed to exist? 'l'he answer, we think, is plain and unmistakable., The Craft are afraid to do their duty. The officers and members of the various Lodges la.r.k the sand and the moral honesty to enforce the law. A little determined and honest work would soon set these matters right. Spend less time in trying to find out the best wa.y to avoid the enforcement of the law, and seek the best way to punish the evil doer. As much as we rep;ret and deprecate it, we have among us vicious and wicked men who have gained admission within our temple. Some in high places, who indUlge in evils the Grand Master so severely and justly condemns. We have heard high officials swear like pirates and have seen them drunk as "Bacchus," and otherwise disgrace themselves and by such vicious habits bring the Fraternity into disrepute. â&#x20AC;˘

It is hardly necessary for the Missouri Committee to say more than he has been saying for ten years past in his reviews. Bro. Brown has not. been alone in his observations. This jurisdiction is cursed with as many profane members, "who swear like pirates," and drink like fish, as Kansas or any other State. Snch men have no more appreciation of the moralities of Masonry than Bro. Brown's pirates.

Bro. Brown, like others, favors a "Masonic Congress" or Convention. Such "Congress," by an una,nthorized call, is to convene in Chicago during the present year. As our Grand Lodge has not appointed anyone to attend, and as representation is n,ot desired by this writer, nothing need be said. As the gathering is to be voluntary, none will be blamed who volunteer to remain at home. The highest reason met with in favor of the Convention -is this: "A meeting of the kind can do no harm." Bro. Brown does not favor the frequent changes of Grand Masters. Hear him: This leads us to remark that in our humble judgment the changing of Grand Masters from year to year is of doubtful propriety, and this luxury should never be indul~ed in at the expense of the great body of the Craft. As a general rule (and we speak from personal experience of many years of official work) there are but few who are called to till the exalted station of Grand Master, who are able to bring to this high office the experience and training that is so essential and necessary to the success of the administration of its incumbent. We can hardly think it possible that any Brother can serve the Craft as well the first as he could do the second year, hence we should be slow to make these changes.


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If Kansas should ever have the experience of some of the older jurisdictions, the" luxury" mentioned by Bro. Brown ,v"ill be found in one term, and the shorter the term the greater the luxury. Bro. Brown complimented the Missouri Proceedings, for 1886, with a five-page notice. He characterized the Address of Grand Master Boyd as "excellent." Bro. Brown knows" excellent" things when he sees them. Extended extracts were made by him from the Address of Bro. Boyd. His extracts from, and comments upon, the work of Missouri's Grand Secretary and Committee. are gratefnlly received because they come from a Brother of capacity and sincerity. He said: Bro. John D. Vincil, Grand Secretary, furnishes the Grand Lodge with a most excellent Report, showing the official work done by that faithful and efficient officer. The Craft of Missouri may well feel proud of'the Grand Secretary's exhibit of Masonic affairs, especially the financial. They never had greater cause for congratulation than they now have. For this favorable condition of the Grand Lodge no one has done more to bring it about than John D. Vincil, and none know this better than the Craft he has so long and faithfully served. He most heartily agrees with the Grarid Master of Alabama, that a Brother who had been honored by his Brethren with a seat in the Grand Lodge, his expenses all paid, should attend its sessions and promptly and faithfully perform his dUI.y, as the Represeutative of his Lodge. not go in on the morning of the first day to see his name placed by the committee on the list of Delegates attending and then retire in good order to retum no more to disturb the Grand Lodge until the paymaster" commences paying off the workmen,.unless it be that he grew a trifle generous in a thoughtless moment, and called out some friend and Brother to take a thimbleful of lightning or forty rod straight with him as the Grand Lodge was nearing its close and they would soon part. We are plell.8ed to say for Kansas Masons we have but little cause for complaint in this direction, perhaps it may be owing to the fact that we have no Montgomery or 8t. Louis,where larking is even fairly good. Seriously we think this is a matter worthy of our consideration, and it is about time Grand Lodges were takin~ some notice of these violations of trust and favor, by our Brethren. If they will not faIthfUlly perform their duties, cut off the per diem and mileage. We afprehend this remedy will be considered by some as a tri1le heroic, perhaps it is, but it wil very soon put an end to all such derelictions of duty, and the prompt attendance of Delegates at the future sessions of the Grand Lodge will be marked. .j

Bro. Brown is so frank and clear headed that it is always a pleasure to review him and his Grand Lodge doings. He will acknowledge the mistakes of his o,vn body as readily as he detects errors in others. Last year this Committee pressed pretty heavily npon a ruling of Grand Master Miller, "that a member could not be brought to trial where personal service could not be made upon him." Bro. Brown sees and feels the injustice of such a ruling, and bows his head in deference to the animadversions of this Committee. Hear him: . Bro. Vincil, we most heartily agree with you in regard to the evil effects of such law and we think we are safe in saying that our law in this particular will at our next Annual Communication be somewhat modified, and made to conform to rights of the Lodges as well as the great body of the Craft and not furnish scamps a way to escape justice.

He takes leave of this Committee thus: The best of friends must part. So good-by, Brother, until another year; if Providence permit, we hope to talk again with you.

To the kindly expressed hope of meeting again allow a warmhearted, old fashioned" Amen." HENRY COOK, Oswego, G. M. JOHN H. BROWN, Wyandotte, G. Sec.


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KEN'fU(JKY, 1886. 'l'he Eighty-seventh Annual Communication was held at the Masonic Temple, in Louisville, beginning October 19th, 1886. M. W. Bro. B. G. 'Witt, Grand Master, presiding; R. W. Bro. Hiram Basset, Grand Secretary. There were present fourteen Past Grand Masters, thirty-eight Representati ves of Grand Lodges, a large list of Past Masters, and Delegates from Lodges. The journal does not furnish a statement of the number of Lodges represented, nor on the roll. The Grand Secretary fails to foot up the number of Lodges in that State. The membership is shown to be less than 14,000. The Address of Grand Master Witt was quite lengthy, covering thirty-three pages. He furnished, at the opening, some historical items. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky was organized October 16th, 1800. The Grand Lodge was, therefore, eighty-six years old at its last session. The Grand Master said that Kentucky furnished one of the brightest stars in the galaxy of Masonic bodies in this country. He claims that a number of the Grand Lodges of the land were children of Kentucky, and that a much larger number were the grand-children of that jurisdiction, Missouri included in the number. The Freemasonry of Missouri, like her population, is largely descended from Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. From his opening this is taken: Nearly 270,000 of the 600,000 Brethren of the mystic tie in the United States owe their Masonic life to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, having been made Masons in Lodges chartered by this Grand Lodge or some one of her numerous progeny. With a pride that is justifiable we may look over this mighty army of the faithful, and with hearts full of gratitude to Him who hath put this great honor upon us; to Him who hath planted the prolific seed in the ferfile soil of the Dark and Bloody Ground nearly a century ago, and who, in His providence, hath watered it with His blessing, causing it to blossom with the sweet flowers of brotherly love' and truth, and its many branches to bear abundantly the blessed' fruits of relief and charity; to Him who hath kept us and permitted us again to meet in Grand Lodge, should we render heart-felt thanks for His goodness to us and to our Order, and, recognizing our obligations to Him, to the Craft, and to each other, let us enter upcm the duties which lie before us. It is my duty now to render unto you an accouut of my stewardship, and report for your consideratioll my official acts as Grand Master during the year that is past;

In treating of the present state of the Fraternity in Kentucky, Grand Master Witt furnished the following statements: Soon after entering upon the duties of my office I received numbers of letters from Brothers all over the country making inquiry as to how they might obtain dimits, being members of Lodges whose Charters had been surrendered and the books withheld or destroyed, or members of Lodges which were practically dead, having ceased to hold meetings. The receipt of so many letters of tillS character led me to make an examination of the statistics of Grand Lodge for ten years past, and I confess, Brethren, that I was astounded at the result of this examination, as you doubtless will be when you hear it:


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[Oct.

Appendix. The number of affiliated Masons in the State in 1876 Number reported 1885

21.237 14,823

Net :?~~bet;~ul~:~ed·::::::::::.·::::·.·:::::::::.. Number dimitted

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::10:378 6,414 7,:)4;) 17.923

Add to this the number lost by death and expulsion and the figures indicate a state of affairs which calls for your most serious consideration, all of this occurring, too, during a period of time in which the population of the State has increased in a proportion almost as marvelous as has been our decrease in numbers. This loss by dimission and suspension has, however, in a measure been offset by the reinstatement and admission of probably thirty per cent, of the loss and the initiation of 8,332 new members. It is true that all of this loss occurred during the first five years of the decade, and that the roll of membership will now show some hundreds larger than five years ago.

After an extended review of the situation, the GrandMaster placed the matter before the Grand Lodge thus: Now, Brcthre~, the responsibility is with you as to the disposition which shall be made of these Lodges, and the Grand Lodge cannot a~ain evade the responsibility. The . Charters, or some of them, at lea.',t, are in your posseSSIOn, and you must dispose of them. The books and property, in some instances, seem to have been made away with, or at least they have disappeared, and you have the added responsibility of protecting the property interests of Grand Lodge in the effects of these defunct Lodges. J>EL'lNQUENT LODGES.

The subject of Delinquent I~odges in Kentucky has certainly been a very troublesome one. During the year 1885, a former Grand Master had caused sixty Lodges to be summoned to appear before the Grand J~odge, and show cause why their Charters should not be arrested. It is said that very few, if any, of these Lodges, answered' the' summons. To the present writer the history of the Kentucky troubles seems to be caused by over-taxing the membership, which led many of the Lodges to become delinquent, and members to lose interest and fall behind in their dues. Then suspension for non-payment of dues followed. They have a law in Kentucky, which requires the vote to be unanimous by which a member can be reinstated for the non-payment of dues. Su~h a law will keep thousands of Masons from returning to the Lodges from which they had been suspended. The Grand Master \'ery earnestly urged the Grand· Lodge to wipe out of the Constitution that" unmasoni~ law," as he terms it. It is not to be wondered at that the membership in Kentucky has been growing smaller year by year. Whether the members who ·allowed themselves to be suspended for non-payment of dues, did so from the proper motives, makes but little differenc~. Having once been suspended, th~re is yery small hope or prospect of their being restored to good standing, with such a law as· has prevailed in that State so long. To require a ballot at all for the reinstatement of a Mason who was suspended for non-payment of dues is unjust. V/hen thu~ susp-ended he is deprived of privileges only until the cause is re-


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moved. \Vhen the dues are paid the cause for suspension ceases, and by right he should return to his former standing without action of the, Lodge, unless he bad remained under suspension for a long term of years. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master reported a number of most sensible rulings. The following extracts are made from what he said: Can a Lodge hold a fair for the purpose of raising money to pay incumbrance on Lodge-room?

Answer-Yes. Is it lawful to raffle articles at a Masonic fair?

Answer-No: any violation of the laws of God or of the State is a violation of Ma-

sonic law. Raffling is gambling: gambling is a violation of the moral law and of the laws of the State. A raffle should not be permitted in connection with any entertainment controlled by a Masonic Lodge. Upon what class of papers should the seal be used?

Answer-Upon all official documents, whether issued by the Lodge or by order of the

Master.

A Brother was, upon tria1, found guiltY of unmasonic conduct. The question was, shall he be expelled? The Master voted. 'When the vote was counted it was found to be a tie. The Master then voted again. Did he have a right to vote twice?

. Answer-No. The Master can vote but once upon any question:

expel was lost.

Will you grant me

11

The motion to

dimit '!

Answer-No. Your Lodge alone has the power to grant )'ou a dimit. 'Vill you grant a Dispensation to confer degrees out of time?

Answel路-No. The Constitution of the Grand Lodge forbids it. MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Master had the following to say respecting the Masonic Home of Kentucky for Widows and Orphans: .Brethr~n, so much eloquence has been ex~nded in the treatment of the subject of our Home III recent years that I feel that nothmg has been left for me to say, even if I had the ability to speak upon such a subject as it deserves. And I shall have to content myself with a statement of a few of the prominent events which have occurred. bearing upon the interests of the Home in the year that is past. The statement of the Board of Directors. which will be submitted to you at this session, will explain ill detail, and better than I could hope to do, all the matters of interest connected WIth the Institution. You know as well as I do the mighty good which has been accomplished through this instrumentality in the past. It is or should be a matter of congratulation to us that its influence for good is no longer confined to our own jurisdiction. For the seeds of a good example which we planted here, in the building and partial endowment of this our Home, have been borne on the winds of a kindly Providence all over this broad land of ours and have taken deep root in the kindly hearts of true Craftsmen in nearly everv Grand Jurisdiction in the country; and the sound of the axe and the gavel is heard abroad in the land as the timbers are hewn and the stones are squared out of which shall be erected these new Temples to charity, where the widow and the orphan shall be cared for and the desolate made happy. Yes, Brethren, we builded better than we knew, for


62

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[Oct.

another and a better branch has been added to the wreath of immortelles which rests upon the brow of this Grand Order. And the building of magnificent structures called Masonic Temples, erected for the admiration of men and for gain. will soon cease, and all the energies of the Craft be directed to the building of a far more glorious Templethe temple of practical charity - wherein the widow and the orphan shall be cared for. On November 2ith, 1885, M:. W. Myron M. Parker, Grand Master of the District of Columbia, and Bros. M. Trimble and A. T. Longlcy, of the National Garfield Masonic Memorial Association of Washington City, visited the IIome, bringing with them a donation of one thousand dollars from that Association. They were received with every courtesy by the Directors of the Home, and returned fully satisfied with the wisdom of their choice in selecting our Home as an object of their beneficence. Pressing business eng~ements made it impossible for me to meet these Brethren. But I endeavored, as best I could, in a letter, to convey to them the sentiments with which the Masons of Kentucky would receive their magnificent donation. The very handsome Chapel at the Home, the gift of Louisville Masons, ha"ving been completed, was, on April 11th. in the name of the Great Jehovah, solemnly dedicated to Freemasonry, to virtue, and to universal benevolence. . The Louisville Masons, as usual, celebrated St. John's Day with a picnic for the benefit of the Home, and met with their usual splendid success, turning over to the Home something more than four thousand dollars as the net rcsult of their effort. DISPENSATIONS.

Quite a number of Dispensations have been granted by the Grand Master, under which two new Lodges have been created. PAST MASTERS' DEGREES.

It affords this writer much pleasure to see the independent manner

in which Grand Masters, Grand Lodges and Committees are speaking out against this thing called a Past Masters' degree. The following extract from the Address of Grand Master 'Witt is deem"ed appropriate: I desire to submit to Grand Lodge a question which has often occurred to my mind. What is the necessity for the Past Masters' degree as a prerequisite for holding the office of Master of a Masonic Lodge'! The rulings of this Grand Lodge on this subject !tppear to be almost ridiculous. In the same paragraph, Digest, page 111, you accord to a Cbapter P!1st Master the very fullest recognition by permitting bim to be installed as a Master without again receiving the degree in a Lodge of actual Past Masters, and immediately follOWing this, you deny him the privilege of being present in a Lodge of actual Past Masters. In fact, there appears to be no such thing as a Lodge of actual Past Masters; it is merely a convocation; no records are kept, and there is no written evidence of a conference of the degree. A~ain, this Grand Lodg'e has ruled that the officers elect of a Lodge shall be install~d Immediately after their election, and no provision is made by which the Master-elect shall receive the Past Masters' degree, while even if there was time and opportunity for the conference of the degree, it frequently occurs that suitable persons duly qualified as actual Past Masters cannot be found to do the work. Why not relieve our statutes"of these seeming absurdities and abolish the Past Masters' degree?

Yes, "Why not?" Make the record consistent, and place the degree of Past Master where it belongs - out of the Lodge curriculum. The idea of conferring a degree called Past MASTER upon one who has not been installed, thereby making him a Past officer before he even路 fills the chair, much less passes it, is ludicrous and anomalous. More anon. This brief review of the Address of Grand Master Witt must close with the statement that it is a very superior and excellent paper.


1887. ] '

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Full and extended reports were made by the Grand Secretary and Grand 'l'reasurer, also by the Committees on Appeals, Finance and Jurisprudence. The Grand Lodge granted Charters for the formation of three new Lodges, and established one under Dispensation. Much business was transacted during the session of a local character. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky carries a fearful load in the way of mileage and per diem. Three dollars per day during the session and eight cents per mile for traveling, will bring Representatives "from Galilee, and from Decapolis, and from Jerusalem, and from Judea, and from beyond Jordan." Kentucky Masonry deserves to live in view of its" Home" enterprise, and surely will survive if it can stand a lottery and mileage and per di,em, with the loss of twenty thousand members in one decade. SALOON KEEPING.

The following resolution was presented and referred to the Committeeon Jurisprudence: WHEREAS, The use of intoxicating liquors as a beverage is the greatest detriment to the growth and prosperity o~ the Masonic Fraternity; therefore, .

Resolved, That the business of saloon keeping or selling as a beverage intoxicating liquors by the drink be deemed a Masonic offense and punishable as other offenses against Masonry.

The Committee on Jurisprudence reported concerning the above resolution, as follows: Your Jurisprudence Committee to whom was referrerl the resolution of Bro. Howard, of Lodgc No. 344, and Bro. Hunt, of Dallasburg, No. 621, in regard to the use of intoxicating liquors. would report that we deem this matter of too much importance to be hastily considered by the committee, and we, therefore, submit said resolution to the Grand Lodge without any recommcndation thercon.

If the Jurisprudence Committee declined to grapple the whiskey devil in Masonry, the Grand Lodge "Jas not afraid to make a deliverance against it as an evil which "is the greatest detriment to the growth and prosperity of Freemasonry," for a motion was made to adopt the resolution, making saloon keeping, by Masons, a Masonic offense, and punishable as other offenses against Masonry. Thus Kentucky, that grand old commonwealth, has placed herself in line with Missouri, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Arkansas, Ohio and other jurisdictions. It has been declared by these several Grand Lodges that saloon keeping, by Masons, is a moral and a Masonic crime. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Annual Report on Correspondence was made by Bro. James W. Staton. It covers 120 pages, rather small type, and is almost entirely a writt~n production, there being very few extracts contained in it. From the opening the following extrac~ is made:


64

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[Oct.

For the fifth time we commence our annual review of the Proceedings of our sister Grand Lodges, at least those who may favor us with their Proceedings. We hope to make a full and complete report, but this we cannot do unless we have a comptete file of all the Proceedings' we are in the habit of reviewing. We shall try to put our Report in a smaller compass than that of last year, and we are not able to see any good reason why this shall not be the case, because 路there Rre no great questions agitating the Masonic world at this time if we except the Quebec-England trOUbles, and the questions relating to this trouble have been fully discussed, and now there is nothing left but to act with the Grand Lodge of Quebec or quietly sit still and see the fight go on between the~e two powers. Which will the Grand Lodge do? This question should be answered boldly either the one way or the other. Personally we are on the side of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. and we have given our reasons therefor so clearly and so fully in our reports heretofore that there is no need to reiterate them here. The American Grand Lodges must uphold the doctrine of uneguivocal exclusive sovereign jnrisdietion, or else the interests and rights of everyone of them are in fearful danger. We may have more to sayan this mbject when we reach Quebec in our review.

He reviewed the Grand Lodge Proecedings of Missouri for 1885, giving us four pages of comments. In speaking of Grand Master Stevenson, he said: He is pretty severe on Masters and Lodges who fail to make proper provision for insurance of Lodge property. We endorse every word he says. Our voice has been heard more than once on this subject, and now, with Grand Master Stevenson, we openly and boldly say that any Lodge failin~ or neglecting to make proper provision for insurance, should be deprived of all relief whatever. He pays a worthy" tribute to fidelity" of the able Grand Secretary. Bro. Vincil. He commends the" :A:ome for the Indigent,'~ and we commend what he says relative thereto. We are free to say, and that without any disparagement to others, that the Address before us is the best we have come across in our present review, at least the best at this writing. It is truly refreshing to take up such a paper and read it, and we confess to have read this one with singular interest.

Bro. Staton complimented the Grand Secretary of Missouri in very high terms: The Report of the Grand Secretary is full and complete, giving details of all the work performed in his office for the year. He makes one recommendation which we heartily endorse, and that is a .. Register of Members," so that any member may be traced from his affiliation to his final disposal by death. dimit or otherwise. Bro. Vineil reports the work of mailing the Grand Lodge Proceedings began in just twenty-onc days after the close of the session.

. . From the comments of Bro. Staton on the Missouri Report for 1885, . a few extracts are herewith furnished: We now come to the most attractive feature of the volume, the Report on Correspondence, which is prepared and presented by the indefatigable and vigorous writer, Bro. John D. Vil1cil. To those who have read Bro. Vincil's reports there is no need of any commendations from us, and to those who have not read thcm we have only to ~ay that they have missed a rare treat. We serve notice now that we cannot take up this Report in its details and notice the many good things that crop out on every page, but we shall be compelled to barely skim its surface and notice only that which is most attractive. Bro. Vincil does not abate in his war on whiskey drinkers and'saloon keepers, and it will be no fault of his if this nefarious business is not finallv driven out of Masonic circles in 路Missouri. The same persistent efforts shouid be exercbed in every jurisdiction until they shall all be freed from this bane of society and disgrace to Masonry. Our views on this subject have been so well defined in other reports to this Grand Lodge that we do not care to go over the ground again. Suffice it to ~ay that we endorse the views as expressed by Bro. Vincil in this, as well as other reports, and hope he will continue his sledge-hammer blows until his own jurisdiction is cleared of the evils, and that his views may become contagious and take deep root in other jurisdictions.

'\Thy abate the war upon the most gigantic evil of the age? The blows of this writer will never cease while the evil remains, or power


1887.]

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65

of pen and voice may be his to wield. To Bro. Staton, the Missouri Committee would say: "'Veary not in well-doing," but "go over the ground again" until Kentucky, like Missouri, says to the saloon gentry in Masonry" QUJ'f THE BUSINESS or QUIT MASONRY." This jurisdiction will soon be cleared of the evil. Kentucky Masons took an advance step last year. Never fall back. Forward move. Bro. Staton further said of this Committee: He does not abate in his attacks on the subject of Grand Masters' prerogatives. He is sound on the "perpetual jurisdiction" doctrine, the Massachusetts departure, and Grand Lodge sovereignty, and thinks that the money spent in triennial conclaves mig-ht be better appropriated in Masonic charity. Yes, if the new" Home" now being inaug-urated by our MiRsouri Brethren could only command the money which will be spent at the coming Conclave to be held at St. Louis, it would have no trouble in raising an endowment fund that would run it for many years to come. Kentucky would be willing to take half of the amount which will be spent on that occasion, which, added to our endowment fund already on hand, would make it sufficient for years to come. The remarks of Bro. Vincil on triennials. in his Report of 1884, were suited to our mind exactly, and we would be glad if every Templar contemplating a ~ilgrimage to St. Louis could read them. We believe that thc larger portion contemplatmg such pilg-rimage would be content to stay at home and expend the amount in helping some of the great Masonic charities of the country. â&#x20AC;˘ .

Nothing is abated as to former deliverances against the abuses of Templarism. Those who have degraded this Knightly Order by debauching themselves, are held under the same reprehension now as in other years. But there are many manly men and noble spirits in this valiant and magnanimous Order. Never was this so fully exemplified as during the great gathering of Templars at our Conclave, in St. Louis, in 1886. The deportment of the Knights while here, the results of "Charity Day" and the general influence of the Conclave, elevated the standard of Templar character, as never before. From the" Conclusion" of Bro. Staton this final extract is taken: The year past has been to us one of considerable perplexity and annoyance, mixed with some sorrow and grief for the loss of our surviving parent, and aged and highly beloved father, who left the shores of earth for a home in tbe celestial world in March last. He had been a Mason for many years, devoted to its teachings and the promotion of its interests. Up to a short time before his death he was always punctual in his attendance at the Lodge and Chapter meetings, often having to be assisted up and down stairs. He was laid away by a few loving Craftsmen with the honors of Masonry. We hope to meet him on the banks of eternal deliverance. While we have had some troubles, we have also had much pleasure. So, taking it all in all, we have doubtless fared far better than we deserve, and wc are content.

To Bro. Staton, the Missouri Committee would hereby convey assurances of fraternal regard and loving sympathy. May the son follow on singing: " We are traveling Home to God, In the 'Way our fathers trod."

JAMES "V. HOPPER, Lebanon, G. M. HIRAM BASSETT, Millersburg, G. Sec. H. B. GRANT, Louisville, ASSIstant G. Sec. G. L. Ap.-5.


66

.flppendix.

[Oct.

LOUISIAN A, 1887. The journal of Proceedings, now under consideration, is a large and interesting issue from the Grand East of Louisiana, containing over 350 pages. Its contents may be briefly summed up as follows: It opens with a very fine engraving of M. W. Bro..Joseph P. Hornor, the retiring Grand Master. There is a brief historical sketch of this distinguished Mason, written by Bro. J. A. Q. Fellows. There are found in the journal minutes of three Special Communications, at the first of which the corner-stone of the monument to the Confederate dead was laid. A short but very appropriate Address was delivered by the Grand Master, Bro. Hornor. Business proceedings of the session, tables, list of members by Lodges, and Report on Correspondence, make up the remainder of the volume. The Seventy-fifth Annual Communication was opened February 14t.h, 1887, in the city of New Orleans. M. W. Bro. Joseph P. Hornor, Grand Master, presiding; R. W. Bro. J. C. Batchelor was Grand Secretary. There were present six Past Grand Masters, with Representatives of twenty-five Gra'nd Lodges, and fifty-one Lodges of that jurisdiction. The membership in the Lodges of Louisiana amounts to 3,899. ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Hornor, covering thirty-eight pages, was one of the most thoroughly business documents to be found in the Proceedings of Grand Lodges. The opening portion was devoted to notices of several distinguished Brethren who had passed away during his term of office. The opening paragraph, which is herewith given, is a note of sorrow: During the past year we have lost from among us many' prominent Masons whose lives have been ornaments of our Order; whose places wIll be hard to fill, Ilnd whose memories we must ever cherish.

Concerning two distinguished Past Grand Masters, the following extracts will be of interest to the general reader: M. W. Bro. James L. Lobdell, Past Grand Master, died in Baton Rouge, on 19th September, and was buried the next day; both myself and R. W. Bro. McWilliams, Deputy Grand Master, were absent from the jurisdiction; it was impossible for R. W. Bro. Buck, Senior Grand Warden, to attend the funeral on account of the very short notice that WlIS given, but at his request, by tele~ram, the Grand Lodge was represented by R. W. Bro. F. M. Brooks, District Deputy Grand Master of that district. The private and Masonic history of the life of Bro, LObdell is familiar to you all; it is but two short years since he presided over your labors, and his devotion to our precepts and tenets needs no eulogy.


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"M. W. Bro. William R. Whitaker, Past Grand Master, died at Montello, Wisconsin, on 13th November, and his remains, at his request, were taken to Boston for interment; I was advised of his demise by tele~raph, and of his desire to be buried with Masonic honors, and,.in compliance therewlth, r telegraphed and wrote to the Grand Secretary of Massachusetts, requesting the Grand Lodge of that State to see that our distinguished Brother should be honored with a Masonic funeral; a prompt acquiescence was returned by telegraph, and on the arrival of his body our Past Grand Master was laid away among the graves of his friends and relatives by the kindly hands of our Brethren of Massachusetts, and his last wishes were thus fulfilled.

He also noted the death of quite a number of other leading members of the Fraternity, both at home and in other States. BUSINESS.

The document now under consideration shows plainly that the Grand Master fully comprehended the situation of affairs in. the Grand Jurisdiction over which he so ably presided. It is evident that he had well in hand the business affairs of the Grand Lodge. He estimated the resources and liabilities of the Grand Lodge, and showed that financially they were falling behind, and that there would be a deficiency of not less than $1,000 for the next Masonic year. Besides this the Grand Lodge is carrying a debt of no sUlall amount, considering the size of the jurisdiction, with a membership of less than 4,000. The matter will be best understood by an extract from the very practical business statement of Grand Master Hornor, which is here given: I commend to your serious attention, the subject of what shall be done with the remainder of the real estate belongin~ to .the Grand Lodge, known as the" Temple property." This consists of the Kround upon which the foundation of the Temple has already been laid; of that occupied by the Avenue Theatre, and of the two unsold lots on Delord Street. The Grand Lodge has now held this property for nearly twenty ycars, and durin~ that time, besides the amount of the purchasc price thereof, has paid out on account of the same in interest, the enormous sum of $68,808.90. This amount added to the sum of $30,000 which is about the price paid for the ground set apart for the Temple. and add also the further sum of $30,000 paid for the foundation, makes a total sum of $128,808.90, which this Grand LodKe has up to this date spent for the new Masonic Temple. r cannot see that we have any nearer prospect now of completin~ the building than we had when the foundations were laid, with the prospect of a future still more unfavorable to the completion of the undertaking; and there can be 110 doubt in the mind of anyone, that the amount of money thus paid out by tbe Grand Lodge, in principal and interest, has been entirely too larKe for any advantages that could possibly be expected therefrum. Tbe property has not increased in value during the twenty years that it bas been held by the Grand Lodge, but r tbink. on the contrary, that it is not worth now by one-half as much as it was when it was purchased: it certainly is not worth more now tban it was then. The amount of $68,808.90 spent for interest thereof hll.s, in reality, been wasted, for neither the Grand Lodge nor the Craft have received any benefit from it, it bas merely served to enable the Grand Lodge to carry a lot of real estate wbich has been constantly decreasing in value. . TEMPLE.

The following extract is made for a purpose: For the space of nearly a generation, the Grand Lodge has struggled and labored to build the Temple for the benefit of posterity; there is no reason to believe that, in the course of another generation, the Grand Lodge would be able to complete tbe work. 1 would be greatly pleased, however, if some plan can be matured by which the Grand Lodge could retain possession of the Temple property proper, and provide in some definite manner for the completion of the work; but to do this, it is absolutely necessary that an ample and permll.nellt financial arrangement should be made by which tbe debt sbould be extinguished, and a fund created for the building of the Temple, whicb would be beld inviolaole for tbat purpose.


68

Appendix.

[Oct.

The object of selecting the above is to say that nothing is more obvious than that our Louisiana Brethren are embarrassed by a Temple enterprise. From the clear and forcible presentation of affairs by Bro. Hornor, in the foregoing extracts, it is evident that his Grand Lodge is suffering from. TOO MUCH TEMPLE.

Missouri tried the experiment, and it was a costly one. Temple elephants are expensive luxuries. REINSTATEMENT.

The subject of Reinstatement of Masons is very carefully and ably treated by the Grand Master in the following statements: REINSTATEMENT OF II1ElIlBERS.

Great good has resulted from the adoption, at last Annual Communication, of the resolution providing for the reinstatement of Brethren suspended for nonpayment of dnes. by a majority vote on payment or remission, or part payment and part remis~;ion, of the amount due at time of suspension, and by its operation not only has the Order gained back a goodly number of worthy members, but the Lodges themselves have further benefited by receiving considerable sums of money in compromise with delinquents, which otherwise would not have come into their cotfers.

Respecting a proposed amendment on the subject, he quoted the proposition and protested wisely against its adoption. Here are both: Provided, that an application for reinstatement shall be read at one stated meeting and laid over for action until the next stated meeting, due notice having been given, in writing, to the members of the Lodge of the intended actioq." I hope that this amendment will not be adopted; as I have said the law, as pa.c;sed by you. at yonr last Annual Communication, has been found to work well, und is popular; there is no need to require so much formality for the restoration of a Brother to his membership; the way should, on the contrary, be made easy for him and the Lodge door should be held as widely open as possible. Once a Mason he is always a Mason, 110 matter how much he owes the Lod~e, and the greater facility that is given him to resume his fraternal workings with hiS Brethren, so much the greater benefit will it be to him and to the Craft at large. Let us remember the parable of the lost lamb, and be glad to welcome our returning Brethren. II

Despite the views of Grand Master Hornor, the above amendment was adopted. Under the head of Unfinished Business, he treated of the subject of District Deputy Grand Masters in a very practical and judicious manner: I regard the proposed making of District Deputy Grand Masters members of this Grand Lodge, very important to your interests. Those officers are charged with grave and important duties, which, if well performed, inure greatly to the bene/it of the Craft, and any measure tending to promote that end, and to insure the presence of those officers at our meetings, ought to be adopted, and the proposed legislation ought to have that effect by increasing the dignity, consideration and value of the office.

Such officers should be recognized as members of the Grand Lodge on account of their valuable services and varied experience. In Mis-


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souri they have always been accorded membership in the Grand Lodge. A very large per cent. of our Grand Masters, for the last thirty years, has been drawn from the ranks of our District Deputies. On the subject of Constitutional QUOl:um, he presents views which are eminently proper, and they are herewith given: CONSTITUTIONAL QUORmf.

By the Constitution of the Grand Lodge, it is provided that that instrument cannot be altered or amended at any session unless there be present, by their Representatives, one-half of the total number of the Chartered Lodges of the jurisdiction; for six vears pa.<;t there hus not been present such It sufficient number, and propoHed amendmerits of the Constitution, the reception of which had been assented to by a majority of the Grand Lodge, have had to lie over from year to year, awaiting for action the time when a Constitutional quorum should be present. The urgent necessity that such a quorum should be obtained, must be apparent to you all, and it is certainly very discouraging to think that our meetings should not be better attended. 'rhere is but one remedy for this evil, and that lies in the more strict enforcement of our laws; for our Constitution itself pro· vides that" all Lodges which shall have failed to make their returns and pay their dues, or to hold their regular meetings and elect their ofl1cers, 01' to be 1'c]Jresented in the Gmnd Lodge for two successive years, shall forfeit their Charter." If this .f1.lndamCTItalla1lJ of 01/.1' organ'izal'ion was carried out the total number of Chartered Lodges would be so milch reduced that a quorum for amending the Constitution would be had at every Annual Communication.

In Missouri a session cannot be held unless there is present a constitntional quorum. Representatives from thirty Lodges constitute our quorum, with "one of the first four elective Grand Officers" to preside. In Louisiana there must be two quOrl1111S, the business quorum, and the one necessary to alter or amend the Constitution. They have not had the latter for six years, says Bro. Hornor. 'Vhy not have only one quorum? On the subject of Revision of the Law, the following matters are treated of, and seem to be necessary. But how about the Constitutional Quorum? REVISION OIo' THE LAW.

I think that the condition of our written law requires your very serious attention. As it now stands, it forms a bulk of matter that might be very greatly reduced, to the

advantage of its proper understanding, applicability and execution. The Constitution, By-Laws and ·Edicts have so grown by annual additions and amendments as to be at least unwieldy, if not in some respects incomprehensible; some of the provisions have become useless, and many are so similar that they could be well consolidated. With the experience that we have gained since the last revision, a great many of the Edict..c; could be very simply expressed in the By-Laws, and it is a fact that cannot be disputed that the more simple a law, the more easily it can be understood and obeyed.

• In treating the subject of Joint Occupancy of Halls, he represents views held by the Grand Lodge of Missouri a$ shown in the following extract : Following the example of Past Grand Master Graham, approved by you last year, I have exercised the dispensing power by allowing the joint occupancy, in several special cases, by Masonic Lodges, of rooms also used by other secret societies. I am as utterly opposed to joint occupancy as any Brother can possibly be, but, in all the cases where I have allowed it, I have been satisfied, from proofs laid before me. that the granting of Dispensation allowing the same, was necessary to save the life of the Lodge requiring it.

/'


70

Appendix.

[Oct.

Such has been the experience and practice of Missouri Masons for many years. Objectionable as is joint occupancy, yet it is a condition for which no general remedy has been found in our jurisdiction. WORK.

The subject of Work clairned the attention of the Grand Master, upon which he presented some of the most sound and sensible views to be met with in Grand Lodge Proceedings; Since I have been a member of this Grand Lodge, for twenty-six years, there has never been had before it an exemplification of the work, and this is a fact greatly to be deprecated. 'fhe mission of Freemasonry cannot be effectually carried out without a proper understanding of the degrees, and the proper communication of our mysteries; the great desirability of uniformity, so far as attamable, is apparent, and this cannot be achieved without a frequent excmplification before the Grand Lodge. Our history on this subject shows that every effort has been tried, and numerous experimcnts have been made to accomplish this object, save the only one in which there is really any efficacy, and that is exemplification at our Annual Communications. We have always had a very efficient Committee on Work, and the holding of Lodges of Instruction have undoubtedly done a great deal of good; but perfection, or anything approaching to perfection, can only be obtaincd by the free exchange of knowledge and ideas between the Brethren from all parts of the juriSdiction, assembled, through their Representatives, in our yearly gatherings. 'fhe only reason that can be given why this very essential matter has not been attended to, is that the Grand Lodge has been so mueh absorbed by other business that it had no time to devote to this purpose. That is not a good or reasonable excuse for the omission of so important a duty; the preservation of our esoteric work in its purity and its proper dissemination among the Brethren, which can only be done orally, is much more important in the opinion of many of the Brethren than any other business which we annually assemble to consider and dispose of; and I propose that at this session an attempt, at least, shall be made to impart some instructions in this important matter.

The Grand Lecturer agency would remedy the defects mentioned above, if employed and regulated as in Missouri. The system, as adopted and worked in this jurisdiction, has secured a degree of perfection not found elsewhere by this writer. STATE OF THE ORDER.

From a careful consideration of this question, Grand Master Hornor presents the following views; From my personal observations, correspondence received during the year, and from reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters, I am satisfied that there is a better feeling amon~ all the subordinate Lodges throughout the State. More enthusiasm has been exhibIted; many more Returns than usual have been received on time, more dues than usual have been paid, and other evidences have been exhibited showing that greater interest is taken III our work and meetings, all of which must soon develop into a revival of our long lost prosperity.

"Long lost prosperity!" 路What a sad tale is told by these three words. Prosperity lost! Lost long since. Why? In all such cases the local physician must find out the cause and recommend the remedy. This COlllmittee is too far away to advise, whatever may be his opinions, Besides gratuitous suggestions are not well received, as a rule. Bro. Hornor said:


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One of the alleged causes of the declension of some of our Lodges is the system of life membership adopted by them. by which members who have served, and regularly paid their dues for a certain number of years, or who have paid a specified lump sum, are thereafter exempted from paying dues. I admit that, for a long time, I was strongly in favor of this regulation, and believed that it would be productive of great good, but my later experience has caused me to entirely alter my opinion.

Being on the ground, Bro. Hornor does not thi~k "life membership" the cause of "declension." It may be "one of the causes." "Vhat are the others? QUEBEC.

On this vexed question Grand Master Hornor takes advanced ground, holding the doctrine that the Grand Lodge of England ought to be placed under the ban of non-intercouse. Here is what he says: There is but one real way to answer the insistence of the claims that the Grand Lodge of England puts forth, and that is to radically cut off all communication with her while she persists in her perverse, obstinate and useless opposition to those principles. I strongly recommend that we respond to the appeal of our Brethren of Quebec by an Edict of non-intercouse between this Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge of England.

The foregoing must suffice for a review of the Address of Grand Master Hornor. It is an exceptionally able and serviceable paper. The neeessity for such an officer at the head of affairs in the Grand Lodge of Louisiana is too evident to require more than mere mention. While the Grand Lodge may not lose the services of Bro. Hornor by his retirement from the office just vacated, yet he might have been more useful to the Craft by further official labors in its behalf. It is to be hoped that his successor may succeed. Having concluded the review of Grand Master Hornor's Address, it only remains to notice how the Grand Lodge acted upon his recommendations. It seems, from the minutes, that his views did not mee~ with unanimous approval. The Grand Lodge adopted the amendment against which he had protested, concerning reinstatement of those suspended for non-payment of dues. The Committee on Jurisprudence disagreed with the Grand Master as to the method of securing a constitutional quorum. The same Committee said that it was not necessary to revise the laws as suggested by the Grand Master. In respect to adopting rules of order, as mentioned by Grand Master Hornor, the committee said the Grand Master is sufficient in power for all rules of order. It was proposed to amend one of their sections, allowing seven Representatives of Lodges in the Grand I~odge to call for a vote by Lodges. The committee did not adopt "the views of the Grand Master concerning non-intercourse with the Grand Lodge of England. A resolution was adopted directing the Board of Directors of the Grand Lodge Hall to place upon the market and sell the Temple property and other real estate belonging to the Grand Lodge, including the ground upon which the foundation of the Temple has already been laid. The


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proceeds of such sale to be used in paying off the bonded debt. The Grand Lodge, by resolution, declared that it was not in keeping with the best interests or success of Masonry for the Lodges to continue what is known as life membership. The Grand Lodge also postponed consideration of the question affecting the relations with the Grand Lodge of England. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering 135 pages, was furnished for the committee by Bro. J. A. Q. Fellows. The review is conducted in a manner somewhat different from the custom now common with committees in the various Grand Lodges of this country. His discussions were conducted under the following heads: Subjects not now generally under discussion. Joint Occupancy of Halls. Physical Qualifications of Candidates. The Black Ball. The Resurrection of the Body. Perpetual Jurisdiction. Past Master's Degree. Grand Lodges and Grand Masters. Grand Lodges of Quebec, England, Australia, etc. Sociability of the Order. Object and Design of Freemasonry. Life Membership. NOll-affiliation, Suspension for Non-payment of Dues, etc. Foreign Grand Bodies.

He concluded 'his review as follows: The writer is sensible the foregoing falls short of the intention. The extent of the extracts is larger than was anticipated, but in doing justice to all could not be well made less. We flatter our~elves the arrangement will please better than if presented in the. usual form. The whole is commended to as favorable consideration as justice will allow; and we only ask of our Brothers, the Reporters, a fair criticism of what we have advanced.

eHAS. F. BUCK, New Orleans, G. M. J. C. BATCHELOR, New Orleans, G. Sec.

MA.NITOBA, ISS"". The Twelfth Annual Session was opened in the Masonic Hall, in the city of Winnipeg, February 9th, 1887; M. W. Bro. Alfred Pearson, Grand Master, present and presiding; R. W. Bro. William G. Scott, Grand Secretary. Quite a number of Representatives of Grand Lodges, Past Grand Officers and Past Masters, besides Representatives of twentyfive Lodges were present. The membership in that jurisdiction amounts to ] ,5GS. The minutes show a gain of 22S. The Address of


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Grand Master Pearson covered twelve pages. He spoke of the wonderful progress of l\iasonry the world over, especially in their jurisdiction. He said the accessions to their ranks outnumbered any previous year. He announced that he had no Decisions to report. A long list of Dispensations was given. Seven new Lodges had been instituted under Dispensation. His report showed a large lot of Dispensations granted to do things which the law did not provide for. Power is a great thing when law is in the way. On the subject of the power of Grand Masters, he had this to say: POWERS 01路' GRAND MASTER.

Having given you a detailed statement of the Dispensations I have issued during the year. I cannot do better. I think, than quote the words of M. W. Bro. Day. Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Maine, every sentiment of which I endorse most heartily, and wonld recommend them to your most earnest consideration :-" There seems to be an idea in the minds of not a few Brethren (Masters of Lodges. too,) that the Grand :Master has power to set aside for the time being any provision of the book of Constitution of the Grand Lodge. and that in their case he ou~ht to do so. I have tried to explain that, while the Grand Master has almost unlimited power to do what he thinks best for the good of the whole Fraternity, he is as much bound to observe and obey the Constitution of the Grand Lodge as any member of a snbordinate Lodge; in fact, more so, for he is specially obligated to obey them. and he eould not consistently punish others for violatin~ laws which he has himself di~obeyed." Allow me also to express the hope that the Brethren. in future, when applying for DispenAAtioJls, will apply only for such as are not a clear setting aside of the Constitution, thereby relieving your Grand Master (being a constitutional one) of the pain of having to refuse to allow them to issue.

He called attention to the fact that the action of the Grand Lodge at a previous session, worked very well in securing membership on the part of those who had been non-affiliated. The Grand Secretary was complimented by the Grand Master in very high terms, as follows: I cannot. I think, in a more appropriate place than just here, express through you to our able and efficient Grand Secretary, R. W. Bro. W. G. Scott, the high appreciation I have of his invaluable services, not only to me personally, but to the whole jurisdiction. I have no fear of contradiction when I say that never in the history of our Grand Lodge has it had so efficient an officer occupying the Secretary's desk. After much correspondence to and fro, grave errors and irregularities have at last been rectified, and now he (the Grand Secretary) is able to present for your inspection a set of books in his office that, I firmly believe, are second to none. and may the Most High long spare him to us in that position which he now so worthily fills. OPENING AND CLOSING.

Under the above head, Grand Master Pearson had something to say about opening and closing Lodges. It will be best understood by the following extract: OPENING AND CLOSING.

Owing to our Constitution requiring business to be done in the third degree, and the bulk of our Lodges working- what is commonly known as the" Canada Work," a great deal of time is taken up in lowering and raising into the different degrees. and as our ritual does not allow of any short form being used. I would ask the Grand Lodge to consider the advisability of appointing a committee of well-skilled Brethren to adopt a short form. or else allow Lodges to open directly in the degree. I found my predecessor allowed a short form of lowering and raising, which I continued, provided always that the Lodge opened regularly in the first, second and third degrees, and then when closing down for that communication doing liO regularly in the third, second and first degrees.


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He announced with much pleasure that the relations of his Grand I...odge with other Grand Lodges of the world, were most fraternal and satisfactory. As to the condition of Masonry in that jurisdiction, he reported that a year of harmony and prosperity had been enjoyed. His mention of the dead of other jurisdictions, particularly that of Bro. Gurney, of Illinois, was vcry appropriate. The various District Deputy Grand Masters presented full and interesting reports. The Report of Grand Secretary Scott was an extended, fnll and cOlnplete one, embracing all matters of interest, both financial and general. The Grand Master's Address was endorsed most heartily and approved by the Board of General Purposes. This Board seems to have all the work to do in that Grand Lodge, and does it well. A resolution was introduced, declaring that no intoxicating beverages should be allowed at refreshment tables in the Lodge-rooms. There is no Report of the Committee on Correspondence, but a Committee was appointed for next year. THOMAS CLARK, 'Winnipeg, G. M. WILLIAM G, SCOTT, Winnipeg, G. Sec.

MARYLAND, 1886. The Grand Lodge met in the Academy of Music, in the city of BaltimOl'e, in its One-Hundredth Annual Session, November 16th, 1886. A session was opened by the Deputy Grand Master, R. W. Bro. George I.... McCahan, In due time the Grand Master, M. W. Bro. Thomas J. Shryock, appeared, and assumed the control of the body. The journal under review is ,,;ithout tables, footings or recapitulation. It is, therefore, impossible to state the number of Lodges, or the mem bel's in attendance. It is gathered from the Address of the Grand Master that the representation was quite large. 1'he Address of Grand Master Shryock covered twenty pages. He opened eloquently, and proceeded to business, giving an account ,of his official work for the preceding six months. The Grand Lodge having previously adopted a system of Grand Inspection, the Grand MaRter reported that it had worked admirably. He stated that the Brethren had studied the laws to such profit that he had not found it necessary to make any Decisions during the term. He had granted a Dispensation to form a Lodge to work in the German language. A Charter was granted to said Lodge


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during the session. The Grand Master reported that he had been present with others at the unveiling of a monument, erected at the city of Annapolis, to the memory of Baron DeKalb. On that occasion the orator of the day said: It was eminently proper that we, the Masons of Maryland, should unveil this statne of Bro. Baron DeKalb, he having been a member of the Maryland Army Lodge, as well as from the fact that everyone of the Generals of the Revolution were Freemasons with a single exception. Benedict Arnold, the traitor.

Grand Master Shryock said the rule of the Grand Lodge worked well, which requires Masters of Lodges to pass an examination as to their ability to confer the 'work before they were installed. Heretofore the Grand Lodge of Maryland has permitted six months' service as Master of the Lodge, to give him permanent membership. The Grand Master r~commended such rule be changed, and that permanent membership in the Grand I,odge could only be secured by service as Master for twelve months. His recommendation was adopted. He announced that when the report of the terrible calamity, caused by an earthquake at Charleston, South Carolina, was received, the Masons of Maryland subscribed $2,000 for the relief of the sufferers. Before this amount was sent, information was received that $1,500 was all that would be needed. The reports of the Grand Inspectors were furnished and printed in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master reported a reduction in their debt, amounting to $38,000. ,The present indebtedness seems to be $128,000. The gratifying announcement was made that the Grand Lodge is gradually getting into a better financial condition. The Grand Orator, Bro. J. M. Harris, delivered a very interesting and readable Oration. The Grand Officers were all re-elected, except the Grand Treasurer. There is no Report on Correspondence in this journal of Proceedings, as that Report is usually rendered at the Communication of the Grand Lodge in the month of May. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary reside in Baltimore.

MASSACHUSETTS, ISS6. The journal now under consideration is not consistent with itself. It opens with the statement that the regular Quarterly Communication was held in the 'Masonic Temple, in Boston, Decem bel' 8th, 1886. It is also headed Quarterly Communication. On the cover it is Annual Communication, December 8th, 1886. The Grand ~'laster opened his Address with this statement, "Again we are duly assembled in annual session." The Grand Master and the Grand Secretary may settle the


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queRtion of dates between themselves. It is sufficient to say there was a session held of some kind, which was presided over by Bro. Abraham H. Howland, Jr., with Sereno D. Nickerson, Grand Secretary. How many Lodges were represented cannot be determined withont counting, as there are no footings. From a statement in the Proceedings, it is learned that there are 28,163 members on the rolls. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Howland covers seventy-two pages, and embraces every possible subject belonging to the Grand Lodge business. From his opening, this extract is made: We may jnstly congratnlate ourselves and the Craft universal upon our progress and condition during the current year. Harmony and concord have prevailed among the Lodges; improvement has been made in our ritualistic ceremonies; our financial con路 dition, both in the Lodges and Grand Lod~e, shows increased balancc.~ on the right side; and fraternal rclationships have been contmucd and extcndcd. NECROLOGY.

Under this head the Grand Master made mention of the death of quite a number of Brethren. His allusions to tbe departed cover ten pages. VISITATIONS.

Nine pages were devoted to narrations of the many visits made by the Grand Master. Numerous 'Warrants and Dispensations for special purposes had been granted. The Grand ~faster made mention of the burial of Bro. William R. Whitaker, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. A reqnest had been received from Joseph P. Hornor, Grand Master, that Bro. 'Whitaker be buried by the Masons of Massachnsetts, according to his own request. Grand Master Howland declined to grant a Dispensation to form a new Lodge. He seems to think that there are Lodges enough in that jurisdiction. The election of Grand Officers took place, as is the custom, at this session. STATED COMMUNICA'l'ION.

This session was held December 28th, 1886, for the purpose of installing the Grand Officers-elect, who bad been chosen at the late annual meeting. During this session, a Past Grand Master's jewel was presented to Bro. A. H. Howland, Jr., the retiring Grand Master. The presentation address was made by the new Grand Master, Bro. Henry Endicott. Following the installation of officers came the annual feast. This is an institution among our Massachusetts Brethren, and closes up . the ceremonies of the year. The Grand Secretary says, in reporting the occasion, that there were over 200 Brethren who sat down to wellsupplied tables and enjoyed the occasion greatly. But the most enjoy-


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able part came after the eating, when the" feast of reason and flow of soul" gave higher character to the feast-a mere animal enjoyment. The usual programme was followed, consisting of toasts and speeches, which continued to a late hour, when the happy occasion terminated with singing" Auld Lang Syne." This Grand Lodge never furnishes any Report on Correspondence, The Grand Master's and Grand Secretary's address is Boston.

MICHIGtlN, ISS7. There arc two Special Communications reported in the journal now under consideration. One was to lay the corner-stone of a Nonnal School and Business College. The other for the dedication of a Masonic Hall. Interesting and appropriate addresses were delivered on both occasions. The Forty-third Annual Communication opened in the city of Detroit, January 25th, 1887. M. 'Y". Bro. Michael Shoemaker was Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. William P. Innes was Grand Secretary. There were present twelve Past Grand Masters, and Representathes from a large number of Lodges. There are 354 Chartered Lodges on the roll, with a reported membership of 28,470. The income from all sources amounted to $11,706.85. The pay-roll footed up over $5,000consuming nearly one-half of the revenue. The Annual Address of the Grand Master is lengthy, and covered twenty-eight pages. It is pre-eminently a business paper, embracing statements of all matters to which the Grand Master had given attention during his term of ofii.ce. Three new Lodges had been instituted under Dispensation. l\IASONIC FUNER,/\LS.

Under the above head Grand Master Shoemaker gave utterance to the following vi~ws : I feel it to be my duty to call your attention to the subject of the observance of Masonic ceremonies at funerals. It is a matter that at this time is occupying" the attention of the Craft, in alllocalites where there are Commanderies of Kni~hts Templar, to an extent that makes it one requiring your serious consideration. It IS claimed by many Masons who have been for years active members of the Fraternity, and whose opinions on all subjects connected with the Craft arc formed with an eye single for the good of the Order, that in consequence of the performance of the burial service of all Masons who are Knights 'l'emplar, by the Sir Knights, with the ritual of the Commandery, the attendance at the burial of Master Masons, when conducted by the IAJdge is attended by but few in number, and to a great degrep, neglected. Purther, it is claimed that Master Masons, not Sir Knights, ought not to be precluded from attending as Masons the funeral of a Sir Knight, as they now practically are, lor the Commanderies are composed of most of the younger and more active members of the Lodges, and when the services are conducted by the Commandery, it takps from the Lodg-es most. if not all of their officers, and reduces their number so that they cannot appear as a Lodge if they wish to do so. The proper remedy, and one that wuuld prob路


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ably be satisfactory to the Commanderies, it has been suggested, is for the Grand Longe to require that all Masonic funerals shall be conducted by Master Lodges, and that a ~~~c~~~t~~~t;~o:~~;/~l~~:{~~~~~ Commanderies be requested to act as escort, when TWELVE MONTHS' RESIDENCE.

The following statements by the Grand Master were submitted for consideration: I have had several applications for special Dispensations to confer degrees upon petitioners who have not been residents in the jnrisdiction of the Lodges to which they applied, or wished to appl)', for the degrees" During the twelve months last preceding the application." As in these cases there did not appear to be an urgency that called for such an exercise of the prerogative of the Grand Master as practised by one of my predecessors I have on each application declined to grant a DispensatioIl. I would suggest, however, that it would be well if the Grand Lodge would definitely settle the question as to the dispensing power of the Grand Master on such petitions. as it has been held by the Grand Lodge that" A Grand Master has no power to dispense with any of the qualifications of a candidate prescribed b)' the regulations." The requests for Dispensations for this purpose will be made to every Grand Master, and there should be a settled policy, in order that the Brethren may dwell together in unity. FINANCIAL.

The Grand Master recommended for careful consideration the question whether Grand Lodge dues could not be reduced. His proposition was that the per capita tax should be reduced from thirty-five to twenty-five cents per member. The matter was referred to the Committee on Finance, which reported that the law should be amended by making the tax thirty cents. This report was referred tothe Committee on Jurisprudence, which approved the same, but upon a final vote the proposition was lost and the dues remain as before. MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Master stated that the Masonic Home Association, located at Grand Ral)ids, had been very successful in its efforts in promoting that enterprise. He said the liberality of the Fraternity, and the wise administration of the officers of the Association had resulted successfully. A farm of more than 100 acres had been purchased at a cost of $12,000, on which the Masonic Home is to be erected. LIQUOR SELLING UNM ASONIC.

The following was submitted on the above subject: Feeling that the time has arrived when more stringent laws should be adopted in regard to the use and sale of intoxicating liquors, I therefore wish to 1:1ubmit the following resolution to this Grand Lodge for their consideration, and hope that the same may receive due consideration: Resolved, That it shall be considered a MaSonic offense for any member of the Fraternity of this Grand Jurisdiction to deal in malt, fermented or spiritllous liquors as a beverage. and that the penalty for so doing shall be suspension or expulsion from the Lodge, at the discretion of the Lodge of which the Brother is a member,


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'Vhether the Grand Lodge considered the resolution more unmasonic than the business it reprobated, cannot be determined. Inferences are not admissible here. Yet the fact is strangely significant that the resolution was laid on the table. 'Will it remain there? Does it not voice the sentiment of a goodly number of Masons in that jurisdiction? Is not that number increasing? 'Will not that resolution, like Truth, rise again? Ah J the ground-swell on this subject is causing many to tremble and others to 'shriek with mingled fear and wrath. "The great day of His 'Wrath" IS at hand. God is ,,,ith this movement. In response to the call made for help in behalf of the people of Charleston, South Carolina, who suffered from the earthquake, a donation of $300 had been made. The Grand Master concluded his Address in the following terms: Freemasonry is essentially practical in its character, in its principles and in its works. Masonry is called Operative and Speculative, and these for all time have been worked in unison; but the Operative work is now of a di Iferent character from what it was when our ancient Brethren worked in the quarries. The nature and kind of Operative Masonry now required of the Brethren is clearly pointed out in the instruction given to. every member of the Fraternity. No apprentice in O:perative Masonry in the olden time ever received more definite or more complete instructIOn in his work than is now given the Freemason from his first entrance into a Lodge np to and including his lessons as a Master Mason. This it is, when thoroughly comprehended. that enables Masons to understand the character of their obli~ations and of the work they are now called upon to perform. That it is but a change III kind; and that the same or greater interest should now be taken in the doing of good works-in the spreading of the cement of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth-than when the trowel was used by Freemasons to spread the' cement that bound a building into one common mass. .

DECISIONS.

The Grand Master reported forty different rulings, from which this extract is made: Statement.-At our next regular, a colored minister is coming to visit our Lodge.

Question.-Have we a right to admit him '? Answer.-You have aright to admit him if heis in every other respect qualified. His color does not debar him. The Grand Lodge has decided that color does not disqualify for membership. that" Masonry color-hlind," and that it does not dictate what shall be the color of the members of its constituent Lodges, or of its l\fB..~ol1ic material." I.

The Committee on Masonic Jurisprudence reported on the above, as follows: In number fifteen, the Grand Master is asked if a Master has a right to admit a "colored minister" as a visitor; and decides that the Master has such right" if the applicant is in every other respect qualified, his color does not debar him." This is undoubtedly. correct; but we submit that, inasmuch as there are but few regulary Chartered Lodges of colored Masons, the Grand Master should have added that extra care should be taken by the Master to satisfy himself that the Lodge hailed from is a regularly Chartered Lodge.

There is a very large" IF" in the Decision of Grand Master 8hoemaker. It is respectfully submitted that" color" should not have been mentioned by the questioner. "Colored minister" was evidently in-


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tended to describe a .lYegro " minister." Why not say so? l'hat would have raised the only question that can be considered, viz., the legitimacy of "Negro Lodges." It is not a question of "color" or "race," but the "minister's" connection with a legally CONSTITUTED Lodge. "His color does not debar hill?" Was" Barkis willin" because of color, or because" qualified" in " every other respect?" Masonry is not "colorblind," but so far as heard from the Grand Lodges'in this country are not blind, any way, to the fact that Negro Lodges are irregular; nay, clandestine. The Grand Mastel' and the Committee on Jurisprudence should have said so. Will the Brethren of Michigan inform this writer where t.he" few regularly Chartered Lodges of colored Masons," mentioned in the above extract, obtained their Charters? 'Vill Bro. Innes kindly furnish some information upon' points now subinitted? The" few regularly Chartered Lodges of colored Masons" must have recei ved such Charters from some Grand Lodge, "authorizing them to meet and work." What Grand T,odge? Has the Grand Lodge of Michigan granted any of these "few" Charters? If so, why ask the question if a "colored minister" hailing from such Lodge, could visit another "regularly Chartered Lodge?" If there is a "regularly Chartered" Negro Lodge on the Roster of Michigan, it must and should be known. If there is no such Lodge Chartered by the Grand Lodge of Michigan, then there can be no "regularly Chartered" Negro Lodge in that jurisdiction.Because no other Grand Lodge can plant a legal Lodge in that jurisdiction. An attempt to do so, whether made by American or foreign Grand Lodges, would be resisted and resented by our Michigan Brethren, . Vias the" colored, minister," mentioned above, made a Mason in a "regttlarly Chartered" Negro Lodge iil some other jurisdiction. If so, who created these" regularly Chartered Lodges of colored Masons?" Some Grand Lodge must have done so, else they were not " regularly Chartered." What Grand Lodge did it? If some Grand Lodge has done this thing, and the right to do so is no't denied in its own territory, why has not the Masonicworld been informed of the fact? If any Grand Lodge creates such a Lodge in any jurisdiction but its own, the Lodge so created is not "regularly Chartered." If any jurisdiction has "regularly Chartered" Negro Lodges under its own obedience, this writer says, "Amen." It is, and has been his theory for years that all free-born Negroes should have "regularly Chartered" Lodges of their o\vn, created by our Grand Lodges and governed by them. Let them have legally constituted Lodges among themsel ves and to themsel ves, as they have schools and churches. Thus this colored race would have the benefits of Freemasonry, and the vaporings'about "color-blindness" \yould cease from the land. This is held to be the conservative view of the subject, and the writer hereof is indifferent to the adverse views of Brethren, whether North or


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South: He, being born and reared among the colored people of the South, and having ministered to them by thousands for thirty years, has known, and still knows, many, very many, whom. he would welcome to his own Lodge with heartiness and love. He would visit them in "regularly Chartered Lodges" as freely as he has gone to their homes to help t.hem in their sickness; marry their children, or bury their dead. He has often communicated instruction to them, far more sacred and valuable than any esoteric lessons ever imparted in a place which only represents the" Holy of Holies." He has often communed with them, and rejoiced, too, at an Altar more holy than the Altar of Freemasonry. It was the Altar of GOD. Through these agencies this writ.er has trained souls immortal for the skies, and has seen t.hem start home with shouts of victory to pass the valley of shadows without fear or danger, following their Divine Guide to the light BEYOND. Give the colored people" regularly Chartered Lodges," and this Committee would say to them, as he has said a thousand times, "God bless and prosper you." Having done much to elevate and save colored people in that which is higher than Masonry, I am not ashamed to avow the foregoing views as to our Institution in their behalf; but, in the judgment of this writer, "regularly Ohartered Lodges of colored Masons" in this country have yet to be created. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPO}{'!'.

The Report of Bro. Innes, Grand Secretary, both general and financial, is an able business paper. The \Vorsbipful Master of one of the Lodges was tried and indefinitely suspended, by the Grand Lodge, from all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry. The retiring Grand Master, Bro. Shoemaker, received the thanks of the Grand Lodge for the able and conscientious manner in which the dilties of his office had been discharged, and a jewel, appropriate to his position as Past Grand Master, was ordei'ed by the Grand Lodge. Much business was transacted during the sitting of the body, and the journal of Proceedings is a handsome work and well arranged. It is in keeping with former superior efforts of Bro. Innes. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report was rend.ered by Bro. William P. Innes, Committee, and is the largest of any received for review the present year. It covers over 300 pages. He announced. at the opening a new departure, having made more extracts from the doings of Grand Lodges, and fewer from what was said by the presiding Grand. Officers than heretofore. He gives the following reason: This year we give as full a synopsis of transactions reviewed as heretofore, but omit in all cases, quoting the opening or closing remarks of the presiding officers. ' G. L. Ap.-G.


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The adoption of this plari was arrived at after much thought, and with many regrets ; but to do justice to all required more space than we felt called upon to bestow. Our volumes had almost become cumbcrsome, and we had to cut off those most beautiful. and, in almost every case, happy sentiments conveyed in the Addresses of the several Grand Masters.

rrhis Committee prefers to condense the views of Grand Lodge transactions, and gi ve more of the sayings of Grand Officers. Bro. Innes reviewed forty-four Grand Lodges in the United States, six Canadian and four foreign. He had under consideration matters from anum bel' of bodies in Europe, about which this Committee knows nothing. Bro. Innes is always very kind in his treatment of the Missouri Proceedings, having given us the benefit of ten full pages in his Report.. In opening: his notice of Missouri for 1886, he was complimentary to our journal, and said: This matchless volume of 330 pages was on our desk just ten days from date of adjournment. Illinois and Missouri have a way of doing things " unbeknown" to the rest of us poor mortals. Brothers, arise and explain! The work, notwithstanding it was quickly done, was weU done.

The journal of Missouri is its own explanation. Ask Bro. Munn how it happened. Bro. Innes extracted largely from the Address of Grand Master Boyd, from the Report of the Grand Secretary, the Committee on J urisprlldence and the Committee on Correspondence. His Report is almost wholly made up of extracts, there being very few expressions of his own views. He concludes his able and laborious Report in the following eloquent language: From the reports received we find that peace and prosperity abound throughout our beloved land, and our Reports on Correspondence this year are particularly free from sharp criticisms of each other's doings. Freemasonry is still advancing, and the beautiful tenets of our Craft 11.1'0 making themselves more deeply felt, and that it will so continue as long as we are true to ourselves, we feel confident. Brothers, the year just closed has had its jovs and its sorrows, and, while Michigan mects once more around an unbroken Grand Lodge Altar, many of our sister Grand Jurisdictions have bcen called upon to mourn the loss of some of the brightest of the galaxy. Among these we may mention a Gurney, Root, Dana, Richards. et cetera. Where are they? Gone to answer the grand roll-call, and awake from the sleep of death to the reward earned by their life on this earth. They will all be missed; we who know them in the busy walks of Masonic life will know thcm no more, and as we think of them as fellow workers in the broad Masonic field, we will, with fond remembrance, revere their memory and drop a silent tear. May the sprig of acacia ever freshly bloom on their graves, and their exalted deeds be forever fresh in our minds.

The new Grand Master, Bro. R. C. Hathe\vay, and Bro. W. P. Innes, Grand Secretary, both reside at Grand Rapids.


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MINNESOTA, 1887. Late in the summer the journal of Grand Lodge Proceeuings came to hand. The delay is offered as a reason for a short review. The Thirty-fourth Annual Communication was held in the city of St. Paul, commencing January 11th, 1887, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. H. H. Gove, Grand Master; R VV. Bro. A. T. C. Pierson was Grand Secretary. The only fact furnished by the Grand Secretary as to the status of the Craft in that jurisdiction is a statistical table, where he announced that 170 Lodges had been chartered, and that fifteen Charters had been surrendered, leaving 155 on the roll. How many members are in those T.odges might be ascertained by counting. ~his Committee has not time to foot up the membership for the Grand Secretary. ADDRESS.

The Address of the Grand Master was of unusual length, covering, thirty-three pages. He said that thirty-four years ago twelve persons met to form the Grand Lodge of Minnesota, that country being then a territory. All but four of the original number had crossed the uark river that divides the future world from ours. Two were present at the Grand I.. odge, of the original number-Bros. A. Goodrich and Grand Secretary Pierson. Grand Master Gove had granted four Dispensations for the formation of. new Lodges. He reported the condition of the Craft as prosperous. The Address contains twelve Decisions, all of which are sound and practical. He favors perpetual jurisdiction over rejeeted candidates. The Grand Master reported the arrest of the Charter of one of the Lodges. From his presentation of the case the arrest certainly did not take place any too soon. The memhers of that Lodge seem to have been in a bad way. They indulged in the pleasant exercise of calling each other liars. Perhaps this term took the place of Brothers. It is stated by the Grand Master that degrees were conferred in said Lodge upon parties where objections existed against them, and who had been previously rejected. Conclud~ng his statement of the case, Grand Master Gove laid the whole blame upon the law, which does not allow "perpetual jurisdiction." The troubles in the Lodge, whose Charter he arrested, were very serious, as stated by him. This occurred under a law which does not allow" perpetual jurisdiction." If "perpetllalism" had existed, there is no telling to what extent that Lodge would have gone. The logic of the Grand Mas~er is rather amusing. He said a few Brethren elected and conferred the' first degree on a candidate who was repugnant to a number of the Brethren of said Lodge. Therefore the law is to blame, which does not teach ., perpet-


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ual juri'Sdiction." He further said that two officers" called each other liars." Therefore the law was to blame, which docs not allow" perpetual jurisdiction." Again several Brethren" indulged in language unbecoming men or Masons, and it was a disgraceful meeting." Therefore the law was to blame which does not aHow perpetual jurisdiction. The suggestion is here made that jurisdiction over the hearts, tongues and actions of those Brethren would 'be fa~ better than perpetual jmisdiction over rejected candidates. Grand Master Gove gave to a certain branch of" Scotch Riteism" the most vigorous kick to be found among the writings of the day. Like other leaders of Masonic thought, Bro. Gove gave the preferences to one branch of Scotch Hiteism over another branch. Thus he became a party to the fight between two branches of something claimed to be Masonic. 'That "something" may be Masonic, but this writer does not know it. And even the deliverances of a Grand Lodge does not settIe that point. The Grand Lodge of Missouri will never become a party to the Kilkenny cat fight now raging between the Gladiators in the" High Rite Arena." It is the easiest thing in the world to conclude that there is no Masonry in these Rites whose members are always wrangling over their claims to legitimacy. A few funerals in this country might bring about peace among contending parties, provided the right ones should die, and no more of the same sort should ever spring up. The ambition for high degrees, and many of them, has done mucl~ to make Masonry ridiculous, and to cause sober, thinking Masons to indulge in a good deal of merriment. INTEMPERANCE AND PROFANITY.

Grand Master Gove presented views concerning the above vires, which evidenced a sound heart and a clear head. Hear him: Intemperance and profanity have ever been considered and held as Masonic crimes, and their prevalence having so much increased induces me at this time to mention them that we may sec the hideousness of them, and each of them, that all who indulge therein may turn away and lead a correct and upright life hereafter. The name of the Deity is openly profaned notwithstanding we are solemnly charged never to pronounce His name but with that reverential awe that is due from a creature to his Creator. During the past year I have heard a Knight of Jesus, before the voice of his vow had died away on the evening air, openly profane His name. 'I'hink of this, Brethren, a member of an Order founded on the Christian religion and the practice of the Christian virtues, profaning the name above every other name. Intemperance is the growing evil of our times and has caused the Lodges more trouble, annoyance and real distress than anyone or all other evils that afflict our Craft. We ought to limit our desires and keep them in due bouuds. It is the duty of each individual to correct this habit, if he has it, and walk orderly, but failing to do this, discipline by the Lodges ought to be ap~lied, and in the true spirit of our Order for the reformation of the offender, not for purllshment or with a vindictive spirit. Let us remember that drunkenness is insanity. Let us walk worthy of our calling, and thereby be a blessing to ourselves and to the world and to the age in which we live. Guard well the entrance of this insidious foe and the destroyer of our ooefulness and our happiness. Be temperate, prudent, discreet, and live within and surrounded by the circle within which we are but a pointhand guided by the principles of the patrons of our Order, the festival of one of which we ave so recently celebrated. A SLIGHT DIFFERENCE.

The Grand Master stated, in his Address, that at the last session of the Grand Lodge, he had appointed a Brother to the honorable office


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of Grand Senior Steward, who was duly installed at that timoe. He called attention to the fact that the name of this Brother had been left out of the list of officers by the Grand Secretary, and another name put in its place. He gave the credit 'for this change to the Grand Secretary in terms not to be misunderstood, which are as follows: I deny the right, here llSSumed by the Grand Secretary, to revise, modify, or change the record of our transactions, or to alter or expunge therefrom at pleasure, without my knowledge or consent. The right does not inhere to the Grand Secretary. His rights are what the name secretary imparts-an oflicial scribe to record the proceedings of the Grand Lodge, and other duties enjoined by the Constitution of this Grand Body. I submit that after an officer has been lawfully appointed and installed, he is entitled to all the honors, immunities and privileges appertaining to the position to the end of his term, unless removed for cause; and that he callnot properly be removed or omitted by the pen of the Grand Secretary. I submit further that it was my constitutional prerogative and duty to appoint the subordinate officers of this Grand Lodge, and am alone responsible to this Grand Body, and to it only, for my official acts, and that you can call me to account to you for the manner in which I have discharged them.

This Grand Secretary should have felt called upon to explain the omission noted above. The journal is silent as to any explanation by Grand Secretary Pierson. THE GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

The Grand Secretary presented his Report, covering the usual business items connected with the office. From this Report is learned the state of their fund for wido'ws and orphans. This amounts to some $10,000. It was ordered by the Grand Lodge that this fund be invested in State bonds drawing interest. The Grand Master made several good recommendations. He favored the Masonic Congress which recently met in Chicago. He said nothing had occurred to mar the fraternal relations existing between their jurisdiction and other Grand Lodges. BOOK-KEEPING.

A committee had been appointed for the purpose of devising some systematic plan for book-keeping in the Grand Secretary's office. The committee reported that they had provided a simple system for the use of the Grand Secretary. They then said: Your committee provided suitable blank books, and informed the Grand Secretary as to the method of keeping the accounts therein, tendering the services of a competent member of the committee in opening the accounts in such books, and, if necessary, ill, making all entries thereih during the year. The Grand Secretary refusing to co-operate with the committee in any way, it became impossible to accomplish anything whate,'er, and the blank books provided by the committee have remained unused. No s)'stem of book-keeping exists in the office of the Grand Secretary.

"No SYSTEM!" How can books be kept without" system?" The above sounds peculiar.,


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The' Grand Master said that they had reached a period in their Masonic history, when they should begin to create a fund for the building of a Masonic Temble, which would serve as a convenience,and produce an income for the Grand Lodge. He suggested that shares of $10 each be taken by every Mason in the jurisdiction, which would raise a sum of more than $75,000. PERPETUAL .JURISDICTION.

The Grand Master's views, already noticed, on this subject received just such a black eye as that system deserves. The committee on his Address treated the subject as follows. So it seems that perpetual jurisdiction is at a discount in the Grand Lodge of Minnesota: Your Committee on Masonic Jurisprudence, to whom was referred so much of the M. W. the G. M.' s Address as relates to exclusive and perpetual jurisdiction, having considered the same, fraternally report that, after mature deliberation and research, they deem the theory and rule of exclusive and perpetual jurisdiction an innovation upon the Constitution and Ancient Landmarks of the Order, as well as violation not only or the independence of the Order but a hindrance to the exercise of the spirit of charity for an applicant who may have once erred, and an obstacle to his reform. Its adoption will enable an unworthy Brother through spleen or spite to strike a worthy applicant for life, and wherever he may go he cannot escape the effect of the blow. Your committee deem the safeguards thrown around our Masonic citadel by our tonstitution and the Ancient Landmarks, viz: One year's residence within the jurisdiction of the Lodge, with the qualifications prescribed with due inquiry, as sufficient guaranty for the protection of the Order. Your committee recommend that the existing regulations as to the qualifications of candidates for the degrees in Masonry in this Grand Jurisdiction be maintained. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering 115 pages, was submitted by the Grand Secretary, Bro. Pierson. It is very largely made up of extracts, with few comments. Missouri, for 1886, received a notice covering four pages. JOHN H. BROWN, Willmar, .G. M. A. T. C. PIERSON, St. Paul, G. Sec.

MISSIssipPI, lSS7. The Sixty-ninth Annual Communication convened in the city of Jackson, on the 9th day of February, 1887. M. W. Bro. B. T. Kimbrough, Grand Master, present and in the chair. R. VI. Bro. John L. Power was G:rand Secretary. There were present seven Past Grand Ma~ters; Representatives of twenty-four Grand Lodges, and 200 subordinate Lodges of that jurisdiction. The roll shows 261 Chartered Lodges, with a membership of 7,406. The Report of the Grand Secretary shows


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a loss of Lodges by surrender, arrest and forfeiture amounting to seventeen. There is a decrease in members of about 350. The Address of the Grand Master covered ten pages, from it the following eloquent and reverent extract is taken: I congratulate you. Brethren, that God, in His wonderful grace, has ~iven you health and strength, and put it into your hearts to come up to this Convocation for the promotion of morality and Masonry. I congratnlate myself that I am permitted to behold your faces again-the faces of so many-assembled in this hall dedicated to the best interests of man and humanity. It is sweet as odors from gardens of fi.owers to sit down with you, out of the tnrmoils of the world, and to listen to your wise. unselfish counsels for binding up the broken heart and scatterillg the blessin?;s of charity-charity in that deeper and broadcr sense-with a hand that is stayed not by sect or creed or country limits, but is universal as the race of man. I know it is your delight to be here where no Atheist comes; here where Trust in God is the pass-word, and the Holy Book of the Law lies ever open before you; here with each other to "meet on a level and part on the square; here to renew your strength and faith and hope and love. tt

NECROLOGY.

The Grand Master reported the death of two Representative, able and good members of the Grand Lodge: T. N. Martin, Past Grand .Junior Warden, and Rev. Harvey F. Johnson, D. D., Past Grand Chaplain, had died during the year. The year has been eventful in the sudden death of the wise and prominent of earth: and, in the lower ranks, the Reaper has gathered in many goodly sheaves. To those desolated homes, we would ~o with the oil' of consolation and point to the evergreen at the head of the gra\'e. and the hope it inspires. Generally, however, the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge has been blessed with health and happiness, and peace and plentythanks, under Providence, to good government-State and National. The returns Of subordinate Lodges will doubtless show an average death-rate among the Craft. Two, very prominent for their zeal. ability and usefulness-Bro. T. N. Martin, Junior Grand Warden m 1864, and Rev. Bro. H. F. Johnson. Grand Chaplain in 18ii-willno longer cheer us by their presence and their counsels in this Grand Lodge below, having been called during the past summer to the rest and reward of the Temple on high. I recommend that a committee be raised and charged with the duty of reporting suitable mention and memorial tablets of all those Brethren. entered into rest, whose virtues and useful lives entitle them to a placc in the permanent records of the Grand Lodge. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master decided that three may close a Lodge in the third degree, when all the members but three have left the hall before closing. The thought presents itself that if three may close a Lodge, why might not three open it as well? 'rhen where is the quorum provided for in the law? If that quorum amounts to seven, and they were all present at the opening of the Lodge, and only three present at the close, it is very evident that there was not a legal number present when the Lodge was dosed. The Committee on Masonic Law and Jurisprudence made the following humorous comment upon the Decision of the Grand Master: If we are permitted to explain what the form and ceremony should be under such circumstances, we approve the first Decision printed under the head of Decisions, .. that they may do so by walking Ol1t and closin~ the door after them, and that the last one out should lock it and take the key with him ,tl but we are unable to see, for ritualistic reasons, how three can close a Lodge of Master :Masons in any other manner.


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The Address was largely devoted to business. He reported the granting of several Dispensations. In one case, retaking the ballot where an applicant had. been rejected for the degrees. He had permitted Lodges to confer the third degree out of time in four different cases. Some curious things are reported by the Grand Master as having occurred during the year. In one case the Charter of a Lodge had been arrested, but the Brethren worked on as if nothing had ever happened. In another instance a Lodge elected a Brother who was not a member of it to the office of Senior "Warden. It is hardly necessary to state that such proceedings were declared illegal. The Grand Master properly held that Decisions made by路 a Grand Master during his term of office have the force and effect of law until the Grand Lodge meets. Grand Master Kimbrough stated that the finances of the Grand Body were in a good condition. He mentioned the Orphan Asylum at Natchez, and recommended that further encouragement of the Grand Lodge be given. Tbis was done by a donation . of $500. OFFICIAL ROTATION.

The Grand Master-gave utterance to the following practical views respecting the too frequent changes of officers in his Grand Lodge, especially the Grand Master. His remarks are herewith furnished: I have referred to what I call the doubtful policy of official rotation, as practised by this Grand Lodge and many other Masonic bodies. This policy, or custom, does not allow the election of a Grand Master from the floor, nor does it at all leave the members of the Grand Lodge to the free exercise of their jud~ment in the selection of Grand Mll.l:>ler, for it is now the unwritten law, that the Junior Grand Warden must go regularly lip by Senior Warden to the station of Grand Master; and a failure to allow him to do so would be considered a reproach. This custom may have originated in the idea that serving in the Warden's stations gives special fitnes~ for the Grand Master's. This I doubt. But if it does, serving as Grand Master gives more special fitness to succeed himself. This custom is very different in its reasons and workings from the law of subordinate Lodges that requires the W. M. to have been a Warden. I am not sure that even that works well. But there the Warden must fit himself for the duties of W. M., for he may have to preside in his stead at any meeting of the Lodge, and in that way he often gets some experience as W. M. But not so here, Here the Grand Master's Deputy first suc.. ceec1s to the chief office in C8.':ie of vacancy. Again, the W. M. does not ha\'e to give place each year to his succeeding Warden, but generally, when a fit man is chosen W. :M:" he holds for several years. Why not so with Grand Master? The custom of turning out your Grand Master each year is not, in my opinion, for the best interest of the Order. We act with much better jndgment in the selection of Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer; they have bucceeded themselves for eighteen or twenty years on account of special fitness. But we have degraded the office of Grand Master, the executivehell.d ofthe Grand Lodge, with the idea it matters not so much who Hils it; while really it has more power for good or evil than all others combined. Yt'ar by year 路we take f0r that office a new man, often of moderate knowledge of Masonic law, and always without experience. We take him, not because really the fittest man for the place, not for the vigor or ability wit.h which we expect him to discharge the duties of his office, but in mere obedience to a weak custom-because he is next in the line of promotion. 1'0 be so chosen Grand Master, gives but little honor to the official, and it may sometime happen, le~s to the Craft. We have, in this, removed the ancient landmarks which our fathers had set. Let us return, in a measure, to the days of Quitman, who served the Grand Lodge for twelve successive years, as Grand Master, and quit then because he refused to serve longer. While this is a day of progress, yet in some things our fathers were wiser than we.


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In Iowa, rotation does not rotate. The Deputy Grand Master and Grand Wardens rarely ever see the promised land of the Grand Master. He is taken from the floor, as a rule, because he is of such standing that the Grand :East needs and calls for him. The others enjoy the compliment of serving, not ruling. It works well. MASONIC CONGRESS.

The proposed Masonic Congress was referred to by the Grand Master, in his Address. He seemed to entertain suspicions of that unauthoriz'ed gathering, and looked upon it as only a step in the direction of forming a National body that should assume to control the Grand Lodges of this country. The Grand Lodge declined to recognize the thing. 'Well done, ye souhd and conservativc Mississirpians. .JURISPHUDENCE.

The Committee on Masonic Law and Jurisprudence, rendered a long and able report. It was both full and exhaustive, being written by that able and accomplished Mason, Bro. Speed, Past Grand Master. It contains a mine of valuable thought, but cannot be copied from without spoiling its interest. Bro. Kimbrough, the retiring Grand Master, was cordially thanked for his able, dignified and impartial ad In i nistration. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

The Report of Bro. John L. Power, Grarid Secretary, is a royal paper, and is full of business throughout. From a bricf personal acquaintance recently enjoyed, the opinion enterbined for ycars was confirmed, that he is the man for the place he has so long and so efticiently fillcd. The following extract is made from his Heport: CO~DJTION

OF THE CRAFT.

In December, I forwarded to the Masters of Lodges, for the Chairman of the Committee on State of the Order, the Annual Circular inviting information on such points as will fully acquaint the Grand Lodge with the condition of the Craft in this jurisdiction. Judging from the returns received and examined, I think the committee will be able to make an exhihit of average prosperity. No new Lodges have been formed, several have forfeited their Charters, and some others are dormant and dead. but there are at least two hundred and fifty live, working Masonic Lodges in Mississippi. If we consider the times, the numerous other Benevolent Orders that attract nC\v material, and the monthly expense necessary to secure benefits ill the same. it is only surprising that so many arc being added to and so few dropped from the rolls of our Ancient and Honorable Fraternity. With the best wishes for all, singly or associated, who are engaged in the noble and glorious work of mutual aid and protection and relief for the widow and the orphan. let us, my Brethren, "stand by the Ancient Landmarks which our fathers haye set up." "The voice of this Institution." as has been beautifully said by another, "comes to us through centuries. and generations join in the words which tell of its labors for the good of man. From' vanished years, deep-toned, like some cathedml chant,' the music swells into a mighty chorus oflJarmonious speech, touching the heart of the earn. est listener with the story it bears in the rhythmic lines of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth. With such a trinity it must ~o on conquering and to conquer. Selfishness shall fiee from its presence, prejudice vamsh from its sight, evil disappear on its approach, and men, with reverent mien, bend the head as it passes down the years. Noiseless as the march of thought, and strong as the Temple of Truth, it has found its way into every


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land where snffering abides, where wllnt needs a haven, or humanity a prayer. Its faithful disciples bearing- its banner broad and bright, wave the symbols in the risingsun, and hold it aloft to be kissed by the soft light of the twinkling stars. Its benefactions know no slumber, for their duties' make all seasons summer.' To the great of earth it offers the joy Ilnd peace which with impartial hand it tenders to the humble and the poor. Of all who seek to serve at its tablE'S and guard its altars. it a.~ks but one question' Is he worthy and well qualified?' Were he king-without this qualification he could not enter. Were he peasant-with it. as a sesame, the bolts fly back, the gates open to his approach. and all the hidden wealth which its Temples hold are uncovered to his view. Through war and pestilence and famine it holds its way, turning the sword of the soldier into the ploughshare of good deed!'i. the breath of the sconrage into whispered words of fraternal comfort, and the cry of hunger into the prayer of gratitude. Its living subjects bear as a talisman against all evil the compa.~s and the square made radiant by the effulgence of its greatest light. Its dead sleep with the emblems of innocence upon their breasts, that it may bear witness of their lives, which tl1e evergreen, its close companion, tells us will be eternal. These are the merit...,. the labors. the claims of that Institution whose welfare we are again assembled to consider. With a resolution as strong as loyal hearts eau give, and a purpose as broad as the needs of our fellow-men, let us prove our worthiness to be numbered with those who constitute' the household of the faithful.' " . CORRESPONDE~CE.

The Report covered seventy pages and was prepared by Bro. A. IT. Barkley, Past Grand Master. His opening was both good and sensible: It has been our constant endeavor to transfer to these pages the best thoughts from the Proceedings of the Grand Lodges brought under review. In some instances we have had occasion to differ from the action had in certain cases, or the strictures made by reporters. This, however, was not done with a captions spirit. nor yet a desire to differ, but because, from our standpoint and construction of law, violence had been done to established principles and nsage. Misquotations lead to wrong constructions and erroneous conclusions, and in more insta.nces than one. we have been forced. in justice to those whose language has thns been dealt with, to make the necessary corrections.

No new questions have been brought to the attention of the l\1a~onic world. The archives have been searched. and a few questions which we thought had long since been laid to rest, have been brought to the front. Among these, some prominence is given to THE POWERS OR PREROGATIVES OF THE GRAND

~IASTER.

This qnestion is argned at length, and with great force, by a committee who had weighed the subject matter for a whole year. It is a report which addresses itself to the sound judgment of those who think, and however much others may see tit to differ from the premises or conclusions, or both, yet the straightforward manner in which the subject is handled must command attention from the Masonic world. There are two views as to the source or origin of these powers, and the conclusions reached will depend entirely upon which of these views is adopted as the true theory. If it is assumed that the Constitution of a Grand Lodge determines what powers shall be exercised by the Grand Master, and that he is limited in their exercise by this instrument; then, in that case. all claims for authority not based upon and deduced directly from the Constitution, are without the shadow of a foundation. But if, on the other hand, it is held that the office of Grand Master "exists independent" of the Constitution ; that there are powers or prerog-atives inherent in the office of Grand Master; that the Constitution does not grant powers; that where the exercise of sneh powers are not inhibited, they may still be exercised under a Constitution, the whole question assumes a new feature, and must be considered not simply upon constitutional principles, but mainly on inherent rights. :Much stress is laid upon this particular fact by those who are classed among the ablest Masonic writers-that although elected to the office of Grand Master by Grand Lodge, he is nevertheless Grand Ma.~ter of Masons. It would be a pleasant pastime to take up the Landmarks and Old Charges, and read from these the powers and prerogatives of the Grand Master. But Landmarks and immemorial usuage are rather indefinite terms, and when we come to define them. our answers are not altogether satisfactory. After all, differences still exist, and Masons, like other men, will have their own opinions in matters Masonic. We can understand why there should be subordinate and Grand Lodges. All outside of these is extraneous, and yet there are not wanting advocates for a


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MASONIC CONGUESS.

This old issue is again thrust upon the Masonic world, but for what special purpose, or what good can grow out of it. we are unable to divine. If to legislate for the general welfare of the Craft the world over, we should object; inasmuch as each Grand Lodge is sovereign and competent to take care of its own affairs, within its own jurisdiction. It might be constituted the expounder of illternational laws, inasmuch as it would have for its object the same end contemplated in the establishment of such a code. The question of physical qualification rises up ever and anon, and a sympathizing Brother is not wantillg to plead the case of the unfortunate ones, but it stands no chance when the Old Charges are brought to bear upon it in their true light.

The Report is mostly written, and contains many terse comments. His review of Missouri for 1886, covering three pages, was cordial and kind. He styled the Address of -our Grand Master Boyd as a "model of excellence." His notice of the Report on Correspondenee, by this Committee, was very complimentary, for which he has hearty thanks. It is to be regretted that Bro. Barkley, the Committee, is not allowed greater space in which to review the Proceedings of other Grand Lodges. lIe is a very delightful "Reporter," as he calls himself. His printer made an ugly blunder in speaking of Bro. Drinkard, of Virginia, who is called Bro. Drunkard. What the noble and qniet Drinkard-an old Virginia gentleman'-will say in reply to this title, remains to be seen. The Missouri Committee steps forward in advance and hurls back the ugly blunder from away up lS'orth down upon the head of the Mississippi Committee. Bro. Drinkard is not one of that sort, he is a gentleman, a scholar and a most perfect model for all committees, especially Bro. BarkleY,to imitate. The following extracts, taken from Bro. Barkley's interesting Report, will close the present review of the journal of l\fississippi. THE BIBLE.

He said on the subject of the Bible: What does this mean, if it is not that it is God's Word ?-and being such, it must be inspired. It is God's Law, and therefore is the rule and guide of man's faith. If this be denied, then Masonry in America knows of no other book which is, and recommends none other as the rule and guide of man's faith. It does receive the Bible as God's Word, and so teaches, and requires all its initiates to accept it as the rule and guide of their faith. The report, which was submitted to and adopted by the Grand Lodge in 1883, was the result of much thought and careful investigation, and in its preparation the whole ~ubject was viewed from a purely Masonic standpoint, and we would not change a single word in it to-day. We had not expected to write one word on this subject, but haVing discovered that Brethren were, in our opinion, wandering from the point at issue, we thought it best to try to bring them back to their proper moorings.

Read this: Freemasonry is not an Order; it is an ~nstilntion. The members of this InstiLution are a great Brotherhood-a Fraternity-founded upon the great principle of nniversal benevolence. We protested against the >name Order when it was adopted by our own Grand Lodge. and we shall continue to lift our voice against it until it is eliminated. "Words are signs of our ideas;" they mean something. and a WrOJlg idea is conveyed every time the word" Order" >is used in connection with the Institution of Freemasonry. Let us, therefore, call thing8 by their right names. The Grand Master of Louisiana, in his Ad-


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dress, says, "Condition of the Craft." We suggested a year ago that the style of the committee should be ., State of the Craft." Either of these is sufficiently clear, and defines itself-either is Masonic, but" Order" is modern, and has no connection whatever with Freemasonry.

He is not hypercritical, but correct. TRIALS.

Concerning confession of an accused party and his confession, Bro. Barkley said; Well, we'll tell you just how it is in Mississippi: The CO'nfes~ion of guilt by the 1Ja1'ty charged does away with lhe neees,'iily of aformal trial. Nevertheless there must be a ballot on the part of the Lodge as to the guilt of the accused. This is" the Mississippi plan." How do you like it? The Lodge must decide in all cases. Should a case come up before this Grand Body that had been decided in any other way, it would be reversed and sent back, and justly so. The verdict must, in all cases. be brought in by the Lodge by mcans of its vote, and not otherwise. This is what the law says, and we speak by the book. Bros. Drinkard and Buck are a unit as to the powers and prerOl!atives of the Grand Maste.l'. We do know that we have as much respect for the Grand Master as any Mason living; but as to these" immemorial" prero~atlves, there is not mnch in them in the end. They are like what the Frenchman said, "just the politeness of it." We sometimes hear a great flourish of trumpets, and some Grand Master in some Grand Jurisdiction says: "I called an Emergent Communication, and by virtue of m~ presence and by the high powers in me vested. made Mr. So and So a Mason at sight.' 'rhe Grand Communication closes, the work stops and the man goes out into the world with things a little mixed, and he never does get them straight. A man can't absorb Masonry-he has to learn it. Masonry is injured by just such work, and the candidate in the mlljority of cases is lost sight of and is of no value to the InsWution. Our Grand Lodge has never yet made a deliverance on this subject, and the time is .yet far in the future, we opine, before she will.

It is not so in Missouri. Here confession does not prevent all the testimony available. It is the opinion of this writer, confirmed by the observation of twenty-five years' Masonic service, that" confession of guilt," as a rule, is made to escape the justice due evil doers. They will "confess judgment" and throw themselves upon the "mercy of the court," thus preventing the introduetion of testimony that would hang them, figllfativdy speaking. They fear discloSUTe8. Our Missouri practice is to hear all evidence possible. If it is not damaging, the accused will not be harmed beyond the effect of his confession. Render any concealment impossible and prevent the suppression of faets. This cannot do any injury, and may result in much good. A formal trial must follow charges in Missouri, even though confession of guilt may be made by the accused. How rnw:h guilty is he?

This review of Mississippi muste1ose. No more fitting conclusion can be made by the writer than by the following tribute taken from the journal under notice. It is transferred to this Report by the writer to honor the name and worth of a personal frienrl and beloved Brother. Rev. Dr. H. F. Johnson was an able educator and minister. It


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was the privilege of this Committee to serve with him several terms in the highest councils of the church to which we both belonged. It is hard to realize that Dr. Johnson is no more of earth. 'Vhen seen for the last time, one year ago, in Richmond, Va., none thought the sturdylooking Representati ve from Mississippi would be the first of the lar~e number of Divines present to be called to the great Beyond. But we all do fade as the leaf. One by one we must cross the silent river and solve t.he deep significance of that startling word-"Eternity." To prepare for such a state is the work of l'ife. It cannot be well done on short notice. Character is the work of time, and character is destiny. Here is a just tribute to Dr. Johnson from the Masons of his own Mississippi home, warm as their own sunny lands: BRO. HAItVEY F. JOHNSON

Was born in Buncombe County, North Carolina. January 7th, 1831. and dicd in Brookhaven. Mississippi, August 4th, 1886, in the fifty-sixth year of his age. In early life he had the privilege of a thorough classical education, and was at the time of his death one of the first men of the State. He cntered the practice of law at the early a;-:e of nineteen, and was on the hil;hway to fortl1ne and fame. From conscientious convictions he becamc a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. and rapidly rose to eminence. In 1867 he became President of Whitworth Femalc College, and by his wise administration and untiring labor, brought that institution to its prescllt high grade of thoroughness and usefulness. Bro. Johnson was a devoted Mason. Affiliating with Brookhaven Lodgc, No. 2H. in ]871, he at once became its Master, and discharged thc duties of that station with characteristic fidelity and zeal. In 1877 he was elected Chaplain of the Gmnd Lodge. The many other pressing demands upon his time, though interfering with his regular attcndallce upon Masonic meetings, did not diminish his love for thc Order, which he recognized as a great power for good in the world. He esteemed it a privilcge to be identified with a Craft so ancient and honorable; he squared his actions by its precepts. and "preached the gospel of the golden rule" by kind deeds and loving words. Of him it may. with truth, besaid: "His life was gentle; and the elements So mixed in him, that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, This was a man! " His great achievements as an educator, his u~efulness and eminence as a minister of the gospel. his public spirit as a citizen, are all matters of not merely local fame, of which appropriate record will be made by the several assemblies with which hc was so prominently Idcntified. He had a long illness, which be bore with manly fortitudc. The end came, and the Great Architect took our TIrother' to the Temple not built with hands, .. eternal in the heavens." He leaves an honored name. While here he wrought as a Master builder, doing bis work ever in the eye of the "All-seeing God." He has passed from labor to refreshment. The will of God be done. .

E. G. DELAP, Natchez, G. M. J. L. POWER, .Jackson, G. Sec.

MONTA.NA, 1886. The Twenty-second Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge was opened in the new Masonic Temple, in the city of Helena, on the 6th day of October, 18~G. M. 'V. Bro. Joseph A. Hyde, Grand Master, presiding, and R W. Bro. Cornelius Hedges, .Grand Secretary. The


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tables showed twenty-eight Chartered Lodges, with a membership of 1,298. The Grand Secretary reported that all of the Lodges had made' returns, and paid their dues. Twenty-five Lodges were represented. It seems from the Report of the Grand Secretary, that he has a new office. Feeling very fine over it, he had this to say: In January last, as noticed in my Report oflast year, an office in the new Masonic Temple was placed at the disposal of your Grand Secretary, and was forthwith occupied. The matter of furnishing and moving was even more than anticipated. but it is confi路 dently hoped that the job will not need to be repeated for a long time, and the additional room and conveniences render it easier to transact business, The reasonable rent of such an office, with heat furnished, would be $20 per month, but the Temple Trustees willingly offer it to the Grand J~odge free of rent. I would, however, suggest that $10 per month be allowed as only a reasonable charge for the heating and lighting of the room.

Here is good news furnished by the Grand Secretary, respectillg the Masonic Home for aged and distressed Masons, their widows and orphans: During the year past a member of one of our subordinate Lodges, well endowed with this world's goods, and still better endowed with the loftiest principles of Masonic charity, ha..o.; signified, by a will that he has executed, his intention to make the Grand Lodge:of Montana his chief legatee for the purpose of endowing a Masonic Home and Asylum for aged and distressed Master Masons, their widows and orphans. We know that such welcome news will fill every Masonic heart with pride and gratitude, as it assures us the possession, at no distant day, of a richly endowed institution of Charity, that other Grand Lodges have only obtained after years of struggle, debt and taxation, The name of this generous and noble hearted Brother, when known, will be forever honored among Montana Masons, and no worthier monument could perpetuate his memory to future generations. ADDRESS.

The Annual Addrdss was brief, covering som.e four pages. the follo,...ing is taken:

From it

Brethren, we should return thanks to our Father in heaven for the many blessings bestowed upon us during the past year. The earth has rendered her accustomed harvest; trade in its various branches has been fairly remunerative, and our people are reasonably prosperous, contented and happy. . }\{asonry, in turn, has partaken, in some degree, of the prosperity of the country, as the Report of the Grand Secretary will show. Peace and tranquility seem to prevail in all the Lodges, There is not a ripple upon the surface that would seem to indicate any disturbance whatever. Our Brethren in other parts of the world have not been as fortunate as we. They have had to contend with pestile'nce, fire, flood and earthquakes. :i\lany have, by these causes, been rendered homeless and destitute, and have been compelled to solicit aid, Immediately after the great fire in Galveston I requested our Grand Secretary to forward $50 to our afflicted Brethren. This act, I know, will meet with your hearty appro~al, and our regret will be in common that our finances would not justify us in sending more.

He had granted permission in some cases to confer degrees without waiting the usual time, and makes the startling announcement that he had allowed one Lodge to receive the petitions ~f three applicants who had been previously rejected. 'Why he did so is not given in his Address. The following healthy sentiments closed this brief paper: Brethren, we are no longer operative Craftsmen, engaged in the work of building houses to shelter men from the inclement weather and in cultivating architecture, but we are engaged in the building up of human character, using thetool拢 of our Craft as


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symbols in the high calling. One of the cardinal virtues of our profession since the days when we were a Craft or guide has becn temperance. Be temperate in all things has been one of the mottoes, to the end that we may be properly qualified 路to perform the work before us. NO DISSIPATED CRAFTSMAN

In ancient times could perform such labor as would entitle him to wages. This being true in operative Masonry, how much less can such a member in this age of speculative Masonry build up a character worthy of our profession. While total abstinence in the use of intoxicating liquors has not been inculcated by our Order, temperance in their use certainly has been. We are a Fraternity; we profess to bear each other's burdens; we are our Brother's keeper. I would suggest in all brotherly kindness. and without any disposition to be censorious. whether or not a Brother in our Order is living up to his professions when engaged in the sale. as a beverage, of intoxicating liquors. May he not cause some worthy Brother to stumble and fall? May he not cease to be a Brother to some poor, weak Craftsman-but a false guide that shall conduct him down the path of destruction, where the wages will be sorrow and misery, rather than up to the Grand Master in whom we all put our trust? The same may be said, in a great measure, in reference to gambling. If all Masons could be induced to discontinue and discountenance the use of one and practice of the other, they would bring untold happiness to themselves, their families and friends, and to the world at large.

It is strange that such deliverances as were uttered by that Grand Master, in the above extract, should have been passed" without note or comment" on the part of the Grand Lodge. Not a word was said by the Committee on the Address, and no action was taken by the Grand Lodge.

One hundred dollars was appropriated for the relief of the Masons of Charleston, who had been so badly shaken up by the earthquake. One Lodge received a Charter from the Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge decided that the examination of a candidate for auvancement at a special meeting of the Lodge, was a satisfactory compliance with the law. The following declaration of principles was adopted. This seems to be in reply to the resolution sent out by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. Nothing further in the business of the session claims attention of this committee. Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. Moo of Montana, assents to, and llpproves路the followin~ general principles of Masonic law, and agrees to govern herself thereby in all her dealmgs and intercourse with other Masonic jurisdictions that will recognize and abide by the same: 1. The Grand Lodge of Montana, formed by, and representing only Lodges conferring the three degrees .E. A., F. C. and M. M., and the auxiliary degree of P. 1\1., of Ancient Crafe Masonry, will not assume to pass upon the claims of allY other organi7.ations whether claiming to be Masonic or otherwise, or dictate to the :members of its Lodges, what other associations or organizations they may connect themselves with, so long as its rightful and exclusive control of Blue Lodge Masonry is not infringed or Interfered with, or the allegiance of its members perverted. 2. Lodges under whose local jurisdiction any sojourning l\fa!;on shall commit any Masonic offense, shall have concurrent jurisdiction to trr and punish therefor, with the Lodge in which the offender holds membership. 3. Any persOIl whose application for the degrees of Masonry has once been rejected in a Lodge of one Grand Jurisdiction who has pcrmancntlr removed to another Grand Jurisdiction and has resided therein continuously for not less than one year, may petition anew without being required to secure a waiver of jurisdiction. 4. Should any matter of difference or contention arise between her and any sister jurisdiction, the Grand Lodge of Montana agrees to submit the matter to friendly arbitration and will not. resort to edicts of non-intercourse. . .


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5. No Masonic Lodge, organization or member shall make or seek to enforce a claim for reimbursement for money or services bestowed as Masonic charity, except by special and positive agreement at the time the money was loaned, or the services z:endered. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering eighty-five pages, was furnished by Bro. Cornelius Hedges, for the Committee. Bro. Hedges writes his Heport throughout, not a single extract being found in the entire production. From his interesting review, the following extracts are made. Concerning our journal, for 1885, he said: This Masonic birth-place of so many of our early and present Craftsmen, challenges our attention to its fair record of Proceedings at its sixty-fifth Annual Communication, held in 81. Louis, and beginning October 13th, 1885. Masonry is stJil growing in Lodges, membership and, better still, in harmony, charity and higher morality. During the year, three Lodges died and nine were brought into life; present number 531. The membership in the State increased 527. . There were only 201 Lodges represented. Is this the result of not paying mileage and per diem, and do you call the result a good one. Bro. Vincil? .M:i1ea~e and per diem are paid to Past Grand Masters, lUld there were thirteen present. Now our way would be to allow the Worshipful Masters and Wardens all seats aud votes in Grand Lodge if presellt, and if either one was present, allow him to cast the full vote of the Longe, and we would allow, collect and pay mileage and per diem for one H.epresentative from each Lodge, and if more than one come, they should divide it between them. We think so much of having good full sessions that we favor the machinery that brings it about.

Of Grand Master Stevenson the following views were expressed: Bro. Robt. F. Stevenson was Grand Master during the year, and proved himself a good executive ollicer, though his Adoress is a little involved and obscure in style, perhaps the result of too compact and paragraphical form of. expression. He reports no Decisions, but claims to have supported temperance with fortitude, and maintained prudence and virtue as a shield against intolerance and fanaticism. His style is graphic in reporting arrests .01' Charters. Vendors of oriental Paganism from Massachusetts found the jurisdiction too hot for their business. One Wor!:ihipful Master was suspended for drunkenness, an old weakness, but charity lightened his puni!:ihment and we presume he has already been forgiven seventy times seven. In making a partial canvass, for cases requiring charitable assistance, fourty-follr Master Masons, 101 widows and ei~hly-two orphan children were reported answering the. description. This is enough to fill a Home of moderate dimensions. On the subject of Relief, he talks well and finds a lack of proper discrimination and reciprocity. The distinction between charity and temporary relief is well put, and needs to be still more elaborated and reduced to recognize rules of general application. There are Boards of Helief at Kansas City and St. Louis doing good work.

The Oration of our young Grand Orator, Bro. Krauthoff, receiyed the favorable mention it so well merited. Of this writer, Bro. Hedges spoke kindly as heretofore-this for instance: Bro. Grand Secretary Vincil is personally responsible for the very complete, instructive and interesting Review of Correspondence. His Grand Lodge appreciates his labors and pays him well as it is able and as he deserves. The matters that he criticises we had olIr !:iay on last year. We are glad to stand corrected on the finances, though our statement only referred to the year's receipts and expenditures, and showed a surplus to ILdd to fonner balances. We did'nt understand that repayment to the Lod&,es. We think the balance will endow a Home without interfering with private chanty. We think we discover a good deal of Bro. Vineil's influence in the advanced moral tone of Mi!:iSouri Masonry.

"Bro. VinCil's influence" alone could do but little in advancing the "moral tone of Missouri Masonry." But the moral tone is ad vancillg, Bro. Hedges, and the en~ is not yet. The day is past when the immoral


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elements in "Missouri Masonry" govern and rule as in other years. The number of workers who labor to give an "advanced moral tone to Missouri Masonry" is large and increasing yearly. 'With the manly men of c'Missomi Masonry" it is a real pleasure to co-operate. Thi.s writer is not a leader: but he tries to push and help those in the front line. A system that is moral, ought to have a "moral tone." Masonry is moral or it is not. If it is not, this Committee has no use for it. If it is moral, as we teach, then the "tone" and the system should harmonize. The higher the" tone" the more useful and influential. l\{asonry, with many, is nothing more than a name-a mere pretense. Hyprocrisy is about all that can be said of such. 路With the good and true it is otherwise. Masonry means something. SAMUEL WARD, Butte, G. M. CORNELIUS HEDGES, Helena, G. Sec.

NEBRASKA, 1886. Not having been favored with the journal of Nebraska for 1886, until one year after the session closed, this notice must be brief, because it is hoped that the Proceedings of 1887 may be received in time for review before the close of the present Report. It seems to this Committee that a journal of 130 pages ought to be prepared and delivered within a few weeks. The Twenty-ninth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska assembled in the city of Omaha, June 16th, 1886. M. W. Bro. Manoah B. Reese was Grand Master, and R. VI. Bro. 'Vm. R. Bowen was Grand Secretary. RepresentaUves were present from 136 Chartered Lodges, with eleven Past Grand Masters, and Representati ves of twenty-fi. ve Grand Lodges. An index and a recapitulation by the Grand Secretary would be helpful to the reviewer of the journal under consideration. How many Lodges there are in that jurisdiction may be ascertained by counting. The membership amounts to 6,698, show~ ing a gain of 851. This, with other information furnished in the journal under review, shows a healthy and prosperous condition of Masonry in the jurisdiction of Kebraska. Twelve new Lodges were reported as at work under Dispensation. ADDRESS.

The Grand Master opened his Annual Address according to the form so common in the present day. He gave detailed reports of what had been done during his official term. The sixteen Lodges chartered at G. L. Ap.-7.


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the last session had been duly organized. He announced that special privileges had been granted in certain cases, to confer degrees out of time, and that $60 had been received in payment for such privileges. It is the opinion of this writer that where persons are allowed to go through the Lodge on the double quick, they should pay extra for the opportunity. But it seems unfair that this should be allowed, when there are many good men who are not able to pay an extra price in order to obtain the degrees in advance of time. DEcrSIONS.

The Grand Master reported fifteen Decisions made by him during his term. Twelve of them were approved by the committee having charge of this department of the business. Two of his rulings were disapproved, and one was" doctored" by the committee. The Grand Master, in this instance, had made himself ridiculous, but the committee would not commit the Grand Lodge to his folly. 1'he Decision which was doctored by the committee, is not given in this report, because it is unworthy of being perpetuated in the Proceedings of Masonic Grand Lodges. He was reversed by the committee on one of his rulings. lIe decided that a Masonic Lodge could not occupy a hall above a saloon. The committee thought there was no law forbidding a Lodge to have its place of meeting over a saloon. However they recommended that no Lodge be allowed to hold its meetings in a building used for a saloon or liquor business, if the fact was known to the Lodge before securfng the property. It was further declared that no building owned by Masonic bodies should be rented for the carrying on of the saloon or liquor business. The Committee on Grand Master's Address had this to say, in reporting upon the document: "The Address of the Grand Master has been carefully considered. The opening portion of the Address, while containing no new truths for the consideration of this Grand Body, furnishes thoughts well worthy of the consideration of all. These thoughts have been presented in one form or another i; every gathering of the twenty-nine sessions which have made up the history of this Grand Body. But they are as pertinent to-day for your consideration as at any time in the past. The careful consideration of this report shows that the requirements necessary for a good Grand Master to possess, have, as usual, been fully tested, and have not been found wanting." The Grand Lodge was congratulated upon the able administration of its affairs by Grand Master Reese, during the past year. The committee said in reference to Bro. Bowen, the Grand Secretary, that they were glad to announce that his great hobby had been fully accomplished, and that he now enjoys the satisfaction of having a fire-proof room in which all the valuables of the Grand Lodge are safely and well protected.


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onPH AN EDUCATIONAL FUND.

The Grand Lodge of Nebraska has such a fund as above named,' amounting to more than $15,000. This is a good beginning ,and promises well for the future. TOO lIfUCH MONEY.

Grand Master Reese seemed to think that the Grand Lodge had more money than is necessary, and said that their funds were accumulating too rapidly, as the amount now on hand is far in excess of their needs. He recommended that the income be cut down, so as to diminish the fund, and suggested a return to the Lodges of a surplus of $8,000. A proposition was made to refund this amount-and carried, but the vote was afterwards reconsidered an9- the whole subject indefinitely postponed. ORATION.

The Grand Orator, Bro. Charles .T. Phelps, delivered an Oration before the Grand Lodge, which, on motion, was ordered printed, and covers five pages. CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. Furnas presented a Report on Correspondence whieh was adopted, and covers less than one page. Certain Grand Lodges which had asked for recognition were not favored by his Report. He treated briefly what he termed" international regulations," proposed by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, and recommended the adoption of some resolutions bearing on the question. There is nothing else in the Proceedings claiming attention in this Report. CHARLES K. COUTANT, G. M. WILLIAM R. BOWEN, G. Sec. Both of Omaha.

NEVADA, 1886. The Twenty-second Annual Communication was commenced at Masonic Hall, in the city of Reno, 8th of June, 1886. M. W. Bro. Michael A. Murphy was GrandMaster and R. W. Bro..Tohn D. Hammond was Grand Secretary. The membership of this Grand Lodge was shown to be a little over 1,000. Fourteen Lodges seem to have been represented, as that number of Lodges was on hand when the pay-roll was settled. There are twenty Charter Lodges on the list.


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The Address of Grand Master Murphy is of usual length, and contains matters of interest to the Fraternity in that jurisdiction. He said that the condition of the Craft was good, so far as heknew. Hethinks there was an increase of interest taken in the work and lectures and in attendance upon Lodge mectings, while prosperity attcnded their labors. Peace and harmony prevailed. He announced that their relations with other Grand Lodges remained uninterrupte,d, except in the case of the Grand Lodge of Utah. Grand Master Murphy made a statement of the case at issue between the two Grand Lodges. He lays the blame upon the Lodge in Utah, which had invaded their jurisdiction. This ease takes up a large portion of his Address. He furnished a list of his official acts, showing a number of transactions of local interest. There is nothing of any special importance in the Address claiming attention. John D. Hammond, Grand Secretary, presented his Report, which covered the usual ground of such papers. The Grand Lodge of South Australia was recognized as a regularly formed Grand Lodge, possessing full Masonic authority within its territory. The Grand Lodge of Mexico was not recognized. CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. John D. Hammond submitted a Report on Correspondence amounting to about ninety pages. He reviewed the Proceedings of fifty-three Grand Lodges. The work bears the character of a synopsis, containing a large number of extracts, with very few comments. The Missouri 'Proceedings, for 1885, recei ved a fair share of attention. As this review is of the journal for 1886, one year having elapsed since the Grand Lodge closed its session, further notice of it will not be taken. The journal, for 1887, may be received in time for review while making up the present report. If it should come to hand in time, due consideration will be gi ven it. HENRY ROLFE was elected G. M. JOHN D. HAMMOND, re-elected G. Sec.

NEW BRUNSWICK, 1886. The Nineteenth Session opened in the Masonic Temple, in the city of St. John, April 27th, 1886. M. 'V. Bro. John V. Ellis was Grand Master; R. W. Bro. Edwin J. Wet~ore, Grand Secretary. Representatives of


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twenty Lodges were present. There are thirty-two Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 1,881. There was a loss of forty-two members during the year. The Address of Grand Master Ellis, amounting to six pages, was a plain, straightforward statement of business. He announced that their relations with all Grand Lodges with which they had been in correspondence, were of the most fraternal character. He referred to the conflict between the Grand Lodges of Quebec and England. From his statement of tlie case the following is taken: The most important question troubling the Masonic world on tbis continent is that arising out of the condition of things in the Province of Quebec. Papers on this matter will be laid on the table of Grand Lodge by the Grand Secretary. There are yet some Lodges existing in Quebec on the reg-istry of the Grand Lodge of England. and it is claimed t.hat these Lodges are clandestine and irregular, inasmuch as Quebec is a territory within the jurisdiction of a reKularly formed Grand Lodge. It will be recollected that what are now Quebec and Ontario were formerly the Province of Canada; that a Grand Lodge was formed for that Province, and was recognized throughout the Masonic'world as a lawful Masonic power; that at the political ConfederatIOn of the Provinces, Quebec was set apart as a Province of the Confederation, and the Members of the Craft there claimed the right to establish a Grand Lodge for themselves, and did establish a Grand Lodge against the authority of the Grand Lodge of Canada, of which their Lodges were constituents, and to which they owed allegiance. Our Grand Lodge declined to recognize the.Quebec Grand Lodge until it was recognized by the Grand Lodge of Canada. inasmuch as it appeared to us that the territory was Masonically occupied by the Grand Lodge of Canada. This view was set out by R. W. Bro. B. L. Peters, who was Grand Master in 18iO, in one of the ablest papers ever written upon the subject, and was maintained by Grand Lodg-e. Finally the difficulty was arranged by the parties interested; the Grand Lodge of Canada recognized the Grand Lodge of Quebec, and this Grand Lodge was, of course. very glad to do the same. the party most interested having surrendered its jurisdiction over the territory. But when the Grand Lodge of Canada was formed, and during its existence. it, by arran~ementwith the Grand Lodge of Eng-land, recognized the existence of English Lodges III Quebec-or, as it was then termed, Canada East, and it in part waived its jurisdiction so far as these Lodges were concerned; and路 so long as it continued authority over Canada East (or Quebec), these Lodges had rights by their original Constitution and by the waiver already referred to. We recognized this condition of things by entering into fraternal relations with the Grand Lodge of Canada as she existed. with these Lodges in her territory, but not holding from her. The Grand Lodge of Canada continues to recog-nize this yet, although she is not in the territory. She only abandoned to the Grand Lodge of Quebec the rights in the territory she herself had.

Concerning Local Matters, the extrads below will furnish sufficient information: A matter which had been brought before me more than once during the rear has reference to the point whether or not a Brother belonging to a Lodge in this jUrIsdiction and resident here has the right to withdraw from member:;hip and unite with a Lodge in Maine, or in Nova Scotia, or elsewhere. It appears that in the County of Charlotte some Brothers, after they are raised, withdraw and join the Lodge at Eastport. in the neighboring State of l\'laine, which is more convenicnt to attend than their mother Lodge. I sympathize with the aggrieved Lodges, but I know of no remedy. I think the absolute right of a Brother in g'ood standing to withdraw from a Lodge is recognized by all Masonic authority, and I know of no law to prevent him from joining a Lodge anywhere. However, as the matter is of special importance to one Lodge, and as it is a matter of principle, I bring it before you for your consideration, as you may view the matter in a different light from that in which I view it. Numerically, we have lost more members than I anticipated we would lose in the past year. There are fewer suspensions for non-payment of dues than in 1884-5. but there is an路 increase in deaths and withdrawals, and a decrease in the number of admissions, both by initiation and by members rejoining. In some, ff Dot all. of the Lodges the policy prevails of getting members who are in arrears of and negligent about their dues to pay up a portion of their indebtedness, as a payment in full. and then to withdraw. The advantage of this is that the..~e Brethren go outof active membership in good standing 8.<; Craftsmen. The disadvantage is that it leads to the unaffiliation of members who are somewhatinditferent, but who might be kept on the books in good standing by a little


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judicious management on the part of the Secretaries. An efficient and earnest Secretarv who will take an interest in keeping up the Lodge, by collecting the dues as a matter business, should not make haste to get Brethren to withdraw who are in arrears.

of

The Report of the Grand Secretary was a good and complete one. Recognition of some foreign bodies was considered, but finally postponed. There is nothing of any special interest in the Proceedings claiming attention here. There is no Report on Correspondence. The Grand Master and the Grand Secretary were re-elected, and both resided in the city of St. John.

NEW JERSEY, 1887. When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for a Committee on Correspondence to rise and explain, explanations will be considered in order. It is hoped that the following will explain: There are some Grand Lodges that hold their sessions during the summer months. The Proceedings of such, usually come to hand after this Committee has about completed its Annual Report. These journals, being received in the midst of pressing labors, preparatory to the coming Grand Lodge session, are denied the consideration due them for want of time. Even hurried and immature reviews are preferred, however, by this Committee, to allowing these journals to go over to the next year. Then there is another class of journals which receive less attention than is desired, or than they deserve. This class belong to the slow workers who send out their Proceedings when they feel like it. Othersome, whose Proceedings may have been sent, but never reached this office. '\Vaiting patiently for their arrival, until hope deferred maketh sick the heart of this Committee, the missing Proceedings are written for. After awhile they come along, and in the summer, when" labors abundant" and torrid heats have exhausted the powers of this Committee, a hurried and unsatisfactory review is the result. Sometimes it becomes necessary to place the notice of such Proceedings at the foot of the list, in order that they may appear in this Report. l'hey' are thus classed under the head" Addenda," because they cannot be noticed in time for an alphabetical arrangement. It is now midsummer, and several journals have just,come to hand containing the transactions of Grand Lodges whose sessions were held six, eight and twel ve months ago. As a rule, these Proceedings had to be sent for and solicited for the purposes of review, none having been received. One Grand Lodge met last January. A recent request for the journal of Proceedings is met with the promise of the journal in September next.


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The journal now under consideration was written for, and has just been received, though the session was held five months ago. Others l;>elong to this class. No blame is attached to, or reflections cast upon the Grand Secretaries, for it is assumed that they sent their Proceedings promptly, when issued. The foregoing explanation is made, ber.ause it is in order, being due this Committee. CELEBRATION.

On the 25th of January, 1887, a most interesting anniversary was held in the city of Trenton, New Jersey, it being the Centennial Celebration of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey. It is thus described by the Grand Secretary in the opening of his Proceedings: In pursuance of notices issued by the Grand Master, Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements, all the ollicers of the Grand Lodge, a very large nnmber of Past Grand Officers and other members, and many invited guests, assembled in Trenton, on the day above named, and the one hundredth anniversary of the establishment of the Grand Lodge of Freemasons, in New Jersey, was celebrated socially, oratorically and musically, as here recorded. At 11 o'clock A. M. a reception was held by the Grand Master, at Masonic Hall, and many visitors and guests were welcomed.

Quite a number of Masonic Dig'nitaries were present from sister Grand Lodge Jurisdictions, noticeably from Pennsylvania and New York. M. W. Bro. Joseph VV. Congdon, Grand Master, presided. The celebration took place in the Taylor Opera House, in the presence of some 1,500 Brethren, ladies and citizens. The history of the occasion is most interesting and quite readable, covering nearly seventy pages of the journal. Public addresses were made by a number of leading Brethren. From the opening remarks of Grand Master Congdon, the following is taken: BRETHREN AND FRIENDS-It is my fortunate privilege and most honorable distinction, as Grand Master. to preside upon this very memorable occasion of the Centennial Celebration of the establishment of the Sovereign Grand Lodge of the Most Ancient and Honorable Society of Free and Accepted Masons in the State of New Jersey, and to welcome to this reunion tbe bonored guests who compliment us by their wesence, and those Worshipful Sirs and Brethren who make up the constituency of this Grand Lodge. While this is a pleasure of superlative degree, one's heart is so crowded with the tender sentiment of such an anniversary, so proud of this congregation of Brothers and friends who testify their regard for Freemasonry by their presence, so full of greeting for our Brethren from abroad, and so impressed with memories of days gone by and anticipation of the days to come, that words seem born of poverty, and thoughts are feeble, though they be fmmed in strongest, most emphatic phrase. We stand this hour reflectively and look far behind, with clear and gladdened vision. along the road that we, and those who came before, have trod. Through the dim vista of a hundred years we see the point upon the path where certain of the busy throng who crowd along" in solemn and unceasing train," put on the lamb-skin apron, pledged their faith and helpfulness each to the other. grasped hands in brotherly union, and began the march as an organized Grand Lodge of Freemasons in New Jersey.

In the evening another most interesting and entertaining affair came off. Such occasions are always pleasant, affording a delightful reunion of Brethren, with other attractions, such as good eating and fine speeches. The Menu and mnsic must have been very inspiring, and


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wrought a wonderful and elevating effect, especially upon the speakers, for their addresses were not only numerous, but fine. Bro. Richard Vaux, Past Grand Master of Pennsylvania, made a characteristic talk. "Richard was himself." The Grand Secretary concluded his history of the occasion in these words: The assemblage then dispersed. and thus was begun, conducted and ended the first Centennial Celebration in the existence of' the Grand Lodge of Freemasons in New Jersey, A. D. 1787-1887, A. L. 5787-5887.

The One Hundredth Annual Communication opened in Freemasons' Hall, in the city of Trenton, January 26th, 1887, and was ably presided over by the Grand Master, Bro. Joseph W. Congdon. The venerable Joseph H. Hough was Grand Secretary. 1'here were present a large number of Lodge Representatives, with six Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers and Past Masters. The present membership of that jurisdiction is reported to be 12,660. This shows a slight gain over the previous year. ADDRESS.

Grand Master Congdon presented a very lengthy Address. As a Masonic and business document, its merits equal its length. Twentyfive pages were occupied by the Address. In the midst of centennial festivities and joys, the Grand Master will be excused for the following eloquent opening: My BRETHREN-Let us rejoice in this memorable convocation. We are assembled in the One Hundredth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in the State of New Jersey. and yesterday. with oratory, music and repast, in festal celebration. we commemorated the Centennial Anniversary of the establishment of this Sovereign Grand Body of Ancient Freemasonry. In humble but joyous praise, let us thank the Omnipotent Ruler of the destinies of all men for the privilege of being permitted to assemble again as in a great family of Brothers, and for all the comforts vOllchsafed to us since we last parted for a twelvemonths' time. A1Jlictions great. misfortune dire, and disappointments sore, have been meted out to some. but the sunny days oflife are, as a rule. more numerous than those of cloud and storm; and for continued life and health, domestic jO)'s. and now, especially. for the happy communion that grows out of these fraternal ties,let our expanding hearts be so imbued with gratitude sincere to Him who rules on high that it shall" rise in free and uncorrupted praise, like fragrant incense;" and then may heaven" double every blessing" in effect. Our minds revert instinctively in this glad hour to that handful of our Brethren who, one day an hundred years ago, made up the organiz!l.tion of this Grand Lodge. Let us in reverence hope that it is to-day permitted them. from seats above, to look upon the scenes that mark this recurrence or that day. If so. how much transformed the world they look upon! How wonderfully the ways of God have developed the aspiring mind of man! Men rush about in steam conveyances that, like busy shuttles in a loom, with speed outstrip the 'winds of Heaven; they send giant vessels dashing through the trackless seas like things of life; great engines, full of superhuman force. are set in motion bv a woman's feeble hand a thousand miles away; the most magnificent monuments of architecture rise towering towards the skies: most intricate contrivances and ponderous machinery take the place of slow and tiresome labor of the hands and swell the comforts of our Jives; the match gives fire to light and heat from the very bowels of the earth; thoughts expressed in words liy round the earth withi n the twinkling of an eye; and friend speaks to friend in natural voice an hundred miles and more away! These arc stupendOUS, most impressiv~ thoughts. I dwell on them to make more impressive and


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important the reflection that in all these. permutations of the century, the Institution of Freemasonry still .. stands upon the ancient ways," unchanged and unchangeable, of all the affairs of man ; "constant as the Northern Star, of whose true and resting quality there is no fellow in the firmament; unvarying, because, unlike any other institution, philosophy or theory of human development, it is finished and complete." THE DEAD.

The Grand Master enumerated the Brethren that had passed away during the year, which constituted quite a long list. Fraternal relations with all other Grand Lodges were reported as being unehanged and harmonious. The Grand Master called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the proposed general Masonic Convention that was to be held in Chicago. He favored the proposition, as it originated with him one year before. CHARLl<:STON SUFFERERS.

In response to the call of Grand Master Smyth, of South Carolina, for aid in behalf of those who suffered by the terrible earthquake in Charleston, a noble response was made; ov'er $2,000 having been contributed. Before all this amount was sent to Charleston, Grand Master Congdon was informed that sufficient relief had been afforded, and that nothing more was desired. The Grand Master reported that some $!)OO of this liberal contribution still remained undisposed of. DECISIONS.

Twenty-three Decisions were reported by the Grand Master. The Decisions are correct interpretations and constructions of general Masonic principles, fairly representing the customs followed by Lodges. They were approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence and by the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master had granted one Dispensation to form a new Lodge, and recommended the formation of another under Dispensation. The Address of Grand Master Congdon commends itself and its author for its superior business merits. The Grand Secretary submitted a detailed statement of all the fiscal affairs of the Grand LOdge. The business of the session was carefully considered, and disposed of in a satisfactory manner, judging from the record. The Grand Master had something to say relative to THE CRAFT IN NEW JERSEY,

I have the exceeding pleasure to report that, as I believe, never has the condition of our Brotherhood in New ,Jersey, all in all, been more gratifying. The uniformity and excellence of Masonic work has never been, I am confident, so nearly perfect as now. But one instance of discordance between Lodges exists, in my knowledge; discipline is excellent, and all subordinates are loyal to this controlling body; material for work bas been found in unusual plenty; and, as a rUle, the finances of our Lodges are in good shape and well administered.


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Lodges are taken to task after this style: Thev are also reminded that the names of all suspended or expelled Masons should be promptly reported to the Grand Secretary, and also restorations, whenever they occur; furthermore, that with their annual returns, Lod~es should report the names of all candidates rejected during the year. How many Lodges have met this requirement? I must also bring to the score the Lodges which have failed to make returns promptly. They are required by the eighteenth General Regulation to make their reports within one week after the annual election has been held, and yet returns were received as late as one week ago this day. I desire to call the attention of Masters of Lodges to the fact that the wearing of jewels of office without ribbons or collars, pinned to the coat or hung on a button. is in direct violation of an enactment of this Grand Lodge, recorded in the minutes of 1868, page 381. That regulation must be lived up to or wiped out. So long as it is a requirempnt of law, Masters do not do their whole duty if they ignore it. It is presumed it was established to secure uniformity.

Grand Master Congdon furnished the following, illustrative of the good results of having signs at command: Here let me with pride revert to an instance of the practicality of Masonic work and teaching that has occurred during the past year. On the 2d of March. in a great gale, a vesvel was carried beyond control and stranded two miles from shore off Barnegat Bay. Two hours afterwards she bilged, leaving her almost entirely under water, with the sea breaking in wild waves fifteen feet over her, and in a short time she was a fantastic iceberg, with half-frozen men clinging to her rigging. A Brother of Mariners' Lodge, of Barnegat, was casnally attracted to thc peculiar position of the boat. He watched it for a moment, when behold! a signal! An instant later it was repeated-and again. It was the Masonic signal of distress! Our sea-faring Brethren called for help-and not in vain. He who saw their significant appeal delayed not, but Hew to the nearest life-saving station for assistance. Meanwhile the crew, six in all, seeking safety, had floated a boat, and were out upon the angry waters. while their vessel fast went to pieces. They were unable to row to shore, and drifted helplessly towards the open sea. But soon strong men, with willing hands and. all useful appliances, were able to compass their relief, and brought them safe to shore. exhausted and badly frozen, but with blessings for the Brother who had seen their saving sign. CORRESPONDENCE.

This work is performed, as usual, by Bro. James A. Norton. His review covers 126 pages, and embraces notices of a large number of Grand Lodge Proceedings. His work is full of qnotations and brief comments. Missouri, for 1886, is accorded a five-paged notice. He treated the Address of Bro. Boyd, our Grand Master, very handsomely, making extended quotations therefrom. He also quoted from the address made before our Grand Lodge by Bro. Rob :Morris. From the Report of Bro. Norton there is copied an expression that is hard 1.0 understand. If he was joking, the selection of the word was unfortunate. If he was in- earnest, he should have used a stronger term. Here is what he said: Bro. Vjncil votes "no" on a periodical Congress of Grand Masters. We knew he would if the opportunity were given him; he's just mean enough for that.

If Bro. Norton meant what he said, and said what he meant, thereby intending to convey the idea that" Bro. Vincil" is "MEAN," "Bro. Vincil" has to say in reply to Bro. Norton, "You arc another." Now, then!


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What he means he must determine himself. This writer does not think that his vote against the proposed Congress of Grand Masters would justify the charge· made against him of being "mean." If he did not mean that the Missouri Committee is "mean," he ought to have been more definite in his meaning. The following extract is taken from his Report, wherein he makes an allusion to this Committee, which is as darkly mysterious as his expression about meanness: Of our Report and of ourself kind things are said. but, somehow, Bro. VincH always tackles New Jersey's Proceedings in hot weather and just after his annual tare. In the first paragraph of the review of New Jersey he says: "There are something- over one hundred [! 1 '" '" '" in that jurisdiction." His pen wouldn't work. Bro. VincH, take our advice. '" '" '" That's esoteric, them stars.

Who can sol ve the meaning of the above? Looking at the above extract, this Committee has compared it with the text in the Report of 1886, and finds that the stars and other things are not in the original copy. The Report of Bro. Norton is a good synopsis. Bro. Robert M. Moore was elected Grand Master, to succeed Bro. Congdon, and Bro. Joseph H. Hough was re-elected Grand Secretary, and resides at Trenton.

NEW MEXICO, 1886. This journal contains the minutes of three special communications, called for the purpose of installing Lodge officers. The Ninth Annual Communication was held in the city of Deming, November 9th, 1886. M. \V. Bro. Max Frost was Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. A. A. Keen was Grand Secretary. There were present seven Past Grand Masters, with other Past Grand Officers, and numerous Representatives of Lodges. There are eleven Lodges in this jurisdiction, and a reported membership of 576, as shown by the Grand •Secretary's table. He announces a gain of twenty-three members. The Address of Grand Master Frost, covering six pages, is rather a striking document. It opens thus: In the battle of life we generally grow selfish, and care little for the dead and wouuded, and those who through misfortune or inability to cope with the stern reality of life, are compelled to lag behind. or are pushed to the wall. It is our duty, my Brethren. to combat this tendency to selfishness. Masonry is one of the most potent agents in that direction. and our Annual Communications especially tend to bring us together as Brethren and friends, from all parts of this great territory, to renew old friendships, make new ones, strengthen the bonds of brotherly affection, and to meet upon a level, to work for the best interests of the Craft and the benefit of the human race.


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He reported a grand increase in membership during the year, claiming that there had been a gain of thirty-eight members. The Grand Secretary said there had been only twenty-three increase.. The Grand Master reported that the funds of the Grand Lodge had run out, and recommended that an assessment of fifty cents per member should be made, to increase their means, so as to meet their obligations. He re.commended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Mexico, "The Federal District," and the Grand Lodge of Lower California. The latter body has never been heard of by this Committee. Both bodies were recognized. He recommended also that an ediet be issued against such Lodges, in the Grand Lodge of Quebec, as owe and pay. their allegiance to the Grand Lodge of England, and such edict was proclaimed by the Grand Lodge: Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of New Mexico holds all Lodges in the Province of Quebec, maintaining allegiance to any Grand Lodge. other than the Grand Lodge of Quebec, as illegal and irregular, and that all Lodges and Brethren under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico are charged not to hold Masonic intercourse with such irregular and illegal Lodges or any member thereof.

The Report of Grand Secretary Keen, is a brief and business-like paper. The Committee on "T ays and Means presented the following, which was adopted, after which nothing further appears in the minutes claiming attention here: . '. In consideration of the low condition of our finances; and with the view of putting the same upon a permanent footing, thereby enabling us to meet the current expenses of printing and other obligations as they mature, and to avoid the borrowing of money in future, we, therefore, concur in the recommendation made by the M. W. Grand Master, in his Address, that an assessment of fifty cents per capita. as shown by last returns, be made upon each member of the subordinate Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction, to be paid from the general funds of such Lodges. CO.RHESl'ONDENCE.

A Report of some seventy pages, written by Bro. Max Frost, contains gleanings from a number of Grand Lodge Proceedings. The Missouri journal for the years 1885 and 1886 were noticed and quoted from. The Report presents a mere synopsis of Grand Lodge doings. C. N. Blackwell, of Santa Fe, was elected Grand Master, and A. A. Keen, Las Vegas, was re-elected Grand Secretary.

NEW YORK, ISS7. The One Hundred and Sixth Annual Communication met in Masonic Hall, in the city of New York, June 7th, 1887, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. Frank E. Lawrence, Grand Master; R. W. Bro. Edward M. L. Ehlers was Grand Secretary. The journal now under review is very


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complete, containing matters of varied interest to the Craft in the " Empire" jurisdiction of this c,ountry. It was brought from the press in good time. From a brief recapitulation it is learned that there are 715 Lodges in that jurisdiction, with a membership of 72,113. The record says "a constitutional number of Lodges were represented." How many, cannot be ascertained without counting. This it is not proposed to do. Judging from the list reported by the Committee on Credentials, the representation was very large. The pay-roll in that jurisdiction annually amounts to nearly $20,000. Representatives of fifty-four Grand Lodges were reported as present. The Address of Grand Master Lawrence covered over forty pages. It embraced a wide range of subjects, showing the vast labors incumbent upon a Grand Master in that large jurisdiction. He opened thus: We come with humble thankfulness to the Great Architect of the Universe, by whose mercy we have, been preserved throughout the year, and under whose fostering ca.re our undertakings have prospered and been blessed. One hundred and six times'the Brethren of this State have now annually a.ssemblcd in this Grand Lodge ; and never with greater reason for gratitude and rejoicing than at the present hour. Never in its history has our Fraternity been stronger or more prosperous, never have its purposes been higher or more firmly determined, never has its capacity been greater. for the performance of labors which may tend to the glory of God and the exaltation of His holy name. Let us, then, proceed to our present duties, not only with all due thankfulness and humility, but with a firm resolution to so improve the opportunities placed within our reach as may most greatly benefit the important interests committed to our care.

He furnished quite a long list of those who had died during the year. Four new Lodges 路had been formed by his permission under Dispensation. He congratulated the Grand Lodge upon the great efficiency and value of their system of work and lectures in use among them. It seems that the Grand Lodge at its last session had ordered the preparation of a history of the Grand Lodge and of Freemasonry in the State of New York. The Grand Master had appointed Bro. Charles T. MeClenachan as Historian, and his work is reported as well advanced, portions of it being ready for the printer. Numerous Dispensations and appointments were reported, as well as official visitations made, by the Grand Master. Foreign relations were treated at length and ably by Bro. Lawrence. Concerning the England-Quebec matter, which was duly considered by the Grand Master, he concluded that no necessity had arisen for any decided action upon the part of the Grand Lodge of New York. In respect to the troub-Ies in the Grand Lodge of Connecticut, Grand Master Lawrence thought it the duty of the Grand Lodge of New York to sustain the course of our Connecticut Brethren in their treatment of the rebellious meri1bers of Hiram Lodge, No. 1. The Grand Master did not favor the proposed Masonic Congress called to meet in Chicago. He said as the proposed meeting had no power to enact any legislation, any opinions that might be


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formulated by said Convention would be destitute of any authority for their enforcement, and, therefore, of no consequence. These views of Grand Master Lawrence represent fully the position of this Committee. PREROGATIVE.

Grand Master Lawrence said that nuinerous applications had been made to him for permission to confer the degrees within a less period of timetban the law allowed. He stated that as there was no authority in the law for granting such Dispensations, but that the statutes forbid it, he had, therefore, refused to grant any such privileges. Grand Master Lawrence treated, at very considerable length, and in a masterly manner, the questions of indebtedness on account of their Masonic Hall. He shows, as in the past, eminent ability to handle this large and burdensome obligation that is upon them. It is fortunate that the Grand Lodge of New York has at its head such a financial'leader. He reported that in response to a call made upon the Lodges for aid to pay . off their debt there had been raised within the period of fourteen months over $200,000. More than 200 Lodges had paid in an amount sufficient to entitle them to exemption from the fifty cents tax in the future. -It is supposed that an amount reachi'ng a quarter of a million dollars has been contributed by the bodies in that jurisdiction, thus reducing the debt to a sum which can be easily managed. The Grand Master said that some twenty months ago their debt was nearly a half-million of dollars. To-day the whole amount of the debt is less than $200,000. Grand Master Lawrence said that as soon as they shall have cancelled the balance of their indebtedness that the erection Qf an Asylum would be proceeded with. Many contributions have been made towards the erection of the Asylum. The Grand Master closed his very able and practical p~per with a bright outlook as to the future. It is so interesting that this Committee would present it entire. It is herewith given: THE FUTURE.

And now, Brethren, our thoughts turn to the future; and the question arises, how best and with the least delay to carry to completion this work in WhICh so much progress has already been made? In my judgment, there is no better method than by diligentlv pursuing the means already adopted; and by a due compliance, upon the part of ail able to extend it, with the provisions of the system of dealinK with this subject. lately established. That such compliance will bc generally given, there is every reason to hope and believe; not only the large number of Lodges which have already contributed their entire proportion of the debt but the many others now engaged- in procuring the means to do so, and which have definitely assured the Grand Master that their proportion will be paid before the end of the present calendar year, afford abundant promise to this effect, and it needs but the acceptance of the recently enacted system by the remainder of the 9I:,ll;ft, to urge thisJabor forward to absolute and complete success. Every obstacle and every adverse arKument in the path of the payment of this debt has been fairly met and overcome. Any thought that this work is now to cease or be abandoned, is not for an instant to be tolerated. The end is plainly in view, We have but to stretch forth our hands to reach and secure it. Now, therefore, now, more than ever, with increasing ardor, we should prosecute this struggle until the end is reached!


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Something of the old prejudice and error doubtless still remains: but through your aid throu~h such measures as vou may be able to concert, and through the continuance of the means already devised, s'urely this may soon be altogether removed. Where this work has acquired the strongest hold, its effect is already most beneficially experienced. I am told by many of the Brethren that their recent effort." have solidified the Craft in their respective Lodges, and strengthened the ties which bind them together; and that, looki n~ back at their late labors in this cause, they are more than repaid for the sacrifice and the struggle, by the consciousness of duty done, by the manly thought that they have borne their full share in this toil, and by the pleasure, mingled with pride, with which they look forward to the great and beneficent results to fiow in the future from this undertaking, and to be in part produced as the result of their endeavors. Thus may it be throu~h all the Craft! The purpose of our labor is exalted, and even holy. The glorious end was for a time obscured by bitter and dreary burdens, but it now shines out once more, as brightly as it shone before the vision of our fathers; and now it is hallowed by the toils and the sacrifices of countless Brethren during almost half a century; and much more easily attainable, and much more near at hand. What Brother worthy the name, understanding this subject aright, will now with路 hold his aid? If any such there are; whom argument cannot reach, whom entreaty is powerless to move, upon whom the force.of example has nowei~ht, and who are so far isolated from the purposes of the Craft at large that they refuse to join, except under compUlsion, in this work, we may rest assured that the course of any few such Brethren will but serve more brightly to,illumine the unselfish spirit of the whole. Happy and glorious will be the day, when, with this debt paid, our Fraternity rises once more to its full stature, un trampled by any obligation. Rut this work means more than the mere payment of the debt; it means even more than the erection of the Asylum, sacred and cherished though that object is. It means the awakening of the noblest impulses, and the mingling of all the Craft in exalted purposes, which, wben accomplished, will but point the way to future labors even broader and higher. Our number is vast, our jurisdiction is broad, our capacity for usefulness' is large beyond expression. Yet, believe me, Brethren, our Fraternity is only truly great when its giant strength is consecrated to the service of the Lord; and greatest of all when our many thousand Craftsmen, swayed by a single purpose, move forward in unison to the fulfillment of labors, merciful and righteous, such as this. PRUDENCE LODGE.

Grand Master Lawrence presented at some length a history of this Lodge, Complaint had been made to him that said Lodge, located in the city of New York,had received the petitions of several notoriously bad and unworthy persons. These" lewd fellows of the base resort" had received the three degrees in said Lodge, and were admitted to membership therein. An investigation proved the complaint to be true, showing that the persons thus received were men whose lives, occupations and associations were lawless, disreputable and vile. The Grand Master said that owing to the great injury inflicted upon the good name of Masonry, and a serious violation of their la\'ls, the case was one that called for the most severe action. He, therefore, arrested the Charter of Prudence Lodge,. and charges were preferred against eight persons. He appointed a commission of Past Masters for their trial. Seven of them were expelled from the Fraternity. Charges were likewise preferred against the Master of said Lodge, and he was expelled. The Grand Master was in doubt whether all who had been concerned in the outrageous acts in that Lodge had yet been punished.


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The Grand Master thought that a Lodge whose alta'f had been so vilely desecrated should never be allowed to meet again, a~d that any good members that may have belonged to that body be left to seek Masonic homes in Lodges free from any such corruption. The Reports of the Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Librarian and various committees, embrace large and varied interests connected with the Grand Lodge of New York. These interests had all received careful attention. The Grand Lodge, by resolution, made final the arrest of the Charter of Prudence Lodge, and the action of the Grand Master was commended as wise, judicious and energetic. Thus prop-. erly ended ~ chapter of history fraught with warning to others. A Masonic Lodge is no place for sluggers, bummers, saloon bouncers and saloon keepers. The apologists and friends of such characters may herd with them and howl to their heart's content when these moral lepers are driven from the pure sanctuary of Masonry. No doubt some were ready to denounce the proceedings in the above-mentioned case, as ex post facto, like the champions of saloon keepers do in Missouri. But the bummers had to go just the same as they will in Missouri. CORRESPONDENCE.

A short Report, covering some eighty pages, was submitted by the committee, of which the venerable Bro. John W. Simons was Chairman. His notices of the many Grand Lodge journals reviewed were necessarily brief. Missouri, for 18fl6, received the compliment of a little more than one page. Speaking of the comments of this Committee, concerning their heavy debt, Bro. Simons made the following gratifying statements: Bro. John D. Vincil again presented the Correspondence Report, and it is a most admirable paper which no thoughtful Mason can read without benefit. In the value of these Reports as indicating the progress of the Fraternity and keeping watchful guard over its best in terests by the fraternal discussion of questions likely to affect its welfare and harmony, we would cheerfully present this as exactly in the right vein. New York, for 1886. has courteous notice, and Grand Master Lawrence is commended for his excellent work in behalf of the Hall and Asylum Fund; but ollr good Brother fails to reach out to the extent of what New York can do under the guidance ofa Masonic Napoleon like Bro. Lawrence. Bro. Vinci! is appalled at the heavy amount of the debt, and reads distrust, averS1:on and opposition between the lines, trusting that the outlook is not S0 gloomy to New Yorkers as it appears at the distance from which he observes the effort we are making. Now see, Bro. Vincil, through onr telescope. When yon were writing, say in the summer of 1886, the amount raised towards the extinction of the debt was about $80,000; now as we write in the latter part of January, 1887, the amount paid into the hands of the Grand Master is over $220,000, and more coming! So lar&,e a jurisdiction is not easily set in motion; but when fairly started, we are apt to exempllfy the saying put into the mouth of Richelieu : II In the lexicon of a bright youth, There's no such word as fail." Thanking our Brother none the less kindly for his fraternal notice of this Committee, we wish him and his jurisdiction all happiness and prosperity. .


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Many Grand Lodges make the mistake of allowing an active and efficient Grand MMter to retire from office when he is most needed. Sometimes the mistake is made of refusing to re-elect a valuable officer. The Grand Lodge of New York did not commit such blunder, but unanimously re-elected Bro. Frank Lawrence, who has shown such wonderful ability in leading that Grand Lodge to a happy deliverance from the fearful incubus which has weighed upon them so long. 'Well might the committee call him a "Masonic Napoleon," for, like the illustrious Corsican, Bro. Lawrence has conquered success, and compelled victory to come out of sceming disaster. He deserves a monument. But his best monumcnt will be found in the great work accomplished by him .. Both Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected and live in New York City.

NORTH CAROLINA, ISS7. The One Hundredth Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge convened in the city of Raleigh, on the 11th day of January, 1887. M. ",V. Bro. F. H. Busbee, Grand Master, present and presiding; R. VV. Bro. Donald ",V. Bain, Grand Secretary. There were present Representati ves from 128 Lodges. The statistics show the total of 220 Lodges, with about 8,000 members in the jurisdiction. 193 Lodges made returns; twenty-five were delinquent. An Address of cight pages was presented by Grand Master Busbee. From the opening the following extracts are made: BRETHREN-We have reverently begun this, the One Hundredth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina, by a due acknowledgment of our dependence upon, n.nd gratitude to the Divine Creator for his continued blessing. Our tribute is next due to the illustrious North Carolinians who so wisely reorganized this Grand Body in the village of Tarboro a century ago. The original foundation of the Grand Lodge, in 1771, seems to have been followed by no regular communications-at least no trace or record of it remains. The perils and privations incident to a desperate struggle had apparently effaced the infant body, and all the energies of the scattered colonists had been enlisted in the cause路 of liberty. And after the long conflict was over and the independence of the States was secured, there arose in the minds of all thoughtful patriots the gravest doubts for the future of the, country. Discordant States. united only by that "rope of sand," the Articles of Confederation, a feeble and widely dispersed people, laboring under the accumulated evils of a debased currency; an impotent government and a divided public sentiment, such difficulties might well make the most sanguine tremble for the future. Just at this time the Representatives of eight Lodges met at Tarboro and reorganized the Grand Lodge of North Carolina. I shall not trench upon the field to be so well occupied by our learned and fluent Orator, as he shall trace the ~rowth and progress of the Fraternity. He may recount the names and virtues of the dIstinguished Brethren who have occupied honored positions in the Order, especially those who have been my predecessors ill this chair. Governor Samuel Johnson .was the first Grand Master, and after him the list contains the names of four other Governors of the State-Richard CasG. L. Ap.-8.


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well, William Richardson Davie, Benjamin Smith, Hutchings G. Burton and Richard Dobbs Spaight. Of Supreme Court Judges, three-Chief Justice John Louis Taylor, Judges John Hall and Edwin G. Reade. There are other names, of scarcely less reputation-Col. Wm. Polk. Judge Robert Strange, Calvin Jones, Samuel F. Patterson, and others of equal reputation. The names of the living Past Grand Masters I omit. Such are the men and Ma..c;ons, Brethren, who built up and afterwards maintained the Grand Lodge of North Carolina. J

He reported thla state of the Fraternity in these words: THE CONDITION OF THE FRATERNITY.

There may be, and doubtless is, a returning tide of national prosperity in the great centres of business activity, but as yet our remoter waters have scarcely been reached bv its ripples. The returns of our agricultural labor have been, in many parts of our State, so meager that we are suffering under serious financial depression. Notwithstandi~ these adverse conditions, Masonry presents to-day a decidedly better outlook than it did a year ago. DECISIONS.

Nine Decisions were rendered by the Grand Master,' which seem to be in conformity with the laws of that jurisdiction. NON-AFFILIATION.

'rhis subject was treated by the Grand Master, after the following fashion: Not in North Carolina alone, but in a large majority of the jurisdictions, the problem of how can the evil of non-affiliation be best dealt with, ha..c; taxed the ingenuity, the patience and the consistency of the Craft. Here our word has usually been like that of Penelope upon her notable loom, what was woven at one communication has been unraveled at the next. No one who sat in this body, under the administration of that eloquent and thorough-going leader, Charles C. Clark, whom we hoped so much to have with us to-night, can forget his scathing attacks upon the evil. Let us search more for prevention than for cure. For the most part non-affiliation arises from the decline of Lodges, from a change of residence and from the neglect of the secretaries in making prompt collections. When a Lodg-e is permitted to become dormant and no active Lodge occupies its territory, non-affiliation is inevitable. The best preven.tive is to keep the Lodges up. Maintain the interest in Masonry, if possible. Again, Masons frequently change their residences, and, leaving their old Lodges, fail to connect themselves with the Lodge in their new home. The fault will usually be found to be in the conduct of the members of the Lodge to which he has removed. If the Brethren take the new comer by the hand, and make Masonry and the Lodge-room pleasant and helpful, there will be no non-affiliation for him. INTElIIPERANCE.

From the Address, the following extract is made concerning the vice of intemperance: . True Masonry teaches, and has ahvays taught, the highest temperance. A standing reproach to the Craft is the abuse of intoxicating liquors by its members. It is this abuse which gives force to, and possibly justifies the position of the advocates of total abstinence. Upon intemperance, in every form, and especially the intemperate use of ardent spirits, by' whomsoever committed, Masonry should take no apologetic position. Drunkenness is a Masonic offense. and no single occurrence should be overlooked or treated as a simple weakness. The Master should see that the offender was at least most seriously admonished. Repeated intoxication is one of the highest offenses, and no ill-jUdged compassion, no faint hopes of future reformation should prevent the Lodge from fearlessly cutting off the faithless Brother. To the victim, tenderness and aid, if either will avail; to the offense unswerving justice. Thus alone can the Craft be saved from uni'versal reproach and contempt.


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THE SOCIAL FEATURES OF MASONRY.

The Grand Master presented the following views concerning this subject: Far be it from me to ad vise that the Lodge-room be made the scene of improper festivity. or to seek to ingraft upon Masonry the features that have brought discredit upon Lodges elsewhere. I only recommend, with all the earnestness in my power. that a united effort be made to render the Lodge meetings more attractive. An inexpensive dinner or supper would be a pleasant addition in many instances. The stomach, and not the heart. is the real seat of the affections. In conn try Lodges, after the conclusion of the proceedings. an informal farmers' club and general discussion upon agricultural matters might well be held, and it would do no harm to have good men in the neighborhood. who were not Masons, to attend these. The result would be that most of them WflUld soon be in the Lodge. In towns and villages a lecture or talk upon some topic of contemporary interest. a recitation, a song. or story, might well be given, either in connection with or as a substitute for a supper. The amount of interest, amusement or instruction which may be dug out of the material of any fairly representative Lodge in North Carolina would really surprise its own members. _ If there be one noticeable want in the social system of North Carolina, it is a want of proper relaxation and amusements; and so true is this that I am sure the recommendation just given will seem to many as a useless innovation upon the serious observance of Masonry, because even the capacity for social enjoyment in many has become atrophied and withered from lack of usc. CONCLUSION.

In concluding his very valuable Address, the Grand Master said: Thank God, the standard of MltSonry is going to the front. Taking part in no controversies of politics, of religion or science. the hand-maid of education, and the upholder of the purest morality, her mission is to raise the human race, to cheer the faint-hearted, to feed the hungry, and to clothe the naked. Her works do praise her. Brethren, shall we not resolve to bear aloft her ancient banner to new and grander victories?

The Grand Secretary's Report is a very interesting and instructive paper. From it information is gathered that the membership of the jurisdiction had been increased during the year. One Lodge had been created under Dispensation, and five continued in like character. Five Lodges that had been dormant were revived. He said: At the opening of the last l\-Iasonic year, I joined the Grand l\1aster in an earnest appeal to many or the dormant Lodges to reorganize and resume work, urging the centennial period as an incentive to a rallying of the inactive forces. This appeal was not without effect, as my reference to Lodges that have been revived will show. A number of Lodges on the verge of dissolution have paid their dues, others in part, and appeals for your clemency are sent up for your consideration, which will be presented to the proper committee. The returns from the Lodges indicate a net increase of membership. I am pleased to be able to report a better condition of affll.irs generally among the Lodges. The greatest need, as an essential to further improvement and advancement, is enlightenment as to the work. ORPHAN ASYLUM.

'l'his is an institution that receives much attention and aid from the Masons in North Carolina. As we of Missouri are greatly interested in building up a similar institution, it is proper that all the facts possible


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should be furnished in this report. In the Orphan Asylum at Oxford, North CaroEna, a high standard of morals is inculcated; strict and kind discipline of children is enforced, and the judicious expenditure of money is made during the year. The names of 257 children had been enrolled. The average attendance was 19i. The average cost of feeding, clothing and teaching each child is about $50 a year. From the report' of the Superintendent of the Asylum, some interesting facts are gleaned. It appears that the State takes a large interest in this enterprise, having made an annual donation of $10,000 to aid the good work. The Grand Lodge annually gi ves $2,000. The income from all sources, per year, amounts to about $20,000. It is stated that the health of the children had been almost perfect during the entire year. Out of the whole number cared for, not one case of sickness had occurred requiring medical aid. This is a remarkable showing, and a gracious Providence must favor this noble enterprise. Strict attention is paid to the diet of the children. The management of the institution recognizes the hnpOl'tant fact that stuffing is not proper feeding, and that proper dieting does much to prevent a tendency to disease. The"housekeeper had been sent away for a term to attend a cooking school-the result has been a wonderful improvement in that department of the institution. Many of the girls have been taught to see that cooking is an art, and one that should be acquired with other accomplishments. During the year a department of telegraphy has been established, and now quite a number of boys and girls have received instructions to such an extent as to be able to receive and send messages, and are competent to take charge of an office. One of the orphans will take charge of a railroad office down town very soon. Thus these orphan children are being trained for usefulness, and acquiring knowledge of such lines of pursuit as will enable them to support themselves for the future. A steam laundry has been connected with the institution, and the larger girls and boys will do the washing for the asylum, thereby savinga large laundry bill each month. An industrial building has been completed. This will be valuable as furnishing opportunities to the pupils for learning dityerent trades, as there will be arranged a shoe shop, a carpenter shop and sewing-room. There is a farm connected with the asylum, upon which have been raised beans, beats, cabbages, cucumbers, celery, corn, potatoes, onions, tomatoes, turnips, hay, fodder, oats, etc., in very considerable quantities. From the amounts thus reported, it would seem this institution must be nearly or quite self-sustaining. The management of the institution send out the children as fast as good homes can be secured for them, and place these orphans where they have every ad vantage. Concerning this part of the work the Superintendent said:


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We have sent out fifty-three children to homes during the present year. The placing of children into good homes is a hard task. Applications for children come to us from far and near, and it is nece&~ary that these applications be thoroughly investigoated before we can act safely or intelligently. Careful inquiry reveals the fact that a !arge proportion of the homes offered are not what they should be and must be declmed. No one not connected with this work can appreciate thc amount of care and anxiety it brings. Our work, however, in this department has been very satisfactory the present year. The worst place in the world for an orphan child is in a bad home, and the best place in the world for an orphan child is in a good home. And liS the years go by and our work enlarges. comes the necessity for more willing hands and more consecrated hearts. Our appeal is to childless homes, to all who are concerned for social purity and the elevation of our little ones," to aid us in this good work. II

Concerning Contributions, the following statement shows what an interest others have in that glorious work: Christmas wail a high time to all the children in the Oxford Orphan Asylum. Col. W. F. Beasley acted the part of Kris Kringle, and the presents were more useful than ornamental, which is as it should be in an institution of this kind. One feature of the festivities WllS exceedingly pleasant to us all, and that was the fact that nearly all the money contributed this year was by citizens of North Carolina. Hitherto the people of New York and Baltimore have contributed more largely to this good cause than our own people. We congratulate ourselves that the good people of our own good State are waking up to the importance alP aiding, as far and as fully as they can, in making our orphan children happy at Christmas.

Ye Masons of Missouri! See what is heing done by your Breth ren in a sister jurisdiction? There are nearly four times as many Masons in :Missouri as in North Carolina. Yet the Brethren there house, feed, clothe and educate nearly 200 children per annum. These are being prepared for active usefulness in life, trained in virtne's ways, saved from crime, and qualified to build up the Commonwealth. What a noble work, with results beyond any computation! God speed the work in that jurisdiction, and add many more to the list. CENTENNIAL.

One hundred years ago the Grand Lodge of North Carolina was organized. It was resolved by the Grand Lodge to celebrate its Centennial during the session by a public gathering in the House of Representatives of the State Capital. On that occasion an oration was delivered by Bro. Eugene S. Martin, the Orator of the day. The address covered eighteen pages, small type, for which he received the thanks of the Grand Lodge. The retiring Grand Master, Bro. Busbee, was caned during the session. The presentation speech was made by Bro. Samuel H. Smith, Deputy Grand Master, on behalf of the members of the Grand Lodge.' Bro. Busbee accepted the present, and acknowledged the kindness of the donors, doubtless feeling that it was better to receive a cane in that way than to have it applied by force and power. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report of some sixty pages was furnished by Bros. Bain and Cowen, Committee. The notices of fifty-six .Grand Lodge Proceedings


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in the short limit of sixty pages were necessarily brief. The journal of Missouri for 1886 received a two-paged notice. The compliment tendered to the Missouri路 journal was evidently the kind expression of Bro. Bain, a warm personal friend of this Committee. He said: "One of the most complete and interesting volumes of Proceedings that comes to us, is that of the Grand Lodge of Missouri." Extracts were made frOli the Address of our Grand Master Boyd. The committee, commenting on his work, had the following to say: The Grand :Master is encouraged at the general outlook in his extensive jurisdiction. Here and there are indications oflack of progress and effort on the part ofsome Lodges. He concludes his very interestin/o{ Address with a glowing and eloquent tribute to Masonry, and to the ability of his right bower, R. W. Bro. .John D. Vincil, the Grand Secretary, whose handiwork is seen in all that makes Missouri Masonr~' progressive.

"Right Bower" may be a good literary term, but it is not Masonic. This Committee disclaims the" soft impeachment" and application. The report of the committee is a synopsis of the sayings and doi路ngs found in the journals revie~d by them. Charles H. Robinson, Wilmington, was chosen Grand Master, and Bro. Donald \Y. Bain, Raleigh, was re-elected Grand Secretary.

OHIO, 1886. The journal of Proceedings for 1886 is of the usual size and styIe. It is without any recapitulation or tabular footings. It is, therefore, impossible to tell the number of Lodges or total membership without the labor of counting. It is not proposed to do that kind of work for the Grand Secretary of Ohio. 'l'he Seventy-ninth Annual COlumunication was held in Cleveland, beginning October 19th, 1886. The Grand Lodge was opened and presided over by M. 'V. Bro. S. S. 'Yilliams, Grand Master; R. 'V. Bro. John D. Caldwell was Grand Secretary. The number of Representatives present may have been known to the Grand Secretary, but he did not furnish them in his Proceedings. The Grand Master presented a very lengthy Address-covering twenty-three pages. It is all business, and, as sllch, is very elaborate. Two Lodges had been created under Dispensation. He reported eighteen Decisions, which are supposed to be in accordance with the laws of Opio Masonry, as they were all approved by the Grand Lodge. OCCUPATIO~

OF HALLS.

On this subject the Grand Master made the following ruling, which was approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence, and adopted by the Grand Lodge. He first quoted their rule on the subject:


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"Ko subordinate Lodge in this jurisdiction shall permit its Lodge-room to be used by any other society or order whatsoever, nor shall it occupy any hall or room jointly with any other society or order, except by the special permission of the Grand Lod~e or Grand :Master; but nothing in this regulation shall be construed to prohibit a subordlllate Lodge from usinK rooms jointly with a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, a Masonic Council, or Commandery, or a Masonic body.'"

Here is his Decision under the above law:

â&#x20AC;˘

This Grand Lodge is committed to the doctrine of exclusive jurisdiction, and guards her rights with zealous care. She would be unjust if she did not accord to other governing Masonic bodies the same rights, with reference to their subordinates, that she claims for herself. Any body claiming to be a Lodge of Master Masons, located in Ohio. and not borne upon ttJe roll of this Grand Lodge, would not be permitted to occupy our halls. Now, in deciding the question as to what other bodies come within the rule, our conclusions must be arrived at by the same rule as that by which she governs herself as to Lodges of Master Masons-hence, a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons to be within the meaning of the rule must be borne upon the roll of the Most Excellent Grn.nd Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Ohio A Council, to be within the meaning of the rule, must be borne upon the roll of the MOl;t Illustrious Grand Council of R.oyal and Select Masters of Ohio; and a Commandery. to be within the meaning of the rule, must be borne upon the roll of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templars of Ohio. Any Chapter. Council or Commandery not on the roll as above. would not be within the meaning of the rule, and Lodges in this jurisdiction would be barred from holding joint occupancy of halls with such bodies. Now, as to other Masonic bodies. This rule was given substantially its present shape in 1875. at which time, in addition to the bodies already referred to. there were in existence in this State bodies. classed as 1\lasonic. under the name of Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, on the roll of the Supreme Council of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States of America. As bodies of that Rite, they were then and had been since 1853 the sole occupants of this territory, and for all this time in different places in this State. had occupied halls jointly with our Lodges; this. too, with the full knowledge of the Grand Lodge, hundreds of her members including Grand :Masters and other Grand Officers, having received the degrees in those bodies and in halls thus jointly occnpied. In deciding the case, then, I applied the same rule that I applied in the cll.<;e of the Chapter. the Council, and the Commandery, llnd held that as the Grand Lodge had for many years permitted a joint occupancy of her halls by Lodges with bodies subordinate to one Masonic power, I could not commit her to the policy of granting a like privilege to a rival of that power, and hence. that Rule i9 of our Code barred Lodges in this jnrisdiction from occupying halls jointly with such rival, and issued my orders to the Lodges throughout the State to that effect.

That the law above quoted, under which his Decision was made, needed no interpretation is quite obvious to this writer. Lodges, Chapters, Councils and Commanderies were fully provided for in the la,,,-. Then why the lengthy interpretation of that law by Grand Master Williams? "Other Masonic bodies" must be provided for. The last words of the Rule (79) indicate the necessity for an interpretation by the Grand Master. The language is provocative of a smile, and a smile it is. The Rule (79) enumerated" Lodge," "Chapter," "Council," "Commandery" "OR A MASONIC BODY." What" MASONIC BODY?" I invite John Smith, Peter Jones, James Johnson and Henry White, "OR" a man to my house. Such an invitation would clearly imply that the parties named by me were not men, but the unnamed factor was the only MAN in the case. So, while the others might come, the "man," with" or" as a prefix, would be especially recognized. Such an invitation would provoke more smiles. The Rule (79) clearly places Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery just where that thing styled" OR A


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MASONIC BODY" would have them located-on a plane of inferiority to a "OR A MASONIC BODY." The interpretation of Rule 79 by Grand Master 'Williams proves it. He said there are in existence in that jurisdiction" bodies classed as Masonic, unoor the name of Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite." This Rite is what the Rule (79) includes when it speaks of "or a MASONIC body." rl'his must be the meaning, unless it was intended to include the 240 degrees of a cert.ain "Boss Mason" in Boston, by the name of Various Wilson. If Grand Master 'Villiams is not fairly represented in the design of his interpretation, it is because he cannot be understood, and failed to make himself intelligible. The interpretation of the Grand Master met the approval of the Committee on Jurisprudence, and their approval was duly sanctioned by the Grand Lodge. A proposition was offered in lieu of the Heport of the Committee on Jurisprudence. Here it is: Resolved, That this Grand Lodge, being composed of Ancient Masters only. is unwilling. and does therefore decline to decide the disputed questions of jurisdiction between bodies other than those which are of the York Rite of Masonry.

This resolution was not approved. The opposite was approved, and Scoteh Riteism, as "the other fellow," "or a MASONIC body," was thus recognized and welcomed by the Grand Lodge of "Ancient Masters" of Ohio. How the Grand Lodge of Ohio, as such, can know that the Scotch Rite is justly "classed as MASONIC," this deponent saith not, because he does not know. Massachusetts defined the whereabouts and status of all bodies outside of the" York Rite," except the shop of Various Wilson. It was thought that such procedure would be novel anywhere else than in Massachusetts. But Ohio is of the same mind. RECOGNITION. On motion of Bro. John D. Caldwell, the Grand Lodge of Colon and Cuba was recognized, and an exchange of Representatives proposed. An amendment to the law, of the Grand Lodge was adopted, directing the Grand Master to appoint, in advance of each session of the Grand Lodge, Committees on Charters,on Dispensations,on Grievances, on PayRoll and on Masonic Jurisprudence. Missouri has had such a regulation for nearly twenty years, embracing other committees-the only difference being that the chairmen of our committees, thus provided for, arc appointed at the close of each Grand Lodge session. The Committee on Obituaries rendered interesting and eloquent tributes to the memory of deceased Brethren who had passed away in Ohio and other jurisdictions; Among them, mention was made of Bro. Octavius 'Vaters and R. E. Richards, of Ohio; also, Luke E. Barber, of Arkansas, and Thomas A. Doyle, Past Grand Master of .Rhode Island.


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During the session of the Grand Lodge a new Masonic Temple, in Cleveland, was路 dedicated by the Grand Lodge, Bro. S. S. Williams, Grand Master, officiating. The Grand Orator of the occasion, Bro. AIIen Andrews, delivered a most appropriate and eloquent address. From it the following is taken: Masonry not only softens our opinions and sentiments and makes them charitable, but makes us benevolent, generous and liberal in all our actions. When insects, like the locusts of E~pt. devour the fruitage of the Western fields, when the yellow fever. like the plague m Pharaoh's land, scourges our Southern cities, when the floods, mighty and irresistible, roll down the prosperous Ohio Valley, and when Charleston, sitting by the seaside, is shaken to her center and her walls totter on their foundations, there is our Order, open-handed and free; there in the name of Masonry is the ready ear, the watchful e)'e, the generous hand. and the sympathetic heart. Wherever want sits in the place of plenty, there is relief, broad in its generosity as our national boundaries, and quick in its response as the telegraph's electric touch. As a moral and social force, Masonry has had a career in the past, and as an instrument of moral and social culture, it has a work in the future. Never in the history of time has there been a nation, and never in the history of this nation has there been a time when there has been such a demand for common honesty and moral worth as there is in this nation at this time. I do not mean that there is retrogression in this respect. God forbid. I have faith in our people, and believe in the destiny of this nation. I mean that we now understand our lines of indm;t.ry, and have reached that period of development, and that there is now such complexity and magnitude in our social, domestic, financial, commercial and industrial relatIOns. that we are more than ever dependent upon each other, and upon the common honesty and personal integrity of those with whom we come in contact. I think I echo the wish of every father when I say that I would rather have my son come from our schools with a sturdy, honest character and a strong individuality, though with very meager attainments. than to have him come witb all tbe learning in tbe curriculum of Harvard, and yet a moral bankrupt. We must make our schools, as well as our Churches and Lodges, understand the equal importance of moral and intellectual culture.

CORRESPO!\DENCE. The Report, covering 100 pages, was rendered by ,V. M. Cunningham, Committee. From said Report a few extracts are herewith made. j\[

ASONIC BALLS.

The Committee said on the above: In the opinion of your Committee, there is no.defense whatever for nominations for office in a Masonic body; and applause therein, except in its Masonic form, is, at least, decidedly inappropriate and out of place. Under the head of " Mn.ine," he says the Grand Master gave his views concernin~ tbat "modern abomination, called the Ma..<;onic ball." Modern, indeed! The modern 111110vators bave sufficient load to carry and sins enough for whicb to answer, without sn.ddling Masonic balls upon them; as fifty years since, and even to a much later period, "Annual Masonic Balls" were a feature in many communities and jurisdictions, although probably not held in Lodge-rooms. One of these comparatively ancient Masonic ball invitations, addressed a half century since to the father of the writer, who was a Mason, was long kept as a Masonic curiosity. Even ritual peddlers and degree tinkers are not entirely a modern innovation.

The force of the protest of this Committee was against dancing in " Masonic Halls," and danc.ing in the character of Masons. If people want to amuse themselves in the ball-room, let it be in such, and not in a LODGE-room. Let them dance as dancers, and not as MASONS. The review of Bro. Cunningham is a very readable production, made up of excerpts and comments. Grand Master and Grand Secretary re-elected.


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OREGON, ISS6. The journal of the Thirty-sixth Annual Communication was quite large, reaching nearly 500 pages. It contains the Proceedings of two special sessions, besides the transactions of the regular session, which occupied about one-fifth of the journal. The Report on Correspondence covers 233 pages. The membersbip of the jurisdiction, by Lodges, takes up nearly 100 pages; other matters consume the balance of space. The full summary is given, showing that there are seventy-three Chartered Lodges and one under Dispensation in that jurisdiction, with a membership of 3,318, being a gain of fifty-eight. The income amounts to nearly $4,000 per year. The printer made Bro. Babcock, the Grand Secretary, sign his Report as Grand Treasurer, though he submitted it as Grand Secretary. That Grand Lodge has a good sized and healthy pay-roll, which eats up about one half of their income. The Thirty-sixth Annual Session opened in the city of Portland, June 16th, 1886, and was well attended. Seventy Lodges were represented, 'with twelve Past Grand Masters, besides other Past Grand Officers and the Representatives of twenty-seven Grand Lodges. M. 路W. Bro. Thomas G. Reames was Grand Master, and R. VV. Bro. F. J. Babcock, Grand Secretary. It was reported, after the session was opened, that two Past Grand Masters, Bros. Jennings and Ferguson, were very ill and not able to attend the sessions of the Grand Lodge. Committees of Past Grand Masters were appointed to visit these afflicted Brethren. They afterwards reported having visited Bros. Jennings and Ferguson, and found that while these venerated Brethren were quite "feeble and much afflicted, yet they were cheerful and hopeful, waiting to be called from labor to the rest of that night whose slumbers should not be disturbed or broken." ADDRESS.

The Address of the Grand Master covered twenty pages. After an exordium of the usual kind he noted the death of a number of prominent Masons which had occurred during the year. He referred to the death of Governor Hendricks, of Indiana, Vice-President of the United States, whose loss is regarded as a national one. The Grand Master reported the creation of one Lodge under' Dispensation. He reported numerous other official acts. The many visits made by him were likewise enumerated. DECISIONS.

There are seven Decisions contained in the Address, all of which are. sound expositions of Masonic principles, and met the approval of the


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Committee on Jurisprudence. The Grand Master treated the subject of "Vork at considerable length. Many other topics were mentioned in his Address, but the matters alluded to being purely local and of no general importance, no record of them is necessary here. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Babcock, presented an excellent business Heport, furnishing a detailed statement of official work done by him. ORATION.

An Oration was delivered by the Grand Orator, Bro. Hill, which covered thirteen pages. It was considered of sufficient merit to find a place in the Grand Lodge journal. RECOGNIZED.

The Grand Lodge of Oregon, upon the recommendation of the Committee on Correspondence, formally recognized the Grand Lodge of Mexico. PICTURES.

The Grand Lodge adopted a resolution offered by the Grand Secretary, directing that 800 copies be secured of the photo-type of each Grand Master-past and future-and that these be inserted in the Annual Proceedings. The one in the journal, now under consideration, if a fair specimen of that kind of work, certainly does no credit to the goodlooking young Grand Master it should represent. He seems to be just coming into view out of the dim distance. The Grand Lodge closed its interesting labors after having given careful attention to all its business. CORRESPONDENCE.

The foregoing review of the Grand Lodge Proceedings of Oregon is made purposely brief, in order that the journal of ]887 may receive notice. Assurance has been furnished this Committee that the Proceedings of the present year will be deli "ered before the summer is ended. In view of that promise, this notice of Oregon is greatly shortened. Bro. S. F. Chadwick is Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence in the Grand Lodge of Oregon. He annually prepares an able and interesting review. The one under consideration seems to be larger than usual, amounting to considerably over 200 pages. The Grand Lodge Proceedings of Missouri, for ] 885, recei ved a very flattering notice-seven pages being employed for that purpose. Bro. Chadwick made some quotations from the Address of Grand Master Stevenson, and made favorable comments upon the same. Extracts were made from various Reports contained in our Proceedings. The Conclusion of Bro. Chadwick's Report is lengthy, and furnishes some very fine and suggestive thoughts. This notice must suffice for the Oregon journal of 1886. .Tames C. Fullerton, of Roseburg, was elected Grand Master, and F. J. Babcock, of Salem, re-elected Grand Secretary.


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OREGON, 1887. The Proceedings of this Grand Lodge, for 1886, have already been reviewed. The journal of the Proceedings, of 1887, having come to hand late in the summer, only a brief notice thereof can be given. The Thirty-seventh Annual Communication met in the city of Portland, on the 15th day of June, 1887. 1\1. W. Bro. James C. Fullerton, Grand Master, present and presiding; R. OW. Bro. F. J. Babcoek was Grand Secretary. There ''''ere present ten Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers. Representatiyes of foreign Grand Lodges and Representatives of a large number of subordinate Lodges in that jurisdiction were present. The Address of the Grand Master is an interesting paper. lIe stated that Masonry had grown with the growth, and prospered with the prosperity of the State. He further stated that the Masonic year, then closing, had been one of the most prosperous in the history of the Grand Lodge. The increase of the membership had been large, and the material from which the new membership had been made w~s the very best in the community. He reported having granted a number of special Dispensations. He had refused permission to Lodges to send ont begging letters, asking aid to build l\'fasonic Halls. He presented a number of rulings, which were correct applications of Masonic principles. In speaking of Grand Lodge finances, the Grand Master stated that their expense for the last year had overrun their income by a considerable amount. He said the expenses of the coming year would be fully as great a..'3 of the one just closed. It appears that their pay-roll cuts down their finances very largely. After paying mileage and per diem at the session mentioned, there was not enough funds to pay for printing the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, leaving the Grand Secretary and other claimants wholly unprovided for. The Grand Secretary presented a fine business document. It is a complete exhibit of the general business and financial affairs of the Grand Lodge. RECOGNITION.

The Grand Lodge of South Australia was accorded fraternal'recognition, on motion of the Committee on Correspondence. In order to me"et their financial liabilities, a resolution was adopted, auhorizing the Grand Master and Grand Secretary to borrow $1,000 on the most favorable terms possible. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, of over 200 pages, was prepared and submitted by Bro. S. F. Chadwick, Committee. He reviewed the Proceedings of forty-nine


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American Grand Lodges. Missouri, for ]886, received the compliment of a seven-paged notice. He copied approvingly from the Address of Grand Master Boyd. From his comments on the Report of this Committee on Correspondence, the following is taken: We agree with Bro. Vinci!, that" The right of objection should be a.<; sacredly guarded as the right to cast R, secret ballot." But. Bro. Vinci!, there are correspondents who do not take this view. You have stated the }'-Iasonic proposition in this Cll.Se. Our Brother says we are inclined to ask what kind of a "test oath" should symbolical Lodges reqnire of such thirty-second fellows who present their" patent." He does not think he could examine a party that would flourish a patent at hIm. You are correct when you say you would not admit him to an examinat.ion upon said document. We think the ruling in Alabama is correct. 'The party must be examined. His patent would be ornamentalâ&#x20AC;˘. but in no sense useful, in such a ease. A Mason would look just as well in the anteroom, waiting for an examination for admission into a symbolic Lodge, with a rosary of the Roman Catholic Church in hand, as with the patent of" those thirty-second fellows." In fact, we prefer the rosary. The patent is Wholly out of place in a symbolic Lodge. It is absolutely required in the Lodges it represents, and its authority there is respected, as it should be. Bro. Vinci! coincides with Bro. Anderson, of California, as to the" right" of Masonic burial. He does not agree with Bro. Gurney, but thinks itis something more than a courtesy. Also, that Bro. Anderson presents one of the strongest reports met with in his labors. In all of which we concur. In Missouri, the rule is that suspension for non-payment of dues means definite suspension. Then, when the dues are paid,the member returns to his former standing. The embarrassment is removed, and the disability ceases with the payment.

In concluding this notice, necessarily brief, some clippings are made from the admirable Conclusio~ of Bro. Chadwick, which furnish some very suggestive thoughts and. valuable reading: We know that the fait.hful Freemason is a safeguard of the Commonwealth, a refuge in municipal distress. We know that the Masonic Lodge-room is a sacred retreat, more so than that of any other institution. We know that Freemasonry is cautious. and chooses her members, or aims to. from every honorable position in life. We know that the standard of il Freemason is not below his own conscience; that wealth adds nothing to Masonic character proper, though it may become a beneficent agent in the hands of a faithful Brother. If we will consult these last days, we will find that great changes have been wrought in the last thirty years. These changes, instead of relaxing man's duties to man, have strengthened and enlarged them. If ever there was a time when Masons needed strong and determined Lodge members and Lodges. that moment is upon us now. In their Lodges Mll.Sons must do their great work for themselves and for mankind. The teachings of Masonry do not stop with methods of alms-giving. Everything is taught a Ma.<;on, the moment he enters the Lodge-room, that is necessary to elevate him to the highest type of mauhood. If man is not good enough to aid his fellow man in matters essential to the happiness of his race, he may be a fit subject for the criminal work of Anarchists, of whom the world has too many. Man is found somewhere, in some organization where membership simply follows favorable answers to questions, if nothing more. If a man comes to a church door for membership, he lDu~t be measured and weighed, morally and socially. It is thus with every man ~eekiI}g an alliance with secret benevolent societies. A test for recognition is by no means withheld from those who want to be associated with the criminal cranks of our d¡ay. A Freemason is a person who is rated, or should be, for what he is worth, morally and mentally, or what he amounts to in the community in which he lives. lIe must bear a rate above what it cost to raise him to manhood. If he falls below that. he will not make a good Mason, or anythin~ else of profit. Every sound man in Civilized communities is supposed to be fitted for some duty to be rendered to his fellow man, either directly or indirectly. We want Lodges of stalwart Masons; not for charitable ends only, but those Masons who hold our country together by their conservative principles, and who, in their deliberations. wisely temper power so that justice and equity shall be grateful to the masses. We should educate the flower of our youth in the tenets of Freemasonry; teach them that these principles underlie good government, municipal, State and National, and thlH their efficacy and force are found in the usefulness of those Masons who embody


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and promulgate them: that the Lodg-e-room is the school-room, the abode of the wise, just and charitable, and that it must be preserved. There is nothing of which a gentleman should be more proud. There is where a name may be had which the world cannot take away, but which the world could not fail to honor; a retreat, where obligation means the very soul of honor; where membership signifies rectitude; where duty is voluntary, never forgotten; where God is revered and government sustained; where good citizenship is the passport to, and charity the adornment of, the Lodge-room; where men ha"ve a standard value, based on determinate principles; where Ma;;ons are found who will have Lodges, dues or no dues, as dues are not essential among gentlemen; and where one Brother never deserts another in the welcome home of his Masonic mother.

'Vith loving regards for Bro. Chadwick, now our Representative ncar the Grand Lodge of Oregon, the present interview must give place to a . fraternal farewell. ANDREW NASBURG, Marshfield, G. M. F. J. BABCOCK, Salem, G. Sec.

PENNSYLVANIA, 1886. The journal of the Proceedings of this Grand Lodge is handsomely gotten up, and is beautified by elegant engravings of Past Grand Master Mitchell; Grand Treasurer Bro. Thomas R. Patton, and the Grand Secretary, Bro. Nisbet; also a very correct and striking view of the magnificent Masonic Temple, located in Philadelphia. As a work the journal is in every sense highly creditable to the Grand Secretary. The record shows three quarterly communications, held respectively in :l\larch, June and September, which meetings were presided over by the M. W. Grand Master, Bro. E. C. Mitchell; R. W. Bro. Michael Nisbet being Grand Secretary. At the first and second of these Communications but little business of any moment was transacted. It was resolved to celebrate the one hundredth anni versary of the independence of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. At the Third Communication, held in September, the Record contains an extended notice of the life and services of the veteran Mason, Bro. Peter 'Villiamson, Past Grand Master and Past Grand Treasurer. This venerable Mason died in the ninety-first year of his age, having been a Mason seventy years. He served as Grand Master two years, and as Grand Treasurer fourteen years. The Grand Lodge, in connection with a historical sketch, adopted as a tribute the following resolutions; Resolved. That this Grand Lodge has received the intelligence of the death of its late Past Grand Master, Bro. Peter Williamson, with 8incere regret and sorrow. Resolved, That it is eminently fitting and proper that notice of the death of our lamented Right Worshipful Past Grand Master should appear upon our records, so that the memory of so true a man and Mason should not pass away and be forgotten.


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Resolved. That this Grand Lodge deeply sympathizes with the family of our deceased Brother in their affliction. _ Resolved, That the furniture of the Grand Lodge and the Jewels of the Gralld Officers be placed in mourning for six months. Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family of our deceased Brother, and that this" In Memoriam" be printed with the Proceedings of Grand Lodge.

On the 24th of September the Grand Lodge celebrated the centennial anniversary of its independence. One hundred years before the Grand Lodge had asserted its independence of the Grand Lodge of England. On the occasion of this celebration a most pertinent and interesting address was delivered by Bro. George W. Guthrie. The address was creditable to the head and heart of its author. Bro. Arnold furnished, on the occasion, a lengthy history of the Grand Lodge and its principal men and officers for a hundred years. A banquet followed, at which toasts were offered and speeches made, evidencing that it was a royal occasion. Another Quarterly Communication was held December 1st, at which the Grand Officers were elected. At this session full and complete reports were made, touching all the financial interests committed to the care of the Grand Body. In the management of fiscal affairs, the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania has wrought wonders and achieved successes simply prodigious. It stands at the head of American Grand Lodges in the accumulation and wise handling of large financial interests. The Annual Communication opened in the Masonic Temple, in ,Philadelphia, December 27th. Grand Master Mitchell was not 'able to be present at this Communication on account of bis health. Having served the Grand Lodge two years as its Grand Master, with credit to himself and profit to the Fraternity, resolutions appreciating his services were passed and ordered suitably engrossed, and to be delivered to him. A Past Grand .Master's Jewel was ordered to be transmitted to Bro. Mitchell, with a letter of sympathy and regr~t that he was not able to be present. The Grand Lodge officers for the new term were then installed. Past Grand Master, Bro. John Thomson, was reported as being unable to leave his bed and attend the session of the Grand Lodge. This venerable Brother is nea'rly ninety years old, and the sands of life are fast running out. On motion of Bro. Richard Vaux, a resolution of sympathy and affection of the Grand Lodge was tendered to Bro. John Thomson, and Bro. Vaux was directed to bear the message of love from the Grand Lodge to their venerable and venerated Brother. The newly-installed Grand Master then proceeded to deliver his inaugural Address. It is brief and to the point. The journal showed that an appeal had been made to the Lodges of the State in behalf of the sufferers from the earthquake in the city of


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Charleston, South Carolina. In response to that appeal over $3,000 had been raised and forwarded to the needy ones in Charleston. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report, rendered by Past Grand Master Bro. Richard Vaux, for the Committee, covers 184 pages. It is a well prepared and vigorous review of all the Grand Lodge journals examined by the Committee. " Richard is himself again," as he ahvays is. Fifty-three Grand Lodge Reports passed under his notice. Fourteen pages constituted his introduction. Bro. Vaux devotes unusual space to extracts, especially in reviewing the journal of the Grand Lodge of Maine. Seventeen pages were devoted to the work of reviewing that journal. He very kindly accorded six pages to the journal of'Proceedings of Missouri for 1886. He spoke of Grand Master Boyd's Address as one of the most interesting papers he had read, and said it could not be too highly commended. He honored said Address with extracts amounting to three pages. Bro. Vaux is, by turns, entertaining and amusing. His review of this Committee possesses both. From his Conclusion the following extract is made: Our yearly task is completed. The gratification and satisfaction that we have received in performing our duty cannot be too emphatically stated.. We may be pardoned, dear Brethren, for the remark that for some time past we have held witb you. and, sad to say, some of your predecessors, the most affectionate and fraternal relations. Every thought of our Masonic heart that we have expressed welled up from our love and devotion to Freemasonry. Our effort.,; have been directed-ever so ineffectually it may be-to preserve unimpaired the traditions of the Craft, its fundamental and changeless. Landmarks, its exalted and spotless character, its unity and harmony, and insure to our successors in the coming time this great heri~e unimpaired and unchanged. FreemltSonry, born in tl:le twilight hour of the earliest of days, has come down the ages invigorated by the most sublime influences. and it will travel to the hereafter I?;uided by that directing and protecting power which it worships and glorifies at its Altars. Such a heritage is worthy of all our sacrifices and effurts to make eternal. We salute you, dear Brethren, in the spirit, faith, truth and bonds of our 路Fraternity.

JOSEPH EICHBA UM, Pittsburg, G. M. MICHAEL NISBET, Philadelphia, G. Sec.

'PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, ISS7. The Twelfth Annual Communication of this small Grand Lodge was held on the 24th day of .June, 1887, in the city of Charlottetown,and was presided over by M. 路W. Bro. John Yeo, Grand Master; R. W. Bro. B. 'V. Higgs was Grand Secretary. This is the first Report received for two years. The journal containing the Proceedings of this session is very small. There are eleven Lodges, with a membership of 455, in this jurisdiction, showing a gain of seven during the past year. The


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Grand Master's Ad.dress covered three pages. There is nothing of any importance found in the paper. The Report of the Grand Secretary neeessarily was quite brief. During the session of the Grand Lodge, the Fraternity present joined with other societies in celebrating the Queen's Jubilee, and at the same time laid the corner-stone of the new City Building. No Report on Correspondence. Grand Master, Bro. Yeo, was elected for the thirteenth time. That jurisdiction has never had but one Grand Master. If Bro. Yeo should pass away, the wonder is, who whonld take his place.' The Grand Secretary, Bro. B. '\T. Higgs, was re-elected, and lives at Charlottetown.

qUEUE<.1, 1887. The Seventeenth Annual Session of this Grand Lodge convened in the city of Montreal, January 26th, 1887. M. 路W. Bro. .T. Fred. Walker was Grand Master, and R W. Bro. .T. H. Isaacson, Grand Secretary. Th~re are fifty-nine Chartered Lodges, with a membership of 2,876, in that jurisdiction. There were Representatives present of thirty Grand Lodges, and forty-seven of the home Lodges were represented. Grand Master 'Valker presented an Address, which covered twelve pages. He said the present year was an important one. He referred, thereby, to the fact that the Queen of England, whom they professed to love and reverence, had ascended the throne fifty years ago. All true Englishmen hail her jubilee year with joy, and that no part of her dominions entertained more sincere feelings of gratitude for Vietoria than those vl'110 reside in the territorial limits of Quebec. His Address contains accounts of various official doings and reeommendations. He said that freqnent applications had been made to him for permission to confer the third degree in less time than required by the Constitution. He refused to grant these requests, except in a few cases. He had granted Dispensations for wearing regalia in public, when the Brethren were appearing at路 Lodge socials and special ch urch services. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master reported four Decisions. He ruled that there was no regulation preventing Lodge Halls from being occupied by bodies not :Masonic. He thought, however, it was not desirable, unless financial necessity required it. He decided that if a defect in a candidate was only the loss of a part of the foot, he would not be disqualified to be ;made' a Mason. He ruled that the law does not forbid the Lodge from helping, out of its funds, a non-aftlliated Mason, provided a majority of G. L. Ap.-9.


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the members should see fit to do so. He further ruled that the placing of the ballot-box on the Altar during the time of taking a vote was proper and legal. He stated that he had ordered the Grand Treasurer to send $200 to the Grand Mast~r of Masons in South Carolina, to aid the sufferers from the earthquake. He next took up the subject that has caused so much difllculty between the Grand Lodges of England and Quebec. The edict, issued by him in July, 188G, cuts off and forbids alll\fasonic intercourse between the Grand Lodge of Quebec and its subordinate Lodges, and the Grand Lodge of England and all Lodges in'obedience thereto. All Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Quebec are commanded to hold no intercourse with any Brethren in obedience to' the said Grand Lodge of England, so far as Aneient Craft Masonry is concerned. From his conclusion on this subject, the following extract is made: This ends the controversy between England and ourselves. The printed Proceedings of this Grand Lodge show a continued and persistent attempt to solve the difficulty by peaceful means, which has failed. The Addresses of my predecessors demonstrated. in the clearest manner. that the doctrine of exclusive territorial jurisdiction was not only held by all tbe American Grand Lodges and Scotland, but by England also. Their arguments have been unanswered, for they were unanswerable. \'\'e would be unworthy the nl1me of Freemasons did we, because comparatively small in numbers. fear to do. that which was right, on account of the power and strength of the Grand Lodge perpetrating a. gross injustice. We shall be glad of the support of our sister Grand Lodges. but whether such support is received or not, can make no difference in the stand we have taken in defense of OUf position as a Sovereign Grand Lodge. We can rest assured that in the end right must prevail. MASONIC HOME.

The Grand Lodge of Quebec seems determined to fall into line with other Grand Lodges of America, in the establishment of a Masonic Home. The resolution having beel). adopted to that effect one year before, a circular had heen sent out to the Lodges, asking them if they concurred in the idea, and to collect one dollar from each member willing to subscribe, and forward the same to the Grand Treasurer. Thus it is seen that the Brethren of Quebec have made a commencement in securing funds for this noble enterprise. The Grand Treasurer reported that he had received on the above account $460. A resolution was presented proposing to levy an assessment of fifty cents per member for each year, in behalf of the Masonic Home. The proposition was postponed for one year. The Grand Lodges of Mexico and L0wer California were not recognized by the Grand Lodge of Quebec, as they preferred to wait until such time as they could receive more definite information as to the standing of said Grand Lodges. A proposition was adopted, directing the appointment of a committee to draft a loyal and congratulatory address to, and invoking the blessings of heaven upon Queen Victoria in this, the jubilee year of her reign, and for a long continuation of her valuable life and her happy administration.


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CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering eighty-seven pages, was rendered by Bro. E. T. D. Chambers, for the Committee. It is a well arranged and readable review, made up of good selections and creditable comments. The Grand Lodge Proeeedings of Missouri, for ]886, received the compliment of a five-paged notice. In speaking of Grand Master Boyd, the Committee said that" he delivered an exceedingly eloquent and interesting Address." The Committee further said, that" if Freemasonry is not a system of morality, its symbolism and its allegories are but a sounding brass, and a tinkling cymbal." The journal of Missouri was further complimented by having some three pages of extracts made therefrom. From his comments upon the Report on Correspondence by this Committee, the following extract is taken: Bro. Vincil's third question touches a subject of interest to the whole Craft. That "we meet upon the level" is one of the proudest boasts of our Order. That this l\lasonic equality implies the subversion of those gradations of rank and title established by society. by the recognized authorities of the State or exponents of revealed religion. we cannot bring ourselves to believe. If the rank and titles which distingnish many of the more eminent and more deservin~ teachers of the Divine truths contained in the volume of the Sa¡cred Law, must of necessity be ignored by their Masonic Brethren-the preten!lion that .. Freemasonry is the handmaid of re1i!{ion." to the contrary notwithstandingthen has the Masonry of the present dny departed, indeed, from both the spirit and the letter of the" 010. Re~ulations." The writer was early instrueted â&#x20AC;˘. Not to derogate from that respect WhICh is due to any Brother were he not a Mason; for, though all Masons are as Brethren upon the same level. yet Masonry takes no honor from a man that he had before; nay, rather, it adds to his honor, especially if he has deserved well of the Brotherhood, who must give honor to whom it is due, and avoid ill-manners."

The Committee wound up the labors of the year as follows, touching upon matters purely local, so far as Roman Catholic pronouncements against Freemasonry lllay be considered local: Since the pages containing our review of Canada were put to press, it has occurred to the writer that a word of explanation might be necessary in order to avoid misapprehension concerning thc references therein contained to Roman Catholic attack!' upon Freemasonry. Cardinal Taschereau's pronouncements against our Order-unwarranted though they be-were addressed solely to those of his own religious communion. over whom he claims authority in matters of conscience. The ultramontane pltpers of this

~~Char~~h~~tfha~e~~~nea~~i~:li;lg~h~f~C~l~~~~~t?~~hg}i~;~l~a\~.e~~~~' a~~ct~~I:~

not limited to Freemasonry, but, unlike those of the Cardinal, are directed against the whole body of Freemasons, even against those whom they know full well Owe no obedience to Papal decrees. and over whom Cardinal Taschereau claims no spiritual jurisdiction. The writer has personal reasons for believing that His Eminence neither seeks to interfere with the spread of Freemasonry amongst those outside his spiritual domain, nor cotinteuances the attacks upon them in the name of religion, by an indiscreet and over zealous press. Masonry claims to be the handmaid of religion, but refnses to arrogate to herself the right to deprecate any established form of faith or morals which includes amongst it.'i essential tenets, a belief in the Great Architect of the Universe, Who has revealed His will to man, and Who will most assuredly reward or punish us, according as we have obeyed or disregarded His Divine precepts. Justice is taught by her as one of the cardinal virtues, and it is in order that no injustice shaH be done to any of our opponents. that we have referred again in this place to the Roman Catholic Church's mandements against us, and to its unfortunate misinterpretation of our aims and teachings.

Grand Master 'Walker and Grand Secretary Isaacson were both reelected, and reside at Montreal.


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ISLANI), 18S6.

From the tables furnished by the Grand Secretary, it is learned that there are thirty-five Lodges, with a membership of some 3,600, in that jurisdiction. The journal under review contains proceedings of two special communications. The first one was held September 1st, 1885, at which time the corner-stone was laid of the monument ereeted in the <:ity of Newport to the memory of Commodore Perry. The cercmonies of laying the corner-stone, as they appear in this journal, are beautiful and imprcssive. The interest of the occasion was greatly increased by an able and appropriate Oration by Reverend Henry 'v. Rllgg, Grand Chaplain. The second special commnnieation was held Fehrnary 3d, 1886, at which time the new 'Masonic Hall, in the city of Providence, was dedicated. An Address was made by Reverend George Fiske. It was quite lengthy, and showed evidence of careful preparation. The Ninety-sixth Annual Communication was held in the city of Providence, May 17th, 1886, and was presided over by the Grand Master, M. 'V. Bro. Lyman Klapp, who delivered a brief Address, devoted to business and general reflections. There is nothing of special interest in the Address claiming attention.. The Report of the Grand Secretary was brief and business-like. ' CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering less than two pages, was presented by Bro. Henry Rngg. He treated only of the recognition of such Grand Lodges as had applied for that honor. The first applicant was the Grand Lodge of the Federal Distriet of Mexico. The committee would not recommend recognition, because Masonic affairs in Mexico are in an exceedingly unsettled condition, and therefore recommended that action be postponed. The next candidate for the honor of recognition is the Spanish Grand Lodge. The request was not complied with. The Grand I.Jodges of New South Wales and Vietoria did not meet with favor at the hands of this Committee. The Grand Lodge of South Australia was formally recognized, and welcomed to a place among the Grand Lodges of the world. Respecting the conflicts between the Grand Lodges of Quebec and England, the Committee holds the position that England should withdraw its Lodges from that jurisdiction. The following shows what was said and done on the subject:

'V.

Your Committee has had its attention specially called to the troubles existing within the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, occasioned by the fact that certain Lodges within that jurisdiction do not recognize the authority of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, but mHintain their allegiance to a Foreign Grand Lodge; a condition that has lately called forth an edict of non-intercourse on the part of the Grand Master of ~Iasons against the irregUlar Lodges referred to. Your Committee believes there ought to be but


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one governing authority in a Grand J.JOd~e territory. They hold that the Grand Lodge of Quebec is rightfully established in that jurisdiction, and, therefore, sympathize with it in its endeavor to rule and govern the Craft within its borders. As expressive of the feelin~ of this Grand Body, )'our Committee woul<1 recommend the passage of the following resolution: Resolttcd, That it seems every way equitable and right, and tending to the prosperity of the Craft, that the three Lod~es in the Province of Quebec, now allegiRnt to the Grand Lodge of England, should transfer their allegiance to the Grand Lodge of Quebec; and the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island will rejoice in all reasonable and proper efforts put forth to bring about this desired consummation.

N. D. ARNOLD, Providence, G. M. EDWIN BAKER, Providence, G. Sec.

SOUTH CAROLINA, ISS6. The journal, under consideration, contains the minutes of a special communication held at Lexington, July 3d, 1886, for the purpose of laying the corner-stone of the monument in the town of Lexington, to the Confederate dead. Bro. J. Adger Smyth, Grand Master, presided, performed the ceremony and" delivered an able and eloquent Address, appropriate to the occasion," so says the record. This is one of the old Grand Lodges of the country, as shown by the fact that the One Hundred and Tenth Annual Communication was held in the Masonic Temple, in the city of Charleston, commencing December 14th, 188(-). M. ,V. Bro. J. Adgar Smyth, Grand Master, present, and in the chair, and R. '\T. Bro. Charles Inglesby, Grand Secretary. There are 1G7 Chartered Lodges in that Grand Jurisdiction, and two under Dispensation, with a total membership of 5,233; 136 Lodges were represented. The journal is in good taste-the peer of any printed, and the counterpart of many that preceded it. Bro. Inglesby is a first-class Grand Secretary. ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Smyth was able and eloquent. Ex路 trads therefrom will be far more interesting to the reader than any comments that may be made upon it by this writer. Jh'om his opening these paragraphs are taken: Life seems but a shifting panorama. The years roll by like a scroll, ever presenting new scenes, and bringing up new duties. The future presses rapidly upon us. The present slips from our grasp as quick as thought. The pa~t recedes from our gaze like morning mist, and we see it no more forever. Yet, daily and hourly, as the leaves are turned, are we writing inscriptions on the pages of Time's scroll, which will remain throughout the ages, long after we have pas~ed away.


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When, a year ago, as your Grand Master. I bade you welcome, though our Grand Ea..<;t had been devastated by the re~istless cyclone, and our Temple itself unroofed, I could ~till speak words of cheer, for no lIves had been destroyed and our losses had been repaired. To-day. as I greet you, a more gloomy and depressing cloud environs us. The dark wing of the Death Ang-el casts its sombre shadow across our pathway, and we sit, with heads uncovered, in the ashes of our grief. Terrible as was the tempest, no words can fitly portray the terrors of that awful night of August 31st, when suddenly, without It moment.'s warning, that most mysterious and mighty of all the forces of nature burst upon us and overwhelmed us in ruin and death. Those of us who experienced that night of agony can never forget its horrors and its sufferings. But this dark background, with it.,> awful shadows and gloomy tints. but serves, by contrRst, to heighten and bring out the warmer, brighter colors in the picture. Black as wa~ the cloud, big with the wails of helpless women and terrified children, and the sobbing heart-bursts of brave men, its other side is bright and glowing with tender love and helpful sympathy. God bless our noble Brethren, who not only sorrowed with us, but stretched out at once the hand of kindness and relief. Swiftly as the lightning sped the news of our terrible disaster over the wires, just so swiftly came back from warm hands and loving hearts all over our broad land olfers of help, and word~ of sympathy and cheer. It were worth the while to have endl1red the suffering and the sorrow to have received the love and the kindness. "A Brother is born for adversity," is written in our greatest Light, and we can almost welcome the adversity to have had poured into our hearts such a tide of brotherly love and Masonic sympathy. Our calamity has, indeed, been a blessing in disguise. It has proven that deep in all hearts there beats a common love and sympathy for our fellows in di~tress. Our country is one! There is no North, no South, no East, no West, when the cry of suffering is heard. Before we could appreciate ourselves the appalling extent of our calamity and our needs, offers of assistance and enquiries as to our necessities came flashing over the wires. Our Brethren waited not to hear our cries for help. but, actuated by the gloriolls principles of Masonry, it was only needful for them to know there was suffering, and their lOVing hearts prompted them to relieve their Brothers' want. The intrinsic value of our tenets was tested in this crucible of suffering, and was proved to be pure gold and a liVing reality.

He furnished a full and complete statement of all moneys that had been received by him from different sources, for the relief of the sufferers by the earthquake. These amounts are given according to the States from which they were sent. Missouri has the credit of giving $1,169.30. It is worthy of remark that some of the smaller Grand Lodges gave more money than many of the larger ones. For instance, Colorado contributed $906; New Jersey, $1,100. The largest contribution went from Pennsylvania, amounting to $3,175. Maryland gave $1,500. Missouri stands third in the list. Wisconsin is sixth in the rank, having given some $800. The total amount contributed to the relief of tbe sufferers footed up over $15,000. The Grand Master reported that he had received from the Grand Lodge of Scotland 100 pounds sterling. This was a noble expression of kind fe~ling and charity on the part of our Scottish Brethren. The excellent Address of Grand Master Smyth was approved and highly commended by the committee. The Report of the Grand Secretary, Bro. Inglesby, was an exceedingly full and complete one, presenting a satisfactory exhibit of the finances. The Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters were received


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and printed. The Grand Lodge of South Carolina is still carrying a heavy debt, amonnting to over $30,000. This indebtedness has grown out of the lnxury of having a Masonic Temple. The Grand Treasurer, in footing up the eost of their Temple, shows that there has been expended, in round figures, $46,000. He said it was impossible to obtain any reliable information as to the worth of the present property. It would seem that the experiment in this case, as in all others in building a Masonic Temple, had proved a very costly one. It would be far better for the Grand Lodges of this country to apply their means to the erection and maintenance of useful charities. There is a good prospect of paying off the entire bonded debt within a few years. 'Within fifteen years the Grand Lodge has paid out, in round numbers, $48,775, on Temple account. Add to this $20,000 of a bonded debt yet to be paid, and路the Temple will prove to be a very costly investment. It is questionable whether the property is worth one-half of its cost. Experience charges high prices for wisdom. ELECTION 01<' OFFICERS.

When the Grand Lodge came to elect officers, one of the members stated that, while it was not usual to elect the Grand Master for a third term, still he desired to place in nomination the name of Bro. J. Adger Smyth. His valuable services, and good management of the financial affairs of the Grand Lodge, pointed him out as the proper one to continue the management of their interests for another year. The Grand Master, with much feeling, acknowledged the high compliment paid to him, and consented to allow his name to be used, if there was no objection. He was elected unanimously. It was resolved by the Grand Lodge to have a suitable jewel prepared for presentation to Bro. Smyth at the next session of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Officers were then installed, and the session was brought to a close. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, of 110 pages, was submitted by the Grand Secretary, Bro. Charles Inglesby, and is a valuable production, containing the reviews of the Proceedings of sixty-one Grand Lodges. The lVIissouri journal, for ]885, reeeived due attention. The Address of our Grand Master Stevenson was complimented, and extracts made therefrom. He said, in reference to a part of the Address, that he could not understand it, and that the evil mentioned by Grand Master Stevenson had not been made known in South Carolina.

It is the pleasure of this Committee to say that a peripatetic party, with headquarters at Boston, visited the West and did what Bro.


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Stevenson charged. He is a dealer in, and dispenser of, numerous things called degrees, besides merchandise connected with Masonry. His name is Variou,s Wilson. He is too numerous to be useful or practical. The Committee on Correspondence declined to recommend the Grand Lodge in the Federal District of Mexico for recognition. The Grand Lodge of South Australia was duly and fraternally recognized. Many interesting and valuable reports were made to, and approved by, the Grand Lodge. Memorial tributes were paid to deceased Brethren James II. Rion, A. C. Small, D. \V. Cntino, Grand Chaplain, and Past Grand Master \Vilmot G. DeSaussure. From the Conclusion of Bro. Inglesby's interesting review the following is taken: The Masonic world is' pursuing the peaceful tenor of its way, and, so far as we know, the only cloud upon the horizon is the Quebec-England controversy. This unfortunately stands where it has stood for several years past, and, we presume, where it will stand. until the three English Register Lodges in Quebec voluntarily give up their Charters. The old mother Grand Lodge has never, and. we suppose. will never accept our American ideas of Grand Lodge Jurisdiction, and that is the end of it. It has been our custom for years past to write our Reports on Correspondence in the long hot ds.ys of summer, and, therefore, most of the foregoing was written prior to the fearful earthquake, which visited this city on the 31st of August last. Before this great dii;:aster, it had seemed that poor old Charleston had drained to its dregs the cup of misfortune. and that, according to the law of compensation, she was entitled to have a turn of the tide, and enjoy brighter days. With heroic endurance and undaunted purpose,' her people had healed the scars of war, the scorch of repea.ted conflagrations, and had rebuilt the ravages of storms and tempests-most nota.bly the dama.ges caused by the cyclone of 1885. Impoverished, but still hopeful, her people. tru!Oting in God, were determined that no effort on their pa.rt should be wanting to phce their dear old city forward in the march of progress, and keep her abreast with her sisters in this progressive age. All seemed well and promisin!/:, when the fateful night of the 31st August closed in on the devoted city, and she was visited by the most fearful and destructive earthquake known in the history of this continent. The horrors, the terrors, the angui:;h of that terrible night have been told again and again. and still never can be told. It is not our purpo:;e here to attempt to describe them. Our people, a.t first crushed with this overwhelming disaster, were almost ready to give up in despair; but the wail of distress which they uttered in their extremity, reached the heart~ of the whole people of this great country-we may say of the whole world-and from every quarter came words and deeds of sympathy and succor. The hearts and purses of the American people were opened to relieve our distresses, a.nd the lightning flashes of the telegraph were in voked to convey to us :;ubstantial tokens of love and symathy, and thus strengthen and encourage our people to new life and hope.

And in this season of want and suffering. our noble God-blessed Institution has demonstrated that its teachings of Fraternity, Charity and Brotherly Love are not mere professions, but are living, active principles, which are practised as well as preached. It would be a work of supererogation for me to attempt to supplement what our Most Worshipful Grand Master will say in his Address on this subject; but as the recipient of very many of the letters conveying substantial tokens of love and affection from Brother Masons to their suffering Brethren in Charleston, I desire here to ~)lace on record the gratitude and appreciation which. as a Mason, I feel to the Craft III g-eneral, who so promptly and generously came forward to aid and assist their suffering Brethren. May God bless and keep them, and in His infinite mercy spare them from any of the suli'ering which they have been so prompt and loving in endeavoring to alleviate.

Grand Master Smyth and Grand Secretary Inglesby were both reelected, and reside in Charleston.


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TENNESSEE, 1887. The Seventy-third Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee was begun at Freemasons' Hall, in the city of Nashville, on the 25th day of January, 1887. M. W. Bro. Thomas O. Morris, Grand Master, presiding, and R. ,V. Bro. John Frizzell was Grand Secretary. The representation was large, consisting of twelve Past Grand Masters and many other Past Grand Officers and Past Masters. There ,vere Repsentatives present of thirty-six Grand Lodges. Missouri was represented by Dr. D. J. Roberts. There were Representatives also from 339 Lodges, out of 394 on the roll. During the year fifteen Lodges had surrendered their Charters, and twelve having failed to make returns for two years, had forfeited their Charters. The membership in the jurisdiction amounts to 14,345; showing a total decrease for the year of 410. From the foregoing, as well as from the reflections of the Grand Master, in his Address, it seems that Masonry in Tennessee is not advancing, but rather on the decline. ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Morris was a brief business paper, and entirely devoted to the interests of the Fraternity in that Grand Jurisdiction. It contains a long list of special Dispensations. He reported numerous visits made by him during his term, and received the hearty commendation of the Grand Lodge therefor. One Lodge had been created under Dispensation. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master stated that many Decisions had been asked for, but he had rendered only fifteen, deelping these of sufficient importance to be reported. His rulings were all approved by the Committee on Jurisprudenee. The Decisions are regarded as practical, sound and to the point. Many interesting and instructive Reports were rendered by the various committees. Thefollowing extracts are made from the Grand Master's Address on the state of the Fraternity in that jurisdiction: Brethren, I have been dishcartened at times during this year, whcn I have seen and felt the lethargy that. like a dark cloud. seems to surround us. What is the cause of all this lethargy and lukc-warmness'! It is not the times, for an era of prosperity seems to be all over the country. Too many Lodgcs.-In my opinion we have too many Lodges. Masonry is too easy to get. It is right at our door, still the Brethren will not attend. In times past when the Brethren were ('ompelled to ride twenty or thirty miles to attend Lodge meetings, the records show that the Lodges were full; the Brethren met in social intercourse; wcre glad to see each other j pulled off their hats and were at home all day. When the time came to separate, they left feeling glad they had becn there, and looked forward with joy to the next meeting. Now we, sometimes, meet with hardly a quorum present.


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transact business strictly, and as soon as the Lodge closes make a break for the door, seemingly afraid that we will have to stop long enough to shake hands with each other. Let us get rid of this habit at once and try the old way awhile. Non-o,tliliates.-Again, the army of non-affiliates is increasing. This class of Masons are willing to eat of the fruit, but are not willing to contribute anything to bear the burdens. I shall be glad to see the day in Tennessee Masonry when every individual Master of a subordinate Lodge will have the nerve to say to any non-affiliate. who is one of his own free will, it matters not how high he may stand socially or otherwise. that you canllot enter the door of my Lodge-room. We have been begging this class for years. and I for one, want to say to them that begging is at an end, and you must respect us. I trust that this Grand Lodge will, if it be possible, tax every non-affiliate in the State, and therefore recommend that the Committee 011 Jurisprudence be directed to formulate an edict laying an annual tax on all non-affiliates m Tennessee of, say, not less than two dollars, to be paid into the Grand Lodge treasury; the same to be collected by subordinate Lodges in whose jurisdiction the non-affiliates reside, and those who will not pay to be dealt with by the Grand Lodge, the same as may be done in subordinate Lo<lg-es. By this means we force all non-affiliates to contribute or become debarred from all the rights and privileges of Masonry, at least in Tennessee.

The Grand Lodge, by resolution, commended the General Masonic Relief Association, delaringit to be of great benefit in the detection and arrest of unworthy persons who attempt to procure aid from Masons. , The Grand Lodge attempted to legislate on the subject of nonaffiliation. Propositions and resolutions were submitted on the subject and considered, but finally postponed until the next Annual Communication. MASONIC HOME.

The Brethren who represented this institution 'were granted the privilege of presenting its aims and objects to the Grand Lodge. An interesting Address was made in behalf of the Masonic Widows, and Orphans' Home, by its President, Bro. M. B. Toney. This grand work is coming to the front more and more. It is to be the chief glory of Masonry of the nineteenth century. The American Grand Lodges are awake to the importance of SYSTEMATIZED benevolence. Only such will tell for good and for the character of the Institution. CORRESPONDENCE.

A brief but quite interesting and readable review was made by Bro. Frank M. Smith, for the Committee. It covers seventy-fom pages. From it such extracts are taken as are deemed of general interest to the reader. The writer belongs to that numerous family of Smiths which descended from the original John. Of the family, it may be said, as the "razor strop" man cries, "A few more left." Our Tennessee Brother is one of them, as this will prove: This Report is by Bro. John D. Vinci!, the Grand Secretary. Bro. V.gives a very full report of Tenne&~ee, 1886. He expre..."Ses sincere regret at the retirement of Bro. Foster, but cherhshes the hope that great things may yet come from Tennessee, as he finds lu'o Smiths on the committee.


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Yes, Bro. V., we were all named Smith in the beginning. Adam's name was Adam Smith, but when any member of the family committed a crime, he was turned out of the family and his name changed.

This writer is not a stranger to the theory of the" SURVIVAL of the fittest." The dogma has not been proven, and is still open for debate. The surviving Smiths have, in many instances, tried to change the name, and did get away from "Adam Smith's" family as far as SMYTH and SMYTHE. The survival doctrine was a failure. Missouri, for ]886, received very kind mention by Bro. Smith, and numerous excerpts were culled from our P;oceedings. They look well in the journal of Tennessee. Bro. Smith is a good gleaner, and fills his review with selections from the various journals noticed. Here is one of his terse sayings, uttered concerning the Kentucky Resolution against saloon keeping: You did not go far enongh. my Brethren, but this will do for a beginning. You must touch those Bourbon County lJoys some of these days; also those who visit the saloons. A Mason has as much right to sell it, as he has to walk boldly into a saloon and drink it.

You are right, Bro. Smith. In Missouri both victim and victimizer share the same fate. The drunkard and the drunkard maker must quit or go. C. A. GOODLOE, Alamo, G. M. JOHN FRIZZELL, Nashville, G. Sec.

TEXAS, lSS6. FIFTY-FIRST SESSION.

A volume of the usual size (quite large) contains the transactions of the Annual Communication, which was held in the city of Houston, commencing December 14th, 1886. M. Vi. Bro. Z. K Coombes, Grand Master, present and in the Grand East; R. W. Bro. T. 'V. Hudson was Grand Secretary. The Record shows an attendance of nine Past Grand Masters, with Representatives from 216 Lodges. The recapitulation shows large gains and large losses. The membership amounts to 20,llO. Lodges not footed up, and I have no time to do the counting for other people. ADDRESS.

Grand Master Coombes presented a purely business paper, showing simply what he had done. Twenty Lodges had been instituted under


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Dispensation. He reported two rulings, one of which the Committee on Jurisprudence approved, while the other was dissented from. As the Decisions are brief they are herewith furnished: 1. A petitioner proved ineligible becanse of his not believing in the existence of the Snpreme Being, God. Afterwards again applied, declaring his belief in God. Should he be received? 1 answered in the affirmative, if found otherwise worthy.

2. Where a Past Master of a Lodge dim its, and afterwards affiliates with said Loflge, is he by said affiliation restored to his position and rights as a Past ~faster of said Lodge. and should he be reported as a Past Master of said Lodge? r decided that he was restored to all his rights and privileges as a Past MtlSter of said Lodge, and should be so reported.

,

Texas has a strange law in relation to actual Past Masters, as the above ruling will show. Here is the way it looks to a Missourian! Bro. Jones serves his Lodge for a term, or many terms, as is often the case, but finds it necessary to sever his connection therewith for a time, at least. He has passed the chair, and is an ACTUAL Past Master. After awhile he returns to his old residence and becomes a member again. 'Vhat has he lost? Nothing, according to right, but everything accordto the Texas rule, which is appended hereto, and is in terms as follows: Resolved, That when a Past Master has lost his membership in this Grand Loflge, by dimitting from the Lodge over which he presided, his subsequent affiliation with that Lodge does not restore him as a member of this Grand Lodge.

To this writer the rule seems unfair, and the doctrine far fetched. The question is asked in an-candor, Is not Bro. Jones an ACTUAL Past Master? Then how can the mere change from one Lodge to another rob him of the honor gained by actual service in a Lodge of his own jurisdiction. If he were to move into the jurisdiction of Missouri he could not become a member of our Grand Lodge on the ground of being a Past Master, because our law does not allow such membership. Past Masters must have presided over Lodges in Missouri to become members of this Grand Lodge. But if Bro. Jones has served the Craft as Master for one or more terms, he is a PAST MASTER in his jurisdiction until he loses that character by death, suspension or expulsion. Dimissinn should not affect his status. It does not, in fact, if he afJiliates with a Lodge in the same jurisdiction where he served amI gained the honors and standing as a Past Master. Legislation may deprive him of such rights as had been worthily gained, but legislation is not al ways just. It is not the province of this Committee to critirise the doings of ~ister Grallll Lodges, bnt the law, as above quoted, which works the loss of rights to a Past Master, is so strange that it would seem out of place in any jurisdiction except Texas. Bro..Tones may have been a second edition of Solomon ,,'hile in his Lodge for many years, but after his dimission and return to the same


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l.odge he is no longer anybody. He mllst go foot and spell up after the old school fashion. 'Well, this appears just a little strained. 1'0 the milld of this writer, the Grand Master was right. THE DEAD.

Grand Master Coombes paid a noble tribute to the memory of Bro. E. W'. Taylor, Past Grand Master. The following is taken from his remarks on the subject: Beginning his career amidst the grand men produced and developed in the struggle for independence in the United States, and afterwards living among the great actors who achieved the liberty of Texas. his own soul WRS fired with the lofty spirit of these patriotic heroes; men who hated tyranny and oppression, who loved liberty better than life il.'self; men who made their mission in life to protect the weak and help the helpless, and he was worthy of his grand associations. Grand, dignified and commanding in his personal appearance, and with a heart so warm and tender. and a disposition so affable and genial, to see him was to admire him, to know him was to love him. And yet no man loved the truth and right better or contended more earnestly therefor. A lion in courage for the right, and the gentle lamb among his associates. Amiable, kind and gentle. he was ever ready to hear all, sympathize with all, help all and unite all. Was there an epidemic in the city. a member of the Howard Association, he was the first of the Howards to see the siek and last to leave the grave. He never faltered; the cry of angui~h reached his eRr and he never failed to respond, 'Twas to him humanity's wail, and his great heart was full of sympathy and love for humanity. He wept with tho~e who wept and rejoiced with those who rejbiced. In him were most happily blended all the amenities aud all the courtesies of l~fe. Possessed of all these lovely characteristics he was dearly loved, yes, venerated by his Brethren, and the best beloved of all our Past Grand Masters. But he was not only loved by those who came in contact with him in the busy activities of life. but there was another and a better and a purer class who ILppreciated him more and loved him better than we did-the little children of the city of Houston. They all knew him, they all loved him, and to hear the sweet voices ofthei'e little ones greeting him lovingly wherever he went and note his kindly recognition of their s\Ve~t greetings. was to bear witness to the grandest tribute to the head and the heart that earth can give a man. Men and women may besto\v kindly greeting!> for personal motives, but these sweet" little oncs" only give their tribute of love to true worth and to sucll loveliness of character as will stand the test of fire. His body was laid away embalmed in the tears of the ,. little ones" of the city of Houston, and his character imprinted in their hearts. The grandest monument ever given to the pure life of a man.

A Lodge of Sorrow was held during the session, at which Bro. James B. Stubbs, Grand Orator, delivered a beantiful oration to the memory of the honored dead, for which he received a vote of thanks. CHARGES AND TRIAL.

A memherof the Grand Lodge misbehaved himself,and was charged thus: The undersigned members of the Grand Lodge hereby charge Bro. J. H. Simms, of Harwood Lodge, No. 468, with gross unmasonic conduct. Specification First.-In this that the said Bro. J. H. Simms, while in attendance upon the present communication of the Grand Lodge, has been grossly intoxicated, neglecting his duties as a Representative of his Lodge to the great discredit of the Craft. . Specification Second.-In this that the said Bro, J. H. Simms, while in attendance upon the Grand Lodge of Sorrow and in the Grand Lodge room, on the 14th day of December A. D. 1886. was under the influence of intoxicating liquors, to the great reproach of this Grand Lodge.

This pink of Masonic propriety was tried by the Grand Lodge, and the speeification of being" grossly int.oxicated" was admitted by him. A motion was made" that the offending Brother be reprimanded by


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the M. "V. Grand Master." The Record says nothing more about the case, not even stating that the Report was adopted. Let us all blush for Texas Masonry. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

An exceedingly interesting Report wasfllrnished by Bro. T.W. Hudson, Grand Secretary. The income from all sources amounted to $12,964.43, showinga healthy and well-managed financial condition. His experience, concerning Lodge returns, is not new or strange to this writer. Much improvement bas crowned the persistent and long cont.inued efforts of this office to bring our Missouri Lodges up to the requirements of the Grand Lodge. It is too much to expect everyone to do as desired. Hear Bro. Hudson in RELATING TO J,ODGE RET.URNS.

I feel it incumbent upon me to say a few words upon this subject. I had hoped that the urgent appeals made by me, through circulars. to the various bubordinate Lodges, for the pnrpose of having their returns made up and forwarderl in due season. so that the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer could lay before the Grand Lodge a full and correct statement of its financial condition at the time of its annual meeting, would have met unanimous concurrence among Lodge Secretaries. yet it seems next to an impossibility to impress upon our Lodges the great importance and necessity for promptly reporting and accounting in ample time. My object in this is to have full statistics of the payments made by the Lodges for fees alld dues of the last year appear at the time the (irand Lodge meets, in order that the Representatives who attend the Grand Lodge call in~pect the books and see whether their Lodges have received their proper credits. how they stand finan路 cially, and iftheir returns are dUly tiled. Yet, I cannot but hope that a glowing zeal for the prosperity of our Institution will inspire a laudable rivalry among our Secretaries as to who will be most prompt, and that soon the complaint of tardiness will be heard no more. DONATION.

The following will prove of interest to many: The following communication from :1I1iss Kate S. Botts, daughter of P. G. l\f. Benjamin A. Botts, deceased, was read: HOUSTO~,

TEXAS, Dccember 15th, 188G.

To the Most WorshipJul Grand Lodge oj Masons oj Texas: I desire to present to your M. W. Grand Body the Masonic Library that bclonged to my father, believin~. as I do, that it would be his wish that the Order he loved so much should he the custodian of his Masonic books. With great respect, KATE S. BOTTS. NO GO.

A resolution ,vas introduced by Bro. M.athews, Past Grand Master, proposing to appropriate $250 to the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. But the Committee on Finance said" NAY, verily." And the Grand Lodge said" Nay" also. So the reportorial Brethren of Texas must continue to" work for nothing and board themselves." The well prepared Report of said Committee deserved a vote of thanks, at least, which cannot be found in the journal of Proce~dings. The divine maxim holds good in Masonry, that" the laborer is worthy of his hire," or deserves just compensation. He that labors should receive wages,


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and he that will not work should not eat or be rewarded. There is known to this writer a certain Committee who receives large compensation for serving in that character-not for what he performs. If possessed of the means, I would freely pay his salary as such Committee, to keep from his journal of Proceedings the silly balderdash, which goes forth as a review, to the great discredit of the jurisdiction. The Texas Committee ought to be paid for valuable services rendered. APPEALS.

Able and extended Reports were rendered by the Committee on Appeals. The cases passed upon were patiently considered, and evidence much painstaking care and labor. One party had been tried by his Lodge and expelled for" denying the Divine authority of the Holy Bible." The committee said: "Let the action of the Lodge be affirmed." This is right. The formula governing such cases is a simple one: "No Bible, no God. No God, no Masonry." CORRESPO~J)Er\CE.

A Report, covering some ninety pages, was submitted by Bro. "E. J. Simkins, for the Committee." The review seems to have been prepared by two writers. Bro. Simkins had an assistant who signed the letter " M." to thee work performed. Who" M." is is not ascertainable from any record at hand. He should not have put his light under cover. The work of Bro. Simkins is a synopsis. That of Bro. "M." is elaborate and extended.. As an illustration, be gave the Maine journal the benefit of seventeen pages, Missouri sixteen, Kansas eleven, Minnesota six, Utah nine, and several others in like proportion. Large extracts and fluent comments characterize the work of "路M." He said so many rare and racy things that this review cannot do justice thereto without transferring them intact to these pages. Space will not justify such appropriation. A. J. ROSE, Salado, G. M.

'r. 路W. HUDSON, Houston, G. See.

1JTAU,

ISS7.

The Sixteenth Annual Communication was held in Masonic HalI~ at Salt Lake City, commencing January 18th, 1887. M. W. Bro. Parley L. 'Villiams, Grand Master, was present and in the Grand East; R. VV. Bro. Christopher Diehl was Grand f5ecretary. There were present five


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Past Grand Masters, with other Past Grand Officers, and Representatives of twenty-four Grand Lodges. There are eight Lodges in the jurisdiction of Utah, all of which were represented. The tabular statement shows a membership of 477. The Grand Secreta.ry, in his general Report, said there were on the roll 377 members. Which is right, he must determine. 'fhe record shows an income of $1,482. There had been disbursed for charity nearly $1,000; the earthquake sufferers in Charleston receiving $100 of that amount. The Grand Secretary said that there was in the treasuries of the Lodges money amounting to $10,595, and that the Lodges owned property to the value of about $10,000. The list of Past Grand Officers furnishes some items of interrest. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Diehl, has been elected to that position sixteen successive times. Surely no one desires his office. This may he owing to the size of hiH salary, which is $500 per year. Three of the early officers of the Grand Lodge have dimitted and gone away. One has been expelled, four have died, and three have been suspended for non-payment of dues. Two of the Past Grand Masters of that jurisdiction are numbered among the dead. ADDHESS.

The Address of Grand Master 'Williams covers seven pages, and is among the very best documents of its kind which have passed. under the notice of this Committee-being a sound, clear, practical business paper. He treated a number of delicate and difficult questions with rare discretion and commendable prudence. He showed' firmness as ,'veIl as judgment in the management of affairs connected with his station. A .Tunior'Varden-elect of one of the Lodges had been arrested in some gambling hell on Sunday. He was tried by the authorities of the dty and fined ;}iiJO, the case against him being clear and strong. Grand Master 'Williams refused to install him in the office of .Tunior 'Varden. He declared the office vacant, and ordered a new election. The Grand Lodge approved this action of the Grand :Master, thereby placing its broad seal of condemnation upon the misconduct of the Mason who disgraced himself and dishonored the Fraternity. The Lodge to which he belongs should have expelled him forthwith. The Grand Master moralized on such unmasonic conduct in the following appropriate terms: It seems to me of the greatest" importance that the professions of Masons to observe the moral, as w~ll as th~ civil laws. should be. made ~o sta~d for something substantial, and not turned mto an idle pretense or meamngless tomallty. It is the indulgence of such departures from that uprightness of conduct which every Mason is admonished to observe, that brings upon our Fraternity a large measure of the criticism to which it is subjected. While we may not expect to avoid criticism from those unfriendly towards, or predjudiced against our Institution, it should be our determined purpose to so live and act that such criticism is not merited; and surely it should be exacted of those proposing to occupy important offices that they should be examples of morality, uprightness and obedience to law.


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FRA'l'gRNAL RELATIONS.

The Grand Master prodaimed that their fraternal relations with all Grand Jurisdictions were harmonious and undisturbed, except in the case of the Grand Lodge of Nevada. For some three years trouble has existed between these Grand Lodges, growing out of the fact that a Lodge in Utah made a :Masonof a party who was claimed by the Grand Lodge of Nevada. The latter Grand Lodge proclaimed non-inter90urse with the Utah Lodge, but at a later day rescinded its action. The matter now seems to be in a fair way for amicable settlement. It is to be hoped that such a result will soon be reached, and that the truest Masoni<: comity and fraternity may obtain. "'Ve be Brethren." RECOG)\I'l'ION.

Numerous applications for recognition had reached Grand Master 'Williams from various bodies styling themselves Masonic. He placed these papers in the hands of Bro. Diehl, Committee on Correspondence, who reported adversely to their claims in the following sensible terms: We have carefully read and considered the papers in each case, and beg leave to report as follows: It seems that it is the intention of our Brothers in Mexico to follow the plan of the Grand Lodges in the United States. and organize a Grand Lodge in each State in that fair land. The idea is certainly a good one. and, if carried out, will be of benefit to Masonry in our sister Republic. Rut we are in darkness concerning the origin of the Lodges that founded these several Grand Lodges. ''\'e believe, and. in fact, know, that most of the Lodges worked formerly under and held Charters from Supreme Councils or Grand Orients. For instance, the Grand Lodge of Hidalgo was organized by twelve Lodges, six of which were chartered by Mexico, three by England, two by France, and one by Italy. Among these twelve Lodges are only three that have been cbartered by a regular Grand Lodge, i. e., the Grand Lodge of England. The other nine are of doubtful origin. The same may be said of the other Mexican Grand Lodges claiming recognition. In former reports of similar claims and character, we have given other reasons why this Grand Lodge should hold to the old maxim, "make baste slowly," and we have found no points in the papers of the fO\lr first named Grand Lodges, neither in the elaim of the Grand Lodge of the Federal IJistrict of Mexico, to change our opinion. We, therefore, recommend that, for the present, no further action be taken in the matter.

From the Report of Bro. Diehl, Grand Secretary, the following extracts are made: FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE GRAND LODGE OF UTAH.

It may not be out of place in this Report to remind you of the fact that, fifteen years

ago yesterday this Grand Lodge was' organized. Of its nine founders, only one is still an active member, and has been a constant attendant at all its Annual Communications. He was one of its first seventeen Grand Officers, and beside him only one more of these seventeen is here to-day. During these fifteen years, the pale Rider has called many of the 124 Qriginal members of the three Lodges to an eternal home; ot.hers, J am sorry to say, have fallen by the roadside, and, through their own fault, are forgotten. It is not my intention at this time to write a retrm;pection of all that has transpired in our jurisdiction since its organization as a Grand Lodge. but J do believe, and doubtless all the Brethren here assembled will agree with me, that with justifiable pride, we can look over the past and exclaim: "All is well." In respect to laws or internal management of the afhLirs of the Grand Lodge, we may have made mistakes, but as Masons and as citizens we have done our duty. We may have-erred in many points, and we may have disagreed on others; but we did not err, and we were harmonious on one point, G. L. Ap.-IO.


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namely: that no man can be a Mason who is not a loyal citizen, and does not obey the laws of his country. All the Grand Lodg-es in our neighborhood are ahead of us as far as numbers are concerned, but the handful of Masons in Utah had and have yet a foe to contend with. whose teachings and practices are the very opposite to the teachings and practices of the Masonic Institntion. Utah has been and is yet a place of darkness, and the :Masons in the Territory claim. and they have a right to claim, that they were the first heralds who sounded the word" Light." The rays of the Masonic light have penetrated into many hearts; it made priestcraft tremble, and, to some extent. superstition vanish. That has been the work of this Grand Lodge and its Lodges during- the past fifteen years. It was good work and square work. We could not do more to be serviceable to our fellowmen. I trust Clio, with her indelible pencil, will write it on the pages of history, so that future generations may look upon the few hundred Ma..c;ons who gathered around their altars from 1872 to 1887, as industrious workmen on the temple of light and humanity.

The Grand Master announced the death of Bro. Frank Tilford, who was Grand Master of that jurisdiction in 1879. Bro. Diehl paid an eloquent and appropriate tribute to the memory of the departed, which is found in the journal of Proceedings. THE LOliISIANA RESOLliTIONS Received a trenchant review, but no solid comfort, from the Committee on Jurisprudence. THE PAST MASTER'S DEGREE Met the following fate, as shown by the record: "The practice of conferring the Past Master's Degree upon a Master-elect is abolished withiJ~ the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Utah." And why not everywhere'? Is a "Master-elect" made a PAST Master by that so-ealti'd degree? If so, he is a PAST Master before he passes the chair. He must be a PAST Master when the degree is conferred, or else there is no sense in bestowing it upon a recipient. If made a PAST Master by a degree, what does he become by actual service? "But," says one; "the degree is necessary to fit the Mastereleet to become Master in fact." That is to say, a degree that does not belong to the Lodge, is very essential in order to do Lodge business and work. This is quite pretentious, surely. Why not say that the Masterelect must receive some degree conferred in the Commandery or Consistory in order to preside over Brethren, many of whom never heard of either body? If the Past Master's Degree belongs to the CHAPTER, as it certainly does, being conferred therein, why is it so necessary to the Lodge? If it is so indispensable, as some claim, it ought to be a part of, and belong to the Lodge system. A Brother cannot be made a Royal Arch Mason unless be has first received the degrees of Mark Master, Past Master and Most Excellent Master. It must be, then, that these very essential prerequisites to receive the Hoyal Arch Degree are necessary parts of, and belong to the Royal Arch system. Capitular Masons claim all the above degrees as belonging to the Capitular system. The claim is fully concedE;d and cheerfully admitted. Then what business has anyone of said degrees with another and entirely


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different system? If Capitular Masonry were consistent; it would contest the right of Symbolic Masonry to appropriate and use one of its degrees. The Lodge is not consistent in claiming and using that which does not, cannot, and never did belong to it. \Ve ought to be ashamed of oursel ves for doing so. Eschew and banish stolen property from the domain of Symbolism. Grand Master Williams had something to say about the injustice of their law 'which suspends a member for non-payment of dues, and then renders his reinstatement very uncertain. Here is the rule, as complained of by the Grand Master: .. But any member thus suspended may be restored, upon his application, by a twothirds majority of the members present, at any regular meeting of the Lodge; provided, all arrearages due at the time of suspension shall have been made, or such arrearages shall have been remitted."

The Grand Master sensibly and justly remonstrated l:tgainst the wrong done members under the above rule. Hear him: Under this provision, a Brother suspended for the non-payment of dues may make application to be restored, pay up all arrearages. and thus remove the cause for which he was suspended, and yet upon a ballot being taken, the requisite two-thirds vote may be wanting. Was such a result contemplated or intended by this amendment, or was this a case of hasty and ill-considered legislation? There would seem to be some injustice in accepting arrearages of dues, and then refusing to restore the applicant. This by-law, as it now stands. provides for suspension for one specific cause only, viz: non-payment of dues, but being so suspended, the delinquent may be kept out of the Lodge and deniea all the privileges of a Mason, after he has removed the cause for which alone he was suspended, by paying up his delinquent dues. This is liot unlike the practice of procuring the extradition of a person on the charge of having committed one crime, and upon his surrender. trying him for another and totally different one. The comparison, however, is to our disadvantage, as here the party may be subjected substantially to the consequences of a judgment against him for a different offense, though without having any charges preferred against him, or having the benefit of a trial. I recommend a reconsideration of this amendment.

The law was amended thus: "And in the event of his rejection by the Lodge, the amount so paid by him shall be refunded, but if the payment of his arrears be accompanied by a petition for a dimit, he shall be restored to membership, and the dimit shall thereupon be granted."

The Report of Bro. Diehl, Grand Secretary, was in keeping with his former practical business documents. He reported their financial affairs as'" sound and healthy." He deserved what was accorded-a new desk and more room. "Ask, and ye shall receive." That is the way i'n which this office obtains what is needed. It appears, from the journal, that the per capita, or Grand Lodge dues, are three dollars per year. This is a high figure, but is deemed necessary in view of the small membership in that jurisdiction, in order to covel' the expenses incident to running the machinery of a Grand Lodge. CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. Christopher Diehl, Committee, furnishes, as heretofore, a feast of good things. He is a vigorous and rather spicy writer and reviewer.


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His excerpts are well chosen, his comments brief, his synoptical condensations good, and his conclusions just. The Missouri journal, for ]886, was treated kindly, Grand Master Boyd was complimented, and this writer not overlooked. The following left-handed tribute from Bro. Diehl leaves this Committee in great perplexity as to his own personality, individuality and identity as to everything. Bro. D. said: "Bro. Vincil's style of writing never leaves the reader to know exactly what he means." 'VeIl, Bro. Diehl is certainly far more lucid in his style of expressing an opinion than this writer is on many subjects. But he is the first to discover and proclaim to the world that Bro. Vincil "never lets people know exactly what he means." It will surprise the friends of this Committee no little to learn that he either speaks in an "unknown tongue," or deals in "riddles," thereby preventing his readers from knowing" exactly what he means." Bro. Diehl is a knowing author, and ought to know what he says and means, but this Committee is inclined to think that "the Court does not know herself" in the above matter, as expressed in his finding. His verdict is condoned by this writer, because he said: We have before us a journal of nearly 350 pages, which was ready for mailing in seven working days after the close of the Grand Lodge. Bro. John D. Vincil, Grand Secretary of Missouri, ought to wear the belt. He beats the world. To him all honor.

This flattering notice is accepted as an offset to the charge already quoted. To" beat the world" is something, after all. Bro. Diehl is in accord with Missouri on "Perpetualism." him:

Hear

Bro. Vinci! is glad that our Grand Lodge gave a" kick" to the perpetual jurisdiction doctrine, and hopes that it may forever "lie buried in its appropriate grave in Utah." So say we. We were sorry that our Past Grand Master Lowe, and Grand Treasurer Paul, who visited St. Louis during the K. T. Conclave, to whom we gave letters of introduction, thought Bro. Vinci! too much otherwise engaged, and came home without seeing him.

Sorry the Brethren from" the Land of the Saints" did not present their letters and receive a royal welcome among Missouri Masons. But, Bro. Diehl, we must part for another year, after a most pleasant interview.

It is a pleasure to record the re-election of Grand Master 'Villiams and Grand Secretary Diehl, both being residents of Salt Lake City.


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VIRGINIA, 1886. The One Hundred and Ninth Annual Communication began its labors in the city of Richmond, December 13th, 1886. M. W. Bro. Francis H. Hill, Grand Master, presided; R. 'V. Bro. William B. Isaacs was Grand Secretary. The Virginia journal grows with the years. The present copy is large and handsome, containing about 400- pages. The membership of the State is printed by Lodges. Thus 150 pages are taken up. There are over 200 Lodges on the roll, with a membership of 8,910, showing a slight decrease. Over 100 Lodges were represented. Among the Representatives present, it is a pleasure to this Committee to note the names of many dear friends and Brethren, known and loved in other years, in the old mother State. Changes may take place and time speed on in its march, but memories of Virginia will live with this writer forever. lIe cherishes his native land with a tenderness that an absent son feels for a precious mother. Dear old home-land! I often dream of th~e, and what sweet rest it would give to slumber in the sacred soil of the a Old Dominion" when alife's fitful fever is o'er." ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Hill covers seventeen pages, and is, like his former production, an able and thoughtful paper. After a brief exordium he announced that their relations with all Grand J~odges with which they were in correspondence, were of a cordial and fraternal character. He said the subordinate Lodges in the jurisdiction, with but few exceptions, were united and prosperous. He paid a vrellmerited tribute to Most Worshipful Bro. Peyton S. Coles, Past Grand Master, under whose active and efficient labors, as Grand Lecturer, there has been a decided improvement in the work of the Lodges. This promises well. Enlist the Lodges deeply and truly in the Ritual, and new life will spring up and spread out. THE DEAD.

The Grand Master paid very delicate, eloquent and pertinent tributes to the memories of departed Brethren, whose lives had been characterized by devotion to Masonic principle and a christian life. DECISIO:1\S.

A number of Rulings were reported by Grand Master Hill, all of which were sound and practical statements of Masonic principles. The doctrines contained in them are correct, and clearly presented. Here is a case that cannot have too wide a circulation. Many Masons

â&#x20AC;˘


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think that when a Brother has been arrested and is held by the laws of the land under criminal charges, he should not be dealt with in a Masonic Lodge for the crime charged, while the charges are pending in the courts. Bro. Hill did not think thus, and this Committee endorses most fully his ruling, which is here given: During the past year, a member of a Lodge was charged with gross unmllsonic conduct. The substance of the specification was that, while employed as assistant in a postoffice, he illegally and fraUdulently appropriated funds to his own use, which did not belong to him, A committee was appointed by the Lodge to investigate the matter, and make report, but failed to do so, Tn toe meantime. the accused left the State, was pursued and arrested in Tennessee by United States officers, brought before a United States court, and indicted. Whereupon the committee declined to proceed to discharge the duty assi~n颅 ed them, for the reason that the case was then in the hands of the United States authoritIes, and was their being investigated, and in this state of the case, the following question was submitted, viz: "Is it proper for the Lodge to suspend action or inquiry subject to the United States tribunal, or should it proceed with its inqui'ry?" Held, that the Lodge should proceed with the investigation of the case. The accused might be tried before a court of law and acquitted upon a mere technicality, or the testimony, under the law, might be deemed insufficient to convict him of a criminal offense, and yet show conclusively that he was guilty of such a gross violation of the moral law, that his membership in a Masonic Lodge ought not to be tolerated for a moment. The two tribunals are in no way dependent on each other. It is true, a case might arise when, owing to the peculiar circumstances surrounding it, the Lodge might not be able to get possession of all the facts necessary to a just and proper disposition of the matter, and by awaiting the action of the court, and the development of the testimony before the court, it might be able to bring before the Masonic tribullal such facts, not otherwise obtainable, as would show conclusively the Iruilt or innocence of the accused, as the case might be, Under such circumstances the Lodge might be justified in delaying its action for a time, but the decision of the court, whatever it might be, should not stop tbe trial of the case by the Lodge.

Of course the above was confirmed by the Grand Lodge. It is just and righteous. A contrary ruling was once made by a Grand :Master in :Missouri, but it never saw the light after the Grand Lodge got through with it. As the successor of that unfortunate Grand Master, I met the same ruling, which had been heard of by a criminal who ,vas under arrest for stealing $11,000. The counsel for the accused pleaded that a former Grand Master had ruled that trials in Lodges mnst await ctiiminal proeeedings in the courts. 'rhe Lodge, over which I was presiding at the trial, seemed to take the same view ,held by eounsel for the defendant and acquitted him. That Lodge never met again. The Grand Master reported that he路 had granted Dispensations for the formation of four new Lo'dges. i\IEMBERSHTP FEES.

The Grand Master gave his views against the custom of charging fees for membership in subordinate Lodges. The Committee on Grand Master's Address agreed with his views, and reported the resolution that no fees should be charged by subordinate Lodges for membership. This resolution was adopted. Such is our-law in Missouri. After two years of able and faithful services, Grand Master Hill retired from office, with the love and appreciation of the Craft in Virginia. The following extract will show the feeling of his Grand Lodge:


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The touching farewell Address of the Most Worshipful Grand Master having been submitted to a special committee, of which Past Grand Master W. B, Taliaferro is chairman, we will leave it in their hands, but wish to express our profound sorrow that, in accordance with the laws of this Grand Body, we lLre called upon to part with him as Grand Master, and we feel that we express the unanimous feelings of every member of the same when we say that he will ever occupy a warm place in our affections. GRAND LECTURER.

Bro. Peyton S. Coles, Grand Lecturer, made a capital showing in his Report, from which the following extract is made: The work. to some extent, has been difficult; over so large an area it is impossible to do justice to all the Districts, or'to visit during the year more than one-third of them. Thc need of instruction is almost universal. Each year the officers of the various Lodges are changed; unskilled Masons are often put in high and responsible places who have no opportunity of improving themselves in the work. Knowing it to be impossible to select judiciously, in every case, the Lodges most needing instruction. I ha.ve, whenever it was possible, responded to invitations and endeavored to assemble in all cases the Brethren at convenient points, and thus render the lectures generally effective. I hopp I have not labored in vain, but that the working" committees I have instituted in tbe different Lodges, and the impetus given by class instruction, may eventually lead to uniformity and perfection in our ritual. I have endeavored to the best of my ability to impart thc Grand Lodge work. The zeal and perseverance generally cvirlenced have lightened my toil, and the mutual inspiration stimulated me often When, tired and discouraged, I have felt my task onerous.

His work was appreciated, as shown by this: As regards the worth and untiring industry of our Most Worshipful Bro. P. 8. Coles, Grand Lecturer. any attempt at commendation on our part would be only a repetition of the expressions used by every Mason in this Grand Jurisdiction, whenever and whereever his name is mentioned. His own consciousness of work well done must be more agreeable than anything we could offer in praise of this indispensable officer. Resolved. That the thanks of this Grand Lodge be and are hereby tendered to our Grand Lecturer. Most Worshipful Bro. Peyton S. Coles, for his untiring zeal and ability, sbo,vn by the efficient work accomplished, and trust he may long live to continue in this good work.

The following evidence of Grand Lodge appreciation are very complimentary to Bro. \Vm. B. Isaacs, Grand Secretary: Your committee are uttBrly at a loss to find language to express their admiration for Right Worshipful Bro. W. B. Isaacs as an incomparable officer. He has earned the eUlogies of this committee for so many years, that nothing remains to be said in his praise, but your committee feel that his worth is too well known to need at our hands what we would express in this Report.

This compliment \Vas due Bro. Isaacs, the elegant gentleman, affable officer and warm-hearted Brother. The Reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters were furnished and printed, covering some thirty pages. There is much more in the Virginia journal worthy of note, but the foregoing must suffice. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report on Correspondence, amounting to seventy-six pages, was submitted by Bro. 'Villiam F. Drinkard, to which attention must


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now be given. It is fair and just to Bro. Drinkard to mention a misfortune which befell him in the early summer, when a fracture of the right forearm" laid him off" for quite a while. Of course this interfered with his work and prevented as full a review as heretofore. It is observable that there are more extracts and fewer of those clear and cogent arguments which have characterized his Reports in other years. Such thoughts as may be pertinent will be transferred to these pages. Under Arkansas, Bro. Drinkard had this to say: The Grund Lodge made an Entered Apprentice and a Master Mason in due form, the Grand Lecturer officiatin~. Accordin~ to Virginia usa~e and what we regard as safe precedents, the work ought to have been done in a subordinate Lodge. Is the Grand Lodge a Master Mason's Lodge in the sense in which a Master,Mason's Lodg'e is spoken of in the O. n.? A Master Mason's Lodge is a certain number of F. and A. Masons duly assembled with a Holy Bible, Square and Compasses, and a Charter or Warrant from some Grand Lodge empowering them to work.

To which Missouri responds: A Grand Lodge does not exist for the purpose of making Masons. Certainly Lodges must exist where Grand Lodges hold their sessions. In such Lodges the degrees should be conferred, even thongh the w'ork be done by Grand Officers. Bro. Drinkard is correct in his view. He might have gone further and said more. If made a .Master Mason in and by the Grand Lodge, to what Lodge does the newly-made Master Mason belong? It will be said, in reply, "to the Lodge which conferred the two preceding degrees." Very well. Why was not that Lodge called for the purpose of conferring the third degree during the Grand Lodge session? No man ever had a degree conferred on him by the Grand Lodge of Missouri during its existence of nearly seventy years. In reviewing Iowa, Bro. Drinkard said: We once saw a Brother arraigned in open Lodge and expelled from the Order within fiftten minutes. He had declared a few moments before in open Lodge that he had visited a clandestine Lodge. The Grand Lodge, on appeal, sustained the action of the subordinate Lodge. The Grand Master complains that although nominations for officc are forbidden in the Grand Lodge, electioneering is discreditably common. We would suppose that most of the electioneering is due to that prohibition. If open nominations and speeches for and against the nominees were allowed, there would be no excuse for electioneering, and we are inclined to believe from our experience in Virginia that there would be but little of it, and that would be ashamed of itself.

In Missouri, nominations are not allowed for Grand Lodge officers. This Committee, in thirty years' observation and experience, has never met with anything that would induce him to favor a change of the Missouri custom or to prefer the Virginia practice. Bro. Drinkard replied to Bro. "Thitaker, of Louisiana, on the same subject, in these terms:


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We tell Bro. Whitaker that the regulation of our Grand Lodge which amuses him so much is not new. but old; that it applies not to the Deputy Grand Master only, but to all Ine elective officers of the Grand Lodge; and that its operation has almost convinced the Prince of Masonic lawyers that every Grand Lodge ought to have such a regulation. It is, in brief. intended (and it has thoroughly effected its purpose) to prevent electioneering' for office, and to prevent officers from being re-electcd on motions to dispense with a balloting, or on motions to elect by acclamation. The voicc of the Virg-inia Grand Lodge is nevcr silenced or muffled. No man can be chosen to any office whilst seated in the Grand Lodge. Every candidate must retire. Every candidate must have at least one competitor. This writer has passed from the office of Grand .Junior Deacon to that of Deputy Grand Master, and we do not recollect tbat we have ever had a Brother to ask us privately to support any candidate. Publicity is made obligatory; and it has been made obligatory in Virginia for so many years that electioneering for office is, by tbe public opinion of the Fraternity, effectually put under the ban.

The Grand Lodge of Missouri long since declared it to be unmasonic for anyone to electioneer for office in the body, and the same" is hereby prohibited." Under such a law, where is the danger that nominations would avert? Bro. Drinkard was exceptionally kind to the Missouri journal of 1886. He said: . In seven working days after the Grand Lodge was closed. Bro. Vinci! broug'ht the Proceedings from the press and mailed them immediately. Bro. Isaacs, of Virginia, does his best. and scolds his printers, but he has never been able to get the Proceedings out with half that promptness. The Grand Master's Address is mostly confined, as was proper, to matters of local interest. One general remark strikes us with forclY". because It describes the condition of things in Virginia. We allude to his remark that if there is any law of his Grand Lodge which prohibits a subordinate Lodge from permitting a Mastcr Mason coming from England to visit without a certificatc of mcmbership, he has been unable to find it.

Of this Committee he kindly remarked: The Report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence is from the pen of Most Worshipful John D. Vinci!. an honored Past Grand Ma.ster, whom we are proud to claim now as a p'ersonal acquaintance and friend, as well as Brother beloved. It is full and able. WhIlst wc do not concur in all his views. wc cannot but feel the force of his trenchant blows when he strikes at something we hold in reverence. He ranks with the ablest of the corps of reporters on Foreign Correspondence. INDEFINITE SUSPENSION

Is one of the things in whieh Bro. Drinkard believes, whether the suspension be for non-payment of dues or unmasonic conduct. And it is one of the things in which this Committee does not believe. Bro. Drinkard reasons thUS, as to non-payment of dues: Now, if this suspended Brother in some way gets money-perhaps borrows it-to pay his dues, is he to be allowed to reinstate himself by his own act? No. Let his Brethren decide whether he is fit to return. Do not say he ought to be tried. 'ÂŁhere is no nced for a trial. "Mercy to him and justice to the Lodge both reqUire that he shall remain as he is-suspended. 'l'hese remarks appl)' also to Brethren suspended for unmasonic conduct. Of course they ought not to be allowed to reinstate themselves; but this is exactly what a law amounts to which allows them to be suspended for a definite time. Think over the matter, Bro. Vineil.

"Bro. Vi neil " has thought" over the matter" long, carefully and as vigorously as possible, and the more he thinks, the wider the space grows between the views of the Virginia Committee and himself. In Missouri the large bulk of our suspensions for non-payment of dues


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grows out of inability to pay. This inability, coupled with sensativeness and pride (a false one, I grant), will keep many from Lodge meetings, and prevent them from seeking the remission of their dues. Many a good Brother has said to this writer: "When I am able to pay my dues and meet the Brethren as their equal, I will return to the Lodge and attend. its meetings. 'Vhile I was in good circumstances and kept up my dues, I was all right with the Brethren. But since I have met with misfortune and lost my means they have bounced me."

'-

No one knows better than the kind and amiable Bro. Drinkard, how heartless are even some of our Masonic Lodges and Brethren. Not all, thank heaven. Many Lodges are run upon cold bnsiness principles, and the Masonry in such Lodges is measured by a money standard. It is dollar and cent Masonry. The shibboleth of such has a metaUic ring in perfect consonance with the clink of a silver dollar. Such Lodges will cheerfully suspend a Brother who does not pay his dues according to the By-Laws. Now, Bro. Drinkard, you say such unfortunate members as I have described, "ought not to be allowed to reinstate themselves." You present cases where parties "had become comparatively worthless before suspension," and make your rule apply to all cases alike. You judge all by some "worthless" fellows. This is not fair. I will ta'ke the list of Masons suspended in Missouri for non-payment of dues, ,year after year, and will show a large proportion who were unab}e to pay and who were" bounced," while the" worthless" portion form a small minority of the whole. "If those comparatively wortldes.~" fellows were snspended for delinquency, they are not likely to "reinstate themselves" by paying up. 'When they pay up and" reinstate themselves" there is evidence of improvement. If they continue" worthless" after being reinstated, proceed against the.m on another line; but, for the sake of "mercy to him and jnstice to the Lodge," do not subject the worthy and deserving Brother to a ballot after he had disembarrassed himself by paying all claims, and thus removed the caase for which he was suspended. "Think over the matter," Bro. Drinkard. RESIGNATION OF

O~路FICERS.

The laws of Virginia and Missouri differ widely as to the rightof Lodge officers to resign. The views of this 'Committee, with the law of Missouri, were given last year. Bro. Drinkard replied, and his reply is herewith given: We would say to Bro. Vincil that whatever else Bro. Hill's Decision may be, it is not new. In the year 1804 the Grand Lodge of Virginia passed a resolution recognizing, the right of any officer to resign. And we really Cllnnot think that there is any good reason why the right should not be recognized by law; for in other States the Grand Master al ways, as a. matter of course, issues a Dispensation. when asked to do so. allowing Lodg-es to elect and install officers out of season. Our law allows them to be elected and installed at any meeting-of course after notice preViously given that an election is to be held. Of course, here, as elsewhere, the Senior Warden succeeds to the office of Master


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if the latter dies or resigns, and the Junior Warden succeeds if the Master and the Senior Warden both die or resign. We know of a Lodgc in this city whose Master and Wardens all removed from the State recently. The Master still (at this writing) returns to Richmond and presides over the Lodge at its regular meetings, but the Lodge proceeded at once, after notif)'ing the members to attend for that purpose, to elect a Senior Warden. Why not? Why should it be necessary to apply to the Grand Master in such .Gases-for instance, if the :Master, too, had resigned? By thB way, what say our reportorial Brethren as to the right of the 1I1a..<;ter, above referred to, to reside in Washington City, and at the same time be a Master of a Lodge in Richmond? We add, in justice to the Lodge, and to the Brethren concerned, and to show that in Virginia we do not elect improper persons to be officers of our Lodges, that the Brethren spoken of above are railroad officials, whose headquarters were removed to Washiilgton recently-one of them the treasurer of that great corporation, the Richmond and Danville Railroad Company.

路With kindest regards and fraternal esteem for Bro. Drinkard personally and Masonically, and with sincere congratulations upon his election as Grand Master of Masons in Virginia, this revie,,, must close. r am glad, Bro. Drinkard, that we know. each other. Your personal courtesy will never be forgotten, while your reference to my visit to Richmond will be cherished as a legacy herewith transmitted to my children: " Virginia receives a notice that charms us-a filial recognition of a parent. Bro. Vincil has made many personal friends in Richmond, and has many admirers among his Brethren who saw and heard him, and also among those who heard of him but did not have the pleasure of any personal intercourse with him." The Grand Master, Bro. Drinkard, and the Grand Secretary, Bro. Isaacs, both reside in Richmond.

WASHINGTON, 1886. The Grand I~odge of 路Washington met in the city of Olympia, on the 2d day of June, 1886, with M. "'\V. Bro. Louis Ziegler, Grand Master, and R. iv. Bro. Thomas M. Reed, Grand Secretary. In addition to the Representatives of forty-three Lodges, there were present seven Past . Gl'and Masters and other Past Grand Officers. The roll shows fortyfour Chartered Lodges, with a membership of 1,800. The income from all sources amounts to about 64,000. The Address of the Grand Master was of unusual length, covering twenty-five full pages. Time is short and space is valuable, therefore this notice must be short. His Address opened with a lengthy prelude, covering two pages and a half. The elo::]uence, poetry and mythology of his exordium caused such a swimming in the head of this Committee, that any attempt to follow the distinguished Grand Master would be a failure. It is enough to say


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that he talked about fir-clad hills and snow-capped mountains, piercing the clouds with heads of perpetual ice, until this writer, in the midst of a summer day, began to feel decidedly cool. The fancy is then swiftly borne to Mount Olympus, the sacred home of .love. There Jupiter is seen seated on a throne of 'ice, fanning himself under a canopy of eternal snows, while beside him sits Juno in a perfect fever of jealousy. Next Minerva leaps full-armed from the brain of Jove, sweeps down the mountains, and dwells with the children of men in their beautiful valley homes below. Then cometh forth Diana, with her train of divinities, sporting with rod and bmv; giving peace and happiness to men. 'fhen there is Hermes, sweeping like a mountain eagle oyer the tops of the Olympia range, to make an evening call npon Ceres. By the time this splendid panorama had passed before the mind of the present writer, he felt that he was no longer able to follow the flighty flights of this soaring Grand Master. The sweep from 1J1e sublime heights to which the mind has been carried, down to the silent hush of. the cemetery, marks the contrasts in human thonght. Consequently the Grand Master next began to treat of death, the great leveler of all human distinctions. He at once furnished the sad announcement that two of their distinguished Brethren and Past Grand Masters had been called from labor during the year. Bro. John T. Jordan, Grand Master in that jurisdiction in 1870, died suddenly of heart disease. Grand Master Ziegler said of Bro. J 01'dan, that he was an honest man and a respected cith~en, a kind father and an honorable Mason. Bro. Ziegler said that the remains of Bro. Jordan were, by fraternal hands, "consigned to the bosom of anI' common mother, to sleep the sleep of the just, in the land of everlasting peace and rest."

It has long been a cherished belief of this Committee that" the land of EVERIu\STIN<i peace and rest" is far beyond the bounds of "Mother Earth." The body will sleep within "the bosom of our common mother," but please do not consign the immortal part of man to the grave, and call it "the land of everlasting peace and rest." The dust shall return to the earth as it was, but the spirit, to GOD who gave it. Another Past Grand Master had fallen during the year, Bro. David Ch. Rothschild, who was Grand Master in that jurisdiction in 1873. DECISIONS.

Seven Decisions were reported. They were all approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence, except one. He had been asked the question, Can a Lodge under Dispensation admit members by affiliation? Here is the answer of the Grand Mastcr;


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Answer-It cannot, because a Lodge U. D.is essentially and strictly the creature of the Grand Master. and exists only during his will and pleasure, and consequently possesses but one function of a Lodge. viz: That of making Masons. Just what the Grand Master himself might do-make a Mason at sight-but no more. Therefore, it follows tbat if the Lodge U. D. is the creature of the Grand Master entirel)', he can only invest it with such powers and faculties as he is himself possessed of, and no more. I hold it to be impossible that the creator can endow his creatures with powers greater than his own.

It is very gratifying to this Committee to record the fact that the above illogical and unsound ruling was not approved by the Grand Lodge.

Bro. Ziegler is at fault in saying that" a Lodge U. D. is essentially and strictly the crea1ure of the Grand Master." It is the jndgment of this Committee that "a Lodge U. D. is * * c* the creature" of the Grand Lodge. It is respectfully submitted that Ancient Grand Masters did not create Lodges under Dispensation, though they may have exercised "the power in me vested" to make Masons at sight. As they did not form Lodges under Disp~nsation, and as such were not created until written Constitutions were formed, it follows that the power to grant Dispensations to form new Lodges originated in Grand Lodges, and was conferred upon Grand Masters. This power can only be exercised by Grand Masters within the letter of the writte~ Constitution, and in accordance therewith. The Grand Lodge, being the creator of Lodges U. D. has the right to prescribe the terms under which they shall exist and operate.. Whatever powers or rights such Lodges ~1ay be endowed with by the creating parent, they can exercise without any regard to the will and pleasure of the Grand Master. The statement of Bro. Ziegler above is without foundation, that a Lodge U. D. can "exist only during the will and pleasure of the Grand Master." The Grand Master has no voice in the matter as to ho\v long a Lodge U. D. shall exist. That is the right of the Grand Lodge, and its right alone-one with which the Grand Master cannot interfere, unless the Lodg'e shall do something in violation of law, when he becomes the agent of the parent power to correct or discipline the minor child of the Grand Body. A Lodge U. D. does many things that a Grand Master is not allowed to do. The postulate of Bro. Z. is endowed with, and characterized by great feebleness. To say that a Lodge U. D. shall not affiliate members is to say that it shall not increase its membership. What was it created for? To make Masons at sight? That is what some Grand Masters do. And Bro. Z. says that a Lodge U. D., as "the creature of the Grand Master," can only be invested with such powers as he possesses. According to the dictum of prerogative teachers, Grand Masters can make Masons at sight. Therefore Lodges U. D. can do so, because they can do "just what, the Grand Master himself might do -make a Mason at sight-but no more." Bro. Z. will do well to take his


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own medicine, and accept the full results of his own logic. This is new dodrine in Israel. In fact, it is so new that it will not be palatable. It sound strange, and appear anomalous to many, to hear that a ]~odge Iuay make Masons (at sight, if you please), and not have the right to arbm:t to membership Masons already made, and fit to become factors of the new Lodge. To receive and consider petitions, elect candidates, initiate, pass and raise them, must be accepted as a far greater work than to receive into the family one who is already a Brother in good sta~ding. The doctrine inculcated in the foregoing ruling would sound as strange teaching coming from anyone else than Bro. Ziegler. 'l'hat he should hold and proclaim such a view, is"not to be wondered at, taking into the accolint his varied fancies. The Decision is at variance with good cnstom and sound practice.

,,,,ill

â&#x20AC;˘ reported a case in extrmso, which should never The Grand Master have appeared in the journals or reports of a~y Grand Lodge. One Brother was indebted to another, and had failed to meet his obligations. The creditor wrote him, requesting payment. The debtor lost his temper, and wrote an insulting reply, which the Grand Master incorporated in his report of the case, wherein is found expressions not fit for a Masonic publication. It is a matter of surprise to this Committee that Bro. Reed, the Grand Secretary, would have allowed such a term as is found in that letter, in the printed Proceedings of his Grand ]~odge. The author of that insulting note was afterwards elected Secretary of his Lodge, without having made due apology to a~ offended Brother, though he had promised to do so. The Grand Mastpr refused to permit his installation as Secretary of the Lodge. He was afterwards put on his trial and acquitted. Bro. Ziegler, in commenting on the subject, gave utterance to the following admirable and appropriate sentiments: In my judgment, the time has come for this Grand Lodge to declare, in unmistakable terms, how far a Ma.~on may act in confidence with a Brother :M:ason, and still be within bounds of propriety; how far he may betray the confidence of a Brother, and still be considered honest and doing right under the section of law referred to. and how near he may hew to the line-ofdishonesty, without snapping the cords of honor and duty to a Brother. We have too much of this kind of sharp practice; a wilful di§regard of our commercial obligations, which some are pleased to term sharp business practice. I tell you, my Brethren, there is no business.in this way of doing. True business is and must be conducted by the strictest rules or integrity, and without a strict observance of these rules, busiuess is a fll,ilure. I tell you, we have too much of this, and Masonry must protect itself, and it must say to its votaries: .. You must lead an honest and upright life, deal honorably with all men, and not permit them to go about to ensnare the unwary, betray their confidence, and defraud them of their lawful due. We cannot afford to let the world point the finger of scorn at our members and say: "That fellow is a Mason; he has defrauded and cheated me, and the law of his Institution upholds him in it." DISPENSATIONS.

The Grand Master reported that four Lodges had,been permitted to work under Dispensation during his'term. lIe had granted permission


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to one Lodge to confer the third degree on a Brother in advance of the regular time. He no doubt felt justified in suspending the law in this partieular case, though he seems opposed to the custom of making Masons in great haste. He exhorts his Brethren to make haste slowly. Grand Mast.er Ziegler reported that their relations with other Grand Jurisdictions were botli cordial and fraternal. He treated the controversy between England and Quebec in a very vigorous manner, and sllstains the latter in its contest for jurisdictional rights. The Grand l\1aster stated that the Craft in that jurisdietion, as a whole, was prosperous and doing ,veIl. MIXED FUNERALS.

'l'he Grand Master took hold of this subject 'n a very vigorous manner, as shown by the following extract: Complaints have come to me from various parts of our jurisdiction (but, of course. always after the event took place), stating that Lodges of Masons, as such, freely mixed with other societies, in the burial of our dead. This adulterous practice I have ever deprecated, and in pronounced terms declared it not only \vrong. but a violation of one of our Landmarks. That the burial of the dead, according to our beantiful ceremonial, is a part of Lodge labor, there can be no doubt. Then, if it is a part of legitimate Lodge work, it follows that it must be done in open Lodge, and cannot be done otherwise. Then if it must be done in open Lodge, how, I ask. can anybody but .Mas0i1S be admitted? Wbat would we, as Masons, think. or do. when in Lodge assembled for work, to learn that organizations known as Odd Fellows. Knights of Pythias, Knights of Labor, .United Workmen. and members of the Fire Department, demanded. and were about to cnter. to participate with us in that work. because. forsooth. the candidate in hand was a member of all these associations? Methinks that every Mason here would rise and bid halt to such palpable violation of the Landmarks, and defend to the last the exclusive tendencies of our Institution. Masonry is an institution peculiar to itself, and, according to its very spirit, can have noLhing in common with other societies, in public or in private. .JOINT OCCUPANCY OF HALLS.

This disturbing and much debated subject is thus treated by our able and vigorous Bro. Ziegler: We have ~o law upon our statute books forbidding Lodges from occupying halls with other societies, yet we have a common law of Ma.<;onry which decrie:; the practice. Masonry is a law unto itself, and according to that law we can have nothing in common with other men or other societies, impliedly nor in fact. Our Temple is, and should be, the Temple of the Faithful. and our shrine should not be desecrated by unhallowed hands. It is a pitiable sight, indeed. to walk into II Masonic Hall (Temple) and behold upon its walls the insignia and emblems of the Order of Odd Fellows. Knights of Pythias, United Workmen and Knights of Labor. It destroys the pure character of a,Masonic Temple. where the sacred rites of our Institution arc practised, and where the almost divine lessons of our time-honored Fraternity are inculcated, and where the God of our fathers is worshipped in truth. In fact, my tlrethren. it is not a Nasonic Hall; it is in truth a pUblic, or, Masonically speaking. a profane Hall. IIence, Masons, for ~triclly Masonic purposes, should not meet in ~uch places, for the immediate practice of our rites; but should endeavor to the very utmost to find a house unto themselves and an abiding place for their kind. TEMPERANCE.

The Grand Lodge of W'ashington, at a former communication, had adopted a rule making it unlawful for the Lodges in that jurisdiction to receive and act upon the petition for the degrees of Masonry from


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any men engaged in the making and selling of intoxicating liquors. The said edict had excited comment and dissatisfaction among some of the Brethren, and some opposition had been raised to the action of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master found it necessary to issue an edict on the subject, which was sent out to the various Lodges. He argued the question at considerable length, and with great ability. He claimed that the Grand Lodge of V/ashington did not exceed her own legal authority and power in adopting the law regulating the liquor traffic in the Lodges. He said that other Grand Lodges had spoken upon this question, and adopted vigorous regulations upon the subject. He concluded his able circular letter in the following terms: Whilst the Grand Lodge of Wa!;hington hath spoken, the Grand Master will act and see it carried into effect, and the reason, my Brethren. why I will see it carrier] into effect is, because it is right anG proper and just, and it is just such a course as Masons and Masonry must adopt and pursue to meet their loud and boasted pretensions to fortitude, prudence, temperance and justice to all concerned. Therefore. my Brethren, one and all, I beseech you, stand by the action of our Grand Lodge, because itis right. It is my duty under our Constitution to see the laws of our Grand Lodge observed and enforced, and by the help of God and your kind co-operation and support, I will see the edict or regulation properly enforced. And I do hereby order and direct the Worshipful Masters of the subordinate Lodges of the Grand Lodge of Washington Territory to see that the edict before and above quoted is obsen-ed and obeyed within their respective Lodges, under pains and penalties of the law.

. He said that the circular seemed to have the desired effect, and that no more signs of dissatisfaction had appeared. The following concludes his treatment on the subject: This seemed to have the desired effect, as no more sig-ns of disaffection are apparent, and only here and there some small troubles seem to grow out of this matter. Yet, my Brethren, after mature reflection, I am constrained to believe that the action of our Grand Lodge, last year, was a right step in the right direction. and that if our ship of state is COllSigned to the guidance of firm hands for but a short season longer, the Brethren of our beloved jurisdiction will see and enjoy the good fruit growing from the wholesome tree just planted. FINANCES.

He took hold of this subject in a fashion peculiar to himself, as he docs every other subject: Our finances are in a state, from hand to mouth. so to speak, and we only make ends meet by imposing on our officers, who perform the labor and clerical work of this Grand Lodge. Our revenues are ample, and by a proper use of them we should go swimminglyon. But there is a screw loose somewhere. In my jUdgment, it is this: we arc paying, under our Constitution, more mileage and per diem than we of right should. Wepay our Representatives and Grand Officers ten cents per mile for every mile traveled, one way, and two and one-half dollars per day for every day consumed III going and returning, and attending the session of the Grand Lodge. This, my Brethren, is too much, and we cannot carry it into effect, for our revenues are inl'ufficient, and we are always compelled to take from the General Fund. to make good the deficicncy of the Representative Fund. This is not right; we must either increase our Representativc dues from our subordinate Lodges, or decrease our Representative expenses; which shall we do? I am persuaded to the belief that we are taxing our subordinate Lodges all we should tax them, onc dollar per annum for each member on their Rolls as Representative dues, and one dollar for each as Grand Lodge ducs; this last goes into the General Fund for general purposes, thus making a total of two dollars a year for each member, in addition to the fee of onc dollar for each degree cunferred. This, in my opinion, is all the tax we can reasonably impose on our Lodges, and have them prosper.


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Then, may be asked, where is the remedy? I promptly answer, we are paying too much to our officers and Representatives for attending the Annual Sessions of this Grand Lodge, and, when properly placed before you, I am persuaded to think, you will agree with me.

Bro. Ziegler received a vote of thanks for his services, and was reelected Grand Master for another term as a compliment. Of his misfortunes and sufferings, a committee said: Your committee has observed with pride that, during the period of greatest physical suffering by our M. W. Grand Master, Bro. Ziegler, his thoughts never wandered from the duties he had assumed, but in the hour of pains and torture, he attended to every duty, and, seemingly. has neglected none; this, too, at a time when more than the ordinary share of work fell to the lot of the Grand Master of this jurisdiction. 'Scarcely had he rid himself of this disea.~e, when a dispensation of the Supreme Architect called away his only daughter, a brig-ht. lovely and accomplished woman-the pride of Spokane Falls!-thus tearing all the tendrils around his warm heart, and bringing him down in grief. Several of the subordinate Lodges. took this grievous affliction to heart, and tendered their condolence-but all did not, and to give unanimous expression of the feelings of the respective Lodges, your committee offer the follOWing resolution: Resolved, That in the sufferings of our M. W. Grand Master, Bro. Louis Ziegler, and in the loss of his beloved daughter, Jennie, the Grand Lodge of Washington tenders to him its sincere sympathy in his sufferings. and condoles with him in his deep losstrusting there may be "a balm in Gilead," and remind him of that Scriptural passage: " Whom the Lord loveth, He chasteth."

The deepest and tenderest sympathies of this Committee are hereby sincerely offered to Bro. Ziegler, with the earnest prayer that a balm di vine may heal the wounded heart. May he truly say: " My Father's hand prepares the cup, And what He wills is best."

From the able.business report of Bro. Reed, Grand Secretary, some interesting items are gleaned. He said: A few words of retrospection may not be wholly out of place here. This Grand Lodge was organized December 8th, 1858, and of the members composing that Masonic COIlvention, about two-thirds have passed over the" Silent River," and of those Grand Officers first elected, but two are now living, the venerable Bro. James Byles, P. G. Ma.~ter, and your Grand Secreta.ry; and of the appointed Grand Officers. but two arc known to be living, viz: Bros. David F. Biles and Jacob L. Myers. '.' A few more days-a few more years," and the personnel of that organizing Grand Assembly will all have passed away. But, banishing sad reflections, feelings akin to pride and congratulation irresistably well up in the bosom of your Grand Secretary, in casting a glance back over the history of this Grand Lodge, and witnessing what it is to-day. It fell to the writer's lot fir;;t to move, and, in conjunction with a few others-noble few-to take action in the organization of a "Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the Territory of Washington," and he may be pardoned for saying that no effort was permitted to slacken until the good work was accomplished. During every session, except one, when other duties compelled his absence, he has been present in some official relation. [Grand Secretary or Grand Master.] While the Grand Lodge in times gone by may have made mistakes in respect to its laws, policy, or the internal management of its affairs, the true history of its workings and honored career, since the date of organization. will compare favorably with any Grand Lodge in the world. . G. L. Ap.-ll


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And permit me here to say that the members of the Grand Lodge here assembled to-day, and the whole Brotherhood of this Grand Jurisdiction have reason for honest congratulation at the measure of success which has followed your Grand Lodge in the past, and the high position it now occupies among the Grand Lodges of both hemisphereยง. The foregoing reflections are penned in view of an inexorable law of nature that your present Grand Secretary must soon retire, and the questionha.s been seriously considered, in his own mind, at least, whether in justice to the Grand Lodge as well as himself, it would not be beWOlr, after the close of the present Annual Communication, to pass over the~cross-pensto abler and more skillful hands. The work of this office is increasing from year to year, and with the continual care of the library and a large ILccumulation of misccllaneous paper files, etc.. the time is now a.t hand when no one person can properly attend to the duties of this office, and engage in other business pursuits.

It is to be hoped that many years may elapse before the efficient Grand Secretary, Br6. Reed, shall feel compelled to "pass over the eross-pcns" to anyone. He cannot be spared from the post he has honored so long. FINANCIAL.

Of their finances, Bro. Reed said: It is gratifying to be able to report that the financial condition of the Grand Lodge is good. At the close of the previous fiscal year the Grand Lodge was in debt about $875. The Grand Lodgc is now free from debt, except the small amount due for incidental expenses of this office, an itemized account of which is presented with this report. It is believed that the receipts at this session will be sufficient to pay representation expenses and the usual current expenses of the Grand Lodge. The returns show a very satisfactory amount of work done by most of the Lodges during the year, three Lodges only failing to do any degree work during the year. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Review, amounting to 140 pages, was fllrni8hed by Bro. "Thomas M. Reed, Chairman." Those portions of the Report prepared by him, are in keeping with his former productions, and cannot be too highly commended, both as to the thought and style. That he did not prepare the Report in its entirety is evidenced by the fact that portions of it are wholly unlike anything he ever wfote before. The part he did not write is signed by the last letter in the alphabet. Who is represented by "'J," remains to be revealed. It is a pleasure to record the re-election of Bro. Thomas M. Reed as Grand Secretary.

lVEST VIRGINIA, ISS6. The journal contains the minutes of two special Communications. The Twenty-second Annual Communication began its labors in the city of Wheeling, November 9th, },886. In the absence of the Grand Mas-


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ter, R. 路W. Bro. Hiram R. Howard, Deputy Grand Master, presided; R. W. Bro. George 路W. Atkinson was Grand Secretary. Seventy-five Lodges were represented. There are eighty-two Lodges on the roll, with a reported membership of about 3,600, showing a gain of sixtytwo. Seventy-eight of the Lodges had made returns. The annual revenues amount to some $3,000. The outlay was nearly as much. The pay-roll of offi~ers and members foots up about $1,500. The Grand Secretary receives a salary of $300 per year. There being no Address from the Grand Master for consideration, the Grand Lodge proceeded to consider various Reports submitted for action. A Resolution was approved forbidding the issuance of circular l.etters, unless by permission of the Grand Master. The application of the Grand Lodge of Mexico fox: recognition was postponed. The Committee on Jurisprudence passed upon a number of rulings, which had been made by the Grand Master during the yeal,. This Grand I..Jodge has assumed a strange attitude on the subject of Joint Occupancy of Halls, as the follo\ving will show: The Grand Master had been asked whether, under the rules and regulations of the Grand Lodge of ,I\'est Virginia, our Lodges can share the use of their Lodge-room and furniture with any other Ma.<;onic bodics than those who recognize their allegiance to the Grand Lodge of West Virginia? To which he replied, as follows: In reply, I would say there is nothing in the rules and reO'ulatiolls of the Grand Lodge of 'Vest Virginia that forbids the Lodges in Wheelin~, or elsewhere. from sharing the use of their Lodge-room and furniture with any body, Masonic or otherwise, whom they may chose to admit. The only Decision upon the SUbject was rendered by Grand Master Bates, in 1867, in these words: " It is not expedient for :Masons to hold joint occupancy of Lodge-rooms with Sons of , Temperance, Good Templars, Odd Fellows; or any similar ~ociety."

This Decision has been reiterated by every Grand Master since 1867, and the nonexpediency of such joint occupation has the force of actual prohibition of such joint occupancy. ,.

While Lodges are not forbidden to share their halls and furnishments with "any body, Masonic or otherwise," yet the same Grand Lodge cleclares it inexpedient for Lodges to permit their Halls to be occupied by Temperance Societies, Odd-Fellows, or other moral and benevolent organizations. If it is "note1:pedient" to occupy halls jointly with said societies, there mllst be good and sufficient reasons on which to base the inexpediency. These reasons should be sufficient to forbid joint occupancy without any expediency in the case. That term expedient is a fraud and catchword, too often used to dodge a real liv'e issue. BAI,LS.

Is there any rule of the Grand Lodge that would forbid the. use of the Lodge-room for a ball to be given on Christmas night for the benefit of the Lodge? In answer, I would say there is no rule upon the subject, and I am not now aware that a similar question has been proposed to any previous Grand Master in this State. But my own opinion is decidedly adverse to the giving of a public ball in a Lodge-


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room. no matter to what purpose the funds thus collected may be applied. You propose to hold a ball for revenue. Of course, every person who can purchase a ticket must be admitted. The dance is not likely to improve the moral tone of the Lodge or enhance its good reputation in the community. Therefore, to the extent of my authority as Grand Master, I disapprove the Ilse of the Lodge-room for a publie ball, to be held all Christmas night or at any other time.

'l'he foregoing is heartily endorsed by this Committee. He is on record touching the question, and bas strong convictions respecting it. Anything that tends to lessen respect for, or destroy the sanctity of, "a place representing the Holy of Holies," should be forever excluded therefrom. Dancers, in their character as such, have no business in such a place. Bro. O. S. Long, Grand Master for the term, was absent, owing to illness. His Address was not prepared in time for the meeting of the Grand Lodge. A Document, of six pag'es, is inserted in a remote part of the journal, signed by him as his Address. It was furnished after the Grand Lodge closed. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report was prepared by the Grand Secretary, Bro. Atkinson, embracing sixty-three pages. It seems to be his first effort in this line of work. The Report is made up in a large measure of clippings from Grand Lodge Proceedings, with a few comments. The Missouri journal, for 1886, received a two-paged notice, embracing extracts from Grand Master Boyd's Address, with some quotations from our Committee no Jurisprudence, and the entire poem of Rob Morris, called the" Level and the Square." The "Test Virginia Committee, like Bro. Diehl, of Utah, made a discovery.' Bro. Atkinson has discovered a man in St. Louis, connected with the Grand Lodge of Masons in Missouri, as Grand Secretary and Committee on Correspondence, by the name of .John D. Vail. Who this party is, Bro. Atkinson will have to determine. 'l'his writer has been a member of the Grand Lodge of Missouri nearly thirty years. He has filled most of its offices, has known its Grand Secretaries and Committees on Correspondence, has been in the office of Grand Secretary for ten years, has written all its Reports on Correspondence during that time, and in all these years has never heard of anyone by the name of John D. Vail. The West Virginia Committee should obtain a patl:mt on his discovery. If he had looked at the list of Grand Secretaries, supposed to be in his possession, the name would not have looked like John D. Vail; but, in plain type, he could have seen the name of the l\1issouri Secretary and Committee to be John D. Vincil. Bro. H. R Howard was elected Grand Master, and George \'V. Atkinson was re-elected Grand Secretary, with headquarters at Wheeling.


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WISCONSIN, lSS7. The Forty-third Annual Communication was held in the city of Milwaukee, commencing June 14th, 1887. M. W. Bro. Eugene S. Eliiott, Grand Master, presided; R. W. Bro. John 'V. Laflin was Grand Secretary. 173 Lodges were represented. The present number of Chartered Lodges is 206, with a membership of 13,]08. There was a gain of "151. Two months after the Grand Lodge closed its session, the journal of Proceedings came to hand, looking as bright and clean as the sunlight appeared to this writer on a June morning, in the beautiful city of Milwaukee. The Address of Grand Master Elliott covered thirteen pages. It is a thoughtful business paper, containing matters of interest to the Craft in 'Visconsin. He had called upon the Brethren of his jurisdiction, for contributions to relieve the cry of distress that came up from the ruined city of Charleston, South Carolina. The response arnounted to some $800, which was duly transmitted through Bro.l.~aflin, ~he Grand Secretary, to the Grand Master of South Carolina. Bro. Elliott rendered a large number of Decisions. The Committee on Jurisprudence said some of the Decisions were not correct, and, therefore, disapproved them. Some of them were pronounced correct in principle, but needed some improvement, which they gave to them. The Decisions were thoroughly sifted by the committee. From the concluding part of the Address, the following extract is made: Let us be more charitable, more social, more faithful. A meagre attendance at Lod~e meetings, a year finished with no expenditures for benevolence, entertainments to which our wives and families are not admitted. all this indicates dry rot which must be checked or the fabric will ~ to pieces. Our danger is from within, not from without. The ranting of an army of detractors cannot affect au institution which has withstood the ravages of centuries. The pyramids which stand like lonely sentinels watching for the returning countersign of the myriads whose footsteps shook the world when Rome was a desert and Athens only a hovel may well regard, with profound indifference, the hissing of the reptiles which drag their slimy lengths along their base. And so this Fraternity, which has survived the malice of bigotry and the persecution of tyrants. never seekin~ a convert, trying to refuse all but good, but steadily increasing until now its members joming hand to hand circle the globe with the strong grip of a Master Mason, this Fraternity need care nothing for the attacks of those who draw their knowledge from ignorance and their facts from fiction. We, who have traveled the rough and rugged road which leads to this sublime degree, know how much of good, how little of bad, is here contained. We know that the teachings of our Craft constitute a code of morality as perfect as can be devised by the wisdom of man; we know that while in no sense a substitute for, it is the faithful ally of true religion, and we know that under its influence all that is good, all that is true, all that is beautiful in our manhood is elevated and perfected.

The following paper was offered by Past Grand Master Bouck. After "some discussion the paper was not adopted." 'l'his Committee has to say, "in reference to the proposition of Bro. Bouck, that he was evi-


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dently straining the point. It rpay not be improper to remark that it was the old effort of straining at a gnat and swallowing a camel. Such legislation was uncalled for, because unnecessary. And the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin acted wisely and well in rejecting it. But here follows the famous paper of Bro. Bouck: WHEREAS, The Order in Freemasonry known as Knights Templar, without the assent of this Grand Lodge, have assumed to bury Masons with Funeral Ceremonies and Rites. WHEREAS, It is conceded and recognized that Masonry of the Lodge, Ancient Craft Masonry, is the trunk and foundation of the whole Masonic Edifice, and that the bodies known as Chapters, Commanderies, etc., are mere branches thereof, .. which spring forth from the tree and receive all their nourishment therefrom," are dependent upon and cannot exist without it. That by the Ancient Rules and Regulations of the Craft, the Constitution and Edicts of this Grand Lodge, the" trunk of the tree" canllot act secondary as a subject to any of its" branches." By reason whereof the great body of Freemasons, as such, are excluded from such Funeral Ceremonies held by Knights Templar, thereby creating dissensions and jealousies among the Craft, and causing comments outside of the Fraternity, which dissensions and jealousies are increasing each year. That if such claims and proceedings on the part of the Knights Templar are permitted and continued, the necessary result must be great want of harmony, if not trouble, between members of Ancient Craft Masonry and the Order of Knights Templar, and likewise dissensions between the members of the Order of Knights Templar and this Grand Lodge. That this Grand Lodge, desirous and anxious that only harmony and ~ood feeling should exist between" the trunk of the tree" and the "branches," in spirIt of Fraternity, Harmony and Peace, request that the Grand Commandery' of Knights Templar of Wisconsin prohibit the Commanderies in its jurisdiction from haVing or holding any such public rites, funeral ceremonies, or burying a Freemason with funeral rites. A .J UST TRIBUTE.

The Grand Master made the following announcement: BRETHREN-There is now confined to his home in this city a Brother who was for many years路one of the most faithfnl and 7,ealous members of this body. One of the brightest minds that ever gTaced the Councils of this Grand Lodge is slowly wasting away by disease. I allude to Past Grand Master Jedd P. C. Cottrill. He loved and still loves the Brethren of the Masonic Fraternity in Wisconsin, and, I believe from conversation with himself and with Mrs. Cottrill, that if some of the older Brethren of the Grand Lodge, with whom he was associated and familiar during his active Masonic life, could make it convenient to call upon him he would be very glad to see them. It is a little thing to do, but to one, who for many years was most zealous in our work, it will be a pleasant thing to assure him by a warm hand shake that, though absent from . 'us, he is not forgotten. P. G. M. Emmons E. Chapin presented the following: It is well that the Grand Lodge here assembled is reminded of one who, before he was stricken with disease, was numbered amongst the most zealous, most active, and most generous Masons whose presence ever graced a Grand Lodge, and who was always present at ollr Annual Communications. Bro. Jedd P. C. Cottrill was Grand Master in 1874,1875, 1876 and 1877, and from the time of his appearance in this Grand Lodge as a Representative from Wisconsin Lodge, No. 13, he was ever ready and Willing to discharge every Masonic obligation or Masonic work devolving upon him. He loved, and continues to love, the Brethren of Ancient Craft Masonry, and Brethren of the Craft in turn loved and honored him. His Masonic works and worth are well known, not only within this jurisdiction, but in other Grand Jurisdictions in correspondence with our Grand Lodge. Members of this Grand Lodge and many absent Brethren deplore his condition, confined as he is to his house by sickness, and dependent upon his estimable wife and sons for care and protection. Bro. Cottrill and his family are entitled to and should receive our sympathy and Masonicsllbstantial remembrance; and, to the end that his lonely journey of life may be smoothed, and the good of Masonry revealed unto him as in his palmy days he revealed the same unto others, let it be Resolved, That the sum of $200 be placed by this Grand Lodge into the hands of the brave and devoted ,wife of Bro. Jedd P. C. Cottrill, to be used for him by her in such manner as in her own good judgment may seem proper.


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CORRESPONDENCE.

The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin bas a new Committee. Bro. Duncan McGregor is that Committee. He presented o"ne of the neatest little Reports, covering seventy-five pages. He comments briefly and extracts wisely. As a new beginner, he may well hope to win a place among the more experienced writers on Correspondence. He gav~ the Proceedings of Missouri, for 1886, a brief but courteous notice of less than two pages. He said that the Address of Grand Master Boyd was elevating in its teachings, and in the interest of the very highest morality. Bro. McGregor said that this Committee deals some telling blows at the vices of gambling and intemperance. That is a part of the wori-.: of the Missouri Committee. Drunkenness, gambling, drunkard making, and incident vices can find no favor in the eyes of a true Mason. Professing to be a Mason, good and true, this Committee has no use for anything that degrades humanity, or disgraces tbe name of Freemasonry. Bro. McGregor said U Masonry is not prohibition, but it is temperance." This is well said. Masonry is morality and decency. Immorality and indecency, as shown in tbe lives of drunkards, and gamblers, and saloon keepers, and such like characters, can be no part of a true Mason's life. Therefore, they are to be opposed and condemned. It was the good fortune of this Committee, during the present summer, to visit the charming city of Milwaukee, and spend some time enjoying the bracing atmosphere and delightful associations of that great business emporium. During tbat visit, the enjoyment thereof was greatly increased by meeting with the efficient and companionable Grand Secretary, Bro. John W. Laflin. The pleasure of the occasion would have been greatly.increased by meeting Bros. Chapin, Elliott, Palmer and others, but the opportunity was not enjoyed. The Grand Mast.er and Grand Secretary were re-eleeted, and both reside in Milwaukee.


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ADDENDA.

The journals of the following Grand Lodges were not received in time for notice and location in alphabetical order, hence they appear in this place.

CANADA, ISS6. From the very full recapitulation of the Grand Secretary, it is learned that there are 357 Lodges on the roll in the jurisdiction of Canada, with a membership of 19,256. The income is reported at $1G,482. Their total assets amount to some $70,000. The Thirty-first Annual Communication was held in the city of Windsor, July 14th, 1886. M. 'V. Bro. Hugh Murray was Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. J. J. Mason, Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from 286 Lodges. The journal of their Proceedings is large and ha!ldsome, containing 340 pages. ADDRESS.

The Annual Address of Grand Master Murray contained nineteen pages. It opened with an extended exordium. The remaining part being devoted to business. A large variety of subjects were treated by the Grand Master, such as Benevolence, Infringement of Jurisdiction, Appeals, arid so on. A case is furnished by the Grand Master, under the head of Appeals, to this' effect. A man, by the name of Harrison, had been tried and sllspended by his Lodge, on the ground of being an Agnostic and Free-Thinker. He appealed from the finding of the Lodge. The Grand Master reviewed the case at great length and very ably. He did not reverse the verdict, but affirmed the same. Of his utterances and action this Committee would say well done. The party thus punished seems to be nothing more than an irreligious libertine, and wholly unfit for a place in the Masonic family. Masonry had been violently assailed by a prominent religious dignitary of Canada. '1'0 his assault upon the Institution, the Grand Master replied as follows: You, Brethren, do not need to be told that this characterization of Mnsonry is cruelly unjust. That we might not appear in the eyes of the world to asscnt for a moment to such injurious and unwarranted assertions. I have thought it my duty, not with any desire to enter into controversy, but wishiug simply to protest against the wrong done our


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Order, to say that the aims and teaching of Ma<;onry are pure and :pcaceaOle. We place the word of God before the neophyte. We ask him to accept it as hIS guide, to reverence it as the sure revelation of Divine will, to seek its counsel, and to obey its precepts. Tolerant of other men's views, we demand that all Masons shall profess faith in the $upreme being, in the immortality of the soul, and in a state of future rewards and punishments. Onr counsels tend to peace, brotherly love and charity. To aid the widow and the orphan, to succor those in distress, to help those who need counselor assistancethese are our duties. We give respect and obedience to the constituted authorities, strive to promote order,

~~~g~.e 9ru~eill~s~~~~~u~ei~0~er~~nBri1~~I~~~n~n~ ;~~ ~~i~tds~~~t~e~frha:~JI~i~a

Grand Lodge of England, and men, the foremost in arts, in literature, in arms, in the State, and in the church, are his Brethren and ours. T dare not say that a bad man may not he a Mason. but T am very bold in saying that a good Mason cannot be a bad man. I regret that Cardinal 'raschereau should have been so ill-informed respecting Masonry, as to prepare and publish the document in question. A GOOD DEED.

The following interesting incident is taken from the journal of Proceedings: A most happy incident occurred since last communication of Grand Lodge, whereby ample provision has been made for one of the orphans entered on Grand Lodge books of benevolence, the circumstances of which incident are briefly as follows: In August last, the M. W. Grand Master informed the chairman of the Committee on Benevolence, that a highly respectable gentleman and his wife, not being blessed with any children themselves, wished to adopt as their own a little girl of about one or two yearf:> of age, and the G. M. enquired whether any such little girl could be found among our Masonic friends. The chairman immediately consulted the books of Grand Lodge alld from them sent to the G. M. a list with partiCUlars of a number of such orphans. The result was a letter from said gentleman requesting enquiry to be made as to whether the widowed mothers would part with their little daughters. Accordingly several letters were written by the chairman to widows who had a daughter at the age. The answers, however, were not encouraging; none would part with her youngest child. Nevertheless, after some further correspondence and personal interview, one widow consented to part with her little daughter. All requisite legal papers were executed, and the child transferred to her new home, where she is not only happy herself, but a constant source of happiness to her foster-parents. For obvious reasons the names of the parties are withheld; yet it will nevertheless be a pleasure and gratification to Grand Lodge, that at least one little orphan, who with her sorrowing mother, was left poor and penniless through the untimely death of the father in the prime of his life, is now amply provided for as the lawfully adopted daughter of a highly respectable and wealthy father.

A very considerable part of the journal is taken up with Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters. A new Constitution was presented, considered and approved. Very much space was taken up in the journal with the work. There is nothing else of special moment claiming consideration in this Report. Bro. Henry Robertson was elected Grand Master, and Bro. J. J. Mason, of Hamilton, was re-elected Grand Secretary. .

DAKOTA, ISS7. The Thirteenth Annual Session of the Grand Lodge of Dakota was held in the city of Huron, commencing .June 14th, 1887. 1\1. W. Bro. William Blatt, Grand Master, presided, and R. 'V. Bro. Charles T.


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McCoy was Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from seventy-three Lodges. There are over ninety Lodges on the roll, with a membership of about 3,600. The Address of Grand Master Blatt is an interesting document, covering eight pages, and being of the very highest order, both as to its moral tone and intelligent expressions of thought. The exordium contains sentiments pure and elevating in their character. From his opening remarks the following is taken, which contains a vigorous blow at vice in its various forms: The chief vices of the age should meet our unyielding opposition. Intemperance, profanity and covetousness, with all their train of kindr~d evils, should feel the hand of our severe condemnation, not only through the legal method of organized society and in a general way, but specifically and among our own, they should be strenuously suppressed by our own methods. '1'0 the eradication of such vices, Masonry should direct every effort. Their existence and practice are the source of that stream that fills penal institutions and the graves of suicides. I do not enter upon an exposition of the principles of Masonry in relation to these vices. None is needed. Let it suffice that they are not to be met or overcome solely, if at all, by grand acts and in notable events, but by the law of our method in all our Lodges and homes and relations with our Brethren. "Line upon line, line upon line; precept upon precept. precept upon precept: here a little and there a little." These duties are first to our Brethren and then unto all, that the world as well as the Brethren may be better for every good Mason within it.

Bro. Blatt announced continued pleasant and fraternal relations with other Grand Lodges. He stated that the condition of the Craft in their jurisdiction was prosperous beyond expectation. Much work had been done, and well done, without undue anxiety to increase the membership. So well was the law understood, and so general dJd harmony prevail, that not a case of grievance had been reported during the year. The Grand Master made the announcement that their finances were in very fair condition. He favored the formation of a fund beyond immediate necessity, so as to be ready to meet any unexpected demands that might arise.

a

NEW LODGES.

Five new Lodges had been instituted under Dispensation. The Grand Master said that he preferred fewer Lodges and stronger ones, as that would give greater stability to the Order. DISPENSATIONS.

He informed the Grand Lodge that he had granted no Dispensa tions, except such as were duly allthorL~ed by the law. He refused two applications. One where Lodges desired to turn out in their Masonic character, on m:emorial day. He held that it was not proper for a Lodge to participate in any public ceremony that was not strictly Masonic. The other case was where he refused to allow a Lodge to take a second ballot when a candidate had been rejected by a member, 'who afterwards withdrew his objection. The Grand Master was certainly right in both instances. J


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He reported the arrest of the Charter of one of their Lodges, which was lacking in all the elements necessary to a healthy life. He therefore thought it best to provide a funeral for the dying body. LIBRARY.

Bro. ParvIn, Grand Secretary of Iowa, had presented to the Grand Lodge of Dakota, 500 volumes of various kinds of Masonic works. These having been bound, were placed in the Grand Lodge library, and constituted, ,vith other collections, a good beginning for a Masonic Library. The Grand Lodge adopted a resolution during the session, tendering thanks to Bro. Parvin for his kindness and lllany favors to that body. ENTERTAINMENTS.

The custom has become general in Dakota to furnish the Grand Lodge a banquet during its session. The Grand Master declared his opposition to such entertainments, giving as a reason, that the membership of the body now being so large, it made such entertainments very expensive to the Lodges in different localities where the Grand Lodge holds its sessions. He thought it best for such Lodges to spend the amount laid out for these entertainments for purposes of charity. The Grand Lodge, during its session, approved this recommendation of the Grand Master, and resolved not to accept any entertainments or banquets in future where its sessions may be held. DECISIONS.

Grand Master Blatt reported eight rulings which were all approved by the Grand Lodge. They were all of local application, and were sound expositions of Masonic law, as to general principles, and having special reference to the jurisdiction of Dakota. After two years of earnest labor, Grand Master Blatt retired from office, being awarded a vote of thanks by the Grand Lodge for his faithful and untiring efforts in governing the Fraternity. In reporting upon his Address, a committee presented the following views: That in the opinion of your committee the Grand Master has struck the key note of success in our organization. That just in proportion that we, as Masons, },lYE the precepts taught andexpillined to every candidate on hil' initiation into the mysteries of our Order, just in that proportion will we deserve and receive the respect and confidence of the world. Of what use is it to say "the name of Deity should never be mentioned except with reverence," and in the next breath use that name lightly-even profanely. Of what lIse to try to impress upon the mind of the initiate that one of the" principal points" of entrance into our Order is temperance, and at the same time some member (it may be an officer of the Lodge) in good and regular standing, be so befogged with the enemy of all that is pure and ennobling that his brain is clouded and his very presence an offense unto his Brethren? .


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Is not such teaching farcial, to my the least? Our hopes in this regard are centered more in the young men of the Order. The body of Masonry represented by this Grand Lodge is mostly composed of young men who, more throu~h carelessn~s than any intention to violate any of the precepts of the Order, are falling mto habits of profan\ty and intemperance. '1'0 these we say, earnestly and emphatically, desist from profanity and intemperance-avoid even the appearance of the evils. Profanity adds nothing to your statements; a Mason's word should never need bolstering with an oath. ' Intemperance and profanity are not only Masonic offenses, but they are crimes in the eye of the law as well, and it is the duty of every Mason to see that the laws of the land are not only upheld, bnt rigidly enforced. Not only should these practices be condemned beeause they are in violation of our precepts and of the laws of the land, bnt for the further reason that the constant practice of these offenses lowers the Fraternity in the estimation of all who are working for the elevation of mankind.

The foregoing was followed' by the adoption of the following resolution: Resolved, That no person who is engaged in the business of keeping a saloon, or is in the business of retailing intoxicating liquors, to be used as a beverage, shall be imtiated into any particular Lodge in this juriSdiction, nor shall any Brother Mason who is engaged in such business be received in any Lodge as a member by affiliation. enga~ed

It will be seen from this aetion of the Grand Lodge that Dakota placed herself in line with many other of the Grand Lodges of this country. There is a growing sentiment, amounting to a resistless purpose, to cut off the whiskey traffic from Masonry. The time 'will come when none can be found to advocate the adinission of the liquor-selling gentry into the Masonic Fraternity. The reason for this is found in the fact that liquor selling, for drinking purposes, is an immoral business. Being immoral, it is unmasonic. Being un masonic, the business, as represented by saloon keepers, can meet with no favor from good and true Masons. It, therefore, follows that the business of saloon keeping is unmasonic, because immoral. Those who are engaged in the business, though they be Masons, are pursuing an iminoral and unmasonic practice. No Mason, who is worthy of a place in our Brotherhood, can defend the immoral business of the saloon keeper. Hence the saloon keeper, being unfit to come into Masonry, must be unfit to remain in it. The Grand Lodge of Missouri will not tolerate the presen<:e of such a crying evil in its Lodges, nor will it permit any such wrong-doers to come into the pale of Masonry. The moral sentiment of the Institution against such vicious pursuits is growing stronger and more determined year after year.

From the number of Grand Lodges that have thundered forth their edicts against the saloon keeping business by Masons, it is evident that the traffic must" go," and those engaged in it, as well as their apologists and champions, would do well to study "the handwri ting on the wall" and learn the temper of this movement. It is not spasmodic or sporadic. It is a reform that has come to stay, and the watchword is "ONWARD." Masonry can live without saloon keepers and their adherents.


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The Grand Secretary, Bro. McCoy, presented a very interesting business Report. There is no Report on Correspondence. Bro. Henry M. Wheeler, of Grand Forks, was elected Grand Master, and Bro. Charles T. McCoy was re-elected Grand Secretary, and resides at Aberdeen.

IOWA, 1887. A volume of nearly 500 pages, handsomely gotten up, and received in good time, contains the Proceedings of the Forty-fourth Annual Communication. The session was held in the city of Davenport, beginning June 7th, and closed on the 9th. M. 路W. Bro. William P. Allen, Grand Master, presided, and R. W. Bro. Theodore S. Parvin was Grand Secretary. On the day previous the Grand Lodge laid the corner-stone of a new Masonic Temple in the beautiful city of Davenport. Bro. Parvin delivered an address. From the extended reeapitulation, furnished by Bro. Parvin, Grand Secretary, it is learned that there are 431 Chartered Lodges on the 1'011,361 of which were represented at the meeting in Davenport. The Reports indicate growth in that jurisdiction in all important departments. The membership amounts to 21,5HI, showing a considerable gain. The income for the year footed up $21,475.86. The mileage luxury cost over $5,000. At the opening of the session an address of welcome was made in behalf of the three Lodges in Davenport, and the same was appropriately responded to by Grand Master Allen. ADDRESS.

Grand Master Allen presented a plain business paper, covering fifteen pages. He made reference to the org-anization of the Grand Lodge, forty-three years ago. when only twelve delegates, representing four Lodges, formed the body, showing a striking contrast to the present status of Masonry in Iowa, with over 400 Lodges, and more than 20,000 members. Truly, the growth of the Fraternity in that jurisdiction has \ been wonderful as well as gratifying.' In numbers and in character the jurisdiction of Iowa is high and commanding. The items of bnsiness fonnd in the Address are numerous and varied. Several Dispensations had been granted for the formation of ne\\' Lodges. Bro. Allen treated, at some length, the subject of a "National Masonic Congress," giving a history of such proposed gatherings for the last forty years. Hi& views of the matter w~re conservative and safe. The late gathering in Chicago claimed notice under the above head, and he dryly remarked that


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while the Brethren were not authorized to represent their Grand Lodges, they had the right to meet and amuse themselves as they might desire. No one has questioned such right, and beyond this nothing is expected to come out of the movement. A MEDAL.

The Grand Master authorized the striking of a medal, commemorative of the laying of the corner-stone of their Library building. One of these reminders is to be sent to each of the Grand Lodges.. with which the Grand Lodge of Iowa is in fraternal relations. WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' HO~IE.

This subject is treated in a practical and vigorous style by the Grand Master, as the following will show: It may be repeated here, and thus kept before the Craft at large, that this movement has become the great burden of thought among the Grand Lodges of this land, and is yet to be the true and legitimate work of Masonry. The great rage, so widespread and ruinous in many cases, of building Masonic TImI'LI,S, has passed away, in a measure, and given place to the more practical work of CHARITY. True Freemasonry has two great and distinctive features-Morality and Charity. Losing sight of these, more or less failure must mark our career. Shorn of her morality, Masonry, like a lost spirit, must wander up and down in the earth, doomed to mockery and disdain, without the power to die, and unfit to live. Without charity she is no more than sounding 'brass and tinkling cymbal. Her mission is a grand one. She comes to mankind, clothed in the pure garb of morality and crowned with charity, and proclaims a glad evangel thus: "Be ye pure and ye shall be happy." Thus she blesses the life anp. lifts up the nature of man. But here is the extract from the sayings of Grand Master Allen; Some time during the past fall my warm-hearted Deputy, R. W. Bro. Wilson, issued, on his own motion, a circular to the Lodges of this jurisdiction, earnel;t!y advocatiu/? the founding in Iowa of a Masonic Home for the widows and orphans of dece~ed and mdigent members of the Craft. The object had in view has my heartiest approbation. In a number of other States this question has become the question of the hOllr. 'l'he success of the now celebrated home in Kentucky, which was established many years since, has everywhere quickened into life the long dormant charitable instincts of the Craft, and we in Iowa will, in my judgment, be recreant to our known duty if we longer lag in the rear, refusing to pay the vows we have vowed in behalf of God and humanity. ~ome fifteen years ago Past Grand Master Guilbert brought this matter before the Grand Lodge, and urged it with all his well known zeal and energy. But, although the plan he proposed was feasible, the time was not propitious, and the agitation of the question was therefore suspended. Now the time is ripe and the way clear. I earnestly commend this important matter to you, and urge that the initial steps be taken at this Grand Commulllcation, which will place us abreast of our duty. I recommend, now that our Library bUilding is practically paid for, that the twenty-five cents additional dues on members, which was levied three years ago, to enable the Grand Lodge to cancel the debt on that building, be continued and set apart as a Home fund, I further recommend that a special committce of three be appointed to report, if possible at this session, a comphrehensive plan for the upbuilding 路of the Home. Brethren, what I say on this momentous question comes directly from my heart. The subject commends itself to me as one worthy of the substantial aid and sympathy of every Mason in this jurisdiction who feels as I do, that we


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.. have too long kept the word of charity to the ear and broken it to the hope. As a business man, not ~iven to ra.shness of action, I feel that we have now the means to accomplish this laudable end, and I regret that I have not the gift of eloquence to aid me ill its advocacy. I leave the question with you, in the confident hope that Bro. Wilson's noble appeal will have so aroused thought as to induce you to bestow upon this question the attention it merits and l:ihould receive.

Joint Occupancy of Halls was discussed by the Grand Master, and he did not spare the language in his characterizations of the" horde of societies that have sprung up like mushrooms within the past few years." Perhaps a few good words might have been spoken in behalf of the "horde of societies" thus denounced, if the Grand Master of Iowa had known the real be;lefit the world has received from such societies. This writer has paid out more than one-half million dollars per term to widows and orphans in the single State of Missouri, contributed by one of the great" horde of societies that has sprung up within the past few years." Perhaps, if the very venerable Grand Master of Masons in Iowa had known more of the good works-Charity-of such " societies,'; he had said less. The Grand Master had fOr\varded $200 to the Charleston, South Carolina, unfortunates, who had suffered from earthquake visitations. He made numerous recommendations, offered acknowledgments to Grand officers, presented his conception of the ideal Grand Master and closed with the usual form of laying down the gavel and taking his place among the Brethren in the ranks. He announced at the close of his Address that recent information had reached him of the death of one of the Past Grand Masters of the jurisdiction, Bro. Wilson. This Brother seems to have been well known in Iowa, so much so, indeed, that neither Grand Master Allen, nor the Committee on his Address, thought it necessary to do more than call him Bro. Wilson. His name being thus omitted by both, forced this Committee to hunt up the memorial tablet, furnished by the Grand Secretary, Bro. Parvin, where it is found that the name was Jeremiah 'Wright Wilson, and that he was Grana Master in 1878. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Parvin, furnished a full and lengthy Report, containing matters of interest to the Grand Lodge of Iowa. His Reports are always important to the Craft there, because he omits nothing, and well understands tbe workings of official machinery and ' the needs of the Grand Lodge. I.,ike the present writer, he has despaired of ever receiving ALL the returns and dues from Lodges within the time prescribed by law. He ascribes this to the carelessn-ess and negligence of Secret;Lries, and said the Masters of such Lodges are no better. Ten years of faithful labor in this office on the same line in Missouri has left but little reason to hope for perfect compliance on the part of tardy and delinquent Lodge officers. In this jurisdiction we have penalties enough to our laws to enforce obedience, but the~'e is no


/'

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enforcement of them. Like the Iowa Grand Secretary, it may be said that the law is a dead letter. From the way Bro. Parvin expresses himself on the" mileage" question it seems that this is an elephant of good size and annoying proportions. It will likely continue to be such, as the claimant for mileage is more anxious to receive his money than to represent the Lodge of which he is a member, as a rule. It is hard to satisfy many Brethren, on such occasions, that the distance traveled by them has been correctly computed. Leech-like, the cry is "more." "MASONIC HOME."

Bro. Parvin touched up this subject in the following vigorous style: A new era has dawned upon our history and labors as Grand Lodges, and from it we may learn that Masonry is progressive,. that it has a mission, and the time has come when eacb and every Grand Lodge should cnter upon its work. , A few years ago a furore seized upon many Grand Lodges to establish'" Masonic Colleges," for which there was no more use than a fiftb wheel to a wagon, as every State bas made ample provision for the free education of its children. Not so. however, for institutions where the aged and hel pless may be amply provided for. Not a single State in the Union, and Iowa is not behind the foremost in her efforts in this behalf, has provided for all such needs. The great charities of the old Grand Lodge of England-homes for the aged Mason, his widow and orphans-are the crowning glory of the world and the age. 'rhe "Orphans' Home," established by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky years ago, has â&#x20AC;˘ proved a great success, and all the land now point to it with just pride. This has been the model from which the Grand Lodges of Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and others have copied, and many of these are now in the full tide of success, domiciled in good and substantial buildings. And in those jurisdictions the needy Brother. his widow and orphaned children are cared for by Brotherly hands. All honor and praise to the enlightened and liberal Masons in those States. The Proceedings of the Grand Lodges named, and others, arc full of recitals on this subject, which we only wish could be read by all our members to stimulate them to "go und do likewise." From our reading, study and observation, we are inclined, without any reservation, to second with aU our heart the movement re-inaugurated in this directioll by our good and earnest Brother, Deputy Grand Master George P. Wilson. This Grand Lodge cannot afford to close this session without bestowing due consideration upon his-wise suggestion. FIFTY YEARS A MASON.

Bro. Parvin had this to say about his connection with the Masonic Fraternity: HALF A CENTURY A 1oIA50N.

Should our life be spared to see the" ides of March," we shall have then rounded out a full half-century of Masonic service-more extensive and varied than has ever falleu to the lot of man. Becoming a Mason in the third Lodge organized west of the Allegheny Monntains (1791) in March, 1838, we were the night we became a lIIaster Mason elected Secretary of the Lodge, in which we were the only youthful member-under thirty-five years of age. From that night, save the two years interregnum till the organiz:ation of Des l\Ioines Lodge, No.1, Burlington, Iowa, in 1840, of which we were a charter member and officer, we have held a prominent office and served the Brethren. Forty-eight years of active and official service in Iowa. A member of the Conventions which organized the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter and Grand Commandery of Iowa; first Grand Secretary and later Grand Master; first Grand High Priest, and first Grand Commander; we have neyer missed a session of the first, and only two of the latter.


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The above contains a remarkable history, and finds few, if any, parallels in the lives of Masons. I Bro. Parvin, as I..Jibrarian, presented a very full statement of the condition of their splendid Masonic Library. It is the pride of Iowa Masons. No Grand Lodge in America has such a large and rare colleetion of Masonic works. RECOGNITION.

Bro. Parvin presented a special Report on Corresponde~ce, in which he recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodges of South Australia, Vera Cruz, and of the Federal District of Mexico. The Grand Lodge of Victoria was not recognized, the committee declining to make any recommendation in favor of the applicant. The Committee on Grievance and -Appeals rendered a lengthy and full Report containing their findings in twenty-five cases.- A new Constitution was submitted for consideration by M. oW. Bro. C. T. Granger, Past Grand Master, and after duly weighing the same it was adopted. Bro. Granger recei ved the hearty thanks of the body for the able manner in which he had discharged the duty imposed upon him. Much important business was transacted by the Grand Lodge during its term of three days, when it adjourned to meet in the city of Cedar Rapids, June 5th, 1888. ' CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. Parvin, after the lapse of one' year, is again on hand with a very full and extended review, covering 234 pages of interesting matter. He reviews the journals under consideration, and makes but few extracts. By the aid of a stenographer and type-writer, this is easily done. He can dictate a report and have it brought out to suit him without the hard labor of other years. The Report may be styled "Gleanings." Bro. Parvin is a good gleaner. Nothing worthy of notice has escaped his attention in the journals reviewed. The difficulty in following him is found in the running style of his work. Extracts are hardly admissible. To follow him through more than 200 pages of well expressed thoughts, without making excerpts, is scarcely possible, yet to do so is to lose the force and strength of his terse and cogent utterances. To transfer page after page to this work is more than can be done. The review perplexes this Committee. However, he is entitled to a hearing. Bro. Parvin disapproves.a custom prevalent in some jurisdictions of charging fees for special Dispensations, as for conferring degrees out of time. Such methods have been fitly styled, allowing our ancient usages to be put up at auction. That is just what it amounts to. The Brother who has money can gallop through on the G. L. Ap.-12.


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[Oct.

double quick, and get his degrees in advance of his less fortunate Brother, who cannot afford the means to bid off the privilege at auction. It is a matter for congratulation with the Masons of Missouri that we are not led into temptation on this line, because to all such as desire to hurry through the Lodge, our law says "You need not apply." Referring to the action of a Grand Lodge, which expelled a member for getting drunk during the session, Bro. Parvin preaches a good Masonic sermon on the inconsistency of the act, while it allows the drunkard-maker to escape. Hear him; Where is the sense and propriety of condemning, and visiting the highest penalty known to Masonry-in that case entirely too severe-of expnlsion, upon a .poor Brother with a strong appetite and a weak jUdgment who became intoxicated. possibly purchasing the very liquor upon which he got drunk from the saloon in the bUilding owned by the very Lodge whose Master was present in the Grand Lodge and voted for his expulsion. If the drunkard, the poor man with a strong appetite, is to be condemned for drinking whiskey, in the name of all the ~ods, both great and small. first condemn the man who sells it to him and the Lodge wh Ich rents the building to the seller for such vile purposes. There never was a saloon in Christendom that did not make drunkards, and the drunkard-maker is very much worse in principles and in morals, and should be in t.he eye of Masonic law, than he who drinks the liquor proffered to his lips.

Bro. Parvin never wrote anything in all his laborious life more to to the point. It is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. The saloon-keeping Mason has such a love for the Brethren, coupled with such a high sense of honor, that he would rather have their eU,stom than anyone else. Their patronage gives credit and character to the business, to say nothing about the disinterested desire to make money. Then this liquor-selling Brother is such a pink of consistency. After he has robbed his Brother of his money, his health, his character and often of his life, he is so sorry. He will, when the money is all gone, help punish the victim of his nefarious calling. It is an indisputable fact that no saloon keeper will tolerate the presence of even a Mason, who is too p09r to pay for the drinks that are destroying him. His generosity is in exact proportion to. the means of a fallen Brother to increase the size of his bank account. "No money, no drinks," is the rule. When the poor wretch is dead and no more money can be wrung from him, then the tender-hearted, licensed murderer puts on mourning for thirty days, joins in resolutions of condolence to the family he robbed of their protector and their money. All this time he is in good standing wit.h his Brethren, and must be held above reproach by them. With many of our Masons the business of saloon keeping by Masons is too sacred to allow of any interference. Like the whiskey ring in this city in other years, "It is a sacred thing." When the Grand Lodge asserts its right to drive the curse from the pale of Masonry, the out-cry against the law is simply amusing. The " vested rights" of saloon-keeping Masons are pleaded in bar of any prosecutions of those engaged in the business. They have the right to


1887.J

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destroy and ruin others, but no one has the right to stop them in their work. Masons may apologize for the wrong doing of their saloonkeeping Brethren, but none of them, who is worthy of the name of Mason, will justify the wrongs of the business. They dare not affirm that such business is Masonic, but must admit that it is unmasonic. Some in our jurisdiction admit that it is so unmasonic as to justify the Grand Lodge in forbidding the Lodges to recei ve any more of that class into the Lodges. Yet these same Brethren raise a howl against the law of the Grand Lodge which says the saloon-keeping Mason must stop his nefarious business or quit Masonry. They admit the business to be unmasonic, and thereby acknowledge that those who are engaged in it are guilty of unmasonic conduct, but they must not be touched. Such reason from bad premises, and forget that what is unmasonic for those who are out must be equally so for those who are in, especially as those who are in have taken a very solemn obligation to support and maintain the laws, which they did in order to get in. And our tender-hearted friends of the saloon keeper and their apologists, forget another thing, that, what is now Masonic has always been so. Saloon keeping is tmmasonic because it is IMMORAL. A business which is immoral once is immoral always. It has always been so. The Grand Lodge has declared that it is so. And the Grand Lodge declared thirty years ago that the J-odges must enforce the law against ALL unmasonic conduct. It was unmasonic then to sell liquor for drinking purposes, because an IMMORAL business. It was, therefore, in violation of the law of the Grand Lodge that Lodges received such tainted and immoral creatures. The complaint of the poor, persecuted saloon keeper must be against the Lodges 路which received them, and not against the law. And the Lodges which received and retained them in disregard of the mandates of the Grand Lodge will find Jordan a hard road to travel before tbis matter is settled. The Grand Lodge of Missouri declared, in 1882, that saloon keeping is a Masonic offense; by this declaration our Grand Lodge defines the quality of the business. It is nnfORAL, and the Grand Lodge has declared that the resolution of 1882 was only a specific declaration of what had always been the law, because the business of saloon keeping had always been immoral. To continue in the business thus declared to be immoral and unmasonic, is to be guilty of a willful and defiant disregard for the law. The Grand Lodge of Missouri does not tolerate that kind of temerity. When she speaks she means what she says. Bro. Parvin thinks that the action of the Grand Lodge of Missouri was in violation of Masonic comity in establishing a Lodge of Masons in the city of Mexico. The good and amiable Bro. Parvin will please tell the Grand Lodge of Missouri how it could violate Masonic comity in creating a Lodge in the Republic of Mexico, when there was


]80

Appendix.

[Oct.

no Grand Lodge in that territory. The present and existing Grand. Lodge of the Federal District of Mexico has been erected since Tohec Lodge, No. 520, was created. by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, at the Capital of old Mexico. That there were Masonic bodies in that country when we established Toltec Lodge is admitted, but there was no Grand Lodge, and none of the York Rite there. If a Grand Lodge has been formed there, which claims the right to govern that territory, the Grand Lodge of Missouri will say to its child, you had better join in with the home body, and form a part of the jurisdiction where yon are located. Bro. Parvin's method of treating the claiIDs of the "High Riters," Memphian and others, is as blunt as it is amusing. He says that the legislation of certain Grand Lodges against the" Memphian" humbug gives it a prominence that causes it to be sought after. He then said: "The skunk, if let alone, will pass you by on the other side undisturbed; but once stir him up with a long pole and you will soon be made aware of his presence in your vicinity. "Skunk" is rather strong as a figure, but this mephitic animal must be the appropriate symbol to use, from the noisome-smell the aforesaid Rite and its propagator has caused in the land. To the mind of this writer, the aforesaid propagator of the "Memphian Rite" only wanted to be kicked in order that he might have a chance to let loose a deluge of mephitic stench. Massachusetts and Illinois gave him the coveted kick, and forthwith he began to fill the air with his very offensive exhalations. Commenting on the ruling of the Mississippi Grand Master who had sanctioned the letting of the lower story of a building owned by a Lodge, to a saloon keeper, while the Lodge occupied the upper room, Bro. Parvin was as tart as this writer ever gets to be on such subjects. Hear him: It seems to us that any man having the good of Masonry at heart would have said, emphatically and at once, it is not Masonic to appropriate its rooms for such purposes as might lead its members from the path of duty and rectitude, and send them upon the down grade which universally leads to ruin. Such a question would not have embarrassed the Grand Master in other jurisdictions any length of time.

One year ago I presented my views on the same matter. The views t.hen expressed have undergone no change, except to become stronger and more intense. Those utterances are hereby reproduced as a sequel to the terse expressions of Bro. Parvin given above: The Grand Lodge of Mississippi has decided that it is not unmasonic for Masons to sell liquor. As the Grand Lodge declares the business to be not unmasonic, it allows and permits its members to do so at will. It is, therefore, a Masonic business. For what is not unmasonic must be Masonic, when a Grand Lodge legislates upon it, and declares it not unmasonic. It is Masoni-e to sell liquor, and it must be Masonic to furnish a place in which to sell liquor; and it must be equally so to receive tile rent from the saloon keeper who sells liquor in Masonic property. Thus a charity fund for widows and orphans can be created out of the proceeds arising' from the rent in this case. It must be a good thing to have such a source of revenue by which to support those whom the


l887.]

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181

saloon keeper shall widow and orphan by his" commercial business," carried on in Lodge property. The Grand Master said" there is nothing unlawful" in renting property to those whose business causes drunkenness, and which is "the vice of the age," .. the fruitful source of nearly all crimes and immorality." It would be unkind to suggest that a business" that shocks" humanity, and brings" harm to the public morality," cannot be carried on under Masonic auspices without the Fraternity being a party to the results. 'l'his would seem to be the necessary conclusion where the Lodge receives a money consideration for the use of its name and privileges. We could not thus willingly become partakers of other men's sins,

It may be added that the moral sentiment of the Masonic Fraternity in this country has reached a point where COMPRO;\llSE with the crimes of drunkard making is out of the question-compromise in such matters is sin.

Bro. Parvin gave our Missouri Proceedings, of 1886, full and kind consideration. He spoke as a filial Son would talk of a loved mother from whom he had long been separated: This is our mother Grand Lodge, and we well remember the handful of those Brethren whom we met forty and four years ago in Grand Lodge session; and of that number, so far as we know, there are but three or four surviving. The three Lodges which constituted the Grand Lodge of Missouri at its organization hailed from the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. Masonry, since its introduction into Missouri, has exerted an influence for good which cannot be measured by the flight of years nor estimated by the lapse of time. Its influence has been at once elevating. purifying and ennobling in its character, and permeated every nook and corner of that great State.

Speaking of our Grand Master Boyd, this was said: The Grand Master discusses, at somewhat unusual length, the subject of Masonic discipline. He tinds that many Lodges regard it in a very light degree, having strange ideas, he says, in reference to unmasonic conduct; but the Grand Master was equal to the emergency, and arrested several Charters because of dereliction of dllty on their part in enforcing proper discipline upon their members. He leaves it as his partillg message, " If you will have Freemasonry in the Lodges, punish those who violate or trample our laws and sacred precepts beneath their feet." The Grand Lodge is discussing in earnest the proposition to establish an industrial Masonic home, in which we hope at an early day to chronicle her entire suecess. The Address is a very practical one, devoted to the discussion of home topics, and is worthy the chief officer of a great jurisdiction. In scanning Bro. Vincil's Report as Grand Secretary, we could not help but contrast it with those of many other jurisdictions wherein the Grand Secretaries disposed of the duties of their office in a page or two, often much less. If they had as much to do. and did it as well as Bro. Vincil, they never could condense the operations of their office into two. or even fonr p~es, any more than he or some others who have a mind to work. He suggests the propnety of more vigorous measures to secure conformity with law on the part of subordinate Lodges, whose ever recurring delinquencies, with respect to making their annual returns and the payment of Grand Lodge dues, has become somewhat proverbial. .

He endorses the views of this Committee on many questions, and said, "We are glad to have such a sound and sensible jurist support our views." Concerning the "making a Mason at sight," out of an Iowa Bishop, and the criticism of this Committee last year, Bro. Parvin said: . Under the head of Pennsylvania, referring to the initiation of Right Reverend Bishop 'Perry, upon whom the degrees were conferred by Grand Master Mitchell, of that jurisdiction,' he asks: "Did the Iowa jurisdiction ever consent for one of her citizens to be made a Mason at sight in Pennsylvania?" If the' Brother would omit the words at sight, we would reply yes. Bishop Perry obtained first, the consent of the Lodges at the place of his residence, and then the consent of the Grand Master of Iowa, that he might


182

[Oct.

Appendix.

receive the degrees at the hands of Grand Master Mitchell. who was a near relative and life-long friend of his, from whose hands it was his special desire to receive the degrees, and the Masons of Iowa ~ratified him therein. They had no thought, much less knowledge, that he was to reCeIve the degrees .. at sight," under a prerogative vested in the Grand Master by the Ahiman Rezon of Pennsylvania. However, these are the ways of our Pennsylvania Brothers, and we should acquiesce therein.

Yes, "the ways of our Pennsylvania Brethren" are their own, and it is a source of joy and congratulation that their "ways" are not numerous. Iowa had no idea that her material would be worked up in such a summary manner when she gave consent for" our Pennsylvania Brothers" to have their ways. 'But Bro. Parvin cannot be followed longer. However desirable the companionship; the separation must now take place. EDWIN C. BLACKMAR, Burlington, G. M. THEODORE S. PARVIN, Cedar Rapids, G. Sec.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, 1887. The Semi-Annual Meeting was held in the city of Manchester, December 28th, 1886, for the Exemplification of the Ritual. The Ninety-eighth Annual Communication was held in the city of Concord, May 18th, 1887. M. W. Bro. 'William R. Burleigh was Grand Master; and R. W. Bro. George P. Cleaves was Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from fifty-four Lodges. There are seventysix Lodges on the roll. The membership foots up 8,174, showing a gain of thirty-five. The Address of Grand Master Burleigh covered thirteen pages, and was devoted wholly to business. He noticed the death of a number of Brethren, and .paid proper tributes to their memories. Numerous Dispensations had been granted for different purposes. A call had been made upon the Fraternity for aid in behalf of the Charleston sufferers. In response to that call, about $900 had been raised and sent to South Corolina. 'The Grand Master reported three Decisions, which were brief and to the point. They were approved by the Grand Lodge. There is nothing of general interest beyond this in the Address. RECOGNITION.

The Grand Lodge recognized the Grand Lodges of New South Wales and South Australia. Full and extended reports were made by the \


1887.J

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183

Committees on Appeals and Jurisprudence. Therp, is nothing of special interest in the business transactions of the session. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering 146 pages, was rendered for the Committee by Bro. Albert S. 路Wait. While the Report is interesting and readable, nothing more can be said of the production, as the journal of New Hampshire came to hand so late in the season, that this notice is necessarily restricted. The journal of Proceedings of Missouri, for 1886, recei ved a brief notice ofless than two p'ages. Bro. ,:y ait quoted from the Address of our Bro. Boyd; commended our Home enterprise, and spoke approvingly of the work of this Committee. As the Proceedings, now under review, came after the Report of this Committee was finished, this notice must be placed in the Addendum. Grand Master Burleigh was re-eleeted, and lives at Great Falls, and Bro. Cleaves, Grand Secretary, was re-ejected, and resides at Concord. .

VERMONT, 1887. A Special Communication was held on Bird's Mountain, August 27th, 1886, to lay the corner-stone of a Masonic monument. M. W. Bro. Marsh O. Perkins, Grand Master, presided and conducted the ceremonies. An able and very appropriate Address was delivered by Bro.'Henry H. Smith, Past Grand Master. The Ninety-fourth Annual Communication was held, June 9th, 1887, in the city of Burlington, and was presided over by M. W. Grand Master Perkins; R. ':Y. Bro. Lavant M. Read was Grand Secretary. 'I'here are about 100 Lodges and 8000 members in that jurisdiction. The representation was large from subordinate Lodges. Representatives of Twenty-four Grand Lodges were present. Bro. Henry H. Smith, the Representative of Missouri, was among the number. ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Perkins is forty pages long. It is too late in the season-being now September-to do justice to the interesting paper under consideration. He announced that the condition of the Craft in the State was healthy and prosperous. Relations with other Grand Lodges were reported as cordial and fraternal. A large increase in membership, in many of the Lodges, was reported. He stated that none of the Lodges were. encumbered with heavy debts, and that


184

Appendix.

[Oct.

all have secure, if not commodious Halls. tIe mentioned a number of the Brethren in that jurisdiction who had been called away by death. He treated at some length the difference between the Grand Lodges of Quebec and England, 'and concluded that the Grand Lodge of Vermont should endorse the action of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, which was done. He reported a number of Dispensations granted, and gave a full and complete statement of all his official acts. Grand Master Perkins presente'd seven rulings made by him during the year. They are considered sound and practical applications of Masonic principles: FINANCIAL.

The Grand Master stated that the Financial Condition of the Grand Lodge was very satisfactory. $100 had been appropriated for the relief of the earthquake sufferers in Charleston, South Carolina. 'The Grand Lodge of Vermont makes an annual appropriation in behalf of Past Grand Secretary, Bro. Hollenbeck. The Grand Master recommended that this appropriation be continued for the remainder of his life. The Grand Secretary's Report was a brief business document. The business of the Grand Lodge was transacted with facility, and shows that careful attention was given to all its interests. A resolution was adopted endorsing the action of the Grand Lodge of Quebec in its struggle with the Grand Lodge of England, and suspended all Masonic intercourse with that Grand Lodge, and all Lodges and Masons owing allegiance thereto. 'fhe Grand Lodge of Vermont disapproved of the idea of a General Grand Lodge, and contended earnestly for the separate jurisdiction of "Grand Lodges. The body positively refused to send delegates to the l\iasonic Congress at Chicago. The Grand Lodge dee1ared in favor of the Past'Master's degree as a part of the installation ceremony of a newly-elected Master. A recommendation was adopted that the Past Master's degree be conferred only in the convention of actual Past Masters, to which virtual Past Masters must not be admitted. This is drawing the lines pretty closely. A Past Grand Master's jewel was presented to Bro. Perkins, the retiring Grand Master, after the installation of his successor. The newly installed Grand Master, Bro. Hall, made the presentation address. Bro. Perkins responded in appropriate terms. CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report, covering ninety-six pages, was rendered by Bro. L. C. Butler, Past Grand Master. It is in keeping with his former efforts. Bro. Butler is one of the close observers and pure thinkers of the times, whose works, as a reviewer, place him high among the Masonic writers of the age. Missouri, for 1886, received a very fraternal notice. Copious


• 1887.]

. Appendix.

185

extracts were made from the Address of our Grand Master Boyd. Bro. Butler commended, in appropriate terms, our enterprise in Missouri connected with the 'Widows and Orphans' Home. He was kind in his mention of this Committee. The lateness of the hour at which the Vermont journal came to hand, prevents further notice or comment. Freemasonry is safe in the ha.nds of such leaders as direct its affairs In the jurisdiction of Vermont . Bro. Alfred A. Hall was elected Grand Master; Bro. Lavant M. Read was re-elected Grand Secretary. His address is Bellows Falls. Bro. L. C. Butler was continued as Committee on Correspondence.

«JON«JLlJSION. The work for 1887 is now complete. The following Grand Lodge Proceedings have passed under review.. Those not included in the list failed to come to hand in time for notice. Here is the liHt reviewed: ALABAMA, 1886. ARIZONA, 1886. ARKANSAS, 1886. BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1886. CALIFORNIA, 1886. CANADA, 1886. COLORADO, ·1886. CONNECTICUT,1887. DAKOTA, 1887. DELA'VARE, 1886. DISTRICT OF COJ~UMBIA, 1886. FLORIDA,1887. GEORGIA, 1886. ILLINOIS, 1886. INDIAN TERRITORY, 1886. IOWA,1887. KANSAS, 1887. KENTUCKY, 1886. LOUISIANA, 1887. MANITOBA, 1887. MARYLAND, 1887. MASSACHUSETTS, 1886. MICHIGAN, 1887. MINNESOTA,1887. MISSISSIPPI, 1887.

MONTANA,1886. NEBRASKA,' 1886. NEVADA, 1886. NEW BRUNSWICK, 1887. NEW HAMPSHIRE, 1887. NEW JERSEY, 1887. NEW MEXICO, 1886. NEW YORK, 1887. NORTH CAROLINA, 1887. OHIO, 1886. OREGON, 1886 & 1887. PENNSYLVANIA, 1886. PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, 1886. QUEBEC, 1887. RHODE ISLAND, 1886• • SOUTH CAROLINA, 1886. TENNESSEE, 1887. TEXAS, 1886. UTAH,1887. VERMONT,1887. VIRGINIA, 1886. WASHINGTON, 1886. WEST VIRGINIA, 1886. WISCONSIN, 1887.


â&#x20AC;˘ 186

Appendix.

[Oct.

It will be seen from the foregoing list that the Proceedings of fifty Grand Lod~es have passed under review. Some disappointment is felt by this Committee at not receiving the Proceedings of the Grand Lodges of Nova Scotia, Idaho, Maine,and Wyoming. This Report has been delayed, hoping that these journal~ would be received in time for consideration. l<""'urther delay is out of the question. This work is rounded up amid the gathering beauties of autumn.

Having passed through an intensely torrid season, with many and excessive labors crowding upon brain and muscle, this Committee is weary. A sense of rolief is felt on reaching the end of another survey of the great field of American Freemasonry. It is the belief of this Committee that true Freemasonry is advancing steadily, and, for the mOot part, satisfactorily, in this country. Two phases of Masonic work challenge the admiration and cheer the hopes of this writer. There is a Grand moral reform going on in the ranks of our Brotherhood. To one who stands on the watch-towers of our Masonic Zion, the outlook, as to the moral elevation of the Fr.aternity, is more cheering than at any former period. The moral sense of the Fraternity is being educated, developed and raised to a higher plane than heretofore. It is not necessary to 'particularize in what respects this is so; but a healthy, moral tone is observable all along the lines. This may not be t.he case every where, but it is', .to the mind of this writer, the rule: It is the belief of Uiis Committee, that the time has come, in the history of our Brotherhood, when the demand is for more morality and purer l~ves. As ¡char-. aeter is the standard by which men should be measured, and a proper passport in life, so in Masonry-character must become the essential commodity in life. If Masonry is anything, it is morality. Divested of this it becomes a mockery. Next in importance comes that grand factor, which must distinguish 'Masonry as an institution, called charity. Studying, as I have for years, the movements of the Masonic Fraternity,and observing the different directions in which. the resources of the Craft have been turned, the conviction is fixed, that at no period in the history of American Freemasonry has the subject of charity been so prominent among us as now. The Fraternity is giving a proper direction to their energies and means. This is shown in a large number' of the Grand Lodge Jurisdictions of the country, by the efforts' made


187

1887.J

to establish charitable institutions for the benefit of the helpless and the dependent. It is the opinion of this writer that on this line of effort there will be a grander movement and a more vigorous effort made in coming years than ever before in our history. I close this review with unshaken confidence in the principles of Freemasonry, because those principles are fraught with incalculable benefit to the race. Humanity needs Freemasonry. The world would be poorer without it. The Institution has its Mission. That Mission is for the world's elevation, improvement and happiness. With these views this Committee throws his banner" with renewed hope, to the breezes fresh and invigorating, on which he emblazens his motto in burning letters, "Morality and Charity." Fraternally,

JOHN D. VINCIL, Committee.


188

Appendix.

[Oct.

ADDRESSES OF GRAND SECRETARIES.

State. Alabama Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Cuba Delaware District of Columbia Dakota Florida

Ge~rgia

Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Indian rrerritory Kansas Kentucky Louisiana :l\1aine Massachusetts Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New York

Name.

Address.

Daniel Sayre Montgomery. Fay Hempstead Little Rock. Geo. J. Roskruge Tucson. Alexander G. Abell.. San Francisco. Edward C. Parrnelee Pueblo. Joseph K. Wheeler Hartford. Jose F. Pellon Havana. William S. Hayes Wilmington. Wm. R. Singleton Washington. Charles T. McCoy Aberdeen. De Witt C. Dawkins Jacksonville. A. M. Wolihin Macon. J. H. Wickersham Boise City. Loyal L. Munn Freeport. William H. Smythe Indianapolis. 路 Theodore S. Parvin Cedar Rapids. Rev. J. S. Murrow A-to-ka, C. N. Jobn H. Brown V\Tyandotte. Hiram Bassett.. Louisville. James C. Bachelor, M. D New Orleans. Ira Berry Portland. Sereno D. Nickerson Boston. Jacob H. Medairy Baltimore. William P. Innes , : Grand Rapids. A. T. C. Pierson St. Paul. J ohn L. Power Jackson. Cornelius Hedges Helena. William R. Bowen Omaha. C. N. Noteware Carson City. George P. Cleaves Concord. Joseph H. Hough Trenton. Edward M. L. Ehlers New York.


Appendix.

1887.J New Mexico North Carolina Ohio Oregon Pennsyl vania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington 'Vest Virginia 'Viseonsin Wyoming British Columbia Canada England Egypt Ireland Manitoba New Brunswick Nova Seotia Prince Edward Island Quebec Scotland

~

Alpheus A. Keen Donald 'V. Bain John D. Cald well F. J. Babcock Michael Nisbet Edwin Baker Charles Inglesby J ohn Frizzell.. T. W. Hudson Christopher Diehl. L. M. Read William B. Isaacs Thomas M. Reed Geo. W. Atkinson Jno. W. Laflin John H. Symons Ed ward C. Neufelder J. J.l\lason Shadwell Clerke F. F. Oddi. Samuel B. Oldham 'Vrn. G. Scott Edwin J. Wetmore Benjamin Curren Geo. W. Wakeford J ohn H. Isaacson D. Murray Lyon

189 Las Vegas. Raleigh. Cincinnati. Salem. Philadelphia. Providence. Charleston. Nashville. Houston. Salt Lake City. Bellows Falls. Richmond. Olympia. Wheeling. Milwaukee. Laramie. Victoria. I-Iamilton, Onto London. Cairo. Dublin. Winnepeg. St. John. Halifax. Charlottetown. Montreal. Edinburg.


Appendix.

190

[Oct.

REPRESENTArrlVES APPOINTED NEAR OTHER GRAND LODGES BY THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI.

Stnte. Alabama ~: Arkansas Arizona British Columbia Canada Connecticut Chili ~:~ Colorado California Colon:Cuba Delaware District of Columbia Dakota Egypt England Florida Georgia Iowa Illinois Idaho Indiana Indian Territory Ireland Kentucky Kansas , J~ouisiana

Maine ~ Minnesota Michiga~ 路

Name. Daniel Sayre .John J. Sumpter Thos. H. McMullin Rob't Burns McMicking James K. Kerr George Lee Jose Mondalodo Ed. C. Parmelee Alexander G. AbelI... Edwardo Loredo Jacob Moore 路Wm. R. Singleton Thomas H. Brown F. F .. Od'di Braxton Baker De Witt C. Dawkins J. Emmett Blackshear N. R. Parvin Jerome R. Gorin Jonas W. Brown William Hacker John H. Dailllenberg Edward Linahan H. B. Grant Albert D. McConaughy John A. Stevenson : Ira Berry : : Henry L. Carver J. C. Coffinbury

. Address. Montgomcry~

Hot Springs. Phcenix. Victoria. Toronto. New Haven. Valparaiso. Georgetown. San Francisco. Havana. Georgetown. Washington. Sioux Falls. Cairo. London. Monticello. Macon. Cedar Rapids. Decatur. ldaho City. Shelbyville. Flint. Dublin. Louisville. Atchison. New Orleans. Portland. St. Paul. Kalamazoo.


1887.] Mississippi ! Massachusetts Maryland Montana Manitoba New Brunswick New York New IIampshire Nova Scotia Nevada Nebraska New Mexico Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Quebec Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont.. Virginia Wyoming Territor'y Washington Territory West Virginia Wisconsin

Appendix. Vv. P. Bouton J ohn K. Hall.. John S. Berry 'Vm. Davenport James Munroe Wm. F. Bunting JohnStewart Chas. G. Connor J. Wilberforce Longley John D. Hammond J. N. Wise W. 'V. Griffin Chas. Stroud .8. F. Chadwick J. Simpson Africa H. L. Robinson Cyrus M. Vanslyck : Charles Inglesby Deering J. Roberts, M. D Geo. H~ Bringhurst P. L. Williams Henry H. Smith William B. Isaacs Edgar P. Snow Thomas M. Reed : William J. Bates, Sr Henry L. Palmer

191

~

Canaan. Boston. Baltimore. Helena. Winnepeg. Saint John. New York City. Exeter. Halifax. Carson. Plattsffiouth. Santa Fe. Sandusky. Portland. Philadelphia. Waterloo. Providence. Charleston. Kashville. Houston. Salt Lake City. Rutland. Richmond. Cheyenne. Olympia. 'Vheeling. Milwaukee.


192

Appendix.

[Oct.

REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED BY OTHER GRAND LODGES NEAR THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI.

State.

Alabama Arkansas Arizona British Columbia California Connecticut Canada Colorado Colon-Cuba Dakota Delaware District of Columbia Egypt Florida Georgia Idaho " Iowa Illinois Indian Territory Ireland Indiana Kentucky Kansas Louisiana Maine Montana Minnesota Manitoba ~cw Hampshire

Name.

James E. Cadle James H. Bethune Robert E. Collins Theodore Brace John E. Ryland Reuben Barney Xenophon Rylap.d Wm. N. Loker "\Vm. H. Mayo Joseph S. Browne James P. 'Vood Isaac M. Abraham.. : John D. Vincil Edward Spencer A. M. Crow J ohn R. Parson Fred W. Mott Martin Collins : P. G. Woods John W. Luke Asa Maddox William E. Robinson Jack P. Richardson Wm. H. Mayo Xenophon Ryland S. M. Davidson Samuel H. Saunders vVm. R. Stubblefield Alex. M. Dockery

Address.

:

King City. Charlcston. St. Louis. Jefferson City. Lexington. Chillicothe. Lexington. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Joseph. New London. Harrisonville. St. Louis. St. Louis. Kansas City. St. Louis. St. I.Jouis. St. Louis. Versailles. St. Louis. Kansas City. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Lexington. Washington. Otterville. St. Louis. Gallatin.


1887.J

Appendix.

New York Noah M. Givan New Jersey Charles F. Leavitt North Carolina Geo. E. 'Yalker Nebraska Chas. F. Vogel Nevada : Seymour Hoyt Jay L. 1'orrey New Mexico Nova Scotia Geo. R. Hunt.. Ohio Henry L. Rogers Lee A. Hall.. Oregon Pennsylvania Robert F. Stevenson Quebec Rev. C. C. 'Woods, D. D Rhode Island Stephen B. Potter Scotland Thomas E. Garrett. South Carolina V. O. Saunders Tennessee Chas. B. Stark Utah B. H. Ingram Vermont.. 'Vm. M. Williams Virginia John D. Vincil. Texas Allan McDowell 'Yyoming Territory James 'V. Boyd Wisconsin Rufus E. Anderson West Virginia Wm. E. Whiting 'Yashington Territory Stephen Chapman

G. L. Ap.-13.

193 St. Louis. Springfield. Bonne Terre. St. Louis. Greenfield. St. Louis. :V\Tarrensburg. St. Louis. St. Louis.' Kansas City. Nevada. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Sedalia. Boonville. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Joseph. Hannibal. Kansas City. Bloomfield.


Appendix.

194

[Oct.

DEATHS. REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, OCTOBER

No. oj Lodge.

Name oj PaTty.

Wm. P. Hughey. S. W. Hutchinson. James Hewish. George T. King. James Mann. Joseph Lamothe. 3. Henry Schwaner. Wm. Letfman. M. B. Crane. 4. Charles E. Rathey. 7. J. M. 'Fryar. 9. Wm. C. Reinholdt. 13. J. R. Atkins. 16. John M. Klepper. 17. R. W. Bryant. 19. D. A. McKamey. George C. Brown. Lewis Rose. 22. H. Jones. J. M. Wells. 23. J. F. Acord. 25. Samuel Gaty. N. F. Hickman. J. H. l\lcLean. M. A. 'Volfiuger. 28. H. W. Crosby. 30. John S. Minor. 34. George Waklin. '1'. D. Wilkerson. 35. J. C. W. Lindsey. 38. Isaac Bundren. P. P. Dowling. 39. B. D. Kendrick. 40. G. H. May. 41. S. J. Pulliam. 42. J. H. Mitchell. 43.• J. 1\1. Mart~·ney. 1.

No. oj Lodge. 44. 46. 47. 53. 55. 56. 57. 59. 60. 69. 72.

76. 77. 78. 79.

80. 82. 83. 84. 89. 92. 93. 97. !l!l.

101.

1, 1887.

Name oj paJ·ty.

C. B. Stevens. J. Keeton. William K. Wood. M. Bowman. J. W. Piper. John B. White. V. P. Bernard. T. G. Whaley. J. D. Wyatt. E. 1\1. Pierce. William Isgrigg. J R. Chapman. A. O. Sanders. G. W. McCarty. J. W. Perry. J. H. Morris. John J. Upchurch. W. 1'. Crabtree. Ebenezer Blackiston. T..J. Henley. C. Kohlund. Peter Petersen. J. F. Ryan. W. H. Grenalds. J. B. Wilcox. George n. Greenleaf. J. L. Roberts. James Witcher. Peter Livengood. J. T. Bell. Z. Block. J. V. Ohlhousen. Isaac S. Phillebaum. Isaac Richmond. Josephus Kelley. .J. E. Johnson. J. T. Leigh.


1887.J

â&#x20AC;˘

No. of Name oj Party. Lodge. 101. Nelson Brown. 102. S. P. Hardgrove. John :McDuffey. 105. John L. Rowlison. C. A. Allgair. A. Woll. 108. H. R. Suppie. 111. R. W. Riggs. R. O. Cascadin. F. S. Spooner. John A. Weberton. 114. George W. Riggins. 116. '1'. B. Stubbs.! Wt Wllliam Tingey. 119. August Racine. 120. J. W. Mothershead. 121. Simon LowDen. A. Lessler. H. G. Vasel. 122. John Abel. John Matbews. 127. Chas. Eambree. 131. Frank Farnsworth E. B. SII!ith. 132. J. L. Creegan. ]33. E. Gallagher. 135. J. K. Farr. 142. H. Harrison. 143. Charles Hamilton. 146. John Teter. 149. Fred. Zeeler. 153. 7,. L. Wilcox. 154. J. T. Rudd. J. T. Lafon. 155. Isaac Crumpacker. 157. John Y. Bird. Harry C. Burnum. 158. Frank HCllderson. 160. John A. Christian. U. S. Anderson. 161. T. Mathis. 162. J. D. Bowen. ]63. James Williams. Henry Miller. 164. John Holmes. ]68. T. P . .McMurry. 172. Burton Edwards. 176. Robert Lafont. T. C. Hardwick. E. Meatt. 177. D. P. Killian. J. C. White. 179. J. J. Mathews.

Appendix. No. of Lodge. 179. 181.

188. 189. 192. 194. 195. 196. 197. 203. 205. 209. 212. 213. 21<1. 215. 218.

o

220. 221. 223. 231. 232. 236. 237. 240. 243. 244.. 246. 247. 249. 251. 252. 256. 262.

263. 264. 265.

266. 267.

195 Name of Party.

Aug. Tcidman. John Selinger. S. Dodd. S. N. Boyd. L. Tyburst. John Coppedge. J. S. Su1livan. J. D. Elmore. Charles Payne. J. E. Rains. James Cordell. C. H. Judd. J. E. McComb. D. V. Harrison. E. M. Spencer. JOIlll Moore. M. C. Whittaker. M. J. l'deBride. J. S. French. G. M. M~Kinney. U. S. Karnes. A. Hecker. William Hayden. J. S. Crain. O. S. Harris. 'V. E. Carey. Creed T. Archer. Thomas James. A. D. Jaynes. J. M. Hutsonpeller. Jesse White. M. D. Blakey. }I~red. B. Holmes. John A. Gilfillian. Charles Cook. Oliver Wood. R. M. Jones. C. W. Bell. T. L. Hewitt. E. B. North. T. K.David. Frank Harder. G. W. Schrameyer. W. C. Harlan. M. C. McMellan. W. W. Miller. T. O. Sittington. W. B. Moody. John Robinson. Thomas S. Patton. A. W. Tapscott. Charles C. Schmide. John M. Harklerodes.


196 No.oj Lodge.

Appendix. Name oj Party.

268. .J. L. Wood.

_ George R. Gooding. R. Dunnington. 271. J. M. Henry. 278. H. Forsyth. 281. W. S. Tipton. 282. H. H. Smith. S. Jacobs. 287. J. W. Barrett. Perry Nichols. 291. Samuel Ennis. 29t. George Carpenter. G. M. Dodge. Eli Meek. 295. John Maupin. 297. N. J. Bass. 298. F. M. Stevens. 299. S. E. Colaflowcr. 301. V. Korrell. 303. C. R. Scott. D. W. MitchelL 305. E. A. Pllyne. 310. :Mile.<; IIfainord. B. F. Shields. 313. S. H. McCullo~h. 316. Chss. Treadenburg. Peter Baker. Wallace Smith. 319. W. T. Ashby. S. Hamilton. 323. M. A. O路Keeffe. 324. E. A. McGofflll. 327. J. R. Thoman. 329. E. C. Tibbetts. 331. G. G. Busse. P. H. Mears. 334. O. D. Lawson. 335. L. Hillery. 338. J. P. Haynes. A. Young. 340. William Case. 345. III. W. Stafford. 349. Samuel Smart. 351. M. Newman. 352. III. Kelley. A. Duncan. J. VIr. Robertson. 354. C. G. Bridges. 357. 1. Howard. 360. J. D. S. Dryden. A. McDowell. F. A. Bacon. W. E. Bent.

No. oj Lodge.

[Oct. Name oj Pm路ty.

F. F. Logan. John W. Mortimer. 363. J. E. Roberts. 366. J. J. Kennedy. 367. John Cunningham. 369. A. G. Joplin. 375. John Moore. 3i1. Charles Brittner. 382. A. G. Cook. 383. J. N. Lansdown. 384. W.C. Toler. 386. Daniel Gloyd. 388. Henry Waid. 389. M. Rall~. 392. S. Lane. Thomas McMinn. 399. A. A. Newland. 400. James Ross. W. M. Kirkpatrick. 403. J. H. Wilkinson. 404. R. E. Hill. 406. R. C. Allen. N. M. Floyd. Joseph Harris. 413. H. F. Simons. 414. H. P. Crawford. 424. W. L. Kieth. G. W. Guyton. 425. S. L. Griffin. 路429. John 1. Haines. R. A. Hatcher. 411. W.S. Nunn. U. McGuire. 443. B. F. Covington. 446. J. III. Daughtrey. 438. , W. C. Wrightsman. T. R. Caton. A. J. Davis. 452. D. L. Walker. 453. G. W. Friend. 4ii5. Joseph Dill. 456. R. H. Knettle. John H. Stephens. 462. J. F. Wilfley. G. W. Edmonston. 463. N. J. Walker. 470. F. D. Snyder. 476. W. S. Thorpe. 478. W. R. Garrison. John Rautledge. 482. H. C. Wilson. 484. Robert Street. 491. J. E. Wells. 360.


Appendix.

1887.] No. oj Lodge.

Name oj Party.

493. William Beach. A. J. Jones. John Berry. 497. Edward Kelley. 500. J. D. Feurt. " \\'illiam Grant.

No. oj Lodge.

197 Name oj Party.

508. William Carson. 513. John C. Naatz. 515. John E. Clark. 524. P. P. EthertoI!' 525. Hiram Suits.


198

[Oct.

Appendix.

SUSPENSIONS FOR NON-PAYMENT 'OF DUES.

REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, OCTOBER

No. of Lodge.

Name of Party.

1. William M. Frazer. J. S. Foukes. J. N. Halfied. A. F. Berrier. Daniel Wheatly. John J. Collins. John Hewitt. F. Matthews. 2. P. Rosse!. 3. Thomas Lewis. Charles Carrillon. T. E. Roberts. C. L. W. Krenser. M. J. Meyer. J, T. Sode. S. L. Weyl. 'William Otting. 4. H. Fiscus. M. P. Hensley. John Biles. 5. Samuel Woods. M.1\IcKay. J. W. Copeland. J. H. Fairm.an. 9. J. K. Dalmas. J. D. Hampsher. E. F. Osborn. E. O. Ryan. J. W. Wrenn. \\'. M. Dean, J. R. Harris. Ch. F. Holmes. John A. Foss. A. L. Skidmore. W. O. Van Blarcom. 10. I. L Farris. H. King.

No. of Lodge.

Name of Pm路ly.

10. B. F. Rire. 15. J. A. Bradford. G. A. Chapman.

17. 20. 22.

28.

29.

30.

35.

1, 1887.

F. B. Creekmore. J. W. Drummons. B. F. Kenney. W. F. Richardson. S. H. Riggs. J. T. West. J. W. Embs. L. M. Price. H. G. Funk. L. Ellison. John Eaton. .J. Martin. John Hill. 1\1. L. Pix. Eugene Warren. Wm. A. Munge. George Munckton. G. Halt. W. H. Humphrey. E. C. Hovely. W. W. Palmer. T. P. Wheeler, John English. G. W. Jones. G. W. Payne. G. W. Leford. C. H. Lafever. K Blackley. D. Coahran. S.Ballew. Wm. Fryett. J. 1\1. Higgans. W. K. Johnson. H. S. MeCum.


No. oj Lodge.

::l5.

36.

37.

38. 40.

46.

48.

49.

52. 53. G5. G7.

60.

62.

66.

199

Appendix.

1887.] Na71/R- oj Party.

F. M. McKee. A. R. Patton. J. N. Truax. W. J. Givens. J. H. O'Brien. R. E. Shaw. L. J. Beck, J. A. Houseman. Thomas Mahannay. Wm. Hamby. F. L. Hartman. R. C. Phipps. J. T. Richards. J, R. Splete. B. II. Ball. G. H. Walker. J. W. Wray. H. B. Allen. E. C. Buckner. G. S. Maddox . .T. A. McFarlane. R. W. Main. G. F. Miller. R. H. Sullins. .T. C. Devers. P. P. Greason. M. G. Harris. G. W. Mitchell. H. Emery. W. T. Stroud. S. Anderson. Christian Plank. J. S. Frazier. John J. Berry. W. D. Fortune. E. Happy. H. Happy. C. D. Sayre. D. H. Quesenberry. R. W. Redgell. G. W. Stennett. N. P. Warren. J. L. Harrison. W. R. Ballinger. J. B. Adams. J. W. F. Carner. J. T. House. G. W. Marriett. James McLain. J. Hooper. C. J;, Newton. John Anderson. M. W. Bumpass.

No. oj Lodge.

66.

67.

71.

73. 76.

77. 78.

79.

83.

87.

Name oj Party.

H. Bumpass. J. E. Benson. H. Eikerman. H. Greshlle. Paul Jenke. W. H. Maxwell. C. Mosby. J. P. Scott. J. O. Allen. D. Bently. S. D. Cochran. .J. M. L. Haun. C. T. Hopper. H. Q. Martin. C. M. Patterson. E. D. Hash. E. W. Slusher. R. S. Shaw. B. M. Danford. J. W. Allen. E. H. Lytle. A. L. H. Crenshaw. James T. Darnell. A. Hoover. H. Rummel. C. G. Peacock. J. B. Toler. S. T. Harris. J. B. DeBenardt. H. C. Vaughn. J. B. Howard. H. J. Seip. J. W. Vance. J. E. Wade. .J. J. Gibbons. W. A. Harropp. J. M. Johnson. A. Owens. A. Wiles. N. H. Wilmot. H. B. Younger. F. C. Green. G. W. Mence. J. H. Tullock. John Bohannon. G. W. Coiner. C. N. Griffith. W. N..Jopes. J. F. Jackson. J. R. Jeffreys. A. Kennedy. N. C. Mead. J. M. Pickell.


200 No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 87. S. N. Simpson. 89. E. J. Broaddus. O. S. Darlington. W. T. Foster. J. H. Nason. 92. B. F. Parsons. 93. R. H. Whitelaw. 95. W. A. Vaughn. 97. H. C. Rose. William Waltz. ]02. John Bose. W. Claybrook. J. R. Goodding. J. S. Goodding. Ben. Howell. J. D. Holderby. C. P. R. Ross. D. D. Richards. J. H. Simpson. S. P. Thayer. 104. A. Berry. 1. N. Crouther. W. A. Dennie. T. B. Lester. G. G. Moore. G. W. Tindall. James Ward. J. E. Wiss. T. J. Hamilton. 106. W. lIf. Bostaph. 110. M. Binam. 117. A. W. Anthony. G. A. Blanchard. W. 1. Boud. P. M. Boud. Jas. Calfee. A.M.Purl. Lewis Walters. A. Wear. â&#x20AC;˘J. S. Wilcoxson. W. S. Gibbs. Lewis Stoddard. .T. O. Todd. Daniel Williams. O. A. Williams. 121. Herman Kollmorga C. Laesig. 122. Jones McGee. 129. J. J. Smith. J. Clark. Wm. Luellen. 145. J. J. Wallis. 147. D. K. Elder.

Appendix. No. oj Lodge.

[Oct. Mame 0ifPar ty.

1

147. C.Homburger. E. T. Ingle. C. A. Seaton. Chas. Watson. 149. H. J. Armstrong. Thomas H. Bayliss. S. E. Ingram. Geo. F. Maitland. J. G. Russell. R. M. Sparks. 152. J. C. Brown. W. C. Brown. E. M. Easley. J. E. Long. J. C. Moulder. J. M. Russell, 156. Robert McDow. F. J. Hogans. A. Henshaw. R. S. Martin. H. H. Rice. 161. B. F. Bass. A. E. Grubb. J. T. Matlock. W. P. White. 163. W. S. McKim. 175. J. R. Jones. ,176. John Ling. N. J. Walker. 179. W. Bergman. H. Camien. J. W. Nowlan. F. Weston. 185. A. Berger. Thos. Foster. A.1\'1. Vedder. M. A. Wyatt. Wm. Roark. 186. J. B. Davis. 188. James Givan . Jos. Lesem. Isaac Shuppert. Henry Davis. W. '1'. Bolling. J. M. Lesem. Wm. Foley. J. A. E. Simmons. 189. R. P. Bean. F. B. Hutson. C. F. Knight. John A. Read. J. B. Johnson. D. Lacey.


1887.J No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 189. F. Sticker. J. A. Gore. 193. D. K. 'Morton. K. P. Withers. J. L. Baldwin. C. L. Harris. 195. C. A. Milliken. J. T. Odor. E. C. Hixon. 196. M. Graham. 197. B. F. Blackmore. W. C. Brooks. W. K. Coffee. H. Hall. Chas. Pool. M. H. Patrick. D. S. Thomas. Julius Moas. John B. White. D. H. Wilson. 214. J. M. Cannon. v\r. E. Minton. David Stallard. G. M. Williams. 218. W. E. Huppert. Thos. Kelley. R. R. Southard. O. Hubble. R. G. Rutler. H. S. Lindsley. H. Hermelink. H. C. Giteau. 220. William Potter. 227. D. R. Crockett. P. Chappell. 231. L. B. Chamberlain. L. J. Dryden. John Hutcherson. 233. S. P. Hornback. 237. J. M. A. Vaughn. R. R. Roberts. 238. D. T. Fitzpatrick. 241. H. L. Kingsbury. James Boyse. O. T. Cottle. .John W. Redmond. Thomas E. Young. C. A. Tripp. 243. E. E. Crandall. 'l'hos, Farwell. J. R. Fleming. Wm. Fitzgerzald. S. M. Pearman.

Appendix. No. oj Lodge. 243. 244.

245.

246. 247.

249.

252.

254.

254.

255.

256.

路201 Name oj l'm路ty.

Geo. C. Betts. Jas. Barbe. J. A. Dawkins. Chas. Eads. J. A. Fraker. J. N. Arnest. Geo. Brown. C. Larkin. 1. F. Yemky. J. P. Walker. S. 8. Nowlin. B. T. Gordon. J. Buzzard. Eo E. Carnes. D. M. Conway. E. E. Ebert. G. H. Edwards. J. P. Foster. J. E. Moore. Job Ratcliff. 'V. V. Carpenter. D. R. Fullen. D. W. Mansur. John 1. Mansur. C. W. Pulliam. L. M. Summers. S. P. Gunter. T. J. Glandow. M ..J. Weddle. W. M. Cassity. T. M. Cuppy. Perry Cheathem. L. R. Carpenter. Robt. Hill. E. A. Henry. J. E. Holcombe. J. C. McConnell. B. F. Rosamond. Mike Strickler. Jos. Wade. John N. Yates. J. F. Acre. Jos. Brown. W. E. Campbell. J. M. Justice. Geo. W. Lock. B. R. Phillips. L. F. Rawdon. Frank Rawdon. Jesse Turner. S. C. Waits. J. A. Eddy. Charles Metzger.


D

202 No.oj Name oj Pm路ty. Lodge. 256. D. B. Veazy. T. A. Warne. 259. E. Mott. R. II. Booth. J. I. Hill. 26i. James Connolly. Frank J. Conway. H. C. Dunne. J. B. Hesser. Fred. Julian. Charles H. Lunday. H. E. Metzger. W. K. Patrick. Daniel Phillips. Alex. Thompson. E. Wiseheart. 268. .I. F. L. Branham. 271. B. S. Norbury. W. S. Norfleet. B. F. Partridge. 274. W. P. Greenlee. Jos. Gray. 277. Jas. Younger. 278. J. W. Williams. 280. Richard Cecil. 281. William Tipton. 293. J. C. Reynolds. .J. H. Foster. W. J. Tanner. B. E. Reese. Allen South. George Boyer. W. T. Renfro. 296. Thomas Potter. L. Lowry. A. Harrima.n. 298. William Berry. W. R. Barnett. Geo. W. Tallant. D. S. Wright. Geo. H. Yount. 299. J. S. Lewis. Geo. Ruck. Wm. Long. B. F. Burker. G. C. }{anla. J. Miller. S. Hartman. S. S. Girard. R. A. Moor. C. W. Parker. .J. A. Kiel. T. B. Murray.

Appendix. No. oj Lodge. 299.

301. 303.

305.

306.

307. 311.

323. 324. 32i.

331. 339.

340. 345. 346. 350. 351.

360.

.[Oct. Name oj PaTty.

N. C. Spickert. J. T.Collins. T. B. Wilson. Val. Schwartz. John Robison. C. M. Brown. Jos. Davis. J. M. Herren. W. Hopkins. J. M. Linn. Thomas Lowey. A. W. Murray. A. R. Patterson. W. B. Randolph. John Scott. G. M. Tucker. E. S. Weyand. J. Bruner. 1. N. Hill. S. M. Hancock. Clay Sea. J. G. Wiles. A. J. Gupton. M. Arnold. Wm: Jefferods. Richard Dalton. S. G. Truitt. A. V. Cutler. A. Netherton. P. J. Cohen. Geo. White. T ..J. Rogers. J. D. Washington. T. D. Mackey. Wm. Ingold. Geo. E. King. William M. Dickson. G. B. Spratt. C. L. Banning. J. M. Waldren. Thos. Waldren. T. S. Turner. J. H. Farmer. S. C. Price. J. W. Poole. J. C. M. Young. J. H. McHenry. Charles Shrieves. M. Shannon. A. Shannon. T. S. Baldwin. James Coff. C. H. Cottnam.


1887.J No. of Name of Party. Lodge. 360. H. L. Couch. A. K. Dunn. T. M. Finney. A. W. Forster. 1'. J. Harvey. W. D. Heron. S. W. Hoyle. J. R. Johnson. V. J. Mathews. A. W. Mitchell. W. T. Nkholson. L. L. Ordway. H. H. Richardson. D.P. Rowland. W. M. Samuel. A. O. Terry. J. S. Thomas. 362. J. H. Taylor. 363. Ira Alexander. 368. J. J. Berry. Luke Gage. S. A. Gilmore. J. S. McCran. S. J .. McCran. G. W. Potter. Henry Rogers. B. M. Wilcox. 371. J. W. Bradley. Walter Bown S. O. Camp. C. B. Sanders. Nelson Talley. 374. A. Bigelow. D. B. Owens. Robt. Price. Wm. Allen. 377. Samuel Shawver. J. C. ~1:inor. Jos. Ward. 381. W. Sharp. Benton lIouser. J. B. White. James Brown. J. A. McClain. 382. W. \\'. McDaniels. R. D. Davis. 383. Henry McCary. M. C. Messer. T. J. Pierce. S. W. Shaw. 39:2. William Sams. 396. J. W. Hogg. 409. David Burton.

Appendix. No. of Name Of Party. Lodge. 409. B. F. Hetrick. C. M. Miller. J. W. Stewart. 411. John A. Hensley. John T. Pope. J. L. Hart. 412. Wm. Hutchinson. G. H. Gebhart. Charles Gould. A. S. Prather. R. M. Raymond. 413. Frank Riley. John Grcfiey. C. Kalber. 416. J. G. Taubold. W. O. Schwab. T. T. Murray. F. Westerman. 424. 'V. C. Conoway. G. W. Crump. William Hutchins. John Jenkins. J. W. Patterson. John F. Thurman. Wm. Johnson. John F. Wimbush. Thomas Rosevier. 425. C. S. Yount. 429. Wm. J. Inzer. 430. Robt. Meyers. Phil Smith. 438. G.P. Clardy. .los. Duncan. T. G. Lawrence. 443. R. L. Miller. C. M. W. Pape. 444. G. W. Pigg. E. T. Darton. 450. J. B. Sport. D. M. Green. G. L. Love. 451. J. W. Sullard. T. J. Meyers. L. H. Callaway. Samuel Duffield. Jas. Wilson. G. S. IT路oss. H. H. Hambling. F. B. Morris. 453. L. Ellison. W. H. Horton. H. R. H. McCanly. J. M. Thompson.

203


204

Appendix.

No. of Lodge. 455. 459. 460. 461.

470.

Name of Pm路ty.

John Crowley. John Robinson. Joseph Davis. H. L. Feichtenkam. Herman Gehlsizer. John Hartwell. A. J. Letner. John M. Miller. 1. N. Albin. S. J. Gillis. A. W. Michaels. Eo P, Sampson. H.P. Wolf.

S. T. Teats. S. Wagner. 473. W. C. Wombles. 474. B. L. Cook. Lewis Sanders. 476. J. Bumgarner. C. Baird. W. Gibbs. -Hughes. J. H. Long. 471.

No. of Lodge.

[Oct. Name of Party.

478. J. P. Buzzard. W. C. Ferrell. W. C. Keochler. 481. 1. T. Elliott. J. H. IIarp. H. C. Cashman. W. A. King. 483. Wm. Green. James O'Tillery. M. Koons. .Tas. H. Williams. N. Drummond. Silas Combs. C. C. mevins. 484. .T. W. Way. 501. W. B. Vert. 506. H. N. Klepper. Alex. Servite. 513. John N. Starke. 519. Saml. Scantling. 526. James M. Daniels. 529. John C. Bridges.


Appendix.

1887.]

205

SUSPENSIONS FOR UNMASONIC CONDUCT.

REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, OCTOBER

No. of Lodge.

Name of paJ路ty.

54. Hugo Biller. 101. J. T. Mallott. 142. Josiah Godbey.

176. Robert Frazier. G. T. Price. 188. John S. Bush. E. A. Smith. 197. 1. N. Lamb. 210. II. C. Payton. 220. Frank Shannon. 264. W. E. Borthick. 322. Neal Smith.

No. of Lodge.

1, 1887.

Name of Party.

327. S. R. Moore. 332. Jos. West. 382. H. C. Murphy. 412. Edwin Mason. 439. T. F. Henslee. 449. W. H. Brown. 455. H. T. Chitwood. 459. J. l\f. Wamack. 461. B. F. Barcroft. 515. R. C. Viles. 51S. C. C. Richards.


206

[Oct.

.I1ppendix.

EXPULSIONS. ,

REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, OCTOBER 1, 1887.

No. of Name of Party. Lod.qe. 35. E. D. Giles. 37. G. W. Henckler. 44. .T. W. Brogan. 72. Chas Autemerth. 95. Isaac Smith. 122. George Jung. 131. W. G. Jones. 140. C. W. Brown. 143. Thomas H. King. 158. W. O. Wolford. 163. Jesse W. Uppercll. 180. John H. Bencler. 185. J. \\'. Rogers. 188. John S. Bush. 204. J. W. Mattucks. 206. Samuel Stewart. 212. G. W. Hagle. 232. S. D. Clark.

No. of Lodge.

Name of Party.

244. D. C. Gamble. 256. G. Rausenbach. 268. Walter Landree. 287. R. M. Agee. 307. .J. P. Watson. John T. James. 308. Geo. H. Berry. 327. Wm. H. Funkhouser. 360. Almon B. Thomson. 362. W. Bowder. 388. Ira W. Palmer. 40G. T. A. Slicer. 435. W. C. Wodlove. 442. 1.:B. Chrisinger. 449. E. D. Robinson. 453. H. Glitsch. 511. Johu Owens. 527. H. C. HeYllolds.


Appendix.

1887.J

R,EINSTATEl\1ENTS. REPORTED TO THE GRAl'iD :LODGE OF II!ISSOURI, OCTOBER 1, 1887.

Na. af Name af Pm路ly. Lodge. 3. John S. Klinefelter. Charles Carrillon. 4. W, T. Wayland. J. F. Lippett. 5. G. B. Ramsey. Marion ~'1eCay. 6. C. A. McLaughlin. 7. C. J. Skeen. 9. F. A. Decie. 11. H. T. Pendleton. Geo. Pleasant. Wm.Riddle. 15. J. W. Drummons. S. A. Riggs. Simon Jones. B. F. Kenney. James Brown. 20. Geo S. Sprague. 25. Wm. N. Belt. 28. John V. Johnston. 33. Newton Griggs. 38. Oliver Hughes. 40. J. B. Gore. 46. J. P. Craig. Wm. H. Scott. 47. Woodson Lynes. Geo. F. Patrick. 49. Wm. Benton. 52. W. Simons. 53. F. J. Kenny. 56. T. S. Moore. 57. H. C. Garner. C. T. Garner. 59. J. A. Everman. 60. J. W. Chaney. B. F. Shelley. 61. Wm. Martin.

No. of Name of Party. Lodge. 66. Jasper Lane. 67. John O. Allen. Daniel Bently. S. D. Cochrane. James M. Hawn. C. T. Hopper. H. Q. Martin. C. M. Patterson. 69. L. E. Cooper. B. S. Hutton. 70. Frank Decker. 71. P. G. Cayton. Wm. H. Beattie. 72. B. S. Baker. 73. T. O'Connell. 74. B. M. Veatch. Wm. C. Reeob. Chas. Veatch. J. J. Kindrick. James Cash. M. J. Rucker. K. Veatch. G. M. Dewey. John A. Fuqua. 76. J. W. Perry. David Moore. L. D. 'Vimsett. Asa Warren. D. L. Young. 79. R. A. Vaughan. 80. John Bohannon. 86. H. O. Torrey. N. O. Crevelling. 88. James Cline. 97. ''\'m. C. Heaston. 102. John Bose. D. Johnson.

207


Appendix.

208 No. oj Lodge.

Name oj Party.

102. J. D. Holderby. 105. H. J. Hewitt. 109. J. M. Miller. M. V. Miller. J. M. Munger. BO. C. Vanhorn. 114. Thos. Loftus. 117. G. A. Blanchard. O. A. Williams. L. Walters. 122. J. O. McDaniel. 131. Frank Wheeler. 132. John F. Bush. 135. H.Neill. 140. Thomas Barker. R. C. Williamson. 149. Adam Walk. J. G. Russell. R. Andrews. 151. W. B. Moberly. 1f>f>. James Jennings. J. M. Harris. J. Crumpacker. 157. Z. Godfrey. 160. T. W. Cunningham. 161. D. Mark. 163. R. Bogardus. N. F. Herrick. R. Chauvenot. 167. M. DUford. 182. James Shearer. J. J. Page. 187. M. L. Thomas. 188. Joseph Lesem. C. Sweeny. 189. E.O. Hill. 192. R. Thornton. 195. E. C. Hixon. 196. W.Griffith. 201. T. B. Hamilton. 210. H. C. Payton. '212. D. F. Pollock. 213. W. M. Rayl. 216. Sainuel Broan. 218. W. C. Huppert. O. Hubbell. R. G. Butler. H. C. Guiteau. 221). C. W. Barker. 236. Al. Whitestock. 237. Green Smith. B. F. Atteberry. 241. E. S. Wilhite.

No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 245. C. Rothwell. 247. E. E. Carnes. 254. H. H. Havelly. Harvey Gipson. B. F. Rosamond. John Yates. 2;j5. A. C. Wilsoll. 257. T. J. Shackelton. 260. James Bigelow. :J. W. Howell. Geo. Schneider. 261. I W. C. Hayes. 263. R. Owens, G. L. Smith. 267. H. E. Metzger. E. D. Jones. 279. T. B. McGuire. 281. B. F. Holeombe. 282. Wm. Rllever. 300. R. F. Phillips. A. Forks:306. B. B. Gaither. J:L. Daugherty. T. F. Frazier. 309. A. C. Kincaid. W. S. Crowley. C. Robertson. 316. John McConnell. 319. W. E. Parker. 322. P. C. Smallwood. 323. Hugo Gober. 327. W. L. Horseman. 328. V. M. Harper. 331. James Craig. 333. W. S. Stevens. W. N. Cole. 334. .J. S. Halstead. S. F. Hoover. 335. W. H. Johns. II. Paterick. 342. L. F. Showalter. 345. C. A. Underwood. D. P. Blair. John Murphy. D. W. Cowan. 349. Wm. M. Smith. 351. J. H. McHenry. 378. A. Bartlett. T. S. Sagerty. 383. Henry McCary. F. J. Pierce. 386. J. H. Page. H. J. Wagner.

[Oct.


1887.J No. of Name of Party. Lodge. 398. J. D. Chapman. J. J. Kaderly. 400. R. J. Alexander. 409. Wm. F. Gilreath. David Burton. 412. M. Millering. A. L. Kellog. R. A. Stpger. R. M. Raymond. A. S. Prather. 413. John Bailey. 411. n. F. Northcutt. 416. F. H. Adams.• John Murdock. E. C. Shourds.

G. L. Ap.-14.

Appendix. No. of Lodge.

209· Name of Party.

420. Thomas A. Dolan. 127. H. C. Walker. 429. J. R. Swindler. 430. R. M. Walln. T. H. Warren. 443. .J. P. Reymilds. D. A. Rhodes. 450. R. L. Lafoon. 476. Charles Baird. 492. Geo. W. Quick. 512. 1. K. Eaton. G. C. McCoy. 518. J. A. Crawford. 530. W. 1. Morrow.


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT. C0:\IPILED FROM <:5

LODGE.

Z

I p:r3"~"n;:gSS'1

Miss.o~ri...

ISt. Lou~s ISt. LOUIS St. Lou!s FrankIIll ISpringfield , Newark 710'~u.llivan ;.. W!\l~ut Grove WllhaIl?-sburg 9 Geo. Washmgton St. LOUIS 10 Agency ""'''''1 Agency llIPauldingville Wright City 12 Tyro Caledonia 13 Rising Sun Barry 14lcyrene c;yrene 15 Western. Star WinstOI~ 16 i MemphIS Memphis 17 Clarksville Clarksville 18 Palmyra ' Palmyra 191paris U?ion 1PJ1Tis : 20 St. LOUlS ISt. LOUIS 21 Havanna McFall. 22 Wellington DeKalb 23 Florida iFlorida 21 "Yyacon~a 路ILaGran.ge 1 2 3 4 5 6

Mendlan Beacon Howard United Ark

8IwllhamSb~rg

1

COUNTY.

I

RETUR~S SEPTE~fBER,

MASTER.

St. Lou~s"''''''''''''iJames A. Harris St. LOUIS 1wm. H. Scott ,St. Louis GeorgeStr~dtman IHoward W. E. MCKInley Greene J. S. A11?-bro~e Knox 路Wm. KlIIdnck Greene J. W. Blakey ,CaIlaw'!-y Is. T. wee.ks St. LoUIS Alexander Douglas Buchanan IJ. M. Farris Warren IJ. W. Tice Washington G. P. Harvey Clay J. M. Barnes IPike D. MCCOllOCk Daviess Wesley Le.e Scotland IJ. P. Nesblt.. IPik~ C. T. Pepper Manon J. W. Proctor Monfoe IJoseph BurnE}tt St. LOUIS ,' Isaac Ko.perhk Gentry Wm. EarL Buchanan Thomas F. Korris Mon~oe l'rhos. Ch?wning LewIs .. : D. H. C~llders

1887.

SECRETARY.

INew ~aven Hanmbal.. 1Windsor H.untsville

33 Ralls 34 Troy 351 Mercer 36 Cooper

I ::::::: ::::::: I Centre IR!llls Ll11COln ITroy Princeton Mercer ICooper ,Boonville

.: : : : : : :

~~I~~~~~~.::.:::

~~~~~.t.:.:

Fra~klin

:\Ianon IHenry: Randolph

S.. C. Griswold (.eo. C. Donehower J. W. Goodin John R. HUll

T'NE OF MEETmO.

John H. Deems (acting) F!rst and Th~rd Thur~days ea. mo. Cbas. Matt.. IFlrst and ThIrd Wedn days ea. mo. IJoseph Brunner :. Second and FourtJ:1 Thursdays. W. Agnew ISaturday on or before full moon. R. B. l\~orris IThird Monday each month. Hugh 'Iempleton Saturday on or after full moon. W. D. Wright.. Tuesday before full moon. IG. R. Paden 1Saturday on or before full moon. P.J. Herner Second and Fourth Tuesdays. L. M. McCrany Saturday on or before full moon. IWm. T. Carter Saturday on or before full moon. S. McSpaden Saturday on or before full moon. M. T. SamueL. Saturday on or before full moon. IJ. L. Farmer Wednesday on or before full moon IC. P. Lehr : Sa~urday on or before full moon. ,Geo. E. Leshe IFnday on or before full moon .. F. M. .R.eynolde ISaturday on or before full moon. John "'. Boulware Second and Fourth Thursdays. W. S. and Saturdays ea. mo. IJ. H. Wllhamson FIrst and Tl'l.lrd Tuesdays ea. mo. Geo. W. Robertson Saturday before full moon. Derge Saturday before full moon. J. W: H.urd' ; S!!-turdaY?!1?r before full moon. ILe,wls Schnmder FIrst and I hlrd Thursday ea. mo.

IJ.

R~i~

F~rst

T~ird

H. R. Bendel Wm. O. Flavell IM. L. Stafford /J. C. Shaefer

W. P. Lindsey .T. D. Starke

~

~ ~

~.

::::::::Isecond and Fourth Thursdays. ~ IFirst Saturday in each month. Second and Fourth Saturdays. Saturd.ay on or before full moon. IT~esday on or before ,full moon.

~~~:'::':::::::::: :::::::: ~:.~.'..~:~~~ :::::::::'.::::::::::: ~~: ..~: .~:~~.~.~~~.:::::::: . :::::: IFIrst Monday and ThIrd. Saturda y.

IA. M. Sears J. J. Shaw

~ ~

IA.

~ ~.~~~.:~~.l:::::::::::::::::~~...~~~~~::::::::::::::I.~~:.~~~~~:::::::::::::: ~~: ..~: ..~~.1.~~.~.~~1: . :::::::::::::::1~: .. ~路. ~~.~?~~:::::::::: 27 Evergreen 28 St. John 29 Windsor 30IH.untsville

I

~ ...... o

~. C. BrIggs : I1 homas H. Harns 1Wm. lIirons H. B. Chilton

Second Saturday eaeh month. Saturday on or before full moon. Tuesday on or before full moon. Second and Fourth Fridays ea. mo.

r--1

oc:>

~


· 37 cedar D8 canao 39 DeWitt 10 M<~. Moriah 41 lEtna 42 Middle Grove 43 Jetferson 441·JaCkSonvme 45 Bonhomme 46 Wentzville 47 Fayette 48.Fulton 491 Ha.ynesville 50' Xenia 51 Livingston 52 Wakanda

53Iw"lon

54 5.) 56 57

Index Arrow Rock Tipton Richmond

lowensville callaO DeWitt.. ls~. Louis lEtna Middle Grove IJcfferson City .Jacksonville Manchester Wentzville Fayette Fulton Holt Hopkins Glasgow Carrollton

lGasconade IMacon Carroll St. Louis Scotland Monroe cOle !'RandOIPh St. LoUIs St. Charles Howard Ca.llaway Clay Nodaway Howard Carrol!... Platte Cass Saline 1\<Ioniteau Ray

"'' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '1

W"lon

Indcx Arrow Rock Tipton Richmond

'C. P. Triplett IW. F. Bennett.. A. D. Richards

s.

A. Me~erly

John Pulltam W. H. Snell S. Brotherton Geo. W. Butler John Brewer !Chas. J ..Walker IR. E. Wltt.. P. Godfrey John A. Eby J. H. Bowen J. T. Goodson T. A. GlIbert H. :M. Halcomb A. M. HalL C. G. Ely W. M. Allison

,w.

8. Cahi~I.. : E. E. Rlch.ardson M. "\'. Dumm Edwin V..Kyte I. M. Busey O. N. Snell John Tellman !1\<1. W. Jones D. C. Taylor Ip. Lee Joseph Rosenbaum .T. W. Hunter W. C. McFarland Thomas W. Morehead Noah Krout 1

IH. H. \',dg,"" J. T. 0 Bannon

Wm. Putsch (8ctin g ) T. M. Hir~t John R. Green

'SaturdaY o.n or before full moon. S.aturday on or before full moon. Second & Fourth Saturdays ea. mo. Seco~d & l:~urth Sll.turdars ea. mo. I.NO ttme glven. First and Third Saturdays ea. mo. IFriday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturd8y on or before full moon. s.aturday on or before full moon. Monda.y on or before full moon. .First Sat. and 1st&3d Fridays. Saturday after full moon. 1VO Relu1·lls. First and Third Wednesday ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. F!'" and Thh'd Sa'n'day, "'" mo.

79lpo~ar

New Bloomfield Callaway waverly :Larayette Cll.meron Clinton Slater Saline Monroe City ~Ionroe Pattonsburg Daviess Linn osage ROcheport.. IBoone Clin~oIl Henry.: Splhvan Franklm ~oanOke IHoward "avannah' Andrew Danville Montgomery Brunswick Chariton KeytesVille Chariton Ashley Pike 11ndependence IJaCkson Steelville ICrawford :. St. Joseph Buchanan St..LOUiS ISt. · Bridgeton St. LOUlS IHallsville Boone Linneus Linn

I

Lou~s

J. C. Cave I'Chll.S. Kra.ns D. B. Adams Jos. Fields .. · !J. '1'. Umstattd E. B. Christie \R. S. Ryors Wesley Scobee L. Mo~d B. P. Ro"land J . D. 1.licks.: A. J. Lambnght J. :\Ic~Jahan ITyson S.. Dines M. H. Holcomb Jolin W. Mahaffey L. A. Flaven ,J. M. Sand~rs 1. C. Mulkms IF. H. l\.Iason .. ·: ,Geo. H. W. Heidorn R. M. Flynt.. iP. C. Flournoy

IG.

C. H. Chnstlll.n H. J. Galbrl:l.ith W. D. Corn H. Gaines C. W. Overman L. C. Rhinehart.. J. W. Vosholl C. M. Pattersoll Joseph.Pollock J. C. Westoo11 Jewel LOckridge Samuel Huffman John B. Harris R. G. Beazley M. VI. Anderson ,J. C. Wells IW. A. Cunningham J. Wh.itmir~ Ulnch Schnalder lphil. Rodan W. W. Vaughan M. C. Flynt 18. D. Sanduskey

IN.

c,.

:-l

L.......J

1No lime gwen.

!S8turday on or before full moon, First and Third Saturdays ea. mo. First and Third Saturdays ea. mo.

~~ ce~·t~~ij~:::·:.::.:::::::::Ic.;e~·t~~ii~::::::::::::: Boo;e:.:::::::::::::::: i:\V:·B·~y·s(;ii::::::::::::::::::: ~v;n::li:'c.~~pe~;te~·(aci;g)I'S~turdaY

60 New Bloomfield 61 Waverly 62 Vinci!... 63 Cambridge 64 Monroe 65 Pattonsburg 66ILinn 67 Rocheport.. 68 Teb? 69 Sulhvan 70IRoanoke 71 Savannah 72 Danville 73'IEureka 74 Warren 75 Ashley : 76 rndependence 77 Lebanon 78 St. Joseph Star 80 Bridgeton 81 Hickory Grove 82IJackson

~

00 00

before full moon. First Fnday & 3d Saturday ea. mo. Time nol given.

First and Third Saturdays ea. mo. ·Saturday on or before full moon. 1st ILnd ilrd Saturdays each month. First Saturday after full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Second Thursday in each month. First and Th.ird Thursdays. Saturday before full moon. ISaturdayon or before ea. full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Tuesday on or before full moon. S.aturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.

~ ~ ~

~

~.

No lime gi·ven.

Second & Fourth Mondays ea. mo. ?r before full moon. Fmt and Thlrd Tues. each month. Second and Fourth Fri. each m. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. S~turday?n

t>:> ..... .....


GRA.~D

SECRETARY'S TA.BULAR

STATEl\1E~T,

~

ETc.-Oontin'ned.

~

.I

~

LODGE.

831 Laclede .. : 84 Potter 85 Miami 86 Brookfield 8i Washington 88 De.fiance.: 89 Frlendshlp 90 King Solomon 9.t Mad.ison 92 Perseverance 93 St. :Marks 94 Vienna 95, Meramec 96 St. Andrews 9i Bethany 98 Webster 99 ),ft. Vernon 100 Canton 101 Bogar~ 102 Bloommgton 103'West View 104 Heroine 105 Kirksville 106 Gallatin 107 Williamsville 108 Gothic 109, Island .City 110 Marcus 111 Trenton 112 Graham 113 PJattsburg 114 Twilight 115 Laddonia 116 Barnes 117 V~rsailles 118,Klllgston 119, De Soto .120 ' Compass

'

\ND P.'faWN O. .AD~~ESS.

Lebanon Longwood :Miami. Brookfield Greenfield

I

COUNTY.

:\fASTER.

:Ma~~field

!J;. W: VIrgIl E.I<...ener R. C. Hanna Oliver Cramer W. L. Gains M: F: Co?per ,Chllhcothe LlVmgston W. N. Norvllle 1St. Catherine Linn·· IC. L. Spalding Madison Monroe G. W. waller Louisiana Pike J. A. Thomason Cape Girardeau Cape Girardeau W. B. Wilson Vienna Maries.: Thos. A. B,ray Eureka ,St. LOUlS M. C. LewIs ,Shelbyville Shelby A. G. Priest.. Bethany Harrison E. R. Durham Marshfield Webster O. R. Winslow Mt. Vernon Lawrence J. P. Porter Canton LewIs \v. B..nenton Bogar~ Carroll M. C. Litteer Bloommgton Macon C. G. Taylor ~lillersville Cape Girardeau J. W. Miller Kansas City Jackson E. F. Allen Kirksville Adair .T. P. Blanton Gallatin Daviess Milt. Ewing Williamsville Wayne A. B. Martindale )'foberly Randolph J. W. Hoover Stanberry IGentry 'T, J. Stockton Frederickstown .. , 1\Iadison N. B. Allen Trenton Grundy B. A. Fry Maitland H<?It.. IE. F. Weller IPlattsburg Chnton J. F. DeBerry Columbia Boone J. W .. Stolle Laddonia Audrain C. A. Smith CabooL 1Texas J. W. Mires V~rsailles Morgan P. G. Woods Kmg8ton CaldwelL S. C. Rogers I De Soto Jefferson Thomas Welch Parkville Platte N. B. Cain

De~a?Ce

Lacl.ede Pettis Baline ILinn Dade

I

~':o~th

jJ.

SECRETARY.

J. M. White (acting) ID. 1\'1. Gray A. Royor C. H. Chamberlain J. L. Wetzel D. W. Poor iFred. H. Hoppe ,Abner H. Hartsock I!.T. NoeL H. F. Summers Wm. H. Huters Joseph Mosby John Gudemuth L. A. Hayward IT. B. Ellis J. Stewart John S. Stansell IM. L. Kurtz Howard young J. Belcher D. R. Cowan W. W. Wood Wm. T. Porter Ed. E. yates John K. Lawrence .Tohn Simpson Wm. B. ~Iastin Richard Brookes Wm. H. McGrath ID. C. Geo. R. Rlley PannelL J. O. Baskett... IG. F. Pettigrew !James McNair rC. H. Smythe J. F. Carley 'J. N. Brink ..;,

IF.

Eve~hart

I

Tum

OF MEETING.

~y.ednesdar

before full moon. j'i'Lmenotg'wen. Friday on or before full moon. ,second & Fourth Tuesdays ea. mo. Friday on or before full moon. Is.tand 3rd each month. I FIrst and ThIrd Saturdays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Monday before full moon. Second and Fourth Tuesdays. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second & Fourt.h Mondays ea. mo. Sa~urday on or after full moon. Fnday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. First and Third :Mondays ea. mo. Tuesday on or before full moon. Second and Fourth Tuesdays. No time given. First & Third Mondays ea. mo. First & Third Saturdays ea. mo. ITime not given. First and Third Thursdays ea. mo. Satllrday on or be.. fore full moon. ISaturday all or before full moon. First and Third Mondays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.· Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.

F~idays

~ ~

..:::l ...., ~

~

~ <::-l. ~

r"'OO ~

~


121 Erwin 122 Dover 123 HermanDl. 124 Union Star 125 Gentryville 126 Seaman 127IAthCIl;S 128 Lorrallle 129 Charleston 130 Hume 131 Potosi 132'1 Farmington 133 Star of the West 134, Pleasant Mount.. 135'Warrensburg 136Phcenix 137 Prairieville 138 Lincoln 139 Ore~on 140 Papmville 141 Chain of Rocks 142 Pleasant Grove 143 Irondale 144 IfIodern 145 Rising Star 146 McGee 147 Cl1Ss 14~ pur<:ly 149 Lexlllgton 150 Birming 151 Milton 152 Linn Cl'eek 153 Bloomfield 154 Concord 155 Springhill 156 Ashland 157 Nortb Star 1?8 Mountai,n Grove 1()9 Green City 160 Pleasant 161 Clifton HilL 162 Whitesville 163 Occidental' 164 Joachi~n 165 Maryville 166 Mirabile

St. Louis Dover Hermann Union Star Gentryville Milall A~bany

1St Louis Lafayette Gasconade DeKalb !Gentry !Sullivan !Gent~y

Ridgway :HarnsOll Charleston ),fississippi... Bates Bates Potosi.. Washington Farmington St. Francois IJ'onton lr~m I leasant Mount ~hller Warrensburg Johnson Bowling Green Pike Prairieville Pike Fillmore Andrew Oregon Holt.. Papinville ~ Bates :Owen Lincoln Otterville Cooper ,Irondale Washington IHuruansville Polk 路Ebenezer Greene College Mound l\Iacon Harrisonville Cass I'ur<:'\y Barry , LexlIlgton Lafayette Halleck Buchanan ! Moberly Randolph Linn Creek Camden Bloomfield Stoddard Concord Callaway Springhill.. Livingston Ashland .. ; ! Boone Rockport Atchison Mounta~n Grove.. Wri~ht Green City Sullivan Morrisville Polk Clifton Randolph "'.' hite!;ville Andrew St. Louis ,St. Louis HillsbC!ro IJefferson :\laryvllle Nodawa Mirabile ICaldwerf. I'

,

J. F. Jonas Travis Buford Wm. Klenger J. J. :McQuinn

D. M. Wilson John B. ~?SS G. B. Jeffries Levi L. Bryant .T. C. Farrar A. W. Scott :Charles E. Barroll 1 w. It. Edgar James Johnson J. Ifr. Bosaker C. Lindenberger A. D. Atkins A. S. Dodge J. E. Cummins H. C. Shively J. M. WilSOll Thomas J. Starke Andrew G. Hughes A. F. Renfrow W. H. Payne IA. Teter iF. H. Clark :R. B. Gladden "John S. BlackwelL !A. Z. FerrelL :C. W. Grimes W. N. Todd Stephen Chapman J. W. Pledge W. R. Simpson A. J. Johnston John F. Hum W. V. MCQUigg J. B. Ash B. W. l\litehell D. J. Stamper 'IE. ~IYe.rs D. A. Jamison R. W. McMullin John H. Bunger ,f. W. Thompson

i\Vm.. Hirt.. R. T. Koontz E. W. Wild H. ~r. Cochran

Second and Fourth Fridays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. First Saturday ear.h month. Second Mon. and Fourth Sat. No Returns.

Wm. McClanahan Saturday on or before full moon. w. R. Matson Sc<?ond ll.n~ Fourth Saturdays. C. F. Fransham Fnday before full moon. S. G. Rosenstein Saturday on or before full moon. E. X. Chastain Thursday on or before full moon. W. T. Hunter Saturday on or before full moon. Frank L. Keith路 Saturday on or before full moon. C. R. Peck Satu.rday .on or before full moon. James Etter No t'lme gwen. G. W. Lemmon First Tuesday each month. J. T. McCune! Tuesday on 01' bcfore full moon. W. B. Hhaw Saturday on or before full moon. W. J. Barnes Saturday before full moon. .T. '1'. Thatcher First and Third Saturday each m. A. Bennett... ,Saturday on or before full moon. J.J. McElwee 'Saturday on 01' before full moon. A. L. Zollinger 路Saturday on 01' before full moon. Elisha Arnold Saturday nearest full moon. D. A.l\Iurpby Saturday Oil or before full moon. B. H. Robinson Wednesday bef'1fe full moon. W. L. McRae Saturday on or before full moon. Geo. D. Littie Friday on or before full moon. Ben T. Anderson Th~rsday on ~r. before full moon. P. H. Chambers Third Monda) ill each month. Jobn Dallam Fourth Saturday in each month. T. D. l\'1yers First Saturday in eacb month. O. A. Nelson Saturday on or before full moon. C. L. Keaton Friday nearest each full moon. J. l\'1. Rudd Fourth Saturday eacb month. L. F. Goben Saturday on or before full moon. W. P. Boqua First and Third Sat. each month. J. A. Newell..: Second Saturday ea. mo. R. Sch:vartz Second and Fourth Saturdays. T. R. DaVIs Saturday on or before full moon. IJ. H. W. Cunningham Friday on or before full moon. Wm. Bradsher Third Saturday each month. 'IJ. W. PopplewelL "I.saturday on or before full moon. Wm. R. Stubblefield Second and Fourth l\Ionday ea. mo. J. Ed. Walker IS~turday on ~r before full moon. W. L. Johnson FIrst and Thucl Saturday ea. mo. James Gray Saturday on or before full moon. 'I

~

00 00

:-:t

~

~ ~ (~

~ ~

~.

lw.

t:..:;> ~

CO


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued.

~ ~

~

,g I .

LODGE. •

I. pT3'i~;,:'~

I

COCNTY.

.

>lAS~E'.

16710nent Francais 'St. LOUlS !St. LOUls E. GrandJean 168 Colony Colony · IKnox ,.{J. C. COleman 169;Camden Point Camden Point.. Platte IJ. N. Blackburn 170 IBenevolence Utica Livingston Geo. CUlling 171 Hartford Hartford putnam jB. F. speak 172 Ce~ser : n;ta~on Macon.; A. W. Gils~rap 173 Umon Umon Franklm J. G. Martm 174 Sturgeon Sturgeon Boone John Lallx 175 NewtoIl Newtonia Newton J. L. Adams 176 Point Pleasant Point Pleasant.. .. New Madrid Samuel Mecklem 1Z7.Te:cas H~us~on ·.. · ITexas 1'.hOS. F. Nicholas 1/8 GrISWOld \pnce s Branch MOlltgomery W. F. Wells 179 Pride of the West... St. Louis St. Louis 1\1. Peterson 180, Des ~{oines Ij~thens Clark ~ . .\1. Doud 181 INovelty tl"oVelty Knox N. J. Watson 182 Stewartsville Stewartsville DeKalb T. G. McCrosky 183:California Cll.lifornia Moniteau J. W. Ramsey 184 Hale City Hale City :Carroll ·James H. Toppass 185 Chamois 'Chamois !Osage \V. 1~. Cochran 186 :\-Iorality Randolph ' Randolph F. K. Collins 187 Carter Jefferson City Cole John Tweedie 188 Hannibal HannibaL Marion :J. <;. Hearne 189 Zeredatha St. Joseph Buchanan !A. F. Braun 190,Putnam Newtown Putnam IJ. W. Harryman 1911 Wilson Pocahontas Cape GirardeaU"'ID. C. Thompson 192 Frankford Frankford Pike W. W. White 193 Anger~na iVlissou.ri City Clay L. G. Hopkins 19! Wellsville Wellsville Montgomery M. H. Garwood 195' Bolivar Bolivar Polk ,C. D. Lyman 196 Q.uitman Quitman Nodaway H. Franklurn 197 Carthag~ CarthBge IJl!-sper D. A. Innes 198 Allellsvllle :Allendale Worth ,C. M.llunt 199 New Hope '·xew Hope I Lincoln , R. E. Black 200 Sonora Watson IAtchison W. H. Morgan 201 Jamesport Jamesp'ort Daviess James Wymore! 202 Westville WestVIlle Chariton L. E. Pancost.. 203IBrumley 'Brumley I)liller :,r. M. Hawkins 204 Rowley ' Dearborn !Platte IJ. C. 'fays

IW.

I

SECRET~RY'

L. C. Valentim jH. B. Becknf'~ ID. F. Craven H. C. Cox C. Raney Thos. B. ~Iowe IStePhen I<razee S. F. Cross C. M. Maret. J. S. Law 11.I. J. Herrick John D. Anderson John D. Henger F. Parkl;)r (acting) J. G. Hernott J. C. Bynum jH. E. Hlakeman 'Samuel )J. Huddleston J. 1'1. Elliott IJ. H. Littrell C. H. Palmer S. Thorne George Rees C. F. Brown J. C. Thompson S. J. Dunkum A. R. Al~orn Jacob i\ll11er F. A. Affleck J. H. Porter

,w.

I'J.

"yar~en ~voodward

Calvm TiltoIl W.H. Baskett.. J. E. H.anCher ;U. F. Shuler Wm. Clark L. Conner T. J. Bashford

\J.

I.

TI~E OF >lEEnNG.

!Fust & Thud Wednesdays ea. mo. :Saturday on or before full moon. 'Saturday on or before full moon. 1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. Saturday on or before full moon. '~'hursday all or before full moon. Saturday on or before full I;!loon. Friday on or before full moon. ,Saturctay on or after full moon. 1'ime not given.

I.saturda.yon or a~ter full moon. \Saturda y before full moon. First & Third Wednesdays ea. mo. S~tu~day .on or before full moon.

~ ~

First and 'Third Saturday each mo. ·Fourth Saturday each month. Second & Fourth Saturdays.

[

iVo ttme [fl'l:en.

iYO time given.

Saturday 011 or before full moon. First Monday each month. Second & Fourth ~Iondays ea. mo. Second & Fourth Tuesdays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. I~'irst and 'l'hird Saturdays ea. mo. Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. lsecond and Fourtl:i W~dnesdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. IF.irst and Third Saturdays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon.

~

~.

o C':l ~


205 1'rilumina Marshall saline IC. A. :vrauch 206 Somerset.. Ilia Mercer J.ohn Norcross 207 Clay Claytonville Clay : J. C. Dagley 208 Salisbury Salisbury Chariton W. S. Stockwell 209 Poplar Bluff Poplar Bluff Butler ,·H. E. Johnson 210 Umonville Unionville ,Putnam., A. P. McElhiney 211 Hickory Hill Hickory Hill iCole John Scott 212 Four Mile Campbell.. IDunklin H. A. Gardner 213 Rolla Rolla IPhelps Wm. PaulseH 214 Forest City Forest City 'Holt.. Thomas Tear 215 Hornersville Cotton Plant.. Dunklin W. T. Sinclair 216 Granby Granby Newton T. J. Denham 217 Barbee Brownsville Saline J. M. Pelot 218 Good Hope South St. Louis St. Louis Charles Clifton 219 Everett Everett Cass S:"E. Licklider 220 Kansas City Kansas City Jackson 1'hos. R. Morrow 221 Mystic Tie Oak Ridge Cape Girardeau W. J. Roberts 222 ! 223 Woodlawn Woodlawn :Monroe C. Hanger 224 Hamilton · Hlj.milton Caldwell. 225 Salem Salem :Dent.. A. A. Flett 226 Saline1 St. Marys ISt:e. Genevieve Henry Roseman 227 Cypress Laclede ILmn S. J. Hardy , 228 Shelbina Shelbina IShelby Wm. T. Dean 229 Mitchell ~olumbus IJohnSOn J. M. D!l-venport... 230 St. James ·St. James Phelps Wm. StImson 231 Warrenton Warrenton Iwarren J. 'N. Shelton 232 Polo Polo Caldwell John W. Tiffin 233 Bue~din : B~cklin.: '.Lin~ : lB. B. Putman 234 St. FrancoIs Llbertyvllle St. FrancoIs A. M. Wallace 235 Ionic Rensselaer ·Ralls ~ID. B. v.'Vest.. 236 Sedalia ~ .. Isedalia Pettis B. H. Ingram 2371 La Plata La Plata Macon B.C. McDavitt. 238 Rllshville IRushville Buchanan I. W. Wilson 239 Hopewell Lesterville Reynolds W. E. Sizemore 240 Granv!lle I~raIlVille Monroe .'G. S. Jones 241 PalestlIle St. Charles St. Charles Jos H. Alexander 242 Portland ; Readsville Callaway S. A. Davis 2431'K~Yston~ : St. LQ~is St. Louis .James Hor~ocks 244 Middle FabIUs Downmg Schuyler Geo. S. Collins 245 Knob Noster Knob Noster Johnson W. H. Anderson 246 Montgomery City Montgomery' City Montgomery John G. Miller 247 Neosho Neosho Newton C. E. Prettyman 248 Rochester Helena Andrew Isaac Clark 249 Carroll Norborne Carroll J. N. Cunningham 2;>0 High Hill High Hill Montgomery John Nebel. 1

E. T. Orear W..M. Bowland T. M. Gash John Clark : E. C. Lacks W. A. Shelton G. P. Laforce Louis McCutcheon J. B. Sally T. N. Claiborn W. M. Latterfield W. A. Vasner J. M. Belamy T. J. Koetzli.. J. L. L. Stephens P. C. ];lcNeill R. W. Harris

Friday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second and Fourth Sat. each m. Saturday before full moon. Saturday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. First Sat. and Third Mon. each m. Friday on or before full moon. Monday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. First and Third Saturday each m. Saturday 011 or after full moon. Second and Fourth Mon. each m. Saturday on or before full moon.

1--4

CIJ 00

~

~

..

J. C. Rodes W. McDonald !<'rank Voelker James E. Welch C. K. Dickerson T. D. Payne Chas. Cartall ,. B. Livsey J. T. Shaw V. B. B~)\~ers .T. C. Wllhams 1. W. Rudisell W. F. Henry J. W. Voohers S. B. Wells 1. C. Trllley D . . F. Sp~rks O. P. Remhart.. B. H. Boone Moses Ely R. T. Gamble ! Alonzo Case , IAlbert Vogt... J. C. Wllliams M. L. Thomas W. J. Dawson Chas. P. Miller

Saturday on or before full moon. lVO Returns. Saturday on or before full moon. ,S~turday 0!1 or before full moon. Fm;t & ThIrd Wednesdays ea. mo. First and Third Fridays ea. mo. !Thursday on or before full moon. ,Saturday on or after full moon. I:saturday on or after full moon. iVa time given.

Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturda~' 011 or before full moon. First Fl'Iday each month. Wednesday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. Saturday before Third Sunday. S~turdaY??!Jr before full moon. FIrst and Ihird Tuesdays ea. mo. Saturday before full moon. F7irs~ & T.hird Wednesdays ea. mo. 1\0 t·tme gwen. Saturday on or before full moon. Monday on or before full mOOD. Second an.d F.ourth Tuesdays. ISaturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. No time given.

~ ~ (1::,

~ ~

<:"0'.

~

~

1--4

Ot


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued.

l\:) ~

~

~

I

LODGE.

-I

~1lHope

252 Alanthus 253 Lindley 2M. Butler 255 Alton 256 Shekinah 257 ,Lodge of Light Z?8IRavanna 259, LOdg.e Of Lo.ve: 260 MechanicsVille 261 Florence 262 Holden 263 Summit.. 26~ Fay.etteyille 26e> ConnthIan 266 SociaL 267 Aurora 268 Lodge of Trutb 269 Rock Prairie 270 New Salem 2it Solomon 27 Granite :: 273 St. Clair 274 Cold Spring 275 Tranquillity 276 Grand River 277 Wm. D. Muir ZZ8.AViJI8; 219,Hogle s Creek 280 Lodge of Peace 281,Fenton 282 Cosmos 283 Stockton 2~ Kew Boston 285 Earl... 286 Hesperian 287 Craft. 288 Hermitage 1

I p?~'~"D1;:~S'1 'Iwashington Alanthus Grove Lindley 'Butler Alton Crystal City Eagleville Ravanna Lancast~r : Mechamcsville New Florence Holden Lee's Summit Fayetteville Warrensburg Martinsburg St. Louis Atlanta Lawrenceburg Argentville Springfield Sedlllia Osceola Henrietta OrearviJIe Freeman Pilot Grove Av~lla

Qu~ncy

Chillhowee Fenton 18t. Louis Stockton INew Boston ICoffeysburg IVirgiJ City : !Canton IHermitage

COUNTY.

~ranklin

,Gentry Grundy ,Bates loregon Jefferson Harrison :l\1ercer

!~ChUYler

,St. Charles :Montgomery JOhnson Jackson ;Johnson Johnson Audrain St. Louis Macon Lawrence Lincoln Greene IPettis St. Clair Johnson saline Cass Cooper Ja.sper Hickory JOhnson St. Louis 8t. Louis Cedar LillI} Davless Cedar Lewis Hickory

MASTER.

'fDIE OF

MEETI~G.

'----------I-----------~

J. W. Pu~ves John Kmght H. Doolin '. D. C. Wize.. , W. '1'. Shaver Jos. HoughtOll 'l'.B. Schaeffer ~iJ. L. Shipley [E. F. Pay.ton C. T. Craig B. E. Wilson \R. A. Long Jas. A. Shaw C. A. Boyles ,A. W. Rodgers S. T ..McGrew Jas. R. McEwen A. D. Goodding John Troxell C. S. Alloway O. H. Travers ; ,P. H. Sangree !A. S. Stewart i A. A. Douglass IAndrew Jackson F. E. Bybee H. W. Harris R?bert Adams W. H. Morse IJOhn.Brown Charles Williama Fred. Skrainka G. R. Corbin John Baker C. J. Feurt.. W. B. Lewis E. J. Goodrich }. S. Hartman

SECRETARY.

I

~IR. W. Zierlein

.-

G. K. Wheat James Winters ;Van B. Van Dyke 路Henry Thompson IR. M. Denholm J. L. Downing J. Jenkins E. H. Roberts Henry Johnson P. P. Ellis John H. Hewes Thos. R. Thornton Wm. P. Greenlee .; John LeMarr, (actmg) C. T. Martin S. B. Potterl V. D. Gordon B. W. Stinson John D. Cox Thomas H. Cox E. J. Davison W. C. Hol~apple 0. Hall \J. R. Marshall F. W. Coombs IJ. W. H. Ross IA. J. Blake J. B~ent C. C. Little John H. Wilkim M. Sweeney 1'. T. Loy D. Howard T. B. Dorsey J. M. Litton Thos. W. Furlong J. H. Childers

n,.

_

Satu,rday.on or before full moon. No ttme gwen. Saturday on or before full moon. First and Third Saturdays ea. mo. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. iWednesday before full moon. ,Saturday on or before full moon. ;Saturday before full moon. First and Third Mondays ea. mo. No time given. First and Third Saturdays ea. mo. S'!-turday on o~ before full moon. FIrst Monday III each month. Time not given. First and Tbird Fridays ea. mo. Monday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Second Monday each month. Third Friday each month. Saturday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Wednesday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second & Fourth Saturdays ea. mo. sa~u.rday on or ~efore full moon. Fnday O? or before full moon. SaturdllY on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. ,Second & I: ourth Mondays ea. mo. !Thursday before full moon. Time not given. !Saturday before full moon. Sat. before f. m. & 2 w. after. jFirst and Third ~fondays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. 1

~ ~' ~

~ ~

~.

~

oo

r-t"


289IAcacia.. ······.. ······ ..··lparadise ··.. lclay 290 Fairmount Fairmoul}t.. Clark 291 Edina IEdina IKnox 292' Lamar Lamar Barton 293 Sarcoxie Sarcoxie~ Ja.sper 294 Mound City Mound City Holt.. 295 i\loniteau Jamestown l\Ioniteau 296 Cameron Cameron Clinton 297 Ozark Fair Grove Greene 298 Marble Hill Marble Hill Bollinger 299 Temple Kansas City Jackson 300Dor~c Forkner's HilL i~allas 301/ White Hall Barnard NOdaway 302 Lick Creek Perry Ralls 303 Osage Nevada Vernon 304 Faithful.. !Fair Dealing Ripley 305 Clarence Clarence Shelbv 306 Ashlar 1commerce Scott: 307 New London New London Ralls 30R parrott.. i'v.laysvme IDeKalb 309 King Hiram Knoxville Ray 310 Sikeston Sikeston Scott

IJ.8. nltll P. S. Rains J. M. Long

>

j W.

W. FeWell. C. S. Armstrong 'H. T. Bruce J. R. Hamer J. F. Boegel. F. M. Wells W, F. Parry Spencer Marlin ·.. ISeth :McFarland S. T. Kauble E. A. Dulin J. F. Tubb P. P. Burkholderi' G. C. Rose Geo. E. Lear G. Y. Crenshaw Job Slack 0. E. Kendall

llIoI. S. Duncan

lsecond·& Fourth Saturdays ea. mo. Saturday before full moon. S~turday on or before full moon:

IW. ~. Mize (acting) LeVi Durham M. S. Johnson J. G. McVeigh I'J. W. Cecil John 1\1. Roberts A. H. Cline F. S. !\'[a~lin IP. J. Hamey F. B. Adams E. E. Kimball J. N. Presson J. H. Polland Samuel A. Mason Geo. T. Finegan W. H. RiggS M. '1'. Slover A. A. Harrison

Tuesday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. No time [liven. 2d and 4th Saturdays each month. Saturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on or before full moon. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month. jSaturday before full moon. :Saturday on or after full moon. 'Saturday on or before full moon .. Friday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. 1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. iSaturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.

Iwm. H. Brown .J. W. Fitch F. 1\L Taylor E. ,,,. Shannon S. T. Blair ..!E; E. Haym~n , W. R. Hopkllls B. E. PhilliPS D. E. )Iaxon W. .J. Roach Lewis A. J. Lippelt Samuel S. Webster G. A. Daugherty '·JOhn Q. A. Cope :. T. B. carmical... IN. Nally E. Scott John Rushing M. A. Lytle Saml. Leyy .. · · IJOhn w. Toppass S. J. Dewey

Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. [1st & 3rd Wednesdays each month. 2d and 4th Saturdays each month. Saturday on or before full moon . :Saturday on or before full moon. lso.turday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. 1st and 3rd Mondays each month. lIst and 3rd Mondays each month. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ea. mo. Saturday on or before full moon. IFriday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. Second Saturday in each month. 2d and ,lth Monda seach month. ISaturda y on or before full moon. 2d and 4th Saturdays each month. 1st and 3rd Mondays each month.

T. W. Wood J. H. W.illiS

1\'0 Ret1lTns.

Time not given.

Ry~~d

IKingsvme Rome Altona Kansas City Osborn 1 Luray Brashear Chapel HilL Denver Hardin St. Louis Independence Meadville New Home West Plains jCainsville Ebony Bertrand St. Joseph

IBe~li!1

IChilhcot~e

Breckenndge

Johnson Douglas Bates .Jackson, DeKalb (;lar~;:

Adair Lafayette Worth Ray St. Louis Jackson Linn Bates .. : Howell Harrison INOdaway Mississippi.. ,Buchanan IG!'m.try Livlllgston Caldwell

,

Wm. P. Gibson A. D. Burrow : 'A. B. Owens iW. D. Charde 'rhos. D. Rice 'E. P. Jones J. 1\1. Moore W. G. Shafer Willis Marrs Geo. P. Long L. L. Lippman (acting) M. M. Langhorne B. L. Barbee Leroy Taylor T. J. Whitmire J, H. Burrows S. cOllings IWm. Love Longley Hardman IS. G. \Veller G. w. putl"?an C. H. Austm

I"'.

~

L-J

.

~g ~~:~~~.:~:::::::::::::::::I~~~~~.~~::::::::::::::I. ~~~:.::::::::::::::::::::I ~~:.:....~~~~~~.::::::::::::::: :::::: I~:.~:.~~~.:~.~~.~.:::::::::~:::::11st and 3rd Saturdays each month.

313 Kingsville 314 Rome 315 Altona 316 RuraL 317'losborn 318 Eldor'!-do . 319 PaulVille 320 Chapel Hill 321 Jonathan 322 Hardin 323 Corner-Stone 324 McDonald 325 Dockery 326::-<ew Home 3271n-1t. Zion '328 cainsville 329 Kennedy 330 Bertr.and 331 Chanty 332 333 Chllhcot~e 334 Breckenndge

~

CJ:) CJ:)

~

~

~

;;S

~

~.

1

~

.....

~


GRAND .SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Contimted.

~ I--'"

00

o -=-1

I

LODGE.

335IMedoc

To\Vx

AXD

P.~. ADD~ESS. Joplm

I

COUNTY.

/Jasper

I

l\IASTER.

John S. },lCI>Onald

II

SECR~TARY.

.

I~1. F. Downmg

~~? ~~.I.~~~~~~~:::::::::::::::~.~.I.~~~~~~::::::::::::~~~~::.:: :::::::::::: :~:.~. . ~~.~.~.~~:::::-:::::::::::::I~: ..~:. . ~~~~.~.~:::::::::::::::::

338 Myrtle 339 Fid.elity 340 J encho 341 Relief 342 Circ.le 343 Agncola 344 ~loberly 345 Fel!owship 346 AI::hngton 347 Spring Creek 348 Wadesburg 349 Pollock 3~0 Tyria:n 3<>1 MosaIc 3521 Friend 353 Benton 3~IHebron:

3~~,Ade~Ph.1..

Millville

IFa~ley

JerIcho jBrOOkline Roscoe Petersburg Moberly

IJ~Plin

j DIxon Edgar Springs Wadesburg Pol!ock JOhnstown Bellevue Ozark 路 St. Louis Mexico Edge~ton

AnCIent Landmark IHarnsburg Young's Creek Rowena North- West.. Tarkio Garrett Arcola Tuscan St. Louis Riddick Buffalo 36~,Hiram Kahoka.; 3631 Fraternal. Robertsvllle 3M Higginsville Higginsville 365 Warsaw IWll.rsaw 366 Adair : Kirksville 367!Barry I'wa>;hburn 368 Crescent Hill. Adrian 3~9 C~m.P0site iDC!n!phan 3,0 WIllIamstown WIllIamstown 371 Sheldon.: 1sheldon.: 372 1~onparell. East L)路nne~ 3;)6 357 358 359 360 361

Ray IPlatte Cedar 'Greene St. Clair Henryl Randolph J)asper .: 1 UlaSkl. Phelps r,ass,. ISulhvan jBates Iron IChristian ,St.. Louis IAudrain Platte IBoone Audrain \Atchison .. : Dade St. Louis IDallas Clllrk ..: Franklm Lafayette Benton Adair Barry Bates Ripl~y

LewIs lvernon Cass

J. 1'1. Carter W. D. Mills J. P. Brash er J. R. Gammon S. F. Hurt L. P. Beaty H. A. Hatfield John S. Reynolds : J. F. Rhea ,0. P. Margedant.. M. Hendrick J. C. Schnelle Wm. Ely A .. J. Harrol IN. H. H. :\iiller Charles B. Duff A. C. Barnes Jas. N. Boydston E. C. Haller W. H. White Jesse Mothens R. A. Church Trusten P. Dyer Smithpeter G. C,. Bradford D. W. Rodgers IJ. H. Searfoss Jas. R. Jones P. M. Smith F. N. Ruse A. J. Satterlee C. B~rrett R. C. Risk 'IJ. V. :. D. P. Kenagy

IA.

lw'

IR.

~lcGrew

S. S. young John H. Carson W. R. Lakey S. F. Gibson G. P. Brown IJ. H. M. Cann Henry Levy Geo. W. Gore F. S. HU.cklns C. T. Lamar W. A. Wade J. W. Dormer John H. Beatty W. J. Russell T. L. Robertson W. H. Cutter \J. A. Gla~don }..l.urry ~llt:hell "W. II. H. Fenton J. A. Craig ,A. F. NeaL I路D. Russell E. E. Hickok T. C. Opdyche Neaper : Rlchard Smlth C. W. Seeber A. S. l\lcGowan iF. M. Douglass lwinter Frost J. N. BrIcker ,A. J. lHcColIum J. W. Ramsey \G. W. B. P. WhIte

ls .

Te~ple

:

TIME. OF

~EETING.

Fust and Thlrd Fndays ea. month. :Saturday after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Wednesday on or before full mOon. Saturday on or before full mOOD. Saturday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full mOOD. 2d and 4th l\londayseach month .. 2d and 4th Fridays each month. I.saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. IS~tu.rday.on or before full moon. 1\0 t-Lme gwen..

Saturday on or before full moon. !SatUTday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. 2nd and 4th Mondays ea. mo. IFirst Tuesday each month. I~aturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second Saturday each month. First Saturday each month. Thursday on or before full moon. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ea. mo. Saturday on or after full moon. Friday on or before fuB moon. Saturday on or after full moon. 2d & 4th Mondays in each month. ;Thursday on or before fUl! moon. lFriday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on or before full moon. Sat. on or before 路Fourth Sunday. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.

~ ~ ~

;;S ~

~.

o '0 ~


373 Mandeville 374 Golden Rule 375 Plumb HilL 3/1 Ancient Craft.. 3ZS K.il\yinning 3,9 Bllhngs 380 Queen City 381 Ionia 382 Richland 383 pythagOras 384 HarmollY 385 Alexander 386 Dayton 387/"yoodside; 388 F armersvl1le 389Arc~na..; 390IManonvllle 391,Ray lown 392 Christ!an 393 Bee Hive 394 Dagan 39~ Lll.timer ; 396 Western Light 397 Gower 398 Jasper 399 Pike 400 Decatur

?Z~ Kin~

~g~ Ga~ei·::. ::::

Mandeville Jonesburg iVI1ddletown St: Joseph Kmg City K.il\yinning Bllhngs IQueell City Barnetts Richland cassville Vibbard Bedford Dayton l:homasvi.ne 1< armersvllle !Win~ersv,ille

Manonville IR>lytown Oak Grove ,Lawson Mendon ,Lick,ing ILOUlsburg Gower Jasper Curryville Peirce City

ICarroll Montgomery Buchanan Gentry

IS.co~la~ld

·

,chnstllm Schuyler Morgan pUlaSki.. IBarr y Ray Livingston.... ,Cass

lo:e~on LlVlJ1gston

Sullivan : Lawrence ,JaCkson IJackson IRa y Chariton Texas Dallas Clillton Jasper Pike Lawrence 1

1

Wm. C. Baird E. A. BalL O. W. Adams IW. H. Leach John Preston Eli ,Barrackm.an W. f. Lampkm T. W. Henton IA. P. France :!W. T. Wright.. C. W. Carter R. T. Craven 1

~'!ontgomery

Led&e~wood

C. T. Grossheart.. S. L. LlVlIlgood I'R. A. Cocl:JrarJ.; Edward Smclalr Milton noone D. P. Dyer IJ. M. Morrow A. F. WOOd 'T. K. ~radford E. P. \, ll.ughan John W. Hall '1'. W. Shockley E. Biggs E. P. Linzee

Is.

IM. Block ISatutday before full moon. S. G. Wright 'Satnrday before full moon. C. PearsoIl Saturday before,full moon. ;.. M. J. Gral:Jam : ISll.turday on or before full moon. E. W. Sahsbury (actmg).. Saturday on or before full moon. IA. H. Fll.rn.sworth Sa~urday on or before full moon. J. M. Morrls Fnday on or after full moon. J. G. Miller Saturday all or before full moon. 1. G. Price ISaturday on or before full moon. J. M. Farrar IThursday on or before full moon. Chas. Ray Saturday on or before full moon. John L. Iseley 'I Saturday after full moon. .. 1VO Retill'ns. R. S. Smith Saturday on or after full moon. B: Old Fonrth Saturday in each month. ,E. C. i\lulford Saturday before full moon. J. T. Richardson Sa~urday on or after full moon. A. H. Grover Fnday on or before full moon. IM. '1': Smith Saturday on or before full moon. T. M. Vermillion Sat. before 2d & 4.th Sundays. J. W. Asbury Saturday before lull moon. !,E. M. Shupe ,Satu.rda y n or before full moon. R. W. Mll.rr \Satu:da y ,before full moon. J. D. Shaw No tune gll.'en. W. B. Sanders .,Saturday before full moon. I:I. C. Helfley First and Third Saturday each m. jThos. G. Ed wards (act'g). Saturday on or before full moon. ;\'1. C. 1'Iiller Wednesday on or before full moon.

~

00 00

~

l-..J

!J.

''''''''''1

0,

~ ~ <:I:l

~ ~

~.

::.:::::: Lowry ~·~·~·c~~b~ia·.:::::I~i;;,co~;· City St. Clair

403 Lowry Ci~y 404 Alexalldna 4051Everton 406 Malden 407\ROyal.. 408 Montrose 409 Ci vil Bend 410 Iberia 41lIJoppa ; 412 Appleton Cit y 413 Valley 414 Greensburg 41fi HunnewelL 416 Cache 417 White Water 418 Clear Creek

:.:::::::;ri;o;;:'if'HiiihCS'::::::::::::I:jOh'n'O:Joi;es":::::"::::::::: Saturday on or after full moon. IJ. R. Barnett R. M. Gracy 8aturda~ on or before full moon. C. J. Hagan W. B. Haston Saturday on or before full moon. :H. ~dington G. i\L Wilson ~~~urdaY all or before full moon. n~l~khn Damel Haynes IJ. P. Lll;sswell I~Tlday on or befor~ full moon. LlVl11gston J. W. Herrold A. B. }< rench Second & Fourth ::Sat. each month~ ~Ionlrose Henry A. J. RusselL W. A. Walker ,Saturday on or before full moon. Civil Bend Daviess S. L. Hardinger E. L. Frost First & Third Saturday each m. Iberia: M.il.1er IA. A. Arendall IJOhn on or before full moon. IHart\'llle : Wngh~ E. C. Steele Wm. NICkle Fnday on or before full moon. , Appleton Clty St. Clair W. F. McColley IAlbert Falcon Saturday on or before full moon. Bolckow Andrew Eo C. Bennett Chas. Davis ISecond & Fourth Sat. each month. Greensburg Knox S. P. lIIaytield S. L. Smith 1illO time given. Hunnewell Shelby W. S. ~lcClintic W. n. 'fhichoff Saturday on or before full moon. South St. Louis St. Louis S. R. Stoddard Danl. Gunn Second & Fourth Sat. each month. Latlin Bollinger M. L. Spradling B. F. Winters Saturday on or after full moon. Lincoln olBenton ,Geo. W. Weaver Enos. H.lI'!oxley IFoUl:th Saturday each month. Alexandna Everton Malden .; MooreSVille

Clark Dade:.;

F~rguson

ISa~urdll.y

~ ~


'GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEl\'IENT, ETc.-Continued.

~ ~

o I

Zo

LODGE.

I,

AND P. TOWN O. ADDRESS.

419 420 421 422 423

I

COUNTY.

I

Star IITaberville !St: Clair Itaska St. Louis St. Louis Urbana urbana Dallas Gate of the Temple North Springtield Greene Newburg CompetItion Laclede 42~ Samarit!ln ~onne 'l:erre ISt. Francois 425 Cedar CIty Cedar CIty Callaway

E. C. McLain John F. Taubold J. 1\f. FOW.ler G. A. Ramsey C. C. Henderson ,Jo~,n Marshall R. :;. Hodges

428 Louisville 429 New Madrid 430 Iron Mountain 431ICement.. 432 Black Oak 433 :\lack's Creek 43! Whe.E;ling 43<:> St. NIpholas 43Q Ash Grove 43/ 438 Temperance 439 :\It. Olive 4'1O TroweL 441IExcelsior 442 Burlington 4431Anchor

S. E. Estes S. L. Barnes J. D. Web!:> 11. O. Parrish T. C. Piper

I'

I

.

MASTER.

'

Sf.CRETARY.

\w.

s. Hoover Adolph Kleintop IGeo. W. Crndinton W. A. Reed John H. Rumfelt G. O. Harris Jas. Lee

I

TnIE OF MEETING.

'Saturday on or before full moon. 1st and 3rd Mondays each month. Wednesday on or before full moon. 2d and 4th Thursdays each month. Saturday on and after full moon. ~d and 4th Saturda.ys each month. Saturday on or before full moon.

:~~ Gie~~~ood·:.· ::.:::::::: Gie~~~o~·d·:.:::::::::: Sch~·y·ie~::::::::::::: w~~:·Loga;;:::::::::::::::::::::IH . ·.A'.. jo;;e·s:::::::::::::::::::::Saturday on or after full moon.

j

Louisville New Madrid Iron.l\[ountain Hallway Preston Mack's Creek Wheelin~

(;ave Sprmg Ash Grove · Smithville North View Lutesville Jackson

i

·.. ·

rCla y Webster Bollinger Cape Girardeau

Rurlin~ton Junc.i~o(law~y

St. LOU1S

:~~ ~.~~.::.:. ::::::::.. :::::::::: ~~~~~~::::

446 Greenfield 447 Fairview 448 Schell City 449 Bois D' Arc 450 Belton 451 Argyle 452 Verona 453 Forsyth 454 Cecil 455\ Barnesville 456. Wallace

Lincoln New Mltdrid St. Francois Polk Hickory Camden Livingston Greene Greene

/st. LOUIs

:

D. C. Reeds ,'Joel Cook. M. \V',Smith B. F. 'leeter J. B. cross

lVO Ret1ll'ns.

1

D. Cargenter R. H. "'keen IW. R. Murray I

Wm. Scn.iby IGeo. J. BIggS : Geo. E. Comegys

:

Dade Sullivan Vernon Greene Cass I·~evada Vernon Verona Lawrence IForsyth Taney Cottonwood P'nt. Mil;.Sissippi.. iLogan's Creek Reynolds Bunceton Cooper

I~,econd and Fonrth Saturdays.

1 h.ursday before full moon. FrIday before full moon.

.

IJ. D. l\IcDonald 'vV.'R. Brooks A. B. Jaques John T. ~hort 1'1'; J. Hupt. ,,\ m. Rclpschlaeger

IJ· L.lVlizener T. S. Florance I.Geo. E. Statler Jacob H. Schaefer IA. Y. Stitt.. R. H. Caffall.

llst and 3rd Saturdays each month. Friday before full moon. Fri. bef. f. m. Yzyr. &. Fri. aft. otb. yz Saturday on or before full moon. 1st and 3d Saturdays each month. 2d and 4th Wednesdays ea. month.

Mason Tallbutt J. oM. Schrock '1'. C. Hambaugh ,\.1. L. Hoyal. W. N. Evans ,H. B. Harris IJ. W. Gregory IJ. M. Harworth Q. A. Tipton Henderson Chitwood 1Wm. B. Karns

Seymour Hoyt.. H. C. 'Warren, Jr '1'. L. Strong R. S. Sims J. B. Robinson R. J. McGowan F. E. White .T. H. parrish J. Brusher '\ThOS. S. Barnes Chas. P. Tutt

First and Third Saturdays ea. mo. Tues. afterFri. on or bef. full moon. Third Saturday each month. 2d and 'Uh Saturdays each month. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Tuesday on or before full moon. First and Third Tuesdays ea. mo. ,:Saturday on or lJ.fter full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. ISatmday on or before full moon.

::..::::::: ~.~~:: : ::::.. ::::::::: ~:.~:.~~~~~~.::::::::::::::::::!~ . . ~: ..~~~.~:::::::::::::::::::::::

Greenfield IScottsville Schell City \Bois D' Arc Belton

ISaturday on or before full moon. ~Ionday on Or before full moon. ISaturday on or aft~r full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. jSaturday on or after full moon.

~

~

~

~

~.

r--"'1

o ~

f'"


4571Triple Tie 4<>9lHazelwood 460 Lambskin 461 Caruthersville 462 Santa Fe

Brazeau Dadeville Seymour St. LOUiS Caruthersville Sante Fe

464Aullvllle .: 465, Gaynor C!ty 466 Centre VIew 467 Pleasant Hope 468 Red Oak 469 Plato 470I}l'?daway 471 Mmeral.. 4.72'Pickering 473 Nineveh 47~ Guilford 47<> Golden 476 Mt. Hope 477 Henderson 478 Racine 479 Rich Hill 480 Jewel 481 Clinton 482 I Clintonville 483 Irish Grove 484 Kirkwood 485 Cold Water 486 'Cairo 487 Herndon 488 Lock Spring 489 Lakeville 490 Montevallo 491IVandll.Jia 492 Daggett. 493 Vernon 494 Lewistown 495!GlObe 496 Robert Burns 497 Straffor~ 498 Kaseyvllle ~99IpayneSVille : 000 Jameson 501 Buckner 502 Philadelphia

Aullvllle.: ~afayette Gaynor C.lty Nodaway Centre,VIew Johnson Pleasant Hope IPolk Red Oak Lawrence Plato Texas Maryville l'iodaway Oronogo Jasper Pickering ,'NOdaWay Olney Lincoln Guilford .: Nodaway Golden CIty Barton Odessa Lafayette Henderson Webster Seneca 路.. l'iewton Rich Hill Bates Pleasant Hill Cass Clinton Henry Eldorado SpringsCedar Fairfax ! Atchison Kirkwood 'St. Louis IB.rosley Cass Cairo Randolph Herndon Saline Lock Spring Daviess Lakeville 1Stoddard Montevallo lVernon Vandalia 'Audrain Loutre Island 'Montgomery ~lounds Vernon Lewistown ILewis Lo~isill:na Pike GalnsvIlle ,Ozark Straffor~.: IGreene Kaseyvllle jMacon Paynesville Pik~ Jameson Davless Buckner Jackson Philadelphia Marion

4~8Melville

463'Clifto~

1

1

IThay~r

lperry D!l-de Webster \St. Louis Pemiscot.. IMonroe Oregon

W. R. Wilkenson Wm. H. Watson John P. Robertson A. R. Barbee H. C. Schult C. C. Davis John A. Fraley J. B. Jones : S. C. L.each \W.~. DeLl;I:ncy LoUIS M.ll11er J. L. Apperson John Geers Chas. Lippman J. H. McAboy J. W. Trullinger John E. Moseley W. J. Beg,gs John E. barrett J. W. :McBurney IT. B. Horn R. J. Henderson ' F. E. Kellogg John 'F. McAfee Albert Judge J. B. Warren J. J. Denny J. G. Hawkins G. L. Sayles J. B. Gooding Wm. J. Hall J. R. Page Jesse Jennings John H. Dooley C. G Daniels Wm.' J. Wray P. H. Shanholtzer J. K. Stroup Wm. C. Freedman IJ. A. Melton Jas. R. Leathers ,J. C. Brodly ,S. T. Howell S. W. Hudson A. Callahan

lw.

E. N. Barbel路 G. ~. AlI,d~r Wm. J. 'I mnble John B. Thompson Wm. A. Ward J. M. Davis D. F. Powell B. R .. Barns S. A. Allen J J. w,harton John C. Cochran James Gowanlock J. M. Embree Geo. P. Bellows C. J. Hubbell IF. M. Wallis Theron Ives IHenr y Coo~ J. W. MardICk J. A. Swetnam 路G. F. Lilliston R. C. Greer J. '1'. Weathers W. D. Myers Wm. Ellis A. J. Adcock Joseph Hagrefe Hu~o S. Jacobi W. R. Glass ,J. S. Bennett C. J. Wheeler L. L. Brookshire W. L. McCray A. A. Batte%ore R. S. Pearson H. Bezold W. H. Parker \R. w. Bagby Wm. A. Gunn : A. McGlllty Jeff Buster F. W. Patton John H. stucker E. R. Henthorn J. B. Cort

jI.IH.

:So time giz'en. l~hu~sdaY: on or before full moon. lvo ttme gwen. 2d & 4th Wednesdays each month. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or bef?re full moon. Saturday on or before fnll moon. lsa~urda.y on or before full moon. j!rIday on or before full moon. fhursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. ,Saturday before full moon. 12? and 'lth Saturdays each month. ,lhursday on or before full moon. :Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Tuesday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second and Fourth Wednesdays. Saturday before full moon. 2d and 4th Fridays each month. Saturday on or before full moon. Tuesday on or before full moon. 20. and 4th Mondays each month. saturday on or before full moon. Fourth i:iaturday each month. 'Tuesday on or before full moon. !Saturday on or after full moon. ISaturday nearest full moon. No time given. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Tuesdav before full moon. !Saturdiy before full moon. , 1st and 3rd Thursdays ea~h month. No Ret~t-rns. ISaturday on or after full moon. Saturday 011 or before full moon. ,Saturday on or !:>efore full moon. ISaturday after full moon. 1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. Saturday on or before full moon.

1--100 00

:-l

~

~ ~ ~

~ ~

~.

~ ~

~


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATElVIENrl', ETc.-Continued.

~ l\:)

o i LODGE.

I

50! Platte City 505 Avalon 506 Lathrop 507 Clearmont 508 Saxton 509 Van Buren 510 Biswell 511 Skidmore 512 Webb City 513!Chariton 514Exeter 515 Galena 516 Milford 5017 Seligman 518 ~riental... 519'1 urIley 520 Toltec

Platte City Avalon ILathrop Clearmont saxto.n Van Buren Browning Skidmore Webb City IGuthridge MillS Exeter Galena Milford Sl:'ligma.n :Blackburn Turney :\Iexico

523 Kidder 524 Spickardsville 525 Cunningham 526 Wayne 527 Higbee 528 Conway 529 Niangua 530 Ritchey 531 Lane's Prairie

Kidder Spiclmrdsville 'Cunningham Piedmont.. Higbee Conway Niangua Ritchey Vichy

~,

AND P.TOWN O. ADDRESS.

I

I

C ·. aUNT\'.:

M S ' ! ASTER. ECRETARI..

_ Platte Livingston IClinton Nodaway IBuchanan Carter Linn Nodaway Jasper ·IChariton: Barry Stone Harton Barry

H. D. Carlos John W. Coots F. Kern : Z. T. :Martin

1

L. Jeffries Jas. M. l\'IcGhee John Carter F. L. Zeller E. T. Webb E. D. Hershey 'B. F. McCary I·J. F. seaman C. F. Robertson T. J. Taylor iSa~ine J. 1,'. Ta~lor Clmton J. ']. EstIlL Rep. of Mexico :A. W. Parsons

jG. F. Jones W. T. Jenkins J. W. Maberry D. H. Kendall

:

T

....< IME OF !"EETIN~.

P. N. Smith Joel F. Short H. W. Crawley B. W. Campbell. 'W. S. Chinll G. C. Couch ,P. A. BOucher H. Smith J. M. Herlocker W. W. Frost John E. Hays Wm. Moore ,W. J. DeGress (acting)

Saturday after full moon. Saturday before full moon. 1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. 1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. iVO Ret1t1'ns. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. :First Saturday each month. ISaturday on or before full moon. IFirst Wednesday each month. uVo lirne gi·ven. jTuesda y .on or before full moon. Saturday nearest full moon. Third Saturday each month. ,No time given. ~ednes~a~ on~o~ before full moon. FIrst & '1 hlrd l' fl. ea. month. Last Thursday each month.

C. R. Parker F. A. Bonner A. Ande r son · C. E. l\Iax.. A. J. L.essley IIR. O. Hardy John J. Redmond J. H. :\Iiller R. A. King

1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. 1st & 3rd Wednesdays each month. 11st and 3rd Wednesdays each mo. 2d and 4th Saturdays each month. Wednesday on or before full moon Saturday after full moon. Saturday before full moon. ISaturclay on or before full moon. Saturday Oil or before full moon.

IT.

~g ~~{:c?t;~::·::.:::::::::~~~~:.c;o~1ty:.:::::::r:cte~~~·.::::::::::::::I:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::'::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~~~ ~~~~:~~: Caldwell Grundy Chariton Wayne Randolph Laclede Webster Newton Maries

Wm. Wilmott J. B. Wright I. B. BedelL D. J. Allen S. Lessley Thos. Anderson J. M. Robertson IJ. M. Ritchey W. A. Dilloll

"'' ' ' ' ' 1

·

~

.......

~

100,')

~

~ . ~ ~.

~

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o Cl

f'"


Compiled from Annual

/

Ret~trns,

~

STATE~IENT.

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR

00 00

::t

of date August 1, 1886, incl~tding receipts from all sources up to September 15, 1887.

L.-.J

t Not Reported. I

i

.1

21

"I

NAME OF LODGE.

~"Mi'''''Uri

!

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~

II~II~ ~!~I~I~ ~ ~'121 ~;~ 15~ ~~ ~~ I mE"o'QPr'I1i.'.~· a o:o'.~ ." .'" ,.

I

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81.0

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p.;

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...................•........................................... 2IiVIeridian ,...................................

3 Beacon I

I

~ 1.0

.0

1

61 7

6 7

5 7

1251

8

3

2, 77 21127

'81

38501 6350

1

·

·

1

I

24

38 50 1 6250

.

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1

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21

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18

·f·;I::::;:::::::

l\:) l\:)

co


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Contimted.

l\:) l\:) ~

t Not Reported.

~S

.

I

I

I1'~-

NAME OF LODGE.

~_

I

I1'Ci 1.1'2'Ci~p.,I'Ci1 I~ ~I 1I~I I ISI'Ci

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I ~~ I ... ~~ '8gl c8;§~·s

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30 Hun"vlll'.......•............................................ 1

1

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Hij~f:·:·::::·::::::·:::::\::::f:::::::::::::::::::::t;!:::JI:;!:::~i:l!}!!I~i<hl}l~I···nft!:::··:::·:i::::::::::, :::::::::: ;·tii:::·::·:::: 37ICOO".u . u u . . ... u.u! ,11·1..·..· ~Ol °1 2

5 11

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100

·1

1

1000

,............

.

~~i~~~~l~~:~i~~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::\ ~I ~ ~I !I"~ t:+~I:j ~ ·t·t ~~19 ~~ 881:::::::::::>::::::::::1:::::::::::: !~ ~g :::::::::::: 1

'"1'' 1' ' ' '

"'1"'1 950 ·\ 950 .. :~IIJ~We~~~::.~~~~·:::.·.·.::·:.·.·.::·.::·.·.~·::::.·.·::::····:··::····::::::::::::::::·~I ~ .. ··3/· 2 3::: "41::: :::1 :::1 i '2 ::: ~~ ~~ ~~ :::::::::::: C:::::::::I :::~:::::::: I·....si'"b·o :::::::::::: 1 44 Jacksonville "'1'"1''' 1 1 1'" 43 21 50 ··.. 2150 . :~I{t~~~~Ml~~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ··.. ·2\ ~1 2 ..·..6 "2 "21:::'' 3 :::!-'i l ::'j ::: ~~ 2~ ~~I :::'''.::::::: :::'::.:::::: :::::'.:::::. 2~ 8~c::::::::: 4250

411Etna

·

···

I .. ·.. ·

·

I

11'"

1

1.. ·

1

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1

·

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1

1

47 Fayette..................................................................

1

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"'1'''111 4111 89

4450

~i~ \~ f:~·: .:) t~u~; :; i~:.i<;:/: u; ; : u. :.;:u.t.; ~i .• . ~'· · ;'·:·:~iI.• ·~I·~i .~': Y·':i.:···I···::;'.;!;~! .1 ·:~; . . ~.~I : .:.: .• • 54IIndex

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· · ~f·~I: • : :.: .:

11 50 ................................•... 1

11 50 ........•.•.

i l i ~ ~ i , I t . : ; ; : : : ) : \ i ~ ) i ) ( " / · \ : ~ : ; : \ : ; ? ~ , · · ~ : . : ~ ' ·:::)i ;;:;ti:t :l • • !It : .i:~ :1 .~i·:i · · ~·i· • ;:;: ;• :;, • :•• • • • : ;:;:• • • ····iii.;• • •:.; ; i ~ ~gl " ;!

62IVincil.: · · ·.. · 63 Cambndge.............................

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6 4,

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41

4

3 11

1

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1

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I

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il ::.I.~: : :1110............ ::: I:::1 ::: ::: 'I :::1 ~rl ~g ~gl :::::::::::: I:::'·:'·:::::: I::::::::::::i····20·501:::::::::::: ~~ ¥~~g.~.~.~~.~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::1 ::::::<::::: i ~I'~I ::: .? ::: ::: . ~I ::: ~~' ~g ggl::: ::::::I::::::::.. : :1 ::::::::::::1 ~~ gg :::::::::::: sulllvan........................................lrl! llr ...I'!I 351 501 1...... . 50 .. lllii;i~~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::·::::::::::::::::::::::'::!} . }j ]'1i ~,:Il~i! i~1 ~I' Hi ~ til . :::::::":::::::.:::::::: :1 I!::::: Z~'warrcn"''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''1 11 ·.. ~I· . "'j"'I'" go · ·1 ~~I~~~~~~b~';g:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::1 ~I

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~~I~~~~~~de·;;~·e·.:::::::::::::::·:::::::: . .·::::.. .: ::..:: :::::..::::.~

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1

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1

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·I..·.. ·I I..····I·.. I.. l .. ·I...I.. ·I·+.. 411 ~g~ ~?!~~~~gio;;· :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::I ~ ~I ~I \s "il ..~ iol::: ~ C ~~! ' 103 West View : ' '1'2192 ' 29 104 HerOine , 4 j 3 , 41 4 "'1'"2 '"1'''''''1''' 91 ~g~I~~ffaStiN~~·::::::::::::::::::::::::. ::::..:::::.·::::::.:::.: :::::: *1 ~ ~ ~I f .\'2 ::: "il : : . ~I ..~"j 1~~ l07 Williamsville 2 I 3 , "·r"·/·"I ..,I ..-/--. 29 ig~I?sy~~~city:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::/ ~i ~! ~ J!'s L:: . ~ ::l.~I:::, ..~1 Ig1 100Icanton

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650

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14 50 4600............ ~~ 88 I::::::::::::I 1'

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1450 1

::::::::::::

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Of


~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATElVIENT-Continued. * Returns

~

O':l

received since this Table was made up. (j

..: ]

s-

II .-~~ -d

NAME OF LODGE.

~

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