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AUGUST 2019 | $5.95

COMMUNITY MINDED

TOGETHER WE RISE

Tracy Chadwell’s

how layla lisiewski created a nationwide network for local moms

mission to invest in

FEMALE-DRIVEN INNOVATION

OME WOMEN OW POWER of

1843 Capital founder, Tracy Chadwell

WRITE NOW!

SEX AND THE CITY AUTHOR

candace bushnell

ON LIFE AND LOVE AFTER 50


For your heaven on earth


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GREENWICH

contents AUGUST 2019 vol. 72 | issue 8

features

departments

50

12 EDITOR’S LETTER 14 FROM THE FOUNDERS Of Enterprise and Earnings

IN GOOD COMPANY

19 STATUS REPORT BUZZ Deborah Royce on her debut novel, Finding Mrs. Ford SHOP Fun back-to-school finds that may just help beat the endof-summer blues. GO The TWA hotel at JFK has been a long time coming. Now that it’s finally open, we check it out to see if it’s worth all the buzz. DO Sabine Shoenberg discusses how the campaign, Think Greenwich, is helping build our town’s brand. EAT New informal, delicious bites on the Avenue: Lord of the Pies; Freshii

A successful venture capitalist, Tracy Killoren Chadwell has solidified her place in the historically male-dominated industry. What’s she investing in? Women, of course. by t i mot h y dumas

58

NETWORK STAR Layla Lisiewski thought her Wall Street job was tough. Then she became a mom. Now, through her moms’ network, she helps women all over the country navigate the road of motherhood.

37 PEOPLE & PLACES Greenwich United Way, Sole Sisters; Inspirica; End Allergies Together; Alliance Francaise of Greenwich; Bruce Museum, shopping with Michael Kors; YWCA Greenwich, Old Bags luncheon; Abilis

by jam i e m a r shall

66

49 VOWS Laboissonniere–Sabia

MEET THE REAL CARRIE BRADSHAW After Aidan. Beyond Big. What’s Candace Bushnell, the fashionable, fierce and funny Sex and the City author, up to all these years later? We find out.

73 CALENDAR 79 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

19

80 POSTSCRIPT In celebration of those dwindling beach days

on the c over: tr acy killoren chadwell of 1843 capital (turn to page 50 to find out the unique meaning behind her company’s name) photo gr aphy by: kyle norton

GREENWICH MAGAZINE AUGUST 2019, VOL. 72, NO. 8. GREENWICH MAGAZINE (USPS 961-500/ISSN 1072-2432) is published monthly by Moffly Media, Inc., 205 Main St, Westport, CT 06880. Periodical postage paid at Westport, CT, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to GREENWICH MAGAZINE PO BOX 9309, Big Sandy, TX 75755-9607. greenwichmag.com

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SAMANTHA LAUREN PHOTOGRAPHIE

by rian n sm ith


ELEISH VAN BREEMS | H O M E

Furniture • Antiques • Lighting • Pillows • Tabletop • Accessories

EV B HOM E 9 9 Fr an k l i n Street | E V B D ESIGN 22 R ailro ad Place | Westp o rt, Co nnecticut | e vba nt ique s.c om


JOIN US ONLINE! august 2019

GREENWICHMAG.com CELEBRATING THE SCENE STEALERS OF OUR TOWN

WHAT’S ON DECK FOR THE FALL?

WE’VE GOT PLENTY OF GREAT THINGS IN STORE!

SEPTEMBER

SUMMER LOVIN’

Visit our galleries for all the fun

AND WE HAD A BLAST! CHECK OUT ALL THE WARM-WEATHER FUN THAT HAPPENED AROUND TOWN THIS SUMMER.

Time to “fall” in love with fashion: The hottest runway trends and where to find them. Plus, it’s time to find out which leaders of tomorrow made our annual list of Teens to Watch.

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER Our tradition of honoring those who give back continues with our twelfth annual Light a Fire Awards. Meet the community-nominated volunteers who think no task is too big or cause too lost to make a difference.

FOLLOW US ON:

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EVENT PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE /MELANI LUST

Everyone’s favorite topic: Food! Our annual food issue takes a look at the local dining scene. Buzz on the street, deals and steals, under-the-radar eats, glam hotspots, best brunches, happy hours and more!


M

ake your summertime dreams a reality.

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Peter McWhorter, MD


GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 72 | no. 8 | august 2019 creative director

Amy Vischio

editorial editor

Cristin Marandino social editor

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Megan Gagnon founding editor 

Donna Moffly assistant editor

Joey Macari contributing editors

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Terry Christofferson, Kathryn Satterfield senior writers

Timothy Dumas, Chris Hodenfield, Jane Kendall, Bill Slocum contributing writers

Timothy Dumas, Kim-Marie Evans, Beth Cooney Fitzpatrick, Mary Kate Hogan, Jill Johnson, Jamie Marshall editorial advisory board

Susan Bevan, Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo, Bobbi Eggers, Kim-Marie Evans, Muffy Fox, Lisa Lori, Jessica Mindich, David Ogilvy, Susan Moretti Bodson

art senior art director

Venera Alexandrova senior art director, status report

Garvin Burke contributing art directors

Tim Carr- fairfield living Kim Gilby - new canaan • darien production director

Kerri Rak design assistant

Taylor Stroili design intern

Kasandra Barton senior photographer

Bob Capazzo

digital media digital media manager

Custom solutions for better living

Amber Scinto digital editor

Diane Sembrot

Experience a California Closets system custom designed specifically for you and the way you live. Visit us online or in our showroom today to arrange for a complimentary in-home design consultation.

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GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 72 | no. 8 | august 2019

publisher

Trish Kirsch publisher-at-large

Jonathan W. Moffly

sales & marketing sales management

Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning

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editor’s letter

AUGUST 2019 / CRISTIN MARANDINO

or obvious reasons this issue brought to mind several of the talented, fearless and determined women whose paths I have been lucky enough to cross—many of whom we’ve featured in these pages. They are women who dream big, work (and play) hard, overcome unimaginable obstacles, forge new paths and proactively create their own destinies. Are there challenges, prejudices and inequities along the way? Unfortunately, sometimes, yes. But I think it’s worth celebrating that we live in a corner of the world where women can get a seat at the proverbial power table. This month we celebrate three women who have done just that. In the male-dominated venture capital industry, Tracy Chadwell is not just breaking her own glass ceiling. By investing in femalerun businesses with a focus on technology, she’s helping other women break theirs. Tracy walks us through her process of evaluating potential investment opportunities and what it takes to get her fund’s money (note, it’s not easy). We know you’ll be as intrigued as we were. (“In Good Company,” page 50). A mother of three young children, Layla Lisiewski had put her career on hold—or so she thought. Little did she know that it was her kids who would lead to her next career path. What started as a fun idea to provide information to local moms about activities and services has turned into a

greenwichmag.com

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nationwide network of women supporting women. The Local Moms Network has grown exponentially over the years and it shows no signs of slowing down. The team includes women whose backgrounds are as varied as the communities they serve—law, marketing, finance, oh yeah, and a former missionary in Africa (“Network Star,” page 58). And finally, we chat with the venerable Candace Bushnell (“Meet the Real Carrie Bradshaw,” page 66). The Sex and the City author is behind the cultural phenomenon that took a sometimes-cynical, always-honest and, dare I say, sneakily-endearing look at dating in New York City in the 90s. Get ready to feel old—the series debuted twenty-one years ago. But Candace is far from shelving her Manolos. Her new book, Is There Still Sex in the City?, takes on the question fans have been asking. Think you know the answer? Come and ask her yourself. On Thursday, September 5 from 6-8 p.m., greenwich magazine will host a book signing with Candace at Saks Fifth Avenue 10022-Shoe. (Really, where else could it be?) Go to greenwichmag.com for info and to register. We hope you enjoy meeting these women as much as we did. They are talented, fearless and determined. They are women of power.

WILLIAM TAUFIC

WOMEN’S WORK F


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founder’s letter

AUGUST 2019 / DONNA MOFFLY

Everywhere we took the kids on spring break, I’d drag along my sample bag.

o this is our entrepreneur issue, spotlighting three pretty impressive ladies, and it got me thinking: I was an entrepreneur once—not in their league— but still . . . . It all started in the late sixties when my friend Dinny Robins came home from Bermuda with a hostess apron. It was waist-toankle—perfect for covering the long skirts that had become popular for home entertaining. Pretty for cocktail hour; practical for the kitchen. “We should make these,” said she, who could whip up anything on her sewing machine. “They’d sell like hotcakes.” Hmm. Dinny could sew; and with my type A persona, chances are I could sell. So we decided to give it a shot. Plus, we could call them Din-Dons—for Dinny and Donna (duh), and you donned them for dinner. Formally “Din-Don Originals.” Clever us. Fortunately, our husbands were on board with the idea, though admittedly my Jack more so than her Jim who became less enthusiastic with every boxful of aprons we UPS-ed out of his office on the Post Road. Jack, after all, was raised by a mother greenwichmag.com

14

who was a bit of an entrepreneur herself. Big Audrey was known to buy hemp rugs in Mexico, rum in Jamaica, even box turtles in the Adirondacks—all for quiet resale to her friends. Arriving back at the airport in Philadelphia, she’d tell the customs officers that she owned several houses that needed floor coverings. About the rum: For a number of years after WWI, Jack’s parents had been invited to Jamaica by Uncle Irving (whoever he was); and coming home from Kingston, his mother took to smuggling bottles of rum off the ship under her long skirts by hanging them from a rope tied around her waist. Don’t know how she walked without clanking. Also don’t know about her turtle business. My guess is that she off-loaded them at pet stores. Anyway, Dinny took herself to Karen’s Fabrics in Cos Cob for material to make samples—many in dotted Swiss like a white one with multicolored ribbons; red with red fringe and a big apple applique pocket; yellow with a little green frog and double band of chartreuse grosgrain at the hemline; plus a couple of models in checked gingham. And off we went with our bag of samples to

VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY, GREENWICH, CT

OF ENTERPRISE AND EARNINGS S


PROUD AND HONORED

Congratulations Ellen Mosher R A N K E D I N T H E TO P 1 0 0 R E A L E S TAT E P R O F E S S I O N A L S I N T H E N AT I O N B Y R E A L T R E N D S / WA L L S T R E E T J O U R N A L *

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founder’s letter Sam Robins, owner of Outdoor Traders on East Putnam. God bless him, Sam placed the first order. (Being Jim’s cousin, he almost had to.) Din-Dons retailed for a pricey $16 apiece (we, of course, made less than half)— definitely a boutique item. So we reached out to classy shops that carried unique gifts—by mail to places like the Lake Forest Shop in Illinois and others in Boston, Philadelphia, Camden (Maine), etc. By foot to the Whitney Shop in New Canaan, where Mrs. Stinchfield, known to be quite picky, was smitten with our wares. Even by plane. Everywhere we took the kids on spring break, I’d drag along my sample bag—and it was in Naples, Florida, that I hit real pay dirt. Buzzy Blynn had offered us and our friends Barbara and Ding Koehler the use of his house there— promising it never rained in Naples. Ha! What did he know? It poured for a week. With three little kids in tow, we saw the inside of every movie theater and bowling alley for miles around; and of course, I peddled Din-Dons. So successfully that Mark, Fore and Strike, with its preppy shops from Cape Cod to southern Florida and a sporty airplane emblazoned with its name and “Exclusive Resortwear for Ladies & Gentlemen,” ordered a gross. A what? OMG, that was 144 of our handmade lovingly stitched one-by-one aprons! Panic set in. We needed another sewer, fast. We already had three—my favorite still remembered for her yard overflowing with gnomes, pink flamingoes and glass globes. To this day, when driving past a lawn full of whimsical decorations, daughter Audrey and I will look at each other and say, “Mary Lopiano.” Now Dinny and I had to go to the wholesalers in New York’s garment district for ribbons, ruffles and fabrics. The owners of one of them (I forget the name) were hilarious, warmly welcoming us with “Oh, here come the Ding-Dongs from Riverside!”

My friend Jane Tuck modeling a Din-Don in 1977—a Christmas number with jingle bells hanging from the red and green ribbons

as they unlocked the door. When we asked the cost of a bolt of dotted Swiss, they’d assure us we were getting “40s prices”—i.e., a real bargain. They loved us! Mrs. Javitz, the senator’s wife, not so much. Once when we were there, she knocked on the glass-fronted door and one of them went over and pulled the shade down right in her face. I guess she was always haggling with them over their prices though she could well afford almost anything, and that made them mad. It also made Dinny and me laugh. The fabric was meant to be delivered to my house, except one day the UPS driver tried to take a short cut. He was on his way to the front entrance of the Riverside Yacht Club when he spotted me playing tennis, stopped his truck, unloaded a giant bolt of 100 yards of material, staggered onto the court with it and asked me where my car was. Needless to say, I redirected him to Meadow Road. greenwichmag.com

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But I had my own delivery problems. After packing Din-Dons into giant boxes on my dining room table, I’d arrive at the Robins’ house on Gilliam Lane at 7 a.m. with a shipment that had to go out right away. This interrupted Jim’s morning routine; he became disenchanted with the whole thing, and I ended up buying out my partner. Then I got bored, sold off the inventory and with my $10,000 total profit from ten years in business, took Jack on a cruise of the Greek Islands on The Argonaut, once the world’s biggest private yacht and owned by the Forstmann family of Greenwich. So much for cottage industry. There are probably a few Din-Dons still hanging in my attic, but it’s too hard to pull down the trap door in the ceiling and climb that creaky wooden ladder to check. Let’s just say that it was fun while it lasted, but publishing is a whole lot more interesting. G


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buzz STATUS REPORT

by jill johnson

Deborah Royce

ON THE HUNT

DEBORAH ROYCE ON HER DEBUT

NOVEL, FINDING MRS. FORD

D

LYDIA MACLEAR

eborah Royce has been honing her craft as a writer for decades, patiently awaiting a chapter in her own life that would allow for the silent stretches of time needed to mold words into a gripping tale. Her debut novel, Finding Mrs. Ford, does not disappoint. It begins in Watch Hill, Rhode Island, a setting Deborah and her husband, Chuck Royce, know well; they restored the grand Ocean House hotel there. Greenwich friends will recognize Susan Ford’s widower in the story, Jack. He’s a “not even thinly veiled” Chuck. But just as those readers settle into what feels familiar, Royce grabs them deftly by the napes of their necks and drops them down a rabbit hole into a grimy disco in 1978 Detroit. It won’t be the last intoxicating tumble. Kirkus Reviews describes Finding Mrs. Ford as “a compelling well-written thriller with an effective twisty plot.” Deborah Royce, who played Silver Kane, Erica Kane’s sister, on All My Children (not to mention numerous film and TV roles), has not penned your average suburban soap opera. We sat down with the Greenwich resident to learn about her inspiration, process, and what prepared her to write this book and . . . the next. AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

19


buzz Why did you decide to write a book?

Do you think it’s harder to write a book or screenplay?

I had been flirting with writing a book for a long time. I I think a screenplay is harder; the mechanics are more was an actress in the eighties into the early nineties. Then complicated. You have to format it properly and know how my first husband and I moved to Paris with our two small you want it to come together visually. I’m more at ease children. It was the death knell for my acting career, but writing a novel. an extraordinary opportunity came up: a position in acquisitions for Studio Canal Plus. They needed English Will we see Finding Mrs. Ford on the big screen? language readers. My mom was right when she had said, Hopefully my agent can sell the movie rights. We’ll see! “Go to college!” [Deborah graduated summa cum laude from Lake Erie College in 1980.] Reading Are you working on your next novel? books and screenplays for a living was I’ve written the first draft of a novel called fantastic. When we moved back to the States, I Ruby Falls. The entire book came to me was hired by Miramax as a story editor. That’s in a flash. It’s more straight-up Hitchcock a long way of saying how writing became my suspense. focus. My years at Miramax, working with BOOKS AND MOVIES Every year I re-read top writers—it was like writing school. My The Pursuit of reading load—twelve scripts and a 500-page Love and Love in a novel per weekend—was pretty untenable Cold Climate. They transport me into this with children, so I left after a few years. I other world where started getting more serious about writing and I feel charmed and joined writing groups. When my youngest left amused and released. Maybe The English home, I could carve out the concentrated time Patient and Doctor I needed to work on a book.

A FEW OF HER FAVORITE THINGS

events and people in your own life that you drew from?

Definitely. Susan’s widower, Jack Ford—anyone who knows Chuck Royce will see him. I took great enjoyment turning my real-life husband into a character. In 1979, Annie is a composite of a few young women I knew back then who were beautiful and dazzling and charming and kind of overwhelming. Susan was based more on myself, but a part of you leaks into all of your characters. I grew up in Warren, the suburb of Detroit where Susan lives. My mother moved away, so I didn’t visit for fifteen years. Five or six years ago I went back and was completely amazed by the level of revival happening in the city of Detroit. It’s a complicated city—from racial issues and tensions to the auto industry, which made Detroit but also contributed to its undoing as people got in their cars and moved to the suburbs. It had been declining for fifty years. The revival is very thrilling.

ACTRESS YOU’D CAST AS SUSAN FORD? Julia Roberts as mature Susan and Emma Roberts as young Susan. PLACE TO GET AWAY Watch Hill, Rhode Island and Normandy, France. Finding Mrs. Ford, By Deborah Goodrich Royce, Simon & Schuster, $27

PLACE TO WRITE I write in Greenwich in a conservatory at the far end of our house. One of my dogs comes to sit with me.

CONTRIBUTED

Where did you find inspiration? Were there

Zhivago–also my favorite films. I love the very personal story set against a big sweep of history. I should also put a thriller in there. I’m a big Hitchcock fan.

greenwichmag.com

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BIKE HSS

Saturday, September 28 HSS Westchester BIKE HSS is a one-day cycling event with two route options, 25 miles and 62.5 miles. This event will raise critical funds for patient care, research, and education to enable people around the world to MOVE better.

Register at

BIKEHSS.org 487 East Main Street • Mt. Kisco, NY

800-486-7553 914-666-5802

LN# WC17260-HO5 CT HIC.0560846

E

grand

ntrance We design and build high quality wrought iron gates and railings, wood gates and fencing, automated gate systems, security and entry systems, handcrafted stone walls, pillars, stairs and patios.

see our gallery of pictures at grandentrance.com AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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shop

1 SEE CLEARLY

by mary k ate ho gan

2

1

School supplies stay tidier when they’re not crammed at the bottom of a bag. This clear Scout pencil case with striped trim keeps their gear in check; $20. Splurge, Greenwich

2 SCRATCH THAT Mistakes seem like no big deal when you can wipe them out with this 3D Walking Sloth Eraser; $10. Splurge

3 HELP DESK Homework just got cozier with this snow leopard tablet pillow; $38. Splurge

KIDS’ CORNER

4 STRESS BUSTERS Kids love “squishies.” They’re like stress balls but cuter. These are scented and can clip onto backpacks or lunchboxes; $7.50. Splurge

HEADING BACK TO SCHOOL IN STYLE

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This print is also available in leggings, PJs, blankets.

5 METALLIC CAMO For mini hipsters, $69.50 at Splurge

6 BEE KIND You’ve ditched the plastic shopping bags and straws, so why would you still use plastic bags every day for your kid’s sandwich? Bee’s Wrap reusables are the more eco-friendly choice and a cute addition to any lunch box; $14.85. Originals, Old Greenwich

7 LET’S DO LUNCH Soft lunchbox with a shiny, colorful rainbow bolt; $30. Splurge

8 SHINE ON Silver Kane backpack; $85. Lester’s

9 ON THE SPOT Trendy and colorful leopard with a girly twist, Herschel bag; $60. Lester’s

10 PREP SCHOOL Stripes are always a smart backpack choice; $59.50. Splurge

11 BOLD AND SPORTY

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Boys and girls love these sturdy, solid backpacks, Champion; $75 for large. Lester’s in Rye Brook

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

E

ven though our toes may still be in the sand, parents and kids are starting to think back-to-school. Yes, there are those teacher-mandated lists with the classroom basics, but for kids it’s all about the fun stuff: cool accessories that make the reading, writing and math easier to bear. Sonia Malloy of Splurge in Greenwich stocks all the trends in the kids and tween section of her store. “Camo is still a big trend with colorful versions aimed at younger kids,” says Sonia. “Also for the fall, we’re seeing leopard prints everywhere: on clothes, accessories and more subtle touches on trim.” Other popular patterns right now include lightning bolts, and stars with reverse sequins are still a favorite, too. We’ve gathered some fun finds that may help take the sting out of the back-to-school blues.


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Kid Cool On-The-Go Style Options for toting books and notebooks or sandwiches and snacks that will suit a range of tastes

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go

by kim-marie evans

TAKING FLIGHT

THE LONG-AWAITED TWA HOTEL RECENTLY OPENED ITS DOORS, BUT DOES IT LIVE UP TO ALL THE HYPE?

SAMANTHA LAUREN PHOTOGRAPHIE

T

he opening of the retro chic TWA Hotel at JFK has been more anticipated than a new musical from Lin-Manuel Miranda. Media coverage was exuberant leading up to the recent soft open. Guests can finally enjoy a “Come Fly With Me” cocktail (complete with swizzle stick) in the Sunken Lounge, where similarly boisterous crowds awaited the Beatles’ arrival in 1965. The project has been the dream of politicians, developers and historians alike. When a hotel is being called “sexy” and “a piece of mid-century magic,” it can be hard to measure up. I recently spent a night in a runway-view room, taught my son to dial a ten-cent pay phone, and did a thorough review of the food and drink. If you’re having Kodachrome fantasies of white-gloved staff whisking away your bags while simultaneously mixing you a swell martini, you’re not alone. No one could be faulted for expecting room service and a concierge at a hotel described as both boutique (it’s not,

Kim-Marie fully immerses herself in the 1960s vibe.

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At the Greenwich Sentinel we have great respect for Greenwich Magazine. Most of us have been reading it, and looking for our photos in it, since we were in our twenties. Our publications share similar missions, to celebrate Greenwich. We know that our hometown is unique and wonderful. Yet, even here, we see how stressful, full lives can overwhelm the calmest disposition. No one wants to be judged for their worst moments, so this February let’s show each other and the world a little extra warmth and remind everyone why Greenwich and our residents are so special. February is home to Valentine’s Day (14) and Random Acts of Kindness Day (17). In this spirit, here are our anonymous friend’s updated Acts of Kindness.

27 ACTS of KINDNESS Help others to be the hero of their own story. Ask the name of your mail carrier, coffee server, waitress/waiter, valet attendant, the person at the front desk, etc. and use their name. Never, ever use the phrase, do you know who I am? Send a hand written thank you note. Put your phone away and be an active listener. When you think a nice thing about someone, say it out loud. Email or write to a former teacher who made a difference in your life. Tell your child that you really like spending time with them (and be prepared to answer when they ask why). Avoid interrupting others when they are speaking. Refrain from honking your horn unless it is a safety issue. Send flowers. Support and cheer for our local everything: retailers, scouts, paper, magazine, schools, teams, lemonade stands, and charities. It matters. Use those email & social media muscles to be nice: send messages of gratitude and use that LIKE button. Be excited for other people’s successes ... out loud. Be the hero of your story. Always hold the door or elevator for the next person. Each month pick up one extra of everything when you grocery shop and drop it off at Neighbor to Neighbor. Ask how can I help? Laugh more. Laugh louder. Each night fall asleep thinking about the best thing that happened that day. Purchase extra dog or cat food and drop it off at the animal control center on North Street with some old tennis balls. Say please, thank you, and you’re welcome. Smile... great! Now smile at someone while making eye contact. Let the person in line behind you go ahead of you if they are in a hurry or with children or just have a few items. When you’re ready to unload your temper on someone, especially in the service industry (like baristas and cashiers), say a prayer for them instead. If you have time, let the other driver have that parking space ... even on Greenwich Avenue. If you can, say yes.

#GreenwichPride


go there are 512 rooms) and fullservice. There’s no bell staff to help at arrival, and the front desk was lightly staffed during my stay. Guests check themselves in on a touchpad and even make their own keys, but the gentleman behind the desk was more than happy to stow my luggage until my room was ready. What the hotel lacks in hightouch service, it more than makes up for in its near perfect re-creation of the golden age of travel. In the guest rooms you can recline in authentic Eames chairs while making free international calls on a vintage rotary phone. Original furniture from Saarinen, Mies van der Rohe and others can be found throughout the hotel as well as wonderfully kitschy touches like LIFE magazines from the 1960s. The iconic flight tubes featured in the movie Catch Me if You Can have been re-created and allow you to go directly from the hotel into JetBlue’s Terminal. »

PRO TIP

The only tube open connects the hotel to JetBlue Terminal 5. Check the map, and if you’re departing from any other terminal, you'll have to take AirTran. We learned this the hard way (and missed our flight, which seems impossible when you wake up with a view of the airport).

SAMANTHA LAUREN PHOTOGRAPHIE

“a piece of mid-century magic”

greenwichmag.com

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SPECIAL MEMORIES LAST FOREVER WE HELP create THEM C O N NECTICUT: 203.324.6222

• LONG ISLAND:

631. 643. 2848

SEE YOUR WEDDING Featured in

Download a wedding submission form at greenwichmag.com or email our weddings editor Ali Gray at Ali.Gray@moffly.com

AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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• STAMFORDT EN T .C O M


go WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

an epic photo in one of the original pilots’ seats. She’s parked just behind the hotel and accessed by the original push up staircase. There’s a live radio feed from one of JFK’s air traffic control frequencies.

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Book a runway-view room; nothing compares to watching planes pull up to the foot of your bed at night. You’ll never hear the engines though, the windows are the secondthickest glass walls in the world (second to the U.S. Embassy in London).

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Forget SoHo House. The infinity edge pool and observation deck overlook some of JFK’s busiest runways including the Bay Runway, which once served as the backup landing strip for the Space Shuttle. Come winter, the pool will be heated to 100 degrees, turning it into a “pool-cuzzi.”

“...recline in authentic Eames chairs while making free international calls on a vintage rotary phone.”

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Just need a place to nap when your flight is delayed? Partial and fullday stays are offered from $149. If you prefer to work out your anger over being stuck at the airport, snag a pass to the fitness center for just $25.

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Reservations are needed to eat at the Jean-Georges Paris Café or to grab a cocktail inside the Connie, a restored sixty-year-old airplane known for breaking the transcontinental speed record. It’s the ultimate spot to snap

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Hotel guests don't need to make a reservation to dine at The Pool Bar (but they’re recommended). Non-hotel guests can make reservations to order refreshments and swim in the pool between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. This is the best reason to pack a swimsuit in your carry-on—should your flight be delayed, console yourself poolside with a cocktail. The Pool Bar serves food from a full kitchen and cocktails including The Runway (a martini served with a flight wings pin) and the Summertime Lemonade (vodka, lemonade and mint). The Pool Bar also hosts private events.

The take away? I’d give it a few months to work out growing pains; not all the eateries are open and details like wastebaskets in guest rooms were overlooked in the original opening. Unless they change the business model, this is a fun and fabulous hotel—just not a luxury one. greenwichmag.com

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RUNWAY PHOTO BY ©THREE MARKS LLC; ROTARY PHONE AND BOTTOM PHOTO BY EMILY GILBERT

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Though the rooms are small, the beds are fabulously plush and comfortable. You won’t find a stock coffee machine, but each room features a martini bar custom built from walnut, glass, mirrors and brushed brass and is stocked with Moët & Chandon Imperial Brut Champagne, Hennessy V.S.O.P Privilège Cognac, and the Belvedere Martini with Belvedere Vodka. A runway-view room starts at around $300 per night.


We’ll help make sure you don’t miss a moment.

SHORT-TERM REHABILITATION

CALL : 203-618-4232 NATHANIELWITHERELL .ORG

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Moffly Media is one of the leading providers of professional event photography and marketing services in Fairfield County. We capture compelling, high-quality images of individuals and groups at meaningful events. With our wide range of capabilities, Moffly will customize a marketing program that’s just right for you.

LEARN MORE! Contact KATHLEEN GODBOLD at Kathleen.Godbold@moffly.com or 203.571.1654

AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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do by beth c o oney fitzpatrick

THE GREENWICH BRAND GREENWICH GETS ITS OWN MARKETING CAMPAIGN

Most people who settle here already know Greenwich is special. Why did you feel there was a need to remind people it’s a great place?

schools, so there’s a lot of choice. We’re fiscally conservative, so we’ve got low [property] taxes. And we’re close to New York.

I’ve lived and worked in every part of Greenwich and have been selling real estate here, in addition to being a developer, for many years. Obviously, I think Greenwich is a wonderful community, but we live in a world now where the media landscape has changed. Negative press sells. And if Greenwich is portrayed negatively, there really isn’t a counterpoint for that. Yet there’s an incorrect stereotype out there and a way the media likes to portray Greenwich that can, on occasion, be quite negative. We wanted to be a voice, a strong voice, for the many wonderful attributes this town has. We didn’t want to take any of the good things happening in town for granted. The whole goal of Think Greenwich is to celebrate and protect and promote Greenwich.

What’s been the biggest success of Think Greenwich so far?

What do you consider Greenwich’s best attribute?

We created a survey for people coming here to live or do business, and the No. 1 reason they give for doing so is work/ life balance. This is truly a town where you can go to the office, put in a full day’s work and then hop off to your kid’s soccer practice. It’s a great reason to set up a company here or buy a house here or do both. This also is not the sleepy, quiet town [it once was]. There’s so much culture, recreation, great restaurants, things to do. And that’s part of what we’re talking about. We’ve got great public and private

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wo years ago Greenwich realtor SABINE SCHOENBERG helped launch THINK GREENWICH, a nonprofit dedicated to building the town brand. Since its inception the organization has hired public relations firms to pitch its zip codes; launched the Experience Greenwich event week last fall; and played a supporting role promoting the successful Greenwich Economic Forum, a gathering of global finance leaders held last November. Since Think Greenwich is committed to selling the town as a great place to live, work and play, we recently chatted with Schoenberg—who along with Jane Owen Brash serves as the organization’s copresident— about her passion for all things Greenwich.

greenwichmag.com

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We’ve had a really great track record of media placement. It’s not easy to sell a positive story these days, so we’re proud of that. We’ve had placements in Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal, The Telegraph. We’re building on that momentum of getting the story out there. We’re a nonprofit and 100 percent of what we raise goes to pay our media agency. The rest of the work is done by volunteers. And since we literally started with a sheet of paper, that feels like an accomplishment. I’d also like to point out that from the very beginning, we’ve had the support of First Selectman Peter Tesei. The idea for this really started as a conversation with his Economic Advisory Committee. You introduce a lot of newcomers to Greenwich. What do you tell them is its best kept secret?

You can really live any life you want here. If you want to really be involved in the community, that’s possible. If you want extreme privacy, that’s possible, too. Also, I don’t think Greenwich gets the credit it deserves for its diversity. Go for a walk at Tod’s Point and just listen to the languages being spoken. People settle here from all over the world What’s your favorite spot in town?

It has to be Tod’s Point. I met my second husband there when I was Rollerblading.

CONTRIBUTED

Sabine Schoenberg


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RideCloserToFree.org


eat by mary k ate ho gan

GOOD LORD!

COURTESY OF LORD OF THE PIES

PERHAPS WITH SOME DIVINE INTERVENTION, THE PERFECT FOOD JUST GOT EVEN MORE PERFECT

Beast of Burden: NYC pizza sauce, pepperoni, pinched sausage, ricotta, mozzarella greenwichmag.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PIT MASTER PIZZA, COURTESY OF LORD OF THE PIES; NEON PIZZA SIGN , ART WALL, POPEYE PIZZA AND PIZZA SIGN BY GARVIN BURKE; PIZZA IN THE MAKING, COURTESY OF LORD OF THE PIES

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n Connecticut we’re no strangers to awardwinning pizza. But the newest pizza place in town, aptly named Lord of the Pies, is making its mark by importing pie from the Midwest. The ‘lord’ in question, Bruno DiFabio, is, in fact, a six-time world pizza-making champion, and he’s introducing many people in our area to a unique style of pie from Detroit. What’s the buzz about? The crust on these brick-oven-fired slices looks thick, but it’s among the most light and airy you’ll ever taste. I confess that I often leave behind crescent moons of ordinary crust on my plate, but I found myself devouring every bite of the special Detroit-style slice of Red Top Roni (pepperoni) pie. The dough is three days in the making, using a special fermentation process that ultimately renders the crust much easier to digest, making it suitable for many who are gluten-free. Bruno’s menu also features the more familiar New York-style pizza, which also has a fairly light and crispy crust and creative blends of toppings such as the very tasty Chickahominy pie with hot salami, olives, tomatoes, burrata and other cheeses or classic Grandma’s with tomato, basil, garlic and fresh mozzarella. Salads, pastas, sandwiches, hearty strombolis (pizza rolls) and a few entrees such as chicken parm, shrimp risotto and mac ‘n’ cheese are also on the menu.

Pitt Master

PIES TO TRY

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NUTS & BOLTS The Detroit pie with hot salami, pepperoni, tomatoes, caramelized onion, green cocktail olives, pinched sausage and red sauce

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PITT MASTER New York gastro style with pulled pork, bacon, spring onion, mozzarella, homemade BBQ sauce and pickled red onion

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SICILIAN SLICE A classic thick, yet light and airy crust, made with double-fermented dough, NYC pizza sauce and whole milk mozzarella

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VEGGIE FIX A lower-carb alternative, the tasty Cauliflower Power pizza— house-made cauliflower crust topped with sundried tomato, pesto, tofu ricotta, arugula and mozzarella

PIZZA PARTY! You can bring Detroit to your backyard with Lord of the Pies’ mobile brick-oven truck, which will fire up custom pies for you and your guests.

AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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LORD OF THE PIES 1 Grigg Street; 203-542-5292; lotpgreenwich.com

HOURS Mon.–Thurs.: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Fri. & Sat.: 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Sun.: 12 p.m.–9 p.m.

Popeye: fresh spinach, garlic, ricotta, mozzarella


FAST & FRESH ANOTHER HEALTHY-ON-THE-GO EATERY HITS THE AVENUE

Buddha’s satay bowl

bowled over

MOST POPULAR ORDERS

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Pangoa bowl (left) with a Tex-Mex blend of brown rice, avocado, cheddar, black beans, tomatoes, corn and cilantro

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The buffalo salad with For speedier service—it tends to get crowded at f you’re craving something loaded with veggies, Freshii romaine, veggies, cherry lunchtime—get the app and order ahead; over time you’ll is the latest healthy-quick-fix franchise to join a growing tomatoes, blue cheese, receive bonus juices, smoothies and other freebies. You category in town—fast food for millennials. Whether ranch and buffalo sauce can create a custom salad and the app will total the calories you’re in the mood for a salad, wrap, bowl, soup, burrito for you. We liked the Asian-inspired Buddha’s satay bowl or you’d rather drink your produce in a juice or smoothie, (310 calories, plus 190 for the sauce) with broccoli, carrots, cabbage Freshii has you covered. Major variety makes this a desirable menu, and rice noodles in a peanut sauce that’s mild in spite of the “spicy” everything from the Metaboost salad packed with greens and other description. Kid-sized options are available, too, with a menu of quesaveggies to heartier fare like the Tex-Mex burrito. To any bowl, salad or dillas, soups, salads and mini strawberry-banana smoothies. The friendly wrap, you can add chicken and steak or pick tofu or falafel for a vegetable servers handed us a complimentary two-pack of enerjii bites (a yummy protein. All calories are listed for those counting; to drill down on nutriblend of peanut butter, oats, honey, coconut and chocolate chips) as we tional info, there’s an online guide that notes details such as grams of fat G were leaving. 375 Greenwich Avenue, 203-413-1299; freshii.com or carbs and milligrams of sodium for every item.

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CONTRIBUTED

I

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Attention Best of Winners! M O F F LY M E D I A

GOLD COAST C O N N E C T I C U T • 2019           

     

You asked for it and we listened! We received hundreds of requests on how you can get additional marketing materials and signs to announce YOUR BEST OF WIN! We’re proud to announce Moffly Media’s official Best Of The Gold Coast & Best Of Town ONLINE STORE!

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people&PLACES by alison nichols gr ay

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE, MELANI LUST 1

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GREENWICH UNITED WAY / Greenwich Country Club

Food for Thought

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he Greenwich United Way recently celebrated its fourteenth annual Sole Sisters luncheon at Greenwich Country Club. Lauren Bush Lauren, CEO and cofounder of FEED Projects delivered the keynote speech. The afternoon included a bit of shopping, a lovely lunch and Lauren’s inspiring talk about the importance of philanthropy. greenwichunitedway.org » 1 Nancy Cook, Karen Cohen, Jill Weiner, Melanie Milgram, Toni Subramaniam, Stefanie Offit, Liz Sandler, Eileen Kim 2 Monique de Boer, Kathleen Godbold 3 Kelly Steuerer, Brooke Shepard, Kristen Forlini, Gina Salese-Cortese 4 Kylie Woolf, Meredith Miller, Kalie Zagger, Courtney Montgomery 5 Janine Kennedy, Icy Frantz 6 Lauren Bush Lauren, Wendy Stapleton AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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people GREENWICH UNITED WAY Greenwich Country Club 1

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1 Alison Miller, Lucy Store, Jocelyn Gjuraj 2 Benjamin Lee, Matthew Blumenthal 3 Vinnie Fusco, Valerie Lazzari, Eric Hanson, Keven Campos 4 Richard Cameron, Polly Lynch, Jimmy Field, James Finn, Reda Supe 5 Cristina Young, Carol Reny, Christine Deb, Tricia Gallagher 6 Alex, Carrie and Samantha Stevelman, Sen. Richard Blumenthal 7 Gina Dunn, Stephen Arena, Rose Gargone 8 Stephen and Morgan Napier 9 Brian and Tara Rozen, Celeste Marsh, Natalie Falcon, Rob Marsh, Andrew Falcon

INSPIRICA / Palace Theatre

Home Sweet Home

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upporters of Inspirica decked themselves out in cocktail attire and headed to the Palace Theatre stage for Spring Soiree, the Stamford-based nonprofit’s annual benefit. There, they helped support Inspirica’s mission to break the cycle of homelessness by helping people achieve—and maintain—permanent housing and stability in their lives. Guests enjoyed delicious bites by Abigail Kirsch, an open bar, a wine raffle, a giving tree, a silent auction and a video presentation that illustrated the impact of the support of the patrons who attended. inspiricact.org greenwichmag.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/JENNA BASCOM PHOTOGRAPHY

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END ALLERGIES TOGETHER / Delamar Hotel

1 Andy and Lauren Goldberg, Greg and Elise Bates, Tom and Kim Hall 2 Tom Hainey, Kate Burkhardt, Evelyn Stephens 3 Ellen and Bill Blair 4 Abbe and Greg Large 5 Rubin PorrasSanchez, Erin Hunt, Dina Hawthorne, Thomas Silvera 6 Ellen and Kyle Huelitz 7 Susheila Starr, Sarah Dolder, York Starr, Adam Dolder, Will Holligan 8 Tim and Cindy Olsen 9 Ben and Hillary Carter 10 Kristin Lemkeu, Natalie Silva, Gabriella and Cindy Fasolino 11 Mary Thornton, Kim Cooper 12 Dave Smith, Brian and Talli Connell, Leigh Smith 13 Ben and Ellen-Jane Moss, Cliff Marks

Safe & Sound

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nd Allergies Together (E.A.T.), an organization that funds research to help solve the growing food allergy epidemic, raised more than $500,000 at its annual event at the Delamar Hotel in Greenwich. More than 300 people attended the event, which included cocktails on the terrace, dinner and a spirited live auction. The evening honored Cliff Marks, president and interim CEO of National CineMedia, for his extraordinary efforts in helping E.A.T. further its mission to end food allergies. endallergiestogether.com Âť

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ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE OF GREENWICH / Greenwich Arts Council

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French Film Fanatics

1 Nathan Ambrosioni, Guilhem Caillard, Geneviève Dulude-De Celles, Jean-Carl Boucher 2 Festival poster 3 David and Karen Robbins, Lynny and Ellery Smith 4 Annie Bouchet, Robert and Salla Alfieri 5 The Greenwich Arts Council 6 Renee Katchem, Claudine Baker 7 Bianka and David Cox 8 Jo Kroeker 9 Mary Balay, Emilie Roy 10 Darby and Allan Cartun 11 Romain Poirot, Sylvie Sergent 12 Michael Ruotolo, Ingrid Jean-Baptiste

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ocus on French Cinema 2019, the fifteenth annual festival of Francophone cinema presented by the Alliance Française of Greenwich, welcomed 6,000 cinephiles to the five-day festival in Greenwich, Stamford and Manhattan this spring. The opening night gala, sponsored by the Greenwich Arts Council, featured French cuisine by Les Maîtres Cuisiniers de France and L'Académie Culinary de France. The weekend highlighted works by Nathan Ambrosioni, Jean-Carl Boucher, Romane Bohringer, Guilhem Caillard, Geneviève Dulude-De Celles, Sophie Pioccioto and Philippe Rebbot. focusonfrenchcinema.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/ DANIELLE ROBINSON CALLOWAY

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1 Tracy Yort, Mary Melvin, Felicity Kostakis, Morgan Glasebrook, Simon McIntire 2 The fashion show 3 Julia Nusseibeh, Michael Kors, Wendy Stapleton 4 Michael Kors, Alexandra Hochman, Erica Coblenz 5 Julia Nusseibeh, Cricket Lockhart, Betset Ruprecht, Felicity Kostakis, Kamie Lightburn

BRUCE MUSEUM & MICHAEL KORS / Michael Kors on Madison Avenue

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ruce Museum supporters Felicity Kostakis and Kamie Lightburn recently hosted a group of twenty fashionista friends and fellow museum members from Greenwich for a private shopping experience at the Michael Kors store in Manhattan. The chic crowd enjoyed an exclusive preview of the Resort 2019 collection and received shopping advice from Michael Kors, who generously donated a percentage of the day’s purchases to help fund the museum’s exhibitions and educational programs. brucemuseum.org » AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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1 Mandy Murphy, Sandra Caruso, Jill Schecter, Kathy Georgas, Eleanor Kaplan, Connie Anne Phillips, Kathleen O’Connor 2 Gretchen Jelineck, Pepper Anderson, Karen Morstad 3 Stephanie Dunn Ashley, Chief James Heavey 4 Courtney Combe, Judith Wertheimer, Gretchen Bylow 5 Dee Mayberry, Mary Jeffery 6 Abbie Idavoy, Mary Lee Kiernan 7 Debra O’Shea, Izabela O’Brien 8 Sue Bodson, Stephanie Cowie, Alessandra Messineo Long 9 Tenley Reed, Lauren Walsh 10 Dr. Stacy Zarakiotis, Pilar Ramos 11 Sabrina Forsythe, Avril Graham, Tina Pray, Scott Mitchell greenwichmag.com

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YWCA GREENWICH / Belle Haven Club

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very year the Old Bags Luncheon at the Belle Haven Club is a sold-out showstopper of an afternoon. The food, view, auction items and people-watching is off the charts. Established in 2006, the Old Bags Luncheon features silent and live auctions of new handbags, designer bags, vintage bags, golf bags and pet carriers donated by designers, retailers and individuals. Proceeds from the afternoon fund the YWCA domestic abuse services. ywcagreenwich.org

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/BOB CAPAZZO

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12 Judith Wertheimner, Officer Mike Rooney 13 Shannon Green, Allie Marks, Nina Bliley, Natalie Stein, Melissa Levin 14 Rachel Kelly, Dana Charette, Stacy Burton 15 Eva Maria Janerus, Stephanie Schnabel 16 Marilyn Timbers, Alexandra DeBourcy 17 Ursula Lyon, Dr. Kim Nichols, Monica Chimera 18 Tracy Holton with one of Greenwich’s finest 19 Giovanna Miller, Mary Young 20 Sandra Caruso, Clare Butler, Connie Anne Phillips, Nozomi Levine 21 Katie Fong Biglin, Joselynn Chua 22 Emma Pennington, Alease Fisher Tallman 23 Dr. Elsa Raskin, Eunice Burnett 24 Dr. Emily Gabeler, Dr. Rose Ryan, Dr. Tiffany Christensen  AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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bilis, a local organization that provides services for individuals with special needs and their families, recently held its annual Spring for Abilis gala at the Woodway Country Club in Darien. Guests enjoyed a champagne reception, cocktails, dinner and dancing, as well as silent and live auctions. The evening raised funds that will help Abilis support more than 700 individuals of all ages with special needs. The gala cochairs were Bibi Clarke, Daniella Mini and Fran Cohen. abilis.us G greenwichmag.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/JC MARTIN

1 Chris and Karina Miller 2 Becca McGovern, Marty Clarke Jr. 3 Glenn and Elayne Demby 4 Jennifer Barry and Melissa Norrgard 5 Isabella Viola, Lucas Viola, Eva Poon 6 A giving tree 7 Amy Montimurro and Adriana Ospina 8 Marc Fox and Patte Nusbaum 9 Gerry and Heather Friel 10 Jenny San Jose and Don San Jose 11 Howard and Debbie Levy 12 Daniella Mini, Fran Cohen, Bibi Clarke


Catherine Stahl On The Way To The Parade

2020

PHOTO CONTEST ENTER TODAY!

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS MUST BE TAKEN IN GREENWICH

DEADLINE: MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

WINNING PHOTOGRAPHS WILL BE FEATURED IN THE JANUARY ISSUE

TO DOWNLOAD MORE ENTRY FORMS GO TO GREENWICHMAG.COM


Melissa McCann Santangelo The Guitarist

Elizabeth Colligan Fog Rolls In

Zada Brown Hawkeye

HERE’S THE PICTURE This is your chance to capture the spirit and vibe of Greenwich on film. The photogenic faces, facets and façades of our town are abundant. Whether you are a serious amateur photographer, a weekend shutterbug or a beginner with a good eye, show us your stuff. WHAT TO FOCUS ON The theme is the People, Places and Animals of Greenwich, with all shots taken in Greenwich. Set your sights on Greenwich people at work, at play, young, old and in-between. Snap that adorable pet doing something cute. Or take pictures of identifiable Greenwich places, from woods to water. Look for those uncommon sites; catch that different perspective. We want to see the town through your viewfinder—who or what you think best exemplifies the character and spirit of Greenwich. If animals are featured in the photo, please identify their owners or the location where they were photographed. IT’S A SNAP TO ENTER > Amateur photographers only > No frames or glass

> Each photograph must have a separate entry form attached to the back of the picture

> Minimum size 5" x 7" • Maximum size 8" x 10"

> Photos will not be returned

> To download more entry forms, go to Greenwichmag.com

> DEADLINE: MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

WE’LL BE THE JUDGE OF THAT A team of impartial judges will choose the winning photographs based on 1. Composition 2. Clarity 3. Creative Concept DON’T FORGET Mail or deliver to: GREENWICH magazine, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. Attn: Ali Gray A completed entry form must be attached to each picture. GREENWICH magazine assumes publication rights for winning photographs. GREENWICH magazine employees are not eligible to enter. Professional photographers are also not eligible.

Entry Form GREENWICH MAGAZINE’S 2020 PHOTO CONTEST please PRINT clearly NAME ADDRESS

CITY

PHONE

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ANIMALS (ALL PHOTOS MUST BE TAKEN IN GREENWICH)

IF STUDENT ENTRY, PLEASE LIST SCHOOL TITLE OF PHOTO SHOT LOCATION/DESCRIPTION

Entries must be received by MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 Mail or deliver to: GREENWICH magazine, 205 Main Street, Westport, CT 06880. Attn: Ali Gray


vows by alison nichols gr ay

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aura and Frank’s love story began the first day they met and “saw the light.” After moving to Connecticut to open a workout studio, a mutual friend put Laura in contact with Frank, who was an electrician, to help with the buildout. The three meet up for lunch and a trip to the mall to get acquainted. While browsing, Laura noticed black track-lighting that she thought would be perfect for her studio. Frank also noticed lighting. The two locked eyes, shared a laugh and their future was bright from then on. After a few years of dating, Frank proposed. The grooms uncle, Monsignor Sabia officiated at the ceremony at St. Catherine of Siena in Riverside, and the reception followed at the Belle Haven Club. It was an eventful day to say the least. After having a bad reaction to the raw bar during the cocktail hour, Frank quickly discovered that he has a shellfish allergy. His face swelled up, and the reception was delayed until the Benadryl kicked in and the EMTs gave him the go-ahead. The bride, daughter of Michael and Audrey Laboissonniere of Rhode Island, graduated from Coventry High School, the University of Tampa and the University of South Florida. Laura is the owner of Club Sweat in Greenwich. The groom, son of Salvatore and Elizabeth Sabia of Greenwich, graduated from Greenwich High School and the University of Connecticut. Frank is the manager for Sal Sabia Electric in Greenwich and co-owner of Club Sweat in Greenwich. The two honeymooned in Italy (where they did not eat shellfish). They call Greenwich home. G

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1 The newlyweds 2 Bride with her sister, Amy Sousa 3 Salvatore Sabia Jr., James Sabia, James Sabia Jr., groom Frank Sabia and best man Adam Roina 4 Flower girl Allison Sousa with bridesmaid Mary Beth Hargrove 5 Meghan Vitti, Nicole Buyskes, Kristina Luciani, the bride, Nicole Gillon, Chelsea Eaton, Jessica Gisondi and Emily Phillips 6 Audrey and Michael Laboissonniere 7 Guests playing cornhole 8 The groom and his mother, Elizabeth Sabia 9 Matthew Yardis and Salvatore Sabia, father of the groom AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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Determined to promote women whenever possible, Tracy chose to wear a dress designed by Greenwich native Nora Gardner. The premise of Nora’s brand is to help women dress for the C-Suite.


TRACY KILLOREN CHADWELL

is investing in the innovative future— and the future is decidedly female

IN G D COMPANY by timothy dumas

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| phot o gr aphy by kyle norton


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ast year, the investing savant Tracy Killoren Chadwell launched a techoriented, women-focused venture capital fund in Greenwich and gave it a cryptic name: 1843 Capital. What does the name signify? To find out, we must travel to nineteenth century London and peek in at the marriage of Annabella Milbanke, a wealthy, devout woman of supreme intellect, and Lord Byron, the great Romantic poet and incorrigible playboy who a paramour described as “mad, bad, and dangerous to know.” The union was predictably turbulent. The straightlaced Annabella excelled at math, which, according to one biographer, served as “a reliable refuge from emotion.” Lord Byron was emotion incarnate. Also, he really was bad and drawn to women who could be pretty bad themselves. Before long, Annabella seems to have confirmed the most salacious rumor about her husband: He was sleeping with his half-sister. Annabella’s dreadful discovery occurred around the time she and Byron conceived their only child together, a daughter they would name Ada. Five weeks after Ada was born, mother and child fled to her family’s country estate up in Yorkshire. Though Byron clearly loved Ada— “sole daughter of my house and of my heart”— he left England under a cloud of scandal, and never saw Ada again during the remaining eight years of his life. (He died of sepsis in Greece in 1824.) Even with Byron out of the picture, though, Annabella worried that his influence— his “wild” Byronic blood—would prove stronger than her own, and so steered Ada resolutely away from all things romantic and poetic. “She only allowed her to study the STEM technologies, science and math,” Chadwell says during a break at her office, in a mansard-roofed Victorian on Mason Street. “And Ada found the beauty in numbers.” Indeed, she proved more adept at math than her mother; so adept, in fact, that she could project numbers into the realm of theory, of far-reaching vision—a realm she called, in spite of her mother, “poetical science.” Today we know Ada Lovelace (her married name) for a treatise called Notes, in which she

interprets an invention by her friend the renowned scientist Charles Babbage. Babbage had designed—but not built—what he called the “Analytical Engine,” a jumble of spools, sprockets and gears that would have performed remarkably advanced computations. While Babbage himself viewed the machine as merely a mechanical computer—important enough, given the enormous labor-saving potential—Ada saw a world of applications beyond numbers. She observed that because the engine would be programmed with punch cards in the manner of the Jacquard loom, which enabled the mechanical production of tapestries, the Analytical Engine’s potential was virtually limitless: “It can do whatever we know how to order it to perform.” She observed that “the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity.” That is, Ada Lovelace envisioned the computer about a century before it came to exist in even rudimentary form. What’s more, in the final section of Notes, she composed an algorithm that would enable the Analytical Engine to generate an intricate pattern of numbers—an algorithm widely considered the first published computer program. “Ada wrote her treatise in 1843,” Chadwell says. “Which is why we named our firm 1843— as a nod to the fact that women have been in technology for a really long time.”

BY THE NUMBERS

Tracy Chadwell might remind one a little of Ada Lovelace. Chadwell’s general partner at 1843 Capital, Alison Andrews Reyes, notes that while Chadwell possesses the sunny, outgoing nature one would want in a business leader, it’s only part of the story: “Underneath all of that is a really strong, intense and driven analytical mind. I find her to be remarkably astute.” As a child, Chadwell too had a natural affinity for numbers, and learned to code BASIC at the age of twelve. Growing up in Rockford, Illinois, a small city northwest of Chicago, she was her family’s intuitive engineer, its fixer of

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broken things. “I wanted to go to MIT, but my mom said, ‘You can’t go to MIT because you won’t find anybody to marry there—there are no cute boys.’” She lets out a not altogether unembarrassed laugh. “I was fifteen years old! I didn’t know better.” Investing? When Chadwell was growing up in the seventies and eighties, investing was still very much the wing-tipped domain of white males. A notable exception, Geraldine Weiss, was careful to sign her influential newsletter “G. Weiss” to obscure her gender. Another exception was the late Muriel Siebert, the first woman to buy a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, whose drive and toughness are Wall Street legend: “I fought like a son-of-a-bitch to get ahead,” she’d say. “I’m still fighting like a son-of-a-bitch.” But in the then-new field of venture capital, which focuses on getting innovative companies off the ground, there were no women role models at all. Tracy’s parents, Lesley and Thomas Killoren, despite throwing a damper on MIT, did encourage her professional ambitions. Lesley herself was a teacher and then an interior decorator, and Tom had a decades-long law practice specializing in trusts and estates. Both parents envisioned their bright, attractive, warmly approachable daughter following in Tom’s footsteps, perhaps even joining him at the firm in Rockford. “I was the dutiful daughter and attended law school at my parents’ behest,” Chadwell says now. “But I don’t think law was meant for me.” She went to Trinity College—her introduction to Connecticut—then to Loyola Chicago School of Law, where she gravitated to the business-y courses: “International tax was my favorite class. And business finance.” Emerging into a weak economy in 1992, Tracy found herself unable to catch on with a law firm. But she did find work at a new merchant banking firm in Chicago—as a receptionist. Always a scrappy dealmaker, she proposed doing the receptionist job for six months, at the end of which the bank would let her in on the dealmaking. “It was a way in the door,” she says. Herein lies a lesson Chadwell hopes young


“Last year I looked at over six hundred opportunities to invest, and we made four investments on behalf of the fund.�


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1 Tracy on ABC news with Bill Ritter 2 Testifying on strengthening the entrepreneur ecosystem for women before the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship 3 Judging a startup pitch competition in Stamford

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Why should this be the case? One reason is that females broaden the pool of knowledge and experience (as does diversity in general). Women, for example, are the more practiced consumers: “Eighty-five percent of all consumer decisions are made by women, so if you don’t have a woman sitting at the table…” Chadwell says, not needing to complete the thought. (Another reason, more theoretical, is that women tend to be better at collaboration.) And yet female founders receive less than 3 percent of total venture capital dollars. Even a resounding success like Beautycounter had trouble securing VC dollars until it reached the absurdly high bar of twenty million in revenue—a hapless reality of operating in a largely male VC ecosystem. “So,” Chadwell says, “I started to focus my investing on trying to find some of the best women founders that I could.”

LET’S MAKE A DEAL

Chadwell formed 1843 Capital to make the most of her new strategy—to play in a bigger league than she could on her own, using only her own money. “In this business, it’s tougher to have a voice if you don’t have more capital at the table,” she explains. Alison Andrews Reyes, who has five tech startups under her belt (and an engineering degree from Dartmouth), soon joined 1843 as general partner. Reyes notes that female-founded companies tend to have lower investment “entry points”—that is, to be undervalued. “As a [company] founder, that would have struck me as being really aggravating— but as an investor, it spells an opportunity.” 1843 then took on a CFO, Gwen Weiss, a seasoned pro formerly of Bedford Funding and Oak Investment Partners. Weiss had been looking to be part of an 1843-style mission: “When I left my last firm, it was my intention to help support women-owned businesses, because I noticed they often lacked the access to expertise and capital available to ‘traditional’ venturebacked companies,” she says. Providentially, she ran across a brief interview with Chadwell in this magazine and decided to introduce herself. Now,

CONTRIBUTED

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people will heed: Get yourself into your desired field by any means you can; even do the work for free, if you can afford to, in order to prove your worth. It paid off for Tracy. After a couple of years, she was helping buy office buildings for Chicago billionaire Samuel Zell. Soon after that, she was in the thick of venture capital, first in San Francisco, then in New York. But in 2003, at the age of thirty-seven, Tracy bowed out of the game. She was at Baker Capital, a billion-dollar growth fund that invested in digital tech and communications firms; and she was one of only about five women partners in New York-based funds of similar size. Even so, it seemed like a good time to leave, with the markets again in turmoil and two very young boys to raise and enjoy. (Chadwell lives in Belle Haven with her husband, Philip, who is also in finance, and their now-teenage sons, Philip Jr. and John.) But the urge to invest could not be laid away. “I was loving my life with my family, but looking for maybe a little bit more as I was driving the kids back and forth to school and signing them up for camps. I like to say I failed retirement. So I started to do what I loved again.” Eventually, with her own money, Chadwell made investments in ten companies, and today those investments are running a superb 40 percent internal rate of return. Two of them, the anti-toxin cosmetics company Beautycounter and the circuit board innovator Tempo Automation, proved to be “home runs” in VC parlance, or investments in companies whose value rises steeply over a brief period. Both companies had female founders (Gregg Renfrew of Beautycounter) or cofounders (Katherine Scott of Tempo), adding to their appeal for Chadwell. “I thought, ‘You know what? There’s really something here.’” The most successful investors, she says, find and exploit “inefficient markets,” or markets whose potential is undervalued. What were female entrepreneurs if not an inefficient market? The research supported her to a startling degree: Companies with a female founder returned 63 percent more capital than companies led by males only, a typical study showed.


“You won’t see us investing in something that is ‘nice to have,’ or something that is sort of a gimmick. We like to invest in ‘have to haves.’”

Weiss says, “I could not be more excited to be a part of a firm that gives a historically underserved segment of founders access to capital to support the growth of their companies.” As a solo investor, Chadwell had done seedstage investing—early, modest funding that helps get a business idea off the ground. 1843 Capital took her to Series A–stage investing— larger investments in startups that have gained traction and are developing a solid revenue base. (Series B and C entail yet larger investments as successful companies seek to expand or go public.) She could still do seed-stage if she wanted. “But seed-stage deals, 90 percent of them fail,” Chadwell says. “We like to step in when companies have about $2 million in recurring revenue.” For 1843, Series A represents an investing sweet spot: They’ve eliminated much of the risk but gotten in ahead of the bigger fish, which would rather see $8 or $10 million in recurring revenue. 1843 Capital focuses on technology—chiefly in the areas of enterprise software, cyber security and “silvertech,” or advances for the aging population. But Chadwell and Reyes are extraordinarily picky. “Last year I looked at over six hundred opportunities to invest, and we made four investments on behalf of the fund,” she says. “You can’t find a needle in a haystack unless you go through the haystack.” The fund’s first investment was in a company called Artemis, which makes software to improve the yield and labor efficiency of indoor farms. Indoor farming happens to be a hot space, growing at about 23 percent per year. “But Artemis has actually been growing about 1,000 percent year-over-year for the past couple of years.” One reason for the rapid growth is smart strategy: Artemis, founded in 2015 by twentysix-year-old Allison Kopf, branched out to cannabis growers just as cannabis-based health products began to explode in popularity. This, in turn, prompted Chadwell to start looking into CBD products, since they tie in neatly with her silvertech premise. Great claims are now being made for CBD’s ability to ease everything from joint pain to insomnia, and to slow the progression of Parkinson’s Disease, though here

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the evidence is more anecdotal than scientific. “I’ve identified a company” to invest in, says Chadwell, having done her usual exhaustive research. “I’m just waiting for them to open.” 1843 Capital also invested in the promising banking tech firm Finn AI, founded by Jake Tyler and Natalie Cartwright. Finn AI offers a virtual banking assistant, a so-called “banker in your pocket.” You simply ask it what you want to know and it tells you the answer. Finn AI has added two client banks since 1843 first invested last October, with more on the way, and Tyler credits Chadwell’s active participation. “She’s going to muck in with you straightaway and focus on solving problems. From day one she’s been helping us make connections and think about our strategy.” 1843’s other two investments are in IOTAS, which brings smart technology to apartments, and Bishop Fox, which provides cyber security services to Fortune 500 companies. Eventually, Chadwell hopes to invest in caregiving for the elderly, perhaps in software that aids in training caregivers. Caregivers will prove ever more valuable as our population ages: Between 2010 and 2050, the number of seniors in the United States will have doubled. “We like to invest in inevitabilities,” Chadwell says. “You won’t see us investing in something that is a ‘nice to have,’ or something that is sort of a gimmick. We like to invest in ‘have to haves.’” Aging, of course, is the big one. “Another inevitability, we feel, is cybersecurity, which my partner Alison focuses on. Either a company that you do business with will be hacked, or you will be hacked. So putting preventative and diagnostic measures in place is of critical importance.” Even “have to haves” get short shrift if Chadwell doesn’t believe in the team behind them. She tells of a young male entrepreneur planning to launch a new incontinence pad—a product that could fit well within her investment compass. (1843 might invest in a maleled team if they deem the prospect ideal.) But she found the marketing materials childish and soon discovered the entrepreneur had not tested them on a target audience, especially older women. Why, she wondered, did he start the company in the first place? Well, he’d heard that


Dollar Shave had been sold to Unilever for $1 billion, and he wanted to make a similar killing. Chadwell, not shy about her distaste for mercenary investing, said, “I don’t think this is for us.” (There are potentially good investments that 1843 steers clear of: Those that require a massive investment in machinery or infrastructure to reach viability, and technologies that are beyond 1843’s range of expertise, like medical drugs and devices. “You could be curing cancer, but I wouldn’t know it,” says Chadwell.) Investors in 1843 Capital not only like its philosophy—gender equity for better returns— but they also have great confidence in Chadwell herself. “We have known and admired Tracy for over fifteen years,” says Greenwich resident Susan Bevan, an early investor with her husband, Tony Daddino. “She is smart, thoughtful and careful. We knew she would be a good steward of our money, and we have already seen a generous increase in our investment.” Another early supporter, well-known energy investor John A. Hill of Greenwich, is impressed with Chadwell’s investing history and her winning aura. “Tracy has a very good record in doing the types of deals 1843 is going to do, which I did quite a bit of due diligence on,” he says. “And then there’s Tracy herself. She’s got a strong personality, strong energy, as you probably know. And to be honest,” he adds, “I like the notion of supporting a female firm. We don’t have enough of them.”

THE WHAT-IF ENDING

Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine was never built because he could not secure the necessary funding. Unlike Lovelace, he was notoriously bad at making his case. (Lovelace wisely proposed a business partnership with Babbage, which he unwisely rejected.) Sci-fi novels have posited alternative histories in which the engine was built to world-changing effect, and so we can do the same: In our scenario, Ada Lovelace’s

Chadwell on a Women in Venture Capital panel moderated by Peter Lehrman at Exponent Exchange 2019

Companies with a female founder returned 63 percent more capital than companies led by males only … greenwichmag.com

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vision is taken seriously against all odds, a Victorian Tracy Chadwell backs Ada and Charles, and the digital age arrives a century ahead of time. Of course, real life proved stranger and stubborner. Women in technology, to say nothing of women in venture capital, still find themselves battling genteel preconceptions. “Just last week I had a woman say to me, ‘Tracy, you can’t possibly be a venture capitalist. How could you be so tough? You’re just so blonde.” Sometimes the backhands are less complimentary. “I had a guy say to me, ‘You have a small fund, but that’s okay, because you have a rich husband, right?’” How should one face such headwinds? Chadwell, ever an optimist, blows right through them. She notes that a major female venture capitalist, Annie Lamont (also blonde, also Midwestern), works next door. “If we got hung up on the negative, none of us would be able to function, right?” she says. “I think you just have to keep your head down and focus on what you’re doing. G And this is what I’m meant to do.”


celebra ting

1 0 years

awards

2019 PANEL OF JUDGES

THE EMCEE

JANE GREEN

BRIAN SAWYER Sawyer | Berson

MARA MILLER Carrier and Company

JESSE CARRIER Carrier and Company

KEITH WILLIAMS Nievera Williams

JENNIFER POST Jennifer Post Design

RICHARD HARTLAGE Land Morphology

EDWARD SIEGEL Edward Siegel Architect

JOHN MEEKS Aman & Meeks

JAMES AMAN Aman & Meeks

the premier home design competition

don’t miss the biggest night in design! Join us for the A-List Awards Networking Gala GET YOUR TICKETS NOW

for the A-List Awards Event! September 11, 2019 at the Palace Theatre in Stamford.

athomefc.com/alist 5:30 PM START MORE NETWORKING!

PRESENTING SPONSORS:

EXCLUSIVE AWARD SPONSOR:

EXCLUSIVE WATER SPONSOR:


ALEXANDRA BALIR PHOTOGRAPHY

Just another day at the office for Layla Lisiewski (with children Alexandra, Michael and Ella)


N E T WO R K STAR A local mom gives new meaning to the phrase “NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION”

by jamie marshall phot o gr aphs by alex andr a bl air phot o gr aphy and kyle nort on

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Meet the moms: Jessica Blouin, Layla Lisiewski and Megan Sullivan

KYLE NORTON; HAIR AND MAKEUP BY MAISON D’ALEXANDRE

Layla with Alexandra, Michael and Ella


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ayla Lisiewski remembers a pivotally challenging time of young motherhood. Her daughter Ella refused to attend her “twos” program at First Presbyterian Nursery School. “She would make me sit outside the classroom so she could see my feet under the doorway,” Layla recalls. (More on this later.) “I had a six-month-old at home. I was so overwhelmed.” Instead of giving up, Layla leaned in. A multitasker by nature, she began using the time to research activities and resources for young children. “As a kid growing up here it wasn’t something I thought about. But as a new mom, I was always looking for recommendations and for things to do,” she says. The amount of information was staggering and difficult to track. Layla decided to aggregate everything she learned, put it into a single word document, and then share it with the moms in Ella’s class. That proved so successful, she wanted to broaden her reach and share the information with the entire community. She envisioned a one-stop shop, an easy-to-navigate network of connections and resources all streamed onto one platform. A friend in California put her in touch with a web developer in San Francisco. He designed a template for the new venture, which Layla named Greenwichmoms.com. In the fall of 2015, she created postcards promoting the site and displayed them at CFCF Roastery & Café on Greenwich Avenue. Within days, patrons had scooped up all the cards. “I knew I was onto something,” Layla says.

IF IF YOU YOU BUILD IT…

gift of time.” Each site covers the basics, from choosing a doctor and finding a local play space to choosing a school, camp or fitness studio. There is an events calendar, beauty and workout tips, easy-to-prepare recipes, blog posts, sponsored content and profiles (Meet a Mom is among the most popular). Though each site reflects the personality of the mom in charge, they share in common an upbeat, enthusiastic tone—these are clearly people who love their communities and want to impart that feeling to their users. “It’s so much fun to share all the amazing things happening in Stamford and rewarding to hear from moms and dads that the information I post is useful,” says Stefanie Horn, the manager of Stamfordmoms.com. As the mom of a one-and-a-half-year-old son, Stefanie wears many hats. Previously a producer with the Jerry Springer show, she launched the Stamford site in January of 2018. Last year, she joined TLMN as Team Manager in charge of recruiting, onboarding and supporting all the site managers. “I follow up with them by getting them set up on social media, with their websites, email addresses, and then help them as they begin posting,” she says. A mother of three and graduate of Greenwich Academy, thirty-fiveyear-old Layla never imagined owning a business, much less becoming an internet entrepreneur, though she says she has long been inspired by fellow GA alum, Ashley McCormick, the founder of jewelry and lifestyle

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hen Greenwichmoms.com officially launched in January 2016, the response from users was lightning fast: “The community really jumped on board,” Layla says. The wife of one of her husband’s colleagues asked Layla if she could start a site in Darien. By year’s end New Canaan and Westport had joined the fold. Since then Greenwichmoms.com has morphed into a national brand—The Local Moms Network—which encompasses eighty-two community sites in twenty-two states. Fourteen more sites are in the pipeline. Each is independently managed by a mother or pair of mothers who have the passion and drive to fulfill the network’s mission of “giving moms the

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KYLE NORTON; HAIR AND MAKEUP BY MAISON D’ALEXANDRE

Giving new meaning to team meetings: Teddy Sullivan, Jessica Blouin, Amy Levin-Epstein Weber, Ella Lisiewski, Layla Lisiewski, Stefanie Horn, Megan Sullivan and Michael Lisiewski


brand ASHA. Rather, Layla was a standout athlete in high school and went on to play Division 1 lacrosse at Brown. “I come from a family of academics,” she says. “My father is a neurosurgeon at NYU and my sister is a cardiologist. I was a trailblazer. I was the first to play college sports.” When she graduated from Brown with a degree in International Relations and Middle Eastern Studies, she channeled her drive and ambition into a private wealth management job on Wall Street. “I didn’t know much at the beginning,” she recalls. “I had an old-school boss who taught me so much. He taught me when to speak and when to listen.” Those were skills that would come in handy years later when she was starting her business. Layla married in 2011 and was pregnant with her first child soon after. “I loved growing up in Greenwich,” she says. “The moment I got pregnant I wanted to move back. I have always had an appreciation for this town. It’s been my passion for thirty-five years.” Fortunately, her fiancé, Gary Lisiewski, had strong ties to the area, too, having grown up in Stamford. They found a house in backcountry Greenwich, which was perfect for their small family. “It had been somebody’s party house,” she says. “It had three big rooms. I felt like I lived in a gigantic playroom.” Now, with three children including a toddler, the couple is building a new house on the property. The best part? “My mom lives five minutes away and Gary’s parents live ten minutes away. It’s very comforting to be sur-

don’t know,” she says, adding that her experience at GA was instrumental in giving her the confidence she needed to move forward. “At Greenwich Academy they breed women who aren’t afraid to fail. I push myself to see what I’m capable of.” But perhaps even more important, Layla wanted to give something back to the community she loved. “It’s true I didn’t understand about web development. But that didn’t mean I couldn’t learn. It was exciting to me to pull this idea out of thin air and run with it.” And run she did. In fact, early on when the project was still in its infancy, Layla would often bring in an extra pair of shoes with her to Ella’s school, which she left outside the door of the classroom. That gave her a window of time to grab coffee and wander the Avenue, to reacquaint herself with local shops and discover new ones, as the idea for the digital platform gelled. With no overhead and virtually no operating budget, Layla came up with clever ideas to promote the site. In addition to learning how to build and maintain a website, she was becoming a social media pro, making good use of Instagram, dedicated emails and blog posts. She recognized early on that to scale up the business, she needed help. In February of 2017, she brought in Jessica Blouin, a Darien resident and former senior business leader at MasterCard, to lead the rebranding effort. Soon after, Layla created a Mother’s Day giveaway on Instagram and Greenwichmoms.com fan Magan Sullivan was the winner. “Layla sent me a note saying she’d left flowers and a gift card in my mailbox,” the Riverside resident and mother of three young boys recalls. “Yes, my actual mailbox.” The two women met in person a couple weeks later and hit it off immediately. The mother of three boys, Megan had left her job doing marketing for a hedge fund in New York City and had been working from home as a consultant, creating community partnerships. Together she and Layla brainstormed ideas to take the platform to the next level. “I called friends in Boston, Houston and Cincinnati. I said, ‘let’s launch this thing and see if it works.’” It worked. The Local Moms Network launched in September 2017. »

TECH TALK

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ike most good ideas, the genesis of Greenwichmoms. com started organically. Layla didn’t know she was going to change the rules of the game; she just wanted to find a way to make it easier for moms to navigate the parenthood path. “Parenthood can be isolating. We wanted to grow a team of smart, savvy women based on their love for the town they live in.” With her background in finance and a passion for art—she is a gifted painter who had a couple of exhibits in SoHo—Layla had little hands-on experience with the tech world. “I didn’t even have an Instagram account,” she recalls. But she didn’t let that stand in her way. “I’m intrigued by what I

Each site manager has a unique backstory: One was a missionary in Africa; one did marketing for the Cleveland Cavaliers; another was a full-time lawyer. AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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FINDING HER TRIBE Layla hits the Avenue with Alexandra, Ella and Michael

need—how to create and manage a website, for example—to carry them into the future. “I had been out of the corporate world for many years,” says Jessica. “But I was itching to get back to work and do something entrepreneurial. It’s a whole new world out there, and my marketing skills were dated given the emergence of social media and new technology offerings.” As far as Layla is concerned, when it comes to TLMN they are just scratching the surface. “We are building communities within the towns we live in while building community on a national level,” says Layla. “We support each other on a daily basis.” Each site manager has a unique backstory: One was a missionary in Africa; one did marketing for the Cleveland Cavaliers; another was a fulltime lawyer. The Local Moms Network has provided employment for more than ninety women across the country. “We want to expand into the suburbs of every state,” says Megan. To help their moms get started, the company offers a six-week program in web development. To keep the momentum moving forward, Stefanie sends out a weekly “Monday Motivational” email blast that incorporates everything from inspirational quotes to suggestions for content or ways to engage their followers. “We’re a network of websites and a network of moms. When you don’t see the people you work with every day, it’s important to be reminded that you have a support system,” says Stefanie. As they look to the future—they are raising capital and have plans to hire a Chief Technology Officer—for Layla, the experience has been nothing short of miraculous. “There is no perfect time to start a business,” she says. “This started as a resource to help moms, and then evolved into something bigger and more helpful. I couldn’t have felt worse about myself than when I was sitting outside my daughter’s classroom so she could see my shoes. I’m glad I could create something good and valuable for moms. It Lisiewski G gave me a sense of purpose.”

“As an entrepreneur you quickly learn what your strengths and weaknesses are.”

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ALEXANDRA BALIR PHOTOGRAPHY

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o one has been more surprised by the rapid growth than Layla. “Selfishly I started this because I wanted to create a sense of community for myself, but now I am offering something back to my community. I wouldn’t be here without the support of my town.” With growth comes challenges, some of which are unique to a tech startup. “The biggest challenge is keeping up with the technology, which is constantly changing. I have brought together a great team, and that helps us maintain quality control.” To help stay the course, Layla draws on her experience as a student and athlete. “My education instilled confidence,” she says. “Leadership skills, teamwork and agility are the thing I got from playing lacrosse.” In other words, she knows how to delegate. “As an entrepreneur you quickly learn what your strengths and weaknesses are.” Case in point: Writer and editor Amy Levin-Epstein Weber joined the management team in October of 2018. In her role as editor-in-chief, Amy directs TLMN’s editorial strategy, which includes interviews with high-profile moms (think Karolina Kurkova and Lake Bell) and sponsored branded content, which can run across the entire network or focus on specific locations. The Cos Cob resident and mother of two young boys has years of experience working on magazines—an aesthetic she is bringing to the digital first platform. “People use their phones all the time, especially moms who are always busy—at pickup and drop-off and games and grocery shopping. Most of us at The Local Moms Network have young kids, so we understand the back and forth and the hustle. It’s all about making it something they can use on the go.” For Layla and her team, Localmomsnetwork .com is not only the culmination of her original vision, it has had a huge impact in other ways. “It brings a sense of community to women, so moving to the suburbs isn’t as isolating,” says Megan. Equally important, it has provided a way for moms to pursue meaningful work within the communities where they are raising their families. For some that means reentering the job market after a hia—Layla tus. For others it may mean learning the skills they


SAVE THE DATE

Thursday, December 5, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

2019

Photos by Melani Lust

Please join us as we honor the extraordinary work of our community heroes. Plus: Community Impact Awards, honoring two outstanding nonprofits Presented by Fairfield County’s Community Foundation

Become a Sponsor

Join us for

For more information & participant opportunities please contact Deb Ryan at 203-536-6027 • deb.ryan@moffly.com

Moffly Media’s 12th Annual Light a Fire awards reception and cocktail party at the Westport Country Playhouse


b y ria n n smi t h ph ot o gr aph by ch ri st oph er l a n e / c on t ou r by g et t y i mag e s

MEET

THE REAL

CARRIE BRADSHAW

Sex and the City author, CANDACE BUSHNELL, dishes about her hot new book, the real Mr. Big and getting naked after fifty


B

efore Carrie Bradshaw was written into existence, there was a sexy blonde scribe pounding Manhattan’s pavement in search of love—or its lustiest approximation—armed

with nothing but a Cosmo, a computer and couture. We are of course talking about Candace Bushnell, the original Carrie, whose New York Observer column-turned-book Sex and the City became arguably one of the most eradefining television series in history. Over twenty years later, Candace’s new book, Is There Still Sex in the City? (also in development as a TV series) delivers a new set of hilarious and heartbreaking truths to its audience—this time about divorce and dating after fifty in a Tinderhindered world. You won’t get Carrie, Miranda, Charlotte and Samantha 2.0 in this version (sorry, diehards), but with Bushnell’s Botox-needle-sharp observations and an equally engaging crew of girlfriends, you’ll be too glued to your Kindle to care. We caught up with the Connecticut native (who knew?) for a little sip and spill. greenwichmag.com

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Tell us about your new book, Is There Still Sex in the City, that you’ll be in Greenwich to promote in September? CB: It is about dating again after not dating for a while, which

I think is a situation that a lot of women find themselves in. So many of my friends were all of a sudden single. You get married, you have kids, you kind of do it all right, but then something happens…for half the people it does work out. But there are still a lot of women who get divorced in their fifties. The kids are grown, and they’ve gotta start dating again. Women go through these different phases, trying to find who you are again not in the context of marriage and kids. Nobody is expecting to be single in middle age. What is the biggest difference between dating in your thirties and forties like we watched Carrie and Co. do versus

“YOU HAVEN’T HAD TO THINK, I HAVEN’T HAD TO TAKE MY CLOTHES OFF IN FRONT OF A STRANGER FOR TWENTY YEARS. NOW YOU HAVE TO THINK ABOUT IT. IT’S TERRIBLE!”

dating at fifty-plus? CB: Generally, if you’re dating in your thirties or forties,

you’re looking to start a family. I call it the reproductive lifestyle. Once you have a kid, you’re on a conveyer belt, that’s your lifestyle. You’re with people who have kids and everything is about the kids, and it really gives you a purpose. But at the end of that conveyer belt, now the kids are grown up and, ‘Oops, suddenly my marriage doesn’t work’ and ‘Uh-oh, I’ve fallen off the conveyer belt and where am I?’ The second time around, people are looking for different things. There are a lot of people who aren’t necessarily looking to make a family because they already have a family. They’ve got the kids. That’s what makes this time so different. It’s a time of exploration but also can be a time of surprising challenge, because you kind of have to deal with death, like the loss of a parent. That’s really what it is, it’s dating and death! It’s like this middle-aged madness. The new nervous breakdown…

PHOTO BY NICK HUNT /PATRICK MCMULLAN VIA GETTY IMAGES

CB: So true. It’s a time when people often will briefly fall

apart. It used to be a nervous breakdown that men would have in their forties, but women weren’t allowed to have a “middle age.” It’s almost like a rite of passage. Things get shaken up and everything’s up for grabs, and that’s what the book is about—navigating that passage. Who is doing the shaking up, women or men? CB: Statistically, it’s the women. It’s a marriage where they

start off with the best intentions. These are marriages where you think, God, they were such a great couple. They were so in love and they’ve got a great wedding story and two great kids and they’re both really good people and they have friends, and then something happens and it just falls apart. It’s kind of not really anybody’s fault, but they just really grow apart

Sarah Jessica Parker and Candace Bushnell at opening night of the New York City Ballet

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and sometimes it can’t be fixed. For women, a lot of them are staying in the marriage and then they realize, This is my last chance at a new life. That’s how they feel. Then there are the women whose husbands dump them in really twisted ways. I’ve had a couple of friends who married really rich guys and have gotten dumped. The richer the guy, the worse, in a way, it’s going to be. They cut you off, it’s like you’re dead. You see people really suffering, and all of this stuff is a big blow to the ego. These are the themes of the book and I’m excited about it. It’s an interesting time. How is dating after divorce? CB: After I got divorced, everyone was like, ‘Oh you’re going

to start dating again in six months.’ Well, you do that, it’s a nightmare. It’s like heartbreaking, you will make every


rookie mistake because you probably haven’t dated in fifteen or twenty years. You haven’t had to think, I haven’t had to take my clothes off in front of a stranger for twenty years. Now you have to think about it. It’s terrible! All these funny situations that we’re in again, but all of this is combined with aging and all those other ‘fun’ things that happen in midlife. How do you think the dating landscape has changed since the advent of Bumble, Tinder and other dating apps? CB: I wrote a Tinder story about it in the book and I found it depressing. Because people do see that there’s a commodification of the person, and that just feels like it’s bad for the soul, you know? Because it’s like we are more than the boxes that we tick off, and people find it frustrating to live in that space. Those are my observations. Now, do people have great success with online things? Yes, they do, but it also seems to be very demoralizing. What have you found to be the most successful mode of meeting men in this passage? CB: I think it’s the old-fashioned way, through friends.

And one of the advantages that people have of being this age is that they know how to do analog dating. They did it really, really well when they were younger, in the 80s, before technology, when people picked up the phone, when they knew how to do that human connection thing. Most of them know how to go on a date and have a conversation. They do know how to meet, and they did it awfully well in the 80s and all through the 90s! You talk about a country enclave, “The Village,” in your book. How is dating in the suburbs different from dating Looking literary chic at this summer’s Book Expo in New York City with fellow authors Eva Chen and Jennifer Weiner

in the city? CB: It really, really depends on where you are. In a place like Greenwich, apparently it’s a dating hub. There are bars to go to and that sort of thing; but if you’re in a more secluded area, then you’re not dating. There’s a dearth. Maybe somebody will come up, but it’s the kind of thing where you can’t rely on the idea that you’re definitely going to have a partner in your future. The question becomes, Do I date at all? They’re not going to meet anybody that they particularly like—they’re not going to do just anything to be with a guy. They don’t necessarily need to. You have a house in Connecticut and an apartment in Manhattan. How Carrie Bradshaw are you these days?

Flashback to when it all began—Candace with Sarah Jessica Parker and Chris Noth

CB: Lately, I’ve spent more time in the city and go out more,

even though I didn’t for quite a few years. It’s not the same as it was when I used to go out in the city, though. I’m not greenwichmag.com

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CANDACE’S CONNECTICUT Though she’s a city girl at heart, Candace grew up in the Nutmeg State. Here’s where you might catch her in Connecticut.

WHITE BRIDGE FARM I’ve ridden horses all my life and love to ride at White Bridge Farm in Litchfield, which is now known as Halcyon Show Stables. They have one of the biggest indoor rings in Connecticut and great trainers, like my dressage coach Katja Eilers. It’s also a short trailer ride to White Memorial, where there are miles of beautiful trails for riding, hiking and biking. halcyonshowstables.com; whitememorialcc.org

MAYFLOWER INN I love the Mayflower Inn. I have a lot of fond memories of going there over the past thirty years. One time we threw a Downton Abbey dinner party there, and everyone dressed up like the characters. It was one of the first places I went

with my real Mr. Big. And the spa is wonderful, especially the pool in the winter. aubergeresorts .com

LE PENGUIN & LE FAT POODLE Le Bilbouquet and La Goulue are both fun dinner places I love on the Upper East Side in the city, and I consider Le Penguin the Connecticut version. I love its steak frites, and the Cajun chicken is another go-to. I’ve been meaning to try the La Boom blackout brunch at Le Fat Poodle with my girlfriends. I heard it’s a good time. I think my poodles Pepper and Prancer, who posed with me on the cover of my book, would approve. lepenguinbistro .com; lefatpoodle .com

COURTESY OF CANDACE BUSHNELL’S INSTAGRAM

“WOMEN GO THROUGH THESE DIFFERENT PHASES, TRYING TO FIND WHO YOU ARE AGAIN NOT IN THE CONTEXT OF MARRIAGE AND KIDS.”


LIVE AND IN PERSON

Join us to dish some sexy dirt with Candace and celebrate her new book!

BOOK SIGNING, MEET & GREET COCKTAILS & HORS D’OEUVRES PRIZE FOR BEST SHOES –––––

THURSDAY, SEPT. 5, 6–8 P.M. –––––

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 10022-SHOE, 20 EAST ELM STREET, GREENWICH For information and to register go to greenwichmag.com

Candace cruises the Upper East Side with wingman Prancer and wingwoman Pepper.

going to clubs. That was such a unique time in the 80s and 90s. Even if you do go out now, it’s not the same.

Darren [Star] was really smart to pick that conversation out of the book. It’s kind of a turning point for Carrie’s life, like, whoa, she’s never been in love and she’s like f**k, what does that mean?

COURTESY OF CANDACE BUSHNELL’S INSTAGRAM; BOOK COURTESY OF GROVE PRESS

Speaking of Carrie, how involved were you with adapting Sex and the City to the TV series?

How close were the episodes to your real life?

CB: For the pilot, which of course was done a year before

CB: There were a lot of moments but, of course, they’re a

the series came out, I read all the scripts, I went to some castings and was sent all the casting tapes and went to all the sets. Susan Seidelman was the director. There weren’t that many female directors then. It was very exciting. They asked, ‘What do you think of Sarah Jessica Parker?’ and I said I think she’s great. Darren [Star] says ‘great, we’re going to go and meet her.’ So Darren and I went to see Sarah Jessica Parker in Once Upon a Mattress. It was so exciting seeing her on Broadway. We went backstage and she was so cute. She had all these pictures in her dressing room of her family. And we went and had a Cosmo!

little different. A lot of the first two seasons came from the book and directly from my life. Like “Valley of the Twentysomething Guys,” where Carrie’s staying at a younger guy’s apartment and there’s no toilet paper, and then he comes down and has this conversation about his crazy dream. That came from this guy who I interviewed for the column…he had a dream where he had these huge hands, but he was in an elevator called the Killavator. It was hilarious. I would just look at some of these guys and think, You are so nutso. Is There Still Sex in the City? is in development as a TV series. How excited are you to write and executive produce?

No fan can forget the lip-biting moment in the pilot when

CB: Honestly, what I’m looking forward to is just the process of

Carrie asks Big if he’s ever been in love and he answers

creating the characters and the TV show. Right now I’m at the very beginning of the process—thinking about it and making outlines and notes. Like so much else at this time in life, it really G is about being in the moment and being good with that.

“Absof**kinglutely” with his sexy smirk. Did that actually happen? Fact or fiction? CB: Absof**kinglutely is directly what my Mr. Big said to me.

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Boys & Girls Club of Greenwich 2019 Annual Benefit Please join us for this concert–themed party featuring DJ Chris Sealey and live music throughout the evening

From Aretha and Madonna to the Stones and Jay Z... come as your musical idol or a concert–attendee

Friday, September 13, 2019 6 : 30 PM

VENUE The Clubhouse 4 Horseneck Lane Greenwich

ATTIRE

Cocktails

8 : 00 PM

Dinner and dancing

*Benefit Committee Member Kim Augustine Karena Bailey Juliet Bakker Beth Barr Michelle Binnie* Kerri Breed Rebecca Breed Gretchen Bylow* Ginge Cabrera Lauren Caffray Pat Caffray Holly Cassin Leason Cercy

Kate Murphy Clark* Judy Collins Meg Critchell Dominique Crosby Amy Dana Colleen deVeer Cristin Deveer Mary Kate Donato Kristina Gabelli* Courtney Gardiner Cosby George Erin Glasebrook Shauna Graziano

Elizabeth Harned Bri Hart Jennifer Hausmann Cynthia Herr Diana Higgins Sophie Hood Nisha Hurst Ilona Kaali-Nagy Cass Karnal M.E. Kjaernested Elizabeth Lake* April Larken Isabel Lasky

Sally Lawrence Yashmin Lloyds Tia Mahaffy* Sally Mann Allie Marks Camilla McGraw* Sara Mendell Jonna Mesimaki Jennifer Miller Samantha Mollett Mimi Moulton* Melissa Nisensen Anne Ogilvy

Katerina Pergola Lisa Quackenbush Ashley Reid Kirsten Reynolds Nancy Risman Abigail Ritman Leigh Ann Ryan Catie Salyer Jessica Schur Jennifer Seidel Meredith Shames Glenn Shaw Lindsay Sheehy

Carter Simonds Megan Sullivan Laura Sullivan Magali Swanson Eileen Tang* Kelly Thomas Catherine Tompkins Graham Veysey Lisi Vincent Kelly Vintiadis Cristina Vittoria Sarah Von Der Ahe Chrissy von Oiste Amanda Wilson*


calendar AUGUST 2019

ART & ANTIQUES ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun. noon5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. AMY SIMON FINE ART, 1869 Post Rd. East, Westport, 259-1500. Tues.-Sat. 11 a.m.5:30 p.m. or by appointment. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. See highlight, page 76. CANFIN GALLERY, 39 Main St.,Tarrytown, NY, 914-3324554. Tues.-Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appt. Fine paintings and sculptures by established and emerging contemporary artists from all over the world. CAVALIER GALLERIES, 405 Greenwich Ave., 8693664. Mon.-Sat. 10:30 a.m.6 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. and by appt. A showcase of a select group of established and emerging artists who represent the finest in modern painting sculpture and photography CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING, 299 West Ave., Norwalk, 899-7999. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appt. See highlight on page 75.

PAUL ROUSSO

Samuel Owen Gallery This month beat the heat and pop into the Samuel Owen Gallery to check out their thoughtfully curated collection of seasoned, emerging and undiscovered artists. The above piece is by Paul Rousso, an American-born visual artist and innovator. Educated at the California College of the Arts, his work is shown at galleries and art fairs around the globe. Rousso’s fascination with paper—currency, advertising, newspapers, magazines—its history and use, its rise and fall, is an emblematic theme reflected frequently in his compositions. 382 Greenwich Avenue.

( for more events visit greenwichmag.com )

AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

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DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m. -5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. Permanent exhibits include Energy Exhibit, Sound and Light Galleries, Preschool Power, Sports Science and Solar Legos. Exhibits at the Discovery Museum are designed for hands-on interaction and learning.

FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. FLINN GALLERY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7947. Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.5 p.m.; Thurs. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. Visit flinngallery .com for exhibit information. GERTRUDE G. WHITE GALLERY, YWCA, 259 E. Putnam Ave., 869-6501. Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. GREENWICH ARTS COUNCIL, 299 Greenwich Ave., 862-6750. Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. noon-4 p.m. The Bendheim Gallery hosts major exhibitions every six weeks; visit greenwicharts.org to learn about upcoming exhibits. GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland Rd., 869-6899. Wed.-Sun. noon-4 p.m. J. RUSSELL JINISHIAN GALLERY, 1657 Post Rd., Fairfield, 259-8753. Tues.Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. A large selection of original marine and sporting art by Arguimbau, Blossom, Demers, Kramer, McGurl, Mecray, Mizerek, Prosek, Shilstone, Stobart and Thompson. KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. Tues.-Fri. and Sun., 1-5 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. KENISE BARNES FINE ART, 1947 Palmer Ave., Larchmont, NY, 914-834-8077. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. or by appt. Visit kbfa.com for show information. LOCKWOOD-MATHEWS MANSION MUSEUM, 295 West Ave., Norwalk,


RIVER HOUSE ADULT DAY CENTER CELEBRATES

LOCAL SATURDAY

SEPT

Motion

28

ARCH STREET

7

PM

CO-CHAIRS AMORY ARMSTRONG KENNY • KATIE COSBY • JOANN MCCARTHY COMMITTEE MICHAEL BASHAM • RACHEL BORDEN • JACKI BREW • ALISA BROCKELMAN • STACEY BURTON • DANA CHARETTE JOHN COOPER • HOLLI CUTTING • BROOKE DAY • JANE DUNN • ADONIS FILPO • KAREN GRUND • ELISE HILLMAN GREEN HEATHER KEANE • LEAH MARMON • JULIE MATHER • ROCCO NATALE • ANNE OGILVY • JEANIE RICCI JANICE RICHARDS • CRISSY ROBINSON • MARY ROYES • MIMI SANTRY • GLENN SHAW • KYLE SILVER NANCY THODE • ALLISON WOLOWITZ • SUSAN YONCE

LIVE AUCTION • LOCAL FOOD • MUSIC • DANCING

Honoring

GREEN FINGERS • GREENWICH GARDEN CLUB • HORTULUS For their commitment to protecting and preserving the natural beauty of Greenwich and for their oustanding community service at River House and beyond.

Sponsors Alison Farn Leigh and JoAnn McCarthy

TO PURCHASE TICKETS, PLEASE VISIT RIVERHOUSE.GIVESMART.COM Funds raised at LocalMotion will ensure that dependent, aging adults in our community can remain LOCAL! All proceeds will go towards River House program expenses including health services, therapeutic recreation, meals, and socialization for our members, as well as respite and support for their caregivers. 125 RIVER ROAD EXT • COS COB, CT • 203.622.0079 • EVENTS@THERIVERHOUSE.ORG • THERIVERHOUSE.ORG


calendar ROWAYTON ARTS CENTER, 145 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, 866-2744. Tues.-Sat. noon5 p.m.; Sun. 1-4 p.m. SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY, 382 Greenwich Ave., 3251924. Mon.-Sat., 10:30 a.m. -6 p.m.; Sun., 11-3 p.m. The gallery is committed to exhibiting the work of emerging to mid-career artists, as well as a variety of strong secondary market works. The gallery has a Nantucket location as well. See highlight on page 73. SILVERMINE GUILD ARTS CENTER, 1037 Silvermine Rd., New Canaan, 966-9700. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. SM HOME GALLERY, 70 Arch Street, Greenwich, 629-8121, Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appointment. Featuring award-winning regional and national contemporary artists. Visit sandramorganinteriors .com for exhibit information.

This Think All Things Devour by Ariel Bowman

Clay Art Center This month (through Saturday, September 14) the Clay Art Center will host a new show, The Emotional Animal, exploring how animals can be a metaphor for our human nature. This exhibit examines how animals are our bond to nature and are all around us, a part of our daily lives whether in our homes or in the wild. 40 Beech Street, Port Chester. 838-9799. Wed.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. Visit lockwoodmathewsmansion .com for program information. LOFT ARTISTS ASSOCIATION, 575 Pacific Street or loftartists.com. Fri.-Sun. noon-5 p.m. Visit website for current exhibits. MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. Daily, 10 a.m.5 p.m. The Maritime Aquarium inspires people of all ages to appreciate and protect the Long Island Sound ecosystem and the global

environment through living exhibits, marine science and environmental education. MICHAEL FLORIO GALLERY, 135 Mason Street, 858-5743. Specializing in established and emerging contemporary artists, marine art and curiosities. Open most days by chance or by appointment, Michaelflorio.com. NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914-251-6100. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

PELHAM ART CENTER, 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham, NY, 914-738-2525 ext. 113. Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. noon-4 p.m. QUESTER GALLERY, 119 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, 523-0250. Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun. by appt. 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century marine art and antiques, including works by Bard, Bareford, Beal, Bishop, Brown, Buttersworth, Dawson, Demers, Gray, Hoyne, Jacobsen, Moran, Stobart, Waugh and Yorke.

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STAMFORD ART ASSOCIATION, 39 Franklin St., Stamford, 325-1139. Thurs.-Fri. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. noon-3 p.m. STAMFORD DOWNTOWN, fun summer series of art and music throughout the city of Stamford, 348-5285 or visit stamford-downtown.com for event information. WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 226-7070. Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. noon-4 p.m. YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-2800. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. noon5 p.m. Permanent collection on view. YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-0611. Tues.Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurs. until 8 p.m.; Sun. 1-6 p.m. The permanent collection includes African art, American decorative art, American paintings and sculpture, ancient art, Asian art, coins

and medals, and modern and contemporary art.

CONCERTS, FILM & THEATER ARENA AT HARBOR YARD, 600 Main St., Bridgeport, 345-2300. Visit arenaharboryard.com for show listings. AVON THEATRE FILM CENTER, 272 Bedford St., Stamford, 661-0321. Visit avontheatre.org for special events and guest speakers. CARAMOOR INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL, Girdle Ridge Rd., Katonah, NY, 914-232-1252. Caramoor is a renowned oasis for musical inspiration that offers audiences the opportunity to hear an in-depth spectrum of music in one of the country’s legendary outdoor settings. Visit caramoor.org for details. CURTAIN CALL, The Sterling Farms Theatre Complex, 1349 Newfield Ave., Stamford, 3298207. Visit curtaincallinc.com for upcoming shows and times. DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. Mamma Mia! coming in September. FAIRFIELD THEATRE COMPANY, On StageOne, 70 Sanford St., Fairfield, 2591036. Visit fairfieldtheatre.org for dates, shows and times. GOODSPEED OPERA HOUSE, 6 Main St., East Haddam, 860-873-8668. Thurs. 1-Sept. 1, Because of Winn Dixie. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7900. No Friday Film Nights in August. JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER, 364 Manville Rd., Pleasantville, NY, 914-773-7663. Visit website for titles and times burnsfilmcenter.org. »


calendar

Bruce Museum The Sharks! exhibition at the Bruce Museum will feature jaws and teeth from numerous species, living and extinct, as well as life-size models of a great white, hammerhead; and these black tip sharks, on loan from the Mystic Aquarium. Sharks! will also address environmental change. The oceans are growing warmer and increasingly impacted by chemicals, plastic and other manmade pollutants. Sharks are harvested by the millions to feed a seemingly insatiable demand for shark fin soup and other products. Can these ancient predators survive in the Anthropocene Era?

LONG WHARF THEATRE, 222 Sargent Dr., New Haven, 787-4282. On the Grounds of Belonging coming in October. PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AT SUNY PURCHASE, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914251-6200. Visit artscenter.org for shows and times. RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-9269. For shows and times visit ridgefieldplayhouse.org. RIDGEFIELD THEATER BARN, 37 Halpin Ln., Ridgefield, 431-9850. Sun. 4, Whose Barn is it Anyway. SHUBERT THEATER, 247 College St., New Haven, 800-228-6622. Visit shubert

.com for more shows, dates and times.

visit aldrichart.org for more information.

updates on lectures, tours and workshops.

STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. Visit stamfordcenterforthearts.org for event information.

AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. Sun. 4, first Sunday bird walk at Greenwich point, 9 a.m.; visit Greenwich.audubon.org for more events.

WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. Tues. 8 p.m.; Wed. 2 and 8 p.m.; Thurs, and Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 4 and 8 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. Thurs. 1-3, Hershey Felder as Irving Berlin.

AUX DÉLICES, 231 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540, ext. 108. Visit auxdelicesfoods .com for menus and dates.

CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. Clay Art Center’s mission is to offer a stimulating space for studio practice, exhibition and educational opportunities to better serve the community.

LECTURES, TOURS & WORKSHOPS ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun. noon5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. Fri. 2, First Fridays: A Contemporary Cocktail Hour, 7-9 p.m.;

BOWMAN OBSERVATORY PUBLIC NIGHT, NE of Milbank/East Elm St. rotary on the grounds of Julian Curtiss School, 869-6786, ext. 338. Wed. 7 and 21, Observatory open to the public free of charge, 8:30-10:30 p.m., weather permitting. Sponsored by the Astronomical Society of Greenwich. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. Visit brucemuseum.org for

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FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon4 p.m. Visit fairfieldhistory.org for tours. GARDEN EDUCATION CENTER, 130 Bible St., 869-9242 or gecgreenwich .org; pruning class, plant doctor series, fruit tree grafting and more. Visit website for classes, dates and times. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. The library offers a

variety of programs: Blood Pressure Screenings, Drop-In Computer Lab, Chess Club, Volunteer Tax Assistance, Foreign Affairs Book Discussion Group; for dates and times visit greenwichlibrary.org NORWALK SEAPORT ASSOCIATION, Washington and Water Streets, S. Norwalk, 838-9444. Daily cruises to Sheffield Island and lighthouse tours. SOUNDWATERS, Brewer Yacht Haven Marina, Batemen Way, Stamford, 323-1978. Visit soundwaters.org for afternoon and sunset sail dates and times. STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday night Observatory Visitors’ Night, 8:30 p.m; Summer Sundays on the Farm, noon-4 p.m. »

PAUL MUTINO

LEVITT PAVILION, Jesup Green, Westport, 226-7600. Summer concerts and films, visit levittpavilion.com for concerts and show times.


2019

MOFFLY MEDIA’S

Lineup Mark your calendars!

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September 25 | 5:30–7:30 p.m.

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Want to see party pics, videos and more details about the 2019 events? Go to ilovefc.com/events


calendar

KIDS’ STUFF / AUGUST 2019

The Maritime Aquarium Ricochet, a golden retriever trained to surf with individuals with physical, emotional and cognitive disabilities, rides the board with a client in a scene from Superpower Dogs, an IMAX movie that celebrates the incredible abilities of dogs. The film will be shown daily through Labor Day on The Maritime Aquarium’s six-story screen. For show times and more details, visit maritimeaquarium.org

AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. Sun. 4, First Sunday bird walk, at Tod’s Point, 9 a.m. AUX DÉLICES, 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540 ext. 108. Visit auxdelicesfoods.com for menus and dates. BEARDSLEY ZOO, 1875 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, 394-6565. Open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of Connecticut’s top family attractions. See more than 300 animals representing North and South American species and learn about their endangered and threatened species, which include the Amur (Siberian) tiger, Andean condor, Ocelot, Red wolf, Maned wolf, Giant Anteater and Golden lion tamarin. Then grab a bite at the Peacock Café and take a ride on the carousel.

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF GREENWICH, 4 Horseneck Lane, 869-3224. Visit bgcg.org for events and programs at the club. BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. Sun. 4, First Sunday Science at the Seaside Center, 1-4 p.m. Visit brucemueum.org for classes and exhibits and after school workshops. DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. The Discovery Museum’s 20,000-square-foot facility includes changing and permanent interactive exhibits, a planetarium, Challenger Learning Center, an auditorium, and five multipurpose classrooms where hands-on science classes are conducted for groups and the general public. discoverymuseum.org. DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill

St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. Sherlock Holmes and the Haunted Cabaret coming in October. EARTHPLACE, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, 227-7253. The mission of Earthplace is to build a passion within the community for nature and the environment through education, experience and action, earthplace.org. FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., noon-4 p.m. GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland St., 869-6899. Visit hstg .org for upcoming camp and programs. GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. The library offers programs for children: Wee Ones, Tales for Tots, Baby Lapsit, Mother Goose Story Time; visit greenwichlibrary .org for dates and times.

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IMAX THEATER AT MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. For special documentaries and Hollywood films on IMAX, check website for films and times, maritimeaquarium.org. KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. Tues.-Fri. and Sun. 1-5 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays for Tots, 1 p.m; Picture This! Saturday Story Time, select Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. The Maritime Aquarium inspires people of all ages to appreciate and protect the Long Island Sound ecosystem and the global environment through living exhibits, marine science, and environmental education. NEW CANAAN NATURE CENTER, 144 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, 966-9577. Sat. 10, Creatures of the Night Hike, 7:30-9 p.m.

STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 3254466. Stay tuned for Paw Patrol Live! coming in November. STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521 or stamfordmuseum.org. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 4, 11, 18, 25, Sunday Farm Market. STEPPING STONES MUSEUM FOR CHILDREN, 303 West Ave., Mathews Park, Norwalk, 899-0606. Every day 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Ongoing exhibits: Energy Lab, Tot Town, build it!, state-ofthe-art Multimedia Gallery and Light Gallery; ongoing events: science lab, community gardens; Rainforest Adventures and Color Coaster; visit steppingstonesmuseum.org for daily classes. WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 222-7070. Visit westportartscenter.org to sign up for workshops and summer camps. G

COSMIC PICTURE LIMITED

ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-4519. Tues.-Sun. noon5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. Sat. 17, Family Art Experiences, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.


advertisers index BUILDING & HOME IMPROVEMENT California Closets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Glengate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Grand Entrance Gates . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Private Staff Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Tischler und Sohn . . . . . . . . . . Cover 3

BUSINESS & FINANCE Cummings & Lockwood LLC . . . . . . . 10 First Republic Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

DECORATING & HOME FURNISHINGS Eleish Van Breems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

ENTERTAINMENT 95.9, The Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Stamford Tent & Event Services . . . . 27

New York City Wine & Food Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 River House Adult Day Center Celebrates Local Motion . . . . . . . . 74

FOOD, CATERING & LODGING Litchfield Distillery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Winvian Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

HEALTH & BEAUTY The Nathaniel Witherell . . . . . . . . . . 29 Park Avenue Vein Laser Center . . . . . 10 Rye Vein Laser Center . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Yale New Haven Health/ Greenwich Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Yale New Haven Health/Yale New Haven Children's Hospital . . . . . . . 17

PEARL JAM

GUNS N’ ROSES

NIRVANA

METALLICA

SUBLIME

DEF LEPPARD

FOO FIGHTERS

RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS

GREEN DAY

SOUNDGARDEN

BEASTIE BOYS

STONE TEMPLE PILOTS

JEWELRY EVENTS

THE SPREAD, BLOODY MARY BY THOMAS MGGOVERN

The 2019 Playhouse Gala Black & White Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 A-list Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Best of the Gold Coast Online Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Bike HSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Boys & Girls Club of Greenwich 2019 Annual Benefit . . . . . . . . . . 72 Closer to Free Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Light a Fire 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Moffly Media's 2019 Event Lineup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Betteridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4 Cartier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4

REAL ESTATE David Ogilvy/Sotheby's International Realty . . . . . . Cover 2, 1 Douglas Elliman/Monica Webster . . . 11 Houlihan Lawrence/Ellen Mosher . . . 15 William Raveis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

MISCELLANEOUS Big Picture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Greenwich Sentinel . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Westy Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

PLAN AHEAD

The Food Issue

OCTOBER AD RESERVATION CLOSE: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4

AUGUST 2019 GREENWICH

79

959THEFOX.COM


postscript photog raph by alison nichols gr ay

BAYWATCH: Byram Edition

N

othing says summer like a lifeguard on duty. But if the sand and surf aren’t your thing, Byram Shore Beach is the place to be. Home to the only public pool in town, the park offers the best of all worlds. How can you beat taking a dip in the pool while taking in the view of the Sound? G

Have a photo that captures a moment in Greenwich? Send it to us at editor@greenwichmag.com for a chance to win $100. Please write photo submission in the subject line. greenwichmag.com

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ARCHITECT: MARK P. FINLAY ARCHITECTS, AIA, PHOTO BY WARREN JAGGER

TISCHLER WINDOWS AND DOORS. UNCOMMON. UNCOMPROMISING.

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Profile for Moffly Media

Greenwich Magazine, August 2019  

Greenwich Magazine, August 2019