Page 1

OFFICIAL PROCEEDI GS OF THE

IXTY- ECO D A

UAL COMMU ICATIO OF THE

/I. W.QIlAND lODQ£ A. ::M.

A. F. &

OF THE

STATE OF MISSOURI, HELD IX i'T. LOnS,

COM E CI G OCTOBER 11, A. D. 1 ti:!; A. L.

5L)~2 •

• SPECIAL ORDER. Each COP)' of

these !'roc-eedings sent to a .ubordinate Lodge, In the Cll.re of the lIIllSter or Secretll.ry thereof, is intended exe)u.h'el,r for that Lodge, and not IlIl the personal property of any officer or member. Three copie are sent to each Lodge, one for the use of the Worshipful MllSter, and one for Secretary, while in office, and are by them to he turned oyer to their successors in otlice with the other property of the Lodge, and the third COP)' is always to be retained in the Lodge,room, for the use of the members. By ORllER 0" THE GRA~I' LOIIG>:.

l'T. LOrI15:

JII'HII R. IIILDRETll I'RINTIN(; CO)IPANY, -Wi' l...\.: ~u.-) XORTH FOl'RTH STREeT.

1882.


OFFICIAL PROCE·EDINGS OF THE

SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION OF THE

M. W. GRAND LODGE A. F.

AND

A. M.

OF THE

s rrAl"E OF MISSOURI, CONVE~ED

ST. LOUIS

1

O~TOBER

AT

10 1 A. D. 1882; A. L. 5882.

ST. LOUIS:

HUGH R

HILDRETH PIUNTING COMPANY, 40i & 405

KO~TH FOURTH STREET.

1882.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS· OF THE

SIXTY-SECOND

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION OF THE

t.

M. W, GRAND LODGE, A. F. & A. M" STATE OF MISSOURI. • The Sixty-second Annual Communication of the l\iost W orshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri, convened in Freemasons' Hall, in the city of St. Louis, October 10th, 1882, at 10 o'clock A. M. PRESENT. A. i\f. DOCKER Y

J,l. W. Grand Jlfaster. ~

REV. C. C. WOODS, D. D

R. W. Deputy Grand Master.

LEE A. HALL

_...

J. W. BOYD 'V. LUKE REV. JOHN D. VINCIL, D. D

.T.

R. IV. Senior Grand Warden.

as R. W. Junior Grand Warden. ;

R. W. Grand Treasurer. R. W.Grand

secret~ry.

ALLAN McDOWELL

R. TV. Grand Lecturer.

REV. JOHN E. BAItNES

W. Grand Chaplain.

REV.

~.

H. BRIGGS....................................... IV, Grand Chaplain.

GEO. R.HUNT

F. L. SCHOFIELD F. W. MOTT..........

, ,

as IV, Grand senior Deacon.

as W. Grand Junior Deacon. TV. Grand lIfarshal.


Proceeding8 of the

4

G. L. FAULHABER....................................... W. A. 路HOLMAN as M. F. BROWN as J. H. DEEMS J. P. WOOD as J. W. BOyD................................................... ASA MADDOX as JOHN W. OWEN..........................................

W. Grand

[Oct. ~ftfarshal.

W. Grand Sword Bearer. W. Grand Slanda?'d Bem路er. W. Grand Senior Steward. IV. Gmnd Junior Steward.

lV". Grand Oi'alor. W. Grand Pursuivanl.

lV. Grand Tyler. _

OPENING.

The Grand Lodge was opened in AMPLE FORM by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, preceded by music, and by prayer offered by Grand .Chaplain Hev. Bro. C. H. Briggs. CREDENTIALS.

A Committee was appointed on Credentials, consisting of Brothers Erwin- Ellis, Wm. H. Carpenter and H. B. Butts. QUORUM.

'rhe l\iost Morshipful Grand Master declared a quorum present. ANNUAL ADDRESS.

The Grand Master then delivered the following Address: BRETHREN OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI:

We are permitted, by the goodness of God, to assemble in the Sixty-second Annual Communication of our Grand Lodge. With grateful expressions to the Almighty Father for his continued and unfailing mercies, let us address ourselves to the work before us. While the year has been crow\1ed with plenty-abundant harvests having rewarded the tillers' toil-prosperity has abounded unto all, find peace has dwelt among our Brethren. Never bas the citizen, the patriot and the Mason had ~reater reason for praise to God throughout our jurisdiction thun now. I have but little to report in the way of OFFICIAL ACTS. I am able to report, from information, received, that the sixteen Lodges chartered by this Grand Lodge at its last session, were duly constituted and started on their mission of good under promising circumstances. I must be excused for making special


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1882.J

5

mention of the constitution of " Carter" Lodge, KO.1S7. This Lodg-e being located at the home of our deeply loved and sincerely mOQrned Brother, James E. Carter, late Senior Grand Warden of this Grand Lodge, the Craft in Jefferson City desired to honor the memory of the worthy deceased, not only by giving his name to the newly formed Lodge, but by making the occasion of its organization one of interest and fraternal pleasure. At the speeial request of the members of said Lodge, I issued a commission to Bro. John D. Vinci! to constitute the Lodge. On the 3d of November last that duty was discharged with perfect satisfaction to all concerned. Bro. Vinci! was efficiently assisted, in performing the duty assigned, by Right Worshipful Brothers Allan :McDowell, Grand Lecturer, and H. B. Hamelton, District Deputy Grand Master. A large number of members of Jefferson Lodge, No. 43, ¡of which our late Bro. Carter was a Past Master, were present. The occasion was made memoraule by the eloquent, just and glowing tribute paid to the memory of our departed Bro. Carter, by Grlmd Secretary Vinci!, in whose honor the Brethren had erected a living monument. It was my desire and purpose to pay such tribute to the name and worth of Bro. Carter, but it was performed for me by my friend and Brother, Dr. Vinci!.

DISPENSATIONS TO FORM NEW LODGES. Dispensations to form new' Lodges have been ordered at the points hereinafter named. In no instance have I made such grant without the fullest investigation through. aU available sources ItS to the propriety of establishing Lodges in the given localities. The A.dvice and information rendered me by the different District Deputy Grand Masters, in their Districts, cnabled me to act with a clearer understanding as to what course of action should be pursued. In this respect their counsel was of great value. As the Grand Secretary will furnish full data concerning the Dispensations issued, it is only necessary for me to rcItort the name and location of the Lodges, which I herewith append: AVALON LODGE, Avalon, Livingston County. LATHROP LODGE, Lathrop, Clinton County. ROME LODGE, Rome, Douglas County. Applications for the above were referred to me by the Grand Lodge. CLARDIONT LODGE, Claremont, Nodaway c::;ounty. SAXTON LODGE, Saxton, Buchanan County. VAN BUREN LODGE, Van Buren, Carter County. BISWELL LODGE, Browning, Linn County.• SKID~IORE

WEBB

LODGE, Skidmore, Nodaway County,

CITY LODGE, Webb City, Jasper County.

CHARITON LODGE, Guthridge :Mills, Chariton County. EXETEH LODGE, Exeter, Barry County. GALENA LODGE, Galena, Stone County. MILFOHD LODGE, Milford, Barton County. SELIG~[AN

LODGE,

SeligmaI~,

Barry County.

e.


6

Proceeding8 of the

[Oct.

DISPENSATION REFUSED. An application for a Dispensation to institute a Lodge at Bois D' Are, in Greene County, was returned without my approval. The limited territory in which a Lodge at that point would have to operate did not warrant an experiment, which,atbest, was of very doubtful character. AUTHORIilA TJ. ONS. Permission was granted to the Brethren herein named for the purposes indicated: To Rev. C. C. WOODS, D. D., Deputy Grand Master, to dedicate hall of McDonald Lodge at Independence. To Rev. JOHN D. VINCIL, D. D., Grand Secretary, to lay corner-stone of First Methodist Church, South, in St. Louis, June 5; and to lay corner-stone of the Southern Methodist Church, in Kirksville, June 23d. To J. W. FARRIS, District Deputy Grand 'Master, to lay corner-stone of Opera House and Masonic Hall at Lebanon. To E. D. PARCE, District路 Deputy Grand Master, to lay corner-stone of Masonic Hall at Ash Grove. To R. W. McMULLEN, District Deputy Grand Master, to lay corner-stone of a new 'school building at De Soto. To CLARK CRAYCRAFT, to lay corner-stone of Masonic Hall at Joplin. INVITATIONS AND VISITATIONS. It were impossible for a Grand Master of a jurisdiction so large as ours to accept a

,-

tythe of the invitJItions extended to him without wholly neglecting all personal interests and business, hence I have been compelled to decline manv calls where, I have no doubt, the pleasure would have compensated for any sacrif1c~s I might have ~ade. I may make special mention of invitations to attend upon very interesting ceremonies in St. Louis and St. Joseph. Owing to pressing engagements I was detained at hQme on both occasions. It was my privilege during the year to' visit the Craft in Kansas City, where I met with a most fraternal and cordial welcome. k similar visit to St. Joseph was enjoyed, where a generous greeting was accorded.

On the 24th of June, aided by many Brethren and leading officers of Northwest Missouri, T laid the corner-stone of the Court House in Maryville, Nodaway County, It was the occasion for an immense gathering of the Craft and citizens in that grand section of our State. The interest of the occasion was most happily enhanced by an eloquent oration, delivered by Rev. Dr,; Henderson, of Hannibal, Past Grand Chaplain of Kentucky. DECISIONS. It will be a cause of great pleasure. no dOUbt, to the Grand Lodge to learn that I have no decisions to report. The satisfaction is none the less genuine to myself, when I say that while many questions have been asked no occasion has arisen where a ruling was required outside of the plain letter of the law, and but few instances occurrcd where any elaborate intel'Pretation~ of the law became necessary. The most that has


1882.J

Grand Lodge oj'Missouri.

7

been reqnired was a reference to the law and decisions in existence. a simplif~'ing of the same and their application to given cases. It may be assumed with certainty that the admirably arranged Revised Laws, now in the hands of the Craft, have enabled the Brethren in this jurisdiction to become more familiar with our jurisprudence, and thus save the Grand Master the labor of settling many issues lon~ since determined. The complete and perfect arrangement of our laws will greatly facilitate the legal knowledge of the Craft in Missouri. . Believing that we have already taws sufficient to meet the exigencies of the Frater- . nity, I am happy not to add any ruling to the present regulations in force. It is to be hoped that many years may pass away before our journals shall be burdened, as in the past, with an excessive amonnt of rulings. Should snch be the case, no codification of our laws will be necessary while the present edition of the Revised Code lasts.

LODGE REMOVALS. The law or the Grand Lodge bein~ fUlly complied with, and the several changes being duly recommended by the proper officers, I authorized the following named Lodges to move into and occupy new halls: Ancient Land Mark Lodge, No. 356, Harrisburg, Boone County. 328, Cainsville, Harrison County. Cainsville 324, Independence, Jackson County. McDonald Spring Hill 155, Spring Hill, Livingston County. Independence 76, Independence, Jackson County. Morality 186, Renick, Randolph County. 118, Kingston, Caldwell County. Kingston l'iumb 375, Middletown, Montgomery County. Craft 287. Canton, Lewis County. 167, St. Louis. Orient Francaill Livingston 51, Glasgow, Howard County. Enreka 73, Brunswick, Chariton County. Globe 495, I~ouisiana, Pike County. Hiram 362, Kahoka, Clark County. Stockton 283, Stockton, Cedar County. Rich Hill 479, Rich Hill, Bates County 321, Denver, Worth County. Jonathan 94, Vienna, Maries County. Vienna Florida 23, Florida, Monroe County. 15, Emporia, Daviess County. Wegtern Star Cache 416, St. Louis. Barbee 217, Brownsville, Saline County. Malden 406, Malden, Dunklin County.

DUPLICATE CHARTERS Were issued, by my direction, by the Grand Secreta,ry, to the following named Lodges, thc originals having been destroyed by tire: Stockton Lodgc, No. 21\::;, Stockton, Cedar County. ~ Eureka 73, Brunswick, CharitOll County. Globe 4()5, Louisiana, Pike County.


8

Proceeclin.ds of the

[Oct.

GRAND LODGE ORDERS, ,,"s found on page 40 of the last printed journal, were promptly carried out, and notices were sent to the several Deputies, in whose Districts the Lodges were located, concerning their halls. DEEDS Were duly executed to the proper parties for the property sold by the Grand Lodge at Pittsville and Pacific. I am informed by the Grand Secretary that the balance due from the sale of the Hall at Pacific has been paid. The Grand Lodge has realized eight hundred dollars from said property. Bro. Robert C. Allen, having been intrusted with the management of our claim, found it necessary to resort to litigation in order to secure possession of t~e property. For his labor and care in the premises he deserves adequate compensation. GRAND SECRETARY'S OFFICE. For two years the Grand Lodge expressed its wish that another office should be secured for the use of the Grand Secretary, where the library could be preserved and made available. Thc committee having in charge this interest. soon after the close of our last session, leased a suite of rooms on the second floor of No. 620 Chestnut street. These rooms have been' tastefully fitted up and afford good otnce facilities and ample accommodations for our library and furniture. Having an excellent vault, all of our valuable papers are secured, while there is a complete exemption from the objections heretofore complained of. In December last I signed a contract with Dr. D. C. Gamble, owner of the property, thereby securing an office for the Grand Secretary for a term of five years, at six hundred dollars per year. This is the same amount paid for the former office. RESIGNATION AND APPOINTMENT. In March last I accepted the resignation of R. W. Bro. A. F. Barr, of Hunnewell, District Deputy Grand :Master of the Second Masonic District. I suusequently appointed Bro. J. C.Hearne, of Hannibal, and directed a commission to issue to him. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. VER1IfOl'lT.

In December last I cancelled, for cause, the commi~sion of R. W. Henry Clark, Representative of this Grand Lodge ncar the Grand Lodge of Vermont. At the same time I appointed and had commissioned ],L W. Bro. Henry I-I. Smith, Past Grand ),'1 aster, of Rutland, Vermont. . M. W. Bro. Smith was pleased to accept the appointment, in terms in keeping with his high character and Masonic worth.

QUEBEC.

The able and distinguished Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, Hon . .John H. Graham, LL.D., having' resigned his f'ommission as our Representative near that Grand Lodgc, at his jnstance 1 appointed to fill the vacancy R. W, Bro. H. L. Robinson. His commission was forwarded. He accepted the appointment with expressions of. fraternal courtes~'.


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

9

It alfords me pleasure to announce, in this connection, that the said Grand Lodge has appointed' and commissioned as it-e; Represcntath'e near this Grand Lodge our R. W. Bro, Rev, C. C. Woods, Deputy Grand Master. Thus the most fraternal relations have been established between the Grand Lodge of Quebec and our Grand Body. Sa soon as we accorded to that Grand Lodge an unqualified recognition we met with ' most frat~rnal courtesy, and a Representative was appointed by them at this Grand Lodge.

REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS

Have been reccived from the fonowing Districts: 1,2,3, 5,6,7,9,10,11,12, 16, 17, 18, 19,20,21,22, 2.5, ~8, 31,32, 3:l, 86, 37, 38, 41, '12, 13, 44, 46, '17,48. The contents of said Reports, embracing much valuable information and some important suggestions, should be epitomized so as to alford the 'best results from their labors to the Craft, and a just recognition of their meritorious services.

NEW MEXICO.

"

The Craft in this jurisdiction, as well, as in the entire country, has learned with deep satisfaction of the very amicable adjustment of the issues between our Grand Lodge and that of New :Mexico. The position assumed by this 1;l(~dy, at its last session. in the Report then adopted, led to an early lind satisfactory settlement. Silver City Lodge became convinced that to remain longer non-allegiant to the New Mexico Grand Lodge, though occupying its territor)', was inimical to the interests of Masonry there, and produc,tive of discord in the Fraternity at llLrge. Besides, it became quite evident to our Silver City Brethren, that the temper of the Grand Lodg-e of Missouri was such that they would not be permitted to occupy their anomalous position longer. Soon after our last session I opened a correspondence with :M:. W. Bro. Newcomb, Gralld Master of the Gracd Lodge of Kew Mexico, looking to a re-establishment of fraternal relations betwcen our respective Grand Bodies. The response was fraternal and courteous, desiring such consummatioll. Tn the meantimc, I addressed a communication to Worshipful Bro.'Cornelius Bennett, Master of Sqver City Lodge, No. 465, urging upon him to takc ~iUch steps as would hasten a much needed and earnestly desired adjustment of pending issues. December 19th, 1881, the Grand Lodge of New l\fexico met in Annual CommuIlication. The action of our Grand Lodge, at its recent session, was laid before that body, having been sent to them by the Grand Secretary through Grand Master Bro. W. H. Scott, of Illinois, as our intermediary. The subject at once received favorable consideration, and non-illtercourse was reVOked, while fraternal relations 'were declared as formally re-established. The Grand Lodge then provided terms on which Silver City Lodge, No. 465. might become idâ‚Źl1tifiedwith ~ew Mexico. These terms were subsequently accepted by the Silver City Lodge. The terms l5ubmitted were, that the'Silver City charter should be surrendered, and the legitimate members of said organization accept one from the Grand Lodge of New .Mexico, being permitted to elect their own officers and certify the same to 'the Gnllld Secretary. These terms being accepted, in due time a charter was issued, and Sil \"l~r City Lodge, No.8, now'stands on tbe roster of that Grand Lodge. Tn April laBt. I received notice from our Grand Secretary that the charter of the late Siln~r City Lodge, No. 1li5, had oeen received by him, and was filed lImollg the archives of the Grand Lodge. Thus happily ended ()Jle of the modern controversies to which we unwittingly became a party. Having been the first to unconditionally recognize the territorial supremacy and absolute soYereignt~' of the Grand Lodge of New'


10 .

Proceedin.t8 of the

[Oct.

Mexico, in 1877. we could not do less than see that said recognition was made to mean what our action declared. As this long-delayed settlement hM reached a final conclusion, there is cause for eong~atulation among all parties. We '1tre all wiser by the experiQnces realized from the controversy now terminated forever. That the doctrine of Grand Lodge sovereignty rests on /l, firmer basis than ever, and is better understood by American Masons, may be considered as some compensation for the agitations and complications of the pMt few years. Such are not likely to disturb the peace and concord of the American Grand Lodges in the future. NECROLOGY. While our jurisdiction bas not escaped tbe visitation of death among those good and great Brethren who have been leaders in the Grand Lodge, other jurisdictions have suffered the loss of their strong and able guides. Massachusetts. for tbe second time within a few years. has been bereaved of a Grand Secretary. R. W. Bro. Tracy P. Cheever, Grand Secretary, died November 23d, 1881. With Grand MMter Lawrence and others, he attended a Special Communication of the Grand Lodge at the dedication of a new Hall. As the evening festivities were in progress, he finished writing up the Proceedings, and said: "My record is finished. It will read right a hundred years hence." Suddenly stricken down by paralysis, the pen fell from his nerveless grasp, and his work was ended. His record was finished, and he went from labor. The jlirisdiction of New York suffered a similar bereavement, December last, in the death of Dr. Jam,es !IoL Austin, Grand Secretary. His active life. strong character, long and valuable labors in pUblic 8.'1 a Mason, rendered him one of the prominent members of the Craft in America. He was Grand Secretary of his Grand Lodge for nearly thirty years. His occupancy of other leading positions in the Craft placed him high in the esteem and thought of the Fraternity of this country. OUR OWN JURISDICTION

Has been deprived of two of its Past Grand Mastl'rs: Most Worshipful Brothers Sltmuel II. Owens and John Ralls are sleeping in dreamle'~squiet beneath the sod of the cemetery. One was cut down in the prime of a vigorus manhood. the other wa.,,' called away amid the quietudes of life's evening. Both rest from their labors. On the 22d of February last, at the Laclede Hotel, in this city, :Most Worshipful Bro. Samuel H. Owens ceased Ilt once to work and live. He had been in declining health for some time previous, and came to the city for medical treatment. No human skill could arrest the progress of the malady. His fine constitution, moved so long by an unconquerable will, yielded to disease and death. Little dreamed anyone present at our last session, 'who looked npon his commanding form, that to-day he would be missing from our annual gathering, where he had been so long an indispensible presence. Yet he is not among us now. There is an empty chair, and here are the insignia of mourning. The drapery of s~rrow hangs about, the Grand EMt, and tears faU at the announcement, " Bro. Sam Owens is dead." I was notified by the Grand Secretary of the death of Bro. Owens, and repaired to his late home in California, Missouri, where, amid the quiet sanctities of the holy Sahbath, February 26th, we laid to rest all that was mortal of our truly loved Bro., and PMt Grand Master, Owens. The Grand Lodge being then and there convened our beautifi.ll Ritual was performed under its auspices. For full partieulars cOllllectcd with the mourllful occasion, I refer you to the minutes of the specil1.l communication held, which will appear in the forthcoming journal of l'roeeedings. A :Memorial Committee was appointed on the occasion, and will report, no doubt, at the present comm unication.


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

11

-JOHN RALLS,

Past Grand Master, died on the 20th -!If July last, at his residence in New London, Ralls. County, in the seventy-fifth year'of his age. Grand Secretary Vincil telegraphed the intelligence to my address, but being abscnt from home, and remotc from lines of communication, I did not learn of the death of Bro. Ralls in time to attend or give directions concerning his funeral. He was buried at Olivet cemetery on Saturday, July 22d iust., by Ralls Lodge. No. 33, and Nâ‚Źw London Lodge, No. 307. A. F. lind A. M. The burial rites were rendered by Most Worshipful R. E. Anderson, Past Grand Master of Missouri. This venerated and patriarchal Brother-was a Kentuckian by birth, and a Missourian by adoption. His father, HOll. Daniel Ralls '(for whom Ralls County was named) came to the Territory of :Missouri in the )'ear 1817, when his son John WliS ten years old. Formore than sixty years nro. Ralls lived in Missouri, and in one community. H.is exemplary life, irreproachable chara.cter and good name constitute a rich legacy to his decendants, his country and the Masonic Fraternity. For fifty years he was a devout and consistent Christian and an active member of the ChUl;ch. He lIcver deemed it derogatory to his standing as a citizcn, patriot, soldier, :Mason or parent to acknowledge God in all his ways, and publicly dcclare bis firm belief in Divine Revelation. Trusted, honored and loved, his SUll went q,own_~\'ithout a cloud to dim the quiet lustre of its setting. As a soldier, he made a creditable record, and WOll a military title that was the synonym of honor. In the Spring of 1847 he was elected Colonel of the Third Regiment of Missouri Mounted Volunteers in the :Mexican war, and serve'd under the command of Gen. Sterling Price until the close 'of that war. He occupied a prominent position, and took an active part, in the battle of Santa Cruz De Rosales, and was highly commended by the commanding General for his bravery and skill during that bloody battle. As a Mason, he was true to his obligations, and ever faithful in the discharge of his duties. His record is with us. and :Masonic history in Missouri would be incomplete without the name, worth amI charcter of John Halls as important elements. Bro. Ralls received the degrees of Aneient Craft :Masonry at Palmyra, -Mo., in 1832, and the Chapter degrees in the R. A. Chapter of the same place. He was a member of New London Lodge, No. 21, and afterwards joined Halls Lodge, No. 33, and was several times elected Master of said Lodges. In October, 1846, he was elected and installed as Grand Master of Masons in Missouri. On his arrival in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in September, 1847 (being then Colonel of the Third Regiment of Missouri Mounted Volunteers, in the Mexican war), he assumed, in the name of the Grand Lodge of :Missouri, Masonic possession of the Territory of New Mexico, and granted a dispensation 'for a Masonic Lodge in Santa Fe, the first eyer organ ized tbere. The history of said Lodge ended with the' close of the Mexican war. I appointed the same Memorial Committee in the case of Bro. Ralls that had been previously constituted to prepare a tribute to the memory of Bro. Owens. No doubt but the Committee will report durillg the present session, when a proper memorial service will be observed.. THE CONDITION OF THE CRAFT Is gratifying, and the outlook, for the most part, is encouraging for the future. I would add that the finunces of the Grand Lodge have never been in so sound and satisfactory a condition. Being out of tIebt. with a. cash fund 011 hand of more than twenty thousand dollars, I can speak with assurance and say that our fiscal affairs have been well and prudently managed.


12

Proceedin.ds of the

[Oct.

CONCLUSION. I will conclude with utterances of sinccre gratitude to the Brethren of the Grand Lodge for the high honor conferred, and the confi,lenee bestowed upon me one year ago. While sensible that the hOllor was. undeserved , thC' expression of your confidence is none the less appreciated. I shall ever cherish the latter while I have prized the former. I will offer, in conclusion, words uttered by me one year ago, when assuming the weighty and grave responsibilities of an office tendered me by your partiality: ' "The age in whieh we live is intensely practical. The world measures us by our actions rather than our professions. Let us, therefore, Brethren, for the coming year,as for all future time, endeavor to empha.'iize more fully in our Iive:s and examples than at llny time heretofore, t/:Je great fact, the great truth; the /1:reat thought, which I would have you carry home with you to your Lodges, and let its echoes resound in your halls, that the great essentwl in Masonry is to practise its teachings. "Brethren, if this sentiment, this vital principle, be embodied 路in our lives, then Masonry rests on a foundation so strong, so secure, sq like the everlasting hills, that the storms of age yet to come shall not prevail against it." With renewed expressions of gratitude for the esteem and affection mltnifested to me in the past, I am, sincerely and fraternally,

ALEX. 1\1:. DOCKEHY, Grand l'[asler.

SUPPLEMENTAL ADDRESS. At the time I concluded my Address the Report of .the Grand Lecturer had not been submitted. It has since been placed in my hands, and exhibits a record of tireless, efficient work in this important department of' Masonic labor. The Report is herewith submitted. KLEIKTOPF CASE.

December 25th, last, charges were preferred against Bro. Adolph Kleintopf, l\faster of Ituska Lodge, No. 420. I cH.used an investigation to be had, under the charge of}{. W. Bro. Stephen ll. Potter, District Deputy Grand Ma~ter,SixteenthDistrict. The examination was thorough and impartial, and, in my opinion, did not warmnt me in suspending the accused from office. The papers in the case are herewith SUbmitted, marked "A,"

GltAND SECRETARY.

I cannot conclude this final 'record of official stewardship without recognir.ing gratefully my obligations to the Grand Secretary for his valued a.~sistance. Our rclatiolls have been most 'pleasant, and unmarked by a single incident to disturb that warm friendship that has existed between us for nearly twenty years. This recognition of a faithful ofIicer is not prompted by the etiquette of official relations, but is made became I have realiL:ed in the twelve months past that he is a most valued counsellor, a faithful friend, and a Grund Secretary without a superior,

ALEX. '1\1. DOCKEHY, Grand

.~{a8tcr.


1882.J

Grand Lodge of JlIissouri.

13

On motion of Bro. Stubblefield, the Address was referred, by the Deputy Grand :Master, to the following Committee of Past Grand Masters: XENOPHON RYLAND, THOS. E. GARRETT, THm1AS C. READY,

S. W. B. CARNEGY, R. E. ANDERSON, JOS. S. BROWNE,

S. H. SAUNDERS, JAS. E. CADLE, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD.

On motion, the Grand Lecturer was requested to exemplify the Work and Lectures of the First and Second Degrees路this , evening at 8 o'cl~ck. Most Worshipful Bro. Stubblefield made the f?llowing correction in justice to Savannah Lodge, No. 71: As an act of simple justice to a deserving Lodge, Savannah, No. 71, I wish to correct an error found in my Annual Addres~, presented olle year ago, as Grand Master, to the Grand Lodge. On page 16 of the Proceedings of 1881, Savannah Lodge, No. 71, is classed with others which had sent out" Begging Letters." This was an unintentional misrep. resentation of said Lodge, and was caused by a confounding of names. It should have been Samaritan Lodge. W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, Past Grand Master.

The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until 2, o'clock this afternoon.

:FIRST DAY-AFTERNOON SESSION. ST.' LOUIS, 1\1:0., October 10, 1882. The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 2 o'clock, by the :Most Worsh~pful Grand Master. Grand. Officers in their respective places. Bro. H. F. Stevenson, under a question of privilege, made a statement why he had not taken his seat as Grand Junior "Varden. STANDING COMMITTEES.

The Grand Master announced the following Standing Committees:


14

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

Chartered Lodges.-J. H. Austin, J. W. Farris. R. F. Stevenson, G. L. Fa.ulhaber, F. W. n. Zoll, J. Ed. Walker, J. R. Middleton, B. V. Chase, F. J. Tygard, M. F. Brown.

lIlott, C.

Unfinished Business.-J. B. Thomas, C. G. Hubbell,.1. S. Ambrosc, R. S. Moore, Sam'l

Cropper. Lodges Under Dispensation.-Chas. F. Vogel, Geo. F. Rogers, B. P. Bailey, J. L. Torrey, W. A. Holman,.J. S. Wallace, J. C. Hcarne, J. H. Deems, R. Barney, J. C. W. Lindsey, !f. L. Rogers. Appeals and Grievances.-N. M. Givan, R. E. Anderson, T. C. Ready, Jos. S. Browne,

Xen.

~yland.

Accounts.-J. E. Cadle, J. H. Frame, J. P. VardeqIan, David Baird, B. H. Ingram, A. 1\1. Crow, J. M. Sallce, J. T. RulIin, Jas. A. Gordon, D. E. Wray, G. P. Bigelow. Ways and .Means.-Lee A. Hall, J. A. Wickham, Jno. R. Parson, H. B. Butts, Asa Maddox, S. H. Saunders, C. S. GIaspell. . Charity.-R. E. Anderson, Jno. E. Barnes, W. I-I. Mayo, J. G. Middlecoff, C. C. Rainwater, R. R. Christie. Jurisprudence.-Thos. E. Garrett, R. E. Anderson, S. H. Saunders, W. R. Stubblefield,

F. L. Schofield. District Deputy Grand Masters.-S. B. Potter, Jno. Goodin, n. G. Wilkerson, J. P. Wood, Sam'l Shook, Wm. Gillespie, Jas. H. Baugh, C. G. Brooks, R. C. Walker, R. P. Clarkson, Philip Rodan. By-Laws.-Erwin Ellis, Jas. A. Adams, Jno. J. Dillinger, Woodson Lynes, P. H. Chambers,.Jno. B. Henderson, G. D. Brant, Thos. Beeler, W. H. Carpenter.

REPORT ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS.

lVlost Worshipful Bro. Xenophon nyland, for the Committee, presented the following report on the Address of the Grand Master: ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 10th,1882. To the .blost Worshipful Grand Lodge of .bfissouri, A. F. and A . .bf.:

The Committee on the. Address of the Most Worshipful Grand Master submit their report and recommend the distribution of the subject matters of the A'ddress as follows: 1st. That so much of the Address as refers to the dispensations for Lodges be referred to Committee ()n Lodges Under Dispensation. 2d. That the action of the Grand Master, in granting special dispensations, be approved. 3d. That so much of the Address as refers to the Reports of District Deputy Grand MastBrs and Grand Lecturer be referred to Committee on District Deputy Grand Masters' and Grand Lecturer's Reports. 4th. We approve the action of th<: Grand Master in the appointment of Foreign RepresentatiYes.

.~


1882.J

Grand

Lod~e

of MisSOltri.

15

5th. The restoration of harmony between this Grand Lodge and the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New Mexico is acknowledged with pleasure. And weare gratified that the action of Silver City Lodge has been such as to contribute to this eild, and .for this Lodge, in common with the Craft of Kew Mexico, we earnestly desire continued prosperity with the blessings of those\vho dwell together in peace Ilnd unity. For the kindly offices of our Most Worshipful Bro. W. H. Scott, Grand Master of Illinois, in the premises, we make acknowledgments with feelings of the utmost fraternity . . 6th. We recommend that the action of the Most Worshipful Grand Master, in refusing to suspend Bro. Adolph Kleintopf, Mo.ster of Huska Lodge, Ko. 420, be referred to a Special Committee, to be appointed by the Deputy Granq Master. . 7th. We recommend that the Committee on Ways and Means make suitable remuneration to Bro. Robert C. Allen for services rendered in behalf of this Grand Lodge referred to in the Address. 8th. The Craft hears, with sorrow, the official announcement of the death of Past Grand Masters'Samuel H. Owens and John Ralls, and approve of the appointment of the Special Memorial Committee, who, no doubt, wiII make suitable recommendations concerning our honored dead. Our sympathy is extended to the Brethren of New York and Massachusetts for the loss sustained by them, respectively, in tbe death of Brothers Austin and Cheever. Theirreeords arc finished. May they read right through all eternity. 9th. The healthy financial condition of the Most 'Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri is a cause for congratulation, and we commend the zeal of the. officers and Craft in this regard. The faithful dIscharge of pecuniary obligations is one of the best signs of the moral condition of the Craft,'and \"e rejoice with Grand Master Dockery in the fact that the condition of the Craft is gratifyin~ and encouraging for the future. No decisions having been reported to this communication is an evidence that the officers and members of th'e Craft bave been admonished of their duty, to study and understand the law and practise its precepts, thereby elevating themselves to, and occupying that station of, manhood to which every Mason should attain. 10th. The administration of Grand Master Dockery has been a successful one. The advancement made is owing to bis wise and judiciolls conduct of affairs, and we commend to the Craft tpe vital principles alluded to in the closing words of his practical and sensible Address. He has sought to make no innovations in our law; nor burden the records with repeated decisions; and fur his wise and conservative course is entitled to the hearty thanks of this Grand Lodge. XENOPHONRYLA ND, S. 'V. B. CARNEGY, S. H. SAUNDERS, THOMAS E. GARRETT, R,.E. ANDERSON, .JAMES E. CADLE, THOMAS C. READY, ,JOSEPH S. BROWNE, W. H:. STUBBLEFIELD, Committee.

VISITOR REOEIVED.

rrhe Grand Seeretary introduced to the Grand" Lodge M. W. Bro. D. 1\1. Browning, Grand :Master of the Grand Lodge of' Illinois. He was warmly welcomed by Grand l\faster Dockery


16

Proceedin.t8 of the

[Oct.

in appropriate terms, and invited to a seat in the Grand East. Bro. Browning respollded to the fraternal welcome extended him in a cordial and eloquent manner. SPECIAL COMMITTEE.

Brothers Geo. R. H1lnt, Geo. L. Faulhaber and E. Price were appointed to examine and report upon the evidence in the case of Bro. A. Kleintopf,Worshipful l\1:aster of ltaska Lodge, No. 120. . GRAND LECTURER'S REPORT.

Bro. Allan ]\[cDowell, Grand Lecturer, presented his Annual Report, which is as follows: ST, LOUIS, Mo., Octobcr, 1882. DR. A. M. DOCKERY, Gmnd }[asta Qf Masons, 8t. Louis, lrfo.:

lrfosl. Worshipful Sir and Brother-Herewith] present my Annnal Report as Grand

Lecturer for the year ending October, 1882 : It affords me pleasure to state that the general condition of the Craft is very satisfactory, the work of Masonry, ItS a rule, wcll done, and the membership entirely harmonious. The bonntiful harvests, with which we have been blessed, have, no doubt, contributed very largely to the present prosperous condition of l\Iasonry in Missouri. Under thc beneficial working of thc present law, relating to non-payment of dnes, we have gottcn rid of ncarly all our drones, and the Masonic hive hums with life and activity. Thcre arc exceptions-far too many-some of which will be referred to under the notices of the路several Districts.

At the beginning of the Masonic year, after consultation with yourself, I determined, as far as possible, to confine my labors to the poorer working Lodges, and to those that had been ieast visited hcretofore ; and I have endeavored faithfully to carry out the programme. The result has bcen, in the main, satisfactory. I may add not wholly so. Borne of the poor working Lodgcs arc so, not from want of opportunity, but from lack of zeal in the cause of l\fasonry. As a general rule, however, there has been a marked increase of interest at my various visitations ovcr those of the last few years. When practicable, for the purpose of saving time and cxpense, I have endeavored to have two or more Lodges unite at thc most convcnient and ecntral point for pnrposes of instruction. I tind the Lodges, as is the case in all jurisdictions, more deficient in the lecturers than in the work, and have therefore given spceial attention to thc former. The Lodges arc generally fairly furnished, but where I havc found them deficient I have not failed to urge upon them the necessity of providing their halls with all necessary furniture, particularly pillars for middle chamber, charts containing emblems, and suitable working tools. Much carelessness is often exhibited by parties in arranging the furniture of a Lodge, in consequence of which chairs, desks, and particularly stoves, hllve been so placcd in the Lodge as very much to interfere with the proper workillg of the Degrees. l\f)' sug. gestions in this matter have generallr been cheerfully complied with.


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

17

I have urged upon Brethren the propriety, and even the necessity, of more fully utilizing the young members in the work than is usually done. In too many Lodges a few Past Masters do most of the work, giving the younger Brethren but little show, either to learn or keep themselves proficient by practice. I fully realize the importance of having experienced men at the head of affairs; but under their direction the younger members could, and with suitable encouragement would, do the active part of the work. In many Lodges I have found old Past Masters acting as Deacons, Stewards, etc., not from any necessity caused by scarcity of good material out of which to select those officers, but solely because they better understood the work, overlooking the fact that this very custom has had much to do in dampening the ardor and quenching the laudable ambition of the. younger Brethren. As occasion offered, I have called the attention of Brethren to the high moral duties taught by Freemasonry, and have endeavored to impress upon their minds that it is not merely a glib repetition of the work and lectures that constitutes the really good Mason. '1'0 earn that proud distinction, a Mason should be foremost in every good word and work in the community in which he resides; should be a better man because he is a Mason; should be true to himself, and upright, honest and just as well as charitable, and â&#x20AC;˘ loving in his intercourse with his 'fellow men. Those twin vices, drunkenness and blasphemy, which degrade the Mason ¡and disgrace Masonry, are year by year less frequently practised by Masons. There are but few, if any, Lodges in the State where continuous and notorious drunkenness would long be tolerated. Profanity, I am sorry to say, though noticeably on the decrease, is not yet banished, as it should be, from the lips of Masons. During the year I have visited or met in Lodges of Instruction officers and members of the..following, among other Lodges. viz: Howard, No.4; Ark, No.6; Agency, No. 10; Rising Sun, No. 13 ; Memphis, No. 16; Havana, No.21; Wellington, No. 22; Florida, No. 23; Wyaconda, No. 24; St. John's, No. 28; Huntsville, No. 30; Cooper, No. 36; DeWitt, No. 39 ; Etna, No. 41; Jacksonville, No. 44; Haynesville, No. 49; Wakanda, No. 54; Arrow Rock, No. 55; Monticello, .No. 58; Waverly, No. 61; Monroe, No. 64; Pattonsburg, No. 65; Savannfth. No. 71; Lebanon, No. 77; :Miami, No. 85; Canton, No. 100; Bloomington, No. 102; Kirksville, No. 105; Gothic, No. 108; Island City, No. 109: Graham, No. 112; Dover, Ko. 122; Gentryville, No. 12f:l; Athens, No. 127 ; Lorraine, No. 128; Lincoln, No. 138; Oregon, No. 139; Birming, No. 150; Maryville, No. 165; Griswold, No. 178; Novelty, No. 181; Morality, No. 186; Carter, No. 187; Hannibal, No. 188; Sonora, No. 200; Rowley, No. 204; Trilumina, No. 205; Salisbury, No. 208; Forest City, No. 214; Farmers, No. 222;. Woodlawn, Ko. 223; Salem, No. 225; Shelhina, No. 228; La. Plata, No. 237; Rushville, No. 238; Granville, Ko, 240; Montgomery City, No. 216; Carroll, No. 249; Lodge of Light, No. 257; Holden, No. 262; Fayetteville, No. 2fi4; Lodge of Peace, No. 280; Craft, No. 287; Edina, 1\0. 2Dl; MOl1l1d City, No. 294; White Hall, No. ;30J; Lick Creek, No. 302; Kingsville, No. 313; Eldorado, No. ;~18; Moberly, No. 344; Loue Star, 1\0. 349; Hiram, No. 302; IIiggimiville, No. 364; Adair, No. 3.66: Williamstown, No. 370; King Hill, No. 376; Ancient Craft, No. 377; Dagan, No. 394; Gower, No. 397; Center, No. 401; Alexandria, No. 104; Valley, No. 413; Glenwood, No. 427; Temperance, No. 138; Aullville, No. 464; Center View. No. 4G6; Nodaway; No. 470; Guilford, No. 474; l\'It. Hope, No. 476; Daggett, No. 492; Lewistown, No. 4\14; and Lathrop, T:. n. I have casuali y becll prcsent at quitc a lIumber of the meetings of other Lodges than those gi,en above, but a.~ these visits were unofficial and for a single night each, I have not thought it necessary to name them. I have spent much time, and I think usefully, in giving private instruction, particularly to those selected as District Lecturers. Heports have been received from the following Districts, viz: Nos. 3, V, 7, S, !J, 10, 12, 14,15, 1G, 17,18, lU, 20, 21, 22, 25, 2V, 2S, 2!J, 31, :::2, ::::::, i;G, :.lV, 87, 38, 4.0,

,n, 4;;, 44, (15, 4V, 48 and W. G. L. Pno.-2.


18 III

Proceedings of the the following Distriet:;

IlO

[Oct.

Leeturers have been appointed, viz: 2, 5,.11, 1i and 51.

There is no law requirin~ the District Lecturers to make any Report, nor is there any specific law requiring the Grand Lecturer to do so; but certainly an officer entrusted with important duties should not think it It waste of time to report how he has performed tho~e duties. If all the District I~cturers would annually report the condition of the work in their respective Districts, it would materially assist the Grand Lecturer and other officers in mapping out the work to be done in future. The District I~cturers hltve, as a rule, performed their duties well. A large number of them have visited every Lodg-e in their District..", and some many times. A larger number of Lodges have been visited in the past than in anyone year since the organization of the Grand Lodge. I append herewith an abstract of the Reports of District Lecturers, showing in detail the work done alH.l the'conuition of the Lodges itS to proficiency in the work and lectures. Respectfully and fraternally submitted, ALLAN McDO'WELL, G1'and Lecturer. [.for abstract of District Lecturers' Reports, see Appendi.T.]

REPORT OF ST. LOUIS MASONIC BOARD OF RELIEF, FOR TIlE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1882.

The Report of the "St. Louis Masonic Board of Helief" was presented,路and ordered printed, as follows: RECEIPT". 1881. $1,i4;) 11 Oct. 1. Balance on hand............................. ~10 00 l. From Cache Lodge, Ko.11(j Good Hope Lodge, No. 218 ::1000 15. Cosmos Lodge, [1;0. 282 25 00 2D. l\1issouri Lodge, No. 1. 25 00 Dec. 3. Pride of the West Lodge, No. li9 30 00 10. Anchor Lodge, No. 443 35 00 Ii. 1882. Beacon Lodge, Ko. 3 ::I.'') 00 Jan'y i. George Washington Lodge, Ko. ~ 20 00 14. Polar Star Lodge, No. i9 ;1.'') 00 28. Aurora Lodge, No. 26i 20 00 Feb'y 4 Naphtali Lodge, No. 25 10 00 11. Corner-Stone Lodge. No. 323 2.5 00 11. West Gate Lodge, No. 445 , 40 00 March 1'8. Tuscan Lodge, No. 360 25 00 April 15. Erwin Lodge, No. 121. 60 00 June :1. Itllska Lodge, No. 120 2.5 00 July l. Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 40 路 30 00- 480 00 Sept. 2. Collections-amounts returned on account of relief to various jurisdictions........................ 203 iO

$2,128 81


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DISBURSE)[ENTS.

Amount paid Jurisdiction of California $ 43 10 District of Columbia................................ 28 00 Iowa 3200 Illinois 106 00 Indiana................... 8 75 Kentucky 1500 Louisiana................................................ 44 05 Mississippi................................... ...... ...... 5 00 Missouri................................................... 25 00 Nebraska.................................................. 5 50 New york................................................ 7 50 Ohio........................................................ 55 30 Texas 500

Dimi~~dl\1ason:.~~~~~.~~.::::·

~ ~~

·.·.·.:::· :::::·.·.·.· ::::: :::..::::::::' . Expense account....................... 76 10 Telegraphing............ 7 85- 472 15 Balance on hand October 1........... 1,956 66 $2,428 81 ATTEST:

LEE A. HALL, Secretary.

ST. LOvIS, Mo., October

~,

MARTIN COLLINS, President.

1882.

A MEMORIAL,

From Good Hope Lodge, No. 218, and Cache Lodge, No. 416, Carondelet, praying the .Grand' Lodge to establish a Board of Relief in South St. Louis, wa.."l read and referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. THE REPEAL

Of the law on joint occupancy of Halls, adopted one year ago, was effected by the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved. That the following resolution, adopted by this Grand Lodge in 1881, be hereby repealed, rescinded, and held for naught, to wit:

"Hereafter no Lodge shall occupy a Hall jointly with any other than a Masonic organb:ation. Pl'ovidcd, This prohibition shall not affect existing contracts with moral and benevolent associations, but when such contracts expire by limitation, they shall not be renewed." R. W. McMULLIN, I JOHN D. VINCIL.


20

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

CHARITY.

A memririal on charity, and a resolution to remit'tlle dues of Eureka Lodge, No. 73, owing to its loss by fire, were sent to the Committee on Charity. The. Grand Lodge was then called from labor until 7: 30 o'clock P. 1\1.

FIRST DAY-NIGHT SESSION. ST. LOUIS, 1\io., October 10, 1882. Grand Lodge met at 7: 30 o'clock for the exemplification of the Work and Lectures of the First and Second Degrees, and was called to labor 路by 1\lost Worshipful Bro. A. 1\1. Dockery, Grand Master. Grand Officers in their respective places. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand, Lecturer, proceeded to exemplify the "Vork and Lectures of the First and Second Degrees. Grand Lodge called from labor until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

SECOND D.A.Y-1\fORNING SESSION. ST. LOUIS, :Mo., October 11, 1882. Grand Lodge convened at 9 o'clock A. M., and was called to labor by Most Worshipful Bro. Dockery~ Grand 1\iaster. Grand Officers in their respective places. Pra.yer by the Grand Chapla.in.


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Grand Lodge of Missouri.

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The minutes of yesterday's several sessions were read' and approved. ORATION.

The Grand Master then introduced Right Worshipful Bro. James W. Boyd, Grand Orator, who delivered a most practical, beautiful and appropriate Oration.

.

MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND MASTER AND BRETHREN OF THE GRAND 1J?DGE OF MISSOURI:

Standing in the footsteps of so many able and eloquent predecessors, and in the presence of the representativ~of Masonry throughout Missouri, it would be unnatural for me not to realize, to some extent, the responsibility of the hour. The different phases of the one great subject have, from time to time, been so ably presented, the field before me has been so well culled, that there seems but little left for me to glean; yet, having been honored with the appointment, you expect me to present a sheaf, even though I gather only what the great reapers have left by the wayside. It has been said that every man's opinion of Freemasonry is elevated just in proportion to his knowledge of its history, symbolism and philosophy. If this is true, it would not be inappropriate for us to consider the most important of theseTHE PHll,OSOPH Y OF

:r.IASO~RY.

For of what avail will be our art, symbolism, ceremonies, plans and aims, unless there is beneath them all a philosophic basis-a philosophy profound enough to adapt our Order to the demands of the highest interest of every civilized country, in every epoch of its history; as well as to the advancement of the true welfare of individuals. We cannot all 'dsit the seat of Solomon's Temple to survey that locality, but we may survey, with an intelligent eye, a structure more magnificent than was that spacious and symmetrical building. We cannot all spend our time in explorations about :Mount Moriah. but we may explore the regions round about the Moriah upon which we p~ofess to stand to-day: We cannot all examine the quarries where the stones were squared and numbered, nor the forests where the timbers were fitted and prepared for that celebrated edifice, but we may examine and understand what it is that now fits and prepares the timbers, squares and numbers the stones, making them living columns and shining pilasters in our grand, effective Institution. .That we may appreciate the problems with which Freemasonry deals, and the results which flow from its workmanship, let us enquire in what respect our Order is adapted to the development of the highest type of manhood, which is, indeed, the end of all philosophy. What is there underlying or pervading its forms, symbols and ceremonies calculated to redound to such a consummation? In order to answer this enquiry it is necessary to ascertain the characteristics of the material which is to be made ready by its workmanship for a place in its polished walls. The rough ashlar with which speculative Masonry deals, is human nature-the human heart, with its infinite capabilities, manifold passions, conflicting tendencies, recurring fears, and undying hopes. To adjust this stone, iridescent with the the fires of immortality, and yet loaded down with a material body, is the work of our Craft. Every man is a strange compound, a combination of two distinct natures mysteriously connected together, and yet constantly at war with each other. For our present purpose, one of theRe may be termed" animal," the other" moral." This animal nature

I


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Proceedin.d 8 of the

[Oct.

is absolutely selfish; all its appetites, passions, inclinations and tendencies are selfish; and it develops itself without any assistance or culture. It needR no school for its tuition. Like the animal about us, it knows no higher law or rule of action than expediency or gratification. It has' no regard for the right or happiness of others. "Responsibility," "oilligalion," "duty," are words unknown to its vocabulary. Self is its motto, self is its end and aim, indulgence is its worsh"ip, gratification is its god. Shakespeare says, " love thyself last," but it loves self first, last, and all the time. Again, he says, "Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, thy God'sand truth's;" but these ends it ignores; their claims it repudiate!'. This selfish nature is the source of all our unhappiness; it destroys happiness in him who yields to its control; destroys even his capacity for happiness, and causes him to disregard the happiness of those around him. The world's history is little less than a panorama of wars, strife, bloodshed and misery-all the work of this selfish nature. " Man's inhumanity to ma~ . Makes countless thousands mourn." But man is by no means all animal; he is also a moral being; endowed with a . conscience. a spiritual illumination, a still, small voice within, whose call to duty may be ever heard above the wildest clamorings of appetites, passions and selfish tendencies. The latter may lash him with their enraged fury, as the angry billows lash the stormtossed vessel; but. as it may ride over the foaming crests of the maddened 'Naves into the peaceful harbor; so may he rise superior to the demands of his selfish tendencies, and pursue a course of rectitude in spite of their fury. Here is the conflict: These selfish tendencies. in their unreasonable demands for gratification, would disregard the true interests of the man, subject him to their tyrannical sway, and, finally, sink him into degradation and ruin; while his moral nature is constantly urging him to deny himself; to restrain these selfish tendencies; to rise above their demands; to obey the dictates of his conscience; to follow a course of benevolence, and thus to be a freeman whom the truth makes free. This is that battle of life which is waged in the breast of every individual. Than this, no more important battle is ever fought. Alexander conquered the world, and wept, it is said, because there were not other worlds to conquer. This animal nature conquered Alexander, and caused him to die in a drunken revelry in the streets of Babylon. Cresar, fired by the love of country, led the Roman legions through a thousand battl es to a thousand victories; love of self-ambition-led Cresar beyond the limits of patriotism; induced him to commit the fatal act of placing on his own brow the crown of the Roman Government, and thus caused his sudden downfall. Napoleon un throned kings and emperors of Europe, and held them captives at his will. This selfish nature-ambitionheld Napoleon captive at its will, swept him beyond his appointed bounds, and thus caused him to be banished to the lonely island. All along the pages of the world's history, we see where her poets, orators, philoophers, warriors and statesmen have gone down in this conflict, beneath the power of this fell destroyer of their best hopes and highest interests. Men everywhere, to-day, overcome the obstacles to what they consider success, then, yielding to the demands of this lower nature, utterly jail to fulfill any useful mission in life, and die unwept, unhonored and unsung, leaving behind them no fit memorial of the life of a rational, intelligent being. . Lije's victory is, so to gain control of this selfish nature that it may be subordinated to a sense of duty, to cultivate and develop the moral faculties so that they may assert their superiority, and thereby establish in the individual true manhood. And every institution, society or order is beneficial in its ultimate results just ill proportion as it enlists, encouruges and assists the individual to fight this battle, and to gain this victor~'.


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Grand Lodge oft Jlfisso-uri.

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But how is this grand result to be attained? How is this victory to be gained? Certainly not simply by good impulses occasionally flashing through the mind; not by sudden outbursts of benevolence now and thcn; not by spasmodic fevers of charity which seize the patient only on state occasions-these can never constitute manhood. An occasional skirmish, or a dress parade, no matter how brilliant, will never gain the battle of life.

Charact~r is to be found in the permanent disposition of the mind-in the governing purpose of the life-and this permanent disposition or governing purpose is the result of a deliberate, unreserved commitment of the spirit to the ends of w路orthiness. In order to overcome this innate, se1l1sh power, it is absolutely necessary for the individual, at some moment, to commit himself, fully. firmly, .deliberately, unreservedly to the ends of benevolence. Without this commitment, there is no foundation upon which to build character. Without a governing purpose controlling the life, all deeds of benevolence are but desultory and, eOllsequently, evanescent in their effects upon the actor. It is true that they may benefit the object, but; subjectively, their influence is lost, and their subjective influence is their only influence which tends, in any way, to make character. There is a great deal o'fthis transient excellence in the world; subjectively, it is a mere shadow flitting across the landscape, nothing more. These purely impulsive acts of charity, which spring from no governing purpose, are like meteors which wildly shoot across the heavens, leaving behind them no trace of their short but brilliant career. These spasmodic displays of generosity may be beautiful in themselves, and pass current among men at a high estimate; they may be apples of gold, but their effect upon the actor is lost, because they are not set in pictures of silver. previously made ready to receive them-their effect upon the actor is eVll.lIesccnt because his mind has not been prepared , to retain their reflex influence. Without this preparation, this committal, generous impUlses and magnanimous conduct will fail to elevate to true manhood. lInder such circumstances. magnanimolls acts may be the finely sculptured pieces of delicately tinted stone, but they do not constitute the beautif1!l and costly Mosaic, which is the aim of the artist, simply because they are not set in a suitable background, previously prepared to retain them. . What the man needs, what the interests of his moral nature imperatively demand in this conflict with these selfish tendencies. is some institution, some individual, some influence which will lead or induce him to rise up in the might of his imperial nature and vow allegiance to its demands-to make this commitment, to form this governing purpose. Show me an institution which demands, upon its very threshold, an unqualified commitment of its initiate to the ends of benevolence; which demands that he enter fully upon this contest, determined to wage an unrelenting war against this selfish nature; .. that he burn the bridges behind him, and thus cut ott' every avenue of honorable retreat, 'and I will show you an institution founded in a wise philosophy. With this foundation for character laid, every act of virtue is a stone set in the wall; every benevolent dced has a permanent subjective influence; every act of charity elevates and ennobles the charactcr of him who only thought to bless the other; all magnanimous deeds and charitable acts are now beautiful pieces of marble set in the mosaic of character; now every victory over self adds strength to the victor, and thus character grows and is developed; thus the individual passes out of the miasmatic valley of selfishness, ascends the shining heights of virtue, and there labors in the noble duties of manhood. Compare him to the man who has surrendered to his selfish nature: In the ordinary afIil.irs of life, the one is equivocal, unstable, untrustworthy; the other is honorable, true awl worthy of all confidcnce. In the profession of medicine, the one is an eml!yric, falsely boasting an alleged panacea, with which he filches the last dollar from the路 despondent invalid; the other is the benefactor of his fellow beings, alleviating pain, anni-

'


24

Procee..din~8

of the

[Oct.

hiJating suffering and allaying distress. In law, the one is n. shyster, polluting this noble profession by his very touch; defrauding those who trust their interests to his care; the other is ever ready to protect the innocent, to shield the weak from the merciless demands of the strong, iild to see that injustice be done no man, however humble or obscure. In politics, the one is a" ringster," full of deceit. false, "a thoroughbred fraud," seeking only self-advancement; the other is truthful, honorable, patriotic, seeking to advance his country's welfare; the one, by his conduct, says, "I have no use for any man unless I can use him; " the other, by his life, proclaims, "I am a man, and whaUver is humanity is akin to me," and deserves my earnest co-operation in its laudable efforts; the one, as he often occupies positions of trust and honor, is like the moon, which reflects the unfruitful rays of a borrowed light, thereby deceitfully appearing to be a beautiful luminary, until the telescope is turned upon it, when the astonishing fact is revealed that it is only a dreary waste, a sepulchral orb, full of yawning chasms and horrible abysses of darkness, upon whose surface charred and desolate peaks rise in dismal chains, like foreboding phantoms -a world in which every principle of vitality has long sincc been destroyed by its own internal, desolating, volcanic powers; the other-'-in all the relations of Hfe, abounding in generosity, magnanimity G.nd true nobility-is like the sun, the real luminary of a grand system of worlds, which sends its rays of heat and life into every nook and corner of the surrounding universe, producillg life, growth and development, thus causing all nature throughout her endless gradations to resound with her thrilling songs of joy and gratitude. I

But what influence does Masonry exert upon State? Is it adapted to the promotion of the true interests of every ci\'ilized country, in every epoch of its constantly chAnging condition? Is it.peculiarly adapted to that end in our country at this time? Every age in a country's history has its own peculiar evil. The predominant evil of the last epoch is not the prcvailing evil of this age, and the prevailing evil of this age will not be the chief evil of the next era~ This leading evil of every age is simply the form in which the selfish tendencies of the people most strongly manifest themselves at that time. The hour forbids elaboration here, and I must confine my observations to two epochs. What, then, is the characteristic evil of the present era? What is the predominant vice of our day? What is the evil which seems to be permeating the masses of our people and affecting all classes of our citizens; the evil whose baneful influences have reached even those who have been honored by positions of trust and power-an evil which is every day extending, which seems to know no abatement, which looms up like a portentous cloud, above our political horizon, which~asts a foreboding shadow across our political sky, whjch, strange as it may seem to you, in this hour of peace and prosperity, even threatens to undermine our Republican institutions, and to destroy our civil liberty? It is that which has been designated as the root of all evil-"the love of money." If there is one vice which can more completely than another extinguish the fires Of patrjotism, and paralyze the benevolent impulses of the路 heart, that vice is the inordinate. love of gain. When this desire to accumulate wealth becomes so general and so excessive in any people as to lead them to regard lightly the means by which it is gained, then dishonesty invades all kinds of business, hypocrisy and deceit characteri7拢 the times, ndulterations and counterfeits abound, "corners" and gambling speculations prevail, every man begins to suspect his neighbor, honesty itself is doubted, moral integrity hangs her head in-shame and weeps over her own downfall, while civil liberty-the daughter of virtue and intelligence-wings her sad flight to realms more congenial to her own prOUd spirit. There was a time in our RepUblic when to show what ought to be done was to secure the adoption of that measure. How is it to-day? What measures are now adopted, and how are they secured? Let the legislative history of the last two decades answer. How many measures of dOUbtful expediency (not to say of doubtful honesty), involving millions of dollars, have marked this period? We live in a most magnificent country. Nature has lavish 1)" bestowed upon us everything necessary for our comfort and happi-


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ness. Our grQwth as a people during the first century of our existence, is without a paral1el in the history of the world. To-day, we rank as one of the leading nations of the earth. And yet, it is a recognized fact that the basis of all this grandeur and power, the palladium of our liberty, the electoral franchise is, to a considerable extent, controlled by money. It is a fact, strikingly suggestive, painfully humiliating, and fearfUlly prophetic, that It potent factor in our elections is money. Do we, as a people, love mOIlCY more than freedom? Do we value gold more highly than honor? Has our material progression become a retrogression in the high qualities of moral excellence? Has partyism been substituted for patriotism? Have spoils, as the end of public measures, been SUbstituted for public good? And do we, as a people, look with complacency upon these signs of the tillles? The curse of our age is this tierce, excessive, absorbing mercenary spirit, which crowds out all higher and nobler motives; and which will, unless checked, prevent the perpetuation of our civil institutions. When the people of any country bow down before the golden calf, and worship at it.<; shrine. the tables of the law of civil liber!'y fall from the hands of the greatest law-givers, and are broken into fragments. Civil liberty is, indeed, the boon of virtue and intelligence in the people; a blessing not gratuitously lavished upon all alike; a reward resen'ed for the intelligent, the unselfish.; but never bestowed upon, or perpetuated to a people too mercenary to be capable of appreciating it. Nor is. it any disparity to libert.y that such is the case. On the contrary, its highest pmise, its proudest distinction, is that an all-wise Providence has reserved it as the noblest reward for the development of our faculties, intel1ectual and moral. The past abounds with iJlustrations: The Grecians were one of the most cultured, literary, brave and patriotic people of ancient times. Their literary productions arc yet the admiration of the literary world, and their deeds of valor are to-day sung in every civilized clime. Yet, even this people became mercenary, sclfish, venal, corrupt, and lost their patriotism to sl1ch an extent that even the burning eloquence of Demosthenes could Dot arouse them to It sense of duty; and their proud republic, after which our own was modeled, fell. not really by the hands of Philip of Macedon, but by its own internal weakness, causcd hy the degcncracy of it.'i eitizells. And who does not know that selfindulgence, voluptuous living. corrupt practices, private and public, in a word, the loss of virtue and patriotism in the Roman people, caused" their grand governmental fabric, Which once held the world in subjugation, to crumble to atoms beneath the attacks of the hardy sons of the North. Other imtances need not be given: Civil liberty is not, cannot be. maintained by t~ayonets, compacts, leagues or constitutions; it can stand upon no oU;er foundation than virtue and intelligence in the people. History is full of warning, and will repeat itself, because we heed not it.e; lessons. And when the future historian shall write the history of our times,- then the full effects of this evil upon our destiny as a nation will be revealed. It is, however, already apparent that the true welfare of our country now demands that all conservative moral forces be swiftly arrayed and called into active service to battle against the further development or extension of this giant evil; for upon the result of this conflict between this mercenary spirit lind higher, better motives in the people, depends not only the future history of our own country, but even the destinies of all thc ages yet unborn. If our experiment of self-governmcnt shall at last fail, that failure will prove a fatal blow to civil liberty throughoul. the world, and turn the wheels of progress back a thousand years. In this momentous contlict, what a powerful intlllence may be, must be, wielded by our Order! 'Vhat a determined,-uncompromising foe this vice finds in l\fasonry !

....

Even upon the threshold of this Institution, the candidate must rise above all mercenary motivcs; he must commit himself against this form of selfishness, and as he advances ~tep by step in Masonry, if he adv~nces in its spirit, he must rise higher ~nd


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higher above this influence, so that to be a ~fason, .indeed and in truth, is to be found in the ranks of those who, by their manner of life, stand shoulder to shoulder in a solid phalanx of opposition to the prevailing evil of our day. While this evil overshadows us, there arc in Missouri alone, not to mention the fortyfive other Grand Jurisdictions in our country, more than five hundred altars upon which the vestal fires of faith, hope and charity never cease to emit their bright and hallowed rays. While the world about us, to-day, seems determined to sacrifice everything for gold, there are, in Missouri alone, more than five. hundred shekinahs burning with their unquenchable glory, from whose presence there go forth, not upon mercenary, but benevolent missions, messengers of good will, to raise the fallen, cheer the faint, strengthen the weak, relieve the distressed, and to dispense that genuine Charity, which, like mercy, brings its own recompense; ".Which droppeth, like the gcntle rain from heaven, Upon the place beneath; it is twice blessed. It blesses him who gives and him who takes." While the foundations of all our greatness and grandeur as a nation are being undermined by this overleaping love of self, there are, in Missouri alone, twenty-seven thousand Craftsmen who profess to be learning, at our altars, these lessons of life which are calculated to elevate them above the poisonous vapors of selfishness, and to array them as living conservators of all that tends to promote civil liberty-as enemies to oppression, and as benefactors ?f the human race. Had-not Masonry come down to us from llntiquity, we might reasonably conelude that it was organized for the especial purpose of combating this evil; but as it is of ancient date, we are forced to admit that at its origin there presided a philosophy wise enough to look down through the vista of ages, and to adapt it to the demands of the true interests of our country in lhis era of its existence. But will our Order be directly antagonistic to the evil which will characterize the next epoeh in our history as a people? What that evil will be, it requires no prophet to tell. There is more than one cause at work to produce the same result. This moneyloving age will produce, and be followed by, an epoch of Atheism. You, who live to witness the moming hours of the twentieth century, can then verify this assertion. It has been said that every government is founded upon some religion. A system of morals based upon some religion, binding upon individuals. is necessary to constitute a State. At any rate, a wide-spread Atheism, such as I have indicated, produces disobedience to law, disloyalty to sovereignty, and engenders materialism. ratIOnalism, socialism, nihilism, communism, and other fulse doctrines wholly inimical to constitutional government, subversive of civil liberty and destructive of true manhood. AIHl this evil. with its concurrent vices, is the monster with which the next generation in our country must grapple in a deathly strug-gle. And, in my opinion, it will be II strug-gle between law and anarchy, liberty and despotism, order and plunder, happiness and mbery. In this struggle. our noble Order will prove itself to be the powerful ally of law, order, liberty, happiness. When that conflict shall Wfl.r fiercest. the silent Masonic banner will be the last to retire from the field: when Atheism shall havc cast its deepest shadow, the :'IIasonic altar shall yet be luminous with the effnlgent my:; of her greltt light; when the night of the triumph of Atheism shall be the dltrkest, one of the last lights to go out in the opposing camp shall be the fire kindled upon the Masonic altar.

,

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Grand Lod.de of Miss.ouri.

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And, thus, Mas:mry will be the powerful conserving" force, antagonistic not only to the predominant evil of the next epoch, but to the chief evil of every age of our existence as a people. But this feature of :Masonry, which is, indeed, its foundation, also meets and &atisfies the chief demand of the human heart. Ever and anon, through all the vicissitudes of life, we are prone to ask ourselves,' What am I? Whence came I? Whither do I tend? Man cannot consent to believe that the earth is his only abiding place. He may reason himself into the well fed, well trained, well developed baboon, but his soul rebels against his false logic, and sadly cries out: Why then have 1 immortal instincts?' 'Why were these longings for immortality implanted in my breast? Who placed them there merely to mock me in my solitude and desolation? Can it be that our lives are but a bubble, cast up by the ocean of eternity to float for a moment on its \vaves and then sink into nothingness? .. Why is it that the high and glorious aspirations, which leap like angels from the temple of our hearts, are forever wandering unsatisfied? Why is it that the rainbow and the clouds come over lIS with a beauty that is not of earth, then pass away, leaving us to muse upon their lovliness?" Why is it that the stars, which hold their festival around the midnight throne are set above the grasp of our faculties, forever mocking us with their unapproachable glory? Why is it that the bright forms of bum an beauty, whose lives here become a part of our own, will not always stay in our presence? Has he, who graced our last annual communication with his presence; whose face, though gone, we still see; whose voice, though now silent, is yet ringing in our hearts, been consigned to an eternal'oblivion? Is there no country where the heart can say; I am at home? These are such questions as lie at the foundation of our happiness; they rise up before us like Banquo's ghost, and will not "down" at our simple bidding. What institution pretends to answer them? Ah l what means that letter" G," "That hieroglyphic light Which none but Cra.ftsmen ever saw." It stands in the East, an ever-present answer to these recurring questions, impressing upon the mind of every Mason that he is born .for a higher destiny; that there is a realm where the rainhow never fades, "路where the stars are spread out before him like the islands that slumber in the bosom of the oce?-n," where the good and the true, who fall before him here like autumn leaves, will forever stay in his presence, even in that Grand Lodge where the Supreme Grand Master of the universe presides.

We have heard that Masonry is grand because she is old; but Masonry is old because she is grand. She has withstood the ravages of time, the revolutions of ages, the unrelenting crusades against her, because she is founded upon a philosophic basis. Masonry is no insurance association; not disparaging or underrating the benefits of insurance, she has nobler, grander ends to accomplish. She is that imperial Institution which carries lessons of true manhood, devotion to women, loyalty to truth into every hamlet within our borders; she is that permanent Institution \\o'hose example has actually called into being almost路 every other benevolcnt order which exists. to-day; she is that imperishable Institution which takes by the hand the Brother who has fallen in this battle of life, that kindly raises him to his feet again, that gently brushes from his brow the dust of defeat, and encourages him to go forth again to the conflict with renewed strength and a firmer determination to accomplish somcthing in life; that noble Institution, which in the silent watches, unobserved, carries joy and gladness to the lonely and desolate of earth; that immovable Institution, which, by her tenets' and cordial virlues, draws, unbidden, to her sanctum sanctorum the high, the low, the rich, the poor,


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and numbers them all alike, ber o\\:n plighted sons and workmen; that imperious Institution, which, by her sublime principleiS, unswerving faith and noble deeds, challenges the admiration of all men. We are Masons, not for what we may get, but f.)r what we may attain, what we may do for others. This is her glory'; this is what mRkes Masonry the s)'nonym of charity throughout the civilized world; this is what will shed brighter and yet still brighter luster upon her fair name, as the centuries, one by one, shall be added to the past, even down to "the last syllable of recorded time," .

Following the delivery of the Oration, the Grand Secretary offered a resolution, which was unanimously adopted, as follows: Resolved, ThatR. W. Bro. James W. Boyd, Grand Orator, be, and is hereby, requested to furnish, for publication in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, the practical, instructive, . appropriate and eloquent Oration delivered this morning before the Grand Lodge, for which timely Address be is entitled to the thanks of this Grand Lodge.

JOHN D. VINCIL, JAS. E. CADLE.

IN MEMORIAM,

Most Worshipful Bro. R. E. Anderson, Chairman of the Memorial Committee, presented a report, which was read, containing a tribute to our late Past Grand .l\1:aster Samuel H. Owens. Following the reading of the above eloquent tribute -which 'was listened to amid the tears of many-appropriate and touching tributes were paid to the memory of Most 'Vorshipful Bro. Owens, by Bl'others Xenophon Ryland, Rev. C. C. 'Voods, ~. D., and John D. Vincil. On motion of :Most Worshipful Rro. Xenophon Ryland, seconded by Right Worshipful Bro. C. C.V\t~oods, the report of the. Memorial Committee was adopted by a rising vote, unanimously. The same committee presented a memoir in honor of Past Grand Master .John Ralls, which ,vas l'e~1d. Feeling tributes were paid to the memory of our late 1\1:ost Worshipful Bro. John Ralls. The Report was adopted by a rising vote.


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SAMUEL H. O\VENS. ST. LQDIS, 1\10., October 10, 1882. To the J1[08t lVo1'shipjnl Grand Lodge oj Jfissouri, A. F.

an~

A. M.:

Your committee, appointed to prepare a memoriam upon the life and death of our late Past Grand Master Samuel H. Owens, prei:ent the following:

Ii---

There are representative men connected with all moral and benevolent systems, as well as all civil and historic institutions-they are mountain-minded men, conspicuous' from ev~ry point of view on the plain above which they have towered. .It is not always that men of transcendent talent are those who thus elevate themselves. On the other hand, fidelity to trust, the ardor of 7,cal, the persistency of effort, often elevate and make men representative, when abstract and absolute talents are not the forces' that have lifted tl).em into prominence. The world is just beginning to learn that its genuine benefactors are not mostly those who, by reason of great gifts or acquirements, or self-assertion, have foisted themselves into fame or notoriety. Silent and unostentatious work, like the coral insects that have, by a persistent plan and perseverance. laid the foundation of continents, has most frequently lam the basis of permanent institutions and forces fo'r the elevation of the race, the mitigation of its woes, and the relief of its wants. All of us, as we have grown older, have learned to discount garish display; to rightly estimate modest merit . and rugged, and even repulsive, integrity. Many a man ,vho appeared to bristle like a chestnut burr, has been found to envelope a sweet kernel; many a homely flower. like the chamomile plant, has revealed its fragrance when pressed; many a star has shone by night, we never saw by day. These remarks seem fit because, as biographers of Samuel H. Owens, we have no splendid eulogium to write, except as the subject of our memoir is illustrated and justified by the general introduction prefacing our tribute. Samuel H. Owens, of California, :Missouri, breathed his last. at the Laclede Hotel, in the city of St. Louis, on the 22d of February, A. D. 1882. Though dying in a public hostelry, he was environed by faithful friends and loving Brethren until his noble spirit left its clay tenement. and never was a man borne to burial with a more genuine testimony to departed worth than our esteemed Brother. ',,"'hen advised that the grim monster had called for him, he received the announcement with a calm fortitude that was consonent with the leading characteristics of his life. To his long-cherished and intimate friend Allan McDowell, he said, "I am not afraid to die." When alone with Bro. Vincil and the wife of his bosom, he said, "My God is a loving Father, in whom I trust." He was afraid of nothing except that which was mean and debasing. He felt that (;00, who is a discerner of the intents and purposes of the heart was acquainted with all his ways, and hence he feared not the final audit of the Great Judge. With Mayo and McDowell standing by his bed-side, while the shadow of death was dark upon it, and fully conscious of his approaching dissolution, he said, .. It can't be long now, and I want you boys to stay with me to the end." "You boys!" What tenderness in the address! How much that makes language limp! 1'\ot y011 Princes and Priests, Magnates and Magistrates, but "you boys!" The man who fails to interpret the pathos of that address has forgotten the sweet trusts and friendships of childhood, the recollection of which lie far back on the sunlit plains and green slopes of life's playgrounds and radiant hopes. It was just like Sam Owens, the noble, generous, trusting, and to-be-trusted Brother. He passed away without a struggle that could be a painful memory to his dear ones and friends, and his countenance, if not that of a " warrior taking his sleep," was suggestive of the tranquillity of one who had " Wrapped the drapery of his couch about him, And laid down to pleasant dreams."


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His remains were taken in cho.rge by his Masonic Brethren, and escorted to his always hospitable hearth-stone at California. The telegraph wire was put in requisition to summon to his funeral the members of the Craft throughout the State, and, from all the diverging lines, came flocking in thc mourners of the beloved dead, who" had known him but to love him." Seldom did there ever congregate from various points so many men to pay funeral honors to one comparatively unknown to the great world. The town of California' never saw such funeral distinction as that paid Bro. Owens. It will take rank with the most illustrious honors ever paid Missouri's historic dea~. . With the impressive ceremonies of our Order, conducted by Grand Master Dockery, â&#x20AC;˘ we covered him out of sight, and turned away with heavy hearts. Had he lived until last May, Bro. Owens would hfLVe compassed his forty-seventh year. "His sun went down while it was yet day." Though it had passed its meridian, and was sinking in the western slope, he was in the prime of his powers and the full of his promi5e. The golden glory of a transfiguring sunset was not his, but as a clear sun dropping from the sky, he sank, shining, to the sepulchre. We had better spared him ere his sun had climbed to the zenith, or when sunk beneath the western hills. In the first instance, we had not known to lament .his virtnes; and. in the last, we could have been comforted with the knowledge that we could not keep him longer. In ancestry he was of Kentncky pedigree, though a native of Illinois, in which State he was born in 1835, while his parents were in transit from Kentucky to Missouri. His father located in Cole County, ncar Jefferson City. and in this neighborhood, on his father's farm, he was brought up a free-minded, simple-hearted yeoman. The rU5'tie employments of his )'outh macle a warp into which all the threads of after-life dashed to weave the web of his character. The dillatan/Rism of the city Cll.5t no single thread into his web of character. The freedom of the country vine, the sweet aroma of the wild flowers, best betokened his manbood and its manifestation. While not disclaiming the kid-gloved greeting, be had a hearty shake for thc honest hand of the husbandman and tbe artesan. He knew no nobility but that which starred and garlercd a princely manhood. His friendliness translated into fact, more forcible than poetic phrase, the sentiment of Tennyson: .. Howe'er it be, it seems to me 'Tis only noble to be good; Kind hearts.are more than coronets, And simple faith than Norman blood." He was, in fine, one of nature's noblemen, before whom the refined and the rustic could stand and exclaim: .. Behold a mun !" To such a nature, the solemn ceremonies of our mystic Order were peCUliarly adapted, and the light which broke out in the Masonic East permeated his very natnre, while the tire which burns on our altar warmed into life those inherent qualities which made him so devoted a Mason, and which prompted him only a few nights before his death, with the fangs of the destroyer already fastened upon his vitals, to crawl, as it were, to this Hall to a special meeting of our Masonic Mutual Benefit Association, and, as if defying nature, lift his trembling voice in behalf of the widows and orphans, whose interests were at stake. By the country fireside he developed a disposition to stud)', and his father, seeing this, matriculated him in the State l;niversity, at Columbia, from which he graduated with honor both in the classical and lcgal. curriculum. While a student be madc the acquaintance of Miss Ella M. Thorpe, then a pupil in Christian Female College, and this ripened into affection. They were married October 11th, 18GO, and the union was a happy one. She snrvives to sorrow for one of the best of husbands, without a child to share her grief or solace her woe. Previous to this union, young Owens tried his fortunes in California; engaged successfully in the conlluercial business, in the !lush times of the Gulden State.


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Scarcely had he settled down to domestic life when his young blood was stirred by the tocsin of war, and he volunteered ill the Confederate Army, in which he conducted himself valiantly, and returned, when the banner of the lost cause was furled, at tbe head of t.he veteran remnant of a gallant Missouri regiment,wbich had thrown its arms and valor on the side of the South. Resuming civil life, he took up his residence in California, Missouri, to practise law,in whieh be secured reputation andricbes. Energetic in disposition, he bad been a political factor in the party with wbich he was affiliated, wielding larg-e local and considerable State influence. He was not successful, however, in his eandidacies for office. He was confronted in his campaigns with a galaxy of political stars who contested with him for public position. He held the office of Mayor of California for six comecutive terms, and was an inspiring and directing spirit in all local enterprises of importance to the community. Yet, though the cbalice was so often dashed from his lips, he never murmured, but bore the close defeats with a Spartan fortitude. Had he been elected to office, his ear would ever have been deaf to tbe rattle of a bribe, and his crest would never have lowered to the demands of insolence or the menaees of mediocrity. He was possessed of that infleXible firmness which would not allow him to fawn for thrift or whine over defeat. He would not bave flattered Neptune for his trident, or Jove for his power to thunder. As a Mason, he was fraternal and philanthrop'ic, sagacious and enthusiastic. He hurled no snow-balls in debate, but with the force of a catapult projected his argument upon the defenses of an antagonist or a wrorig. As to when he first beheld the "light" by which Mnsons work, we are not advised, but, from his initiation, be became thoroughly impressed with its beauties, and as more light broke in upon him, he became an active, earnest worker on the Temple. He was no drone in the bive. He passed, with increasing credit, the several chairs, until, in 1872, he was elected Grand Master of this Grand Lodge. He had been Chairman of several of our standing committees, and, after retiring from the East, was restored to his position as Chairman of the Committee on Grievance, and held the position until bis death. His views were always well matured. He w'as a stranger to all mere parliamentary finesse, disdained neutrality, and always confronted his adversary witb his visor lifted. In May, 1881, he was chosen Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, having served in the several subordinate offices. He was the .leading spirit in, and the first Eminent Commander of, Prince of Peace Commandery, No. 29, of Knights Templar, at Jefferson City. He was a Companion in Council, No.1, Royal and Select Masters; a member of St. Louis Lodge of Perfect.ion, No.2; and a Scotch Right Mason of the Fourteenth Degree. His Lodge and Chapter membership were in California. He was also Treasurer of the Grand Lodge of United Workmen, and-though weak and enfeebled from the disease then upon him-attended it annual session about a week before his death. While it was known that he had for some time suffered with a malady that baffled medical skill-the best of which was employed-his decease was suddcn, and scnt a shock of surprise shivering through the hearts of a multitude of friends who loved him with a fraternal ardor. It does not behoove us to attempt to lift the curtain of the future in idle enquiry as to his eternal estate. Before the mystic veil that hides the hereafter we !Stand with uncovered heads and unsandaled feet, with his memory green in our breasts as the acacia that fell from fraternal hands upon his throbless breast. Certainly he survives in deeds of love, no calumny can dim. If the fraternal breast were a quarry, many crimson stones could be gathered to erect a monument to his memory. All that knew him must pass to join him in the" pale realm of shaue " ere fond recollection of our beloved and bemoaned Frater shall pass from the earth, while the influence of his life will beat along the ages, mingling with those unseen and noiseless forces that shape the destin~' of individuals find institutions.


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Though missed in our Lodges, Convocations and Conclaves, his vacant chair will be an eloquent reminder of his virtues, while the mantle of charity will oblivionate all recollections of his frailty and his faults. The sympathies of our great Fraternity will go out like sun-shine to make rosy the cloud that lowered over his premature grave, while love, like the shuttle of the sun-beam and the shower, will scarf with rain-bow hues and graceful are, the green turf, that rests lightly above his dreamless repose. Under this bow of promise we will rest in hope, that when the reveille of the resurrection shall sound through the bivouac of the dead, it may be our happy lot to join hindu the congress of the "spirits of just men made perfect." We will wait and watch to see who will take up and as nobly wield the trowel that dropped from his nerveless grasp. We commend for your adoption the following resolutions:

Resolved, 1st, That the memory of our dead and beloved Past Grand Master, Samuel H. Owe.ns, be ever cherished by the Craft with true heart-felt affection. Resolved, 2d, That the Grand Lodge of Missouri tender to his deserved Widow their sincere condolence. Resolved, 3d. That the Grand Secretary furnish, and transmit to the family of the deceased, a written copy of this report. Resolved, 4th, That the Grand Secretary'\;et apart and dedicate a page in the procedlngs of this Grand Lodge to the memory of Past Grand Master Samuel H. Owens, with the motto"Spes Mea In Deo Est." . Fraternally submitted, R. E. ANDERSON, JOSEPH S. BROWNE, JAMES E. CADLE, .rNO. D. VINCIL, SAMUEL H. SAUNDERS,

Committee.

JOHN RALLS. ST. LoUIS, Mo., October 10, 1882. To the ],[ost lVol'shipjul Grand Lodge oj ]'fi~sou1'i, A. F. and A. M . .'-

Your committee to draft memorial and resolutions touching the death of Past Grand Master John Ralls, would report: It was twenty-one years ago last May, since the writer hereof first became a member of this Grand Lodge. How v'ividly recurs the impression made on our mind, then a comparative youth and a novice in the work of the Craft, as we found us surrounded by those whose silver hairs and active participation in the work, betokened them "The Fathers in Israel." There were Foster, Daggitt, O'Sulivan, McFarland, Whitcomb, Sharp, Russell, Stille, Dunscolllb, Rulls, Carnegy, and a host of others upon whose brows the frosts of age had not yet settled. How scarcely we then realized what sad havoc the "scythe of Time" makes among men. The child of that day has but attained his manhood, and yet aile by one they are gone to the shadow land, never to return. Upon the right hand and UpOIl the left they have fallen, till all are gone, save the oldest of the company, and he still lingers on the shore, linking the past with the present, while in the feeble !'tcp and wan eye, lighting np from time to Lime into a brightness that seems no longer of this world, we read the slow and certain approach of danger und of llissolution.


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of Missouri.

33

On Thursday evening, July 20th, 1882, at his quiet home, ncar New London, in Ralls County, Missouri, Col. ,John Ralls breathed his last, aged 74 years, R months and 2 days. He was born in Bath County, Kentucky, and was a son of Daniel Ralls, for whom Ralls County was named. Tn October, 1817, he came with his father to the then Territory of Missouri and stopped in St. Louis until October, 1818, when they moved to what was then Pike County, and improved a farm ncar New London. lIe was twice married-his second wife having preceded him to the Spirit land abont two years. In 1883 he umted with the Baptist Church, at Bethel, in Ralls County, and at the time of his death was one of the deacons of the Church at New London. In the Spring of 1847 he was elected Colonel of the Third Regiment of Missouri Mounted Volunteers, and served under the command of General Sterling Price until the. close of the Mexican War. He ocenpied a prominent position and took an active part in the battle of Santa Cruz De Rosales, and wa.s highly commended by his commanding General for his bravery and skill during that bloody battle.

,..

As early as 1832, he sou~ht light in Masonry and was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, in Palmyra Lodge, No. 18, advancing to the degrees of Capitular Masonry in Palmyra Chapter, No.2. He afterwards became a member of New London Lodge, No. 21, but subsequently affiliated with Ralls Lodge, No. 33, and was several times elected Worshipful Master of these respective Lodges. In October, 1816, he was elected and installed Grand lVIaster of this Grand Lodg-e, and on bis arrival in New Mexico in September, 1847, he assumed, in the name of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, Masonic possession of tbe Territory of New ~iexico, and granted a Dispensation for a Masonic Lodge at Santa Fe-the first ever organized there. To speak of him as a Mason, would be to tbis Grand Lodge unnecessary. Its history for many years presents him as a most able, industrious, dili~ent leader of the Craft; ever jealous of its honor and prosperity; ever anxious to promote its welfare and usefulness. A regular attendant-serving on its committees, acting at times as District Deputy Grand Master-he exercised a wholesome conservative influence, and will be missed in our Councils. The lessons tau~ht at our altar he practised in every-day life. As a neighbor he was ever assiduous in the performance of the kindest offices, endearing himself to all with whom he came in contact. In the smiles of his benevolent face the sobs of the grieving widow were hushed, and suffering orphanag-e wiped away the tears of sorrow. To hold to the lips of desponding misery the cup of consolation was, to him, the most ~rateful task. lIe lived well, and he died well. Though a great iiufferer, in his last illness, yet he bore it meekly, remarking to his son, signifieantly: "There is rest for the weary." Like a ripe ear full of grain he was g-athered to his harvest home, and leaves an example of faith in the Lion of the Tribe of Judah and devotion to our Order worthy of imitation. On the afternoon of July 22d the writer hereof performed our funeral rites at his burial, amid a large concourse of citizens, under the auspices of Ralls Lodge, No. 33, and New London Lodge, No. :~Oi, unitedSweet are the thoughts of him, Though he is gone; Rays from the sepulchre, Why should we mourn? Gentle the words he said, Brightening the path we tread, B.lest is the hallowed den-d, . Why should we mourn ?

G. L. Plw.--3.


34

Proceeding8 of the

[Oct.

We recommend that a memorial page be set apart in our Proceedings to his memory, with the motto: " He rests, in the stilly shades." ,R. E. ANDERSON, .lOS. S. BROWNE, .lAS. E. CADLE, JNO. D. VINCIL, SAM'L H. SAUNDERS, Committee.

REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY.

The Grand Secretary presented his Annual Statement, which was ordered printed in the journal of Proceedings, and is as follows: To the Most Worshipj1tl Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A. F. and A. J[..' My Annual Report is herewith submitted as your Grand Secretary:

Charters were issued and forwarded for the following Lodges, as authorized by the Grand Lodge at its last session: Hopewell Lodge, Lesterville, Reynolds County. New Boston Lodge, New Boston, Linn younty. Billings Lodge, Billings, Christian County. Young's Creek Lodge, Young's Creek, Audrain County. Malden Lodge, :Malden, Dunklin County. White Water Lodge, Cross Roads, Cape Giardeau County. Black Oak Lodge, Black Oak Point, Hickory County. Ash Grove Lodge, Ash'Grove, Greene County. Carter Lodge, Jefferson City, Cole County. Platte City Lodge, Platte City, Platte County. Clifton Lodge, Clifton, Oregon County. Adair Lodge, Kirksville, Adair County. Rich Hill Lodge, Rich Hill, Bates County. Cold Water Lodge, Brosley, Ca..~s County. Prairie Home Lodge, Prairie Home, Cooper County. Burlington Lodge, Burlington Junction, Nodllway County. COMMISSIONS TO DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS, With printed instructions, were forwarded at once to these appointees of the Grand Master. DISPENSATIONS, For the formation of new Lodges, have been issued, according to directions, with names and dates following: October 18th, 1881.-Dispensation for Gaynor City Lodge, at Gaynor City, Nodaway County. J. B. Pittman, Worshipful Master; H. A. Adcock, Senior Warden; F. A. Orr, Junior Warden. Issued by order of the Grand Lodge. The following were issued b)' order of the Most Worshipfnl Grand Master:

"

-......


1882.J

Grand Lodge of MissOl~ri.

35

October 26th, 1881.-Di!!pemation for Ayalon J"odge, at Avalon, Livingston Count)'. W. P. Monroe, Worshipful Master; J. Jones, Senior Warden; C. Roberts, Junior W!lrden. November 18th, 1881.-Dispensation for Lathrop Lodge,at Lathrop, Clinton County, C. M. Smith, Worshipful Master; Z. T. Martin, Senior Warden; O. B. Sweet, .JuniorWarden. December 31st, 1881.-Dispensation for Clearmont Lodge, at Clearmont, Nodaway County. John :Vr. Lamar, Worshipful Master; Alex. Gray, Senior Warden; A. M. Hulse, Junior Warden. January 17th, 1882.-Dispensation for Saxton Lodge, at Saxton, Buchanan County. A. F. Greenard, Worshipful Master; G. W. Lynch, Senior Warden; C. W. Carson, Junior Warden. January 2;;th, 1882.-Dispensation for Van Buren Lodge, at Van Buren, Carter County. A. B. Martindale, Worshipful Master; J. S. Coleman, Senior Warden; C. A. Hoskins, Junior Warden. l\farch 9th, 1882.-'Dispensation for Rome Lodge, at Rome, Douglas County. S. W. Bunch, Worshipful Master; F. A. Thomas, Senior Warden; W. J. Campbell, Junior warden. March,27th, 1882.-Dispensation for Biswell Lodge, at Browning, Linn County. John Carter, 'Vorshipful Master; W. B. Calhoon, Senior Warden; D. W. iHswell, .Junior Warden. March 29th, 1882.-Dispensation for Skidmorc Lodge, at Skidmore, Nodaway County. W. V. Smith, Worshipful Master; John Grigsby, Senior Warden; B. F. Albright, Junior Warden. ARril5th, 1882.-Dispensation for Webb City Lodge, at Webb City, Jasper County. A. A. Hulett, 'Vorshipful Master; Chas. R. Chinn, Senior Warden; John C. Webb, Junior Warden. June 15th, 1882.-Dispensation for Chariton Lodge, at Guthridge Mills, Chariton County. O. B. Anderson, Worshipful Master;~. D. IIershy, Senior Warden; J. L. Eidson, Junior Wardcn. June 16th, 188~.-Dispensation for Exeter Lodge, at Exeter, Barry County. Henry F. Goode, Worshipfnl Master; John F. Webb, Senior Warden; J. M. Stubblefield, Junior Warden. ,June 22d, 1882.-Dispensation for Galena Lodge, at Galena, Stone County. J. F. Seaman, Worl'hipful Master; Z. D. Jennings, Senior Warden; ,r. S. May, Junior Wardcn. June 2,lth, 1882.-Dispensation for Milford Lodge, at Milford, Barton County. M. J. Faubion, Worshipful Master; C. F. l~obertson, Senior Warden; Oscar Berry, Junior Warden. June 30th, 1882.-Dispensation for Scligman Lodgc, at SCligman, Barry County. W. G. Neely, Worshipful Master; G. W. Roller, Senior Warden; D. W. Wilkerson, Junior Warden. . Thus it will be seen that fifteen dispensations have been issued since the last session. Two were continued by the Grand Lodge, making a total of seventeen Lodges which have been working under dispensation during the year now closing. DUPLICATE CHARTERS Have been issued as follows: January 5th, lSS2.-To Stockton Lod~e, 1'<0. 283, at Stockton, the original having been destroyed by fire. By onlcr of the Grand :Mnster.


36

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

February 3d, 1882.-1'0 Globe Lodge, ~o. 495, at Louisiana, the original having been fire. By order of the Grand Master.

destro~ed by

:Minch 8th, 1882.-1'0 La Plata Lodge, No. 237, at La Plata, the original having beEm lost. By order of the Grand Master.

.

COMMISSIONS

Have been issued in special cases by direction of thc Grand Master: November 4th, 1881.-1'0 R. W. Bro. S. B. Potter, as Deputy of the Sixteenth District, 1Ji,cC A. C. Stewart, resigned. . May 20th, 1881.-Commissiollcd R. W. Bro. J. C. Hearne, Deputy of the Second District, 'vicc A. F. Barr, resigned. FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVES Have been commissioned, by order of the Grand :Master, as follows: H. L. Robinson, of Oswego, Canada, to b~ the Represen&tive of the Grand Lodge of Missouri near the Grand Lodgc of Quebec, vice Hon. John H. Graham, Past Grand Master, resigned. M. W. Bro. Henry H. Smith, Past Grand Master, Representative of this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Vermont, vice Henry Clark, whose commission has been revoked by Grand Master Dockery. CHARTERS RECEIVED. On the 3d of February la.~t, I received the charter of Lafayette Lodge,路No. 32, late of Lexington, Mo. Information wa.~ communicated to me at the same time by M. W. Bro. Xenophon Ryland that said Lodge had consolidated with Lexington Lodge, No. 149. October 5th, 1882.-1 rer,Bived the charter of Border Lodge, No. 115, formerly at Elk Mills, McDonald County, the same having been surrenllered. SILVER CITY CHARTER. On the 20th of April last I received, by the hands of R. W. Bro. D..J. Miller. Grand Secretary, the charter of Silver City Lodge, No. 46-5, late of Silver City, New Mexico. I was officially informed, at the same time, that the members of said Lodge had given in their adhesion and become allegiant to the Grand Lodge of New Mexico. Following such action, they were chartered by said Grand Lodge, and now stand enrolled as one of the constituent Lodges of that jurisdiction. We should congratulate our New :Mexico Brethren, as well as ourselves, upon ,the happy termination of the late unpleasantness. FINANCIAL. At the close of the rast session the Committee on Accounts passed upon the fiscal affairs of this office, and found a balance due the Grand Lodge, as per entries, and from receipts of the Grand Treasurer, amounting to $18,658.67. The statement of the Grand Treasurer showed the same condition of the finances. The accounts of these two officers were approved by the committee, and the report was adopted. During the following months I received and paid over to the Grand Treasurer, $2,482.92, making a total of $21,1-11.50, prior to the coming in of the dues for 1882.


1882.J

37

Grand Lodge of MisSOltri.

Eight hundred dollars were received for the PlLC:ific Lodge property; $140 from sale of Pittsville Lodge property; $100 for charter fees; $75 from Secretary of the Grand Chapter for office rent; $a90 for Dispensation fees; and $27.42 for dues from members of Defunct Lodges. The balance of the above named sum ($2,482.92), amounting- to $950.50, was for dues to the Grand Lodge, remaining unpaid at the elose of the session. It is proper to say that every cent due the Grand Lodge from its subordinates, was paid long before the new dues and returns for 1882 were due. . The following exhibit will place before you the financial condition of the Grand Lodge up to and including the receipts of to-day: Balance in hands of Grand Treasurer last settlement $18,658.67 Paid Grand Trea.surer since last settlement on old account................................. 2,482.92 Paid Grand Treasurer on dues for 1882, as per receipts........................................ 10,847.35 TotaL

$31,988.94

There has been paid out during the year the sum oL Leaving a balance of.........................................................

$11,789.03 20,199.91

on hand to-day. The disbursements are shown by the accompanying exhibit, showing number of warrants, amounts drawn and to whom paid. It will be seen from the foregoing that the Grand Lodge has in hand the sum of $20,199.91. It is presumed th&t the committee, raised last year for that purpose, will submit " some plan for the secure and satisfactory funding of the finances of this Grand Lodge."

As the expenses of the Grand Lodge for the ensuing year will be much less than during the year now closing, it may be confidently assumed that there will be a surplus of at least $12,000 of the fund now on hand after deducting the necessary expenses. While it is to be hoped that this surplUS may be safely and satisfactorily funded, the suggestion is hereby offered that the Grand Lodge can do the generous thing by its subordinates, in remitting their annual dues for the year next ensuing. The subject is respectfUlly submitted for consideration and determination. The Lodges have reported and made payment the present year far in advance of any term in my knowledge of Grand Lodge affairs. The returns show a healthy growth among the Lodges, and the statistical exhibit will indicate an increase of the membership. It affords me pleasure to announce that the affairs of the Grand Lodge, the Fraternity at large in the State, our finances and the condition of this office are in admirable condition. RECAPI'l'ULATTON. On hand last settlement, $18,658.67 Paid Grand Treasurer on old account..................................................... 2,482.92 " dues of 1882................................................................. 10,847.35 Tqt.al. $31,988.94 Disbursements us per list of warrants hereto appended....................................... 11,789.03 $20,199.91

Fraternally submitted, JOHN D. VINCIL, Grand Secretary.


Proceedin.ds of the

38

[Oct.

Amounts paid John W. Luke, Grand Treasurer, since the close of last session, as shown by his receipts, numbered from one to thirty-two: Receipt No. 1. 2

3..: 4

5 6 7 8

: : ;

9

10 11. 12 13 14 15 16

. $228 50 9650 . . 196 50 . 41500 . 14250 .. 27500 8600 . 8367 .. .. 106 50 . 82000 3275 . . . 74 50 6450 . . 106 50 . 196 00 . 17850

Receipt No. 17 : $805 00 18....................... 705 50 19................................ 718 00 20................................ 589 50 21................................ 513 50 22 1,069 50 23................................ 812 35 24 1,480 50 25................................ 604 50 26................................ 551 50 27.......................... ...... 531 50 28................................ 355 00 29................................ 388 00 30................................ 375 00 31................................ 415 50 32................................ 312 50

Received since October 11,1882 : $13,330 27 Amount on baud 1881................................................................................... 18,658 67

~

$31,98894 11,789 03

October 11, Total Balance on band

$20,199 91

Total Disbursements

:....................

DISBURSEMENTS. Tbe following amounts have been paid out since last settlement, as shown by the books herewith submitted: DATE.

WARRANT.

1881. October 14. 14. 18. 22. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 29. 29. Nov. 1. 2.

7. 7.

Dec.

7. 18. 21. 21. 1.

No. 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

A~IOUNT.

PAYEE.

Pay-Roll, Past Grand Masters Chartity, B. O. Austin F. L. Billon, books Charity, Mrs. Geo. F. Gouley John Alberty 1vIichigan Sufferers Dues refunded, Morality Lodge, No. 186 Pleasant " . " 160 Geo. Thorp, Grand Tyler, 7 months' service Postage, Grand l\faster Allan McDowell, salary J. W. Owen, Grand Tyler' and washingOffice rent for October Insurance on Grand Lodge property Salary, Grand Secretary, first month Postage Salary, J. W. Luke, Grand Treasurer, 1881.. Postage, Grand Lodge Proceedings, 1881.. Printing Proceedings, stationery, etc., 1881 Allan l\fcDowell, salary Salary, Grand Secretary, second month

.. . .. . . . . . .. .. . .. . .. .. .. . . ..

:.;

.. ..

$133.00 200.00 150.00 300.00 100.00 250.00 30.50 26.50 107.50 26.00 100.00 81.00 50.00 50.00 250.00 27.95 150.00 147.00 1,182.35 100.00' 250.00


Grand

1882.] Dec.

2.

22.

8. 23.

Lod~e

39

of JI{issouri.

Office rent, November Revision of Laws, J. L. Torrey

. ..

$50.00 200.00

Office rent and janitor fee for December Allan ~lcDowell, salary Fitting up new office; library, etc Salary, Grand Secretary, third month Office rent and janitor 'fee for January Cleaning and repairing portraits of Pru;t Grand Mul;ters Ralary, Grand Secretary, fourth month Allan l\fcDowell, Salary Office rent and janitor fee for February Expenses, S. H. Owens' funeraL Salary, Grand Secretary, fifth month Allan McDowell, salary : A. M. Dockery, salary and postage Allan :McDowell, salary Office rent and janitor fee for :i\1arch Salary, Grand Secretary, sixth month Allan }'fcDowell, salary : , Postage : Office rent and janitor fee for April Halary, Grand Secretary, seventh month J. H. Krippin, painting Office rent and janitor fee for May Salary, Grand Secretary, eight month Allan l\IcDowell, salary

. .. : .. .. . .. . . . .. . .. .. . :.. . .. . .. . .. . .

52.00 100.00 817.20 250.00 52.00 41.00 250.00 100.00 52.00 69.38 250.00 100.00 150.0Q 100.00 G2.00 250.00 100.00 29.95 [)2.00 2GO.00 8.00 [)2.00 250.00 lOO.OO 100.00 230.00

IS82.

Jan.

Feb.

March

2, 24. 4. 25. 5. 26. 27. 27. 1. 28. 18. 29. 18. 30. 23. 31. 1. 32. U. 33. 11. 34.

13. 35. 18.

36.

28. 37'April

May , June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

1. 38. 12. 39. 2l. 40. 29. 4l. 1. 42. 1. 43. 2!). 44. 1. 45. 5. 46. 5. 47. 13. 48. lG. 49. 22. 50. 27. ill. 1. 52. 14. 53. 26. 54. 1. 55. 1. 56. 4. 57. 4. -Ji8. 27. 1. 60. S.' 61. i2. 62. 28. 63. 2. M. 2. 65. 9. 66. 9. 67. 9. 6&. 9. 69.

FJ路

Postage on Reviscd Laws Printing Revised Laws Allan McDowell, salary Office rent and janitor fce for June Salary, Grand Secretary, ninth month Commission expenses on sale of Pacific HaIL : Office rent and janitor fee forJuly Allan McDowell, salary Salary, Grand Secretary, tenth month Postage, printing and incidentals Allan :McDowell, salary , 011ice rent and janitor fee for August Salary, Grand ~ecretary, eleventh month Coal for ofIice Allan :McDowell, salary Office rent and janitor fee for September Allan McDowell, balance on salary J. W. Luke, salary, C;'rand Treasurer A. M. Dockey, salary, Grand Master Salary, Grand Secretary, twelfth month Incidental expenses, postage, etc

. .. . . . ,. . .. .. .. .. . .. . . ,. .. . .. .. .. . ..

1,69~.09

100.00 52.00 2;;0.00 50.00 52.00 100.00 250.00 56.GO 100.00 G2.00 250.00 24.00 100.00 52.00 200.00 150.00 12;;.00 250.00 60.11 $11,789.03


[Oct.

Proceedin.d 8 of the

40

GRAND TREASURER'S REPORT,

Read and referred to the Committee on Accounts: J. W. LUKE,

GRAND TRRASUREI~,

In account with Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M., oj Missouri:

1881.

DR.

12. To balance per Report Cash of Grand Secretary 17. 22. November 7. December 1. 20. 1882. February 3. :March 1. 29. April 9. JUly 2G. August 19. 2l. 21. 24. 29. 3l. September 2.

October

fi.

7. 8. 9. 11. 12. 21. 22. 22. 路2f>.

October

26. 28. 29. 30. 6. 9. 9. 10. 10.

" . ..

$18,65867 $241850 9650 19600 41500 14250 275 00 8G 00 8367 10650 82000 3275 19 50 5500 G4 50 lOG 50 196 00 17850 80500 70550 67900 3900 58950 51350 1,06950 81235 1,48050 53400 7050 551 50 53150 355 00 38$ 00 35750 1750 415 50 31250 $13,330 27- 13,330 27 S31,9H8 94


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1882.J

41

CR. By Warrant No. 1. 2 3

. . . ..

4 • !j .................................•..........••.•••...•.•........:

6 7

:

.

.'

8

. .

.

!)

.

]0.; 11 12 13 14

. . .. . ..

15 ]6

:.. ..

17 18 19 20 21.

, .. .. .. ..

22~

23

.. ..

24 25

.. ..

26

..

27 28

.. .

2!)

.

30

.

31 32 33 34

. .. .. ~

3& .......••.......•.............................••.•........................• :36 . :37 . :38 . :39 .

40 41

11-

.

.

42

.

4:3

..

44

..

45 46 47 48.;

.. . ;. .

49

.

50

..

51

52 53

:

.

.. .

$13300 20000 ]5000 ~OO 00 ]0000 25000 3050 2650 10750 2600 10000 81 00 5000 fiO 00 25000 27 05 15000 14700 ],182 35 ]00 00 2;)0 00 fiO 00 20000 5200 ]0000 817 20 25000 5200 4400 25000 10000 5200 6038 25000 10000 15000 10000 fJ2 OJ)

2;jO 00 10000 2995 5200 25000 800 5200 2;)000 ]00 00 100 00 23000 ],G9309 100 00 5200 25000


Proceedin.ds of the

42

[Oct.

By \Varrant No. 54 55 ;>6 57 58 59 60 Gl. G2 G3 G4 65 66

.. .. â&#x20AC;˘

:

: , : ,

:

$5000 5200 100 00 25000 5650 10000 5200 250 00 2400 100 00 5200 20000 15000 125 00 25000 60 11

.. . .. .. .. .. . ,.. .. .. ..

67

..

G8 G9

.. . .

$11,789 03-$11,789 03 20,199 91

Balance.............................................

$31,988 94. JOHN W. LUKE, ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 11, 1882.

Grand Treasurer.

RECAPITCLATION. LOCI~,

ST.

Mo., October 11, 1882.

To the Most Worshipjul Grand J,odge oj ltfissoul'i, A. F. and A. M. : .~

BRETH HEN-I submit herewith my Report as Grand Treasu~er to this date showing: Balance on hand, October 12, 1881. Receipts from Grand Secretary

$18,G58 67

13,330 27 .

$31,988 94 11.789 03

Warrants paid, from Nos. 1 to 69, inclusive

Leaving balance on hand this date $20,199 91 On det.>osit in Third National Bank to my credit as Grand Treasurer 20,220 84 Over deposit, for which It Warrant in my favor is fraternally asked..................... 20 93 Leaving in Bank correct balance

:

.'..$20,199!)l

Respectfully submitted, J. W. LUKE, Grand Treasurer.

REPORT ON REPRINTING

The Constitution and By-Laws of the Grand Lodge wa..." presented and adopted, and the committee discharged. It is as follows: '1.'0 the Most Worshipju.l Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A. F. and A.

,1[.:

Your committee, appointed at your last session, to superintend the reprinting of the Constitutions and By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of )Iissouri, together with the Standing


1882.]

Grand

Lod~e

of .Missouri.

43

Resolutions, Decisions and Rulings, beg leAse to report that they have discharged the duty imposed upon them to the best of their ability. The work has been prepared, pUblished and distributed in acr,ordance with the resolution under which the committee were appointed. Soon after the close of the last session of the Grand Lodge your committee met and organized by selecting Bro. Jay L. Torre)', of St. Louis, to act as Secretary. fJ.'he committee take this opportunity to state that Bro. 'Torrey discharged his duties efficiently, intelligently and with untiring industry, and is deserving of the commendations of the committee as well as of the entire Craft for his invaluable services. JOHN D. VINCIL, LEE A. HALL, ALLAN MCDOWELL, Committee,

MEMORIAL.

The following memorial was referred to the incoming Grand l\'Iaster: To tile lIfost Worshipful Grand Lodge of Mwsouri, A. F. and A. jlf. "

On the night of the 5th of October, 1882, Tyrian Lodge, No. 350, A. F. and A. M., had their l\Iasonic Hall. with all the furniture, destroyed by fire, leaVing them without a place to .meet; and, having some 'work on hand unfinished, they wo.uld therefore ask that a Dispensation be granted, allowing the Lodge to meet in another building in Johnstown to transar,t their business; and the said Lodge be permitted to go to Montrose lodge-room to finish the work they have on hand. They had their hall insured for $500, but that will not cover the loss, if they get the full amount. Fraternally,

, W. E. FLETCHER, Senior Warden, Tyrian Lodge, No. 350. NOTE.-Gra.nd Master Woods, after his instllllatioil, granted the above request, and authorized his permission to be certified to the parties interested, whiehwas done by the Grand Secretary.

GRAND LODGE REPRESENTATIVES.

Rev. C. C. 'Voods, Deputy Grand .Master, and S. B. Potter, District Deputy Grand Master, presented.their commissions as Repl'esentati ves near the Grand Lodge of Missouri, from the Gr~:Lnd Lodges of Quebec and Rhode Island. They. were recognized in their official character by the Grand Master. rrhe Grand Lodge was called ii'om labor until 2 o'clock this afternoon.


44

Proceedin~ s

of the

[Oct.

SECOND DAY-A:FTERNOON SESSION.

ST. I.JOUIS, Mo., October 11, 1882. Grand Lodge reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M., and was called to order by the Grand Master, Most Worshipful Bro. Dockery. Grand Officers in their respective places. Prayer by Bro. John E. Barnes, Grand Chaplain. APPEAL

For aid, presented in behalf of Pattonsburg I.Jodge, 'No. 65, whose Hall had been destroyed by fire, was read, and referred to Committee on Charity. CASE OF KLEINTOPF.

The Special Committee on the Kleintopf Case' presented their report, which was adopted, and the committee discharged: ST. LOCIS, Mo., October 11, 1882. To the ]I[ost W01'shipjul Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A. F. and A. M.: Your Special Committee, to whom was referred that part of the Grand Master's Address referring to charges against Bro. Adolph Kleintopf, of ltaska Lodge, No. 420, having made a thorough examination of the case as tried and presented by Right Worshipful Bro. S. B. Potter, District Deputy Grand Master of the Sixteenth District, find no reason for setting aside the action of the Grand Master in the premises. GEO.'R. HUNT, G. L. FAULHABER, Committee.

D. D. 'GRAND MASTER'S AND G. LECTURER'S REPORT.

The following reported was approved: To the .ilfost Worshipjul Grand Lodge oj lrIiBsouri, A. F. and A. )I.: Your committee, to whom was referred the reports of District Deputy Grand Masters and the Grand Lecturer, submit the following: ,

''''''l


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1882.J

45

The committee have'examined reports from District Deputies of thirty-eight Districts, viz; Nos. 1, 2, 3, fl, 6, 7,8,9, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 17,18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23,25, 26, 28, 29, 31, 32,33,35,36,37,38,39, .41,42, 4a, 44,46,47 and 48. All these reports show that the Craft, in the respective Districts, is in a flourishing condition, doing excellent work and accomplishing much good. A majority of these reports are so incomplete, however, that it is impossible to collate from them all the statistical information that we had hoped to lay before the Grand Lodge, therefore we submit oIlly the following statement of the value of the real and personal property, other than cash, owned by the Lodges in their respective Districts: District No.1, " 2, " 3, " 5, " 6, "

Twelve Lodges rcport.. Four " Twenty " One " Eleven "

$8,475 R,280 14,290 1,4:10 11,0&'>

00

00 00

00 00

7, No Statistics.

" 8, Thirteen " 9, Four " 10, Five " 11, Four " 12, Eleven " 15, No Statistics. " 16, Twenty-five " 17, No Statistics.

" .......................................... ......................................... .......................................... .......................................... "

10,20000 2,800 00 7,250 00 1,450 00 3,760 00 21.,240 50

" ]8,

" ., " " " " "

19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26,

Nine No StaNstics. Six No StaListics. Five ,\, Three No Statist-ics.

8,29000 2,4.0000 8.100 00

2,60000

" 28,

'" 29, Two " 31, Seven " 32, No Stafi.~lics. " 33, Six " 3ll, Ten " 37, Four " 38, No Stcltistics. " 39, Four " 4], No Statistics. " 42, Three " 43, Seven " 44, Ten " 46, No Statistics. "47, Two " 48, Six

1,000 00 3,120 00 1l,OOO 00 2,960 00 1,715 00 1,450 00

2,25000 7,000 00 5,95000 80000 ],22;"j Oll

$H5,140 50


Proceedings of the

46

[Oct.

The Deputies failing to make returns are from the following Districts: Nos. 4, 13, 14, 24, 27, 30, 34, 40, 45, 49, '50 and 5l. The Deputy of the Forty-third District reports that the lodge-room of St. Aubert Lodge, No. 314, at St. Aubert, Callaway County, was dc,<>troyed by fire on the ninth of December last; that the Lodge's charter, books, and, in fact, everything contained in the hall, was consumed; that the Lodge had not convened for one year prior to the destruction of its hall, and that he had written to the Worshipful Master of the Lodge on three different occasions, regarding the matter, and could obtain no satisfactory reply as to what the Lodge intended to do in the future. Your committee would recommend that the District Deputy ofthis District be instructed to visit the place and obtain possession of the remaining effects of the Lodge, which consist of $80 in cash (as stated in his report), and turn the same over to the Grand Lodge. The Report of the Grand Lecturer is very full and complete, containing much valuable information, and showing a large amount of work done, he having met the officers and members of ninety-two Lodges, and instructed them in the work and lectures of the several degrees. We cannot refrain from commending the zeal of our Right Worshipful Bro. :McDowell, Grand Lecturer, ill the discharge of his duties during the past year. This is an important work, and we concur in his suggestion that the District Lecturers should hereafter make report of their stewardship to him, so that he may be able to give instruction in the future in those Districts where his services are most needed. Fraternally submitted, S. B. POTTER, R.P.CLARKSON; PHILIP RODAN, J. H. BAUGH, JAMES P. WOOD, B. G. WILKERSON, SAl\I'L SHOOK, R. C. WALKER, JOHN GOODIN, WM. GILLESPIE, C. G. BROOKS. CommitWe.

UNFINISHED

BUSIN~SS.

The report of the Committee on Unfinished Business was approved, and is as follows: I

To the l'[ost Worshipful Grand Lodge oj Missou"i, A. F. and A. Jf. : Your Committee on Unfinished Business beg leave to make the following report: At the Annual Communication of 1880, the following proposed amendments to thc Grand Lodge By-Laws were submitted, and at the last Annual Communication, postponed. the same having been read Oll three several days, printed and ordered to be considered at the present Annual Communication, viz: Section 2, Article 16, By-Laws of 187:), page 2-5, the word" thirty" (30) to be stricken out, l111d the word" twentj'" (20) inserted inslcu,u thereof.


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

47

Also Section 21, Article 16, page 2R, By-Laws of 1875, strike out the word" fifty" (50), and insert instead thereof the words "twenty-five" (25). Nothing else has been presented to your committee for its consideration. We therefore recommend that the same be acted upon at the present session. Fraternally submitted,

J. S. C. J.

B. THOMAS, CROPPER, G. HUBBLE, S. AMBROSE, R. S. MOORE, Commit1ee.

SPECIAL REPORT ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

John D. Vinci!, Committee on Foreign Correspondence, presented a special report concerning the recent formation of the Grand Lodge of Arizona.' The resolution thereto attached was adopted, thereby formally recognizing the Grand Lodge of Arizona. To the Most Worship.{ul Grand Lodge oj !ofissouri, A. F. and A. !If. :

Your Committee on Correspondence would present for speciai consideration and action the fact that a Grand Lodge has been organized in the Territory of Arizona. Said organization took place on the 23d of March, 1852.. DelcgoRtes from several Lodges in that territory assembled in Tucson and held a convention, which perfected a code of laws, followed by an election of Grand Officers and the adoption of a resolution to organize a Grand Lodge. The Lodges entering into the new organization were created by the Grand Lodges of California and New Mexico. Aztlan Lodge, working under a charter from the Grand Lodge of California, was not represented at the organization of the Grand Lodge of Arizona; and at first is seemed as路 if an opportunity offered for another firstclass row, a la New Mexico. A cinmlar from the Grand Secretary of the new Grand Lodge conveyed the intelligence that said Lodge had joined the organization, and thus secured unity and harmony in the new jurisdiction. To be well assured in the premises I wrote the Grand Secretaries of the Grand Lodges of California and New Mexico for official information concerning t.he legal status of the ncw organization. From these Brethren replies came that settle the claims of Arizona, and prove that it is worthy of, and entitled to regconition. Bro. Abell, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge o~ California wrote me as follows: . "DEAR SIR AND BROTHER-YOUrs of the 19th 1I1L, arrived while I was absent from the city in search of a Htttle health, else it would have been answered earlier.

" In reply to' your enquiry, I think that the Grand LOdge of Arizona was properly and lawfully organized. We had four Lodges in that territory-three of which were cha.rtered, and one of which was Under Dispensation, and of course took no pa.rt in the , Proceedings. There was also a chartered Lodge from New Mexico, which, with two of ours, composed the convention tha.t forllleJ the new Grand Lodge. One of our chartered


48

Proceedin~s

of the

[Oct.

Lodges, that at Prescott, through some misunderstanding was not represented in the convention, but it has since given its adhesion to the new Grand Lodge, and is now known upon its register as Aztlan Lodge, No. 1. " I can only add that our Grand Lodge will undOUbtedly recogni7.e and welcome its third daughter (Oregon and Nevada were the first and second) at its communication in October next. " With all best Wishes, yours truly and fraternally, ALEX. G. ABELL, Grand Secl路etary."

Similar information was received from Bro. D. J. Miller, Grand Secretary of Mexico.

Ne,y.

I have been thus particular as to details and facts, in order that our Grand Lodge in its act of recognition, herewith.proposed, may not be under any apprehension as to future complications. There is no " wooden horse" in this case. I therefore submit and recommend the adoption of the following: Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Arizona has been legally constituted, and is hereby recognized as the only supreme and lawful Masonic authority within the territoriallimits of said jurisdiction. We hail this young Grand Lodge, with its five Lodges and three hundred members, as a promising auxiliary, and welcome it to the family of American Grand Lodges. Faternally,

JOHN D. VINCIL, Committee.

JURISPRUDENCE.

Most -Worshipful Bro. Thos. E. Garrett presented a report from the Committee on Jurisprudence, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the Most WorShipful Grand Lodge of Missonri, A. F. and A. M.: I

Your Committee on Jurisprudence, to whom was referred the joint petition of Good Hope Lodge, No. 218, and Cache Lodge, No. 416-both situated in thc Carondelet District of the city of St. Louis-praying for a division of thc Board of Relief of St. Louis, and a separation of the Board of Relief Fund, submit the following as their answer and report: The law of this Grand Lodge makes and maintains concurrent jurisdiction in all the cities of Missouri within the corporate limits of which more than one Lodge is established. In the cities, therefore, the Lodges draw the material for their membership from the whole popUlation, irrespective of the residence of applicants and the location of the IJodges. No lines are drawn marking District.<; for the work of making Masons. The Grand Lodge law, creating Boards of Relief, provides that in every town or city containing two or more Lodges there shall be a Board of Relief, composed of two Represcntatives, duly accredited, from each Lodge, which Relief Board 8113-11 dispeu:;e charit~' in cases of need to worthy Master Mason:;, their widows and orpham, who are


, 1882.J

Grand Lodge of .Missouri.

49

not members of said Lodges, or the relicts or offspring of the membcrs; the charit), fund being crcated by contributions of five dollars for each initiation in the Lodges represcnten in the board. This is the sum and substance of the Grand Lodge law constituting and rcgulating a charity for the benefit of strangers and sojourners in distress, who can prove thcir right to aid from the charity fund. We are now asked to change the law, specifically and exclusively for the city of St. Louis, and for the special convenience of our Brethren at Carondelet. Carondelet is within the corporate limits of the city of St. Louis. Good Hope and Cache Lodges may draw their Masonic material from any portion of the city, seven or ten miles away, no line is drawn in the city indicating thus far shult thou go, and no fart.her, for membership. Why should not the Lodges at Carondelet contriuute their quota, as provided, to the General Charity Fund established by the Grand Lodge? To divide the city into districts, with a Board of Relief for each district, would make it feasible under the law for charity a.pplicants to run from one district to the other and claim Masonic benefit.c;, induding members of city Lodges, who are precluded by the present organization of Boards of Relief t.hroughout the State. To divide the Board of Relief fund, a~ proposed, by a <livision of the city into <listricts. in the opinion of your committee, would create endless confusion, and could not fail to be prejudicial to the eause 9f charity, for which we labor to minister. \\'e therefore recommend that the prayer of the petitioners be not granted. Fraternally submitted, TIIOS. E. GARRETT, R. E. ANDEI{SON, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, S. H. SAUNDERS, F. L. SCHOFfELD,

Committee.

FUNERAL SERVICE.

T1l..e Committee on "Funeral Serviee" presented a report, thr01fgh its Chairm~n, Bro. Garrett. On motion, the Grand Lodge resolved to receive the "Service," and to recommend it to the subordinate Lodges for thefr use. It was further ordered that ten thousand copies路 be printed and distributed by the Grand 'Secretary among the various J.Jodges in the State in proportion to their membership. A copy of the Service ~s bound with these Proceedings. TEMPERANCE.

.....

Hight 'Vorshipful Bro. J. W. Farris, District Deputy Grand l\1aster, in obedience to instruetions, presented the following papcr, which ,vas referrcd to a speeial committee, consisting of Brothers J; ,V. Boyd, XCIl. Hyland and ,J. 1\1. Sallee: G. L. PRO.-1.


50

Proceedin~s

[Oct.

of the

'.1'0 the lffost Worshipjnl Gmnd Lodge oj j1.[issouri, A. P. and A .â&#x20AC;˘W.: WHI,REAS, It is with shame that we acknowledge that there are l.f~sons who so far forget their dignity as to get drunk, and thus bring Masonry into disrepute; thetefore, be it

Resolved, That it is hereby made a violation of 1-rasonic morals to be engaged in the traffic of liquor as a dramshop-keeper, and all persons engaged in such business are declared to be ineligible as petitioners for thc Mysteries of l.fasonry within this Grand Jurisdiction. .

Resolved, fU7'lher, That we instruct the District Deputy Grand Masteror this District. to present this resolution to the Grand Lod~e at the next session and urge it'S adoption. HERMAN FERGUSON, ERWIN ELLIH, J. A. BRADSHAW, 'w. W. CL'SHING, .JOlIN TURRENTINE, J. M. BOTLER.

INDUS'l'RIAL HOME.

The committee on the above interest prpsented a report, whieh was adopted. At the instanee of the committee, J. E. Cadle and John D. Villeil were 8nhsequently added to their number. 'rbe repzrt is a.,; follows: HT. LOUIS, Mo., October 11th, lRR2. To the ,"oSt IVorshipjul Grand Lodge oj NisSOll1'i, A.

F~

and A . .11. :

rndllstria~ome"

Your special committee, to whom wa." referred the matter of an " for the widows and orphans of deceased members, respectfully submit that they have been unable to mature any plan by whil!h could be carried out the establishment of the institution suggested in the resolution under whieh they were appointed. Believing that the objcet sought to be accomplished, is one worthy of the consideration of the Grano Lodge, awl to llvoid any hasty action, we recommend that the committee be continneo, to report at the next annual communication. Fraternally submitted, H. B. BUTTS, G. W. DEGROODT, WM.'H. MAYO, Committee.

CHARTERED LODGES.

The following report, from the Committee on Chartered Lodges, was approved and ordered printed:


Grand. Lodge of Mis801~ri.

1882.]

51

To the l1fost WorslrijJj'ul Grand Lodge o.llliissollri, A. F. and A. lrf.:

Your Committee on Chartered Lodges would respectfully submit the following report: We have examined the reports of all the Lodges received to date and submitted to us by the Grand Secretary. . We find the reports of the folloWing Lodges correct, as prescribed by Section 20, Article XV!., Grand Lodge By-Laws. Page '17, New Book of Constitutions: Kos. 1, ~, 4, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 16, 43, 44, 46, 47, ,'iI), 51, 52, 53. GG, 57, 81, 82, 83, 8:'), 87, R9, 90, 92, 93, !ii, 112, 114, 116, 117, 120, 121, 122, 123, 144, 145, 147, 148, 150, Hil, 152, ][j:~, 175,176,177,178, 179, 186, 187, 188, 207, 208, 212, 213, 214, 2\.1, 21R, 219,

17, 20,22,23, 25,27, 29, :n, 33, 31, 36 38, 39,40,41, 58, 60, 61, 62, 64, 6;'), 67, (;8, 71, 72, 7G, 77, 78, 79, 80, 95, 07, 100, 101, 103, -104, lO;), 106, 108, 109, 110, 111, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 134, 135, 136, 138, 140, 112, 164, 156, 158, 160, 163, 104, 165, 166, 169, 170, 171, 174, 1R9, 190, 192, 194, 195, 197, ]98, 199,200,202,203, 205, 221, 222, 223, 225, 226, 228, 229, 231, 232, 233, 236, 237,

~~W,U~~,~~~~~~~~lli,25~25~25~W~~~W~~,W~W,W~W~

270, 272, 275, 27(;, 279, 280, 281, 282, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 293, 2\14, 295, 207, 299, 300, :101, 302, 304, 30G, 307, 308, 311, 316, 317, 321, 322, ~2:~, :124, 325, 328, 334, 335, 336, 338, 339, 341, ~~M~~~W,~~m,~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

378, 407, 436, 464, 4!)4,

379, 408, 437, 467, 4!)5,

380, 381, 382, 411, 412, 415, 4~9, 4'11, 442, 468, 470, 472, 4!)6, 4!)~l, 500,

384, 386, 416: 418, 443, 441, 47;>. 478, 503, 50路1.

386, 419, 445, 479.

390, 420, 447, 480,

392, 421, 448, 481,

393,'894, :~!l6, 399, 401, 422, 423, 424, 425, 426, 44!), 4-50, 453, 4.'i;,), 456, 482, 483, 484, 487, 488,

402, 427, 4iiR, 489,

403, 428, 459, 490,

40'1, 429, 460, 491,

405, 430, 461, 492,

406, 43i>, 462, 493,

Incomplete list of officers, and officers not known: Nos. 10, 14, 18, 19, 21, 35, 42, 45, 51, 63, 66, 70, 76, 84, 88, !)1, !)9, 107, 11!), 131, 132, 133, 1:>7, 143, 141;, 16R, 173, 191, 201, 206, 210, 211, 217, 234, 2.57, 261, 266, 277, 278, 284, 2!ll, 303, 306, 310, 32G, 327, 332, 344, 357, 372, 375, 383, 387, 388, 389, 3!)1, 417, 446, 452, 457, 477, 4!)7, 501. ' . Date of meeting not stated: Nos. 54, 133, 185, 395. Names of

~cmbers not

alphabetically arranged:

Nos. 2, 21, 24, 70, 98, 139, 181, 312, 313, 350, 36!, 375, 410. Not signed by the Worshipful 路Master: Nos. 37, 1:37, 181, 220,

2:~0,

296, 350, 410, 452, 474.

Not signed by the Secretary:

Nos. 3i, [j6, 137, 184, 230, 410. Seal not attached: Nos. 24, 37, 86, 102, 118, la3, 1:~7, 141, 162, 172, 173, 180, 184, 227, 230, 239, 274, 284, 292, 2!)6, 310, 318, 319; 320, 330, 3;i2, 357, :~64, 367, 3Ul, 410, 432, 463, 466, 473, 48.'), 498. Officers' names not in list of members: Nos. 113, 315, 486. Raisings not in list of members:


52

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

Nos. 6, 18, n, 7,1, 98, 113, 159, 1R3, 224, 23R, 309, 326, 377, 476. Admissions not in list of members: Nos. 11, 15, 28, 98, 149, 157, 167, 183, 185, 196, 230, 242, 256, 271, 315, 329, 340, 377, 387, 433.

List of members does not contain those whose dues have been remitted: Nos. 30, 74, 76, 149, 193, 23fi, 3R9, 400, 451. Reinstatements not in list of members: Noo.~~~~~~~~~~~fl~

Lodges making no returns: Nos. I), 26, 49, 69, 96, 130, 15fi, 161, lR2, 204, 209, 216, 246, 250, 252, 253, 258, 273, 2R3, 285,314,337,343, 349, 361, 363, 3il, 374, 3!JR, 409, 413, 414,431,434, 43R, 440, 4.')4, 471,502. In the matter of the petitions of Portland Lodge. Ko. 242, and Arlington Lodge, No. 346, for change of name, your committee are of the same opinion as in 1881 and 1882, that the identity ofthese Lodges, by name, in the Grand Lodge record should not be destroyed, and therefore recommend that the petitions be not granted. In the matter of the petition of the !lrethren of Madison Lodge, No. 91, to remove to a new Hall in Holiday, Monroe County, Missouri, we recommend that permission be granted. After a careful examination, your committee recommend that New Boston Lodge, No. 284, Linn County. Missouri, be transferred from the Forty-sixth Masonic District to the Ninth Masonic District, as prayed for in its petition. Gower Lodge, No. 397, failed to report the names of its members, and your committee were unable to determine whether it was correct or not. Fraternally SUbmitted, J. B. AUSTIN, Ie F. STEVENSON, F. W. MOTT, .J. ED. WALKER, B. V. CHASE, M. F. BROWN, .J. W. FARRIS, G. L. FAULHABER, J. R. MIDDLETON, F. J. TYGARD, Committee.

A SPECIAL OOMMITTEE

On redistricting the State was ordered, under (he following resolution: '1'0 the .Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of

.~[i.w)1J,ri,

A. F. and A. M.:

Resol'ved, That a committee of three be appointed. whose duties it shall be to enquire into the present division of this jurisdiction into Masonic Districts; the number and arrangement thereof, and whether the same should not be increased or more convenjentl)' arranged:


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Miss07!ri.

53

That at the next Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge said committee make report, accompanied by such recommendations as to them may secure the greatest efficiency in the discharge of the various'duties of District Deputy Grand Masters in the oversight of the Craft in their rcspectivc jurisdictions. E. L. SCHOFIELD, JOHN D. VINCIL, Committee.

Brothers E. L.Schofield, Allan l\1:cDowell and S. B. Potter were appointed under the above resolution. TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS.

Bro. John R. Parson, Committee on 'rransportation, sub路" mitted his report, which was accepted with the thanks of the Grand Lodge to Bro. Parson: ST. Lours, Mo., October 11,1882.

To the 1I10s! Worshipful Grand Lodge of jlfi~souri, A. F.' and A. lIf...

Your Committee on Transportation and Hotels would respectfully report that the following arrangements havc becn made: R'eprescnt!tivc;:; who pay full fare c~ming can obtain return tickets, on presentation of Grand Secretary's certificate, as follows: St. Louis & San Francisco R. R The Missouri Pacific " Chicago & Alton ''''abash, St. Louis & Pacific " St. Louis Iron Mountain & Southern R'y Keokuk Northern Line Packet Co

One Fourth Fare. One Third .. .. . One IIalf

The Hotels will accommodate Representatives on the following terms: Hotel Brown $1 50 Per Day. !lfrs. Davis' Hotel..................................................................... 1. 50 Hurst's Hotel. 路 : $1 50 1 75 Everett House............. 1 50 2 00 St. James Hotel............................................................... 1 50" 2 00 Barnum's Hotel 1 70 \Vindsor HoteL...... 2 00 Lac:lede HoteL ':'............. 2 00 2 50 Planters' House............... 2 50 :1 00 Lindell Hotel.................................................................. 2 50 :1 00 Southern IIotel........................................................................ 3 00 Everett Housc for Rooms, 50c. 75 1 00 Hurst's Hotel. " 50 75 IIotel Barnum " 75 Fraternally, JOHN R. PARSON, Committee on Transportation and Hotel<;.


Proceedin~8

54

of the

[Oct.

GRAND SECRETARY'S OFFICE.

The committee, appointed heretofore to procure a suitable office for the Grand Secretary, presented a report, which was approved, and the committee discharged: ST. LOUIS, l\{O.,Octotber 11,1882. To the Mosl Worshipfl11 Grand Lodge of jJ[issouri, A. P. and A. M.:

Your committee, appointed to procure a suitable room for the Grand Secretary's office and the Grand Lodge library, would respectfully report that they have leased two rooms '-., at No. 620 Chestnut street, at the annual rent of six hundred dollars. JOHN D. VI~CIL, W. LUKE, .JOHN R. PARSON,

JOH~

Committee.

ACCOUNTS.

The Committee on Accounts reported as follows, the same being adopted: To lhe Most WorshiPful Grand Lodge of jJfissOU1"i, A. F. and A.

jJ{.:

The Committee on Accounts would beg leave to report that we have examined the books and vouchers of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer, and find the same correct. DR. Balance in hand of Grand Treasurer, October 12, 1881.. $18,658 67 Grand Secretary has collected and paid over to Grand Treasurer........ 13,330 27 Total.

.

$31,988 94

CR.

Grand Treasurer has paid out, as per warrants

$11,789 03

Balance on hand October 11,1882

$20,199 91

Respectfully SUbmitted, JAMES E. CADLE, J. H. FRAME, JAS. A. GORDON, J. B. VARDEMA~, J. M. SALLEE,' DAVID BAIRD, G. P. BIGELOW, B. H. INGRAl\{, A. M. CROW, J. T. RCFFIN, D. E. WRAY, Committee

,


1882.]

Grand

.Lod~e

of Missouri.

55

AMENDMENTS TO' BY-LAWS,

Heretofore submitted, were taken up and discussed. The proposition to reduce the fees for the three degrees in subordinate Lodges, from thirty to twenty dollars, was defeated. The proposed reduction of Grand Lodge dues, from fifty to twenty-five cents, was defeated. A. resolution was offered to exempt subordinate Lodges from annual dues to the Grand I...Iodge for the ensuing lYlasollic year. The Grand l\'Iaster declared the motion .out of order. PLACE OF MEETING.

A motion was made to hold the next session of this Grand Lodge in Kansas City. An amendmen,t was offered, to meet in Sedalia. The vote being taken on the amendment, it was rejected, and a like fate attended the original motion. EXEMPLIFICATION.

The Grand Lodge voted to have an exemplification of the 'Vork and Lectures of the Third Degree, by the Grand I...Iecturer, this evening, at 7:30 o'clock. The Grand Lodge was then called from labor untIl 7:30 .o'clock this evening.

SECOND DAY-NIGHT SESSION-EXEMPLIFICATION. ST. LOUIS; Mo., October 11, 1882. The Grand Lodge convened in the l\faster Masons' Room, at 7:30 o'clock, and was called to labor by Right vVorshipful Bro. Lee A. Hall, Grand Senior 'Yarden. Grand Officers in their respective stations.


56

Proceedin~ 8

of the

[Oct.

The meeting being for the exemplification of the 'York and Lectures of the Third Degree, Right Worshipful Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer~ took the chair, and proceeded to exemplify the Work. The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

THIRD DAY-l\:10RNING SESSION. ST.LoUIS,

Mo., October 12, 1882.

Grand Lodge reassembled at 9 o'clock this morning, an'a was called to labor by the l\iost 'Vorshipful Grand Master, Bro. A. M. Dockery. Grand Officers in their several stations. Prayer was offered by Grand Chaplain Bro. Barnes. Minutes of yesterday's several sessions read and approved.

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES.

Most Worshipful Bro. Noah M. Givan, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report on Appeals and Grievances. The same was considered, by subjects, and ap-. proved as a whole: To the Most Worsh'ipJul Gmnd Lodge oj MissOttri, A. F. and A. M.:

Your Committee on Grievance beg leave to report that they have given a full and careful consideration to all the cases presented for their determination, and have reached the conclusions therein indicated. We have aimed to do justice in each case and at the same time adhere to the law of this Grand Jurisdiction governing J\Iasonic trials. We have as nearly as possible followed the course adopted by the former Chairman of this committee, the late beloved and lamented Sam'l H. Owens, of giving the main points in each case in as concise a manner as possible, and then giving our own views, so that the Grand Lodge may have a general idea of the facts and of the conclusions we have reached. We cannot give a full statement of each case, but have endeavored to make plain the questipns. decided, and to apply the law to the facts as presented in the record.


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

57

No. 1. A. W. CHENOWETH, W. M.,

}

VS.

YANCY LoDGE,

No. 148. '

This is doubtless intended for an appeal from'the action of the Lodge suspending Bro. GarlaJid A. Mann; but there was no appeal taken, the only thing indicating it is the following, taken from the record; "An appeal was then taken; the W. l\f., upon his own motion, ordering that the proceedings and evidence in the case be certified to the Grand Lodge, upon the grounds that the punishment infi{cted is entirely inadequate, in view of the gross unmasonic conduct charged and proven." An appeal cannot be taken in this way. No notice was given, as required by Sec. 18, Art. 19, of the By-Laws. The accused was charged with cursing and abusing two Brethren, and striking one of them, and was found guilty and suspeuden. for three months. There being no appeal here the proceedings are dismisEed, which leaves the jndgment of the Lodge in force. â&#x20AC;˘

No. II.

G. W. LAWREI'CE VS.

GRANBY LODGE,

No.

216.

}

Appeal from the jUdgment of the Lodge suspending him.

The only papers in this case are, charge and specification, statement of three persons, on three separate pieces of .paper, the appeal of Bro. Lawrence and two letters from the Secretary to the Grand Secretary, giving the facts in a narrative form, from which we Jearn that the accused was suspended for five years. There is no transcript of the proceedings, nothing to show that charge and specification were presented in open Lodge, or . that a time was fixed for trial, or that notice was given, or that any trial was had. The . specification found with the papers is as follows: "That on or about the 31st of May, 18i9, the said G. W. Lawrence did cheat, wrong and defraud one Robert Meadeor of a certain amount of money of the vallie of $1,034." This is entirely too vague and indefinite. The,' evidence was much of it hearsay and therefore incompetent. If the Brother was suspended for five years on the evidence sent up, injustice was done him. We therefore, as~>uming from the statement of the Secretary, that be was suspended, recommend that the judgr,nent be reversed and the cause remanded, with instructions that definite specifications be presented, and proceedings thereon had according to law. No. III. C.C.DUAPER 'liS.

LACI,EDE LODGE,

No. 83.

}

Appeal from the jUdgment of the Lodge acquitting Bro. JNO. BOHANNON.

The record in this case is complete, and we congratulate the Lodge on having an efficient Secretary. Charge was preferred by Bro. R. P. Goodall, who at the time of the alleged grievances was Sheriff of the County. The general nature of the specifications was that Bro. Bohannon, while pretending to assist the Sheriffin the capture of a criminal, was aiding him to make his escape, and, among other things, accepted $50 from the Sheriff to give to the criminal at a time when he could be captured and the money recovered; find instead of giving it to him gave it to his uncle and permitted the uncle to take from his pocket a revolver to be given to and for the use of said criminal. The evidence is voluminous and we cannot give space here for even a synopsis of it, but the accused himself admitted that he permitted the pistol to be taken from his pocket, and that he gave the $50 to a person other than the crimina~; and while he asserts


Proceedin.ds of the

58

[Oct.

his good faith, he is cont.radicted by so many of the witnesses, and there are so many suspicious circumstances against him, that we are unable to see how he was acquitted. A change of one vote would have convicted-the vote being: guilty, 24; not guilty, 13. The criminal was charged with murder, and it was the duty of every good citizen and Mason to aid in his capture. The security of life and property depends upon a faithful execution of the laws of the land, and when a Brother Mason undertakes to assist an officer in the execution of the laws, he should not be guilty of any duplicity, or place himself in a position that will not bear the most rigid scrutiny. We think the testimony.warranted the conviction of the accused, indeed, his acquittal upon the facts given in evidence is a reflection upon the Order. Let the judgment of the Lodge be reversed and the cause remanded for a new trial. No. IV. S. G. S,nTlI VS.

HANNIBAl,

LODGE, No. 188.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge acquitting E. C. HAYs.

This trial grew ont of a disgraceful quarrel between doctors, over a post mortem examinatioil, and occured at the mansion house ....here the remains of the head of the family lay cold in death. Instead of standing in the presence of the grim monster with bated breath, where the wail of the widow and the cry of the orphan should soften hearts and make men nearer of kin, these hardened sons of Esculapius, made the air resonant with angry words and profanity and even attempted personal violence on each other. . Dr. Smith charged Dr. Hays with assault. The evidence ,was heard by the Lodge and a copy of it is furnished your committee. It is somewhat conflicting. Dr. Hays says Dr. Smith called him a liar before he slaped him (Smith) in the face. This Dr. Smith路 denies, but says, " I told him if he was down town I would call him a liar." Either was exceedingly aimable! The Lodge. after hearing the evidence, votell IlS follows: guilty. 7 ; not guilty, 13. The app_eal is based alone on the ground that the finding is against the law and evidence. Those who heard the evidence are the best judges of its weight where there is a conflict. Let the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed. No. V. D.J.

STAMPER VS.

CLIFTON HILL

LODGE, No. 161.

Appeal from action of the Lodge in failing to assess punishment after finding Bro. } ALFRED JONES guilty.

Bro. Alfred Jones, a member of Vincil Lodge, No. 62, WIlS charged by the J. W. of Clifton Hill Lodge, Ko. 161, in that Lodge, with" premeditatedly shooting and killing Bro. S. H. Blair on the 30th day of April, 1882." Trial was had and he was found guilty. After failing to expel. the Lodge voted for suspension, without fixing any time. Then votes were had on time of suspension, in the follOWing order-2.,) years, 5 years, 2 years, I-year, six months-and two-thirds not voting for either, the voting ceased and the Lodge closed. TIro. Stamfer has appealed for the reason that the Brother was found gUilty and no punishment assessed. The record fails to show where Bro. Jones resided at the time charges were preferred. He was not present at the trial, but was represented by counsel appointed by the WorshipfUl Master. The record also fails to show that after charges were preferred in Clifton Hill Lodge, that Lodge notified Vincil Lodge, of which the accused was a member, and that Lodge given the privilege of trying the clLse, as required in the rule approved by this Grand Lodge in 1872. (See Proceedings lR72, page 28; Constitution, 1882, page 72, Note 2; Proceedings, 187f), page 59, in case of Wright et ill VS. Aurora Lodge, No. 267. This notice should have been given.)

.--.,


..

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1882.J

59

The Lodge also committed error in the manner of voting on the question of suspension. It was doubtless mislead by Note IG, pageG6, Constitution, 1882. The language of the Committee on Grievance in 18i2, in case of .Campbell V8. Paris Union Lodge, No. 19, would seem to warrant the method of voting pursued by the Lodge in the case at bar. But the precise question here presented was not then before the committee. If it attempted then to construe Section 7, Article 19, of our By-Laws, that construction has since been overruled. In 1875, when the question was specially considered by the Committee on Jurisprudence, the Grand Lodge adopted a plan of procedure in trials, including the manner of voting, both on the questions of guilt and of punishment, which are, in brief, if the verdict be guilty and expulsion fails" the Worshipful Master shall state the question: Shall the Brother be suspended? (Motions being made to suspend shall state the time, and the vote taken on the longest time suggested first.) The suspension and time of suspension being voted on at the same time, ete." (See Proceedings, 1875, page 68, Constitution, 1882, page 61, Note 1.) From this it will be seen that the Lodge, after expulsion had failed, should have voted on suspension and the time of suspension at the same time, eommencing with the longest time proposed. For the errors stated the case must be reversed. The Lodge placed itself in the unenviable position of finding a Brother guilty of premeditatedly killing another Brother, and yet refusing to even suspend him for six months. Human life must be lightly esteemed by those who refuse to punish. There must have been a mistlLke either in Bro. JOlles' guilt, or else the killing of a man must be regarded as a trifling matter-a mere breakfast spell. Let the judgment of the Lodge be reversed and the cause remanded, with direetions to Clifton Hill Lodge to notify Vincil Lodge, No. G2, and send a copy of the charge and speeifications, that it may have the privilege of trying the case, should it prefer to do so. If not, then let Clifton Hill Lodge proeeed to a new trial, giving the accused notice of the same, in accordance with the rules here announced. No. VI.

s. C. SCOTT VS.

POLAH STAR

LODGE, No 79.

1 I

r

J

Appeals from the action of the Lodge in suspending Brothers CHARLIE THAW, \"I'M. B. RIDER,and C. S. ROGERS, respectively, for non-payment of dues.

These Brethren were severally suspended for non-payment of dues, and Bro. Scott appeals for the'reason .that Bro. Rogers against whom similar charges were pending was allowed to remain in the lodge-room and cast his vote upon the question of suspension, except in his own case he did not vote-but was present. The record does not show whether he was present and voted or not, but if he did, would it be cause for reversal? We think not. In 1871 Past Grand "Master Garrett decided that" When several members are arraigned for non-payment of dues * * * all those under charges must retire, as they cannot vote on a genera! question in which all of them are equally interested." In that ease fort)' out of sixty members of the Lodge were under charges for non-payment of dues, and the above was announced advising the Master how to proceed. If the trial had been had, and they suspended, it would not have been such irregularity as to cause a reversal. It was irregular to allow anyone under similar charges to remain and vote, but if conviction results, the accused cannot complain. Certainly no injustice was done him. Since writing the above, we have received the appeal of Bro. Rider, who appeals for the reason, as he alleges, that the Lodge is largely indebted to him, and embodies in his appeal the records of the Lodge,in regard thereto. This defense was not made at the trial, and the records embraced in the appeal were not introduced in evidence, and can-


60

Proceedints of the

[Oct.

not properly be considered here. If the Brother hus a valid claim against the Lodge he should establish it, and the L<ldge should pay it, but the question of its validity is not qefore your committee, and cannot for the first time be considered by the Grand Lodge on appeal. Let the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed. No. VII. THOMAS :lIfCCLUNG V8.

BARNESVILLE LODGE, No. 455.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge acquitting Bro. S. T. RICE.

The record in this case is imperfect; but, from what is before your committee, it may be inferred that Bro. McClung preferred charge and specification against Bro. Rice. The latter is in the following words: "First, for misrepresenting a diseased mule, which has defrauded me out of $75, the least calculation." The accused was present at the trial. The vote was: guilty, 16; not guilty, 17. A close analysis of the specification makes this result inevitable. It will be observed that he is charged with "misrepresenting a diseased mule." The mule does'nt seem to be complaining, and if he, or she, as the case may be, can stand it, no one else should complain. The animal, however, may complain of the balance of the specification, viz" "which has defraudcd me out of $75, the least calculation." If the mule did that, punishment should be inflicted, not however by a Masonic Lodge. unless the animal be a member of the Lodge. At least, Bro. Rice should not be punished for what the mule did! The error complained of in the appeal is given in the following words: "By the Brother's ballot, they voted Bro. Rice not guilty of not defrauding me, a Master Mason." By the old rule of grammatical construction, two negatives are equal to one affirmative. Applying that rule to the statement, then the accuscd was found guilty and the appellant should not complain, but the vote shows differcntly. The Mastcr of the Lodge should not have permitted a trial on this specification. 'Vhen, however, a trial was had, and Bro. Rice acquitted, Bro. McClung should have been satisfied with the result. The members of the Lodge who heard the evidence were the best judges of the merits of his complaint. Let the appeal be dismissed and the judgment of the Lodge stand. No. VIII. BEN. A. HAMILTON VB.

PIEDMONT LODGE,

No. 449.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The record in this case is somewhat remarkable, to say the least. It commences with a call meeting, held July 22d, 1882. The object was stilted to have a trial in the case of Bro. J. L. Whitehead against Bro. B. A. Hamilton. Bro. Jno. P. McFarland (who was Worshipful Master) read charges against himself. Why.he did this, does not appear. Uro. Hamilton asked for a continuance, which was refused. Lodge then called from labor until 7: :30 P. M. The Lodge met again at 7 : 30 P.]I[, The Secretary read charge and specifications against Bro. Hamilton. At 8 1'. Ill. the Lodge" adjourned" for its regula.r meeting. At 9 P. ~I. the Lodge was again opened. The Junior Warden read specifications. Bro. Hamilton asked for a continuance, which was refused. Then commences the evidence. Bro. Whitehead was called to the witness-stand, and said, in general terms, the allegations are true. On cross-examination he refused to answer a number of questions, and, finally, the Worshipful ~:[aster refused to allow any further cross-examination by defendant. The examination of another witness was begun, and, before it was concluded, Bro. Hamilton retired, claiming he could'nt get a fair trial. Then the record shows" it was moved and seconded th~t we adjourn until Saturday, July'

'--'"


1882.]'

Grand

Lod~e

of JlÂŁissouri.

61

29th, 1882, at 4 o'clock P. M." Then it proceeds, "at 10: 45, JUly 29th, 1882, trial was resumed. Bro. Bunning resumed' his examination. Bro. ,Holland stated, I am not competent to conduct Masonic trials," etc., whcn "it WM ordered that we adjourn until' August 12th, at 2 o'clock P. lIf., 1882." At that date the trial (if such it may be called) was cDncluded, and Bro. Hamilton was expelled. No vote was had on any of the specifications. The vote was" for guilty, or not guilty." The record fails to show that charge and specitkations were presented in open Lodge, or that a time for trial had been fixed, or that the accused had been given a copy of the charge and specifications, or that any notice was given the absent members. Many other errors occurred too ,numerous to mention. The specifications, though lengthy, are exceedingly vague and indefinite. The Second is a sample, viz., "Has been a continued source of discord among the members, ete., and has stirred up strife and contention, etc.," without stating how this has been done. Another, the Fourth, is, "has maliciously preferred false and slanderous charges against W. ni. Jno. P. McFarland, etc.," withont stating what they were or in what the falsehood consisted. The others are of like character and drawn in the same manner. The whole record is a maudlin mess, and if it states the facts, the Grand Master . should enquire into the work of the Lodge. It is not usual for Masonic Lodges to "adjourn" from day to day, or to conduct trials by piecemeal, as this one was. As the Worshipful Master was, from the nature of the charge, somewhat interested, it was certainly in bad taste in him to arbitrarily cut off' a cross-examination of a witness. Let the judgment of the Lodge be reversed and the cause remanded. Let the specifications be made definite and certain, and if they charge a Mll.SOhic offense, let the proceedings then be cond ucted according to law, and we recommeQd that the Grand Master send the District Deputy Grand Master to preside at the trial. â&#x20AC;˘

No. IX. DANIEL ZOOK VB.

OREGON LoDGE,

No. 139.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspending him for non-payment of dues.

There is no merit in this appeal. Some irregularities are assigned as error, but the record shows that he was notified, and was suspended for the non-payment of dues. He does not claim that he was not in arrears, and gives no valid reason for not paying his dues. He can be restored by simply paying his arrears up to the date of suspension. Let the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed. No. X. HENRY

H. WINDS

VB.

LINN CREEK LODGE,

No. 152.

}

.Appeal from the judgment of the IJodge suspending him.

'The charge in this case is for shooting and wounding Bro. L. .T. Roach. A trial was had and the accused indefinitely suspended. This jud!?ll1cllt was set aside by Grand Master Dockery, and a new trial ordered. The result of, the second trial was the SIlSpension of the accused for seven years, from which he appeals. The testimony is voluminous, and reveals a most disgraceful state of affairs-a drunken broil and general row which occured in a saloon at the card table. Both the parties are Past ~fasters of the Lodge, and, since the difficulty, Bro. Roach has been elected and installed Master, and presided at the trial. The Lodge has divided into factions, and both parties have friends who seem to adhere to them regardless of merit. Truly the condition of this Lodge is an unfortunate one, and should be enquired into. It was manifestly improper for Bro.


Proce:e0in~s

62

of the

[Oct.

Roach to preside at the trial. Although the charge was preferred by the Junior Warden, yet Bro.' Roach was the prosecuting witness. A long statement of his being with the evidence in the case. Delicacy, at least, would have suggested that he retire and allow the Senior Warden to preside. For this error, we think, the case should be reversed; and if the Lodge is in the condition represented to your committee, the charter should be arrested, as we believe it has not sufficient inherent virtue to purge it of Ithe unworthy material contained in it. We therefore recommend that the judgment be reversed, and the cause be remanded for a new trial, and, also, that the Grand Master-elect investigate the condition of the Lodge, and, if found as represented to your committee, that he arrest the charter, whieh will avoid the' necessity of a new trial. In that event, charges should be preferred against both the parties to this affair in a Lodge having jurisdiction, and a trial thereon had where justice can be done. No. XI.

J. J. REEIJ

vs. MECHANICSVILLE LODGE, No. 260.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The specification in this case is as follows: "That he, John Reed, did, by false statements and false representlltions, obtain from R. Eo Gamble the sum of $300, etc." Bro. Reed was not present at the trial, living fifty miles away, and says that he was sick at the time and unable to get there. He so llotified the Lodge, but they did not receive the notice until after the trial was had. The evidence sbows that Bro. Gamble endorsed a note for $300 for Bro. Reed, and had it to pay, which does not support the charge that he obtained the money from Bro. Gamble. '1'h,e specification should be amended. If he obtained Bro. Gamble's signature to the note by false statements and false representations, then he should be charged with, and tried for, that. But if the Brother endorsed the note simply because he was asked to by a Brother Mason, and then had it to pay, that of itself does not constitute an offense. Ko Mason should ask a business favor of another, . simply because he is a Mason, and if he does, the Brother asked has as much right, and it is as much his duty, to refuse as though the person asking him was not a Mason. If a Brother is in need, then all charitably disposed Brethren, who arc able, will help himas a matter of charity-not as a matter of business. Masonry is not a b~lsiness institution, and the business affairs of the world should be kept out of it. If the Brother here is guilty it is because he made false statenwnts and repl'esentation.~ in obtaining the signature, and not simply because the good Brother who endorsed it for him had the money to pay. In order that Bro. Reed may have an opportunity to be present at the trial, we recommend that the judgment of the Lodge be set aside, and the cause be remanded for a new trial. Let amended specifications be filed, and a copy served on the accused, with notice of the time of trial, and then let the case proceed according to law. No. XII. G. W. OSSING VS.

ITASKA LODGE, No. 120.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge acquitting Bro. AUG. GOSERRINK. '

Bro. Gosebrink was charged with misappropriating Lodge funds while Treasurer of the Lodge. The trial was had and he was acquitted. The record is complete, and is presented in excellent shape. The evidence sustains the charge, and no evidence or explanation was offered by the defense. He admitted to several of the witnesses that he had used the money in business, and, after being acquitted, he "warmly thanked the Brethren for their verdict, and promised to pay the money as ~oon as he was able." There may be extenuating circumstances in this case, but the record fails to show it. A Lodge officer has no right to use Lodge funds in his business, although he may


1882.J

Grand Lodge of Jllissouri.

63

think he can safely do so and be able to return it when needed. He should not be excused for a misappropriation of Lodge funds. Let the jUdgment be reversed, and the cause remanded for a new trial. . No. XIII. This is the petition of II. C. Parish for rcstoration. He was expelled by Golden Lodge, No. 4i5, .July 8th, 18i5. The petition is recommended by a number of Masons and others in the neighborhood where the petitioner has resided for four years past, who certify that" they find him upright and honorable in his life and busil.less transactions." The petitioner expresscs sincere attachment to the principles of the Order, and regret at the nec~essity which cnllsed his explllson. 'fhollgb the Lodge refuses to recommend his restomtlon, yet we think we should learn to have mercy and exercise charity towards the penitent unfortullate, and we recommend that H. C. Parish be restored to his l\Illsonic rights and privileges. No. XIV. This is a memorial of Bro. Tom M. Moore, complaining of the action of a Lodge of which he. was not a member, in reference to allowing a ball to be held in the lodgeroom, and, also, that it was occupied a portion of the time as 11 store-room. The matters were investigA.ted by Past Grand ~faster Stubblefield and Grand'Master Dockery, who found that the goods formerly in the'room hac} been removed, and the Lodge Was directed not to again allow the usc of the hall for dancing. The memorialist unjustly assails the motives of the Grand Masters, Grand Secretary and District Deputy Grand 'Master. There was no occasion whatever for this. We are unable to see anything in the nlemorial demanding the attention of the Grand Lodge. No. XV. This is a memorial from Bro. Paul Calame, of Hermann Lodge, No. 123, making complaiut of serious irregUlarities and violations of Masonic law in that Lodge, on the part of the Worshipful Master and a number of members. The parties accused have no notice, and the matter is not properly here. If the charges are true, the Lodge should be dealt with. We recommend that the memorial be referred to the incoming Grand Master, with instructions to cause them to be investigated, and, if found true, that he tllke such action as, in his judgment, the nature of the case demands, Fraternally submitted, NOA II M. GIVAN, R. E. ANDERSON, XEN. RYLAND,

JOSEPH S. BROWNE, THOS. C. READY, Committee.

ELECTION.

The hour having arrived for the election of officers for t,be ensuing year, the Grand Lodge proceeded to perform that duty. 'rhe Grand Master appointed as tellers, Brothers vVm. R. Stubblefield, of St.. Louis, and A. M. Crow, of Kansas City. 'rhe eleetion resulted as follows: GRAND OFFICERS: REV. CHAS. C.WOODS, of Kansas City LEE A. HALL, of LOllisiana ROB'T F. STEVENSON, of Clinton JOHN W. BO'fD, ofSt. Joseph SA1\fUEL 1\1. KENNAHD, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, of St. Louis

GHAND MASTER. DEI'UTY GRAND l\1ASTER. SENIOR GRAND WARDEN. JUI\JOR GRAND WARDEN.. GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECHETARY.

The Grand Lodge was then ealled from labor until 2: 30 o'clock this afternoon.


64

Proceeding 8 of the

[Oct.

THIRD DAY-AFTERNOON SESSION.

ST. JJOUIS, Mo., October 12, 1882. Grand Lodge met at 2:30 o'clock, and was ca.lled to labor hy Most Worshipful Grand Master Bro. Dockery. SPECIAL COMMITTEES.

The Special Committee~ appointed to ~onsider and report upon the paper presented by Bro. J: W. Farris, on the 'remperance Question, rendered their report. Bro. N. 1\'1. Givan offered an amendment, which was adopted, and the report was then approved, and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful G)'and !'odge of Missouri, A. F. and A. Jf.: The Special Committee, t.o whom was referred the resolution of Brothers FergllsOll, Ellis and others, r~peetfully submit that, in their opinion, it would be an innovation upon the principles of Masonry for this Grand Lodge, by legislation, to add to, or take from, the moral or physical Qualifications, the possession of which has ever been held requisite to entitle any profane to be initiated into the Mysteries of Masonry. The law declaring habitual drunkenness a Masonic offense. is explicit, and any Lodge refusing to snstain temperance as one of the cardinal virtnes of Masonry, is derelict in duty. Hany of our Brethren become, or are, the victims of intemperance, they arc SUbject to discipline for a violation of their moral and Masonic obligations. It follows, then, that those who keep saloons onght to be held amenable for the violations of the principle of Masonry. We recommend the adoption of the following resolution: Rcsolvcd, That the business of saloon keeping is hereby declared to be a Masonic offense, and those engaged in that business are liable to be dealt with for llnll111S0nic conduct. . XENOPHON RYLAND, JAMES W. BOYD, J. M. SALLEE, Commillec.

On motion, Brothers Geo. M. Foster, Allan McDoweH and John R. Parson were appointed a committee to procure for the Grand Lodge a new outfit of eo11a1'8, aprons and other necessary paraphernalia. ADOPTED RESOLUTIONS.

The following resolutions were adopted: Resolvcd, That the subordinate Lodges are required to send, with their annual returns to the Grand Lodge, certified copies of all changes made in their By-Laws, and resolutions adopted having the force ofa by-law. Rcsolved, That the Masonic Boards of Relief of Missouri, are hereby required to make annual rcports to the Grand Lodge, and to the Lodges represented in the reFpective Boards, said reports to be made lip to September 1st. in each year. JOSEPH S. lmOWNE, JOHN D. VI NUL.

â&#x20AC;˘


Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1882.].

65

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION.

The Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation reported as follows, which was adopted ~ ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 12, 1882.

To the ]lEost Worshipful Grand Lodge of ]lfissouTi, A. F. and A. M.:

Your Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation respectfully report as follows: We have carefully examined the records and returns of the following Lodges Under Dispensation, and recommend that charters be issued, as follows: Skidmore Lodge, Skidmore, Nodaway County. Laddonia .Lodge, Laddonia, Audrain County. Webb City Lodge, Webb City, Jasper County. . Gaynor City Lodge, Gaynor City, Nodaway County. Milford Lodge, Milford, Barton County. Avalon Lodge, Avalon, Livingston County. Seligman Lodge, Seligman, Barry County. Chariton Lodge, Guthridge Mills, Chariton County. Biswell Lodge, Browning, Linn County. Galena Lodge, Galena, Stone County. Saxton Lodge, Saxton, Buchanan County. Clearmont Lodge, Clearmont, Nodaway County. Van Buren Lodge, Van Buren, Carter County. Exeter Lodge, Exeter, Barry County. Lathrop Lodge. Lathrop, Clinton County. Triangle Lodge, Perryville, Perry County. We find that the records of Skidmore Lodge and Laddonia Lodge are defective in some particulars, and ,ve recommend that the respective District Deputy Grand Masters see that they are corrected according to the notations made by the committee, before setting them to work. In matter of Rome Lodge, Under Dispensation, at Rome, Douglas County, we recommend that the Lodge continue Under Dispensation for another year, and that the District Deputy Grand Master cause their records to be corrected in conformity to the notations made by the committee. Your committee have also examined the petitions for dispensations, and would recommend that the prayer of petitioners for dispensations to form new Lodges be granted as follows: Oriental Lodge, Blackburn, Saline County. Green City Lodge, Green City, Sullivan County. Sheldon Lodge, Sheldon', Vernon County. Turney Lodge, Turney, Clinton County. G. L. PRO.-5.


66

Proceeding8 of the

[Oct.

In matter of the petition to form Index Lodge at Index, Cass County, the information before your committee as to the propriety and necessity of establishing said Lodge being insufficient to路 warrant your committee in recommending the granting of the petition, we would recommend that the same be referred to the incoming Grand Master. Fraternally submitted,' CRAS. F. VOGEL, R.BARNEY, . J. C. HEARNE, H. L. ROGERS, J. S. WALLACE, J. C. W. LINDSEY, GEO. F. ROGERS, JOHN H. DEEMS, B. P. BAILEY, JAY L. TORREY, W. A. HOLMAN, Committee.

BY-LAWS.

The Committee on By-Laws presented a report, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the )fost Worshipful

G~and

Lodge of )fissouri, A. F. and A. M..'

Your Committee on By-Laws would respectfully submit the following report: We have examined the By-Laws of Avalon, Exeter and Webb City Lodges, and find the same conform to the Code adopted by this Grand Lodge. Section 2, Article 2. of the By-Laws of Trenton Lodge, No. 111, reads as follows: "All the officers shall be elected at the regular meeting preceding the Anniversary of St. John the Baptist (or as soon after as practicable)." This is clearly in violation of the rules and regulations of this Grand Lodge. A definite time must be fixed for the election of officers; and if, from any cause, the Lodge fails to elect at that time, the Lodge cannot, at a subsequent meeting, proceed to the election of such officers without a dispensation from the Grand Master. We therefore recommend that the last clause of this by-law be rescinded. The following amendment to the By-Laws of Zeredatha Lodge, No. 189, has been submitted to your committee: "Every member shall pay the annual dues of threc dollars. Provided, That when a Brother shall have been a member, in good standing, of this Lodge for twenty years in succession he shall be exempt from dues." . While your committee fUlly appreciate the charitable feelings of the Brethren of this Lodge towards their aged Brethren who have borne the heat and burden of bUilding up Masonry in St. Joseph, and, fully believing the object of the amendment to be praise-


1882.]

67

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

worthy, still we cannot approve it, as it is in direct conflict with the law of this Grand Lodge; and, therefore, recommend the Lodge to rescind it. But would suggest to the Lodge, that, as the dues become due, they can, by resolution, remit the dues of all those they desire. Fraternally submitted,

,

ERWIN ELLIS, WM. H. CARPENTER, P. H. CHAMBERS, JAS. A. ADAMS, J. J. DILLINGER, THOS.G. BEELER, WOODSON LYNES, Commiuee.

WAYS AND MEANS.

The Committee on Ways and Means presented a report, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the Most JVorsltipjul Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A. F. and A. Af. :

Your Committee on Ways and Means find available funds in the hands of the Grand Treasurer .

$20,199 91

_We recommend the following: APPROPRIATIONS.

Printing Proceedings of 1882 $1,000 Rent of Grand Secretary's office.............................................................. 600 Salary of Grand Secretary ~ 2,500 Chairman Committee on Foreign Correspondence...... 500 Salary of Grand Treasurer............................................................... 150 Printing and Stationery............... 200 Postage... 2.')0 Contingent Fund..................................................................................... 50 Grand Tyler.... 150 Grand Lecturer : 1,750 Grand Master's Expenses for 1882-3.................................... 250 Total Appropriations

\

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 $7,400 00


Proceedin~8

of the

[Oct.

i'A Y-ROLL. .

Past Grand Master S. W. B. Carnegy, 180 miles, 3 days S. H. Saunders, 175 miles. 3 days Thos. E. Garrett, 3 days J. E. Cadle, 225 miles, 3 days X. Ryland, 243'miles, :~ days , T. C. Ready, 108 miles, 3 days N. M. Givan, 254 miles, 3 days Joseph S. Browne, 350 miles, 3 days R. E. Anderson. 135 miles. 3 days 'V. R. Stubblefield, 3 days

:

. . . .. . .. .. . .. ..

:

Total Pay路Roll . St. Louis Commandery Exp., P. G. M. Sam'l H. Owens' Funeral... ~

Total Payment Leaving an available balance 011 hand

.

$1800 1775 900 202..') 21 15 1440 2170 2650 1325 900 $171 00 6950 $7,64050 $12.559 41

01'

ly submitted, LEE A. HALL, S. H. SAUNDERS, JOHN R. PARSON, C. S. GLASPELL, H.B.BUTTS, ASA MADDOX,

Committee.

OHARITY.

The following report on Charity was adopted: ST.

LOUIS,

Mo., October 12, 1882.

To the ltfost lVorshipful Gmnd Lodge oj liriBsouri, A. Ji'. and A. !tf.:

,

Your Committee on Charity beg leave to report: That but two cases have been presented to them within the time, and having the endorsement, as required by the existing law, viz: That of Bro. B. O. Austin, recommcnded by New Bloomfield Lodge. No. GO. and that of Bro. John F. Alberty, recommended by Canton Lodge, No. 100, and Craft Lodge, No. 287. To these cases the Grand Lodge has committed itself by heretofore making appropriations, and, with increasing age and infirmity, their claim becomes stronger. . A majority, at least. of your committee are convinced that it was nevcr contemplat.ed ill the organization of Grand Lodges. that they should become a medium for distribution of charity in individual cases; and, if cncouraged, it will ere long necessitate the creation of a Pension Bureau, and take this noble work out of the hands of subordinate Lodges, whose peculiar province we think it is to provide for such cases. Having, however, regarded the.se cases as of such peculiar surroundings as to warrant an appropriation, the Grand Lodge could not now reject them without great hardship.


1882.J

Grand Lod.te of JI£issouri.

69·

We therefore recommend appropriations as follows: To Bro. B. O. Austin, the sum of two hundred ($200) dollars, to be disbursed by New Bloomfield Lodge, No. 60. To Bro. John F. Alberty, the sum of one hundred ($100) dollars, to be disbursed by Craft Lodge, No. 287. There were two other applications for individual charity, but neither of them come recommended by the Lodge under whose jurisdiction they reside, nor were they presented until since the meeting of the Grand Lodge. In one case, the memorial states that the applicant has been a dimitt€d Mason for over forty years, and, while it may be a meritorious case, yet we should hesitate about rewarding such idleness in the vineyard. We do not feel authorized to set aside the plain requirements of the law to meet such cases, and, therefore, are constrained to refuse ~hem. The application of Eureka Lodge, No. 73, to have its dues for. 1882 remitted, was referred to this committee. The ground of the application is, that its building, jewels and furniture were destroyed by fire. There are circumstances which were detailed to this committ€e that, in our opinion, relieve this Lodge from the imputation of carelessness in not insuring their property, and we recommend that their prayer be granted. We have had before us an application from Miss Aula More, asking a donation from this Grand Lodge to aid her in the establishment of a Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home, at Eureka Springs, Arkansas, where the sick and afllicted of every Stat€ may repair and drink of the health-giving waters without money and without price. ;

The enterprise looks grand (on paper), and the enthusiasm of Miss More, in the undertaking, is unbounded. But, though it is proposed to be national in its character, yet we think it but right that the Grand Lodge of Arkansas should take the initiative in this enterprise, and if she endorses it with a heavy appropriation, we may fall into line. For the present, we feel constrained to refuse the application. R. E. ANDERSON, JOHN BARNES, R. R. CHRISTY, J. G. MIDDLECOFF, Majorily oj Committee.

MONEY REFUNDED.

The following resolution was adopted, providing for the return to the subordinate Lodges of seventy-five per cent. of the dues paid to Grand Lodge the past year: Resolved, That there be refunded to such of the Lodges in this. Grand Jurisdiction as have paid annual dues for the year 1882, a sum equal to seventy-five per cent. of the amount so paid by them as Grand Lodge dues for said year; and that the Grand Secretary be authorized to carry this resolution into effect. \ W. M. WILLIAMS, JOHN D. VINCIL.


Proceedings of the

[Oct.

COMMITTEE DISCHARGED.

The committee, appointed one year ago to devise some plan for the secure funding of the moneys of the Grand Lodge, asked to be discharged, and the request was granted.

PICTURES

Of Past Grand Masters Sam'l H. Owens and John Ralls were ordered placed in the forthcoming journal of Grand Lodge ~roceedings.

A new cut for memorial pages was ordered by the Grand Lodge. THANKS.

A vote of thanks was tendered the railroads and hotels which have extended favors to the members of this Grand Lodge. PROCEEDINGS.

The Grand Secretary was directed to have printed 2,250 copies of the Proceedings of this session of, the Grand Lodge.

INSTALLATION.

Most Worshipful Bro. A. M. Dockery, the retiring Grand Master, proceeded to install the Grand Officers, Bro. F. W. Mott acting as Grand Marshal. The following were duly inducted into officc:


1882.]

Grand Lodge of JlIissouri.

71

GRAND OFFICERS FOR 1882-83. REV. CHAS. C. WOODS, D. D., of Kansas City LEE A. HALL, of St. Louis ROBT. F. STEVENSON, of Clinton JAMES W. llOYD, of St. Joseph S~MUEL M. KENNARD, of St. Louis , REV. JOHN D.. VINCIL, D. D., of St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, of Greenfield REV. JOHN E. BARNES, of Licking REV. C. H. BRIGGS, of Springfield REV. ALEX. PROCTOR, of Independence REV. H. G..JACKSON, of Sedalia REV. H. B. BOUDE, of Kansas City REV. P. G. ROBERT, of St. Louis REV. J. M. CHANEY, of Plcasal~t Hill GEO. R. HUNT, ofWarrensburg A. M. CROW, of Kansas City .JOHN H. DEEMS, of St. Louis C. G. HUBBELL, of St. Joseph C. E. BUSHNELL, of Bolivar G. O. JACCARD. of Kansas City D. E. WRAY, of Versailles W. M. WILLIAMS, of Boonville J. P. WOOD, of New London J. ll. THOMAS, of Albany JOHN W. OWEN, of St. Louis

GRAND MASTER. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER. GRAND SENIOR WARDEN. GRAND JUNIOR WARDEN. GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECRETARY. GRAND LECTURER. GRA]I;'J) CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND SENIOR DEACON. GRAND JUNIOR DEACON. GRAND MARSHAL. GRAND MARSHAL. GRAND SWORD BEARER. GRAND SENIOR STEWARD. GRAND .JU]I;'IOR STEWARD. GRAND ORATOR. GRAND ORATOR. GRAND PURSUIVANT. GRAND TYLER.

CHAIRMEN OF STANDING COMMITTEES. JURISPRUDENCE GIUEVANCE RETURNS OF LODGES U. D RETURNS OF CHARTERED LODGES TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS REPORTS OF D. D. GRAND MASTERS CHARITy FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

;THOMAS E. GARRETT, St. Louis. NOAH :r.L GIV AN, Harrisonville. CHAS. F. VOGEL, St. Louis. JAMES B. AUSTIN, St. Louis. J. R. PARSON, St. Louis. . S. B. POTTER, St. Louis. R. E. ANDERSON, Hannibal. JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis.

DISrRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 1st- DISTRICT-R. C. RISK, Williamstown. 2d .J. C. HEARNE, HanniOal. 3d H. B. BUTTS, Louisiana. 4th .J. M. NEWLAND, Old Alexandria. nth JOHN F. TIPPETTS; Montgomery City. 6th W. H. CARPENTER, Centralia. 7th 1\1. C. McMELLEN, Huntsville. Bth DA VID BAIRD, Kirksville. !lth JOHN J. DILLIKGER, Owasco. J. P. MURRAY; Trenton. 10th 11th " G. P. BIGELOW, King City.


72

Proceeding8 of the

[Oct.

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS-Continued. 12th DISTRICT-GEO. F. ROGERS. Hamilton. R. B. KICE, Richmond. 13th 14th JOHN H. STRINGFELLOW, St. Joseph. 15th M. McKILLOP, Rockport. 16th Wl\f. H. THOMPSON, St. Louis. J. W. PURVIS, Wll.'3hington. 17th 18th CHAS. E. BARROLL. Farmington. 19th WM. B. WILSON, Cape Girardeau. 20th J. H. BETHUNE. Charleston. 21st STEPHEN CHAPMAN, Bloomfield. 22d C. W. MILSTER, Greenville. 23d R. B. LOGAN, Caledonia. 24th D. M. CAUGHELL, Chamois. J. M. ORCHARD, Salem. 25th 26th JOHN E. BARKEj. Licking. 27th H. B. HAMILTON, Jefferson City. 28th J. W. FARRIS, Lebanon. 29th J. W. ROBERTSON, Ozark. 30th E. D. P ARCE, Springfield. 31st J. M. RITCHEY, Newtonia. 32d E. P. LTNZEE, Mount Vernon. 33d SEYMOUR HOYT, Greenfield. 34th W. G. WEAVER, Bolivar. 35th J. G. MIDDLECOFF, Clinton. 36th SAMUEL E. LICKLIDER, Everett. P. G. WOODS, Versailles. 37th 38th B. H. INGRAM, Sedalia. 39th R. L. HARVEY, Slater. 40th J. H. TOWT, KanSll.'J City. 41st .JOHN T. RUFFIN,Carthage. 42d R. W. McMULLIN, Hillsboro. 43d WOODSON LYNES, New Bloomfield. GEO. R. HUNT, Warrensburg. 44th A. S. SATTERLEE; Adrian. 45th 46th REUBEN BARNEY, Chillicothe. E. W. JOY, Savannah. 47th 48th T. C. READY, Mexico. MILTON HELWIG, Cameron. 49th \ " J. W. EWING, Camden Point. 50th B. V. MORRIS, Gainesville. 51st

CLOSING.

The minutes of to-day's session were read and approved. The Grand Master, Bro. C. C. vVoods, addressed the Brethren briefly, invoking the co-op~ration and aid of all in the work of the ensuing year. The retiring Past Grand Master, Bro.


1882.]

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

73

A. M. Dockery, gave utterance to the deep feelings of his heart for the kindness, confidence and honor received at the hands of the. Craft in the past, and pledge~ unwavering fealty to our common cause for the future. As expressing the 'gratitude of ~ll, for the harmonious session enjoyed, and the good will prevailing, all joined in singing, "Praise God, from whom all blessings flow." Prayer was o:t;fered by Bro. Barnes, Grand Chaplain, when the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge was closed in AMPLE FORM by the Grand Master.

-~,o:-~~~.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

SPECIAL COMMUNI-CATION OF THE

M. W. GRAND LODGE ft.

F.

AND

A. M.

OF THE

STATE OF MISSOURI, CONVENED AT

CALIFORNIA, FEBRUARY 26, A. D. 1882; A. L. 5882.

ST. LOUIS: HUGH R. HILDRETH PRINTING COl\IP.A.NY, 407 & 405 NORTH FOURTH STREET.

1882.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

SPEOIAL COMMUNICATION OF THE

M. W. GRAND LODGE, A. F. & A. M" STATE OF MISSOURI. • C.ALI.FORNIA,

Mo., li"ebruary 26, 1882.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and A.ccepted Masons of Missouri, convened this day at 2 o'clock P. M., in the Court Honse, up stairs, and was opened in .AMPLE FOR1\{.

GRAND OFFICERS. ALEX. M. DOCKERy : S. B. POTTER............................................... JOHN H. DEEMS.......................................... R. F. STEVENSON JOHN HUFF REV. JOHN D. VINCIL, D. D........................ BEN. V. CHASE........................................... D. W. SHACKELFORD................................ GEO. L. FAULHABER FRED. W. MOTT

M. W. Gmnd Master. lV. Deputy Grand llfa8ter. W. Senior Grand Warden. Jv. Junior Grand Warden. W. Grand'l'rew3urer. W. Grand Secretary. W. Grand Senior Deacon. W. 'Grand Junior Deacon. W. Grand Marshal. W. Grand Marshal. O. G. ELL..................................................... W. G'rand Steward. J. Vi. BRENT................................................ Jv, Grand Steward. J. yOUNG · W. Bearer oj Great Lights. W. II. WILSON............................................. W. Grand Tyler.

R. R. R. R. R.


4

Proceedings of the

[Feb.

Prayer was offered by the Grand Secretary. Grand Master Dockery stated the object of this Special Communication to be the interment of onr deceased Brother, the late Hon. Samuel H. Owens, Past Grand Master. The announcement, made in touching terms, caused deep feeling in the Grand Body, as evideneed by flowing tears on every hand. I'ALL BEA REHS

Were appointed by the Grand Master, as follows: DR. J. H. P. GRAY, of California. JUDGE R. Q. ROACH, of California. M. C. RICE, of California. HON. JOHN WALKER, Jefferson City.

HON. ROBT. McCULLOCH, Jefferson City. HON. HENRY L. ROGERS, St. Louis. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis.

And the following Past Grand Masters were added to the above list: DR. SAML. H.SAUNDERS, Otterville. DR. JAS. E. CADLE, Chillicothe. RUFUS E. ANDERSON, Hannibal.

JUDGE NOAH M. GIVAN, Harrisonville. JOSEPH S. BROWNE, St. Joseph.

\

The following, resolution, offered by the Grand was adopted:

S~eretary,

Resolved, That the M. W. Grand Master be, and he is hereby: requested to appoint, at his convenience, a committee to prepare and present to the Grand Lodge, at its Annual Communication, in October next, a tribute to the memory of our deceased M. W. Bro. Samuel H. Owens, Past Grand Master.

A procession was then formed, and marched to the late residence of the deceased, where religious services were conducted by tb;e Grand Secretary. The remains were then taken charge of by the Masonic Fraternity; and the vast cortege slowly wended its way to Evergreen (l\iasonic) Cemetery. In the procession there were the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter (of which deceased was Grand High Priest), members of numerous subordinate Lodges, Order of United Workmen (of which Bro. Owens was Grand Receiver), the Military Company, of which he was Captain, and the city authorities, he having served as :Mayor. for a term of four years. The sad


1882.]

Grand

Lod~e

of Missouri.

5

occasion called together the largest concourse of people ever seen in Central Missouri. No Masonic funeral in the State was ever so largely attended, except that of the lamented Gouley. The whole proeession was escorted by a body of Knights rremplar from St. Louis, and Prince of Peace Commandery of Jefferson City, to wh~ch the deceased belonged, and of which he was a Past Commander. rl'he Fraternity, from nearly every portion of the State, was represented, Brethren having come from St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Joseph, Hannibal, Chillicothe, Gallatin, Jefferson City, Harrisonville, Boonville, Clinton, Tipton, Sedalia, Otterville, Warrensburg, and from, adjacent country Lodges.

,..-

Arriving at the beautiful Masonic burying-ground, somewhat remote from the city, the burial ceremony of the Fraternity was impressively rendered by Dr. Alex. 1\1. Dockery, Grand Master. Then, amid the holy calm of that Sabbath evening, all that was mortal of S~tmuel H. Owens was laid to rest in the silent eity of the dead. Returning from the cemetery, the Grand Lodge resumed labor, when the Grand Master ~nnounced the Memorial Committee, provided for in the foregoing resolution.

MEMORIAL COMMITTEE. RUFUS E. ANDERSON, NOAH M. GIVAN,

S. H. SAU NDERS, JOS. S. BROWNE,

The Grand Lodge was then closed in

JAS. E. CADLE, JOHN D. VINCIL.

AMPLE FORM.

~$:~etarY.


- ...---------------------1-

-1----------------------11G. L. PRo.-6.

75


-1-----------------------

11/

"";".

-1-----------------------177


-11------..------

1_

-1-------------------------..79


-I---------~----------I-

--

- ...-------------------181


-...--------------IIIiIIII---------I-

-11---------------------------1183


SPECIAL.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS.

â&#x20AC;˘

The" report of the-committee does not appear in these Grand I.Jodge Proceedings, because it was lost. One of the eommittee wrote me that it was left in the office of Bro. :l\1ayo, Secretary of the Gra;nd .chapter. It never was left in my office. What became of it is a mystery at present unsolved. It can only be stated that one of the committee handed me a paper, on which was the statement that 207 Lodges were represented. rrhere were, in addition, eleven Past Grand Masters present, with other Past Grand Officers, and a large number of Past Masters. As the report of the committee could not be found after tUe most diligent search, and as it could not be duplicated, I am compelled to print the Proeeedings without it.

THE RALLS ENGRAVING.

The Grand Lodge directed an engraving of our late BI'~. John Ralls, P. G. 1\-1., to be placed in the Proceedings with that of Bro. S. H. Owens. The picture of Bro. Owens appears; that of Bro. Ralls docs not, ' because a steel engraving could, not be obtained so as to furnish the Craft with our Proceedings before the first of .January. It was deemed best by the Grand lVlaster and others, whom 1 consulted, not to delay the work for the picture. Such long delay as was found neces~ary to


86

Special Notice.

[Oct.

secnre the engraving would not only disappoint the Craft thronghout the State, but cause a loss of interest in th~ Proceedings.When the engraving is received it (~路an be forwarded to each Lodge,}Lnd placed in the Proceediugs or framed and hung up in the Hall. ff deemed best, it can he reserved and plaeed in the next year's Proceedings. Fraternally,

~$:~1"nf .......


ANNUAL COMMUNICATION IN 1883. 'ÂŁhe Sixty-third Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held in St. IJouis, commencing at 10 o'clock, on the morning of the Pirst Tnesday after the Second Monday (viz., the 9th day) in Oetober, 1883.


APPENDIX.


REPORT ON CORRESPONDENCE. ST. Lours, Mo., October 1st, 1882. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of

.Mi~sow路i,

A. P. & A. )[.:

I herewith submit my Annual Report on Correspondence:

ALABAMA, 1881. Grand Lodge commenced its Sixty-first Annual Grand Communication in the city of Montgomery, December 5th, 1881, and was presided over by Bro. Henry Clay Tompkins, Grand Master. One hundred and seventy-four Lodges were represented. Alabama has a membership of some eight th~llsand. The Address of Grand Master Tompkins was of good length and of equal merit. He closed his second as he did his first term, by furnishing a paper full of practical value. The decisions rendered-twenty-four in number-were governed by the laws of that jurisdiction. Being in accord therewith they were pronounced" sound and lucid expositions of the several matters of which they treat." The Grand Master was complimented by the Jurisprudence Committee, in approving his rulings, as a "profound Masonic jurist." The committee did themselves credit ill honoring thus their chief executive. RECOGNITIOK.

Our chcerfuland amiable Bro. Beers, as Chairman of the Com.mittee on Correspondence, presented a report recommending the formal recognition of the Grund Lodge of New South Wales. His report was approved. We are not yet ready to recognize this Grand Lodge, nor any other under similar circumstances. We, of Missouri, have quite recently gotten rid of a little trouble, caused by hW3tJj recognition. Our joy is so great and our sense of rclief so delightful aftcr shaking off the New :Mexico night-mare, that weare not hun~iJlg for any kindred experiences. And none need apply. ' THE GENERAL REPORT

on Correspondence is from that" ready writer" and capital reviewer, Bro. Oliver S. Becrs. The Report is lenghty, exhaustive and able-,-covering 234 pages of the journal. In reviewing Arkansas, he shaved Grand Master Thornburgh's Address pretty closel)', and clipped his rhetorical wings,until the Brother now stands on a路level with common humanity, instead of sailing so high. But Beers says, dryly, "Alas! for rhetoric, when G. L.-Ap. 1.


2

Appendix.

[Oct.

rhapsody guides the pen." In our last review we failed to enthuse over Bro. Thornburgh's rhetoric, and could not appreciate somc of the eloquent parts of his Anclress. We find th'lt Bro. Beers views the matter in the same ]>r<Lcticallight. We make an extract from his remarks: ' After the opening, in ample form, the labors of the Craft were suggested bv an elaborate Address from the Grand Master which, barring a little extravaganee of statement and a decided sophomoric tone, gives interesting and welcome tidings from this :Masonic strOl.lghold. We are always plea~ed to hear guod ti<lings from Arkansas and can readily forgIve the Grand Master tlllY little peculiarities of thought and expression, which mar his 11Icssage. in consideration of the news he brings, and also of his characteristic exuberance of feeling. We have read the review of Arkansas, by Bro, Beers, with no little amusement. His "sharp instrument" was more than merely alJpl'ied to the" naked" or exposed points found in his investigations. We think he pierced the cuticle a few times, and the puncturing may have' causel! the Grand )laster anl! Committee on Jurisprudence to wince a little. However, Bro. Beers' known amicability will screen him from the charge of severity: He thinks that the Committee might have acted more Wisely than to have misinterpreted and misrepresented "SI'IHITUALIS~r." 'Ye wonld not be willing to misrepresent Bro. Beers, or allow the same to be done by another, if in our power to prevent it. Therefore we quote his deliverances in full as to the" much denounced SpiTitualism" which he eVidently approves, as shown by the following: Whatever of apology the Grand Master's" playful wit and humor" (and some might call it levity) may huvc required at the hands this Committee, it secms to this writer that they were not very wise or circumspect in attempting to illustrate their apologetic effort by an all usion altogether misin terpreting Sl'IRlTU A LIS~r. Learned in the lore of jurisprudence as this able committee undoubtedly is, still some phases of the truth, relating to man's surroundings, his present and future condition and possibilities, have been developed in the 19th century which are probably not" dreamed of in their philosophy," among which we judge the subject above misreprcsented to bc one of ,thei,r undiscovered facts. We hope their o'er conservative impenetrablcness may soon be pierced by this "lig-ht shining in darkness" and heraldiug a new ano brighter day and dispensation and that they will discover anon that this much denounced Spiritnalism bctokcns the dawn of an unrivalled mental and moral illumination: That it is indeed a fact. not potential but real; neither antagonistIC to Masonry nor religion, but. a discovery of transcendent importance to both in its adaptation to the purer motives, enlargcd influence, and higher aims of both. So we interpret it. Th.e above presents to us a "new departure" in the work of a Masonic Reviewer. If "Spiritualism betokens the dawn of an unrivalled mental and moml iIluminatiori," we pray its apostles and teachers to give us all the light they now have, without the darkness and mystery with which thcso-~~alled "fact" is surrounded. Why use the cabinet and darkened room to exhihit a " fact" that is declared to be .. real? " Is a "fact" less "Teal" when made known in the ,l1:ght of day ~ The grandest" facts" of history were not presented "in a corncr." So says the Divine Hecord. The Great Teacher brought to light the unknown and the unseen. lIe did not hold sean<:es in corners or darkened chambers. The theatre whcre He displayed" facts "-both ,. real" and" potential "-was not behind a screen, but the mountain top, the temple with its crowds, the cemetery with its multitude., All the" facts" of "Spiritualism" we have ever met were confined to darkness. Without the cabinet and dark places, we have found no Ilttempt to manifest any" fact" of" Spiritualism." We have challenged the priests of t,his "new and brighter day and dispensation" to come to the light and show what Spiritualism is. They never come. Why they love darkness rather than light, is to us as much a mystery as some things (not .. facts ") they present. Perhaps the reason why their "facts" are DOt" potential," though apparently" rcal," is because they will not material ize in, or bear the light of day. We have no controversy with the teachers of Spiritualism, but claim the right of enquiTy as to their teachings. We are familiar with a statement uttered long ago, that" he that


3

1882.J

doeth truth cometh to the lig111. that his deeds may be made manifest." or tested, that they are properly performed. We make no charge that" men love darkness" rather than open man ifcstation , because of the doubtful character of their" deeds" or "facts." Still, we must ask why do they not come to the light f Perhaps the" Spiritualism" championed by Bro. Beers differs fro.m th~kind ,ve have in the. West. We hope so, for his sake. Still, we must ask him to differentiate "facts 1'eal" and "facts potential." Bro. Beers is rather opposed to " holding dancing parties in a Masonic hall." We join' him in the well timed and just characterization given below. In reviewing a California decision, allowing and justifying such desecrations as "hall" dances, he says: How can the dance be comfortably conducted in the Lodge unless the" decks" are previollsly" clcared for action." the room dismantled of its Masonic ornamenl<;. its Masonic li~ht..,; extinguished. its garlanders dead, and all but. mirth departed'? The rules and methods of" social fe5tivities" are ccrtainly not displayed on any Masonic trestle board with which we are familiar. We have a dim recollection of a tradition in which Masonry and dancing were somewhat intimately uiisociated, but this association cost our patron saint. John the Baptist, his head, and is rather to be heeded as a "varning against, than as a precedent favoring, such an unnatural and unnecessary combination of opposites, as the work of the Lodge and the festivities of the dance. Possibly our friends of the OCCID~;NT may intend to create a new side-degree to illustrate the legend of Herod's birth right dance and its tragic result. If so, call it for Herodhts' daughter and let it teach tlle moral of her triumphant dance-the prevalence of vanity over virtue. But even when thus intended the show bad best be displayed in a more public place than in a Lodge HalJ. We would be pleased to follow this chaste and just writer throughout his entire Review and enrich our Report with extracl<; therefrom. This not being allowable, we close by commending his work as one of the rare productions furnished by the reportorial corps of American Grand Lodges. RUFCS W. COBB, Montgomery, G. M. DANIEL SAYRE. :Montgomery,. G. Sec. OLIVER S. BEERS, Mobile, Com. on Cor.

ARIZONA, 1882. We have received a small' pamphlet-fIfty-seven pages-labeled, .. Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of F. & A. Masons of the Territory of Arizona-First Session. lS82." Said pamphlet contains the doings of a Delegated Convention. ealled for the purpose of forming a Graild Lodge in and for the Territory of Arizona. Said Delegates assembled ill the Masonic Hall, in the City of Tucson, :March 23<1, lS82. A Committee on Credentials was appointed by the chairman of the meeting, which reported Delegates from three ehflrtered Lodges and from one Under Dispensation. The Report was received, and subsequently the follOWing was adopted: I

Resolved, That in the judgment of this Convention, Arizona Lodge. No. '257: Tucson Lodge, No. 263, and 'White Mountain Lodge, l\'o. 5. are legally constituted and chartered Lodges of Free and Accepted MU$ons. and that the Representatives of said Lodges here present are duly authorized and qualified to organize and eonstitute a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Arizona. WHEREAS, The Representatives of the several Lodges of Free and Accepted Masons of the Territory of Arizona, assembled at Tucson on the 23d day of :March, A. L. 5882,


4

[Oct.

Appendix.

have assurance that there arc in successful operation in the Territ,)!路y of Arizona the requisite number of duly and constitutionally warranted Lodges to authorize the formation of a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Arizona; lwcl, WHEREAS, It has bcen made to appear that the Delegates from said Lodges are now suffieient authority to organize and constitute such It Grand Lodge;

f;T~et~~r~lf~~~edwith ~

Resolved, That the Representatiyes of the several duly warranted Lodges now in operation in the Territory of Arizona, and present at this assemblage, proceed to the organization of a eonyention for the formation of a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Arizona. Rcso17;ed, That a committee of five-the presiding officer of this meeting being the chairman-be appointed by the chair to draft 0. Constitution for the Grand Lodge of the Territory of Arizona.

A Constitution was presented and adopted, with an ample Code of By-Laws. An election was held for Grand Oflicers, when a full list was chosen and installed. The convention then adjourned sine d'ie. Two subsequent meetings of the Grand Body were held, at which all necessary business was transacted in order to the completion of the organization. The Lodges that entered into the association were acting under cllluters from the Grand Lodges of California and New Mexico. Solomon Lodge, Under Dispensation, received its authority to work from California. When the new Grand Lodge was organized, the Delegates from said Lodgc Under Dispensation asked for and received a charter. It was named King Solomon Lodge, and received number five (5). Its location is Tombstone, and has a membership Of sixty. Aztlan Lodg-e, located at Prcscott, A. T., working under a charter from the Grand Lodge of California, was not representcd at the form!l:tion of the new Grand Lodge. In reading the Proceedings and finding said Aztlan Lodge not among the formative , elements, we concluded at once there was another chance for a row on the sovereignty of jurisdiction issue, a la New Mexico. Our purpose was at once formed to let the new candidate for recognition severely alone. Upon examining the list of Lodges and members, in the appenoix, we found Aztlan Lodge at the head of the list, and numbered ONE. The inferellee was that said Lodge had' given in its adhesion to the new order of things ad 'interim, and accepted the situation. A circulur from the Grand Secretary, since received, proves our conclusion to be correct. To make assurance doubly sure, we wrote to Right Worshipful Brothers Alex. G.. Abell and Dave J. Miller, Grand Secretaries, respectively, of California and New Mexico. Prom these Brethren we have replies that settle the claims of the Grand Lodge of Arizona to recognition. From Bro. Abell, Grand Secretary of California, we have the following very satisfactory and assuring information: DEAR SIR AND BllOTHEIt-Yonrs of the 19th ult. arrived while I was absent from the city in search of a little health, else it would havc been answered earlier. In reply to your enquiry, I think that the Grand Lodge of Arizona was properly and lawfully orglUlized. We had four Lodges in that Territory-three of which were chartered, and one of which was Under Dispensation, and of course took no part in the proceedings. There was also a chartered Lodge from New Mexico, which, with two of ours, composed the convention that formed the new Grand Lodge. One of our chartered Lodges, that at Prescott, through some misunderstanding was not represented in the convention, but it has sinee given its adhesion to the new Grand Lodge, and is now known upon its register as Aztlan Lodge, No. 1. I can only add that our Grand Loc]ge will undoubtedly recognize and welcome its third daughter (Oregon and Nevuda were the first and second) at its communication in October next. With all best wishes, yours trUly and fraternally,

ALEX. G. ABELL, Grand Secretary.


1882.J

Appendix.

5

.Our information from Bro. Miller, Grand Secretary. of New Mexico, is of similar import. From the foregoing facts and information there ca~l be no doubt of the legal status of the Grand Lodge of Arizona, and it should 1e welcomed into the family of Grand Lodges of the world. We shall so recommend in a special Report to our Grand Lodge. This young'jurisdiction has a fair start in the race with Westem Grand Lodges. With five subordinates and nearly three hundred members, the showing is good and the out-look encouraging. Success crown the efforts of our Brethren. AKSEL M. BRAGG, Tucson, G. III. GEO. 'J. ROSKRUGE, Tucson, G. Sec.

ARKANSAS, 1881.

,....-

The Forty-second Session wa.s held at Little Rock, beginning November 22d, lRSl, with Most Worshipful Bro. J, H. Van Hoose, Grand Master, and Luke E. Barker, Grand Secretary. The record says there were present a constitutional number of Representatives. 'fhe Grand Ma.ster, Bro. Van Hoose, submitted a very lengthy Report, commonly called an "Address." It is in some measure interesting and suggestive, though too "long drawn-out" to 1e endowed with "sweetness" throughout. The Grand Ma.ster is an earnest, true, practical man and Mason, but has not learned to avoid the prolix style and prosaic manner of presenting matter.. Many words do not necessarily convey the most thoughts. Work is better than talk. In this view Bro. Van Hoose has done well. He is a zealous II doer of the word," and his work for the year proves his zeal. He granted eleven Dispensations for the formation of new Lodges. We think the number sufficient for one ),ear, though the Grand Master said it wa.s less than had been established in some years preceding. Still he wa.s discouraged. We hope one of the Lodges instituted may not have a history similar to the person whose name it bears. "Van Winkle" always suggests a train of thought not at all in keeping with the activities' of Lodge work, harmony and life. Perhaps the omission of "Rip" froni the Lodge name may save it from the experience of the illustious sleeper. We are the more hopeful,as "Van Winkle" Lodge is located at "Eureka Springs." According to Bro. Thornburgh, Pa.st Grand Master, the" flowing waters" of Arkansas have" healing on their wings." Surely Eureka water will keep Van Winkle Lodge alive, and not necessitate a resort to anything more exhilarating. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master said: I have made a great many decisions-many more than I would have had to make if the officers of thevH.rious Lodges had taken the pains to examine the appendix to the proeeedings of the Grand Lodge of ]880, as they could there have learned what they wished to 1mow. A few of the many decisions I have made were 1\EW; at least I had never met with anything just like them, and these I will submit for your consideration. The" great many decisions" made amount to an indefinite number. He numbered them up to about forty, and then ga\~e the remainder promiscuously. He says a few were l~ew. If those he reported were .. new," what mu::;t be the extent of the "old r"


6

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Committee on "MasO~lic Law and Usage" reviewed the decisions and corrected some of them, so that all were finally approved. The committee wisely condensed and formulated the decisions, thus presenting them in much better shape, and concluded by complimenting the Grand :Master as having done" a great deal of zealous, faithful, hard work." The Report shows that while much work was done, no small amount of it could have been performed without imposing upon thc goud nature of Bro. Van Hoose.. Bro. Geo. E. Dodge presented a Special Report, touching the Kew South Wales Grand Lodge, and recommended that fraternal recognition be accorded. It was so ordered. The usual Oration was delivered before the Grand Lodge. Thos. C. McRea was the orator. A very proper memorial tribute was paid to the late honored and deeply lamented James A. Garfield. Bro. Garfield, as a Mason, was widely mourned. The election of Grand Officers took from two important positions our late co-worker Luke E. Barber, Grand Secretary, and George E. Dodge, Committee on Correspondence. Both were valuable workers in their spheres of operation. Bro. Barber retires from office full of years, hOllors and usefulness, and will enjoy the rest so well won. Bro. Dodge vacates the reportorial chair for the Grand East. Sorry to lose him,' for the time being, fro~ the Guild, but congratulate Arkansas Masons on his election. He will add new lustre to that already WOIl by the Fraternity of thE-t jurisdiction. A new Grand Secretary comes into the ranks. We expect he is a yonng man, full of possibilities and forces. He has " a good name," which is "rather to be chosen than great riches." We are sorry to see him restricted by a meagre salary-only ei.qht hund1'ed dollars. Bro. Barber proposed that it be twelve hundred per year, but his motion failed. Perhaps the Brethren wanted the new Grand Secretary to prove himself a " workman that need not be ashamed," before they pay him a living salary. The Grand Lodge of Missouri develops her men by eneouraging them, and thereby secures the best that money and confidence can bring to the front. We welcome Bro. Fay Hempstead, Grand Sectetary, to thc rallks of the" Scribes" most heartily. The following' complimentary resolution was presented and adopted just after the Grand Lodge had 1'f<fu~ed to pay the new Grand Secretary twelve hundred dollars a year. It was presented by the same Brother who moved to allow only eight hundred dollars per annum for services worth twice that sum: ResoI1!ed. That the thanks of this Grand Lodge are hereby tendered to our worthy Pai,t Grand Secretary, L. E. Barber. for the faithful and honest manner in which he has discharged the duties of Grand Secretary for so lIlallY years. And we express the eamest hope that he will yet be spared to us many years to aid us with his counsel and cheer us with his presence.

It is not diflicult to guess that some of the" thanks" tendered Bro. Barber, " Past Grand Secretary," in tbe above resolution, were for the cheap mallner in which he had "dischargell the duties of Grand Secretary for so many years." His successor, Bro. Hempstead, may work in hope-of thanks at least-and live on eight hundred dollars a year, if he can.

Appropriations for expenses were made, amounting to over six Ihousand dollars, of which sum the Grand Secretary will receive eight hundred for services worth, if well rendered, all that will be done by those who may consume the balance This, in a jurisdiction composed of .more than thl'ce hundnJd Lodges and ten tlwumncl members, suggests that the laborer, though worthy of his hire, does not get it. That is all.

........


1882.J

. Appendix.

7

CORRESPONDENCE.

We were a little troubled on learning tbat Bro. Dodge had been elected Grand l.faster, on account of losing his valuable contributions, as Reviewer, in the field of correspondence. But we subsequently found that be had been elected permanent Chairman of this Coml1littee, in 1877, and that no change could be made by the Grand Master. The chairmanship remains unchanged. If Bro. Dodge is willing to do double duty, he is competent to run both offices, and we hope he may give the Craft another Review, such as is now before us. TJ:1is Report occupies less than one hundred pages and covers an extended field, home and foreign. Our Proceedings for 1880 are reviewed and kindly treated. Extracts from our Report are made, with commendatory notices. We make an extract for a purpose: Bro. John D. Vinci! makes a special report on Foreign Correspondence in regard to Scotland ann. Quebec. Dakota and Minnesota.Cuba and Colon; but, as the questions referred to are ha.ppily settled, we will do no more than to express the hope that the only remaining controversy of a simiIRr charllcter to those referred to, to wit. Missouri vs. New .Mexico, .may find as happy a SOlution as those which have at lust passed into history. If it would assist any towards sueh a felicitous consummation for us to whisper gently that we think our sister Missouri is WRONG in her position, we would consent to say so. Otherwise, we are as " dumb as an oyster." Bro. Vinci! Rlso gives us another of his fine large reviews, touching upon all of the Grand Lodges save seven. His wise, witty and pithy comments permeate the one hundred and twenty-two pages. Here is an item which i.o as charactenstic, perhaps, us any, for a random selection. 'We remark by way of parenthesis, that the lavish expenditure of A;Iol;\IUNITlON is vastly out of proportion to the SIZE OF THE GA~[E-i. e., the danger of such doctrine making headway in Masonry~ The withering criticism was called forth ill the course of his review of Virginia, where a Past Master had the right to demand to be tried by a "Commission of Past Masters," whatever that is. Bro. Dodge has learned, no doubt, that Missouri's" wrong position" has been righted, and that the" controversy concerning New Mexico" is at an end, having found a" happy solution." Silver City Lodge, No. 465, ill New Mexico, holding a charter from the Grand Lodge of Missouri for some years, and the cause of our controversy, is now allegiant to the home Grand Lodge. Its original charter is on file in our office and we are all happy. Bro. Dodge may" speak in meeting,'" and remain" dumb" no longer. We were" wrong," as to one position, and we acknowledged our error. There was no trouble in settling matters when manly purposes prevailed. Peace reigns and all is quiet along the lines. Concerning the wast~ of "ammunition" on a small game, alluded to above, we reply that Maine and Virginia regard the game as of immense" size." We refer Bro. Dodge to the elegant (?) reply of the Virginia committee, "nameless, evermore," showing how the "game" is prized. A Virginian Past Master is a "sacred thhlg," common hands must not touch it. Bro. Dodge concludes his interesting review in these words: We shall have little to say in conclusion. The Masonic si.tuation at home and abroad appears to be one of quiet prosperity. The only dark spots visible are in the direction of New York and Connecticut in the East, and Missouri and New Mexico in the West. True .Masonic light is dawning in the East, and lighting up the pathway of reconciliation. Minnesota in the West. hus set an example in the fraternal settlement of her difficulty . . with Dakota, which Missouri cannot do better than to follow. This would seem to be almost a vain hope, in view of the bitterness that is noticeable ill the controversy; but no controversy is impossible of horiorable and fraternal settlement among MASONS.' Though tempkd to linger in our leave-taking of the dear Brethren with whom we seem almost to have.enjoyed pleasant converse face to face, we are admonished by the waning hours, and a sense of the demands of other dutie..~. to pronoun'Ce the word which "many a time and oft" has marked the limit of many of the bright spots in life: "Goodbye!" GEO. E. DODGE, Little H.ock, G. M. FAY HEMPSTEAD, Little Rock, G. Sec.


,

8

Appendix.

[Oct.

BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1881. We have before us the journal of the Tehth Session of this Grand Lodge. The body met June 18th, 1881, at .Masonic Temple, Victoria, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. Eli Harrison, Sen.,.Grand Master. R. W. Bro. Edgar Crow Baker was Grand Secretary. Representatives from the several J,odges (six in number) were present. Twenty-nine Grand Lodges were represented at said session. The Grand l\faster reported, in his Annual Address, that little business had claimed attention the past year-" no disputes, no' appeals and no decisions." This is a small jurisdiction as to Lodges and membership, and does not seem to be advancing. In the six chartered Lodges there had been only three initiations. Pive were raised during the year, and thirteen atnliations-eighteen gain in all, with twenty-two dimissions, four deaths and seven suspensions-an evident loss, as shown by the figures, of nineteen. The total membership is less than three hundred. The outlook does not seem to be full of promise. Still, the Grand Master appears to be hopeful, as shown by the following: No appeals, and therefore no decisions. Although my expectations in reg-ard to new Lodges have not been fully realized, I do nO.t dispair, but have full confidence that the time is not for distant when we, and our children shallrrjoice in seeing the valleys of the surrounding forests become happy homes for thousands of people, and the mountains of our adopted country give up their hidden treasures of mineral wealth to enrich its inhabitants; enabling them to buid up cities and to beautify and adorn the temples that shall be erected to the true and living God. In considering over the cbanges that have taken place in the province within the last ten years, the admirable manner our much beloved Order has kept together, increased in wealth and not diminished in numbers, is surprising, when we consider the number of Brethren with property and mean!; who have left the province, and gone to reside in different part!; of the world. some in Asia, some in Europe, some in Australia, some in different parts of America, and some in Africa. I have been personally acquainted with more than sixty Brethren that have left the province during the above period to seek homes in other countries. but I hope the time is near at hand when we shall be ble!;sed with an increase of material fit for the temple.

There is one consolation, however, that during these great changes there has been a determination to let no one enter but the worthy, good and true; Rnd at the same time to cleanse the hive of the drones, lind detach the worthless material from the building, thus placing the Craft in a much better position than could reasonably be expected under the circumstances. The Grand Master reported all his official acts, which were approved. He announced that all was" peace and harmony with the Grand Bodies with whom we arc corresponding." His .remarks concerning "Relief," "Charity," and "Fraternal Dead," were appropriate and well timed. He recommended to his Brethren" Dlasonie Mutual Associations" or Insurance. His Address was brief, and closes well, because in good time. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Baker, presented a full exhibit, in his Annual Report, of all matter!; incident to the office he so creditably fills. He reported the receipt of Proceedings from a large number of. Grand Lodges, and reviewed those that he represents at his own Grand Lodge. The Glmeral Report on Foreign Correspondence, by the usual committee, consists simply in the enumeration of those journals received from sister Grand Lodges-" only this, and nothing more." The usual Grand Lodge sermon was preached on Sunday by the Grand Chaplain, and finds Ii place in the Proceedings. We find the following novel paper wOoS presented, discussed and finally referred to the" Board of General Purposes," which seems to be the omnium gatllerum of English Grand Lodges:


1882.. ]

.Appendix.

9

. 1. No Brother shall be eligible to the office of Deacon in a subordinate Lodge till he is competent to confer the Entered Apprentice Degree.

2. No Brother shall be eligible to be Warden till he has served a term as Deacon", and able to confer the Entered Apprentice and Fellow Craft Degrees. 3. No Brother shall be eligible for Worshipful Master till he has served II term as Warden, and able to confer the Entered Apprentice. Fellow Craft and Master Masoll Degrees, and deliver all the lectures; except in case of lIew Lodges, or by special dispensation of Most Worshipful Grand Master. 4. Examinations as to proficiency are to be held in the presence of a Board of Past Masters appointed by the respective Lodges previous to the Annual Election. 5. No Brother raised to the Third Degree, shall be allowed to exercise his right as a Master Mason, nor will he be considered or permitted to be a member of his Lodge until he has proved by examination his proficiency in the Degree. COOTE M. CHAMBERS, Victoria, G. 1\1. RDGAH CROW BAKEJ'l., Victoria, G. Sec.

CALIFORNIA, 1881. The journal of California doings for 1881, is, as heretofore, one of large dimensions, superior workmanship and complete arrangement, having no superior in the Fraternity. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Abell, though one of the fathers, Secretarially speaking, loses nothing by the increase of years, but improves with age, like other good things in life. His work is an annual monument, which will stand when the workman is laid low. The Thirty-second Annual Grand Communication cOllvencd in San Francisco, October 11th, 1881, and was presided over by the Grand Master, 1\1. W. Bro. Samuel Crawford" Denson; R. W. Bro. Alex. Gurdon Abell, Gra.nd Secretary. Representatives from two hundred Lodges were present, besides Past Grand Officers and Past Masters. Eight Past Grand Masters and ten Past Grand Wardens were enrolled as present. In the list of Grand Officers there are names that ought to give character to any assembly of men in America. It is not necessary to give all the names in full, but we cannot forego alluding to the fact that the California Grllnd Lodge is sustained by a combination of illustrious personages rarely found in Amcrican jurisdictions. Clav'Vebster Taylor, John Quincy Adams, Thomas ,Jefferson, Bcn. Franklin, Thomas Ha.~t 'Benton Anderson and others. Rich in minerals and in the productions of the soil, California is opulent in .â&#x20AC;˘ IJames not born to die," 'l'hos. Hart Beilton Allderson, a Missourian, whom we knew in llis boyhood, is worthy 0"1' a place in the bright array, where Clay Webster Taylor shines as a grand orb, whose glory mingles with Occidental splendors. To know " these Brethren, as we do, is to stir a desire to pa)' them a tribute which words cannot express. Grand men! stand ye, like your monntains, firm and commanding, contending for the right along the gold fringed margin of a continent. There are less than three hundred Lodges in California, with a reported membership of some' thirteen thousand. Yet, we venture to say that no Grand Jurisdiction in this cOllntry is in advance of our Occidental Brethren ill all the elements that constitute essential and vital Masonry. To reach this elevated position, two Brethren have contributed more than the world knows of, and ha ve been ably seconded by their co-workers. We hesitate not to say that John Mills Brown, as a Grand Muster for four years. and


10

Appendix.

[Oct.

Alexander Gurdon Abell, as a Grand Secretary for twenty-six years, have rendered services to the Craft in that jurisdiction unsurpassed by any in this broad land. But we are not the eulogist of these able,Brethren. Others there have deserved well, and have been suitably remembered. And there are those in the line now, who are yet to路 be felt and honored. Grand Master Denson contributed to the history and Masonic reading fund of the 路Grand Lodge an Address of some nine pages, closely printed matter. He announced that the year of his service had been one of peace, prosperity and happiness. No present or Past Grand Officer had been summoned hence,while the State bad been happily exempted from pestilence, epidemic or wide-spread calamity. Flood and flames, so destructive in other places, bad touched them lightly. The address throughout is commendable, showing that the Grand Lodge made no mistake in its choice of a Grllnd !I'1astcr. Vire clip a sentiment from the report of the Committce on Grllnd Master's Address, which is timely, and harmonizes with our views already expressed: Our 'jurisdiction, from the noble patriarch who first' honored the position of chief Executive of this Grand Lodge, and who, by the blessing of 11 benign Providence, yet honors '1.18 with his presence. down to him who now. with such marked ability, fills that position, has been peculiarly fortunate in the :ocleetioll of those upon whom to bestow this hi~hest mark of appreciation and honor.' May the same wise discrimination characterize thIS Grand Body in all its future selections. The Grand Master reported a few decisions which were in accord with general usage and therefore approved. He presented condensed statements from the reports of District Deputy Grand Masters, showing health, growth and harmony among the Lodges in the jurisdiction. An appeal having reached Grand Master Denson in behalf of the Michigan sufferers, caused by the desolating forest fires in that State, he presented it to the Grand Lodge. Following its reference to a committee came a report recommending the appropriation of one thousand dollars" for the relief of the sufferers by the recent fires in that State." The amount was immediately telegraphed by Grand Master Denson and acknowledged by the Grand Master of :Michigan. That kind of :Masonic work means something, and is worth more than a dozer: tootin.q speeches. or as many grand parades. How truly said the Grand Master-" such an appeal never went unheeded in -this land of generous deeds." We remember how Masonic money poured across the continent from California Masons, when the yellow fever was desolating Southern homes and filling that beautiful land with woe and' death. . The Grand Master presented an earnest, thoughtful and eloquent appeal in favor of "the establishment of a permanent institution for the relief, earc and maintenance of our orphan children." We must copy part, at.least, of his jUdicious remarks: We are about to lay the founoations of a structure that may, if we act unwisely, dwindle, decay and tumble oown; or which may grow and increa.<e, and accumulate power for good, and become so permal1ent and firmly e!\tablishcd that thousands of greatful hearts will praise the generous scheme after you and r have been forgotten. Benevolence to mankind is man's noblest work; and man llcver approaches nearer the attributes of Divinity, than when engaged in schemes of pure and unselfish r,harity. We have it now within our power by the exercise of prudence al1d good judgmcnt to inaugurate a plan of systematic and substantial charity that will rcfleet credit. not alone upon us, bnt also upon the age in which we live. Let a free and fnll discussioll be had, and then let us ado)Jt the plan proposed by the committee. or such other plan as may promise better resuIts; and if possible let it be put into immediate operation. Above all things let us avoid the too common error of attempting to condur,t an extensive enterprise upon other than sound business prineiples. Whatever plan of organi7.11tion may be determined upon, this Grand Lodge should, in my judgment, manage, control and assume responsibility for it, and not one dollar's indebtedness should ever be incurred without the dollar being first provided to meet the debt. No costly buildings should be erected at present, nor should any unreasonable or uwpian thing be attempted. If we manage wisely, as we must, the llecessary means can be readily furnished by the Lodges alone, and if we succeed inla)'ing well the foundations of thi~ grand and good work, as I feel assured we shall, I

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1882.J

Appendix.

11

, feel justified in expressing- an abiding hope that there will be found men of generous hearts and ample means who will with hearty pride make snch munrncent donations and endowments as will mltke this one of the most magnificent eleemosynary institutions in all our broad domain. There are many noble and generous hearted men. whose sublime energy and comprehensive business capacities have been rewarded, in this land of grand opportunities, with wealth computed by millions, and to snch men can we appeal with confidence for liberal cndowmentc; to aid so deserving a canse, founned upon such a sound and intelligent basis as to assure them that their contributions will be wisely managed and prudentiatly appropriated to alleviate human distress. We trust the above broad, generous and discreet views nlay realize practical fulfillment. The God of the orphan prosper and give success to this grand enterprise. From the Address we make this last extract 011 a subject that touched more hearts than any event in American history: . A painful theme now comes in place. On the second day of last July, while the nation of which we are proud to be humble citizens, was necorating its halls, its streets and its homes in holiday attire for the joyous celebration of the Natal Day of the proudest enactment of our country's history, a single vile act turned all our joy to woe and plunged a happy people into the depths of anxious grief. A great and good man who had been chosen to the highest political place attainable by man; one with whom a nation was satisfied. and of whom It nation was proud; one to whose noble and generous impUlses the conflicting sectionalism and distrust hitherto distubing our land were rapidly yielding; one whose great heart and honesty of purpose were rapidly unHing the severed chains of mutual confidence and unity, and rekindling the smonldering fires of patriotism throughout the States; one whose every thought and act refiected the light imparted to him in a Masonic Lodge-was struck down by an act of unprovoked, unmitigated and fiendish assassination. I cannot dwellllpon the dreadful thought nor recount to you how that brave and magnanimous man, in ~pite of his ghastly and mortal wound. ke:pt grim-visaged death at bay week after week, with a sublime and heroic resolution to chng to life and perform his unfinished mission, until all of him that was mortal had so wasted away as to. be unablc longer to contain his great soul.

When the solemn clang of the weeping bells tolled out the mournful intelligence of his death, the nations of the eart.h put on the habiliments of woe, and the twenty-sixth . day of September, in the year of our Lord 1881, when his body was consigned to carth, was entered upon the calcndar as the gloomiest day of time. The Grand Secretary rendered an extended and able Report, presenting a complete exhibit of the well managed fiscal affairs of the Grand Lodge. 'fhe annual receipts amount to nearly t\V{mty thousand do11o,rs. He closed his Report by announcing what is a common and almost .stale fact in that Grand Lodge, that all the Lodges had made retu7路ns for the fiscal year then closing, and their, dues had been paid. This is something rarely met witl, in Grand Lodge Reports. At no point is our patience so sorely tired as in respect to annual r!'lturns and dues. We find that a certain per cent. of our Missouri Lodgcs uniformly fall behind, and would not be happy unless delinquent. These Lodges have been indulged, in other years, until they regard the present Grand Secretary as severe, harsh and exacting in his efforts to bring them to time. We have educated a good share of our Lodges. in four years, to be promptly obedient to law. The I1'egligent number is heing reduced each term, and they now constitute a small fraction. We may not hope to reach tbe desirable point gained and steadily maintained in California, of having reports and dues from all the Lodges on hand by the anllual meeting. A tcn-paged Report from the Grand Lecturer is found in the California journal. This is the most complete Report of the kind we have ever scen, and is commended to Grand Lecturers generally. We shall give our invaluable teacher in }'lissouri the benefit of it.

A very largc amount of important business was transacted by our California Brcthrcn during their session: An Oration of considerable merit and beauty, and extra length, :was published in the Proceedings. 路The Grand Orator, Bro. Boruck, was not preseu.t to deliver the Oration, being" suddenly called away," but furnished it for pUblication.


12

Appendix.

[Oct.

We are gratified at the appointment of our friend, Uro. Rev. Thomas Hart Benton Anderson, as the next Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge. He may not equal "old Bullion," as to a certain kind of speech, though living in a land of gold; yet, for Western eloquence, Clay, Webster, Adams, Jefferson, Franklin and the other worthies in that jurisdiction will pale their Occidental fires in the light of his glowing effort. We would like to suggest his theme, and let him describe the" Universality of "Masonry "-from Plymouth Rock to the Golden .Gate ; from the everglades of Florida to where Aurora hangs her vail of light over the face of the Northern sky; from Jerusalem to Boston! What a theme! CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. "Wm. Henry Hill. Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence," presented his annual Review, covering 104 pages. Like former Reports from his pen, it is rare in excellence and eminently superior. Fifty-six journals were reviewed in an able, just and fraternal manner. We have no idea of the magnitude or altitude of California mountains, but the Hill of that jurisdiction, who, writes Reports on Correspondence, is no pigmy (as a Reviewer). He improves each year, like the wine of the Orient. He styles Alabama Beer(s) "a sparkling beverage," and thinks it "as good a cup as one would wish to drink." We never tasted Beer(s) (lager) but once. That taste was enough for life. If our name was Beer we would change it to something palatable. in order to get rid of the foam and bitter accompaniments. He, of Alabama, is not endowed with either attribute. There is no lagel' quality in him. We protest against the frequent attempts to make puns on his name, as he is too good a man to be compared to the stuff called beer. II

Bro. Hill gives Iowa a secondary place by making its Grand Secretary (Bro. Parvin) de facio the Grand Lodge." The Reviewer of Iowa says:

Grand Secretary Parvin submitted a Report quite as long as that of the Grand Master, and very much in the style of such an otlicer. But then as Bro. P. is de jcu:to the Grand Lodge of Iowa, all this is only proper and in good keepin/;. Besides, the good Brother always writes so well, that we are glad to sce anything from his pell, whether it is a Secretary's Heport or one from him as 11 member of the" M. A. S.,'路 or the writer of obituaries. He always gives us something to think about. He says that the labors in the offlce are so constant, continuous and exacting that he could" only keep pace with time and discharge them by working early and late. in season and out of season, and in a method and order inherited and not acquired." He justly takes a pride in saying that the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, voluminous as they 路are, were in print and distributed inside of forty days. "Well done, good and faithful servant," Some of our Iowa Brethren will likely think that there is some Grand Lodge in their jurisdiction besides Bro. Parvin, invaluable' as he may be as an integral part. As to Bro. Hill's praise of the Iowa Grand Secretary, we say, "So mote it be," or Amen," if you prefer it. His Proceedings arc always on time, and unsurpassed in kind. Ours, not so large or elegant, were rtelivcred last year in less than thirly working days. We are willing to give Iowa the p路a.lm, but claim to have distanced that jurisdiction by several days. ",'lissomi is accorded a very kind notice by Bro. Hill. Our Review is commended and its author complimented, for which grateful acknowledgments are hereby tendered. We especially appreciate the tender sympathy offered us, touching the great sorrow we had felt.路 'Ye refrain from commenting on Bro. lIill's remarks concerning the" Silver City Lodge" trouble in New l\fexieo. As that question, or case, is "out of court," and all parties are happy, let us hear no more of it. Missouri erred olle time too many when she erred at all, but has corrected her mistake and repaired the wrong. Give her credit for being honest. 'Ne cannot dwell longer with Ollr California Brother, delightful as is the association. We arc more than pleased to reeord that our good friend and Brother Clax Webster Taylor, Shasta, was elected Grand Master;' Alex. G. Abell, San Francisco, Grand Secretary. II


1882.]

13

Appendix.

CANADA, 1881. The minutes of six especial communications appear in the journal before us. Cornerstones were laid on these several special occasions, and AddresHes delivered. The Twenty-sixth Annual Session met in the City of Hamilton, July 13th, 1881. M. W. Jas. 路A. Henderson, Grand Master, presided, and R. W., J. J. Mason was Grand Secretary. A very large number of Past Grand Officers, Past Masters, Representatives of Grand Lodges, with Representatives from 264 Lodges, were present. There are on the roll of the Canada Grand Lodge,346 Lodges, and 17,635 members. An Address from the Hamilton Lodges was presented and cordially accepted, the response being made by Grand Master Henderson. The Grand Master presented another excellent paper. His Annual Reports are characteristically business and practical documents. We like them, and will make extracts therefrom as an exhibit of what our Canada Brethrcn are doing. He opened thus: The mission of our Order is truly that of peace and good will; 'we have nothing to do with political turmOil, with the conflicts of contending parties in the State, or with the aggressive attempts of Nations. Freemasonry, 3,8 properly understood, IS not only a principle of systematic cohercnce founded on charity and ~ympathy, but a Brotherhood of meu who desire to promote the intellectual enlightenment and moral advancement of each other, to the honor of the Great Architect of the Universe. It is a satisfaction to know that if imperfections are to be found among us, the Order itself countenances no departure from the rules of rectitude and propriety; the very clouds which occasionally obscure our hori7.0n remind us of the rays of light behind, which augur a forthcoming glorious noon. With these principles before us, let us tben take counsel together as to the lJest means of advancing the work for which we are here associated, and so carry out the designs left by our predecessors on the Masonic Trestle-board. The following is more to the point than some fine orations we find printed on the "Mission" of Masonry or its " Beauties," etc.: In my Addrcss of last year, I remarked that it was desirable to see our funds increased, not merely for the sake of accumulation, but that our circlc of Benevolence may be stillmore cnlarged. I have now the gratification of being able to announce that the pa)'ments during tile period ending 31st May la~t, to the widows and orphans and to distressed Masons, amoullted to $1:l,408,76, and yet our fllllds have increased by $2,628,76, our invested flllHlS and cash balance on 31st May, 1881, beillg $63,401. Truly, the (frand Lodge of Canada is rewarded for its relieving witii liberal hands the many objects of tender solicitudc l1no compassion. 1 shall not further allude to our monetary affairs, as the Financial Statements of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary, full and complete in matters of detail, with the l{eport of the Board on Audit and Finance, will be laid before you. He retired from it service of two years in the follOWing terms, and of him it may be truly affirmed, "Well done, good and faithful servant:" By the Craft our laws have been well observed, and thc officials of Grand Lodge at all times performed t.heir duties with intelligence and alacrity; no trouble of any importance or magnitude has arisen that has not been promptly met and decided" on. I retire from the TJu0ne of the Royal Solomon, having the gratification of knOWing that peace and good will extended throughout this jurisdiction, and feeling that I can hand down to my successor a prosperous Order.

*

*.

*


14

. Appendix.

[Oct.

Brethren, a great and important trust has again devolvcd on us, the rcpresentatives of the Ancient Craft, fs:>r there never was a time when Masonic influence was more felt than now. May we discharge that trust with diligcllce and lidefity, and see that the landmarks of the Order are preserved, its precepts acted upon. and its professions carried out. Guided in the future by the past, may we not assert thltt so long as we continue to act according to the tenets of our time honored Ordcr, !Lnd to carry out its principles, so long will our Institution prosper and exercise its influence on I;cnerations yet to come. Let each and all, during this communication, cultivate that unity which is the cement which unites. arid that harmony which is the bond that binds us together, and gentle peace will hover over our deliberatIons and rest among us. The Address waS commended by the committee, and pronounced an eloquent one. The District Deputy Grand l\fasters all furnished full and complete Reports, which were printed. Masonry in Canada is in a most flourishing conditioll, as shown by the Reports. There is a "Board of General Purposes" in that Grand Lodge that does nearly. everything, so tbat the business is expedited in a manner peculiar to themselves. "The Board on Grievance" had a large number of cascs to review, and did it well. No Report on Correspondence is furnished. JA8. MOFFAT, London, G. M. J. J. MASON, Hamilton, G. Sec.

COLORADO, 1881. Three Special Communications and the Twenty-first Annual Communication are chronicled in the journal now before us for review. The corner-stone of a court-house was laid June 24th. 1881, by Grand Master Greenleaf, where and when he delivered a briefly pertinent oration, which is printed. The Twenty-first Annual Session was held September 20th, 1881, in Denver, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. Lawrence N. Greenleaf, Grand Master; R. W. Bro. Ed. C. Parmelee, Grand Secretary. Representatives from twenty-seven, out of twenty-nine, Lodges were in attendance. The Grand Master furnished a good Report of his official.doings for the preceding term. He said the year had been one of unusual prosperity, and grew cloquent in his descriptions of the progress and development of the country. Masonry had shared in the general prosperity. Lodges had multiplied and the membership showed It healthy growth, while peace and harmony everywhere prevailed. A just and appropriate tribute was paid to the memory of our late distingUished Brother, Dr. Albert G. Mackey. Feeling mention wa~ made of the death of Bro. ,las. A. Garfield. The Grand Master had been present at the laying of the corner-stone of the" Egyptian Obelisk in Central Park." New York, OctOber, 1880, and reported fully the attractions of that interesting occasion. The Grand Master had granted 'numerous Dispensations--among them were nine to institute ne\\" Lodges. Thirteen decisions rendered by him were reported, and were subsequently approved. We find no occasion to review said decisions or difrer from them, as they bring up no new points or unsettled questions.


1882.]

Appendix.

15

The Grand Master presented a fair and clear statement concerning one of our Missouri Masons who wcnt to Colorado and joined in the formati<Hl of a new Lodge there, while under suspension in this jurisdiction. We copy his presentation of the case in full: . On June 8th, 1881. I received a communication from Most Worshipful Bro. W. R. Stubblefield, Grand Master of l\lissouri. stating that Bro. A. W. Settle. one of the charter members of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 32, had been suspended by Richmond Lodgc, No. f>7. of Missouri, f0r non-payment of dues. He enclosed a letter from the Secretary of Olive Branch Lodge. No. 32, under seal, notifying Richmond Lodge that Bro. Settle, under our law, severed his connection with that Lod~e September 18th, ]877, at wldeh time hc became a charter member of Olive Branch Lodge. Bro. Stubblefield expressed It wish to know how the Brother got into a Lodge in this jurisdiction as a charter member without a dimit or other documentary cvidence of his l\fasonic standing, and further, what kind of a law we had in Colorado that could sever a member's connection with It Lodge in that juris.diction 'without their consent. The act complained of occurred during the term of Past Grand l\faster Henry. Upon rcceipt of the communication, I addressed a letter to Bro. Parmelee. Grand Secretary, enquiring whetper the dimit of Bro. Settle accompanied the petItion for dispensation, as requircd by our Constitution. He replied that he could find no dim it, but that the Brother signed the petitions for dispemation and charter. I then wrote Bro. Stubblefield, informing him that there had evidently been a. violation of the law of Colorado during the term of one of my predecessors and that I would do all in my power to remedy the matter should it transpire that we were in fault. I also wrote Bro. Henry upon the subject, which resulted 111 a personal interview, but he was unable to throw any light upon the matter, though, he was strongly of the opinion that the Constitution during his term did not have the present requirement in regard to dimits. I also w'rote Bro. Settle elicitin~ the fad that the Grand Master did not require his dimit or that of others. I again wrote Bro. Stubblefield on July 20th, stating that I was convinced that there had becn a violation of our law, and requesting him as the aggrieved party to indicate the best method of settlement. Owing to his abscnce from St. Louis, I did hot receive his reply till nearly a month after. He took issue with me that the Brother was an innocent party, upon the ground that Bro. Settle had paid dues to the Missouri Lodge after the formation of the Colorado Lodge. I bad suggested that we treat it as a case of dual membership, but he replied that l\fissouri did not recognize it. He thou~ht I shotlld order his name stricken from the roll (being a suspended Mason) and direct nim to pay his dues to his Lodge in Missouri, procure a dimit, present it to Olive Branch Lodge and affiliate in the regular way. I immediately wrote Bro. Settle that in my view of the case the Grand Lodge had no power"to dimit him from his Lodge in Missouri, and that he was virtually a suspended Mason in both jurisdictions were the strict letter of the law enforced, that T was disposed to be lenient in the matter, and suggested as the best way out of the difficulty, that he pay his dues to Richmond Lodg-e. apply for a dimit and forward the same to me. Bro. Settle readily acquiesced in my sug!{estions and promised to act upon thcm at once. I notified Bro. StUbblefield of this disposition of the case. The action and views of the Grand Master were commendable in the matter, and showed the right spirit. Unlike the Grand Lodges of Connecticut and New York, Colorado and Missouri will have no controversy, but an early understanding led to an amica)Jle adjustment. The Committee on the Grand Master's Address gave a finishing touch to the matter, and there it will remain: In the case of Bro. SettJe. of Olive Branch Lodge, whose status was complaincd of by the Grand l\Jaster of Missouri. your committee nre of the opinion that the trouble all arose from the Secretary of Olive Branch Lodge writing to the Missouri Lodge that which was 110t true, and Gmnd Jl;Iaster Greenleaf falling into the error of admitting that sUltement to be true. The Secretary of Olive Branch Lodge wrote the l\Iissouri Lodge that we had dimitted a member of theIr body. Our Grand Master accepted thc statement as correct. In fact, however. there was no truth at all in it. Had there been, then the Grand Master of Missouri cou] 'I rightfully complain of us. But ill the organization of Olive Branch Lodge no law of thb jurisdiction was violated. The ready and honorable adjustment of this matter illustrates how easily questions of difference may be settled when people tr?/ to 90 so. Where there is a will, there is always a way. "Behold, how great a matter a little fire kindleth," said one lopg ago, because the" little fire" is allowed to get a start-" get away" with people. BRO. THEODOlm S. PARVIN.

Theodore S. Parvin, Past Grand Master of Iowa, was introduced and welcomed to a seat in the East. Bro. Parvin responde.d in all approp~iate spceclT.


16

Appendix.

[Oct.

CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. "Byron L. Carr, Chairman Committ.ee on Foreign Correspondence," presented a ninety-paged Review of the Annual Proceedings of the several Grand Lodge>; with which Colorado is in fratBrnal correspondence, so far as the same had been received. Missouri, for Ul80, received fraternal attention in a two-paged notice. The Address of Bro. J. S. Browne was favorably commented on and ext.racts made therefrom, as well as from the Committees on Jurisprudence and Correspondence. Bro. Carr furnishes a very readable Review and intersperses his extracts from others with discreet comments of his own. From the heart comes a sincere "thank you, Bro. Carr, for the sympathy and 'earnest prayer' sent us in our personal' grief." We are happy to assure our Brother, far away, that "the question of conflict of jurisdiction with the Grand Lodge of New Mexico" has been most amicably and honorably adjusted. We admire the Conclusion of Bro. Carr, and feel disappointed thathe is not on the committee for next year. Why not, we know not. lIe says: We do not know that we have expressed such sentiments as will meet the approval of our own Grand Lodge, but they are honestly ours, and we shall stand by them unt.il convinced '\ve are wrong. Should we meet with'eritieh;lll, we have only to say we have met it before and survived the shock. ROHT. A. QUILLlAM, Wals~nburg, G. M. ED. C. PARMELEE, Georgetown, G. Sec. L. N. GREENLEAF, Denver, Chair. Com. on Cor.

CONNECTICUT, 1882. The Ninety-fourth AJlnual Communication was held in Hartford, commencing January 18th, 1882. M. W. Bro..lamcs McCormick, Gra:nd Master, presided; R. W. Bro. J. K. Wheeler was Grand Secretary. One hundred and tell Lodges were represented, out of a total of one hundred and cleven living Lodges. These Lodges embrace a membership of nearly fifteen thousand. The Annual Addrcs~ opens in a very p1cll.sltnt tone and rnns ~moothly on to the end. He recognized the two grcat llnd essential qualities of all moral life-supreme love to God, and affection for eaeh other. In his enumeration of losses sustained by the gencral Fraternity, he recorded, mournfully, the decease of Dr. James M. Austin, Grand Secretary of New York, and Bro. James A. Garfield. Of the latter he said:

On the 2d of July last. Bro. .Tames A. Garfield. President of the United States, was shot by an aS~fiSsin. and after It lingering illness. borne with manly and heroic fortitude. he died from the effects of the wound. on the .19th of September. Our country was plunged into the deepest sorrow, and the good and true men of every nation shared our grief, and_ from overflowillg hearD; poured forth their sympathy. None felt greater horror at the deed. none fclt more profound sorrow at his gad alld untimely death. and nOlle more deeply sympathize with thc bereaved mother, wife and children, than thc members of our Fraternity.


1882.J

Appendix.

17

The body of the Address was devoted to business purely local and of interest alone to his own jurisdiction.

He presents the following concerning their tr01lbles with the GRAND LODGE OF NEW YORK.

On the 16th day of July. M. W. Horace S. TIl.ylor, Grand Master of Masons in New York, official v notified me of the removal of the edict of non-intercourse which was issuen by the Grand Lodge of New York, in June, 1880, and requested that the differences between the Grand Lodg-es of New York and Conneticut be submitted to the Grand Lodges of the United States, or as many of them as we should ag-ree upon, for arbitration; I!-nd invited me to join with him in making up a statement of facts to be submitted. I expressed on behalf of this Grand Lodge, its earnest desire to maintain fraternal relations with sister Grand Lodges, and a willingness to submit the questions at issue to the arbitration of our peers, and requested. that as the Grand Lodge of New York claimed to be the aggrieved party. it should present a statement of grlevance. Owing to the absence of M. W. Bro. Taylor. his ;;tatement of the claims of the Grand Lodge of New York did not reach me until tbe 11th of October. On my return from Yorktown, I called on 1\f. W. Bro. Taylor, and at my request. the futher consideration of this matter was postponed until after the annual communication of this Grand Lodge.

One year ago, with the edict of non-intercourse in force, this Grand Lodge believed that the whole subject-was" taken out of the range of argument and discussion." The edict has since been removed. and I recommend that this matter be referred to a special committee. If this Grand Lodge has erred it has been under a misapprehension of the facts, and the construction the Grand Lodge of New York has placed upon its own laws. I trust and believe that the committee may be able to report resolutions which may be satisfactory to the Grand Lodge of New York. and honorable to the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. The correspondence is herewith submitted. . That the Grand Lodge of Connecticut may stand alongside of California, we gladly record the fact that the returns of the Lodges were all received, arid dues paid for the year ending with the annual meeting. So says Bro. Wheeler, the Grand Secretary. Well done. The Grand Lodge sent $1,229.17 to the Michigan sufferers. This amount was contributed by the various Lodges in the State. A MASONIC CHARITY FUND

Of some sixteen hundred dollars had been contributed by the Lodges in su.ms from one dollar upwards. The committees, touching the death of Bro. Jame3 A. Garfield, reported as follows: Hardly would it be possible for lan~uage adequately to express the feelings of sympathy, of grief, and of indi~nation WIth which in common with our fellow citizens of every name, and in common It might be said with the civilized world, we think of the terrible crime which left a lovIng household without its head, and took from one of the mightiest nations on earth, the ruler of its choice. \,ye stand aghast at the crime. we stand tearful in sympathy as we think of the sorrow involved. We stand as Brothers by a Brother's grave. We love to speak of ollr Brother Ja.mes A. Garfield, and because he was that we would tenderly convey to his family the assurance of fraternal sympathy, and we recommend that our Right Worshipful Grand Secretary be directed to convey to them the expression of our condolence with them. The following resoluti~ns closed a fraternal review" on the New York controversy." The Report was adopted: Rcso/t'cd, That the Grand Lodge of Connecticut hereby expresses its great gratification at the withdrawal by the Grand Lodge of New York of its edict of non-intercourse with this Grano Lodge, ana cordially reciprocates the desire of the Grand Lodge of New York for the restoration of harmonious relatio~ls between the two Grand Lodges.

G. L.-AI'. 2.


18

Appendix. :

[Oct.

RC8o/t'ed, That this Grand Lodge disclaims any tlcsire or intent of subverting or interfering with the operation of any of the laws of the Grand Lodge of Kew York;" in the matter complained of, or of giving to its own laws an)' extra territorial force or effect. Resolved. That this Grand Lodge, in assuming that the granting of a charter to Hamilto!l Lodge, No. 54, severed the mcmber<;hip with Webotuck Lodge of i'llch of the petitioners as were members of said Lodge, acted under a misconstruction of the laws of the Grand Lodge of Kew York, and does hereby withdraw slleh assumption, and conCedes that it was without force or effect to disturb the relations of such members of Webotuck Lodge.

ResohJcd, That this Grand Lodge approves and endorses the claim of the Grand Lodge of New York that membership in any Lodge can only be acquired or terminated by the operation of the law of the Grand Lodge in whose jurisdiction. such Lodge is situated, except in case of. discipline for Masonic offenses. . Resolvcd, 'That this Grand Lod~e hereby expresses its earnest hope that the Grand Lodge of New York will accept thIS action of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut as a full and tinal settlement of the vexed question which has ~o long disturbed the peace of the Brethren of neighboring jurisdictions, and that fraternal relations may be fully restored between them. . We arc pleased to record the above disclaimer, in Resolution two, and the concession contained in Resolution three. The doctrine enunciated in Resolution four, as to the terrninlltion of membership, removes all ground for. controversy,' because it is the only correct position that exists. We therefore join Connecticut in the expressed hope that New York "may accept this action" as a "ful1 and final settlement of the vexed qu.estion" so long a source of trouble and agitation' between two sister and contiguous jurisdictions. No one in the land wiII rejoice more heartily at such" final settlement" than the writer of this Report. We have been honored by Connecticut as its Representative near our own Grand Lodge for quite a number of years. We are fond of the Brethren up there, especially so of the Grand Secretary. We were unWillingly forced to chide the Brethren and express, in strong terms, our disapproval of their course concerning the "New York controversy." We can talk to friends and admonish them of error, better than others. But the controversy is certainly ended, and we expect to record, .with great pleasure, the favorable action of New York as to the above Resolutions of Connectkut. Thus may end the lnst of our Grand Lodge controversies, and ma.y no more mistll,kes of like gravity occur to disturb the peace and harmony of Brethren 'who should dwell together in.unity. . â&#x20AC;˘ CORRESPONDENCE.

A Review of some eighty pages was furnished hy Grand Secretary Wheeler, which is brief enough from one who supplies good things as far 11.<; he goes. Jl,lissouri, for 1881, is reviewed at considerable length and in excellent spirit. . The reviewer complimented us with a seven-paged notice, which was far more than could be allowed many others. His quotations from our last Report are fuJI and extended. He notked with evident satisfaction the settlement of our "unhappy controversy" with New MeXico, and said: The trouble which ha.<; for a time existed between Missouri and New Mexico has been adjusted, thus ending one more unhappy controversy, which has been disturbin~ the peace and harmony of the Craft, not only in the two jurisdictions named, but its influence has been felt throughout the entire country. An exhaustive Report is submitted by the Chairman of the Committee, Bro. .John D. Vinci!, which was adopted. The views expressed by the committee are based upon the action of the Grand Lodge in extending to New Mexieo its unqualified recognition as a constitutionlri body, with ~1Jl)f(~lIW 11[/t.~()n'ir; /tuthm'Uy 11Jilhin its ¡tCITitur,i111 lim.its. The act, therefore, of maintaining a Lodge within the limits of New Mexico in the face of such legislation, could not be supported with any degree of consist~ncy. As Mi.ssouri and Connecticut were both in error iIi the origin of the controversies now settled, happily, a fellow feeling should have made us wondrous kind. As both are out of the woods, will we be caught again.? Not on such points 11.<; involved us in former


1882.]

19

Appendix.

complications. As to points of difference between Bro. Wheeler and this writer thcre is no room for further discussion owing to the a.djustment of pending issues. He will not be convinced by us. We are self-satisfied. Thus be buried our variances. We thank Bro. Wheeler for believing that we do get waked up," as he calls it. We are fond of waking up others, but not harshly." Our arguments may seem harsh, because they are pointed. We are not harsh in nature or purpose. Hear him speak of us in another direction: II

II

In Our last Report, we made a playful remark on account of the prolixity of his Report, and suggested the idea that he might have preal:hed once. He acknowledges that he did, and says he is Roing to keep it up as long as there are an)' sinners around. Well, Brother VineH, let me teU you something. You never can convert a Connecticut Yankee with any such preaching as you gave us in your Heport of 1880. We expect Bro. Wheeler has been converted, as his Grand Lodge adopted resolutionssee above-that contain just" sUch preaching" as we delivered in 1880. How the change of heart was'effected, anG to what extent, among 0llr Connocticut Yankee" Brethren, we know not. Certain it is, that路resolution three (above) contains our doctrine of 1880. II

JAMES McCORMICK, Windsor, G. M. J. K. WHEELER, Hartford, G. Sec.

DAKOTA, 1881. The Seventh Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge was held in the City of Sioux Falls, June 14th, 1881, with Representatives from eleven Lodges present, besides present and Past Grand Officers. M. W, Geo. II. Hand, the Grand Master, being absent, R. W. Henry H. Folk, Deputy Grand Master, presided; R. W. Chas. T. McCoy, Grand Secretary, was present. The Address of the (absent) Grand Master was read by the Acting Grand Master, Bro. Folk. It was a good Report of official matters, and embraced much of interest. He reported the. Lodges in a prosperous condition, for the most part. The growth of the Craft, while not rapid, was reported as strong and healthful," giving promise of permanency and usefulness. The subjeet of visiting Lodges was alluded to as impracticable under existing drcumstances. While the law makes it the duty of the d'l-ll.nd Master to visit and instruct the Lodges, that officer found it impossible, as there are one hnn.dred and fifty thousand square miles in the jurisdiction, "a territory much larger than all of the New England States, with New York and Pehnsylvania combined." He said: II

Our Lodges are scattered from the southern boundary to the British line, and from the State line of Minnesota to Wyoming. It is evident that the Grand Master cannot visit all these Lodges personally without using a much larger share of his time than should be required of him, leaving out of consideration the question of expense, 'We would beg to be excused from making official visits to all thc Lodges in that large Territory. A few decisions of local application were reported. Dispensations for the formation of l;iix new Lodges had been grantcd. Charters were granted to fiye of said Lodges, and one was continued Under Dispensation. There are now twcnty-two chartered Lodges in Dakota. and one Under Dispensation, with a total membership of 723.


20

Appendix. The Colon and Cu!Ja

(~mnd

[Oct.

Lodge was recognized. lIllNNESOTA AND DAKOTA,

Like Missouri and :New Mexico, had been at variance for a time over the" exclusive jurisdiction" doctrine. Dakota claimed supreme control over all Lodges in thut Territory. l\Iinnesota exercised control for a time over Bismarck Lodge. Hence the dispute. Bismurck Lodge, like our Silver City Lodge in New Mexico, finally surrendered its churter to the mother Grand Lodge-Minnesota-and received a charter from Dakota, alld became allegiant thereto. This ended the controversy. We recorded the happy settlement in our last Report, !Jut refer to it now for the purpose of introducing expressions of honorable and fratCfllal feeling from both sides. The Grand Lodge of Minnesota passed the following: Resolved, That the Granel Lodge of Minnesota extend to the Grand Lodge of Dakota the right hand of fellowship, and !Ji(ls her a hearty welcome into the general sisterhood of Grand Lodges. and that a communication be addressed to the Grand Lodge of Dakota, asking the appointm~nt of a Grand Representative near this Grand Lodge.

Grand Master Hand said: As Grand Master "VeIls. in his Address, says, "After m'uch research I am convinced thut the great weight or authority is against our position, and in favor of the establishing, as the governing law in such cases. the American rule of absolute exclusive territorial jnrisdiction," it will be seen that the Grand Lodge of Minnesota, by the adoption of the foregoing Report, fully concedes the principle for which we have sO long contended. All parties are happy, and we hope are at peace among themselves, with all the world ~ and the rest of mankind. The following shows the appreciation of the Grand Lodge for its retiring Grand ¡Master: Be it Resolved by the M. W. Grand Lodge of Dakota now assembled, that we heartily endorse the course of our 'Most Worshipful Grand Master, Bra Geo. H. Hand, during Ule recent controversy between this Grand L0dp;e and the M. W. Grand Lodge of l\1innesota, now so happily ended; and we tender to him our grateful thanks for the able, emdent and impartial manner in whieh he has discharged the duties of Grand Master during his several terms, extending over a period of four years, and embracing a time in which this Grund Lodge has. by judicious guidance, advanced to an important and permanent place in the Fratemity of Masonic Grand Bodies. THOS. H. BROWN, Sioux Falls, G. I\L CI-IAS. 1'. McCOY, Bon Homme, G. Sec.

1882. The I~ighth Session was held at Watertown, June 13th, 1882, with Representatives from twelve Lodges. There are thirty-two Lodges in that jurisdiction, with a membership of 1,1;>7. M. W. Thomus H. 'Brown, Grand Maf:ter, presided, and R. W. ehas. T. McCoy, was Grand Secretary. The Grand Master presented an Address of medium length and good ability. He said Masonry in that jurisdiction was progressing with a rapid and vigorous step. Seven years before, the Grand Lodge was organized with six Lodges, and about 200 members were identified with them. Now, there are over thirty Lodges and more than 1,000 members. Truly, this wa.." a good showing. He had granted seven Dispensations for the formation of new Lo(lgcs. Some practical suggestions were uttered, though they might â&#x20AC;˘ pot all suit our latituq~.


1882.J

Appendix.

21

On the perpetual jurisdiction doctrine he held our views, and expresses them thus: A Lodge asked whether or not it should receive the petition of a candidate who had been rejected by a Lodge in another jurisdiction. To this we replied in th~ affirmative. The candidate had resided"for several years within the jurisdiction of the Lodge, and was well known to most of its members. In the absence of any Constitutional provision, we held it to be good Masonie law, that the jurisdiction over profanes only contlniIes so long as they remain within the Grand Lodge jurisdictioll, and that upon removal to another jurisdiction-they then become eligible material, .the same as if no action had ever been taken in the jurisdiction from which they removed. Revised and codified laws were considered and adopted by the Grand Lodge. CORRESPONDENCE.

A hurriedly prepared Report was presented by Bro. Wm. Blatt, chairman. following is concerning New Mexico and Missouri:

The

It is true that Our sympathy! as well as our firm convictions of right and justicc, were wholly OIl the side of .New MexICO, yet we cannot approve of her action in adopting- the extreme measures she adopted in this controversy. Nor do we think that it hastened that reconciliation which, we are happy to state, is now near at hand, and we trust ere this consummated.

.......-

This was a sober and conservative view of the subject, and harmonizes with our repeatedly expressed con victions. The Report of Bro. Blatt consists largely of cullings from Grand Lodge Proceedings. In this, however, Missouri, for 1881, was entirely over..looked. The Reviewer closes thus: In closing our Report, we can but reiterate what we have said at its beginning: 'fhat the very short time given the committee for preparing its l{eport, and the want of familiarity of so vast a subject, will insure us the leniency of the ,1\1ost Worshipful Grand Lodge, as well as that of the Masonic Fraternity at large. OSCAR S. GIFFORD, Canton, G. M. CRAS. T. McCOY, BOIl Homme, G. Sec.

DELAWARE, 1881. Grand Lodge met in Seventy-fifth Annual Session in Wilmington, October 5th, 1881. M. W. Joseph W. H. Watson, Grand Master, presiding, with R. W.Wm. S. Hayes, Grand Secretary. We believe there' are twenty-one Lodges and 1,321 Master Masons in the jurisdiction of Delaware. The Grand Master opened his Address witli a reference to our national sorrow, caused by the President's death. In the course of his remarks this passage occurs: But while the nation mourns its President, Masonry mourns a Brother beloved, and knows that one of its brightest lights has been extinguished. that another broken column is now within its temple, that another master workman ha.~ fallen with his work unfinished, and like that great architect of old whom we are taught to revere and emulate, he was true to the last, and gave up his life because of his firmness in the d~charge of his duty; and Masonry who claims a Washington. a Franklin and a Lafayette now claims â&#x20AC;˘ and points with equal pride to the name of James A. Garfield.


22

Appendix.

[Oct.

The Grand Master announccd that Masonry in that jurisdiction was in a very flourishing condition. He reported having visited many of the Lodges, and expected to have extendcd his official work, but was hindered by sickness and death in his family. He announced the very satisfactory condition of Grand Lodge ~nances. The jurisdiction had been happily exempted from the visitations of the reapcr Death, no permanent member of the Grand Lodge having been removed. One decision was reported and confirmed. The Michigan sufferers were remembered in the Address, and Grand Lodge voted them fifty dollars. The Address was wiscly brief,as the Grand Master had but little to report. The Grand Lodge adopted a new Constitution and. By-Laws. This Grand Lodge does not provide Itsclf and Report on Foreign Correspondence.

t~e

Craft at large the luxury of a

The Grand 1\faster and Grand secretary were both re-elected.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 1881. Stated Communication was held in Washington, January 12th, 1881. l\I. W. Noble D. Lamer, Grand Master, presided, an~ R. W. Wm. R. Singleton was Grand Secretary. John Mills Brown, Past Grand Master of the California Grand Lodge,was present. and welcomed by the Grand Master. Also, R. W. Best, Past Grand Master of Korth Carolina. A Report was rendered by the Committee on Library. The indebtedness of the Masonic Hall Association still troubles-perhaps oppresses-our Brethren of the District. A resolution was adopted to hold a" Grand Masonic Fair" to raise money to liquidate the "pre~%ing indebtedness" of the Associatiou. We hope the ladies ~ook hold of the enterprise and made it a success, as'heretofore. Special communications are ,reported and the semi-annual meeting came off May llth,1881. Nothing of intcrest, to the general reader, is recorded. A special meeting of the Grand I_odge WllS convened, June 26th, to attend the funeral of Bro. Albert Gallatin Mackey, Past Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of South

Carolina, and member of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia. The annual communication was convened November 9th, 1881, with the usual Grand Officers present. The Address of Grand Master Lamer was a brief and business documcnt. He reported having visited all the Lodges in the jurisdiction twice, except two. There are twenty-two Lodges in that Grand Lodge Jurisdiction, and something near three thousand members. He reported the Grand Lodge out of debt-a state of affairs not having existed before for fifteen years.

~

We clip the following question and answer from the Address of Grand Master Lamer for the purpose of endorsing the soundness of his ruling, and commending 'it to all who take up "strangers" and vouch them into Lodges without any examination that is worthy of the name. And such careless Brethren arc oftcn taken in and done for by these "strangers" with whom they make too free:

"Has any Brother the right to examine a visitor claiming to be a member of the â&#x20AC;˘ Fraternity WIth the view of introducing him to a Lodge. unless he is authorized so to do by the Grand Master or the Worshipful Master of a Lodge?"


1882.J

Appendix.

23

My ans\\.'er to this question has been; in every instance, in the negative. The examination of visitors claiming to be.members of the Fraternity 1s an important matter and

~h~~~~l~~~~~11yrl~iv~nt~~I~;;~f?na[~ek;i;d~tgf ~eu1u~;~~g~e~ 8;;to~~,~~~ ~la\init t~U~~ of us has fully proven his tl,.<;sertion and it is so pronounced by the Brethren to whom the duty of examina,tion may be entrusted. To guard against imposition in this matter and prevent the introductiou of imposters into our mIdst, I hold, and have so instructed the Brethren, when opportunity oltered, that all examinations of visitors should be made by a committee appointed by the Grand Master or the Worshipful Master of a Lodge, who are supposed to be better qualified than an)'one else to select Brethren capable of discharging this important duty. The follOWing will be appreciated by others as well as by the writer of this Report:

'Thecircllmstances attending the assassination, sufferings and death of our lamented Bro. James Abram Garfield. President of the ljnited States, and a member of Pentalpha Lodge, No. 23, of our juri:-:diction, are familiar to you all. and I do not deem it necessary at this time to undertake the task of pronouucing an eulogy upon him or dwelling upon the 路horrible details connected with the sad event which has cast so much gloom over our beloved land and deprived the Fraternity of our jurisdiction of a devoted nrotl~er and the countryof an honored Chief Magistrate. Bro. Garfield, although not It member of this Grand Lodge, was well and favorably known to the Brethren of .this District, being connected in all branches of Masonry with bodies in our own jurisdiction. He was one whom we honored not merely on account of his high position in civil life, but more espeeially on account of the great interest he always mal11fested in our Brotherhood n.nd the ~reat anxiety he always di~played to become thoroughly acquainted with the sublime principles taught in our ceremonies. Brethren, he is gone! The ruthless ,hand of the assassin, at a moment when all was bright in Qur Brother's life, when he was about to seek rest and refreshment from the vexations and labors of high position, and when he was buoyant with the hopes of a peaceful and happy recreation by the side of the convalescent and loving partner of hIS life, at the sea-shore, fired the fatal shot, and the spirit of our respected and fH,mented Brother has taken its flight, and is now at peace with our Supreme Grand Master in the celestial Lodge above, where all good M.asons hope at last to arrive. We take this from the Grand Lecturer's Report: The condition of the Lodges is that of harmony'; the amount of work probably a little below the average; the material seems to be ~ood, as far IL.'; I know; the officers of the Lodges are generally workmen of skill, and assIduity; the exceptions are few, and seem to exist from a pressure of business rather than au indifference. or lack of ability. This I infer from the fact that they seem to realize their situation, and do not enjoy it very much. We clip the following resolutions from the tribute to Bro. James A. Garfield: Resolved. That this Grand Lodge desires to give expression to her deep abhorence of the dastardly crime by which the precious life of our beloved Chief.Magistrate was ~truck dOW,II, and her sense of the bereavement which we, in common with onr fellow- . citizens, have suffered by his death. . Re,~ol1!ed, That as ~fa.sons, we deplore the loss of a Brother who was greatly endeared to us by the ties of fraternal intercourse, n.nd one who was an ornament 路to our, Brotherhood, a devoted friend to its principles and a noble exemplar of its practical teaehin~ and virtues.

Resolved, That in respect for his memory, the hall and insignia of the Grand Lodge be appropriately draped; that these resolutions be entered on our journal and a memorial page of our published Proceedings be devoted to the honor of his name. R('~~olved, That an attested copy of this :Minute be transmitted to the family of our illustrious and lamented Brother, with the tender of our profound and respectful sympathy.

The Installation Communication was held December 27th, 1881, when, among others, Grand Master Noble D.Larner was reinvested with the emblelll of authority, and Wm. R. Singleton was again assigned to his welllil1ed post of Grand Secretary.


24

.ilppendix.

[Oct.

COURESPONDE:\CE.

The Report is ag-ain from the pen of Bro. Singleton, Grand Secretary, a veteran l\fa.~on and worker. His Review, of some sixty p..ges, shows his skill in this field of effort. Missouri is well treated, both as'to space and the spirit of his notice. He records his dissent. kindly, from Missouri as to New Mexico. Well, Bro. Singleton, that matter is settled. We preparecl the Report adopted by our Gmnd Lodge last session, giving a history of the whole affair, and brought our Grand Lodge to see that she must either cancel her recognition of New Mexico or else remove Silver City Lodge, as the bone of ~~ontention, from that jurisdiction. Our Report was adopted, and the trouble is ended, We are glad Bro. Singleton did not desert us in the day of our periL' It would have hurt our feelings. Fa~ better had it been for all, could such Brethren as Parvin and Ingleshy have given us their mediation instead of going off into splinters. Missouri can live without their representative presence at the Grand Lodges of Iowa and Sonth Carolina. At the time they ficwoff, a Grand Master (Rev. Bro. Scott, of Illinois) was mediaUng like a "peace maker," and did much to bring the alienated parties to a sober consideration. His services were invaluable. Missouri appreciates-yea, love.~ him for what he did. Bro. Singleton was kind ("not' seven;' "), but passive. When the battle waxed hottest, the writer of this, with Bro. Scott, of Illinois, was prcparing the way, quietly; to bring abont results that were finally secured, and ended the affair. We stood between two fires--opposedby a horne element, and shot by the New :Mexico people. We had our OW11 plan, and consulted no one. Missouri had to be brought to a given point before an amicable settlement was possible. The man did not live, who could have brought our Grand Loog-e to the proper point any suoner than was done. To fig-ht "the worlo, the flesh and the devil," and then stano where two slashing factions were breaking their lances all afound and over us, was more stirring than comfortable. But we determined to secure, in the end, the honor of our own Grand Lodge, and preserve her integrity. In doing so, we struck blows not il1 harmony with our peace-loving and quiet nature. We defended onr own Grand Lodge where defensible; and rebuked her inconsistencies. She was brought to scc and acknowledge her wrong, and make honorable reparation. Kew .Mexico is saUsfied, because vindicated. And no one contributed more to her vindication than the writer of these lines, so far as the principle goes for which she contended. Our Report, last session, was :U1.nnan,~'werable vindication of that principle. At the same time, New Mexico will remember us f9r another thing: v'le did not champion her folly, but scored her deeply while defending her rights. So ends the war. We copy a few of the strong, wise and terse sayings of Bro. Singleton found i.n his " Conclusion: " â&#x20AC;˘ Within the last forty years we have seen the Masonic Institution rising from its ashes, .. in 1835, gradually taking irito it.<; bosom men of distinction, in law, state; medicine, science and literature, who, becoming possessed with the idea of its value a.~ an educator tor public service. and fOf its capacity in controlling the morals of society, have, many of them, given lqi all of their leisure in writing for the Masohic press that they might spread abroad true Masonic light and knowledg-e to their less informed Brethren. ft becomes. essential that our Masonic laws should no longer be dictated by local customs and personal idios}'ncrasies and predi.lections. Do we say this because we think and hope that our pecnllar views may be adoptcd '! By no means; we are willing, if so be the conRcnsus decide, to surrender every view we may have upon all the mooted questions. What wc' want is "uniformity" of laws and then conJorm'iJ.y to them. Until then, we surrender our convictions to no man on this continent in reg-ard to what l~ been the law. as agreed to by a majority of onr Grand Jurisdi<!tions. We have very recently read dicta from various chairmen of committees, uttered with a oogmatism that is quitp. re.fresking; parti<mlarly from some who have just llil\.de their maiden report. and we wondered where they have been hiding their mode8ty for so long a period as that the world of JlTasonry has been for so many. many years under the clond. Nevertheless. Grand Lodges still legislate; new Grand Lodges beeome recognized if they are not Grand Lodges,. present handsome jewels to their d'istin.quished Grand Representatives; make Masons; uuild handsome Temples,.as in New South Wales, without saying to eertain ones" bv your leave," and soon, yes very soon, will be duly recognized by the :\fother Grawl r:odges, although tI:ere may be many and lpud voices opposed to it. Yet the "sun. do move,"


Appendix.

1882.]

25

nevertheless, fur we see the shalluws go onwanl and still onward. Now, if all the Grand Lodges should unanimously declare that no Grand Lodge shall in future be RECOG~IZED by them unless, in its organization, every chartered Lodge in that jurisdiction had joined therein. then no set of Lodges. we think, in an unoccupied territory would be rash enough to violate this dictum. Yet the inherent right to organize a Grand Lodge is not circumscribed by any extraneous circumstances. The other Grand Bodies have nothing whatever to do with it. The history of MasollT}' from the year 1717 to the organization of Grand Lodges in the Colonies, beginning with Massachusetts, 1777, and then continuing to the present day, clearly shows that any three Lodges in an unoccupied territory conld and did from a legitimate Grand Lodge. Recognition by others has nothing to do with it. In the historical review of Grand Master Graham, of Quebec, we have the whole subject laid open, and we feel satisfied that so convincing will be the arRumcnts that the Grand Lodge of England will do by Quebec as she did formerly by Canada. We, however, now dismiss the subject for this year and reiterate what we have been saying for ten years past. Our life task now is to obtain more uniformity in our Masonic jurisprudence on this continent, and when we shall have seen that the same identical question shall be decided in the same way wherever it may arise, then will we be willing to lay aside 'the pen as having done a good thing for an institution which has had our labors in and out of its tiled doors for forty-two years. ' -

FLORIDA, 1882. Grand Lodge met in Fifty-third Annual Communication at Jacksonville, January ]7th, 1882. and was presided over by M. W. Bro. Wm. E. Anderson, Grand Master. R. W., A. W. Knight, acting a.<; Grand Secretary in the absence of R. W. Dewitt C. Dawkins; the regular Secretary. Bro. DaWkins, Grand Secretary, being absent on account of the critical illness of his wife, the following was adopted: Resolved, That the sympathies and kind regards of this Grand Lodge be at once sent to our worthy and beloved Brother, the Grand Secretary, that he may know we remember him in his sad affliction.

Fifty-five Lodges were represented, out of seventy-three on the roll. The membership in that jurisdiction is a little above tlVO thousand. Income for dues', some two thousand dollars. The year closed with peace and prosperity, while harmony had prevailed, and tbe Lodges were reported as generally prosperous. The Grand Master reported a few decisions. We present them: Question-Do not the members of a Lodge whose charter has been arrested for non¡ payment of Grand Lod~e dues, stand as suspended Masons'! â&#x20AC;˘ Answer-Yes, they stand towards the Fraternity in the position of suspended Masons. Question-Are such Ma.<;ons, before they make good their Masonic standing, eligible as petitioners for the formation of a new Lodge? Answer-They are not eligible. Question-Can a Lodge restore to his Masonic standing, an expelled member of another Lodge, the Lodge which p~ed the sentence having become defunct? Answer-They cannot. The Grand Lodge istbe only power which can restore him. The proper course will be'for him to address a petition to the Grand J.lodge, praying- for restoration, which petition should be approved and recommended by the Lodge which desires his restoration, and within whose jurisdiction he resides. Question-=-Jf a Lodge has been opened in regular Communication, and it is found that there are only two members of the Lodge present, are the acts of those two members binding upon the Lodge? ' .

.


26

Appendix.

[Oct.

AnSllJer-They are not. There must be present a sufficient number of the members of the Lodge to open and work (without reference to visiting Brethren who may be present) to make their acts binding upon thc Lodge. To decisions numbered one and tW(} we demur. These rulings will disfranchise a large and unfortunate class of Brethren, who are. as innocent of any act worthy of suspension, as Grand Master Anderson, who said above, "such stand towards the Fraternity in the position of suspended Masons." The rule, if legal, would work injustice to any Mason whose Lodge charter had been arrested. 'l'he injustice 'done, falls necessarily upon innoccnt parties. Lodgcs failing to pay Grand Lodge dues deserve to be killed. But there are always good men and true in such Lodges who keep their own dues paid up. To say such Brethren stand as "suspended Masons," is to say that the" faithful among the faithless found," shall suffer for the dereliction of others. A" suspended Mason" is practically dead while under suspension. We are pleased to see that the Jurispru路dence Committee partially corrected the rulings of their Gra'ld Master, thus: The first decision of the Grand !\faster is evidently intended to refer to members of a Lodge whose charter has been arrested; who, themselves, are in default, and we agree that such should stand in the light of suspended :Masons, Bllt if the record of such Lodge shows that these are member" who have discharged all their Masonic obligations, they become non-affiliated by the arrest of the Lodge charter, but are in good standing, and the Grand Secretary should so certify when the proper application is made to him. We do not believe a Brother'can be placed in the position of a " suspended Mason" by an act of a Gra.nd Master or a Grand Lodge arresting the charter of his Lodge, and not give him the benefit of a trial. This looks too much like trifling with the sacred right of Lodge membership and Masonic life. If a Brother should die while standing " towards the Fraternity in the position of a suspended Ma.<;on," such suspension, caused by arrest of charter for dereliction a.<; to dues, he is denied Masonic burial, and bis family cut off from all charity and sympathy, If Brethren fail to pay Lodge dues, let the Lodge discipline them, and not leave it for the Grand Lodge to punish indiscriminatel)' and without trial all who happen to be in arrears when the charter is arrested. In killing an O1'ganization for delinquency, by arresting the Lodge charter, the Grand Lodge should not inflict Masonic death upon the individual members of the organization. Arrest of charter is to end a delinqnent corporation. Any law that goes beyond this, and destroys the life oj members of the Craft without trial, is llS unjust as it is unmllSonic. The conviction has been growing on us for years, that Masonic life is too easily ended and summarily disposed of, in these modern days of rapid movement. We may have beco~e indifferent to its worth and sacredness by the growing disregard for hwnan life and n'ghts, 110W so alarmingly prevalent. The Grand Master presented the follOWing "case:" A case has arisen in our own jurisdiction during the past year, which, in my opinion, renders necessary some modification of our law in reference to the penal jurisdIction of the particular Lodges. A Mason was alleged to have committed a grave Masonic offense. Under our law as it now st'1nds, no Lodge in the State had jurisdIctioll or the rig-ht of trial, except the distant Lodge of which he was a member. The Lodge in whose jurisdiction he resided, by resolution. disowned him, and refused longer to recognize him as a MllSon, His own Lodge had in the meantime surrendered its charter, and become defunct. The singular spectacle is thus presented, of a Mason who is charged with a most grave offense, yet is not subject to any jurisdiction iII the State; who has been disowned and denounced by the Lodge nearest his place of residence, and vet is not debarred from visiting any other Lodge. . Strangely defective must be the law of any jurisdiction that provides not for the trial and punishment of Masons who commit" grave :\lasonic offenses" away from their own "particular Lodges." We gratUitously offer our Florida Brethren a little law of the' Missouri Code; as follows:


1882.J

Appendix.

27

PENAL JURISDICTION.

All chartered Lodges in this jurisdiction have full power and authority to exercise Penal jurisdiction over all Masons, Non-affiliated as well as Affiliated, within their several jurisdictions, for violations of Moral and Masonic law. We refer the Florida Brethren to' oUr views on this subject in the review made of Kentucky's position in Report on Correspondence for 1881. The Committee on Jurisprudence seemed to think that they had some precedent by which parties could be punished who were not members of a Lodge where the" grave Masonic off'eme" was committed, and that "no further legislation upon the SUbject is l1ecessary." If the.committee is right, the Grand Master is mistaken. If he is correct, the committee weren.t fault in judgment. We like a little plain law better than precedent, especially where precedent is very remote. The Committee on Jurisprudence presented some wise and judicious rulings on other questions submitted. The Grand Mast€r and Grand Secretary were both re-elected. This Grand Lodge never furnishes any

~eport

on Correspondence.

GEORGIA. This Grand Lodge meets biennially. Their last Annual Communication was held October, 1880. The journal of that session we received last year. As this body does not convene until October of the present year (1882) we shall hear nothing from the Brethren until next Report. We trust by that time to hear good news from that interesting and excellent jurisdiction.

IDAHO, 1881. This Grand Lodge met in Fourteenth Annual Communication, September 14th, 1881, • at Boise City, with 1\1.W., H. E. Prickett, Grand :\faster, in the chair, and R.W., L. F. Cartee, as Grand Secretary. The committee reported a large number of persons as" entitled to seats in the Gmnd Lodge." How many were present we cannot determine. As near as we can ascertttin, there are ten Lodges in Idaho, and nearly four· hundred members. We owe Grand ~fl\ster Prickett an apology for calling him Pickett, in our Review last year. The reason of the mistake was that we were thinking at the time, if our name were Prickett, we would have it changed. Hence'the mjstalro~ His Address to the Grand Lodge is not to be judged by h is name. however. The paper opens cleverly, and contains sume very good things. For instance, he said: It is not the unworthy that generally drop out and forsake us. Once within the Lodge they are pretty sure to remain, and it is the upright man and desirable Mason that withdraws when he is no longer willing to remain and associate with the unworthy. Again, it should be borne in mind that an admission is not for a day or for a short time only, but for life, and everythmg unites in demanding the exercise of great care in the selection of material out of which to build up our. organization. .


28

Appendix.

[Oct.

The above is quietly suggestive, and furnishes food forrefiection. Grand Master Prickett made A. few good common sense rulings, commendable for brevity and correctness. He favors the consolidation of Lodges, and says "it is much better that there should be one vigorous Lodge than two, weak in numbers, and especially so in active working members. We arc pleMed to record the consolidation of two Lodges under another name than lJorne by either: "Owhyhee" and "War Eagle" Lodges united and assumed the name of "Silver City." Good-" O-why "-should they not drop such names, and sail under something more suggestive. The Grand ]'laster concluded his very good Address in sound utterances, thus: There is a disposition on the part of some to overlook and forget thc fact that Masonry is based upoil the fundamental truths of God's revealed word-the Great Light of :Masonry. . Such a departure calls for prompt and decisive action, and should be discountenanced by all true Masons. AgaiJl, we frequently hear of Brethren being neglectful of their duties towards each other. In times of excitement discord arises among them, and they villify and calumniate each other. Let me entreat such to remember that they arc Masons; that the mission of our Order is ,. Peace and good will to men;" that assu,<;sins of character are worse than the persons who merely kill the body, for their work has the effect to spread a moral contagion which is worse than'poison to the body. A change in the Grand Secret.uyship is noted. We hope the new incumbent will give liS fuller exhibits of the fiscal affairs of the jurisdiction than has been done heretofore. F. E. ENSIGN, Harley, G. M. J. H. WICKERSHA]'f, Silver City. G. Sec.

ILLINOIS, 1881. Heretofore, a feeling of incompetency has caused us to shrink from the work of reviewing the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge or" Illinois, because of the large and eminently representative character of that jurisdiction and the ability of its leading :Masons. This year, a sense of fear comes upon us, overwhelming and crushing. '-\Ie have carried a life-long dread of the massive and large. Wc have stood awe-oppressed in the presence of mountains grand, and felt sureI)-'" If God's Eternal Throne

Hath pillars vast, this is one." We have a profound admiration' for a thrce-story'Saratoga trunk, and generally stand at Ii respectful distance when such a body is in motio~ or to be moved. We cannot do justice to the struggling and lofty feelings now striving for expression. There is no u~e in trying. lIencE', we despair of accomplishing the work before us, as we look Ilt the massive pile now claiming consideratioll. The immcnse body, when recein~d, had to he handled by a large force to get it up stairs, atHl into our office. As we cut off the wrappings and prized it around, so as to rcad its title, we found, "Proc'eeding;; of the Grand Lodge of Illinois." The volnnle contains nearly seven hundred pages. We never saw anything l-ike it in the line of Grand Lodge Proceedings. We think it has no" like: ness of things in heaven above, ill t~le earth beneath, or that is in the water under the


1882. ]

Appendix.

29

earth." The law-giver of old was commanded, amid the thunders of Sinai, not to allow 'i finy graven image or any likeness," to be made and worshipped, of things in the above named realms. We apprehend no dang~r exists as to makinf] anything like the journal before us, and, therefore, there need be no fears of idollitrous worship from any source. We may admire the spirit of labor prompting its prOduction, but we can nen'lr "bow down" nor .. worship" this .. vast creation." We are overcome with a feeling of muchness. Life is too short, time is too valuable and the weather too warm for Wi to attempt a review in proportion to the size of the journal claiI~nil1g consideration. Besides, we wish to reserve some space for the forty other Grand Lodge journals that follow Illinois in alphabetictH order. A hurried flight over the vast :1nd outlying fields of matter contained in the Proceedings under review, is all we can promise. If our wings fail us not, we hope to reach the bappy word, "Conclusion." Grand Lodge met October 4th, 1881, in Chicago, in .. Forty-second Grand Annual Communication." 1\L W. and Rev. Wm. H. Scott, Gr:1nd Master, present and presiding; R. W. Frank HUdson~ Jr., acted as Grand Secretary. The riame of John F. Burrill disappears as Grand Secretary. He had resigned as such oflicer during the year, and the Deputy Grand Secretary had been assigned his office until a successor could be duly elected. Finc1ing no .. Recapitulation" in the journal, we are not prepared to stllte the number of Lodges represented nor the exact number in the jurisdiction. We .infer that there :1re in existence over seven hundred Lodges. The" Tllbular Statement" shows a total membership of 38,lG8. This Grand Lodge pays its memhers six cents per mile and two dollars PCI' day, as compensation for travel and service. 1'11'0 results are thus gained: First-an unusually liberal annual representation. Second-a very generous pay-roll. OPENING.

The 1>rinted prayer of the Grand Chaplain, as it appears in the journal, was prepared, we presume, to be read. It is a clever prayer. ANNUAL ADDRE.<;S.

The Grand Master, Bro. Scott, presented an Official Report, covering twenty pages. He opened his Address formally, and indulged in some practical remarks. Then followed it tribute to our late President,.from whieh we make an extract: J desire in this brief notice of our loss to ask you, my Brethren, to grasp with a firmer purpose .your determination to press forward to the prize of your high :i\Iasollic calling. Our deceased Brother was a type of spiritual manhood to which all should aspire. It is not his exalted political prominence around which is be1ng gathered the fragrant evidences of love and admiration, but rather arouud a life of devotion to God, humanity and fraternity. Our Brother was a mall of largc attainmellts, ann with an intellect the peer of the best product of the nations-graced. withal, by a genial, grateful, truthful, loving disposition, that made his home the ~ymbol of that .rest which he has attained in the presence of the Father.

Tributes to other deceased Brethren followed, such as Brothers Lock.e, Holland. and Pace; of lllinois; Albert G. Mackey and Wm. G. Tonn, of other jurisdictions: An extended statement is furnished, of his administration, touching matters purely local. Some cigar making J[as~n (nhad stolen Masonic li~ery with which to serve his pocket.<;. Bro. Scott declared it "a base prostitution of our significant emblems to mercenary purposes." The emblems used were the square and compasses and the letter G. We have seen sl1ch "prostitution .of our significant emblems." On hotel signs, over saloons, on tobacco boxes :1n.d elsewhere, we have observed the square and compas.<;es and letter ll. and five points. Such users of our emblems should be prosecuted under the


â&#x20AC;˘

30

Appendix.

[Oct.

law concerning" false pretenses." If Masons, good and true, they wlll not violate our law, which forbids the use of such emblems. If not, they should be taught not to sail under our colors. But these are not the only "prestitutions of our significant emblems." We hawe seen these" significant emblems" upon the pel'sons of so-called Masons, who gave the l,ie to their significance or meaning by every aet of life. We cannot discover the consonance in wearing a blazing letter G, and profaning the name it symbolizes with every breath. The want of consistency strikes us with force. This subject challenges extended treatment and thought. But we are limited as to time and space. Grand Master Scott very kindly treated the subject of our troubles concerning New Mexico, recommending peace measures rather than non intercourse with Missouri. We express for our Grand Lodge-as well as personal gratitude-warmest thanks to Bro. Scott for his wise course and forbearing spirit in the premises. But for him, there might have been some action had which would have precipitated undesirable results. Missouri is grateful to him, and will not forget his earnest mediation, which was¡ fruitful as to the end in view. The Grand Master reported twelve decisions made during his term. All were approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence. except three, which were slightly corrected. The Grand Master's Address, taken as a whole, was worthy of its author. and ably sustains the well earned fame of those who have preceded him. With such Brethren as Lavely, Cregier, Robbins, Gurney and Scott at the helm, Illinois Craftsmen may feel the Grand Lodge is in safe hands, and the Grand East will reflect honor upon a jurisdiction that has but few equals. Our Brother-friend, Past Grand Master Robbins, presented a beautiful and eloquent memorial tribute in honor of the late Chief Magistrate of the Nation, Bro. James A. Garfield. We clip one part for our readers, as furnishing excellent thought. Bro. Robbins said: Among the great conservative forces of society, Masonry has stood foremost in inculcating respect for the civil magistrates and obedience to constituted authority. For this reason, if for no other, it is fitting that as we gather here so close under the shadow of the great calamity which hILS robbed our cou ntry of its Chief Magistrate, we should pame to place upon the records of our Grand Lodge some recognition of the event. But it is especially fitting that we should do this, because while we share in the common loss of a great and good and wise ruler, we mourn also the sundering of those endearing ties which bound him to us as a member of this great Fraternity. At such an hour we will not,'be('8,use of this special relation, claim that our loss is greater than that of others, nor our grief deeper, for who shall measure either the loss or the grief of a great people, bereft of the chosen one whose career in the high station to which they had called him had but just opened with the promise of a noble future. "I\'e will come only as equal mourners with them, and, standing reverently by the ~rave of James A. Garfield, with sorrowing yet proud and grateful hearts, thank God for a lIfe filled with that spirit of fraternity which is the ideal of Masonry, but which Masonry is swift to confess it cannot kindle. though striving ever to f~n into more vigorous life the spark already existing in the heart. 'The acting Grand Secretary, Bro. Hudson, in presenting a report from his office, closed with this notice of ~lis predecessor, Bro. Burrill: In closing this Report, the Grand Secretary deems it due to the Grand Lodge, as well as to Bro. Burrill, to state that upon assuming the otlice of Grand Secretary by the appointment of the.Most Worshipful Grand Master, on the 1st of September last, the books and papers were found in excellent shape. and Bro. Burrill turned overall the moneys belongmg to thc Grand Lodge as shown by his books. In fact, had it not been for Bro. Burrill's methodical and buisnC!'s-likc way of conducting the Grand Secretary's olIlce, it would have heen impossible for any onc to have taken up the work and carried it forward through the ~usiest month of the year with anything like success. , ' Such mention was just and proper. The Grand Lodge voted to donate, and authorized the Grand Master to forward to the Michigan sufferers by forest fires, the sum of one thousand dollars.

-....


1882.J

Appendix.

31

During the session, M. W. Bro. Geo. C. Connor, Grand Master of Masons in Tennessee, appeared as a visitor, and was introduced by Bro. Joseph Robbins and received with Grand Honors. The journal of this session of the Grand ,Lodge ab1unds with able Report,>, containing well digested matter bearing upon the local interests of Illinois J\-[asonry. We record with pleasure the re-election of our own friend and Brotber Scott. A new Grand Secretary, Bro. Munn, is now in harness. We welcome him to the Secretarial corps as a valuable accession. We hope he may prove as efficient as he is Loyal, and demonstrate the worth of his name by the superiority of his works. CORRF..8PONDENCE.

,..-

A new Richmond is in the field here. Bro." John Washington Brown" prepared and had printed, in advance of the Grand Lodge session. a somewhat lengthy (?) Review of Grand Lodge work in other fields than his own. The Report reaches the moderate (?) length of about five hundred pages. A good deal of the Review is written, and well â&#x20AC;˘ written, too, and the selections are good, affording texts for comment and amplification. We are not prepared to endorse all Bro. Brown has written, because we have not read edl he has wrttten, and probably never will. It becomes a question of time. We like sweetness long drawn out, but must have tirne to dispose of the S1J'eets provided. No doubt the Report is an able one'. We will not question it, for Bro. Brown is an able writer. But the m1tCl!ness overcomes us. A leading regret, present now, is that we cannot reciprocate'the courtesy shown :Missouri, and give Illinois as many pages as the Review awarded us. Thirteen pages of his Report are devoted to a notice of the Missouri jonrnal of 1880. The Proceedings of that year are most kindly noticed and commented upon, while numerous extracts are made from the doings of the body and from our Report on Correspondence. We like the \v.ay Bro. Brown treated the questiJn of "reimbursement."

He said:

A. daim, made by a Lodge upon another Lodge. in thejurisdiction, for reimbursement for money expended in relief of one of its members, was <:ollsidered, and it was decided that reimbursement should be made. Unless consent is first obtained, a Lod~e has no right to expend money for another, and demand reimbursement. If the assistance rendl'red is not intended as an out and out charity, imnlediate application for consent to the cxpemc should be made. and only so much as is authorized should be bestowed. Now, the'telegraphic and postal facilities arc such that there really is no excuse for extending relief in behlllf of another Lodge. before obtaining its authority so to do, and if such precaution is neglected, then no reimbursement sl'iould be expected or allowed. ;'IIodern Masonic" chro'ity" has become so much a "Imsiness" affair that it is difficlIlt to tell where charity is to be fouud. We confess ou:self to be in the dark. Concerning our New Mexico troubles, he had this to say, after quoting largely from our Report: l'Iissouri erred in recognizing New Mexico at all. She should, from the first, have held that the proceedings of the convention claiming to form the Gr.and Lodge of New Mexico were null and void, because they were not the united action of AJ.L of the Lodges interested. This would have saved her from thc appearance of inconsistency, and enabled her more efficiently ttl defend her r:ights. Missouri did err in recogniiing. New J\lexieo, and then allow her Lodges to remain there. Missouri saw her error,¡ and has corrected it. Missouri will never 'perpetrate another such blunder while hisUmJ lasts. She would not have fallen into the pit, had


32

Appendix.

[Oct.

Bro. Gouley been alive or had the present writer been at the helm. We are on record as to this subject, and will oppose any recognition of Grand Lodge sovereignty until said Grand Lodge can be sovereign, and suffer no divided authority. Bro. Brown gave thirteen pages to New Mexico. He was just, in that he had allowed the same amount of space to Missouri. No\v; as the questions at issue are out of court, we submit that the Reviewer cut down his extracts in proportion to the diminution of the subject. We are not willing to consume space with Bro. Brown's arguments on these dead issues, though he occupicd tepable ground and reasoned well. Nor have we time or space to follow him through his thirty-pagcd rcview of New York. Of course, the Connecticut affair elicited extended remarks, and required numerous extracts. But this case is also out of court. We presented, heretofore, our views in extenso on the New YorkConnecticut controversy. Kentucky and Tennessee are at peace. Dakota and Minnesota have no longer a case on the docket. Missouri and New Mexico are harmonious. Our ,. occupation is gone." Bro. Brown and this writer must turn attention to more quiet vocations than the controversies about sovereignty of Grand Lodges. From Bro. Brown's "Conclusion," we make one closing extract: It was our intention to write at length on a numbcr of topics not treated in the body of this Report, but we must forbear, as we have already occupied a hundred pages more than we intended to. It is true our Grand Master and Grand Lod~e have not prescribed a straight-jacket for us, and we can have our say in fnll if we WIll, still we must have due regard for propriety, and not make too much expense.

We are sorry Bro.路 Brown did not have a juller say, fearless of the straight-jacket. We would like to see him turned loose, and" write at length" on all topics claiming his thought. We believe he could prepare a Review of good dimensions. We appreciate his labors. He certainly performed a great task. We commend his work as deserving and creditable. But there is too much of it. REV. Wl\:I. H. SCOTT, Salem, G. M. LOYAL L. l\1U:NN, Freeport, G. Sec.

INDIANA, 1882. We are glad to welcome to our annual feast this biennial visitor. the usual size greets us after a two years' absence.

A journal of about

The Sixty-fourth Meeting of the body was held in Indianapolis, May 23d,1882. A "pid1l1路e".of the retiring Grand Master, Calvin 路W. Prather, strikes the eye as we open the journal. Why do not Grand Lodges grace their Proceedings with pictures of good looking Brethren, such as Grand Secretaries, instead of Grand Masters all the time'! For illStance take Bro. '''m. H. Smythe, Grand Secretary 01' the jurisdiction of Indiana. He was present at the late biennial meeting and should have been pictured as well as his Grand Master, Bro. Prather. . After an interregnnm of two years, Representatives from 475 Lodges assembled at the biennial meeting. Bro: Prather, Grand Master, ill opening his ~ddress, said: After two years we meet again to exam inc the work, renew our pledg-es of fidelity and draw our designs, that the Craft may continue to peacefully pursue theIr labor. We find our~elves happily situated-harmony and prosperity in our juriSdiction, on fraternal terms WIth all the Grand Lodges of the world, and a bright outlook for the future. Brethren, I con!!ratulate yon and the Masons of Indiana upon this happy condition of our allairs. Freemasonry has Jlourished in this Grand Jurisdiction, espeeially during


1882. ]

Appendix.

33

the past year. We have not been distressed by fires, floods, or storms; whilst many of our sister jurisdictions have suffered greatly; many Lodges have been broken up. and hundrecls of our Brethren in those jllrisctietions rendered homeless and penniless. We should, indeed, be grateful that none of these (lire calamities have overtaken us, and with Masonic zeal show our sympathy to those so sorely tried, by relieving them as far as is in our power. . He reported that eight Lodges had beeTi formed under Dispensation, while a dozen chartered Lodges had ceased to exist. Some Lodges had consolidated. He quoted at length from the j\[asonic Advocate "he views of Bro. Martin H. Rice, and made them his own, respecting c. perpetual jurisdiction." The views arc in accord with those we have promulgated and defended for )'ears in our annual reviews. His necrologieal I ist embraced the honored dead of the country among our Brotherhood. He reported a few decisions which quadrate with well settled usage and principles of Masonic jurisprudence. The happy adjustment of our New Mexico troubles formed a topic for congratulatory mention. He closed by presenting some very practical and salutary" Recommendations." Not the least interesting was an earnest recommendation that mileage and per diem be reduced, as railroads and hotels always reduce their rates on Grand Lodge occasions. His idea was that money should not" be made out of attendance upon the Grand Lodge." We know such to be the fact, however. Some who attend Grand Bodies make more money out of their attendance than they ever realize in the same length of time when at home. Ero. Prather stated that the amount paid to Representatives over and above their actual e:rpenses amounted to three thousand dollars. A soft thing for Representatives but death on Grand Lodge finances. He recommended a reduction of mileage to three cents per mile, instead of five, and two dollars per diem in place of three, and the continuance of biennial meetings. The latter was adopted and the Grand Lodge will not hold another stated communication until MaY,1884. The reduction proposed in piy to the members did not reduce. Oh, no! Once give Representatives to the Grand Lodge a taste of mileag-e and per diem and we defy any power on earth to choke them off or reduce their income. The showing as to their finances was good and encouraging. 'We cull this gratifying statement from the Report of Trustees, in which it is shown that $31,333.34 had been paid on their debts in two years: This is certainly a grand showing; nearly one!t.ldrd of the entire debt wiped out since last we met ill this hall, substantial proof of the wisdom of the Grand Lodge in adjourning for two years. Permit us again to renew the recommendation of two yell,rs ago, that when this Grand Lodge closes, it stand adjourned until the 2ith day of May, 1884. By so doing, at least one-half of the remaining debt eaTi be canceled, the balance of which can be paid ill full 011 or before the first day of February, 188i, the date of the final maturity of the same. This is the last adjournment that the Trustees will recommend, for the simple reason that there will be no occasion to do so again, as after May 2ith, 1884, the custom of holding annual meetings of the Grand Lodge can be resumed. The Trustees apPreciate keenly the sacrifices that are being made by the Craft in depriVing themselves of the pleasures and benefits of these annual meetings. but it has been clearly shown bv the experience of the pa;;t two years that it is the shortest and most direet way to get out of debt, and to this end we should direct our energies. No harm has come to the Craft and no department of Masonry has suffered on aeeount of the last adjournment, and we know of no rcasOl! why the Grand Lodge should not be governed in this matter by sound business principles when the benefits to be derived from it arc of so much importance ,to the membership in general and the Lodges inparticulal'. What we here promise can and will be faithfully carried out. A vote for adjournment is a vote to save ten thouscrnd dollan; to the Masons of Indiana.

APPEALS.

A case is reported which challenges our attention. A party was charged as follows, 路and expelled, RlId then appealed to the Grand Lodge: G. L.-Ap. 3.


34

[Oet.

Appendix. 1. The accused

d~nies

the existence of God.

2. The accused denies the existence of the Supreme Ruler of the Universe. 3. That the accused publicly renounced his trust in God. 4. That the accused pUblicly expressed contempt for Masonic invocations to Deity. 5. In effect same as last. 6. In effect the same. i. That the accused declared openly that he did not care for Masons or Masonry, or for his own standing in that regard. ,

8. That the accused pUblicly declares contemptuous opinions of the fundamental principles of Masonry. The accused

~led

six reasons for a reversal of the verdict. We give them:

1. The charge and specifications are unmasonic.

2. The proof is not sufficient to warrant conviction. 3. The- Worshipful Master erred in his statement of Masonic Law. 4. The specifications were Dot proved by the witnesses. 5. A Lodge cannot expel a Brother for atheism after he has been made a Mason. 6. Wind Prayer constitutes no part of Masonry. The jljth reason came near knocking us down, and the si.'Clh took the" wind" out ofour sails. The Committee on "Grievances and Appeals," after a long and patient examination, presented an able report, and concluded their labors by noticing that stunning (sixth) reason, th us : " Wind prayer constitutes no part ~f Masonry." The committee have endeavored to arrive at some reasonable conclusion as to the meaning of that singular proposition. It would look as if impertinence was intended. We can hardly believe that such was intended. To indulge in impertinence and frivolity indicates coarseness in mental and moral texture, most especially when it occurs in the eourse of proceedings of a legal character.

.

If the' accused employed the above sentence as an outcropping of a newly-born prejudice and by way of slur, we can submit to it. The proposition in its most charitable construction does not amount to anything. However blinded by zeal, or however anXIOUS one may become, reason and proper respect for the opinions and the considerate conduct of others, arc rules of life that ought to obtain. Masonry has no uneonservative principles. Masonry scorns the fanatic, and is silent in the presence of a scold.

We fully believe that a Mason who proclaims an utter disregard for his own respectable standing as such, is guilty of un masonic conduct. Secondly, we believe that one who is a 1)1'onounccd atheist ea,nnot besustained in Masonry; not that it would be in itself a cnme, but it would be contrary to all Masonic usage, incongruous with Ma-Honic sincerity and solemnity, and ill violation of the fixed and 10llg established principles of Masonry. The action of the Lodge whieh expelled the nameless crcat.ure above mentioned, was approved, and his anti-windiness may go hence, without day, having 'no longer a case in court. And all t.rue Masons every whcre will applaUd the finding of the COIDlllittee and the action of the Grand Lodge of Indiana,.


1882.J

Appendix.

35

CORRERPONDEN'CE.

A genuine Report was furnished by Bro. Wm. Commons, covering about one hundred pages. it reviews Missouri fully and ably for two years-I880 and 1881. We copy this from his Introduction: Your Committee on Correspondence would respectfully report that the work of reviewing the Proceedings of corresponding Grand Lodges has been delayed by the tardiness with which said Pro('eedings have been received. And inasmuch as our Grand Lodge held no meeting in 1881, a double amount of work has been thrown upon this committee. We trust, however. we have performed the work assigned us with some merit. and to the satisfaction of yourself and of the Grand Body over which you have the honor to rreside. It bas been our cndeavor to present this review in as condensed and practica form as possible, using no superfluous verbiage, and so compiling the proceedings and annotating the rulings and decisions of the several Grand Bodies and Grand Masters, as to make this report of some utility to the Craft; and as we bave studiously avoided occupying space, we respectfully ask that you will recommend to the Grand Lodge its publication. Though called on to perform" double duty" in reviewing most of the Grand Lodge Proceedings for two. years, yet capably and ably was the work performed. Again we bid our Indiana Brother" good-bye" for two years, with best wishes and kindly greetings. BRUCE CARR, Indianapolis, G. M. WM. H. SMYTHE, Indianapolis, G. Sec.

INDIAN TERRITORY, 1881. The journal before us is a complete volume of all the Proceedings from 1874 to the present. It contains a history of the organi:mtion of the Grand Lodge, and is a reprint of Proceedings. The Seventh Annual Session convened" in the town of McAlester, Choctaw Nation," November 1st, 1881. 111. W., P. J. Byrne, G. M.; R. W. Rev. J. S. Murrow, G. Sec: We find on the roll fourteen chartered Lodges and one Under Di8pensation. There is a reported membership of 411, with an income for dues of $570. There is manifest evidence of improvement and growth in the jurisdiction under review. We trust the moral tone of lIfasonry has been improved and elevated above its former standard, as represented by Bro. Murrow a few years ago. 'l,Ve look for such elevation under the labors and influence of Brothers Murrow, Buckner and others, of pure lives and high standing. The Grand Master reported that the Craft was steadily growing in prosperity and numbers in the Territory. Two Di:;pcllsations had been granted for the establishmcnt of new Lodges. One decision was reported, defining who could be elected Master of a Lodge. Thc decision is a simple recital of an old rule. Bro. Murrow, Grand Secretary, presented an extenoed Report, furnishing "'a full exl1ibit of the fiscal affairs of the Grand Lodge.


36

Appendix.

[Oct.

·We see a resolution was adopted authorizing the Grand Secretary to have printed "the Report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence." We have not seen the Report. .As i~ was to be printed with the Grand Lodge Proceedings, we presume it was forgotten, as it does not appear in the journal. Under the head, "Report of Committee on Foreign Correspondence," we find the following: . This Report was received. and a part read, including a resolution recommending the Grand Lodge of New South Wales. as folloWs: WHEREAS, It appears to your committee that a Grand Lodge of Masons was greatly needed in New South Wales, and that a number of Lodges did effect such an organization there, which has enjoyed a vigorous, prosperous and useful life : therefore,

-

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of the Indian Territory recognizes the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New South Wales. A. F. & A. M., a.~ a Sovereign Grand Masonic . Body, and welcomes her into the Sisterhood of Grand Lodges.

"Only this, and nothing more." CHAHLES E. GOODING, Colbert, ,G. M. J. S. MUHROW, A-tok-a, G. Sec.

REV.

IOWA, 1882. A neatly bound and beautifully printed volume of more than 400 pages is before us for consideration. It contains the doings of the Thirty-ninth Grand Annual Communication, in addition to the Report of the Committee on Correspondence (180 pages). And we may mention here that there are" Biographical Sketches of Distinguished Masons" found in the journal before us of exceedinR great interest. In this department we find the names of Brothers James A. Garfield, President of the United States; Giuseppe Garibaldi, Past Grand Master of Italy; Dr. Edward A. Guilbert, Past Grand Master of Iowa; Robert F. Bower, General Grand High Priest of the United States, and James L. Gillis, a hero of "Morgan times." Exceedingly fine and well executed steel engravings of President Garfield, Dr. Guilbert and Companion Bower embellish the Iowa journal, in connection with the aforementioned biographical s·ketches. The Grand Lodge. whose Proceedings we now have under review, met in Des Moines, .June 6th, 1882. M. W. Bro. George R. Van Saun, Grand Master, presided, and R. W. Bro. Theodore S. Parvin was Grand Secretary. Three hundred and ninetoen Lodges were represented. There are 383 working Longes in the Iowa jurisdiction with an average membership of fifty-three, aggregating Hearly twenty thousand in the State. Fifteen Lodges were chartered, and four are Under Dispensation. Grand Master Van Saun gave an offidal account of his stewardship in a well prepared and somewhat lengthy Address, it being nearly nineteen pages. Following his exordium.,eame a detailed statement of the business part of his administration. He reported the constitution of eleven Lodges, put to work under charters granted by the Grand ,Lodge at its previous session.


1882.J

Appendix.

37

On the subject of granting Dispensations for the formation of new Lodges, he had this to say: To grant Dispensations for new Lodges has been a subject upon which I havE! reflected and studied assiduouslv, with a desire to arrive at!l just conclusion in each case presented, in order that no wrong might be done to Brethren applying and at the same time protect our Institution from unnecessary increase of Lodges numerically. MallY Grand Masters in sister jurisdictions have deemed it to be to the interest of Masonry in their several jurisdictions to refuse entirely the granting of Dispensations for new Lodges, and many writers on Foreign Correspondence have given utterance to the same views, and have gone so far, even, as to state that those Grand Masters referred to have exhibited a great virtuc in refusing to grant them. Well, this may be so; if so, thcn I do not possess that so-called virtue, and must suffer accordingly in the estimation of my Brethren. I am surely as much opposed to the undue multiplicity of Lodges, merely for the sakc of making a few more Masters and the simple accommodation of a few of the Brethren who may apply, as the writers to whom I have referred, but when needed I have felt it my duty to grant their requests. On account of Lhe building of new lines of railways and the extension of many others in our State, many new towns have sprung up and rapidly developed, so that it would have been simply an injustice to the Brethren at many of these places to have ignored their wishes and refused their requests. The middle ground view is the best. Some Grand Masters cannot say "no," and hence they grant the requests of all petitioners who may come along. They seem to think in this, as in rendering decisions, that a big list will give character and eclat to their administration. The next Grand Master takes an opposite view, goes to the other extreme, and vetoes everything that is in sight, refusing aU applications. The Grand Master of Iowa had the good judgment to strike the medium between the extremes. He wrote wisely, because conservatively, on the subject. On non-affiliation as a "prevalent mala'dy," he said: I would therefore recommend, as a partial remedy at least, that we treat our non路 affilillted Brethren not as outcasts, but us men and Masons, make our lodge-rooms pleasant and attractive, our ceremonies interesting and instructive, extendillg to them a fraternal greeting and a Brotherly welcome, and, by our own correct living and doing, so draw them to us that they will be obliged, by their own volition, to become again united, living, active members of our Order. He pronounced the system of mileage as it obtains in Iowa" an unmitigated evil,'~ and ought to "be abolished." We are glad one man can be found who has t~e courage to speak out against this "unmitigated evil." ''\T e presu1ne some of the" prerogative" champions and advocates will gnash their teeth and howl promiscuously when they read the views of this Iowa Grand Master. He speaks so positively that all may know that he means business. Having received many requests to grant the privilege or perform some act' wholly inconsistent with the laws and regulations, he said:

Strange infatuation on the part of many Brethren, that a Grand Master is greater than the Grand Lodge which elected him, and has authority to set aside its laws and regulations at his will and pleasure. In answer to such communications, I ha.,.e answered that when I was honored by being elected to this high and honorable position and installed therein, I did not receive any manifestation of power which would permit me to violate our laws any more than any member of a subordinate Lodge, but rather that I recognized and felt the responsibility of the trust reposed in me, and was the more strongly pledged to obey those laws myself, and to see them duly executed by the Craft, In my humble judgment, a Grand Master is simply the servant of his Grand Lodge. His prerogatives are to breathe the pure air of heaven, as other Masons should; to perform the duties of his office in accordance with the Constitution and By-Laws which he has vowed to uphold and see duly executed; to live uprightly before God and man, and thus, by a consistent Masonic life, afford the best example for his Brethren to follow. We beg to say in approval that the above is in good, clear, strong, plain English, tersely expressed, and fits our views perfectly, We applaud the writer of such sentiments, and join in their propagation. Our fight has been" single handed" against


38

Appendix.

[Oct.

this "]Jrerogatit'e" humbug. Away with it, or else abolish all laws enacted by Grand Lodges to regulate and direct Grand Masters in their official work.. They are either lLnder law or are above it-independent of it. If above law, why the mockery of having law? If ttnder law, down with this" prerogative" bosh, and let Grand Masters govern according to LAW, and not be ever prating about prerogatives. We think Bro. Van Saun has dealt this prerogative claim a blow, the effects of which will be felt in the coming years. On Lodge visitations, the Grand Master said: Believing it to be the duty of the (}rand Master to visit the subordinate Lo<lges for the purpose of instruction in the ritual and jurisprudence of our Order. I have. so far as time and opportunity would permit. visited mauy of them. seeking to impart the little light and knowledge I may have obtained in the past. and thus instruct and enconra~e the officers and members to renewed effort for the purpose of maintaining the high position which we, as Masons. occupy. In this good work I have been sustained and supported by our worthy Grand Secretary. who has accompanied me on two or three extended tours in different parts of the State, and by his able efforts have given such ,instruction and advice to the Craft. . He closed an exceptionally good Report, as Grand :Master, in these words: There is one mark of honor to' which I aspire, and which I hope by my own efforts to attain at the hands of my Brethren, which I look forward to far more highly than any yet bestowed-a legacy to be left to my children-and that is, when I shall be called from the labors of earth to the mansions above, my Brethren may truthfully say of me: "He died as he lived-a just and an upright Mason." " The purest treasure mortal eyes behold Is spotless reputation. That away. Men are but gilded loam, or painted clay." His Address was followed by full and complete Reports of other Grand Officers, such as Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary and Grand Librarian, together with a most readable " paper on the fraternal dead," by Bro. Parvin. A very interesting and eloquent tribute was paid to the. memory of Bro. James A. Garfield by Bro. E. A. Guilbert, Chairman of Committee. We note in the Proceedings that a resolution was defeated, which proposed to pay no more mileage for three years. The Grand Lodge authorized the purchase of the library of the late Robert F. Bower, General Grand High Priest, said to be one of the most valuable collections of'the kind in the world. The Proceedings of the Iowa Grand Lodge are very interesting throughout, and all the affairs of the Grand Lodge show the presence and impress of good hands and clear heads. CORRESPONDENCE.

As already mentioned,' a Review of 180 pages was prepared by the toiling, hardworking, untiring Bro. Parvin. It was written, not extracted. He uses his pen, not the scissors. He gave to Missouri the benefit of four pa~es, and referred to his resignation as the Representative of Missouri at the Grand Lodge of Iowa. His rca..~n seemed, to himself, just and proper, and we will not question it, no more than we would his honesty or sincerity. As the Representative of Miswuri at the Grand Lodge of Iowa, Bro. Parvin thought our Grand Lodge would bounce him, unless he would defend Missouri's action concerning New Mexico. As he would not defend Missouri, but proposed to criticise her indefensible course, he feared that famous committee. of Missouri, would obtain a judgment of ouster against him. So lIe left (resigned) before being ousted. Well, we like his


Appendix.

1882.J

39

independence, but think his fears got the better of him, as to what Missouri might have done. Our Grand Lodge would no more have rebuked him for criticising our policy on the New Mexico controversy than this writer would have approved it. No, not a bit of it. Our Brethren finally got to see the real status of the question, and then declared for the right.' We had a hard fight to secure the result. Our Grand Lodge would not have condemned Bro. Parvin for criticising our mistaken course. No more would it have taken such a step than would this writer defend the rulings and course of rickety officials, whose decisions were distinguished more for numbers and repetition than for originality and knowledge of jurisprudence. . He said, concerning the non-representation of Missouri: Let the Grand Lodge of Missouri recall her threats held over her officers, and permit them courteously and fraternally to speak their own opinions, whether they coincide with those held by herself or her Grand Masters, and Iowa will gladly return to her "first love" and her "mother's house." To which we reply that the" threats held over her officers" by the Grand Lodge of Missouri are like moonbeams on the north side of a tombstone in Iceland, at midnight. They I1rc as powerless in effect as the creature whose wounded honor demanded a little salve when said " threats" were enunciated. This is true, so far as the present writer is concerned. Said writer has never abated his utterances or failed to speak, courteously, his" own opinions" freely. Iowa can return to her" first love" and her" mother's house" at pleasure, and will be welcomed as warmly as she received our blessing thirtynine years ago. As to repeating said" threats held over her officers," we would have them stand monumental of the folly of pandering to spleen, and marking a momentary triumph of personal spite. The authors of both havc met their reward. Owing to limitations upon us-self-imposed-we cannot copy or even mention the many interesting points found in Bro. Parvin's remarkably able Address which have arrested our attention. We clip one comment with which to close. In. reviewing the Kansas journal, Bro. Parvin said: The Proceedings are marred (disgraced we had almost written) by the published reprimand of a Worshipful Master and member of the Grand Lodge, from which we extract a choice bit: .. The evidence was conclusive that yOll were not only in a place of bad repute, but engaged in business derogatory to Masonry, disgraceful to the Lodge of which you are Worshipful Master, and dishonorable to yourself as a man and a citizen." For this, he was only reprimanded. But thcn he is a Worshipful Master; had he been some insignificant member, and untitled, he would doubtlessly have been suspended or expelled. Alas! pity 'tis true that the higher the officer and the more advanced the guilty be, the more the leniency extended him for his misdeeds. It ought not so to be. Such men and Masons should have the punishment quickened and increased, for they sitl against much light and knowlcdge. However, as Iowa is a "glass house," we must not be too severe on ourKansas Brothers. The above is severely just. GEO. B. VAN SAUN, Cedar Falls, (re-elected) G. M. THEO. S. PARVIN, LL.D, Iowa City, (re'elected) G. Sec.

KANSAS, 1882. The Twenty-ninth Annual Communication of the Kansas Grand Lodge convened in Topeka, February 15th, 1882, and was opened in AMPLE FORI-[.


40

Appendix.

[Oct.

M. \V. William Cowgill. Grand Master, present and presiding; H. W. John H. Brown, the indefatigable and irrepressible Grand Secretary, being at his post. A large delegation from subordinate Lodges, with Past Grand Officers and Past Masters were in tlttendance. From Bro. Brown's Summary, we learn tbat there are now 208 chartered Lodges in that jurisdiction, with an enrolled membership of 9,241. Grand Master Cowgill presented a thoroughly business Address-commenced when be began, and quit when he was done. But few official visitations had been made by him, "business engagements" being the" only excuse" assigned. Still, he magnified the importance of "official visitations." He reported slow progress in disseminating the work. His remark is a proper one, that" the practice of conferring degrees out of time is one that should not be encouraged." We are not inclined to repeat former utterances or reproduce arguments of other days against '.' the practice" above mentioned, but it is one we delight to jolt on every occasion, and feel good always after hitting tbis "practice" that ought to be outlawe,d. The Grand Master granted permission for nineteen new Lodges to be instituted Under Dispensation. He called attention to a matter which strikes us as strange, in view of the length of time the parties resided in the community without being found out as impostors. We copy, as follows: I wish to call the attention of our Lodges to a class of Masons, found in almost every community, who claim to he members of Lodges in good standin~ in other jurisdictions. These Masons visit our Lodges some times for years, and wben asked to get their dim its, and put in their petition for affiliation, nearly always have some excuse. I have had experience with two of this kind during' the past year. One has been an active worker in one of our Lodges for seven years. In fact he was well instructed in our ritual. and the Lodge could hardly work without him. "Vhen asked to get his dimit and affiliate, he would promise to do so. but never did. When questioned about his standing in his Lodge in Indiana, as was frequently done, he said his Brother was keeping his dues paid up, and that he knew he was all right. Finally I concluded to investigate the matter, and wrote to his Lodge to find out his standing. and in due tim~ I received a reply saying he had been expelled for unmasonic conduct for years. In another case a party had been visiting for eight or nine years, and claimed to be a member of some Lodge in Iowa. Investigation revealed the fact that he had been suspended twenty-five years. We only have this to say: Investigation was good at lw;t. Why not investigate at to prove his claim to good standing?

ji1'St, and give the Brother a chance

The best view we have ever seen in print, we find containcd in the following extract,' concerning"':RESTORATION FROM SUSPENSION FOR NON-PAYII1ENT OF DUES.

Our laws for the restoration of a. Brother who has been suspended for non-:(>ayment of dues are the same a.s if suspended for some other cause. A Brother who IS under suspension for non-payment of dues may pay up, and if he docs not ask to be reinstated, he still stands suspended. Or he may ask to be reinstated, and the Lodge may refuse to reinstate him. This, in my judgment, is not as it should be; and I wish to submit a few brief suggestions on this suhject. Sup~ose the Lodge should refuse to reinstate a Brother after payment of his indebt~dness, WhICh is a] ways possible, then he would continue to be punished when no cause exists, for suspension is intended as a punishment. In this case the Brother would be punished simply because he had once been (ielinquent with his dues. .If the payment of his dues does not restore him, the Lodge, to be just, should not receIve the money. The Inws of Masonry are supposed to be humane and just; but there is certainly no justice in punishing a Brother when no cause exists.

'--'"


1882.]

Appendix.

41

Suspension does not take away membership, it only puts it in abeyance; it takes away certain privileges, and these privileges cannot be taken away without fault on the part of the suspended Brother; then, when this default is cured, his Masonic rights should be restored. When a Lodge suspends a Brother for non-payment of dues, the intention undoubtedly is that this s\lspension shall last only so long as the Brother remains in debt to tbe Lodge for his dues. On this assumption it follows that the Lodge intends to restore him to good standing when he pays his dues. Then wby require him to pass through the ordeal of a petition, a reference to an investigating committee and an election to carry out the intention of the Lodge when payment should restore him. In t.he by-gone centnries, whe'n 'harsh and barbarous laws tolerated imprisonment for debt, the payment of the debt always ~ave the debtor a right to his freedom; and should we who are proud of onr fraternal lel1lency and justice, in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, standing in front of all the past ages, in all that humanizes and ennobles our race. be more harsh in principle? When the Brother has paid his dues, his offense being removed, what motive exists for an abridgment of his rights. The cause having been destroyed, why contiriue the effect? " What it is our duty to do we must do because it is right, not because anyone can demand it of us." We bave copied the foregoing in full from Bro. Cowgill's Address, because it presents a fair, candid and unanswerable line of thought, such as is not met witb in a lifetime. We have heretofore fought and denounced the unjust and (we believe) iniquitous custom of holding Brethren SUbject to ballot, in order to restoration after payment of dues for which they had been suspended. We will ever oppose the odious practice. Grarid Master Cowgill deserves commendation for his bold, manly and outspoken views on this important subject. We had boped his views would win approval and eUcit favorable legislation. But the following extract from the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence points in another direction: Your committee are of the opinion that, as the Grand Lodge, as shown. by its legislation, has considered that the punishment by suspension is not too severe for the offense of non-payment of dues, that the provisions of Section 42 of the By-Laws, for the restoration of a susp'ended Mason, afford a reasonable method for his reinstatement to all the rights an? privIleges of membership. . We bave not seen "Section 42 of tbe By-Laws" for the restoration of suspended members, and do not know its terms. But we would guess its meaning, and that is, that a Mason suspended for non-pa.yment of dues can only be restored to good standing by ballot. 'rhis is clearly iJ,1ferable from the fact that the committee did not adopt the Grand ~Iaster's views, but clung to "Section 42 of the By-Laws," saying" the punishment by suspension is not too severe for the offense of non-payment of dues." The punishment is not out of proportion to the" offense," we admit, provided the law would remove the penalty when the cause for punishment has ceased. But we fraternally submit that when dues are paid, and the cause for which a Brother was suspended ceases, to still bold him liable to a baUot in order to regain standing in his.Lodge, is more than "severe." It is both cruel and unjust. We presume our Kansas Brethren do not mean to be exacting, but they are" severe" in requiring something more than payment of money. Our patience would be severely. tried by such a law in our jurisdiction. But why argue the case. They would not be convinced if one should rise from the dead, and plead for a different rule after rejecting the views of Grand Master Cowgill. Three hundred dollars had been sent to the Michigan sufferers by the Grand Master

ad interim. Brothers Albert G. "Mackey, Allen H. Crowe, Grand Master of Nova Scotia; Dr. J. 1\f. Austin, Grand Secretary of Kew York, and President Garfield were well remembered in appropriate tributes by Grand Master Cowgill.


42

Appendix.

[Oct.

DECISIONS.

Thirteen decisions were reported, and were sent to the Committee on Jurisprudence. That committee approved all, e'xcept two. REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY

Brown was more than figures, being extended, suggestive and practical. REPRIMANDED.

Charges having been preferred against the Worshipful Master of one of the Lodges, his trial came before the Grand Lodge, when he was found guilty, and a reprimand was ordered. Said reprimand was given, and ordered printed in the journal of Proceedings. We copy it. The Grand Master said: It is anything but pleasant to perform this duty imposed by the Grand Lodge, yet a decent regard for the character and dignity of the Fraternity in this jurisdiction requires that the acts of its members, es:pecially those of the Worshipful Master of a Lod~e, which in any manner disgrace or brmg it into contempt, should receive its unqua.llfied condemnation.

Bro. Myron A. Wood: Three charges were preferred against you; you appeared before the Commissioners, testimony was introduced both by the Lodge and yourself, and on the conclusion of the examination all the papers, testimony and proceedings were duly sent up for final action by this Grand Body. Though there was some testimony against you upon the first and second charges, the Grand Lodge voted you guiltless. Upon the third, the evidence was conclusive, that you were not only,.in a place of' bad repute, but engaged in business derogator)' to l\Jft~onry, disgraceful to the Lodge of wliich you WllS Worshipful Master, and dishonorable to yourself as a man and citizen. The punishment is light compared with acts committed, but as you have already suffered by deprivation of office and consequent humiliation, I will only add, if you entertain an abiding respect for our beloved Institution, you will in future so demean yourself publicly and privately, as in good measure to wipe out the stain upon your own character and that gratuitously inflicted upon Masonry. We dare to venture the remark that the penalty was not in proportion to the offense, as hinted a:t in the reprimand. The following Special Report, by Bro. Brown, Committee on Correspondence, was adopted: Your Committee on Correspondence beg leave most respectfully to report that we have been officially advised of the final and very satisfactory adjustment of the unhappy difficulty that has existed in the Province of Quebec from its organization. We, therefore, offer the following preamble and resolution. WHEREAS, The obstructions to fraternal intercourse between the Grand Lodges of Quebec and Scotland have been removed by the judicious action of the latter, we extend our hearty congratulations to these two Grand Lodges on the final restoration of that peace and harmony which should ever characterize all Masonic bodies; therefore, Resol'ved, That the follOWing resolution, adopted by this Grand Lodge at its annual communication in 1879, be and the same is hereby rescinded: Resolved, That all Lodl$'es and Master Masons subordinate to the Grand Lodge of Kansas are hereby strictly forbIdden to admit as a路visitor, or aid in charity, or in any manner hold Masonic intercourse with an)' person or persons hailing from or holding membership in any Lodge in the Province of Quebec until they first exhibit a certificate of good standing, properly attested by the Secretary of some Lodge subordinate to the Grand Lodge of Quebec, said certificate to be further duly authenticated by the Grand Lodge of Quebec.

We do not understand the Why and wherefore of the last resolution above. An Oration was delivered during the session, and is found in the journal of Proceedings.


1882.] ·

Appendix.

43

CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. John Brown, Grand Secretary and Committee on Correspondence, presented a review of the Proceedings of fifty-one Grand Lodges, and noted four" absentees." There is a vast amount of good reading found in the one hundred and seventy-three pages of small type before us in his Report. We do not read everything in these reviews, but it is easy to find the good things in Bro. Brown's writings. He reviewed Missouri, for 1880, fully and fraternally, copying from that other Browne (Joe), who was Grand l\{aster. He replied at length to our critique on their Jurisprudence Committee of the previous year, and says we misapprehended the committee. So be it. We thought we understood the committee, and argued against their position accordingly. We dislike to misrepresent or mistake things, just as much as we regret being in error as to any subject. We certainly thought the committee meant what their language conveyed. Our· misapprehension shall certainly not be credited to their want of explicitness and lucidity ... Bro. Brown always furnishes a good Review, made up of terse sayings and judicious selections. His" Conclusion" is the soberest, best Conclusion we have seen. He sounds Dotes of wisdom that must be heard: But disguise it as we may, what threatens the intef{rity of Masonry most, and therefore is the ground of greater apprehension, is found within the ranks of .the Brotherhood itself, Causes now operating and daily gaining strength, whose effects already produce three-fourths of the troubles which Masons are forced to encounter. unless suppressed by • fearless, vigorous hands. can but produce still greater disorders, if they do not end in irreparable dislocations of the Fraternity. The fact that over twenty-five thousand membersfull one-twentieth of the Fraternity"in this country-have been suspended within less than two years, is startling evidence that hasty and inconsiderate action f!ItS too long been the rule in the admission of candidates, and in the financial management, of Grand Lodges. The rapid increase of non-affiliates also occasions no little anxiety. and well may when it is understood that in every jurisdiction they are numerous-in some equaling from one-fourth to one-third of regular membership of the Craft. These things are not the outcome of chance or accident. There are causes for both, which are not far to seek. We would copy more, were it allowable. The Grand lifast€r and Grand Secretary were re-elected. Bro. Cowgill lives at Freedonia; Bro. John H. Brown, Grand Secretary, at Wyandotte.

KENTUCKY, 1881. The Eighty-second Annual Communication was held in Louisville, October 18th, 1881. M. W., W. L. Thomas, Grand Master, presided; R. W. Hiram Basset. Grand Secretary. Four hundred and eighteen Representatives 'were present. That number of representative ·Masons ought to do a great amount of business in three days, inasmuch as they received three dollars per day and eight cents per mile for the trouble of going to and from Grand Lodge. We think twelve hundred and fifty dollars per day in the way of expense, simply as per diem allowance, ought to call forth good work from the best talent in the commonwealth. It is to be inferred that such is the case, as Kentucky Masons cling to the grand luxury of a large sized paY-l'oll-only about $9,000 for 1881. Reduced rates of 'travel and board ought to present an inducement to Brethren to attend Grand Lodge, when the members receive three dollars per day aud eight cents per mile in the way of


Appendix.

44

[Oct.

compensation. We wonder how mu~h clcar money Brethren make out of Grand Lodge attendance? We mean the economical Bret.hren. We have.known some members who attended Grand Lodge that could exhaust any treasury in the land, and then borrow money to get home on. And we have seen such during the sessions only twice-first, when they enrolled, and second, when the paY'ToU was in order. How much other l'oll they had could not be told. as their whereabouts were not known by those who behaved themselves. Enroll aud pay constituted their Alpha and Omega. The membership in Kentucky seems to have fallen off within the last few years. as that jurisdiction only reports a little over fourteen thousand. The decline numerically has been by thousands. An Address of merit, fourteen pages in length; was presented by Grand Master Thomas. He had found it necessary, soon after entering upon his official career, to issue a "circular" to the Lodges in thc jurisdiction. It covcred many vital points. He reported some decisions, which arc as correct as he could make them under existing laws. His prayer seemed to be for latitude under the law to rule differentl)-. " PREROGATIVES."

The Grand Master is a man after our own heart on the subject of " prerogatives." We are happy to find Olle Grand Master beyond the limits of Missouri holding views such as we have advocated for years. Bro. Thomas is a "stalwart" on this subject. Hear him: The prerogatives of the Grand Ma"ter is a subject that has been largely discnssed by several of my predecessors in office. Upon my election I at once carefully examined the law upon this subject; and with the Constitution so clearly before me, together with the reports of the various committees 011 jurisprudence submitted during" the last few years. I became satisfied that this Grand Ll)rl~e only intended its Grand l\fll.ster to "enjoy all t.he powers and prerogatives conferred by the ancient constitutions and the usages aud hllldmarks of the Craft, subject to the provisions of this Constitution" (Art. V., Sec. 2). 'While I may differ largely with the Grand Lodge on this provision of her Constitution, still I felt compelled, in compliance with my vows of office, to ri~idly adhere to her laws. Hence 1 have invariably declined to grant dispensations to "confer degrees Ollt of time," to "hold elections at times different from those required by 111w," to ,. hold special elections to fill vacancies," etc. He speaks as follows of "OUR DEAD."

Since our last meeting, the hand of death has been busy in our midst. Several whom this Grand Body had delightetl to honor have been called from us. Bro. J. O. JollIIston, who had served this Grand Lodge in various occupations for many years; Bro. W. D. Hopper. whose valuable services we had'so long enjoyed; the venerable Bro. A. G. Hodges whose familiar face was so well known by the members of the Grand Lodge; Past Grand Master Wintersmith, who served the Grand Lodge so faithfully in days gone by, have all been summoned to the Grand Lodge above. I regret that I have not suflieient data at hand to enable me to give to the Grand Lodge a brief sketch of the Masonie history and services of each of these Brethren; but I suggest that a committee be appointed to obtain the necessary information, and that suitable obituary notices be prepared, and that a memorial page be set apart for each of them. An extended and most interesting sketch of the Widows' and Orphans' Home is found in the Grand Master's Address. It would repay reading if we had space for it. We give a paragraph. It is an appeal that touches our heart. How deeply it must have stirred Kentucky Masons, none can tell: I have endeavored, my Brethren, in a small amount of space, to bring before your attention the interests of the Home. Mud} more could be said. You have, by your generous contributions, completed the building, furnished a small portion of it, and crcllted an endowment fund which, by the most (~areful management, will only yield hll.lf enough to support the present inmates. The qucstion is with )'OU. The Board of Directors have


1882.J

.I1jJpend,ix.

45

not only given~ tbeir labor of love, but are among tbe largest contributors to the institution. Somethmg must be done. The eyes of your Brethren throughout the world are upon you. You cannot go backward. You cannot stand still. Upward and onward m ll~t be your cry. The cry of the orphan is still heard in our midst; the distress of the widow is still abroad in our land; the eye of the detased Brother is still looking down upon us from his far away home. Oh, my Brethren, ean you resist their appeals? You have never faltered yet. Now, when so near the cO\'l~tcd spot, with our eyes Just beholding the bright and beautiful consummation of our :;upplications and prayers, with the light of the new day just dawning upon us, can we hesitate, can we pause? I know Kentucky Masons well cnough to answer for them. 'The trouble herctofore mentioned by us as worrying our Kentucky Brethren, caused by Grand Treasurer Hodges (now deceased), seems likely to end in victory for the Grand Lodge. Grand Lodge property of large value had been hYP0thecated by the Grand Treasurer, without show of authority. When the Gmnd Lodge claimed its 100 shares in the Masonic Temple Company, the bank holding saill stock refused to give it up. Suit was commenced for its recovery, and the finding of the Chancery Court was in favor of the Grand Lodge. Unless the case goes, by appeal, to a higher court, the Grand Lodge ' wiII have no further annoyance. WHY IS THIS

,

THUS?

We have observed for years an abuse of a sacred trust, on the part of Grand Lodge olflcials, that has been as surprising as painful. We allude to the Grand Treasurers who have cllused the loss of Illultiplied thousands of money belonging to the l\Jasonic'Fratemity. Our own jurisdiction has a history-not written-and silence, though golden, may not be just. We will not repeat the history of our losses. But why these losses? Other jurisdictions have suffered, as has ours. CamlOt these defalcations be prevented? Have we not Brethren of business qualities and brains sufficient to guard the funds of the Brotherhood? In the annual representation of our Grand Lodge, there is business capacity and talent enough to run banks, and manllge the affairs of a commonwealth. Why this oft recurring trouble about Grand Lodgc funds'! Two reasons appear to our view: First-Too great h.aste in looking after these interests at Grand Lodge meetings. Second-Overconfidence in Brethren whom 'we consider worthy of our SUffrages. Masonry, as sneh, is :Masonry. Business i.s business. One is not the other "b)" a large majority." The defalcations of Masonic officials occupying positions of respomibility, having sacred trusts in charge for others, have destroyed more fUlly the confidence of many of the Fraternity than all other causes combined. This wrecking of confidence ought to cease; and to stop it, is tv render it impossibe. It can be done. How? Not by locking and guarding' the stable after the thief has gotten away with the horse. The custom has been to select some reputable Brother, of representative standing and w'orth. As Grand Treasurer, he receives the funds, holds, and uses them in his bus'iness, without bond or any kind Df security. A collapse comes, his business fails, he goes into bankruptcy, and carries with him all the funds placed in his hands. Thousands of ow' money went into his business. Had success, instead of jail1lre, been his reward, we would not have been benefited by the use of ,our money, beca.use we were not" time depositors," and received no interest. Then, why allow the use of our money? This use of other people's tru~t funds is where much of the trouble arises in our financial affairs as a Fraternity. It is true of the custodians of funos of subordinalâ&#x201A;Ź, as well as Grand Bodies. We have gone to such custodians of subordinate bodies with duly authenticated orders for money, and have been coolly informed, "I CllDnot pay you now; my aCCoulll is overdrawn in bank, just at present, as it is the first of the month-ca1I again." We left, wondering what that" account in bank" had to do with Lodge ,funds. Our ignorance excused the delinquency. But subsequent information cleared UlJ the mystery. :Masonic funds were deposited to the 'ind'ividual f.l'edit of the custodian aforesaid. And when the aforesaid custodian of l\Ifisonic funds fails in business, the funds aforesaid, like the Dutchman's pigs, "dey coomes up missing." We most fraternally submit that the custodian~ of Ma.sonic funds, whether belonging to Grand or subordinate bodies, have no


46

Appendix.

[Oct.

rigId to use such funds for any purpose otlter than that for which they were intended. Such custodian {Ucepts the trust with a full knowledge and understanding of its nature. It is not his money. Rut, after a few such failures, put your Grand Treasurers under bonds. Yes, lock the stable now, and save the next horse. Very well. Put the Grand Treasurer under heavy bonds. What of it? In order to obtain securities, the Treasurer aforesaid will ,often agree to deposit the funds with the bondsmen in their bank, etc. They enjoy the privilege of handling our funds, and pay no interest, the use of their names being deemed sufficient compensation in the way of interest. Then they fail, the Grand Treasurer has nobody behind him, and must suffer, if solvent. If not, the Grand Lodge loses all. Then there is some more hasty legislation, and some more attempts to lock the door. If these results and conditions were not so frequent and so serious, we would gratify a strong propensity to laugh. A Grand Lodge or other Masonic body should never permit the 1JSe of its funds, except to meet its own liabilities, without assuming the sale responsipillty for their use. We would therefore have our Grand Lodge, by its Grand Master or by a committee, select a place of deposik order the Grand Secretary to place all funds there to the credit of the Grand Treasurer, furnishing him the deposit ticket as cash, and take his, receipt for the amount said ticket shows. The Grand Lodge thus selects its own depository, and becomes its own depositor. If the depository thus chosen by the' Grand Lodge 'becomes insecure, or fails, the Grand .Lodge, having made its Qwn selection and become its own depositor, .!Jas no one to blame, the Grand Treasurer is exempted from responsibility, and bonds are no longer what they are, simple delusions and mockeries. Why a Grand Treasurer should be held responsible for funds deposited in a bank, when it fails, if he has done all in his power to secure a safe and reliable depository, docs not yet fully appear. We¡ would wish to be excused from carrying â&#x20AC;˘ responsibilities under such circumstances, when, by no fault of ours, the funds might be lost. We hope Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri and other jurisdictions will learn wisdom from unfortunate experience-yea, from" the things which they have suffered." The Grand :Master rendered the following decision; Fifth-Is it necessary that there should be seven Master Masons present before a Lodge of Master Masons can be opened? Of course I was compelled to decide this question in the affirmative, and only refer to it now for the purpose of saying to the Grand Lodge that the law rcquiring seven Master Masons present, before a Lodge can be opened, is working a very great hardship on many of the country Lodges. The old law, only requiring three to be present, seemed to meet the views of many Lodges much better than' the present regulation. A Lodge with a small membership, in the country where the membership is scattered over a large territory cannot always secure the attendance of seven. Business of importanc~may have to be neglected; the Lodge may have to go by several stated meetings without a quorum to open and transact the business. The Master, with four or five of the leading- spirits of the Lodge may assemble time and again, anel have to go away without being able to transact any business, and thus the intcrests of the Craft sutter. It does seem that the old idea of ,. three or more," would meet all exigencies and produce less dissatisfaction. As long as the law stands on the books, as at present. . of course it must be enforced. He decided according to law, that seven Master Masons must be present in order to open a Lodge of Master Masons. Though the law compelled him thus to decide, yet he demurred, and argued against the law, and begged the question in .. a feeling and sensible manner." If only .. three" Master Masons can be found .. faithful amOllg the faithless" and lukewarm, who will attend at the time and place of meeting, the sooner that Lodge is numbered among the dead, the better for Masonry ill that locality. We speak on general principles. However, the Committee O!l Jurisprudence sustained the law which required the presence of seven. A suustitute was offered for the Report on said decision, as follows: It is the sense of this Grand Lodge that three Mastcr Masons, members of a Lodge, inclnding the Master or one of the \'Vardens. may open a Lodge and tramact business; and that all former decisions of this Grand Lodge conllicting with this view are hereby overruled.


.!lppend.ix.

1882.J

47

Strange to say, this substitute for decision five was adopted, allowing three Master Masons to open a Lodge and transact business. After the substitute was incorporated into the Report, the Grand Lodge ~/ifuscd to adopt the Report as thus amended, The decision-number five-was then taken np and adopted, thus maintaining the law requiring seven to open a Lodge. This was wise and proper,but it seems to have required a long trip around Robin Hood's barn" to get in at the original door. II

LOTTERY BUSINESS.

The Grand Lodge of Kentucky has enjoyed lottery privileges," granted by the Legislature of the State many years ago, and still has the franchise. We have heard and read milch about the" lottery business," but never understood until now that a Grand Lodge of Masons was tbe original title-bolder and present beneficiary of a lottery scheme. We presume the end was intended to justify the means in raising money. We are not informed as to what 1t.~e the money realized from the lottery business was applied. We condemn the means without hesitation, and denounce the lottery schemes of the days as adjuncts of gambling hells, if not the very hells themselves. 'We would blush for :Missouri Masonry, were such schemes as this Kentucky lottery affair a part of our history. II

CORRESPONDENCE.

The Annnal Review was prepared by that veteran writer and Mason, Bro. Robert Morris. It covers ninety pages, and contains notices of over fifty Grand Lodge journals. The Review is terse, but unusually brief, for Robert Morris. He clips much and comments hurriedly. We are amused at the following reply to Bro. Parvin, of Iowa: Bro. Parvin said that" all the Masonic world takes the Tennessee side in the Tolliver case." Is tbat so? We will lay a wager, our old hat against Parvin's, that we will get the private opinion of fifty-four Grand Masters in the United States upon an assumed case of Masonic law that shall embrace all the points in the Tolliver case, and fifty of them will favor the decision of Bro. Pettit and the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. Come, now, Theodore; back up your judgment. Don't say, becl1.use you are an elder in thc Presbvterian Church, you don't bet. So are we. So is our Past Grand Master Campbell iI. Johnson. So is our Past Grand Master John H. Leathers, all three of us, elders in the same church; but so reckless in defense of Masonic j ustice that church rules are nowhere with us, when it comes to the honor of old KentUCky. Not being a member of the Presbyterian Church, as arc our distinguished Kentucky and Iowa Brethren above named, but a Methodist, betting, with us, is out of order, and we are excluded from the pool proposed between Robert and Theodore, with Brothers Johnson and Leathers a.'i stakeholders. Nevertheless, we tell Robert that Theodore will take his hat and all his spare change on the above wager. How anybody, except Robert Morris and Kentucky Masons, can take sides against Tennessee in the Tolliver case, is something beyond the comp'rehension of the present writer. Of us, he says: Concerning- Kentucky, for 1879, Bro. Vincil is dignified and courteous. He snvs that Bro. Pettit's Addre..'is is a good business document, free from all clap-trap. and particularly praises his circular to the Lodges. In the Tolliver case, Bro. Vinci! considers that 'l'ellllessee was right. and that every Mason is amenable to the Lodge within whose jurisdiction the act complained of is committed. In support of this opinion, he gives an extended argument, Hut no one knows better than he that the other ,~ide can array large authorities. We forbe:~r only for want o( space. Are always glad to have Bro. Vincil's opinions, even though adverse t,o our own. In our remarks, in 1879, concerning the various Grand Lodge quarrels, the printer or the (printer's) d - l mixed things sadly, running Missouri against Dakota, Quebec against Indian 'l'erritory, and New Mexico against all creation. This gives Bro. Vinci! an opening for wittlcii"ms, and only for his kindly heart he might have touched us more severely. Of one thing we feel confident, that, as all the other Grand Lodge quarrels are now settled, this betwecn Missouri and - , the other Grand Lodge, whichever it is, will soon bave a quietus.


48

Appendix.

[Oct.

Last year we touched up that" Tolliver case," as we did in 1880. We askcd Bro. Morris to notice our position in 1880, and answer our arguments. He says in reply: ,. The other side CAN array large authorities." But" the other side" did not array evcn small "authorities." It therefore remains to show where .the "authorities" are to be found adverse to the position of Tennessee on the" Tollivcr case." We are in the market to purchase all such authorities at a premium. As to the" Grand Lodge quarrel" between :l\1issouri and New Mexico, we are glad' to inform Bro. Morris that we are at peace with "all the world and the rest of mankind." The Ncw Mexico case is out of court forever. Bro. Morris closed his brief and pleasant Report thus: We understand, as this form is closing. that mcasures were taken last wcck in the Grand Lodge of Missouri to settle. the difficulty with New Mexico, on terms honorable to both. God grant success. Your prayer is answerd. All is well. The Review mentioned was of our journal for 1880. What Bro. Morris will say of us, when he reviews our Proceedings for 1881, remains to be seen. We arc unable to find any appointees of the Grand Lodge in the journal, and therefore cannot say who was appointed Committee Oil Correspondence. We presume Bro. Morris will still be hcard from. WM. H. MOFFAT, Louisville, G. M. HIRAM BASSETT, Millersburg, G. Bec. H. B. GRANT, Louisville, Ass't G. Sec.

LOUISIANA, 1882. The Seventieth Annual Grand Communication of this Grand Lodge commcnced in New Orleans, February 13th, 1882, and continued in session five days. 1\:1:. W. Bro. Wm. R. Whitaker, Grand Master, presided, and R. W. James C. Batchelor, M. D., was Grand Secretary.

Sixty Lodges were represented. Wc find no rccapitulation, and cannot affirm the number of Lodges in that jurisdiction, but judge that there are some two hundred, with a probable membership of about five thous~nd. Thc journal before us is an admirable one, in keeping with Bro. Batchelor's former productions. Louisiana, Iowa and California stand in the front, so far as superior Grand Lodge journals constitute pre-emincnce. Others are good, but none better. The journal now under revie\v opens handsomely, with a splendid picture ,of Grand Master Whitaker, followed by an intercsting sketch of his public and Masonic life, written by thc Grand Secretary, Bro. Batchelor. â&#x20AC;˘ THE ANNUAL ADDHESS,

By Grand Master Whitaker, is a very readable paper, though devoted to business. lIe p~id eloquent, yet 'simple tributes to the worthy 2'fasonic dead of the year closed, " whosc labors for Freemasonry have made their memories precious to the Cmft." These werc cnumerated a.<; James A. Garfield, Grand Mastcr Allen Crowe, of Nova Scotia j


路1882.J

Appendix.

49

Dr. Albert G. Mackey and Dr. James M. Austin, Grand Sccretary of New York. There were several deaths alifm'ig the leading members of the Fraternity in Louisiana, which were mentioned. with tender regard, such as Wm. McDuff, }'lllit Warden; Geo. W. Race, Past Grand Marshal; Charles 1. :Martin, Grand Tyler, and Wm. A. Brainerd, Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence. . In closing our brief review of Louisiana laSt YE:lar, we playfully said: Bro. Brainerd's Report covers eighty-three pages, clear open type, much shorter than the Review of Bro. Whitaker in 1880. but none the less interesting. We are glad he did not do as two other Correspondents did, who preceded him-say "Ja7'cwell" just after. we were introduced. He will be heard from again, and we shall be delighted with a continued acquaintance. As his predecessor, Bro. Whitaker, was struck by Official lightning, Bro. Brainerd rna)' be in danger, and "fall from grace" ere long, by giving up the reportorial quill for the gavel in the Grand East. Alas! that death should have caused many a sad "fa7"C'wcU" ere the year was half gone, and our newly formed acquaintance is broken forever. "He will be heard from" no more. The pen is still, the hand is COld, the tongne is silent. "The gavel il\ the Grand East" will never be wielded by him, nor call him to labor again. He is 'at refreshment, and res~ with others, called from labors. Of him, Bro. Wbit4ker, the Grand Master, said: Bro. Brainerd's record was both brilliant and solid. He had few, if any, superiors as a Masonic lecturer, and gave much of his time to bestowing information upon the work to his less informed Brethren. He organized a permanent Lodge of Instruction, and his labors there will prove a lasting benefit. He was enthusiastic in this field, and had, in an admirable degree, the faculty Of imparting to others that which he so clearly understood. As a Masonic writer he had made all excellent record by his Report on Correspondence last year, and it was with more than ordinary satisfaction that your Grand Master, after much solicitation, obtained his consent to serve as Chairman of the Foreign Correspondence Committee for another year. The value of his work in this connection is well attested by the universal commendation of the leading Masonic reviewers of the country. Death has deprived us of his services, but he has gone to his reward. FINANCIAL,

The Grand Master had this to sa): of their financial affairs : The financial condition of the Grand Lodge has decidedly improved since our last . annnal assembly. I have seen no occasion to deviate from the plan of action followed .by my recent predecessors, concerning the management of our a~sets. Careful economy in expenditure, and diligence in the collection of income, with the constant rise in the market value of our real estate, havc produced gratifying results. Of the condition of the Craft he speaks thus: The reports of the District Deputies, so far as received, show a general, though not very marked, change for the better in the condition of Freemasonry in Louisiana. While apathy is too prevalent, there are many indications of a revival of the ancient spirit and renewed prosperity is occasionally rewarding the efforts of the zealous and judicious. Certainl}' decadence is no longer the rule, and the prospect is improving, The Lodges of InstructIOn are not serving their intended purposc. When the experimellt had the charm of novelty, it was measurably successful, but that day has gonc by. The law is extremely strict relativc to the attendance of Lodge officers, but it is generally disrcg'llrded. J thad better be repealed, if it cannot be enforced. Summonses are too serious thll1gs to be trifled with, and if they can no.t be generally made effective in carrying out the system of Lodges of Instruction, it is far better that they should not be issued. It is useless to look for the causes of failure, when the failure js so absolute. Eight hundred dollars had been cont.ributed to the relief of the Michigan sufferers, by tlle Lodges, and one thousand dollars had been forwarded by the Grand Master from a relief fund in the keeping of the Grand Lodge. G. L.-Ap. 4.


Appendix.

50

[Oct.-

.JOINT OCCUPANCY.

The Grand Master had been badly handicapped by a law in existence as to joint occupancy of halls. As we, in Missouri, are threatened with such an ironelad rule, we copy Grand }faster Whitaker's remarks: .. Our law positively forbids Lodges holding their sessions in rooms occupied by other secret societies. Dispensations permitting the practice III some calies, where the circumstances rendered it manifestly expedient, had been granted by my predecessors. At the last Annual Communicat.ion. the Grand Lodge insisted upon the enforcement of the law. The evident purpose of the Grand Lodge was to forbid the future issuance of such dispensations. Without discussing the question as to the power of the Grand Muster in the premises, I suggest that the rule be so modified us to recognize the right of the Grand Maliter to permit" joint occupancy," where the interest of the Craft, in his opinion, may require it. 'Vhatever may be the opinion of a Grand IIJaster, as to the extent of his authority, the positively expressed wish of the Grand Lodge. in a matter of this kind, is not to be lightly disregarded, and yet the rigi~ enforcement of this law works serious harm to a number of Lodges of excellent standmg. The enforcement of the proposed rule among our Missouri Lodges will result in the of a large per cent. of our good working subordinates, and will cripple many others, We shall oppose the proposed enactment, which is as indiscriminate as it is without reasop or justification.

total e.l:tinct1:on

The Grand Master presented the following, touching" Foreign Relations:" Nothing has occurred to impair the amity of our relations with any of the Masonic jurisdictions with whom we are on terms of intercourse, The Gra.nd }faster of Quebec communicated to me last July the gratifying information that all difficulties between his Grand Lodgc and that of Scotland had been settled, by the enrollment of the Scotch Lodges under the Quebec registry, and the resumption of intercourse.

,

RECOGNITION.

The Grand Lodge of Colon and the Island of Cuba was fraternally recogni7.ed. The following was adopted: Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Spain (Juan Antonio Perez, Most Worshipful Grand Master) is hereby acknowledged as the supreme authority over Symbolic "Masonry in Spain; a.nd we tender our fraternal salutations to¡ that Grand Body, requesting our Most Worshipful Grand Master to take the necessary measures to secure an exchange of Grand Representatives. â&#x20AC;˘

We are not prepared for the recognition of Spain as a Grand Lodge, We have our reasons. REPORTS

From the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were full and complete, shOWing a good fiscal condition of the Grand Lodge. Bro. Batchelor's annual exhibit is one of the best we have seen. CORRESPO~DEI'CE,

As already noted, Bro. Brainerd, Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence, had been" called from labor" early in the year, The preparation of the Report devol ved upon a new and inexperienced committee. Bro. John G. Fleming presented a lengthy and well arranged Review, covering over two hundred pages, thirty-five of which were devoted to extracts from other writers concerning Foreign Grand Bo'7iies. Of Bro. Brainerd, his predecessor, Bro. Fleming had this to say: I now come to the saddest/art of my work: to speak of that good man and whose place I have been calle to fill.

MlL~on

'

To R. W. Bro. 'Wm. Albion Brainerd was assigned the task of writing the Report on Foreign Correspondence for the Grand Lodge of this State. On the lith of last June he

suddenl~' died

of the effects of sunstroke,


1882.]

Appendix.

51

Were it not tbat it is wrong for man to repine at the will or complain of the dispensations of his Creator, I could not help but wish that he might have been spared to discharg-e the duties allot.ted to him, and read the many pleasing, even high eneomiums that have been paid his lll..~t year's report by his contemporaries throughout the entire Fraternity. It was not alone by his writing that his good qualities were made manifest, it was also in the daily walks of life; and so far as it is possible for man to judge of his fellow-being, but few have ever lived who will have fewer offenses to answer for when they a~)pear before thatjudg-ment. seat, to which his spirit has gone. The noble example of hIS life-his pure and spotless character, is a rich heritage to his children and his Masonic Brethren, Of the work assigned him he said: Some six months ago I was appointed to write this report, and notwithstanding the fact that our Grand Secretary, Dr. Batchelor, and Grand Master 'Whitaker, have afforded me every facility, and rendered me all the assistance in their power, I have fO\lwl the . time too short to read and digest-even to my own satisfaction-the voluminous proceedings submitted for review; and hence, have confined myself to a grcat extent to the consideration of the addresses of Grand· Masters and action of Grand Lodges, and have not shown that attention to the Foreign Correspondence Reports, their merits entit1e~ them to: 'Rut, because I have been limitl~(l to a short time, it does not by 1I,ny means follow tha I would, or could have accomplished an enviable success, even if I had been given two years to do it in, .

,.,-

For a man that lectures, or writ€S, there are two ways to achieve success; one is to convince his audience or his readers that he is thoroughly Master of the subjects he discusses; and the other is to make it manifest that he don't know anything about them. In the latter way he is likely to secure the most notoriety, because critics and commentators generally prefer to have something easy to dissect and controvert, and would rather tackle a fool thlLn a philosopher; as in doing so, it is much easier for them to make a display of their own limited knOWledge. For a novice, Bra, Fleming clips extensively, discreetly and pleasantly-sometimes amusingly. We would not like to see a Review from his pen, provided two years had been given to do it in, for fear he might throw the Illinois Review into the shade, with its fit'e hundred pages. "Woodman! spare that tree," But we hope to see a Review from Bro. Fleming" next time," when, unlike the present writer, he will not be so hurI;ied as to do more excerpting than writing, Bro. Fleming gives Missouri the benefit of jull ten pages of his Report, and places us under obligations that we appreciate, but cannot now reciprocate'. Numerous and extended extracts arc made from our journal for 1881. lIe has a clear-and comprehensive knowledge of the Missouri and New :Mexico controversy, now happily ended, Bro. Fleming treated the subject in a manly and fraternal spirit. He concluded his review of the SUbject thus: Thus, it will be perceived, Missouri has asked New Mexico to withdraw its sentence of excommunication against Silver City Lodge, so that the last named may take the place she lon~ ago should have chosen, and New Mexico has withdrawn her edict against MissourI. Further information has reached us upon the subject, and we can hardly hope that the ban has already been lifted from Silver City, and that she has assumed the station of one of the constituents of the Grlllld Lodge of New Mexico; but the spirit lately manifested by both the parties to the controversy gives promise that au accommodation will be reached, that disagreements will become matters of the past, and that the Mother Grand Lodge and her high-spirited offspring will bc('ome fast friends. For the good of tbe Fraternity-so mote it be! Thus will a calamitous breach be healed, and the doctrine of Grand Lodge sovereignty be established more securely than ever. Doubtless Bro. Fleming has learned before now that this whole disturbance has given place to peace and good will. The" Mother Grand Lodge" has done what she ought to have done foul' years ago. Then" her high-spirited offspring" would never have had occasion to say hard things about the "old folks," anll we would have been "fast friends" from the beginning. The whole trouble grew out of a lilunder at the start on our part as a Gra.nd Lodge. Weare glad to announce that Bro. Fleming is Chairman of the Correspondence Committee for the next term, The Grand Mast:€r and Grand Secretary were both re-elected.

..


52

Appendix.

[Oct.

MAINE, 1882. We llre glad to have the Maine journal for 1882 in such good time. The Sixty-thinl Annual Session began its labors in Portland, May 2d, 1882. LMt year we received only one copy, and that after writing for it. M. W. Marquis F. King, Grand Master, presided, and the veteran R. W. Bro. Ira Berry was "Recording Grand Secretary." , Representatives were present from 169, out of 181, Lodges in the jurisdiction. The membership foots up about 19,000 in Maine. This is certainly a splendid showing, giving an average membership to each Lodge of one hundred or thereabout. The Address of M. W. Bro. King, covering eleven pages of the journal, is a business paper of merit. He was evidently under the gentle influence of spring-time and flowers while the poetic elements of his nature simply bubbled over. He said: We meet at a season of the year when nature, after an apparent rest, is springing into 路new life, manifesting everywhere a fresh activity, and taking to itself new forms of loveliness and beauty. We are thus reminded of the fresh life and higher beauty which we should ever seek to give to the labors which are demanded of us as fellow Craftsmen here, not forgetting to humbly acknowledg-e our dependence upon the God of nature and of life, and with faith, offering the prayer of the psalmist of old, "Let the beauty of the Lord our God be upon us; and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou it." After reading the above, our readers ;,vill justify the statement already made, that. the poetic in him was stirred. In further proof,we submit the follOWing excerpt: It becomes my very agreeable duty to welcome you to our Sixty-third Annual Communication; to welcome you to

"the beautiful town That is seated by the sea," Which has the pecular honor of having bcen the birthplace and early home of America's great poet, whose voice hM been so recently stilled in death. I "But the poet's memory here Of the Landscape makes a part; Like the river, SWIft and clcar, Flows his song through many a heart." The condition of the Craft is thus stated: We have occasion to congratulate ourselves at this time that the condition of our Fraternity is so generally prosperous; that no dissensions have arisen to disturb our peace and hinder the successful prosecution of the purposes of our Institution.

,

.

He then a<1<1ressed himself to business in a man1,1er convincing and evident that he knew what business was. A statement of various interests, that had claimed his attention, followed. On joint occupancy of halls, he presented the following sensible and practicable talk: May I not call your attention, at this session, to the question of joint occupancy of halls? Many of our Lodges have poor apartments, others have good buildings, nominally their OWI1, but actually sutlering under the burden ot debt, and very many have

--"


1882. J

Appendix.

53

their influence seriously impaired by being compelled to devote the greater part of their income to the payment of rent. The amount of time that any hall is actually required for Lodge meetings is very small, and I am not aware that it has ever been deemed unmasonic to admit the profane as visitors to our apartments; in fact, this has been made a source of revenl,1e in some instances, and no objections made.. It is true that we dedicate our halls in the most solemn manner to Freemasonry; but this does not prevent the building being' sold for other purposes, and the Lodge moved to other apartments, to be in-like manner dedicated. We not only dedicate our hallS to Freemasonry, but to Virtue and Univ~al Benevolence; and might we not in many cases promote the interest of the former, by perIIlitting our halls to be used for purposes not Inconsistent with the two latter? He referred to the Michigan sufferers, and announced that contributions had been made for their relief by different Lodges in the jurisdiction. One Dispensation had been granted for the formation of a new Lodge. No decisions reported. We presume none were rendered. We would infer that such a jurisdiction as Maine needed but few deeisions now. After being under the tutelage of such Brethren as Drummond imd others for many years, the laws ought to be well high perfect and the Brethren thoroughly trained. Honorable mention was made of a velemn in the following terms: . As an event worthy of notice, the Deputy of the Seventeenth District reports that he installed into the office of Junior Warden of Cumberland Lodge, Bro. Charles Megquier. who, fifty-five years before, was installed into the same office. This is one of ~)Ur oldest Lodges. It has been the home of the silver tongued Greenleaf, the philanthropic Fessenden, the nmiable True, and many other distinguished Masons; and he, I believe, is now their eldest Brother. Bro. Megql;ier was a member of the Masonic State Convention, held in Portland in 1843, and served upon the" committee raised to address all the Lodges in this State, upon the subject of Masonry Eenerally, and recommend that all the I\Iasonic bodies be represented in the Grand Lodgoe of Maine." Of those who formed that convention, I think that Brothers Megquier, Charles Fobes and William F. Safford, the two latter members of Ancient Landmark Lodge, are all that are left. Long may they be spared to us in the full" enjoyment of the.happy reflections consequent upon a well spent life." I am ~ratified to be able to say that Gen. Megquier is here to-day, able and readi to perform hIS offieial duties. Take him by the hand, Brothers; it will do you good, and he likes it. _ . He recommended that the names of Past Grand Masters be placed upon the pay-roll, as the wisdom nnd experience of such Brethren would be of,ralue to the Grand Lodge. We, of Missouri, adopted the above suggestion one year ago, and we are glad of it. He concluded thus: In closing, permit me to call your attention to a recommendation worthy of conMost路 Worshipful Charles A. Welch, to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts:

~ideration, of

"There is a large number of Past Masters in this State who have been members of the Grand Lodge. Many of them still retain a warm interest in its affairs; others have, perhaps very naturally, lost their interest in a body in which they are in no way directly represent~d. and of which they possibly think they have no great chance to be members. I have heretofore recommended, and I now, after reflection, recommend with more confidence, that the Worshipful Past Masters of each Masonic District be authorized to elect one of their number to be a member of this Grand Lodge." . Under the Missouri law, all actual PMt Masters who Il,re members of Lodges are members of the Grand Lodgc. The Committee on Return~ reported that there are 181 chartered Lodges in the jurisdiction, 177 of which had made returns. These were commended, for the most part, as to promptness, and the care with which they had been prepared. A slight falling off in the membership was reported, but there was an increase of work. Memorial tributes were presented and approved, honoring the names and worth of several deceased Brethren.

..


Appendix.

54

[Oct.

A Report from the Committee on the" Doings of Grand Officers" was presented by our friend and good Brother Edward P. Burnbam, Past Grand Master. He recommended: 1. That tbe Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters be not printed tn juU, but only abstracts thereof.

2. That mileage to District Deputy Grand Masters and Past Grand Masters be not paid, on account of insufficient revenue. Laid over for one year. 3. Adverse Report to increasing

th~

membership of the, Grand Lodge. Approved.

4. Reported against changing the "present doctrine as to perpetual jurisdiction over rejected candidates." Laid on tbe table for one )'ear. 5. "Would recommend no attempt to define what otber degrees in Masonry are proper to be received in our State." Approved. 6. "Approve granting power to Lodges to appear in pUblic, at the request of the civil authorities," on specified occasions. Laid over. Bro. Burnham also

pre~ented

the following, which was adopted:

The Committee on Doings of Grand Officers, having considered that part of the Address of the Grand Master in relation to the death of President Garfield. our Masonic Brother, recommend that a page in our printed Proceedings be devoted to the memory of our deceased President. On joint occupancy of halls, the following was adopted, as presented by Bro. Josiah H. Drummond: ' That application to a Lodg-e for joint' occupation of their ha.11 by another society, shall be granted only by a two-thirds vote of the Lodge, the application having been laid over from one stated meeting to another; ]J1'ovided, however, that in special cases the Grand ~laster may give permission to act upon such application at any stated or special meeting, if he sball find sufficient cause therefor. CORRESPO~DENCE.

The Annual Review on Correspondence was furnished by Bro. Josiah H. Drummond, Chairman of the Committee. It had been prepared and printed in a'dvance of the session, and was distributed to the members of the Grand Lodge. Covering 160 pages, it is an able and faithful review of the doings of all the Grand Lodge Proceedings received by the committee. Bro. Drummond always reviews fully and impartially. He regrets want oj time necessary to write more in preparing his Reports, instead of stringing together a lot of extracts. WeJl, Bro. Drummond, we are in a similar fix, and would never furnish any Report at all if we had to write everything. Like yourself, we "sigh that we cannot command time" to do like Bro. Parvin, of Iowa. We cons01e ourself thus, however: There are so maIlY good things 'in the Proceedings of other Grand Lodges that we can have for the ta!i-ing, that we prefer the extracts to our own sayings, knowing them to be much better. Bro. Drummond gets the laugh on Dr. Parvin,. after this wise: We have had our little langh. The Grand Master states that he had issued Dispensations to new Lodges, "giving them such .Mu.8onic names as they had selected or as I could find suitable and appropriate." The Grand Secretary devotes nearly two pages to "Names of Lodges," in WhICh he praises the "happy thought" of Grand :Master Guilbert of givVlg to now Lodges only Masonic names, and congra,Lulate.c; his Grand Lodge that since tbis policy was adopted, with few exceptions, I10ne but Masonic names had been permitted to enter into the Temple. The Committee 011 the Grand Secretary's Report " heartily approved" what he said in regard to names of Lodges. But the Grand Master granted a Dispensation to VENUS Lodge; and the Grand Lodge, upon the recommenda路

'.".


1882.J

Appendix.

tion of the Committee on Charters, ordered a charter to issue to VENUS Lodge. Of all ,the names-but there, wc call1lot do justice to the subject. But it did strike us as very fnnny, that in the very Proceedin~s in which the Grand Master, Grand Secretary and committee took pains to make such sensible and commendable remarks in relation to the names of Lodges, we should find tbe record of the creation of one with that name. Well, we should say the Maine committee had a "little laugh" at the expense or'the Iowa Brethren, and we have enjoyed it greatly. A year ago we had our laugh at Bro. Parvin and his Lodge names. "Give him a rest." . Bro. Drummond reviewed our Missouri Proceedings for 1881 in a four-paged notice, for which we are grateful to him. His treatment of our Missouri follies respecting New Mexico are in keeping with his very manly and Brotherly course hitherto. He does not approve the action of our Grand Lodge in reference to occupying halls with "other secret societies of the day." Neither do we. Our temper is of a sort to pronounce the rule adopted one year ago, and then suspended for twelve months, an outrage upon the rights of the Lodges of the State. This constant infringing upon their rights in everything is unjust, and 'we protest in their name and behalf. We do not believe, however, that our Grand Lodge will fasten this odious rule upon-the Lodges of Missouri. Speakingof our Report for 1881, Bro. Drummond said: The Report on Correspondence (112 pp.) is again presented by Bro. John D. Vincil. To us, its interest is vastly diminished by the fact that the law of his Grand Lodge requires him to defend the action and decisions of his Grand Master and Grand Lodge, although, in his view, they may seem erroneous and wrong. As we read, we are hannted by the query, "Is this Bro. Vincil's opinion, or is he defending his Grand Master or Grand Lodge?" . The imprisoned Paul, at Philippi, said to his frightened custodian: "Do tbyself no harm-be not alarmed." So say we to Brothers Drummond, Parvin and others. Above, you have "Bro. Vincil's opinion" of a rule foisted upon tl~e Craft by the" Grand Lodge." 'Ve have spoken our" opinion" of it, and will not defend it or the" Grand Lodge" that passed it. This is .. Bro. Vincil's opinion." As to "Bro. Vincil defending bis Grand Master," he has had no occasion to do otherwise during five years, with one exception. Some men and things are indefensible. We are in a mood to say that when dealing with m.anly m.en, we never have any trouble. We have yet to meet our first difficulty with gentlemen. Bro. Drummond may .always mark" Bro. Vincil's opinions" as his 0101ÂŁ, wherever found, even though at variance with the accepted standards. A Grand Lodge censure is sometimes an officer's highest endorsement. The splenetic opposition of a small creature is often the surest guarantee of correctness on the part of those opposed. When a small boy, we, for the first time, saw a little animal in the woods, whose appearance pleased us. Contact changed our estimate. Ignorance of men bas occasionally led to the same results. We are older now. "Judge not by appearances." We shall avoid creatures,.hereafter, whose jragmncc is their principal element of strength. Bro. Drummond is kind and forgiving, because he thinks this writer is "so near the mark" on certain doctrines which he maintains. We ar~ grateful for the follOWing: Well, we'll forgive, inasmuch as he comes so near the mark on the doctrine of supreme and exclusive territorial jurisdietion; let him only admit. as his Grand Lodge did, the logical result of his own doctrine, and all will be well. He is really nearer in accord with us than he suspects: those who hold that there is .1 a connection existing between a Lodge and its Grand Lodge which no others have power to annul," also generally hold that there is "a connection existing between a Lodge and its members which no others have power to annul," and they .. maintain for Rubordinate Lodges inalienable and exclusive jurisdiction over their own members." . The principle is precisely the same in both cases, but Bro. Vincil vehemently denies the latter applIcation, and insists that Masons are amenable to the laws of the jurisdiction in which they nre, although members of Lodges in another. This is undoubtedly cotrect, and is apglicable to Lodges equally as to individual Masons. The principle is based dfc~ro~~e octrine of terl'itorial jurisdiction in contradistinction to that M perlKYlwl juris-


56

Appendix.

[Oct.

Allow us to say, Bro. Drummond, that we wrote and defended the doctrine in the Report adopted by Ollr Granel Lodge concerning the New Mexico controversy. But for that Report, the ~aid controversy would be raging still. In the study and preparation of said Report-written in advance of Grand Lodge session-we saw errors into which we had previously fallen. Our Report was submitted to the Committee of Past Grand Masters Owens, Garrett and Anderson, and every word was endorsed by them. There may be ,. illogical conclusions" in the Report, but they were not seen at the time. We admitted in the discllssion that our views had undergone a change as to some points. Our candor was evident to the Brethren, as our Report was unanswerable. They approved both, and the case is out of court forever. When we reach the ag'e of Bro. Drummond and are enriched a.~ he, by long and ripened experience, we may begin to "see through a glass, darkly." If we could have enjoyed such expericnce and the benefits of some study and research, five years ago, this New Mexico controversy would not have annoyed the Masonic Brotherhood of the country. Our Grand Lodge blundered from the start, anq we had no Gouley to set us right or prevent us from starting wrong. It required full Jour yea.rs to rectify the error of an hour. But we are wiser, if not better, by our undesirable expericnce. Kew Mexico is herself again; Missouri has acknowledged her error and corrccted it, and we have peace all along the lines. The dissensions being ended and the discussion closed, we believe with Bro. Drummond, that "the doctrine of exclusive territo'rial Grand Lodge jurisdiction is upon a firmer basis than ever." The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected, and Bro. Drummond is Committee on Foreign Correspondence.

MARYLAND, 1881. Grand Lodge met November 15th, 1881, in the City of Baltimore, it being'the Ninetyfifth Annual Commu,nication. M. W. John S. Tyson, Grand Master, presided, and R. W. Jacob H. Medairy was Grand Secreta!)'. . Seventy-one I.odges were reported as having Representatives present. An" abstract from thc returns of Lodges" is found in the jOllrIlal, from which we learn that there are 4,474 members of Lodgoo in that 路jurisdiction. How many Lodges there are, we cannot say, as our wallt Qf time will not permit us to do the counting for the Grand Secretary. The Address of Bro. Tyson is a brief one, and creditable withal. He alluded in appropriate terms to the great bereavement of the Nation and the Craft, caused by the decease of President James A. Garfield and Dr. Albert G. Mackey. He mentioned with pleasure the interesting ceremony participated in, at the laying of the corner-stone of the National Monument, at Yorktown, Va., October 18th, 1881, commemorative of the surrender of the British army under Lord Cornwallis. The Grand Master reported a few offici'al acts, and presented some recommendations for consideration. The appeal from Michigan, in behalf of those who suffered b~' the destructive forest fires, had been responded to by the Craft, in the way of voluntary contributions amounting to $636. The Grand Lodge was not in a financial condition to make an appropriation. Hence a.n appeal had been made, with the above result.


1882.]

Appendix.

57

Bro. Tyson wrote cheerfull)"-perhaps hopefully-concerning the Temple debt, still carried by the Grand Lodge. It was said by some one in recell't years, that" a National debt is a National blessing." Wonder if our Maryland Brethren have a similar feeling respecting the good sized' blessing called a Grand Lodge or Temple debt? We presume several Grand Jurisdictions in this country have an opportunity to smack their lips over the deliciousness of their blessings or luxuries.

The follOWing is as explanatory

~

complimentar)':

The regular business of the Grand Lodge was at this stage of the proceedings suspended, and the Grand Master, addressing Past Grand Master John M. Carter in most complimentary terms, reviewed his administration of the affairs of the Grand Lodge while Grand Master, and concluded by presenting him with a beautiful Past Grand Master's jewel from members of the Grand Lod~e, as a token of their appreciation of his services. Bro. Carter responded with much feelmg, being deeply impressed with what he conceived to be unmerited honor. The presentation speech, made by Grand Master Tyson, was printed, and the reply of Bro. Carter followed. From each we make an extract, presenting first an excerpt from Bro. Tyson's presentation talk, th'us: Your Brethren have admired your conduct as Grand Master. They admire no less your conduct as Past Grand l\laster. And having no higher honor to bestow upon you, having given you all they had to give, they have requested me, as their spokesman, to express thus publicIy the sentiments of esteem and affection which they feel for you, and also to request your acceptance of this token of their regard. It is distinctively a Past Grand Master's jewel, and as such we request you to accept it. Permit me to have the honor of investing you with it, and to express the hope that vou max live to wear it for many years, with pleasure to yourself and with honor to the Fratermty. Bro. Carter, after being duly surprised, responded in proper terms, saying some very good things. The extract below was sensible and modest: You rightly say, Most Worshipful sir, that the Brethren of this' Grand Lodge have given me all they had to bestow. They have conferred upon me honors of which great men in this and other countries have been proud to boast. But they have given me even more-they haH~ given me without stint their unfailing and generous love and esteem throughout my whole Masonic career. And now. with this magnificent emblem of their consummated favor, proffered with your kind expression of their continued fraternal regard, they have added another to the many obligations which I bear to them,and which I trust I shall always as sincerely appreciate as I do at this moment. We record with satisfaction the re-election of both Grand Master and Grand Secretary of the Maryland Grand Lodge.路 Both reside in Baltimore. sEnU-ANNUAL

CO~IMUNICATION.

The regular half-year meeting was held May 9th, 1882. The opening paragraph says the Grand Lodge had" met semi-annuftlly for ninety-five and a half years." The usuftl Grand Officers were present. A very brief Address was presented by Grand Master T)'son, 路in which refer~nce is made to local interests alone. Reports from Grand Lecturer and Grand Inspectors were furnished, and are found in the printed Proceedings. ,Bro. Medairy, ~rand Secretary, presented a lengthy and full Report as to fiscal affairs. CORRESPONDENCE.

'fhe Report wail prcpared by "Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, M. D" Chairman of the Committee," and embraces brief notices of the doings of forty-four Grand Lodges, with extracts made therefrom, the whole covering 108 pages of good opcn type. Missouri, for 1881, is aeoorded full space and generous notice, consisting of selections and short comments.


58

Appendix.

[Oct.

The committee said, respecting our matters, that" there is good reason to believe that the difficulty between Missouri and Ne~ Mexico will soon be amicably adjusted." Yes, all things have been" amicably adjusted," and both parties are happy. We are content to keep out of all such scrapes in the future. Bro. Gorgas does not concur in the views of the New Mexico committee, concerning " Sunday meetings." He believes with others, ourself included, that holding meetings on Sunday would present a pernicious example, and engender criticisms that would injure our Order. Well said, Bro. Gorgas. Grand Officers remain the same.

MASSACHUSETTS, 1881-82. This Grand Lodge mourns: For the second time within the brief period of a few years, the Brethren and Grand Lodge of Massachusetts have been bereaved of their Grand Secretary. In reading up the Proceedings of this jurisdiction, now under review, we miss the name and work of our valued friend and esteemed Brother, R. W. Tracy P. Cheever, Grand Secretary. A strikingly correct likeness of our departed Brother greets us in the journal now being reviewed, Who that ever saw his fAce or his chirography will fail to recognize either as seen in the volume of Proceedings? Looking upon that quiet, thoughtful face, we recall the pleasant associations and enjoyable seasons of other days, while seated in Brotherly converse in his own office. 'Dear old friend and good Brother of the past, we must say farewell. In our last review of the doings of the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, we carried forward the work to March, 1881. Since, a number of sessions have been held-some special and quarterly and annual and stated. November 26th, 1881, a Special Communication was convened in the Masonic Temple, Boston, by summons of Grand Master Lawrence. We copy the following; It becomes my sad and painful duty to summon you again to the grave of a departed Brother. Once more the Grand Lodge of Mas~achusetts is called to mourn the loss of the Recording Grand Secretary.

R. W. Tracy.P. Cheever participated with the other Grand Officers in the ceremonies attending the dedication ot the new hall of Paul Dean Lod~e, at Korth Easton, on the evening of the 22d instant. After carefully noting the hour ot the closing of the Grand Lodge, he remarked to one of the Brethren; "My record is finished; it will read right a hundred years hence." The words were prophetic, and sing-ularly appropriate to his own case. Within half an hour he was stricken with apoplexy, and continued entirely unconscious until three o'clock on the following afternoon, when he passed peacefully on, as we humbly hope and believe, to the Celestial Lodge above. He was buried by his Brethren with Masonic honors. One of the most appropriate tributes we ever read was delivered by Rev: Dr. Leonard, on the funeral occasion. We prefer to occupy space for the following rather than utter our own thoughts;


R. W. BRO. TRACY P. CHEEVER, Recording Grand Secretary of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

BORN 1\.'1' MA.RBLEHEAD, MASS., MARCH

28, 1824.

,...--

He was an upright man, a devoted husband and father, a genial companion, a loving friend, a learned lawyer, a patriotic citizen and soldier, an eminent and sincere Mason, deeply versed in the history of Masonry, and well skilled in its jurisprudence.

Died at Xorth Easton, Mass., Novemher 23, 1881.

"My

RECORD IS FINISIlED."

"In thy sight the eternal record lies, Tho'u dost drink from life's immortal wells, :Midnight's mazy mist before thee flies, And in heavenly day thy spirit dwells."

59


60

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[Oct.

We append the following closing words of Rev. Bro. Leonard's beautiful and appropriate tribute: Finally, I ask you all to recall his own words, spoken but yesterday, it seems, so alive are they with his own truth and trust. What he then said of his life-long friend, we may reverently take up and apply in our most lOVing thought of him. In that life" whose ~ limits and significance are beyond our finite range, he has gathered the fruits of all his faith, his work and his love. Doubt not, my Brethren, that in ampler airs, on higher planes of activity, in wider spheres of Brotherhood. his life is warmed by the breath of the Divine Spirit, to which he has returned, and brightened in the glow of eternal love." " To the Lord of all worlds, and to the Master of all life in filial confidence, we now commit him." " Therefore ,is it, Brother of our stricken hearts, that to thee we speak no word of farewell." 'Say not GOOD NIGHT, But in some happier clime bid us GOOD MORNING.''' The Annnal Communication met in Boston, December 14th, 1881, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. Samuel Crocker Lawrence, Grand Master;R. W. Bro. Sereno D. ' Nickerson, Past Grand Master, was the acting Grand Secretary. The Annual Report of Grand Master Lawrence was presented, and furnishes evidence of a clear head and a good heart. He feelingly alluded to the loss sustained by the Fraternity in that jurisdiction in the decease of Grand Secretary Cheever. He recorded the death of R. W. Daniel Harwood, who had passed away in the eighty-first year of his age, having been a Mason fifty-nine years. A like tender and touching tribute was paid to the memory of our deeply loved and lamented Brother, James A. Garfield. A fine likeness of the President graces the journal before us. Also one of the late deceased Past Grand Master John T. Heard. The Grand Master furnished a journalized account Of "official visitations," which showed that he had been on the move. He mentioned, in patriotically Masonic terms, his visit to Yorktown, Va., and his participation in the ceremonies of laying the cornerstone of the National Monument to be erected there, commemorative of the triumph of American arms over the British army under Cornwallis. Of the corner-stone laying, he had this to say : I had some very pleasant interviews with the Grand Masters and other Grand Officers of various jurisdictions, North and South, and although we represented constituencies very widely separated, we forgot State bounds and special affiliations, and our intercourse was warmed by that fraternal sympathy which is the natural outflow of our Masonic Brotherhood. ,It seems to me a very suggestive fact in the current history of our Order that it should receive this honorable mark of recognition from the National authorities, in the invitation extended to it, to lay the corner-stone of the monument at Yorktown. The Masonic ceremonies were a.very important and impressive part of the proceedings, and were evidently regarded with great interest by the large concourse present. It is very strange indeed that men from" various jurisdictions, 'North and South,' should have met at such a time and place. Where was Blanchard and the "anti" crowd? As Washington and I-'llfayette had something to do with that little affair at Yorktown, Va., about Il. century ago, both being Masons, it might seem right and proper that the Ordcr of which they were members "should receive this honorable roark of recognition" from the authorities. But we want to know why Blanchard and his yelpers , were not there to put in their hoarse croakings that the country was in danger by reason of the Masonic influence exerted over National affairs. Perhaps the howling crew had not returned from their trip up "Salt River," whither the anti-Masonic Presidential ticket went after the election in 1880. We know the anties had a ticket. We have not

- ...


1882.J

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61

heard of its success. Our information is that a .MASO~ u;as elected President in 1880. The Blanchard crowd did not get back from Salt River, thither sent by a Nation's contempt, in time to hi~s and scowl at the Yorktown ceremonies. What a pity. Bro. Lawrence had appointed Bro. Sereno D. Nickerson actin/{ Granel Secretary, upon the sudden demise of Bro. Cheever. The appointee is a Past Grand Master, and an efficient worker in all departments of Masonry, being well qualified for the new position 'assigned him. His election naturally followed the appointment. Grand Master Lawrence furnished an instance of "Personal .Jurisdiction," which shows how the doctrine of " perpetual jurisdiction" works. Here it is: By a communicRtion received from the Grand Master of Masons in Illinois. it appears that.J. H. Richards, who had once been rejected as a candidate for the degrees in Paul Revere Lodge, in this State, had applied for admission to a Lodge in Illinois, by signing a blank petition, which was afterwards filled out by a member of the Lod/{e in question', and which stated that the applicant had not petitioned any other Lodge for initiation. On rliscovery of the fal~ehood, an investigation was at once ordered, and the new member was indefinitely suspended, and his accomplice expelled from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. . As there was falsehood and fraud practised in the case, we have no objection to the verdict. The Grand Master furnished a full and elaboru.te statement of the Grand Lodge debt. This debt is the result of having a Masonic Temple. During the year, said Temple debt had been reduced ~ome $60,000, leaving the net indebtedness of the Grand Lodge about $100,000. A very just tribute was adopted by the Grand Lodge in memory of President Garfield. A lengthy biographical memoir was presented and approved concerning the late Grand Secretary, Bro. Tracy P. Cheever. The Grand Officers were elected at this session, and installed Dec. 27th, 1881, at the "STATED COMMUN'ICATION'."

At this session, Past Grand Master Chas. A. Welch installed the elected and appointed ofllcers. Bro..Josiah H. Drummond, Past Grand Master of Maine, was present, introduced and warmly welcomed by the Grand Master. After the installation, came THE

A~NUAL

FEAST.

The Brethren drank toasts" to the memory of the Holy Saints John," "George Washington," "James A. Garfield," "Beloved Brethren who have recently gone from us," "President Arthur" and "our Brethren wheresoever dispersed throughout the world." Speeches were next in order, and they followed numerously. They were too numerous to note or quote from, in view of both merit and length. The account of the feast closes thus: After a dramatic recitation by R. W. Bro. Wyzeman Marshall, the company joined in singing Auld Lang Sync, and the Grand Lodge was closed. Thus, in the lang\l~e of the old Records, the fetist was celebrated" in a most .polite and elegant manner; WIth that beauty and harmony of parts ~o peculiar to the Ancient and Honorable Craft." A Quarterly Commullieation was held March 8th. 1882, presided over by Grand Master Lawrence; Bro. Nickerson, Grand Secretary. This meeting was devoted to the consideration of purely local affairs. Grand Muster Lawrence took occasion to warn the Brethren "against spurious Rites and degrees." He denominated the "Egyptian Rite" as" pretended Musonie de~rces," the" unscrupulous manager" of which had been expelled from Masonry. Hesaid, in conclusion. that:


62

Appendix.

[Oct.

He did not believe that any Brother, who had lately entered into these spurious organizations, had done so from any lack of fidelity to Masonry, or with any thought of the inc:ongruity of the relations it would occasion; for the spirit that impelled the traffic would not be generally understood, nor its unhappy results fully realized, until the â&#x20AC;˘ mischief had been done. He had thus brought the matter before the Grand Lodge, feeling that it was one that deeply concerned the welfare of Masonry. He relied upon the wisdom of the Grand Lodge to take such action as is best calculated to suppress practices which aim a direct blow at the best interests of the Order. We have been imposed upon by the same sort of degree-mongers and peddlers. But a timely exposure made by us checked the spread of the "Rite" in Missouri, and prevented the organization of the" Thrice Grand and Ineffable" humbug in St. Louis. Whenever necessary, we are prepared and will publish-for general distribution-by circular, a full expose of this stupendous fraud. We have the data in hand with which to convict the pre.~ent "unscrupulous manager" of the" Rite," whose headquarters are in Boston, of duplicity, fraud and" tricks that are vain." In his letters to us, bis implied threats do not frighten us at all. When he threatened the life of Grand Master Lawrence. because of his exposure of the fraudulent Rite, he placed himself beyond the recognition of Masons and gentlemen. We have not hesitated to expose the spurious thing called .1 Egyptian Rite of Memphis," despite the attempts at intimidation. ONTARIO.

This nondescript concern or self-styled Grand Lodge continues to annoy the legitimate Grand Lodges of the country by seeking recognition. The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts disposed of the matter summarily and wisely thus: We therefore recommend that the Grand Secretary be requested to return the letter referred to us to the gentlemen fr?m whom it came, and to politely and kindly inform them, that, when they are recogmzed as a Grand Lodge by the Grand Lodge of Canada, the matter ()f their recognition as such will properly come before this Grand Lodge. SAMUEL C. LA WRENeE, G. M. SEREKO D. NICKERSON, G. Sec. ADDHESS: Masonic Temple, Boston.

MICHIGAN, 1882. Grand Lodge met in Detroit, January 24th, 1882. M. W. Bro. Oliver L. Spa'!lding, Grand Master; R. W. \\Tm. P. Innes, Grand Secretary. . Past Grand Master McGrath delivered an address of welcome, which was responded to by Grand Master Spaulc;ling in behalf of the Grand Lodge. The journal shows a large number of permanent members and Representatives present, and the pay-1'OU is a good sized one. The table of returns shows that there are :H3 chartered Lodges in existence, with a total membership of 25,831. The loss in membership for the previous year was over one tlwusand. THE

AN~UAL

ADDRESS

Of GJ'3,nd Master SpaUlding was reasonably brief and clearly business-like.


1882.]

Appendix.

6B

He reported his official acts in detail. His decisions, as reported, amounted to eighteen in number, although nearly one 'hllndrerl questions upon Masonic law and practice had been submitted to and answered by him. The Committee on Jurisprudence declared that the reported decisions' were" based on well established Masonic law, and recommended that they be severally approved and adopted," which was done. FIRE SUFFERERS.

Speaking of the relief afforded those who had suffered from the devllstating fires of last September, he said: ' At once the great-hearted, generous people, all over the land poured out their charity, but after all the relief was but temporary. Provision ~ust be made for shelter, and in some degree for food, till crops could grow. Teams and tools and seed wheat must be had at once or the time for sowing would be past. This required organized effort. In this emergency I called upon Masons at home and abroad to come to the relief of Masons. The response was instant, grand, Masonic. Knowing Masonry, believing in it as I did. and cognizant of its beneficient teachings and works, I, after all, was not half aware till then how grandly, how nobly Masons livcd their "Masonry. From other Grand Jurisdictions, by successive mails, and even by talegraph. came tens, hundreds and thousands of dollars. These Brethren we cannot thank enough. God grant their time of Tleed may not come. but if it does. the Masons of l\Iichigan will have enough to do to repay one-half the debt they owe them. At home. on the instant, our :Masons and Lodges sent large sums in cash and needed supplies. Of these we can give you no detailed account. As soon as we could proceed systemati'cally these donutions came to me and have, with moneys received from abroad, bee~ fairly and equitably distributed. In concluding his Address, he said: T have now given you a review of my official acts, T believe you will find 110 :Masonic principle abrogated or invaded. I am commanded by our Constitution" to cause the ancient landmarks and charges to be observed." I have sought to do this, and to guard against all innovations. If we depart from our time-honored conservatism, we are lost as surely as the Christian who seeks to improve his Bible. We have no plfl.ce for Musonic cranks-no room for theories. The Masonry of the ages is good enough for us. Its principles are as fixed a.<; the foundations of the hills, and as unchangeable as the GQd who proclaimed them.

The true Mason will let them alone. The nominal l\fnson who want,,<; to improve Masonry and obtain a patent on his device-get rid of. Our Institution would not have withstood obliquy and persecution, nor endeared itself to generations had 'it not been a ~ood one. It commends itself to good men. 1t condemns bad men. Its past is safe; Its present and future is with Wi, and those we teach. We have something' to do ~eyond going to the Lodge and paying our dues. . A lengthy I{eport was made by a special committee concerning "our Fraternal pead." CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. Wm. P. Innes, Grand Secretary, prepared and submitted a Report on Correspondence, covering 134 pages. His review embraced a notice of the doings of thirtysix Grand Lodges, according- to his "Table of Contents.'" He culled from our last journal sufficient matter to cover three pages. Our Revjew was not omitted. From his Introduction we clip the following: To our nation it has been a year of great sorrow. Our Chief Magistrate and worthy Brother, James A. Garfield, has passed from earth to Heaven. The villianous hand of the assassin took that life ht' could 1I0t give, and our Brother's death was almost as tragic as that of IIiral)l of old. â&#x20AC;˘


64

Appendix.

[Oct.

Our State has been devastated by fire; property, the accumulation of years, has been swept away, and many a Masonic home has been made desolate, the inmates being reduced in a moment, as it were. from affluence to poverty, and obliged to look to the world for even the necessaries of life. The Angel of Death has made sad havoc in the home of many a Mason. Loved ones, our support for years, have been ruthlessly torn from our fond embrace, and" the places that knew them know them no more." The writer has been made to drink deeply of the " bitter cup." His fond hope, she who always cheered him in his labors for the Craft. has passed away, and gone to wait that glorious resurrection made so plain to all good Masons. Our report has been written under the weight of great grief. It has been done without the usual cheering words of her who for years has at this season sat by our side and encouraged us onward. We therefore crave indulgence for our short-comings, and express the hope that the coming year may tie as bright and cheerful as the fondest wishes of the Fraternity might desire. How tenderly and deeply we feel for our Brother, words can not tell. God only knows the depth of such a wound as he carries in the heart, while the hand has to be busy and the mind at work. We have passed through the saine dark valley and deep waters. We have no words, Brother-we know how empty they seem under such a weight of gricf. We would sha?'c, were it possible, the" bitter cup" in such an hour, that it might be lcss "bitter" to another. In preparing any paper, with such a silent pain ever tearing the heart, who is competent to meet the responsibility imposed. God comfort the sufferer. May he hear the Voice of infinite tenderness saying. " I love thee, I love thee, pass under the rod." ALANSON PARTRIDGE, Birmingham, G. M. W. P. INNES, Grand Rapids, G. Sec.

MISSISSIPPI, 1882. Th"e Sixty-fourth Annual Communication was held in 'Jackson, February 8th to 10th,1882. M. W. Bro. John F. McCormick, Grand Master, in the chair, and R. W. Bro. John L. Power, Grand Secretary. The Credential Committee reported 227 Lodges represented, and sjxty-seven not represented. The Grand Secretary's summary shows that 2&') Lodges had made annual returns. The membership in the State foots up 9,133-a slight falling off since last year. Receipts for the year are reported at $9,363.85. Grand Master McCormick opened his Address with appropriate words, and then plunged into business as ifused to it, avoiding the too frequent oxordium of indefinite length. His report has a business ring throughout. He may properly be denominated the" rCfusing" Grand Master. We have been in bodies that were styled" non-concurring" assemblies. "I move non-concurrence," wa... the popular motion. Bro. McCormick did not concur in many things presented him. He ?'cfus'cd permission to ?'cIAlke the ballot in any number of instances. He rcfused to grant a dispensation to ballot on applications out of time. He rcfuscd permission. to allow charges against a Brother where he was not ll. member of a lJodge. Frequently refused dispensations" to hold post burial services at the graves of deceased Brethren." He granted dispensations to institute four new 路Lodges. He reported very few decisions. He concluded when he had finished, or " quit when he had路 done." \


Appendix.

1882.]

65

The Report of the Grand Secretary wa.<;, as heretofore, all excellent one, being full, complete and instructive. Our Bro. Power has, with others, been called to pa~s through deep waters. Death hall visited the home circle and called away a bright and promising son, the joy and hope of the father's heart. .We remember how a similar shadow hung over us two years ago, while preparing onr Heport, and what anguish we suffered in the work of the season. Oh! never to be forgotten sorrow. Bro. Power says in his Report: Brethren, in submitting this report, I must crave your indulgence. In the midst of busy preparatioll of this occasion, I was arrested in my work. A great shl:tdow ha.<; settled upon my heart and home; and were it not for the fraternal love and sympathy of mv Brethren and friends, Ilnd ill humble faith that even behind this frowning PrOVIdence, He hides a smiling face, I could not endure this sudden, this terrible afttiction. But God is still good, and Ilis mercy endureth forever! Knowing so well what he suffered from the" great shadow that -settled on heart and home," we tender him our heart-sympathy, praying that the" eternal God may be his refuge, and underneath may be found the everlasting arms. Concerning "the Distress in :Michigan" Bro. Power had the following kind words: THE DISTRESS IN MICHIGAN

By the forest fires, last summer, touched the heart of the country. Thousands of homes were destroyed, and hundreds lost their lives. The appeals fo~ help were not unheare<l in our Statc', and from many sonr.ces a handsome aggregate was forwarded. As the result of an appeal to the Lod~es and public, issued in September. I forwarded to the Grand Secretaries ofl\Iasolls and Odd Fellows in Michigan, a total of $1,~n,83, a detaited statement of whieh is herewith submitted; also grateful acknowledgments of same. In our 'gTeat affliction in lRiS, I received from Michigan a total of $4,4~7.06, with many meJ;sages that more was ready if needed, and it wa.'> to me a sort of sad pleasure. to'be the medium of reciprocating their sympathy and generositv. I trust yon will permit the list of eon, tributors to appear as a part of this report, so that it be a matter of permanent record. The amount forwarded lllcindes the sum of one hundred dollars, for which the Grand Ma.,>ter directed me to draw a warrant on the Grapd Treasurer. Our Mississippi Brethren have ready hands and willing hearts for every good work. As evidence, read the following: The undersigned, Special Committee, have had under consideration that portion of the Grand Secretary's Report relating to the Natchez Protestant Orphan Asylum, and recognize the claims of thlit Institution as coming distinctly within the provill~e of this Grand Lodge to extend relief to a necessitous and worthy object, and .illustrating in a high degree the grand principles of Charity and Brotherly love, upon which our Institution is founded. Could they carry out their wishes, and what they believe to be the earnest desire of this Grand Lodge, they wonld recommend the appropriation of such lin amount as would at once relieve the minds of the lady managers from all doubt and uncertainty as to this year, at least, and furnish a liberal and comfortable support to the little ones under their care, who have been deprived of their natural protectors-establishing a horne in name and in fact, which would be an ornament to our State, a credit to our Order, and a sure haven and harbor of refuge to the loved ,ones of our own households should we be called hence ere provision had been made for their maintenance and support. But our ability and our desires are not in accord, and in view of pending expenses and the somewhat depleted condition of the Grund Lodge Treasury, thev would recommend the adoptioll of the f o l l o w i n g : ' â&#x20AC;˘ Resolved, That the sum of five hundred dollars be appropriated for the use and benefit of the Natchez Protestant Orphan Asylnm.

. An appropriation of fifty dollars was made in bchalf of "children (mutes) in the Deaf and Dumb Institute." In as much as yc did it unto these, ye did it for Him. whose they are. G.

L,~Ap.

5.


66

Appendix.

[Oct.

FRATERNAL DEAD.

Impromptu addresses were made in the Grand Lodges in honor of distinguished deceased Masons elsewhere. We copy in part these fraternal utterances. Senior Grand Warden Bro. Lavery spoke as follows concerning DR.â&#x20AC;˘JAMES M. AUSTIN,

Late Grand Secretary of New York: As t~e Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of New York near this Grand Lodge, I have a mournful duty to perform, not only in behalf of the Empire state, but of the Masonic Fraternity of the nation. M:. W. Bro. JILmes M. Austin, late Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of New York, has entered into his rest. Bro. Austin had filled the position of Grand Secretary for the last twenty-eight years, 'with credt to himself and honor to the Craft. :Many other prominent stations in the !\{ll.sonic Fraternity have been filled by the illustrious Brother, and in all he was true and faithful. He was no meteor in the Masonic Heaven, flashing with unwonted brilliancy for Il few short years, and then extinguished, leaving no record of his worth; but he was afullorbed planet, revolving round the Masonic Snn. growing bri~hter and brighter each moment of his life. shedding effulgent rays of light all arouna him. Step by step he advanced up the Masonic ladder until he gained the summit, and from the pinnacle of a well finished Ma..~onic Temple he went to present his' work to God. His reputation was not only State wide, but embraced the nation, yea, the world. We know how the hearts of all our .Craftsmen in Mississippi go out to our own Grand Secretary, and how the affections of Masons Ilnd their loved ones cluster around him, . and he has served us only fourteen years, while Bro. Austin held the same place in the affections of the Masons of New York for twenty-eight years. When first elected Grand Secretary he represented thirty-six thousand Brethren, while at his death he had recorded in the archives of the Grand Lodge tl1e names of seventy-eight thousand affiliated Masons. His love for the Fraternity cannot be measured by metes and bounds. His was the hand that sent the munificent donations of New York Brethren to our beloved Grand Master Power, that enabled him, in our deep sorrow, gloom and pestilence to alleviate the suffering and aid the distressed. The following resolutions were then adopted by a rising vote : Resolved, That in the death of M. W. Bro. James l\f. Austin, late Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of New York, we recognize that one of the greatest li~hts in Masonry has fallen, and that his loss will be keenly felt wheresoever the Craft is dIspersed. . Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of :Mississippi tender to the Grand Lodge of New York fraternal sympathy for the great loss they have sustained in the decease of their beloved <;7rand ::ieeretary. Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions, signed by the Grand l\faster and attested by the Grand Secretary, be forwarded to M. W. Horace S. Taylor, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New 'york. DR. A.LBERT G. )fACKEY.

The following remarks were made, and resolutions adopted as presented: RE~lAnKS

BY PAST GRAND )IASTER HOWRY.

In the absence of the Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina near this Grand Lodge, I d'esire to pay a tribute to the worth and exalted charaCter of one of the most eminent Masons that has ever lived in our nation-who passed away from earth during the past ~lasonie year. Most illustrious Bro. Albert G. Mackey, so well and widely known wherever Masonry has a foothold in America, is dead! As a Masonic writer and jurist, he had few his equal, and no superior. His pUblications are in every Lodge and Chapter in the land, and his decisions 011 Masonic Law are highly revered. and are established as precedents everywhere. He loved lo[asonry, and mao.y years of his long life were given to its study: and havill!?: delved deep and brOl,lght forth jewels. he gave them, as priceless treasmers, to the Craft. We mourn his death to-day. I offer the following resolution as expressive of the sense of this Grand Lodge:


1882.J

Appendix.

67

Resol1JCd, That fraternal condolence and sympathy be eXt'2nded by the Grand Lodge of Mississippi to the Grand Lodges of South Carolina and District of Columbia, for the great loss they have sustained in the death of the eminent Masonic Jurist and Brother, Paf;t Grand :Master Albert G. Mackey.' ,

The newly installed Grand Master, M. W. Bro. Frederic Speed, spoke in substance as follows: Before taking the vote upon the adoption of the resolutions, permit me to say, I should not follow the promptings of my own heart if I were to omit adding to wbat has already been so well said, a few brief words of respect and loving remembrance to the illustrious Brethren whose distinguished abilities and long protracted services have rendered each of them so worthy of perpetuation, for it was my privilege to have enjoyed their acquaintance and to have maintained, for a number of years, relations of personal friendship with them. It is strikingly appropriate that as we are about to bring the labors of the Grand Lodge to a close. and to take each other by the hand and speak the words of parting, which must needs be to some of us, a tinal leave-takjn~-for we cannot all hope to be permitted to meet again until we shall be assembled within the golden portals ofthe Gmnd Lodge whose tyler is death-that we should pause for a brief moment to add to the tributes of respect whieh have been and are being paid wherever Masons meet, to tlle memories of these Princes and great men, which have so lately fallen in our :Masonic Israel. . I shall never forget how the tears ran down the cheeks of that noble hearted man, James M. Austin, as I related to him, in New York, during the great epidemic of eighteen hundred and seventy-eight, some of the details of the awful calamity with which our peoplc were then mantaining an unequal struggle, and how warmly he replied when I referred to the orphans and widows, for whom bread and shelter would bc needed . .. Oh," said he, .. we are not going to let you bear all that burden alone. We are ready and willing to do our whole duty by our Brethren, and we shall not forget their widows and orphans, when we know their necessities." During the twenty-seven years which he continuously discharged the duties of Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of New York, he received and disbursed over tw01llillions of dollars 'without the loss of a single cent; as Past Grand High Priest of New York, and Past General Grand High Priest of the General Grand Chapter of the United States, ne needs no eulogy, for he yet lives in good deeds, performed with a willing heart, and his name will remain green in the memory of all who knew him as a zealous Mason and an honest, upright gentleman. Of Bro. Albert G. Mackey, Bro. Speck uscd these words: Albert Gallatin Mackey/was a Mason ~vhose reputation was world-wide路; wherever English speaking Lodges and Chapters are held, his monitors are the standards; his works on ",'1asonic law were the foundation of our present admirable system of jurisprudence, and no mooted point is decided without consulting the laws which he reduced to a system. The principles which he laid down in his work on Masonic Parliamentary Lltw govern t.he Lodges of the universe, while in his Encyclopedia of Freemasonr~' there is gathered the wisdom of all the ages upon the history, philosophy, ethi~sl symbolism and laws of the Institution; his thousands of articles contributed to the periodICal Masonic literature of his day, gave a permanent value to what. otherwise would have lon~ since passed into oblivion. It needed not the titles of the high offices which he filled durmg his long and useful career to preserve his memory from perishing, for the footprints which he impressed upon the firm and enduring rock will not be effaced so long as Masonry itself shall continue and man shall pursue thc study of the great enigmas which its rituals and doctrines continually unfold to the studiously inclined. The name and fame of this great scholar and author have added additional lustre to the array of honorable names which are associated with the offices of Grand Master, Grand Secretary and Grand High Priest of South Carolina; Genera] Grand High Priest of the General Grann. Cbapter, and Secretary General of the Supreme Council for the Southern Jurisdiction of the United States. Our Brethren having wrought the tasks assilfned to them i~ the quarries of earth, do now, ItS we fondly hope, "rest from their lallors ' beneath the shades of the trees in the Paradise Of God, and it but remains f()r us, who honor their memories, to so路follow their good examples t.hat when we, in our turn, shall be called upon to bring up our work for inspection it IDay be found acceptable and we receive "the whit:e stone" with a lIew name written. . . The resolutions were then ad0pted by a unanimous rising vote. These are the best tributes we have met, and we gladly present them to our Brethren of Missouri as true expressions of the worth and character of the distinguished Masons named.


68

[Oct.

Appendix. CORRESPOKDEKCE.

Bro. "James :M. Howry, Chairman." presents another interesting and instructive Review. It only coyers eighty-four pug-es-thirty less than last. "Short and sweet." 'We protest against the" short." Like one of Dickens' characters, we want" lIIORE" from Bro. Howry. He seems to have been hampered, and was terrorized an the way through by the word" condense." We wish he had enjoyed larger liberty and possessed the space occupied by our Illinois co-laborer. His review embraced notices of nearly all our American Grand Lodges. The Report was written, and but little use made of the scissors. It is rich in thought, mellow with experience, and a garner of wise, good thi¡ngs. We are pmzled as to selections, so many are deserVing of attention that some â&#x20AC;˘ must be passed by. He eompliment~ this writer for the facility with which the Grand Lodge journal oflast year was published He said, in ,less than two months after the Grand Lodge dosed, our Proceedings were on his table. Indeed, Bro. Howry, in less than thirty workin,9 days we began to mail our Proceedings. Bro. Howry gave the Missouri journal the benefit of nearly three pages of his short Report. A very just view of our doings in Missouri was presented. lIe seemed to feel as we did when he encountered the able and large Report of Bro. Brown, of minois. Hear him: Foreign Correspondence by Bro. John W. Brown, 493. pages! What shall we do with it? What we write goes off in a few hours-we cannot pass it by sub silentio. We can't read it, we can't digest, criticise or comment on the vast amount of Masonic intelligence and literature which our distinguished Brother has collected and put togcther in the very able and voluminous rE>port before us. We turned over to Maine first after reading the exordium. He calls Bro. Drummond the ,. Nestor of the corps reportorial." We turned over page after page. and we numbered twcnty-six for Maine! We passed on to Mississippi, thinking we could make a few remarks on Bro. Brown's comments on our little Jurisdiction, but we found sixteen pages devoted to us, in which he gives widc berth to our Grand 'Master French, and all the leading committees. He gives his Brother in minois a chance to read some of the sayings of Mississippi Masons in their own words. His comments on Bro. French's Address are generally approvingly given. From his Conclusion we clip this: In closing our report, we feel sad at the thouRht of losing some of the most distinguished members of the Fraternity during the last year. We will mention a few of the ~~J~c:~s~J(~~~~~~~e~.we can but give a passing notice of the character and standing of Bro. James A. Garfield was a Mason, but was not distinguished as such among the Craft, over and above hundreds of others who have departed this life; yet he was a true :Mason and had advanced to the Order of Knighthood and stood well in all the branches of the Order to which he belonged. He became in his last years a distinguished public man, and reached the zcnith of political power in our Government-that of President of the United States. His sad fate caused our great Hepublic to mourn, and while we as citizens joined in the general grief-as Masons our grief was more poignant. Bro. Albert G. Mackey, 1\1. D., had grown gray in the service of the Craft. He was a Masonic author and jnrist, and understood the philosophy of symbolic l\fasonry, its legendary historv, usage and jurisprudence, as well perhaps as any American Mason. Hc advanced to all the Orders in Masonry which were practis~d in this country, and the whole Fraternity feel the loss of this distinguished Brother. Bro. George Stoddart Blackie, M. D., wat a brilliant Masonic writer. His reports on jurisprudence were ab'le and solid-equal to any which came under our eye. It is greatly to be regretted that in his last report he was cramped, and could not do himself or. the cause he loved so well, or his Grand Lodge, justice. Tennessee mourns the loss of her distinguished Brother, and 'in this the whole Craft unite! . Bro. .lames M. Austin, Past Grand :Master and Grand is extinguished, too. Peace to his ashe!;!

~ecretary, New

York-his light

Bro. Allen H. Crowe, Past Grand Master of Nova Scotia, passed away during the last vear. He had been Chairman on Foreign Correspondence, and was elected Grand Master in 1~80. Mississippi sympathiZes with our Brethren in the great loss they have sustained.


Appendix.

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69

The death of Bro. Wm. G. Tonn, Grand Secretary of Wyoming, is referred to in. our review of that Grand Jurisdiction. We part, regretfully, with our dear Bro. Howry, not knowing whether he and the writer may be spared to exchange greetings again on the way to that" Haven of Rest" whose glories beam undimmed forever. The parting words of friends sometimes make us sad. So of the closing paragraph, which follows, from Bro. Howry's Report: And as our ~fasonic sun is fast going down,' we can but rejoice that we have been in green fields and rich pastures. amOJl~, not only our Brethren in Mississippi, but the universll.] Brotherhood III all civilized lands known to us. The noble and the good are falling fast around us, but we hope to overtake them soon, in the Haven of Rest, where all good Ma801ls hope to arrive at last. In the land of the immortals, where the sun never goes down,we hope to meet our Brethren beloyed and all who love God. Beneath celestial skies we would rest, and with them study the Divine, and advance in knowledge forev~r. . "

~h,

what will it be, to be there." FREDERIC SPEED, Vicksburg, G. M. JOHN L.. POWER, Jackson, G. Sec. JAMES M. HOWRY, Oxford, Com. on For. Cor.

MONTANA, 1881. The Seventeenth Annual Communication. was held in Helena, October 4th, 1881. M. W. Bro. Geo. \V. l\lonroe, Grand Master, present and in the chair; R. W. Bro. Cornelius Hedges, Grand Secretary; with permanent members and Representatives from twenty Lodges. The preliminary Heport says there are twenty-one Lodges and 839 members in that jurisdiction. 1<'our Past Grand Masters were present. The Grand Master read a brief and well digested Heport. Congratulations and greetings were extended, and thanks were offered for a merciful exemption from pestilence, which had" not visited our beautiful mountain homes," while calamities caused elsewhere by "fire, flood and storm" had left them undisturbed. . Harvests had been abundant, mines had yielded rich returns, flocks and heras had mUltiplied, while" tidings of peace, prosperity and happiness" 'Came up from all directions. He then announced his official doings for the year, which have no general interest. As he had not any time to spare to visit the various Lodges, he bad addressed a letter or circular to each, and gathered much valuable information from those that responded, concerning the Craft, and announced that harmony prevailed among the Brethren. Death had been at work among the Brethren, and several were called from labor. Memorial pages were recommended, commemorative of these "zealous Masons, and upright and good men." Bro. Monroe presented the following strong 'and just views concerning a much debated question, i. C.,. that of perpetual jurisdiction _over rejected material. We have had our say heretofore, and it affords us pleasure to hear the mountain slogan ringing out so clearly from our Montana Brother. He said:


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In one respect, my Brethren, I feel that we are far' behind the true Masonic teaching and spirit l楼f this enlightened age, that is, in respect to Masonic jurisdiction over rejected material. While I would exercise every possible precaution to prevent the ingress of improper material to our lodge-rooms, and would rather add to, than take from the D;lethods of inspection. I firmly believe that the practice in this jurisdiction of Lodges who reject an application for degrees holding a perpetual right or power to prevent . the applicant from receiving "the degrees from any other Lodge within ~he jurisdiction or elsewhere, is at variance with the common principles of justice, upon which our Order is founded. To make myself more clearly understood, I quote the opinion of Bro . .John D. VinciI. Past Grand I\-Iaster of Missouri, who says, .. that in the theory of perpetual and exclusive jurisdiction on the part of a Lodge over a p~rson whose application to it for the degrees has been rejected. there is in volvcd a principle at variance with human rights and human authority. It is the assumption of the absolute and supreme, unwarranted and unsustained by any authority with which men or human institutions are endowerl. Man, in the exercise of his moral liberty and social rights, cannot be 1?1lrsued and disfranchised forever by arbitrary legislation. When a party proposes to ulllte with a moral institution, such a..s Masonry is, the Lodge may not accept his overtures, but, while rejecting his proposition, it cannot thereby become possessed of an inalienable right or claim to him, soul, body and spirit. In the R.8serting of such a claim, there is declared a supremacy over the whole being of the party, autocratic, despotic, imperial and papistic." Concerning the" perpetual jurisdiction" doctrine, the Committee on .Jurisprudence expressed itself in terms strong and emphatic: In the matter of exclusive and perpetual jurisdiction over rejected material, as understood and practised in sOllie jurisdictions, it strikes your committee as equally abhorrent to the spirit of justice as it is in violation of all good and sound reason. As expressive of our practice and the views that are held in this jurisdiction, we append a resolution, if the Grand Lodge shall see proper to express itself more explicitly. Yet the Grand Lodge indefinitely postponed the matter. We are sorry that the " abhorent" practice did not get a full knock down blow from the vigorous young Grand Lodge of the mountains. The Grand Secretary, Bro. Hedges, presented a brief business Report, and followed it with a general Report. A codification of the Constitution and By-laws had been made, which met with approval. THA:-iKS

Were voted the retiring Grand Master, as follows:

Resolved. That the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of !\fcmtana, having been witness to the zealous, faithfuL intelligent labor of our Most \Vorshipful Bro. George W. Monroe. durillg the period he has held his high oUice, records its cOllviction that his labors have been such as路to entitle him to the gratitude of the Brethren of this jurisdiction, and of all Masons wheresoever dispersed. New South Wales Grand Lodge was formally recognized. Mileage and per diem were voted the members present at this annual session. A fine steel engraving of the retiring Grand Master, Bro. Monroe, graces the Montana j.ournal as a frontispiece. A review of Grand Lodge Proceedings, covering seventy-eight pages of the journal, was furnished by Bro. Cornelius Hedges, " for the committee." He acknowledged his tardiness thus: Having spent the summer in the East, we had not a word of our Foreign Correspondence written when the Grand Lodge met. It was therefore necessary to l\,.<;k indulgence and trust or omit it altogether. Having seen fit to indulge us in time and trust us not to send anything to print that will discredit :Masonry or the jurisdktion, we shall endeavor to justify this confidence, and begin this review October ~th, hoping to have it done before the holidays.


1882. ]

Appendix.

Any committees that would leave the mountains of thal;jurisdlction to spend a "summer in the East" ought to be banished to the" Mountains of Hepsidam" where the, etc. His Report, though long delayed, is a good one. He averages about two pages to each Grand Lodge journal of Proceedings. Of us he said: The Grand Secretary '11 as been hot after the old delinquents, and nearly cleared the list. Two only remain. Polar Star is no longer a safe guide to the way-worn travelers, and the Lily has faded pw;t.rccognition or reanimation. While the Lily has faded, and long since was cut off as dry and dead, Polar Rtar, No. 79, still shines, having passed from under the long eclipse, and is now one of the best and livest Lodges in this jurisdiction. Bro. Hedges had this to say concerning a little affair of ours: Bro. Vincil was reprimanded by a committee of three P. G. M.'s for presuming to differ from the ruling of P. G. M. Ready. The only appeal, of course, lies to Grand Lodge, but then the humblest ought to be allowed to express his opinions, even though . they did not coincide with those of the Grand :Master and Grand Lodge. But the committee go still further and hold that the Committee on Correspondence should not only approve bnt actively defend the opinions of the Grand l\faster against all comers. With such an understanding of the dutIes of the position, we fancy anyone worthy to fill the part would sturdily dccl ine the terms of service. If compelled to part with Bro. V. in the field that he has adorned so well, it will indeed be with deep and lasting regrets.

It is due all parties that we say this: Our criticism of the above named functionary was caused by a misapprehension of his meaning as to a decision. We were defending our Grand Lodge from what one Bro. Reviewer thought was her position concerning the decision of the aforesaid functionary. In making the defense of our Grand Lodge we / pierced the cuticle of the aforesaid until he roared. We made ample explanation, but it did not satisfy wounded vanity. l\!en with a gTievancc must be vindicated. The vindication was accorded. But be it known and read of all men, that there is not power enough betweeil Brownlow's extreme points of the universe. "heaven and-hades," to induce this writer to approve or defend the opinions of every man that happened to become a Grand Master if those opinions do not quadrate with our views of right and law. We have no defense for or approval of the indefensible views and crochety notions of rickety officials. As to leaving this field of effort and pleasure, where we meet and Commune with ~IEN, no such thoughthas yet ranged into view along our mental horizon. To do so would afford pleasure to some who prefer our silence to our pen, and would rather have our position than our labors.

The review by Bro. Hedges was written entirely. We have not noticed a single excerpt. So much the better. It is too good to pw;s in silence, and is too large to transfer to our pages. We must simply commend and approve, and then say "Good-bye." His conclusion is one, of the inspiring treats of the year, but we must leave it untouched else we destroy its charms. THOS. M. POMEROY, Missoula, G. M. CORNELIUS HEDGES, Helena, G. Sec. and Com. on Cor.

NEBRASKA, 1882. The Twenty-fifth Annual Communication was held at Lincoln, June 20th and 21st, 1882. M. W. James R. Cain, Grand Master, presiding; R. W. '"'I'm. R. Bowen, Grand Sec-


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retary. Seventy-three, out of seventy-nine Lodges, were represented. There is no Recapitulation or Index to the journal. We believe the jurisdiction has a membership of nearly four thousand. A fourteen-paged Address from Grand Master Cain is furnishedin the Proceedings, embracing a lengthy exordium; a fraternal mention of worthy deceased Brethren, and extended business exhibits incident to his term. He announced the formation of eight new Lodges nnder dispensation. ,Thirty decisions were reported, and still the Craft will worry the next Grand Mastcr all the same. This" decision" business ought to stop. We are in favor of a "perpetual irrjunction" against the rendition of decisions by Grand Masters. The rulings of Grand Master Cain were all approved except two. These were unimportant points. The Grand Ma~ter stated that their relations with other Grand Lodges continued to be of the most cordial and fraternal nature. He announced, with satisfaction, the settlement of the New :Mexico controversy. The Address of Bro. Cain was a good, practical paper, for which he received comrnendation and endorsement. Full and interesting reports were rendered by Grand Secretary Bowen, Grand Treasurer Hartman, and Grand' I.ecturer Gillette. The general business of the session was oflocal interest, and seems to have been transacted in harmon)' and with facility. The Grand Lodge resolved to celebrate the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Organization of the body. September 23d, 1882, will be the time, and Omaha the place, for said celebration. ORATION. Bro. James S. Gilham, Grand Orator, delivercd a ten-paged Oration, which was approbated and printed. It is a novel production. \\'e cannot comprehend the following; " Our Lodge is erected to God, not as the author oj life 01' source oj law, but as the Supreme Architect." "Doctors differ." Take from J\lasonry the idea of" Our FATHER," and the Brotherhood is so emasculated that Masonry may go to its own place, among the owls and the bats. If GOD is not to be recognized as "the Autlwr oj lije and source of law," who is? The Address is well written and reads well, but for practical life it sounds utopian and too much of theja1' away style. A brief Report (fifty pages) on Foreign Correspondence was rendered oy it committee consisting of Bros. E. F. Warren and Jas. A. Fulleys. Brief notices were made of fifty-one American Grund Lodge journals, besides extended comments concerning Masonry in Great Britain and Germllny.路 The description of the home and foreign methods oj rnaking l\lasons is as fanciful as comieal. A patent right should be obtained at ollce and illIlo- . vators estopped. EDWIN F. WARREN, Nebraska City, G. M, WM. R. BO\VEN, Omaha, G. Sec.

NEVADA, 1882. Two Special Communications were held: one for the purpose of laying the cornerstone of an Asylum' for the Insane; the other for the interment of the remains of Past Grand Master George Robinson. 'fhe Eighteentp. ANNUAL Eession cOlwened in the City of Virginia, June 13th, 1882, with M. W. Horatio S. Mason, Grand Master, in the chair; and R. W. J(,hn D. Hammond, Grand Secretary. Eighteen Lodges were represented. Thisjurisdiction reports twenty-two working ,Lodges, with a membership of about thirteen lmndred, an average of fifty-five members per Lodge. We consider this a good showing, especially for a new country.


1882.J

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The Grand Master, Bro. Mason, presented all he wished to say in a six-paged Address; at least, we presume, he did not want to say more or it would have been uttered. His , was a busincss Report, devoted chiefly to telling of the doings of the term. He said his official year had been a quiet one ill the jurisdiction. Harmony was prevalent; the Brethren were earnest alld faithful; the Lodges in good financial condition, and the outlook for the Craft in the State not gloomy. No decisions rendered. This is "good news from a far country." Relations with other Grand Lodges continued to be harmonious. Quebec and New Mexico were congratulated on the amicable adjustment of difficulties heretofore so ullpleasant. A running sketch is then furnished of official acts performed, and mention of deceased Brcthren at home and abroad. A" case" is mentioned that strikes us hard: A Michigan Brother, in distress, received contributions from a Nevada Lodge, amountillg to $2iO, and notified the Brother's Lodge of the fact. The Michigall Lodge said to the Nevada Brethren: . It was decided at our regular meeting, held on Monday evening. January 2d, that we could not allow your bill incurred during the sickness of Bro. Vanderhoof, and, upon motion, it was laid upon the table. indefinitely. The allowing of the bill would have established a precedent which this Lodge could not have followed without being in danger of bankruptcy.

The Nevada Brethren appealed to Grand Master Partridge, of Michigan, for redrcss. He replied, that: It was the duty of H'hite Pine Lodge to relieve a genuine Brother, if in want, to the best of their ability, but not to go beyond its ability. This the Old Charges require to he done, and your Lodge in takiIig care of this Brother was doing its duty, no more; and, in Iny opinion, Stlmmit Lodge is not liable as to your claim, unless they requested White Pine Lodge to take care of the Brother and would pay the expenses.

Thus the matter stood when last heard from. That old question of reimbursing Lodges will not down at the bidding of any power, and will continue to trouble, ghost-like, our Brethrcn all over the land. Dollars and 'cents Masonry haVing supplanted the old kind, there will necessarily follow many sUch cases as the foregoing. Would a Michigan Lodge have given a Kevada Brother $2iO without seeking an)' return? We like the way Bro. Grand Master Mason concludes the subject: I refer to this case, not to Cllst any reproach upon our Brethren of Michigan, nor to e\"en illtimate that you shOUld in the least fail to relieve distressed worthy Brothers, wherever dispersed, bUI to caution you. that if yon expect to be reimbursed for any outlay mn.de in behalf of an)' Brother llailing from the other side of the Rocky Mountains. yOIl must o1Jtaill authority in advancc. Of course, the Brother might die while vou are negotiating; but, unless yuu are able to care for his wants without the hope of fee or reward, thcre is 110 other way. This is the law. The ways of our Eastern Brethren are different from our ways, and we cannot change them. 1 would recommend the use of the telegraph in such ca;;cs. Yes, sir. Do as little as possible for the sick and dying until the telegraph brings word from that Michigan, or any other Lodge, that you mayor may not help the stranger. There were no tclegraphs in the old days, when Masonry meant something. Now, they are a great convenience in catching Masonic dead beats and protecting Lodges. Yes,路 use" the telegraph in aIr such cases." . The Grand Lodge of New South Wales was formally recognized at the instance of Bro. John D. Hammond; Grand Secretary. We have no objection. Others may do as they list. We have lJad too much ?'ecor;nizing of a Grand Lodge, while there were Lodges within the territorial jurisdiction non-allegiant thereto, and" thereby hangs a tail." We want no more of the .. tail" or the Ilnimal. ORATION.

Grand Orator and Past Grand 1Iaster Henry L. Fish furnished the annual confectionar)' in the way of all Oration. Like Ule orator in Nebraska, just reviewed, Bro. Fish went


74

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[Oct.

too far away. Placing himself on the Sian-crowned apex of " the ancient Pyramids of Egypt, which rise massive and gray-grand, gloomy and peculiar-from out the Valley of the Nile," the Orator spread his wings for a flight across the ages, sweeping up through . the plague-smitten epoch of Pharaoh, across the Red Sea, with the E;todus-ters, on to the reign and era of princely Solomon, the orator wended his tirelebs way. We omitted to mention Isis and Osiris and the death of Typhon. Nor shall we fail to note that Babylon was visited during the Captivity, followed by the hegira ofIsrael from the land of their songless sorrow and tears. Then, OIl and out among the nations, follOWing the line of the " dispersion" from Judah's Capitol until the footfall of Craftsmen was heard" throughout Asia, '" '" '" even to the remote countries of Italy and Spain." We arc tired before the flight is ended~ 'Vish we could meet with an oration路 that would make Masons bella men, teaching them to" fear God and keep his Commandments," to reverence his name and law, abstain from profanity, drunkenness and vice in all its forms, and urge the founding of charities for widows and orphans. Bro. Fish presented a good oration of the kind, but, like its kind, it is too far away. The trouble is, our Grahd Orators O1'ale too much. CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro. John D. Hammond, Grand Secretar~', "for the Committee," furnished the Annual Report, and it is delectable. It covers ninety-five pages, and is well made up of excerpts, with good comments. lIe quotes from the Address of Gand Master Stubblefield; notices the presence of Grand Master Scott, of Illinois; Grand Chaplain Coleman, of Kentucky. He commended the style of our lamented Bro. Sam Owens' Report on Grievance; quoted from Bro. Briggs' Oration, and said we had presented" a first-class Report on Correspondence," quoting therefrom freely. We extract his CO~CLUSIOX.

We have never realized the length of the English alphabet as we do at this moment. From A to Iz7.ard, from Alabama to Wyoming, what a vast distance is thus expressed! And now, having ~iven some little attention to details along the line of march, what shall we say of the whole? Say that true Masonry is growing elsewhere, not in numbers. surely, quite the reyerse, but in those nobler elements that have marked the few in all the ages, of time. We have little sympathy with deductions drawn from statistical tables, for men arc not to be numbered as one connts the sheep in u pasture. Say that the day of fuss and feathers, of pomp and parane, of self and self-seeking has well-nigh gone. :::lay, further, best of all, that bickering;; and strife and a puctilious regard for jots and titles to the ne~lect of the weightier points of the law are passing,away. It has been a year of reconcllliation and peacemaking. The Brethren of New York and Connecticut, of Missouri and New :;';Iexico, of Scotland and Quebec once morc dwell together in unity, and there is scarcely a ripple of discord to be seen in the :;\'Tasonic world. Many unsettled questions there are, some of them vital, but we have done with fighting each other, let us hope, forever. Horatio S. Mason, Carson, Wll,S re-elected Grund 'Master; and John D. Hammond, same place, was continued as Grand Secretary.

NEW HAMPSHIRE,. 1882. This Grand Lodge holds annual and semi-annual sessions. The Semi-annual Communication was held in the city of ~fanchcster, and was principally occupied in exemplifying the work. A committee reported Oil the life and death of Hey. James Adams, Grand Chaplain, who passed away December 10th, 1881.


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The Nincty-third Annual Session convened in Concord, May 17th, 1882. Officers and Representatives present in good numbers. Wc find no" Recapitulation," no" Index" and 110 "Table of Contents." If the Grand Secretary presented a Report, It was not published. He had printed an "Abstract of Returns of Lodges." From it we learn of an increase in membership amounting to thirty-one, the whole number of members aggregati!1g 7,841. Bro. Cleaves furnishcs the Fraternity a neat, well-printed journal. The District Deputies are pr!vileged to have their reports printed in the Proceedings. The Jurisprudence Committee presented a lengthy, elaborate and learned report on a very. simple question, viewed in the light of Missouri law and practice. We presume it was necessary to ai1' the subject for its health. The finding of the co.mmittee was that certain" petitions for a charter have leave to withdraw." They withdrawed. AI'I'UAL ADDRESS.

The M. W. Grand Master, Bro. Frank A. McKean, furnished a five-paged Report of his official labors. He said" progress" could be reported from all he could learn of the Craft. The Order had prospered and maintained a healthy increase. OBITUARY.

Since la.~t session death had been busy gathering from their ranks members of the Grand Lodge.路 Five of the Brethren have fallen, to whose memory the Grand Master paid appropriate tributes. No decisions were reported by the Grand Master. The Address was not of special interest, being a brief statement of local affairs. CORREsPoJ'mEl"CE.

A Review of ]04 pages was presented by Bro. "Albert S. Wa~t, for the Committee." We guess he was "the Committee." His examination of, and report upon the doings of fourty-four Grand Lodges ~vas in keeping with his well sustained efforts of the past. In his Review of Arkansas he " gets away" with Bro. Dodge on certain questions at issue. As Bro. Dodge has been elected Grand :Master. the New Hampshire Committee will have to lVait for a reply until the Arkansas Brother Dodge(s) around with another Report. Bro. Wait writes his review for the most part, and clipps from others with good judgment. ?llissouri, for 1881, was treated to a brief and courteous notice. We quote this: The Grand Lodge of Utah having' overruled a decision of their Grand Master, to the effect that when a member of a Lodge objects to the admission of a Brother as a visitor, the Master has no discretion, but must exclude the proposed visitor. Bro. Vincil ex'presses great surprise., and declares this new doctrine, and as strange as new. The doctrine is certainly not new, though doubtless many hold the view of Bro. Vincil and the Grand Master of Ctah. Our own Grand Lodge, however, have heretofore held doctrine in exact accordance with that of the Grand Lodge of Utah, and in a former report we discussed the subject at length, announcing similar views. 'Ve think man)' MaSOilS and Grand Lodges hold the same view. . We care nothing a.~ to the age of the doctrine in question. We objeet to the principle involved. The 'right or the 'Wrong of the matter must determine it, not age or precedent. We do not believe anyone can defend, successfUlly, the action of Utah, or overturn our position. The membe1'Ship of Lodges certa.inly should enjoy some rights over visitors. Brethren hll.ye the undoubted right to say who shall become members of thei~ Lodges. Be)'ond question, their rights, as to the presence of clements in their Lodges, do not stop at


76

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the ballot box. The" right of visitation" depends as much upon the will of the membership to be visited as it does in conferring the degrees. The members oj a Lodge have 1'ights peculiar to themselves. which rights no one outside oj said Lodge can contravene 01" infringe. To object out ari objectionable Brother is one of those Lodge-vested rights. The right is just as certainly an endowment as the right to reject the same objectionable Brother if he petitions for membership in the same Lodge. We ask anyone, who can, to differentiate these rights. Bro. Wait is such a pleasant writer, and is so agreeable in manner and matter, that we dislike to tackle him. But we have said enough. We clip one paragraph from the" Conclusion" of Bro. 'Vait's pleasant review: The year now closed, if remarkable for anything touching the interests of Masonry, has been for its absence of events calculated to arrest the special attention of the Brethren, or demanding discussion from Masonic writers. IiJdeed the year .eems to have been characterized by that best species of prosperity, a-telldency to close union, with little to disturb the fraternal relations of the Brelhren. Such matters of difference among some of the Grand.l\fasonicjurisdictions as called for notice in our report oflast year, have either been fully adjusted, or are in such progress of adjustment as substantialiy to have restored fraternal concord; and it may now be truly said that the Masonic Fraternity presents to the world an unbroken and undisturbed barmony: We hope to greet our Brother again in thc pleasant work of review ncxt year, as he was assigned the same position on the committee. A. \V. BAKER, Lebanon, G. l\1:. GEO. P. CLE.AVES, Concord, G. Sec.

NEW JER.SEY, 1882. This Grand Lodgc met in Ninety-fifth Annual Commnication, January 18th ..1882, in Trenton, with III. W. Bro. Joseph W. Martin, Grand Master, presiq.ing; and R. W. Bro. Joseph H. Hough, Grand Secretary. In addition to the Grand Officers, there were present a large number of Past Grand Officers, Past Masters and Hepresentl1tives of Lodges. The journal is artistically beautified with fine engravings of Past Grand ~raster Bro. Henry R. Cannon, Bro. James A. Garfield, late President of the United States. The number of Lodges and members in the jurisdiction are about the same as last year, perhaps a slight gain in both. The numerical strength is reported at 1l,7i2. THE

AN~UAL

ADDRESS

Of Bro. Martin is a very superior paper, much of it deserving special notice, and a transfer to our pages, far more. indeed, than our space wil~ allow. 'Ve present this: It is a pleasure to report that peace and harmony exist among the Lodges. nnd between t.he Lodg-es and the Grand Lodge. Bnt few occa.sions have arisen during the year where difference.,; have required the intervention of tlle Grnncl Master, and the prompt acquje~cence ofthe offending Lodges in his dedsons has sl:'rved to confirm and strengthen my often-expressed belief in the utter loyalty to this Grand Body of its subordinates. It is a cause also for deep gratification that the relations between the Grand Lodge of New .Terse}' and its sisler Grand Lodges have. throughont the year. been harmonious and pleasant. Diversities of opinion have been readily reconciled. and questions of law, and of jurisdiction over petitioners, discl1s~ed in It spirit that could not fail to result in a prompt and satisfactory understanding.


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77

He furnished a complete detail of official a('ts, embracing various matters of a local chA.racter. A dispensation had been granted rlivers Brethren to form a new Lodge; styled Jlfusconetcong. Nothing in a name, you know. . Grand lIiaster Martin presented a lengthy and eloquent tribute to the worthy dead of his jurisdiction, and several leading Masons beyond the home limits. DECISIONS.

Twenty. in number were reported, "and all and every approved" by Jurisprudence Committee, with a heartiness which evidenced warm appreciation. Some of them would not suit our jurisdiction. We will not p,articularize, as no great ,principle is involved. The Grand :Master says "it is patent that the Grand Lodge is living beyond its income." He said retrenchment must prevail or income be increased.. Divers recommendations were made, and then followed the inevitable

" CONCLUSION."

From it, this we clip: And so, my Brethren, ends the record of the year, alld with it ceases my cOllnection with the Grand Lod~e as its presiding officer. and with the Craft in this jurisdietion as its rnler. The gavel wnich. a twelve-month since. yon placed in my hands will, in ll. few hours hence, be transferred to that Brother who, by a m~jority of your suffrages, you may delegate to receive it. Joy and sadness mingle in the determination made to take this step~but, "mingle as they may," it is taken, and it is 'irrevocahle. Why the" irrm'ocablc," we llre not advised. The committee on his Address said: They feel satisfied that they express the unanimous convictioll of the Brethren who enjoved this privilege of listening to the address ll." it fell from the lips orour M. W. Grand Master, when they tlay that the address is creditable in the highest degree to both the head and the heart of its author, and the the Grand Lodge lIlay well be proud in inscribing upon its 'printed minutes an essay so full of eloquence lind ability as the one which will grace our next published Proceedings. Tl~e

following was well and worthily bestowed:

Rcsolt'cd, That this Grand Lodge sincer]y reg-rets the refmal of M. W. Bro. Joseph W.

Martill to longer occupy thestlltion of M. \V. Gralld Master, and desires to here express its appreciation of the courtesy, ability and fidelity with which he has filled that high office. ~I.

Resolved, That

W. Bro.

~Iartin

committee路 be appointed to cause to be prepared and to present to a Pit."t Grand lIIaster's jewel.

It

We cannot appreciate the following: /, A printed communication from the l\L W. Grand Lodge of Michigan, appealing for aid for the SUffering in tlmt State on account of the great fire dnring the last Summer, was rearl, and the M. W. Grand Master decided that it cuuld not be rCl:eived, as it was not properly signed or sealed. Our Grand Lodge made a donation to the l\Iichigan sufferers on some kind of a paper sent us by the Grand Lodge of Michigan. We do not know thnt it was'" properly signed or sealed." But the mOllcy went "all the same," and was soon acknOWledged by Bro. llllles, Gmnd Secretary. It was not very far from New ,Jersey to Grand Rapids by telegraph.


Appendix.

78

[OM.

CORRESPONDENCE.

A Report of 112 pages was furnished by Bro. "James A. Norton, for the Committee." Tt is equal to former reviews presented by this admirable reportorial writer. We have read him with profit and pleasure in the past. Both will be denied us in the future. Here is the reason:

.

This being our last Heport on Correspondence, we bid our Brother reporters an official good bye, and take occasion, in closing, to thank them for their uniform courtesy extended to us and to assure them that we shall continue to take a lively interest in their labors, and intend. so far as opportunity offers. to keel! informed of their discussions. 'Ve have aquired a relish for the polished productions whleh annually appear in the Proceedings of American Grand Lodges, and hope never to lose the interest we have in the various questions which give rise to the sprightly, witty and able Reports on Correspondence. Well, this beats us! We have just parted" officially'; with:l\1. W. Bro. Martin, the elegant writer and efficient Grand Master. Now here comes Bro. James A. Norton, late Committee on Foreign Correspondence, and bids us all an "official good bye." Who will follow, and what next? }{atters assume a serious a.c;pect when two such representative Brethren retire at the same time from the front in a smaU jurisdiction like" Jersey." 'We are truly sorry to part with Bro. Korton. But we wiII try and love Bro. l\I. B. Smith, the succeeding Chairman. We know oj him, and wish to hear Jl'orn him. Then Bro. Hough, Grand Secretary, is on the same Committee. All the good. things of Jersey are not yet exhausted. "Good bye," Bro. Norton, " In the sweet bye and bye" May we meet on some beautiful shore. WM. HARDACRE, Camden, G. 1\'1. .lOS. H. HOUGH, Trenton, G. Sec.

NEW MEXICO, 1881. The Fourth Annual Session convened at Las Cruces, December 19th, 18R1, with 1\ÂŁ. W. Bro. Simon B. Newcomb, Grand Master, present and presiding; R. W. Bro. David J. Miller, Grand Secretary. Several Special Communications had been held during the year, the proceedings of which were published in the jOlirnal before us. Six Lodges (all then in existence in the Territory) were represented. The Grand Master presented and eight-paged Report, embracing an account of his official work. One Lodge had been instituted Under Dispensation. Three rulings were reported, which we regard as sound and practical in the fullest sense. . Grand Master Kewcomb gave a full and explieit statement of his official course eoncerning the controversy between our respective Grand Lodges. The" Proclamation" of non-intercourse with the Grand Lodge of Missouri was a part of his Address. JIe followed this with it most fmternalletter from M. W. TIro. Will. H. Scott, Grand Master of Illinois. Bro. Scott acted a.'5 an intermediary between our Grand Lodges, owing to nonintercourse. Under a flag of truce, borne by him, we were able to get before the li-rand Lod~e of New Mexico the action of our Grand Lodge at its last session, concerning Sil vel' _ City LOdge. We were glad to avail ourselves of the friendly oflices of Bro. Scott, to send

.-....


1882.]

.I1pperu.1ix.

79

"through the lines" our" deliverance," and request the Grand Lodge of New Mexico to so shape its legislation that Silyer City Lodge might have another opportunity to accept the situation, or be left without excuse. Out resolutions, adopted last session, thus reached the New Mexico Grand Lodge, and were incorporated into the Address of M. W. Bro. Newcomb. He concluded his report on the 'vexed question thus: Brethren, our chief contention throughout this Hnhappy controversy has been to maintain our ?'i,qht to supreme and exclusive Masonic authoriiy within our territorial limits. This ?'i,qht the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri has at length conceded. I place the whole matter before you with the earnest hope that you will take such action in the premises as will result in the restoration of fraternal relations and inter-. course with our mother Grand Lodge, and harmony in our own jurisdiction. I will state in this connection that I have received 8, very kind and fmternal letter from l\L W. Grand Master Dockery, of Missouri, expressing the sincere hope that a complete and thorough restoration of fraternal relations between the Grand jurisdictions of Missouri and :Mew Mexico would speedily be consummated. I take great pleasure in making specjal mention of our Grand Representative near the l\I.W. Grand Lodge of llIinois. Bro. Hamilton has advocated our cause with great ability and commendable zeal. As the result of his labors, the Grand Lodge of lllillOis adopted a resolution placing her square upon our side of the controversy with Missouri. Fraternal relations with such Grand Lodges as had recognized New Mexico were reported as undisturbed. Bro. Newcomb said thatfm'ty-five American Grand Lodges have extender} fraternal recognition to their Grand Lodge. Grateful recognition of meritorious and valuable aid was expressed by him to his co-workers: I desire to express my sincere thanks to the Officers and Past Grand Officers of Grand Lodge for their kind assistance and support, and especially to Grand Secretary Miller for the very efficient manner in which he has oischarged the onerous duties imposed upon him by his office Bro. :Miller is necessarily called upon to devote much of his time and no slight lobor to the performance of these duties, ano hitherto he has had no remuneration beyond the gratification produced by the consciousness that he has performed his duty faithfully and ,veIl. I sincerely hope and trnst that the time is not far oistant when we can compensate him, in some measure at least, for the clerical part of his work; to recompeJise him commensurately with his ability and zeal I fear we shall never be able. Of financial matters, the following is a satisfactory statement: The financial condition of the Grand Lodge is good; we have no debt, and the . amount of funds on hand is sufflcient to pay the expenses of the Annual Communication. Brethren, let us never depart from the excellent policy established at the hpginning of Ollr existence as a Grand Lodge, and to which ,ve hnve since adhered, of]w.yinrJ OUT lI;ay

as

'/()~

{II).

The Address of Grand Master Newcomb. while brief, was comprehensive, and covered all the ground necessary, and was in excellent spirit. The Report of Bro. D. J. Miller, Grand Secretary, is a full and complete one. Hc works well for no pay. M. W. Bro. Griffin, Past Grand Master, presented a paper, as" Chairman of the Special Committee on the Grand l\Iaster's Address," which was, "by a call and vote of all the Lodges," unanimously adopted. We copy all that bears upon the point treated, without extracting platters heretofore published: Your Committee to whom was referred the Address of the Grand Master beg leltvc to 'report that they h,ave duly cO'lsidered the resolutions adopteo by the Most Worshipful (;rillld Lodge of Missouri, and that were transmitteLl to our Grand l\'1aster through the fraterual mediation of the Most Worshipful Graud Mastel' of Illinois, together with the report of the comJ!littce submitting them to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and, having


80

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[Oct.

considered the said resolutions and the said report, havc reached the gra tifying conclusion that the Grand Lodge of Missouri has coneeded the daim of nbsolute and supreme Masonic authority for which this Grand Lodge has so long and strenuously contended: it therefore affords us the greatest pleasnre to report that the causes which in the IOllin led to the interdiction of ~Iasonic intercoursc betwecn this Grand Lodge and that of ':Missouri no longer exist. Your committec therefore submit the following preamble and resolutions, and recommend their adoption; .

*

*

Resolved, That the resolutions adopted by this Grand Lodge at its Third Annual Communication, held on the 17th, 18th and 19th of January, A. D. 1881. declaring that all Masonic relations and intercourse had ceased and determineo betwecn this Grartd Lodge and the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, and interdicting and forbidding all Masonic intercourse between Masons of this Grand Jurisdiction and that of the Grand Lodge of )fissouri, be and thc same are hereby rescinded. Resolved, That the l\L W. Grand 1\laster be and he is hereby authorized and requested to cause proper proclamation to bc made of the adoption of these resolutions; and the R. W. Grand ~ecretary is hereby directed to trammit a copy of thc same to the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri and to all other Grand Lodges in correspondencc with this Grand Lodge. and that he also furnh,;h a copy thereof to each of the subordinate 路Lodges of this jurisdiction.

The above action repealed the "non-intercoursc" decree, and amicable relation's between the two Grand Lodges were thus happily rcstored. We devoutly trust that no cause may ever arise to disturb these relations. As showing the facts of history, we preseot the following action of Silver City Lodge, No. 465. The Brethren of that Lodge evinced a gratifying wfllingness to get out of the weather and save themselvcs from the wrath to come: At a regular communication of Silver City Lod~e, No. 465, A. F. and A. M., held December 1st, 1881, the following preamble and resolutIOns were oflered, and, on motion, were adopted by a unanimous vote: WHEHEAS, Silver City Lodge, No. 465, A. F. and A. M., being desirous of ending the discord now existing between the Grand Lodges of New Mexico and Missouri, and of harmonizing the Craft in this jurisdiction: therefore, Resol1Jed, That Silver City Lodge, No. 465, doe~ rcspectfully petition the Grand Lodge of New Mexico to grant it a charter, pledging itself to at once surrender the charter now held by it from the Grand Lodge of .Missouri if said petition is granted by your Grand Lodge.

The above was referred to the Committee on Grand Master's Address. A preamble and some resolutions having been referred to the same committee, a Report covering the whole ground was rendered," and, after lengthy discussion," was "unanimously adopted." WHEREAS, Information has come to this Most Worshipful Grand Lodge that a 111Imbel' 'of the Brethren lalcly compo~ing- Silver City Lodge, No. 465, Missouri Registry, A. F. and A. :'11., in this Grand Jurisdiction, who~e charter wa.s arrested by order of this Grand Lodge, April 22d, 1880, have intimated a willingness to regain their Mawnicstanding in this Grand Jurisdiction in order to form a Yoluntltry organic union with this Grand body; and, WHEREAS, In pursuance of a resolution of this Grand Lodge the following Brethren, formerly members of sllJd Silver City Lodge, have taken dimits from the Right \\'01'shipful Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge, to wit: Jacob Abraham. John H. Ea.ton. N. H. Gale .Jesus S. Garcia. Richard Hudson, R. H. Knight. Robert Y. :s'ewsham, John NicholsOIl, Norman F, Salter, Harvy H. Whitehillllnd James !Ii. Wilson; and, WHEREAS, Since the arrest of said charter, as aforesaid, Alpha Lodge, 1\0. 7, has been duly constituted in Silver City, whcre said Silver City Lodge formerly existed; and, WHEREAS, The Brethr<:n, aforesaid, who now int!mate a willingness to. have .the said Silver City Lodge rehabIlItated. have for the past lour years, and espeCIally Slllce the arrest of said charter as aforesaid, maintained and do maintain a refractory and defiant attitude towards this Grand Lodge, have persistently rejected our kind and fratemal offers to admit them to this Grand Lodge, have refused to obey or resp;ct an edict of this


,81

1882.]

Grand Lodge to them directed', and have persistently refused to recognize the authorit); of this Grand Lodge and do not now acknowledge t.heir error, nevertheless and notwithstanding th{)sc facts. and this Grand Lodge being desirous so far as is cOlJsistent with its self-respect lLnd dignity as the absolute Masonk authority within the Territory of New ?Iexico of covering with the broad mantle of Masonic charity the grievous mistake and the contumacy of our aforesaid erring Brethren, and of extending to them in the interest of peace and harmony another opportunity to regain their lost standing in the Fraternity, and for the sole purpose of securing the restoration of peace and harmony in this Grand jurisdiction, and of again cementing the bonds of friendship and brotherly love so rudely severed uy the contumacious action of said Brethren, and regardless of their defiant and refractory course, which produced these dissensions, and to the end that there may no longer exist any pretext for the continuance thereof; now, therefore, be it by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New :Mexico Resolved, That upon the written application of a constitutional nnmber of the Brethren who composed said Silver City Lodge at the time of the arrest of its charter as aforesaid, except those who have dimitted as aforesaid, asking that said Silver City Lodge, No. 465, ue rehabilitated, there shall be issued to them a charter from this Grand Lodge; and it is hereby made the duty of the '~Iost Worshipful Grand Muster, upon such application being made. to cause the Charter, whose issuance is provided for by this resolution, to be prepared and delivered to the Brethren making such application, and that said Lodge, when so chartered, shall be numbered'Silver Cit)' Lodge, No.8, and 8ha11 have concurrent jurisdiction with said Alpha Lodge, No.7, provided, that before said charter shall be issued the said applicants shall meet and elect the offtcers of said Lodge, and certify the same to the Most Worshipful Grand :Master. Resolved, 'l'hat the Grand Secretary be, and is hereby, directed to tran'smit a copy of these resolutions, duly certified under the seal of this Grand Lodge; to the Brethren formerly composing said Silver City Lodge, except those who have dimitted as aforesaid, and that he also transmit a copy thereof to Alpha Lodge, No.7, for its illformation.

We have but to remark, in winding up this history, that Silver City Lodge did surrender its charter to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and the same is now tiled away to sleep forever in onr office. Further, that the members composing said Lodge at the time specified above, did petition the New Mexico authorities for a new charter, and received the same. It is now â&#x20AC;˘ numbered eight on the Grand Lodge register. We wish to add that the Grand Lodge of New :Mexico persistently contended for its rights and won in the end. She was consistent in the contest, though we believe not always wise. Of this nothing need be said now, since "this cruel war is over." We are glad it is ended. That our views underwent some modifications as to the controversy,' us we gre,y into familiarity with the¡ issues involved, we are happy to record. In the conduct of the cxciting contest to its¡final conclusion we followed our honest convictions. That we were always right, and everyone else, holding adverse views, were wrong, we are far from believing'. A review of the controversy only tends to deepen onr sense of the fallibility of human jUdgment. With the unfortunate experiences of the past four , years we could now take hold of a similar subject and conduct it very differently. We have grown wiser and better by the experiences of the contest. We close by saying that the greatest satisfaction derived from the controversy is found in the fact that we wrote the Report adopted last year, by our Grand Lodge, which forced Silver City Lodge to terms, and brought her to recognize that she had to do something. We were unwilling that the peace of the whole ?fasonic family in America should be disturbed, jf not hroken up, just to gratify 1)1U~ Lodge, and that Lodge contending for, and on, a wrong principle. The Heport we prepared was approved and defended by three of the ablest. Past Grand Masters Missouri ever had, vi7.: Bro. Owens, Garrett and Anderson. ,The contest over the Report will never be forgotten by those who were present. But the contest is ended, and" peacc hath her victories," far more desirable than those of raging uattles. Our motto and acclaim is peace on earth; good will to men. We offer our congratulations and hearty good wist,les to our Brethren of New Mexico. HENRY L. WALDO, Santa Fe, G. M.

DAV. J. l\ULIJER, Santa Fc, G. Sec.

G.

L.-Ap.

6,

\


82

Appendix.

[Oct.

NEW YORK, 1882. The One Hundred and First Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted :Masons of the State of New York wa." opened at the Grand Lodge-room, in the city of New York, on the afternoon of June 6th, A. L. 5882. M. W. Horace S. Taylor, Grand Master, was present and presided; R. W. Edward M. L. Ehlers acted as Grand Secretary. The Journal of Proceedings is about the usual size, and has lost none of the attractiveness heretofore presented as an Annual, though the former Grand Secretary, Bro. Austin, has" ceased at once to work and live." The" Transactions" cover one hundred pages; Published Reports o{Deputies, twenty-two pages; Statistics, thirty pages; Report on Foreign Correspondence, one hundred pages; besides a List of Lodges and other matter of ordinary interest. From the" Recapitulation" we glean the following: Number of Lodges, 714; represented at this session, ni8. The number raised during the year, 3,34i. Non-affiliated or suspended for non-payment of dues, over jour tlwnsand; restorations, some two thousand. Number of Master Masons, about seventy thonsand. The membership does not vary materially from last year. The loss by suspension for nonpayment of dues is something astounding~overjom' thousand. There is some encouragement in the fact that about two tlwusand were reinstate~. Twelve Past Grand Masters were present at the Annual Communication. Grand Master Taylor presented an unusually lengthy and very able Address. It contains as much food for thought as any paper of the kind we have ever read, comi11g from the Grand East. Following a brief exordium, hc said: Before proceeding to the consideration of the practical matters which will claim our attention, let us pay a tribute of respect to the memory of those who have passed away since we last met. The notice of losses sustained by their own jurisdiction and others, was full and appropriate. Prominent among New York's fallen B;-ethren were the following: M. W. Stephen H. Johnson, dicd at Schenectady, in June last, soon after the meeting of the Grand Lodge. He was elected Grand Master in 186i, and had held responsible offices in the Legislative and Judicial Departments of the State government. R. W. James M. Austin died December 3d, 1881. lIe wa." at the time of his death, and had been for twenty-seven consecutive years, Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge. Although for some months his health had been somewhat impaired, his death was sudden, and its announcement caused a feeling of deep sadness throughout the State. On Friday, November 25th, Dr. Austin, while in his otTire eng~ged in the discharge of his duties, had an attack of apoplexy, and was conveyed to hIS home. On the Sunday following, in response to a note received from his family, I visited him. 1 found him sitting in an easy-chair, dressed, and apparently in the full possession of his faculties. I had a long interview with him, in which he indicated what he would wish to have done, in the event of his illness proving fatal, and I gave him such comforting assurances as I could. He seemed to be impressed with the idea that he would not recover, but I could not believe that his apprehensions were well founded. I left him fnlly believing that I should see him again, but after that day until his death he was unable to see me.

Thus passed away, full of years and of ll':mors, one to whom we had looked up to for more than a quarter of a century for counsel and guidance. To him, more than to almost any other man, does the l\lasonic Fraternity ill the State of New York owe its prosperity, aud its infiuence in other jurisdictions. His name, more than almost any other, was a respected, a familiar name wherever Masonry exists. To us, his loss is well-nigh irreparable; and it will be many, many years before the void which his death has caused can be filled. He has left us the example of a wise and good man and Maspn. Let us profit by this, and let us cherish his memory in our inmost affections.


1882.]

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83

The decease of leading Masons throughout the great Masonic family was properly chronicled. Among them we find the names of Bro. Englesby, 'of Vermont; Bro. Blackie, of Tennessee; Bro. A. G. Mackey, of Washington City; Bro. Tracy P. Cheever, of Massachusetts; and President Garfield. On the

con~ition of Masonry,

Bro. Taylor spoke as follows:

So far as I am able to jUdge, from my correspondence during the year, and from personal observation, the Lodges have enjoyed a fair degree of prosperity, and I believe that the'membership has been increased rather than diminished. I think the number of unaffiliations for non-payment of dues, will be found to be less than '[01' several years past, I would suggest that this practice may have been carried too far; and that it never should be resorted to, except in the case of a Brother who is able to ;pay his dues and refuses to do so. When a Lodge unaffiliates a worthy Brother, who IS unable to pay his dues, it violates the most solemn obligations of Masonry. No statute of the Graud Lodge can absolve a Mason or a Masonic Lodge from the obligations assumed at the altar. Th!1t cause exisl.€d for the above remarks by the Grand Master, concerning the nnlwming of so many Brethren for non-payment of dues. we have no doubt. We endorse his utterances as sound, wise and timely. Under the head of Complaints, the Grand Master reported several eases where the laws of comity had been broken, concern· ing material worked up which belonged to New York, and some the reverse. We believe no Webotuck affair is likely to grow ont qf the cases mentioned. The following will be read with interest: From the Report of the Trustees of the Hall and Asylum Fund, it will be found that very satisfactory progress has been made during the year in the reduction of the debt; and the thanks of the Grand Lodge are due to the Trustees for the judicious manner in which they have discharged the arduous duties imposed upon them. A new lodgeroom has been fitted up in the Temple, which was opened May 1st, called the" AUSTIN ROO}f," in memory of our lamented Grand Secretary. This room is a beautiful and valuable addition, and will materially increase the revenue of the Temple. On the subject of "Jurisprudence" the Grand Master said some things that must soon claim the sober consideration of legal minds in various jurisdictions, We present the following: I desire to say a word in regard to the force and importance of decisions of Grand Masters and thc Grand Lodge upon matters which are contained in the Constitution and Statutes. There is but one method by which the Constitution and Statutes can be changed, and that is the method provided in the Const.itution itself. Any decision of a Grand Master, therefore, although it be approved and confirmed by the Grand Lodge, which changes the Constitution or St.atutes, is null and void. For both the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge are as much bound to obey and conform to the Constitution and Statutes as the humblest member of the Fraternity.

We have \vondered why our American Grand Lodges never thought of, or discovered that they violated their Constitution by wholesale every yeaI'. Perhaps all Grand Lodge Constitutions and Statutes (or By-Laws) have clauses, by which amendments, alterations, additions' or repeals can be made only with some labor, and evcn with difficulty. We will take the Constitution of Missouri to illustrate our views. It is practically impossible to alter, amend or repeal our Constitution; The proposition for a change must be made on one of the first FOuR days of the regular annual session. The Grand Lodge of Missouri has not been in session four days within the last ten years. The proposed change should get it legal start, must go to the Lodges and be read in each one in the State tll1'ee several times. If a ]\fA.TORITY of aU the LODGES vote in favor of the chang-e, it comes back to the Grand Lodge, and a majority may adopt it on anyone of the four days of a th1'ee days' session. A By-Law can only be altered, amended or' repealed by a proposition to do so being read on three several days of the session, and published, and lie over one year, when it may be adopted b)' a majority of the members present. It will be seen from the foregoing how very difficult it is to secure even a needed ehange in our Laws. And we do not complain that these almost impossible conditions exist as guards to prevent too


84

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[Oct.

frequent and hasty changes. But, in the presence of these nearly impossible conditions, how ridiculous our custom must appear to every careful thinker. Laws and Regulations which can hardly be altered or repealed by the law-makin.q POWER, can be rendered nugatory for the time bE:ing by the ipsi dL-r.it of It Grand Master. Then he reports his" Decisiens" to the Grand Lodge, and that body gravely aPl)1'oves them, though it could not make the changes those Decisions" embody in less than twelve months by pursuing Constitutional methods. A Past Grand Master once said of a certain action of his Grand Lodge: "This Grand Lodge sometimes plays-a hot place." We do not know about the twt place, but we do know that Grand Lodges, like other bodies, do some very .funny things. And none are more amusing than those now under consideration. Some peacock, accidentally in office, will report thirty or forty "Decisions" for the glory of the thing, that he may appear wise above what is written-and the Grand Lodge will approve them. Many of them embody changes or additions to the organic law, which law ought not to be disturbed except by prescribed methods. If Grand Lodges would take the proper view of this subject, two results would be secured: .First-There would be preserved a greater respect for our laws. Second-Our Annual Proceedings would be freed from the presence of that modern nuisance called " Decisions." I.

Grand Master Taylor announced the amicable adjustment of the famous Webotuck' Lodge difficulty. He closed his treatment of the vexed question thus: If you shall regard the action of the Grand Lodgc of Connecticut as I do, the serious differences which have existed for nearly ten years, are now at an end. I feel that I have a right to congratulate myself, as well as the whole Fraternity of this State. upon this happy and honorable termination of the differences between the Grand Lodge of Connecticut and ourselves, and the restoration of the fraternal relations which formerly existed between us. And I reciprocate the desire of the Grand Master of Connecticut, that the harmony now re-established, may never again be disturbed.

On this subject a report was made, which was adopted. From it we make this extract: Your Committee feel well assured that every Brother in this jurisdiction will unite in heartily rejoicing- that all differences between this Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge of COllllecticut are happily ended, and Masonic intercourse restored, and they submit the following resolution for consideration: Resolt'cd, That this Grand Lodge is especially gratified at the renewal of fraternal relations with it.<; old and esteemed neigh bors, the Grand Lodge and Brethren of the State of Connecticut, and regretting past differences, most cordially express the hope and wish that nothing may ever happen to again mar the perfect peace and harmony now happily restored and existing. .

Thus is ended the needlessly troublesome controversy between sister jurisdictions tbat ought never to have given any annoyance. SOMETHING NEW.

We have read of Barnum's "WHAT IS IT." We believe it was on exhibition in the city of New York. Our curiosity never led us to hunt it up when in Gotbam. And 0111' dislike for mO'l/,stl'osities, whether natural or moral, will prevent any desire to become familiar with a lllo~t anolllolom; thing in the New York Grand Lodge. . Past Grand Master Joseph J. Couch, Chairman of a Special Committee on the" What is it," denominated this new monstrosity in Mn.sonry as

Well, the thing has a name. But does the creature exist? We will hear from Grand Master Taylor and then from the Committee of which 1\1. ''''. Bro. Couch was the Chairtnan. Speaking of what the committee calls "Grand Lodge PolHics," Bro. Taylor said bf the accursed thing: .


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So notorious is this evil, and so disastrous threaten to be its comequences, tbat no personal considerations should prevent it from being brought sqnarply before the Grand Lodge. No considerations of delicacy should prevent the Grand Master from bringing the Grand Lodge face to face with an evil which threatens its prosperity, and which, if not checked, will cudanger its continued existence. It is a fact known to all, that persons, past llnd present mcmbers of the Grand Lodge. make organized and systematic efforts for tbe election of themselves or their friends to high office, bringing to their aid all the questionable arts of the professional politician, and striving by artificial and unmasonic means to create such a sentiment for or agaillst a particular person as will insure his success or defeat, before the Grand Lodge as a body shall bave come together. The Grand Lodge is in fact deprived of its right to the free choice of its officers. Members are persistently solicited to vote for or against particular individuals, and路their attention is diverted from the discharge of the serious duties which they arc selected to perform. Tbe all-absorbing question has grown to be, not, What measures shall the Grand Lodge take for the good of the Fraternity? but, Who shall be elected to o11ice? The aggrandi7Alment of individuals is not the purpose for which this Grand Lodge was created. Its officers are its servants, called to occupy high places not for their own exaltation, but solely bccause the necessities of the Grand Lodge require their services. No person has the right to demand elevation to office. It is for the Grand Lodge itself to sclect its officers from among those it dcems deserving. No one can have "claims to office." and tbe more an individual permit;;; his own good qualities to be paraded the less reason is there why the Grand Lodge should recognize them. If the Grand Lodge has no higher duties than to elect officers 'from )路ear to year, any distinctions of its conferring will soon become trivial and empty. If it is to be controlled by political methods and manipulations. and if the' chief purpose of its being is to be the creation of the largest possible number of Grand Officers within the shortest sp'ace of time, its usefulness is gone forcvcr. The Grand Lodge is a body created for mo're substantial purposes. To use it merely as the vehicle for conferring titular distinctions upou individuals, is to degrade it from the high position it has occupied since its formation. These propositious are so self-evident, that under ordinary cireumstances it would be needless to refer to them; but in view of the unnatural condition of things which is sought to be brought about, it is incumbent upon the Grand Lodge to go back to first principles, and give sucb considerations as these their due weight. Any person who strives, by means of trickery and intrigue, to foist himself upon the Grand Lodge as one of its officers, is not only unworthy to be a Grand Lodge officer, but his presence should not be tolerated as a Mason. This unmasonic political spirit ha.'S become intensified in consequence of the more frequent' changes in Grand Lodge officers, which has taken place within tbe last few years. Formerly, when changes were less frequent, time was given for any excitement which existed during or previous to an election in the Graud Lodge, to subside. But now, no sooner is one election over than combinations are formed for tbe next, and thus the Fraternit)' is kept in perpetual turmoil. I commend this subject, in all its bearings and in all its possible consequences, to the serious consideration of the Grand Lodge.

r have felt compelled to denounce the present system of Grand Lodge politics, but in doing so r disclaim all intention of referring to individuals. I also recognize that the necessity of referring to this subject in vol ves the necessity of preventing my name from being presented to the Grand Lodge for re-election, lest I should be charged with seeking to advance my own !)ersonal interests. Now hear the committee and Bro. Couch: The committee would gladly omit all reference to these resolutions in their relations to Grand Lodge politics; but duty forbids, for their contents show conclusively that the whole case originates just here. With all its complications and embarrassments, it is a direct out~rowth of the political situation. In truth. the situation and the case mutually explalll each other. Meridian and South Side Lodges simultaneously espoused the cause of the removed Deputy, and passed the resolutions that appear in this case. . These resolutions are unmistakably partisan. In varied phrase they represent the Grand Master as disregarding his pledges; disappointing bis friends, using the powers of his higlLoffice for personal and partisan ends, and generally pursuing a course detrimental to the interests of Masonry. They characterize the newly appointed deputy as a selfish aider and abettor of the Grand .Master, and with equal distinctness they present the removed Deputy as one whose devotion to the" one term principle" and the interests of 'his favorite candidates caused his removal from office. "While the political situation explains the resolutions, they in turn expose and partly illustrate a great evil in the situation. Under a pretext of devotion or of opposition to the


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so-called" one term principle" that evil has grown apace. Its pernicious influences have extended until the worse than idle gossip of the corridor and ante-room has been incorporated in the order of Lodge business and placed permanently in the recorded proceedings; and now we are called to witness the amazing' spectacle of Masonic Lodges assuming responsibility for electioneering charges against the Grand Master, while he is compelled to exhibit and denounce the same before the Grand Lodge in justification of his 路own official action. This may be politics, it certainly is not Masonry. So long as these scandals festered "in the ante-rooms the situation was deplorable; when they corrupted business within the Lodges, it became intolerable. There was, then, not only "just cause," but a positive demand for prompt action by the Grand Master. His suspension of these warrants was, in fact, an attempt to stay the spread of pestilenee by a quarantine of the infected Lodges. Logically, this action should have been followed by a thorough investigation to determine appropriate remedies. The Grand :Master, however, decided to take no further action himself, but rather to place the whole matter before the Grand Lodge just as it stood; and in view of the manifest embarrassment that might have attended a different course no exception can justly be takcn to that decision. In the absencc of such further investigation by the Grand Master, or any formal charges against these Lodges for trial before the Grand Lodge, the committee has confined itself to the resolutions passed by these Lodges, and concludes by submitting the following resolutions: " I. That the above report be adopted as an expression of the sense of the Grand Lodge in relation to the matters therein contained. II. That the action of the Grand Master in suspending the warrants of Meridan and South Side Lodges be and the same is hereby approved. III. That the suspension of these warants is hereby terminated and that the warrants be returned with instructions to the respective Lodges to have the objectionable resolutions expunged from the record of their proceedings. In the name of decency and of Masonry, we ask,.to what have our New York Brethren come? What a plunge from the proudest position among American Grand Lodges! "GRAND LODGE POLITICS."

We have thought a little and read some in the years of life, but never in the realm of thought or the course of reading have we met with anything so repugnant to our feeling'S or so disgraceful to the Masonic name as is presented in the foregoing. Silch conduct has yet to receive its just and proper characterization. From a statement found in the Proceedings we learn that the Grand Lodge owes over SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS on the Masonic building called a Temple. Six years ago the Grand Lodge of New York had a membership of Master Masons amounting to 81,882. In these six years the additions to the membership have averaged, at a very low estimate, three tlwusand per year. This ought to have given one lmnd1'cd thOusand members by this time. The present membership of Master MasOlls is less than seventy thousand. What has become of the other thirty thousand? Look at the loss by suspension for non-payment oj dues annually reported, and the answer is at hand. Between Jour and fivc thousand are "unafflliated for' non-payment of dues" annually, as shown by the report. The loss from this cause for 1882 is 4,159. For six years this has been going on. From the Reports of the Grand Secretary of that Grand Lodge we find that for three consecutive years the loss of members by" unaffilition for non-payment of dues was 5,091, or 15,274 in three years. In seven reports, beginning in 1876,' and including 1882, the loss of Master Masons from the above cause footed up thirty thousand six hundred and twenty-nine, or an average loss annually of 4,375. As to what has caused this annual decimation, so alarming and appalling in its aggregate, we can only conjecture. We expect the taa; on the membership to pay off the "Temple" debt has had an effect. We guess so. By the time the remaining SIX HUNDRED THOUSAJ.'iD DOLLAHS are paid by levies upon the membership there may be more" unaffili.


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ations for non-payment of dues." We are prompted to ask a practical question: Does it pay? In our judgment these Grand Lodge elephants (grcllt temples) have done more to disaffect Brethren, weaken Masonic loyalty and bring the Institution into bad order than all other causes combined. The fact seems lost·sight of that thousands of Masons are poor, and therefore unable to provide luxuries for others which they cannot have or enjoy. We find the following was offerd and referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. It was not heard of after reference: •

R..esolved, That the M. W. Grand Master elect be requested to entcr into correspondence with the present Grand Masters of the different Grand Lodges, for the purpose of establishing a law which will require a specific residence within a State before a candidate will become eligible for Freemasonry. We had supposed that the different Grand Lodges" possessed ~uch a law." It is queer if they have not such a law already. Indeed, we think, the mover did not understand himself or the state of things generally. Our Grand Lodgc has had a law which will requirc a specific residence" of twelve montli$ in this juriSdiction, for many long years. We think conferencc not necessary on the subject. • II

II

II

We are glad to see that the Grand Lodge of New York paid a just tribute to a most deserving and able officer, the retiring Grand Master, as follows:

Resolved, That the retiring Grand Master, M. W. Horace S. Taylor, by his careful, conscientious and intelligent discharge of the duties of his office, has richly merited the thanks of this Grand Lodge, which are hereby tendered to him. .

CORRESPONDENCE.

A review of one hundred pages, from the pen of that veteran writer, Bro. John W. Simons, contained all examination of the Proceedings of forty-four American Grand Lodges, and several from abroad. The Report evidences the pains-taking care and' labor -of thc author, as ill former years. Missouri, for 1881, received the benefit of a threepaged notice. Bro. Stubblefield, our Grand Master, was liberally quoted from, as was Bro. Briggs, our Grand Orator. Bro. Simons referred to the decision of Bro. Grand Master Stubblefield, allowing a new ballot one month after some candidates had been rejected. Very true, Bro. Stubblefield did declare a certain ballot void, because it was afterwards discovered that fourteen balls were in the box, and only twelve members had been present. He held that twelve members could not legaUy cast fourteen ballots. Therefore, he set the ballot aside and ordered a new one. This leads Bro. Simons to say: This appears to us a very dangerous proceeding. We hold to the doctrine that the ballot, having been once declared, must remain until the lapse of such time as the Constitution may pr.ovide. Excuses are never wanting when it is desired to upset a contrary ballot. The rcason given in this instance is exceedingly diaphanous : either the ballot box was not properly prepared or there were two members present who knowingly voted twice each time. Either way, the ballot should have remained as declared. Bro. Simons did not mean to mislead his readers nor misrepresent Missouri. He is incapable of purposely doing either. But he has placed our Grand Lodge. in a wrong light before the Fraternity. If he had read the report of our Committee on Jurisprudence respecting said decision of Bro. Stubblefield, he would IHwe found that said decision was overruled. After reviewing the case, and citing our law against retaking ballots at subsequent meetings, the committee concluded thus: We regard the reopening of the ballot to rectify mistakes at a subsequent meeting, as a precedent fraught with danger. If it were established as a rule by the Grand Lodge, it


88

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would incvitably lead to discord and confusion. We therefore pronounce against reconsidering or retaking any ballot upon a candidate for the mysteries, at any meeting after he has been proclaimed rejected, until the lapse of a year, as the law directs. This conclusion was approved by the Grand Lodge, because it was in accordance with our existing laws of long standing. Bro. Simons overlooked tile final disposition of the case. BENJ. F~AGLER, Suspension Bridge, G. M. EDWARD M. L. EHLERS, New York, G. Sec.

NORTH OAROLINA, 1881. The Ninct)'路fifth Annual Communication was held D.ecember 6th to 8th, 1881, at Raleigh, with M. W. Bro. Henry F. Grainger, Grand Master, in the chair, and R. W. Bro. Donald W. Bain, Grand Secretary, and a fair number of Representatives of Lodgesninety-eight being represented. The Grand Secretary's statement shows that there are 220 Lodges at work in the jurisdiction-19J of these made returns, 29 did not. The reporting Lodges show a membcl'ship of 6,277. This is a small showing for the" old North State." TtJe Grand Secrctary reported 1,503 "residcnt Masons not membcrs." Then why return them? He then added 1,116 :i\'!asons from Ilj,St year's report, members, and" resident Masons" not members. By adding 2,500 names, persons formerly members of Lodges now extinct, he makes a 'showing of Masons in the State amounting to 11,:196. We do not apprcciate this style . of presenting the Masonic strength of a jurisdiction, because we cannot see the reason therefor. Bro. Bain has reasons no doubt for his works and ways. The Annual Address opcns thus: BRETHHEN-To God, before whom every :Mason has been taught that he should with reverence most humbly bow. we are laid under renewed obligation for His watchful care and merciful providence in permitting us to come again in safety around our common altar, to review. the work of another year, and by wise and prudent counsel. lay new plans upon our Masonic trestle-board whereby the interests of Free' masonry may be promoted, and the benefits it desiglls to bestow upon its votaries and the recipient.'; of its fostering care, be extended and more permanently secured. It is, therefore, eminently proper, and our imperative duty as Masons, to formally and humbly acknowledge our gratitude. and return 0111' thanks to him whose divine favor has been so signally manifested in the preservation of our lives and the prosperity of our Fraternity through another year, and to imToke His aid and guidance in the various matters which will be presented for our deliberation and action during our present session. It is not improbable that important matters, affecting the interest of the Craft, will be before you, and 1 sincerely hope that everyone will put aside individual preferences al)d personal considerations, and at all times and in al matters diligently endeavor to secure the adoption of such only as will most probably tend to advance the cause of our beloved InstItution. If, however, upon the consideration of any measure, Brethren I differ in their views. I earnestly entreat, as 1 believe you will, that you characterize your differences with a noble and pleasing emulation of who can best work and best agree. Of the condition of the Craft the Grand Master had this to say: It is a yery pleasing announccment that I havc to make to you of the increasing interest in Masonry in lllalIY parts of the State, while it is to be regretted that there has been, and still is, a declension in others. Upon the whole, however, it is evident that it has improved and is still improving. Others, familiar with the state and condition of the Craft, share with me in the belief that we are approaching a brightcr cra of prosperity


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than we have enjoyed for several years past. So far as I have been able to learn, the number of good men seeking admission into our ranks have very considerably increased in the recent past, and many who have deen non-affiliated are returning to the Lodges. He announced that his official correspondence" had greatly exceeded all expectations,· and recommends a· more perfect ·and thorough knowledge of the "Masonic Code." A few decisions were reported of minor character, and the same were approved. II

The Grand Master presented, at some length, a history of the condition and prospects of the Masonic Orphan Asylum at Oxford. He pronounced it a " Noble, and perhaps the most extensive and best organized charity in existence under Masonic supervision in this country." We presume he never saw the Home" at Louisville, Kentucky. II

STATE AID

Is rendered in a solid and liberal manner, as shown by this statement: The State appropriation of three thousand dollars for the support of the Asylum, made by the LegIslature in 18i9. was increased by the Legislature in 1881 to five thousand dollars annuall~. nut for this increascd aid from the State our embarrassments during the year would have becn much more serious than they were. It could not have come at a more opportune time, and for ·it we are profoundly grateful; it and the contributions of the Lodges and the friends of the A~'lum have been economically applied to the support of the orphan work and the erection of the new building.

lIIOXmfENTAL.

Masons ·love to honor their Brethren and keep them in remembrance when called hence. The Government of North Carolina and the Masons of the State, alike, honored themselves by perpetuating, in stone, the name. worth and deeds 'Of Governor and. Grand Master Caswell. The following statement, from Grand Master Grainger, is one of the ·most commendable things in his excellent Address: THE CASWELL MONFMENT.

During the month of June, I was requested by the Governor of the State and the Caswell .Monumcllt Association to call a special communication of the Grand Lodge, in Kinston, on the 3d day of August, and lay the corner-stonc of the beautiful monument erected in that town to the memory of Richard Caswell, the first Governor of North Carolilla. It was my pleasure. and my duty, to comply with their request. Richard Caswell was not Gilly a distinguished patriot aIld statesman, but ,vas a distinguished and 7,CalOllS Mason. He was the first Deputy Grand Master of this Grand Lodge, fwd its second Grand Master. While exercising the functions of the latter otflce he was summOiled to the Supreme Grand Lodge above. ~othing could be more appropriate than that the corner-stone of the monument. erected by the State to his memory. for meritorious services, be laid by the Grand Lodge over which he had presided, and whose highest interest and welfare he had at heart at the time of his death. I convened the Gand Lodge on that day. and in its presence and the presence of several thousand spectators. laid the corner-stone of that handsome monument. We, as well as the State, honor and cherish his memory. On the shllJt or the monument is a Masonic emblem, represellting the Holy Bible, Square and Compasses, as is a Master Masons' Lodge at work, with a glwel beautifully engraved just above. When the corner-stone was laid, Grand Master Grainger made a brief Address, from which me make an extract: His heroic and patriotic deeds will ever be held in ~ratdul remembrance by all lovers of civil and religious liberty. Few men. if any, during the dark period of the Revolution. did more to secure American iJl(lependence tban Richard Caswell. When our forcfathers adopted a Constitution for North Carolina as a free and independent State, they elected him their first Goveruor. and committed to him the a/rail'S of civil, government during the perilous years of 1776, liii, lii8 and 17i9. Throughout the


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Revolution, whether in the civil or military service. he was ever at the post of duty doing and daring whatever he deemed necessary for freedom and independence. When the war had ceased, and the civil government had been fully established and taken the place of the sword and the bayonet, he was a~ain elected Governor {)f the State, an event showing unbounded popularity and the high estimate by his fellow-citizens of hL~ patriotic services to the State. Not only did he occu:Py high places of trust and honor in the military and civil government of our early history, but was a distinguished Mason, and enjoyed the esteem and confidence of our Craft. He was appointed the first Deputy Grand Master and elected the second Grand Master of Masons in North Carolina, which latter office he held at the time of his death. Grand Master Grainger declined re-election on account of feeble health and heavy professional duties. But his Brethren would not heed his wishes. He was harnessed for another term. Five Lodges received charters during the session. Our friend and Bro. Bain, Grand Secretary, presented a journal of proceedings at once neat and attractive. He is a good officer, and we1mow him personally as an amiable and christian gentleman. We find this note in his journal as to a Report on FOREIGN

CORRESl'ONDE~CE:

Owing to professional engagements of the Chaitman of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. he has not been able to "furnish his Report to accompany these Proceedings. To avoid further delay in issuing this volume, he will, at the request of the Committee on Printing, complete his Report to be issued as a s~perate pamphlet. We have waited for the" pamphlet" aforesaid until the summer is well nigh ended, and the harvest is past, and no pamphlet. Guess it is not coming. We cannot delay longer, as the printer wants" copy." As we prepare this review in bed, deprived of locomotion, we realize that confinement is not re.~t, and pain is not s-weet, though some poet said so. Don't believe it. He never el~joyed (n the luxury of a sprained ankle and St. Jacob's oil. Grand Master Grainger and Grand Secretary Bain were both re-elected. The latter lives in Raleigh. .

NOVA

SC~TIA,

1881.

The Sixteenth Annual Communication was held in Halifax, June 1st, 1881, and was presided over by the Deputy Grand Master, Bro. Lewis Johnstone. The Grand Master, M. W. Bro. Allen Hill Crowe, had been freed from labor and called to rest on the 10th of November following his installation. Official duty and responsibility devolved upon the Deputy. He announced the death Of his chief in pertinent and tender terms. His Address was brief and proper. The Grand Secretary, R. W. Bro. Benj. Curren, furnished a complete exhibit of business affairs.. His Recapitulation showed sixty-eight chartered Lodges in the jurisdiction, with about 2,900 !\faster Masons. All the Lodges made rcturnS'except five. The Grand Lodge is somewhat embarrassed, financially, and has to appeal to the Lodges for aid. The mileage and per diem business has ha.d something to do with their financial troubles. From the Report on the acting Grand Master's Address, we take the following:


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The high and well-merited encomiums on the death of Jl,L W. Bro. Allen H. Crowe, late Grand Master, are such as must recommend themselves to this Grand Body, and yOllr committee 路would suggest that a copy of that portion of the Address be sent to the family of our deceased Brother. Your committee regret that they cannot, under the present financial condition of this Grand Lodge, do more than express most fully their sympathy with the family of our deceased Brother; but hope that the time will come when some action may be taken by this Grand Body to perpetuate the memory of our late lamented Grand Master. We received information-by circular-last season that Nova 'Scotia Masons had been bereaved, and in our Special Report announced the fact to our Grand Lodge. A memorial page was assigned as a tribute to the deceased. We did not receive their Grand Lodge journal until late in the season, when 0111' Review was in print. The journal is a neat one, and in. every sense very creditable. It gives a full statement of their doings; contains a full roster of Lodges and members; Reports of District Deputies; Revised Constitution, and Report on Foreign Correspondence. The Report covers less than fifty pages, and reviews forty-six Grand Lodge Proceedings. The Reviewer was Rev. D. C. Moore. Its brevity is a merit not to be discarded. The selections constitute its chief attraction. They are numerous and proper. The act路ing Grand Master, Johnstone, was complimented for his services, following the death of Bro. Crowe,. but was not chosen to the Grand East. WM:. TAYLOR, Halifax, was elected G. M. BENJ. CURREN, Halifax, G. Sec.

OHIO,1881. The Seventy-second Annual Communication wa.'! held at Toledo, commencing October 18th, 1881. M. W. Grand Master Bro. Reuben C. Lemmon present and presiding. R. W. Bro. John D. Caldwell, Grand Secretary, from Committee on Credentials, reported Representatives in attendance, as enrolled, from over three hundred chartered Lodges; whereupon the M. W. ~rand Master declared the Grand Lodge duly opened. The members united in devotion, repeating the" Lord's Prayer." Did

0111'

Brethren of" Israelitish " faith say the" Lord's Prayer?"

The above Report indicates a good attendance of Lodge. Representatives. The" Pay Roll" may not have been without its influence, as it footed up full ten thousand dollars. The Statistical Table shows a membership in Ohio of 29,100. How many Lodges are in the jurisdiction we know not, and have not the time to do the adding up. The Recapitulation does not show, and the Index is not at home. IIi communicating to the Grand Lodge a Statement of his Official Acts, Grand Master Lemmon said: From October last until May my official obligations compelled me to be absent from Toledo, and during that time I was unable to give personal supervision to the correspondence and official business of the Grand Master. ,He turned over the management of atnlirs to an experienced Past Grand路 Master. Where was the Deputy Grand Master? In his absence, why not invoke the official co-operation of the next in. rank, the Senior Grand Warden? He stated that a dispensation had been granteu to form a new Lodge. This is found in the Address:


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It affords me pleasure to state that since :your last annual meeting the differences between the Grand Lodge of Minnesota and the Grand Lodge of Dakota have been satisfactorily adjusted.

Differences have arisen bet\veen the Gralid Lodge of Missouri and the Grand Lodge of New Mexico, which remain a subject of controversy. The edict of non-intercourse issued by the Grand Lod~e of New York, in 1880, against :Masons of Connecticut has been withdrawn, and their differences have been referred to arbitration. With the exceptions named, harmony and good will prevail among the several Masonic jurisdictions of America. Happy are we to inform the Ohio Brethren that the" controversy" between Missouri

and New Mexico Grand Lodges is at an end. The charter of Silver City Lodge has been in our office for months past, and the members of that late recusant Lodge are keeping house for themselves, under authority from the Grand Lodge of New Mexico. Thirteen decisions were reported by the Grand Master. They appertain to local questions, and were practical applications of Ohio law. The decisions mentioned were referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, and that was the last of them so far as the journal shows. RECOGNITION.

The Grand Lodges of Indian Territory, Colon and Cuba and New South Wales were formally recognized.. GARFIELD TRIBUTE.

Ohio Masons could well afford to honor the name and worth of Bro. James A. Garfield; late President of the United States. This they did in Grand Lodge. We have seen nothing more appropriate than this: I But he was to us a Brother. In Columbus. Ohio, November 22d, 1861, he was brought to light as a Mason. He loved his Brethren '01' the Craft, and prized Masonry because all human distinctions here were lost in the more exalted ideas of genullle worth and manly Brotherhood. When the records ofvalor and magnanimous self-sacrifice are written by the historian of the late war for the integ-rity of the Union, the name of James A. Garfield will prominently appear. When the records of American statesmen are written, his will be reCOrde<1111 a prominent place. Bnt none of these will register all his worth, or even the noblest and best elements of his character. These were of the homely sort and they tonched, at once the heart of the queen in her castle, and the poor washerwoman in her hut, of the ruler of the people and the humblest laborer of the land. He enthroned the domestic virtues in his own heart, when a boy at work, when a man teaching and leading the people, when called to rule the nlttion; and never weakened their scepter by setting them aside for. a moment. His mother, his wife, his children, his home. the sacred writin~s and the worship of God were loved as mneh by James A. Garfield the President as by James A. Garfield the lll,boring boy at Newburg-. His life is a bright example for the youth of the land. His memory is a li~ht at every fireside. his example a model for the Craft, and all men would be better, purer and happier if they would fOllow his pious example in offering up incessant devotions in the house of God. While we all share in a deep sense of common bereiwement. we extcnd our sympathies'to the sorrowing Craft, our sincere condolence to his heroic and deeply stricken wife, his worthy and bereft mother, and his fatherless children, and offer uur fervent prayers to Almighty God that he may guard and keep them by the bounty of his providence until the end of life, and mercifully vouchsafe to each a glorious reunion with him they mourn in the peaceful abode of the blessed. In our Memorial.Discourse, delivered in this city, in honor of President Garfield, our Brother, we elaborated the points found in the above.


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t

The tribute to Bro. Albert G. Mackey, by Grand Secreta,ry John D. Caldwell,-is worthy of the subject and the autl~or. CORRESPONDENCE.

Bro.R. E. Richards furnishes, as Chairman of the Committee, a charming Review, covering seventy pages. His notices of finy-four Grand Lodge journals had necessarily to be brief to fall within seventy pages. The Report is well written where the reviewer used his pen instead of the scissors. We are pleased with an explanation furnished as to why mileage and per diem had been reduced from ten to sb: ecnts per mile, and from thrce 1.0 fwo dollars per day.. The explanation explains: The failure of the Grand Treasurer-since dead; peace to him-left the Treasury of the Grand Lodge, like Mother Hubbard's larder. absolutely bare. The old rate of ten cents per mile and three dollars per day would' exceecl by several hundred dollars the receipt.s of the current session. It. was therefore Hopkins' choice with the Delegates, six cents or nothing, and the forcible manner in which the situation was stated by the COUlmittee on Ways and Means, brought the grumblers to their senses: "If we payoff at the old rate, there not being money enough to go around, those who come first will be paid, while those who com~ last will get nothing." Ev~ry man of them feared he ll).ight be the last to reach the cashler's table; hence, the;f unammously agreed to reduce.... In reviewing Missouri, for 1880, he referred to a decision of our Grand l\laster Browne, thus: A Lodge U. D. conferred the Entered Apprentice Degree upon material bclon<Ting to another Lodge-an invasion of jurisdiction. Grand l\faster Browne decided tIle act " illegal, null and void." If a reviewer is perI'flitted to criticise the official acts of ll. Grand Master, the undersigl1~d would say there is a "screw loose somewhere" in the above. The applicant received the degree in a just and lawful manner; and, Olice received, it could not be' taken from him. If the Lodge committed an illegal act, punish it according to deserts: but do not declare the action, so far as applied to the candidate, "null and void." He was not at fault. ' It might be expected from the action of our Grand Lodge, a few years since, that we would feel compeUed to defend Grand Master Browne's ruling above criticised. Not much. We will not defend the decision, the Grand Master who made it, nor the Grand Lodge that approved it. Personauy, we would stand by Bro. Joe Browne always. But we do not endorse the doctrine of his ruling, but say that Bro. Richards holds the correct view. The candidate was an innocent pm路ty, and should not be made to suffer in consequence of the error, ignorance or folly of some Lodge. We are not set for the defense of everything emanating from the Grand East. Decisions sometimes, like their sources, are very rickety concerns, and will not justify patchin.q up. This has no reference to Grand Master Browne or his decision, though we will not defend'him on the above point.

Bro. Richards, of Ohio, seemed troubled at the liberality of Missouri towards her Grand Secretary, as to salary as well as the cost of our Report on Correspondence. Well, now, Bro. Richards, you are too amiable and pleasant for us to say to you what Bro. Vaux, of Pcnnsylvania, did. However, permit the rcmark that Missouri" provides liberal things" for all who serve or are depeIHlent upon her. The" cripple" receives from Missouri :MaSons a support, and would not allow the Grand Secretary to be cut down in wages. And our Missouri Fraternity wOlllrlnot give up the work of it,> Committee on Correspondence for an?/monied consideratioll. We thank Bro. Richards from the heart for his tender of sympathy. May we meet again in this department of thought and work, if not permitted to meet in the flesh. He is wisely continued as Committee on Correspondence. CIIAS. C. KIEFER, Urbana, G. M. JOHN D. CALDWEl,JJ, Cincinnati, G. Sec.


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[Oct.

Appendix.

OREGON,1881. By writing for it, we secured, in September, 1882, the Grand Lodge journal of Oregon for 1881, held June 13th of that year, and only one copy at that. Wishing to preserve it we shall not clip therefrom, and therefore this review must be very short, owing to the late hour of receiving the journal. Perhaps the journal of 1882 may come in before Grand Lodge convenes-who knows? The Thirty-first Session convened in Portland, June 13th, lR81, M:. W. Bro. R. P. Earhart, Grand Master, presided; R. W. Bro. F. J. Babcock was Grand Secretary. Sixty-seven Lodges and 2,763 members constitute two items gleaned from the journal. Nearly all were represented, as shown by the pay-roll. That ]iay business generally brings them. . THE ANNUAL ADDRESS,

Fourteen pages in length, is strictly business in character, and local in detail. He an路 nounced the year closed a prosperous one, with the prevalence of peace and harmony amon~ the Fraternity and Lodges. Foreign relations were reported as most amicable and cordial. The Grand Master had granted no dispensations for new Lodges. He presented at length a statement of the educational fund, showing its condition to be satisfactory. A few decisions were reported, which, with their local character and application, need not be commcnted upon. He dissertated at some length on the" great number of societies formed for every variety of purpose." Yes, this is an Age of Societism. But what has that to do with the Masonic Institution. His elaborate and extended comments upon the office, duties, etc., of a' Master, were interesting, instructive and readable. The Reports of Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were full exhibits of Grand Lodge finances. The Grand Lodge had been on the borrow, during the previous year, to the tune of $1,600. . ORATION.

An oration, full of good sense, wisdom and beauty, was delivered by our personal friend and Rev. Bro. J. R. N. Bell, Grand Orator. Bro. Bell, like Th. H. B. Andersonhis compeer elsewhere-from California, is a bold, elevated thinker-eloquent and strong. R. W. Bro. Newell, Governor of Washington Territory, was introduced to the Grand Lodge and made some remarks. I CORRESPONDENCE.

Fifty-four' Grand Lodge journaJs had been received by Bro. "J. F. Chadwick, Chairman." In It Report, of 159 pages, :\fissouri, for 1880, received full and fraternal notice in the three pages awarded us. Bro. Chadwick is a terse and cOJilprehensive writer, gathering, in condensed form, much honey from many flowers. G. M. STROUD, Portland, G. M. F. J. BABCOCK, Salem, G. Sec.

~...


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PENNSYLVANIA, 1881. Quarterly Communieations were held in the Months of :Mareh, June, September and December. M. W. Bro. Samuel B. Dick, Grand Master, presided; R: W. Bro. :Michael Nisbet, Grand Secretary, was at his post. Business interests, of varied and important character, were considered and disposed of. Our esteemed friend and R. W. Bro. Richard Vaux, Past Grand Master, was received and acknowledged as the Representative of the Grand Lodge of Colon and the Island of Cuba. The Grand Lodge, at the June quarterly session, resolved that it was proper to hold a Masonic celebration in Philadelphia, June 24th, 1882, to commemorate the Sesqui-Centenllial of the First Grand Communication of the- Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. An extensive committee was appointed.

../

Grand Master Dick decided adverse"r y to a "custom in Philadelphia," that all the officers of Lodges mW'lt be installed at the same time" the Worshipful is installed." The rule seems to 'have prevailed to install the ;liaster on the night of the election, and the other officers at the succeeding meeting. The rule was summarily smashed by the Grand Master. Extended, full and detailed Reports were presented and considered, touching the large financial interests carried by the Grand Lodge. These interests are ably handled, and in a healthy any gratifying condition. Bro. Nisbet, Grand Secretary, presented a Report, shOWing the membership in that jurisdiction to be nearly 35,000, with 379 Lodges. At the fourth quarterly session, December 7th,1881, the annual election took place, which' resulted in the choice of all the officers in service. These were installed at the Annual Grand Communication, December 2ith.. The progressive spirit of the age, and aggressive, as well, seemed to have threatened, seriously, the fine Masonic property of our Brethren in Philadelphia. Railroads make and destroy property. And it gives but little concern to such corporations whose property , stands in their way. The following explains our meaning: Resolved, By the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Pennsylvania, in Quarterly Communication assembled, That we do hereby earnestly protest against the proposed location of what is known as "The Elevated Railroad" upon Filbert street, adjacent to the M~onic Temple at Broad street, because, in our judgment, it will destroy the architectural beauty of It structure that is a permanent ornament to the city of Philadelphia. and which belongs to the Fraternity, not only in our city. but in the State; and also. because it will impair and be a permanent injury to the usefulness of the building itself, and be an unqualified injustice to those who have labored earnestly and zealously to rear this structure, not only for the use of the Fraternity, but to remain for centuries as a thing of beauty in the adornment of our city. At this writing, We are not advised of the outcome of this matter. We have seen the property mentioned above, than which none is superior on the continent. We have also seen the unsightly, annoying and forbidding" Elevated Railroads," like the abomination of desolation, spoken of by the prophet, " standing where they ought not." We hope the" Temple" property in Philadelphia may escape the presence and blight of this modern Iconoclasm. Bro. Richard Vaux presented the following, which was approved:


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Resolved, That the Righ t Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted :Masons of Pennsylvania, having heard of the death of I{ight Worshipful Bro. James M. Allstin, M. D., Grand Secretary of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New York, tenders to the Craft of that Masonic jurisdiction its deep regret at the loss it has sustained in the death of a tried, true and faithful Masonic officer of the Grand Lodge of New York. Resolved, 'rhat a copy of these resolutions be trammitted to the Gr,and Lodge of New

York.

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered on the minutes of this Grand Lodge.

Fraternal Masonic recognition was formally extended to the Grand Lodges of Ireland and New Mexico. " The Almoners of the Grand Lodge Charity Fund" reported that they had extended Missouri had one beneficiary; Virginia, eleven; Pennsylvania, 246. The" Stephen Girard Charity Fund" was disbursed to the amount of $3,319.10. Relief had been granted to "215 poor and respectable Brethren "-196 of these were of the home jurisdiction.

relief to 2il applicants. The sum thus expended reached the amount of::;:3,130.

ADDRESS.

Bro. Dick, Grand Master, rendered an official account of his stewardship, which is replete with mattcrof local intcrestand importallce. The Address was essentially a business one, showing'a g-ood knowledge of the fiscal interest and general condition of the jurisdiction. lie recorded the decease of Past Grand Master Alfred R. Pottcr, which is the Nth Past Grand Master called to rest within three years. Truly, death regards not rank or age. We all rnust go. Nearly five thousand dollars had been contributed by the Lodges in response to a circular sent out, appealing for aid in behalf of the Michigan sufferers. Surely, the Masons of this coulltry do some queer things, to be as bad people as Blanchard and other fools represent them. "Wisdom is justified'of her children."

CORRESl'ONDEKCE.

Bro. Richard Vaux, Past Grand :Master, "Chairman of the Committee," gives the Masonic world It delightful entertainmellt in his Annual Heview, of ninety-seven pages. It is a ?1!l'Wen Report. We fail to discover any evidence of the use of scissors. The work is characteristic. It is the work of Bro. Vaux. No one but he can produce such a Review. Like Bro. Parvin, of Iowa, his style is peculiarly his oWll-strong, original and terse. His Introduction to the review of fifty-one Grand Lodge journals is rare' and taking. We never could writc an Int1'oduction. In appearing before the public as a speaker, getting stflrtcd has always been the trying part of our work. Bro. Vaux can bttroduce his Report and then present it. We have been amused at the trenchant manner of this old Roman, as he hews here and there, and, like Mark Antony, "moves right on." IIis allusion' to the Report of Bro. Brown, of Illinois, caused a quiet smile, which ~oon faded away when we remembered 'our own review of that huge work. Bro. V:lUX pertinently asked whether" Bro. Brown ever hoped to see a Chairman of any other Committee all Masonic Correspondence follow his example" in producing a Report of nearly five hundred pages? This deponent speaketh only for Missouri. Should a. committee prepare a Report of such dimensions, it would result in a flilIcml. With Bro. Vaux, we do not object to the style or matter of the work, but to the e.1:ample set other committees. We think Ohio got a little worsted in the" joust at arms" with our veteran Brother of Pennsylvania. .Reviewing New Mexico, Bro. Vanx said:


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This committee eould not heretofore recogni?:c New Mexico, because she was neither supreme nor sovereign in her jurisdiction; but since all Lodges there, and the whole Cmft, recognir.e the Grand Lodge of ~ew Mexico, and there are none to contravene this acknowledgment, we rejoice to be able to extcnd to this new Grand Lodge our cordial and most fi'aternal salutations, and shall ask the grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, at its present communication, to recognir.e it. New Mexico is now "supreme" and "sovereign in her jurisdintion," and the recognition above is opportunc and proper. Of our Missouri journal,Jor 1881, Bro. Vaux has numerous, kind and complimentary words, for which we heartily thank him, No one in the family of Reviewers has treated us, in our experience, with more kindly consideration and forbearance than our venerated and distinguished Brother. His reply to our friendly and frank criticism of last year, on the making of Masons under age, is as follows: The annual Report of the Committee on Foreig-n Correspondence come's up' to the high standard Bro. Vincil established in his first Report as Chairman of this Committee. His notice of Pennsylvania, like his notice of all the other Grand Lodges, is full and complete. Right \Vorshipful Bro. Vincil docs 'not understand how our Right Worshipful Grand Master Bro. ~isbet can make a man ,. under age" a ~rason. He says .. under age" is not lawful Masonic age, consequently he contends the Landmarks have been broken. This is very sad, very sad, very sad! But let us tell Hr<'>. Vinci!, that when the Grand Master of Pennsylvania, by virtue of his authority, 'plenary and supreme, makes an individual a Mason, in contemplation of Masonic law, he is then and there eo instante of lawful age. On the same SUbject, we. find a well put statement in his reply to Bro. Richards, of the Ohio Committee: . Our system makes no mention of legal age. Masonic law requires mature or lawful age for all its initiates. Either of these may be more or less than the civil law standard amol1g different countries, climates and peoples: For general convenience, as an accepted rule, the legal majority, or twenty-one years, is by custom adopted in most l\Iasonie jurisdictions as the minimum age for candidates; but it is only for convenience, and is not a landmark. We understand now what the custom is in Pennsylvania. We respect our Brethren very highly in thatjllrisdiction. But their cU8tom is not our cnstom, nor do we believe in it. There should be a un//orm standard among the jurisdictions of the world. The following is too rich to be lost, but must be handed round: Esteemed Bro. Vincil, Bro. MacCalla's prayers are lay prayers. He has never been annointed with the holy oil, nor has there ever been any super-imposition of hands upon him; but you ought to )lCar him, as we sit together, goillg o\'er the work of this Report, utter his unclerical prayers. I will give you an example: "I do pray you, Bro. Vaux, stop a moment, and let us take a rest. I do hope and pray, Bro. VllllX, that you will stop reading that Report on Jurisprudence. J understand it." Opening- the Proceedinl?s of l\lissouri, looking up from his '\'Titing, "J hope and pray that Bro. Vincil's Report IS as good this time as it was last; there is some pleasure in hearing it read; "-and after awhile, working all night, looking up at the hands of the clock as they point to the small hours of the morning, then hear Bro. l\lacCalla change his tune-quit praying, and begin at something like this: "Right" Worshipful Sir, I swear I alIl going. home." We wonder if Bro. Vaux did any praying of any kind on the occasion mentioned. We fear he did not even utter a good, old-fashioned "Amen," or else Bro. MacCalla would not have quit praying, and" swear I am going horne," thus suddenly" fall from grace." We think be must pray sometimes, as he concludes, his admirabie Review, thus: We invoke the Great Architect of that Spiritual Temple, whose foundations rest on eternal justice, love, mercy and truth; indestructible, everlasting; that change not in jot or tittle, to vouchsafe to our Fraternity the blessings o( His Divine favor, and so direct and order all proceedings of the Craftsmen, that Freemasonry may remain stable, unchanged and unimpaired. To which we respond, gladly,-" Amen." SAMUEL 13. DICK, Philadelphia, G. 1\1. :MICHAEL NISBET, Philadelphia, G. Sec. G. L.-Ap. 7.


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QUEBEC, 1881. â&#x20AC;˘ Two emergent communications wcre held, in addition to the "Twelfth Annual Communication," during the Masonic year, the doings of which are fully reported in the the journal now before us. The Twelfth Annual Session convened in the city of Montreal, September 28th, 1881. M. W. Bro. John H. Graham, Doctor of Laws, Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. John H. Isaacson, Grand Secretary. This Grand Jurisdiction carries on its. roster fifty-seven Lodges under charter, with a membership of about twenfy-five hundred. The session now under: review lasted three days, and performed valuable and important labor. We are pleased to record that since our Grand Lodge extended to the Quebec Brethren an unqualified recognition, full and complete comity has been established between our jurisdictions. Quebec, through her Grand Master, Hon. John H. Graham, LL.D., recently commissioned as her Representative near the Grand Lodge of Missouri, our distingnished Bro. Rev. Cbarles C. Woods, Deputy Grand MMter. And a commission has been issued from this office, by order of our Grand Master Dockery, to Bro. Robinson, as our Representative at tbe Grand Lodge of Quebec. Our fight for tbe rights of this sister Grand Lodge, and our move last year for its unqual~(ied recognition, have reached a grateful fruition. \\'e only add here and now that the journal before us contains an account of the very happy settlement of difficulties in Quebec, growing out of the hitherto non-adherence of the Lodges in that territorial jurisdiction. The Masonic world can afford to be glad and offer congratulations. For the twenty-five thousand Masons of Missouri we send a hearty, rousing shout ,)f joy across the border to our long troubled Brethren. Indeed, we feel ever so jubilant, not only for them and the principle at issue-thus again gloriously vindicated-but for ourselves, because ~e are out of tbe woods concerning the New Mexico embroglio. Hurrah fo~ the doctrine of Grand Lodge sovereignty and common sense. At one of the emergent communications mentioned, the question reached a happy solution, as showri by this: The M. W. the Grand Master then from the throne, all membcrs oj Grand Lodge standing, communicated to the officers and Brethren of Elgin, King Solomon and Argyle Lodges, tbe resolution of Grand Lodge, adopting the report of the committee. Mutual hearty congratulations were exchanged on the so happy settlement of the long standing difficulty, and the officers of the three Lodges took their seats as members of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. The above named Lodges were" of the Scottish registry," and having adhered to the Grand Lodge of Quebec, the controversy with Scotland is at an end. But bow about tbe non-adhering Lodges which belong to "old England?" There are three of them. They will not surrender their charters and so vacate a sovereign territory or jurisdiction, nor will they unite with the Quebec Grand Lodge. They ought to do one or the other. We are in favor of Quebec having all her patch to herself, as we contended for New Mexico last year. England is willing for her Lodges in the Dominion to unite with Quebec, but they don't do it. Then try them a little longer, until patience and forbearance cry for justice. If they will not adhere, go for them. Hedge them about with non-intercourse and appeal to the Grand Lodges of North America to refuse them recognition. Do not perpetrate the farce of declaring them clande.<tine,¡ for they are not-they are legitimate Lodges. Do not declare their charters arrested. Proceed prudently and with discretion. Bye and bye the mother Grand Lodge will say you must,. and they will.


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We copy the following from the very able and exhaustive Report of Grand Master Graham, bearing on the subject: For twelve years, three Lodges of English constitution, viz: the St. Paul, the st. George and the St. Lawrence, have been suffered to continue within the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, contrary to the constitutions of the Fraternity and in contravention of the rights, privileges and prerogatives of this Grand Lodge, and to the detriment of theCrllft within her territorial juriSdiction, and many fraternal efforts have been put forth to induce the said Lodges voluntarily to become of obedicnc~ to this. Grand Lodge and to be enrolled on its Registry, but thus far seemingly without avaIl. The Grand Lodge and the Grand Master of England have repeatedly affirmed their willingness to acquiesce in the union of these three Lodges with this Grand Lodge, should they so elect. but England has hithc'rto failed (although frequently appealed to by this Grand Lodge) to do what this Grand Lodge holds to be her d.uty in tile premises, namely, either to recall the warrants of said Lodges or to require them to become of obedience to the Grltnd Lodge of Quebec. It appears. therefore. that much longer forbearance on ,the part of this Grand Lod~e can scarcely in reason be looked for, either, by the Grand Lodge of England br by the saId three Lopgcs. It is therefore my opinion that the Grand Lodge of Quebec, in strict conformity of the constitutions and landmarks of the Fraternity~in the defense and ma.intenance of her sovereign rights and prerogatives as a lawfully constituted and duly recognized Grand Body-with a due regard to her solemn obligations to the sister Grand Lodges of the world from whom she has received recognition. and with whom she is in fraternal correspondence-and because of her !mperative duty to uphold and promote the welfare, the unity, the rights and general mterests of the Craft, both at home and abroad; that from all these and every other Masonic consideration and obligation, the (~ntnd Lodge of Quebec wmdcl be jttUy justified in taking- action for the immediate vindieation of her sovereign authority which has been so long set at naught; and is now adopting measures towards the said three Lodges of English institution here, similar to, and based on the constitutional enactments cited above from the British constitutions; and ill employing the same means as have been adopted by the Grand Lodges of England and Scotland, and by Grand Lodges on this contincnt, in like qircumstances as Quebec now is, in the defense and viudication of their rights and prerogatives when such have been set at naught and denied by Lodges or individual Masons within their respective sovereign jurisdietions. Yet, notwithstanding all these a.nd other like important considerations, I beg earne_<;tly to advise Grand Lodge not to take any decisive aetion thereon at this present communication; and, with a profound appreciation of the grave responsibility devolving upon me, I pray you, fraternally, to acquiesce therein. The Address of Grand Master M:. W. Bro. Graham, is one of the ablest papers that has emanated from any of the American Grand Lodges within our term of observation. Fortunately, indeed, was it for the Grand Lodge of Quebee that such a wise and able officer has been at the head of her affairs for the past eight years, to guide the Craft through such perilous times. We appreciate the following: OUR 1I1ARTYRlm BROTHER.

On the 2d day of July last, our eminent and illustrious Rrother, his Excellency the President of the United States-General, the Honorable James Ab'ram Garfield, was shot by an assassin, and, lifter a lingering illness, borne with Christian, manly and heroic fortitude, he died from the effects of the wound on the 19th day of September instant. The whole world was then struck with horror at the foul dced. The neighboring Republic is now plunged into the deepest sorrow, a.nd all good and true men of every nation, kindred,and tongue, share their ~rief-mourn with them in their sad affiiction~~ao~?~\~;~~~~bl~fo~~e~:~~cho~~fg~~all~~;~he%~pathY and condolence to that great None felt greatcr horror at the accursed deed which struck him down-none feel more profound sorrow at his sad death-and nonc more deeply sympathize with the sorrowing nation, or the sadly bereaved mother, wife and children, than the members of our Fraternity. I now therefore propose that this Grand Lodge, in anllual communication assembled, do sorrowfully express and suitably convey our heartfelt sympathy and sincere condolence to the deeply afflicted family of our m:l.rtyred Brother, with the fervent prayer that the Most High may ever have them in, His holy keeping, and at the last may He receive them all to Himself, and to never-ending and blissful communion with the dear departed. So mote it be. '


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I beg also to propose that a memorial page of our Grand Lodge Proceedings be dedicated and hcld sacred to the undying memory of our illustrious Brother, the late HON. JAMES ABRAM GARFIELD.

A Revised Constitution of excellent and meritorious character was carefully considered and adopted. A Report was submitted by the "Board of General Purposes," and adopted. It contains some very plain statements about the" Mother Country," which remind us of a paper. we have heard read on the 4th of July in this country. It was the opinion of our forefathers, over one hundred years ago, that some people" knew no law as to entering, or con tinuing to encroach upon, another's fields." But here are some of the words of our Quebec Brethren about their Mother Grand Lodge: . There remanl;' the grave and important differences between us and the Grand Lodge of England touching exclusivc Masonic jurisdiction within our Province. The latter body unhappily knows no law as to entering, or continuing to encroach upon another's fields; but quickly recognizes a trespass upon its own peculiar domain. This is obsolete doctrine in modern Masonic lore the world over elscwhere, and ought In England to give place to a more acceptable interpretation of right. The discussion of our recognition and the principles affirmed at the formation of this Grand Body, and adhered to with fraternal tenacity ever since, have been almost a series of confiicts with foreign Grand Bodies for supremacy within our own territory. Happily, those contesting the rights with us are becoming fewer and less able to cope with us. The efforts now bein<Y made for the final settlement of the question with England are in the hands of able Crat-tsmen, who, if sustained, will ultimately vindicate our ri~ht to govern ourselves and all Craftsmen within our own legislative division Masolllcally, and victory will establish that right only is might. JOHN H. GRAHAM, LL.D., Richmond, G. M. JOHN H.

ISAACSO~,

Montreal, G. Sec.

RHODE .ISLAND, 1881. The journal of Proceedings now under review should have been examined and reported upon last year, but were not received until August, 1882, when written for. As but one copy came, we cannot sparc it from the library for clipping purpose, and, therefore, must give a resume of its contents verybriefiy: This journal contains the transactions of a special communication, the semi路annual and thc annual meetings. The Ninety-first Annual Se&~ion was held in Providence, May 16th, 1881, and was presided over by M. W. Bro. Edward L. Freeman, Grand Master; R. W. Bro. Edwin Baker was Grand Secretary. This is a small jurisdiction, territorially, but has thirty-five Lodges,. with a member路 ship of 3,795. The table of statistics shows a decrease in members since 1880. This Grand Lodge receives the Annual Address from its Grand Master at the semiannual meeting, refers it to a committee, and a report is rendered at the annual communication. The Address of Grand Master Freeman was presented and referred during the session now under consideration. We will learn what the committee think of i(from the journal of :May, 1~82, which we hope may reach liS before August, 1883. The Grand Master reported, at length, his official acts, embracing dispensations, constitu-


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tion of a new Lodge, appointments, approval of By-Laws, decisions, visitations; condition of the Lodges and finances. He concluded his business paper with an eloquent and practical exhortation. The journal is beautified by superior likenesses of Past Grand Master E. L. Freeman and President Jas. A. Garfield. . A two-paged Report on Forei~n Correspondence was presented by Rev. Bro. H. W. Rugg. It treats of Scotland and Quebec, of New Mexico, of New South Wales, and of New York and Connecticut. Thcre is nothing in the report wor.thy of special mcntion. TheholJe of Bro. Rugg, that the action of Missouri might be such as to lead to an early and amicable settlement of the New Mexico controversy, has been realized. If the journal of 1882 comes along in time, it will be examined and reported on. We do not know who is the pl'esent Grand Master. A postal, recently rec.eived, informs us that Bro. Edwin Baker, Providcnce, is still Grand Secretary.

SOUTH. CAROLINA, 1881. The Onc Hundred and Fifth Annual Communication was held in Charleston, December 13th, 1881, M. '\T. Bro. James F. 'Izlar, Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. Charles Inglesby, Grand Secretary.•Representatives were present from 1<10 char~ered Lodges. Therc are 182 charted Lodges in the jurisdiction, with a reported membership of nearly six thousand. The average being a little over thirt); members per Lodge. The Grand Master rendered a brief business report of his official service. therefrom a short homily on

We extract

TE~lPERANCE.

I have becn frequently paincd and mortified at the conducot of members of this Grand Lodge. Some Brethren seem to forget that temperance is one of the four cardinal virtues, and, in forgetting this. bring disgrace upon themselves, and upon the Order which they ha.ve been selected to represent, and which they knowingly and wilfully misrepre8ent. These things, BrethrCI1, ought not so to be. Consider for a moment the solemn truth that "no ma.n liveth to himself." That every thought and deed makes its impress upon the world, and influences in It measure the conduct of our fellow-men. That the work you are doing upon irnm·ortal minds will not crumble and perish, but will last to all eternity. Standing in the honored position where you have plaecd me I would, ill a spirit of Brotherly love and affection, call your atwntion to these evils; and warn you of the consequences to yourselves, and to the Order which you profess to love and venerate. Remembcr that it is not Frecmasonry. my Brethren, that makes 'the man, but the man that makes Freemasonry honorable or dishonorable. We mentioned, with feeling, the decease of Bro. Albert G. Mackey, so long connccted . with the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. The name and works of Bro. :Mackey will live in his old jurisdiction as long as an intelligent· Brotherhood may exist. The Grand Master reports a debt still weighing down the Craft as formerly. Of the embarrassed condition of the Grand Lodge, he said: But with all the able mana"'cment of our distinguished Brother, the Financial Agent, the debt of the Grand Lodge stUI remains. Some means should be devised, some method should be adopted, for the speedy settlemcnt of our outstanding obligations. Too little attention has been given to this matter Ilt our Annual Communications. It is a question of the utmost imp'1rtance, and should receive earnest and careful consideration. I feel peculiarly interested in this matter, as it will be remembered that the Grand Lodge


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declined at its last communication to adopt any measure proposed for the raising of money to defray the expenses of the Grand Lodge, and pay the interest on the bonded debt. The result of this action will be to incrcase, ill stead of diminish, the Grand Lodge indebtedness. This action of the Grand Lodge, in my opinion, was suicidal, and the evil consequences must therefore fall upon those who struck the blow. Too much Temple, we presume. He referred路 to our troubles with new Mexico, and endorsed the action of Grand Secretary Inglcsby in resigning his commission as our Representative near the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. We devoutly trust that our distinguished Brothers Izlar and Inglesby felt greatly relieved, andIeel good still, over what they said and did. We give them joy. As we no longer have a Representative at the Grand Lodge of South Carolina our interests must suffer until such time as one can be found who will take the position of" a friend at路 court." \Vhen that will be depends upon the present opinion of our South Carolina Brethren concerning us of Missouri. \'\'e think that after reading our Special Report of 1881, on the New Mexico controversy. Bro. Inglesby may learn that some of us in Missouri had a hard task to lead our Grand Lodge to the light. While . we were employing our own methods for its accomplishment, and not being understood by many, we have no very gushing compliments for those who deserted us in the fight. Grand Master Izlar furnished his Grand Lodge with a dozen decisions. For the 'most part they are good rulings. One or two are, to us; incomprehensible. The dullness of our mental perception is no bar to the light that 'may be in the rulings referred to, though we are not the happy j'ecipient of the light. However, the Committee ou Grand Master's Address said that his decisions were" in all respects, according to Masonic law, correct and impartial," so far as they were" capable of judging." We presume said decisions will stand the test after receiving the above endorsement, added to which we have to record the approval of the Committee on Jurisprudence. The last above named committee presented this: Resol1Jcd, That it is the scnsc of this Grand Lodge that a Brother holding dual membership is entitled to fill any office in the gift of either or both Lodges at one and the same time.

And the same was adopted. So we withdraw our opposition to the ,custom of dual membership. We discover new beauty and usefulness in the law or rule tolerating it. It is a charmiug idea, and dazzles us. Then it is so serviceable. A want quite general can be so easily remedied. One Brother can hold office in "both Lodges" at once. The Lodges, by doublin,q up, can have all the bright workers employed, and their talents utilized. The Lodges will thus have a good opportunity to get better officers than under our rule. Then some Brethren will be able to secure office in Lodges away.from home, where they are not so well known and appreciated. Some prophets are without honor in their own country or ne;ghborhood, but away from home they ean spread themselves "like a grccnbay tree," Give them a chance. Let them spj路ead. Let the Brethren "fill any office in the gift of either or both Lodges at one and the same time." Give them plenty to do, it will prevent rust. Besides, it will always be so convenient for one Brother to fill offices in "both Lodges at the same time," and enable him to do justice to both. Added to all, will be the encouragement to members of one given Lodge to fit themselves for office and duty, when a dual member from another community eall "come over and help us" by taking office away from them. The only remedy for them will be to play the dual act and go from home to get office and post up for the work. The above rule, adopted by the Grand Lodge, places dual membership in a new light. " We never saw it in that light before." If we had only been enlightened sooner, all our feeble efforts in opposition to the dual custom would have been spared, and instead, they would have been employed, as now, in its advocacy. We are so fascinated with the rule


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that, if it prevailed in l\1issouri, we would offer an amendment, and have universal membership established, and then allow a "Brother to hold office in anyone or ALL the Lodges at one and the same time." Wouldn't we have a few of them though? We observe that the Jurisprudence Committee, above mentioned, favored "nominationB jor O.f}U:ers oj a Lodge." Their recommendation was approved. The Report. on Correspondence was prepared by Bro. Charles Inglesby, and covers eighty-eight pages. He reviewed the doings of fifty-seven Grand Bodies, home and foreign, Missouri, for 1880, being included. His review of our matters of that year seems like reviewing faded dreams, as the principal subject was New Mexico. That question, has been,adjudicated so long.. since that allusion to its status seems an ex parte treatment. Bro. Tnglesby endorsed our views on the Kentucky-Tennessee issues. We think Bro. Rob Morris will find very few to endorse the Kentucky position. We d~ not believe he would do so if he were out of that jurisdiction. Bro. Inglesby defends duai membership as it exists in his jurisdiction after a fashion, and answers our objections thus: Well, our Gmnd Lodge has now amended its Constitution, and forbids dual membership. Even before this \\'ag done, however, the case stated by Bro. Vincil could never have arisen. Our Constitution fixes" erasure from the roll" as the penalty for 110n,payment of dues. Suspension is only for crime, and it has been repeatedly decided that, in case of dual membership, suspension in one Lodge equally affects his membership in the other. Neither equId a difficulty similar to that between' New York and Connecticut arise in our jurisdiction, because with us each signer of a petition for a dispensation to form a new Lodge is required to state wh3,t Lodge he belongs to, and if it is one beyond the jurisdictioll, is not permitted to sign until he procures his <limit. \..'ith referellce to Masons from abroad, for the express purpose of preventing an invasion of jurisdiction, our Constitution provides as requisites to affiliation-1st, a residence of twelve months in this State; and, 2d, the production of a dim it. But, says Bro. Vincil, when he has his dimit he is an unaffiliated Mason-but he is one holding a dimit, and the whole scheme of our Constitution and legislation is to induce such Brethren to affiliate. Where the petitioners are resident Masons and members of Lodges within the jurisdiction, they are not required to procure dimits before the new Lodge is chartered: became, should Grand Lodge decline to grant a charter, in such case the petitioners would all be left unaffiliated Masons. The law in this jurisdiction is. therefore, as follows. and we think Bro. Vinci! will COllCur in saying that it avoids , the evils to which he refers: "Masons who sign a petition for the formation of a new Lodge do not, upon the eharter being issued to suclLLodge, ipso jacto, become members of the same and sever their connection with their former Lodge. On the contrary; they retain membership ill their old Lodge, and only become members of the new Lodge by taking dim its from the old and joining the new body. While the Lodge is under dispensation it has no members, the Worshipful Masters and Wardens merely acting as proxies of the Grand, Lodge. When it is chartered, such Brethren as have been initiated, passed and raised therein, become -ipso facto members. The others must regularly sever their connection with their former Lodge and join the new one. As we have previously recorded our convenion to the custom or dogma. of dual membership, we accept, all and every, the statements of our fraternal Brotber. Everything is satisfactory except a j(:U) things, and they may be accepted when we understand them. Let us see. The Committee on Jurisprudence, already quoted, said, "that a Brother holding dual membership" may fill offices in both Lodges. Bro. Inglesby, says above: "Our Grand Lodge has now amended its Constitution, and jorbids dual membership." We cannot understand how it isjorbidden by an "amended Constitution," and aUowed to such, an extent by the Committee on Jurisprudence as to permit a Brother holding dual membership to fill office in two" Lodges at one and the same time." We will wait for an expl~nation.

Once more Bro. Inglesby says, above, that to prevent" an invasion of jurisdiction our Constitution provides as requisiteB to aUiliation.¡ 1st, A residence oj twelve months in tltis State;" "and, 2d. The production of a dimit." â&#x20AC;˘


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This committee mO\'es "non-concurrence." "A 1'esidence oj twelve month.~" in South Carolina is a necessary requisite to affiliation, though the affiliant has a dimit when he invades that jurisdiction. \Vell, what next! Bro. Inglesby says" our CONSTITUTION provides" that twelve months' residence is requisite besides a dimit, in order to affiliation. 'Vell, as" our Constitution" so" provides," we have nothing more to say, except you only need the" Chinese Wall" to finish your jences with. JOHN D. KE~NEDY, Camden, G. 1\1. CHARLES INGLESBY, Charleston, G. Sec.

TEXAS, 1881. The Forty-sixth Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Texas was convened in the city of Houston, at the Masonic Temple, on Thursday, December 8th, A. L. 5881, A. D. 1880, at 10 o'clock A. ?of. The Grand Lodge was opened 'by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, Bro. J. H. McLeary, in ample form, and with prayer by Right Worshipful Bro.J. J. Clemens, Grand Chaplain. Right Worshipful George H. Bringhurst, the Grand Secretary, was at his post. Nine Past Grand Masters were in attendance. There were Representati.ves present from 270 Lodges, besides 35 Grand Officers, 12 Past 'Grand Officers, and 172 Past Masters, nearly 500 in all. We learn, incidentally, that there are five hundred Lodges in the jurisdiction of Texas, with a membership of about seventeen thousand. This would give an average membership per Lodge of thirty-four. Grand Master McLeary presented the longest Address .'we have met with the present year, not even excepting Illinois. It covers thirty-two pages. He 9pened thus: "Again the cil'cle of the sun isjinished," We hope the sun will continue to "circle." \\'e think it do. We would not have it stop yet awhile. He announced the general prosperity of the Craft in Texas, and the prevalence of peace and harmony. As to his work this is presented: My labors have been arduous. and I fear .that it may be with a feeling of too great rplief that I approach the time when I shall su'rrender the gavel and the cares of the exalted statioll. in which your Brotherly love ha~ placed me, to some other Brother, who, if he may not have more zeal for the cause of Freemasonry, may have more leisll1'e for the work, and mDIe ability to perform the high duties of the Oriental chair. In this connection, I beg to assure my succeBsor that the office of Grand Master of Masons in Texas is no sinecure. Every moment of leisure has been devoted to its duties, and the manual exertion alone is considerable. I have written during the year about four hundred letters to the Brethren. and distributed several thousand circulars. It has been my lot, also, to make many decisions, involvin~ more or less labor and investigation, the most important of which only will be reported. I have not been able to visit extensively, a..<; was my illtcnti011, owing to the confilling duties of the political office which the people of Texas have called me to fill. We regard his correspondence as light. In the same office we wrote over one thousand otncialletters during our 1irst term in this juriSdiction., Thirteen Dispensations had been granted for the formation of new Lodges. He reported the issuance of muny other Dispensations-too numerous to mention; the arrest of charters and other oflicial acts. Four decisions find a place in his Address. He holds to the doctrine that a one-eyed man cannot 1'cccive, enough Masonic light to become a true and faithful.Brother among us.

-....


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Anyone who had been initiated with such a defect must be arrested in his "wild career" so ., soon as the blemish is ascertained." Yes, stO]) him, though he may be morally as pure as " Truth lind Grace" can make him, but receive and advance candidates with two eyes, wbose characters are stained, whose lives are libels upon Masonry, and. whose moral standing the devil would repudiate. Bro. McLeary paidjust'and eloquent tributes to Past Grand Master John B. Jones, of Texas; Albert G. Mackey and President James A. Garfield. The Grand Master presented a pretty full, though somewhat condensed, Report from each of the Annual Reports of the thirty-two District Deputy Grand Masters of the State. He recommended that the Grand Secretary should have an assistant. His appointment of a ". Private Secrcta1'Y" was announced, and he recommended the creation of a "permanent office" of that kind. Well, Texas is a large country, and they have big things and ways down there. So the Grand Master of 17,000 Masons ought to have a "Private Secretary." It is the first time we have met the idea. We favor it, provided the aforesaid "Private" is permitted to exercise all the .functions of his chief, and become such high functionary in the event of death or removal of the Grand Master. The Grand Lodge Committee said: Your committee do not concur with the M. W. GrandMaster in his recommendation of the employment of a Private Secretary t<> the Grand Master at the cost of the Grand I,odg-e. We think the honor of being a Grnnd Master more than compensates for the trouble and expense of performing the duties, however numerous and burdensome, incidental to the office. Taking the Address of Bro. McLeary as a whole it is more tha,n an ordinary paper, evincing throughout great zeal, earnest purpose and vigorous interest. Deputy Grand :Master Matthews made an interesting Report. Bro. Albert Pike' was in attendance during the session. He was introduced, heartily welcomed, and, upon being requested, the R. W. Brother enlightened the Brethren with an elaborate and interesting Address upon the symbols and usages of the three degrees of Freemasonry, which was received with marked attention. A vote of thanks was tendered him for his instructive Address. The Grand Lodge provided an assistant for Grand Secretary Bringhurst" thus: Resolved, That the Grund Secretary be and is hereby authorized路to employ a deputy for four months in ca'ch year, and at a salary of one hundred and fifty dollars per month, to be paid by the Grand Treasurer upon a warrant of the Grand Secretary, provided a portion of the time for which such assistant Secretary shall be employed shall embrace the period of time included between the 15th day of November and the 1st day of February following, and partiCUlarly during the Annual Communications of the Grand Lodge.

The same committee presented the following: Your committee heartily concur in the' action of the M. W. Grand Master in refusing Dispemations to confer degrees out of time-believing, as they do, that the rule in force renders the conferring of degrees too successively rapid, either for the good of the Order or for the benefit of the candidate so receiving them. . OUr Texas Brethren are sound on general principles, but nothing they ever did pleased us more than the above deliverance. The followinp; is good: The habit of asking aid from the different Lodges of the State upon the happening of any casualty, howevcr trivial, hilS been of latc years too eommon in this juriSdiction, and cannot be too severely reprehended. In this case, the loss, as reported by the M. W. Grand Master, seems to have been small indeed. and not at all corresponding to the effort made by 711ineola Lodge to 0btain relief. ]\ot eoutent with an appeal to the Lodg-es in this jurhdiction, it is to he inferred that thesc Brethren contemplated seeking assistance beyond the limits of the State. Bro. James :Masterson offered this, and it went to a committee:


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Resolved, 'rhat the printing of the'Reports on Foreign Correspondence is a useless expense, and hereafter, except when otherwise specially ordered by the Grand Lodge, will be omitted from the pUblished Proceedings.

This was the same Brotber who had been appointed the year b'efore to prepare the Report on Correspondence and didn't do it. This was the same Brother of whom the Grand Master said: ' It will be remembered thatat the last Communication a Committee on Foreign Correspondence was appointed, with R. W. Bro. James Masterson as tbe Chairman. Knowing his eminent fitness for the position, I re;;ted s'athsfied that we would have an excellent Report. But on the 25th of .June last I received a letter from him declining to write a Report, but 1I0t'giYing, as it appeared to me, a sufficient reason therefor. I then wrote to him to reconsider his determination, since which time I have not had the pleasure of hearing from him directly, but afterwards, on the 6th of October, through a Brother residing in Houston, I learned that he was determined not to make a Report.

This same Brother is Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence for next year. We hope his determination" not to make a Report" may give way to a better purpose. As the whore thing is considered by him as a useless expense" he ought to resign in time for some one else to write a Report. Possibly the following may have mollified him, and caused a change of heart: II

Resolved, That the present method of distributing the printed Proceedings of the sessions and work of the Grand Lodge Ine insufficient; that bue few of the members of subordinate Lodges can inform or acquaint themselves with the many important matters annually being presented, OWillg to the small number of copies of the Proceedings supplied; and that to remedy such insufficiency, a pro rata distribution of olle copy of the Proceedings of this body for every twenty members or fraction thereof, as reported by the annual return of each subordinate Lodge, be issued to the several Lodges.

Our Texas Brethren "provide liberal things" for the needy and suffering, as evidenced by the fact that $1,a56 had been sent to the suffers in Michigan. A Lodge of sorrow was held on Sabbath of the session" in memory of the dead who departed this life during the past Ma.sonic year." An appropriate and interesting Address was delivered by the newly elected Grand Master, Bro. Thomas M. Matthews. This same Brother, UpOIT his installation, delivered a good inaugural Address. He lives at Edam, Texas.. George H. Bringhurst was re-elected Grand Secretary, and lives ll,t Houston.

UTAH, 1882. It is a matter ofastonisbment to us how Bro. Diehl can crowd so much matter into his journal. Before us is a little annual of only 142 pages. It contains a record of three Grand Lodge meetings-two special and one annual communication. The Academy of Music bad a corner-stone to be put in place, and the Grand Lodge must do it, and an oration was in order. Bro. Robert Newtori Baskin delivered a four-paged Address, .. which was frequently interrupted by applause." This was wrong-the applause-for two rea.sons: 1st, it " interrupted" the speaker-perhaps, confused him; 2d; and consumed his time, thereby preventing a longer speech. Give us more speech and just leave out the applause.

The Grand Lodge was convened November 20th, 1881, to bury its S~Ilior Grand Warden, Bro. Gumpert Goldberg. Tbe remarks of the Grand Master are in place here


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. BRETHREN OF TH E GRA ND LODGE: For the first time since the existence of our Grand Lodge one of its officers has died while at his post of duty. Behold the West, it is draped in mourning. The Brother who, by your suffrage, occupied that station for two years and two days, is no more: bis earthly career is enden. Bro. Gumpert Goldberg has obeyed a summons sent to him from the Grand Master on High. He has left us never to return. Our Senior Grand Warden died at his home. in the city of Ogden, la..,t Monday. In the death of our departed Brother, his family suffers one of the greatest of life's aJIlictions; the community will miss a good man and true; the Masonic Fraternity, an ornament to the Craft. A Brother l"Iaster, in whose cbaracter was blended all the qualities which constitute a perfect structure, has passed away, and for us it only remains to pay the last sad tribute of respect to our BroLher and co-worker in Masonry. It is for this reason that I have convened the Grand Lodge. THE ANNUAL CO:lIMUNICATION,

Being the eleventh, convened in Salt Lake City, January 17th, 1882, with M. W. Bro. Philip Henry Emerson. as Grand Master; and R. W. Bro. Christopher Diehl as Grand Secretary. Seven chartered Lodges were represented, these being all [that are in the jurisdiction. The membership ofthese Lodges amounted to 421. Then comes the Address of the Grand Master, consisting of eleven pages. Next we have Reports from Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary, the latter is an exceptionally good paper. These路 are followed by a Report of Grand Librarian, Bro. Diehl-the usual run of minute work, election and installation. Then we have the membership of thejurisdiction, by Lodges, memorial pages, and a sixty-paged Report on Correspondence, by the Grand Secretary, in which he reviewed the doings of fifty-three Grand Lodges. All the foregoing contained within 142 pages of good, clear, readable print. How do you do it, Bro. Diehl? ADDRESS. Bro. Emerson, Grand Master, presented a good, sound, conservative Report, filled with business and practical s~ggestions. The following item furnishes a bit of news to us: From information received, I learned that peace and harmony have reigned among the Lodges and Brethren on the" Gem of the Antilles" ever since the union was perfected. But an intruder has come from without, causing trouble llnd annoyance. I am in receipt ofa communication from the M. W. Antonio Govin, Grand Master, informing me. that the Grand Oriellt of Spain undertakes to, and has established and cbartered Lodges on the Island of Cuba. Against this assumption, the aid of this, and of ever)' Ameflcan Grand Lodge, is implored. . Let a few more" Orients" try their hand at invading the jurisdictions of the world, and soon that style of lIfasonry will be quarantined against by legitimate Masonry everywhere. We are ready for the order to go forth against all "Orients." We like and applaud the following from the Address of Bro. Emerson: There is no question in Masonic law upon which I stand more firm than on the question of Grand Lodge jurisdiction and ~overeignty, and I believe that every member of this Grand Lodge coincides with me on this important qUelltion. It is said that the doctrine of Grand Lodge juriSdiction, as admitted in North America, is of American origin. and was not known during the earlier history of Grand Lodges. For that reason, and for that alone. the European Gmn<l Lodges oppose this doctrine, without which lIfasonic affairs on this continent would be in constant turmoil, and which is essentially necessary to el!'ect Grand Lodge supremacy and regulate Masonic matters. From the same jUdicious paper, the following excerpt will alford genuine pleasure to our readers, showing, as it does, the prosperous and healthy condition of Masonry in a country where the slime-pits of Mormonism seethe and boil. This national fester, whose leprous flow of corruption pollutes the very atmosphere, can find neither place nor encouragement among the Fraternity in that jurisdiction. Here is the excerpt: . Within {)ur own jurisdiction, the Craft have been more than usually prosperous. Although the net gain~in membership, as will be seen by the Report o~ the R. \1Ii. Grand


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Secretary. has not been large, yet all the Lod~es ~ive evidence of sound and vigorous life. Financially, they never were in a hetter condition. When we remember that so long as we hold fast to the principles and ancient landmark:;; of Masonry. a large majotity of the people of the Territory are unworthy of !lnd ineli!l:ible to its privileges and benefits, and must so continue until there is a radical and fundamental change in their belief and practices, and when we further renH'mber the changing and transitory condition of the class forming the minority from which our ranks must be recruited, I think we have abundant cal1~e for congratulation in the advance that has been made during the past year. Throughout the entire jurisdiction the Brethren have 10yaIly devoted them~elves to promoting the prosperity of the Fraternity, and by living together in peace and harmony, are day by day adding" strength !tnd supp'ort" to the Institution of Freemasonry; and the pure precepts of our Order are bearing fruit in the daily lives of its members. Let us all most earnestly strive. not only to continue in this ., good way," but improve upon it, until 'we make the Order all in every-day practice that it is in theory. If we do not succeed in bringing every member of the Craft up to the full stature of a perfect Mason, yet our standard of excellence will be greatly advanced. We are glad to record the fact of a presentation mentioned by the Gi'and Master, as follows: . On the 22d day of March last, our R. W. Grand Secretary attained his 50th year. As these are the times when centennials and semi-centennials are very appropriately celebrated, a number of his Masonic Brethren deemed this a fitting opportunity to show their high regard for him, both as a man and a Mason. and to demonstrate in some appropriate manner the fact that they appreciated the valuable services rendered by him in advancing the standard of Masonic knowledge and usefulness in this jurisdiction by his indefatigable labors as Grand Secretary, Grand Librarian, and especially as Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence. They invited the Brethren generally. with their wives and sweethearts. to meet, on the eyening of the day named, in this Hall. where, at the request on their behalf, I presented him a valuable gold watch and chain. so engraved as to perpetuate the j0yous OCClusion and the high esteem in which he is held by his Brother :Masolls. for generations to come. All who were present will10ng' remember the touching remarks of our worthy Brother at this unexpeCted demonstration, as. with moistened eye and tremulous voice, he responded to the brief words of presentation. The only remark we have to make, is, that the recipient, Bro. Diehl, has deserved a long time. Having been penned, and caned, and watched by our Brethren, we know all about Bro. Diehl's surprise, embarrassment and emotions. He is worthy of the" valuable gold' watch and chain" presented, and any other favors his Brethren can confer.' WATCHING

The Grand Master closed his very excellent Address with these words: And no~ my work is nearly done. For myself, the past year has been crowded with pleasant associations. Whether the future rears of my life's pilgrimage be few or many, the recollection of the year just passed wiI be bright with sunny memories. , Bro. Diehl, Grand Secretary, in his admirable l{eport, gives a resume of their history as a Grand Lodge for ten years past. We excerpt as follows therefrom: A }IILE-STONE.

It is a singular contingency that the I}rand Lodge. at its Ninth Annual Commulllcation. amended Section 1 ofits By-Laws, so as to meet hereafter on the third Tuesday in

January, which directs us to assemble this year on the same date the Grand Lodge was organized ten years ago, This is, indeed, a strange happening, and should not pass by unnoticed. ' Brothers of the Grand Lodge, we have wandered, to路day, a full decade. In the journey oflife. a decade is considered to be a mile-stone. It is a mile-stone in the journey of a Grand Lodge of Ancient. Free and Accepted Masons. As the past extincts more and more.. and as those who have knowledge of our early epoch may have been called to their long Journey before another decade has passed, we should pause a moment and look back and chronicle some of our historical events for a guide in the future. after which we may have gathered strength enough to journey onward and upward to the top of yon mountain.

*

And now, my Brethren, it is ten years ago this verv day that Bro. Sol. Siegel came in my place ofbnsiness and summoned me to appear bet'ore the Grand Lodge, where I was


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informed that I had been appointed Assistant Grand Secretary, and would now be installed as such. At first I was more than astonished, because. among the 124 :Masons then in Utah, there were but two who had opposed the formation of the Grand Lodgenamely, Bro. S. J. Nathan and myself. We both had fought it in our irlt. Moriah Lodge with our voices and votes: a third member talked in our favor previous to the meeting-, but, Ilt the final show of hands, joined the enemy. This is a matter of history, and wfn convince you that I had not sought the honor, neither was I acquainted with the work of the office, but well did I know that I had to do it all. On the 8th day .of October, 18i2, it being the first Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, I was elected and subsequently installed Grand Secretary, and. by the suffrage of its members, have held the office since; Whether J have done and discharged my several duties to your satisfaction and to the interest of the Craft in Utah is for you to say, and should you, lit this Communication, see tit to relieve me from the onerous work, I can assure you that I will IlOt grumble; on the contrary, I will gladly lay down my pen !Lnd retire from the SouthEast corner. and take, cheerfUlly, a seat on the fioor of the Grand Lodge. An incident of a rare and interesting character is thus recorded by the Grand Secretary : On the 2d day of last June, the 1\f. W. Grand Master raised his oldest son to the sublime degree of a Master Mason in Weber Lodge, No.6, at Ogden. I was determined to make it a festive occasion, and requested the Lodges in the jurisdiction to send a delegation of Brethren to the meeting, whereby not only a' ceremony would be witnessed that might not occur again -in a lifetime, but which would also show and convince our Grand Master that his labor for and devotion to the interests of Masonry in Utah were appreciated by its members. I am happy to be able to report that each Lodge was represented by thrce or more members. and thus a tribute of respect was paid our Grand :Master, of which he has reason to feel pToud. The ceremony itself was as solemn as it is raf(~, and the officers and members of Weber Lodge showcd their guests a hospitality that is scldom equalled and never surpassed. I only wish that our Brother, Alvin Charles Emerson, made a ~laster Mason undcr such auspicious circumstances, may follow in the footsteps ~ofhis illustrious father as a man and a Ma.~on. One Lodge was granted a charter by the Grand Lodge, after having "served 'a lawful time" under probation. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report is by Bro. Diehl, Grand'Secretary, and contains sixty pages of' interesting matter, abounding with choice selections and extended comment., of a high order. Missouri, for 1880, was briefly and courteously noticed. He said our Report was" comme il jaut." "VC do not know how that thing is cooked, or whether it is something good to eat or only to look at. Not being acquainted with Choctaw, we can only guess at the meaning of the expression" comme iljault," and conclude the writer took that method to poke fun at us. Our comm路on il-lncss is not our jau(l)t, but only our misfortune. Bring on some more of your mountain Indian talk. Wc have not space for as many cullings from Bro. Diehl's excellent Revicw as we could wish. One must suffice. In reviewing the Virginia Proceedings, he got scared at something said by the elegant (?) committee, and beat a hasty retreat from his own dunghill. We are surprised at Bro. Diehl. A Brother who has fought with such vigor. and exposed with such energy the leprosy of l\lqrmonism. should never show the" white feather" on so small a show of dangcr as presented by the refined and compl"imentary committee of Virginia. Ilear him beg: . . Like the learned Bro. Vaux, of Pennsylvania, so does Bro. Drinkard call us to task for saying that the Deputy Grand Master opened the Grand Lodge in AMPLE FOHM. We stand corrected, Bro. Drinkard, and promise to do it " no more." In Pennsylvania, a RIGHT Worshipful Officer opens the Grand Lodge in AMPLE FORlIl. Why may not the same be done in Utah or in Missouri by our RIGHT Worshipful Deputy Grand Master? In opening II Grand Lodge, the DEPUTY Grand Master is G-rand .MasUr for the time being. The term AlIIPI,g FORM belongs to the Grand [,odge, without reference to the presiding oificcl' who opens it. As this term belongs to the Gran~ Lodge, llnd is


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used to distinguish it from the lower body, whcre "openeq inform" only is used, Ample Form mustbe employed when the Grand Lodge is opencd. As the term is used to distinguish the Grand Lodge from the Subordinate, and not the officer' presiding, no other term should be used, no mattcr ifthc Grand Lodge is opened by the Deputy Grand Master, or one of the Grand Wardens. If this is not so, then it follows that the Grand Lodge may lose'its distinctive term, Ample Form. That being the case, it may cease to be the Grand Lodge by the loss of some of the attributes by which it is cndowed and distinguished from the SubQrdinate. If the Grand Lodge may lose its Ample Form distinction by not being opened by thc MOST Worshipful, but by a RIGHT Wor:;hipful Officer, it should be opened in aform corresponding wilh the title of the opening o.tfi.cial. In a Subordinate Lodgc, the term used is simply" opened inform," when done by Ma.<;ter or Wardens. A Mastcr opens inform; a Grand Master, in AMPLE FORM. Then a RIGHT Worshipful Officer (Deputy Grand Master or Grand Wardens) should open in" RIGHT Ample Form." Yes, wcll, the MOST 'Worshipful Grand Lodge of Utah was opened by the RIGHT Worshipful Deputy Grand Master in RIGHT AmlJ{e Form. This must be so, unless the presence and presidency of the Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master robs th~ Grand Lodge of its endowment of being a MOST Worshipful Body. If such reduction can take place in the GRA:-<D Lodge, it must also obtain in the Subordinate. There the Master, as highest officer, opens 'in form. When he is absent, the one below him opens according to the loss路 of rank, and by the same rule of reduction. It would be then opened in less thanfonn. Very likely, and often it is so. We prize highly the views of our" learned Bro. Vaux, of Pennsylvania," but confess our surprise at his position. And we think Bro. Diehl was hasty in' his promise not to do so any more. The opinions of Bro. Vaux arc entitled to grell,t consideration as a "learned" and able committee, but the views of the other party, who so frightened Bro. Diehl, fail to impress us. His familiarity with the writings of" Jefferson Brick," ""'ar Correspondent" of the" Rowdy Journal," surpasses his k.nowledge of Masonry or the amenities of fraternal correspondence." WM. FLETCHER JAMES, Salt Lake City, G. M. CHRISTOPHER DIEHL, Salt Lake City, G. Sec.

VIRGINIA, 1881. A journal of 486 pages comes from the" Old Dominion," for 1881, presenting quite a formidable appearance. However, its contents are easily summarized. Seventy pages are devoted to journalizing the event of the year. The Grand Lodge of Virginia having been invited to lay the corner路stone of the Yorktown Monument, accepted the invitation, and performed the ceremony on the 18th of October last. The arrangement" made for the august occasion were in charge of :M. W. Bro. Peyton S. Coles, Grand Master, who presided at the session and officiated when the work was performed. Past Grand Master Beverly R. Wellford . .Jr., delivered an Oration, covering eighteen pages of the journal. It was historic, patriotic, Masonic. From the Conclusion of his eloquent Address we clip the following: The corner-stone has been laid, and it only remains for the workmen now to pile high the shaft and fit it for the cap-stone. God speed them in the blessed work. For, when it is complete, it will stand for generations yet to come, speaking thus from graves over which the Acacia will never cease to bloom, in a voice WhICh will command audience: We have built these institutions of American liberty upon no sh~ftin.q sands of tempomry expediency, but up01~ the Eternal Rock oj political?'ight and tmth, and in.the conservation and


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preservation of lhem-Have Faith-Have Hope-Have 'Chm'ity-and the mins ma?1 descendthe flMds 1iwy come-the wind~ may blow and beat upon them,. but the'lJ will not fall-for they arefqunded upon the Rock. ANNUAL MEETING.

The One Hundred and Fourth Grand Communication was held December 12th, 1881, in Richmond. M. W. Bro. Peyton S. Coles, Grand Master, presided. R. W. Bro. Wm. B. Isaacs was Grand Secretary. The Proceedings covered 116 pages. The next 190 pages embraces tables, membership by Lodges, etc. The tables report 236 Lodges, 10,154 members; average membership per Lodge, 43. Another portion of the journal (3i pages) is devoted to a "historical sketch of Mackey Lodge, 路Ko. 6(l, by Thos. E. Moorman,;' andto decisions, etc. Grand Master Coles' Annu'al Address of eight pages was opened with g-rateful expressions, but saddened by the announcement that" heavy chastening" had been the lot of the jurisdiction. Death had visited their" M:asonic household" and removed the Senior Grand Warden, Bro. Mayo B. Carrington. Others were mentioned in the same connection as having been called from labor. The Grand Master reported at some length the event already mentioned-the laying of the corner-stone of the Yorktown monument. Bro. Coles said he had" been called upon to decide but fcw questions of Masonic law." He reported but one. Seven Dispensations had been g-ranted for the institution of new Lodges. Relations with foreign jurisdictions were reported as of the most eor(lial Masonic nature, except with路路France. Last year we characterized the purpose of Bro. Coles to visit the Lodges in his jurisdiction as a "stalwart" one. In proof thereof we insert his statement of the work done dm:ing the second term of official service: VISITATIOXS.

In pursuance of the plan adopted, and executed as far as possible last year, of visiting the different Lodges of the State, and with a view to awakening general interest in the Yorktown celebration, I continued my visits w!lCnever practicable. In this way I have visited, with some exceptions, all the Lodges of the State, and thus have had a persunal opportunity of knowing the status of Masonry in our Grand Jurisdiction. I have nothing but a good report to make. At no time, I venture to assert, within the 101 years of its organized existenee, have our Grand Lodge represented so numerous, enlightened and zealous a constituency. So long as we adhere with our present zeal and tenacity to our great cardinal principles, I see only a happy and prosperous future ahead for our beloved Institution. In this connection, my Brethren, let me take the opportunity of making my grateful acknowledgments to the officers and members of all the Lodges of the State, whit'h it has been my good fortune to visit, for their uniform kindness and hospitality. In all these visitations I have been the recipient of such courtesies and attentions as shall link their memory with all that is pleasant and enjoyable in life. \Ve take the following from the Conclusion of his very excellent Report :' By Brethren, the period of my stewardship is drawing to a close. and the duties of this honored tfliSt will soon devolve upon another. Before the privilege of speaking to you, as Grand Master. has passed from me, I would say a few words, which come from my heart, freighted with fraternal ~ove and sympathetic interest. For two years I have passed in and out among you, laboring for your welfare, and serving you with my best effort. Mistakes I have cartainly made, for "Our truest steps are human-still To walk unswerving were divine."


112

Appendix.

[Oct.

In the distribution of places of trust and honor, I have tried to consult the best interests of the Craft, rather than the dictates of personal friendship. Whatever 1 may have done during my official life, has been done with an eye single to the welfare of our beloved Institution. My record for two years is before vou, and the Gavel will soon â&#x20AC;˘ pass into other hands. The Reports of District Deputies are printed in the journal, showing the condition of the Craft pretty generally. As in some other jurisdictions, there are Lodges here and there that need life and improvement. Indeed, some are dead, practically, not having met for quite a time. We learn, not officially, of the death of one of Virginia's veteran Masons, the venerable James Evans, Past Grand Master and Grand Lecturer. RUBEN M. PAGE, Abingdon, G. l\L WM:. B. JACOBS, Richmond, G. Sec.

WEST VIRGINIA, 1881. Two Special Communications are chronicled in the journal now under review-both convened for the purpose of laying corner-stones of churches. If all special communications for such purposes were reported and printed in our jurisdiction we would not have space in the Proceedings to publish the annual doings of the Grand Lodge.. The Seventeenth Annual ~:leeting was held in the city of Wheeling, November 8th, 1881. M. W. Rro. Charles J. Faulkner, Jr.,Grand Master, presided; R. W. O'Dell S. Long was Grand Secretary. Seventy-two Lodges were represented out of the whole number of working Lodges of eighty-one. A good attendance, but a good pay-roll has much to do with large representations. Seventy-six, out of eighty-one, made returns-all but five. This is a good indication. "Whole number of members reported," 3,25G; "loss since last Report," 159. Two new Lodges were chartered during the session. A full ten-paged Address came from the Grand Master. It was strictly a local business .paper, containing details of what had been done by him officially. He reported some decisions, all of which are correct rulings and of special applicatioll. Full Reports were rendered by the Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer and Grand Lecturer. These were followed by Reports from the several District Deputies, which werc printed, by order of the Grand Lodge, in the journal. The Michigan sufferers had becn aided by an appropriation amounting to $100. The following is all we find as to FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE.

The Grand Secretary, on behalf of the regular Committee on Foreign Correspondence, stated that the committee had been in receipt of the.Proceedings of the several Grand Lodges with which we hold fraternal relations, and that they had no recommendation to I11ll.ke for the action of this Grand Lodge at the present time. The most interesting question now presenwd is that as to the right of the Grand Lodge of New South Wales, in Anstralia, to recognition as a sovereign and independent Grand Lodge. The committee wus inclined to recommend formal recognition, but deemed it more prudent to wait, in the hope that all objection may be removed by the action of the Grand ~o.dge of England.


113

Appendix.

1882.J

The sympathies of the Masonic world are with the new Grand' Lodge. and t he committee hoped that no obstacle to recognition would be found to exist at thc llext annual communication. It was also stated that the committee had information that the edict of non-intercourse between the Grand Lodges of New York and Connecticut had been withdrawn by action of the former Grand Lodge and the true principles of Masonic toleration and fraternity were likely tofiud a fresh illustration in the fraternal settlement of the questions in dispute.

We find nothing of particular interest in the Proceedings under consideration. JOHN H. RILEY, Ripley, G. M. O. S. LONG, Wheeling, G. Sec.

WISOONSIN, 1881. This Grand Lodge holds itS session in June. We never receive the Proceedings in time for review during the season following the session. It is now September, and three months have elapsed since the Thirty-eighth Anuual Session was held, and no journal of Proceedings is yet received. As we cannot wait lor the Proceedings of 1882 we must notice the doings of lRSI. The Thirty-seventh Annual Communication was held June 14th, 1881, in the city of Milwaukee. M. W. Bro. Emmons S. Chapin, Grand Ma.<;ter, presided; R. W. Bro. John 'V. V\.'oodhull was Grand Secretary. There were, as per Report, 193 chartered Lodges in that jurisd'ietion, with a member,ship of nearly cleven thousand. Grand Master Chapin's Address was twelve pages long. He announced the ollicial year as having been a quiet one. The" venerable" men of the jurisdiction had been passing over the" narrow stream" sinee last communication. He mcntioned thc names of several veterans, such as Rro.Jllel Newell ,'gO years old, a Mason of .57 years' stam-ling;- Thos. Hooley belonged to the s~lIIe class; Geo. Hawley, nearly 90 years old, for more that 60 years a Mason; these, with others', had crossed the" silent river," full of years and full of honors. Six D!spensations had been granted for the formation of new Lodges. "Our relations with other Grand Lodges are harmonious," said the Grand Master. Ten decisions were reported. They were severally p.pproved by the Committee on .Jurisprudcnce, and are now part of the regulations of that jurisdiction. There is nothing in thc Address or in the Proceedings calling for special notice. CORRESPO~DENCE.

Bro. John W. Woodhull prepared and submitted a Review of seventy-five pages. The Report was a review of the doings of Grand Lodges for 1880. Why l\Iissouri w~ left out we cannot surmise. His Report was made to the JUIlC session of 1881. Our Proeeedings were sent him in November. 18tiO, full seven months bel.ilrc his Report wa." submitted to the Grand Lodge. Did he not receive our Proceedings? We think he did. Perhaps he feels towards us as he did towards himself, as expressed in the" Conclusion" of his Review. I t seems to us that his" Conclusion" concludes: G. L.-Ap. S. \


114

Appendix.

[Oct.

We feel disgusted with the work we have attempted to perform for the Grand Lodge. We have tried to review the Proceeding of other Grand :Lodges, for the purpose of giving our Brethren a knowledge of the doings of the Fraternity'throughout the United States, but both time and space have been too limited to eI)8ble anyone to do justice to the matters before us. We have found in our review of the Procecdin~s of other Grand Lodges many things which would have been of use to our thinking Brethren, but have . been obliged. regretfully, to pass them by. This will be our last effort in this direction until such time as our Grand Lodge wishes a report in full of the transactions of other Grand Bodies. Such as it is, we leave it without any anticipations of approval. The work docs not deserve approval from our own or other jurisdi!-ltions. It is a great building not half completed. Emmons E. Chapin was elected Grand Master and John W. ";oodhull Grand Secretary.

WYOMING, 1881. This Grand Lodge meets in the same month as ours, and there is always a wide The Seventh Annual Communication was held at Rawlins, October 11th, 1881. We received the Proceedings of said session in Septeniber, 1882. M. W. Bro. Robert 'Vilson presided over the Grand Lodge as Grand Master, and R. W. Bro. Wm. L. Ash acted as Grand Secretary. gap between our notices of each other.

The table shows a registry of five Lodges and 352 members. All the Lodges were represented. We find all Grand Officers' names with the word 0..9 before them. We presume none of the' former Grand Officers were present. Grand Master Frank M. Foote: being necessarily absent, sent his Address, which was read by the acting Grand Master, Robert Wilson. He announced, in formal terms, the death of Bro. Wm. G. Tonn, late Grand Secretary. He said of Bro. Tonn's departure: His death was so sudden that those who attended him, while struggling for breath, and had left his side, thinking him better, only returned to find him better-not in this, but in another world-found that the Grand Master above had called from labor to refreshment, one who had earnestly endeavored to assist in rebuilding his temple on earth. Al thou~h no Brother or friend was near to receive his last message, still the expression left on his lace, when retnrned to us, was such, that we could easily imagine his answer to the ca]J was," Here am T, and ready." To Brother MILrtin Collins, President of the Masonic Board of Relief, of St. Louis, who received his remains llnd effects, and who returned them in such a condition as only lovillg hands could have placed them: to Missouri Lodge, 1'0. 1, of St. Louis, who received and watched the body, while lying in state, in their Lodge, and escorted it to the train that brought it to us; to the Gru.nd Lod~e of Utah, that came so many miles to assist in the In.''t sad rites; to Salt Lake Commandary, No.1, that came and acted as escort; to the Union Pacific Railway Com- â&#x20AC;˘ pally, who furnished transportation to all who desired to come and a,<;sist in paying a last tribnte; to Bro. Robert C..Jordon, 8:1d, (whom we love so well,) and who eame so many hundred miles to preside at the Lodge of Sorrow, and to the Fraternity throughout the world, who have since met, and sent us exprCSSiO}lS of sympathy, we are indebted. The Address of Bro. Foote was singularly brief.

He said of foreign relations

thi~:

Our standing with foreign bodies of the Order are tlrm and fricndly, our acts in the past, have not, to my knowledge, been questioned, ILnd the record of our work has been favorably received and commented 011 everywhere.

.


1882.J

Appendix.

115

STATE Ok' THE 路ORDER.

The Report of the Grand Secretary will apprise you of the condition of the Order, and I call your attention to it, asking your assIstance in determining as to whether, at this meeting, there can be any action tending to its improvement. A Report on Correspondence was furnished by John H. Symons, of some eighty pages. His style will bring him to the front as a Reviewer, because he writes and does not cull. He gave Missouri, for 1880, a very kind, considerate and extended notice. He is a just, safe and conservative writer. We bid him welcome to our corps. ROBERT WILSON, Rawlins, G. 1\1. JOHN H. SYMONS, Laramie, G. Sec. It was his first Report, so he informs us.

CONCLUSION. ,..,.

The time is here for closing this Review. We have noticed the doings of the following Grand Lodges-all that have been re.ceived : AJ~ABAMA,

188!. ARIZON A, 1882. ARKANSAS, 1881. BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1881. CALIFOltNIA, 1881. CANADA, 1881. COLORADO, 1881. CONNECTICUT, 1882. DAKOTA, 1881-1882. DELAWARE, 1881. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 1881. FLORIDA, 1882. GEORGIA, 1882. IDAHO, 1881. ILLINOIS, 1881. INDIANA, 1882. INDIAN TERRITORY, 1881. IO'V A, 1882. KANSAS, 1882. I{J<~NTUCKY, 1881. LOUISIAN A, 1882. l\IAINE, 1882. l\lAltYLAND, 1881-1882. MASSACHUS]"~TTS, 1881.

MICHIGAN, 1882. MISSISSIPPI, 路1882. MONTANA, 1882. NEBRASKA,1881. NEVADA, 1882. NEW HAMPSHIRJ<::, 1882. NEW J"'~RSEY, 1882. NE'V MEXICO, 1881. NEW YORK, 1882. NORTH CAROLINA, 1881. NOVA SCOTIA, 1881. OHIO, 1881. OREGON, 1881. PENNSYLVANIA,1881. QUEBEC, 1881. RHOnE ISLAND, 1881. SOUTH CAROLINA, 1881. TEXAS, 1881. UTAH, 1881. VIRGINIA, 188l. '\VJ1~ST VIRGINIA, 1881. WISCONSIN, 1881. WYOMING, 1881.

Why others have not come, may be known to those Grana Secretaries whose journals we have written for, but failed to obtain. To all such we have appealed for their Proceedings, but in vain. In most cases we have written twice. The following Grand Lodge Proceedings are missing, and mUiSt go unnoticed: Manitoba, 1882; Minnesota, 1882; New Brunswick, 1882; Prince Edward Island, 1881; Tennessee, 1881; Vermont, 1881; Washiugton, 1881. .


116

Appendix.

[Oct.

In passing through the extended and inviting field, reviewed in the foregoing pages, we have metmltny familiar names and faces. At the same time. dark lines and memorial pages have told again the sad story of our mortality. Many of our Brethren, dearly loved, have" gone before" to the land of light. Their names and forms alike will not be long remembered. This is such a hurried, jorgeUing life we all live. We weep and mourn for the absent ones, but, oh, so soon we laugh again, and rush on, forgetful that they are gone. How like a funeral procession is life? We know we are on our way out to the cemetery. We know there are mourners in the line, moving to that silent city. We know the column has headed to an open spot. where the broken sword prophesies of dreamless Slumbers for others. We laugh as we march on; perhaps are silent by constraint in the presence of rigid suffering and speechless sorrow, till "dust to dust" is said. Then turn and hurry away to the tune of "Dixie," and offer a tribute to the memory of buried worth by deep potations at the shrine of" Gambrinns," just outside the cemetery gate. Yes, we miss our Brethren dead. We shall" meet" in coming gatherings, "but we shall miss" those who are away out in tM somewhere. In life's communications, or in the realms of thought, peopled by the creations of many a thinker, there will be vacant places, emptiness and silence. No more shall we greet or follow the studious, concise and incisive Blackie. Never again shall we commune with the gentle and amiable Cheever; the sturdy Austin, the chivalrous Bower, the tireless Mackey-these, with many others, wOlithy all of places in immortal chronicles, have gone beyond" the pale realms of shade" into realms where consciousness is measured by the sweep of God's own eternal years. And our own jurisdiction claims a place among fraternal mourners in the great family of the American Brotherhood. From the ranks of our Past Grand Masters, two have been called a way since last we met. The veteran Ralls and the irrepressible Owens will come up no more to our annual gatherings. So moves on the procession, heading at the grave, while one after another drops from sight, and the law of decay seems triumphant. But W9.it! The law oflife shall vanquish the death tendency after awhile, and the life principle shall assert itself over the law of decay, because it is the mightier power. Life is natural-death is abnormal, and must cease. Then shall those who slcep awake to life and light, which are the great unconquerable forces of the universe. The lion of the tribe of Judah shall proclaim the doom of death, and turn loose the tides of life to sweep over the domain of universal being. .. There shall be no more death." Then shall our Brethren be seen again. all alive forever. In reviewing the journals of the various Grand Lod~es mentioned, two things have been quite patent: Pirst-The very general harmony and peace prevalent in the entire Brotherhood, with evidences of growth aud prosperity. Second-The jew decu,ions to be found in the journals of Proceedings. The decision business has been largely overdone within the last ten years. We would like to characterize this business, and the small men who sought notoriety by it, as they deserve. But we arc comforted by the knowledge that such men and their favorite works are things of the past. \\'ith" the owls and the bats" we very cheerfully leave them. We take leave of the guild with sentiments of appreciation and affection.

-.....


1882.]

Appendix.

117

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OF DISTRICT LECTURERS.

FIRST DISTRICT. Bro. Frank L. Schofield has visited eleven Lodges. They are generally in fair working order. Nos. 41, 100, 222 and 287 are especially good working Lodges. THIRD DISTRICT. Bro. H. B. Butts has visited ten Lodgcs, and otherwise instructed three. Most of them do the work tolerably well, but a few are sadly deficicnt. IIe held a Lodge of Instruction during the winter at Louisiana. SIXTII DISTRICT. Bro. Wm. H. Carpenter held a Lodge of Instruction at Sturgeon. He has visited several Lodges. The Lodges are doing but little work, but doing it well. SEVEKTI1 DISTRICT. Bro. Ben. T. Hardin reports that Bro. Ledru Silvey, District Deputy Grand Master, held a Lodge of Instruction at Moberly. Tcn Lodges were represented. The meeting ,,'as a decided success. He has visited scvcral of the Lodges. They are all in tolerably fair working order. EIGHTH DISTRICT. Bro. David Baird has visited six Lodges, and devoted a great dcal of time to private instruction. The District has greatly improvcd in correct work during the year. NINTH DISTRICT. Bro. .John J. Dillinger reports Nos. 244, 380 and 427 as being in splendid working order. The last mentioned is one of the most zealous, energetic and bright working Lodges in the State. All the other Lodges do their work reasonably well, except No. 239, which is in a somewhat lethargic condition. TENTH DISTRICT. Bro. Wm. H. McGrath has held a series of meetings for instruction at Trenton, which were well attended, and much good was accomplished. He has visited all his Lodges, and finds them in fair condition. Nos. 35 and 111 are doing a large amount of work, and doing it well.


118

Appendix.

[Oct. /

ELEVENTH DISTRICT. Bro. H. M. Cranor held a Lodge oflnstruetion at Albany, at which nine Lodges were represented. The meeting was a very successful one. The Lodges are, generally, in a fair working condition. No. 377 deserves special mention for the zeal and activity displayed in acquiring a knOWledge of the work, and in the practice of the genuine principles of Freemasonry. TWELFTH DISTRICT. Bro. Geo. F. Rogers has visited six Lodges. Several work well; in the others the work is not as good as could be desired. All, however, are willing to learn, and some improvement has been made in the last year.

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT. Bro. John Bonham held a Lodge of Instruction at DeKalb, at which eight Lodges were represented. There was much interest manifested, and he thinks the meeting resulted in a great deal of good to the Craft. He bas given much time to private instruction. The three Lodges located in St. Joseph do their work in first class style; all the others fairly, except Nos. 10, 101 and 204, which are in a backward condition.

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. Bro. Malcolm :McKillop has visited several of his LodgeS. The work is fairly done. No. 294 deserves special commendation for zeal and proficiency.

SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. Bro. S. B. Potter reports that the work in the various Lodges is fully up to the standard, as mentioned in his former reports, and is, in most cases, in accordance with that authorized by the Grand Lodge. A Lodge of Instruction, under the supervh;ion of the District Deputy Grand Ma.<;tcr, was held in Masonic Hall in St. Louis, commencing Januar)T 7th, 1882, and continued each succeeding Saturday night unW March 25th, making twelve sessions. These meetings were well attended, yet the average was not quite up to the previous year. In order to (~reate a great interest in these gatherings, he suggests that, instead of holding a Lodge of Instruction at a fixed place, it be held with the various Lodges, arranging with their Worshipful Masters to set apart an evening for this special purpose. It is believed that the plan suggested would prove beneficial for a time at 1ea."t, in that a larger number would reap the benefit of the instructions. fie has visited the following Lodges, viz: Nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 20, 2fi, 40, 79, 121, 163, 167, 179, 218, 243, 267, 282, 323, 3GO, 416, 420, 413, 44.5, 4GO and 481. Those not visited are Nos. 45, SO, 95 and 281-alllocllted outside 9f the city. 8EVENTEENTH DISTRICT. Bro. J. W. Purvis has visited none of his Lodges except No. 251, of which he is Worshipfull\faster. The Lodges are working reasonably well. EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. Bro. Chas. E. Barroll reports that the interest in Masonry in his District is in a rather languishing condition.


1882.J

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119

NINETEENTII DISTRICT. Bro. W. B. Wilson reports that all his Lodges are in good working order, and doing the work as approved by the Grand Lodge. . TWENTIETH DISTRICT. Bro. J. H. Bethune reports that the work of Masonry is being done in a manner that does credit to the Lodges and the Order. TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. Bro. Stephen Chapman reports that some of the Lodges work fairly well, while others are very backward. Nos. 130 and 215 are not in a flourishing condition. TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT. Bro. C. W. MUster makes brief report that he has not held any Lodge of Instruction. As far I1S he can learn, Masonry in his District is about on an average with that in other Distl'icts throughout the State. TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. Bro. J. M. Orchard held a Lodge of Instruction at Steelville, at which two Lodges were represented. Considerable interest was shown, and. doubtless some good resulted. He takes rather a discouraging view of Masonry in his District, but hopes that the interest will improve. TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. Bro. John E. Barnes has instructed five Lodges. dition.

All except No. 177 are in good con-

TWENTY.SEyENTH DISTRICT. Bro. H. B. Hamilton has visited none of his Lodges, owing to absence from the State. They are all, or nearly all, in good working order. Nos. 43 and 187, located at Jefferson City, retain their justly earned reputation for doing good work. TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. Bro. J. W. Farris reports that he held a three days' Lodge of Instruction at Lebanon, which was attended by Brethren from all the Lodges in the District, and also from nine outside of the District. The Brethren present were very zealous to learn, and good success attended their efforts. The results were very gratifying.. He has visited all his Lodges except two. The work is very well done, and closely accords with the work of the Grand Lodge. TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT. Bro. W. T. Lamkin has visited all his Lodges. Nos. 159 and 430 do the work somewhat poorly; No. 352, tolerably well; and No. 379, very well. THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT. Bro. J. M. Ritchey has visited all his Lodges, giving each the benefit of three days' and nights' instruction. The work in all is reasonably well done.


120

Appendix.

[Oct.

'l'HIRTY-SECOND DISTRIC'f. Bro. E. P. Linzee bas visited all bis Lodges except one. In No. 452'the work is poorly done; in No. 367 and Galena, U. D., vcry well done; and fairly in all the rest. THIRTY -THIRD DISTRICT. ]~ro. Seymour Hoyt bas instructed the officers and members, generally, in his visits to various Lodges, and endeavorcd to correct any inaccuracies in work. In all material points he has found but few errors.

THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. Bro. R. F. Stevenson reports that the Lodgcs visited by bim do the work creditably. The Lodges, generally, do the work in their way tolerably well, though not conforming strictly to the work of tbe Grand Lodge. Nos. 342 and 403 are rather in the background. THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. Bro. W. H. Stansbury bas visited all his Lodges, has held four Lodges of Instruction, and ~as conferred a great many degrees. The Lodges are generally doing good work. THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. Bro. P. G. Woods has given private instruction to the officers and members of the I,odges in M:or~an County. They have the standard work and lectures. He has not visited the Lodges located in Benton County, for want of time and opportunity. THIRTY-EIGIITII DISTRICT. Bro. B. II. Ingram held weekly meetings for instruction in the city of Sedalia, during the winter months. The Lodges in Pettis County are in fair working condition. He has not visited the Lodges in Cooper and Moniteau Counties, but has made enquries in regard to them, and all reports received are favorable. TIIIRTY-NTNTH DISTRICT. Bro. Lcslie Orear, District Deputy Grand Master, called two Lodges of Instructionone at Marshall and onc at Higgirisvme. Fivc Lodges were represcnted. Keithcr of the meetings was remarkable for numbers or enthusiasm. No. 205 does fair work, and No. 464 has a zealous and intelligcnt membcrship. FORTIETH DISTRICT. Bro. G. O. Jaccard has bcen industrious, as usual. His report shows forty-one visitations, not, of course, always in an official capacity. His report does not show, but it is known to be II fact, that he has spent much time and labor in the instruction of officers llnd members, and even candidat.cs. The canse of Masonry is rapidly, yet steadily, progressing in the Fortieth District, and cspeciall)' in Kansas City. FORTY-FIRST DISTRICT. Bro. John T. Ruffin has visited, with onc'or two exceptions, all of his Lodges, S9me of them man~' times. The work is, generall)', fairly done.


1882.]

o

Appendix.

121

FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT. Bro. Woodson Lynes has visited all of his Lodges, a number of them twice. He also held a Lodge of Instruction at Fulton. He says all the Lodges are in good working order, which is high praise coming from him, as he is a .close ritualist, and expects all the Lodges to come squarely up to the mark. FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. .~

Bro. Geo. R. Hunt has visited all of his Lodges, some of them several times. The work in most of them is well done. A Lodge of Instruction was held at Holden, at which five Lodges were represented, and much zeal and interest manifested. FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. Bro. Wm. B. Leach has visited six Lodges. In all these the work is fairly done. He . also learns, from reliable sources, that all the other Lodges are in fair condition, except one, which is not mentioned by number, as it seems to be on the road to improvement.

,....-.

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. Bro. E. W. Joy, District Deputy Grand Master, called a Lodge of Instruction at Barnard. Six Lodges were represented. All these work tolerably well. Nos. 165 and 470 are in excellent condition. -FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. Bro. Thos. C. Ready reports that he held a/general Lodge of Instruction, which was tolerably well attended, and, be tbinks, was productive of good. The Lodges all do good Work, and each is a credit, in every particular, to the Order.

FIFTIETH DISTRICT. Bro. J. F. Kenney has held meetings for instruction at Weston. The officers know the work, and all the T.Jodges are capable of conferring the degrees correctly. He has given considerable time to private instruction. It will be proper to bear in mind that words of praise or censure, used in the foregoing Abstract of Reports, are, to a certain extent, to be underst.ood as relative terms. A Lodge and its manner of working will be described by a District Lecturer as good, bad or indifferent, according to the standard which he has set up in his own mind. Work which one would pronounce excellent. another, mor.e exacting in his notions, would consider far from being first-class. With this distinction in view, it is believed that tbe foregoing is a fair and correct statement of the condition of the various Districts, as far as obtainablp.. The Grand Lecturer visited quite a number of the Districts, and was present and assisted at many of the Lodges of Instruction above referred to, and can vouch for the zeal and ability almost universally displayed by the District Lecturers. '

ALLAN McDOWELL, Grand Lecturer.


.....

~ ~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, COMPILED FROM RETURNS, SEPTEl\IBER, 1882. =========~====:::::::=:::;=====--_._------~--

~

LODGE.

1

,p.T3.'~~~:gsS. 1

1

14:

1

1

,

,'"

.

=

MiSSOUri... St. Louis 2, l\Ieridian St, Louis 3 Beacon L .. ,St. Louis 4 Howard .' i ~ew Franklin [) United I Springfield 6 Ark Newark 7 O'Sullivan Walnut Grove 8 Williamsburg Williamsburg 9 Geo. Washington :St. Louis 10 Agency A~ency 11, Pauldingville Wright City 12 Tyro CaledOIlia 13 Rising Sun :Barry Auburn Auburn 151 Western Star Emporia 16 )Iemphis l\Jemphis 17 Clarksville Clarksville 18 Palmyra Palmyra I!) 1I Paris Cnion P!Lris 20, St. Louis , St. Louis 21: Havana l\fcFall.. 22, Wellington 1DeKalb 231 Florida IFlorida 24. Wyaconda. Lagran(l'e 25 Naphtali St. LOUIs 26 ' i\Iexico l\Iexico 27 Evergreen )lew Haven 28 St. John Hannibal.. 29 Windsor Windsor 30,1 Huntsville Huntsville 31' Liberty Liberty 321 'I'riangle *1 perryYiIle 33' Ralls Madisonville 34 i Troy , Tro)'

COUNTY.

St. Louis St. Lou!s St. LOUls Howard :(lrecne Knox IGreene Callaway St, Louis · ,Buebanall jWarren Washington Clay Lincoln Davie8s Scotland Pik<; MarlOn Monroc St. Louis Gentry ,Buchanan jMonroe LewIs St. Loui!>. AlIdrain Franklin Il\Iarion ,Hcnry Randolph \Clay : Perry Ralls jLincoln

I

-~-.---!

Wro. Gillespie !f'. Wclcker IL. W. Teuteberg i Wm. C. Chancellor J. M. MC.Kim .T. W. Blakey

: Samuel T. Weeks Ben. V. Chase E. P. Williams F. R. Cornelius W. G.. Everod .T. W. )'foore, acting R. 1:<'. \Vaters, acting .rohn Castor J. '·V. Barnes I.,. R. Downing John B. Best... ·F. P. Voughn J08. II. "Villiamson Wro. r~url.. L. B. Peabody Th~s. ehawning .T. N. Hagood J. a.baz Brazier X. Beyersdortf ,Geo. C. Donehower I'.ras. W. Brown Moses Hayman <1. J. Sto:;dale ' ·m. T. lIuff E. J. Mellon Jas. A. Jackson

-------_._------

SECRETARY.

I

TIME

~F MEETING.

Iwm. H. Ma.yo Chas. l\IaU

First and Third Thursdays. - i First and Third Wednesdays. F. H. WellrneyCr -.. tSecond and Fonrth Thursdays. 'Geo. C. Edwards Saturday on or before full moon. ' ,Vo nP.tltrn~. A. E. Dent Saturday on 0. I' after full moon. ,A. F. Kerr Tuesday before full moon. 'Thos. R. Hobson Saturday on or before each full m. P. G. Heuer Second and Fourth Tuesdays. )1. W. Farris Saturday before full moon. C. M. Bryan Saturday on or before full moon. W. B. Ramsey Saturday on or after full moon. )1. '1'. SamueL Saturday before full moon. C. F. Magruder Saturday on or before full moon. Jobn T. 8haw 'l'ime not gi-ven. IC. F. Sanders Friday on or before full moon. 1\1. Rey.nolds Saturday on or before full moon. James W. Proctor Second Thursday III each montb. IE. G. B. l\Jc)lutt... First and Third Saturdays. . Morgan O. Whitman First and Third Tuesdays. Joshua Bradley Saturday before each full moon. A. Dcrge Saturday before each full moon. Sam~lCl Hcav:en Ridge S~tllrday bef?re each full moon. LUUIS SchnClder Fw;t and Thm1 Thursdays. ,John T. l\IcCoy..· Second and Fourth Thursdays. , ],;0 Retn'l'n3. W. T. Thurman IFirst Satnrday in month. W. C. Kealey " Second and Fourth Saturdays. R. F. Taylor Saturday on or before full moon. .T. C. Schaefer Tues.onarbet'. f.m.or 2d Tues.aft. H. r.uckley 'First Monday and Third Saturday. '.Jamel> C. Koell Saturday OIl or after full moon. G. P. Rice Second Sllturday. • :Eugene K. Bonfils Saturday on or before full moon.

~ "t3 ~

~ ~

~.

iF.

,w.

j

o <:?

rt"


'.

35. Mercer .36: Cooper 371 Cedar 38 1 Callao 39 DeWitt.. 40 l\ft. Moriah 41 lEtoa 42 Middle Grove 43 1Jefferson ~ Jacksonville 4D Bonhorr:me 46 Wentzvllle 47 Fayette 48 Fulton 49 HayneSville 50 Xenia 51 Livingston 52 Wakanda 53 Weston 54 f1ouglas 55 Arruw Rock 56 Tipton 57 Richmond 58 Monticello 59 Centralia 60 New Bloomfield 61 Waverly 62 Vineil.. 63 Cambridge 6i Monroe 65 P~ttonsburg 66 I,mn 67 ROcheport.. 68 Teb? 69 Sulhvan 70 Roanoke n Savannah 72 Danville 73 Eureka 74 Warren 75 Ashley 76 Independence 771 Lebanon 781 St. Joseph 79 , Po.lar Star 80 ,Bridgeton

' Princeton 1 }lercer Boonville :Cooper Burbois Frankliu Callao Macon DeWitt Carroll St. Louis : St. LOuiS lEtna Scotland :\'Iiddle Grove Monroe IJefferSon City Cole Jacksonville Randolph Manche.ster St. LOUlS Wentzville St. Charles Fayette Howard \Fulton Callaway Holt ' 1 Clay Hopkins Nodaway Glasgow HOwl1r(l.. ' Carrollton Carroll Weston ; Platte MarthaSVille Warren ,Arrow Rock Saline ITipton :\lonitoou Richmond Ray Monticello Lewis Centralia Boone ; New Bloomfield Callaway Waverly Lafayette Camm·on Clinton Slater Saline , ~fonroe City Monroe P~ttonsburg Daviess Lmn Osage IRocheport.. Boone Clin.ton I:fenry .: 'lsulllvan l.ranklm Roanoke Howard Savannah Anctrew Danville Montgomery Brunswick Chariton Keytesville Chariton Ashley Pike Independence Jackson ' Steelville Crawford St. Joseph Buchanan St.. Louis St. LOll!S Bndgeton St. LOUIs 1

'J. H. Shelly ISpeed Stephens !Chas. P. Triplett I.A. D. GOOd.ale A. '1'. Kendrick jWm. Dodds A. K. HickS S. D. Nave IChurch G. Brooks R. PowelL 1G. W. Wyatt.. R. B. Dular IR. P. Williams 'IJOhn E. Salle

r

J. L. Anderson :John H. Turner, .Jr :H. 1\'1. Pettit R.M.urdock S. C. Griswold C. l\I. Sutherlin Philip Riley : W. A. Holman J. H. Leeper J. M. AngelL Woodson Lynes !R. P. Motte !J. F. King !R. L. Harvey 'D. O. Wood !: 1\1. Poa:gc 1. J. Robll1son Wesly Scobee Montgomery P. B. Rowland J. D. Hicks E. 1\1. MitchelL E. M. Hughes J. S. Wallace O. F. Smith l\1. W. Houston John A. Westmoreland F. W. Webb H. L. Littleton Philip Rodan.'\: J. H. Garrett..

iA.

I,H.

/E.A. D.MarsGil.es Jas. A. Houseman IE .•,. E. Richardson !Hiram Jaqua

\Tuesday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Fridays. Saturday on or before full moon. Sat..on or b.. ef. f. m. and 2 weeks aft. Second and fourth Saturdays. V. Kyte Sec011d and fourth Saturdays. rR. A. Farrell 7'imenotgiven. J. B. Quisenberry Saturday orl'or before-full moon. IWill. S. Brotherton Friday OIl or before full moon. H. ~: p.owell : s.aturda y on or before full moon. G. Iltt1?ar~ Smlth Saturday on or before ~ull moon. John I.,. RIChards Saturday Oll or before tull moon. Tho~. G. Deatherage :\Ionday on or before full moon. Jas. W. Overton First Saturday and Third Friday. No Retu1'7Is. T. \V. Porter First Saturday in month. '1'. \V. Morgan Monday on or before full moon. J. L. Detherage Sat. before f. m. and 2 weeks after. J. O. White Firs~ and.Third Saturdays. Duelley Burgess , No t'ime gwen. G. II. Bowers ISaturdav on or before full moon. C. G. Ely l\Iondayon or before full moon. W. \V. Ewing Time not .qh·cn. . J. P. Richards , :- Saturday on or before full moon .. Adam Rodemyre Saturday before each full moon. W. 1\1. Longley Third Saturday and first Friday. H. J. Galbraith Saturday on or before full moon. S. S. Hare First and Third Saturdays. W. J. Jones Sat. on or bef. f. ro. and 2 weeks aft. W. R. P. Jackson First and Third Saturdays. . . Wm. E,lIis First and Third S.aturdays. John I' uer Saturda)' on or alter full moon. Chus. ~reyer Sccond'l'hursllay. J. G. l\1iddlecoff First and third Saturdays. B. S. Hutton Saturday before full moon. J. W. Bagby Saturday before each full moon. N. B. nilldings Second Wednesday in each month. E. R. Brown Thursday on or before full moon. R. G. Beazley Tuesday on or before full moon. L. M. Applegate Saturday before full moon. W. D. Orr Saturday on or before full moon. Isaac 1\1. Rodgers Second and fourth Saturdays. IG. W. :Mattock ,Saturday on or before full moon. 'J. C. Mulkins..' First and Third Tuesdays. D. ~v .. Sadler lsecond and fourth Fridars, ,Jefl. Van Grundy Saturday on or before ful moon.

IE.

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00 00

~

L......J

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~ ~

~ ~

~.

1

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~

CO


~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR SrrATEMENT, ETc.-Oontinued.

o

z

LODGE.

811 H. ickory Grove 82 Jackson 83 Laelede , 84. Potter 851l\fiam i 86 Brookfield 87 Washington 88 Defiance 89 Frienclship 90 King Solomon 91 2\Iadison 92 Perseverance 98 St. Marks 9,1 Vienna 95 Memmee 96 St. Andrews 97 Bethany 9il Webster 99 "'It. Vernon 100Ic,anton 101 Easton 102 Bloomington 103 "Vestyiew 104. Herome 105: Kirksville 1061 Gallatin 107 Golden Square 108 Gothic 109' Island CitY 110 Marcus 111 Trenton 112 Graham 113 ;\Ia~~burg 114 I wllIght.. 115,' Laddonia 112 Barne.s 11/ Versallles

TOWN AND P. O. ADDRESS. ' H.allville LlI1neus

COUNTY.

Bs>one LlI1n Laclede Longwood Pettis 1\fiami.. Saline Brookfield Linn Greenfield Dade Defiance Worth Chillicothe Li\'ingston St. Catharines ILinn Holliday Monroe Louisiana 'Pike ·Cape Gimrdeau ICape Girardeau Vienna J',·Iaries 1 Eureka 'St. Louis Shelbyville IShelby : ; Bethany ·IHarriSon \)larshneld Webster : 2\It. Vernon Lawrence c,unton Lewis Easton Bu..cho.nan Blooming-ton "'lacon Millersvi,!.!e jCapeGirarcleau Kansas Cay Jackson Kirksville Adair G~llatin Daviess '·'·estport iJaekson i\Ioberly IRll.ndOlph 1 Stanberry ,Gentry Fredericktown I i\Iadison ITrcnton IGrundY Graham Nodaway Plattsbu,rg Clinton Columbla Boone '~J Laddouia Alldraill Grave.l Point ..i'l'exas 'IVersalllcs /Morgan 1 Lebanon

SECRETARY.

MASTER.

IR. l\.L.Fl y nt.. F. W. Powers 'l'. A. Barr S. P. Hunt.. Joseph Wilson Geo. W. Adams John A. Relldv Jacob Winemiller G. D. Brant.. J. R. Crampton Wm. Hard Enoch Pepper John C. Jeannin Thos. A. Bray M. C. Lewis Miles S. Gtllidett.. D. W. Robertson G. T. Collins Benj. 1.'1. Smit~ Geo. W. LeftwlCh C. G. TUylor KS. i\~i.!ler John \" llson Da.vid Baird J. A,.. Wickham R. E. Cowan .1. S. McClellan 1\1. F. Brown :F. R. Newberry IC. S. GlllSpell...: Chas. H. Talbot J. W: Ellis Jas. A. Adams "IG. "Y. covey Jas. Arch~r

P. H. DeVlI1na

Il\1. C. Flynt.. S. D. Sandusky ,C. W. Rubey D. M. Gray J. F. Webster W. E. Brott W. L. Gaines G. H. Orr W. W. Thornton C. S. Spalding J. T. Noel. Taylor Frier Henry A. Astholz A. N. Farrow \Emil Morsehell Geo. W. Wanamaker :Josepb Wbby T. K. Gay. pTO tem IRobt. S. :\l.orris C. W. Bemght jJOSePh Belcher J. 'yo Miller Julms Angelman C. A. Allgaier i.A. F. McKa:land IW. W. WlllIams C. A. Williams B. N. Bonel. E. II. Day K R. Featherston Jos. R. Welch Chas. Ingles F. PannelL ID. P. i\Ioore J. B. l\Iilt~n ,Jos. McNair

i

TIi\m

~

H:>-

OF MEETING.

Saturday on or b~fore full moon. Saturday before full moon. Wednesday before each full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday before full moon/ Second and fourth Wednesdays. I Friday on or before full moon. ' First and third Fridays. First and third Saturdays. Saturday on or before full moon. First Saturday. [thereafter. Mon. on or before f. m. and 2 weeks Second and fourth Tuesdays. Second Saturday. Saturday before full moon. No Retu·1'7/,s. Slltnrnay on or before full moon. 'First Friday after full moon.' ;Saturday on or before full moon. 'geeond and fourth Saturdays. ~aturday on or after full moon. Friday on or before full moon.

~ ~. ~

~ ~

<::"oJ.

~

S~tnrdayon.orafterfullmoon.

:F Irst and thIrd Mondays. 'fhursrlay on or before full moon. ,' S,~cond and (ourth Tuesdays. :Flrst and thlrd Saturdays. First and third Mondays. First and third Saturdays. !Saturday on or before ea. full moon. !First and thil'tl Thursdays. iSaturday before full moon. S~turday on. or before full moon. First and thlrd Mondays. Saturday on or before full moon. Sat.urday on or before full moon. Third Saturday.

'0 o ~


\

118\Kin g ston 119.De 80to 120 Compass 121 ' Erwin 122 D.over 123 Hermann 124 Dardenne 125 1Gentryville 12GjSeaman 1'27 Athens 128 Lorraine 129 Charleston 1301 "'est Prairie 131 potOS\ 132 Farmlllgton 133 Star of the West 134 Pleasant )lount 135 Warrensburg 136 Phcenix 137 Prairieville 138 Lincoln 139 Ore~on 140 Paplllville 141!Chain of Hocks -142 Plea~ant Grove 143 Irondale 144IModern 145 !{'ising Star 14G "[eGee 147 Cass 148 yancey 149 Lexington 150 Bil'ming 151 Milton 152 Linn Creek 153 Bloomfield 154 Concord 155 Spring Hill. 156 Ashland 157 Korth Star 15S·Johnson 159 ~Iendota 160, Pleasant.. 161! Clifton Hill 1621 Whitesville 163 OccidentaL .

Kingston !Caldwell.. De SotO Je~.erson Parkville Iplntte St. Louis St. Louis D.o.ver Lafayette Hermann Gasconade O'Fallon St. Charles Gentryville (;entry ~1. ilan SulIivan Albany Gentry Lorraine Harrison Charleston I Mississippi... Clarkton ,Dunklin potoS! IWaShingt~n Farmmgton St. FrancOIs Ironton Iron Pleasant Mount....,Miller " Warrensburg JO!lllson Bowling Green /Pike Prairieville Pike Fillmore ! Andrew Oregon Holt.. l'apinville Bates Chain of Rocks /Lillcoln Otterville A.:ooper Irondale Washington Humansville Polk Ebenezer Greene College Mound 1\Iacon Harrisonville Cass Pineville )IcDonald Lexington Lafayette Halleck Buchanan Moberly !Randolph Linn Creek ICamden Bloomfield lstoddard Concord Callaway Spring FIiJI.. I Livingston Ashland !Boone Rockport Atchison Greenville Wavne protem.. · · ··ITariey .:\forrisville POlk Clifton Randolph Whitesville Andrew St. Louis St. Louis 1

Geo" Armstrong E. S.l'yle F. Kahm G. J. Berne J,~wis Ligon Wm. Herzog B. '1'. Gill Geo. N. Crane..~ Jeff.. swanger J. B. Thomas IG. B. Jeffries A. E. Simpson IW.R. pearson Chas. E. BarrolL W. R. Edgar H. H. Brockman J. M. Bosaker G. Munroe A. D. Adkins F. Knickerbocker .1. H. Parish Levi Moler W. Eo Bro\m S. H. sa.unders Reuben Wilson· O. W. Fisher W. H. Payne J. L. Martin W. II. Stansbury A. W. Chenoweth ·Geo. Hutchison D. W. Clouser C. W. Grimes L. J. Roach S. Chapman John B. Henderson .las. B. Francis H.S. Baxter John W. Smith C. W. Milster ;c. A. James IP. W. :MitchelI...

R. L. Dodge O. Fakes F. ~I. )lcDoIlltld,p. t Simon Loewen Robt. T.. Koontz Ed. M. Clark W. C. Williams A. T. Carson IC. H. D.ownt~in C. n. HInkley A. F. Woodward S. G. Rosenstein : rwm. '1." Hunter L. K. Peers C. R. Peek R. H. Franklin G. w. Lemmon J. W. Grafford "Y. B. Shflw J. L. Deming J. T. Thatcher Philip Zeal. B. W. Pollard · ThOS.. J. Starke Calland Arnold W. R. Hudson D. M. Evans J. Hugh Teter Douglass Dale 1\1. N. Lamanee Thos. Standi~h John Dallam J. H. DuvalL W. N. Todd C. B. Crumb J. 1\1. Hudd L. F. Gobin Henry M. Cheavens Jas. A. NewelL 'C. A. Bennett.. I C. C. Owen ~ Thos. C. MitchelL

J. W. Poppelwell... H. A. Krueger

H. B. Watson R. L. 1\L McEwen \

Saturday on or before full moon. Satu.rday on or befo.re full moon. Sat. on or bef. f. m. & 2 w's thereaf'r. Second and fourth Fridavs. S,~turday on or .before full moon. II.lrst Saturday III each month. Saturday after full moon. Saturday before full moon. sa.turday OIl or before full ~oon. Second and fourth Saturdays. Saturday on or before full moon. i Time not given. No Retw·ns. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. ~. Time not given. . Time not given. ,First Tuesday in each month. Tues. on or before f.m.&2dTues. 1'1'. Saturday on or before full moon. ISaturday before full moon. First )[onday and Third Saturday. Satnrday on or before full moon. I1VO t-ime given. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday nearest full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. IWednesday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. _ Friday before full moon. Wednesday on or before full moon. Third IVlonday in each month. Fourth Saturday in each month. First Saturday in each month. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday nearest full moon. Fourth Saturday in each month. Sat.urday before full moon. Thlni Saturday. Second Saturday. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or befor.e full moon. Friday on or before full moon. No Ret~(rns. Saturday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Mondays. 1

~

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I 1'

I'

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;;S

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I--l

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued. ~. I,

L ODGE.

164' Joachim 1651 :\faryvi1le 1661 l1irabile 16i Orient Francais HiS IColony : l~DI Camden POl11t. 1/° Benevolcnce IiI Hartford 1Z2 1 Qe~ser 1/3\ Umon 1Z~! Sturgeon l~uINe~vton

1/6[ Pomt Pleasant.. Iii Texas liS Griswold liD Pride of the West... 180 Des }.lomes lSI Novelty

I P. O.

TOWN AND ADDRESS.

Hillsboro

I~[aryvi1le

:\lirabile St. Louis Colony Qa!UdenPomt.. UtlCa Hartford

I

I1'Ia~on Umon

ls.turgeo~

,Ne~vtollla

Pomt Pleasant Houston Price's TIranch St. Louis Athens Novelty

I'

I~~ISte~\'.arts:ville

183 ICalIfornIa ]&1 i Calhoun 185 i Chamois 186 ' MOrality 18i Carter 1S8 1 Hannibal 18D; Zeredatha 190 Putnam 1.91 Wilson 192 Frankford 193 Angerona 194 Wellsville 195 Bolivar 19G Quitman 19i Carthag.e 198 AllensvIlle 19D NewHope 200 Sonora

Stc~va.rts:ville

Callforllllt Calhoun Chamois ,Renick jJctrerson City IHannibal St. .Joseph INewton iSbawneelown ·IFrankford 1'lissouri City Wellsville Bolivar Quitman lcarthage Allendale New Hope Watson 1

C,OUNTY.

Jeflerson Nodaway Caldwell.: St. Louis Knox

1\r· I· ASTER.

R. W. l\ic:\fullen A. P. 1'Iorehouse Vincent Bowman J. A. Schultz 1M..F. Wright Pl.a~te J. W. Bywaters Llvmgston A. A. Stone Putnam IG. C. Ful1erton ,1'Iacon.: Wm. H. Scars !Frankhn John H. Pugh ·.. IBoone S. W. T~.Irner Newton : J~ M. RItchey INew 1'Iadnd 1-. R. Yonnt.. iTcxas ·.. · I·Jas. R. Simmons i:Montgomery 1\1. L. Cope iSt. Louis Peter Steinman~l ·Clark A. M. Doud, actlllg IKnox IW.H. F. owcn I.DeK~lb A. D. :\lcCrosky MOlllteau \John Hough :Henry ,R. C. Owens 'Osllge 1'1'. P. Berr y jRaIIUolPh "B. T. Hardin Cole J. S. Ambro~e Marion Thos. S. Howell :Buchanall James W. Boyd Putnam 'rhos. l\lcA lister C~pe Girardeau C. R. Johnson PIke John E. Henry Clay L. G. Hopkins :Montgomery M. H. Garwood Polk C. E. BushnelL Nodaway D. G. Porter JRSPer P. K: B~ll:rd '':orth I~alvlll rl}ton Llllcoln Geo. W. vaughan Atchison ~B. F. Plasters

S ECRETARY..:

==i

L. A. Green F. P. El1iott J. F. Hines R. 1'fengotti T. A. HUlL T. ,~. Purdy H. C. Cox J. W. Roberts WilL P. H~we Jno. F. Hem S. F. Cross J;.H. Wa~son r 110 Laslenr G. A. Lea.vitt John D. Anderson :H. F. Hoppius :John F. Parker ·IS. N. Boyd J .. C. Bynum Wm. Barton ;Henry Slack \' Henry Ernstmyer G. A. Settle :\lax Rauh IS. Thorne ,Geo. Rees ; I Elijah 1'1. Strawson ·R. P. Henderson S. J. Dunkum Thbs. C. Reed Jacob Miller F. A. Affleck S. Adkins ~hos. B. uc~bee C. H. GOldlllg J. O. Basket Stephen Soutb

f)

j

~ ~

T DIE OF '[ ,Y EETING.

Saturday 'on or before full moon. First and third Saturdays. 'l'ime not given. Second and fourth Mondays. ~aturday on or before full moon. . S~turday on. or before full moon. FIrst and thIrd Saturdays. Saturday on or before full moon. 'l;hursday all or before full moon. I'lhursday on or before full moon. Friday all or before full moon. Saturday after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. s.aturday on or after full moon. Saturday before full moon. First and third Wednesdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Timenot.rriven. Saturda~ on or before full moon. Fourth dl.turday. :Saturdayon or before full moon. :.! No time given. I Saturday on or before full moon. First Monday-. :Second and tourth l\fondays. 1 Second and fourth Tuesdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. First and third Saturdays. Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after' full moon. i S,E;cond and .fourth Wednesdays. j FIrst and thIrd S!!-turdays. Saturday before tull moon. First and third Saturdays.

~

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~.

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0

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f'i'-


'I,

• 201\ . Tames p ort 202 Westville 203 Brumley 204 Rowley 205. Trilumina 20G Is.omerset 207 Clay 208 Salisbury 200. Poplar BlUtf 210:Unionville 211 Hickory Hill 2121 Four Mile 213 Rolla 214. Forest City :!15 Hornersville 216 Grallby 217 Barbee 218 Good Hope 219 Everett.. 220 Kamas City 221. ilIystic Tie 222 I Farmers · 223 Woodlawn 2241 Hamilton 225 Salem 22G Saline 2:....)7/ Cypress c 228 Shelbina 229/ Mitchell 1

'Jamesport !Westville Brumley.: ·IArnoldsvllle )rarshall. somerse. t.. [Claytonville S(l,lis1)\lry :POPlar BlUfL unionville Hickory Hill. Four ·Mile Rolla 'Forest City rCotton I'lanL ·Granby ,Browllsville /.SOllt.h St. Louis Everett Kamas City Oak Ridge · ILa Belle Woodlawn 'Hamilton ISalern · St. D·Iary's /Laclede.; Shelbina IColllrnbus

II-I. B.unker IJas. A. How.e :'.11ller J. il1. I-Iawkms Buchanan Saline iJohn J. Dawes illercer ,.1. W. stockman IClay !ThOS. M. Gash Chariton Lazar Loeb IButler Putnam J. G. Hart.. Cole 1 E. M. Lumpkin ,Dunklin .J. :\1cBride IPhelps L. F. Purkei' Holt H. :Y1. Wilson Dunklin 'G. T. Smith Newton I Saline J. B. white St. LOUiS "H. C. Christophcr ,Cass S. E. Licklider Jackson G. O. JacclHd Cape Girardeau E. H.. Harris ILeWis'.. · · ·..·.. Isarnuel Brooking )Ionroe J. l\I. 'furner Calc1 welL ,.T. W. Harper 'Dent.. D. R. Henderson Ste. Genevieve Lewis Schaff Linn W. Freeman Shelby Samuel KennerlJ· Johnson W. C. Goodwin

IA. P. Sh.our

Davies..<;

C~ariton

IN.

IG.

Jas. A.~edding IJames Thompson 1

,

IS. K. Selig IGeorge Randle W. H. Waers John Clark

1 Saturday on or before full moon. ··1 Saturday atler full moon. S~turda~ ~n or before full moon.

1.1\0 Rctll111.s.

Friday on or before full moon. S.a,t.urda y,' on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. [Saturday on .01' before full moon.

• L.....J

.i'vo Ret'llI"JI,8.

1

jwm. A. SheltOn John Norfieet~ L. McCutcheon A. H. Orchard J. il1. Ford !W. M. Satterfield

iSaturday before full moon. Saturday before full moon. ~hursday on or before full moon. SaturdaY on or before full moon. First Saturday and third Monday. Friday on or before full moon.

IT. C. Andrews Chas. F. Hull IL. 'r. Dorsett.. 1n. G. RllsselJ.. W. K. Hatther W. H.. Allen J. C. Rhodes J. S. orr .T. \V. Wingo Henry Roseman Z. T. Standly : IJ. W. Sigler James Moseby

Friday on or before full moon. IFirst Ul1d third Saturdays. ' Saturday on or after full moon. Seconn. Rnd fourth ~Iondays. Saturday on or lJefore full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. , First and third Tuesdays. Saturday on or before lull moon. Saturday 011 or before full moon. /First und third W~dnesda.ys. First and third FrIdays. Thursday on or before full moon.

!'

~

85 ~

1\'0 Rct1wns.

I 1

~ "'N I.::J

~ ~ ~

~ ~.

~

~~~I' ~a~;~i~I:;::::::::::::: ·~S;;~~~~~;;:::::::::: ~~a~Fe~;·::::::::::::::: i~~~~s~tl~lE~lti~e:.::::::: :::::: Ir.h~.\)~~~~~.~~:.:::::: ::::::::::::1; ~~t~i~~:Y

232. Polo ,' ,1'010 ,' i.C.·l~ldwell 233 Bucklm : iBuckhn Lll1n 234 St. Francois LibertFille ,St. Francoi8.. 235, Ionic iHellsselacr Ralls 236, Sedalia Sedalia Pettis ~371 La 1'lata ILa Plata J\Iacon 238 Rushville Rushville !Buchanan 2391' Hope",:ell l;csteryille Reynolds 240 GranVIlle (,ran ville )lonroe ISt. Charles ;St. Charles..· .241 Palestine 2'121 Portland 'Portland Callaway 243 Keystone ,St. Louis !St. LOUiS 244 Middle Fabius IDowning ISchuyler 245 1 Knob Noster : ,;,Knob Xoster ;: 'Johnson 246 'Montgomery CIty.. ,)Iontgomery City Montgomery 1

1

IJ. W. 'riffin IB. B. I'utman W .. 2\1. Madison B. D. Neale 1". A. Sampson IB. C. McDavitt IJ. W. Rankins 1\.'V. E. Sizemore IJ. D. Evans Jos. H. Alexander A. D. Offet... r'Ym. R.ichardson D. C. Gamble IC. L. t ribbs James F. Gra,es

lv.

IHenr y. ·Slack B. Bowers A8a illcAllister W. H. Brown 'Geo. L. Faulhaber /W. J. BiggS S. n. Wells 1.1. SuttOIl N. M. Read John K. McDearmon R.R. Jordan James Horrocks 1.1. D. Skidmore John A. Collins IA. f. l\lcCanne

on or after full moon. . Sat. on or before f. rn.&2 weeksaft'r. Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.

, 'Jlime not given. ' Saturday OIl or before full moon. /\'Yednesday on or before full moon. No time. Sa~urday before third Sunday. Fnday on or before full moon . First and third Tuesdays. Saturday on or before full moon. .F.irstand third WedneSdays. Saturday on or before full moon. , l'}id.ay Ol~or before full moon. l~o ttme gwen.

~

~

--.l


f-oool

~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued.

路1

~ ,

Lo

G

D E.

247 Neosho 248IRochester 249Icarroll 250 High HilL 251, Hope : 252! Alanthus 25:3 Lindley IButler 25;) i Alton 256 Shekinah 257; Lodge of Light.. 258 R.l1Vanna 259 1 Lodge of Love 260IMechanicsville 261 Florence 262 Holden 263,Summit.. 2~41 Fay.ette~'ille 265. Conntluan 266 ' SOCial. 267 Aurora 268 Lodge of Truth 2~9 1 ~oCk ,Prairie 2,0: l\ew Salem 2711 SOlo~on 272 Gramte 2731St. Clair 274 Cold Spring 275 Tranquillity 276, Grand River 277\ Wm. D. Muir 278. A. Villa.., 279, Hogle's Creck 280' Lodge of Peace 281 Fenton 282 Cosmos 2831 Stockton

~~

I .

TOWN AND

P.

I

C,

o. ADDRESS'I_~~

Neosho ~ewton Rochestcr Andrew Norbome !Cal'rOll High HilL.: Molltgomery Washington Il:路ranklin AlltnthUS 11(1cntry Lindley Grundy 1Butler Bat.es Alton Oregon Hanover .Jefl'cl'son ,Eaglesville ' E1al'rison : R.ava.nna I'i\.Icrcer Lancaster Schuyler i\Iechanicsville St. Charles New .J:t'loren(~e Molltgomery Holden Johnson Lee's Summit.. :,Tackwn F:;yette~iJle :JOhnson 1 Warrensburg ,Johnson ~.Ill.rtinsburg ,Audraill St. Louis St. LOu;s Atlanta l\Jacon ,Ash Gro::e jG!.e~ne 1 Argentvllle ILllH.:oln Spring-field Gre<:n SedalIa PettIs, Osceola 'St. CIll.ir , Henrietta Johnson 1orearville ;Sal.ine Freeman IICass Pilot Grove Cooper' Avilla, Jasper Quincy 'Hickory Chillhowee iJohnson Fenton ;St. Louis St. Louis ..!St. Louis Stockton ICectar 11

M' -----S--路 _~STER_. _~ETA~ H. C. Dalton John J. Idewn W. A. ~IcCubtion

Edward U. Bliss Jas. 1\1. Vanmeter F.. P. ~Iechan

J. W. Purvis

R. W. Zierlin

Jas. Quinlalld O. D.. Allstin Wm. '1'. ShaH~r Chl1.s. F. Lee l\l. Pyle

R. 1\1. Dobson IA. L. Sims 'Joseph B. Johnson IRobert C. :i\Ioore J. L. DOwlling :

Elijah Eggers IC E. Gamble P. Ellis Wm. E:tcele 'JlIs. A. Shaw I'~'路 ,~[ya~t : E. 1. Penmngton ,A. J. Dougla.ss IS. H. Potter :\lnrtiu Attebcrry I~1. H. (;il~iland B. Dewey W. F. Dnn. r~ John Montgomcry 'Jacob DOllOVUIl IS. O. Wallace /B.. J. Orear F. C. Shaler II. W. Harris H. Stemmons J. S. Hill .T. W. Stone E. J. Thurman Eden Reed \

Burrell Nuttcr, pTO tem ,. W. C. Calawav B. Eo Wilson.: Robert A. Long 'rhos. R. Thornton Wm. P. Greenlee J. Zoll C. T. ).Iar.tin 'IJ' A. Wright.. A. M. Atteberry ,D. A. Hadley: B. DOwl1ll1g Tho~. F. Kersey ,G. \\'. Ready /B. n. Bennett O. HalL :' J. R. 1-Iarshall F. W. Combs Jas. T. Ellis N. L. Stemmons W. A. Feaster T. R. Taylor John H. Wilkins Michael Sweeney

r

1w.

IH.

'I'

00

'I DIE OF

l'

EETING.

Tuesday on or 1 Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday all or before f.Ull moon. No Returns. S~turday on or before full moon. 1\0 Retn1'11s. First and third Saturdays. Saturday in each month. FrIday on or before lull moon. No Ret'ltrrts. First and third Saturdays. First Saturday. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. l\Iondayon or before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. First and third Saturdays. ~~turday on o~ before full moon. FIrst Monday In each month. ,Saturday all or after full moon. First and third Fridays. 1 Tuesday all or before full moon. ,Saturday on or af~er full moon. ,Saturday on or alter full moon.. Tu~sday ~n or after full mOOIl. ThIrd FrIday. SaturdllY before' full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Wednesday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Every alternate Wednesday. s.aturdll. Y 011 or before full moon. 1Friday on or before full moon. Wednesday on or before full moon. Saturday Oil or after full moon. Second and fourth Mondays. "Yo Returns.

Fj~st

~

~

("\)

~ ~

~.

,., 0' C?

f""


2~IN.'ew Bostol1 ····:·.. INe'~ Boston· ·· .. I.Lin~ ·· · · I'vv..c. Tolly 285 EarL Cof'feysburg : Davless 286 Hcsperill.n Virgil City Cedar ,A. Barter p 287 Craft.. Canton ILewis IW. H. Beach t" 288 Hermitage Hermitage Hickory :1'1. N. Neihardt.. " 289 ~c~cia Pa:adise Clay iW. L. Sparks .:> 290 I.a~rmount.. Fal.rmount <:;'lark · iGeo: Gantly '1l 291 Edina Echna: !Knox J. W. Hawks . 2!)2 Lamar Lamar Barton J. W. Delman :.0 2931 Sarcoxie S.arcoxie Jasper 'J. F. ScotL 29~ ;Vrou~ld City "[ounel City Holt: IJas. S. Hart.. 290, :\IolHteau Jamestown MODlteau 0. B. Hudson 2!!6 I C'tmeroll Cameron Clinton 'A. llarriman 297iO zar k > Fair Grove Greene jS. H. Spence 29S::\Iarble Hill Marble Hill. Bollinger 'i\Ioses Whybark 2!l9 "Tem Ple Kansas City Jackson ;IA. M. Crow 300 Doric { Forkner's Hill Dallas Jus: Warden 301 White HilL Barnard Nodl1.way Noah .McCaskey 302. Lick creek Perry jHl111S·.. ·.. · · T. F. GilL 303 1Osage Nevada Vernon J. W. Dungan 30!1 FaithfuL Gamburg Ripley IJ. F. 'rubb 305 Clarence crarence ·· .. ·.. ·1she.lby ·· ·.. ·I'wm. Shutters 30G Ashlar ,.. Commerce Scott. S. Overso!.. 307 New London New London ·.. IRalls , .Tames P. Wood 808: Parrott.. ~Iaysville :De Kal t E. J. Smith 309i King- Hiram Knoxville lRay ID. D. Gant.. 310'1 Sike~ton Sikeston :scott \0. E. KendalL 311 Kearney Kearney Clay ,W. J. yates : 312 l\'~ . .Plei,t-"ant.. M~. Ple~.~ant Gentry.. ,: /T. 1;. Wilson: 313 Kmgsvllle Kmgsvule · IJohnson ,G. CT. Valentme

I

J. W. Forrest

!Saturday on 01' after full

J. M. Sitton P. ~l. Hawldns Samuel Dent.. ~I. F. Du!1ean Henry Weher Jos. Baker W. L.Mack W. W. Fewell M. f;,L Smith H. L. Blakeman :\1. S. :VlcKee ·John Klingmore .T. M. Cofer J. H. Waite A. Hoeting Preston Davis M. Richards E. E. KimbalL T. W. Presson J.. T. Herron A. W. Ireland Geo. E. ~Iayhal1 Geo. W. Howell. A. T. l\loffitL Needham Sikes 1'. D. Anderson T. C. H!Jssy W. P. GIbson

/Sat. bef. f. m. and 2 weeks threafter. ,First and third :\Iondays. I·saturctay on or before full moon. Second and fourth Saturdays. Sfl.turday before full moon. Saturday before full moon . Thurs. on or bef. f.m.&2 weeks af'r. ITuesctay on or before full moon. Sat. of full moon a.na 2 weeks after. Saturdav 011 or before full moon. Second and fourth Saturdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. First and third Tuesdays. . 'Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. jsaturday on or before full moon. Friday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Sat. on or bef. f. m: & 2 W'8 thereaf'r. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. First and third Satunlays. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. First and third Saturdays. gaturda): on or before full moon. vaturday on or after full moon.

''1'. H. Welch J. F. Murphy D. W. Hegole G. T. Doty B. F. Spencer W. J. Hoach Lewis A. J. Lippelt.. Leader N. Gooda.le J. V. B. Wade G. H. Carter John Murphy L. P. Coldvin

. Seconrt and fourth Saturdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before [:Ull moon. Saturday on or before tull moon. Saturday before full moon. F!rst and th!rd ~Iondays. FIrst and thIrd Mondays. First and third Saturdays. Saturday before full moon. Friday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon.

No Rctll'l'ns.

mo.oll.

'I

~

00 00

l\:)

L...J

~ ~ ~

[

~.

M1. ~\.\t~\~~b.~~.~.:::::::: :::::: !~\t~I~~~~::::::: :::::: I~~~~~~~·~:.::::::: ::::::: i~·I~;i·G:·Canti:ei'l.: :::::: :::::: I~C~Ci~Ck(;;:::::::::::: :::::: ~~~ ~1~~;t~en. 316' Rural. Kansas City Jackson ,B. W. Warner James Eo Vinci!.. First and third ·Wednesday;;.

317' Osborn 318 Eldorado 319IPaulville 320'Chapel Hill 321 Jonathan 322 Hanlin ·.. · 323 Corner Stone 324 McDonald 325 D.ockery 326 New Home 327 Mt. Zion 328 Cainsville 329 Kennedy

Osborn .'De Kalb Luray Clark Brashear Adair Chapel Hill L!tfayette Denver ·Worth ·.. ·.. IHardin Ray St. Louis St. Louis Independence Jackson !~Ieadville Lil1n '~ew Home ',Bates /West Plains HowelL Cains\'ille !Harrison Lamar's Station INodaway

R. L. Evans :Samnel Blakely ,R. ~f. Brashear \W. B. Newman John J. Clark ;Geo. P. Long F. Lfu!1be ;H. H. wult.. IE . . D. Harvey IR. F. Bulett.. H. T. Smith !.John M. Sallee .:.: iE. 1\1. Bailey

,w.

IJ. II,.

'l\:) "'"' ~


~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued. :@'1

I

P.TOWN 0. ADDR~:SS.' ,COUNTY. AND

LODGE.

330 Bertrand 331! Charity

1

~?2, Ry~and

Bertrand.==iMiSSiSSiPPi... St. J?seph ,Buchanan

1 ne~ll~l..

,,33, ChIllcothe 334 Breckenridge

Chllhcothe Breckenridge .Joplin : HallSVille ~[alta Bend Millville Farley路 Smithton Brookline Roscoe Petersburg

IG~n.try i Llvmgston

. Caldwell... j Jasper 336 HallsvIlle Boone 337 ~Ialta Saline 338 IMyrtle ,Ray: 339 Fidelity !Platte :310' Amity Pettis 3U! Relief Greene 342 Circle St. Clair 3'13 Agricola Henry 3-14 'Moberly ~Ioberly Randolph 3i5: Fel~owship Joplin Jasper 346 Arlmgton jArlington Phelps 3i1 Spring Creek Edgar Springs JJheIPs 348 Wadesburg Wadeslmrg Cass 349 Lone Star Lone Star Gentry 350 Tyrian Johnstown Bates 31>1 IBdlev"' 1ron , 3uZ'} nend '''1 0. zark .. 路 路 C.'hrlstlan 353 Ben Franklin ,Savannah Andrew 1 354 Hebron l\Iexieo i Audrain 3?5 Ade!phi.. , Unio~l l\lills iPlatte ~.:~ .1\nclent Landmark, F!arnsburg Boone: ,,~)' loungs Creek Youngs Creek Audram ??8 comr,ort 1R?c.ky Comfort 1\IcDonald " 3')9 Garrett hlte Hare Cedar t 3601'l'~sc~n ISt. I;ouis St. Louis 3Gl\RlddlCk Dallas IBUftalo 362 Hiram rKahoka Cla.rk 36:1 Fraternal ' Robertsville Franklin 3M; Higginsville ' Higginsville Iafayette 86iJ'Warsaw Warsaw Benton 366IAdair .. IKirksville :rl5 ' )Iedoc.:

i

I

""""""1

~l"'ai,

~

i~dair

I

MASTER.

John Rushing .J.}lI. Au.stin A. Manring Samuel ShOOk J. W. RozelL J. S. McDonald J. L. Henry

TmE OF MEETIKG.

SECRETARY.

::

C. W. Burton.; L. Hardman ,So Levy IRobert S. Moore F. Reed S. A. Underwood J. HalL

Second S a t u r d a ; - - - - - Second and fourth Mondays. Saturday on ?r before/ull moon. Second and fourth Fridays. First and thir<l Mondays. First and third Thursdays. Saturday on or after full moon.

S. S. young 1. H. Carson John V. Harris S. F. Gibson Geo. P. Browne Peter D. Lane Chas. B. Rodes A. W. StillwelL J. H. Imboden H. W. Cox E. W. MarIan

Saturday on or before full moon. Wednesday on or before full moon. First and third Saturdays. Saturday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Mondays. Second and fourth Fridays.

iVO

Silas Keith A. Ireland D. Smith W. B. Searcy W. F. Shackleford .J. H. Webster John W. Barnett... J. S. Reynolds jF. S. Huckins P. l\largedant W. A. Wade

IO.

A. B. Maupin C. V. Co!'ey .las. J. GIdeon F. T. McFadden I.T. M. Riley :J.~. Boydston F. Ge.n~ry W. H. WhIte S. A. Street...: ,Jas. ?>l. TraVls !Jay L. Torrey L. Raynolds G.B. Stafford '.1. E. ROberts ,W. W. Preston S. W. Smith 0. Gates

IA.

IM.

1E.

'V. S. Jarvis S. A. Reybum John C. Rogers J. L. Bennett Geo. A. Poteet M,urray M~tchell... ~\. H. H. p'enton r. 1\1. Whlte W. F. l\Iore ISamuel Achord ~lf. H. White jFrank Furth Wm. J. Phelps jJ. )1. Leverich J. II. Stapp A. S. McGowan Robert H. Brecon

W

o

Retllrns.

Time not given.

Saturday on or after full moon. Sat. on or before f:ro. and 4th Sat. iVO

~ ~ ~

~

~

~.

Ret1l1路ns.

Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday. on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second Saturday. ' First Tuesday. ISaturday on or after full moon. ~~turday ~n or befo;e full moon. 1

I'Iimenotgwen.

~riday on or befor~ full moon .. 1 hursday on or bel are full moon. Fi.rst and ~hird Tuesdays. Ttme not gwen.

Friday on or lJefore full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Monday on or before full moon. First and third Thursdays. IMonday on or before full moon.

(3 (j

rt"


3~7lBarrY : 308 Cresent Hill 3G9 Composite 370 Williamstown 371:Craig 372 Xonparcil. :n8 : ~.Ialldcville ~Z:! qolde n Rule ·· ,>/,) 1 I lumb :n6 Kin/? Hill.. 377 AnClellt Craft 3Z8 K,il\yinning 3/9 BIlhngs 3SCJ Queen City 3S1 Ionia :)82 RiChland 388 Pythagoras ?S'!. Ha:mon y : 3SrlI Alcxander 386 Dayton 3S~ 'yoodside: ~88I'armersvllle

.:>89 Arcana 390 Marionville 391 Ray.to~vn 392 ChrIstian 393 Bee Hive 394 Dagan 395 Latimer 89(; Western Light.. 397 Gower 398 Jasper 899 !Pike 400 Decatur 401 Center 402 G.avel 403 Lowry City 404 Alexandria 405 Meredian Sun 406,IMalden , 407 Royal 40sIMontrose 409 Civil Bend 410 Iberia 411 Joppa 412 Appleton City

was.hb.ur.Il Burr y Adnan Bate~ Doniphan Ripley Williamstown Le\Vis ~ cr.a.ig oo.IHolt East Lynne Cuss ;\ilLndev.ille :carroll ·IJO?Csburg; · I"lontgOmer~ )flddlctO\\l1. Montgomery ISt. Joseph :Bucha.mtn City Gentry K,ihyinIJing S,co~la!1d Blllll1gs Chflstlan Queen City Schuyler jBarnettsville Morgan IH.iChllLnd pulaski.. Cassville ·Barry Vibbard ·IR!l~ Bedford Ll\lI1gstOll Dayton 'Cass I'l:homasvi,l1e 0re~on }!l:rmers~.llle Llvl.ngston WInters,llle Sulhvan Marionville Lawrence I,~ytow.n Jackson Pmk HIll Jackson Lawson ~ay .: MendoD Charlton Licking Texas ILouisburg Da;lIas IGower Clmton fvlidway Jasper Icurrvvme p.ike Peirce City Lawrence Lebanon Laclede New Cambria :Macon Lowry City St. Clair Alexandria Clark Austin Cass Malden Dunklin Moorsville Livingston Montrose Henry 'Civil Bend Daviess !Iberia Miller IHartville wright.. Appleton City St. Clair

I

IKing

1

IA. F. AUlt A. .T. Satterlee D. K. Ponder ;\1. L. Chapple iG. W. Farrow lwm. C. Bail'.d Silas Carr S. W. Hammack W. H . .Brindle Geo. "Vard EliBarrickm.an W. T. Lamkm .T. G. Miller A. B. Brock L. S. Brown Chas. Ray ~. R. Gant.. Chas. Glltes E. P. Parker J. B. Old : Wm. ~L McClam J. S. 'Iodd Edward Sinclair A. WOOdSOl~ A. B. Cundiff Wesley .1\1. Allison G. E. Mizner T. M. Bradford IJ. L. Watson John W. HalL

w.. K. BIl.YleSS J. W. Dunean A. J.1\lcCallnm R. C. ;\Iumma , H. Jerrard -:\1. B.lock L. H.J~ckson C. Parker , W. H. Leach J. Carroll. F.'. M. FUlk: IE. M. Morns Jas. Carter T. H. Stifler J. A. Br&dshaw B. F. ~IcCary A. Hauser ,.T. H. Baugh :L. H. HulL F. Collier J. ~~.qark J. 1. RIChardson \John A. 1IcCullah '1'. Smit~ : T. M. Vermlllton IJ. W. Asbury E. L. Hatfield R. W. Marr J~ D. Shaw : N. G. cummmgs

jW.

IM.

1"""'"''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''1'''''''''''''''''''''''''

J. W. CaldwelL J. A. Beaven H. T. Wright L. Lingo E. J. Higgins A. C. Sullivan E. B. Usury Dan. Haynes Anton Shuler C. H. Watkins B. F. Hetrick IT. J. ;\Iarchant F. Hudson A. Naylor

IB.

,

Thos. G. Edwards \J. F. Stark Wm. B. Farris J. O. Jones John B. BelL H. L. Seldon : D. H. Webster David ;\I. Harris A. B. French J. H. Vickars N. F. Compton John Fergusoll Wm.Kickle Jas Hodkins

;Sll.t!1.rday on or before full moon. IThlrd Saturday. 'Sat. before foui·th Sunday in ea. m. Saturday on or after full moon. NO Ret1lrns.

Saturday on or before full moon. I Saturday 011 or before fUll moon. ?atur~ay.on orbe~ore fUll moon. fhur.day on or before full moon. ~Saturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on or before full moon. ls,a~urdaY on or before full moon. Friday on or after full moon. \Saturda.y on or after full moon. iSaturday on or after full moon. IThursda y on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturchty on ?r before full ll:oon. Second and fourth Saturdays. Saturday on or after full moon. ~'ourth Saturday. Saturday on Or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Fri. on or bel'. f. m. and 2 weeks aft. Saturday before full moon. . Sat. before 2nd and 4th Sundays. Saturday·before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. iNo time. ISaturday on Or before full moon. ISaturda y on or before full moon.

~

CJ)

~

L-J

1

lVO

~

...... ..;:: I..:J

('i:>

~

~

~.

~

RetllTns.

Saturday on or before full moon. Wed. on orbef. Lm. & 2d Wed. aft. Wed. on or bef. f. m. & 2d Wed. aft. . s.at. after f. m. and 2 weeks after. Saturday after full moon. Mon. after f. m. and 2 weeks after. Monday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Saturdays. No time. First and third Saturdays. Saturday on full moon. iFriday on or before full moon. IFriday on or before full moon.

Jo=.ll

CIJ ~


~

~ ~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATE¥ENT, ETc.-'-Gontinued. ~

.

1

-

LODGE.

I

'·'1·

p?6>.\~~~I~~SS.

COUNTY.

4131 Vnlley ..............•...... moeko,;':::= ,,"d,"w , IGreensburgIKnox ' Hunnewell IShelby 4t~ cac. ~e .. ; South St Louis St LOU!s 4tl Whlte Water StroderVllle Cape Girardeau 4t8 Clear Creek Lincoln Benton 419 Sla,..............•......... T.be"'iIle 420 ltaska St. Loms !St LOUIs 421 Euclid Versaillcs 1l\lorgan 422 Gate of the Temple N. Springfield Greene 423 Newburg Competition Laclede 4~; Sa~arit~n Bonne ~e~re 'Washington 4_<> Cedar CIty Cedar CIty Callaway 42~1 Leesville :. Leesl'ille Henry 42/1 Glenwood Glenwood Schuyler 428 Louisville Louisville Lincoln 429 New l\htdrid.: Kew Madrid.: New l ladr!d ,130 Iroll l\Iountam Iron :Mountam St. FranCOIS 431 1 cen1ent Halfway P~lk 432 1Blackoak Preston HIckory 433 'I l\Iacks Creek Macks Creek ICamden 434 Wheeling Wheeling Livingston 435 St. Nicholas Cave Spring Greene 436 Ash Grove Ash Grove Greene 437 Tuscumbia Tu~cu~bia Miller ,138, Temperance SmIthvIlle Clay 439: 1ft. Olive North View Webster Trowel: Lutesville Bolling9r 441 Exc~lsJOr IJack~on Cape Glrardeau 442 Burhngton Burlmgton Junc.. Nodaway '143 Anchor , iSt. Louis St. Louis 444' Ada \Orriek \Ra y West Gate St. Louis St. LOUiS 44~ Grc:eu,tield Greenfi~ld Il?ad~ 441 FalrvlC\~ IScottsvll.le ,Sulhvan 448 Schell Clty ISchell City ,vernon 44~); PiedmOllt.. ,Piedmollt [V ayne 414 Greensburg 415 HunnewelL

i

440

I~.t. Clai~

MASTER.

SECRETARY.:I.

1No Rct""". """"""""""""""""'''''''1

,A. L. yancey I'A. C. Wheeler T. J. Bean A. M. McIntire C. A. Klemtopf.. G. eo. H. Stover IG. E. 'McCawley Wm. Bohannan W. Keeth ,H.. S. Hodges IJohn Vllnlemons Wm. Logan S. E. Estes I'l'hos. J. 0. Morrison J. G. Webb

IE.

lI~cLain

IA.

W. B. ThiehOff W. M. McGinnis C. M. Seybold, pro tem E. II. :Moxley Wm. H. John R. Ballmger Carl W. Biersack J. La Clair A. J. Reed F. J. T~tl~y R. P. NICkols ,,~. T. Hill GIlbert D. Gray H. H. Higgenbotham Henry C. Ri~ey H. Clay DaVIS

Pott~r

1

A. Morgan • Joseph Clouse

R. G. Pendleton S. W. Crocker

1

No Retu1'1Is.

lsaturda y on or before full moon. 9~cond an~ fourth Saturdays. 'ILme not gruen.

Fourth Saturday. S,!!-turday on.or before full moon. 11< lrst and tlllrd Mondays. First Saturday in each month. /'Recond and fourth Thursdays. Saturday on or after full moon, IS!!-turday on or before full moon. FIrst Saturday. ~aturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or b~t'ore full moon. Saturday on or alter full moon. No Ret1!1'ns.

.

~

~ ~ ~

;;S

~

~.

Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. 1\'0 Ret1!1'ns.

1

Geo. Biggs Geo. Vandever H. Bradlyford Wm. R. Adams W. R. Brooks

L. K. Anderson

IJOhn Scott, pro tem Frank Kraus G. 11. Patterson

Thursday before full moon. Saturday before full moon. S!!-turday on. or before full moon. First and thud Saturdays. Friday before full moon.

IA. S. Coker L. A. Hartness ;Thos. J. Stone :Th.os. J. Leake il·R:J. Hunter S. S. Clark J. W. Schro~k ID. C. Hutchmson John P. McFarland

Joseph Koehler IFrank Carr R. H.Catrall.. H. C. Perdue G. A. Grunnewald 0. S. Ragland H. C. Warren, Jr T. G. Hambaugh Edward MorIson

Sat. on or before new and full m. Saturday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Saturday on or after full moon. Second and fourth Tuesdays. TlIes. after :r<:ri. on or before full m. Fln:t and thIrd Saturdays. Second and fourth Saturdays. Second and fourth Saturdays.

JA. '1'. Weir

No Ret'!trns.

I'

4451

TIME OF MEETING.

o Q

~


450·Belton

4~1 ~rgyle 4u2 Verona

IRelton Nevada Verona

Ica~s

Vernon Lawrence

·IA. H. Linn

R. i"1. Slaughter.. ······· ..·.. G . L. Lon', acting

Granville §'.. Hoss W. P. McNalr..

: John A. Williams

,. IRaturday on or before full moon. iS~turday 0!1?r before full moon. First and '1 hiI'd Tuesdays.

:~1 ~g~~;~::: ::::::::::::: r?~~~~:~ :: : :: :::: .~~gf%n· . : ::::::::: H. ~. . ~.~~~~~. ::: :::::::::::::::::::II;~Thos. . ~~.~.~~:S. ..Barnes ~~~~:~.::::::::: ::::::1 pomi;:~~·g~~en. Chitwood Time not given. 1

455 Barnesville LORan's Creek Reynolds ,156 Wallace Bunceton ICooper 407 Tripl~ Tie Longt<!wn Perry 4;:)8 Melville Dadevllle Dade ,159 Hazelwood Seymour [Webster '!(i0 Lambskin St. Louis :St. Louis ,161 Caruthersville caruthersville \pemisCot.. '162Isata Fe : Santa Fe Monroe 468 Clifton Warm Fork Oreg-on 'H~ f~Ul.lv.ille..: .;. . l.\Ullvil.le..: I~afllYctte 46<l (.aynor City ···IGaynor City NOdaway 466 Ceutre View ~ Centre View Johnson 467 Pleamnt Hope Pleasant Hope Polk 468 Red Oak Gray's Point.. Lawrence 'Hi9 Plato Plato ITexas 470 N<:>daway I\Iaryville INodaway 471 :MlIleral. Oronogo "'I'Jasper 472 Pickering Pickering Nodaway 47R Ninevah Olney Lincoln 474 Guilford Guilford NOdaway '175 Golden Golden City Barton 476 Mt. Hope Odessa Lafayette 477 Henderson Henderson Wcbster 478 Racine Racine Kewton 479 Rich Hill Rieh HilL: Bates 480 JewelL : Pleasant HIII... ICass 481 Clinton Clinton IHenry 482 Clintonville Clintonville iCedlJ.f 483 rr~sh Grove ?I'1!lton I~tehiso.n 484 KIrkwood Kirkwood St. LOUIs 485 Co~d Water Br~sley Cass 486 Cairo CaIro Randolph 487 Herndon Herndon Saline 4&'-' Lock ~pring Loek ~prinR !?1l.Viess '189 LakevIlle Lakeville Stoddard 490 Montevallo Montevallo Vernon 491 Vandalia Vandalia Audrian '192 Daggett :Loutre Island ·1IIontgomery 493 Vernon :\lounds ..·..·.. ····..·IVernon 944 Lewistown Lewistown Lewis 495 Globe :Louisiana ;Pike 1

1

J. H. Walker lw. R. w,ilkinson W. H. ".atson

John A. Waller ?II. M. Wilkinson IG. W. Alleler W. J. Trimble A. R. Newcomb IS. H. Steele Jas. B. Davis.~ James Johnson B. L. Ba~ne.s John GrJIl\itt.. R. C. HulL John C. Coehrun.. ; .Tas. Gowenlock Wm. Rook W. H. Hudson

A. S. Ingles J. H. Ingram Thos. H. Brittan R. E. Boyd M. G. Wood H. H. Stopp John Bowser J. S. GiIlett.. Jas. D Cooley A. P. Ferguson .T. n. Warrell [S. Van <!undy J. B. wllde 'IF. V. H?lloway J. G. 'Vllson John S. Crain L. '1'. Ewar~ Jesse Jenmngs T. T. Curry ;.. 8. D. Ely :Wm. ~. ""':ray 0. J. Sulhvan R. S. Brisco IW. C. :\Iodiset

J. C. Pistole ThcronlYes B.L. Cook Henry C. McGown C. L. Frost G. F. LiIlcston W. K. Davis IJ. Goldenberg W. D. ?lIeyers ;Wm. Ellis :R. H. Warren iJ. J. Denny T. Mudd F. J. Stri~e.: IJ. W. Phillips Will H. Fenwick F. M. Burris B. H. Rutland J. W. Stuermer IG. H. Smith IGeo. R. Wright.. ·A. J. James B. C. Roberts John C. Walters

John P. Robertson A. B. Barbee: Geo. W. Carlton John S. Drake J. W. White J. L. R.e~eck Jus. n. Pittman S. H. McElvane Wm. McVauzant L. D. HazIer W. T. Moon ~r. Kusbaum

IH.

Retll1'ns.

~

L.....J

Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. ,. Thur.Sd!ty on or before full moon. SltturdllY 011 or before full moon. ·Secolld Wednesday each month. Saturday on or before full moon. SaturdRY on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturd.ay on or before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Friday on or bcfore full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. ;Saturday on or before full moon. :SRturday before full moon. ;Second and Fourth Saturdays. iVO

~

CfJ CfJ

.

Saturday on or after full moon. Time not g'i'ven.

No time. Tuesday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Wednesdays. ISaturday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Fridays. ISat. on or before f. m.&2 weeksaft'r. Tuesday on or before full moon. Second and fourth Mondays. Saturda~ on or before full moon.. Fourth Saturday. TUeSday.. on or before full moon. Monday on or before full moon. Saturdo..y on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Tuesday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. First and Third Thursdays.

~ ~ ~

~ ~

~.

~

• 00 00


.....

GRAND SEORETARY'S TABULAR STATEl\tIENT, ETc.-Oontinued.

'1

~

LODGE.

496 Robert Burns 497 Strafford , 4\18', Kaseyville 499 Paynesville 500, Jameson ~Oll Bu~kner : ,,02 Ph Iladel ph la ii03 Prairie Rome 504 Platte City 505 Avalon 50r>: Lathrop 507. Clearmont 508 Saxton 5091 Van Buren .')10 BiSWell. ~11 S~idmo~e

~1~ 'yeb~ CIty i'U chanton 514,1 Exeter 515 Galena ~)lf:)i ~Iilford

517· Seligman

TO WN-AN D. P.O. ADDRESS. COUNTY.

Gainesville O;;m,rk Strafford : Greene Kaseyville Macon Paynesville Pike, Jameson Daviess Bu~kner ·: .. · ·.. I'Jac~son Pluladel ph la 1\farlOn Prairie Rome Cooper Platte City :Platte * Avalon :Livingston * Lathrop 'Clinton *IClearmont .l'Nodaway *;Saxton Buchanan *:Van Buren jCarter *.BroWnin g Linn :. S~idmo~e INodaWaY ) Webb .Clty : oTllSpt:r /Gutht'ldbe :\IillS ,CIJUl'1ton * Exeter ,Barry * Galena Stone *Milford·..· iBarton *,Seligman ,Barry

MASTER.

S. C. Herndon B. W. Dillard S. L. Kasey J. C. Bradley C. E. Cornue J. 1\1. Adams

IRobert Q,. Gilliland IH. A. MCGinty John Buster F. W, Patton !Charles Pipkin :.G. Allison

Chus. R. Seott Korton B. Anderson Wm. P. )Iunro Z. '1'. Martin John 1\[, Lamnr A. F. Grecnard A. B. Martindale, John Cl1rter Wm. V. Smith A. A. Hulett... IO. B. AI1l1cr"'on Henry F. GOOde J. F. Seaman M. J. Fllubion 1Wm. G. Neely

\A. J. Lacey IGeo. A. Warner Andrew J. Barnes jD. H. Kendall... 'John W. Cisna IH. H. Rig-gins Joel F. Short oT.efl.. KellIledy W. M. Asher ,E. T. Webb ,J. H. Pltgett A. Boucher, U. l\£. Fiske J. M Herlocker Isaac Stapleton

1

I

. , . SECRETARY.

'v .

1

I'w.

,

·00

t+>-

Ill.. TIME OF MEETING.

Saturday on or before full moon. /Saturda y on or after full moon. , Saturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on after full moon. i1. No First and third Saturdays. Relurns. Sat. after f. m. & 2 weeks thereaf'r. Saturday on or before full moon. iFirst and third Saturdays. iFirst and third Saturdays. :Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon . Saturday on or after full moon. First Saturday in each month. Sl!-turday on. or b~fore full moon. :Flrst ann thlrn Wednesdays. 'Seeond Saturday. 'Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. IWednesdayon or after full moon. 1Thursday on or before full moon.

~

~

~ ~

~

~'

HI~~~I~~y/:::I'I~J;.~~F ·:::{~~~{F:.:::!~5.~~;;,~;"...i:...I::: * Chartered

October 12th. 1882.

t

t Dispensation grantcd October 12th, 1882.

Dispensation continued from last Session.

o ~

~

j


)o....l

GRAND' SEORETARY'S TABULAR STATElVIENT.

00 00

~

Compiled from Annual Returns, of date October 11, 1882, incl'uding Receipts from all sources up to October 11, 1882.

~

..:

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-

,

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11

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued. I • i

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1

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63 cambridge 64 ~lonroe

6 6

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, 3[ 3

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· ;

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·.. ·1 Bridg~ton Hallvllle Linneus........................

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St. Catharines

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90 Kin~ Solomon

····1

99 ~1t. Vcrnon 100 Canton : 101 Easton

~1t. Vernon...................

Canton......................... Easton..........................

2 1 7

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3 1 3

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.. .. . . . ; .

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GRAND SEORETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued. .

I

..

NAME.

sI

z;j 1-

09

~SlA.nd

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City

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112 Graham

Graham

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St. Louis.......................

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1

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR SrrATEMENT-Oontinued.

. ...

21 S

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NAME.

I

I~

. '0

LOCATION.'

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......

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Montgomery City......... Neosho

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264 Fayetteville 2651 Corinthian

266 .social.

'Favetteville \'Varrensburg................ ; r.lartinsburg

\...... 2' 1

1

116

1

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:::::::

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STA.TEMENT-Continued. 1

1

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...:

NA~[E.

2

LOCATIO~.

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.2i3 St..clair 2i4 1Cold Spring 2i5'Tran q uillit Y

josceola .. '.. oreurVille

,

• .. 1

·

·..

Av~lla...........................

'1

1

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21

2

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1

1550

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1

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Stockton

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1

1

1

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1

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292 Lamar

Lamar..........................

21

22

II

: ..·! ..·' .. ·I ..· ..·.. ·

18

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1

19

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1

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1

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·

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Gambnrg...................... Clarence....... Commerce New London '

30Ll Chucnce

30~IJ\shlar

I

30, New London

318

EldOmdD

!Lm.Y........................... Brashear , .................. .................. ..................

:H!l Panlville

1 4 91' 3

' 21

l ~ . . .~

1

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1

1

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1

2 3

4 2

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3

3

2

3

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1

24, ,......................... 52 1 · 1· 1 39............ 46............

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,

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.

1~ 00 25 00 I? 50 2300

.. .. . .

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1 31

,

3

2

1... 111............

1

1

.... 11

1..

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2;

27

351

....1······1. ..

1'

$1300

..

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..................

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.................. West PlaiIls . Cainsville . ILamar.sStation ,

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.

I

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333 i ChilleDth•.........•..•....•........ Chillioothe.... .•.... ••••....•

~

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..................

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1,

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GRAXD SEGRETARY'S TABULAR S'rATElVIENT-Continued.

. ...

21

NAN'.

LocmON.

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Mlington.....................

6

6:

4

3,

353 Ben Franklin 35'!Hebron

Savannah Mexico

4

6

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31' 2

2 ...

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z \ .5 >l-t, ~ ...; A 0 ~ ~ ~ -- - - - - - - - - - - ------------ - - --1- - , - -1-'- - - 346 Ad'ngton

1

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7

2

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57 82

41 00 1900

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~~~ ~~~fe~~ilb·;~it::::::::::::::::::::: Kilwinning.................. rfir!:~~;::::::::::::::::::::: :4 41~ J..... i '''is .....51~ ~ ::: ::: "i :::1...... ·....S ~g ::::::::::::':::::::::::: :::::::::::: i~ ~g!:::::::::::: 3i8 Kilwinning 241 1............ 1900, ..

375 Plumb

] Middletown..................

3

31

3......

1

1

11:

15,

1

1

.

1

25

()

rt'


3791 Billin", .,

31

Billin", ,..............

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28

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29

$1'150

~~ :::::::::::: ::::::::::::

::::::::::::

13 50

..

'27 ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

. . . . . .

............ ............ .

422\Gate of the Temple 4'23 Newburg 42-1 Samaritan

.__

~. Springfield

·1 Competition................. Bonne Terre 1

_

I

_

71 2

31 3

41

5

21' 4 6

41 l' 1

11··.. ··1 ..·' ..· .. ·1 21 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

21 3 41

'27

.

25 108

.. ..

35

59 ·· 40 69

.

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.

.

1

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29 50 1 20 00 34 50

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~

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATE:NIENT-Continued.

~ 2 II E

NA;lIE.

LOCATION.

::l

~~

~

~

.-

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'a;

~

~

~

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==.= 512

Z • 425 Cedar City.===== Cedar City.. 426Le~'ille L""wille 1'

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Bunceton Longtown

1

3 21

2 2

2 3

2 2 3......

2 1 1 1.........

1 1

481 22

1

2150, 1100,

.. ..

ro

o Ci

~


\

i~~lMelville

Dadeville.....................

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

·1......

l!ii~~~~;;;~:.::::::::::: i~~~b.~;,,~::::::::::··! "1 l : : :~ .... ll'::::t~I::, ::') /4IChftO~""" Aullville..:

4~r.. 46g·GayIlOr~ItY

""".""""."". Warm. Fork.................. ,: Aullville .:..

3 21 1 2 6 4 5 9871 1

Gaynor~Ity

,"!"entcev'ew

1

1

centcev..,w

1

1

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34 1

1

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1 .. ·

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23····································1

$17001

..

~ ~:::::::::;:

700 1 13 00

1150

Clinton.............

486lc"'m...........

C.'m

4

5

.1

3

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1

3

1

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Mound'.....

,

4......

481

49

1

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Buckner ,· * Philadelphia Prairie Home...............

21......

2 ·..

3

3

3

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·1·.. 1...... ,

1

1

2'100,

~

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........ 1

ii· ::ii:::·:::· ..i:i:::;::/:ii·;:.::::, ~! ftl:::ii".:::: 1

'4

~i ~ ~t'i: i(!i: ;:! !:!i! : ~ ~ ~)\r/: !i:! : : I: : i.: : : !: : ~;:;~ : : ~ :~ : ':1 !: ; ; ; ~ ~ 501 Buckner 502 Philadelphia 503 Prairie Home

1

00

..

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4811 Clinton

~

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1

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001·

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30............

1500

25

12 50

.. . ..

~

~

~


~

~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Concluded.

21S

.

~

LOCATION.

NAME.

::l

Z

3.c.c ~ ~ .~ '8 gj a3 ......

501 IPlatte City 5051 Avalon 50G Lathrop

Platte City t Avalon t Lathrop........................

~~~ ~~~~~~~~:.:::: :.::.:::.:::::.:::.JI~~~~~~~.:::::::::::::::::::::'

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r.1....... . ~ ~ ~ : : : · i ·~I ~g':::::::::::: ::::::::::::1::::::::::::1:::::::::::: :::::::::::: l!fli~t~i~~~:::::.::::::::::::::::].f~~i~ff;~~~~~:::::i::::.~ ~I''''';:: : :.~ ~ ~ ~::::)~~i~~ ~: I ~ ~I: : ~!: !i ~: ~ ~:~ ~ ~;: ~ ~: :~ ~ <~ ~:~ ~ : I:~ : :~ ~: ~ : : : ~ ~ ~: 516Mi~ford g~gl'~~~v~r.~:~::::::::::::::::::::::::J~:gw~y~~~.:::::::::::::::::::

511 Skidmore· ·..·..·

517 Seligman

* ~0 Returns.

·..·

:::1· ::: ::: :::

·+ISkidmore

tlll,Iil.ford t,Seligman

t Chartered October 12th. 1882.

·1......

2.2 1 21 2......

1......

21

1

1

1

1...........

1

10· 10

1

·..

1 .. ·

1

·1

1

..

·

·

·..· ..

..

~ ~ ('i:)

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~.

t Remitted by Grand Lodge.

o (";) M-


149

Appendix.

1882.]

RECAPITULATION. Chartered Lodges on the Roll, October, 1881...; , Ceased to exist during 1881-82, by surrender and consolidation Chartered October 12, 1882 'fotal Chartered Lodges Lodges Under Dispensation....... Total Lodges making Returns for 1882 Total Lodges not making' Returns for 1882 Lodges Chartered October, 1882

. .

504 3-

.

501 16

.

517

3 . .. ..

473 28 16

517-

i:itt~~::~~~~.~..~~.~~~~~~.~.~.. ~~.. ~~~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Passed Raised Admitted Reinstated

Increase Dimitted Died Suspended for 路Non-Payment of Dues Suspended for Unmasonic Conduct Expelled Decrease Gain

.. .. . ..

207 1,459 1,340 1,309

1,021 221

2,551

. :

~

.. . .. . .

517

969 306 476 27

29

..

1,807

.

744

Rejected ; :...................................................... 439 Members reported (including new Lodges) :........................ 23,789 ~stimated Members from Non-Reporting Lodges....................................... 500-24,289

NOTE.-At a low estimate, there are 24,000 affiliated Masons in the Grand Jurisdiction of Missouri.-[GRAND SECRETARY.]


Jo-o4

Or

ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES" UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF IfIISSOURI, ORGANIZED

COMPILED FROM

ORIGI~AL

~~I

OF LODGE.

2IJo.achlm 3 Huam 4 Harmony ~ 'l'a.ylor ;) Ohve Branch 6 Unity 7 Franklin Union 7IGrover 8 Vandalia 9 Sangamon 10 Union 10 Shawnee 10,IChapel.. 11 Eden 13 Tucker 1,1 Boonville 15.Central

Herculaneum St. Charles Louisiana Springfield Alton Jackson Fro.nklin Calhoun Vanrlalia Springfield Jonesboro New Santa Fe Cha p el Hil!.. I:~ovington: Ste. Gencvleve Boonville Smithville

16,Columbla 21 JS'ew London 21,Greencastle 22 Franklin 23 Hiram 24 Hltrmony 24 Wyaconda 26;Springfield 27:Ringgold 27iTemperance

ColumbIa New London \Greencastle Alton St. Charles Jacksonville 'La Grang-e Springfield :Ringgold lvanctltlia

15lPerseve~ance

1

Louisia~a

1.821..

DOCUMENTS BY GEO. FRANK GOULEY, GRAND SECRETARY, 1876.

REVISED AND BROUGHT DOWN TO OCT. 10, 1882, BY

~ I~A)IE

CO\.:NTY. .Teffe,rson St. Charles Pike Greene Cape Girardeau Howard Henry

'Jackson Lafayette ; : Ste. Gencvleve Cooper Clay Pike Roone Ralls Sullivan

STATE. '.. l\Io Mo :Mo :Mo Ill Mo Mo ;:Mo IIlL Ill

1m lIIo Mo ,Il.l. Mo ~10

Platte

,1\-10 11\10 Mo :'010 1)10 IlL Mo Ill... Mo Ill 1.1110 Ill

Vcrnon

,1\10

St. Charles Lewis

JOH~

D. VINCIL, GRAND SECRETARY.

DATE O.F CHARTER.

I

. RE~:'~RKS.

].oct., 1820. b) G. L. of Tenn ,Arrested AprIl 7, ~82il. 1820, by G. L. of Tenn lsurrendered Apnl4, 1826. Oct. 11, 1821. Surrendered April, 1825. May: 6: 1852 Un~ted wi.th "United, No. ~." . UllIted wIth 1st G. L. of IllmOls, 1824. i Apnl3, 1822 iNOV. 25, 1821, disp. G. L. Ind.. .surrendered January 7,1823. April 3,1822 Arrested December 20, 1831. ),o[ay, 18(j~ Died 1860. October 8.1822 United with 1st G. L. of Illinois, 1824. IOctober 25,1822 Arrested A ril 11,1826. ,Octobe. I' 25,115'22 enited witR 1st G. L. of Illinois, 1824. 'l\lay, 1858 Surrendered 1863. 'May 6.1852 Surrendered 1855. ,'OctOber 9. 1822.; IIUnited with 1st~. L. of Illinois, 1824. October 10,1826 Surrendered Apnl6, 1831. April 3. 1827 Arrested October 3,1838. 1\-lo.y 6, 1852 Went down on account of war, 1861. April 8, 1~28. Arrested April 3, 1838. October il, 1830 Arrested October 3,1838. October 5,1837 Surrendered 1862. on account of war. June 2, 186(; Arrested April, 1879. October 5, 1837 United with G. L. of Illinois, Oct., 1843. October 5, 1837 Arrestcd October 16,1846. October 2,1838 United with G. L. of Illinois, 1840. June 10,1853 Surrendered 1876. October 8.1839 United with G. L. of Illinois, 1840. :May 6, 1852 Arrested Mo.y.1855. October 9,1839 United with G. L. of Illinois, 1842.

~~l~~~&~.,t路.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~1:l~~~.~~::::::::::::: ~.~~~::::::::::::::::::: rff:::::::: ~~~b~~5~:i:路i8R9::::::::::::::::::::: ~~~~~g~~~~~ i~7~:

29,Osage

1

Little Osage

o

~lay

6, 1852

Destroyed 1861, by war.

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32\Lafar ette

)Lexington /Lafllyette : : ,Ll~.xilJgton Lafayette ,,3 I-llJ1sboro alws Mt. MOrIah.. HIllsboro 37 Dawson Wellington Lilofoyette 38/GrAham Pleasant Hill Cuss 39 Tully Tully Lewis 39 Clinton Carlyle 39;Modenll. Modena lYlercer 40IColema~:I. St. I-?uis, 41,Des Momes Burllngton 41'Bolivar Bolivur IPOlk 42 HOl1stoll Breckenridge CaldwelL 42 Iowa Bloomington .' 42 Middle Grove II'Iiddle Grove ~Ionroe 44 Rochester iRochester Andrew 46 Sparta, formerly "Kabzeett"I'sParta Buchanan 46 Martha 路Washington Washington Franklin ~9 M!neral Point 1I'l!neral Point ;; : ,)0 II'Ilddletown MIddletown Montoomely 50IOzal'k Springfield Greene 50 Anderson Chapel Hill. Lafllyette ~6iPlatte Platte City Platte 09,Lancaster Lancaster ISchuyler 59;Marion : Salem 60 St. Clair Belle\'iIle 61 Osceola Osceola St. Clair 62 lYlaysville l\[aysville DeKalb 62 Dubuque Dubuq~le 63 St. Marys PerryvIlle Perry 63 Iowa City ,Iowa City fA.Landmark 'Warsu\~ Benton 651~[elo(ly Pluttevllle 66!lYlarShall.. MarshalL Saline 69 Alexandria Alexaudria Clark 70 College I1'1arion College ,Marion 70 IDickinson Monrce IMarion 75 Bowling Green Bowling Green Pike 81 Neosho Neosho Newton 83 Dalla ICalhoun :Henry 84 Multanomah Oregon City '

11\<10

~2 L~fayette

85 Johnson '\Varrensburg 86 ::\Iitchell ;Columbus 86 Mo. Mil. 3d Reg't Mo. VOL) B8 Ba.tes Bu~ler 880hve Branch Ulllon

Johnson Johnson Bates : Franklm

1\10

October 8, 184.0 October 19, 1867 October 8,184.0 May 28,1858 June 12, 1KI3 June 9, 1853 October 8, 1841.. Junc 2, 1866 October 8, 1841.. October 20,1841.. June 9,1853 June 2,1866 October 20, 1841.. June 9,18-53 June 10, 1853 October 8,1841.. June 10,1853 Octob~r 1l~ 18<12 May 2::>,1854 October 17,1842 ::\Jay, 1858 IOctob~r 14: 1842 1IIIay 2;>, 1854 October 11, ]842 ,October n, ]842 IOctober 15,1842 May 25,185<1.. Octob~r 101 18<13 :iVlay 2D, 1854 ,October ]0,1843 IOctober 1~, 1843 Octobe. I' 12, 1843 October 12,1843 October 16, 184'1.. October 16, 1844

Mo Mo 11'10 Mo Oregon.

October 1<1, 184.6 October 1<1, lR46 October 17, 1846 October 19, 1816

Mo IlL IIIo II'Io Mo IlL Mo lila Iowa Mo 1'<10 '. Iowa lYlo Mo Mo Mo W.is Mo lYIo ~Io

,1I1o MO Ill Ill :Mo :1\'10

IIowa Mo IIowa :M<;l IW. IS :iVIo l\Io

,

::\10

110 : , ,'Mo :Mo

March 19,1847 Unknown October 14, 18.17 'l\lay 28, 1858 ;.; October 14,184/

,Arrested December 1,1866.. . Con sol. 1882 with L~xilJgton, No. 149. Arrested October 1b, 1846. Surrendered 1864. ,'DestroYed 1862, by war. Surrendered May, 1863. Arrested OctOber 19.1846. Arrested OctOber, 1876. Ch~nged ~o "~It. Moriah, No. 40," 184.,1. United WIth G. L. of Iowa, 1844. Surrendered 1863. Arrested April 22, 18G9. "L'nited with G. L. of Iowa, 1844. Arrested February 29, 1864. Surrendered 1865. Arrested OctOber 19, 1846. Arrested May, 1863. United witli G. L. Wisconsin, 1844. Arrested lYlay 18, 18<)8. Arrested October ]8,1847. Destroyed 1861, by war. Surrendered 1864. . 1Arrested 1866. 'United with G. L. of Illinois, 1844. United with G. L. of Illinois, 1843. Destroyed 186], by war. Destroyeo. 1862, by war. United with G. L. of Iowa, 1844. Surrendered January, 1864. . United with G. L. of Iowa, 1844. De~troyeC!- 1861, by war:. . Umted WIth G. L. of WlsconslIl, 1844. Arrested 1851. Arrested 1864. Changed to "Dickinson," 1847. Formed from "College, No. 70." Changed to "Ashley, No. 75." Surrendered 1863; restored as 247, in 1867. Arrested October 28,18-52. First Lodge on Pacific Coast. United with G. L. of Oregon. Destroyed lSfi1, by war. 'Destroyed 1861, by war. 路I'CIOSCd with Mexican war. Destroyecl1861, b::_war. Arrested about 185::.>.

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ROLl; OF "DEAD LODGES," ETc.-Oontinued.

Ot ~

~

1

N,DrE

OF LODGE.

TOWN.

~8IDre~~en

I

COUNTY.

116'1 DavlCss 118 Hiram 119 FOHer 124 Cedar 128IKirksVille : 128 Live Oak 129.Collstantine 130;Barry

Dresgen : , Pettis HarrIsonvIlle Cas:; COlumbia \BOone Cuba Crawford Jackson Cape Girardeau Pleasant Hill Cass ;LUS Vegas ITer. of New i\iex l\It. Vernon Polk Springfield :.. :Greene Carthage Jasper Georgetown Pettis ,:\Iacoll Macon Macon ~Iacon i\Iiami Saline New i\-Iadrid New Madrid Las Cruces 'rer. of New Mex Santa Fe Ter. of New Mex Ste. Genevieve Ste. Genevieve St. Louis St. Louis St. FrancisVille !Clark "yaverly Lafayette SIbley Jackson ,South:West City Mc~onald Gallatll1 _ Da VICSS St. Charles St. Charles Boston Scott.. Fremont Cedar Adair KirksVille Pleasant Hill Cass 'Charleston IMiSSiSSiPPi.. Barry Cassville

I,},) RIdgley 137 Warrenton 138 Round Prairie 140 Smithton 141 Mi~dlebury

RIdgley Warrenton Newark Smithfield Middlebury

144 John Dade

,Cassville

.lolprame U4 Boone U4:.Evening Star %,Aeacia U5 Pleasant HilL u5Ichapman 99 Mt. Vernon 101 Greene 103:Carthage 105Relief.. 106:Macon 106 Laporte 106 Miami 108 New Madrid 108 Aztec 109 Montezuma 109 Louisiana III St. Louis llz IEZell.. l1~."yaverIY

I

l1<>:SIbley

115iBorc~er

l~!I'S~rc.OXie

H1Ior.lenta~ 143 FlInt HIll

' :

S~rcoxie

!J~sper

~r~mtOI~ :Flmt Hill

Mercer Grundy St. Charles Barry

PJatte Warren Andrew

ISTATE. \_.~~E OF CHARTE~_I

RE:'>!ARKS.

IOctober 19, 1867"'''''''''''''''''''1 Arrested JUl~, 1878, by T. C. Ready, G. M: . October 12, 1847.. Destroyed 1861, by war. '!olav 8.1818 .. "'.lay 29, 1855 Surrendered June 12,1875. May 5, 1848 Went down during the war. i\lay 8, 1848 Arrested 1853. June 2,18(;6 United with G. L. of New "Mexico, 1877. i\Io May 11, 1848 Surrendered December 27, 1862. Ii\fo :\fay 12,1848 United with" United, No.5," 1857. 'i\lo May 12, 18~Y , Burned out 1861. . Mo May 10, 1849 Went down 1860. ~fo May 28, 1858 'Surrendered IB73. Mo 'May 28, 18fJ8 IChanged to" Macon, No. 106." Mo May 10, 18-19 ,surrendered February 10, 1857. MO !May 10, 1849 Destroyed during the war. October 19, 1867 j United with G. L. of New Mexico, 1877. May 8, 1851.. United with G. L. of New Mexico, 1877. M. 0 18.07, by G. L. of pa IArrested by G. L. of Pennsylvania, 1824. i\-Io 1809, by G. L. of'Pa Arrested. 1'.10 May 9, 1850 ,SUrrendered 1860. MO ,.t.lay 9. 185g Surrendered Ja~uary 28, 1860. Mo ~lay 10, 18JO Surrendered 1863. MO 'Oct?ber 15; 1874.. Surrendere~.October, 1882. Mo Mil.} 10, 18JO Arrested 1816. Mo May 10, 1850 Surrendered May, 1862. Mo May 10, 1850 Surrendered 1866. i\Io i\-Iay 10, 1851. Surrendered 1863. 1\.10 May 8, 18tH Arre~ted1863. New Charter 1864 to No.105 Mo October 19,1867 Arrested by G. L. of Missouri, 1877. Mo ~.IaY 8, 1851. surrendere.d July 28, 1874. I~IO May, 1&')2 Arrested 1852. )fO ,i\Iay,}85~.. · ·· IArrested May, 1858.• Mo May I, 18u1.. Destroyed 1861, by war. _ Mo June, 1851.. Surrendered 1856. I Mo May 31.1855 Arrested 1865. . Kansas. May, 1855 '1\11 records lost. Mo May 31, 1855 ,:. IArrestE:d 1872. . i\Io October 17;}8/3 ;ConsohdlIted WIth Trenton Lodge, 111. Mo May 31, 18::>Ll Surrendered 1863. ... IMo June 1, 1855 oI Destroyed 1861, by war. MO Mo !MO Mo Mo :Mo

1

I

~ ~ ~

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~.

,......,

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f"'"


145 i Windsor CJty l~i B~lffalo : 1<>2 l Lmn Creek :

"I

;\Vinrlsor City :B~lffalo : L1I1n CreCk

ICarroll Dallas ICamden

'1'.10 :Mo IMO

:June I, 1855 IIIIa~, 1855.:: 1'.Iay 26,18-)<>

£,10 £,10 IMO IIIo

May May May: 1I'1ay IMay

'Surrendered 1855. Arrested.18G!. . Destroyed 1861, by war.

~

CJ:; CJ:;

~~~i~i~~Si~;g~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~:b~~~~~t~iiy:::::I::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~:g~~~: ~;~J~'..~~~~:;::::~:::::::::::::::::::::: ~~J~t~~nr~turns.

158 Cornwell Rose HJ1l. Johnson > .159Ipa<;:ific pa<?itlc jFranklin =" 1GO:EdJl1a :.:., :Ed~na Knox 161.Robcrt ·MoIns Sa',annah Andrew :-::; 167iElclorado Luray Clark . 168iFairmount :Fairmount.. Clark 169;Tuscumbia [TUSCUmbill. Miller 172 Wolf Isla.nd Wolf Island Mississippi... 173 Union, form'ly "Bollinger" 'Wolford's Store Bollinger 17i Winchester Winchester Clark 180 Kenner ~ :Athens Clark 184 :Modern j'HUmansville polk 1.%:Dayton Dayton. lcass 187" Henry Clay" MiIlersburg 'Callaway 191 Zerubbabel.. IPlatte City :Plalte , 195 Wet Au Glaize Wet Au Glaize Camden 197 camde.n cam. den IIR.aY 200 Washburn.: Washburn .: Barr~ 203 Pleasant Ridge ; Plea~ant RIdge Hamson 203 Green Ridge Windsor Henry 204 Bent.. Taos 205,Rocky Mount Camp Floyd ; ,Alto Vista Daviess 208:Alto Vista 211 Orion St. Joseph Buchanan 212:Austin _ Austill. C.ass :216!WestPlains West Plains Howell

28,18<)6 28, 1&?~ 29. 18.?6 28,18<)6 :;\10 18, 1857~ Mo '~Iay 18, 1Kli MO 1:\Ill.y 18, 1&i7 Mo :\fay 80, 1857.. i\:lo May, 1857 Mo May, 1857 Mo May, 1858 MO May ,1859 1May, 1859 1'.10 I MO illfay, IS.59 :Mo :May 28.1859 Mo May, IS60 M. 0 !'v.lay, 1859 Mo iHay, 1860 Mo May. 1860 Mo October 19,1867 N. i'vIex. June 1, IS60 Utah IJune 1,1860 Mo May, 1861 MO ,May, 1861 :MO l\Iay, 1861 :'.10 !'vIay, 1861

:

, Destroyed 1861, by war. Arrested Jan., 18i8, by T. C. Ready, G. M. Arrested £'Iay, 1_~66. Surrendered 18<>1. Surrendered 1861. Surrendered June 12,1863. Surrendered 1863. Surrendered August 22,1874. No records. Destroyed 18G1, by war. Destroyed 1862, by war. Destroyed 1861, by \var. Destroyed 1SG!. by war. IAr. .June, ISS1. by W. R. Stuoblefield,G;l\I. Arrested June, 1879, by N. ~r.Givan, G. M. ; lsurrendered 1862. • ".Ient down 1861, by war. IDestroyed 18Gl, by war. Arrested 1863. Surrendered 1873. Surrendered 1865. 1 • Surrenderec1186!. IArrested 1865. ISurrendered 1863. D.estroycd 1861, by war. i'surrendered 186!.

~g:~~~~~;; . :::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~~~~~;1:::::::::::::ili~r1g~: . :::::::::::::: ~ig: ::::::,~i:r: f~~i :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: g~~~~g~;~g f§~r~~ war.

~191Ncw Boston

New Boston

i Macon

MO

IOctober 12, 1869

,Snrrendered 18il.

~

L....J

~ "'t1 ~

~

~ ~

~.

.

~i!~~~~f:::::::::::::·:::: ~IfJ.it::;::::;::i~~¥i.:;:::::·::.g~::i~Jig~I,~;:::::::::::::::::I,!~l~¥1:!;6:~ :~:'NUcm

232'Lonc Jack 289'Spencersburg 274!New Market.. 2ii Index

2~ILillY

29<> Grove ::126 Kit Carson 330:Lathrop ,

Lone Jack JaCkson spencersburgIPike New :Market.. Platte Index Cass :.. G:ant City Worth .: Webster Groves 1St. LOuis Elizabethtown Lathrop Clinton

,MO

j'October 19, 1867 ~"y, 186;) Mo October 15,1868 !'vlo October 15, 1868 1'.lo 1868 Mo i\lay 1<>, 1868 N. Mex. I October 12, 1869 i\'Io iOctober13, 18iO !'vIo

·I.octob~r,

Surrendered 18ii. Sm'l'endered September,lSS!. Surrendered October, 18iS. Arrested 1877. Ar. Dec., 1880, by W. R. Stubbletie.ld, G.l\I. Surrendered 1874. . . Arrested ISi8, by T. C. Ready, G. M. Arrested May, 18i9, byN. M. Givan,G.l\L

~

Ol CI:l


~

ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES," ETc.-Contill'lled.

~

~

1._.

XA)!E 01" LODGE.

332 Clark

Ci-ty 336'Oak Grove 3471'Landmark 348 Ash Grove 3·18Cimarron 357iPhelps 364iKing David 366 IUnanimity 379 CoatesviIle 406 I1.turrea 407 HO\l~ton 409 Unity 417 1Covenant.. 432IDauphine 433!Silent Temple 436ILamonte 442 Mt. Lebanon 463 Lake 465 Silver City 479 Triangle 480,Union

i

ToWl"..

ICOIJNTY.

~=:_:_='Clark City..~.:= Cl;;rk 'pink Hill. IKennctt... Ash Grove ,Cimarron ;Phelps City ·!Kamas City Weston Coatesville 'Han1!ibal Wellmgton lRichmond ICarrollton IDQ.uphine :Macon ILamont~

/Mt. Morlah ,Cunningham Silver City IBUtler La Junta

IJaCkson DUllklin Greene : !AtchiSOU Jl1.ckson ..IPlatte Schuyler !:\la~ioIl

,Latll.yette iRay 'Carroll IO~age

IMacon 'petti~

IHarnson ,Chariton Grant. !Bates New Mexico

I STATE.

I

DATE OF CHARTER.

:Mo::'-~~.: Of!tober 12:·1870

IMO October 12, 1870 Mo October 13, 1870 Mo October 13, ]870 K :\'1ex.;October 14. 1875 i:\fO 'October, 1870 ')10 October 13, 1870 IMO October ]:~. 1870 ]\[0 October, 1871.. ,Mo October 13, lSZl.. ··1\10 October 13, 181t. )10 October 13, 1871.. I:\1o October ]2,1872 Mo October 17, ]873 Mo October 16, 1872 Mo October 1~, 1872 Mo October 1h, 1872 :1\10 October 17, 1873 :N. :\fex. October 17, 1873 1:i\10 ,'October 15,187<1.. October 15, 187L

~

:

RE)fAR_I_{S_.

_

'SIl·rrendered 1875. .'Surrendered October 3, 1873. IArrested Mar., 1879, by N. M. Givan, G. i\f. 'Arrested 1872. Surrendered 1879. Surrendered 1881. Surrendered 1879. .'Surrendered 1879. ConsoI.1881 with Glenwood, No. 427. ;Consol. with Hannibal Lodge, No. 188. Destroyed by fire December 19, 1873. Surrendered 1876. Con sol. with Wakanda Lodge, No. 52, '80. .'Surrendered 1 8 7 9 . . Surrendered October, 1877., IArrested Oct., ]8]8, by T. C. Ready, G. M. Surrendered, ]819. IArre~ted November 7,1876. Surren'd ch'ter, & united with G. L of N. Surrendered Oct., 1877. [Mex.,1882, united with G. L. of~ew :\-1exico, 1877,

~grl~rt~~~?JI~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::i~f~~~iN~~~~ .. :::::::Ir~~t~;~~ ..::::::::::::: ~~:::::::: :::::::::::;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::·:.:::I~~~~~re~e~~~r79.·

~

~

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; t-l

LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE M. W. GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI,

~

~

FROM ITS ORGANIZATIO~, APRIL 23D, 1821.

L.....J

DATE ELECTION.

GRAND i\IASTER.

I

*I

D. GRAND i\IASTER.

April. 1821.. Thos. F. RiddiCk. Oct., 18;: ~ath:l B. Tuc~er ..;?hompson DOUglass. Oet.• 18_2 Nath 1 B. Tucker Thompson Douolass Oct.• 182~ :-lath'l B. Tucker *Geo. H. C. :\Telody :-lath'l B. Tucker *Geo. H. C. 1'Ielod~ Oct., 1824 Oct., 1825 Edward Bates *Geo. H. C. :Melody Oct.. 182~ ~dward Bate.~ : Hardage Lane Oct., 182/ Edward Bates * Hardage Lane Oct., 1828 Hardage Lane Geo. H. C. Melody Oct., 1829 Ha~dage Lane <.Fred. L. Bi~lon Oct., 1830 Haldage Lane Geo. H. C. :Meloc1y * Geo. H. C. Melody Dec., 1831.... Edward Bates Oct., 1832 H. R. Gamble *.Geo. H. C. :Ylelody Dec.• 18:33 Sinclair Kirtley *:A. B. Chambers *ISinclair Kirtley Nov.,1834 A. B. Chambers Oct.• 18:1:)tt A. B. Chambers * Sinclair Kirtley Oct.• 1836 S. W. B. Carnegy John D. Daggett... Oct.• 183i S. W. B. Carnegy John D. Daggett Oct., 1838 1S. W. B. Carnegy John D. Daggett... Oct.. 183!l IP. H. MCBr!de : A. B. Chambers ~ Oct., 1840 IP. H. McBflde Joseph Foster Oct., 18H \P.,H. McBride * .Toab Bcrnard Oct., 18'12 IP. H. McBride * Joab Bernarel. Oct., 184i3 .I:P. H. :\lcBride * Joseph Foster Oct., 1844 IJ. W. S. )litchell.. * Fred. L. nillon Oct., 1845 !J. W. S.l\Iitchell * John D: Taylor Oct., 1816 'John Ralls * John D. Taylor ' E. S. Rllggles Oct., 184i 'Joseph Foster May, 1848 IIJoseph Fo~ter E. S. Rugglcs May, 1849 John F. R) land....... E. S. Ruggles 'May, 18;JO IJohn F. Ryland '" B. W.Grover May, 1851.... IB. W. Grover * E. S. Ruggles 'May, 1852 !n. \V. Grover * S. F. Currie June. 1853 !Wilson Brown '" L. S. Cornwell D. P. Wallingford May, 1854 L. S. Cornwell Oscar F. Potter May, 1855 i L. S. CornwelL

<

I

GRAXD S. WARDEN.

I

GRA~D

J. WARDEN.

GRAND TREASURER.

I

GRAND SECRETARY

IJames Kennerly ·lwilliam Rates Archibald Ga~bl;:~IWilliamRenshaw.* <,Edward Bate~ <IW!ll!am ~ates : Ar~h!bald Gamble :,"~~ll!am Renshaw.~ ,Edward Rate, IWllllUm G. Pettus ' Arehlbald Gamble ,Wllllam Renshaw.* *,Edward Bates *IWilliam G. Pettus * Archibalrl Gamble *·T. Douglass.* *IWilliam G. Pettlls *IThornton Grimsley..* Archibald Gamble *!T. Douglass.* ' *IWilliam G. Pettus *IThornton Grimsley..* Archibald Gamble *IJohn D. Daggett.* :,Mart!n Ruggles..: :IJohn F. Ryland : Rich. T. McI~inne~ John D. Daggett.: *'Martlll Ruggles R. Gam~le ,~ Thornton Gr!msle~ *!John D. Daggctt.~ R. Gamble IAdam L. MIlls · Thornton Grimsley ,John D Daggett.· ,;, IJ;. R. 9a~ble : A~m L.1.I!llS ;: Bernard Pratte..: ::J?,hn D. D~ggett.* ,,SmclaIr KIrtley....... Adam L. 11Jlls Thomas Andrews 'I} led. L. BIllon. *,Oliver Parker _* Augustus Jones *,Thomas Andrews *, Fred. L. Billon. '\M. J. Xoyes * Augustus Jones * Thomas Andrews *'Fred. L. Billon. * John Wilson *,G. A. TutUe * Geo. H. C. Melody *John Garnett.* * Oliver Parker yS. W. B. Carnegy :.. Geo. H. C. Melody * Thomas W. Conyers.* * Oliver Parker .'· S. W. B. Carnegy Geo. H. C. Melody * Thomas W. Conyers.* *,Edward Searcey * GranvilleSnell * Geo. H. C. :i\lelody * Richard B. Dallam.* "'IA. B. Chambers * Thomas Andrews *,Geo. H. C. Melody * R!chard B. Dallam.'!' *,A. B. Chambers ." Alex. T. Douglass *jGeo. H. C. ~relody * RIChard B. Dallam.* tAlex. rr:. Douglass William vance""';'iGeo. H.~. l\relod~ : R!chard B. Dallam.: ,Alex. 'I. Douglass John Orllck IGeo. H. C. Melody...... RIChard B. Dallam.· *'Joseph Foster * C. H. Bowers Geo. H. C. Melody * Richard B. Dal111.m.* *:Joseph Foster * C. H.Bowers John Simonds .;> Richal'd B. Dallam.* *,J. W. S. Mitchell * E. S. Ruggles * Fred. L. Billon Richard n. Dallam.* E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jll.coby *:John S. Watson .;> Richard n. Dallam.* *,E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F.Jacoby *John S. Watson '~ l"red. L. Billon. *,E.S. Ruggles * J. L. F. JaCOby *'tJOhn S. Watson * Fred. L. Hillon. *,J. L. F. Jacoby * Cyrus Osborn * John S. Watson * J. W. S. Mitchell.* :,ICyrus Osborn.: ; Joseph M.egguire *IJohn S. Watson : J. W. S. MitCh:Il."'", · ,Joseph 1\leggUlre P. DrapOl ,John 1\1. Reed · C. D. W. Johnson. *,!'. Draper S. F. Currie *J. T. Johnson * C. D. W. Johnson.* *IS. F. Currie * J. H. Turner J. T. Johnson ." C. D. W. Johnson.* *I.T. H. Turner S. H. saun.ders I'J. T. Johnson * A. O'Sullivan'* J. W. Chenoweth * R. C. Hill * Joseph Foster * A. O'Sullivan.* IJames H. Britton Oscar F. Potter IJoseph Foster * A. O·Sullivan.* JJ. W. Chenoweth * H. E. Van Orsdell.... * John D. Daggett * A. O'SulliYan.*

IH.

<

lI.

<

~ ~ ('\:,

~ ~ ~.

~

9.

~

Of Of


~

LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS, ETC.-Continued.

OJ ~

DATE • . ELECTION.

I

GRA~D ~[ASTElt.

I

D. GRAND

~[ASTEIl.

I GRAND S. WA.IWEN.

i:

GRAND J. WARDEN. I

.I

GRAND TREASURER.

I

GRAKD SECRETARY.

,IJ

M';;:-1135' 1Benj.';' in Shacp .' IIV. A. ennningham S. H. S.nnde" Mace<>' Boyd : ohn D. Daggett ' .A. 0' . ;\TllY.·, 18;).~7...i.S., H. S~llnders ,.P. Drn p er *!J. F. Houston *IJOhn D. Daggett.. *A. O:Sllll!van.* i:lIIarcus. Boyd .Marcus BOyrt *IJohn F. Houston *.John Decker * John D. Daggett.. '" A. 0 §iulI!van.* ]\fay, 18u~ S. H. Saunders *;1\I. H. .i\[cFarland W. R. Penick IJohn Dccker *IJohn D. Daggett.. .'i' A. O'ciullivan.'" 1\Iay, 18·')9 'Marcus Boyd ·W. R. Penick John Deckcr *S[l.mltel 1\r. Hayes John D. Daggett.. *,A. Cn';ulliYiI11* ]\fa\" 1860 '1\[, H. 1\IcFarland l\fa~', lS6l...IWilliam R. Penick John Decker *·IGCo. Whitcomb *:IA. L. .i\-IcGregor I.Tohn D. Daggett.. *:.o\. O'~ull!\·an.* May. 1862 George ';:hitcomb * Jc:hn IT. Tur.ner Wm. ~. L,<?ke:Samuel Rnsscll.. *IJohn D. Daggett.. ;:A. O:.~IlIl!~an.:.:.· .i\Tay, 1860 John H. ) urncr N. L?ke~ ,John D. \, lIl<~ll.. IA. L .. l\J~Gr~g~r· I,f~hn p. Dfl/fgett.. IA. O.~ull:\.an .. ~ .i\Iay, 186L. John F. Houston IJohn D.' Illcll.. :A. L. McGre"'or Martlll.Collll1S I"m.~. Lol,er A. OSulll\an. :\[av, 1865 IJohn F. Houston ~·IJOhn D. Vinci!. ·:'IIartin Collins R. E. Anderson Wm. N. Loker 'A. O·Sullivan.* May, 1866 IJohn D. Vinci!. W. E. Dunscomb *,R. E. Anderson A. L. l\IcGregor I\Vm. N. Loker 'A. O'Sullivan.* t Oct., 186i E. Dunscomb *IC. A. HOWley !'l.'. E. Garrett.. IWm. D. 1\IUir "'. 'Wm. N. Lol,er G. Frank Gouley,'" t Oct.. 1868" .. .1ohn D. Vinci!. R. E. AndC'rson Wm. D. 1\Iuir *IA. 1\£. Dockery Wm. N. LOkCr.. 'IG. Frank Gouley.* *,T. E. Garrett.. Alex. M. Dockery :Samuel H. Owens * Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley.* Oct., Ui69 IWillillm D. l\Iuir Or-t., 18iO ,Thomas E. Garrett.. IR. E. Anders'm :Samucl H. Owens ""John K Ryland Wm. N. Lol,cr IG. I'rank Gonley.* Oct., 18il. /ThomaSE. Garrett iR. E. A. nder.son iSamucl H. owens *iJOhn E. RYlan.d ,.rm. 'N. LOker.. IG.. Frank Gonley.* John W. Luke Jas. E. Cadle Wm. N. Loker IG. Frank Gouley.* Oct., 18i2 Samncl H.Owens *iJ. E. Ryland O~t .. l~Zil R. E. Arders.on John W. LUk? IJas.~. ~adle I~en~phon Ry)~nd ";m. N. Lo~er !G. ~ranl~ <::ouley.: Oct., 1~~~ John ~': Luke lxenoJlhon H)lancl.. ),as. L. ~[l.cue ~ 11)1.0S.~. I~~~dy :.. m.m.~. Lol~e~ -;C~. 1 ralll~ (TOllle~.~ Oct., 1.,~~ J!l-mes E: Cllrlle ,;Xenophon Ry~and 1)lOS. C. Re!!?) ll'oa~:\1. Gnan I",m. N. Lo~el. I(T. ~ranl~ qOllle)~.* ; " m. N. Lokar Oct., lS/h \,xen. H) lR.nd 1fh.OS. C. Read) Noah M. Gnall M. G. 1.IUbLle G. I rIlnk (,ouley. I, Oct., lSii T. C. Heady Noah M. Givan IJos. S. Browne ,W. R. Stubblefield IWm. N. Loker ,John D. Vinci!. IJos. S. Browne ..!Wm. R. Stubblefield ..!Jas. E. Carter *I.Tohn W. Luke :John D. Vinci!. Oct., 1::\i8 Noah M. Givan Oct., 1/li9 .1os. S.. B. rowne W. R. Stubblefielcl.. IJas. E. Carter.. 1T *IAlex. 1\[, Dockery.: John W. Luke I,JOhn D. ,:!nc!l. Oct., lS80 IW. R. SLubblefield Alex. M. DOckery lchas. C. Woods Lce A. HR;Il IJohn ":. Luke 'John D. "~nc!1. Oct., 1881.. Alex. :\1. Vockery Rev. Chas. C. Woods Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson IJohn W. Luke John D. Vmcl!. Oct., 1882 !Chas. C. 'Yoods ,Lee A. HR.~~.:: IRoht. F. Stevenson James. W. Boyd ,.I~amuel M. Kennard John D. Vinci!. ----- ,._--- --"- - - - - - - - - - . '" Decc[l.scd. il John W. Luke served, by appointment. as Grand Secretary, from t Died August 11th. 1800, while in office. April 11th, 18ii, to October 11th, IS/i. ; Appointed August l;;.Lh. 18(;6, by John D. Vinci!, G. 1\01. ~ Died within one week after his installation. ? Died April 11th, IS/i. while in office. tt There was 110 Communication in 1835, owing to the anti,masonic excitement.

*1"·111.

lw.

e

OFFICERS

FOR THE

ORGAN~ZATION,

FEBRUARY 22d.

1821.

EDWARD BATES, WorshipJitl Master. JA)IES KENNERLY, SC'Iliol' Warden. WILLIAi\oI BATES, Jnnio')' Wardm. JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasl!1'(:r. ABRAM BEC~, ScC1·elal"!I.

~ ~ ~

~ ~

~.

(3 0 ~


Appendix.

1882.J

157

DELINQUENT LODGES. I

THE FOLLOWING LODGES HAVE MADE NO RETtTRNS FOR

No.

Lodge. 5. United. 26. Mexico. 130. West Prairie. 161. Clifton Hill. 204. Rowley. 209. Poplar Bl~ff. 216. Granby. 2.')0. High Hill.

No.

2路52. 258. 283. 285. 314.

3:n. 349.

S71.

Lodge. AIll.nthus. Ravanna. Stockton. Earl. St. Aubert. Malta Bend. Lone Star. Craig.

1882:

No.

Lodge. Jasper. Greensburg. Wheeling. Trowel. Benton. 471. Mineral. 502. Philadelphia.

37R. 411. 434. 440. 454.

The above Lodges were furnished with blanks for returns in good time. Such blanks lire always mailed early in August. This was done the past year. A postal was sent to each Lodge, giving notice of the sending of blanks, with a request that I be informed of the failure to receive them. Three months afterwards, Secretaries WI ite for blanks. Notices have been sent to the delinquents since Grand Lodgo closed, urging them to forward returns, so that a correct report eould be rendererl of the membership in the jurisdiction. To such notices no attention has been paid. The pleasnre of being delinquent seems a full off-set to duty and obligation. To such, appeals and law are trifles.


[Oct.

Appendix.

158

DELINQUENT LODGES.

THE FOLLOWING I,ODGES AnF. IN ARREARS FOR DUES THE PAST YEAR:

No.

Lodge.

24. 'Vyaconda 42. Middle Grove so. Bridgeton 108. Island City 125. Gentryville 137. Prairieville 145. Rising Star

Amount. $10 10 17 28 24 14 13

00 50 50 50 00 00 00

No.

Lodge.

206: SOlnerset 273. St. Clair :ns. Eldorado 343. Agricola 395. Latimer 407. Royal 438. Temperance

Amonnt. $21 50 23 00 13 50 27 00 25 00 14 50 19 00

The foregoing Lodges have failed to forward their annual dues, as required by law. It is to be hoped that they will soon conform to Grand Lodge requirements. Some IJodges (not any of the above), learning that Grand Lodge has ordered seventy-jive per cent. of their dues refunded, have sent in twenty-five per cent. This does not meet the law. The Grand Lodge must 1'eceive thefull amount due from each Lodge before any part will be 1路eJunded. As this goes to press, there is an unpaid balance due from the subordinates amounting to about one thousand dollars.


159

Appendix.

1882.]

SUSpENSIONS FOR UNMASONlC' CONDUCT.

REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF IIfISSOUR1, OCTOBER

No. oJ

Name oj Parfy. Lodge. 1. .John McKittrick, 44. .J. ''i. Broga.il, 1\11. E. Poiner, 59. J. A. Jackson, 136. J. W. McClellan, 152. H. H. Winds, 18:2. Walter Thompson, 184. E. Gutredge, 199. John Brown, 221. W. R. Whitaker, 247. H. M. Rice, 295. J. A. Elder, 307. J. D. Watson, :~31. D. P. Wa.llingford,

No. of Lodge.

N((1IU~

10, 1882.

of Pa.l路fy.

E. G. Bernard, Rob't H. Landrum, T. M. Craven, J. W. Wade, .John B. Chilclltt. A. W. Robinson, J. G. Grimes . W. B. Davis, U. L. Fox, R. B. Linch, E. A. Talbott, C.B. Wilson, 48G. .J . .J. SnodgTRss, 48\1. .J. M. Horlon.

387. 390. 3Ho. 410. 411. 412. 417. . 427. 429. 469. -181.


160

Appendix.

[Oct.

EX.PIJLSIO NS.

REPORTED TO THE GR,\:-;D LODGE OF ;lIlSSOUJU, OCTOBER

No. of Lodge.

Name

q( POT!y.

18. Fred. Diehl, 28. Theo. Schrarwner, !i2. D. F. HUddleson, 64. E. E. Roberts, 148. John Johnson, 157. Wm. Obb, 174. IJ. Ryan, ISo. L. Dysert, 260. John J. Reed. 276. J. II. Bogar, 277. F. M. Murphy, T. L. Burger,

No. of LodfJf'.

Name

10, 1882.

q(

Parly.

'29:.,.,., Joseph Potts, :{04. D. Simonds, :,107. Chs. A. Edson, :327. Sml. K. DeCott, :):)(). S. F. Porter, :17:1. Fletcher l\farpel, :177. W. II. Brant. :l!)O. Daniel R. Hurst, 路100. W. 1\1. Wermington, 411i. L. D. Pomeroy, :-,00. Ely l\leConnelJ.


161

.Ilppendi.x.

1882.]

REINSTA TEMENTS.

REPORTED TO THE nilAND LOD(;}'; OF

No. of J.,odUe. 9.

,...-.

]0. ]3. If>. 17. 19. 20.

22. 27. 28.

30. 31.

36. 40.. 43.

52.

56. 57.

62.

Nrt1nc of Pa1路/H.

J. H. Geohart. Wm. Fruendellau. J. A. Robertson, W. W. Rule. E. W. Wilder, W. M. Haley, Simon Popper, Max Jacobs. Simon Freund, S. Diament. .1.1'. Weil, A. B. Fristoe, C.Dix, R. A. Kelling, 13. F. Schelaberger, Geo. Holt, Chs. Chadwick. .1. Galispie, G. ?If. Millcr, B. M. Wallace, W. H. 'Voodson, D. "T. Weal', John Canton, E. P. Caruthers, S. W. Cox, W. S. Pope, K C. Redfield, J. D. Wright. J. C. Stoffer, W. B. Shepherd, Otto Shaugenbugher, J. S. Briscoe, F. J. McFarland, A. W. Settle, J. P. Quisenbery, Dn. Masters, A. T. Baubia,

M~f:S01TRT, OCTOBER ]0, ]882.

No. I~r T,odD!:路 li2.

Namenf Pal'ly.

.1. W. Cline,

.T. E. Conklill, Henry. .T. C. Hooker. M. E. :Moore, G. 'V. Klnchelo, J. T. Kirk, A. Fike, T~os. Holton, A. Overton, H. C. H'udnall, .lohn E. Collins, W. West. :M. R. Howell, G. W. Easl~y, T. J. Fleemltn. Enoch vVilson, O. P. Burn!!, L. G. Ham!{lond, B. Leopold, J. l\L Adams, R. S. Brown, Dnl. McKinsey, Geo. Burch, Wm. Janecke, J. G. Davis, J. J. Hunter, F. M. Boas, L. Ashlock, C. C. M. Helderbrand, G. W. Scoggins, J. D. McClaren, D. C. McAlister, Jas. Oglesby, N. J. Wilson, W. R. Chaplin, J. W. McSpadin,

' ' 111.

G4. iiI'. 71. 74. 79.

82. 89. 104.

10". ]09. 110.

123. 127. ]31. ]33.

135. 136. 145. 147.


Appendix.

162 No. oj Lodge. 148.

152.

153. 155. ]56. 163. ]64. 167. 171. 176. ]84. ]88.

189.

190. 193. 194. 201.

208. 210. 213.

215. 225.

233.

Name Qf Parly.

W. J. Nowell, C. W. Nowell, B. W. Nowell. 1\1. Reeves, R. D. Wills, L. J. Cleveland, John N. Wilson, 'V. C. Brown, John路 Anderson, J. M. Russell, D. W. Hill, Joshua Crumpeckcl', J. G. Burnett, E. F. Burkley, Rott. Wilson, L. Marion, A. Martin, T. H. Moss, A. Hiddlc, J. W. Minnish, \V. II. Honeaus, Josiah Madison, M. J. Brown, H. C. Whiting, R. E. Arthur, H. C. Farris, O. F. Ingalls, F. C. 'fischer, Ely Stanley, T. B. Gills, W. R. Wilson, H. C. Cox, J. M. Harris, Jas. Lucas, J. W. Miller, W. P. Rowland, John Richards, R. J. Mansfield, L. F. Hatcher, J. S. Donnivll.n, \-Y. T. Hutchins, J. N. Levy, JohnCochrall, B. M. Hodges, J. S. Potter, J. Orchard, H. T. Sprillger. John Kemedy, J. C. Burk, J. M. Cash, John Munpowel', E. n. Schook, L. Sipple,

No.vf Lodge.

[Oct. Nome of Pori!!.

243. H. D. Lighthuser, 247. Hy. Osburn, 24!J. .Jas. Hall, 254. C. C. Dukc,

263. 264. 276. 281. 282. 292. 295. 298. 301. 307. 308. 309. 316. 321. 324. 3~8.

831.

3:~3.

3:38. ;34.2. 354. 3路')5. 360. 8tH. 362. 365. 367.

.J. D. Harper, I F. 1\1:. Lickey, 1.\1. A. Magnard, John '1'. Smith, L. M. Wright, J. "V. Abarnathy, B. B. Vandike, B. W.,.cuppy. Alcn Slayback, L. Cowen, 'V. L. Foster, J. A. Pcting, Wm. Stedhein, E. D. Taylor, B. L. Stark, A. K. Anderson, .J. M. Shipley, J .. 1\L Roberf,.,>, John Geno, Jas. Stonehocker, Sam'l G. Trewett, E. Holbent, W. S. Ross, .John T. Butler, D. E. Mason, Wm. Fountain, E. F. Brower, J. Riley, L. P. Riley, H. B. Wilson, R. B.l\IcGreggor, John Kenmair, C. F. Knight, E. J. Prowler, J. K. Pare, Lewis Haynes, .J. T.13rowl1, E.J. Brown, T. H. Taylor, Joel Sheppard, Edward Duncan, .J. W. Fanell, E. L. Stone, P. J. Harvey, .J. W. Shaw, W. H. Stump, Joseph Meyers, F. M. Cochran, W. R. Mitchell,

i


1882.] No. of Lodge. 372. 378. 386. 387. 388. 412. 415.

422. 423. 424. 428. 429.

Appendix', Name of Party.

Geo. W. Hunt, F. M. Fulk, M. L. Williams, J. T. Wagoner, John D. Travis, T. J. Reed, John Maddos, C. V. Johnson, A. B. Clayton, W . .T. Roundtree, W. H. Gardner, W. C. Conway, J. J. Kinkaid, E. F. Mahone,

163

No. of . Name of Party. Lodge. 430. C. W. McFarland, 446. A. J'.iSorter, 450. R. Bruce, 451. James Wilson, 459. J. J. McMullcr, J. A. Warname, 469. A. B. Bates, 473. David Ward, 474. John Lauming, J. M. Moorehead, 481. R. R. Prince, 483. M. N. Thornton, 484. J. W. Way.

,

-

,


164

[Oct.

Appendix.

DEATHS. REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF' MISSOURI, OCTOBER 10, 1882.

No. of Lodge. 1.

2.

2. 9.

11. 1~.

14. 18.

19-. 21. 24. 25. 28. 29. :10.

:n. 33. 34.

35.

36. 38. 41. 42. 4G. 47.

48.

No. of JAdge.

Name of Pm路ly.

Thos. Kirgin, .fohn Williams, P. M. :Enzinger, H. A. Sontag, S. Bartmall, John H. Margnnrd. S. N. Locklin, Thos. H. Russell, W.13. Watson, Wro. France, n. L. May, C. Sanford, Thos. E. Hotcher, R. M. Johnson, Sam'l Shepard, P. Williams, T. D. Malby,'_ John R. 'Villiaros, John C. Schultz, Wm. F. Gue, John C. Long, Joel Yancey, J. C. Olliver, John Ballew, M. Nathan, John Ralls, John Britton, L. Curtis, J. T. Thompson, .Tohn Kelly, Adam Clark, J. C. Dodson, R. 1\f. Edelen, E. H. Wheeler, G. A. Parsons, Sam'l W. Scovern, \V. H. Garey, John M. Reid 1\L L. Hatton,

Name of PaTly.

,')0. 1m. 13. Connelt, 58. Louis Culbert, 54. C. M. Weller. 58. T. J. Star, S, B. Turner, GO. E. W. Hall, 62. J. H. Weir. D. F. Zimmerman, 65. Hny. Rane)',

6<>. Constant Buchoe, 70': 7:;' 7G. ii').

7!) 8:!

,

8:1_

8;,_ ~(;

S!I 9~

9;, 9/i 101_ ]02.

108.

104. 105. 107.

R. 1.. Evans, C. \V. Fleetwoofl,

Fred. Neidholt., Wm. Peacock. S. Kaufmann, John A. Eo Meyer, Wn.1. Neihaus, .f. T. Shelton, W. B. Brinkley, John Morrison, .I. W. Grunstrlld, Geo. Burress, \\'m. Egar, E..I. Stimson, .I. W. Way, D. C._Pearson, Le\vis C. Wilson, Peter Junk, R. G. Ander"on, C. G. Howe, T. S. Marmaduke, IIy. Lawn, ,r. J. Miller, ,1. D. Miller, C. 1\1. Turner, E. n. Cravens, J. W. Crampton. 1\1:. W. Smith, 'fhos. Goforth, -


Appendix.

1882.] No. of Lodge.

Name oj Party.

110. .1. C. Berryman, 111. D. Market, A. McGregor, N. Van Deventer, 112. Peter Kelly, 113. .J. P. Foreman, 114. H. C. Keene, 117. Dn1. Vv'iJliams, David Todd, S. P. Hunter, lUi. E. N. Brown, 119. L. J. Pinson, 121. Jno. L. Molthaei, Lewis Schiller, Lewis Bauman, John Sutsch, ' E. F. Boehemer, ] :22. J. B. Dysart, 126. R P. Halleberton, ]31. A. A. Hill, W. D. Hornsey, 133. S. C. Liscourt, Wm. Tong, ]39. Chas. Mann, 140. H. C. Tutt, â&#x20AC;˘ 143. J. W. Carter, H4.. John Starkey, 147. D. D. Martin, IHaac Hoss, 14.8. M. B. Mitchell, 149. W. R. Davidson, T. S. Mitchell, II. Y. Bunn, Albert Keller, ]53. M. L. Kuhn, 154. W. M. Sharp, 156. Ely M. Bass, T. M . .Tones, 163. Emanuel Godlove, A. G. Braun, 1\f. Viedt, O. P. Saylor, 16'1. J. R. Cook, Anton Yearger, 16G. L. B. Clevenger, ]67. B. Williams, ]68. Thos. McMurry, ]72. Thos. G. Shark, 175. G. W. Weams, ]77. J. A. Miller, W. Percells, R. Y. Smiley, L. Richardson, 17!). Chas. Levy,

/

No. oj Name oJ Parly. Lodge. 179. ,J. H. McAlpin, ]80. S. M. Northrop, 183. Sam'l H. Owens, ]88. C. K. Priest, 189. H..A. Raird, ] 90. Simon Riggs, 1~J3. Henry Corwin, I\J5. J. H. Bond, ,John Wat;;on, :200. O. D. Squire, :20:2 . .T. M. Duncan, D. C. McColliun, Fred. ~oldge, 205. G. Gauldin, J. P. Rodgers, :208. C. J. Knox, :210. Emmett Holt, 215. R. G. Cook, 2]8. 1'. Genail, \V. 1\1. Steel, A. H. Smart, 220. C. No Olmstead, 2:24. E. T. Harris. 'V. H. lIenry, 227. M. D. Hardy, 229. R. M. D. Rudolph, S. Boerner, 233. J. H. Hill, 2:')4. Ellis Counts, Jno. K. Harris, By. N. Kelly, \'Vm. Swink, 2%. F. M. Truett, 236. Logan Clark, Milton Hurne, 2:39. E. M. White, :241. J. L. \\'hite, J. H. Rowe, n, A. Harris, 243. John Wingate, Ch. F. Alden, M. S. Crantz, Thos. M. Waunal, 24.4. Jasah Smoot, :2'17. C. E. Webster, 2:):1. Jacob VI'eaver, 262. J. W. Mack, . 263.' A. H. Price, 268. S. R. Goodson, 269. R..J. Beason, 271. A. B. Townsend, 272. R. T. ,Jenty, 273. G. W. Hall. John C. Ferguson,

165


';>

166

Appendix.

No. of Lodr7C.

Narrte of Party.

Wm. Croslin, Wm. Ewald, 270. T. H. Harrington, 2Rl. T. R. Vandover, R. Nichols, A. C. North, '275.

282.

288. 291. 29:,. 294. 29G. 2\)7. '298. 299. 303. 305. 30G. :107. ;,09. :)]0.

w;. 81!J.

;,2:3324. 327. :~:~1.

838. 33~.

344. 345. 317. :351.

:)52. 360.

361. 363.

No. of Loa[/~.

3G4. 372.

373. ;:\71.

:376.

Julius~Mueller,

J. F. Zigemann, Bernard Snuger, Geo. Feman, B. F. Dark, C. M. Campbell, J. R. Atkinson, Benj. Ellars, King Wingate, John Grant, S. W. Anderson, Wm. V\'itherspooll, A.J. Hampwn, A. M. McKinley. G. Schuttlin, D. W. McNeal, B. Pollard, James Williams, W. K. Florrence, A. B. Kinkaird, J. K. Grimes, C. D. Kellllucke, S. W. Withrow, L. VI'. Bmdley, A. Hainer, Ed. Lorenze, Wm. Macafee, John Proffiit, C. D. Balin, Hiram F. Below, H. B. Kenyon, C. W. Morley, John Callahan, 1\f. E. Fisher, J. B. Lea, '1'hos. Morford, 1\1. L. Bradford, B. S. l\fcHall, A. J. Lopp, J. J. Holliday, H. 1\1. Spelbrink, W. W. Sanford, '1'. V. McConnell, A. C. Trovis, R. D. Reynolds, H. Vorhies, N. B.Gale, F. M. Daniels.

[Oct.

:):-;0. :'lRL

:,82. :183. 385.

388. 390. 392. 391. 390. 400. 401. 405. 417. 418. 420. 421. 423. 424.

-125. 42!J. 436. 437.

'13R. 411. 443. 44.5. 447. 451. 456.

457. 460. 461. 462. 464. 476. 478. 479. 480. 482. 491. 497.

Namc oj Party.

Chs. P. ShrodeI', J ..1\1. Farmer, G. Jas. Gelleland, '1'hos. Kimbell, W. H. Smith, Jas.Brown, Jas. Weier, H. T. Bartlett, J. H. Simmons, Ruben Riggs, A. J. Hopkins, S. C. Grate, Michel Kops, G. G. Gillett, R. K. Sikeston, T. A. Hallett, J. W. West, W. S. Marsh, C. T. Harris, J. A. Dennis, A. Smith, H. C. Grimes, J. P. Moxley, .J. W. Shockey. F. J. Morris, J. J. Burney, E. C. Burney, W. W. Ousley, H. W. Chappell, Wm. J. ''''hitson, F. T. Frazier, Jas. C. Piles, Edg. Spratt, R. D. Hensley, C. J. Roehr, G. B. Copp, T. B. Harmon, Max Mayers, G. W. Sullivan, W. B. Kerns, W.C. Ewing, D. E. Slephens, Otto Wilson, Robt. Dickey, T. Hamilton, Wm.Emmons, G. J. Bleobitt, L. Burton, D. \\'. Owen, .J. Spicket, J. R. Cox, W. E. Bor.an, A Sykes, J. H. Gibson.


1882.J

167

Appendix.

DISTRICTS AND D. D. G. MASTERS. GHANI> SECRETAHY'S STArrBMENrr i"J10Wlr-"G LOCA1'lOr-; OF

LODGES ACCORDING TO DISTRICTS FIRST DISTRICT.. !L C. lUSK, D. D. GJM., LE\YJSTO\\路路:,\.

Connty.

Scotland do do Lewis do do do do do do

Name of Ladue. 16 Memphis 41 Etna 378 Kilwinning

i.ocalion. Memphis. . Etna. Kilwillning.

24 V"yaconda 58 Monticello 100 Canton 222 Farmers 287 Craft 370 Williamstown 494 J,ewistown

I,a Grange. ;\lollticello. Cantoll. I,aBclle. Canton. Williamstowll. Lewislown.

Des Moines Fairmoun t Eldorado Hiranl 404 Alexandria

AtllCIlS.

No.

: ~.............................

:

:

Clark do do do do

180 290 318 362

Fairmoun t. J,uray. Kaboka. Alexandria.

SECOND DISTRICT. .J.

路Marion....... do do do

c.

HEARi\'E, D. J). G. M., HANNIBAL.

18 I'aIJnyra 2S St. Johns ]88 Hll.lllJibal 502 Philadelpbia

:

Mat路ioll. Hannibal. Hallnibll.l. Philadelphia.


168

[Oct.

Appendix. County.

No.

Shelby do do do

Xnme oJ Lodue.

90 St. Andrews 415 Hunnewell :,128 Shelbina 305 Clarence

Location. Shelbyville. Hunnewell. Shelbina. Clarence.

:

TI-IIRD DISTRICT. HENny B. BUTTS, D. D. G.

l\lonroe do do' do do do do do Ralls do do do Pike do do do do do do do do

lIf.,

LOUISIANA.

19 Paris Union 23 Florida

:

Middle Grove :Monroe l\ladison \Voodlawn Granville : 462 Santa Fe 42' 64 !J1 22:1 240

:Paris. Florida. i\liddle Grove. l\lonroe. Halliday. 'Voodlawn. Granville. Santa Fe.

:

:1:1 Ralls Ionic 302 Lick Creek 307 New London

Center. Rcnsslaer. Perry. New London.

2;>5

:

:

Clark~ville.

17 Clarksville 75

A路shley

92 Per~everance 136 Phccnix 137 Prairieville 39!) Pike 192 Frankford .' 4DS Globe ....................................... 4!J!J Paynesville ....................................... ....................................... ....................................... ....................................... ....................................... .......................................

;

Ashley. Louisiana. Bowling Green . Prairieville. Curryville. Fran.kford.. Louisiana. Paynesville.

FOURTH DISTRICT. .US. :\1. NE\YLAr\J), D.

n. (,.

,Hi Wentzville 124 Dardenne

St. Charles do do do

2路11 Palestine 260 Mechanicsville

Wcntzville. O路Fallon. St. Charles. Mechanicsville.

Lincoln . do do do do do do

14 Auburn ;14 Troy 199 New Hope 路 270 New SaICln 428 Louisville 473 Nineveh 141 Chain of Rocks

Auburn. Troy. New Hope. New Salem. Louisville. Nineveh. Chain of Rocks.

:

\Varren...................................... 11 Pauldingville do 54 Dongllls do 231 \VarrentQlI

/

:\1., THOL

W~ight City. l\fll.rthasville. "rarrenton.


-1882.]

169

. Appendix. FIFTH DISTRICT. JOHN F. TIPPETTS, D. D. G. M., :liON'L'(W.\lERY Cl'l'Y.

County. M:ontgomery do do do do do do do do

No. 72 178 246 250 261 374 375

Name oj Lodge. Danville Griswold Montgomery City High Hill.. Florenee Golden Rule Plumb 194 Wellsville 492 Dagget

Location. Danville. Price's Branch. M:ontgomery City. High Hill. New Florence. Jonesburg. l\fiddletown. Wellsville. Loutre Island.

SIX'l'H DISTRICT. W!II.

n.

CARPENTER, D. D. G. JlL, CI';NTI{ALJA.

Boone do do do do do do

59 Centralia 67 Rochcport II'! Twilight 156 Ashland 174 Sturgeon 336 Hallsville 256 Ancient Landmark

Howard do do do

: 17 Fayette :............................... 51 Livingston 70 Roanoke 4 IIoward

Centralia. Rocheport. Columbia. Ashland. Sturgeon. Hallsville. Harrisburg. Fayette. Glasgow. Roanoke. New Franklin.

SEVENTH DISTRICT. 1\1. c. :l1':ln;LAN, D. D. G. :1'1., HUNTSVILLE.

Randolph do do do do do do do

1.

r..: : ,

~

30 Huntsville 44 Jackson ville 151 :Milton 161 Clifton Hill 186 Morality 344 Moberly 4S6 Cairo 108 Goth ic

Huntsville. J ackson ville. l\1ilton. Clifton Hil!. Renick. J\1obcrley. Cairo. . J\fobcrley.

Chariton................................... 73 Eureka Brunswick. do 74 \\'arrcn Keytesville. do 202 \\'cstville \\'estville. do 39'1 Dagan l\1endon. _d_o_ _ ._5_13_C_h_a_ri_to_l_l_';"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_"_.._.._.._.._.G_'u_t_h_r_idge Mills.

=__.__._._._._.: ;.:

* Chartered October 12th, 1882. G. L.-Ap. 13.


170

Appendix.

Seventh District Continued.] County.. Carroll...................................... do do do

No. 52 373 24!) 3!)

[Oct.

Name of Lod{Je. \Vakanda Mandeville CarrolI. DeWitt

Location. Carrollton. Mandcville. Norborne. DeWitt.

EIGHTH DISTRICT. Di\V[[) BAIRD, D. D. G. ')1., KIRKSVILLE.

Knox do do do do

6 168 181 291 414

Ark Colony Novelty Edina Greensburg

Newark Colony. NoveHy. Edina. Grecnsburg.

Macon....... do do do do路 do do do

38 102 146 237 268 402 172 4!)8

Callao Bloomington l\IcGee La Plata Lodge of Truth Gavel Censer Kascyville

Callao. Bloomington. Colleg-e l\Iound. La Plata. Atlanta. New Cambria. l\Iacon. . Kascyville.

Adair do do

.'

,

:

'

31!J Paulville 105 Kirksvillc 366 Adair

Brashear. Kirksville. Kirksville.

NINTH DISTRICT. .JOHN .J. DILLINGER,

Schuyler do do do

,

25!) 380 427 244

n. n.

G. M., OWASCO.

Lodge of Love Queen City Glenwood Middle Fabius

Lancnstcr. Q.ueen City. Glenwood. Downing.

Sullivan do do do

126 Seamlln 38!) Arcana 447 Fairview U.D. Green Cityt

Putnam do do

171 Hartford 1!)0 1'1ltnam 210 Unionville

Hartford. KewtowIl. Unionville.

Linn

284 New Boston

New Boston.

t Dispensation Granted October 12th, 1882.

:

l\Iilan. Wintcrsvillc. Scottsville. Green City.


171

Appendix.

1882.J

TENTH DISTRICT. .1. P. MURRAY, D. D. G. M., TREKTOK.

Grundy do

Connt?!.

No. Nam.e oj Lod.qe. III Trcnton 253 Lindley :

Location. Trentoil. Lindley.

Merccr do do

l\lercer SODlerset 258 Ravanna

Princcton. Cleopatra. Rn.vanna.

35 20G

ELEVENTH DISTRICT. G.

r.

BIGELOW, D. D. G 111., KIN(; CITY.

Harrison do do do

97 257 328 128

Bethany Lodge of Light. Cainsville Lorrainc

Gentry do do do do do do do do

125 Gentryville 127 Athens 252 Alantbus 312 l\it. Pleasant 349 Lone Star 3ii Ancient Craft 332 Ryland 21 Havana 109 Island City

Worth do do

321

Bcthany. Eaglc. Cainsvillc. Lorraine. /

GentryVillc.· Alban)·. Alanthus Grove. Ellington. Lonc Star. King Citro Bcrlin. Havana. Stanberry.

Allensville Jonathan 88 Defiance

Allcndale. Dcnver. Defial1cc.

Ig8

,

T\VELFTH' DISTRICT. GEO. F: ROGERS, D. D.·~. 111., HA1IfILTOK.

Caldwell do' do do do Davicss do do do do do do do

:

166 l\1irabile Hamilton Breckinridge l18 Kingston 232 Polo :

Mirabilc. • lIallli1ton. 13rcckinridge. Kingstoll. Polo.

224 334

;

Western Star 65 Pattonsburg 201 Jamesport 285 Earl. 488 Lock Spring ;>00 Jameson 409 Civil Bend 106 Gallatin 15

'"

:

Emporia. Pattonsburg. Jamesport. Coffeysburg. Lock Spring. Jameson. Civil· Bend. Gallatin.


172路 .

Appendix.

[Oct.

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. R. B. I([CE, D D. G. JlL, RICIDfOND.

Count.1j.

Name of Lodge.

No.

Ray do do do do do do

57 300 322 238 3&1 393

Richmond King Hiram Hardin Myrtle IIannony Bee Hive

4'11

A.d:L

Clay do do do do do do

31 Liberty 193 Angerona 207 Clay 28!l Acacia 311 Kearney 44.8 Temperance 13 Rising Sun

Location. Riellmond. Knoxville. Hardin. MilIville. Vibbard. Lawson Station. Orriek. Liberty. Missouri City. Greenville. Paradise. Kearney. SmithvilIe. Barry.

FOUH.TEENTH DISTRICT. JOHN

Buchanan do do do do do do do do do .: do

n.

STRINGFELLOW,

n. n.

G. 1\1., ST. ,JOSEPH.

10 Agency 'VeIlington 78 St. Joseph 101 Easton 150 Binning 189 Zeredatha 20'1 Rowley 238 Rushville 331 Charity 376 King HiIl 508 Saxton * 22

:

Agency. De Kalb. St. Joseph. ElLSton. Halleck. 8t. Joseph. Arnoldsville. RushviIIe. 8t. Joseph. St. Joe. Saxion.

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. MALCOL"l "1' KlI-LOP, D. D. G. ;'II., ROCKPOHT.

Atchison do do

157 North Star.: 200 Sonora 483 Irish Grove

Hockport. Sonora. l\fiIton.

Holt do do do

139 Oregon 211 Forest City 294 l\found City ~71 Craig

Oregon. Forest City. Mound City. Craig. ------

* Chartered October 12th, 1882.


Appendix.

1882.J

'173

SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. WJlL

n.

TlIO]\!PSON, D. D. G. JlL, ST. LOUIS.

Name Q( Lod.qe. 1 l\fissollri 路2 Meridian 3 Beacon 9 George Washingoon 20 St. Louis 25 Naphtali. 40 1\fonnt M:oriah 45 Bonhomme 79 Polar Star 80 Bri dgcoon 121 Erwin 163 Occidental 167 Orient Francais 179 Pride of the West.. 218 Good Hope '" 243 Keystone 267 Aurora 281 Fenton 282 Cosmos 323 Corner Stone 360 Tuscan 416 Cache 420 ltaska 443 Anchor 44f> West Gate 460 Lambskin 481 Kirkwood 95 1\lerfl.lnec No.

COUllt?!.

St. Louis................................... do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do : do do , do : ; do do

,

Location. St. Louis. St. LOllis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Manchester. St. Louis. Bridgeton St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. \ South St. Louis. St: Louis. St. Louis. Fenton. St. I,Ollis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Sollth St. Louis. St. LOllis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Kirkwood. , ..Eureka.

SEVENTEE:NTH .DISTUicT. .J. W. PURVU5,

Franklin................................... do do do do

27 173 251 363 69

n.

D. G. JlL, WASHINGTON.

Evergreen Unio'll IIope Fraternal Sullivan

New Haven. Union. '~'ashington.

Robertsville. Sullivan.

EIGH'fEEKTH DISTRICT. CHARLES E. BARRO},!"

D. D. G. JlL, FARMINGTON.

Ste. Genevieve

226 Saline

St. l\fary's.

St. Francois do

132 Farmington 234 SL. Francois

Farmington. Libertyville.


174

[Oct.

Appendix.

Eightecnth Dist1'ict Continucd.] County.

St. Francois do r.fadison

No.

Namc of Lodgc.

121 Samaritan ~

1:~0

Iron Mountain

110

M:arcus

NINETEE~TH

:

Docation. Bonne Terre. Iron Mountain.

Fredericktowll.

DISTRICT.

WM. B. WILSON, D. D. G. M., CAPE GIRAHDEAU.

Cape Girardeau do do do do do

93 St. Marks West View 221 Mystic Tie 141 Excelsior 191 Wilson 417 White \Vater

Cape Girardeau. Millersville. Oak Ridge. Jaekson. Shllwlleetown. Stroderville.

Perry do

457

Brazeau. Perryville.

Bollinger do

2!l8 Marble Hill.. 4.40 Trowel.

Marble Hill. LIlt.esvilJe.

103

Triple Tie 32 Triangle *

TWEN'l'IETH DISTRICT. .1. IT. BETHUNE, D. D. G. 11'1., CHARLESTON. ~

Pemiscott

1Gl Caruthersville

Cll.ruthersville.

New Mndrid do

17G Point Pleasant. 129 New ~ladrid

Point PIe.'lSant. New l\Indrid.

Mississippi.. do

129 Charleston 330 Bertrand

Charleston. Rertrand.

Scott do

38G Ashlar 310 Sikeston

Commerce. Sikeston.

TvVENTY-FIRST DIS'rRICT. STErIlE", CHAPMAN, D. D. G.

Jr.,

BLOO;\fFIELD.

Dunklin do do do

130 West Prairie 212 Four l\file 215 Hornersville 40G r.falden

ClarktOI1. Four r.file. Cotton Plant. Malden.

Stoddard do

1f,3 Bloomfield 189 Lake'ville

Bloomfield. Lakeville.

* Chll.rtered October 12th, 1&'32.


.Ilppen~ix..

1882.]

175

T"VvENTY ~SECO ND DISl'IUCT. C.

w.

;\ULS'l'Im, D. D. (-i. ;\1., GHEE!\VILLE.

County.

Name of Lodge.

jVo.

~

Poplar Bluff Van Buren * Fuithful.. COlllposite

Location.

Butler Carter Ripley do

209 50() 304 369

Poplar Blnll'. Vlln Buren. Little Black. DoniplJan.

Wayue do

Li8 Johnson 449 Piedrnont.

Greenville. Piedmont.

Reynolds do

105 Barnesville 23lJ Hopewell

Logau's Creek. Lcsterville.

TWENTY-THIHD DISTRICT. H. B. LOGA:-<, D. D. (;. )1:,

Washington do do

路 12 Tyro 131 POtOiSi. 143 Irolldale

Iron do

351

C:\LEDO~lA.

:

l:l:) Star of the \Vest Mosaic

Calec1onia. Potosi. lrondale. lrontoll. Belleview.

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. T. P. I:ERHY, D. D. G. }L, CHAMOIS.

Gnsconllde do

123 J-lcrmann Cellar

Hermann. Bllrbois.

66 Linll 185 Chamois

Liuu. Chamois.

3'

f.............

Osage do

64 Vielllla

:Maries

;

Vicnua.

T'WENl'Y-FIF'rn DISTRICT. .J. ;\1. ORClf:\I{D,

Crawford Phelps do do Dent

n.

D.

(T.

77 Lebanon :

;\1., SALEM.

Steclville.

230 St. James 213 Rolla 347 Sp~illg- Creek

St. Janles. Rolla. Edgar Springs.

225 Salem

Salem.

* Chartered October 12th, 1882.


176

Appendix.

[Oct.

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. JOHN E. BAHNE8, D. D. (i. ;\1.', LICKI:'\G.

County.

No.

Shannon Oregon do do Texas do do do

IYmne of Lodge.

Location.

. 255 Alton

Alton. '1'homasville. 'Varm Fork.

~

387 ''I'oodside'

163 Cliftoll 177 Texas ~

Howell

395 Latinler 469 Plato 116 Barnes

:

HoustOll. Licking. Plato. Gravel point.

327 Mt. Zion

West Plaines.

T'VENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. II. B. HA;\IIIJrON, n. D. G.

Cole.. do do }Iiller do do do

:

,I.,

./EFFEH80N CITY.

43 Jefferson 211 Hickory Hill 187 Carter

Jelfersoll City. lliekory Hill. Jefferson City.

134 Pleasant Mount.. 110 Iberia 137· Tusculnbia 203 Brulnley

Plcasant Mount. Iberia. Tuscumbia. Brumley.

TWEN'rY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. JOHN W. FARRIS, D. D. G. "'\., umANON.

Pulaski do

3R2 Richland 3·16 Arlington

Cn.mdCll do

152 Linn Creek 433 :'fack's Creek

],aclede do do

83 Laclede 101 Centre 423 Newburg

: :

Richland. Dixon. Linn Creek. Mack's Creek. Lebanon. Lebanon. Newburg:

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT. J.

w.

HOBEFTSON, n. n. G.

TallCY do

453 Forsyth 159 ~Icndota

Christian do

352 Friend 379 Bi1lings

,r.,

O:,.';.\HK.

Forsyth. Protenl. Ozark. Billings.


177

Appendix.

1882.J

THIRTIETH DISTRICT. Eo

D. PARCE, D. D. G. M., SPRINGFIELD.

County. Vvebster.................................... do do do ~

Wright

No. 98 459 439 477

Name oj Lodge.. '\'ebster ~ Hazelwood Mt.Olive·····························o Henderson

411 Joppa

Greene . do do do do do do do do do

145 271 297 341 422 435 5 7 497 436

:

Location. :M:arshfield. Waldo. Webster. Henderson. Hartville.

Rising Star SolOlnon O;r,ark Relief Gate of the Temple St. Nicholas United O'Sullivan ,Strafford Ash Grove

Ebenezer. Springfield. Fair Grove. Brookline. N. Springfield. Cave Spring. Springfield. Walnut Grove. Strafford. Ash Grove.

THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT. .J. M. JUl'ClIEY, D. D. G.

~1.,

:\'EW'fONlA.

McDouald do

358

148 Yancy Comfort

Pineville. Rocky COlnfort.

Newton do do do

175 216 247 478

Newtonia. Granby. Neosho. Racine.

c•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Newton Granby Neosho Racine

THIRTY -SECOND DISTRICT. Eo P. LINZEE, D. D. G.

Lawrence • do do do do do

269 Rock Prairie 390 Marionville 400 Decatur 452 Verona 468 Red Oak 99 Mt. Vernoll

Barry

,

367 Barry 383 Pythagorns

do

do do

jlL, "IT. VEHNON.

';'

Stone

514 Exeter* 517 Seligman'" 515 Galena*

* Chartered October 12th, G. L.-Ap. 14.

1~S2.

:

Ash Grove. :Marionville. Peirce City. Verona. Gray's Point. !lH. Vernon. \Vashburn. Cassville. Exeter. Seligman. Galena.

--------


[Oct.

Appendix.

178

THIRTY -THIRD DISTRICT. SEY)fOUH HOYT, D. D. G.

County. Vernon do do do do do

: :

~

Dade do do

No. 303 448 490 451 193 U.D.

~L,

GHEENFIELD.

Name of Lodge.

Location.

Osage Schell City Montevallo ArgyIe Vernon Sheldon t

Nevada. Schell City. M:olltevallo. Nevada. J\iounds. ~.Sheldon.

87 Washington :. 446 Greenfield 458 :Melville

Barton do do

Greenfield. Greenfield. Dadeville.

292 Lamar 475 Golden 516 Milford "'

Lamar. Golden City. l\iilford.

, THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. . w.

G. WEAVER, D. D. G.

M.,

BOLIVAH.

Hickory do do

279 Hogle's Creek

288 Hermitage 432 Black Oak

Quincy. Hermitage. Black Oak Point.

Polk do do do do

144 160 ]95 431 467

Humansville. l\Iorrisville. Bolivar. Half Way Pleasant Hope.

Dallas do do

:100 Doric 361 Riddick 396 \Vestern Light

Cedar do do do

283 286 359 482

l\Iodern Pleasant Bolivar : Cement Pleasant Hope

Stockton Hesperian Garrett CHntonville

;

Forkner's Hill. Buffalo Louisburg. ,

Stockton. Virgil City. White Hare. Clintonville.

THIR.'fY-FIFTH DISTRICT. .J. G. Jlf'rDDLECOIi'F, D. D, G. JlL, CLIKTON.

Henry do do do do

29 "'indsor ,.. 68 Tebo 1S4 Calhoun 343 Agricola 408 Montrose

- - - - - - - _.. _ . _ - - - '" Chartered October 12th, 1882.

Windsor Clinton Calhoun. Norris Fork, Montrose. -----_. --------t Dispensation granted October 12th, 1882,


179

Appendix.

1882.) .

Thirty-Fifth District Con/inned.] Name of Lodge. County. No. Henry 426 Leesville : do 481 Clinton . St. Clair do do do do .:

Location. Leesville. Clintori.

273 St. Clair

Osceola. Roscoe. Lowry City. Taberville. Appleton City.

342 Circle

403 Lowry City ,119 Star 412 Appleton City

'rHIRTY-SIXTH DISTIUGJ'. ~A)l'J, Eo LICKLIDEH, D. D. G. )1., l-lAHHlSONVlLLE.

Cass do do do do do do do do do

147

Cass

HarrisOllville. Freeman. East Lynne. Daytoll. Austin. Everett. Relton. Pleasant Hill. \Vadesburg. Brosley.

276 Grand River 372 Nonpareil. 386

Dayton

40.) Meridian Sun 219

Everett

450 Belton

.1ewcll. : \\'adesburg 485 Cold \Vatcr

;

480 348

THIRTY-~EV:ENTH

DISTRICT.

P. G. WOODS, D. D. G. 'M., VEHSAILLES.

Benton do do

365 \\'arsaw 418 Clear Creek 454 Benton

Morgan do do

381 Ionia 421 Euclid 117 Versailles .. ;

:

\Val'saw. Fort Lyon. Lincoln. Barnettsville. Versailles. Versailles.

THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. n. Cooper do do

II. INGRAM, D. D. G. M., S,EDALIA.

:.................. 36 Cooper 142 Pleasant Grove 456 Wallace Wm. D. :Muir Prairie Home

~~ :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~~~ Petiis do do do

~

236 Sedalia

Granite 340 Amity 8'1 Potter 272

r ..

BoonviIle. Otterville. ! Bunceton. Pilot Grove. Prairie Home. Sedalia. Sedalia. Smithton. Longwood.


180

[Oct.

Appendix.

Thirty-Eighth Distrid Continued.] County.

1I10niteau do do

Name of lJOdge. 56 Tipton : 18~ Californ ia 295 l\foniteau

lJOcation. :ripton. Californ ia. JamestowIl.

No.

THIRTY-NI.NTH DISTRICT. R. L. llARVEY, D. In. G. M., SLATER.

Lafayette do do no do do do Saline do do .. do do do do do do

61 122 149 320 464 476 348

\Vaverly Dover Lexington Chapel Hill Anllville Mount Hope Higginsville

Waverlr. Dover. Lexington. Cbapel Hill. Aullville. ,Mount Hope. Higginsville.

;').'i

Arrow Rock Cambridge :Miami. Trilumina Barbee Tranquillity ::\lalta Herndon Orie?tal t

Arrow Rock. Slater. :Miami. Marshall. Brownsville. Centerville. l\laJta Bend. Herndon .. Blackburn.

63 85 205 217 275 337 487 U. D.

FOHTIETH DISTRICT. .J. II. TO\\"T,

Jackson....... do do do do dodo do do do do

I).

D. G.

~I.,

Independcnce Hcroiue Golden Square Kansas City Rural Temple Summit McDonald Raytown 39~ Christian ;)01 Buckner

K:\:\'SM3 CITY.

76 10! 107 220 316 299 263 324 391

:

:

lndependencc. Kansas City. \Vest Port. Kansas City. Kansa-s City. Kansas City. Lee's Summit.. .Independencc. Raytowll. Pink Hill. Buckller.

FORTY-FIR.ST DISTIUCT. .Joll?' T. HUFFI1\,

.Ja.."per do do

n.

l>. C;. ;\1., t\ln'H ..\(;E.

197 Carthage 278 Avilla 293 Sarcoxie

t Dispensation gmnted October 12th, 1882.

;

CarthR.ge. Avilla. Sarcoxie.


1882.]

181

Appendix.

FOl路ty-F'irst District Continned.]

J a.sper do do do ..: do

County. .. .

No. 3:{:l

345 398 471 512

,

Name of Lodge. Medoc , Fellowship: Jll.Sper , MineraL Webb City

J,oca,uoll.

East Joplin. J oplin. l\Hdway. Oronogo. \Yebb City.

FORTY -SECOND DlS'l'HJCl'. RICI1AHJ) W. )r':\II:LLIX,

Jefferson do do

n. n.

G. :'IL, 1-1JLLSWIHO.

119 DeSoto 164 Joachim

DeSoto Hillsboro. Hanover.

2:)6 Sheklnah

o FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT. WOODSON l,y)iES, D. D. G. M., NEW

Callaway................................... do do do do do do : do

8 Williamsburg 48 Fulton 60 New Bloomfield 81 Hickory Grove 154 Concord 242 Portland 314 St. Aubert. 42-'> Ceda.r City

l~LOOi\1FIELD.

Williamsbllrg. Fulton. New Bloomfield. Hallsville. Concord. Portland. St. Aubert. Cedar City.

'

FORTY-FOUR'rH DISTRICT.

Johnson do do do do do do

do do do

22!J 245

262 264 265 280 313 466 135 ,. 274

Mitchell Knob Noster Holden Fayetteville Corinthian Lodge of Peacc Kingsville Centre' View Warrensburg Cold Spring

:

Columbus. Knob N:of;ter. Holdcn. Fayetteville. Warrensburg. Chilhowee. Kingsville. Centre View. Wa.rrensbllrg. Henriet~.

FORTY-FIF1'H DIS1'RICT. A . .r. 8ATTEHLEE, D. D. G. )f., ADHTAX.

Bates do do do

140 Papinville 254 Butler 315 Altona 350 Tyrian

;

Papinville. Butler.. Altona. Johnstown.


182

[Oct.

Appendi.x.

Forty-Fifth District Cnntinned.] County.

No. .

Bates do do

::If>S Crescent Hill.. 326 New Home 179 Rich Hill

Name of Lodge.

Location.. Crescent Hill. New Home. Rich Hill.

FOR1'Y-SIXTI-I DISTRICT. HEUBEN HAR)<EY,

Livingston.... do do do do do do do , do

89

170 333 38fi 388 434

n.

D. G. JI., CHILLICOTH E.

Friendship Benevolence Chillicothe Alexander Farmersville

Chillicothc. Utica. . Chillicothe. Bedford. Farmersville.

::ye:ll.~~~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::~~:;~~~~iP.

407 155 Spring HilL 505 Avalon * 8~!

Linn do do do do do do

:............ 86 90 227 233 325 510

Spring Hill. Avalon.

Jackson Brookfield King Solomon Cypr:ess Bucklin Dockery Biswell *

Linneus. Brookfield. St. Catherine. Laclcde. Bucklin. Bottsville. Browning.

FOUTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. E. W . .JOY, D. D. G.M., SAVANXAH.

Nodaway do do do do do do do do do do do ., do

:

.짜

Andrew.................................... do do do do do :1=

112 165 196 301 170 472 474 50 442 465 507 511

Grabanl. IIfaryville Quitlnan White Hall Kennedy Nodaway Pickering Guilford Xenia Burlington Gaynor City * Clearmont,;: Skidmore:!:

Graham. Maryville. Qllitman. Barnard. Lamar Station :Maryville. Pickering. Guilford. Hopkins. Burlington Junc. Gaynor City. Clearmont. Skidmore.

7\ 138 162 248 35:l 413

Savannah Lincoln Whitesville Rochester Ben. Franklin Valley

Savannah. Fillmore. Whitesville. Rochester. Savannah. Bolckow.

;329

Chartered October 12th, 1882.

;


1882.]

183

Appendix.

.

FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. :rHOS. C. READY, D. D. G. M.,

County. Audrain do do do do do

No. 26 266 354 491 357 115

;

i\I~CX

reo.

, Name of Lodge. l\fexico Social Hebron Vandalia yOullg's.Creek Laddonia *

Location. :Mexico. JI,iartinsburg. nlexico. Vandalia. young's Creek. Laddonia.

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT. MILTON HELWIG, D. D. G. JlL, CAMEHOK.

De Kalb do do

182 Stewartsville 317 Osborn S08 Parrot

Clinton do do do do do

62 113 397 296 506 U. D.

Stewartsville. Osborn. l\faysville.

,

Vincil Plattsburg Gower Calneron Lathrop'" Turney t

Cameron Plattsburg. Gower. Cameron. Lathrop. Turney.

FIFTIETH DISTRICT.. J. W. EWING, D. D. G. )f. CAJlIDEN POINT.

Platte do do do, do do

:

~

53 120 169 339 355 504

Weston Compass Camden Point.. Fidelity Adelphi. Platte City

\\Te.<;ton. Parkville. Camden Point. Farley. Union Mills. Platte City.

FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT. R

. Douglass Ozark

V. MORInS, D. D. G.

~f.,

U.D. Romct 496 Robert Burns

GAINESVILLE.

Rome. Gainesville.

'" Chartered October 12th, 1882. t Dbpensati6n granted October 12th, 1882. t Dispensation continued October 12th, 1882.

o


1B82.]

Appendix.

185

. REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED NEAR O'fHER GRAND LODGES BY THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI. I

State. Name. Alabama , Dani el Sayre , Arkansas ; ~· E. H. Epglish British Columbia Robt. Burns McMicking Canada J amesK. Kerr Connecticut ·.George Lee : Chili J ose Mondalodo Colorado Ed. C. Parmelee Alexander G. Abell.. . California Colon-Cuba Ed~ardo Loredo ~: Dela,vare William S. Hayes District of Columbia "\Vm. R. Singleton Dakota Thomas H. Brown Egypt F. F. Oddi England Braxton Baker Florida De'Vitt C. Dawkins Georgia J. Emmett Blackshear Iowa Rr!!3igned. Illinois Jerome R. Gorin Idaho ·: J6"has 'V. Brow~ Indiana : 'W illiam Hacker Ireland : Edward .Linahan ; Kentucky John 1\1. Todd Kansas 1\f. S. Adams Louisiana J ohn A. Stevenson l\1:aine Ira Berry : Minnesota Henry L. Carver Michigan J. C. Coffinbury : Mississippi Charles T. Murphy Massachusetts J olm K. Hall..

Post-G.tru:e. Montgomery. I.Jittle Rock. Vio.toria. Toronto. New Haven. Valparaiso. Georgetown. San Francisco. Havana.. Wilmington. ·Washington. Sioux Falls. Cairo. London. Monticello. Macon. Decatur. , Idaho City. Shelbyvill e. Dublin. Louisville. Leavenworth. New Orfeans. Portland. St. Piml. Kalamazoo. Durant. Boston.


186

Appendix.

State. Name. Maryland John S. Berry Montana H. L. Hosmer Manitoba J ames Munroe New Brunswick 'Vm. F. Bunting New York J. Edward Simmons New Hampshire Chas. G. Conner : Nova Scotia Robt. D. Clark Nevada :.John D. Hammond Nebraska J. N:Wise New Mexico 'V. Griffin ; Ohio A. M. Ross Oregon John McCracken Pennsylvania Thomas Brown Quebec H. L. Robinson Hhode Island Charles D. Green South Carolina Resigned. ~ Tennessee Deering .J. Roberts, M. D Texas ~ Geo. H. Bringhurst Utah : Fra~k 'rilford Vermont Henry H. Smith Virginia 路William B. Isaacs : 'Wyoming Territory Edgar P. Snow Washington Territory Thomas M. Recd ~ \-Vest Virginia William J. Bates, Sr W'isconsin Henry L. Palmer

"T.

[Oct. Post- o.ffice. Baltimore. Virginia City. Winnipeg. Saint John. Ne'w York City路 Exeter. Halifax. Carson. Plattsmouth. Santa Fe. Cincinnati. Portland. Philadelphia. Oswego. Providence.

Nashville. Houston. Salt Lake City. Rutland. Richmond. Cheyenne. Olympia. Wheeling. Milwaukee.


187

Appendix.

1882.]

REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED BY OTHER GRAND LODGES NEAR THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI.

Statf.

Alabama Arkansas British Columbia California Connecticut.. Canada Colorado Colon-Cuba Dakota Delaware Distriet of Columhia Egypt Florida Georgia Idaho Iowa Illinois Ireland Indiana Kentucky Kansas Louisiana Maine Minnesota Manitoba.' New Hampshire New York New Jersey North Carolina

J.Vam,f';.

James KCadle Jamefl H. Bethune Allan l\icDowell.. .Tohn :E. Ryland John D. Vincil.. Xenophon Ryland 'Vm. N. Loker Lee A. Hall.. J oseph' S. Browne J ohn D. Vinci!.. Noah M. Givan .1ohn W. Luke Edward Spcncer : .1ohn W. Luke Tohn R. Parson Tohn D. Vincil.~ :Martin Collins John W. Luke Thomas C. Ready : William E. Robinson Thomas E. Garrett Thomas R Garrett.. Xenophon Ryland Samuel H. Saunders Wm. R Stubblefield Alex. M. Dockery .1ohn VV. Luke : Charles F. I . eavitt.. B. O. Austin

Post-o.tJice.

Chillicothe. Charleston. Green:field. Lexington. St. Louis. Lexington. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Joseph. St. Louis. Harrisonville. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. 路 St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Lexington. Otterville. St. Louis. Galiatin. St. Louis. Springfield. New Bloomfield.

(\


Appendix.

188 State. Nebraska Ncvada New Mexico Ohio Quebec Rhode, Island Scotland Tennessee Utah Texas 'Yyorning l'erritory Wisconsin West Virginia Washington Territory

?

Name. Chas. F. Vogel.. Tohn 'V. Luke

.John D. Vineil Rev. C~ C. Woods; D. D Stephen B. Potter 'l'homas E. Garrett.. 'V111. A. Prall.. "Tilliam B. Dreseher Allan McDowelL Rufus E. Anderson 'Vm. E. 'Vhiting Jobn D. Vincil..

[Oct. Post-o.Oice. St. Louis. St. I.Jouis. . St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Hannibal. Greenfield. . Hannibal. Kansas City. St. Louis.


1882.]

189

Appendix..

\

GRAND

LODGES~ADDRESS

State. Alabama Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connedicnt Delaware District of Columbia Dakota , FJorida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Indian 'l'erritory Kansas Kentucky Louisiana ; :Maine Massachusetts Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi :Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New .Jersey New York New Mexico

OF GRAND SECRETARIES.

0 Na.me. Daniel Sayre Luke E. Barber Geo. .1. Hoskrnge Alexander G. Abell Edward C. Parmelee .1oseph K. \Vheeler 路William S. Hayes 路Wm. R. Singleton Charles T. McCoy.' De Witt C. Dawkins J. Emmet Blaekshear.: .1. H. \Yickersham Loyal L. lVfunn William H. Smythe Theodorc S. Parvin Rev. J. S. Murrow John H. Brown : :Hiram Bassett.. .1ames C. Bachelor, M. D lra Berry Sereno D. Niekerson ; .1aeob H. Medairy William P. Innes A. T. C. Pierson ,John L. Power :Cornelius Hedges William R Rowen ,John D. Hammond George P. Cleaves Joseph H. Hough Edward 1\1. L. Ehlers David .1. Miller

Address. lVIontgomery. Little Rock. Tucson. San Francisco. Georgetown. :.Hartford. Wilmington. \Yashington. Bon Homme. Jacksonville. :Macoll. Silver City. Freeport. lndianapolis. lowa City. A-to-ka, C. N. "Tyandotte. Louisville. Kew Orleans. Portland. Boston. Baltimore. Grand Rapids. St. Paul. :..1ackson. Helena. Ornaha. Carson. Concord. f'renton. New York. Santa Fe. 0


190 State. North Carolina Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Ten~essec ,: Texas.; 路 Ut~h Vermont : Virginia ? Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming British Columbia Canada Chili.. England Egypt lreland Manitoba New Brunswick Nova Scotia Prince Edward Island Quebec Scotland

[Oct.

.Appendix. Namr;. Donald W. Bain : John D. Caldwell. F ..J. Babcock Michael Nisbet Edwin Baker Charles Inglesby ,John FrizzelL George H. Bringhurst.. Christopher DiehI.. Wm. H. Root u 路William B. Isaacs Thomas M. Rced : O. S. Long .Tohn 路W. Woodhull. John H. Symons Edgar Crow Baker J ..J. Mason J ose :M:ondalodo J ohn Hervey F ..F. Oddi. Viscount Bernard : J ames Henderson '\Villiam F. Bunting Benjamin Curren Geo. \V. Wakeford John H. Isaacson D. Murray Lyon .

Address. Raleigh. Cincinnati. Salem. Philadelphia. Providence. Charleston. Nashville. Houston. Salt Lake City. Burlington. Richmond. Olympia. Charleston. Milwaukee. Laramie. Victoria. Hamilton, Onto Valparaiso. London. Cairo. Dublin. \Vinnepeg.. St. ,John. Halifax. Charlottetown. l\fontreal. Edinburg.

.

. '"


FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MASONIC LODGES, I

PRE1'ARED BY

THOS, E, GARRETT, P, G. M.

...j

• , ST. LOUIS:

HUGH R. HILDRETH PRINTING COl\fPANY, 407 & 405 NORTH FOURTH STREET.

1882.

/


FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MAS()NIC

I-lO]) (j-ES.

SERVICE IN THE LODGE-ROOM. The Lodge .should be called to -meet at least one hour bejore the set by the jamily JOT the funeral to take place. None except _Maste?' Jfason.~, in flood standing, mem,bers of hodges, or those less than one year dim,Wed, can participate as ~ftfasons in a .Mason-ic fu.nel'oL In case the Jfaster and 1Vardens (~re all absent, It Past Nasta may open the Lodge, preside, and conduct the services. The pre.siding o.tJicer opens the Lod,r;e on the Third degrp,e 1:n Jlfasonry, and after stohnp the ul~ject, and making x1J.,ch remarks as he may deem proper on a funeral occasion, the Jlfaster or Chaplain 'Will open the serv-ice as follows:

tim(~

Master-" What man is he that liveth and shall not see death? Shall he deli ver his soul from the grave?" Response-" Man walketh in a vain shadow: he heapeth up riches, and can not tell who shall gather , them."


4

FUNE1U.L SERVICE

Master-" When he dieth he shall carry nothi ng away; his glory shall not descend after him." Response-" Naked he came into the world, and naked he must return." M aster-" The Lord gave, and the Lord 'hath taken away; blessed be the name ~f the Lord." The

~Master

then, taking the roll in his hand, says:

cc Let us live and die like the righteous, that our last end may be like his!"

The Brethren aJ1.Nwer:

God is our God for ever and ever; He wi 11 be our gu ide even un to death!" CC

The

~MaNter

then records the nume and age of the deceased

npon the rofl, and says:

" Almighty Father, in Thy hands we leave, with humble submission, the soul of our deceased Brother." The Rrethnn answer three times (fli7iing the Grand 1ÂŁ011ors -;:.each time).

"The will of God mote it be. Amen!"

IS

accomplished!

So

The (Jmnd honors are given in the foUowing manner: Both hands m'c rai..oed abo~'c the head, the palms touchin,q, th('y are then cl'osscd on the breast, lhe left 7lppermost, and then dl'Oppcd by the sides.


}i'OR MASONIC LODGES.

The J[(~ster

5

_~[aster then deposits the HOLl. in the AHCHIYES, a.nd the or Chapla'in repeats the jollowin,q prayer.

Our Father in Heaven, thou hast promised to be with us in time of need. Weare路 again impressed with our weakness, and turn to Thee whose power endureth forevoer. The walls we build are broken down, the builders are smitten with sore affliction, but the edifice of God is eternal, and His refuge is everlasting. We beseech 'fhee, Almighty One, hear with favor our humble petition for Thy blessing in our heart's distress. In Thy infinite wisdom a Brother has been taken from our band to meet with' us no more. Give, O! give us the outpouring of a Father's love. Strengthen us in our weakness, and cast Thy Divine light upon our darkness. We hail . Thee, Wonderful Counselor, Almighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. We come to Thee with spirits bowed low, and ask the bounty of Thy mercy and the grace to draw nearer to Thy throne. Support us through the afflictions of Timoe; prepare us for Thy presence in E terni ty, and bring us to a blissful reunion with departed friends and Brothers in the house not made wi th hands. Amen.

Response-So mote it be.


6

FUNERAL SERVICE

Master-The place of a Brother is vacant. But yesterday he was here. Is he shut out in total darkness? Junior Warden-As he built his moral edifice , in be~uty, so his beatified spirit basks in the sunlight of eternal day. Master-Did he fall because of weakness? Where is the power that shall raise him up and whisper words of comfort to his soul? Senior Warden-The Lion of the Tribe of Judah is strong to save, I n strength He is established and H is kingdom endureth from everlasting to everlasting. Mas~er-ll1 wisdom, strength and beauty the Great Architect of the U n~verse builds His Temple and disposes His workmen. We bow with humble reverence and submission to the fiat of His wisdom, and rely upon H is strength. Let us mould our lives and characters in the beauty of holiness, and await wi th con fide nee the tender mercy of the Great Judge. The Master announces that memorial remarks from any of the Brothers present are 'in order. }Vhen all who wi.~h to speak hare spoken, the ]lIasler commits the Lodge into the charge of the Ma1'sILal to direct its movernent..~ to the hOt/se or the church, as the case may be, and finally to the place of interment,

,/


7

FOR MASONIC LODGES.

ORDER OF PROCESSION. 1. 2.

a.~

3.

l:lJler with drawn sword.

4.

Stewa,rds with 11Jhite rods. .5.

6. 7.

J1faster

eSC01't.)

Mason,~.

Treasurer and Secretary. Senior and Junior WW'dens. 8.

9.

Musicians.

](nights Ternplw' (if pr'esent,

Iloly 11Jritings, on a

Past Masters.

r.u.~hion,

covered with black cloth, carried

,

by the oldest member of the Lod,qe, or some suitable Brother. 10.

The }.{aster, supported by two

n.

11Jith

th'e insignia

with rods.

~

~

The

Deacon.~

O,{ficiatinfl Clergymen.

t;..

~

e

Body

(,j

"-'

Cl:l

'" e

placed thereon.

~

,,'-'

~

"""I

Mourners. , When the procession halts for service at the house or church,

it ShOldd f01'1n open lines and the 'order be reversed through the lines. l짜hen it arrives at the place of intennent the sQ.?ne order should be observed, and while passing through the lines and at the grave, the Chaplain or }.{aster should read or recite:

\


8

:FUNERAL SERVICE

"Remember now thy Creator In the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou sh~lt say, I have no pleasure in them; while the sun, or the light, or the mo~n, or the stars be not darkened, nor the clouds return after the rain. I nthe day when the keepers of the house shall trem ble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened, and the doors shall be shu t in the streets, when the sou nd of the grinding is low, and he shall rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall be brought low; also, when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond-tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail; because mangoeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets: or ever the silver cord be loosed or the golden bowl be hroken, or the pitcher be broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistern. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was; and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it."


FOR MASONIC LODGES.

9

SERVICES AT THE GRAVE. At thr. gra1H~ the Lod,qe forms a cinle or .~emi-circle. The Maste?' and other o.fficers of the Lodge lake their l)Osition at the hea.d of the grave; the Tyler behind the }.faster, and the mourners at the foot. The rerigious bnrial service of the chu?'ch (~f there be any) should ve ji1'st performed, after which the j11a,sonic service begins:

Master-One by one they pass away, the Brothers of our adoption, the companions of our choice. A, Brother whose hand we have clasped in the bonds of fraternal路 fellowship now lies before us in the rigid embrace of death. All that remains of one near and dear to us is passing from our sight, and we know that we shall meet him on earth no more. We, who knew him so well in our Brotherhood, feel that in his departure from among the living, something has gone out of our own lives that can never be again. Thus, as human ties are broken, the world becomes less and less, and the hope to be reunited with friends who are gone, grows more and more. I-I ere is immediate compensation, which, while it cannot assuage our grief, may teach resignation to the inevitable doom of all things mortal.


10

FUNER.AL SERVICE

Whqe we stand around the open grave, in the presence of a body, once, and so lately, warm with life and animate with thought, now lingering for a brief moment at the dark portal of the tomb-.like a beam of holy light the belief must come) this cannot be all there is of day. Stricken human nature cries .out: There must be a dawn beyond this darkness and a never setting sun, while this short life is but a.morning star. The cycles of Time r'oll with the procession of seasons. Spring is bloom; summer is growth; autumn is frui,tion; winter is the shroud, and beneath its cold, yet kindly fold, live the germs of a new life. Spring comes agai n; growth matures, and frui t is eternal. This is the religion and lesson of Nature, and the universal example cannot fail in relation to man. Let us draw comfort and consolation from things visible in this sad scene, and lift our eyes to the invisible Father of all with renewed faith that we are in His Holy Hands. Besides His infinitude of worlds, we have also His word, "that He is All, and All-upholding." We can do nothing for the d~ad. We can only offer respect to our Brother's inanimate


, , FOR MASONIC LODGES.

11

clay, and cherish his memory in the abiding faith that our temporary loss is his eternal gain. In this belief let us commit him with due reverence to the keeping of the AllFather, who is supreme in wisdom, infinite in love, and ordereth all things well. I t is an ancien t and honored custom of the . Order of Free and Accepted Masons to perform the rites of burial over the remains of a. departed Brother. I n the character of Masons we are now assembled, and address ourselves to that solemn duty. Fam.ily .~(m;ice to be omitted in: are presrmt.

ca.~e 110

rdot11JeS of tI,e

deC(>((8(~d

While we pay this tribute of respect and love to the memory of our late Brother, let us not forget to extend our fraternal sympathy to his deeply afflicted and sorrowing family: (wife, children, father, mother, brothers, sisters, as the relatives may be present), in your irreparable bereavement, and as he, for whom we are all mourner's, was true to us, and faithful to the ties of our Brotherhood, so shall路we be true to you in the practice of the principles of Free Masonry and in tender memory of our loved and lost. He gave much of his time to us in devotion to our cause. We owe a grateful acknowredgment


12

~

FUNRRAL SERVICE

to you for his social companionship and service, and mingle our sorrows at parting with yours, his near and dear relations.

Master-" May we be true and faithful: and may we live and die in love !" Response-" So mote it

~e."

Master-" May we profess what is good, and always act agreeably to our profession!" Response-" So mote it be." Master-" May the Lord bless us and prosperous us, and may all our good intentions be crowned with success!" Response-." So mote it be." Master-" Glory be to God in the highest; on earth peace! good will towar~ men!" . Response- cc So mote it be; now, from henceforth, and for evermore. Amen.~' Hrotllcrs'in concat.

Farewell! Farewell! Farewell ! Master-Farewell, Brother - - - - (speaking the name in full), until we meet thee, and we greet thee on that ever shining shore, to be parted never more, forever, and forever. The apron 1~S taken from the co.ffin and handed to the ~~la8ler; and 1Jjhile the co.Oin is being lowered 'into the gra1l(;, either of the following funeral d'irges may be sung-the one 'U-sed, to be selected and announced before lea1;ing the lodge-r~om:


FOR MASONIC LODGES.

FUNERAL DIRGE. Am-Pleyel's Hynm.

Solemn strikes the funeral chime, Notes of our departing time, As we journey here below Through a pilgrimage of woe. ,,"

Mortals, now indulge a tear, For Mortality is here; See how wide her trophies wave, O)er the slumber of the grave! Here another guest we bring; Seraphs of celestial wing, To our funeral altar come, Waft our friend and Brother home. Lord of all! below-aboveFill our hearts with truth and love; When dissolves our earthly tie, Take us to Thy Lodge on high.

.

13


14

FUNERAL SERVICE

HARK, FROM THE TOMBS. H ark, from the tom bs, a doleful sound, Mine ears attend the cry: " Ye living men, come view the ground Where you must shortly lie. " Pri nc<;s, this clay must be your be<;l, ' In spite of all your towers; The tall, the wise, the reverend head Must lie as low as ours." Great God! Is this our certain doom? And are we still secure? Still walking downward to the tomb, And yet prepared no more? Grant us the power of quick'ning grace, To fit our souls to fly; Then, when we drop this dying flesh, yv e'll rise above the sky.


15

FOR MASONIC LODGES.

A t the conclusion of the singing, the Jlfaster, displaying the apron, continues:

The lambskin, or white leather apron, is an emblem of innocence, and the badge of a Mason; more honorable than the crown of royalty, or the em blazoned insignia of princely orders, when worthily worn. The MCl8trr drops the apron into the !lra've.

Our Brother was worthy of its distinction, and in the grave it shall bear witness to his virtues, and our confidence in the sincerity of his profession. The .Master,

di~~playing

The Evergreen in Immortality.

an eVCT,I}rem 8pl'i,l/, 1S

contin/ll:.~:

emblematic of our Faith

This green sprig is the sy m bol of that vital spark of our being which continues to glow more divinely when the breath leaves the body, and can never, never, never die. The ./.~{ast('.r drop,~ the c1;er.qreenin the -grewe, and the Brother,~ each make c( similm' deposit, ?JJith as tutle confusi,on as possible. If the place i.~ convenient, they nwrch around the grave in a line. When all are again settled in their places, the publ'ic ,grand honors are gi'ven by three times three.

The will of God it be. Amen.

1S

The Alaster then continu,es:

accomplished; so mote


16

'FUKERAL SERVICE

Change is the universal law of mortali ty, and the theme of every page of its history. Here we view the most striking illustration of change that can be presented to mortal eyes, minds and hearts. Ties of fraternity, friendship, love, all broken, and earthly pursu its, hopes and affections laid 'waste by death. Let us profit by this example of the uncertainty of the world: and resolve to live honest, pure and worshipful lives in daily preparation for the summons that will, sooner or later, surely corrie. I t came to our Brother, whose remains we have here laid away to rest eternal, and reminds us that we, too, are mortal-.-subject to the universal law. Our Brother is dead, and cannot speak for hims,elf. Let us defend his good name. Frailties he may have had, as what mortal man has not? 1"0 err is human, charity is Divine, and judgment is with the Almighty and AllMerciful. In this resting place of the body, virtues only are remem bered, and sweet memories bloom. I

All must pass through the Shadow of Death, and .each one must make the dark journey alone. Let us all hasten to secure

I

â&#x20AC;˘


FOH. l\f ASONIC LODGES.

17 '

the passport of an upright life, to the glories of a better land. Unto the grave we have resigned the body of our Br<?ther. The Jl((.~t(~r SC((UI't.~

(I.

handful (~f ('((Tlh 'in the grapl'.

Earth to earth; dust to dust; ashes to ashes; there to remain until the dawn of that resplendent day, when again, the morning stars shall si ng together) and all the sons of God shall shou t for joy. Pray,:r by the Moder or Chaplain.

Thou, 0 God) knowest our 'down-sitting and ou路r up-rising, and understandest our thoughts afar off. Sh-ield and defend us from the evil intentions of our en~mies, and support us under the trials and afflictions we are destined to endure while traveling through this vale of tears. ~an, that is born of a woman, is of few days, and ftill of trouble. He cometh forth as a flower, and is cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow) and continueth not. Seeing his days are determined) the number of his, nlonths is with Thee; Thou hast appointed his bo.unds that he cannot pass; turn from him that 'he may rest till he shall accom plish his day. For there is hope' of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout .


路 18

FUNERAL SERVICE.

agaIn, and thar the tender branch thereof will not cease.. But man dieth and wasteth away; yea, man giveth up the ghost, and where is he? As the waters fail from the sea, and the flood decayeth. and drieth up, so man lieth down and riseth not up till the heavens shall be no more. Yet, 0 Lord! have co~'passion on the children of Thy. creation; administer them comfort in time of trouble, and save them with an everlasting salvation. Amen.

Response-So mote it be. Master-In the language of poetic inspiration, we say to everyone: "So live that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan that moves To that mysterious realm where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death. Thou go not, like the quarry slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach the grave, Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams." i.~

The ]Ji'OGfSsl:rm then ;'etnrns to the lod,lje-roum and the Ludge dosed.


CONTENTS.

A

...'

Accounts, Report of Committee on....................................... 54 Address, Annual, of Grand "Master .4, 12 Conclusion........................................................ 12 Referred to Committee........ 1~ Report on, by " 14, 15 Supplemental, of Gr~nd Master........................ 12 of Grand Orator 2], 2R " Resolution orl... 28' Amendments to By-Laws, rejected................................................ ;")5 Annual COinlnunication, meeting of............. ~~ closing of 72,7:i Appeal for Aid.::............. 44 Appeals and Grievances, Report of Committee on .5(i, 63 Arizona, Grand Lodge of, recognized '......... 48 AuthorizatIons :................................................................ 6

E Board of Relief, Report of.. 18, 19 Boards of Relief must report to Grand Lodge............................... 54 Business, Unfinished, Report on .45, 47 By-Laws, Amendments to, rejected............................................... 55 Report of Committee on 66, 67

o Charity, Comrnittee on................................................................ 14 Memorial on :........................................ 20 Report of Committee on 68, 69 "


210

Oontents.

[Oct.

Chartered TJodges, Committee on................................................. 14 Report of Committee on 50, 52 Charters, Duplicate, issued.............. :35 issued.......................................................................... 34 surrendered......... 36 CloRing 72, 73 Conlmissions issued................... 36 ordered.................................................................. 8 Committee on Foreign Correspondence, Report of.. App. 1 to ]16 Committees, Speeial, appointment of.. 16, 49, 52, 53,64 " on New Outfit....................... 64 " of last year, discharged................................. 70 " Report of, Kleintopf..................................... 44 " on Grand Secreta~y's Office........... 54 " " 'l'emperance .. :......................... 64 Standing, appointment of.......................................... 14 Chairman of, appointed........................ 7] Commnnication, Annual, Sixt)r-second ". 8 opened.................................................. 4 closed 72, 73 Special :: . Correction of Error by Stuhblefield.............................................. 13 Craft, Condition of...................................................................... 11 Credentials, Committee on, appointed.......................................... 4 Report on, lost 85, 86

D Dead Lodges, List of 150, 1.54 Deaths, List of : 164,166 Decisions, none reported.............................................................. 6 Deeds, Executed.......................................................................... 8 Delinquent Lodges, in arrear. for dues the past year 15H " which have made no returns for 1882 159 Disbursements 38, 39 Dispensations to form new Lodges issued 34, 35 granted : 5, 65 refused.................................... 6


Oontents.

1882.]

211

District Deputy Grand Masters, appointment of............................. 72 " Reports of :...................... 9 Report of Committees on 44, 46 " "

E Election of Grand Officers............................................................ 63 Exemplification of Work 20, 55 Expulsions, List of ;. 160 o

F

}<'inancial ,....... :36 Foreign Correspondence, Report on App. 1 to 116 Representatives, appointed.............................................. 36 " List of App. 185,8 :.......... 49 :Funeral Service, approved " published : :; APP.

G

Grand Lecturer, exemplification by 20, 55 " Report of : 16, 18 Report on........................................................... 46 Lodge Representatives, appointed....................................... 8 recei"ed :........... 43 Master, Address of ; 4, 12 Election of............................................................ 63 Secretaries, Foreign, List of App. 189; 190 63 " Secretary, Election of.......................... mention of........................................................ 12 Report of : 34, 39 on Office of 8, 54 " Treasurer, Election of......................................................... 63 " R.eport of ~· 40, 42 "

H Home, Industrial, Report on Hotels, Thanks to · ~

,.............................................. ~.....

50 70


212

.[Oct.

.Contents. I

Industria1 Home............ 50 In 1\lelnoriam.............................................................................. 28 Installation of Grand Officers 70, 71 Invitations mentioned................................................................. 9

J Jurisprudence, Report of Committee on

.48, 49

K

o

Kleintopf, A., Case of

12, 15,44

L Law, repeal of.............................................................................. 19 Lodge reInovals.......................................................................... i Lodges, chartered, Report on 50, 52 Delinquent, in arrear for dues the past year 1;')8 which have made no returns for 1882 , 159 Under Dispensation, Report on 65, 66

l\1eeting, place of. 55 tilne of.......................................................................... 87 l\lernorial Pages App. 75,81 Service.......... 28 l\lemorials presented ~ .l9, 43 Money refunded to Lodges........................................................... 69

N Necrology........... . lie,v l\1exico

.

10 9, 10

o Officers, List of, in the past.. 155, 156 Official Acts nlentioned......... 4 Oration : ~ 21, 28 ordered printed............................................................... 28

...


1882.]

213

Contents.

Orators, Grand, appointed......... Owens, Samuel H., Funeral of.. Mention of Tribute to

71 73, 76 10, 15 29, 32

p Pay-RolL.... Pictures of Brothers Owens and Ralls, ordered.............................. Place of Meeting......................................................................... Proceedings ordered published.....................................................

68 70 55 70

Q Quebec :.................................... Quorum present..........................................................................

8 4

Ralls, John, mention of..................... 1] "~ Tribllte to 32; 34 Recapitulation......... 87 ................................. ~ App. 149 Removal of IJodges...................................................................... 7 Repeal of La\" on joint occupancy of Halls.................................... 19 Report o~ Committee on Accounts................................................ 54 " Appeals and Grievances 56,63 Chartered Lodges 50, 52 .. " Correspondence 路 : .47, 48 D. D. G. M. and G. Lecturer's Reports .44, 46 Funeral 路Service.......... 49 Grand Secretary's Office........ 路54 Industrial Home..................................... 50 Jurisprudence.路 .48, 49 I Printing JJaws .42, 43 Transportation 53 Unfinished Business .46, 47 District Deputy Grand Masters................................ 9 Grand Lecturer 16, 17 Grand Secretary 34, 39

I


Contents.

214

[Oct.

Report of Grand Treasurer .40, 42 Memorial Committee 28,34 St. Louis Board of Relief.. 18, 19 Special Committee on By-Laws 66, 67 Charity 68, 69 Lodges U ..D 65, 66 Temperance................................ 64 Ways and Mearis~ 67, 68 Report on GrandMaster's Address 14, 15 Representatives, Grand............... 8 " :Foreign ~ 185, 188 Resignations............... 8

s Silver City Charter returned.................................. 36 Special Committees 16, 49 Special Conlmunication............... 47, 48 Special Report on Correspondence Temperance :............................ 64

T Tenlperance.................................................................................. 49 Thanks....................................................................................... 70 Time of Meeting, next.. App. 87 Transportation and Hotels........................................................... 58

u Unfinished Business, acted OIl.. ~ Report on............ U nmasonic Conduct, Suspension for...............

;......................

55 46. 159

v Visitor received...............

Ways

~nd

Means, Report of Committee on

15

67, 08


OFFIOERS OF THE

GRAND LODGE OF MO. 1882--83. REV. CHAS. C. WOODS, D. D., Kansas City.. Grand Mastel'. LEE A. HALL, St. Louis D. G. "blaster. ROBT. F. STEVENSOK, Clinton G. &en. Warden. JAMES W. BO rD, St. Joseph G. •Tr. Warden. SAMUEL M. KENNARD, ~t. Louis G. Trea.~ltrer . . JOHN D. VINCIL, D. D.,* St. Louis G. Sec/·etal·Y. LL N McDOWELL, Greenfield G. Lecturer. RE'. JOB E. BARNES, Licking Gr. Chaplain. " C. B. BRIGGS, Springfield " " " ALEX. PRO(,'TOR, Independence " ,. " H. G. J CK...~ T, Sedalia................. " " " " " H. . BOt DE, Kansas City " P. G. ROBERT, St. Louis " " " J. M. CHANEY, Pleasant Hill......... " ., EO. R. Ht T, arrensburg G. Sen. Deacon. • M. CROW, Kansas City G. •Jr. Deacon. JOH H. DEEMS, St. Louis G. J-Iarshal. C. G. HUBBELL, St. Joseph..................... " C. E. BUSH ELL, Boliyar G. Sword Bea1·er. G. O. JACCARD, Kansas City G. Sen. Steward. D. E. "~RAY, Versailles G. J/'. Stc/rard. "'. ~L 'VILLI MS, Boonville G. Omfo/'. J. P. 'WOOD, New London....................... " J. B.·.~HOMAS, Albany G. Pltr.~1l'i/l(/Ilf• .JOHN··W. OWEN, St. Louis a. T,7/ler. -l(.

All-\o Committee on Foreign ('orrespolldencl>.

XoTE.-All letters for Grand Lectnrer should he addressed to eare of the Grand ~eeretary, who will promptly forward them.

1882 Proceedings - Grand Lodge of Missouri  

COM ECI GOCTOBER11,A.D.1 ti:!; A.L. 5L)~2 • l'T. LOrI15: JII'HII R. IIILDRETll I'RINTIN(; CO)IPANY, SPECIAL ORDER. A. F. &amp; A. ::M. 1882....

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