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THE NEW MOOD N°65 2019


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18 Chairman SHAHAB IZADPANAH

EDITORIAL

PUBLISHING

Editor in Chief MOJEH IZADPANAH

Sales Director NADINE CHEHABEDDINE

Managing Editor NATASCHA HAWKE

Digital Sales Manager ZENA LOUAY

Acting Fashion & Beauty Editor DINA KABBANI

Office Manager JULIA NICOLAE

Sub-Editor SARAH WALKER-DUFTON

Senior Publishing Executive DESIREE LABANDA-GAVERIA

Contributing Editors ANNIE DARLING LUCY WILDMAN LAURA BEANEY HAFSA LODI NINA CATT

Paris Representative GHISLAIN DE CASTELBAJAC

Guest Fashion Stylists CELIA-JANE UKWENYA STUART ROBERTSON KELLY-ANN HUGHES ANNA KLEIN

Subscription Tel: +971 4 553 90 49 Email: subs@mojeh.com

Advertising Inquiries Tel: +971 4 553 90 49 Email: advertising@mojeh.com

LOUIS FOURTEEN FOR MOJEH

Contributing Photographers CHANTELLE DOSSER MALAK KABBANI BORNA AHADI JENNY BROUGH GREG ADAMSKI TINA PATNI

Tel: +971 4 425 86 00 Email: louis@louisfourteen.com Published under HS Media Group FZ LLC Registered at Dubai Design District Building No. 8, Offices 212 P.O.Box 502333, Dubai, UAE.

ART Production and Creative Direction MOJEH MAGAZINE Art Director AMIRREZA AMIRASLANI Graphic Designer BALAJI MAHENDRAN

Cover photographed by JENNY BROUGH Model Kristin Lilja wears DIOR HAUTE COUTURE

WWW.MOJEH.COM Louis Fourteen for MOJEH Follow us on Twitter @MOJEH_Magazine MOJEH Swiss Representative Office: Rue de Rive 4, 1204 Geneva, Switzerland Average qualified circulation (February-June 2018): 11,077 copies For the UAE printed by Emirates Printing Press LLC. Distribution- UAE: Al Nisr Distribution LLC. Bahrain: Jashanmal & Sons BSC (C). Oman: United Media Services LLC. Lebanon: Messageries Du Moyen-Orient The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessary those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the readers particular circumstances. The ownership of trademark is acknowledged, therefore reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All credits are subjects to change. Copyright HS MEDIA GROUP FZ LLC 2011


20 CONTRIBUTORS ZIGA MILHELCIC, Slovenian, photographer

CELIA-JANE UKWENYA British, stylist

Ziga shot supermodel body activist

Dubai-based

Ashley Graham with Italian fashion

styled Ashley Graham in the denim

designer Fausto Puglisi for Body Talk

collection the model designed for

on page 96.

Marina Rinaldi. See the full shoot in

stylist

Celia-Jane

Body Talk on page 96.

Describe your photography style. I would say my style is all about

How long have you been a stylist? 11 years.

shapes, beautiful light and a natural looking edit of the photos.

Any favourite styling memories? Working as stylist for Scissor Sisters

What inspires you? Different things inspire me – sometimes locations,

and on a styling team for Lady Gaga back in London.

sometimes models and, very often, beautiful natural light.

How was it to work with Ashley Graham? She was a dream! A massive

How was working with Ashley Graham? It was such a joy working

ball of energy and positivity and smiles. Such an inspirational boss lady.

with Ashley! She has amazing energy and the whole mood was so

What book are you reading at the moment? All I seem to be reading

relaxed. We had so much fun shooting with her.

these days are briefs for shoots!

Who would you love to work with? I would love to work with other

What’s important to you? Balance in life, maintaining inner peace and

supermodels such as Anja Rubik, Gigi Hadid, Elsa Hosk and Kaia

happiness, and treating others how I would like to be treated.

Gerber. There’s literally so many, I could go on and on.

What are you looking forward to this year? The birth of my baby boy.

What films are you currently watching? The last movie I watched

What do you do in Dubai to relax? Lock my phone in a cupboard

was Bohemian Rhapsody, but to be honest I’m more into series lately.

during weekends or when I want to relax.

What are you shooting next? I actually don’t know because bookings usually come so last minute!

GREG ADAMSKI, Polish, photographer

Ashley Graham wears her own design denim collection for Marina Rinaldi

Greg photographed model Jak B in glorious Dior jewellery pieces for La Dolce Vita on page 226. He lives in Dubai.

How would you describe your shooting style? I would always like to define my style as cinematic. I cherish the classic and natural in photography, based on real emotions. What do you love to shoot the most and why? I’m inspired by a woman’s beauty. On that basis, I can build the fashion story. Who would you love to have around a dinner table? Edward Hopper, Ansel Adams and Guy Bourdin. I think that would be an interesting mix. If you could photograph anyone, who would it be? Probably some interesting actresses and actors. Whose work you are inspired by? I like pictures by Txema Yeste. What is your greatest wish? To travel back to the 1930s and take pictures around the world. Where are you travelling next and why? I’m planning a trip to Japan in search of the new inspiration for my pictures.  Where do you go to relax in Dubai? I enjoy weekends on the beach and exploring the traditional culture of the Middle East.


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33

MOJEH TRIBUTE: KARL LAGERFELD A tribute to Karl Lagerfeld, creative director of Fendi, Chanel and his

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eponymous label, we say goodbye to the world’s number one designer

BE INSPIRED Upgrade your wardrobe with painterly prints and Pop Art-themed accessories

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STYLE EDIT How to navigate the new season, from tie-dye prints to

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raffia bags, we’ve got you covered

FAN GIRLS Four women with strong personal style share their love for the designers that feed their imaginations and fill their wardrobes


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96

BODY TALK

Model Ashley Graham and designer Fausto Puglisi sit down to dissect

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plus-size fashion – who’s doing it, who’s not doing it, and why – and the

responsibility of a self-proclaimed body activist

MODEST MAGNETISM As Petar Petrov makes his first visit to the Middle East, MOJEH meets the designer, whose quiet charm and understated successes are the very embodiment of his modern, modest aesthetic

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IN THE LIGHT OF THINGS Heady combinations of metallic florals paired with leather pleats

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and oversized ruffles make a case for future vintage style this spring

CHEAT SHEET ’19 From over-the-top feathers to spandex-like biker shorts and magenta two-piece suits, here is what you’ll be wearing for S/S19


M y Tw i n C o l l e c t i o n w i t h G i g i H a d i d

# D i a mo nd A d d i ct i o n


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THE BIG REVEAL Glorious timepieces treated as works of art sit pretty alongside bold

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and beautiful jewels that will shine bright this March

LA DOLCE VITA Overindulge in diamonds for a taste of the good life

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MODERN MASTERPIECES Spring/summer’s new mood supplies a palette of pretty colours,

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a smattering of shimmer, and unrivalled tools of the trade.

These are the beauty heroes of the season

THE ART EDIT The must-see events and exhibitions of the UAE’s most artistic month


CALIBER RM 07-01


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EDITOR’S LETTER

A NEW MOOD This March issue marks a sad time for the fashion world. As we are sending to press, the news that Karl Lagerfeld has passed away in Paris, aged 85, is saturating the headlines and social media. The designer, whose shows I have had the pleasure of attending for nearly a decade, is arguably the most recognisable figure in fashion today, and as creative director of Fendi, Chanel and his eponymous label, his contribution to the pages of this magazine has been immense. Please join us in remembering Karl and his game-changing collections in our retrospective on page 33, which celebrates our many photoshoot collaborations with Chanel since the magazine’s inception, from the 2012 pre-collection to last season’s cruise. Another fashion powerhouse who we celebrate in this issue is supermodel Ashley Graham who is changing the way women view their bodies. In a MOJEH first, Italian fashion designer Fausto Puglisi sits down with the Nebraska-born model to discuss their collaborations with plus-size fashion brand Marina Rinaldi, the responsibilities that come with being a model in 2019 and why curvy is always sexy. Turn to Body Talk, page 96, to read the full interview, or log on to MOJEH.com to watch the video. Celebrating the new mood the spring collections are ushering in, led by Maria Grazia Chiuri’s spring haute couture collection for Dior featured in our cover shoot Clowning Glory on page 112, the March issue is optimistic, creative and fun. Navigate the trends in our annual spring catwalk report on page 146, learn how to wear them in the Style Edit and go behind-the-scenes for beauty inspiration in the Backstage Beauty Report, page 236. A bumper issue that will set you up for the season – take it all in, learn from it, and put it to the test.

Follow me on Twitter and Instagram @Mojeh_I and write to me at editor@mojeh.com

Mojeh Izadpanah Editor in Chief

Above: Photographed by Jenny Brough, Below: Photographed by Chantelle Dosser


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2 3 1

4 5

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THE MOJEH EDIT Timeless lace, chic camel and classic accessories evoke carefree glamour for a perfect lesson in transseasonal dressing.

1. TABITHA SIMMONS X JOHANNA ORTIZ at MODA OPERANDI | 2. ROMANCE WAS BORN at MATCHES FASHION | 3. LUCY FOLK at NET-A-PORTER | 4. BULGARI | 5. SANAYI 313 at MATCHES FASHION | 6. STAUD at MODA OPERANDI | 7. REJINA PYO at FARFETCH

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32 Photographed by Jenny Brough

SUBSCRIBE TO MOJEH MEN MAGAZINE HAVE THE VERY BEST IN STYLE DELIVERED DIRECTLY TO YOU. Call or email us at +971 4 553 9049 and subs@mojeh.com


A TRIBUTE

Karl Lagerfeld

1933 - 2019 In a career spanning seven decades, German-born designer Karl Lagerfeld not only changed the landscape of fashion, he revolutionised in his wake some of the industry’s most iconic houses. From ChloÊ to Fendi and most notably Chanel, his loss on the industry is immeasurable, his creative genius irreplaceable. He will always remain ahead of his time, a visionary who invented the future.


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Always Look Back Chanel haute couture winter 2013 MOJEH 16 | September/October 2013 Photographer: Riccardo Vimercati Stylist: Guillaume Boulez


Little Can Be Here Chanel spring/summer 2014 MOJEH 19 | March/April 2014 Photographer: Philip Riches Stylist: Guillaume Boulez

Bedazzled at the Place Vendome Chanel pre-fall 2012 MOJEH 10 | September/October 2012 Photographer: Federico de Angelis


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Unique Encounters

Last Dance

Chanel spring/summer 2016

Chanel cruise 2017

MOJEH 35 | March 2016

MOJEH 43 | December/January 2017

Photographer: Michelle Du Xuan

Photographer: Liv Friis-Larsen

Stylist: Camille-JosĂŠphine Teisseire

Stylist: Kelly Baldwin

Soul of Spring Chanel spring/summer 2017 MOJEH 45 | March 2017 Photographers: Joseph Paradiso and Yuki Tseng Stylist: Davian Lain


Gilded Gardenia Chanel haute couture spring 2015 MOJEH 25 | March/April 2015 Photographer: Anthony Arquier Stylist: Guillaume Boulez


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Flecks of Gold Chanel autumn/winter 2018 MOJEH 61 | October 2018 Photographer: Rocio Ramos Stylist: Cristina Perez-Hernando


In Motion Chanel cruise 2019 MOJEH 63 | December / January 2019 Photographer: Benoit Peverelli Stylist: Daneenart Burakasikorn

Castaway Chanel cruise 2018 MOJEH 53 | December/January 2018 Photographer: Vivienne Balla Stylist: Kelly Baldwin

Walk This Way Chanel haute couture winter 2018 MOJEH 62 | November 2018 Photographer: Chantelle Dosser Stylist: Anna Klein


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Be

Upgrade your wardrobe with painterly prints and Pop Art-themed accessories

Inspired Photographed by Tina Patni Styled by Stuart Robertson

Bag, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO


Watches (from top): HUBLOT and TAG HEUER


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Boots, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN


Shoes, FENDI


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Shoes, ELISABETTA FRANCHI


Boots, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN


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Bag, DIOR


Shoes, DOLCE & GABBANA


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Bag, CHANEL


Shoes, STUART WEITZMAN


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Bag, GUCCI


Bag, KARL LAGERFELD


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Bag, VALENTINO


Shoes, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO


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Bag, LOEWE


Bag, BALLY


Photography: Benoit Peverelli / GoRunway.com

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Models frolicking barefoot in the pristine sands of Chanel’s S/S19 catwalk


STYLE EDIT

LIFE’S A BEACH Karl Lagerfeld takes Chanel to the seaside for S/S19


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Zingy, vibrant yellows intermingle with black and beige looks

The suit of the season takes on new volumes

F

ashion. It is fast-paced, ever-changing and these days, quite frankly hard to keep up with. So when the sounds of lapping waves are heard, beckoning between the maddening rush that is fashion week, it comes as no surprise that Chanel lovers would answer Karl Lagerfeld’s lazy call for a mini break. After all, what could be more inviting to those jumping from show to show in towering heels, than to kick them off and run barefoot, trouser cuffs turned up, in the champagne shores sweeping the Grand Palais at Chanel sur la plage? A spectacle for its spectators, the siesta-like story being spun was that of bare skin and midnight swims, hot lazy days spent sipping cocktails and working on golden tans. Amid the multitude of images sparked by the seaside vista, visions of Madame Coco on the shores of Deauville came to mind. Her dreamy sunset adventures spent on the Normandy coast with its expansive blue-grey skies were wonderfully conjured by Karl, full of emotion and an immense idea of freedom. And those feelings of liberation came to life as Luna Bijl opened the show floating down a long beach of fine white sand, as friends of the maison Pharrell Williams, Caroline de Maigret and Pamela Anderson watched, perched on the wooden boardwalk benches that lined the luxuriously real beach of the Grand Palais. An army of barefoot, plastic mule-carrying models followed in the house’s usual staple tweed ensembles. This spring though, the fabric came dusted in bright magentas, dusky lilacs


Spherical bags resemble inflatable beach balls

and punctuating pastels. Karl delivered the suit of the season, revisited and redone in bigger volumes, with wide-shouldered bouclé jackets over black cycling shorts. Yes, even the cult athleisure staple managed to swim its way up the shores of Chanel, evoking images of the house’s (and Karl’s) 1991 scuba-and-tweed collection; proof that the lycra-infused biker favourite is just as relevant today as it was back then. For those who came looking for dresses, there was no chance of anyone getting lost at sea, as a boatload of A-lines, slips and shifts docked at the sandy catwalk, ready to take on the summer breeze. Sun-drenched yellow was a running theme among the carefree line-up, extending into accessories in vibrant canary, zesty lemons and the palest of citrus hues – its imaginary rays spreading a golden glow on everything they touched, from vanity cases to fingerless gloves. The summer motif didn’t stop there. Waves of iridescent sequins swept over dresses, descending them into the night adorned in tulle, and yoke tops sprinkled with glitter – the star, a showstopping evening cape complete with a long leather fringe – guaranteed to cause ripples throughout the night. Pastel shades for daywear and sparkling black for lazy summer nights, it was all very real and wearable fashion, yet fabulously fun. A line-up that the body of clients at the show would most certainly give their stamp of approval. Season after season, Karl has proved his brilliance at presenting Chanel in a new light, and for S/S19, he not only managed to transport lapping waves into the heart of Paris, but reworked and replayed the house’s iconic emblem in the same nonchalant manner and spirit that overtook the 83-look collection. ‘CHA’ on one side, ‘NEL’ on the other, the new spin on the famous six-letter motif was emblazoned on bold earrings, straw caps, plastic mules and other accessories of the season, jumping out against the dune-coloured sandy setting of the show. Hard to miss was Kaia Gerber, whose branded black-and-white ensemble spelled out the maison’s name in three separate yet eye-catching places – across her belt, shirt pockets and earrings. The line-up of accessories that followed was just as difficult to ignore as the model sporting them. There were two-for-theprice-of-one bags as models walked out with double-quilted body bags crossed over the torso. The coastal atmosphere continued, as oversized terry cloth bags were reminiscent of soft cotton beach towels, while spherical bags swinging from models’ hands resembled inflatable beach balls, and totes in waterproof canvas begged to be taken out and tested on the beach. Wicker vanity cases, low-heeled transparent slides and straw chapeaus lent further levity to Karl’s summer panorama – capturing the breezy allure and seaside spirit that defined his S/S19 collection.

Parasols ran through the collection like a leitmotif


INSIDE S/S19

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MIU MIU’S PRETTY PUNKS Raw, dishevelled elegance was served up in abundance as unashamedly feminine frocks added a softer vision to Miuccia Prada’s Miu Miu punk princesses for spring. Denim was sliced and diced; hems were left unfinished, and it was all topped off with cushiony bows – plus a large dose of sequins. Diamanté bow headpieces were definitely the spotlight stealers.

Diamanté bow headpieces at Miu Miu

MIU MIU

THE CHAIN GAME The new rule of thumb when it comes to necklaces is to layer and stack. Whether it’s amulets, unusual stones or medallion coins, mix-and-match various standout pieces, then pile them on for some multi-layered allure.

COACH

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

PACO RABANNE


BIG SHOULDERS, BIG STATEMENT

LOUIS VUITTON

How does Nicolas Ghesquière see the future? If his series of conquering silhouettes are anything to go by, then it’s big, bold and voluminous. Sequin-embroidered mesh took over sculptural dresses at Louis Vuitton S/S19, floral prints mixed with the classic monogram, and hi-tech fabrications were treated with geometric motifs. The latest collection of deconstructed and exaggerated clothing mixed with sci-fi graphics is on a mission to empower women. The chosen armour? Ballooning sleeves and built-out shoulders. Yes, according to LV, self-assurance comes in the form of an oversized blouse with silky inflated sleeves this season.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

THE NEW OSCAR Photography: GoRunway.com

One thing was clear from the nomadic line-up at Oscar de la Renta S/S19, that Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia had holidayed somewhere exotic this year. The co-creative directors’ collection was a walking montage of India, Italy, Marrakech and Croatia – places they had (separately) sojourned over the summer. Rife with decorative tassels, silk embroidery, strapless sarongs and vintage blooms, it was a fresh, eclectic take on the classic Oscar de la Renta.


62 JACQUEMUS

CRAFT WORK Traditional techniques pave the way for high-end handiwork this season. Championing the homespun aesthetic is none other than Altuzarra, with its fishnetclad models giving us artisanal at its best for S/S19, complete with swinging threads and decorative belts adorned with hundreds of tiny shells, that rattled sweetly down the catwalk. Jacquemus gave us another cult accessory to covet, this time replacing his gigantic S/S18 straw hat with an equally-oversized raffia tote – a must-have for any beach savvy woman this summer.

The extravagance of Gucci continues for S/S19

GLORIOUSLY GUCCI Cue the dramatics, sparkles and vastly elaborate fashion. That’s what you get with Alessandro Michele – bucketloads of theatrics and an eclectic offering of clothes and accessories to go with it. This season, Paris was the destination for Gucci’s gang of oddballs, who took to the catwalk at Le Palace, a nightclub-turned-theatre, for what was the last chapter of the brand’s ‘French trilogy’ tribute. This started with the pre-fall campaign, followed by the cruise ’19 show, and now the S/S19 finale. And what an ending it was. In true Alessandro form, a thousand inspirations came to life walking down the aisles of Le Palace, all boasting his trademark odd sense of styling. There was Dolly Parton’s face on a sleeveless denim jacket, an elaborate pair of tassel-tiered trousers, a bedazzling leather jockstrap, a slew of excessively over-the-top beaded gowns, fronds of feathered fans, and a new bag shaped like Mickey Mouse’s head. It was pretty much all over the place, and all pretty typical of the designer. Jane Birkin unexpectedly appeared, singing a rendition of Baby Alone in Babylone as guests sat precariously perched on the edge of their seats, entranced by the legendary British singer’s midshow performance, before the spotlight returned to ALTUZARRA

the extravagant clothes on the stage of the beautifully-dramatic underground theatre. It was all quite a wild show – live cockatoo on model Mae Lapres’ shoulder, included.


MARINE SERRE

Key fob detailing from Marine Serre

WASTE NOT FASHION Since winning the LVMH Prize in 2017, Frenchborn and Belgium-trained Marine Serre has taken her small, independent fashion house on an upcycling journey, sparking a mini recycling revolution in her waste-not trail. This season was no different. Blurring the boundaries between couture and sportswear, her functionalist ready-to-wear pieces featured 50 per cent upcycled materials, reworked into what has undeniably become her trademark style. From dresses made from old white t-shirts, to evening gowns cut from fishing vests and a coat with key fob details, she left nothing to waste.

SUMMER BOOTS Ankle boots in the summer? The S/S19 catwalks made it clear the perennial winter favourite has transitioned into spring. Hold on to those last few days of cooler temperatures with a short-heeled pair.

2 1

3 1. MARQUES’ALMEIDA at BROWNS FASHION | 2. ACNE STUDIOS | 3. ELLERY at THE MODIST

PROENZA SCHOULER


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PRADA’S PRETTY YOUNG THINGS In her quest to explore the rise of youthful influence on fashion, politics and beyond, Miuccia Prada gave a collection of provocative and subversive design. Her bright young things came out dressed in schoolgirl-esque dresses, A-line tunics and ladylike coats – a tribute to 1960s and ’70s youth – all paired with kneehigh stockings. She took conservative looks and subverted them, lending an exaggerated twist to everything from sensible jumpers, which she poked holes in, to the wrap skirts that revealed nude legs through slits in their sides. It was a liberating take on the bourgeois, – incredibly strong and utterly refreshing. This sense of conformist rebellion was echoed through the accessories, which saw the return of the Alice band. In bright plush satin, decorated with sparkling crystals and metallic studs, these prettifying hair pieces will make it on to many a wish list this spring.

FENDI

PRADA

BURBERRY

GIVENCHY

THE CHIC BELT BAG Today’s version of the go-to accessory of the 1980s has little resemblance to its predecessor. Sophistication has been amped up a notch, or 10, and these slick, buttery leather iterations beg to be worn hands-free.


THE SILK ROAD

TOKEN TEES Call it the season of the mighty t-shirt, as designers embrace their love for graphic posters. There was

Traditional scarf motifs have blown up big –

Jeremy Scott’s ’90s grunge take on today’s selfie culture, via polaroids printed on t-shirts featuring

taking over patchwork tops, handkerchief dresses

images of his younger self, while for his final collection for Calvin Klein, Raf Simons paid tribute

and the silkiest of scarves. Wear a simple singular

to Steven Spielberg’s 1975 blockbuster Jaws, with shark-splashed tees that are bound to cause

piece or go head-to-toe to make a statement.

a frenzy among fans of the classic.

ISABEL MARANT at MODA OPERANDI

CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC

JEREMY SCOTT

A MAD HATTER’S WORLD There were a whole lot of squiggles at Moschino. Real-life sketches came to life on models, who walked down the catwalk clad in white fabric scribbled with marker streaks in every hue imaginable. Besides the drawn-on ’80s-inspired attire, it was the wide-brimmed chapeaus perched perfectly on the heads of the Moschino girls that stole the show. Delightful and fun, the dish-like toppers perfectly finished what was a wacky mad hatter’s S/S19 collection.

GUCCI at NET-A-PORTER

MOSCHINO

MUZUNGU SISTERS at THE MODIST


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Bag, VALENTINO

VALENTINO’S NEW TOTE First seen in September on the S/S19 catwalk, the new V-Ring handbag conveys Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli’s interpretation of the maison’s classic yet contemporary aesthetic. High quality materials and a bold new V logo finished in antique brass strike a balance between heritage, modernity and luxury, 50 years after the bag’s creation. This reinterpretation sees Valentino’s V-Ring has been given a bold new update

OUT OF OFFICE Fashion’s new-found obsession with escapism meant S/S19 collections were transported to faraway lands in search of summer romance, offering us

an

escape

from

reality.

Natacha Ramsay-Levi’s Chloé girls led the pack – their boats washing up on the shores of Ibiza and Morocco as they were clad in sarong-like skirts and head-to-toe scarf prints. A New Age take on boho offered a gang of hippy wanderers, who topped their fluid silk dresses and artisanal layers with stone-adorned harnesses and tailored blazers. It was sensual and of-the-moment, a modernist perspective on a feminine utopia, all taking place beneath the blazing Mediterranean sun. Jewellery further deepened the sweeping sense of bohemia in the form of summertime souvenirs – with plenty of beaded armbands, dangling earrings and sculptural necklaces to layer and stack.

Chloé’s S/S19 campaign by Steven Meisel

minimalism meet boldness, as a clean designed V symbolises the very essence of Maison Valentino.


ANYTHING FROM GIVENCHY Elegant sophistication embodied Clare Waight Keller’s androgynous woman for spring. She managed to capture strong femininity masterfully with her tailored tuxedo-like jackets, tucked into cargo pants.

A new dawn at Burberry

RICCARDO TISCI DEBUT When Riccardo Tisci was announced as Christopher Bailey’s successor at Burberry, his debut collection was highly hyped, and thankfully, rightly so. His first offering marked a new dawn at the esteemed English maison, as he held on to the house’s old-world luxury code, but added a 21st-century spin.

GIVENCHY

From left: GANNI at MATCHES FASHION | TIBI at THE MODIST

MODERN UTILITY Practical yet pleasing, fashionable but functional. Words that one usually won’t hear come together were all over the S/S19 catwalk. Whether in oat­meal shades or moss FENDI

green hues, utility dressing in its many colour variations was seen in oversized anoraks, utilitarian jackets, and the multi-pocketed must-have trousers of the season.


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FOR DREAMERS What does MSGM’s Massimo Giorgetti dream of? According to his latest collection, his reveries are filled with field after field of flowers, as far as the eye can see. All fuzzy and unclear, his print offerings mimicked the wonderful, misty quality of dreams. His floral garden was stretched and reinterpreted into big blooms on jackets, trench coats, trouser suits and more. Stretchy jersey dresses came in pops of red and pink, while fluid body-clinging silhouettes were painted in interesting colour blocks. Print and palette juxtapositioned, at times poetically elevated, and at others completely marketable and ready for street style consumption – something that Massimo has carved out as a trademark. And to the streets he went, with boxier shapes, logo sweatshirts and a streak of sportswear-inspired silhouettes, treated with tie-dye (handmade in Milan). For those who came in search of staple MSGM, it was there in abundance – shouting just as loudly as its floral print counterparts, and just as striking. Massimo ended his sweet, nostalgic sequence with more tie-dye, this time though, the wishy-washy print made it on to ostrich-feathered frocks and pretty ruffled denim dresses. Statement

Tie-dye shouted loudly at MSGM

making and certainly what dreams are made of.

THE DENIM JACKET Its throw-over-everything quality has made denim outerwear a wardrobe staple with season after season appeal. Effortless yet high-impact, this season’s jean jacket is a worthy investment, and anything-but-average.

BALENCIAGA at MY THERESA

MIU MIU at NET-A-PORTER

GUCCI at BROWNS FASHION


PRINT TO COVET: FANCY FLORALS

GEOMETRY CLASS This season’s boldest bag trend is taking shape in solid rectangles, odd angles, and crescent-like silhouettes. Think outside the box, and go for the more unusual and architecturally-inspired.

ARANAZ at THE MODIST

Richard Quinn’s S/S19 embellished florals were pretty show-stopping YUZEFI at MODA OPERANDI

TONYA HAWKES at OUNASS

PORTS 1961

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

ROPED IN What does expressive dressing look like in 2019? The art project of your dreams! Yes, crafty is the new word du jour, as rope tassels led the pack of artful pieces sweeping through the spring/summer collections. Championing the homespun aesthetic was Philosophy Di Lorenzo Serafini’s wanderlust theme, that will have us in knots this summer.

DANSE LENTE at MATCHES FASHION


THE ART OF FASHION

From 3D paint at Marni to Proenza Schouler’s pre-show art installations and Balenciaga’s take on Comic Sans script, S/S19’s most memorable moments were its most artistic Words by Dina Kabbani

A

MARC JACOBS

sugary-sweet extravaganza made up of voluminous bundled ruffles and froths of feathers opened the show at Marc Jacobs S/S19. Beaded chiffon was woven into floor-length gowns, fanciful frilly tops were paired with even fancier sequinned trousers, and a line-up of exaggerated clown-like silhouette dresses were conjured – for those who revel in dressing up. It was big and bold, and more importantly, dripping in sugar (pastel colours to be specific), as Marc brought to life the ever-so saccharine palettes of Irish painter Genieve Figgis. The worlds of fashion and art have been on a constant tandem of collaboration since the start, as painters, photographers, illustrators and sculptors have acted as muse, inspiration and sometimes, the missing link, to a fashion house’s seasonal collection. For S/S19, Marc used Genieve’s breathtaking cloud-like colour schemes to explore his idea of fantasy. It resulted in a glorious, mostly pastel palette of delicate silks, trapeze shapes and voluminous ruffles. It was powdery and fluffy, dream-like and magnificent, and a clear tribute to the artist, who found herself part of a special member’s club – featuring fellow artists Stephen Sprouse, Takashi Murakami and Richard Prince, with whom Marc collaborated during his role as creative director at Louis Vuitton. Berlin-based assemblage artist Isa Genzken was another creative who found her foothole in the fashion-art world for spring, this time as a full-on participant: not just a muse, but a collaborator. For Proenza Schouler’s highly-anticipated S/S19 show, one that marked the designer’s return to New York Fashion Week, Isa created an improvisational installation of mannequins (in new season garments), which greeted guests at the entrance of the venue. The art associations took off from there, planting themselves on models Kaia Gerber and Gemma Ward, who took to the catwalk in oversized shirts stitched with photographs of New York taken by Isa.

Photography: GoRunway.com; Genieve Figgis

THE INSPIRATION

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Clockwise from left: A model poses backstage at the Proenza Schouler S/S19 show dressed in an oversized shirt featuring one of artist Isa Genzken’s photographs of New York; The installation produced by Isa for the Proenza Schouler S/S19 show; The exaggerated ruffle dresses seen at Marc Jacobs; Genieve Figgis’ cloud-like colour scheme paintings; Models backstage at the Marc Jacobs S/S19 show


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Clockwise from top left: A model poses backstage at Marni’s S/S19 show in Milan; Greco-Roman collage prints at Marni; Creative director Demna Gvasalia collaborated with artist Jon Rafman to create an LED tunnel that surrounded the catwalk at Balenciaga S/S19; A close-up of one of Balenciaga’s typography-inspired dresses


LOEWE

LOEWE

Amber Valetta was another Isa-carrying vessel, who donned tote for S/S19 – one that he has named the Gate bag. a vest similar to the one the artist has been known to wear It was ambitiously crafty and highly called-for. After all, uniformly. It was all so fresh, and definitely a spin on how Loewe is a brand that is all about its bags, and in this instance, one art form can affect the other: a somewhat subtle nod of they truly did not disappoint. appreciation, from one artist/designer to another. Francesco Risso demonstrated his belief that one should treat Across the pond in Paris, championing the arts and crafts fashion as a blank canvas at the Marni showcase. He suggested aesthetic was founder of the Loewe Craft Prize, Jonathan that, just as in art, designers should know when to stop – Anderson. This year he upped the curatorial ante at Loewe to quit while ahead before overthinking ruins the end product. S/S19, bringing the concept of wearable art to life with an And it is due to this theory that we saw chopped-up corsetry artsy-intellectual exhibition scene, and sculpted busts, collage prints of spread across the UNESCO heritage classical Greco-Roman statues and “The kinetics on display dresses with finger-like paint-marks. building. Set up to reflect art that moves, the display took over three It was deliberately messy and were not just art for rooms: starting with Japanese potter incomplete, and all very reminiscent the sake of art – this Ryoji Koie’s ceramics spinning on of the way painters and sculptors was a demonstration of record turntables, followed by an work: raw, real and unafraid to get their hands dirty. Amid the adjoining space full of Lara Favaretto’s what was to come in the high-end handiwork we saw at revolving car wash brushes. The Loewe collection” kinetics on display were not just the S/S19 shows, there art for the sake of art – this was a were designers who looked demonstration of what was to come in the Loewe collection: to interpret art in a more modern manner. a mirror of the movement that swept over spring. Breezy Balenciaga’s Demna Gvasalia brought it home, teaming kaftans billowed gently, jacquard trousers crinkled with up with Canadian digital artist Jon Rafman to create an each step taken on the runway and unfinished hems and LED tunnel of screens that surrounded his catwalk. Between loose fabric were left to trail behind the patchwork-clad the visually-entrancing backdrop and succession of glamorous clan of models. The art references did not stop there. looks that followed, he sent out a slew of draped dresses Rustic woven baskets by Joe Hogan, Loewe Craft Prize’s covered in reimagined versions of the Balenciaga logo first winner in 2016, decorated the last room of Jonathan’s in various Microsoft Word fonts – his take on modern exhibition, slowly creeping into the collection, reimagined typography, and one that promises to have everyone in wonderfully-thatched wicker and offering a new walking around in Comic Sans script.


74 THE COLLABORATIONS

The sunny Max Mara capsule collection, inspired by Nantucket

Interior designer Anthony Baratta

MAX MARA X ANTHONY BARATTA What do you get when you combine relaxed female fashion with one of America’s most famous interior design gurus? According to Anthony Baratta: “A sporty, contemporary and fun collection – sort of like my decorating.” The 12-piece Max Mara capsule collection entitled Nantucket is part of the brand’s Weekend line, and features the esteemed architect’s signature blue-and-white chinoiserie patterns. From easygoing dresses to palazzo trousers and delightful accessories, the capsule boasts strawberry-coloured gingham, blue stripes and a delicate rose motif, and includes the brand’s trademark Pasticcino bag, available in the decorative Chinese art and furniture print. At Max Mara, The Dubai Mall

MIRA MIKATI X MR. Everything you need to know about the new and colourful collaboration Lebanese designer Mira Mikati with Japanese artist Mr.

Jacket and t-shirt, MIRA MIKATI X MR.

You’re a designer, what drew you to an art collaboration? Art has always inspired my collections. Before Mr. I had collaborated with New York artists Kaws, Darcel and Jack Pierson. I feel it’s a natural collaboration between two similar worlds that I love. How did it all happen? I fell in love with Mr.’s art in 2003 and went to Tokyo in 2009 to visit his studio. I didn’t have my own collection back then but was hoping to collaborate with Mr. somehow, someday. Why Mr.? Because it’s colourful, kawaii (a Japanese term for cute), happy, and makes me dream of my favourite city, Tokyo. What does art mean to you? It’s a way of telling a story, that each person can read in their own way. A way of dreaming, and of being transported somewhere else. Your favourite piece from the collection? A painting with my two eldest kids. I’ve had a third one since, and feel now I need a part two, with my three kids. Your favourite piece from Mr.’s exhibition? Sara. The head of a girl with rainbow hair and a lot of wild dreams in her eyes. Miramikati.com


BALENCIAGA X FARFETCH The duo have partnered to create an exclusive capsule collection to raise awareness of endangered species, featuring limited edition ready-to-wear, shoes and accessories, all fur- and leather-free. Farfetch.com

Carlotta and Nicolò Oddi

Photography: © Mira Mikati/My Lalaland Limited; © Mr./Kaikai Kiki Co. Ltd; Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images

Shoes, ALANUI X SUPERGA

ALANUI X SUPERGA Known for their oversized jacquard cashmere cardigans that pay homage to Native America, siblings Nicolò and Carlotta Oddi of Alanui are bringing their recognisable patterns to footwear this season. “We really wanted a brand with a personality and history, that could also fit the Alanui aesthetic,” says Carlotta Oddi of the collaboration with famed Italian shoe house, Superga. “Superga sneakers are clean and pure, and we thought of them as a white canvas, where we could express our creativity and the Alanui universe.” This season, Hawaii and its relaxed attitude to life was the main inspiration for the Alanui S/S19 collection, one that was also translated into the six styles it created with Superga. Bandana prints, beaded embroidery, shells, frangipani flowers and fringes are all mix-and-matched, creating unexpected combinations that marry the trademark aesthetics of both Alanui and Superga. “Both brands are made in Italy, of course, and both of them were born with a focus on a single item: the classic white tennis shoe for them, and the jacquard cardigan for us,” says Carlotta. “Two different worlds, apparently far from each other – that can easily merge and result in a great new item!” Antonioli.eu Alanui x Superga shoes on the streets of Milan Fashion Week 2019


76 The design duo behind Rotate

GETTING TO KNOW... PETER DO

LABELS TO KNOW

Having cut his teeth at Derek Lam and Celine, meet Phoebe Philo’s new protégé and the latest designer to join Net-a-Porter’s mentorship programme, The Vanguard

ROTATE BY BIRGER CHRISTENSEN When Scandi-cool Danish influencers Jeanette Friis Madsen and Thora Valdimars set out to create pieces to fill the gaps in their own wardrobes, they never imagined it would lead to a new fashion label. The duo’s first jump into ready-to-wear has seen them team up with

PETER DO S/S19

concept shop Birger Christensen for Rotate – a collection of dreamy must-have pieces to wear over and over again. At Ounass.com What’s your aesthetic? Sensitive, considered, and impactful. ROTATE S/S19

Your clothes are very much about everyday wear. What makes them so interesting? I think my clothes are designed just enough to warrant a second look. The pieces allow a woman to show multiple sides of her personality at once. Why no catwalk shows? At the moment, I’m focusing all my attention on developing the collections. I eventually would like to have a show, but I also believe the garments should be able to stand alone, because ultimately that is what fashion is truly about – clothes. How has social media helped you build your brand? Instagram has completely changed my life. My entire team and I met on social media about seven years ago, and that’s how Net-a-Porter discovered us too. Who is the Peter Do woman? And why is she different? The Peter Do woman is discerning, and appreciates a piece with well thought-out construction and fine fabrics. She does not seek to make a loud statement, but rather an impactful one. What do you anticipate will come from being a Vanguard designer? I hope to be able to truly understand my clients. Net-a-Porter is a leader in online luxury, so its stamp of approval allowed new clients to discover us, and feel comfortable welcoming us into their closets. My customers are one of the most important things to me, because without them, there is no Peter Do.


FOR WOMEN PERFECT MOMENT at NET-A-PORTER

GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS Net-a-Porter is celebrating women, and fashionably so, with the launch of six exclusive t-shirts for International Women’s Day (March 8). The collection’s March 1 launch marks the second time the luxury etailer has teamed up with charity Women for Women International, and last year’s campaign raised enough money to support over 170 women through the charity’s training programme. It features a t-shirt from six designers: Victoria Beckham, Ellery, Rosie Assoulin, Isabel Marant, Alexa Net-a-Porter’s empowering collection of exclusive t-shirts

Chung and Perfect Moment, showing individual interpretations of women’s empowerment and courage. At Net-a-porter.com

THE FEMALE FACTOR Photography: GoRunway.com

The future is definitely female according to Alexander McQueen’s Sarah Burton, who celebrated sisterhood and rites of passage with her S/S19 show. The collection, which is available at the new boutique in The Dubai Mall, explores strength through emotion and vulnerability. The message? That women can be powerful yet feminine; strong yet exposed. The female milestones of birth, sisterhood, betrothal, marriage and mourning were explored at Alexander McQueen’s Paris Fashion Week show


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Left: Sisters Merve (left) and Beste Manastir (right) with their father and mentor Adnan Manastir, a craftsman who has been designing leather goods by hand since the age of 11. Below: The founders of Turkish handbag brand Manu Atelier are expanding the label to feature shoes

THE BAGS

MANU ATELIER S/S19

5 MINUTES WITH... MANU ATELIER Turkish designers Merve and Beste Manastir on their leap from bags to shoes Why the big accessory shift? As the designers of Manu Atelier, we had a woman in our minds when we created the brand. For us, bags have always been special, since we grew up in the workshop watching our father designing and crafting them. We wanted to complement them with shoes that have the Manu aesthetic and brand values such as quality, design and craftsmanship for the modern woman to enjoy to the fullest. How long has this been in the making? We spent almost two years in development before launching the shoes. The casts were the hardest part for us. Both of us are obsessed with creating the right shape and elegant appearance, but we also wanted to keep the price range affordable as much as we could. It took a lot of time to find the right craftsmen to create the right pair of shoes. Tell us about the new shapes. We wanted to keep the number reasonable, so we launched five models, but of course with many colour options like we do with our bags: it’s our signature. There’s the Manu Lace-up Boots, Manu Mules and Manu Loafers. We wanted to give modern updates to classic styles; to give the feeling of confidence and joy with playful patterns, cut details and most importantly a lightweight feeling on the feet. How did you learn about manufacturing? We were exposed to the raw talent of our father, Adnan Manastir, one of Turkey’s oldest artisans, who created leather goods by hand at his atelier in Istanbul from the age of 11. He taught us the importance of craftsmanship, and of course because we spent so much time in the atelier when he was making admirable pieces, we knew that we wanted to follow in his footsteps. Manu Atelier shoes will be available from June at Manuatelier.com

Manu Lace-up boots, one of five new styles launching this season


SPOTLIGHT ON... INÈS BRESSAND With her sculptural baskets, Inès Bressand is weaving the craftiest accessory of the season Why did you take up basket weaving? I grew up in a house with a lot of craft objects, so I’ve always used a basket on a daily basis. Who picked up your first collection? My first collection of baskets was spotted on my website by Dover Street Market (DSM) Ginza in Tokyo. They have been very supportive, giving me the opportunity to work with DSM in Los Angeles and New York. I’ve been able to reach the US market through a great door! Where do you produce your bags? My Akamae series is woven in Ghana using elephant grass. The bags are then sent in their simple forms to my atelier in Marseille, where I reshape and stitch the handles. My Tsaone series of backpacks is entirely stitched in France – I make the lining and handles, then the straw parts are done by a hatmaker. What materials do you use? For straw, it’s wild savannah grass from Ghana which is just cut, rolled and woven wet. No additional ingredients. The leather I use is tanned in France. It ages well, and gets better the more the bag is used. Who do you design for? I first design the bags for myself. Of course, I enjoy seeing customers adopt the baskets. It’s the combination of simple materials, skilled weavers who need to work in a fair process and Inès Bressand’s Akamae bag collection

Bag, COMPLÉT

LABEL TO KNOW: COMPLÉT Founded by Hubert De Givenchy’s god-daughter Leonora Fuhrer-Agmon and her two friends Emily Whyte-Meridor and Sivan Moshkovitz, this new line of made-in-Italy bags promises to add the final touches to a woman’s wardrobe. Complét’s Valery envelope clutch with its signature leather bracelet handle, is the model to covet for spring. At Shopbop.com

Complét’s new line of bags for the minimalist at heart

a joyful customer which makes me happy – straw, hands and heart! ines-bressand.format.com


80 SUNSET SHADES Orange, in a multitude of shades,

THE ACCESSORIES

is proving to be the colour of spring. Whether in bright peach, creamy salmon or vibrant coral, a bright, sunny pair of orange-hued heels is the safe way to take your first steps into the season.

Immerse yourself in the elements at Level Shoes TABITHA SIMMIONS at THE MODIST

ALL ABOUT EXPERIENCE In its new 360-campaign entitled Another World, Dubai’s footwear haven Level Shoes is introducing the S/S19 season through a one-of-a-kind sensorial shopping experience. Customers will be able to engage in curated journeys, from immersive digital opportunities to personalisation and styling activations – all while they roam around the new transformative landscape of the store, designed to mirror the elements of earth, water, fire and air.

DOUBLE THE FUN AT PRADA

MALONE SOULIERS at OUNASS

Shopping bags are now a wardrobe staple, offering us a versatile yet fashionable way to tote our wares around. Prada is upping the ante on the traditional carryall with its Twin bags – a new offering of not one, but two, classic shoppers, that come as a pair. Sealed in the same Prada packaging and made in a lightweight material, these easy to fold, take-everywhere bags come in a duo of solid black, plus a choice of all-over Prada print. Bags, PRADA

At The Dubai Mall boutique

ALBERTA FERRETTI


Photography: Tina Patni. Styling: Stuart Robertson

Bag, GUCCI

VERY BERRY Searching for your daily fruit intake? Gucci’s strawberry-print Zumi bags are this season’s most achingly-sweet arm pieces


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VINTAGE RETURNS Achingly-hip street style stars turned

NOTE- WORTHY

fashion designers Gilda Ambrosio and Giorgia Tordini are once again borrowing eccentrically from past fashion decades – ’80s meets ’40s to be exact – bringing to life big shoulders, sparkly sequins and a flurry of pastel feather accents for Attico S/S19. With a slew of winning party dresses, retro crop tops and a pair of jodhpur trousers, these are fun pieces for the girl that likes vintage, but with a modern spin. At Harvey Nichols-Dubai

Fun, feathery accents in sorbet tones

Attico served up extreme elegance for S/S19

A SHINY NEW LOGO As fashion houses try to reinvent themselves in a bid to keep up with the trends, many are reimagining their brand’s logo. Enter the latest Salvatore Ferragamo print, the Gancini. The new monogram, thought up by the Italian maison’s creative director of women’s collections, Paul Andrew, aims to become a symbol of Ferragamo and its values – past, present and future. With a double-hook fastening, the design is subtle and void of any brand initials, taking inspiration directly from the wrought iron hardware of the house’s headquarters in Florence, Palazzo Spini Feroni. Ferragamo has also tapped into a select group of artisanal influencers to promote the Gancini in a new digital campaign, made to celebrate the pattern and its long-standing heritage. Available at The Dubai Mall

Celebrating Salvatore Ferragamo’s iconic Gancini


Big and bold, the new silhouettes of the season

MARC JACOBS

MATTY BOVAN

GUCCI

CELINE

BALMAIN

Crushed sheaths, ruffles, big shoulders, balloon sleeves and swirls of tulle and taffeta as far as the eye can see, the dresses of spring come packing quite the punch. The message this season? Big is definitely beautiful. Everyone from Alessandro Michele at Gucci to Matty Bovan and Balmain showcased their appreciation for XXL shapes, amping up the volume on fabulous couture dressmaking, and taking it to even further extremes. Think larger-than-life volume and extravagant proportions: Marc Jacobs’ giant ruffle collars are a shining example.

THE MOOD

VA-VA-VOOM VOLUME


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Photography: Borna Ahadi. Words: Dina Kabbani. With special thanks to Masti Dubai

MOJEH FASHION

Nour wears blazer, skirt, shoes, tights, bag, earrings and necklace by Gucci


FAN GIRLS

Four women with strong personal style share their love for the designers that feed their imaginations and fill their wardrobes

Nour wears top, skirt, tights and shoes by Gucci

NOUR FLAYHAN Lebanese-American, illustrator

At the age of only 28, Lebanese-American illustrator Nour Flayhan was one of 15 creatives tapped to create artwork for the new Gucci Bloom campaign (Acqua di Fiori), her colourful illustrations showcased on the Italian house’s Instagram account. But her relationship with the brand started way before she put pencil to paper and sketched for them. “When I was very little, my mum used to tell me stories of my grandfather coming back from his trips abroad with gifts from Gucci,” says the Kuwait-raised Lebanese artist. “Back in the day, they were known for their leather goods, so many members of the family had Gucci shoes or bags and I used to love running my fingers across the double G monogram sign.” Although Nour has always had a soft spot for the Italian label, the relationship only blossomed into the love affair it is now after Alessandro Michele joined as creative director. “He opened up a gate of mysticism and magic, a world I always dreamed of. His artistic vision and world blew me away,” she explains. “Growing up in a creative household I lived in a little world in my head, and his Gucci reminded me of that world.” The first pieces she ever bought herself were a Blind For Love silver engraved heart locket and a silk illustrated scarf. The latter has become part of a collection of scarves she hopes to frame one day and cover a wall in her home. “Just like when you enter the Gucci Store. It’s a dream to one day create one of my own,” she says. Her new wish list is filled with more whimsical and playful pieces, including a magical illustrated Florence Welch book, Gucci’s dreamy homeware and S/S19’s jewelled headpieces. “I would say every collection Alessandro has brought to life has captured my heart. His eye for detail is extraordinary: he created a world I forever want to live in,” she says. Nour’s style follows the direction of Alessandro’s new Gucci, constantly changing to fit her mood. “There are days I want to change what I wear because whatever I was feeling that morning, I wasn’t feeling by the evening. And that’s what I love about Gucci. That you can dress up and have fun with things. Mix and match, and you can never go wrong.”


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ANICÉE GOHAR French-Egyptian, TV producer

Anicée wears coat and jeans with skirt by Roni Helou, paired with Converse trainers

The dress is so passe partout, you can wear it to a party as much as a picnic,” she says. “I like the lines and the fact that his designs are simple but classy, bordering a bit on the1970s working woman. He’s not trying too hard either, there’s this easygoing, oversized chic vibe I like. It reminds me of Dolly Parton’s 9 To 5 song and how it must have felt going to work listening to that song when it just came out.” It is in the way she talks about Roni’s clothes and his brand’s creative direction that we slowly see Anicée’s true style emerge. And although she was only introduced to the designer last year, she already knows how she likes to style his clothes. “I love big earrings or stacking rings, but with Roni Helou’s designs I feel like natural and simple things go best.”

Photography: Malak Kabbani

In her role as TV producer, reporter and occasional writer, Anicée Gohar is constantly on the go. She bounces from city to city, depending on the project at hand, her moves dictating her fashion choices, as she trots around the globe. “I never really know or follow what the trends are,” explains the 28-year-old French-Egyptian, who is currently based out of London. “I often don’t have the luxury to really pick, because I live out of suitcases, so I wear whatever I’ve remembered to pack. I’m always missing the right tights for this outfit or the socks for that one, and underdress for this one. I just have to make do!” Although she tosses around the word “random” when asked about her exact style, on matters regarding fashion’s ethical responsibility, she knows exactly where she stands. “I usually only buy items from designers I know or second-hand stuff. I don’t like to participate in the mass manufacturing of textile, that is the second most polluting industry after oil, and one that exploits labour force,” she says. It is this precise stance for sustainable fashion that brought Anicée and designer (turned-close-friend) Rani Helou together. The duo, who met at a fashion event in London last year, found they shared the same ethics on conscious consumerism. “I’ve always been a Roni Helou girl without even knowing it. His brand stands for so many things that I find more interesting than fashion itself,” she says of their relationship. “Roni uses his brand to encourage local action, animal care, equality and sustainability, all of his clothes are also eco-friendly. He sources fabrics from dead stocks to avoid waste and bring awareness to the forgotten garbage crisis Lebanon, and the whole world, is facing. A part of his profit also goes towards backing a free fashion school in Beirut.” A young brand that just recently started to make its footprints on the fashion landscape, Roni Helou is all about modern and versatile pieces, an ethos that his young millennial followers (Anicée included) swear by. “My favourites from Roni are the blue Dirk dress and the Boxy coat with the big checks.


AnicĂŠe wears suit by Roni Helou


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What I love about Madiyah’s designs is that there’s always something young and playful about them. Joud Al Aswad

Joud wears t-shirt and trousers by Madiyah Al Sharqi


JOUD AL ASWAD

With special thanks to Facilité, Building 2, Dubai Design District

Syrian-Canadian, project manager

An avid supporter of emerging brands, especially those built in the Middle East, Joud Al Aswad has found herself in Emirati designer Madiyah Al Sharqi. “I first got introduced to Madiyah in 2013, which is around when she first started,” explains the 26-yearold project manager who lives in Dubai. “I think today I own about seven or eight pieces that I’ve collected over the seasons – long and short dresses, super delicate tops and skirts, and statement pieces that I like to reserve for special times. They’ve sort of become keepsakes because her designs are unlike any other brand I’ve encountered,” she explains. Since then, the young brand has progressed immensely, its design aesthetic moving in a more contemporary direction in response to the needs of today’s woman who craves more simple and modern silhouettes. This progression was a turning point for many young women in the region, who just like Joud, were searching for “something very feminine but also very contemporary and wearable,” she says. “I think a lot of us, especially the brand’s fans from its earlier seasons have always only thought of it for its formal lace gowns. But I worked with the brand briefly, and it was during the season when Madiyah transitioned to incorporate a lot more separates that you could throw on for the day, and learned to appreciate it so much more. I learned I could also wear ready-to-wear pieces that didn’t call for a formal occasion.” With a style heavily influenced by her mood, Joud loves to mix up her wardrobe and play around with different looks, something that she can do with Madiyah’s pieces, ones that although have shifted aesthetics, are still just as versatile as when they first launched. “S/S17 may be my most favourite. It was the collection where the models wore the clothes styled with baseball caps and over-the-knee boots,” she explains. “It was still signature Madiyah Al Sharqi – with the lace, beading and ultra-feminine accents – but the turning point was the styling, and it showed how accessible her pieces could be. Something that one could easily include in their everyday wardrobe.” Her closet favourites include a top with dramatic big sleeves and a silver miniskirt,

Joud wears jumpsuit by Madiyah Al Sharqi

her first ever purchase from the Emirati brand. These days Joud loves experimenting, and is all about mixing her different Madiyah pieces. “Today, I’m wearing a tee that says ‘namaste’ with ‘mas’ in a different colour, a play on Madiyah Al Sharqi’s initials,” she says. “I learned that the S/S19 collection was inspired by Jackie Kennedy’s trip to India in 1962 so ‘namaste’ was a tribute to that.” “Another of my favourite looks has to be the jumpsuit with the long slit down the side. What I love about Madiyah’s designs is that there’s always something young and playful about them,” explains Joud. Her favourites are also standout looks from the brand’s S/S19 collection, which “are subtle enough to wear for work, out with friends, or on holiday,” according to Joud.


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A typical look for me is what I like to call French chic. It’s a uniform of jeans, shirt, jacket. That’s my base.

Marcela wears jeans and top by Isabel Marant at MyTheresa

MARCELA DANIELOVA Czech, designer relations director

In her role as designer relations director of Fashion Forward, Dubai’s premier platform for emerging designers from across the region, Marcela Danielova knows the importance of creative expression in one’s personal style. Her day-to-day wardrobe features various regional labels, each fronted by strong independent women, whom she admires respectively. “Some of my staple go-to labels are regional brands,” says the 41-yearold Czech. “I really like the simplicity of Bouguessa and Lama Jouni as well as the coolness of Arwa Al Banawi.” Marcela has slowly shaped the industry’s landscape, her work in supporting local budding talent immeasurable, and although she is the first to advocate supporting

anything regional, it is in personal favourite and purveyor of effortless cool Isabel Marant that Marcela’s carefree spirit comes to life. “Back in 1994 when I used to live and work as a model in Paris. That was when I first became aware of the brand,” she explains. “I remember they originally started with knitwear and then eventually expanded their offering.” It is the allure of Isabel’s relaxed Parisian aesthetic that draws Marcela to the label, and its mix between masculine femininity and a rock ‘n’ roll edge is something that she sees in herself. “A typical look for me is what I like to call French chic. It’s a uniform of jeans, shirt, jacket. That’s my base,” she says. “I love jackets, all kinds of them, from leather to smoking. I also like to wear maxi pants with men’s shirts and miniskirts with oversized tops or jackets.” Like Isabel, she focuses on key clothing pieces every woman needs in her wardrobe: staples that the modern and cool woman of today should not live without. Her style fluctuates depending on how she feels, the change of season and her body. And at times when she is lost for inspiration Ines de la Fressange or Loulou de la Falaise are the women she looks up to. “I love the aesthetic of Isabel Marant, but not everything is for me,” she says of the brand. “The Etoile collection is too young. I prefer the main line, especially the evening dresses, jackets and tops. My first ever piece was actually a black mid-length dress with gathered shoulders, it fitted all occasions and was just perfect. I wore it tirelessly.” And it definitely wasn’t her last piece. Marcela also owns a couple from Isabel’s earlier collections, as well as quite a few from her collaboration with H&M from 2013, including a pair of leather pants and oversized sweater that according to her, “she never gets to wear in Dubai.”

With special thanks to Ninive

Marcela Danielova


Marcela wears Isabel Marant dress and boots


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FASHION IN FOCUS

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THE BIG BANG Fashion takes on exaggerated, playful proportions, while accessories follow suit in chunky oversized shapes. Use Simone Rocha’s voluminous silhouettes for reference. 1. MIU MIU | 2. HILLIER BARTLEY at NET-A-PORTER | 3. CHLOÉ | 4. FENDI | 5. LOEWE at MY THERESA | 6. SIMONE ROCHA at MATCHES FASHION | 7. PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

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PRADA

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PLASTIC FANTASTIC Luxury lies in artisanal flourishes made from clear PVC and decorative acrylic this season. Try a sequin cocktail dress for a little novelty, and a lot of fun. 1. MIDNIGHT 00 at THE MODIST | 2. PRADA at MODA OPERANDI | 3. FENDI | 4. SHRIMPS at MATCHES FASHION | 5. SIMONE ROCHA at MATCHES FASHION | 6. LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ at MY THERESA | 7. TIBI at NET-A-PORTER

Words: Dina Kabbani. Photography: GoRunway.com

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2 ART ATTACK Painterly prints bring wearable works of art to life. Abstract fabrics at Marni and graphic accessories at Louis Vuitton are definitely conversation pieces to pick up now. 1. GUCCI at NET-A-PORTER | 2. VICTORIA BECKHAM at MODA OPERANDI | 3. RIXO | 4. LOUIS VUITTON | 5. BALENCIAGA at NET-A-PORTER | 6. PASKAL at BROWNS FASHION | 7. GERMANIER at MATCHES FASHION

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JEREMY SCOTT

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6 FULLY ILLUSTRATED Pop art, comic-style cartoons and bold graffiti, it’s time to embrace artsy prints in all their glory. From kaleidoscopic colours to graphic fabrics, make a head-to-toe statement. 1. BALENCIAGA at MY THERESA | 2. J.W. ANDERSON at NET-A-PORTER | 3. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN | 4. ACNE STUDIOS at MATCHES FASHION | 5. PRADA at MODA OPERANDI | 6. RE/DONE at THE MODIST | 7. SOPHIA WEBSTER at BROWNS FASHION

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Photography: GoRunway.com

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MOJEH INTERVIEW

BODY TALK Photographed by Ziga Milhelcic

Styling: Celia-Jane Ukwenya. Hair and make-up: Melanie Myers @ MMG

Model Ashley Graham and designer Fausto Puglisi sit down to dissect plus-size fashion – who’s doing it, who’s not doing it, and why – and the responsibility of a self-proclaimed body activist


Fashion designer Fausto Puglisi (in his own clothes) poses with Ashley Graham wearing MARINA RINALDI BY FAUSTO PUGLISI. Possession bracelet and ring, PIAGET. Serpenti watch, BVLGARI


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od e l , activist and d es i g n e r Ashley Graham and Italian fashion designer Fausto Puglisi were in Dubai in January to celebrate the opening of the new Marina Rinaldi store in The Dubai Mall. Both guest designers for the brand which caters specifically for women who are considered plus-size, we thought it a good opportunity to hear them in conversation, as designer and muse for this underrepresented demographic. Here’s what happened. Fausto Puglisi: Hi MOJEH. I’m so glad and honoured to be here in Dubai, as a journalist. Ashley Graham: Is this your first time as a journalist? FP: Yes. AG: Well congratulations. This suits you. Well, let’s see if it does suit you [laughs]. FP: So let’s start? I mean she’s amazing. I believe she [Ashley] represents a modern woman now: the modern girl. I believe every single woman on the planet should be like her. She doesn’t act, she’s like this, that’s why she’s so chic and sophisticated – because it’s your personality. AG: Thank you. FG: What does it mean to be a model in 2019? AG: First of all, thank you for all those amazing compliments. So, to be a model in 2019, there’s a responsibility – you have to be more than just a beautiful face. You have to be a voice; you have to use your voice. Because you have a platform. There are so many young people following us, and they want to know what we have to say. For so long, models didn’t have a voice. And now, because of social media, we do – so be responsible. You have to think about this as a business. If you really want to have longevity, then you have to know where your avenue of revenue is going to be – outside of just, click click click. FP: What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned? AG: Oh my gosh. I think, because of the way my mother raised me, being from the Midwest of America – she’s from Nebraska – everybody’s so nice. It’s one of the top five happiest states in America. FP: Oh really? I want to go there. AG: If you need a little joy in your life, just go visit Linda Graham in Nebraska. She raised me to always be nice, no matter what, and I think in this industry, where there are kind of vicious people, or people who make you feel like you’re not good enough, to kill people with kindness has been the best lesson.

I never had any role models growing up who looked like me. Like, nobody was talking about cellulite or back fat. Ashley Graham

FP: Because they’re insecure. AG: Of course, and you can sniff it out from a mile away. FP: But you know, I am from Sicily. Nebraska and Sicily – I’m sure they’re very similar. AG: [laughs] I don’t think so. ‘Nebraska and Sicily are similar’ – said no one ever. FP: What is a body activist? AG: Well, I never had any role models growing up who looked like me. Like, nobody was talking about cellulite or back fat. Nobody was actually saying: ‘my body is worth more than what all of you have to say.’ So when social media came about, I realised that I had a voice, and I had a voice to change the fashion industry. I just started calling myself a body activist, and the next thing you know, a lot of people are calling themselves body activists. FP: Yes, but it’s incredible because you were the first. We worked together in Moscow, remember? And you wore a dress with a big slit, with sensuality, a sense of freedom, and sophistication. You kill them all, you know, you kill all the other girls as well. You were incredible and it was fantastic. FP: Are you a feminist? AG: You know what’s really funny is that I’ve been asked this before, and I hate labels. I hate it when we have to put a label on a woman, like ‘you’re plus-size’ – or whatever it is. And if I really think about it, I think the word ‘feminism’ is something that I do resonate with, but I’m not sitting here calling myself a feminist. But I want equal rights for women, because we deserve them.


Ashley wears dress, ASHLEY GRAHAM X MARINA RINALDI. Shoes, MARINA RINALDI. Rose earrings, Possession choker and Possession fully paved bangle, PIAGET


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Ashley wears top and trousers, ASHLEY GRAHAM X MARINA RINALDI. Serpenti Scales earrings, Serpenti necklace, Serpenti Viper bangles and Serpenti Bracelet, BVLGARI. Possession bangles and Possession ring, both PIAGET


Use your boldness and brilliance to change the world. Because every woman has that in them. Ashley Graham

FP: I agree with you. AG: I think it’s very important to have this conversation, because I think a lot of young people are calling themselves feminists, and they don’t know the history behind it. It’s important to understand how that all began, but equal rights? Hell yeah. Having everything a man has, and maybe a little more [both laugh]? Hell yeah! FP: Who taught you to be body positive? AG: My mom. She’s always been very curvy, and growing up, she never said, ‘I’m ugly,’ or ‘I’m fat,’ or ‘I need to go on a diet.’ She never said that in front of me. And I didn’t realise then, how that would translate to me now, as an adult. That I learned that from her, to be okay with who I am. And even in grade school, I would come to her and say, I don’t know, like ‘mom, what is this fat right here?” And she would say, ‘look, I’ve got it too, and if you didn’t have it then you wouldn’t belong in this family.’ So she’s always made me feel really well about myself, and everything starts at home. FP: I want to know your mother. She’s in Nebraska still? AG: She’s in Nebraska. She’s single – ready to mingle! FP: Oh wow, I love it! FP: Did you ever think you’d be on the cover of magazines? Of course, yes? AG: Well, you know what’s funny is that I didn’t! I always had people telling me that I wasn’t going to be. I started modelling at 12, and you just keep persevering. That’s the whole point. I believed what people told me, that I wasn’t

going to be on covers, and to just be comfortable with being like a little catalogue model, and that’s it. And then when I started getting older I thought, ‘oh no, I can have exactly what I want.’ And then – boom. I don’t even know how many covers I’ve been on. FP: It’s about energy. It’s connected to our brain – if we want it, we get it. AG: I make vision boards. Have you ever made a vision board? You make mood boards all the time for designing, so imagine a mood board but with everything you want in life – so: house, money, a relationship, health, whatever, – and you cut little words out, or pictures. Fausto Puglisi: It’s the universe. I’m shameless, I want it, I get it. If I’m going to do Super Bowl, I’m going to do Super Bowl. Fausto, you want Madonna, I say I’d love to. FP: Who are your female role models? AG: Definitely my mom, because of what I already explained to you, and I think, Kathy Ireland – do you remember her? She is a model-turned-mogul and that is what I want to do. FP: That’s great. Have you had negative comments on social media? How do you deal with them? AG: Who hasn’t had negative comments on social media? What do you do, do you write them back? FP: There are so many people, and press people, who are very frustrated. And they sit at home just judging, judging judging. AG: They’re insecure. But I always make it a teachable moment. If somebody says something to me that’s really terrible, I make it into a teachable moment. I make them understand why they’re wrong, so hopefully they don’t do it again. I mean, not every comment, I don’t have that much time. FP: What advice do you want to give to women? AG: Oh – to use your boldness and brilliance to change the world. Because every woman has that in them. What’s your vision for women? FP: You know, so many times women are the biggest enemy of themselves: they are jealous if you are more beautiful, more sexy, more successful. So many times, the women themselves are afraid to be judged by their husband, their girlfriends, their circle of friends – and it’s really ridiculous. You just have to feel like the queen of yourself; feel proud of who you are. Just educate yourself and don’t be judged. It’s your life, it’s your moment; it’s your time, your body. When you [Ashley] talk about your body, it’s not to impress someone – it’s for yourself. When you own it, you can do whatever you want, and you do that, and that’s fantastic.


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AG: Thank you. FP: What makes you feel beautiful? AG: I think feeling beautiful is subjective, don’t you think? I feel beautiful when I leave the gym, I feel beautiful when my husband tells me I’m beautiful – no hair, no make-up, and I’m just there, in the morning, with like crust in my eyes. I mean, I feel beautiful when I’m glammed up and ready to get on the runway or the red carpet. There are so many moments where I feel beautiful that it’s just about... it’s a personal thing. FP: What is your favourite part of your body? AG: My hourglass figure. It’s not really a part, but I like my shape. FP: Oh yes, that’s great, that’s beautiful. I love that. FP: Do you think there is enough size-inclusive fashion? AG: [Shouts] No! I don’t, I don’t! It’s like, ‘where is it?!’ I think that there’s an issue where designers don’t have the ability – because it’s a money thing – to make bigger clothes. This is what I’ve heard. FP: No, baby, this is not true. Not at all. It’s because they start saying: that’s vulgar, that’s not chic. AG: So it’s really about the aesthetic, is what you’re saying? FP: I mean the word chic is the worst thing I’ve ever heard in fashion. Unfortunately it’s about – it’s chic; it’s not chic. What’s chic? You can be super curvy, and sexy, and it can be chic. I mean, you’re fantastic, you don’t need one gram less. AG: So this is really, truly it? It really is about the designer, and whether they want to do it or not? Because there have been some designers who have put curves on the runway, and in campaigns, and capsule collections – but then there’s some who won’t even have that conversation. So it’s truly because they don’t feel like this is chic? I know you can’t speak for all designers, but this is your perspective? FP: I like everything that is happy in life – that’s glorious, and fun – and in Sicily, which is my island, you have so much of that. Men like curvy women, and curvy women love themselves. It’s about femininity, it’s about seduction, it’s about breaking the rules, it’s about being yourself – it’s like music. I love Milan, but it’s a stereotype city of rules, so to find the freedom I needed to go to Miami, to Ocean Drive. And when I was there, one morning, I saw all these bodies, and these bodies were about happiness, and they were all so different. I realised – yes, I’ll do it! But I’m not doing like, let’s cover your skin. I’m doing, let’s show off who you are. And just have fun. This is what I think.

I want women to feel confident and comfortable in everything they’re wearing... I wanted to make something young and fesh, but for the everyday woman. Ashley Graham

AG: No, I love it. You did a great job with your collection. FP: And you represent it perfectly. What clothes did you think you’d never be able to wear? AG: Nothing. There are no rules anymore. FP: What is your favourite piece in the collection? AG: Well, first of all I put this on [points to pink dress by Marina Rinaldi by Fausto Puglisi] because I love this, and I also love the long floral dress with the zip in the centre. I get DMs all the time from women: ‘Where’d you get that? You’re amazing.’ Because of that dress – it’s that amazing. And the see-through leopard, red, that sold out didn’t it? FP: Thatsoldout,yes,andyour[owndesign]brawastheperfect touch. You designed a denim collection [for Marina Rinaldi], how was that? AG: It was fun. I have the same vision that you have, I want women to feel confident and comfortable in everything they’re wearing. And so, to collaborate with Marina Rinaldi, because they’re so luxurious and have great fabrics – you can’t find curvy designer wear that’s easily accessible. That’s why I wanted to make something that was young and fresh, but for the everyday woman. FP: Good, and you got it. Thank you very much. AG: Thank you very much. Off to The Dubai Mall. FP: Miami Beach! AG: I wish. Watch the full video interview between Ashley Graham and Fausto Puglisi on MOJEH.com


Ashley wears ASHLEY GRAHAM X MARINA RINALDI. Jewellery, as before. Marina Rinaldi is now open at The Dubai Mall


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MOJEH INTERVIEW

MODEST MAGNETISM

As Petar Petrov makes his first visit to the Middle East, MOJEH meets the designer, whose quiet charm and understated successes are the very embodiment of his modern, modest aesthetic

Words by Lucy Wildman

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s the modest fashion movement gains global momentum, never has there been a time more focused upon the Middle East as a centre of sartorial inspiration. From high-profile celebrities, models, designers and entrepreneurs championing an aesthetic previously ignored, in most part, by the fashion industry, the shift in perspective is palpable. With Dubai Modest Fashion Week returning to the city for the second time this month, and key fashion houses reacting to this new trend with collections that not only appeal to regions where covering up is culturally appropriate, but those where restrictions don’t exist, independent designers whose brands already walk the modest line are instrumental in leading the charge of change. One such designer is Vienna-based Petar Petrov, whose cool elegance has been showcased on the likes of Amal Clooney to Julia Roberts and the Duchess of Cambridge. Founding his eponymous womenswear brand in Vienna in 2009, with a dynamic aesthetic fusing feminine fluidity with precise tailoring, Petar’s work quickly became the go-to for the woman who wanted both emotion and elegance hanging in her wardrobe. Snapped up by The Modist founder Ghizlan Guenez on her pre-launch buying trip for the now infamous modest fashion etailer, Petar’s collections have proven highly desirable to The

Modist’s customers from day one, who gravitate towards the ultra-flattering silhouettes and unique fabrics that have made the designer’s name. Recently collaborating on an exclusive capsule collection with The Modist, specifically designed for the special occasion-centric lifestyles of women in the region, Petar’s first visit to Dubai was a chance for the designer to discover exactly how his vision of modern modesty would fit into the Middle East. “Dubai is truly amazing. It feels like a place where we have a space for new things, a place that’s not yet 100 per cent explored,” he explained to MOJEH, as we sipped coffee on the terrace of the The Bulgari Resort. “When you are in old Europe, you feel like everything is already done, everything is established. It feels like you have more freedom in doing things here.” Inspecting the magnificent morning view of Downtown Dubai, the Ukraine-born designer adds: “Every minute there’s a new building Designer Petar Petrov popping up. Something different; something unexpected. And I love that.” Petar’s love of creativity, modernity and diversity is one of the key factors in how his working relationship with The Modist developed at such a rapid rate. “When Ghizlan first entered our showroom, she was wearing a long dress, with a leather biker jacket and heels. Normally the buyers come in with sneakers on, very casually dressed. But she embodied everything about both our brand and hers,


Soft, gently structured silhouettes for spring

I was just really happy if I could pay everyone their salary. That’s what success means for me. Petar Petrov

PETAR PETROV

which we loved, and said that in every one of our collections, at least 50 per cent of it was exactly what she wanted to wear. She basically had us at ‘hello’,” he explains. Petar Petrov has been part of The Modist since it was founded in 2017 on March 8, International Women’s Day. Celebrating its second anniversary this month, the relationship between the e-tailer and the designer has blossomed, with the launch of its first exclusive capsule collaboration marking a significant moment for both brands. “We trusted The Modist and they believed in us. Ghizlan had an idea about how she wanted to dress herself, which resonated with so many other women – to dress in a way that was modest and stylish and impeccable. And not just in the Middle East, where she was based, but globally,” says Petar. “So she created this curated platform, where you could find everything you needed to achieve that, and came to us because our designs spoke to her. And while we don’t necessarily think ‘modest’ when we think of Petar Petrov as a brand, there are parallels of what we are doing that works for them, and their vision of how they would like women to dress.” Launched at exactly the right moment, as an array of changes in everything from the political, cultural and social worlds to the film and fashion industry came to an unforeseen crescendo of transformation, The Modist introduced Petar’s strong and sophisticated designs to an entirely new fashion audience. Two years in, and Petar Petrov is now one of the best-selling international designers on the site – prompting the 42-yearold to create an exclusive line for the brand that would appeal to the ever-growing global modest market. “In general, we are inspired by women, and the way in which they want to feel more beautiful; more elegant. The capsule collection was like a dialogue between us and the strong and stylish women who actually make it happen at The Modist,” reveals Petar. “What I really like about Ghizlan and Sasha (Sarokin, The Modist’s fashion and buying director) is that when they come to the showroom they always get so emotional about the collection. And what we like so much about this region, even though this is the first time we’ve had a chance to come here, is that girls like sparkling colours, they like metallic, they want to dress well. Basically, they like everything we like, so let’s make a beautiful collection that reflects those kind


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I really like that women here are so utterly confident to dress up. Peter Petrov

Petar’s fabrics feature light-catching metallic threads

PETAR PETROV

of women – those who party with panache. And who don’t just party in December, but celebrate life all year round.” In a city where going to the beach or the supermarket requires a well-considered outfit, and red carpet events are a daily occurrence, Petar’s 11-piece capsule slips effortlessly on to the busy Dubai girl’s fashion wish list. Brought to life in the label’s signature metallics and exquisite fabrics, and including diaphanous maxi-dresses and sharp-shouldered tailoring, the capsule is an edit of wardrobe statement pieces, designed specifically for women who want to dress modestly, but with a sense of style and freedom. “I really like that women here are so utterly confident to dress up, and make the effort all the time,” enthuses Petar. “Actually, we had been getting complaints from some regions saying we were too extravagant, too glamour-focused, and we weren’t doing enough daywear. And we come to Dubai, and what we do is considered daywear! Dubai is just so extra– the biggest, the fastest, the tallest – the most well-dressed. To see and feel that so profoundly as a designer is a real breath of fresh air.” Based in Vienna, Petar’s atelier and home are a combined space: a vast, open-plan apartment filled with light, in one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Despite being inspired by

his surrounds, the designer’s love of travel is also intrinsic to his design process. “I always get inspired when we travel, because it’s interesting to see what people like, what people wear.” Noting that everyone on the terrace we’re sitting on is wearing colour, Petar’s clearly delighted by how bold Dubai’s residents are in their style choices. “In Austria, people act in a different way. They dress in a different way; there’s a totally different influence. And here, it feels so international.” And as a first-timer in Dubai, the energy he radiates is something he credits to the vibrancy and innovative nature of the city. “I’ve met so many people that enjoy this whole feeling of escape that permeates the atmosphere of Dubai. I’ve only been here a matter of days, but when you come here it’s such a wild experience, because it is so new and fresh, and everyone seemingly has these new eyes that give them this spurt of vigour and creativity to do and try new things.” A designer whose ethos is rooted in female empowerment, those closest to Petar in the region are a physical display of how he, as a designer, wants to transmit that feeling of feminine power through modest luxury. “I think the best example of what we as a design house are trying to do is what one of our best friends here said to us. She said: ‘I don’t have


to look up to myself all the time. All the others have to look up to me! So, I don’t care what I’m wearing. I will dress up – wherever I go, whenever I want.’ And that kind of attitude is probably what makes our collections work so well here. Women like showing off, which is fantastic, and they love fashion. They love to dress up, to wear colour and print – they are not afraid of too much.” That combination of glamour and reservation; wildness and contemplation; elegance and innovation is clearly the mark of a very smart and talented creative mind. Establishing his label little over a decade ago as a graduate of Vienna’s University of Applied Arts, Petar’s mentors include fashion trailblazers Raf Simons and Viktor & Rolf, both recognised for their groundbreaking designs and forward-thinking development techniques. With Viennese modernism, exceptional materials and purist forms having a profound influence upon his work, the designer’s pieces are coveted and collected by the most discerning of dressers – from women who, at the start of his career, worked tirelessly to track down the stores that carried his designs, to the male fans who beg him to start producing menswear again – something he has considered, but cannot do, because he’s too busy with his womenswear line. “We have talked about it, but honestly, I just don’t have time,” he muses. “We are lucky that our women’s collections are doing so well that we can focus on one thing. I’m happy with what we have, and admittedly, I’m not happy with what we can find on the market for men. But it’s a full-time job to design a collection, and we have a full-time job already – more than that. So until I figure out how I’d do menswear too, it’s just going to have to be fabulous womenswear for now.” Currently debating whether or not to add another collection to his line, Petar’s upwards trajectory is something he – rather aptly – is exceptionally modest about. “I never really thought about whether or not I’d be successful. I never actually think about success in this way,” he explains, clearly a little uneasy about quite how well he has done. “I just want people to want our clothes. For me, the most oppressive thing is to have my clothes somewhere, hanging on the rails, and no one wants them. So every time, when we do the collection, we try and make it better than the last. That’s it. I never think about it as success. At one point, like three years ago, I was just really happy if I could pay everybody their salary. That’s what success means for me. Oh, and then maybe pay me my salary too.” Famous for the fact his brand pays all of its employees – a rarity in an industry that relies heavily upon the unpaid talents of interns, often for years at a time – Petar’s consistent focus upon developing the brand without compromising on a concrete set of morals means he chooses to work with talented people he admires and likes, and vice versa. With this in mind, will there be another collaboration with The Modist? The emphatic nod is enough of an indication from Petar, but a resounding “YES!” from his colleagues soaking up the sunshine beside us, strengthens the gesture. “Well I think so, yes. I mean, we like each other quite a lot, and it seems to work. So that’s reason enough for me.”

PETAR PETROV

High-shine finishes complement a powdery blue palette


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Photography: Getty Images / Timur Emek

MOJEH TALKING POINT

Shanina Shaik demonstrates the perfect, personalised, nude shoe at New York Fashion Week


E QUA L F O O T I N G From head to toe, fashion and beauty businesses are catering to women of diverse ethnicities

Words by Hafsa Lodi

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hen you envision the wardrobe of a ballerina, shades, and when Marc Jacobs released his Shameless it’s never without her staple ballet slippers – foundation in 2018, he cast 29 different models reflecting likely conjured in an enchanting hue of satiny a range of ethnicities for the campaign, which starred British salmon pink, a colour frequently deemed to be ‘nude’. It’s model and activist Adwoa Aboah, who is half Ghanaian. a shade that’s meant to be reflective of a person’s skin tone, This year, cult beauty brand Glossier expanded its range and while skin pigments vary tremendously among women of cosmetics too, to include a wider range of colours in skin of different ethnicities, females have typically been restricted tints, concealers and powders. There’s even Browndages to this soft shade of salmon when seeking out nude-coloured – a company that produces bandages in brown tones, in fashion and beauty products. That’s all changed, thanks to an attempt to make covering up cuts more subtle for increased awareness about multiculturalism over the past certain shades of skin. few years. In October last year, British ballerina shoe brand But feet are also a point of focus for diverse shades, and not Freed of London, even released slippers in shades of bronze only for ballerinas. Women who seek out stylish sandals and and brown for dancers of darker skin heels are demanding more inclusive tones. Previously, ballerinas with skin shades of nude, because just as putting “Just as the wrong colours that bore no resemblance to the on the wrong shade of foundation can ruin quintessential shade of ballerina pink, a woman’s face, a mismatched nude shoe shade of foundation had to resort to applying dark makeup to could look downright bizarre, and even can ruin a woman’s alter the appearance of her skin colour. their shoes so that they wouldn’t contrast face, a mismatched so dramatically with their skin colours. PR and marketing executive Lyaila Mufti There’s no denying that diversity is explains that her quest for the perfect shoe can look currently a trending buzzword in the nude shoe remains unsuccessful because downright bizarre” fashion and beauty industries. As the the colours available on the market are catwalks of Milan, Paris, London and unflattering for her skin tone. “I actually New York portray a greater range of skin tones, brands are stay away from nude shoes because I’ve never found a pair waking up to the demand for more inclusive products. Just as that suits me. I have looked in stores ranging from high end Halima Aden, a hijab-wearing Somali-American, has helped designer to high street, but have not been able to find anything usher in a wave of new collections catering to modesty, and because the nude colours never complement my skin,” Ashley Graham, a self-proclaimed body activist, has helped she says. “I am quite tanned, so the shoes always look very draw attention to the need for more size-inclusive designs, fair on me and end up making my skin look darker than it is.” faces of different colours have highlighted the need for Lyaila is of South Asian heritage, and her dilemma is a common one among women of Eastern ethnicities. And products that target their skin tones. Beauty has been at the forefront of the movement. When while there are countless other colours available in shoe Rihanna forayed into cosmetics with her Fenty Beauty brand stores, Lyaila says that in her line of work, a good pair of in 2017, she did so with a range of 40 different foundation nude heels is a style necessity. “I think a solid pair of nude


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Tamara Kilic nails her nude at London Fashion Week

heels are a standard wardrobe staple for the industry I am in. I just want a classic, pointy-toe nude heel,” she says. Women like Lyaila are in luck, because American footwear label Stuart Weitzman is the latest brand to jump on the diversity bandwagon. For spring 2019, the brand has extended its colour palette to include a variety of skin-coloured shades, available in a classic pointed pump, a block-heeled sandal, a strappy stiletto and a sleek suede ankle boot. These alternative takes on the classic nude tone offer a solution for darker-skinned women on the hunt for embellished nude sandals for an evening out, or pointy pumps for work that won’t stand out too starkly. While diverse shades of nude may not be the norm among footwear brands, Stuart Weitzman’s approach is by no means a first. In 2016, Christian Louboutin extended the available colours in his nude collection to include hues of brown, stating that nude is a concept, rather than a colour. “They disappear like magic and become a fluid extension of her legs,” were the designer’s famous words about nude shoes. There’s also UK-based brand Kahmune, which has championed the concept of diversity in nudes since it launched in 2017, and has even been dubbed ‘The Fenty Beauty of Footwear.’ The label

Photography: Getty Images / Christian Vierig; GoRunway.com

Tonal inspiration on the streets of New York


Nude is a colour that goes with everything, transcends gender and is appealing to both men and women. Nour Al Tamimi

offers 10 different shades of nude – from white, to black, with hues of beige and brown in between. While these initiatives are certainly revolutionary in the realm of footwear, it’s hardly fair to label brands that do offer only a single shade of nude in their designs as exclusionary or racist. Some shoe designers maintain that while they may carry shoes that are described as nude in colour, there is no correlation between the hue and their customers’ skin tones. Nour Al Tamimi, creative director of sneaker brand The Nou Project, explains that the slightly pink shade of nude chosen for her unisex shoe line was selected because it suits all skin types, and not because it would emulate the skin colour of any specific wearer. “When we first went sourcing for materials at the beginning stages of the brand, we wanted black, white and nude to be the staples of the brand. The nude tone was actually the most challenging to find. It was important to have the right shade, that will not look beige nor pink, and we succeeded in that,” she says. “The nude sneakers are actually the best sellers. Nude is a colour that goes with everything, transcends gender and is appealing to both men and women.” The designer explains that footwear brands, especially homegrown small businesses, are different from make-up labels when it comes to colour ranges. “Make-up brands have infinite amounts of nudes, but our nude wasn’t meant for that,” she says. Instead of looking at nude as a shade that’s associated with skin colour, Nour sees it as a shade that’s simply in vogue. “Dressing in nude tones has been a trend for quite some time, and we are sure it will stay, because of its understated elegance,” she says. For those brands that do dabble with darker colours, diversity can be a double-edged sword. The phrase ‘cultural appropriation’, is thrown left and right at brands who tow the line with designs that could be labelled as either diverse or disrespectful. Take the recent case of Katy Perry for instance, who was forced to pull a shoe design from her own brand after it was likened to the controversial black face icon that Gucci also faced heat for. Katy’s slip-on loafers were merely playful mules depicting a set of eyes, a nose and mouth as embellishments, and were available in both tan and black models. Were the black versions designed in an attempt to make a racist dig? Probably not, however in today’s social media age, ‘controversy for the sake of controversy’

Stuart Weitzman’s latest diversity-friendly shoe campaign

sometimes trumps ‘fashion for the sake of fashion,’ and brands are becoming fearful of backlash from critics. On one hand, we want to celebrate diversity. On the other, we catastrophise when darker colours allude to sensitive icons of race. Adding more diversity-friendly shades to shoe collections is a commendable move, but diversity is more than skin-deep. Embracing different body shapes and sizes is also key to cultivating a more inclusive, open-minded fashion industry. Stuart Weitzman’s latest campaign may be deemed a showcase of multiculturalism, but there’s a lot more to diversity than hiring uber-famous, ultra-pretty supermodels who happen to reflect minority ethnicities, to front your campaign. Granted, millennial social media personalities like Kendall Jenner and Willow Smith will bring in publicity, but aside from the fact their skin colours are opposites, the models in question are not all that diverse. Nonetheless, steps forward by brands like Stuart Weitzman and other businesses focusing on inclusivity in fashion should be applauded, even if they’re just baby steps.


112

Embroidered playsuit over rhinestone jumpsuit and shoes, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE


CLOWNING GLORY Dior’s spring haute couture collection brings the circus to town in magnificent costumes and playful pieces that will bring out the showgirl in you

Photographed by Jenny Brough Styled by Kelly-Ann Hughes


114

THIS PAGE: Sequinned dress and cap, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE OPPOSITE PAGE: Bustier and skirt with satin band appliqué and cap, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE


116

THIS PAGE: Knit-effect gauze top and chiffon band skirt, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE OPPOSITE PAGE: Tulle knit playsuit and cap, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE


118


THIS PAGE: Tulle ensemble with white origami skirt and cap, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE OPPOSITE PAGE: Silk tulle evening dress, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE


120


OPPOSITE PAGE: Tulle dress over structured corset, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE THIS PAGE: Evening organza coat and dress, cap and shoes, DIOR HAUTE COUTURE Model: Kristin Lilja at Next Models Make-up: Roberta Kearsey Hair: Yuuki Yanase at Coffin Inc Nails: Lucie Pickavance at Caren Agency Photographer’s assistant: Guillaume Mercier Stylist’s assistant: Bo Dube


122

IN THE LIGHT OF THINGS Heady combinations of metallic florals paired with leather pleats and oversized ruffles make a case for future vintage style this spring

Photographed by Francesco Scotti Styled by Kelly Baldwin


Zip-up jacquard rose print top, high-waisted rose print trousers and leather ankle boots, LOUIS VUITTON


124

Zip-up jacquard rose print top, short sleeve zip jacket, green leather miniskirt and Infinivy V single earring, LOUIS VUITTON


Frill blouse with oversized sleeves and Trapeze bag, LOUIS VUITTON


126

Short sleeve zip jacket and Dauphine bag, LOUIS VUITTON


Mix print jersey t-shirt, trousers with side pockets and chunky chain bracelet, LOUIS VUITTON


128

Geometric brush stroke t-shirt, wide trousers with belt and Infinivy V single earring, LOUIS VUITTON


Frill blouse with oversized sleeves, short sleeve zip jacket and high-waisted brushstroke trousers, LOUIS VUITTON Model: Iza B at Established Models Make-up: Manuel Losada at Art Factory Studio Hair: Melanie Myers at MMG Produced by MOJEH/Kelly Baldwin


130


WILD ABANDON Intoxicating colours and undone, oversized silhouettes encourage your inner expressionist Photographed by Chantelle Dosser Styled by Anna Klein

Dress, YOHJI YAMAMOTO | Shoes, DR. MARTENS


132

THIS PAGE: Dress, GUCCI OPPOSITE PAGE: Coat and shoes, DRIES VAN NOTEN | Shirt, ACNE STUDIOS | Trousers, MAX MARA


134


Blazer, shirt and shorts, SAINT LAURENT


136


THIS PAGE: Coat and shoes, MIU MIU OPPOSITE PAGE: Shirt, trousers and blazer, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO | Sleeveless blazer and shoes, MUGLER


138


THIS PAGE: Coat and shoes, MIU MIU OPPOSITE PAGE: Dress, VALENTINO


140


THIS PAGE: Cardigan and trousers, CHANEL OPPOSITE PAGE: Shirt and trousers, SCHIAPARELLI | Shoes, MIISTA


142


Jacket, belt, top and skirt, HERMES


144

Trousers, TIBI | Blazer, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO | Shoes, ACNE STUDIOS


Dress, VALENTINO Model: Sofia Fanego at Silent Paris Make-up artist: Samuel Ruffin Hendrix at Agence Saint Germain Hair stylist: Sachi Yamashita at Agence Saint Germain Photography assistant: Olivier Colairo Styling assistant: Tifaine Ribouleau Produced by MOJEH


146

MOJEH FASHION

FENDI


CHEAT SHEET ’19 From over-the-top feathers to spandex-like biker shorts and magenta two-piece suits, here is what you’ll be wearing for S/S19


SACAI

CHANEL

BALMAIN

MSGM

CHLOÉ

148 DENIM ON DENIM


BLUE JEAN BABY Frayed hems, stonewashed patchwork and raw indigo hues. It’s time to embrace fashion’s most versatile and genderless material in high-rise, wide-leg or bootcut iterations – suitable for just about every body, shape and height.

VICTORIA/TOMAS NATASHA ZINKO

MARQUES’ALMEIDA

JUNYA WATANABE

ISABEL MARANT

COACH

JIL SANDER

FENDI

THE SHORTS


TO DYE FOR

COLLINA STRADA

DIOR

STELLA MCCARTNEY

MSGM

Woodstock-inspired 1960s hippy chic is given a fresh update for the new season. Psychedelic swirls take on an ombré effect in the brightest of rainbow hues, for a modern spin on the Summer of Love.

XXXXXXXX ECKHAUS LATTA

150


LOUIS PACOVUITTON RABANNE

PRADA

NO. 21

JOHN ELLIOTT

COCKTAIL HOUR

PROENZA SCHOULER

PRABAL GURUNG


HOMESPUN HANDIWORK

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

LOUIS VUITTON

DIOR

Ditching machines in favour of something more artisanal, fashion headed to the craft corner where crochet nets and fisherman weaves were spun into this summer’s sartorial must-have dress.

CHLOÉ

152


SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

SONIA RYKIEL

FYODOR GOLAN

ALTUZARRA

J.W. ANDERSON

PORTS 1961

APPLIQUÉ ELEMENTS


PATTERN PLAY

ZIMMERMANN

VALENTINO

ISABEL MARANT

ETRO

CHLOÉ

Call it the season of print, as designers embrace their love of motifs, splashing pattern into head-to-toe looks, in what was the loudest statement to march down the runway. Swirling paisleys are a big favourite, with Valentino leading the trend.

MARNI

LOEWE

SCARF MOTIFS

CHLOÉ

154


MARY KATRANTZOU

DOLCE & GABBANA

BALENCIAGA

POP ART PRINTS LOUIS VUITTON

PACO RABANNE


ALL-IN-ONE BOILERSUIT

DRIES VAN NOTEN

ACNE STUDIOS

ALBERTA FERRETTI

The jumpsuit has witnessed quite the style revival since its Top Gun days, this season solidifying itself as a game-changing wardrobe staple. Modern and practical, its androgynous yet equally chic twin (the boilersuit) is the new must-have for spring.

ISABEL MARANT

156


COACH

HERMÈS

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

GIVENCHY

BLUMARINE


CELINE

DELPOZO

MAISON MARGIELA

ADEAM

XXL KNOTS

LITTLE BOW PEEP HELLESSY

158

Whether down the spine, across the sleeves or knotted at the neckline, bows added some whimsical, feminine flair to this season’s offering. Expect to see them in larger-than-life iterations, too.


RODARTE

MIU MIU

ANDREW GN

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

ERDEM

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

BOW ACCENTS


FEATHERED FRIENDS With floor-skimming gowns at Oscar De La Renta, sweet trimmings at Valentino and frothy pastel plumes at Marc Jacobs – there’s more than one reason to spread your wings for S/S19.

ROCHAS

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

LOEWE

MSGM

160


TOM FORD

MARC JACOBS

VALENTINO

RICHARD QUINN

MARINE SERRE


MARC JACOBS

LOUIS VUITTON

GUCCI

162

EIGHTIES EXCESS Last season’s ’90s domination has given way to a new wave of ’80s high-voltage glamour. Think lamé ruffles, power shoulders and exaggerated volumes, and you’ve nailed the trend.


RODARTE

ISABEL MARANT

GARETH PUGH

PUSHBUTTON


ANIMAL KINGDOM

RICHARD QUINN

BURBERRY

ROCHAS

BALENCIAGA

The big cat print is proving dominant, as we see collections overrun with fierce iterations of the classic leopard pattern. Take your style cue from the runways and go head-to-toe, because more really is more this season.

LONGCHAMP

164


J.W. ANDERSON

TIGER TAKEOVER

TOM FORD

ADEAM

CHRISTIAN COWAN

ROBERTO CAVALLI

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

A TOUCH OF WILD


OFF-WHITE

MATTY BOVAN

GUCCI

MOLLY GODDARD

166

It’s the season of excess, as frou-frou frocks took on a life of their own in swathes of tulle, voluminous poufs, and the crispest of taffeta. The new rule of thumb when it comes to eveningwear – the bigger and more extravagant, the better.

BALMAIN

LARGER THAN LIFE


SIMONE ROCHA

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

MARC JACOBS

MARY KATRANTZOU

MOSCHINO


FUNCTIONAL FASHION

ERMANNO SCERVINO

DRIES VAN NOTEN

ALBERTA FERRETTI

Including utility shirts, army green dresses and patch-pocket combat trousers – a new wave of throw-on-and-go pieces are making a stong case for practical and fuss-free fashion. Keep the fuctionality going and pair with this season’s hands-free belt bags.

EMPORIO ARMANI

168


PAUL & JOE

FENDI

HERMÈS

GIVENCHY

MARINE SERRE


CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC

ANNA SUI

SPORTMAX

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

BALMAIN

170

SURF’S UP California dreaming? Raf Simons definitely was, as he got lost in the deep blue with his Calvin Klein homage to Jaws. Marine Serre upcycled neoprene wetsuits into dresses, and Sportmax gave us surf-inspired references that were absolutely wave-worthy.


ETRO

PRABAL GURUNG

MICHAEL KORS

MARINE SERRE

HOUSE OF HOLLAND


SAINT LAURENT

VALENTINO

MARCO DE VINCENZO

172

RAZZLE DAZZLE Dripped in high-shine paillettes and the most reflective of sequins, head-to-toe is how one should wear the new wave of sparkles. Keep accessories simple, taking just a supporting role.


HALPERN

BALMAIN

DAVID KOMA

ASHISH


DAY-GLOW

BLUMARINE

CHRISTOPHER KANE

BALENCIAGA

OFF-WHITE

Miuccia Prada owned A/W18 with her luminous nylon pieces, and a cohort of designers carried her neon torch through to spring. From Balenciaga to Off-White, it’s retina-scorching glow for all.

ANDREW GN

174


PRABAL GURUNG

NAEEM KHAN

ERMANNO SCERVINO

NATASHA ZINKO

NO. 21

JEREMY SCOTT

IN THE LIMELIGHT


OTTOLINGER

PRADA

MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH

JACQUEMUS

FENDI

176


LES BENJAMINS STELLA MCCARTNEY

VIVETTA

UNRAVEL GCDS

Once again biker shorts managed to cycle their way down the runway at Fendi, Prada and Jacquemus, though this time around to glam effect in bold prints and elaborate embroidery, under blazers and the prettiest of spring tops.

MUGLER

CITY SPIN


CAROLINA HERRERA

BRANDON MAXWELL

MAX MARA

SACAI

ANDREW GN

178

BRIGHT CANARY Spring optimism comes in the form of tangy turmerics and creamy yolks, as sunshine yellow casts an uplifting mood. Kaia Gerber in head-to-toe canary at Marc Jacobs is reason enough to smile.


RABIH KAYROUZ

JULIEN MACDONALD

CHANEL

LOUIS VUITTON

MARC JACOBS


180

MOODY BLOOMS

PETER PILOTTO

ANDREW GN

ANNA SUI

ELIE SAAB

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

Embroidered on lace and printed on silks, florals loomed large in splashing blown-up proportions. For that little something extra, look to Mary Katrantzou’s botanical butterfly-filled garden. Simply divine.


DOLCE & GABBANA

CAROLINA HERRERA

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI MARY KATRANTZOU

SIMONE ROCHA


SUNSHINE SUITING Live for bold and bright? This season’s palette of jewel tones will bring your on-duty suiting up to spring speed. Stick to one head-to-toe colour, and you’re guaranteed to get it right.

CEDRIC CHARLIER

ESCADA

PRABAL GURUNG

BALENCIAGA

182


DAVID KOMA

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

ROKSANDA

GUCCI

EMPORIO ARMANI


ALL THE TRIMMINGS

LOUIS VUITTON

GIVENCHY

GUCCI

BURBERRY

Perfectly polished, fringing takes on a more sophisticated form in waist-skimming crystals and tasseled hems that’ll shimmy and shine with your every move.

CHANEL

184


R13

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

JACQUEMUS

COACH

BLUMARINE

LONGCHAMP

SUEDE FRINGING


DIOR

MAX MARA

ISSEY MIYAKE

ALTUZARRA

186

CHANEL

BEIGE FOR DAYS Taupe, latte and mocha – creamy shades took over entire silhouettes. From combat trousers at Fendi and chic separates at Chanel to trench coats at Max Mara, it was full-on muted beige for many.


PRADA

FENDI

DION LEE

CHLOÉ

J.W. ANDERSON


PIONEER GIRL

ULLA JOHNSON

ALBERTA FERRETTI

VALENTINO

Romantic, wild and free, designers had us yearning for simpler times for our spring wardrobe, from John Galliano’s ultra-feminine pinafores to the whimsical florals at Erdem.

JOHN GALLIANO

188


ERDEM

LOEWE

ERDEM

COACH

BROCK COLLECTION


LACE RACE

ERDEM

MARCO DE VINCENZO

VICTORIA BECKHAM

DION LEE

Lace is nothing new, but in the hands of Christopher Kane and Victoria Beckham – it’s decidedly more masculine. Think modern silhouettes, sliced and diced with peekaboo details for added edge.

J.W. ANDERSON

190


ALBERTA FERRETTI

KOCHÉ

PACO RABANNE

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

CHRISTOPHER KANE

VALENTINO

DARK DENTELLES


Photography: GoRunway.com

192


MOSCHINO

ACC ESSO RIES With the big, bold fashion of S/S19, accessories have stepped up their game to offer more than just a supporting role. Find out the standout pieces stealing the spotlight this season


Heading out for the day? Pack everything you need and then some, as spring’s super vessels promise maximum carriage on any day of the week. Finally, a valid (and equally chic) reason to indulge your love for carrying your world around with you.

POIRET

ETRO

MATTY BOVAN

BLUMARINE

BIG BIG BAGS

PROENZA SCHOULER

194


FILA

LOEWE

JACQUEMUS

STELLA MCCARTNEY

JIL SANDER

EMPORIO ARMANI

WICKER CARRYALLS VERSACE

ANTONIO MARRAS


FENDI

CHLOÉ

LOUIS VUITTON

BURBERRY

196

It’s time to dig out those trusty originals from the back of the wardrobe, as designers re-issue some of fashion’s most beloved classics. Fendi’s Baguette is a season highlight, as is Dior’s trusty Saddle.

DIOR

THE CLASSICS


STELLA MCCARTNEY

GIVENCHY

MAISON MARGIELA

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

DOUBLE BAG IT A.F. VANDEVORST

CHANEL

GCDS

ELISABETTA FRANCHI

ICEBERG


ALEXA CHUNG MARQUES’ALMEIDA GIORGIO ARMANI

BADGLEY MISCHKA

DOLCE & GABBANA LOEWE

Handwoven rattan and wicker have transitioned from what was once considered a holiday essential to this season’s cult accessory. Up the artisanal ante and inject your daily uniform with some serious straw.

CHANEL

WOVEN WONDERS

ALTUZARRA

CHRISTIAN WIJNANTS

ALBERTA FERRETTI

198


PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

CLAUDIA LI

DRIES VAN NOTEN

BOSS

CHANEL CAAFD

ULLA JOHNSON

TOD’S

SONIA RYKIEL

MICHAEL KORS

JACQUEMUS

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

ISABEL MARANT

FRINGES

ROPE BAGS


MICHAEL KORS

PLATFORMS Spring sees style taken to comfortable new heights, as skinny stilettos were ditched in favour of solid and chunky platforms. Topping our wish lists are Miu Miu’s signature edition and, while gold and overly bedazzled, Dolce & Gabbana’s take is utterly divine.

DOLCE & GABBANA

JEREMY SCOTT

MIU MIU

SAINT LAURENT

200


LOU DALLAS

JIL SANDER

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

GABRIELA HEARST

KIM SHUI

REJINA PYO

BLUMARINE

DRIES VAN NOTEN

MARNI

VIVETTA

AALTO

VIVIENNE HU

MULES

WOODEN SOLES


PRABAL GURUNG

MSGM

FASHION EAST

202

FEATHERS

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

DRIES VAN NOTEN

VALENTINO

MISSONI

Lighten your load and bring some fanciful fun to your feet for the cheeriest season with dip-dyed, feathered heels. There’s nothing more fantastically frivolous than the feeling you’re fluttering your way from day to night.


SALLY LAPOINTE

SIMONE ROCHA

CHANEL

MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH

PALMER HARDING

ASHISH

ATLEIN

BALMAIN

NO. 21

ON OFF

PVC


COMME DES GARÇONS BYBLOS

SNEAKERS

ROBERTO CAVALLI

VETEMENTS

MSGM

204

NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD

OTTOLINGER

PYER MOSS

MARQUES’ALMEIDA

COACH

Chunky, ugly and oversized, flatform-esque sneakers are still going strong for the new season. Love them or hate them, it’s time you lace up.


ANNA SUI

AREA

BLUMARINE

COLLINA STRADA

SACAI

ICEBERG

JOHN ELLIOTT

TOME

ALEXA CHUNG

ALTUZARRA

STELLA JEAN

A.F. VANDEVORST

ACNE

SLIP-ONS

HIKING SANDALS


RICK OWENS

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

TOM FORD

TOD’S

BYBLOS

Ditch micro for macro when it comes to eyewear, as the iconic Tour de France-inspired, semi-rimless shape returns. Think high performance meets high fashion, bigger and more stylish than ever before.

GIVENCHY

VISORS

EACH X OTHER

LOEWE

ACNE STUDIOS

206


ETRO

JOUR/NÉ

BADGLEY MISCHKA

FENDI

MISSONI

SPORTMAX

RODARTE

VERSACE

DOLCE & GABBANA

ANNA SUI

SEASHELLS FLORAL


JOHN GALLIANO

VALENTINO

208

HATS

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

CHANEL

GUCCI

MOSCHINO

Head-turning toppers? Yes please! Whether straw, floppy or super-supersized, seriously stylish chapeaus planted themselves at Valentino and Gucci, as well as Chanel.


SIMONE ROCHA

ANN DEMEULEMEESTER

MARY KATRANTZOU

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

DIOR

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

VIVETTA

PRADA

MIU MIU

HEADBANDS BOWS

VEILS


210

Photographed by Ina Lekiewicz

SUBSCRIBE TO MOJEH MAGAZINE HAVE THE VERY BEST IN STYLE DELIVERED DIRECTLY TO YOU. Call or email us at +971 4 553 9049 and subs@mojeh.com


Photography: Tina Patni. Styling: Stuart Robertson. Words: Natascha Hawke

JEWELLERY EDIT

THE BIG REVEAL Glorious timepieces treated as works of art sit pretty alongside bold and beautiful jewels that will shine bright this March

Vintage inspiration watch in white gold and malachite, PIAGET


212

PARISIAN PERFECTION Behold the ethereal beauty of the Dior Grand Soir Botanic N1 with its white-gold dial in lacquered gold, embedded with sapphires, emeralds and diamonds. A collector’s piece and true work of art. Dior Grand Soir Botanic N1, DIOR TIMEPIECES


Kissing green beryl and green tourmaline detachable necklace and earrings, BOGHOSSIAN

Butterfly earrings by Silvia Furmanovich

KISS ME QUICK “The stone speaks to me. That’s my starting point. I’ll look at it, hold it, touch it and it will inspire me,” says Edmond Chin, Boghossian’s creative director of his unique relationship to his craft. It’s no surprise he was taken with the magnificent greens of the tourmaline and beryl stones in his latest

5 MINUTES WITH... ALEXANDRE FURMANOVICH The co-designer of Silvia Furmanovich jewellery talks to MOJEH about his new Botanical Collection, made by a community in the

one-of-a-kind creation. Part of the Kissing Collection, so called because

heart of the Amazon rainforest

of the way one stone touches the other, making them as one, the necklace

Can you tell us more about the new collection? The new Botanical

is transformable with detachable pendant and matching earrings, all

Collection is a really important collection for us, because it is something

encrusted with diamonds. At Boghossian boutiques

that really represents Brazil. It’s made by a community located in the middle of the Amazon forest with sustainable wood, natural colour – not dyed or anything – and it was a great collection for us because it is something so unique. People really appreciate the craftsmanship.

Chrysalis earrings, DHAMANI 1969

How is the ethical jewellery industry growing? I think the world has changed. Nowadays you need to be sustainable. For example, lots of jewellery houses used ivory, and it’s the same thing as wearing a fur coat these days. Especially when you extract these types of materials from nature, like wood, you don’t want to destroy the trees and you have to be pretty sustainable. The world has changed completely. What are your favourite pieces? My favourite would be the butterflies of course! They are always one-of-a-kind pieces. The colours are incredible and I really like the lily pads with the frogs because if you go to the community in the Amazon, you see lots of lily pads over there. How long do the pieces take to create? Sometimes it takes a year. If it’s a really special piece that takes time to manufacture or you need to find the right stone, the right colour or even just for the idea to come,

BACK TO NATURE

it can take over a year.

Inspired by the journey of a cocoon into a butterfly, the Chrysalis collection

someone who already owns a few diamonds. However, they also want to

from Dhamani 1969 “represents a very unique and innovative collection

have something that is unseen, and at the same time, really wearable.

among our array,” says CEO and managing director Amit Dhamani.

What can we expect next? We’ll be launching an Oriental collection

“These jewels belong to a vibrant, bright and friendly woman, who

in three months with limited-edition clutches and jewellery pieces.

has never lost the vitality of a child and the gentleness of a butterfly.”

Available at Azza Fine Jewellery Showroom at La Fontaine Centre of

The perfect sentiment for UAE Mother’s Day on March 21.

Contemporary Art, Manama, Bahrain

Who is your customer? I think it’s someone who really likes art and


214 ONE TO WATCH: AMY GATTAS Paris-based with Lebanese-Colombian heritage, the ultra cool, delicate pieces from Amy Gattas are created using a traditional Colombian filigree technique, giving them a beautiful finish that will look great with S/S19’s take on bohemia. Amygattas.com

Les Galaxies de Cartier Collection bracelet in pink gold with diamonds moonstone and milky quartz, CARTIER

COSMIC CARTIER The new collection, Les Galaxies de Cartier, from the Parisian jeweller is, you guessed it, inspired by the intergalactic glamour of the cosmos. Limited edition pieces have been created to mimic cosmic objects such as clusters of stars and the planetary alignment, but the outright beauty of the fractal meteor inspired piece, seen above in pink gold, quartz and diamonds, is to die for. AMY GATTAS

MARLI NEW YORK

Bracelets, MARLI NEW YORK

NEW BOUTIQUE: MARLI NEW YORK Founded by designer Maral Artinian, whose contemporary fine jewellery has been inspiring women in New York for years, Marli New York announces the opening of its new boutique at The Dubai Mall. Fall in love with Maral’s elegant, architectural pieces and wearable keepsakes inspired by her colourful life. Her collection portfolio offers styles for every taste and occassion – from subtle slivers of gold punctuated with motifs for everyday wear, to statement cuffs encrusted with precious stones for more special events. To be enjoyed from one woman to another. Now open at The Dubai Mall


COCKTAIL HOUR Show-stopping, knuckle-duster cocktail rings in all the colours of the rainbow make a grand statement for evening dressing. Rings (clockwise from top right): CARTIER | VAN CLEEF & ARPELS | PIAGET | DIOR FINE JEWELLERY | CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY | DE GRISOGONO | VERSACE FINE JEWELLERY


216

HIGH SHINE This dazzling timepiece from David Morris is based upon the iconic Rose Cut collection. Rose cut diamonds are set on the bezel encompassing a hand-carved mother-of-pearl dial giving the watch an elegant, vintage appeal. Rose cut diamond watch with leather strap and diamond deployment buckle, DAVID MORRIS, THE DUBAI MALL


SET THE SCENE A timepiece that tells a story, the Lady Arpels Jour Nuit Fée Ondine sees a tiny nymph seated on a waterlilly watching the sun rise and set as the dial rotates, mesmerising it’s owner. Lady Arpels Jour Nuit Fée Ondine watch, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS


218

OVER THE RAINBOW Italian duo Dolce & Gabbana have harnessed the vibrant colours of the rainbow in a new collection of jewellery and watches. Consisting of sparkling gem rings, bracelets and this array of colourful timepieces, nature’s most beautiful hues are redefined for the wrist. Rainbow collection watches, DOLCE & GABBANA


STYLE NOTE Big, bold and beautiful are the buzz words around jewellery at the moment, and these cocktail rings encompass them all in one, shiny hit.

Tentazione earrings in gold with diamonds, DE GRISOGONO

NEW NOVELTIES During January’s SIHH, de Grisogono revealed 75 creations to breathe new life into its classic icons, notably a capsule collection fittingly entitled Extravaganza, inspired by hedonistic nights in legendary places. Raggiante purveys the glamour of the French Riviera of the 1920s in its rings and earrings, complete with Art Deco accents; Divina’s

Rose Intense ring in pink gold, pink sapphire and diamonds, CHANEL FINE JEWELRY

curved shapes in pink gold, white diamonds and black rhodium is inspired by the iconic yacht Christina O in the 1950s; and Tentazione epitomises the 1970s glamour of Studio 54 in its statement earrings, disco dancing with diamonds.

Infinite Blue Ring in white gold with aquamarine, lapis lazuli and diamonds, PIAGET

Earrings, GRAFF

MOTHER’S DAY INSPO Should you have the luckiest mother alive, indulge her in a pair of stunning heart motif earrings for a Mother’s Day to remember. For something soft and feminine, pick a pretty pink pair from Graff, but for mothers with a bit more edge, a vibrant green Daniel K pair will keep you in her good books. Diamonds are a girl’s best friend, just like her mother.

Eclat Eternal pink and white diamond ring, MOUAWAD


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RUBY RUBY RUBY Crazy about rubies? This bold timepiece from de Grisogono epitomises the vibrant nature of the Italian jeweller. Set with no less than 525 rubies, it is not for a wallflower to wear. Baby Grappoli S04 watch, DE GRISOGONO


TAKE A DIP Dive right in to this fabulous 7.75-carat Paraiba tourmaline pear-shaped ring, swimming with white diamonds, set in 18-karat white gold. It’s like wearing a dream holiday on your hands. Paraiba tourmaline and diamond ring, DAVID MORRIS, THE DUBAI MALL


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MOJEH JEWELLERY & WATCHES

RENEWABLE ENERGY

Can jewellery be beneficial to our physical and emotional wellbeing? As gemstones gain recognition for their alleged healing properties, we examine why more women are turning to jewellery for a sense of safety

Words by Annie Darling

W

e are obsessed with ‘wellness’. We exercise more, smoke less, and eat more healthily than any other generation. According to the Global Wellness Institute’s latest research, the wellness market is growing at a historic rate, nearly twice as fast as the global economy. As such, it’s unsurprising that gemstones are gaining in popularity; not only for their good looks, but – rather – their purported healing properties. Gems have long been sought-after for their supposed influence on wearers: it’s said that certain jewels affect chakras (power points) in the body through vibrations. Previously dismissed as nonsense, they are cropping up on catwalks (memorably depicted on Christopher Kane’s S/S19 draped satin gowns) as well as the rich and famous (Victoria Beckham, Angelina Jolie and Naomi Campbell all carry healing crystals). It begs the question: has mysticism gone mainstream? Pascale Monvoisin is well-known for her Bohemian style and exquisite talismans, which are available at Dubai’s Comptoir 102. “Jewellery with a message or symbol has always existed, but I think we are paying more attention to our wellbeing,” she says about the recent surge in ‘positive’ jewellery. “Through these energies, we can better connect to our environment.” Millennials are often criticised for being selfish and entitled, but many are leading the way with current sustainable trends. From owning smaller houses to choosing eco-friendly travel options, they are proving to be an environmentally-conscious generation. Millennials are also more mindful: 42 per cent have

meditated at least once in the past year, with meditation now nearly a billion-dollar industry, according to Pew Research Center. With so much pressure to perform at work or make a greater impact on the world, the younger generation is more active in finding and keeping a healthy life balance. Jewellery is an intimate accessory that has long been associated with protection, of course – both spiritual and physical. Ancient Egyptians wore amulets and talismans (most notably the ankh, a symbol of life) to preserve their health, while Ancient Greeks layered gold to solidify their social standing. Iranian jeweller Anousha Razavi collaborated with entrepreneur Shiva Safai for her newly-released collection, Noush Jewellery x Shiva Safai. Inspired by ancient

Ring, SAMANTHA TEA


Photography: Betina Dutoit, for MOJEH 49

Dior’s Rose des Vents collection was born from Christian Dior’s own superstition and passion for astrology


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Pendant, SAMANTHA TEA

Persian coins, gems are carefully selected to evoke love, luck or power. “Jewellery has historically been used to inspire emotion and improve a person’s health,” explains Anousha. Mita Vohra, founder and creative director of fine jewellery brand Ortaea, agrees. Her latest collection has been designed in collaboration with Prince Rostislav Rostislavovich Romanov, who is a member of the House of Romanov, the former ruling Russian Imperial dynasty. Intricate creations comprising different golds are handcrafted using abstract designs and textures. Beautifully dramatic, the collection’s rustic charm meets irresistible glamour from a bygone era. The line’s main inspiration comes from the modest birch tree, which Mita explains, “is symbolic in Russia. A mythological talisman, protector and healer, the birch tree is a mark of constant renewal as it sheds and renews its own bark.” Mita’s collection takes otherworldly inspiration from an empire’s rich heritage. The Hope Diamond, the world’s largest deep-blue diamond, was discovered in India and sold to King Louis XIV of France in 1668. It was stolen during the French Revolution and reappeared half a century later in a private collection owned by Dutch banker Henry Philip Hope. A series of unfortunate events followed his acquisition of the diamond, including his heir’s bankruptcy, during which the jewel had to be sold. The Hope Diamond was soon rumoured to be ‘cursed’. When Harry Winston

donated it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1958, its frame exploded while on display. HH Sheikha Mariam bint Khalifa bin Saif Al Nahyan launched MKS Jewellery, a brand which embodies the heritage of the UAE, in 2013. “We have several clients that purchase pieces because they believe that it’s gem attracts a certain energy,” she confirms. “Citrine, for example, is known for its positive energy and is popular because many clients believe it attracts prosperity and success.” For many, it seems that gemstone properties calm an otherwise chaotic world; counterbalancing the anxiety of never-ending responsibility and feelings of Instagram FOMO. Amethysts get rid of addictive behaviour; aventurine evokes good fortune; pearls bring wealth… We live in a time when many are concerned that global advancements in equal and civil rights are under threat. Perhaps women are turning to jewellery for a sense of safety and nostalgia? Alternatively, has an increase in women’s rights regionally (Saudi Arabia, for example, lifted its women’s driving ban last year) led to a greater celebration of our femininity through wearable spiritualism? “I believe that everything around us is made up of energy,” explains Sheikha Mariam. “As a jewellery designer, I strongly believe gemstones are no different. They contain energy which can be used for various purposes.” Our desire for a sense of comfort, purpose and the idea of there being something meaningful beyond the self is very much with us. As humans we crave certainty, and to believe that someone or something is in control. “I’m not superstitious,” laughs Pascale Monvoisin, “but I do carry a little piece of crystal either in my bag or around my neck every day. It’s a lucky charm for me.” Shiva wonders whether this self-soothing behaviour reduces a gemstone’s significance. “I think that, in the 21st century, gemstones have lost some of their historical importance and value,” she explains. “It could be because of our consumerist culture; products are bought today with less emphasis on their deeper meaning and value.” Dubai-based designer Yara Tlass is working hard to ensure that’s not the case with her jewellery brand Usfuur, which means ‘bird’ in Arabic. Inspired by peace and minimalism, Yara donates a percentage of her sales to the charity Watinili, an effort that supports refugee communities. “With every purchase, we donate a share to help support a small grassroots initiative working with displaced children in need,” she tells MOJEH. “Gemstones can attract positivity,” she furthers, “especially when the wearer believes in their healing properties.” Mita Vohra agrees that the wearer’s conviction has a significant impact. “Ultimately it is all about individual curiosity, connection, perspective and understanding.” Christopher Chiu, co-founder of Sirciam, adds that the designer’s dedication to a piece also affects its properties. “When an artist creates from the heart and dedicates their


WHAT TO WEAR

Earrings, SUMAYA BAKKAR

PEARLS Said to have powerful calming effects, an ability to balance your aura and offer protection and security. Ring, SIRCIAM

life to their craft, the jewellery they make becomes their life’s work,” he explains. “Our emotions and life experiences become our jewellery.” Astrological themes feature heavily in Sirciam’s collections; the brand’s Healing Stone Earrings feature brilliant white diamonds and crystal, which are set in 14-karat rose gold. “Our Aphenos and Cosmic Light Rings have been used as alternative bridal rings, and have brought a lot of happiness,” Christopher adds. “We used watermelon tourmaline stones in the design, which metaphysically soothes the heart, and counteracts anger and resentment. This gemstone is often used in meditation and assists in the calming of the mind and emotion, allowing us to release stress.” Samantha Tea’s latest collection, aptly named Sea You, is inspired by the designer’s favourite holiday destination: Ibiza. The line features various gemstones, including pyrite and turquoise, which she says “has a powerful physical healing property.” “Nowadays we are placing more value on wellness. We want to feel good, look after our body, mind and spirit, and I think there’s more attention being focused towards a holistic way of being,” says Samantha. This mindfulness could be a reason behind our increased interest in ethically-sourced jewellery, too. “There’s a special place for the power of these stones. We often lead chaotic and stressful lives, and to believe in this kind of energy gives us a sense of protection. It keeps our spirit elevated when we feel that we can carry something meaningful.” We often discuss the value of jewellery in monetary terms, but perhaps we should be exploring our collection’s spiritual significance more often. There are few, if any, scientific studies on the efficacy of gemstone healing, but there’s no denying an enthusiast’s connection with an astonishing creation; especially one with personal importance. This unexplainable affection does not fade, so whether you believe in the power of gemstones or not – it’s hard to deny jewellery’s breathtaking allure.

Rose Tendre ring, CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY

ROSE QUARTZ Often called the “Love Stone” it has high energy used for all things related to love.

High jewellery ring, DE GRISOGONO

RUBY Wearing rubies can bring you happiness, prosperity, intergrity and lots of self-confidence.

Midnight Sun ring, PIAGET

EMERALD The stone of the heart, emerald symbolises mercy, compassion and love, promoting spiritual, emotional and mental balance.


226

LA DOLCE VITA Overindulge in diamonds for a taste of the good life

Photographed by Greg Adamski Styled by Natascha Hawke

La D de Dior PrĂŠcieuse watches, DIOR TIMEPIECES


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Rose Dior Bagatelle rings, La Rose Dior PrĂŠ Catelan rings, Archi Dior rings, Gourmande Pastel ring and Archi Dior earrings, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY


La Rose Dior Pré Catelan ring, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY


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Rose Dior Bagatelle ring, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY Archi Dior earrings, ring and bracelet, DIOR HIGH JEWELLERY


La Rose Dior PrĂŠ Catelan earrings, necklace and rings, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY


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Archi Dior earrings and Diorella ring, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY


Rose Dior Bagatelle necklace, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY


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Archi Dior ring, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY


Archi Dior rings and necklace, Bois de Rose ring and bracelet, DIOR FINE JEWELLERY Model: Jak B at Signature Element Make-up: Athina Doutis at MMG Hair: Amanda K at MMG


236

MOJEH BEAUTY

BACKSTAGE

BEAUTY REP ORT

Photography: GoRunway.com

This season, designers didn’t hold back with beauty. From the red lips dotting the Givenchy runway to the choppy fringes at Prada and the graphic cat eyes at Dior – there were plenty of high-impact looks to take your beauty cues from for spring


GUCCI


238

EYE SPY

TADASHI SHOJI

HALPERN

Brilliant neons, thumbprint eyeliner and a splash of moondust are the makings of this season’s loud and proud eyes.

ZIGGY STARDUST

JEREMY SCOTT

SIMONE ROCHA

KATE SPADE

VERSACE

The secret to the starry eyes that dominated the S/S19 runway? A healthy addiction to glitter and an uninhibited hand. With shimmer and shine, it’s go bold or go home.


POP ART EYES

ASHISH ARTHUR ARBESSER

GCDS

COURRÈGES AFTERHOMEWORK

Embrace the bold eye movement and take it one step further with can’t-stop-staring lids. Think dayglow shades and electric hues when picking your colour.

MARQUES’ALMEIDA

LUTZ HUELLE

BYBLOS

GABRIELA HEARST

THE BIG BLUE


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MARNI

GRAPHIC LINER

YOHJI YAMAMOTO

ROCHAS

A steady wrist and a lot of freehand practice is the only way to nail this season’s modern graffiti cat-eye.

DRIES VAN NOTEN

BURBERRY

THE BLONDS

EXPERT ADVICE “To create the perfect feline flick, sketch the outer corner of your eye with a light eyeshadow as a guiding tool. Once this is done, take your desired liner and fill in the line.” Mariam Khairallah, M. A.C global senior make-up artist


LINED INNER RIMS

BRUSHED OUT BROWS

DIOR EMPORIO ARMANI

MSGM CHRISTIAN WIJNANTS

SPORTMAX

DELPOZO

ROBERTO CAVALLI

ELIE SAAB

Unkempt and bushy seems to be going strong, as fluffy brows took over at Roberto Cavalli, Delpozo and Sportmax.


POWER POUTS

GIVENCHY

KOCHÉ

MARINE SERRE

ESCADA

ASHLEY WILLIAMS

A perennial favourite, a crimson pout was paired with practically every trend this season. Lips at Escada and Givenchy all said the same thing – glamour is only a red tube away.

GUY LAROCHE

CHALAYAN

HIGH VOLTAGE LIPS

GCDS

242


FULL ON NUDE

BARE NAKED LIPS To enhance the retro palette that ran across Peter Pilotto’s S/S19 collection, make-up artist Lauren Parsons played it nice and nude, with barely-there lips to enhance the Pre-Raphaelite skin and painterly eyes that made up the main focus of the beauty look.

PHILIPP PLEIN

PETER PILOTTO

MICHAEL KORS

MARCO DE VINCENZO

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

Naked and real, nothing oozes subtle sexiness like a nude lip. From café au lait creams to matte tan, there’s a shade to make everyone bare all.

NICOPANDA

MOSCHINO

JOUR/NÉ

LIP LINER


MAX MARA

Sun-starved? Get a healthy, post-beach complexion using warm tones and sunset shades. Pair with windswept hair to nail the look.

BRANDON MAXWELL

SUN-KISSED SKIN

JOUR/NÉ OLIVIER THEYSKENS

ALTUZARRA

EXPERT ADVICE “My favourite trend for S/S19 is the healthy look. A great transition from winter to spring, it’s about applying a great bronzer all over the face, a pink/red blush on the apple of the cheeks, and topping it all off with clean eyelids and mascara.” Mariam Khairallah, M. A.C global senior make-up artist

ZIMMERMAN

244


PLAIN JANE

CHRISTOPHER KANE

PROENZA SCHOULER

BALMAIN

ROBERTO CAVALLI

S/S19 served up simple ‘no-make-up’ make-up with dewy skin at the centre of this look. Think your skin, but better, complemented by peach nude lips and barely-there shadow.

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

MISSONI

HOUSE OF HOLLAND

ETRO

FULL ON FRECKLES


VICTORIA BECKHAM

HAIR HACKS Knotted buns, low ponies, and everything in between. Here’s all the hair inspo you need for the season.

CHRISTOPHER KANE

SACAI

SALLY LAPOINTE

MARNI

ALTUZARRA

246

SHOWER HEAD High-shine, lacquered and swept back, the wearable post-shower wet look will mean breaking a sweat this summer is a conscious call.


THE CHIGNON

EUDON CHOI

THE ’70S TOPKNOT Romantic and ethereal, Sam McKnight gave models a wispy high bun at Fendi’s S/S19 show. The chic chignon iterations saw hair swept in high-slung knots with delicate flyaways, dreamily left loose to frame the face.

OLIVIER THEYSKENS

FENDI

AREA

NAEEM KHAN

Messy, topknot or nape-scraping – the mighty bun promises maximum style mileage, that’ll take you seamlessly from day to night.

LOEWE

MIU MIU

DRIES VAN NOTEN

FRINGE BENEFITS


CUSHNIE

JOHN GALLIANO

POWER PLAIT ERIKA CAVALLINI

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

MAX MARA

BORA AKSU

GYPSY BRAIDS

PRABAL GURUNG

248

Sleek and sculpted, braids became a recurring theme on the catwalk, with designers making a case for a longer, bolder plait that means business.


TRUE ROMANCE

ANNA SUI

RODARTE

LUISA BECCARIA

GIORGIO ARMANI

RYAN LO

Sweetly dishevelled, pretty floaty waves are giving feminity a spot in the limelight, as delicate crowns and floral pins add some much-needed romance.

ULLA JOHNSON

TADASHI SHOJI

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

LOEWE

THE LOW PONY


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NAUGHTY NAILS

PHILIPP PLEIN

CHROMAT

THE BLONDS

From outlandish nail art to encrusted jewels, these are the talon trends to nail for your next manicure.

MARY KATRANTZOU

From The Blonds’ spike-covered nails to Adeam’s gem-adorned falsies, crafty jewels were turned into the most statement-making nails.

AREA

ADEAM

PRISCAVERA

LIBERTINE

BEDAZZLED BLING


HALPERN

TWO-TONE TALONS

SADIE WILLIAMS

GARETH PUGH

JEREMY SCOTT

MANISH ARORA

THOM BROWNE

Neons. Neutrals. Why stick to one when you can have both? Nails get experimental and artsy this season, as we see dual tones of opposing colours mix-and-matched in graphic, bold and attentiongrabbing designs.

TIBI

COURRÈGES

TEMPERLEY LONDON

NOTICE-ME NEUTRALS


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MOJEH BEAUTY

BEAUTY NEWS The shades, scents, products and trends set to reignite your regime for spring DRx SpectraLite FaceWare Pro, DR. DENNIS GROSS SKINCARE at NET-A-PORTER

SPACE AGE SKINCARE Supercharge your skincare regime with one of this year’s most talked about beauty-tech devices. Created for home use by results-driven skincare brand, Dr. Dennis Gross, the futuristiclooking medical grade mask is inspired by professional in-office lasers and adorned with more than 150 red and blue LED lights to repair the skin. Science proves that red light stimulates the natural production of collagen and elastin to reduce sun damage, wrinkles and redness, while blue light targets acnecausing bacteria to prevent future breakouts – sending this gadget to the top of our wish list for its multi-tasking abilities. The best part? It’s worn for just three minutes per session, making it effortlessly quick and easy to use. At Net-a-porter.com

TEMPERLEY LONDON

From left: Aqua Falls Make-up Removal Water and Icy Falls Refreshing Cleansing Face Jelly, VALMONT

The Only One 2 Eau de Parfum, DOLCE & GABBANA | Pure Musc For Her Eau de Parfum, NARCISO RODRIGUEZ

A SPRITZ FOR SPRING From warm, earthy notes to bold, beautiful florals, spring’s newest fragrances have arrived with a bang. Narciso Rodriguez’s Launching this month, Swiss skincare creator Valmont has developed a line

Pure Musc For Her is bursting with a heady bouquet of floral

of products which are perfect for use in the Middle East. Offering gentle yet

and woody musks, while Dolce & Gabbana’s The Only One 2 is

powerful formulas that fight environmental pollutants, the range boasts gels,

an intoxicating blend of violet, red rose and blackberries, with

creams, foams and lotions to cleanse, exfoliate and balance the skin. At Tryano

an unexpected yet intriguing note of sweet coffee.

Compiled by Nina Catt

SKIN DEEP


BEAUTY MEMO From left: Stunna Lip Paint in Unattached, Undefeated and Unlocked, all FENTY BEAUTY

5 MINUTES WITH...

HECTOR ESPINAL

Fenty Beauty’s global make-up artist shares his tips on how to achieve the perfect basic face Fenty Beauty has redefined the make-up shade game. How did you do it? I think we honestly never realised that so many people did not have a foundation, or that people had to mix. So we went out and made many tone options – something for everyone. Though, it was never about the number of foundations, I think anybody can come up with a hundred different foundations, it was about the undertones and surface tones, and understanding why that was our main focus when we were making them. How has this transpired into the rest of the Fenty products? Since we created this whole momentum in the beauty industry with our colour shades, all of

POWER POUT

our products have had to follow that same path. So, say if we do

Step into the new season with megawatt accents of daring colour, courtesy of Fenty Beauty’s three new matte lip shades. The vivid pink of Unlocked, bright coral of Unattached and sultry purple of Undefeated are guaranteed to bring all the drama. At Sephora

a coral, it has to be universal. Will it look good on you, on me, on everyone? If a colour does not show up on a model during our final test, it does not go to production until we get it right. What are your tips on getting the right colour? For foundation, I always say look to your chest. Your face is very exposed to the sun while your neck is not: it’ll always be whiter. But if you look at your chest, it’s the

CUSHNIE

most colour-balanced between the two. For concealer though, it should be the same shade as the back of your wrist, because the sun never hits there. These are the easiest steps for picking colour. How can we achieve a basic face with the new line of concealers and foundations? I would have to say coverage is a matter of preference. So, for those who like a lot of coverage, they should apply concealer with a brush. Same thing with foundation: it’ll give more coverage, because it picks up more. But if you dab your sponge in concealer or foundation, it’s going to give you the most natural look – avoiding texture, since it’s mimicking what its touching. Your one main rule when it comes to coverage? You always want to look like a better version of yourself. You don’t want to take your make-up off and look like someone else, that’s scary. It should never be transformative, just something to enhance your natural beauty.

From left: Pro Filt’r Soft Matte Longwear Foundation in 235 and Pro Filt’r Instant Retouch Concealer in 235, FENTY BEAUTY


254

MOJEH BEAUTY

6

BEAUTY IN FOCUS:

5. Shade Variation Care Nutritive Mask in Chic Copper CHRISTOPHE ROBIN at NET-A-PORTER | 6. Color Full Hair Mask, RAHUA at OUNASS

NEW SEASON HAIR

5

FORGET-ME-KNOT The bun is back. Take your style cues from the runway and pull hair into an effortlessly chic top knot. Leave a few strands loose and wrap them around a curling wand to soften the look.

1. Imperméable Anti-Humidity Spray, ORIBE at OUNASS | 2. Airwrap styler, DYSON

FENDI

SEEING RED When it comes to seasonal hair trends, ombré, balayage and babylights have long been the go-to for that post-winter pick-me-up, but there’s a new hue in town. The colour we’re about to see everywhere? Copper. Keep it fresh by bathing your tresses with nourishing colour-protecting masks.

2 3

3. SIMONE ROCHA at MATCHES FASHION | 4. SOPHIE BILLE BRAHE at NET-APORTER

AFTERHOMEWORK

4 SCENE-STEALING ACCESSORIES

PRADA

From bejewelled hair clips to statement headbands, hair accessories are having a huge moment on the catwalk, and our Instagram feeds.

Words: Nina Catt. Photography: GoRunway.com

1


L’Essentiel Natural Glow Foundation, GUERLAIN Knesko Skin’s Repair Collection Travel Essentials kit

BASE CAMP

SKINCARE 101: SPOTLIGHT ON KNESKO

Switching to a foundation that contains all the benefits of luxury

Lejla Cas on why her celebrity-loved skincare label is every

from 97 per cent naturally-derived ingredients? Even better.

bit worthy of its cult following

skincare sounds like the perfect match. When it’s formulated Mineral pigments, marine and plant active ingredients unite in Guerlain’s L’Essentiel Natural Glow to create a buildable

Why did you create your

foundation that evens skin tone, hydrates, balances and protects.

own line of collageninfused masks? I launched Knesko Skin in 2012 after working in the skincare industry for over 12 years. With my background as an aesthetician and make-up

1

1. Beauty Elxir, CAUDALIE at NET-A-PORTER | 2. Re-Dew Set & Refresh Spray, BEAUTYBLENDER exclusively at SEPHORA | 3. Balancing Rose Mist, KORA ORGANICS at NET-A-PORTER

3

2

artist, starting my own brand was a natural progression. What are the benefits of using collagen-infused skincare? Collagen is widely acknowledged as being among the most effective natural skincare ingredients on the planet. Our team of doctors have boosted the age-defying effects of marine collagen with our unique Gemclinical polypeptide technology by breaking down large collagen molecules into smaller chains, allowing for optimal penetration into the epidermal barrier. Tell us about your different collections. Diamond Radiance is ideal for addressing areas of concern including discolouration, dullness, large pores and fine lines. Diamonds are ‘the king of gems’ and stimulate the crown chakra to promote a more radiant spirit. Nano Gold Repair is ideal for firming, lifting, and hydrating skin, while purging negative energy blocks at the same time. Tell us about your new gemstone rollers? Our handcrafted gemstone rollers are made from fair-trade green jade and white jade (available in the UAE this month) or black obsidian and rose quartz (launching later this year). They are then dipped in rose gold. Each one is

MAGICAL MISTS

personally charged with reiki healing energy by myself. What do gemstone rollers actually do for the skin? Green jade rollers

Formulated to hydrate parched skin, set make-up, protect

tone and define, while white jade rollers contour and refresh. Our

against environmental aggressors and increase the absorption

new rose quartz roller calms and soothes, and our black obsidian

of subsequently-applied skincare products, the best face mists

roller helps to detox and protect. Knesko Skin is available at

are jam-packed with a potent blend of powerhouse ingredients.

Bloomingdale’s-Dubai, Harvey Nichols-Dubai and Ounass.ae

A 3pm spritz can also boost your mood.


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Clockwise from top left: Water Fuse Hydro Toner, DR. JART+ exclusively at SEPHORA | Hydra Beauty Camellia Water Cream, CHANEL | Hydra Life Balancing Hydration 2 in 1 Sorbet Water, DIOR | Waterburst Hydrated Glow Moisturizer, GLAMGLOW exclusively at SEPHORA | Super Aqua-Gel Perfecting Hydration Matte Finish, GUERLAIN

Photography: Tina Patni. Styling: Nina Catt

MOJEH BEAUTY


WONDER WATER With a kaleidoscopic array of skincare innovations emerging faster than we can keep up with, the beauty industry is awash with newness – but among all the noise, one particular trend seems to be making a splash Words by Nina Catt

I

n 2018, an infinite slew of skincare trends entranced our social media feeds. Captivated by the onslaught of offerings that promised to plump, rejuvenate and future-proof our faces, we invested a huge amount of time, money and effort into beauty and personal care – one of the fastest-growing industries in the region. In fact, according to research by Euromonitor International, the Middle East and Africa’s Dhs93.3 billion beauty and personal care market will grow by 6.4 per cent per year over the next five years – that’s a bigger predicted growth than the expected global increase, which sits at three per cent per year. The facts don’t lie. We are extremely invested in taking care of our appearance, and a glimpse of Sephora at The Dubai Mall on highlypublicised product launch days would support that research. Last year was a transformative one for beauty and grooming. We witnessed the rise of skincare tools such as crystal face rollers, and a smattering of high-tech laser gadgets delivered the luxury of professional-grade treatments within our homes. Next-gen foil sheet masks were on the agenda for Saturday nights thanks to the interminable popularity of Korean-born inventions, and botanical-infused oils blossomed into our bathroom cabinets like a fresh bouquet of seasonal florals. This year? It’s all about water. About 60 per cent of our body is made up of water, and for our organs to function properly it’s fundamental that we drink enough of it every day. If we don’t provide our bodies with sufficient water, the effects of dehydration show through the skin, leaving it dry and lacklustre. In the past, experts have advised that our daily water intake should be around eight glasses, or two litres, however this recommendation should vary depending on activity level, sweat production, climate, and more. If constantly sipping water seems like a chore, another approach to ensure our skin (and body) is sufficiently hydrated is by adding water-rich foods into our diet. Nutrient-loaded, water-dense and brightly coloured fruit and vegetables provide both nutrition and hydration to help the body hold on to and utilise its water more efficiently. This all goes towards helping to enrich cells, maintain proper circulation, aid with digestion and support healthy skin. Coupled with a dedicated beauty regime, skin will be brighter and more radiant.

With all this talk on the importance of H20, it’s no wonder that ‘water-based’ or ‘hydro-skincare’ products are buzzwords dominating our conversations when it comes to newfound beauty benefits. Thanks to water’s resplendent ability to keep skin hydrated, we have already seen a rise in fluid and lightweight formulas for 2019. Korean-born skincare brand Dr. Jart+ has immersed itself in the trend, and its Water Fuse range of ultra-lightweight gels, are right on cue. “Not only is skin temperature elevated in hot parts of the world like the Middle East, but it is also subjected to very low temperatures because of the constant exposure to air conditioning – causing a loss of moisture,” explains Clara Kwon, who is the global trainer for the Dr. Jart+ brand. “It is difficult to maintain a normal and healthy complexion when skin is put under so much pressure. Providing extra hydration with lightweight formulas is essential to helping maintain balanced moisture levels and to keep the skin energised all day long”. Dubai-based beauty educator and make-up artist, Angélique Turner expands on the science behind the trend. “The stratum corneum (the outermost layer of our skin) is made up of cells that can absorb five to six times their own weight in fluid. For skin to look and feel smooth and supple, this outer layer should be made up of 10 to 30 per cent water,” she says. “Water-based products can deposit and replenish a lack of H20, and at the same time, act as a vessel to distribute active ingredients from the product into the skin.” Another brand to dive into the aquatic beauty movement is celebrity-favourite Glamglow, with its Waterburst moisturiser. “Water-based products usually penetrate deeper than other textures,” says education manager for the Middle East, Sophie Waller. “These formulas are suitable for all skin types, even oily. An oily skin has excess sebum but can still lack water due to lifestyle challenges and environmental changes, so it’s essential to restore lost moisture without adding any additional oil. Hydro-formulas help plump dehydration lines, improve texture and give the skin a healthier appearance.” However you increase your intake of H20, one thing is for certain, taking a dip into the trend could be worth its weight in more than just water.


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MODERN MASTERPIECES Spring/summer’s new mood supplies a palette of pretty colours, a smattering of shimmer, and unrivalled tools of the trade. These are the beauty heroes of the season

Photographed by Tina Patni Styled by Nina Catt


MASTER STROKES Sometimes, it’s the smallest of statements that make the biggest of impacts. Case in point, the bold swipes of brightly-coloured eyeliner seen at Christian Siriano and Versace. Whether you go all-out with a graphic wing or keep it simple with a subtle flash of colour in the waterline, use your artistic license to create a look that suits your style. It’s time to get creative! Left pot: Ombre Hypnôse Stylo Shadow Stick in Bleu Chrome, LANCÔME | 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Overdrive, URBAN DECAY | Matte Highliner Gel Eye Crayon Eyeliner in Out of the Blue, MARC JACOBS BEAUTY exclusively at SEPHORA. Right pot: Diorshow On Stage Liner Waterproof Liquid Eyeliner in Matte Pop Green and Matte Pink, DIOR | Dessin Du Regard Waterproof Eyeliner Pencil in Blue, YVES SAINT LAURENT


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PAINTED POUTS This season, the minimal make-up movement is challenged once again with the return of the power pout. As seen at Givenchy and Escada, rich velvety mattes reign supreme. Lips are set to get loud. From top: Matte Lipstick in Russian Red, M.A.C | Studded Kiss Crème in Underage Red, KAT VON D exclusively at SEPHORA | K.I.S.S.I.N.G Lipstick in So Marilyn, CHARLOTTE TILBURY | Rouge Allure Velvet Luminous Matte Lip Colour in Imperial, CHANEL | L’Absolu Rouge Drama Matte Lipstick in Rose, LANCÔME | Rouge D’Armani Matte Lipstick in Four Hundred, GIORGIO ARMANI | Ultimate Lipstick Love in Brave, BECCA X KHLOÉ KARDASHIAN & MALIKA HAQQ exclusively at SEPHORA


NEW NEUTRALS The muted tones of peaches and cream are the

power pastels garnering attention on the catwalks for spring/summer – notably at Gucci and Prabal Gurung. They’re also deliciously sweet splattered against all skin tones.

Clockwise from top right: Intense Nail Lacquer in Bella, DOLCE & GABBANA | Nail Lacquer in It’s In The Cloud, O.P.I | Nail Lacquer in Sugar Dune, TOM FORD | Le Vernis Longwear Nail Colour in Bleached Mauve, CHANEL


262 PALETTE OF GILT A glistening gathering of antique golds shone down on the spring/summer shows of Kim Shui and Temperley London. Load up on the mascara for an out-of-this world look. From left: Ombre Hypnôse Stylo Shadow Stick in Plantine, LANCÔME | Chrome Paint Shadow Pot in Sun Drenched, TARTE | Ombre Première Longwear Cream Eyeshadow in Patine Bronze, CHANEL | Perfect Mono Cream Eye Colour in Gold Band, DOLCE & GABBANA | Dazzleshadow in Oh So Gilty, M.A.C


HIGH BEAMS A new way to highlight has arrived, making the trend for luminescent skin much easier to master. Draw on that coveted lit-from-within glow with a solid stick – the new beauty hero that’s creating conversations. Swipe over the high points of the face – the tops of the cheekbones, the brow bones and the cupid’s bow – for an instant, glimmering, lift. From top: Baume Essentiel Glow Stick in Sculpting, CHANEL | Nudies All Over Face Glow in Illumi-Naughty, NUDESTIX exclusively at SEPHORA | Glow Stick Highlighter in Moonlight Shimmer, SEPHORA


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TOOLS OF THE TRADE Beauty tool trends come and go (remember the silicone applicator?) but the word on the lips of pro make-up artists backstage remains the same, as sponges are the crowned application tool of choice. This season, a new slew of mini variations has bounced into our beauty bags - perfect for stippling and creating a flawless canvas. From top: Vanish Seamless Finish Liquid Foundation in Golden, HOURGLASS exclusively at SEPHORA | Electric Violet Cosmetic Sponge, BEAUTYBLENDER exclusively at SEPHORA | The Basic B Blending Sponge, HUDA BEAUTY | Quickie Blending Sponge, TARTE


CLEAN SLATES The importance of a clean canvas is essential when it comes to make-up application. Keep your complexion clear and hydrated by treating it with regular masks that provide skin-boosting benefits, for a flawless finish. Clockwise from top: Hydra Life Pores Away Pink Clay Mask, DIOR | Primrose Facial Cleansing Masque, AESOP | Supermud Clearing Treatment Mask, GLAMGLOW exclusively at SEPHORA


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SCENT-SATIONAL OBJET D’ARTS Spring/summer’s new crop of fragrances incorporate an intoxicating blend of floral and grassy notes. Housed in artfully eclectic bottles, give them the attention they deserve by gracing your boudoir with their presence. Modern day collectables don’t come prettier than these. From left: The Alchemist’s Garden Moonlight Serenade Perfumed Water, GUCCI | Flowerbomb Nectar Eau de Parfum Intense, VICTOR & ROLF | Nettle & Wild Achillea Cologne, JO MALONE LONDON


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MANISH ARORA

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LIFE IN TECHNICOLOUR Smatterings of paint-like shadow and graphic sweeps of neon eyeliner see high-impact make-up back in the spotlight.

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1. Loubibelle Lip Beauty Oil in Rouge Louboutin, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN BEAUTY at NET-A-PORTER | 2. Obsessions Eyeshadow Palette in Amethyst, HUDA BEAUTY | 3. Dual Liner in No.3, GIVENCHY | 4. Liquid Blush in Orgasm, NARS at OUNASS | 5. Lipglass in Heroine, M.A.C | 6. Eye Colour Quad in Daydream, TOM FORD BEAUTY | 7. Highliner Matte Gel Eye Crayons in Grapevine and Mist Me, MARC JACOBS BEAUTY

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From left: Miss Dior Eau de Toilette and Miss Dior Roller-Pearl


IN BLOOM In an era where fragrances and their creators dance in and out of the perfumery sphere, very few stand the test of time. Unless of course, you are Dior…

Photography: Tina Patni. Words and Styling: Nina Catt

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n February 12, 1947, at age 42, Christian Dior presented his very first clothing collection under his namesake label. To accompany his debut, the Parisian couturier fantasised about creating the ultimate accessory, the final touch to his fashion house, if you will – a feminine, f loral fragrance. “Make me a perfume that smells of love”, he requested of perfumer Paul Vacher, which, unbeknown to either gentlemen, would be the birth of one of the most iconic fragrances of all time. Introduced to the world on that same February winter’s day 72 years ago, Miss Dior – named as a tribute to the designer’s sister – was born. Fast-forward to the present day, Miss Dior has experienced many makeovers at the hands of the house’s skillful perfumers. The very first bottle was designed to mirror and celebrate the curves of a woman’s hourglass

figure, gradually evolving over the years into the silhouette that we recognise today – square with a bow at the neck. This month, a new version of the iconic floral fragrance is blossoming into the perfumery sphere. For this new adaptation of Miss Dior Eau de Toilette, Dior’s perfumer-creator, François Demachy, emphasised the juice’s essential grasse rose, by giving it a hint of freshness with a new lily of the valley accord – a favourite Dior flower, and Christian Dior’s lucky charm. “Miss Dior Eau de Toilette is more of a harmony than a melody. Its floral nature is heightened, and its notes match each other, corresponding, and binding together,” François explains. Of all the great perfume houses, Dior is perhaps the most illustrious and prestigious, thanks to its most celebrated fragrance. But can the new scent withstand another 72 years? Only time will tell…


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TALKING POINT

PRESSING FOR PROGRESS Research shows women are more stressed than men, as we attempt to balance our domestic duties with high-pressured careers

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e have grown accustomed to the idea that being too busy is a sign of importance, and that feeling pressure indicates ambition. Despite being the closest we have ever been to gender equality, women are fighting a new battle against a persistent adversary that’s becoming increasingly prevalent: stress. According to a 2018 study published by UK healthcare company Forth, women are significantly more likely to suffer from stress than men, with female participants admitting that, on average, they feel stressed for three more days per month, compared to their male counterparts. Of the women who took part in the 2,000-strong study, 42 per cent believed that they were too stressed throughout their day-to-day life, and when asked about how this impacts their physical and mental health, a shocking 59 per cent admitted that it worried them. Laura Posada is a US TV personality, mother, attorney, motivational speaker and author. With over 600,000 social media followers, she has used her notoriety to make waves in the philanthropic world, and her efforts have been recognised by The Wall Street Journal, as well as former president Barack Obama. “We sometimes believe that women are completely free from the limitations that we had in the past, such as being confined to the home,” she explains, when asked about the reasons women are reporting increased stress levels more than ever. “But, in some ways, this is still happening, and we have also chosen to carry other heavy burdens. It is common now for women to study, have professional careers, work and be independent.” Laura acknowledges that these are “wonderful achievements”, but argues there are downsides. “What is not being mentioned is, according to recent research, women do double the number of domestic chores in comparison to men. This doesn’t seem fair, if we’re also working and contributing economically to the home.” A 2015 study published in the Journal of the American Heart

Association suggested that women “report greater stress and stressful life events than men, potentially because of their different roles in family life and work, as compared to men.” Although most women in developed countries are no longer fighting for the right to attend university, earn minimum wage and attain senior management positions, we continue to struggle with double standards and, of course, less pay. We’re also expected to be the primary caregivers to our children, all while maintaining a happy household, friendships and hobbies. As if that weren’t anxiety-inducing enough, we’re additionally bombarded with glossy images of perfect bodies and bee-stung pouts, which mainstream society insists we aspire to. “We want true equality,” insists Laura, “with shared responsibilities, both at home and at work.” Unsurprised that there’s a proven stress gap between the genders, she furthers: “The problem is that it’s now expected that women should work both outside and inside the home, without help from our partners and, above all, we are expected to do it perfectly. This puts a lot of unnecessary pressure on us, and it can be a factor that contributes to a life of dissatisfaction,” she explains. “This makes women forget about themselves – we sacrifice our own wellbeing to achieve goals that are often not even realistic in the first place.” In light of all this, it’s becoming harder for women to achieve a balanced and happy life – cue images of high-heeled executives burning the midnight oil, between hastened calls home to check in on her spouse and their children. “We want to succeed in our professional lives, but we also want our families to be well. We want to be there for them and support them. We also want to spend time with our friends. It’s a very complex balance,” concludes Laura, “and it’s more difficult for women than it is for men.” Michelle Obama knows what it’s like to balance a highpressured job alongside parenting, albeit with the help of

Photography: Anthony Arquier, for MOJEH 46

Words by Annie Darling


More and more women are admitting to feeling stressed to the point of concern in their everyday lives


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As well as pursuing careers outside of the home, society still expects women to shoulder domestic chores and care for their families


Women forget about themselves – we sacrifice our own wellbeing to achieve goals that are often not even realistic in the first place. Laura Posada

expensive childcare. “Marriage still ain’t equal, y’all. It ain’t equal. I tell women that whole ‘you can have it all’ – mmm, nope. Not at the same time. That’s a lie,” she said last year to cheering crowds during her Becoming book tour. Where can we turn for an explanation? “A man can easily focus more on his job, and he won’t be criticised,” argues Laura. “People will say that he’s a responsible man, working hard to support his family. If a woman does the same, she will have plenty of critics, because people still think that women are the ones responsible for the home and children. This happens in almost every culture around the world.” Suad Abu-Dayyeh is the Middle East consultant for Equality Now, an international women’s rights organisation. Prior to joining the group, she worked with the Women’s Center for Legal Aid and Counselling in Jerusalem, a Palestinian feminist NGO that addresses gender-based violence in the region. “A woman is still seen as a wife who should be at home, and when it comes to sharing domestic responsibilities, this doesn’t happen, even when she works outside of the home,” says Suad. “It’s taken for granted that women will shoulder the domestic burden because of the way that society perceives their role at home. They care for the whole family – not just the children but also their husband and members of their extended family.” There’s no biological explanation for why women do more housework. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, on a typical day nearly half of women do household chores, while only 20 per cent of men do the same. Men also manage to carve out three more hours of leisure time. It has long been suspected that these dynamics amount to added stress for women, and the reason seems to stem from societal stereotypes. After all, it would be ridiculous to suggest that a specific gender is physically predisposed to doing the dishes or taking out the rubbish. “Women are still fulfilling men’s needs and aspirations, as well as their own. Men can help by recognising this and sharing those burdens and responsibilities that are typically shouldered by the women in their lives,” informs Suad. Living in a patriarchal society that discriminates against women and girls inspires Suad to advocate for their rights. “It’s not fair for women to go to work, come home, and have to do all of these chores which require so much energy

and time,” she says. “I believe that when women work outside of the house, domestic responsibilities should be shared with men.” She adds: “As women don’t receive payment for domestic labour, it’s not recognised, appreciated or respected, and this is a problem.” Thanks to mistrust about the gender disparity in stress, as well as mental illness in general, it is easy for women to feel like their added anxiety is unwarranted. This is despite plenty of research to underscore that reality, including a report from the United Nations that revealed women are assuming nearly three times more of the work associated with the home than men. Studies have also found that at least one cause of the housework imbalance can be traced back to childhood chores, with the US Bureau of Labor Statistics suggesting that girls are asked to do more work around the house than boys. This dynamic carries a lesson for both genders: girls learn that housework is their responsibility; boys learn that girls will clean up after them. It would seem that we are socialised to act this way, that we carry these behaviours into adulthood, and that we’re only just beginning to observe the detrimental long-term effects that this sort of conditioning has on our minds and bodies. Not only is stress impacting women’s everyday lives – how we interact with colleagues, friends and family – but chronic stress and anxiety leads to deadly health issues like heart disease, which is the leading cause of death in both men and women. On a positive note, millennial men are more likely to take on housework, including childcare duties women have tended to bear in the past. Additionally, according to the American Psychological Association, women are more likely than men to take charge of their stress and manage it. The concept of self-care has long been misunderstood as overindulgence, but disconnecting from stressors like work or home responsibilities is important. Granted, it’s easier said than done, but working on staying in the moment by being mindful of your thoughts and surroundings can be achieved by simply reflecting over a hot cup of coffee. While it may seem obvious, putting thoughts into actions is essential to bridging the stress gap that’s tormenting the lives of so many women today. Our independence and freedom of choice has never been greater, but it’s up to us to ensure excessive anxiety doesn’t prevent us from living our lives to the fullest.


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MOJEH TRAVEL

TRAVEL EDIT

BULGARI HOTEL LONDON

When landing in London, make sure your base is as resplendent and remarkable as the city itself

Words: Kate Wills and Natascha Hawke

THE SUITE LIFE

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’m lying in a poolside cabana, cream drapes billowing around me, debating whether to order a smoothie before I do a few laps. The light plays on the gold mosaic tiles in the floor of the pool. But I’m not in Ibiza or Bali. I’m in the heart of London at the Bulgari Hotel. It’s hard to believe this twofloor subterranean sanctuary of green glass is in Knightsbridge, just yards away from the most famous shop floor in London, if not the world. The seven floors of Harrods might be within striking distance, but for now the shopping can wait. When you’re sat by the UK’s longest hotel pool (a cool 25 metres), it’s all too easy to let the day fly by. This is the kind of hotel where you find yourself thinking ‘maybe there’s not that much to see in London anyway’, as you sink into the jacuzzi. As you’d expect from Bulgari, one of the oldest Italian jewellery houses and purveyor of luxury watches and accessories, the hotel is the epitome of sumptuous gloss and glamour. The brand opened its first hotel in Milan in 2004 and now has six properties around the world (in Milan, London, Bali, Dubai, Beijing and Shanghai), with openings in Paris, Moscow and Tokyo on the slate for the next few years. At the London


outpost, which opened in 2012, the dark granite lobby, velvet furniture and grey staff uniforms set the tone from the outset. It feels as though every surface is marble, mirrored silver or mahogany, and I later discover there’s not a single painted wall in the entire property. Although all 85 rooms have a touch of opulence, the seven signature suites here manage to feel both incredibly decadent, but with a homely warmth. The one we’re staying in is palatial in size and decorated in the manner of a very stylish (very wealthy) friend’s house. There’s a curated bookshelf with titles you actually want to flick through, ideally while sat by the fireplace. The centrepiece of the room is a huge mahogany dining table which seats 10, perfect if you wanted to invite friends over for supper, and there’s a Sonos sound system to put on some jazz while you make them a drink from the patinamirrored drinks cabinet. Although, each suite comes with its own butler service, so you can leave that to them if you prefer. But it’s in the bathroom that things get elevated from five-star to ‘I’m never leaving’. All the suites come with showers that can be turned into ‘steam room mode’ (if you haven’t had your fill of steam and sauna time in the spa), while the freestanding marble bath makes you feel like a pharoah. Although possibly even more extravagant, as the ancient Egyptians didn’t have miniature Bulgari toiletries. Back down in the spa – it’s hard to keep yourself away – the array of cutting-edge treatments make other hotel spas look positively backwards. There’s the David Peters acupuncture facial, featuring a blend of eastern and western techniques such as cupping, 24-karat gold and LED light to leave you glowing. There’s also mesotherapy – where a rejuvenating cocktail of vitamins and minerals is delivered to the skin via micro air gun injections. I opt for a cryotherapy sports massage, which involves cryogenically cooled air – an eye-watering -30 degrees – blasted on to areas of tension to penetrate deep into the layers of tissue and improve circulation and blood flow. It doesn’t feel unpleasant, just a bit chilly, and when my therapist begins kneading me, I feel like he’s better able to get into the pockets of tension in my back. The treatment finishes with some alignment of my hips and back and I feel like I don’t so much walk out the therapy room as glide, a good few inches taller. I suppose I should do some actual sports to go with my sports massage, and the Workshop fitness area, founded by personal trainer Lee Mullins, is a no-fad gym, where London’s most in-demand workouts can be found. There’s boxing, yoga and resistance-based training, and the secluded atmosphere makes it a draw for celebrity clients. But if you’re more of a ‘shopping is my cardio’ person, then Knightsbridge is the ultimate base. If Harrods and Harvey Nichols don’t have what you’re looking for, then it probably doesn’t exist. Anya Hindmarch, Lulu Guinness, Burberry and Christian Louboutin all have boutiques here. And if you feel yourself flagging, the legendary Rococo Chocolates and the pastry shop Baker & Spice are the place for a sugar kick. And after all that exertion, it’s the ultimate luxury to kick back at the Bulgari. Whether in the 47-seat cinema which is available for private hire, or back at the pool. For shopping and spa-lovers this really is la dolce vita. Bulgarihotels.com

Bulgari Hotel London is perfectly placed in premium Knightsbridge

The home-from-palatial-home living room of a Bulgari suite

Bathroom suite extravagance


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The lobby of The London Edition

THE LONDON EDITION If you’re the kind of person who likes to get a feel for a city by staying in the very heart of it, then the location of The London Edition couldn’t be better. Ten steps left out of its front door and you’ll find yourself on the bustling thoroughfare that is Oxford Street, London’s shopping super-highway that runs past the buzzing boutiques and restaurants of Carnaby Street, Regent Street and Bond Street, ending like a fashion full stop at world-renowned designer emporium Selfridges. Steeped in history like the city itself, the hotel, situated in Fitzrovia, is housed in a property that dates back to 1835 and was once the stately home of King Edward VII and, later, Russian jeweller Carl Fabergé. While the communal spaces are cavernous with high ceilings and extravagent finishes, when it comes to the living spaces – it feels absolutely boutique. The 173 rooms are all designed to feel cabin-like, with wood panels and fur throws that add to the ski chalet aesthetic. Cosy enough to let you feel at home, but leave the room and the social buzz of the lobby reminds you this is one of the places to see and be seen in London. If not shopping, which is unlikely, you’ll definitely be eating – and where the city itself offers unlimited dining options, the hotel is home to one of the best. Helmed by celebrated Michelin-starred chef Jason Atherton, Berners Tavern is a hot-spot for Londoners and visitors alike, who enjoy great drinks and a menu loaded with English grub made fancy, in the debonair surroundings of the Ian Schrager-created space. Editionhotels.com/london

The Loft suite

Inside the Penthouse living room


THINGS TO DO

The Jacobean Suite

KETTNER’S TOWNHOUSE Reopened early last year by the Soho House group and described by founder Nick Jones as “affordable glamour”, with its Soho address, Kettner’s Townhouse offers a touch Catch up on couture at the V&A

of traditional English charm with the added luxury of a swish champagne bar. Kettnerstownhouse.com

CHRISTIAN DIOR: DESIGNER OF DREAMS Hosting its largest fashion exhibition since the supremely popular retrospective Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2015, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London’s Kensington presents Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams. Showcasing over 500 objects including 200 rare haute couture garments alongside film, photography, fragrance and accessories belonging to the storied Parisian couture house, this is a must-see for fashion enthusiasts. Until July 14; Vam.ac.uk

Spectacular views await at The Shard

THEATRE IN THE CLOUDS The Theatre In The Clouds experience at Shangi-La Hotel At The Shard brings culture to you, via intimate plays performed in London’s highest hotel suites, from playwrights such as Noël Coward and John Van Druten. Shangri-la.com/london

Get your Italian on in Shoreditch The beautiful Rosebery tea room

CECCONI’S SHOREDITCH

MANDARIN ORIENTAL REOPENS

If you fancy eating Italian while in London, then Cecconi’s is the place to see and

Currently undergoing refurbishments, the Mandarin

be seen. Originating in the fancy west London district of Mayfair, it has become

Oriental Hyde Park fully reopens this spring, but already

somewhat of an institution to those in the know. Now with locations all over the

open to guests is the spa, Heston Blumenthal’s Dinner

world, from Hollywood to Istanbul, the latest is in Shoreditch, in the recently opened

and the exquisite, Instagram-friendly The Rosebery tea

Redchurch Townhouse. Book to avoid disappointment. Cecconisshoreditch.com

rooms – a must for visitors. Mandarinoriental.com/london


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One of just six villas at Saruni Samburu

THE DESTINATION Plan ahead for some memorable travel experiences, from the wilderness of Northern Kenya to the unrivalled fun of Walt Disney World

Spectacular views across the Kalama Conservancy at Saruni Samburu

SARUNI SAMBURU, KENYA Home to just six villas within a sprawling 200,000-acre plot, Saruni Samburu in the Kalama Conservancy of Northern Kenya is the stuff from which safari dreams are made. Only five hours by plane from the Middle East, followed by a short one-hour internal flight and 20-minute drive, the lodge is within easy reach for those looking for an adventure with minimal travel time. Currently offering four nights for the price of three, there’s no better time to experience the Saruni Special Five: Grevy’s zebra, reticulated giraffe, beisa oryx, Somali ostrich and gerenuk. Saruni.com


Clean, minimal interiors at Aman Kyoto

NEW: AMAN KYOTO Set to open in November, Aman Kyoto will be the third Aman property in Japan. Located in a hidden garden near the Kinkaku-ji temple, the boutique resort will have only 24 rooms and two villas, all designed with Japanese tradition in mind, and each with garden or stream views. A stone’s throw from the city’s 17 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the resort will offer easy access for sightseeing, but also a peaceful sanctuary away from the chaos. An ideal base for first-time visitors to Kyoto. Aman.com

Pool and beach luxury at W Dubai – The Palm

NEW: W DUBAI – THE PALM It could be in Miami, but its just along the West Crescent of the Palm Jumeirah. The newlyopened W Dubai – The Palm brings the kitsch-cool of the W hotel brand back with a bang. Its 350 guest rooms decked out in typical W style, where a party vibe is at the core, all offer sea views and substantial balconies from which to see them. Dining plays a big part, with restaurants from the playful Italian chef Massimo Bottura and chef Akira Back as the main attractions. Marriott.com

FOUR SEASONS FOR KIDS To mark the release of Disney’s Aladdin movie, a live action remake of the classic animation, Four Seasons Resort Orlando at Walt Disney World Resort is offering the Explore a New World Disney Gift

Words: Natascha Hawke

Card Package from May 1 to September 30. Valid for two- and three-night stays, the package includes US$200 and US$500 Disney Gift Cards that can be used against theme park tickets, dining experiences and souvenirs. Guests will also receive complimentary transportation to the theme parks and access to the water park. Fourseasons.com/orlando The pool at Four Seasons Resort Orlando


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CULTURE EDIT THE GEORGE MICHAEL COLLECTION The art collection belonging to the late iconic musician George Michael has been published online for purchase by Christie’s auction house. Over 200 works by his own British contemporaries such as Tracey Emin, Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas and Marc Quinn are up for sale from March 8 - 15, with the flagship auction taking place on March 14 at 7pm. Christies.com The Incomplete Truth, 2006, Damien Hirst

Commissioned Portrait Untitled (George), 2007, Michael Craig-Martin

MODEST FASHION WEEK Following a very successful inaugural event in 2018, Modest Fashion Week returns to Dubai this month at Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai on the Palm Jumeirah. “Come to see the diversity of design in this amazing fashion movement; celebrate women’s achievements and inclusivity, come to get involved with fashion for a good cause, and celebrate the beauty and modernity of modesty,” says co-founder Franka Soeira. March 7-9 at Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai A model presents creations of Muslima Wear during the Dubai Modest Fashion Week


NEW OR IMPROVED The city’s top restaurants offer updates and new experiences to their already coveted menus

Scallop ceviche at Lima

CEVICHE NIGHTS AT LIMA Take a seat at the El Puerto ceviche bar in Lima Dubai in City Walk and learn about the origins of the dish through a four- or seven- course menu designed A piece by Bahraini artist Sarah Aradi, who will exhibit at ArtBAB

by head chef Diego Sanchez. Available Wednesday to Friday from 6pm. +971 56 500 4571

Under the patronage of Her Royal Highness Princess Sabeeka Bint Ibrahim Al Khalifa, wife of the King of Bahrain and president of the Supreme Council for Women, Art Bahrain Across Borders (ArtBAB) returns this month for a fourth edition. The theme for 2019 is ‘legacies’ and will honour the heritage of Bahrain’s contemporary art scene, which spans almost 50 years. The fair runs from March 6 to 10 at the Bahrain International Exhibition & Convention Centre. Btea.bh

Colourful tofu at Hakkasan

BRUNCH AT HAKKASAN Located at The Avenues at Atlantis, The Palm the award-winning Cantonese restaurant has introduced its new Friday brunch concept. Complemented by a party atmosphere, eat dim sum, Peking duck and more of your favourite Chinese dishes. +971 4 426 2626

Art by Jae-Hyo Lee

Korean Art, A Contemporary Take On Texture will showcase the works of 19 Korean artists who use a combination of classical materials like oil paint, ink, and ‘hanji’ paper made from the Korean mulberry tree, as well as less expected threeWords: Nina Catt

dimensional materials like cycle chains, steel nails, copper piping and artistic tools to produce their artworks – creating unique,

Japanese delights at Izakaya

CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL AT IZAKAYA

unexpected, and extraordinary pieces that are most definitely

To celebrate the most picturesque time of year in Japan, Izakaya at

a must-see. The exhibition will take place from March 13 to 28

JW Marriott Marquis is offering a special set menu every Monday night

at Opera Gallery Dubai. Operagallery.com

from 6pm. +971 4 414 0000


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Zayan The Label at Facilité

Wellington: The World of Horses by Holly Peterson

FASHION FIX

JUMP FOR JOY

Dubai Design District is home to some of the region’s coolest

Horse show enthusiasts across the globe will be well-informed of renowned

boutiques, studios and cafés, so it came as no surprise at the end

equestrian show, Wellington. Named after the coastal town in Florida where the

of last year, when Facilité opened its doors as a unique one-of-a-

exhibition is held for 12 weeks each winter, the show plays host to award-winning

kind multifunctional space that serves as a showroom, event space,

riders, who chart their horses over jumps, showcase the art of dressage, or pit

retail store, art gallery and more. The latest pop-up to grace the

them against champion polo teams. Created as a behind-the-scenes sneak peek

contemporary interior comes in the shape of a t-shirt gallery that

inside the rings of the world’s largest and longest-running competitive horse

will run for a limited time, ending later this month. Showcasing and

show, Wellington: The World of Horses by Holly Peterson, with photography by

selling pieces from eight Middle Eastern designers – Madiyah Al

Elena Lusenti, celebrates the sportsmanship and emotional bond between horse

Sharqi, Arwa Al Banawi, Nasifa Skourti, Lama Jouni, All Things

and rider through thought-provoking words and fine photography. What’s more,

Mochi, Zayan The Label, La Terre Est Folle and Arcade III – who

proceeds from this book will be donated to the Brooke Innovation Fund, which

are united for this unique set-up. Hurry along to building two in D3

invests in new ideas to improve the welfare of working animals and communities

while the pop-up is still on show. Facilite.ae

that depend on them. Available at Maison Assouline, The Dubai Mall

The terrace at Tasca restaurant

The Mandarin Oriental Jumeira offers a room with a view

STAYCATION GOALS You’ll be forgiven for thinking you’ve arrived at a far-flung destination upon check-in at one of Dubai’s most recent hotel openings, the Mandarin Oriental Jumeira, Dubai. Located along the shoreline of Jumeirah Beach, the resort’s chic and spacious rooms boast a luxurious, contemporary feel, many with stunning views across the sparkling waters of the Arabian Gulf. With six restaurants and lounges, a spa and a kids’ club, the resort is the perfect escape for both couples and families alike. Mandarinoriental.com/dubai/jumeira-beach


THREE TO TRY A new kind of restaurant-with-a-view is trending, turning its focal point to the inside, rather than what’s on the outside. These eateries boast serious decor goals. Kizmet’s dreamy interiors

The sfera di cioccalato vegan chocolate sphere dessert at Ronda Locatelli

PLANT-EATER’S PARADISE Vegans, rejoice. Thanks to Dubai’s recent surge in the trend for plant-based cuisine, gone are the days of limited options when dining with friends at some of the city’s most admired restaurants. Ronda Locatelli at Alantis The Palm boasts a dedicated vegan menu, featuring no less than 40 distinctive Italian dishes. Offering a variety of imaginative salads, pastas and pizzas (complete with vegan mozzarella), be sure to save room for one of celebrity Chef, Giorgio Locatelli’s innovative vegan chocolate desserts. +971 4 426 2626

KIZMET, DUBAI OPERA Based on the simple idea of ‘the food we grew up with should never be forgotten’, this Downtown gem has wooed locals with its soul food, namely the sweet-tooth selection. The chai and apple pie is an absolute must-try. +971 4 338 8717

A new way to dine in Dubai

Opa transports diners to the Greek isles

OPA, FAIRMONT DUBAI If you’re looking for an authentic Greek experience with a vibrant ambience, look no further. ‘Opa’ is the word that Greeks shout when a plate is smashed, and you’ll definitely be hearing it a lot here! Expect traditional dishes and a smashing good time. +971 4 357 0557

DINE WITH A DIFFERENCE From March 18 to 23 Peroni Nastro Azzurro returns with the second edition of #TheItalianWay concept, The Supper Club: Menu39. In an inventive approach to Dubai’s dining scene, guests will feast on a five-course pairing menu designed around a carefully curated selection of 39 local and Italian ingredients. Held in an exclusive, never-before-seen outdoor space on the 39th floor of the InterContinental Dubai Marina, guests will be seated at a communal table for a fully immersive Italian dining experience with a twist, priced at Dhs350 per person for dinner with a specially crafted drinks menu. +971 55 992 9102 Maison Assouline’s new home at The Dubai Mall

A celebration of all-things gastronomic, Dubai Food Festival is in full

MAISON ASSOULINE, THE DUBAI MALL

swing, continuing until March 9. Savour street foods of the world at

If you enjoy your coffee served with a side of culture, head to Maison

Galeries Lafayette Le Gourmet and Le BHV Marais at City Walk, or refine

Assouline, located in the Fashion Avenue wing of The Dubai Mall.

your cooking skills with a celebrity chef masterclass at Taste of Dubai in

The new concept store is a showcase of expertly curated books, art

Dubai Media City Amphitheatre. Visitdubai.com

and furniture paired with the Swans bar – a delightful Parisian style café that’s perfect for people-watching. +971 4 438 4546


ART DUBAI CONTEMPORARY ADDIS FINE ART, Addis Ababa · AGIAL ART, Beirut · AICON ART, New York · AKAR PRAKAR, Kolkata / New Delhi · ANDERSEN’S, Copenhagen · ASPAN, Almaty · PIERO ATCHUGARRY, Pueblo Garzón / Miami · ATHR, Jeddah · ATISS DAKAR, Dakar · AYYAM, Dubai · CARBON 12, Dubai · GALLERIA CONTINUA, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Havana · CUSTOT, Dubai · DASTAN’S BASEMENT, Tehran · ERTI, Tbilisi · EXPERIMENTER, Kolkata · ISABELLE VAN DEN EYNDE, Dubai · GAZELLI ART HOUSE, Baku / London · GREEN ART GALLERY, Dubai · GROSVENOR, London · HAFEZ, Jeddah · LEILA HELLER, Dubai / New York · KRISTIN HJELLEGJERDE, London / Berlin · IN SITU-FABIENNE LECLERC, Paris · MICHAEL JANSSEN, Berlin · DR. DOROTHEA VAN DER KOELEN, Mainz / Venice · KORNFELD, Berlin · KRINZINGER, Vienna · ANNA LAUDEL, Istanbul · LAWRIE SHABIBI, Dubai · CHRISTIAN LETHERT, Cologne · MAM, Douala · MEEM, Dubai · VICTORIA MIRO, London / Venice · FRANCO NOERO, Turin · OFFICINE DELL’IMMAGINE, Milan · ORBITAL DAGO, Bandung · OTA FINE ARTS, Shangai / Singapore / Tokyo · GIORGIO PERSANO, Turin · PRIMO MARELLA, Milan / Lugano · PROJECT ARTBEAT, Tbilisi · RONCHINI, London · THE ROOSTER, Vilnius · ROSENFELD PORCINI, London · SANATORIUM, Istanbul · SEISMASUNO, Madrid · SFEIR-SEMLER, Beirut / Hamburg · SMAC, Johannesburg / Cape Town / Stellenbosch · FILOMENA SOARES, Lisbon · SPRÜTH MAGERS, Berlin / London / Los Angeles · WALTER STORMS, Munich · TORE SUESSBIER, Berlin · TEMPLON, Paris / Brussels · THE THIRD LINE, Dubai · VOICE, Marrakech · WADI FINAN, Amman · ZAWYEH, Ramallah · ZIDOUN-BOSSUYT, Luxembourg · ZILBERMAN, Istanbul / Berlin BAWWABA · Curated by Élise Atangana 856G, Mandaue City – Kristoffer Ardeña · AICON CONTEMPORARY, New York – Adeela Suleman · ANNE-SARAH BÉNICHOU, Paris – Chourouk Hriech · CANVAS, Karachi – Hamra Abbas · GUZO ART PROJECTS, Addis Ababa – Wanja Kimani · GYPSUM, Cairo – Gözde İlkin · EMMANUEL HERVÉ, Paris – Sérgio Sister · JHAVERI CONTEMPORARY, Mumbai – Shezad Dawood · PERVE GALERIA, Lisbon – José Chambel · VERMELHO, São Paulo – Marcelo Moscheta RESIDENTS · Curated by Fernanda Brenner & Munira Al Sayegh A GENTIL CARIOCA, Rio de Janeiro – Laura Lima · PIERO ATCHUGARRY, Pueblo Garzón / Miami – Verónica Vázquez · BARRO, Buenos Aires – Nicanor Aráoz · RUTH BENZACAR, Buenos Aires – Luciana Lamothe · CASA TRIÂNGULO, São Paulo – Rodolpho Parigi · GALLERIA CONTINUA, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Havana – José Manuel Mesías · INSTITUTO DE VISIÓN, Bogotá – Mazenett Quiroga · MENDES WOOD DM, São Paulo / Brussels / New York – Luiz Roque · GALERIA PILAR, São Paulo – Flora Rebollo · REVOLVER, Lima / Buenos Aires – Jerry B. Martin · SERVANDO, Havana – Luis Enrique López-Chávez · LUISA STRINA, São Paulo – Alexandre da Cunha ART DUBAI MODERN DAG, New Delhi / Mumbai / New York · DHOOMIMAL GALLERY, New Delhi · ELMARSA GALLERY, Tunis / Dubai · GROSVENOR GALLERY, London · MARK HACHEM, Beirut / Paris / New York · HAFEZ GALLERY, Jeddah · GALLERY ONE, Ramallah · PERVE GALERIA, Lisbon · SANCHIT ART, New Delhi · TAFETA, London · UBUNTU ART GALLERY, Cairo


“SCHOOL IS A FACTORY?” What should education prioritise in the coming decade? How should humans be taught in the age of accelerated mechanisation? Will higher education escape the ghetto of elitism? And will we need humans to teach humans anymore, anyway? Bringing together artists, curators, novelists, futurists, architects and technologists, Global Art Forum 2019 tests the urgent challenges and opportunities facing education today, and tomorrow.

Art Dubai’s Global Art Forum is supported by the Office of Public and Cultural Diplomacy in the UAE.

Artist Josef Albers with his class at Black Mountain College, shot for Life magazine © Photo by Genevieve Naylor / Corbis via Getty Images

ART DUBAI, MADINAT JUMEIRAH MARCH 20-21, 2019


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ART EDUCATION From the auction house placing Middle East art on a global platform, to the foundation protecting its threat from war, we spotlight what Dubai’s female art pioneers are looking forward to during Art Week

Photography: Borna Ahadi

Words by Laura Beaney

Katia wears a dress from Jubelle and shoes by Jimmy Choo. She is pictured in front of You Are My White Dream, My Love and My Hope by Farhad Moshiri at Sotheby’s Dubai


KATIA NOUNOU-BOUEIZ Director and head of Sotheby’s Dubai Head of a Woman (1958) by Fouad Kamel, courtesy of Sotheby’s

Once typecast as ‘emerging’ markets, Middle Eastern and Iranian art have soared to new heights in recent years, sparking an international awakening to the range and quality of works that spawn from the region. Internationally, institutions like the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and The British Museum are building their collections, but in the Middle East itself, momentum is growing with the establishment of international auction houses like Sotheby’s, which opened its first Dubai showroom in 2017. The inaugural auction brought in Dhs13.2m in sales from buyers spanning 33 countries and set five artist records, with Iranian-born artist, Ali Banisadr’s painting In Medias Res selling for Dhs1.69 million. These remarkable figures provide further insight into the increased global appetite for the art of the region. “Being of Iraqi and Iranian descent, I was always exposed to the wondrous creativity that stemmed from this part of the world from a young age,” shares Katia Nounou-Boueiz, director and head of Sotheby’s Dubai. “Despite having grown up in London, I unfailingly found myself drawn to Middle Eastern art and felt a strong affinity to it.” Katia, 32, carved out a career for herself defined by her passions, and in her position handles the works of leading masters from the Arab and Iranian world, from Mahmoud Saïd to Sohrab Sepehri. “I like art that tells a story and makes you feel, even if that story is dark,” she shares. “One of the main elements that excites me about Middle Eastern art is that there is almost always a powerful narrative behind each work. The struggles of the geopolitics of the region, be it war or the Arab Spring, should be shared with the world, and art is an impactful way to do this.” During Katia’s 11-year tenure with the auction house, she has experienced the market’s rapid evolution, taking pride in the demand for diversity in the artists that Sotheby’s represents. “What makes our auctions so special is that alongside works by ‘blue chip’ artists like Ali Banisadr, Mahmoud Mokhtar and Farhad Moshiri, we also focus on younger artists and new names. Many exciting artists made their auction debuts at Sotheby’s last year, including Salah Yousri, Farshid Maleki, Youseff Sida and Mehdi Moutasha,” she explains. Artists from the GCC are also coming to the fore; last year Sotheby’s reached international records for leading Emirati artists Mohammed Kazem and Hassan Sharif, as well as Saudi’s Maha Malluh and Abdulrahman Al Soliman. There has also been an unexpected rise in global demand. “I’m surprised by how more and more frequently clients from the West are collecting art from the Middle East,” says Katia.

“In our recent London auction, a client had consigned a work by Armenian-Lebanese painter Paul Guiragossian – which was acquired by a buyer from a small town in Denmark!” For Art Dubai 2019, Katia’s focus falls upon the female gaze. “Women artists have been underrepresented for the past 30 years, and now finally we are seeing a move towards female empowerment, ” Katia confirms, explaining that this social shift has been echoed in Sotheby’s Middle Eastern sales. “We are increasingly focusing on female artists who have been under the radar. At Art Dubai, I’ll be looking out for works by Shaikha Al Mazrou, represented by Lawrie Shabibi gallery, and a personal favourite, Huguette Caland, who just had a show opening at the Tate St Ives.” Art Dubai runs from March 20 to 23 at Madinat Jumeirah; ArtDubai.ae


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NATALYA ANDAKULOVA

Natalya wears dress, blazer and jewellery by Dior and shoes by Stuart Weitzman. She is photographed in front of Bakhodir Jalal’s Interflow painting at Andakulova Gallery

Malevich Tank by Almagul Menlibayeva

The art of Central Asia is as complex and compelling as the ancient narratives that flow from the region. It’s an ethnic cauldron, comprising diverse diasporic communities, nomadic tribes and the myriad of faiths that span from Islam (the most prevalent) to Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity, and even Shamanism (in Siberia). Positioned at the heart of the storied Silk Road, Central Asia has long been a hub for trade and migration, and the location of radical social and political transformations that have impacted its art. The influence of early 20th century European art forms followed by the tsarist conquest of Turkistan, saw focus fall upon local craftsmanship, while the formation of the USSR left its heavy imprint upon the development of fine art. Now, the former Soviet republics have obtained national independence and their artists, liberated from state censorship and the restrictive climate of socialist realism, are enjoying creative freedom. Some dwell on tradition, reviving once forgotten crafts while others, particularly in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan veer towards the avant-garde. Culturally-loaded and at the crossroads of the old and new, it’s precisely this world of unpresented creative possibilities that’s captured the interests of gallerist Natalya Andakulova. “Can you blame me for being inspired by the art and culture that characterised my childhood?” quips the founder of Dubai-based Andakulova Gallery. Part Russian, part Uzbek, 36-year-old Natalya embodies the diversity of her homeland. Her eye for and appreciation of the art of her region took off as a student in Russia under the tutelage of acclaimed Uzbek painter, Mirzaahmedov Khakim. “He advised me on my first purchase, a painting of his, which only fuelled my appetite for more,” she continues. As her collection grew, and through travel and research, Natalya became increasingly aware that the Central Asian artists she adored were lacking international prominence. Through the establishment of her gallery she aimed to address this disconnect, providing an international platform for emerging and mid-market contemporary Central Asian artists with a designated focus upon those from Uzbekistan. Andakulova Gallery presents an insight into the multifaceted and fragmented culture of Central Asia through its programme of artists working across varied mediums. Kyrgyz painter Yuristanbek Shygaev, for example, relays the ancient folklore and philosophies of his people

Photography: Borna Ahadi. Artwork: Andakulova Gallery

Founder of the Andakulova Gallery


My Silk Road to You 10 by Almagul Menlibayeva

Camouflage Centaur by Almagul Menlibayeva

through new techniques, placing them in a contemporary context, while the late Max Penson (a personal favourite of Natalya’s) documented the economic transformation of Uzbekistan. The legendary photojournalist took the country as his adopted home and captured its rapid transformation from a traditional feudal society to a modern republic. “Dubai was a natural location for my first gallery,” she explains. “Its ethnic mix reflects that of Central Asia, and from a business perspective, it’s a prime location. I don’t have to travel to London, New York or Hong Kong to meet buyers, because they’re already here!” Now, in its sixth year, the gallery and its regional focus are fulfilling the visions of its founder, attracting increasing international attention. Looking to Art Dubai, Natalya reflects on the inaugural edition of the aptly named Bawwaba (meaning ‘gateway’ in Arabic), a section of the fair and programme which spotlights artists from Latin America, the Middle East and Africa, as well as Central and South Asia. “It’s truly a gateway to the world,” she enthuses. “This new structure offers visitors greater access and allows them to engage more deeply with artists and galleries from non-western geographies like Central Asia. With its freshly defined programming including films, Art Dubai speedboats along the full spectrum of art making. All bases have been covered; every section taken into consideration; each taste catered to.” During Art Dubai, Andakulova Gallery will display the works of contemporary Kazakhstani artist and curator, Almagul Menlibayeva whose portraits of lone, yet powerful women aim to capture the modern condition. The works of Almagul Menlibayeva will be on display at Andakulova Gallery from March 6 to September 20; Andakulova.com


Photography: Borna Ahadi

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Shireen wears a Peter Pilotto at The Modist blazer, Loewe trousers and shoes by Stuart Weitzman and is photographed in front of a painting by Samir Rafi at the Green Art Gallery in Dubai


SHIREEN ATASSI Director of the Atassi Foundation

In October 2018, Syria’s National Museum of Damascus reopened its doors following six years of closure, enforced by war. Some might consider this a step towards ‘normality’, but for others it’s a stark reminder that their country’s cultural heritage must be preserved. Years of unrest have seen ancient artifacts ravaged and damaged in the crossfire, while antiquities were looted for sale abroad. The destruction of the 2,000-year-old Lion of Al-lāt statue by militants and the abandonment of the Damascus studio of celebrated contemporary painter, Tammam Azzam, further emphasises that art from every period of Syria’s rich history has been placed under threat. Yet it refuses to be snubbed out. “Since the conflict started in 2011 it has become vital to us that we help preserve and promote Syrian art,” explains Shireen Atassi, the 46-year-old director of the Atassi Foundation for Arts and Culture. “The voices of artists today rise to counter destruction and violence, to make sense of it and to persevere. Their talents and work are sources of hope, identity and inspiration for future generations,” she continues. And, much like the work of the artists that it nurtures, the Atassi Foundation is another symbol of resistance. The Atassi family’s patronage of the arts began in 1986, a time when Syrian art was relatively closed off to the rest of the world. Sisters Mouna and Mayla Atassi worked together to transform the attic of their family bookstore into the city of Homs’ first private art gallery. Atassi Gallery rapidly expanded to fill the building, its walls brimming with local art, and it became an unprecedented space for intellectuals and art appreciators to connect and collect. “When I worked at Atassi Gallery with my mother during the early 1990s, I was surrounded by Syria’s artists, writers, poets, and filmmakers,” recalls Shireen. Over the years that followed, the gallery exhibited some of Syria’s most celebrated artists – including Fateh Moudarres, Abdullah Mourad and Ahmad Durak Sibai. It moved to the capital of Damascus in 1993 and continued to play a pivotal role in shaping Syria’s creative landscape, pursuing ambitious programming and cultivating a vibrant environment for cultural exchange. When the inevitability of war ensued, the conflict saw Syria’s institutions close their doors in their droves, as civilians fled. The Atassi Gallery’s 30-year journey took a fresh turn as the Atassi family, along with their art collection, left for Dubai in 2012. Rather than simply reopening in a new destination, the family felt compelled to take their longstanding role, supporting Syria’s artists, a step further, with the establishment of Atassi Foundation – the joint vision of mother and daughter team, Mouna and Shireen. “Syrian art

Nightgown by Nagham Hodaifa, courtesy of the Atassi Foundation for Arts and Culture

is quite peculiar in that it has kept its authenticity without following the traditional western schools,” considers Shireen. “The year 2000 was a turning point, because the Internet became widely available in Syria and artists got a window to access art globally. However this window of access was only one way: the world didn’t get a glimpse of art in Syria.” That’s where the Foundation comes in. Atassi Foundation launched as the only non-profit organisation during Art Dubai in 2016. “It was a gamble,” says Shireen. “But all of our exhibitions to date have taken place in this city, so we feel it’s our platform.” Acting as a safeguard for modern and contemporary Syrian art, the Atassi Foundation has amassed one of the most comprehensive collections, but as a non-profit, it also plays a critical role in developing the careers of the next generation of Syrian artists, connecting them with international audiences through partnerships with institutions such as The British Museum and Canada’s Aga Khan Museum. Indeed, the Atassi family have built a legacy, yet they continue to face the future. Shireen and Mouna are currently busying themselves with a summer symposium, the initiation of a prize for young art writers, as well as throwing weight behind their research initiatives, including the Modern Art Syria Archive (MASA). During Art Dubai, Atassi Gallery will exhibit Personal Revolutions – a collective show drawing together the works of Syria’s contemporary female artists, who have revolted against tradition, society, subject, and even technique. Personal Revolutions will be on display at Alserkal Avenue from March 9 to April 9; Atassifoundation.com


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Chourouk Hriech’s De Quoi Ce Monde Est-Il le Miroir on display at the Galerie Anne-Sarah Bénichou, Bawwaba

THE ART EDIT

I

t’s that time of the year again when the international art world descends upon Dubai en masse. Whether hunting for fresh works by emerging artists or classic pieces by established stars from around the world, Dubai Art Week (March 16 to 23) draws in crowds of collectors, curators and critics as well as the general public. Art Dubai (March 20 to 23), held at Madinat Jumeirah, includes 90 galleries from 41 countries this year with a greater focus on those from the Global South, namely Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Central and South Asia. But while the fair is the main draw for many, there are hundreds of events and exhibitions taking place across the Emirates. From the arts and culture hub of Dubai’s Alserkal Avenue to the Sharjah biennial, these are the must-see art events in the UAE this season.

Words by Aimee Dawson. Photography: Gerhard Hauge

The must-see events and exhibitions of the UAE’s most artistic month


BACK TO SCHOOL Get your pencil case ready, this year’s Global Art Forum (March 20 to 21) – the fair’s programme of talks – is called ‘School is a Factory?’ and looks at the state of education today. Presentations range from what we can learn from the groundbreaking German Bauhaus school, established 100 years ago, to discussions about how artificial intelligence is changing the way we learn.

Form 1, 2018, by Sara Naim, courtesy of The Third Line

BREAKING BOUNDARIES

FOCUS ON: HUMA KABAKCI Second-generation collector and founding director

Syrian breakthrough visual artist, Sara Naim’s practice dissects how proportion shapes

of Open Space, London

our perception and notion of boundary. She explores the physicality of these ‘boundaries’ and its form, with complex questions of: If borders do not exist on a cellular scale, can we define ‘border’ on a macro scale? Can shape be considered an object in itself? See works by Sara Naim at The Third Line, Art Dubai Contemporary

What are your must-see events outside the fair? The exhibition Fabric(ated) Fractures, which explores ‘sensitive spaces’ – spaces that challenge ideas of nation, state, and territory are especially interesting to my curatorial practice, since this year’s theme of my organisation Open Space is called ‘Space without spaces’. What are you most looking forward to at Art Dubai? The booths of Galleria Continua, Sfeir-Semler and Galerie Krinzinger and – since I am especially curious about artists from Central Asia, the Caucasus and the Balkans – I also want to see the booths of Project ArtBeat from Tbilisi and Aspan Gallery from Almaty.

Soul Fire by Irakli Bugiani, courtesy of Project ArtBeat

Artist Tammam Azzam, courtesy of Galerie Kornfeld, Berlin

THE DEEPEST PAPER CUTS Tammam Azzam first gained attention in 2013 when he was forced to leave his studio in Syria and began making digital photomontages in Dubai. His works look at the conflict within art making in the face of war and violence, directly addressing the ongoing conflict in his home country. Azzam is inspired by the narratives of people through their experiences and connections to their surrounds. Although the motifs can often be precisely located, the transformation goes beyond the object event the picture is based on. Using handpainted papers with more than 50,000 individual pieces, his images come together like chaotic mosaics that unfold into powerful abstractions resembling buildings, structures and disasters. See works by Tammam Azzam at Galerie Kornfeld, Art Dubai Contemporary


294 Farah Al Qasimi’s M Napping on Carpet, 2016, courtesy of the artist and The Third Line

Seher Shah and Randhir Singh; Studies in Form, Brownfield Estate (#15), 2018, commissioned by the Samdani Art Foundation for the Dhaka Art Summit, 2018. Photo courtesy of the artists and Green Art Gallery

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK Proving that the scene in Dubai continues to grow, this Art Week is welcoming some new additions to the art world fold. The Jameel Arts Centre, which opened in November last year on the Jaddaf Waterfront, is presenting three new solo shows on the artists Seher Shah and Randhir Singh, Hemali Bhuta and Farah Al Qasimi (until June 8) alongside their main group exhibition Crude (until March 30), about how oil has transformed the Middle East. Opening on March 18 is the newest space, Ishara Art Foundation at Alserkal Avenue, which focuses on contemporary art and artists from South Asia. The inaugural show at the independent non-profit is Altered Inheritances: Home is a Foreign Place (until June 23). “[It is a] poetic conversation between Shilpa Gupta and Hemali Bhuta, Fold (detail), 2016, courtesy of the artist and Green Art Gallery

Zarina, thinking about identity, language, belonging and the concept of home,” says Nada Raza, the artistic director of the foundation.

SATURATE YOURSELF IN SOUND The hypnotic sound installations by the Swiss artist Zimoun are the perfect antidote to Art Week burnout. Inspired by a combination of Zimoun uses analogue motors connected to everyday objects that produce sounds when they move. For his solo show at the New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Art Gallery 658 prepared dc-motors, cotton balls, cardboard boxes, 70 x 70 x 70 cm, 2013, courtesy of Studio Zimoun

(until June 1), he is presenting five immersive works, including a new room installation that is sure to rhythmically soothe your soul.

Photography: Sara Al Haddad

biology, engineering, music and installation,


GOOD VIBRATIONS Leaving the Echo Chamber (until June 10), the 14th edition of the Sharjah Biennial, is three exhibitions rolled into one. Curated by Zoe Butt, Claire Tancons and Omar Kholeif, the presentations will create a “series of provocations about how one might renegotiate the shape, form and function of the ‘echo chamber’ of contemporary life”, the organisers say. New works have been commissioned from artists including Amie Siegel, Carlos Garaicoa, Meiro Koizumi and Lawrence Abu Hamdan and the pieces can be found in venues across Sharjah.

Deira by Hussain AlMoosawi, courtesy of Gulf Photo Plus

FACE TO FACE If photography is your thing, check out Gulf Photo Plus’ exhibition Facade to Facade (until June 8) by Hussain AlMoosawi. Capturing the surfaces and structures of buildings in the UAE from different periods in history, the tightly focused photographs reveal beautiful symmetrical repeating patterns as well as documenting the rapidly My Mother Playing the Oud, 1958, oil on hardboard, 99 x 69 cm by Semiha Berksoy, courtesy of the artist

developing architecture of the country.

FOCUS ON: MALIHA TABARI Collector and director of Tabari Artspace, Dubai What are your must-see events outside the fair? The opening of Sharjah Biennial, a highlight of the art calendar for me. It’s one of the region’s strongest platforms to discover Middle Eastern art and draws in a global audience with its innovative programming. Launching on March 18, which is DIFC’s Art Night, we will exhibit Strange Fruit – a solo exhibition of works by the powerful female Lebanese painter Tagreed Darghouth. What are you most looking forward to at Art Dubai? Aside from the influx of a global audience who we always enjoy welcoming into our gallery during the fair, Art Dubai has developed into an all-encompassing platform that offers an opportunity to interact with art on so many levels.


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Artist Tomas Sarenco, Andersen’s, Copenhagen

SCIENTIFIC ART FORMS FOCUS ON: NADA RAZA

Coming with first time exhibitor, Copenhagen-based contemporary art gallery

Artistic director of Ishara Art Foundation, Dubai

Andersen’s, artist Tomas Sarenco is best known for his large-scale, interactive installations and floating sculptures, and for his interdisciplinary approach

What are your must-see events outside the fair? The Residents section for the inclusion of galleries from Latin America and Bawwaba with its solo presentations by Hamra Abbas, Shezad Dawood and Adeela Suleman,

to art. His work explores new, sustainable ways of sensing and inhabiting the environment, the result of research into the origins of the observable universe, arachnology and the potential future for airborne dwelling. See works by Tomas Sarenco at Andersen’s, Copenhagen, Art Dubai Contemporary

just highlighting the South Asian artists. What are you most looking forward to at Art Dubai? Fabric(ated) Fractures (until March 23) curated by Diana Campbell Betancourt of Samdani Art Foundation at Concrete in Alserkal Avenue, with a fantastic selection of artists from South Asia.

Everyday Waterfalls 3, 2019 by Hamra Abbas, courtesy of Canvas Gallery for Art Dubai

FOCUS ON: SALMA TUQAN Deputy director of Delfina Foundation, London What are your must-see events outside the fair? The solo exhibition of Kamrooz Aram at Green Art Gallery (until May 30), the opening exhibition of the Ishara Art Foundation, and the chance to do some studio visits at the Alserkal Residency. Not forgetting, of course, the Sharjah Biennial (until June 10) which promises to be a very interesting edition and includes the work of several Delfina Foundation alumni such as Alia Farid, Shezad Dawood and Michael Rakowitz. What are you most looking forward to at Art Dubai? Among a year celebrating the centenary of the Bauhaus, I am very much looking forward to the Global Art Forum’s take on the impact of the radical school from a non-European perspective.


Untitled by Flora Rebollo, courtesy of Galeria Pilar

MEET THE RESIDENTS

Artist: Luiz Roque, Title: Ancestral, Year: 2016, Medium: HD video, Dimensions: 4’44”, Courtesy: Photo credit: Andrej Vasilenko

Twelve artists from Latin America’s leading galleries touch down in the UAE to take part in Art Dubai Residents, an annual four- to eight-week residency programme which encourages artists to immerse themselves in the culture of the emirates and to produce new artworks, which will later go on sale at the fair. This edition, its second, is co-curated by São Paulo–based curator and artistic director of art space Pivô, Fernanda Brenner. “My idea is to bring together artists that have very different approaches to the so-called Latin American context and yet reflect the region’s most pressing issues and artistic concerns. I would avoid strict definitions but artists from the region often defy the western conception that meaning is only conceptually-derived. Praxis and form are very important to many of the artists in the section, you can find visually striking pieces with a strong political background,” says Fernanda of her vision. Fernanda joins forces with Abu Dhabi-based curator, Munira Al Sayegh on this project. Munira is interested in helping the visiting artists overcome any lingering preconceptions or stereotypes: “One of the biggest things is that people assume women – Emiratis and Arabs – are not empowered, and I want to challenge that notion. I am also looking to show the artists beyond the institutions towards the more homegrown conversations,” she says. During the residency process, the artists will visit museums and galleries but they will also be sourcing material and producing their work on site, which will lead to unplanned encounters and conversations that can be equally rewarding. “Everything changes when you are producing in a new landscape,” says. “And that is where I come in. I am going to help

Photography: Andrej Vasilenko

these artists map out their practice, make introductions and help to facilitate their progress.” Expect a diverse spectrum of artworks from a new video work by artist Luiz Roque who will pull from his love of science fiction, the legacy of Modernism and pop culture, to create his vision of futuristic Dubai; to Flora Rebollo’s dynamic large-scale colourful compostions; and Laura Lima’s theatrical conceptual works that explore the boundaries between the everyday life and the absurd.

Abu Dhabi-based curator Munira Al Sayegh


298

MOJEH CULTURE

Dana wears dress by Alice McCall at Ounass. She sits on her beloved blue Roche Bobois sofa, in front of a painting by street artist Martin Whatson

Life & Style Words by Ann Marie McQueen

Photography: Borna Ahadi

Saudi-Palestinian fashion entrepreneur Dana Malhas is exactly where she wants to be – living with her husband and son in a Dubai home that beautifully balances contemporary design, with just a touch of crazy


Clockwise from left: Decorative plates by Italian designer brand Fornasetti add a touch of theatre to Dana’s sleek home; Her fashion roots are never far from sight, with displays of coffee table books from her favourite maisons; The eclectic mix of artifacts and accessories are the fruits of Dana’s travels

I

f someone new were visiting Dana Malhas’ Dubai home, they probably wouldn’t even notice the candles. The small Lalique Ombelles votives are placed lovingly around various corners of the Saudi-Palestinian fashion entrepreneur’s DIFC apartment. “These were our gifts to our guests the day of our wedding dinner, and of course we kept a few for the memory,” she tells us. “They are extra special to me because they have our names engraved on the bottom. I love how delicate and elegant they are, almost like the lace that was on my dress that night.” The 31-year-old accomplished mother of one – three-yearold son Khaled – has called Dubai home for more than six years. Between 2010 and 2012, she balanced a job at an investment bank while starting her own fashion business in Jeddah. She was just 22 when her concept store Cream Boutique opened its doors, breaking even that first year, and she managed the business remotely while Khaled was born in Dubai three years ago. Dana feels her accomplishments on the journey have given her something even more valuable than business success, and she values “having a voice that I can use to support

upcoming designers and discovering new talents.” The space her family of three shares in Dubai’s bustling financial district has been lovingly decorated in shades of grey, white and brown – with strategic pops of colour, like the signature blue Roche Bobois sofa – much like the Pinterest boards she curates. Take her dishes: which were all purchased from different shops and brands, so that her dining table ends up looking like an art piece. “Our house is young and modern, but sophisticated at the same time,” says Dana. “It’s contemporary, but it has a lot of classical pieces. It’s a mix of many different materials and textures that are not usually put together. It’s bold and daring in some parts but has lots of clean lines everywhere.” Sunday and Thursday mornings are spent at home, checking emails, organising the house and making sure all is on track. In the middle of the week, Dana is out the door by 8am, running errands for work or family. Each day she and her Lebanese husband of six years, Amer Ghandour, make sure to grab some couple time, catching up over his lunch break at home while their son naps after nursery. “As soon as Khaled wakes up, I’m all


300 Clockwise from right: Dana’s two treasured Louis Vuitton trunks hold her most sentimental possessions; The collection of Bearbricks toys that Dana feels add a fun, young element to her living area; Muted soft furnishings in keeping with the home’s clean yet cosy décor

his until he goes to sleep,” she says. “We have a different activity every day – football, swimming, Arabic, French, sometimes horseback riding or play dates at the park. This is my one-on-one time with him, and it’s so precious to me.” Evenings are spent unwinding, relaxing and getting ready for another busy day. When it’s time to go out, the couple loves the food and “great vibes” at Jumeirah Al Naseem’s lagoon restaurants, which include Flamingo Room by Tashas and Il Borro Tuscan Bistro. “We are also always in DIFC as it’s so close by, and we have so many options with different cuisines. You can hop from one place to another,” she says. And while Dana loves trying out new restaurants as they open, her favourite nights are those spent hosting house parties and get-togethers at home. “Weekends are spent with our friends and family – usually dinners and gatherings,” she explains. Although Dana is a master of scouting and sourcing, when it comes to her home’s interior design, she presents her husband with options, and he has the final say. And rather than shopping around to find the right items, Dana says she usually has an “exact vision” of what she needs or wants. And when she spots it on her travels –

she pounces. “I have some €80 (Dhs330) swings from a random shop in Berlin, right next to a Roche Bobois sofa that I waited four months for,” she says of the contrast created as a result. The juxtaposition continues with a vintage Baccarat floor lamp, placed next to a concrete console she had made through her husband’s company. “I really don’t care where a piece is from, as long as it fills the puzzle in my head,” she says. The way Dana approaches her space is similar to how she dresses, balancing contemporary and serious with crazy, loud and colourful. Her go-to formal outfit is a classic white shirt and black blazer, while her mostworn shoes are a pair of white Dior J’adore slingbacks. And her most recent purchase? A flowing, easy-to-wear dress from Zimmerman. “I don’t have a specific brand that I love,” she explains. “It really all depends on the piece, the fit, the fabric, the colour – much more than the designer.” In the home, Dana’s years of working in fashion and expressing herself through outfits have naturally evolved into interior design and home styling, as a form of self-expression. Take a piece the couple purchased from the Norwegian street artist Martin Whatson, which hangs


I really don’t care where a piece is from, as long as it fills the puzzle in my head. Dana Malhas

Dana wears a dress by Johanna Ortiz at Ounass, and stands beside a painting by Layal Khawly

Frivolity meets history with more Fornasetti accessories

above the previously mentioned blue sofa. “Again it’s a mix of calm and crazy, which represents us and our style so well,” she says of the artwork. “It also has a very special meaning to me, as the artist personalised it for us and wrote our names in a discrete way that only we can see.” The couple have also collected a number of Bearbricks – a series of sleek, cartoon-style miniature toys designed by the Japanese company Medicom. “Every time we travel, we try to find a unique piece to bring home with us,” she says. “I love how funky they are, and it just adds a fun, young element to our living area.” Classic luxury is well-represented here, too, with Dana counting two Louis Vuitton trunks among her most treasured possessions. They serve a practical purpose, storage, in a home she would prefer had more closets. “I love the vintage feel they add to our modern home; my eyes can never have enough of them,” she explains. “They are also where I keep all my pictures and treasured memories. I just feel it’s a safe place to hide some of my favourite things and include them in our house, without having to display them.” Khaled has been carefully considered in these interiors, too. He has his own playroom, which gives him freedom to imagine and create, and has helped teach the toddler the lesson that even toys have to be organised. “He also now understands that he has his area, where he keeps his special toys, and mummy and daddy have an area where they keeps their special ‘toys’ – and we take care of both spaces equally,” shares Dana. Interestingly, her favourite room in the house wasn’t intended for any of its permanent occupants to use: the guest bathroom. “I love the mix between the materials – the raw concrete, the shiny marble, and the perfect shade of gold detail here and there,” she says. “I chose every element in this bathroom. And every time I walk in I feel like I am walking into one of those Pinterest pictures that I’ve pinned.” Although her dream home would be a beach house in the middle of nowhere, perhaps in the Maldives or Seychelles, in reality, Dana wouldn’t change a single thing. “I feel like I have enjoyed every phase of my life at the right time, in the right way, and that I did not compromise one thing for the other,” she says.


302

FINAL NOTE

RISING STARS

As the high-rise platform returns for S/S19, Saint Laurent’s starry pair are making the case for walking tall

Photography: Tina Patni. Styling: Stuart Robertson

Taking centre stage amid the crochet bags, extravagant headbands and XXL visor sunglasses that demanded the catwalk’s attention this season are a line of high-rise soles that are elevating accessories into stylish new heights. Leading the pack are the Paige sandals, Saint Laurent’s nod to the 1970s, and spring’s most dominating block heel reference. These platform showstoppers sit on a chunky midsole decorated with tiny metallic stars, with a golden knotted front and wrap-tie straps to secure neatly at the ankle. Wear them with one of spring’s equally shiny party frocks, for some serious leg appeal.


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INTERVIEW: Supermodel body activist Ashley Graham joins fashion designer Fausto Puglisi on the sofa for an in-depth chat about being a fashion icon in 2019.

BASELWORLD: Highlights and new novelties from the world’s luxury watchmakers reported as they are released between March 21 and 26.

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FASHION WEEK: Up-to-the-minute fashion week coverage, from the shows, models and style on the streets – everything you need to know about A/W19.

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY: We celebrate inspirational women both at home and abroad on International Women’s Day, March 8.

MOTHERS’ DAY : Great gifting ideas for the most important woman in your life. Mother’s Day in the UAE falls on March 21.

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