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February 28, 2019


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VISION

ACK NOW L EDGMENT S

MAYOR:

Mike Rawlings

CITY MANAGER:

City Manager - T.C. Broadnax

CITY COUNCIL: 1 - Scott Griggs

2 - Adam Medrano 3 - Casey Thomas, II 4 - Carolyn King Arnold 5 - Rickey D. Callahan 6 - Omar Narvaez 7 - Kevin Felder 8 - Tennell Atkins 9 - Mark Clayton 10 -   Adam McGough 11 -   Lee M. Kleinman

PARK BOARD:

TBG PARTNERS INC.

2 - Jesse Moreno

Mark Meyer, Principal

3 - Taylor Toynes

Sherri Collison, Project Manager

4 - Harrison Blair

Gabriela Weber, Designer

5 - Yolanda F. Williams

Elizabeth Levkulich, Associate

1 - Barbara Barbee

6 - Timothy W. Dickey 7 - Sonya Woods 8 - Bo Slaughter 9 - Becky Rader 10 -   Robb Stewart

Jim Mansky, President

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND: Diane Regas, President & CEO

Adrian Benepe, Senior Vice President, Director of National Programs - Create Robert Kent, North Texas Area Director

11 -   Jeff Kitner

Molly Plummer, North Texas Parks for People Program Manager

12 -   Rodney Schlosser

Devin Girod, Texas Dircector of Philanthropy

13 -   Calvert Collins-Bratton

Matt Moffa, Conservation Planning Project Manager

14 -   Paul Sims

Mitchel Hannon- Senior GIS Analyst

PARK AND RECREATION STAFF:

12 -   Sandy Greyson

Willis C. Winters, Director

Emmalee Dolfi, Senior Manager of Enterprise Data Systems

13 -   Jennifer Staubach Gates

John Jenkins, Deputy Directory

Lindsay Withers, Senior Cartography Manager

14 -   Phillip T. Kingston

Louise Elam, Assistant Director

Danny Paez, Cartography Associate

Peter Bratt, Chief of Staff, Manager II

Seema Kairam, Rose Fellow Studying Housing Equity and Displacement - St. Paul, Parks for People Program Magager

PARK BOARD PRESIDENT Robert Abtahi

Jason Ney, Park Planning and Acquisition Manager Leong Lim, Site Development and Engineering

Kiest Conservation Area


F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

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TA BL E OF CONT ENT S

01   Introduction

7

Corridor Overview & History History Scope

02   Community Engagement

13

Timeline Stakeholder Meetings Community Outreach Community Engagement Community Surveys

03   Context 

25

Parks Strategy New Park Prioritization Recommendations

99

Future Study Areas

33

Urban Greenbelt Vision Vision Elements Resiliency in the Corridor Green Priorities Social Priorities Green Solutions Community Resiliency Growth & Equity

05   Park Sites Vision

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Trail Vision Proposed Trail Alignments Focus Area A Focus Area B Focus Area C Focus Area D Focus Area E Focus Area F Focus Area G Focus Area H Cost & Phasing Trail Prioritization Recommendations

07   Future Study Areas

Local Context Hydrological Context Parks & Open Space Context

04   Urban Greenbelt Vision

06   Trail Vision

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09   Appendix Select Survey Preference Questions 10-Minute Walk Project Impact: Trails

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VISION

Forward

PARK AND RECREATION DIRECTOR WILLIS WINTERS, FAIA

The Dallas Park and Recreation Department has a proud legacy dating back to 1876, with the establishment of the city’s first park, City Park. Through acquisition and generous donations, our system has grown as the city has grown and now encompasses close to 400 parks totaling more than 21,000 acres. The Dallas Park and Recreation Department’s mission is to champion lifelong recreation and serve as a responsible steward of the city’s parks, trails, and open spaces. With that mission in mind, the Department’s vision for the future is for a comprehensive system of parks, trails, open spaces, and recreation facilities that sustains, inspires, and invigorates. A crucial component of this vision is protecting and providing access to Dallas’ natural beauty. Sharing geologic roots with the Texas Hill

Country, southwest Dallas County is home to some of our city’s most important landscapes, from the fossilized shells of an ancient inland sea, to the namesake escarpment of Oak Cliff. Over eons, Five Mile Creek and its tributaries have carved out the hills and valleys of Southern Dallas, creating a landscape unique within our city and worthy of celebrating. Once complete, the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt will be an important repository of historic landscapes and natural beauty for Dallas. In our files I have letters from the Park Department Director in 1952 encouraging the Public Works Department to develop Five Mile Creek into a parkway, much like the Turtle Creek Parkway. While the Department was able to slowly develop some crucial parks in this corridor, including heavily visited

facilities such as Glendale and Kiest Park, no comprehensive vision has been established for the entire greenbelt—until now. This is why the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Master Plan is so important. Thanks to the leadership of the Trust for Public Land and the input of community stakeholders and organizations, we now have a master plan for the full realization of Five Mile Creek’s potential. The Five Mile Creek Greenbelt will connect our existing parks with both nature and trails, preserve natural space in a growing part of our city, and provide outstanding recreational opportunities for residents. I applaud the efforts of our many stakeholders and thank you for developing this plan. Regards,

Willis C. Winters

Five Mile Creek near Kiest Conservation Area and Rugged Drive


F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

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Communit y Voices

AMANDA JOHNSON

BOB MONG

CHRIS DOWDY

ELLEN FITZSIMMONS

MARK MEYER

Southern Hills Neighborhood Association, Vice President

University of North Texas at Dallas, President

Paul Quinn College, Vice President of Academic Affairs

Friends of Oak Cliff Parks

Principal, TBG Partners

The Five Mile Creek is the northern border of the Southern Hills neighborhood. The creek and its surrounding green space is the location for many neighborhood block parties and gatherings, dog walking, and playtime for the children. Southern Hills considers Five Mile Creek a beautiful part of our neighborhood. Last summer, I decided to call family and friends over for a friendly game of soccer. We decided to have our game at the Five Mile Creek in Southern Hills because it is a wide open space within walking distance from our home. Needless to say, we had a blast and even decided to explore the creek beds for fossils after our game. We would greatly benefit from the installation of a gazebo and tables for parties and gatherings, a covered playground for the children to play, and a wide sidewalk for families and seniors to walk, run, and ride bikes. The creek suffers from erosion and needs to be preserved by installing retaining walls to reduce erosion. Safety is a big concern for us, and it will be essential to add enough lighting to light the walking path, but low enough not to disturb the home across the street.

A greenbelt along Five Mile Creek would be a huge asset for UNT Dallas. Environmental learning is a discipline in which we would like to grow, and this type of asset would help us recruit talented faculty and improve the quality-of-life for our students and campus. It would be an awakening to see this unfold.

NANCY WHITE

“The waterways and green spaces around Paul Quinn College have the capacity to become wonderful parts of our city’s resilience systems and social infrastructure – if only we have the vision. Our students deserve a rich understanding of the natural world. Five Mile Creek presents an educational opportunity to tie what we teach in the classroom with the surrounding environment.”

“Five Mile Creek is a place of nature in our city’s own backyard. This urban wilderness is home to old growth burr oaks, blackland prairie, and migrating birds. Trails, interpretive signage, and educational programming would help everyone access the creek and enjoy its natural beauty.”

This is a plan not created by a team of designers but by a community that is investing their time and energy creating a network of social connections though open space that will be a foundation to improve the daily lives not only for them but for their children and future generations. This forward thinking by the community enables them to control how this plan is designed and implemented giving them the ability to be the owners of the plan.

Community Member

M JOYCE BROWN

Outstanding proposal. Love the way the organizations included community partners in providing input.

TONYA ROYAL Glendale Park Resident I am excited about the Five Mile Creek Project. Young adults, older adults, and children will benefit a lot form this great work.

Community Member This is something that is needed for Oak Cliff.

ELENA STEPHENS Oak Cliff Resident since 1984 Love the inclusive planning process, I am happy to see trails connecting more parts of Oak Cliff and Dallas.

BARBARA MACLEOD Brettonwoods Neighborhood Association, President. Friends of Oak Cliff Parks Volunteer This trail plan is a much needed connector for southern citizens for recreation, transportation, and most importantly, greenspace.

Community ownership is stronger than any single city policy or ordinance, this ownership creates pride, community connections and dedication to making sure the community holds together that gives hope and inspiration. I believe this plan creates hope and inspiration.


6


01   Introduction

View of Five Mile Creek


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INTRODUCTION

VISION

Corridor Overview & History

OVERVIEW A Greenbelt Corridor for Dallas From its source near Dallas Executive Airport, Five Mile Creek runs for 15 miles through the hills and valleys of southwest Dallas, draining an approximately 70-square mile area of the city. Before merging with the Trinity River near the Joppa Preserve, the creek and its tributaries pass through some of Dallas’ last remaining heritage landscapes, untouched by the cycle of surrounding development. Cedar brakes and riparian woodlands rise out of its layers of Austin chalk and Eagle Ford shale, and patches of blackland prairie can be found in the uplands. With development in the City accelerating, the need to protect and provide access to these natural places could not be more urgent. The Trust for Public Land, TBG Partners, and City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department have worked with Southern Dallas residents to create a community-oriented master plan for a network of parks, trails, and preserves called the Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt. This greenbelt will protect some of the last untouched heritage landscapes in Dallas, provide public access to new trails and green space, improve the environmental health of

the Trinity River, create connections between Southern Dallas neighborhoods, and provide outdoor education opportunities. Only 60% of Dallas residents live within a 10-minute walk to a park or a 1/4 mile walk to a trail. Residents and communities within the Five Mile Creek watershed desire closeto-home, quality parks that provide access to nature, outdoor recreation, community gathering spaces, connected trails, and the environmental and health benefits that these greenspaces provide. Utilizing a planning framework based on the existing forest ecology and stream system close to the Great Trinity Forest, there is the opportunity to create a network of parks, trails, and nature areas throughout the Five Mile Creek watershed. By planning and designing for both neighborhood and community parks and conserving valuable environmental assets, the Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt addresses key outdoor and recreation needs of Southern Dallas. Along Five Mile Creek, creating parks for people means providing multiple nature experiences, from community parks with picnic tables and playgrounds, to health and wellness trails, to access of Dallas’ beautiful urban

wilderness areas. This network of parks, trails, and preserves will not only increase community greenspaces and serve local residents, but provide people with unparalleled access to the natural heritage of Five Mile Creek—and ensure that it is protected for generations to come.

DALLAS GREEN LEGACY The City Beautiful Since the early 20th century, Dallas has aimed to include parks, trails, and greenspaces in city planning mechanisms. The city’s first official comprehensive plan, The Kessler City Plan for Dallas, encapsulated the city’s aspirations as a part of “The City Beautiful” movement that aimed to combine nature and infrastructure to create green veins of aesthetic beauty across the city. Although only portions of plan were implemented, this concept was continued in various planning measures and documents throughout the 20th century. Several parks within the Five Mile Creek Watershed were built prior to 1940, including Kiest Park and Glendale Park, completed in 1930 and 1938 respectively.

Great Trinity Forest AT&T Trail

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INTRODUCTION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

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HISTORY

HISTORY Green and Grey Infrastructure after The Kessler Plan Five Mile Creek Parkway was proposed in the 1944 Bartholomew Plan for Dallas. The plan states that the many creeks that drain into the Trinity River, including Five Mile Creek, “offer opportunities for the use of open drainage channels with attractive boulevards on each side, such as Turtle Creek Boulevard.”1 Turtle Creek is Dallas’ most fully realized expression of the “City Beautiful” urban planning movement. The only implemented parkway from the Kessler Plan, Turtle Creek is still a signature park asset for Dallas, demonstrating the value of integrating recreation and park access along stream corridors. The other major parkway called for in the Kessler Plan, Mill Creek, was never built. In 1952 L.B. Houston, the Director of the Dallas Parks Department made this recommendation for a Five Mile Creek Parkway: “The long range plan completed in 1944 proposed to create a parkway along Five Mile Creek from the Trinity River westward to connect Glendale Park with Kiest Park, and also including several tributary channels. Similar recommendations were made for the preservation of White Rock Creek and other comparable waterways.”

The Director recommended the development of a unified plan and policy to preserve Five Mile Creek as a parkway, similar to the Kessler 1 2 3

Plan’s approach to Turtle Creek. Without planning and protection of the watershed, he feared Five Mile Creek would face the same fate as Mill Creek Channelized and eventually buried to make room for impending private development, Mill Creek was an example of mid-20th century urban planning practices that contributed to urban inequity.2 Current Significance Today, many of Dallas’s stream corridors have become highly valued public resources, providing considerable recreational, environmental, and economic benefits to surrounding neighborhoods and the city as a whole. White Rock Lake, the White Rock Creek Trail, and Turtle Creek Parkway remain some of the city’s most treasured and utilized parks. With proper planning and implementation, a park and trail network along Five Mile Creek and its tributaries could become an important green asset for Southern Dallas. The City of Dallas has developed many parks and trails throughout the Five Mile Creek corridor, but the Bartholomew Plan’s proposed parkway was never fully developed. Glendale Park and Kiest Park were completed before 1940, Arden Terrace and College Park were completed between 1958 and 1962, and the majority of the existing Five Mile Creek Greenbelt was implemented between 1968 and 1997. Today, the City is preparing develop a new community— informed master plan for Glendale Park. Each of these investments represent progress toward the decades-old

concept of a continuous greenbelt along Five Mile Creek— a vision that today Dallas has the opportunity to fully realize. In the 1980s, the Five Mile Creek area experienced high levels of flooding, prompting residents to request better solutions from the City of Dallas.3 The creek was channelized and engineered to mitigate flooding from stormwater. Continuing the tradition of integrating green and grey infrastructure and using creekways as opportunities for more parks, trails, and greenspace, designers can protect the remaining natural part of Five Mile Creek and its tributaries before grey solutions are necessary. The goal of this document is to compile and expand upon the current park and trail plans for Five Mile Creek, maintaining the spirit of the prior plans. This plan comes at an important inflection point in Dallas’ history: Southern Dallas is enjoying rapid economic growth and expansion, and now is the time for thoughtful preservation of natural open spaces for the enjoyment and benefit of future generations in the southern sector. The Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt proposes enhancing access to the creek and its tributaries through trails, as well as conserving and remediating land that drains into the creek, thus protecting and restoring its natural ecology. By following the creek’s many tributaries, the greenbelt network brings nature to people, and in doing so, helps nearby communities experience the benefits that this green, connected corridor provides.

Harland Bartholomew and Associates, 1943. Your Dallas of Tomorrow: A Master Plan for a Greater Dallas. Dallas, Texas. Dallas Municipal Archives. Dallas (Tex.). Park Department. Dallas Park Board Minutes, Book 11, 1946/1953. Dallas Municipal Archives. KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.). News Clip: 5 Mile Creek, June 7, 1989; Fort Worth, Texas. UNT Libraries Special Collections.


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INTRODUCTION

VISION

Scope

SCOPE Overview This document addresses three key elements of the Five Mile Creek watershed. First, it serves to compile existing plan documents for parks and trails in the watershed, analyze gaps, and proposes new parks and trails in the corridor to improve close-to-home park access for Southern Dallas residents, as defined by The Trust for Public Land’s “10-Minute Walk” standard. Secondly, this document synthesizes a highlevel community engagement process to visualize the possibilities for an interconnected series of parks, trails, and greenspaces along Five Mile Creek and its tributaries. Finally, this document proposes development recommendations for implementation by not just public agencies, but other non-profit partners and the private sector. This plan casts a vision for greenspace development and investment that creates a healthy, connected, and resilient Southern Dallas.

Activities 1  Ten focus group interviews with key stakeholders, including political leadership, Dallas Park Department staff, local education institutions, and potential implementation partners 2  Three public visioning workshops with communities in the communities 3  One community survey

Vision Deliverables • Community Vision • Current Context -- Existing plans and assets

• Guiding Equitable Development Principles • Overall Greenbelt Vision Plan -- New Park Areas -- Programming Examples -- Parcel Prioritization Recommendations

• Five Mile Creek Watershed Trail Network -- Additions to Dallas Trail Network -- Trail Type and Programming Example -- Implementation Prioritization Recommendations

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F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

STUDY AREA MAP

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02   Community Engagement

Community Meetings


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COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

VISION

2.0

T imeline Community town halls are completed.

Planning work was completed in December 2018 and submitted for review in January 2019 with anticipated park board adoption in February 2018.

Stakeholder meetings and planning work continued.

TPL City of Dallas Park and Recreation Director and staff assigned to the project.

OCTOBER 2018

TBG Partners joins the project as a key partner.

The Trust for Public Land initiated public survey and outreach.

COMPLETION

Stakeholder meetings and planning work continued.

JUNE 2018

AUGUST 2018

NOVEMBER 2018 Project stakeholder meetings are completed.

SEPTEMBER 2018 TPL initiated open-house style community meetings.

JULY 2018 Stakeholders are contacted and interviews are initiated with political leadership and city staff.

PROJECT KICKOFF After studying the corridor, Trust for Public Land embarked on a master plan process to gauge potential, community visioning for the corridor, and feasibility of park land acquisition, planning, and design.

Technical planning work began.

Project partners attended National Night Out at Glendale Park. Stakeholder meetings and planning work continued.

Final planning with and recommendations are completed.


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COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

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F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

Stakeholder Meet ings

OVERVIEW

The interviews for this project were crucial in providing context and deeper understanding of the key parks and open space needs of Southern Dallas. Interview findings will inform later phases of the project. Interviewees were asked about their experiences, including needs, desires, gaps, opportunities, and challenges.

INTERVIEW OBJECTIVES • Identify planning goals, opportunities, and constraints; • Gain a better understanding of the existing conditions, priorities and related initiatives (including any additional opportunities for collaboration in this effort); • Gain insight into potential implementation strategies; • Gain insight into existing arts and cultural programming in and around parks; • Identify additional individuals and groups to involve. • Begin community outreach and build partnerships.

INTERVIEWEES 1  City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department Meeting -- Willis Winters, Director -- Jason Ney, Park Planning and Acquisition Manager -- Peter Bratt, Chief of Staff, Manager II

2  City of Dallas Park Board Representative Meeting 1

10  Friends of Oak Cliff Parks -- Jon Papp, President

-- District 8 Representative Bo Slaughter

-- Ellen Fitzsimmons, Vice President

-- Roddrick West

-- Barbara Barbee, City of Dallas Park and Recreation Liason, Park Board Representative for District 1

3  City of Dallas Park Board Representative Meeting 2 -- District 3 Representative Taylor Toynes, founder of For Oak Cliff

4  City of Dallas Park Board Representative Meeting 3 -- District 4 Representative Harrison Blair

5  City of Dallas Park Council Member Meeting 1 -- District 8 Representative Tennell Atkins

6  City of Dallas Park Council Member Meeting 2 -- District 8 Representative Casey Thomas

7  Former City Plan Commission and Bond Task Force Member -- District 1 Representative, Chad West

8  City of Dallas Office of Environmental Quality and Sustainability -- James McGuire, Managing Director -- Susan Alvarez, Assistant Director

9  County + Council of Government Planning and Trail Representatives -- Rick Loessberg, Dallas County, Director of Planning & Development -- Micah Baker, Dallas County Public Works, Senior Transportation Planner -- Komala Nappa, Dallas County Public Works, Project Manager Trails and Open Space Planning and Development -- Kevin Kokes, North Central Texas Council of Governments Transportation, Sustainable Development Program Manager

11  University of North Texas at Dallas -- Robert “Bob” Mong, President -- Monica Williams, Vice President for University Advancement and President of the UNTD Foundation

12  City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department Meeting 2

-- Louise Elam, Assistant Director, Planning & Facilities, with Jason Ney and Peter Bratt

13  Paul Quinn College -- Dr. Michael Sorrell, President -- Chris Dowdy, Vice President of Academic Affairs

14  Groundworks Dallas -- Rick Buckley, Executive Director

15  Bluitt-Flowers and Parkland Staff -- Representatives from Community Services, Planning Design & Construction,

INVESTIGATIVE MEETINGS 16  Opportunity Dallas -- Christie Myers, Managing Director

17  City of Dallas Planning and Urban Design -- Don Raines, Jr., Senior Planner

18  buildingcommunityWORKSHOP -- Lizzie MacWillie, Associate Director -- Lisa Neergaard, Senior Policy Manager


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COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

VISION

Communit y Outreach

DESIGNING WITH COMMUNITIES

The Trust for Public Land believes community engagement and participatory design are key components of any strategy to assist communities as they plan, fund, and implement their conservation and park priorities. “Community engagement” refers to the process by which The Trust for Public Land builds ongoing relationships with local organizations and residents for the purpose of planning and creating parks and open spaces that contribute to healthy, livable communities. “Participatory design” refers to a set of activities, events, and conversations with community stakeholders to directly involve them in the design and development of their public greenspaces. These two principles form the foundation of strong design and long-term community stewardship of community parks. In addition to community engagement and participatory design, the core team has been building relationships through presence and project work. The City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department has been working on numerous projects in the corridor through the 2017 Bond Program, such as the new master plan for Glendale Park. The Trust for Public Land has been working in the area on an initiative called “Cool and Connected Oak Cliff”, a partnership with Texas Trees Foundation and The Nature Conservancy to plant 1,000 trees in the South Oak Cliff neighborhood to increase pedestrian connectivity and combat the urban heat island effect.

A Collaborative Process

Core Principles

Trust for Public Land, in partnership with the City of Dallas and TBG Partners, led the community outreach and engagement process for the Five Mile Creek master plan. Close collaboration with local non-profits, neighborhood associations, and other community-based organizations was key to our engagement strategy. The Trust for Public Land’s community engagement process is driven by the belief that expertise on place is local and including stakeholders in the design of their greenspaces leads to greater success. Robust engagement with local communities is essential to creating successful community spaces.

This process is driven by Trust for Public Land’s core principles, and our goal was to reach as many community members as possible through a variety of meeting formats.

When community stakeholders and residents having a meaningful voice in a park’s development, the design and stewardship of these greenspaces are better than projects that do not incorporate holistic and thorough engagement. Engagement can also empower communities to catalyze and build support for other projects, bringing critical resources to underserved communities. Most important, the approach of bringing a community together in support of a common goal strengthens the social fabric of the neighborhood, which leads to community pride.

Community engagement event at For Oak Cliff

1  Empathy 2  Humility 3  Transparency 4  Accountability 5  Inclusivity 6  Equity Engagement Formats • Community Open Houses Three targeted community meetings with participatory design and engagement activities.

• Stakeholder Meetings Individual and small group interviews about regional and local context, opportunities and constraints, relevant work examples, and desires for parks and trails.

• Community Survey A web-based survey to explore desired park and trail types, programming features, and community needs.

Community engagement event at For Oak Cliff

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COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

ENGAGEMENT FEEDBACK MAP

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Beckley Saner Park

KIEST PARK

Clinton P Russell Elem School

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Boude Storey Middle School

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Clara Oliver Elem School

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Whitney M VA young Jr Elem HOSPITAL School New Tech High School

Sarah Zumwalt Middle School

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Beckley Heighs Park

Fellowship Christian Academy

KiPP Destiny Elem School

TG Terry Elem School

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David W Carter High School

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Five Mile Creek

Legend - Challenges sidewalk improvement needed trail under construction

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Legend - Challenges

Legend - Opportunities

Legend - Opportunities

Highland Hills Park

Alta Mesa Park

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Legend - Opportunities

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Gateway Charter Academy

Kennedy-Curry Middle School

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Birdie Alexander School Umphrey Lee Elem School

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Ronald E McNair Elem School

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Proposed Trail Council District Boundary

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Robert L Thornton Elem School

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GLENDALE PARK

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Plaza De Las Americas Ballroom

Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard

Adelle Turner Elem School William Hawley Atwell Law Academy

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DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT -RBD

DART Red Bird Transit Center

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Academy of Dallas Charter School

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Justin F Kimball High School

Thomas Tolbert Elem School

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S BECKLEy AVE

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Legend - Opportunities

Legend - Opportunities

dense vegetation

preserve open space

picnic area

basketball

community garden

soccer

erosion

proposed connection bike lane

hike & bike trail

restroom

water park

baseball

flood prone

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playground

bench

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lighting

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COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

VISION

Communit y Engagement

STRATEGIES

Through a series of knowledge mapping, amenity determination, and visioning exercises we asked residents to share their knowledge of Five Mile Creek and express their desires for what they wanted to see in parks and trails along the creek systems, including programming and location.

ACTIVITIES

Engagement activities at Open House Community Meetings were focused on knowledge sharing about the Five Mile Creek watershed, including the stream and its tributaries, existing parks and trails, and areas for greater greenspace or improvement. 1  Knowledge Mapping Using pins, attendees marked on a map where they live, where they frequently visit, which parks they attend, new areas they thought would be good for a park, and areas that needed improvement.

Attendees were shown examples of vacant properties in their the Five Mile Creek Watershed and used dots to vote on the programming features and qualities they preferred. Each person was given six dot stickers, and they could place them however they wished. Overall respondents were interested in all trial types, but in particular those that featured amenities. Residents often voted for fun, modern play equipment. The senior population emphasized that they serve as the caretaker for family members even if the children do not live with them so high-quality play equiptment was important to them. Finally, residents voted for mixed passive and active recreation amenities and enjoyed the idea of stronger, reflective, fun placemaking in their neighborhood shared spaces.

Total Engagement Public Meetings Public Meeting Attendence Online Survey Paper Survey Stakeholder & Investigative Inverviews Social Media Followers Social Media Reach Social Media Engagement

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Legend - Opportunities

139

Pavilion / Gathering Area

Active Sports

84

Picnic Area

Lighting

Hike & Bike Trail

Restroom

121

Clear Trees

Bench

3543

Playground

Concession Stand

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564

3  Community Survey The Trust for Public Land created and administered a web-based survey to explore desired park and trail types, programming features, and community needs within the Five Mile Creek watershed.

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The survey was distributed through email and promoted advertisements on Facebook via the Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt Facebook Page.

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OPEN HOUSE MEETINGS

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1  For Oak Cliff - 10/20/2018 4478 S Marsalis Ave, Dallas, Texas 75216 Council District 4

2  Highland Hills Library - 11/07/2018 3624 Simpson Stuart Rd, Dallas, Texas 75241 Council District 8

3  Dallas Executive Airport - 11/15/2018 5303 Challenger Dr, Dallas, Texas 75237 Council District 3

4  Public Review: For Oak Cliff - 02/16/2019

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Flags and post-it notes were also used to any additional feedback the attendees wished to convey. Glendale Park was most frequently sited as the park visited the most and also an area noted for numerous improvements. Residents also noted that greater connectivity to Glendale or creating similar parks with walking trails would be positive in their neighborhoods. Safety was the most frequent concern noted. Erosion control, lack of trail amenities, and sidewalk conditions were also frequently noted as concerns, as were lighting and security.

2  Programming Feedback

Potential park parcel engagement activity

2.0


COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

CEDAR CREST TRAiL (UNDER CONSTRUCTiON)

BLUiTT-FLOWERS HEALTH CENTER

GATEWAy PARK SiTE (PROPOSED)

SOUTH OAK CLiFF HiGH SCHOOL 1

GREEN ALLEy

3

ON-STREET W/ PLACEMAKiNG

FiTNESS

MURAL

PLAyGROUND

SEATiNG

SiGNAGE & WAyFiNDiNG

2

TRAiL ALONG ALiCE BRANCH CREEK

E Overton Rd

SUN VALLEy PARK SiTE (UNDEVELOPED) 1

3

R CE B ALI

S Marsalis Ave

2

AN

35E

CH

CR

EEK

1

Ann Arbor Ave

PLA N N

Fi V E

3

( CREEK TR AiL LE

M i

2.0

E D)

Alice Branch Creek Community Engagement Exhibit

19


20

COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

VISION

Communit y Surve ys

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Q2 How familiar are you with Five Mile Creek?

Q4 What do you dislike about this park?

Q5 Why do you use local parks? Check all that apply.

Feeling unsafe, the presence of litter, lack of parking, crowds, and erosion issues create unfavorable park conditions for respondents.

The most frequented use, 3-5 times a week, is for exercise and fitness. The next most frequented use is taking kids to the park.

Public Opinion Hearing directly from community members was one of the most important parts of this process. The plan for Five Mile Creek was influenced by the hopes and dreams of local community members for the creek.

QUESTIONS Q1 What is your zip code?

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

I work or volunteer in an organization that is involved in Five Mile Creek I've never heard of Five Mile Creek before now I've heard of Five Mile Creek, but don't know much about it I am very knowledgeable about Five Mile Creek I know where Five Mile Creek is located and a little bit about it

75% of total respondents identified that they have at least heard of Five Mile Creek. Sixteen respondents know where Five Mile Creek is located but do not know much about it. Only two respondents had never heard of Five Mile Creek before the engagement process. Q3 What is the name of the park you visit most frequently? What do you like about this park?

Generally speaking, the majority of the survey responders (73%) live in the area that lies between I-30 and I-67. Nearly a quarter of the respondents live in the corridor between I-67 and I-45.

Trinity River Turtle Creek Lake Cliff Pecan Grove Reverchon Elmwood Park Annie Stevens Boulder Park Oak Cliff Nature Preserve Twin Falls Glendale Klyde White Rock Kidd Springs Kiest

Respondents also use the park for picnics, biking, and events. 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

Kiest Park is the most frequented park by the respondents.

35

40

2.0


2.0

COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

Q6 Refer to the map above of the Five Mile Creek Corridor. What park types would you like to see in the Five Mile Creek Corridor? Check all that apply.

Q7 Refer to the map above of the Five Mile Creek Corridor. What park improvements would you like to see in the Five Mile Creek Corridor? Check all that apply.

Q8 For each of the following park amenities, please let us know: (1) Have you used it in the past 12 months? (2) Are more needed? Check box if answer is “yes.” If “no,” no answer is needed.

Q9 Why do you use trails?

0.00%

10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 80.00% 90.00% 1 I don't use trails Transportation (for example: to get to school or work)

1

Other (please specify) Socializing with friends 0.00% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

None of the above Other (please specify) Sports & Active Recreation Facilities

10.00%

20.00%

30.00%

40.00%

50.00%

60.00%

70.00%

Walking your dog

80.00%

Recreation

None of the above

Experience nature and wildlife

Other (please specify) Additional programmed activities and events

Community Features (pavilions, picnic areas + BBQ facilities, community gathering places) Natural Open Spaces

Trails and natural open spaces were the most Trails desired park type identified by respondents. In the “Other” option, respondents added trails for biking, dog parks, play areas for children along with several comments about paying attention to providing items that can be maintained or adding benches and trash cans to help keep the areas clean.

Public Art & Cultural Features Exercise and health amenities (loop trails, exercise equipment, health and wellness classes and programming) Better Lighting Increased Security

Respondents would like to see lighting improvements, an increase in security and exercise classes and amenities in their parks. Other answers included trails, pet stations, dog parks, bike trails, water fountains, litter cans, and community gardens.

According to respondents, activities most used in the past 12 months include paved walking trails, mountain biking, nature trails and environmental education, dog parks, and soccer fields. Respondents also added bike lanes and equestrian trails.

21

Respondents said they use trails for recreation, to experience nature and wildlife, and for exercise and fitness. Less than 3% of respondents said they do not use trails.


22

COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

VISION

2.0

Five Mile Creek Vision Plan - Paper Version Park Design Preferences Parks can be designed in many different ways. Parks can feel wild and natural, polished and sophisticated, and there are countless possibilities in between. Please take a look at these park photos and and then answer the questions below.

Q10 Would any of the following encourage or help you to use trails more frequently? Check all that apply.

Q11 Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above?

Q12 Which below best describes 12. Which statement statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above? I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this park. your thoughts on the park above? I would visit this park often if it were close to where I live.

11. Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above? I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this park. I would visit this park often if it were close to where I live.

I might occasionally visit this park if it were close to where I live. I would be unlikely to visit this park. Why did you choose this answer?

I might occasionally visit this park if it were close to where I live.

13. Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above? I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this park. I would visit this park often if it were close to where I live. I might occasionally visit this park if it were close to where I live. I would be unlikely to visit this park.

I would be unlikely to visit this park.

Trails closer to respondent’s homes, increased security, more lighting, and trail access points would encourage people to use the trails more frequently. Other responses such as increased pedestrian amenities such as water fountains, signage and wayfinding, bike stations, benches, etc. would encourage respondents to use the trails more frequently.

Q13 Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above?

Why did you choose this answer?

Why did you choose this answer?

37% of respondents acknowledged they might visit the park if it were close to where they lived. 33% said they would visit the park if it were close to where they lived. Other comments were that the park looks maintained, they enjoy the open space, like large trees, good for a picnic, and looks safe and calm. Respondents commented that the park lacks activities, needs more shade, lacks a dog park, needs trails, lacks natural space, is too open, looks boring, lacks activities for kids, lacks seating, and lacks lighting, Other comments were that the park looks maintained, enjoys the open space, likes large trees, good for a picnic, and looks safe and calm.

41% of respondents were unlikely to visit this park. Respondents thought that the park lacked greenspace, trails, and shade and it doesn’t look interesting. Some noted it looks too kid-friendly and is not dog-friendly.

45% of the respondents would visit this park often if it were close to where they lived. Some thought the park needed more shade, could use a play area, isn’t kid-friendly, is too man-made, and have utility concerns.

Quite a few respondents acknowledged that it looks very kid-friendly and safe.

Others thought the park looked inviting, liked the trails, weren’t concerned about the powerlines, liked the trees, felt like a getaway, incorporated natural elements well, could be a potential picnic spot, looks maintained and is restful.

See appendix for select survey questions


2.0

COMMUNIT Y ENGAGEMENT

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

23

Findings and Summary

Q14 Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the trail to the left?

No respondents said they would be unlikely to visit this trail. 45% said they would be willing to travel from another part of town to visit the trail.

Great Trinity Forest AT&T Trail

Q16 What specific park and trail improvements would you like to see in the Five Mile Creek area?

• 43 respondents primarily use the park for exercise and fitness at about 1-2 times per week. 32 respondents never use the park to walk the dog and 27 never take kids outside.

Respondents would like to see connected trails, better lighting, more shade, dog parks, preserved nature, less trash, better access • 92% of respondents would like to see more to trails, increased awareness, special needs trails in the Five Mile Creek Corridor. 79% accessibility, and more park programming in the would like to see more natural open spaces. Five Mile Creek area. 68% would like increased security and 63% would like better lighting. Q17 Is there anything else you’d like to add? • 88% of respondents said they use trails for Additional comments include having police exercise and fitness and 80% said they use presence on bikes and horses, water parks, trails to experience nature and wildlife. water features, ecological improvements to the • To encourage more trail use, 58% of creek, and thank you for caring about South respondents would like to see more Dallas. lighting. 55% would like to see trails closer to their home, better maintenance and more destinations along trails. FINDINGS

Respondents said it has lots of shade, nature, trails, feels inviting, is a balance between natural and built, break from the city, is exactly Community Input Takeaways what people are looking for and is a cool • About 3/4's of respondents know where place to explore. Other comments included Five Mile Creek is located but do not know preserving nature for wildlife, to provide much about it. security, to make the trail wide enough to avoid • Kiest park is the most frequented park by overcrowding, respondents due to long the amount of uninterrupted walking paths, it's spacious, Q15 What would help you visit your local the large trees, police presence and usable parks more often? sport courts, Respondents said that access to neighborhood • Feeling unsafe, the presence of litter, the parks and trail connections to other parks, lack of parking, crowds and erosion issues parking, trails, dog parks, safety, lighting, create unfavorable park conditions for shade, trees, variety of activities to choose respondents. from at the park, better marketing and communication about parks and activities, and better maintained, would help them visit their local parks more often.

SUMMARY Meeting Needs • Since 3/4's of respondents only know where Five Mile Creek is located, there is an opportunity to educate respondents about challenges and opportunities associated with the creek in an effort to promote positive change for the area. • Since respondents spoke highly of Kiest Park, this park can inform design decisions for future parks. • Future park designs should take into account the unfavorable park conditions that respondents mentioned. • Since respondents primarily use parks for

exercise and fitness, it could be beneficial to provide additional opportunities to use parks for other reasons. For example, socializing with friends, amenities catered to children, and safe ways to experience nature and wildlife. • Respondents who would like to see more trails and natural open spaces in the Five Mile Creek Corridor affirm the need for this masterplan. • Safety concerns must be considered and implemented into future park plans for increased probable use by respondents. Strategies to provide adequate lighting, security, and a maintenance plan will be vital to ensure safe usable spaces for all to enjoy. The respondents from multiple zip codes show how this could be both a community and city-wide asset. Overall, the public was enthusiastic about the proposed Five Mile Creek plan.


24


03   Context

View of Five Mile Creek


26

CONTEX T

VISION

3.0

Local Conte x t

GENERAL FRAMEWORK Location and Residents

Existing Community Amenities

Located approximately seven miles south of downtown Dallas, the Five Mile Creek watershed encompasses approximately 70 square miles and is home to 186,297 people. Much of the land within the watershed is greenfield, and economic development is a concern shared by many residents and stakeholders. There are three city council districts in the area (3, 4, and 8) with diversity of neighborhoods, development patterns, and demographics. The majority of the population is African American and Hispanic. This plan seeks to address the unique interests and priorities of the various neighborhoods within the watershed.

The map to the right shows important community features including the number of educational facilities, semi-public and public institutions, park sites, and light rail lines. These are all important factors for park and trail considerations.

Study Area Demographics -- 186,297 Total Population

Additionally this map shows vacancy in light green and waterbodies and the streamline in blue, illustrating the geospatial connection between existing community features and opportunities for future parks and trails. Equitable development was a key guiding principle in the process. Consideration was given to how the greenbelt could be used to connect community assets and fill in service gaps through new park and trail amenities.

-- 61,703 Households

Connectivity

-- 56,942 Children

Improving multimodal transportation and mobility options through better pedestrian and bicycle connectivity were important factors in the long-term feasibility of the plan. The current trail network is categorized as “existing,” “programmed” (meaning designed and funded but not yet built), and “proposed” (meaning designed but not funded). These trails are included to guide where connectivity could be improved by extending current facilities or filling gaps.

-- 25,318 Seniors -- 51% Households with Income under $35,000 -- 61% African American -- 33% Hispanic -- 20% White -- 15% Other Race -- 4% Asian

Downtown Dallas

Five Mile Creek Watershed Study Area

-- 2% Mixed Race -- .03% Pacific Islander / Hawaiian

Esri, HERE, Garmin, © OpenStreetMap contribut


CONTEX T

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

27

LOCAL CONTEXT Map Showing Parks, Trails, and Public Transportation with Community Asssets, Public / Semi-Public Institutions, Schools, and Vacancy

District 1

District 5

Zan Wesley Holmes Jr Middle

William B Miller Elem Oliver W Holmes Humanities / Comm. Academy

District 4

ale

E Kiest Blvd Maya Angelou High

Justin F Kimball High

St

Christ for the Nations

South Oak Cliff High Daniel Webster Elem

Red Bird Youth & Family Center

Bishop Dunne Catholic

HI Holland Elem

Learning Alternative Center for Empowering Youth

St Elizabeth’s Catholic

VA North Texas Health Care

Clara Oliver Elem

12

Elisah M. Pease Elem

Whitney M Young Jr Elem Harry Stone Montessori

New Tech High

Sarah Zumwalt Middle

S Polk St

Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard

Rd

67 Thomas L Marsalis Elem

William Hawley Atwell Law Academy

W Red Bird Ln

35E

Laurel Land Memorial Park

JN Ervin Elem

Robert L Thornton Elem

TG Terry Elem

KIPP Destiny Elem

W Camp Wisdom Rd Fellowship Christian Academy Ronald E McNair Elem

UNT Dallas

Birdie Alexander Elem

W Wheatland Rd

Airports

District 8

Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

Kennedy-Curry Middle

Education Institutions / Semi-public

Gateway Charter Academy

David W Carter High

Rd

Cemeteries

Texans Can Academy Dallas Grant East

Umphrey Lee Elem

tu nS

McCommas Bluff Landfill

Paul Quinn College

o

ps

Sim

S Lanca

Golf Club of Dallas

Boulder Park

art

ster Rd

Adelle Turner Elem

University Hills Blvd

Dallas Executive Airport -RBD

45

iew ie V

District 3

S Hampton Rd

nn

Bo

12

John W Carpenter Elem

WW Bushman Elem

yv nn

Boude Storey Middle

Su

Clinton P Russell Elem Barbara Jordan Elem

TW Browne Middle

District 7

John Neely Bryan Elem

Kiest Park

W Kiest Blvd

Thomas Tolbert Elem

J.P. Starks Math, Science and Technology Vanguard

S Marsalis Ave

S Beckley Ave

W Illinois Ave

S Westmoreland Rd

3.0

Landfill 20

Parks / Recreation Railroad / Transit Light Rail Station

20

Vacant

Duncanville

Water City of Dallas Boundary

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

Council Boundaries


28

VISION

CONTEX T

3.0

H y drological Conte x t

CONTEXT The namesake of Five Mile Creek Watershed, Five Mile Creek begins in the City of Duncanville near Redbird Airport and runs for 15 miles through the hills and valleys of southwest Dallas, draining an approximately 70 square mile area of the city. The creek was rerouted from its original ending location to feed the Fin and Feather Club Lake where it was then channeled into the Trinity when Interstate 20 was built. The current terminus is a quarter mile north of Interstate Highway 20 at the Trinity River. Five Mile Creek flows through five city parks: Pecan Grove, Kiest, Glendale, Arden Terrace, and College. Layers of Austin Chalk and Eagle Ford shale are under its basin. The drainage area soil is primarily calcareous and clayey surface layers over chalky subsoils. Historically, there were three vegetative zones within the creek’s drainage basin: cedar brakes along the stream course and hillsides, riparian woodlands on the floodplains, and tall grasses on the upland prairies. By the mid-1980’s, most of the land was extensively developed for commercial and residential uses.

Photos Taken From Various Locations Along Five Mile Creek


CONTEX T

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

29

HYDROLOGY

W Illinois Ave lvd

tB

S Beckley Ave

prings B

ale

W Kiest Blvd

St

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ranch

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ile

Honey S Su

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S Marsalis Ave

E

F

St

Alice

45

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Bran

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12

Creek Crow

12

S Polk St

67

ch

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W Red

35E

Br an n kl aw

Alta

<all other values>

City of Dallas Boundary

WETLAND_TY Riverine

Riverine

Lake

Freshwater Pond

Freshwater Pond

Freshwater Forested/Shrub Wetland Freshwater F orested/Shrub Wetland s ite

Bra

S

HU8_12030105_Wetlands

Wh

Freshwater Emergent Wetland Freshwater Emergent Wetland Hutchins

20

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Rd

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Dallas_mainroads

Lake

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Br oo

w Vie

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an Br

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an Br

Sim

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W Camp Wisdom Rd

rt

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Bird L

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University Hills Blvd

So

Legend Wilson Branch

d oo W

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S Hampton Rd

ek

S Westmoreland Rd

3.0

FLD_ZONE 0.2 PCT Annual Chance Flood Hazard

R W Wheatland Rd 20

n wto

Ne

Duncanville

ek

Cre

0.2APCT ANNUAL CHANCE FLO OD HAZ ARD A AE

AE Cemeteries

Floodway

Legend Dallas_mainroads

HU8_12030105_Wetlands

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

Parks / Recreation

Mill's Creek

Vacant

Peak's Branch Sump 100 year


30

CONTEX T

VISION

Parks & Open Space Conte x t

RELEVANT PLANS Citywide Plans* City of Dallas Park & Recreation Comprehensive Plan- 2016 This Park and Recreation Comprehensive Plan establishes the mission for the Park & Recreation Department to champion lifelong recreation and serve as a responsible steward of the city’s parks, trails and open spaces.

Dallas Trail Network Plan- 2008 This plan establishes a citywide network of linear, loop, nature and neighborhood trails extending across almost 250 miles.

A Renaissance Plan for Dallas- 2002 One of the most comprehensive urban park studies ever commissioned, the Renaissance Plan marks a commitment to reestablishing Dallas as a premier park system in the country. The vision is for Dallas to be recognized by residents and visitors as a city with a great park system.

forwardDallas! Comprehensive Plan- 2006 forwardDallas! is Dallas’ first citywide comprehensive plan. Shaped by citizen involvement, it envisions the future Dallas in which residents and stakeholders want to live and do business.

Dallas Bond - 2017 The 2017 Bond Program was approved by voters in November 2017 and includes captial improvement funding in 10 propostions. These propositions included: Streets & Transportation, Parks & Recreational Facilities, Fair Park, Flood Protection & Storm Drainage, Library Facilities, City Facilities, Economic Development, and Homesless Assistance Facilities.

North Texas Council of Governments Mobility 2045 In June 2018, North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) adopted the Mobility 2045 plan which details veloweb, community paths, on-street bikeways, shared-use paths, and more.

PARKSCORE®1

The Trust for Public Land Parkscore® index analyzes public access to existing parks and open space. Select Dallas statistics are: • Currently ranked 49th out of 100 cities • Park land: 27,038 acres • People served per acre: 49 • Median park size: 7.8 acres • Park land as a % of city area: 12.5% • Park spending per resident: $107.62

Dallas Bikeway Plan - 2011 The Dallas Bikeway Plan is the result of a community driven planning effort to establish a bicycle facility master plan, implementation strategy and recommendations for complimentary bicycle policies and programs.

*City of Dallas descriptions of plans

1. Trust for Public Land, 2013. ParkScore index. Washington, DC: Trust for Public Land. Available from: http://parkscore.tpl.org/

Kiest Conservation Area

3.0


CONTEX T

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

31

PARKS & OPEN SPACE District 1

Beckley Saner Park

st T rai l Cre da r

t

ies

Ce

W Illinois Ave

S Marsalis Ave

il ra ll T Hi

Elmwood Parkway Trail

k al

Ch

S Beckley Ave

District 5

Oak Cliff Nature Preserve

EK

District 7

vd Bl

Kiest Park

Int eru

rb

Su

District 4

yv nn

an

ity rinrail T t ea st T Gr ore F

Tra il

ale

W Kiest Blvd

St

Trin i Ce ty Au nte du r Tr bon ail

Cummings Park

Kiestwood Trail

ster Rd

Singing Hills Rec Center

S Lanca

S Polk St

Beckley Heighs Park

University Hills Blvd

S Hampton Rd

35E

W Camp Wisdom Rd

District 8

Miller Family Park

on

ps

Sim

Hutchins City of Dallas Boundary Highland Hills Park

Alta Mesa Park

k ee Cr Trail n t o l ny be Rureen G

d

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s Trali

Boulder Park

Twin Falls Park

Laurel Land Memorial Park

45

ek ile Cre Five Mnbelt Trail Gree

Glendale Park

Highland Hill

W Red Bird Ln

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Thurgood Marshall Park

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67

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12

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Fi Grve M ee ile nb C elt ree Tra k il

12

S Westmoreland Rd

3.0

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail

20

City of Lancaster Trail Cemeteries

W Wheatland Rd

Parks / Recreation

20

Vacant

Duncanville

Park Gap Lakes

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

Council Boundaries


32


04   Urban Greenbelt Vision

Wildflowers at Glendale Par


34

U R B A N G R E E N B E LT V I S I O N

VISION

Urban Greenbelt Vision

A VIBRANT, GREEN CORRIDOR

KEY STATISTICS

COLLECTIVE ACTION

GREENBELT RECOMMENDATIONS

Using a Network of Parks and Trails to Link Communities and Neighborhood Assets

Conservation and Site Factors

Plan, Fund, Protect, Create

A Community Inspired Vision

Through the engagement process, feasibility conversations, stakeholder interviews, and technical planning efforts, the greenbelt vision proposes the addition of four new parks and one potential schoolyard to park opportunity all connected by over 22 miles of trail broken out into eight study areas.

Implementation of the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt will require acquiring or obtaining access to over 627 parcels of land. Each segment of the greenbelt will need further investigation and planning work, acquiring or establish access for the site, design, development, and funding. Careful planning, diligent implementation, and strong partnership will be key to its success. This plan is meant to cast the vision for long-term collective action by public agencies, non-profits, private philanthropy, developers, and institutional partners, working together toward a shared goal. As opportunities to realize various components of the greenbelt become available, these individual entities can help advance planning work, provide funding, acquire and protect land, and together create the greenbelt.

The Five Mile Creek Watershed in Dallas is home to some of the most beautiful topography and ecology in the city and presents a major opportunity for expanding the city’s park and trail network. While there are many parks and trails in the watershed, their connectivity is limited and many residents voiced their desire for better parks and trails. This greenbelt utilizes Five Mile Creek and its many tributaries as a spine, resulting in a network of parks and trails that bring closeto-home park access to thousands of nearby residents. By capitalizing on existing ecological assets, the greenbelt connects neighborhoods with important community institutions, provides opportunities for economic development, and creates new recreational opportunities across Southern Dallas. The vision for the Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt hinges on the concept that the park and trail system can provide varying environmental and nature experiences while also creating important connections within neighborhoods, to each other, and to active transportation. These different experiences aim to serve all and address specific environmental and community needs.

The team identified over 600 parcels that overlap the proposed parks and trails. -- 627 total parcels totaling 3,192 acres -- 565 privately owned parcels totaling 2,241 acres -- 62 publicly owned totaling 950 acres -- 10 railroad and utility easements totaling 57 acres -- 130 parcels in the highest priority Smart Growth for Dallas Conservation Layer totaling 1,452 acres

While acquiring or gaining easement access for each of these parcels is essential, this plan proposes a prioritize hierarchy based on community assets, the number of residents within a 10-minute walk to the site, and equity considerations. Parks and Trails for Residents The overall impact of the trail portion of this vision will serve a total population of 44,3115 residents and the parks vision will serve a total population of 12,931. This totals an increase in population served by trails by 55% and an increase in population served by parks of over 118%. The highest increase in coverage was for low income residents.

• The following chapters describe each aspect of the plan, presenting these key aspects of the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt: • The Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Vision: Themes, Elements, and Development Principles • Parks Vision Sites • Trail Vision Segments and Locations • Future Study Areas

4.0


4.0

U R B A N G R E E N B E LT V I S I O N

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

OKLAHOMA CITY

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Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt: Park and Trail Vision

LYNDON B JOHNSO N FWY

Existing Programmed (funded) On sidewalk/street Proposed (by City of Dallas)

CITY OF DESOTO

CITY OF LANCASTER

Proposed (by TPL/TBG)

Greenbelt vision FIVE MILE CREEK January 14, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

HU T CHIN STER

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This map displays the proposed trail alignments and park creation opportunities defined in the during the community engagement and planning processes.

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-6 7

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Fi v e M i le C re e k G re e nb e lt

342

CA AN

W S COCKRELL HILL RD

S MARSALIS AVE

HO 7 -6 US

N

LN

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V U SL

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£ ¤ D a ll a s Ex ec ut iv e A i rp o rt

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Kiest

Kiest Con se r vat i on Area

W KIEST BLVD

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Oa k Cl i ff Nat ure Pre s er v e

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DUNCANVILLE RD

E ILLINOIS AV

BONNIE VIEW RD

FORT WORTH

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1

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Miles

±

Through determining priorities for the community and the City of Dallas, these opportunites were mapped, showing the framework for the future Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt.

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Vision Elements

OVERVIEW Refuge, Restoration and Remediation, Recreation and Health The new parks and trails in the Five Mile Creek Corridor build on the vision for an interconnected greenbelt. Based on discussions with the community, stakeholders, and field experts, key elements of the parks created focus on these concepts: refuge, restoration and remediation, research, and recreation.

REFUGE

Parks and trails in the Five Mile Creek corridor should increase access to greenspace while providing reprieve from daily urban life. Whether it is a park bench and loop trail for a resident to enjoy, or a hike through urban wilderness, these parks aim to serve the community’s needs and provide a green, beautiful asset for their enjoyment. Community Spaces While access to the beauty and nature of Five Mile Creek is one of the main goals of this plan, the most important element of the parks and trail vision is to design for people. Improving access to close-to-home parks and trails for the residents of the Five Mile Creek watershed will require more community spaces and neighborhood park elements. In each proposed park site, neighborhood and community park elements should be included. These will be specific to the individual site and community needs identified through the

community engagement process. Examples include social gathering spaces, play areas, grills, lighting, loop trails and recreational elements. The goal of these places is to provide varying natural experiences and to serve the community’s needs. Gateways to Nature The community spaces and entrances are opportunities to create gateways to nature that invite residents and visitors to experience the deeper urban wilderness elements of Five Mile Creek. Through the engagement process, residents identified their desire to experience urban nature, but felt it was not accessible due to both physical barriers and concerns for safety. Access points should be designed to create a gradient of natural experiences, beginning from the programmed community park and culminating in the full experience of natural refuge. This will allow users to choose their experience based on comfort while encouraging a deeper connection to the environment over time. Environmental Education Opportunities As part of the greenbelt experience, environmental education should be used to increase comfort and understanding of nature’s importance to overall health and wellness. These educational elements should illuminate both what is on the site and its importance, as well as how to access these natural elements with clear wayfinding. These educational elements should be site-specific and reflective

of interests identified through the community engagement process. These additional elements could include neighborhood histories or visual elements created by local artists. Environmental Education Outcomes Environmental education is critical to all residents, but especially children. Independent studies from academic and research institutions, federal and state agencies, and nonprofits consistently show that converting vacancy, greening on and near school campuses, and creating outdoor learning environments does in fact foster academic success. A 2017 report published in the Journal of Experiential Education examined the experiences of 56 seventh and eighth grade students in the Rocky Mountain West who participated in a two-day outdoor experiential learning camp.

Two brothers playing at the site of Cook Park in Atlanta, GA.

While 79 percent of the students reported that they found the experience valuable, it was the students who struggled in traditional learning environments who particularly flourished. “Adolescents who had, over the years, come to view school-based learning as meaningless and disengaging were motivated and immersed in this experiential, in-context, field-based learning…In this more active, experiential setting, these students often became the leaders of their peers. Instead of avoiding learning by being unfocused, off-task, or disruptive, most were intently engaged and likely learning deeply as a result.” Students observing plants at Glen Helen Nature Preserve.

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INSPIRATION IMAGES FOR FIVE MILE CREEK FROM VARIOUS TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND PROJECTS

Boys walking on a parth at Silvermine Fowler in New Canaan, CT.


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VISION

VISION EL EMENT S

RESTORATION AND REMEDIATION

With limestone cliffs, native prairie, and bottomland forest, Five Mile Creek and its tributaries are home to unique and beautiful scenery. These landscapes are iconic, but many have felt the impacts of invasive species, habitat loss, erosion, and pollution. Trails and parks within the watershed should not only provide access to these features, but where necessary, restore and remediate their natural ecology. Native Interventions Restoration components on these sites should target removing invasive species, restoring natural economy using native plants, and using green solutions to address erosion. Each intervention should be site specific, but overgrowth along the stream corridor, invasive species, and erosion are challenges most sites face Through green infrastructure and park design, these parks aim to include naturebased solutions to environmental challenges so that significant grey infrastructure is not needed. Addressing Environmental Challenges As with many urban streams, Five Mile Creek and its tributaries face environmental challenges including water quality, floatables, and debris. Increased runoff from urban development and illegal dumping have created further challenges to keeping waterways clean. By protecting the stream corridors, this plan also envisions using best practice green

infrastructure and stormwater management to buffer the existing systems. By restoring natural ecology and environmental remediation, the greenbelt will not only improve environmental conditions in the immediate area, but will create a healthier watershed and Trinity River.

RECREATION AND HEALTH Health and the Environment One of the key findings from the community engagement process was the desire for better outdoor recreation opportunities, both passive and active. The Five Mile Creek Vision Plan aims to increase park and trail use for a healthier, more active community. By creating more close-to-home parks, the greenbelt increases the opportunity for free, public recreation within a 10-mintue walk of all. Five Mile Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural beauty also provides the opportunity to reduce stress and anxiety while encouraging these recreational opportunities. As individual trail segments and parks are designed, site-specific community engagement activities should be used to determine what active recreation elements are possible and desired.

island effect. New parks offer opportunities to develop programming partnerships with organizations who can address specific health issues, educational opportunities, active recreation events, and healthy food distribution. By considering each park site individually and connecting all these elements with the trail system, the vision for Five Mile Creek is one that is healthy, inclusive, and provides holistic solutions.

RESEARCH AND INSTITUTIONS Partnerships and Programming

The Five Mile Creek watershed is home to two important higher education institutions: Paul Quinn College and University of North Texas at Dallas (UNT Dallas). The presidents of both institutions recognized the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt as a potential asset for their students and faculty, including research, outdoor learning, and programming. The creek, tributaries, and surrounding land could serve as an outdoor learning lab, providing opportunities for students to experience and study ecology, water quality, and other environmental issues. In addition to environmental topics, the greenbelt also provides opportunities to Holistic Solutions for Healthier Communities research public health, land management, and Health opportunities in the corridor go beyond recreation. Programming partnerships between increasing opportunities for active recreation. these two institutions can also help activate the Greening the watershed through tree-planting, greenbelt, which will help discourage negative decreasing impervious surface cover, and and illicit activity from occurring. conserving land help combat the urban heat

Art sculpture as a trail marker at Stinger's Ridge in Chattanooga, TN.

Johnson Oak Park in Bridgeport, CT.

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INSPIRATION IMAGES FOR FIVE MILE CREEK


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U R B A N G R E E N B E LT V I S I O N

VISION

RESILIENCY IN T HE CORRID OR

RESILIENT DEVELOPMENT Overview Throughout the Five Mile Creek watershed are opportunities to deploy green infrastructure. The Five Mile Creek Watershed and creek corridor is home to some of the more beautiful, limestone bottom streams in the city, but it is currently bound on the southern, eastern, and western boundaries by concentrations of industrial uses. Many parts of the creek are challenged by erosion, invasive species, floatables, and pollutants from run-off and dumping. The use of green infrastructure in new parks, trails, and existing assets should be considered holistically and at a variety of scales to suit community context. As Southern Dallas continues to develop, the protection of the stream corridor with green solutions is imperative to maintaining the environmental, social, economic, and aesthetic assets in the area. As this development occurs, improvements should also be made to new development projects, existing streets and greenspaces, and vacant lands. Development that uses green infrastructure to improve environmental factors should be incentivized.

SMART GROWTH FOR DALLAS Data for Resiliency Smart Growth for Dallas is a data-driven initiative to improve the environmental, social, and economic resilience of Dallas by creating close-to-home parks, trails, and greenspaces for the entire city. Led by Trust for Public Land in partnership with Texas Trees Foundation and buildingcommunityWORKSHOP, Smart Growth

for Dallas is an online mapping platform that highlights and prioritizes specific geographic areas in Dallas for investments in parks, trails, greenbelts, trees, green stormwater infrastructure, and other green assets. Following a “triple bottom line” strategy, the analysis identifies where green assets can provide tangible social, economic, and environmental benefits. The interactive mapping platform highlights areas where multiple greening objectives can be accomplished at the same time, such as reducing urban heat and flash flood risk. The tool incorporates customized data layers into geospatial maps to prioritize parcels throughout the City of Dallas, based on five key planning objectives. Cool As of 2018, Dallas is the third-fasted warming city in the country. Well-positioned green space and canopy cover can reduce ambient temperature by 5° to 10° F. Smart Growth for Dallas identifies areas of Dallas where green assets can reduce urban heat islands and cool nearby neighborhoods.

Connect Many Dallas residents rely on biking paths, greenbelts, and linear parks for their daily transportation needs. Working with stakeholders from DART, Dallas Park and Recreation Department, and Dallas Department of Transportation, Smart Growth for Dallas identifies areas of high need for improvements to pedestrian safety, complete streets, “first-mile / last-mile” connections between mass-transit and critical destinations, and safe routes to school.

Absorb/Protect Parks, open spaces, and green infrastructure can absorb stormwater and serve as a buffer between rivers and surrounding development, providing flood protection. Smart Growth for Dallas identifies locations where green asset investments, such as expanded tree canopy, rain gardens, or strategic park design and location, can absorb stormwater, improve water quality, and protect development from flooding.

Health By creating opportunities for active recreation, parks and open spaces are able to improve the health of nearby residents. Our analysis identifies areas of our city with high health disparities, where parks, trails, and active recreation can help combat diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and asthma.

Equity

Student class in Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs, OH.

Greenspace plays a particularly important role in neighborhoods with a high prevalence of low-income households, children, senior citizens, and residents with limited English-proficiency. For these groups, parks, trails, and other green assets can offer unique strategies for building stronger neighborhoods through creative placemaking, environmental design, and programming. Smart Growth for Dallas identifies areas of Dallas where greenspace can have the most positive impact for

Conservation Corps. volunteers in Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary in St. Paul, MN.

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OKLAHOMA CITY

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AR E ST

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DALLAS

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CR

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TX

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AUSTIN HOUSTON

SAN ANTONIO GU

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OF

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US

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§ ¦ ¨ 45

Cr

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W h eat l a nd W WHEATLAND RD

§ ¦ ¨ 35E

CITY OF DUNCANVILLE

Jo pp a Pres erve

310

PS

ON

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D

J. J . Lem m o n

Overall Stacked Priorities

342

§ ¦ ¨ 20

This map displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas overall(stacked) priorities for the Five Mile Creek Project Study Area.

V U

Tom mi e M. Al l en

310

N

I- 4 5

This result is designed to identify where green infrastructure interventions can be expected to benefit multiple objectives from the Smart Growth for Dallas project.

CITY OF HUTCHINS

Very high

Proposed (by City of Dallas)

Moderate

CITY OF DESOTO

CITY OF LANCASTER

VE SA

High

O

LA

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PH

AL ND

Overall priorities

LE

STER

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NCA

Private conservation land

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R NE

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Existing park

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Railroad

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R i er v

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LYNDON B JOHNSO N FWY

Study area

Existing

La

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UNIVERSITY HILLS BLVD

S POLK ST

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Ru ny o n C re e k G ree n b el t

-6 67

m

S i ng i ng H i l l s A nn ex

N

W CAMP WISDOM RD

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£ ¤

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G l en d a l e

D N VI AR

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Bo u l d e r

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By using the Smart Growth for Dallas data and analysis framework, several key objectives emerged for the Five Mile Creek watershed. The results show a persistent need to both improve and protect the stream corridors, address urban heat, and provide better connectivity and pedestrian safety through expanding the trail system. Importantly, the analysis indicates that the majority of communities in the corridor face disproportionately high economic and health challenges - issues that can be addressed through environmental interventions.

Y WA EST

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67

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Five Mile Creek Analysis

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SU

O a k C l i ff Nat ure Pre s er v e

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DUNCANVILLE RD

E ILLINOIS AV

BONNIE VIEW RD

FORT WORTH

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Overall priorities analysis (from Smart Growth for Dallas) FIVE MILE CREEK January 14, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

1

2

Miles

±

The overall (stacked) priorities result was created using an equally weighted maximum on the stacked benefit results of these five objectives: Connect, Cool, Health, Equity, Absorb and Protect.For more information about the analysis methodology for the Smart Growth Dallas project visit: www.smartgrowthfordallas.org


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OKLAHOMA CITY

OK

E ST

BLV

DALLAS

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CR CE

AUSTIN HOUSTON

SAN ANTONIO GU

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Jopp a Pres erve

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PS

ON

R UA ST

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J. J . Lem m on

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Tom mi e M. Allen

310

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Private conservation land

Trails

Proposed (by City of Dallas)

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VE SA

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AL ND

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EP

HU T CHIN

L TE

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Land conservation priority areas FIVE MILE CREEK January 14, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

STER

342

NCA

V U

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LYNDON B JOHNSO N FWY

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W h eat la nd

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This layer displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas Cool overall priorities. This objective is designed to identify opportunities for land conservation. Percent canopy cover, acreage, percent grassland cover, and environmental considerations were applied to show areas with high potential for greenspace conservation and at development risk.

342

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Kiest Con se r vat i on Area

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Oa k Cl i ff Nat ure Pre s er v e

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DUNCANVILLE RD

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OKLAHOMA CITY

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DA R

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SAN ANTONIO GU

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Jop pa Preserve

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J.J . Lem mo n

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Tommie M. Allen

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CITY OF HUTCHINS

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Proposed (by City of Dallas)

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CITY OF DESOTO

CITY OF LANCASTER

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High

RD

LA

On sidewalk/street

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AL ND

Absorb and Protect priorities

HO

STER

Private conservation land

Trails

P LE

HU T CHIN

342

Proposed (by TPL/TBG)

NCA

V U

N LA

Park

S RD

N I-35E

City/town area

Railroad

Programmed (funded)

This map displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas Absorb and Protect combined priorities. This objective is designed to identify areas to help absorb rainfall, reduce flooding, and recharge drinking water supplies while saving energy for water management through water-smart parks, playgrounds, green alleys and other green infrastructure projects. This objective also identifies areas to protect vulnerable infrastructure, neighborhoods, and residents from riverine flooding.

R i er v

ke

LYNDON B JOHNSO N FWY

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SU

Oa k Cl i ff Nat ure Pre s er v e

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DUNCANVILLE RD

E ILLINOIS AV

0

Absorb and Protect priorities (from Smart Growth for Dallas) FIVE MILE CREEK January 14, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

1

2

Miles

±

Both Absorb and Protect were treated as separate sub objectives within this larger objective to better manage water resources. Each has its own set of criteria that were weighted to create a stacked benefit result for Absorb and Protect separately. These two sub objective stacked benefit results were then combined using a weighted max to produce an Absorb and Protect combined priorities result. That result is shown on this map, with areas in orange reflecting moderate priority, areas in dark orange classified as high priority and those in red classified as very high priority. Green infrastructure interventions in these areas can be expected to help reduce the impacts of stormwater and support management of water resources.


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OKLAHOMA CITY

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E ST

BLV

DALLAS

LA

DA R

TX

CR CE

AUSTIN HOUSTON

SAN ANTONIO GU

LF

OF

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EX

IC

O

C I TY O F DA L L A S Chal k Hi ll Trai l

V U

Bo ren H i l s e we c k

Ced a r C res t G o l f Co u rs e

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W ILLINOIS AVE

NE LA V

S MARSALIS AVE

HO 7

-6 US

US

R

k

45

Y FW VE

LO

TR

Ru ny o n C re e k G ree n b el t

S POLK ST

7 -6

W WHEATLAND RD

on

V U

§ ¦ ¨ 35E

CITY OF DUNCANVILLE

Jo pp a Pres erve

310

PS

ON

R UA ST

D

J. J . Lem m o n

342

V U

Tom mi e M. Al l en

310

N

§ ¦ ¨ 20

I- 4 5

CITY OF HUTCHINS

T

Very high

Proposed (by City of Dallas)

Moderate

CITY OF DESOTO

CITY OF LANCASTER

D

VE SA

High

ER

LA

On sidewalk/street

ON

AL ND

Cool priorities

PH

HU T CHIN

Private conservation land

Trails

E EL

Proposed (by TPL/TBG)

STER

342

NCA

V U

N LA

Park

S RD

N I-35E

City/town area

Railroad

Programmed (funded)

R i er v

ke

LYNDON B JOHNSO N FWY

Study area

Existing

La

V U

UNIVERSITY HILLS BLVD

E CAMP WISDOM RD

US

W h eat l a nd

m

S i ng i ng H i l l s A nn ex

N

E

W CAMP WISDOM RD

S IM

S RL THORNTON FW Y

US

-6

7

S

Bo u l d e r

m

G l en d a l e

D N VI AR

LN

§ ¦ ¨

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Wagon Whee l Park

M

RD

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PY EX

S WESTMORELAND RD

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Tr i n it y

PE

AL

BI

67

This layer displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas Cool overall priorities. This objective is designed to identify opportunities to cool people from heat waves, and reduce summer energy use through increase of tree canopy creating shady green spaces and reduction of head absorption by buildings and impervious surfaces that help reduce the urban “heat island” effect.

Cr

RD

Y WA ST

TR

N COCKRELL HILL RD

Five M ile

TE

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RE

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ED

T BE

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Cool Stacked Priorities

342

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KE

-6 7

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Fi v e M i l e C re e k G re e nb e l t

£ ¤ D a ll a s Ex ec ut i v e A i r p o rt

V U CA AN

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S COCKRELL HILL RD

LN

T ES

N - 20

E KIEST BLVD

SL

TO AL

V

AL YV

W

HO

W LEDBETTER DR

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EI

NN

Kiest

Kiest Co n se r vat i o n Area

W KIEST BLVD

E

SU

O a k C l i ff Nat ure Pre s er v e

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DUNCANVILLE RD

E ILLINOIS AV

BONNIE VIEW RD

GREEN PRIORIT IES

D

AR FORT WORTH

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Cool priorities (from Smart Growth for Dallas) FIVE MILE CREEK January 14, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

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CR

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Connect priorities (from Smart Growth for Dallas) FIVE MILE CREEK January 14, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

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This layer displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas Connect overall priorities. This objective is designed to identify opportunities to connect Dallas through trails and transit lines to provide carbon-free transportation and and link residents to popular destinations, jobs and each other.


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This layer displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas Health overall priorities. This objective is designed to identify opportunities to use green Infrastructure to bring environmental and physical benefits to people with existing health conditions.

Study area

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Health priorities (from Smart Growth for Dallas) FIVE MILE CREEK January 3, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

0

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U R B A N G R E E N B E LT V I S I O N

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

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OKLAHOMA CITY

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0

Equity priorities (from Smart Growth for Dallas) FIVE MILE CREEK January 3, 2019. Copyright © The Trust for Public Land. The Trust for Public Land and The Trust for Public Land logo are federally registered marks of The Trust for Public Land. Information on this map is provided for purposes of discussion and visualization only. www.tpl.org

1

2

Miles

±

This layer displays the results of the Smart Growth for Dallas Equity overall priorities. This objective is designed to locate opportunities for Green Infrastructure to bring environmental benefits to the underserved and disadvantaged populations while also improving quality of life.


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U R B A N G R E E N B E LT V I S I O N

VISION

Green Solut ions

NEIGHBHORHOOD INTERVENTIONS Overview

Environmental Equity

At the neighborhood scale, whether it is a new park, revitalizing a community greenspace, or implementing green infrastructure improvements, locations should be prioritized based on equity, public health, and environmental factors, such as urban heat island rates. In areas disproportionately impacted by these issues, there should be a focus on renovating parks, utilizing public land, and capitalizing on vacant open space for green infrastructure parks with play elements.

To combat “green gentrification” and improvements designed solely for future development, organizations and the City of Dallas should work directly with communities to determine current residents’ needs and desires. Through outreach, education, visioning, and collaboration with City of Dallas agencies, neighborhoods can ensure positive - and desired - green infrastructure improvements for their communities.

In addition to green infrastructure improvements to new and existing developments in the corridor, the City of Dallas and partner organizations should work with communities to improve the resiliency of neighborhoods to environmental challenges. Public agencies should consider programs that incentivize community groups and neighborhoods to implement green infrastructure improvements in their shared spaces and on residents’ property.

Organizations should partner and work with the City of Dallas to ensure that residents who desire better green infrastructure in their communities receive the long-term benefits of those improvements. Green Infrastructure Based on the ecological structure of the Five Mile Creek Watershed, designers and developers may implement a variety of natural improvements on any given site.

To address the urban heat island, increase infiltration, slow down and filter run-off, and implement holistic solutions to help mitigate climate change, improvements should be considered in these areas: • Improving stormwater management through the use of bioswales, retention areas, wetland and greenways • Protecting urban forests and increasing canopy cover where needed, including planting more street trees • Incentivizing developments to use technologies such as green roofs and water catchment systems Performance metrics for improvement include: -- Stormwater Management -- Water Conservation and Quality -- Habitat Creation and Restoration -- Temperature and Urban Heat Island -- Energy Use and Emissions -- Carbon Sequestration and Avoidance -- Air Quality -- Waste Reduction -- Social and Economic Factors

Children walking in Miccosukee Greenway in Tallahassee, FL.

Girl exploring forest

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Communit y Resiliency

DESIGNING FOR SAFETY

As a part of green infrastructure improvements within the neighborhood, safety and crime prevention should be considered in the inventory and neighborhood planning initiatives as well as individual site design. While neighborhood and watershed greening is a primary goal of the Five Mile Creek Vision, blight and overgrowth on vacant lands contributes to both increased illicit use and further perceptions of unsafety. As a part of the outreach and planning process, areas of concern should be identified and addressed, through either supporting community efforts or implementing improvements.1 Design and Programming Considerations

Birdwatching at Silvermine Fowler in New Canaan, CT.

• Utilize participatory design and involve residents. Local knowledge and support is crucial to creating safe places. • Locate high-activity zones near site edges to encourage circulation on a main path and attract users. If possible, plan for concessions and programming from vendors on the park edge. • Many access points should be provided to maximize park use. • Clear signage, wayfinding, and lighting enhance feelings of safety and comfort, which increases positive site usage. Additionally, overgrown areas should be cleared to provide users with strong sight lines. • Ensure regular and property maintenance

Green infrastructure at LA River & Aliso Creek Confluence Park, Los Angeles, CA.

1. See NRPA Guidelines for Creating Safe Environments to Enhance Community Wellness. https://www.nrpa.org/contentassets/ f768428a39aa4035ae55b2aaff372617/park-safety.pdf

and cleaning. Volunteer efforts by residents may be used to supplement maintenance provided by city staff. • Access to information and park staff and essential to continued use of green space sites. • Attempt to plan for uses at all times of day to activate the site with a human presence as much as possible. Work with other local organizations to create programming partnerships. This could also include assisting neighborhood associations or groups forming leagues that have a regular presence at the site. • Consider both gender and age in programming. Women and children use parks significantly less due to safety concerns and programming. Additionally, residents can work individually or form a group to engage in cleanup and beautification programs, conduct neighborhood patrols, form a block watch, and organize on-site events. Designers and organizations working in the area can support residents by auditing conditions and suggesting physical improvements to areas of concern.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

When working in a community, either on a new community asset like a park with green infrastructure components, or initiating the participatory design of streetscape improvements, implementers should consider the following recommendations to ensure both best practices and gauge local support:

• Host neighborhood educational series about the benefits of green infrastructure. • Complete an inventory of green assets and create a strategic plan to best connect green spaces with partners and a variety of interventions. • Collaborate with neighborhood and homeowner associations to identify and help advocate for shared goals and priorities. • As implementers work on projects, continue outreach to neighborhood groups to support projects they can accomplish. These could include programs that encourage better stormwater management on private property or programs like Adopta-Lot, where neighborhood associations and community groups take control of a vacant piece of land for community gardens, playgrounds, or gathering spaces. • Advocate for policies that incentivize on-site stormwater management. • Establish a program within the community group or neighborhood association that teaches residents about green infrastructure installation and maintenance. to help with the long-term success of local projects, and for local job training. • Inventory unsafe spaces with the community and create a strategic plan for site improvements. • Work with the community to inventory unsafe spaces and create a strategic plan for site improvements and identify programming partners.


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VISION

Growth & Equit y

EQUITABLE DEVELOPMENT Overview As the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt is developed, it is imperative that the new amenities serve the needs of residents who currently live in the area, especially those without a close-tohome park or trail. Throughout the community engagement process, three goals related to the equitable development of the greenbelt emerged: 1  To ensure that current residents benefit from improvements through collaboration and partnerships 2  To catalyze positive growth of desired uses with greenspace improvements that benefit the existing communities 3  To foster increased green infrastructure improvements into other aspects of development Community Investment As individual trail segments and greenspaces are developed, further engagement is recommended for these sites through participatory design. This process should include an assessment of community readiness for collaboration with the city, other non-profit organizations involved in the area, and community groups. In many cases, neighborhoods will need assistance in legal processes that can help prepare them for outside investment, requesting public aid, and ensuring the communities’ long-term goals are met. Organizations working on greenspace initiatives in the corridor should work with other

non-profits focused on housing and equitable development as well as City of Dallas agencies such as Economic Development, Housing, Planning and Urban Design, in addition to Park and Recreation, to ensure park creation and renovation catalyzes equitable development. Other organizations and developers working in the area are strongly encouraged to do the same and should provide resources for residents to request assistance from these agencies and organizations. Parks, trails, and greenspaces are vital to healthy communities, and their benefit should be safeguarded for the current residents of the area. Positive, Inclusive Growth As parks and trails can be economic catalysts for further development, organizations working in the corridor should partner and advocate for programs that ensure growth is equitable. These programs and initiatives fall into these categories: Workforce and Small Business, Housing, Placemaking through Arts and Culture, and Access to Health Amenities. Specific advocacy, education, and incentive programs should be included as a part of new development projects. Workforce and Small Business Development -- Prioritize local residents and community members for construction, post-construction, and maintenance jobs. -- Support grants and provide funding for job training, mentorships and internships, and technical assistance for local residents.

-- Collaborate with local educational institutions to train and education emerging professionals and youth.

-- Hire local artists to help ensure that visual elements of developments are reflective of the community.

-- Support vendors from the surrounding neighborhood on public sites.

-- Ensure that the programming and events provided at the park are free or low-cost to existing residents.

-- Strengthen physical connections to existing businesses and help local small businesses leverage the park space for their benefit.

Housing: -- Provide opportunities for education about housing, resources, and city programs. -- Partner and collaborate with organizations focused on housing to create positive and community-driven improvement. -- Host workshops with allied non-profits and city agencies to understand neighborhood needs and desires to better advocate for housing strategy. -- Support the preservation of existing affordable housing and the expansion of affordable housing options in communities surrounding developments. Density and housing price should mirror the current existing housing stock in communities, unless otherwise specified through the engagement process. In many cases, community benefits should be included as a part of new developments.

Placemaking through Arts and Culture -- Use public spaces as central hubs to share and disseminate information. Provide both physical spaces for this information and work with other organization to program cultural and educational events for the community. -- Amplify narratives and voices of the community through all art of all disciplines.

-- Use cultural programming to promote existing community assets. Further cultivate these assets by providing programming, workshop, and educational opportunities

Access to Healthy Amenities -- Development of public spaces should also consider accessibility and neighborhood connectivity to bring people to and activate spaces. -- Programming and designed elements should address specific challenges to that neighborhood and radiate from the public spaces. Some examples include: -- A community that is impacted by the urban heat island should consider additional tree planting to the access points of the park development. -- A community who does not have walkable access to healthy food should consider a distribution point partnered with a public space, -- A community challenged by cardiac disease or obesity should include solutions that encourage physical activity at the park. -- The health of the community should be considered with any development, and partnerships with health organizations can provide design and engagement recommendations in addition to programming and education. -- Green infrastructure to address public health and environmental concerns should be considered wherever feasible.

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Girls walking near a stream at Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs, OH.

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05   Park Sites Vision

Stakeholder Charrette Map


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PA R K S I T E S V I S I O N

VISION

Parks Strategy

VISION FOR THE COMMUNITY Safe Access to Nature

Park Amenities

Parks by the Numbers

The Five Mile Creek watershed is home to some of the most beautiful natural landscapes remaining in Dallas, coupled with large parcels of land that present an opportunity for preservation and recreation. The ecological structure of these lands can provide both an environmental and recreational benefit, but can also be a stressor due to concerns about safety (from both criminal activity and unconstrained nature). The park creation opportunities that follow blend wilderness experiences with social, community, and recreation amenities. This will create a gradient of experiences ranging from the urban, built environment to the deep, peaceful wilderness of many of the stream corridors.

Detailed in the previous chapter, this vision of a variety of nature experience is achieved through the following thematic categories:

Key statistics of greenspace conservation and park creation in the vision:

• Refuge • Restoration and Remediation • Recreation and Health

• Environmental Opportunities -- 4 new preserve park study areas in addition to the Alice Branch Creek Demonstration Project -- Over 550 acres for land conservation, habitat connectivity, and environmental services

• Research and Institutional Programming • Social Opportunities Each park includes specific community features and areas for partnerships in the above categories. Although future work initiated by this plan should be site specific, incorporating elements from each about category will support the community’s vision.

-- 12,931 total residents served by total park creation, including over 7,000 residents who currently do not live within a 10-minute walk to a park or trail. -- 62% of the total population is low income -- 76% of the total population is African American

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F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

"Everyone needs access to clean, quiet and safe natural refuges in a city. Short exposures to nature can make us less aggressive, more creative, more civic minded and healthier overall... as the poets, neuroscientists and river runners have shown us, we also at times need longer, deeper immersions into wild spaces to recover from severe distress, to imagine our futures and to be our best civilized selves." - Florence Williams, The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative

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PA R K S I T E S V I S I O N

VISION

NE W PA RK PRIORIT IZ AT ION RECOMMENDAT IONS PHASE 1 RECOMMENDATIONS

Park area target zones are listed on the facing map. Each area has been prioritized based on the priority considerations listed to the right. Park Sites by Priority 1  Park Area C 2  Park Area A 3  Park Area B 4  Park Area D In addition to supporting the above recommendations and to encourage partnership and collective action, the criteria for these priority recommendations is listed in the following column.

PRIORITIY CONSIDERATIONS 1  10-Minute Walk to a Park Gap Areas -- Parks should be prioritized in park deserts

2  10-Minute Walk to a Park Coverage by Population -- Parks who serve the most people should be prioritized

3  10-Minute Walk to a Park Inceased Coverage by Population -- Parks with the most new coverage should be implemented first

4  Proximity and Connectivity to Planned Trail Opportunities -- Parks with the potential to connect to planned trails and services should be prioritized

5  Overlap with Equity and Public Health Priorities from Smart Growth for Dallas -- Planning for an equitable city, parks that can provide services and health improvements in areas who need it most should be prioritized.

6  Green Infrastructure Suitability and Conservation Metrics, including acreage. -- From neighborhood parks to preservation lands, sites with the most opportuntity for GI improvements, suitability to implement these factors, and space to implement the most benefit should be prioritized.

7  Development Risk and Surrounding Land uses -- Parcels adjacent to new development in densifying areas should be of the highest priority to conserve. Potential park sites that are most hospitible for development due to topography, canopy cover, or access should be prioritized. Typical View of Grassland Prairie in Five Mile Creek

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Beckley Saner Park

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University Hills Blvd

Golf Club of Dallas

Laurel Land Memorial Park

Glendale Park

Singing Hills Rec Center

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Boulder Park

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Highland Hills Park

City of Dallas Boundary 20

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) and Proposed

W Wheatland Rd

Dallas Sidewalk Trail

20

City of Lancaster Trail

Duncanville

Parks / Recreation Park Gap

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

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06   Trail Vision

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TRAIL VISION

VISION

T ra il Vision

VISION FOR THE COMMUNITY Crossing Neighborhood Barriers A challenge for creating trails is the cost required to cross difficult barriers. By reducing the number of crossings or finding less restrictive routes, communities will enjoy a more connected region rather than separate, isolated communities. Interconnectivity will generate a greater sense of community and allow residents to better utilize the open spaces in the region. The barriers in this region include: highways, collectors, rail lines, difficult erosion areas, significant grade change, creeks, tributaries, and more. The proposed alignments minimize crossings and begins to address where crossings are logical and feasible. Creating Access for All Residents

Various neighborhoods along the corridor have both vacant land and common open space that is severely underutilized. By utilizing these areas for trails, trailheads and pedestrian bridges, residents will have direct connections to the trail and park greenbelt in their respective neighborhoods. Other neighborhoods currently have no access, no parks and no trails. The goal is that every resident in the area will eventually be within a ten-minute walk to a trail or park. Providing Connections to Nature and

Education During community outreach, many residents expressed that they utilize one park or none at all. With the new alignments, residents will be able to access nature, parkland, playgrounds and trails with ease. It is important to provide residents the opportunity for these connections to stay active,connect with nature to reduce stress and depression.

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TRAIL VISION

Connecting the Community to Close-to-Home Neighborhood Parks A network of fitness trails abound throughout the Five Mile Creek Corridor. Walking, hiking, rollerblading and biking, are just a few of the many activities that the trail system supports. Meet up with a friend, spend time with the kiddos, or find refuge from the urban environment here at Five Mile Creek. The trails connect you and your family to other neighborhood friends, parks and nature preserve areas.

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TRAIL VISION

VISION

PROP OSED T R A IL A LIGNMENT S

INTRODUCTION

Careful consideration was taken and studied to provide realistic and impactful trail alignments. Trail types and various levels of importance were established during the process to ensure the trail alignments are reasonable.

TRAILS Types of Trail In order to best tie into the City of Dallas and Dallas County trails, there are two denominations in this vision package: City Trails and Sidewalk Trails. 16' trails are recommended for major linear trails. Other trail widths are to be determined by future anticipated trail activities and specific schematic designs. City Trail Proposed city trails are estimated as if they are 16’ trails which are functional for multi-use trails. The trails are wide enough to provide adequate spacing between cyclists and pedestrians, ensuring safety. Two levels of trails are priced later in this section. Sidewalk Trail Where city trails are too costly or adequate land is not available, sidewalk trails become necessary to continue connections. Sidewalk widths will vary depending on availability of right-of-way.

Proposed and Future Study Proposed Trail The majority of trails in this document are recommended for inclusion in future planning and funding strategies, including city and county trail master plans. Future Study Alignments These alignments are either more difficult or do not connect as many residents to the main spine of trails.

TRAIL ALIGNMENT OBJECTIVES

Trails which are already adopted in the City of Dallas and Dallas County Trail Master plans are a great start to connecting Southern Dallas. However, there are gaps in the trail network that will help connect residents who either are not able to access a park or trail from their homes.

Alignment Objectives Many items were taken into account to find the most ideal alignments. All of the items below were studied and considered when choosing ideal trail and sidewalk alignments: 1  Ability to tie into existing or proposed trails 2  Ability to tie into existing or proposed parkland 3  Proximity to schools, institutions, and community services 4  Availability of underutilized open space and vacant land to make connections 5  Study of alignments that could reduce park gap areas 6  Accessibility options to major nodes of transportation 7  Availability of open space along tributaries and waterways 8  Location of City of Dallas owned or vacant properties to reduce obstacles in acquiring parcels or requesting easements on property owners

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71

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

S Cockrell Hill Rd

PROPOSED TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

W Illinois Ave

FOCUS AREA A

v ny

nch

ch da ms

6 ek

14

Miller Trail

15

Memory Branch Trail

16

Wilson Branch Trail

17

Highland Hills Trail Extension

18

Simpson Stuart Trail

19

Newton Creek Extension

20

South Prong Trail

21

Peacock Branch Trail

David W. Carter High School

S Polk St

ch an Br dy

e DA RT

UNT DART Stop

Library and Fire Station

15

ch

17

20

FOCUS AREA F

20

JJ Lemmon Park

n

Cr

ee

k

City of Dallas Boundary TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail

JJ Lemmon Rd

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail

FOCUS AREA E

W Wheatland Rd

to

TPL/TBG Proposed Trail

Highland Hills Park

Alta Mesa Park

ch

ran

ry B

mo

Me

13

Br an

ch

10

Lin

University Hills Blvd

UNT

k ee Cr rail T on ny belt u R en e Gr in

gs

Alta Mesa Trail

11

Sp r

13

E Camp Wisdom Rd

Ru ny on

Camp Wisdom Trail

21 Birdie Indian Alexander Ridge Elem. Park

an

12

Meadow Stone Park

10

Rickett’s Branch Park Br

Rickett’s Branch Park Trail

k Ric

ch

ish

11

Rickett’s Branch Trail

W Camp Wisdom Rd

n ra sB ett

Pa r

Newton Creek Trail

10

YMCA

12 Camp Wisdom DART Stop

Sim

ew

C ek on re wt Ne

Veteran’s Trail

9

20

The Golf Club of Dallas

S on Highland Hills

ps

N

anch

Wilson Br

Rd

8

Boulder Park MTB

Singing Hills Recreation Center

rt tua

w Vie

Alice Branch Trail B

35E

Magnolia Trace Senior Community

19

ie

7

W Red Bird Ln

McCommas Bluff Landfill

ek

16

nn

H

Alice Branch Trail A

Twin Falls Park

Laurel Land Memorial Park

Miller Family Park 14

18

Cre

Rd

Bo

G

6

W Laureland Rd

F O CE U S Bird A RLnE A D Red

on

Paul Quinn College

ls Trail

F

Woody Branch Trail

Five Mile Creek

Ne

wt

Highland Hil

E

5

FOCUS AREA H

45

nch

D

Adam’s Branch Trail

Adelle Turner Elem.

W oo

Mark Twain Trail

5 Mi Creek Greenbelt Trail

FOCUS AREA G

9

College Park

Arden Terrace Park

5

DART Red Bird Transit Center

S Hampton Rd

3

Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard

S Polk St

ile Cre

Doris Berry Trail

Gle nd Loo ale Pa r pT rail k

45

k ree ail i C lt Tr 5 M nbe e e Gr

Alta Mesa Bra

2

Dallas Executive Airport (RBD)

3

t

res Fo ity d) rin nde T t (fu ea Gr Trail

Rd

C

Ledbetter Creek Trail

Thurgood Marshall Park

8

12

d Le

w Vie

1

4

B

67

Trail Names

Veterans Park

Dr

er

tt be

nie

A

12

nT ra

Bon

Zone

Cummings Park

S Marsalis Ave

All

4 7

W Ledbetter Dr

ba

il

South Oak Cliff High School

ice Br a

Bra n

Fi G ve M re en ile be Cr lt ee Tr k ai l

Kiestwood Trail

Fruitdale Rec Center Seaton Park

FOCUS AREA C

Cedar Crest Trail

2

A

Duncanville Rd

od T rail

Zion Apostolic Temple Doris Berry Park

ur

St

two

Thomas Tolbert Elem.

er

E Kiest Blvd

W Kiest Blvd

Kies

Int

ale

k Dr

1

Westhaven Park

Ricketts Branch

n Su

Coombs Cree

Ledbetter Creek

Fivem

6.0

Dallas Sidewalk Trail City of Lancaster Trail Cemeteries Parks / Recreation Education Landfill

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

Institutions / Semi-public Water

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Commu


72

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A A

INTRODUCTION Vision

Doris Berry Trail

Overall, this area is fragmented by large industrial and light industrial land uses which makes it difficult to provide adequate connections. This area does, however, have some major trails coming into the area, so it is important to make close critical connection gaps that will make the trails most successful. For example, there is a proposed future DART stop near Westhaven Park that is important to connect the trails into.

Doris Berry Trail begins at the unfunded extension of Kiestwood Trail and runs south along Lampasas Avenue as a sidewalk connection. The sidewalk connection turns west to run along Blue Ridge Blvd. The proposed trail then runs along the eastern edge of Thomas Tolbert Elementary School to tie into the existing trails at Doris Berry Park.

Goals 1â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Plan for greater pedestrian connection to future public transportation by providing access to the future DART stops. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Connect Doris Berry Park into the larger parks & trail system.

Doris Berry Park Connection

Physical Conditions The Ledbetter trail is proposed through a highly-forested area and will require a pedestrian bridge to cross Five Mile Creek and will need to consider a safe DART crossing. Doris Berry will need to cross Blue Ridge Blvd; however, there is already a crosswalk at Blue Ridge Blvd and Los Angeles Blvd.

Kiestwood Trail Connection

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS Ledbetter Creek Trail The alignment connects into the proposed Five Mile Trail at Kiest Valley Parkway and connects to the future red DART line extension. The alignment would run adjacent to Ledbetter Creek. The area is heavily wooded and would also require thought to how it safely crosses the DART line. Ledbetter gives a great trail terminus to Five Mile Trail by allowing the new terminus to be the DART stop.

Ledbetter Creek

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73

FOCUS AREA A

Trail Types TPL/TBG Proposed Trail Dr

W Illinois Ave

Ch

Cre

ek

TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail

k

bs

al

Dallas Existing Trail

m

H ill

Co

a Tr

o

S Cockrell Hill Rd

il

Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail Parks / Recreation Education Institutions / Semi-public Water

Ledbetter Creek Trail

Difficult Crossing

1

reek

Westhaven Park

Rail Crossing

Pedestrian Bridge

W Kiest Blvd K ie s

t wo

Photo locations

od T r a il

Thomas Tolbert Elem.

12

Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail

Doris Berry Park

Zion Apostolic Temple 2

K ie s

t wo

od T r a il

S Westmoreland Rd

ter C

Doris Berry Trail

bet

Fivemile Creek

Led

Duncanville Rd

6.0

W Ledbetter Dr

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the


74

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A B

INTRODUCTION

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

Vision

Woody Branch Trail

Adam’s Branch Trail

Due to major highways crossing through this part of the study area, the neighborhoods are somewhat disconnected and cut off from the larger trail and park network. The vision for this area is to find creative crossings under highways which not only create unique environments but also provide some reprieve from hot summer sun for trail users. The underpasses could be developed similar to situations seen at the Buffalo Bayou in Houston, Texas.

This trail begins at Five Mile Trail at a difficult crossing of I-35 and TX-12 Loop. It follows along the I-35 feeder on the eastern side and would require a trail to connect where Woody Branch passes under I-35. This trail would be similar to the Buffalo Bayou trails in Houston, Texas which provide some relief from summer sun. This would require clearing of underbrush and engineering studies. See Trail Perspective on page 91 for an example of what this could look like.

Adam’s Branch trail begins to the north at the Overton Road overpass at I-35. The trail then runs alongside W Overton Rd as a sidewalk connection, then follows along portions of Adams Branch Creek as a city trail. It requires a pedestrian bridge across Five Mile Creek as it ties into the proposed Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail near Big T Plaza. It is recommended as a future study trail.

There is also a nice mix of nature trails and neighborhood connections which provide trail diversity and ample opportunity for users to access the trail network.

The trail then continues through a highlywooded area following along Woody Branch until it ties into Hunters View Ln. It follows Hunters View Ln as a sidewalk connection and crosses W Red Bird Ln to Twin Falls Park.

This trail is recommended as a future study trail. The main purpose is to connect the proposed Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail as a mostly sidewalk connection to Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard, and connecting to Woody Branch.

Goals 1  Create better connectivity from South Oak Cliff High School and the surrounding neighborhood to the larger trail network. 2  Provide trail connections for the somewhat disconnected neighborhoods between I-67 and I-35E. 3  Create trails alongside Woody Branch as nature trails, which are not found in this area. 4  Establish a trail loop for recreation, park connectivity and better access for pedestrians and cyclists.

Alice Branch Trail This trail branches off to the south from Cedar Crest Trail along the west side of South Oak Cliff High School’s running track. The trail runs parallel to Alice Branch Creek through the wooded property which contains dedicated park land. The main alignment would exit the wooded area on the southeast corner through an abandoned alleyway. The trail would continue down Vanette Ln as a sidewalk connection, then turn south down Fitzsimmons Street.

Below 35 E Bridge

Mark Twain Trail

Physical Conditions

Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard

The largest physical barriers are the highway crossings. Many of the area waterways are the back of lot lines which creates challenges to provide connected trails. However, there are some key areas that follow wooded areas and could become amazing natural areas for the community.

Conway St. & W. Ledbetter Dr.

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TRAIL VISION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

75

FOCUS AREA B

Trail Types

E Kiest Blvd

TPL/TBG Proposed Trail TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail Dallas Existing Trail

Cedar Crest Trail

Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) h

Dallas Proposed Trail

US 35 Crossing

Dallas Sidewalk Trail Cemeteries

A lli

Ad

South Oak Cliff High School

c e Br an c

n

ch

ams

Br a

67

Parks / Recreation

Bra Alice

Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Branch Trail

4

Education Institutions / Semi-public

rail nch T

Fi Gr ve M e e il nb e C el re tT e ra k il

6 7

Water Difficult Crossing

12

Pedestrian Bridge

35E

Mark Twain Trail

Photo locations Gle nda L o o l e Par k p Tr a il

Typical condition (See p 90-91)

3

rail nch T

ra dy B Woo

oo W

dy

a Br

nc

5

S Marsalis Ave

Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard

S Polk St

6.0

h

W Laureland Rd

Twin Falls Park

Laurel Land Memorial Park

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User C


76

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A C

INTRODUCTION

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

Vision

Veteran’s Trail

Physical Conditions

This portion of the study area has a great deal of untouched wooded areas, the VA North Texas Health Care Center, numerous schools, Paul Quinn College, and UNT-Dallas. It is important to provide connections to the VA hospital for veterans and families of veterans that may have limited mobility options. Creating connections for the various schools in the area also supports healthy lifestyle options, as well as safe alternative routes for children and students.

The Veteran’s Trail originates off the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail approximately 1000 feet east of Bonnie View Rd. The trail travels north through a heavily-wooded area and crosses Five Mile Creek which will require a pedestrian bridge. The trail continues north until it reaches Stag Rd. From here, it travels west as a sidewalk connection then slightly south to the adjacent neighborhood where it continues for a few blocks. The trail continues north as an easement through underutilized or vacant properties past Ledbetter to 52nd Street. The sidewalk connections meet with Veterans Drive to connect up with Veteran’s Park at the VA Hospital.

The trail conditions are quite different for each trail. The Veteran’s Trail is one that is predominantly sidewalk connections and street crossings while Newton Creek is covered with tree canopy and heavy underbrush. Newton Creek is fairly wide in areas with some erosion conditions, so thoughtful consideration should be provided when choosing how close the trail is to Newton Creek.

The Five Mile Creek Trail continues to the east, connecting the Great Trinity Forest, providing access for Paul Quinn College, and alternate routes for more mobility options and connectivity. Goals 1  Connect Veterans Park and the Veterans Hospital into the proposed Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail. 2  Take advantage of the forested area along Newton Creek to provide nature trails. 3  Provide opportunities to partner with and provide better access to Paul Quinn College.

Easement

Newton Creek Trail Newton Creek Trail connects the proposed Five Mile Creek Greenbelt trail at the convergence of Wilson Branch Trail, Highland Hills Trail, Simpson Stuart Trail and Newton Creek Trail Extension. The trail follows parallel to Newton Creek on its eastern edge through a heavilywooded area. The trail would run along the eastern edge of Paul Quinn College. This portion of the trail terminates at Simpson Stuart road where a road crossing would be required.

Veteran’s Drive

4  Provide alternate connections to the Great Trinity Forest. 5  Provide trail connections to the numerous schools in the area.

Open Space

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TRAIL VISION

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77

FOCUS AREA C E Ill

inoi

Trail Types

s Av

e

TPL/TBG Proposed Trail TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail Dallas Existing Trail Fruitdale Rec Center

In t

Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail

Seaton Park er

ur

ba

Dallas Sidewalk Trail y xp lE tr a en SC

nT ra

il

Parks / Recreation Education

yv nn

Su

Institutions / Semi-public

ale

Water

St

Difficult Crossing

r tte

e db

VA North Texas Health Care System

Le

Cummings Park Elisha M. Pease Elem School

Pedestrian Bridge

Dr

Photo locations

12

Typical condition (See p 92-93)

Veterans Park

Harry Stone Montessori

il Tra VA

Sarah Zumwalt Middle School

A. Maceo Smith New Tech High School

45

8

Bon w Vie nie

k e e a il Cr le lt Tr i 5 M e nb e e Gr

Rd

Arden Terrace Park

5 Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail

College Park

JN Ervin Elem School

9

Ne Nowton rth Cr Ex eek ten Tr sio ail n

Paul Quinn College

o

ps

Sim

d

rt R

ua

t nS

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


78

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A D

INTRODUCTION

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

Vision

Rickett’s Branch Trail

Rickett’s Branch Park Trail

The Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail terminates at the UNT-Dallas DART stop. The area has pockets of established neighborhoods intermixed with large parcels that are either underdeveloped or vacant. The area would benefit greatly from having a loop trail that connects to UNT-Dallas, but also provides nature trails.

Rickett’s Branch Trail, along with a portion of Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail, creates an approximate four and a half mile loop trail for the community. The trail alignment is almost entirely city trail as opposed to sidewalk trail.

South of E Camp Wisdom Road, Rickett’s Branch Trail splits, with the eastern split connecting to Rickett’s Branch Park then following Wesleyan Drive as a sidewalk connection to the west, to connect back with the main trail alignment. This will provide greater connectivity to the neighborhood while also providing access to an existing park for surrounding neighborhoods.

Goals 1  Create additional loop trail for residents and UNT-Dallas students. 2  Connect Rickett’s Creek Branch, which is dynamic and presents educational opportunities. 3  Create better connectivity to the UNT-Dallas DART stop for residents and students.

The trail begins at Singing Hills Recreation Center and ties into Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail. It follows along the north side of Rickett’s Branch Creek and Lazy River Drive. It continues its southwest trek to Houston School Road where further study is needed to study whether to cross the road at-grade or see if a pedestrian connection under the bridge is feasible. Rickett’s Branch Creek is quite steep in places along this stretch, so special attention is needed to study erosion and safe distances from steep embankments. The trail continues along the southern edge of the creek and will require another study when crossing E Camp Wisdom Rd. It will then continue south along the creek and split west while Rickett’s Branch Park Trail veers to the east. The trail continues through a semiwooded floodplain to Dodson Drive where it continues almost due east to University Hills Blvd to connect back into Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail.

Ricketts Branch

Physical Conditions Both trails meander along forested areas which will require tree clearing. Much of Rickett’s Branch is quite dynamic which makes the trail and surrounding conditions interesting and engaging. However, steep embankments, erosion, and complex road-crossing issues do present challenges.

E. Camp Wisdom Rd.

University Hills / UNT

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TRAIL VISION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

FOCUS AREA D

Trail Types

Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail

Thomas L Marsalis Elem School

E Red Bird Ln

TPL/TBG Proposed Trail TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail Dallas Existing Trail

Robert L Thorton Elem School

Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail

t’s ket Ric

ail h Tr c n Bra

City of Lancaster Trail

Singing Hills Rec Center

Parks / Recreation Education Camp Wisdom DART Stop

Institutions / Semi-public Water Difficult Crossing

10

Pedestrian Bridge

E Camp Wisdom Rd

Rickett’s Branch Park 11

Li RT A

k ee Cr a il on lt Tr y e n Ru e nb e Gr

ris

hB

ra

nc

h

UNT DART Stop

ch r an

sB in g

10

R Children’s First Academy

Photo locations ne

ch

D

an

University Hills Blvd

Ri c

t ke t

r sB

Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

Pa

6.0

Gateway Charter Academy

20

on uny

Sp

r

Typical condition (See p 88-89)

79


80

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A E

INTRODUCTION

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

Vision

Alta Mesa Trail

Camp Wisdom Trail

This area has access to trails but lacks connectivity. By providing a connection between Highland Hills Trail and Runyon Creek Trail, the area becomes much more connected, helping residents access recreation and public transportation.

This trail begins at the terminus of the Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail and runs parallel to E Camp Wisdom Rd. The trail crosses under the DART Blue Line - where it is already a raised line - near E Camp Wisdom Rd. The trail faces a busy crossing at South Lancaster Rd and continues east through a highly-wooded area where it will also require a pedestrian bridge crossing over Alta Mesa Branch. The trail terminates into the trails at Alta Mesa Park.

Camp Wisdom Trail begins at Camp Wisdom Rd where Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail is proposed to cross the road. The trail ties into Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail,continuing north along the west side of the Dallas South Central Police Station and eventually connecting to the Camp Wisdom DART stop. The trail continues to a dedicated park property, which is not yet developed. These lines are recommended for future study.

Miller Trail

Physical Conditions

Miller Trail is one of the shortest trails proposed in this document. The trail connects Highland Hills Trail to Miller Family Park, which improves park accessibility and awareness. Ideally, Miller Family Park would require a pedestrian bridge over Alta Mesa Branch to connect the playground and baseball field to the proposed Miller Trail.

Alta Mesa Branch, which would be crossed by Alta Mesa Trail and connect to Miller Family Park, is narrow with shallow depths. The condition will make it easier to cross with pedestrian bridges.

Goals 1  Create a nearly six-mile loop trail for the community comprised of Five Mile Creek Trail, Glendale Park Loop Trail, Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail, Alta Mesa Trail and Highland Hills Trail. 2  Provide better connectivity to Camp Wisdom DART stop for residents and students. 3  Connect Miller Family Park to Highland Hills Trail, providing accessibility and park awareness.

Alamain Dr. near Alta Mesa Park

Simpson Stuart Rd. & S. Lancaster Rd.

4  Provide connection from Alta Mesa Park and Highland Hills Trail to Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail.

Camp Wisdom DART Stop

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F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

81

FOCUS AREA E

Trail Types

12

TPL/TBG Proposed Trail TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail

k ee Cr il li e Tra t e M el F i v e e nb r G

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail

Glendale Park Loop Trail

Dallas Sidewalk Trail

Five Mile Creek

ch

Education Institutions / Semi-public

an

anch

Br

e L in

RT

Ri

ck

et

ts

Water Difficult Crossing

DA

Robert L Thorton Elem School

Parks / Recreation

Alta Mes a Br

Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail

E Red Bird Ln

Miller Family Park

342

Pedestrian Bridge

l rai rT

14

lle

Mi

l rai

om

T

Sim

sd

pW

m

Ca

12

Camp Wisdom DART Stop

Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

13

Alta Mesa

h r an c

sB

pr

nS

Alta Mesa Park

r Rd

Lancaste

R un

g

S

Trail

UNT

in

Photo locations

Trail

Dallas Police Dept - South Central

E Camp Wisdom Rd

UNT DART Stop

on

R rt tua

Highland Hills

i

k ee Cr r a il n T o ny e l t Ru e nb e r G

d

ps

Singing Hills Recreation Center

yo

6.0

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus D


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TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A F

INTRODUCTION

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

Vision

Wilson Branch Trail

Highland Hills Trail Extension

The proposed trails have the opportunity to be quiet and calming nature trails in close proximity to parks, community places, and residents. Due to proximity with Paul Quinn College, Kennedy-Curry Middle School and the Highland Hills Library, educational opportunities and programming are ideal. An example is educational signage along trails.

This trail ties into the proposed Newton Creek Trail by crossing Simpson Stuart Road. The trail requires a crossing of Newton Creek and follows parallel to the existing rail line through wetlands. The wetlands area may require a boardwalk which is a great opportunity to provide educational opportunities to be close to wetland wildlife. The trail or boardwalk continues until it reaches Wilson Branch. The trail connects into the JJ Lemon Park trail and then continues out the southern end of the park through a heavily wooded area until it reaches Bonnie View Rd where it crosses into Highland Hills Park.

This trail extension culminates from the Highland Hills Park trails and connects to the City of Dallas’ proposed Highland Hills Trail. The trail alignment proposes a slight variation from the city’s alignment in that it continues through the northern portion of a wooded tract of land rather than following the southern boundary of the same tract. This follows a shallow creek until it connects with the Highland Hills Trail that follows the electrical easement. There may be need for a very small pedestrian bridge over the creek in this portion.

Memory Branch Trail

Due to less dense development in the area, many of the proposed trails or boardwalks wind through wooded areas and a wetlands area. There are minimal difficult crossings, but will require a few pedestrian bridges and a boardwalk.

Goals 1  Create a nearly six-mile loop trail for the community, comprised of Five Mile Creek Trail, Alta Mesa Trail, Highland Hills Trail, and Wilson Branch Trail. 2  Connect Paul Quinn College into the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail system 3  Connect JJ Lemmon Park and Highland Hills Park into the into the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt Trail system. 4  Provide pedestrian access to Highland Hills Library and Fire Station. 5  Provide alternative route for south portion of Highland Hills Trail, connecting Highland Hills Park through a natural setting.

Memory Branch Trail culminates at JJ Lemon Park, connecting with existing trails by way of a pedestrian bridge over Memory Branch. The trail follows a wooded area along the north side of Memory Branch. The trail continues northwest until it reaches Highland Hills Dr, providing a connection to Highland Hills Library and Fire Station.

Newton Creek

Physical Conditions

Memory Branch

6  Connect to Tommie M Allen Recreation Center

Paul Quinn College

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TRAIL VISION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

FOCUS AREA F

Trail Types TPL/TBG Proposed Trail

Ne k ee Cr il le Tra i t e M el F i v e e nb Gr

Arden Terrace Park

wt on

College Park

Ne

TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail

45

Cre

wt

ek

on

Cr

Tra il

ee

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded)

k

Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail JN Ervin Middle School

Parks / Recreation

Paul Quinn College

Education

Wil

Alta Mes a Br

Cre ek Five Mile

son nch

Bra

anch

il Tra W

Miller Family Park

d

R rt

on

ps

Sim

M

em o

Highland Hills Library and Fire Station

il ra ry Branch T nch ra Me

Difficult Crossing Pedestrian Bridge Photo locations

15

ry B

ie

nn

Bo

Highland Hills

w Vie

nB ran ch Tra il

Rd

Trail

lso

KennedyCurry Middle School

lan

gh

Hi

Highland Hills Park

ills

dH il Tra

Alta Mesa Park

mo

Water

ch ilson Bran

JJ Lemmon Park

ua St

Institutions / Semi-public

Wi

ills

dH

n hla

il Tra 17

g

20

ew t

Alta Mesa Elem School

on Cr e

ek

Hi

N

6.0

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

83


84

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A G

INTRODUCTION Vision

Newton Creek Trail (Extension)

The following two trails have the ability to create greater connectivity to some of the largest natural open spaces in the metroplex. Connecting to the Great Trinity Forest Trail allows residents of the area to access wildlife and a major Dallas amenity.

This trail is a future area of study that runs along Newton Creek. This trail is recommended because it provides a much more natural setting connection to the Trinity Forest and the trails around it by following alongside Newton Creek and Five Mile Creek. The trail faces a few crossing issues, but provides much more pleasant experiences than the Simpson Stuart Trail. The trail will need to cross two rail lines at I-45 and TX-310; it appears most of these crossings can happen under these roads/ railroads. Further study is required to see what is feasible.

These trails could have a large impact on the community. Goals 1â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Connect the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt system to the Great Trinity Forest Trail and Joppa Preserve. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Continue the Newton Creek Trail to connect to other trails around the Trinity Forest to create loop trails.

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS

Great Trinity Forest Connection

Physical Conditions The waterways in this area are dynamic and typically have moving water.. Creating trails will require selective clearing of forested areas as well as addressing some complex crossings of highways, rail lines and large road sections.

Newton Creek

Simpson Stuart Trail The Simpson Stuart Trail begins at Newton Creek Trail and follows as a sidewalk connection to the funded Great Trinity Forest Trail. The trail will be entirely sidewalk connections and faces some crossing issues when crossing two rail lines, I-45, as well as facing tight right-of-way opportunities as it crosses TX-310. The trail connects into the Great Trinity Forest Trail at the Joppa Preserve.

JJ Lemon Park Connection

6.0


TRAIL VISION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

FOCUS AREA G

Trail Types

Joppa Preserve

TPL/TBG Proposed Trail TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail

y ni t Tri rail t ea t T Gr r e s Fo

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail Parks / Recreation

18

rt

Ne

wt on

Cre

ek

Tra il

Sim

Institutions / Semi-public

o

ps

45

a tu nS

Education

il Tra

Landfill Water McCommas Bluff Landfill

Difficult Crossing

son

Wil

Ne

Pedestrian Bridge

nch

Bra

w

to n

Cr ee

il Tra

kT ra il

16

W il

ch son Bran

Photo locations Ex

te n

Ne

JJ Lemmon Park

w

sio

to

n

n

Cr

ee

ry Branch Trail

JJ Lemmon Rd

lso

nB ran ch Tra il

New ton C r eek

mo Me

Highland Hills Park

Connection to AT&T Trail and Trinity Forest Spine Trail

310

Paul Quinn College

Wi

6.0

20

19

k

Fiv

e

le Mi

Cr

ee

k

85


86

TRAIL VISION

VISION

FOCUS A RE A H

INTRODUCTION Vision

Peacock Branch Trail

This area could potentially be one of the more utilized trails in the region, especially by cyclists heading to Boulder Park or pedestrians and families headed to the beautiful Golf Club of Dallas property.

Peacock Branch is another future study trail, which hinges upon the future of The Golf Club of Dallas. The trail branches off from South Prong Trail and would require a pedestrian bridge. The trail continues through the southeast corner of the Golf Club property. The Trail crosses W Camp Wisdom Road and would require another pedestrian bridge just south of the road. The trail continues through a heavily wooded area to Indian Ridge Park and on the eastern boundary of Birdie Alexander Elementary School.

Goals 1â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Provide safer and better connectivity to Boulder Park Mountain Bike Trails. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Create connections to schools and future city parks.

TRAIL ALIGNMENTS South Prong Trail South Prong Trail is a future study trail alignment that begins at the southern boundary of Twin Falls Park. The trail crosses Polk Street at a narrow crossing that will require study. The trail continues parallel to the creek and into what is currently The Golf Club of Dallas. The trail continues through the adjacent neighborhood, crosses S Hampton Road, and connects to the YMCA. The trail continues alongside another neighborhood to reach another challenging crossing at I-67. This crossing could be similar to sub-highway crossings in Houston, Texas at Buffalo Bayou. The trail terminates into Boulder Park, which is a popular mountain-biking park. A key component of whether this trail is feasible is the outcome of the future of The Golf Club of Dallas property. South Prong Trail could make a great amenity and connector for the region.

I-67 Underpass

The trail continues through wooded areas and neighborhoods to follow alongside W Wheatland road and connect to David W Carter High School and future park land. Physical Conditions

S Polk Crossing

The waterways in this area are quite steep and range from narrow to wide. Some of the connections in the area will be difficult if trying to follow adjacent to the streams, as many have back-of-lot residential conditions. The area also has several difficult roadway and highway crossings, which will need further study.

W Wheatland Road

6.0


TRAIL VISION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

FOCUS AREA H Thurgood Marshall Park DART Red Bird Transit Center

Trail Types TPL/TBG Proposed Trail TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail Adelle Turner Elem.

Dallas Executive Airport (RBD)

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail Parks / Recreation Education

67

Institutions / Semi-public

Twin Falls Park

n

ird L

ed B WR

Water

Boulder Park MTB

Difficult Crossing The Golf Club of Dallas YMCA

20

Pedestrian Bridge

South Prong Trai

Photo locations

l Beckley Heights Park TG Terry Elem School

Peaco ck Bra

nch Tr ail E Kimwood Dr

Peacock B ranch

Meadow Ronald E Stone McNair Elem Park School

S Polk St

W Camp Wisdom Rd S Hampton Rd

6.0

Birdie Alexander Elem.

Indian Ridge Park

21

Umphrey Lee Elem School

David W Carter High School W Wheatland Rd 20

Danieldale Park

Typical condition (See p 90-91)

87


88

VISION

RICK E T T â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BR A NCH T R A IL

TRAIL VISION

6.0


6.0

TRAIL VISION

Increasing Safety Trails are used throughout the day and into the evening. Strategic lighting provides safety and access for all. Go for a stroll in the cool of a summer evening. Take the dog for a walk after work in the winter. Run before work in the mornings. Meet up with a friend down the street.

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

89


90

VISION

WOODY BR A NCH T R A IL AT I - 3 5 CROSSING

TRAIL VISION

6.0


6.0

TRAIL VISION

Transformed Spaces Once isolated and overgrown spaces become hubs for activity as trails weave throughout the Five Mile Creek corridor. Bridges provide a refuge of shade from the Texas heat. Pedestrians are able to navigate through formerly unmaintained landscapes.

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

91


92

VISION

CROSSING A ND ENG AGING W IT H WAT ER

TRAIL VISION

6.0


6.0

TRAIL VISION

Better connectivity and access to water Five Mile Creek provides users with opportunities to engage with the creek unlike before. Bridges nestled into the trees become iconic pieces in the landscape and serve and meeting places for social activities. Children enjoy throwing rocks into the water from above. Timeless amenities keep Five Mile Creek vibrant and bursting with activity.

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

93


94

TRAIL VISION

VISION

COST & PH ASING

COSTING Strategies for Implementation Trail-cost estimations are based upon a series of preferences and priorities. Priorities are separated from desires identified during the community engagement process. A range of costs are outlined for each trail segment in the Five Mile Creek Corridor. The cost estimate is based on a one-mile trail segment and defines key variables to consider for a low-cost trail versus a high-cost trail. Costs do not include land acquisition or professional design fees. A low-cost trail option includes a 16’ concrete trail at 5” thickness, one 70’ pedestrian bridge for every two miles of trail, two benches and one trash receptacle per 1/2 mile rest area, trail signage, sod, 15% design costs, insurance, bonds and general contractor overhead and profit.

A high-cost trail option includes everything in the low-cost option plus 3” canopy trees every 250’, one dog waste station per mile of trail, one drinking fountain per two miles of trail, an electrical panelboard per two miles of trail, irrigation, LED bollards every 100’, art installed every two miles, shrub beds and trailhead signage. Costs for each trail segment are segmented in the corresponding table to the right. This is a broad overview of potential trail costs and more consideration should be taken to refine numbers as the implementation process moves forward.

Equitable Amenities In many neighborhoods, trail amenities are funded and provided by friends of groups and neighborhood associations. In an effort to address environmental equity, especially in low income, underserved areas, implementers should consider furnishing more amenities than the standard to contribute to a more equitable park system. This means considering the highest cost tier when implementing a new project in many parts of the Five Mile Creek corridor.

6.0


6.0

TRAIL VISION

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

95

TRAIL SEGMENT INFORMATION TABLE

Trail Segments Segment

Linear Feet

Mile

Future Study?

Notes

Council District

Cost Valuation

1

Ledbetter Creek Trail

3,076

0.58

No

Concrete Trail

Need DART rail crossing and Pedestrian Bridge over Five Mile Creek

3

$

2

Doris Berry Trail

2,493

0.47

No

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

NA

3

$

3

Mark Twain Trail

5,635

1.07

Future

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Crossing Loop 12 and Pedestrian Bridge over Woody Branch

4

$$$

4

Adam’s Branch Trail

5,091

0.96

Future

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Crossing under I-35 and Pedestrian Bridge over Five Mile Creek

4

$$

5

Woody Branch Trail

8,670

1.64

No

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Crossing at Loop 12, Crossing under I-35 and crossig at Laureland Rd

3,4

$$$

6

Alice Branch Trail A

6,371

1.21

No

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

NA

3

$$$

7

Alice Branch Trail B

4,595

0.87

Future

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

NA

4

$$

8

Veteran’s Trail

8,870

1.68

No

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Crossing Bonnieview Rd and Pedestrian Bridge over Five Mile Creek

3,4,8

$$$

9

Newton Creek Trail

5,637

1.07

No

Concrete Trail

Heavily Wooded with potential wetlands

8

$$$

10

Rickett’s Branch Trail

17,152

3.25

No

Concrete Trail

Crossing at University Hills, Crossing at E Camp Wisdom Rd and Pedestrian Bridge at Parish Branch

3,8

$$$$

11

Rickett’s Branch Park Trail

1,994

0.38

No

Concrete Trail

NA

8

$

12

Camp Wisdom Trail

3,160

0.60

Future

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Crossing at E Camp Wisdom Rd

3,8

$

13

Alta Mesa Trail

5,066

0.96

No

Sidewalk

Pedestrian Bridge at Alta Mesa Branch and Crossing under Lancaster Rd.

3,8

$$

14

Miller Trail

667

0.13

No

Sidewalk

NA however there is a Pedestrian Bridge needed within Miller Family Park to connect to trail

3,8

$

15

Memory Branch Trail

4,162

0.79

No

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Pedestrian Bridge at Memory Branch

8

$$

16

Wilson Branch Trail

6,325

1.20

No

Concrete Trail and Sidewalk

Crossing at Simpson Stuart Rd, Pedestrian Bridge over Newton Creek

8

$$$

17

Highland Hills Trail

3,649

0.69

No

Concrete Trail

NA

8

$$

18

Simpson Stuart Trail

6,409

1.21

No

Sidewalk

Crossing at Rail, I-45, TX-310 and another rail line

8

$$$

19

Newton Creek Extension

9,776

1.85

Future

Concrete Trail

2 Pedestrian Bridges over Newton Creek, Crossings at I-45, TX-310 and two rail lines.

8

$$$

20

South Prong Trail

9,166

1.74

Future

Concrete Trail

Crossing under I-67 and crossing at Polk Street

4

$$$

21

Peacock Branch Trail

9,919

1.88

Future

Concrete Trail

Pedestrian bridge over South Prong Creek and Peacock Branch

4, 8

$$$

Zone

A

B

C D E F G H TOTALS

Trail Type

23.20 This cost valuation is a rough estimate based on linear trail length. $ represents an approximate starting price around $100,000 $$$$ represents an approximate starting price around $2,200,000


96

TRAIL VISION

VISION

T R A IL PRIORIT IZ AT ION RECOMMENDAT IONS NEW TRAIL RECOMMENDATIONS

All the proposed trails are important elements of the greenbelt vision and gaining site control to the areas proposed is essential to protecting the tributaries from private development, but because of the number of additions to the existing trail network, the study areas above have been prioritized. This prioritization is for new trail ranking only, but areas with both park and trail opportunities should also be considered high priority. Trail Study Areas by Priority 1  Study Area D 2  Study Area B 3  Study Area F

NEXT STEPS FOR CITY TRAILS -- Connects Schools, Institutional Facilities, or Cultural Centers to Each Other

3  Improves the Green Network -- Creates a Loop or Connects Existing Trails to Each Other -- Connects Institutional Facilities or Schools to Parks

4  Areas within or Adjacent to Smart Growth for Dallas Conserve Priority Parcels Percent Increase in Service Area of the 10-Minute Walk Metric (1/4 mile walk radius). Highest Priority Trail Listed Criteria Met Study Area D

4  Study Area G & C

-- High number of schools and institutional facilities

5  Study Area A & E

-- Connects directly to two schools

6  Study Area H

-- Connects directly to the Cedar Crest Trail which connects to two Dart Light Rails Stations

Priority Considerations 1  Increases Mobility and Access to Transportation -- Creates Off-Street Connections Public Transit Facilities to Institutional Facility, Community Assets -- Connects Existing Trails to Public Transit Facilities -- Connects Residential Areas to Public Transit Facilities

2  Improves Pedestrian Access to Institutional Facilities -- Connects Existing Trails to Schools -- Connects Existing Trails to Institutional Facilities and Cultural Centers

-- Includes Target Conserve Acquisition Parcels for new Park Creation -- Includes initiated neighborhood scale improvement project focused on connectivity, health and wellness, and community vitality.

Study Area B -- High number of schools and institutional facilities -- Connects directly to two schools -- Connects directly to the Cedar Crest Trail which connects to two Dart Light Rails Stations -- Includes Target Conserve Acquisition Parcels for new Park Creation -- Includes initiated neighborhood scale improvement project focused on connectivity, health and wellness, and community vitality.

Developers and organizations wishing to assist in planning, funding, design, and construction of unbuilt trails already in the City of Dallas Trail Network Plan should work with the parks department to determine strategy and may refer to the following status remarks: Five Mile Creek Planned Trails Chalk Hill Trail to Briar Grove Park -- Planned for in trail document, but no additional work has been committed. -- Next Steps: Fund study, design, and construction of segment

Briar Grove Park -- Planned for in trail document, but no additional work has been committed. -- Determine next steps with City of Dallas

Briar Grove to Kiest Trail -- Design and construction documentation completed, but construction is unfunded. -- Fund construction

Kiest Conservation Area Bridge -- Planned for in trail document, but no additional work has been committed. -- Organizations are seeking funds for bridge to connect to existing trail, providing a solution to the trail gap.

Kiest Park East Boundary to Glendale Park Loop -- Fund feasibility study

Glendale Park to Arden Terrace Trail -- Bond funding exists for design and some portion of construction dependent on results of study. City of Dallas is analyzing in an effort to release funds.

College Park to Joppa Preserve -- Planned for in trail document, but no additional work has been committed.

Additional Planned Trails Runyon Creek Trail -- Phase 1 completed terminating at Singing Hills -- Phase 2 planned, designed, and funded to UNT Dallas. Construction will be initiated in 2019

Cedar Crest / Honey Springs Trail -- Fully funded to Illinois DART light rail station. -- Currently under construction. Expected completion in 2019

Chalk Hill Trail -- Design completed. Construction awaiting additional funding for additional costs associated with engineering needs.

6.0


TRAIL VISION

97

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

S Cockrell Hill Rd

TRAIL FOCUS AREA PRIORITY MAP

W Illinois Ave

FOCUS AREA A PRIORITY 5

nch

ch

ek

14

Miller Trail

15

Memory Branch Trail

16

Wilson Branch Trail

17

Highland Hills Trail Extension

18

Simpson Stuart Trail

19

Newton Creek Extension

20

South Prong Trail

21

Peacock Branch Trail

David W. Carter High School

S Polk St

ch an Br

e Lin DA RT

UNT DART Stop

15

FOCUS AREA E PRIORITY 5

to

JJ Lemmon Park

n

Cr

ee

k

City of Dallas Boundary

Highland Hills Park

Alta Mesa Park

ch

ran

ry B

mo

Me

17

ch

dy

10

12 Camp Wisdom DART Stop

Library and Fire Station

13

Br an

Alta Mesa Trail

UNT

k ee Cr rail T on ny belt u R en e Gr in

gs

13

11

Sp r

Camp Wisdom Trail

Meadow Stone Park

E Camp Wisdom Rd

Rickett’s Branch Park

21 Birdie Indian Alexander Ridge Elem. Park

10

Ru ny on

12

University Hills Blvd

Rickett’s Branch Park Trail

k Ric

ch

11

W Camp Wisdom Rd

an

Rickett’s Branch Trail

ch

Br

10

n ra sB ett

ish

Newton Creek Trail

YMCA

Pa r

9

The Golf Club of Dallas

ew

C ek on re wt Ne

Veteran’s Trail

20

Sim

Rd

8

Boulder Park MTB

Singing Hills Recreation Center

S on Highland Hills

ps

N

anch

Wilson Br

w Vie

Alice Branch Trail B

35E

Magnolia Trace Senior Community

rt tua

ie

7

W Red Bird Ln

ek

16

nn

H

Alice Branch Trail A

Twin Falls Park

Laurel Land Memorial Park

Cre

Rd

Bo

G

6

W Laureland Rd

Miller Family Park 14

on

19

ls Trail

F

Woody Branch Trail

FOCUS AREA H - PRIORIT Y 6

FOCUS AREA D P R I EORed R I Bird T Y Ln1

wt

Highland Hil

E

5

Five Mile Creek

Ne

McCommas Bluff Landfill

18

9

Paul Quinn College

nch

D

Adam’s Branch Trail

Adelle Turner Elem.

W oo

Mark Twain Trail

5 Mi Creek Greenbelt Trail

FOCUS AREA G - PRIORIT Y 4

45 College Park

Arden Terrace Park

5

DART Red Bird Transit Center

S Hampton Rd

3

Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard

S Polk St

ile Cre

Doris Berry Trail

Gle nd Loo ale Pa r pT rail k

45

k ree ail i C lt Tr 5 M nbe e e Gr

Alta Mesa Bra

2

Dallas Executive Airport (RBD)

3

t

res Fo ity d) rin nde T t (fu ea Gr Trail

Rd

C

Ledbetter Creek Trail

Thurgood Marshall Park

8

12

d Le

w Vie

1

4

B

67

Veterans Park

Dr

er

tt be

nie

A

12

nT ra

Bon

7

Trail Names

Cummings Park

S Marsalis Ave

All

4

6

Zone

ba

il

South Oak Cliff High School

ice Br a

Bra n

da ms A

Duncanville Rd

Fi G ve M re en ile be Cr lt ee Tr k ai l

Kiestwood Trail

Fruitdale Rec Center Seaton Park

FOCUS AREA C - PRIORIT Y 4

Cedar Crest Trail

2

W Ledbetter Dr

ur

St

od T rail

Zion Apostolic Temple Doris Berry Park

er

ale

two

Thomas Tolbert Elem.

Int

E Kiest Blvd

W Kiest Blvd

Kies

v ny

FOCUS AREA B PRIORITY 2

k Dr

Westhaven Park

Ricketts Branch

n Su

Coombs Cree

1

Ledbetter Creek

Fivem

6.0

TPL/TBG Rd JJ Lemmon

Proposed Trail

TPL/TBG Proposed Future Study Trail Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded)

20

Dallas Proposed Trail Dallas Sidewalk Trail

FOCUS AREA F PRIORITY 3

W Wheatland Rd

20

City of Lancaster Trail Cemeteries Parks / Recreation Education

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

Institutions / Semi-public Water

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Commu


98


07   Future Study Areas

Kiest Conservation Area


100

F U T U R E S T U DY A R E A S

VISION

Future Study A reas

OAK CLIFF GOLF COURSE

Opened in 1953 as the Oak Cliff Country Club, the Perry Maxwell-designed golf course holds an important place in the southern Dallas community. Although still in operation as a golf course today, in recent years there have been attempts to transform the 152-acre golf course into residential development. Three tributaries of Five Mile Creek merge near the center of the property, and any future development should consider opportunities for hike-bike trails to connect with nearby Boulder Park and Twin Falls Park.

SOUTH I-20 CONNECTION

Near the southern limits of the city and the connection to the City of Lancaster, this portion of Dallas is rapidly developing with warehouses and other industrial uses. Consideration should be given to acquiring and protecting land for future use as park and open space.

DUNCANVILLE CONNECTION

Five Mile Creek rises just north of the boundary between City of Duncanville and City of Dallas, offering an opportunity to connect the two communities via a trail or veloweb. Using as a guide the burgeoning trail system along the Trinity River (which connects Dallas, Irving, Grand Prairie, and other cities), extending the Five Mile Creek Greenbelt into Duncanville would provide enhanced transportation and recreation options for these two cities.

LEDBETTER / I-35 CONNECTION

Three branches of Five Mile Creek converge near the cloverleaf intersection of IH-35 and Ledbetter Dr. (Loop 12). Implementing a safe and cost-effective solution for crossing these highways will be critical to the success of the greenbelt. Future study of this crossing could be funded and led by the North Central Texas Council of Governments or TxDOT.


F U T U R E S T U DY A R E A S

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

101

st T rai l Cre da r

lvd

tB

Ce

Beckley Saner Park

ity rinrail T t ea st T Gr ore F

E

es Ki

Kiest Park

Int eru

rb

Su

Oak Cliff Nature Preserve

W Illinois Ave

S Marsalis Ave

il ra ll T Hi

Elmwood Parkway Trail

k al

Ch

S Beckley Ave

FUTURE STUDY AREAS

yv nn

Tra il

ale

W Kiest Blvd

an

St

Trin i Ce ty Au nte du r Tr bon ail

Cummings Park

Kiestwood Trail

Beckley Heighs Park

ster Rd

S Polk St

35E

Laurel Land Memorial Park

Singing Hills Rec Center

Miller Family Park

S Lanca

S Hampton Rd

Twin Falls Park

d

rt R

on

ps

Sim

a Stu

s Trali

Boulder Park

W Red Bird Ln

University Hills Blvd

S Westmoreland Rd

OA K C L I F F G O L F C O U R S E

45

ek ile Cre Five Mnbelt Trail Gree

Glendale Park

Highland Hill

DUNCANVILLE

Rd

Thurgood Marshall Park

rve se ils e r a P Tra pp re Jo Natu

iew ie V

67

12

nn

12

Bo

LEDBET TER / I-35 Fi Grve M ee ile nb C elt ree Tra k il Gle n Loodale p Tr Park ail

Hutchins

I-20 SOUTH

W Camp Wisdom Rd

Highland Hills Park

Alta Mesa Park

k reerail C on lt T ny be Rureen G

City of Dallas Boundary 20

Dallas Existing Trail Dallas Planned Trail (Funded) and Proposed

W Wheatland Rd

Dallas Sidewalk Trail

20

City of Lancaster Trail

Duncanville

Parks / Recreation Park Gap

City of Dallas

Desoto

Lancaster

Lakes


102


08   Appendix

Five Mile Creek Greenbelt


104

APPENDIX

VISION

SEL EC T SURV E Y PREF ERENC E QUEST IONS Five Mile Creek Vision Plan - Paper Version Park Design Preferences Parks can be designed in many diďŹ&#x20AC;erent ways. Parks can feel wild and natural, polished and sophisticated, and there are countless possibilities in between. Please take a look at these park photos and and then answer the questions below.

12. Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above?

13. Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above?

I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this park.

I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this park.

I would visit this park often if it were close to where I live.

I would visit this park often if it were close to where I live.

I might occasionally visit this park if it were close to where I live.

I might occasionally visit this park if it were close to where I live.

I would be unlikely to visit this park.

I would be unlikely to visit this park.

Why did you choose this answer?

Why did you choose this answer?

14. Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the trail above? I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this trail.

11. Which statement below best describes your thoughts on the park above? I would be willing to travel to another part of town to visit this park. I would visit this park often if it were close to where I live. I might occasionally visit this park if it were close to where I live. I would be unlikely to visit this park. Why did you choose this answer?

I would visit this trail often if it were close to where I live. I might occasionally visit this trail if it were close to where I live. I would be unlikely to visit this trail. Why did you choose this answer?

8.0


APPENDIX

105

F I V E M I L E C R E E K G R E E N B E LT

10 - MINUT E WA LK PRO JEC T IMPAC T: T R A IL S Five Mile Creek study area: Potential trails ParkImpactâ&#x201E;˘ Analysis DALLAS, TEXAS

DRAFT

December 28, 2018

Demographic statistics Demographic category

INDIVIDUALS

Total population*

Newly-served population*

Total population

43,115

15,354

Age 19 and younger

11,996

4,286

20-64 years old

23,571

8,424

Over 64 years old

7,548

2,641

White

5,209

1,568

Black

32,431

11,866

American Indian/Alaska Native

142

57

Asian

270

85

17

3

4,272

1,520

767

246

Hispanic origin**

8,548

2,793

Under 75% median household income

7,360

2,580

75%-125% median household income

2,272

771

Over 125% median household income

5,073

1,884

Pacific Islander Other race Two or more races

HOUSEHOLDS

8.0

*Within a combined 10-minute walk service area of 18 potential trails within the Five Mile Creek study area. "Newly-served population" refers to people that are not already within a 10minute walk service area of an existing park or trail. 2017 Forecast Census Block Groups provided by Esri **U.S. Census captures Hispanic origin separate from race Dallas median household income: $46,644


Profile for Molly Plummer

Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt Masterplan  

The Trust for Public Land, TBG Partners, and City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department have worked with Southern Dallas residents to cre...

Five Mile Creek Urban Greenbelt Masterplan  

The Trust for Public Land, TBG Partners, and City of Dallas Park and Recreation Department have worked with Southern Dallas residents to cre...

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