Page 1


contents 1ntRobuct1on ........................... 4 abm1n1stRat1on ..................... 8-9 c las s es ... . .. ... .. ...... .. ... .... .. .. .. 12-13 stubent l1~e .......................40-41 SPORtS ................................ 78-79 0R4an1zat1ons ................... 96-97 ~a culty ..............................112-113 2

I


EDUCATION AND HUMAN PROGRESS

The college, like the human belng, is constantly in motion. By its very nature, a college is either growing or decaying. This is t.J:ue only because a college is nothing more than a group of people seriously bent on the I.ask of cducatlng and being educated. The process of education, the process of seeking out answers to the mystery of 1ife iLsclf, is an undeniable movement; hopefully a Ionvard movemenL. At North Idaho Junior College, the student is caught up in Lhe educational movement. Ile has elected to join the group of his fellows in Lhc search for knowledge, and like il or no, he gives to some degree his individuality and his humanity Lo the group as a whole. The student at North Idaho Junior College soon finds that his horizons of knowledge a1路e involuntarily broadened. In the college community, the student discove1路s lhal those who teach do not claim Lo impart quantitative knowledge so much as open doors lo ways of discovering knowledge. The actual burden of discovery is placed upon the 1:1houldcrs of the student himseU, and the individual effort becomes the key to the discovery of each student's personal identity. There is a defm1tc progress inherent in the definition of the college environment. The student has Lo be concerned not only with scholarship and empirical fact; he is also placed in an atmosphere which causes him to become aware of himseU and his emotions. For the first Lime in his life, tJrn student is forced into himself lo discover himsell by intensive intrnspect1on. The attitudes and emotions that he flnds in his own soul are solidified into lhe mature, U1inking individual. This process of discovery is indeed a progressive process; a process that goes on in the mind or every student, and lhereforc, in the college itseJJ. We dedicate the 1967 Driftwood to this process of growth. Within these pages, we give special consideration to lhe expansion of the student emotionally, spiritually, and scholastically. We have grown with our generatton; we have !ell the expansion of our awareness; we now dedicate our annual to the sLudenl and to his continuing prob'l'ess as a human being. ---Jeff Cox

4


FOUNTAIN OF

KNOWLEDGE

W€ aR€

S€€k1n4

tRUth

s


pues1l)ent p. a. chu1st1anson

6


College students everywhere are becoming more and more aware of the fact that they must involve themselves in lhe affairs of the world about them. They t路ecognize Lhat upon graduaLion they will be rapidly swept up in the stream of life's activities. There will be precious litlle time to Lest the tenor or the swiftness of the stream before becoming completely eugulied. To be able to adjust to Ute changing world and to be able to make useful contributions to our society means developing the ability to adjust rapidly and intelligently. Ac ti ve participation as a student in lhe affairs of his college is an excellent way to prepare for decisions made later. Join with your fellow students in informing yourseU, in making intelligent decisions based upon all available information. Train you1路self to become an activist without becoming an obstructionist. Develop an inquiring and analytical mind without becoming a cynic. Today, as never before, opportunities for growth are available to students. Today, as never before, demands are being made upon our young while in college and immediately after 1:,rradualion. Fortunately today, as never before, our college students are responding and measuring up. P.A. Christianson

..... INSIGHT

..... DECISION

7


8


....... ALTRUISM

i1;1~

s11i or

Tti I! N 漏 R路1 11 I DA Ii 0 J L' I' I 0 I~ C O LI I ~~~'5 (t4~1f N BIYI \X'1Nl ON LUML~tl~ COMI A~' ~ ~ () IS DJf 0 IC Al CD 1 0 1 IU: fl\ [ /1'10 (,\

.

.

.

E L \\/ I I~ 1 0 N fl) j ~ I D I~ E L S 0 I~ \V/ I t~ 1 CJ (~ ~ ~r. ff R SAM U t L I~ 0 SI: I~ ts ER I~~

tit /;\ Rli ES

J0

9


LEFT TO RIGHT: MR. SCOTT REED, MR. WALTER BURNS, DR. L. FREDRICKSON,

10


~eqents

MR. E. A. SYDER,

~m.

CHARLES RUSSELL, PRESIDENT P. CHRISTIANSEN.

11


classes 12


..•....... PERSPECTNE

.... . .. .. . IMAGINATION

..• .. ...... DETERMINATION

13


Allm, R.aad}·

Albtrtull, IM!y

the t=Reshmen The freshman is well named -- nothing in twelve years of e lementary and secondary education has prepared hlm for the unique atmosphere of the college community. The freshman year is indeed a year of confusion. llalf-formed ideals and beliefs are ruthlessly shattered, and the ft·eshman is forced to make an intense effot•l to readjust. But once lhe effort has been made, the freshman is exposed to one of many mature satisfactions -- the satisfaction of gaining a knowledge of himself and his environment. For the first time In his life, the freshman is given the real responsibility to learn. If he accepts the challenge of this responslblllty, he is rewarded with the satisfaction of gaining definite opinions which are the direct r esult of his very own expanding knowledge. It is this satisfaction that g ives the freshman a glimpse into the profound meaning of a college education. - - - Jeff Cox

.Amell, l.lnda Amnwn, Kl·n

Andrn1on, Co&rol Andrea. John

AnM>lmo. ltuoJd .\rrlitnn, ThoM:t.S \L<;hi90ft, {)oruul(' \\Chi-.~

ALha. Cbal'lt<f

AU., W•omr \ubre} •

itoa.tid

\utto, Oa'Vld

lMtlr), lb\ld H..ulr~.

H:Uh.>y, • Vt•l)'n 0Jll lc)', ltitlfM•ll

Uotk('r, ·'l'rt)'

O;;ki•r, ~rrm IJ.ilrlt"l, :-i.iu&ro.n lbrnCJa. IJoCLl\ld

14

Don


Bulington, &n?rl)'

&lllen, Ouu.nc

Uc.an, J.amea

ll<>ck, Claytnn

O<>Ck<!t', Fr.wick Boor, non11ld Belto, Krta1lm1

B<"rr)', Sancln

Ucat, Oa\·llf Bc'll't 1dc, Ual")•I Dlggentil.lt, ,,.:i.rnn BlscboJf. Duane Bishop, Rllymond

UJorvlck, Bernard !Joller. C'h>ldcb Bordon, Andre:.1a

Bocon. Stc\'0'11 Brodt-rlt'k. WUlh::in\

Broolcn, S:ullc Brof•hy, Mary

Drown, Gt't'gory brown, Micheal Brown, rhllJlp

Brown, Robert

15


Uruchcr. Donn.Id Uruggom, Larry llrullin~B, fl\'gi;)'

Uul'J1holt, Su.11:an

Ourdkk. Crc~ory Durn-.•ll, L.yll' Bun1~. Dt•Mhf

HurLOn, Ch:irlca

lly(ord, Wllllam Cetrucron, Ron Carl1t0n, Shwmon C0it01Q.O, Llnda. C:arotht.•rlf. Tom

Carpenter, All1•u C.<.trJX_•nt~r. Huth AMe Ctl:;.('}'•

t_;r.ry

Ch1tl'f!CU, OM.)'

Character, 1..t.•oni1rd

Chllrlca. WUll.:un Chanin, Mfeh:it•I

Clark. Hober\ Cl11rlw. Bonni Chun. LOnnu.. Collb, ,Jl'rry

Coleman, lfen1·y Colcii, Con8tnn1.:c Collins, Michael ColHna, Opnl CO'\\ lef', Murk C.ox. John

Croc•kt•LL, Larry Cro~·l<'ll,

Rot>l•rl

Croot, VirKutl11

Cror.d, Annou.c Cltfkl)·, l'1101ni:t1t

l>'..imw.no. Hlt.n lln\•Ql\J)Ol'"L, .loount.-

l>.i\' I&,

John

J};t.via, Knren l:kt\"lt . Ned lh\'la, \\' Ullom

fklylcy, Ccrald l~htnvy, P·aulll IA!~k.r&,

"l't•l".t)'


DeWah, l>ouglu Ul".mtlrl, JUckA.rd

Dingler, Mi:argrct Dionne, ~regqry Dodd, Donn:.

Pohrnu\n, M"ry l>ollCy, UcMI•

Doney, Lloyd r>ouiith•s. J>t:mn(' Url8S•· l.A•IJ.tul Orhtkel , l)arl·e Ducow. W:arrcn Dunham, Gary Dunand. Lynn

Durbin, D1wid t>urfa.i, •:m.·n

£.lchon ••lud) t:cklund, Ernt!st F.dwarde, WlJJ lArn EilJ'..m,tn, Ed

tlgcc, \lh.•tuld t::lkln.11. Jud} ~

merson,

Jnc~

f'n.>n&On, Anna M:trlt! Eyman, Hoy t..rdn.e1h.cr. Hobert

i.·uu.... u. Shlr ld~ Fl•rguson, Mury l'mky. ~lnd.o l'hu.•ul4, S:andra l'll,mln~.

llor1»

t·' oldcn, l..:1uro f'ook, Ton)· f'unl, .10.Ann

f'oistcr,

l~·M.)'

1''01.ll1t,

CM.rlee

1-·oua,, \1arvln f'rcdcrkk. 11.n.rloy f'rymi~r. Wdllllm furcy, Mike

(0.tgl.', lttX:H.•r\.

Galic., lh1ltk'°n (.jaJ.)OW\l\', (i:lll'

V:,rl lng.houac. Tt.•rco


.\bbot. Pt-tcr .\cbm•. l.ouh.~

.\.lrnquLtt. Saocy

Armu,., \llL•·

1'"11. IJqyd ll<>l·k..'r, Ch:nn tk·nNch. ttotx-n Jllad~.

Ju.Ba

Ula"·b-ood, S.anc)· B-Ou.chton, t.uv.dl

u•..-......

t;uc,·nc BudnN, Joha

Horrw.·u. l..rc

c.mpa_.u.

lllto.t1Ulna

(..'";-;arrnM:"k. P•tr1cy

cwt, Julto <.1~r1'. c.~111:·.

:Sorm:IJ1

rn..·

c..~."4·11

c.•ramcr, L1nib l>;o1it110n. 1"111 UA\', lktllJia t.\·11n11, ,\rlt•nt-•

l l'Y''• l>OlVJd

111~rll, f.rnH•• t'ol\•, hatht hit.

l

tuunlJllll, l.'f·llK

(;hlli('r, lk•lt\' Grt.1\', \l.trtl)"n C~nnha•. Cl.t'°l'"'" tr.aa..un, 1""41rlcl.a

lll'tt<'rh·. ll"l[lh

H11lm••u11t. l'md11 ll·•h. t'h·ll Hopkin•. U1trt""'ra Hon~. 1.-rry Hut.hdn•. "•lly

J.lcolM, lArry


Joki. Gru.m

,John, Rog'°r

.,ohna, Harold Julmaon. SormAn

.rotm 11on, ltobl.n Jonc11:1-. &a...ao Kenned)·. WHLlwn t\t•nl, ll6"·a.n1

l..:irkln, Clia)·ton U•vcndor11ke, 1'om Llnd1sll"Om, .Jtirry Llrklquh1-t , llon

~~1$hcr, H.t1n Johnaon, SWn• f.u<.-c-y, C.uol \tcCurn11ck., M:ui.oaru• Mttrley, Dave M<Jtk, Sat.Icy

Moody, lttchlln.I Nl.-wCU, IXth:

C>tlcnlhltl, nr1a11 Ch·crlwul, \'1ri;m11.1 Pl'rkln•, fom J>n·:1t.on, lfaw

na,l-nht>r'ttl, Rlcturd Hocehl. \I Uro lkl\H' ' Ut•n.nll ~mlklll,

Mike

t'ch1dCnc.•r,

SCc\"t~

::OChool~r. K..lrt.•rt Sch1d~.

\1 Ike

~1 ...-b\•rl, C...-r1itd !:!imon•. t;ctna Snmltc1· ••111.mc. Smitll, Tom ~mllh, Wl•lfl1C)' Solberg, t\;.1.rcn Toll(<n, IU.y


Gaylord, t\(>nnelh 01dd1", RlchQrd

Glll><•rt, 1.rndn Gllli;,un. Linda

Mr. Hatch said lt was recommended for children!

Gilliand, 0.lry

Glroox, Vktor Ct(ll m. llOilfllli:t Gruham, .rohn

C1·uy, Julie

Oruy, Kirby l.ireen<\. wmuun Crceoo, D::ill•

Crot1.kt.I, Hun11h.I Cro\'Oli, Coralie

Cro\·U, Slt•,•o Gullkbon, SJndn C:Wt.+rl, IWymond 11.a<"\'('l""!I, Donna M.

Hale, lldcn Hall, l}"ld

Hullgrecn, John munilton, YvoMt• Hu.Rl.'y, }tcl\in I li:uisen, .Sohn

llarbuwn, Durell lb.rman, Di.1\'td

llMrelson. Rlch1.rd HArru1gccn. Mary 11..lrrl&an. Cbt•rJe llarrlJl. Jo..nc Ila.rt, MUro

H:1.scnochrl,

Joe~

lhUhaw:ty, Ron ltatktnburg, L..arry llaye-e, C11rolo

20

llaye1. llch·tn 11.:i.yworth, lk·J\'o Ua:cct, Charlie


fbul. Jolllt.. Heald. Garr

Hcuw~mt')l'f•

'1ttlyn

Hrlall"om. lh·rb

No, No!

Tbe Santa Maria was noL a Spanish stripper!

llL'ndricks, Th.om•• llc11ry. Normllll llcrg:t!rl, Cu.thh'Cn llcrlu. c.::uhcrme

lllU, IUoh>rd llHt, Jame• lhort, Jt"".:an lllJdi,:MIG, PJ'itK"llla

llolltday. Terry flol11tcoua, lluo~:,

~n

lt«s

11.W. l:dw&rd

llu..i<'k. w,u.i.il.nl llowctt. Sa.ncy

u.i..r. J-s>I> llwmptltcy, Jiolon.-e lluni, lb.vu.I llLlnl. Hcmald fluKhc•. Ju11cph

1-.on, Dradh\V

hoy, R.&ndcna Jackwn, Go:ary

Jack.on, J.amca ,Jttcob•, C111hy Joc-ub!l.(11', Ja.inet Jac"*'llOft• \'1.t1uua JJ.t:f>~r. John

J.am'-'•· ('aru1

J"n••un,

llu;(t.•r

J1·n11t.•n, 14' Uy

Jt>nw•.

•~Ii«'

Jl•Hkk, l..CJllt" Job. »luran

Johaaon,

Bf'RICC'

21


John*>ft. Ct.1udla Jl)hlltc>ft, lhn1C'l

Joh:n.IOft. Cr~t."Qr) •. Jotuuioa, Crc.·• t.•

.,.,,...*1111.

John J"""-,lbmo¢1

.NhMtoa, rlmolhy JotAC•• lloana

J111lt•111 1 llh·hllrd Jom•111, \'tirni;n

.JuUln. t\t,llh K1d1JWtl, Ourb,1 r.1 Kl•anu. l'iollrld:i

K• u~y. >t1chart t\,1Ulr'd,, lt"llllller Mkl'alm, \\1)"Dr" :t\nik"r I toi:arni

f\:lft., l.oul•

Kir1.•hncr, M:arv1n

J\.ovatt.·h, M:a,rvtn t\r.un"r. Di.maid Jo\uhlm.an, ltona.ld l~;amblcy, Hutcv L:unJM.•rt, Patrkl!a

1.-ngforll, ttcrracn t...at.Nurt.•, lkborra

1,;;aPrath, C:h.trlca Ur.an, 11.arold l.u.rllOd, \\'allt;am LawllOll, Jud)

L-..nl, 0.-i<o t..an>rd, "11<-ryl Li&hlht'1d, Kirk Liadgr<t1, K>y

Lutlt', Daud LA>nocn, BrcndD Long, Glc-ta

L}'tnlln, UurA ~h:CC'"klll,

.\l \kCla&n, ~11kc McClure. n.ob,·n.ne ).le Cord, lnmc~ \h-Cormlrk, P~lrkl• :\kCoy, ~nt.·


\lcCo) , Ro.:anno \kl>f:rmtd, Cl:wdlll )t< tlOIUld. G2ry \kl>un.altl. John

'ld~Tll.

tuub.

)ld)O!AtrlJ. H.:iymood

11' lb.a, t1oyd )I ll\1iln, P&trkk

McK1t.txn, ftu.•h:a..rd Mr~1nl..,>··

Will1.:i.m

'kl'f.•it)..., .J.._oa.nnc \h•Pt•!lk, l.)(•t•n

\lap{I,

l~·lan.>

J.l.aUMt, l>omtd tdAllo\, la,.,.

)1.anJm,

Ph:arlt·~

\bM, )lari;h.s

"f-lnnlnal, B.:1rb:lra

M.ll"t'U re. l\'1'nl'lh \1.tr11n ,

t:1n,1•r

\Unlo, fanw•

'1a.-.n. ILucd \l2t.iton, \hr)'

\tatUla, I Isner

'1-.ayt>4"rr~-,

.S11om1

)tu.y•. Jtld1An.I Mt"11d, t:llub\•lh Mt!lum, J•t•k Ml'~dtlh, l"tmulh~

Ml'rrlam,

)Jcrrl.DIAD. t;ranl llcrriU, <"•rnl )lt'laker, l>unu Mlhcllc:h, )hc-ha&-1

'1 LUCr. <.i<-vr"(:

:..tult'r, nm MUlhal•ler, N1h·lcy

\lilHkcn. l)t·nnl• \IUb, J_.n1t • ~IU.c~ll.

• ,,..1

.lhUOO. :\Llr..

\IGl'lltNmer), \r\fmr litoore. P•1.r1e1a \toor-maM, U•rlcu•

Tht"Ol~re


)lorrt•, rmn \lurl1Jn. \\ 1IHa1n

MowilJor, Hntt:e ltu.ca.L. BOO

Good b'Tief - a man-eating bowling ball!

-">''-'r•,

~nnl1

Nl•artn11, John N~dhiam, Ptlmola

N«ly, John

Sct..oa, (.,..rle• ~~:lllCa-.

Ilona.Id

S("1Mft.

Kt~th

Sadaot1, Oun

Nipp, Calvln

Sipp, llo•ld Sirk. Caroly11 Sobl..,, Osh•ld Nomec, AKJM'• Nuu, Micb.l..cl

Olin, !,hanQn Olkoocn, Karol

o.ter.oo, t.:\·an Orr, JWgcr P.alrlll, Lonyne Par90lll, Dand

Dorla Pendorp.t, Lola Pcnlland, t.Uchae:l Perl'). PhU Pe~r1. Larry Pete.rM>ft, Dorene PtiLer.on, Ct-nevlo\l«t

Patl4.'t9GI\,

Petor.on, lflln• P~te.raon,

Thoma•

Pc:toreon, Va.Iorio Phay, Rol\lld PblUlpe, Anno Pieree, John Polntne.r, Kathi•


PolteHft. I thlta Po1W\tn, liillll&lt

Pooler. l "t-dl"i• 1..opp• .\Q.tbunv

P°"cra, P"'1fld;~ (->rlnnu. 1)1,1,·ld Purt·ell. C'lltford J>urdy', .lanln:'

lt.y~m. WC)'

rtacv,

Rnn~W

f\alnlo. P11."CI.'

lt.lndolt, "illy

rt••MUfltl"". Orirt&a

ftaymtlfd, <r1.·nc:': R11.-cd, ltQllC'rl

neutv. Cbe•l~r Rmlrw. l>ou&lu Reynolu, lohn

Reyt&iQltt. Urry Ric.-, Honald Rich.art!•, llu•U!r rtich.itrdann, t~lydt.' Rlch.arc.:M>n, 'ttM.'rcu R,.. 0 Jcrr)'

R1~kfin.

Ct-raid

Re•.

Drc.n1e R..lftior. S.haron Rtph"4't!r. JUI Roach, 011rbcara Kotllond, ltkk Roiiwn. Thum11

Roland, ltnbt.1rt Rum1ne, lh:n1r~' Jacquc-hno Hult, I.An) R:iu, .1.-cl

Roe•.

Slucrhl"I, Ronald Sa)~n.

t\.alhy


!';l.halL, fhnry ~haut•r, \1.:ark

~h"'rnun, ~bmldl..

Nouh! Noah!

'Come back, Noah!

Schnclx'r~t•r. Ot ...nu :SC-hul'lX, \Yil111un

St·huh~. t\1•nny

81cbt•rt. l>•I\ ht

><11.t,LI.... !'Mw, T11m:ar1 ;;i,.tdrn,\\llbur SO.ldoa, Doh

tctu,.,tu. Ja.:k Shultt:1bt'l"p.'r, S.rn•lr~ !'Hn11•on, llrunna Smllh, ,\Jltn ?imUh, Uunllol Hmllh, luhn

Smith, ~'hlU'(.lfl So4"C."CI, lh har1I ~··f\ lk, lb')

~......

1...i.1

>un, lir"l' Still.lua. Larry !itoclt<m, Jim "°<b•ll,Uab -.ldard,M)

stonr, J•aarw

~tr.md, C~Oflt'­

s.ill1un, C...r)· Jc-rn

~Ltun,

~11n11t~11111, ~Uwrln.t

... rency, \'i Lh

26

!\ \t•r.un. lho11t

l•1lor, llo•kl

"'"' rlln.:. l\•r•nUc,

l'ht1 yl £u1ih<-n

~~und,

\\uilt't'I

Ibo

Kan:t.ld


l't"".dl. R.anJy T~kbc.•r. \11iia.·

thorn. 1\nha Tt.,,mt1•. \th:t11u,,l

Thnmr..,.-.. c·hrl• .t'h.otu11•0J1, Jl'UJU10

Never we'll forget all the joy that is ours .... loday.

niomp..o. 1'111ylU• I humpoon. lih<"r)'l I bomton, Sorman

Tot>lh,

\\lll~m

fom.a.I, D:lud

room...·y, Jamea fr••"*rt\\f'IJ, [>.,1,n True, Rieb.a.rd T nu•. ROA.lie TUl'kl·r, flll•ti.a.rd

Turkl • .\b.MUa f1A.rley. S<c'c ·ru.rabour. lnnr:r

ru.rner. t:arl Tunk"r . Fred Tu.mt'!', Wtllwa

Tyrrell, \\ay.o

"'°'

\'uKlcec\, \'lDIOD, Tom \'m.oa, Joet W~rLh,

Cbti.tle•

\\'~r,

I.art) \\'alli.t•r. lL..:ur

\ \'u.bi.'U1, <J.t.rald

Ward, J im \\'uhburn, Larr)'

\\'atoon. f hon1.1• W11U1t,

Hol~rt.

Wtbb, Larr)' Wold<m. 11... ml

27


Confused ? I ' m a F r eshman - I ' m never confused !

\\irll•.

RoJl.>t:•rl Wtul~) .

........

\\r•I,

\\hH,•l) ,

:\lidwd W1kum.

\\Hl1ur 0

ll!thllr I

ltnn

Hol~·1·t

Wilkt•n•, foh'f Wlllc.•r, \lh·h~t•I \\'lUl:1111•, U.:i.vhl

Wilh~m• .

<""°'°P'

"'1111:.ma, .l.mr• \\nu.am•, Lranu

WUHanu•. Mtd..ac-l \\'Hila.me. \'kky Wtlec:.\, Oonaltl WU..,,., Co.ti<!

WhM."i>rt.·•m••r, J1m \\'1ru..-lln·nrwr, JuJv \\ulff!, f"_..rl Wulh•r•. ~Lbr)"lk"

\\'oo. trma

\\ ood. Ca.roll" Wrtdl1, R ibt•r& 1

\\').;&ll, (0.

raW

\'.ad;.•. Krl•Urt..i

\';uvlt, l"ntd

~'antll, lk·nnt• y,., Kh·r, L.arry Vuurn.att•, ·rom Youn.:. Mnlll-..t

28

ZrhJrr, l rn.•flt llt>ilcr,, l'h1U11


With the sp11~1t

of

<)eteRm 1nat1on, tRuth an<) challenqe In OUR heaRts; we ventuRe fORth Into the kate1<)oscope of Life ...to<)ay


.\ndrr-. Gary

the sophomoQes The sophomore year is a transitory year. The student in his sophomore yea1· has completed, or nearly completed, that crisis of identity which is so important to a maturn outlook on life. At the beginning of Lhe sophomore ycat·, the student is indeed Lhe "wise fool. " I le has seen into Lhe inner meaning of the college education, but he often makes the mistake of believing he has seen everything. The transilion is made when lhc s ophomore begins to look deeper and deeper into the experience of living, and begins to sec the complexity thal goes hand and hand with maturity. This insight will disillusion some , but it will offer to the thorough student a great desire and appreciation fo1· the ri c h knowledge to come in his future education, whether that education means years more of college , or s imply living as an aware member of the human community. --- J eff Cox

Andt!raun, 1..-tr)

Andn·wa. C:.lhryn Anthon) , r l"ll .Arnt.'). Suaun

Arnott.I, 11\Abellt'

Arnutd, '.\b.r.:iha Akhi..,,., John lb.iUl9, ~"atrJda

B.t.l.l..W., Olli

Ba.hhrna, Nm.Ira llarLoa.. •·,crcu &.tor, J::lhl"! lbdrll, t>and

rk-cWr. 1..arr')'

nrelh.. John lk ll 11 • •runaUl.ln lk·nnc:U, (."h...rk•

30

11.\·rKnli&n, •

ldn.·n..·,.

1~1r1t•tn.uu.

Ntt.•r.\·J

ltitrn11nl,

~aun


Blword, Clarl("DCCt

-

lllulonl.

SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS: John 0 1 Niel, President; Wink Anderson, Vice-President: Linda Larson, Secretary.

Blayne. SMt'Ol'I JloHun. Alu

Boeetb.

Kar'"•

Uoucbard. Dono

lLQusbllHi, Jiloclh llo~~n. JaDK.•• l\o)·\•r • llnni

lt.vurlh, Mark l h iaun, ltalpb

Un.1IUM&u1>. Paul Drlnl'Y• fualhl~ U ro~. Jc>hn

llro"n•

P~U.ay

Oruc.·hcr, Ja.act

nu,:kley1 t>;hid ltull, J,;1n

O...rlon, ·r... rry Rur1&0U, Allt'on liyt.lu, KiMmtlh. lluttcdabl, f:C'hDC

31


Camp, PhylU• Canham. Lyle Cnrteon, Richa:rd Carney. Dan

Carnie, Ch11rlc8

Carpenter,

t~ay

Catwell, Barry

cwrce. Joe

Clark, Jerry ClNn<ma, 11.arold

Collett, lktt.)' Coon, ll~rt Cooper, Rwily

Cot..,. Thom•• Corbett, Ucuy CoalJl, Mkbella Crant•, John Curli.8, Jome•

03.hl,

C:aOO.:u~e

Dahlbvrg, Rogcrt Dahlberg. WUJU..m IXlmlano, L.croy 03.nqulst, J'1nCl

P>y. Richard

De-Barber. John Do()(lcr, Joh.n

Odtccstcr, Rofl!lld OcrLing, Sharon OcVorc. Chrhulnc Dc\Vill,

llo~

Dlcl.7, Robert. Dlllahunl, Judllh Ollt~. &rbarn Dionne, Doug

Oobrman, Peg Donut, Allen

l>orchak. Swve

Oona, 0<"s-mond OunamorQ, Lo.wrenoo Dyke&, Katherine &dwards, Dona

Edward•, Richard Emohlsetr, Jc>e

Eamuy, Ly•lc


··~r. Jaatl

Ft>rp.9Gll, l 't:). t ldctl

o.,._.,.

nwr. Jamoa

11\dl, 1-a•n·noo

•la.JM,

Anll.a

nathl'r•. Jatnc.-• rra1.lt•r, l>at

• n ..h.•klhilt I rant"t"• •'rl1li~. llo~ard

•·r.1111 K:Hhle~n J'ullt•r, (..'.ukl)' t;atb.--11.h

Jam~•

(~:lrtU'U,

U1ch.:ard

c.;.rrun

\11d1.:1t>I

c.;1Hru. :->u·u? ()ilman \\alk•r t:I\~,

(;IUTCI•, tri.alhlttn

Cll":ti.on, K:ay {~r.

rtul

<Moclunan. Georct'

Gr11n1, tamaln ltnl\t'8, JaftC\

Gret."'ft<' ~C\<' Ou111lQQd, ~Ill")'

t"'utUlu.a Hert 11.alllWI)' . Rh hard llamm<•Dd, Ja.,~k llinl , tflurta

It••"•· Barry

l11twk•, JoAnn lht)'t'tl!i;i. Greg

lh..fpttr&. 1·11umJ10 tlNkk,lll. llon lh-nl.·>· R.andy lhbb&rJ. Bonni<'

ll lrtu, 11(.•ubh

Uull.1100. Helen lfollt:nbl.-ck , l).,n lfoln,b1ad, Echard Uvltem('r. f'.ct-ard lha.tt...y, R·ibtrt ..... ,.,.•• l>W.

John


,lam•• Jam J:unc>•, Robyn

Jt_•Hkk, l 1"'111k

Jr••11;k, MuLtn

We struggle to climb above the lonely mist...

J•JI"''· Clary Juhn~on,

rnm•1·>1

J1)hl\•lun, J•>t-Oflh J1.11lcl, U111uld

t\Jtrr~ Kath)·

K:autlm•"• Jill h.~'«l1H, \fld~l•I

K1;_•llrw1·, NJ•.111

t\-:mp100, Gary Kt•ru. PalrlclA l\, HIA~r, Jud) ~.tn..")

.........tlt.Qslf>, h.<X•llllCft,

Gilry \\ •yN.·

~ ..,.iacbkt"

Knillu Arthur )\:ntllu, to;.,rby t\1U1ls., Ulhy l.ammana Albeon l.aad:f'r~. Po.JU);l,aa

l.an1:,·. K<llh}

LarlM.'n, ll1r0>n l.arllCft, t.1..i:t l,,a1l..t·y.~1n

Laut, J.aney l..ealic:er. llo)d l..t.1UKMI, l'.IU)'

l.leil, t\lrlb

LUllbrlcl..:o. lk•Hy

t.. •nt~.

•~rl

l,..Knllt.·r, C .... rlt<•

lA.lc••· l)\on11t1 Lundqu1at, La• rem:.: \lc..\hAlC!t, l>itlt )kCoy, l(.,,btoru,


~h.'Cnckcn.

Hunald

\ictucn, J:.nlc('t

Mct:arlo.mJ. \\1 1.llla.w Mcllcnry. J'c,·orly

. . . and I can leap tall build ings in a s ingle bound !

McMu.rray, KAlWctm MaP\Jl:tnd, EUean

\taggl. Sindra

Ma{P1UJ1un, UnrohJ

Mancu. Dorolhy \tarchund,

Jn~1h

\lttl'lln. Ckm1ld MA8l, Dill

Melnera. Terry Mentch, Ront1ld

Me.-.dllh, l'hll Mlkttla.un, llo_rold MitchvU, Dclvid Molk!r, K.Athh.-cn

MoSJburg, I.ea.Ice Murph)•, Sl..lp

Murrey, \Hdu:tel Murrell. L..1rt')· Nll.!o;l•l, LlM.ry Nau, tlll.rbarn

l'\elson. Jlarr!I Nt•lt1ein. H11.:hard NIJ;h, Jdhn ~lgh,

Thom:LS

O'Cunn..•11. U:tr)' 0\mrtl.C!Ad. Al

Olm•lcad,

lt~t)'11wnd

O'N4.'lll. Jqbn Oti:lltuon, Cl11rk O\nh.'t.'k. Robt•rl Palmer. Rodney

Pch.•riHJn. Pt:tcr Peh.•rioe.•tn, Bill Plttraall, Si'l.llryl


&>Ulirr. H•,.larr P1e&oru1e, D;lirrel

PrhlU, \'.-rnle JUUpi•l, • nln

Yes, Marriage is a sacred institution!

ftl.-tklck.up11, Mu~u1ll Rt.-c<I, •:u H<'ftah, J>irn;iht

Rcyl\•tld•,

~:h1:r)'l

IUch111uftd, Ju.AMO

RJ1:1t•. l..u<'llc Rtn1C. Hlcbarti Ruhl11n•, Mi.lf't<llrrt

Rlllbm•. Llbdli Roe, ll.lrr1 -.\\llltd'

Ri>N, \flcbcl Rn":~, Sbrrrt 1Wb.Jw, M.arjurh.•

R~. ~1.a.rk'I

Sa.1111,

::..am

~ba011rr.

Linda

Sd11m, John

S..bre-lbcor, ICobcorl ~:t.• tni.ek. thcM.rd

& r•tttQn. Jam.... Src2ur. r>..irl1lh1

Stldm, l'Qn IS<l\'OCD, Robll>

Seufcn, \\ UILam ..-: t a, Sorrna Sl.rllwr, ~

SihHt. lt•)li(lr !:>1lrtk:att.I, '.'\ur111A N.oaNr, J ltl('ph ~

n1tb, R 11Un

S.Jmmc'n, CUrtla '."\l(1l~r, J ranee•

36

5,>Uur, l'horl<ro


SUley. Gu~n St.trr. l.O"AcU

~Ukcy,

-lay

!'lraft&C, \\tUlac

You know, I dream " beautiful" dreams

~ltlv•n, l··dwln S..rpluw, l'imlu $ua.nllu , '1 h:h11cl f •ylur, t.:lwrlu

r•ylor, .\kh·La: Tbomaa, John Tbornpaan

IA"OOIU'd

l'osdlt'r , Jtobrr\

Tra•~k. T<lny

Tretc;hel. Ooonl1 Trial, Wal~r Turk, Gary T1.1 rk, Gregory Turnt"r, Phil

t'hl. Rieh.ud

vaallc••·

Conn~

\"&nl\.lt-~ck. ~n

Verbe1. L..,rry \\'aggllOCr, Olltucl Walch,

~y

\\alle"u.~Lb.

W1.mwr 1 Anllur \\Df'll, Jack

" •Wr•. Claret \\&U., Mrt!O

Wecku·n. Dina Wt·tlu. lhan.a

Wetit, C'11rol Wh"'-'· Gar~· Willi.Jim•. th rtnl• W 11l1om•, Pil\rkk.

Wtl.on, Jani_..,\ , Wllk~r. Ch.ul~•

Win.hip, <'aml

37


\l.'1441

l.inJ4

\\i>lh:. \I.irk

Wuht1r1o, 1.,•11llt' \\ 'orlhl.ni.;ton, Cun.ti

\\oodNU

Mll·hacl

\\rld'll. IUt"bar~

\\ ut-M,•t.:ko. O:aryl Yui.;,,r. Jt.AA.·rl

YcUC"r. J•nk':• Juun~.

J;one•

\'c.,.na. lob.II Zt.•hm, Hober\

"/.1mm11rm;Ln. Theodott

Zy... , Larry '-lllk,

~&.an

Turrc-11. Tt'"rry l fiord. Lrlp L snphrie-,. u~

\\'041Lo\f""t'. Glen \\'4."U, l u"1 WulrnA.G, Dor~ \'eoraon. ~er

i:nci ....

o......

•~...aru~u. \'*AOt

~dt•k.11<>0 1

llt>b

l>\!.h.·ook, t:n1Ul1 C.lrd .-or1I. ,J04.·I

Col ~.

Uudwr, 1,,,.., "°'"·p, SuwnM

ftada. Oonn1f'


39

I


stubent 40

t1~e


..•.... SOLITUDE

41

I


a.S.B. PR€SJ0€nt

ne1l peteRson

VIC€-PR€Sl0€nt

peqqy OohRman

42


STANDING, left to right: Dave Prlano, Advisor: Mr. llaugbt, Advisor: Mr. Tritt.on, Colleen Turnbull, Dennis Riggs, John 0 1Nelll, Advisor: Mr. Hat.ch. SEATED: Patsy Brown, Linda Larsen, Peg Dohrman, Neil Peterson, Terry Anderson, Advlsot路: Mr. Burns.

contRol

43


south souno

Debate Coach, Richard Hyneman, and members of bis forensic squad, lefl to right, Cathi lieriza, Kristy Beito, and Patsy Brown depart for Modesto, California io compete in the 1967 Speech Nationals .

Debate Coach, R. L. Hyneman, receives the " Coach of Yeai-'' award :u local speech tournament.

"w1nn1nq" season Both debaters and interpretive readers climaxed their 66- 67 season with winnings at Idaho State and the Tournament of Champions, and finally were off to California to the National Junior College Speech Tourney, near San Francisco. They witnessed, many times, the thrills of victory and the agony of defeat in over 200 rounds of competition. Out of 8 tournaments, they brought home 4 trophies and 9 awards.


LEFT TO RIGHT: Patsy Brown, Elli Ba!tor, Sheryl Bergstrom, Joann Richmond, Kristy Beilo, Candi Dahl, Art Thayer, John O'Neill and Coach Richard Hyneman.

Oesate ano oRal 1nteRpRetat1on LEFT TO RlGHT: Coach Margaret Cale, Cathi Reriza, Peg Dorhman, Vern Prlvllt.


a cappella cho1Q


blRâ&#x201A;ŹCtOR

Lou kelly The existence of this highly disciplined musical group is a testimonial to the artistry of its highly talented director and to the dedicated personal work of each chorister. Mr. Kelly "plays" his singers as a master organist's fingers and feet unify Lhe heterogeneous resources of his instrument. lie has succeeded in molding his fifty voices and personalities into the most expressive of musical instruments, the choir of human voices. rt was a year of "giving," Mr. Kelly avowed that these young people had given him the most satisfying year of his life; and in turn he has given them a knowledge and love of great music, and the thrilling experience of being a creative part of that music. Together, dfrector and singers have given live music of high quality to our Junior College, to the city of Coeur d'Alene, and to the thousands for whom they have sung on their concert tours. By Rev. Bernard J . Hopkins, CSsR

noRth 1baho 1un10R colteqe ensemsle


th€ W€B


halloween Whirling amid webs, witches and wanton faces, the students of NIJC spent the nigbl of October 30 in bizarre revelry at the annual Halloween Dance. Dress was definitely informal, any old sheet would do, and the eerie sound affects were provided by "Smiley, Offbeat, Lil' Oro, Professor and the Grasshopper." The refreshments were so devilishly appetizing that even the vampires had to forsake their "normal" diets for the earthly fare. As Lhe witching houi· approached, it was clear that the evening was a bone rattling success for all.

Dispensing wilh the ll'aditionnl sheeL nnd pointed hat, Claudia

McDermidt and her dale went 'Mod. "

1

"B€St bQ€SS€b"

49


snow~lake ~antasy Under a ceiling of snowflakes couples danced to the rhytlun of the Christmas season at the annual AWS formal ball entitled ''Snowflake Fantasy. " Skaters on a frozen pond, the familiar snowman and a red velvet sleigh afforded the atmosphere for the gala event.

The high point of the evening was the crowning of the royalty. Surrounded by their court, Sherrie Rowe and Neil Peterson do1U1ed crowns of holly and reigned over the formal occasion. Music was presented for the ball by "Tootle James and ms Knights of the Round Table. "

I


the ''SW€€th€aRt" tR€€

---

6 52


On the evening of February 23, a warmth spread through the Student Union Building as couples entered into the dance called the "Sweet Heart Tree. " The unique and beautiful decorations gave an immediate impression of serenity. The Sweet Heart Tree, itself, created an aura of blissful rapture. King Mike Elgee and Prince Gary O'Connell reigned over lhis fantasy land of cupid.

CUPID'S COURT: King, Mlke Elgee; Prince, Gary O'Connell.

King Mike and date.

Prince Gary and date.

53


COURtesy o~ GIRLS OORm.


Patty Is setting her course.

"Ab, yes! Just nbout the right size."

"We've been through this before. I'm loo young to man路y ! "

What's it all about?

55


The present North Idaho Junior College drama dcparlmcnl was established three and one half years ago . Since its inception at that time, the Cardinal Players, as they have come to be known, have forged ahead into a consolidated, worth while and energetic group. Each year the players present two major productions of three acts for public viewing. They also produce two one act plays that are performed for the student body. Other productions are given for various civic groups in Coeur d' Alene . The interest and participation have grown oonsislenlly both in class and 2nd outside activity. Tho doparlmcnt also sponsors the "Club Orpheus," a dinner dance given in January at the end of finals . Tho members of the group stage a floor show in which individual talent is displ ayed. Tho purpose of this drama organization is not only to foster individual talent , but to prepare students to appear in front of any kind of an audience with grace , case and poise . A slogan has developed over the years that is very apropros to the feeling generated in the Cardinal players "Onward and Upward With The Arts. "

~IRâ&#x201A;ŹCtOR

56


th€ Whit€ phantom W1•itleo by: WILBER BRAUN Directed by: l\IARGARET GALE Assistant Director: VERN PRIVITT

cast L'< ORDER OF APPEARA.'<CE :\"IARY OOllR;\IAN BAROAAA Dll.:rz PEGGY BRVNINGA SANDRA BALDW!l\ TOM llEBERT JOlll\ 0''.l:EILL OES:\10'.l:D DAUGHTS


the caRb1nal playeRs pResent

PLAYERS: Plano, Mrs . R. Swanson: Drums, llunl Swnn: Sax, Bob Dahlberg.

" thURB€Q Written by JAMES THURBER Produced and Directed by MARGARET GALE Assistant DiL·eclor: CATHI HERIZA Technical Direcwr: GERALD DALEY

58

cast IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE GRANT MERRIMAN CLAUDIA McOERMIDT GERALD SIBERT KRISTY BEITO VERN PRIVITT SANDY BALOWlN PEGGY DOHRMAN JIM BEAN KEN VERNON CATHI HERIZA PATSY BROWN STEVEN GROVES GLEN WESTOVER EDNA SIMONS


Patsy .Brown seeks inspiration.

The earlier stages of "A Thurber Carnival."

Enthusiasm! Self-Rellance! Anxiely! !

Margarel Gale, dlrector, reflects on the weeks oC trying rehearsals, and anticipates "Opening Night. II

59


woQO Oance

"You may call it sleep-walking, but I say that she ls promiscuous!"

60


4entlemen shoppeRs

"Lez go crash the women's department al Abercrumpie and Fitch!"

macseth

"I do believe r shall have another Brandy!"


s oav10, Oetuose ano snooks puesent On the night of October 22, the folk singing group of David, Delrose and Brooks, which were from New York, appeared in the Student Union of the NIJC. They sang such songs as "Summer Time" and "All Ove1路 the World," along with beautiful originals they had composed. As the trio sang, they conveyed the meanings of their songs in such a way that all felt the beauty and magnificence of the lyrics. Their voices cast a hypnotism that enraptured the students and established a mood of "feeling." Each person felt a happiness and a sadness as they left the building that evening. A happiness because they had heard and enjoyed the voices of the rcknowned group, and a sadness because the performance had ended.

62


On the evening of March 3rd, t.he Student Union at NIJC took on a touch of the "far out" and other psychedelic fantasies via the affairs theme "The Trip". Guest artists for the event, under the guidance of Michael Daley, of the University of Montana, as master of ceremonies, were Ranch and Atwell, of Gonzaga University, David Steinberg of New York City, The Beller Mouse Trap, also of Gonzaga, and NIJC students, Cathy lleriza, Claudia McDermidt, and Peg Dohrman. The wide variety of entertainment brought to the many students who attended, was set against a backdrop of outsized figures and symbols of this occult phase. The audience was seated upon the Qoor in the dimly lit room around low-level "plank and keg" tables. Amid the candle light and fluorescent paint accents, all were served beverages and hors d 'ourves. The occasion was a complete success and everyone came away having been entertained by something just a little bit dillerent.


Senator Frank Chul路ch spoke in the Student Union Building on April 21. His address to the students was concerned with the role of the United States in Viet Nam. The senator's speech was exacting and precise, and all those in attendance were mesmerized by his words. AU questions directed toward him at the conclusion of his dissertation were answered promptly, and were well received. As the senator departed from the building, he was rewarded with a warm, enthusiastic applause.

66


ken on v1et nam

On April 24, Kenneth Armstrong, war correspondent from Viet Nam, presented two factual filmed reports of aclivilies in Viet Nam. The films gave a view of Viel Nam ranging from the cilies t.o the jungles, and fighting areas to Lhe back land. They depicted the stark realism of war, and how soldiers are sacrificing their lives for our counlry. The words he spoke were not humorous or comforting. Ile e>.'Ploited the truth of war in its every facet.

67


PRESEnTS

The drama department again presented theil' annual dinner dance and floor show "Club Orpheus" on January 28, 1967. The theme 11 0n Broadway" was directed by Mrs. Margaret Gale, head of the drama department, and students Peg Dohrman, Cathi lleriza and Gary Chappell. The menu included a choice of either choice New York cut steak or jumbo fried shrimp. The dinner began with a crab cocktail and tossed green salad followed by the main course with baked potato, vegetable and French bread. To climax the fine dinner an exotic fresh fruit and cheese plate was served to the guests. The dinner, catered by the Student Union, was served by the Couer ctâ&#x20AC;˘ Alene High School Vikettes. The floor shows were presented at 9:00 p. m. and 10:15 p. m. Micheal Daley of the University of Montana, acting as master of ceremonies began the evening with "Another Opening-Another Show", a song hit from the

broadway musical "Kiss Me Kale" other acts to follow were David Steinberg of New York, Mary Dotu:man, a student at NIJC who sang "Sadie, Sadie" from broadway's "FUIUly Girl " and Dianne James of NIJC doing a medley, also from "Funny Girl." Gwen Stal ey gave a rendition of "Summertime" from "Porgy and Bess" and "Who Can I Turn To" from "The Roar of The Greasepaint The Smell of The Crowd. " Claudia McDermidt performed a modern dance int,erpretation of "Goldfinger" and Cathi Heriza and Gary Chappell performed "What Now My Love. " Micheal Dayley and Cathi Heriza rettU¡ned to the stage to do "Away, Away" and Mr. Daley closed lhe show with "The impossible Dream" from the show recently in production and best musical of 1966 "The Man of La Mancha. " Dance music was presented by "Tootie James and His Knights of the Round Table" for the remainder of the evening.


P'NDlll ACTS AID DUICl1IJ "'1U 1111111

AO


n 1 J c a.s.B. PRâ&#x201A;ŹSâ&#x201A;Źnt

A joyful seek of abandon swept over the college as campus days arrived. Colorful signs and posters advertizing the various activities adorned the buHdings. The hypnotic craze of wildness began with the car bash in which students slashed and smashed an old car. The pie eating contest took place with students throwing the pies rather than eating them. Meanwhile, the beard contest was judged and the three best beards at NIJC were announced. Then came the last day, which all the students had awaited with anxious anticipation. Water fights with balloons, buckets of water and hoses took place most of the day. Girl s were init iated by a goodly dosing with water, and then a bath in an oversized mud puddle. Carefree action was the feeling that had spread to all, during that Friday. The finale to this fabulous week was the bed race. It started from Seventh St. on Sherman, and ended at the college with the track team winning (wouldn't you know it)? Campus days are, indeed, the most exciting event of the year.

70


Opposition dampens facult.y !

71


a t=ew last SURVIVORS

R€0 BaRon tRIUmphs

72


campus

Bâ&#x201A;Ź-ln


IF YOU PLAN FOR ONE YEAR, GROW GRAIN IF YOU PLAN FOR TEN YEARS, GROW GRASS

IF YOU PLAN FOR ONE-HUNDRED YEARS, GROW TREES, BUT IF YOU PLAN FOR ETERNITY, GROW MEN. ---------UNKNOWN


-路路


''softly

as

I

leave

you

,,

n


spo~ts

78


...•... ACTION

79


n 1J c caR<)1nals

BOTTOM ROW, left LO right: C. Re lily. Mgr. , R. Allen, B. Schuetz, J. Bellar, W. Ducote, D. Driskel, C. Loomer, N. Thompson, D. Mitchell, Mgr. 13ACK ROW: R. Williams, Head Coach, R. Huskey, Mgr., A. Montgomery, T. Traweek, A. McCaskill, D. Barnes, D. Treadwell, B. Edwards, W. Broderick, R. Raymond, Ass'L Coach.

coach Rollie w1tl1ams

80


coach comments on season "l wasn'L parLicuJarly pleased with the win-loss record, bul a numbe1· of factors contributed to the outcome. I have never been one Lo rely on luck or use this term lo describe a loss, but this was wiLhouL a doubt the most unlucky team I have coached. Our injuries and loss of personnel came at. a most inopportune time. We had the players Lo have a much more successful campaib'll, but we couJdn'L seem to coordlnate a i·cal team effort throughout U1e season. I suppose U1e best statement to make would to look to the future and work for next year. "

Al and Dan go for t•ebound against Yakima Valley JC.

1966-67 SCOReBOaRO NIJC vs. 77 71

69 6'1 62 50 89

107 70

72 67 60 !19

5.J !17

5.J 64

74

Gs 65 !l9

1:15 6·1 75 72 6b

Yaklmn Valley Yakima Valley Columbia Dasm Casper College (Wyo.) Casper College College of Southern Idaho Mount Royal JC Mount Hoyal JC Spokane Community College Boise College Boise CoUcgl! Columbia Basin U of Idaho Froi;b College of Southern Idaho Dig Bend Commumty Col. Spokane Community College t..,'11n~1·~ily of Moul. Fro:.b Unl\'eri;ity of Mont. Froi;h \\'cnatc:hcc \'alley \\'f.!natchcc \'alley llii; Bend Communlly Col. Gon1.ai,.-:i L Frosh \\ ashmgton State Frosh L or Idaho Frosh Gonzaga U Frosh Washinb'ton State Frosh

62 55 G!! 71

,_

-~

70 :Jh

37 71 b2 101 1:1

\JG jti

Gti

;9 71

71

'";9 70

G:? iJI h~J

.,0

NlJC Hcgion 1-SUb Hcglonal Tournament Ontano. Oregon 7l:! Southwctitcrn Oregon Comm. Col. 67 T1·casu1·e Valley Comm. Col. Season Hccord for 28 Games Won I l Lo:>t l 7

81


mont4omeRy sets up Bucket

caRb ReBounbs ShORteR

Rival 82


cheeuteaoeus Oe01cate sp1u1t Through lhe promotion of college spirit and enthusiasm, lhe cheerleaders dedicate their efforts to Rollie Williams and lhe 1966-67 basketball team. Our intention bas been lo make the community represented to support the college. All luck and success in future years lo both . . . . . . Cardinal Cheerleaders

84


85


tRack

TOP ROW, lcll lo right : Floyd :\lcllan, :\tanager: Cary Wutzke, Bill Broderick, Jolk1c, lllarv Faust, Jim Bean. BOTTOM ROW: Greg Mills, Alan Boehm, Neil PcLeri;on.


Gary zeros-in javelin

Cards charge lull speed lnlO "action"


Jolkie prepares lO hurl d111c.


LEFT TO RIGllT: George Goetr.man, Bill lllcFarland, John O'Neill, Ski1> Murphy, Stun Zisk.

Coach: Mr. Keating.

Coach: Warren Keating

n I JC ''1967'' qol~ \ 90


-


FIRST ROW, lcfl IO right: Jerry Walseth, John Deeter, Claire Simmons, Randy Teall, Bill Morton, Jack Hammond, Larry Ruff, Dave Nipp. SECOND ROW: Coach Crowe, Jerry Heibc, Pal Williams, Dave Boller, Bill Schuetz, Vance Ekwortell, Darce Orclskel, Larry Murrel, Cooch Raymond.

Head Coach: James Crowe

1967

BaS€Ball The 1967 baseball team did not achieve a Lriumphant campaign in a win loss aspect, however, I sincerely feel they gave a hundred percent, 100% of the time. With respect to effo1·t exerted and spirit displayed, this year's team was a success.

92


Assistant Coach: Dick Raymond

Lury Muriel scores one for Cards.

Cardlnal rtrsl baseman stretches for ball!


letteRmen's ctus

Larry Rafl, Dave Boller, Chuck Loome, Dan Tredwell , Don Barnes, Jorry Riebe, Bill Scheutz, Ron Minch, Randy Teal, Jack Hammond, John Deeder, Warren Pucote, Don Johnson, Speedy Riely, Jet·ry Schreiber, Rusty Cooper, .John Atchinson, Larry Murril, Floyd McHan, Neil Peterson, Wink Anderson, and Dave Mitchell.

t

w I

l €

s Elaine Atkins, DoMa Metzker, Micki Costa, Patty Lennon, Claudia McDermidt, Sandy Berry. 94


~Rill

team

BOTTOM ROW, lefl to righl: Thr esa Garlinghouse, Pat \lcCorm1ck, R. Gohlm, S. Olin, ÂŁ. Rood, M. Rubow, J. Jenson. SEC0:-10 HO\\': J. ;\tcCucn, P. Van Kleek. D. Weller, J. Ryan, P. LeMon, L. Stockwell, S. Cramer, S. Howe.

TlllRD ROW: J. L3uf, M. Bozarlh, J. K:lufam, t:. Adkins, M. Laskey, J. Dykes, J . Brueher.

~latson,

S.

LEFT TO RIGHT: John Renoylds, Diallll Weller, Jane Law, .Mike Anderson, Frank Yamamoto, Pam Yamamoto, Claudia McOermidt, Terry Anderson, Janice llumphery.

95


ou4an 1zat1on s 96


....... UNITY


puBl1c1ty committee

Cathi lleriza, Candy Dahl, Sher! Leonard. Ellie Ua101路, and Sandra Baldwin.

stuOent act1v1ty committee Wes flat.ch, Advisor, Jan Bull, John R. O'Nelll, Kalhy F'rosl and Peg Dorhman.

98


phi theta kappa

BACK ROW: Nell Peterson, Henry Nagel, Raymond St.one, Ad\•isor· Mike Ross, and Gary Wautzke. Andrews, and Candy Fuller.

FRONT HOW: Dianne Weller, El:iine Atkins, Kathy

99


newman ctus

K:llhy Andrews, Col. John .\le Farland

and

~lary

He1h

.\laL~on.

pRessyteR1an clus

Robert llusky, Shc1路l Howe, and Dave Prtnno.

100


vets ctus

STANDING, left t.o right: James Galbraith, John Rubleman, Glen Becker. SEATED: Bill Oalbcrg, Dennis Burr, David Buckley, Jim Hill.

C1QCl€

k

BACK ROW: Don Reffalt, Jerry Riebe, Greg Dionne, \\'nyne Ketchum, Jim Cu1·tis, Tom Cuddy. .Jim Young, Rusty Cooper, Doug 1>1onnc, Hick <..arn\'l, ~lark C:owlcs.

FRONT RO\\':

101


~ecca

Don llollenbeck, Jct路ry l\lortln, Mr. l\lcGlnly, l\lary Ferguson and Carol West.

GIRlS ClUB

BOTTOM ROW, left to right: :.'>!. Dingler, Linda Seaman, K. Frost, :.1. Bosarth, S. Laskey. J. Hazel. TOP ROW: Corol Anderson, Jo Ann Fo1路d, Patty Bailey, Carol ;\lcrrllt.

102


snea

LEFT TO RIGHT: 0. Secor, B. Baslington, C. Vanlless, S. Lasky, K. Moser, S. Rowe, 0. Edwards, O. Massa, B. Huskey. president.

en41neeus ctus BOTTOM HOW: 0. Greeno, M. Claflin, E. Zeitler, 0. Maine, Bill Dahlberg, J. WLlson, J. Marchand, Mr. Van Kleeck. SECOND ROW: 0 . Yandt, D. Yandt, Larry Huff, Richard Burton, C. Blakley, A. Carpent.er, A. Wanner, L. Webb. TlIIRD ROW: M. Null, W. Roeske, J. Riebe, D. DeWall, B. Walts, F. Achenbach, R. Reed, P. llolzmex, T . Nigh . FOURTH ROW: 8 . Larsen, P. Theichal, G. Kempton, L. Bruggom, C. Hazel, R. McKibben, D. Kramer, J. Melom, B. Gunsalus.

103


TOP ROW, lcfl lo rlght: Mike Elgee, Dennis Riggs, llclen llollnnd, Sheryl Sperllng, Cary Wnlzkc, Mlke Nuu, Dn1·rel Preslorloul!, Charles Alha, O:iry McDonald, Hich Daley, \l:11·k \\'olfk. BOTTO~! HOW• \licki Cosln, Paula Surplus, She1·ry Rowe, Tammy Johnson, Linda Slocl.."\\Cll.

Ski ClUB INSTRUCTOR: Cbrls Tompson, Helen Loll:lnd, Larry McLean.

104


ffi€ffiB€RS Bonnie Clark, Robyn McClure, Richa1·d Day, Eva Reed, r.'lr. Burns, Jan Bull, Ron Fisher, Al Boehm, Priscilla Ohdgson, Sharon Ringer, Bernice Johnson, Marjorie Rubow, Gary Turk, Dennis Williams, Ed Holmblud, Bruce English, Randy Henley, Betty McLean, Lorayne Paoletti, Bob Dalberg, Dianna Weller, Sheri Leonard, Tom Cope, Sandra Baldwin, Mike Thatcher, Gary Wutzke, Neil Peterson, Buzz Lamanono, Duane Balln, John Crane, Tome Hebert, Steve Dorshek, Jim Jackson, Dan Seldon. TWIRLERS: Sandy Berry, Patty Lennon, Elaine Atkins, and Donna Metzker.

Oance sano

Mr. Bu1·ns

sano Gary Wutzke, Richard Day, Gary Turk, Priscilla lloclgson, Shel Leom:u·d, Al &chm, Neil Peterson, Dennis Willaims, Ed llolmblad, Bob Dahlberg, Duane Balin, John Crane, Tom Cope, Tom Hebert, Jan Bull, Steve Dorshek, and Jlm Jackson.

n 1 Jc sano 1n conceut 105


Choir Concert To Be Given M1y 23 :-.lJC"'a A ,~..,,' • ··• 0: )fr stll ptHf'nt o "'1ftli1tl C .a-tt.rt lllJ' 23 at &h• Sl:TdlJI, 11&.T >.SnnUSI &<baol C)1:Ulll·

alum, At dlJI COQClllt l•O ctiolt mt=h!>J& •UI tt<"<1h

IMptralJccal

A1u1d.t

whJ.c.h

or" tift".lrcti'd iannualb to l•" rholr tftr$blirs J11d.. d 1D0•1 out1t1ndlnc tn th.,tr arf'\'104·

Ct1mmencen«>nt Sp eakf'r

'67-'61 Scholarship Win11rs Are ll1Md

ira 1.bf'I C'liolr. •«ol'ft1nc to l..cull Kttlb , dlr twr. T'brt toUn•ln& Jlt"Call"" ha~ t"Dr U•• UU rd 1011 t.hr Coll bo<o a • . . - llcilolan.J\IPB i• •nPP'd ln mU.iar a r~ ll>t Ill• Joa! 19€1 HA: Jud>' cordlnL bO~ver. for Ui:t• ftrlt llalCwe. Ml W (l>olOlllJ H Um• &hO' llf' tqlla1 ii ua..... - · • -ono11: llantlf Mlwa Kt>llJ •aid 11Vt1ol•t Cowr O'Alf'M £1.tm; 11. .1><~ c1 lh• dlolf Dauda 2lo1ll'f Piii! SCllrOePrn.,,tb eqapd Ill """'4lle.,rlal Ol'A 1-"'7: t:i.c uri t:it•"'a&ll'd atu0crnt1i r0t Sa01aln1.Qe.Al 1Hf. J\f!Jb U.led tha& wa1•t PO•" O> tED&UI""

*' Pllal

1u,7ua• planatni to Jaln Ute ct.air n.. u 1Hr ff" bl• t)e.. /l)rl" \ho .ind Of ltill MllU!.ltPr.

A tac;r&d tl9l•"l,ton cont-t!n, •btcb wu P1"od1J.OC'd and fttllt

AhO'ft aa IUSO T'.' In Sra&Ut:i ttf' UJ• ctaolr. na atto oe KADI T\' SOOk.,.... N.,- 1 al 3 !IO p.a. Koll1 uld.

6r1d11tiol 1111 11 SUB MIY 20 blcn•t aodal

•Y.m•

or tb•

JIM. a«0rdln1 to Caocb' """"' docorallon cl>.U.....

Dfco:auoca tot :bf' ball ban ktO plamled. lb1'7 wUJ coat -•>alcaUb $175 IO UGO. Pro..- wtll k dna al Ill• doOl llball&UAs Ille lh.,.. of Ille b&ll. ""6otlb I Wiii I.eat• Yoa " A ballot dln::lfr wUI bl' o&ened ID u.e rO<H:t of Ill• SUB pn>tldod loo d>ltm ... a1.. lbt-... will ... tabl,.• for &11, at:ae ..Sd~ 1&11• Nl11r d•dtA•d 10 rln<rl.,. Ill• decoca-: '"Yoa wUI lla\O IO It> IO 11>~11111Jwlll•u•11U._.,

"111 be . ..,...

11<o-. ~...,ti"'' »..W l)laa - · Wink ...fJOe lllk• Ol<a - " " c-ie V.. H•u PtJ DolMsa. -

cu.tr

hllor.

APl'LICATIOll llHlllD fDI H<\Dlll5SIDll

,,,_loll..

ICUC•"*loll-.

oad Rttnalollol 9111 ... lh• ...... al 1110 Prl""'" pla,Jed bf llelYID TaJIOI 1111 tbe orpo. lba lnvooaUon ud Brn._...

1111); 111111.... .... RotuJ Club: Do• l'ool• \'f'W 11111 l1ta17 ~I •at: Marl• Raina, 111117 0 0...,IJOrde lleJDOrllll R. •. OnrJ01c1o; C1ntoia Oul· llaCao' Club: JUiee

diction .. 111 be otr."'d try

Ibo Re-d ...,...... Wink!• Ill• Pt<labr\erlan Ctr.arch. !CUC'• A CloMll& Choir

Vf'll Aini~ · 5'an Ooll -IO......_ 0.11; .. Illa. D. S OalMr. CllUldi• lllo-

win alas "RaumcUoa." .. A Ml•tJ Portreaa b our God." u.d "0 D., NI ol

-

Olace.••

-nia •bO wW , _ llall ..... CUllllll•IA .,..UC.ror 1-..11.. .....,.. Jul1 I, llCCOllllN lo lflallio r•c:f,atrar.

w-

coa-~~"'"m

ocww d•Alft• Eade:a

be Dr. Dm Pane....,, Pr..1. 0.111 al Eaaiom •Uhlft&IOA

IC J . - - 1 1 1 1 : llaodlll Slid 'llUIW>ISDG Polo•r O> !EAilaMrtn1l

.llarlla•

lllalo OOll•P• HI• addrua ltl UU9'4 .. YOli&r Pottar' In. • l"ut&Utt Qf Accelf"111tlnc Cbaq• ...

oonni... D<Al90Cld

Lamb« (."<> ; f'JulH W!lClloopll'f

AO

P.~:

O.: lbo,...•

. . - k Ol'A ConalalOIY of ud A«"P'«i 5cClt ua 1111.a of ~•o: Daftd IC1PP ond 0.told o-J le7 P'lnl llrcmll)' lloal<: - i . r.... Auodalod

RaJmOCMI

Aacl_.

0.-IOl<laa~!Ora

lil>Oka:i•.

ITllUT IOAIUI ...SllCHTAllY

a-aoa0Ul.Mlft1'UH}'f' ~ u IM1-f8 •lud.,.1 bo•nl

•tcnlUI' . VIiion• Illar llallltt

Pt••.-.

t. "n• pft'ald I ElloUUll ...ltln...,. ..... C?ll•.,, Dr

Doa Pa

nan hu

DH'JI

MllfCtf'll al (lJC• IJP<:akn fos Ill• lilJC e:a-=-tdlM"• lk1a 7f"at Or. Pane ~DD hai. t~n

..,...,...,..=.,,.

Pf. .ldOSll

ol E1115C llhte I• 1003 b• . . . bh•

180. Ot

11U

COll1tlf'

&Jt'tAIGUi.1»

and Lyao Durand ..1ec&td aa r~reuntaU'u U... -llod Co< lb• P<llllloo. 01 lb• AOl•rt""" .uaod&UOO • • Al8 ornnn. ·~~ of Cvll•I"" I r Teach<'f Edu· 1111- ol o la- ' llaJ' 9. RUOD for • atal• di-pt.rt: '

-

Oolln

Oonmaa Alill · - of ,.. • 11"=> ID Po ud.

lnWll•• pro-

~

ln Bla14e

- - - - - " 11><U.n

LIClll IEYS •ST ••IYllAY M All

-.U

.....

la

..,_,_ ••<• pUQQl-1

r.,. lllo' 24. llllldoola •h• nnnot

wn.

wlll i. dlaqod 11 00, to b. paid lo

Ibid U..lt

..,_,_

. . olllC.

&OC<>rdlnf IO

ff#

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•Phtait;;

loch ..,.., bo IO 11,. Dl«u

llro.

"rot

ol

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lff. IU-al• Clollc - -

Tbe Ond\ll.Uon Ball-a dlnn•r..tan....-to l>o bold ll&J lh~ &VB, wlll l>o Ille

:Ill In

CoauD.oc-.mt'ai • • • r c l 1 ea •Ill be Hid lo< snduallna 1 1 - al IO:llO Fridal .oniina. lllQ 26. IH"i. Ill Ille

_1_...,.

HIM•

220 To Gred11te At Co11menc1111nt Exercises M1y 26

ar

.J " atem

st.al~ oon~cr Uid.

• u 1radua It Wu.twi.1 1011 liUI Unl•.,,.lV H baa

sprnl IP 111,,. PltACIJ)aJ

1111•

a lc!s.che-1• llhd

IUP"n-1101

1•al1tanl 1u.1r.nttn!•nd nt 1h 'rlalhlnrton mool•. H• ro

cehtd bl• mutC'f'"• dc:aoo ltolO Oolcrado 151&"' Coue and Cl!llllll•I d ttl• docionl worta al C I la l.'lllt0nl1J lls Pall noD U& oppaJnted

-ct ' "

_,. Ill<! 10nmm ot WUlllnl'Clll

u

a MmMr Of lbe 1ta1e·• edoaillan R• 1' obo • mflllber ot Ille Jllllm £.daaalloo FaclllUH COlllDll•

ln Officers Hid SessiOIS Al MUC Ellfll> - · laO !llC,'9 !IOOI lllM&llOlrt llrtil Idaho at• Utndrd O.tu.ffl al ~1JC May I 4, Tho ••liJCd4 1&111hl •er!J tndnc la• C'ri.:nlnal Law nan:o:tra ti.• aad mrd111n· ol IM i:auoaal cru: 1!1.tomn1uoo <:er.tu ln 1'ia.&b· 111011 D C a=t1lln& IO CllttD.. Hao I TOcaUonal

Cla•••• • tr tw COl11S:ie\CG t:li dQa tn

OlllILO

"1)

L

Aco·

S&Oll•

dt'ak Dlaa, wlll preaen! lb!! craduald Mid E. A. S<llet. C!lalrmMI o1 Ill• llo&nl or Tna.U•, .tll pnau.t Ulfl dll'loc-. p~..,

paduates..,..

rtc1hldod Of Ibo lollowtDI II>

1trvcUm1

•nd

14tar=a1Son

llt&d-

CODCOmlN Ulla ,rear"a aatJOll H.C'rcta...

°"""

Mid

so•na

Pit~

lllMI up as

•Ill ho

1~.Uablo tn lM r~ahtrar's ornoe IUl)'Umo an.r liar 17.

PIMH

1IOCI\

u ooulble anu lba.t date-. and cbtck Ill""' In lrnrcedlat•l1 lf\ff

a.

Cbtii cttf1DQQ,J. to lbt ball. .y ol tb•

odmlalatnuon bralldlll& p1<-

""'IJ'

alllrodl b7 D:JO lo Ill

•cnlll1 or *1 26 ''" In at.naCUoc• coceeni.ln1 the

aUOtl •rrr7 ottkrc ltf' coportunltt 10 atteod """Sh'

proo.dure to foUO'W, wtU be no urh,anal.

. . id ,... hundl'll aM 111'\J • M\tn. n haff' aUnndM th• tbtvt' ~"1lon1 brld lhl1 )'•ar

and cenino11•• •Ill nOI bo

&1

lllJC

&coll llbed J &mn lnpllo Ka•k t we"' lf>4

llft<I JMD

"lbtn

P1rtlclpatlon In Ill• ceiwl!IOlll•• 11 ""1•111!11

Ot.olft!U

l•au'"1 to &nJOnl! who l• not

cr•aent...

Tb•,. are a fc• 1stn ln-

""""""• om~ rrom llonoe1 Koo al &lloshone

'11atl- 10 Ill• otni;.. n ... "'" be ""'CllUod lor !le ~llCll

atldlAwt• eounllhau.aditel.

...1••

co • n ..1 cane, nm aomid

Top Vocational Siudenta

011111 IA OD 111• l>o1.1d of Lil,.. left Of Ill~ llpok""o O:r.IOIU• llltJ

AClluo C<>•ncll

la a

lllOmbor or lh• Counrll of lb« l'odl•lloo or R•lloaol ""'

cndlUAI

COlllm!UIOU

Of

llllMt EducaUOll. I• a . ..,.... of IM Wubln11'l0 CUlzn•a °""'ell "'"' . . . "PPO!ntod _,. lllo IO• mot IO · Mlp • Ibo Edllc:alloaal Toi.. .,_... Ccamlaaloo ol Ille _.,~llO•·

'Ille 11119fllrot "'· -· · ...._ Ill• lllQ :111111 o - - D I la ''YOio ..... . . Ill • P'lllll• of Aeoel1111 ca...."

mu SllOW CAllCILUD 1'e AW - . allow bu ..... _lltddia1101dlfd. ele -atc:ca &eCIOftlllll IO l'IQr a - AW P!ltlllloal.

106

0.J""4 rd ' - " J - - -.ri-r d , ,,..,

"'°

hllf'•" ....... "'9


newspapeQ

sta~~

Don Smith, Editor Barbara Manning, and Jlm Young.

The Cardinal Paper Staff was like a wagon wheel, each member a spoke that helped it turn. Barbara Manning, editor was more or less U1e mother of the staff. If it wasn 'l for her yelling at us to get our work done and then editing our material, the paper would not have been as good as it was. Jim Young, chief reporter, was another asset to the group. His comical quips, laughter, and work all aided in making the paper. Kathie Pointer, second chief reporter, worked hard in gathering news. She did a lot of leg work as well as finger work (typing) in putting out the Cardinal Review on time. Ken Vernon reporter, proof read ou1路 work, and showed us how to improve. His seriousness motivated us all to work harder. Judy Kessinger, reporter, was the typist of the group and the one who kept our spirits high. She was also the leg reporter and gathered in news that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. Ron Grotzke, reporter, was the last spoke in the wheel. He was the one that decided on the importance or the unimportance of material in articles. Ron's logic added much to the staff.

Jim Young and Judy Kessinger.

107


66 1

t

w 0

67

0

0 Cathi lleriza, Edit.or

Editing the 1966-67 Cardinal Driftwood has, indeed, been a privilege and a challenge. It has been my endeavor to create a yearbook which will portray the NIJC college student, depicting him in his esthetic role throughout the year. I hope my effort in attempting something of this

nature has been successful--- --------thank you for the opportunity. Cathi Her iza Editor

109


stubent union CO-WORkâ&#x201A;ŹRS STANOCNG, lefl t.o righl: Auckey Smllb, Dea James, llclc11 Sluder, Callie Knapp, Mildred Broduson. SEATED: Leone Patzer, West.on Hatch, Ruth Mlller.

110

Mrs. Anderson


STANOlNG, left to right: Visitor, 0. Siverson, Kathy Frost, Linda Finney, Carol West, Visitor. SEATED: Tammy Johnson, Patsy Brown, Nancy Walch, Sheryl Bergstrom, Joanne Richmond.

campus cRusa<)e ClUB

"It is our endeavor to strive for Christian unity."

111


t=aculty 112


····· •. GUIDANCE

· • • • ··.FOUNDATION

.. · · · • · INSPIRATION


HERSCHELL RIEBE Dean of Men Mathematics Engineering

DR. EVA OGG Dean of Women Educalion Ilead Political Science

RAYMOND STONE

Academic Dean Social Science

DEXTER MOSER

Engineering Dept. Head Directo1路 of Guidance

GERALD WENDT

Business Manager

WESTON HATCH

Studenl Union Manager Assistant Bus. Manager

114

ITSUKO NISHIO Regist1路ar

MRS. SEYMOUR

Receptionist


MRS. J. A. ANDERSON Bookkecµcr

MRS. D. ATWOOD English

WAL1'Ell J. BURNS JR. Biology Band

ANNETTE BIGNALL French Sµeech

RICllAHD CHAMPOUX llisto1·y Ocpanmenl I lead English Social Science

MRS. A. W. BERG Secretary

JA~IES

B. CHOW

English History Baseball Coach

LORETTA DUNNIGAN

Business Department Head

115


MARGARET GALE Drama Speech

GERTRUDE GILBERT Business Administration

116

CLEVE CAINE Auto Mechanics Head

FLOYD FREELAND Auto Mechanics

FRANK H. EVANS Biology Department Head

MR. GARCIA Psychology

OR. FRANCES HEARD English

R. L. HYNEMAN Literature Debate


WARREN KEATING Physical Science GoU

LOU KELLY Music Department Head

LUVA LEE Physical Educalion

LUCILLE LAi'lGE English Oeparimenl Head

CARL KRUEGER Forestry Technician

ORRIN LEE Physical Education

JOHN McFARLAND English Spanish Malh

ROBERT McGINTY Economics Mid-Management

117


BETTY McLAIN Business

BERNARD MERRIMAN Radio Production

F. S. OAKBERG Physical Science Department Head

DR. EARL PRIDDY Humanities Department Head

MR. RADFORD Auto Mechanics

ll8

RICHARD HAYMOND Biology Baseball

W. F . POWEHS Body Fender

TOM ROBB Distributive Education Truck


CATllERCNE SCATES Physical Educnllon

llAHLAN SECDEllT Industrial Electronics Head

MRS. AL SOllENSON

Assistant Librarian

FLOHENCE STRANAJIAN llome Economics Department !lead

VffiGrNIA TINSLEY Engllish

H. N. SODERLING !lead Librarian

JACK STEVE Industrial Elecironics Engineering

DALE THJTTON llaU1emalics Dept. Head

119


DON VAN KLEECK Dr(l[ting and Design

FACULTY NOT SllOWN CLARENCE L. llAUGllT LEONARD G. COPE A. N. DECl-J:R MARVL'I FARMEH MRS. J. llOWf;LL EDWARD T. LITCHF!J::LD RUTH :llcFARLAND JOHN A. RUPERT JOHN D. SPRINKEL EDWIN STUART

STAFF NOT SHOWN WlLLIA:\1 A.'.:OERSON LORAN BANEK KENSETH BEACll NOIUIAL CHAPPELL MAIUE DAHLMAN ?.UKE DEJANOVlCll CllAHLOTTJ:: llAGEN JOAN O'LEAHY JOUN F. PARK1':R 1101\IEH SCllOOLEH LOWAHO SCHOOLER JA'llCE SllEPPERO

120

ROLAND \\'lLLIAMS Physical Education Department Head

ROBERT WRJGllT Business Adminlstralion


Yearbook 1967 Driftwood  

A publication of North Idaho Junior College

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