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Molly Taylor Architecture Portfolio


“First life, then spaces, then buildings - the other way around never works.” -Jan Gehl University of Oregon | M. Arch, M. Iarc 2018 | mollyetaylor.com | taylor.mollye@gmail.com | 202.365.4277

*The background line drawing is a map of Alcúdia, Spain, the location of the archaeological site where my design story began. Linework created in Rhino with Grasshopper plugin Elk.


CONTENTS 1 Tailored Coffee Café + Coffee Retail | Eugene, OR

2 HUD Innovation in Affordable Housing Competition 2016 | Santa Barbara, CA

3 Cottage Grove Public Library | Cottage Grove, OR

4 Lane County Courthouse | Eugene, OR

5 Occupiable Mosaic Urban Design | Copenhagen, Denmark

6 Other Work | Markethall Truss | Pembe Tatu | Flyve | Hendrick’s Hall


1

Tailored Coffee Café + Retail

Location Eugene, OR Interior Architecture Design Studio Fall 2016 Professors Frank Escher + Ravi Gunewardena This design called for the renovation of an existing building that borders an underutilized public square in downtown Eugene, Oregon. The new shop would be occupied by Tailored coffee, a roastery and café operating out of a much smaller space in another part of Eugene. This redesign imagines an expansion of their roastery operation and retail offerings. The transformation of the shop and the square is accomplished by opening up the northern exterior wall and spilling the café space outdoors into the square. This provides for eyeson-the-square, making it a more friendly place with reduced crime. The larger location in the heart of Eugene’s downtown positions Tailored to be the go-to shop for coffee enthusiasts, locals, and tourists alike, and it emphasizes Eugene’s burgeoning local coffee culture. A custom pinwheel-shaped counter and retail display furniture unites the space. The counter differentiates cafe, retail, roastery, and staff areas while simultaneously providing circulation guidelines and cohesion in a large space.


Floor Plan

West Exterior Elevation


Public Square Exterior Perspective


Cafe Perspective

North-South Section


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DISPLAY SHELVING DISPLAY SHELVING

Wood countertop Embedded L-Brackets TYP. Purse hook 1x2 Blocking TYP. 3/4” Plywood structure TYP. 3/4” Plywood Service Shelving TYP.

CAFÉ COUNTER COUNTER CAFE

Wood finish Cavities for Plumbing and Electricity DISPLAY PLATFORMS

Plumbing, electric

DISPLAY PLATFORMS

1x2 Wood base structure

Custom Counter Diagram: Box + Shelf

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Coffee Bar Detail

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DISPLAY SHELVING

CAFE COUNTER

DISPLAY PLATFORMS

Retail Storage

Espresso Station

Retail Checkout Coffee Ground Disposal

Custom Counter Elevation Detail

Refrigerator

Coffee Bar

Plumbing + Electricity


ROOFTOP SOL Powers 100%

AMPLE DAYLIGHT

2

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HUD Innovation in Affordable Housing

Location Santa Barbara, CA Competition Entry February 2016 Group Members Lyndsey Deaton, Andrew JepsonSullivan, Emily Brown, Isabela Rivera, Alex Bibb

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Finishing as a top 10 semi-finalist out of over 100 entries, this project focused on reinventing the relationship between water and the residents of Southern California to foster a healthy respect for the role of water in nature while educating people about its true costs and appropriate uses. Architectural form takes inspiration from the site’s history, context, and mild climate. Massing and siting apply urban design patterns that promote security and a comfortable pedestrian experience, resulting in a mixed-use anchor for the neighborhood. The design is the product of the work of a multidisciplinary team and the experience was collaborative every step of the way. The team met regularly to coordinate research efforts and collaborate on design decisions. My primary role was the team’s 3D modeler, using Revit 2016 to build and render.

1 GREY WATER + BLACK WATER The system intakes water from greywater sources (showers, faucets, laundry) & blackwater sources (toilets, kitchen sinks).

2 ANOXIC TAN sold particle introduces e bacteria to d organic mat


LAR PHOTOVOLTAICS % of electricity demand

NK Allows the es to settle and engineered digest the tter.

REDUCE WATER-USE All water-using appliances and fixtures have the EPA’s WaterSense label.

VIEWS FROM UNITS TO COURTYARD

RAINWATER CAPTURE The rooftop is designed to capture over 330,000 gallons of rainwater annually. The dramatic movement of water cascading from the roof channel to the second story cistern sends a powerful message about the source of water used on-site. Balcony cisterns direct water into subterranean storage tanks for filtration; rainwater meets 100% of the community’s irrigation and recreation needs. Atop the tower, a sizeable solar hot water cistern meets the water needs of the community outreach offices and the cooperative.

ROOFTOP SPOUT Visual connection from roof to ground

STOOPS Stairs are a gathering place for residents of all ages.

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ON-SITE WATER RE-CYCLE (OWR) The OWR system merges innovative technology with ecological processes to effectively treat and reuse wastewater on-site. The replicable OWR model’s smaller infrastructure footprint and lighter carbon footprint are appropriate for our national crisis of infrastructure degradation. The process mimics the efficient ecological processes of coastal wetlands combined with filtration and disinfection- all of which occur in subterranean tanks. Above ground, a series of connected vegetated swales with signage educate the community about the underground mechanics.

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RAINWATER CISTERNS

+ UNIVERSAL ACCESS

SUBTERRANEAN IRRIGATION

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NATIVE + DROUGHTRESISTANT PLANTS

+ + +

3 GRAVEL FILTERS Gravel attracts nutrients and deposits a high-quality effluent.

4 TIDAL CELLS Water is washed across a series of membranes.

5 ULTRA-VIOLET TREATMENT Water is disinfected through ultraviolet light and chlorine as needed.

6 STORAGE + USE Compliant with the California Plumbing Code and NSF 350, the treated water is stored underground for non-potable uses such as flushing toilets and mechanical systems.


N

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IN

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M

SO

LA

IC

RO

CL

IM

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/S

HA

AT E

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AL YS I

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Energy efficiency measures in the design including passive ventilation, day lighting, and tight insulation reduce the energy demand by 45%. The energy to meet remaining demand is sourced from rooftop solar panels as part of a public-private partnership. Monteria Plaza activates the corner, inviting transit riders, cyclists, and pedestrians to share the space. The community service outreach offices, classrooms, food trucks, and cooperative act as destinations, promoting pedestrian diversity. Encouraging this mix of users increases site security and contributes to the community’s value within the neighborhood.

RE

AL

PLAZA MANAGED BY SANTA BARBARA PARKS + REC Following construction, SBPR will enter into a management agreement with HASBC to operate and maintain Monteria Plaza as an asset to the surrounding community. This allows HASBC to focus on resident support while residents benefit from the plaza amenities.

ES

TA TE

S

HASBC RESIDENT SERVICES + COMMUNITY OUTREACH

PA RT N

ER

SH

IP

S

8 UNITS LEASED TO SBCC Santa Barbara Community College is actively seeking partners for student housing. Among low-income and first-generation college students, more than a third are parents.


CAR PARKS Consolidating cars into car parks enhances safe pedestrian access and reinforces the concept of walkable neighborhoods.

MONTERIA PLAZA SERVICE OUTREACH OFFICES + LEARNING CENTER BIKE PARKING (15)

LOW-IMPACT DEVELOPMENT 100% of the on-site runoff is filtered and absorbed by bioswales in the islands within and around the car park.

A

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WATER RIBBON

D

+ B

COMMUNITY GARDEN + PLAYGROUND

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+ +

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SOLAR PV

C F

01

5

G

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A CO-OPERTIVE (1 FLOOR) 1,080 SF

C RESIDENTIAL (3 FLOORS) 7,290 SF D RESIDENTIAL (2 FLOORS + TUCK-UNDER PARKING) 4,860 SF E RESIDENTIAL (2/3 FLOORS + TUCK-UNDER PARKING) 14,850 SF F RESIDENTIAL (2 FLOORS) 5,940 SF G FAMILY OPPORTUNITY CENTER (1 FLOOR) 1,100 SF

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SOLAR HOT WATER TOWER

+ EASEMENTS MAINTAINED

10

B SERVICE OUTREACH OFFICES, CLASSROOMS + RESIDENTIAL (3 FLOORS) 7,290 SF

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E

URBAN DESIGN Supports walkability by breaking the superblock in two, improving visual diversity, calming traffic, and increasing pedestrian connectivity without compromising safety.


Courtyard with Water Feature


The units are distinct, allowing for personalization and ownership. Defined entryways, visible from other units, increase security. Windows are oriented for natural cross-ventilation, views, and daylight. To accommodate individual indoor climate needs and seasonal peaks in temperature, the units have a multi-room ductless minisplit in the family areas coupled with an energy recovery ventilator.

10’-0” UP 8’-0”

DN DN

SECOND FLOOR

9’-0”

0 1

5

Floor 2 Plan

10

13’-0”

0 1

5

Floor 3 Plan

10

9’-0”

THIRD FLOOR

12’-0”


3

Cottage Grove Public Library

Location Cottage Grove, OR Architecture Design Studio Winter 2016 Professor Don Corner Knowledge, community, and contemporary mass timber technology meet on main street: a new public library occupies a corner in the heart of historic downtown Cottage Grove, Oregon. The design celebrates knowledge and community through light and vertical and horizontal sight lines. Located in a region in which timber plays a significant role in the local economy, the library’s structure showcases modern mass timber innovations. Columns and beams are gluelaminated wood. The innovative floor system is Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) with integrated services adapted from a case study of the University of British Columbia’s Wood Innovation Design Centre by Michael Green Architecture. The skylight with light shelves is also CLT, adapted from a case study of The Hive library in Worcester, England by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios.


Program areas are distributed around the atrium according to individual versus group users, responding to the atrium and to the context. Individual study areas are located around the perimeter, while group and communal areas are located both near the open atrium and overlooking the corner of Main Street and 7th Street (the parade street). Collections are located with sound compatibility in mind, with the most quiet spaces located on the third floor. It was a priority to spread staff offices out across the three floors in order to reduce the need for active surveillance.

Corner Perspective

MAIN STREET

PARADE STREET

LIBRARY

COMMUNITY

Main street, Historic Parade Street Community Center at Historic Armory

Vicinity Plan

PUBLIC PARK

Parti Diagram


MAKERSPACE

NONFICTION COLLECTION

TECH HELP

DESKTOPS

OPEN TO BELOW

STAFF WORK ROOM MULTIMEDIA

CAFE

SMALL MEETING ROOM

STORAGE

OFFICE OFFICE

STAFF WORK ROOM

Third Floor Plan

OFFICE

CIRCULATION DESK LARGE MEETING ROOM

GENEAOLOGY

STORAGE

GALLERY/LOBBY

SMALL MEETING ROOM

LIBRARIAN DIRECTOR OFFICE OFFICE

STORAGE

LOADING DOCK

STAFF BREAK

OPEN TO BELOW

CIRCULATION DESK

MULTIMEDIA

FICTION COLLECTION

FICTION COLLECTION

LARGE MEETING ROOM

TWEENS

TEENS

KITCHEN KITCHEN

CHILDREN’S LIBRARY

GALLERY/LOBBY

RECEPTION HALL

CHILDRENS’ BALCONY

LOADING DOCK

ALLEY

RECEPTION HALL

Ground Floor Plan

CAFE

ALLEY

Second Floor Plan

OFFICE


North-South Section Perspective

West-East Elevation

West-East Section


CLT Atrium Skylight

CLT Roof Enclosure

Glulam Beams

Glulam Columns

CLT floor structure with integrated systems

Level 1, 2 heavy timber structure Structural Axon

Second Floor Parkside Perspective


4

Lane County Courthouse

Location Eugene, OR Architecture Design Studio Spring 2016 Professor Gary Moye Completed in a studio course emphasizing hand drafting, this design for the new Lane County Courthouse in Eugene, Oregon uses light and sight lines as manifestations of the pursuit of justice. The 120,000 square foot program with complex relationships between user groups required rigorous analysis. Spatial and circulation solutions were developed without sacrificing the creation of inspired spaces. I expanded the program to account for the increased role of mediation in the judicial process. I emphasized this mediation option with prominent front-facade placement of the mediation rooms.


Rendered Ground Floor Plan


Level 2 Plan - Typical Courtroom Floor Layout


In this courthouse design, daylight is used as a metaphor for the pursuit of justice and for transparency. It was important that each courtroom have some access to daylight, which was a challenge due to the constraints of the site. This light access is accomplished by a large lightwell in the center of the building that is wide enough to allow daylight to reach the lowest floors. The floor plan balances that need for light access with the need for separate judge, prisoner, and jury circulation pathways. A large atrium space carries the light metaphor to the public circulation areas,

North-South Section

and the ability to look from the ground floor and from other levels at the court entries is an important symbol of transparency. The law library is given a symbolic position above the public entry. Law is a practice based on precedent, and the library’s prominent placement emphasizes this fundamental fact.


North-South Elevation


5

Occupiable Mosaic

Location Copenhagen, Denmark Urban Design Studio Summer 2016 Professor Michela Nota Blågårds Plads is a public square located in Copenhagen, Denmark in Nørrebro, one of Copenhagen’s 10 official districts. The space is dominated by a large rectangular sunken square that was built in the early 20th century and is a protected historic landmark. Nørrebro is the most multicultural district in the city; 26% of residents are immigrants or descendants of immigrants, mostly Muslims of Middle Eastern origin. Blågårds Plads, surrounded by a Kulturhuset (Culture House), a library, and several popular cafés, is a focal point for the life of the neighborhood. This redesign aims to evolve the square’s image and identity to celebrate Blågårds Plads and Nørrebro district today. Mosaics, patterns made up of many distinct pieces arranged together to create a complete work of art, form part of a rich Islamic artistic culture in the Middle East. Nørrebro is a cultural mosaic in modern-day Copenhagen. In a time of global division, mistrust, and lack of understanding about Islam and its followers, this design seeks to promote cross-cultural dialogue and education while celebrating community.


GIRIH PATTERN

PAVER PATTERN BASE

FLEXIBLE FURNITURE

OCCUPIABLE MOSAIC SEATING


Vicinity Plan

DESIRE LINES

Desire Lines

Site Plan

Amenities


FALL EQUINOX

WINTER SOLSTICE

SPRING EQUINOX

SUMMER SOLSTICE

Solar Analysis

TODESGADE

Site Section

MOSAIC PLAYGROUND

HISTORIC SQUARE

MOSAIC SEATING

BLÅGÅRDSGADE


Mosiac Seating Perspective


6

Other Work

Market Hall Truss Pembe Tatu Pavilion Flyve Luminaire Hendrick’s Hall Remodel Proposal The work represented on the following pages consists of smaller-scale projects that have been important in my development as a designer. Each of these projects was done as part of a partnership or a team. Collaborating and working in a group is an environment in which I thrive, and I enjoy the process of brainstorming and debating ideas with team mates invested in a common goal. I have made a significant personal impact on each project or element of a project represented here.


Market Hall Truss Location Big Sur, CA Structure Course Winter 2016 Professor Mark Donofrio Partner Valentina Leoni This market hall design focuses on the relationships between light, structure, circulation, and program. Where the top chords of the timber truss would normally meet, the tip is instead cropped, allowing light to stream in through the central axis of the space. Structurally this is made possible by a 1.5” diameter steel rod, which resolves the compression forces from the two top chords. This path of light aligns with the opening width on each end of the structure, and emphasizes the central cirulation zone, while flooding the entire hall with daylight. The central pathway would be flanked by a row of market stalls on each side, as seen in the design sketch on the following page. The trusses rest on rammed earth walls, and stall organization would be regulated by the truss spaces, which at 5’ on center accommodates either 10’- or 15’-wide stalls.


’1 = 23/3 | NOITCES

’1 - dn23/3 | NALP

Custom finFin Customsteel Steel 4x4 DF-L select 4x4 DF-L Select structural Structural 1/2” 1/2”Steel steelbolt bolt

’05

50’

30’

4x4 DF-L select Select structural Structural Custom steel Custom SteelfinFin

snilrup

noitalusni digir

gnikced evoorg ni egnuot

htal

enarbmem foorp retaw

PLAN Plan | 3/32nd - 1’

50’

htal dial ylralucidneprep

30’

selgnihs doow

1/2” Steel 1/2” steel bolt bolt

’03

LLAH TEKRAM EHT

THE MARKET HALL

Custom finFin Customsteel Steel 4x4 DF-L select 4x4 DF-L Selectstructural Structural

4x4 DF-L Select Structural

wood shingles

Wood shingles lath Lath perpendicularly laid lath Lath laid perpendicularly water proof membrane Waterproof membrane rigid insulation Rigid insulation tounge in groove decking Tongue-in-groove decking

Custom Steel Fin 1/2” steel bolt

purlins Purlins

Section SECTION | 3/32 = 1’

Design Sketch


Pembe Tatu Pavilion Location Africa Prototyping Wood Course Winter 2016 Professor Mark Donofrio Team Members Garrett Mitchell, Alex Padgett, Jenni Huynh The Pembe Tatu (“triangular” in Swahili) team had spent the term studying vernacular and contemporary African architecture. The final project called for an Expo Pavilion with a wood connection inspired by our area of study. 60% of urban dwellers in Africa live in slums. Our pavilion would be returned to one of these sites after the Expo, and we designed it with three principles in mind: • Keep members small and lightweight, make it easy to disassemble, transport, and reassemble with simple tools and unskilled labor. • Take inspiration from African Vernacular architecture, considering organic forms and common building practices explored in earlier studies. • Design a module that could be repeated, enabling simple mass pre-fabrication, transport, and ease of assembly. The components are made from 1/4” plywood using a CNC router. The open-air pavilion can be clad with sheet material, or modules can be filled in with mud or left open as windows similar to some vernacular African architecture.


Clips bend and splay outward to hold the shape of the module

11 kerf slits are centered 6” long + 1/4” wide Inner Radii are “dog-boned” to allow for tight fit of interlocking pieces Female slots for spoke connection held in tension

Unit #1 “Spoke”

Unit #2 “Plate”

Connecting the Module

Module Connections

Unit #3 “Web”

Unit #4 “Kerfed Ply”


Flyve Luminaire Location Eugene, OR ECS II Course Winter 2016 Professor Ihab Elzeyadi Team Members Susanna Davy, Gillian Hevey Flyve is a decorative luminaire designed to provide ambient light and display of brilliance to a reading nook in the Smith Family Bookstore’s downtown loaction. The reading nook space is defined by a nearly 8 sqft skylight in the center, with a flared ceiling distributing daylight. Flyve interacts with the daylight from the skylight when the lamp is turned off. When electric lighting is necessary, the luminaire’s soft white LED lamp complements the warm colors of the parchment and gold folded papers. Light from the LED is allowed to escape through the top of the luminaire to wash the light shelf, providing an ambient layer of light in the space. The folded papers protect the bulb from emitting too much glare and provide a layer of sparkle trickling down into the space as they interact with light sources. The delicate nature of the folded papers contrasts with the golden rods from which they hang, adding interest to the flyve silhouette.


from the skylight when the lamp is SECTION off. When electric lighting is neces the luminaire’s soft white LED lamp complements the warm colors of DESIGN INTENT parchment and gold folded pape PHOTOMETRIC DATA Light from the LED is allowed to es flyve is a decorative luminaire designed 175 180 180 1 165 the top of the 155 luminaire to to provide ambient light and displaythrough of 145 the light shelf, providing an ambie brilliance to a reading nook in the Smith 135 80 Family Bookstore. The reading nook of light in the space. 70 125 60 space is defined by a nearly 8-squareThe folded papers protect the 50bul 115 foot sky light in the center, witha flared 40 30 105 much glare, and prov ceiling distributing daylight. flyve is emitting too 20 a layer of sparkle trickling down in designed to interact with the daylight 95 10 the space 90as they interact with0 th from the skylight when the lamp is turned 85 10 light sources. The delicate nature off. When electric lighting is necessary, ELEVATION 20 Section Elevation SECTION folded papers contrasts with the g 75 30 the luminaire’s soft white LED lamp 40 rods from whichthey hang, adding complements the warm colors of the 65 to the flyve silhouette. 5060 A parchment and gold folded papers.interest 55 B 70 Light from the LED is allowed to escape MATERIALS 45 80 through the topPoint of A:the luminaire to wash 90 35 60 Watt Soft White LED Lightbulb FC = (79.6) x cos(90) 25 the light shelf, providing an ambientWestinghouse layer 15 2.5” push-through socket (8’1/16”) 2 5 0 0 5 of light in the space. Lampe shade wire form, cut FC = 1.24 Steel wire mesh LAMP SPECIFICATIONS Steel Insulation Support Rods The folded papers protect the bulb from CRI 80 Point B: 24 Gauge Jewelry Wire emitting too much glare, and provide 815 lumens FC = (71.2) x cos(16) Parchment Paper 2 Height = 25’ a layer of sparkle trickling down intoShimmery Translucent (8’4-1/16”) 2700 KCeiling Gold Paper the space asFC they Actual wattage: 11 = .98 interact with the Invisible Thread Gold Spray Paint light sources. The delicate nature ofMetallic the E6000 Auto/Industrial Adhesive Point C: folded papers contrasts with the golden Ceiling reflectance = 65 ELEVATION Epoxy Putty for Metals FC = (27) x cos(90) rods from whichthey hang, adding 2 Krazy Glue Task Surface Height = interest to the (15’) C flyve silhouette. 3’ above floor FC = .12 REFLECTED CEILING PLAN MATERIALS PLAN

PLAN Plan

SECTION

Flyve

Point Source Calculations (FC = “Foot Candles”)

60 Watt Soft White LED Lightbulb Westinghouse 2.5” push-through socket Lampe shade wire form, cut Steel wire mesh


Hendrick’s Hall Remodel Location Eugene, OR Professional Project Spring 2016 Professor Rob Thallon Team Members Garrett Mitchell, Sam Clagett Tasked with developing ideas for improving the University of Oregon’s architecture and planning facilities, a team of three UO architecture students and one architecture professor met weekly to brainstorm and provide feedback on each students’ independent work. My primary role was producing images of Hendrick’s Hall for the purpose of soliciting donors. The remodel would transform a building currently filled with small offices into a new space for the PPPM department containing a large classroom, a small classroom, administrative offices, and the restoration of an historic entry on the east side of the building.


Design goals for this project included exposing the historic timber truss, programming adequately sized classroom, administrative, and lobby spaces, and creating an inspiring environment for Planning, Public Policy, and Management (PPPM) students. On-site documentation and historic plans from the early 20th century informed the creation of a 3D Revit model of the space, which was used to fuel discussion in weekly charrettes.

Small Classroom New1,090 sf flexible classroom accommodates up to 54 seats

Administration office space 184 sf New 525 sf room can be used for seminars, conference room, or classroom for up to 26 students

DN

Potential restoration of historic entry

Exit corridor with seating and display areas for exhibiting PPPM work

Annotated Floorplan

Large Classroom


“First life, then spaces, then buildings - the other way around never works.� -Jan Gehl University of Oregon | M. Arch, M. Iarc 2018 | mollyetaylor.com | taylor.mollye@gmail.com | 202.365.4277

Molly E Taylor Portfolio  

www.mollyetaylor.com

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