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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts Thesis Research 2017/2018


Declaration

Declaration This booklet is the summary of two stages of an undergraduate research thesis titled Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts, a requisite of the Bachelors degree in Architectural Engineering program in Al AlBayt University, Mafraq, Jordan. Data included is referenced and aimed for Academical use. The content is an original work of the author and may be changed for the purpose of correction and/or further editing. Prepared by Mohammed Al-Hanbali Supervised by Dr.Safaa Al-Husban

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Validating The Research

Validating The Research

The content of this booklet has been approved by the research supervisor following two jury discussion sessions, held in 19/10/2017 and 7/12/2017 for both (Project Proposal and Justification) and (Case Studies and Site Analysis) stages respectively. This part of the research aims to establish the basis which the project will stand on, what it aims for and justify the need and importance of it, explaining what it can offer further than what exists and reinforcing the available ideas with further ways of use, mainly through data collection and analysis.

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Table of Contents

Table

of

Contents

Introduction.......................................... 1 Aims......................................................... 6 Focus....................................................... 8 Proposal...............................................14 Case Study. .........................................16 Site Analysis.......................................50 Synthesis 68

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Introduction

1


Introduction

Earlier this year, an announcement blew up local and regional media headlines, “Unemployment at highest rate in 25 years”(1) a Jordanian newspaper stated. Such a huge problem came of no shock to the local communities of Jordanian cities, they’ve known for years it would get to this and it was only a matter of time. Such a huge problem can not be allowed to linger anymore without further identification and proper study to produce serious, realistic solutions.

About the problem Unemployment has been a nightmare haunting Jordanians for years now, it hit 18.2% first quarter of this year (2) and has been growing more each year within the labor force of Jordan. With many attempts to solve this problem in different and approaches, still nothing was able to handle it efficiently.

Labor force: The whole of the economically active population, including employed and unemployed Jordanians.

Types of Unemployment

(4)

1. Frictional Unemployment: Is a temporary type of unemployment that results from normal labor market turnover such as the period of unemployment that people experience when they move between jobs. 2.Cyclical Unemployment: Is the temporary unemployment that results from economic downturns (i.e. recessions), which are part of the normal business cycle. 3.Structural Unemployment: Economists say unemployment is “structural” when the skills of the unemployed workers are not well suited for the jobs available.

Problem Causes

(5)

• Insufficient earnings

Problem Identification In order to provide proper solutions to a problem, we first need to understand every part of it. According to The European Training Foundation (ETF) (3) : Unemployment : Any person of 15+ years of age who is without a job, but who is able to work, available for work and looking for work. Unemployment rate: The total number of people who are unemployed as a proportion of the labor force, which itself is the sum of employed and unemployed people. Economic activity rate: The number of employed and unemployed people as a proportion of the working-age population.

• Unsatisfactory working conditions • Lack of career guidance counselling for students and unemployed people • Lack of opportunities to find satisfying work following graduation • The difficulty for individuals of obtaining jobs compatible with their qualifications • The gap between the skills of graduates and the needs of employers • Social and cultural obstacles for the full integration of women into the labour market • The wider international and economic situations

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Observations Studies show the depth of the problem, the labor force being no more than 17% of total population estimated by 9,814,995 Jordanian in 2017, that’s 2/3 the rate of 2008 (6). The community struggles to afford for the non-working segment , yet the working one suffers from high unemployment. Jordanian Labor Force by Gender (NCHRD)(7)

Percentage Distribution of The Jordanian employed Persons (%) by Age Groups (DoS)

Age Group/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

15-19

2.9

2.9

2.7

3.4

3.2

20-24

13.4

12.4

12.5

12.9

13.5

25-29

17.8

18

17.2

17.2

17

30-39

32.6

33

33.4

31.9

29.7

40-49

22.1

22.7

23

23.6

23.3

50-59

8.4

8.6

8.7

8.9

10.4

60+

2.7

2.4

2.5

2.2

3

Total

100

100

100

100

100

Gender/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Male

1,178,886

1,191,240

1,210,832

1,318,067

1,357,948

Female

264,691

253,459

249,506

289,532

302,308

Governorate/ Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

1,443,577

1,444,699

1,460,338

1,607,599

1,660,256

Amman

40.9

39.4

37.7

37.1

38.9

Balqa

6.3

6.5

5.9

6.5

6.5

Zarqa

13.6

13.1

13.5

13.1

13.0

Jordanian Labour Force by Participation (NCHRD)

Labor/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

1,443,577

1,444,699

1,460,338

1,607,599

1,660,256

Unemployed

175,470

182,063

173,650

209,569

253,616

Employed

1,268,107

1,262,636

1,286,688

1,398,030

1,406,640

Jordanian Labor Force by Age group (NCHRD)

Percentage Distribution of The Jordanian employed Persons (%) by Governorate (DoS)

Madaba

2.6

2.8

2.9

2.3

2.4

Irbid

17.5

18.7

19.5

20.0

18.7

Mafraq

4.4

4.7

4.9

5.4

4.9

Jarash

2.7

2.7

3.1

3.2

2.6

Ajloun

2.2

2.3

2.3

2.5

2.5

Karak

4.7

4.7

4.9

4.6

4.6

Tafiela

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.7

1.7

Ma’an

1.8

1.6

1.8

1.9

1.9

Aqaba

1.9

1.8

2.0

1.8

2.1

Total

100

100

100

100

100

Percentage Distribution of The Jordanian employed Persons (%) by Economic Activity (DoS)

Age Group/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

15-19

56,966

56,044

54,420

69,868

74,558

20-24

235,653

224,481

227,392

258,576

289,608

25-29

267,907

272,109

264,447

290,546

298,738

30-34

241,037

243,978

243,958

248,793

35-39

202,821

204,938

214,367

40-44

173,839

173,460

45-49

119,780

127,447

50-54

67,654

55+

77,920

Total

1,443,577

Industry/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Agriculture, Forestry,and fishing

2.0

2.0

1.8

1.7

1.9

Mining and Quarrying

0.8

1.0

0.8

0.8

0.8

Manufacturing

9.7

9.9

10.2

10.0

9.7

237,093

Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply

0.8

0.6

0.7

0.7

0.7

232,461

222,484

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.3

182,546

198,152

193,769

Water supply, sewerage, waste management and remediation activities

125,926

149,859

151,265

72,242

77,977

82,210

99,523

70,000

69,305

77,134

93,218

1,444,699

1,460,338

1,607,599

1,660,256

The Economical Participation Rate (%) by Governorate (DoS)

(8)

Construction

6.0

6.4

6.6

6.0

6.1

Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles

15.5

15.7

15.3

15.3

15.4

Transportation and storage

7.2

7.6

7.9

7.7

7.6

Accommodation and food service activities

2.4

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.9

Information and communication

1.9

1.6

1.7

1.6

1.3

Financial and insurance activities

2.0

1.9

2.1

1.7

1.9

Real estate activities

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.4

Percentage Distribution of The Jordanian employed Persons (%) by Economic Activity (DoS)

Governorate/ Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Amman

37.9

36.7

36

35.6

35.3

Industry/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Balqa

39.5

38.2

35.2

37.9

36.5

Zarqa

37.3

35.4

34.5

34.6

33.7

Professional, scientific and technical activities

2.5

2.3

2.1

2.5

2.8

Madaba

41.9

42

38.7

35.9

34.9

Administrative and support service activities

1.5

1.3

1.4

1.2

1.3

Public administration and defense; compulsory social security

25.5

26.2

26.2

26.3

26.1

3

Irbid

36

36.9

36.2

36.9

35.9

Mafraq

36.4

36.9

36.7

38.8

37.4

Education

12.6

12.1

11.9

12.4

11.5

Jarash

35.9

35.1

38.6

38.2

36.3

Human health and social work activities

5.1

5.0

4.9

5.0

5.1

Ajloun

35.8

34.9

35.2

36.6

36.9

Karak

45.4

42.3

43.1

43.1

40.7

Arts, entertainment and recreation

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.4

Tafiela

43

42.5

41.4

41.4

42

Other service activities

2.6

2.2

2.1

2.3

2.5

Ma’an

40.6

41

38.2

36.9

40

0.3

0.4

0.6

0.7

44.6

38.1

37.6

39.1

43.2

Activities of households as employers; undifferentiated goods and services-producing activities of households for own use

0.6

Aqaba

Activities of extraterritorial organizations and bodies

0.3

0.3

0.4

0.6

0.6

Total

100

100

100

100

100


Introduction

A 5% growth rate implies approximately USD1.8 billion of growth per annum. This will need to be shouldered by a few key sectors, which need to grow at a pace of 10%+ per annum for the next 3-5 years. While this pace of growth has been achieved by the Agriculture and Construction sectors in the past 5 years, all other sectors will require a significant jump to achieve the targets that have been set. (9)

These results suggest improvement in the less growing sectors, where general trading certainly requires more care in order to participate for real economically, Industrial sector holds big potential as it is, with the development of infrastructure to support it. Unemployment Rates (%) By Sex (DoS)

Gender/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Male

10.4

10.6

10.1

11

13.3

Female

19.9

22.5

20.7

22.5

24.1

Total

12.2

12.6

11.9

13

15.3

2016

Unemployment Rates (%) by Age Groups (DoS)

Age Group/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

15-19

35.3

34.1

36.1

32.1

40

20-24

27.8

30.4

29.3

30.5

34.5

25-39

10.2

10.7

9.9

11.2

13.4

40-54

4.2

4.3

3.7

4.8

4.5

55-65

2.6

1.9

1.6

2

1.9

65+

2.5

0.6

2.9

2

1.5

Unemployment Rates (%) by Educational Level (DoS)

Formal Education/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

Illiterate

9.3

7.6

6.1

7

2016 6.6

Less than Secondary

11.2

10.9

10.4

11.1

13.8

Secondary

8.6

8.5

7.5

8.2

9.4

Intermediate Diploma

10.8

11.9

9.6

12.6

13.4

Bachelor and higher

15.9

17.8

77.3

18.6

21

Percentage Distribution of the Jordanian Unemployed Persons (%) by Educational Level (DoS)

Formal Education/Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

Illiterate

0.9

0.7

0.4

0.4

2016 0.4

Less than Secondary

44.4

41.3

43.7

43.4

46.1 6.2

Secondary

8.2

8.2

7.3

6.5

Intermediate Diploma

9.5

10.1

7.9

9.3

8.1

Bachelor and higher

37

39.8

40.6

40.3

39.1

Almost 75% of unemployment is among the youth of ages 15-24 of Jordanian population. People with less than secondary degree are facing unemployment increasingly each year, which urgently demands a permanent, efficient solution. Percentage Distribution of the Jordanian Unemployed Persons (%) by Governorate (DoS)

A credit facility is a loan or collection of loans a business or corporation takes to generate capital over an extended period of time. It can be in the form of revolving credit, term loans, committed facilities, letters of credit or most retail credit accounts.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

It is apparent that the Jordanian community’s unemployment problem is related to the level of education, as well as the lack of demand for employees, a study by Phenix Center for Economic and Informatics Studies shows that the majority of job offers posted in local newspapers, do not require a certain level of education(55.2% of posted offers), yet they are focused on specific fields jobs, mainly managerial and financial followed by jobs in education (10).

Highest rate of unemployment lies in the capital city, Amman, surrounded by 5 other governorates, being the most accessible with the best infrastructure and economic stability among other cities, makes it the proper starting point to solve the issue.

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Aims

Aims

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Aims of Development Infrastructure and Economics Sector (11) Internal trade and supply sector: • Utilizing mechanisms to maintain market stability through market monitoring. • Promoting free market competition and regulating overpricing.

• Expanding the establishment of centers of excellence for vocational training to match training programs and labor market needs. • Spreading a culture of entrepreneurship and self-reliance through selfemployment programs. • Reorganizing the labor market to limit reliance on foreign labor.

Axioms National Employment

• Protecting local production. • Maintaining a strategic reserve of essential commodities and improving selfsufficiency rates. • Reducing waste in the strategic reserve.

Interventions

Restructure and organize the education and vocational training system.

Promote self-employment, entrepreneurship and a culture of self-reliance

Axioms

Interventions Local Development Ensure the availability of revolving funds in all governorates across Jordan to facilitate lending for low income individuals.

• Training business owners in technical and managerial skills.

• Encouraging and stimulating entrepreneurship and innovation • Fostering and building the capacity of existing businesses. • Providing the right marketing for products of this sector’s projects and businesses.

Social Development (13): Labor Sector • Restructuring and organizing technical and vocational training. 7

Financially support programs that focus on fostering entrepreneurship amongst the youth.

Provide on the job training for short periods for unemployed youth with the aim of helping them acquire skills demanded by the market.

Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprises(MSMES Sector)(12)

• Simplifying patent registration procedure.

Promote self-employment and entrepreneurship as an important driver to reduce youth unemployment.

Reassess and restructure microfinance funds to better support small scale projects. Establish an active policy program

• Offering the needed financing with facilitated and suitable terms.

Ensure the implementation of the Human Resource Development Strategy, as it encompasses reform and improvement in conventional and vocational education.

Enhance local economic development across governorates

Capitalize on public financing windows to fund SMEs projects in Governorates including, Development and Employment Fund, Agriculture Credit Cooperation, Governorate Development Fund, and Enhancing Economic Productivity Program (MOPIC). Develop the concept of self -employment for VTC graduates. Institutionalize micro franchising concept through establishing an aggregator and further developing business ideas.


Focus

Focus

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (14) “Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) systems across the world play a crucial role in developing highly skilled craftsmen and technicians who help the economy to grow. Revitalizing TVET is essential at this juncture in Jordan’s development. Job creation will increasingly have to come from the micro, small, and medium sized enterprises making up the bulk of Jordan’s private sector, which will require a steady stream of literate, numerate, critical thinkers who are well qualified, and enterprising technical and vocational graduates.”

A Brief History

(15)

The idea of vocational education can be traced to apprenticeships. Blacksmiths, carpenters, merchants, and other trades have existed almost since the advent of civilization, and there has always been apprenticeship-style relationships where specific techniques and trades have been passed down to members of the younger generation. Vocational education as we understand it today started in the early twentieth century. The industrialized countries of the West were the first to notice the benefits of having a specialized skilled work force and diverted funds to institutions that taught such skills. For most of the twentieth century, vocational education focused on specific trades such as an automobile mechanic or welder, and was therefore associated with the activities of lower social classes.

9

As a consequence, it attracted a level of stigma, and is often looked upon as being of inferior quality to standard postsecondary education. However, as the labor market became more specialized and economies demanded higher levels of skill, governments and businesses increasingly invested in vocational education through publicly funded training organizations and subsidized apprenticeship or traineeship initiatives. Towards the end of the twentieth century a new trend helped further the appreciation of vocational education. Up until that time, most vocational education had taken place at vocational or technology schools. However, community colleges soon started to offer vocational education courses granting certificates and associate degrees in specialized fields, usually at a lower cost and with comparable, if not better, curricula.

TVET in Jordan Jordan has implemented important improvements in its TVET provision over the last 15 years, and the institutional building blocks of a world-class TVET system are being put in place. Nonetheless, significant challenges remain to ensure that these measures are effective, and in tackling further key issues that undermine quality, innovation, access and accountability within the system. The current state of TVET provision is analyzed using the five strategic themes introduced in the Section 2 of this Strategy.


Focus

Challenges facing TVET in Jordan Access: Not enough students pursue TVET and there are not consistent pathways which encourage and help them progress to higher levels of training. Quality: The private sector does not play a big enough role in TVET, training levels and industry experience are insufficient for TVET instructors and funding is not sufficient. Accountability: There is not one entity that sets priorities and standards for TVET and there is an absence of reliable data to drive and inform decision making. Innovation: New approaches are needed to increase and make better use of funding and to expand access through new and interesting program delivery approaches. Mindset: TVET is not recognized as a pathway to success and prosperity. Being a TVET trainee and TVET teacher are considered to be of low social status.

The Current State of TVET Provision in Jordan (16) Access The system as it stands serves to reinforce negative perceptions of TVET as a less appealing route and career path than an academic one. Progression and Pathways: Enrolment in the TVET sector is poor; at tertiary level there are 313,500 students studying at Jordanian universities, while only 20,500 students are enrolled in the Kingdom’s public and private Community

Colleges. At the secondary level, overall only 4% of students are enrolled in vocational streams, and enrolment as a share of total secondary enrolment has fallen since 1999. Once in the system, there are limited opportunities to leverage training from entry-level TVET providers to higher levels of training or study. Entry and re-entry points through the system are not clearly articulated or promoted. As a result many students use TVET instead as a bridging mechanism or back-door entry route to university. At secondary level, poorly performing students are funneled into TVET routes. The MoE’s Vocational Education system starts after Grade 10, when students can choose between the Academic or the Vocational Tawjihi stream. Although students can choose a vocational track, the decision as to which stream a student chooses is based largely on Tawjihi marks (with only 14% of students choosing the vocational stream). Those students who do not pass the Grade 10 exam have no option but to go to a VTC if they wish to stay in formal education and training. There is no pathway from these centers to Community Colleges, and so for students who do not pass Tawjihi, there is no progression pathway to university. Lifelong Learning: The idea of continuing professional and personal development (CPPD) after entering employment is not embedded in Jordan and further hinders progression opportunities in TVET. There is currently little evidence of short term focused training courses to encourage CPPD being developed or delivered. The absence of an NQF means that individuals do not have access to progression pathways after their initial qualifications.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Quality Curriculum/provision: There are some fundamental mismatches between the skills required for 21st century employment and the outputs from the current TVET system, largely due to the lack of private sector and employer involvement in course design and delivery. This results in a supply driven system which delivers poor quality results with limited relevance at every level. TVET provision is considered outdated, not ‘applied’ enough, and not providing the skills required by Jordanian employers. It does not place sufficient emphasis on preparing students for employment in a 21st century knowledge economy, which involves going beyond providing up-to-date technical competence, and also develops personal qualities of enterprise, networking and creativity. In terms of practical experience, there are not enough opportunities for applied learning, with apprenticeships and practical training mainly limited to the VTCs and not part of an overall approved progression framework. Finally, less than half of employers surveyed as part of the most recent National Employment Strategy were happy with the skill levels of new hires. Employers cannot differentiate between the levels of programs delivered in a vocational school, a training institute, or a community college, and only 15% of Jordanian employers currently hire TVET trained labor The lack of effective employer engagement in the shaping and delivery of TVET provision fuels a negative cycle whereby the poor expectation of employers are confirmed by shortcomings in delivery, whereas more effective engagement would grow a positive cycle of improved outputs from the system and greater employers satisfaction with it

11

and willingness to engage. The diagram below, from a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) analysis, illustrates the two cycles:

Part of the reason for the low levels of private sector participation can be explained by considering the composition and working of the Jordanian economy, which creates a number of challenges and barriers to employer involvement and the development of relevant programs. These challenges include: Limited capacity to engage: Small enterprises (with fewer than 20 employees) account for 98% of all enterprises in Jordan and 37% of all employment in the private sector. As a result of their size, these enterprises are largely focused on short-term interests and productivity, which limits their capacity and the perceived value of playing a role in the design of TVET programs.

Varied requirements and poor articulation of training needs: Growing enterprises often have difficulty


Focus

defining their emerging skills and training requirements, and their needs are often very particular and specific. It is therefore difficult to create meaningful and relevant general TVET programs to supply these enterprises Increased self-employment: Since employment opportunities are not growing quickly enough to absorb all job seekers, self-employment is one of the main paths into the labor market in Jordan, which requires different kinds of TVET courses designed to support micro businesses – building entrepreneurship, commercial awareness, etc. Inadequate instructor and teacher training: A further factor influencing poor perceptions of the quality of TVET provision is that trainers themselves often do not have sufficient industry or technical experience. Training and teaching staff with expertise in both technical and pedagogical skills are key to a strong vocational institution. Insufficient funding: The levels and distribution of funding for TVET have negative impacts on delivery and quality across the sector. TVET in Jordan is mainly publicly financed.

Accountability Governance: Chronic shortcomings of leadership and fragmented governance characterize the TVET sector in Jordan. TVET policies and provision involve various levels of government, multiple ministries, the private sector and a wide range of stakeholders. Aligning these interests demands effective coordinating structures of governance, a policy framework that incentivises cooperation, and strong leadership.

Incentives: The terms on which funding is supplied provide powerful levers for improving accountability for effective use of those funds. However, public funding allocations to TVET providers are not based on results or outcomes, and budgets are allocated based on historical spending trends, which can perpetuate poor performance. Local accountability is also reduced by the highly centralized nature of the system. Quality assurance, monitoring and evaluation: Accountability is further shaped and driven by regulatory controls, especially over the quality of the services and results provided. Quality assurance of TVET in Jordan is highly fragmented, with separate quality assurance processes and bodies in each of the three Ministries involved with TVET provision. Each has their own mechanisms for the collection of data, monitoring, and evaluation.

Innovation Access to reliable labor market data limits TVET development: As it stands, Labor Market information is gathered by a number of sources Department of Statistics (DoS), the MoL, the Social Security Corporation (SSC), the CSB, the MoHESR, and the National Aid Fund (NAF). There is no central repository for this information. Creating a self-sustaining TVET sector: As pressure on government funding continues, learning providers are increasingly looking for innovative ways to secure investments, generate income and reduce costs

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Mindset As in many other countries, a number of culturally engrained attitudes and mindsets have played a role in hindering the progress and development of a vibrant TVET sector. Jordanian society has traditionally undervalued TVET and the craft, technician and associate level careers that it supports. Negative perceptions of TVET: There is a clear preference among students and their families for academic university degrees in Jordan, irrespective of whether this route positively impacts employability or not. There is an engrained cultural stigma associated with the prospects and status of technical and vocational paths and qualifications, and current enrolment numbers clearly demonstrate this preference.

Visionary response to challenges: 1. Establish progressive pathways to promote and recognize all forms of learning and skills development within the system and in the labor market and create new options for high quality tertiary TVET education. 2. Increase the quality of TVET through consistent training requirements for TVET instructors, aligning standards and quality assurance for all institutions, and closer coordination with private sector. 3. Put in place clear governance structures to ensure accountability across the sector. 4. Diversifying the source of funding to TVET, including encouraging more Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs), and improving the use of funds in ways that can incentivize positive change in the system. 13

5. Promote and establish TVET as an attractive learning opportunity from an early age, and throughout the system.

Global Best Practice (17) USAID-funded Education Development Centre study concluded that the most effective programs shared common characteristics: • Leadership and accountability. • Demand-driven design. • Open access. • Portability of skills. • Continuous improvement. • Public-private partnerships. • Sustainable financing. • Replicability. • Economic and social impact of the project, program or system. Strategic Objective

Projects

Access – Establish progressive pathways to promote and recognize all forms of learning and skills development within the system and in the labor market and create new options for high quality tertiary TVET

•Approve the National Qualifications Framework •Degree-level TVET programmes and Provision •Equal pay for TVET Graduates •Licensing for craftsmen and technicians

Quality – Increase the quality of TVET through consistent training requirements for TVET instructors, aligning standards and quality assurance for all institutions, and closer coordination with private sector

•Establish standards and training requirements for TVET trainers and instructors •Accreditation and grading system for all TVET trainers •Transfer the CAQA to the SDC •Align TVET provision to the National Employment Strategy and Jordan 2025 goals

Accountability – Put in place clear governance structures to ensure accountability across the sector

•Design and establish the SDC •Enforce/facilitate the use of data to inform policy and decisions

Innovation – Innovate funding and provision in the sector through transforming the E-TVET Fund, PPPs, and expanding innovative modes of delivery

•Establish a private sector-led Skills Development Fund •Establish new PPPs aligned with priority clusters identified in Jordan 2025 •Expand apprenticeship programmes

Mindset – Promote and establish TVET as an attractive learning opportunity from an early age, and throughout the system

•School-based careers guidance and exposure to design and technology •Participation of Jordan in the World Skills Competition •Reform the current tracking system for the MoE VET stream and delink VET from low scholastic achievement


Proposal

Proposal

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Proposal The proposed solution is a contemporary VET center with a new vision that satisfies the goals sought for future development in both economical and social sectors. Focused on youth, ages between 15-24, whom have and have not yet completed their education. In order to prepare a powerful, skilled force of labor and craftsmen to support the rapid economical growth in many economical sectors, they must first educationally fit, with a minimum amount of knowledge enough to let them face the modern day hardships in labor market. Enrolled students and trainees will be learning two Academic subject, as they go through their full vocational training path. These two subjects will be Project Management and Design courses, which will grant a certificate once the participant completes his study plan successfully. This will allow the creation of a proper learning stream in school that prepares students academically and skill-wise for joining vocational training.

15


Case Study

Case Study

16


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Content Legend Plan/Section

Urban scale

Classroom

Commercial

Workshop

Residential

Design Studio

Services/Cultural

Gallery

Industrial

Administration

Farmland/Greenery

Library

Vacant

Entertainment

Utilities

Privacy Levels High

Vehicular Circulation

Medium

Pedestrian Circulation

Low

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Circulation


Case Study

Global Case Study Academy Of Fine Arts Wroclaw Project Area: 9250m2

Project location: Wrocław, Poland

Architect: Tomasz GĹ‚owacki

Project year: 2012

Overview Creating proper space for artists and art was the main issue of the design. The solution is an open and accessible yet still practical space. Transparency of the building is the key solution for creating space for design process, art exhibitions and contact with urban trespassers.

Geographical location

Choosing this project Not only the similarity of function intended with the proposed project, this case demonstrates a successful integration of existing significant elements with a new building in a modern urban context with the least negative effect upon it.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Project Concept The design aimed to provide the dynamic, adaptable space that fits the needs of artists, as well as a subsequent exhibition of their art and works. Using the flow of light and the bulk of mass it and transparency of material to communicate, preserve and interact with it’s surroundings whilst maximizing the functionality of the facility. The simple but expressive shape of the Academy of Fine Arts visually closes the street and the courtyard of neighboring buildings, but opens to the inner courtyard, which allows to divide the intimate, orderly space in a crowded and chaotically built part of the city.

Urban Context Located in the center of the city, among important cultural and administrative buildings, the academy blends into the context as an extension of the preexisting buildings.

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Case Study

Site-Plan Project taken generic block footprint, parallel to streets and connecting to adjacent buildings, forming courtyards that hold other buildings. Simplicity of the building enchants it’s connection with other buildings, it appears as an extension of adjacent buildings that draws no attention to itself, but to it’s content and what surrounds it, creating a dialogue with the existing urban fabric and exhibiting it’s preexisting elements. Thus the project succeeds to merge into the busy center of city.

Case analysis The building is fronted with the gallery space, coated by transparent glass showing off the exhibition material inside.

Ground floor Function

Ground floor Zoning

Ground floor Privacy Levels

Ground floor Circulation

Vertical movement axes coverage 20


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

First floor Function

Main entrances are marked by a slight overhead extrusion in mass, by the street, while sub- entrances are located on the sides.

First floor Zoning

The historic building enclosed in the courtyard isn’t affected by the pure building material nor the simple massing of the building, maintaining it’s cultural value.

First floor Privacy Levels

First floor Circulation 21


Case Study

A buffering zone of trees isolate and enhance the view from and into the workshops area and prepare for the transition between the building and the preexisting garden.

Second floor Function

Level of privacy is gradually limited and defined by the size entry and function of spaces. Vehicular access to the project crosses pedestrian circulation path into the courtyard, allowing the delivery of supplies away from common parts.

Second floor Zoning

Services zones are disrupted and connected exclusively with other zones. Similar functions are located and focused in one continuous zone, merging spaces together allowing more flexibility in movement paths. Simple, semisymmetrical ma facade seem to be solid on one part and a bit dynamic given to shy massing, with slight hierarchy in elevations, creating harmony with these of surrounding, going into balance

Second floor Privacy Levels

Second floor Circulation 22


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts The interior is as simple as the exterior of the building, pure and simply finished materials, essential furnishing and exposed structural and mechanical systems ad great emphasis on lightening and continuity of space in both vertical and horizontal directions rather than drawing attention to the inside.

Sixth floor Function

Vertical movement axes spreading across the building countering the narrowness of corridors and walkways. Movement is maintained by axes affected by the orientation of streets and surrounding buildings.

Sixth floor Zoning

Vertical and horizontal movement axes and circulation patterns are maintained across the entire building.

Sixth floor Privacy Levels

Section C-C Function

Section C-C Zoning

Section C-C Circulation

Sixth floor Circulation 23


Case Study

Section A-A Function

Conclusion • Project aimed to merge within the urban context, with the use of form and material. • Design driven implication affected both the interior and exterior simultaneously.

Section A-A Zoning

• It succeeded in exhibiting the more valued elements of existing context, drawing less attention to itself. • It failed to provide sense of distinction or uniqueness in terms of what function it’s based on.

Section A-A Circulation

Recommendations • Project located in a rich urban context should emphasize it’s valued aspect. • Instead of competing with existing features of existing fabric, the project can actively prove it’s existence with help of a strong sensual proposition instead of alien forms or material.

Section B-B Function

• In order to have an impact on a place, strong connection with it is to be established first. • Design should seek out to redirect implemented forces posed by context to satisfy it’s need as well as benefiting the project.

Section B-B Zoning

Section B-B Circulation

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Secondary Global Case AUB Design Studios and Workshops Project area: 3000 m2

Project location: Wallisdown, Poole, UK

Architect: Design Engine

Project year: 2016

Overview The AUB Design Workshops & Studios Conversions consist of the transformation of two former on-campus halls of residence, originally constructed in 2001, into modern studio and teaching space for Arts University Bournemouth’s internationally renowned higher education courses.

Choosing this project Although the project is a re-designing of existing buildings, it brings the theoretical and practical ways of learning together within a compact space and yet provides space for social exchange and relief.

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Geographical location


Case Study

Project Concept Designers aimed to retrofit two old buildings to follow the University’s newly proposed master-plan, with the usage of modern materials, reforming spaces and bringing the outside closer to the inside to boost artist’s creativity and productivity while offering the place to learn, exhibit and socialize. During the study phase of the buildings, designers drew the outlines of what to reuse, pluck or adapt with the framework of the master-plan, they kept in mind that they needed spaces that not only fit for purpose, but one that interact with students, inspires them and engage with their creativity.

Urban Context Located in Poole, a town rich with history going as old as the Iron age, it’s considered a tourist resort for it’s natural harbour, historical buildings and the infamous Lighthouse art center.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Site-Plan Design resulted in isolating the studios from the rest of the campus visually and sensually but in return refreshes the area. But Buildings maintained their original form, in sync with other university facilities. Heavyweight, highly-serviced mechanized modeling and prosthetic workshops are concentrated on the ground floor. This enables a structural strategy for a new steel frame to be inserted with the outer masonry skin, thus allowing the removal of cellular load-bearing partitions to create large open plan studios, which in turn facilitate the proposed natural ventilation strategies.

Case Analysis As well as symmetrical planning, spatial allotment goes on par with the other building in terms of capacity and order rather than nature of function. This goes as far as movement axes and pedestrian circulation patterns.

Ground floor Function

Ground floor Zoning 27

Ground floor Privacy Levels


Case Study Utilities are distributed in specific areas across each building where they serve other zones from their own. Narrow corridors were replaced with flow of space through opening studios onto themselves creating sense of intimacy and privacy.

Ground floor Circulation

Vertical movement axes coverage Top floor invested the roof for free natural lightening and ventilation, as well as a sense of openness in opposition to limited interior space. Simplicity of interior is contrasted by the vivid colours and bold forms of students additions and works.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Although applied new materials provides a sense of modernity to the buildings, it contradicts the theme of the other old parts.

Student work gallery receives the main entrance way linked to the exterior visually with glass curtain walls.

If the campus, if the heavy, solid straight lines of the plans didn’t disturb the natural flow enough, this design decision did as well as it did to the calm atmosphere of the area.

Line of trees separates the educational buildings away from the hustle of roads and streets as well as protecting the semi-private social space from intrusion.

Buildings tend to become uni-function focused upstairs, where only concerned users attend to the spaces.

The facades brought to life with shading curtains of aluminum of neutral colour that lets light into buildings and filters the visual access into it. The yard in-between them serves as a buffer between buildings whilst linking the space associated to them as their own private space.

First floor Function

29


Case Study Progression in the privacy of sectors is apparent through the shorter corridors become, zones being less opened to each other and more into themselves and the changing in lightening patterns due to the shading of the aluminum veil. Giving the students the sense of owning the space and developing a relation of belonging to the space.

First floor Zoning

First floor Privacy Levels

Section A-A Function

First floor Circulation

Section A-A Zoning

Section B-B Function Section A-A Circulation

Section B-B Zoning

Section B-B Circulation

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Conclusion • Project aimed to re-fit old buildings into a newer campus master-plan, changing their purpose complexly. • It aimed to manipulate existing natural and physical resources with the least amount of impact outside the area where they are located. • It succeeded in forming spaces moving from accessible for all to personal, intimate rooms where students can occupy and belong. • It failed to display a mediator form that communicates with existing parts and interacts with newer ones equally.

Recommendations • Texture, material and colour, together can bring static forms into life. • Simple interior design can direct attention to an intended point of focus , within or outside the building, as well as encouraging interaction with space. • Lightening plays a major role in defining the boundaries of space. • Manipulation of circulation routes can create personal, intimate space or a public, hub for congregation.

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Case Study

Regional Case Centre for Training and Qualification in Marrakech Crafts Project Area: 5100 m2

Project Location: Marrakech,Morocco

Architect: Abdelhakim Guilmi

Project year: 2013

Overview CFQMA is part of an effort to focus Handicraft sector as social and vocational integration youth. The entire atmosphere of the building, detaching the obvious social impact to the community, oozes of a particular touch of quintessential cultural mannerisms to the Marrakech region.

Choosing this project

Geographical location

Located within an urban context rich with traditional and cultural influences, this project fits as one stitch of the homogeneous fabric. Reflecting modernity with solemn composure an a pure sense of design.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Project Concept The designer believed that the best way to promote national crafts is by showing them, therefore he created the building as a journey to study all types of different crafts, proposed by unique, yet natural materials and simple geometry that intertwines local styles. The entire atmosphere of the building, detaching the obvious social impact to the community, oozes of a particular touch of quintessential cultural mannerisms to the Marrakech region that it is located, but slowly seeks to advance this idea rather than stagnate in the all too familiar music of traditional conservation which sometimes cannot be detached from simple mimicry and reproduction.

Urban Context Project is located within a traditional area with a very high density of buildings and inhabitants. The area has taken the traditional Moroccan urban theme with buildings so close to each other with small passageways, alleys and courtyards coming in-between , enclosed and crude to the outside, intimate and welcoming from within. Buildings within that urban fabric all look similar from the outside, bulky and simple, the variation is inside where one is a delightful elegant cluster of spaces built by high quality materials and detailed finishing while the other is as simple as it’s outside.

33


Case Study

Site-Plan The project absorbed the features of it’s containing urban fabric, digested the aspects and reflected a refined version of it’s own, a set of adjacent buildings united by form, material and movement network where public spaces breathe through the middle of the compound..

Case Analysis All sub-entrances are marked by small but wide gates that lead into alleys, while main visitors entrance is a simple gateway that goes through into a corridor, surrounded by symmetrical spaces defined by arches and walls into the project complex. Project is fronted with a resemblance of the traditional Moroccan “Kissariya” (markets area), where they exhibit works and crafts of the center. Function spaces are distributed across the project connected by passages defined by walls and arches.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts The wideness of passages explain the relation of space to public, wide near entrance and narrow by the workshops. The solidity of building masses is sheared by space penetrating it’s through masses, leaving a harmonious composition of plants and structure. The entire atmosphere of the building, detaching the obvious social impact to the community, oozes of a particular touch of quintessential cultural mannerisms to the Marrakech region that it is located, but slowly seeks to advance this idea rather than stagnate in the all too familiar music of traditional conservation which sometimes cannot be detached from simple mimicry and reproduction.

Ground floor Function

Ground floor Zoning

Vertical movement axes coverage 35

Ground floor Privacy Levels


Case Study The formation of mass and space solves ventilation and lightening issues, yet creates it’s own where restrooms and workshops vent into narrow, half closed pedestrians walkways and captures noise within the facility’s walls. Movement network along with the massing and detailing, offer a rich spatial experience throughout the center that stimulates the sense of exploration and re-visiting value.

Ground floor Circulation Mixture of simple modern material, traditional formations and culturally rich details channel an ageless, deep rooted picture of architecture, physically and sensually. Asymmetrical planning erects into a hierarchical continuity of solid masses treated with void aesthetically and functionally.

First floor Function

36


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

First floor Zoning

First floor Privacy Levels

Despite the purity materials, diversity of treatments offered by grids carving, lines engraving of simple material that’s crossed by an articulation of mass and openings along the solid facades.

First floor Circulation

Section A-A Function Eastern Facade

Section A-A Zoning

Section A-A Privacy Levels

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Section A-A Circulation


Case Study

Conclusion • The Project aimed to create a modern place to show, teach and revive traditional crafts while still being accepted into the complex urban structure. • It embodied the essence of it’s function, becoming a showcase for what it offers. • It succeeded in maintaining an interesting compromising form of modernity and traditionalism. • It failed to successfully organize space to achieve maximum functionality and efficiency.

Recommendations • Traditional architectural elements and features can be re-introduced to fit modern conditions. • Form can actively affect function unless it confronts it vitally. • Unity in façades and over all form can be reached through usage of homogeneous materials, while they can be treated diversely to appeal to aesthetical interest. • Spatial experience adds a new dimension to what a project can express or what’s intended for the user to feel.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Secondary Regional Case Training Center for Sustainable Construction Project Area: 2340 m2

Project Location: Chwiter, Morocco

Architect: Anna Heringer

Project Year: 2013

Overview The Training Center for Sustainable Construction in Chwiter, a satellite town of Marrakesh, will demonstrate low tech and high-tech strategies that consider the local cultural identity. And thus be pilot program to develop a partnership between sustainable development and industry.

Choosing the project Within the culturally rich context of the project, it provides modern solution inspired by the traditional ways of the people, paying respect to the identity of place and originality of methods.

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Geographical Location


Case Study

Project Concept This project was intended to provide the means of research and development of the local building styles in ways which locales are familiar with, by integrating both traditional low tech and modern high tech methods of construction with earth, aiming to support society growth and employing efficient sustainability methodology to be an example for other modern facilities. The aim is to research, train and employ efforts into maintaining and expanding the center and benefiting local society with the usage of natural available materials in sustainable approach.

Urban Context The project was proposed in Chwiter, a satellite town that was found in response to the over densified fabric of the center of the city Marrakech, where new vacant areas can be employed to fulfill rising opportunities.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Site-Plan The training center takes the form of a congregation of buildings crossed by passages intertwined with courtyards, the traditional Moroccan urban cluster. The overall form takes over the historical “Ksar� (Castles) of Morocco, redefined with another softer material, location associated treatment and an efficient use of traditional lightening and ventilation techniques, such as wind-catchers and articulated masses.

Case Analysis The master plan of the Center balances indoor and outdoor areas to create a diversity of public realms. A massive earthen wall leads into a spacious garden. The complex interchanges between classrooms, workshop areas and outside patios and courtyards surrounded with niches for private study. Students will grow fruit and vegetables in the organic garden. Spaces along movement network are invested into personal use areas where individuals can attend to their business while still connected to the inside of the building with the merit of sensory accessibility to the outside. Ground floor Circulation

41

Ground floor Function

Ground floor Zoning

Vertical movement axes coverage


Case Study Ground floor Privacy Levels Outlines of zones privacy is drawn by their positioning to entry points as well as level of access into them through other zones.

Comfort cooling tower is a modern version of the ancient Arabic Wind Tower in which wind was directed down a tower by deflectors and then across a pool of water filled jugs at the base. Hot outside air enters the cooling tower’s structure through evaporation pads mounted at the top. Temperature substantially reduced as the air gives up latent heat evaporating the water. First floor Function Facades come to move with the interchanging of opening heights, sizes, shapes and orientation. Clerestory windows peak one mass to seek another natural light and fresh air. Efficient sun shading with fixed blinds prevents high solar heat gains in interior areas. No direct sun strikes an outside wall or window of a passively cooled area. Motorized blinds regulate light into the windows above corridors, classrooms and teachers rooms. Although the building material may seem to limit the heights and areas of spaces structurally, it transforms the handicap into an interesting diversity of solutions to different zones, forming unique a flow of space between the interior and exterior of the building.

First floor Zoning

First floor Circulation

First floor Privacy Levels

42


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Energy Concept The concept is developed to meet the demand of energy efficiency, comfort and flexibility. It is mainly based on characteristics of the local climate and the specific building usage. Ground temperatures in two meters depth provide a comfortable and useful temperature range between 16 °C and 24 °C all the year. Efficient sun protection is needed to avoid high cooling loads from solar radiation through the windows and from solar heated walls and roofs.

Section A-A Zoning

Section A-A Function Section A-A Circulation

Section B-B Function

Section B-B Zoning

Section B-B Circulation

Section C-C Function

Section C-C Zoning

Section C-C Circulation

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Case Study

Conclusion • The proposal focused on local development in both human resources and community practice fields. • It offered local and traditional methods re-defined in modern ways and treatments for still constant challenges. • Theoretically, it succeeded in presenting an interesting, attracting educational space. • Yet it still fails to provide reality based results and anticipated outcomes for modern local demands and needs.

Recommendations • Natural ventilation and lightening are not be replaced with artificial, yet they can be employed in different methods that they usually are. • Every small, neglected or unattained space can be invested to reform a new way of experiencing sensual or physical trial. • Every spatially opened, defined or undefined purpose area can become an interesting, lively room for social interaction. • Flow of space can transform strict, limited areas to journey of sensory stimulants ,full of experience.

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Local Case Vocational Training Corporation Overview VTC provides its services to all citizens regardless of their education level working of the platform of lifelong continuous learning, both in vocational preparation programs of all professional levels, or upgrading competency programs to raise competency of workers on job in marketplace.

Choosing this project VTC has always been the pioneering institutes in vocational education and training since it was established. Offering opportunities to Jordanian youth to seek other ways of being effective place in society.

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Geographical Location


Case Study

Urban Context Located in King Abdullah Industrial City, at Sahab, the vocational training institute is divided into two separate buildings, the main administrative building, fostering programs for Electrical, mechanical and technical training, as well as smiting, aluminum works, sewing and culinary skills. The other part is a hanger that holds wood work and carpentry training.

Case Analysis The main building takes a linear shape, along the services street. Rooms split into theoretical and practical education spaces, without a barrier in-between them, and sometimes they two merge where no enough space is available for both. Openings in most rooms are high above the ground stripes of glass and aluminum that can hardly spark visual communication between the inside and outside, shaded by cantilevers they barely let direct sunlight inside except for early morning, if at all. Ground floor Function

Ground floor Zoning

Ground floor Privacy Levels

46


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts The grim atmosphere lingers within closed spaces and narrow corridors inside the building, while outside walkways are brighter and livelier out looking the courtyard formed by adjacent building.

Ground floor Circulation

Vertical movement axes coverage

Equipments and tools are clustered inside, more a showcase of ware than a usable set of machines.

First floor Function

First floor Zoning

First floor Privacy Levels

47

First floor Circulation


Case Study On the contrary with the main building, machines and equipment are given enough space to work with and consider safety factors, with lining on the floor to deliver the idea clearly, while it’s been ignored in different parts completely. Material and machine storage is placed in the middle-back of the structure, dim, deranged and consuming a large area of poorly organized space.

Over all, the buildings take functionality to the extreme over form, not anywhere near satisfactory results in terms of managing spaces or creating an ideal educational hub, neither a productivity encouraging stimulant. It lacks social interaction and decent elementary functions, putting every aspect in poor order to achieve the minimum level of response to the needs and calls of an acceptable usable space.

48


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Conclusion • Institution aims to prepare a well trained, local market ready force of technical and vocational workers. • It succeeds in reaching the minimum requirements for a usable training/educational space. • Whilst failing in providing a proper learning atmosphere or fully functional spaces for their purpose of use.

Recommendations • Form does affect function, in ways of figuring the level of performance it will trigger. • Site forces can become a huge disadvantage for the project if misunderstood, miscalculated or mistreated. • As much as spaces open into each other encourage activities and interaction, some function should not be mixed, otherwise they’ll interfere with and disturb each other. • Means of access into a space and sensory feedback by which, implies emotions and anticipation of what lies beyond, if a misconduct to be made, some views of the entire place and activities held within may and will impact the rest of the experience.

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Site Analysis

Site Analysis

50


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Content Legend

Land-use

Zoning

Residential A

Residential

Residential C

Commercial

Commercial

Services

Others

Hospitality

Effect Levels Very Strong

Vehicular Circulation

Strong

Pedestrian Circulation

Moderate

Parking

Low

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Transportation


Site Analysis

Overview The proposed site, in between two of the most important, most active streets in Amman, the land plot is in the heart of a busy area in between lively neighborhoods, where both public and private transportation reach all day long throughout the year.

Geographical Location

52


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

A Site fitting Project’s purpose The proposed site holds high potential to seat a human resources project, and guarantees a huge impact onto local community, with no expiry date set to what it can provide or offer in terms of variety in presented services and expected outcomes, and with no requirement for location attached obstruction.

Prior Usage Adjacent land plots used to be a farmland for growing Sunflower, it was until over a couple of years earlier when waste and aggregate were dumped onto the dirt roads separating them, followed by ceasing work on them, as they became neglected and unattended to.

53


Site Analysis

Demographics It is estimated that 14.4% of Amman population inhabit University sub-district, with a population density of about 2700 Person/Km ².

Panoramic Views from and into the site

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Distance from site to nearest Civil Defense Station Al-Madina Al-Monawara St 286, Amman to Civil Defense, Amman

Drive 1.0 km, 3 min

Map data ©2017 Google, ORION-ME

200 m

via Al-Madina Al-Monawara St and Akef Al-Fayiz St.

3 min

Fastest route, lighter tra c than usual

1.0 km

Distance from site to nearest Police Station Al-Madina Al-Monawara St 286, Amman to Tla'a Ela'li Police department, Amman

Drive 3.8 km, 9 min

Map data ©2017 Google, ORION-ME

200 m

via Al-Madina Al-Monawara St

9 min

Fastest route, lighter tra�c than usual

3.8 km

via Grays Haddadin St. and Was� At-Tall St.

9 min 3.9 km

via Sareyah Al-Kenani St.

11 min 3.6 km

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Site Analysis

Distance from site to nearest Hospital Al-Madina Al-Monawara St 286, Amman to Jordan University Hospital

Drive 1.0 km, 2 min

Map data Š2017 Google, ORION-ME

200 m

via Al-Madina Al-Monawara St and Queen Rania St

2 min

Fastest route, lighter tra c than usual

1.0 km

Distance from site to Downtown Al-Madina Al-Monawara St 286, Amman to Amman

Drive 10.5 km, 15 min

Map data Š2017 Google, ORION-ME

1 km

via Queen Rania St

15 min

Fastest route, lighter tra c than usual

10.5 km

via Al-Sharif Naser Ben Jamil St.

19 min 11.3 km

via Queen Rania St and Al-Sharif Abdul Hamid Sharaf St.

20 min 10.5 km

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Contextual Analysis Landmarks

Solid:Void

57


Site Analysis

Vegetation

Wind Direction

Use of Exterior space

Land-use

Land-use Zoning

58


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Buildings Usage and heights

Dimensions

Existing setbacks

Proposed setbacks

Topography

59


Site Analysis

Land Sections

Drainage Patterns

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

Section 4

60


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

61

Noise patterns

Emitted noise patterns

Views into the site

Views from the site

Northern Skyline

Southern Skyline


Site Analysis

Pedestrian and Vehicular Circulation

Traffic and traffic generators

Available public Transportation

62


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Shading patterns March 20th, 9Am

Shading patterns March 20th, 12Pm

Shading patterns March 20th, 3Pm

63


Site Analysis

Shading patterns June 21st, 9Am

Shading patterns June 21st, 12Pm

Shading patterns June 21st, 3Pm

64


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Shading patterns September 23rd, 9Am

Shading patterns September 23rd, 12Pm

Shading patterns September 23rd, 3Pm

65


Site Analysis

Shading patterns December 21st, 9Am

Shading patterns December 21st, 12Pm

Shading patterns December 21st, 3Pm

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Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

S.W.O.T Analysis Strength • Ease of reach by either private or public transportation methods, from different locations inside and outside Amman Governorate. • Located in-between lively neighborhoods, where sighted ,visited and passed by a huge number of people each day. • The area inhabited by different classes of society, of different origins and ages. • Availability of elementary urban infrastructure. • Part of the areas concerned with current urban development projects on both metropolitan and micro scales.

Weaknesses • The area suffers from heavy traffic during rush hours. • The site is exposed to different sources and levels of acoustic pollution. • It has limited area in support for future expansion. • The urban context does not have a clear theme nor a dominant style of architecture, leaving it’s identity shattered fragmented.

Opportunities • Create the point of connection between vernacular, international and hybrid styles of building architecture in the area, proposing a sense of unity and linkage to local identity. • Enriching cultural and social aspects and introducing higher classes to more acceptable forms of crafts and vocational work. • Becoming an example of attraction points for more human resources focused development project within local community, specially for the younger factions.

Threats • Failing to set a new standard for an acceptable community space concerned with human resources development and social conjunction. • Stuttering and Incompetence of infrastructure to keep up with the required level of efficiency for the project. • Losing the peak of interest, due to other significant projects within reach from locales. • Causing more negative impact on the already damaged Eco-system. 67


Synthesis

Synthesis

68


Sun Path-Winter Solstice

Sun Path-Summer Solstice

Annual Wind

Precipitation and Climate

Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

69

Global

Secondary Global

Regional

582.8mm

805.7

247.4


Synthesis Secondary Regional

Local

Site/Proposal

247.4

272.8

272.8

70


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Noise Emitted

Noise Received

Views From Site

Views Into Site

Global

71

Secondary Global

Regional


Synthesis Secondary Regional

Local

Site/Proposal

72


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Main Faรงades

Composition

H- Movement Axes

Building Typology

Global

73

Secondary Global

Regional


Synthesis Secondary Regional

Local

Site/Proposal

74


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Function Interrelation

Privacy Patterns

Urban Grid

Global

75

Secondary Global

Regional


Synthesis Secondary Regional

Local

Site/Proposal

76


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Functional-Spatial studies of the Global Case

77

Function

Area (sqm)

Percentage

Users

Workshops

1605.5

17.3%

356

Studios

2390

25.8%

530

Class-Rooms

87.5

0.9%

70

Entertainment

261

2.8%

-

Administration

361

3.9%

-

Utilities

1617.5

17.5%

-

Gallery

1310

14.1%

-

Total

7632.5

82.5%

956

Circulation

1617.5

17.5%

User’s Share of total Project space (sqm)

Project total

9250

100%

9.7


Synthesis

Functional-Spatial studies of the Secondary Global Case Function

Area (sqm)

Percentage

Users

Workshops

205

8.5%

45

Studios

1030

42.9%

228

Administration

320

13.3%

-

Utilities

387

16.1%

-

Gallery

98

4%

-

Study areas

51

2%

20

Total

2091

86.8%

293

Circulation

317

13.2%

User’s Share of total Project space (sqm)

Project total

2400

100%

8.2

78


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Functional-Spatial studies of the Regional Case

79

Function

Area (sqm)

Percentage

Users

Workshops

1885

36.9%

418

Class-Rooms

445

8.7%

356

Entertainment

400

7.8%

-

Administration

110

2.1%

-

Utilities

1425

27.9%

-

Gallery

75

1.4%

-

Total

4340

84.8%

774

Circulation

760

15.2%

User’s Share of total Project space (sqm)

Project total

5100

100%

6.6


Synthesis

Functional-Spatial studies of the Secondary Regional Case Function

Area (sqm)

Percentage

Users

Workshops

260.5

17%

58

Class-Rooms

224

14.7%

180

Entertainment

116

7.6%

-

Administration

75

4.8%

-

Utilities

176.5

11.4%

-

Gallery

99.5

6.5%

-

Study areas

175

11.3%

70

Total

1127

73.5%

308

Circulation

398

26%

User’s Share of total Project space (sqm)

Project total

1525

100%

5

80


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

Functional-Spatial studies of the Local Case

Functional-Spatial Programming Rudimentary Proposition

81

Function

Area per user (sqm)

Users

User per unit

Area per unit (sqm)

Units count

Area (sqm) per unit + 30% Circulation

Total Area (sqm)

Percentage

Educational Spaces

1.25

1120

30

37.5

28

50

1400

3.6%

Studios

4.5

560

25

112.5

17

150

2550

6.5%

Learning Workshops

4.5

560

25

112.5

17

150

2550

6.5%

Industrial Workshops

80

40

20

1600

2

2400

4800

12.4%

Recourses Facilities (Libraries)

2.5

560

-

-

-

-

1820

4.7%

Entertainment

5

1200

-

-

-

-

6000

15.5%

Exhibition

9

200

-

-

-

-

2400

6.2%

Administration

9

80

1

9

60

12

720

1.8%

Utilities

-

-

-

-

-

-

7500

19.3%

Project Total

25 (Per user)

1200

Area (sqm)

29720

-

8980 (Circulation)

38700

100%


Synthesis

82


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts

List of References

1. The Jordan Times, 2nd of June, 2017 issue. 2. Jordanian Department of Statistics.

3. The European Training Foundation (ETF) Unemployment in Jordan report, 2005. 4. Economic Literacy in Human Service Professions, Unit 12 (P2,3). 5. The European Training Foundation (ETF) Unemployment in Jordan report, 2005 (P8,9). 6. Human Resources Indicators in Jordan report, 2009 (P6). 7. National Center for Human Resources Development. 8. Jordanian Department of Statistics, Employment and Unemployment Scan. 9. JORDAN ECONOMIC GROWTH PLAN 2018 – 2022, The Economic Policy Council (P8,9). 10. Employment Trends in Jordan 2016 ,A study of employment ads in Jordanian newspapers. 11. JORDAN ECONOMIC GROWTH PLAN 2018 – 2022, The Economic Policy Council (P73-76). 12. JORDAN ECONOMIC GROWTH PLAN 2018 – 2022, The Economic Policy Council (P77-80). 13. JORDAN ECONOMIC GROWTH PLAN 2018 – 2022, The Economic Policy Council (P110-112). 14. National Human Resources Development Strategy 2016-2025 (P140-142). 15. http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Vocational_education 16. National Human Resources Development Strategy 2016-2025 (P147-156). 17. National Human Resources Development Strategy 2016-2025 (P144-145).

More Resources 18. https://www.archdaily.com 19. http://aasarchitecture.com 20. http://architektonickatypologie.vsb.cz 21. http://paglowacki.pl 22. https://www.designengine.co.uk 23. http://www.amush.org 24. http://www.archidatum.com 25. https://www.lafargeholcim-foundation.org 26. http://vtc.gov.jo/vtcen 83


Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts - Thesis Research  

This booklet is the summary of two stages of an undergraduate research thesis titled Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts, a requisite of t...

Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts - Thesis Research  

This booklet is the summary of two stages of an undergraduate research thesis titled Academy of Industrial Arts and Crafts, a requisite of t...

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